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Full text of "In the field : the bulletin of the Field Museum of Natural History"

January 
\ February 

2001; : 



' .T,h e . Pi'e I d„ M u s e jj m ' s M e m b e r P u b I i c a-t.i o n 




^•i i jT^;'  ,■ (T 



.LepitiT Spec:ies ^ 
3ItiscQV®5?M in Madagascar 

Kremlin Gold 

From One Continent to Another 



From the President 



Willard L. Boyd, former Field Museum president, was elected as a fellow last fall to the American Academy 
of Arts & Sciences, a 220-year-old organization founded by John Adams that brings scholars and policy- 
makers together to study complex, long-range issues and recommend actions. A former lawyer and now 
a professor of law at the University of Iowa, Mr Boyd has served with distinction in two major posts in 
educational and scientific administration: president of the University of Iowa (1969-1981) and president 
of The Field Museum (1981-1996). He is also a valued member of numerous advisory bodies of national 
scope in public policy and cultural affairs. On behalf of The Field Museum, we congratulate Mr Boyd for 
this prestigious honor 



A Successful String of Special Exhibitions 



Over the past five years, it has been our privilege to present to our visitors a wonderful array of temporary exhibitions 
"exploring the world and Its people. " 




2000 

Africa: From Eritrea with Love 

Masks: Faces of Culture 

The Dead Sea Scrolls 

Picturing J. rex: Selections from the 

Lanzendorf Collection 
Kachinas: Gifts from the Spirit Messengers 
Star Wars: The Magic of Myth 
Americanos: Latino Life in the United 

States 
The Endurance: Shackleton's Legendary 

Antarctic Expedition 
Kremlin Gold: 1000 Years of Russian 

Gems and Jewels 

1999 

Origins 

Women in Science: Conversations in 

Conservation 
Margaret Mee: Return to the Amazon 
With Patience and Good Will: The Art of 

the Arapaho 



The Tibetan Art of Healing 

The Art of Being Kuna: Layers of 

Meaning Among the Kuna of Panama 
Sue: The Inside Story 
Insects: 105 Years of Collecting 
Summer Festivals of Guerrero and 

Oaxaca: The Cycle of Propitiation and 

Sacrifice 
Sounds from the Vaults 
The Chicago Bears: 80 Years of Gridiron 

Legends 
Cartier 1900-1939 

1998 

Soul of the Game: Images and Voices of 

Street Basketball 
Viewing Olmsted: Photographs by Robert 

Burley Lee Friedlander and Geoffrey 

James 
Assignment Rescue: The Story of Varian 

Fry and the Emergency Rescue 

Committee 
Living Colors: A Butterfly Garden 
Voyage of a Nation: The Philippines 
Charles Carpenter: Native American 

Portraits 
Poster Art from the Golden Age of 

Mexican Cinema 1936-1957 
China's Feathered Dinosaurs 
Swedish Folk Art: All Tradition is Change 
The Art of the Motorcycle 
La Guadalupana: Images of Faith and 

Devotion 

1997 

Sacred Arts of Haitian Vodou 
The Illegal Camera 1940-1945: 
Photography in the Netherlands during 



the German Occupation 

Kayapo Imaging 

Dinosaur Families: The Story of Egg 

Mountain 
Archaeopteryx: The Bird that Rocked 

the World 
A Basketmaker in Rural Japan 
Sisters of the Great Lakes: Art of 

American Indian Women 

1996 

Modern Japanese Ceramics 

Travelers in an Antique Land: Early Travel 

Photography in Egypt 
In Their Own Voices 
Feeling the Spirit: Searching the World 

for the People of Africa 
Planet Peru 
Spiders! 

From the Good Earth 
Visual Fusion: Work by Chicago Latino 

Artists 
Cajun Music and Zydeco 
Portraits of Clay: Potters of Mata Ortiz 
Heaven on Earth: Orthodox Treasures 

from Siberia and North America 
Red White Blue and God Bless You: 

A Portrait of Northern New Mexico 

And 2001 will continue this tradition. 

John W. McCarterJr 
President & CEO 



What do you think about In the Fielcf? 



In the Field tries, whenever possible, to implement your feedback in making this a better magazine. Beginning with this 
issue, we moved the mailing label to the back since many readers wish to frame the stunning covers. It is now slightly 
smaller so it can fit into your file drawers, and the cover is heavier so it will last longer Your Guide to the Field, the calendar 
section in the middle, is now a pullout so that you can keep it in an easily seen, quickly accessible place. And the entire 
magazine is now printed on recycled paper in soy-based inks — carrying the Museum's conservation ethic to a practical, 
meaningful level. 

We will slowly be trying new things throughout 2001. Please send comments or questions to Amy Cranch, publications 
manager. The Field Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605-2496, or via e-mail at acranch@fmnh.org. 



Inside 



Get a glimpse of the ambitious visionaries 
who helped build the Department of 
Anthropology over the past century. 



A Field Museum scientist is part of 

an international team that discovered new 

species of endangered lemurs. 



'W^ ^ Efe J' 



r^m' 



John Moyer and Paul Martin 
filming a 1950 excavation. 



7 



Your Guide to the Field, which 
highhghts exhibitions, classes, lectures 
and more, is now a pullout section 
for quick, easy reference in planning 
your visits or continued learning 
opportunities. 




17 



Propithecus verreauxi veneauxi, 
Beza-Mahafaly Special Reserve, 
southwestern Madagascar. 



A 26-year volunteer wins a lifetime 
achievement award from the Illinois 
Association of Museums. 




Peter Gayford, volunteer, and 
Chapurukha Kusimba, associate 
curator of African anthropology. 



INTHEFIELD 



January/February 2001, Vol.72, No. 1 

Editor: 

Amy Cranch, The Field Museum 

Designer: 
Depke Design 

Copy editor: 
Laura F Nelson 

In the Field is printed on recycled paper using 
soy-based inks. 

In the Field (ISSN #1051-4546) is published bimonthly by 
The Field Museum. Copyright 2001 The Field Museum. 
Annual subscriptions are $20; $10 for schools. Museum 
membership includes In the F/eW subscription. Opinions 
expressed by authors are their own and do not necessarily 
reflect the policy of The Field Museum. Notification of 
address change should include address label and should be 
sent to the membership department. POSTMASTER: Send 
address changes to In the Field, The Field Museum, 1400 
South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605-2496. 
Periodicals postage paid at Chicago, Illinois. 

Tliis issue's cover image, "Icon Wall, Paint Elevation: 
Kremlin Gold," is a watercolor and ink on illustration board 
designed and painted by David Layman of the exhibits 
department. Scenes like this can be viewed as backdrops in 
"Kremlin Gold: 1000 Years of Russian Gems and Jewels" 
through March 30, 2001. 



rjield 



useum 



The Field Museum salutes the people of 
Chicago for their long-standing, generous 
support of the Museum through the Chicago 
Park District. 

The Field Museum 

1400 South Lake Shore Drive 

Chicago, IL 60605-2496 



ph 312.922.9410 
www.fieldmuseum.org 



Museum Campus Neighbors 



Shedd Aquarium 



Shedd Aquarium kicks off its "Oceanarium Turns 10" celebration 
with "Totally Training" from January through March. Learn about 
the importance of training programs for marine mammals and for 
cats and dogs as well. Watch the dolphins and belugas learn an 
entirely new behavioral program during regularly scheduled marine 
mammal presentations. These are techniques you can try on your pet 
at home, with help from Ken Ramirez, Shedd's director of training 
and husbandry, during "Pet Training — The Shedd Way," on Feb. 10, 
from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. For details and to register, call 312.692.3333. 
For general information, check out www.sheddaquarium.org. 



Adler Planetarium 

The first Saturday of every month, explore the skies from 1 1 a.m. 
to 3 p.m. during Sears Family Days at the Adler Planetarium & 
Astronomy Museum. Family activities cover a wide variety of 
topics, including the stars and constellations. Admission is free. 

Or, journey to the edge of the universe as you take a voyage in 
the world's first StarRider'^" Theater to Black Holes: Into the Dark 
Abyss. This ongoing sky show explores a force of gravity so power- 
ful that it captures everything that comes too close. For more 
information, call 312.322.0304 or visit www.adlerplanetarium.org. 



JANUARY • FEBRUARY 2(101 1 



107 Years of Anthropological 
Leadership at The Field Museum 

By Warren Haskiii, Volunteer, and Stephen E. Nash, Head of Collections, Department of Anthropology 




THE FIELD MUSEUW/CSA8065 



European Archaeology Hall, North Court, Field Museum of Natural History, fackson Park, about 1907. 



When The Field Museum was founded in 1893, its 
Department of Anthropology became the principal 
beneficiary of some 50,000 objects acquired for 
display during the World's Columbian Exposition 
of that year. These objects represented prehistoric 
and existing cultures from around the world, 
including spectacular archaeological specimens 
from the Ohio Hopewell (ITF Nov./Dec. 2000), 
ethnographic objects from numerous cultures of 
Central and South America (ITF May /June 2000) 
and musical instruments and pottery from places as 
varied as India, Japan and Palestine (ITF Nov./Dec. 
1999). These priceless collections, as well as those 
built later in the 20th century, tell only part of the 
Field's illustrious history. Here we introduce you to 
some colorful personalities that have led the 
Department of Anthropology and helped the 



Museum attain a prominent place in the worldwide 
social science community. 

A Young and Aspiring Institution: 1890-1920 

Prior to the Exposition, Harvard University's 
Frederick Ward Putnam, who was heading the 
Exposition's Department of Ethnology, supervised 
dozens of anthropologists in a whirlwind of col- 
lecting activity between 1890 and 1893. 
Archaeological and ethnological collections arrived 
from all over the world, ranging from Egypt to 
Ecuador, from northern Canada to Chile. 

The Field Museum was incorporated by 64 
civic and business leaders who, at Putnam's prompt- 
ing, wanted to retain the Exposition's collections in 
Chicago to help build a world-class natural history 
museum. They persuaded Marshall Field I to donate 



2 IN THE FIELD 



$1 million for its endowment and recognized this 
gift by naming the Museum after him. The first 
formally named curator was William Henry 
Holmes, who was hired away from the Smithsonian 
Institution for $4,000 a year. During his brief 
tenure. Holmes engaged in only one major collect- 
ing expedition. In 1 895, he co-lead the four-month 
long A. V. Armour Expedition to Mexico to collect 
Maya, Aztec and Zapotec objects from important 
archaeological sites, including Chichen Itza, Uxmal, 
Palenque, Mitla, Monte Alban and Teotihuacan. 

Holmes was a visionary who felt a great 
urgency for his fledgling Museum to engage in 
additional collecting activity. In an 1 897 letter to 
EJ.V. Skiff, the Museum's director. Holmes pro- 
posed an "extended exploration of certain 
little-known portions of South America. . .[for] 
the acquirement of Museum materials and the 
prosecution of the research work that properly 
accompanies the collection and use of such materi- 
als." He feared that other "museums of the world" 
were "sending expeditions to the most remote cor- 
ners of every country" with the likely result that 
"the vast body of the materials and data now avail- 
able for the study of Anthropology are doomed to 
disappear before proper representations can be 
secured." The Museum, he asserted, "as a young 
and aspiring institution, . . . can not afibrd to take 
a subordinate place in this field." To avoid this fate. 
Holmes hired collector extraordinaire George 
Amos Dorsey in 1896. Holmes resigned in 1897 
to return to the Smithsonian, and Dorsey, then 29, 
became curator. 

George Amos Dorsey: 1896-1915 

While Putnam's student at Harvard, Dorsey was the 
World Columbian Exposition's superintendent of 
archaeology and supervised collecting its objects 
from South America. After the Museum hired him, 
Dorsey was immediately dispatched to the western 
United States to amass archeological and ethnologi- 
cal material. He was sensitive to Holmes's concerns 
and determined to collect as much as he could dur- 
ing several forays into the field. He was a relentless 
collector and a formidable, aggressive motivator of 
his assistants. Under his leadership the Museum 
acquired nearly 20,000 objects, particularly from 
North and South America, the Philippines and 
Malaysia. In a 1931 obituary, Fay-Cooper Cole of 
the University of Chicago described him as "the 
greatest museum-builder of the period." In 1998, 




Dr. George Dorsey 
with TehuUche man, 
Patagonia, Argentina. 



Adjunct Curator of Anthropology Robert Welsh 
described Dorsey as "the principal architect of Field 
Museum anthropology collections." Dorsey 
remained curator until 1915. After that he cam- 
paigned for Woodrow Wilson's reelection, served in 
the U.S. Navy during World War I, was a professor 
of comparative anatomy at Northwestern University 
and worked as a correspondent for the London News. 

One of Dorsey 's acquisitions, almost unnoticed 
at the time but which has had a permanent impact 
as an exhibit and tool for building international 
relations, has a fascinating history. In the 1 890s 
elements of a large, engraved wood Maori meet- 
inghouse named Ruatepupuke were sold to a 
German dealer of Maori artifacts. In 1905, Dorsey 
purchased the house elements for $5,000, but the 
Museum's building — the Exposition's Fine Arts 
Palace, currently the site of the Museum of Science 
and Industry — had no exhibit space available for 
the house, and it was relegated to storage. After the 
Museum moved to its current Grant Park site, the 
house was reassembled as an exhibit on the ground 
floor in 1925. During renovations in the 1980s 
Ruatepupuke was again disassembled and its status 
became unclear. Following detailed consultations 
between the Museum, led by Curator John Terrell, 
and Maori leadership, the Maori generously 
suggested that it should stay in Chicago as an 
authentic Maori outpost and meeting place. Today 
Ruatepupuke stands behind the "Traveling the 
Pacific" exhibition at the west end of the Museum's 
upper level and is used for lectures, receptions and 
festive gatherings. 

By the end of 1908, 14 years after the Museum 
opened, the Department of Anthropology was no 



JANUARY • FEBRUARY 2001 3 



longer a one- or two-person show, for Dorsey had 
hired curators who specialized in the anthropology 
of particular culture areas. Notable among the eight 
curators then on staff was Berthold Laufer, assistant 
curator of Asiatic ethnology. 

Berthold Laufer: 1907-1934 

Dorsey hired Laufer in 1907, but before he ever 
visited the Museum, he led a benefactor-funded, 
three-year collecting expedition to China and 
Tibet. By the time he returned to Chicago in 
1910, he had acquired more than 10,000 objects 
for the Museum's collections. When Dorsey 
resigned in 1915, Laufer became curator, a post 
that he held for the next two decades. 

Laufer is remembered today for his critically 
acclaimed scholarship in Asian archaeology and 
ethnology, as well as his extensive object acquisitions 
for the Museum. He read and spoke several lan- 
guages, including Chinese, and was a prohfic writer. 
At the time of his death, he was considered the 
leading Sinologist of his day. Just as curators and 
collections managers do today, he answered inquiries 
from experts and amateurs on the ethnology, 
archaeology, history and art of China and Tibet. 
As virtually the only Western anthropologist who 
could read and speak Chinese, Laufer became the 
recognized authority Vv'hom other anthropologists 
consulted concerning artifacts from China. 





Dr. Berthold Laufer hoUiii^^ a rhinoceros horn cup. 

From 1919 to 1921, all personnel were occupied 
with moving the Museum from its original Hyde 
Park site to its present home at Roosevelt Road and 
Lake Shore Drive. The new building opened on May 
21, 1921, the first of three cultural institutions to be 
erected on what is now the Museum Campus (ITF 
May /June 1998). (Shedd Aquarium and the Adler 
Planetarium were added in 1929 and 1930, respec- 
tively. The Museum of Science and Industry opened 
at The Field Museum's former site in 1933.) 

After a hiatus during World War I, fieldwork 
resumed in 1922 when Museum scientists went on 
a joint expedition with colleagues from Oxford 
University to excavate the 5,000-year-old city of 
Kish, near Babylon in present-day Iraq. The 10-year 
project yielded more than 30,000 objects, ranging 
from bronze vessels to cuneiform-inscribed clay 
tablets, stone tools and jewelry. Half of the collec- 
tion remains at Oxford University; the other half 
still forms an important and heavily researched 
component of the Museum's collections. 

Laufer died in 1934. His tenure here is marked 
by a philosophical shift in the Museum's mission. 
Whereas Dorsey sought to collect as much as 
possible and have the Museum serve largely as an 
object repository, Laufer was more interested in the 
research potential and analytical significance ot the 
Museum's collections. 

Paul Sidney Martin: 1929-1972 

In August 1929, just before the stock market crash, 
Laufer hired a recently minted University of 
Chicago Ph.D. named Paul Sidney Martin. During 
his 43-year tenure as curator, Martin became a 
giant in the development of North American 
anthropology and archaeology. He conducted field- 
work during 37 summers, excavating more than 
70 archaeological sites in Colorado, New Mexico 
and Arizona. No archaeologist before or since has 
been able to match Martin's impressive research and 



Dt Paul Martin iurvcying Hi^ins Flat Pueblo, New Mexico. 



4 IN THE FIELD 



publication record. In the process, Martin and his 
senior colleagues at the Museum trained an entire 
generation of archaeologists, thereby setting the agenda 
and charting the fiature of North American archaeo- 
logical method and theory for decades to come. 
Martin's 600,000-piece artifact collection 
includes more than 300 whole or reconstructed 
ceramic vessels, 40,000 corn cobs, 265,000 pot- 
sherds, 7,000 chipped stone tools, 170,000 pieces of 
chipped stone detritus, 1,500 projectile points, 1,000 
bone awls, 400 grinding stones or manos, 57,000 
animal bones, 16,000 botanical remains and 600 
pieces of groundstone.Yet the vast majority of these 
objects has never been systematically analyzed in 
any meaningful way. Martin tended to catalog only 
those artifacts that he published; collections from 
37 of the 70 sites he did not publish reports on 
were never processed. In 1997, Curator Jonathan 
Haas received a National Science Foundation grant 
and hired Stephen Nash to catalog and computer- 
ize the 600,000-object Martin Collection (ITF 
Jan. /Feb. 1999). The results, complete with site 
reports and an artifact image gallery, are now 
available on the Museum's website at www.field- 
museum.org, making the Martin Collection one 
of the most accessible archaeological collections 
of North American objects. 

Donald Collier: 1941-1970 

Donald Collier, a specialist in South American 
ethnology and archaeology whom Martin hired in 
1941, succeeded Martin as chief curator after he 
stepped down in 1964. Collier is remembered for 
developing ethical standards that many museums 
now apply to sensitive issues such as the acquisition 
of illegally or illicitly acquired antiquities and rep- 
resenting ethnic minorities in museums. In the 
early 1950s, Collier became one of the first 
museum curators to make materials available for 
radiocarbon dating analysis, a significant step in the 
evolution of museum philosophy. At that time, 
radiocarbon dating required destroying extremely 
large amounts — sometimes pounds — of material 
in the form of wood, bone or charcoal to obtain 
a date. Today, radiocarbon dating is much less 
destructive, using particle accelerators from which 
dates can be obtained on milligram-sized samples. 

Collier served as chief curator until 1 970. His 
resignation marked the end of a remarkable 76-year 
period in which only five people had held this posi- 
tion — Holmes, Dorsey, Laufer, Martin and Collier. 
Each man greatly influenced — or, one could say, 
determined — the allocation of the department's 
resources and its research agenda. For the past three 
decades departmental operations have proceeded 
more democratically as leadership rotated between 



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curators on a regular basis. And in 1999, the 
department took a significant step when it hired 
Gary Feinman from the University of Wisconsin 
as its new chairman. 

The Future 

The Department of Anthropology is entering the 
new millennium with a renewed sense of vigor and 
purpose, though in many ways the magnitude of its 
chosen task might seem unfathomable to the likes 
of Holmes, Dorsey or Laufer. The department's 
roster now lists nine curators, two curators emeriti, 
34 professional staff, 15 adjunct curators, 45 Ph.D. 
research associates, nine associates and more than 
50 volunteers. Curators are conducting cutting- 
edge anthropological field research in China, Peru, 
Brazil, Puerto Rico, New Guinea, Africa, Mexico 
and North America, much of it focused on the 
development of politically and economically 
complex societies around the world. 

Anthropology stafl^ are also deeply involved in 
developing exciting new exhibits, including the 
recent "Sounds from the Vaults" exhibition (ITF 
May /June 1999), the upcoming "Pearls" and 
"Chocolate" traveling exhibitions, and the new, 
permanent Halls of the Americas. The collections 
management, conservation and registration staffs are 
processing collections that have been backlogged 
for years, and in some cases, decades. They are busy 
administering and developing collections-processing 
grants so that the Museum's stunning anthropolog- 
ical collection of 1.5 million objects is preserved in 
perpetuity. As the department continues to promote 
the understanding of cultural variations and change 
through time and across space, it will build upon 
the accomplishments of its founders to reaffirm 
its leadership in museum anthropology in North 
America and, indeed, the world. ITF 



lANUARY • FEBRUARY 21)01 



Field Museum Scientist Helps Discover Three 
Unknown Lemur Species in Madagascar 



Carolyn Malkin, Freelance Writer 

Lemurs are primitive primates that live in trees and 
are found only on the island of Madagascar and the 
nearby Comoro Islands off the east coast of Africa. 
They have long noses, agile limbs and piercing round 
eyes and can be as big as a medium-sized dog or as 
small as a chipmunk. There are about 40 species of 
living lemurs, and more than half of them are endan- 
gered since Madagascar's poor, rapidly growing 
population is destroying their forest habitats. 

Until a few years ago, scientists believed that 
only two species of mouse lemurs (the smallest of 
their kind) lived on the entire island: Microcebus 
murinus, found in the dry forests along the western 
coast, and Aiicroccbiis riifiis, seen in the more humid 
eastern forests. But a group of researchers, including 
Steven Goodman of The Field Museum, Jorg 
Ganzhorn of the University of Hamburg and 
Rodin Rasoloarison of the University of 
Antananarivo in Madagascar and the Deutsches 
Primatenzentrum in Germany, recently completed 
the most detailed survey ever, reported in the 
December 2000 Intcrnalioiial Journal of Primatology, 
of mouse lemur populations in Madagascar's 
western forests. Comparing the physical characteris- 
tics of mouse lemurs from 12 geographic locations, 
the scientists found that seven different species — 
including three new to science — are living where 
only a few were thought to exist. 

"It's incredibly rare to describe a new species 





Microcebus nijiis, brown nioiisc Iciiuir, AndriVU1nu^y, Madagascar. 



Lemur catta, ring^-tailcd lemur, Beza-Mahajaly Special 
Rescnv, southwestern .Madagascar 

of primate, let alone three," says Goodman, who has 
documented Madagascar's amazing biodiversity for 
more than 10 years and helps Malagasy students do 
field research as part of the World Wide Fund for 
Nature's Ecology Training Program, based in the 
island's capital city of Antananarivo. 

Mouse lemurs are the most common primates 
on Madagascar, with as many as 400 individuals 
living in one square kilometer. But their nocturnal 
lifestyle makes them hard to observe. "At many sites 
when you walk through the forest with a headlamp 
on, you see their eyes bouncing aO around you," 
says Goodman. 

Rasoloarison did much of the fieldwork that 
led to the recent discoveries, surveying mouse 
lemurs at a dozen sites — from thick dry forests to 
thorny scrubland. Ganzhorn, the third co-author, 
has been studying lemurs for many years and 
coordinated field research at the Deutsches 
Primatenzentrum's field station in the Kirindy 
Forest, one of Rasoloarison's study sites. 

After analyzing physical characteristics of the 
mouse lemurs such as their teeth, skulls, length 
and body size, the researchers found clear-cut 
differences between the seven different species. 
"It was already clear from museum specimens that 
there was a tremendous amount of variation among 
mouse lemurs," says Goodman. "But previous 
assessments were based on too few specimens from 
widely scattered localities, many very discolored 
and as much as 150 years old. The data were not 
adequate to assess variation within a population." 

The three new species are Microcebus berthae, 
Microcebus sambiranensis and Microcebus tavaratra. The 
names of two other species, Microcebus myoxinus and 
(continued on page 15} 



6 IN THE FIELD 



YOURGUIDETOTHEFIELD 



A Calendar of Events for January and February 



Inside 



Exhibits 
Festivals 
Family Programs 
Adult Programs 
Free Programs 



Don't let the cold winds of winter keep you at home. At The Field Museum, 
you'll find a variety of enjoyable and intellectually stimulating programs 
for all ages. Unless otherwise specified, call 312.665.7400 for information, 
tickets or to register for programs. Information is also posted on our 
website at www.fieldmuseum.org. 



From One Continent to Another 



Using objects of material culture to explore the peoples who 
made them is central to many Field Museum special exhibi- 
tions. Adding interpretive context can reveal complementary — 
or competing — priorities among both the Field's internal team 
members and the outside lenders to an exhibition. New con- 
text also challenges the design itself to reinforce the themes 
that unfold. 

Curators from the Kremlin museums first conceived "Kremlin 
Gold: 1000 Years of Russian Gems and Jewels" as a lavish testa- 
ment to the skill of Russia's decorative artists over time. To them, 
an object's technical, geographic or chronological details — such 
as what raw materials were used, where it was made or how 
styles evolved — were of primary importance. Less significant 
were the tales of the tsars and tsarinas or bishops and patriarchs 
who used these breathtaking wares to glorify faith and power. 
This may partly reflect an unconscious assumption that 
Europeans are familiar with their own history and do not neces- 
sarily need background information to illuminate the objects 
housed within their palaces and museums. It may also be a 
holdover from earlier, more conservative centuries, when many 
museums grew from state collections that were simply opened 
up to public view. 

American museum-goers, however, often expect interpretation 
that adds greater meaning beyond an object's design or style. 
This challenges exhibit developers to tell the story behind the 
objects and, as a result, build a deeper connection to the people 
and times from which they came. 

"When we reviewed the list of objects included in 'Kremlin 
Gold,'" says Project Administrator David Foster, "we realized that 
many are linked with famous people or events from Russian his- 
tory and that fleshing out their meaning would resonate with 
many visitors." 

In one grouping, for example, visitors see a bishop's stole, miter, 
pendant and cross, each embellished with rare jewels and intri- 
cate engravings. It's easy to imagine a Russian Orthodox bishop 
bearing this entire ensemble and passing through the faithful 
in an ancient Moscow cathedral. 




Gold bratina with lid, Moscow Kremlin Workshops, J 694. 

Ultimately our Kremlin colleagues came to understand our goal 
of enlightening visitors to Russian history through its art. They 
also supported a unique design concept. "When the exhibit team 
was discussing a design approach," says Foster, "the idea arose 
that the touch of the hand should be evident throughout." Since 
the objects are so exquisite and the fine craftsmanship so strong, 
the team decided that nothing in the presentation should strike 
a jarring note. Thus, from the hand-painted backdrops (such as 
the one on the cover), to the silk-screened text panels and 
oil-painted portraits, to the ornamental railings, to the lighting 
and music, every detail of the production was hand-produced 
to support and enhance the artifacts. 

Visitors to the exhibition have sensed this subtle chemistry. Some 
have said that the lights, colors, music and weathered surface of 
the icon wall worked on their imaginations, briefly propelling 
them into the Russian world and intensifying their appreciation 
for the beautiful artworks on display in "Kremlin Gold." 

Collection loaned by The State Museums of the Moscow Kremlin. 
"Kremlin Gold" was organized for its U.S. tour by The Field Museum 
in partnership with The Houston Museum of Natural Science. 



JANUARY/FEBRUARY 20(11 7 



Kremlin Gold Lecture Series 



Upcoming- 



The artifacts in "Kremlin Gold" are not 
' only rare and beautiful, but are also deeply 
connected to Russia's cultural history. 

Join us for a series of lectures that will look at 
Russia's wealth of mineral resources, its artistic 
and literary culture and great figures from 
its rich history. 



Natural and Cultural Treasures: 
Gems In Russian Orthodox ( ] 

Religious Icons J^^l,!^' 

Reverend John J. Matusiak, St. 
Joseph Church, Wheaton, III. and f ^ , 

Joel Bartsch, Curator, Houston , ._- 

Museum of Natural Science ,  

Learn the history behind the gilded treas- I 

ures that are used in Russian Orthodox 
traditions. Explore how Russia's wealth of ] 
mineral resources provides exquisite gems, 
precious metals and spiritual inspiration. 

Thursday. Jan. 11, 6:30 p.m. 

$12; students/educators $10; members $8 



From Kremlin Gold to the 
Russian Silver Screen 

Yuri Tsivian, Soviet Cinema Specialist, University of Chicago 

Immerse yourself in Russian film, food, facts and fine arts. Join 
us for a daylong screening of several Russian film classics. We'll 
also visit the "Kremlin Gold" exhibition. 

Sunday, Feb. 11,11 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Without lunch— $18; students/educators $15; members $12 
With lunch— $38; students/educators $35; members $32 
Cash-bar vodka reception following event 

s In March: 

Great Figures in Russian History 

Dr James Cracraft, Professor of History and University Scholar, 
University of Illinois at Chicago 

Saturday, March 3, 2 p.m. 

$12; students/educators $10; members $8 

The Face of Russia: Anguish, Aspiration 
and Achievement in Russian Culture 

Dr James H. Blllington, Scholar of Russian Culture and the 
Librarian of Congress 

This lecture is jointly presented with the Chicago Council 
on Foreign Relations. 

Saturday, March 24, 2 p.m. 

$18; students/educators $15; members $12 

PHOTOS COURTESY OF STATE MUSEUM, MOSCOW KREMLIN, ©2000. 



Wrapped in Pride: 
Ghanaian Kente and 
African American Identity 



Oprah Winfrey wears it. Maya Angelou and Jesse Jackson 
wear it. It can be seen at baptisms, graduations and weddings. 
It may suggest royalty, sacredness or status and has become 
the most recognizable of at! symbols of African identity. 

"Wrapped in Pride: Ghanaian Kente and African American 

Identity" will explore the cultural significance of kente, a 
vibrant, boldly patterned cloth made by the Asante and Ewe 
peoples of Ghana. Once known only to West Africans, today 
kente is produced in greater quantity, incorporated into 
more forms and exported to more places than any other 
African fabric. 

The exhibition, open April 13 through July 15, 2001, showcases 
approximately 500 objects, including traditional and modern 
kente cloth, looms, photographs, simulated marketplaces and 
dressed mannequins in popular and ceremonial settings. The 
first part of the exhibition traces kente's African roots and the 
artistry and techniques used to produce it. The second part 
explores its flourishing presence in the United States since its 
first introduction by the Black Nationalist and pan-African 
movements of the 1950s and '60s. Hundreds of variations — 
from hats, bags and umbrellas to drums, toys and furniture 
patterns — underscore its impact among African Americans. 

"The African American embrace of kente cloth represents the 
psychological return to and pride in African heritage," says 
Chapurukha Kusimba, associate curator of African anthropol- 
ogy. '"Wrapped in Pride' sets the stage for the inevitable 
reunion of African people wherever they are. It helps provide 
answers to a never-ending quest for recognition and, for 
some, a remedy for the restless soul." 

"Wrapped in Pride: Ghanaian Kente and African American 
Identity" was organized by The UCLA Fowler Museum of 
Cultural History and The Newark Museum, Newark, New 
Jersey. The exhibition and its national tour are made possible 
by Ford Motor Company. The exhibition has received funding 
from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the 
National Endowment for the Arts. 



t 



... , ......U'L ">».,H«" J'.l 

"I. ..'" "\.^«"' "^.^.• 
n'"n a* ii'"ii 



Man's kente cloth, 
Ewe people, Ghana fleft). 
Asante kente cloth, 
Ghana (below). 




8 YDUK t;uii)tTcv 



Fli;i 1) .MUSEUM 



African Heritage Festival: A Common Thread 

Celebrate African American History Month with us! 

FREE with Museum admission. This annual festival celebrates contemporary African cultures and their connections to the United 
States. Join us for a fun-filled time of family performances, storytelling, scientific demonstrations and hands-on activities. 

Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 3-4, 7 7 a.m. -4 p.m. 
Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 5-6, 10 a.m.-l p.m. 
This year's festival will focus on the art and use of traditional African textiles. Festival highlights include: 



LECTURES 
Madagascar Textiles 

Saturday, Feb. 3, 1:30 p.m. 

Field Museum Anthropologists 
Chapurukha Kusimba, Ben Bronson and 
Judy Odiand will explore how textiles 
relate to Africa's environment, economy 
and culture. 

Of Manes and Man-eating 

Sunday, Feb. 4, 1:30 p.m. 

Why did the infamous man-eating lions 
of Tsavo kill more than 100 people? And 
why don't these two male lions have 
manes? Find out about the research of 
Field Museum Zoologist Dr. Bruce 
Patterson. 




Chocolate Chips Theatre Company 

PERFORMING ARTS 
Spinning Tales 

Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 3 and 4, 
noon and 2 p.m. 

Explore the rich cultural history of 
Africa's textiles at this interactive family 
performance, specially commissioned 
from the renowned Chocolate Chips 
Theatre Company. 




Storytelling at the 2000 festival. 

African Storytelling 
with Thetu 

Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 3 and 4, 
11 a.m. and 3 p.m. 
Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 5 and 6, 
10:30 a.m. and noon 

Experience the engaging tradition of 
African storytelling. Thetu draws upon 
her Kenyan heritage to present stories of 
humor, courage, wisdom and African 
truths. 



SCIENTISTS ON THE FLOOR 
Birds of Africa 

Visit with Field Museum scientists and see 
some of Africa's most interesting birds. 

Dye-namic Plants! 

Learn how to use every-day foods to dye 
fibers, and take home the beginning of 
your own artifact. 




HANDS-ON FAMILY FUN 

Asante Symbols: Adinkra 
Stamps 

Adinkra stamps convey a message. Learn 
about the cloth, the symbols and African 
traditions. Discover the meaning behind 
the designs, many of which symbolize 
proverbs, ideas and African objects. 

Africa Mega Map Challenge 

Take the challenge and construct the 
continent of Africa using our mega 
puzzle map. See where The Field Museum 
is conducting research! 

World of Weaving 
Interpretive Station 

See and touch woven fabrics from differ- 
ent parts of the world. Learn how these 
textiles are created through an elaborate 
process. Discover the significance and 
importance of kente cloth. 

The Great Interchange 
Interpretive Station 

Learn about the origins of specific plants 
through a map activity and guessing 
game. Discover how people in Africa 
have exchanged foods and dramatically 
influenced global cuisine. 

Also look for other learning stations that 
explore how Africa's fabrics and textiles 
reflect its diverse cultures. 

African Heritage Festival: A Common 
Thread is made possible through the 
generosity of Abbott Laboratories. 



YOUR GUIDE TO THE FIELD MUSEUM 9 



Performing Arts 



A Family Dinosaur Concert: Chicago Chamber Musicians 

Live narration, a vivid multi-media presentation and Chicago's finest musicians combine 
to tell the story of Sue the T. rex. Join us for a rousing performance of Tyrannosaurus 
Sue: A Cretaceous Concerto, with music and story by Bruce 
Adolphe. You'll also hear The Story of Ba bar, with text by 
Jean de Brunhoff and music by Francis Poulenc. 

Adults and children ages 3 and up 

Sunday, Jan. 21, 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. 

All tickets are $10. 

Call 312.CALLCCM (312.225.5226) to reserve tickets. 




to 



QQ 



New Discoveries Lecture 



Ghana's Kingdoms of Gold 

Dr Christopher DeCorse, Associate Professor of Anthropology, 
Syracuse University 

Discover how the Fante people, who have lived on the coast of Ghana for cen- 
turies, influenced the cultural development of sub-Saharan Africa. These 
skillful traders built a lucrative commerce — first in gold and later in slaves— 
that brought diverse cultures into contact with each other. Dr. DeCorse has 20 
years of field experience in Africa and was a Fullbright scholar and lecturer at 
the University of Ghana. 

Saturday, Feb. 17, 2 p.m. 

$12; students/educators $10; members $8 







Courses 



Ancient Egyptian Magic III: 
The Realm of the Night 

Thomas Mudloff, Consulting 
Egyptologist/Website Moderator, 
Discovery Channel 

Join us for an in-depth look at three 
philosophical and magical texts that 
reveal what ancient Egyptians thought 
about life, death and life after death. 
The Egyptian Book of Am-Duat 
(Netherworld), the Book of Caverns and 
the Book of Gates are the first sacred 
Egyptian texts to chart the world 
beyond. Ponder the ancient Egyptian 
beliefs that darkness is the birthplace of 
light and that eternal life's home is in 
thereaira of death. 

Saturdays, Jan. 20-Feb. 3 
(3 sessions), 10 a.m.~1 p.m. 
$80; members $68 



Below is a calendar of the temporary exhibitions you will have an opportunity to visit in 2001. 
Some dates may change. Remember to call or visit our website for specific information. 



Star Wars: The Magic of Myth 
Through January 7 



The Endurance: Shackleton's Legendary 
Antarctic Expedition 
Through January 15 



Kremlin Gold: 1000 Years of 
Russian Gems and Jewels 
Through March 30 



Special Workshops 



All About Movement 

Liz Cruger, Green Light Performing Company 

Discover tlie world around you through motion. Learn how 
reptiles, birds and dinosaurs would move in, around and 
through various habitats. You may experience life as a young 
T. rex or become a bird flying south for the winter. Wear 
comfortable clothing. This is yoga for families with a twist! 

For adults arid children ages 3-5 
Saturday, Jan. 20 or Saturday, Feb. 17 
(Each workshop is one session.) 
9:30-10:30 a.m. 
$10; members $8 




Fossil Basics 

David Dolak, Instructor, Science Institute, 
Columbia College 

Learn to identify different types of fossils 
in this introductory look at the field of 
paleontology. Explore fossils from trilo- 
bites to grapolites, mollusks and corals. 
You'll also get to prepare a real fossil fish 
for research or display. This course offers 
valuable experience for those interested 
in our fossil collecting trips. 

Wednesdays Jan. 31 and Feb. 7 
(2 sessions), 6-8 p.m. 
$42; members $36 

Love Potions: 
Essencia d'Amour 

Kristin Wrede, Aromatic Consultant 

Just as Cleopatra used oils from various 
herbs to fuel her love affairs, you too can 
take advantage of the ancient art of 
blending. Use jasmine, rose, sandalwood. 



ylang ylang and other mystical oils to 
create your own intriguing love potion- 
just in time for Valentine's Day. 

Saturday, Feb. 10 
11 a.m.-2 p.m. 
$30; members $25 



Shrines to Go 

Cyd Engel, Special Projects Manager, 
Milwaukee Art Museum 

Discover how cultures across the globe 
communicate through personal shrines 
and devotional imagery. We'll explore the 
Field's galleries for inspiration and then 
return to the studio to create our own 
mixed media shrines, which may be 
whimsical or serious. No drawing or art 
experience required. Come prepared to 
explore, experiment and discover! 

Saturdays, Feb. 17, 24 and March 3 
(3 sessions), 9 a.m.-noon 
$80; members $68 



Egyptian History: 

Third Intermediate Period 

Frank Yurco, Egyptologist 

Find out what life was like in Egypt from 
1070-525 B.C., when the high priests at 
Thebes had as much political power as 
the royal house at Tanis. Yet this was also 
a period of relative stability and affluence 
that left behind some of the richest finds 
in the history of Egyptian archaeology. 
Learn about exciting findings and fasci- 
nating stories that reveal why this division 
of power did not also divide the country. 

Wednesdays, Feb. 28 -April 4 
(6 sessions), 6:30-8:30 p.m. 
$85; members $72 




T^ 



Kachinas: Gifts from the Spirit 

Messengers 

Through July 22 



HK: 



Between Cultures: Children 
of Immigrants in America 
January 5 through May 6 



Kinetosaurs: Putting Some Teeth 
into Art and Science 
March 23 through July S 



Special Workshops (continued) 



The Two Of Us 

Connie Sulkin, Siragusa Foundation Early Childhood Initiative 

Join us for an eight-week exploration of The Field Museum. 
This winter, we'll have fun learning about owls, animal tracks, 
bears and much more. Each week we will travel the Museum's 
exhibition halls and enjoy stories, songs, hands-on activities, 
an art project and a snack. 

For adults and children ages 3-5 

Tuesdays, Jan. 23-March 13 

TO- 1 1:30 a.m. or 1:30-3 p.m. (Choose one time.) 

S95 per child; $80 per member child 

For each child, one adult attends at no charge. 





Naturalist Certificate Program 



Deepen your knowledge about the natural environment and share this passion with others. The Field Museum, 
The Morton Arboretum and the Chicago Botanic Garden are offering an integrated program of nature study for 
both beginners and more advanced naturalists. Participants can register for courses based on general interest; 
no prior course work is required. For a certificate, 15 to 17 courses must be completed. 
Please note: You must provide your own transportation to off-site class locatiom. 



Plant Families of the Midwest 

Patrick Leacock, Department of Botany, 
The Field Museum 

Use flower structures and other traits to 
identify common plant families on sight. 
With more than 2,500 species of flora 
throughout the region, this skill is useful 
for naturalists, gardeners, botanical artists 
and others. Naturalist Certificate 
Enrichment. 

Wednesdays, Jan. 10-Feb. 14, 
(6 sessions), 6-8:30 p.m 
$145; members $115 



Forest Preserve 
District of 
DuPage County 



Deciduous Trees in Winter 

Rich Hyerczyk, Field Museum Instructor 

Learn how to identify trees by looking at 
their buds, fruit, leaf scars, bark and 
branching pattern. The text Winter Tree 
Finder by May Thielgaard Watts and Tom 
Watts may be purchased at the first class. 
Naturalist Certificate Enrichment. 

Tuesday, Jan. 23, 6-9 p.m. and 
Saturdays, Jan. 27-Feb. 17 
(5 sessions), 9 a.m.- noon. 
$145; members $1 IS 




Field Ecology: Winter 

Liane Cochran-Stafira, Department 
of Biology, St. Xavier University 

How does an animal's shape help it stay 
warm? How does wind affect the shape 
of a tree? Examine how the physical envi- 
ronment influences the lives of plants and 
animals. The text Ecology and Field 
Biology by R.L. Smith may be purchased 
at the first class. Naturalist Certificate 
Requirement, both tracks. 

Thursdays, Jan. 25 and Feb. 1 from 7-9 
p.m. and Sundays, Jan. 28 and Feb. 4 from 
9 a.m.-l p.m. (4 sessions) 
$125; members $105 




Wrapped in Pride: Ghanaian Kente 
and African American Idiefitity 
Ap' i 13 through July 




In Her Hands: Craftswomen 
Changing the World 
j May 18 through October 28 



^l^ 



Living Colors: A Butterfly Garden 
May 25 through September 3 



^^ 



Special Workshops (continued) 



StorfTTme 



e: Facts, Fables and Fiction 

Hear a story, sing songs and make an art project to take 
j home — all in 20 minutes. This program for young children and 
their families is sponsored by the Siragusa Foundation Early 
Childhood Initiative. One adult for every three children, please. 
Meet in the "Living Together" exhibition on the main level. 

ij£l^ p.m. ei^ery Saturday and Sunday 
^iffZAdditional programs: 7 p.m. Jan. 2-5 
yrjrfree with Museum admission 





Swedish Folk Tales 

Swedish American Museum, 
5211 N. Clark Street 



Listen to tales from Sweden's rich folkloric tradition, 
brought to life on the stage. This program is part of the 
Cultural Connections series that takes you to area museums 
to examine cultural artifacts, observe cultural traditions, 
sample ethnic food and participate in lively discussions. 

Sunday, Feb. 18, 3-5 p.m. 

$17; members $15 

To register, call 312.665.7474. 



Naturalist Certificate Program (continued) 



Northern 
Winter 



linois Fauna: 



Chet Ryndak, Superintendent of 
Conservation (retired). Forest Preserve 
District of Cook County 

Study area mammals and birds to dis- 
cover how they've adapted to survive in 
their environment. The recommended 
text is Life in the Cold: An Introduction 
to Winter Ecology by Peter J. Marchand. 
Naturalist Certificate Requirement, both 
tracks. 

1/l/ednesdays, Feb. 21 and 28, 6:30-8 
p.m. and Saturdays, Feb. 24-Mar 10, 
9 a.m.-noon (5 sessions) 

$125; members $105 

I 



Coursework completed at any campus 
will earn credit toward The Morton 
Arboretum Naturalist Certificate. 

NCP Courses at 

The Morton Arboretum 

Call 630.719.2468 for more information. 

Field Ecology: Winter • Northern Illinois 
Fauna: Winter • Conservation Biology • 
Nature Writing: Interesting 
Explanations • Plant Families of the 
Midwest • Conifers in Winter • 
Deciduous Trees in Winter • 
Introduction to Botany • Stewardship 
Forum • Natural History Photography • 
Astronomy 



NCP Courses at the Chicago 
Botanic Garden 

Call 847.835.8261 for more information. 

Introduction to Botany • Northern 
Illinois Fauna: Winter (TENTATIVE) • 
Nature Writing: Interesting 
Explanations • Tree Identification 
and Ecology • Plant Families of the 
Midwest 





Forest Preserve District of 
DuPage County 



JIM SCHULTZ/CHICAGO ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY 



mmmmm 



Julie Taymor: 
Playing with Fire 
June 14 through 
November 4 



SIgmund Freud: 
Conflict and Culture 
October 3, 2001 through 
January 6, 2002 



Cleopatra of Egypt: 
From History to Myth 
October 20, 2001 through 
March 3, 2002 



Cheyenne 
Opens August 10 



Exhibition Tours — Free with Museum Admission 



The Endurance: Shackleton's 
Legendary Expedition 

Relive Shackleton's dramatic 1914 
expedition with a guided tour. 

Saturdays, Jan. 6 and 13, 1 1:30 a.m. and 
1 p.m. Also Jan. 4, 9 and 1 1, 2:30 p.m. 
and 3:45 p.m. 



Inside Ancient Egypt 

Unlock the secrets of ancient Egyptian 
mummies. Learn about life and afterlife 
in this great African civilization. 

Every weekday! 

January through March, 1 p.m. 




Northwest Coast 
Indians and Eskimos 

Discover a spectacular array of artifacts 
depicting two very different North 
American neighboring environments 
and cultures. 

Every weekday! 

January through March 

Mondays at 1:30 p.m., Tuesdays at 1 1:30 

a.m., Wednesdays through Fridays at 

11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. 



"Ice Stalactites," Frank Hurly, 1916. 



DAILY HIGHLIGHTS TOURS Visit the exhibits that make this 
Museum one of the world's finest and hear the stories behind some 
of these fascinating objects from nature and human culture. 



Daily: 

Monday-Friday, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. 
Saturday-Sunday, 1 1 a.m. and 1 p.m. 



Hands-on Activities and More 



Interpretive Station 
Activities 

Every weekend you'll find a selection 
of hands-on activities throughout the 
Museum. For example, you may see 
a soil scientist at work, find out what 
your name would look like in Egyptian 
hieroglyphs or dissect an owl pellet to 
see what the bird ate. Check the infor- 
mational directories when you arrive 
at the Museum for a list of each day's 
activities. 

Every Saturday and Sunday! 

Pawnee Earth Lodge 

Experience life as the Pawnee Indians 
lived out on the Great Plains. Field 
Museum staff and docents bring history 
to life in this full-size replica of a tradi- 
tional Pawnee lodge. Join us around 



the campfire to examine tools and 
toys made of buffalo and hear stories 
of what it was like to go on a buffalo 
hunt. 

Every Saturday and Sunday! 

10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 
Weekdays at 1 p.m. 




Scientists on the Floor 

Visit with Field Museum scientists to 
learn about their exciting research. 
You'll get to see rarely displayed speci- 
mens from the Museum's collections. 

Every second Saturday of the month 
Jan. 13 and Feb. 10, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 

Artists on the Floor 

Visit with and observe artists as they 
create finely detailed scientific Illustra- 
tions. Find out the important role these 
drawings play in the scientific process. 

Every third Saturday of the month 
Jan. 20 and Feb. 17, noon-3 p.m. 



14 YOUR GUIDE TO THE FIELD MUSEU.M 



Unknown Lemur Species in Madagascar 



(continued from page 6) 



Microcebus griseorufus, were resurrected from past 
research on mouse lemurs. A sixth, Aiicrocebns 
rafclobensis, was recently described by a research 
group from the University of Hannover in 
Germany, and the seventh is M. mminus, originally 
thought to be the only one living in Madagascar's 
western forests. 

Northwestern University evolutionary biologist 
Anne Yoder conducted an independent genetic 
analysis that confirmed the team's results. 

Research on lemurs is important from an 
evolutionary standpoint because they are the most 
primitive of living primates. "Understanding aspects 
of lemur biology and evolution gives us a window 
into the history of more advanced primates, like 
ourselves," says Rasoloarison. 

While mouse lemurs are seen everywhere on the 
island, it turns out that some species are restricted to 
very small areas. For example, M. griseomfus lives only 
in the dry, spiny bush at the island's extreme south- 
western end, and the reddish-colored M. berthac 
(named for Madame Berthe Rakotosamimanana 
of the University of Antananarivo, who has made 
significant contributions to the study of lemurs) 
is only known in Madagascar's Kirindy Forest. 

"Before recent research, we thought that M. 
murimis was the only mouse lemur in all of western 
Madagascar," says Rasoloarison. "It was assumed 
that, if one forest was destroyed, the species would 
still be OK as it could be found elsewhere. Now 
that we know so many species are involved, it gives 
new importance to protecting our isolated forests." 

