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Full text of "Industries of the Saginaws; historical, descriptive and statistical .."

Class. 
Book 



COPYRJGHT DEP0S17 




J-M- 

ESTNER 



SA6INAW ii 

ICH ■ 



.?ffiaffitt-V' 



Established 186 7. 

J. B All MAN, 

OF 

DRY GOODS, 
CARPETS ^ CLOAKS, 



IN NORTHERN MICHIGAN. 

THE LATEST 

ov0lti@8lDre88 gnmmings. 

SILIS JIW if S&llllll Bliss SOOIS I SPlBlIIifY; 

Sole Ag ents fo r 

Butterick's Patterns and Centemeri Kid Gloves. 

MAIL ORDERS RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION. 
J . B A U M A N , 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

Dry Goods, Carpets and Cloaks, 



s 





J-M- 
ESTNBR 

EASrSAGlNAV/ 
• MICH ■ 






Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1887, by 

J. M. ELSTNER & CO., 

in the Office of Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C. 



Printing and Binding 

by 
The Courier Co., 

East Saginaw. 



PREIFACEI. 



I^HE object of this book is to present a view of the Saginaws which will 
conve}' a fair idea of their progress, their present status, and their future 
prospects. There has been no effort made to exaggerate or color an}- of the 
features of the situation, and it has been the endeavor of the compiler to make 
every statement accurate. In order to accomplish this end recourse has been 
had, in every instance, to the best available sources of information. 

So far as the historical portion of the work is concerned, there has been 
no attempt to go into details further than to present such facts as tend to show 
the steps in the progress of the Saginaws to their present position of importance 
as centers of production and distribution. 

Without making any pretensions to a high order of literary merit for this 
book, the author ventures to hope that the information it contains ma}' be 
found useful to the people of the Saginaws and interesting to the general 
reader. 

J. W. LEONARD. 

East Saginaw, Decembrr, 1887. 



CONTELNTS, 



Early Days . 
Years of Procjrkss . 
Transportation 
Navigation 
Ur(janized Efforts 

LO(JS AND LlTMBKR 

Salt Making . . 
Other Manufactures 
The Merchants . >. 
The Banks . 
Real Estate 
The Two Cities 
Social Facts 
The Press . 
Representative Hoitses 
Index 



9 
17 
21 
27 
28 
32 
40 
42 
47 
48 
52 
57 
62 
71 
77 
212 



PROMINELNX ILaLUSTRATIONS. 



Bird's Eye View of the Sacjinaws . . . ' . 
The Sa(jinaw County Court House, Sachnaw City . 
Saginaw City — Hamilton Street, South from Court . 
East Saginaw — Genesee Avenue, Looking Toward Bridgk 
East Saginaw — Gknesee Avenue, Looking from Brii»ge . 
Saginaw City — Court Street, West prom Hamilton 
East Saginaav — Academy of Music . . . . . 

East SA(iiNAw — Homk for the Friendless 

East Saginaw — ARUEirEK Hall ...... 

East Saginaw — Gkk.nlvnia Institutk .... 

Saginaav Citv — Tfie Baknakd Block . . . . . 



2 
8 
16 
34 
46 
56 
64 
64 
70 
70 
142 



EARLY DAYS. 



THE PIONEERS AND FIRST SETTLERS OF THE 
SAGINAW VALLEY. 



THE story of American progress presents a record as unique as it is interest- 
ing. No otlier chapter of bistorj' approaches it in the rapidity with which 
the wild and waste places have been made to fructify under the hand of indus- 
try, and the wilderness to evolve into a populous and civilized community. No 
other narrative more strongly illustrates the truism that it is events, and not 
years, that make histor3^ At the opening of the Nineteenth century' Michigan, 
with the exception of a sparse settlement at Detroit, and an insignificant post at 
Mackinaw, was useless to humanitj^, except as it afforded hunting grounds for 
fierce and nomadic Indian tribes. The Saginaw Valley was a dense forest, 
which had as yet been visited by no white man, save an occasional zealous 
missionary, who ventured in the cause of Christianity where others, actuated 
by self-interest, feared to follow. 

It is not the purpose of this work to attempt any extended or minute nar- 
rative of the past, but to present in this introductory chapter only such perti- 
nent points from the history of the Saginaws as tend to show the steps in their 
progress from the original forest to their present advanced position as a center 
of trade and industry. The' review will necessarily be brief, and is designed 
only to contain such facts, concisely told, as are necessary to illustrate the 
story of the industrial development of the Saginaws from the first beginnings 
in civilization to the bus}' activity of the present. 

Indian tradition affords the information that the Chippewas, who inhabited 
this region as the immediate predecessors of its white inhabitants, obtained it 
in a battle with a tribe known as the Sauks some time in the sixteenth century; 
while ethnalogical researches even go beyond that event to an Aztec population, 
antodating the Sauks, and still further to the mound builders. But whatever 
the thoughttul or curious may find in investigations among the fossils for the 



10 The Industries of the Saginaws. 

traces of the primitive inhabitants, or in gathering up the remnants of Chip- 
pewa and Alonquin tradition, the results of the search can have little bearing 
upon the subject of progress or industry. The history of the Saginaws, there- 
fore, in so far as it is'pertinent to the object of this volume, begins with the 
early settlements by white pioneers. 

FIRST VISITORS AND SETTLERS. 

Throughout the settlement of the Northwest it was usually the priest who 
came first, and he was generally closely followed b}' the soldier. In the Sagi- 
naw Valley, however, the Jesuit fathers were the first to venture into the wilder- 
ness, Allouez and Dablon visiting the Valley in 1665, and Pere Marquette and 
Joliet coming three years later ; and other missionaries made occasional visits 
from time to time. The first trader who ventured into this region was Francois 
Trombley who visited the Saginaw Indians in 1792. He met with an unfavor- 
able reception, being attacked by the Indians, and on his return trip he was 
drowned in Lake Huron. Other French traders made occasional trips, and in 
1811 several found their way to the Valley. Louis Campau, a French Cana- 
dian fur trader, settled in what is now Saginaw City, and built a log house in 
1816 on Water street, opposite the location now occupied by the Wright Lumber 
Company's mill, which was the first house ever built in Saginaw county. Here 
he carried on a considerable trade with the Indians, and other tradei's and 
trappers came to the Valley prior to the negotiation of the treaty of 1819 be- 
tween General Cass, Commissioner for the United States, and the Chippewas, 
by which large tracts of land were ceded to the Government by the Indians in 
consideration of an annuit3^ The treaty was followed in 1822 by the establish- 
ment of Fort Saginaw, and the block-house and stockade of the fort were lo- 
cated at what is now the intersection of C^ourt and Hamilton streets, occupying 
a site almost identical with that upon which the Taylor House now stands. The 
garrison^was composed of two companies of the Third United States Infantry, 
and was in command of Major Baker. In the spring of 1823 a flood from the 
Tittabawassee caused an overflow of the river, and in the summer there was 
much sickness among the troops, two lieutenants and a number of soldiers 
dying. Major Baker, the commanding officer, in a report to the War Depart- 
ment, stated that " Nothing but Indians, muskrats and bull-frogs could possibly 
exist here," and upon this representation an order came from the War Depart- 
ment for an evacuation of the fort, and the troops left for Detroit late in the fall 
of 1823. In 1824 the American Fur Company established a post at Saginaw, 
William McDonald being the trader, and occupying the abandoned fort for his 
headquarters. He remained three years, at the end of which time Eleazer 
Jewett, who had arrived in 1826, became the factor for the American Fur Com- 
pany, Patrice Reaume l)eing the trader. In 1827 Ephraim S. Williams and his 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 11 

brother, Gardner D. "Williams, purchased the rights of the American Fur Com- 
pany and the interests of the brothers, Louis and Antoine Campau, and thus, 
combining rival interests, became the great fur trading firm of this region. 

KAKLV PIONEERS. 

From 1826 to 1830 the Saginaw Valley began to attract the attention of 
those seeking homes on the frontier, but the settlement of the countrj- was ver}' 
slowl}' accomplished, the entire number of white settlers in Saginaw — compris- 
ing at that time the entire region between the Flint River and the Straits of 
Mackinaw — amounting to but twenty-eight souls, and that of what is now Gene- 
see county to seventy, giving to the entire Saginaw Valley a population of 
about one hundred whites all told. 

These figures, small as they seem, represent the beginning of an occupation 
of the Valley, which was eventually to transform the untrodden wilderness into 
a fruitful land of plenty and to supplant the murmurings of the winds among 
the pine? by the hum of industry and the whirr of impatient machiner}-. 

Saginaw Count}- had been recognized for a number of j'ears, it having been 
originally created by the proclamation of General Cass, Governor of Michigan 
Territory, in 1822. For judicial and governmental purposes it was attached to 
Oakland county. In 1831 Governor Cass established the city of Saginaw as 
the count}' seat of Saginaw county, and in the same year the county was or- 
ganized into a separate township. In 1833 the county was organized by vir- 
tue of an enactment passed by the Territorial Council in the preceding year. 

THE FIRST SAW MILL. 

The Williams brothers, Ephraim S. and Gardner D., who have before been 
mentioned in this sketch as pioneer merchants of Saginaw, had a brother in 
Detroit named Harvey \YilIiams, who was noted as a blacksmith and machinist 
of a superior order of ability. This gentleman, afterward familiar to the citi- 
zens of the Saginaw Valley as " Uncle Harvey/' had visited Fort Saginaw in 
1822, bringing supplies for the troops from Detroit. It was not until 1834 
that he returned to make his home in the Valley. Upon his arrival Mr. 
Williams began the erection of a small steam saw mill, located at the foot of 
what is now Mackinaw street, to which a run of stone was afterward added, for 
the purpose of supplying the citizens with corn meal. This mill, long known 
as the " G. D. & E. S. Williams mill," was the first steam saw mill erected in 
the Saginaw Valley. Great as was the faith of its projectors in the future of 
this region, even their views of future possibilities could not have compassed 
the wonderful results which have since shown themselves, and which in the 
present afford an example of industrial development to which history presents 
few parallels and no rivals. 



12 The Industries op the SaginaWS. 

It was in 1836 that the second mill was built. The first one had proved a 
successful venture. The " land fever " which struck the county about that 
time brought numbers of people who were looking for homes, and those who 
sta3'ed needed lumber to build houses. The success of this mill led to the 
erection of another, known, b}' way of distinction, as "the big mill." It was 
located at what was afterwards known as Buena Vista, on the east side of the 
river, the site of the mill being about identical with that now occupied by the 
East Saginaw gas works. This mill was erected for the owners by Mr. Harvey 
Williams. It was from this mill that the first cargo of lumber that ever left 
the Valley was shipped in 1837. 

In 1836 the first steamboat which ever appeared on the waters of the 
Saginaw river arrived. It was the Grovernor Marcy, which came from Detroit 
and reached Saginaw Citj"^ July 9 of that year. During the same year another 
Important step in material progress was taken in the establishment of the first 
newspaper, the Saginaw Journal. In that 3'ear also the land forming the site 
of the present city of East Saginaw was entered by Dr. Charles Little. 

In 1837 Saginaw City was laid out and the streets named. The first plat 
of the village, under the name of the " Town of Sagana," was made as early 
as 1 822 for S. McCloskey and John Farelly, while the place was still occupied 
as a frontier fort. The platting of the city in 1837 was upon a more extensive 
scale, and was made for Norman Little and Messrs. Mackey, Jennison and other 
settlers, who had formed a compan}' and bought the city plat and a quantity of 
land adjoining. They went to considerable expense, building a large hotel, 
the " Webster House," at an outlaj^ of $35,000, and a large four-story ware- 
house cost $25,000. A bank was started, which, after the fashion of those 
days, immediately issued bills in large quantities. These bills had a red back, 
while the face was ornamented by pictures of canal boats and steamboats. 

The earl}' part of 1837 was an era of flush times in Michigan, which was 
admitted as the twenty-sixth State in the Union, January 20 of that year. A 
census was taken in the same 3'ear which showed the population of Saginaw 
county to be 920. Speculation ran rife throughout the West, and land in par- 
ticular was held at greatly inflated prices. Everything was in a condition 
which in modern speculative pai'lance would be designated as " a boom." Two 
special crazes had taken possession of the western country. One developed 
itself into a desire to start a bank, the principal capital of which consisted of an 
industrious printer who could turn out " money " with sufficient rapidity, and 
the other consisted of a desire to buy and sell lots in towns which were princi- 
pally attractive on paper. The excitement was great, but, after the manner of 
such feverish ebullitions, was brief, and following the boom came the panic, 
bringing with it great distress and bankruptcy to man}-. 



The Industries op the Saoinaws. 13 

TlIK PANIC Ob' 1837. 

Those were indeed times of disaster. Failure to observe the cardinal 
principles of banking, and the issuance of bills without capital or assets to 
back them, were leading causes of the trouble which afflicted the entire western 
country in the last half of 1837 and the early part of 1838. For a time the 
"wild-cat" money was freely exchanged for gold. The pioneers were not 
adepts in the subtleties of finance. Honest themselves and plain and open in 
their dealings, they did not understand that a bill representing itself to be a 
dollar could be but worthless paper. The abundance of money — while the 
"wild-cat" bills were regardt i as money — made times good, and the people 
did not complain of inflation. But when the blow came it was a stunning one. 
Ease, and in some cases wealth, gave way to poverty, and workmen who had 
before been enjoying high wages, lost employment, and industry came to a 
standstill. 

This slate of affairs was severely felt at Saginaw. Many who had come 
here attracted by the high wages then current left the settlement by the Flint 
trail— then the only means of egress — and few returned. 

The full force of financial disaster had expended itself within a year. The 
sufferers at that time doubtless thought that the bottom had fallen out of 
eveiything, but they were mistaken. The most marked trait of American 
character islts power of recuperation from the effects of trouble of this charac. 
ter, and while the effect of the panic of 1837 was doubtless a retarded growth, 
the reaction set in the following year and the people cautiously and carefully, 
heeding the admonitions of their recent experience, set to work to retrieve their 
shattered fortunes. For two or three years the progress was slow. The 
Saginaw Journal, the first newspaper, died for want of patronage, and filled the 
first grave in the journalistic cemetery of the Valley. In 1842, however, 
business had somewhat revived and Mr. R. W. Jenny started another paper, 
The Nortir Star, which lived some four or five years. The increase in popula- 
tion and business in the decade from 1840 to 1850 was slow but steady, and 
those who applied themselves to industry found it remunerative. 

GERMAN SETTLEMENTS. 

The year 1845 is important as having been the one in which the German 
immigration to Saginaw county began. In an address made by Dr. M, C. 
T. Plessner at the organization of the German Pioneer Society in 1881 many 
interesting facts in regard to the German settlement in the county were given. 
From that address it appears that the first German settlers were three West- 
phalians, Messrs. Stelgrider, Tuerke and Sittering. These were followed by 
the Franconian settlements, the first of which, fifteen in number, under the 
guidance of Pastor Kraemer, arrived in 1845, and were the first settlers of 



14 The Industries of the Saginaws. 

Frankenmiith. Several other colonies came from the same localities in the 
few years following, and in 1849 came another German immigration, composed 
principall}' of refugees who lett Germany after the troubles of 1848. The 
Franconian settlers had been nearly all farmers and mechanics — those who 
came later represented all professions and occupations. The German element 
of the Saginaws has ever since been a large one, and it maj' be said to its 
credit that it has always devoted itself to industry and good citizenship, and 
has proven a most valuable aid to the material progress of the cities and ad- 
jacent county. 

EARLY INDUSTRIES. 

The years from 1845 to 1850 were progressive, and with the settlement of 
the county the village of Saginaw assumed importance as a market town, and 
it is stated that in 1849 Saginaw had eleven dealers in dry goods, groceries, 
etc.; one steam saw mill, three hotels, five carpenter shops, three blacksmith 
shops, one bakery, and three boot and shoe stores. 



YEIARS OF PROQRESS. 



THE GROWTH OF THE SAGINAV/S IN TRADE 
AND INDUSTRY. 



SAGINAW CITY was a thriving village long before an idea had been enter- 
tained of founding a city on the east side of the river. Leon Suay, a 
French hunter and trapper, was the first white resident of the site now occupied 
by East Saginaw. He lived in a log house built by the American Fur Company 
and which was located where the Bancroft House now stands. He was known 
as Captain Suay and resided in the house referred to for many years. Curtis 
Emerson located on the east side of the river just outside of the original plat of 
East Saginaw on the tract since known as the " Emerson Addition." in 1846. 
He named his domain " Buena Vista," and his house " The Hall of the Monte- 
zumas." He carried on the mill known as the Emerson mill. 

The land upon which the city stands was purchased from the United States 
Government in 1836 by Dr. Little. It passed through several hands prior to 
1849, when it was bought by Hoyt & Co., of New York. In the same year Mr. 
Charles W. Grant, the first American settler, located here. The original plat 
of East Saginaw was surveyed in 1850 for Alfred M. Hpyt. The growth of 
the town was rapid for those days. The Genesee plank road was built in 1850, 
the " Blue Mill " being that year erected by A. M. Hoyt and C. W. Grant for 
the purpose of sawing plank for the road. A school building was put up in 
1851 at the corner of Genesee and Washington avenues, and the Valley City 
Hotel was completed and opened to the public the same year. 

The improvement of the new city was rapid, and by 1853 a number of 
important industries bad taken shape. In that year a steam flouring mill was 
erected with a capacity of 1,000 bushels per day, and a planing mill was built 
with a capacity for dressing 30,000 feet of lumber daily. Another important 
event of that year was the publicption of the Saguunc Enterprise, the first 

3 



18 The Industries of the Sacunaws 

newspaper ever issued in East Saginaw. Man}- other indications of progress 
showed themselves, and the town prospered until Julj- 5, 1854. On the morn- 
ing of that da}^ came the first serious visitation of fire. The residences, stores, 
mills and workshops of the citizens were destroyed, and in a few hours the 
products of five years of patient industrj' were swept away. The loss approx- 
imated $250,000 in the value of property destroyed, and only a few of the 
losers had protected themselves b}' insurance. In a short time afterward, 
however, the damage had l)een repaired, and the buildings erected after the 
fire were of a much improved character and included a number of brick blocks. 
It would be impossible to narrate, in detail, the items of the industrial 
progress of East Saginaw, but it will suflflce to say, for the purpose of this 
review, that the progress of the city was both steady and rapid from 1855 to 
1860. In the former year East Saginaw was incorporated as a village, Norman 
Little being chosen its first president, and this incorporation was in force until 
1859, when it gave place to a city government, and William L. P, Little was 
chosen as the first Mayor of the city. The census taken the following year 
showed the city to have over 8,000 inhabitants. 

progress of SAGINAW CITY. 

While the new town on the eastern side of the river was thus giving in- 
dications of progress, its elder sister on the west bank was also advancing — • 
not so rapidl}", but none the less surel^'. During the first half of the decade 
from 1850 to 1860 there w^as but little increase in the population, but the last 
half made a better showing. In 1857 the city of Saginaw was incorporated, 
and at the election held soon afterward Grardner D. Williams was elected as the 
first Mayor of the city. In that year the population of the city proper was 
only 563 ; but it had increased at the taking of the census three years later to 
1,712. 

THE SAGINAWS IN THE WAR. 

When it became apparent that war was necessary for the preservation and 
defense of the Union, no State was more prompt in response than Michigan, 
and immediately following the proclamation of President Lincoln a number of 
companies were organized in the Saginaws. The people were thoroughly 
enthused with patriotic sentiments and the large number of volunteers and en- 
listed men who left the Saginaw Valley for the front attests the loyalty of the 
people. During the war the number of men furnisiied to the Union army by 
Saginaw county footed up 2,039. 

It was not alone in furnishing men for the army that the citizens showed 
themselves devoted to the cause of the Union. The ladies formed a society to 
said sick and wounded soldiers which gave eflective assistance to the cause, an 
other citizens who were too old for service or kept at home from other caused 



TiiK Industkiks of tiik Saoinaws. 19 



gave generous contributions and in otbor ways cooperated with the State Mili- 
tary i3()ard in aid of the successful prosecution of tiie war. Of tlie men who 
went to tlic front many never returned, and of tliose who came back most liad 
seen hard service on the most hotly contested battle fields. Manj' of these still 
live and are members of G. A. 11. Posts, and other organiz<itions of veterans. 

While the war was in progress there was no diminution in the efforts of 
the citizens to build up and improve the cities, and a number of important en- 
terprises were inaugurated during that period. Among these was the building 
of the Genesee avenue and Bristol street bridges ; tlie lighting of East Saginaw 
by gas ; and the building and i)utting into operation of the first street railway. 
But the most important was the completion, in 1802, of connection ))etween 
Saginaw and Flint b}' the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad. This was followed, 
in 1866, l)y the Jackson, Lansing & Saginaw, the building of which had the 
efTect of greatly adding to the population and commercial importance of Sagi- 
naw City, which in that year had reached a population of 6,420 people. 

THE PAST TWENTY YEARS. 

Following the completion of the railroads came steady accessions to the 
population of the Saginaws. The industries of both cities steadily increased, 
and from year to year, from that time to the present, accessions have been 
made to the productive industries of the two cities, special reference to which 
in their present state will be found in a separate chapter of this work. There 
have been times within this period, especially in 1873, when financial troul)le 
has temporarih' affected the great lumber and salt industries, but in the aggre- 
gate the record of the two decades immediately preceding this writing Las been 
one of gratifying prosperity. And it is not only in the production of lumber 
and salt that growth has been observable. The accessions of population have 
not been wholl}', or even principally confined to the cities. The excellence of 
the soil of the Saginaw Valley for the uses of agriculture has been demon- 
strated, and the towns have been surrounded with a back countr}' tenanted by 
an industrious farming community who take the place of the pines which have 
been felled, and who make the land give forth the increments of wealth in the 
results of labor, who are supplying to the towns an element of business strength 
which will prove of utmost value and will sustain them and justify their con- 
tinued expansion even after the last saw log shall have been floated down the 
waters of the tributaries of the Saginaw. 

The Saginaws in the past have furnished many examples of the success 
attendant upon persistent industry' fortified by the intelligence which impels to 
the improvement of opportunities, and to-da}', surrounded with all the con- 
veniences of life and endowed with the insignia of an advanced civilization, 
bear witness to the wisdom of those hardy pioneers who, in the days when none 
of these things were, hewed out a home for themselves in the wilderness. 



20 The Industries of the Saoinaws. 

Wonderful as has been the advancement of the last half century, there is 
no indication that the climax has been reached, but the prospect for the future 
is in ever}' wa}' favorable to a progress full}- as great as that which in a retro- 
spective view seems little less than miraculous. The incentives to industry 
and improvement are as strong now as at any period in the history of the Val- 
ley, while the instrumentalities and means for secuiing prosperity are daily 
multiplying. There is every reason to believe that another fift}' years will pro- 
duce results which will make the consolidated Saginaws of that day as far in 
advance of the present as the two cities now are of the insignificant settlement 
of 1837. 



transport:" AT?10N. 



RAIL LINES AJND WATER ROUTES AIDING THE 
CITY'S COMMERCE. 



NO item is of more importance in promoting tlie growth and securing the 
stability of the industries of a city than its means of communication with 
the outside world, and every line of railroad added brings with it an augmen- 
tation of the volume of business. In this respect the Saginaws are more 
favored than any other of the cities of Northern Michigan, for here more rail- 
roads center than at any other point in the State, outside ot Detroit. 

■ The early settlers of Saginaw looked forward to the building of a railroad 
to connect them with the business centers of the country as the one thing need- 
ful to secure the development of the material resources of this region, and in 
1835 a company was organized for the construction of a railroad from Saginaw 
City to Mt. Clemens, via Lapeer, and other railroads were from time to time 
projected, on paper. It was not until 1857, however, that any steps extending 
beyond theory were taken. January 21 of that year the Flint & Pere Mar- 
quette Kailroad Company was organized, and February 24 following accepted 
the provisions of the law donating lands to this company. In the years that 
have intervened between that time and the present not only this, but a large 
number of other railroads have been completed, and still others are in course 
of construction, until the new Saginaw, soon to be formed b}^ the consolidation 
of the cities, will constitute the great railroad center of Northern Michigan, 
with railroad facilities not surpassed by any of the commercial centers of the 
countr}'. 

Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad.— This, the first road built in 
the Saginaw Valley, has performed no inconsiderable part in the building up 
of the industries of tiiis region to the gratifying (^mdition of prosporit}" 
which is now apparent. After the organization of the company in 1857 the 



22 The Indistriks of the Saginaws. 



preliminary surve3-s were made, and it was not until the fall of 1858 that the 
grading was comraenced, and during the following year twenty miles of the 
line were graded and eight miles of rails were laid. The opening excui'sion 
of the road, from Saginaw to Mt. Morris and return, was given January 20, 
1862. A heavy snow storm occurred that day, and the train took four hours 
to make the twenty-six miles to Mt. Morris. To write in detail the history of 
the construction of this road would occupy more space than can be spared 
here, but it will, perhaps, be sufficient to say that from the beginning of its 
history to the present time additions and improvements have been made until 
the Flint & I'ere Marquette is now justly regarded as one of the most im- 
portant railroad systems of Michigan. Its main line is 361.13 miles in length, 
while its branches and sidings are 211.41 miles more, in addition to which it 
has recently concluded arrangements by which the Port Huron & Northwestern 
will be added to its system, an arrangement which will greatly increase its 
facilities for direct traffic with the Eastern seaboard, by a connection with the 
Grand Trunk at Port Huron. 

This road is an East Saginaw institution, and has its headquarters, general 
offices and machine shops here. In addition to a through business in freight 
and passenger traffic, the line is specially important in connection with the 
lumber industry of the Saginaw Valley. It has excellent terminal facilities 
in Saginaw, and reaches every yard on the east side of the river, and also has 
switches to the west side and a large number of sorting yards all along the 
track in this locality. The track of this road is one of the best in the State, 
and its car equipment is as complete as any in the country. The road owns its 
own parlor, sleeping and drawing room cars, and runs a train every day from 

Bay City, Detroit and Toledo with them attached, and also runs a train every 
night with a Pullman car from Buy City and Saginaw to Chicago. The Flint 
& Pere Marquette road connects the Saginaw Valley with the Northwest by a 
line of steamers plying between Ludifigton and Manistee to Milwaukee. Dur- 
ing the season one boat leaves Ludington every night except Sunday, connect- 
ing with trains, and one boat leaves Milwaukee every night except Saturday, 
also making connection with trains. The line affords a direct connection be- 
tween the Northwest and the Eastern seaboard, and does a large through busi- 
ness in transporting freight from the Northwest to Eastern markets and for ex- 
port. The steamboat line was staited in 1876, and now consists of three boats, 
named, respectively, F. & P. M. Nos. 1, 2 and 3, and another boat to be called 
the F, & P. M. No. 4 is now on the Detroit Dry Dock Company's docks and will 
begin to run in the spring of 1888. Of these boats two run from Ludington 
and Manistee to Milwaukee, while another plies between Ludington and Manis- 
tee and Chicago, and is principally engaged in carrying salt. Outside of the 
importance of this road to the Saginaws as forming one of the most convenient 



TlIK I.NimSTHIKS OK TIIK SA(J1NAWS. 28 

of its channels of trade, it is also a matter of large local interest to East Sagi- 
naw, as being one of the most important of its home industries, the master car 
builder's department employing 170 men, the master mechanic's department 
170, the round house 50, and other departments employing workmen stationed 
here to the number of 110, while the employes in yards and on trains which 
ave short runs number 650. making a total of 1,150 employes of this road 
who live in East Saginaw. The passenger depot of this road is one of the most 
complete structures of its kind in the State, and in addition to this building, 
the compan}- has its headquarters block on Washington avenue, and extensive 
works, including a machine shop 100x300 feet, as well as commodious black- 
smith shops, car shops, paint shops, engine houses, freight depots, cow sheds, 
etc. The present officers of this company, are W. W. Crapo, President ; H. C. 
Potter, Vice President and General Manager ; H. C. Potter, Jr., Secretary and 
Treasurer ; David Edwards, Assistant General Manager and General Passenger 
Agent ; Sanford Keeler, Superintendent ; W. F. Potter, Assistant Superintend- 
ent ; Arthur Patriarche, General Freight Agent ; A. W. Newton, Land Com- 
missioner ; W. L. Webber, Solicitor, and Gilbert W. Ledlie, Auditor. 

Michigan Central Railroad. — One of the most important railway 
systems in the country, connecting by the most direct route the great cities of 
the Atlantic seaboard with the Northwest, and affording unexcelled facilities 
both for freight and passenger traffic, is the Michigan Central, which, in addi- 
tion to its trunk line from Buffalo to Chicago, has a number of important 
connecting lines, two of which form important items in the transportation 
facilities of the Saginaws. Of these one. extending from the main line at 
Jackson through Saginaw City to West Bay City, and there connecting with the 
Mackinaw Division for Mackinaw, was the second road built to the Saginaws, 
having been completed to Saginaw Cit}' in 18G7. In 1871 this line, known as 
the Jackson, Lansing & Saginaw, passed into the hands of the Michigan Central 
Railroad Company, which has ever since operated it as the Jackson, Lansing 
& Saginaw Division. It forms a favorite and expeditious route to Chicago and 
the West, to the North traverses a vast timber region I3 ing between Saginaw 
and the Straits of Mackinaw, and the extension of the Shore Line, which con- 
nects at Alger, with the Michigan Central to Alpena, forms another important 
addition to the transportation facilities of the Saginaws, by reason of the con- 
nection it affords with the Huron shore towns. This line has important con- 
nections with other systems, including the Lake Shore Road, the Grand Trunk, 
connections at Lansing with the Detroit, Lansing & Northern, and at Owosso 
with the Toledo & Ann Arbor, and the Detroit, Grand Haven & Milwaukee. 
Another important division belonging to the Michigan Central system is the 
Detroit, Saginaw & Bay City Railroad, having a total of 151.S miles, including 
the Bay City division, Detroit to Bay City, 108 miles; the Saginaw branch, 



24 TriE Industries of the Saoinaavs. 

Vassal- to Saginaw City, 22.3 ; Lapeer & Northern branch, Lapeer to Five 
Lakes, 8.5, and Caro branch, Vassar to Caro, 13 miles. This division gives 
direct communication with Detroit, and also with Lapeer and other important 
points, as well as affording an important channel for the receipt and shipment 
of through freight to and from the great cities of the Atlantic, via the Michigan 
Central system. 

Port Huron & Northwestern Railway. — This road, which tra- 
verses one of the most fertile sections of the State, was opened to traffic be- 
tween Port Huron and East Saginaw February 17, 1882, and since that time a 
number of valuable branches have been added, and the road now covers 218 
miles of main line and branches with 12.83 miles of sidings, including the main 
line from Port Huron to East Saginaw, 91 miles ; Sand Beach to Saginaw 
Junction, 58.25 miles ; Port Austin to Palms, 35 miles ; and Almont to Port 
Huron, 33.75 miles. The present gauge of the road is three feet. This road, 
which connects Saginaw with an extensive territory of great importance to it, 
will soon, it is said, pass into the hands of the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad 
Company, a proposal for its purchase by that company having been accepted- 
As a part of the plans in connection with this transfer, it is contemplated to 
change the gauge of the road to standard upon its main line from Port Huron 
to the Saginaws. The importance of this acquisition to the Flint & Pere Mar- 
quette is made manifest by a glance at the map. It will give to the Flint & 
Pere Marquette a direct line across Michigan from Ludiugton and Manistee on 
Lake Michigan to Port Huron, where the connection with the Grand Trunk 
system will give the Saginaws the most dirct route to the t astern seaboard, 
shortening the distance from Minneapolis and other northwestern points to the 
East by about 65 miles as against any other road. The value of this connec- 
tion will be further enhanced upon the completion of the tunnel now being 
constructed under the St. Clair River at Port Huron. 

The Saginaw, Tuscola & Huron Railway.— This is an East 
Saginaw road, and one which has proved of great value by connecting the 
Saginaws with a section of country directly tributary to them as a business 
territory. It was completed to Sebewaing in 1882, and subsequently was ex- 
tended to Bay Port, a delightful summer resort on the Saginaw Bay, where is 
located one of the finest hotels in the State with 100 rooms, and which is a 
favorite stopping place for pleasure seekers during the heated term. From 
Bay Port the road has recently been extended 18 miles to Bad Axe, the county 
seat of Huron count}-, where it connects with the Port Huron & Northwestern. 
The road is a three- foot gauge, and is a valuable auxiliary to the business of 
East Saginaw, where its terminus and headquarters are situated. It runs 
through the fertile agricultural regions of Saginaw, Tuscola and Huron coun- 
ties, and is largely engaged in hauling consignments of hay, grain, stone, staves 



TriE Industries of the Saginaws. 25 



and other products of the woods and farms of the region through which it 
traverses, and brings to this market a large trade wliich it renders accessible. 
Saginaw Valley & St. Louis Railroad. —This road, which is 
operated b}^ the Detroit, Lansing & Northern Railway, is important on account 
of the directness of its connection between the Saginaws and Western Michi- 
gan, giving communication with St. Louis, Ithaca, Alma, Edmore, Lake View, 
Howard Citj' and Grand Rapids, a through train running daily between East 
Saginaw and Grand Rapids, at which city it also affords connection with the 
railroads of the Lake Michigan shore, including the Chicago & West Michigan. 
Toledo, Saginaw & Mackinaw Railroad.— This is the name of a 
road now in course of construction, upon which work is now being done be- 
tween East Saginaw and Durand, where the road will connect with the Toledo, 
Ann Arbor & North Michigan, the Detroit, Grand Haven & Milwaukee and 
the Chicago & Grand Trunk Railways. The road is to be a standard gauge, 
and the charter^' authorizes the company to run to Mackinaw, and doubtless 
upon the completion of the division now in hand the other divisions will be 
rapidly pushed. The company is an East Saginaw concern, of which A. W. 
Wright is President ; P. H. Ketcham, Vice-President ; W. R. Burt, Treasurer ; 
W. C. McClure, Secretary; J, Edget, Attorney; and, in addition to Messrs. 
Wright, Burt, Ketcham and McClure, Messrs. C. W. Wells, Thomas Merrill 
and J. M. Ashley, Jr., are Directors. These gentlemen are all well known as 
among the most successful of the business men of the Saginaws, and the early 
completion of this road is assured. It will form another important feeder to 
business and outlet for the products of the Saginaw Valley. 

A number of other raili'oads are in contemplation, among which the 
Toledo, Saginaw & Muskegon, and the Chicago, Hastings, Kalamazoo & Sagi- 
naw are projects which are being pushed, and will doubtless end in important 
additions to the railwj'y connections of the Saginaws. The importance of 
Saginaw to railroads is no less than that of the railroads to Saginaw, a fact 
which will be appreciated when it said that the freight offered in the sixteen 
square miles known as the Saginaw River District exceeds in tonnage the 
entire wheat crop of Michigan or of Dakota. Every railroad centering here 
is doing a prosperous business, and their earnmgs are annually increasing. 



NAVIGATION. 



IN addition to the benefits offered by the existence of a large number of 
railroads radiating in every direction, the Saginaws possess the advantage 
of being located upon a river, giving tliem facilities for transportation all over 
the Great Lakes. The Saginaw River is formed by the junction of the Tittaba- 
wassee, the Cass, the Flint and the Shiawassee Rivers, each of which is useful 
for the purpose of floating logs, lumber, timber and other products. The re- 
port of the Board of Trade for 1886 shows that there had been floated out of 
these streams up' to the beginning of 1887 more than 9,200,000,000 feet of pine 
logs, besides hundreds of millions of feet of pine lumber and other products. 
The Saginaw River, which is eighteen miles in length, is navigable for the 
largest lake craft, and a considerable amount of the products of the Saginaw 
Valley is shipped by the cargo. An idea of the volume of the business trans- 
acted by the people of the Saginaws by lake may be formed from the fact that 
in 1886, a year which fell below the average in lake traffic, 414 steamers and 
1,088 vessels, with an aggregate tonnage of 463,895, arrived at Saginaw River 
ports, and 421 steamers and 1,371 vessels, with an aggregate of 493,091 tons 
burden, cleared from Saginaw River ports during the same 3^ ear. 

In an early day, and before the advent of railroads to the Saginaw Val- 
ley, the people largely depended for the procurement of goods to supply their 
needs upon the navigation of lake and river, and soon after the settlers came 
to the Valley occasional vessels came from Detroit and Lake Huron points. 
The first steamboat to arrive at Saginaw was the "Governor Marcy," which 
reached Saginaw City July 9, 1836, although even before that time the visits 
of schooners and other vessels were quite frequent. In 1837 Nelson Smith 
built the first boat ever put together in the Saginaw Valle3\ It was a schooner 
of light tonnage, named the •' Julia Smith," and was afterwards used in the 
coasting trade. In 1848 the " Buena Vista," a steamboat, was constructed in 
a ship yard which had been built for the purpose at the foot of Bristol street, 
East Saginaw. It was successfully launched, and for many years was utilized 
as a tug and packet boat. In 1851 Daniel Johnson built the " Snow " at Zil- 



TiiK Industries of theiSaginaws. 27 

waukie, and in the same year Curtis Emerson built the " Ethan Allen " steam 
barge, and launched her from the docks near the Emerson mill. Since that 
time a large number of vessels, including sailing vessels of all rigs and a 
number of propellers have been built in the Saginaws, and there are now fifty- 
seven barges, five schooners, nine propellers and fifteen tugs owned in whole 
or in part by East Saginaw capital, and running regularly in the season to and 
from this port in the lumber, coal and oil trade, in addition to which there is a 
large number of vessels doing business at this port, but which are owned else- 
where. 

The regular steamboat lines include the Saginaw River line, carrying 
freight and passengers, which was established over twenty 3'ear8 ago and has 
since run ever}^ season, and its boats now ply between Bay City and East 
Saginaw, calling at thirteen points en route, a boat leaving every two hours 
from 6 A. M. to 6:30 p. m. These boats are the " W. R. Burt," licensed to 
carry 500 people, and the " Lucille," allowed to carry 250 people. The Sagi- 
naw, Bay City & Alpena line makes three trips weekly between East Saginaw 
and Alpena, making its first landing at Baj' City and having seven stopping 
places between Bay City and Alpena. The Saginaw, Detroit & Cleveland line 
is composed of the propellers " Sanilac " and " Don M. Dickinson," and carries 
freight between the Saginaws, Detroit, Cleveland and points en route ; and in 
addition to these regular lines a large number of vessels are during the year 
chartered to carr}' cargoes of lumber from the Saginaws to difl^ereut lumber 
markets upon the Great Lakes. 

It will thus be seen that the Saginaws possess facilities surpassed by no 
other points for transportation of their products to leading markets, and that 
these rail and water routes are convenient to the transaction of the business of 
the Valle}'. The large amount of lumVjer sold and other products made here 
render this an important point for transportation lines, and these facilities are 
increasing from 3'ear to year in such a manner as to centralize in Saginaw the 
business of Northern Michigan. 



ORQANIZELD EIFFORTTS. 



ASSOCIATIONS IN AID OF THE COMMERCE OF 

THE VALLEY. 



THE business men and manufacturers of the Saginaws have not been forget- 
ful of the advantages to be derived from unit}^, and as a consequence 
there are here a number of organizations which exert an influence for the benefit 
of the trade relations of the Saginaws with the outside world and of the mem- 
bers of these organizations with each other. In 1874 a private enterprise was 
started by the Hon. Charles V. DeLand, known as the Lumber Exchange, 
which was intended to furnish a medium for facilitating trade in lumber and 
lumber products. This organization, however, onl}^ continued a few 3'ears. 

Saginaw Board of Trade. — lu 1876 a number of the leading manu- 
facturers, merchants, etc., of the Saginaws associated themselves together as a 
Boai'd of Trade, under the provisions of the act of March 19, 1863, for the 
incorporation of Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce, and the acts 
amendatory of and supplementary thereto. The organization took place May 
9, 1876, when a constitution was adopted declaring the objects of the associa- 
tion to be " to promote just and equitable principles in trade ; to correct an}- 
abuses which may exist, and generally' to advance the interests of trade and 
commerce in the Saginaw Valley." From that time to the present the Board 
of Trade has exerted an important influence in directing the business of the 
Valley in a manner calculated to secure harmon}' of action, and its published 
reports, issued annually, containing full and complete information as to the 
trade of the preceding year, present a faithful exhibit of the volume of the 
business transactions not only of the Saginaws themselves, but of the entire 
Valley, as well as furnishing useful information to outsiders in regard to the 
advantages of the Saginaw Valley. The statistics of the production of lumber 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 29 

and lumber products and salt gathered under the auspices of this bod\' are in 
every respect complete, and are presented in such a manner as to invite tlie 
attention of all interested in those important branches of industry. The officers 
of the Board of Trade for 1887-8 are John S. Estal)rook, President ; C. W. 
Wells, Vice-President ; J. A. Whittier, Second Vice-President ; P. A. O'Don- 
uell, Treasurer, and C, W. Grant, Secretary. 

The Michigan Salt Association. — Prior to 1878 many attempts 
had been made to secure a combination of those interested in the production 
of salt in Michigan, and an organization named the Saginaw & Bay Salt Com- 
pany was formed, and later the Saginaw Salt Company. The latter afterward 
consolidated with the Michigan Salt Association, which was organized in 1876, 
and which from that time to this has been steadilj'' increasing in influence, 
until now it includes in its membership almost all of the salt producers of the 
Stgvte, and in 1886, out of a total of 4,097,943 barrels of salt produced in 
Michigan, the Association controlled all but about 600,000 barrels. The Asso- 
ciation has a capital stock of $200,000, and its headquarters are located at 
East Saginaw. It handles the product of all the manufacturers embraced in 
its membership, lakes their salt as fast as made, places it on the market and 
pa3-s for it in full when sold.' The perfection of its system is such that the 
Association is enabled to distribute the salt product much more efficiently tlian 
any individual possibly could do. It has agents in all the principal cities, the 
principal ones being at Chicago, St. Louis, Milwaukee, Duluth, Louisville, Cin- 
cinnati, Toledo, Nashville and Sandusky. The original charter of the Associa- 
tion expired in 1881 b}' limitation, and it was at (mce reoi-ganized under the 
name of the Salt Association of Michigan, and in 1886 was again organ- 
ized under its old name of The Michigan Salt Association. The importance 
of such an organization is manifest, as it protects the product against competi- 
tion between dealers ; and the position held by Michigan as the greatest salt 
producing State in the Union, its product equalling about 50 per cent, of the 
entire domestic product of salt in the United States, makes unity of action 
among those interested in this branch of production an absolute necessity. 
The affairs of the Association have been well and successfully managed from 
its original organization to the present time, Mr. Wellington R. Burt having 
been its President throughout its history, and the other officers being A. Miller, 
Vice-President ; D. G. Holland, Secretary; Thomas Cranage, Treasurer ; and 
the Executive Committee being formed of Messrs. W. 11. Burt, Thomas 
Cranage, J. L. Dolson, W. J. Bartow and F. C. Stone. 

The Business Men's Association. — An important addition to the 
business organizations affecting in a direct way the commercial prosperity of 
the Saginaws was that made by the organization in May, 1886, of the Business 
Men's Association of East Saginaw, Mich., the objects of which are declared 



30 The Industries of the Saginaws. 

by the by-laws of the Association to be, " the inducinsj of manufacturers to 
locate in the city ; the opening up of good roads and the consideration and 
discussion of all subjects afl'ecting the rights and interests of East Saginaw." 
In order to better carry out these objects the Association has standing com- 
mittees on manufactures, trade and commerce, railways, wagon roads, 
municipal affairs, statistics, ways and means, etc. It is the duty of these com- 
mittees to take up the branches of inquiry connected with their respective com- 
mittees, and to these bodies are referred all matters relative to the interests 
they have in charge. Among mau}^ other things which have been done by the 
Business Men's Association for the benefit of East Saginaw is the publication 
in convenient form for distribution pamphlets setting forth the advantages of 
East Saginaw as a place for business and residence, and showing the details 
which go to make up its prominence as a center .of production and distribu- 
tion. The membership of the Association embraces about sevent3'-five or 
eighty of the leading merchants, manufacturers, etc., of East Sa,ginaw, and the 
following prominent and substantial citizens are its officers : Max Heaven- 
rich, President ; A. M. Marshall, First Vice-President ; W. C. McClure, Second 
Vice-President ; A. H. Comstock, Secretary ; William T. Wickware, Treasurer. 

The Board of Trade of the City of Saginaw.— In pursuance 
of the provisions of the act of March 19, 1863, " For the incorporation of 
Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce," sixty-three business men of 
Saginaw City associated themselves under the above title in October, 1886, for 
the purpose, as stated in their constitution, " to maintain Board of Trade rooms, 
to inculcate principles of justice and equity in trade, to acquire and disseminate 
valuable commercial and economic information, to advance the interests and 
forward the growth and prosperity ot trade, commerce and manufactures in 
the city of Saginaw." Sines its organization the Board has exerted a beneficial 
influence in promoting the material interests of the city, notably in aid of secur- 
ing the location of the Lutheran Seminary in the city, and in securing the loca- 
tion at Saginaw of a number of new manufacturing concerns, including a match 
factory, a grey iron factory, and a cold storage building now in course of erec- 
tion. It has also aided materially in securing the new street car line, and the 
entrance of the Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad into the city. The Board, act- 
ing through its several committees, takes an active interest in every movement 
tending to enhance the facilities or promote the interests of Saginaw City. The 
officers of the Board are C. Gr. Fowler, President ; J. L. Jackson, 1st Vice- 
President ; J. H. Shackleton, 2d Vice-President; H. V. Hughes, 3d Vice- 
President ; Charles Moye, Treasurer, and Benjamin Greer, Secretary. 

It will therefore be seen that in the aids and instrumentalities for the 
efficient prosecution of business, the merchants and manufacturers of the Sagi. 



The Industuiks of tiik Saoinaws. 31 

naws are fully alive to the advantages of united effort, and that they are, 
moreover, actuated by a patriotic devotion to local interests and an abiding 
faith in the advantages for growth in prosperity of the twin cities. 

Saginaw Valley Underwriters' Association. — This is an organi- 
zation formed in 1882 and comprising in its membership most of the leading 
underwriters in a territory extending south to the Detroit, Grand Haven & 
Milwaukee Railwa^^ and north to Alpena, and having for its object a general 
supervision of the companies, regulation of rates and improvement of I'isks, 
and since its organization the Association has exerted a beneficial influence in 
securing a uniformity in usage in insurance matters in this region. It is under 
the charge of Mr. George H. House as Manager, who has efficiently attended 
to this business from the organization of the association to the present time. 



LOQS AND LUMBEIR. 



THE TIMBER RESOURCES AND PRODUCTS OF 
THE SAGINAWS. 



WHILE not the only industry', the business of the manufacture of lumber 
and lumber products has for a number of years formed the most im- 
portant of the productive industries of the Saginaws, and of the Valle}^ in 
general. In the space permitted to the review of this subject in this work it is 
not possible to go into details, but an endeavor will be made to present in a 
general way the facts going to show the importance of this trade. 

The statistics of this industry are presented in a most complete manner 
by the annual reports of the Board of Trade from 1881 to 1886 inclusive, and 
the figures for 1887 will no doubt be given with the. same accuracy, perspicacity 
and judicious arrangement by which the preceding issues have been marked. 
It is not the intention in this volume to invade the realm so well managed by 
Mr. Cowles, whose experience as a compiler of statistics, and facilities for se- 
curing accuracy, give such value to these reports. Those therefore who desire 
to consult the statistics of the lumber product of 1887 will find them in the 
forthcoming Seventh Annual Report of the Saginaw Board of Trade. The 
figures used in this review are for the most part taken from the previous issues 
of this report, to which the author of this work here acknowledges his indebt- 
edness for much important information. 

EARLY MILLING. 

Upon a prcAaous page of this work reference has been made to the build- 
ing of the first mill in the Saginaw Valley, the mill being located at the foot 
of Mackinaw street in Saginaw Citj'. The second mill, afterward known as 
the " Emerson Mill," was built in 1836, the owners being H. Williams & Co., 
and Messrs. Mackey, Oakley and Jennison and Norman Little. It was re- 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 35 

garded as a model mill, and many shook their heads in deprecation of the 
folly of building a mill of so large a capacity. At first the mill did well, as it 
was kept bnsy in cutting long timbers for the Michigan Central Railroad, and 
shipped to that road at Detroit, in 1836, the first cargo of lumber that ever 
left the Saginaw Valley. After that contract was completed, however, the mill 
found the demand for its product insufficient. The effect of the panic of 1837 
was to retard progress in the Valley, and the local demand for lumber was in- 
considerable, while orders from the outside were slow and after ten years the 
mill shut down and the houses surrounding it were deserted. This did not 
last long, however, as in 184(5 the mill was purchased by Curtis Emerson and 
James Eldridge, who refitted it with new machinery and increased its capacity 
to 3,000,000 feet per season. 

The second mill on the east side of the river was built in 1850 by Charles 
W. Grant (now the Secretarj^ of the Saginaw Board of Trade) and the late 
Jesse Hoyt, and the next mill to be built was that of Sears & Holland, erected 
in 1855. Soon afterward there was a rapid increase in the number of mills, 
and at the end of 1855 there were twenty-three mills on the river with an 
aggregate capacity of 60,000,000 feet per season. In 1857 there were 44 mills 
in operation on the Saginaw River, manufacturing that year 113,700,000 feet 
of lumber. In 1867 the number of mills had been increased to 82 and the 
product to 423,963,190 feet. In 1870 there were 83 mills operated and the 
cut was 576,736,600 feet. In 1882 the number of mills had been reduced but 
their capacity greatly increased, the 70 mills then operated cutting 1,011,274,- 
905 feet, or more than double the amount that had been produced fifteen years 
before by 82 mills. Since 1882, which was the year of the largest cut in the 
history of the Valley, the amount of the cut has been reduced, but it is stilll 
very large. Ii\ 1886 the cut of the 64 mills on the Saginaw River aggregated 
798,826,224 feet, a total only exceeded by that of the five years from 1880 to 
1884 inclusive. 

The Emerson mill, considered as a model in the years from 1836 to 1850, 
was when purchased by Messrs. Emerson and Eldridge in 1846, and before 
the}' increased its productive power, equipped with three upright saws the 
capacity of each of which averaged 2,500 feet per day. The slabs and saw- 
dust were hauled awa}- from the mill at an expense of five dollars per da}' and 
seven cords of mixed wood were daily consumed for fuel, at a cost of two 
dollars per day. In comparison with this mill, regarded as perfect in its day 
and generation, a description of a model mill of to-day may prove of interest 
to many readers of this volume. 

THE MODERN MILL. 

The mill selected for this description is one to which in addition to the 
conversion of timber into lumber the manufacture of salt is added. The saw 



36 The Industries of the Saginaws, 



mill, salt block, cooperage, barns, offices and piling grounds together cover an 
area of forty-five acres, and the product of the works amount to 25,000,000 feet 
of lumber, 1,500,000 staves and 75,000 sets of heading, in addition to which 
the firm manufactures 2,000,000 shingles during the summer months. They 
also have four salt wells and a very extensive salt block, and make 50,000 
barrels of salt per annum. The mill is 80 feet wide by a length of about 
192 feet, with a large boiler and engine house attached. Included in its equip- 
ment is a 700 horse-power improved Corliss engine, fed by five boilers, 5x16 
feet, a pony engine for night work for making salt, and a pumping engine in 
each of four wells, all fed by two other 5x16 boilers. As a thoroughly repre- 
sentative mill, a brief description of its operations will doubtless be of interest 
to the general reader. The logs are taken from the boom by a steam driven 
endless chain, called a " log jacker," which brings them up in rapid succession 
through a door in the center of the mill upon the upper floor, where they land 
upon the steam log flipper, which rolls them right and left down a slightly in- 
clined plane, at the end of which each log is caught by a "loader," which 
throws them upon the circular carriage by the " steam nigger." It is placed 
on the arms of the steam-feed carriage, where it is caught by "dogs," and by 
working a lever is set in required position for the saw, against which the steam 
carriage rapidly sends it. Returning, the log turning machine grabs it, turns 
it rapidly around, and the other side is exposed to the circular saw. Of these 
circulars there are two, one on each side, with all the accessory machinery, as 
if it were two separate mills, and by these circulars the log is either faced for 
the gang mill or cut into lumber, as desired. If the former, the logs pass 
quickly along the cant transfers to the gang mill, where they are sawed into 
lumber of the desired thickness. The gang mill of this establishment, which is 
one of Wickes Brothers' most improved make, is a powerful machine, running 84 
saws, and it is placed upon a foundation of solid masonry 16 feet deep and 40 
feet at the base. After leaving the gang mill, which is located between and a 
little more than the length of a log behind the circulars, the lumber — for it is 
now lumber — travels along the lumber transfer, a device consisting of revolv- 
ing rollers, to the stock lifter, which turns it over in piles on to the tables of 
the edging machines, of which there is one at each side, the stock lifter work- 
ing both ways. Here the edgings from the boards, and the slabs, which are 
constantly running along live rollers from the circulars, are run on to the slab 
table against small circular saws, which cut them into about four-foot lengths 
and drop them into a shute leading to the slab transfer, which carries them 
across the mill in an elevated position to a spout, whence they are dropped 
into wagons below and carted to slab piles, the larger slabs being taken out of 
the transfer and made into staves, heading, lath, etc. From the edging 
machines the lumber passes to the trimming tables, one situated on each side. 



Thk Industries op the Saoinaws. 



The trimming table is an ingenious arrangement of saws protruding from an 
inclined plane, each protected by a projecting iron arm. The boards traveling 
on chains passing over these springs, press down out of sight all saws except 
the one nearest the end of the board, which trims that end, a stationary' saw 
doing like work at the other end. By this arrangement a board of say ten 
feet long will meet the first saw, one of twelve feet the second, and others in 
accordance with their length. From the trimmer, the lumber, which is now 
finished, is run on the tram cars and drawn b}' horses along an elevated tram- 
wa}' to the piling grounds. These piling grounds cover a very large space with 
about a mile of elevated tramway 18 feet high throughout, and on one side of 
the grounds is the river and the boom, which holds 4,000,000 to 5,000,000 feet 
of logs, and on the other side a large bayou dredged and docked l)y the firm, 
and from whence they do their shipping. The saw dust is carried by a saw 
dust transfer direct from the saws automatically into the fires, all surplus pass- 
ing over the furnaces to large store houses, whence they remove it at night to 
the furnaces used in running the pon}' engine in the salt works. The wheels 
throughout the mill are all of iron, the two fly-wheels weighing 30,000 pounds 
each. The saws are sharpened and gummed by improved machines, which 
work automatically. Employment is given in the mill, salt block and cooper 
shop, etc., to a force of 125 men and 16 horses, in addition to which the firm 
has a force of about 250 men employed in lumbering operations in the woods, 
taking out about 25,000,000 feet of logs per annum, receiving their logs through 
the medium of the Tittabawassee Boom Compan}- and the Flint & Pere Mar- 
quette and Jackson, Lansing & Saginaw railroads. 

SOURCES OF SUPPLY. 

The ax of the lumberman has steadily reduced, from year to year, the 
acreage of standing pine in the district from which the Saginaw River mills 
receive their raw material. The Saginaw River District, as it is generally 
termed, embraces the counties of Tuscola, Lapeer, Genesee, Saginaw, Gratiot, 
Isabella, Gladwin, Clare and Midland, and from these counties the main sup- 
ply of timber in the past has been derived by the Flint, Bad, Cass, Fine, Salt, 
Chippewa, Tobacco and Tittabawassee rivers, all of which are tributar}- to 
the Saginaw. As shown by reports of the Board of Trade, the Flint, Cass and 
Bad rivers now contribute but little to the log supply of the Saginaw River 
mills, the timber on these rivers having for the most part been cut, and the 
timber on the Chippewa and Pine rivers is now well up on the head waters 
and small tributaries. A ridge of timber still exists covering the head- 
waters of the Pine, CUiippewa, Tobacco and Tittabawassee, and continuing 
across to the headwaters of the An Sable and along the headwaters of Thunder 
Bay River, from which the Saginaw mills re<'eive the greater part of the stock 



38 The Industries op the Saoinaws. 

furnished. Other sources of suppl}^ are the Flint & Pare Marquette Railroad 
and the Saginaw Division of the Michigan Central, while a considerable amount 
of timber comes from the Saginaw Bay District, drained by the Pine, Rifle, 
Au Gres and other streams bordering the Saginaw Bay. The reduction of the 
stock of pine in the district immediately surrounding Saginaw has induced 
the Saginaw River lumbermen to invest extensively in tracts of pine in the 
Upper Peninsula and the Georgian Ba^- District of Canada, and the supply 
from the Upper Peninsula is annuall}^ being increased. That from Georgian 
Bay, however, is hampered by the export duty placed upon the timber by the 
Dominion Government. Many speculations have been made as to the amount 
of timber still available for the use of the Saginaw manufacture, some of the 
earlier of which have alread}' been exceeded by the amount actually cut, and 
while it is of course inevitable that the time will come when merchantable pine 
will be a very scarce commodity, that result will not be reached for a number 
of years yet, and when it does, it will be to give place to agricultural pursuits, 
which will doubtless prove sufficient to maintain the Saginaws as important 
business centers and to compensate for the loss of the lumber industries. At 
present, however, the manufacture of lumber and lumber products is in a 
thriving condition. The reduction of the timber supply has, of course, had 
the effect of enhancing the price of timbered pine lands and stumpage, and 
caused the logging operations to recede, each year, farther and farther from 
the manufacturing center. In an early day the Cass River formed a principal 
avenue of receipt for timber, but the present year the output of the stream 
was but 3,346,480 feet, and it is practically exhausted as a source of supply 
Even the Tittabawassee, which up to the end of 1886 had, from the organiza- 
tion of the Tittabawassee Boom Company in 1864, rafted and delivered 8,068,- 
119,311 feet of logs, has only rafted and delivered, during the season of 1887. 
about 365,000,000 feet, as against 403,988,740 feet in 1886, the output of this 
river being this season the smallest, with the exception of 1885, since 1878. 

lumber products. 

While the greater part of the lumber manufacturing industry of the Sagi- 
naw River still consists in the manufacture of rough lumber, there has been 
a commendable tendency, of late years, to increase the value of the products 
of the Valley by doing much of the planing and finishing and the manufac- 
turing of articles of which lumber forms the raw material at home, thus giving 
employment to a larger number of men and materially adding to the produc- 
tive resources, and consequently the wealth, of the Saginaws. The number of 
yards maintained in the Saginaws is steadily increasing, and the ratio of dr}' 
to green lumber shipped is yearly becoming greater. Planing mills, sash, door 
and blind factories, and other important enterprises are in operation. 



TiiK Tndi'stuiks ov the Saoinaws. :!:i 

The figures of production of pine lumber of the Saginaw River mills in 
188(i, furnish a fair idea of the volume of this manufacture. In that year the 
entire cut of Saginaw Hiver mills amounted to 784,921,224 feet, of which 374,- 
!*64,!HI9 feet was cut in the Saginaws and vicinity. Tn the same year 18,005,- 
000 feet of hardwood lumber was manufactured, of which the Saginaws pro- 
duced 6,280,000 feet. This branch of manufacture presents important oppor- 
tunities for the future. The Board of Trade review for 1886 pertinently says; 
'• Not much attention has been i)aid to the manufacture of hardwood lumber 
on this river as yet. In 1883 the cut more than doubled that of the past year, 
but a dull and weak market has checked production. There is a vast quantity 
of hardwood lumber available in this section, however, and it will become an 
important factor in lumbering operations the coming years in this Valley." 

Other important branches of manufacture in the Saginaws and vicinity for 
1886 aggregated as follows : Shingles, 166,213,000 ; lath, 31),665,300 ; staves, 
23,053,338 ; heading, 1,684,022 sets ; and in addition some 2,000,000 oak 
slaves were also manufactured in the Saginaws and along the lines of the rail- 
roads centering here. 



SALTT MAKINQ. 



AN INDUSTRY IN WHICH THE SAGIN AV/S TAKE 

THE LEAD. 



THE fact of the existence of important quantities of saline water in Michi- 
gan surtlcient to encourage manufacture was first demonstrated by Dr. 
Houghton, then engaged in making the geological survey of the State, in 1840 
although it was not until 1859 that operations looking to the utilization of this 
important supply were adopted in the Saginaw Valley. In that year the East 
Saginaw Salt Manufacturing Company was ox'ganized, and from that time to 
the present the manufacture of salt has been carried on with steadil}^ increasing 
volume, until in 1886 the product was larger than in any previous year. An im- 
portant factor in securing a superiority in the quality of the product and 
hai-mony among those engaged in this department of manufacture is the Michi- 
gan Salt Association, mentioned elsewhere, and which now handles almost the 
entire salt product of Michigan, Of the total production of the United States 
Michigan furnisher nearly half, and the greater part of this product is handled 
by the Michigan Salt Association, with headquarters located in East Saginaw. 
The counties iu which salt is found in Michigan are Saginaw, Bay, Huron, St. 
Clair, Iosco, Midland, Manistee, Mason and Gratiot, and of a total of 3,677,257 
barrels manufactured in 1886 in ^lichigan, Saginaw county produced 1,213,764 
barrels, a larger amount by ovei- 300,000 barrels than was produced by any 
other county in the State. Daring that year fifty-two salt companies with 
fort3'-five steam blocks, twelve pan blocks and 4,000 solar salt covers were in 
operation, having a manufacturing capacity of 1,400,000 barrels. The increase 
in salt production has been steady and continuous from 561,288 barrels manu- 
factured in 1869 to 3,677,257 in 1886, and the total salt manufactured in the 
State up to the end of that jear was 37,282,586 barrels. This important 



The Industries op the Saoinaws. 41 



industry differs from that of the raanufacture of himber, in the fact that it is 
permanent, and while the present methods usuall3' contemplate the workin{< of 
the two industries in conjunction, the manufacture of salt can be carried on in 
connection with any other industry b}- which steam is utilized, and the salt 
works in connection witii mills are now in many instances operated by the use 
of exhaust steam from the mills. 

Owing to the careful system of State inspection, the figures in regard to 
the salt production of Michigan are easily obtainable since 1869, in which year 
the inspection law took effect. Prior to that time the total amount of salt pro- 
duced in the State was 3,282,117 barrels. From that time to the close of the 
fiscal year ending November 30, 1886, a total of 34,100,469 barrels was pro- 
duced, and in the eleven months of the fiscal year 1887 up to October 31, a 
total of 3,619,132 barrels was produced, making a grand total from the incep- 
tion of the salt industry to October 31, 1887, of 41,001,718 barrels. While 
this part of this work goes to press too early to include the November figures 
in the total, enough has been shown to make certain that the product of 1887 
will exceed that of any previous year in the historj' of the industry'. 

An important consideration in regard to this valuable branch of manu- 
facture is as to the future of it when, as will inevitably' be the case, the timber 
supply is no longer available for the manufacture of lumber upon its present 
scale of magnitude. It is claimed that the manufacture of salt as a separate 
industry would not be remunerative. It is manifest, however, that the exist- 
ence of the inexhaustible supplies of brine will prove a great incentive to other 
manufactures which can in the Saginaws find a lucrative employment for their 
exhaust steam in the manufacture of salt, and there is little reason to fear that 
so bountiful a suppl}- of raw material will be allowed to go to waste, or that so 
important an industry as that of the Michigan salt production will be permitted 
to fall into desuetude. 

Of the salt producing counties Saginaw is far in th§ lead in the volume of 
its output, the record of previous years being steadily maintained, and this 
county having, in the eleven months ending October 31, 1887, produced 
1,047,113 barrels out of a total of 3,611,832 barrels, distributed as follows : 

District No. 1 — Saginaw County 1,047,1 13 

District No. 2— Bay County 823,827 

District No. 3— Huron Countv 165.512 

District No. 4— St. Clair County 278,903 

District No. 5— Iosco County 279,041 

District No. 6— Midland County 39,381 

District No. 7— Manistee County 798,812 

District No. 8 — Mason County 177,174 

District No. 9— Gratiot County 2,069 

Total 3,611,832 

6 



42 The Industries of the Saginaws. 

As a consequence of the low price at which the product has ruled for the 
past 3^ear, it is likely that the manufacture will be restricted during the coming 
winter, in order to reduce stocks. 

In qualit}', the salt produced in Michigan is without a superior. The high 
standard maintained in the product is largely due to the State inspection law 
which has been in operation since 1869. The office of the State Salt Inspector 
is located at East Saginaw, with deputy inspectors in the several districts. 
OTHER MANUFACTURES. 

Iron Industries. — The great volume of the manufactures of the Sagi- 
naws calls for the use of a vast amount of machinery of various kinds, and 
to supply this want a large number of prosperous manufacturing establish- 
ments are conducted, devoted to the production of machinery and machinery 
appliances, and in several departments of the iron manufacturing industry 
Saginaw holds a prominent place among the leading cities of the Lake Region, 
special prominence being given to the manufacture of boilers, engines and saw 
mill and salt making machinery of every description. The location of the 
Saginaws is unsurpassed for the .successful prosecution of these branches of 
industry, the supply of iron being accessible, the iron ore from the Lake 
Superior region being both unlimited in quantity and unsurpassed in quality, 
and the means of communication with the centers of production of this raw 
material being ample. The Saginaws form a superior field for enterprises of 
this character, being in the midst of a large and growing population, con- 
stituting a home market for these products, and there are many branches of 
iron and steel manufacture which have not yet been entered upon, which could 
with advantage be inaugurated and conducted in the Saginaws. 

Furniture. — One of the most encouraging signs for the future of the 
Saginaws is the recent tendency to establish manufactures calculated to utilize 
the lumber supply in the manufacture of a large amount of lumber products. 
Among the recent steps in that direction may be mentioned the establishment 
of several furniture factories, a branch of industry for the prosecution of 
which no place affords better facilities than the Saginaws. Both pine and 
hardwood lumber are in plentiful supply and every means to secure the suc- 
cess of enterprises of this character is at liand. The furniture factories already 
established are steadily increasing their business and demonstrating the 
availability of the Saginaws as a center for this important manufacture, and 
there is no reason why there may not be built up iiere a number of industries 
of this character fully equal to that of any other city in the Union. The same 
causes which Jiave contributed to make this luisiness successful in Grand 
Rapids and other places exist here in the Saginaws, while the means for dis. 
tribution of the product to all parts of the country are of the most efficient 
chai-acter. 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 43 

Carriages, Wagons, Etc. — A number of shops and factories are 
eniployid in the manufacture of every description of wheeled vehicles, some 
of which operate upon a large scale and have a trade territor}' extending far 
beyond local bounds. In heav}- vehicles adapted to the uses of lumber camps 
the products of the Saginaw factories are of acknowledged superiority and 
other establishments are engaged in making lighter vehicles which are of the 
best qualit}-, both in workmanship and materials. Proximity to vast sources 
of supplj- for the raw material gives superior facilities for the successful 
prosecution of this branch of industry, and in addition to an extensive home 
market vehicles can be produced here at a minimum cost of production which 
would justify shipment to all parts of the country. 

Flouring Mills. — In both the cities the manufacture of flour is carried 
on upon an extensive scale, and for home consumption the product of these 
mills is a favorite. The quality of the flour manufactured here is of unexcelled 
merit, and there is no reason why this industr}' should not be increased in its 
proportions. No State in the Union produces a better quality of wheat than 
Michigan, and it would proAc of advantage to ship more of it in the shape of 
flour and less in the grain. A leading inducement to the introduction of more 
manufactures of this character is the fact that the manufacture of salt can be 
profitabl}' combined with it without any increase in power, and as the acreage 
of cultivated lands in Northern Michigan is increasing year by year there is 
ever}- reason to predict the growth of this industry. 

Wooden W^are, Eltc. — The great success of one of the larger manu- 
facturing establishments in Saginaw City, in the manufacture of washboards, 
curtain rollers, measures, sugar boxes, barrel covers, etc., is an impressive ex- 
ample of the j)ossibilities in the way of varied industries in the Saginaws, and 
there are many other kindred departments of trade for which there is ample 
room heie. Ever3'thing of which the principal component is wood can be pro- 
duced here to the greatest possible advantage. An excelsior manufactory' 
could be profitablj' operated, the basswood of which the best quality of this 
article is made being plentiful in the immediate vicinit}'. A match factory has 
already- been started under auspices which give assurance of success, and it 
would be difficult to name an industr}- connected witli an}' kind of wood work 
which would not prove remunerative to those who might invest in it. 

Other Industries. — There are a large number of important manufac- 
turing concerns engaged in various lines of industry besides those enumerated, 
including cooper shops, cigar box, soap, broom and other factories, etc. The 
manufacture of cigars engages a number of establishments, and the brewing 
industry is also an important one. Several job printmg offices are kept busy, 
besides which the newspapers, referred to more fully elsewhere, give employ- 
ment to a large number of prin.ters. There are several book binderies, and 



44 ' The Industries of the Saoinaws. 



other trades related to the printing art have their representatives in the Sagi- 
naws. There are several firms in each of the cities engaged in the saddler}' 
and harness manufacture, and the manufacture of leather is also well repre- 
sented b}' a large firm in East Saginaw. 

But while the number of manufacturing firms and corporations in the two 
cities is already very large, and much larger than the average of cities of the 
same population, the avenues to enterprise in this direction are not yet blocked, 
and there is room for a much greater~number of productive industries. It is 
in its manufactures that the prosperity of a city finds its impetus, and American 
enterprise is not prone to allow opportunities for the profitable investment of 
capital and employment of labor to go to waste. No location on the continent 
excels that of the Saginaws for Ihe encouragement offered to manufacturing 
enterprises in supplying the means for their success. With every facility for 
transportation possessed by the most favored cities, and possessing abundant 
supplies of raw materials for nearly all kinds of productive occupations, with 
an industry like that of salt manufacture to be utilized as an auxiliary to other 
important productive enterprises and to add to their profits, and with an agri- 
cultural population steadily increasing, and widening and strengthening the 
home market, the incentives to energy and the rewards open to enterprise exist 
here to an extent not surpassed b}' any locality in the Union, and equalled by 
few. 

Examples of success are not wanting. The Saginaws have in the past 
oflfered many instances of the fact that industr}', enterprise and energy, com- 
bined with the exercise of sound business judgment, find here a fitting arena 
lor their exercise and bring compensation in prosperity, 'and in many instances 
in wealth. 



T"HE1 MEIRCHANTTS. 



THE SAGINAV/S AS A HOME OF TRADE AND 

COMMERCE. 



IT is not possible, in every instance, to draw tlie line between the transactions 
of merchants and manufacturers, many of the latter selling their own pro- 
duct direct to the wholesale or retail trades. There are some lines, however, 
which in the Saginaws are distinctly devoted to the business of the distribution 
of products manufactured elsewhere, man}' of them vast enterprises involving 
a large amount of capital, and exerting an important influence in their con- 
tribution to the prosperity of the Saginaws. Here is rapidly being centered 
the source of suppl}' for the large and constantly growing population of 
Northern Michigan, while in many lines a much wider territorj- is covered. 

Grain, Produce and Provisions —The trade in the products of the 
farm is steadily increasing. The cutting down of the timber, while reducing 
the supply for the manufacture of lumber, has brought and is bringing to the 
Saginaw Valley large numbers of thrifty farmers to cultivate its productive 
soil, and there is a steady annual increase in the acreage and production of the 
country tributary, in a commercial sense, to the Saginaws, which form the best 
market in the State for farm produce, the large manufacturing operations mak- 
ing a home market for the greater part of the production. In provisions also, 
there is a large consumption here. The Board of Trade report for 1885 showed 
receipts of provisions amounting to 10,695,000 pounds at East Saginaw, and 
while the figures for the present year are not definitely obtainable it is a con- 
servative estimate to place them at 25 per cent, above the figures of two years 
ago. For flour and all kinds of grain and feed the demand for consumption is 
very large, and there is a steadily increasing activity in the business of the city 
as a point of distribution for the products of agriculture. As the railroad center 



48 The Industries of the Saginaws. 

of Northern Michigan Saginaw is favorablj- located for becoming, in time, the 
center of the shipping trade for all the cereal products of this region, and will 
doubtless in the future handle much of the grain which now goes to Toledo 
and Detroit for shipment to the Eastern seaboard. 

Groceries. — The wholesale trade of the Saginaws in groceries is an im- 
portant item in its commerce, a number of large houses being engaged in this 
department of industr}'. This is a distributing point for a large area, and is 
the chief base of supplies for all the lumbering regions of Northern Michigan 
and along the lines of the Flint & Pere Marquette and the Mackinaw Division 
of the Michigan Central. The large amount of capital invested in this branch 
of trade and the steady and active demand for goods of this character, enable 
the jobbers of the Saginaws to offer goods at .prices as low as Detroit or other 
wholesale markets, and the retail trade, I'ecognizing the fact that they can save 
freight expense and time by buying here, are each year more unanimously 
looking to Saginaw as their source of suppl}'. The volume of transactions of 
the jobbing houses of the Saginaws now aggregate over $4,000,000 annuall}-, 
and the territory covered b}' their trade is expanding into the Upper Peninsula, 
especially into those lumbering regions in which Saginaw capital is invested. 

Hardware. — As a market for hardware Northern Michigan is one of 
the most favorable locations in the country, the demands of manufacturers and 
lumbermen calling for goods of this character in large quantities. An East 
Saginaw house engaged in this line is the second largest in the country, and a 
number of others do an extensive business. In the classes of goods used in 
saw and planing mills and lumbering operations the volume of transactions is 
particularly large, and Saginaw houses engaged in this department have a trade 
territory not confined by local bounds, but extending to all the lumber pro- 
ducing regions of the country, and particularly of the Northwest, while frequent 
shipments are made to the Southern States and even to foreign countries. The 
revival of the hardware trade, noticed throughout the country- during the past 
3'ear or two, has been felt in the Saginaws, and the demand for these goods is 
active at prices which, while not so high as those ruling several years ago, offer 
a fair margin of profit. 

Clothing, Etc. — A number of lai-ge houses, both wholesale and retail, 
are engaged in the sale of clothing, and in this line there has been greater 
activity during 1887 than in several years preceding it. An important branch 
of this business here is in the suppl3- of clothing, shirts, etc., for lumbermen, for 
which a large trade centers here. There is a ver}- perceptible increase in the 
jobbing trade of this city in this line, the dealers throughout Northern Michigan 
beginning to recognize the fact that goods can be bought as cheaply here as at 
places more distant, and the saving effected in freight and in the time con- 
sumed in filling orders being an important inducement. Prices have ruled low, 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 49 

but the marked increase in the volume of business has in a large measure c(Mn- 
pensated for this, and tlie clothing business, with its associated line of men's 
furnishing goods, has been fairly prosperous throughout the year. 

