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Full text of "In the field : the bulletin of the Field Museum of Natural History"

The Field Museum's Member Publication 



Education's Impact: 
Stories from Chicago, 
Wyoming, China and 



.^dag;ascar 



Scientists Discuss 
Favorite Field Gear 



D 



Winter 
2005-2006 




FKOMTHE PRESIDE NT 



Education : Here and Amund the Globe 




Even long-time Field Museum members sometimes feel overwhelmed by the w/ealth of 
information presented in the Museum's many exhibitions. Next time you visit, consider 
taking advantage of the more than 100 Field Museum docents who await you. These 
volunteers are dedicated to enriching your visit and are trained to help you make the 
most of your time by pointing out exhibition highlights and answering questions. Our 
docent-led tours are a great introduction to the Museum, or a fun way to rediscover 
favorite exhibitions in a structured way. 



Beth Spencer is among 
the innny Field Museum 
docents available to 
enhance your visit. 



The variety of tours includes: 
IVIuseum Highlights — a lool< at 
some of our most popular exhibi- 
tions (weekdays 11am and 2pm, 
weel<ends 11am); Inside Ancient 
Egypt — a tour through our per- 
manent exhibition covering 4,000 
years of fascinating history (weel<- 
days 1pm, weel<ends at noon); 
Pawnee Earth Lodge — a chance 
to experience Native American 
life on the plains (weekdays 
1pm program, weekends 10am 
to 4:30pm); and Plants of the 
World — a view of one of the most 
extensive plant model collections 




in the world where you'll also learn 
about botany research at The Field 
Museum (tour times vary, please 
inquire at the Museum's informa- 
tion desk in Stanley Field Hall 
where all of our tours begin.) 



In addition, we have docents sta- 
tioned on the floor to explain the 
latest scientific discoveries about 
Sue and discuss the intriguing 
history featured in the temporary 
exhibitions. Dinosaur Dynasty 
and Pompeii. (These docents are 
available weekdays 10am to 2pm, 
weekends 10am to 4:30pm.) 

Our docent-led tours are just one 
way The Field Museum reaches 
the public through education. 
Articles in this issue illustrate 
the scope of our role as educa- 
tors — locally, nationally and 
internationally we serve teachers, 
students, the public and the scien- 
tific community. We are making 
a lasting impact through a wide 
variety of programs — from train- 
ing Chicago area teachers how to 
use Museum resources, to helping 
Chinese archaeologists become 
skilled in a more cost and time 
effective method of surveying 
ancient sites. Our cover story tells 
about the Stones and Bones pro- 
gram that takes high school and 
undergraduate college students to 
Wyoming to dig for fossils. Our 
calendar section features many 
educational activities ranging from 
celebrations of African American 
culture, to discussions by National 
Geographic explorers. 




Steven Goodman, PhD. 

.'Je also fea- 
ture an article 
co-authored by 
Steven Goodman, 
PhD, Field 
Museum senior 
field biologist in 
Madagascar. Dr. Goodman and his 
colleagues are helping Malagasy 
conservation biologists emerge 
from the shadows of their mentors 
to play a larger role in studying 
and preserving their country's 
unique biodiversity. In September, 
the John D. and Catherine T. 
MacArthur Foundation announced 
that it had chosen Dr. Goodman 
to be a MacArthur Fellow. He will 
receive $500,000 in "no strings 
attached" support from the foun- 
dation over the next five years. 
MacArthur Fellows are selected 
for their creativity, originality and 
potential. We congratulate Steve 
on this well deserved recognition! 



John W. McCarter, Jr. 
President and CEO 



What do you think about Tn the Field? 



For general membership inquiries, including address changes, call 866.312.2781. For questions about 
the magazine In the Field, call 312.665.7115, email noshea@fmnh.org, or write Nancy O'Shea, Editor, 
The Field Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605-2496. 



IN 



FIELD 



Winter 2005-2006, December- February, 
Vol.77, No. 1 

Editor: 

Nancy O'Shea, The Field Museum 

Design: 

Deptce Design 



Old the Field is printed on recycled paper 
using soy-based inks. All images ©The 
Field Museum unless otherwise specified. 



In the Field (iSSN #1051-4546) is published 
Quarterly by The Field Museum. Copyright 
2005 The Field Museum. Annual subscriptions 
are $20; $10 for schools. Museum membership 
includes In the Field subscription. Opinions 
expressed by authors are their own and do 
not necessarily reflect the policy of The Field 
Museum. Notification of address change should 
include address label and should be sent to 
the membership department. POSTMASTER: 
Send address changes to Membership, The 
Field Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496. Periodicals postage 
paid at Chicago, Illinois. 

Cover: Theodora Gibbs-PlessI w/ields a sledge- 
hammer as she searches for fossils during the 
Stones and Bones program in Wyoming. Top 
inset: John Katahara carries the Stones and 
Bones flag. Bottom inset: Lance Grande, PhD, 
teaches the program. Photos by John Weinstein. 

The Field Museum salutes the people of Chicago 
for their long-standing, generous support of the 
Museum through the Chicago Park District. 



Field 



j: 



fe 



useum 



1400 South Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496 
312.922.9410 
vww.fieldmuseum.org 




The Stones and Bones program takes advanceci 
placement high scliool and undergraduate col- 
lege students to Wyoming to dig for fossils with 
Field Museum paleontologists. 
Top: Stones and Bones stiidenls Irene Ginakakis 
and Madison Kramer. 



4 



A Field Museum scientist has been instrumen- 
tal in developing a program called RAP-Gasy, 
to help Madagascar's new wave of conservation 
biologists. 

Middle: Marie Jeanne Ralierilalao, a RAP-Gasy 
metnlur, curates the bird collection at Madaf^ascar's 
Uuiversite d 'Antananarivo. 



16 



When Museum scientists venture into the 
field, the equipment they pack is vital to the 
success of their work. Read about the things 
they won't leave home without. 
Bottom: Cart W. Dick, PhD, peers through the 
net he uses to capture bats. 



18 



In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 
and other devastating natural disasters, an 
environmentalist and an anthropologist from 
The Field Museum give their thoughts. 



Museum C am pus Neighbors 



Adier Planetarium Lost Spacecraft: Liberty Bell 7 Recovered, a 
special exhibition at the AdIer Planetarium is on display though 
Jan. 8, 2006. See the fully-restored Liberty Bell 7 space capsule, 
learn how astronauts trained for the first NASA missions, experience a 
rocket launch sequence and much more. Don't miss the Adier's Star of 
\Nonder sky show this holiday season. This enduring holiday show takes 
visitors on a magical journey back in time to discover the remarkable 
story behind the "Star of Bethlehem." Now showing in the historic Sky 
Theater through Jan. 1, 2006. For more information, visit www.adler- 
planetarium.org or call 312. 922. STAR. 



Shedd Aquarium Take advantage of Shedd Aquarium's discount 
days, Dec. 10-14, when general admission to the aquarium is free (fees 
do apply 10 Oceanarium and Wild Reef admission). Then, Shedd turns 
into Neptune's HoUday Kingdom, Dec. 16 through Jan. 2, 2006. Kids 
will find an undersea wonderland with special programs, activities and 
crafts. Best of all, they can visit with King Neptune himself and pledge 
to take some action every day to protect Neptune's realm and the rest 
of nature. Holiday events are free with general admission. For more 
information, visitwww.sheddaquarium.org or call 312.939.2438. 



WINTER 2005-2006 i:)ea-mhcr-Fchmtny 



iATURE 





Stones and Bones: Students Learn While 
Working as Paleontologists 

Liwce Grande, PhD, Vice Presidenf, Head of Collections and Research, 
and Curator, Department of Geology, Tlie Field Musetim 

Photos by John Weinstein 



For each of the past two years, I have enjoyed teaching a summer field course to a 
small group of advanced placement high school and undergraduate college students. 
The four-v\/eel< course, called Stones and Bones, is run through the University of 
Chicago and The Field Museum and covers paleontological theory, method and practice. 
Stones and Bones begins at The Field Museum where the students spend a week learn- 
ing about fossil collections and the type of research conducted here. The second two 
weeks are spent in the mountain desert near Kemmerer, Wyoming— one of the world's 
most spectacular fossil sites— where the students participate in hands-on fieldwork. 
Then it's back to The Field Museum, where they finish the program focusing on what U 
done with the collected fossils, including preparation, study and analysis of the material 
and incorporation of the specimens into the permanent Museum collection. 




Tlw 2005 Museum field 
crew in Wyoming includ- 
ing the Stones and Bones 
class. Museum staff and 
ivluniccrs, Dr. Grande 
and his daughter Lauren. 



A Solid, Effective Team Working 
in Spectacular Surroundings 

After a week of intensive class work in Chicago, 
the students are well acquainted with each other 
and the class merges with my regular field crew of 
12 to 16 Museum staff and volunteers. By the time 
we travel to Wyoming and start living and work- 
ing together 24/7, we are 
a solid, effective team that 
works hard, forms close 
bonds and shares unfor- 
gettable experiences. Our 
efforts are well coordinated 
as we tear through slabs of 
solid limestone. Using picks, 
hanmiers, shovels and finally 
brooms, we uncover fossils, 
carefully remove them with 
special saws, and then pack 
them up for shipping back 
to Chicago. The fieldwork portion of the course 
is much more than simply a training exercise. It's 
a real paleontological excavation in an incredible 
mother lode of beautifully preserved 50-million- 
year-old fossils. 

We live at the dig site for two weeks, camp- 
ing together just steps away fixam the fossil quarry 
in one of the most spectacular desert regions of 
the western United States. In the evening, smaller 
groups handle the various duties that go along 
with camping 10 miles from the nearest town. 



The students learn a lot about each other, but 
also about themselves as they take turns serving as 
cooks, dishwashers, and doing all the other jobs that 
transform our group into a temporary community. 
And what a place for our community! Herds of 
pronghorn antelope graze in the valley below, and 
golden eagles, bald eagles, hawks and falcons soar 
above. At night we hear coyotes howling in the val- 
ley and occasionally a mountain lion screams in the 
distance. Daytime temperatures may reach the high 
80s, but after dark it cools considerably — usually 
down into the 30s — making the campfire a natural 
gathering place for the group to discuss the day's 
events and plan for tomorrow. 

Green River Formation Yields Beautifully 
Preserved Fossils 

When we start working in the quarry, we find 
hundreds of fossils each day. Because of a chain 
of highly unusual geological conditions, an entire 
50-million-year-old lake community of extinct 
plants and animals is extremely well preserved in 
the high mountain dessert. We find everything 
from tiny fossilized bacteria and pollen, to beauti- 
fully preserved 13-foot crocodiles, as well as palm 
fronds, birds, bats, three-toed horses, primates, fishes, 
insects, leaves and flowers, turtles, lizards, and many 
other fossils. Most of the fishes and other vertebrate 
animals we find are complete skeletons. We see 
stomach contents in some of the fossils and learn 
what they were eating, we see developing embryos 



2 i IN THE FIELD 



Additional Information About the Program 

The complete name of the course is Stones and 
Bones; A Course in Pa\eonto\og\ca\ Research 
Methods and Field \Nork. It is offered through 
the Graham School of General Studies at the 
University of Chicago. The course is given in late 
June and early July, and Dr. Grande will offer 
it again next summer. The prerequisite is some 
coursework in general science, particularly in 
biology, zoology, or geology. Enrollment is lim- 
ited to 16 students. For more information on the 
Stones and Bones program and the University 
of Chicago's Summer Programs for High 
School Students, call 773.834.3792 or email 
slopez@uchicago.edu. 




GN9060I 096RD 



in some specimens (an indication of live birth), and 
we find size series of many species that show how 
the animals grew. It is as though an entire tropical 
community has been frozen in time. We learn an 
enormous amount about the evolution and his- 
tory of the North American biota from this locality, 
because the site represents a virtual window look- 
ing 50 million years into the past. 

Our Dedication to Education and 
Collections-Based Research 

The Stones and Bones program is one excellent 
example of the many collaborative educational 
programs between The Field Museum and the 
University of Chicago. Museum curators teach 
many graduate and undergraduate college courses 
at the university, advise graduate students, and 



'...Students obtain a special hands-on experience 
early in their educational development. As a 
result, we hope some of them will be attracted 
to the sciences as a career.' 




attract a number of exceptional graduate students 
to U of C programs. In return, the university sup- 
ports Field Museum students and grants graduate 
degrees to those students. 

In the case of the Stones and Bones program, 
students obtain a special hands-on experience early 
in their educational development. As a result, we 
hope some of them will be attracted to the sci- 
ences as a career. The Field Museum benefits from 
having the students expand its field crew signifi- 
cantly. The fossils collected in the Stone and Bones 
program are important for the Museum's research, 
collections and exhibitions. The specimens have 
high research value and will be studied by me and 
by scientists from all over the world. When the 
Museum opens its new Evolving Planet exhibition 
next March, a section of the exhibition devoted 
to the Green River Formation will feature some 
of the fossils found by Stones and Bones students. 

Stones and Bones is a collaboration where 
everybody wins — the students, the University of 
Chicago, The Field Museum, and the scientists who 
will study the collected material for decades and 
even centuries to come. ITF 



Above: Field site for 
the 2005 expedition to 
Lewis Ranch in sonth- 
western Wyoming, one 
of the world's most 
productive fossil sites. 



Field Museum geology 
volunteer Mike Ehhind 
watches student Andrew 
Spitzer pry up a layer 
of fossil-rich rock. 



WINTER 2005-2006 nannKr^Tvh, 



INTHEFIELDINTERVIEW 



Center: Elizabeth 
Babcock. PhD. 

Teacher Anne Hoversen 
(left) and Principal 
Lorelei Bobroff,from 
St. Paul of the Cross 
School in Park Ridi>e, 
talk with Dr. Babcock in 
the Museum 's Paumee 
Earth Lodge. 



Field Educator Makes Museum 
a Learning Tool for Teachers 

A Conversation with Elizabeth Babcock 

Kaiherine I.' Hnniley, Writer 
Photos by Diane Alexander IVliite 

As Director of Teacher and Student Programs in The Field Museum's Education 
Department, Elizabeth Babcock, PhD, helps the Museum fulfill its purpose of educating 
the public. In the Field spoke with Dr. Babcock about her experiences and the work of 
her department. 



UF: What is the main goal of your job? 

Dr. Babcock: To make the Museum accessible to 
Chicago area teachers and students. Teachers some- 
times don't realize the wealth of resources here and 
don't know The Field Museum continues to offer 
new things all the time. We train the teachers to use 
the Museum. We've also tried to make everything 
affordable. In September 2004, we made all of the 
temporary exhibitions free for all Chicago area 
schools. 

ITF: What experiences have made the 
biggest impression on you? 

Dr. Babcock: The most memo- 
rable experiences are the ones 
in which I see the fruit of our 
labor in educating teachers and 
students about how to use the 
Museum in a meaningful way. In 
my role, 1 also teach classes, and 
it's the contact with the teachers 




'If a teacher is well trained on how to use the 
Museum's resources then it's more likely the stu- 
dents are going to have meaningful experiences.' 

and students that keeps me — and all the folks in 
the education department — rejuvenated everyday. 

ITF: When you're designing programs, what aspects 
do you consider in order to fully engage students? 

Dr. Babcock: It's important to make sure the students 
have some sort of interaction with real artifacts and 



specimens. They're going to have a very different 
sense of what ancient Egypt was all about when 
they come here and see the artifacts, 
as opposed to just reading about it in a book or 
on the internet. 

ITF: Why do you feel it's important to train 
educators? 

Dr. Babcock: I think a lot people assume that when 
a teacher comes to the Museum it's automatically 
easy to use the Museum in an effective way, 
but we know that's not the case. Over 
the course of a teacher's 20 to 30-year 
career, he or she is going to work 
> ith thousands of students. If a 
cacher is well trained on how 
o use the Museum's resources 
then it's more likely the students 
are going to have meaningful 
experiences. 

ITF: How do you help students and 
teachers make the most of field trips? 

Dr. Babcock: One way is through the free 
educator guides. These guides help them think 
through how they can build the fTeld trip into their 
classroom learning. We also train teachers on our 
focused field trip framework that outlines different 
ways of interacting with our exhibitions. That way, 
teachers and students become better Museum users. 
We also have a fantastic decent corps of volunteers 
who likes working with the school groups and 
regularly take them on guided exhibition tours. 

ITF: When students and teachers leave, how do you 
hope they view the Museum? 

Dr. Babcock: I had a really neat experience the 
other day. A group of third and fifth grade students 
came with their parents and teachers on a family 
field trip. We did a dinosaur-related set of activities, 
when they left, we asked them for evaluations. They 
said things like, "I didn't know that the Museum 
was such an interesting place."... "I hadn't been 
here in 20 years, I didn't know that they had these 
new resources." We love comments like that. ITF 

Citigroup Foundation provides lead corporate support for professional 
development programs for teachers at Tfie Field Museum. 



IN THE FIELD 



OFSPECIALINTEREST 



Helping Malagasy Scientists Study and 
Conserve Their Island's Unique Habitats 



Steven Goodman, PhD, Senior Field Bioloi^ist, Tlte Field Museum 

Achille Raselimanana, PhD, Biodiversity Pro<^ram Officer, IVVVF-Madat^ascar 

The island of Madagascar has levels of endemic plants and animals virtually unparal- 
leled anywhere else on Earth and the country faces considerable pressure on remaining 
natural forest habitats. It is impossible to protect what is unknown and the more we 
learn about the organisms of the island, the greater insight we have into conservation 
needs. The availability of trained human resources is key to conservation efforts in 
Madagascar. Malagasy scientists must have the means to conduct research and the 
experience to place scientific data in a context that can enhance conservation. It is 
simply imperative that Malagasy scientists play a key role in the progress of programs 



associated with their island's biodiversity and natural environments. ^ 

as RAP-Gasy — a team of Malagasy biologisiStttffi 



^*€^ 



In the early 199()s, the World Wildlife Fund and 
World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF)-Madagascar 
office began the Ecology Training Program (ETP). 
It strives to furnish logistical, financial and supervi- 
sory support to promising young Malagasy graduate 
students working in conservation biology and in 
collaboration with Malagasy universities. Field 
Museum Senior Field Biologist Steven Goodman, 
PhD, (article co-author) began coordinating this 
program close to its conception and continues 
in this capacity. In 1996, herpetologist Achille 
Raselimanana, PhD, (article co-author) joined 
WWF-Madagascar as the biodiversity program 
officer and as coordinator of ETP. This program has 
advanced knowledge of the island's unique biologi- 
cal inventories and hundreds of Malagasy students 
and researchers have visited nearly 200 different 
sites for multidisciplinary biological inventories. 
About 50 students have earned higher degrees 
at Malagasy universities associated with ETP and 
slightly more have visited The Field Museum to 
conduct research. Thanks in part to ETP, a body of 
Malagasy biologists has emerged with the needed 
skills to make a difference in advancing conserva- 
tion programs on their island. 

However, a couple of years ago, a problem 
involving the advancement of Malagasy biologists 
became apparent. While the new wave of these 
scientists obtained important governmental and 
nongovernmental jobs, thus having a profound 
impact on the conservation programs of their 
unique island, on the research side, many remained 
in the shadows of their mentors. 

In order for these conservation biologists to 
forge their own visions and create their own pro- 
fessional identities, something had to be done 
quickly. With a three-year grant given by the John 
D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and 
administered by The Field Museum, this problem 
has been partially addressed with a project known 



conduct rapid assessments of poorly known forested 
areas on the island and helps foster other consprva- ?>: 
tion biologists from that nation. 

The RAP-Gasy team finished the first year of 
the project this past Southern HemispTiere sum- 
mer. They surveyed eight different sites in a variajv 
of regions of the island. Each year they intend to 
spend about five months in the field, two or three 
months working at universities conducting research 
and giving conservation biology courses, and"4:he 
balance of the year pursuing research projects in 
their fields of interest, particularly those with 
foreign collaborators, and acting as mentors for 
the next generation of Malagasy biologists. 

For example, mammalogist Voahangy 
Soarimalala is conducting a systematic 
revision of a Malagasy rodent genus. Sh?* 
spent the past two summers at The Field 
Museum working with specimens and in 
the molecular laboratory of Sharon Jansa, 
PhD, at the Bell Museum at the University 
of Minnesota. Dr. Raselimanana just finished 
a three-year postdoctoral position studying the 
molecular phylogeny of a group of Malagasy lizards 
at the Yale University laboratory of Anne Yoder, PhDv 

As you read this, the RAP-Gasy team is in the ' 
field for their second season together. This is the 
best time of year to conduct research in Madagascar 
because plants are flowering and fruiting and ani- 
mals are notably active. Who knows what wopde'ri ''.tforegrdund) are two 
the scientists will find? But that is a subject ^ ^Vj^mcinbers of the 
future article. ITF c < lyg ' ^^ P-Gasy team. 

\.. many [Malagasy conservation biologists] 
remained in the shadows of their mentors. In 
order for [them] to forge their own visions... 
something had to be done quickly.' 




chille RaseHmanatm, 
'hD, (haik^rouud, 
eated at tnakeshift field 
lab) and Marie Jeanne 
Raherilalao (seated in 



WINTER 2005-2006 Dncmin-r-Vehmary 



INTHEFIELDFEATURE 



Field Museum Spearheads Regional 
Collaboration of Environmental Educators 



SAM educator Joliaiina 
Tliompsoti shares the 
basics of soil science with 
a student. 



Submitted by The I'ichI Museum Education Department 

Each year, The Field Museum's Soil Adventure Mobile (SAM) educators introduce 
about 25,000 Chicago area children and adults to the "world beneath their feet" 
through innovative hands-on activities about soil and biodiversity. SAM audiences learn 
about biology and conservation by participating in activities such as touching live mil- 
lipedes and worms, creating a variety of soil mixtures, and identifying typical backyard 
soil critters. Recently, the SAM program expanded its outreach to include the states of 
Indiana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa and Missouri. 



educational resources, including the SAM 
program; the redesigned Underground Adventure 
website (www.fieldmuseum.org/undergroud- 
adventure); the teacher resource. Unearthing Soil 
Secrets: An Educator Guide to Underground Adventure; 
and the Underground Adventure classroom poster 
available through the Field Museum's Harris Loan 
Center (312.665.7500 or www.fieldmuseum.org/ 
harrisloan). 