Madagascar: so many species, so little time 

Madagascar's forests are home to an amazing 
variety of unique plant and animal life, including 
probably more than 12,000 species of flowering 
plants, half the world's chameleon varieties, 300 
species of butterflies and nearly 100 species of 
mammals. Nearly 100 percent of the island's 
mammals are endemic, which means they exist 
only there and nowhere else on earth. 

Despite Madagascar's biological riches, it is one 
of the world's poorest nations, with a per capita 
income of approximately $240 per year. About 80 
percent of the population are subsistence farmers, 
many of whom practice traditional "slash and 
burn" agriculture. As a result, only 10 percent of 
the island's forests remain, and recent estimates 
suggest that one to two percent of those are being 
destroyed each year. 



"Anything living in the forest in Madagascar is 
threatened due to the rapid loss of habitat," says 
Goodman. In fact, a lemur known as the golden- 
crowned or TattersaU's sifaka, first discovered just 
12 years ago, may soon be extinct because its tiny 
population is restricted to a part of the country 
where the forest is rapidly disappearing. 

Goodman and other scientists are racing to docu- 
ment the plants and animals in Madagascar's most 
threatened areas — not only for scientific purposes 
but to help set conservation priorities. Their work 
could soon become the only record of many of these 
species. "At this point, it's not a race to save things; it's 
a race to know what's there," says Goodman. 

In addition to his own scientific research, 
Goodman has directed the Ecology Training 
Programme (ETP) of World Wide Fund- 
Madagascar in association with the country's 
University of Antananarivo since 1992. He advises 
10 graduate students each year, helping them con- 
ceptuafize research projects, find funding, plan their 
fieldwork and publish the results. 

"I believe the country's greatest hope lies with 
its young people," says Goodman. "That's why I 
do what I do." ITF 




"Madagascar Mouse 
Lemurs," by Peggy 
Macmamara, Field 
Museum artist in 
residence. 



JANUARY • FEBRUARY 21101 15 



Membership News 



ASTC Passport Program Participants — 
November 1, 2000 to April 30, 2001 

Local restricrions may apply. Participating museums within 90 miles of each other are not required to offer free admission to each other's members. Museums 
with local reciprocity agreements are marked with an asterisk (*). Acquaint yourself with the admittance policies of participating sites. The Passport Program 
entides visitors to free general admission. It does not include special exhibitions, presentations, merchandise discounts or other discounts associated with 
museum membership unless stated otherwise. For non-US participants, or to see a complete list, call ASTC at 202.783.7200 ext. 112 or visit www.astc.org. 



ALABAMA 

Anntston Mus. of Nat. Hist. 

Ctr. for Cultural Arts 

Gulf Coast Exploreum Mus. of Sci. 

McWane Ctr. (Discovery 2000) 

Sci-Quest North Alabama Sci. Ctr. 

Southern Mus. of Flight 

U.S. Space & Rocket Ctr. 

ALASKA 

The Imaginarlum 

ARIZONA 

Ariz. Sci. Ctr. 

Flandrau Sci. Ctr. & Planetarium 

Lowell Observatory 

ARKANSAS 

Mid-America Sci. Mus. 
Mus. of Discovery 

CALIFORNIA 

Bay Model Visitor Ctr. 

Birch Aquarium at Scripps 

Calif- Acad, of Sci. 

Calif. Sci Ctr, 

Chabot Space & Sci. Ctr. 

Children's Mus. at La Habra 

Coyote Point Mus. for Env Educ. 

Discovery Sci. Ctr. 

Exploratorium 

Explorit Sci, Ctr, 

Fresno Metro Mus, of Art, Hist, & Sci, 

Humboldt State Univ. Nat, Hist, Mus, 

Lawrence Hall of Sci, 

Undsay Wildlife Mus, 

Reuben H, Fleet Sci, Ctr 

Sacramento Mus, of Hist,, Sci, & Tech, 

San Bernardino County Mus, 

Santa Barbara Mus, of Nat, Hist. 

Tech Mus. of Innovation 

Turtle Bay Mus, and Arboretum 

Carter House Nat, Sci. Mus. 

Redding Mus. of Art & Hist, 

Paul Bunyan's Forest Camp 

Redding Arboretum by the River 

COLORADO 

Discovery Ctr, Sci, Mus. 

CONNECTICUT 

Maritime Aquarium 

Sci. Ctr of Conn, 

Roaring Brook Nature Ctr. 

Sci, Ctr, of Eastern Conn, 

Yale Peabody Mus, of Nat, Hist. 

DELAWARE 

Del Agncultural Mus, & Village 
Del, Mus, of Nat, Hist 
Hagley Mus and Library 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Capital Children's Mus, 

FLORIDA 

Brevard Mus, of Hist. & Sci, 

Children's Sci, Ctr, 

Discovery Sci, Ctr,-CFCC 

Fairchild Tropical Garden 

Fla, Adventure Mus,, Charlotte Cty, 

Fla, Mus. of Nat, Hist, 

FOCUS Ctr 

Gillespie Mus. of Minerals 

Gulfcoast Wonder and Imagination Zone 

Imaginarium Hands-on Mus, & Aquarium 

Mary Brogan Mus, of Art and Sci, 

Miami Mus, of Sci, and Planetarium 

Mus, of Art & Sci-Brevard 

Mus, of Arts and Sci, 

Mus, of Discovery & Sci, 

MOSI (Mus, of Sci, & Industry) 

Mus, of Sci, and Hist, of Jacksonville 



Orlando Sci, Ctr, 
South Fla, So, Mus, 

GEORGIA 

Coca Cola Space Sci, Ctr, 

Fernbank Sci, Ctr, 

Mus, of Arts & Sci- 

Nat'l Sci. Ctr, (Fort Discovery) 

SciTrek, Sci, & Tech, Mus, of Atlanta 

IDAHO 

Discovery Ctr of Idaho 

ILLINOIS 

Lakeview Mus, of Arts and Sci, 
The Sci, Ctr, 

INDIANA 

Children's Sci. & Tech. Mus. of Terre Haute 
Imagination Station By ASSET 
Muncie Children's Mus. 
Sci, Central 

IOWA 

Family Mus, of Arts and Sci, 

Grout Musuems: Bluedorn So, Imaginarium 

Iowa City Area Sci, Ctr, 

Putnam Mus, of Hist, and Nat, Sci, 

Sci, Ctr, of Iowa 

Sci, Station 

KANSAS 

Exploration Place 
Sternberg Mus, of Nat, Hist, 
Univ, of Kan, Nat. Hist. Mus. 

KENTUCKY 

Highlands Mus. & Discovery Ctr, 
Louisville Sci, Ctr, 

LOUISIANA 

La, Arts and Sci, Ctr 
Sci-Port Discovery Ctr, 

MAINE 

Children's Mus, of Maine 

MARYLAND 

Excel Interactive Sci, Mus. 
Maryland Sci. Ctr. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Children's Mus. 

EcoTarium 

Mus. of Sci. 

Nat'l Plastics Ctr. and Mus. 

Robert S, Peabody Mus. of Archaeology 

MICHIGAN 

Alfred P Sloan Mus. 

Ann Arbor Hands-on Mus. 

Cranbrook Inst, of Sci. 

Detroit Sci, Ctr, 

Exhibit Mus. of Nat. Hist. 

Flint Children's Mus. 

Hall of Ideas, Midland Ctr. for the Arts 

Impression 5 Sci. Ctr. 

Kingman Mus, of Nat, Hist, 

Mich, Space and Sci, Ctr. 

Southwestern Mich. College Mus. 

MINNESOTA 

Bell Mus. of Nat. Hist. 

Duluth Children's Mus. 

Headwaters Sci, Ctr. 

Heritage Hjemkomst Interpretive Ctr. 

Sci, Mus, of Minn, 

MISSISSIPPI 

Russell C, Davis Planetarium 

MISSOURI 

Discovery Ctr, of Springfield 
Sci, City at Union Station 
St Louis Sci, Ctr. 

MONTANA 

Mus, of the Rockies 



NEBRASKA 

Edgerton Explorit Ctr, 
Omaha Children's Mus. 
Univ of Neb. State Mus. 

NEVADA 

Children's Mus, of Northern Nev. 
Lied Discovery Children's Mus. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Children's Mus, of Portsmouth 
Christa McAuliffe Planetarium 
SEE Sci, Ctr, 

NEW JERSEY 

Liberty Sci, Ctr 

Newark Mus. & Dreyfus Planetarium 

NEW MEXICO 

Explora Sci. Ctr. and Children's Mus. 
Las Cruces Mus. of Nat, Hist, 
N,M Mus, of Nat, Hist, and Sci. 
Space Ctr, 

NEW YORK 

Brooklyn Children's Mus, 

Buffalo Mus, of So, 

Tifft Nature Preserve 

Hudson River Mus, 

Mid-Hudson Children's Mus. 

Milton J. Rubenstein Mus. of Sci. & 

Tech./The Discovery Ctr, 

N,Y. Hall of So. 

N,Y. State Mus, 

NY Transit Mus, 

Northshore Sci, and Tech, Ctr. 

Roberson Mus. and Sci. Ctr 

Rochester Mus. & Sci. Ctr. 

Schenectady Mus. 

Sci. & Discovery Ctr. 

Sci. Discovery (Ztr of Oneonta 

Science Center 

Staten Island Children's Mus. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Catawba Sci. Ctr 

Discovery Place 

Health Adventure 

Imagination Station 

Nat. Sci. Ctr. of Greensboro 

N.C. Mus. of Life and Sci, 

N,C. Mus. of Nat Sci, 

Rocky Mount Children's Mus, 

Schiele Mus, of Nat, Hist, & Planetarium 

SciWorks, Sci, Ctr & Env Park 

Western N,C, Nature Ctr. 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Gateway to Sci. 

OHIO 

Boonshoft Mus. of Discovery 

The Children's Mus. of Cleveland 

Cincinnati Mus. Ctr. 

COSI Columbus 

COSI Toledo 

Great Lakes Sci. Ctr. 

Health Mus. of Cleveland 

Inventure Place, National Inventors Hall 

of Fame 
McKinley Mus, 

OKLAHOMA 

Kirkpatrick Sci, and Air Space Mus, at 
Omniplex 

OREGON 

AC, Gilbert's Discovery Village 
Ore, Mus, of Sci, and Industry 
Univ, of Ore, Mus, of Nat, Hist, 
WISTEC, Willamette Sci. & Tech. Ctr 

PENNSYLVANIA 

The Acad, of Nat. Sci. 



Carnegie Sci. Ctr. 

Discovery Ctr. of Sci. & Tech. 

Franklin Inst. 

North Mus. of Nat. Hist, and Sci. 

Pittsburgh Children's Mus. 

Please Touch Mus. 

Reading Public Mus. 

Whitaker Ctr for Sci. and the Arts 

RHODE ISLAND 

Thames Sci. Ctr. 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Roper Mountain Sci, Ctr 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

Children's Sci, Ctr, 

Kirby Sci, Discovery Ctr, 

South Dakota Discovery Ctr & Aquarium 

TENNESSEE 

The Children's Mus, of Memphis 

Cumberland Sci, Mus, 

East Tennessee Discovery Ctr 

Hands On! Regional Mus. 

Hands-On Sci. Ctr. 

Pink Palace Family of Mus. 

TEXAS 

Austin Children's Mus. 

Children's Mus. of Houston 

The Cook Arts, Sci. and Tech, Ctr, 

Dallas Mus, of Nat, Hist, 

The Discovery Sci, Place 

Don Harrington Discovery Ctr 

Fort Worth Mus. of Sci. and Hist. 

Houston Mus. of Nat, Sci. 

Insights El Paso Sci. Mus. 

McAllen Int'l Mus. 

McDonald Observatory Visitor's Ctr. 

The Mus. of Health & Medical Sci. 

The Science Place 

Sci. Spectrum 

Space Ctr Houston 

Witte Mus. 

UTAH 

The Children's Mus. of Utah 

Hanson Planetarium 

Utah Mus. of Nat. Hist. 

VERMONT 

Fairbanks Mus. and Planetarium 

Lake Champlain Basin Sci. Ctr. 

Montshire Mus. of Sci. 

VIRGINIA 

Danville Sci. Ctr. 

Sci. Mus. of Va. 

Sci. Mus. of Western Va. 

Shenandoah Valley Discovery Mus. 

Va. Air & Space Ctr — Hampton Roads 

Hist. Ctr 

Va. Aviation Mus. 

Va. Discovery Mus, 

Va, Living Mus, 

Va, Mus, of Nat, Hist, 

WASHINGTON 

Columbia River Exhibition of Hist., Sci. and 

Tech. (CREHST) 
Three Rivers Children's Mus. 

WEST VA. 

Sci. Ctr of W.Va. 
Sunrise Mus. 

WISCONSIN 

Discovery World: James Lovell Mus. Of Sci., 

Economics, & Tech. 
Milwaukee Public Mus. 

WYOMING 

Wyo. Sci. Adventure Ctr. 



16 IN THE FIELD 



26-Year Volunteer Wins Lifetime Achievement Award 



Amy Cranch, Editor 

Many of us remember something — a defining 
event, an influential person, a favorite movie — 
that inspired us to follow our life's interests. For 
Peter Gayford, a book on Troy that he read in high 
school stirred a fascination with history that has 
led him through, among other things, 26 years of 
volunteer service to The Field Museum. 

Last fall, the Illinois Association of Museums gave 
Gayford the Lifetime Volunteer Achievement Award, 
a prestigious recognition for the nearly 10, 500 hours 
he has dedicated to the Field since 1974. He was 
recently appointed as an associate in the Department 
of Anthropology for his contributions. 

In the 1 970s, Gayford researched, photographed 
and proofread the Chinese and English texts for a 
catalogue of Chinese rubbings. He then helped sur- 
vey the Museum's Egyptian collection and restore 
the tomb in preparation for our renowned "King 
Tut" exhibition. In the 1980s he assisted in cata- 
loging a massive collection of clothes, pottery, 
weapons, religious articles and other items that 
Presbyterian missionaries had collected from 
various countries between 1850 and 1910. 

Since 1996, Gayford has worked with 
Chapurukha Kusimba, associate curator of African 
anthropology, on projects related to African 
weaponry. Inspired by a rich collection that 
includes arrows, bows, spears, shields and knives, 
Gayford and Kusimba are working to standardize 
the collection's descriptions, determine who made 
the weapons and where, understand their multiple 
uses and meanings and provide insight into how 
warfare shaped Africa's complex ethnic groups. 



"Peter and I have become quite good friends," 
said Kusimba. "Besides working on scientific issues, 
I value Peter's counsel as a senior colleague at 
the Field. His dedication to the collections and 
collections-based research is infectious." 

Gayford is a testimony to how volunteering 
can make a difference to many people, including 
oneself. "The Field Museum allows me to follow 
my interests and think for myself," he said. "1 always 
feel comfortable. It's like a family here." 




Peter Gayford (left), volunteer, and Chapurukha Kusimba, associate curator of 
African anthropology, demonstrate how the markings on shields might indicate 
a particular clan, an individual's status or how it was used. 



Volunteering at The Field Museum 



Volunteers provide the vital link that helps bring The Field Museum alive for millions of visitors each 
year. Opportunities are available in nearly every department, both in the public areas and behind the 
scenes. Whether interpreting an exhibit, assisting with school or public programs, providing general 
administrative support or Involved in the care or research of our collections, volunteers learn about our 
planet's remarkable natural history while also helping to sustain the Museum's ongoing operations. 

Volunteers generally work two to four days per month and are asked to commit one year to the 
Museum. Short-term or more flexible commitments may also be available. Benefits include, among 
many, free admission, discounts in our stores and restaurants, reduced fees for educational programs 
and invitations to special previews and events. You must be 16 to apply. 

For information or to apply call 312.665.7277. You may also access the volunteer application and 
consent form through the "Museum Information" section of our website at www.fieldmuseum.org. 



JANUARY • FEBRUARY 2(101 17 



A Real Underground Adventure 



It's easy to get lost at the Field if 
you're not familiar with its layout. 
You may be looking for the 
restroom but find vourself in the 




Eric and George Petwkie of Rochester, .\/i///;., were greeted by 
this bug as the iniUionth msitors to "Underground Adi'eiitiire." 



lunchroom. You may stumble 
across an e.xhibit room that 
you've never seen before. And 
just when you thought you 
were on the first floor. . . 

That's what happened to 
George Penokie and his 10-year- 
old son. Eric, when the\- were 
\-isiring bom Rochester. Minn. 
But a series of \\Tong turns unex- 
pectedly put them in the right 
place at the right moment. 

The Penokies were the 
1 -millionth \dsitors to enter 
"Underground Ad\enture." 
our permanent e.xhibition that 
opened in 1999. A giant bug and 
several media were on hand to 



grant the luck%- father-son duo a 
trip for four to the Grand Canyon. 

"What if we had hit one more 
stop light or gone to a different 
e.xhibit?" asked George. "If we had 
done any litde thing different, we 
wouldn't have won. " 

Eric, who has never been to 
the Grand Canyon, was ecstatic. 
"I saw the bug and couldn't figure 
out what was happening. Then I 
saw my dad's name on the certifi- 
cate and w'as Uke, "We won!'" 

Let's just hope the bugs the 
Penokies encounter in the 
Grand Canyon aren't as big and 
talkative as the one they met in 
"Underground Adventure!" 



Making A Cultural Connection 




Japani 



iancing. 



.Museums are wonderfiil places to 
learn about contemporary- com- 
munities, and Chicago is one of 
the worid's premier museum cities. 
The Field's Center for Cultural 
Understanding and Change, along 
with 15 ethnic museums and 
culmral centers, offers a unique 
program called Cultural 
Connections. Acting as an "urban 
anthropologist" you can tra\el to 
different culmral institutions to 
meet people fiom diverse back- 
grounds and discover reasons 
behind cultural diversity; 

Using the anthropologist's 
technique of parricipant-obser\"a- 
rion, you can examine museum 
coUecnons, obser\'e cultural 
traditions and partake in fascinat- 
ing discussions. A wonderfiil 
assortment of ethnic foods is 
ser\-ed at each event. 

Tickets are S17/S15 for 
members. Pre-registrarion is 
required. For more information, 
caU 312.665.7474. e-mail 
anthioafiiinh.org or \-isit 
\\'^\^v.fieldniuseum.org. 



Swedish Folk Tales 

Swedish American Museum, 
5211 N. Clark Street 

Tales fiom Sweden's rich 
foUdoric tradition are brought 
to fife on stage. 
Sunday, Feb. 18, 3— 5 p.m. 

Ukrainian Immigration 
to Chicago 

Ukrainian National Museum, 
721 N. Oakley Boulevard 

Reflect on why Ukrainians 
came to Chicago and, more 
importandy. why they stay. 
Saturday, March 10, 1—3 p.m. 

Purim Celebration 

Spertus Museum, 

618 S. Michigan Avenue 

Celebrate the annual Jewish 
holiday of Purim. commemorat- 
ing Queen Esther's rescue of 
Persian Je\\T\- fixsni certain death. 
TInirsday. March 29, 6— 8 p.m. 

Chicago's Global 
Communities 

Chicago Historical Society, Clark 
Street at North Avenue 



Learn about how Chicago's 

rich ethnic diversity' has 
grown since 1945. 
Tluirsday, April 5, 6— 8 p.m. 

Amber and Its Place in 
Lithuanian Culture and Art 

Balzekas Museum of Lithuanian 
Culture, 6500 S. Pulaski Road 

Explore the historical, cultural 
and artistic significance of 
Lithuania's only national gem. 
Wednesday, April 25. 6— 8 p.m. 

Shared Stories — 
A Joint Event 

Korean American Resource and 
Cultural Center and Filipino 
American Historical Society, 
3952 N. Ashland 

Hear humorous experiences of 
Korean and Filipino immigration. 
Tluirsday, May 17, 6-8 p.m. 

Chicago's Southeast Side: 
A Community Story 

Southeast Historical Society, 
39958 E. 106th Street 

Go on a student-led historical 
tour of Chicago's Southeast side. 
Saturday, May 19, 10 a.m.— 2 p.m. 



18 IN THE FIELD 



Kremlin Gold Ball Reaps a Fortune 



More than 1,000 guests came to 
The Kremlin Gold Ball on Oct. 
20, 2000, to help The Women's 
Board raise more than $410,000 
for The Field Museum's research 
and education programs. The gala 
marked the opening of "Kremlin 
Gold: 1000 Years of Russian CJems 
and Jewels," as guests delighted in 
gazing at the opulent objects on 



display, including thousand- 
year-old church icons, diamond- 
encrusted crowns of the tsars and 
two Faberge Easter eggs. 

Other elements of the 
evening reflected the exquisite 
beauty and detail of the exhibit 
itself. George Jewell Catering 
Services LTD catered a superb 
dinner, and Brown-Forman 



Beverages Worldwide donated the 
fine wines. Flowers by Heffernan 
Morgan, Inc. provided the stun- 
ning decor, flooding Stanley 
Field HaO in a sea of gold 
beneath a halo of eight chande- 
liers suspended from the ceiling. 
Guests packed the floor, dancing 
to The Bob Hardwick Sound. 




1 Caryn Harris (left) and Diana Mayer, co-chairmen oJTIie Kremlin Gold Ball, view the g^old sarcophagus cover made 
for Prince Dmitry, the youngest son of Ivan the Terrible. 2 Barbara Pcarlman (right), presidctit of The Women's Board, 
with her husband, Jerry. 3 Mayor Richard M. Daley and Field President and CEO John McCarter welcome Dr Irina 
Rodimtseva, director of the Moscow KremUn's State Historical-Cultural Museum Preserve, to the ball. 



Investing in the Field: The Annual Fund 



What is the Annual Fund? 

The Annual Fund strengthens 
The Field Museum's mission to 
offer education, exhibition and 
research programs by supporting 
its ongoing operations. We need 
your contributions to help refur- 
bish collections, develop public 
programs and maintain and 
improve our historic building. 

How is the Annual Fund 
different from Membership? 

The Annual Fund gives you the 
opportunity to further support 
the Field beyond the cost of 
membership. A contribution to 
the Fund nicludes benefits of a 
one-year family membership and 
invitations to exclusive programs 
and previews. If you choose to 
v/aive your benefits, your entire 
contribution is tax-deductible. 



Annual Fund Levels: 

Field Contributor $100-249 

Field Adventurer $250-499 

Field Naturalist $500-999 

Field Explorer $1,000-1,499 

Founders' Council $1,500 and above 

How can I make a 
contribution? 

Contributions to the Annual 
Fund can be made by cash, 
check, credit card or appreciated 
securities. A matching gift from 
your company could double your 
contribution and place you at a 
higher level. Please check with 
your employer to see if it pro- 
vides this opportunity. For more 
information or to make an 
Annual Fund contribution, please 
contact Heather Scott at 
312.665.7784. 



ff^ 




Aniuial fund supporters attended a private 
viewing of "Kremlin Gold" and other special 
exhibits on Oct. 30, 2000. Tlie evening also 
featured a lecture by Alexis de Tiesenhausen, 
director of Russian art for Christie's NewYork, 
on Russian art history's influence on Faberge. 



JANUARY • FEBRUAl^Y 201)1 19 



From the Archives 



Mark Schnwltzcr, Writer, Development Department 



The small statues with Bill Turnbull, curator emeri- 
tus of fossil mammals, pose interesting questions. 
What was the man with the headphones hstening to 
before he fell asleep? What is the bearded man look- 
ing at? And where is the monkey taking the man 
with the helmet? The answer to all three is space. 

In 1963 the Museum's Department of Geology, 
headed by Dr. Rainer Zangerl, created a series of 
exhibits on space geology to celebrate Chicago's 
Space Month. Among the displays were light- 
hearted sculptures representing the history of 
space exploration, including Greek astronomer 
Hipparchus, who estimated the motions and 



^.^^KXtr rt'v^iVify ". 




distances of planets; Galileo, who invented the 
telescope; and a modern man urged on by his 
pioneering cousin, the monkey. 

Turnbull recalls that the sculptor who created 
the figures, a former medical illustrator named 
Tibor Perenyi, had escaped from Hungary after the 
Soviets suppressed an uprising there in 1956. 
Perenyi then became the Museum's geology artist. 

Perenyi asked geology staff to model for the 
sculptures. Zangerl, for example, represented 
Galileo. Hipparchus, Turnbull believes, was really 
Robert Dennison, former curator of fossil fishes. 
And Turnbull himself inspired the sleeping NASA 
man. "This is the man who keeps in touch with 
the astronauts in outer space. Of course, there's not 
much to do," he laughs, "so you go to sleep." 

Who was the slim astronaut being led to duty 
by the space-sawy chimp? While the helmet makes 
it difficult to confirm, Turnbull thinks it was really 
Eugene Richardson, "because he was the skinniest 
guy in the department... Even the space suit itself 
is skinny despite their normal bulky design." 

We have witnessed incredible milestones in 
space exploration. In 1957, the Soviet Union 
launched Sputnik I, laying the grounds for the 
international race to space. In 1969, astronauts Neil 
Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin made the 
legendary landing on the moon and returned with 
rock and soil samples. Probes have explored Jupiter, 
Saturn, Mars and other areas of the solar system. 
Reusable space shuttles have enabled astronauts to 
perform dangerous, complex work in space. The 
Hubble telescope collects more data than is possible 
from the ground, shedding light onto the origins 
of our universe. Even more importantly, coopera- 
tion has replaced competition, as U.S. and Russian 
astronauts work side-by-side and 16 nations have 
banded together to bring about the International 
Space Station. 

In the early 1960s, Museum research focused 
on meteorites, "visitors from an extinct planet," as 
the only tangible source of knowledge about other 
planets. Today, Meenakshi Wadhwa continues to 
study pieces of Mars, asteroids and the moon that 
have arrived on Earth as meteorites. She hopes they 
will reveal information about how the solar system 
and its planets were formed and is establishing a 
state-of-the-art age-dating laboratory to uncover 
glimpses of the creation of the universe. 



BillTiiriibiill, curator emeritus of fossil mammals, houses these statues from a 1963 
exhibition on space f^eolo{;y in his office. The reclining man was modeled after him. 



20 IN THE FIELD 



Ask a Scientist 



Send your questions to Amy Cranch, The Field Museunn, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL, 60605, or via e-mail at 
acranch@fmnh.org. Due to the volume we receive, only the questions chosen for In the Field will be answered. An archive 
of previous questions can be found in "quick links" on our website at www.fieldmuseum.org. 



Why do shorebirds hang out so far from 
the water, such as at the Skokie Swift CTA 
station? Was this area once a wetland? 

The term "shorebirds" refers to members of the 
order Charadriiformes, which represents some 300 
species worldwide, including sandpipers, plovers, 
terns and gulls. Although many species are found 
near water, others have discovered feeding and living 
opportunities away from water. In our area, ring- 
billed and herring gulls fly from their lakeshore 
roosting areas daily to forage in places like city 
dumps and mall parking lots. 

The killdeer, a plover species common around 
Chicago in the non-winter months, also forages or 
nests in open habitats that are not necessarily near 
water, including cemeteries, parks and parking lots. 
The Skokie Swift station could have been a wedand 
at some point, but having evolved to use a variety of 
open urban habitats, shorebirds probably frequent 
the area today for its foraging opportunities. 

John Bates 

Assistant Curator, Department of Zoology, 

Division of Birds 



What North American insects are 
most deadly to humans? 

There are no North American insects that are 
normally fatal to humans. However, while most 
people are not particularly sensitive to wasp, bee or 
ant stings, some individuals may succumb to anaphy- 
lactic shock or die unless treated immediately. The 
harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex) of the western United 
States is generally considered to have the most 
painful sting, with intense pain lasting up to four 
hours. 

Also, mosquitoes carry potentially dangerous 
diseases. In Illinois, for example, the house mosquito 
(Cnk'x pipiens) carries a form of St. Louis encephali- 
tis, and the eastern tree-hole mosquito (Aedes 
triseriatiis) carries LaCross encephalitis. Both diseases 
can produce flu-like symptoms and may be fatal in a 
small percent of the population. 

Philip Parrillo 

Curatorial Assistant, Department of Zoology, 

Division of Insects 



Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation 







A 


B 




Filing date: Oct. 31, 2000. 


Total copies printed 


46,158 


56,000 


1 certify that all infor- 
mation furnished here 


Title: In the Field. Publication 


Paid and/or requested circulation: 






is true and complete. 


number: 898940. Frequency of 


Outside-county mail subscriptions 


16,287 


19,453 


/s/ Amy Cranch, editor. 


publication: bimonthly. Number of 


In-county subscription 


21,166 


24,660 


In the Field. 


issues published annually: six. Annual 
subscription price: $20. 


Sales through dealers, carriers. 






A = Average number of 
copies of each issue 




street vendors, counter sales and 






Office: 1400 South Lake Shore Dr., 


other non-USPS paid distribution 


none 


none 


published during the 
preceding 12 months. 


Chicago, IL 60605-2496. 


Other classes mailed through USPS 


131 


106 


B = Actual number of 


Publisher: The Field Museum, 1400 


Total paid and/or requested 






copies of single issue 


South Lake Shore Dr., Chicago, IL 


circulation 


37,584 


44,219 


published nearest filing 


60605-2496. 


Free distribution my mail: 






date. 


Editor: Amy Cranch, The Field 


Outside-county 


594 


615 




Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Dr., 










Chicago, IL 60605-2496. 


In-county 


2,917 


2,295 






Other classes mailed through USPS 


none 


none 




Managing Editor: none. 












Free distribution outside the mail 


833 


5,000 




Known bondholders, mortgages and 










other security holders: none. 


Total free distribution 


4,344 


7,910 




The purpose, function and nonprofit 


Total distribution 


41,928 


52,129 




status of this organization and the 


Copies not distributed 


4,230 


3,871 




exempt status for federal income tax 










purposes have not changed during 


Total 


46,158 


56,000 




the preceding 12 months. 


Percent paid 


89.64 


84.83 





JANUARY • FEBRUARY 2001 21 



Field Museum Tours at a Glance 



For more information or free brochures, please call Field Museum Tours at 800.811.7244, or send them an e-mail at 
fmtours@sover.net. Please note that rates, prices and itineraries are subject to change and that prices are per person, 
double occupancy. 



Costa Rica Adventure 

Feb 25-March 6. 2001 (10 days) 

Costa Rica's natural heritage is one 
of astonishing diversity. Our itinerary 
includes the jungle river channels of 
Tortuguero on the Caribbean coast, 
Poas Volcano and the cloud forests 
of Monte Verde high in the central 
mountains and Palo Verde's wildlife 
areas on the Pacific. Optional exten- 
sion to Tamarindo Bay. 

Museum Leader: 
Botanist William Burger 
Price: $3,995, including 
airfare from Chicago 

Baja: Among the Great Whales 

March 9-17, 2001 (9 days) 

Each winter gray whales migrate 
south from their arctic feeding 
grounds to breed and rear their 
young in Baja's sheltered lagoons. 
Zodiac landing craft give you a 
water-level perspective on these 
incredible mammals. Enjoy snorkel- 
ing and kayaking among Baja's 
uninhabited desert islands. 

Price: $2,990 and higher, not 
including airfare 

An Insider's Tour of Santa Fe 

April 29-May 4, 2001 (6 days) 

Led by Field 

Anthropologist 
Jonathan Haas, 
a native of New 
Mexico, this short 
trip offers a splen- 
did combination 
of archaeological sites, museums, 
cultural centers, artist and craftsmen's 
workshops, outstanding restaurants 
and a fine hotel. Highlights include 
the prehistoric ruins of Poshu- 
Ouinge and Sapawe, ancient Taos, 
historic Pecos, the San Felipe 
Pueblo's Green Corn Dance and 
Georgia O'Keefe's house. 

Museum Leader: 
Anthropologist Jonathan Haas 
Price: TBA 




Circumnavigation of Crete 

May 3-13, 2001 (11 days) 

Circumnavigate Crete aboard a luxu- 
rious 34-passenger yacht, tracing the 
rise and fall of the powerful Minoan 
civilization. Visit Lasithi, birthplace of 
Zeus. View lofty mountains, dramatic 
gorges, quaint villages and breath- 
taking ocean views. Visit the wildly 
beautiful Kourtaliotiko Gorge, the 
Frangokastello fortress and Europe's 
only palm-tree forest. 

Museum Leaders: 
Archaeologist David Reese and 
Anthropologist Catherine Sease 
Price: $3,795 and higher, not 
including airfare 

The Geology and History of 
New Zealand 

Nov 3-21, 2001 (19 days) 

New Zealand's diversity will astound 
you. On North Island visit Goat 
Island Marine Reserve, Tongariro 
National Park, the NZ Maori Arts 
and Crafts Institute, Tokomaru Bay, 
Gisborne, Wellington's Museum of 
New Zealand and Botanic Gardens. 
On South Island tour Christchurch's 
Canterbury Museum, Dunedin, 
Oueenstown and Milford Sound. 

Museum Leaders: Anthropologist 
John Terrell and Geologist Scott 
Lidgard 
Price: TBA 







mr^^ 




T.^'^'< 


&''t''^ 




M 




__^Zj^j^ 


p 




^^ 


^ 


^■l 

m 




i 



Amazon by Riverboat 

Dec 1-9, 2001 (9 days) 

Travel aboard a 14-cabin riverboat 
exploring the remote upper reaches 
of the Amazon River system. 
Experience the forest and wildlife of 
the Amazon Jungle. Optional exten- 
sion to Cuzco and Machu Picchu. 

Leader and price: TBA 

"My husband, sister and I went on the Amazon riverboat 
tour last December. Field Museum tours are first class. 
Tlic riverboat was clean and comfortable with a great crew. 
Tlie fi}od was good. TIte company is always interesting. Tlie 
villages we visited were filled with e.xcited children and 
adults who were pleased we were there; our reception was 
always warm and comfortable. It only rained hard once and 
cleared up, and we had little trouble with mosquitoes. Our 
wildlife exxtusions were fun and informative. I never felt 
unsafe in Lima. Tliis is the type of adventure you couldn't 
do alone without a package like this. In short, go for it!" 




Two Field Museum curators, leading experts on the cultural 
and geological history of New Zealand, share their vast 
experience and insights as well as special contacts during 
our custom-designed tour of both North and South Islands. 



INTHEFIELD 



March 

April 

2001 



The Field Museum's Member Publication 



I 




Hilltop Terrace 
Excavations in Mexico 

Kinetosaurs: 

Putting Some Teeth 

into Art and Science 



FROMTHEPRESIi:)ENT 



Support Grows fo r M useum Expansio n P l a ns 




There has been a lot of excite- 
ment over the past few months 
surrounding the plans to renovate 
Soldier Field. We are indeed 
looking forward to the 2,500- 
car parking facility across the 
street and recapturing 19 acres 
of parkland on the Museum 
Campus. 

As you may know, we have 
big plans also — to build a new 
research center for our invalu- 
able anthropology, zoology and 
geology collections; to construct 
a new accessible entrance on 
the building's east side for 
school children and people with 
special needs; and to retool the 
Museum's loading dock, which 
each day accepts scientific col- 
lections, exhibit components, 
retail deliveries and, last spring, 
our T. rex named Sue. The new 
East Entrance has become a 
high priority since the changes 
planned for the Museum 
Campus and resulting traffic 
flow would otherwise force 



busloads of schoolchildren and 
special-use visitors to make the 
long, arduous walk to the handi- 
cap-accessible West Entrance. 

Our plans have received a 
great deal of favorable coverage 
in the local media. In the 
Chicago Tribune on Jan. 14, the 
headline read, "Space to grow 
becoming thing of the past at 
Field." The extensive article 
underscored both the interna- 
tional significance of the 
Museum's 21.8 million objects 
and specimens and the fact that 
there is inadequate room to 
house, conserve and research 
new collections. 

The Chicago Sun-Times story 
on Jan. 8, "Field lobbies for 
$60 million," described the 
Museum's work to obtain State 
funds for the building project. 
And in a Jan. 22 Crain's 
Chicago Business editorial, 
"Backing Field Museum's fund- 
ing bid is a natural," the 
editorial board voiced strong 
support of our State request. 
"For Governor George Ryan 
and the General Assembly," it 
said, "one of the bottom-line 
questions will be: Is this a good 
investment for the public? The 
answer is yes." 

During the State's legislative 
session, we will be looking to 
our Museum members and other 
close friends for support in 
Springfield. In the Museum's 



great Stanley Field Hail, thou- 
sands of visitors have already 
signed postcards that are being 
delivered to legislators, the 
Governor and the Mayor. We 
need all of your help to get this 
vital support from the State of 
Illinois. Write, call or email 
your elected state officials, 
including Governor Ryan, asking 
for their support. (Visit the 
"find districts/officials" link at 
wvw\/.elections. state.il. us for 
contact information.) Please 
also contact the four legislative 
leaders — Senate President 
James "Pate" Philip, Senate 
Minority Leader Emil Jones, 
Speaker of the House Michael 
Madigan and House Minority 
Leader Lee Daniels. We appre- 
ciate your support. 

John W. McCarter, Jr. 
President & CEO 



MSLhnLd o voii think ahnut fn thp Fipinf? 



We mentioned in our last issue that we will be introducing content and design improvements to In the Field 
throughout the year. You might notice that we are using new fonts, colors and icons, representative of the 
Museum's standards, and have streamlined the design of several sections. Please send comments or questions 
to Amy Cranch, publications manager. The Field Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 
60605-2496, or via email at acranch@fmnh.org. 



INTHEFIELD 



March/April 2001, Vol.72, Mo. 2 



Editor: 

Amy Cranch, The Field Museum 

Designer: 
Depke Design 

Copy editor: 

Laura F. Nelson 



In the Field is printed on recycled paper using 
soy-based inks. 

In the Field (ISSN #1051-4546) is publislied 
bimonthly by The Field Museum. Copyright 
2001 The Field Museum. Annual subscriptions 
are $20; $10 for schools. Museum membership 
includes In the Field subscription. Opinions 
expressed by authors are their own and do not 
necessarily reflect the policy of The Field 
Museum. Notification of address change should 
include address label and should be sent to the 
membership department. POSTMASTER: Send 
address changes to In the Field, The Field 
Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, 
Chicago, !L 60605-2496. Periodicals postage 
paid at Chicago, Illinois. 

The cover image, courtesy of The Children's 
Museum of Indianapolis, is from "Kinetosaurs: 
Putting Some Teeth into Art and Science," open 
March 23 through July 8, 2001. 



The Field Museum salutes the people of 
Chicago for their long-standing, generous 
support of the Museum through the 
Chicago Park District. 

The Field Museum 

1400 South Lake Shore Drive 

Chicago, IL 60605-2496 

312.922.9410 

www.fieldmuseum.org 



H 



fe 



Field 



useum 




Majestic hilltop ruins in Mexico reveal much 

about their ancient inhabitants. 

Photo at left: An offering^ found at El Palmillo. 



6 



Gina Grillo shares what drew her to 
photographing immigrant children. 
Photo at left: India Independence Day. 



7 



Find out about movable, life-size dinosaur 
sculptures, Earth Month activities, fieldtrips 
and more in Your Guide to the Field. 



16 



Millions of students nationwide are taking 

e-fieldtrips with The Field Museum. 

Photo at left: Participants in an e-fieldtrip about Sue. 



18 



They may not have been nominated for an 
Academy Award, but the dozen or so films shot 
at the Field span 8 decades and many subjects. 



Museum Campu s Neig hb ors 



Shedd Aquarium Shedd Aquarium's Oceanarium turns 10 in 2001. 
To celebrate, Shedd offers a variety of special events in its renowned 
Pacific Northwest coastal habitat. Guests can watch the beluga whales 
and Pacific white-sided dolphins learn an all-new behavioral program 
during regularly scheduled Oceanarium presentations, then talk with 
animal-care staff members afterward about the techniques used to train 
marine mammals and other animals. The new presentation debuts on 
April 27, along with new exhibits in the Oceanarium's underwater viewing 
gallery and movies in Phelps Auditorium. Check Shedd's website, 
www.sheddaquarium.org, for specific "Oceanarium Turns 10" events, or 
call 312.939.2438. 



Adier Planetarium Enjoy the spectacle of the starry sky and experi- 
ence Far Out Fridays at the AdIer Planetarium on the first Friday of 
every month in 2001. Scope out the family activities from 5 to 10 p.m., 
including: telescope viewing; unlimited shows in the historic Sky Theater 
and the world's first StarRider™ Theater; live lectures by AdIer 
astronomers; hands-on activities; special demonstrations; and gallery 
and Doane Observatory tours. Admission for Far Out Fridays is $13 for 
adults, $10 for children/seniors and $5 for members. A Family Star 
Pack is $40 (2 adults/2 children or 1 adult/3 children). For information, 
visitwww.adlerplanetarium.org or call 312. 922. STAR. 



MARCH/APRIL 2001 



INT HEFIELD FEATURE 



Excavations at El Palmillo: 

A Hilltop Terrace Site in Oaxaca, Mexico 

Gary M. Fciiimnn, Chair and Curator of Anthropology; Linda M. Nicholas, Adjunct Curator of Anthropology 




LINDA M NICHOmS/K 



The liilltop terraced site of El 
Palmillo, one of more than 
1 , 400 artificially flattened 
terraces in the [alley of 
Oaxaca in southern Mexico. 



Hilltop terrace sites have long been recognized as a characteristic form of settlement 
in the prehispanic Valley of Oaxaca in southern Mexico. More than 100 years ago, 
Field Museum curator William H. Holmes wrote, "About Oaxaca many of the important 
architectural remains are found on mountain tops, and one soon comes to recognize the 
notched profiles of the ridges and peaks that border the valley as being due to the 
strangely directed enterprise of the ancient inhabitants. . . .As the explorer climbs the 
slopes and picks his way from summit to summit, he is fairly dazed by the vast array of 
pyramids and terraces, which not only crown the heights but overspread the steep slopes, 
destroying traces of natural contour and making the mountains actual works of art. From 
the massive ramparts of these mountain cities one gazes down into the blue and distant val- 
leys, where the present cities and towns appear as mere patches of white and pink set in 
fringes of green." 



IN THE FIELD 




A mid variety of maguey, a succulent plant that has been an 
important food source in the region for thousands of years. 



More than 100 of these majestic hilltop ruins 
have been reported and mapped in the Valley of 
Oaxaca since the late 1970s. At times in the past, 
especially during the Classic period (ca. A.D. 200- 
800), these densely populated settlements housed 
almost two-thirds of the valley's population. Yet 
few of them, other than the region's prehispanic 
capital, Monte Alban, have been the focus of 
systematic archaeological excavation. Most valley 
fieldwork has concentrated on elite contexts, 
namely temples and tombs. Consequently, we 
know very little about how the ancient inhabitants 
of these settlements, the Zapotecs, lived, other than 
that they built their houses on artificially flattened 
spaces carved into the mountain slopes, often high 
above the valley floor. 

Our aim is to discover the nature of household 
organization and economic activities at these 
Zapotec terrace sites by excavating at El Palmillo, a 
large hilltop site with roughly 1 ,400 terraces in the 
dry, eastern part of the valley. Assisted by William 
Middleton, a Field postdoctoral research scientist, 
we now have completed two seasons of a long- 
term excavation project at El Palmillo. Given our 
interest in domestic structures and activities, we 
started our investigations in 1999 on some of the 
lower terraces, away from the public core of the 
settlement and to ease the logistical aspects of 



our work, including a 20-minute walk up a steep, 
rocky slope. 

Ceramics recovered during earlier studies at El 
Palmillo indicated a long history of occupation, from 
ca. 300-200 B.C. up to the Spanish conquest in the 
early 1500s. The site was small at the beginning, 
with the earliest inhabitants settled on just the hill's 
summit and upper slopes. As the population grew, 
the settlement spread to the lower slopes where 
we conducted our excavations, while the major 
ceremonial, public core remained on top of the hiU. 
The first terraces and houses in the residential area 
we excavated appear to have been built at the end 
of the Terminal Formative or very early in the 
Classic period (ca.A.D. 150-250). Although 
dispersed settlement continued in other parts of 
the site (both up- and down-slope), the final or 
uppermost construction episode on the excavated 
terraces dates to late in the Classic period (A.D. 
600-800). 

In 1999 we excavated three terraces completely 
(1147, 1148 and 1162) and uncovered a series 
of rooms and structures around small patios, 
some with plaster floors. At the north end of the 
excavation area, we discovered a large, shallow 
oven that appears to have been used to roast 
maguey, a succulent plant that grows throughout 
the region. Below this oven, we found a smaller but 
more formal stone-lined oven and the stone founda- 
tions of several large structures. AH of these features 
extended north onto an adjacent terrace (1163). 




Crew members excavating 
M residential architecture on 
% terrace i 163 at El 
i Palmillo. 



MARCH/APRIL 2001 



Plan of the residential 
structures surrounding 
an open plaza that 
were discovered during 
the 2000 excavations 
at El Palmillo. 



We returned to the same part of the site in 2000 
to complete excavation of terrace 11 63 and 
uncover the remaining features. Our aim was to 
further clarify the architectural connections 
ben,veen the terraces and intensively investigate the 
large ovens. The ovens are significant because the 
modern village's major industry is the production 
of mescal, an alcoholic beverage made from 
maguey. Instead of making mescal, the prehispanic 
inhabitants may have used the ovens to roast the 
heart of maguey for food. 

During the first two field seasons, we exposed 
an area of appro.ximately 480 square meters. In some 
places, we excavated almost two meters of prehis- 
panic deposits, much of which was intentional 
construction fill, before reaching bedrock. One 
thing we have learned during our work at El 
Palmillo is that erecting terraces involved more 
construction than we previously imagined. The 
settlement's prehispanic occupants did not simply 
foUow or tinker \\-ith the contour of the natural hill 



" ^^^^°:^^^^ 




In 



6E 8E 10E 12E 14E 

Area excavated in 1999 

Area excavated in 2000 



when building terraces. Rather, construction was a 
monumental enterprise that purposely created a 
human-made landform. Even nonscientists can see 
that humans modified the hills, as Holmes noted 
1 00 years ago. Residential terrace life appears to 
have involved regular episodes of wall construction, 
terrace maintenance and spatial modification, all of 
which required considerable labor and coordination. 

After their initial construction, the terraces 
appear to have undergone a cycle of gradual 
accumulation of sediments and minor repairs 
followed by major episodes of renovation. During 
major renovations, terrace walls were raised and 
surfaces covered by considerable layers of new, 
often sterile sediment. Terrace sites were at once 
holistic architectural entities — giant tiered fea- 
tures that reshaped large natural hills — and 
modular settlements composed of a series of 
roughly similar units. 

During 1999 and 2000, we defined two residential 
architecmral complexes consisting of several discrete 
but closely connected rooms around three sides of a 
central patio. We also uncovered several small 
residential structures; 26 burials, including a small 
tomb; 14 offerings; and a dozen fire installations, 
including the tvvo large maguey ovens. The archi- 
tectural complexes and most of the other structures 
underwent multiple episodes of construction or 
were closely superimposed atop previous structures. 

Although the two architectural complexes are 
situated on separate terraces, they are remarkably 
similar in construction and basic layout. In both, 
a narrow rectangular structure is located toward 
the back, east side of the terrace and links two 
smaller rooms at the north and south ends. These 
structures surround a small central patio, leaving the 
front, west side of the terrace open. The northern 
structure had a mortuary function, as a number of 
burials were uncovered in and around them during 
both excavation seasons. The long, eastern struc- 
tures are especially similar, constructed with flat 
foundation stones and well-made plaster floors. The 
southern structures are more square shaped. 

The prehispanic Zapotecs generally buried their 
dead near their homes, often under house or patio 
floors or in small domestic tombs, presumably to 
reflect familial continuit\^ Burials at El Palmillo 
largely conform to these patterns, although burial 
location varied according to an individual's age. 
Most of the adults were interred in formal burial 



MAP OF TERRACE 1163 



4 IN THE FIELD 




One of the offerings that was placed in the central patio area. 

features or in the central patios. An adult male and 
female were placed in a small tomb associated with 
one of the northern structures, while five adults 
were buried in the central patio area. Three adult 
males and two adult females were interred in the 
northern structure of the other complex. Many 
of the adult interments were reused or opened, per- 
haps for ritual reasons. In contrast, most of the 
children were positioned under house floors or in 
large jars placed in terrace walls, probably during 
construction or rebuilding of the walls. One or two 
complete ceramic vessels accompanied many buri- 
als, and the "richest" burial, an adult female, 
contained six complete vessels. 

Most of the non-burial ofl^erings consisted of a 
pair of ceramic vessels, similar to those recovered at 
Monte Alban from the same time period, with a 
larger vessel (often with tripod supports) placed 
upside down on top of a smaller, simpler vessel. 
Offerings were found in a variety of contexts, but 
most often in the central patio areas or under house 
floors. They appear to have been placed during 
building or rebuilding episodes and may have been 
part of dedication ceremonies. We have yet to find 
any artifacts inside the offerings, although we sus- 
pect they may have held perishable materials. The 



soils recovered from inside the vessels and burials 
are currently being analyzed. 