Dry Goods. — Both of the cities have large establishments engaged in 
the dry goods business, and in addition to a thriving retail trade a jobbing 
business is done which is steadily increasing in volume. The stocks carried 
are large and varied and the volume of transactions is sutficiently large to 
enable the merchants here to compete with those in Detroit and other markets 
in prices, and the number of retailers who transfer their purchases to Saginaw 
is annually incx'easing. In the retail dry goods trade some of the houses in 
each of the cities compare favorably, in the extent and assortment of their stock, 
with those of any of the cities of Michigan and adjoining States, and the same 
is true of millinery, fancy goods and other kindred lines. 

Other Merchandisers. — It would be difficult to name a branch of 
mercantile business in which the Saginaws fail of representation, either at 
wholesale or retail. In horses East Saginaw is the most important market in 
Michigan, outside of Detroit, and is especially so in regard to heavy draught 
animals suitable for use in logging operations and for work around mills ; and 
in other live stock an active and steadilj' growing business is done. 

In agricultural implements the volume of transactions shows a steady 
increase, and the rapidly increasing acreage and production of Northern Michi- 
gan is causing an augmented demand for an improved character of farm 
machinery and implements for the supply of which the Saginaws are the recog- 
nized center. In boots and shoes a large business is done, a number of pros- 
perous houses being engaged in this branch of business. The drug business 
here is also a large one, amounting to about $500,000 annuall}-. The trade in 
liquors and cigars, which includes in addition to local consumption an exten- 
sive jobbing business throughout Northern Michigan, is also an important item 
in the business transacted in the city. Other prominent lines are coal, hides, 
leather, brick, stone, cement, etc., paper, stationery, jewelr^^ and all the varied 
lines of merchandise which pertain to the commerce of a thriving business 
community. 

Aggressiveness is a marked feature of the business operations of the 
merchants of the Saginaws. They fully appreciate their al)ility to compete, on 
favorable terms, with dealers in Detroit, Toledo and Chicago and other cities 
for the trade of Northern Michigan, and their success in this direction is 
annually becoming more marked. The opportunity is presented for Saginaw 
to confirm its title as the commercial center of this section of the State, and 
that it will be utilized no one who is accpuiinted with the progressiveness of 
Saginaw merchants will for a moment doubt. 



Ti^HEl BANKS. 



THE FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS OF THE SAGI- 
NAWS AND THEIR CONDITION. 



AN important consideration in estimating tlie business of a city is tlie con- 
dition of its banking institutions, witli reference to tlieir facilities to 
handle the business of the place. Tested by this consideration the present 
time must be regarded as one favorable to the Saginaws, as the aggregate of 
business done by the local banks is larger than at any time in the history of 
the Valley, and the amounts of capital and surplus, the deposits, loans, bonds 
and exchange maturing, etc., of the Saginaw banks are now larger than at any 
previous period. 

In the absence of a clearing house to show the volume of banking trans- 
actions the information necessary to exhibit the progress of the banks must 
be derived from a comparison of official statements at various times, and such 
a comparison will be sufficient to indicate the progress that has been made. 
For this pui-pose a comparison of the October statements of the six National 
Banks of the Saginaws for the years 1886 and 1887, and of the July state- 
ments of the Savings Bank of East Saginaw for the same years, will prove 
interesting as showing the progress made by the banking institutions of the 
two cities. 

During the year the comparison of the statements of the First National 
Bank of East Saginaw shows an increase in resources of $49,543.94 ; in loans 
and discounts of $65,685.00, and in surplus fund of $10,000. 

The Second National Bank of Elast Saginaw increased its resources $65,- 
221.60; and its loans and discounts_$78,688. 16. 

The Home National Bank of East Saginaw showed an increase in resources 
of Sl45,129.41 ; in loans and discounts of $222,551.52 ; and in surplus of 
$4,000. 



51 The Industries op the Saginaws. 

The East Saginaw National Bank increased $40,540.21 in resources ; 
$25,719.01 in loans and discounts, and $8,000 in surplus. 

The First National Bank of Saginaw City increased its resources 399,- 
086.85 ; its loans and discounts $35,954.53 ; and its surplus $15,000. 

The Citizens' National Bank of Saginaw City increased its resources $52,- 
487.02, and its surplus $5,000 ; but showed a slight decrease in loans and dis- 
counts, this item being $5,343.07 less in 1887 than in 1886. 

The Savings Bank of East Saginaw increased its resources by $107,501.97; 
its loans and discounts $85,826.98 ; and its surplus $10,000, in the year from 
July, 1886, to July, 1887. 

It will thus be seen that the seven banks above mentioned made an aggre- 
gate increase of $559,511.00 in resources, $504,082.75 in loans and discounts, 
and $52,000 in surplus, during the year ; showing an active banking business, 
and indicating a busy employment of capital, A gratifying fact shown in the 
statement of the Savings Bank of East Saginaw is the increase in its deposits 
from July, 1886, to July, 1887, of $95,421.36, showing that the year was a 
prosperous one for the people genei-ally. 

In addition to the banks above mentioned the People's Savings Bank of 
East Saginaw, and the Saginaw County Savings Bank, of Saginaw City, opened 
for business during the year, and the substantial and prosperous private bank- 
ing house of George L. Burrows & Co., in Saginaw City, and that known as 
Seligman's Bank of Commerce, in East Saginaw, also do a very large and 
active business. 

The paid up capital and surplus of the corporate banking institutions of 
the Saginaws is as follows : 

Bank. Capital. Surplus. 

First National, East Saginaw $ 100,000 $ 50,000 

Second National, East Saginaw 150,000 30,000 

Home National, East Saginaw ,... 300,000 54,000 

East Saginaw National Bank 100,000 15,000 

First National Bank, Saginaw City 200,000 100,000 

Citizens' National Bank, Saginaw City 100,000 25,000 

Savings Bank of East Saginaw '. 50,000 35,000 

People's Savings Bank, Ease Saginaw 50,000 

Saginaw County Savings Bank, Saginaw Cit}'. 50,000 

Total $1,100,000 $309,000 



RKAL ElSTTAT^El. 



A SPIRIT OF IMPROVEMENT MANIFEST IN 
THE SAGINA\VS. 



THE condition of the real estate market in the Saginaws is not what would 
be called, in the modern speculative sense, a " boom," by which is meant 
an unhealthy and temporary inflation of values beyond all possibility of main- 
tenance, but it is, nevertheless, in a healthy state, the demand for good 
properties being sti'ong and an advance in prices commensurate with the growth 
and bright prospects of the two cities is well sustained. 

In Saginaw City the improvement in the real estate outlook is especiall}' 
marked. Great progress has been made in the erection of buildings there in 
the past few years, and there is not only an augmentation of the number, but 
also a decided advance in the character of the buildings which have recently 
been erected. Many of them would do credit, from an architectual standpoint, 
to the largest cities of the Union, while all are of a substantial and permanent 
character. A gratifying feature in connection with the improvements in Sagi- 
naw City is the fact that they have been effected by residents, are designed for 
permanent investment, and are a manifestation of the confidence felt in the 
town and its future by its own citizens. This confidence is full}- justified by 
the situation and prospects of the city. Most advantageously situated for 
permanent residence, occupying the highest ground in this vicinity, its 
location is unsurpassed, while recent improvements in switching facilities 
make it specially attractive for the location of manufactures, for which eligible 
sites are here numerous. In addition to these advantages, the recent passage 
of the act to consolidate the two cities has brought about a consideration of 
the attractions of the west side for residence purposes, and it is the view of 
many that the fashionable quarter of the consolidated Saginaw of the future 
will be on the Saginaw City side. These, and other causes, have contributed to 



The Industries op' the Saqinawr. 53 

create an active demand for property on that side of the river, and to cause to 
be placed on the market a large portion of the town tract which has heretofore , 
been withheld from sale. A number of notable accessions have lately been 
made to the manufacturing concerns in Saginaw Cit}', and several others are 
projected which will aid in swelling the volume of its productive industries^ 
and add to its wealth and population. The prices of real estate have ad- 
vanced, but not unreasonably so, and the values of business and residence 
property now maintained are not excessive, and are fairly based upon the ad- 
vantages and prospects of the cit}'. The market shows no speculative features ; 
most of the transactions being made with a view to improvement, and those 
looking for manufacturing sites or locations for residence or business will find 
them obtainal)le at lair figures. 

In East Saginaw, also, there is a healthy state of affairs in the real estate 
market, and the cit}- is growing at a rate more rapid than at any previous 
period of its history. A number of important transfers of city property were 
made during the past year, most of which were sales made to parties who have 
invested for the purpose of improvement. Two subdivisions have been added 
to the city during the past few years, and the lots in them have met a steady 
demand, for residence purposes. A nymber of manufacturing locations have 
been disposed of in various parts of the city. There has been some advance 
in prices, but not more than is justified by the steady growth of the population 
and increase in productive industries ; and it is believed by those best qualified 
to judge that prices will advance considerably from present figures. The con- 
solidation measure has contributed to give an impetus to the real estate mar- 
ket, and the demand for good properties shows a gratifying and increasing 
activit}-. 

There are no real estate boards or associations in either of the cities to 
give figures showing the volume of the transactions in real estate, all the 
trading in city property being done through individual agents ; but those en- 
gaged in the business report the market as being in a more satisfactory' con- 
dition than for many j'ears past. 

Outside of property in the two cities, there is a large amount of business 
done here in pine lands and farms. In timbered lands there has been great 
activity' during the past 3'ear, the upward tendency of prices for lands of this 
character being marked, and many transactions in this class of property have 
been consummated in the past few months, involving large amounts. Some of 
the heaviest holders of pine lands in the country live in the Saginaws, and 
their holdings not only embrace tracts in Michigan, but also extend to all the 
timbered regions of the country, and a vast amount of the pine lands of Wis- 
consin, Minnesota, and even of the Southern States and Pacific Coast are 



54 The Industries of the Saginaws. 

owned here. In farming lands there is a good demand for first-class properties 
in all parts of the Saginaw Valley, in which the agricultural population is 
annually increasing. It was thought, in an early da}', that the land in the 
Saginaw Valley was for the most part useless for the purposes of agriculture, 
there being, in all parts of the country, a false impression that pine lands were 
necessarily sterile. This, however, has long since been disproved b}' the test 
of experience, and no one, at this date, would attempt to stigmatize the land 
of the Saginaw Valley as "pine barrens." On the contrary, the land in this 
vicinity is, acre for acre, as productive as that of an}' region of the country ; 
agriculture is as remunerative here as anywhere, and far more so than in many 
other parts of the west. This fact is now becoming well known, and as a con- 
sequence, the demand for farming locations in the Valley is annually becoming 
more active. 

In all its departments the real estate business of the Saginaws is in a 
healthy condition, and as the demand for real estate is always a reliable 
barometer of the prosperity of a community, this state of affairs may be ac 
cepted as an indication favorable to the future of the Saginaws. 



TTHEl T:^W0 CITTIEIS. 



THEIR LOCATION AND RESOURCES— HOW 
THEY ARE GOVERNED. 



THE intimate relations between the two Sagiuaws, separated only by a stream 
bridged in five places, causes the events of their history to blend into 
each other, so that it would be difficult to record the doings of the past as to 
one without frequent reference to matters equally affecting the other. One in 
interest, it has long been apparent to the foreseeing that it was manifestly the 
destiny of the two cities, at some time or other, to become united under one 
municipal organization, and this has already been provided for in the act of 
the Legislature for the consolidation of the two cities in 1891. The idea of 
consolidation is not a new one, but has been frequently agitated from time to 
time during the past quarter of a century, and in 1873 a strong effort was made 
to secure a union of the two cities, but a popular vote showed that public sen- 
timent was not yet ripe for the consummation of the measure and the party of 
consolidation was at that time defeated. 

THE CITY OP SAGINAW. 

Incidental to the brief historical chapters beginning this work mention has 
been made of the organization of Saginaw first as a village, and later, in 1857, 
as a city. At the time of its incorporation its commercial and professional 
interests were represented by sixty-five offices, stores and shops, and it had 
four churches, two society rooms, the Union and two select schools, and the 
old-time court house and jail. Following that year, however, the city began 
rapidly to advance ; streets were laid out, shade trees were planted, and in 
three 3'ears its population had advanced from 536 inhabitants at the time of 
its incorporation to 1,712 in 1860. It has since seen good times and bad ones, 
but its general trend has been in the direction of growth, and the advance of 



58 The Industries op the Saginaws. 

its population gives evidence of stability, the figures in 1866 having reached 
5,426 ; in 1870, 7,460 ; in 1876, 9,890 ; in 1880, 10,522 ; in 1884, 13,767 ; and 
in 1887, 16,753. The city is the oldest in the Saginaw Valley, and its location 
is in every respect favorable to permanent residence and to the establishment 
of prosperous industries. It is located on the west bank of the Saginaw River, 
eighteen miles from Saginaw Bay and near the junction of the Saginaw, Titta- 
bawassee and Shiawassee rivers, its city limits inclosing an area of about eight 
square miles. It is well laid out, and contains a large number of handsome 
residences and imposing business blocks, which would do credit to any city on 
the continent. Its facilities for the manufacture of rough and dressed lumber, 
shingles, sash, doors and all other lumber products are unsurpassed, and it is 
the home of a large number of the most productive of this class of industries. 
It is at the head of navigation of the Saginaw River and is connected with the 
outside world by rail lines in every direction, and is equally well supplied in 
this respect with its sister city on the e?st side of the river. It is connected 
with East Saginaw by two railroad and three other iron bridges and two street 
railway lines. The Court House, one of the handsomest structures of its kind 
in the country, was erected in 1884-5 at the expense of the city for the county 
at a cost of over $100,000, and in addition it has the Teutonia Opera House, 
Armory Hall, Arbeiter Hall and other public halls ; it has the Holly system of 
water works, an efficient fire department, is well supplied with gas for private 
lighting, and the Jenny electric light plant is now in operation for public illu- 
mination. It has fourteen church structures, five of which are built of brick, 
and affords church privileges for people of all faiths. 

The water works system of Saginaw City is very complete, and now runs 
one set of Holly quadruplex pumping engines, with a capacity of 2,000,000 
gallons per day, and one set of new Gaskill horizontal pumping engines with 
5,000,000 gallons daily capacity. It is contemplated soon to replace the old 
Holly set by another set of Gaskill engines with a capacity of 8,000,000 gallons 
per day, which will give to the city a capacity for supplying 13,000,000 gallons 
of water daily. These Gaskill engines are made by the Holly Manufacturing 
Company, of Lockport, N. Y., and are their latest and most highly improved 
pumping apparatus. In connection with the system over twenty miles of pipe 
are laid and 200 hydrants ai-e used. 

During the past few years the spirit of improvement has taken possession 
of the people, and man}^ conveniences have been added. A large amount of 
additional pavement has been laid, a charter has been given to the new Union 
street railway, affording a competing connection between the two cities, and 
recently a very important move has been made in granting a franchise to the 
F. & P. M. Railway to build a belt line around the city, t ^The eTenn}' electric 
light system of the city runs 73 arc lights for public lighting and has a capacity 



The Industries of the Saoinaws. 59 

for 78, the stationary engine being an automatic cut-off, tested 78 horse- 
power, with a steel tubuhxr boiler having a pressure of 125 pounds to the square 
inch ; three dynamos, two of which are of 30 lights each, and one 18 lights, run- 
ning 1,200 revolutions per minute, and the plant includes an automatic indi- 
cator, which shows which lights are running and which are out. The franchise 
of the Jenny Company expires in 18S8, when there is some prospect of the 
city procuring the plant and running it. The following named gentlemen 
f^ompose the present city government : Mayor, John H. Shackleton ; Recorder, 
David Crowley; Controller, William Binder; Treasurer, John W. Richardson ; 
City Attorney, F. E. Emerick ; Street Commissioner, Henry F. Allen ; Cit}' 
Marshal, Zachariah Raskins ; Chief Engineer of Fire Department, Philip 
Opfergelt ; Poundmaster, William Mahlebeu. In addition to these officers 
there are six Aldermen, one from each of the wards of the city, and Boards of 
Health, of Education and Water Commissioners. 

THE CITY OF EAST SAGINAAV. 

In a former portion of this work reference has been made to the early 
history of East Saginaw, and it has been shown that the city made rapid 
growth from the beginning. It has sustained, during the later years, the 
record of its earlier growth, and it is annually increasing in population and 
importance. The assessed valuation of real and personal property in the city 
has increased over thirty per cent, in the past eight years, and the steady in- 
crease in the number and volume of the industries of the city is favorable to a 
continuance of prosperity and expansion. 

The citj' is located on the east side of the Saginaw River, sixteen miles 
from Saginaw Bay, and its facilities for communication with the outside world 
have been set forth in a previous chapter. In area the city covers 3,904.82 
acres, and its present population is about 35,000. It presents every attraction 
for permanent residence, is favored with a healthful climate, its people are 
progressive and public spirited, and the social advantages embrace everj' 
modern aid to progress and advancement. A commendable pride is felt by 
the citizens in the city and its advantages, and every movement looking to the 
material advancement of the cit}' meets with encouragement. 

The city is well built, many of the business blocks and more pretentious 
i-esidences ranking among the finest in the State. The municipal government 
of the city has ever been characterized b}- a public spirited liberality in all 
possible measures to promote the health and comfort of citizens, and the 
public expenditures have been judiciously made so as to secure every public 
improvement possible to be made with due regard to proper economy of fiscal 
management. The cit}- has over thirtee"!! miles of paved streets, to wiiich 



60 The Industries of the Saginaws. 

three miles additional will be added in 1888, and had at the beginning of 1887 
twenty-two miles of sewers, to which important additions, involving an ex- 
penditure of $100,000, have been made during the year. 

The water supply of the city is ample and of good qualit}^, the water be- 
ing brought from a point near the junction of the Saginaw with the Tittalia- 
wassee and Shiawassee rivers. The Holly water works are supplied with 
quadruplex compound pumping engines of great power, one of them having a 
pumping capacity of 6,000,000 gallons, and the other of 2,000,000 gallons per 
diem. The water supply is managed by the Board of Water Commissioners 
and the plant of the water works covers over 11 acres of gi"ound, with all 
necessary buildings. 

There are two street railway's, with branches, wholl}' within the city limits, 
in addition to which there are two lines between East Saginaw and Saginaw 
City. 

The lighting facilities of the city are not surpassed, the street lighting be- 
ing done by means of electric arc lights, and the lighting of stores and 
residences being by incandescent lights and an ample supply of gas. Tele- 
graph and telephone connections are ample for the needs of business, and the 
district telegraph system has been in use for more than a year past. 

In May last the system of issuing building permits, in vogue in most large 
cities, was introduced, and during the six months following permits were issued 
for the construction of 117 new buildings, and for alterations and repairs to 
97 buildings. 

In the means for procuring the necessities and comforts of life the city is 
amply supplied. In the surrounding country all kinds of vegetables and fruits 
are raised, and food of every kind is plentiful and cheap. In all mercantile 
lines the stores of this city are completely stocked, and many of them compare 
favorably in any respect with the largest of the retail establishments in Detroit. 
Reference will be found elsewhere to the social and educational institutions of 
the city, and much matter in regard to its advantages will be found classified 
under proper heads. 

The city government is composed of the Mayor, a Common Council and 
other officers, charged with special duties. The Common Council consists of 
the Mayor, Recorder, Clerk, and eighteen Aldermen, two of whom are elected 
from each ward. The following are the city oflScers for 1887-88 : Mayor, 
Henry M. Youmans ; Recorder, Walter J. Lamson ; City Clerk, Ferd A. 
Ashley; City Controller, Edwin Aikin ; City Treasurer, James F. Brown ; Cit}- 
Assessor, Frederick Hartmann ; City Attorney, Robert B. McKnight ; City 
Engineer, John J. Granville ; City Physician, Jonathan S. Rouse ; Health 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 61 

Officer, Titus Duncan ; Director of the Poor, James S. Kerns, Sr. ; Street 
Siiporinlondent, William Grant; Chief of Police, T. Dailcy Mower; (Miief of 
Fire Department, Marshall G. Smith ; Police Judge, John E. Nolan. 

THE VILLAGE OF OARROLLTON. 

Adjoining the cit}' of Saginaw on the north is the village of Carrollton, in 
which a large and steadily increasing number of saw mills, planing mills, box 
factories, manufactures of barrels, sash, etc., and salt works are situated. The 
village is favorably' located as to transportation and other business facilities, 
and many sites adapted to the introduction of a still greater number of manu- 
factures are located there. The population of the village is annually increas- 
ing, and its prospects are bright to become one of the most prosperous sections 
of the consolidated city of Saginaw, of which it will form a part. 

These three prosperous municipalities are united in many bonds of com- 
mon interest, and the Legislature of the State has made provision for their 
consolidation in one government under the name of " Saginaw." This will be, 
undoubtedly, the second city in the State, and will only be excelled by Detroit 
in population, wealth, and commercial resources. 



SOaiAL KAQTTS. 



SAGINAV/ INSTITUTIONS DEVOTED TO CHAR- 
ITY, INSTRUCTION AND AMUSEMENT. 



IN the foregoing pages an endeavor has been made to present the advantages 
of the Saginaws from a business view. In the present chapter it is pro- 
posed to show that the social side of life is here no less attractive, and that 
in addition to business facilities, all the advantages of modern civilization 
which make up desirability^ for permanent residence can here be found. In 
all the means for the enjoyment of social existence and the pursuit of happiness 
in instruction or pleasure, the Saginaws are well provided, and organizations 
are plentiful for ministering to human wants in religion, education, social in- 
tercourse, music, the drama, literature and all the various objects which 
indicate the mtelligence, enlightenment and human s^-rapath}- of the people. 

Churches. — It was once humorously' observed by a public speaker in an 
address upon early days in the Saginaws, that " In the ' high times ' of Sagi- 
naw City, they had started everything except a church ;" and it is doubtless 
true that the pioneers of the Valley did not bring with them any excessive 
stock of piety. Yet the earliest white visitor to this region was a raissionar3', 
and from the earliest history of the American settlement endeavors were 
made by zealous men and women to build up the cause of religion here. The 
success of their efforts is well attested by the fact that every shade of religious 
faith is represented in the Saginaws, and that many of the ecclesiastical 
structures of the two cities are among the most beautiful and elaborate build- 
ings of this character to be found in the State. The clergy of the Saginaws 
is able and the religious advantages of the cities are such as to commend them 
to church-going people. 

Schools. — Michigan as a State is justly proud of the advanced position 
it has ever taken in the cause of public education, and the public school system 
has been fostered in the Saginaws by the cheerful aid of citizens, and judicious 




EAST SAGINAW — ACADEMY OP MUSIC. 




EAST SAUINAW — HOME FOR THE I'UJENDLESS. 



The Industries of the Saoinaws. 65 



direction of those entrusted with the management of scholastic affairs. The 
lu-st school district in Saginaw County was organized April 18, 1837, and com- 
prised the territory now covered by Saginaw, East Saginaw, Carrollton and a 
radius of about six miles in every direction. This district had one school 
-house, located in Saginaw City, and the first teacher was Horace Beach, of New 
York. Even before this time there had been a private school conducted for 
about two years. The history of education in the Saginaws has, from that 
early day to the present time, been progressive, and the educational facilities 
have kept pace with the municipal and social growth of the two cities. Sagi- 
naw City has invested many thousands of dollars in its school buildino-s, of 
which it has eight, with a capacity for the accommodation of three thousand 
pupils. The High School, which is recognized by the faculty of the State 
University as a preparatory department of that institution, its graduates being 
admitted to the University classes without re-examination, is ably managed 
and under judicious guidance. In addition to the public schools are a num- 
ber of educational institutions under the auspicious of various churches, in- 
cluding the St. Andrews Academy, connected with the Catholic parish of St. 
Andrews, conducted by the Sisters of Providence ; the Lutheran and St. Paul's 
(German) Church Schools, and a Kindergarten School, conducted under the 
auspices of the Teutonia Societj'. 

East Saginaw has an efficient school system, and the public educational 
fjicilities include a high school and thirteen district schools, with an enrollment 
of 4,537 pupils, and the average attendance during the year ending in Julv, 
1887, was over 95 percent. Two years ago this citj^ took the initiative in this 
State in furnishing free text books to all pupils, thus placing all on the same 
level. The school system of the city is in charge of the Board of Education, 
composed of eighteen members, two School Inspectors being elected from each 
of the wards of the city. Ninety teachers are employed, and the schools are 
efficiently nganaged and under the general supervision of Mr. C. B. Thomas, 
Superintendent of Schools. Outside of this comprehensive and well conducted 
public school system there are a number of educational establishments con- 
nected with various churches and societies, or conducted under private auspices. 
Among these are the German Catholic School of the Sacred Heart, the Indus- 
trial Mission School, St. Hedwig's School, St. John German Lutheran, St. 
Mary's Academy, the Kindergarten School, controlled by the Germania Society, 
and two business colleges. 

Libraries. — Well stocked libraries are maintained in connection with 
the public schools both in Saginaw City and East Saginaw, the latter being 
formed l)y the consolidation of the Young Men's and the old East Saginaw 
libraries in November, 1873, and containing 7,488 books, in charge of Mrs. Luc}- 
Houghton as librarian. A munificent provision for the future library' facilities 



66 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



of East Saginaw was made b}' the will of the late Jesse Ho^'t. By tlie same 
the laud known as Hoyt Park was also devised to the city, but as part of the 
consideration of the transfer to the city of the park, such sum as the city might 
appropriate was to be used in defraying the expenses of the library. The city 
in 1883 agreed in consideration of the transfer to it of the park to pay the 
trustees $1,000 annually, to be used in the care and maintenance of the library 
property, such payment to commence as soon as the library building is ready 
for use, and to continue thereafter so long as the library shall be kept up and 
maintained, and the city also assumes all taxes and assessments upon the 
library property. The trustees of the library received from the Michigan 
executor of the estate of Jesse Hoyt, deceased, $100,000 on February 7, 1883, 
and four lots in Hoyt's plat, and their last annual statement showed the gross 
earnings of the fund and property for the four years preceding to have been 
$28,302.06. The library building is now in course of construction and will 
cost about $50,000, and will in all probability be ready for occupancy in the 
summer of 1888. The library will be a free consulting and reference library, 
and the provision made for its maintenance is sufficient to sustain a large and 
valuable collection of literature. The Germfinia Institute also has a large 
library of books in the German language. 

Amusements and Recreations.— The means of enjoyment supplied 
by the Saginaws are numerous and suited to the various tastes of different 
classes of people. For the lovers of the drama the Academy of Music, situated 
on the corner of Washington avenue and William street, in P]ast Saginaw, offers 
surperior attractions, it being one of the finest theatres in the State, and in the 
convenience of its arrangements not surpassed by an}- in the West. It was 
built in 1884, the first performance taking place December 16, and is owned by_ 
the Academy of Music Company, of which W. L. Webber is President, W. 11. 
Burt, Vice-President, and J. B. Peter, Secretary. The building, which cost 
$70,000, is 70x140 feet in dimensions, has a stage 35 feet deep b^- 68 feet in 
width, and its auditorium, which has a seating capacity of 1,200 people, is ad- 
mirably adapted for obtaining a good view of the stage from every part of the 
house, is comfortably seated, and has in addition to the orchestra circle, par- 
quette, dress circle and gallery, four boxes and ten loges. Its appointments 
and scenery are in every respect firstclass, and the attractions offered include 
those of the highest grade, such well-known stars as Booth, Barrett, Salvini, 
Fanny Davenport, etc., having filled engagements at this theatre. It is eligibly 
located in reach of street cars from all parts of East Saginaw, South Saginaw 
and Saginaw City. In addition to the Academy of Music there are other minor 
theatres and halls in each of the cities, and several social and musical societies 
devoted to the purpose of securing entertainment for their members and 
friends. 



The Industries of the SAniNAws. 67 

The East Saginaw Driving f'ark is a mile track, and driving and trotting 
meetings are held annuall}^, presenting many of the most famous animals on 
the turf. This track is admitted by horsemen to be the best in the State, and 
it has had a national reputation ever since " Goldsmith Maid " made her best 
time on this track. 

While but little work has been done looking toward the improvement of 
the park property of the city, East Saginaw is well supplied for the future, the 
will of the late Jesse Hoyt having vested in the cit^' title to a tract of twenty- 
eight and one-third acres of land fronting on Washington avenue, south of 
Brewster street. A provision has been made to excavate lakes and fill the low 
grounds adjacent to them with the excavated material, and it is probable that 
in the course of a few j-ears the park will be put in good shape for the use of 
the citizens. The city also owns a tract, 1,000 feet square, at the junction of 
Tuscola, Park and Second streets, known as Park Street Park. 

Charitable Institutions. — Organizations for the relief of suffering 
and distress are the best evidence that can be given of the benevolence of a 
community. In East Saginaw there are several societies formed for benevolent 
objects, and a prominent institution of this character is the Home for the 
Friendless, comfortably- housed in an elegant building shown in an illustration 
on another page of this book. The society was organized in 1870 for the 
benefit of destitute women, and the Home is located at the southeast corner 
of Bates and IMcCoskr}' streets. The officers in charge of this benificent 
institution are Mrs. A. H. Comstock, President ; Mrs. C. S. Draper, Vice- 
President ; Miss Burt, Recording Secretary ; Mrs. W. F. Potter, Corresponding 
Secretary, and 3Irs. Adelaide C. Fisher, Matron, There is a Board of Managers 
consisting of twenty-four ladies, and a Board of Counsel consisting of six gen- 
tlemen. The institution has proven of great benefit in the alleviation of suf 
fering and destitution, and its management has been such as to reflect the 
highest credit upon those having its affairs in charge. 

Two benevolent institutions maintained by the Catholic Church are St. 
Mary's Hospital and St. Vincent's Orphans' Home. The hospital was estab- 
lished in 1874 under the auspices of the Sisters of Charity, five of whom are 
in charge of the details of its management, and the institution, which is 
located at 830 South Jefferson street, has an average of twenty-five inmates. 
The St. Vincent's Orphans' Home is locuted at 206 Bates street, has an average 
of eighty-five inmates, and is under the management of Sister Cecilia, Superior, 
assisted by seven Sisters of Charity. 

Societies. — In the Saginaws there are a number of associations for 
l)cnevolent and social objects, and the Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights of 
Pythias, Knights of Honor and all other leading secret and benevolent orders 
in the United States are represented by lodges, etc., having large memberships. 



68 The Industries of the Saginaws. 

- . ^ 

The German residents of the city have a number of societies similar to those 
usually conducted where people of this nationality arc numerous, prominent 
among which is the Germania Society, which was organized September 2, 185fi, 
having at that time onU' aliout twenty members. In 1867 the Germania 
Societ}' was incorporated, and in 1877 the}' erected the Germania Institute, a 
substantial and artistic structure, which is shown in one of the illustrations of 
this book. The gardens surrounding the Institute cover a full block, brilliantl}' 
lighted with lamps of all colors, well shaded and supplied with seats and a 
music pavilion in which a trained orchestra performs on stated occasions. 
The objects of the Germania Societ}' are benevolent and social, and among 
its prominent branches is the Maennerchor, or singing branch, with a member- 
ship of over sixty trained voices under the <lirection of Prof. Yaeger. The 
kindergarten branch has from sixt^'-five to seventy-five children and two 
teachers, and the societ}- is seeking special legislation authorizing them to 
establish an insurance department for securing benefits to members in case of 
sickness or death. In addition to the Institute, the society owns the building 
in which the city offices are located on Genesee avenue, and which brings them 
a rental of $4,000 per annum. This property was the bequest of the late 
Anthony- Schmitz, one of the earliest members of the society. 

The Arbeiter Untersteutzing Yerein, or the German Working Men's 
Mutual Benefit Association, owns an imposing structure at the corner of Janes 
and Fourth streets, and is a societ}- for the mutual benefit of its members in 
case of sickness or death, and a branch of this societ}' is also maintained in 
Saginaw City and owns the Arbeiter Hall, at the corner of Adams and Oakley 
streets and four lots. Both are members of the State Bund. 

The Teutonia Society of Saginaw City is a literary and social organiza- 
tion, and owns the spacious and imposing Teutonia Hall and Opera House. 
The society was organized over twenty-five years ago, and now has 120 mem- 
berg. In connection with the society a kindergarten is conducted under the 
control of the ladies, and it is soon contemplated to add a gymnasium to other 
departments of the society. 

Without the space to further particularize, it may be stated that the people 
of the Saginaws are in every respect situated for enjoying the comforts, the 
pleasures and the amenities of social existence, and have all the means for 
making life worth living. 




EAST SAGINAW— ARBEITKR HALL. 




EAST SAGINAW — GEUMANIA INSTITUTE. 



TTHR PREISS. 



THE LEADING NEWSPAPERS ISSUED IN THE 

TWO CITIES. 



THE American press is characteristic of the xiracrican people. It is vigorous, 
tireless, and has a habit of "speaking out in meeting." A successful 
newspaper is generally representative of the people of the place in which it is 
located, and its value to a communit}' is be3-ond estimate. In the Saginaws 
there are a number of newspapers, and they have aided, in no small degree, in 
promoting the interests of the two cities in every useful wa^- and -aiding their 
progress to their present prosperous condition. The daily papers of the 
two cities are The Courier, Herald, and News, of East Saginaw, and the Evening 
Journal, of Saginaw City, each of which also publish weekly editions, and The 
ISaginaw Valley News and Tlie iSaginawian, both of Saginaw City, and The 
Saturday Telegram, of East Saginaw, are weekl}" papers. In addition to these 
there are two German weeklies, the Saginaw Post and the Saginawer Zeitung, 
the latter of which also publishes a Sunday edition called the Sonntagshlatt. 

The Saginaw Courier. — George F. Lewis began, in 1859, the publica- 
tion of The Weekly Courier. He was joined in 1863 by Major E. W. Lyon, and 
in March, 1868, tlie firm was further augmented by the admission of R. M. 
Thompson and Joseph Seemann to the firm, the Daily Courier being then first 
published. Changes were afterward made in the firm, and in 1870 The Courier 
Company was incorporated. The oflRcers of the company now are : W. L. 
Webber, President ; Frank Lawrence, Secretary and Business Manager ; J. 
B. Peter, Treasurer ; Directors, W. L. Webber, Frank Lawrence, J. B. J*eter, 
T. E. Tarsney and E. D. Cowles. The editorial staff is composed of E. D. 
Cowles, editor ; F. W. Bushell, city editor ; C. B. Schaefer, news editor ; W. 
E. Gardiner, assistant city editor, and other reporters. The paper is a favorite 



72 



The Industries op the Saoinaws. 



not onl}' in the Saginaws, but also throughout this section, and it exercises a 
potent influence in all matters pertaining to this portion of the State. Mr. 
Cowles, its editor, is a forcible and logical writer, and is an able advocate of 
the interests of the Saginaws. The paper is supplied with all the means for 
presenting the news from the world at large in a comprehensive manner, being 




a member of the Associated Press, and in local news its reports are complete 
and accurate. It gives a dail}- record of the progress of the great lumber and 
salt industries, and is in every respect a thoroughly wide-awake and repre- 
sentative journal. It is a favorite in both cities on account of the prominence 
given to local interests, and has a larger circulation than any other paper in 
the Saginaw A^'alley. The Courier occupies a substantial and imposing three- 
story brick building, 35x150 feet in dimensions, and runs in connection a well 
equipped job printing office, bindery, etc. 

The Saginaw Evening News.— The oldest and most influential 
evening paper in the Saginaws is the Saginaw Evening News, which was estab- 
lished May 2, 1880, by Joseph Seemann and Charles IT. Peters, who are still its 
proprietors. The paper is a member of the Associated I'ress and has every 
facility for obtaining the news of the State and the world at large in a complete 
and accurate manner. Mr. John A. Walsh, a bright and industrious news- 
paper man, has held the position of editor for the past three j-ears, and Mr. W. 
F. Goldie has been assistant editor for about the same time. The firm owns 



The Industries of the Saoinaws. 73 



an imposing brick block on Tuscola street, between Franklin and (.'ass streets, 
and in addition to its newspaper business carries on a successful business as 
job printers, for which thej- have a complete equipment. Mr. Seemann, of this 
firm, was formerly a member of the firm by which the Courier was founded, and 
was for thirteen years in charge of the job office of that establishment. Mr. 
Peters, who has resided in this city for the past thirty-five years, was press- 
man in the 6b?mer office for fifteen years prior to the formation of this firm. 
The enterprise has been a successful one, and the zealous advocacy b}' the 
Nf^cs of local interests has made it a favorite with the people of the two cities 
and the surrounding country. In June last a weekl}^ edition was added, and 
this also is building up a large circulation and a valuable influence. 

Saginaw Herald. — This paper was established September 1, 1878, 
having previously bought the plant of the ^Saginaw Republican, and it has 
since been successfully conducted and is recognized as an able advocate of 
local interests and Republican principles. The proprietors of the paper are 
the firm of Laing & Brother, and in addition to a daily paper issued every 
morning, a weekly of large and growing circulation is issued. Its principal 
point ot excellence is the completeness with which local matters both in East 
Saginaw and Saginaw City are daily presented, and its devotion to the interests 
of the Valley has been an important aid to development and progress. 

The Saginaw Evening Journal. — The only daily paper in Saginaw 
City is the Saginaw Evening Journal, which was established in April, 1886, 
with Mr. D. Z. Curtis as manager and editor and F. Bruce Smith as city editor. 
There had been several former attempts to sustain a daily paper in Saginaw 
Cit}', but from various causes all had gone to join the innumerable throng in 
the newspaper graveyard. The Journal, however, is healthy and vigorous, is 
under good management, is alive to the interests of Saginaw City and has a 
substantial patronage. Mr. Curtis, its editor, was with the Minneapolis press 
prior to coming to Saginaw City, and Mr. F. Bruce Smith was the Saginaw 
City reporter of the Courier. He sustains his reputation as a "hustler" for 
news by his work on the Journal, and the combination is one which possesses 
every requisite to newspaper success. A weekly edition has just been added, 
and this no doubt will also prove a successful venture. The paper deserves 
the support of the citizens of Saginaw Cit}', and is getting it. 

The Saginawian. — This paper, which was established nineteen years 
ago in Saginaw City, is under the guidance of that veteran journalist of the 
Saginaw Valley, Mr. George F. Lewis, who is its proprietor and editor. Mr. 
Lewis was the founder of the Courier, and has long been recognized as an ex- 
ponent of the interests of the Saginaw Valley, possessing both ability and 



74 The Industries op the Saginaws. 

zeal. The paper is Democratic in politics, has a large circulation throughout 
the Valley, and is published by the firm of Lewis & Ganschow, who conduct a 
successful job printing establishment in connection with the paper. 

The Saginaw Valley News — This newspaper was established in 
1874 in Saginaw City bj- Mr. Charles H. Lee, who still remains its proprietor 
and editor, and it has from that time to the present sustained a reputation for 
devotion to local interests and Republican principles. Mr. Lee is a old news- 
paper man, and the paper is a welcome visitor to homes throughout the Sagi- 
naw Valley. The publishers of the paper are Messrs. Lee & Stoelker, who 
have in connection with the newspaper a job office which is noted for^turning 
out first class work. 

Saturday Telegram. — This bright and newsy weekly is published 
by Elmer S. Crawford, having an office in the Herald building on Cass street 
in East Saginaw, and is filled with interesting and entertaining matter, and in 
addition to the discussion of local topics presents a large amount of miscella- 
neous reading, and is a popular and successful, journal. 

GERMAN PAPERS. 

Saginawer Zeitung. — The oldest German paper in the State, outside 
of Detroit, is the Saginawer Zeitung, which was established in 1868 and has 
since been steadily issued. It is published on Wednesday of each week, and 
since 1881 has also published a Sunday edition, called the Saginawer Sonntags- 
hlatt. It is published by the firm of Bierle & Buergermeister, and has long 
enjoj'ed a large circulation among the German people of the Saginaw Valley' 
and the State at large. 

The Saginaw Post.— Another German weekly, established about a 
year ago, which has already built up a large circulation and an important in- 
fluence among the German people of the Saginaw Valley and Northern Michi- 
gan, is the Saginaw Post. It is enterprising and vigorous and presents news 
in an attractive manner with intelligent comments upon affairs interesting to 
the people of this section. Its success from the start was so great that in nine 
months from its inauguration it was enabled to enlarge. The proprietors and 
pu])lishers of the ))aper are F. & C. Reitter, an enterprising firm of job printers. 
The success of these newspapers, and the hearty support they receive 
from the people of the Saginaw Valle}'. is abundant evidence of the intelligent 
appreciation by the people of the efforts made by the papers in their behalf. 
The}' have earned success and support by zealous advocacy of all measures to 
promote the growth and development of the industries and material interests 
of the Saginaws and the Valle}' at large. 




MORLEY BROTHERS.— (8ee opposite page.) 



RRPRRBRNTATIVR HOUBRS. 



LEADING MERCHANTS, MANUFACTURERS AND 
BUSINESS FIRMS OF THE SAGINAWS. 



n'^IIE object of this concluding chapter is lo present the history- and existing 
JL status of the principal mercantile and manufacturing corporations and 
lirms, whose capiLal, energy and enterprise have been and are the most im- 
portant factors in the developuient of tlie resources and expansion of the trade 
of the Sagiuaws. The houses mentioned arc all reliable firms, and whatever 
tiie list may lack of being coui[)lete is not chargeable to any bias on the pt'.rt 
of the editor oi- i)ublishers. 



Morley Brothers.— Hardware ; 117, 119, 121 and 123 North Washing- 
ton avenue, and 118, 120, 122 and 124 North Water street , East Saguiaw. — 
As a conspicuous example of success in business pursuits in the Saginaws, 
the great house of 3Ioiley ]>rothers presents a most notable instance, its 
business having steadily expanded from year to year from the original 
formation of tiie firm to the present time, and so grown that the firm now 
occupies a position as the hardware house having the largest number of lines 
in America, and in many respects superior to any other in tlie world. The 
business was originally inaugurated upon a comparatively small scale in a 
frame building at the corner of Cass street and(Jenesee avenue in 18G3. ' This 
building was erected on posts to raise it from the pond beneath, and the sur- 
roundings were a blacksmith shop on one side, and the pond on the other. In 
18(i5, more room being demanded by the business, it was removed to Empire 
block on Water street, and the continued increase of the business caused the 
firm to add store after store, until they occupied seven of them, each in turn 
proving insufficient for the accommodation of the business, being scattered, 
and the arrangements for doing business hampered by many disadvantages. 
On April 1, 1881, premises were purchased of Jesse Hoyt fronting !»G feet on 
Washington avenue and running through to Water street, with a depth of 240 
feet, and having a frontage of 150 feet on Water street, which had been oc- 
cupied previously by a summer garden. On April 1, 1882, the business was 



The Industries op the Saoinaws. 



removed to the new building, which had been erected in the meantime. In 
this building, which was purposely designed for the uses of the business, ad- 
vantage was taken of all the points gleaned in visits b}' the members of the 
firm to New York, Chicago, St, Louis and Cincinnati. The building was 
designed by Burnham & Root, of Chicago, and as completed forms one of the 
most massive, substantial and elegant business structures in the country. The 
classical proportions and elegant design of the building serve to satisfy the 
artistic eye, while from a utilitarian standpoint, more gratification will be found 
in noting the massive strength of the building, its proof against ordinary acci- 
dent, its stone piers, large enough for a lighthouse, wrought iron beams, heavy 
enough for the spans of railroad bridges, and masonry which would serve as a 
defense against iieavy ordnance. The floors and shelving are the only wood 
in the building, the ceilings being iron, and as a preventive against fire pipes 
and hose connect with each floor. The building is a four-stor^- and basement 
structure, the basement being devoted to the storage of oils, paints and painters' 
supplies, long rows and tiers of casks, bau'els and kegs filling it completely. 
Emerging from the basement into the iron room in the rear of the building, 
and opening on Water street, is a busy scene, iron of all shapes and sizes 
standing in vast racks, and chains, cables, anchors and iron in a thousand 
shapes are found. Here also is room for fifteen teams, and a force of men is 
kept busy loading and unloading, or transferring goods to the elevators for dis- 
tribution through the building. Entering the building on the main floor 
from Washington avenue the space is divided into three, each making a large 
store. In the center of the building, about fift\' feet back from the Washing- 
ton avenue front, are offices for the book-keepers and proprietors, and spacious 
vaults lighted by a large skylight. The oflflces are fitted up in a most elaborate 
manner, having the appearance of a well equipped bank. The three divisions 
are for house furnishing hardware, shelf hardware and saddlery and carriage 
hardw'are, each of which departments is presided over by an experienctd man- 
ager. The packing department occupies part of the second floor, in which are 
piles of packages of all shapes and sizes, coils of rope, rolls of belting, tools of all 
kinds and for all trades, boxes of glass, kegs of nails, tons of bolts, boxes of 
glass, pots and kettles in vast supply, lumbermen's tools of ever}' description, 
etc. The third floor is devoted to the storage of goods, and here also are 
found racks filled with rules, log sticks, board measures, etc. On the fourth 
floor is a large supply of horse collars, embracing every conceivable style and 
make, heavy collars for draft horses, light collars for smaller animals, fancy col- 
lars for fine equipages, stacks of saddles, piles of wheels, bent wood for carriage 
work, etc. In part of the old headquarters of the house, half a block distant 
on Water street, is carried on the manufacture of Morley Brothers' unequalled 
line of tools for lumbermen, and fine carriage, coach and heav}' harness and 
lumber horse collars. The floor space in their main building aggregates 80,000 
square feet, and without further attempting, within the limited space possible 
in this article, to describe their stock in detail, it is sufficient to saj' that it is 
unequalled in assortment and unsurpassed in extent, and covers everything in 
the line of hardware of every description. In July 1863, Messrs. George W. 
and i^^dward W. Morley inaugurated this business, and seven months later Mr. 
Ciiarles II. Morley joined the firm. In February, 1883, the present joint stock 
compan}- was organized and incorporated, with a paid in capital of .$350,000, — 
.Messrs. George AV. Morley, Edward W. Morley, and their nephews, Albert M. 
-Marshall, Albert H. Morley and John M. Morley and Mr. Thomas A. Hai-A'ey 
being the members of the company. Mr. George W. Morle}' is President, 
Edward W. Morley, Vice-President, and A. H. Morley, Secretary and Treasurer. 
The specialties of the firm are lumbering tools, consisting of peavies, cant 



The Industries of the Saoinaws. 7f) 

hooks, hand spikes, pike poles, setting poles, skidding tongs, swiiinp hooks, 
loading blocks, chain hooks, raft dogs, etc. Their patent Railroad Step Ladder 
is found in all the leading hardware houses in the country, and its convenience, 
durability, safety, and saving in time, labor and expense has been attested by 
use in stores, 'libraries and factories throughout the country and indorsed 
by hundreds of testimonials. They also manufacture a large amount of 
harnesses and all descriptions of harness furnishings, and in their various 
departments give emplq^'ment to a force of 200 hands. Their trade covers 
the entire country, and is particularly large in all lumber districts. With un- 
surpassed facilities for the requisite display and shipment of goods, and with 
practically limitless resources and systematic business methods, the firm has 
built up this vast business to the wonderful proportions which now make it 
the leading establishment in its line in the world. 

Wells, Stone & Co. — Pine Lands, Logs and Lumber ; Water street ; 
Saginaw City. — This well known and prosperous concern dates its inception 
from 1867, when the firm of Northrop, Wells & Co., of which Mr. A. W. Wright 
was a membei", was formed, and the business was conducted under that st^'le 
for a year, when Mr. Northrop retired from the firm, and his place was taken 
by Mr. Farnam C. Stone, who with Messrs. Charles W. Wells and A. W. 
Wright form the present firm. The original business of tiie firm was as whole- 
sale grocers and dealers in lumbermen's supplies, to which was added the 
business of dealers in pine lands, logs and lumber, but in 1885, upon the 
incorporation of the great Wells-Stone Mercantile Company, with Mr. C. W. 
Wells as President and Mr. F. C. Stone as Vice-President, the lumbermen's 
supply and grocery departments were relinquished to the company, the firm of 
Wells, Stone & Co. continuing business as lumbermen and dealers in lands, 
logs, etc. Upon the firm account the}' conduct two lumber camps in Gladwin 
and Clare counties, employing one hundred and twent}^ men and fifteen teams, 
and cut some 12,000,000 feet per season, selling their logs in this city and 
throughout the Valle3\ As members of the A. W. Wright Lumber Co., of 
which Mr. C. W. Wells is Vice-President and Mr. F. C. Stone Treasurer, they 
conduct all the logging and lumbering operations of that great compan}-, lum- 
bering in Clare, Roscommon and Gladwin counties, operating four camps, with 
three hundred men and sixt}' horses, and running twent}^ miles of railroad, 
with three locomotives and sixty cars, cutting from 25,000.000 to 30,000,000 
feet eacTi season. As a firm, and through the A^arious companies the}' are in- 
terested in, the\' are owners of large tracts of valuable pine and farming land 
in this and other States, and the firm occupies in ever\' respect a prominent 
position among the leading concerns in this department of industry. 

J. Bauman. — Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Dry Goods and Notions ; 
Corner of Court and Washington streets ; Saginaw City. — In the variety- of 
its stock, the extent of its transactions, and in facilities for supplying the 
wants of the public in everything in the line of dry goods and notions, the 
establishment of Mr. J. Bauman is not surpassed by any similar concern in the 
State. The business was established upon a comparativel}' modest scale 
twent}' years ago by Mr. Bauman, who from that time to the present has re- 
mained its sole proprietor, and by his thorough knowledge of all the details of 
the business, superior ability in the selection of the stock and constant and un- 
remitting endeavors to give satisfaction to his customers, the trade has steadily 
expanded from 3'ear to year from the inception of the business until the 
present time, until now the establishment is one which reflects the highest 
credit npon the city, and which furnishes a striking example of the possibilities 
for business success in the Saginaws. The business premises occupied em- 



80 The Industries op the Saqinaws. 



brace two handsome stores, fronting 45 feet on Court street, and running back 
125 feet into an extension of tliree stores, built and owned by himself, having 
a frontage of 75 feet on Washington street b}' a depth of 75 feet. The build- 
ing is one of the handsomest in the Valley, and is fitted up with every con- 
venience and accessor}' calculated to facilitate the operations of the business. 
The stocks carried are very large and are added to dail}', the active business 
conducted requiring constant accessions of new goods, and the enterprise of 
Mr. Bauman showing itself in the fact that every novelty is landed in the Sagi- 
naws as soon as produced. The stock embraces everything in staple dry goods, 
dress goods, silks, velvets, plushes, flannels, linens, blankets, hosiery, (iotton 
goods, corsets, trimmings, underwear, woolen cloths, fancy goods, etc., in 
addition to which the cloak department is stocked with the richest and most 
superb lines of ladies', misses' and children's cloaks and wraps, sacques, New- 
markets and jackets, a full line of seal garments and a large stock of shawls ; 
while the carpet department is complete with everything in the line of velvets, 
body Brussels, tapestrj- Brussels, ingrains, rugs, etc., lace curtains and drap- 
eries. Mr. Bauman is also sole agent for Butterick's patterns and the Centemeri 
kid gloves. Employment is given to a force of fift}' competent clerks and 
assistants, and the house enjoys, in addition to a ver}' heavy retail patronage 
from the Saginaws and surrounding country', a considerable jobbing trade 
throughout Northern Michigan. Mr. Bauman is a thorough business man, and 
supervises all the details with a perfect system, and deals with all upon ac- 
curate, reliable and honorable methods, and it is due to the propriet}^ of his 
business conduct that the great success attained by this -leading establishment 
has been achieved. 

O'Donnell & Spencer".— Manufacturers of Lumber; Planing Mill and 
Box Shook Factory, (xenesee avenue and Flint & Pere Marquette Railwaj-; 
also on the Michigan Central Railroad and Toledo, Mackinaw & Saginaw liail- 
road ; East Saginaw. — Among the large manufacturing concerns which have 
contributed in an important degree to the increase of the fame of the Saginaws 
as a manufacturing center, that of O'Donnell & Spencer occupies an important 
place. The firm, which is composed of Messrs. P. A. O'Donnell and C. K. 
Spencer, was formed in 1883. The building occupied by the firm, together 
with the lumber yards adjoining, cover an area of 17^ acres, eligibly located 
with railroad tracks running to the mill doors, and affording every facility for 
handling and shipment of material and product. The main building, a two- 
story structure, 144x112 feet in dimensions, is equipped with all the most 
modern and improved machinery adapted to the manufacture of dressed lumbei', 
box shooks, etc., propelled by an engine 18x22, fed bj' two boilers, 5x16. The 
firm is largely engaged in the manufacture of flooring, siding, ceiling, mould- 
ing, etc., and does a specially large business in the manufacture of box shooks, 
to which they expect to add, during the coming season, the manufacture of 
sash, doors and blinds, for which the}' have a full and complete modern plant. 
Employment is given to a force of 130 workmen, and the trade of the firm is 
ver}' large, the product being shipped to fifteen States, the principal markets, 
however, being found in the States of Ohio, Indiana, Kentuck}^ Illinois, New 
York, Pennsylvania and New Jersey. IMessrs. O'Donnell & Spencer have long 
been prominently identified with the lumber interests of the Saginaw Valle}'. 
Mi\ P. A. O'Donnell came to the Saginaw Valley in 1855 and Mr. C. B. Spencer 
in 18()8, and both have been in the lumber business ever since coming here. 
They are large owners of timbered pine lands near Manistee, on the Grand 
Rapids & Indiana Railroad, and Mr. Spencer, in addition to his interest in this 
firm, is also a member of the firm of Seeley & Spencer. The close attention 



The Industries of the Sauinaws. 81 

paid by the members of the firm to the details of the business, their uniform 
accuracy' in filling orders and their reliability in all transactions have com- 
mendetl them to the favor and patronage of a large and steadily growing trade. 

Symons Brothers & Co. — J. W. Symons, President ; S. E. Symons, 
Vice President ; (jrcorge H. Glynn, Secretary and Treasurer ; Wliolesale 
(li-rocers ; 126 and 128 North Washington avenue; East Saginaw. — This busi- 
ness was established twelve years ago in Bay City, from which it was removed 
five years ago to East Saginaw, the original firm being known as Symons, 
Smart & Co., under which name it was incorporated November 5, 1883, and 
continued until September 1, 1886, when the name of the corporation was 
changed to its present style. The company now has a capital stock and surplus 
paid in amounting to $45,000, and occupies a spacious two-story brick building, 
40x140 feet in dimensions, with an L in the rear. These premises are com- 
pletely equipped with a very large and completely assorted stock, containing 
everything in the line of staple and fanc3' groceries, grocers' sundries and 
canned goods, a specially fine line of teas, coftees, tobaccos, cigars, etc. The 
firm maintain the most favorable relations with producers and importers, which 
enable them to keep their stock up to the highest standard of qualit}', and to 
gi\'e to the trade every advantage in prices, and as a consequence of these 
facilities, combined with uniformly fair and accurate dealings with the trade, 
they have l)uilt up a large business covering all Northern, Eastern and Central 
^lichigan, in which they are represented by three active and experienced travel- 
ing salesmen. They also have salesmen to represent them to the trade in the 
Saginaws, and a force of twenty clerks and assistants are employed in the 
house. In teas and coffees their stock embraces all the best goods, and the^'^ 
sell an aggregate of about 2,000 chests of tea and 125,000 pounds of coflTee 
per year. In tobaccos and cigars they carry all leading brands, and also .do a 
ver}'^ large trade. The directors of the corporation are Messrs. J. W. Sj'mons, 
S. E. Symons, Seth Davis, George H. Glynn and E. R. McCormick, all business 
men of superior attainments, and under the thorough and practical system 
adopted by these gentlemen in the prosecution of their business, the trade of 
the house is thriving and steadily growing from year to year. 

Saginaw Manufacturing Company, — C. H. Davis, President; 
Richard Brown, Vice-President ; H. H. Greene, Treasurer and Manager ; J. 
G. Dunscomb, Secretary; Manufacturers of Bough and Dressed Lumber, Wash- 
boards, Barrel Covers, Shade Rollers, Bail and Grease Boxes, Etc.; General Office 
and Factory, Perry and King streets; Saginaw City. — The business now conducted 
by this large and important corporation was originally established in 1872, 
when it was conducted under the style of the Saginaw Barrel Factory, the business 
being continued under that style until 1882, when the works were destr03'ed 
Ly fire. The present works were erected immediatel}' afterward, and the 
existing corporation was formed in January, 1883, with a capital stock of 
$150,000. From that time to the present the business of the corporation has 
steadily expanded from year to year, until it now covers not only the entire 
Union, all of Canada, South America, Mexico, etc., but also embraces almost 
the ent're continent of Europe and Great Britain. The premises occupied by 
the firm embrace a saw mill, 50x130 feet in dimensions, with two additions 
30x50 and 16x50 feet respectively, and a boiler house, 40x60 feet, containing 
a battery of five boilers, each of 50 horse-power, and a Babcock boiler of 250 
horse-power. The saw mill engine is a Buckeye of 250 horse-power, driving a 
steam feed, circular saw, edgers, trimmers, etc., as well as a complete outfit of 
special machinery for the manufacture of grease boxes, basket rims, etc. The 
main building occupied as factory premises has four high stories above ground. 



82 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



each 70x160 feet in dimensions, and contains a Porter & Allen engine of 320 
horse-power and a Reedy elevator. On the main floor is the planing mill, 
having two large double surfacers, one planer and matcher, five moulding 
machines of various sizes, two re-saws, five rip saws, six cut-off saws, two pony 
planers, three turning lathes, two of which are automatic, and about twent}' 
other small machines. In an addition to this floor, whicli is 20x52 feet in 
dimensions, are lour turning lathes, one sand papering machine, one double cut- 
off saw, automatic steam tool grinders, etc. A space of about 90x70 feet on 
the second floor is devoted to grease box manufacture, making about 30,000 
boxes per daj', and another room, 60x70 feet, is used for the manufacture of 
washboards, of which 200 dozen per day are turned out, and in which is located 
five crimping machines for zinc, of which they use over a ton per day, and here 
also are wood printing pi-esses and all the requisite special machinery. All of 
the third floor and the north half ot the fourth floor is devoted to the manufac- 
ture of window-shade rollers, of which the}- make enormous quantities. In the 
equipment of this department are included eight spring wire winding machines, 
five boring machines, six drill presses, seven turning lathes and a large amount 
of other special machinery'. The south half of the top floor is used for the 
manufacture of grease box stock. The works throughout are equipped in a 
complete manner, not only for the advantageous prosecution of the manufac- 
turing operations, but also in every other respect, automatic fire extinguishing 
pipes being laid along the ceilings throughout the building, furnished with 500 
heads, each of which, at a temperature of 150 degrees, will open, throwing a 
stream within a radius of 100 feet. The force of men employed amounts to 
300 in the various departments. In addition to the premises al)ove mentioned 
there is a warehouse to the west of the factory, 30x160 feet in dimensions, 
filled with shade rollers and washboards packed for shipping, and to this 
building there is an addition of two stories, 6-1x33 feet in dimensions, the lower 
floor of which is utilized as a machine and repair shop, where the company has 
made all its own small machinery, and which has in its plant four power 
punches, drills, lathes, printing presses, etc., which are driven by an upright 15 
horse-power engine. In this building is a Crane Brothers' elevator, and the 
upper floor is devoted to the storage of small trimming supplies. They also 
have a store house, 36x25 feet in dimensions, a salt block, drv kilns, piling 
grounds, fine new offices, etc., all covering several acres. The saw mill cuts 
about 6,000,000 feet of lumber per annum, most of which is used up in the fac- 
tory, and the company has one salt well and drill house making 15,000 barrels 
of salt per annum. This compan}- makes the most of tlie boxes used b}' the 
Frazier Axle Grease Co., and in this liranch, as also in the manufacture of 
washboards and shade rollers, ranks among the largest in the world. The 
members of the corporation are prominent and successful business men. Mr. A. 
W. Wright, who'has a large interest in the company and was formerly its Presi- 
dent, is well known b}' reason of his prominent connection with many important 
business enterprises throughout the Slate. Mr. C. H. Davis, President of the 
company, is a member of the firm of Wright & Davis, and largely interested in 
timber lands and lumbci-. Mr. H. H. Greene, the Treasurer and Manager of 
this company,'" is;.a business man of superior attainments, to whose practical 
supervision of the vast operations of this business and perfect system in its 
management, is largelj^ due the prosperity it enjoys In order to facilitate the 
business the company maintains an office at Chicago at 218 and 220 Market 
street, imcharge of Mr. B. E. Bushnell as sales agent, and a New York office 
at 73 Murray street, with Mr. N. A. Newell as sales agent. It is repri'sented 
on the road by a staff" of active and experienced traveling salesmen, its product 



ThecIndustries of the Saginaws. 83 



being sold through jobbers in the cities, and distributed all over the countr}-, 
the exporting business of tlie company being conducted from its New Yorl< 
office. 

East Saginaw Steam Laundry. — Cook & Gray, Proprietors ; (U)'2 
( Jenesee avenue ; East Saginaw. — Tiie tirni of Cook & Gray is of recent 
formation, the business having been established in October of the present year 
by Messrs. George Cook and Robert Gray, who are the individual members. 
The premises occupied b}' the firm embrace a two-story building, 25x(i0 feet in 
dimensions, completely equipped with all the latest and most highly improved 
laundry machinery, and the firm has so far met with a marked ancl gratifying 
success in its undertaking, and by tlie satisfaction given by all work produced 
at the establishment have laid the foundation for a steady increase in the 
volume of their patronage. The force of hands emploj'ed amounts to ten in 
number, which will be increased as tlie business demands, and the firm has 
established branch offices at the Star Clothing House, Marlette and at the 
Chapel House, Sebewaing, Mich., and proposes to establish man}' more through- 
out the Saginaw Valley. Mr. Gray, of this firm, prior to the establishment of 
this business, had been connected with several of the leading laundries in 
Detroit for seven 3'ears, and Mr. Cook, who is associated with him in this en- 
terprise, is a business man of superior attainments. Starting out with all the 
requisites to success, the prediction that the career of the firm will be a pros- 
perous one is amply justified. 

G. W. Meyer & Go. — Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions, Hats, Caps, 
Gents' Furnishing Goods, Groceries, Tobaccos, Cigars, Hardware, Crockery, 
Glassware, Etc.; 808 and 310 Potter street; East Saginaw. — -This firm, of 
which Messrs. Gus W. Meyer and W. H. Miller are the individual members, 
was established ten years ago, since which time they have enjoyed a large and 
steadih' growing trade with the citizens of East Saginaw, as well as a large 
patronage from farmers and others in the surrounding country. They occup}' 
spacious premises at 308 and 310 Potter street, where the}^ carry large and 
complete stocks, embracing everything in the lines of dry goods, notions, hats, 
caps, gents' furnishing goods, groceries, tobaccos, cigars, hardware, crockery, 
glassware, etc., making a careful assortment in all their lines, and carrying 
none but the best and most reliable goods in each of their departments. As 
a consequence of the careful assortment of their goods and the uniformly 
reliable methods of the firm, both of whom are thoroughly' practical and ex- 
perienced men in the business, the trade of the firm has steadily increased from 
its inception to the present time. A full force of competent clerks and 
assistants are employed, and the firm enjoys a merited reputation for the 
prompt and accurate manner in which all orders are filled, the reasonable 
prices at which goods are sold, and the polite and accommodating methods 
upon which all its dealings are conducted. 

Cooper & Peck — Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Staple and Fancy 
Groceries ; 107 and 109 South Jefferson street; East Saginaw. — This business 
was originally estal)lished by Mr. R Boyd in 1865. several changes occurring 
until the formation, in 1874, of the firm of R. Boyd & Co., by whom the busi- 
ness was conducted until it was purchaseil by this firm in November, 1886. 
The business premises occupied by the firm embrace the main floor and base- 
ment, 50x125 feet, of the building at 107 and 109 South Jefferson street, 
elegantly fitted up with all the conveniences and accessories for the displaj' of 
goods in an attractive manner, and for the prosecution of the grocer}' l)usiness 
upon an extensive scale ; and completely stocked with everything in the line 
of staple and fancy groceries, including a speciall}' fine line of hermetically 



84 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



sealed goods iii glass and caus, a superior stock of teas and coffees, a com- 
pletely assorted line of cigars and tobaccos and everything kept in a first-class 
grocery and provision house, as well as a complete line of brushes and brooms 
of all kinds. In connection with the store is a well kept market, where is kept on 
hand at all times a large stock and complete assortment of the choicest meats, 
both fresh and salt, fish, poultry and all kinds of game in season. This de- 
partment is fitted up with an A. J. Chase Cold Blast Refrigerator, which will 
hold twenty sides of dressed beef, and is the most complete and effective de- 
vice of its Idnd ever built. The firm also controls the sale of the famous Alma 
creamery butter for the Saginaw Valley, and handles a trade which is not ex- 
celled in its volume by any store in the Saginaws. In addition to this they do 
a large and steadily growing wholesale trade covering the territory from Jack- 
son to the Straits, and all between the coast lines, east and west. Fifteen clerks 
and assistants are employed in the store, and a staff of traveling salesmen 
represent the firm on the road. Great care is taken in the selection of the 
stock, which is always made up of the freshest and best articles in all lines, 
bought in large quantities from first hands, fcnabliug the firm to offer the 
best inducements both in price and quality. The members of the firm are 
l)usiness men of superior attainments and accurate principles, and to this fact, 
coupled with industry and energy, is due the prosperity by which their enter- 
prise has been attended. 

Green, Ring & Co. — Manufacturers of Gang Sawed Lumber, Lath, 
Salt, Staves,' Heading, Etc.; Foot of Salt street; Saginaw City.— The vast 
volume of the transactions of this firm, the superiority of its equipment and 
facilities, and the extent of its product gives it a special prominence among 
the large lumber manufacturing concerns of the country. The origin of the 
business dates back to 18G1, when it was started by the firm of Hale & Stinson, 
which firm was bought out by Messrs. W. S. and Charles H. Green, under the 
firm style of W. S. Green & Son, shortly afterward, and passed through several 
styles of firm until the present one was organized about four years ago. Of 
this firm Messrs. W. S. Green, D. Hardin, and Clark L. Ring, of Saginaw, and 
Mr. Charles Harter, of Ilion, N. Y., are the members. The works embrace a 
saw mill with three engines of 100, 80 and 60 horse-power respectively, with a 
battery of four boilers with 5 foot shell by 16 feet, and one boiler of 7 foot 
shell by 14 feet, driving a powerful steam feed 40-foot cylinder, a large circular 
saw, Wickes Brothers' gang saws, butting saws, edgers, trimmers, a set of 
Bruno's steam stave machinery, steam saw sharpeners, etc. The logs are taken 
from the river on a 'steam driven carriage. In addition to the saw mill works 
the firm has four salt wells, with an engine in each, a very large steam salt 
block, a pan block witli three pans, each 36x18, which are heated by a return 
flue running from a furnace the length of the buildnig, about 150 feet and 
back, and making a finer grade of salt than the steam block so much in use. 
In the salt equipment is included large settlers and drying vats, storage house, 
barns, etc. The firm has spacious piling grounds for lumber, eflfective tram- 
ways and spacious docks, with a capacity for holding 15,000,000 feet, and the 
grounds occupied by the firm cover forty acres. The product of the \vorks 
amounts to 20,000,000 feet of lumber, 2,200,000 staves, 110,000 sets of head- 
ing, 4,000,000 laths and 60,000 barrels of salt. The firm employs in the mill 
a force ranging from sixty-five to seventy hands, and job out their salt works, 
which employs twelve men. There are eight men at work in the cooperage, 
and in the manufacture of barrel stock and laths eighteen men are employed. 
These industries, in addition to lumber manufacture, are carried on in their 
own works and with their machinery and power, but the firm is relieved of the 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 85 

trouble of keeping track of the men and their pa}'^ roll. The firm employs five 
teiuns, and is in every way prepared to carry on the business upon an cixtensive 
scale. As a firm, they own no pine lands, but saw b}' the thousand feet for 
others. The members of the firm individually, however, are large owners of 
pine hinds on the Tittabawassee, Tobacco and other rivers, wliicli they lumber 
through jobbers. jMr. W. S. Green, of this firm, is also of the firm of W. S. 
Green & Son, logs and lands ; Green & Noble, lands and logs ; the Tobacco 
lliver Lumber Co., dealers in lumber, logs and lands; Green, Hardin & (■<)., 
and is a director of the Citizens' National Bank of Saginaw. Mr. Daniel 
Hardin, of this firm, is Tresident of the Citizens' National Bank of Saginaw, a 
member of the firm of D. Hardin & Co., sash, doors and blinds, of Green, 
Hardin & Co., and of the Tobacco River Lumber Co. Mr. Clark L. Ring, in 
addition to his interest in this business, is of the firm of Bliss, Merrill & Co., 
pine lands, logs and lumber ; E. J. & C. L. Ring, logs and pine lands, and 
otherwise proaiineutly identified with leading business enterprises. The 
business of the firm is very large, its lumber being shipped to Ohio ports and 
all Eastern markets^ as well as a large amount being sold to local wholesale 
yards. The salt product of the firm is sold through the medium of the Michi- 
gan Salt Association. The business of the firm, vast as it is, is conducted 
upon a perfect system, and upon methods which commend it to the favor and 
patronage of the trade. Mr. J. H. Malcolm, who has been identified with 
the firm for the past five years and is now general manager, has been a 
resident of Saginaw for the past fifteen years, and was formerly connected 
with the First National Bank of Saginaw. 

The Alex. Ferguson & Son Insurance Agency.— Fiie, Life and 
Accident Insurance ; Genesee, near Washington Avenue ; East Saginaw. — The 
founder of this business, Mr. Alex. Ferguson, was long a prominent citizen of 
Saginaw, to which he came in March, 1849, starting in business in a jewelry, 
book and stationery store in 1852, which he continued for eight years. He 
was afterward the general manager of the Western Union Telegraph office at 
East Saginaw, and filled the position of Collector of Customs for twelve years. 
In the fall of 1880 he was elected County Treasurer, and on February 27, 1883, 
he died. He established the insurance agency in 1870, a few years afterward 
being joined by his son, Mr. Frank A. Ferguson, by whom the business has 
been continued alone since the death of his father. Mr. Frank A. Ferguson is 
a thoroughl}' practical and experienced underwriter, having had a thorough 
training in the business, in which he enjoys a large patronage, attracted b}' the 
uniform reliability and system of his business methods, and the superior list 
of companies which he represents, including in fire insurance the American 
Fire Insurance Co., of Philadelphia ; the American Insurance Co., of Newark, 
N. J. ; the Commercial, of California ; the Continental, of New York ; the 
Connecticut, of Hartford, Conn. ; the City of London, of London, England ; 
the Commercial Union Assurance Co., of London ; the Fire Association, of 
Philadelphia ; the German-American, of New York ; the Hanover, of New 
York ; the Insurance Company of North America, of Philadelphia ; the North 
British and Mercantile, of London; the Pennsylvania, of Philadelphia; the 
Phoenix, of Hartford, Conn ; Traders, of Chicago, and the Washington Fire 
and Marine, of Boston. In marine insurance he represents the Continental, of 
New l^'ork ; the St. Paul Fire and 3Iaiine, of St. Paul, Minn., and the Louis- 
ville Underwriters, of Kentucky. In life msurance he represents the Equitable, 
of New York ; in life and accident insurance he is the representative of the 
Travelers' Life and Accident Insurance Co., of Hartford, Conn., the leading 
company in this branch of insurance. Through these well-knowu aud sub- 



86 The Industries op the Saginaws. 



slantial corporations, all firmlj^ established institutions willi a deserved reputa- 
tion for honorable methods and the prompt payment of losses, Mr. Ferguson 
is prepared to otter safe insurance at the lowest terms consistent with legitimate 
business principles. Thoroughly practical and experienced in all the details 
of the business, and possessing the facilities ofl'ered by an unsurpassed list of 
companies represented, this agency enjoys a large business not only in its im- 
mediate territory of Saginaw county, but also through Northern Michigan and 
the Northern Peninsula upon risks owned by citizens of Saginaw. Mr. Frank A. 
Ferguson steadily maintains for the agency the high reputation which it se(;ured 
under the management of his father, by rigid adherence to the same principles 
of business integrity b}' which the conduct of this business has been char- 
acterized from its in(^eption. 

Pioneer Iron and Galvanizing Works.— A. T. Bartlett & Co., 
Proprietors ; Manutacturci'S of Steam Engines. Saw Mill and Salt Well 
Machinery, Etc. ; 930 South Water street; East Saginaw.=These works were 
originally established in 1854 by the tirm of Warner & Eastman, from whom 
they were purchased by Mr. A. F. Bartlett, the firm afterward becoming 
Bartlett & Moore and then Bartlett & Spindler. Upon the death of Mi'. 
Bartlett, whicli occurred some eight ^ears ago, Mrs. Bartlett bought out Mr. 
Spendler's interest, and the firm a.ssumed its present style, the business being 
owned by Mrs. A. F. Bartlett, who personally attends to the financial affairs of 
the works, while the practical management of the works is in the elHcient and 
experienced hands of Mr. Alexander M. Lemke. The works, comprising the 
foundry, blacksmith shop, warerooms, machine shops, etc., cover over half a 
block. The machine shop is a handsome white brick building, erected in 1881, 
with two stories each 20 feet high, and covering an area of 150x60 feet. On 
the main floor is a 35 horse power engine ; a large boring mill that will swing 
and turn a 10 foot pulley; twenty lathes of all sizes from those with a capacity 
for turning an 8-foot diameter down to the smallest ; five 'bill presses, one of 
which, recenily put in, is the latest improved drill, with boring attachment; 
four planers, one shapcr, one slotting machine, two pipe machines, a new bolt 
cutter, and other machinery. Up stairs is the pattern shop, well stocked, and 
having a complete outfit of light machines, fine tools, etc.; the whole plant of 
the building making a model machine shop. In the blacksmith shop is a 
powerlul steam hammer for heavy forgings and all the requsite plant, tools, 
etc.; and the other departments are equally well equipped. Large as the facili- 
ties are, however, the expansion of the business has been such that it is pro- 
posed to increase them by l)uilding a new foundry and galvanizing shops, and 
enlarging the machine shops. At the works a large business is carried on in 
in the manufacture of galvanized iron pipes for salt wells, and about 500,000 
feet of pipe are galvanized annually; in addition to which the works do a large 
business in the manufacture of steam engines, saw mill machinery, including 
the latest improved gaugand circular mills, mannnoth and medium sized steam 
feeds, salt well machinery, etc. They send saw mill engines as far west as 
Denver, and deck hoistiug engines to all points South, and have an unequaled 
reputation for slide valve engines. The works are now engaged upon a con- 
tract from the street railroad for fifty tons of castings, including frogs, switches, 
frog plates, etc. Mr. Alexander M. Lemke, the manager, is a mechanical 
draugiitsman of ability, and prior to coming here as draughtsman and superin- 
tendent ol works in January last, was for seven years with E. P. Ellis & Co., 
ot Milwaukee, builders of Corliss engines. Smce his arrival the Corliss engine 
for the new Feige-Silsbee Furniture Co. was built at these works, and several 
more are on hand. Arrangements have also recently been made for the raanu- 



The Industries op the Saoinaws. 