The Field Museum formally launched the alli- 
ance with a two-day workshop in November that 
focused on environmental education resources 
for teachers. Thirty representatives fi-om partner 
organizations and Field Museum staff convened 
to share resources and training tips for environ- 
mental science teachers. During the workshop, 
participants assessed each institution s environmen- 
tal education programs, shared common challenges 
and developed regional and local strategies for 
program improvement. As the first of two planned 
workshops, the conference set the stage for what 

'Sharing best practices with other 
science education institutions 
allows us to magnify the impact 
of our respective education pro- 
grams and resources/ 

pro!nises to be a productive collaboration. 

To learn more about the EEIUA partner insti- 
tutions and the initiative, please check out the 
resources section of the Underground Adventure web- 
site or call 312.665.7536. In the meantime, keep 
your eyes peeled for the Soil Adventure Mobile at 
our partner locations! ITF 

We thank the members of the EEIUA advisory committee. Lead sponsor; 
Monsanto. Additional support provided by the Albert Pick Jr Fund. 




The traveling SAM program is only one part of a 
new Field Museum regional alliance focused on 
the permanent exhibition, Underground Adventure. 
Called the Environmental Education Initiative for 
Undergroufid Adventure (EEIUA), this collaboration 
brings together science institutions in the Midwest 
to share educational techniques and programs on 
soil science, biodiversity and conservation. As Victor 
Olapojoye, the Field s administrator of outreach 
programs and coordinator of EEIUA, explains, 
"Sharing best practices with other science educa- 
tion institutions allows us to magnify the impact of 
our respective education programs and resources." 

EEIUA partners include The Field Museum; 
Blank Park Zoo in Des Moines; Missouri Botanical 
Garden in St. Louis; Indiana Dunes National 
Lakeshore; University of Wisconsin-Madison 
Arboretum; and Southwest Research and Outreach 
Center in Lamberton, Minnesota. Partners have 
access to the full range of Uttderground Adventure 



m 



IN THE FIELD 



YOURGUIDETOTHEFIELD 



Calendar of Events for Winter 2005-2006 December-February 



Inside: Exhibitions Festivals Family Programs Adult Programs 



Pmgrams at 
a Glance 

Details inside! 

Family Programs 

Family Overnight 12/17 

Peaceable Kingdom 12/27 

Two of Us Workshops 1/3-1/24 & 2/7-2/28 

Martin Luther King Performances 1/13-1/16 

Frederick Douglass Performances 2/11-13 

African American Literature Lecture 2/12 

Adult Programs 

Ghosts of Vesuvius Lecture 12/7 

Handmade Pasta Workshop 1/25 

Betty DeRamus Lecture 2/1 1 

African Ancestry Lecture 2/15 

Cultural Connections Programs 2/18 Gr 3/18 

Migration Lecture 2/28 

Restoring Stabiae Lecture 3/4 

Evolving Planet Preview 

Dino Discovery Days 3/11-13 
Create a Play in One Day! 3/11 
Evolving Science Lecture 3/11 

National Geographic Live! Series 

Africa By Air 2/21 
Exploring Bhutan 3/14 
Chasing the Tornado 3/28 
Three Among the Wolves 4/25 
In Search of King Tut 5/23 




New Exhibition 

Tlirough March 26, 2006 




POMPEI I 

STORIES FROM AN ERUPTION 

Two thousand years ago a vibrant society disappeared beneath 
the ashes of Vesuvius. Now you can uncover its buried 
treasures — and its human drama — at 
The Field IVluseum. 

The c-xiiibilion was organized by the Ministero per i Beni e le Attivtta Culturah, 
Sopnntendenza archeologica di Pompei, Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeotogtci 
delle province di Napoli e Caserta, Regione Campania. 



Presented by Harris N.A. 



Featured Lecture 

Ghosts of Vesuvius 

Dr. Charles Pellegriiw, Author 







mM 



V 



i^Sm 



mH: 




Uncover the strange connections between major disasters such as the eruption 
of Vesuvius and the collapse of the Twin Towers on September 11. As one 
of the world's only experts on downblast and surge physics, Pellegrino 
will explore the remnants of an extraordinarily advanced civilization, 
then dissect the effects of Vesuvius' eruption, in hopes of saving lives 
around volcanic hot zones. 

]\ediiesdaY, Dec. 7, 6pm 

s 16, students /educators $14, members $12 



_I 



fer 



Field 



useum 



General Museum Information: 312.922.9410 

Family and Adult Program Tickets and Information: 312.665.7400 

Please note: Refunds will be issued by Field Museum staff, minus a $10 processing fee, for group and family overnights only. No 
refunds or exchanges are permitted for any other programs. Fees for programs cancelled by The Field Museum will be refunded in full. 



WINTER 2005-2006 December- February 



Your Guide to the Field: Calendar of Events for Winter 2005-2006 December- February 



Discover the rich history of the African 
American migration experience 

FchniaTy 2006 

Be inspired by speakers and performers that use their work to explore the extraordinary stories 
and legacies of the Underground Railroad. Lectures, first-person interpretations, and more will 
uncover the rich heritage of Africans in America, from slavery to today. 



Gallery Programs 

A Portrait of Frederick Douglass 

Virtually travel back in time to the Columbian Exposition 
of 1893, where Frederick Douglass delivered his inspiring 
speeches about freedom and equality in the US and abroad. 
Celebrated Chicago actor and singer Kevin Mcllvaine will 
portray Douglass' famous orations, backed by moving 
performances by the Apostolic Church Choir of Chicago. 

Sanirday, Feb. 1 1— Monday, Feb. 13, 2pm 
Free with Museum admission 



SponsorwJ by Ariel Mutual Funds. 




Adult Lectures 

Forbidden Fruit: Love Stories from 
the Underground Railroad 

Bclty DcRiUmis, author 

Venture back into a dangerous world where freedom was 
scarce and romance was off-limits. DeRamus recounts 
astonishing tales of slaves who found love in the most 
unusual places, documenting stories that have remained 
hidden for more than a century. 

Saturday, Feb. 1 1, 2pm 
Free with Museum adtiiissioii 



uvnvN c MOim>«wsNnn>.iMC 



FORBIDDEN 

FRUIT 



*• LOVE STORIES FROM T 
UNDERGROUND RAILROAD 




BETTY DE RAMUS 



8 I IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 



General Museum Information: 312.922.9410; Family and Adult Program Tickets and Information: 312.665.7400 



Frederick Douglass and 
African-American Literature 

Williatii Cooh, Dartmouth College 





Gain insight into tlie life and works 
of Frederick Douglass through an 
intimate look at his contribution to 
African-American literature. Dr. Cook 
will trace the construction of African- 
American oratory and preaching and 
show how they have shaped literature 
and discourse. 

Sunday, Feb. 12, l2:J0piii 
Free with Ahiseuin admission 



African Ancestry, Inc. 

Dr. Rick Kittles, Scientific Director, African Ancestry, Inc. 

Learn more about Dr. Kittles' well known work studying 
the genetics of hereditary prostate cancer among African- 
Americans. Dr. Kittles traces African-American ancestry 
through unique genealogy research, studies of population 
history, and disease associations. 

Saturday, Feb. 15, 2pm 
Free with Museum 
admission .,awt 




Evening Lecture/ 
Performance 

In IVIotion: The African-American 
IVIigration Experience 

Opening Performance: Tlie John Work Chorale 
Keynote Presentation: SyhianeA. Diouf, author 

Learn more about this author's new interpretation of African- 
American migration history, which includes the self-motivated 
activities of peoples of African descent trying to remake them- 
selves and their worlds. See how these industrious peoples used 
survival skills, efficient networks, and their dynamic culture to 
thrive and spread in the new settlements of the Americas. 

Tuesday, Feb. 28, 7pm (includes book signing) 
$18, members $15, students /educators $12 

A Spiritual Journey Percussion Ensemble 

At the Harold Washington 
Cultural Center-Bronzeville 

Expand your musical 
horizons with this creative 
ensemble that uses 
traditional African 
instruments to tell stories 
and inspire people. Family 
audiences will hear songs, see 
basic choreography, and learn 
about the power of music. 

Saturday, Feb. 18, 2pm 

Free to the public 

For more information, visit wunv.haroldwashittgtotKulturalcenter.com 




tCiMBEBLY MAZANEIVGN90534 2 i D 



More dino fun 



Dinosaur Dynasty: 
Discoveries from China 

Through April 23, 2006 

Meet dinosaurs you've never seen before — all the way from 
China! This exhibition features authentic fossils and life-size 
casts of 21 dinosaur skeletons from one of the world's hottest 
spots for dinosaur research. 

This exhibition was produced by DinoDon, Inc., in cooperation with Beringia Ltd. and the 
Inner IVIongolian Museum. 




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WINTER 2005-2006 December- Felmmry 


9 





Family Overnight 

Dozin' With The Dinos 

Sue the T. rex is having a sleepover! Join us for a night of 
family worl<shops, tours and performances. Explore ancient 
Egypt by flashlight, prowl an African savannah with man- 
eating lions and tal<e a stroll through the Royal Palace in 
Bamun, Africa. Then spread your sleeping bag amidst some 
of our most popular exhibitions. The event includes an 
evening snack and breakfast. 

Saturday, Dec. 17, and Fridays, Jan. 6 
and 20, and Feb. 10 and 24 
5:45pm in the evening until 
9am the following day 
$47, members $40 



>.-'i4Wt*'i:;'i./'^'~v:^*iite^SrtiiiWf 



Adult Class 




Family Performances 

Peaceable Kingdom 

Celebrate the holidays 
with cultural traditions 
from around the globe. The 
three-day festivities include 
performances by choral 
groups, bands, and jazz 
ensembles that reflect the 
ethnic diversity of Chicago. 

Hypnotic Brass Ensemble: Monday, Dec. 26, 2pm 
Tribus Futuras: Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2pm 
Edgar Gabriel's String Groove: Wednesday, Dec. 28, 2pm 
Free with Museum admission 




Free Lecture 



Italy's Hand-made Traditions 

Slow Food Chicago 

Enjoy an evening of pasta tasting and demonstrations by 
Chef Theo Gilbert, whose Pasta Adagio Restaurant and 
Market creates handcrafted pasta and sauces from organic 
flour, farm-raised eggs, and other local ingredients. You'll 
learn more about the worldwide Slow Food movement, 
founded in Italy to promote the pleasures of the table 
and food produced using sustainable farming. The tasting 
includes wine. 

Wednesday, Jan. 25, 6:30— 9pm 
$60, members $50 

Please note: Space is limited, and class 
location is TBD. 



^.A 



c 



Luxury and Power in the 
Seaside Villas of Stabiae 

Dr. Thomas Xoblc Howe, 
Coordinator General of the Restoring 
Ancient Stabiae Foundation 

Experience the wealth and osten- 
tation of the spectacular seaside 
resorts near Pompeii. You'll see 
how these luxurious homes served 
as centers for power in the hot sum- 
mers, as senators and businessmen 
entertained guests with exclusive 
parties. You'll also learn about 
the innovative project of the Restoring Ancient Stabiae 
Foundation, which is preserving, excavating and returning 
the villas to their former grandeur. 

Saturday, March 4, 2pm 

Free with Museum admission 

For more information on Stabiae and the Restoring Ancient 

Stabiae project, visit their website at www.stabiae.org. 




Below is a calendar of current and upcoming temporary exhibitions. Some dates may change. 
Visit our website at wvvw.fieldmuseum.org or call 312.922.9410 as the date of your visit nears. 



Auschwitz Album: The Story of a Transport 

January 27-June 4, 2006 



.•iw'iaw i 



Design Innovations in Manufactured Housing 

Through January 16, 2006 




King Performer Keeps Dream Alive 

Celebrate the birthday of Martin Luther 

King Jr. with a moving portrayal of his 

speeches on nonviolence, faith, love, and 

equality. Chicago actor and singer Kevin 

Mcllvaine, who travels the country portraying the slain civil 

rights leader, is known for his ability to enthrall audiences as if 

King himself were speaking. This is the first program in a series 

commemorating the 40th anniversary of the Chicago Freedom 

Movement. 

Friday, Jan. 13— Monday, Jan. 16, 2pm 

Free with Museum admission 

For more information, visit www.cfm40.org. 

Sponsored by Ariel Mutual Funds. 




Family Workshops 

Two of Us: African Culture and Mammals 

Join us in this four-week excursion through the wonders of The 
Field Museum! You and your little one will travel the Museum's 
exhibition halls, sing songs, hear stories, touch objects, make art 
projects, and enjoy snacks while exploring natural history themes. 
Choose either a focus on African culture, from Ancient Egypt to 
modern day Bamun, or an exploration of mammals of the world. 

African Culture: Tuesdays, Jan. 3-24, 10-1 1am 

Mammals: Tuesdays, Feb. 7—28, 10— 11 am 

For families with children ages 3-5. 

$32, members $27 

Note: For every child with paid 

attendance, one parent or 

cliaperone attends for free. 



JOHN WEINSTEIN/GN90771 .030D 



Cultural Connections 




The Language of Looks 

Experience cultural diversity in your hometown! 

This year, through the Cultural Connections program, local ethnic museums and cultural centers are presenting 
joint events that explore the messages of identity that we send and receive through appearance. 

Join Field Museum staff and Cultural Connections partners for their early spring collaborations: 

Arab American Action Network and Swahili 
Institute of Chicago 

Saturday, Feb. 18 

Indo-American Center and Chicago Japanese 
American Historical Society 

Saturday, March 18 

For more information, including the Teacher Course for Lane/CPDU 
credit, see www.fieldmuseum.org/ccuc/cultural.htm 

Cultural Connections has received generous support from The Joyce Foundation, Kraft Foods, Polk Bros. 
Foundation, Chicago Public Schools' Office of Language and Cultural Education, Richard H. Driehaus 
Foundation, and Charles and M.R. Shapiro Foundation. 




Jungles 

Through March 5, 2006 



Pompeii: Stories from an Eruption 

Through March 26, 2006 



Planet with Dinosaur Discovery Da 



On March 10, 2006, our new exhibition about the history of life on Earth — 
including an expanded hall of dinosaurs — will finally be open! Help us celebrate 
and take part in a performance, see rarely viewed specimens from the Museum's 
collections, handle real fossils, and more. 



volving 



Gallery Programs 

Interpretive Stations 

Discover the geological hot spots of the Americas by piec- 
ing together our Mega Maps that locate and identify the 
best places to find and excavate fossil evidence of prehistoric 
life. Later, play our Extinction Game and learn w/hy and how 
certain species have survived Earth's mass extinctions — v\/hile 
others have been lost forever. 

Saturday and Sunday, March 11 and 12, lOani-noon and l-3pm 
Free with Museum admission 

Special Artists at the Field 

Examine the enthralling work of Evolving Planet illustrator 
Karen Carr, and learn what it takes to depict scenes of life on 
Earth millions of years ago. Come early, visit with the artist, and 
sign up for a special guided tour of the exhibition with Ms. Carr 
(limited to 45 participants). 

Saturday, March 11, 10am— noon, Tour: 1pm 
Free with Museum admission 






Children's Workshop 

Create a Play in One Day! 

Foundation Tlieatre Group 

Put your little one in the director's chair! 
Children ages 5-11 will write a short dinosaur 
play under the tutelage of professional actors, cast it 
with their new friends from the workshop, and perform at 
the Museum that same day. 

Saturday, March 11, Reiiearsal: 10am— 2pm; Performance: 2:30pm 
$16, members $12 

Special Women's History 
Month lecture 

Can 200 Million-Year-Old Leaves Predict the 
Future for Plant Biodiversity? 

Dr. Jenny McEhuain, FM Dept. of Geology 

Take a virtual expedition to chilly Greenland to see how fossil 
plants are helping scientists untangle the mysteries of ancient 
global warming trends — and 
helping shape predictions about 
the effects of future global 
warming on Earth's biodiver- 
sity and ecology. 

Saturday, Marcli 11, 1:30pm 



i 




^^^H 



The Elizabeth Morse Genius Charitable Trust is the generous sponsor of the Genius Hall of 
Dinosaurs. 

Evolving Pianet is made possible, in part, with support from the Illinois Department of Commerce 
and Economic Opportunity, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the U.S. 
Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Education. 



Dinosaur Dynasty: Discoveries from China 

Through April 23, 2006 



Transforming Tradition: Pottery from Mata Ortiz 

Through May 31, 2006 



NATIONAL 
GEOGRAPHIC 



Travel across lush Africa, the frigid Canadian north, even 
the Midwest's tornado alley, in our fifth year of National 
Geographic Live! presentations. Get your tickets early to 
see the best photographers, explorers, and conservationists 
bring their dramatic adventures to The Field Museum. 




Wings Over Africa: Tracing 
the Human Footprint 

J. Michael Fay, Explorer and 
Conservationist 

Witness the effects of human 
• development on Africa's great 
II biodiversity through magnificent 
aerial photography. You'll see the 
'^ great lengths — including a 60,000- 
mile "megaflyover" of the continent — to w/hich Fay has gone to 
heighten awareness about Africa's growing conservation needs. 

Tuesday, Feb. 21, 7:30pm 
Exploring Bhutan 

Michael Hawley, Computer Scientist and Explorer 

Jump into the mind of one of the world's most visionary think- 
ers, who is changing the way we think about sharing and 
utilizing information. A real renais 
sance man, Hawley will take you 
on a visual odyssey across Bhutan 
with vibrant photographs from 
his recently published book on the 
Himalayan kingdom. 



^  S"-^' 



Tuesday, March 14, 7:30pm 

Chasing the Tornado 

Tim Samaras, Severe-Storm Researcher 

Follow the winding path of some of Earth's most destruc- 
tive natural phenomena. You'll hear some of Samaras' 
most harrowing stories of storm chasing in tornado coun- 
try, and how he is carefully engineering probes that will 
teach us more about the dynamics of twisters. 

Tuesday, March 28, 7:30pm 



Ticket Information 

Call 312.665.7400 or visit ww/w.nationalgeographic.com/nglive 
to purchase tickets. A limited number will be available onsite the 
day of the event starting at 5:30pm, but we recommend reserving 
tickets in advance since this series sells out. 

Also, a series subscription makes a great gift! We'll send the 
tickets along with a personalized gift card at your request. 

Series Subscriptions — On Sale Now 

Explorers Circle Help ensure the continuation of the NG Live! 
series in Chicago! Benefits include reserved seating; a private 
reception with Zahi Hawass prior to the May 23 event; signed 
copy of the book Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the 
Pharaohs; and acknowledgement of your support of the series in 
each printed event program: $390; TFIVI, IMG and Geographic 
Society of Chicago members $375 



Three Among the Wolves 

Helen Tliayer, Explorer 

Walk in the way of the wolf with Helen Thayer and Charlie, her 
half-dog, half-wolf companion. Thayer will recount the extraor- 
dinary education she and her 
husband received living among 
packs of wolves in the Canadian 
Yukon and Arctic, using Charlie 
as an interpreter between wolf 
and man. 

Tuesday, April 25, 7:30pm 



In Search of King Tut 

Zahi Hawass, Egyptologist 

Get a first-hand look at the CT scans 
and other investigations being per- 
formed on Tutankhamun and other 
ancient mummies of Egypt. Dr. 
Hawass is leading an international 
team of scientists in this provocative 
look at one of antiquity's most endur- 
ing mysteries. 

Tuesday, May 23, 7:30pm 






Patron (reserved seating): $140; TFM, NG and Geographic 
Society of Chicago members $125. 

General admission: $105; TFM, NG and Geographic Society of 
Chicago members $90; students $60. 

Individual Events— On Sale January 17 



Patron $30; TFM, NG and Geographic Society of Chicago 
members $28. 

General admission: $24; TFM, NG and Geographic Society of 
Chicago members $22; students $15. 

Educators- Student programs, teacher workshops, and online lesson 
plans are provided in conjunction with the series. For more informa 
tion, go to nationalgeographic.com/nglive or call 312.665.7500. 



National Geographic Live', edu 
Plum Creek Timber Company. 



nade possible by the generous support of 



Examine old legacies and new creations 




The Auschwitz Album: 
The Story of a Transport 

Jan. 27-Juue 4, 2006 

Striking blacl<-and-white photographs tal<en 
by Nazi S.S. officers provide the only visual 
record of the arrival and imprisonment of 
Hungarian Jews in the Auschwitz-Birkenau 
concentration camp. 

This exhibition was created by Yad Vashem, The Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' 
Remembrance Authority in Israel. The Field Museum presentation is made possible 
by the American Society for Yad Vashem. 

Generous support has been provided by the Crown Family. 



Design Innovations 
in Manufactured 
Housing 

Tliroughjan. 16, 2006 

Original models and drawings by 

noted architects and industrial designers offer creative 

solutions for pre-fabricated homes. 

This exhibition was developed by the City Design Center, College of Architecture and the Arts, University of 
Illinois at Chicago, in collaboration with The Field Museum. The City Design Center, College of Architecture and 
the Arts, University of Illinois at Chicago received funds from the National Endowment for the Arts and 
the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts to create this exhibition. 

Transforming Tradition: 
Pottery from IViata Ortiz 

Tlirough May 31,2006 

Witness the rebirth of a unique pottery 
tradition in the exquisite ceramics from 
the Mexican town of Mata Ortiz. 

^h)s exhibition was organized by The Field Museum, 




JOHN WEINSTEIN/Al 143 r 





i^'J 



.^^.WL'h/T' 



Getting Here: Field Museum visitors can park in Soldier Field's parking garage. 

Visit www.fieldmuseum.org for information on parking lots/rates, free trolleys and public transit. 