We intensively sampled deposits from the two 
large ovens to determine if maguey residues are, in 
fact, present. Although there are structural and size 
differences between the two, both bear striking 
similarity to maguey ovens used today in Matatlan. 
The remaining fire installations were primarily small 
hearths, probably used to prepare food, situated 
outside the domestic structures or rooms. 

Although we are still in the early stages of 
our study, we are excited by our findings on such 
issues as residential construction, household 
economies, ritual activities and the spatial and 
political organization of Oaxaca hilltop terrace 
communities. Given the current interest and 
encouragement that we have from Matatlan, the 
potential for productive long-term research at El 
Palmillo is extremely promising. With continued 
support from the Instituto Nacional de 
Antropologia e Historia, the Centro Regional de 
Oaxaca, the local authorities of Santiago Matatlan, 
the National Science Foundation and The Field 
Museum, we look forward to additional field sea- 
sons and to gaining a fuller understanding of the 
nature of domestic life in ancient Oaxaca. ITF 



MARCH/APRIL 2001 



INTHE FIELD FEATURE 



Between Cultures: 

Children of Immigrants in America 



Amy Craiicli, Editor 

For six years, Chicagoan Gina Grillo has been 
photographing swearing-in ceremonies, cultural 
celebrations and other events to capture the immi- 
grant experience. But her interest in the subject 
dates back to childhood. The granddaughter of 
Italian immigrants, Grillo feels connected to the 
issues, both internal and external, that immigrants 
experience as they assimilate into a new life. Her 
exhibition, "Between Cultures: Children of 
Immigrants in America," features 25 poignant 
black and white images, along with children's 
essays and drawings, and runs through May 6, 
2001. Below is an excerpt from an interview. 




China Moon Festival 



ITF: What drew you to the subject of immigrant 
children? 

GG: All four of my grandparents came to the 
United States in the early 1 900s from Italy, and 
most of them were gone before I was born. As with 
many immigrants of the time, they let details of the 
past go. I grew up with a longing to find out more, 
an urge to uncover the mysteries of where I came 
from and where my family is now. 

The subject of my work originates from an early 
interest in understanding how the decision of one 
family's generation to immigrate affects those that 
come afterward. I felt that if I didn't delve into it, 
no one else would, and that could be a loss. 

ITF: How did you get started? 

GG: I started where new immigrants start. I went to 

lines outside of the Immigration and Naturalization 



Service, and then I heard Mayor Daley was hosting a 
swearing-in ceremony at Grant Park. 

It was quite a learning experience. Until then, 
for example, I had never heard of the Oath of 
Citizenship — a moving, patriotic document. I 
thought going through this would help me 
appreciate my own citizenship in a different way. 
I met several families and was sometimes invited to 
their homes. I became interested in ethnic commu- 
nities — how the facade of a neighborhood defines 
or reveals its level of diversity, and how fleeting that 
is. When my family came here, for example, Italians 
were one of the largest groups, and now they're 
not. That's historically significant and worth my 
undivided attention. 

ITF: How did the project evolve? 
GG: The INS invited me to shoot new immigrants 
arriving at O'Hare, which became the foundation 
for how I would piece together what I do now. I 
would wait for the planes, sit in a special section for 
new immigrants, talk with them, and when they 
were willing, photograph them right after arrival. 
That was remarkable... to be part of those first 
moments, that first hour. 

One thing key to the exhibit is the time I've 
spent with children in inner city schools here and 
in Brooklyn. Big Shoulders, a Chicago Archdiocese 
program that gives scholarships to immigrant 
children, connected me directly to inner city schools 
... with diverse populations. You can imagine how 
^ incredible that was. This project is not a self-portrai- 
d ture; it's about community, and I couldn't have done 

f it without one person after another helping me. 

< 

5 ITF: Did your motives change once you began 
networking and working with the schools? 
GG: No. I saw that today's immigrants are no differ- 
ent than my own family. To understand the risks 
and courage, the longing and sacrifice, has always 
been personal. What my family went through 100 
years ago hasn't changed much, and the greatest 
way to honor my grandparents is to honor the 
immigrants around me. 

ITF: And photographing other families helps you 
feel connected to your roots? 
GG: Yes. Through photography, I became more 
clearly rooted in how my grandparents influenced 
me. At a certam point I realized that the ability to 
take risks in the great way that immigrants do — to 
throw away everything that is familiar — is the 
secret to succeeding at anything. I want to know 
more — understand more — about that level of 
courage. I hope people who look at my images see 
something familiar, a common humanity. ITF 



IN THE FIELD 



YOURGUIDETOTHEFIELD 

A Pullout Calendar of Events for March and April 

Inside: Exhibits Festivals Family Programs Adult Programs 



Kinetosaurs 
Opening Weekend 
Events! 

Meet Kinetosaur 
Creator John Payne 

Meet the man behind the 
dynamic dinosaur sculptures 
featured in ''Kinetosaurs." 
Sculptor John Payne will 
demonstrate how these enor- 
mous sculptures move and 
discuss how he combined his 
passions for art and natural 
history to bring prehistoric 
creatures to life. 

Saturday and Sunday, March 24 and 25 

10 a.m.- 2 p.m. 

Free with Museum admission 

Sue Hendrickson Booksigning 

Meet Sue Hendricl<so<L 
discoji^erer of Sue the /VfA-. 
Hencifickson is visiting Tm, 
Field Museum to celebrate 
opening of "Kinetosaurs" anc 
to debut her new autobiogra- 
phy Hunt for the Past: My 
Life As an Explorer. 

Friday—Sunday, March 23-25, 

11 a.m.-2 p.m. 

Free with basic admission 

Lool< inside for other special 
programs throughout the run 



Hands-on Fun Brings Dinosaurs to Life 



"Kinetosaurs: Putting^ Some Teeth into Art and Science" 
March 23 -July 8,2001 



What do kids really 
want when they gaze at 
dinosaur fossils? 




Tliey want tliose prehistoric 
bones to come to life! 

The living, breathing, roaring 
dinosaurs of your imagination w/ill do just 
that at "Kinetosaurs; Putting Some Teeth 
into Art and Science." Inside this exciting 
exhibition, visitors and gallery assistants can 
set life-size sculptures of a T. rex and other 
dinosaur skeletons into motion. 



THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM OF INDIANAPOLIS 



The Kinetosaurs are activated through an ingenious system of wires, pulleys, rings 
and levers. And they are surrounded by interactive displays, computer simulations 
and hands-on learning stations where visitors can gain dino-insights into anatomy, 
art, engineering and life sciences. 

Sculptor John Payne, who designed the Kinetosaurs to closely resemble real dinosaur 
skeletons, created the sculptures out of galvanized steel and discarded industrial 
parts. Payne first became interested in dinosaurs a decade ago when he brought his 
children to The Field Museum. Through reading and the Internet, Payne taught him- 
self about dinosaur anatomy. Then he combined his passions for art and science to 
create the Kinetosaur sculptures. 

Because building dinosaurs from steel is different than building them from bones and 
tendons, the Kinetosaurs can't mimic exactly how dinosaurs moved. But seeing the 
Kinetosaurs graze, hunt and defend themselves sparks the imagination of kids and 
adults alike. 

After seeing "Kinetosaurs," you'll never look at fossilized dinosaur bones in the 
same way again. 



of the exhibition. 


/ 
/ 


"Kinetosaurs" created by The Children's Museum of Indianapolis. 
Sculptures by John Payne of Payne Studios, Asheville, NO, 1998, 1999. 




Th. Field 

Museum 


Call 312.665.7400 for information, tickets or to register for 
programs (unless otherwise specified). 






MARCH/APRIL 2001 


7 




I ©THE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM OF INDIANAPOLIS 

Kinetosaurs 

Dance-Like-a-Dinosaur Family Workshop 

Green Ught Performing Company 

Run, plod and jump like a dinosaur in this interactive 
performance. Dance the role of a T. rex, Triceratops or 
Stegosaurus and discover how bones can tell scientists 
about these ancient creatures. 

Saturdays, March 24— July 7, i p.m. 
For adults and children ages 3—7. 
$2 

Build-a-Dino Family Workshop 

Create your own T. rex, Triceratops or other dinosaur 
marionette out of fun foam. Learn how dinosaurs with 
differently shaped bodies might have moved. 

Sundays, March 25— July 8, J p.m. 
For adults and children ages 6—10. 
$8; members $6 

Dinos Under the Big Top Family Activities 

Join us in the exhibition "Kinetosaurs" for a carnival of 
interactive dinosaur activities. Apply your dino-insights to 
intriguing questions about anatomy, art and life sciences. 

Saturdays and Sundays, March 24— July 8 

10 a.m.— l p.m. 

Free uHth admission to "Kinetosaurs." 



Kremlin Gold Lecture Series 

Last two events! 

Great Figures in Russian History 

Dr. James Cracraft, Professor of History and University Scholar, 
University of Illinois at Chicago 

Find out more about Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, 
Catherine the Great, Nicholas II and other major figures 
in Russian history whose stories are linked to objects in the 
exhibition "Kremlin Gold: 1000 Years of Russian Gems and 
Jewels." Dr. Cracraft is an internationally recognized authority 
and author of seven books in this field. 

Saturday, March 3, 2 p.m. 
$12; students $10; members $8 




The Face of Russia: Anguish, Aspiration and 
Achievement in Russian Culture 

Dr James H. Billington, Scholar of Russian Culture 
and the Librarian of Congress 

Explore how Russia's rich tradition of art, spirituality and 
culture throws light on the country's historical development 
and its current political prospects. Author of the book The 
Face of Russia, Dr. Billington is one of the nation's leading 
experts on Russia and has been a policy advisor to several 
presidential administrations. 

Saturday, March 24, 2 p.m. 
$18; students /educators $15; 
members $12 

This lecture is jointly presented 
with the Chicago Council on 
Foreign Relations. 



Kremlin Gold: 1000 Years of Russian 



8 IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 




Call 312.665.7400 for tickets, information or registration (unless otherwise specified). 



It's Wild in Chicago 
Festival 2001 

Find out how you can help create, preserve 
and restore natural habitats at The f^ield 
Museum's four-day environmental festival. 

Free with Museum admission. 

Saturday and Sunday, April 7—8, 11 a.m.— 4 p.m. 

Monday and Tuesday, April 9—10, 10 a.m.— l p.m. 



Festival highlights: 



\ 



Discover dozens of environmental organizations brought 
together by the Chicago Wilderness coalition. 

Talk with Field Museum scientists about their research 
and careers. 

Enjoy interactive performances where you'll meet Hody 
Coyote, a friendly puppet, or see Insect Theater, presented 
by the Illinois Natural History Survey. 

Hands-on fun at our Habitat Learning Stations. 




^=«*«TO^ 



^l 




New Discoveries Lecture 

Life in the Treetops: Tlie Ups and Downs 

Hear the adventures of Dr. Margaret Lowman, a scientist and 
acclaimed author who has dangled 10 stories above the ground 
to study life in the rainforest canopy. 

Saturday, April 7, 2 p.m. 

$12; students /educators $10; members $8 

This lecture is presented jointly by The Field Museum 
and Earthwatch. 

Voices from The Field Series 

Earth on Edge: Reclaiming Urban Ecosystems 

Jonathan Lash, President, World Resources Institute 
John Rod^ner, President, Chicago Wilderness 

Leaders from around the globe are looking to Chicago for 
solutions to one of our most pressing environmental problems. 
Find out why the World Resources Institute, a think tank and 
key advisor to the United Nations on environmental trends, is 
recognizing the Chicago Wilderness coalition as a model for 
making urban metropolises more environmentally sound. 
You'll also preview footage from an upcoming Bill Moyers 
documentary on the environment. 

Saturday, April 7, 4:30 p.m. 

Cost is $18; students /educators $15; members $12 

This presentation is brought to you jointly by The Field Museum and the 
World Resources Institute. 



THE FIELD MUSEUM/GN8943C.29 



^m 






\ 



THE FIELD MUSEUM/GN 88748.43C 




nside for literarv readina and familv 



;ishoD d 



tf. !'f.tlSf,Y 



/lARCH/APRlL 2001 9 



Performing Arts 

Dancing with Dinosaurs: Tlie Story of Sue 

Teens Together Ensemble 

Learn about the evolution of dinosaurs and the science of 
paleontology through dance and song in this original musical 
by Teens Together Ensemble. Performances start at the 
"Life Over Time" exhibition and travel through the exhibi- 
tion halls. 

Saturdays, through May 5, 1 p.m. 
Free with Museum admission! 



\ 




Lectures 

Uncovering the IVIysteries 
of the Olmec 

David Grove, University of Illinois 
Ann Cyphers, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico 
Gary Feinman and Joshua Borstein, Tlie Field Museum, 
Anthropology Department / 

Learn more about the colossal human heads that the Olmec 
culture carved from volcanic rock more than 3,000 years ago. 
Some are more than 7 feet tall and weigh more than 4 tons! 
Then check out the full-scale replica of an Olmec head, a gift 
to the City of Chicago from the Mexican state of Veracruz, 
which stands near The Field Museum's north entrance. 

Saturday, March 10, 9:30 a.ni.-l p.m. 
$12; members $10; students/educators $5 



1 



I 



Adult Courses 



Botanical Painting and Illustration 

Marlene Hill— Donnelly, Scientific Illustrator, 
Tlie Field Museum 

Learn to draw and paint plants with both scientific accuracy 
and artistic style. We will study the elements of structure, 
light and color theory that bring 
an illustration to life. All experience 
levels are welcome. 

Tuesdays, March 20-May 8, 
6-8:30 p.m. 
$115; members $98 



Egyptian History: Late Period, 

The Saite Period — The Persian Period 

Frank Yurco, Egyptologist 

Discover what life was like in ancient Egypt from about 
700-332 B.C., a period during which foreign rule devastated 
Egyptian culture. 

Wednesdays, April 18- May 23 
(6 sessions), 6:30— 8:30 p.m. 
$85; members $72 




Below is a calendar of the temporary exhibitions you will have an opportunity to visit in 2001. 
Some dates may change. Remember to call or visit our website for specific information. 



Kremlin Gold: 1000 Years of 
Russian Gems and Jewels 

Through March 30 



Kachinas: Gifts from the Spirit 
Messengers 

Through July 22 



Between Cultures: Children 
of Immigrants in America 

January 5 through May 6 



Family Fieldtrips 

Fossil Hunt at Mazon Creek 

Dan Dolak, Instructor, Columbia College 

Do you like to hunt fossils? Come with us to Mazon Creek where 
geology specialist David Dolak will reveal special techniques for 
collecting fossils. You'll discover what northern Illinois looked 
like 300 million years ago. If you're lucky, you might find a 
prehistoric jellyfish, shrimp or plant. 

Saturday, March 24, 8 a.m.— 3 p.m. 
$32; members $27 




Family Workshops 

Connecting to Conservation 

Sara Fretzin, Environmental Conservation Programs, 
The Field Museum 

You can make a difference! Go behind the scenes to 
meet Museum scientists and learn about the importance 
of biodiversity in your everyday life. Discover fun, excit- 
ing ways for parents and children to become 
conservationists in their own homes and communities. 

Friday, April 21, 6-8 p.m. 

Adults with children grades i and up. 

$15; members $i2 



Make Your Mark 

Cyd Engel, Special Projects Manager, Milwaukee Art Museum 

Explore the Museum for inspiration and then return to the studio 
to design your own personal mark, which may even be made into 
a stamp. No prior artistic or drawing experience necessary. Sense 
of adventure required. 

Saturday, March 3 1 and Sunday, April 1 (2 sessions), 
10 a.m.— 3 p.m. 
$12; members $64 



Literary Reading 



An Evening with W.S. Merwin 

Pulitizer Prize winner W.S. Merwin, whose work pos- 
sesses an intimate feeling for landscape and language, 
will read poetry on environmental topics. Merwin's 
career spans five decades and he is currently a Poetry 
Consultant to the Library of Congress. 

Tuesday, April 24, 6:30 p.m. 

$15; students /educators $12; members $10 

This program is presented in a unique collaboration with the 
Poetry Society of America, The Poetry Center of Chicago and 
The Guild Complex. 




Adult Fieldtrips 

Spring Birdwatching: Bald Eagles 

Alan Anderson, NaturaHst 

Journey to Savanna, III., to view the feeding and roosting 
habits of our national symbol. In early spring, more bald 
eagles can be seen along the Mississippi River in Illinois 
than anywhere south of Alaska. 

Saturday, March 10, 6 a.m.— 6 p.m. 
$60; members $50 

Fossil Hunt at Mazon Creek 

Adults can enjoy fossil hunting too! 
See detailed description under 
Family Programs. 

Saturday, April 7, 
8 a.m.— 3 p.m. 
$48; members $41 



MATTHEW SCHV'.ART 



Kinetosaurs: Putting Some Teeth 
into Art and Science 

March 23 through July 8 




Wrapped in Pride: Glianaian Kente 
and African American Identity 

April 13 through July 15 



In Her Hands: Craftswomen 
Clianging tlie World 

May 18 through October 28 




Illinois and Michigan Canal Heritage Tour 

Irving Cutler, Professor Emeritus, Chicago State University 

Discover the historic sites, architecture, ethnic enclaves and 
recreational trails along the I&M Canal, which brought 
Chicago's early growth. We'll stop at Lemont, Lockport and 
Joliet for lunch, walking and browsing. 

Saturday, April 21, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 
$62; members $52 



The Field Museum, The Morton Arboretum and the 
Chicago Botanic Garden are offering an integrated 
program for both beginners and more advanced nat- 
uralists. No prior course work is required. 

Living the Land Ethic: 

The Relevance of Leopold's Vision 

Jim Ballowe, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Bradley University 

Aldo Leopold (1887-1948) was an internationally respected conser- 
vationist and a pioneer in the development of a "land ethic." Learn 
how his ideas affect contemporary thinking and explore your own 
environmental ethic. 

Sundays, March 4-25, W a.m.— 1 p.m. 

$125; members $W5 



Living Colors: A Butterfly Garden 

May 25 through September 3 



Julie Taymor: 
Playing with Fire 

June 14 through November 4 



Cheyenne 

Opens August 10 



Call 312.665.7400 for tickets, information or registration (unless otherwise specified) 



The Two of Us 

Coimie Sulkin, Early Childhood Specialist 

Young children and their adult companions are invited to a six- 
week exploration of The Field Museum. Each week we'll travel 
the Museum's exhibition halls and enjoy stories, songs, hands-on 
activities, an art project and a snack. 

For adults and children ages 3-5 

Tuesdays, April 17-May 22 

10-11:30 a.m. and 1:30-3 p.m. (Choose one time.) 

$70 per child; $60 per member child. For each child, one adult 

attends at no charge. 

This program is sponsored by 

the Siragusa Foundation Early Childhood Initiative. 



Cultural Connections 

Chicago's Global Communities 

Chicago Historical Society, April 5 

Amber and Its Place in Lithuanian 
Culture and Art 

Balzekas Museum of Lithuanian Culture, April 25 

Ukrainian Immigration to Chicago 

Ukrainian National Museum, March 10 

Purim Celebration 

Spertus Museum, March 29 

Tickets to all events are $17; $15 for members; free for children 
up to 11 years. To register, call 312.665.7474. 



Animal Tracking 

Christina Bentz, Environmental and Conservation Programs, 
The Field Museum 

Peek into the secret lives of animals as you read clues about 
where the animals went, what they did and why. 

Wednesdays, March 21 and April 11, 7— 8:30 p.m. 
Saturday, March 24, 9 a.m.— noon 
Saturday, March 31, 6:30-9:30 p.m. 
$130; members $110 




Field Ecology: Spring 

Liane Cochran- Stafira, Department of Biology, 
St. Xavier University 

We'll study how succession has influenced both our physical 
environment and ecological views. Be prepared to be out- 
doors most of the time. 

Wednesdays, April 25-May 9, 7-8:30 p.m. 
Sundays,April 29-May 13, 9-11:30 a.m. 
$130; members $110 

Coursework completed at any campus will earn credit 
toward the Morton Arboretum Naturalist Certificate. 

For NCP courses at The Morton Arboretum, 
call 630.719.2468. 

For NCP courses at the Chicago Botanic Garden, 
call 847.835.8261. 



Local Flora 1: Spring 

Edna Davion, Department of Botany, The Field Museum 

The landscape comes alive when you can identify the names 
and characteristics of the plants found in local forests, prairies 
and wetlands. 

Tuesdays, April 17— May 15, 7— 9 p.m. 
Saturdays, April 21— May 19,9 a.m.-noon 
$150; members $120 




Sigtnund Freud: 
Conflict and Culture 

October 3, 2001 through 
January 6, 2002 



Cleopatra of Egypt: 
From History to Myth 

October 20, 2001 through 
March 3, 2002 




Exhibition Tours-Free with Museum Admission 



Inside Ancient Egypt 

Unlock the secrets of ancient Egyptian 
mummies. Learn about life and after- 
life in tliis great African civilization. 

Every weekday! 
1 p.m. 



4 




i^^9.>-^'-^'**^jui.rn 



Northwest Coast Indians 
and Eskimos 

Discover a spectacular array of arti- 
facts depicting two very different North 
American neighboring environments 
and cultures. 

Every weekday! 
Monday, 1:30 p.m. 
Tuesday- Friday, 1 1:30 a.m. 
and 1:30 p.m. 



Daily Highlight Tours 

Visit the exhibitions that make this 
Museum one of the world's finest. 
Hear the stories behind some of these 
fascinating objects from nature and 
human culture. 

Daily! 

Monday— Friday, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. 

Saturday— Sunday, 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. 

The Field Museum is open daily, 
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed Christmas 
and New Year's Day. 

Visit us as www.fieldmuseum.org. 



Hands-on Activities 
and IVIore 

Interpretive Station Activities 

Every weekend you'll find a selection of hands-on 
activities throughout the Museum. You may meet a soil 
scientist at work, see your name in Egyptian hieroglyphs 
or dissect an owl pellet. 

Every Saturday and Sunday! 

Pawnee Earth Lodge 

Field Museum docents help bring history to life in this 
full-size replica of a traditional Pawnee lodge. 

Daily! 

Saturdays and Sundays, 10 a.m.— 4:30 p.m. 

Weekdays at 1 p.m. 

Story Time: Facts, Fables and Fiction 

Listen to a story, sing songs and make an art project to 
take home — all in just 20 minutes! One adult for every 
three children, please. 

Euery Saturday and Sunday! 1 p.m. 

For adults and young children 

Meet at the "Living Together" exhibition. 

Sponsored by the Siragusa Foundation 
Early Childhood Initiative. 




THE FIELD MUSEUM/GN90006C. 1 9 

Scientists at The Field 

Visit with Field Museum scientists to learn about their 
exciting research. You'll get to see rarely displayed 
specimens from the Museum's collections. 

Every second Saturday of the month 
March 10 and April 14, 11 a.m.— 2 p.m. 

Artists at The Field 

Bring your own materials and get tips from professional 
artists as they create scientific illustrations and other 
art works inspired by our exhibitions. Stools will be 
available. 

Every third Saturday of the month 
March 1 7 and April 21, noon— 3 p.m. 



14 IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 



MEMBERSHIPNEWS 



Exclusive Members' Viewings fo r 'Kinetosaurs 



// 



Hands-on fun brings dinosaurs to life in 
"Kinetosaurs: Putting Some Teeth into Art and 
Science." Set a T. rex and other life-sized dinosaur 
sculptures into motion and learn how these enor- 
mous creatures may have run, roared and fought 
millions of years ago. 

Member viewing dates 

Wednesday, March 21 9 a.m. -5 p.m. 

Thursday, March 22 5 — 10 p.m. 

Sunday, March 25 5-10 p.m. 

Sunday,April 1 5-10 p.m. 

Reservations 

Reservations are required to receive timed entry 
tickets to this exhibition. Please do not request 
preview tickets for non-member guests — children 
or adults. RSVP by March 12 via mail or fax 
(312.665.7701) to receive your tickets by mail. 
No phone reservations will be accepted. 
Reservations received after this date will be held 
in will call, and a membership services represen- 
tative will call you with your entry time. 



Member preview tickets are limited, and time 
slots are available on a first-come, first-served 
basis. If you cannot attend the preview, and wish 
to view the exhibition another day or for a second 
time, a limited number of free passes are available. 

How to get free member passes for 
"Kinetosaurs" on another date 

Members are eligible to receive up to four free passes 
to special exhibitions at the Field in addition to your 
tickets for members-only viewings. Family members 
can receive up to four passes and senior, student, indi- 
vidual and national affiliate members can receive up 
to two passes by caUing Ticketmaster at 312.902.1500. 
(A service charge and transaction fee will be 
assessed.) Members may also obtain passes at the 
membership services desk for future dates or same- 
day viewing for no additional service charge. Viewing 
dates and times are available on a first-come, first- 
served basis. For more information, call the 
membership office at 312.665.7700. 

Parking will be available in the Soldier Field 
parking lot for $7.50 per vehicle. Corner Bakery 
will be open until 8 p.m. 




Triceratops. Kinetosaurs created byTIre Children's Museum of Indianapolis. Sculptures by John Payne of Payne 
Studios, Asheville,NC, 1998, 1999. 



MARCH/APRIL 2001 15 



IN THFFIELD FEATURE 



F-Fipli 



ring Millions to The Field Muspum 



Cher)'! Bardoe, StaffWriter 



From a press release 
aeated by students at 
AlWood Middle School 
iiiWoodhuH,III.,as 
part ofTlie Sue Files 
curriculum. 



Imagine talcing a behind-the-scenes tour of The 
Field Museum led by several top scientists. Picture 
yourself working right alongside them to investi- 
gate cutting-edge scientific theories. Or envision 
traveling with these scientists into the field to 
gather insect specimens, conduct ethnographic 
research or retrieve fossilized dinosaur bones 
fi-om the ground. 

Each year The Field Museum's electronic 
fieldtrips bring these opportunities to millions 
of students, teachers and families nationwide. 

"With e-fieldtrips, we can bring our scientists 
right into the classroom or home," says Jennifer 
Eagleton, manager of educational media. "E-field- 
trips allow students to explore the same questions 
that our scientists study ever\- day, but on a more 
accessible level. We're giving kids the resources to 
think through scientific questions for themselves, 
with our scientists as virtual mentors." 

E-fieldtrips feature rsvo major components. First, 
Field Museum scientists host a broadcast that is 



^.^ge? believe 
-Several eyewtnesee-^ 

TheY «te° ^"* J aue'9 ^o99i\ 

-""^"'"TlU^eatV^'^ 
5he .X19 or 1^ She '^ ^^ 

^ L l^eet \m- ^^^ "^ 
td\ and 4-2- tee i ^ 

^n any etephant. 



delivered by webcast, satellite, select PBS and edu- 
cational stations, distance learning networks and 
VHS tapes. On Dec. 13, for example, an estimated 
8.3 million viewers in Canada and 28 U.S. states 
had the opportunity to tune into Tlie Sue Files. 
During the broadcast, viewers met scientists fi-om 
the Museum's geolog\' and zoology,' departments, 
traveled to South Dakota to see Sue the 77 re.x 
being excavated and followed several students 
through hands-on activities to determine how 
Sue may have moved and her relationship to 
other species. 

Students and teachers also can log onto the 
Museum's website to participate in an interactive, 
on-line curriculum. More than 14,800 Illinois 
students have already begun working on The Sue 
Files curriculum, in which students determine 
whether Sue the 77 re.x was the culprit in the 
disappearance of Field Museum scientist Dr. I. M. 
Prey. Afiier using the scientific method to review 
eyewitness testimony and gather data about Sue, 
students write a letter to cit\- officials, hold a press 
conference or draft a newspaper article summariz- 
ing their fmdings. 

The Field Museum has been at the foreftont 
of educational technology ever since 1996, when 
we pioneered one of the nation's first electronic 
fieldtrip programs. "With our world-famous collec- 
tions, exhibitions and ongoing scientific research, 
the Field is an invaluable educational resource," 
Eagleton said. "This technologv' is bringing the 
Museum's resources to more people than ever." 

The Field Museum's next e-fieldtrip will air 
in April 2001. Living Heritage: Critical 
Conservation will focus on the importance of 
biodiversity in South America, Afi-ica and Swallow 
CUfFWoods, lU. To learn more, check the educa- 
tional technology section on our website at 
www.fieldmuseum.org/education. 




16 



IN THE FIELD 



OFSPECIALINTEREST 



A&E's Inve5tigati\/e Reports 
Fpatures Cofan nonsfirv;^tinn Efforts 



On Thursday, April 26, Bill Kurtis wiU preview 
his latest A&E Investigative Reports at The Women's 
Board's annual outreach lunch. Guardians of the 
Rainforest. His lecture and film, Hie Cofan Peoples of 
Ecuador, will document the work of Field Museum 
scientists in Ecuador alongside the indigenous Cofan, 
original inhabitants of the rainforest. 




Cofan members at Vermejo, a small milage in the 
Ecuadorian foothills. 



The afternoon will include Randall Borman, son 
of missionary parents, who remained in Ecuador 
and became a Cofan member. (Borman received 
the Parker/Gentry Award in 1998 for his conserva- 
tion work with the Cofan.) Setting examples for all 
to follow, Borman and the Cofan are experts in 
ecology and conservation, with projects that include 
recovering endangered turtle populations, establish- 
ing ecotourism ventures and producing colorful 
botanical field guides. Local students and teachers 
participating in our satellite Field Trips program 
will be our guests to learn first-hand from scientists 
and members of the Cofan about the meaningful 
impact of conserving the world's natural resources. 

Please join us in honoring these Guardians of 
the Rainforest. McDonald's sponsors the lunch, 
with generous support from Stephen Freidheim. 
All proceeds benefit the Museum's Cofan conser- 
vation and cultural projects and Field Trips. The 
lecture begins at 11 a.m., and lunch follows. 
Tickets are $80. For tickets or information, call 
The Women's Board office at 312.665.7135. 



Friends of the Library 

[Jnwpjls Digital Tmag in g Prog ram 



Birds and beasts will fill the 
corridors on the evening of May 1, 
spilling from the third-floor read- 
ing room as the Friends of The 
Field Museum Library celebrates 
its 10th anniversary. The creatures 
are actually in the form of fine 
art prints and high quality T- 
shirts, reproducing some of the 
most beautiful original works 
held in the Mary W Runnells 
Rare Book Room. 

Albrecht Durer's rhinoceros, 
Edward Lear's parrots and John 
James Audubon's birds and 
quadrupeds are among many 
illustrations that have been 
reproduced through an image- 
licensing program sponsored by 
the Friends of the Library. 

Royalties from the program are 
building the Library's endowment, 
helping to secure the future of 
this great scholarly resource. By 
special arrangement with the 



licensees, all purchases during 
the event will generate at least 
double the usual royalty for the 
endowment. 

While the corridors adjacent 
to the Library will become an 
art gallery for the evening, the 
reading room will become 
a digital imaging workshop 
demonstrating the art and 
technology of digital image 
capture, retouch and print 
production. The staff of Black 
Box Collotype of Chicago wiU 
perform and explain high- 
resolution image capture and 
Photoshop manipulation 
of digital image files for 
production of fine art facsim- 
iles. We will also display and 
discuss the proofing process 
that leads to a finished print. 

Admission is free for 
Friends and their guests and 
$25 for non-members. All are 



welcome to attend; reservations 
are limited. For reservations or 
information about joining the 
Friends of the Library, call 
Megan Sweeney at 
312.665.7136 or email 
msweeney@fmnh.org. 




From John James 
Audubon's The Birds 
of America (London, 
1827-1838). Plate LX I, 
Great Horned Old. " 



MARCH/APRIL 2001 



17 



OFSl'ICIALINTEREST 



The Field on Film 




-— nUBMni 9 9 ^IH 



Miirk Alrcy, Admimstrativc Coordinator, Auidcinic Affairs 

If there were an Academy Award category for 
"Best Performance by a Museum," The Field 
Museum would be a shoe-in. From the comic to 
the dramatic to the horrific, more than a dozen 
feature films and television series have used the 
Field's majestic halls and neoclassical facades as 
recognizable movie shorthand for "museum." The 
most familiar example may be 77;e Relic, a 1 996 
entry about a brain-sucking monster on the loose 
in a Chicago natural history museum, but the 
Field on film stretches back to the days before 
movies "talked." 

Holl)-\vood and foreign 
studios were shooting The 
Field Museum at least as 
early as the 1920s — as 
a newsreel subject. 
Paramount. Fox- 
Movietone, Pathe and 
other major companies 
shot dozens of newsreel 
segments at the Field in the 
'20s and '30s, with subjects 
ranging from the unveiling 
of a newly acquired 
turquoise, to a visit fi^om 
the Prince ofWales, to 
cleaning the elephants in 
Stanley Field Hall. It is dif- 
ficult to know how many 
of these shorts survived the 
^ ravages of time — and 
2 nitrate film — but a few still 
S exist in film archives and 
^ provide a fascinating 
5 glimpse of the Field during 
= this era. 

" Fast-forward some 50 
years to find the Field in a 
major motion picture — the 1973 big-screen adap- 
tation of Desmond Morris' pop-anthropology 
bestseller, Jlic Xakcd Ape. Although the film is no 
longer in distribution, long-time Museum staS" 
members recall that a human evolution exhibit 
was created in the main hall for a scene featuring 
Victoria Principal. The filmmakers reportedly 
ofliered the ersatz exhibit to the Museum when the 
production was completed, but then Field Museum 
President Leland Webber declined. 

The Museum's next big-screen part was a more 
mainstream efl^ort with bigger stars and is better 
remembered today — Daimeiv.Tlie Omen II. The 
1978 sequel to 77;e Omen finds the young 
Antichrist in the care of his uncle, Chicago indus- 



trialist Richard Thorn (played by William Holden), 
who also chairs the Thorn Museum (played by the 
Field). The Thorn Museum is slated to acquire a 
trove of biblical-era artifacts that hold clues to 
Damien's true nature, and thus figures prominently 
in the story. Besides establishing shots of the south 
entrance, the film captures Stanley Field Hall and 
the Egypt gallery of that period (now the Siragusa 
Center). The movie ends with Damien standing on 
the Museum's north steps with an imperious smile 
as he ponders his destiny (and perhaps two more 
Omen sequels). 

Damien was on the forefront of a boom in 
Chicago-based moviemaking, driven by a trend 
toward "runaway production," when producers fled 
Los Angeles in search of visual variety, reduced red 
tape and lower costs. The creation of the Illinois 
Film Office in 1975, and the arrival of Mayor Jane 
Byrne's film-friendly administration the following 
year, led to the rapid entrenchment of Chicago as 
a vibrant film location. Today, stars' trailers and 
movie catering trucks have become common sights 
on Chicago streets — and at The Field Museum. 

The Museum's next appearance was in a romantic 
comedy called Continental Divide (1981), concerning 
the unlikely romance of a Mike Royko-Uke Chicago 
Sun— Times columnist (John Belushi) and an earthy 
ornithologist (Blair Brown). After a brief separation 
their passion is rekindled when the scientist returns 
to give a lecture at "The Natural History Museum." 
Before the final embrace, Belushi's rumpled news 
hound makes several indecisive passes up and 
down the Field's north steps as he works up his 
courage to go in. 

The Field played a small part in the 1986 pilot 
to the series Crime Story, when two professional 
burglars admire "The Lakeshore Museum" from 
the steps of Shedd Aquarium as they discuss plans 
to heist the "Hapsburg jewels." There were larger 
supporting roles in two 1988 films. In Vice Versa, 
an ancient artifact causes a father (Judge Reinhold) 
and his teenage son (Fred Savage) to switch bod- 
ies. Desperate to reverse the spell, we see the pair 
walking through Stanley Field Hall on their way 
to consult an archeologist about the object's 
origins. In She's Having a Baby, Kevin Bacon 
plays a young husband beset by the anxieties of 
a new marriage and impending fatherhood. The 
"Museum of Natural History" — Stanley Field 
Hall again — figures in four scenes, notably the 
one in which his wife (Elizabeth McGovern) 
reveals that she is expecting. 

Not to be typecast, our handsome neoclassical edi- 
fice won non-museum parts in two 1 989 releases. 



IN THE FIELD 



OFSFECIAl INTEREST 



In Tlic Package, a political thriller starring Gene 
Hackman, the Museum stands in for a D.C. military 
office building and reappears as itself in an aerial 
shot when the action shifts to Chicago near the 
film's climax. The Field also co-stars with Jessica 
Lange in The Music Box as a Chicago courthouse, 
with both the north exterior and grand staircase in 
Stanley Field Hall setting the scene for the film's 
war-crime trial. It was back to work as a museum 
in 1990 in Tire Kid Wlto Loved Christmas, a senti- 
mental made-for-TV movie, followed by another 
appearance as a government-type structure in the 
1993 ABC series Missing Persons. 

The Field is central to the plot of The Relic 
(1996), a movie about a monster that gets loose 
after being shipped back to Chicago with a load of 
archeological artifacts. Only a few scenes were shot 
at the Field, including the north entrance, Stanley 
Field Hall and the west balcony, but the producers' 
efforts at re-creating "back-of-the-house" labs and a 
two-tiered zoology exhibit convinced many viewers 
that the whole movie was shot here. The Field also 
appears in the 1 996 thriller Chain Reaction, but is 
portrayed in a vaguely Smithsonian fashion as a 
Washington, D.C, science museum, combined via 
wildly discontinuous editing with parts of the 
Museum of Science and Industry. 



The Field remained busy in the 1990s, appearing 
in television's Early Edition and at least two episodes 
of the NBC hit ER. Its most recent feature film 
stint was a 2000 remake of a 1993 French fantasy- 
comedy Les Visiteurs, called TIte Visitors, which has 
only been released in the United Kingdom. And 
parts of The Muhammad Ali Story with WiU Smith 
wiU be filmed here in 2001. 

Ron Ver Kuilen, managing director of the Illinois 
Film Office, reports, "After the El, the intersection of 
Milwaukee, North and Damen and Wrigley Field, 
The Field Museum has been our most popular 
filming location." At last count, that's 1 1 features, 
two TV movies and five TV episodes, not including 
at least 30 newsreels and a 1 954 TV commercial for 
Community Motors Pontiac. Their "thumbs up" 
quotient is mixed, and there is nary a Best Picture 
among them, but each one, from the newsreels to 
Tlie Relic, contains an unintended, often unexpected 
pleasure for fans of The Field Museum. The "Best 
Performance by a Museum" category may be a 
stretch, but "Most Photogenic?" The Field is the 
winner, hands-down. 

In Damien: The Omen II, one of the earliest features shot at 
The Field Museum, a terrible secret is gradually being revealed 
to Richard and Ann Tliorn (William Holden and Lee Grant). 





MARCH/APRIL 2001 19 



Field Museum Tours at a Glance 



For information, call Field Museum Tours at 800.811.7244 or email fmtours@sover.net. Please note that rates, 
prices and itineraries are subject to change and that prices are per person, double occupancy. 



An Insider's Tour of Santa Fe 

April 29- May 4, 2001 (6 days) 
This focused tour offers a splen- 
did combination of archaeological 
sites, museums, cultural centers, 
artist and craftsmen's workshops, 
outstanding restaurants and one 
fine hotel. Highlights include the 
prehistoric ruins of Poshu- 
Ouinge and Sapawe, ancient Taos, 
historic Pecos, the San Felipe 
Pueblo's Green Corn Dance and 
Georgia O'Keefe's house. 
Museum Leader: Anthropologist 
Jonathan Haas 



The Geology and 
History of New Zealand 

Nov. 3-21,2001 (19 days) 
New Zealand's natural and 
cultural diversity will astound 
you. On North Island visit Goat 
Island Marine Reserve, Tongariro 
National Park, the NZ Maori 
Arts and Crafts Institute, 
Tokomaru Bay, Gisborne and 
Wellington's Museum of New 
Zealand and Botanic Gardens. 
On South Island tour 
Christchurch's Canterbury 
Museum, Dunedin, Queenstown 
and Milford Sound. 
Museum Leader: Anthropologist John 
Terrell and Geologist Scott Lidgard 

Amazon by Riverboat 

Dec. 1-9, 2001 (9 days) 
Travel aboard a 14-cabin riverboat 
exploring the remote upper 
reaches of the Amazon River 
system. Experience the forest and 
wdldUfe of the Amazon jungle. 
Optional extension to Cuzco and 
Macchu Picchu. 
Museum Leader: TBA 

Mysteries of Earth 
by Private Jet 

Dec. 30, 2001-Jan. 23, 2002 
(25 days) 

Travel aboard a private, first-class 
Boeing 757 on a once-in-a-hfe- 
time journey to the world's most 
remote habitats: the vast flora 
and fauna of the Amazon; volcanic 
Canary Islands; great apes of 
Borneo; annual migration in 
Tanzania; wildlife of Nepal; 
rare species of the Galapagos; 
undersea life of the Great Barrier 
Reef; moai of Easter Island; tribal 
cultures of Papua New Guinea; 
the Seychelles; and Samoa. 
Guest Leader: Renoimied evolution 
expert Stephen Jay Gould 



"I thought the trip was wonderful. This was the trip of 
a lifetime for us. We loved every minute of it." 




Egypt Revisited 

Oct. 14-28,2001 (15 days) 

Explore spectacular archaeological 
sites and monuments not seen on 
your first trip. (First-time visitors 
should see Egyptian Odyssey 
below.) Highlights feature Abusir, 
Dashur, Maidum, Faiyum, Tanus, 
Abydos, Dendara, dawn at Abu 
Simbel and three nights cruising 
Lake Nasser, plus lesser-known 
sites in Cairo, Luxor and Aswan. 
Museum Leader: Egyptologist 
Frank Yurco 



Egyptian Odyssey 

Jan. 27-Feb. 3, 2002 (8 days) 

Explore the amazing world of 
Egypt's ancient pharaohs by land 
and riverboat. Discover astound- 
ing archaeological sites, including 
the famed pyramids of Giza, the 
site of ancient Thebes, the three 
colossi of Ramses II and the 
Valley of Kings. Take a nostalgic 
Nile cruise aboard one of two 
vintage paddle wheelers, built at 
the turn of the century. 
Leader: Egyptologist Frank Yurco 



"I learned so much, saw so much and 
the events ran so smoothly they almost 
seemed choreographed." 

Co-sponsored with the Explorers 
Club, Mysteries of Earth encompasses 
four continents and is led by Stephen 
Jay Gould, well-known scientific 
writer and lecturer 





The Hidden Wilderness 
of the Cordillera Azul 



* A Butterfly Garde 



*.%- 





FRO.MTHEPRESIDENT 



Field Rese arch Season Swells at the Museum 




Anthropology 

Jonathan Haas — Peru to survey and map 
large preceramic sites in three valleys on 
the central coast 

Alaka Wall — Lake Calumet to continue 
social asset mapping research in conjunc- 
tion with the conservation design work. 
Peru to assess working with the Shipibo 
on monitoring the environment. New York 
City to research gender roles, work and 
health among African-American women. 

Antonio Curet — Tibes in Ponce, Puerto 
Rico, possibly one of the earliest chlefdoms 
in the Caribbean, to identify potential 
domestic areas using geophysical techniques. 

Gary Feinman, Linda Nicholas and 
William Mlddleton — Oaxaca, Mexico, 
to excavate residential terraces at El 
Palmillo and look for changing patterns of 
domestic life and economic organization 
(ca. A.D. 200-800). 

Botany 

Greg Mueller — Costa Rica to co-coordi- 
nate an international workshop and 
collect fungi as part of the Costa Rican 
National Inventory. 

Jun Wen — China, India and Vietnam to 

conduct field studies on the systematics of 
the medicinally important ginseng species 
and the biogeography of Asia. 



On almost any given day, Field Museum scientists can be 
found combing through dense forests, wind-swept plains 
or snowy mountain footpaths seeking clues to understand 
our planet's people and places. Here are just a few points 
on the global map some of our scientists will be visiting 
in the next few months: 



Environmental and 
Conservation Programs 

Debby Moskovlts — Peru to follow up on a 
rapid biological inventory completed last 
fall. Bolivia to begin work on a primate 
research center and transforming logging 
concessions into conservation concessions. 

Robin Foster — Ecuador to assess the 
Andean foothills, a potential site for 
future rapid biological inventories and 
training in inventory methods. 

Douglas Stotz — Calumet to continue a 
conservation study on bird populations 
and distribution in areas targeted for 
ecological restoration. 

Geology 

Olivier Rieppel — China to study recently 

discovered middle Triassic marine reptiles. 

John Flynn — Chile to prospect for new 
fossil mammal localities in the Andes 
Mountains. 

Jenny McElwain — Sierra Nevada to collert 
fossil plants from the Middle Eocene Chalk 
Bluffs flora and test a new method of esti- 
mating paleo-elevation. Tibet to collect 
high-altitude fossil plants in investigating 
the uplift history of the Tibetan plateau. 

Lance Grande — Wyoming to excavate in 
the fossil beds of the Green River 
Formation, one of the most productive 
freshwater fossil locations in the world. 

Peter Wagner — Nevada, Utah and 
California to collect gastropods from the 
Ordovician and Devonian periods. 



Zoology 

Barry Chemoff — Guyana to collect fishes 

and photograph specimens for his revision 
of the characid genus Bryconops. 

Harold Voris — Thailand to study snake 
ecology in national parks. 

John Bates — Democratic Republic of 
Congo to help two research stations 
document biodiversity. 

Petra Sierwald and Jason Bond — Republic 
of South Africa to collect arthropods, 
including spiders and millipedes, for 
research here and at other institutions. 

Janet Voight — Juan de Fuca Ridge, 
Pacific Ocean, to build biological collec- 
tions in cooperation with a geophysics 
cruise that is using a remotely operated 
vehicle. 

Tom Gnoske — Bhutan, Himalayas, to 
conduct bird and small mammal faunal 
inventories and survey the distribution 
of tigers and their prey. 

For more information on our scientists or 
their research, visit wv*(w.fieldmuseum. org. 
You may also meet some of them at 
Members' Nights on May 23, 24 or 25. 
See page 21 for more details on this antic- 
ipated opportunity. 

John W. McCarter, Jr. 
President & CEO 




I _io 



Continuing improvements, we have introduced two new changes in this issue. Membership News, histori- 
cally placed around the middle of the magazine, has a permanent new home inside the back cover so you 
will always know where to go for the latest membership information. Also, we have replaced Ask A 
Scientist with Scientist's Pick on page 15. It's a striking large photo of an unusual artifact or specimen 
from the collections that our own scientists choose to highlight. It may be something you might not other- 
wise see and is tied to our goal of presenting science in an exciting, engaging, educational way. Please send 
comments or questions to Amy Cranch, publications manager. The Field Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore 
Drive, Chicago, IL 60605-2496, or via email atacranch@fmnh.org. 



INTHEFIELD 



May/June 2001, Vol.72, No. 3 



Editor: 

Amy Cranch, The Field Museum 

Design: 

Depke Design 

Copy editor: 

Laura F. Nelson 



In the Field is printed on recycled paper 
using soy-based inks. 

In the Field (ISSN #1051-4546) is published 
bimonthly by The Field IVluseum. Copyright 
2001 The Field Museum. Annual subscriptions 
are $20; $10 for schools. IVluseum membership 
includes In the Field subscription. Opinions 
expressed by authors are their own and do not 
necessarily reflect the policy of The Field 
IVluseum. Notification of address change should 
include address label and should be sent to the 
membership department. POSTMASTER: Send 
address changes to In the Field, The Field 
IVluseum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496. Periodicals postage 
paid at Chicago, Illinois. 

The cover image is inspired by Living Colors; A 
Butterfly Garden, created by The Field Museum 
and open May 25 through Sept 25, 2001. 
Photo montage by Jacqueline Hartmann. 



The Field IVluseum salutes the people of 
Chicago for their long-standing, generous 
support of the IVluseum through the 
Chicago Park District. 



j: 



ter 



Field 



useum 



1400 South Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496 
312.922.9410 
v^ww.fleldmuseum.org 



^^^ 6 




A rapid biological inventory in Peru reveals 

at least 28 species of plants and animals new 

to science. 

Left:Tliis Bolitoglossa sp., apparently 

new, sets the highest- altitude record for a 

salamander in Peru. 



New research concludes that ferns and 
horsetails are the closest living relatives 
to seed plants. 

Left: The report made the cover of Nature 
magazine in February. 



15 



New column! See Scientist's Pick for a 
close-up view of a seal's distinctive teeth. 



16 



Repatriation is active at The Field Museum. 



18 



Celebrity-made masks will be auctioned 
off to benefit the Museum. 
Left: Masks by Donna Blue Lachman (left) and 
Dirk Lohan (right). 



Museum Cam pus Neighbors 



Shedd Aquarium The Oceanarium turns 10 
in 2001. Watch the beluga whales and Pacific 
white-sided dolphins in an all-new behavioral 
presentation, with lots of surprises. Throughout 
May, take part in an Oceanarium birthday 
party, and in June, go behind the scenes to see 
how the marine mammals are cared for. Check 
www.sheddaquarium.org for specific dates and 
times, or call 312.939.2438. 



Adier Planetarium Celebrate the eternal 
creativity of the human spirit that sought to 
measure, track and ultimately mechanize 
time in Episodes from the Story of Time, 
open April 11 to Sept. 3, 2001. Marvel at 
unique, seldom-seen artifacts, such as ancient 
astrolabes, complicated sundials, perplexing 
perpetual calendars and intricate clocks. For 
information, visit vw\/w.adlerplanetarium.org, 
or call 312. 922. STAR. 