87 



faeture of C. Heme's patent tubing clamp for saltworks. Mr. Lemke has been 
manager for about three months, and carefully supervises all the detail.s of the 
business. Mrs. Bartlett is a lady of great business ability, and aids greatly in 
the success which these works enjoy. 

H. & E Goeschel. — Wholesale and Retail Dealers in General Merchan- 
dise ; "410 Genesee avenue, East Saginaw. — This old esta!)lishe(l and well-known 

firm of merchants is composed of Messrs. Herman 
and Edward Goeschel, by whom this business has 
been successfully conducted from the formation of 
the firm in 1864 to the present time. They occupy 
a three-stor}' and basement building, 25x150 feet in 
dimensions, crowded from roof to cellar with a com- 
plete assortment emi)racing full stocks of drj- goods, 
boots and shoes, groceries and prox'isions, crockery, 
glassware, hardware, plated ware, house furnishing 
goods, sewing machines, etc. A force of eight com- 
petent clerks is employed by the firm, and they 
enjoy a large and steady trade with the citizens of 
the S£<ginaws and the surrounding country, and a 
specially large trade from the farmers of the Saginaw 
Valley. Careful selection is made of the stock, so 
as to secure at all times the best quality in all lines, 
and the firm, which has throughout its long and 
honorable history conducted its business upon reli- 
able methods, still maintains intact the high reputa- 
tion which it has enjoyed throughout its business 
career. The members of the firm are eminently 
practical and experienced merchants, thoroughly 
understanding the needs of this section. 

William L. Smith. — Photographer ; Corner Genesee avenue and Cass 
street, East Saginaw ; Barnard Block, 208 Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — 
Mr. Smith has carried on business on his own account as a photographer for 
the past four years, prior to which he had been with his brother in Saginaw 
City for three years and with Mr. Angell in East Saginaw for one year, and 
has altogether had fifteen years' experience in the business, coming to the 
Saginaws from South Bend, Ind. He now conducts two studios, one in East 
Saginaw and the other in Saginaw City. His gallery in PJast Saginaw occupies 
the third floor, 25x125 feet in dimensions, of the building at the corner of 
Genesee avenue and Cass street, has handsome fittings and elegant appoint- 
ments with all the latest and most highly approved apparatus and accessories 
belonging to a strictly first-class photographic establishment. Mr. Smith is a 
great lover of his art and a close student of improvements and inventions in 
pliotography, and keeps to the front in his business. His photographs are 
triumphs of the art and are retouched and finished in a style equal to that oi 
the most noted galleries of the country. He enjoys also a superior reputation 
for the high artistic merit of his li(e-size work, having apparatus for executing 
natural size photographs directly from life,, and also executing India ink and 
water coUn* portraits in a most skillful manner. His Saginaw City studio is 
also handsomely furnished and perfectly equipped and produces efjually good 
work. He has six skilled employes in the East Saginaw studio and four in 
Saginaw City, and at both establishments enjoys a large patronage from citizens 
and visitors. Basing his claims to success solely upon the merit of his work 
he has fairl}^ earned the position he enjoys as a leader in the art of which he 
is a master. 




88 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



W^illiam Neumann. — Dealer in Fancy and Staple Grocei'ies, Crockery, 
Glassware, Etc.; 322 Lapeer street, East Saginaw. — By steady industry and 
the reliability' of his business conduct Mr. Neumann has built up a prosperous 
and stead ii}' growing business, including, in addition to a large patronage from 
the citi;:ens of the Saginaws, a very large trade from farmers and others in the 
surrounding country. 3Ir. Neumann is a native of German}', in which country 
he was born in 1845. In 1866 he came to East Saginaw, and for two years 
worked at the American House and afterward worked for N. Schmelzer for two 
j-ears, and about the same length of time for H. & E. Goeschel. In 1872 he 
started in business for himself at the corner of Webster and Lapeer streets, 
which he conducted nntil 1878, at which time he removed into his new brick 
building, a two stor^- structure at the corner of Park and Lapeer streets, 24x74 
feet in dimensions, with an L, 20x36 feet. Mr. Neumann lormerlv had a 
partner, ^Ir. Ernest Berger, who died in 1881, since which time Mr. Neumann 
has conducted his business alone. He carries large stocks and full lines of 
everything in staple and fancy groceries, grocers' sundries and canned goods, 
and makes a specialty of flour and feed, and also carries a complete assortment 
of everything in the line of crockery and glasswai'c. He makes careful selec- 
tions, and his stock ut all times comprises the freshest and best goods obtain- 
able. As a consequence of the merit of his goods and the accuracy of his 
dealings, Mr. Neumann has built up for his establishment popularit}' and 
prosperity. 

D- H- Jerome & Go- — Dealers in Hardware, Mill and Lumbermen's 
Supplies ; Court street ; Saginaw City. — This is the oldest commercial house 
in the Suginaw Valley, there being no other that has existed so long without 
change of name, and the enterprise having been originally inaugurated in 1855 
by the Hon. David H. Jerome, who still remains at the head of the firm, 
the other members being Mr. E. I. Peck, who had been a trusted employe of 
the house for ten years prior to becoming a member of the firm in 1880, and 
Mr. Edward A. Moye, who joined the firm in the present year. The business 
premises occupied embrace a handsome three-stor}' and basement brick build- 
ing, 100x100 feet in dimensions, stocked from roof to cellar with vast supplies 
and complete assortments of everything in mill and lumbermen's supplies, 
builders' and all house hardware, painters' and plumbers' supplies, gas fixtures 
and globes, all kinds of wngon stock and also bar and other iron, nails and 
tools, and the firm are Michigan agents for Pi. Hoe & Co.'s chisel tooth saws, 
Hubbard & Co.'s solid tooth saws, Tanite emery wheels. Josiah Gates & Son's 
short lap oak tanned leather belting, salt well tubing, steam pipe and fittings, 
boiler flues, steam pumps, lubricators, injectors and every description of 
machine appliances. The firm has a trade extending all north and west 
throughout the State, and in lumber districts all over the country, and em- 
ployment is given in the house to twent}- skilled and competent clerks and 
assistants, while tliree traveling salesmen of wide acquaintance represent the 
house to the trade. The head of this great house, David Howell Jerome, has 
long been recognized as one of the leading and notable citizens of Michigan. 
He was born in Detroit, Mich., November 17, 1829, his parents having removed 
from Trumansburg, Thompkins (iounty, N. Y., in 1828 to this State. When he 
was less than two years old his father died, and his mother removed to New 
York, where she remained for three years, afterward returning to Michigan and 
locating on a farm in St. Clair county. Mr. Jerome was given all the educa- 
tional advantages which Michigan afl[o)-ded in those early days, and in his 
seventeenth year went to work assisting his brother, Timothy Jerome, in 
hauling logs in the pine woods. The next summer he rafted logs down the St. 



Teie Industrfes ok tiir Saoinaws. 89 



Clair River to Algonac, and in 1847 lie was appointed Deputy Clerk and 
Kegister of Deeds of St. Clair county, remaining in that position for two years. 
He afterward returned again to the woods, and in the spring of 1850 with his 
brother chartered the steamer -'Chatauqua" and became her master, and was 
afterward engaged in navigation until 1885. lu January, 1853, Mr. Jerome 
went to California, returning the following year, when he joined his brother 
Titl" who had located in Saginaw and embarked in lumber operations. In 1855 
the brothers purchased Blackmer & Eaton's hardware establishment at Saginaw, 
^Ir. David H. Jerome assuming the management of the firm, which has since 
been conducted with so much success and has reached a position of acknowl- 
edged prominence in this department of industry. Mr. Jerome has been 
prominent in politics, and was elected Alderman soon after his arrival in 
Saginaw. He was identified with the birth of the Repuljlican party, and has 
ever since been known as a consistent advocate of the principles of that party. 
In 1862 he was elected State Senator, in 1865 was appointed by Governor 
Crapo as a member of the State Military Board, of which he served as President 
for eight years, and in 1873 was apponited by Governor Bagley a member of 
the convention to prepare a new State Constitution, and was Chairman of the 
Committee of Finances of that body. In 1875 he was appointed a member of 
the Board of Indian Commissioners and in 1876 was Chairman of the Com- 
missioners to visit Chief Joseph, of the Nez Perce tribe, to effect a settlement 
of the difficulties then existing. In 1880 Mr. Jerome was nominated by the 
Republicans for Governor, and was elected and served his term with marked 
efficiency and characteristic zeal for the welfare of his native State. In all the 
relations of life, social, official and commercial, his career has ever been 
marked by a high standard of integrity, and the success which has crowned 
his well conducted efforts has been earned by the application of honorable 
principles to all his transactions. 

Stone Brothers.— Shingle Manufacturers ; King street, foot of Brady 
street. East Sagin?w. — The mill now conducted by the firm of Stone Brothers 
was built six years ago by F. Brucker, by whom it was conducted for four 
years, at the end of which time he was succeeded by Messrs. Solomon C. and 
Charles E. Stone, under the present style. Both members of the firm are 
young men of superior business attainments and energetic methods, and by 
close attention to the details of their business, and maintaining the quality of 
their product at the highest grade of excellence, the firm has built up a large 
trade with the markets of the East and South, finding ready sales for their entire 
product. The rail! is equipped with a 30 horse-power engine, drag and circular 
saws and a highly improved shingle machine, and all necessary appliances for 
the conduct of the business, and the firm has a boom with a capacity for hold- 
ing 3,000 logs. During the present season they have made 5,000,000 shingles, 
in the manul'acture of which they give steady emplo3'ment to a full force of 
workmen. The firm enjoys the confidence and esteem of the trade as a result 
of the accuracy and reliability upon which its methotls are conducted. Their 
"Eagle" brand of shingles is recognized as being superior in quality, and is 
in constant demand, and the firm is doing a thriving business. 

National Brewery— Peter Raquet, Proprietor; Brewer of Pilsener 
and Lager Beer, and Bottler ; (Jorner of Genesee avenue and Walnut street. 
East Saginaw. — Prior to establishing in l)usiness for himself in 1885, Mr. 
Peter Raquet had been for many years engaged with his brother, Mr. Jacob 
Raciuet, in a similar business on Jiapeer street. In 1885 he built his present 
premises, embracing a three-story brick building, 50x125 feet in dimensions, 
which he utilizes for cellar and storage warehouse, a three-story brewery, 80x50 



00 The Industries of the Saoinaws. 



feet in dimensions, and another >»uilding, 40x50 feet. These premises are 
equipped with all the very finest and most highly improved brewing apparatus, 
including a complete outfit of refrigerating machinery for cooling the product 
of the brewery by the means of ice and salt. The machinery includes a 60- 
horse power engine and a highly improved air-pump, the products of the 
Amei'ican IMachine Co., and a kettle with a capacity of eighty barrels. A 
foice of eight competent brewers is steadily employed and two teams are en- 
gaged in the operations of the brewery. The product of the establishment is 
a favorite with consumers and in large demand b}^ the trade not only in the 
city, but also in Cheboygan, and all parts of Northern ^lichigan, and the 
reputation attained by the Pilsener and lager beer made at this establishment 
has been fairh' earned, only the best and purest materials being used, and 
the most approved processes employed in the manufacture. The brewery has 
a capacity for the manufacture of 25,000 barrels per year, and is kept steadily 
running to its fullest capacity, as a consequence of the large demand for the 
product. In connection with his brewery, 3Ir. Raquet conducts a malt house, 
occupying a four-story building, 35x75 feet in dimensions, and located at the 
corner of Grcnesee and Walnut streets, where he carries the malt used in his 
brewing operations. Mr. Raquet is a thoroughly practical and experienced 
brewer, and his honorable methods of conducting business, and uniform ac- 
curacy and fairness in all his dealings have earned for him a steady increase in 
his business from its inception to the present time. 

Wells-Stone Mercantile Company.— Charles W. Wells, Presi- 
dent ; Farnam C. Stone, Vice-President ; William C. Phipps, Treasurer ; 
Charles C. Prindle, Secretary ; Wholesale Grocers, and Dealers in Lumber- 
men's Supplies ; Water street, Saginaw City. — Conspicuous alike for the ex- 
tent and variety of its stock and the volume of its transactions, the Wells- 
Stone IMercantile Company is one of the most prosperous and extensive of the 
commercial establishments of Michigan. The business was originally estab- 
lished in 1867 by the firm of Northrop, Wells & Co., which became Wells, 
Stone & Co. in 1869, Messrs. Charles W. Wells, F. C. Stone and A. W. Wright 
being the members of the latter firm and continuing the business until the 
formation in 1885 of the present corporatit)n, which succeeded to the wholesale 
grocery and lumbermen's supply business of the old firm, the latter still con- 
tinuing, however, as dealers in lands, logs and lumber. The firm has a two- 
story warehouse, 200x150 feet in dimensions, which is completely stocked with 
every description of staple and fancy groceries and provisions, tobaccos, dry 
goods, drugs, lumbermen's tools and wearing apparel and every description of 
goods in all lines which can be used in lumber camps. Near the warehouse, 
the firm has a spacious elevator, completely equipped with all the machinery 
and accessories necessar}' to its successful operation, and having a storage 
capacity for 100,000 bushels of oats, a mill for grinding No. 1 feed and corn 
meal and a large storage capacity for grain in bags, and other heav}^ mei'- 
chandise. In addition to this large establishment the firm has branch stores 
at Meredith, Sanford, and Coleman on the F. & P. M. Railway and at West 
Branch on the Jackson, Lansing & Saginaw Railway, and they also have a 
large establishment occupying a four-story building, 100x100 feet in dimen- 
sions, at Duluth, Minn. In the premises at Saginaw Cily employment is given 
to a force of thirty-five clerks and assistants, while three traveling salesmen 
represent the firm on the road, and at the various branches full staflis of clerks, 
assistants, etc., are maintained. The business of the firm extends throughout 
the entire State, and is especially large in the northern and western portions, 
and they also enjoy through their Diiluth establishment a large trade through- 



The Industries op the Saoinaws. 91 



out Minnesota and the Northwest generally. The company enjoys unsur- 
passed facilities in every way for the prompt and efficient transaction of busi- 
ness in their line, and possesses the confidence and esteem of the trade as a 
merited result of the uniformly fair and honorable methods b}- which every 
detail of the business has been characterized from its inception to the present 
time. The business is conducted upon perfect and accurate system, and its 
management is in the hands of successful and substantial business men, to 
whose sagacious methods it owes the prominence it has achieved. 

Charles G. Fowler. — Insumnee and Real Estate ; 21 G North Hamilton 
street, Saginaw Cit}-. - This business was established in 1 863 by Mr. H. R. 
Gaylord, whose grandson, Mr. Charles G. Fowler, was trained to the business, 
entering the office in 1874. He afterward went ont for a time, and in 1879 
became a member of the firm of Gaylord & Fowler, afterwards Gaylord, Ba1> 
cock & Fowler, to the insurance business of which firm he succeeded three 
years ago. He is a practical and experienced imderwriter, and carries a large 
amount of the best risks in the Saginaw Valley. In fire companies he repre- 
sents the ^tna, of Hartford, Conn., with a capital of $4,000,000, assets of 
$9,568,840, and a net surjilus of $3,450,221 ; the Commercial Union Assur- 
ance Co., of London, with assets in the United States of $2,256,314, and a net 
surplus of $997,377 ; the Fire Association, of Philadelphia, capital $500,000, 
assets $4,445,576, and net surplus of $939,563 ; the Home Insurance Com- 
pany, of New Tork, capital $3,000,000, assets $7,807,712, net surplus $1,413,- 
795 ; the Hanover, of New York, capital $1,000,000, assets $2,546,675, and a 
net surplus of $540,904 ; the Hartford, of Hartford, Conn., capital $1,250,000, 
assets $5,055,946, and a net surplus of $1,789,987 ; the Insurance Company 
of North America, of Philadelphia, capital $3,000,000, assets $8,474,352, and 
net surplus of $2,530,329 ; the Lancashire, of Manchester, England, United 
States assets $1,498,187, and net surplus of $619,154; the Lion Fire Insur- 
ance Co., of London, United States assets $803,283 and a net surplus 
of $554,960 ; the Michigan Fire and Marine Insurance Company, of Detroit, 
capital $200,000, assets $366,602, and surplus as to policy holders of $264,074 ; 
the Niagara, of New York, capital $500,000, assets $2,260,480, and surplus of 
$489,340 ; Northwestern National Insurance Co., of Milwaukee, capital $600,- 
000, assets $1,355,342, and net surplus of $273,817 ; the Pennsylvania Fire In- 
surance Co., of Philadelphia, capital $400,000, assets $2,710,885, net surplus 
$1,227,426 ; the Phoenix x\ssurance Co., of London, United States assets of 
$1,887,175, and net surplus of $647,534 ; the Queen, of Liverpool, United States 
assets of $l,976,093,net surplus $740,910; Springfield Fire and Marine Insurance 
Company, of Massachusetts, capital $1,000,000, assets $3,044,915, and a surplus 
of $679,821 ; the Union Insurance Company, of California, capital $750,000, 
assets $1,161,362, and net surplus of $118,990 ; the Western Assurance Co., of 
Toronto, Ont., United States assets of $972,557, and net surplus of $428,023. 
In life insurance Mr. Fowler represents the well known, solid and prosperous 
New England Mutual Life Insurance Company, of Boston, one of the most 
substantial and liberal of the life insurance corporations, and in accident in- 
surance, he repi'esents the Standard Accident Insurance Co., of Deti-oit. In 
addition to his insurance business, Mr. Fowler is largcl}' engaged in the real 
estate business, and has 5,000 acres of good farming lands in the Saginaw 
Valley, as well as a large amount of city real estate. Mr. Fowler is an active, 
pushing, progressive and representative business man, and in addition to his 
interests in this business, is a member of the firm of Fowler Brothers, dealers 
in lumber and lands, established in 1882, and who lumber in the southwestern 
part of Saginaw County. They mill in Marian township, and sell their product 



92 The Industries op the SacxInaws. 



throughout the central portion of this State. Mr. Fowler is justly regarded 
with confidence and esteem by the business community, and is President of 
the Saginaw City Board of Trade, and otherwise prominently identified with 
the spirit of progress and the industrial development of the city. 

Baumgarten & Heller. — Wholesale and Retail Dealers in General 
Merchandise ; Corner of (renesee avenue and Park street. East Saginaw. — 
This business was established over a quarter of a centuiy ago by Mr. Philip 
Baumgarten, who continued the business until six years ago, when he was 
succeeded by Mr. Frank Baumgarten and Mr. Peter P. Heller, under the present 
firm style. The}' occupy a spacious and imposing three-story brick corner 
building, 25x155 feet in dimensions, where they carry a large and completel}' 
assorted stock of everything in the line of staple and fancy groceries, a specially 
well assorted stock of flour of every description, woodenware, crockery, glass- 
ware, lamps, lamp goods, yarns, lumbermen's supplies, canned goods, wines 
and liquors, notions and sundries, the stock filling the building from roof to 
cellar. Great care is taken in the selection of the stock so as to secure the 
best qualit}- of goods in all these lines, and in addition to the members of the 
firm two competent clerks are employed and a wagon is utilized in the city 
deliver3\ The firm does a large business with the citizens of the Saginaws, and 
enjoys a specially large patronage from farmers and others in the surrounding 
country. The reputation established by this house in its twenty-five years of 
honorable business history has commended it to public favor, and the firm is 
both a popular and prosperous one. 

A. Baumgarten. — Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Boots and Shoes ; 
802 Genesee avenue ; East Saginaw. — Mr. Baumgarten established this busi- 
ness four years ago, and being a gentleman of superior business attainments 
and experienced in mercantile pursuits, he has adopted methods in his busi- 
ness that commend him to the favor and patronage of the people of the 
Saginaws and the surrounding country, and to a large trade with lumbermen 
and others. He occupies a three-story brick building, 25x125 feet in dimen- 
sions, and carries a very large stock, filling two floors of the building and 
embracing in its selection every grade and quality of goods for ladies', men's, 
boys' and children's wear, farmers' and lumbermen's lioots and shoes, leggins, 
slippers, rubber footwear, etc. Mr. Baumgarten is assisted in his business by 
three competent clerks, and is in every way equipped with all the necessary 
facilities for the conduct of the business upon an extensive scale, and he is 
prepared at all times to supply every description of goods in his line at whole- 
sale or retail, affording to his customers superior inducements in quality and 
price, and dealing with all in a prompt and reliable manner, 

Mrs. E. J. Selleck.— Millinery and Fancy Goods ; 102 South Wash- 
ington avenue, East Saginaw ; and Court street, near Hamilton street, Sagi- 
naw City. — 31rs. Selleck established in business four years ago, originally 
locating on Court street near Hamilton street, in Saginaw City, and where she 
has carried on business with such signal success and with such high apprecia- 
tion from the ladies of both the cities and their surroundings, that in the 
spring of the present year, in order to better accommodate her great and grow- 
ing business on the east side of the river, she established the elegant millinery 
parlors she now occupies at 102 South Washington avenue, the second door 
from Genesee avenue and opposite the Bancroft House, where she is prepared 
to show a very fine stock of millinery goods, consisting of all the latest novel- 
ties of the season, both in the finest goods and the cheapest grades. The 
trimmed goods department is not excelled in its completeness and quality by 
any in the Valley, and as a consequence her establishments are in high favor 



The Industries op the Saqinaws. 93 



with the ladies of the Saginaws as well as in the surrounding towns and cities, 
and she has a large business with patrons in Bay City, St. Charles, St. Louis, 
Flint and other localities in Northeast Michigan. Mrs. Selleck is thoroughl}- 
practical and experienced in the business, in which she was engaged for fifteen 
3'ears in Ohio prior to coming to Saginaw City. Ladies desiring anything in 
the wa}' of trimmed millinery, plumes, birds, velvets, ribbons, silks and other 
trimming will do well to inspect the superior stock contained in Mrs. Selleck's 
establishment. 

A. T. Bliss & Brother.— Manufacturers of Lumber, Lath, Shingles 
and Salt; Mills at Carrollton, Mich.; Office, corner of Hamilton and Ames 
streets ; Saginaw City. — No two citizens of the Saginaws are better entitled to 
be regarded as thoroughly representative of its progress and its commercial 
and manufacturing importance than Col. A. T. Bliss and his brother. Dr. L^'man 
W. Bliss, each of whom is prominently identitied with many of the most im- 
portant business enterprises in the Valley. These gentlemen formed the firm 
of A. T. Bliss & Brother twenty years ago, and have since been steadily 
engaged as manufacturers of lumber, lath, shingles and salt, having large mills 
and extensive works at Carrollton. Their saw mill, which is one of the largest 
on the river, is equipped with a 500 horse power engine, a batter}' of five large 
boilers, each 5 foot shell by 18 feet, and a smaller one of two boilers for the 
salt works. Among other machiner}' embraced in the plant is a Wickes new 
improved gang, a large circular, steam feed, edgers, trimmers, and all necessary 
machinery. The product of the mill amounts to 18,000,000 feet of lumber, 
from 10,000,000 to 20,000,000 staves, 60,000 sets of heading, 3,000.000 laths 
and 10,000,000 shingles. Adjacent to their mills the}^ have six salt wells, the 
last one of which was bored last spring, and each of which is supplied with a 
pumping engine, and they have a very extensive salt block, and make about 
55,000 barrels of salt annually. The mill and salt works with warehouses, 
store houses, barns, docks, piling grounds, etc., cover an area of about twent}'- 
five acres of ground, in addition to which the firm cultivates a fine farm of 
about 350 acres. The firm formerl}' operated a mill at Zihvaukie, which was 
burned in 1886, and which was rebuilt. It is now operated b}' Messrs. J. W. 
and E. S. Bliss,, sons of Dr. Lyman W. Bliss, the firm retaining an interest in 
the mill. The lumber operations of the firm of A. T. Bliss & Brother are 
chiefly carried on in Gladwin and Clare counties, where they run two camps of 
about fifty men each, and also lumber through five or six jobbei-s. The firm 
also owns large tracts of pine and farming lands in Isabella, Midland and 
Gladwin counties. In their Carrollton works they give employment to a force 
ranging from 100 to 125 men, and also utilize a number of horses in their 
business, and the lumber and lumber products of their mill find a read}' market 
at Buffalo, Tonawanda, and in the principal towns in Ohio, Pennsylvania, Con- 
necticut and all Eastern States. The salt manufactured by the firm is sold 
through the medium of the Michigan Salt Association. Both members of the 
firm are prominent in man}' ways. Col. Aaron T. Bliss being President of the 
Williams-Perrin Implement and Produce Company, President of the Bliss 
Lumber Company, President and Director of the Saginaw County Savings 
Bank, Director of the Citizens' National Bank, Director of The James Stewart 
Company, and otherwise concerned in important business enterprises. Dr. 
Lyman W. Bliss, in addition to his interest in this business, is of the firm of 
L. W. Bliss & Co., druggists, Bliss & Davis, physicians. President of The 
James Stewart Company, and largely interestecl in real estate and farming and 
other lands throughout tliis section. The operations of the firm are systemat- 
ically conducted, and its reputation with the trade is second to none, its busi- 
ness methods throughout its long and honorable career having ever been 
characterized by uniform accuracy and reliability. 



94 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



The Allington & Curtis Dust Separator Company.— Well- 
ington R. Burt, President ; Waldo A. Avery, Vice-President ; Greorge F. Cross, 
Treasurer ; William E. Allington, Seci'etary ; W. H. Curtis, General Agent ; 
Franklin and Brady streets. East Saginaw. — This company was formed in 
1886 for the purpose of inanufacturing and selling perfected dust separators 
and furnace feeders for planing mills and all kinds of wood-working estab- 
lishments. The excellence of the device is attested by the favor with which 
it has been received by a large number of manufacturers, the machines hav- 
ing been introduced into nearly all the large mills in the Saginaw Valley, and 
in a large number of others throughout the country. It is the only perfect 
dust separator on the market, advantage having been taken in its design of all 
the lessons of experience, and every defect attaching to other devices of the 
kind having bten excluded from the mechanism of these machines. It is 
adapted for all planing mills and wood-working establishments where fans are 
used, operates with absolutel}' no back pressure on the fan, is constructed 
without the use of canvas, burlaps or an}'- kind of combustible material, is 
built entirely of iron and is absolutely fire-proof. It is the only machine which 
separates fine dust from the air without producing back pressure on the fan 
and consequent loss of draught. It is unrivalled in the simplicity and efficiency 
of its mechanical operations, working automaticall}'^ and requiring no atten- 
tion, and operates without friction and consequent consumption of power b}' 
revolving shavings in small circles or against rough surfaces. As a fui-nacc 
feeder the dust separating machine has no equal, depositing the dust and shav- 
ings directly into the furnace, with or without air, and without any back 
draught from the furnace. The company has recentl}' erected new works, 
60x120 feet in dimensions, completely equipped for carrying on the manufac- 
ture of these machines, and employing a force ranging from thirty to forty 
men, and turning out form ten to fifteen complete machines per week. The 
company also designs and constructs galvanized iron piping for use in fac- 
tories and mills where exhaust fans are used, and is prepared to submit esti- 
mates and execute contracts for work of this charactei'. The company is in- 
corporated and one of large resources and abundant capital to protect any 
who have, or may in the future, purchase their machines, and furnish a bond 
to all users of their machines, guaranteeing title. The President of the com- 
pany, Mr. Burt, is also President of the Michigan Salt Association, and con- 
nected with a large number of the leading business and financial enterprises 
of the State. Mr. Waldo A. Avery, Vice-President, is of the firm of Avery 
& Co., lumber and planing mills, and of McCausJand & Co., wholesale 
grocers and dealers in lumbermen's supplies. Treasurer Cross, is President of 
the Cross, Gordon & Randall Lumber Co., Vice-President of the First National 
Bank of East Saginaw, President and Treasurer of the Standard Lumber 
Company, and otherwise prominently connected with large business interests ; 
and Mr. Allington, the Secretary, is also Secretary and Manager of the 
Standard Lumber Co. Thus guided by successful business men, enjoying un- 
surpassed facilities and producing a machine of positive value and unequalled 
utility, the success already attained by the company is thoroughly merited, and 
doubtless permanent. 

Schwemer & Witt. — Dealers in Dry Goods, Groceries, Crockery, Etc.; 
601 and 608 Genesee avenue ; East Saginaw. — This firm, of which Messrs. L. 
Schwemer and J. Witt are the individual members, was formed five years ago, 
and occupies a two-story building, 50x75 feet in dimensions, with a warehouse 
in the rear, 24x50 feet. Here with the assistance of eight competent employes, 
they carry on a large and steady business as dealers in every description of 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 95 

dry goods, notions, etc., as well as a full line of Crocker}^, glassware, etc. In 
addition to these lines, they are agents for the American and Union sewing 
machines, in which the}' do a large business, these machines being leading 
favorites throughout this section as a consequence of their great utility. They 
enjoy a large trade in the Saginaws, as well as considerable patronage from 
farmers throughout the adjoining country, and are justly popular as a result of 
the uniform fairness and accuracy of their dealings. 

The Stenglein Manufacturing Company. — A. W. Anschutz, 
President , August Stenglein, Vice-President ; elohu Stenglein, Treasurer : F. 
W. Sowatsk}', Secretar}-, Manufacturers of Furniture ; Corner of Water and 
Mackinaw streets, Saginaw Citj'.— This prominent and thriving manufacturing 
enterprise was established in 1881 by the firm of Stenglein, Anschutz & Co., 
by whom it was conducted until the incorporation in 1886 of the present com- 
pany, which has a paid up capital of $20,000. Their factory is a handsome 
and well appointed three-stor}- brick structure, 75x60 feet in dimensions, and 
with the adjoining office and grounds, their premises cover an area of 100x60 
feet. The f actor}' is completel}' equipped with all the requisite machinery and 
appliances adapted to the business, propelled b}' a 36 horse-power engine, and 
employme'nt is given to a force ranging from twenty-five to thirt}' skilled em- 
ployes in the manufacture of furniture, including bed-room furniture of all 
grades, center and fanc}' tables, and the Flint patent folding chair, a device 
which has attained a merited celebrity and a trade extending to all parts of 
the United States, while in their other lines the firm enjoys a patronage cover- 
ing the Saginaw Valle}' in its entiret}', and a considerable trade throughout the 
Northern Peninsula. All the operations of the factory are conducted upon a 
perfect S3'stem, which conduces to the maintenance of the high standard for 
which its products are famous, and the business methods of the management 
of the company's affairs are based upon accuracy and reliability, and as a con- 
sequence the company enjoys in a high degree the favor of the trade and the 
volume of its sales increases from year to year. 

William Williamson. — Established 1863 ; Machine Shop, Steam 
Fitting, General Blacksmithing and Wagon Making ; also Dealer in New and 
Second Hand ^lachiner}- ; corner of Saginaw and Mackinaw streets, East 
Saginaw. — Mr. Williamson came to East Saginaw in 1863, and. began his 
apprenticeship with his brother, Henry Williamson, and remained in his em- 
plo}' for six and one-half years, when he bought out his brother and took 
charge of the business himself. In 1872 he erected a two-story brick build- 
ing, 32x60 feet, to which he made an addition 30x60 feet. Of the first 
named building the first floor is utilized as a machine shop, and is equipped 
with one lathe, 25-foot bed and 38-inch swing, one with 14-foot bed and 22- 
inch swing, and another with 7-foot bed and 14-inch swing ; one 10-foot bed 
b}' 24x26-iuch New Haven planer, one pipe-cutting machine, and a complete 
outfit of tools needed to carry on the business. Here also he carries a com- 
plete stock of pipe ; and on the second floor is a complete stock of valves and 
fittings. In the addition is located the blacksmith shop, with three fires, run 
by fan olast ; also, one bolt-cutting machine, shears, punchmg and drilling 
machines, and a complete outfit of tools for doing all kinds of mill and salt 
well work and general blacksmithing. About twenty-five feet west of the 
blacksmith shop is a two-story wagon shop, 20x00 feet in dimensions, for which 
it has a full line of machinery, operated b}' power ti-ansmitted by wire cable 
from the machine shop. About thirty feet nortii of the machine shop is a 
warehouse, 30x75 feet in dimensions. A specialty is made of mill and salt 
well work, and carts, wagons, etc,, are made to order, and all kinds of wagon 



06 The Industries of the Saginaws. 

work is done and repairing promptl}' attended to. Mr. Williamson is prepared 
to do every kind of pipe fitting to order in the most skillful and workman- 
like manner, and in all lines the work of the establishment is not surpassed by 
that of an}- other in the Valley. A force of skilled workmen is emplo3'ed, 
and all orders are promptly and satisfactorily filled, close attention to all the 
details of the business and leliabilitj' in ever}' particular having secured for 
Mr. Williamson a merited and steadily growing prosperity. 

Keeler & Hogeboom. — Druggists ; Court street, corner of Washing- 
ton street, Saginaw Cit}'. — The popular and prosperous drug firm of Keeler & 
Hogeboom is composed of Messrs. W. H. Keeler and John (i. Hogeboom, and 
was formed in 1879. Their handsomely appointed and well equipped store is 
eligibly located at the northeast corner of Court and Washington streets, and 
is completely stocked with a full assortment of all standard drugs and chemi- 
cals, all approved proprietory medicines and a specially fine selection of toilet 
articles, perfnmery, fancy goods, druggists' sundries, etc. Both of the mem- 
bers of ihe firm are educated and practical pharmacists, and their store enjoys 
a superior reputation for the careful and accurate manner in which prescrip- 
tions are compounded from the best and purest materials, and they do a large 
trade in all the branches usualh' conducted l)y a firstclass drug establishment. 
The business has steadily increased in volume from year to year from its in- 
ception to the present time, and the accurate and reliable business methods of 
the members of the firm, and their constant endeavors to give satisfaction to 
their customers have combined to give the establishment a popularity which is 
not exceeded by that of any firm in the line in the Valley. 

R S. Stewart. — The Grocer ; 518 Genesee avenue ; East Siiginaw. — 
This business wes established twelve years ago by the firm of Stewart Brothers, 
by whom it was conducted until two years ago, since which time Mi*. R. S. 
Stewart has carried on the business as sole proprietor. He occupies the entire 
builning, 25x100 feet in dimensions, at 518 Genesee avenue, where he carries 
full stocks and completely assorted lines of everything in staple and fancy 
groceries, grocers' sundries and canned goods of ever}' description, and all 
fruits and vegetables in season. Great care is taken by Mr. Stewart in the 
selection of his stock so as to secure at all times the best and freshest goods, 
and by uniform promptness and accuracy in all his dealings he has built up a 
large trade in the Saginaws, as well as a considerable trade from the surround- 
ing country. The close attention paid by him to all the details of the business 
has secured for his establishment a merited popularity. 

Rust Brothers & Co. — Manufacturers of Lumber, Lath and Salt ; 
Mills at South Saginaw and Bay City ; Office, Court street, between Hamilton 
and Water streets, Saginaw City. — One of the oldest and best known of the 
lumber manufacturing concerns of the Saginaw Valley, is that now conducted 
under the name of Rust Brothers & Co., and operating mills at South Saginaw 
and Bay City. The South Saginaw mill began operations in 1863, then being 
conducted by the firm of Rust & Ingeldaw, the firm becoming Rust Brothers 
& Co. in 1881. The Bay City mill was started in 1864 under the proprietor- 
ship of the firm of A. Rust k Co., in 1878 changing to A. Rust & Brothers, 
and in 1883 to Rust Brothers & Co. The members of this firm are Mr. John 
V. Rust, of Cleveland, O., and Messrs. Amasa and Charles A. Rust, of Sagi- 
naw City. The South Saginaw mill has three engines of 80, 50 and 30 horse- 
power respectively, a battery of four boilers of ^}4 foot shell by 16 feet, and 
another of three boilers, 5 by 16, from which are run a powerful engine feed, 
gang and circular, edgers, trimmers and all requisite machinery and appliances, 
including all the latest improvements and most modern and labor saving in- 



The Industriks of the Sacunaws. <»7 



venLiaiis. This mill cuts from 12,000,000 to 14,000,000 feet of lumljei-, iiuii<:cs 
50,000 sets of heading and from 1,100,000 to 1,200,000 staves and 1,800,000 
huh per annum. Adjacent to the mill are located the five salt wells and a 
large salt block belonging to the firm, and producing about 35,000 barrels of 
salt annually. Convenient and well located docks, ample tramways and ex- 
tensive piling grounds make out the remainder of the premises of the firm, 
embracing an area of about thirty acres. The IJay City mill has three engines 
of 80, 50 and 40 horse power respectivel}', a battery of five boilers, 5x16. a 
powerful gang steam feed and circular, and all necessary plant and equipment 
of the most improved character. The cut of this mill will average about 15,- 
000,000 feet for the season, and about 25,000 laths per day for the same 
period, embracing about 150 days. In connection with this mill the firm have 
four salt wells and drill houses, each with pumping engines, and make from 
35,000 to 40,000 barrels of salt, which the}' ship in bulk through the medium 
of the Michigan Salt Association. In connection with these premises also, the 
firm have a large salt block, spacious warehouses, piling grounds, docks, etc., 
covering in all some twenty acres. At the South Saginaw mill a force of 100 
hands and fourteen horses is employed, and 110 hands and a number of horses 
are utilized in the works at Bay City. The firm has a large trade, the market 
for its product being found principally in Ohio, New York and the Eastern 
States, and the salt all being sold through the nledium of the IMichigan Salt 
Association. The great extent of the facilities of the firm, the superior char- 
acter of the product and the uniformly reliable methods upon which its busi- 
ness is conducted, have secured it a prominence second to none in the country, 
and the firm has ample resources, and in addition to its lumber and salt busi- 
ness, also has a large farm at Creen Point, while its individual members are 
largely interested in other important industries. Mr. Amasa Rust, of this 
firm, is of the firm of Rust, Eaton & Co., engaged in a similar business ; of 
Rutman & Rust, who have mills and salt works at Bay City, and of Burrows 
& Rust, dealers in lands, lumber, etc. The business is conducted upon per- 
fect and accurate system, and the enterprise forms one of the most gratifying 
examples of success among the industries of the Saginaws. 

A. W. S. Oalderwood — Dealer in Dry Goods, Notions, Clothing, Etc.; 
2704 South Washington avenue, South Saginaw. — Mr. Calderwood has been 
engaged in this business for the past fifteen years, during which time he has 
conducted his affairs so as to secure a merited reputation as one of the leading 
business men of the south end. He occupies premises 30x125 feet in dimen- 
sions, has two salesmen, and carries large and complete stocks of everything 
in the line of dry goods, notions, clothing, oil-cloth, table linen, hosiery, gents' 
furnishing goods, etc. He formerly carried a stock of millinery in this store, 
but the demand for more room, caused by the steady increase of his trade, led 
him to remove this department to premises opposite at 2705 South Washington 
avenue, 25x125 feet in dimensions, where a thriving millinery business is con- 
ducted by Mrs. Calderwood, carrying a full line of hats and bonnets, trimmed 
and untrimmed, ribbons, trimming, feathers, ladies' underwear, hosiery, etc., 
and full lines of silks, velvets and fancy goods of all kinds. The trade of 
each of these establishments is steadily increasing, as the result of the careful 
selection of the stock, so as to secure at all times the best and most iwpular 
goods, and the uniformly correct and accommodating methods of ^h: and Mrs. 
Calderwood in their relations with their customers. 

R J. Birney.=Dealer in Drugs, Medicines, Chemicals, Etc. ; corner of 
Court -tind Hamilton streets, Saginaw City. — The eligibly located stand at the 
corner of Court and Hamilton streets has been conducted as a drug store for 



98 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 



the past thirteen j-ears, the business originally having been conducted by Mr. 
William Moll, who was succeeded by Mr. D. C. Clark, followed by Sumner & 
Wisner, then early in 1886 the firm of Birney & Wisner, and since Jul}', 1886, 
having been conducted by 3Ir. Birney alone. The premises occupied by the 
business have a 25-foot frontage on Court street by a depth of 125 feet on 
North Hamilton street, with a laboratory at the side, 25x60 feet, and the main 
floor and basement are utilized for the purposes of the business. A large 
wholesale and fresh stock is carried embracing evei'ything in the line of drugs, 
chemicals, a full line of perfumes and toilet goods, a complete stock of the 
best makes of trusses and supporters and a speciall}' fine and carefull}' selected 
stock of pure wines and liquors for medicinal uses. The services of five com- 
petent clerks and assistants are engaged in the business, which is very large 
and embraces in addition to a heavy patronage from- the citizens of the Sagi- 
naws and vicinity, a considerable jobbing trade throughout Northern and 
Western Michigan. Mr. Birney is a skillful and educated pharmacist, and 
brings to the prosecution of the business an accurate knowledge of its details 
and an active and careful supervision of its transactions which have secured 
for the establishment a first-class reputation for the accuracy of the methods 
upon which the business is conducted. Prescriptions are carefully compounded 
from the best materials, and every department of a first-class drug establish- 
ment is attended to. In addition to this house Mr. Birney has a prosperous 
branch store at 415 Genesee avenue at the end of the bridge on the west side 
of the Saginaw River. He manufactures his own extracts and a number of 
specialties of high repute, and his stock is at all times kept well assorted both 
in quantity and quality. Correct in all his dealings, Mr. Birney has enjoyed a 
steady expansion in his business from his first connection with it to the pres- 
ent time. 

Holzheimer House. — C. F. Holzheimer, Proprietor; 508-512 Potter 
street, opposite F. & P. M. Passenger Depot, East Saginaw. — Mr. Holzheimer 

established himself in this business in 1882, 
since which time, b}' the superior character 
of the accommodations afforded by his es- 
tablishment, he has secured a prominent 
place in the favor of the citizens of Saginaw 
and the traveling public. The hotel com- 
prises a new brick building, three stories in 
height, and contains forty-seven well fur- 
nished and neatly kept rooms for the accom- 
modation of its guests, including bed rooms, 
parlors, etc The rates ol the hotel are 
$1.00 per da)', and the accommodations 
offered l)y the establishment are of a char- 
acter not surpassed, if equalled, by any 
house with the same rates in the State. Mr. 
Holzheimer careful!)- supervises all the de- 
partments of his business for the puri)ose of 
securing the satisfaction of his guests, fur- 
nishes his table with a plentiful supply of 
good, well cooked and well served viands, and those who have once patronized 
the hotel usually return to it upon a second visit. Mr. Holzheimer is a native 
of German}', but came when a small child to this country, his parents engag- 
ing in farming in Niagara i:county, N. Y., until 1865, when they removed to 
Ottawa county, Mich. Mr. Holzheimer served throughout the entire War of 




The Industries of the Saginaws. 99 

the Rebellion in the 28th Regiment of hew York Volunteers and the 2nd New 
York Mounted Rifles, and was honorably discharged after good service in 1865. 
He is a gentleman of thorough!}' accurate and reliable business methods, and 
enjoys the general respect as a substantial and worthy citizen. 

Butman & Rust. — Manufacturers of Lumber and Salt ; Mills at Bay 
City ; Otlice at Saginaw City. — One of the oldest, best, known and most pros- 
perous of the manufacturing firms of the Saginaw Valley, is that of Butman 
& Rust, of which Messrs. Myron Butman and Amasa Rust are the individual 
members, and which was formed in 1865. They own and operate a saw mill at 
Bay Cit}-, 120x150 feet in dimensions, with a large and complete equipment of 
all the latest and most improved machinery and appliances adapted to lumber 
manufacture, including a battery of seven large boilers, as well as another 
l.oiler outside, for the purpose of runningtheir salt block, Sa'c powerful engines 
running a Wickes Brothers' gang, a large circular, trimmers, edgers, butting 
saws, etc. In addition to the mill, the firm has three salt wells and drill houses 
and a salt block with an extensive boom, docks on three sides, an outside dock, 
inside dock, slip dock and mill dock, giving pilage for 5,000,000 feet of lum- 
ber, all covering several acres. The annual product of the mill amounts to 12,- 
000,000 feet of lumber and 3,000,000 laths, in addition to which the firm have 
from 3,000,000 to 3,500,000 shingles made for them. They also produce about 
25,000 barrels of salt, which they ship in bulk to the association, and therefore 
make no barrel stock. Their store-house adjoining their salt block has a ca- 
pacitj' for holding 15,000 barrels of salt in bulk, and the firm lumbers in Glad- 
win county, running two camps of about forty men each and about twenty 
teams. In Gladwin county the firm owns a farm of 500 acres, and also owns 
pine and farm lands in large quantities throughout Roscommon, Gladwin, Isa- 
bella, Midland, Gratiot and Saginaw counties. At the mill and salt works em- 
ployment is given to a force ranging from eight}' to one hundred hands, and the 
product of the mill, which is of the best quality, finds a ready market in Ohio 
and all eastern cities. Mr. Butman, of this firm, is a native of Milan, O., 
where he was born in 1825, He was educated at Huron Institute, Erie coun- 
ty, O., and came to Saginaw in 1855, having previously entered some 4,000 acres 
of fine timber lands in this vicinity, and he has been a heavy dealer in timber 
lands from that time to the present. Mr. Amasa Rust, of the firm, is well 
known as a leading operator in lumber, logs and pine lands, and a member of 
the firms of Rust, Eaton & Co., Burrows & Rust and Rust Brothers & Co., 
and other important business enterprises. Thus managed with perfect system 
in the conduct of the business, and a reputation surpassed by none, this firm 
has achieved a position of distinction among the leading and most prosperous 
of the great industries of the Saginaw Valley. 

Charles Lee — 3Ianufaoturer of Sash, Poors, Blinds, Flooring, Etc. ; 
634 South Water street, corner of Hoyt street. East Saginaw^ — Mr. Lee has 
been engaged in the lumber business ever since he established this enterprise 
in 1803, and is properly regarded as one of the successful manufacturers of 
the Saginaw Valley. He has a large saw mill, boom and blocks of lumber six piles 
deep on the river bank. His planing mill and sash, door and blind factory 
occupy a two-story building 150x180 feet in dimensions across the street from 
the saw mill, and the mills and lumber yards cover twenty-two lots. The 
planing mill and sash, door and blind factory take a large portion of the cut 
of the saw mill, the lumber being kiln dried, worked up and sold in the manu- 
factured state. Both mills are fitted up with all the most modern and improved 
plant and machinery adapted to the requirements of the business. The saw 
mill erected in 1882, and the planing mill, which was originally a saw mill, 



100 The Industries op the Saginaws, 

was remodeled and improved in 1876. Employment is given to a force of 
sixty-five hands, and the mills enjoy unsurpassed shipping and receiving 
facilities by rail and river, the railroad tracks passing between the saw mill 
and the planing mill. The annual cut amounts to about 4,000'000 feet, and a 
stock of about 3,000,000 feet is carried on hand. He has at all times a com- 
plete assortment of roughed and dressed lumber of all dimensions, and a very 
large stock of sash, doors, blinds, ceiling, siding and lath. He does a large 
business, his product being shipped to towns in Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania, 
and all East, as well as a considerable trade with Chicago. His facilities are 
unsurpassed, and his reputation the highest, all his dealings being character- 
ized by uniform fairness, promptness and accuracy. 

Charles Rimmele & Brother. — Dealers in Groceries, Provisions 
and Produce ; No. 132 North Hamilton street, Saginaw City ; telephone No. 
905. — This firm was formed in May, 1886, succeeding Mr. William Moye, who 
had been established for sixteen years. The firm occupies the main floor and 
basement, 25x100 feet in dimensions, where the}- earr}- large and thoroughly 
diversified stocks of everything in the line of staple and fanc}' groceries, pro- 
visions of every description and all kinds of produce, giving employment to 
three competent clerks, and having a large trade with the citizens of the Sagi- 
naws, as well as a considerable patronage from farmers and others in the sur- 
rounling country. The goods carried b}- the firm are selected with great care 
from the freshest and best stock, and the quality of the goods, combined with 
the uniformly accurate and prompt methods of the firm, have secured for 
them a first-class reputation. The members of the firm are Messrs. Leopold and 
Charles llimmcle, both of whom are thoroughly practical merchants, and 
closel}' supervise every detail of the business, basing their claims to success 
upon the merit of their stock and the uniform reliability of their transactions. 

Saginaw Beef Company. — L. Cornwell, Proprietor ; Wholesale 
Dealer in Swift's Choice Chicago Dressed Beef, Live Stock, Dressed Hogs, 
Mutton, Smoked Meats, Etc.; Corner of Potter and Third streets. East Sagi- 
naw. — This business, which represents a large and important industr3% was 
established in 1883, Mr. Cornwell having a half interest in the business, and 
the other half being owned by Messrs. G. L., G. F. and E. F. Swift, of Chicago. 
Two years ago Mr. Cornwell acquired the entire business, which he still con- 
ducts under the old name. Mr. Cornwell, who has been in the live stock busi- 
ness from his boyhood to the present time, is thoroughly practical and experi- 
enced in all departments of the business in which he is engaged, and possesses 
the best facilities for the supply of ever}' description of goods in his line to the 
trade throughout the Saginaw Valley and Northern Michigan. The premises 
occupied 1)}^ him in this citj'^ embrace a building, 35x125 feet iit dimensions, 
the front part of which, 30x40 feet, is used as office and sales rooms, with an 
overhead scale and track. In the rear of this is the cooling room, 35x70 feet 
in dimensions, with overhead railway, from which hang hooks with wheels. 
These railways lead from the cooling room to a room in the rear, 15x35 feet, 
at the end of which the loaded cars come, and these emptj' their loads on to 
the hooks, which are then run directly into the cooling room and store room, 
over which a large supply of ice is deposited. Mr. Cornwell has 1,800 acres 
at Mt. Morris, Mich., which is his home, and where he has a large stock of 
about 3,000 sheep and 300 cattle, and is a large dealer in live stock, doing a 
considerable business, shipping to Buffalo and other eastern points. In addi- 
tion to this establishment Mr. Cornwell also conducts a similar business at Bay 
City, under the name of the Bay City Beef Company, His business is very 
large, and he has agents visiting different points in Northern Michigan taking 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 



101 



orders for goods in his line. Tlie dressed beef bandied at the estal)lishment i.i 
of the best quality, being the product of the celebrated packing houses of Swift 
& Co., of Chicago, and of this he sells about 300 head per week, as well as an 
average of 800 hogs and 125 sheep. Mr. Cornwell is a gentleman of large 
resources, and the inisurpassed facilities possessed by him for supplying goods 
in his line, the thorough accuracy of his business methods and his promptness in 
lining orders have caused the volume of his transactions to steadily increase 
from 3'ear to 3'ear. 

James S. Smart, Jr. & Co. — Manufacturing Confectioners, and Job- 
bers in Oysters, Fruits and Canned Goods ; 133 North Franklin street. East 



MANU F ^ • 




Saginaw. — A prominent addition to the larger business houses of the Saginaws 
was made in the formation a year ago of the firm of James S. Smart, Jr. & 
Co., of which Mr. James S. Smart is the active member, and Mr. Gilbert W. 
Lee, head of the well-known Detroit firm of the D. D. Mallory Co., is a special 
partner. Prior to establishing this business Mr. Smart had been for a number 
of years a member of the prominent wholesale grocery firm of Symons, Smart 
& Co. The firm occupies a handsome and commodious three-story and base- 
ment building, 35x120 feet in dimensions, adapted in ever}' wa^' to the pur- 
poses of the business, and efjuipped witli all the necessary machiner}- and 
plant for the manufacture of confectionery, and employment is given to a force 
of twent}' skilled and competent workmen and assistants, while three traveling 
salesmen represent the firm in its trade terrritor^", embracing the country from 
Flint to Manistee and Cheboygan, points on the Flint & Pere Marquette rail- 
road, Alpena, and all along the shore ; in fact, all the northern portion of Mich- 
igan. They manufacture all kinds of candies and confections, and in addition 
are large jobbers in oysters, fruits and canned goods of ever}' decription, in 



102 The Industries op the Saginaws. 



which their stock is unsurpassed in quality, and in steadily growing demand 
by the trade. The inception of the business has been marked by a gratifying- 
success, and the superior reputation held b}' the members of the firm with the 
trade, its first-class facilities and the promptness and accuracy of the methods 
upon which its business is conducted, will doubtless secure for it a still greater 
increase in the volume of its business. 

J. H. Benjamin. — Wholesale Manufacturer of Concord Buggies ; 318, 
320 and 322 Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — Mr. Benjamin established this 
business in 1870, since which time his trade has grown, and he has steadily in- 
creased his facilities until he now has one of the most completely equipped es- 
tablishments of the kind in the State. He occupies a two-story brick building, 
75x100 feet in dimensions, and gives employment to- a force ranging from ten 
to fifteen men in the manufacture of everything in the carriage-making and 
blacksmithing line, except horseshoeing, and enjoys an unsurpassed reputation 
for the great superioril}' of all the work produced at his establisJiment. He 
makes a specialty of the manufacture of Concord buggies, in which his trade is 
not confined to local bounds, but extends to all parts of the country ; he having 
sent his Concord buggies as far west as C/alifornia, south to Florida and east to 
New Jersey. In his general line of wagons, carriages, etc., he does a la,rge 
business with the people of the Saginaw Valley and the Northern Peninsula, 
and is at all times kept busy, owing to the high reputation which he has built 
up for uniformly reliable and superior work. He is prepared to fill all orders 
for every description of work in his line with accurecy and despatch, and close- 
1}^ supervises all the details of his business, so as to maintain intact the high 
repute which good work and honorable dealings have secured for him. 

Linton Manufacturing Co. — Aaron Linton, President ; Amasa Rust, 
Vice President ; W. S. Linton, Treasurer ; C. E. Linton, Secretary ; Wholesale 
Dealers in and Manufacturers of Lumber, Salt and Packing Boxes ; Jefferson 
street, near Washington avenue, East Saginaw. — Mr. Aaron l^inton has long 
been identified with the lumber manufacturing industry of the Saginaws, hav- 
ing originally come to this city in 1858, from which time until 1870 he held 
the position of foreman in Curtis & King's saw mill, and in 1870 started in 
business for himself, building a large saw mill on the F. & P. M. Railroad, 
which he conducted for three years, at the end of which time the mill was 
destroyed by fire. He then returned to Saginaw City and built a planing mill, 
which was burned six years afterward, but which was immediately rebuilt, Mr. 
Linton associating with himself his sons, William S. and Charles E. Linton, 
under the firm name of A. Linton & Sons. They conducted a prosperous 
business until May 28, of the present year, when again their property was 
destroyed by fire. After this a site was purchased in the Fifth Ward, covering 
ten acres near the old race track, bounded on the east by Jeflferson street, 
north by the St. Clair branch of the F. & P. M. R. R., Washington avenue be- 
ing near by on the west, and on the south the Toledo, Saginaw & Mackinaw 
Railroad now in course of construction. The present company was incor- 
porated in August with a capital stock of $50,000, and the mill and other 
buildings erected. The main building is a two-story structure, 58x160 feet in 
dimensions, with a detached brick building, 22 feet to the east of it and 44x58 
feet in area, wh'ch is utilized for a boiler and engine room. Just north of the 
mill is a steam salt block, 48x172 feet in dimensions, and a drill house. The 
mill is completely equipped with all the most highly improved machiner}- and 
appliances adapted to the manufacture of rough and dressed lumber and box 
shooks, including one engine of 175 horse-power ; two boilers, 5^x17 ; two of 
S. A. Wood's 14-iuch fast feed planers ; two flooring machines ; one 27-inch 



The Industries op the Saqinaws. 



103 



double surfacer and matcher ; one 10-inch moulder ; two pony planers ; one 
Joslin segment saw, 50-inch ; one 36-inch Benjamin & Fischer re-saw ; one 
Williamsport gang edger ; one S. A. Wood power feed rip saw ; one Wright's 
automatic cut-off saw ; one combination cut off and rip saw ; four*saw tables, 
with 14x16 inch saws for cutting boxes, and two rip saws. The upper floor, 
which is devoted to the manufacture of box shooks, is ecjuipped with all the 
special machinery adapted to that branch of manufacture. The planing 
capacity of the mill is 125,000 feet per day, and that for the manufacture of 
boxes from 60,000 to 70,000 per week. Employment is given throughout the 
3'ear to a force of 100 workmen and the firm does a large business, appropriate 
"to the extent of its facilities and resources. The great soap manufacturing 
firm of Proctor & Gamble, of Cincinnati, are stockholders in the company', and 
the soap boxes used b}' the firm are manufactured by this compan}'. The salt 
product of the company has been all contracted for, and therefore does not go 
on the market. Mr. Aaron Linton, President of the compau}-, is thoroughl}"^ 
experienced in all the departments of the business of lumber manufacture, in 
which he has been engaged for over thirt}' ^-ears, and Mr. Amasa Rust, Vice- 
President, is well known as one of the most prominent lumber manufacturers 
and owners of pine lands in the State. Mr. W. S. Jiinton, Treasurer of the 
compan}', is a prominent and popular citizen, and has served two terms of two 
years each as Alderman from the Seventh Ward, and last fall was elected as 
a Representative of the State Legislature from the Second District on the 
Republican ticket, and served this conscituency with honor and efficiency. 
Mr. Charles E. Linton, Secretary of the company, has had a complete business 
training, and his attainments are such as to fit him for the duties of the 
position which he fills. These gentlemen, with Messrs. C. A. Rust, of Saginaw, 
and J. W. Donnell}-, of Cmcinnati, form the Board of Directors. The firm 
has a substantial standing, starting out with every prerequisite to success, and 
the merit of its product and systematic methods upon which its business is 
conducted will doubtless secure the prosperity of the enterprise. 

John G. Schemm. — Brewer and Bottler of Lager Beer and Manufac- 
turer of Ginger Ale, Etc.; North Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — This is an 




old established and well-known brewery, having been started in 1866 l)y the 
firm of Schemm & Gruhler. In 1869 Charles Schoenheit bought the interest 



104 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



of Mr. Grubler, and the firm became Schemm and Schoenheit, and as such was 
conducted until 1881, since which time Mr. John Gr. Schemm has conducted it 
as sole proprietor. Great improvements and additions have been made to the 
brewer}' frftm time to time, and as now conducted it comprises a three-story 
l>uilding, 130x100 feet in dimensions, with bottling works and ollice 30x100 
feet, all of white brick. The brewery is completely equipped with all the 
modern' plant and appliances adapted to the business, and contains three large 
and well built cellars, large grain storage and malt rooms, di*y kilns, etc. 
Nothing but hops and malt is used in the manufacture of the superior beer 
produced at this establishment, and which enjoys the favor of consumers, on 
account of its uniform purity and excellence, and the 7,000 barrels of the pro- 
duct annualh' produced at the establishment is all required by the local demand. 
Up to the present Mr. Schemm has used ice for refrigerating purposes, but as 
that takes up too much room, it is his intention to put in a refrigerating 
machine, which will give him enlarged space and afford him an opportunit}^ to 
increase his capacity. Fifteen hands are employed and eight horses utilized 
in the business, and Mr. Schemm, who is a thoroughly practical and experi- 
enced brewer, enjoys the prosperity which comes from a superior qualit}' of 
goods, and uniform reliability of business conduct. 

Brand & Hardin. — Manufacturers of Roller Process Flour ; also Man- 
ufacturers of Shingles and Salt ; Corner of Water and Mackinaw Streets, Sag- 
inaw City. — This well known and prosperous firm was originally established in 
1879, the members being Messrs. J. F. Brand and A. C. Hardin. They occupy 
a spacious and complete flour mill, four stories high, and 80x100 feet in di- 
mensions, in which the}'' have all the necessary machinery and appliances for 
the manufacture of flour of superior quality b}'^ the roller process, and have re- 
cently made an addition for a feed mill, into which they are now putting a 
complete outfit of roller process machinery. The flour mill has a capacity for 
the manufacture of 200 barrels of flour daily, and the firm have a salt block ad- 
joining, with a capacity for the manufacture of 13,000 barrels per annum, and 
a shingle mill in the rear of these premises, in which they cut 3,000,000 
shingles per season. Their whole premises cover an area of 150x225 feet, 
fronting on the railroad tracks of the Michigan Central Railroad, and running 
back to complete docks on the river fiont. The firm have four engines, 75, 
35, 25 and 15 horse power, respectively, using two large boilers, antl piaking 
salt from exhaust steam, thereby securing great eoonom}^ in the expense of 
their salt manufacture. In their flour mill a force of eighteen men and three 
horses are employed, and they have twent3-five men employed in their shingle 
mill and salt works. The trade of the firm is very large, and so celebrated are 
their brands of '• Gold Medal," " O. K. Roller Patent," " Standard " and '* Pur- 
itan," that the local demand, and that of the northern portion of Michigan, 
calls for their entire product. In shingles their trade is mainly in the States 
of Ohio and New York, while their salt is sold through the medium of the 
Michigan Salt Association. Messrs. Brand & Ilardin are energetic business 
men, thoroughly understanding all the departments of the business in which 
the}' are engaged, and supervising all its operations with good judgment, deal- 
ing with the trade upon fair and accurate methods, which have secured for 
them a high place and a constantly growing trade and prosperity. 

Singer Manufacturing Company.— J. 0. Charlcbois, Agent ; 512 
Genesee avenue, East Saginaw. — The uneciualled extent of the operations of 
the Singer Sewing Machine Company, the large amount of its output, the great 
volume of its sales and the undiminished popularity of its machines render 
this corporation the most important of all those engaged in the manufacture 



TiiK Industries of the Saginaws. 105 



of sewing machines. The trade of the company extends to all parts' of the 
civilized world, and agencies are maintained in all the principal cities of the 
United States and Canada, as well as in Europe and Australia. h\ East Sagi- 
naw the Singer Manufacturing Company has had an oUice for over twenty 
years, and this oMice has, since March last, been in the experienced charge of 
Mr. J. O. Charlebois, who came to this city from Traverse Cit}-, where he had 
been engaged as agent for this company, prior to which he was similarly en- 
gaged at Muskegon, Mich. The Singer machine has always kept ahead of its 
competitors by being the first to introduce valuable improvements in mechanism, 
and the new vSinger machine is to-day in the lead, and unsurpassed in its per- 
fect adaptation to all domestic uses to which a sewing machine can be put. 
The East Saginaw business of the company covers some twenty-nine counties 
along the Michigan Central and Lake Shore, and also extends in the Upper 
i'euinsula to the Sault and Schoolcraft Count}-. Employment is given in this 
district to a force of sixty salesmen and assistants, and from 2,500 to 3,000 
machines per year are sold from this office. The business of the branch is 
prospering under the careful and efficient management of Mr. Charlebois, 
whose close attention to the interests of his principals and zeal in making 
known the merits of these machines has resulted in a largel}' accelerated trade 
in the territory assigned to his charge. 

Kimball & Merriam. — Lumber Dealers ; Office and Yard, 1901 South 
Hamilton street, Saginaw City,— This firm, of whcih Messrs. R. Kimball and 
N. Merriam are the individual members, was established three j-ears ago, since 
which time they have enjoyed a large and steadily growing trade as dealers in 
every kind of rough and dressed lumber, which they purchase on the docks 
from local manufactures, and in which they do a large trade, handling about 
12,000,000 feet per annum, and shipping to all eastern and southern and some 
western markets in car load lots. The firm has conveniently arranged and 
commodious yards covering eight blocks, located on both the Michigan Cen- 
tral and Flint & Pere Marquette railroads, with railroad tracks throughout the 
premises, giving them unsurpassed facilities for the receipt, handling and 
shipment of lumber of every description. They 'carry very large stocks of 
lumber of all lengths and dimensions in their yard, and give employment to a 
force ranging from thirty to forty men. Both members of the firm have long 
been connected with the lumber interests of the Valley, and by uniformly cor- 
i-ect and reliable business methods, have commended themselves to the favor 
of the trade throughout the country, and have prospered to a gratifying degree 
in their enterprise. 

Ernst Wilke.— Flint & Pere Marquette Meat Market ; Fresh and Salt 
-Meats, Sausages, Etc.; 504 Potter street. East Saginaw. — This business was 
established six years ago by iNIr. Wilke. The premises occupied by the store 
embrace a handsome two- story brick building, 35x75 feet in dimensions, in 
which is an ice chest in the rear, 20x20 feet. Here is carried at all times a 
large stock and complete assortment of the best quality of goods in the lines 
of fresh and salt meats of every description, all kinds of sausages, turkeys, 
chickens, etc., and the careful selection made of the stock, and the thorough 
correctness and reliability of all the dealings of Mr. Wilke have secured for 
his store a prominent place in the confidence of the people of the city, and he 
does a large and steadily growing business. The premises are well equipped, 
and Mr. Wilke, who is thoroughly acquainted with all the details of the 
Itusiness and supervises them with a steady endeavor to satisfy his customers, 
is enjoying a thriving trade, which he has fairly earned by close attention to 



106 The Industries of the Saoinaws. 

business. He renders his own lard and dresses all meats, etc., that are used 
to supply his trade, and he contemplates adding in a short time a large power 
sausage machine with a capacity of over two thousand pounds per da}'. 

Avery & Co. — Manufacturers of and Dealers in Rough and Dressed 
Lumlter, Lath, Shingles, Etc. ; Hayden street, corner of Franklin street, East 
Saginaw. — This prominent manufacturing establishment was started six years 
ago by the firm of Cooper & Avery, by whom it was conducted until two years 
ago, since which time Mr. Waldo 0. Aver}' has been the sole proprietor. The 
main yard and mill occupies Hayden street from Franklin to Cass street, about 
220 feet deep. The planing mill and sash, door and blind factory occupies a 
brick structure, three stories high, and 120x50 feet in dimensions, with an 
engine and boiler house extension, 50x60 feet, and (toiiveniently located with 
railroad tracks on both sides, facilitating the handling and shipment of raw 
material and manufactured product. On the premises is a large shed for the 
storage of fine dressed lumber, 210x25 feet in dimensions. The works are 
equipped with all the latest and most highl}' improved machinery adapted to 
the business, and in them is dressed 10,000,000 feet of lumber per annum. 
The firm keeps on hand at all times a large supply and complete assortment, 
in all dimensions, of rough and dressed lumber, lath, shingles, fiooring, siding, 
ceiling, mouldings, sash, doors, stair work, frames, etc. A force of sixt}' hands 
is employed, and the product of the works is noted for its superior quality, 
which has secured for it a trade covering all points east and south, the product 
being shipped over the Michigan Central and Flint & Pere Marquette railroads. 
Perfect system is maintained in all the operations of the business, the manu- 
facturing departments being under the practical and experienced supervision 
of Mr. W. T. Cooper as general superintendent. Mr. Avery is one of the lead- 
ing business men of the city, and in addition to the proprietorship of this 
business, is a member of the prominent firm of McCausland & Co., wholesale 
grocers and proprietors of the Valley Spice Mills. He justl}' enjoys the 
approval and patronage of the trade as a result of uniform accuracy in his 
business methods, and has earned a gi'eat and steadily growing success. 

Wickes Brothers. — Manufacturers of the Celebrated Wickes Gang, 
and All Kinds of Heavy Mill Machinery ; 512 North Water street, East Sagi- 
naw. — This prominent and repi-esentative firm was originally established in 
1860 by Messrs. Henry D. and Edward N. Wickes, who were later joined by 
Messrs. Harry T. and William J. Wickes, these four gentlemen now composing 
the firm. Their machine shop is 130x50 feet in dimensions, with an L 60x70 
feet. It is completely outfitted with all the latest and most improved machinery 
adapted to the business, including twelve lathes, the largest of which will take 
a 28-foot shaft, a lioring mill with a 78-inch wheel, ten large planers, hanging 
and rotar}' drills, swinging tables, stationary and traveling cranes, etc. Their 
foundry, which is a continuation of the L, is 60x80 feet in dimensions, and has 
the largest cupola in the State, holding eight tons. Their pattern shop, in 
which they carry a large and complete stock of patterns, is a two-story build- 
ing, 50x75 feet, and their ofiices and mill supplv department occupy a two- 
stoiy building, 65x50 feet, with a large warehouse and shipping department in 
the rear. Here they deal in and carry large stocks and full lines of everything 
in mill supplies, wrought iron pipe fittings for steam, gas and water, belting, 
packing, steam pumps, governors, inspirators and all steam heating apparatus. 
Their works, with a large yard in the center, cover about a block, and the,y 
have an extra warehouse for surplus stock further up the street. Employment 
is given to a force of one hundred hands, and in their works they manufacture 
all kinds of heavy mill machinery, making a specialty of the Wickes' Improved 



TiiK Industries of the Saoinaws. 107 

Iron 1^'rame Gano; iMill, which is so designed and proportioned as to insure 
durable anil continued movement at the highest speed, safely increasing the 
quantit}' and improving the quality of work done, and admitting at the same 
time of the use of tliiinier saws and the carrying of heavier feed than is 
practical in other machines. This mill has ol)tained the approval of lumber 
manufacturers in all parts of the Union and Canada where lumber is cut, and 
occasional orders are also received from foreign countries. Over 300 of these 
mills are now in use, and the firm enjoys a constantly growing patronage as 
the merits of their mills become known over a wider range. All the opera- 
tions of the works are conducted upon perfect and accurate S3-stem, ami the 
firm enjoys the approval of the trade, as a result both of the merit of their 
work and the reliable methods upon which their dealings are conducted. 

Eaton, Potter & Go, — Manufacturers, and Wholesale and Retail 
Dealers in Lumber, Lath and Salt ; Mill at foot of Center street, South 
Saginaw ; Office, Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — No names are more prom- 
inently- connected with the development of the lumber industry of the Saginaw 
Valley than those of the gentlemen composing this firm, including Messrs. I). 
L. C. Eaton, Fred. H. i*otter, George L. Burrows and L. Burrows. The 
business now conducted by this firm is an old one, having been originally 
founded by Mr. John Gallagher, who built the original mill in 1853, and who 
cut in that year 1,500,000 feet of lumber. The premises were acquired by 
the present firm in 1873, since which time vast additions and great improve- 
ments have been made to the area of the premises, the building and plant, and 
they now occupy as a mill building a two-story structure, 100x150 feet in 
dimensions, completely equipped with all the latest and most highly improved 
machinery and appliances adapted to the requirements of the business, 
including two engines, 18x20 and 18x30 respectively, six boilers, 5x16 each, 
and all the necessary saw mill machinery for the production of lumber upon 
the most modern principles ; each device for expediting the operations, im- 
proving the product or facilitating the work of manufacture being employed. 
In addition to the lumber manufacturing plant, the firm have complete salt 
works, salt block, drill house, etc., and have an annual product of 17,000 
barrels, while their lumber product will amount to about 15,000.000 feet of 
lumber, 1,000,000 laths, 800,000 staves, 500,000 sets of heading and a large 
quantity of pickets, etc. The capacity of the mill is for 90,000 feet of 
lumljer per day. Employment is given to a force of seventy-five workmen, 
and the lumber product is sold to all markets of the East and South, while 
the salt product is disposed of through the medium of the Michigan Salt 
Association. The members of this firm are prominently identified with other 
important business enterprises of the Saginaw Valley, Mr. D. L. C. Eaton 
being also a member of the firms of Bust, Eaton & Co., and George L, 
Burrows & Co.; Mr. Fred. H. Potter also being of the firm of George L. 
Burrows .t Co., and .Mr. George L. Burrows being of the firms of Burrows & 
Bust; Bust, Eaton & Co., and the head of the old and substantial banking 
firm of George L. Burrows & Co. All the operations of the works are con- 
ducted upon a perfect and accurate system, the resources of the firm are in 
every respect ample, its facilities without a superior and its success the 
merited result of the combination of all these advantages. 

J B. TeaL— Wholesale and Betail Meat and Vegetable Market ; 2700 
South Washington avenue. South Saginaw. — This is an old established busi- 
ness, having been started fifteen years ago by Mr. J. B. Teal. lie carries a 
large and completely assorted stock of the choicest meats, poultry, butter, 
cheese, eggs, canned goods, buckwheat flour, oysters, and all vegetables in 



108 The Industries op the Saoinaws. 

season, and not only has a large trade in South Saginaw, but has also secured 
a considerable patronage, which is steadily expanding, in ICast Saginaw and 
Saginaw Cit}-. He does a large business, supplying other dealers with dressed 
ineats, smoked hams, and every description of sausages, etc. The thoroughly 
accurate and accommodating business methods upon which he conducts his 
business, the great care taken by him in the selection of his stock and the 
promptness of his delivery have secured for his establishment a reputation 
second to none in the Saginaws. Not only is his stock of fresh meats com- 
posed of the choicest to be found in the markets, but in salt meats, hams, etc., 
his stock is of superior excellence, as Mr. Teal packs sufficient of these goods 
in the winter to supply his trade throughout the seassn. He employs a com- 
plete force of assistants, and by thorough reliability and constant endeavor to 
please his customers throughout his long and honorable business history, he 
has achieved a first-class reputation and a steadily increasing prosperity. In a 
shoit time he will increase his capacity for jobbing by adding a large power 
chopper to be devoted exclusively to the sausage department. 

Lou. Gr. Moore. — Druggist ; Washington and Gratiot streets ; Sagi- 
naw. This well known and popular stand has been for fifteen years conducted 

as a drug establishment, having been originally occupied by Mr. William Moll, 
who was bought out by Mr, A. L. Moore, a brother of the present proprietor, 
in 1880, and was conducted by him until Mr. Lou. Gr. Moore succeeded to the 
business two years ago. The store is eligibly located at the corner of Wash- 
ington and Gratiot streets, having an entrance on both streets, and Mr. Moore 
carries a large and completely diversified stock of everything in the line of 
drugs and chemicals, approved proprietary medicines and druggists' sundries 
of every description, in addition to which Mr. Moore makes his own extracts, 
as well as a number of specialties, which have acquired a merited celebrity for 
their superior quality. The store enjoys a first-class reputation for the ac- 
curate and careful manner in which prescriptions are compounded from the 
best and purest materials, and Mr Moore has a large business in the city, as 
well as a considerable trade from farmers and others in the surrounding 
country. The merit of his stock and the close attention paid by him to all 
the details of the business have caused his enterprise to become a successful 
one. 