Hours: 9am-5pm daily. Last admission at 4pm. Please note the Museum closes at 5pm even when an 
evening event is scheduled. Event participants will be asked to leave the building until 30 minutes before 
their event begins. 

Admission and Tickets: Member passes can be reserved through the membership department 
(312.665.7705) or picked up at the membership services desk. For non-members, The Field Museum's 
gold pass, which includes general admission plus one special exhibition, ranges in price from $8 to $19, 
depending on your age category and whether you are a Chicago resident. Please bring your ID to receive 
the appropriate ticket price. 

Tickets are available at the Museum's admission desks, or in advance via www.fieldmuseum.org or 866. 
FIELD. 03. For all admission and ticket details, visitvwvw.fieldmuseum.org. 

Accessibility: Visitors using wheelchairs or strollers may be dropped off at the new east 

entrance. Handicapped parking and wheelchairs are available on a first-come, first-served basis. 
Call 312.665.7400 to check on the accessibility of programs that take place outside of the 
Museum. 

Information: 312.922.9410 orwww.fieldmuseum.org 



their long-standing, generous support of the Museum through the Chicago Park District, in addition. Museum programs are partially supported by a CityArts 
_ am 4 Grant from the City of Chicago O^rtment of Cultural Affairs and the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency. 

^accordance with Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972, we do not discriminate on the basis of sex in our programs or activities. Please call 312.665-7271 to conuct our Title IX Coordinator in 
e human resources department should you have any questions or concerns. 



14 IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 



SCIENTIST'SPICK 



The Terrible Marsupial Saber-Tooth 




VELIZAR SIMEONOVSKI 



On Sept. 21,1926, Elmer Riggs, The Field Museum's first vertebrate paleontologist, was 
conducting fieldwork in northwest Argentina in rocks now dated at 3.5 million years. He 
made an important find — a skull and partial skeleton of an animal that looked very similar 
to a saber-toothed tiger. But this was no cat! The specimen formed the basis for a new spe- 
cies that Riggs named Thylacosmilus atrox, the marsupial saber-tooth. Living marsupials 
include animals such as the opossum and kangaroo. Riggs had found a striking example of 
"convergence," the evolution of similar traits in two unrelated lineages of organisms. 

Thy/acosmi/us atrox was powerfully built and almost as big as a jaguar. Its huge canine 
teeth were longer than any saber-toothed tiger's, with the roots embedded all the way 
behind the eyes. In addition, these sabers were ever-growing, an advance over the any of the 
other saber-tooths. 

For much of the "Age of Mammals," South America was an island continent where giant 
flightless "terror birds" and carnivorous marsupials, including Thylacosmilus, were the 
largest meat-eaters. When the Isthmus of Panama formed and united the Americas, dogs, 
bears and cats entered South America for the first time. Marsupial saber-tooths went extinct 
and terror birds made it to what is now Florida before they also died out. 

Riggs found a total of three Thylacosmilus specimens. The second included a lower jaw 
with a large flange projecting down from the front. The flange protected the saber when 
the mouth was closed, as a scabbard protects a sword. The third specimen was smaller and 
formed the basis for a second species that Riggs called Thylacosmilus lentis. Riggs sent this 
specimen to Argentina to be held in the research collections of the Museo de La Plata. 

The Field Museum's Thy/acosm/lus specimens represent much of what we know about 
this rare animal and paleontologists from around the world come here to study them. 
When the Museum's new Evolving Planet exhibition opens next March, casts of the skull of 
Thylacosmilus, a terror bird skeleton, and a real saber-toothed tiger skeleton will be on display. 

Bill Simpson, Tlie Field Museum's collections manager of fossil vertebrates, chose this Scientist's Pick. 



Thylacosmilus was a 
powerfully built animal, 
almost as big as a jaguar. 



WINTER 2005-2006 December-February 



15 



INTI 



;ldfeature 



Essential Gear That Scientists 
Won't Leave Home Without 

Compiled by Stephany Sellings, Writer 
Photography by Diane Alexander Viliite 

Field Museum scientists often work miles from the nearest towns and endure some of 
the world's harshest climates and terrains. The success of their efforts, and even their 
own well-being, depends on what they carry with them in backpacks and duffel bags. 
A survey of several scientists revealed interesting, and sometimes surprising, answers 
to the question, "What equipment is essential to your field work?" 



L. Antonio Curet, PhD, 

Assistant Curator, Department 
of Anthropology 

I cherish a small hand tool 
that at first looks like a 
dental tool, but is not 
Because of my "emo- 
tional" attachment to this 
tool and how protective* 
I am of it, my students and 
field assistants have named '"■^"■^^^^" 
it Excalibur! It is made of steel with a triangular, sturdy 
point resembling an arrowhead on one end, and a small 
spatula on the other. The point is strong enough to dig 
hard, clay soils, while the spatula is very handy for 
removing loose dirt. Its small size and relatively heavy 
weight are ideal for conducting precision work 
without damaging the objects; I never go to 
an excavation without it. 




Lisa Bergwall (left) and Connie Vanbeek 

Fossil Preparators, Department of Geology 

Vanbeek: I take a thin rubber pad that expands to two 
inches thick when inflated with air and resides under 
one's sleeping bag, thus making a good night's sleep 
more of a reality. Essential equipment! 

Bergwall: An inflatable pad is important the first 
couple of nights, but after that, you're so tired... 
I could have a rock under my back and still 
sleep! A multi-purpose 
knife is essential to me 
when I'm in the field. I 
also need to have a top- 
ographic map — I like to 
see where we are. 




I 



* Editor's note: According to other Field Museum 
anthropology curators, good archaeology toq^ 
are often ">(5rro^d," never to be returne 






Carl W. Dick, PhD, 

Brouti Postdoctoral Fellotn 
Department 0f2k>ologY 

I am a postdoctoral associate of Bruce Patterson, PhD, MacArthur cura- 
tor of mammals at The Field Museum. I study the ecology and evolution 
of parasites and their relationships with their hosts. My stiidy organisms 
are rather bizarre; blood-feeding fly parasites that exist nowhere except 
on the bodies of bats. Because bat fly species usually are specific to their 
host species, I must capture the bats in order to study the flies. A piece of 
equipment essential to this task is a mist net. Developed by the Japanese 
to capture birds, mist nets are made of lightweight nylon or 
polyester threads, supported by five or six heavier shelf cdrds. 
Between each shelf cord, the mesh net bunches up into folds. 
Nets — usually 20 to 60 feet long and about nine feet high_;— aire' 
stretched along and across places where bats fly at niq 
as trails or roads, over water sources, near fruit trees, or some--, 
t'mes over the exits of the bats' roosts. If the net is pla 
correctly, bats fly into the soft net and become entangled wdthin 
the folds between the shelf mr^^ onnp^p hat ic captured 
jently untangled from the nel.~^=^:tlVi 



Akiko Shinya 

Chief Preparator, Fossil Vertebrates, 
Department of Geoh^y 

Among many essential items in the field, my 
solar-powered triple sensor watch will always bel 
with me throughout the trip. 
When prospecting, we normally 
establish a time to meet, usually 
in two to three hours after we 
set out. It's impossible to tell 
time without a watch in the 
middle of nowhere. I once had 
an incident where I didn't have 
a watch, making my team wait 
for me for two hours. I also had 
a clock with batteries, but it 
stopped working. This solar-pow- 
ered watch charges fully while I'm out in the sun. 
It also has a compass, an altimeter, and a barome- 
ter, which is handy for predicting weather change. 





Manager of International Commtmity Outreach, 
Environmental and Conservation Programs 

One thing I can't live without when I'm traveling in the 
field is my iPod. I bought one right away when they 
became available back at the end of 2002. I can't imagine 
being without one now. It is especially fun to share music 
with people. The Cofan, the indigenous group we work 
with in Ecuador, seem to prefer the hard stuff — Metallica, 
Black Sabbath and Queens of the Stone Age, that sort of 
thing. The louder, the better. I also never travel without a 
pair of noise-canceling headphones. Not only can you use 
them on long flights, but you can also wear them in noisy 
hotels so that you can get to sleep 
at night. 





Greg Mueller, PhD, 

Curator, Department of Botany 

People frequently ask me what I'm carry- 
ing when I get off the plane with my big 
duffel bag bursting at the seams. I carry a 
lot of gear, but several items are critical: 
my camera, my "true color" lamp, vials 



of chemicals that act as a DNA fixative, and my mushroom 
dryer. Because the mushrooms loose their color and shrivel 
up upon drying, I need to document their appearance in fresh 
condition. I take detailed notes on the size, shape, texture, 
odor, color and taste — but I don't taste the deadly poisonous 
species! Regular light bulbs do not give off the same color as 
sunlight, however with my "true color" lamp I get accurate 
color information. Since a photo is worth a thousand words, I 
take a picture of each specimen before drying it. Then I place 
small bits of selected mushrooms into the vials of DNA fixative. 
Finally, I preserve the specimens with a food dehydrator that's 
similar to what people use to make banana chips and dried 
apples. Two other items — one low-tech and one high-tech — are 
essential in the field: a large basket for carrying specimens and 
global positioning system (GPS), so that I know my location. 



OFSPECIALINTEREST 



Field Museum Archaeologists Help Chinese 
lleaaues Slav One Step Ahead of the Bulldoz( 




Field Museum anthropologist Anne Underhill, PhD, had recently finished her doctorate 
In 1993 when the opportunity of lifetime came along. It was China. After about 50 

years of keeping foreign archaeologists out, the world's most populous country 
^^ was inviting them in. Dr. Underhill, who had to write a dissertation on China 
without the benefit of her own fieldwork, jumped at the opportunity. 



providing a smaller scale of observation, and in diat 
part of China there would never be suiEcient time 
or resources to provide a complete regional picture 
or census of ancient sites on the landscape. 

"No one had done systematic regional surface 
sur\'ey in China," Dr. Underhill said. She believed 
the method could effectively identify' the regional 
settlement pattern around Liangchengzhen, thus 
providing new information about relations between 
communities. At the same time, it could identify 
sites that might soon be destroyed by China s rapid 
economic and population growth. 

That's where Field Museum Anthropology 
Chair Gary Feinman, PhD, then a professor at the 
University ofWisconsin, came in. Years earlier, he 
had helped pioneer systematic survey at sites in r 
Mexico. In 1995, at Dr. Underhill s request. Dr. 
Feinman traveled to China with his wife, anthro- 
pologist Linda Nicholas, an exj>ert in reading maps. 
They worked with Dr. Underhill and helped train 
Chinese archaeologists in the survey method. At 
first, it \\:as a tough sell. 

"We were walking up forested hills, through 
apple orchards. They wondered, 'why bother?"" 
Dr. Underbill recalled. But the project pnxluced 
impressive results showing that Liangchengzhen was 
the center of a hierarchical network of smaller sites 
that, in turn, oversaw' many smaller farming hamlets. 
Shandong University and the Rizhao City Cultural 
Bureau are planning to host a conference to discuss 
with other Chinese archaeologists the wider signifi- 
cance of the projects findings from the survey and 
the excavation at Liangchengzhen (1998-2001). 
Dr. Feinman sees it as an audition for the survey 
methodology. Although they did not invent regional 
survey. Dr. Feinman and Linda Nicholas are now in 
pan responsible for its growing popularity in two 
o{ the most archaeologicaUy rich countries in the 
world — Mexico and China. "I'm hoping that we 
can continue to influence Chinese scholars to do 
more regional survey," he said. 

Thanks to The Field Museum's scientists, China's 
archaeologists may finally be able to breathe a sigh 
of relief in the fece of all those bulldozers. ITF 



iJut China's open door wasn't just for 
archaeologists. Foreign investment in 
the country also swelled. Rapid develop- 
Aunc L'ndeHtill, PliD. ment funded by several sources continues 

to push the nation's cities up and out. Tlte China 
Tratisportatioti Yearbook states that between 1 988 and 
2002, more than 15,500 miles of expressways were 
dug, flattened, and paved. 

How can archaeologists save and study several 
thousand years of Chinese history and prehis- 
tory >vhen an army of bulldozers threatens to 
destroy important sites? Back in the mid-1990s. 
Dr. Underhill and her colleagues saw a solution. 
Her project, focused on the prehistoric town of 
Liangchengzhen in northern China's Shandong 
Pro\'ince, would be the first in that country to 
employ systematic regional surface survey. Using 
this field procedure, surveyors on a team walk about 

'[Dr. Feinman and Linda Nicholas] worked with Dr. 
Underhill and helped train Chinese archaeologists 
in the survey method. At first, it was a tough sell.... 
But the project produced impressive results...' 

50 yards apart and at the same pace, over the land 
looking for artifacts. In time, and through system- 
atic apphcation of this methodolc^, large areas are 
covered. The presence of artifacts on the surface 
indicates a site lies beneath. The more traditional 
method of digging at sites is far more expensive. 



Left: Dr. Underltill 
dimbing an upland area 
in China. 




It 



IN THE FIELD 



OFSPECIALINTEREST 



Resiliency After a Natural Disaster Depends on 
Strength o f Community and Conservation Groups 



Alaka Wall, PhD, John Ntiucen Curator hi Anthropology 
and Director, Center for Ciilttirai Understanding and 
Change, The Field Museum 

When a natural disaster strikes, the degree of impact, 
the differences in vulnerabihry among the affected 
population and the quickness with which people will 
recover are all dependent on the social conditions 
prior to and after the disaster. 

We know from anthropological research that people 
can be extremely resihent after a disaster, finding ways 
to use existing social relarionships to rebuild the mate- 
rial infrastructure necessary to survival. 

The most effective way to safeguard people and 
work toward quick recovery in a disaster's aftermath 
is to understand and utilize e.xisting social assets in 
implementing interventions. For example, commu- 
nities often develop their own information sharing 
networks that may be independent of standard media 
broadcasts. Knowing how community networks 
function is critical for pre-disaster communications. 

The Field Museum's Center for Cultural 
Understanding and Change (CCUC) recendy com- 
pleted a study of the cultural assets of new immigrants 
from Mexico. We found a variety of ways in which 
immigrants keep in touch with each other, including 
reliance on associations of immigrants from their 
own hometowns. These organizations are trusted 



sources of information. In general, 
even the most vulnerable populations 
have developed their own strategies 
for accessing resources or organizing 
themselves. In the communities where 
CCUC has been building partner- 
ships to either promote the value of 
cultural diversity or work to improve 
the quality of life, we have found a 
wealth of such social assets and cre- 
ative capacities that are indicators of a 
community's ability to withstand 
adverse circumstances or recover 
quickly after disaster passes. We have 
found block associations, social clubs, 
arts groups, kinship networks, faith 
institutions and much more. 

Destroying or neglecting such 
social assets by breaking up networks 
of support, or not allowing people to 
participate in rebuilding activities, will 
slow recovery or make the impact 
of the disaster worse. Our work demonstrates that 
including communitv' assets in a "first response" 
system has the potential to make it truly comprehen 
sive, mitigating disasters' impacts and saving lives. 




DIANE ALEXANDER WHJJI 



'Knowing how community 
networl<s function is 
critical for pre-disaster 
communications.' 

- Alaka Wali, PhD. 



Laurel Ross, Conservation Implementation Regional 
Director, Etmronmental and Conservation Programs, 
Tlie Field Museum 

There is nothing inherently evil in the forces of 
nature. A natural "disaster" is only a disaster when it 
harms the life and property that we value. 

From nature's point of view, fires, floods, earth- 
quakes, hurricanes and tsunamis are disturbances that 
play important roles in preserving the diversity of 
Ufe on Earth. Many species and natural communi- 
ties depend on these disturbances to maintain their 
health. Midwest prairies and oak woodlands thrive 
on fire and languish without it. Spring floods provide 
habitat for migrating waterfowl and critical spawning 
habitat for many fish species. 

However, we know the destruction that is caused 
when a major natural disturbance occurs where peo- 
ple live. It is important for us to try to understand, 
prepare for, and predict these phenomena. We cannot 
control nature, but we can try to be wise in living 
with nature. 

In the Chicago region, we are fortunate that a 
century ago visionary leaders made the decision to 
invest public dollars in the protection of land that 
now comprises a mosaic of over 275,000 acres of 
preserved areas. Make no mistake — it is not only 
orchids and butterflies that benefit from these pre- 



serves. Natural resources in urban areas are called 
green infrastructure because they make major contri- 
butions to the quality of life of people in densely 
developed landscapes. Chicago's green infrastructure 
has been called our "barrier islands," protecting us 
from nature's fury by collecting, storing, and infiltrat- 
ing storm water. 

In 1995, The Field Museum along with 33 other 
conservation-conscious institutions launched an 
etTort called Chicago Wilderness (CW), dedicated to 
celebrating and expanding the area's tradition of con- 
servation. Today, CW has 182 member organizations 
that are changing the vision and management of our 
region fi-om one of many patches of green in a sea of 
people to that of a thriving metropolis with a valu- 
able green infrastructure essential to our welfare and 
worthy of our support. ITF 




'We cannot control 
nature, but we can try 
to be wise in living 
with nature.' 

- Laurel Ross 



19 



FROMTHEARC HIVES 



Field Museum Website to Feature 
World's Columbian Exposition Collection 



Stephen E. S'asli, PhD, Head of Collections, Department of Anthropology, Tfie Field Xtusaim 

One hundred-twelve years ago, visitors to Chicago were treated to a rare spectacle: 
a group of Eskimos in their traditional clothes walking in the summer heat through 
an Egyptian bazaar complete with "scandalous" belly dancers. These sights were part 
of the cultural displays at the World's Columbian Exposition, which opened to great 
fanfare on May 1,1893. 



Top: Potter)' from 
Graham Canyon, Utah, 
featured at the World's 
Columbian Exposition. 

Center: "Ferris Ulieel, 
and Bird's Eye Vieu' of 
Xliduwy. " Large pho- 
tographic print, 1894, 
from The White City 
(As It Was). Creator: 
Jackson, IVilliam Henry, 
1843-1942. 




Four times latter than any previous world's fair, the 
Columbian Exposition included 65,000 exhibits 
in 300 buildings spread over 686 acres in Jackson 
Park and the Midway Plaissance on Chicago's south 
side. When the E.xposirion closed on Oct. 31, 1893, 
more than 27 million people, a number at that time 
equivalent to half the population of the United 
States, \asited the fair and witnessed the debut of 
things such as the Ferris Wheel, Shredded Wheat, 
Aunt Jemimah Syrup and Cracker Jacks. 

The Columbian Exposition was also respon- 
sible for introducing the American public to the 
emerging science of anthropologv; More than 100 
anthropologists, government oiEcials, missionar- 
ies, and U.S. Army and Navy officers collected 
thousands of objects for the Columbian Exposition 
to showcase the development of cultures in the 
Americas. In addition, international commissions 
fix)m Australia, Brazil, Ceylon, Columbia, Ecuador, 
Eg%-pt. India, Italy. Japan, Java, Mexico. Sweden, and 
elsewhere sent exhibits highlighting their culture 

and history. All told, nearly 50,000 
anthropological objects were dis- 
played at the Exposition and later 
at the Columbian Museum, the 
predecessor to The Field Museum. 
Today, much of the Columbian 
Exposition collection is stored in 
the Museum's vaults, with only 



a handful of items on public display, such as the 
totem poles in Stanley Field Hall. 

With the assistance of a $146,000 grant from the 
Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelle\' Foundation, the 
Museum will be working over the next two years 
to digitally photograph the original Columbian 
Exposition collection and create a website that will 
include information about the objects, both in their 
historical context and within the framework of the 
World's Columbian Exposition. Highlights of the 
collection include an abundance of 1 9th century 
ethnographic objects, ranging fix)m Sri Lankan 
masks to Zulu artifacts from southern Africa. The 
collection also contains items that were particularly 
unique to the Columbian World's E.xposition, such 
as a 23-foot- wide by 13-foot-tall silk Japanese tap- 
estry made specifically for the event and which is 
currently on display in Japan. •; 

By September 2007, more than 20,000 items 
will be available for viewing through the website, 
allowing the pubhc to explore the complete col- 
lection for the first time in more than 100 years. 
The Museum also plans to digitize its collection 
of archival materials detailing the historical and 
cultural significance of the World's Columbian 
Exposition. 

For more information on this project; please insit the 
preliminary Columbian Exposition website at www. 
Jieldmuseum . org/wcecollection . 

"Rtiim ofYiuatan" outside of Anthropological 
Building from Columbian Gallery: A 
Portfolio of Photographs of the World's 
Fair, The Werner Compatiy, 1893. 




MEMBERSHIP/ANNUALFUNDNEWS 



Two Special New Membership Categories 



Royal Tut at $125, and Tut at Twilight at $250 



We've streamlined the advanced ticketing 
process, created concierge services, and 
added more value! Let us give you the 
royal treatment with four tickets to 
Tutankhaimm and the Golden Afie of 
the Pharaohs* at $10 each (a 33 percent 



discount off the public price), exclusive 
phone hodine, express ticketing line at 
the membership desk to obtain any tick- 
ets that might be available for that day or 
dates in the fliture, and two limited-edi- 
tion, collector membership cards. "Tut at 



Twilight" members will also receive two 
free tickets to their choice of 20 after- 
hour viewing opportunities — 
a $100 value! Learn more 
about these categories on 
www.fieldmuseum.org. 



Member Ticket Pre-Sale for King Tut 

Obtain your member tickets for Tutankhamun beginning Dec. 13 — five weel<s before the public sale. Member tickets 
are $10 each. The quantity available depends on your category of membership. Members may purchase additional 
tickets by ordering via the Museum's website www.fieldmuseum.org, by phone (312.665.7705), or at the member- 
ship services desk. A service charge will apply to phone and web sales. The exhibition opens to the public May 26, 
2006 and runs through Jan. 1, 2007. 

Membership Refund, Exchange and Lost Ticket Policy: Member discounted ticl<ets are non-refundable. Exchanges for discounted tickets or free tickets are 
allowed up to one day prior to the ticket date and only once per order "Tut at Twilight" and Annual Fund members may exchange tickets at any time. Lost 
tickets will be reissued to members if the Museum's membership department receives notice one day prior to the ticket date. 