Museum Campus Walking Tours Discover 

how Chicago's three natural science museums 
have been brought together in a contemporary 
version of Daniel Burnham's Plan of Chicago. 
Admire Chicago's architectural skyline against 
nature's shoreline. Meet in front of Shedd 
Aquarium at 11am on June 2, July 7 or 
Aug. 4. Tickets are $5, or free for Chicago 
Architecture Foundation members. Visit 
www.architecture.org, or call 312.922.3432 
for details. 



MAY/JUNE 2001 



I NTH EFI ELD FEATURE 



The Hidden Wilderness of the Cordillera Azul 

William S. Alrcrsoii and Dehra K. Moskovits, Environmental and Conservation Programs 



Tlie Sliipiho call these 
craggy peaks oj the upper 
Rio Pisqtii manashahiie- 
mana, or turtles, in 
allusion to a row of 
piled-up turtles. 



Rapid biological inventories, a critical focus of The Field Museum's Environmental 
and Conservation Programs, aim to catalyze immediate action for conservation in 
threatened regions of high biological value. The scientific teams focus primarily on 
groups of organisms that indicate habitat type and condition and can be surveyed 
quickly and accurately. 

Our rapid inventories do not attempt to produce exhaustive lists of organisms. 
Rather, vje use a time-effective, integrated approach to identify different biological 
communities and determine whether they are of outstanding quality and significance 
in a regional or global context. 

In-country scientists are central to these teams. And after each inventory, long- 
term management of the natural communities and further research rely on initiatives 
from local scientists and conservationists. 

When an inventory is completed, typically within one month, the team relays the 
survey information to local and international decision makers who can set priorities 
and guide policy and action in the host country. 




IN THE FIELD 



Cordillera Azul — 

the "Blue Mountains" of Central Peru 

The northern Cordillera Azul mountain region is 
huge, wild and breathtaking. The easternmost — and 
youngest — range of the Andes, the Cordillera Azul 
sprang up between the lowlands of the Ucayali 
River to the east and the hills and valleys above the 
HuaUaga River, a major center of coca cultivation, 
to the north and west. Its dynamic geologic setting — 
with jagged mountain crests and ridges, landslides 
and sheer rock cliffs, broad lowland valleys and 
slopes, and high-altitude wetlands — was the target 
of the Museum's three-week rapid biological inven- 
tory this past fall. 

A striking, important aspect of the Cordillera 
Azul is its staggering diversity of habitat types, from 
the wide range of altitudes (200 to 2,400 meters), 
to the large variety of soil and rock types, to the 
extensive wetlands. There are few or no permanent 
residents within the highlands, and human use is 
generally low, even by the indigenous Shipibo 
community in the eastern lowlands. 

Our leading partner in the inventory and 
subsequent conservation negotiations is the 
Asociacion Peruana para la Conservacion de la 
Naturaleza (APECO). In 1999,APECO spear- 
headed an initiative with the Red Ambiental 
Peruana, a private environmental coalition, and 
recommended establishing a new national park 
within the rugged highlands. 

Our goal was to obtain quickly the biological 
information critical to empower and sustain these 





Russian-made helicopters 
of the Peruvian National 
Police carried us to 
otherwise inaccessible 
areas within the 
Cordillera Azul. 



national and regional conservation efforts. The 
Cordillera Azul stiU offers the rare opportunity to 
act before habitat fragmentation and degradation 
forever transform the landscape. 

Speed is essential because transformation 
approaches swiftly. The nearly 10,000 sq. miles 
of contiguous foothiD and lowland forests, once 
under partial federal protection, are now under 
threat from multinational logging interests, which 
have designated a huge expanse of ancient 
Amazonian forests as logging concessions. New 
roads being planned for extracting the timber will 
attract massive, disorderly colonization that will 
lead to damage much greater than the direct 
impact of selective logging, unless comprehensive 
and immediate measures for conservation can be 
put in place. 

The good news is that while we were there, the 
Peruvian government declared the remaining acreage 
as a reserved zone, signifying at least temporary, con- 
tinued protection from timber harvest and agriculture. 

Rapid Inventory of the Proposed National Park 

Charged with collecting and relaying information 
before public auction of the lowland logging con- 
cessions, we started planning the rapid inventory 
with APECO's Lily Rodriguez and secured funding 
from the John D. and Catherine T MacArthur 
Foundation. Our first big challenge was to reach 
our study site. Ringed by sheer rock escarpments, 
the heart of the northern Cordillera Azul is 
extremely difficult to access. The central section 



'Most of the areas to the east, west and south were 
hilly and forested. But to the north was one of the 
most incredible views [I have] ever witnessed in [my] 
40 years of Peruvian travel..." John P. 0'Ne\\\ 



MAY/JUNE 2001 




Tlie Scarlet-banded 
Barbet ^Capito wallacei^ 
a iiai', endemic species, 
is knouv only in tall 
cloud forests on afetv 
ridge aests within the 
northern Cordillera Azid. 



of this escarpment rises a vertical mile out of the 
lowlands, reminiscent of the front range of the 
Grand Tetons in Wyoming. 

A wonderful chain of support took us from 
the Museum's e.xternal affairs otEce, to our federal 
relations representative in Washington, D.C., to the 
Peruvian National Police (PNP), each entity- 
helping us gain access to the area. From the 
moment we landed in Lima, the PNP helped 
get the team and our unwieldy gear into the 
field. PNP helicopters also flew us in and out 
of our survey sites, giving us hours of superb 
close-up views of different habitats. 

Once on the ground, the inventory team — with 
scientists from rvvo Peruvian and two U.S. institu- 
tions — spread out along trails cut by our Peruvian 
and Shipibo guides. The vertical climbs to the crests 
challenged even the youngest and hardiest among 
us. It was treacherous walking around in the 
spongy, unstable mats of superficial roots at the 
'"top of the world." One false step and you sank 
to your hips, with your stomach quickly lodging 
in your throat. But as we became increasingly 
exhausted and sore, the views grew more stunning 
and the plant and animal Ufe spectacular. 

What can a group of scientists find in three 
weeks, covering three sites? An impressive amount, 
when the area is as rich and rugged as the 
Cordillera Azul. 

We established several satellite camps across 
a range of elevations. During those 21 days, we 
surveyed vascular plants, fishes, reptiles and amphib- 
ians, birds and large mammals. For each organism 
group, we found specialized species with restricted 
ranges and habitats. Dozens of records of plants and 
animals are new for Peru. And at least 28 species — 
but likelv manv more — are new to science. 



The botanists registered about 1 ,600 species of 
plants and estimated 4,000 to 6,000 for the region. 
More than 12 species are new to science, including 
a "bonsai" version of a giant tree at the ridgetops. 
The diversity of palms — an important food 
resource for maintaining high densities of several 
mammals and birds — is remarkable in the region. 
In less than one month, the team encountered 43 
percent of the 105 palm species known from Peru. 

The mammal team recorded 7 1 species of mam- 
mals, including a black squirrel that is possibly new 
to science. Noteworthy records include bush dogs, 
spectacled bears, 10 species of monkeys (with the 
woolly, spider and saki monkeys common and 
tame) and daily sightings of white-lipped peccaries, 
with more than 100 individuals per herd. The 
sightings include 13 endangered species. 

Together with a field team from the Louisiana 
State University Museum of Natural Science, the 
ornithologists registered more than 500 species of 
birds, with one new species — the Scarlet-banded 
Barbet {Capito wallacei) — newly described from a 
single group of ridges in the northern Cordillera 
Azul. Three species are new records for Peru. The 
Cordillera Azul has sizeable populations of game 
birds, large parrots and macaws. Two poorly known 
and habitat-restricted species, the Royal Sunangel 
hummingbird {Heliangelus regalis) and the Bar- 
winged Wood- Wren {Henicorhina leucoptera), 
are common in the stunted forests at the crests 
of mountains; the Cordillera Azul may be the 
previously unknown center of distribution for 
these species. 

The herpetologists found 82 species of 
amphibians and reptiles, with eight possibly 
new species of frogs and one new species of 
salamander, only the fourth known from Peru. 
Brightly colored frogs — representing a rich 
assemblage of species from northern and central 
Peru, and from the highlands and lowlands — 
were a prominent feature at every elevation. 

Finally, a sampling of fishes in the headwaters 
revealed a rich fauna with at least 22 new records 
for Peru, of which 10 are possibly new to science. 
The fish team found several new species in water- 
fall-studded, clear-water streams in the highlands. 
Some have e.xtreme adaptations for climbing 
waterfalls: they cUng with their strong sucker 
mouths to vertical and even overhanging rock. 
In the lowlands, the ichthyologists registered large 
numbers for species typically exploited for human 
consumption, indicating a healthy fish community. 



IN THE FIELD 



The stark beauty of the region, the wealth of 
interesting species and the harshness of the terrain 
all contributed to the trip's intensity and a strong 
bond that developed among team members. 
Everyone endured logistical mishaps with good 
humor, including all the food ending up in one 
high camp while all the water ended up in another. 
Those who had to camp along steep slopes gracefully 
tolerated their sleeping fellow campers rolling into 
their tents at night. 

Toward the end of the trip, tragedy struck. The 
PNP helicopter that had supported us throughout 
the expedition crashed, killing the copilot and 
severely injuring the pilot and flight engineers. 
Our hearts and healing wishes remain with the 
survivors and their families, and with the family 
of Livio Orozco Escobar, the copilot. Our 
continued efforts in the region will carry our 
deep gratitude and devotion to all who extended 
their kindness and dedication. 

Conservation Opportunities 

The rapid biological inventory team is recom- 
mending that the Peruvian government reclassify 
the reserved zone as a national park and extend 
its limits to follow the natural contours of the 
terrain. The approximately 5,000 sq. miles of 
proposed parkland would protect a unique set 
of biological communities that are among the 
most diverse of all existing conservation areas 
in Peru. Many of these communities are endan- 
gered or unprotected elsewhere, and are 
disappearing fast. 

The sheer size and isolation of the proposed 
park will allow it to function as a genetic refuge 
for game animals and commercial tree species that 
may be exploited to local extinction elsewhere 
in Amazonia and the Andes. Appropriate land 
management and economic alternatives in the 
lowlands will engender protection of the entire, 
contiguous range of biological communities, from 
dwarf vegetation at the mountain crests to the tall 
rainforests along lowland rivers. 

The 1,000 indigenous Shipibo who live in 
the expansive, still-intact lowlands east of the 
proposed park represent a promising potential for 
conservation. Shipibo guides worked closely with 
us on the rapid biological inventory and on a 
previous expedition led by APECO. Since the 
inventory, representatives of APECO and The 
Field Museum have been discussing options with 
the Shipibo to develop a conservation plan for 
the area where they traditionally live and hunt. 




The Shipibo can play a major role in creating a 
balanced management plan for the area, including 
monitoring schemes to prevent excessive hunting, 
fishing and over-harvest of forest products. Shipibo 
residents are interested in developing ecotourism 
and other low-impact economic alternatives that 
are compatible with the long-term survival of their 
culture and the plants and animals of the northern 
Cordillera Azul. 

Where are we now? The Field Museum and 
APECO have been working with Peruvian govern- 
mental and non-governmental entities since the 
fieldwork was completed and presented the rapid 
inventory results in late winter. One goal is to secure 
national park status for the highlands before the 
Peruvian government changes this summer. Feasible? 
Possibly. Many are working hard, in Peru and the 
United States, to maximize the chances of success. 

Our second goal, backed by Peruvian and 
international organizations, is to convert the 
three concessions inhabited by the Shipibo people 
to conservation concessions rather than logging 
concessions. The moment of truth will come 
during the public auction this June of the 22 
"logging" concessions that now cover 5,000 sq. 
miles of lowland forests east of the Cordillera 
Azul escarpment. Until then, and we hope long 
after, we will continue planning for conservation 
with the Shipibo. If these collaborative efforts are 
successful, the Cordillera Azul region may soon 
become one of the most treasured natural assets 
of Peru — and of the world. ITF 

For the complete, multi-authored report of the Cordillera 
Azul expedition, or more information on rapid biological 
inventories, visit wwwfmnh.org/rbi. 



Our Shipibo guides take 
a short break after a 
long, steep climb to our 
highland camp. 



MAY/JUNE 2001 



I NTH EFIELD FEATURE 



Scientists Shake Up the 
''Family Tree'' of Green Plants 



Greg Borzo, Media Manager, Academic Affairs 



Cyathea (tree fern), com- 
monly called fiddlehead; 
young leaf, tightly curled 
in crazier; Costa Rica. 



Apparently, the lowly fern deserves more respect. 

New research that appeared as the cover story of 
Nature on Feb. 1 concludes that ferns and horsetails 
are not — as currently believed — lower, transitional 
evolutionary grades between mosses and flowering 
plants. In fact, ferns and horsetails, together, are the 
closest living relatives to seed plants. 

"Today's systematists are using genomic tools 
to rewrite the textbooks on animal and plant evo- 
lution," says James Rodman, program director of 
environmental biology at the National Science 
Foundation, which funded the research. "This 
research is the latest major rearrangement of the 
plant tree of life. It will encourage others to explore 
ferns as model organisms for basic ecological and 
physiological studies." 

This research calls for rethinking the "family 
tree" of green plants. Also, it uncovers a research 
shortcoming. All inain plant model organisms used 
for research (such as Arabidopsis, which recently 
became the first plant to have all its genes 
sequenced) are recently evolved flowering plants. 
This limitation could compromise scientific 
research. Models in the newly identified fern and 
horsetail lineage are heeded to round out the study 




of plant development and evolution. This could 
help scientists fight invasive species, engineer 
genetic traits, develop better crops and prospect the 
botanical world for medicines. 

The new research uses morphological and DNA 
sequence data to show that horsetails and ferns 
make up one genetically related group, which 
evolved in parallel to the other major genetically 
related group made up of seed plants and including 
flowering plants. 

"Our discovery that 99 percent of vascular plants 
fall into two major lineages with separate evolution- 
ary histories dating back 400 million years will likely 
have a significant impact on several disciplines, 
including ecology, evolutionary biology and plant 
developmental genetics," says Kathleen Pryer, Ph.D., 
lead author of the paper and assistant curator in 
botany at The Field Museum. "Viewing these two 
genetically related groups as contemporaneous and 
ancient lineages will likely also have profound con- 
sequences on our understanding of how terrestrial 
ecosystems and landscapes evolved." 

The work of Dr. Pryer and her colleagues builds 
on the Deep Green project, an unprecedented 
collaboration of researchers dedicated to uncovering 
the evolution of and interrelation of all green 
plants. In 1999, Deep Green reported at an interna- 
tional botanical conference that DNA analysis 
indicates that all green plants — from the tiniest 
single-celled algae to the grandest redwoods — 
descended from a common single-celled ancestor a 
billion years ago. Green plants, which include some 
500,000 species, are among the best-documented 
groups in the tree of life. The new paper on ferns, 
horsetails and seed plants improves scientists' under- 
standing of that group still further. 

To learn more about related work, 
visit these website links: 

• Phylogeny, character evolution and diversification 
of extant ferns: http://www.fmnh.org/research 
_collections/botany/botany_sites/ferns/index.html 

• The hfe history and fossil record of horsetails: 
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/plants/spheno- 
phyta/sphenophyta.html 

• A plant phylogenetics project called Deep Green: 
http://ucjeps.herb.berkeley.edu/bryolab/green- 
plantpage.html ITF 



IN THE FIELD 



YOURGUIDETOTHEFIELD 



A Pullout Calendar of Events for May and June 



Inside: Exhibits Festivals Family Programs Adult Programs 






Hands-on 
Butterfly Fun 

Learn about butterflies and 
the habitats they call home 11 
through hands-on activities ^• 
that you'll find near the 
Living Colors exhibition and 
throughout the Museum. 

Put together a butterfly 
puzzle and learn about the 
antenna, proboscis and other 
parts of a butterfly's body. 
Learn to identify the mark- 
ings of local butterflies as you 
draw them with chalk on the 
sidewalk. Or gain insight into 
the art of scientific collection 
and discover how you can help 
maintain and restore wildlife 
habitats. 

Wednesdays, Sattudays and Sundays 

May 25-Sept. 3 

FREE with Museum admission 



_x 



fe 



Field 



useum 



New Exhibition- 
Living Colors: A Butterfly Garden 

May 25-Sept. 3, 2001 

Step into a lush, enchanting world of living color. 

The Field Museum has created a captivating garden where hundreds of butter- 
flies will flutter and swirl around you on the southeast terrace. 

The garden is home to more than 35 species of butterflies and moths 
that are native to North America. All around you butterflies sun them- 
selves, sip nectar from flowers and chase one another within inches of 
your head. Stand very still. ..and one may even land on your nose! 

As you explore the garden, use our butterfly guides — available in English and 
Spanish — to see how many species you can identify. You can also watch as 
new butterflies emerge from their chrysalises (or moths from their cocoons) 
and expand their crumpled wings to take flight for the first time. 

Visiting Living Colors is a wonderful way for both adults and children 
to celebrate the summer Stroll leisurely through this delightful 
garden, learn about butterfly biology and conservation efforts 
and marvel at nature's fragile beauty. 

Don't miss this magical sensory experience. 

Living Colors: A Butterfly Garden is created by The Field Museum. 




Call 312.665.7400 for information, tickets or to register 
for programs (unless otherwise specified). 



MAY/JUNE 2001 



Your Guide to the Field: A pullout calendar of events for May and June. 



Don't Miss Sue's Birthday! 

After 67 million years of being buried in tlie earth, Sue is celebrating her first year in her new home 
at The Field Museum. We'll celebrate throughout May with a variety of activities for all ages. 



Family Programs 

Sue-per Birthday Parties 

Join us for a birthday breal<fast complete witli party liats, 
favors and a special Sue birthday cake at each table. Stay as 
long as you like after breakfast. You'll have the IVluseum practi- 
cally to yourselves for a whole hour before we open to the 
public. If your child has a birthday in May, you can arrange to 
have your party here and celebrate right along with Sue! 

For families with children ages 5—10 

General admission: $28 for adults and $23 for children 
Members: $25 for adults and $20 for children 

Breakfasts are 7— 9am every Saturday in May, 
with additional breakfasts on May 1 and May i 7. 

Check out more listings under Family Dino Fun inside! 




Adult Programs 

Scientific Symposium 

Dinosaur enthusiasts may be interested in the A. Watson 
Armour Symposium on May 12, entitled The Paleobiology 
and Phylogenetics of Large Theropods. The day will feature 
technical presentations by top paleontologists. Check our 
website at www.fieldmuseum.org for details. 

Feathered Dinosaurs and the Origin of Birds 

Could dinosaurs be the genetic ancestors of birds? Dr. Philip J. 
Currie, whose work on feathered dinosaurs has been covered 
by National Geographic and PBS' Nova series, will explore the 
question that has revolutionized paleontology. Following the lec- 
ture, join prominent paleontologists from around the world for 
a lively roundtable discussion. 

Sunday, May 13 

Lecture at 1:30pm; Roundtable at 3pm 

Lecture or Roundtable only: $12; 




Sue at The Field Museum is made possible by McDonald's Corporation. A major sponsor of Sue 
is Walt Disney World Resort. Additional support has been provided by the Illinois Department 
of Natural Resources/Illinois State Museum. 



IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 



Call 312.665.7400 to register or reserve tickets for programs (unless otherwise specified). 



Citywide Puppet Festival 
Kicks Off at Field Musei 



useum 



Festivities Highlight 
New Exhibition 

Puppeteers will take over The Field Museum's 
lawn on Thursday, June 14, to kick off the City 
of Chicago's Puppetropolis Chicago festival. 

Festivities are 6-9 pm, and are free. 

Join us for all types of puppetry — marionettes, moving 
shadows, masks and more. Highlights include Redmoon 
Theater, original pieces by Chicago youths and demonstrations 
by Jabberwocky Marionettes. 

Festival goers can also see Julie Taymor: Playing with Fire, 
which is at the Field from June 14 through Nov. 4. In this 
exhibition, extraordinary sets, masks, puppets and costumes by 
award-winning director Julie Taymor will ignite your imagination. 
Discover how Taymor, best known for her direction of Disney's The 
Lion King on Broadway and the feature film Titus, integrates differ- 
ent cultural traditions to create larger-than-life theater. 

Puppetropolis Chicago will continue through June 24. 
For more information call 312.744.3315. 

Jufie Taymor: Playing with Fire was organized by the Wexner Center for 
the Arts at The Ohio State University. 

The exhibition is made possible by a generous gift from Ford Motor Company. 
Major support is also provided by Agnes Gund and Daniel Shapiro, the John S. 
and James L. Knight Foundation and PricewaterhouseCoopers. 

Puppetropolis Chicago community outreach programs are made possible by 
The Albert Pick, Jr Fund. The festival is coordinated by the City of Chicago 
in collaboration with the Chicago Park District and The Field Museum. 



Redmoon Tlieater 
to perform at 
Puppetropolis 
Chicago. 




Opening Week 

Activities for Julie Taymor: 

Playing with Fire 




Fool's Fire (Film Screening) 

See Julie Taymor's remarkable artistry in action in this 
darkly comic fable. Screened in Hi-Definition. 

Saturday, June 16, 2pm 
$4, plus Museum admission 

Co-presented by The Field Museum, CineMuse and the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts 

From Indonesia to The Lion King: 
Julie Taymor's Odyssey (Lecture) 

Theater critic Roger Copeland will explore how Taymor 
melds diverse cultural art forms. 

Sunday, June 17, 2pm 
$4, plus Museum admission 

Ramayana (Performance) 

Tamara and the Shadow Theatre of Java will present 
this beautiful Hindu-Javanese legend. 

Friday,June 22 and Saturday, June 23, 2pm 
$4, plus Museum admission 

The Selfish Giant (Performance) 

Bill Hubner, of Disney's The Lion King on Broadway, will work 
with Chicago youth to present Oscar Wilde's short story through 
puppetry. 

Sunday,June 24, 3:30pm 
$2, plus Museum admission 



MAY/JUNE 2001 



Family Dino Fun! 

Family Overnight: Dozin' with the Dinos 



Join us for an evening of family fun and camp out 
amidst some of our most popular exhibitions. We'll 
celebrate Sue's first birthday with a variety of 
dinosaur-related activities. 

For adults and children grades 1—6 
S :45pm on Friday, May 4 to 
9am on Saturday, May 5 
$45; members $38 




Explore the origins of 
the Amazon River. 




ke-a-Dinosaur 



Workshop 

Green Light Performing Company 

Dance the role of a T. rex, Triceratops or Stegosaurus 
and discover how bones can tell scientists about these 
ancient creatures. 

For adults and children ages 3—7 
Saturdays through July 7, 1pm 
S2, plus Museum admission 



Workshop 

Create your own T. rex or Apatosaur marionette out of 
fun foam. Learn how dinosaurs with differently shaped 
bodies might have moved. 

For adults and children ages 6—10 
Sundays through July 8, 1pm 
members S6 



\^ Performing 
Arts/Lectures >? 

The Eternal Frontier 

New Discoveries Series \^ 

Tim Flaunery, Director, South Australian Museum 

Premier paleontologist Tim Flannery will unveil his latest 
book and trace the development of the North American 
landscape from an asteroid strike 65 million years ago 
to today. 

Saturday, May 5, 2pm 

$12; students/educators $10; members $8 



-3fti. 






?ZBIGNIEWBZOAK 



African Rock Art: 
Paintings and Engravings on Stone 



j^^ /^ Author Alec Campbell 
^^ atid Photographer David Coulson 



Discover an almost forgotten past through the rarely seen 
artistic masterpieces of our ancestors. Enjoy images and 
stories from the first comprehensive book on Africa's rock art. 



Wednesday, May 16, 6:30pm 
SI 2; students /educators 
$10; members $8 





iM>9V\ 



Below is a calendar of the temporary exhibitions you will have an opportunity to visit in 2001. 
Some dates may change. Remember to call or visit our website for specific information. 



Kinetosaurs: Putting Some Teeth 
Into Art and Science 
March 23 through July 8 



Wrapped in Pride: Ghanaian Rente 
and African American Identity 
April 13 through July 15 



Kachinas: Gifts from the Spirit 

IMessengers 

Through July 22 




Make your own ro(ixiti£,,dinosiiur puppet. 




Gallery Performani 

Teens Toj^ctlier Ensemble 

Learn about the evolution of dinosaurs and the science 
of paleontology through dance and song. 

Every Saturday and Sunday in May. I lam and Ipm 
FREE mth Museum admission 



Behind the Scenes 



jng Out Chicago's Birds 



Workshop 

Dr. David Willan^^offecfmn^fmager, Field Museum Division of Biut 

Take an insider's tour of the Museum's bird collection and learn how 
ornithologists conduct their research. Then use our Birds of the 
Midwest guide on nature walks this summer. 

For adults and children grades 1 and up 
Fridayjune 15, 6— 8pm 
$15; members $12 





©JOHN WEINSTEIN/GN89270-36AC 



This just in... 



Exploring the Source of the Amazon River 

Field Forum Series 

Explorers Zbigniew Bzdak, 

Piotr Chmielinski and Andrew A. Pietowski 

Enjoy the riveting photographs and anecdotes of three 
Polish-American explorers from the expedition that, with 
support from National Geographic and the Smithsonian 
Institution, has finally pinpointed the source of the 
Amazon River. 

Lecture in Polish: Saturday, May 19, 1pm 
Lecture in English: Saturday, May 19, 3pm 
$15; students /educators $12; members $10 

Ticket includes admission to the Field 
and Amazon Rising at Shedd Aquarium. 

Presented jointly by The Field Museum, Shedd Aquarium 
and The Polish Museum of America. 




Internationally renowned paleoanthropologist and con- 
servationist Richard Leakey will appear at the Field 
on May 10 at 6:30pm. Leakey is famous for his fossil 
finds, for taking on ivory poachers to save the African 
elephant and, most recently, for working to bring 
democracy to his native Kenya. 

Call 3 12. 665. 7400 for details. 



Richard Leakey 





In Her Hands: Craftswomen 
Changing the World 

May 18 through October 28 



Living Colors: A Butterfly Garden 
May 25 through September 3 



Julie Taymor: 
Playing with Fire 

June 14 through November 4 




-ave a fun-foam cloth and find other hands-on learning 
tivities when you visit the special exhibition Wrapped 
Pride or the permanent exhibition Africa. 

tOam- 



 Ipiii 



^imdays and Sundays from April 13— July 75 
ilEE with Museum admission 



Other Programs 



The Museum offers a variety of hands-on activities to make 
your family's visit special. Listen to stories, sing songs, 
dissect an owl pellet, make an art project and more! Check 
the Information Desk for details on the day of your visit. 




Fun activities can 
make your family's 

visit speciiil. 



Adult Fieldtrips 

Chicago Waterways 

Iri'ing Cutler, Ph.D., Professor Emeritus, 
Cliicdgo State University 

From the Chicago Locks to the Calumet River, cruise 
Chicago's inland waterways to get a unique perspective 
on the ecological, economic and historical development 
of this great city. 

Saturday, June 9, 9am— 5pm 
$50: members $43 




Weekend Birding Trip to Black 
Swamp, Ottawa County, Ohio 

Alan Anderson, Naturalist 

Break out the binoculars! The Ottawa National Wildlife 
Refuge is home to wetland birds, shorebirds, ducks, 
herons, hawks, migrant warblers and nesting bald eagles. 

Fruiay-Sunday, May 18—20 
$I.S 5; members $170 

Thf : :• Museum and the Chicago Audubon Society are co-sponsoring this trip. 



Adult Courses 

The Goddess Hathor 
and the Temple of Serabit 
El-Khadim 

Tliomas Mudloff 

Consulting Egyptologist/ Website 

Moderator, Discovery Channel 

Discover how Hathor — sometimes 
worshipped as the Egyptian goddess 
of fertility, other times feared as the 
destructive Eye of Re — represents the 
"goddess principle" in myth. 

Saturday, May 12 
10am— 4pm 
$55; members $47 




enne 


Sigmund Freud: 


Cleopatra of Egypt: 


Opens August 10 


Conflict and Culture 


From History to Myth 




October 3 through December 9 


October 20 2001 through 
March 3, 2002 



The following activities are free 
witli Museum admission. 



libition tours 



Hear the stories behind some of our exciting exhibitions 
on our daily Highlights Tours. On weel<days, also look for 
tours of Inside Ancient Egypt and Northwest Coast Indians 
and Eskimos. 



leet Field IVluseum scientists and see rarely 
displayed specimens from our collections. 

Every second Saturday of the mouth, 1 'lmu—2pm 



Bring your own materials and get tips from artists and 
scientific illustrators as they create artwork inspired 
by our exhibitions. 




1VI embers' Nights! 

May 23-25 

The most fun you've ever had at a museum., 
the 48th Annual Members' Nights 

Explore our research and collections areas. 

iVleet experts in botany, geology, zoology, anthropology 

and conservation. 

Enjoy special presentations, entertainment, games 

and exhibits. 

Revisit your favorite permanent exhibitions. 



See page 21 for more details. 




©RONTESTA/A108352 



Naturalist Certification Program 

The Field Museum, The IVlorton Arboretum and the Chicago 
Botanic Garden are offering an integrated program for both 
beginners and more advanced naturalists. Call 312.665.7400 
for a complete schedule of Naturalist Certificate courses 
throughout the summer. 



Tree Identification and Ecology 

Casey Sullivan 

Urban Forester, Village of Riverside 

ncrease your enjoyment and understanding of the 
outdoors by learning about the biology and ecology 
of common trees in the Chicago region. 

Wednesdays, June 13 and 20, 6-9pm 
Saturdays, June 16, 23 and 30, 9am- noon 
$150; members $120 




Get your Cleopatra of Egypt tickets now! 

Scheming seductress or political mastermind? Don't miss this chance to unravel Cleopatra's mystery. 

This exclusive exhibition is appearing only in Rome, London and at The Field Museum. See the feature story on page 17. 

Member tickets are available beginning June 1, a month before ticket sales open to the general public. 
Call Ticketmaster at 312.902. 1500; a service and transaction fee will be assessed. 



%^ 








KicriSos 



Kinetosaurs: 
Putting Some Teeth 
into Art and Science 

Open through July 8, 2001 

Hands-on fun brings dinosaurs to life. Set a T. rex and other life- 
size dinosaur sculptures into motion and learn how these enormous 
creatures may have run, roared and fought millions of years ago. 

Visit Kinetosaurs on the weekend and enjoy additional gallery 
activities led by Museum staff. 

Saturdays and Sundays through July 8, Warn -2pm 

Kinetosaurs created by The Children's Museum of 
Indianapolis. Sculptures by John Payne of Payne 
Studios, Asheville, NO, 1998, 1999. 



Wrapped in Pride: 
Ghanaian Kente and 
African American Identity 

Open through July 15, 2001 

Trace the origins of the kente cloth that is celebrated in Ghana. 
You'll discover how this colorful, bold fabric has become a 
powerful icon of African heritage for people throughout the world. 

Join us at the Kente Community Project Showcase to see 

original artworks, research projects and performances that 
explore questions about African American identity. 

Saturday, June 23, 11am— 3pm 

See the Family Programs listings inside for other 
exhibition-related activities. 

This exhibition was organized by the UCLA Fowler Museum of Cultural History, 
Los Angeles, CA and the Newark Museum, Newark, NJ. The exhibition and its national 
tour are made possible by Ford Motor Company. Additional support for the Chicago 
presentation is provided by the Field Associates, the Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation 
and Chicago Tribune. 

Kente cloth is traditionally worn for ceremonial occasions in Ghana. 






Hours: 9am-5pm daily. Closed Christmas and New Year's Day. 

From May 28-Sept. 3 we will open at Sam for extended summer hours. 

To get tickets: Living Colors: A Butterfly Garden, Julie Taymor: P\ay\nq with Fire and Kinetosaurs: 
Putting Some Teeth into Art and Science are all specially ticketed exhibitions. 

Member passes can be reserved in advance by calling Ticketmaster at 312.902.1500; a service 
charge and transaction fee will be assessed. Non-member tickets can also be reserved in advance 
through Ticketmaster. 

Day-of tickets are available at the Museum, while supplies last. 

Information: 312.922.9410 orvwwv.fieldmuseum.org 



L^' #'^1^'*^ 



14 IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 



SCIENTIST'SPICK 



Umbealer Seal Teetli 



I 




©JOHN WEINSTEIN/Z 94331_2C 



Resembling a prehistoric tool or cresting wave, these oddly shaped teeth appear inefficient for 
tearing and chewing. They are, however, quite useful for this filter-feeding mammal commonly 
known as the crabeater seal (Lobodon carcinophagus). The seal feeds almost exclusively on 
tiny, shrimp-like krill. After taking in a mouthful of water, the seal closes its lobed teeth, 
forming a sieve to separate the water from the krill. Specimens such as this one, which was 
collected on the Ross Ice Shelf in 1934, are important examples of the diversity of seals, and 
mammals in general, and are what make the Museum's collections so valuable to evolutionary 
biologists and other scientists. You can see these teeth on exhibit in the Hall of Mammals. 



MAY/JUIME 2001 lIS 



INTHEFIELDFEATURE 



Repatnati on Law Alive at The Field Museum 



Amy Cranch, Editor 



The Field is negotiating 
the return of this Cape 
Fox totem pole, shotvti 
here ca. 1900 in the 
Museum 's original 
Jackson Park home. 



Imagine a precious belonging — 
something beyond material value 
that holds deep emotional or 
spiritual meaning — being 
stripped from your ownership, 
leaving a void in your personal 
or cultural identit\. For various 
Native American groups that 
sense of loss has been a pressing 
reality for at least a century, as 
many of their sacred and cultural 
objects and human remains are 
either gone forever or rest 
between the walls of museums. 




But under the provisions of a 
sweeping law passed about 1 
years ago, many groups are wel- 
coming back their artifacts of 
significance, and both sides — 
museums and Native Americans — 
are seeing its profound impact. 

The 1990 Native American 
Graves Protection and 
Repatriation Act attempts to 
reconcile two divergent value 
systems, one based on seeking 
and disseminating knowledge 
and the other on spiritual and 
cultural values. When it was first 
passed, native peoples feared that 
harsh battles would erupt with 
museums, and museums worried 
that their collections would be 
gutted. While conflicts do arise, 
increased understanding has led 
museums to generally agree that 
native groups have a right to 
reclaim their sacred objects. 
Also, native groups often back 
the role museums play in pre- 
serving their artifacts and telling 
a historical story. 

The Field Museum has 
returned three objects in recent 
years and is currently negotiating 
the repatriation of a totem pole, 
on view in the Northwest Coast 
exhibition, to its original Cape 
Fox owners. The pole, showing 
an eagle, thunderbird and bear, 
was taken in 1899 during the 
Harriman Expedition from an 
abandoned Tlingit village in 
Alaska. 

Specific circumstances under 
which an item is returned vary 
from case to case. With the 
totem pole, it is unknown 
whether the village had been 
wiped out by smallpox or 
whether its inhabitants had 
temporarily moved elsewhere by 
the time the expedition arrived. 
Either way, it is clear that the 
pole was taken, providing solid 
grounds for the Cape Fox to 
reclaim it. 



In another repatriation case, 
the Arizona State Museum 
traded Hohokam pots with The 
Field Museum in the 1950s. The 
original owners, the Gila River 
Indian Community, recently 
asked the Field to return these 
funerary objects. Since they 
had been acquired through legal 
means between two institutions, 
the community has designated 
the Arizona museum to serve 
as its official representative for 
the repatriation. 

The Field has a long history 
of strong relationships with 
native groups, fi^om inviting 
their counsel in building the 
Pawnee Earth Lodge and other 
Native American exhibitions, 
to opening the doors for native 
leaders to view, study or cere- 
moniously honor their objects, 
to returning specific culturally 
important objects in which an 
appropriate hnk was established 
to the requesting group. We 
have also discussed with groups 
how to treat materials with 
respect, which might include 
taking an object off exhibit or 
storing it in limited-access areas. 

World history books are filled 
with stories of peoples who were 
conquered and lost aspects of 
their culture, and museums ofi:en 
hold traces of their past. The 
repatriation law forged a union 
between museums and native 
groups that was long overdue — • 
the results showing benefits 
beyond the written law. While 
it is challenging to both sides, 
the law provides a workable 
means for native groups to 
reclaim vital parts of their 
heritage. The Field Museum's 
discussions with the Cape Fox 
regarding the return of the totem 
pole proves that the two sides 
can cooperate in the research 
and display or ownership and 
worship interests of all. I7F 



16 IN THE FIELD 



INTHEFIELDFEATURE 



Field Museum Presents Exclusive 



:/«■)•)'/ Bdidoc, Staff Writer 



W.is slie the most beautiful woman m the world? 
A seducer and destroyer of great men? One of the 
shrewdest political minds of her day? 

Visitors can discover the truth for themselves 
at Cleopatra ofE^iypt: from Hi.<fory to Myth. Thn 
exclusive exhibition, which explores the life, liaisons 
and legend of Egypt's last c]ueen, will appear only 
three places in the world: Rome, Lontlon and in 
Chicago at The Field Museum from Oct. 20, 2001 
through March 3,2002. 

This major exhibition features more than 350 
spectacular artifacts and priceless artworks from 
the worlds premiere classical and Egyptian collec- 
tions. Many of the pieces come from The British 
Museum in London, which organized the exhibition, 
and the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. Others come 
from the Louvre, the Hermitage, the Vatican and the 
Metropolitan Museum of Art. 

"The breadth of the exhibition, the superior 
caliber of the artifacts and Cleopatra's powerful 
story combine to make this show an extraordinary 
experience," says David Foster ofThe Field Museum's 
exhibitions department. "This is a rare opportunity to 
understand who C'leopatra really was and why she is 
still so alive in Western culture today." 

An Egyptian queen of Greek heritage, C'leopatra 
embodied the confluence of East and West. The 
exhibition reflects this dichotomy by presenting 
artworks from both traditions. Statues, busts and 
portraits in the stylized Egyptian manner illustrate 
how Cleopatra's subjects loved and worshipped her 
as a goddess. Artworks in the classical style portray 
Cleopatra's Greek ancestors and reveal how she 
captured imaginations during the two years that 
she lived in l^ome as Julius Caesar's mistress. 

"Egypt had fascinated the Romans for centuries," 
Foster explains. "Then in 46 B.C. E., Julius Caesar, 
the most powerful man in the Roman world, 
brings the queen of this wealthy, exotic land to 
Rome to be his mistress. The Romans were both 



Cleopatra's hairstyle, Egyptian motifs entered into 
Roman decorative arts and Egyptian religions 
blossomed. It could be called the first wave of 
'Egyptomania.'" 

Cleopatra is best remembered for her love 
affairs — first with Caesar and then with Marc 
Antony, the seasoned general who vied for control 
of the Roman world after Caesar's death. When 
Caesar's heir defeated Antony and Cleopatra, the 
two lovers committed suicide in one of history's 
most passionate scenes. 



Cleopatra of /;(,')'/'' '"cve.ils that these alliances were 
as political as they were personal. Rome needed 
the wealth and agricultural resources of Egypt, the 
Mediterranean world's breadbasket, to grow. A savvy 
strategist, C'leopatra traded these assets for the security 
of her dirone and preserved her nation's indepen- 
dence tor 20 years while the Romans conquered 
the rest of the Western world. 



through countless poems, songs, paintings, plays, 
bt)oks and movies. The final section of the exhibition, 
designed by the Field specifically for the U.S. 
presentation, traces how Cleopatra's legend has 
evolved to reflect the morals of each succeeding age. 

"Human beings seem to need stories of people 
that we know are real, but who lived lives that are 
larger than ours," Foster says. "By virtue of 
who she was, when she lived and how she 
lived her life, Cleopatra's story has 
become a magnet for more stories, and 
more layers of meaning." 

Over the years Cleopatra has been 
condemned as a manipulative, greedy 
destroyer of men; heralded as the ' 

soul of courdy love; envied as a sen- ^ 

sual, passionate beauty; and admired 
as a courageous, complex heroine. 
Now Cleopatra of Ef^ypt adds two 
more faces to the mix. She was an , 

intelligent, gifted leader. And she was a 
woman who — centuries after her • 

death — still has the power to capture 
our imagination. , 

Field members can reserve their advance 
tickets to Cleopatra of liffj'pt before ticket sales 
open to the general public. See Your Guide to 
the Field for details. ITF 



T7/;'-< exhibition ha.'' 
Miiseiiiii ill collaboi 



been or{;aiiized by The British 



Meiiiiiio, Rome. Iiiieriiatioiial Spoii.'^or BP, 
National Sponsor Exelon. 



CLEO 

PATRA 




'.^•Sr- 



V 




BUST COURTESY OF VATICAN MUSEUMS, VATICAN CITY; STELJ\E COURTESY OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM 



MAY/JUNE 2001 ' 17 



OFSPECIALINTEREST 



Celebrities Make 



l e Fie ld 



Masks are tools for transformarion and self-expres- 
sion, artistic windows into a broader cultural stor\-. 
They are alternately charming and macabre, holy 
and heathen. 

On Friday, June 8. from 7pm to midnight. 
The Field Museum will host Faces in the Field, 
an exploration of the Museum's nearly 6,000 
masks from around the world, plus an auction of 
masks created bv famous people in entertainment, 
art, music, fashion, business, pohtics and sports. 
Guests can voyage through the exhibit halls to see 
spectacular masks. .Anthropology- curators wiU be 
on hand to unlock the mysteries of this incredible, 
diverse collection. 



Regional entertainment will fill Stanley- Field 
Hall, fiiom colorfiil Chinese lion dancers to the 
haimting, earthy tones of an Australian didgeridoo. 
Sotheby's will lead the auction of these one-of-a- 
kind masks, created by such distinguished celebrities 
as Sue Hendrickson, Bill Cosby, Ernie Banks, Yoko 
One, Colin Powell, John Travolta and Donald Trump. 

Admission is $100, which includes hors d'oeuvTcs, 
cocktails, entertainment and the sUent and live 
auctions. Proceeds will support the restoration of 
our anthropological collections, including the con- 
ser^-ation and preser\-ation of our mask collection. 
For tickets, caU 312.665.7124. 




1. Robert Altiiidti 2. Gary Femik 3. Edivard Paschke 4. Yoko Oiw Lennon 5. Sam Zell 6. Victor Skrebneski 
~. Dan Roan 8. Dati Ji^cts 9. Ronald J. Gidwitz 10. Mike Ditka 11. Marcos Roya, commissioned by Roy 
and .Mar)' Cullen 12. Ernie Banks 



IN THE FIELD 



OFSFECIALINTEREST 



Federal Funds Su pport Museum Plans 



The Field Museum proudly thanks U.S. Senators Richard "Dick" Durbin (D-III.) and 
Peter Fitzgerald (R-III.) and U.S. Representatives Danny K. Davis (D-III. -7) and Jan 
Schakowsky (D-III. -9) for securing federal funds in the 106th Congress for Museum 
programs and initiatives. 



These members of the Illinois delegation, with help 
from U.S. Senator Christopher "Kit" Bond (R-Mo.) 
and U.S. Representative Dave Obey (D-Wis.-7), 
obtained funds in the fiscal year 2001 budget 
of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban 
Development (HUD) for two major capital 
projects — expansion of the dinosaur hall and 
the Sidney R. and Addie Yates Exhibition Center. 

The dinosaur hall, Life Over Time, received $1.1 
million to fill in the northeast hght well, located 
between the wings of this exhibition. (The five 
other original light weUs have been reconstructed 
to provide additional storage and exhibition space.) 
Sens. Durbin and Fitzgerald also secured $250,000 
from NASA to provide funds for research in pale- 
ontology and earth sciences. The Museum will 
continue working with the Illinois congressional 
delegation to gain funding for educational program- 
ming related to paleontology and earth sciences, 
including electronic fieldtrips, in which students 
can see and talk to scientists in the field as they 
are conducting excavations and research. 

Also, thanks to Reps. Davis and Schakowsky, the 
Museum will receive an additional $1 million from 
HUD's Economic Development Initiative to 
expand the Yates Exhibition Center, allowing for all 
temporary exhibitions to be housed on the main 
floor. (Rep. Schakowsky won the 9th District 
House seat upon the retirement of Congressman 
Yates, who died last October.) 



The new configuration will increase the Museums 
flexibility to install exhibitions up to 20,000 sq. feet 
or two or three separate exhibitions at 7,000 sq. feet 
each. It will also make room for the new East 
Entrance on the ground floor. 

Please join the Museum in thanking Sens. 
Durbin and Fitzgerald and Reps. Davis and 
Schakowsky. For more information on federal 
support, contact Fay Hartog Levin, Vice President 
of External Afl^iirs, at 312.665.7220. 





1 ffh 


\Ui-.ii).. 


Vim aL 



Sen. Peter Fitzgerald (R-III.) and Sen. Dick Durbin (D-III.) are (getting ready to 
unveil Sue tlwT. rex as Rep. Judy Biji^ert (R-IU.-13), Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-III. -9) 
and Rep. Dainiy K. Davis (D-III. -7) wait with e.xcitcnwnt. 



Butterflies in the Field to Benefit 
Parental Involvement Project 



Stanley Field HaU wiU be transformed through light, 
sound and scent into a glorious fairytale garden on 
Friday, June 22, for Butterflies in the Field, the Field 
Associates' annual Field Trip summer gala. Inspired 
by the exhibition Living Colors: A Butterfly Garden, 
this black-tie event wiU benefit the Museum's 
award-winning Parental Involvement Project. 

Guests will enjoy an elaborate buffet catered 
by Chicago's premier restaurants, a full open bar, 
dancing to live entertainment and a raffle with 
wonderful items from some of Chicago's favorite 
stores, salons and restaurants. Guests will also be 
able to privately peruse the Museum's exhibits. 



The Field Associates is a diverse group of young 
professionals committed to promoting the 
Museum's collections, research and public pro- 
grams. The Parental Involvement Project (PIP), one 
of the group's primary funding and volunteer pro- 
jects, gives parents the resources to better assist their 
children's educational progress and expose them 
to cultural activity at an early age. PIP invites 
inner-city families to the Museum once a month 
to promote learning as a family experience. 

Tickets for Butterflies in the Field are $75 for 
Field Associate members, $85 for non-members, or 
$100 at the door. For information, call Marcie Rawls 
at 312.665.7137, or visit www.fieldmuseum.org. 



MAY/JUNE 2001 



FROMTHE ARCH IVES 



World War TT Remembered 



Alan Slicfiier, Vohiiilc 



World War II affected The Field Museum as it did 
nearly every U.S. institution. In all, 40 members of 
the Field fimily, from guards to trustees, served in all 
theaters of action at ranks ranging from private to 
brigadier general. A 1942 Field Muscuin News article 
said that the employees serving then represented 
more than 14 percent of the staff, greatly influencing 
daily operations. Volunteer Ellen Smith, for example, 
ran the bird division by herself for two years. 

While research on the existing collections con- 
tinued vigorously during WWII, expeditions to 
most foreign lands suffered. Nevertheless, sizeable 
numbers of specimens arrived at the Field during 
the war, some from areas that were neither well rep- 
resented in the collections nor well known to most 
Americans before they became battle sites. 

How did this wealth of material arrive during 
wartime? Many people maintain their interests even 
during trying times. Collectors, amateur and profes- 
sional alike, often collect under any circumstance. 
Field staff members who served in the war sent 
large, diverse collections back to the Museum. 
William Beecher, the most prolific collector of the 
naturalist servicemen who later became director of 
the Chicago Academy of Sciences, sent specimens 
in wooden boxes from the military kitchen. One 
shipment from the Solomon Islands contained one 
crayfish, 19 fishes, 40 lizards, 17 snakes, six frogs, 52 
bats, a cuscus skull, three birds and 49 insects. 

Melvin Traylor's wartime contributions were 
made under quite different circumstances. Traylor, 



now curator emeritus of birds, joined the Marine 
Corps in 1941 and was assigned to officer training 
school in Samoa despite his private first class rank. 
His brigade was sent to Guadalcanal in 1942, where 
the American troops had only partial control. While 
there, Traylor's patrol was caught off-guard by 
Japanese gunfire. When he realized he was the only 
officer alive, he took over and led his patrol to safety. 

About one year after earning a silver star for his 
actions, Traylor was hit by shrapnel, lost his eye and 
was hospitalized in San Diego. His eventual involve- 
ment with the Scripps Institution of Oceanography 
brought him, still in uniform, to Bikini Atoll to 
determine the effects of air and underwater atomic 
bomb explosions on commercial fishes. Before 
departing, Traylor asked the Museum to send his 
bird-collecting supplies, which he used to sample 
fairy terns, common and white-capped noddies and 
other local island species. 

The Field still commemorates those who served 
during WWII in a section of its Pacific Spirits exhibi- 
tion. The display includes a book of WWII 
memories — from tragic to humorous to poignant — 
contributed by Museum visitors. One person wrote 
of a loved one, "He stayed up for three days straight 
doing his watch and nursing the wounded, who 
covered the entire flight deck of the U.S.S. 
LexingtoiirWe invite you to read and contribute to 
this ongoing memorial, located in the back of Pacific 
Spirits on the west side of the Museum's upper level. 