Brown & Ryan. — Dealers in Lumber, Logs and Shingles; Yard at 
Jackson, Lansing & Saginaw Railroad crossing ; Mill, west end of Johnson 
street bridge. — Among the firms engaged as dealers in lumber, logs and 
shingles, that of Brown & llyan, formed two years ago, is one of the most 
active and prosperous. The members of the firm are Messrs. Addison T. 
Brown and William Kyan. They own and operate a mill at the west end of 
the Johnson street bridge, occupying a building, 80x150 feet in dimensions, 
and equipped with a 60 horse-power engine and two 5x16 boilers, running a 
circular saw and all accessary- machinery, and making aliout 75,000 feet of 
pine lumber per day during the season, which they ship to Chicago and Ohio 
and eastern ports. In addition to this business of the manufacture of pino 
lumber, the firm also largely deals in hardwood and Norway pine and have a 
yard for car shipments located at the Jiickson, Lansing & Saginaw Railway 
crossing, where they carry a stock of about 7,000,000 feet of lumber, and give 
employment to twelve men. In addition to this lousiness they are largely en- 
gaged in lumbering on the Tobacco River, where Mr. Brown owns extensive 
tracts of pine and farm lands, and carries on large operations in cutting, 
rafting and delivering lumber. The saw mill premises are eligibly loc^ated, 
occupying one of the best sites on the river, and in addition to the main build- 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 10i» 



ing includes a large barn, offices, docks, piling grounds, etc., the whole plant 
covering about thirty- acres, and besides their own shipping business the firm 
does a large local trade, employing altogether about ninety hands, and utilizing 
about twenty horses in the various departments of their business. liotli mem- 
bers are practical men and supervise their affiiirs in a manner conducive to 
success, the correct S3'stem upon which they conduct their affairs having 
secured for them a great and growing prosperity. 

J. H. Shackleton.— Roller Mills ; Manufacturer of Flour, Meal, Feed, 
Etc. ; Mills, corner of (Jratiot and Lyon streets, Saginaw City. — Mr. Shackle- 
ton inaugurated this enterprise eight years ago, and has since carried it on in 
such a manner as to commend himself to the approbation and patronage of 
the people of the Saginaw Valle}', and has achieved such a success that an in- 
erease of his facilities became an imperative necessity, and during the present 
year he has remodeled and improved his mill, adding an extra story to the 
main building, building an extension, and putting in a full roller process 
throughout. The mill as now operated embraces a three-story building, 30xG() 
feet in dimensions, with a new extension 30x25 feet, and a boiler house at the 
side, 20x25 feet, containing a 50 horse-power engine, fed by a boiler with a 
four-foot shell and fourteen feet in length. Mr. Shackleton gives steady em- 
ployment to six hands and two teams, and the products of his mills are justly 
celebrated for their supeiior quality, his brands "Favorite," " Golden (lem ' 
and " White Rose" roller floor being standards of excellence in qualit}-. lie 
also manufactures fine and coarse meal, rye, graham and buckwheat flour. No. 
1 and 2 feed bran, middlings, etc., and deals in corn, oats iind screenings. He 
carries at all times a large stock, and does a very large business in the city and 
surrounding country, dealing with all upon reliable methods, and maintaining 
a standing not excelled by an}' firm in its line in the State. Hon. John li. 
Shackleton is a citizen who is highly esteemed and justly regarded as a repre- 
sentative man who has a deep interest in the welfare of Saginaw City. He is 
now serving the people as Mayor and fills that ofBcewith honor to himself and 
credit to the cit}-, discharging its duties in a conscientious and efficient manner. 

E. Schoeneberg. — Fire Insurance and Real Estate Agent ; Taylor 
House Block, Saginaw City. — Mr. Schoeneberg has been engaged in his present 
business for the past four years, prior to which he had been City Treasurer for 
a number of years. Since embarking in his present enterprise he has, In- 
close attention to all the details of the business, built up a pronounced and 
gratifying success in all the departments of a legitimate real estate business, 
to which he attends with a promptness and fidelity which has commended him 
to a large patronage among the leading propert}' owners of Saginaw county. 
He deals largely in real estate on his own account and for his clients, and is 
also busily engaged in his insurance agency, representing a number of the 
leading and most substantial insurance corporations of the countr}-, including 
in fire insurance the Orient, of Hartford, with a capital of $1,000,000, assets of 
$1,604,486, and a net surplus of $132,186 ; the I'rovidence-Washington, of 
Rhode Island, one of the oldest and strongest insurance corporations of the 
country, having been founded in 1799, and which has a capital of $400, ()(»(•, 
assets of $1,025,804, and a net surplus of $M3,677 ; the Teutonia Fire and 
Marine, of Dayton, ()., capital, $100,000, assets, $374,858, and a net surplus of 
$208,183 ; the Ohio, of Dayton, with a capital of $150,000 assets, $244,2(Mi, 
and surplus as regards polic\- holders of $202,609 : the Girard, of Philadel- 
phia, capital, $300,000, assets, $1,357,468, and a surplus of $883,869 ; also 
the Cincinnati linderwriters', one of the strongest and most substantial of the 
insurance companies of the country. In life insurance he represents the 



110 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



Northwestern Mutual Life, of Milwaukee, Wis., the strongest of the Western 
companies, and one which does the largest life insurance business in Michigan ; 
and in accident insurance he represents the American Accident, of New York, 
one of the most substantial of accident companies. Through these first-class 
and well-known corporations Mr. Schoeneberg is prepared to write safe insur- 
ance at the lowest rates, and as a consequence of the uniform fairness and 
accurac}- of his dealings, he does a very large business in this department, 
which is steadily growing. Mr. Schoeneberg is agent for the Ro3'al Belgium 
and Roj'al Netherland lines of mail steamers, and is pi'epared to issue passage 
tickets upon these first-class Atlantic steamers at rates as low, and upon terms 
as favorable as they are issued from the general office. Mr. Schoeneberg is in 
every respect a responsible and representative citizen, and enjo3'S in a 
prominent degree the confidence and respect of the community. 

George A. Alderton. — Wholesale Grocer ; 315 and 317 North Water 
Street, Saginaw City. — No merchant in the Saginaws bears a better reputation, 
or enjoys a more extensive and rapidly growing business than Mr. Alderton, 
who for twelve years has been engaged as a wholesale grocer. He occupies a 
two-stor}' building, 50x100 feet in dimensions, where he carries ver}- large and 
complete stocks of everything in the line of staple and fancy groceries and 
grocers' sundries and shelf goods, and makes a specialty of teas, coflees. 
tobaccos, cigars, spices, etc. These goods he })urchases from first hands, main- 
taining the most favorable relations with importers and manufacturers, and 
being enabled to offer to the trade special inducements both in quality and 
price, the stock being selected with special reference to quality, and being al- 
ways composed of the freshest and best goods obtainable. Six clerks and 
assistants are emplo3ed in the house, and Mr. Fitz Harris represents the 
house on the road, Mr. Alderton also making occasional visits to his customers. 
He has a large and steadily growing trade covering all points along the lines 
of the Flint & Pere Marquette, Detroit, Lansing & Northern and Michigan 
Central railroads, and has commended himself to the confidence and patronage 
ot dealers by the prompt and satisfaclor}' manner in which all orders are filled, 
and the fair and liberal methods adopted in all his dtalings. Mr. Alderton is 
an energetic and enterprising luisiness man, and in addition to this business is 
largely' interested in the Michigan Hoop Company, which has works at St. 
Louis, Mich., Breckenridge and Merrill, and gives employment to some 300 
men, shipping hoops to all parts of the countiy, and which corporation ex- 
pects shortly to add a branch here. Mr. Alderton personally supervises all 
the details of his business with the result of a steadily growing prosperity, 
trade always being good with this establishment. 

J. F. Brown & Son. — Insurance ; Bancroft Block, Genesee avenue. 
East Saginaw. — This firm, which was established three j'cars pgo, is composed 
of Mr. James F. Brown, and his son, Mr. Hugh B. Brown, and is one of the 
most prosperous of the underwriting firms of this cit}', representing a number 
of the most substantial insurance corporations of the country, including in fire 
insurance the ./'Etna, of Hartford, Conn., with a cash capital of $4,000,000, 
assets of $9,5K8,839, and a surplus over capital and all other liabilities of 
$3,450,221 ; the American, of .Boston, with a capital of $300,000, assets of 
$008,965, and a net surplus of $157,095 ; the California, of San Francisco, with 
a capital of $600,000, assets of $1,008,878, and a net surplus of $132,581 ; the 
Citizens', of New York, with a capital of $300,000, assets of $1,102,460, and a 
surplus of $332,427; the Mercantile Fire and Marine, of Boston, with a capital 
$400,000, assets of $647,887, and a surplus of $117,177; the Michigan Fire 
and Marine, of Detroit, capital $200,000, as.sets $366,602 ; the Orient, of Hart- 



The Industries of the Saoinaws. Ill 



ford, Conn., capital $1,000,000, assets $1,604,486; and in marine insurancrc 
they represent tlie Plienix, of Brooklyn, N. Y., with a capital of $1,000,000, 
assets of $5,383,172, and a net surplus of $557,087. In plate glass insurance 
the iirm represents the Lloyd IMatc Glass Insurance (Company, the oldest and 
most substantial of the insurance corporations of its character, and which has 
a capital of $100,000 and assets of $242,406. In accident insurance they rep- 
resent the Standard, of Detroit, with a capital stock of $200,000, assets of 
$305,781, and a surplus as to policy holders of $21,849. In life insurance they 
represent the Northwestern Mutual, of Milwaukee, with assets of $26,648,074, 
and a surplus as to policy holders of $6,009,579, wliile in fidelity insurance thciy 
represent the American Surety Company, of New York, a corporation of large 
resources formed for the purpose of furnishing corporate security for em- 
ployes, etc. Through these reliable comj)anies the firm is prepared to offer 
sale insurance at the lowest rates consistent with legitimate insurance prin- 
ciples, and b}^ close attention to business has secured a large and steadily 
growing business in the Saginaws and the surrounding country. Mr. James 
F. Brown, the senior member of the firm, was for many years Piesideut of the 
Merchants' National Bank, now the Home National Bank, and is a prominent 
and representative citizen, now filling with efficiency the office of City Treasurer, 
while his son, Mr. Hugh B. Brown, is a gentleman of superior business attain- 
ments, who brings to the business energetic and progressive methods, which 
have largely aided in its success. 

J. D. Meldrum. — Blacksmith and Wagon Maker; 317 and 319 South 
Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — Mr. Meldrum is a thoroughly practical and 
experienced man in every department of his business, having worked at it for 
nine years for others prior to establishing in business for himself seven years 
ago. His blacksmith shop, which he owns and which was built expressly for 
the purposes of the business, comprises a two story brick building, 25x80 feet 
in dimensions, to which last year he added an adjoining building, which he 
utilizes as a carriage painting and general workshop, and which is a two story 
structure, also 25x80 feet. He carries on every department of a general black- 
smithing business, does horseshoing in the most skillful and accurate manner, 
making a specialty' of the shoeing of fast and driving horses, and performing 
work in this line so as to stop over-reaching, interfering and knee-knocking. 
In his wagon and carriage making department Mr. Meldrum has a special celeb- 
rity' for his Concord wagons, in which his trade reac-hes to all parts of the State, 
and the demand for which taxes his present facilities. He also manufactures 
heavy wagons, and in the spring of the present 3'ear built two for railway cart- 
age, one to carry seven and one to carry five tons, and which are not excelled 
in workmanship by any made anywhere. In his wagon department he makes 
for orders principally, but during this winter purposes making some extra Con- 
cord wagons, as he can sell all he can make. He gives employment to ten 
highly skilled workmen, and in addition to the line of manufacture, he does 
carriage repairing, painting, and all kinds of wagon and buggy work. His 
practical knowledge of the business, the close and accurate attention paid by 
him to all orders, and the uniform fairness and reliability of his dealings have 
secured for Mr. Meldrum a prominent place in the confidence of the communi- 
ty, and a prosperit}- which steadily grows from Near to year. 

J. O'Hare. — Dealer in Fine Boots, Shoes and Rubbers ; 412 Court street, 
Saginaw City. — Mr. O'Hare has had a long and practical experience in every 
department of this businesss, in which he was engaged for over twenty 3'ears 
at Fenton, Genesee County, Mich., and established himself in his present busi- 
ness in this city four years ago, since which time his store has become recog- 



112 The Industries ok the Saoinaws. 



nized headij[uarters for the procurement of the best qualities of goods in the 
lines of boots, shoes and rubbers. He occupies the main floor, 25x100 feet in 
dimensions, elegantl}' equipped for the purposes of the business with hand- 
some show windows, and located in the best business portion of the cit}* on 
Court street, between Hamilton and Washington streets. He carries large 
stocks and complete assortments of the highest class of goods in his line, the 
l)roduct of the best Eastern manufacturers, including among others, those of 
Hannan & Sons, of New York, and Cox, Young & (rardner, of Boston, in 
men's wear; P. Cox and John Kell^y, of Rochester, and Reillej, of Auburn, 
N. Y., in ladies', misses' and children's wear ; I. Mendell & Co., of Philadel- 
phia, in l)oys' shoes, Blacker, Sachs & Co., Cincinnati, and other celebrated 
makers. In rubbers the assortment is most complete, and the product of the 
best makers. The establishment enjoj's a very large family trade in the city 
as well as a considerable business from citizens of the surrounding country. 
Four competent clerks are employed in the store, and Mr. O'Hare, by keeping 
the quality of his goods up to the highest standard of merit and by prompt at- 
tention to every detail of his business and uniform fairness and reliability, has 
secured a merited success in his enterprise. 

John Stolz & Son— Wholesale and Retail Butchers, Etc.; 807 Genesee 
avenue. East Saginaw. — This business was the pioneer establishment of its kind 
in the city, having been founded in an early day by Mr. Solomon, who was a 
brother-in-law of Mr. John Stolz. Mr. Stolz has been a resident of the city 
since 1852, and in 1859, upon the death of Mr. Solomon, the business passed 
into the hands of Mr. Stolz, who conducted it alone until four years ago. when 
he was joined by his son, Mr. William Stolz, forming the present firm. The 
premises occupied and owned by them embrace a handsome two-story and 
basement brick building, 25x125 feet in dimensions, where they have every 
convenience and accessor}' calculated to aid or expedite the operations of the 
business, and give employment to eight men. Three wagons are used in con- 
nection with the business, and a large stock is carried, embracing everything 
in the line of fish, salted and smoked meats and sausages of all kinds, as well 
as poultry of every description in its season. The firm enjoys a large retail 
trade in the Saginaws and vicinity and also does a prosperous shipping trade to 
points along the railroads centering here. The establishment has throughout 
its history from pioneer days to the present held a prominent place in public 
confidence, having always been conducted upon fair and honorable metnods, 
dealing in honest goods and being reliable in all its transactions. 

William McBain. — General Insurance; 211 Genesee avenue, East 
Saginaw. — This business was established twenty years ago b}' Mr. Robinson, 
who had several partners at diflferent times, Mr. McBain succeeding to the 
business about eight years ago. He represents a number of the leading 
companies of the country, and also writes policies for the Upper Peninsula to 
Lake Superior. He represents the following well-known and substantial fire 
companies, including many of the best in existence : The Anglo-Nevada, of 
San Francisco, capital, S2, 000, 000 ; the British-American, of Toronto, with 
assets in its Tnited States branch of $808,770 ; the Commerce, of Albany, 
New York, capital $200,000 ; the Cooper, of Dayton, (.)., capital of *100,00() ; 
the Franklin of Philadelphia, capital, $400,000 and surplus of $967,8-18 ; the 
Guardian, of London, England, with assets in its Tnited States branch of 
$1,367, 179 ; the Ilibernia, of New Orleans, capital, $400,000 ; Imperial, of 
London, England, with assets in its United States branch of $1,620,50(5 ; the 
Lancashire, of Manchester, England, with $1,498,187 assets in the United 
States ; the Lion, of London, assets in the United States of $803,283 ; the 



Thk Industries of thk Saoinaws. 118 



Mercantile, of Cleveland, O., capital, $200,000 and surplus of $112,941 ; the 

Noi-tborn, of Aberdeen, Scotland, with United States assets of $1,388,076 ; 
the New Hampshire, capital, $500,000 ; the Norwich Union, of England, 
United States assets of $1,245,466 ; the People's, of Manchester, N. H., 
capital, $250,000 ; the Phamix, of London, England, United States assets of 
$1,887,175 ; the Springlield. of Massachusetts, capital, $1,000,000 ; the Union, 
of California, capital, $750,000 ; the Union, of Philadelphia, capital, $:{75,000 ; 
the Westchester, of New York City, capital, $300,000 and net surplus of 
$310,511 ; the Western, of Toronto, Canada, United States assets, $060,821 ; 
and the Security, of New Haven, Conn., capital, $200,000. In steam boiler, 
l)late glass, suretyship and accident insurance he represents the Fidelity and 
Casualty Co., with a cash capital of $250,000, and assets of $578,105. In life 
insurance he represents the United States Life Insurance Co., of New York, 
with a paid-in capital of $440,000, assets of $5,633,138, and reserve at 4:^- per 
cent, standard, of $4,594,488, and a surplus as to policy-holders of $1,013,690. 
Through these first-class and reliable insurance corporations Mr. McBain is 
prepared to issue policies upon the most favorable terms consistent with safe 
insurance principles. He represents the greatest number of companies of any 
agent in Michigan, and as a result of the superior character of the companies 
represented by him, and of his own thorough knowledge of all the details of 
the insurance business, he has built up a prominent place in the confidence of 
the insuring public ; and in his long connection with the insurance business 
he has never disputed a single claim, and losses have been paid promptly and 
satisfactorily. Mr. McBain has been a resident of East Saginaw for the past 
twenty-one 3'ears, and was in the lumber business until about nine 3'ears ago. 
He is a business man of superior attainments, and has secured a prominent 
place among the underwriters of the State by energy and close attention to 
business. 

O. S. Grant & Go. — Dealers in Fine Boots and Shoes ; 121 Genesee 
avenue, opposite Bancroft House, East Saginaw. — This well known and popu- 
lar boot and shoe house was originall}^ established in 1 860 b}' the firm of C. H. 
Smith & Co., with whom Mr. 'Grant was connected as a clerk for eight 3ears 
prior to purchasing the business ten years ago. He afterward associated with 
himself Mr. Thomas M. Hubbell, and these two gentlemen compose the present 
firm. They occupy a two-story building, 25x100 feet in dimensions, eligibly 
located, where they carry a large and completely diversified stock of boots and 
shoes of all kinds, making a specialty of the finest products of the best eastern 
makers, and having a display of superior goods which is not excelled in the 
State. A specialty is made of ladies', gents' and children's fine shoes, and the 
firm enjoys a high class trade, embracing the leading people of the Saginaws 
and vicinity. As a consequence of the care taken in the selection of the stock, 
the house is justly regarded as headquarters for the procurement of desirable 
goods in their line, and the firm is both a prosperous and popular one. 

G. F. Wniiams & Brothers- — Manufacturers and Wholesale and 
Retail Dealers in Lumber and Salt ; Office and Y''ard, Water street, between 
Jackson and Lyon streets, Saginaw City. — One of the oldest manufacturing 
concerns in the Saginaw Valle\- is that now conducted by the firm of G. F. 
Williams & Brothers, of which Messrs. George F., William A. and Stewart B. 
Williams are the individual members. The business was originally established 
in 1836 by Mr. Gardner D. Williams, who conducted it alone until he was 
joined by his son, Mr. G. F. Williams, and afterward, upon the death of the 
founder in 1857, the present firm, composed of his sons, was formed. The 
premises occupied by the business cover about nine acies, with large saw mills, 



114 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



equipped with a 60 liorse-power engine, four boilers, 4x20, and two, 5x1 6, and 
all the latest and most improved machinery and appliances adapted to the bus- 
iness ; a salt block with four wells and drill house, each pumped b}' a small en- 
gine, large storage buildings and spacious lumber yards. The premises have 
a large water frontage, extensive booms and railroad tracks throughout, facili- 
tating the handling of raw material and manufactured product. In the manu- 
facturing operations employment is given to a force of 100 men, and in the 
lumbering season from 150 to 200 men are employed in the woods, as well as 
a large number of horses. The cut of the mills for the present season will 
amount to about 12,000.000 feet of lumber, and the salt production of the 
tirm to 30,000 barrels. The firm enjo3'S a first-class reputation with the lum- 
ber trade throughout the the country, and their product is shipped East b}- rail 
and water, while their salt is sold through the medium of the Michigan Salt 
Association, of which the Messrs. Williams are members. The Hon. Gardner 
J). Williams, the founder of the house, built one of the first mills erected in 
the Valley, near where the present works are situated. The original structure 
was burned and was replaced b}' another, which also burned. The present 
mill was ei'ected in 1875, and is one of the most completely' equipped in the 
Valley. The firm is one of large resources, and its business is conducted upon 
methods which commend it to the approbation of the trade. 

George Stingel. — Wholesale and Retail Butcher; 118 and 120 North 
Washington avenue. East Saginaw. — This business was established twenty years 
ago by Mr. George Stingel, who was joined three years later by his brother, Mr. 
John Stingel, forming the firm of Stingel Brothers, by whom the business was 
conducted until early in October, when the firm was dissolved, Mr. George 
Stingel continuing the business alone. He occupies a three-story and basement 
building, 50x120 feet in dimensions, which he utilizes as a store, and in addi- 
tion has a slaughter and packing house on Water street, near Miller street, 
where he does a large business as a packer, putting up some 2,500 barrels of 
pork and 500 barrels of beef per season, and rendering lard, tallow, grease, 
etc. To this packing house he is preparing to make additions, when his facili- 
ties and output will be largely increased. He gives employment to a force 
amounting to twenty hands in winter and twelve in summer, and in addition to 
a large trade at wholesale and retail in the city, has a steady trade from the 
surrounding towns, including Bay Port, St. Louis and Cheboygan, Mich., and 
all the northern part of the State. Throughout his long connection with the 
business Mr. Stingel has enjoyed the approbation of the community and the 
trade, dealing with all upon fair and honorable methods, and being uniformly 
prompt and reliable in his dealings. 

Meakin's Steam Laundry.— James Meakin, Jr., Proprietor; E. II. 
Dame, Manager; 110 North Jefferson street, East Saginaw. — Mr. Meakin 
established this enterprise in March of the present year, and has already built 
up a large patronage from the citizens of the Saginaws and vicinity, which he 
has acquired because of the uniformly superior character of all the work 
turned out at his laundry. His business is steadily growing, and he is pre- 
paring to establish a number of branches through the State to facilitate the 
handling of the large number of orders constantly being received from out- 
side points, and those desiring to establish branches would do well to corres- 
pond with Mr. Meakin. The laundry occupies a handsome and spacious two- 
story building, and is completely equipped with a modern and improved outfit 
embracing all the necessary machiner}' and plant for the successful conduct of 
the business, and which is propelled by a twelve horse-power engine. He 
gives employment to a force ranging from eleven to eighteen skilled hands, 



The Industries of the Saginaw!:!. 115 



and has a wagon which he utilizes in calling for and delivering work. The 
volume of his business may be estimated from the fact that at the estab- 
lishment 1,200 shirts per week are laundried, and other articles in proportion. 
The practical details of the business are under the experienced care of Manager 
K. 11. Dame, and by the superior work of the laundry, and the correct and 
reliable methods of Mr. ^Meakin, the enterprise is rapidly achieving a great and 
gratifying success. 

A. W. Wright Lumber Co. — Ammi W. Wright, President ; Charles 
W. Wells, Vice-President ; Farnam C. Stone, Treasurer ; W. T. Knowlton, 
Hecretar}' ; W. H. Wright, Mill Superintendent ; IManufacturers and Dealers 
in Lumber, Lath and Shingles ; Saw ^lill, foot of Throop street ; Planing Mill, 
corner of Farley and Water streets, Saginaw City. — No name in Michigan is 
more prominently connected with the lumber manufacturing and general 
business interests of the State than that of Mr. A. W. Wright, b}' whom this 
business was founded in 1882. Ammi Wilfard Wright was born at Grafton, 
Windham County, Vt., in 1822. He came to Detroit in 1850 and to Saginaw 
in the following 3'ear, and spent his first year in this section in inspecting 
lands on the Cass, Tittabawassee and Flint Rivers, securing some of the finest 
pine lands in the State. He began operations on the Cass River, near the 
present village of Caro, and soon became prominent among the leading 
operators in pine lands and lumber. From 1859 to 1865 he was a member of 
the firm of Miller. Payne & Wright, which was dissolved in the latter year, 
when the firm of A. W. A\'right & Co. was formed, consisting of Mr. Wright 
and J. H. Pearson, of Chicago, in which city they had large j^ards. In 1867 
these gentlemen established a wholesale suppl}^ store at Saginaw, associating 
with them Messrs. Northrop and Wells. In 1868 Mr. Northrop retired, Mr. F. 
C. Stone taking his place, and the firm became known as Wells, Stone & Co. 
In 1871 Mr. Wright bought out Mr. Pearson's interest. The firm of Wells, 
Stone & Co. soon became widely known, and having bought 30,000 acres of 
pine land in Roscommon, Gladwin and Clare counties, they established an 
extensive lumbering plant, and built some thirty miles of railroad, equipped 
with three locomotives and sixty cars, in addition to which they cultivated a 
farm of 1,000 acres. In 1882 the A. W. Wright Lumber Company was 
organized, and the lumber, land and railroad interests of Wells, Stone & Co. 
and also the firms of A. W. Wright & Co. and Wright & Knowlton at 
Saginaw, embracing the saw mill, salt block, planing mill, lumber yards, etc. 
were all merged in this corporation. The saw mill owned and operated by 
them is one of the largest on the river and has two Wickes' gang mills, one 
large gang being driven l)y a 110 horse-power engine with 16x28 cylinder, and 
a smaller gang driven by a 75 horse-power engine of 16x18 cylinder. The 
engine which drives the general machinery is of 300 horse power, 28x36 
cylinder, and counting the smaller engines and cylinders, in all twent}', 1,200 
horse-power is used in the saw mill establishment. The other machinery 
about the mill includes three trimmers, three edgers, a very powerful shot-gun 
steam feed, log loaders. Hill's steam niggers, two sets of Hall's shingle 
machinery. Hill et Co.'s steam drag saw, which is used in the shingle mill and 
is the onl}- one on the river, two of Hall's jointers, sapper and bolter, two lath 
machines, stave jointers, heading machines, folders, etc. The company runs a 
locomotive on their elevated tramway, the only one on the river, which the}' 
utilize to haul lumber from the mill to the piling grounds. They have two 
batteries of four, and one of two boilers, each 5x16 feet, use Covel's Automatic 
Saw Sharpeners for the gang and circular saws, and manufacture from 25,000,- 
000 to 30,000,000 feet oflumber, 12,000,000 shingles, 3,500,000 laths, 13,000,- 
000 to 15,000,000 staves and 60,000 sets of heading annually. In addition to 



116 The Industries op the Saoinaws. 



the saw and shingle mills, the company' has five salt wells and drill houses, 
each with a 35 horse-power pumping engine, and a salt block of very large 
proportions, and they manufacture 50,000 barrels of salt per annum. Their 
planing mill, which is located at Farley and Water streets, is replete with the 
most improved modern machinery, manufactui-ed by the S. A. Woods Maciiine 
Co., of Boston, the plant including two laige boilers, two engines of 70 and 
25 horse-power respectively, three planers and matchers, one endless belt single 
surfacer, one 30-inch double surfacer with feed rollers, the largest and best 
made ; and a B. F. Sturtevant Patent Lumber Dryer, three kilns, is used in 
connection with this mill. In addition^ the compan}' has large storage sheds, 
barns and offices, piling grounds, sorting yards, slab grounds, etc., all covering 
a river frontage of some 2,000 feet by a varying depth of 400 to 800 feet, witli 
about 1 800 feet of boom frontage. The lumbering for the compan}' is done 
b}' the firm of Wells, Stone & Co., running four camps, employing 300 men 
and 50 teams and utilizing thirt}' miles of railroad, three locomotives and sixty 
cars in Roscommon, Gladwin and Clare counties. In the saw mill and yards 
in this city 160 men are employed, while eighty men are engaged in the 
planing mill, and thirty-six horses are used in the business. The compan\' 
also has coal yards further south on Water street and handles about 5,000 tons 
of coal per year. The trade of the company is very large, its product being 
principally shipped to Ohio, Indiana, Michigan and eastern ports b}' rail and 
water, and a large car trade also being enjoyed in dressed lumber from tlie 
planing mill. Vast as the business is, its operations are conducted upon a 
perfect and accurate system, which has secured for the establishment the large 
and steadil}^ growing prosperity which has been a marked characteristic of the 
career of this company. Mr. Wright, in addition to his Presidency of this 
corporation, is otherwise prominently connected with leading business enter- 
prises in the Saginaw Valley and throughout Michigan, being of the firms of 
Wright & Ketcham and Wright and Davis, logs, lands and lumber ; Wells, 
Stone & Co., the Wells-Stone Mercantile Co., President of the First National 
Bank of Saginaw, the Commercial Bank of Mt. Pleasant, and was one of tiie 
incorporators, and for many years President, of the Tittabawassee Boom 
Company. He is also connected with many commercial enterprises in Detroit, 
Duluth, Louisville and other cities, has cattle ranches in Texas, Dakota, 
Montana, etc., and large real estate interests throughout Michigan and 
Minnesota. He resides at Alma, Mich., a town which is mainly of his creation 
and in which he takes a great interest. The steady increase in prosperity 
which he has enjoj^ed has been earned by close attention to business, superior 
executive ability' and a keen judgment which has enabled him to improve his 
opportunities. The gentlemen connected with him in the active management 
of the business of the company are all fitted by experience and ability for the 
discharge of the duties of their several positions, and each has contributed 
largely to the great inctrease in facilities, trade and prosperity enjoyed by this 
(corporation from year to year from its organization to the present time. 

Michigan Dairy Salt Company. — H. A. Batchelor, President ; ^\. 
J. Bartow, Secretary and Treasurer ; Manufacturers of Pure Dairy and Table 
Salt ; West end of Genesee street bridge. East Saginaw. — The prominence of 
the Saginaw Valley as a center of salt production led to the formation of the 
Michigan Dairy Salt Company, formed for the purpose of manufacturing 
the finer grades of dairy and table salt. The original incorporation of 
the compan}' occurred in 1877, when the}' began operations in the Power 
Block on South Water street, at that time having a capacity for 50,000 barrels 
per year. In 1883 the present works were built, having a capacity for 100,000 
barrels per annum. The main building, which is a three-story structure, 50 



The Industries of the Saqinaws. 1 1 



feet high, is 110x65 feet in diinensions, and its machinery is operated by 
means of a 35 horse-power engine fed by a 0x12 boiler. Adjoining the build- 
ing is an addition, 20x70 feet in dimensions, used for packing sacks and 
barrels. The company receives coarse salt by car loads on the track at the 
doors of their works, and it is then elevated to the top lloor, where it is waslied 
in purified brine, and after a week or two of draining it is sent down to the 
lower floor to the drying kilns, consisting of two large revolving iron cylinders 
thirty feet in length and five feet in diameter, and it is then elevated to screens 
on the top floor and passed down again to the grinding stone, from which it is 
brought up again and distributed through a horizontal trough about seventy 
feet long, from which it is fed through hoppers to the packing table immedi- 
ately underneath, where two rows of girls pack it into two, three, five and ten 
pound white cotton bags which are packed in barrels of 280 pounds eacli. 
The larger bags of 28, 56, 112 and 224 pounds respectively, are of strong 
drilling, and are not packed in barrels. The works give employment to fifty 
hands. The coarse salt is received and the finer salt is sold through the 
medium of the Michigan Salt Association, by whom it is distributed through 
their various agencies to all parts of the country, especially throughout the 
^orth. South and West ; the product of these works having a merited celebrity 
for the great superiority of its quality over any other produced, tlie dairy and 
table salt made at this establishment being undoubtedly the best in the world, 
and as such is largely in favor with consumers, and in steadily increasing de- 
mand by the trade. Mr H. A. Batchelor, the President of the company, is a 
prominent business man, well known as a member of the firm of Whitne}' & 
Batchelor, manufacturers of lumber and salt, and the other members of the Board 
of Directors are Mr. W. J. Bartow, Secretary and Treasurer of this company, 
and in addition a member of the firm of Bartow & Enright, proprietors of the 
Kast Saginaw Omnibus Line, and agent of the estate of Jesse Hoyt, and also a 
large dealer in real estate and lumber ; Mr. J. A. Hamilton, formerly President 
of this company, was of the firm of Hamilton, McClure & Co.; Mr. D. L. C. 
Piaton, of the firm of Eaton, Potter & Co., lumber, and Rust, Eaton & Co., 
lumber and salt ; and Mr. Walter S. Eddy, of the firm of Charles K. Eddy & 
Son, manufacturers of lumber and salt, thus oflScered by successful business 
men, having vast resources and unexcelled facilities, the company has attained 
its present prominent position by the superiority of product and business man- 
agement. The excellence of the quality of salt manufactured by the company- 
has received the indorsement of success in competition with the product of other 
makers. A premium was offered at the Exposition at St. Louis, Mo., last year, 
for butter treated with different brands of salt. The butter taking the prize 
was made with salt made by this company. At the Fat Stock and Dairy Show, 
at Chicago, November 18, 1887, the salt of this company took three prizes, 
including the First Premium, the (xrand Prize, and the Grand Sweepstakes 
Prize. 

Crescent Match Factory.— C. H. Davis, President ; John L. Jack- 
son, Vice-President ; H. H. Green, Secretary and Treasurer ; N. H. M. 
Whitaker, Superintendent; corner of Water and Waller streets, Saginaw 
City. — It is conceded by all who have investigated the subject that the Sagi- 
naws present a favorable opportunity for the establishment of every descrip- 
tion of industries for which lumber forms the raw material, and every such 
enterprise inaugurated adds materially to the productive capacity of the twin 
cities. Prominent among the more recently formed establishments of this 
character is the corporation known as the Crescent Match Factory, recently 
organized in Saginaw City and which occupies a two-story building, 40x90 feet 
in dimensions, equipped with a 45 horse-power engine, Trever shingle machines. 



118 The Industries op the Saoinaws. 



(the matches being made out of shingle wood), edgers, cutoff saws, together 
with filling machines and all the latest and most highly improved machinery 
and appliances adapted to the business ol match manufacture, and in addition 
to their factor}' premises the company have a dry kiln, 16x24 feet in dimen- 
sions, a dipping room, 30x40 feet and a store house 26x40 feet, and in addition 
to the manufacture of matches the company make their own boxes, devoting 
the upper floor of their main building to this pappose. Thus equipped, the 
company has a capacity for the manufacture of 1,000 gross of matches dail}', 
and will give employment to about 100 hands in the manufacture of parlor 
matches, of which the product of the factory exclusivel}^ consists. The com- 
pany' is one of ample financial stability and is composed of business men of 
successful record and the highest character, including Mr. C. H. Davis, who in 
addition to being President of this company, is also President of the Saginaw 
Manufacturing Co. Vice-President Jackson is in addition to his interest in 
this business the proprietor of the most extensive machine shop in Saginaw 
City ; Mr. H. H. Green, Secretar}' and Treasurer of this company, is Treasurer 
and Manager of the Saginaw Manufacturing Co., and Mr. N. H. M. Whitaker, 
late of the Diamond Match Co., the Superintendent, is a gentleman of long and 
practical experience in the details of match manufacture, and in his hands the 
practical management of the factory is confided. Thus officered and super- 
vised, and endowed with all the means for securing success, the prosperity of 
this enterprise is assured. 

Feige-Silsbee Furniture Manufacturing Company— H. C. 

Silsbee, President ; Ernst Feige, Vice-President ; E. T. Judd, Secretary and 
Treasurer ; Warren and Brewster streets. East Saginaw. — One of the most 
notable additions to the manufacturing facilities of the Saginaws is that made 
in the in(;orporation in 1886 of the Feige-Silsbee Furniture Manufacturing 
Compan}' with a capital stock of $125,000. The factor^' is a new three-story 
and basement building, 200x65 feet in dimensions, with a brick engine room, 
80x50 feet, dry kiln, 30x50, and yards and out-buildings covering ten acres of 
ground, eligibly situated with railroad tracks at the door of the factory. The 
premises are completely equipped with all the latest and mostly highly im- 
proved machinery and appliances adapted to the requirements of the business, 
and employment is now given to 120 liands, which will eventuall}' be increased 
to between 200 and 300. The capacity is very large, and every description of 
bedroom and liall furniture and mantels is manufactured at the works from 
the highest priced and most artistic to the medium and cheap grades. The 
firm has already built up a business extending nearly throughout the United 
States, covering the entire country east to the Atlantic, west to California and 
south to Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi. Mr. Feige, of this firm, came to 
East Saginaw with his father in 1854, his father engaging in the furniture 
business until 1860, when he turned it over to his sons, George, Ernst and 
Henry. This firm continued business for a long time, but was finally dis- 
solved, Mr. Ernst Feige establishing in business for himself prior to the 
formation of the present corporation. Mr. Silsbee is from New York, where 
he was for twenty-five years engaged in the manufacture of furniture, and Mr. 
•Judd, Secretary and Treasurer of the company, is also a well known business 
man, being President of the First National Bank of East Saginaw, and Secre- 
tary and Treasurer of the Sagmaw, Tuscola & Huron Railway. The firm is 
one of vast resources and the best facilities, and composed of men whose 
practical experience and first-class reputation are important elements contribu- 
ting to success. No enterprise in the Saginaws is of more practical value to 
its industrial development than that of this compan}-. 



The Industries op the Saginaws. no 



John L. Jackson. — Manufacturer of Steam Engines, Salt Well, Haw 
and Sliingle Mill 31acliinery, and Castings of all kinds ; Corner of Water and 
Jelferson streets, Saginaw Cit}'. — Mr. Jackson started in business eight 
years ago and conducted it successfully until in August, 1885, bis premises 
were destroyed b}' fire. With characteristic energ}' he at once rebuilt, and has 
now a larger business and premises than ever. His works comprise a two- 
story brick machine shop, 100x60 feet in dimensions, with an L 30x100 feet, 
and a large foundry and yards covering half a block. In his machine shops he 
has a 50 horse-power engine, seven lathes, one of which is 4i^-feet swing, two 
42-inch planers, four drills, one of them a 42-inch drill, a shaper, bolt cutter, 
and all other requisite plant and machinery adapted to the successful prosecu- 
tion of the business upon a large scale, the whole making up a machine shop 
equipment which has no superior in the State. In the foundry he has a 10 
horse-power engine which run his rattler, blower, etc., and a complete outfit, 
lie manufactures steam engines and machinery for salt wells, saw mills and 
shingle mills and all kinds of castings, and makes a specialty' of a new auto- 
matic cut-off engine, his own recent invention, one of which he has put up in 
(icrmain's new mill and another in the new Crescent match factory, of which 
he is Vice-President. In addition to manufacturing he conducts a completely 
equipped repairing department and gives close and accurate attention to repaii'- 
ing machinery, well tubing and jDipe fitting, aud he also builds and refits 
machiner}- of all kinds. He gives employment to a force of skilled workmen 
ranging from twenty-five to fifty in number, according to the season, and enjoys 
a large trade extending to all points within a radius of one hundred miles of 
the twin cities. Mr. Jackson is a thoroughly practical man in all the depart- 
ments of the business and carefully supervises all its details so as to secure the 
uniform superiority in materials and workmanship which marks all the pro- 
ducts of his works. His energy and the propriety of his business conduct have 
earned for him a steadily growing prosperity which is the result of merit. 

Peter O.Andre. — Heal Estate ; Office, Andre Block, Court street, Sag- 
inaw Cit3\ — Mr. Andre, who was born in Detroit in 1817, is one of the oldest 
and most prominent of the citizens of Saginaw, to which he came first in 1846, 
purchasing the stock of goods of the American Fur Compan}-, and continued in 
the mercantile business until 1862, when he sold his entire stock of goods, and 
engaged in the lumbering business for three years, after which he embarked in 
the dry goods and boot and shoe trade in Saginaw until 1869. He has been en- 
gaged in the real estate and lumber business in connection with his other pursuits 
since 1848, and has been for many years one of the largest holders of Saginaw 
Cit}' propert}', which he has been busily engaged in improving for a number of 
years. He first erected on Hamilton street a brick block of stores in 1866, 
and later with Mr. Moll erected the Andre & Moll block on Court street, and 
in addition has built the brick stores at 412 and 414 Court street and the stores 
adjoining, as well as a considerable amount of business pioperty on Washing- 
ton street. He still owns a number of prominent pieces of property, and has at 
all times on hand desirable tracts in all parts of the cit}'. During his long res- 
idence in Saginaw from earl}' days to the present time Mr. Andre has been 
prominently' identified with the development of the material resources of the 
city, and has ever been regarded as a progressive and active business man. 
He served the city in 1864 as Mayor, was Register of Deeds for Saginaw coun- 
ty as early as 1850, was a member for seven years of the Common Council and 
Supervisor for nine vears. The great growth of the city during the period of 
more than fort}^ years of Mr. Andre's residence in it has fully justified his 
judgment in making early investments in the city and in the confidence he has 
ever felt in its future. 



120 The Industries op the Saginaws. 



G. B. & S. L. Wiggins. — Manufacturers of Pine and Hard Wood 
Lumber and Salt, and Dealers in Logs, Lumber, Pine and Faming Land ; Foot 
of Hess street, East Saginaw. — Prominent among the manufacturing estab- 
lishments located at the south end is that now conducted by the firm composed 
of Messrs. George B. and Stephen L. Wiggins. The site now occupied by their 
mill premises has long been utilized by similar industries, the firm of Bundy 
& Youmans having owned a mill on this site many years ago. This mill was 
burned, and another mill was built and conducted by Messrs. Wiggins, Cooper & 
Co., Mr. James Cooper becoming a partner in the firm. -In Jul}', 1883, this mill 
also burned, and immediately another mill, the one now in operation, was 
erected, and was conducted by the firm of Wiggins, Cooper & Co. until the 
present fall, when 3Ir. Cooper withdrew from the firm, which changed to its 
present style. The mill is a two-story structure, 50x120 feet in dimensions, 
equipped with a circular, steam feed carriage, steam log turner or nigger, run 
by a 16x30 cylinder engine, with three boilers each 5x16, and all other 
requisite machinery, the mill having a capacity for the production of 6,000,000 
feet of lumber per year. In addition to this, the firm has a planing mill 
attached, where they manufacture flooring, siding, etc., and which is equipped 
with planers, matchers, »re-saws, siding saws and all accessory machinery, pro- 
pelled by a forty horse-power engine, and in every way adapted to dressing 
lumber upon a large scale. The firm has two salt wells, with a production of 
from 25,000 to 30,000 barrels annually, and in addition to their lumber and 
salt product, the firm makes about 200,000 staves and about 30,000 sets of 
heading per annum. Gr. B. and S. L. Wiggins also run a large lumbering busi- 
ness, having a camp on Tobacco River with about sevent}^ men employed, and 
in their mill premises in South Saginaw the}' employ- a force ranging from 
forty to sixt}' men, their works including mills, salt works and lumber yai'ds, 
covering over ten acres of ground. The product of their mills is in large de- 
mand, and the firm does a considearble trade in Southern Michigan, Ohio, 
Pennsylvania and Seneca Falls via Tonawanda. Their salt is sold through 
the medium of the Michigan Salt Association, and the firm are also owners of 
and have for sale desirable pine and farming lands in various parts of Michi- 
gan. Mr. S. L. Wiggins attends to the lumbering interests of the firm, which 
puts in large amounts of logs for themselves and for other parties, while Mr. 
Gr. B. Wiggins attends to the management of the works. The firm has long 
been prominentl}- identified with the lumber interests of the Valley, and is 
prosperous as a result of the close attention paid to the details of the business. 

W- G. Smith. — Manufacturer of Parlor Furniture and Lounges ; 302 
Court street, Saginaw Cit}'. — A prominent addition to the manufacturing estab- 
lishments of the Saginaws is that of Mr. Smith, who recently started in this 
enterprise. Mr. Smith is a gentleman who has long been practically engaged 
in this business, having learned his trade in Cleveland, 0., and worked in 
Chicago and other cities, and prior to establishing in business for himself, was 
engaged with the firm of Foster, Charles & Co. as an upholsterer. He is a 
superior workman, with educated taste and judgment, and starting in with the 
intention to excel in the quality of the productions of his establishment he has 
alread}' built up a prosperous trade in the Saginaws and other towns through- 
out Michigan and Ohio, selling at wholesale only. He occupies a two-story 
l)uilding, 25x100 feet in dimensions, and in addition has a warehouse' on Water 
street. He gives steady employment to a force of highly skilled workmen, and 
has a traveling salesman, by whom he is represented on the road. The merit 
of his products, and the fair and accurate methods upon which he conducts 
business, cannot fail to procure for his establishment a prosperous career. 



The Inphstriks of thk Sacmnaws. 



121 



Edward Germain. — Manufacturer of Lumber, 8ash, Doors, Blinds, 
Box Sliooks, etc ; Brewster street, near Genesee axenue, East Saginaw. — One 




of the most notable examples of success in productive industry furnished by 
the history of Saginaw manufactures, is that of the factory conducted by Mr. 
Edward Germain, which has enjoyed a steady increase in its facilities and ex- 
pansion of its trade from its original establishment in 1 874 to the present time. 
The business was originally located at Park and Millard streets, upon a com- 
paratively modest scale, the equipment of the mill at that time consisting of 
one planer, one resaw, one edger and a set of sash, door and blind machinery, 
propelled by a 10x16 engine fed by a 4x12 tubular Iwiler. Additions were 
afterward made from time to time, but in 1883 the business having outgrown 
the capacity of the premises which it occupied, it was removed to its present 
more commodious location on Brewster street, a few blocks north of 
Genesee avenue, where the works, with adjoining yards, now cover twenty-eight 
acres of ground. The l)uildings include a four-story brick mill, 140x120 feet in 
dimensions, a three-story brick L, 96x228 feet, a planing mill occupying a 
frame addition 154x128 feet, iive Sturtevant patent dry kilns, each 20x75 feet 
in dimensions, an engine and boiler house, a dust collector, etc, the whole af- 
fording over four acres of floor space. Side tracks of the Flint & Pere Mar- 
quette and Michigan Central railways give unsurpassed facilities for the re- 
ceipt of raw material and shipment of manufactured product. The equipment 
of the works is in every respect complete and modern, including four boilers 
5x16, and three engines of 400, 75 and 25 horse power respectively, six large 
planers, two pony planers, five moulding raachineSj a complete set of door ma- 
chinery and wood polishers and a vast amount of other machinery adapted to 
the manufacture of doors, sash, l)linds, frames, mouldings, packing boxes, box 
shooks, cloth boards, stairs, stair railings, balustrades, posts, all kinds of hard and 
soft wood interior finish, rough and dressed lumber, lath, shingles, etc., in all 
of which lines the firm does a very large >)usiness, its daily output amounting 
to two car loads of box shooks, from 400 to 500 doors, from 400 to 500 pairs 



122 The Industries op the Saginaws. 

of sash, from 150 to 200 pairs each of blinds aud shutters, and other products 
in proportion. Of screen doors 75,000 are produced ])er season. The force 
now emplo3'ed amounts to 200 men, and the trade of Mr. Germain extends t^o 
all Eastern and Ohio markets in the general lines of manufacture, the box 
shooks going to the States of Connecticut, Ohio, New York and Illinois. This 
vast business has been built up by close attention to all the details of the busi- 
ness and by careful supervision of all the manufacturing operations, in order 
to se(uire for the product tliat uniform excellence for which it is celebrated. 
Mr. Germain is a gentleman of superior executive abil'ty, and has conducted 
his enterprise upon such methods as have commended him to the confidence 
and approval of the trade throughout the countr}', and has merited the success 
which has attended his enterprise. 

F. B. Wiggins & Co. — Wood- Working Machinery and Mill Supplies ; 
113 South Jefferson street. East Saginaw. — This firm, of which Messrs. V. B. 
and George B. Wiggins are the individual members, was established in 1885, 
since which time their business has steadily grown, as a result of the superior 
assortment of their goods and the fair and liberal methods adopted b}' them 
in the prosecution of their business. They occupy the main floor and base- 
ment, 25x100 feet in dimensions, of the premises at 113 South Jefferson street, 
where the^' carry full and complete stocks of every description of wood-working 
machinery and mill supplies, making a specialty of planing machine knives, 
aud also carrying a complete assortment of Hoyt belting, rubber belting, hose, 
circular saws, band saws, emery wheels. Babbitt metal, cotton waste, sand 
paper, lace leather, files, etc. The firm has recently bought the patent of the 
Giant Beader, a machine attachment which can be adjusted to making any 
size of beading, and in which the}' have large sales, and shortly intend to 
increase their facilities for manufacture. In addition to the lines above 
enumerated they carr}' full and complete stocks of butchers' tools and 
supplies. The firm is prepared at any time to furnish full planing mill outfits 
and all mill supplies, and gives employment to a force of five clerks and 
assistants, and a staff" of traveling salesmen represents the firm throughout the 
northern and western portion of Michigan. Mr. George B. Wiggins, who is 
an uncle of the other member, is a prominent business man, being a member 
of the firm of Wiggins, Cooper & Co., lumber and salt manufacturers, and of 
G. B. & S. L. Wiggins, also lumber and salt manufacturers ; and of the firm 
of Wiggins & Howry, dealers in lumber, logs and pine lands. Mr. F. J). 
Wiggins is a thoroughly practical and experienced man of superior business 
attainments, and by close attention to all the details of the business has built 
it up to a position of prosperity and stead}- growth. 

Cameron & Merrill. — Lumber and Salt Manufacturers ; Works at the 
foot of King street, Saginaw City. — This firm is one of the well-known manu- 
facturing concerns of the Saginaw Valley, the works occupied b}' them having 
been originally established in 18G4 by the Forest A^alley Salt and Lumber 
Company. The cut of the mill amounts to 15,000,000 feet of lumber annuall}', 
in addition to which the firm manufactures from 800,000 to 1,000,000 staves, 
and from 45,000 to 50,000 sets of heading. In addition to their mill works, 
the firm operate tliree salt wells and a salt block, and make about 35,000 
barrels of salt annually. Included in their premises are barrel stock works, 
warehouses, booms, docks, piling grounds, etc., covering some fifteen acres of 
ground. The}' have evei-y facility for the receipt of raw material and the ship- 
ment of manufactured product by rail or water. Employment is given to a 
force of one hundred men, and the lumber product of the firm is shipped to 
New York State, Pennsylvania and Ohio, some being sold to local yards and 



TiiK Tni)i:si'Kiks of tiik Saoinaws. ' 123 

throughout the State, and the entire output of their salt works being sold 
through the medium of the ^lichigan Salt Association. The members of the 
firm are Messrs. Norman Cameron and Thonias .Merrill. Mr. Thomas Merrill 
is identified with numerous business enterprises and individually interested in 
real estate, owning the Merrill Block, in Saginaw, as well as large amounts of 
pine and farming lands, logs, etc. 

H. p. Smith. — Ileal instate. Etc.; 112 South Washington avenue, East 
Saginaw. — Mr. Smith has been actively engaged in the real estate business for 
the past twenty years, and was for a number of years in partnership with Mr. 
Frank Lawrence, Init since January, 1887, has conducted the business alone 
lie has on hand at all times desirable residence and business properties in 
East Saginaw, as well as farming tracts in Saginaw, Gratiot, Isabella, Mid- 
land, Gladwin and Bay counties. He also carries on a considerable business 
in loans, and is prepared to loan money on the most favorable terms on real 
estate in the twenty-five counties surrounding Saginaw, in addition to which 
he does a large business in city mortgages. Mr. Smith, from his long 
experience in the city, has acquired a thorough and accurate knowledge of 
values of real estate in Saginaw and the surrounding counties, and is regarded 
as an authority upon the subject ; and by the close attention paid by him to 
all commissions placed in his hands, and the uniform accuracy and reliability 
of his business methods, has earned a merited reputation and prominence in 
this department of business. In addition to this business Mr Smith is also 
engaged in business as a manufacturer of and dealer in carriages, buggies, etc., 
his premises being located at the corner of Franklin and German streets. 
This business which is an old established one, he bought last spring, from F. 
J. Knapp, and it is now managed for Mr. Smith by Mr. George Scolien, a man 
of close and practical knowledge of all the details of the business. The 
premises occupied include a show room, 25x75 feet in dimensions, with a 
workshop in the rear, 20x80 feet and the adjoining lot, 25x150 ieet for the 
storage of materials, etc. Employment is given to a force of fifteen highly 
skilled workmen, a specialty being made of Concord wagons, although all 
kinds of light business vehicles are manufactured. All the productions of the 
establishment are of the highest standard of quality, and it does a large 
business in the Saginaws and throughout Northern Michigan. In connection 
with this business a well equipped repairing department is conducted and a 
specialty is made of carriage painting in the highest style of the art. Mr. 
Smith is an old resident of East Saginaw and one of its representative citizens, 
and has always taken a great interest in its growth and development. He 
owns a farm of four hundred acres, two-thirds cleared, about four miles south- 
east of East Saginaw, which he is stocking with Clydesdale horses, Poland- 
China swine, and Holstein-Friesian cattle. Of the latter he iias now forty 
head, nine of which he imported. The Holstein-Friesian are the greatest milk 
producers of any breed of cattle in the world. They are of large frame, 
I'ound, plump liody, short legs, and white and black in color, the latter pre- 
dominating. They are docile in disposition and keep in good condition on 
short allowance of food. The farm is managed by Mr. George W. Brown, 
who is experienced in the business and thoroughly efficient. 

Koehler Brothers.— Steam Forge, Bolt Works and Machine Shops ; 
208 South Water street. East Saginaw.— Attention has been called, in an earlier 
part of this work, to the great and growing importance of the iron industries 
of the Saginaws. There are fifteen large and well equipped establishments, 
involving an outlay of over $1,000,000 in machinery, buildings and plant, and 
having iin annual production of over $2,000,00(1. In fact the Saginaws are 



124 The Industries ot the SagiNAWs 



more largel}' engaged in this industry than any other city in Michigan, out- 
side of Detroit. Among the important and successful concerns in this line is 
that now conducted by the firm of Koehler Brothers. This business was 
established in 1852, thus ranking as one of tlie oldest manufacturing concerns 
of the Saginaw Valley. It was founded by Mr. Frederick A. Koehler, who came 
from New Jerse}' and settled in Saginaw City. Shortly after his arrival Mr. 
Alfred Hoyt and others induced him to remove to East Saginaw, and he started 
in business by building a blacksmith shop and residence at the corner of 
Washington and Tuscola streets, and did a steadily growing business, having all 
the work on Host's vessels and most of the mill work, until succeeded bj* his sons, 
Messrs. James A. and Fred. H. Koehler, in 1878. The business having out- 
grown the facilities of the old location, the Messrs. Koehler, who carried on 
the business under the name of Koehler Brothers, bought, built on and removed 
the business to the premises now occupied by the works, having a frontage of 
100 feet by a depth of 120. In 1880 Mr. Fred. H. Koehler died, and the 
business has since been carried on by Messrs. James A. Koehler and Clarkson 
A. Koehler. The works have all the requisite plant and mo,chinery for doing all 
the heaviest blacksmithing and mill work, and their trade reaches not only all 
over the State of Michigan, but also throughout Minnesota and Wisconsin, 
and as far away as Texas. Colorado and Los Angeles, Cal. The works have 
special facilities for manufacturing salt and artesian well tools of all kinds, as 
well as conveyer chains for saw dust, slabs, etc., bolts, pole joints, and all 
the requisites for saw and lumber mills. {Employment is given to a force of 
twenty skilled workmen, and the thoroughness with which all the details of 
the business are conducted, the superior workmanship and the unsurpassed 
quality of the materials used have secured for the products of this establish- 
ment a widespread reputation ; and the promptness and accuracy with which 
all orders are filled, and the uniformly I'eliable methods upon which the busi- 
ness is conducted give the firm a high place in the confidence of mill men and 
owners of machinery in all parts of the country'. Both Mr. James A. Koehler, 
and Mr. Clarkson A. Koehler, are thoroughly practical and experienced men in 
the business, and all its details are conducted undei their personal supervision. 

Joseph Stringham. — Insurance and Adjuster of Fire Losses ; Ban- 
croft Block, Genesee and Washington avenues, East Saginaw. — Mr. Stringham 
is one of the best known and most prosperous underwriters in the State. He 
was born in Detroit and located in East Saginaw in 1867, forming a partnership 
with M. H. Gallager in the insurance business. Soon afterward the firm was 
changed to Ten Eyck, Stringham & Wheeler and later to Stringham & Wheeler. 
This business was afterward disposed of and Mr. Stringham was for two years 
Assistant State Agent of the Home of New York, and four years State Agent 
of the New York Underwriters' Agency. In 1878 he returned to East Sagi- 
naw and entered into partnership with E. J. McClintock, and in ^881 went into 
business in his present individual venture. His experience has made him an 
authorit}' upon all insurance subjects. He represents a number of the leading 
insurance corporations of the country, and is prepared to issue policies for fire, 
life, accident and plate glass insurance upon the most reasonable terms con- 
sistent with the secui'it}' of the investment. He represents in fire insurance 
the J^^tna, of Hartford, capital $4,000,000 and net surplus $3,450,221 ; the 
Detroit Fire and Marine, of Michigan, capital $300,000 and net surplus of 
$405,543 ; the Germania Fire Insurance Company, of New York, capital 
$1,000,000, net surplus, $638,084 ; the Hartford, of Connecticut, capital 
$1,250,000 and net surplus of $1,789,987 ; the Liverpool and London and 
Globe, of Liverpool, England, with tot?l assets in its United States liranch of 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 



125 



*(;,639,781, and a net surplus of $3,077,539 ; the Phenix, of Brooklyn, N. Y., 
capital $1,000,000 and net surplius of $557,087 ; the libode Island Under- 
writers' Association of Providence, capital $500,000 and surplus of $222,960 ; 
the St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company, of Minnesota, capital $500,- 
000 and surplus of $348,675 and the Underwriters' Agency of New York, also 
of large capital and resources. In life insurance he represents the well-known 
and reliable Mutual Reserve Fund Life Association, which at the beginning of 
the present year had assets amounting to a total of $1,586,493.55, against 
total liabilities of $375,700, leaving a net surplus of $1,210,793.55. He also 
represents the Pacific Mutual Life and Accident Insurance Co., of San 
Francisco, with a capital of $100,000, assets of $1,498,621 and a reserve at 4^ 
per cent, of *1, 269,727. lie also represents Lloyd's Plate Glass Insurance 
Co., of New York, the oldest, largest and most substantial of the plate glass 
insurance companies. IMr. Stringham devotes his entire attention to the insur- 
ance business, and is an expert adjuster of fire losses and special correspondent. 
He is frequently called away to adjust fire losses in other cities, and his 
accurate knowledge of insurance matters and the unsurpassed solidity and 
reputation of the companies he represents as well as his own accurate and 
reliable business methods have secured for him a prosperity which is the result 
of merit. 

William Roeser & Sons.— Dealers in Farming Tools and Implements, 
Wagons, Carriages, Harness, P]tc.; 416 and 418 Franklin street, Saginaw City. 




— Mr. Koeser, who is a pioneer resident of Saginaw county, established himself 
in business as a general store keeper in Freeland in 1849. In 1870 ho established 
this business on North Hamilton street in the location where Martin's new- 
livery barn is now- in course of erection. He continued the business with signal 
success, each year showing an increase in the volume of his trade, and in 1883 



126 The Industries of the Saoinaws. 



bis sons, William Roeser, Jr., and Charles L. Ftoeser, who had received a prac- 
tical training in the business under the experienced supervision of their father, 
were admitted to the firm, which then assumed its present style. The premises 
occupied by the firm embrace a fine new two-story double building, 00x120 
feet in dimensions, with the upper floor of the postoffice next door, also 00x120 
feet, and in addition occupy for storage purposes a lai'ge barn and wagon shop 
on Monroe street, and the}' also have a warehouse for storage at Freeland. 
The stock of the firm, which is very large, embraces everything in the line of 
farming tools and machinerj', wagons, carriages, harness, etc., and the firm has 
the agency for the world-renowned McCormick binders, reapers and mowers, 
which have attested their superiority as the best machines of the kind ever 
invented. They are sole agents for the Nichols & Shepard Co.'s and Advance 
engines and threshers, the Three Rivers vibrator and Empire clover huller, 
John Deere's all steel plows, and many others, the best made, and carry large 
stocks of farm wagons, including the Flint, Studebaker and Milburn makes, 
Studebaker, Milburn and Rogers platform spring wagons, buggies and carriages, 
Portland and swell-bod}' cutters, John Deere, Trump, Bonanza, Albion and 
Boss cultivators, Empire and Crown drills, Crown and Red, White and Blue 
mowers, and a large number of other first-class agricultural machines and 
vehicles. They also carry a complete stock of harness. A large force of 
clerks and assistants is employed in the house, and several travelers represent 
the firm throughout the Saginaw Valley and Northern Michigan. The details 
of the business are supervised in an intelligent manner by the members of the 
firm, and a large increase in its trade has been earned by close attention to all 
the details of the business, great care in the selection of the stock and uniform 
fairness and reliability in the methods upon which the business is conducted. 

Heavenrich Brothers & Co. — Max Heavenrich, President ; Carl 
Heavenrich, Vice-President; Louis Mautner, Secretary and Treasurer; Wholesale 
and Retail Clothiers, and Dealers in Lumbermen's Furnishing Goods ; 301-309 
Genesee avenue, and 102-114 North Franklin street. East Saginaw. — Among 
the larger commercial establishments which have contributed in an important 
degree to the business development of the Saginaws this firm occupies a nota- 
ble and prominent place. The business was established in 1876 by the firm of 
Heavenrich Brothers, and was conducted by them until 1886, when the present 
company was incorporated with a capital stock of $150,000. The history of the 
enterprise from its inception to the present time has been one of annual and 
steady growth, extensive additions being made to the facilities of the firm from 
time to time, and its retail and wholesale patronage steadily increasing from 
year to j'ear. The premises occupied by the firm are the largest devoted to 
this branch of commerce in the Saginaws, four stores on Genesee avenue being 
devoted to the retail trade of the house, the clothing department and gents' 
furnishing goods department being each 25x100 feet in dimensions, the custom 
tailoring department, 22x80 feet, and the boot and shoe department adjoining, 
22x100 feet. On North Franklin street the firm has one store 22x80 feet and 
two 22x40 feet in dimensions, and in the rear of these are two others 40x44 
and 25x30, the North Franklin street stores comprising the wholesale depart- 
ment. The stock embraces everything in the line of clothing, from the finest 
goods made, the productions of the most noted English, French and German 
looms, to heavier articles suited for rough wear ; while in lumbermen's fur- 
nishing goods the assortment contains everything pertaining to the line of 
unsurpassed variety and in txtent of stock not excelled by that of any estab- 
lishment in the State. The furnishing goods department is also complete in 
every particular, and the stock of hats and caps embraces every style of men's 



The Industries of the Saginaws. ]2'1 



and youths' headwear. The boot and shoe departnient is perfectly equipped, 
embracing- not only the products of the best eastern manufacturers in ladies', 
men's, misses', youths' and children's wear, but also a speciall}' superior stock 
of lumbermen's camp and drive boots, boot pacs and other heavy goods suited 
for the woods and river. The boot and shoe department is conducted by the 
firm of Heavenrich & Co., of which Messrs. Max and Carl Ileavenrich, Louis 
Seifert and Ed. F. Fleury are the members, and which was established in April, 
1884. The steady development of this business is one of the most gratifying 
instances of commei'cial success afforded by the business histor}' of tiie A^alle^'. 
The present prosperous condition has been built up b}' a combination of the 
highest order of executive ability with an intelligent comprehension of the 
needs of the citizens of the Saginaws in this branch of industry. As a conse- 
quence the business includes not onl}' the largest retail trade in this line in 
Northern Michigan, but also a large and steadily expanding jobbing trade 
throughout the northern counties of the State and the Upper Peninsula, the 
linn by the vast volume of its business and its favorable relations with the 
leading manufacturers being enabled to offer superior inducements, both in 
quality and price, and in this respect enabled to compete with any house in the 
country. Employment is given in the clothing and furnishing goods depart- 
ments to a force of twenty-five clerks and assistants, while six more are em- 
ployed in the shoe department, and from thirty-five to forty experienced cutters 
and tailors are employed in the custom tailoring department, which latter is 
one of the most completely' equipped in the State, and turns out goods which 
in fit and workmanship have no superiors. The head of this vast establish- 
ment, Mr. Max Heavenrich, occupies a deserved prominence among the leading 
citizens of the Saginaws, and is noted no less for his public spirit than for his 
superior business attainments. In addition to his position as President of this 
corporation he is Treasurer of the large wholesale grocery firm of The James 
Stewart Company, is a director of the East Saginaw National Bank and Presi- 
dent of the Business Men's Association of East Saginaw, an organization which 
contributes more largely than any other to the growth and development of the 
industries and material interests of the city. No establishment is more truly 
representative, and none is more worthy, b}' the extent of its resources, the 
suj)erior character of its facilities and the A'olume of its trade, of prominent 
mention in a work detailing the results of commercial and productive energy 
in the Saginaws. 

Daudt, W^atson&Oo. — Importers and Jobbers of Earthenware, China 
and Glassware ; Lamps, Chandeliers, Silver Plated Ware and Table Cutleiy ; 
420 and 422 Genesee avenue. East Saginaw.^The largest and 
finest establishment in the china and glassware trade in North- 
ern Michigan is that of Daudt, Watson & Co., dealers in china, 
earthenware, glassware, lamps, gas and oil chandeliers, fancy 
goods, table cutlery and silver plated ware. The business was 
first established b}' Daudt & Klauser, and the present firm suc- 
ceeded February 1, 1887. The partners are Ferd. Daudt, 
Hamilton Watson and C. Daudt, the latter gentleman being the 
President of the Daudt Glass & Crockery Co. at Toledo, O. 
The premises occupied by the firm embrace a handsome three- 
story and basement brick building, 50x100 feet in dimensions, 
and finely appointed throughout. The stock of goods here dis- 
played is one of the finest to been seen anywhere in this line of 
trade. It embraces artistic pottery, porcelain and glassware 
brought -from nearly every prominent establishment and glass 
factory in the world. Among the richly decorated goods are 




128 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



dinner sets, breakfast and tea sets, toilet sets of the Limoges ware of Haviland 
& Co., and tiie rich and popular Carlsbad ware. In ornamental pieces they 
have a large variety of the latest novelties of the European manufactories, 
special sets for fish, game, soup and icecream, etc., artistic pottery in placques, 
figures, vases and many difi'erent designs of the new Belleek china, a rare shell 
like procelainof exquisite shading and glazing hard as the best Japanese ware. 
In glassware they carry full lines of the richest French and Belgian as well as 
the fine American cut flint and the new and rich Bohemian satin glass in deli- 
cate shades and decorations. The stock also embraces a great variety of gas 
and oil chandeliers and lamps of all kinds, -including the renowned Rochester 
lamps in electro plate, bronze and brass, and handsome hand painted shades 
and globes of all colors and etchings. Here are also heavy china, stone and 
earthenware and glass for hotel and steamboat use, finer goods and ornamental 
ware for family use, cutler}^ and silver plated ware. The immense show rooms 
are marvels of elegance, taste and beaut}-. The firm employs a large staff" of 
clerks and salesmen, and the trade, both wholesale and retail, is very large and 
active, extending throughout the State. The members of the firm are gentle- 
men well known in this communitj-, and the house has retained its old cus- 
tomers as a result of the great superiority of the selection of the goods, the 
reasonableness of the prices, and the fairness of all its dealings. 

Remer Brothers. — Manufacturers of Kelley Island Stone Lime ; and 
Dealers in Coal, Calcined Plaster, Cement, Hair, Brick, Fire Brick and Clay ; 
Yard, Water street, foot of Madison street, Saginaw City. — This business was 
established seventeen years ago by Mr. J. Remer, the firm afterward changing 
to J. Eemer & Son, and in 1882 assuming its present style, the members of 
the firm now being Messrs. Charles C. and Henry C. Remer. They occupy 
spacious premises covering an area of about 250x120 feet with railyoad 
tracks in front, and spacious and convenient docks in the rear, and have large 
lime kilns with tramways on which stone is elevated by steam, making litne ot 
a superior quality in large quantities. Thej' carry very large and completely 
assorted stocks of coal, chiefly dealing in anthracite, and have large and lofty 
coal sheds and other buildings, with full lines of calcined plaster, cement, hair, 
brick, fire ln-ick and clay. They give emplo3^ment to a force ranging accord- 
ing to the season from fifteen to twenty-five hands, and utilize nine horses in 
the operations of their business. In coal they have a large trade in the Sagi- 
naws and surrounding country, while in lime and other lines they do a large 
trade all over the northern portion of Michigan. Thoroughly acquainted with 
every detail of the business, and conducting all their transactions with fair- 
ness and accuracy, the firm enjoys a high place in the confidence of the trade 
and community, and has earned a prosperity which steadily increases from 
season to season. 

National Tea Company. — (Cyrus D. Jones, Scran ton, Pa., Frank 
C. Jones, New York, Charles Jones, Brooklyn;) Dealers in Teas, Coffees, 
Spices, Etc.; F. C. Knapp, Saginaw Manager; 317 Genesee avenue, East 
Saginaw. — This well-known and prosperous tea house is a branch of the 
National Tea Company, having headquarters at 79 Front street, New York, 
and having fifty-five prosperous branches in different cities throughout the 
United States. The company has maintained a branch in East Saginaw lor 
the past thirteen years, and another branch at 3 Court street, Saginaw City. 
At each of these branches is carried a large and complete stock of every 
description of Chinese, Japanese and Asam teas, all approved grades of 
coffees, spices of every description and the unrivalled National baking powder. 
The vast business done by the company and its direct importations from the 



Thk Industries op the Saoinaws. 129 

tea and coffee districts, where it has experienced bu3'ers, render its goods at 
all times reliable, and the favorable relations it holds with producers enables 
it to otfer unsurpassed inducements in qualit}' and price to consumers. At 
the East Saginaw establishment a force of eight clerks and assistants is 
employed and two wagons utilized in the city delivery, and a similar force is 
kept at the establishment in Saginaw City. The business here is under the 
management of Mr. F. C. Knapp, who came from Hudson, Mich., four years 
ago to engage in this business as an employe, Mr. Charles Jones having 
charge of the store, and at that time residing here. For the past three years 
the business here has been in the hands of Mr. Knapp, whose close attention 
to its details, fair and honorable methods of dealing and thorough efficienc}' 
have contributed largely to the steady increase in the business of the company 
from the time he took charge to the present, 

Angell, the Photographer. — Franklin street and Genesee avenue, 
East Saginaw. — The great excellence of the products of the studio of Mr. D. 
Angell has long been recognized by the people of the Saginaws, and his studio 
is justh' regai'ded as headquarters for the procurement of the best work in this 
lipe. Mr. Angell has been connected with this business twenty -five years, and 
was in Chicago and Wisconsin prior to coming to East Saginaw sixteen years 
ago. He attends to photographing in all its branches, including in addition to 
cabinet photographs, commercial work, life size work, oil and water color and 
crayon work, etc. He is the owner of a process wherebj^ a steel engraving 
effect is given to photographs. This process does not effect the high lights, 
but relieves the shadows, and gives an individuality to each picture, which 
cannot be secured by an}' other means. He occupies as a studio the second 
floor of the building at the corner of Franklin street and Genesee avenue, 25x 
125 feet in dimensions, where he has an elegantly fitted reception room, an 
operating room with excellent lights, and printing and retouching rooms in the 
rear. He gives employment to five skilled artists, and all the products of his 
establishment are executed and finished in the highest style of the photographic 
art. Throughout his long connection with this business Mr. Angell has ever 
depended upon the character of his work for success, and the prosperity he has 
achieved is entirely due to this excellence. His trade is not confined by local 
bounds, but he has patrons throughout Michigan, and has a very large and 
established family trade, embracing the leading people of the Saginaw Valley. 

Michigan Saw Company. — W. H. Presser, Proprietor ; Manufac- 
turers of Mill Saws, and Dealers in Emery Wheels, Etc.; 117 South Water 
street, East Saginaw. — This business was originally established in 1881 by an 
incorporated company, of which Mr. W. H. Presser was manager. Twice the 
establishment was visited by fire, and after the last of these conflagrations Mr. 
Presser bought the remaining stock and plant, retaining the old style and asso- 
ciating with himself Mr. Martin Marshall under the style of Presser & Marshall, 
of which firm Mr E. J. McClintock became a member later. in the spring of 
the present year Mr. Presser bought out the two partners, and is now sole pro- 
prietor of the business. He occupies a three-story building, 25x80 feet, 
equipped with all the requisite machinery for the successful prosecution of the 
business, and giving steady employment to ten highly skilled workmen, the 
product of the works being sold throughout Michigan, Wisconsin and south as 
far as Alabama, in all districts where saw and planing mills and wood-working 
enterprises are conducted. At the works are manufactured circular saws, 
shingle saws, heading saws, jointer saws, band saws, etc., and the company are 
dealers in emery wheels, etc, a specialty being made of saws, which are manu- 
factured in all sizes, from five inches to six feet in diameter. Tn addition to 



130 The Industries of the Saginaws. 

the manufacturing department, saw repairing and regrinding is done at the 
works in the most workmanlike and complete manner, and in all the dejjart- 
ments of the business the establishment, which is under the experienced and 
practical supervision of Mr. Presser, in all its details, enjoys a prominent place 
in the confidence of lumber manufacturers in all parts of the country-. 