Taxes and Tut: Two Good Reasons 

to G ive Before Year-End 



Congress has enacted the Katrina Emergency Tax Relief Act of 2005 (KETRA) to encourage charitable giving for the 
remainder of 2005. Although prompted by the crisis of Hurricane Katrina, KETRA encourages increased giving to all 
recognized public charities. Under KETRA, the contribution limit for gifts of cash (not securities) made by individuals 
to public charities such as The Field Museum has increased from 50% of adjusted gross income to 100% of adjusted 
gross income through Dec. 31. 

Being a donor in The Founders' Council is a wonderful way to experience Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the 
Pharaohs. All Founders' Council donors will be invited to an exclusive preview event. In addition, FC donors will receive 
four complimentary tickets and the opportunity to purchase an unlimited number of $10 discounted member tickets to 
the exhibition. For more information on end-of-year giving and The Founders' Council, please call 312.665.7773 or 
email fcouncil(a)fieldmusem.org. 





Annual Fund King Tu t Benefits 



Canopic Cofftiietie of'liitaiikhanitiii 



Becoming a donor to The Annual Fund 
is a great way to get the most out of 
your King Tut experience. All Annual 
Fund donors will be invited to an exclu- 
sive Tutankhamun and the Golden Ai^e of 
the Pharaohs preview event. In addition, 
Field Explorers and Field Naturalists 



($500 and above) will receive three com- 
plimentary tickets and the opportunity 
to purchase an unlimited number of 
$10 discounted member tickets. Field 
Adventurers ($250-$499) will receive two 
complimentary tickets and an unlimited 
number of $10 discounted member tick- 



ets. Field Contributors ($1.=)0-$249) will 
have the opportunity to purchase a total 
of eight $10 discounted member tick- 
ets. For more information on the many 
opportunities available with The Annual 
Fund, please call 312.665.7777 or email 
annualfund(^ fieldmuseum.org. 



Do Your Holiday Shop pin g at The Field Museum Stores 

Take a trip to sunny Italy by visiting The Pompeii Exhibition Store! We offer products that turn your bath into a Roman spa, including 
sponges, bath salts, robes, slippers and hand towels. Accent your holiday wardrobe with luxurious scarves, as well as pearl jewelry and 
hand-carved Italian lava cameos. For home and garden, we feature a mosaic wail fountain and Roman statuary and planters. Our Italian 
cuisine items include pasta, chocolates, olive oil and vinegar, and accoutrements for wine lovers. The stores also have toys and books 
about volcanoes as well as a volcano-shaped rock display. 

* The Exhibition is organized by National Geographic, Arts and Exhibitions International, and AEG Exhibitions 
in association with The Supreme Council of Antiquities of Egypt and The Field Museum. 
Tour Sponsor: Northern Trust. Chicago Sponsor; Exeion, Proud Parent of ComEd. 



WINTER 2005-2006 Dvccwher-Irhnuiry 



21 



Rehuildin g Your Museum 



New Collections Resource Center is Ready 
'^'^--Two Million Artifacts and Specimens 



Greg Borzo, Media Manager, Scientiftc Affairs 

On Sept. 12, The Field Museum officially opened its new, S65 million Collection Resource Center 
(CRC). Now begins the gargantuan task of moving about two million artifacts and specimens from over- 
crowded storage rooms into the 186,000-square-foot, chmate controlled facihrs- — a job that could take 
up to four years. Since many of the objects are especially large, the move will free up as much as one- 
third of the Museum's current collections space, some of which will be converted into public exhibition 
areas and a hands-on education center. 

Each item transferred into the CRC has a specific, designated place in one of the center's 45,500 
shelves, trays or drawers. But the CRC is much more than a big storage facihn.'. It houses more than 
10 scientific laboratories, a photography darkroom, x-ray equipment, and special rooms for freeznig and 
storing specimens of tissue, blood and DN A. It also includes conference and seminar rooms, and work- 
rooms where scholars can study the Museum's collections. 

The new t"acilit\' features innovative safer\- features, such as a fire-suppression system with hydrotluo- 
rocarbon gas as a first line of defense. Overhead water sprinklers would be used only as a last resort, since 
water would damage the priceless collections. The CRC was also designed with spark-proof rooms for 
storing specimens preserved in containers of fluid, typically 70 percent ethyl alcohol. To prevent any 
chance of a spark, no outlets or computers are allowed in these rooms, and all light fixtures are fiilly 
enclosed. Cables in the floors can 
detect if any alcohol — even one 
drop — is spilled. In that event, fans 
automatically draw off^the alcohol 
fumes, minimizing the risk of an 
explosion. 

The CRC expansion is 
expected to solve our growing 
needs for the next 25 to 30 years, 
according to Scott Demel. PhD, 
Field Museum collection project 
coordinator. 




Mar)' Aiiiie Rogers (left), collection manager, 
division of fishes, explains CRC storage during the 
Sept. 12 four 



A guest examines a cast of Sue's skull that will he 
moi'ed into the CRC. 



KaiiiAnffili 



Year-End Giving Check List 

• Complete all gifts by Dec. 31, 2005 to qualify for a 2005 tax 
deduction. 

• Keep all gift receipts and acknowledgment letters for your 
tax files. 

• For maximum tax benefits, consider giving securities that have 
increased in value and that you have owned for more than one year. 

• If you sold securities this year and owe capital gains taxes, 
remember that a gift to The Field Museum may partially or 
completely offset any tax liability on your gains. 



Please Note These Special Museum Hours 

The Museum will be open late on the following dates: 
Monday, Dec. 26 through Friday, Dec. 30, hours: 9am-7pm; 
last admission 6pm. 

Tlie Museum will close early on these dates: 
Thursday, Dec. 8, hours: 9am-3pm; last admission 2pm. 
Wednesday, Dec. 14, hours: 9am-4pm; last admission 3pm. 
Saturday, Dec. 24, hours: 9am-3pm; last admission 2pm. 
Saturday, Dec. 31, hours: 9am-3pm; last admission 2pm. 



.^' 




INTHEFI 



The Field Museum's Member Publication 



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The Science and 
the People Behind 
Our Newest 
Exhibition ^^ 



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FROMTHEPRESIDENT 




the Hearinf 



Our Mission 



The Field Museum's new permanent exhibition Evolving Planet opens March 10. 
exhibition, which covers 27,000 square-feet, presents the history of life as it has 
unfolded over Earth's long history through the process of evolution. 

The theory of evolution has taken center stage in recen t months in the media and 
our nation's court system. 



 jsrif:K=j!rjmt 



Rendering by Karen Carr 



Below: Members of the 
Museum 's Exhibitions 
Department who contrib- 
uted to Evolving Planet. 



Evolution is the accumulation of 
inherited changes in populations of 
organisms over the course of gen- 
erations. These changes can result 
either from mutation or from the 
recombination of genes. Over time, 
such changes can result in entirely 
new species. Evolutionary biology 
explains the process by which all 
life on Earth has come to exist 
and the interrelationships among 
species. 

Since 1893, Field Museum scien- 
tists have been actively engaged 
in research around the world, 
in their laboratories, and with 
the Museum's collections, which 



include over 23 million objects 
and specimens. Whether study- 
ing a fossil to gain a deeper 
understanding of T. rex, estab- 
lishing the ancestry of spiders, 
unraveling the genetic code of 
mushrooms, or digging into our 
own human origins, our scientists 
use evolutionary theory every day. 
This continuing commitment to 
deepening our knowledge of evolu- 
tion keeps us at the forefront of 
scientific research. Developing 
exhibitions and educational pro- 
grams that address evolution, 
meanwhile, keeps us true to our 
mandate to educate and inspire 




a broad public about the natural 
sciences. 

Theories — explanations that fit 
the evidence at hand — are meticu- 
lously tested through trained 
observation, repeatable experi- 
ments, and extensive peer review 
before they are accepted among 
the scientific community. From 
time to time, they are revised 
as new evidence arises. Although 
there is debate in the scientific 
community about exactly how 
evolution works, the theory itself 
has come up against no substantial 
conflicting scientific evidence. It 
is well established as the scientific 
explanation for our world's rich 
biodiversity, and has become the 
cornerstone of biology. Molecular 
biology, population biology, 
comparative anatomy, and paleon- 
tology all continue to deepen our 
understanding of evolution and 
extend its power to explain life on 
Earth. As a scientific institution, 
The Field Museum embraces its 
obligation to present evolution to 
the public as the explanation for 
the patterns of biodiversity that 
we see today. 

John W. McCarter, Jr. 
President and CEO 



What do yo u think a bo ut Tn t h e Fie ld? 



For general membership inquiries, including address changes, call 866.312.2781. For questions about 
the magazine In the Field, call 312.665.7115, email noshea@fmnh.org, or write Nancy O'Shea, Editor, 
The Field Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605-2496. 



.^ 



IN 



FIELD 



Spring 2006, March-May 
Vol.77, No. 2 

Editor: 

iMancy O'Shea, The Field Museum 

Design: 

Depke Design 



Oln the Field is printed on recycled paper 
using soy-based Inks. All images ©The 
Field Museum unless otherwise specified. 

In the Field (ISSN #1051-4546) is published 
quarterly by The Field Museum. Copyright 
2006 The Field Museum. Annual subscriptions 
are $20; $10 for schools. Museum membership 
includes In the Field subscription. Opinions 
expressed by authors are their own and do 
not necessarily reflect the policy of The Field 
Museum. Notification of address change should 
include address label and should be sent to 
the membership department. POSTMASTER: 
Send address changes to Membership, The 
Field Museum, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496. Periodicals postage 
paid at Chicago, Illinois. 

Cover: Two Herrerasaurus do battle in a scene 
that might have taken place 230 million years 
ago. The Field Museum's new Evolving Planet 
exhibition takes visitors on a journey through 
four billion years of life on Earth. Rendering by 
Karen Carr. 

The Field Museum salutes the people of Chicago 
for their long-standing, generous support of the 
Museum through the Chicago Park District. 



Field 



_i 



fe 



useum 



1400 South Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496 
312.922.9410 
www.fieldmuseum.org 




Our newest permanent exhibition, Epohing 
Planet, opens to the pubHc on March 1 0. It 
includes nearly 1,300 unique specimens and 
more than 100 interactive displays. 
Top: Artist Karen Carr's rendering ofDimetrodon, 
one of the most ferocious carnivores of the Permian 
Period (290—248 million years ago). 



4 



Evolving Planet's project manager and content 
specialist discuss how the Museum's exhibitions 
team and academic staff worked together to 
create the exhibition. 

Middle: Evolving Vhnet features 23 newly restored 
murals by Charles R. Knight. 



6 



The Field Museum's Education Department 
provides materials to help teachers and par- 
ents explain evolution. Also, Museum docents 
attended a series of special classes to prepare 
for Evolving Planet. 

Bottom: Museum educator Mara Cosillo-Starr with 
materials that teach children about Earth's history. 



16 



Throughout Evolving Planet, video presenta- 
tions allow visitors to meet nine Field Museum 
scientists and learn more about their research. 
These scientists, whose work helped shape the 
exhibition, are profiled in a special four-page 
article. 



Museum Campus Neighbors 



Adier Planetarium The popular sky-show Stars of the Pharaohs 
returns to the AdIer May 26 and runs through Jan. 1, 2007. 

Visit ancient Egyptian ruins — remnants of a vibrant civilization 
that was the most advanced and powerful on Earth. And don't 
miss the Adier's Far Out Fridays held the first Friday of every 
month — March 3, April 7, and May 5. Activities include tele- 
scope viewing of the night sky, unlimited shows in the Sky and 
StarRider Theaters, Doane Observatory tours, and more. Explore 
the universe at America's first planetarium, home to two full-sized 
theaters. For more information, visitwww.adlerplanetarium.org, 
or call 312. 922. STAR (7827). 



Shedd Aquarium Do you believe in dragons? You just might 
after meeting the Komodo at Shedd Aquarium. A mouth packed 
with sharp teeth and deadly bacteria, the ability to track its prey 
for miles, the hunger to devour an entire pig in 20 minutes — and 
those are its good qualities! Check out the Komodo, basilisks, 
caiman lizards, chameleons and more. From the tiny day gecko to 
the world's longest lizard, the crocodile monitor, they'll all be at 
Shedd starting April 8. For details, visit www.sheddaquarium.org 
or call 312.939.2438. 



SPRING 2006 .\larcli-Mdy m 







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EVOLVING PIAJ^ J:, , 

FOUR BILLION ^EARS4)f# 
LIFE ON EARTH '* 



The Field Museum's newest permanent exhibition, Evolving Planet, opens March 10. 
It's a fascinating journey through four billion years of life on Earth, from single-celled 
organisms to giant dinosaurs and our extended human family. Unique fossils, animated 
videos, hands-on interactive displays, and recreated seascapes and landscapes help tell 
the compelling story of evolution — the single process that connects everything that has 
ever lived on Earth. "Evo/v/ng Planet gives visitors a new look at the evolution of life 
on Earth, and the scientific evidence on which that story is based," says paleontologist 
Richard Kissel, the exhibition's content specialist. For example, he says, the recent dis- 
covery of dinosaurs with feathers and wishbones has all but cinched the case that birds 
are their direct descendents. In contrast, new scientific debates are swirling around 
life's origins: Did it arise near deep-sea hydrothermal vents, or were organic compounds 
brought to Earth on a meteorite? Meanwhile, new technologies for dating and analyzing 
fossils, along with DNA analysis, have cast new light on human evolution. 



In video presentarions throughout the exhibition, 
Field Museum scientists explain what we're still 
learning about the past, present, and future of life 
on Earth. (See page 16 for profiles of these scien- 
tists.) £i'()/i'/«(j Plane! illuminates both time-tested 
and emerging ideas about the evolution of life with 
state-of-the-art exhibition tools, including a spec- 
tacular animated screen that surrounds visitors with 
5()0-million-year-old sea creatures. 

But the real stars of the exhibition are the fos- 
sils, including hundreds never before displayed 
and nianv that are rare or exclusive to The Field 



Museum. Among them are the oldest known fossil 
of cells whose DNA is contained within a nucleus; 
the "Tully monster," an odd marine creature (and 
Illinois state fossil) discovered not far from Chicago; 
the oldest known complete skeleton of a bat, a 
creature that has scarcely changed in 50 million 
years; and several dinosaurs making their Field 
debut. 

A highlight of many visitors' journey through 
Evoli'iii(i Plaiicl will be the Mesozoic Era — the 
age of dinosaurs — and dinosaur fans of all ages are 
in for a treat! The new Genius Hall of Dinosaurs 



IN THE FIELD 



^::. 



'^'^ ^--^ 



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by Charles R. Knight. The Museum has beautifully 
restored these famous and beloved paintings that 
depict a world populated by T. rex, Triccratops and 
other long-extinct animals and plants. Nine Knight 
murals hang in the exhibition's dinosaur hall and 
are sure to ignite imaginations. 

The disappearance of dinosaurs made way for an 
astonishing diversity of mammals. There have been 
at least six mass extinctions since the dawn of life; 
each one allowed the surviving lineages to diversify 
as they developed new features and occupied new 
roles in an altered world. Euolving Planet explores 
the climate changes and environmental challenges 
that led to the diversification of mammals — from 
small rodents to the enormous short-faced bear 
making its first appearance in this exhibition. (See 
page 1 5 for more about the short-faced bear.) 

The past 65 million years hold many fascinat- 
ing stories, including how hoofed land mammals 
evolved into ocean-dwelling whales, and why two 
predators — separated by a vast sea and 25 million 
years — evolved the same saber-like teeth. Visitors 
will also learn about the origins of Homo sapiens, 
including the wide array of hominid species that 
comprise the many branches of our family tree. 



houses a gargantuan display, with authentic fos- 
sils and detailed casts spanning the era from 
Herrerasaurus, one of the earliest dinosaurs, to the 
ferocious meat-eaters of the Cretaceous Period. 
Among the long-necked sauropods are a 72- 
foot-long Apatosaurus; original bones from the 
Brachiosaunis (a cast of which stands guard outside 
the Museum), and the 18-foot-long youngster of 
a new dinosaur, Rapetosaums, discovered recently 
in Madagascar. The armored Stegosaums is here, as 
well as the horned and frilled ceratopsians and a 
pachycephalosaur with its huge helmet of bone. 
Representing the plant-eating ornithopods is a 
Parasaurolophus, newly mounted in a life-like pose. 

While Sue, the Field's premier theropod (meat- 
eater), holds court downstairs in Stanley Field Hall, 
Sue's world is represented in Evolving Planet by a 
variety of animal and plant fossils that were found 
along with the T. rex skeleton, including crocodiles, 
lizards, fish, and other dinosaur bones. Sue's close 
cousin, Dasplelosaurus, hunches over the body of a 
duck-billed hadrosaur. Nearby are another, more 
distant cousin, Allosaurus; the raptor Deinonychus; 
and Cryolophosaurus, one of the first dinosaurs 
found in Antarctica. 

As visitors dig deeper, they will discover what 
makes a dinosaur a dinosaur, what was happening 
to the Earth's climate and land masses during their 
time, and much more. There's a special activity area 
for junior dinosaur fans, with lots of interactive dis- 
plays. Evolving Planet prominently features 23 huge 
murals painted for The Field Museum 80 years ago 



^Evolving Planet gives visitors a new look at the 
evolution of life on Earth, and the scientific 
evidence on which that story is based/ 

One of the most fascinating stories is that of 
Lucy, an early member of our family from the 
species Australopithecus afarensis. A cast of Lucy's 
skeleton shows why her discovery in 1 974 was so 
significant: the shape of her pelvis and legs indicates 
she walked upright, like us; but her brain was small 
and her skull the size of a chimpanzee's. It was this 
discovery that convinced scientists that humans 
began to walk upright before our brains grew large, 
not the other way around. 

Evolving Planet is made possible by a gener- 
ous contribution from Anne and Kenneth Griflln. 
The Griflins said, "We are delighted to sponsor 
this amazing exhibition. We especially appreci- 
ate Evolving Planet's emphasis on showcasing 
Field Museum scientists and their discoveries. The 
Field Museum is an institution of international 
importance, providing educational experiences for 
millions of visitors over many generations. We are 
so pleased to be able to help make Evolving Planet 
possible." ITF 

For more information visit www.fieldmuseum.org/ 
evolvingplanet. 

Evolving Planet is made possible by Anne and Kenneth Griffin. Tfie Elizabeth 
Morse Genius Charitable Trust is the generous sponsor of Evolving Planet's 
Genius Hall of Dinosaurs. 



SPRING 2006 March-May 




AN INTERVIEW jiiTH RICHARD KISSEL AND TODD TUBUTIS 



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When Todd Tubutis was a high school student in the Chicago suburb of Park Forest, he wrote The Field 
Museum asking for a job. He was turned down. Undeterred, Tubutis went on to earn bachelor and master's 
degrees in anthropology and museum studies. In 2001, he was hired by The Field Museum's Exhibitions 
Department, and for the past five years has served as project manager for the Museum's new Evolving Planet 
exhibition. Paleontologist Richard Kissel, whose undergraduate and master's degrees are in geology, is finish- 
ing his dissertation in zoology. Since 2003, he has worked as Evolving Planet's content specialist— a job that 
requires him to use his knowledge of science to help shape an exhibition. 

While Tubutis and Kissel have different skills and educational backgrounds, both have made significant con- 
tributions to Evolving Planet and are proud of the impact the exhibition will have in presenting evolution to 
the public. In the Field talked to them about their work. 



ITF: What role did each of you play in the making 
of Evolving Planet? 

Tubutis: I led the development and design team 
responsible for revitalizing the former Life Over 
Time exhibition. As we progressed, it became clear 
that a brand new exhibition deserved a new name: 
Evolving Planet. 

Kissel: I ensured that all of the science in the exhi- 
bition is correct and up-to-date. I also acted as a 



liaison between the Exhibitions Department and 
the Geology Department. 

ITF: Why did the Museum decide to "revitalize" its 
exhibition on evolution? 

Tubutis: In 2001, we conducted a study and found 
that visitors were not leaving Life Over Time with 
the messages we wanted them to take away. There 
were elements of the exhibition that simply weren't 
working — some hands-on components often broke 



IN THE FIELD 




down and as a result, weren't conveying specific 
messages to our visitors. 

Since Life Over Time opened in 1994, much has 
happened — scientists have made many new discov- 
eries, and movies like Jurassic Park and TV programs 
such as those on the Discovery Channel have 
changed the public's expectations of how this kind 
of material is presented. Also, when our exhibition 
of Sue opened in 2000, it raised the bar for the way 
we exhibit and explain paleontology. 

ITF: How does the Museum's scientific staff work 
together with the Exhibitions Department? 

Kissel: As an educational institution, it's the 
Museum's responsibility to 
present scientifically accu- 
rate information to our 
visitors, so the Exhibitions 
Department works closely 
with the scientific staff as 
new exhibitions are devel- 
oped. Because of Evolving 
Planet's size and scope 
however, my position was 
created to lessen the bur- 
den on our already busy 
scientists. Thus, once the 
developers and I crafted 
label text and other ele- 
ments, the curators then reviewed our work. In that 
sense, they were basically checking my work, and 
they often had great suggestions for how to explain 
complicated concepts and theories — it was a nice 
collaboration. 

At the end of the day, I'm really proud of 
Evolving Planet. I've traveled to a lot of other 
museums around the world, and I think this exhibi- 
tion is one of the, if not the, most comprehensive 
explanation of the history of life on Earth in any 
museum anywhere — it's one-of-a-kind. 

ITF: As project manager, what were some of your 
biggest challenges? 