In 1946, Melvin Traylor, 
then an associate in the 
bird division, stumbled 
across a common noddy 
nest in Bikini Atoll while 
on duty to test the effects 
of atomic bombs on com- 
mercial fishes. 




20 IN THE FIELD 



MEMBERSHIPNEWS 



Members' Nights 



The most fun you've ever had at a museum. ..the 48th Annual 
May 23, 24 or 25, 5piii-IOpiii 



• Explore areas of our vast collections that are 
normally ofF-limits to the public. 

• Meet experts who work in the Museum's 
laboratories and academic departments. 

• Experience presentations created especially 
for members. 

• Enjoy special entertainment, games and 
exhibits for kids. 

• Dance to music from various cultures. 

• Discover where exhibits are developed. 

• Revisit your favorite permanent exhibitions. 

Order your FREE tickets by May 1 1 ! Look for 
the invitation in the mail, or call 312.665.7700 
to register. 

Please don't delay. Members must order advance 
tickets by May 11. Wednesday and Thursday 
evenings wiO be less crowded than Friday. You 
may share Members' Night with friends with the 
two complimentary guest passes you will receive 
when you order. 

Food Service 

The Corner Bakery and McDonald's will be open 
from 5 until 9:30pm. The ground floor vending 
areas will be open from 5 until 10pm. 

Transportation and Parking 

Parking is available in the Soldier Field parking lot 
for $7.75 per car. Free trolleys will transport you 
between the parking lot and the Museum's south 
entrance until 10:30pm. 

A free shuttle bus service wiU also operate 
from the Union and Northwestern Stations to 
the Museum between 4:30 and 10:30pm at 
approximately 25-minute intervals. Look for the 
Ryder school buses with a Field Museum placard 
in the window. 



lembers' Nights 





Bnny Chenioff (above), 
associate curator of fishes, 
and Meenakshi Wadhwa 
(left), associate curator of 
metcoritics, share their 
work with curious mem- 
bers at a previous 
Members' Night. 



Important Reminder: The Museum and restaurants 
wiU close to all visitors, including members and 
their guests, between 4 and 5pm to prepare for the 
evening. There wiU be no admittance until 5pm, no 
exceptions. Please plan your arrival time accordingly. 
For membership information, call 312.665.7700. 



Do you have friends or family visiting this summer? 

Now through Labor Day, two premier downtown hotels, the Hilton Chicago and the Palmer 
House Hilton, are offering special room rates starting from $189 per night — and children 
can stay for free. This package also includes a lavish breakfast buffet, use of the indoor 
swimming pool, free general admission tickets to The Field Museum and a Sue goody bag. 
For reservations call the Hilton Chicago at 877.865.5320, or the Palmer House Hilton at 
877.865.5321, and mention code P8. 



MAY/JUNE 2001 21 



Field Museum Tours at a Glance 



For information, call Field Museum Tours at 800.811.7244 or email fmtours@sover.net. Please note that 
rates, prices and itineraries are subject to change and that prices are per person, double occupancy. 



Egypt Revisited 

Oct. 14-28, 2001 (15 days) 

Visit spectacular archaeological 
sites and monuments not seen on 
your first trip. (First-time visitors 
should see Egyptian Odyssey 
below.) Highlights include Abusir. 
Dashur, Maiduni, Fai\-um. Tanus, 
Abydos, Dendara, dawn at Abu 
Simbel and three nights cruising 
Lake Nasser, plus lesser-known 
sites in Cairo, Luxor and Aswan. 
Museum Leader: Egyptologist 
Frank Yurco 

Nature and History 
of New Zealand 

Oct. 27-Nov. 14, 2001 (19 days) 

New Zealand's natural and cultural 
diversir\' will astound you. On 
North Island \isit Goat Island 
Marine Reser\-e,Tongariro 
National Park, the New^ Zealand 
Maori Arts and Crafts Institute, 
Tokomaru Bay, Gisborne and 
Wellingtons Museum of New 
Zealand and Botanic Gardens. On 
South Island tour Christchurchs 
Canterbury Museum, Dunedin, 
Queenstown and Milford Sound. 
Museum Leaders: Anthropologist John 
Terrell and Geologist Scott Lidgard 

Egyptian Odyssey 

Off. 28-^ov. 1 1, 2001 (15 days) 
Jan. 27-Feb. 10, 2002 (15 days) 

Explore the amazing world of 
Egv-pt's ancient pharaohs by 
land and riverboat. Discover 
astounding archaeological sites, 
including the famed pyramids of 
Giza, the site of ancient Thebes, 
the three colossi of Ramses II 
and the Valley of Kings. 
Museum Leader: Oct. leader TBA; 
Jan. leader, Egyptologist Frank Yurco 




We'll fisit Lii.xor's Karnak temple, the most impressive temple complex in 
Egypt, on both the Egyptian Odyssey and Egypt Rei'isited tours. TIte complex 
also includes the Great Temple ofAmun, whose hypostyle hall features massiiv 
columns decorated in relief. 



Amazon by Riverboat 

Dec. 1-9, 2001 (9 days) 

Cruise aboard a 14-cabin 
riverboat, e.xploring the remote 
upper reaches of the Amazon 
River system. Experience the lush 
forests and plentifiil wildlife of the 
Amazon jungle. Optional extension 
to Cuzco and Machu Picchu. 
Museum LeaderTBA 

Mysteries of Earth 
by Private Jet 

Dec. 30, 2001-Jan. 23, 2002 

(25 days) 

Travel aboard a private, first-class 
jet on a once-in-a-lifetime jour- 
ney to the world's most remote 
habitats: the vast flora and fauna 
of the Amazon; volcanic Canar\' 
Islands; great apes of Borneo; 
annual migration in Tanzania; 
wildlife of Nepal; rare species of 
the Galapagos; undersea life of 



the Great Barrier Reef; intrigu- 
ing moai of Easter Island; tribal 
cultures of Papua New Guinea; 
the secluded Seychelles; and the 
Polynesian culture of Samoa. 
Guest Leader: Renoutied expert on 
etvlution, Stephaijay Gould 

Tanzania Migration Safari 

Feb. 1-14, 2002 (14 days) 

Experience the spectacular herds 
of the Serengeti Plains. Hundreds 
of thousands of wildebeest and 
tens of thousands of zebras and 
antelope amass in this area each 
year, attended by Uons, cheetahs, 
hyenas and other predators. Enjoy 
four days in the Serengeti. then 
three days at Ngorongoro Crater. 
Museum Leaders: Bill Stanley 
and Mary Anne Rogers, 
Field Museum zoologists 



''We've traveled a fair amount and we've never had a better trip experience.' 



The Field Museum's Member Publication 



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July 

August 

2001 



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FROMTHEPRESIDENT 



Rpcent Su ccesses With Gloh;^! Tmp ;^nt 




When we announced that a 
large, complex society had 
arisen in Caral, Peru, five cen- 
turies earlier than anyone had 
thought, nearly every major 
media outlet covered it, from 
the Los Angeles Times to the 
New York Times, N PR to BBC, 
Newsweek to U.S.News & 
World Report. Ruth Shady 
Soils of San Marcos National 
University in Lima, along with 
Field anthropologists Jonathan 
Haas and Winifred Creamer, 
questioned whether a lack of 
ceramics meant the civilization 
was younger or less complex. 
Their tests proved that the 
ruins date back as early as 
2627 B.C. E.— when the pyra- 
mids were being built in Egypt. 
(Story on page 2.) 

Since our rapid biological 
inventory last fall in the 
Cordillera Azul mountains 
in another part of Peru, we, 
along with our lead Peruvian 
partner APECO and others. 



have been working toward the 
creation of a new national 
park. Just before press time, 
the president of Peru signed it 
into law. This park will ensure 
the protection of more than 
5,000 sq. miles of pristine 
forest — slightly larger than 
Connecticut — and its unique 
biological communities that 
are among the most diverse of 
all existing conservation areas 
in Peru. 

Zoologists Tom Gnoske 
and Julian Peterhans Kerbis 
just returned from working 
with the World Wildlife Fund 
(WWF) to inventory the birds 
and mammals of Bhutan. 
Virtually everything collected 
is a new record for this mysteri- 
ous Himalayan country, only 
recently opened up to the 
Western world, including 
several species from the 
Alpine zone that have close 
relatives right here in North 
America. We hope to work 
with WWF-Bhutan to estab- 
lish the country's first natural 
history museum. 

Guggenheim fellowships 
were awarded to Dr. John J. 
Flynn, MacArthur curator of 
geology, and Steve Fiffer, 
author of Tyrannosaurus Sue. 
Flynn, knovm for several major 
fossil finds and his role in the 
acquisition and research of 
Sue, will work on the interplay 
of evolution and geologic 



change in South America. 
Fiffer, an Evanston attorney 
who wrote about Sue's discov- 
ery and acquisition, will write 
a history of medical knowledge 
about the spinal cord. 

We are making a cast of 
Magdalenian Girl, our cher- 
ished Ice Age skeleton, to send 
to France this summer. It will 
be installed where she was 
discovered at Cap Blanc in the 
Dordogne Valley. It is fitting 
that an exact replica of the 
original skeleton can be 
returned to the original site 
of her burial 14,000 years ago. 
We are taking advantage of the 
casting program to conduct 
radiocarbon dating and DNA 
testing on the original skeleton. 
Once the work has been com- 
pleted, the original skeleton 
will be returned to our Life 
Over Time exhibition on the 
Museum's second floor. 

These are five accomplish- 
ments that represent the 
global impact of your Museum. 
Thank you for making these 
efforts possible. 

John W. McCarter, Jr. 
President & CEO 



.FieMl 



INTHEFIEL 



IIINSIDE 



July/August 2001, Vol.72, No. 4 

Editor: 

Amy E. Cranch, The Field Museum 

Design: 

Depl<e Design 

Copy editor: 

Laura F. Nelson 



In the Field is printed on recycled paper 
using soy-based inks. All images © The 
Field Museum unless otherwise specified. 

The cover image highlights the Fool's Fire 
installation in Julie Taymor: Playing with Fire, 
open June 14 through Nov. 4, 2001 
(J. Weinstein/GN9019C). 

In the Field (ISSN #1051-4546) is published 
bimonthly by The Field Museum. Copyright 
2001 The Field Museum. Annual subscriptions 
are $20; $10 for schools. Museum membership 
includes In the Field subscription. Opinions 
expressed by authors are their own and do not 
necessarily reflect the policy of The Field 
Museum. Notification of address change should 
include address label and should be sent to the 
membership department. POSTMASTER: Send 
address changes to Membership, The Field 
Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496. Periodicals postage 
paid at Chicago, Illinois. 

The Field Museum salutes the people of 
Chicago for their long-standing, generous 
support of the Museum through the 
Chicago Park District. 



IC 



fe 



Field 



useum 



1400 South Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496 
312.922.9410 

wvvw.fjeldmuseum.org 




^^tf ^^^ Mtf 




2 



Field Museum anthropologists help 
discover the Americas' oldest city. 
Left: This civilization was one of the 
first in the Americas to use irrij^ation. 



4 



Behind the beauty of butterflies 
and moths are clues to evolution 
and conserving our ecosystems. 
Lift: Owlet moths, Papaipema. 



15 



Take a microscopic look at a Martian 
meteorite in Scientist's Pick. 



16 



A Tanzania trip participant shares 
journal excerpts on her experiences 
with the African landscape and wildlife. 
Left: Baby baboons rode their mothers' 
backs Uke jockeys. 



Museum Campus Neighbors 



Shedd Aquarium Shedd Aquarium's 
Oceanarium Turns 10 celebration offers 
The Best of Belugas in July. Come to a 
beluga birthday party on July 15 to celebrate 
as Qannik, the male calf, turns a year old. 
August is devoted to The Dolphin Days of 
Summer, saluting the high-flying Pacific 
white-sided dolphins with dynamic activities 
and new interactive programs. Free with 
admission. Call 312.939.2438 or check 
www.sheddaquarium.org for information. 



Adier Planetarium Dawn of the Space 

Age, a new exhibition, traces the fascinating 
story of American space exploration with original 
prototype rockets and original oil paintings by 
space artist Chesley Bonestell. Also, Luna 
Cabana offers 13 weeks of live Salsa music, 
free dance instruction and Latin-inspired food 
and drinks on Thursday nights through Aug. 30 
from 5 to 10pm. Admission is $3. For informa- 
tion, vi5itwvvw.adlerplanetarium.org, or call 
312. 922. STAR. 



New Trolley Routes The city has expanded 
the free trolley service to include two new 
downtown routes that connect CTA, Metra and 
Amtrak stations to the Museum Campus and 
Navy Pier. The trolleys run approximately every 
30 minutes between 10am and 6pm daily. 
Memorial Day through Labor Day. Visit 
www.cityofchicago.org/Transportation/trolleys 
for the hours, destinations and connections to 
the trains, or pick up a route map at the 
Museum Campus welcome centers. 



JULY/AUGUST 2001 



INT HEFI ELD FEATURE 



Field Museum Anthropologists Help 
Establish Date of the Americas' Oldest City 

Greg Borzo, Media Manager, Academic Affairs; Plunos courtesy of Jonathan Haas, Anthropology 

Had a few ceramic bowls been found among the ruins, tine real age of the ancient site 
at Caral, Peru, might have been determined long ago. First discovered in 1905, the 
site has puzzled anthropologists with its monumental architecture and advanced 
irrigation systems but lack of pottery remains and other riches that mark most complex 
civilizations. Hence it was largely ignored until instinct grabbed a team of archaeologists 
hiking the arid terraces in 1999 and told them to take a closer look. 




-~ -^ — »-. . , 



Structures of wooden 
poles, mud and cane, 
much hke the homes 
of today (left), housed 
servants or peasants who 
tanned or hauled rocks to 
build the pyramids. The 
remains of an adobe- 
walled home (right) 
indicate higher status. 



New radiocarbon dates of the reed-woven bags 
found within walls indicate that Caral, 120 niiles 
north of Lima, was home to the earhest known 
urban settlement in the New World. The surprising 
evidence pushes the development of these advances 
in the Americas back to as early as 2627 B.C.E. — 
about the same time the Egyptians were building 
their own pyramids. 

"Our findings show that a very large, complex 
society had arisen on the coast of Peru centuries 
earlier than anyone thought," said Jonathan Haas, 
Ph.D., MacArthur curator of anthropology at The 
Field Museum. The new research, pubhshed in 
Science in April, was conducted by Haas. Dr. Ruth 
Shady Solis of San Marcos National University 
and the study's lead author, and Dr. Winifred 
Creamer, associate professor of anthropology at 
Northern Illinois University and a Field Museum 
adjunct curator. 

Sitting above the green valley floor, Caral would 
be easy to overlook with its sun-dried desert hills 
surrounding a cluster of simple earthen mounds. 



But beneath each dry shell lies a terraced pyramid 
structure built some 4,600 years ago. There are also 
sunken plazas, residential neighborhoods and several 
smaller mounds — all erected before ceramics were 
introduced in Peru. As one of 18 large contemporary 
sites in the Supe Valley of Peru's Pacific Coast, these 
sites played a pivotal role in the social, political 
and economic development of civilization in 
South America. 

The radiocarbon samples were taken in con- 
junction with Dr. Shady 's ongoing research. 
Excavations are focused on assessing the range and 
function of architectural features and determining 
the sequence and construction methods of the site's 
colossal mounds. 

Pyramids dominate landscape 

Caral's central zone contains six large platform 
mounds arranged around a huge pubhc plaza 1,800 
feet in diameter. The largest mound, "Piramide 
Mayor," measures 60 feet high and 450-by-500 feet 



IN THE FIELD 



at the base. The mounds were built by pihng 
mesh sacks, filled with rocks fi-om the riverbed and 
surrounding hills, inside retaining walls that formed 
the base. They were also painted in pinks, blues, 
yellows and other earth tones to enhance their 
magnificence. Research indicates that all six mounds 
were built in only one or two phases, indicating 
complex planning, centralized decision-making and 
mobihzation of large labor forces. 

While Egypt's pyramids contained halls and 
rooms inside them, stairs, rooms, courtyards and 
other structures were constructed on the tops and 
sides of the Caral pyramids. Excavations will deter- 
mine whether there are rooms, passageways or even 
tombs inside the Caral mounds. 

Other architecture at the site indicates a high 
level of cultural complexity. The varied styles and 
quality of Caral's housing point to a richly stratified 
society. And three sunken circular plazas, the largest 
of ^vhich is 150 feet in diameter, testify to the 
emergence of a well-organized religion with open, 
pubHc ceremonies. Such plazas are an architectural 
form that continued throughout the Andes for 
several thousand years. 

Ultimately, the social, political and religious sys- 
tem founded in the Supe Valley provided ancestral 
roots for the great civilization of the Incas, who 
ruled the Andes some 4,000 years later when the 
first Europeans arrived in the 16th century. 

Other villages in Peru were occupied before 2600 
B.C.E., and some of them even had small-scale 
public platforms or stone rings. However, all sites in 
the Americas occupied in the third millennium 
B.C.E. are dwarfed by the 200-acre size of Caral and 
its huge monuments. Of the 18 recorded preceramic 
sites in the Supe Valley, 10 are more than 60 acres 
in size. Any one of these 1 0, if taken alone, would 
probably be the largest settlement in the New 
World during the same period. Collectively, this 




concentration of urban setdements — all with monu- 
mental architecture and all based on irrigation — 
is simply unparalleled in any period. 

Caral's location some 14 miles inland from 
the Pacific is also important. Because the Peruvian 
coast is extremely arid, the only source of water for 
fields is the Supe River, and the only way to get 
the river water to arable land is by way of irrigation 
canals. Thus, as Dr. Creamer noted, "The farmers at 
Caral may have been the Americas' first pioneers to 
build canals and open the vast potential of channeling 
river water to rich desert lands surrounding a river's 
valley bottom." 

Caral's domesticated plants included squash, 
beans and cotton. No corn has been found, and 
its absence establishes for the first time that this 
starchy staple was not necessary to the development 
of a complex society in South America. 

"Caral offers an opportunity to investigate one 
of the fundamental questions of Western archaeol- 
ogy and social science, namely, what is the origin 
of complex, centralized, highly organized society 
in the Americas?" Dr. Haas said. "This is a project 
that comes along once in a generation and offers 
opportunities rarely glimpsed in the field of 
archaeology." ITF 



The pyramids of Caral 
are buried beneath millen- 
nia of windblown sand. 



The Supe Valley 

Sites 

Valley boundary 

Arable land 




This map shows the Supe 
River valley of Peru where 
Caral is located. 



JULY/AUGUST 2001 



The Facts Fluttering From Wings 

Paul Z. Goldstein, Assistant Curator of Insects, Zoology 

Inspiring poems, paintings, fables and fashion, butterflies and moths have attracted 
scientists and laypeople for centuries. While their loveliness captures our imagination, 
they also provide vital evolutionary clues and act as litmus tests for evaluating the 
integrity of our native ecosystems. Our summer exhibition. Living Colors: A Butterfly 
Garden, showcases the beauty of butterflies and moths alongside the importance of 
museum science in studying these fascinating creatures. 



Our collections are 
historical resources that 
help researchers worldwide 
discover, describe and 
forwally name netv species. 



Butterflies and moths make up one of the largest 
orders of insects, with more than 145,000 known 
species in habitats ranging fix)m the Arctic tundra to 
your own backyard. Many more species await dis- 
coverv: They are collectively known as Lepidoptera, 
or "scale-winged" insects, referring to the thousands 
of microscopic, shingle-like scales that cover 
their wings and give them their colors. Most 

Lepidoptera 1^4 of 46 recognized superfamihes — 

are, in fact, moths, while butterflies and skippers 
comprise only about 20,000 species. In a way, 
butterflies are moths that have evolved unique 
features and habits. 

The Field Museum boasts one of the LJnited 
States' most important butterfly and moth collec- 
tions — approximately 200,000 specimens and 
growing. The largest segment, more than 50,000 
specimens , was amassed by Herman F. Strecker, a 
professional sculptor whose passion was collecting 
butterflies and describing new species. An obsessive 
collector, Strecker devoted years of his life to 
building what was then considered one of the best 
collections of worldwide butterflies. The Museum 
purchased the coUecrion in 1908 for $15,000, and 




it took William Gerhard, the sole curator of insects 
at the time, more than three months to prepare the 
collection for the ttain journey from Pennsylvania 
to Chicago. It was rumored that Strecker's fanatical 
nature got the better of him, and that his relation- 
ship with several contemporary lepidopterists 
became strained when he "borrowed" important 
specimens from their collections. 

Biological collections, the backbone of museum 
science, are the world s taxonomic Ubraries that 
enable scientists to catalog life on Earth and our 
understanding of its evolutionary history. Without 
specimen collections, there could be no progress 
in taxonomy or systematics because there would 
be no "permanent" specimens to which we could 
anchor names. We would also be unable to under- 
stand patterns of faunal change over rime; many of 
our Lepidoptera specimens were collected from 
natural areas that have since disappeared. 

Of local concern is the profound degradarion of 
prairie habitats in the past century. Because so many 
butterflies and moths require prairie or prairie-like 
habitats for survival, they are valuable indicator 
species that can help prioritize areas for conserva- 
tion and evaluate diSerent landscape management 
techniques. Last summer Field Museum scientists 
began inputting data from specimens associated 
exclusively with threatened prairie habitats into 
a database. The data wfll be incorporated into a 
larger database that includes similar information 
fixjm other museum and universitv^ collections. 

Until 1999. Gerhard had been the only lepi- 
dopterist to occupy a curatorial position at The 
Field Museum. Much has changed since his day 
for both museum science and e.xhibitrv' First 
erected in 1998, Liinng Colors highlights a relatively 
new phenomenon for museums — e.xhibitions that 
feature Uve animals. The Field was one of the first 
museums to erect a live butterfly exhibition. 

The Field Museum has also kept pace with 
high-tech scientific developments. Several zoology 
and botany staff members use the Pritzker 
Laboratory for Molecular Systematics to study 
organismal relationships and evolution using DNA. 



IN THE FIELD 




Gulf fririllaiy, Agraulis vanillae 

Elaborate lasers help us determine the sequence 
of nucleotides in portions of the DNA molecule. 
Various computer programs then analyze these 
sequences to generate hypotheses, known as phylo- 
genetic trees, of how different species are related to 
one another. In principle, these techniques can be 
appHed to any group of living organisms. 

Part of the research focuses on owlet moths, the 
largest family of Lepidoptera. Using the phyloge- 
netic trees, it is possible to infer evolutionary stages 
of many of their features. We are particularly 
interested in how the larvae of herbivorous insects 
evolve to feed on different host plants, especially 
those whose chemicals act as defensive compounds. 
The ancestors of the owlet moths fed primarily on 
grasses and their relatives and have only recently 
adapted to flowering plants, many of which are 
extremely toxic. 

Many of our curatorial staff are involved with 
local and international conservation programs. Since 
most butterflies and moths have extremely specific 
living requirements, they are especially good gauges 
of habitat health. Most caterpillars, for example, 
only feed on one to a few closely related plant 
species. The caterpillar of one threatened prairie 
species, the Rattlesnake Master borer moth 
{Papaipema eryngif), feeds exclusively in the roots 
of Rattlesnake Master {Eryngium yuaifoUum). Its 
decline, therefore, could signal that the plant species 
is in trouble. 

Butterfly and moth species may also have light, 
temperature, humidity and soil hydrology require- 
ments that we do not know much about, and these 
insects often disappear from threatened habitats 



before we see troubling signs. Techniques to man- 
age and protect natural areas, including prescribed 
burning, mowing and selective application of 
herbicides to control invasive plant species, are 
greatly enhanced by continually evaluating their 
effects on populations of butterflies and moths. ITF 

Learn more about butterfly and moth biology and conserva- 
tion at Living Colors, open through Sept. 3. Pick up the 
brochure about growing your oum butterfly garden, or call 
312.665.7400 for information on educational programs. 

Living Colors: A Butterfly Garden is created by The Field Museum. 



Paul Goldstein (right) 
works with a student to 
pin species they collected 
in Madidi, Bolivia. 




JULY/AUGUST 2001 



OFSPECIALINTEREST 



A Word from Our President 



You may recall the Museum's $40 million request 
to the State of Illinois to build a new Collections 
Resource Center and East Entrance. After many 
anxious months, we received confirmation that 
this year's budget contains $20 million for the first 
phase of constructing the center. We hope and 
expect that the second installment of $20 million 
will be in next year's budget, and we are prepared 
to push the start of construction to the earliest 
date feasible. 

We especially thank Ron Gidwitz, Chairman 
of the Board of Trustees, for his extraordinary 



leadership throughout this initiative. Ron's 
strategic vision, commitment and concern kept 
this initiative aUve. 

We are also gratefiil for your tremendous 
support and participation. We are told that our 
statewide communications effort was both impressive 
and unprecedented — generating more than 20,000 
letters, cards, emails and calls. We are confident that 
every- legislator who received communications on 
this initiative will not soon forget the strength of 
our voice. 

With gratitude and humility, we thank you. 



Revisiting the Origin of Life 



77ii5 Metacoronympha 
sehta ofgaiiism from the 
hindgut of a termite from 
Trinidad is stained with 
DAPI, which hinds to 
DS'A. Each hhie dot is 
a muleus. It is a single 
cell with more titan 
1,000 nuclei. 



While traditional belief places 
humans at the apex of evolution, 
it may be more accurate to think 
of ourselves as a colony of closely 
associated bacteria, according to 
evolutionist L\Tin Marguhs, Ph.D. 
Science has primarily focused on 
plant and animal species to deci- 
pher evolution, but it is now 
more understood that bacteria. 
Earth's only inhabitants for the 
first two billion years, are the 
foundation of all Ufe and its 
processes. Without bacteria, for 
example, there would be no 
fermentation, photosynthesis or 
oxygen breathing. 

The Founders' Council pre- 
sented the 2001 Award of Merit, 
given annually to an individual 
who has brought understanding 
of the environment to the public, 
to Dr. Marguhs, a distinguished 
professor at the Universirs- of 




Massachusetts. In her presenta- 
tion, Tlie Origin of Species 
Ra'isited, Dr. Margulis refined 
Darwinian and Lamarckian con- 
cepts of evolution to show how- 
crucial bacteria and other 
microbes are in the evolutionary 
history of hfe. 

Dr. Margulis bases her w-ork on 
the serial endosv-mbiosis theory 
(SET), first proposed 30 years ago, 
in which Ufe made of nucleated 
cells evolved through svTnbiotic 
relationships among bacteria. 
Mitochondria, organelles of a cell 
that fimction as power plants, con- 
tain their own DNA apart fiom 
that found in a nucleus. This 
"extra" DNA, she proposes, is a 
fossil of an ancient event in which 
one organism ate but failed to 
digest another: two different 
organisms formed new cells. 
Animal and plant cells can do nei- 
ther; they cannot spht to yield 
ofepring or fiieely exchange genes 
with different organisms to change 
into another form. Dr. Margulis 
thinks s)-mbioses like these enabled 
hfe to evolve rapidly. Since there 
are so many bacteria and they 
reproduce so easily, the result is a 
planet made fertile and habitable 
for larger life forms. 

Throughout her illustrious 
career. Dr. Margulis has helped 
popularize science and champion 



the environment. She has pub- 
lished extensively for audiences 
ranging fiom professional scientists 
to schoolchildren. She is also well 
known for her collaboration w-ith 
James E. Lovelock on his Gaia 
h-ypothesis, which describes the 
Earth as a self-regulating system in 
which growing, metabolizing and 
reproducing life forms create 
environmental conditions that 
affect survival and even extinction 
of other life forms. 

Dr. Margulis has received 
numerous distinguished fellow- 
ships and awards, including a 
National Medal of Science fixjm 
President CUnton in 2000 and 
Sigma Xi's Proctor Prize in 1999. 
She is an elected member of the 
U.S. National Academy of 
Sciences and the Russian 
Academy of Natural Sciences. 

As core supporters, Tlie Founders' 
Couihil strettgthms our dynamic 
agenda of sdentific, education a»td 
exhibition programs. Council tnemhers 
contribute between $1,500 and 
$25,000 or mote annually. Benefits 
include priiMe exltibition opatings, 
Mund-tlie-scenes tours, cxclusife 
cdiuational eivnts and special oppor- 
tunities with distinguished scientists 
siuh as Dr. Jane E. Goodall. For 
infonnation, call Kristen Jacobs at 
312.665.7773. 



ew X>:^Ni jN'^-rRS" 



^ V.ASSiC-'^u&ET-s DtPARTVEM' OF GEOSCi£MCES 



IN THE FIELD 



YOURGUIDE rOTHEFIELD 



A Pullout Calendar of Events for July and August 



Inside: Exhibits Festivals Family Programs Adult Programs 




'ormances: 
The Magic Behind 
Puppetry 

See some of the theatrical 
artistry represented in Julie 
Jaymor Playing with Fire 
come to life. 

The Chicago troupe 
Jabberwocky Marionettes 
will illustrate the creativity 
and technique behind shadow 
puppetry, marionettes and the 
ancient Japanese tradition of 
Bunraku puppetry. 

July 1-Nop. 14 
Saturdays and Sundays 
1 lam— 3pm 

FREE with Museum admission 



_I 



fe 



Field 



useum 



% 



New Exhibition 



ire 



New Lxnmiiion — 

Julie Taymor: Playing with F 

June 14-Nov. 4, 2001 

Extraordinary sets, masks and costumes 
will ignite your imagination. 

After more than 25 years of making spectacular theatrical art, critically 
acclaimed designer and director Julie Taymor has received wide public 
recognition for her recent triumph on Broadway with Disney's The Lion 
King and the debut of her first feature film, Titus, starring Anthony 
Hopkins and Jessica Lange. 

In this exciting exhibition, you'll see 
full-scale sets, puppets, masks, costumes, 
video clips and props that Taymor has used 
to create her larger-than-life worlds of 
spectacle and pageantry. 

You'll also discover how Taymor blends 
cultural traditions from around the globe 
and across the centuries to tell universal 
stories of love, lust, compassion, revenge, 
cruelty and innocence. Her inspirations 
range from 18th century Japanese puppetry 
to Mexican muralism to African textile motifs 
to Shakespearean traditions. Her work is 
right at home at the Field, where 
you can draw parallels between 
her designs and objects in our 
Africa, China and many 
other cultural exhibitions. 

Join us for an inspirational 
experience that celebrates an artist's 
vision and the creativity and ingenuity 
of cultures throughout the world. 



Julie Taymor; Playing with Fire was organized by the 
Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University 

This exhibition and its national tour are made possible by 
Ford Motor Company. 

Major support is also provided by Agnes Gund and 

Daniel Shapiro, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation 

and PricewaterhouseCoopers. 




General Museum Information: 312.922.9410 

Family and Adult Program Information and Tickets: 312.665.7400 



JULY/AUGUST 2001 



Your Guide to the Field: A pullout calendar of events for July and August 



Create Your Own 'Theme for a Day' 
at The Field Museum — ^ 



fe^: 



can't enjoy it all in one trip. Bring this pullout calendar with 
you on your next visit and follow the Nature Lover's Tour. 
Then come back again for the Masks of the World Tour. Or 
develop your own theme by selecting from our more than 35 
world-renowned exhibitions. 



'S'' 





y 



^ 




■■■■.'•^M 



Nature Lover's Tour 

For all ages 

n start your day with L/ving Colors: A Butterfly Garden, 
on the southeast terrace through Sept. 3. Step into a 
lush, enchanting world where 55 species of butterflies 
and moths swirl around you. Experience nature's fragile 
beauty up close as new butterflies emerge before your 
eyes. Stand very still... and maybe one will land on your 
nose! Families should look for hands-on butterfly activi- 
ties throughout out the Museum (see Family Programs). 

^ Continue on to Nature Walk (Hall M-7W on the 
Museum's visitor map), where you'll find scenes of 
butterflies and other animals in their natural environ- 
ments. Follow a trail through prairies, wetlands, 
woodlands and ocean shores. 

A Get a new perspective on the insects and soil that 
support summer gardens in Underground Adventure 
(Hall G-3/4E). You'll shrink to the size of a bug and 
explore an immersive, interactive environment where 
everything is 100 times its normal size. 

n Finish off the day in the Small Treasures Gallery (Hall 
G-4E) with Insects: 105 Years of Collecting. Enjoy spec- 
tacular insects and learn about what goes on behind the 
scenes at the Museum to develop the scientific collections 
that help us learn more about our natural world. 

Living Colors; A Butterfly Garden is created by The Field Museum. ^ 

Mj^osanto is the lead sponsor of Underground Adventure. 



In Underground Adventure, see what life is 
like through the eyes of a bug! 




8 IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 



General Museum Information: 312.922.9410; Family and Adult Program Information and Tickets: 312.665.7400 



Masks of the World Tour 

What can a mask tell us about the culture that 
created it? Find out when you explore the 
Museum's cultural exhibitions, focusing on 
the masks that you'll find along the way. 

For all ages 

Start near the totem poles in the Northwest Coast exhi- 
bition (Hall M-3E on the Museum's visitor map). You'll 
find more than 200 masks in the nearby exhibition cases. 
What are they made of? What symbols do you see? What 
do you think the colors or expressions represent? 




KInetosaurs: Putting Some Teeth 
into Art and Science 

Closes July 8, 2001 

Hands-on fun brings dinosaurs to life. Set a T. rex and other 
life-size dinosaur sculptures into motion and learn how these 
creatures may have run, roared and fought. Visit Kinetosaurs 
on Saturdays and Sundays, from 10am-2pm, and enjoy addi- 
tional gallery activities led by Museum staff. 

Kinetosaurs is created by The Children's Museum of Indianapolis. 
Sculptures by John Payne of Payne Studios, Asheville, NC, 1998, 1999. 



Wrapped in Pride: Ghanaian Kente 
and African American Identity 

Closes July 15, 2001 

Trace the origins of the kente cloth that is celebrated in Ghana. 
You'll discover how this colorful, bold fabric has become a pow- 
erful icon of African heritage for people throughout the world. 

See the Family Programs listings for information about Kente 
Cultural Learning Stations. 



This exhibition was organized by the UCLA Fowler Museum of Cultural History and the 
Newark Museum, Newark, IMJ. 

This exhibition and its national tour are made possible by Ford Motor Company. The exhibition 
has received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, dedicated to expanding 
American understanding of history and culture; the National Endowment for the Arts; and the 
Getty Grant Program for the publication. 

Additional support for the Chicago presentation is provided by the Field Associates, the 
Elizabeth F. Cheney Foundation and Chicago Tribune. 




Thursday Night Mixers 
Outdoors at the Field 

The Field Museum is the place to be on 
Thursday nights this summer! Join us on 
the iVluseum's north terrace for food, drink, 
gorgeous views of the city skyline and live 
music from Chicago's hottest bands. 



Ttmrsdays tlirotigh Sept. 6, 7— 9pm, $10 per person 
Advance tickets atmlahle through Tkketinaster at 

312.902.1500 or wunatL-ki- o- - . 

able at entratue. Call 3 12.6' . 



Please noterlhis eivnt is outdoor: 
exhibitions will not he open u 

Held in partre-i ■_ ~ 



Tlie Museum's 



productions. 



July 12 
July 19 
July 26 
Aug. 2 
Aug. 9 
Aug. 16 
Aug. 23 
Aug. 30 
Sept. 6 



Bumpus 
Underwater People 
Casolando 
Michael McDermott 
Domestic Problems 
Robert Cornelius 7 



Umphrey's McGee 
TBD 




Below is a calendar of the temporary exhibitions you will have an opportunity to visit in 2001. 

Some dates may change. Remember to call 312.922.9410 or visit our website for specific information. 



Kinetosaurs: Putting Some Teeth 
into Art and Science 
Through July 8 



Wrapped in Pride: Ghanaian Kente 
and African American Identity 
Through July 15 



Kachinas: Gifts from the 
Spirit Messengers 
Through July 22 



Dancing with Dinosaurs: The Story of Sue 



Tccih Together Ensemble 

Learn about the evolution of dinosaurs and tlie science 
of paleontology through dance and song. 

Weekdays throtij^hoiit July and August, 10:30am and 1pm 
FREE with Museum admission 



The following activities are free 
with Museum admission. 



Weave a fun-foam cloth and find other hands-on learning 
activities when you visit the special exhibition Wrapped 
in Pride or the permanent exhibition Africa. 

Saturdays and Sundays through July 15, 11am— 3pm 






Learn about butterflies and the places they call home 
through a variety of hands-on activities. Put together a but- 
terfly puzzle, draw butterflies with chalk on the sidewalk 
and discover how you can grow your own butterfly garden. 

Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays through Sept. 2 
1 1am —3pm 



^v 





Naturalist Certificate 
Program Celebrates 
5th Anniversary 

Deepen your knowledge about the natural environ- 
ment and share this passion with others through 
the Naturalist Certificate Program (NCP)! 

The Field partners with The Morton Arboretum, which originally 
developed the certificate, and the Chicago Botanic Garden to offer 
this series of field-oriented classes in ecology, botany, zoology, 
geology and interpretation. The Field joined this program in 1996, 
and more than 250 nature enthusiasts are currently enrolled to 
pursue a certificate. 

'M started with a few courses, and before I knew it, I was taking 
all the courses I could," says Steven Thomas, a lawyer and avid 
camper who shares his enthusiasm and increased knowledge with 
his 8-year-old daughter and her classmates. "Chicago is a terrifi. 
place to study the environment because of its amazing biodiver- 
sity. Within a short drive, we have access to prairies, forests, 
wetlands, dunes, bogs and lakes." 



In Her Hands: Craftswomen 
Changing the World 

Through October 28 



Living Colors: A Butterfly Garden 

Through September 3 



Julie Taymor: Playing with Fire 

Through November 4 




Curious beginners to more experienced naturalists can enjoy NCP 
classes, which attract students from a variety of backgrounds for 
personal and professional development. Students can take just a 
few courses or earn a certificate by taking 13 to 15 courses. 

jdents can take courses at any of the three campuses, each 
- which offers a unique experience. At the Morton Arboretum 
dfid Chicago Botanic Gardens, courses highlight the natural 
landscapes available at those institutions. At the Field, courses 

;n the Museum's exhibitions and vast scientific collec- 
: . i and take students to wilderness sites throughout 
Chicagoiand for fieldwork. 



"NCP is a great partnership. Together the 
three organizations are offering adult 
learners a program with a lot of depth 
and diversity." 

Beth Crownover, The Field's Educat'C^ ' 

Department ' 



lime: i-ac 



imEiiii3*iiI 




Listen^^^PotT^st^^OTf^n^Take an art project to take 
home — all in just 20 minutesl One adult for every three child'- 
pease, fvleets in the Living Together exhibition. For younc 
and their families. 

ipiii daily itijuly Jiid August ' 

 s progra-Ti is soc^soreo oy tng Stragusa r 



Every weekend you'll find a selection of hands-on activities through- 
out the Museum. You may meet a soil scientist at work, see your 
name in Egyptian hieroglyphs or dissect an owl jjellet. 

Every Saturday and Sunday! 
10am— noon and l—3pm 



Field Museum docents help bring history to life in this full-size 
replica of a traditional Pawnee lodge. 

Daily! Saturdays and Sundays, 10am-4:30pw 
Weekdays, 11am, 11:30am, 1pm and 1:30pm 



July-August NCP Courses 



Dr. Patrick Leacock, Department of' Botany, Tlie Field Museum 

Learn the basic biology of fungi, their roles in the envir- 
onment, characteristics of major groups and how to identify 
a mushroom genus. 

Wednesdays, July 18 and 25\ 7-9pm P. 
Saturdays. July 21 and 28, 9am— 1pm 
SI 30, members $110 




^ll^c^Z^ 



-^12M5.7400fbriutWi 



Pr^ 



^•^riir 



m 






DTODD 




i 




Cheyenne Visions 

Opens August 10 


Sigmund Freud: 
Conflict and Cuitu 

October 3 through C 


re 

)ecember 9 




Cleopatra of Egypt: 
From History to Myth 
October 20, 2001, through 
March 3, 2002 



General Museum Information: 312.922.9410; Family and Adult Program Information and Ticl<ets: 312.665.7400 



The following activities are free 
with Museum admission. 



Hear the stories behind some of our exciting exhibitions 
on our daily Highlights Tours. On weekdays, also look for 
tours of Inside Ancient Egypt and Northwest Coast Indians 
and Eskimos. 



Meet Field Museum scientists and see rarely displayed 
specimens from our collections. 

Evei:ii,jeauui^atuidiliyif the ""-^"'l', llam—2pm 




Light Show 






Bring your own materials and get tips from artists and 
scientific illustrators as they create artwork inspired 
by our exhibitions. 

Every third Saturday of the month, nooii—3pnn 



Watch Chicago's fascinating story take shape in a new out- 
door sound and light show that features the words of poet 
Gwendolyn Brooks, columnist Mike Royko, novelist Mark 
Twain and other Chicago luminaries. Historical images will be 
projected onto the Museum as these legendary voices tell 
Chicago's story. 

Most Tliiirsdays, Fridays and Saturdays, June 28— Sept. 1 

Presented on the Museum's north fagade at dusk 
(approximately 8:30pm) 

Call 312.665. 71 i4 or visit wuw.fieldmuseum .org for 
information. 

Chicago Pageant; A Mew Canvas is co-produced by the Chicago Historical Society, 
with cooperation from Steppenwoif Theatre, Goodman Theatre and CITY 2000. 




©JIM NACHEL 



Id Ecology: Summer 




m 



olzahn, Envininmental and Conservation 
Programs. The Field MuscHm 

Study the fundamental concepts of conservation 
biology. Examine how biodiversity relates to 
restoration ecology, habitat management, 
endangered species and captive breeding. 

Wednesdays, Ah9^' 1—1 5, 6-9pm 
Saturday, Aijgf 1 1, 9am— noon 
SLW^members $110 




Tom Hintz, Field Museiun Instructor 

Explore how competition and altruism influence populations 
n ecological communities. Investigate how genetics affect 
ndividuals and populations, and study basic equations used 

to determine the fitness of populations. 

Tuesdays, Aug. 7—21, 7— 9pm 

Sundays, Aug. 12-19, 9am-noon 

$130, members $110 

For courses at The Morton Arboretum, 
call 630.719.2468. 

For courses at the Chicago Botanic Garden, 
call 847.835.8261. 



Get your Cleopatra of Egypt tickets now! 

Scheming seductress or political mastermind? Don't miss this chance to unravel Cleopatra's mystery. 
This exclusive exhibition is appearing only in Rome, London and at The Field Museum. 

Advance tickets on sale now. See Membership News on page 2 1 for details. 



Look for these 
exciting programs 
this fall. 



Analyzing Freud 

Program series beginning in October 

Examine Freud's impact on the way we 

see our world tlirough a series of adult 

programs accompanying the Sigmund 

Freud: Conflict and Culture exhibition, 

open Oct. 3 to Dec. 9. Hear prominent 

speakers from a variety of perspectives 

discuss contemporary views of neuro- 

science and the unconscious, the cultural impact of 

psychoanalysis in children's literature and other topics. 

This series is being presented by The Field Museum in collaboration with the 
Humanities Laboratory at the University of Illinois, Chicago. 

The Field Museum gratefully acknowledges the Freud Community Advisory 
Panel for its insight and assistance. 

This exhibition is organized by the Library of Congress in cooperation with the 
Sigmund Freud-Museum in Vienna and the Freud Museum, London. 

A Conversation 
with Meave Leakey 

Thursday, Oct. 4 

Share the excitement of a cutting-edge and 
controversial discovery that may forever 
'S change how we think about human ancestry 
and evolution. World-renowned paleoanthropologist Meave Leakey's 
discovery of a 3.5 million-year-old skull suggests that there may 
be another branch on the human family tree. 






Explore Cleopatra 
and Ancient Egypt 

Program scries beginning in October 

Transport yourself to ^ 

ancient Egypt through a 
series of lectures, films, ,^ 
behind-the-scenes tours, f, 

classes and other pro- ' 

grams. The Field Museum >,-_/ 
and the Oriental Institi 
are collaborating on a 
series of programs to 
complement the Cleopatra 
of Egypt: From History to 
Myth exhibition at The Field 
Museum and the permanent 
collections at both institutions. 

This exhibition has been organized by The British Museum 
in collaboration with The Fondazione Memmo, Rome. 

International Sponsor BP 
National Sponsor Exelon 



i 




;*■ 



VATICAN MUSEUMS, VATICAN CITY 



Visitor Information 



* 



•afessT" 



^■- -<i^ 



Hours: 9am -5pm daily. Closed Christmas and New Year's Day. 
We are open at Sam for extended summer hours through Sept. 3. 

To get tickets: Living Colors: A Butterfly Garden, Julie Taymor: Playing with Fire and 
Klnetosaurs: Putting Some Teeth into Art and Science are all specially ticketed exhibitions. 

Member passes can be reserved in advance by calling Ticketmaster at 312.902.1500 (service 
charges apply) or coming to the Membership Desk near the Museum's south entrance (no 
service charges). Non-member tickets can also be reserved in advance through Ticketmaster. 

Day-of tickets are available at the Museum, while supplies last. 

General Information: 312.922.9410 orwww.fieidmuseum.org 

Adult and Family Program Information: 312.665.7400 



14 I IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 



SCIENTIST'SPICK 




M WADHWA/7594 



Resembling a Jackson Pollock painting of rhythmic dribbles and smears, this is actually 
a scanning electron microscopic image of a thin section of Zagami, a Martian meteorite. 
It may indicate that water once resided on the red planet. New research by Meenakshi 
Wadhwa, associate curator of meteoritics, shows that the crust of Mars is moderately to 
heavily oxidized. Since water is the most common oxidizing agent in the Earth's crust, it 
is possible that water existed in the crust of Mars as well and caused it to become oxidized. 

Wadhwa determined the oxidation condition of six Martian meteorites by analyzing 
minute amounts of europium — a rare earth element — in a mineral known as pyroxene, which 
makes up a large portion of these rocks. The pyroxenes (reddish orange grains) and plagio- 
clase (blue grains) in this image are the most common minerals found in rocks formed by 
volcanic processes on Earth and Mars. These meteorites may have been formed in lava flows 
on the surface of Mars 180 to 474 million years ago ... hardly a "modern" creation. 



JULY/AUGUST 2001 



INTHEFIELDFEATURE 




Uons balanced 
gracefully in the 
acacia tree branches. 



Story and photos by Robin Colburn, Trustee 

Many of us fantasize about visiting places far away and entirely foreign to our culture. 
When it gets down to it, few of us muster up the courage to wander beyond familiar 
surroundings — or at least familiar society. Field Museum Tours mal<es those somewhat 
intimidating adventures comfortable and secure — much like traveling with family. 
I have completed three trips with Field Museum staff: Kenya in 1997 with Bruce 
Patterson; an Amazon tributary with Barry Chernoff and Jennifer Wheeler in 1999; 
and Tanzania, the most recent trip, with Bill Stanley and Mary Anne Rogers. The Field 
Museum scientists offer an "inside track" to learning the dynamics of foreign ecosys- 
tems and the politics and social behavior of both the animals and people of the regions. 
They act as bridges between our existing world and perspectives and these new experi- 
ences. Here are some highlights from the journal I maintained during this most recent 
extraordinary trip. 



Feast for the senses We arrived at the Arusha 
airport near Kilimanjaro in darkness and walked 
down the hard stand to the sizzhng sounds of cicadas 
and an embracing warm breeze. The sensory experi- 
ence of Arusha the next day — the pre-dawn call to 
prayer emanating fix)m the nearby mosque; strolling 
women wrapped in intricately patterned kangas of 
teal, saffixjn and ruby; donkeys led along the roadside 
bearing goods; and the aroma of fires and roasting 
food — was extraordinarily stimulating. We were at 
last in Africa. 



Arusha National Park Giraffes with a seeming^ 
nonchalant bearing, well enough protected to 
hardly fear humans, greeted us near the park. 
Black and white colobus monkeys bantered 
about in the trees, while exotic butterflies deco- 
rated the park office steps. From an overlook of 
Ngurdoto Crater, a region off-Umits to preserve 
its natural ecosystem, we were able to view the 
Cape buffalo below. Blue monkeys swung fiwm 
trees, and snails the size of human fists dotted 
the hillsides. 



IN THE FIELD 



Scene after scene unfolded with each bend in 
the road. A crowned crane, wearing a fuzzy golden 
crest evocative of a centurion's helmet, spread its 
wings broadly as if to invite our admiration. Cape 
buffalo — powerful and potentially dangerous ani- 
mals — apparently did not frighten the warthogs 
grazing and romping amidst them, perhaps finding 
safe harbor from predators in their presence ... A 
dikdik, a tiny antelope sporting diminutive, pointed 
horns, offered us a glimpse of his beauty before 
shyly disappearing with one leap into the grass. 
These small mammals rarely w^eigh more than four 
kilograms, nor exceed 50 centimeters in height; I 
amused myself with the thought of smuggling one 
home in my backpack. 

One of the greatest sights of Tanzania — no, 
of Africa — soon came into clear view: Mount 
Kilimanjaro, a moving frame of clouds drifting by its 
snow-capped summit. This awe-inspiring landmark 
seemed the Mount Olympus of the gods of Afi-ica.... 