John H. Beese & Co. — Wholesale and Retail Dealers in (!oal, 
Sewer Pipe, Cement, Hair, Fire Brick, Fire Clay, Etc. ; 235 South Water street, 
East Saginaw.— Mr. Beese established this business four years ago, since 
which time he has carried it on with a steadily growing success, and now 
enjoys a large trade with the manufacturers and citizens of the Saginaws and 
the surrounding countr}'. He has large coal sheds fronting 50 feet and 
running back 80 feet, two docks and a spacious yard, and carries very large 
stocks of assorted qualities of anthracite, bituminous, cannel and smithing 
coal, which he is prepared to deliver on order, or to have shipped direct from 
the mines. In addition to this business, he carries large and completely 
assorted stocks of sewer pipes, bends, elbows, traps, etc., and all dimensions 
of drain tile, foreign and domestic cements, hair, fire brick and fire clay, etc., 
and is agent for Bridgeport brick. The firm employs in its yard seven hands 
and has four teams which are utilized for the purpose of delivery. As a 
consequence of the accuracy of all its dealings, and the prompt and satis- 
factory manner in which all orders are filled, the firm is doing a thriving business. 

Mayflower Mills. — P^anil Moores, Manager ; Pioller Flour Manufac- 
turers ; 424 South Water street. East Saginaw. — This is one ot the oldest mill 
concerns in Michigan, the first Mayflower Mills having been erected in 1851, a 
year after the city of East Saginaw was laid out. They were built by the late 
Jesse Hoyt, of New York city, and continued in operation until destroyed by 
fire in 1860, when a new and larger mill was built on the same site by Mr. 
Hoyt. In 1866 Mr. Emil Moores was admitted to the firm, and in the same 
year the mills were considerabl}' enlarged. Since that time Mi*. Moores has 
been the manager of the business, which after after his advent to the firm in- 
creased so largely that the facilities of the mill became too contracted for the 
eflicient prosecution of the business, and in 1882 a complete roller mill of 500 
barrels daily capacity was put vip upon the order of Mr. Moores by the JohnT. 
Noyes jNIanufacturing Company, of Buffalo. In their present condition these 
mills are now the largest mill establishments in Michigan, and consist of five 
large buildings, including an elevator with a storage capacit}' of 85,000 bushels 
of wheat, and a warehouse used for storing bian and fine feed, with a capacity 
of 45,000 bushels, the old Mayflower Mills, now used for packing and storing- 
flour and offal, with a capacity- for the storage of 5,000 barrels of flour and 
300 tons of offal ; and engine and boiler house, containing a 400 horse-power 
Steeple compound engine, with high and low pressure c^'linders, fed b}' two 
steel tubular boilers 16 feet long and 6(5 inches in diameter, while the main 
building, the new IMayflower Mills, is a four-story and basement structure, 
50x80 feet in dimensions. In addition to a full roller process for the manu- 
facture of flonr, the mills are equipped with a roller process plant for the 
manufacture of a fine quality of meal. All the cooperage for the mills is 
made on the premises and employment is given to a force of twenty hands in 
the mill and ten in cooperage department. The IMayflower Patent and May- 
flower Roller flour has a just celebrity for its superiority, being made from 
Michigan amber and white winter wheat, and the meal made in these mills is 
also equally popular. The business has largely increased under the practical 
and experienced management of Mr. Moores, to whose reliable business 
methods, combined with the merit of the product of the mills, is due the 
prosperous business enjo^'^ed l)}'^ this establishment. 



The Industries of the Saqinaws. 181 



William F. "Weber.— East Saginaw Trunk Factory; Manufacturer of 
and Dealer in 'I'runks, Traveling Bags, Etc.; 120 North Cass street, East Sagi- 
naw. — Mr. Weber is a tliorouglily practical and experienced man in the business 
of trunk manufacture, in which he has been engaged for the past twenty vears. 
He was for nine years with Martin Maier, of Detroit, and worked in this city 
with another party for two years prior to establishing in business for himself 
in 1885. His factory is now the only one engaged in this branch of industry 
in the Saginaws, and occupies a building 35x125 feet in dimensions, completely 
equipped with all the necessary plant and appliances for the successful carry- 
ing on of the business, employment being given to a force of highly skilled 
workmen, and all the operations of the business being personally supervised by 
Mr. Wel)er. in order to secure for the product of the establishment the excel- 
lence for which it is cele])rated. He makes and deals in every description of 
trunks, traveling bags, etc., makes trunks and samjjle cases to order, and in 
connection with his business conducts an efficient repairing department, in 
which orders for every kind of repairs to traveling goods are filled in a prompt 
and satisfactory manner. The trade has steadily grown from its inception to 
the present time, and IMr. Weber enjoys a thriving business as a result of close 
attention to all its details. 

D, McLeod. — Manufacturer of Shingles ; North Water street, between 
Madison and Monroe streets. Saginaw Citj^ — ^Mr. jNIcLeod has long been 
prominentU" identiQed with the shingle manufacturing industry of the Valle}', 
having established himself in business in Saginaw Cit}' fourteen years ago, 
and steadily carried it on from that time to the present. Six years ago his 
mill was destroyed by fire, but Mr. McLeod started at once to repair 
the loss he had sustained, and built his present mill, which, with the ad- 
joining grounds, covers an area of 100x100 feet. It is convenientl}' located 
with railroad tracks in front and the river in the rear, affording every facility 
for the handling of raw material and shipment of the manufactured product. 
The mill is completely equipped with modern and improved machinery, and 
makes 6,000,000 shingles annually, giving employment to a force ranging from 
fifteen to twenty men, and the product of the mill is of unexcelled quality and 
in large demand by the trade. In addition to the shingle industry Mr. McLeod 
carries large stocks of wood, which he sells at wholesale and retail. He is a 
thoroughly practical man, conducting his business on accurate and reliable 
methods, and having an unsurpassed reputation for the promptness and 
straightforwardness of his business conduct. He is a native of Scotland, from 
which country he came to Quebec, Canada, in 1852, and after traveling through 
Canada and New York settled in Toronto for five 3'ears. He afterward con- 
ducted a saw and shingle mill on the Ottawa river for a number of years, and 
in 1865 came to Saginaw and worked at mills up to the time of establishing 
his present industry. His enterprise has been rewarded with success, and his 
trade is large and steadily growing. 

Victor Slesinger. — Dealer in Hides, Pelts, Wool, Furs, Cracklings and 
Tallow ; 130-132 North Jefferson street, East Saginaw. — Mr. Slesinger has been 
in this business in this cit}' for the past nineteen years, and was a pioneer in 
this branch of industry. He was for fifteen years on (lenesee avenue, later 
removing to the quarters now occupied on North JefiTerson street. In the rear 
of the lot there occupied he has a new two-story brick building 40x75 feet in 
dimensions, and has an office fronting on the street 20x25 feet. He carries on 
a large business as a dealer in clipped wool, which he bu^'s from farmers 
thl-oughout the Saginaw Valley. In this business the volume of his trade has 
steadil}' grown. Seventeen years ago all he could obtain through the country 



132 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



was 3,200 pounds. Last summer he handled 200,000 pounds of wool. In 
addition to this branch of his business Mr. Slesinger also handled an average 
of about 500 sheep skins per week, or 25,000 per year, which he secured from 
farmers, butchers, etc. In all branches of his business Mr. Slesinger reports 
a steadj' increase, except in hides, in which the production in the Valle}' has 
greatly decreased, owing to the largely increased use of dressed beef shipped 
in refrigerator cars from Chicago and other points. He also handles furs, which 
he ships largely to New York for export. 

In addition to this business Mr. Slesinger conducts a personal security 
bank, and loans money on diamonds, watches and valuables that can be put in 
a, safe. He is prepared to offer superior inducements to those needing accom- 
modation of this character, and in all his lines he conducts business on honor- 
able and reliable methods which have secured for him a first-class reputation 
and a merited success. 

T. 0. L. Zander.— The New York Tailor; 120 North Hamilton street, 
Saginaw Cit5^ — Mr. Zander, who came from New York two years ago and 
established this business, has built up a large patronage not onlj' in the Sagi- 
naws, but also throughout the State, as a result of the thoroughly practical and 
artistic manner in jvhich garments are produced at his establishment from the 
finest and most desirable patterns and fabrics. He occupies a well located and 
equipped store, 25x30 feet in dimensions, where he carries a carefully selected 
and large stock, embracing the finest imported and American goods, and Mr. 
Zander is prepared to give to his customers garments in exact accordance with 
the prevailing mode, of intrinsic value in material, workmanship and perfection 
of fit, and made in a style which is unsurpassed by any merchant tailor in the 
Northwest. Mr. Zander is always on the lookout for the finest goods produced 
by the most noted looms of Europe and America, and as a consequence his 
stock always embraces the latest and the best, his present supply for fall and 
winter wear being as fine a display of fine goods as was ever brought to the 
West. He gives steady employment to fifteen highly skilled workmen, and 
has three travelers taking measures and orders throughout this State, Illinois, 
Wisconsin, and as far west as Montana. His business has steadily grown 
from its inception and is still increasing, the products of his establishment 
always giving satisfaction and his place being justly regarded as headquarters 
for superior gai'ments. 

Buehler & Deibel. — Dealers in Boots, Shoes and Rubbers; Court street, 
near Washington street, Saginaw City. — This firm, of which Messrs. J. J. 
Buehler and Philip Deibel are the individual members, was formed two years 
ago, and b}' selling superior goods at the lowest prices have pecured a liberal 
share of the patronage of the citizens of and visitors to the Saginaws. Their 
store is eligibly located on Court street, near Washington, and their stock of 
boots and shoes embraces everything in the line of ladies', gentlemen's, 
misses', youths' and children's wear, the productions of the most famous 
Eastern manufactories, including in ladies' fine shoes such goods as those of A. 
S. Elderkin, Taylor & Co., and Smith & Herrick, all prominent manufacturers 
of Rochester, N. Y., and in gentlemen's shoes the fine goods of Lilly, Bracket 
& Co., of Brockton, Mass., and the famous Emery shoe, while in children's 
shoes and rubber goods their stock is of an equally superior quality. The 
firm has secured a prosperous and thriving business by selling the best goods 
at the lowest prices, marking its stock in plain figures and charging strictly 
one price to all their customers. In addition to the members of the firm, who 
devote all their time and attention to the details of the business, two cofli- 
petent clerks are employed, and the great merit of their goods and the satis- 
factory character of their dealings have made the house popular and prosperous. 



The Industries of the Saoinaws. 1;W 



John A. Price. — Personal Security Bank, 418 Tuscola street, East 
Saginaw. — Mr. Price lias been engaged in this pursuit since 1884 and does a 
large business as a consequence of the uniform fairness and liberalit}' of his 
methods. He is prepared at all times to loan money in any desired amount on 
diamonds, watches, jewelry and other articles of value, or upon chattel 
mortgages upon ever}' class of personal property without removal, and upon 
horses, cattle, etc. He has constantly on hand a large and select stock of the 
finest diamonds, watches and jewelry which he sells at a price much below 
their value. He is a gentleman of ample resources and a thorough knowledge 
of all the details of the business in which he is engaged, and those having 
good collateral and desiring financial accommodation will find his terms 
reasonable. To those desiring to purchase watciies, gems and jewelry his 
establishment offers superior inducements, his stock embracing a number of 
undoubted bargains, and Mr. Price being thoroughly reliable and accurate in 
all his representations and dealings. 

Anderson Brothers. — Fine Drj' Goods, Silks, Dress Goods and Laces ; 
218 Genesee avenue. East Saginaw. — This firm, of which Messrs. Peter and 
Charles A. Anderson are the individual members, came to East Saginaw early in 
1886 from Toledo, where they had been for eight years engaged in a similar 
business, and bought out the old house in this stand of J. W. Howr}'. They 
occupy a handsome and convenient three-story building fronting 25 feet on 
Genesee avenue and running back 100 feet, with an L running west to Franklin 
street^ 40x50 feet in dimensions, which the}^ utilize for their cloak department. 
The}' carry ver}' large and complete stocks of everything in the line of dry 
goods, especially assorted so as to include the finest qualities of goods and the 
latest novelties in patterns and fabrics, their stock of silks, dress goods and 
laces being especially complete. As a consequence of the great care taken in 
the selection of the stock as to make its qualitj' unsurpassed, the house is 
accurately regarded as headquarters for fine dry goods of every description, 
and enjoys a large patronage from the ladies of the Saginaws, as well as an 
extensive and steadily increasing transient trade. A force of twenty clerks 
and assistants is employed in the house, and the firm enjoys unsurpassed 
facilities for supplying goods of the finest quality in all departments of a high 
class drj' goods establishment. 

W. S. Mitts & Co. — Personal and Exchange Bank ; 109 South Cass 
street, East Saginaw. — This firm, which is composed of Messrs. W. S. & S. W. 
Mitts, was established two years ago, since which time they have enjoyed a 
large and steadily increasing business as brokers in stocks, bonds and all 
kinds of securities, dealers in farm and timber lands, logs and lumber, and 
also conduct a very large loan business on chattel mortgages and collateral of 
all kinds, and buy and sell fine jewelry and watches and other arti<;les of 
value, and, in fact, buy ever^'thing in the line of jewehy. They are prepared 
to loan money in any amount and on reasonable terras to those who are 
prepared to oflfer good security, and those desiring accommodation of this 
character will find this firm a first-class medium through which their business 
can be transacted in a reliable manner. The Messrs. Mitts are business men 
of superior attainments, thoroughly fair and accurate in their dealings, and 
conduct their business upon methods which have secured for them the respect 
and confidence of the community. 

Saginaw Valley Paper Co. — F. S. Sears, Proprietor ; Dealer in All 
Kinds of Blank Books, Stationery, Paper Boxes, Twine, Flour Sacks, Etc. ; 



134 The Industries op the Saginaws. 



221 South Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — Mr. Sears is an experienced man 
in tliis department of commerce, having been engaged in a similar business 
for twelve years in Detroit prior to establishing himself in this city three years 
ago. He occupies as office and warerooms a building 25x100 feet in dimen- 
sions, and carries a very large and completely assorted stock of everything in 
the line of blank books, stationer}', twines of all kinds and flour sacks ^of ^a 
superior quality, as well as all other goods pertaining to this line. He has a 
very large business in the Saginaws and surrounding country, and has a hand- 
some double wagon and a single one which he utilizes in delivering goods to 
his customers throughout this section. The goods carried by him are of a 
superior qualit}-, and the favorable relations which he enjoys with leading manu- 
facturers enables him to oifer superior inducements both in qualit}- and price 
to the trade and large consumers, and he is prepared to fill all orders for every 
descrtiption of goods in his line in a prompt and satisfactory manner, and his 
business has increased in volume annually from the inception of his enterprise 
to the present time. 

Selle & Jasper. — Fine Tailoring ; 112 South Washington avenue, 
opposite Bancroft House, East Saginaw. — This firm, of which Messrs. M. A. 
Selle and C. F. Jasper are the individual members, was established in 
February of the present 3'ear, when they bought out part of the stock of Werno 
& Luetke, by whom the business was established in 1885. They occupy an 
eligibly located and completely equipped store with large plate glass show 
windows, and carry a large stock of fine goods, buying their English, French 
and German goods in London, Kngland, and having a special line of fine 
goods made directly to their order. They enjoy facilities unsurpassed for 
producing gentlemen's garments of intrinsic value, in accordance with the 
prevailing mode and with special adaptation and fitness to the wearer, 
employing a force of fifteen highly skilled workmen, and enjoying a 
large trade in the Saginaws and their surroundings, as well as a considerable 
order trade thi'oughout the State, and some customers in the West and South. 
Mr. Selle, of this firm, is a highly skilled artist in this business, and came to 
the citj' from Chicago, where he had previously been engaged, some three 
years ago, and was employed as cutter for Werno & Luetke until he bought 
them out with Mr. Jasper at the beginning of the present year. Since that 
time the business has been doubled, and the firm is one of the most prosperous 
in its line in the State. Mr. Jasper is also a practical man in the business, 
and the combination is one containing the elements of success. As a 
consequence of the superior character of the garments produced at this 
establishment, their trade is steadily growing, and they enjoy the patronage of 
the leading people of the Saginaws. 

E. S. Newton & Go. — Foundry and Machine Shop ; Corner of Water 
and McCoskry streets, East Saginaw. — The works conducted by the firm of E. 
S. Newton & Co. were originally established in 1871 by Merrill & Bacon, by 
whom they were conducted until June of the present year, when the business 
was purchased by Messrs. E. S. Newton and C. H. Rademecher, who compose 
the present firm. Prior to the formation of this firm Mr. Newton was with 
Wickes Brothers of this city for twenty years, and was for four 3^ears foreman 
and sixteen years superintendent of the works. He is well and favorably 
known all along the river and throughout the northern portion of Michigan. 
Mr. Rademecher was also with Wickes Brothers for over twenty-two years, and 
like Mr. Newton is a thoroughly practical man in all the details of the foundry 
and machine shop business. The several shops cover an area of about 200x200 
feet, but they propose pulling down a portion and rebuilding so as to have the 



The Industries ok the Sacinaws. 135 



whole concern under one roof, and when their contemplated changes arc made 
their works will be the most convenient of the kind in this section of Michigan. 
Their present large machine shop is crowded with all the finest tools and ma- 
chinery adapted to the purposes of their business, including nine lathes from 
six feet down to smaller sizes, two large planers, drill presses, etc., to which, 
when they get their works fully organized, they will add others, and increase 
their force of hands and push their trade into a wider territory. At i)resent 
they give employment to a force of twent}' hands, and carr^' on a large business 
as builders of steam engines, saw mill and salt well machinery, salt pumps, 
valves, etc., and as dealers in steam pumps, injectors, governors, tubing, pipe 
fittings, etc., and make a specialty of steam heating. Bringing to the prosecu- 
tion of the business practical knowledge of a superior character, and supervis- 
ing all the details in a careful and accurate manner, the}^ enjoy a trade covering 
the Saginaw Valley, and which is steadil}' growing and expanding. 

William Gemmill. — Hardware, Stoves, Oilcloth, Etc.; 715 Warren 
street, Near Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad. East Saginaw. — Mr. Gemmill is 
a thoroughly practical and experienced man in the hardware business, and for 
two years prior to establishing in business for himself was a partner of M. S. 
Couse in his store on Potter street. He embarked in his present enterprise 
March 1, 1887, and now occupies a two-story brick building, 30x125 feet in 
dimensions, lighted by two large show windows, and in every wa\' adapted to 
the purposes of the business. He carries large and complete stocks of ever^'- 
thing in the lines of shelf and heavy hardware, Golden Star base burner stoves 
and ranges, tinware, pocket and table cutlery, bird cages, etc., and the largest 
stock of oilcloths in the city. He gives employment to three competent clerks 
and assistants, and enjoys a large and steadily growing patronage from the 
citizens of the Saginaws and the surrounding country. He sustains a first- 
class reputation for the fairness and accuracy of his dealings and for correctly 
and promptl}^ filling all orders for every description of goods in his line. Since 
Starting in business for himself his trade has steadil}' increased in a manner 
which gives certain indications of a prosperous career for the enterprise. 

Coiinelly Brothers. — Brokers and Furniture Dealers ; 131, 133, 135 
and 136 South Washington avenue. East Saginaw. — This firm is composed of 
Messrs. John E. and Thomas Connelly, who have successfully conducted the 
business for the past seven years, and who occupy the main floor of three 
stores, 75x100 feet in dimensions, with an extension 25x60 feet, and a branch 
store across the street, occup3ing the main floor, 25x100 feet. In these 
extensive premises they carry a large and complete stock of new and second- 
hand furniture, carpets, stoves, crockery, etc., and are always prepared to 
supply every description of goods in their line with promptness and at the 
lowest prices. Mr. John E. Connelly came to this cit}' from Ontario, Canada, 
when a boy twenty-two years ago, and fifteen years ago embarked in the 
grocer}' business, later going into the fruit business, and seven j-ears ago 
associating with himself his younger brother, started in his present line. Up 
to last year he had been interested in the lumber business, but finding that the 
constantly growing business of his store needed his undivided attention he 
sold out his lumber manufacturing interests. The Connell}- Brothers 
personally supervise all the operations- of their business, in which the}' are 
assisted by four clerks and employ two wagons for deliverv, and are doing a 
thriving trade as a consequence of the fairness of their dealings, and the 
bargains which they at all time have on hand. 

Miss M. E. Hayden, — Fashionable Millinery Establishment ; 122 South 
Washington avenue, East Saginaw. — An establishment, which has in a short 



136 The Industries of the Saginaws. 

time built up a large trade which is steadily growing, is that of Miss M. E. 
Hayden, who came to this city from Detroit early in 1886, and has since 
acquired a merited celebrity for the superior character of all the productions of 
her establishment, the careful selection of her stock and tbe thoroughly satis- 
factory manner in which orders are filled. She occupies an elegantlj' appointed 
store room, 30x80 feet in dimensions, where she carries a large assortment and 
attractive display, embracing all the latest novelties in millinery, and a superior 
line of trimmed and untrimmed hats and bonnets. She also carries a large 
stock and complete assortment of all kinds of hair goods, wigs, puffs, frizzes and 
toilet necessaries. She is also agent for the Universal Fashion Co.'s Perfect 
Fitting Patterns, and in every respect the stock is of a character to invite 
inspection of the ladies of the Saginaws. Miss Hayden, who is thoroughly 
practical and experienced and of excellent taste and judgment, gives employ- 
ment to five competent milliners, and is doing a thriving business which is 
fully merited by the superior quality of her goods, and her prompt and ac- 
commodating methods. 

James McGregor & Sons. — Manufacturers of Steam Boilers and 
Sheet Iron Work , Corner of Water and Williams streets, Saginaw City. — Mr. 
James McGregor, by whom this business was founded, is a member of a family 
which contains a number of prominent manufacturers of steam boilers, he hav- 
ing two brothers in Detroit, each of whom conducts an establishment of this 
nature. The business conducted by James McGregor & Sons, in Saginaw City, 
was established in 1862 by Mr. James McGregor, by whom it was continued 
alone until six years ago, when his sons, Messrs. John McGregor and James 
McGregor, Jr., who had been carefully and thoroughly instructed in all the de- 
tails of the trade under the capable and experienced supervision of their father, 
were admitted to the firm, which then assumed its present style. They occupy 
a building 80x100 feet in dimensions, completely equipped with all the latest 
and most highly improved machinery and appliances adapted to the require- 
ments of the business, and give employment in summer to ten and in winter 
to twenty-five hands in the manufacture of steam boilers of every description, 
and all kinds of sheet iron work, making a specialty of mill, marine and house 
boilers. During the past summer the firm built two 5-foot shell by 16-foot 
boilers for the Union School at Saginaw City, eleven boilers for house heating 
for Wickes Brothers, as well as filling a large number of other orders. The 
firm has at all times a stock of new and second-hand boilers on hand and for 
sale, and gives prompt attention to repairing boilers of every description. It 
enjoys a large trade from all parts of the Saginaw Valley, which it has earned 
by the superior character of the workmanship of all the productions of its es- 
tablishment, the promptness with which orders are filled, and its uniform reli- 
ability in every particular. 

Mittermier & Rohde. — Dealers in Groceries, Vegetables, Fruits, 
Poultry, Oysters, Etc., 421 Genesee avenue, East Saginaw. — This business was 
established in 1875 by Mr. Charles Pendell, who conducted it for about eight 
years, when Mr. Hamilton became the proprietor for a short time, and was 
succeeded three years ago by the present firm, composed of Messrs. John 
Mittermier and August llohde, both of whom had previously been engaged in 
the house, Mr. Mittermier for seven, and Mr. llohde for five years. The 
premises occupied by the firm embrace a two-stor}^ brick structure, eligibly^ 
located at 421 Giiuesee avenue, and heavily stocked with full and complete 
assortments of everything in the line of staple and fancy groceries, a specially 
fine assortment of canned goods, eggs, all fruits and vegetables in season, teas 
and coffees, jjoultry, oysters and grocers' sundries. The complete knowledge 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 137 



of the business possessed by both members of the firm is shown in the great 
care taken in the selection of their stock, by which they have commended, 
themselves to the favor and patronage of the citizens of the Saginaws and 
vicinity ; and the}' are prepared at all times to fill orders in a prompt and 
accurate manner, being aided in their business by five competent clerks and 
assistants, and utilizing two wagons in their city delivery. The establishment 
is a favorite one with the people of the Saginaws, and the energy and enter- 
prise of the firm has secured for it a steady and gi'owing success. 

M. L. Herley & Co. — Depot ]>rug Store ; 514 Potter street. East Sagi- 
naw. — This business was established fifteen years ago by Mr. M. L. Herley, 
who conducted it alone for six years, when he was ioined by Mr. F. L. Kisten- 
macher, forming the present firm. They have a well kept and completely 
equipped drug establishment, eligibly located at 514 Potter street, where they 
carr}' large stocks and complete assortments of everything in the line of drugs 
and chemicals, full supplies of all approved proprietory medicines and drug- 
gists' sundries of every description. They also manufactui'e a number of spe- 
cialties which by reason of their superior efficacy, are in large demand, includ- 
ing Herle^-'s Liverwort Kidnej^ Cure, Herlej^'s White Pine Balsam and Herley's 
Improved Liver Pills. Emploj'ment is given to a force of three competent 
clerks and assistants, and prescriptions are carefully compounded from the 
purest materials by skilled pharmacists. As a consequence of the excellence 
of their stock and the close and accurate attention paid by the members of the 
firm to every detail of the business, they have built up a first class reputation, 
and a trade which steadily expands, the store being a popular one with the 
people of the city and surroundings, the firm constantly endeavoring to give 
satisfaction to its customers. 

Benson & King. — Manufacturers of Picture Backing, Thin Box Lum- 
ber and Box Shooks ; Atwater street, corner of Cass street, East Saginaw. — A 
prominent addition to the manufacturing concerns of the Saginaws was made 
in the spring of the present year, when Messrs. N. S. Benson and Louis King, 
who had previously conducted a similar business at Owosso, came to this city 
and built a completely equipped mill upon a piece of land which the}' pur- 
chased from Mr. Lewis C. Slade. The mill covers an area of about 70x100 
feet and is completely equipped with all the latest and most improved machin- 
ery adapted to their business, including a very fine standard automatic engine 
of 50 horse power and boiler with a five-foot shell by sixteen feet in length, 
four new planers, as well as resaws, rippers, and all other plant and appliances 
required in their manufacturing operations. Although the main business of 
the firm is the manufacture of picture backing, thin box lumber and box 
shooks, for the quality of which they have secured a reputation which is un- 
surpassed, they also do a general planing business chiefly on orders, and deal 
extensively in lumber, lath and shingles, which they are prepared to supply in 
an}' desired quantity. Both members of the firm are energetic and enterprising 
business men and supervise the details of their business with an intelligent 
knowledge of all its departments and accurate methods whichj^have secured for 
their enterprise a steadily increasing prosperity. A force ranging from fifteen 
to twenty workmen is employed in the mill and their trade in their specialty^ of 
picture backing extends to all parts of the country, orders having been received 
by the firm as far away as Calif oinia. The thriving business enjoyed^by them 
so far gives promise of a successful career for the establishment. 

J. J. Winsor. — Planing Mill and Salt Works ; First street. Near Rail- 
way Bridge, East Saginaw. — This well-known planing mill was built over six 
years ago, at first being run by the firm of Within & Anderson, and later by 



138 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



Within & Bowen, who were succeeded b}" Mr. J. J. Winsor. The mill is lOOx 
100 feet in dimensions, and is fitted up with all the latest and most improved 
machinery and appliances, including one 26-inch surfacer, a No. 5 planer, an 
18-inch resaw, an 8-inch moulder, three saw tables with 14-inch saws, a self- 
operating emery planer sharpener and other necessary appliances, propelled by 
a 100 horse-power engine fed by two boilers. In these premises, which have a 
capacit}' for dressing from 25,000 to 30,000 feet of lumber per da}', a force 
ranging from twelve to fifteen hands is employed, the mill being kept steadily 
busy throughout the season, dressing lumber chiefly on Detroit orders. In ad- 
dition to this business Mr. Winsor is engaged in the manufacture of salt, having 
a spacious drill house and salt works, and manufacturing salt in large quanti- 
ties, the output of the works in 1886 amounting to 8,650 barrels. The salt is 
manufactured by the use of exhaust steam from the planing mill, and the pro- 
duct is sold through the medium of the Michigan Salt Association. Mr. 
Winsor, the proprietor of the business, is a thoroughly practical and experi- 
enced man, who understands every detail of this department of industry, and 
carefull}' supervises his afiTairs in a manner which has secured for him the con- 
fidence of the trade and a large and constantly pi'ospering business. 

Richard Khuen. — Insurance ; Office adjoining the Saginaw County 
Savings Bank, Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — No insurance agency in the 
Saginaws enjoj's a better reputation or does a more extensive business than 
that of Mr. Richard Khuen, who is well known as an accurate and reliable 
underwrite'r, and as such holds a high place in the confidence of the insuring 
public. He represents a number of the leading companies, all of them sub- 
stantial and noted for the promptness with which they pay all losses, including 
the New York Underwriters' Agency, composed of the Citizens and Hanover 
Insurance Companies, of New York, the Citizens, having a capital of $300,000, 
assets of $1,102,460, and a net surplus of $332,427, and the Hanover, having 
a cash capital of $1,000,000, assets of $2,546,675, and a net surplus of $540,- 
904. Mr. Khuen also represents the German American, ot New York, cash 
capital of $1,000,000, assets of l!5,150,899, and net surplus of $2,344,273 ; the 
Continental, of New York, cash capital, $1,000,000, assets, $5,239,981 and net 
surplus of $1,374,857 ; the Connecticut Fire Insurance Company, capital, 
$1,000,000, assets, $2,129,742, and surplus of $424,871 ; the American, of 
Philadelphia, capital, $500,000, assets, $2,301,858, and surplus of $552,874 ; 
the St. Paul Fire and Marine, of Minnesota, capital, $500,000, assets, $1,448,- 
026, and surplus $348,675 ; the Liverpool and London and Globe, of Eng- 
land, the largest fire insurance corporation in the world, and having in its 
United States branch $6,639,781 assets, and a surplus of $3,077,539 ; the 
Royal, of Liverpool, England, assets in the United Stales, $4,830,132, and 
surplus of $2,329,552 ; the London and Lancashire, of England, assets in the 
United States of $1,430,064, and surplus of $622,041 ; North British and 
Mercantile, of London, United States assets of $3,378,754, and surplus of 
$2,013,106 ; the Fire Insurance Association, of England, capital $500,000, 
assets of $4,445,576, and net surplus of $939,569 ; the Franklin, of Phila;- 
delphia, cash capital of $400,000, assets of $3,177,106, and surplus of $967,- 
848 ; the California, ot San Francisco, capital $600,000, assets of $1,068,878, 
and surplus of $132,581 ; the Buffalo-German, capital, $200,000, assets $1,186,- 
455, and surplus of $()81,401 ; the Guardian, of London, England, United 
States assets of $1,367,479, and surplus of $795,317 ; the Sun Fire Office, of 
London, the oldest insurance corporation in the world, with United States as 
sets of $1,666,681, and a net surplus of $549,206 ; tbe Washington Fire and 
Marine, of Boston, capital $1,000,000, assets $1,949,467. He also represents 



The Tnmistkies op the Saginaws. 13fl 

the Hartford Steam Boiler Insurance Co., capital $250,000, assets $693 070, 
and a net surplus of $111,882. Through these prominent and substantial 
corporations IMr. Khuen is prepared to write insurance at the lowest rates con- 
sistent with the absolute security offered by these first class companies. Mr. 
Khuen, who has been a resident' of Saginaw since 1854, has been engaged in 
business pursuits ever since that time, and is a substantial citizen. In addi- 
tion to his business of insurance, he is the secretary and treasurer and a di- 
rector of the Saginaw County Savings Bank. He is a business man of supe- 
rior attainments, and is justly regarded with the greatest confidence b}' the 
community. 

P. Opfergelt. — Manufacturer and of and Dealer in Harness, Saddles, 
Collars, AVhips, Etc.; Hamilton and Cass streets, Saginaw City. — Mr. Opfergelt 
is one of the oldest citizens of the Saginaws, he having come to this city when 
a boy with his father in 1857, and continuously resided here with the exception 
of a few years, from that time to the present. In 18(i4 he established himself 
in his present business, in which he has built up a large and constantl}' grow- 
ing trade, as a consequence of the superior qualit}' of materials and workman- 
ship of all the products of his establishment, and the careful selection of his 
stock, which is at all times completely assorted. He owns and occupies atwo- 
stor}' building, 25x70 feet in dimensions. In his store he carries a complete 
slock, embracing everything in the line of light and heavy harness, robes, sad- 
dles, blankets, collars, whips and saddlers' goods of every description, and has 
a glass room in his store running the full length, for keeping the stock clean. 
He gives employment to a force of six skilled workmen, and makes a fine light 
harness as well as heavy luml)er harness, and his trade extends to every part of 
the Saginaw Valley, all the products of his establishment being of unsur- 
passed qualit}', made of "the best materials and by skilled workmen. The re- 
liable methods which have characterized the dealings of Mr. Opfergelt through- 
out his long business history have been rewarded by a substantial and merited 
prosperity. 

Charles H. Plummer. — Manufacturer of and Healer in Lumber, Lath, 
Shingles, and All Kinds of Hard Wood ; also Manufacturer of Flour and 
Dealer in Pine Lands •, Bliss Block, Genesee and Washington avenues. East 
Saginaw. — The name of Mr. Plummer has been identified with the lumber man- 
ufacturing industries of the Saginaw Valley tor the past twenty years, and he has 
been in the lumber business for thirty-one years. By steady industry and 
close attention to all the details of his business he has achieved a gratif3'ing 
success and a well-earned competence. He now owns some 35,000 acres of 
land in this State, and is largely engaged in lumbering and lumber manufac- 
turing, having a mill at Ogemaw, Mich., built in 1883, and nine miles of rail- 
way in the woods, with locomotives and a full equipment, employment being- 
given in the lumbering and manufacturing operations to a force of 125 men. 
The mill has a capacit}- for the manufacture of 50,000 feet per day, and its 
product is in demand in all the principal lumber mai*kets, Mr. Plummer having 
supplied the Government works at Cleveland, Buffalo and Fairport, and enjoy- 
ing a large shipping trade to Buffalo, Tonawanda and New York. He has a 
planing mill connected with his saw mill, and makes a specialty of dressed 
lumber and of superior bill stuff' for government and railroad work. He has a 
large yard at Jackson, Mich., with a capacity for 10,000,000 feet of lumber, 
and is now busii}' engaged in filling a large order for bill stuff' for the Michigan 
(,'entral depot at Battle Creek from his mill at Ogemaw. Mr. Plummer also 
has a flour mill in Saginaw City, 50x100 feet in dimensions, and completely 
equipped with the full roller process, giving emplo^'uient to six men, producing 
forty l)arrels of flour dail}- and selling its product throughout Michigan. Mr. 



140 The Industries op the Saginaws. 

Plummei- is justly regarded as one of the most substantial and representative 
of the citizens of the Saginaws, and always exhibits a deep interest in their 
welfare and advancement. He is in every respect a self-made man, and has 
earned prosperit}' by deserving it. That he is also a thoroughly patriotic 
American is shown by his recent generous offer of " forty acres of as good 
beech and maple land as there is in Michigan " to the families of each of the 
policemen murdered at the Haymarket at Chicago, together with enough lum- 
ber to erect a house for each family on the land, conditioned only on their 
occupying the same. 

Saginaw Lumber and Salt Company. — James Maclaren, Presi- 
sident ; R. A. Loveland, Vice-President ; R. H. Roys, Secretary ; D. L- 
White, Jr., Treasurer ; Manufacturers of Lumber and Salt ; Mills at Crow 
Island ; Office, Bancroft block, Grenesee avenue, East Saginaw. — The mill now 
operated by the Saginaw Lumber and Salt Company has been conducted for 
over twenty years, its first proprietors being known as the Oneida Company-, 
and the mill afterward being reconstructed by the firm of Sibley & Bearinger, 
who operated it for four years prior to 1882, when the present corporation 
was organized. The company now has a paid-in capital of $100,000 and a 
surplus of $100,000, and is one of the most substantial corporations of this 
character in Michigan. The mill premises embrace a two-stor}- building, 
175x225 feet in dimensions, surrounded by five acres covered with buildings 
used for manufacturing purposes. It is completel}^ equipped with modern and 
improved machinery and appliances adapted to the business of the manufac- 
ture of lumber, including a gang of thirty-two saws, one band saw, one circular 
saw, and one 300 horse-power and one 140 horse power engine, and to this 
equipment a number of improvements and additions are to be made, and the 
mill is to be remodeled this winter, among the new machines to be introduced 
being new trimmers, slab slashers, edgers, etc. The present capacity of the 
mill amounts to about 20,000,000 feet per year. In connection with the mill 
large salt works are operated, the company havmg six salt wells with a full 
equipment of machiner}^ for salt manufacture, including six grainers, each 
130 feet long and six settlers each 110 feet long. The entire grounds 
occupied by the company embrace 700 acres, including large piling grounds 
where are stored from 8,000,000 to 10,000,000 feet of lumber, in addition to 
which the compan}'^ usually has an equal amount piled upon their commodious 
dock. An important item in the facilities of the company is its boom, which 
is the finest on the river, and holds from 12,000,000 to 15,000,000 feet of logs 
without going out of the territory owned by the company. In addition to 
these water facilities, the conveniences for handling and shipment by rail are 
unsurpassed, the tracks of the Flint & Pere Marquette Railway running into 
their premises. Employment is given to a force ranging from 125 to 150 
hands and the comi)any has a very large business, including in addition to an 
extensive trade in Michigan, constant orders from Ohio, Pennsylvania and all 
Eastern points. The company has a very large yard trade amounting to about 
10,000,000 feet and they ship over a thousand cars of lumber annually. Mr. 
Maclaren, the president of this company, resides at Buckingham, Canada, 
and has mills on the Ottawa River, and is very largely engaged in the lumber 
business on the upper Canadian rivers, cutting last year 50,000,000 feet which 
he sold in Canada, and he is also president of the Ottawa Bank, with a capital 
of $3,000,000 and otherwise prominently identified with important business 
enterprises. Mr. Loveland, the vice-president of this company, is general 
manager of the company. Thus having large resources and unsurpassed 
facilities the company occupies a position high among the leading enterprises 
of this character in the Saginaw Valley. 



TnE Industries of the Saqinaws. 143 



The N. & A. Barnard Oorapany. — Arthur Barnard, President ; 
Levi H. Goodwin, Secretary and Treasurer ; Alexander W. Chapman, Mana- 
ger ; Lumber, Salt, Pine and Farming Lands ; foot of Emerson street, Sagi- 
naw Citj-. — Tliis establishment, comprising one of the largest and most com- 
pletely' equipped mill and salt manufacturing plants in the Saginaws, dates its 
inception back to 1860, when the business was established by the Michigan 
Salt Manufacturing Company. About twenty three years ago the firm of 
Barnard & Binder bought up all the stock of that company, and this firm was 
in turn succeeded by that of N. & A. Barnard. Upon the death of the father, 
Mr. Newell Barnard, three years ago, the present company was incorporated, 
Mr. Arthur Barnard remaining at the head of company as its President, The 
output of their mill in lumber and lumber products amounts to 20,000,000 feet 
of lumber, 15,000,000 shingles, 4,000,000 laths, 1,500,000 staves and 60,000 
sets of heading. In addition to the lumber manufacturing premises, the com- 
pany has six salt wells with a production of 60,000 barrels of salt annually. 
One of these wells was the second bored in the Valley, having been drilled in 
1860, and the company has one of the best equipped salt works in the district. 
Among other buildings is a warehouse with storage capacity for 40,000 barrels 
of salt and the companj^ has also a large and handsome barn, accommodating 
the thirtj^ horses used in connection with their manufacturing operations, and 
also has very extensive piling grounds ; the entire works and premises cover- 
ing an area of thirty-five acres, with over a mile of elevated tramway, a large 
water frontage, railroad tracks throughout and every convenience and facility 
calculated to aid or expedite the business of manufacture, handling and ship- 
ment. In the works employment is giving to a force averaging 200 hands, and 
the lumber product finds a market in Ohio and eastern ports. A notable new 
departure inaugurated by this company is the manufacture of hemlock build- 
ing lumber. Through this region there has existed a prejudice against hemlock 
lumber, notwithstanding the fact that it has been used extensively for building 
purposes throughout the eastern States for man}- years and proved its utility in 
every instance. In the lumbering operations in the territory tributary to Sagi- 
naw manufactures, the hemlock has been passed by, and a large amount of this 
timber is left standing on tracts from which the pine has been cut off. To Mr. 
Arthur Barnard is due the credit of inaugurating upon a large scale measures 
to utilize this valuable raw material, and the company is now making a 
specialty of hemlock lumber, the output from their mills this season being over 
10,000,000 feet, and the capacity of the mill is now being increased in order to 
keep up with the demand. The company is prepared to fill orders for hemlock 
in carload lots, and the success which has so far attended the experiment of 
its introduction encourages them to still greater activity in this branch of man- 
ufacturing industry. The company lumbers in the Southern Peninsula, and 
has large tracts of pine and farming lands in Saginaw, Isabella, Clare, Midland 
and Grladwin counties, and the management of the business of this vast con- 
cern evinces a combination of experience and fitness which naturally results in 
success. Mr. Arthur Barnard, the President of the company,, who has been 
trained to the business and is thoroughly and practically experienced in all its 
details, is notable as one of the most enterprising of the citizens of Saginaw 
and a public spirited man. No one citizen of Saginaw has been more promi- 
nent than he in adding to the architectural beauty and attractiveness of the 
city, and he is the owner of a number of handsome business blocks and other 
important property, representing many of the most prominent additions to the 
architectural features of the city. He owns all the business blocks on the 
square bounded by Hamilton, Water, Franklin and Ames streets, all new build- 
ings, substantially built and completely equipped, and in great demand by 



144 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



tenants, which buildings are shown in the accompanying illustration. The 
large amount of his investments in property of this character forms a strong 
testimony of his confidence in the future of Saginaw. The gentlemen asso- 
ciated with Ml'. Barnard in the management fill their respective positions with 
marked ability, Mr. Levi H. Goodwin, the Secretary and Treasurer, attending 
to the oflSce affairs of the corporation with a degree of eflSciency showing the 
highest standard of business attainments, and Mr. Alexander W. Chapman, the 
Manager, being a thoroughl}- practical lumber manufacturer, to whose supei'vi- 
sion of the details is largely due the acknowledged superiority of the product, 
and the systematic methods upon which the manufacturing operations are con- 
ducted. 

L. W. Voepel. — Dealer in Books, Stationery, Wall Paper, Etc. ; Barnard 
Block, 218 North Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — A prominent and important 
addition to the commercial establishments of Saginaw City is that of Mr. 
Voepel, who has had long experience as a practical paper hanger, interior 
decorator and artistic sign writer. In the spring of the present year he estab- 
lished this business, and carries a large and complete stock of the finest pat- 
terns of wall papers from the leading manufactories, and also has on hand a 
full line of blank books, school books and supplies and ofl3ce stationery, and 
in addition he carries on a large business in paper hanging, house painting and 
interior decorating, giving employment to a force of skilled and experienced 
workmen. The store is eligibly located in the Barnard Block, and is atti-ac- 
tively and neatl}' fitted up, and his stock, in careful selection and quality, is 
not surpassed by any in the Valley. Mr. Voepel has so far enjoyed a satisfac- 
tory and steadily growing trade, giving every promise for the success of his 
new enterprise. 

J. S. Martin.— Livery and Sales Stables ; 306, 308 and 310 North Ham- 
ilton street, Saginaw City.— Mr. Martin has long held the foremost position in 
this department of industry in Saginaw City, originally establishing his busi- 
ness in 1871, when he purchased from J. J. Harvey the stables located at the 
corner of Water and Cass streets, afterward removing the business in the same 
year to 409 and 411 Adams street, and again removing in 1881 to the north 
end of the Barnard Block, where he is now at this writing located, and has a 
handsome and commodious establishment ; but the steady advance in his busi- 
ness has made even these premises too contracted for his i)urposes, and he has 
had fitted up at 306-310 JNorth Hamilton street the handsomest stables in the 
Saginaw Valley, the main building being 140x60 feet in dimensions and two 
stories high, and sheds in the rear extending through to Water street, a dis- 
tance of 220 feet. The structure, which is an elegant and imposing one, was 
erected by Mr. Arthur Barnard expressly for the purpose of this business, and 
the equipment of the building contains everything calculated to aid or expe- 
dite the operations of the business, accommodation being afforded for eighty 
head of horses. Mr. Martin has forty horses for light livery, hack and bag- 
gage service, and in his new premises has forty stalls devoted to boarding and 
sale horses. He has the finest hearse in the State, being manufactured by the 
celebrated carriage building firm of The James Cunningham, Son & Co., and 
he has four of the finest coaches, the product of the same makers ; a number 
of handsome double and single family carriages, and a great variety of buggies, 
light road wagons, etc. Mr. Martin does the hotel, baggage and transfer busi- 
ness of Saginaw City, running four hotel busses anl one extra large one for 
four or six horses, eight express wagons and a number of hacks. He gives 
employment to a force ranging from ten to fifteen men, and in every depart- 
ment of the business is thoroughly practical and experienced, and conducts all 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 145 

the operations in such a manner as to secure for his establishment the good 
opinion and patronage of the citizens of and visitors to tlie Saginaws. As a 
consequence of this close and accurate knowledge and attention, Mr. Martin'.s 
business has steadily increased from its inception to the present time. 

A- D- Bechtel. — Dealer in Furniture and Household Goods ; 206 
North Hamilton street, and 304 and 306 Franklin street, Saginaw City. — Mr. 
Bechtel has carried on business for the past fourteen 3^ears at 304 Franklin 
street, to which he has added other premises in the Barnard block on North 
Hamilton street, where he carries a large and complete stock of every descrip- 
tion of bazaar goods, including the finer qualities of furniture, and a large 
stock of crockery and glassware, embracing the productions of the leading 
foreign and domestic makers, a speciallj' fine assortment being , shown 
of decorated dinner and toilet sets, bar goods, etc. He has a large stock 
of feather pillows, blankets, fine quilts and robes, musical instruments, 
jewehy, celluloid toilet articles, albums, frames and eveiy description of goods 
suitable for holiday, birthday and other presents, while at his premises on 
Franklin street, which consist of the main floor and basement of two stores, 
50x60 feet, he carries a large stock of stoves of the best makes, mattresses of 
all kinds and new and second-hand furniture. These goods he sell for cash or 
on installments, and has a large and steadily growing trade both in Saginaw 
City and East Saginaw and throughout the surrounding farming country, and 
so large is his business, and so complete his stock that even his present 
premises are insutficient to properly accommodate the volume of his business, 
and he proposes making an addition to his premises at 306 Franklin street, 
40x80 feet in dimensions. He gives employment to three experienced clerks 
and assistants and has two wagons to aid in the work of deliver}*, and by the 
thoroughly accurate and reliable methods of his conduct throughout his long 
and honorable business histoi-y, he has earned for his enterprise the pros- 
l)erity which has attended it, and a reputation as one of the leading and most 
substantial. merchants of the city. 

J. K. Stevens. — Real Estate, Abstract and Loan Office ; 214 North 
Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — One of the most extensive and best known 
dealers in real estate in Northern Michigan is Mr. Jerome K. Stevens, who 
first came to Saginaw City forty years ago. In 1855 he went to Chicago, 
where he remained until 1861, after which he engaged in the dry goods 
business in East Saginaw for ten 3'ears as a member of the firm of Stevens, 
Poole & Co., then the largest store in its line in the Valley. In 1870 he 
removed to Saginaw (.ity and filled the office of Registrar of Deeds for six 
years, since which time he has been engaged in the real estate business. He 
has a complete and accurate abstract of titles to all the lands in Saginaw 
county, all the minor details of each conveyance being noted, and he makes a 
specialty of perfecting titles. He has at all times on hand and for sale and 
exchange good cit}' property, as well as a large list of improved and unim- 
proved farming properties in Saginaw, Isabella, Midland and other counties. 
He also is prepared to loan money on long time and at the lowest rates of 
interest on good real estate security, and in all lines he does a large business, 
his practical knowledge of all the details in regard to the present and prospec- 
tive values of land in this section affording him superior facilities for carrying 
on the business, and he is in every respect a popular and prosperous citizen. 

Charles B. Burton. — Caterer and Confectioner ; 210 Hamilton street, 
Saginaw Citj'. — Mr. Burton started this enterwise eight 3'ears ago, originally 
locating at 411 Genesee avenue. East Saginaw, from which he removed to his 
present location about two months ago. In his enterprise he .started out with 



146 The Industries of the Saginaws, 



the intention to secure success by deserving it, and by close and accurate at- 
tention to all the details of his business, and filling orders in a uniformly satis- 
factor}'^ manner, he has acquired a merited reputation as a leader in this line of 
industr}' in this section of the State, and has built up a large connection, en- 
jojang the patronage of the leading citizens of the twin cities. He has an 
elegantly equipped establishment in the Barnard Block, embracing the main 
floor and basement, 25x100 feet in dimensions, including a handsome and 
artistically furnished refreshment parlor, all the appointments of which are in 
the best possible taste, and every accessory for setting a table in an attractive 
manner with fine silver and other proper furnishings. Mr. Burton makes all 
his own finer confections, cakes, etc., and the products of his establishment are 
of unequalled excellence. He has a very large business as a caterer, giving 
special attention to weddings, parties and banquets, which he is prepared to 
supply upon the shortest notice and in the most efficient manner. He is pre- 
pared to furnish creams and ices of the best quality on short notice, and the 
stock of confections, cakes, etc., carried by him is not excelled by that of an}'^ 
establishment in the State. Mr.. Burton gives employment to a force ranging 
from six to eighteen hands, according to the season, and by uniform prompt- 
ness and reliability has built up his trade to a prosperous and prominent 
position. 

Hoyt Planing Mill. — Operated by W. L. Webber, Executor and Trus- 
tee ; W.J. Bartow, Manager ; Manufacturers of and Dealers in Lumber, Lath 
and Pickets ; Washington street, near North Cit}^ Limits, East Saginaw. — No 
other name is so prominently connected with the history of East Saginaw as that 
of Jesse Hoyt. The land on which the city now stands was purchased from the 
Government in 1836 by Dr. Charles Little, of Avon, N. Y., and in 1849 and 
1850 was purchased by Alfred M. Hoyt, of New York, and the original plat ot 
East Saginaw was surveyed by A. Alberti for him in December, 1850. In 1854 
Mr. Alfred M. Hoyt disposed of his interest in the new citj' to his brother, 
Jesse Hoyt, who, from the time of his purchase, devoted his entire energies to 
the development of the city, and to his enterprise and public spirit is due, 
more than to any other one cause, the rapidity of its growth to a commanding 
position as a manufacturing and commercial center. Among the many enter- 
prises with which his name is connected, that of the Hoyt planing mill is 
prominent. Upon the site now occupied by the mill there was formerlj^ a 
dairy salt works, built in 1865, and which afterward became a box factory. 
This structure was burned in 1871, and a new building was put up by Mr. 
Hoyt in 1874, which was 100x140 feet in dimensions, gave employment to 
forty-five men and dressed about 10,000,000 feet of lumber annually. This 
building was burned May 16, 1881, and the present building was erected in 
1882, in which year, on August 14, occurred the death of Mr. Jesse Hoyt. 
Fiom that time the business has been conducted by Mr. W. L. Webber, exec- 
utor and trustee of the Ho^^t estate, the management of all the details of the 
manufacturing operations being in the hands of Mr. W. J. Bartow, as manager. 
The present building is 205x140 feet in dimensions, with an engine room 40x60 
feet, and six dry kilns, covering an area of 60x120 feet. The entire premises, 
including piling grounds, etc., cover an area of fifty acres, and the works are 
completely equipped with all the most h:ghly improved machinery adapted to 
the manufacture of dressed and surfaced lumber, including one 250 horse- 
power engine and one of 25 horse-power, four S. A. Woods surfacers and 
matchers, one S. A.^Woods moulder, one Houston moulder, one Joslyn resaw, 
one Wetherbee, Rugg & Richardson siding saw and two Williamsport gang 
edgers. Employment is given to a force of 100 men, and the production ot 
the mill amounts' to from 23,000,000 to 24,000,000 feet of lumber annually. 



The Industries of the Saqinaws. 147 

The salt works in connection are important, the first well having been drilled 
in 1859 and 18G0 on tliese peemises by tlie East Saginaw Salt Manufacturing 
Company to the depth of 745 feet, the second in 1873 to a depth of 700 feet, 
and the third in 1874 was sunk 764 feet. Its production amounts to from 
30,000 to 35,000 barrels of salt per annum, and in addition a solar field about 
five acres in extent. The drill houses and salt works generally are completely 
equipped with all the most approved appliances for salt manufacture, and in 
connection with the mills barrels are manufactured as packages for its salt 
product. The trade of the mill consists of rail shipments to all the New 
England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Maryland ; also to 
Ohio, Indiana, Illmois and Wisconsin, and its product, which is of the best 
quality, owing to the superior character of the plant, finds a ready market. 3Ir. 
W. L. Webber is executor and trustee of the Hoyt estate, and has resided in 
East Saginaw since March, 1853, when he opened an office and entered upon 
the practice of law. He afterward became connected with the Flint & Pere 
Marquette Railroad as its solicitor and land commissioner, which position he 
held from that time until June 1, 1885, when he resigned the office of land 
commissioner, but still is the general solicitor of the company. Since the death 
of Jesse Hoyt he has had charge of his large interests in the Saginaw Valley 
as trustee and executor. His great executive ability and close attention to 
the interests of the estate have demonstrated the wisdom of his appointment 
to the charge of its affairs, and in every relation in life Mr. Webbe)- occupies a 
prominent position as one of the representative citizens of the Saginaw Valley. 
Mr. Bartow, the manager of the planing mill, has been a resident of East Sagi- 
naw since 1854, is one of its ex-Mayors, and has been at the head of this busi- 
ness from the time of its establishment by the late Mr. Hoyt, and by his 
thorough and practical knowledge of all the details of the business has exerted 
a leading influence in securing for the business the prosperity and steady in- 
crease which it has enjoyed from its inception to the present time. 

Hoyt Saw Mill— Operated by W. L. Webber, Executor and Trustee ; 
Robert Staples, Foreman ; Manufacturers of Gang Sawed White Pine Lumber; 
North of City Limits, East Saginaw.— This mill was built in September, 1866, 
by Wickes Brothers, at a cost of $20,000, and was purchased by Jesse Hoyt 
in 1870, and has since his death been operated by Mr. W. L. Webber, 
executor and trustee of his estate. The mill was enlarged about five years 
ago, and now has a capacity for the manufacture of 100,000 feet of lumber, 
16,000 lath, 9,000 staves and 500 sets of heading per day. The outfit of ma- 
chinery embraces all the most highly improved and effectual devices known to 
this department of industry, the plant including five boilers, 5x16, and one extra 
boiler, 4x16, one engine, 10x12, with an 8-foot drive wheel, and another, 20x30, 
with a 10-foot drive wheel ; a Wickes gang of fifteen saws, large cylinder and 
all accessory machinery. Employment is given to a force of seventy-five men, 
and the greater part of the product goes to the Hoyt Planing Mill, where it is 
made into dressed lumber and other lumber products. Mr. Robert Staples 
has been in charge of the practical operations of the mill since 1870, and by 
the thorough system adopted by him in the management of the business has 
largely contributed to its effectiveness and success. 

J. J. Harvey.— Livery, Sale and Boarding Stable ; Corner of German 
and Franklin streets. East Saginaw.— Mr. Harvey established this business 
twenty years ago, and by the completeness of his facilities and his close atten- 
tion to all the details of the business, enjoys a prominent position in the line of 
industry in which he is engaged. He owns and utilizes a handsome two-story 
white brick building, 100x100 feet in dimensions, which he had built expressly 



148 The Industries oj- the Saginaws. 



for the purposes of the business, and which has a spacious and completely 
equipped carriage room in the front half, and a well arranged and well ven- 
tilated stable with fifty stalls in the rear, all on the ground floor, and unsur- 
passed facilities lor getting out stock, vehicles, etc., in case of fire, having thret 
large double doors at each end of the building. He keeps on hand a great 
variety of handsome buggies, phaetons, coupes, coaches, etc., and is prepared 
to supply on short notice turnouts of unsurpassed elegcince. In addition to 
his livery business he conducts a large boarding stable business, and has a 
commodious carriage repository, and the upper floor of his premises is devoted 
to various departments and the storage of surplus summer or winter vehicles, 
paint and tiring shops, etc. Mr. Harvey keeps his own carriage painters' 
and blacksmith shops, etc., and large as his premises are he contemplates 
adding to them by the erection of a building in the rear, as the stead}' increase 
of his business has made his present premises too contracted for his purposes. 
He gives employment to a force of ten hands and has from thirty to sixty 
horses constantly in his stable ; and the careful attention paid to all animals, 
the superior quality and condition of his vehicles and the propriety' of his 
business conduct have commended Mr. Harvey in an eminent degree to the 
favor of the citizens of the Saginaws and vicinity. 

R. Gottschalk. — Manufacturer of Cigars and Dealer in Pipes, Tobacco 
and Smokers' Articles ; 4.09 Lapeer street. East Saginaw. — Mr. Gottschalk es- 
tablished this business three years ago, since which time he has enjoyed a large 
and steadily increasing trade, as a result of the superior merit of the goods 
produced at his establishment, in which he has a large trade not only in the 
Saginaws and vicinity, but also a heavy business with dealers in Manistee, 
Cheboygan and Northern Michigan generally. Among the brands of fine ci- 
gars produced at his establishment may be prominently mentioned the "Bride " 
and " Henry Clay," excellent and highly approved ten-cent cigars, and the 
"Favorite No. 1,"' " K. 0. T. M," "K G." and "Five Beauties," all of which 
are five-cent cigars of unsurpassed quality. Great care is taken in the selec- 
tion of the materials from which all these cigars are made, and a large force 
of highly skilled workmen is given employment. In addition to the manufac- 
turing department, Mr. Gottschalk carries a large and complete stock of pipes, 
tobaccos and smokers' articles «f every description, in which he floes a large 
trade in the Saginaws and vicinity. Mr. Gottschalk is a thoroughly practical 
and experienced cigarmaker, and has earned a merited prosperity, as a result 
of the quality of his goods and reliable methods. 

O- & E. Ten Eyck. — Manufacturers of and Dealers in Shingles, Pail 
Staves and Heading, and Salt ; Water street, Near Flint & Pere Marquette 
Railway, East Saginaw. — This business was established twenty years ago by 
Messrs. C. and E. Ten Eyck, both of whom are now deceased, and for the past 
eight years has been owned by Mrs. I. D. Ten E3'ck as a special partner, and 
Mr. Trevette B. McCormick as the active member of the firm. The shingle 
mill of the firm is a two-story structure, 100x50 feet in dimensions, with com- 
modious and convenient docks in the rear, and railroad tracks in front. Ad- 
joining the shingle mill is a large salt drill house, and on the other side of the 
street is their salt block, 260x65 feet in dimensions, with a large shingle shed 
adjoining, the whole covering a space equal to about an entire block of ground. 
The mill and works are completely equipped with all the latest machinery and 
appliances, including a 100 hoi-se-power engine, and ever^'thing in the way of 
plant necessary- to the successful conducting of the business, the mill having a 
capacity for the manufacture of 120,000 standard shingles per day, and the 
salt works having 90 bax-rels daily capacity. Employment is given to a force 



The Industries op the Saqinaws. 140 



of seventy-five hands, and the shingles manufactured by the firm are noted for 
their excellence of quality, and the trade of tiie firm extends to all parts of the 
Union. Mr. McCormick, in whose hands the practical management of the 
business is placed, is thoroughly experienced in all its details, and attends to 
the operations of the mill in a manner which secures the maintenance of the 
high standard of qualit}- for which the firm is celebrated, while his reliable 
l)usiness methods have secured for the firm a high place in the confidence of 
the trade throughout the country. 

D. Hardin & Company. — Manufacturers of and Dealei-s in Sash, 
Blinds, Doors, Mouldings, Siding, Flooring, Etc., Steam Salt Block in Connec- 
tion ; corner of Water and Lyons streets. Saginaw City. — This business, which 
hold a merited prominence among the industries of the Saginaws, was original- 
ly established in 1869 by Mr. Daniel Hardin, the firm afterward changing to 
its present st3le, and Messrs. Horace P. Denison and Chester Biown being the 
other members of the firm. The premises occupied by the business embrace a 
three-story white brick mill, 75x80 feet in dimensions, large storage sheds, a 
large salt block, etc., covering nearlj' two blocks, and in the manufacturing 
operations a 60-horse power engine is utilized, as well as the latest and most im- 
proved 'plant and machinery adapted to the business, including the only ma- 
chine for making rafting pins in the Valley. The firm manufactures in large 
quantities every description of sash, blinds, doors, siding, flooring, moulding, 
etc., and in their salt block turn out an average of about 12,000 barrels of salt 
per annum. J]raplo3fment is given to a force ranging from fort}- to sixty work- 
men, and the firm enjoys a trade extending to all points north and west, ship- 
ping their product by rail, and as a consequence of the superior character of all 
their productions, enjo}' a trade in which the orders constantly tax their pro- 
ductive capacity. Mr. Daniel Hardin, the founder of the house, in addition to 
his interest in this business, is a member of the firm of Green, Ring & Co., and 
is President of the Citizens' National Bank, and otherwise prominently identi- 
fied with the leading business and financial enterprises of the Valley. Among 
the productions of the firm a specialty is made of church and fine residence in- 
terior work, and the firm enjoys unsurpassed facilities for the prompt supply 
of every description of goods in this line, all the members of the firm being 
thorough and practical business men, who conduct their affairs upon reliable 
and accurate methods. 

Ingalls Oil Company.— Headquarters at 46 Jefferson avenue, 
Detroit ; W. H. Wallin, Manager at East Saginaw ; North Eighth street, foot 
of Sears street. — This business was established fifteen 3-ears ago b}- the firm of 
Squire & Newman, b}' whom it was conducted for some three years, when tlie 
business was acquired by Ingalls & Co., and a year later b\- the Ingalls 
Oil Compan}', a well-known corporation having its headquarters at 46 Jefferson 
avenue, Detroit, and works at the Grand Trunk Junction in that cit}-, and of 
which Mr. C. C. Bloomfield is President, and Mr. George A. Foster, Treasurer. 
The business here was located at Sixth street and the Flint & Pere Marquette 
Railway crossing until six years ago, when removal was made to the present 
premises. The building occupied by the company here is 40x100 feet in 
dimensions, outside of which are two iron tanks, each of 500 barrels capacity, 
into which oil is pumped by an engine out of the tank cars. From these 
tanks pipes lead into the building where barrels are filled. The trade of the 
company is very large, amounting to an average in winter of about 2,000 
barrels per month, and employment being given to six hands. The company 
has branches at Flint, Owosso, Jackson and West Bay Cit}-, as well as the 
establishment in P]ast Saginaw, and does business all over the State, the trade 



150 The Industries op the Saginaws. 

from this branch, however, being principally located in the Saginaws, Caro, 
Vassar and other portions of the Saginaw Valley. The business of this branch 
has steadily prospered under the efficient and careful management of Mr. W. H. 
Wallin, whose close attention to all the details of the business has secured for 
the company a prosperous trade in the territory assigned to his charge. 

H. Coleman. — Furnishing Undertaker and Complete Livery Stable ; 
corner of Washington avenue and Tuscola street, East Saginaw. — Mr. Coleman, 
who has been a resident of the city for the past twenty years, established this 
])usiness fourteen years ago, and was for several years in partnership with J. 
J. Harvey. This firm dissolved many years ago, since which time Mr. Cole- 
man has conducted the business alone. Three years ago he bought the hand- 
some two-story brick barn, 60x120 feet in dimensions, which now forms part 
of his premises and later bought two lots north and west, and built his two- 
story brick stable, 60x66 feet in dimensions, having ten fine boxed stalls and 
forty open stalls. This gives him the whole floor of the main building, 60x120 
feet, for carriage space, harness and wash rooms, offices, etc. To the north of 
the main building and adjoining, fronting on North Washington avenue, is his 
undertaking office, and part of the upper floor of the main building is also de- 
voted to the storage and display of undertakers' good and supplies, of which he 
carries the largest and most complete stock in the city. On the next lot north, 
standing in its own grounds, is his handsome private residence, which he built 
and owns. He does the larger part of the undertaking business of the city, 
his facilities being of the best character, and the careful and complete manner 
in which he conducts funerals, and the skillful way in which he does embalm- 
ing by the latest improved process, commending him to the approval of the 
public. He carries in stock a superior assortment of caskets, marble vaults, 
etc., and has elegant hearses, coaches, coupes, etc., which he utilizes for 
funerals. The undertaking establishment is in charge of Mr. W. Frazer, as 
manager, who is thoroughly practical and efficient. In livery Mr. Coleman has 
a great variety of light vehicles, as well as coaches and coupes, has thirt}^ good 
iiorses and the finest harness and trappings. He keeps his own carriage paint- 
ing shop and painters, and also does a large boarding business for the horses 
of the leading citizens, for which he has the most ample accommodations. He 
has the Bancroft Hotel liver}' business, and gives employment to twelve ex- 
perienced hands, and thoroughly supervises all the details of his business, so 
as to secure at all times satisfactory results. His business has steadily grown 
from its inception to the present time, and his establishment, is one of the best 
equipped and conducted of its character in the State. 

The Savings Bank of East Saginaw —H. C. Potter, President ; 
Fidwin Eddy, Vice-President ; A. Schupp, Treasurer ; East Saginaw. — Prom- 
inent among the financial institutions of the Saginaws is the Savings Bank of 
East Saginaw, which was incorporated in 1872, and from that time to the 
present has held a prominent place in the esteem of the community, jts 
methods having always been safe and conservative, and its business active and 
extensive. The showing made b}' its last report, dated July 4, 1887, is a 
gratifying one, it being shown by the statement then made that the bank had, 
in addition to its paid-in capital of $50,000, a surplus fund of $35,000, and 
undivided profits of $3,578.64, while its deposits at the same time amounted 
to $670,846.26, its total resources being $759,424.90. By the same report it 
was shown that the bank had loaned out on real estate and other sound 
securit}^, $568,203.59, and that it had bonds of the city of East Saginaw and 
school districts of this State, amounting to $31,900. The bank pays 4 per 
cent, interest on time deposits, and accepts amounts from savings depositors 




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The Industries op the Saqinaws. 153 



from $1 up. The Board of Trustees of the bank consists of the following 
well-known and successful business men : — Messrs. H. C. Potter, William L. 
Webber, Edwin Eddy, W. J. Bartow, George C. Warner, Emil Moores, II. C. 
Potter, Jr., James B. Peter, Charles Lee and Henry Melchers. 

The Saginaw, Tuscola & Huron Railroad Company.— In a 
chapter upon the transportation facilities ot tlie Saginaws in an early portion 
of this work reference has been made to the Saginaw, Tuscola & Huron Rail- 
road as an important factor in contributing to the business facilities of the 
Saginaws. In the necessarily brief reference to the road in that connection 
many interesting particulars in regard to the road and the territory reached bj' 
it were omitted. It extends from the Saginaws in a northe'asterl}' direction 
through to the villages of Reese,' Fairgrove, Akron and Unionville, in Tuscola 
count}', and Sebewaing and Bay Port to Bad Axe, the count}' seat of Huron 
county, — sixty-seven miles of as fine farming land as can be found in the State. 
Mr. M. B. Wilkinson is Superintendent and C. M. Rice Auditor. Its general 
offices are in East Saginaw. As a means of reaching summer resorts present- 
ing superior attractions this road occupies an important place. There is an 
annually growing interest among the people of the entire country in Michigan 
as a summer resort. The motto of the State seal, "aSY quceris peninsulam 
amcenam, circumspice,^' ("If you seek a pleasant peninsula, look around you,") 
contains advice of which advantage is annually being taken by an increasing 
number of seekers of health and pleasure. The situation of the State, almost 
surrounded as it is by the Great Lakes, blessed with a healthful and invigor- 
ating climate and with its shores dotted with islands and resorts of unsurpassed 
beauty, are elements which naturally attract a large and steadily growing num- 
ber of visitors to the State. Several of the most beautiful of these are reached 
by the line of the Saginaw, Tuscola & Huron Railroad, prominent among which 
is Wild Fowl Bay, a beautiful sheet of water some five miles in length and 
four miles in width, upon the eastern side of Saginaw Bay and forming a part 
of it, and bounded on the east by the main land of the Huron peninsul a , on 
the north by Sand Point, a narrow strip of land four miles in length, and pro- 
tected by North Island on the west and Heisterman Island on the southwest. 
Almost surrounded by the waters of the Great Lakes, and yet shut in from 
their tumultuous winds and waves, it is a natural harbor which presents the 
greatest attractions for sailing, rowing, hunting and fishing. Near the shore 
the water is shallow and the bottom has a covering of soft white sand, giving 
to the bay superior attractions as a bathing ground. All lake fish are found here 
in abundance, and in the autumn season large numbers of wild fowl afford fine 
sport for the hunter. On the high south shore of Wild Fowl Bay, beautifully 
situated in an evergreen grove, is the Bay Port Hotel. There had long been a 
postoffice and a few houses near the site of the hotel, and the place had been 
known as Bay Port fifteen years prior to 1884, in which year the Saginaw, 
Tuscola &, Huron Railroad was extended to Wild Fowl Bay. Hon. William L. 
Webber, of East Saginaw, President of the Saginaw, Tuscola &, Huron Railroad 
Company, bought a tract of land on the shore, divided a portion of it into vil- 
lage lots, and in 1885 began the erection of the hotel, which was completed, 
furnished and opened to the public in June, 1886. It is a handsome and sub- 
stantial structure, with foundation walls of stone resting upon solid rock about 
four feet below the surface of the ground. The remainder of the building, 
three stories in height above the basement, is wood, supplied with good brick 
chimneys, and is lathed and plastered throughout. The inside finish is of red 
oak, and all the furnishings and appointments of the house are those of an 
attractive resort. In the basement are the laundry, refrigerator and furnace 

20 



154 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



rooms, in the latter of which are located two large Smead warm air furnaces 
for use in chilly weather. Upon the first floor are a number of rooms and 
offices, including the ladies' parlor, with the dining room in the rear, both com- 
manding a view of the bay, and upon the other side of the hall is the waiting 
room, and beyond that the gentlemen's smoking room and billiard room. The 
second and third stories are divided into large, well furnished and thoroughl}^ 
ventilated chambers, most of which have connecting doors, enabling two or 
more df them to be thrown together en suite. A wide veranda, built on thi-ee 
sides of the building, and commanding views of the waters of the bay and the 
islands in the distance on one side and open groves on the other, forms an 
attractive refuge from the heat of the summer sun. Sail boats, properly 
manned, and row boats are to be found at all times at the boat houses near b}', 
and upon the shore near the hotel is a bath house well supplied with bathing 
suits and bath house appointments. A well built bowling alley is another of 
the attractions of the hotel. The management of the hotel is in the hands of 
Mr. D. H. Webster, who has had a long and practical experience in hotel man- 
agement, and who, with the itssistance of his wife, pays every attention to the 
comfort and accommodation of guests. The many and varied outdoor attrac- 
tions of the neighborhood, are supplemented b}' efficient arrangements for in- 
door recreation or amusement in stormy or chilly weather, and the hotel, which 
is shown in the accompanying illustration, is one of the most desirable places in 
the country at which to spend a summer vacation. Three miles from the hotel 
are situated the Bay Port quarries and lime kilns, the opening of which has 
proved a great benefit to the cities of the Saginaw Valley, to which its prox- 
imity has proved the means for securing supplies of stone and lime at a cost 
about 50 per cent, less than before these quarries were opened. Three and a 
half miles west of Bay Port, is Heisterman Island, so called from its ha^Mng 
been the residence of Hon. Carl Heisterman until 1883, at which time it was 
purchased by an association organized for that purpose and known as the 
Island Club. The club has between one and two hundred members, and the 
island has been improved by the laying out of walks, lawns, etc., and the 
building of the Club House, furnishing sleeping accommodation for seventy- 
five guests, with large dining room capacity. Fourteen cottages ha^^e already 
been built upon the island, and it is rapidly increasing in favor as a summer 
resort, offering unsurpassed facilities for bathing, sailing and fishing. A branch 
track of the Saginaw, Tuscola & Huron Railroad extends north to the shore 
west of the dock at Bay Port, where grounds have been set apart exclusively 
for the use of picnic parties. The grounds have a shore line of 1,600 feet, 
with shady groves immediateh' adjoining the beach, and as a provision against 
the discomforts arising from storms, a building 100x18 feet in dimensions, 
with open sides and provided with tables, benches and other conveniences, has 
been erected. These grounds afford an attractive resort for parties who wish 
to enjoy a day at the beach, a two-hours' run taking parties from East Saginaw 
to the grounds, and the return being made in the same time. The efforts made 
by the company and its officials to make available the natural attractions of 
Bay Port and its vicinity, have opened to the tourist and the pleasure seeker 
a place in which rest, health and recreation can be found not surpassed by an^^ 
on the Lakes. 

* Michigan Paper Company.— Swinton & Reynolds, Proprietors ; 
Wholesale Paper, Stationery and Books; 406 Genesee avenue and 119 and 
121 South Franklin street. East Saginaw. — This firm, which is composed of 
David Swinton, George A. Reynolds and William T. Cooper, was established 
five years ago, and its members are probably the youngest men in the whole- 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 155 



sale paper trade in the country, the oldest not being twenty five and the 
3'oungest twenty-one years old when they started in business. Their premises 
were formerh' located at 111 Genesee avenue, from which the}' removed in the 
spring of the present 3'ear to cheir establishment at 119 and 121 South Frank- 
lin street, embracing a two-story l>uilding, 40x100 feet in dimensions, with a 
one-story warehouse of like dimensions in the rear. They carry full lines of 
stationery of all kinds, printers' supplies, blank books, office supplies and 
everything usually found in a first-class paper and stationery house, and the}- 
also have a large warehouse for surplus stock at the Michigan Central Railroad 
yard, and the finest and best stocked retail book and stationery store in the 
Saginaw Valley at 406 Genesee avenue. The business has been a success from 
the first and is steadily increasing, now giving employment to a force of fifteen 
clerks and assistants, while three traveling salesmen represent the house in all 
parts of the State of Michigan, their business being especially large in the 
northern portion of the State. Their stocks are very large and carefully 
assorted, and the firm has built up a solid business and a first-class reputation 
by close attention to all the details and earnest efforts to secure the favor of 
their patrons by their thorough and reliable business methods. 