Tubutis: One of the biggest challenges was pro- 
tecting our unique collections. We had to build 
shelters for the large dinosaurs (that weren't going 
anywhere!) to protect them during construction. 
The 23 Knight murals had to be removed, cleaned, 
restored and reinstalled. They are very large works 
of art — some 25-feet long — and moving them was 
a challenge. Another challenge was coordinating 
the outside vendors and contractors who supplied 
us with specialized services. It was also my job to 
keep other Museum departments abreast of the 
project so that everyone could stay informed about 
Evolving Planet. 

ITF: What do you hope people wiU learn and 
remember after seeing the exhibition? 

Tubutis: I hope that visitors leave grasping our 



At left: Todd Tubutis 
and Richard Kissel 
discuss plans for the 
exhibition. 



main message: Evolution is a process that is ongo- 
ing — whatever has ever lived on Earth has led to 
the rich biodiversity we see today. At the end of the 
exhibition we talk about how the rate of extinction 
is as high today as it has ever been. Humans are in 
part responsible for that. We don't know what will 
happen next but, with or without humans, life will 
continue to evolve. 

Kissel: For me, it is all about the fundamental ques- 
tion, "How did life and the Earth that it inhabits 
get to where it is today?" I think people should be 
curious about this subject — it's a very compelHng 
story. I also hope that people leave Evolving Planet 
with a better understanding 
of the theory of evolu- 
tion — whether they choose 
to accept it or not, we want 
them to understand what it is 
all about. 

ITF: As scientists make new 
discoveries, will the exhibition 
change? 

Kissel: Yes, because new dis- 
coveries and ideas will always 
continue to refine our under- 
standing of Earth's past. A key 
objective of the exhibition's 
design was to account for 
this progress. For example, text panels can be eas- 
ily updated to incorporate new information, when 
necessary. 



\..this exhibition is one of the, if not the, most 
comprehensive explanation of the history of 
life on Earth in any museum anywhere — it's 
one-of-a-kind/ 

ITF: You've worked on this project for several years. 
Are far as your careers are concerned, what have 
you learned that will be helpful to you in the future? 

Tubutis: I've learned that even with solid exhibition 
goals and messages guiding your work, a design will 
inevitably undergo many changes — undoubtedly 
for the better — over a five-year span. 

Kissel: One of the greatest things a scientist can 
do is educate. Working so closely with the bril- 
liant exhibition developers of Evolving Planet has 
strengthened my ability to communicate with, and 
therefore educate, general audiences about science. 

ITF: What's next for both of you? 

Tubutis: For my next project, I'm working on Maps, 
an unprecedented exhibition featuring 1 00 of the 
world's greatest maps, opening in November 2007. 

Kissel: I'll concentrate on finishing that dissertation! 



SPRING 2006 March-May 



INTHEFIELDFEATURE 



Mara Cosillo- Starr, 
Field Museum resource 
center manager, with 
skulls that show human 
evolution. 



Museum's Education Programs Enhance 
Understanding of Evolution 

Eduarda Briseiio, Program Administrator, Field Museum Education Department 

Evolution. The word has sparked debate among school boards and legislatures across 
the country. The Field Museum embraces its obligation to present evolution to the pub- 
lic as the only scientific explanation for the origin of today's biodiversity. To help enrich 
this effort, the Museum's Education Department has developed a compelling slate of 
public and school programs designed to provide resources for families and schools on 
how to effectively teach evolution. 

Our teacher and student division will offer an 
expanded program including new student classes 
that explore the Earth and its creatures, and edu- 
cator workshops that allow teachers to preview 
the exhibition, discover links to Illinois Learning 
Standards, and develop focused activities they 
can use before, during, and after their field trip. 
In addition, a host of educational materials will 
provide visitors with tools for an in-depth explora- 
tion of evolution. A comprehensive, downloadable 
"Educator Guide to Evolving Planet" will introduce 
teachers to the various sections of the exhibition, 
provide information on how to plan field trips, and 
offer resources for further investigation of this topic. 
In addition, two specialized educator guides, focus- 
ing on teaching evolution and the importance of 
mass extinctions in Earth s history, will be available 
via our website and the Harris Loan Educational 
Loan Center. Educators and parents are encour- 
aged to stop by Harris Loan to borrow Experience 
Boxes that allow for further exploration of dino- 
saurs, hominids, and geologic timelines in their 
classrooms and homes. 

A fiill list of our education programs is available 
on the Evolving Planet website at www.fieldmu- 
seum.org/evolvingplanet. ITF 




Our public programs, for visitors of all ages, include 
a robust series of lectures, workshops, perfor- 
mances, and gallery programs designed to enrich 
the Museum visitor experience. Our "Evolving 
Science" lecture series will feature Field Museum 
scientists exploring topics as diverse as evolution- 
ary' genetics, primate evolution, and the evolution 
of dinosaurs. A staged reading o( Inherit the Wind 
will bring to life the Scopes Monkey Trial — the 
famous case in which a sci- 
ence teacher was accused 
of the "crime" of teaching 
evolution. An array of fam- 
ily programs wiU encourage 
children and their parents to 
discover the geologic time- 
line of the Earth, debate 
what killed the dinosaurs, 
and delight in a multitude of 
free gallery programs during 
opening v\"eekend's "Dinosaur 
Discovery Days." 



Evolving Planet Docents Help Explain Exhibition 

MaryAiiii Bloom. I'oiinikrr Coordin.ifor, 
Field .Mtisciiin Hiiiium Resources Dcpartmcin 



\ 



Volunteer docents often will be available in E\io\\i'mg 
Planet to enhance visitors' understanding of the exhi- 
bition. Our dedicated docents prepared for Evolving 
Planet by attending all-day training sessions held on 
nine consecutive Saturdays earlier this year! As part 
of the docent training, several Field Museum and 
University of Chicago scientists lectured about their 
evolution-based research. 



6 IN THE FIELD 



YOURGUIDETOTHEFIELD 



Calendar of Events for Spring 2006 March-May 



Inside: Exhibitions Festivals Family Programs Adult Programs 



Programs at 
a Glance 

Details inside! 
Family Programs 

Family Overnights 3/24, 4/14 & 5/6 

Two of Us Worl<shops starting 3/7. 4/4 & 5/2 

Create a Play in One Day! 3/U 

Inlierit the Wind 3/18 & 19 

Mazon Creek Fieldtrip 3/25 or 4/22 

What Killed the Dinosaurs? 4/22 

Birth of the Earth Workshop 5/5 & 5/12 

Adult Programs 

Evolving Science Lectures 3/11, 4/8, 4/29, 
& 5/13 

Last Supper Lecture 3/25 

Ozone Shield Lecture 3/25 

Ancient Americas Course/Fieldtrip 4/5-5/10 

Fossils Fieldtrip 5/6 

Auschwitz Lecture 5/12 

Bird Watching Workshop 5/13 

Cultural Connections 3/18. 4/19, & 5/17 

Tutankhamun Opening 

Egyptian Hieroglyphs Course 5/18-6/22 
Egypt Discovery Days 5/26-29 
Create a Play in One Day! 5/27 
Exhibiting a Legend Lecture 5/27 

National Geographic Live! Series 

Exploring Bhutan 3/14 
Chasing the Tornado 3/28 
Three Among the Wolves 4/25 
In Search of King Tut 5/23 



_Ih£ 




Luseum 




Final Weeks! 

Tlnou^h March 26, 2006 




POMPEI I 

STORIES FROM AN ERUPTION 

Two thousand years ago a vibrant society disappeared beneatin 
the ashes of Vesuvius. Now you can uncover its buried 
treasures — and its human drama — at The Field Museum. 

The exhibition was organized by the Ministero per i Beni e le Attiviti Culturali, Soprintendenza archeologica di 
Pompei, Soprintendenza per i Beni Archeoiogici delie province di Napoli e Caserta, Regione Campania. 



Presented by Harris Bank 



Featured Lecture 

The Restoration of Da Vinci's The Last Supper 

Pinin Brambilia Barciloii, Chief Curator 



-4^ 



Explore the controversial techniques employed to restore Leonardo da Vinci's The 
Last Supper. Barcilon will illustrate how the restorers cleaned and restored the paint- 
ing according to contemporary textual descriptions, and will address the concerns of 
critics of the restoration. This lecture will spark the imagination of anyone who appre- 
ciates the beauty, technical achievements, 
and fate of Renaissance painting. Lecture will 
be presented in Italian, with an interpreter. 

Saturday March 25, 2pm 

$16, students /educators $14, members $12 

Special thanl<s to the Consulate General of Italy in Chicago and the 
Italian Cultural Institute in Chicago for tft'^ir valuable support of 
these public programs. 



kLJb KiL^ 




General Museum Information: 312.922.9410 

Family and Adult Program Tickets and Information: 312.665.7400 

Please note: Refunds will be issued by Field Museum staff, minus a $10 processing fee, for group and family overnights only. No 
refunds or exchanges are permitted for any otfier programs. Fees for programs cancelled by The Field Museum will be refunded in full. 



SPRING 2006 March-May 



Your Guide to the Field: Calendar of Events for Spring 2006 March-May 



Explore the history and 
evolution of our planet 



Opens March 10 

To celebrate the grand opening of Evolving Planet, we've compiled 
a host of great programs^ from fieldtrips to lectures to workshops 
for the whole family. Visit this dynamic new exhibition and find out 
more about the history of life on Earth! 



c^i 



I 



Children's Workshop 



Create a Play in One Day! 

Foundation Theatre Group 

Put your little one in the director's chair! 
Children ages 5-11 will write a short 
dinosaur play under the tutelage of 
professional actors, cast it with their new 
friends from the workshop, create their own 
costumes, and perform for the general 
public at the Museum that same day. 

Saturday, March 11, 10am— 2pm rehearsal, 
2:30 performance 
$16, members $12 



Family Programs 

Inherit The Wind 



Witness a multi-media adaptation of this famed play directed 
by Bernie Sahlins, co-founder of Chicago's Second City. 
Inherit the Wind brings to life the "Scopes Monkey Trial" of 
1925, presenting two great lawyers arguing the case for and 
against a science teacher accused of the "crime" of teaching 
evolution. 

Saturday and Sunday, March 18 and 19, 1pm 
$16, students /educators $14, members $12 

What Killed the Dinosaurs? 
You decide! 

Families are invited to determine history! 
The most scientifically credible dinosaur 
extinction theories will be presented in 
this live theatrical program where you the 
audience will help decide which theory might be correct. The 
Field Museum is collaborating with WGN radio personality 
John Williams and the Galileo Players comedy troupe to bring 
dinosaur extinction theories to life in this exciting, all-ages, 
interactive variety show. 

Saturday, April 22, 11am 

$16, students /educators $14, members $12 



The Birth of The Earth 

Dive into Earth's history in two workshops focusing on the 
evolutionary and geologic timeline of the Earth and 
our region. You and your little ones will learn 
how It's possible that there were once icebergs in 
Illinois! For families with children ages 7-12. 

Fridays, May 5 and 12, 6— 8pm 
$30, members $24 
session: $15, 





8 IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 



General Museum Information: 312.922.9410; Family and Adult Program Tickets and Information: 312.665.7400 



Evolving Science Lectures 

Can 200 Million-Year-Old Leaves Predict the 
Future for Plant Biodiversity? 

Dr. Jennifer McElwain, FM Dept. of Geology 

Take a virtual expedition to chilly 
Greenland to see how fossil plants 
are helping scientists untangle the 
mysteries of ancient global warming 
trends — and helping shape predic- 
tions about the effects of future global 
warming on Earth's biodiversity and 
ecology. 

Saturday, March 11, 1:30pm 
Free with Museum admission 

Primate Evolution: From Early Origins 
to the Neanderthals 

Dr Robert Martin, FM Provost 

Learn about the latest issues and discoveries in 
primate evolution from one of the world's foremost 
experts. Dr. Martin will trace the origins of the primate 
evolutionary tree and analyze new evidence that confirms 
Neanderthals as a species separate from modern humans. 

Saturday, April 8, 1:30pm 




Free with Mu 



seiini admission 



The View from the Center of the Universe 

Drjoel Primacli and Nancy Ahrams, UC Santa Cruz 

Get an entertaining glimpse at the new pictures of the uni- 
verse that are emerging from modern cosmological research. 
Their latest book will also be available for purchase and 
signing. 

Saturday, April 29, 1pm 
Free wilii Museum admission 



Dining at the Garden of Eden: Diadectids and 
the Evolution of the Modern Ecosystem 

Richard Kissel, FM Exhibitions Dept. 

Travel back 300 million years to the emergence of diadectids, 
Earth's first herbivores, which signaled an important step in the 
evolution of Earth's modern ecosystems. Dissect the herbivore's 
roles in the larger ecosystem, and see how paleontologists inter- 
pret the diets of these and other long-extinct creatures. 

Saturday, May 13, 1:30pm 
Free with Museum admission 




Adult Field Trip 

Fantastic Fossils 

Dave Dolak, Cohimhia College 

Identify and collect fossils with the help 
of Museum experts. You'll travel to the 
world-famous Ordovician outcrop near 
Brookville, Indiana, where geologists 
have found a number of well preserved 
fossils from 450 million years 
Adults only please. Please 
register by May 1. 

Saturday, May 6, v 

7 am— 7pm 

$105, members $95 



/^ 



Special Artists at the Field 





Examine the work of EvoMng Planet illustrator Karen Carr, 
and learn what it takes to depict scenes of life on Earth mil- 
lions of years ago. Come early, visit with the artist, and sign 
up for a special guided tour of the exhibition with Ms. Carr 
(limited to 45 participants). 

Saturday, March 11, 10am— nooti. Tour: 1pm 
Free with Museum admission 



Evolving Planet is made possible by Anne and Kenneth Griffin. The Elizabeth Morse Genius 
Charitable Trust is the generous sponsor of Evolving PianeVs Genius Hall of Dinosaurs. 



SPRING 2006 Mnrch-Miiy 



Family Workshops 



Two of Us 



1f« 



Join us in one of these four-week excursions through the 
wonders of The Field IVIuseum! You and your little one will 
travel the Museum's exhibition halls, sing songs, hear sto- 
ries, touch objects, make art projects, and enjoy snacks. 
Choose from one of the following sessions: 



Dinosaurs and Fossils 

Tuesdays. March 7-28, W-Uatii 

Insects and Soil 

Tuesdays, April 4—25, iO—iiam 

Native American Cultures 

Tuesdays, May 2— 23, W—llam 

Each four-week session: 

$32, members $27 

For each 3—5 year old child with 

paid attendance, one adult chaperone 

attends free. 





Adult Lecture 



Is Earth's Ozone Shield Recovering? 

Dr. Paul A. Newman, NASA Goddard Space Fli^^ht 
Center, Dr Stephen Andersen and Dr. Drusilla Hujord, 
Environmental Protection Agency 

Despite ongoing expectations that the ozone hole will 
recover, we have yet to see evidence that a recovery 
is underway. Explore the important issues that have 
resulted from climate change during this timely lec- 
ture, the second in a series of forums organized by the 
Adier Planetarium. This forum will inspect the history 
of the ozone hole, examine its potential effects on human- 
ity, and lay out plans for present and future recovery 
events. 

Saturday, March 25, 10am— noon 
Free with Museum admission 
To register or for more information visit 
wuv. adicrplanctarium . org/climatcchange. 



Summers on the 
Museum Campus 

Summer World's Tour is right 
around the corner! Children 
ages 5-10 are invited to 
unearth the mysteries of King 
the Field, explore the 

verse at the Adier Planetarium, and dive into the 
reat Lakes at Shedd Aquarium. Choose one of 
four sessions, beginning July 10. Call the Adier 
Planetarium at 312.322.0329 for registration 
information. 

Too old for summer camp? Teens can get involved 
with the Field's Summer Teen Volunteer Program. 
Fulfill community service requirements while 
getting an inside look at the Museum, talking 
with visitors, and exploring natural history. To be 
considered, complete the on-line volunteer applica- 
tion by April 15 or call 312.665.7503 for more 
information. 



Adult Course/Fieldtrip 

Discover the Ancient Americas II 

Dr. Ma.xine McBrinn, FM Anthropology Dept. 

Delve into the fascinating world of the ancient 
Americas, and visit surviving relics. Building on 
the fall 2005 class (not a prerequisite), this 
multi-part adult course will explore the his- 
tory of the people of the Americas, and give 
' you a preview of the new Ancient Americas 
exhibition opening in 2007. You'll finish the 
course by traveling to Cahokia Mounds State 
Park, center of the Mississippian world and the 
largest center of population in prehistoric native 
America north of Mexico City. 

Wednesdays, April 5-May 10, 6-8:30pm 
Course and Field trip: $145, members $130 
Field trip only: Saturday, June 3, 6ani-8pm 
$85, members $75 




Below is a calendar of current and upcoming temporary exhibitions. Some dates may change. 
Hsit our websitP at vwAV.fieldmuseum.ora or call 312.922.9410 as the date of vour visit nears 




Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs 

May 26, 2006-January 1, 2007 



Jungles 

Through March 5 



.«• 



Family Overnight 

Dozin' With The Dinos 

Sue the 7. rex is having a sleepover! Join us for a night of fam- 
ily worl<shops, tours and performances. Explore ancient Egypt by 
flashlight, prowl an African savannah with man-eating lions and 
take a stroll through the Royal Palace in Bamun, Africa. Then 
spread your sleeping bag amidst some of our most popular exhibi- 
tions. The event includes an evening snack and breakfast. 

Fridays, March 24, April 14, and Saturday May 6 
5:45pm until 9am the following day 
$47, members $40 



Adult Workshop 

Bird Watching on the Museum Campus 

Dr Dave WiUard, FM Division of Birds 

Focus a stroll through the beautiful Museum Campus by looking for 
birds with a Museum bird expert. See a small snapshot of the more 
than 100 different bird species that migrate through the wooded 
and grassy areas of Chicago during the month of May. 

Saturday, May 13, 8-1 0am 
$15, members $12 





Pompeii: Stories from an Eruption 

Through March 26 







Family -^ 
Field Trips 

Fossil Hunt at Mazon Creek 

Dave Dolak, Columbia College 

Do you like to hunt fossils? Come with 

us to the world-famous Mazon Creek site, 

and discover what Illinois was like more than 

300 million years ago! Plan on a one-quarter mile walk to fossil 

locations. For families with children ages 8-17. 

Choose one Saturday: March 25 or April 22, Sam— 3pm 
$40, members $30 M 





Cultural Connections 

Join an intercultural dialogue among 
cultural centers and museums around 
the Chicago region. Programs include 
a one-hour presentation focusing on 
this year's theme. The Language of 
Looks, followed by lively discussion 
over a meal about the role that appear- 
ance plays in communicating identity 
and values. For more information, call 
312.665.7474, or visit www.fieldmu- 
seum.org/ccuc. 

March 18: Mirror, Mirror On The 
Wall... How Am I Perceived By All? 

April 1 9: Traditional Yet Contemporary 

May 1 7: Beauty hi Action 

Cultural Connections has received generous support from The Institute of Museum and Library 
Services, Kraft Foods, Polk Bros. Foundation, Chase, Chicago Public Schools' Office of Language 
and Cultural Education, Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, Illinois Humanities Council, and Charles 
and M.R. Shapiro Foundation. 





Dinosaur Dynasty: Discoveries from China 

Through April 23 



TUTANKHAMUN 



And The Golden Age of The Pharaohs 



May 26. 2006 -Jaiwary /. 2007 

.art in the first of many education programs designed to help you further explore this exciting exhibition. 



Adult Course 

Egyptian Hieroglyphs for 
Museum Goers 

Emily Teeter, Egyptologist 

Take a crash course in Egyptian hiero- 
glyphs! You'll get an introduction to 
the texts that commonly appear on 
objects like sculptures of royalty and 
everyday artifacts. Learn to translate 
the meaning of these texts, using the 
collections of the Oriental Institute and 
The Field Museum as your guides. The 
course includes a "pop quiz" on the inscrip 
tions found in the Tutankhamun exhibition. 

Tliursdays, May 18, 25, and June 1 at OI, 

7- 8:30pm 

Thursdays, June 8 and 22, 7-8:30pm, and Saturday, June 24, 

W:30am—noon at FM 

Six session course: $214, OI and FM members $184 (Note:Tliere 
will be a small materials fee for a packet of handouts and readings 
to be provided by the instructor.) 

To register, please contact Oriental Institute Museum Education at 
113. 102.9501, or register online at the Oriental Institute website: 
unmi'. oi. uchicago. edu . 



Egypt Discovery Days 

Get some hands-on experience with ancient 
Egypt! Participate in special Interpretive 
Station activities — families can play the 
giant Senet Game, see their name in 
hieroglyphs, or help construct a giant 
pyramid. 

Friday— Monday, May 26—29, 10am— 2pm 
Free with Museum admission 





Create a Play in One Day! 

Foundation Theatre Group 

Put your little one in the director's 
chair! Children ages 5-11 will write 
a short Egypt-themed play under the 
tutelage of professional actors, cast it 
with their new friends from the work- 
shop, create their own costumes, and 
perform for the general public at the 
Museum that same day. 

Saturday, May 21, 10am-2pm rehearsal, 
2:30 performance 
$16, members $12 

Adult Lecture 

Tutankhamun: Exhibiting a Legend 

David Silverman, Exhibition Curator 

Follow the legend of King Tutankhamun 

back nearly 100 years, from the discovery 

of his extraordinary tomb to the treasures of 

the current exhibition. The curator of both 

exhibitions (1977 and today) will talk about 

the excavation of the tomb and the subsequent exhibitions that 

sparked Egyptomania in the US. Regain a sense of nostalgia about 

the 1977 exhibition and discover the new technologies that have 

made this new gathering of artifacts all the more important. 

Saturday, May 21, 2pm 

$16, students /educators $14, members $12 



An exhibition from National Geographic. Organized by Arts and Exhibitions International and AEG 
Exhibitions in association with The Supreme Council of Antiquities of Egypt and The Field Museum. 