Lake Manyara Early into the park, the palms, 
heat and humidity created a delicious sensation of 
tropical jungle. Some 50 baboons moved toward us 
as though operating a checkpoint, dividing and sur- 
rounding the vehicle. Young offspring rode their 
mothers' backs like jockeys perched upon their 
mounts. Some gathered insects from the brush, 
while others groomed themselves, ambivalent to 
our presence. Their humanlike antics could have 
captivated us for hours. 




The earthy, rich scent of elephant dung inter- 
mittently greeted us. We paused at a small bridge, 
stirred by what many of us were witnessing for the 
first time — five elephants dousing themselves in 
the stream below. We watched, transfixed, until 
they climbed the sloped bank and disappeared 
into the woods. 

We learned via the radio communications 
between guides that lions had been sighted. Deeper 
into the park we encountered several, perched in 
acacia trees, legs dangling lazily, their tails gently 
twitching. Occasionally, one would rise to study us 
with casual interest and then reposition itself on the 
thorny branch with exceptional grace and balance. 

That night at the lodge my fellow traveler and I 
settled in poolside hoping to see bats feeding on 
insects over the water. Glowing eyes — not those of 
a bat — studied us from the far edge of the pool. It 
was a genet, a beautiful cat-like creature with a 
spotted body some 50 centimeters in length and a 
striped tail nearly as long. We filmed it transfixed as 
it devoured toads struggling to escape the pool. 
Waiting patiently as each amphibian approached the 
edge, it pounced and swallowed its prey with amaz- 
ing speed, gracefully moving along the water's edge 
between strikes. Our ballerina left the stage too 
soon; the show concluded. 

The Ngorongoro Conservation Area promised 

to be the most intense wildlife experience of the 
trip as the Ngorongoro Crater, more than 100 sq. 
miles in area, teems with the largest variety of ani- 
mals concentrated in one place in eastern Africa. 

Every turn introduced a new performance. A 
blue monkey lovingly embraced her youngster. A 
trail of safari ants sought its next encampment, 
towing termites from a recently raided nest.Vervets 
(small, long-tailed monkeys) fed in the grasses. They 
had a more delicate appearance than other monkey 
species we had seen, their black faces contrasting 
the white brows and cheeks. 

Eating lunch at Ngoitokitok Spring requires great 
caution; in fact it is best done inside the vehicles 
since the black kites there are renowned for swoop- 
ing down and snatching food from unsuspecting 
diners. The center stage of this lunch location was 
a pond populated by hippos. These marvelous 
creatures amused us as they bobbed up and down, 
snorting, grunting and splashing. 



Vervets amused us 
with their deliberate, 
busy behavior. 



JULY/AUGUST 2001 



The agama lizard's 
jlamboyant coloring is 
evocative of a rubber toy. 



Our first evening at the Ngorongoro Serena 
Lodge was an almost mystical experience. As the 
clouds lifted and swirled, shafts of light from the 
setting sun pierced their openings to allow teasing 
glimpses of the lakes below. This Shangri-La beck- 
oned us to the rhinos and flamingos glowing 
twilight pink in the waters of its basin. 

The next day in the crater, a dozen or so 
Maasai ostriches strutted about, their comically 
small heads topping long necks that swung with 
each stride. Thomson's gazelles appeared golden 
in the early light, and a golden jackal rolled on its 
back, gleefully relieving an itch. 

We encountered two black rhinos, at close range, 
standing in a defensive pose. Though their mass and 
strength clearly gave them the upper hand, they 
nonetheless kept a wary, mindful eye on our vehi- 
cles. Scores of wildebeest dotted the landscape, 
some running in front of us, kicking exuberantly, 
grunting, galloping and tossing their heads defiandy. 

Down the road, a Cape bufialo had succumbed 
to hons a few hours before. Two hyenas slinked 
away, apparently having feasted, and vultures now 
possessed the carcass. Three tawny eagles some 
20 feet away awaited their turn as the vultures tore. 




tugged and poked at the carrion with great 
enthusiasm — a gruesome, yet fascinating display of 
animal behavior. Occasionally one bird, seemingly 
envious of another's choice spot, aggressively seized 
the better position with hissing, biting and fiirious 
flapping of its massive wings. 

We revisited these remains five hours later to 
discover that the carcass had diminished another 
50 percent. The vultures had nearly hoflowed 
out the buffalo; one could be seen through the 
gaps of the exposed ribs feeding upon the 
animal's interior. Although a morbid subject, it 
illustrates an important point: protecting a habitat 
like the Ngorongoro Crater aUows the ecosystem 
to maintain a balance. Every living thing finds its 
niche; nothing is wasted. 

The suspect predators slept soundly near the 
kiU. Eight of these great cats slept by a puddle in a 
marshy area, their legs casually draped over one 
another. The Hons v/ere not the least bit wary of us, 
and I wondered if they fear anything at aU. Their 
indifierence was, in a way, humbHng. 

The lesser flamingo, whose intense color is 
enhanced by early morning and late afternoon Ught, 
moves in large populations, wading and feeding in 
the waters. Their soft echoing squawk has a near 
hypnotic eflect. Greater flamingos, which are much 
taller and paler, seemed like punctuation marks 
appearing among the lesser species. These birds 
extended and contracted their necks into flexing 
"s" shapes with grace and elegance. The sunlight 
sparkling on windswept water, the motion of birds 
as they waded and fed, the occasional extension of 
wings exposing the solid black undersides and the 
soft chorus of sound emanating from the numerous 
species of waterfowl was poetic. 

The entire crater experienced a population 
explosion of moth larvae called "army worms." 
Millions of them adhered to the grasses; many 
crossed the roads en masse, even creeping over 
a snake sunning itself in the road. To see a few 
caterpillars would have been interesting, but the 
enormous number seemed grotesque. But again, 
nothing here is wasted; a golden jackal snapped up 
these creatures with gusto. 

At first glance, and even second, one would 
suspect nothing in the high grasses, but up popped 
a head — ^bearing the dazzling face of a cheetah, the 
illusion of black tears streaming from its eyes. 
Panting in the heat, it quickly surveyed its sur- 
roundings, and then dropped to the ground as 
though collapsing. Another rose, walked a few steps 
and then "tumbled" as well. A backdrop to this 
display, the wildebeest migration continued, 
unaware of the predators concealed in the tall 



IN THF FIFI n 



grass nearby. Yet another head emerged, then 
dropped ... returning to slumber, I supposed... 

The Olduvai Gorge where Mary Leakey discovered 
the earliest known hominid skuU at the timo (1959), is 
the site of ongoing research to this day, well worth a 
visit. A marker indicates the exact location where Mary 
spotted the famous skuU while walking her dogs. A 
monument commemorating this discovery stands near 
the marker and is adorned with a number of fossils 
found by visiting tourists, an ongoing tradition. 

We drove onward to an amazing natural phe- 
nomenon — the Shifting Sands. Long ago, a volcano 
spewed fine debris that was shaped by constant 
winds of the open plain into the form of a crescent. 
Over time the wind has picked up sand from the 
windward side and deposited it on the leeward side, 
moving consistently toward the Serengeti. Markers 
denoting the progress of the dune over the years 
span a remarkable distance backward from its 
present location. 

The Serengeti, with a staggering wildlife 
population, is the largest park in Tanzania. One 
of the greatest moments for us in this park was 
our first leopard sighting. Although the distance 
between it and us was substantial, we were able to 
distinguish a stunning leopard resting in a tree. 
While the bright sky reduced our view, its 
silhouette was elegant. Later that afternoon, we 
visited another leopard in much closer proximity, 
grooming and occasionally returning our gaze. 

Agama lizards frequent the picnic area of the 
Serengeti Visitor Center. Warming themselves on 
sunlit stones, they bob up and down, occasionally 
startling their observer with the sudden snatching 
of a fly on the wing. With upper torsos of intense 
pink and the lower portions and tails cerulean blue, 
they resemble rubber toys more vividly colored 
than any butterfly or tropical fish I have seen. 

Throughout the game parks, Kori bustards, nearly 
three feet taU, "strut their stuff" in a provocative 
mating display. They flip their tails over their backs 
toward their long, thick necks and expose a pre- 
dominantly white, feather duster-like underside. 
Prancing about in large steps, they inflate their 
swinging necks, echoing the effect of the white tail. 

Hearing the camp, we came upon a steinbuck 
resting at the fork in the road. While some animals 
rely upon their speed and agility to escape a preda- 
tor's grasp, the steinbuck remains very still to evade 
the eye of the predator. 

The Serengeti dusl< and dawn bring with them 

a glorious chorus. Hyenas chuckle in the distance as 
birds add their calls, songs and occasional alarms. 
Insects and amphibians call to one another. It is a 




symphony well orchestrated by Mother Nature, and 
the stage of wilderness allows for an uninterrupted 
performance. Nothing can compare to hearing 
nature's music devoid of the sounds of mankind and 
its machines. 

The aromas of rain-moistened earth, animals, 
dung and wet vegetation fill the air with a greater 
perfume than any of man's creation. Stars emerging 
undimmed by city lights, bats dipping and weaving 
through the air as dusk deepens to darkness and 
moths with glowing eyes hovering around the 
campfire — all are wondrous marvels of nature. 

A trip like this is not for everyone, I know, 
but visiting one of the greatest natural, virtually 
undisturbed corners of the world is a rejuvenating, 
revitalizing experience. It is an opportunity to learn 
about the real world — that which nature designed 
so well — and an opportunity to grasp the impor- 
tance of protecting what we can while we can. ITF 

Upcoming trips include Egypt, New Zealand, the 
Amazon, an around-the-world journey by private Jet and 
Tanzania. For information, see the back cover, call Field 
Museum Tours at 800.8U. 7244 or email 
fmtours@sover net. 



A dainty dikdik turns 
toward us before vanishing 
into the grass. 



JULY/AUGUST 2001 



FROMTHE ARCH IVES 



The Women Who Watch Over Us 



Kristin VaiiHeiikelem, Volunteer 



Tlie muse oj research 
in Stiinley Field Hall is 
enfolded within layers of 
sweeping arches. 



So quiet that one might not notice them at first 
glance, four regal women stand motionless in the 
upper corners of Stanley Field Hall. They have been 
there since World War I, nobly representing the 
activities that take place within the walls of 
this impressive neoclassical building. "Record," 
"Research," "Science" and "Dissemination of 
Knowledge" were created by New York sculptor 
Henry Hering (1874-1949) as part of his 1916 
contract to do the statuary and other decorative 
work for the new Museum building. 

"Record," clutching her quill and tablet, stands 
in the southeast corner across from "Research," who 
peers into her magnifying glass. In the northeast, 
"Dissemination of Knowledge" shows her baby the 




contents of a book, and in the northwest, "Science" 
wears a crown of laurels and holds two objects: a 
scroll in her right hand and — in a Hamlet-like 
stance — a human skull in her left. 

Although his mentor was the prolific Augustus 
Saint-Gaudens (1848-1907), Hering was perhaps 
the least recognized among the candidates being 
considered for the work. Today, however, Hermgs 
work can be found in such Chicago landmarks 
as Union Station, the Civic Opera House, the 
Michigan Avenue Bridge and the Federal Reserve 
Bank Building. Although it is credited to Saint- 
Gaudens, the Lincoln figure in Grant Park was 
also largely Hering's work, along with the design 
of $10- and $20-gold pieces minted between 
1907 and 1933. His art can also be found in Yale 
University, Indianapolis and Cleveland. 

For the Field alone, Hering sculpted eight 
eleven-foot, five-ton caryatids (female statue-pillars); 
four bas-relief panels representing geology, botany, 
zoology and anthropology; and the lion medallions 
on the upper side walls of Stanley Field Hall. 
Hering also designed four statues representing the 
cardinal directions and four statues representing 
earth, water, fire and air, which never made it to 
the Field. Curiously, duplicate sets of the direction 
statues found their way to the Museum of Science 
and Industry entrances. 

Hering sent photographs of his work in 1917 
to Field Museum architect Peirce Anderson, who 
responded: "Your caryatids are perfectly bully, and I 
congratulate you very heartily on the outcome of 
these . . . The handling of the drapery and other 
details is certainly a joy to the eye." On the back of 
another enthusiastic letter fi-om Anderson, Stanley 
Field himself penciled in his agreement: "The first 
four figures of the main pediment . . . meet with my 
entire approval. 1 am ... delighted with them." 

Hering made the fi"ont page of the New York 
Times years after his involvement at the Museum, 
but not for his art. In 1945 he returned home fi-om 
a golf course to find the wreckage of a U.S. Ariny 
bomber in his penthouse studio. Lost in the fog, the 
plane had crashed into the Empire State Building, 
careening debris into nearby buildings. Hering, 
whose interest in golf had expanded to designing 
experimental clubs, was more concerned about the 
safety' of those clubs than his artwork. Fortunately 
his sculptures, especially the graceful muses of 
Stanley Field Hall, continue to delight and captivate 
visitors to this dav. 



20 



IN THE FIELD 



MEMBERSHIPNEWS 



Free Member Passes for Jul 



Extraordinary sets, masks and costumes by an award-winning director will ignite your imagination in 
Julie Taymor: Playing with Fire, open June 14 through Nov. 4, 2001. Family members can receive up to four 
passes for this special exhibition, and senior, student, individual and national affiliate members can receive 
up to two passes. To obtain your passes, call Ticketmaster at 312.902.1500 (fees will be assessed), or visit 
the membership desk for future or same-day tickets (no additional fees). Viewing dates and times are avail- 
able on a first-come, first-served basis. For information, call the membership office at 312.665.7700. 



Save the Date 



^ 



Cleopatra di Egypt, openloct.^20, 2001, through March 3, 2002, promises^ 
to be an extraordinary e)q3erience with more than 350 priceless artifacts and 
artworl<s to explore the life, liaisons and legend of Egypt's tragic queen. This 
exclusive exhibition will appear only in Rome, London and at The Field 
Museum. Members-only viewing dates are Oct. 21, 24, 26 and 28. Details 



to come in the mail 



>• 

J 



■^ 



\ 



f Or, get additional Cleopatra tickets now! 

If you plan to see Cleopatra beyond the members- 
only viewing, member passes and advance tickets 
are now available. 



itfer 



Benefits: Family memtfers car^receive four passes, 
and senior, student, individual atid national affiliate 
members can receive two passes. j -- • ; , 

Purchasing Additional Tickets: Cleopatra tickets 

for an additional member in your household are 
$10 each. Cleopatra tickets for a non-member guest 
are $10 each plus general admission. The Museum 
offers discount combination tickets that include 
basic admission, with greater discounts for children, 
seniors and students. 

/ 



Ordering Tickets: To guarantee 

entry at the time of your choice, reserve 
your tickets through Ticketmaster at - 
312.902.1500 (fees will be assessed), or 
visit the membership desk (no additional 
fees). Tickets are available on a first-come, 
first-served basis for same-day viewing 
or future dates. 



lav viewi: 



\ 



Exchanging Tickets: Me^nbers may exchange 
tickets for a future date at the membership desk. 
No refunds are available for unused tickets. 

For information, visit ivww.fiel4museum.org, or call the 
membership office at 312.665:7700 

■■*' 

i 



Another M emorabre M embers' N i g h 





Thank you to the staff who worked hard to prepare their activities and the members who brought their 
family and friends to Members' Nights. We appreciate everyone's enthusiasm and involvement in creating 
another unforgettable experience. Here's what one member wrote: 

I'm not sure who had the better time: my four-year-old grandson who got to hold a 
snake; my 22-year-old son who got a "private" lecture in the Egypt exhibition; my 
husband, who had all his questions answered by the Sue staff; or me! Our entire 
family wants to say, "Thank you very much!" -Chestine Puralewski 



ft 



JULY/AUGUST 2001 



Field Museum Tours at a Glance 




For information, call Field Museum Tours at 800.811.7244 or email fmtours@sover.net. Please note 
that rates, prices and itineraries are subject to change and that prices are per person, double occupancy. 




Egypt Revisited 

Oct. U-28, 2001 (15 days) 

Explore spectacular archaeological 
sites and monuments not seen on 
your first trip. (First-time visitors 
should see EgN'ptian Odyssey 
below.) Highlights feature Abusir, 
Dashur, Maidum, Faiyum, Tanus, 
Abydos, Dendara, dawn at Abu 
Simbel and three nights cruising 
Lake Nasser, plus lesser-known 
sites in Cairo, Luxor and Aswan. 
Leader: Frank Yurco, Egyptologist 
Price: $4,325, not including airfare 

Nature and History 
in New Zealand 

Oct. 27-Xov. U, 2001 (19 days) 

_New Zealand's diversity will 
astound you. On North Island 
visit Goat Island Marine Reserve, 
Tongariro National Park, the New 
Zealand Maori Arts and Crafts 
Institute, Tokomaru Bay, Gisborne 
and Wellington "s Museum of New 
Zealand and Botanic Gardens. On 
South Island tour Christchurch's 
Canterbury Museum, Dunedin, 
Queenstown and Milford Sound. 
Leaders: John Terrell, anthropologist, 
and Scott Udgard, geologist 
Price: $5, 895, not including airfare 
(estimated $1,995 jitom Chicago) 



Egyptian Odyssey 

Oct.28-Nov. 11,2001, 

or Jan. 27-Feb. 10, 2002 (15 days) 

Explore the ^vorld of ancient 
pharaohs by land and riverboat. 
Visit the famed pyramids of Giza, 
The Egyptian Museum, the Valleys 
of the Kings and Queens, Karnak, 
the temples of Khnum, Horus and 
Isis, and Abu Simbel's three colossi 
of Ramses II. Enjoy five-star 
accommodations throughout. 
Leaders: Egyptologists Tliomas Mudloff 
(Oct.) and FrankYurco (Jan.) 
Price: $4,325, not including airfare 
(estimated $945 return Jrom NY) 

Amazon by Riverboat 

Dec. 1-9, 2001 (9 days) 

Explore the Amazon, Ucayali and 
Tapiche Rivers in Peru for eight 
days aboard a 14-cabin riverboat. 
Search for river dolphins; howler, 
squirrel and capuchin monkeys; 
sloths; and capybaras, plus unusual 
birds such as the jabiru and 
hoatzin. Optional extension to 
Machu Picchu, the magnificent 
archaeological sites around Cuzco. 
Leader: William Burger, botanist 
Price: $3,890. including round-trip 
airfare from Miami 



Mysteries of Earth: 

An Expedition by Private Jet 

Jan.20-Feb. 13 or Feb. 14- 
March 10, 2002 (25 days) 

Embark on a once-in-a-lifetime 
journey to the world's most 
remote habitats: the vast flora and 
fauna of the Amazon; volcanic 
Canary Islands; great apes of 
Borneo; annual migration in 
Tanzania; wildhfe of Nepal; rare 
species of the Galapagos; undersea 
life of the Great Barrier Reef; 
moai of Easter Island; tribal cul- 
tures of Papua New Guinea; the 
Seychelles; and Samoa. 
Leader: Social scientist Michael Shertner 
Jan.) and II ayne Rcinne)' (Feb.) 
Price: $36,950, including airfare from 
Miami and return to Washington, D.C.. 
on ajirst class, 88-seat prifate jet 



Tanzania Migration Safari 

Feb 1-14, 2002 (waitlisted), 

or Feb. 19-March 4, 2002 (14 days) 

Travel at the best time of year to see the spectacular herds 
of the Serengeti Plains. Hundreds of thousands of wilde- 
beest and tens of thousands of zebras and antelope amass 
in this area each year, attended by lions, cheetahs, hyenas 
and other predators. Enjoy four days in the Serengeti, then 
three days at Ngorongoro Crater. Zanzibar extension. 
Leader: Zoologists Bill Stanley and Mar)> Anne Rogers 
(first trip) and David Willard (second trip) 
Price: $6,245, not including airfare 

Belize 

March 29-April 7, 2002 (10 days) 

Enjoy a perfect combination of Mayan sites, rainforests, 
wildlife and the Caribbean. Visit the pyramid of Lamanai, 
panoramic Xunantunich and the spectacular Tikal. 
Observe howler and spider monkeys, coatimundi, peccary 
and hundreds of bird species, and snorkel along the 
Barrier Reef at Hoi Chan Marine Reserve. 






>ill 






^Bl^ »s^^>^^B^^^^^^H 







Septembei 

Octobei- 

2001 



The Field Museum's Member Publication 



Web Key Identifies 
^Tanzknian Mammals 

Cleopaira of Egypt: 
. J^rom History 



Mijspum W plcnmps Npw Vice President of Academic Aff;^ir<; 

Dr. Robert D. Martin starts this September as the new vice president for academic affairs. Trained at Worcester 
College, Oxford, England, he has spent most of his career in biological anthropology and has strong interests in 
paleontology and conservation. For the past 15 years he directed the University of Zurich's Anthropological 
Institute and Museum. Having published more than 200 articles, books and translations. Dr. Martin is one of 
the world's leading figures in primate biology and the origin of humans. Among his numerous scientific honors 
is election as a fellow to the UK Institute of Biology and the Zoological Society of London. 




ITF: What sparked your interest in primates? 

RM: The interplay of chance and opportunity. From Oxford, I 
went to Germany to study tree shrew behavior as a model for 
the beginnings of primate evolution. Tree shrews were then 
thought to be the most primitive living primates, but I discov- 
ered that the mother leaves her 
infants in a separate nest and 
suckles them only once every two 
days. Since primates excel in 
parental care, I began to question 
the link between tree shrews and 
primates. My Ph.D. thesis turned 
into a complete re-examination of 
early primate origins. The crucial 
importance of museum collections 
became obvious, and I became 
deeply involved in the methods 
used to work out evolutionary 
relationships. 

Later, in seeking a good home for a cherished pair of 
hand-reared tree shrews, I began a long-standing relationship 
with the Jersey Wildlife Preservation Trust (JWPT). In 1975, 
I edited the proceedings for the first international conference 
on breeding endangered species in captivity and subsequently 
played an advisory role at JWPT for 25 years. This connec- 
tion fostered my interests in conservation. 

ITF: Tell us about your subsequent work. 

RM: As a postdoctoral student in France — where the biggest 
bonus was meeting my wife, Anne-Elise — I switched to real 
primates and chose the relatively primitive lesser mouse 
lemurs. I visited Madagascar in 1968 to collect the first 
detailed data on their behavior and ecology and was also 
exposed to the realities of conservation problems, particularly 
deforestation. Once again, museum collections proved to be 
vital. At that time, only a single lesser mouse lemur species 
was recognized for Madagascar, but I identified a clear divi- 
sion between two main species. Now at least eight can be 
recognized. 

I then became a lecturer on primate evolution at 
University College London (UCL). In 1974, I moved to the 
Zoological Society of London to direct research on reproduc- 
tion, primarily of New World monkeys, and in 1975, I was a 
visiting professor at Yale University. A few years later I 
moved back to UCL to become first reader and then professor 
in biological anthropology. I also co-organized an interna- 
tional conference, which lead directly to the pioneering 



Prosimian Biology (1974) and later to The Study of Prosimian 
Behavior (1979). I continued fieldwork in Madagascar, South 
Africa, Panama and Brazil, with growing concern for conser- 
vation problems. 

ITF: How did your focus shift to early humans? 

RM: In 1986, I moved to the University of Zurich to direct 
the Anthropological Institute and Museum. Following my aim 
to "climb up the primate tree," I focused on Old World mon- 
keys, apes and humans. This was partly spurred by hands-on 
experience with museum exhibitions. I also launched collabo- 
rative research on computer-assisted paleoanthropology, using 
a new system that begins with CAT scans of fossils at a local 
hospital, progresses to 3-D imaging and reconstruction and 
ends with actual replication of reconstructions using stere- 
olithography. We applied this first to Neanderthals, so I had 
finally reached the top of the primate tree! I also developed a 
joint investigation of the effects of population fragmentation 
in the Barbary macaque as a model for primate conservation 
genetics. In between, I completed the textbook Primate 
Origins and Evolution (1990), widely used in courses on 
biological anthropology and primatology and as a reference 
source for research. This was followed by the award-winning 
Cambridge Encyclopedia of Human Evolution (1992). 

ITF: What is your vision for academic affairs? 

RM: Individual meetings with almost every curator 
revealed a stunning level of achievement in all areas, 
ranging from exceptional success in obtaining grants to 
publishing in the best journals. My top two priorities will 
be to provide the proper infrastructure and encouragement 
for optimizing research and to work toward improved pub- 
lic appreciation of the Museum's collections and associated 
scientific achievements. 

I shall seek new ways to use the Museum's vast collections. 
A unified computer catalogue is needed, and new techniques 
such as 3-D visualization and analysis and comparative DNA 
studies can be explored for specimen research. The Pritzker 
Laboratory for Molecular Systematics and Evolution has been 
amazingly successful and cost-effective; one challenge is 
expanding it without endangering its incredible vitality. A 
rolling program of expert evaluations, essential for strategic 
planning and maintaining excellence, will also be established. 

I will also promote strong university connections. Nearly 
every curator is linked with a local university, so it is simply 
necessary to maximize use of the Museum's facilities for 
student research projects and teaching. 




hnut Tn thp F 




South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605-2496. 




INTHEFIELD 

Sept/Oct 2001, Vol.72, No. 5 

Editor: 

Amy E. Cranch, The Field Museum 

Design: 

Depke Design 

Copy editor: 
Laura F. Nelson 



In the Field is printed on recycled paper 
using soy-based inks. All images © The 
Field Museum unless otherwise specified. 

The cover image highlights Cleopatra of Egypt 
From History to Myth, opening Oct. 20. 
Ptolemaic queen with vulture headdress, first 
century B.C., courtesy Musei Capitolini, Rome. 
Round-topped limestone stela with Ptolemy VIII 
before Egyptian deities, c. 142-116 B.C., 
courtesy The British Museum. 

In the Field (ISSN #1051-4546) is published 
bimonthly by The Field Museum. Copyright 
2001 The Field Museum. Annual subscriptions 
are $20; $10 for schools. Museum membership 
includes In the Field subscription. Opinions 
expressed by authors are their own and do not 
necessarily reflect the policy of The Field 
Museum. Notification of address change should 
include address label and should be sent to the 
membership department. POSTMASTER: Send 
address changes to Membership, The Field 
Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496. Periodicals postage 
paid at Chicago, Illinois. 

The Field Museum salutes the people of 
Chicago for their long-standing, generous 
support of the Museum through the 
Chicago Park District. 



Field 



X 



fe 



useum 



1400 South Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496 
312.922.9410 
www.fieldmuseum.org 




A new web key is the first of its kind 

to help researchers identify Tanzanian 

mammals. 

Left: Macroscelididae, four-toed, 

long-eared elephant shrew 



4 



The Museum replicates an Ice Age 
skeleton to send back to its discovery 
site in France. 
Left, middle: Magdalenian Girl 



15 



Zero in on an exquisitely detailed 
Burmese lacquer feast bowl in 
Scientist's Pick. 



16 



Scientists and volunteers brave 
darkness and gooey mud to hunt 
for snakes in Singapore. 
Left: Cerberus rynchops, dog-faced 
water snake 



21 



Membership News gives details 
on Cleopatra previews, tickets and 
downtown hotel deals. 



Muspum Campus Neighbors 



Shedd Aquarium The Oceanarium Turr]s 10 celebration continues as 
the Aquarium commemorates its 20 millionth visitor to the Oceanarium 
in October. The lucky guest will receive special prizes to mark the event. 
Scheduled activities include Stunning Seal in September and a Penguin 
Party in October, as well as the new marine mammal presentation that 
launched in April, Don't miss out on special opportunities to learn more 
about the animals all year long. For more details about Oceanarium 
Turns 10 activities or to plan an Aquarium visit, call 312.939.2438, or 
visit www.sheddaquarium.org. 



Adier Planetarium Don't miss Solar storms, the Adier's new sky 
show premiering Sept. 14, 2001, in the StarRiderTM Theater. The sun's 
far-reaching influence has continued for more than four billion years. 
In this dramatic presentation, visitors will travel to our nearest star, 
plunge deep into a sunspot and then emerge to experience the power 
of solar flares. Discover the sun's surprising effect on our daily lives — 
from the awesome beauty of the Northern Lights to electrical power 
grid blackouts and interruptions of satellite-based communications. For 
information, visitwww.adlerplanetarium.org, or call 312. 922. STAR. 



SEPT/OCT 2001 



INTHEFIELD FEATURE 



Odd toe hooved 
mammals, Perrisod, 
rhinoceros (top) and 
zebra (bottom) 



Web-based Key Helps Researchers 
Identify Tanzanian Mammals 

Greg Borzo, Media Manager, Academic Affairs 

With more than 21 million items, The Field Museum's collection of artifacts and 
specimens is an ideal place to identify various faunas from many countries or regions. 
The challenge is finding ways to give researchers worldwide access to the collection. 

To meet this challenge, William Stanley, collection 
manager of mammals, has organized images and 
descriptions of the skulls and skins of mammals 
found in Tanzania on a website — in English and 
Kiswahili. Although the tool was designed primarily 
for natural resource managers and biologists at 
Tanzanian universities, Stanley hopes that most peo- 
ple with an interest in mammals at any level will 
find it fascinating, if not useful. "Scientists, students 
and educators — anyone, in fact — can reach through 
the web, open a drawer at the Field and study what 
they find there," he said. 

How the key works 

The site, which launched this past summer, is not 
just a list. Rather, it is structured as a taxonomic key 
to identify adult mammals. By answering a series of 
either-or questions, someone with a skuU or skin 
specimen in hand can narrow down the possibilities 
until he or she identifies the specimen. Photographs 
and drawings accompany the questions to illustrate 
the difference between the two choices presented. 

As the website visitor, you must choose, for 
example, whether or not the skull has teeth. 
Your selection automatically takes you to the 
next choice — such as wings versus legs or fins, hair 
versus scales or a trunk versus a nose that is not 
elongated — ultimately leading you to the genus 
identification. It is important to remember that the 
illustrations serve as a reference only and may not 
exactly match the specimen you have in your 
hands, just as all humans have teeth but not every- 
one's are identical. Also, your specimen must match 
aO the criteria hsted, so even if only one out of five 
characteristics does not match, then you must 
choose the alternate description. 

First of its kind 



This easy-to-use tool is the first web-based key 

fofTanzanian mammals. It relies on feedback fi-om 
users in Tanzania both for alternative and better 
f ways to phrase the Kiswahili and for ease of use 

I with the pictures. In addition, using images to 

J distinguish animals differs from the traditional text- 

ti book approach, which applies written descriptions 

I for identification. Finally, it is easier to update a 

web-based guide with new findings than to update 





IN THE FIELD 



a textbook. In Tanzania, as in other counties, new 
records of known species are being documented 
all the time, and new species are stiD being discov- 
ered. The Field Museum does not have a complete 
set of skulls or skins for all Tanzanian mammals, 
so Stanley rounded out the set by photographing 
specimens at the Brookfield Zoo and Smithsonian 
Institution and soliciting students at the Art 
Institute of Chicago to draw whales. It is possible 
that a specimen not available on the key will even- 
tually be added. 

Giving bacic to tlie world 

The new key identifies about 170 mammals to the 
level of genus, and Stanley plans to extend that to 
the level of species. "If this model works, it could 
be a good way to increase access to — and the 
usefulness of — our collections of plants and animals 
from other countries," he said. "This is a good way 
for us to give something back to the world." 

Stanley focused on Tanzania because he has 
been studying there for years. The country is rich 
in biodiversity, especially the Eastern Arc Mountains 
(EAM). Formed millions of years ago, these moun- 
tains — sometimes called the "Galapagos Islands of 
Africa" — contain some of the most biologically 
diverse and endemically rich montane ecosystems 
in all of Africa. 

For the past ten years. The Field Museum and 
the University of Dar es Salaam have investigated 
the ecology and distribution of EAM small mam- 
mals, particularly shrews, bats and rodents. These 
surveys and associated specimen-based research have 
yielded several new discoveries and an expanded 
knowledge of the natural history of the group. 



While the shrew fauna appears to contain the 
greatest number of endemic species, the rodents 
also show interesting patterns. Certain rodent 
species are broadly distributed across the archipel- 
ago but are not found at lower elevations. The 
small mammals from each mountain group may 
offer clues on the uniqueness of the Eastern Arc 
and the most effective way to conserve the habitat. 
Throughout the world, scientists have only identi- 
fied a small percentage of all species that are 
thought to exist. It is vitally important to identify 
and classify aU plants and animals to improve our 
understanding of life on Earth, especially since 
many species are threatened with extinction. 

This project is one of the first steps in creating a 
new generation of tools that will help researchers — 
even those with little training — identify local fauna, 
Stanley said. "One of the main goals is to get 
Tanzanian students interested in mammals and hook 
future scientists. We have already received one sug- 
gestion to Hst the different genera so that teachers 
could go directly to aardvarks, for example, and show 
their students what an aardvark looks like." 

Many excellent publications were consulted in 
preparing these keys, which were developed in 
collaboration with the University of Dar es Salaam 
in Tanzania with support from the MacArthur 
Foundation. Since internet access in Tanzania is 
hmited,The Field Museum plans to supplement 
the web-based key with a compact disk. ITF 

To use the key, visit unmv.fieldmuseum.org/tanzania. 
At press time, Stanley was in Tanzania continuing his 
EAM survey and refining the new key. 





Soricidae, musk shrew 
(left) and shrew (right) 



SEPT/OCT 2001 



INTHEFIELDFEATURE 



The Making of a Human: 

Molding and Casting Magdaienian Girl 

Amy E. Craiich, Editor 
All photos by John IVeitisteiii 

This past summer The Field Museum completed a cast of Magdaienian Girl that was 
installed at the site of her discovery in the Dordogne Valley of France in July. What 
drew me to this story was not only exploring why the Museum did this or the process 
of molding and casting a skeleton. Like many of us who work here or visit the Museum, 
I was also drawn to the human aspect. From the mundane to the esoteric, I wondered 
what she looked like, how she filled her days, what her relationship was to her natural 
world, whether a child had passed through her body. ... Beyond the reflection is a fasci- 
nating historical look at how The Field Museum acquired this venerated Ice Age 
skeleton, how we have made it available for additional research and display and how 
this process has enhanced the Museum's knowledge and experience. 




Stephen Lalik, an 
exhibits department 

preparator, applies 
Japanese tissue to an 
arm bone. 



How Magdaienian Girl came to Chicago 

Beloved in the world of prehistory, the rock shelter 
of Cap Blanc, discovered in 1909, contains one of 
the most powerful remaining friezes of the Ice 
Ages. Reindeer, horses, bison and other animals 
roam the walls, and a fine collection of stone and 
bone tools was unearthed. But excitement over 
these finds precluded further investigation, and 
when a protective enclosure was being built in 
1911, a workers pickaxe accidentally struck a 
human skuU. Placed near the big horse ft-ieze, the 



skeleton was on its side in a fetal position with 
stones positioned at its head and feet. A fuU 
anatomical study conducted in the early 1930s 
debunked speculation that it was a man and con- 
cluded that it was a young female of about 20 years. 
Not only is it one of the most intact skeletons of 
the age, but also one of the few found close to a 
frieze, indicating a connection to the site or a 
person of high standing. 

The original Field Museum display said a small 
ivory point found above the abdominal cavity may 



IN THE FIELD 



have caused her death. Henry Field's 1955 memoirs 
posed other romantic speculations: "This weapon 
may have caused blood poisoning. . . . Was she killed 
by her lover . . . another Cro-Magnon girl ... in 
battle? Was she the daughter of the sculptor-high 
priest?" During that time period, interestingly, 
ivory was uncommon in France, and there is Httle 
evidence of human-to-human violence. However, 
while the first official report omits discussion of the 
ivory point, the excavators' original correspondence 
confirms that there was one, shedding Ught onto 
how she might have died. 

The pre-historians who had extracted the 
skeleton had trouble selling it in Paris, and it was 
eventually returned to J. Grimaud, the site's owner. 
Nine years passed before he attempted to sell it again, 
negotiating first with the American Museum of 
Natural History in New York. With a high price of 
$12,000 and an absence of associated archaeological 
materials, the American Museum decHned. Harvard 
University's Peabody Museum also declined, at 
which point Grimaud's lavvyers persuaded him 
to drop the price to $3,000. While the American 
Museum's interest piqued again, it stuck with its 
original decision to decline. In 1926, Henry Field 
stepped in and closed the deal — for $1,000. He 
wrote in his memoir, "I hurried to New York 
and . . . packed her very carefully in cotton wool 
and carried her in a suitcase to a compartment 
on the Twentieth Century (train). We had a very 
uneventful night together." 

Touted in the media as "the only prehistoric 
skeleton in the United States," Magdalenian Girl 
received 22,000 visitors the first day she was 
displayed. Nothing like that had happened in 
the Museum's history up to that time. 

Molding and casting the skeleton 

In 1999, Field Museum President and CEO John 
McCarter went to France and met an archaeologist 
who reminded him of the connection between our 
skeleton and France's Cap Blanc site. As a gesture 
of good will, McCarter gave the archaeologist and 
another colleague access to our collections and 
archives to piece together how the skeleton made 
its way from France to Chicago. Upon their 
request, and with their resources, the Museum also 
agreed to follow up on the original plan of 1912 — 
to place a cast of the skeleton in front of the frieze, 
thus restoring this essential Ice Age site. 

Before molding and casting began this year, the 
Museum's anthropology department tested the 
skeleton's condition and determined that the bones 
are lightweight and fragile, with cracks, chips and 
other abrasions. Most had been treated at some 
point, though there are no records here that 
describe such work, and the bones were filled with 
various materials. A yeUow-tinted shiny material or 



wax-like substance coated several surfaces, and a 
chalky, gray or flesh-colored material fiUed some 
porous areas. WiU Pestle, a collections manager who 
specializes in human remains, produced a complete 
inventory of the bones. While on exhibit, some of 
her bones had been set incorrectly, and she was laid 
out lengthwise as opposed to the original fetal 
position. "Now each bone is listed as an individual 
specimen to make managing her more complete, 
accurate and efficient for further study," said Pestle. 

1. Sealing — Since the bones had not turned 
into either fossils or stone, the preparators worked 
closely with the conservators to identify a safe 
sealant. Wherever the bones were porous or 
cracked, the preparators covered them with thin 
Japanese tissue that was tamped in place with 
various grades of the sealant in a surgical-grade 
acetone. The sealant and tissue can be reversed 
once the casting has been completed. Matthew 
Groves, repHcation shop supervisor in the exhibits 
department, said, "In our opinion, we have done 
the best possible job to keep the chemicals out, 
partially out of respect and partially for science." 

2. Seams — The preparators determined where 
to place seams, since having the correct number 
of parts to a mold is paramount to protecting 
the specimen. 

3. Clay — Using a wax-based clay, the preparators 
built walls around the bone to dictate how the 
rubber would move on the bone. 

4. Rubber — Several types of rubber were tested 
to find one that was soft, elastic, the least adhesive 
and quick to set. The team chose a silicone rubber 
with a good range of properties and long life. It was 
either painted on in layers or poured according 

to the size of the bone. 

5. Plaster — Once the plaster was appHed, which 
retains the rubber, the completed mold was carefully 
opened up, piece by piece. The original mold can 



Building day around 
the lower jaw 




SEPT/OCT 2001 



be kept as an ancillary to the collections, and from 
it, the Museum can produce about 20 more casts 
for further research before the form wears out. 

Even with 1 5 years of molding experience in the 
fine arts. Groves was initially reticent toward work- 
ing with human remains. He was part of the team 
that reconstructed Sue, but the dinosaur's bones 
have lithified, or turned to stone, and are thicker, 
stronger and less Ukely to be penetrated. "Once 
Magdalenian Girl was decommissioned and taken 
off display, we got up close and could really see the 
beaut%' of the bones, their personality," he said. "1 
had second thoughts but decided that keeping the 
process in-house would allow us better control and 
the ability to do the best possible job within an 
atmosphere of respect and care." 

Molding and casting Magdalenian Girl also 
opened up the opportunity to use new materials 
in a different way and learn about how the body 
works. Ultimately, no matter where in the process 
one is involved, it is about learning and disseminating 
new knowledge. Groves said, "The recipients were 
pleased with the quality of the cast, and it made me 
feel good that we kept the process here at the Field." 

Ethical issues 

Working with human remains inevitably highlights 
some interesting ethical issues. During the conser- 
vation analysis, there was some debate about which 
bones to hold aside for testing. Scientists generally 
agree that the teeth are the most appropriate to test 
because they are not porous like other bones and 
do not easily absorb other materials. Magdalenian 
Girl's teeth are in excellent shape; they had not 
worn down, and the molars were coming in at the 
time of her death. But there is an aesthetic argu- 
ment to extracting erupting teeth. The Museum 
decided to hold an arm and leg bone aside because 
of their length and ease at which freehand sculpture 
could be completed. 



Molding and casting also raised questions about 
conducting processes that can be destructive in 
order to make a specimen more accessible and pro- 
duce information. Destructive samphng involves any 
process, such as radiocarbon dating or DNA testing, 
in which a portion has to be removed from the 
specimen for testing. In addition, issues arose on 
intellectual property, such as who pubhshes the 
results, who owns the information and what it is 
for. As scientific and technical knowledge and 
processes evolve, situations like this one are good 
opportunities to review older pohcies and proce- 
dures and ensure that the safest, most updated and 
ethical handling practices are in place. 

Future initiatives 

Molding and casting Magdalenian Girl has opened 
the doors to additional research on the specimen. 
The three most substantial future projects include 
properly labeUng the bones, acquiring thorough 
age, sex and metric data and conducting x-rays. 
Scientists are also considering DNA analysis. The 
Museum will redesign the manner, safety and security 
of how she is displayed, as well as upgrade aspects 
of the Life Over Time exhibition, beginning this fall 
through 2003. 

Observing the intense care that went into this 
process clearly showed me how science and wonder 
cannot exist without each other. The awe and 
curiosity I experienced in seeing this Ice Age 
human up close probably reflects similar responses 
in a scientist seeking to uncover the facts. While so 
much of Magdalenian Girl is about the importance 
of collections — or the research, care and accessibUity 
of a particular specimen — it is also about the con- 
nection we have to our origins. Read a natural 
history magazine, watch a documentary or walk 
into an exhibition. Inevitably we are irresistibly 
captivated by clues to where we came fiom and 
who we are. ITF 



Lalik labeled each piece 
and orietited the skeleton 
cast in its correct position 
before sending it to France. 




IN THE FIELD 



YOURGUIDETOTHE FIELD 



A Pullout Calendar of Events for September and October 



Inside: Exhibits Festivals Family Programs Adult Programs 



Exclusive 

Exhibition 

Opens! 

Cleopatra of Egypt: 
From History 
to Myth 

Oct. 20, 200 i- March 3, 2002 

Cleopatra of Egypt promises to be 
an extraordinary experience. Witin 
more than 350 spectacular arti- 
facts and priceless artworks from 
the world's premier classical and 
Egyptian collections, this major 
exhibition explores the life, 
liaisons and legend of Egypt's 
tragic queen. 




Lectures and Films 

The Field Museum (TFM) and the University of Chicago's 
Oriental Institute (01) are collaborating on a series of 
jrograms to complement the Cleopatra of Egypt exhibition 



f 



pdthe perma.nent collections at both institutions. 



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At the Field Museum 

Antlent Alexandria Unveiled 

Pl0ck Goddig, Undenmter 
Archaeologist and Author 
Marvel at the valuable new discoveries 
that famed French underwater archae- 
ologist Franck Goddio and his team 
ave pulled from Cleopatra's ancient 
'al quarters, which are submerged in 
arbor of modern-day Alexandria. 
day, Oct. i5, 6:30pm 
12, students /educators $10, 
'FM and OI members $8 



Cleopatra of Egypt: 
I > From History to Myth 

11/ t •^^''" Walker, The British Museum 



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Hear Cleopatra's extraordinary story 
■from the scholar who curated the 
exhibition. 

Saiiirday, Oct. 20, 2pm j 
$12, students /educators $10, 
'M and OI members $8 



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Fondazione Memmo, Rome. 

International Sponsor BP 
National Sponsor Exelon 






At the Oriental Institute 

1155 E. 58th St. 

Call 773.702.9507 for information. 

Cleopatra in Context: 

A Princess Descended From 

So Many Royal Kings 

Dr Robert K. Ritner, 
University of Chicago 
Wednesday, Oct. 24, 7:30-9pm 
$17, TFM and OI members $15 
Pre-registration required. 

Portraits of the Queen: 
The Ancient Struggle 
Over Cleopatra's Image 

Ian Moyer, 

University of Chicago 
Wednesday, Oct. 31, 7:30-9pm 
$17, TFM and OI members $15 
Pre-registration required. 

Free Film Series 

Films are followed by docent-led 
tours of the OI's Joseph and Mary 
Grimshaw Egyptian Gallery. 

Who Was Cleopatra? 

Sunday, Oct. 21, 1:30pm 

Cleopatra: Destiny's Queen 

Sunday, Oct. 28, 1:30pm 



V-, 









General Museum Information: 312.922.9410 


Museum 


Family and Adult Program Information and Tickets: 312.665.7400 


I 


SEPT/OCT2001 7 



Your Guide to the Field: A pullout calendar of events for September and October 



New Exhibition-Sigmund 
Freud: Conflict and Culture 



Explore the life and legacy of one of the most influ 
figures of the 20th century. Manuscripts reveal Freud's key ideas and 
vintage photographs illustrate his life, while television and movie clips 
demonstrate ho\N his theories have become a part of popular culture. 



Oct. J- Da: 9, 2001 



T-9 



Analyzing Freud 



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This exciting new program combines yie 
breadth and depth of a college course with the ''/ 
flexibility to tailor your studies to your inter- "^ 
ests and schedule. Enjoy fKUdA'^z'm':^ ¥rQu6 as a 
lecture series. Or enroll in the complete course, 
which also includes readings, assignments and 
discussion labs through the Unive/sity:of ,^ 
Illinois at Chicago. *jm^'' 

Lecture Series ,^H^U^ ^^^^^^ 

Individual lectures: %i2, students /educatojx-$ 10' ' -J 

members $8 ^^- A^^^^^^ ^ ^ '^ 

Attend all nine lectures and save 20 percent 'on tne full series: 
%86, students /educators $72, members $58. 



Attend three lectures and save 15 percent: 
$30, students /educators $25, members $20. 

Credit Course ^ 

Enrollment information for Analyzing Freud (LAS 494) is 
available from UIC at www.oce.uic.edu or 312.996.8025. 



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Sigmund Freud: Conflict and Culture is organized by the Ulfrary of CBngi 

cooperation with the Sigmund Freud-Museum in Vienna and the Freud Museum, London, 

Analyzing Freud is being presented by The Field Museum in collaboration with the 
University of Illinois at Chicago Humanities Lab. 

The Field Museum gratefully acknowledges the Freud Community Advisory Panel for 
its insight and assistance. 



>t-*« 




October Lecture Topics 

Freud and Our Past 

Michael S. Roth, 

California College of Arts and Crafts 

Get a historical perspective on the 
relationship between our past and our 
identity. Curator Michael Roth will discuss 
Sigmund Freud: Conflict and Culture and 
compare pre-Freudian, Freudian and 
post- Freudian approaches to psychotherapy and memory. 

Wednesday, Oct. 3, 6:30pm 

Beyond the Mythologies: Dreaming Across Cultures 

Dr Waud Kracke, University of Illinois at Chicago 
Understand how Freud's ideas connect to other perspectives 
on dreams. 

Tuesday, Oct. 9, 6pm 
On the Unconscious 

Dr. Peter L. Giomcchini, Center for Psychoanalytic Studies 
Explore Freud's theory that the unconscious could affect 
conscious thought and behavior. 

Tuesday, Oct. 16, 6pm , 

■-" .e 
Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Picture Books 
for Young Children 

Dr Ellen Handler Spitz, University of Maryland 
Consider how children's literature contributes to our 
psychological development. 

Tuesday, Oct. 23, 6pm 



Freud and Modern Neuroscience 

Hugh R. Wilson, York University 

Trace the connections between Freud and modern neuroscience. 
. Tuesday, Oct. 30, 6pm 

Visit untwfielfittMseum.org or mil 312. 665. 7 400 for a list 
of November lectures. 



8 IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 



General Museum Information: 312.922.9410; Family and Adult Program Information and Tickets: 312.665.7400 






>..\r 






Whether it's world music, Latino culture, films 
or a fall harvest celebration, join us for these 
five festivals! 



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J- WEINSTEIN/GN89894.10C 



City of Chicago's 
World Music Festival 

Highlights at the Field include: 



Groove with Tarika, Madagascar's 
most-loved musical ambassadors. 
Saturday, Sept. 22, 1pm, FREE with 
Museum admission 







• Discover tlie melodic Dan Tranli, 

a Vietnamese stringed instrument, 
played by l\lgo Than Nhan in the 
Spring Essence IVIusic Workshop. 

Thursday, Sept. 21, 2- 4pm, $W 

• Experience the profound poetry of Ho Xuan Huong, 

an 18th-century Vietnamese concubine. Accompanied by l\lgo 
Than Nhan, poet and translator John Balaban will read from 
his acclaimed translation of Spring Essence; The Poetry of Ho 
Xuan Huong. 

Thursday, Sept. 27, 6:30pm, $10, members $8 

Presented in collaboration witfi The Poetry Center. 