Bruno Martin. — Patentee and Manager of the Martin Excelsior Tobacco 
Resweater ; Tin, Copper and Iron Worses ; Corner of Genesee avenue and 
Chestnut street, East Saginaw. — Mr. Martin has been a resident of East Sagi- 
naw for the past nineteen years, and established his present business in 1871. 
He was formerly located on Franklin street, where he was burned out two 
years ago, and afterward removed to his present premises, where he occupies a 
building 50x125 feet in dimensions, in which his shop and store are situated. 
Here with the assistance of three workmen he carries on a steadily prosperous 
business in the manufacture of everything in the line of tin, copper and iron 
ware, a large portion of the time making all kinds of tin house furnishing 
goods, and he also does roofing and plumbing to order in the most complete 
and workmanlike manner. He carries a large and complete stock of tinware, 
all well made, and in this line the product of his establishment is not excelled 
by that of any in the Saginaws. Mr. Martin is the patentee and manager of 
the Martin Excelsior Tobacco Resweater, a device of the highest merit, and 
which is not excelled for the purpose for which it is designed, and is largely 
in demand by tobacco and cigar manufacturers in all parts of the country. 
Mr. Martin is thoroughly reliable and prompt in all his dealings, and his busi- 
ness is prosperous as a result of close attention to all its details. 

' Mikado Tea Company.— E. P. Zerbe, Manager ; Importers, Jobbers 
and Retailers of Fine Teas, Coffees, Spices, Etc. ; 315 Genesee avenue, East Sag- 
inaw.— Among the recent additions to the business establishments of the Sagi- 
naws, that of the Mikado Tea Company is one of the most notable. They oc- 
cupy a handsome and commodious store, 35x120 feet in dimensions, at 315 
Genesee avenue, where they carry large and complete stocks embracing the 
finest goods in teas, coffees, spices, etc., devoting themselves exclusively to this 
line, and being equipped with every convenience and facility calculated to aid 
the operations of the business, paying special attention to the assortment of the 
stock, so as to secure at all times the freshest and the best goods to be found 
anywhere. The firm has already, by the merit of its goods, its low prices and 
accommodating methods, commended itself to a large trade from the citizens of 
the Saginaws and surrounding country, both German and English speaking 
salesmen being employed in the store, and the company being prepared to de- 
liver goods to any part of the city. The proprietor of the business is Mr. Ed- 
ward Bullock, of Detroit, Mr. E. 1*. Zer])e being the resident manager. Mr. 



156 The Industries of the Saginaws. 

Zerbe is a thoroughly practical and experienced man, understanding every de- 
partment of the business, and by his efficiency is rapidly building up for the 
house a prosperity commensurate with the merit of its goods and the superior 
facilities it enjoys. 

Miss E. Beechler. — Fashionable Dressmaker ; G-age Block, corner of 
Lapeer and Jefferson streets, East Saginaw. — Since establishing her business in 
1886, Miss Emma Beechler has enjoyed a large patronage from the ladies of 
the Saginaws, which is steadily increasing, as a meri ed result of the superior 
work turned out at her establishments She occupies spacious and elegantly 
fitted quarters in the G-age block, 30x100 feet in dimensions, and gives employ- 
ment to a force of highly skilled dressmakers, ranging from six to ten in num- 
ber, according to the season, and is prepared at all times to execute orders for 
dresses, suites, cloaks, wraps, etc., in the latest and most fashional>le st3'les, and 
makes a specialty of the proper draping of dresses so as to secure perfect fit, 
elegance and special adaptation to the wearer. As a consequence of her supe- 
rior work Miss Beechler has built up her business to a gratifying condition 
of growth and prosperity, and has already secured a valuable connection, em- 
bracing man}^ of the most prominent ladies of the Saginaws and vicinity. Miss 
Beechler is a thoroughly skilled and experienced modiste, and has earned the 
confidence with which her establishment is regarded, by close attention to every 
detail of the business. 

Aug. Eggert- — Manufacturer and Dealer in Fine Upholsterered Goods 
and General Furniture ; 514 and 516 Genesee avenue, East Saginaw. — This 
business was established eighteen years ago by the firm of Eggert & Heine- 
man, the former being Mr. E. Eggert. About thirteen years ago Mr. Aug. 
Eggert became a member of the firm, the style of which was afterward changed 
to E. & A. Eggert, and the business was so continued until 1885, since which 
time Mr. Aug. Eggert has conducted it as sole proprietor. The premises occu- 
pied by the business embrace a three-story building, 40x100 feet in dimensions, 
where is carried in large supply and complete assortment every description of 
fine parlor, dining-room, bed-room, library, hall, vestibule and office furniture, 
the product of the best makers in the country, and of the latest and most ar- 
tistic designs, the choicest woods and the best workmanship. A full line is 
carried of silk, tapestry and other furniture coverings and all upholstery 
goods, and Mi'. Eggert does all his upholstering, in which line the workmanship 
produced at his establishment is not excelled by that of any similar concern in 
the country. A force of ten skilled hands is employed, and Mr. Eggert enjoys 
a large trade in the Saginaws and surrounding country, and also a considerable 
trade through all the northern part of Michigan. Thoroughly understanding 
all the details of the business and conducting his affairs upon the basis of uni- 
form reliabilit}-, his trade steadily grows and his establishment is one of the 
most prosperous business houses in the Saginaw Valle}'. 

H. Friedlein. — Watchmaker and Jeweler ; Hamilton street, opposite 
American House, Saginaw City. — Mr. Friedlein established this business upon 
a comparatively modest scale nine years ago, but by close attention to all its 
details, and a practical knowledge of the business, has built up a large and 
steadily- growing trade. He occupies a handsome and centrall}^ located store, 
25x100 feet in dimensions, elegantly finished in ebony, where he carries a 
large and select stock of gold, silver and filled case watches, gold jewelry, 
clocks, ornaments, etc. Specialties handled by Mr. Friedlein are the celebrated 
James Boss gold watches, and the Keystone and Leader coined silver watch 
cases, which are greatly approved as a consequence of the perfection of their 
make, and the combination of strength and beauty, which is their marked 



The Indusi^ries of the Saginaws. 157 



characteristic. In addition to his business as a dealer, Mr. Friedlein has a 
very large patronage in bis repairing department, the excellent manner in 
which all work in this line is performed at this establishment having procured 
for him a large railroad custom, in addition to that of citizens generally. Mr. 
Friedlein has earned the prosperity which he enjoys, as a consequence of the 
uniformly prompt and satisfactory manner in which he fills all orders for every 
description of work in his line. 

Stevens & Deveaux. — Real Estate, Loans, Abstracts, Land and Tax 
Agency; Seligman's Jiuilding, Corner of Genesee avenue and Franklin street. 
East Saginaw.— This business was established ten years ago, and since that 
time has been conducted with a careful attention to all its details which has 
secured for the firm, of which Messrs. J. K. Stevens and P. ¥. Deveaux are the 
individual members, a prominent place in the favor of the leading real estate 
owners, and a large trade in every department of its business. The members 
of the firm are thoroughly acquainted with the details of the history of land 
titles in Saginaw county, Mr. Stevens having been Register of Deeds, and Mr. 
Deveaux his deputy, and the firm having full abstracts of titles of all lands in 
Saginaw county. They have on hand at all times and in large quaniities good 
city property both in Saginaw City and East Saginaw, as well as large amounts 
of farming lands in Saginaw, Isabella and Midland counties and a number of 
improved farms. They are prepared to loan money in any desired amount on 
long time and at the lowest rates on good security, and to act as land and tax 
agents for non-resident and other owners of lands throughout this section. A 
specialty is made of perfecting titles and the redemption of lands from back 
taxes and other clouds and encumbrances. The careful attention paid b}' the 
firm to all the details of the business has given them special prominence jxmong 
the real estate firms of the Saginaw Valley, and they conduct a large business 
on both sides of the river, maintaining an office at 214 North Hamilton street, 
Barnard Block, Saginaw City. They are prepared to execute all commissions 
in their line in a faithful and satisfactory manner. 

H. & W. Heim. — Dealers in Drugs and Medicines, Fancy and Toilet 
Articles ; 201 Janes street. East Saginaw. — This well known firm of phar- 
macists was established three years ago, and now occupies a handsome two- 
story brick buildmg, and has one of the most attractive and neatly kept 
pharmacies in the Saginaw Valley. Their location is in every respect eligible, 
and their stock embraces all the best and purest articles in drugs and 
medicines and standard pharmaceutical preparations, as well as a full line of 
every description of fancy and toilet articles, and the members of the firm 
are thoroughly educated and practical chemists, and make a specialty of 
analytical work. In addition to their general line of business, they manufac- 
ture a number of special and highly approved pharmaceutical preparations, 
including Helm's Pectoral Balsam, Tooth-Ache Drops, German Salve, Corn 
Cure, etc., for all of which the demand is very large and steadily growing. 
The stock of fancy goods and toilet articles carried by the firm is especially 
well selected and assorted, containing all the best and most approved goods in 
the line, including a number of specially elegant articles suitable for holiday, 
birthday and other presents. The Messrs. Heim closeh' attend to all the 
details of their business, and make every endeavor to give satisfaction to their 
customers, and as a consequence of their promptness and reliability are build- 
ing up their trade to a gratifying and continued prosperity. 

F. Greve. — Dealer in Picture Frames, Mouldings, etc.; 524 Genesee 
avenue, East Saginaw. — Mr. Greve had been for ten years working for othei- 
parties engaged in a similar line of business prior to establishing in business 



158 The IndustribIs o1p the SaginaWs. 



for himself five years ago. He began upon a comparatively modest scale in a 
small place at the corner of German and Jefferson streets, from which he re- 
moved in the spring Of the present year to the more commodious location now 
occupied by him at 524 Genesee avenue, where he carries a large, complete and 
carefully assorted stock of engravings, mouldings, etchings, etc., embracing a 
number of the most artistic articles of this character ever brought to the Saginaw 
Valley. He is prepared to make all kinds of frames to order, and the productions 
of his establishment have a high reputation for superior quality, which has se- 
cured for Mr. Greve a large trade in the Saginaws and vicinity. He occupies 
premises 25x100 feet in dimensions, the store being upon the main floor and 
the wareroom upstairs. He enjoys superior facilities for supplying every de- 
scription of goods in his line upon upon short notice, and the accurate manner 
in which he fills orders has resulted in a steady increase in his trade from the 
inception of the business to the present time. 

H. Heinlein. — Merchant Tailor ; 313 Lapeer street, East Saginaw. — 
Mr. Heinlein has long been known to the gentlemen of the Saginaws and 
vicinity as a first-class tailor, he having been engaged in the business in this 
city ever since his arrival in 1856 from Germany, where he learned his trade. 
He has occupied his present location since 1874, and for a while was assisted 
by his son, who now, however, is established for himself in business at West 
Bay City. Mr. Heinlein carries a well assorted and complete stock of foreign 
and domestic woolens of the best quality, and is at all times prepared to cut, 
make and fit garments in accoi'dance with the prevailing styles, and of the 
best materials and workmanship. He employs none but highly skilled work- 
men, and as a consequence, all the productions of his establishment are satis- 
factory, and he enjoys a first-class reputation and a steady trade, as a result of 
the merit of his work, and the promptness and accuracy with which he fills all 
orders, 

Morley, Ewen & Oo- — Wholesale and Ketail Dealers in Coal, Lime, 
Cement, Sewer Pipe, Etc.; 321 North Water Street, East Saginaw. — This is 
the oldest established coal business in East Saginaw, having been founded 
about thirty years ago by Mr. Joshua Tuthill, who was succeeded by the drm 
of C. 'W. White & Co., of which Messrs. G. W. Morley and G. B. Morley were 
members. Upon the retirement from the business of Mr. White in 1880, Mr. 
F. D. Ewen became a partner, and the firm assumed its present style, the 
business steadily growing from that time to the present, and including in its 
trade territory the entire Saginaw Valley and all northern Michigan. The 
firm occupies premises covering 300x150 feet, with unsurpassed shipping and 
receiving facilities, railroad tracks in front and the Saginaw River in the rear. 
Upon these premises the firm has a convenient and commodious new coal shed, 
150x120 feet in dimensions and about 50 feet high, and also large cement and 
tile sheds, brick stable, etc., fine docks with about 300 feet river frontage, and 
a full equipment of hoisting cranes and every convenience and accessory cal- 
culated to aid or expedite the operations of the business. A large force of 
men is employed, amounting in winter to as high as fifty hands, and a large 
number of teams are utilized in the business of delivery. The firm carries 
large and completel}' assorted stocks of all kinds and sizes of anthracite and 
bituminous coal, lime, foreign and domestic cements, sewer pipes in all sizes 
and styles, etc., and the firm is prepared to supply every description of goods 
in its line upon the shortest notice and of the best quality. The business is 
conducted in a systematic and accurate manner, and the firm is justly regarded 
as one of the most reliable in the Valley. In addition to their interests in 
this business, the Messrs. Morley are prominently connected with other 
important enterprises, Mr. G. W. Morley being President, and. Mr. G. B. 
Morley Cashier, of the Second National Bank. 



The Industries of the Saoinaws. 150 



Fred Bamford & Co. — Painters and Decorators, and Dealers in Artis- 
tic Wall Papers, Room Mouldings, Art Glass, P]tc.; 123 South Franklin street, 
East Saginaw. — Tlie firm of Fred Bamford <& Co. is composed of Messrs. Fred 
Bamford and Will 11. Thayer, both of Detroit, where they conduct a ver}- large 
establishment, having their store and warehouse at 255 and 257 Jeflferson 
avenue. The business was originally established in Detroit by Joseph Godfrey, 
the firm later becoming Bamford & Humphrey, the present firm being formed 
in 1881. In February, 1886, the East Saginaw house was established, and 
placed in charge of Mr. Thomas D. Bamford, a nephew of Mr. Fred Bamford, 
and a thoroughh' experienced man in the business, under whose supervision a 
large patronage has been built up in the Saginaw Valley, and giving employ- 
ment to a force of twenty skilled workmen. The firm are extensive dealers in 
wall papers, Lincrusta Walton and room mouldings, and do all kinds of paint- 
ing, paper hanging and tinting, making a specialty of the highest class of 
interior decoration, frescoing and plastic ornamentation. Among the fine resi- 
dences decorated by this firm may be mentioned those of Messrs. C. W. Wells, 
F. C. Stone, Arthur Hill, W. C. McClure, W. Gilbert, J. W. Howry and others. 
The excellence of the workmanship in the decorating done bv this firm has 
secured for it a prominent place as the leader in its line, and as a consequence 
they do a very large business, never failing to give satisfaction to those for 
whom the}^ execute work, and the business is steadily growing as a conse- 
quence of their reliable work. 

Banner Steam Laundry. — Rossiter & IMcClintock, Proprietors ; 
North Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — This firm, of which Messrs. Richard C 
Rossiter and Elias J. McClintock are the individual members, was established 
three years ago, starting in the laundry business, and the steady increase in 
their patronage rendered their facilities insufficient, and during the present 
year the}^ had built for them their present commodious premises, which the}- 
have equipped with all the latest and most improved machiner}^ adapted to 
laundry business, the outfit being from the celebrated Troy Steam Laundry 
Manufacturing Co., including washing machines, which can be used for boiling, 
blueing, hot or cold washing ; centrifugal wringers, which will dry the most 
delicate laces without friction or wear ; starching, ironing, collar and cufi" ma- 
chines, a large filter of 250 gallons per day capacity, a 12-horse power upright 
engine and 15-horse power boiler. The premises occupied by the firm embrace 
a new brick building with perfect light and ventilation, two stories in height 
25x80 feet in dimensions. All the operations of the laundry are conductei upon 
the best known processes for securing the best results in this branch of indus- 
try, and only filtered water is used in all washing, and condensed water for 
flannels. Employment is given to a force of twelve hands, which the firm ex- 
pects to double by spring, and the uniformly satisfactory work turned out at this 
establishment, the great care taken with all goods and the promptness and ac- 
curacy of the firm in every respect have secured for them a large and steadily 
gi'owing trade, and the favor and patronage of the citizens of and visitors to 
the Saginaws. 

A. Wegst & Co. — Carriage Manufactory and Repository; 116 and 118 
Janes street. East Saginaw. — One of the most prominent recent additions to 
the business institutions of the Saginaws is that furnished by the establishment 
of the firm of A. Wegst & Co., of which Messrs. A. Wegst and J. P. Beck are 
the individual members. The premises occupied by them at present comprise 
a two-story new brick building, 50x125 feet in dimensions, in addition to which 
they have another building on German street, which they temporarily occupy, 
and expect to build during the coming spring another building, 25x125 feet, 



160 The Industries op the Saginaws. 

with an elevator. The}' own a large vacant lot adi'oining their premises, and 
in the future expect to add still other premises than those mentioned. The}- 
carrj' on the manufacture of everj^ description of buggies, wagons, cutters, etc., 
making a specialty of Concord wagons and top buggies, which they manufac- 
ture and sell at wholesale and retail. They give employment at present' to a 
force of eight highly skilled workmen, which they expect to duplicate as soon 
as the contemplated addition is made to their premises. They are prepared to 
make carriages, wagons and sleighs to oi'der, and make a specialty of carriage 
painting and trimming. Their establishment is equipped with all the neces- 
sary plant and appliances adapted to the successful conducting of this depart- 
ment of industry, and the work produced from their establishment is of a high 
quality and is rapidly commending itself to a large and steadily growing trade 
not only in the Saginaw Valley, but throughout Northern Michigan. The 
senior member of the firm, Mr. A. Wegst, is well known as one of the most 
solid and substantial citizens of the Saginaws, and his partner and son-in-law, 
Mr. Beck, is a thoroughly practical and expei'ienced carriage and wagon maker, 
under whose personal supervision the manufacturing department is conducted, 
with the result of securing a steady uniformity of excellence in the product of 
the establishment. It is the intention of the firm to push their trade, and en- 
joying ample resources and the best facilities, combined with an already estab- 
lished reputation for unexcelled work, there is no room to doubt the success of 
the enterprise. 

Yawkey & Corbyn. — Hardware^ Stoves, Etc.; 508 and 510 Genesee 
avenue, East Saginaw. — This prominent and prosperous firm, of which Messrs. 
Cy. C. Yawkey and Ralph F. Corbyn are the individual members, was estab- 
lished four years ago, the business having been originall}' located at 520 Grene- 
esee avenue until early in 1886, when in order to better accommodate the 
greatly expanded proportions of the business, the firm removed to the more 
commodious quarters the}' now occupy, embracing a two-story and basement 
building, 50x100. feet in dimensions and eligibly located at 508 and 510 Gene- 
see avenue. Here they carry a large and completely diversified stock embrac- 
ing everything in the line of heavy and shelf hardware, builders' materials, 
stoves, tin ware, house furnishing goods, bicycles, tricycles, velocipedes, etc. 
In stoves, f ui'naces and heaters thej^ carrj' especially superior stocks, embracing 
stoves of all kinds. Peninsular ranges and cooking stoves, Peninsular " llegal " 
and " Radiant " heaters, McGee's Boston heating furnaces and many other va- 
rieties, and in building materials carry a specially large assortment and com- 
plete stock of locks, knobs, butts, etc., and all sizes of nails, glass, and, in fact, 
everything used by builders. Employment is given to a force of six competent 
clerks and assistants, and the firm enjoys a trade which embraces in "addition 
to a heavy patronage in the Saginaws, a considerable jobbing trade with all the 
northern section of the State. The firm maintains the most favorable relations 
with the leading manufacturers, and is prepared to ofi[er special inducements 
both in quality and price to its customers, and by promptness in filling orders 
and accurac}' in carrying out all the details of the business, it has built up a 
first-class reputation and a trade which steadily increases from year to year. 

Alio BirsS- — Manufacturer of Carriages, Wagons, Steighs, Etc. ; Frank- 
lin, Between Tuscola and Johnson streets. East Saginaw. — The prominent 
position among the important industries of the Saginaws attained by this estab- 
lishment is due to the enterprise and energ}^ of Mr. Birss, who has steadily 
conducted the business for the past thirteen years, and throughout that time 
has paid special attention to maintaining in the quality of its product the high 
reputation which it just!} holds not onl}- in the immediate vicniit}- of this city, 



The Industries op ttte Saqinaws. Ifil 



but throughout the State at large. He occupies a three-story brick building. 
50x100 feet in dimensions, with high ceilings, the rear portion of which is used 
for wood work and wagon building, the upper floors for painting, finishing, 
storing, etc., and the front part of the first floor, which has six fires, is used tor 
horse shoeing, carriage trimming and repairing, in which business Mr. Birss' 
establishment is not exceeded in volume by any concern in the Valley. In 
addition to these premises Mr. Birss is now building an addition, 20x45 feet in 
dimensions and three stories high, adjoining his present premises, and which 
he will utilize for storage, etc. He manufactures every description of car- 
riages, wagons, sleighs, etc., and in all lines the work turned out at this estal> 
lishment is strictly first class. He makes about seventy-five wagons per year, 
besides a large number of Concords and buggies. The large and elegant furni- 
ture van, which is used by Mr. Harry Bates, and which is the only one of its 
kind in the city, was built at this establishment, and is a superior piece of 
workmanship in this class of vehicles. In addition to the manufacturing de- 
partment a large business is done not only in horse shoeing, but also in every 
description of jobbing pertaining to this line of industry, and Mr. Birss gives 
steady employment to a force ranging from seventeen to eighteen highly skilled 
workmen, carefully supervising all the operations of his 'establishment and 
using only the best materials in all departments of his work. The establish- 
ment is the largest one in the State covering such a general business, and the 
large trade it enjoys is the merited reward of close attention to orders and 
uniform reliability in all the dealings of Mr. Birss. 

First National Bank.— Erastus T. Judd, President ; George F. Cross, 
Vice-President ; Clarence L. Judd, Cashier ; corner of Genesee avenue and 
Cass street, East Saginaw.— This prominent and substantial institution was 
originally organized in 1864 mainly through the efforts of Mr. Erastus T. 
Judd, who since that time has been its executive head, devoting his attention 
to the business of the^bank, and directing it in the successful career which it 
has ever since enjoyed. In 1884, upon the expiration of the original charter, 
the bank was re-organized, and is now in a highly prosperous condition, as 
shown by the latest published report of its condition, dated July'l, 1887. At 
that time the bank had, in addition to its paid in capital stock of $100,000, a 
surplus fund of $50,000, undivided profits of $6,339.88 and resources of $473,- 
078.25. The bank does an active business as a general bank of loan and 
discount, issuing exchange upon the leading domestic and foreign cities, 
discounting approved paper, loaning money upon good security, attending 
promptly to collections of .; all 'kinds, and carrying on all the departments 
usually conducted by a national bank. The Board of Directors is composed 
ol prominent and substantial business men, included among whom, in 
addition to President Judd, are Mr. (George F. Cross, Vice-President of the 
bank, who is a prominent mill owner, a member of the lumber firm of Judd & 
Cross, President of the Cross, Gordon & Randall LumberjCo., PresidentJ and 
Treasurer of the Standard Lumber Co and otherwise prominently identified 




H. Ediret, of Kdget & Brooks, attorneys, and Henry S. Wilson, pine lands. 
The cashier of the bank is Mr. Clarence L. Judd, son of the President, and a 
gentleman who bv training and education, as well as by; experience, is 
thoroughly qualified for the responsible duties, which he performs with marked 
efficiency. Under the systematic methods and conservative course adopted 
by its management, the bank has accjuired a prominent place in the confidence 
of the public, by whom it is justly regarded as one of the soundest and most 
substantial banking institutions of the State. 



21 



162 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



H. F. Honsberger. — Dealer in Dry Goods, Notions, Etc.; 116 North 
Washington avenue, East Saginaw. — This business was established in 1883 by 
Mr. E. Trump, who was succeeded in the spring of the present year by Mr. H. 
F. Honsberger, a gentleman of long and practical experience in this business, 
and who had been engaged as a drj- goods merchant at Springfield, Canada, 
for five years prior to coming to East Saginaw. He occupies a four-story build- 
ing, 30x125 feet in dimensions, in which he carries a large and complete stock 
of everything in the line of staple and fancy dry goods and notions, including 
all kinds of cotton goods, silks, velvets, embroideries, laces, white goods, dress 
goods, oil cloths, hosiery and fancy goods of every description. He gives em- 
ployment to a full force of clerks, and his store, which is eligibly located, is 
fitted up with every convenience and accessory calculated to aid or expedite 
the operations of the business, including a cash railwa}^ and all modern im- 
provements. The stock carried is very large, occupying the entire building, 
and Mr. Honsberger is rapidly increasing his trade, as a result of the superior 
selection of his stock, the leasonableuess of his prices and the fairness and ac- 
curacy of his transactions. 

William W. Johnson. — Architect ; Room 21, Hoyt Block, East Sag- 
inaw. — Mr. Johnson began his business career by learning the trades of pat- 
tern maker and carpenter, afterward becoming a draftsman, and carefully 
studying the principles of architecture, in which he soon found his vocation. 
Four years ago he came to this city, and since that time has acquired a 
recognized position as a skillful and accomplished architect, thoroughly under- 
standing all the details of the profession, and designing and superintending 
buildings in a thoroughly' accurate manner. A number of the most prominent 
structures built in the city since his arrival here were designed and erected un- 
der his supervision, he having made the designs for, and superintended the 
Hoyt School, Home for the Friendless, Mr. Gilbert's dwelling on Jefferson street 
opposite the Methodist church, Mr. Brooks' dwelling on Jefferson street, Mr. 
Hanchett's in Saginaw City, a dwelling for Mr. Sanford Keeler, Superintendent 
of the F. & P. M. R. R.; 'All Saints'" church and the Polish Catholic church 
of East Saginaw, a school at Jackson, Mich.; a school at Manton, Mich.; a 
store block at Owosso for Weisner & Sharpstein, as well as a number of other 
business and residence structures. All the buildings erected under the super- 
vision of Mr. Johnson combine artistic elegance with practical adaptation to 
the purposes for which they are designed, and the entii-e satisfaction given by 
his professional services is attested by a large and steadily growing patronage 
which keeps him constantl}' busy. 

Henry Passolt — Manufacturer of Laundry and Toilet Soaps ; 422 
McCoskr}' street. East Saginaw. — Mr. Passolt has been established in busi- 
ness ever since 1863, and throughout his long career has b}' close attention to 
business built up his trade to a position of prosperity, as a consequence of the 
excellence of his produce and the prompt and accurate manner in which he 
fills all orders. He occupies as office and stock room a two-story brick build- 
ing, 25x60 feet in dimensions, adjoining which he has his works, 25x140 feet. 
He manufactures a full line of laundry and toilet soaps, including in laundry 
soaps, the "Diamond," "Chinese," "Domestic," "Victor," "Michigan," 
"Superior," -'Savon," etc., and in toilet soaps, " White Glycerine," " Honey," 
" Brown Windsor," " Rose," " Mottled," " Fine Toilet," " Transparent 
Glycerine," White and Mottled Castile, Oval Assorted and Ladies' Toilet 
soaps, and also makes shaving soaps, round and in tin foil. The output of 
the factory is very large, steady employment being to a force ranging from 
eight to ten hands, an(l in addition to the manufacture of soaps, Mr. Passolt 



The Industries op the Saqinaws. Ifi3 

also makes potash and pearlash, which he ships to New York, Boston, 
Cincinnati and oilier points. He is prepared at all times to pay the highest 
prices for tallow and grease, and to supply any of the goods manufactured by 
him to any points on order. He has built up a thriving business as a result 
of nearly a quarter of a centur}' of honorable methods. 

Eugene Ringler & Son.— Druggists and Chemists ; 118 South Ham- 
ilton street, Saginaw City. — Mr. Eugene Ringler, by whom this business was 
founded twenty-one years ago, is a native of WurtemVierg, Germany, where he 
was educated, and from which he came to America in 1847. In 1852 he gradu- 
ated in the medical department of the University of Michigan, and after prac- 
ticing medicine at Fostoria and Tiffin, O., enlisted as assistant surgeon in the 
Union army, and served to the end of the war. Then, after another two years 
at Tiffin, 0., he came to Saginaw and engaged in business, having a pai'tnerfor 
one year, and then removing to his present premises, where he conducted busi- 
ness alone until the past summer, when his son, Mr. E. A. Ringler, who had 
been for thirteen years engaged in the same line in New York, joined him in 
the formation of the present firm. The store occupies premises 25x100 feet in 
dimensions, and is completely stocked with a full line of drugs and medicines 
of all kinds, the firm making all their own tinctures and extracts, and in addi- 
tion, also making a number of special preparations, including Fragrant Pearl 
Dentine for the teeth, Carbolated Glycerine Chili for the skin, chapped hands, 
etc., a cough mixture, blood purifier, liver pills, sarsaparilla, cod liver oil 
emulsion, etc., which preparations command a large and steadily growing sale, 
as a consequence of their proved excellence. The firm is a substantial and pros- 
perous one, backed by experience and knowledge, and enjoys in a merited de- 
gree the confidence and approval of the citizens of the Saginaws. 

T. J. Norris. — Groceries and Provisions ; West Side of Genesee Bridge, 
East Saginaw. — Mr. Norris established this business eleven years ago, and has 
since carried it on with steady and growing success, as a consequence of the 
careful selection of his stock, and the fair and accurate methods upon which he 
has conducted it. He l)uilt and owns the building occupied by him, and the 
adjoining one which he rents out, both of these buildings being two-story brick 
structures, each 25x80 feet in dimensions. He carries a large and completely 
assorted stock of every description of staple and fancy groceries and provisions 
of all kinds, and enjoys a large trade from the citizens of East Saginaw and 
Saginaw City, as well as CarroUton and the surrounding country'. The loca- 
tion of the store is a favorable one, being central, and Mr. Norris has built up 
his business to its present proportions by careful attention to all its details, 
and thoroughness in all his transactions. 

Blumberg & W^einberg, — Dealers in Clothing and Gents' Furnish- 
ing Goods, Hats, Caps, Etc.; 419 Genesee avenue. East Saginaw. — Mr. 
Solomon Blumberg of this firm established himself in business early in 1886 
on Genesee avenue, near Washington avenue. In September of the present 
year he formed a partnership with Mr, Emil Weinberg, who had previously 
been with Rich Brothers, and the firm removed to their present eligibly 
located and handsome premises, 25x125 feet in dimensions, where the}- carr^' 
ver}' large and complete stocks, embracing everything in the line of clothing, 
gents' furnishing goods of every description, hats and caps of the latest st5'les, 
and a specially well assorted line of lumbermen's clothing, of which they make 
a specialty. The stock is carefully assorted and bought from first hands, and 
the firm maintains the most favorable relations with manufacturers which 
enable them to purchase at the closest margins and give their customers the 
benefit of the lowest prices. As a consequence, their store is justly regarded 



164 The Industries op the Saginaws. 



as headquarters for obtaining good goods at tlie lowest rates, and tliey liave a 
very large trade, including not only the residents of the Saginaws, but also a 
large trade from farmers and others in the surrounding countr}'. Both members 
of the firm are first class business men, and they have a thriving trade, which 
they maintain by uniformly fair treatment of their customers. 

Henry Goldsmith. — Successor to T. Goldsmith & Son ; Dealer in No- 
tions, Fancy Goods, Etc.; 124 South Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — This bus- 
iness was established eleven years ago b}- Mr. T. Goldsmith and his son Mr. 
Henry Goldsmith, under the firm name of T. Goldsmith & Son, and was con- 
tinued under that style until September of the present year, since which lime 
Mr. Henr}' Goldsmith has conducted it as sole proprietor. The premises occu- 
pied by the store embrace the main floor, 25x120 feet in dimensions, of the build- 
ing at 124 South Hamilton street, with the basement and a large room in the rear. 
Here are carried large stocks of everj'thiug in the line of notions, fancy goods, 
silverware, china, crockery, glassware, toys, baby carriages, books, stationery, 
albums, photograpliic supplies, vases, ornaments, rubber goods, etc., carefully 
selected so as to comprise the best goods in the line. Employment is given to 
three clerks, and the establishment enjoys a large trade from the people of the 
Saginaws and surrounding country, in addition to which it is doing a consider- 
able amount of jobbing throughout this section. Mr. Goldsmith, the proprie- 
tor of the store, is a business man of superior attainments, who has commended 
himself to the favor and patronage of the community as a result of the fairness 
and reliabilit}^ of his methods, and the close attention paid by him to ever}' de- 
tail of the business. 

Kirby Blakely. — Insurance and Ileal Estate, and Manufacturers' 
Agent for Agricultural Machinery' and Implements ; corner of Warren and 
German streets, East Saginaw. — Mr. Blakely, who had previously been in the 
employ of Mr. D. A. Pettibone, started in the insurance business five years ago, 
locating his office at the corner of Genesee avenue and German street, where he 
still h?s his insurance office. Later he added to his business that of agent for 
McCormick's Harvesting machines and supplies, and dealer in all kinds of 
farm implements, in which he is now largely engaged, occupying for this busi- 
ness a lot 100x125 feet in dimensions, with a building 20x100 feet, in the cen- 
ter, and sheds around the sides. He carries a large and complete stock of farm 
implements and agricultural machines, buggies, etc., the sheds being utilized 
for the storage of heav}' machinery and farm wagons, in which line he is agent 
for the celebrated Coquillard wagons. In this line his stock is complete in 
every particular, embracing all that is latest and best in the way of farm ma- 
chinery and implements, and he enjoys a large business covering not only the 
entire Saginaw Valley but also extending to all parts of northern Michigan, 
three traveling salesmen representing him in this trade territory for the sale of 
these goods. In insurance he is the representative of a number of the leading 
and most prosperous companies, including the Hamburg-Bremen, of Ham- 
burg, Germany, having in its United States branch assets of $1,119,692, and 
a surplus over all liabilities of $509,894 ; the Newark, of New Jersey, capital 
$250,000, and surplus of $319,303 ; the Providence-Washington of Providence, 
R. I., capital $400,000, and assets ^1,025,824 ; and the Clinton, of New York, 
capital $250,000 ; through which companies he is prepared to offer safe insur- 
ance at the lowest rates consistent with the absolute safety of the investment. 
Mr. Blakely also deals in real estate and handles it as agent ; is a Notary Pub- 
lic, and is prepared to attend to all business in the line. He is a business man 
of superior attainments, and in all the branches in which he is engaged is en- 
joying a stead}^ increase in the vol u are of his transactions, as a result of close 
attention to all the details and uniform fairness of dealing. 



The Industries of the Saginaws. K!.') 

W". B. Moore. — Wholesale and Retail Druggist ; 201 and 203 Grenesee 
avenue, and 1U2 Washington avenue ; Laboratory and Warehouse, 215, 217 
and 219 North Water street. East Saginaw. — This establishment is the out- 
growth of the drug business founded in 1865 by Mr. A. A. Dunk, who died in 
December, 1879, and was succeeded in January, 1880, by Mr. W. B. Moore, 
who had been connected with the business under the proprietership of Mr. 
Dunk from 1873. Since acquiring the business Mr. Mooie has had a steadily 
growing trade, and lias greatly extended the premises occupied, and the 
facilities possessed by the business. His elegantly fitted and perfectly 
appointed store at the corner of Genesee and Washington avenues is 80x100 
feet in dimensions, having two entrances and four show windows, and being 
completely fitted up with shelving and show cases arranged for the tasteful 
and attractive display of the stock, and having an ottice in the rear of the 
store, back of which is a storeroom for keeping surplus stock. In addition to 
these premises Mr. Moore has a laboratory and warehouse at 215, 217 and 219 
North Water street, and is fitting up a new branch store at the corner of 
(lenesee avenue and William street, which will be made attractive with all 
the appliances pertaining to a first-class drug establishment, and will be under 
the management of Mr. W. W. Sheldon, a druggist of twenty years' experience, 
who has been with Mr. Moore for the past year. Mr. Moore is the proprietor 
of a number of first-class proprietary articles, many of which have a celebrity 
and trade extending all over the country, including Dunk's Camphorated 
Arnica, William's Camp Liniment, William's Pine Balsam. Beebee's King of 
Pain, Rough on Corns, Moore's Cincho Myrrh tooth powder, Moore's Sarsap- 
arllla, sticky fly paper, etc., in the manufacture of which he gives employment 
to a force of fifteen hands. In the store he has a staff of five competent clerks 
and assistants, and in the new store will giA'-e tmployment to four more. He 
carries a large and complete stock embracing everything in the line of staple 
drugs, as well as a large stock and attractive display of fancy goods and toilet 
articles, handkerchief extracts, including Lundborg's, Lubin's and Rimmel's 
unequalled goods, making an assortment of extracts, colognes and toilet waters 
of unequalled merit. His line of purses, card cases, hand mirrors, hair 
brushes and other fancy goods is in every way complete, while in cigars, which 
he sells at wholesale and retail, his goods are of the finest quality and his trade 
very large. As a consequence of the great merit of his goods, and the uniform 
promptness and accuracy with which he fills all orders, he enjoys a large trade 
with the citizens of the Saginaws and with lumber camps throughout the 
Saginaw Valley region, as well as a large outside trade in his proprietary arti- 
cles. The success which has attended Mr. Moore's business career has been 
built up by close attention to his business, and a steadfast endeavor to give 
satisfaction to his customers. 

J. P. Derby. — Wholesale Grocer; Produce Commission Merchant; Derby 
Block," North Water street ; Retail Store, 718 and 720 Genesee avenue. East 
Saginaw. — Mr. Derby has continuously conducted this business since he estab- 
lished it in 1857, and during the thirty years of his business history has en- 
joyed a steady and constant growth in the volume of his trade, and has built 
up a reputation second to none in his line in the State. He owns the hand- 
some white brick building on North Water street, known as the Derby Block, 
and comprising five three-story stores, of which he occupies two, covering an 
area of 70x100 feet, with a dock in the rear of the premises. He carries very 
large stocks and full lines of everything in staple and fancy groceries, grocers' 
sundries and shelf goods, mill and camp supplies, etc., in which he enjoys a large 
wholesale trade covering not only the Saginaw Valley, but also all the northern 



166 The Industries op the Saginaws. 

part of Michigan. In addition to this business he has the finest retail grocery 
store in the Saginaws at 718 and 720 Genesee avenue, occupjing a two-story 
building, 60x80 feet in dimensions, completely equipped with everything in the 
line of groceries, delicacies, etc., and from this store enjoys the patronage of 
the citizens of the Saginaws and their surrounings. He also deals largely in 
produce and does an extensive business as a general commission merchant, 
holding the coofidence of shippers and producers by the careful and accurate 
manner in which commission services are performed by him. The excellent 
standing which has been maintained by this house throughout its long and 
prosperous business history, has resulted from careful attention to all the de- 
tails of the business, and uniform fairness and reliability in the business 
methods of Mr. Derby. 

Second National Bank.— (>. W. Morley, President ; Sewell Avery, 
Vice-President ; G. B. Morley, Cashier ; East Saginaw. — Holding- a deserved 
prominence among the most solid and substantial corporations ot the Saginaw 
Valley is tlie Second National Bank of East Saginaw, with a paid-in capital of 
$150,000, and which was incorporated under the National Banking Act in De- 
cember, 1871. It enjoys a large and active business in general banking, 
receiving the accounts of banks, bankers, corporations, firms and individuals, 
discounting approved commercial paper, loaning money on good security, 
and also makes collections and draws exchange on the leading domestic and 
foreign cities. A gratifying exhibit is made by the latest published report of 
the condition of the bank, dated August 1, 1887, in which it is shown that the 
bank has resources of $715,725.23, and in addition to its paid-in capital stock 
has a surplus fund of $30,000 and undivided profits of $16,937.83. The busi- 
ness of the bank is conducted on safe and conservative methods, its Board of 
Directors being composed of Messrs. George W. Morley, Sewell Avery, Waldo 
A. Avery, Edward W. Morley and H. C. Potter, Jr. 

George Spatz. — Steam Baker and Wholesale Cracker Dealer; Corner 
of Hamilton and Cass streets. Saginaw City. — Mr. Spatz has been engaged in 
this business for the past sixteen years, throughout which time he has main- 
tained for his establishment a high place in the favor of the citizens of the 
Saginaws, and a trade throughout the northern portion of Michigan, as a con- 
sequence of the superior quality of all the productions of his establishment. 
He does a large local business in bread of every description, and in crackers 
his trade also extends all over the northern portion of the State, Mr. Spatz 
being well known to the trade, and visiting his customers personally. The 
premises occupied by the business comprise a two-story building, 60x75 feet in 
dimensions, and employment is given to a force of ten skilled workmen, the 
bakery being equipped with all the latest and most improved machinery and 
appliances adapted to this department of industry. Mr. Spatz is prepared to 
till all orders with accuracy and despatch, and the thriving business he enjoys 
was acquired by close attention to all its details. 

Henry Feige. — Manufacturer and Dealer in Fine Furniture, Upholstery, 
Carpets, Curtains, Draperies, Etc.; 318 and 320 Genesee avenue, and 113-117 
Cass street, East Saginaw. — This business was originally established in 1863 by 
the firm of Feige Brothers, of which Messrs. George and Henry Feige were the 
individual members. The firm became George Feige alone in 1880, by whom it 
was conducted until recently, when upon Mr. George Feige engaging in the Feige 
& Silsbee Furniture Manufacturing Co., he was bought out by his brother, Mr. 
Henry Feige, b}' whom this business is now conducted as sole proprietor. He 
occupies a three-story and basement building, 25x100 feet in dimensions, front- 
ing at 318 Genesee avenue and has the two upper floors of No. 320, a building 



The Industries of the Saoinaws. 167 



of the same size. A passage-way cionnects this store with the rear of the other 
premises occupied b}' Mr. Fcige, which is a three-story buih^ing with 75 feet 
front on Cass street by 60 feet in depth. The two stores combined form the 
largest furniture and furnishing store in the Saginaw Valley, and they are com- 
pletely stocked with everything in the line of fine and medium furniture, the 
finest carpets of foreign and domestic manufacture, antique curtains, Swiss 
curtains, shades, shade cloth, King's Scotch Holland, patent shade rolls, shade 
trimmings, curtain loops, jute curtains, cross stripes and curtain goods of all 
kinds, and latest styles, as well as full lines of oil cloths, rugs, matting, etc. 
Embraced in the stock also is a full line of the celebrated John Rogers terra 
cotta groups of statuary. In all these goods Mr. Feige maintains the most fa- 
vorable relations with the largest manufacturers, b}^ which he is enabled to 
offer unsurpassed inducements both in quality' and price, and he enjoys a large 
trade including, in addition to a heavy business in the Saginaws and the Sagi- 
naw Valle}' generally, a large order trade, orders having been received from as 
far west as Omaha and Denver, and as far east as New York City ; and a num- 
ber of residences in Detroit have been completely furnished from this store. 
The house from its inception to the present time has always enjoyed a superior 
reputation, its business having been uniforml}' conducted upon honorable and 
reliable methods. 

John Otto, Jr., & Co. — Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps,. 
Etc.; 207 Genesee avenue. East Saginaw. — This firm, which is composed of 
Mr. John Otto, Jr., of this city, and Mr. Alexander Jacobi, of Mt. Clemens, 
Mich., began business in this city in May of the present year, and occupies 
Doughty's old stand at 207 Genesee avenue, where they have a spacious and 
attractive store located in a fire proof building completely stocked with hats, 
caps, neck-wear, hosiery, shirts and every description of gentlemen's furnish- 
ing goods, the stock embracing the latest styles and novelties, and being 
selected with special care to till the demands of the best class of customers. 
The business in this city is under the management of Mr. John Otto. Jr., Mr. 
Jacobi conducting a similar establishment at Mt. Clemens, Mich. The firm 
also carries a complete stock of fine silk umbrellas in gold and other heads 
and is at all times prepared to supply the gentlemen of the Saginaws with the 
most attractive and desirable goods in the lines in which they deal. Com- 
petent and accommodating clerks are employed in the store, and every 
facility- is used to assist customers to make proper selections. Mr. Otto is a 
business man of superior attainments, who thoroughly understands all the 
details of the business, and brings to the management energetic and enter- 
prising methods which have secured for the house a large and steadily grow- 
ing trade, and made it popular with the gentlemen of the twin cities. 

Seyffardt & Walz. — Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Hardware, 
Building Material, House Furnishing Goods, Agricultural Implements, Etc.; 
618-622 Genesee avenue. East Saginaw. — This house, which is j ustly regarded 
as one of the most substantial and prosperous in the Saginaw Valley, was 
founded in 1869, the firm being composed of Messrs. William Seyffardt and 
George Walz. They occupy a two-story and basement brick building with 80 
feet front by a depth of 100 feet, equipped with every facility and convenience 
calculated to aid or expedite the operations of the business, employment being 
given to force of fifteen competent clerks and assistants. They carry very 
large and thoroughly diversified stocks of everything in the line of heavy and 
shelf hardware, building material, stoves, house furnishing goods, agricultural 
implements, paints, oils and brushes, etc. The firm are agents for the cele- 
brated "Columbia" bicycles and tricycles, of which they carry a complete 



168 The Industries op the Saginaws. 



stock, and in stoves they handle full lines of the celebrated "Jewel " stoves, 
manufactured b}' the Detroit Stove Works in ranges, heaters, base burners, etc. 
In paints, oils and brushes their stock is especially complete, the firm being 
agents for Harrison's celebrated "Town and Countr}' " ready mixed paints, 
and the}' also carry a full line of artists' supplies of every description, while in 
household and builders' hardware, agricultural implements, etc., their stock is 
completely assorted and of the best quality'. As a result of the merit of their 
goods and the uniformly reliable methods adopted by the firm in all its deal- 
ings with the trade and the public, they enjoy in addition to a heavy business 
with the people of the Saginaws, a large trade to the north and west through- 
out the State of Michigan. 

Cornell & Stafford. — City Bottling Works ; Manufacturers ot Ginger 
Ale, Root Beer, Birch Beer, Cream Soda, Sherbet, Diamond Rock Seltzer and 
Pops of All Kinds ; Factory, corner of Fourth and Chestnut streets ; Office, 
115 Genesee avenue, East Saginaw. — The City Bottling W^orks were estab- 
lished sixteen years ago by Mr. L. Quinnin on Genesee avenue, and conducted 
by him until five years ago, when he was succeeded by the firm of Cornell & 
Stafford, of which Messrs. S. Cornell and J. Stafford are the individual 
members. Since coming into the possession of the business the firm has made 
vast improvements, and greatly added to the facilities for manufacture, as well 
as extending the trade over a largel}' expanded territory. They now occupy 
for their factory a spacious building at the corner of Fourth and Chestnut 
streets, where they have a complete plant and all necessary machinery for the 
manufacture upon a large scale of ginger ale, and everything in the line of 
pops and aerated waters ; giving steady employment to six hands, and closely 
supervising the operations of the factory, so as to secure at all times that 
uniformitj' of excellence by which the product has obtained a foremost reputa- 
tion, and a trade extending throughout Northern Michigan. In their specialty 
of ginger ale this firm is not surpassed by any in the State, and of this product 
they make from 100 to 500 dozen bottles per day. They also manufacture 
root beer, birch beer, cream soda, sherbet, diamond rock seltzer and pops of 
all kinds, of which they produce from 100 to 500 dozen bottles daily. The 
firm utilizes five wagons in its business, and by promptness in filling orders, 
and accuracy in all its transactions, has built up its enterprise to the success 
which it now enjoys, 

A- Schupp. — Insurance ; Home National Bank Building, East Saginaw. 
— Mr. Schupp, who has been established in business ever since 1878, is recog- 
nized as one of the best informed and most successful underwriters in the State. 
He represents a list of companies embracing the most solid and substantial cor- 
porations, including the Home Insurance Company, of New York, which at the 
beginning of the present year had a cash capital of $3,000,000, assets of $7,- 
80lJ,711, and a surplus over all liabilities and capital of $3,388,916 ; also the 
Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool, England, which had in its American 
branch at the beginning of the present year assets of $1,976,093 and a surplus 
of $2,329,552 ; also the Niagara, of New York, capital $500,000, assets $2,- 
260.480, and net surplus of $489,340 ; the Fireman's Fund, of San Francisco, 
capital $1,000,000, assets $2,052,263 ; the Fire Insurance Association, of Lon- 
don, England, with assets in its United States branch of $921,475, and a net 
surplus of $385,832 ; the Rochester-German, of Rochester, N. Y., capital $200,- 
000, assets $658,481, and a surplus over all liabilities and capital of $172,625 ; 
also the Sun Fire Office, of London, England, the oldest insurance corporation 
in existence, having been organized in 1710, and which had at the beginning of 
the present year in its United States branch assets of $1.6()6,681 and a net 



The Industries op the Sacjinaws. Ifi!) 



surplus of $549,206. Through these standard and unsurpassed insurance com- 
panies Mr. Schupp is prepared to place insurance at the lowest rates consistent 
with the absolute safet}' of the investment, and attends promptly to all busi- 
ness in the line. He makes a specialty of the insurance of saw mills, lumber, 
brick blocks, merchandise, manufacturing establishments, dwellings and furni- 
ture, and possesses unusual facilities for carrying large lines of insurance. He 
is a gentleman of long business experience, and in addition to this business, 
occupies the position of Treasurer of the Savings Bank of East Saginaw. He 
is ably assisted in his insurance business by his son, Mr. Otto Schupp, and the 
agency enjoys the confidence of the citizens, its transactions always having 
been characterized by accuracy and reliability. 

A. A Schott & Co. — Pharmacists, and Dealers in Pure Drugs, Medi- 
cines, Chemicals, Etc.; 131 North Cass street. Next to Postoffice, East Saginaw- 
— This firm, of which Messrs. A. A. Schott and T. Duncan are the individual 
members, was formed two years ago, and from that time to the present have 
enjoyed a successful and growing business with the citizens of the Saginaws 
and surroundings by the merit of their stock and the careful and accurate man- 
ner in which they compound prescriptions and fill all orders for every descrif)- 
tion of goods in their line. They carr}' at all times large stocks and complete 
assortments of every description of pure drugs, medicines and chemicals, all 
approved proprietary preparations, toilet and fancy articles, fine perfumes of 
foreign and domestic make, and druggists' sundries of every kind. They have 
a full line of wines and liquors for medicinal uses, and a fine selection from the 
best brands of imported and domestic cigars. Their store, which comprises 
the main floor of a three-story brick building, is eligibly located at 131 North 
Cass street, next to the postoffice. and is neatly kept, the goods being dis- 
played in an attractive manner. The firm has earned the prosperity and in- 
creasing trade it enjoys by thorough knowledge of and close attention to ever}' 
detail of the business. 

Burdick & Moore- — Dealers in Meats, Groceries, Vegetables, Etc.; 
130 and 132 Jefferson street, East Saginaw. — This firm, of which Messrs. 
D. D. Burdick and James Moore are the members, was formed fourteen years 
ago, and conducted a market on Franklin street until June 29 of the present 
year, when they were burned out. Jul}' 11 they opened their present estab- 
lishment, which they now own, occupying two stores, embracing a two-story 
new brick building, 30x150 in dimensions, eligibly located and in eveiy way 
adapted to the needs of the business. One of these is used as the market, 
where they carry at all times a large and fresh stock of meats of unsurpassed 
quality, and all vegetables in season, and in the back part of which they have 
a large cooling room, 20x30 feet in dimensions, to facilitate the preservation 
of the stock in first-class condition. The other store comprises the grocery 
department, where is kept, in large stock and complete assortment, everything 
in the line of staple and fancy groceries, grocers' sundries, shelf goods, etc. 
The firm has every facility for the business, and gives employment to a force 
of twelve competent and accommodating clerks and assistants. Throughout 
the history of the firm it has ever been noted for the great care taken in the 
selection of its stock, and the uniform accuracy and reliability by which its 
dealings are characterized and in this way has built up a large trade with the 
citizens of the Saginaws and surrounding country. They do an extensive 
jobbing business in barreled beef and pork, and have recently added a new 
engine and boiler, with which they heat their buildings, and operate a sausage 
machine with a capacity of 3,000 pounds per day. 

23 



170 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



D. K. AUington — Architect, Mechanical Engineer, Etc.; Office, 
Koom 24, Hoyt Block, East Saginaw. — Mr. AUington, who is a thoroughly 
practical architect and mechanical engineer, carae to Saginaw in 1862, and for 
two years followed building, after thtit engaging for eight years as superin- 
tendent of salt works and in 1874 established himself in his present business, 
in which he enjoj'S a large patronage, the thoroughness of his knowledge of all 
the details having secured for him a superior reputation and first class patron- 
age. He makes a specialty of the planning of saw and planing mills and other 
manufacturing establishments. Prominent among the structures built and 
equipped under his supervision is the Van Winkle and Montague Mill, at Gar- 
den Bay, the William Peters Mill at Bay City, and the mill of J. W. & E. S. 
Bliss, near Zilwaukee, Mich. In his specialty of mill building he has no supe- 
rior in the State, his thorough knowledge of mechanical engineering enabling 
him to plan structures of this character, and to place machinery in them in such 
a way as to produce the most satisfactorj^ results. In addition to this business 
Mr. AUington has invented a patent machine for band saw mills, which is man- 
ufactured in this city, and which has been adopted generally by the mills 
throughout the Saginaw Valley and Canada. Mr. AUington is also agent for 
the Taper Sleeve Pulley Works of Erie, Pa., and is prepared to furnish the full 
line of pulleys manufactured by that company, and which are of unsurpassed 
quality, and is also prepared to furnish every description of machines and ma- 
chinery to order. Closely attending to all the details of his business, and con- 
ductmg his affairs upon honorable and reliable methods. Mr. AUington enjoys 
a merited prosperity, which is steadil}^ growing from year to year. 

Sheyer Brothers — Dealers in Dry Goods, Clothing, and Ladies' and 
Gents' Furnishing Goods ; Central House Block, 2620 South Washington 
avenue, South Saginaw. — This firm, of which Messrs. Simon and Hej'raan 
Sheyer are the individual members, was established four 3-ears ago, and since 
that time has commended itself to the favor and patronage of the citizens of 
the Saginaws and vicinity by the close and accurate attention paid by them to 
every detail of their business, the earnestness of their endeavors to give satis- 
faction to their customers, and the superior quality and low prices of the goods 
in which they deal. Their stock, which is large, is well displayed in their 
store, which is 35x150 feet in dimensions, and includes everything in the line 
of staple and fancy dry goods, clothing, ladies' and gents' furnishing goods, 
hosiery, hats, caps, blankets, oilcloths, etc., carefully selected with especial 
reference to the needs of the people of the Saginaws. The members of the 
firm are both experienced and practical merchants, who conduct their business 
upon fair and honorable methods, which have commended them to a large and 
steadily increasing trade among the residents of the cit}', as well as a consid- 
erable trade from farmers and others in the surrounding country. 

Nelson Holland. — Manufacturer and Dealer in Gang Sawed Lumber 
and Salt ; Mill and Salt Block, Corner of Atwater an i Water streets. East 
Saginaw. — Mr. Holland's present works were erected in 1878 ou the site of one 
of the first mills that was built on the east side of the river. As now operated 
the premises comprise a mill, 60x160 feet in dimensions, with an engine house, 
40x50 feet, and a wing 20x60 feet. The plant comprises all the latest and 
most highly improved machinery and appliances adapted 'to the business, in- 
cluding a 200-horse-power engine. On the premises also are four salt wells, 
with a salt block 160x150 feet in dimensions, a railroad shed, 30x25 feet, with 
a capacity for holding 7,000 barrels, large cooperage warehouses, sheds, and 
other buildings, covering over one solid block, besides which Mr. Holland has 
twent3'-six lots of water frontage around the mill. Steady employment is 



The Industries op the Saoinaws. 171 



given through the season to a force ranging from seventy-five to one hundred 
men. and the annual product of the works amounts to from 16,000,000 to 18,- 
000,000 feet ot lumber, 1,500,000 laths, 750,000 staves, and 40,000 sets of 
heading. Of salt the product is about 35,000 barrels per annum. The mill, 
piling grounds, etc., are located on the river bank, the salt block and other 
buildings being immediately opposite, across Water street. Mr. Holland has a 
very large business, his product all going to his own extensive yards at Buffalo, 
N. Y., from whence it is distributed to the trade. The salt product is dis- 
posed of through the medium of the Michigan Salt Association. 

Louis Quinnin.— Real Estate ; Municipal Court Block, Cass street, 
between Genesee avenue and Tuscola street. East Saginaw. — Mr. Quinnin, who 
is recognized as one of the most successful and substantial of the citizens of 
the Saginaws, is a native of Sandusky, O., from which place he removed with 
his father to Detroit in 1845. He served in the regular arm}- during the War 
of the Kebellion in Horse Battery M of the Second United States Artillery, and 
participated in some fifty battles prior to Lee's surrender, at which he was 
present, and was wounded three times. After the war his regiment went to 
California, and Mr. Quinnin remained there until March 13, 1867, when he was 
honorably discharged at Presidio Barracks, San Francisco. In 1870 he came 
to East Saginaw and engaged in the manufacture of pop and mineral water at 
the corner of Genesee avenue and Chestnut street, which business he continued 
for nine years. A few years after coming here Mr. Quinnin, forseeing the 
growth of East Saginaw, made a number ot judicious investments in real 
estate, and in 1874-5-6 bought, among other property, the three lots on Cass, 
between Genesee avenue and Tuscola street, on which he has smce built the 
Municipal Court Block. In the block is a drug store of which Mr. Quinnin is 
now the owner, and where he keeps on hand a large stock and complete 
assortment of drugs, chemicals, surgical appliances and druggists' sundries of 
ever}^ description. He also owns the post office block at the corner of Cass 
and Tuscola streets, as well as a number of business structures and dwelling 
houses throughout the city. His financial ability has been demonstrated by 
the rapid increase in the value of the property in which he has invested with 
the result that he is now iustly regarded as one of the most successful men of 
the city. 

Rose Brothers. — Wholesale and Retail Butchers ; 2612 South Wash- 
ington avenue. South Saginaw. — This firm, of which Messrs. William A. and 
John T. Rose are the individual member, has been in existence for ten years. 
Their experience in this business covers a period of twenty-eight years, during 
which time they have commended themselves to the favor and patronage of 
the citizens of the Saginaws b}^ the uniform fairness and accuracy' of their bus- 
iness methods, the superior character of their stock and the close attention paid 
by them to every detail of their business. The}' occupy a brick building, 30x 
125 feet in dimensions, with a slaughter house in the rear, and carry at all 
times large and well selected stocks of every description of fresh, salt and 
smoked meats, canned goods, etc., and makeaspecialty of supplying fresh but- 
ter and eggs of the best qualit}'. The store, which is especially adapted to the 
purposes of the business, is kept neat, with its stock properly displayed, and 
the firm do a large business not only in their immediate neighborhood, but also 
in East Saginaw and Saginaw City, employment being given to four hands, 
and their delivery wagon being constantly bus}' supplying their customers. In 
addition to this wagon they have two others for hauling stock. By constant 
endeavors to secure the satisfaction of their customers, and uniform reliability 
in all their dealings they have secured prosperity in their enterprise, and a rep- 
utation second to none eneaged in this line of business. 



172 The Industries op the Saginaws. 

William Mueller. — Contractor for Brick and Stone Work ; Sixth and 
Lapeer streets, East Saginaw. — Mr. Mueller, who is a German by nativity-, 
came to tbis country in 1867, locating in East Saginaw, and later establishing 
himself in his present business, taking his first contract in 1872. He is a 
thoroughly practical and experienced man in the business in which he is en- 
gaged and as a consequence of tlie faithful manner in which he fills all con- 
tracts, the careful supervision given by him to all the details and his uniform 
fairness and reliability has secured a large patronage, and he has built a num- 
ber of the leading and most prominent buildings in the city, including Arbeiter 
Hall, the Strasburg Restam-ant, the Sherman House, the Courier building, the 
new News building, erected in 1884, the Emerson school and the Home for the 
Friendless, both built in 1886, and did the mason work on the Bearinger build- 
ing, on Franklin, near Tuscola street, and is now working on the Ho3't Library, 
built of Bay Port blue stone and Lake Superior red stone trimmings, and brick 
trom the Tittabawassee. Mr. Mueller, by close attention to business, has built 
up a superior reputation and a high place in the regard and confidence of the 
citizens, and he is now serving the second year of his term as Alderman from 
the Third Ward. He is a prominent member of the Germania and Arbeiter 
societies, and owns a large amount of valuable propertj' in diflferent parts of 
the city, and is in every respect a substantial and prosperous citizen. He gives 
employment to a force ranging from twenty to forty hands, and the success he 
has achieved is the merited result of fair dealing and superior workmanship. 

F. E- Tallmadge. — The Franklin Livery, Sale and Boarding Stables ; 
North Franklin, between Tuscola and Johnson streets. East Saginaw. — This 
well known and popular livery establishment began business about four years 
ago, being originally conducted bj' Mr. C. M. Hill, who owns the building, 
then passing into the hands of other parties, by whom it was conducted until 
two years ago, when Mr. Tallmadge acquired the business and has since 
carried it on upon methods which have commended the establishment to the 
favor and patronage of the citizens of the Saginaws and vicinity. The build- 
ing is a two-story brick structure, specially designed and erected for the 
purposes of the business, having ample capacity' for the proper accommodation 
of thirty-five horses. The livery equipment includes fifteen horses and a full 
outfit of carriages, coupes and light vehicles of first-class make and handsome 
appearance and in addition a large boarding business is done, six trained 
attendants being employed to give proper care to animals in the stables. Mr. 
Tallmadge is a thoroughly practical and experienced man in all the depart- 
ments of this business, by close attention to all the details of which he has 
achieved a merited popularity and pi'osperity. No establishment of its kind in 
the Saginaws has better facilities, and at none is better care and attention 
given to horses than at the Franklin. 

Farmers' Hotel.— Louis Miller, Proprietor ; 804 Genesee avenue. 
East Saginaw. — This business was established nineteen years ago by Messrs. 
George Boehm and Louis Miller, under the firm style of Boehm & Miller, and 
continued by them in the original structure up to 1881, when the present build- 
ing was put up to replace the old one. Early in 1885 Mr. Boehm died, since 
which time Mr. Miller has conducted the business as sole proprietor. The ho- 
tel is a three story brick structure with 47 feet front, and runs back 110 feet to 
William street, and opposite the William street front Mr. Miller has a barn 
with ample accommodations for thirty-four teams. The hotel has thirty neatly 
furnished and properly kept rooms, the table is supplied with the best the mar- 
ket affords and the hotel has a large patronage from farmers, lumbermen and 
others from all parts of the Saginaw Valley. The rates of the hotel are $1.00 
a day, and Mr. Miller has made it popular by close attention to the comfort 
and convenience of his guests. 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 17/1 



East Saginaw National Bank —John G. Owen, President ; Edwin 
Eddy, Vice-President; 8. 8. Willielm, Cashier; 108 South Washington street, 
East Saginaw. — This bank, which is justly regarded as one of the most solid 
and substantial financial institutions in the city, was incorporated in 1884, since 
which time it has conducted a successful business. By tlie latest puldished re- 
port of its condition dated at the close of business August 1, 1887, it was shown 
that the bank had resources amounting to $349,077.95, and in addition to its 
paid-in capital stock of $100,000, had a surplus fund of $15,000, and undi- 
vided profits of $7,253.21. A general banking business is transacted, loaning 
money on first class security, discounting approved paper, issuing exchange on 
the principal domestic and foreign cities, carrying the accounts of banks, cor- 
porations, merchants and individuals and attending to commercial collections, 
etc. The management of the bank is in experienced hands, and it is conducted 
on safe and conservative methods which have commended it to the confidence 
of the business community and citizens generally. The Board of Directors is 
composed of business men of the highest standing, including Mr. John G. 
Owen, President of the bank, a prominent lumber and salt manufacturer and 
manufacturer of sash, doors and blinds, and otherwise largelj' identified with 
important business enterprises ; Max Heavenrich, of Heavenrich Brothers & 
Co., President of the Citizens' Association, Treasurer and Manager of the James 
Stewart Company, lumbermen's supplies, etc.; J). B. Freeman, dry goods; 
Louis Quinnin, a prominent real estate owner ; Edwin Eddy, of Eddy, Avery 
& Eddy, lumber, salt, pine lands, etc.; William B. Baum, of W. B. Baum & 
Brother, proprietor of the Sherman House and director of the People's Savings 
Bank ; and Mr. S. S. Wilhelm, a banker of thorough and practical experience, 
to whose efficiency as cashier of the bank is largely due the prosperous position 
it enjoys. The bank sells drafts on England, Ireland, Scotland, Germany, 
France, Holland, Norway, Sweden, Belgium, Switzerland, Denmark, Italy anil 
the other European countries, and in everv respect is prepared to transact all 
kinds of legitimate banking business. 

Moeller & DeLand. — Druggists ; Dealers in Wall Paper, Stationery, 
Etc.; junction of Mackinaw street and South Washington avenue. South 
Saginaw. — This popular and prosperous drug establishment was originally 
started by the firm of Hubbard & Randall, several changes afterward occurring 
until the business was acquired by Mr. D. E. Prall, who was succeeded by the 
firm of Moeller & Youmans, which firm carried on the luismess for nine years, 
until the spring of the present year, when the firm of Moeller & DeLand, con- 
sisting of Messrs. A. R. Moeller and M. L. DeLand succeeded to the business. 
They occupy a twostory brick triangular shaped building, attractively 
furnished and completely equipped with all conveniences for the successful 
conduct of the business, and they carry large and complete stocks of every 
description of drugs, medicines and chemicals, all approved proprietar}' 
articles, as well as complete lines of stationer}^, wall paper, window shades, 
periodicals, blank books, lamps and lamp goods, and a well selected stock of 
the best brands of tobacco and cigars. The prescription department bears a 
special celebrity for the careful and accurate manner in which prescriptions 
are compounded from the best materials. In connection with their wall paper 
department they carry a large and complete stock of ready mixed and other 
paints, oils, brushes, and all painters' supplies. In a part of their premises is 
located the post office of South Saginaw. Both members of the firm are skill- 
ful pharmacists and thoroughly accurate and reliable business men, and the 
steady increase in their business is the merited result of close attention to all 
its details. 



174 The Indttstries of the Saoinaws. 



Rust, Eaton & Co. — Manufacturers of Lumber, Lath and Salt ; Works 
at Zilwaukie; OflSce over Burrows' Bank, Saginaw City.^Th:s is one of tlie prom- 
inent lumber manufacturing concerns of the Saginaw Valle}'. The company 
was formed in 1865, the only changes being the death of two members, whose 
widows still retain an interest. Mrs. Emiline E. Bradley was the wife of A. 
S. Gaylord, a member of this firm, and has since remarried. Mrs. Martha A. 
Hay is the widow of James Hay, who was also of the firm. Tlie other mem- 
bers of the firm who have beea connected with it from its inception are Messrs. 
Ezra and Amasa Rust, D. L. C. Eaton and George L. Burrows. The mill, salt 
block and other works are located at Zilwaukie, on the Saginaw River, about 
five miles north of Saginaw. They have ample dock frontage and a large 
boom. Their saw mill was built by Daniel Johnson and others in 1848, and 
passed through several hands prior to its acquisition by the present firm in 
1865, since which time it has been rebuilt and remodeled, new machiner}' being 
put in throughout, including one of Wickes Brothers' improved gangs, a large 
circular, two butting saws, two edgers, one trimmer, a lath mill and all neces- 
sary machinery. All modern devices and improvements calculated to increase 
the output, improve the product and economize time and labor are found in the 
mill. In addition to the manufacture of lumber and lumber products, the firm 
is engaged in the manufacture of salt, and has two salt wells and a salt block. 
The capacity of the mill is about 15,000,000 feet of lumber, 3,000,000 laths, 
and from 30,000 to 35,000 barrels of salt. The lumber product is shipped to 
Toledo, Cleveland, Buffalo, Tonawanda, Albany and other Eastern ports and 
markets, and the salt is delivered in bulk to the Michigan Salt Associatii-n, and 
as a consequence the firm does not make barrel stock. In the operations of 
the works employment is given to a force ranging from eighty to ninety men 
and ten horses, and in addition to the manufacturing business the firm is 
engaged in lumbering in Grladwin county, where it has a camp giving employ- 
ment to a force of from forty to fifty men, and it also lumbers through jobbers 
in Midland and Isabella counties, bringing the logs by rail to the Tittabawassee 
River, whence they are floated to the mill. The firm are large owners of pine 
and farming lands in the Saginaw Valley, aad the members of the firm are 
largely interested in other similar enterprises. Mr. Ezra Rust, of this firm, is 
also a member of the firm of Rust & Wheeler, pine and farming lands, logs 
and lumber ; Mr. Affasa Rust is of Burrows & Rust, Butman & Rust and Rust 
Brothers & Co., and otherwise prominently identified with the lumber interests 
of the Valley. Mr. Eaton is a member of the firm of Eaton, Potter & Co., 
who have a mill, salt works, etc., at South Saginaw, also of Burrows & Eaton, 
lands and logs. He is prominent as a substantial citizen, having a large farm 
in Gratiot county, and many private investments. Mr. George L. Burrows, of 
this firm, is the oldest banker in Saginaw City, being head of the firm of G. L. 
Burrows & Co., and he is also a member of the firms of Burrows & Eaton, 
Burrows & Rust, and individually the owner of large tracts of pine and farm- 
ing lands. Mi's. Bradley and Mrs. Hay are also large owners of pine tracts 
and farming lands and interested in investments in other important business 
enterprises. Thus made up of solid and substantial citizens the company 
occupies a leading position, is well managed, and has been maintained by a 
combination of large capital and accurate methods. 

C M. Norris. — Dealer in Pianos, Organs, Musical Merchandise, Etc.; 
314 Genesee avenue, East Saginaw. — This well-known house was founded in 
1866 by J. C. V. Wheat, with whom Mr. Norris was associated as clerk. In 
1869 Mr, Wheat sold out to Mr. J. B. Jackson, who retained Mr. Norris as 
principal salesman, until he, in turn, sold out to Mr. A. W, Wheat, brother of 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 175 



the founder of the" business. This was in 1872 ; and in 1873 Mr. Norris, who 
had remained with Mr. Wheat, became a partner in the business, the interests 
of which he had done so much to promote, and it was then carried on under the 
firm name of Wheat & Co. which became a household word in every part of 
Northern Michigan, In 1875 Mr. Wlieat died, and in 1879 Mr. Norris bought 
out the interest of his widow, and has ever since been sole proprietor. Up to 
December, 1881, the business was located on Washington avenue, but was 
then removed to the building known as the Music Block, where it attained, if 
possible, a still greater celebrity, and was continued up to January 1, 1888, 
when, a favorable chance presenting itself, it was removed to the building 
which it now occupies. This is a handsome three-story brick structure on 
Genesee avenue, in the very best business quarter of the city. Here an 
exceedingly prosperous wholesale and retail trade is conducted on square 
business principles, and a large stock carried in pianos, organs and every 
description of musical instruments, such as violins, guitars, banjos, harps, 
acGordeons, etc., as well as a full line of sheet music, and musical instruction 
books. This stock includes all the latest productions of the leading home and 
foreign composers and publishers, and will be found very complete and com- 
prehensive. In addition to these various lines Mr. Norris handles the famous 
Domestic Sewing machine, for which he has the sole agency in the Saginaws 
and surrounding district. As this machine is known by experts to be the 
best in the world, any furiher mention would be superfluous. Ladies or 
gentlemen who wish to have music in their houses, and yet do not want to 
bu)^ instruments, will find at this house a large number of pianos and organs 
to rent on reasonable terms. Here, also, anyone who wants a piano or organ 
tuned, repaired, moved, set up, or shipped, can have the work done promptl}' 
and in the best possible manner. We have shown that this music house has 
carried on a successful business in East Saginaw for ver}^ nearly a quarter of 
a century and is to-day upon a stronger and firmer foundation than ever, 
while numbers of would-be competitors have come and gone. This fact should 
appeal strongly to the citizens of Northern Michigan for a continuance of the 
favors which the}^ have hitherto so liberally bestowed. All patrons may be 
assured that every exertion will be made by Mr. Norris to retain and increase 
their good will, and to give perfect satisfaction in every transaction. His 
long experience in, and practical knowledge of his business peculiarl}' qualifies 
him to do this ; and he has no doubt that he will not only keep all his old 
friends, but gain man}- new ones in his present location. 

O. K. Eddy & Son.— Manufacturers of Lumber and Salt; West End of 
Genesee Avenue Bridge, East Saginaw. — Among the leading firms engaged in 
the lumber and salt industries that of C. K. Eddy & Son has a special promi- 
nence attaching to it, as a consequence of the vast extent of their trade, the su- 
perior character of their facilities and the volume of their output. The 
founder of the business, Mr. Charles K. Eddy, was born in Penobscot County, 
Maine, in 1820, where his earlier days were passed. xVfter receiving an aca- 
demical education he became a surveyor and civil engineer, and as such was 
employed by the State of Maine on its public surveys for eighteen years. In 
1858 he went to Ottawa, Canada, where he engaged in lumbering for seven 
years, and came to Michigan in 1865 and followed the same business until 1880, 
when he purchased the Chicago Mill, the oldest in the Valley, erected in 1853 
by Mr. Fred Babcock, which he greatly improved, and which he and his son 
have since operated under the firm name of C. K. Eddy & Son. Their saw mill 
is a two-story structure, 200x100 feet in dimensions, with seven large boilers, 
5x10 feet, feeding two powerful engines of 300 and 100-horse power respec- 



176 The IndiTStries op the Saqinaws, 

lively, four small pumping engines in their salt wells, and a Wickes Brothers' 
new improved gang mill, one large circular and other machinery. The perfect 
mechanism of their plant makes it one of the most complete in the country. 
The logs are taken from the booms by an endless chain of (.broad blinks, with 
]Mcks, or teeth, every few feet, the lower pulley of this chain being under the 
water in the booms. The logs are pushed over the chain and caught by the 
teeth, and a steady stream of logs goes up the incline at a rapid rate^to a large 
circular saw where they are faced and sent rapidly to the gang mill, near by, 
which saws four logs into two-inch planks at once, and can reduce^to lumber 
1,200 loo's per day. The lumber is run along revolving rollers to trimming tables, 
from which the slabs are run on rollers against three small circular saws and cut 
into equal lengths, dropped into an automatic shoot and are whirled away to stor- 
age bins. There they are dropped into large wagons and carted to slab piles. 
The sawdust, which is the sole fuel used in the house, is carried automatically 
from the saws to the fire in a similar manner. The lumber runs along revolving 
rollers to the sizing tables, where it runs against saws cutting equal lengths, 
and then drops on to trucks and is carried away along a tramway to the piling 
grounds. Railroad tracks run throughout the premises, and the piling grounds 
have first class water frontage, and the firm thus enjoys unexcelled facilities for 
shipping their product, which amounts to about 15,000,000 feet of lumber, 
1 ,500,000 laths, 1,500,000 staves and 75,000 sets of heading per season. On the 
premises are four salt wells and a salt block, 260x60 feet in dimensions, and 
the salt product of the firm amounts to about 50,000 barrels per year. In ad- 
dition to these premises are large store houses, barns, oflSces, etc., piling ground 
with a capacity of about 12,000,000 feet, the entire premises occupied by the 
firm covering some eight acres. In addition to this business the firm are large- 
ly interested in other valuable properties and business enterprises. They own 
and have for sale large tracts of farming lands in Isabella, Clare and Ogemaw 
counties, and both Messrs. C. K. Eddy and Walter S. Eddy are members of the 
firm of D. Eddy & Co., dealers in lands, logs, lumber, etc., of Eddy-Glynn 
Lumber Co., Turin, Upper Pininsula, Mich., operating a saw mill and dealing 
in lumber, lands, logs, etc., also of the C. K. Eddy Lumber Co., this last being 
a concern lately established upon the premises recently occupied by T. Jerome 
& Co., as a saw mill and salt block, which was burned in the summer of 1886, 
where a lumber yard is in operation, through which in a short time C. K. Eddy 
& Son expect to handle in the car trade the entire product of their mill each 
year. To their already extensive premises they will add a planing mill, which 
will be built in time for the coming season. They take an especial pride in, and 
are both fond of good horses, and in a small way are breeders and in their sta- 
bles are to be found as fine specimens of both draft and driving horses as are 
to be found in Michigan and enjoy the fact that from a stock of which they 
owned four generations, a colt, (" Chimes E.,) has been brought out by them 
who by his performances on the turf at Cleveland, places them at the head of 
Saginaw County as producers of speed. The business of the firm gives em- 
ployment to 110 hands and eight teams and their product of lumber goes to 
Ohio, New York, Pennsylvania and all eastern points, while their salt product 
goes to the Michigan Salt Association, by whom it is distributed through their 
branches all over the country. Perfect system is maintained in all the opera- 
tions of the business, and the firm is one of the highest reputation and de- 
servedly great prosperity. 