Tour Sponsor: Northern Trust 

Chicago Sponsor: Exelon, Proud Parent of ComEd 




The Auschwitz Album: The Story of a Transport 

Through June 4 



Transforming Tradition: Pottery from Mata Ortiz 

Through May 31 



General Museum Information: 312.922.9410; Family and Adult Program Tickets and Information: 312.665.7400 



NATIONAL 
GEOGRAPHIC 



Chase a tornado, observe wolves in the Arctic, and explore 
ancient Egypt in our fifth year of National Geographic 
Live! presentations. Get your tickets early to see the best 
photographers, explorers, and conservationists bring their 
dramatic adventures to The Field Museum. 



^m 



mM'i 



Exploring Bhutan 

Michael Hawlcy, Computer Scientist and Explorer 

Jump into the mind of one of the world's most visionary think- 
ers who is changing the way we think about sharing and utilizing 
Information. A real renaissance man, Hawley will take you on a 

visual odyssey across Bhutan 
with vibrant photographs 
from his recently published 
book on the Himalayan king- 
|| dom. After the presentation, 
take a closer look at the 
book — the largest ever pub- 
lished — for yourself! 

Tuesday, March 14, 7:30pm 

Chasing the Tornado 

Tim Samaras, Severe-Storm Researcher 

Follow the winding path of some of Earth's most destructive nat- 
ural phenomena. You'll hear some of Samaras' harrowing stories 
of storm chasing in tornado country, and how he is carefully 
engineering probes that will teach us more about the dynamics 
of twisters. 

Tuesday, Marcli 28, 7:30pm 






Three Among the Wolves 

Helen Thayer, Explorer 

Walk in the way of the wolf with Helen Thayer and Charlie, 
her half-dog, half-wolf companion. Thayer will recount the 
extraordinary education she and her husband received living 
among packs of wolves in the Canadian Yukon and Arctic, using 
Charlie as an interpreter between wolf and man. 

Tuesday, April 25, 7:30pm 
In Search of King Tut 

Zahi Hawass, Egyptologist 

Get a first-hand look at the CT scans and 
other Investigations being performed on 
Tutankhamun and other ancient mummies of 
Egypt. Dr. Hawass is leading an International 
team of scientists in this provocative look at 
one of antiquity's most enduring mysteries. 

Tuesday, May 23, 7:30pm 

Note: Tickets for this presentation in James Simpson Theatre are 
sold out, but additional tickets are now on sale for guests who 
would like to watch a hue video feed ofDr Hawass's presentation 
in nearby Montgomery Ward Lecture Hall. These tickets are $16, 
members $12, students /educators $10, and are only available by 
phone, at 312.665.7400. 



Ticket Information 

Call 312.665.7400 or visit www.nationalgeographic.com/nglive to purchase tickets. A limited number will be available onsite the day of the 

event starting at 5:30pm, but we recommend reserving tickets in advance since this series sells out. 

Also, a series subscription makes a great gift! We'll send the tickets along with a personalized gift card at your request. 

Individual Events 

Patron (reserved seating) $30; TFM, NG and Geographic Society of Chicago members $28. 
General admission: $24; TFM, NG and Geographic Society of Chicago members $22; students $15. 

Educators— Student programs, teacher workshops, and online lesson plans are provided in conjunction with the series. For more information, go to 
nationalgeographic.com/nglive or call 312.665.7500. 

National Geographic Live) educational programs are made possible by the generous support of Plum Creel< Timber Company. 



Investigate historic tragedies 
and ancient fossils 



The Auschwitz Album: The Story of a Transport 

Through June 4 

Striking black-and-white photographs taken by Nazi S.S. officers provide 
the only visual record of the arrival and imprisonment of Hungarian 
Jevi/s in the Auschwitz Birkenau concentration camp. 

Free Lecture: Auschwitz: The Making and Unmaking of Hell 

Dr. Robert Jau mu Pelt, School of Architecture, University of Waterloo 

Find out more about the history of this infamous camp. Dr. van Pelt will use the 
exhibition photographs — and more — to describe a day in the life of Auschwitz, 
situating the human experience within the camp's larger history and purpose. 

Friday, May 12, Ipni 

Free mth Museum admission 

This exhibition was created by Yad Vashem, The Holocaust Martyrs' and Heroes' Remembrance Authority in Israel. 
The Field Museum presentation is made possible by the American Society for Yad Vashem. 

Generous support has been provided by the Crown Family. 



Dinosaur Dynasty: Discoveries from China 

Don't miss your chance to see these remarkable dinosaurs before they make their way 
back to China! 

This exhibition was produced by DinoDon Inc., in cooperation with Beringta Ltd. and the Inner Mongolian Museum. 
— „ 





Visitor Information 





Getting Here: Field Museum visitors can park in Soldier Field's parking garage. 
Visitwww.fieldmuseum.org for information on parking lots/rates, free trolleys and public transit. 

Hours: 9am-5pm daily. Last admission at 4pm. Please note the Museum closes at 5pm even when an 
evening event is scheduled. Event participants will be asked to leave the building until 30 minutes before 
their event begins. 

Admission and Tickets: Member passes can be reserved through the membership department 
(312.665.7705) or picked up at the membership services desk. For non-members, The Field Museum's 
gold pass, which includes general admission plus one special exhibition, ranges in price from $8 to $19, 
depending on your age category and whether you are a Chicago resident. Please bring your ID to receive 
the appropriate ticket price. 

Tickets are available at the Museum's admission desks, or in advance via www.fieldmuseum.org or 866. 
FIELD. 03. For all admission and ticket details, visit www.fieldmuseum.org. 

Accessibility: Visitors using wheelchairs or strollers may be dropped off at the new east entrance. 
Handicapped parking and wheelchairs are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Call 312.665.7400 
to check on the accessibility of programs that take place outside of the Museum. 

Information: 312.922.9410 orvwww.fieldmuseum.org 



FESTTTiimngTTrnT'l'qiy^Tr 



useum programs are partiaiiy 
...U of Cultural Affairs and the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency. 

: Amendments Act of 1972, we do not discriminate on the basis of sex in our programs or aaivities. Please call 312.665.7271 to contact our Title IX Coordinator 
id ;^oii have any questions or concerns. 



14 IN THE FIELD CALENDAR 



Rendering by Karen Carr 




THE GIANT 
SHORT-FACED BEAR 








One of the most spectacular 
<■' fossils in the Evolving Planet exhi- 

bition is that of a giant "short-faced" 
bear. The bear, Arctodus simus, weighed 
V up to one ton and (when standing on all 
four limbs) was about five feet tall at 
I ''' the shoulder, making it one of thelargest 

^' terrestrial mammalian carnivores the world 

has ever known. Its nickname comes from the short 
snout that made its face look almost cat-like. 

Its large canine teeth were similar to those of today's living 
cats and were capable of delivering an exceptionally strong bite. 
Because of its meat-shearing teeth and powerful jaw muscles, sci- 
entists think the short-faced bear may have been more carnivorous 
than living bears, with the exception of the polar bear. Unlike today's 
bears, the short-faced bear had long, slender limbs and walked flat- 
footed, paws pointed forward (not inward, as today's bears walk). The 
limb structure tells scientists that short-faced bears could probably 
run fast, and the bear's height would have helped it see over tall grass 
and other vegetation — important for hunting large herbivores such as 
camels, bison and horses. 

The habitat of the giant short-faced bear was widespread over 
North America— from Alaska and Canada into central Mexico. 
Humans may have helped cause the extinction of the short- 
faced bear about 12,000 years ago by competing more 
' successfully for the same prey. Some remains of this powerful 
carnivore have been found at ancient sites containing human 
' artifacts and remiains. 

'riii< Sdciiti:i!'f Pitk ii\i< ilicsai by Riduml Kissel, exhibition avitent sneciiilist 



'litis Siicmisi's Pith \i;is clioi 
for Evolving Planet. 



R('ii/7/((,' tip on its bitik loi^s, tite slton-fdieti bear in Evolvu 
PLmct is dboin 12 feet rail. 



SPRING 2006 March-Miy 15 




L^iilta-tiiltWl 



EV0LVINGTL™ET FEi 

OF THESE FIELD MUSEUM SCIENTISTS 



Greg Borzo, Media Manag^er, Scientific Affairs 




Robert D. Martin, PhD, Anthropology Department Curator, 
Biological Anthropology and Provost, Academic Affairs 

Dr. Martin has devoted his career to exploring the evolutionary tree of primates. In addition to our own 
species, Homo sapiens, the order Primates contains about 350 other living species, from lemurs to mon- 
keys to apes. In his quest to achieve a reliable reconstruction of primate evolutionary history. Dr. Martin 
has studied an array of characteristics of living primates, including anatomy, physiology, chromosomes and 
DNA. He has been particularly interested in the brain and reproductive biology, as these systems have been 
of special importance in primate evolution. Additionally, there are almost 500 primate fossil species dating 
back 55 million years. For skeletal features, it is possible to include the fossil evidence, and thus geological 
time, in the picture. By studying living primates in the forests of Africa, Madagascar, Brazil, and Panama, 
Dr. Martin has also been able to include behavior and ecology in an overall synthesis. 

In his own words: Understanding primate evolution is an essential basis for interpreting the special case of human 
evolution. Without this secure foundation, it is exceedingly difficult to produce convincing explanations for the evolution 
of our many special features. If we only compare humans and our closest relatives, the great apes, any conclusions that 
we draw have no generality and are not testable. 

One good illustration of the need for broad comparisons is provided by investigations of the timescale for primate 
evolution. Although the earliest known primate fossils are 55 million years old, our statistical analysis allowing for gaps 
in the fossil record indicates that primates actually diverged from other mammals about 90 million years ago. Wlien this 
result is applied to human evolution higher up in the tree, it emerges that our lineage probably branched away at least 
eight million years ago, earlier than previously thought. 




Lance Grande, PhD, Geology Department Curator, Fossil Fishes 
and Vice President and Head of Collections and Research 

Dr. Grande is trained as a biologist and a geologist. He studies the comparative osteology (structure and 
function of bones), ontogeny (developmental history) and biogeography (geographic distribution through 
time) of fossil and living fishes. His work, largely funded by the National Science Foundation, has focused 
on the ray-finned fishes (Actinoptcrygii), a group containing half of all known vertebrate animals. Dr. 
Grande is also interested in the philosophy and application of methods used to interpret evolutionary rela- 
tionships and Earth history. Some of the fish groups on which he has conducted major studies include the 
Siluriformes (catfishes), Clupeomorpha (herring and herring-like fishes), Osteoglossomorpha (bony-tongues) 
and several more primitive groups (gars, bowfins, sturgeons, and paddlefishes). Dr. Grande is also interested 
in the origin and evolution of the modern North American fi-eshwater fish fauna as well as in develop- 
ing new techniques for preparing fish fossils so their skeletons can be more productively used for detailed 
comparisons with living fishes. Every year he conducts fieldwork in the famous Green River Formation 
in Wyoming, where he works in some of the world's most productive fossil beds and often teaches a field 
course called Stones and Bones through the Graham School at the University of Chicago. The Green River 
Formation contains a rich fossil bonanza comprised of a beautifuOy preserved, extinct, 52-million-year-old 
tropical lake community containing millions of fossil organisms, from microscopic bacteria and insects to 
13-foot-long crocodiles and palm trees. 

In his own words: /( is both an honor and a terrific opportunity to oversee the largest, most diverse fossil fish collec- 
tion in North America, containing more than 35,000 specimens — from single fish skeletons to large slabs of rock with 
more than 200 individual fish. As a biologist, I also work extensively with living fishes. In addition to our huge fossil 
fish collection in the Geology Department, The Field Museum has the good fortune of having over two million recent 
fishes in the Zoology Department, and of being located near the Shedd Aquarium with all its wonderful resources. 
Today there is no better place in the world to study the evolution and biodiversity of fishes than The Field Museum. 



16 IN THE FIELD 



Olivier Rieppel, PhD, Geology Department Curator, Fossil Amphibians and Reptiles 

During the Mesozoic, also called the "Age of Reptiles," a number of reptile lineages secondarily adapted to 
a life in the sea. Over the past few years. Dr. Rieppel has pursued the global revision ofTriassic stem-group 
Sauropterygia, marine reptiles that later gave rise to the more widely known plesiosaurs, pliosaurs and elas- 
mosaurs of the Jurassic and Cretaceous. This work provided the basis for the ongoing collaborative research 
program with faculty and students of the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology 
in Beijing, focusing on new collections ofTriassic marine reptiles from southern China. These new 
collections require taxonomic work not only on sauropteryians, but also on other marine reptiles such 
as protorosaurs.The Triassic record of marine reptiles is rich and diverse, and allows the study of broad 
evolutionary patterns as originally terrestrial lineages adapted to marine habitats. 

More recently, Dr. Rieppel became involved with research on the origin of snakes. This collaborative 
research seeks to integrate paleontology, comparative morphology and molecular 
systematics.The origin of snakes is a longstanding problem in the evolution of reptiles 
that still awaits a satisfactory resolution. It is now embedded in a broad-scale investiga- 
tion of the evolutionary history and relationships of squamate reptiles (snakes, worm 
lizards and other lizards) as part of the Tree of Life program sponsored by the National 
Science Foundation. 

In his own words: Researching the evolution of various reptile lineages and reconstructing their 
phylogenctic past raises a number of theoretical and methodological issues that require philosophi- 
cal analysis. I take an active interest in the history and philosophy of comparative biology. 



Peter Maitovicky, PhD, Geology Department Curator, Dinosaurs 

Dr. Makovicky studies the evolutionary history of dinosaurs. His research is particularly focused on small 
theropods (carnivorous dinosaurs) and how they evolved into living birds. The theropods closely related to 
birds had wing feathers, brooded their nests, and were small animals that were virtually indistinguishable 
from the earliest bird, Archaeopteryx, in all but a few features. Dr. Makovicky also focuses on the horned 
dinosaur group Ceratopsia, which includes animals such as Triceratops and Protoceratops. He has conducted 
fieldwork in Wyoming, China, India, and Argentina, and has described six new dinosaur species with col- 
leagues from various parts of the world. 



Top: The world of dino- 
saurs shown in a Charles 
R. Knight mural in 
Evolving Planet. 




1/GN9029'1.55D 




In his own words: In 1995, ive had strong evidence that birds evolved from small, carniv- 
orous dinosaurs like Velociraptor. Nevertheless, there was still a gap between the anatomy 
of birds and non-avian theropods. There was also much debate regarding how many of the 
traits that characterize birds, such as feathers, flight ability, and nest care, may have evolved. 

In the intervening decade, new theropod discoveries from around the world have provided 
amazing answers to many of these questions. 



Below: Painting of Sue 
by John Gurche. 




.^ 



SPRING 2006 .\l,mli-.\l,iY 



Wk 



fi'* « 4 



^ 



■dIM 




Meenakshi Wadhwa, PhD, Geology Department Curator, Meteorites 

Meteorites are rocks that have fallen to the surface of the Earth from interplanetary space. They are "spa 
probes" that allow us to explore other worlds. While most meteorites originated from 
asteroids, scientists beUeve a few were ejected by large impacts on the surfaces of the mo 
and Mars. Dr. Wadhwa studies the chemistry of these "rocks from space" to understand 
how and when our solar system and the planets within it were formed. 

To do this work, she has established a state-of-the-art geochemistry and geochronolog 
laboratory at The Field Museum. Dr. Wadhwa is a team member of Genesis, the NASA 
spacecraft mission that brought back samples of solar wind (streams of particles flowing 
outwards from the sun). She will be studying these samples to understand the chemical 
composition of the sun, which makes up more than 99 percent of the mass of the solar 
system. She is also involved in future NASA missions to send rovers to Mars that will he 
us to understand the history of water on that planet and whether life ever evolved there, 

In her own words: VVliat most people don't realize is that much of what we know about the origin of the solar s) 
tem and the Earth, and the atoms that make up everything around us, comes from studying meteorites. Meteorites at 
other samples brought back from spacecraft offer us a unique opportunity to understand the inner workings of the ph) 
cal universe around us. 



Top: A Charles R. Knight 
mural in Evolving 
Planet. 




John R. Bolt, PhD, Geology Department Curator, Fossil Amphibians and Reptiles 
The origin and early evolution of tetrapods is one of Dr. Bolt's main research 
interests. Tetrapods are four-limbed vertebrates, a category that includes humans. 
The earliest known tetrapods are from the Late Devonian, about 380 million years 
ago. Devonian tetrapods are found in fewer than a dozen localities worldwide. 
Tetrapod localities from the Mississippian (359 to 318 million years ago) are also 
rare, with only about two dozen localities worldwide. Dr. Bolt is currently studying 
Mississippian tetrapods that he collected from a locality in southeastern Iowa. 

Preservation of many of these specimens is very good, and in some cases excep- 
tional. Preservation quality is particularly important in the case of the earliest 
tetrapods. These specimens have turned out to show many unexpected features which would have been 
difficult to interpret from poorly preserved material. Taken together, the increasing numbers of specimen 
from the Devonian and Mississippian are finally beginning to give scientists a look at the first tetrapods. 

In his own words: The earliest tetrapods would have been expected to he primitive, and this has turned out to be 
case. Nevertheless, something that has impressed me about Mississippian and Devonian tetrapods is just how primitit 
they were. It is often helpful to think of them as highly evolved sarcopterygian fish. But whether you view them from 
fish perspective or a tetrapod perspective, one of the best things about studying early tetrapods is the way it forces you 
change your expectations. 




Peter Wagner, PhD, Geology Department Associate Curator, Fossil Invertebrates 

Snails (gastropods) are one of the most successful and diverse animal groups. Because of 
their hard shells, they have left a dense fossil record. Dr. Wagner studies shells of gastropoc 
and related mollusks from about 500 to 350 million years ago in order to test ideas abou 
what caused different long-term evolutionary patterns. For example, he studies the long- 
term diversification and/or elimination of some shell types, how rapidly new shell forms 
and/or new species appear, and which survive or die over mass extinction events. 

Dr. Wagner has shown that snail shells changed more frequently and more drastically 
early in gastropod history and particular types of shells evolved far more frequently than 
expected given the range of possible shell types. In addition, he has shown that many no\ 
extinct shell types once were common and evolved frequently. Wagner's research is funde 
by the National Science Foundation and has included fieldwork in the Australian outbac 
as well as visits to museums across the globe. 

In his own words: Gastropods have a much denser fossil record than other animal groups do. My 
work involves combining the data I collect with computer programs I write in order to separate the 
hypotheses that might work from those that clearly do not. 



18 IN THE FIELD 



Jennifer McElwain, PhD, Geology Department, Associate Curator, Paleobotany 

Dr. McElwain is interested in the interactions between plant biodiversity and climate change in the geo- 
logical past. Specifically, she studies how changes in greenhouse gasses, such as carbon dioxide, can directly 
and indirectly influence the relative abundances and diversity of different plants and the functioning and 
ecology of ancient ecosystems. She studies three important intervals in Earth history: the Triassic-Jurassic 
boundary (200 million years ago); the Early Toarcian (178 million years ago); and the Cenomanian- 
Turonian boundary (90 million years ago). Each of these intervals is characterized by major extinctions 
which reshaped ecosystems. Understanding how global warming in the past influenced the ecology and 
biodiversity of ancient ecosystems may help us in our quest to conserve biodiversity in 
the future by elucidating the types of plants that are most sensitive to changes in the 
climate system. 

In her own words: Analyses of the fossil record enable us to track the ecological dominance of 
different plant groups throi4gh time and assess how climatic changes and changes in atmospheric 
composition affected these patterns. 




JOHN weiNSTEIN/GEOe5637C 




Scott Lidgard, PhD, Geology Department Associate Curator, 
Fossil Invertebrates 

Dr. Lidgard is a paleoecologist, a scientist who studies interactions 
between ancient organisms and their environments. He is currently 
studying ecological forces such as predation as possible drivers of 
large-scale trends in the history of life. His work focuses on bryo- 
zoans, marme invertebrates that live on the bottom of the sea. They 
form colonies in an enormous variety of shapes, with as few as two 
or as many as two million individuals. The complexity, colonial 
nature, and excellent fossil record of bryozoans make them ideal 
subjects for studying general patterns of ecology and evolution. Dr. 
Lidgard looks at the precise timing and co-occurrences of predators 
and prey in the fossil record, the appearance and spread of skeletal armament among fossil bryozoans, and the 
mechanisms of attack and dietary specialization of bryozoan consumers alive today. By combining these dif- 
ferent perspectives, he tests difi^erent hypotheses about the role of predation in the evolutionary process. 

In his own words: We know from countless field studies and experiments that predation is an important force molding the 
bodies and life histories of organisms. There is also a wealth of evidence that predation is one factor structuring the distribution 
and abundance of organisms, and for some species causirjg extinction in ecological time.Yet scientists continue to debate how 
predation correlates with large-scale trends in the diversity and forms of organisms over millions of years on a global scale. 



Above: The coal forest in 
Evolving Planet. 



SPRING 2006 Mardi-Ma)' 



19 



Corporate Corner 



Technolog 



The Field Museum has received a gift of a full software upgrade from Microsoft 
worth $1.4 million. The gift launches the Museum into a new phase of technologically 
advanced program and research support. Museum staff members have already begun 

to use the software which allows them to 
collaborate more efficiently. 

Michael Gorriaran, general manager 
r Microsoft's U.S. Enterprise Sales 
perations, said, "The Field Museum 
works tirelessly to help educate and 
inspire citizens throughout Chicago, 
helping them to more fully realize their 
potential in life." 

"We are delighted to have an ongo- 
ing partnership with The Field," added 
Janet Kennedy, general manager for 
Microsoft's Midwest District-Enterprise 
Sector. 

"The Field Museum is extremely 
gratefi -soft for their generous donation," said Field Museum Vice President 

of Institutional Advancement and Chief Financial Officer, Jim Croft. "Not-for-profit 
organizations typically cannot afford the most recent top-of-the-line software," Croft 
added. "Microsoft's donation allows us to be at the forefront of technology. This gift 
means a great deal to The Field Museum." 

Above: Michael Gorriardii (left), and Jim Croft stand in front oj the Museum's main computer server. 