Unity Day 

Celebrate how cultures come together around music with 
sxciting hands-on activities and performances. 
Saturday, Sept. 22, iOam—3pm 
Free with Museum admission 

Poet and translator John Balalyan 




Celebracion- 

Our People, Our Americas 

Enjoy music, hands-on activities and 
lectures about The Field Museum's research. 

In particular, learn how a Field Museum research expedition 
with Peruvian and other international partners led to the creation 
of a 5,000-square-mile national park in Peru. 

Thursday— Friday, Oct. 4—5, Warn— 1pm 
Saturday-Sunday, Oct. 6-7, 11am— 4pm 
FREE with Museum admission 

Celebracion 2001 is made possible through the generosity of Abbott Laboratories. 



Margaret Mead Film Festival 

View three insightful and artistic documentaries exploring 
the formation of cultural identity. 

Saturday, Oct. 13, 1 lam-3pm 

$15, students /educators $12, members $10 



Sor Juana Festival 

Sample a range of Latino music at this showcase of stellar 
female musicians of Mexican heritage. 
Friday, Oct. 26, 7pm. Call for details. 

Presented in collaboration with the Mexican Fine Arts Center Museum. 



Halloween Harvest Festival 

Commemorate the harvest season and Halloween. Highlights 

include a family performance from the Rembrandt Chamber 

Players. 

Saturday, Oct. 27. Call for details. 



SEPT/OCT 2001 




Lectures 



New Discoveries Series 




The Lanzendorf Collection: 
Marriage of Art and Science 

John Lanzendorf, 
Collector ofPaleo Art 
Discover how dinosaur art fuses 
scientific inquiry and artistic 
imagination. Book signing included. 

Monday. Sept. 10, 6:30pm 

$20, students /educators $18, mewhcrs 



Amphibian Conservation 
in the 21st Century 

Dr. Michael Lannoo, Recipient of the 2001 
Parker /Gentry Award 
Meet an award-winning biologist who 
is crusading to reverse environmental 
degradation that is harming amphibians 
and may affect human health. 

Tuesday, Sept. 11, 6:30pm 
$12, students /educators $10, 
members $8 



Natural Disasters and Ancient Oaxaca 

Dr. \'elly Robles Garcia, Xational Institute of Anthropology 

and History in Octxaca 

Find out how early inhabitants and modern archaeologists 

have coped with the impact of ruinous earthquakes. 

Saturday, Sept. 15, 2pm 

$12, students /educators $10. members $8 

Architectural Design: A Response to Culture 

DougLis Cardinal, Douglas J. Cardinal Architect, Ltd. 

Discover an acclaimed architect whose work eloquently 

expresses environment and culture. 

Sunday, Oct. 7, 2pin 

$12, students /educators $10, members $8 

Presented with the support of the Department of Foreign Affairs and 
International Trade of Canada. 




Below is a calendar of the temporary exhibitions you will have an opportunity to visit in 2001. 

Some dates may change. Remember to call 312.922.9410 or visit our website for specific information. 



In Her Hands: Craftswomen 
Changing the World 

Through January 13 



Living Colors: A Butterfly Garden 

Through September 3 



Julie Taymor: Playing with Fire 

Through November 4 




Field Trip 

DcU'id Dolak, Columbia College 

Do you like to hunt for fossils? Come 

with us to search for prehistoric plants 

and animals. 

Families with children ages 8— 1 7 

Saturday, Sept. 22, 8am—3pni 

$32, members $27 




t 



Older 
Adult Lecture Series 

Tuesday Afternoons at the Field 

Spend a relaxing, educational afternoon with a lecture 
featuring one of our special exhibitions and a social 
discussion over complimentary coffee and tea. 

Each lecture is $15, members $12. 

Tickets to Julie Taymor: Playing with Fire and Cleopatra 

of Egypt are not included. 

Bringing Exhibits to the Field 

Robin Groesbeck and Robert Weiglein, TFM Exhibits Dept. 
Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2pm 

How Freud Came to Develop 

His Psychology of the Unconscious 

Dr. James W.Anderson, Institute for Psychoanalysis 
Tuesday, Oct. 16, 2pm 

Cleopatra VII: 

Clever Woman or Seductive Temptress? 

Frank Yurco, Egyptologist 

Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2pm 

The member rate of $12 is available to Oriental Institute 

members for this lecture. 



Two of Us 



Workshop 

Connie Sulkin, TFM Education Dept.^ 
Learn about raccoons, Woodland Nativr 
Americans and dinosaurs as we shai-e 
stories, songs and hands-on activities. 
Children ages 3—5 and an adult cotnpanioi, 
Tuesdays, Oct. 2- Nov. 20 
10-1 1:30am or 1:30- 3pm 
$95 per child, $80 per member child 
For each child, one adult attends at no charoc 

This program is sponsored by the Siragusa Foundation 
Early Childhood Initiative. 



Adult Courses and Workshops 

Botanical Painting and Illustration 

Marlene Hill-Donnelly, TFM Geology Dept. 

Draw and paint plants with scientific accuracy and artistic style. 

No experience necessary. 

Tuesdays, Sept. 18— Nov. 6, 6-8 :30pm 
$115, members $98 

Fossil Basics 

David Dolak, Columbia College 
Identify different types of fossils and 
prepare a real fossil fish for research 
or display. 

Wednesdays, Oct. 3—17, 6— 8pm 
$42, members $36 

Spineless Wonders! 

Dr. Wendy Taylor, TFM Geology Dept. 

Go behind the scenes to see rare fossil invertebrates and discover 

how paleontologists study fossils. 

Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 am-noon 

$15, members $12 





Cheyenne Visions 

Through March 31, 2002 



Sigmund Freud: 
Conflict and Culture 

October 3 through December 9 



Cleopatra of Egypt: 
From History to Myth 

October 20, 2001, through 
March 3, 2002 




oin us for a'ri evening of family fun and camp out amidst 
some of our most popular exhibits. 

Families with children a(;c.< 6-12 
5:45pm on Friday, Oct. 5 to 9am on Saturday, Oct. 6 
/ [ $45 per participant, members S38 

On your next visit, look for exciting and fun 
visitor programs. Hear stories, sing songs, 
dissect owl pellets, meet scientists and more! 
Checl< the information desk when you arrive. 

Take a flashlight tour o/ Inside Ancient Egypt at our family overnight. 



Adult Fieldtrips 

Fossil Collecting at Larson Quarry 

David Dolak, Columbia College 

Searcli for 400-million-year-old corals and mollusks at an 
exciting new site for our adult-only fieldtrips. 

Saturday, Sept. 15, 7am-2pm 
S48, members $41 

The Return of the Sandhill Cranes 

.4/(7/1 Anderson, Xaturalist 

Watch these beautiful birds gather in the Indiana wetlands, 
which attract thousands of cranes each fal 




Saturday, Oct. 21, 10am-8pm 
$60, members $50 



Cultural Connections 
Program 

Travel to area museums to celebrate cultural 
crversity. Visitwvvw.fieldmuseum.org or cal 
665.7474 for details on fall events. 



kHtv/;]iiliii:]i 



Becoming Human and Beyond 



General Museum Information: 312.922.9410; Family and Adult Program Information and Tickets: 312.665.7400 



The following activities are free 
with Museum admission. 



T^tories behind our fascinating exhibitions 
on a daily Highlights Tour. Also watch for tours of 
Jnside Ancient Egypt and Eskimos and Northwest 
Coast Indians. 




Bring your own materials and get tips from artists and 
scientific illustrators. as they create artwork inspired by 
our exhibitions. ■;■ 

Ei'cry third Saturday of the month, I lam— 2pm 



Meet Field Museum scientists and see rarely 
displayed specimens from our collections. 
Every second Saturday of the month, llain—2pni 



Naturalist Certificate Program 

The Field Museum, The Morton Arboretum and the Chicago 

Botanic Garden offer an integrated program for naturalists of all experience levels. 





Local Flora: Fall 

Edna Dauion, TFM Botany Dept. 

The landscape comes alive when you can identify 
plants in their ecosystems. 

Tuesdays. Sept. 1 1, 25 and Oct. 2, 6:30-8:30pm 
Saturdays, Sept. 15, 29 and Oct. 6, 9am- noon 
$150, members $120 

Field Ecology: Fall 

Michelle J oh nson , 

TFM and Chicago Wilderness 

Study animal behavior and plant life cycles in this outdoor lab. 
^i Wedtiesdays, Sept. 12 and 19, 7 -9pm 
^^fc Sundays, Sept. 16 and 23, 9am -1pm 
*"* % $130, members $110 

Exploring Mosses, Algae and Lichens 

Rich Hyerczyk, TFM 

^ Discover the paradox these organisms pose to biologists. 
Wednesdays, Sept. 26, Oct. 3-17 and \bv. 1 and 8. 6-9pm 
$130, members $110 



Illinois Geology: Glaciers and Tropical Seas 

Gina Wesley and Dr. Darin Croft, TFM Geology Dept. 

Explore the complex past that led to Illinois' 
modern landscapes. 
TImrsday, Oct. 11, 6:30- 8:30pm 
Tuesdays, Oct. 16 and 23, 6:30-8: 30pm 
Sundays, Oct. 14 and 28, 9am— 4pm 
$220, members $180 

Interpretive Skills for Naturalists 

Sara Race and Dan Brinkmeier, 

TFM Environmental and Conservation Programs 

Develop your ability to share environmental information 

with others. 

Tliursdays, Oct. 25 and Nov. 1, 6— 9pm 

Saturdays, Oct. 27 and Nov. 3, 9am-noon 

$150, members $120 

For courses atThe Morton Arboretum, call 630. 719.2468. 
For courses at the Chicago Botanic Garden, call 847.835.8261. 



Tackle the tough questions raised by the latest scientific advances to make headlines. In this 
multi-disciplinary conference, leading thinkers will explore primordial questions on what it 
means to be human in light of new research from the Human Genome Project, robotics, 
neuroscience, paleontology and artificial intelligence. 

November 1-3, $240, members of.-\nierican Association for the .■\dvanccment of Science orThe Field Museum S210, students $180 
Rei^ister by Oct. I for a discount. 



't K-LOESCH.WEXNER CENTER FOR The A 



Don't 

Julie Taymor: 

Playing with Fire 



Extraordinary sets, masks and costumes will 
ignite your imagination. Discover how Julie 
Taymor, best known for her direction of Disney's 
The Lion King on Broadway and the feature film 
Titus, integrates diverse cultural traditions to 
create spectacular theater. 



Or 



,;,,-.,,,,,;, v„. J 2001 



Informances: The Magic Behind Puppetry 

The Jabberwocky Marionettes bring puppets to life. 
Saturdays and Sutidays through Sov. 4, 1 lam-3pm 
FREE with Museum admission 

Cultural Crossroads Weekend 

Meet the genius behind the P\a:^'mq with F\re exhibition, see 
her work come to life and explore the roles of performance 
and creativity with a full weekend of thought-provoking events. 
Check our website at wvwv.fieldmuseum.org for more details. 



An Evening with Julie Taymor 

Tliursday, Sept. 6, 7pm 

$20, students /educators $18, members $15 

Film screening of Titus 

Julie Taymor will give an introduction and, 
after the film, answer audience questions. 
Friday, Sept. 7, 7pm 
$18, students /educators SI 5, members $12 






Playing with Fire — Crossroads in Culture 
and Creativity Symposium 

Introduction by Julie Taymor 
Saturday, Sept. 8, 10am, $25 

Exhibit Walk-Throughs With Cultural Experts 

Tlwrsday, Sept. 6, 5:30pm— —Creatiuity and Cuhure 
Friday, Sept. 7, 5:30pm — Performance in Cuhures 
$18, students /educators $15, members $12 

Receive a 20 percent discount when you attend a gallery 
walk-through and the avnt immediately following. 

Julie Taymor Play'tnq with Fine was organized by the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State 
University. This exhibition and its national tour are made possible by Ford Motor Company. Major 
support is also provided by Agnes Gund and Daniel Shapiro, the John S. and James L. Knight 
Foundation, and PricewaterhouseCoopers. 



Breaking Science News 
Comes to the Field 

Search and Discovery of 
Our Earliest Ancestors 

Meave Leakey, Paleoanthropologist 




R0«:E CARLTON. 



Hear for yourself about the controversial new discovery that 
made headlines worldwide this spring — a 3.5-million-year-old 
skull, found by world-renowned scientist Meave Leakey, suggests 
that there may be another branch on the human family tree. 

Tlnirsday, Oct. 4, 6:30pm 

$20, students /educators $18, members $15 



Visitor Information 





Hours: 9am-5pm daily. Closed Christmas and New Year's Day. 

To get tickets: Cleopatra of Egypt: From History to Myth and Julie Taymor: Playmg 
with Fire are specially ticketed exhibitions. 

Member passes can be reserved in advance by calling Ticketmaster at 312.902.1500 
(service charges apply) or coming to the membership desk near the Museum's south 
entrance (no service charges). Non-member tickets can also be reserved in advance 
through Ticketmaster or at the Museum's will call desks. 

Day-of tickets are available at the Museum, while supplies last. 
Information: 312.922.9410 orwww.fieldmuseum.org 



IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 



SCIENTIST'SPICK 




When world-renowned Burmese lacquerware experts Ralph Isaacs and Sylvia Fraser-Lu each 
visited the Museum's collections last year, they both zeroed in on this water bowl, finely adorned 
with royal figures in an imaginative palace setting. Isaacs suggested it was one of the best pieces 
anywhere, and Fraser-Lu called it the "piece de la resistance of the collection." 

Isaacs wrote that its delicate construction implies that the weft of the bamboo foundation is 
made of horsehair. The detachable hoop, which protects the rim, is possibly the only surviving 
one of its kind. 

The bowl's maker, Hsaya Sein, probably crafted it for a competition organized by the British 
colonial government in Rangoon (now Yangon). He etched "first prize certificate holder" around 
the upper wall to entice potential customers. 

The scenes depict the legendary 11th-century exploits of Kyanzittha, army commander to King 
Anawrahta, whose throne he later usurped. Many stories are based on historical events in which 
Anawrahta raged wars of expansion against neighboring kingdoms. The bowl, made c. 1910, 
tells of an attack in Yunnan in southwestern China, supposedly to obtain a sacred Tooth Relic of 
the Buddha. 



SEPT/OCT 2001 








Stuck in the mud 



Amy E. Cranch, Editor 



W 



Snake! Snaaake! Sssnnnake! 



// 



Depending on whom you ask, this call emanating from the infinite new-moon darkness 
in a mushy mangrove swamp could signify someone's scariest nightmare — or most 
thrilling victory. 



Equipped only with flashlights, plastic bags and bare 
hands, Harold Voris, curator of amphibians and 
reptiles, and his entourage of up to 30 volunteers 
have been slogging through the parks of Singapore 
collecting water snakes for research. Although abun- 
dant throughout Asian wetlands, homalopsines are 
relatively unknown. These live-bearing, rear-fanged 
snakes are mildly venomous, with a bite, though 
rare, that only produces an annoying stinging sensa- 
tion. What makes them intriguing to scientists is 
that they can tolerate salty, brackish conditions, 
unlike their freshwater relatives, and they used to 
Hve solely on land. 

"Snakes and other reptiles came on land more 
than 100 million years ago," said Voris. "But about 



60 million years ago, several groups of reptiles rein- 
vaded the sea. We want to find out why — and how." 

Focused in Sungei Buloh Nature Reserve and 
Pasir Ris Park, where the mangrove forests take 
advantage of the interface between sea and land, 
the studies aim to determine the abundance of 
homalopsines, as well as detail their ecology. 
Singapore has a highly fragmented series of small 
nature reserves, some only as big as an urban park. 
Impressively, however, the reserves support a healthy, 
stable snake community; some areas maintain as high 
or a higher diversity of snakes than other parts of 
Southeast Asia. This is a good indication of habitat 
health and an excellent case for active conservation. 

"The Singapore government has argued that the 



IN THE FIELD 



reserve fragments are so small, 
why bother keeping them?" said 
Voris. "It would rather turn them 
into recreational areas hke soccer 
fields or manicured parks. But 
they are worth keeping, 
not just for their biodi- 
versity, but also as a 
reservoir for species that 
have been there over time." 

Unique to the surveys is the heavy reliance on 
volunteers assembled through a network of organiza- 
tions that include the Raffles Museum of Biodiversity 
Research at Singapore's National University, the 
National Parks Board and the National Zoo. During 
one expedition, for example, the work force spent 21 
nights in the field and averaged six to 20 people per 
mght, excluding the investigators. 

"The consistency and dedication of the volunteers 
are a pleasant surprise for us," said Voris. "It signifies 
an interest in conservation. Most of the volunteers 
are young and will hopefially continue working to 
save the snakes and remaining natural habitats." 

During the past trip, the volunteers' only respon- 
sibility at first was to spot snakes, but it quickly 
became a jovial obsession. "It was a wild scene with 
lots of hoopin' and hoUerin' every time someone 
found a snake," said Voris. "They even started a 
'club' for people who had been bitten!" 

Working during the moon's new and fuU phases, 
when the tides are accentuated and snake activity is 
high, volunteers tolerate dark and squishy condi- 
tions. They use homemade wooden skis or dive 
booties to navigate through the muddy goop and 
rely on their hands or tongs to capture the snakes. 
The volunteers first observe, collect and bag the 
snakes. Then a team leader, usually Voris, records the 
data, including the snake's identity, time it was cap- 
tured and details of its microhabitat. Each snake 
receives a number, and its weight, length and sex 
are processed in a laboratory. It is also massaged to 
regurgitate its food. While land snakes favor small 
animals such as mice and lizards, these slippery 
swimmers feed on fish, crabs and other shelled 
food, which could provide clues as to why they 
gave up on land so long ago. 

Most Sungei Buloh snakes receive passive 
integrative transponder (PIT) tags, or rice-sized 
microchips injected beneath the skin, that can 
be read via scanner. This identifies a snake if it is 
recaptured, while also providing information on 
how it grows, uses a habitat and how long it lives. 




Cerberus rynchops, 
dog-faced water snake 



The snakes are 
returned to their 
capture site within 
24 hours. 

Voris' team also 
studied six snakes 
through radiotelemetry 
over a five-week period. 
A radio transmitter was 
surgically implanted in their abdomens that could 
be detected from a greater distance than the PIT 
tags. Dr. Daryl Karns, a Field Museum research 
associate, could track the individual snakes using 
a radio receiver without having to recapture them 
for information on their movement in time and 
space and how they utilized the habitat. The snakes 
are allowed to recover for several days before being 
released back at their point of capture. 

At press time plans were under way for an 
additional trip this fall to gather information on the 
aquatic snakes' growth rates under natural conditions. 
It is also hoped that local researchers will become 
interested in homalopsines and build on the foun- 
dation Voris and his team have provided. ITF 

For more information, visit unmv.fieldmuseum.org 
/research_coUections /zoology /zoo_sites /snakes. 



Dt Daryl Karns tracks 
snakes via radiotelemetry. 




SEPT/OCT 2001 



INTHEFIELDFEATURE 



Fjpld Ambassadors: Exploring the Possihilities 

Mark Larson, Matiager, Educational Partnerships and Programs 
Jordan Liingstnim, Administrator, Educational Partnerships 



Tracy Kwock, DePriest 
Elementary School teacher, sits 
crossed-legged on the floor out- 
side Wrapped in Pride: Ghanaian 
Kente and African American 
Identity. She is surrounded by 25 
raptly attentive second graders as 
she reads Kente Colors by 
Chicago author Debbie 




Ltft to riglii: Marshall 
Baltazar (Pulaski 
Academy), WilheUnina 
McGee (Shields 
Elementary), Chris Olsen 
(Xorthside College Prep), 
Sylvie AngUn (University 
of Chicago Laborator)' 
School), Aurelia Spann 
(Henderson Elementary) 
and Eileen Day (Blaine 
Eletnentary) 



Chocolate. When Kwock finishes, 
she distributes six copies to the 
children to share as they make 
their way through the exhibition. 
They squeal \\ith the excitement 
of recognition, comparing images 
from the book to the real thing. 
Insighrfijl questions charge the 
air. The students emerge with 
an enriched understanding of 
kente cloth, a satishing reading 
experience and a sense that The 
Field Museum is an extension of 
their classroom. 



Kwock is one of 63 Field 
Ambassadors — classroom 
educators and administrators 
who act as liaisons between their 
schools and the Field. Through 
orientations and forums. 
Ambassadors work intimately 
with Museum educators to 
explore the Museum and its 
resources. They meet wth scien- 
tists, exhibitors and education 
leaders to develop innovative 
ways to engage their students and 
colleagues with Museum content. 

Imagine... 

• Sue Hendrickson spends 

an hour swapping adventure 
stories with 150 girls from the 
Young Women's Leadership 
Charter School. 

• Nationally recognized storyteller 
Syd Lieberman reveals the 
human drama behind a Faberge 
e^ before Ambassadors tour 
Kremlin Gold. 

• Blaine Elementar\- transforms 
itself mto a "dinosaur museum." 

• Transfiguration Catholic School 
hosts an event for its faculty at 
the Museum, and teachers irom 
every grade level bring their 
classes here in response. 

• Ambassadors meet scientists. 
w-alk through exhibition models 
or pose questions to political. 
literar\\ emironmental and 
other distinguished leaders they 
might not otherwise meet. 

• Ambassadors formed a book 
club that covers Museum con- 
tent for different grade levels. If 
approved, the books are added 
to a resource list for all teachers. 



Field Ambassadors was 
launched in 1999 with 28 dedi- 
cated Chicagoland educators and 
has grown dramatically since 
then. In 2000, the program 
expanded to 63 teachers. This 
summer, we received more than 
100 applications and selected 60 
new Ambassadors. Starting in 
2002, 100 Ambassadors will be 
added each year. We anticipate 
ha\"ing a Field Ambassador in 
ever\- Chicago PubUc School and 
many private and suburban 
schools, forming a powerflil 
teacher network that explores 
and expands the boundaries of 
possibility- when children 
encounter the real thing. 

"The Field Museum," sa\'s 
Kwock, "is no longer an imposing 
building filled with knowledge 
beyond my students' grasp, 
but rather a place where great 
discoveries can be made and 
explored. My students are 
empowered to ask questions. 
We have become partners in 
learning." 

Imagine that. 

If you or someone you know- 
is interested in being a Field 
Ambassador, call 312.665.7558 
or email fieldambassadors@field- 
museum.org for an application, 
due June 30 of each year. 

Field Ambassadors is made possible 
by a grant from Polk Bros. 
Foundation with additional support 
from Tlie \egaunee Foundation and 
Ryerson Tull Foundation. 



Last year's Field Ambassadors left thpse words nf enrnuragement. 

"Welcome to a very wonderful event in your life. We are the 'new explorers' in education!" 

— Cowl Cleltmd, Transfiguration Catholic School 

"Expect your mind to soar and your heart to lead you to new challenges."-s<jH(/ra Stone. Suder Elementmy School 

"A magical, mystical voyage for all your senses. To be shared with all you meet!" - Mary Burgess, DeKalb High School 

"Be moved! Here, work is play! Play hard! - Dennis Zygadio, Austin Community Acadany 



IN THE FIElD 



OFSPECIALINTEREST 



Clfio patm Ball tn Charm Chicago 



Pull out the golden crowns, sultry gowns and lavish robes. The Cleopatra Ball may 
inspire the Elizabeth Taylor or Richard Burton in all of us. 



On Friday, Oct. 19, the Women's Board of The 
Field Museum will host The Cleopatra Ball — 
unquestionably Chicago's most prestigious, seductive 
black-tie affair this fall — to mark the opening of 
Cleopatra of Egypt: From History to Myth. 

Selected from the world's great Egyptian and 
classical art coUecrions, the masterpieces in Cleopatra 
reveal the life and liaisons of Egypt's last, most 
charismatic queen. Remarkable sculptures and 
portraits from the ancient world illuminate how 
Cleopatra's contemporaries perceived her. The 
exhibition also showcases how Cleopatra's story 
has endured through countless poems, books, 
songs, paintings, movies, jewelry and other works, 
thousands of years after her tragic death. 



United Airlines will sponsor The Cleopatra Ball 
and assist the Women's Board in welcoming this 
extraordinary exhibition to The Field Museum, 
the only North American venue. Carrier has also 
provided in-kind support. 

The Women's Board anticipates 1 ,000 guests 
to dine, drink and dance in Stanley Field Hall in 
honor of Cleopatra, who has stirred the heart and 
fired the imagination for the past 2,000 years. 
Tickets start at $400. Call the Women's Board 
at 312.665.7135 for information. 



This exhibition has been organized by The British Museum in collaboration 
with the Fondazione Memmo, Rome. 

International Sponsor BP 
National Sponsor Exelon 



Fmm the Pasture to the Living Room 



Suite Home Chicago follows the hoofsteps of Chicago's 
most legendary public art display. Cows on Parade, 
with more than 400 sofas, chairs, ottomans and 
television sets dotting the city's parkways and plazas. 
Handcrafted by local artists, these fiberglass forms 
wiU make you laugh, ponder or gaze in awe as their 
expressions range from the silly to the serious. They 
also make a great place to relax and enjoy our 
beautiful city. 

Cleopatra's Throne, The Field Museum's contribu- 
tion to Suite Home Chicago on the southwest stairs, 
was created by David Hanke of the exhibits depart- 
ment. His design was chosen among several 
imaginative staff submissions because the spectator 
becomes the royal figure. The Egyptian-inspired sculp- 
ture is a golden cobra flanked by cheetahs and 
Cleopatra cartouches. 

The throne attracts a line of people who want 
to pretend they are queen or king, if only for a fun 
photo opportunity. We hope it wiU compel visitors 
to learn more about Cleopatra's riveting story when 
Cleopatra of Egypt: From History to Myth opens on 
Oct. 20 here at the Field . 

The Field Museum ivishes to thank Bob Crawford, 
chief executive officer of Brook Furniture Rental and 
a Field Museum trustee, for his generous support of 
Cleopatra's Throne. 




Jonathan and Alexandria Chow, i2 and 4, of Okemos, Mich., kick back as king 
and queen before visiting the Museum. 



SEPT/OCT 2001 



FROMTHEARCHIVES 




( 

Rare Map Navig ates Way to Library 



^^^tS^^^tlUams, Head Ubrarian 

Cutting-edge cartography — 17th century- variety- — 
_ - _ > ha» arrived at The Field Museum. Hailed after its tirst 

\^ i^ifrJi'iJxtJfiii^Sts^iS^ei in 1625 as the most informative, current 
-• -J- J description of the Americas, Johannes de Laets 

/V JT \f^ ^kscliA'inghf mil West-Iiidieti served as an important 
source work well into the 1 690s. De Laet. one of the 
first <fifectors of the Dutch West India Company, 
TuppAfUUjf co^jtinued to enlarge and update the work, produc- 

M^^^Ks^ the expanded second Dutch edition in 1 630, a 
Latin edition in 1633 and a French one in 1640. 
j f ~hf' fJ^^^fJ^ A--splendid copy of the noteworthy second Dutch 

edition has found a new home in the 

library's Mary W. Runnells Rare Book 
Room, filling a significant gap in the 
map collections. 

As a director of the West 
India Company, formed 
in 1621 and modeled after 
the successful East India 
Company, de Laet received a 
steady flow of new information 
gathered by company agents 
pursuing Dutch colonial interests 
in the New World. The first edi- 
tion of the Beschrijviiiglie focused on 
Dutch acti\-ities in South and Central 
America. To produce the 10 maps in that first edi- 
tion, de Laet enhsted the talented Hessel Gerritsz, 
cartographer for the East India Company. The result 
set a higher standard for accuracy in mapping the 
Americas and helped estabhsh a new, open style of 
cartographic rendering that broke with the heavily 
decorative style of Gerhardus Mercator (1512-1594) 
andOrtehus (1527-1598). 



1^ 



Ji^^M 



GL 



isrovA . 

NOVVMBELGIVM 
ET VIRGIN 



Even as de Laet was publishing the first edition 
of his work, he was directing the efforts of the West 
India Company in consoUdating Dutch holdings 
and acti\-ities in North America. The company 
founded Fort Orange in 1624 near the site of pre- 
sent-day Albany, New York, and in 1626 relocated 
scattered Dutch settlers to the lower tip of 
Manhattan Island, creating what would become 
New York City. De Laet's expanded second edition 
ot Bescliriji'iiiglie in 1630 included descriptions of 
these new North American regions of Dutch inter- 
est and added four more maps by Gerritsz, three of 
them dealing with the east coast of the continent. 

We reproduce here a detail from the most 
important of these — the Nova Anglia map — 
containing numerous cartographic "firsts." 

This is the first printed map to use the Native 
American terms Maitbattes (Manhattan) and 
Massachusetts as place names and to name .V. 
Amsterdam (the fijture New York). Also used for the 
first time are the Dutch names Xoordt Rivier for the 
Hudson and Ziiyd Rivier for the Delaware. In the 
tide cartouche of the map itself appears the first use 
o{ Soi'iim Belgium (New Netherlands). 

Dr. Richard Boyimi of the Unifersity of Wisconsin gener- 
ously donated the map and has received an honorar)' 
membership to Tlie Friends ofTlie Field Museum 
Librar)', which fosters interest in the library and supports 
the dex'elopmeiit of its rich collections of books, prints, 
manuscripts and other research materials. For information 
on becoming a Friends member, call 312.665.7136 or 
email library ^frieiids(§finnh. org. 




IN THE FIELD 



MEMBERSHIPNEWS 




_,_ ra Member Previews 

Members-only viewing dates are Oct. 21, 24, 26 and 28, 5 to 10pm. 
Details to come in the mail. 

. Q,\eopatra of Egypt: From History to Myth, open Oct. 20, 2001, through March 3, 

i/20.02, promises to be an extraordinary experience with more than 350 priceless arti- 
;;:facts and artworks to explore the life, liaisons and legend of Egypt's tragic queen. 
This exdjjsive exhibition has already closed in Rome and London. Don't miss your last 
t6 see it here — the only North American venue and the last stop on the tour. 




(Sf^f ■additional Cleopatra tickets now! 



iK^/ujplan to see Cleopatra of Egypt beyond the members-only viewing, member passes 
ajrid iadvance tickets are now available. 



ir~DtH^ilS: Family members may receive four passes, 
i and senior, student, individual and national affiliate 
/ members may receive two passes. 

"" Purchasing Additional Tickets: Cleopatra tickets 

' for an additional member in your household are 
^ ^$10 each, and tickets for a non-member guest are 
4 '$10 each plus general admission. The Museum 
 offers discount combination tickets that include 

basic admission, with greater discounts for children, 

seniors and students. 

Ordering Ticl<etS: To guarantee entry at the time 
of your choice, reserve your tickets through 



Ticketmaster at 312.902.1500 (fees will be assessed), 
or visit the membership desk (no additional fees). 
Tickets available on a first-come, first-served basis 
for same-day viewing or fiiture dates. 

Exclianging TicltetS: if you need to exchange 
tickets for a future date, please do so at the mem- 
bership desk no later than one week before the 
date of the tickets you currently hold. No refunds 
or exchanges are available for unused tickets. 

For information, visit umnv.fteldmuseum.org, or call the 
membership office, open Monday through Friday between 
8:30am and 4:30pm, at 312.665.7700. 



-/-/ 



Do ynu havp family or friends visiting ovpr the holidays? 

Several Chicago hotels are offering special packages that include tickets to see Cleopatra of Egypt, 
open Oct. 20, 2001, through March 3, 2002. 

WitlTconvenient locations along Michigan Avenue, these hotels 

jafiW wonderful amenities and a range of options to suit every 
^ Jj5fidget,^CaU each one for details on specific packages, which may 
.^/ yiclufe such benefits as complimentary breakfast, fitness center 

privileges and valet parking. To offer your guests maximum flexi 



is a timed-entry exhibition, can be used anytime during their 
visit without having to call ahead. 

Hotel reservationists wiU inform you of any blackouts that 
may apply when you book your package. We hope to see you 
and your guests soon. 



- .bijity during their stay, hotel guest tickets to see Cleopatra, which 



C^go's N ew Essex Inn 

_800 S^outh Michigan Avenue 



^rSfi^s 



Congress Plaza Hotel 

520 South Michigan Avenue 
800.635.1666 



Executive Plaza Hotel 
Chicago 

71 East Wacker Drive 
800.621.4005 



Four Seasons Hotel Chicago 

120 East Delaware 
312.280.8800 



The Centennial Club — Cleopatra Event 

Centennial Club members can enjoy a private viewing of Cleopatra of Egypt on Oct. 18. The British Museum's 
Susan Wall<er, curator of Cleopatra, will give a brief presentation. Details on this invitation-only event will 
come in the mail. 

The Centennial Club is comprised of individuals and families who have been members for 30 years or 
more. For information, call the membership office at 312.665.7700. 





Field Museum Tours at a Glance 



For information, call Field Museum Tours at 800.811.7244 or email fmtours@sover.net. Please note that 
rates, prices and itineraries are subject to change and that prices are per person, double occupancy. 



Egypt Revisited 

Oft. U-28, 2001 (15 days) 

Explore spectacular archaeological 
sites and monuments not seen on 
your first trip. (First-time visitors 
should see Egyptian Odyssey 
below.) Highlights feature Abusir, 
Dashur, Maidum, Faiyum,Tanus, 
Abydos, Dendara, dawn at Abu 
Simbel and three nights cruising 
Lake Nasser, plus lesser-known sites 
in Cairo, Luxor and Aswan. 
Leader: Frank Yurco, Egyptologist and 
research associate in anthropology 
Price: $4,325, not including airfare 

Egyptian Odyssey 

Oct.28-Xoi: 11,2001, 

or Jan. 27-Feb. 10, 2002 (15 days) 

Explore the world of ancient 
pharaohs by land and riverboat. 
Visit the famed pyramids of Giza, 
The Eg\-ptian Museum, the Valleys 
of the Kings and Queens, Karnak, 
the temples of Khnum, Horus and 
Isis, and Abu Simbel's three colossi 
of Ramses II. Enjoy five-star 
accommodations throughout. 
Leaders: Egyptologists Tlionias Mudlqff 
(Oct.) atid Frank Yurco (Jan.) 
Price: $4,325, not including airfare 
(estimated $945 return from A"i7 



Amazon by Riverboat 

Dec. 1-9, 2001, 

or Jan. 18-26, 2003 (9 days) 

Explore the Amazon, Ucayali and 
Tapiche Rivers in Peru for eight 
days aboard a 14-cabin riverboat. 
Search for river dolphins; howler, 
squirrel and capuchin monkeys; 
sloths; and capybaras, plus unusual 
birds such as the jabiru and 
hoatzin. Optional extension to 
Machu Picchu, the mag^nificent 
archaeological sites around Cuzco. 
Leaders: Botanist Hllliam Burger (Dec.) 
and zoologist Barr)' Chernoff (Jan.) 
Price: $3,890, including round-trip 
airfare from Xliami (Dec.) 

Mysteries of Earth: An 
Expedition by Private Jet 

Jan. 20-Feb. 13 or Feb. 14-March 
10, 2002 (25 days) 

Embark on a once-in-a-Ufetime 
journey to the world's most 
remote habitats: the vast flora and 
fauna of the Amazon; volcanic 
Canars- Islands; great apes of 
Borneo; annual migration in 
Tanzania; wildlife of Nepal; rare 
species of the Galapagos; undersea 
Hfe of the Great Barrier Reef; 
moai of Easter Island; tribal cul- 




tures of Papua New Guinea; the 
Seychelles; and Samoa. 
Leaders: Social scientist Michael 
Shermer (Jan.) and geologist 
Wayne Ranney (Feb.) 
Price: $36,950, including airfare from 
Miami and return to Washington, 
D.C., on ajirst class, 88-seat private jet 

Tanzania Migration Safari 

Feb. 1-14 (wait-listed) or Feb. 19- 
March 4, 2002 (14 days) 

Travel at the best time of year to 
see the spectacular herds of the 
Serengeti Plains. Hundreds of 
thousands of wildebeest and tens 
of thousands of zebras and antelope 
amass in this area each year, 
attended by lions, cheetahs, hyenas 
and other predators. Enjoy four 
days in the Serengeti. then three 
days at Ngorongoro Crater. 
Zanzibar extension available. 
Leaders: Zoologists Bill Stanley and 
Mar]' Anne Rogers (first trip) and 
David Willard (second trip) 
Price: $6,245, not including airfare 

Nature and Civilization 
in the Mediterranean 

April 6-20, 2002 (15 days) 

Enjoy ancient sites and natural his- 
tors' on a 1 5-day voyage aboard an 
all-suite, 88-passenger yacht. Visit 
Kourion in Cyprus, and tour 
Aphrodisias or Dalyan and Caunos 
in Turkey. In Greece, e.xplore 
Kastellorizo, Rhodes. Santorini, 
Heraklion and Knossos on Crete, 
Delphi, and the birdlife and wet- 
lands of the Ambracian Gulf. 
Experience Kotor, Montenegro, on 
the Adriatic Coast, and finish your 
vo^-age with a day in Venice, Italy. 
Leader: Anthropologist Dai'id Reese 
Price: TBA 



. JiMf^^te^ Ji^-f-^^ 




November 
December 



Ttve Rie.id Museum's Mrember Pu^li&ati 








. ^/^ 





W^ 






'U^ 




c^^^ 



f <' 



Bhutan: Sanctuary 
for Biodiversity 

Sigmund Freud: ^ 
Conflict and Culture 










^ fH^ 



'^-90^ 




A Place to Gather , a Place to Reflec t 




Barbara Ceiga (left) and 
Shelley Ulrich of the 
exhibitions department 
reflect on the U.S. 
flags that flanked the 
Museum's north fa(ade. 



Sept. 11 was a day of tragedy 
for our nation and all of 
humanity. We closed the 
Museum out of concern for the 
safety of our visitors and staff 
and to mourn the loss of lives 
and the suffering of our nation. 

On Sept. 12, w/e reopened 
with a new sense of dedication 
to our mission and work. From 
this tragedy we take on a 
rekindled sense of purpose: 

• to understand the Earth 
and its peoples 

• to document the complexity 
of life 

• to preserve our natural 
environment 

• to share with our community 
the wonderful diversity of life 

• to help us and our audiences 
understand the importance 
of living together in peace. 

The Field Museum is a 
gathering place for people of 
all cultures, faiths and ages. 



To that end, the Museum has 
taken many thoughtful, pro- 
active steps toward helping all 
of us — staff, volunteers and 
visitors alike — find meaning 
and understanding in the tragedy 
while reflecting on what brings 
us together as human beings. 

We offered our staff the 
chance to share their thoughts 
and feelings in an open forum. 
We gathered with our guests 
in Stanley Field Hall to join the 
City of Chicago in a moment of 
prayer and remembrance. We 
eliminated our admission fees 
for two weekends so that people 
of all backgrounds could 
explore the diversity of cultures 
throughout our exhibitions. We 
held public meetings to help 
visitors absorb and contemplate 
the events. The panelists, 
including several Field Museum 
scientists, gave insight into cul- 
tural understanding and change, 
globalization, faith, conflict, 
Middle Eastern cultures, toler- 
ance, coping with trauma and 
more. And music of all notes — 
the Chicago Children's Choir, a 
drum circle, the Chicago String 
Quartet, West African and 
southwest Asian — filled the 
halls with song. Major support 
for these free programs was 
generously provided by The 
Boeing Company, with addi- 
tional funding from Nuveen 
Investments and The Chicago 
Community Trust. 

We also placed a message 
box in the Living Together 
exhibition so that visitors could 
write about their feelings. 
Young or old, American or 
international, the messages 



reflect what many of us have 
probably experienced at least 
once in the recent months: 

"The spirit of ail Americans 
during this time will stay 
with me always." (Ireland) 

"I pray that we do not give in 
to hatred and prejudice, but 
instead reach out to those that 
are unlike us and impact com- 
fort, understanding and iove." 

"f feel bad for the families that 
still have missing moms and 
dads." (Age 10) 

"The pain — the hope — the 
strength of our people — one 
nation — after all is said and 
done — has made us one family." 

"The sun is shining but my 
heartaches. ... How ludicrous 
that the sun shines right now." 

"I fear for the solidarity and 
freedom nation. ... I fear for 
what comes in the days ahead." 

"I realize the many things I 
take for granted and often 
forget to honor and respect." 

"I am very mad they crashed 
into that special building by 
the White House. ... Hatred is 
no love in your heart." (Age 7) 

In these times of tragedy and 
uncertainty, we hope you find 
solace and strength in reflecting 
on the enduring human spirit 
and the common bonds that 
unite us all. 

John W. McCarter, Jr. 
President & CEO 




VOLLtt 



iQiit In±lie_ReM2_ 



For general membership inquiries, including address changes, call 312.665.7700. For questions about In 
Field, call 312.665.7115, email acranch@fmnh.org or write Amy E. Cranch, Editor of In the Field, The Field 
Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605-2496. 



INTHEFIELD 

l\lov/Dec 2001, Vol.72, No. 6 

Editor: 

Amy E. Cranch, The Field Wluseum 

Design: 

Depke Design 

Copy editor: 

Laura F. Nelson 

%<r In the Field is printed on recycled paper 
using soy-based inks. All images © The 
Field Museum unless otherwise specified. 



In the Field (ISSN #1051-4546) is published 
bimonthly by The Field Museum. Copyright 
2001 The Field Museum. Annual subscriptions 
are $20; $10 for schools. Museum membership 
includes In the Field subscription. Opinions 
expressed by authors are their own and do not 
necessarily reflect the policy of The Field 
Museum. Notification of address change should 
include address label and should be sent to the 
membership department. POSTMASTER; Send 
address changes to Membership, The Field 
Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496. Periodicals postage 
paid at Chicago, Illinois. 

The cover image showcases Sigmund Freud: 
Conflict and Culture, open through Dec. 9. Recto 
and verso of Freud's speech for a BBC interview 
in English, December 7, 1938. Manuscript 
Division, Library of Congress. Photo of Sigmund 
Freud, 1921. Prints and Photographs Division, 
Library of Congress. 

The Field Museum salutes the people of 
Chicago for their long-standing, generous 
support of the IVIuseum through the 
Chicago Park District. 

Field 



j: 



fe 



useum 



1400 South Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496 
312.922.9410 

www.fieldmuseum.org 





2 



A new program will help discover and 
protect wildlife in Bhutan, one of Asia's 
most biologically diverse but least 
known countries. 
Left: Collared Grosbeak (Mycerobas affmis) 



7 



See Your Guide to the Field for pro- 
grams on Freud, fossils, cultural diversity, 
Cleopatra, chocolate and more. 



16 



Paleontologists debate about whether 
snakes evolved from land or sea. 
Left: Skull of the Hxisiophis fossil Joiind 
ill the Middle East 



19 



A conservation biologist is awarded 
for research on amphibian declines 
and malformations. 
Left: X-ray of a iiialjoniied mink frog 
from Minnesota 



21 



Membership News invites you to shop 
in the stores for 20 percent off or come 
to the Children's Holidav Celebration. 



Mij^pum Campus Neighbors 



Shedd Aquarium Get an insider's look into the Oceanarium's daily 
activities during Shedd's Go Behind the Scenes opportunity, Nov. 2 to 16, 
noon until closing. Learn what the dolphins eat and what the belugas 
play with, and talk with the marine mammal trainers about their jobs. 
Free with a one-day pass. For more information, call 312.939.2438, or 
visit www.5heddaquarium.org. 

Adier Planetarium Travel 93 million miles to our nearest star, 
plunge deep into a sunspot and then emerge to experience our powerful 
sun in Solar Storms, the Adier's new StarRiderTM Theater show. 
Discover the sun's influence on Earth — from the awesome beauty of the 
Northern Lights to electrical power grid blackouts and interruptions of 
satellite-based communications. For information, visit wwAw.adlerplane- 
tarium.org, or call 312. 922. STAR. 



Museum Campus visit viww.museumcampus.org, the new one- 
stop website for the AdIer Planetarium, Field Museum and Shedd 
Aquarium, for a daily calendar, museum programs, directions, traffic 
alerts, e-postcards and the fun, educational Virtual Explorer Guide. 
Also, sign up for the new IVIuseum Campus Chicago brochure in the 
e-Explorers Guide section. 

The free trolley service has been extended for the weekends only (10am 
to 6pm) through December. There will be no service on 
Bears game days and additional service during the holiday 
weekends. Schedules subject to change. Visitwvwv.cityofchicago.org/ 
Transportation/trolleys for information. 



NOV/DEC 2001 



INT HEFIELD FEATURE 



^^_'^5P 



The Royal Kingdom of Bhutan: 
Sanctuary for Biodiversity 

Amy E. Cranch, Editor, Lawrence Heaney, Associate Curator, Mammals, 
and Julian Kerbis Peterhans, Adjunct Curator, Mammals 

All photos by Harald Schuetz 

Imagine merging the distinct landscapes of Colorado, West Virginia and Costa Rica 
into an area half the size of Indiana. This seems like a geographic anomaly, but not 
in the Royal Kingdom of Bhutan, a tiny country nestled in the heart of the Himalayan 
Mountains between China and India. Wrapped for centuries in a cloak of mystery, 
Bhutan has recently chosen to begin opening its doors. Though rarely visited by out- 
siders, it is now seeking external assistance in conserving its astoundingly diverse 
habitats. Since information on its biological diversity is extremely limited. The Field 
Museum leapt at the chance to collaborate on the first comprehensive inventory of 
Bhutan's birds and mammals. 



S^m- 



In 1999, the World Wildlife Fund invited The Field 
Museum to collaborate on an inventory of Bhutan's 
small birds and mammals, develop a training program 
for Bhutanese biodiversity specialists and initiate 
plans for the country's first biodiversity museum. 
From meager information on the fauna of the 
Himalayas, which is biologically one of the least 
known parts of the world, we quickly predicted 
that Bhutan may have the highest concentration 
of biological diversity in Asia. 

Although its area is only 18,147 square miles, its 
human population density is low, and its powerful 
Buddhist conservation ethic has led Bhutan to 
retain about 70 percent of its natural forests — the 
highest percentage in Asia. Altitudes range dramati- 
cally from about 500 feet to more than 24,000 feet; 
only Nepal has a greater range. And Bhutan lies at 
the crossroads of three great biological regions: the 
lowland rainforests of South and Southeast Asia; the 
rhododendron/conifer forests and alpine meadows 
of northern Asia and Europe; and the Himalayan 
fauna itself, a unique and diverse assemblage of 
species found only along the Himalayan Front. 

After a preliminary conference in Nepal and 
months of planning, Tom Gnoske, an assistant 
collection manager in birds, Pamela Austin, an 
associate in mammals, Julian Kerbis Peterhans, an 
adjunct curator in mammals, and Harald Schuetz, 
a professional photographer, entered Bhutan in 
March 2001. Our team's first impressions were 
vivid — spectacular landscapes, benevolent Buddhist 



traditions, outstanding architecture and literally 
breathtaking cuisine dominated by chUies! But 
perhaps most remarkable is a national mandate 
to maintain a stable environment and society: The 
Bhutanese government protects almost 33 percent 
of the land. 

Our team worked with colleagues from the 
Bhutan Nature Conservation Division at four sites 
in central Bhutan ranging from 2,400 to 12,000 
feet. At the highest site, we documented such 
animals as a pika, closely related to species found 
in the Rocky Mountains, and a boreal owl, the first 
Bhutanese record of this species that also lives in 
northern Asia, Canada and the northern United 
States. At middle elevations (4,000 to 8,000 feet), 
we observed animals that are found only on or near 
the Himalayan Front, including the takin, a burly 
herbivore distantly related to goats, sheep and cat- 
tle, and such birds as the cutia and black-throated 
parrotbUl.We hope to also visit the tropical lowland 
forest, where we are likely to see animals shared 
with lowland India and Burma. 

We also encountered large, dangerous carnivores. 
At 8,000 feet, we found footprints in the snow of 
a female Asian leopard and large cub. Evidence of 
Bengal tigers was regularly found next to the nets 
the team set along trails for surveying small birds, 
and a nursing Himalayan black bear and cub sur- 
prised Schuetz and Gnoske in the cool broadleaf 
forest at 2,400 feet. 

(continued on page 4) 



This page: Tlie blue poppy (Meconopsis sp.), with its delicate blue or purple bloom, grows high up in rocky terrain. 
A mystique surrounds its existence since, rarely seen, it takes several years to grou>, flowers only once and dies soon 
after producing seeds. 

Opposite pageiYoung Buddhist monks at Lhuentse Dzong carry on centuries-old traditions in Bhutan, a country of 
about 2 million people cradled among the Himalayas. Isolated ft>r centuries, Bhutan is slowly opening its doors to out- 
siders, but the royal family and National Assembly arc adamant that reverence fiir the natural world take precedence in 
determining the course of economic development. 



IN THE FIELD 











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INTHEFIELDFEATURE 




Top-.Tite masiive takin (Budorcas taxicolorj can balance graccjuUy on us hind legs to reach branches 8 feet high, or prop nselj up aganisi a tree 
trunk and lean forward until the trunk snaps to gain access to leafy food. Takins liiv in the rugged Himalayan foothills and mountains above 
4,000 Jeet, wftere they lead a shadowed life in the broad-leafed and conifer forests, preferring thickets and dense bamboo. 