Jay Smith & Son. — Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Drugs, Chem- 
icals, Patent Medicines, Druggists' Sundries, Etc.; 417 Court street, Saginaw 
City. — In 1852 Mr. Jay Smith, who had arrived in Michigan from his native 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 177 

State of New York a year previous, bought the store of L. Wesson, then the 
only drug store in the Saginaw Valley, and from that time to the present has 
remained at the head of the business, which he conducted alone until four 
years ago, when he was joined by his son, Mr. Fletcher S. Smith, in the forma- 
tion of the present firm. In 1874 Mr. Smith erected the Smith Block, one of 
handsomest and most imposing structures in Saginaw City, containing three 
well equipped and convenient stores, one of which he occupies, and which is a 
three-story and basement building, 22x100 feet in dimensions. The firm 
carries very large and completely assorted stocks, the most extensive and 
complete in the Valley, of every description of drugs, chemicals, patent medi- 
cines, druggists' sundries, etc., and in addition manufactures a number of first- 
class and highly approved pharmaceutical preparations, among which may be 
prominently mentioned Smith's Sarsaparilla, Dixon's Pectoral Cough Syrup, 
Canada Liniment, Hazel Cream, Healing Ointment, etc. The firm gives em- 
ployment to three competent clerks and assistants, and in addition to a very 
large trade in the city and surrounding country, has an extensive and con- 
stantly growing jobbing trade with all points in Northern Michigan. In 
their retail department the firm enjo3'S a special celebrity for the careful and 
ascurate manner in which prescriptions are compounded from the best and 
most reliable drugs, and a very large patronage from the people of the 
Saginaws. The uniformly reliable and accurate methods upon w'hich the 
business has been conducted throughout the long and honorable history of the 
house has given it a special distinction among the leading business houses of 
the Valley, and made its name a synonym for propriety of business conduct. 

Williams-Perrin Implement and Produce Company. — A. T. 
Bliss, President ; William A. Williams, Vice-President ; J. W. Perrin, Secre- 
tar}'; Frank S. Peet, Treasurer ; Wholesale and Retail Dealers in All Kinds of 
Carriages, Cutters, Sleighs, Farm Implements, Machinery, Wagons, Engines, 
Wind Mills and Produce; Warerooms, 515, 517 and 519 South Washington, 
and 515, 517 and 519 Gratiot streets ; Office, 507 South Washington street, 
Saginaw City. — Although of comparativeh'^ recent establishment, this corpora- 
tion has already made its mark and taken a place among the most prominent 
of the business concerns of the Saginaws. The inception of the business dates 
back to two years ago, when it was founded by Messrs. Williams and Perrin, 
who continued the business as a private firm until February of the present 
year, when the existing corporation was organized with a capital stock of $25,- 
000. B}^ this incorporation the firm has been enabled to better accommodate 
its vastly increased patronage, and the fact that this house in two years has 
been developed from a comparatively small beginning to a business handling 
over $100,000 per annum, is one of the most gratifying indications of the pro- 
gress of agricultural development in Saginaw county. The company's ware- 
rooms form a large establishment covering the greater part of a block. The 
carriage room, which is crowded with vehicles from the best Eastern manufac- 
turers, runs through from Washington to Gratiot street, and is 25x260 feet in 
dimensions. The agricultural implement room also runs through from Washing- 
ton to Gratiot, and is 75x200 feet, and the office and saddlery room is 20x80 feet, 
fronting on both streets. The company carries very large lines of everything 
in carriages, cutters, sleighs, farm implements, machiner}', wagons, engines, 
wind mills and produce, and they are agents for the ^Minneapolis and Walter 
A. Wood mowers and binders, Brj^an's all steel plow, the celebrated Pet Disc 
harrow, which retails at $25, Haliday's wind mills, Upton thresher and traction 
and plain engines and separators, Buckeye spring tooth cultivators, mounted 
cultivators with seeding attachment, Iron Age cultivator, Eccd harrow of 



178 



The Industries of the Saoinaws. 



Kalamazoo, New Whipple harrow, Farmer's Favorite drill, 9, 11 and 13 hoe ; 
Thomas' hand and self dump rake, the Dutton scythe grinder, Hocking Valley 
corn sheller, Flint cabinet creameries for the farm and dairy, the Moses wagon 
of Lapeer, Capitol wagon of Lansing, Jackson wagon of Jackson, and the well- 
known line of driving and pleasure carriages made by H. A. Moyer, of S^'ra- 
cuse, N. Y., and F. A. Babcock & Co., Amesberry, Mass. In addition to this 
line of agricultural implements, their stock of carriages, wagons, sleighs, robes, 
whips, harness, bells, blankets, and every description of stable furniture, is 
complete in every particular. Employment is given to a force of eight clerks 
and assistants, and three traveling salesmen are constantly on the road, which 
number is increased in the summer, and the firm does a large trade all north 
and west through the State and along the D. & M. Railroad. The company 
are transfer agents for Central and Northern Michigan for the several manu- 
facturing concerns above mentioned, and are prepared to fill orders from the 
trade for the superior agricultural machinery at factory prices. The manage- 
ment of the business is in the hands of business men of successful record and 
long experience, the stockholders being the following well known and promi- 
nent business men of the Saginaw Valley: A. T. Bliss, Amasa Rust, F. C. 
Stone, William A. Williams, E. G. Rust, James W. Perrin, Henry A. Smith, 
W. N. Guider and F. S. Peet, the officers of the corporation being the gentle- 
men named in the head lines of this article. 

Harry Bates. — Dealer in Horses, Wagons and Carriages, and Manufac- 
turer of Harness, Etc.; 208, 210 and 212 Franklin street, East Saginaw. — Mr. 

Bates has been exten- 
sively engaged in this 
business in East Sagi- 
naw for the past 20 
years. The premises 
occupied by him em- 
brace a handsome new 
two story brick struc- 
ture, atfording floor 
space for office, har- 
ness rooms and stable, 
50xU0 feet. The sta- 
ble is provided with a 
telephone, lit b}' gas, 
heated by steam radia- 
tors and is kept scru- 
pulously^ clean and 
neat, and here is to be 
found as fine a selec- 
tion of first - class 
horses as was ever 
brought to the State, a car load of which Mr. Bates receives every two weeks, 
and occasionally oftener. Mr. Bates does a very large business in the dispos- 
ing of horses at private sale, selling an average of from 500 to 600 per year. 
He makes a specialty of fine Clydesdale and other first-class stock, and his 
establishment is justly regarded as the headquarters for the purchase of the 
finest draft horses to be procured. Connected with the business is a well- 
equipped harness shop, in which every description of harness of the best 
quality is made to order. A recent addition to the business is the storage of 
furniture, and Mr. Bates is prepared to fill all orders for moving either furni- 




The Industries of the Saqinaws. 179 



ture or merchandise in the most efficient manner, he having recently had huilt 
the finest furniture van in the city. Mr. Bates is justly regarded as an 
authority' on horses, and is a practical veterinary surgeon, having attended 
college in Toronto, and being thoroughly practical and informed upon all the 
details of the care of horses. 

George F. Stevens. — Merchandise Broker ; corner of Genesee and 
Washington avenues, East Saginaw. — Mr. Stevens, who is the son of Mr. 
George W. Stevens of the firm of Stevens & LaDue, has been for the past 
three years successfully engaged in business as a merchandise broker, in which 
line he has built up a large connection with the wholesale trade of Saginaw 
City, East Saginaw and Bay City, with whom he does a large car trade in pork, 
provisions, grain, sugar, syrups, meal, canned goods and staple groceries gen- 
erally', in all of which lines he represents a number of the leading houses in the 
country, with whom he has constant communication by wire. The superior fa- 
cilities possessed by Mr. Stevens for filling orders in this line, and the close at- 
tention paid by him to business have secured for him a large and steadily 
growing connection and a heavy business for the houses he represents, among 
which are Douglas & Stuart, Chicago, the oat meal men ; Wolff & Reessing, 
New York, importers and canners of all kinds of fish ; Hills Bros., New York, 
foreign fruits and nuts ; De Grauw, Aymar & Co., New York, cordage ; Chica- 
go domestic dried fruit dealers, and fifty-six other first-class firms who deal in 
nearly everything handled by the wholesale grocery trade. Mr. Stevens has 
also bought and shipped a great many cars of second quality salt to western 
dealers. 

B. Herrig. — Wholesale Dealer in Tobacco, Groceries, Provisions, Flour, 
Feed, Hay, Etc.; Ill and 113 South Water street, opposite the Michigan Cen- 
tral Railroad Passenger Depot, Saginaw City. — Mr. Herrig, who has been a 
resident of Saginaw City for the past thirty -eight years, established this busi- 
ness in 1860 and has since conducted it with steady success, enjoying a high 
place in the confidence of the trade and the community as a result of honora- 
ble business conduct. He occupies two stores of three stories each, and 50x 
100 leet in dimensions, heavily stocked with complete assortments of fine cut, 
plug and smoking tobaccos of all the most approved brands, staple and fancy 
groceries, provisions, flour, feed, pork, hay, straw and seeds in bulk. All of 
these goods are of the best quality, bought from first hands, and are sold at the 
lowest prices. A force of eight clerks and assistants is employed and three 
teams are utilized by the business. Mr. Herrig does a very large business with 
the citizens of the Saginaws and also enjoys a considerable jobbing trade with 
local dealers and those in other towns of the Saginaw Valley. His two sons, 
Messrs. Bernhard Herrig, Jr., and Louis M. Herrig render him efficient aid in 
the details of the business, and the honorable methods upon which the transac- 
tions of this house have been conducted throughout its extended business ca- 
reer have secured for it a great and merited prosperity. 

Rust & Wheeler.— Pine and Farming Lands, Logs, Lumber, Etc.; Of- 
fice over Burrows' Bank, Saginaw City.— This firm, of which Messrs. Ezra 
Rust and Charles E. Wheeler are the individual members, was formed two 
years ago. They own large tracts of pine and farming lands in Midland, Glad- 
win, Clair, Osceola and Ogemaw counties, from which they cut from four to five 
million feet of logs per annum through jobbers, which they have sawed by 
the mills of Rust, Eaton & Co. and others, and ship to Toledo, Cleveland, Buf- 
falo, Tonawanda and interior and eastern ports in round lots and cargos. Mr. 
Rust of this firm is also of the firm of Rust, Eaton & Co., manufacturers of 
lumber, lath and salt, and otherwise prominent in important business enter- 



180 The Industries of the Saginaws. 

prises. The firm is one of large resources, and its facilities for supplying lum- 
ber in any desired quantity to any of the lumber markets are not excelled by 
those of any lumber firm in the country. Close attention is paid to all the de- 
tails of the business, and the firm is prepared, in addition to its lumber lousi- 
ness, to sell choice farming lands to all those seeking home in the Garden Spot 
of the Peninsulpr State. 

A. Byrne. — Dealer in Grroceries, Provisions, Etc., and Wholesale and 
Retafl Wines and Liquors ; Saginaw City. — Mr. Byrne established himself in 
business fifteen years ago at the corner of Porter and Clinton streets, where he 
still carries on the grocery business upon a prosperous scale, and where also 
his dwelling is situated. He also has a lara:e wholesale liquor establishment at 
125 Hamilton street, where he carries a complete stock of wines and liquors, 
including the best brands of rye and Bourbon whiskies, imported goods, em- 
bracing the finest brandies, gins, Irish and Scotch whiskies, wines, cordials, 
liqueurs, etc. At his grocer}^ he carries a large and complete stock of staple 
and fancy groceries, provisions, teas, cofl'ees, fruits, vegetables, etc., as well as 
a full line of grocers' sundries and canned goods. As a consequence of the 
careful manner in which his stock is selected Mr. Byrne's stores are head- 
quarters for the family trade of the citizens of the Saginaws and vicinity, and 
the business steadily increases from year to year. 

John Gaensbauer. — Dealer in Boots, Shoes, Slippers and Rubbers ; 
North Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — Mr. John Graensbauer is one of the 
oldest of the residents of the Saginaws, he having started thirty-six j^ears ago 
to this place from Detroit, in order to see what Saginaw City was like. 
Arriving, he found a great forest with a few shanties along the river, and 
asked some one whom he met, " Where is Saginaw City? " To quote Mr. 
Gaensbauer's own words, when he was told that he was in the heart of it, he 
got tired, and wanted to go home, but hadn't money enough, and so he 
invested what he had in forty acres of land near the city at $4 an acre, and 
engaged in farming for four years, when he sold out his forty acres for $2,000, 
with which capital he started again at his old trade of shoe making. Up to 
the last year or two he did custom work, keeping a number of men ; but has 
abandoned that line, and now sells the products of the leading eastern manu- 
factories, embracing the finest goods in the line ever brought to Saginaw City, 
including a complete assortment of boots, shoes, slippers and rubbers for 
ladies', misses', men's and children's wear. He gives employment to two 
clerks and two workmen, and occupies the main floor, 25x100 feet in dimen- 
sions, carrying at all times a complete and well assorted stock. Mr. Gaens- 
bauer is a gentleman of means, who has earned prosperity as the merited 
result of close attention to business and uniform correctness in all his dealings 
with the citizens of the Saginaws and its vicinity. 

E. O- & S. L. Eastman & Co- — Manufacturers of and Dealers in As- 
sorted Lumber ; Yard, corner of Mason and Franklin streets. East Saginaw. — 
This firm, of which Messrs. E. 0. and S. L. Eastman, of this city, and Fred 
Hempy, of Cleveland, 0., are the individual members, was formed two years 
ago. They are largely engaged as lumbermen, owning log interests on the 
Tittabawassee, in Gladwin and Midland counties, and they have their logs cut 
at the mill of Warner & Eastman, of which firm the Messrs. Eastman are mem- 
bers. They have yards covering two blocks at the corner of Mason and Frank- 
lin streets, and sell about 12,000,000 feet of lumber per annum. They are in 
every way equipped lor shipment by rail or water. The firm has enjoyed a 
steadily increasing business from its inception, and has a large trade, shipping 
lumber in car lots to Ohio and eastern markets. 



The iNDtJsTiiiEs op the RAniNAWS. 



181 




Excelsior Steam Boiler Works, — Wildman Brothers, Proprietors ; 
Manufacturers of Stationary, Marine and Locomotive Boilers, Etc.; Corner of 

William and Water streets, East Saginaw. 
— These works comprise one of the most 
important of the manufacturing establish- 
ments of the Saginaws. enjoying a merited 
celebrity for the superiority of all their 
products, and a large trade throughout the 
Saginaw Valley, while in some special lines 
j orders are filled from all parts of the West, 
and from as far south as Florida. The 
business was established twenty years ago 
by Mr. Robert Wildman, by whom it was 
conducted alone until two 3'ears ago, when 
he was joined by his brother, Mr. Andrew 
Wildman, forming the present firm. The 
works occup}' a building 50x100 feet in 
dimensions, with a spacious j-ard adjoining, 
docks at their rear, and railroad tracks at their front doors. These works are 
completely equipped with one of the best and most extensive outfits of 
machinery and appliances adapted to the business to be found in the State, and 
give employment to a force of sixty hands. The firm are largely engaged in 
the manufacture of stationary, marine and locomotive boilers of every descrip- 
tion, pumps for testing, washing out and filling steamboat boilers, and every 
kind of sheet iron work, in addition to which the firm make a specialty of 
boiler steel linings lor cellars, and have just finished a large one for the cellar 
of the First National Bank in East Saginaw. In connection with the works a 
well equipped repairing department is conducted, where every description of 
repairs to boilers and other sheet iron work are attended to in a i)rompt and 
workmanlike manner. All the manufacturing operations are carefully super- 
vised in order to secure a uniformity of excellence in the productions of the 
establishment, and it is to this merit that the firm owes the thriving trade which 
it enjoys. 

Bliss & Parsons. — Dealers in Pine Lands, Logs and Lumber ; 1 Mer- 
rill Block, Saginaw City. — The great growth of the lumber industry of the Sag- 
inaw Valley has led to a steady appreciation in the price of pine lands, and 
dealing in property of this character has for the past few years been conducted 
with steadilj^ augmenting activity. A firm engaged in this department of bus- 
iness is that of Bliss & Parsons, of which Messrs. Aaron P. Bliss and Isaac 
Parsons are the individual members, having an office in the Merrill block in 
Saginaw City. This firm has about 150,000,000 feet of standing timber in Wis- 
consin, as well as a large amount in Michigan, which they work through job- 
bers, having lumber cut b}' contract and shipping the same to leading eastern 
markets. The}^ also own extensive tracts of redwood and fir timber in Cali- 
fornia and Washington Territory. The firm has superior facilities for conduct- 
ing this business, and is steadil}' extending its operations and increasing its 
holdings from year to year. Mr. Aaron P. Bliss, of this firm, is a nephew ot 
Dr. Lyman W. and Col, A. T. Bliss, both of whom have for many years been 
prominent lumber manufacturers of the Saginaw Valley ; and both Mr. Aaron 
P. Bliss and Mr. Parsons are experienced lumbermen, possessing an accuiate 
knowledge of values of pine lands. In addition to this business Mr. Bliss is a 
director of the First National Bank of Saginaw, and also a director of the Sag- 
inaw County Savings Bank, and is the proprietor of the Swancreek Stock Farm, 



182 The Industries ot* the Saginaws. 



containing 640 acres, situated on Swan Creek, in Saginaw County, eight miles 
south of Saginaw. This farm has all the necessary appointments for the suc- 
cessful prosecution of the stock-raising business that experience has approved 
or money can procure. The stable facilities are complete, and Mr. Bliss has 
started into the enterprise with the intention of making it the model institution 
of its kind in this State. At this farm he carries on a large business as a 
breeder of shorthorns. He is also developing pacing qualities in horses, own- 
ing the celebrated pacing stallion, "Clear Grit," and is now making arrange- 
ments to engage extensively in the breeding of fine draft horses. In shorthorns 
his herd has no superior in the country, representing the well-known families 
" Mrs. Flathers," " Kose of Sharon," " Josephine," " Phyllis," and others, with 
the " 15th Duke of Woodford " at the head of the herd. Mr. Bliss has at all 
times on hand superior horned stock and horses, and is one of the most exten- 
sive dealers in the Valley. 

Saginaw Dry Goods and Carpet Company. — L. Penoyer, Pres- 
ident ; D. Burnham, Vice-President ; W. E. Bamsey, Treasurer ; G. M. 
Starke, Secretary; M. W. Tanner, Manager; 413 and 415 Court street, Sag- 
inaw City. — Among the large mercantile establishments of the Saginaws, none 
holds a more prominent place than that now conducted by the corporation 
known as the Saginaw Dry Goods and Carpet Co. The business was estab- 
lished a number of years ago by the firm of J. B. Wolfenden & Co., composed 
of Messrs. J. B. Wolfenden and A. W. Wright. This firm removed to Detroit 
in 1880, selling out the establishment to Burnham, Spaulding & Co., which 
afterward became Burnham & Co., to which the present corporation succeeded 
in 1885. The premises occupied by the company embrace two handsome 
three-story and basement brick buildings, 50x120 feet in dimensions, elegantly 
equipped and fitted up with a modern passenger elevator and all the latest and 
most improved conveniences and appliances calculated to aid or expedite the 
prosecution of the business. A very large stock is carried, covering every- 
thing in the line of staple and fancy dry goods, including in addition to all 
standard goods, the latest novelties in designs and fabrics, and a particularly 
fine assortment of carpets, curtains, draperies, etc. The store is centrally 
located, and enjoys a large patronage from the leading people of the twin 
cities, and in addition does a considerable jobbing business throughout the 
Valley and the northern part of the State. A force of thirt}' competent clerks 
and assistants is employed, and the details of the business are conducted upon 
a perfect and accurate system, under the skillful and experienced management 
of Mr. M. W. Tanner, who personally supervises the business, and to whose 
efficiency is due in a large measure the foremost position held by this house in 
the confidence of the people of the Saginaws and the surrounding country. 
The stock is selected with especial care from the best goods to be found in the 
Eastern markets. Mr. Penoyer, the President of the company, in addition to 
his interest in this house, is largely identified with other business and financial 
enterprises, and is Vice-President and a director of the Citizens' National Bank 
and of the Saginaw Savings Bank. With ample resources and unexcelled 
facilities, this house enjoys a prosperity unexcelled by any other business 
establishment in the Valley. 

Warner & Eastman. — Manufacturers of Lumber and Salt ; 840 South 
Water street. East Saginaw. — The firm name of Warner & Eastman has long 
been identified with prominent industries in the Saginaws, Messrs. W. H. 
Warner and Loton H. Eastman having formed a co-partnership as early as 
1854, and established the Pioneer Foundry (now Bartlett). In 1859 they went 
into the lumber business, constructing a saw mill near the Pioneer Foundry, 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 1R3 



and later added a shingle mill, and in 1876 also added the manufacture of salt 
to their business. In 1880 Mr. Eastman died, but his interest is represented 
by his heirs, and the firm as now constituted is composed of W. 11. Warner, 
E. 0. and S, L. Eastman and Myra F. Cornwall. The mill is a two-story 
structure, 80x120 feet in dimensions, run by a battery of four 5-foot shell by 
18-foot boilers, and one marine boiler of 5^ -foot shell by 12 feet, feeding a 200 
horse-power, 24x30 cylinder double engine, driving a powerful steam feed, a 
large circular and improved gang mill, and edgers, trimmers, barrel stock 
machines, etc. The equipment of the mill is in every respect complete, and 
the firm has also three salt wells and a salt block, 130x150 feet in dimensions, 
in which they run an engine to take the salt out of the gi'ainers. They also 
have a cooperage shop, 160x30 feet in dimensions, and have excellent dockage 
facilities and ever}' advantage for shipping b}- rail or water, railroad tracks 
running between the mill and salt works, and they also have extensive piling 
grounds, barns, etc., their entire works and yards covering over sixty lots. 
The works give employment to a force ranging from ninety to one hundred 
men, and the product of the mills, in addition to a large business with local 
3'ards which do a car lot trade, is shipped to Buffalo, Tonawanda and Ohio 
ports, while the salt produced by the firm is disposed of through the medium 
of the Michigan Salt Association. The product of the works amount to about 
10,000,000 feet of lumber annually, the capacity of the mill, however, being 
12,000,000 feet, 700,000 staves, 50,000 sets of heading and 25,000 barrels of 
salt. The firm lumber in Gladwin and Midland counties, where in their own 
camps they give employment in the season to fifty men and twenty horses, be- 
sides giving out work largely to jobbers. 

A "W. Achard & Son. — Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Heav}' and 
Shelf Haidware, Mill Supplies, Stoves, Etc.; 200, 202 and 204 South Washing- 
ton street, Saginaw City. — This old established and prosperous house was 
founded in 1864 by William Seyffardt and A. W. Achard, changing in 1873 to 
A. W. Achard, to Achard & Schoenberg in 1878, and in 1884 back to A. W. 
Achard, who was joined by his son, Mr. Emil F. Achard. The firm owns and 
occupies a spacious and imposing two-story and basement white brick building, 
hqated by steam and 60^80 feet in dimensions, which they erected three years 
ago, and to which last year they added thirty feet to the rear making the 
premises now 60x110 feet in dimensions. In ISos. 200, 202 and 204 South 
AA'ashington street, on the main floor, is carried a heavy stock and full assort- 
ment of every description of goods in the lines of tools, cutlery, builders' and 
general shelf hardware, mill supplies, etc., and they have a large elevator, 
» shipping room and bar iron room in the rear. In No. 204 they carry full 
stocks of stoves of all kinds, including " Jewel " and "Garland " stoves and 
ranges, and a full line of tinware and house furnishing goods, with a spacious 
room in the rear, where they carry a complete assortment of mantels, grates, 
tiles, chandeliers, etc., which they have in great variety. Their spacious and 
lofty water-proof basement and upper floors are devoted to surplus stock, and 
they have a large warehouse in the rear, fronting on Water street, for agricul- 
tural implements, wagon stock, sewer pipe, drain tiles, etc. In addition to the 
lines above enumerated they carry very large stocks of paints, oils, glass, 
brushes and painters' supplies, one side of the store at No. 200 and 202 being 
devoted to the display of samples in this department of their business. In 
connection with their business they conduct a manufacturing department, 
where they make every description of tin-ware, and in addition to this, they do 
all kinds of plumbing and gas fitting work. The firm gives employment to a 
force of fifteen hands, and is represented in its trade territory, embracing the 



184 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 




whole of Northern Michigan, by a staff of traveling salesmen. Tn the retail 
department the firm enjoys a large trade with the citizens of the Saginaws and 
vicinity, which the}' have built up by close attention to all the details of the 
business, by care in the selection of their stock, and by thorough and accurate 
methods in all their transactions. 

Crowley House. — D. Crowley, Proprietor ; Corner of Hamilton and 
Ames streets, Saginaw City — The site of the Crowley House has long been 
,,.^,,.,:.:-^ occupied for hotel purposes, the 

original establishment of this char- 
acter having been the Brockway 
House, which was opened twelve 
years ago, and which was a small 
place which afterward became the 
Benson House. In 1879 the premi- 
ses were purchased by Mr. Crowley, 
who built two additions, each three 
stories in height, and 50x22 feet 
and 40x20 feet respectively in di- 
mensions. The building as it now 
stands is a handsome white brick 
structure of three stories and base- 
ment, with a frontage of 65 feet on 
Hamilton street and 90 feet on Ames street, contains forty well-furnished and 
completely outfitted bed-rooms, comfortable dining room and parlors on the 
main floor, and first-class sample room for the use of commercial travelers. 
Mr. Crowley, the proprietor of the hotel, makes every effort to secure the com- 
fort and convenience of his guests, and furnishes the table of the hotel with 
the best obtainable articles, which arc served in a proper manner. Employ- 
ment is given to a force of fifteen trained assistants, and everything is done to 
make the house popular with the traveling public, the rates being reasonable 
and the house being eligibly located on the line of the street railway. The 
hotel has had a prosperous business from the time Mr. Crowley acquired it to 
the present, and maintains the superior reputation it has built up by the close 
attention paid by Mr. Crowley to all the details of the business. Mr. Crowley 
is in every respect a representative citizen and now fills with efficienc}- the 
office of City Recorder. 

A. D. Spangler & Co. — General Commission Merchants ; Wholesale 
Dealers in Fruits, Produce, Nuts, Berries, Etc.; 200 and 202 North Washington 
avenue, East Saginaw. — A firm of comparatively recent establshment, and one 
which has already built up the largest business in its line in the Saginaw 
Valley, is that of A. D. Spangler & Co., of which Messrs. A. D. Spangler and 
C. J. Chambers are the individual members. This firm was formed about a 
year ago, prior to which Mr. Spangler had been for three years with Mr. J. T. 
Bell in the same business. The present firm occupies two stores in the three - 
story brick building at the corner of Tuscola street, 50x60 feet in dimensions, 
where they have on hand at all times a large and complete stock of foreign 
and domestic fruits, produce of all kinds, nuts, berries, etc. The firm have 
established the most favorable relations with producers and shippers by the 
uniformly satisfactory character of their commission services, and the close 
attention paid by them to the interests of those sending them consignments. 
They handle in their seasons every description of fruits, being the largest 
handlers in the Valley of watermelons in their season, berries, bananas, 
peaches, and in the spring are very large handlers of early southern potatoes ; 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 185 



in addition to which they have a large business in foreign fruits and nuts and 
do a general commission business in butter, eggs, poultry and all kinds of 
countr}' produce, and in the winter season do a jobbing trade in fresh oysters, 
being agents for the celebrated " Manoken " brand. Closely attending to all 
the details of the business, the enterprise of the firm is scoring a gratifying 
success. 

Flatt, Bradley & Co. — Exporters of Square Oak, Black Walnut, Hewn 
and Sawed Oak and Pine Timber, West India Pipe and Barrel Staves and 
White Pine Masts ; 6 Seligman Block, East Saginaw. — The firm of Flatt & 
Bradley, of which Messrs. J. I. Flatt and John Bradley are the individual 
members, was formed twenty years ago at Hamilton, Ont., where they still 
conduct business, and six years ago these gentlemen, with Mr. M. F. Van 
Sickle of East Saginaw, formed the firm of Flatt, Bradley & Co., for the pur- 
pose of carrying on business in this city as dealers in and exporters of square 
oak, black walnut and other timber. They have mills at Castleman, Canada, 
and have from 4,000 to 5,000 acres of timber lands. They do a large 
business in this market as buyers of pipe and barrel staves and headings and 
of square oak. black walnut, hewn and sawed oak and pine timber and white 
pine masts. They have handled this year up to the present writing 150,000 
staves, 50,000 cubic feet of square oak, 18,000 cubic feet of black walnut, 80 
masts, 15,000 Canada pipes and 500,000 feet board measure of sawed pine lum- 
ber. The staves go to New York for export to Great Britain, while the Canada 
pipes are taken to Cuba, South America and all countries where molasses is pro- 
duced, and to Italy and France for wine. The oak timber is purchased in the 
Saginaw Valley and the black walnut from the West. The firm is the largest 
in its line in this region, and is one of the best known and most successful ex- 
porting firms of the country. 

Everett House. — Wash. Salisbury, Proprietor ; Northwest corner of 
Genesee avenue and Franklin street. East Saginaw. — The Everett House was 
opened in 1864 by Mr. Marshall G. Smith, and afterward passed through a 
number of hands. Nine years ago, when Mr. Salisbury became its pro- 
prietor, the hotel had been badly run down, but since then he has conducted it 
in a manner which has steadily increased its popularity and prosperity, and 
has made its name known all over the country as a first class hotel in every 
respect. The hotel is eligibly located in the very heart of the business center 
of East Saginaw, on the corner of Genesee avenue and Franklin street, and is a 
three story building, 175x320 feet in dimensions, with oflSce, billiard rooms, 
barber shop, bar and other public rooms on the first floor, and seventj' 
elegantly furnished and neatly kept rooms up stairs. The house is equipped 
with all the modern conveniences and appliances usually found m a first-class 
hotel, and its appointments are strictly in keeping with the high character of 
the house, while its table is deservedly celebrated for the excellent quality 
and judicious variet}' of its fare and the efficiency of its service. A force of 
thirty trained attendants is given employment, and the office afl^airs of the 
house are under the skillful supervision of Mr. Eugent W. Farmer as chief 
clerk. He was with the Bancroft House for four years prior to coming to the 
Everett a year ago, and is popular with the traveling public and attentive to 
all the wants of the guests. Mr. Fred. H. Simonton, the night clerk, formerly 
of the Kirkwood and Michigan Exchange at Detroit, and other leading hotels, 
is also very popular. Mr. Salisbury, the proprietor, has furnished the house 
throughout with due regard to the conveniences required by guests, and 
manages the affairs of the house with experience and good judgment. He is 
an old hotel man, and well known to the traveling public as one of the most 



1'86 The Industries op the Saginaws. 

successful caterers iu Micliigan. The rates of the house are $2 per da}', and 
the accommodations are such that those registering at the Everett once are 
sure to return, no pains being spared to provide for the comfort and con- 
venience of travelers. 

A. Hobson. — Steam Stone and Marble Works ; Office and Yard Next 
Door to 3Iaytlower Mills, North Water street, East Saginaw. — Mr. Hobson, 
who established himself in business in 1869, has continued it with close atten- 
tion to all its details, and has secured a trade which places his establishment 
among the leaders in its line in the State. His yard and works have a front- 
age 120 feet, running back 100 feet to spacious and well located docks. They 
are completely equipped with everything in the wa^^ of plant and machinery 
adapted to the preparation of stone for use, including a ten-foot rubbhig bed, 
the largest piece of casting ever made in the Saginaws, two gang saws, a power- 
ful steam derrick with a capacity of. lifting twenty tons, and all other equip- 
ments appropriate to the business. Mr. Hobson deals largely in all kinds of 
rough, sawed and cut stone, Scotch and American granite, foreign and domes- 
tic marble, plumbing and furniture marble, ornaments and gravestones from 
the latest designs. He enjoys a large trade in all departments of the business, 
taking contracts for all kinds of building stone work, and now having in his 
employ a force of one hundred men, of whom forty-tive are in East Saginaw, 
fifteen in Saginaw City and forty at Grand Ledge, where he is now engaged 
upon a large contract putting in the stone work of the bridge for the D., L. & 
N. Railroad. He is now erecting St. Paul's church, all of stone, on North 
Washington avenue in this city, the guild house and rectory for St. John s 
Episcopal church in Saginaw City, and is furnishing the cut stone for the new 
Sixth Ward Roman Catholic church in Saginaw City, as well as for a number 
of private residences, etc. He furnished the stone for a large block in Mid- 
land ; for the First National Bank at Ludington ; the Clare County Bank at 
Clare, Mich., and for many other leading structures in this section. He has a 
marble 3'ard for the display and sale of ornamental work at 821 Genesee 
avence, where he carries a large and complete stock of the finest designs in 
mortuary stone work. He enjoys unsurpassed facilities for the supply of 
goodb in his line, and is prepared to furnish estimates and execute contracts 
for all kinds of stone work. The complete and workmanlike manner in which 
he fills all orders has secured for him an unsurpassed reputation, and he enjoys 
a thriving business as a result of his skill and close attention to business. 

Citizens' National Bank of Saginaw. — D. Hardin, President ; L. 
Penoyer. Vice-Pi'esident ; D. W. Briggs, Cashier ; 406 Court street, Saginaw 
City. — Holding a prominent position among the most solid and substantial of 
the banking houses in the State is the Citizens' National Bank of Saginaw, or- 
ganized in 1880, and which has since conducted an active and prosperous busi- 
ness, its safe and conservative methods commending it to the confidence and 
approval of the citizens of the Saginaws and vicinity. The bank does a gen- 
eral banking business, loaning money on approved security, discounting ac- 
ceptable commercial paper, paying careful and accurate attention to collections, 
issuing exchange upon the leading cities of this and other countries and doing 
all regular business. The condition of the bank is highly satisfactory, and 
by the last report of its condition, published October 5, 1887, it was shown 
that the bank, in addition to its paid-in capital stock of $100,000, had a 
surplus fund of $25,000, undivided profits of $34,292.52 and resources of 
$655,669 96. The Board of Directors of the bank is composed of a number of 
the most prominent and substantial of the business men of Saginaw, the Presi- 
dent, Daniel Hardin, being, in addition to his position at the head of this cor_ 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 187 

poration, a member of tlie firms of Green, Ring & Co. and D. Hardin & Co., 
and of the Tobacco River Lumber Company. The Vice President, Mr. I'enoyer, 
is well known as the President of the Saginaw Dry Goods and Carpet Co., 
and director of the Saginaw County Savings Bank. The other directors are 
W. S. Green, of Green, Ring & Co., W. S. Green & Son, Green & Noble, Green, 
Hardin & Co., and the Tobacco River Lumber Co.; P. Bauer, the well-known 
clothier ; G. K. Grout, an attorney of twent}^ years' practice. Mr. D. W. 
Briggs, the Cashier, is a banker of thorough experience, who. by the efficiency 
with which he attends to the affairs of the bank, has aided in a marked degree 
in securing the gratifying condition it now enjoys, and the high place it holds 
in the confidence and respect of the community. 

Taylor House — Fred B. Sweet, Proprietor ; corner of Hamilton and 
Court streets, Saginaw City. — This hotel, which is the largest and most coni- 
pletely equipped in Saginaw City, occupies the site upon which Fort Saginaw 
was erected in 1822. The present structure was built in 1866 by William H. 
Taylor, and is a four-story and basement building, Ironting 75 feet on Court 
street by 120 feet on Hamilton street. The hotel was closed for some months 
in 1879, and was reopened in January, 1880, by L. Burrows, Jr., & Co., and 
was continued by that firm until 1884, when tlie house again closed until Jan- 
uary. 1885, when it was reopened, renovated and refitted by the firm ot Burrows 
& Sweet, b}- whom it was conducted for six months, since which time Mr. Sweet 
has carried on the business as sole proprietor. Mr. Sweet is a prominent and 
representative citizen, and had been engaged for fourteen years as County Clerk 
prior to engaging in his present business in 1885. The numerous alterations 
and great improvements made in the house since he has had chai'ge of its af- 
fairs have made it in every respect a first-class hotel, fitted up with all modern 
conveniences and improvements and in a most desirable location, being at the 
corner of the two most prominent thoroughfares of the city and the center of 
its business quarter. The office, reading room, billiard room, etc., are on the 
ground floor, the parlor, dining room and other public rooms on the second 
floor, while the other floors contain ninety completely furnished, comfortable 
and convenient bedrooms. The aflfairs of the house are closely supervised by 
Mr. Sweet, and the office affairs are conducted bv Mr. Charles F. Elbert, who, 
prior to taking his present position three years ago, had six years' experience 
in the Bancroft House at East Saginaw. He is well known to the traveling 
public, thoroughly efficient in his duties and his acquaintance with traveling 
men has been an important factor in building up the large patronage of the ho- 
tel. Mr. Sweet, the proprietor, is also popular with the traveling public, as 
well as with the citizens of Saginaw, and the steady endeavor made by him to 
secure the comfort and convenience of the guests by providing comfortable 
quarters and supplying his table with all seasonable delicacies and first-class 
fare in every particular has secured for the house the rank it holds as one of 
the best conducted in the State. Thirty trained and experienced attendants are 
employed and*the patronage of the house comes from all parts of the country, 
embracing all prominent visitors to Saginaw City. 

Stevens & La Due. — Manufacturers of Lumber, Shingles and Salt; 
Mills at CarroUton ; Office, Corner of Genesee and Washington avenues, East 
Saginaw. — This firm, composed of Messrs. George W. Stevens and John La 
Due, was formed about six years ago, since which time they have held a promi- 
nent position among the prosperous and progressive lumber manufacturers of 
the Saginaw Valley. They operate works at CarroUton for the great New 
York importing and exporting firm of De Grauw, Ay mar & Co., covering some 
twenty acres, including a large and completely equipped lumber and shingle 



188 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 



mill and extensive salt works, located on high ground, the site being one of 
the best on the river for manufacturing purposes, and having ample railroad 
tracks and switches on both the Michigan Central and Flint & Pere Marquette 
railroads, facilitating receipt of raw material and shipment of manufactured 
product. The works are completely equipped, and the product, which is of the 
best quality, amounts to 10,000,000 feet of lumber, 10,000,000 shingles, 500,000 
staves, 50,000 sets of heading and about 50,000 barrels of salt per year. The 
trade of the firm is principally with large dealers in the East in all their pro- 
ducts except salt, which is sold through the medium of the Michigan Salt Asso- 
ciation. Employment is given to a force of 125 men, and all the departments 
of the business are systematically conducted, while the relations of the firm 
with the trade are of the most satisfactory character. In addition to this busi- 
ness Messrs. Stevens & La Due are interested in the Corning Lumber Com- 
pany, dealers in pine lands and logs. They lumber on the Whitefish River, 
where they put in logs which they sell to numerous firms, and they also deal 
in logs cut by others. They are interested in some 200,000,000 feet of stand- 
ing pine in Wisconsin, and 20,000,000 feet in the Upper Peninsula. 

East Saginaw Conservatory of Music. — Corner of Genesee ave- 
nue and Park street, East Saginaw. — Of all human accomplishments none hold 

a higher place in popular esteem 
than that of music, and in none is 
the eflfect of training more observ- 
able. The advantages of East Sag- 
inaw for securing a first-class edu- 
cation in music, both vocal and in- 
strumental, have been rendered 
complete by the recent establish- 
ment in this cit}' of a conservator}^ 
of music, an institution with a full 
staff of teachers, and devoting it- 
self to instruction in all the 
branches of a finished musical edu- 
cation. The staff of the conserva- 
tory is of the highest order of 
musical ability, including Anton Strelezki, piano, whose fame as an instrumen- 
talist and composer is world wide and unsurpassed ; Mr. B. L. Faeder, a grad- 
uate of the Leipsic Conservatory of Music, who has charge of the violin depart- 
ment, and who has a widespread fame as a concert artist ; Prof. Boardman, 
piano, acknowledged as a leader among instrumentalists and teachers, and Mr. 
Felix Jaeger, former conductor of the German Opera and Thalia Theatre, New 
York, who has charge of the department for teaching voice culture for oi3era and 
en semble playing ; Mesdames Nellis, Brush and Godfrey, vocal, and a large staff 
of other professors and instructors in all instruments, all branches of music, 
voice culture, languages, etc. The Secretary of the association is Mr. C. J. 
Sparks, who has charge of the business department, and who is prepai'ed to 
furnish information on application in regard to terms, etc. In connection with 
the Conserv^atory a musical bureau is conducted, designed to furnish music for 
concerts, receptions, etc., and which is in correspondence with various bureaus 
in all parts of the United States, thus being enabled to furnish students becom- 
ing capable with positions. The Conservatory is meeting with great success 
and is steadily improving, and many have received the benefits of its training, 
and testify to its excellence. Mr. C. E. Bresler, who has the principal pro- 
prietary- interest in the Conservatory, is prominent in the financial circles of the 
State. 




The Industries of the Saqinaws. 189 



The Standard .Lumber Company, — George F. Cross, President 
and Treasurer ; Robert M. Kandall. Vice-President ; William K. Allington, 
Secretary and Manager ; Gavin Telfer, General Agent ; Yard and Works, 
Franklin, Brady, Cass and McCoskry streets, Kast Saginaw. — One of the 
largest, most completely equipped and most prosperous of the planing mills of 
the Saginaw Valle}- is that owned and operated by this company, which was 
incorporated in August 1885. The works of the company are 80x100 feet in 
dimensions, with a storage shed attached of the same size. The mill is com- 
pletely equipped with all the latest and most improved machinery and 
appliances adapted to dressing and finishing lumber, the equipment including 
a 60 horsepower engine made by Owens, Lane, Dyer & Co., of Hamilton, 0., a 
16-foot boiler with a 5-foot shell, four large planers and a full outfit of resaws, 
rippers and all appliances pertaining to this branch of manufacture. A special 
feature of the equipment of this mill is the excellence of its facilities for 
handling stock. Railroad switches are located along both sides of the works, 
and rough lumber is taken from a car on one side and from thence run along 
steam automatic carriers to the planers, and from thence by similar carriers 
taken right into the shipping car, by this means saving much handling ani 
enabling the company to rush through an order with great rapidit3^ I^^ ^'^^ 
mill is in active operation the excellent Dust Separator and Furnace Feed 
made by the Allington & Curtis Dust Separator Co. This machine carries the 
shavings, sawdust, etc. directly into the furnace ; but as a much larger amount 
of shavings, etc., is made than is needed for fuel, the company utilizes the 
machinery in the manufacture of real estate, by running a transfer under the 
railroad track to a block of swamp land owned by the company on the other 
side of the track, which the}^ are rapidly filling up with shavings and sawdust 
to a depth of five or six feet. Everything connected with the operation of the 
works is suggestive of perfect sj'stem and the utilization of every possible 
means to secure the highest standard of merit in the product of the mill and 
to save unnecessary labor and waste. From 80,000 to 90,000 feet of lumber 
are daily dressed in the mill, and employment is given to a force ranging from 
thirt}' to forty men. A large amount of the work done* by the mill is on 
orders from local firms, who ship the product direct from the works to all 
Eastern States, Ohio, etc. On account of the superior facilities enjoyed by 
the firm the works are kept constantly busy during the season, and the com- 
pany is regarded as a leader m this branch of industry. Mr. Cross, the Presi- 
dent of the company, is also President of the Cross, Gordon & Randall 
Lumber Co., Vice-President of the First National Bank of East Saginaw, 
Treasurer of the Allington & Curtis Dust Separator Co., and otherwise prom- 
inentl}' identified with leading and important industries. Mr. Randall, Vice- 
President of the company, is also Treasurer of the Cross, Gordon & Randall 
Lumber Co. and a prominent business man ; and Mr. Allington, Secretary and 
Manager, is also Secretary of the Allington & Curtis Dust Separator Co. and 
practically supervises the operations of the works, and to his thorough 
knowledge of the details of the business is largely due the prosperity which 
has attended this enterprise from its inception to the present time. 

Fred W. Hollister. — Architect and Superintendent ; Barnard Block, 
Saginaw City. — Mr. Hollister has for twenty-three years pursued the practice 
of his profession in this city, and he is justly regarded as an architect of supe- 
rior ability. As a result ot this reputation, his services are largely in demand, 
not only locally, but all over this and other States. Among the buildings 
which attest to the great skill of Mr. Hollister may be mentioned the Saginaw 
County Court House, the finest building of this class in the State and in the 



190 The Industries op the Saginaws. 



"West, the furniture and furnishings being designee^ by Mr. Hollister, and 
nothing in the State being able to compare with the same. The Mt. Pleasant 
Court House, Isabella County, Ogemaw County, Gladwin County and Huron 
County Court Houses are all of his designs and also the jails for the same. 
The Michigan Soldiers' Home at Grand Rapids, the largest and finest of the 
State buildings, was designed and constructed under his personal supervision, 
within his estimate, and completed inside of a year. The Iowa Soldiers' 
Home at Marshalltown, la., was designed by Mr. Hollister, and built in accord- 
ance with his plans. The First Presbyterian Church of this city, a beautitul 
structure, seating 700 people, was built under his supervision at a cost of $45,- 
000, and is a model church. The Methodist Episcopal Church of this city, 
seating 500 people, and costing $18,000, is one of his designs, and is a hand- 
some building. The Sixth ward Catholic Church of this city, seating 600 peo- 
ple, is now being built according to his plans at a cost of about $15,000, and is 
a fine building. Mr. Hollister was the architect of the Alma Normal School 
buildings, costing $30,000, and the High School building at Alma, costing 
$20,000. In school house buildings Mr. Hollister has no superiors, as the fol- 
lowing buildings exemplify : The Central School building, Mt. Pleasant, 
Mich., seating 500 scholars, and costing $18,000 ; the Ludington Central High 
School building, a very beautiful and substantial edifice, which will seat 700 
scholars and will cost $35,000 ; the large sixteen room school building at Man- 
istee, Mich., seating 1,000 scholars, and costing complete $40,000 ; the Second, 
Fourth, Fifth and Sixth ward school houses of Saginaw City, costing from $9,- 
000 to $18,000 ; the Fourth, Fifth and Seventh Ward school houses of East 
Saginaw, and school buildings ai Flint, Jackson, Cheboygan, Clio, Scottville, 
Farwell, St. Ignace, etc. Mr. Hollister designed the German Evangelical 
Lutheran Seminary of Saginaw, the Germania Institute of East Saginaw, the 
Arbeiter Hall of East Saginaw, the Teutonia Hall of Saginaw, the Cheboygan 
City Hall, the Caro Village Hall, the Heed City Hall, supervising the construc- 
tion of the same, and all doing him honor. In residences he has designed a 
great many of the finest, including Mr. Merrill's, Mr. Hill's, Mr. Stone's, Mr. 
Tillottson's, Mr. Well's, Mr. Vincent's, the Keho houses and a great many 
others, and is now completing a beautiful residence for Mrs. James Hay. Mr. 
Heavenrich, Mr. Wickes, Mr. Rupp, Mr. Hill and Mr. Nathan also had Mr. 
Hollister furnish the designs and plans for their residences. Of the work of 
Mr. Hollister, illustrated in this book, the Saginaw County Court House and 
Barnard Block in Saginaw City, and the Germania Institute and Arbeiter Hall 
in East Saginaw, are fair specimens. 

F. & C Reitter. — English and German Job Printers ; Publishers of 
the Saginaw Post ; 118 South Franklin street, East Saginaw. — A well-known 
firm of job printers, and one that has a deserved reputation for producing first- 
class work, is that of F. & C. Reitter, composed of Frederic J. and Christian 
Reitter. Job printing is executed in English and German, the firm having the 
most complete German printing ofllce in Central and Northern Michigan, and a 
book bindeiy with complete facilities is operated in connection with the 
printing office. Reference has been made elsewhere, in the article on the 
press of the city, to the Saginaw Post, a German weekly newspaper, the publi- 
cation of which was commenced January 1, 1887. It has achieved a great 
success, has already outstripped its competitors in circulation in the Saginaw 
Valley and Northern Michigan, and has a large circulation among farmers as 
well as among the residents of the Saginaws. Its subscription price is $1 per 
year in advance. The firm also publishes " Loefflerin Kochbuch " (German 
Cook Book) and although a young firm, they are hard working and enter- 
prising, and rapidly coming to the front among the prominent firms of the 
Saginaws. 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 



191 




??^- 



Lewis O. Slade. — Wholesale Dealer in Rough and Dressed White Pine 
Lumber ; Otlice and Yard, Atwater street, between Jefferson and Franklin 
streets, East Saginaw. — This business was established three years ago by the 
firm of Stephens & Slade, by whom it was conducted until April, 1887, when 
Mr. Slade purchased the interest of his partner, since which time he has carried 
on the business as sole proprietor. He has yards in connection with the F. & 
P. M. K R. Co. with a capacity for holding between 5,000,000 and 6,000,000 
feet of lumber, and is a heavy wholesale dealer in rough and dressed white pine 
lumber of all descriptions, which he sells in carload lots, handling from 5,000- 
000 feet per annum. Mr. Slade recently sold a piece of ground near his office 
to Benson & King, who have erected a planing mill upon it, and that firm, being 
near by, do most of his dressing. Mr. Slade has oa hand at all limes a large 
stock of assorted lumber, and is prepared to fill orders in carload lots in a sat- 
isfactory and prompt manner. He enjoys a large business, shipping lumber to 
points in New York, all through New England, Pennsylvania, Maryland, New 
Jersey, Virginia, Ohio, etc., and has built up a large and profitable trade, by 
close attention to every detail of his business. He gives employment to a large 
force of men, and conducts his aflJairs upon strictly accurate and reliable 
methods. Mr. Slade is an old and highly esteemed citizen of East Saginaw, 
having come to this cit}' in 1867 as a boy, and received his education here. 
He is a pushing, enterprising and representative man, and is highly esteemed 
by his fellow citizens. He is now filling the office of Alderman, representing 
the Fourth ward, and in that, as in every other pursuit in which he engages, his 
course is marked by earnestness and industry. Correspondence solicited. 

V. Kindler. — Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Fire Arms, Ammunition, 
Sporting and Athletic Goods ; 418 Genesee avenue. East Saginaw. — The oldest 
and largest sporting goods establishment in the State of Michigan is that of Mr. 
Kindler, by whom it has been conducted with steadily increasing success from 
1867 to the present time. Twenty years of experience in the business has given to 
Mr. Kindler a thorough knowledge of all its details, which, coupled with the fact 
that he is himself an ardent sportsman, enables him to so assort his stock as 
to adapt it t-o the needs of sportsmen of all kinds. He carries a large stock, 
completely filling the two-story and basement building, 25x100 feet in dimen- 
sions, occupied by the business. The stock comprises specially fine lines of 
guns and ammunition and an immense variety of shooting goods and fishing 
tackle, outdoor and indoor sporting goods, including base-ball, lawn tennis, 
croquet, gymnasium supplies, hammocks, camping outfits, and a most complete 



192 The Industries of the Saqinaws, 

line of pocket cutlery, razors and shears. Mr. Kindler has the agency of the 
leading American manufacturers of fire arms and sporting goods, such as 
Winchester Repeating Arms Co., Marlin Fire Arms Co., Colt's Patent Fire 
Arms Co , Union Metallic Cartridge Co., American and United States Cartridge 
Co., L. C. Smith Arms Co., A. G. Spalding & Bros.' sporting goods, etc. 
Dealers and sportsmen, b}' applying for same, can procure illustrated cata- 
logue and other valuable information. Competent workmen and the latest 
improved machinery are employed in the repairing department, where ever}' 
kind of work is executed in an artistic manner. The firm has established a 
reputation for supplying at all times the best and most reliable goods at the 
lowest prices, which has made it popular not only with Michigan sportsmen, 
but with those of adioining and other States as well. 

George W- Dailey. — Expert Sign Writer; 413 South Water street, 
Saginaw Cit}'. — Mr. Daile}' started this business seven years ago, and has 
established a first-class reputation for the superior character of his work, all 
orders being filled promptly and in a highly satisfactory and artistic manner. 
He is in every respect a skillful artist in his department of industrv, and makes 
a specialty of pictorial advertising signs and artistic window shades. He does 
every description of rapid sketch view and figure work for pictorial signs, and 
has done all the best work in that line in the city, including a large figure 
group on the side wall of P. Bauer & Sons' clothing house, all of Bechtel's 
pictorial signs, etc. His gold sign work is considered the best in the State, 
and he also does a great deal of political portrait and cartoon sketching during 
election campaigns. He occupies a two-story building, 25x100 feet in dimen- 
sions, properly equipped for carrying on the business in an efficient manner, 
and does all the designing and outlining himself, being aided in the business 
otherwise by four employes. He has a prosperous trade, and those employing 
his skillful services ma}' be sure of satisfactory results. 

A- H- Camp. — Watchmaker and Jeweler ; Dealer in Watches, Clocks, 
Jewelry, Silverware, Etc.; 106 North Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — Mr. 
Camp, who is a thoroughly skilled and expert workman, seven years ago 
bought an interest in the business which had previously been conducted by 
Mr. D. W. Kinney, and the firm became Kinney & Camp. Two years ago 
Mr. Camp bought out the entire business which he has since conducted as sole 
proprietor. His store, which is 25x80 feet in dimensions, is elegantly fitted 
up in ebony and walnut, and he carries a valuable and well-assorted stock of 
watches, clocks, jewelry, silverware, etc., spectacles, eye-glasses and optical 
goods of all kinds, a specialty being made of correctly fitting spectacles to 
the eye. He executes repairing and engraving in the most skillful and 
artistic manner. Mr. Camp, by reliable dealings, has secured a high place in 
public confidence and approval. 

John F. Oosendai. — French Steam Dye House ; 129 North Jefferson 
street. East Saginaw. — Mr. Cosendai has carried on this industry for ten years, 
and for the last five has occupied his present premises, 30x125 feet in dimen- 
sions. He gives employment to four hands, and has a trade covering East 
Saginaw, Saginaw City, Bay City and the Saginaw Valley generally. His 
facilities are unsurpassed, and this house has a wide spread celebrity for the 
uniformly superior work and the prompt and accurate filling of orders. A 
specialty is made of cleaning, d}eing and curling plumes, in which this house 
has no superior, and all kinds of clothing are also cleaned, dyed, etc., in a 
skillful manner. Mr. Cosendai is a thoroughly practical and experienced man, 
and orders sent to him by mail or express will receive prompt attention. 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 193 



The West Side Club.— Benton Hancliett, President ; Dr. 0. P. Bar- 
ber, A^'ioe PrcsK'cnt ; Thomas 11. Rusling. Secretary and Treasurer ; Ptoonis in 
Barnard Block, Saginaw City. — A book designed to present the attractions of 
the Saginaws would be incomplete, if reference was not made to the West Side 
Club, an organization incorporated under the State laws to promote social in- 
tercourse among the members and to provide and arrange suitable club rooms' 
for wholesome mental and physical recreation, etc. The club has already 118 
members, composed of the leading people of Saginaw, who are each owners of 
one share of the stock, at $25 per share, the shares being certificates of mem- 
bership, and transferable only through the books of the club and with the ap- 
probation of the Boai'd of Directors. The rooms of the club are commodious 
and Qtted up with excellent taste, and the personnel of the club is such as to 
give it practical control of social events, and a leadership among social organi- 
zations. Its affairs are managed by a Board of Directors, nine in number, who 
hold office for one year, the pi-esent directors, elected in November, 1887. being 
Dr. 0. P. Barber, Arthur Hill, T. H. Rusling, F. C. Stone, Col. A. T. Bliss, C. 
J. Reynick, J. K. Stevens, Benton Hanchett and Rev. B. F. Matrau. 

Oppenheimer's Complete Cigar Store.— Wholesale and Retail 
Cigars, Domestic and Imported, Tobaccos, Pipes and Smokers' Articles of all 
kinds ; Imported Cigars a Specialty ; 210 Genesee avenue, East Saginaw. — It 
may be said, right here, that space will not permit to do this house justice. 
The head lines to this article speak the facts. In our experience we have seen 
nothing like it ; it is absolutely the most complete concern of its kind in the 
country. While making no pretense at jobbing — "only canvassing the Valley" 
— it carries the biggest variety of cigars and smokers' articles of any house in 
this great country of ours. Particularly is this so in Havana cigars, as each 
and every one of the standard factories' brands, including cigars manufactured 
in New York, Kej' West and Tampa, Florida, and imported Havanas, are kept 
in stock, each in the various sizes and large consignments arrive daily. All 
the varieties of smokers' articles, in the most unique and complete form, are 
shown in sixteen elegant 6-foot metal show cases, in departments. For in- 
stance, one case contains only fine meerschaum pipes, all bend styles ; another 
the same in straight st3des ; another imitation meerschaum in the bend ; 
another imitation straight. Another case contains fine genuine straight briar ; 
another fine bend briar ; another bend and straight, assorted, of the second 
quality ; another onl}- tobacco pouches ; another only snuff boxes ; another 
onh' fine plain amber and meerschaum cigar holders ; another fancy carved 
meerschaum cigar holders ; another nothing but amber and meerschaum 
cigarette holders ; another only cigar cases ; another only cigarette cases, etc. 
We repeat, it is a wonderful selection, and there is no city in the Union but 
would be proud of a similar concern. Mr. Samuel Oppenheimer is its manager, 

Charles F. Marskey. — General Agency Michigan Mutual Life In- 
surance Company ; Office, No. 1 Seligman Block, over Heavenrich Brothers' 
Store. — No name is more prominently identified with life insurance interests 
in the Saginaw Valley and Michigan than that of Mr. Marskey, who for eight- 
teen years has been closely connected as special business representative in 
this and other States, and aided in establishing this solid and largest financial 
institution in Michigan — The Michigan Mutual Life Insurance Co., of Detroit. 
Under the management of Mr. Jacob S. Farrand, President, Oscar R. Looker, 
Secretary, and a board of prominent business men as directors, the compan3' 
has gained a national reputation in seventeen States as to integrity and fair 
dealing with its policy holders, in issuing its plain and indisputable policies 
with cash indorsements on all its plans of insurance. By retaining the 



194 The Industries of the Saoinaw8. 



million of dollars annually at home, to be loaned and used in developing 
western resources, it is favorably located for realizing higher rates of interest 
on absolutely- safe real estate investments, enabling this company to offer to its 
policy holders more profitable insurance investments than anywhere else can 
be obtained. 



Charles De Shaw. — Cooper ; 942 North Fourth street, East Saginaw. 
— Mr. De Shaw established this business twelve years [ago, since which; time 
he has conducted it with steadily growing success. He has all the necessary 
plant and equipment for the successful conduct of the business, and gives 
emplo^-ment to a force of ten hands in the manufacture of flour, pork and lard 
barrels, and large underground cisterns, in all of which^lines he has a large 
patronage, the barrels produced by him being without a superior in quality, 
only the best materials being used and the most skilled labor employed. As 
a consequence Mr. De Shaw enjoys a large patronage in the city and surround- 
ing country, and an established reputation which has secured for his enterprise 
a merited popularity and prosperity. 

William G. Dalke — General Dealer in Groceries and Provisions; 
Corner of Washington avenue and Hoyt street. East Saginaw. — Mr. Dalke 
established himself in business nine years ago, originally locating opposite his 
present premises, where he carried on the business for seven years, at the end 
of that time building two handsome two-story brick buildings, one of which he 
now occupies, and renting out the adjoining premises. He occupies the main 
floor and basement, where he carries a large and complete stock of the freshest 
and best goods in staple and fancy groceries and grocers' sundries, teas and 
coffees, tobacco and imported and domestic cigars, as well as all kinds of fruits 
and vegetables in season. He enjoys a large and steadily growing trade in the 
Saginaws and vicinity, fills all orders in a prompt and accurate manner, and is 
justly regarded as one of the most prosperous of the retailers of the city. 

The Eagle Drug Store. — W. H. Foot, Proprietor ; 524 Potter street, 
East Saginaw. — Mr. Foot, who is a thoroughly skilled pharmacisf^of long ex- 
perience in the business, established his present enterprise early in 1887, and 
has secured a large patronage in the city and surrounding country. He occu- 
pies a building. SOxlDO feet in dimensions, elegantly equipped and lighted by 
incandescent electric lights. He carries a complete stock of standard drugs 
and chemicals, approved patent medicines, toilet articles, a carefully selected 
assortment of wines and liquors for medicinal uses, the finest brands of im- 
ported and domestic cigars and every description of druggists' sundries. The 
proprietor, Mr. Foote, personally supervises every detail of the business, pay- 
ing special attention to the prescription department, in consequence of which 
the Eagle Drug Store stands high in public confidence. 

S. Davis & Co. — Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 
and Millinery; 804 Genesee avenue and 106 and 108 Franklin street. East 
Saginaw. — This firm, composed of Messrs. Seigfried Davis and Samuel Gold- 
stone, was established eighteen years ago, and is popular with citizens of the 
Saginaws and the trade throughout the State of Michigan. The retail store is 
25x100 feet in dimensions, with a two-story and basement L, 50x75 feet, run- 
ning west to Franklin street for the wholesale department. The firm carries very 
large and complete stocks of staple and fancy dr}^ goods, foreign and domestic 
silks, satins, velvets, etc., as well as all kinds of dress fabrics, white goods, linen 
goods, cotton goods, laces and embroideries, ribbons and furnishing goods, 
hosiery and notions, and millinery goods, and also manufacturers of hat and 
bonnet trimmings, etc. The cloak department is on the ground floor, with 



The Industries op the Saoinaws. 195 



ample space and convenient rooms. The stock is assorted with great care, and 
is of the best quality. The firm is well known to the dry goods trade of the 
State, in which it is represented by a staff of etBcient traveling salesmen, in ad- 
dition to which a large force of help is employed in the house. The business 
is conducted upon modern and progressive methods. 

O. J. Demars & Co. — Dealers in Clothing, Hats, Caps, Furnishing 
Goods, Trunks, Valises, Etc., 317 Court street, Saginaw City. — Mr. Demars, 
who is of French descent and a native of Montreal, Canada, came to the Sao-- 
inaws in 18G5. At that time he could speak no English, but notwithstandiuo- 
this disadvantage he persevered, and in 1872 he inaugurated his present 
enterprise, which he has built up to a great and gratifying success. lie 
occupies premises 25x100 feet in dimensions, eligibly located at 319 Court 
street, where he carries a large and completely diversified stock of read}' made 
clothing, hats, caps, furnishing goods, trunks, valises and all kinds of travelino- 
goods. He sells at low prices, and his establishment enjoys a steadily grow- 
ing trade with the citizens of the Saginaws and vicinity. 

Friedman & Hynan, — Practical Book and Job Printers , 119 North 
Franklin street. East Saginaw. — This firm, composed of Messrs. Kalma Fried- 
man and Thomas Hynan, was formed in August, 1885, when they established 
themselves at 319 Genesee avenue, removing later to the premises now occu- 
pied by them at 119 North Franklin street, in the Everett House Block, bein<>- 
30x125 feet in dimensions, where they have a complete plant for the pi'<>-ecu- 
tion of the business of book and job printing, having three presses, an engine 
and boiler, and all the necessary plant and equipment. Prior to eno-agino- in 
this business both members of the firm were for seven years employed in the 
Courier office, and both are thoroughly practical and experienced printers, 
understanding every detail of the business, and take a pride in turning out 
work of uniform merit in all lines of book and job printing. Employment is 
given to a force of six skilled workmen, and the firm is prepared to do work 
in the best manner and upon the most favorable terms. 

Dr. Engelbert Frenz. — Druggist ; 701 Lapeer street. East Saginaw. 
— Dr. Frenz, who is an educated physician, as well as a highlv skilled pharma- 
cist, established this business twelve years ago, and has earned the favor and 
patronage of citizens and a stead}' and constantly growing business. His neat 
and attractive store is completely fitted up with all the conveniences and ac- 
cessories appropriate to the business, and stocked with a full and complete lipe 
of fresh drugs and chemicals, toilet articles and perfumery, and druggists' sun- 
dries of every description. The thorough and practical knowledge and edu- 
cated skill of Dr. Frenz has secured for him special prominence for the careful 
and accurate manner in which prescriptions are compounded from the best ma- 
terials. Dr. Frenz has a first class reputation resulting from correct methods 
and constant endeavor to give entire satisfaction to his customers. 

E. St. John & Co. — News Dealers, Book Sellers and Stationers ; 
Dealers in AVall Paper, Window Shades, Etc.; Court street, between Washing- 
ton and Hamilton streets, Saginaw City. — One of the oldest and best known of 
the business establishments in the Saginaws is that of E. St. John & Co., which 
was established nineteen years ago by Messrs. E. St. John and J. N. Penoyer, 
under the name of Penoyer & St. John, who successfully conducted the busi- 
ness for fourteen years, when Mr. Penoyer died, and Mr. W. T. Palmer became 
a member, forming the present firm. The premises occupied by the business 
embrace the main floor and basement, 25x150 feet, with a workshop in the 
rear. The stock comprises very large supplies and full lines of all the leadino- 



196 The Industries op the Saginaws. 



newspapers and periodicals, a large stock of standard books and the latest pub- 
lications, full and complete assortments of every description of stationery, 
blank books, office supplies, stationers' sundries and fanc}' goods of all kinds, 
and a stock of wall papers, window shades, etc., not surpassed by that of an^' 
establishment in the Saginaw Valley. In school books and school supplies of 
all kinds, the stock is well assorted, all standard educational works being kept 
on hand. In addition to this business, the firm is a leader in the line of paper 
hanging and decoration, giving employment to from five to ten skilled hands, and 
enjo3'ing in this department of industry the patronage of the leading people of 
the Saginaws and vicinity, and having a reputation which is not surpassed for 
the thoroughly skillful manner in which all work in the line is done by them. 
In the store a staflf of five clerks is employed, and the trade 6t the house em- 
braces, in addition to a large patronage from the people of the Saginaws and 
vicinity, a considerable jobbing trade through the Valley. The house has held 
a high place in the confidence and approbation of the public throughout its 
long and honorable business histoiy by a steady adherence to correct business 
principles, by being prompt and reliable in every particular and by conducting 
its business upon accurate business methods. 

The Jaraes Stewart Gorapany, Limited. — Dr. Lyman Bliss, 
President ; Max Heavenrich, Treasurer and Manager ; 0. F. Wisner, Secre- 
tary ; Wholesale Grocers, Importers of Teas and Dealers in Lumbermen's 
Supplies, Etc. ; North Water street and Genesee avenue. East Saginaw. —This 
business was originally started in 1872 by Mr. James Stewart, bj^ whom it was 
continued until 1882, when the present corporation was formed, Mr. Stewart 
still retaining a large interest in the business. The office and salesrooms of 
the company embrace a two-story building, 200x100 feet in dimensions, with 
first-class dockage and shipping facilities, in addition to which the firm has a 
feed mill, 160x25 feet, on North Water street at the railroad crossing, and 
which has a capacity for 50,000 pounds per day, and they also have a feed 
warehouse, 200x20 feet, and two other warehouses for pork, fiour, tobacco and 
general merchandise, covering 60x100 and 60x75 feet respectively. They 
carry enormous stocks and full lines of staple and fancy groceries, tobaccos, 
teas, pork and pork products, flour, feed and lumbermen's supplies of every de- 
scription. The company directly imports its own teas, which comprise the finest 
stock and largest variety ever brought to the Valley, and enjoys a heavy busi- 
ness in the Saginaw Valley and throughout Northern and Western Michigan, 
Twenty-five competent clerks and assistants, are employed in the store and 
three traveling salesmen represent the firm on the road. Dr. Bliss, President 
of the company, is also of the well known firm of Bliss & Davis, of L. W. 
Bliss & Co., druggists, of A. T. Bliss & Bro., lumber, logs, pine, salt, shingles, 
etc., and is manager of the Saginaw Stave Milling Co. Mr. Max Heavenrich, 
Treasurer and Manager of this company, is also a prominent and leading busi- 
ness man, being President of the firm of Heavenrich Brothers & Co., director 
of the Saginaw National and other banks, and President of the Citizens Assoc- 
iation. Hon. O. F. Wisner, who is the Secretary of the company, is also of 
the firm of Wisner & Draper, Attorneys. The company also deals extensively 
in salt and shingles. Its vast business is conducted upon perfect and accurate 
system, and its standing is of the highest character. 

Bullock Music House — Miss J. M. Bacon, Proprietor ; W. S. Thom- 
son, Manager ; Pianos, Organs, Music and Musical Merchandise ; 109 and 111 
North Washington avenue. East Saginaw. — This house was established fifteen 
years ago by Mr. R. D. Bullock, who died in September, 1884, after which 
event Miss Bacon, who had been engaged in the house as a book-keeper, pur- 



The 1ndustiii15s op the Saoinaws. 197 



chased the business, including this establishment and another store at 126 
Main street, Jackson, Mich. Miss Bacon is at Jackson, and the l)usiness liere 
is in charge of Mr. W. S. Thomson, who has been connected with the house 
since 1873. The stock carried is very large, the house being State agent for 
Hazelton Bros.', A. B. Chase, Ernest Gabler & Brother, Sterling, C. Kurtzman, 
and Haden & Son pianos, and the Smith American, A. B. Chase, Sterling, and 
United States organs. The stock also embraces all kinds of musical instru- 
ments, sheet and book music and musical merchandise of ever}' description. 
The premises comprise two stores covering an area of 60x80 feet, and five 
clerks and assistants are employed, including Messrs. Cr. W. Mills and G. W. 
Guiley, who have been with the house for the past ten 3'ears as salesmen. 
From the two houses the business covers the entire State, a force of traveling 
salesmen representing it on the road. The business is large and steadily 
growing and the house a popular one. 

L. M. Lyon. — Market Gardener, Etc.; 425 East street. East Saginaw. — 
Mr. Lyon, who is of Puritan stock, was born in New York State, from which 
he removed to Michigan in 1845, locating in Saginaw twenty-five years ago. 
When he first came here he bought ten acres of ground, to which he added 
from time to time, until he now has fift}^ acres under cultivation, upon which 
he produces every description of vegetables and summer fruits, in which he 
does a large trade, selling to merchants in Saginaw City and East Saginaw, and 
shipping to Lansing, Jackson and other State points. He employs from thirty 
to eighty hands, and his garden is kept in the highest state of cultivation, his 
production of strawberries having amounted two years ago to 500 bushels. 
Last year Mr. Lyon put in eight acres of horse-radish, the product of which he 
put up in the best vinegar and sold to Chicago, Cincinnati, Buffalo, Rochester, 
Indianapolis, Toledo, Cleveland and Michigan jobbers, shipping to Chicago 
1,000 dozen. He also put up 250 barrels of sauerkraut last year. Mr. Lyon 
has raised as many as 6,000 bushels of tomatoes in one season. Next season 
he will have an acre each of grapes, currants and raspberries and two acres of 
cherries. His hot house, which is 125x25 feet in dimensions, with a boiler 
room attached, gives him every facility for the rassing of early vegetables, 
plants, etc. The great demand for his product is such that Mr. Lyon proposes 
to add greatly to his facilities, and next year will open a canning factory, 
giving employment to 125 hands. Mr. Lyon has earned the prosperity he 
enjoys by close attention to all the details of the business, and by uniform 
fairness and accuracy. 

Gossel Brothers. — Dealers in Groceries, Provisions, Flour and Feed, 
Crockery, Glassware, Tobaccos, Cigars, Wines, Liquors, Etc.; 900 Lapeer 
street, corner of Sixth street, East Saginaw. — This business was founded in 
1879 by Mr. Peter P. Heller, to whom the present firm, composed of Messrs. 
Joseph and Frederick Gossel, succeeded three years ago. They occupy a two- 
story building, 25x150 feet in dimensions, and carry large and complete stocks 
of staple and fancy groceries, provisions, flour of the most approved brands, 
feed and grain, of crockery and glassware, and a superior assortment of tobac- 
cos, cigars, wines, liquors, etc. In addition to the members of the firm, who 
personally attend to the details of the business, three clerks are employed, and 
a wagon is utilized in the city delivery. The firm enjoys a large trade in the 
city and vicinity, and also with farmers from the surrounding country, from 
whom they buy produce. The Messrs. Gossel are practical and experienced 
merchants who have earned a gratifying and steadily increasing success. 

Lambie Brothers.— Merchant Tailors, 121 North Jefferson street. 
East Saginaw. — This well known and popular tailoring firm is composed of 



198 The Industries op the Saginaws. 



Messrs. John J. and A. Lambie, and was formed four years ago, prior to 
which time both members had worked in the same line for nine years for 
others. They first located at 232 Warren street, removing to their present 
quarters about a year ago. They carry a well assorted stock embracing fine 
goods of foreign and domestic manufacture, and enjoy a first class reputation 
for the fit and workmanship of all garments produced at their establishment. 
They employ eight skilled workmen, and fill orders for every description of 
work in their line in a prompt and satisfactory manner. Their practical 
experience in the business and their careful supervision of its details have 
procured for them a thriving trade. 