Sue Store Features Evolving Planet Items 

Complement your visit to Evolving Planet with a stop at the newly renovated 

Sue Store. New products include DInosoles — kids' sneakers with 

fun dinosaur designs and a dine footprint. Walk in snow MC • ^ 

or sand and leave dino tracks! The new product collection ' 

for Evolving Planet features a Triassic terrestrial scene 

and a quartet of dinosaurs by artist Karen Carr. And 

always available in the Sue Store is merchandise for the ^ 

whole family featuring the world's most famous T. rex, 

as well as books, games, plush dinos and toys. 



Diiiosolcs with fun dinosaur (/<'</(,'/« and a dino potpri\u. 



INTHE FIELD 



Summer 2006 



THE FIELD MUSEUM'S MEMBER PUBLICATION 



TUTANKHAMUN 



AND The Golden age of The Pharaohs 





DESIGN: 

Bockos Design, . 

Printed on recycled paper 

using soy-based inks. 

Ail images £ The Field Museum I 

unless otherwise specified. 

IN THE FIELD (ISSN #1051-45«6) 
is published quarterly by The Field 
Museum. Annual subscriptions 
are $20; $10 for schools. 
Museum membership includes 
IN THE FIELD subscription. 
Opinions expressed by authors are 
their own and do not necessarily 
reflect the policy of The Field 
Museum. Notification of address 
change should include address 
label and should be sent to 
the membership department 



POSTMASTER 

Send address changes to: 
Memt)ership, The Field Museum 
1400 South Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, IL 60625-2496 
Periodicals postage paid at 
Chicago, Illinois, and additional 
mailing offices. 

COVER: This miniature 
coffinette held the liver of 
King Tut It measures about 
15.5 inches in length. 

e ANDREAS F., VOEGELIN. 
AKTlKEKUUSEi;U, BASEL UNO 
SAUUL.UNG lUDWIG 



^ 



Held 



useum 



1400 Soutli Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, !L 60625-2496 
312.922.9410 
www.fieldmuseum.org 

The Field Museum salutes 
the people of Chicago for the  
ioig-standing, generous supp. 
of the Museum through the 




2 



Tutditkhamim and the Golden Age of the Pliaraolis presents more than 130 
ancient artifacts excavated fixjm the tombs of Tutankhamun and members of his 
family. Left: Tire gilded funerary mask of Tjiiya, great-grandmother of King Tut. 



4 



Anthropologist James L. PhiUips, PhD (piaured left), discusses the Tut exhibition 
and why the culture of ancient Egypt continues to fascinate us. 



16 



Meet the public face of the Museum. Seven employees fixim 
our Membership, Guest Relations and Protection Services Departments 
describe the challenges and the rewards of their jobs. Left: Lysette Bell's 
swilc makes members feel uvkomed. 



18 



The Field Museum s new John G. Searle Herbarium is a state-of-the-art 
facility that houses over 2.7 miUion botany specimens. Left: Field Museum 
Botany Chair Mithael O. Dillon at the opening of the new herbarium. 



Museum C am pus Neighbors 



^ 



The whole family will 
thrill to the excitement of the Adier's new interactive 
sky show, Egyptian Nights: Secrets of the Sky Gods. 
The fun continues in the digital StarRider Theater 
with Stars of the Pharaohs (May 26 through Jan. 1, 
2007). Watch our website this summer for informa- 
tion about an upcoming exhibition featuring NASA's 
Gemini 12 space capsule. Captain James A. Lovell, 
Jr. and Dr. Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin flew Gemini 12, 
the final mission of the Gemini program, for three 
days in November, 1966. For more information, 
visit wvw.adlerplanetarium.org or call 
312.922.STAR (7827). 



Do you believe in dragons? 
You will Virhen you meet the eight-foot, 130-pound 
Komodo dragon at Shedd Aquarium's new special 
exhibition. Lizards and the Komodo King. This is 
the first time that a live Komodo dragon— the world's 
largest lizard species— has ever been displayed in 
Chicago. But there's more! Explore the dizzyingly 
diverse world of lizards, from gravity defying geckos 
and quick-change chameleons to water skimming 
basilisks and a slow moving, venomous Gila monster- 
more than 30 species. Lizards and the Komodo King 
runs through Feb. 28, 2007. For more information, 
visit www.sheddaquarium.org or call 312.939.2438. 




r^* 



FROM THE PRESIDENT 



The Golden Age of the Pharaohs 



Our relationship with King Tutankhamun goes back 44 years, to a month-long exhibition 
in 1962 co-sponsored by The Field IVIuseum and the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute. The show 
included 31 artifacts from Tut's tomb and three from the tombs of other kings. It attracted 125,000 visitors 
and helped raise money to save Egyptian monuments from the waters of the Nile River after construction 
of the Aswan Dam. In 1977, we hosted a larger and longer-running show of Tut's treasures: 55 dazzling 
artifacts that reignited "Egyptomania." That exhibition, also the result of a partnership between the 
Oriental Institute and The Field Museum, drew over 1.3 million visitors during its four-month Chicago run. 



RTESV OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART. 
HIVES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF EGYPTIAN ART 




Above: This photo of 
Howard Carter, who dis- 
covered Tut's tomb in 1922, 
is part of a special exhibition 
at the Oriental Institute 
(May 23-Oct. 8). 

Right, top: Archaeologist 
Zahi Hawass, Secretary 
General of Egypt's 
Supreme Council of 
Antiquities. 

Right, bottom: Our new 
Director of Membership, 
Michelle Clayton. 



We are now ready to introduce Tut and his 
royal family to a new generation of Museum visitors 
with the May 26 opening of Tutankhamun and 
the Golden Age of the Pharaohs. A portion of 
the revenue generated from this exhibition will go 
toward building the new- 
Grand Egyptian Museum 
in Cairo, overlooking 
the pyramids of Giza. 
The museum will not 
only take visitors on 
a voyage through one 
of the ancient world's 
most fascinating cultures, 
it will also preserve 
priceless artifacts 
spanning 7,000 years of Egypt's history, including 
the complete Tutankhamun collection. Those 
of you who have traveled to Egypt know that 
this conservation effort is crucial and overdue. 
The Field Museum is proud to help. 

Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the 
Pharaohs once again brings us together in partner- 
ship with the Oriental Institute. To coincide with 
our exhibition, the Oriental Institute Museum 
is showing 50 photographs of Howard Carter's 
excavation of King Tut's tomb in the exhibition. 
Wonderful Tilings'. TIk Discovery of the Tomb of 
Tutankhamun: The Harry Burton Photographs 
(May 23 through Oct. 8). The OI Museum is also 
highlighting objects in its permanent galleries that 
are contemporary with King Tut and is offering 
many educational programs, a complete list of 
which can be found on the website 
www.oi.uchicago.edu. 




The Field Museum 
has long showcased Egyptian 
treasures and educated the 
public about their significance. 
The permanent exhibition. 
Inside Ancient Egypt, is among 
our most popular, hi the past 
five years, we have presented two outstanding 
temporary exhibitions: Cleopatra: From History 
to Myth, and Eternal Egypt: Mastenvorks of Ancient 
Art from the British Museum. We have forged 
relationships with curators and Egyptologists 
from around the globe, including the Secretary 
General of Egypt's Supreme CouncU of Antiquities, 
Zahi Hawass, PhD, who will attend the opening 
events for Tutankhamun and give a keynote 
address here on May 23. 

Finally, just in time for the opening of 
Tutankhamun, we welcome our new Director of 
Membership, Michelle Clayton. 
Michelle previously headed 
the membership department 
at the Lincoln Park Zoo and 
has solid experience working 
in Chicago's educational 
community. 




(y .Inhn V 



John W. McCarter, Jr. 
President and CEO 




Tutankhamun 

and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs 

When British archaeologist Howard Carter uncovered the remarkably preserved tomb of 
Tutanl<hamun in 1922, he created a worldwide sensation. When the boy king's riches toured 
the world in the 1970s, the term ''blockbuster exhibition" was born. 



Now, Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the 
Pharaohs (May 26 through Jan. 1, 2007) offers 
Field Museum visitors a chance to see fabulous 
new treasures and enter the world that gives them 
meaning: 250 years that marked the pinnacle of 
ancient Egypt's culture, wealth, and imperial power. 

As those who saw the earlier exhibition 
can attest, coming face-to-face with the treasures 
of King Tut is an encounter not soon forgotten. 
The new exhibition, twice the size of the original, 
will feature more than 130 ancient artifacts — 
of gold and silver, jewels and semi-precious stones, 
alabaster and gilded wood — excavated from 
the tomb ofTutankhamun and other royal tombs 
in the Valley of the Kings. 



"Tutankhamun's tomb was a spectacular 
discovery — untouched since antiquity," said James 
L. Phillips, PhD, acting curator of the Near East 
and North Africa at The Field Museum and pro- 
fessor of anthropology at the Universit\' of Illinois, 
Chicago. More than 5,000 beautifijlly preserved 
artifacts were found in Tuts tomb, and the 50 
selected for this exhibition — along with more than 
70 fixjm other royal tombs — are among the most 
breathtaking objects of ancient Eg\pt. Only a few 
of these were in the original exhibition, and many 
have never before traveled outside Egypt. 



IM THE FIELD 



Northern Trust is the tour sponsor of this 
exhibition. Northern Trust's William A. Osborn, 
Chairman, said, "We are proud to help bring the 
treasures of King Tutankhamun back to the U.S." 
Exelon Corporation is the Chicago Sponsor, 
and the company's Chairman, John W. Rowe said, 
"Exelon is proud to be a part of this unique 
exhibition that opens the doors to an astonishing 
figure of the golden age." 

The exhibition's dazzling artifacts include 
a gold diadem, inlaid with semi-precious stones, 
that graced the boy king's head in life and death; 
a miniature gold cofFm, in Tut's image, that held 
his liver; and a gold dagger, wrapped with his 
mummy to protect him in the afterlife. A wooden 
bust shows the king as a young and very human 
figure, while exquisite gilded statuettes portray 
him as the ruler of all Egypt. A small shrine of 
wood covered in gold and silver is engraved with 
tender scenes of Tutankhamun and his young wife. 
And most poignant of all is a child-size throne of 
ebony and ivory inset with gold. 

Other spectacular treasures include those 
from the tomb of Yuya and Tjuya, believed to be 
Tut's great-grandparents. Tjuya 's coffin is a stunning 
sight, covered in a bright reddish gold inlaid 
with colored glass that forms her broad collar. 
Another fascinating artifact comes from the tomb 
of Amenhotep II: a model boat shaped Hke the 
royal barge and painted a bluish green, the color 
of life reborn. In such a celestial boat the soul 
of the pharaoh would travel the heavens with the 
sun god, dying each night and resurrected each 
morning with the rising sun. 

Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the 
Pharaohs tells the fascinating story of Egypt's 18th 
dynasty, the height of Egyptian culture, wealth, and 
power. The empire extended from Libya to Gaza, 
from Syria to Sudan; art and literature flourished, 
and architecture and technology advanced. But 
Tut was born into an era of great cultural upheaval. 
His father, Akhenaten, had replaced the worship of 
many gods with a radical new monotheistic religion, 
only to have it overturned by Tutankhamun's 
advisors soon after the old king's death. 



"Religion, and its emphasis on the afterlife, 
contoured every aspect of Egyptian society," Dr. 
Phillips explained. "Just think about where all 
these objects came from: tombs. Ancient Egyptians 
spent their lives accumulating objects they would 
need in the afterlife — furniture, jewelry, games, 
weapons, amulets, canopic jars to store the organs 
where the soul resides. And of course, offerings 
for the gods. You could say they lived to die." 
(See an interview with Dr. Phillips on page four.) 

'Ancient Egyptians spent their lives 
accumulating objects they would need 
in the afterlife.... You could say they 
lived to die.' 



Tutankhamun's early death has long been 
shrouded in mystery. He had ruled for about 10 
years, and was scarcely out of his teens when he 
died — unexpectedly, to judge by the relatively 
small and simple tomb in which his mummified 
body was buried. X-rays taken in 1968 suggested 
to some that he might have been killed by a blow 
to the head. But the exhibition offers a series of 
recent, more detailed CT scans that show no signs 
of trauma. The CT video shows a "virtual autopsy" 
of Tut's mummy. (The mummy itself remains 
in the Valley of the Kings.) Visitors will also see 
a newly commissioned bust, offering a life-like 
interpretation of Tutankhamun based on the CT 
scan. In a large display, "The Faces of Tut," visitors 
can compare that version with photographs of two 
other busts made from the scan, and with images 
drawn from the art they've seen throughout 
the exhibition. 

"There have been a number of conflicting 
theories about what Tut looked hke," says Field 
Museum Project Management Director David 
Foster. "This will give visitors an opportunity 
to see first-hand how scientific knowledge and 
interpretations develop over time." itf 

An exhibition from National Geogi-aphic. 
Organized by Arts and Exiiibitions International and 
AEG Exhibitions in association with The Supreme 
Council of Antiquities of Egypt and The Field Museum. 

Tour Sponsor: Northern Trust 

Chicago Sponsor: Exelon, Proud Parent of ComEd 



Opposite, left: A mirror 
case made of wood 
covered with sheet gold. 

Opposite, middle: 
Tutankhamun's heart 
scarab lies in the center 
of this stone and glass 
pectoral. 

Opposite, right: A gold 
coffnette, measuring 15.5 
inches in length, held the 
liver of Tutankhamun. 



SUMMER 2006 • JUNE-AUGUST 



IN THE FIELD INTERVIEW 



Our Fascination with King Tut and Ancient Egypt 

A Conversation with James L. Phillips 

Nancy O'Shea, Editor 

The Museum's content specialist for Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs is 
James L. Phillips, PhD, acting curator of the Near East and North Africa at The Field Museum 
and professor of anthropology at the University of Illinois, Chicago. In the following interview, 
Dr. Phillips discusses why Tut and ancient Egypt continue to captivate us and what we can 
learn from the exhibition. 




^ 




ITF: IMiy do you think 
people are fascinated by 
King Tut and by ancient 
Egypt in general? 

Dr. Phillips: People are 
fascinated by Tut because ot the spectacular nature 
of the artifacts and the context in which they were 
found. When Howard Carter found Tut s tomb 
in 1922, communication was just beginning to 
become global, so it was one of the first big events 
that the world learned about as it was happening. 
The drama of the discovery entered the psyche of 
the Western world (Egypt was always in the psy- 
che of the Eastern world.) Also, ancient Egypt has 
a visual element that some other ancient cultures 
don't have. We've all heard about ancient sites such 
as the temples at Angkor Wat and the Hanging 
Gardens of Babylon. But have you ever been to 
Babylon? You don't see the gardens now! But you 
can see the pyramids, the sphinx and other monu- 
ments ot ancient Egv'pt.We don't have to imagine 
how they looked. And, through the ages people 
have removed important artifacts from Egypt and 
brought them to their own countries — London and 
Istanbul have almost identical Egyptian obelisks in 
public squares — so we think of ancient Egypt as 
a forerunner of our own cultures, even though that 
really isn't true.Judeo-Christian-Muslim origins 
have nothing to do with Egypt. Those cultures 
began m Mesopotamia or the Levant, not Egypt. 
And don't forget. Eg\'pt also fascinates us because 
as grammar school children we are all taught 
about Egv'pt and the mysteries of the tombs 
and the burial practices. 



ITF: Wliat objects in the exhibition are your favorites, 
and why? 

Dr. Phillips: I really like the sarcophagus of Tjuya, 
the great-grandmother of Tut. I think it's prettier 
than Tut's sarcophagus [which is not in the exhibi- 
tion] . I also like the gold dagger that was found 
on his body. 

ITF: IMiy do you hke the dagger? 

Dr. Phillips:(Laughs) Because it's pretty.' You don't 
need any other reason to like something! 

ITF: Wliat role did you play in helping the Museum 
prepare for the exhibition? 

Dr. Phillips: Well, this is an interesting story. 
During the Cleopatra exhibition a few years ago, 
I went out to dinner with [Field Museum President] 
John McCarter and [Egyptian archaeologist] Zahi 
Hawass. Zahi and I talked about putting together 
an exhibition we called "Life and Death in Egypt," 
but John kept asking about the possibility ot 
bringing Tut back to Chicago. The next year, Zahi 
was appointed head of the Supreme Council of 
Antiquities of Egypt and he wrote to me and said 
that a Tut exhibition was being organized! That's 
when the Museum's exhibitions senior staff 
became involved and pushed the project forward. 
Tutankhamun is a traveling exhibition, and is being 
shown in institutions that have very different 
physical spaces. Originally, our exhibition space 
was going to cover 7,500 square feet, but that was 
eventually doubled to 15,000. 1 have to give 



IN THE FIELD 




JOHN WEINSTE1N/GN90716 015D 



RON TESTA/GN82608 



RON TESTA/GN82611B_10 



Above, left: 

James L. Phillips, PhD, 
is the content specialist 
for Tutankhamun and 
the Golden Age of 
the Pharaohs. 

Above, middle: 
Stanley Field Hall 
as it looked during the 
1911 Tut exhibition. 

Above, right: Long lines 
formed to see Tut in 1977. 

Opposite: Found on 
King Tut's body was this 
pectoral in the shape 
of a falcon. 



a lot of credit to members of the Field's exhibitions team led by Project Management Director 
David Foster — they did a wonderful job. As content specialist, it's been my job to give input from 
an academic point of view. I also help explain the significance of the exhibition to the media and will 
give some public programs. 

ITF: Are you currently conducting research in Egypt or the Middle East? 

Dr. Phillips: I'm doing research in Sinai — an excavation of a New Kingdom site built by Tut's great- 
grandfather, Amenhotep III. It's a fort on the border of Canaan and Egypt in northwestern Sinai. That's 
a project forTrinity International University in Deerfield [Illinois]. Then I'm going to southern Turkey, 
near Antioch, on a project for the Oriental Institute. We'll be working in the Hittite City of Alalach 
and investigating what happened to local residents when Hittites conquered the city. 

The current Tut exhibition is very different from 
the exhibition in 1977.... [it] puts Tut into the context 
of his time in history...' 

ITF: How would you rate Tlie Field Museum's Egypt collections? 

Dr. Phillips: The Museum has a wonderful collection of artifacts from Egypt. The collection is not 
very large, but it contains many historically important pieces. 

ITF: Wlten visitors leave the Tut exhibition, what do you hope they will have learned? 

Dr. Phillips: The current Tut exhibition is very different from the exhibition in 1977. The earlier exhibition 
told the story of Tut from more of an art history perspective and all objects were from his tomb. This new 
exhibition puts Tut into the context of his time in history and what was happening in areas such as religion 
and politics. More than 50 percent of the objects come from tombs of his ancestors. I hope people leave 
with a better sense of Egyptian history and the place of young Tut in that historical scheme. Actually, 
Tut's relatives were far more important than he was. His father, Akhenaten, was the "Sun King," and 
his grandfather, Amenhotep III, expanded Egypt, itf 



SUMMER 2006 • JUNE-AUGUST 



IN THE FIELD FEATURE 



Educational Partnerships Complement 
Tut Exhibition 

By Tiffany Plate, Writer 

This summer, Chicago will be Tut-crazy. And it won't just happen at The Field Museum. 
Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs, augmented by a number of special programs 
and collaborations, will have you seeing symbols of Egypt everywhere you go. 




Top: I iikey Alikhaii, 
J children's librarian from 
Chicago's I Vest Addison 
branch, wears a Tut-inspired 
licaddress during a summer 
rcidiiig orientation. 

BottiVii: Diirid Foster, 
Field .\lu<ciini project 
iiiaiiagcmcnt director. 
speaks to a i^roup ot Chicago 
librarians about the Tut 
exhibition. 



The Field is a cultural insriturion with a long 
history of proxiding educational opportunities that 
extend outside the Museum walls — especiaUy 
when a blockbuster exhibition like 
Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the 
Pharaohs comes to us. That's why, each 
year, the Field forges partnerships with 
other local organizations and institu- 
tions that help expand our reach to 
new and diverse audiences. 

While Tutankhamun is at the 
Field, we'll partner with the Oriental 
Institute and Museum, the Chicago 
5 Public Librarv, and a number of other 
= organizations to cross disciplines and 
provide a well rounded "Tut experi- 
ence" for visitors of all ages. For instance, kids 
can go to their Chicago Pubhc Librar\- branch 
to discover the wonders of ancient Egypt, adults 
can take field trips around the city to see Egyptian 
architectural influences, and teachers can learn what 
modern technology is telling us about Tut's time 
through the scholarship of local Eg\-pt experts. 

"It's important for us to reach beyond the 
Museum walls and into the communities." says 
Beth Crownover. the Museum's pubhc programs 
and operations director. "Working \\ith scholars 
and researchers at institutions Uke the Oriental 
Institute provides us with additional resources that 
^ve can. in turn, bring to our own audience." 

Though the collaborations \\-ith the Oriental 
Institute will result in mosdy adult-focused pro- 
grams, other important partnerships will proxide flin 
for children and taniihes, too. Our annual Summer 
World's Tour Summer Camp is a joint collaboration 
among the Museum Campus institutions. This 
summer, campers will visit the King Tut exhibition 



at the Field, discover the importance of preserving 
the Great Lakes at the Shedd, and engage in space 
exploration at the Adler. 

Children will also be able to experience 
Tut through a special Summer Reading Program 
offered in conjunction with Chicago Public 
Libraries. Children of all ages are encouraged 
to participate by reading and reporting on a book 
at any of the 79 Chicago Public Library locations. 
The program will lead them on a journey to the 
world of King Tut, the pharaohs, and more. The 
more books children read, the more prizes they 
can win. Libraries will also guide children through 
some of the Field's favorite interpretive activities, 
including 70 Days of Mummification, in which 
kids prepare a cloth mummy for its journey into 
the afterlife. In August, the reading program wUl 
come to an exciting climax when participants 
visit the Museum to see the ancient treasures of 
Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs. 