Bottom left: A pika (Ochotona sp.) surveys its territory on a snowy rocky slope at 12,000 feet. Tfiis short-eared relatiiv of rabbits is similar to 
species that are widespread in northern Asia and the Rocky Mountains of Sorth America. 

Bottom right :Tlie tiny black-throated parrotbill (Paradoxornis nipaleiTiisI lives in small flocks that forai^e for bamboo seeds in the understory 
of foothill forests at 3,500 to 3,900 feet. 




Our first field season lasted only eight weeks, and 
the data are still being anal\-2ed. However, our first 
assessment is that Bhutan stiU has nearly all of its 
original wildlife and may have the best prospects in 
Asia for long-term conservation. Although lai^-scale 
losing and mining are banned, catde breeds used to 
produce milk and milk b\products, including the 
N-ak and mithun, challenge the ecosN^stem with 
overgrazing and habitat destruction. Also, there is 
increasing direct competition \\ith humans when rare 
top predators, such as the snow leopard, brown bear 
and wild dog. feed on livestock. We hoi>e our carefiil 
documentation of the distribution and habitat needs 



of small birds and mammals will help determine 
conser\-aQon priorities so that a stable balance can 
be achieved between humans and wild species. 

In the meantime, generating new information 
on Bhutan's natural historv' will certainly arouse 
greater interest in its conservation. Also, offering 
highly focused programs for our Bhutanese col- 
leagues about the role of natural histor\' museums 
in research and public education will help them 
develop the expertise they need to continue 
making informed decisions about their country's 
fiature — a fijture that appears remarkably and 
refreshingly bright. ITF 



IN THE FIELD 




/)( habitats ranging from lowland tropical rainforests at 500 feet to permanent glacier fields at more than 24,000 feet, Bhutan supports one of the 
widest range of habitats in the world. It is also one of the most stable environments in Asia with 70 percent of the country still forested. Biological 
diversity is probably equally high, though poorly known. Some of the species eiKOuntered by our team included, from top left, the cutia (Cutia 
nipalensis), capped langur (Trachypithecus pileatus), boreal owl (Aegolius funereus), a tiny shrew as yet unidentified and a yellow-billed blue 
magpie (Urocissa flavirostris). Conifer forests predominate the upper elevations, including this fir tree at about 12, 000 feet (Abies sp., pictured at left). 



NOV/DEC 2001 




Top: At our campsite at 12,000 feet elevation, in forest dominated by rhododendron and fir trees, snow fell nearly every night. Tlie pika (page 4) 
and boreal owl (page 5) were documented at this site. 

Bottom left: Inseparable from human survival, the yak (Bos grunniens) has served as a source of food, shelter, labor, clothing, fuel and tratisportation 
for centuries in Bhutan's harsh environment. It cannot sunnve below 10,500 feet and is often found in the most remote regions above 12,500 
feet. An endangered species, the yak bears only one young after a nine-month gestation period, and the babies need one year to wean before they 
can sunnve on their owti. 

Bottom right: A visual symbol of strength, authority and spiritual unity, Trongsa Dzong is perched high on cliffs overlooking a gorge that was carved 
out b)' the great Manas River in central Bhutan. Formerly used as fortresses, each dzong now serves as a monastery and administrative center. 



IN THE FIELD 



YOURGUIDETOTHEFIELD 



A Pullout Calendar of Events for November and December 



Inside: Exhibits Festivals Family Programs Adult Programs 



New 
ExhibitiouJ 



Sigmund Freud: 
Conflict and Culture 

ThroHxh Dec. 9, 2001 

Explore the life and legacy of one 
of the most influential and contro- 
versial figures of the 20th century. 

Since his death in 1939, Sigmund 
Freud's theories have been by 
turns revered, debunked, revised 
and reviled. This exhibition is the 
most comprehensive examination 
yet of Freud's work and impact. 
Manuscripts and letters reveal 
Freud's major theories, vintage 
photographs illustrate his life, and 
television and film clips demon- 
strate how his ideas have been 
absorbed into popular culture. 

Organized by the U.S. Library 
of Congress, which houses the 
world's largest collection (80,000 
objects) relating to Freud's life, 
the exhibition uses words and 
images — sometimes contentious, 
sometimes humorous — to portray 
a variety of viewpoints. 

Don't miss this opportunity to inves- 
tigate Freud's impact for yourself. 

Sigmund Freud: Conflict and Culture is organized by the Library 
of Congress in cooperation with the Sigmund Freud- IVluseum in 
Vienna and the Freud Museum, London. 



^ 



Field 



useum 




Analyzing Freud Series 

Individual lectures: $12, students/educators $10, members $8. Attend three 
lectures and save 15 percent: $30, students/educators $25, members $20. 



Freud and Women 

Dr. Marian Tolpiit, Institute for 
Psychoanalysis, Chicago 
Take a fresh look at Freud's answer to 
the question, "What do women want?" 

Tuesday, Nov. 6, 6pm 

Sigmund Freud, Arthur 
Schnitzler and Eyes Wide Shut 

Dr. Peter Loewenherg, University 
of Cahfornia, Los Angeles 
Explore the connections between 
Freud's writings, fiction and Stanley 
Kubrick's film. 
Tuesday, Nov. i3, 6pm 

This Helen Ross Lecture is co-sponsored by the 
Institute for Psychoanalysis. 

Freud and the Jews 

Dr. Sander Gilman, University of 
Illinois at Chicago 
Understand what being an Eastern 
European Jew meant for Freud. 

Tuesday, Noi>. 21, 6pm 

Analyzing Freud is being presented by The Field Museum 
in collaboration with the University of Illinois at Chicago 
Humanities Lab. It is also supported by the Austrian 
Cultural Institute, NY. 

The Field Museum gratefully acknowledges the Freud 
Community Advisory Panel for its insight and assistance. 



Feature Presentation 

Anthropology Discovers 
Childhood: The Impact of Freud 

Dr. Mary Catherine Bateson 
George Mason University, Arlington, VA 
Discover how Freud's work opened up 
new vistas for research in the field of 
anthropology. His emphasis on early 
childhood experience influenced the 
development of key theories about 
how individuals become members of 
larger societies. 

Tuesday, Nov. 20, 6pm 




Dr. Mary Catherine Bateson 



General Museum Information: 312.922.9410 

Family and Adult Program Information and Tickets: 312.665.7400 



NOV/DEC 2001 



Your Guide to the Field: A pullout calendar of events for November and December 




Cleopatra of Egypt: 
From History 
to Myth 



Your Attendance is 
Requested by the Queen 

Tltrough March 3, 2002 

Fabled for her sensual allure, Cleopatra is best known 
for seducing Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, two of 
the ancient world's most powerful men. But history 
also indicates that Cleopatra may have been one of 
antiquity's shrewdest political minds. For more than 
20 years she preserved Egypt's independence against 
an ambitiously expanding Roman Empire. 

Unravel the mysteries of Egypt's last queen for yourself 
in Cleopatra of Egypt: From History to Myth. This 
extraordinary exhibition reveals Cleopatra's life and 
liaisons through more than 350 spectacular artifacts 
and priceless artworks from the world's premier 
classical and Egyptian collections. 

You'll also discover how Cleopatra's story has endured — - 
through countless poems, books, songs, paintings, 
movies, jewelry and other works — for 2,000 years after 
her tragic death. 

The Field Museum is the only North American venue 
for this exclusive exhibition. 

An Acoustiguide Audio Tour is available for an 
additional fee. 



This exhibition has been organized by The British Museum in collaboration 
with The Fondazione Memmo, Rome. 

international Sponsor BP 
National Sponsor Exelon 

Supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities. 



Spend an exciting weekend in the city! 

Several hotels are offering special packages that include tickets to Cleopat 
of Egypt. Check our website at www.fieldmuseum.org/cleopatra for details. 



8 ! IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 



General Museum Information: 312.922.9410; Family and Adult Program Information and Tickets: 312.665.7400 



Learn more about Cleopatra 
with these exciting programs! 

The Field Museum (TFM) and the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute (01) are collaborating on a series 
of programs to complement the Cleopatra of Egypt exhibition and the permanent collections at both places. 



Programs at The Field Museum 

Cleopatra VII: Clever Woman or Seductive 
Temptress? Afternoon Lecture Series 

Frank Yurco, Egyptologist 

Explore the many facets of Cleopatra's identity and enjoy 

a social discussion over complimentary coffee and tea. 

Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2pm 

$15, TFM and OI members $12 

Tickets to the Cleopatra of Egypt exhibition are not included. 

Pre-registration is required. 

Looking for Cleopatra studio Course 

Cyd Engel, Milwaukee Art Museum 

Examine ancient portraits in Cleopatra of Egypt. Then create 

your own portrait using mixed media collage, drawing and text. 

Saturdays, Nov. 3 and 17, 10am- 1pm 
$70, TFM and OI members $60 

Cleopatra: From Papyrus to CD-Rom 

Beliind-tlie-scenes Fieldtrip 

Dr. Janet H.Joluison, Oriental Institute 

Enjoy a guided tour of Cleopatra of Egypt, 
then travel by bus to the 01 for a behind-the- 
scenes look at how scholars piece together 
meaning from ancient texts. 
Saturday, Nov. 3, 12:30- 4:30pm 
$38, TFM and OI members $32 
Space is limited and pre-registration is required. 

Cleopatra's Egypt Adult Course 

Frank Yurco, Egyptologist 

Discover the ancient Egypt of the Ptolemaic dynasty, when 

the land of the pharaohs was a center of Hellenistic life and 

culture, and Cleopatra ruled from Alexandria. 

Wednesdays, Nov. 7- Dec. 12, 6:30- 8:30pm 

$85, TFM and OI members $72 



Cleopatra in Context: Egypt, 

the Mediterranean World and Africa 

Dr James Phillips, TFM Anthropology Dept. 
Understand Cleopatra's and Egypt's roles 
in the Mediterranean and African worlds. 

Sunday, Dec. 9, 2pm 

$12, students /educators $10 

TFM and OI members $8 




Programs at the Oriental Institute *««..-*. 

1155 E. 58th St. 

Call 773.702.9507 for information. 

In Death Immortal Lecture 

Dr. Robert K. Ritner, University of Chicago 

Trace Cleopatra's image in literature, painting and sculpture in 

this slide presentation. Event includes a reception. 

Wednesday, Nov. 7, 8— 9:30pm 
FREE 

Cleopatra's Palace: In Search of a Legend Film 

Omar Sharif narrates the underwater excavations of ancient 
Alexandria. Event includes a tour of the OI's Egyptian Gallery. 

Sunday, Nov. 4, 1:30pm 
FREE 



Cleopatra's Egypt Adult course 

This course is being offered at both 
institutions. See TFM listing for 
description and fees. 

Saturdays, Nov. 3-Dec. 15 (skips Nov 24) 
10am— noon 



Tlw Lira Ensemble 





Enjoy Our 
Peaceable Kingdom 
Holiday Festival 



Make The Field Museum part of your holiday tradition! 
Our Peaceable Kingdom Festival offers fun for the entire family 
with music reflecting cultures throughout Chicago and around the 
world. Enjoy performances from Polish-American, Mexican- 
American and African-American choruses. 
Saturday- Sunday, Dec. 22-23, ll,am-3pm 
Wednesday, Dec. 26, llam-3pm 
FREE with Museum admission 



NOV/DEC 2001 



Family Workshops 



Fossil Fun for Families 



Dr. lVef7dYfa)'hT,TFM G^^ hept. 

Delve into the fascinating world of fossils 

You'll get to see and touch 

fossils from around the world, 

make fossil impressions, handle 

life-size dinosaur models 

and much more. 

Families unth children ages 6-10 A 

Saturday, Nov. 3, 10 -Ham ^^ 

SiO. members $8 



Literary Reading 




Killing Indians: Myths, Lies and 
Exaggerations, by Sherman Alexie 




World of ' 



-.J, c»..:^j- 



e unique voice and social commentary of writer Sherman 
..J, whom The New Yorker lauded as one of the top writers of 
21st century. A Spokane/Coeur d'Alene Native American from 
...shington, Alexie has received critical acclaim for his fiction, 
)oetry and screenwriting. Alexie's first screenplay, Smoke Signals, 
A/as honored with the 1998 Sundance Film Festival's Audience 
Award and Filmmaker's Trophy and is further distinguished as the 
first feature film ever produced, written and directed by Native 
iAmericans. 

Friday, Nov. I6,6:30pm p — 

students /educators $18, members $15 \ 




Below is a calendar of current and upcoming temporary exhibitions. 

Some dates may change. Remember to call 312.922.9410 or visit our website for specific information. 



Sigmund Freud: Conflict and Culture 

Through December 9, 2001 



In Her Hands: Craftswomen 
Changing the World 

Through January 13, 2002 



Cheyenne Visions 

Through February 17, 2002 



Behind the Scenes? 



Dr. David IVillardf 

TFM Division of Birds 

After a busy summer of bird watching, do you have a notebool< full 

of observations? Go behind the scenes to view our amazing bird 

collection and compare notes with Field IVluseum scientists. You'll 

learn how bird scientists conduct their research and what local 

birds are planning for the winter. 

Families with children grades 1 and up 

Friday, Nov. 9, 6-8prn 

S -15, members $12 



During Your Visit 



Story 



Listen to a story, sing songs and make an art project to 
take home — all in just 20 minutes! Meets in the Living 
Together exhibition. 

Families with young children 

One adult for every three children, please. 

Saturdays and Sundays, 1pm 

Daily from Dec. 26—30 and Jan. 2-6 

FREE with Museum admission 

This program is sponsored by the Siragusa Foundation Early Childhood initiative. 



Lectures 



Becoming Human and Beyond Conference 

Leading thinkers will explore how new research from the 

Human Genome Project, robotics, neuroscience, paleontology 

and artificial intelligence affects our humanity. 

Nov. 1-3 

$210, members of American Association for the Advancement 

of Science or The Field Museum $180, students $150 

Visit www.aaas.org/spp/dser/becominglmman.httrjfor more details. 

Co-organized by The Field Museum and the Program of Dialogue on Science, Ethics 
and Religion of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. 



Adult Fieldtrips 



Ethnic Chicago 

Dr. Irving Cutler, Professor Emeritus, Chicago State University 
Explore the past and present of some of Chicago's most vibrant 
ethnic communities, including Maxwell Street, Greektown, 
Bridgeport, Chinatown, Pilsen and Wicker Park. 

Saturday, Nov. 17, 9am-4:30pni 
$60, members $50 
Lunch included. 



A Tale of Two Histories: Early States in Japan 

New Discoveries Series 

Professor Gina Barnes, University of Durham, England 

Compare two divergent historical accounts of the political 
and social currents running through Japan in the third 
through fifth centuries — a turning point on the road to 
state formation. 

Saturday, Nov. 17, 2pm 

$12, students /educators $10, members $8 

This lecture is part of the Boone Lecture Series on East Asian Anthropology and 
Culture, named after Commander Gilbert Boone and Katharine Phelps Boone, 
who endowed the series and gave the IVluseum an extraordinary collection of 
Japanese art and material culture. 




Cleopatra of Egypt: 
From History to Myth 

Through March 3, 2002 



Chocolate 

February 14-September 8, 2002 



The Tiniest Giants: 
Discovering Dinosaur Eggs 

March 15~September 2, 2002 






Experience life as the 
Pawnee Native Americans 
lived out on the Great Plains. 
Docents help bring history to life 
in this full-size replica of a traditiona 
Pawnee lodge. 

Saturdays and Sundays, lOam- 4:30pm 
Weekdays, 1pm 



The Museum offers a variety of hands-on activities to 
make your family's visit special. Dissect an owl pellet, 
see your name written in hieroglyphs and more! Check 
the information desk for details on the day of your visit. 



Cultural Connections 

Travel to area museums to celebrate cultural diver- 
sity. Pre-registration is required; call 312.665.7474. 

Lithuanian Folk Songs: The Soul of Lithuania 
At the Balzekas Museum of Lithuanian Culture 

6500 S. Pulaski Rd. 

Hear the Knights of Lithuania chorus and learn about the 
history and impact of the oldest Lithuanian organization in 
the United States. 

Saturday, Nov. 17, noon— 2pm or 4— 6pm (select one) 
$17, members $15 , i I | 

Parallels Between Us— A Joint Evenki 

; 1 !  

At the Mexican Fine Arts Center Museum 

1852 W. 19th St. 

Discover how the experience of being colonized by Spain has shaped 

the traditions of Mexico and the Philippines in similar ways. The 

Mexican Fine Arts Center Museum and Filipino American 

Historical Society of Chicago are partnering on this event. 

Saturday, Dec. 1 

noon- 2pm or 4— 6pm (select one) 

$17, members $15 



JWRD K LOESCH/WEXNER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS 
1 - - 



Filipinos 
IN Chicago 



sft 



fi .>*»v 




Books such as this arc an important 
way of passing on cultural heritage, 
which is the theme of the December 
Cultural Connections event. 



«r 




Julie Taymor: Playing with Fire 



11 trough .\'or. 4, 2001 



General Museum Information: 312.922.9410; Family and Adult Program Information and Tickets: 312.665.7400 



The following activities are free with Museum admission. 



Hear the stories behind our fascinating exhibitions 
on a daily Highlights Tour. Also watch for tours of 
Inside Ancient Egypt and Eskimos and Northwest 
Coast Indians. 



Bring your own materials and get tips from artists and 
scientific illustrators as they create artwork inspired by 
our exhibitions. 

Euery third Saturday of the month, 1 lani-2piii 



Meet Field Museum scientists and see rarely 
displayed specimens from our collections. 

Ei'ery second Saturday of the month, 1 iam-2pm 



Field Museum 
Unveils Chocolate! 

Feb. i 4- Sept. 8, 2002 

Next Valentine's Day, The Field Museum wil 
unveil Chocolate, a new traveling exhibition 
developed and built completely by the 
Museum's exhibitions department. 

Immerse yourself in the story of a rainforest 
treasure as you take a sweet journey for all 
ages — from the rainforest to the civilization 
of the ancient Maya, from 16th century 
Europe to a modern-day 
candy factory. 

Chocolate will reveal facets 
of this luscious treat that 
you've never thought about 
before. 




ocdia\e 





Plan now for the Unwrapping Chocolate series. 

Examine the plants, products, history and culture of chocolate 
in Unwrapping Chocolate: Culture and History, a series of 
public programs on Tuesday evenings from Feb. 19 to April 
23, 2002. Unwrapping Chocolate combines the breadth and 
depth of a college course with the flexibility to tailor the 

studies around your interests and schedule. 
Enjoy this program as a lecture series, or 
enroll in the complete course, which also 
includes readings, assignments and discus- 
sion labs through the University of Illinois 
at Chicago. 

Chocolate and its national tour were developed by The Field 
Museum, Chicago. This project was supported, in part, by 
the National Science Foundation. 



Extraordinary sets, masks and costumes wilI^|||||||||||||||||WBation. Discover how Julie Taymor, best 
known for her direction of Disney's The Lion King on Broadway and the feature film Titus, integrates 
diverse cultural traditions to create spectacular theater. 

Julie Taymor. Playing with Fire was organized by the Wexner Center for the Arts at The Ohio State University. This exhibition and its national tour are made possible by Ford l/Iotor Company. 
Major support is also provided by Agnes Gund and Daniel Shapiro, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, and PricewalerhouseCoopers. 



Field Museum 
Stores Offer 
Something for 
Everyone 



■'^frj-^vyn 




, , \\ i II II II P 1. 1) (^ 1  I) i '• 

-jmimcmmmmntm 




This holiday season, visit The Field Museum Stores 
for a variety of new and unique gifts to delight 
every person on your list. 

You'll find a full line of Cleopatra-inspired and Egyptian treasures. 
For an elegant, personalized gift, look for pendants that display a 
person's name in hieroglyphs and symbolize long life and good 
luck. Art lovers will enjoy reproductions of Egyptian art on 
authentic papyrus paper Also select from a variety of intriguing 
books and other one-of-a-kind accessories. 

In honor of the world's most famous T. rex, the store is adding 
new Sue merchandise. Look for umbrellas, plush backpacks, 
handcrafted Sue ornaments from Poland and reproductions of 
Sue watercolor paintings created by Museum artist-in-residence 
Peggy Macnamara. As always, the store also carries an array 
of fun and educational dinosaur toys. 

Also look for our exclusive Curator's Choice items. While 
conducting research around the world, Museum anthropologists 
personally select ceramics, baskets, carvings and other merchan- 
dise from the local artisans they meet. This fall, look for pottery 
from the Shandong Province in China. Every Curator's Choice 



J WEINSTEIN/GN8879i 



piece comes with a label providing background information, such 
as date, locality, artist information and how the item relates to 
The Field Museum's current archaeological work. 

Members regularly receive a 10 percent discount on all 
purchases. On Dec. 1, 2 and 3, the Museum is offering members a 
20 percent discount. For more information, call 312.665.7694. 



CLEOPATRA 



i'l 



EGYPT 



The Museum Stores 
will feature a variety of 
Cleopatra-related items 
and Egyptian treasures, 
including this exhibition 
catalogue. 



\ 






1 



From 

HISTORY 

TO 
MYTH 






Hours: 9am-5pm daily. Closed Christmas and New Year's Day. 

To get tickets: Cleopatra of Egypt; From History to Myth and Julie Taymor: Playing 
with Fire are specially ticketed exhibitions. 

Member passes can be reserved in advance by calling Ticketmaster at 312.902.1500 
(service charges apply) or coming to the membership desk near the Museum's south 
entrance (no service charges). Non-member tickets can also be reserved in advance 
through Ticketmaster or at the Museum's will call desks. 

Day-of tickets are available at the Museum, while supplies last. 

Information: 312.922.9410 orwww.fieldmuseum.org 



^'""^^B 



14 



IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 



SCIENTIST'SPICK 




Fit for gods of enormous might, muslirooms of Macrocybe titans are among the largest of any 
fungus. This specimen, three feet in diameter and nearly 16 pounds when fresh, grew out of 
an abandoned leaf-cutter ant nest. It was collected as part of the Costa Rican National 
Fungus Inventory, an international project coordinated by Gregory M. Mueller, chair of The 
Field Museum's botany department. The mushroom is probably poisonous to humans, and the 
strong cyanide odor it emits indicates there may be an internal toxin keeping fungi-favoring 
critters away — hence its unstoppable titanic size. 

The project, which is the largest, most comprehensive inventory of tropical fungi ever 
attempted, is designed to answer questions about fungi diversity, distribution and biology. 
In addition to his international leadership, Mueller also manages the research group focusing 
on mushrooms and other macrofungi for the inventory The Field's own Sabine Huhndorf and 
Fernando Fernandez are studying ascomycetes, small fungi that appear as black dots on wood 
and may aid in decomposition, and Robert Lucking works with lichens. Together, Field 
Museum mycologists and their students cover most major groups of fungi. 

To learn more, visit www. inbio.ac.cr/papers/gt_hongos/en/index.htm. Gregory M. Mueller, 
curator of mycology and chair of the botany department, chose this Scientist's Pick specimen. 



NOV/DEC 2001 I 15 



INTHE FIELD FEATURE 




Tlw hind leg of 
Haasiophis 



Olivier Rieppel, Chair, Department of Geology 
Photos by Mark Widlialm 

It has been called a paleontological "hot potato." Two groups of scientists have come 
to very different conclusions about the origin of snakes from looking at the same set of 
fossils. One says they evolved from land animals, and the other claims they descended 
from seafaring ancestors. It is complicated to determine which combination of facts 
and philosophy will prevail, but let's look at where Field Museum scientists stand. 



Setting the stage 

Popular groups such as dinosaurs and their descen- 
dants and relatives evolved during the Mesozoic era 
(250 to 65 million years ago). Less well known are 
the numerous groups of reptiles that entered the 
sea. In the Cretaceous period, the last part of the 
Mesozoic era, a group related to today's monitor 
lizards, called mosasauroids, adapted to the sea. Early 
representatives were small, elongated creatures with 
a long neck and tail and smaU limbs. Toward the 
end of the Cretaceous period, the mosasaurs had 
arrived amongst the largest predators of the sea 
before they became extinct. 

The lower jaw of mosasaurs is unique among 
lizards in two ways. First, the front tips of the 
mandibles meet in a highly mobile contact. Second, 
each mandible has an inner joint between the front 
tooth-bearing bone and more posterior elements. In 
the 1870s, E.D. Cope explained that this structure 
allowed mosasaurs to engulf large prey. He classified 
them in a group he called Pythonomorpha and 



found them to be related to snakes. 

The sea, however, is not the only environment 
for lizards with an elongated body and small limbs. 
Many land-dwelling lizards that live in loose sand, 
open grassland, under leaf litter or in self-con- 
structed tunnel systems show similar adaptations. 
Some authors, therefore, have sought the ancestors 
of snakes among such land-dwelling lizard groups. 
In 1940, G.L.Wall published his groundbreaking 
observation on the embryological development of 
a snake's eye, which differs from that of a lizard in 
profound ways. Some lizard ancestor would have 
adapted to a secretive (hiding), nocturnal or even 
burrowing life, correlated with an elongation of 
the body, reduction or loss of external limbs and a 
reduction of the eye. In the snake descendants, the 
eye would have redeveloped completely, but in ways 
that difier from the eye of lizards. This hypothesis was 
backed up again in 1973 when two scientists found 
that the optic centers in the brains of hzards and 
snakes differ in their embryonic developinent. 



^ 



IN THE FIELD 



A debate begins 

The stage was thus set for conflicting hypotheses 
of snake origins. Do snakes descend from marine 
mosasauroids or from secretive, nocturnal or even 
burrowing lizard ancestors? Our current under- 
standing of snake evolution would seem to favor 
the latter hypothesis since today's primitive groups, 
such as blind snakes, thread snakes, pipe snakes and 
shield-tails, are either burrowing or secretive and 
have a limited capability to engulf large prey. 

As one climbs up the evolutionary tree, snakes' 
feeding mechanics become more sophisticated, and 
they can eat prey that is larger than the diameter of 
their head. These boas, pythons and more advanced 
snakes are called Macrostomata, or big-mouthed 
snakes. When a python eats, the lower jaw primarily 
secures the prey in place while the upper jaw 
"walks" across the prey and pulls it into the esopha- 
gus. This, however, contrasts with Cope's earlier 
theory that he used to support snakes' relationship 
to mosasaurs (of the sea), which placed emphasis 
on the lower jaw's function in feeding. 

And then along came... 

In the 1 970s, a zoology professor at Jerusalem's 
Hebrew University, George Haas, befriended Arab 
families that quarried limestone near 'Ein Yabrud 
in the Judean. This limestone, deposited in a shallow 
marine environment about 93 million years ago, 
was rich in fossils, including fishes, turtles and 
the occasional early mosasauroid and snake. Haas 
purchased many of these fossils for his collection, 
yet never expected to come across fossil snakes with 
well-developed hind limbs. All primitive snakes, 
including boas and pythons, still retain rudiments 
of the pelvic girdle and femur, but not almost-com- 
plete limbs as those found in the 'Ein Yabrud fossils. 

Haas had spent a lifetime studying land lizards 
and snakes in search of snake origins, but now he 
had pulled snakes with almost-complete hind limbs 
from the sea (figuratively speaking)! His last publi- 
cations reflect his bewilderment and unwilHngness 
to concede that snakes might have had a marine 
origin after all. Haas died during the process of 
describing the second of the two species he had 
in his collection. 

Picking up where Haas left off 

In 1997, M.S.Y. Lee and M.W. Caldwell re- 
described Pachyrliacliis, the first fossil snake from 
'Ein Yabrud, as a snake rather than a snake-like 
mosasauroid. Based on its well-developed hind 
Umbs, they postulated that Pachyrliacliis is not only 
the most primitive snake known, but also the link 
between snakes and mosasaurs, a link that implies 
a marine origin of snakes. 



I co-wrote a detailed study pubhshed in 
Fieldiaiia,The Field Museum's scientific journal, that 
severely criticized their conclusions. I have also 
joined forces with other scientists who work 
on the 'Ein Yabrud mosasauroids. Together we 
described the second species Haas had in his collec- 
tion, which we named Haasiopkis in his honor. As 
the best-preserved specimen, it documents beyond 
all doubts a macrostomatan skull similar to that of 
a boa and python. But what about the well-devel- 
oped hind limbs? 

Two interpretations are possible. If Pachyrhachis 
and Haasiopbis are primitive, representing the root 
of the family tree of snakes and the link to marine 
mosasauroids, then the skull structure and jaw 
mechanics characteristic of macrostomatan snakes 
must have evolved twice, once in these fossils and 
again in macrostomatans.The intermediate groups 
of snakes would have lost the macrostomatan skuU 
structure to adapt to a secretive or burrowing 
mode of life. 

If, on the other hand, Pachyrhachis and Haasiopkis 
are classified as macrostomatan snakes, their hind 
limb may have re-developed from rudiments like 
those seen in boas and pythons. But lizards have lost 
their limbs multiple times throughout evolution, 
and it is also quite possible that snakes did so, too. 

If snakes are of terrestrial origin, their fossil 
record could be rather poor; fossilization happens 
less frequently on land than in the sea. The 
Mesozoic record of fossil snakes is woefuOy 
incomplete, indeed, and one could 
speculate that a variety of 
Mesozoic snake lineages 
that may have had well 
developed hind limbs 
remain unknown. 



Limits of a 
scientific debate 

With journals such 
as Nature and Science 
involved, the debate on 
Pachyrhachis and Haasiophis 
has gained prominence in 
vertebrate paleontology. At 
this time it seems that the debate 
has stalled, and that there is no alter 
native but to agree to disagree. Both Maureen 
Kearney from the Museum's amphibians and rep- 
tiles division and I are not satisfied with this state 
of affairs. The task at hand is to go to the root 
of the problem and try to understand how the 
language of science is threatening to break 
down. The answer may lie in empirical research 
as much as in the philosophy of science. ITF 




Tlw fossil snake 
Haasiophis /rem the 
mid-Cretaceous period, 
found in the Judean. The 
arrow indicates where the 
hind leg on page 1 6 is 
located. 



NOV/DEC 2001 



OFSPECIALINTEREST 



Making Connections and Stayi ng C onnected 

Laura F. Nelson, Writer 




The Annual Fund and 
Founders' Council provide 
unrestricted support to 
programs such as turtle 
conservation in South 
America. Here, Roberto 
Aguinda (left) and a 
member of a neighboring 
village in Ecuador review 
a book that the Museum 
co-created with the Cofan. 



There are countless ways that friends and supporters 
come to The Field Museum. Many approach it with 
a sense of scholarly yearning, others with intrigue. 
Others want to support the great work that is done 
at the Museum every day. 
They may start off as mem- 
bers, increase to The Annual 
Fund level (annual contribu- 
tions of $100 and above) and 
eventually build remarkable 
associations through The 
Founders' Council (annual 
contributions of $1,500 and 
above). Whatever the level of 
giving, every gift helps sustain 
the operations of this vast 
institution. 

Giving to The Annual 
Fund or Founders' Council 
gives you greater exposure 
to collections, research and 
exhibitions. It also increases 
the opportunity for more 
personalized learning, 
specialized giving, program 
involvement and one-on-one relationships. 

Cary Malkin, chair ofThe Founders' Council, 
initially became intrigued when former Museum 
President Sandy Boyd introduced him to world- 
class scholars doing significant independent research 
both at the Museum and in its name. As a strong 
supporter, Malkin says, "The opportunity to meet 
and visit with these scholars is just fantastic." 

As a member of The Founders' Council, Patricia 
Schnadig says the Museum's scientific side is what 
"the public often doesn't see — building a collection, 
the years of work behind each exhibition and devel- 
opment of programs from the ground up. There is 
more to the Museum than the public space." 
Schnadig's personal connection came through 



giving to the Field Dreams program of the Women's 
Board, which is a wish hst of departmental projects 
that need funding. It includes everything from a 
color printer to equipment for a field laboratory in 
China. Schnadig chose to support conservation and 
environmental work through the Cofan turde 
preservation project in Ecuador. (See www.fieldmu- 
seum.org or the Nov/Dec 2000 In the Field for 
more information.) Schnadig says she has "never 
worked with people who are so generous with their 
time in every department. The more involved you 
are, the more exposed you are to curators and 
scientists. It is an ongoing education." 

Jean Carton participates and supports in many 
capacities. "The interactions and relationships that 
develop between the curators and the volunteers, 
and therefore with the public, are wonderful," she 
says. Carton makes a connection by looking for 
magical ways to bring facts to our audiences. To this 
end she helped develop scavenger hunts throughout 
the Museum. Families can try to find a dik-dik in 
the Africa exhibition, or discover "How hot is 
lava?" "Scavenger hunts teach awareness, point of 
view and height perspective," she says. "You can't 
talk to a 3-year-old about a giraffe's eyes — they're 
too high up. But ask them to look for their feet or 
knees? The child will connect." 

Malkin, Schnadig and Carton have these experi- 
ences because they give, and through giving, they 
learn firsthand how their contribution has helped 
the institution. Personal learning experiences send 
financial supporters on an open-ended journey 
fiDed with opportunities for new perspective. 

Participating in The Annual Fund or Founders' 
Council strengthens the Museum's mission to offer 
education, exhibition and research programs. 
"There are not too many places in the world hke 
the Field — they can be counted on one hand," says 
Malkin. "It is important that this institution receive 
the support it needs to keep its mission alive." 



How can I be a part of The Annual Fund? 

Contributing to The Annual Fund gives you tine opportunity to furtiier support the Field beyond the cost 
of membership. A minimum gift of $100 or more will give you a 1-year family membership in addition to 
invitations to exclusive programs and preview/s, based on your level of giving. 

Please use the enclosed envelope if you w/ould like to mail in a year-end contribution. Contributions can 
be made by cash, check, credit card or appreciated securities. A matching gift from your company could 
double your contribution and place you at a higher level. Please check with your employer to see if it 
provides this opportunity. 

For more information, please contact Heather Scott at 312.665.7784. 



IN THE FIELD 



OFSPECIAL INTEREST 



Amphibian Rpsparrher Wins Conservatinn 



Because their skin is permeable to water and the 
grunge found in it, amphibians are excellent 
bioindicators. Their abundance and health point 
to the quality of a habitat. But the recent dramatic 
decline in amphibian numbers, along with an 
increase in frog malformations, has many scientists 
hopping for answers. 

Dr. Michael Lannoo received the Parker/Gentry 
Award in September for his research and public 
education eftbrts on amphibian well-being. His 
environmental work covers many fronts: researcher, 
author, university professor, featured Discovery.com 
expert, biodiversity advocate and conservation 
biologist. As the U.S. coordinator for a task force 
estabhshed by the World Conservation Union. 
Lannoo and his colleagues have documented several 
factors that contribute to declining and malformed 
populations — habitat destruction, ultraviolet-B 
radiation, parasites and pesticides, to name a few. 

Most of Lannoo's studies are concentrated 
in the Upper Midwest, which has become one 
of two U.S. hotspots for amphibian malformation. 
Clearing and draining the land for agriculture in 
the early 20th century was a major contribution to 
amphibian decline. "For every leopard frog we see 
today, there were probably 100 to 1,000 more alive 



100 years ago," he says. Regarding 
malformations, missing limbs and 
bizarre outgrowths are the most 
common ones seen. Disfigured 
animals do not live long; they are 
either predated or die quickly 
because of their inability to move 
normally. "The grossest of these 
malformations were not even 
conceivable 10 years ago. What 
will it be like in another 10 years?" 

Lannoo is a full professor with 
joint appointments at the Indiana University 
School of Medicine and Ball State University. 
He also enjoys a summer appointment at the Iowa 
Lakeside Laboratory. 

Tlie Parker / Gentr]' Award, presented amiually by Hie 
Founders' Council, honors an outstatiding individual or 
i^roup whose efforts have made a significant, practical impact 
on preserving the world's rich natural heritage, and whose 
actions serve as a model for others. Tlie award is named 
for the late Tlieodore A. Parker III, an ornithologist, and 
Alwyn H. Gentry, a botanist, who both died on Aug. 3, 
1993, while surveying hill forests in western Ecuador. Go 
to wwu'.fieldmuseum.org/parkergentryfor more information. 




Leopard frog with an 
extra appendage off 
its hack left knee 



New Dinosaur Expert Already L eavin g Footprints 



Jokingly called a "15-foot-long, 700-pound 
duck," a weU-preserved, 70-miUion-year- 
old fossil found last summer has solved the 
mystery of what an ostrich-like dinosaur 
ate and where it lived. 

Dr. Peter Makovicky, The Field 
Museum's new assistant curator of 
dinosaurs, unearthed Gallimimus bullatus 
in the Gobi Desert during an expedition 




conducted by the American Museum 
of Natural History (AMNH) and the 
Mongolian Academy of Sciences. A thin, 
comb-like structure on its beak — never 
seen before — is similar to the filter-feed- 
ing beak of a contemporary duck. 
Gallimimus is an ornithomimid, a fast-run- 
ning, bird-like dinosaur with a small head 
and long tail. Ornithomimids belong to 
theropods, the carnivorous dinosaurs that 
include Tyrannosaurus rex. The crux is that 
they are toothless. 

Whereas previous theories showed 
Gallimimus chasing animals or browsing 
through trees, this discovery indicates that 
it may have strained tiny invertebrates and 
other food particles from water and sedi- 
ment. It stood about seven feet tall and 15 
feet long — large to be slurping up minis- 
cule portions from the bottom of a pond. 
Makovicky s find, not fully grown, is about 
half that size. 

Caked in sand, Makovicky s team was 
about to head home when they discovered 



a near perfectly articulated tail that contin- 
ued into the rock. Many dinosaurs are 
found in what is called the "classic death 
pose," in which their neck tendons dry out 
and the head is pulled back over the hips. 
This Gallimimus apparently fell whole into 
still water, was buried quickly in mud or 
sand and remained undisturbed; almost all 
of its bones touched the way they would 
have in Hfe. 

Makovicky, who joined the Field 
from AMNH, co-authored a paper in 
Nature with Dr. Philip Currie, curator of 
dinosaurs at the Royal Tyrrell Museum 
of Palaeontology in Alberta, and Dr. Mark 
Norell, a curator and chair of paleontol- 
ogy at the AMNH. The beaks of the two 
fossils described, Gallimimus and 
Ornithomimus edmontonicus, probably con- 
sisted of keratin, the same material found 
in human hair and fingernails. Makovicky, 
the Fields first fulltime dinosaur expert, 
will be building the Museum's dinosaur 
collection. 



^ The skull of Gallimimus bullatus and the rare soft tissue that indicates it was a filter feeder 



NOV/DEC 2001 



19 



FROMTHE ARCHIVES 



The Accide ntal Collector 



Mark Schweitzer, Special Projects Coordinator, Institutional Adi'ancement 



Austin Rand, former 
curator of birds, inquisi- 
tively studies the huia 
specimen that he acciden- 
tally discovered in the 
collections area. 



To excel in any field, you need commitment, ability 
and expertise. But even the most accomplished pro- 
fessional will admit that a little serendipity now and 
then doesn't hurt. This is as true in collecting speci- 
mens for science as it is anywhere else. 

Consider the experience of Austin Rand, former 
curator of birds. In 1948, he wrote, "Birds are where 
you find them — if luck is with you." He meant that 
a collector would welcome chance, in addition to 
scientific know-how, when searching for specimens 
out in the field. He may not have imagined that 
luck could help him within range of his own office. 
Four years later, he described an extinct bird that 
was added to the collection "not through expedi- 
tion, not through long correspondence, local 
collection, or exchange, but by accident . . . sitting 
on a shelf, overlooked, in a corner of the Museum." 

Heteralocha acutirostris, or huia, is one of about 
three species of wattled, starling-like birds fi-om 
New Zealand. While the two other species are 
represented in the collections, Rand thought the 
Museum might never acquire a huia. One day he 
noticed some materials in a dim corner of the 
collections area, including a dark, pigeon-sized bird 




with a long, curved bill. Rand had found his 
huia without even having to leave the building. 
The specimen was probably collected during the 
Museum's earliest days and never catalogued. 
"Now, it goes into our study collection, where ... 
it wiO remain . . . available for comparison and 
study," Rand said. 

Sometimes the specimen finds the collector. 
In 1938, a Cooper's hawk crashed through a third- 
floor window. Staff members tried to pick up the 
stunned hawk, but it revived and led them on a 
wild chase. The hawk eventually joined the N.W. 
Harris Public School Extension program as a live 
educational specimen. More recently, David Willard, 
collections manager in the birds division, recalls a 
peregrine falcon that chased a mallard into the 
Museum's west entrance. The duck died from the 
impact and became part of the collections. 

Animals are not the only research specimens 
that come calling at our door. In 1981, botany staff 
members discovered a Gastrocyhe lateria mushroom 
growing near the building's west entrance. 
Department Chairman Gregory Mueller said it 
was only the second recording of this species 
growing east of the Rocky Mountains. "The only 
explanation I could think of was that the spores 
must have come to the Museum on someone's 
feet." he said. "When you see things that are that 
far out of their range, they are often thought to be 
dispersed by birds. But people carry things around 
on them, too." 

Mueller also recollects that in 1983, the Museum 
received a shipment of plant materials from Bolivia. 
"We thought they'd come in ordinary cardboard 
boxes, but instead, they came in these great baskets," 
he said. "They were made of palm, and some were 
even babies' cribs." The delivery unexpectedly 
brought several fine examples of economic botany, 
which studies how humans use plant materials for 
food, medicine, textiles, shelter and other important 
needs. "So, in addition to the new plants for the 
herbarium, we accessioned the baskets into our 
Timothy C. Plowman economic botany collec- 
tions," Mueller said. 

Austin Rand's words may ring true in perhaps 
hundreds of other stories throughout the Museum's 
research and exhibition halls. Sometimes specimens 
are where you find them — if luck is with you. 



MEMBERSHIPNEWS 



Double Discount Shopping Days 



Whether you're buying for kin, colleagues or comrades, The Field Museum Stores 
are a sure thing for holiday gifts. 

On Dec. 1, 2 and 3, take advantage of a members' double discount — 20 percent off all merchandise, 
including special Cleopatra-related items, handcrafted gifts, educational toys, books, jewelry and festive 
souvenirs. Remember to bring your membership card. 

The store is open daily from 10am to 5pm. For more information, call 312.665.7694. 



Children's Holiday Celebration 



It's a dazzling sight — tiny lights cascading the walls, talents of al 
of eager children donning their holiday best. 



sorts and hundreds 



On Wednesday, Dec. 5, from 4 to 6:30pm, member families are invited to the Women's Board's annual 
Children's Holiday Celebration. Come celebrate cultural diversity and enjoy festive food, entertainment 
and educational craft-making activities. 

Keep your eyes open for Santa Claus and a merry elf. Other performers include the Stu Hirsh 
Orchestra,Jessie White Tumblers, Ballet Chicago Studio Company, Chicago Children's Choir, Mr. 
Imagination and stilt walkers and jugglers. 

Reservations are hmited, and tickets wiU not be sold at the door. For tickets call 312.665.7135. 



Calendar Announcement 







For years it has been our great pleasure to give you an annual calendar, yet we are sad to announce that, 
for now, it will no longer be published. Rising costs in paper, printing and production have made it too 
expensive to offer as a free gift. We thank our previous sponsors and those members who expressed 
gratitude and admiration for the calendar, and we hope you continue to enjoy other benefits that 
membership at The Field Museum provides. 



U.S. Postal Service Statement of Ownership, Management and Circulation 


1. In the Field 


15. Extent and nature of circulation 


Average no. copies 


No. copies of 


2 898940 




each issue during 


single issue 


3. Oct. 1, 2001 




preceding 12 
months 


published nearest 
to filing date 


4. Bimonthly 

5. Six 


A. Total no. copies 


55,395 


53,000 


6. $20 

7. Amy E. Cranch, 312.665.7115, 

The Field Museum, 1400 South Lake 


B. Paid and/or requested circulation 

1. Outside-county subscriptions 

2. In-county subscriptions 

3. Sales through dealers, carriers, street 


20,819 
26,500 
None 


20,370 
25,217 
None 


Shore Drive, Chicago, Cool< County, 
IL 60605-2496 (same for nos. 8, 9 


vendors, counter sales and other non- 
USPS paid distribution 






and 10) 


4. Other classes mailed through USPS 


24 


34 


11. None 


C. Total paid and/or requested circulation 


47,343 


45,621 


12. Has not changed during preceding 


D. Free distribution by mail 






12 months 


1. Outside-county 


470 


536 


13. In the Field 

14. Sept. 1, 2001 

16. November/December 2001 

17. I certify that all information fur- 
nished is true and complete, /s/ Amy 


2. In-county 

3. Other classes mailed through USPS 

E. Free distribution outside the mail 

F. Total free distribution 

G. Total distribution 


3,111 
55 

4,341 

7,977 

55,395 


4,226 
46 

2,506 

7,314 

53,000 


E. Cranch, Editor, In the Field 


H. Copies not distributed 


75 


65 




I. Total 


55,395 


53,000 




J. Percent paid and/or requested circulation 


85.58 


86.07 








NOV/DEC 2001 HHHj 



Field Museum Tours at a Glance 




For information, call Field Museum Tours at 800.811.7244 or email fmtours@sover.net. Please note that 
rates, prices and itineraries are subject to change and that prices are per person, double occupancy. 



Amazon by Riverboat 

Dec. 1-9, 2001, or Jan. 18-26, 2003 
(9 days) 

Explore the Amazon, Ucayali and 
Tapiche Riven in Peru for eight days 
aboard a 1 4-cabin riverboat. Search 
for river dolphins; howler, squirrel 
and capuchin monkeys; sloths; and 
capybaras, plus unusual birds such 
as the jabiru and hoatzin. Optional 
extension to Machu Picchu, the 
magnificent archaeological sites 
around Cuzco. 

Leaders: Botanist William Burger (2001) 
and zoologist Barr]' Chcriioff (2003) 
Price: $3, 890, including round-trip 
airfare from Miami (Dec.) 

Mysteries of Earth: 

An Expedition by Private Jet 

Jan. 20-Feh. 13 or Feb. 14-Marcli 10, 
2002 (25 days) 

Embark on a once-in-a-hfetime 
journey to the world's most remote 
habitats: the vast flora and fauna of 
the Amazon; volcanic Canars^ 
Islands; great apes of Borneo; annual 
migration in Tanzania: wildlife of 
Nepal; rare species of the Galapagos; 
undersea life of the Great Barrier 
Reef; moai of Easter Island; tribal 
cultures of Papua Nev\' Guinea; the 
Seychelles; and Samoa. 
Leaders: Social scientist Michael 
Shermer (Jan.) and geologist 
Wayne Ramiey (Feb.) 
Price: $36,950, including airfare from 
Miami and return to Washington, D.C., 
on a first class, 88-seat priuate jet 



Tanzania Migration Safari 

Feb. 1—14 (wait-listed) or Feb. 
19-March 4, 2002 (14 days) 

Travel at the best time of year 
to see the spectacular herds of 
the Serengeti Plains. Hundreds of 
thousands of wildebeest and tens 
of thousands of zebras and antelope 
amass in this area each year, 
attended by lions, cheetahs, hyenas 
and other predators. Enjoy four 
days in the Serengeti, then three 
days at Ngorongoro Crater. 
Zanzibar extension available. 
Leaders: Zoologists Bill Stanley 
and Mary Anne Rogers (first trip) 
and David H 'illard and Tom 
Gnoske (second trip) 
Price: $6,245, not including airfare 

Nature and Civilization 
in the Mediterranean 

April 6-20, 2002 (15 days) 

Enjoy ancient sites and natural 
history on a 1 5-day voyage aboard 
an all-suite, 88-passenger yacht. In 
Greece, explore Athens, Chios, 
Patmos, Rhodes, Santorini. 
Heraklion and Knossos on Crete, 
Delphi, Dodoni, and the bird-life 
and wedands of the Ambracian 
Gulf. Experience Kotor, 
Montenegro, on the Adriatic Coast; 
and conclude your voyage with a 
day in Venice, Italy. 
Leader: Anthropologist Damd Reese 
Price: $7,945 and higher, 
not ittcluding airfare 



April 21-May 2, 2002 (12 days) 

Circumnavigate Crete on a luxuri- 
ous 34-passenger yacht, and discover 
the wonders of the Minoans. Visit 
the magnificent palaces of Knossos, 
Phaestos, MaUia and Kato Zakros, 
and the ruins of Gortyn and Lato. 
Tour the Heraklion Museum, his- 
toric Chania and the monasteries of 
Toplu and Preveh, and drive through 
beaudflil Kourtahoriko Gorge. 
Leaders: Anthropologist David Reese 
Price: $5, 195 and higher, 
not including airfare 

Galapagos Islands Adventure 

July 5-15,2002 (11 days) 

Journey aboard a comfortable 
20-passenger ship to the astounding 
Galapagos. Home to bird, plant 
and fish species found nowhere 
else on Earth, the archipelago has 
contributed greatly to our knowl- 
edge of evolution, and has remained 
much as it was miOions of years 
ago. Opportunities for up-close 
wildlife encounters are spectacular, 
as animals show httle fear of 
humans. Machu Picchu extension 
available. 

Leader: Botanist Michael Dillon 
Price: $4, 945, not including airfare