George Froelich. — Manufacturer of Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron Work, 
Roofing, Etc.; 822 Lapeer street. East Saginaw. — This business was established 
a number of years ago by Messrs. V. Spindler and George Froelich, by whom 
it was conducted until 1885, when Mr. Spindler bought out the business and 
conducted it until September 15, 1887, when he in turn was bought out by Mr. 
Froelich. The premises occupied by him are 25x100 feet in dimensions, and 
he has a large and steadily growing business in the manufacture of tin, copper 
and sheet iron work, including house furnishing goods, guttering, spouting, roof- 
ing, etc., which he executes in the most workmanlike and efficient manner. 
He is thoroughly practical and experienced in all the details of the business, 
and executes all orders promptly and accurately. He also carries a stock of 
stoves, carefully selected from the best makes, and which he sells at the most 
moderate prices. 

E. A- Gyde. — Manufacturer of Staves, Heading and Hoops ; King and 
Youmans streets. South Saginaw. — This mill is completely equipped for the 
manufacture of hoops, staves and heading, and the building, which is 85x60 
feet in dimensions, contains in its equipment a 12x20 engine, fed by a new 
steel boiler, 5x16, specially manufactured for the purposes of this establish- 
ment by Gray & Wildman, a circular saw for cutting planks and green wood, 
a hoop cutter weighing over five tons, two hoop planers, a Ward pointer and 
lapper, which finishes both ends of the hoop at one operation and turns out 
sixty a minute, two coilers and a complete set of stave and heading machinery. 
The product of the works of Mr. Gyde for the present year amounts to 5,000,- 
000 hoops, 2,000,000 staves and 225,000 sets of heading. About sixty hands 
are emplo3'ed, and the trade of the establishment, with the exception of about 
1,000,000 hoops sold to local trade, reaches all leading business centers from 
the Atlantic coast west to Kansas and Iowa. This is the only hoop factory in 
the Saginaws, and Mr. Gyde is a thoroughly competent and experienced man 
who has earned the success by reliable dealings and sagacious management. 

A. L. Moeller. — Dealer in Choice Groceries ; 2614 South Washington 
avenue. South Saginaw. — This business was established fifteen 3-ears ago by 
Mr. Anthony Blankerts, for whom Mr. Moeller worked as clerk for over six 
years, becoming proprietor of the business in 1884. He has a thriving and 
steadily growing trade with the citizens of the south end and farmers in the 
surrounding country. His stock comprises the freshest and best goods obtain- 
able, embracing staple and fancy groceries, grocers' sundries, canned goods, 
tea, coffee, sugar, flour, all vegetables in season, soap and other laundry requi- 
sites, wooden ware, etc. He makes a specialty of teas, especially of a 50-cent 
article which has no superior in the Valley. His store is a neat two-story brick 
building, which he has recently purchased. He delivers goods to an}' part of 
the city in liis own delivery wagon, and is in every respect prompt and reliable. 

Cornick & Meyers. — Dealers in Boots, Shoes, Rubber Goods, Etc.; 
318 Genesee avenue, East Saginaw. — This business was established twelve 



The Industries op the Saqinaws. 



199 



years ago by Mr. J. W. Howry, who was succeeded by Mr. C. L. Kittredge, 
the firm l?ter becoming Cornick & Kittredge, and afterward assuming its 
present style, Mr. Coi'uick having been a member of tlie house from the first. 
Tlie}' occupy the main floor and basement, 25x100 feet in dimensions, of the 
building at 318 Genesee avenue, perfectly lighted by handsome plate glass 
windows, eligibly located, and completely' stocked with every description of boots 
and shoes for ladies', misses', gentlemen's, boys' and infants' wear, as well as 
a large and complete assortment of rubber goods. A specialty is made of fine 
Eastern goods, and the}' keep at all times a complete assortment of goods of 
the best quality. The business is supervised by the members of the firm and 
four competent clerks are employed. The firm enjoys a large trade, which 
steadily increases as the result o| uniformly fair and liberal methods. 

St. John Manufacturing Company. — Manufacturers of the Cooling 
Poultice and Protection Boot ; 409 Court street, Saginaw City. — This is a 

com pan}' organ- 
ized for the pur- 
pose of engaging 
in the manufac- 
ture of a device 
patented Septem- 
ber, 1886, and 
which is of the 
highest utility for 
the treatment of 
foot diseases in 
horses. It keeps 
in place for an}' 
desired period of 
time, bandages, 

poultices, wet sponges or moss, medicines, etc., which may be necessary in the 
treatment of any injury to or ailment of the foot. It can be worn by a horse 
in box stall, in pasture, and even on the road in case of a lost shoe. The in- 
vention has met the approval of leading horsemen all over the country, and is 
without doubt one of the most important inventions in connection with 
veterinary treatment. The top of the boot is made of heavy canvas, and the 
bottom of rubber, with a light adjustable malleable iron shoe as a support. 
It is cheap, durable and desirable, and solves the difficuly long felt in applying 
treatment to the feet of horses. The oflSce of the company is at 409 Court 
street. Saginaw City, from which these appliances can be ordered in any de- 
sired quantity, and the factory is in the Temperance Hall Block on South 
Hamilton street. 

C L. Benjamin. — Complete Livery and Undertaking Establishment ; 
Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — Mr. Benjamin, who is an old resident and 
prominent citizen, established his present enterprise in 1880, and in 1882 
built his present premises comprising a handsome two-story brick building, 
with a coach house upon the front of the main floor, and a stable in the rear. 
He has elegantly appointed offices, and an undertaking department, euObracing 
the finest hearses in the Valley, together with full and complete stocks of the 
finest goods in caskets, coverings, trimmings, etc. In his livery department 
he has an unsurpassed stock of coaches, coupes, buggies, horses, harness 
trappings, etc. He employs ten men, and has thirty horses, all fine animals, 
constantly on hand. Mr. Benjamin does a large business in his livery depart- 
ment, and in undertaking he has secured the best custom by the appropriate 





200 The Industries of the Saginaws. 



and able manner in which he conducts funerals, and has a merited celebrity 
for the completeness with which he executes embalming by the latest improved 
process. In addition to his membership in this firm, Mr. Benjamin is a 
member of the firm of Foster, Charles & Co., dealers in furniture, upholstered 
goods, etc., and is otherwise identified with prominent business concerns. 

"W. J. MofiBt- — Insurance ; Room 3, Music Block, Junction of Genesee 
avenue and ijapeer street, East Saginaw. — Mr. Moffit established this business 
nine years ago, and is an experienced and popular underwriter. He represents 
the (icrman Insurance Co., of Freeport, 111., the largest in resources and busi- 
iness of any company of this character having its home in the West. During 
the ten years ending at the beginning of 1887 its assets had steadily advanced 
from $416,371.15 January 1, 1877, to $2,044,704 January 1, 1887, an un- 
equalled record of increase in the value of its assets. At the beginning of 
1887 the company had, in addition to its capital of $200,000, a net surplus of 
$255,850, and had policies in force insuring $150,302,378. The Ohio Farmers' 
Insurance Co., of LeRoy, 0., at the close of business in 1886 had assets of 
$1,347,398.89, and a cash surplus by Michigan standard of $370 809.47. This 
company insures only private residences, churches and school houses, unex- 
posed by business risks against loss or damage by fire or lightning. Its 
policy is in plain and simple terms, and it has adjusted and pays its losses 
fairly and promptly, and from the restricted character of its risks is not liable 
to very large losses. Ever since its organization in 1848 its income has ex- 
ceeded its expenditures, and the company is justly regarded with confidence 
by those who wish to insure their homes. Through these companies Mr. 
Moffit is prepaied to offer insurance at the lowest rates consistent with the ad^ 
vantages offered by these companies, and he does a large business, which is 
steadil}' increasing from year to year. 

H. H. Shaler.— Groceries, Flour, Feed. Etc.; 2702 South Washington 
avenue. East Saginaw. — Mr, Shaler started this business six years ago and h|s 
trade has steadily grown, and now embraces a large patronage from the citizens 
of the Saginaws and vicinity, earned by his promptness and reliability and the 
uniform excellence of his stock. He carries a complete assortment of all kinds 
of staple and fancy groceries and grocers' sundries, and a specially fine line of 
flour and feed. In flour his stock comprises the celebrated "Mayflower," 
" Gold IMedal " and " Favorite " brands, all of superior quality and in great 
demand by consumers. Mr. Shaler, who is a native of Canada, is a thoroughly 
practical and experienced business man, and carried on business at Milford, 
Ind., prior to coming to this city. He gives employment to two competent 
clerks, and is prepared to promptly fill orders for every description of goods in 
his line. 

M. 0. Conley. — Manufacturing Jeweler ; Dealer in Watches, Clocks 
and Silver Plated Ware ; 512 Genesee avenue. East Saginaw. — Mr. Conley be- 
gan business as a manufacturing jeweler eight years ago, and in 1886 he 
added to this business that of a dealer in watches, clocks and silver plated 
ware, of which he carries a very large stock of superior assortment embracing 
the prodiicts of the most noted makers. He is thoroughly practical and ex- 
perienced, and does all kinds of diamond setting in a most skillful and artistic 
manner, repairs watches and clocks, and attends to all the details of the busi- 
ness. His jewelry is noted for beauty and superior workmanship, and he has not 
only a^large trade in the Saginaws but throughout the Valley and Northern Michi- 
gan. The premises occupied by him embrace the main floor, 25x100 feet in 
dimensions, and five clerks and assistants are em[)loyed. He enjoys a thriv- 
ing trade as a result of the accuracy and promptness with which all orders are 
filled, and the uniformlj- reliable chanicter of his dealings. 



The Industries of the Raoinaws. 201 



Charles J. Sparks. — General Insurance and Real Estate Agent and 
Notary Pul>lic ; Cross Block, corner of Genesee avenue and Park street, East 
Saginaw. — Mr. Sparks, who has resided here for the past twelve years, has been 
engaged in his present business for three years, and b}' close attention to its 
details has built up a prosperous and steadily expanding business, especially 
among the German citizens. He represents the Union, of Buffalo, and the 
Ohio, of Da^^ton, O., both substantial and reputable fire companies, and in life 
insurance he represents the well known and first class Michigan Mutual, of 
Detroit. In real estate he has on hand good farms of from 40 to 160 acres in 
all parts of Saginaw County, which he will sell on reasonable terms, as well as 
desirable city properties ranging from $500 to $10,000 in value. He promptly 
attends tO collections and to the drawing of contracts and conve^'ancing in all 
its branches, and through European correspondents enjo\'s facilities for the 
closing of estates in any part of Europe for heirs who live in this country. 

Newell & Robinson. — Wholesale and Retail Dealer in School Books, 
Blank Books, Stationery, News, Wall Papers, Shades, Etc. ; 214 South 
Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — This business was established in 18B1 b)i Mr. 
E. C. Newell, who in January, 1887, was joined by Messrs. E. 0. Newell, F. 
G. Newell and W. R. Robinson, and the firm of E. C. Newell & Co. was 
formed. In May 1887, Mr. E. C. Newell sold out to his partners in order to 
engage in a manufacturing business, and the name of the firm was again 
changed to its present style. The premises occupied by the firm are 25x100 
feet in dimensions where they carry large and complete stocks of school books, 
blank books, stationery, news papers, periodicals, wall papers, window shades, 
etc., as well as fire works in the proper season and other goods. Four hands 
are steadily employed and in the spring of the year, when the firm does wall 
papering, employment is given to a force of from six to ten others. The firm 
has a prosperous business in the Saginaws and surrounding country, and a 
considerable jobbing business throughout the Saginaw Valley and the 
Northern part of Michigan, The members of the firm are business men of 
superior attainments and accurate methods, and enjoy a first-class reputation. 

Charles E. Ring. — Manufacturer of Shingles ; West End Genesee 
avenue bridge, East Saginaw. — Mr. Ring has been engaged in this business for 
the past five years, although the mill now conducted by him had been known 
as the Hosmer mill for six or seven 3'ears previously. It has since been vastly 
improved and enlarged and occupies a two-story structure, 75x120 feet in di- 
mensions, having a fifty hoi'se-power engine and 4x14 foot boiler, two sets of 
Hall shingle machines and all other necessary plant and equipment. Employ- 
ment is given to from twenty-five to thirty workmen, and the product amounts 
to 1^000,000 shingles per season. The mill, with storage grounds, etc., cover 
over an acre, and has a convenient dock, 50x100 feet in dimensions, facilitating 
shipment by water, while railroad tracks in close proximity give superior 
facilities for handling by rail. The shingles manufactured in this mill are well 
known to the trade for their superior quality, being XXX and six-inch clear 
butt shingles, and largely in demand by the trade, the product being principally 
shipped to Rochester, Buffalo and New York State generally, Massachusetts, 
Connecticut and all Eastern markets. 

Charles Straw.— Dealer in Groceries, Etc.; 124 North Washington 
avenue. East Saginaw. — Mr. Straw has for the past twelve years carried on 
business in East Saginaw, for the last two of which he has been located in his 
present store, 30x125 feet in dimensions. He buys his goods from first hands 
and selects them with care so as to keep his stock up to the highest standard 
of qnality and carries a complete stock of staple and fancy groceries, grocers' 



202 The Industries op the Saginaws, 



sundries, farm produce of all kinds, foreign and domestic fruits, and ever}'^ va- 
riety of vegetables in their season. He employs a number of clerks, sells goods 
at the lowest prices and delivers them promptly to his customers, keeping 
a wagon constantly busy. He has established a large connection of steady 
customers in the Saginaws, and also has a large patronage from the farmers 
of the surrounding country. 

Smith's Art Store. — William Smith, Proprietor ; Manufacturer and 
Dealer in Oil and Water Color Paintings, Etchings, Engravings, and all kinds 
of Art Goods; 120 South Washington avenue, East Saginaw. — IMr. Smith 
established this business nineteen years ago, and now has a complete stock of 
pictures of all kinds, including valuable oil paintings, water colors, pastels, 
etchings, engavings, chromos, prints, etc.; a superior line of mouldings, includ- 
ing gold and metals, bronzes and natural woods, and also has a large stock of 
made frames, gold and fancy cabinet frames, statuary, stands, easels, fire 
screens and fancy goods usually found in a first-class art store, while the line 
of art materials is very complete, and includes AVinsor & Newton's oil and 
wateii colors, DeVoe's American oil colors, pastel colors, LeCroux china paints, 
metallic and mineral paints, brushes in red and black sables, Russian bristles, 
Bright's celebrated brushes, papers, canvas, academy board plaques, panels, 
ground glass, etc. Mr. Smith has a lull staff of clerks and assistants, and 
traveling men represent him in all parts of the State, and he also has branch 
stores at Mt. Pleasant and Alma. His premises in this city occupy atwo-storj' 
building, 25x100 feet in dimensions, and he is prepared to fill orders for all 
kinds of goods in his line in a prompt and satisfactory manner. 

J. Gr- Schaefer. — Meat Market ; 321 Lapeer street, East Saginaw. --One 
of the oldest and most popular meat markets of the cit}' is that of Mr. J. Gr. 
Schaefer, who has conducted it for fourteen years in a manner which has 
earned the approval and patronage of the citizens of the Saginaws. His place 
is equipped with all necessary conveniences and accessories, is neatly kept and 
well stocked. The premises occupied embrace a two-story and basement 
brick building, and the stock includes all kinds of meats, of the best quality, 
which he sells at the most reasonable prices, and delivers to customers on 
order, having two wagons for that purpose. Mr. Schaefer himself packs the 
hams, sides, etc., sold at his establishment, and they are of unsurpassed 
quality. He also is noted for the superior quality of his sausages, in which he 
does a large trade. He has four competent assistants, and has maintained a 
first-class reputation throughout his long business career, by close attention to 
business, and constant endeavors to give satisfaction to his customers. 

William J. Cook. — Manufacturer of Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron Ware, 
Gutters, Etc.; and Dealer in Furnaces and Tin Ware; corner of Adams^and 
Washington streets, Saginaw City. — Mr. Cook established this business ten 
years ago, and formerly made a specialty of the manufacture of tin ware, but 
has now limited his product, owing to large factory competition, and devoted 
himself more especially to the manufacture of galvanized iron cornices and pipe 
work, in which he has no superior in the quality of his work or facilities for 
manufacture in the Valley. He gives close and accurate attention to all kinds 
of job work, and carries on at all times a large and complete stock of furnaces, 
which he is prepared to put in to order, and also ot gasoline stoves, gasoline, 
etc., and tin ware of every description. He occupies a two-story building, 25x 
100 feet in dimensions, and employs from three to five men, according to the 
season. Mr. Cook is thoroughly prompt and reliable in all his dealings, and is 
enjoying a large trade, which steadily grows from year to year. 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 



20?, 




Foster, Charles & Co. — Wholesale and Retail Dealers in All Kinds 
of Furniture ; Barnard Block, North Hamilton street, Saginaw City. — This 

firm, which was formed several years ago, 
is composed of Messrs. James H. Foster, 
Albert T. Charles and Charles L. Benja- 
min. They occupy a handsome three-stor}' 
and basement building, 50x100 feet in di- 
mensions, and contemplate further increas- 
ing its facilities by erecting in the rear a 
building 60 feet deep by 100 feet wide, 
which will afford them still greater advan- 
tages for the display of their superior ^tock 
of goods, and which will have an entrance 
from the side street. The firm carries 
large stocks and full lines of fine parlor, 
bed-room, dining-room, hall, vestibule, 
library and office furniture, rattan goods, 
chairs of every description and everything 
pertaining to the line. The store is one of the largest of its kind in the Sagi- 
naw Valley, and has built up a first-class reputations for the great bargains it 
offers, and enjoys a large trade in the Saginaws and from all the surrounding 
countrj". Every effort is made to give satisfaction to the customers of the 
house, and the uniformly reliable methods of dealing adopted in its manage- 
ment have secured for the establishment the high place it now holds in the 
popular esteem. 

Eberhard Vollmer. — Meat Market; 319 Lapeer street. — Mr. Yollmer 
is thoroughly practical and experienced in this business having been employed 
in another establishment prior to starting for himself in April, 1887. lie oc- 
cupies a neatly kept and attractive store on Lapeer street, between Webster 
and Park streets, where with the aid of four employees he closeh' attends to all 
the details of his business, and a constant endeavor to give satisfaction, which 
has secured to him a thriving and growing trade with families in the city and 
its vicinity. He carries a large and well assorted stock of fresh and salt meats, 
sausages, etc., and has a wagon which is kept busy delivering goods to his cus- 
tomers. His enterprise is meeting with success and daily increasing in popu- 
larity as a consequence of promptness and fair dealing. 

R. Weston.— Sanitary Plumbing, Gas Fitting and Steam Heating ; 207 
South Washington avenue, East Saginaw. — Mr. Weston has been steadily 
engaged in this business since he was fourteen years old, when he began to 
learn the trade in Detroit, and has been located in Saginaw for the past five 
years. He has a large and completely assorted stock, embracing all the latest 
and most improved devices in sanitary plumbing, gas fitting and steam heat- 
ing appliances, and as a consequence of the superior character of all the work 
produced, enjoys the favor and patronage of the leading citizens of the Sag- 
inaws and adjacent country, having fitted up houses for C. H. Davis, Dr. Fuer- 
bringer and Dr. Lancashire in Saginaw City, and the residences of Messrs. 
Ketcham, Caskey, W. R. Burt and Ed. Morley, of East Saginaw, and other 
leading citizens. He occupies eligible premises 25x100 feet in dimensions, 
employs five highly skilled workmen, and has every facility for carrying on the 
business upon a lai-ge scale. 

S. McKenzie.— Blacksmith, Wagon Maker, Etc.; 412 South Hamilton 
street, Saginaw City. — Mr. McKenzie, who has been a resident of Saginaw for 
the past twenty years, established himself in his present business in 1873. He 



204 The Industries op the Saqinaws. 

occupies a two-story structure, 25x75 feet in dimensions, built in 1887, 
especially adapted to the purposes of the business, and equipped with a com- 
plete plant. He does a general blacksmithing business, does horse-shoeing in 
a skillful manner, and wagon and carriage repairing of all kinds. He also 
manufactures wagons, and will build light and heavy wagons. Concord bug- 
o-ies, etc., to order. Only the best materials are used and the most skilled 
workmen employed in the business, four hands being constantly engaged, and 
the operations of the factory being conducted under the practical and experi- 
enced supervision of Mr. McKenzie. Work may be entrusted to Mr. McKenzie 
with the assurance of satisfactory results. 

Frederick Wolpert. — Dealer in Groceries and Provisions, Flour, 
Feed, Etc.; 901 Lapeer Street, East Saginaw. — Mr. Wolpert, who came to " 
Saginaw in 1864, established himself in business in 1874, at CarroUton, where 
he conducted a general store. That establishment was burned out, and Mr. 
Wolpert removed to his present location, a handsome two-story building, com- 
pletely stocked with staple and fancy groceries, provisions of all kinds, flour, 
feed, etc., canned and dried fruits, grocers' sundries and shelf goods, all good 
goods and sold at low prices. Mr. Wolpert, who is a thoroughly practical bus- 
iness man, closely attends to all the details of his business, enjoys a large patron- 
age from the citizens of the Saginaws and farmers and others in the surrounding 
country. He is assisted in the management of the business by his son, and is 
prepared to fill all orders in a prompt and satisfactory manner, and to deliver 
goods to any part ol the city. 

G. C. Warner. — Manufacturer of All Kinds of Harness and Turf 
Goods; Dealer in Whips, Blankets, Brushes, Etc. ; 112 South Franklin street. 
East Saginaw. — This business was established twelve years ago by Warner & 
Gould, who conducted it until two years ago, when Mr. Warner succeeded to 
the business as sole proprietor. He occupies a two-story building, 25x100 feet 
in dimensions, and carries a large and completely assorted stock of whips, 
turf goods, harness, blankets, brushes and everything pertaining to the stock 
of a first-class harness and saddlery establishment. He manufactures the 
finest harness and saddlery made in the State, and has received about twenty 
diplomas for the excellence of his manufacture, which has never failed to take 
the lead wherever exhibited in competition. Mr. Warner, who is a thoroughly 
practical and experienced man, does a very large business, principally in the 
Saginaw Valley, but also including a considft-able order trade from surround- 
ing States from people who desire the best goods in this department of industry. 

J. C Welch. — Watch Maker and Jeweler ; 523 Genesee avenue, 
northwest corner of Warren street, East Saginaw. — Mr. Welch, who had 
previously been engaged for eight years in the business elsewhere, established 
himself in this city a year ago, and has already built up a thriving trade, as 
a result of close attention to business, and thorough and accurate knowledge 
of all its details. He carries a well-assorted stock of clocks, watches, 
jewelry, diamonds, etc., and pays particular attention to repairing, making a 
specialty of repairing fine watches, which is attended to by expert workmen. 
Mr. Welch is an experienced and practical optician, and makes a specialty of 
supplying spectales and eye-glasses to fit all eyes, for which business he has 
facilities not surpassed by any establishment in the Valley. The superior 
character of all the work turned out at the establishment has earned for Mr. 
Welch a steady increase in his business from its inception to the present time. 

William Rapp. — Meat Market ; South Fourth and Walnut streets, 
East Saginaw. — Mr. Rapp, who is a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, came 



The Industries ov the Saginaws. 205 



from that country direct to Saginaw county in 1866. He is a thoroughly 
practical and experienced butcher, and formerly had a shop and residence at 
Lee and Wadsworth streets, removing to his present premises three years ago. 
He runs a neat and well appointed meat market, stocked with a well-selected 
assortment of the finest beef, pork and mutton, as well as all kinds of 
sausages, etc. Mr. Rapp has a thriving trade in all parts of the city, goods 
being promptly delivered to customers by a wagon which he keeps for that 
purpose. He is a thriving and substantial citizen, and has earned prosperity 
by close attention to business and uniformly honorable conduct. 

James Stinson. — Dealer in Crockery, China, Glass Ware, Etc.; 402 
Genesee avenue, East Saginaw. — Mr. Stinson, who has been for twenty years 
engaged in business, h'as built up a large trade with the citizens of the Sagi- 
naws and transient customers by careful selection of his stock and prompt and 
accurate attention to all orders. He occupies the main floor of the building at 
402 Genesee avenue, where he carries a complete and well selected stock of the 
finest goods in crockery, china, glass ware, gas and oil chandeliers, etc. In 
china his stock embraces some of the finest importations of French and 
English goods, and his stock of Belgian, Bohemian and American glass ware 
is especially complete. He has a full line of English and American porcelain 
dinner services, fine lamps, chandeliers, etc. His store, which is fitted up with 
elegant plate glass windows and all conveniences for the proper display of the 
stock, is a center of attraction to those who desire good goods, and his reliable 
methods have secured for him the approbation of the community. 

John Stein and Fred. Eckert. — Wagon Makers, Horse Shoers and 
General Blacksmiths ; Second street, between Janes and German streets. 
East Saginaw. — The shop occupied by these gentlemen is 30x150 feet in 
dimensions, and completely equipped for the purposes of the business which 
they have conducted for six years, for which it is used. Two blacksmiths 
and two wood-workers are employed, and others are added in the busy 
season. This firm manufactures wagons and buggies to order, and enjoys a 
firstclass reputation for the superior qualit}^ of all the vehicles turned out at 
their establishment, and is especialh' noted for the excellence of the lumber 
wagons produced. They carry on hand at all times a stock of wagons, 
buggies, etc., and make store delivery and truck wagons to order. The}' do 
horse shoeing in the best style of the farriers art, and being thoroughly 
practical and experienced, enjoy a thriving trade. 

B. A. Searls. — Dealer in Choice Family Grocei'ies and Provisions, Dried 
and Canned Fruits, Etc. ; 516 Potter street. East Saginaw. — Mr. Searls has 
been established in business since 1879, and has a large patronage in the city 
and surrounding country earned by close attention to every detail, and prompt- 
ness and accuracy in filling orders. He carries a very large and complete 
stock of staple and fancy groceries and provisions, dried and canned fruits, 
grocers' sundries and shelf goods. Great care is taken in the selection of his 
stock, which embraces the freshest and best goods to be found in the market, 
sold at reasonable prices and promptly delivered to any part of the city, two 
wagons being kept constantly busy. He has four competent clerks and 
assistants, and himself is a mei'chant of long experience, and thoroughly 
accurate and reliable. He does a large trade, his custom including many of the 
leading families of the Saginaws. 

Powe & Howell. — Photographers ; 305 Genesee avenue, East Sagi- 
naw. — This business vvjis established three years ago by Messrs. T. H. I*owe 
and C. M. Howell, Mr. Powe taking charge of his gallery at Muskegon, and 



206 The Industries op the Saginaws. 



Mr. Howell of the studio in this city. Mr. Howell is a highly skilled photo- 
grapher of sixteen years' experience, and was several 3'ears with Howland, of 
Cincinnati, as head operator. The studio here is eligibly located on the second 
floor, handsomely furnished and equipped with the most improved apparatus, 
appliances and ai'cessories. The work produced is of the highest standard of 
excellence, and perfect in finish. In addition to cabinets, life-size and 
commercial work is done in the highest style of the art. Skilled assistants are 
emplo3ed, and superior work has earned for the establishment a steadily in- 
creasing patronage and popularity. 

John Burdett. — Grocer, News Dealer and Confectioner; 125 North 
Jeflferson street. East Saginaw. — Mr. Burdett has resided in East Saginaw for 
about nineteen years, and worked at his trade as a machinist until he went 
into the news and confectionery business, occupying premises one square dis- 
tant from his present quarters for about a year, at the end of which time he 
bought out his partner, and removed to his present premises. He added a 
full line of groceries to his stock. He has three competent clerks and assis- 
tants, and a wagon for city deliver}-. He carries a well assorted and superior 
stock, selected with special care, and fills orders in a prompt and satisfactory 
manner. His constant endeavors to give satisfaction to his customers, and 
fair and accurate dealings have earned a steady increase in his patronage and 
his establishment is fast taking a prominent place in popular esteem. 

A. T. Ward. — Banker and Broker, and Dealer in Diamonds, Watches, 
Etc.; 105 South Jetferson avenue, corner of Genesee avenue. East Saginaw. — 
Mr. Ward established this business four 3'ears ago, prior to which he was a 
member of the firm of Brown & Ward, now Brown & Grant, jewelers, etc. 
Since that time he has carried on a personal security bank, buviug and selling 
stocks and bonds, lumber, land, logs, etc., and advancing money on personal 
propert}^ or good security, cashing notes, drafts, checks, etc., and carries a 
select stock of fine diamonds and gold watches and chains, having some of the 
most favorable bargains in watches and diamonds to be found in an3' part of 
the countr3'. In this line he handles nothing but the finest goods, offering a 
special chance for selection. He does a large business with the citizens of the 
Saginaws and the surrounding countr3-, and occupies an elegantl3- equipped 
office. He is a gentlemen of long business experience and thoroughly reliable 
methods, with whom it is satisfactor3' to have dealings. 

J. L. Smith. — Baker and Confectioner ; 2,716 South Washington 
avenue, South Saginaw. — Mr. Smith, who was born in New York State, went 
to Canada as a boy and settled near Chatham, Ont. He has been in the 
bakery business for the past fort3'-seven years, and lor three 3*ears in confec- 
tionery manufacture. Mr. Smith does his own baking, having an oven with a 
capacit3' for 200 loaves, and is the only baker in South Saginaw who has an 
oven in operation, his competitors purchasing their bread from others. Mr. 
Smith, who is thoroughl}' practical and experienced, carries a complete stock 
of bread of the best quality and confections of ever3^ description, and is doing 
a large and steadily growing trade as a result of the great merit of his product, 
the promptness of his deliver3-, and the uniformly fair and accurate methods 
upon which his business is conducted. 

R. H. Wniiams. — Grocery and Market ; corner of Sixth and Johnson 
streets, J^ast Saginaw. — Mr. R. H. Williams was formerl3' engaged in this line 
of business at Denver, Col., and at Juniata, Mich., and this year purchased the 
stock, fixtures and business of Trowbridge & White. He lias a large trade in 
the Saginaws and vicinit}*, and occupies a two stor}- corner store, the grocery 



Thk Inpustrtrs op thk Saoinaws. 207 




department facing on Sixth street, and being 30x100 feet in dimensions, and 
the meat market facing on Johnson street and being 25x40 feet. He carries a 
hirge and complete stock of staple and fancy groceries, grocers' sundries, her- 
metically sealed goods in glass and tin, teas, coflfees, cigars, tobaccos, etc., and 
a large and select stock of the best meats, the freshest vegetables, and all fruits 
in season. Five hands are employed, a wagon is kept constantly busy in call- 
ing lor orders and delivering goods, and the business is constantly prospernig. 

H. H. Brix. — Manufacturer and Dealer in Hats, Caps, Furs and Gentle- 
men's Furnishing Goods ; 323 Genesee avenue. East Saginaw. — This business 
was established nine years ago by Meyer & Brix, and was con- 
ducted by that firm until the death of Mr. Meyer four years 
ago, since which time Mr. Brix has carrried on the business 
as sole proprietor. He carries a large and complete stock of 
hats, caps and gents' furnishing goods, but his prime 
specialty is furs, in which line in the winter months he does 
a ver}' large trade, being the only furrier in the city, and 
carrying in these goods Shetland, South Sea and Alaska 
Seals, Sea Otters, Mink, Beaver, North American Otter, etc., 
from which he manufactures coats, caps, mutts, collars, 
guantlets, boas, trimming, etc., to order. He also carries a 
complete stock of bear, wolf, lynx, buffalo, raccoon, tiger 
and leopard skins which he makes into robes and parlor 
^^ vugs, and also repairs furs in a workmanlike manner. These 
goods he receives from London, England, and New York, 
carries a large stock and employs a force ranging from five to ten hands. He 
has a large trade not only in the Saginaws but also throughout the State, and 
in addition, frequently' receives individual orders from other cities, and from 
dealers in New York and elsewhere. 

James Mack. — Dealer in Hats, Gents' Furnishings, Etc. : 300 Genesee 
avenue, East Scginaw. — Mr. Mack has carried on this business for twenty-five 
years, and by carefully selecting his stock, and reliable business methods, has 
made the establishment of " Mack, the Hatter," recognized headquarters for 
the gentlemen of the Saginaws. He occupies an elegant corner store, 25x100 
feet in dimensions, with fine show windows, and completely stocked with the 
best goods. He is agent for and carries a full line of Dunlap & Co.'s hats, the 
recognized standards of gentlemanly headgear, as well as full stocks of products 
of other well known hatters, W. A. Drown & Co.'s fine silk umbrellas, and the 
latest and finest qualities of shirts, gloves, ties, underwear, hose and other 
gents' furnishings. The stock is not excelled in completeness and assortment 
by an}^ in the State, and Mr. Mack, with the assistance of a full staff of com- 
petent clerks is kept busy with a large patronage from the gentlemen of the 
Saginaws and surrounding country. 

Emil Jochen.— Hardware^ Stoves, Tin Ware, Etc.; 2618 South Wash- 
ington avenue, South Saginaw. — Mr. Jochen for the past fourteen years has 
carried on t)usiness as an extensive dealer in hardware, etc., and has built up a 
large trade not only in the city, but also including a considerable patronage 
from the farming community of Saginaw and adjacent counties, lie carries a 
large and complete stock of shelf and heavy hardware, full assortment of Pen- 
insular and Jewel stoves and ranges, tinware, tools, paints, glass, putty, oil 
cloth, agricultural implements, etc. The premises occupied by him are 25x150 
feet in dimensions, and two competent clerks are employed. Mr. Jochen holds 
a prominent place in this branch of trade, earned by adherence to correct busi- 
ness principles. 



208 The Industries op the Saoinaws. 



Charles Roseland. — Grocer ; 900 Cherry street, corner of Seventh 
street, East Saginaw. — Mr. Roseland established this business three years ago. 
He has a prosperous trade as a dealer in staple and fancy groceries, teas, 
coffees, tobaccos, cigars, fruits and vegetables and a full line of canned goods 
and grocers' sundries. He occupies a handsome building, 25x100 feet in 
dimensions, and Mr. Roseland, with two assistants, is kept busy in supplying 
the large trade enjoj'ed by him, the promptness and reliability of his methods 
and close attention to business having commended hina to public favor. His 
increasing trade taxes the capacity of his premises and it is his intention to 
enlarge them in the coming spring. 

A- S. Jjivermore. — Dealer in Fresh and Salt Meats, Fine (Iroceries, 
Crockery, etc.; 620 Potter Street; East Saginaw. — Mr. Livermore came, when 
a boy four years of age, with his father to Bay county in 1852, the following 
year removing to East Saginaw. When sixteen years old he enlisted at 
Flint in Company E of the 7th Michigan Cavalry, under Capt. McCormick, 
and served during the war, and was subsequently for one year with 
General Custer in his campaign against the Indians. Returning to East 
Saginaw he engaged in various kinds of business prior to 1875, when he 
established his present business. He carries a stock of fresh and salt meats, 
staple and fancy groceries, grocers' sundries, canned goods, and a full line of 
crockery, glassware etc. He employs four competent clerks, and delivers 
goods to all parts of the city. 

William H. McPhee.— Merchant Tailor; 420 Franklin street, Sagi- 
naw City. — Mr. McPhee has long been well and favorably known and largely 
patronized b}' the gentlemen of the Saginaws, b}' whom his house is justly 
regarded as headquai'ters for the correct styles, good materials, first-class fit 
and perfect workmanship in gentlemen's attire. He established this business 
fifteen years ago, and now occupies a well equipped and elegantly arranged 
store, fitted in ash, with glass cases all around to preserve the stock from 
dust, etc., and carries complete and carefully assorted stocks, embracing the 
latest styles and finest products of leading foreign and American looms, 
offering unsurpassed opportunities for selection. His store is 25x70 feet in 
dimensions, with an L, 25x25, used as a work shop. He gives employment to 
ten highly skilled workmen in the house, and in the busy seasons also employs 
others outside. All the details are personally supervised by Mr. McPhee, 
who has by this means maintained throughout his long business history the 
high standard of workmanship for which his establishment is noted. 

Budge & Prince. — Manufacturing Confectioners ; 414 Potter street, 
East Saginaw. — This firm, composed of Messrs. John Budge and F. W. Prince, 
was formed in August, 1887, prior to which Mr. Prince had been a member of 
the firm of Jas. S. Smart, Jr., & Co., in the same line. The firm has every requisite 
for success, and is largely engaged in the manufacture of candies and fine con- 
fections, including, in addition to the general line, a number of novelties, 
prominent among which are their Fruit Tablets and Prince's Cough Drops. 
They give employment to a force of six highly skilled workmen, and per- 
sonally supervise all the operations of the factory. Their valuable experience 
and accurate knowledge enable them to guarantee the excellence of their 
product, only the best and purest materials being used and skilled workmen 
employed in the business. The business is both of wholesale and retail, and 
the trade has steadil}' grown from the start. 

Michigan Curtain Roller Co— E. C. Newell, Secretary and Treas- 
urer ; corner of Watci- and William streets, Saginaw Citv. — Mr. ^'eweU has 



The Industries of the Sacjinaws. 209 



resided in Micbigan since 1838, at which time he came here from Wayne 
County, New York. lie was engaged in law practice prior to IBHl, when he 
established the house of E. C. Newell & Co., which he controlled until the 
present year, when he sold out that business to Newell & Robinson in order to 
devote his attention more fully to the business of this company, which was es- 
tablished ten years ago, and now has an extensive patronage in all parts of 
the Union. His lactory comprises a two-story building, 50x80 feet in dimen- 
sions, with grounds adjoining, covering -about a block. Employment is given 
tothirty hands in the manufacture of patent curtain rollers, step ladders, ex- 
tension ladders, spring fixtures, etc., and in addition to this special line a regu- 
lar planing mill business is done, including planing, matching, flooring, siding, 
etc., of every description. 

Richard Luster.— Dealer in Fine Groceries, Fruits, Vegetables, 
Oysters, Etc. ; corner of Cass street and Genesee avenue, East Saginaw. — The 
oldest establishment in the city dealing in fine groceries is that of Mr. Richard 
Luster, who has for tweut3'-eight years continuously conducted the business, 
and commanded confidence by the superior selection of his stock and fair and 
liberal methods. He has for twenty-lour years occupied his present store at 
the corner of Cass and Genesee avenue, comprising the first floor and base- 
ment, each 30x125 feet in dimensions. Here he carries a large and complete 
stock of choice fruits and vegetables, oysters, celery, sugar, teas, coffees, wood- 
ware, brooms, hermetically sealed goods in cans and bottles, and an especially fine 
line of tobaccos and cigars. In oysters his stock is not excelled in selection 
or quality, and in all lines is the best obtainable. He has three clerks, utilizes 
his own wagons in city delivery, and fills orders in a prompt and accurate 
manner, which never fails to give satisfaction. 

Thomas Willis. — Dealer in Boots, Shoes, Slippers and Rubber Goods : 
2714 South Washington avenue, East Saginaw. — Mr. Willis has resided in Sag- 
inaw for twenty years, and has conducted this business for the past ten years, the 
fi.rst six of which he was located in the postoffice block, from which he lemoved 
four years ago to his present premises. He carries a large and complete stock 
of ladies', gents', misses', youths' and children's foot wear, including boots, 
shoes, slippers and rubber goods of every description, and he has a large trade 
in the city and surrounding country, enjoying a merited reputation for the su- 
perior quality of his stock. In connection with his business he has an order 
and repair department, and is prepared to furnish custom made boots and shoes 
of the best quality- to order, and to do all kinds of repairing. 

E. J. Marshall. — Manufacturer of Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron Work ; 
Agent for the Celebrated Richardson & Boynton Co.'s Furnaces and Heaters ; 
112 South Water street, East Saginaw. — Mr. Marshall established this business 
three years ago, prior to which he had for several years been with C. B. Choate, 
dealer in hardware and mill supplies. He employs five hands in the manufac- 
ture of all kinds of tin, copper and sheet iron work, roofing, eave-troughs, etc., 
and also pays special attention to heating and ventilating, being agent for the 
celebrated Richardson & Boynton Co.'s furnaces and heaters, which have no su- 
periors for their general utility for the purposes for which the}' are designed. 
This superior line of furnaces, etc., includes the "Perfect" Portable Gas Tight 
furnaces, the " Salamander " Heating furnaces, " Yorkshire " Wrought Iron 
furnaces, " Calorific" Wood Burning furnaces, " Steel Bodj' " Heating furnaces, 
*' W^estern Champion " Ventilating Room Heaters, "New Giant" Heating fur- 
naces, etc. These superior furnaces and heaters Mr. Marshall has supplied to 
a number of the best houses in the Saginaw Valle}'. He occupies a two-story 
building, 25x60 feet in dimensions, and is prepared to fill all orders in a prompt 
and satisfactory manner. 



210 The Industries of the Saoinaws. 

R. Asbeck. — Grocer ; Lapeer and North Seventh streets, East Saginaw. — 
Located for the past twentj' years in his present premises, Mr. Asbeck is well 
known to the citizens of East Saginaw as a thoroughly responsible and 
reliable business man, and has a large and steadily increasing trade, not only 
from the residents of the city, but also a considerable patronage from the 
farmers of the surrounding country. He occupies a two-story building, 
25x100 feet in dimensions, and another building adjoining, 25x40 feet. He 
carries a large and complete stock of staple and fancy groceries, provisions, 
grocers' sundries, shelf goods, etc., and with the efficient assistance of his 
son, is kept busy, the careful selection of his stock, and the constant 
endeavors made by Mr. Asbeck to please his customers having made his 
establishment a popular one. 

Schmidt Brothers. — Wholesale and Retail Dealers in Fresh and Salt 
Meats ; corner of Hamilton and Franklin streets, Saginaw City. — This firm two 
years ago, bought out Mr. William Moye, who had long been established in a 
similar business, and from that time to the present has enjoyed a large and 
steadily increasing trade in the Saginaws and throughout the lumber camps of 
Northern Michigan. Their stock always includes the freshest and the best in 
fresh meats and the products of the best packing houses in salt meats. Em- 
ployment is given to eight clerks and assistants and two wagons are utilized in 
delivering goods to their many customers. The premises occupied by the firm 
comprise the main floor and basement. 25x100 feet in dimensions, completely 
equipped for the business and they have two-story buildings in the rear, 
20x120 feet, for the purpose of ^dressing meat and storage, and they use en- 
gines and other power machinery to facilitate their business. They also have 
commodious cellars and the finest refrigerator facilities. The Messrs. Schmidt 
are thorough business men, who have fairly earned the prosperity which they 
enjoy in this enterprise. 

J. W^. Gibson. — Dealer in Groceries and Provisions ; corner of Warren 
and Johnson streets, East Saginaw. — Mr, Gibson established this business six 
years ago on the corner opposite his present premises, and has earned the favor 
and patronage of the citizens of East Saginaw by the thorough and careful as- 
sortment of his stock, close and accurate attention to filling orders, fair prices 
and entire reliability. He occupies a two-story corner building, 25x100 feet 
in dimensions, where he carries a large and complete stock of staple and fancy 
groceries, grocers' sundries and shelf goods, teas, coffees, tobaccos and all kinds 
of provisions. He has recently removed into his new premises, which he owns 
and which afford him better facilities for the display of his stock than those 
formerly occupied, and his trade has steadily increased from its inception to 
the present time. 

D. F. Humphrey. — Dealer in Furniture; 117 Lapeer street, East Sag- 
inaw. — Mr. Humphrey established himself in this business twelve years ago, 
and has occupied for the last seven years his present premises, embracing a 
two-story building, 35x125 feet in dimensions. He carries a complete stock of 
medium and common furniture, including chamber suites, lounges, chairs, ta- 
bles, bedsteads, mattresses, springs, pillows, etc.; and a superior line of baby 
carriages. ^Mr. Humphre}' is a thoroughly' practical man, and maintains unex- 
celled relations with the leading manufacturers by which he is enabled to oflfer 
goods of the highest merit at the lowest prices. He conducts his business with 
promptness and upon accurate methods, has a large and steadily growing trade. 

Williara Knippel — Groceries and Provisions ; Wines, Liquors, No- 
ions, Etc.; 925 Janes street, East Saginaw. — Mr. Knippel has be enlocated 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 211 



upon the same spot he now occupies for thirty-one years, and for tlie last nine 
years has carried on his present business. He occupigs a new two-story build- 
ing, well. adapted for the purposes for which it is applied, and carries a large 
and complete stock ot the freshest and best goods in staple and fancy groceries, 
provisions of every description, a select stock of wines and liquors and a full 
line of notions and grocers' sundries, and has a large trade with the people of 
the city and with farmers in the surrounding country, enioying a first-class 
reputation for uniformly fair and accurate dealings. He has achieved a merited 
success by close attention to every detail of his business. 

J. W^. Richardson. — Manufacturer of Harness, Saddlery, Etc.; South 
Hamilton street, next to Taylor House, Saginaw City. — Mr. Richardson has 
conducted this business from 18G4, and throughout his 4ong business history 
has maintained a first-class reputation for superior workmanship in the line in 
which be is engaged, and has secured a steady and extensive patronage. The 
premises occupied by the business embrace the main tloor and basement, 25x 
120 feet, of the building immediately south of the Taylor House, in addition 
to which there is a work-shop in the rear. Mr. Richardson manufactures all 
kinds of fine and light bugg}' and carriage harness, as well as heavy luml)ering 
harness, ot which he makes a specialty, and in which his trade is not confined 
to local bounds, but extends over the lumber districts of the country, orders 
being received by him from as far west as Washington Territory, and east 
from New York and Maine. He also manufactures collars, bridles, saddles, 
etc., and deals upon a very large scale in whips, blankets, robes, all kinds of 
saddlers' goods and saddlery supplies of every description. His stock is not 
surpassed in quality or quantity by any in the Valley and he gives steady em- 
ployment to a full force of hands, and enjoys a very large trade in all his 
lines. His facilities for the display of his superior stock of goods are of the 
best character, and the promptness and accuracy with which he fills all orders 
for goods in his line, and the uniformly fair and liberal methods adopted in 
the transactions of his business, have made his establishment both popular and 
prosperous. 



OENEIRAL INDE,X. 



PAGE. 

Af hard, A. W. & Son, wholesale and i-etail 
dealer in heavy and shelf hardware, mill 
supplies, si oves, etc — 183 

Allin^toii & Curtis Dust Separator Co., The. 94 

Alderton, Geo. A., wholesale grocer 110 

Ailing-ton, D. K., architect, mechanical en- 
g-ineer, ete 170 

Andre, Peter C, real estate 119 

Ang:ell, The Photographer 129 

Anderson Brothers, tine dry goods, silks, 
dress g-oods and laces : 1:^3 

Asbeck. R., grocer 310 

Avery & to., manufacturers of and dealers 
in rough and dressed lumber, lath, shin- 
g-les,etc 106 

Barnard— The N & A. Barnard Co.— Lum- 
ber, salt, pine and farming- lands. . .» 143 

Bauman, J., wholesale and retail dealer in 
dry g-oods and notions, (See also inside 
pag-e, front cover) 79 

Bartlett, A. F. & Co., proprietors of the 
Pioneer iron and galvanizing- works. . 86 

Baumgarten & Heller, wholesale and retail 
dealers in general merchandise. . 92 

Baumg-arten, A. .wholesale and retail dealer 
in boots and shoes 92 

Bates, Harry, dealer in horses, wagons and 
carriages, and manufacturer of harness, 
etc 178 

Bamford, Fred & Co., painters and dacora- 
tors, and dealers in artistic wall papers, 
room mouldings, art g^ass, etc l.W 

Banner Steam Laundry, Rosslter & McClin- 
tock, proprietors , 159 

Benjamin, C L., complete livery and under- 
taking establishment 199 

Benjamin, J. H., wholesale manufacturer 
of Concorri buggies. (See also page 217). . 102 

Beese, John H. & Co., wholesale and retail 
dealers^in coal, sewer pipe, cement, hair, 
fire l^rick, tire clay, etc 130 

Benson & King, manufacturers of picture 
backing, thin box lumber and box shocks. 13" 

Bechtel, A D. dealer in furniture and 
household goods 145 

Beechler, Miss Emma, fashionable dress- 
maker * 156 

Birnej% R. J., dealer in drugs, medicines, 
chemicals, etc 97 

Birss,"Alic, manufacturer of wagons, car- 
riages, 'sleighs, etc 160 

Blakely, Kirby, insurance and real estate, 
and manufacturers' agent for agj-icul- 
tural laachinery'and implements 164 

Blumberg & Weinberg, dealers in clothing 
and gents' furnishing goods, hats, caps, 
etc.7 163 

Bliss, A. T. & Brother, manufacturers of 
lumber, lath, shingles and salt 93 

Bliss &,Parsons, dealers in pine lands, logs 
ana lumber 181 

Bliss Aai-OQ P., Swancreek Stock Farm 181 

Brand & Hardin, manufacturers of roller 
process flour; also manufacturers of 
shingles and salt 104 

Brown & Ryan, dealers in lumber, logs and 
shingles 108 

Brown, J. F. & Son, insurance 110 

Brix, H. H.," manufacturer and dealer in 
hats, caps, furs and gentlemen's furnish- 
ing>goods 207 

Buehlcr & Deibel, dealers in boots, shoes and 
rubbers 132 

Burdick &'Moore, dealers in meats, "grocer- 
ies, vegetables, etc 169 

Butman & Kust, manufacturers of lumber 
andsalt 99 



PAGE. 

Budge & Prince, manufacturing confec- 
tioners 208 

Burton, Charles B., caterer and confec- 
tioner 145 

Burdett, John, grocer, news dealer and con- 
fectioner 206 

Bullock Music House, pianos, organs, mu- 
sic and musical merchandise 196 

Byrne, A., dealer in groceries, provisions, 
etc., and wholesale and retail wines and 
liquors 180 

CalderwoOd, A. W . S , dealer in dry goods, 
notions, clothing, etc 97 

Cameron & Merrill, lumber and salt manu- 
facturers 122 

Camp, A. H., watchmaker and jeweler; 
dealer in watches, clocks jewelry, silver- 
ware, etc 192 

Citizens' National Bank of Saginaw 186 

Cook, William J . , manufacturer of tin, cop- 
per and sheet iron ware, gutters, etc.; 
and dealer in furnaces and tinware 202 

Cook & Gray, proprietors East Saginaw 
Steam Laundry 83 

Cooper & Peck, wholesale and retail dealers 
in staple and fancy groceries 83 

Coleman, H , furnishing undertaker, and 
complete livery stable 150 

Connelly Bros., brokers and furniture 
dealers 135 

Conley, M. C, manufacturing jeweler; 
dealer in watches, clocksland silver plated 
ware 300 

Cornell & Stattord. city bottling works; 
manufacturers of ginger ale, root beer, 
birch beer, cream soda, sherbet, diamond 
rock seltzer and pops of all kinds 168 

Cornick & Meyers, dealei-s in boots, shoes, 
rubber' goods, etc 198 

Cosendai, John F., French steam dye house 192 

Crescent Match Factory. . . .'. 117 

Crowley House, D. Crowley, proprietor. . . 184 

Dailey. George w , , expert sign writer. . . . 192 

Dalke, William G., general aealer in gro- 
ceries and provisions . 194 

Daudt, Watson & Co., importers and job- 
bers of earthenware, china and glass- 
ware, lamps, chandeliers, silver plated 
ware and table cutlery J27 

Davis, S. & Co , wholesale and retail dealers 
in dry goods, notions and millinery 194 

Demars, O. J. & Co., dealers in clothing 
hats, caps, furnishing goods, trunks, va- 
lises, etc 195 

Derby, J. P., wholesale grocer; produce 
commission merchant 1H5 

DeShaw, Charles, cooper 194 

East Saginaw Conservatory of Music 188 

East Saginaw Sieam Laundry, Cook & 
Gray, proprietors 83 

East Saginaw National Bank 173 

Eastman, E. O. & S. L. & Co.. manufac- 
turers of and dealers in assorted lumber 180 

Eagle Drug Store, The, W. H. Foot, pro- 
prietor 194 

Eaton, Potter & Co., manufacturers and 
wholesale and retail dealers in lumber, 
lath and salt 107 

Eddy, C. K. & Son, manufacturers of lum- 
ber and salt 175 

Eggert, Aug., manufacturer and dealer in 
line upholstered goods and general furni- 
ture 156 

Everett House, Wash Salisbury, proprie- 
tor 185 

Excelsior Steam Boiler Works, Wildman 
Bros., proprietors Wl 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 



213 



I'AOK. 

Farmers' Hotel, Louis Miller, ))roi)rietor. . . 17:i 

Feifje, Henry, inaiiufiicturor anil dealer in 
fine furniture, upholstery, earprts, eur- 
tains. draperies, etc lti(i 

Feige - Silsbee Furniture Manulaeturing- 
Company 118 

Ferg-uson— The Alex. Ferguson & Son Insur- 
ance Agency, Are, life and accident insur- 
ance 8") 

First National Hank lijl 

Flatt, Bradley & Co, exporters of hardwood 
lumber, etc ISf) 

Foster, Charles & Co., wholesale and retail 
dealers in all kinds of furniture ~'0!5 

Fowler, Charles (i., insurance and real es- 
tate !t] 

Friedlein, H , watchmaker and jeweler I,i6 

Frenz, Dr. Engelbert, druggist 19.5 

Friedman & Hynan, practical book and job 
printers lii.') 

Froelich, George, manufacturer of tin, 
copper and sheet iron work, roofing, etc. 198 

tJaensbauer, .lohn, dealer In boots, shoes, 
slippers and rubbers — 180 

Germain, hdward, manufacturer of lum- 
ber, sash, doors, blinds, box shocks, etc 1:.M 

Gemmill, William, hardware, stoves, oil- 
cloth, etc 135 

Gibson, .J. W., dealer in groceries and pro- 
visions 210 

Gossel Brothers, dealers in groceries, pro- 
visions, Hour, etc 197 

Goldsmith, Henry, dealer in notions, fan- 
ej' goods, etc I(i4 

Gottschalk, K., manufacturer of cigai'S 
and dealer in pipes, tobaccos and 
smokers' articles 148 

Goeschel, H. & E., wholesale and retail 
dealers in general merchandise 87 

Grant, C. S. &Co., dealers in tine boots and 
shoes 113 

Green, King & Co., manufacturers of gang 
sawed lumber, lath, salt, staves, heading, 
etc 84 

Greve, F, dealer in picture frames, mould- 
ings, etc 1.57 

Gyde, B. A .. manufacturer of staves, head- 
ing and hoops 198 

Hardin, D &Co., manufacturers of and 
dealers in sash, blinds, doors, mouldings, 
siding, flooring, etc 149 

Harvey, J. J., livery, sale and boarding 
stable 147 

Haydcn, Miss M. E., fashionable millinery 
establishment., 135 

Heavenrich Brothers & Co., wholesale and 
retail clothiers and dealers in lumber- 
men's supplies 136 

Herley, M L. & Co., Depot Drtig Store 137 

Heim, H. & W., dealers in drugs and medi- 
cines, fancy and toilet articles 1.57 

Heinlein, H., merchant tailor 158 

Herrig, B , wholesale dealer in tobacco, 
groceries, provisions, tiour, feed, hay, 
etc " 179 

Holzheimer House, C. F. Hol/.heimer, pro- 
prietor 98 

Hobson, A., steam stone and marble 
works 18t) 

Holland, Nelson, manufacturer and dealer 
in gang sawed lumber and salt. 170 

Honsberger, H. F., dry troods. notions, etc. 162 

Hollister, Fred W., architect and superin- 
tendent 189 

Hoyt Saw Mill, manufacturers of gang 
sawed white i)ine lumber 147 

Hoyt Planing Mill, manufacturers of and 
dealers in lumber, lath and pickets 146 

Humphrey, D. F., dealer in furniture 310 

Ingalls Oil Company 149 

Jackson, John L., manufacturer of steam 
engines, salt well, saw and shingle ma- 
chinery and castings of all kinds 119 



PAGE. 

.Jerome, D, H. & Co., dealers in hardware, 
mill and lumbermen's supijlies 88 

.loehen, Kmil, hardware, stoves, tinware, 
etc . . , 207 

.] oh nson. Wiliiain W . , architect. ..[.V..\\.\. 163 



Keeler & Hogeboom, druggists 

Kliuen. Richard, insurance 

Kiml)all iV Merriam, lumber dealers 

Kindler, V., wholesale and retail dealer in 
firearms, sporting goods, etc 

Knippel, William, grocoi'iesand provisions, 
wines, li(iu(>rs, notions, etc 

Koehler Brothers, steam forge; bolt works 
and machine shop 

liambie Brothers, merchant tailors 

Lee. Charles, nuinulacturer of sash, doors, 
t)linds, llooiing, etc. .. 

Linton Manufacturing Co., wholesale 
dealers in and manufacturers of lumber, 
salt and packing boxes 

Livermore, A. 8., dealer in fresh and salt 
meats, fine groceries, crockery, etc 

Luster, Richard, dealer in tine groceries, 
fruits, vegetables, oysters, etc 

Lyon, L. M, market gardener, etc 

lUack, .Tames, dealer in hats, gents' fur- 
nishings, etc 

Marshall, E. J., manufacturer of tin, cop- 
per and sheet iron work, etc 

Martin, J. S., livery and sales stable 

Marskey, Chas. F., special representative 
Michigan Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany 

Mayflower Mills, Emil Mdores, manager; 
roller flour manufacturers 

Martin, Bruno, patentee and manager of 
the Martin Excelsior Tobacco Resweater; 
tin, copper and iron works 

McLeod, D., manufacturer of shingles 

Me Bain, Wm., general insurance 

McGregor, James & Sons, manufacturers 
of steam boilers and sheet iron works. . 

McPhee, William H., merchant tailor 

McKenzie, S., blacksmith, wagon maker, 



etc. 



Meakin's Steam Laundry, James Meakln, 
Jr., propi'ietor 

Meldrum, J. D., blacksmith and wagon 
maker 

Meyer, G. W. & Co., dealers in dry goods, 
notions, hats, caps, gents' furnishing 
goods, groceries, tobaccos, cigars, hard- 
ware, crockery, glassware, etc 

Michigan Curtain Roller Co [ 

Michigan Paper ('ompanj', Swinton & Rey- 
nolds, proprietors; wholesale paper, sta- 
tionery and books 

Michigan Dairy Salt Company, manufac- 
tui-ers of pure table and dairy salt. 

Michigan Saw Company, manufacturers of 
mill saws and dealers in emery wheels, 
etc 

Mitts, W. S. & Co., Personal and Exchange 
Bank 

Mitterinier & Rohde, dealers in groceries, 
vegetables, fruits, poultry, oysters, etc.. 

Mikado Tea Company, importers, jobbers 
and retailers of fine teas, cofl'ees, spices. 



9<; 
138 
105 

191 

310 

123 
197 



102 

208 



309 
197 



307 



209 
144 



193 
130 

1.55 
131 
113 

136 

208 

203 
114 
111 



83 
208 



154 
116 

129 
i;{3 
136 



etc. 



155 

Moore, Lou G., druggist 108 

Moore. W. B., wholesale and retail druggist 165 

Mollit, W. J , insurance 300 

Morley Brothers, hardware 77 

Morley, Kwen & Co., wholesale and retail 

^oal, lime, cement, sewer pipe, etc 158 

Moeller & DeLand, druggists; dealers in 

wall paper, stationery, etc 173 

Moeller, A. L., dealer in choice groceries.. 198 
Mueller, William, contractor lor brick and 

stonework 173 

IVational Brewery, Peter Raquet, proprie- 
tor 8V 



214 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 



PAGE. 

National Tea Company, dealers in teas, 
cotfees, spices, etc 128 

Neumann, William, dealer in fancy and 
staple groceries, crockery, glassware, 
etc 88 

Newell & Robinson, school books, blank 
books, stationery, news, wall paper, 
shades, etc 201 

Newton, E. S. & Co., foundry and machine 
shop 134 

Norris, C. M., dealer in pianos, organs, 
musical merchandise, etc 174 

Norris, T. J., groceries and provisions 163 

O'Donnel! & Spencer, manui'acturers of 
lumber; planing mill and box shook fac- 
tory 80 

O'Hare. J., dealer in flue boots, shoes and 
rubbers Ill 

Oppenheimer's Complete Cigar Store 193 

Opfergelt, P., manufacturer of and dealer 
in harness, saddles, collars, whips, etc.. . 139 

Otto, John Jr. & Co., gentlemen's furnish- 
ing goods, hats, caps, etc 167 

Passolt, Henry, manufacturer of laundry 
and toilet soaps 163 

Pioneer Iron and Galvanizing Works, A. 
F. Bartlett & Co., proprietors; manufac- 
turer of steam engines, saw mill and salt 
well machinery 86 

Plummer, Charles H., manufacturer and 
dealer in lumber, lath, shingles and all 
kinds of hardwood; also manufacturer 
of flour and dealer in pine lands 139 

Powe & Howell, photographers 305 

Price, John A. , personal security bank 133 

Quinnin, Louis, real estate. 171 

Kapp, William, meat market 304 

Kaquet, Peter, proprietor National Brew- 
ery; brewer of Pilsener and lager beer, 
and bottler, 89 

Kemer Brothers, manufacturers of Valley 
Island stone liine, and dealers in coal, 
calcined plaster, cement, hair, brick, Are 
brick and clay 138 

Reitter, F. & C , English and German job 
printers; publishersof the Saginaw Post. 190 

Richardson, J. W., manufacturer of hai'- 
ness, saddlery, etc 311 

Rimmele, Charles, & Brother, dealers in 
groceries, provisions and produce 100 

Ring, Charles E., manufacturer of shin- 
gles 201 

Ringler, Eugene & Son, druggists- and 
chemists 163 

Boseland, Charles, grocer 308 

Rossiter & McClintock, proprietors of Ban- 
ner steam laundry 159 

Rose Brothers, wholesale and retail butch- 
ers 171 

Roeser, William & Sons, dealers in farm- 
ing tools and implements, wagons, car- 
riages, harness, etc 135 

Rust Brothers & Co., manufacturers of 

lumber 96 

Rust, Eaton & Co., manufacturers of lum- 
ber, lath and salt 174 

Rust <.Sl Wheeler, pine and farming lands, 

logs, lumber, etc 179 

Saginaw Manufacturing Company, manu- 
facturers of rough and dressed lumber, 
washboards, barrel covers, shade rollers, 

bail and grease boxes, etc 81 

Saginaw Beef Co., L. Cornwell, proprietor; 
wholesale dealers in Swift's Chicago 
dressed beef, live stock, dressed hogs, 

mutton, smoked meats, etc 100 

Saginaw Lumber and Salt Company 140 

Saginaw Valley Paper <'o., F. S. Sears, 
proprietor; dealer in all kinds of blank 
books, stationery, paper boxes, twine, 

flour sacks, etc 133 

Saginaw Dry Goods and Carpet Co 183 

Saginaw, Tuscola & Huron Railroad Com- 
pany, The, (see also inside back cover). .. 158 



PAGE. 

Savings Bank of East Saginaw, The — 150 
St. John, E. & Co., news dealei-s, book- 
sellers and stationers; dealers in wall 

paper, window shades, etc 195 

St. John Manufacturing Co., manufao- 
facturers of the cooling, poultice and 

protection boot 199 

Schwemer & Witt, dealers in dry goods, 

groceries, crockei-y, etc 94 

Schoeneberg, E., flre insurance and real 

estate agent 109 

Schott, A. A. & Co., pharmacists and 
dealers in pure drugs, medicines, chemi- 
cals, etc 169 

Schupp, A., insurance 168 

Schemm, John G., brewer and bottler of 
lager beer, and manufacturer of ginger 

ale, etc 103 

Schaefer, J. G., meat market 303 

Schmidt Bros., wholesale and retail dealers 

in fresh and salt meats — 310 

Selleck, Mrs. E. J., millinery and fancy 

goods 93 

Sellc & Jasper, fine tailoring 134 

Second National Bank 166 

Seyft'ardt & Walz, wholesale and retail 
dealers in hardware, building material, 
house furnishing goods, agricultural im- 
plements, etc 167 

Sears, F S., proprietor Saginaw Valley 

Paper Co : 133 

Searls, B. A., dealer in choice family gro- 
ceries, etc 305 

Shackleton, J. H., roller mills; manufac- 
turer of flour, meal, feed, etc . 109 

Sheyer Bros., dealers in dry goods, clothing 

and ladies' and gents' furnishing goods. 170 
Shaler, H. H., groceries, flour, feed, etc — 300 
Singer Manufacturing Co., J. O. Charlebois, 

agent 104 

Slesinger, Victor, dealer in hides, pelts, 

wool, furs, cracklings and tallow 131 

Slade, Lewis C, wholesale dealer in rough 

and dressed white pine lumber 191 

Smith, William L , photographer 87 

Smith. W. G., manufacturer of parlor fur- 
niture and lounges ;. 130 

Smith, H. P., real estate, etc 133 

Smith, Jay, & Son, wholesale and retail 
dealers in drugs, chemicals, patent medi- 
cines, druggists' sundries, etc 176 

Smitk's Art Store, William Smith, proprie- 
tor 303 

Smith, J. L , baker and confectioner 30H 

Smart, James S., Jr., & Co., manufactur- 
ing confectioners and jobbers in oysters, 

fruits and canned goods 101 

Spangler, A. D. & Co., genei-al commission 
merchants; wholesale dealers in fruits, 

produce, nuts, berries, etc 184 

Sparks, Charles' J., general insurance and 

real estate agent, etc 301 

Spatz, George, steam baker and wholesale 

cracker dealer 166 

StandardLumber Co.,The 189 

Stevens & LaDue, manufacturers of lum- 
ber, shingles and salt 187 

Stevens, George F., merchandise broker.. 179 
Stevens & Deveaux, real estate, loans, ab- 
stracts, land and tax agency . 0*1 

Stevens, J. K., real estate, abstract and 

loan office 145 

Stein, John, and Fred Eckert, wagon mak- 
ers, horse shoers and general black- 
smiths 205 

Stewart— The James, Stewart Co., whole-- 

sale grocers, etc 196 

Stewart, R. S., The Grocer 90 

Stenglein Manufacturing Co., The, Manu- 
facturers of furniture 95 

Stinson, James, dealer in crockery, china, 

glassware, etc 305 

Straw, Charles, dealer in groceries, etc 301 

Stone Brothers, sbintfle manufacturers. . . 80 



The Industries of the Saginaws. 



215 



PAGE. 

Stlngel, Geo., wholesale and retiiil butcher 114 

Stolz, John & Son, whoicsiile and i-etail 
butchers, etc 11~ 

Stringham, Joseph, insurance, and ad- 
juster of flie losses 1^ 

Swinton & Reynolds, proprietors oT Michi- 
g'an Paper Co In4 

Syinons Urothers & Co., wholesale g-rocers. 81 

Tallniadge, F. E.. the Franklin livery, sale 
and boarding- stables 17:J 

Taylor House. F'red U. Sweet, proprietor.. IsT 

Teal, J. B., wholesale and retail meat and 
vegetable market lOV 

Ten Eyck, C. & E., numuracturers of and 
dealers in shingles, pail staves and head- 
ing-, and salt US 

Voepei, L. \V., dealer in books, stationery, 
wall paper, etc 144 

V'oUmer, Eberhard, meat market. . 308 

Ward, A. T., banker and broker; and 
dealer in diamonds, watches, etc ~06 

Warner& Eastman, manufacturers of lum- 
ber and salt 183 

"'arner, G. C, manufacturer of all kinds 
of harness and turf a:oods; dealer in 
whips, blankets, brushes, etc 304 

Weber, William F , East Saginaw Trunk 
Factory; manufacturer of and dealer in 
trunks, traveling bags, etc.. 131 

Wegst, A., & Co., carriage manufactory 
and repository 159 

Welch, J . C. , watch maker and jeweler — 304 

Wells, Stone & Co , pine lands, logs and 
lumber , T9 

Wells-Stone Mercantile Company, whole- 
sale grocers and dealers in iumbeTmen's 
supplies 90 

Weston, R , sanitary plumbing, gas fitting 
and steam heating- 203 



HAOE. 

West Side Club. T\w 1H3 

Wickes Urothers, manufacturers of lliecel- 
ebratcd Wickes gang and all kinds of 
heavy mill machinery lOfi 

Wiggins, F. 15 , & Co., word working ma- 
chinery and mill supplies ISJ 

Wiggins, (J. R. A: S. L , manufacturers of 
pine and hardwood lumber and salt, and 
dealers in logs, lumber, puie and farming 
lands 13(1 

Wilke, Ernst, F. & P. M. meat market, 
fresh and salt meats 10.5 

Wildn an Brothers, proprietors Excelsior 
Steam Boiler Works IHl 

Williamson, William, machine shop, steam 
fitting, general blacksmithing and wagon 
making; also dealer in new and second 
band inaeliinery !'5 

Williams, G. F., & Brotheis, manufacturers 
of and wholesale and retail dealers in 
lumber and salt ■ .. 113 

Williams-Perrin Implement and Produce 
Company, wholesale and retail dealers in 
all kinds of carriages, cutters, sleighs, 
farm implements, machinery, wagons, 
engines, wind mills and produce 177 

Williams, R. H., grocery and market .. 306 

Willis, Thomas, dealer in boots, shoes, 
slippers and rubber goods 209 

Winsor, J . .!., i)laning mill and salt works. 1.37 

Wolpert, Frederick, groceries, provisions, 

Hour, feed, etc 304 

Wright, A. W., Lumber Co.. manufac- 
turers and dealers in lumber, lath and 
shingles 115 

Yawkey & Corby n, hardware, stoves, etc. . ItiO 
Zander, T. C. L., The New York Tailor.... 133 



ADVERTISERS INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Bauman, J., dry goods, carpets, cloaks, 
etc. (See also page 79) .. Inside front cover 

Benjamin, J. H., wholesale manufactur- 
ers of Concord buggies. (See also page 
103) 317 

Elstner, J. M & Co., publishers 316 

Flint & Pere Marquette Railroad 

Outside back cover 



PAGE. 

Ciiooch Freezer Co., manufacturers of pat- 
ent ice cream freezers 316 

Michigan Central Railroad 218 

Saginaw, Tuscola & Huron Railroad. (See 
also page 1.53i Inside back cover 



216 



The Industries op the Saginaws. 



The Gooch Patent Ice Cream Freezers. 

These freezers are entirely different 
from an}^ other make in the market. By 
their simplicity of construction and per- 
fect adaptability to the process of making 
all kinds of Ice Cream, Sherbets, Frozen 
Fruits, Etc., they have taken the front 
rank in the market and are universally 
acknowledged THE BEST FREEZERS 
MADE. 

Dealers are constantly taking up the 
sale of them, and are discarding inferior 
Freezers heretofore thought good ones. 
Our increase of sales has been NINE 
HUNDRED PER CENT. SINCE 1879, 
thus showing their great popularity. 
The " PEERLESS " are made 3-quart to 10-quart for family use ; the 
" GIANT," with fl^'-wheel, 14-quart to 42-quart for confectioners and hotels. 




For Sale by the Learting- Saginaw and East Saginaw Hardware and 

Queensware Trade. 



THE COOCH FREEZER CO., 



ci:srci2srniT-^Ti, o. 



J. M. ELSTNER & CO., 



X'XJIOXjTSXZSSft.S 



The 

The 
'J"he 
The 
The 
The 
The 
The 
The 
The 



Industries of 
Industries of 
Industries of 
Industries of 
Industries of 
Industries of 
Industries of 
Industries of 
Industries of 
Industries of 



San Francisco, Cal. 
Cincinnati, O. 
St. Louis, Mo. (1885. 
New Orleans, La. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Grand Kapids, Mich. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Savannah, (ia. 
Houston, Tex. 



The Industries of St. Louis, Mo. (1887.) 
The Industries of Chattanooga, Tenn. 
The Industries of Montgomery, Ala. 
The Industries of Detroit, Mich. 
The Industries of Dubuque, la. 
The Industries of the Saginaws, Mich. 
The Industries of Kansas City, Mo. 

(In Preparation.) 
The Centennial Review of Cincinnati, O. 

(In Preparation.) 



IJ^ J'list Office Block, Corner Cass and Tuscola jStreets, 
EAST SAOINAW. MICH. 



The Industri'es op thk Saginaws. 



217 



O 



O 

o 

pq 

oo 

CO 

oo 

CO 

tq 




218 



The Industries op the Sawinaws. 




JV \ICHIGAN 
CENTRAL 

f _J 




\.^^ He^) tn^l£^t)^ PoiDts }r ^ ^^, „ 

W.R.BUSENBARK,^^^^^^ PassT. Ag't Chicago. G erVl. Passer ^ Tkt J^gt^ 

Four Express Trains with Parlor and Sleeping Oars Attached, between 

EAST SAGINAW, SAGINAW CITY t DETROIT 

Oonnecting with Thronerh Oars to 

, NEW YORK, BOSTON, BUFFALO, TORONTO, 
NIAGARA FALLS AND CINCINNATL 



WAGNER PALACE SLEEPING CARS FROM THE 

SAGINAW VALLEY TO CHICAGO 



-^TTTTHO-CTT CH^lNTa-E. 



PARLOR AND SLEEPING CARS TO MACKINAW, 



Foot of Court St , Southeast Cor, Genesee and Washington Aves., 

Saginaw (SimY, CQigh. Gasii Saginaw, CQigh- 



Saginaw, Tuscola and Huron Railroad, 

THE 

SHORT LINE between WESTERN MICHIGAN 

And Points on the 

HURON PENINSULA OF MICHIGAN, 

AND THE 

Only Direct Line 

Between the 

SAGINAW VALLEY 

PORT AUSTIN, 

GRiND STONE CITY, 
PORT HOPE, 

HURON CITY, 

SAND BEACH, 

CASEVILLE, 

GACETOWN, 
&c., &c., &c. 

W, L, Webber, Presiden/. M, B, Wilkinson, supennhmkni. 

Bay Port Hotel, at Bay Port, 

wii^ri fow:L' bat. 

Operated by the S., T & H. R. R. CO., 

Is being- enlaro-ed, and for Season of 1888 will have capacity 

for three hundred Guests. 

T II E 

GROUNDS & BEACH are km Improyei aul will mate BAY FORT e^iial to auy 

SUMMER RESORT on the GREAT LAKES. 

D. H. WEBSTER. Manager of Hotel. 




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