The magic of Tutankhamun can't be held 
within the Museum's walls. Stop by your local 
Ubrary, register tor a special class, and visit the 
exhibition to discover all of the wonders of 
ancient Egypt, itf 

SEE THE ENCLOSED YOUR GUIDE TO THE FIELD 
FOR A COMPLETE LISTING OF ADULT AND FAMILY 
TUTANKHAMUN-RELATED ACTIVITIES. FOR MORE 
INFORMATION ABOUT TEACHER PROGRAMS, 
CALL 312.665.7513. 



6 IN THE FIELD 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS SUMMER 2006 JUNE-AUGUST 



YOURGUIDE TOTHE FIELD 



INSIDE > EXHIBITIONS FESTIVALS FAMILY PROGRAMS ADULT PROGRAMS 




Egypt Discovery Days 5/26-29 
Create a Play in One Day 5/27 
Wrapped Up in Reading 6/12-8/5 
Special Artists at the Field 6/17 
Silk Road Story Time starts 6/17 
Summer Camp starts 7/10 
Two of Us 8/7-8/28 & 9/4-9/25 
Mazon Creek Field Trip 8/26 
Upcoming Overniglit 9/8 



ADULT PROGRAMS 



Cahokia Mounds Field Trip 6/3 

Egypt's Past and Present: 

Sunday Symposia 6/18, 7/16, 8/20 

Dinosaurs witin Feathers 
Lecture 6/22 

Egyptomania, Chicago Style 7/15 



Jl 



fe 



Field 



New Exhibition! 



AND The Golden Age of The Pharaohs 




MAY 26, 2006 THROUGH JANUARY 1, 2007 

During the 1977 blockbuster exhibition tour, Tutankhamun, the celebrated 
"boy-king," became a cultural phenomenon around the world. Thirty years later. 
King Tut returns. We are proud to present a spectacular new exhibition 
enhanced by new technology. See nearly 130 dazzling Egyptian treasures, 
including many, like Tutankhamun's royal diadem, that were not shown in the 
1977 tour Explore the magnificent 18th Dynasty, 
and gain a present-day appreciation of Tut's 
brief but magical reign. 

An exhibition from National Geographic. Organized by 
Arts and Exhibitions International and AEG Exhibitions 
in association with The Supreme Council of Antiquities 
of Egypt and The Field Museum. 

Tour Sponsor: Northern Trust 

Chicago Sponsor: Exelon, Proud Parent of ComEd 

Featured Lecture 

Tutankhamun: Exhibiting a Legend 

David Silverman, Exhibition Curator 

Follow the legend of Tutankhamun back nearly 100 years, from the discovery 
of his extraordinary tomb to the treasures of the current exhibition. The curator 
of both exhibitions (1977 and today) will talk about the excavation of the tomb 
and the subsequent exhibitions that sparked Egyptomania in the US. Regain 
a sense of nostalgia about the craze around the original 
exhibition and discover the new technologies that 
have made this new gathering of artifacts all 
the more important. 

SATURDAY, MAY 27, 2pm 

$16, students /educators $14, members $12 
CPDUs available 



!?■•-»«■•« 







useum 



GENERAL MUSEUM INFORMATION: 312.922.9410 
FAMILY AND ADULT PROGRAM TICKETS AND INFO 



'Pleasenote: "Refunds will be issued by Field Museum' staff; Silnus a"$l0 processing fee, for group and family 
overnights only No refunds or exchanges are permitted for any other proorams- Fees for programs cancelled 
by The Field Museum will be refunded in full. 



arth the wonders of ancient E 



Experience 

to learn all about Egypt 



ANKHAMUN AND THE GOLDEN AGE OF THE PHARAOHS 



1 join these dynamic programs 



-from the 18th Dynasty to today. 



Egypt Discovery Days 

Get some hands-on experience with ancient Egypt! 
Participate in special Interpretive Station activities- 
families can play the giant Senet Game, see their name 
in hieroglyphs, or help construct a giant pyramid. 
Watch as Artists at the Field create Egyptian-themed 
projects, then borrow/ fun Harris Educational Loan 
materials to extend the learning into your home! 

FRIDAY-MONDAY, MAY 26-29, 10am-2pm 
Free with Museum admission 



Children's Workshop 

Create a Play in One Day! 

Foundation Theatre Group 

Put your little one in the director's chair! Children 
ages 5-11 w/ill w/rite a short Egypt-themed play under 
the tutelage of professional actors, cast it w/ith their 
new friends from the workshop, create their own 

costumes, and perform for the 
general public at the Museum 
that same day. 

SATURDAY, MAY 27, 
10AM-2PM REHEARSAL, 
2:30pm performance 
$16, members $12 




Gallery Programs 



story Time 

Take a seat in one of our exhibition halls, hear a story, 
and make an art project to take home, all in 20 minutes! 
This summer we'll be featuring Egyptian Gods and 
Goddesses by Henry Barker, I Met a Dinosaur by Jan 
Wahl, and Tutankhamen's Gift by Robert Sabuda. 

EVERYDAY IN JULY & AUGUST, 
weekends YEAR ROUND, 1:30pm 
Fnr with .Museum admission 




Summer Reading Program 

Wrapped Up in Reading 

The Chicago Public Library, together with The Field 
Museum, is celebrating ancient Egypt with the children's 
Summer Reading Program. Children of all ages are 

encouraged to participate by 
reading a book and reporting 
on it at any of the 79 Chicago 
Public Library locations. 
The program will lead them 
on a journey of exploration 
and discovery of the times 
of King Tut, the pharaohs, 
and more. The more books 
they read, the more stickers they gather and prizes 
they win! For more information please visit 
chicagopubliclibrary.org or call 312.747.4780. 

JUNE 12-AUGUST 5 
Free 





Interpretive Stations 

Stop by a hands-on interpretive station to learn more 
about ancient Egypt. See what your name looks like 
in hieroglyphs, learn to play senet on our gigantic 
game board, help with the preparation of a mummy 
with our 70 Days of Mummification activity, or try 
our new How to Build a Pyramid station! Museum 
docents will be on hand to answer questions and 
facilitate these interactive displays. 

SATURDAYS & SUNDAYS IN JUNE, 
DAILY IN JULY & AUGUST, 
IOam-NOON AND 1-3pm 
Free with Museum admission 



Adult Symposia 



Egypt's Past and Present: Sunday Symposia 

Take a closer look at some of the most fascinating stories surrounding Egypt in this three-session series. CPDUs available. 



The 18th Dynasty: Tutankhamun 
and the Nile in Context 

Dr. Peter Dorman, The Oriental Institute, Dr. James 
Phillips, FM Dept. of Anthropology, Dr. Mohammed el 
Bahay Issawi, Egyptian Geological Survey and Mining 
Authority, Dr. Mohammed Abdel Mahsoud, Sinai for 
Egyptian Antiquities Authority 

Get a fascinating view of ancient Egyptian history, 
including the 18th Dynasty, the importance of the Nile 
in Egyptian culture, and the 
landmark events that led up to 
the time of Tutankhamun's reign. 

5 SUNDAY, JUNE 18, 1:30pm 





Special Artists at the Field 

Learn about the ancient practice of papyrus-making 
w/ith featured artist Karen O'Neal. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 17, 11am-2pivi 
Free with Museum admission 




Religion and Art in 

the Time of Tutankhamun 

Dr. Gay Robins, Emory University, Dr. James K. 
Hqffmeier, Trinity International University 

Explore the important role that art and religion 
played in ancient Egypt, especially with regards to 
the burial practices of royalty, such as Tutankhamun. 

SUNDAY, JULY 16, 1:30pm 

Contemporary Excavations 
and Research in Egypt 

Dr. Stephen P. Harvey, Tlie Oriental Institute, 
Prof. Miroslav Barta, Charles University, Prague, 
Dr W. Raymond Johnson, The Oriental Institute 

Get the latest news on recent digs in Egypt's 
historically rich sites. 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 20, 1:30pm 

Each symposia: $16, students /educators $14, 

members $12 

Egypt's Past and Present: Sunday Symposia is presented in collaboration 
with The Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago. 



Egyptomania, Chicago Style 

Michael Berger, Egyptologist 

Get on board for a bus tour of Chicago as you've never 
seen it before! Discover how Egyptian art and design 
have influenced the look of architectural and historic 
sites throughout the city. Start with an orientation at 
the Oriental Institute, followed by a city-wide bus tour 
that includes lunch at a Middle Eastern restaurant. 
Tour involves some walking, so wear comfortable shoes 
and dress for the weather. Coach bus transportation, 
lunch, and handouts included. 

SATURDAY, JULY 15, 9:30am-4pm 
S79, TFM and OI members $10 
CPDUs available 



Summer Camp 

Summer World's Tour 2006 

Limited Space Available 

Don't miss the dynamic experience 
of summer camp on the IVluseum 
Campus! Organized collectively with Adier Planetarium 
and Shedd Aquarium, Summer World's Tour at the Field 
will help children investigate artifacts from the distant 
past, and see why their preservation is such an important 
part of helping us understand our present and future! 
Kids will try their hand at various ancient Egyptian 
practices such as papyrus making, jewelry making, 
and mummification, then investigate whether or not 
Tutankhamun's tomb really carries a curse! 

FOR CHILDREN AGES 5-10 ONLY. 

CHOOSE ONE SESSION: JULY 10-14, JULY 17-21, 

JULY 24-28, OR JULY 31-AUGUST 4 

$220, members $200 

To refiister, please call the Adler at 312.322.0329. 




Bring the treasures of The Field Museum 
right into your home! 

Are you looking for fun, hands-on educational activities 
to do with your children or ways to reinforce what your 
child learns in school? Borrow Museum materials from 
the Harris Educational Loan Center! We offer ready-to-use 
hands-on educational kits and dioramas based on Field 
Museum exhibitions. 

Search our catalog, reserve materials, and register online 
at www.fieldmuseum.org/harrisloan. Annual 
registration for families and home schoolers 
is $60 per year; borrowing is free. For more 
information, call 312.665.7555 or 
email harrisloan@fieldmuseum.org. 

HARRIS IS OPEN 
TUESDAY-FRIDAY, 10am-5pm, 
AND SATURDAY 9am-4pm 





Adult Lecture 



Cahokia Mounds 

Dr. Maxine McBrimi, FM Dept. of Anthropology 

Travel to Cahokia Mounds State Park, center of the 
Mississippian world and the largest center of population 
in prehistoric native America north of Mexico City. 

SATURDAY, JUNE 3, 6am-8pm 
$85, members $75 



>\ / \ 



Dinosaurs with Feathers 

Dr. Mark Norrell, American Museum of Natural History 

Step into the shoes of this important paleontologist who's 
busy tracing the connections between small carnivorous 
dinosaurs and modern birds. You'll travel across the globe 
with him as he names new dinosaurs and attempts to develop 
new ways of looking at fossils using 
'' CT scans and imaging computers. 
* ' Norrell will discuss his discovery of 
the bizarre primitive bird Mononykus, 
as well as the unearthing of other 
important bird-like characteristics 
in all kinds of dinosaurs. 

JUNE 22, 7pm 

$16, students /educators $14, 

members $12 

CPDUs available 



Tutankhamun and the 
Golden Age of the Pharaohs 

MAY 26, 2006-JANUARY I, 2007 



Cheyenne Visions 

OPENS JUNE 16, 2006 






Family Workshops 

Two of Us 



^' 




t 



A Special Story Time 

Along the Silk Road 

Come walk along the ancient Silk Road trade route. To make 
our long journey more enjoyable we'll share stories about the 
exotic places we pass through with fellow travelers. How did the 
beautiful crescent-shaped lake that lies nearby Dunhuang first 
appear? Make your very own shadow puppet to help tell the 
story of the White Cloud Fairy and find out! 



WEEKENDS, JUNE 17-18, JULY 15-16, 
AND AUGUST 19-20, 1:30pm 
Free with Museum admission 




Join us in one of these four-week excursions through the wonders 
of The Field Museum! You and your little one will travel the 
Museum's exhibition halls, sing songs, hear stories, touch objects, 
make art projects, and enjoy snacks. Choose from one or more 
of the following sessions: 

Dance and Culture: Explore the role of dance and movement 
in different cultures around the world. 
TUESDAYS, AUGUST 7-28, 10-11am 

Egypt: Travel to ancient Egypt and discover the fascinating 

reign of King Tut. 

TUESDAYS, SEPTEMBER 4-25, 10-11am 

Each four-week session: $32, members $27 

For each 3—5 year old child with paid attendance, 

one adult chaperone attends free. 



Expeditions@fieldmuseum™ 

Dig into the past of Peru's ancient Andean empires with Field 
Museum Curator and archaeologist Dr. Patrick Ryan Williams 
and his distinguished team of fellow scientists. 
Follow them to excavations at Cerro Baul, 
a remote mountaintop citadel that was the sole 
point of contact between the Tiwanaku and 
I the Wari— two great kingdoms whose dynamic 
3 relationship ultimately contributed to 
Z the rise of the Incan Empire. 




Sign up to receive Dr. Williams' emails 
from the field (beginning early June) at 
www.fieldmuseum.org/expeditions. While you're 
there, stop by the Cerro Baul website to watch 
videos of the 2004 season, read crew bios and 
track the research with interactive maps! 



Give your summer science 
programs a soil adventure! 

Environmental educators will bring the Soil Adventure 
Mobile to your community group or summer camp, and 
show you and your children just what's going on underground. 
They'll touch live wiggling worms, use microscopes to see soil 
organisms close up, and learn about the complex ecosystems 
that exist beneath our feet. Find out more information at 
wwA/v.fieldmuseum.org/education/outreach_sam.htm 
or by calling 312.665.7519. 




Eskimo and Inuit Carvings: 
Collecting Art from the Arctic 



JULY 1, 2006-JUNE 17, 2007 



Impressions of Tsavo 

JULY 7, 2006-JULY 7, 2007 







Family Field Trip 

Fossil Hunt at Mazon Creek 

Dave Dolak, Columbia College 

Get our your hiking boots and join us for a fossil hunt at 
the world-famous Mazon Creel< site. You'll find your own fossils 
and discover what Illinois was like more than 300 million years 
ago. Plan on a one-quarter mile walk to fossil locations. 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 26, 8am-3pm 
$40, members $30 




Upcoming 
Adult Course 

Advanced Chicago Geology 



Join this combination class and field trip just for adult 
amateur geologists! You'll get a chance to learn and practice 
field techniques through classroom lectures and demonstrations 
as well as site visits to premier local geological areas. The field 
trip will include a visit to the Chicago Portage, Palos Hills to 
explore glacial remnants, a rare stop at Camp Sagawau Forest 
Preserve (Cook County's only canyon), and Mazon Creek 
for fossil collecting. 

WEDNESDAYS, SEPTEMBER 13 & 20, 6-9pm, 
FIELD TRIP: SEPTEMBER 30, 8am-4pm 
$95, members $85 



Family Overnight 

Dozin' With the Dinos 

Sue the T. rex is having a sleepover! Join us for a night of 
family workshops, tours and performances. Explore ancient 
Egypt by flashlight, prowl an African savannah with man-eating 
lions and take a stroll through the Royal Palace in Bamun, 
Africa. Then spread your sleeping bag amidst some of our most 
popular exhibitions. The event includes 
an evening snack and breakfast. 

FRIDAYS, SEPTEMBER 8 & 15, 

5:45pm until 9am THE FOLLOWING DAY 

$47, members $40 





Upcoming Lecture 

1491: New Revelations of the Americas 
Before Columbus 

Charles Mann, Author 

Journey back in time to an American land you've never 
known. Mann will discuss his best-selling book, which traces 
the "pre-history" of the Americas and debunks myths about the 
first inhabitants of this land. You'll learn about the sophisticated 
cities of the Aztecs, the agricultural advances of pre-Columbian 
Indians in Mexico, then hear how the Field's 
°JI^.L~'.'.lll!-! J I own anthropological research is contributing 



14^91 



NEW REVELATIONS OF THE } 
< AMERICAS BEFORE COLUMBUS | 



to this story. 

THURSDAY OCTOBER 19, 7pm 

$8, students /educators $7, members $6 



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The Auschwitz Album: 
The Story of a Transport 



THROUGH JUNE 4, 2006 



New exhibition 
coming this fall 



September 
kicl<-off event 



Gregor Mendel: Planting 
the Seeds of Genetics 

SEPTEMBER 15, 2006-APRIL 1, 2007 

Meet the brilliant, 19th-century friar who became 
the father of modern genetics. Recreate Mendel's 
famous pea experiments to discover the laws of 
heredity for yourself, understand the basics of genetics, 
and meet modern Mendels— scientists on the cutting 
edge of this field today. 



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This exhibition and its 
North American tour were 
developed by The Field Museum, 
Chicago, in partnership with 
The Vereinigung zur Forderung 
der Genomforschung, Vienna, 
Austria, and The Mendel 
Museum, Brno, Czech Republic. 



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GEOGRAPHIC 



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Cultural Connections 

The Field Museum and over 20 community-based 
cultural centers and museums have joined together to 
bring you a new year of Cultural Connections, a series 
of public presentations by community members about 
Chicago's cultural diversity and an opportunity for you 
to share your own perspectives through dialogue. 

To meet this year's partners, learn about the annual 
theme of teaching, and enjoy an evening of food, musi- 
cal performances, and storytelling, join us Wednesday 
September 20 from 5:30-7:30pm for our annual 
Kick-Off Event at The Field Museum. 

For more information, go to www.fieldmuseum.org/ccuc 
after August 1. 



Cultural Connections has 
received generous support from 
The Institute of Museum and 
Library Services, Kraft Foods, 
CHASE, Polk Bros. Foundation, 
Richard H. Driehaus Foundation, 
Chicago Public Schools' Office 
of Language and Cultural 
Education, Illinois Humanities 
Council, and Charles and 
M.R. Shapiro Foundation. 




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Get your tickets early for our 
exciting fall National Geographic 
Live! presentations. 

Join us for another series of entertaining evenings 
with dynamic men and women whose stories of 
exploration will enlighten and inspire you. Visit our 
website to find out more about the series schedule. 

SERIES TICKETS GO ON SALE JULY 15. 



Study art where humans and nature intersect 









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GETTING HERE 

Field Museum visitors can parl< in Soldier 
Field's parking garage. Visit www.fieldmu- 
seum.org for information on parl<ing 
lots/rates, free trolleys and public transit. 

HOURS 

Summer hours are 8am-5pm daily. 
Last admission at 4pm. Hours are subject 
to change. Please consult the Museum's 
website for the most up-to-date information. 
Please note the Museum closes at 5pm even 
when an evening event is scheduled. 
Event participants will be asked to leave 
the building until 30 minutes before 
their event begins. 



Cheyenne Visions 



OPENS JUNE 16, 2006 

Celebrate tlie artistic vibrancy of Cheyenne history and present-day culture 
through beautiful color photographs of Cheyenne art and artifacts. 

Esl<imo and Inuit Carvings: 
Collecting Art from 
the Arctic 

Is JULY 1, 2006- JUNE 17, 2007 

Discover historic and contemporary carvings In stone 
and animal bone created by Eskimo and Inuit artists 
from Alaska and Canada. 



Impressions of Tsavo 



JULY 7, 2006-JULY 7, 2007 

Dazzling color photographs reveal the remarkable wildlife, landscape, 
and people of the Tsavo region in East Africa. 

I 5 These exhibitions vjere organized by The Field Museum. 



ADMISSION AND TICKETS 

For this special engagement of 
Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the 
Pharaohs, members (except for Royal Tut 
and Tut at Twilight members) will be eligible 
to purchase exhibition tickets at a reduced 
rate of $10 (versus $25 for non-members). 
Family members are eligible for up to four 
discounted tickets; Individual, Senior and 
National Affiliate members are eligible 
for up to two discounted tickets; Student 
members are eligible for one discounted 
ticket. Tickets can be purchased by 
calling 312.665.7705 Monday-Friday 
from 8:30am-4:30pm or picked up at 
the Membership Services desk at the south 
or east entrances. Tut and Tut at Twilight 
Members should call 312.665.7929 
to reserve their exhibition tickets. 
For more information, please visit 
www.fieldmuseum.org/membership. 

For non-members. The Field Museum's 
gold pass, which includes general admission 
plus one of our other special exhibitions 
such as Tutankhamun or Underground 
Adventure, ranges in price from $8 to $25, 
depending on your age category and 
whether you are a Chicago resident. Please 
bring your ID to receive the appropriate 
ticket price. Tickets are available at the 
Museum's admission desks, or in advance 
via www.fieldmuseum.org or 866. FIELD. 03. 
For all admission and ticket details, 
visit www.fieldmuseum.org. 



ACCESSIBILITY 

Visitors using wheelchairs or strollers 
may be dropped off at the new east 
entrance. Handicapped parking and 
wheelchairs are available on a first-come, 
first-served basis. The Museum's west 
parking lot is also available for handicapped 
parking on a first-come, first-served basis, 
and the west entrance is also handicap- 
accessible. Call 312.665.7400 to check 
on the accessibility of programs that 
take place outside of the Museum. 

INFORMATION 

312.922.9410 orwww.fieldmuseum.org 



The Field Museum salutes the people of Chicago 
for their long-standing, generous support of 
the Museum through the Chicago Park District. 
In addition, Museum programs are partially 
supported by a CityArts Program 4 Grant from 
the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs 
and the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency. 

In accordance with Title IX of the Education 
Amendments Act of 1972, we do not discriminate 
on the basis of sex in our programs or activities. 
Please call 312.665.7271 to contact our Title IX 
Coordinator in the human resources department 
should you have any questions or concerns. 




SCIENTIST'S PICK 



The Sarcophagus of Pefthaukhonsu: 
A Field Museum Treasure 



Abovc:A detail from 
the sarcophagus. 

Below: The sarcophagus 
(with lid positioned 
above it) dates to 
the 4th century BC. 

Bottom, right: Museum 
staff move the heavy 
lid into the Collections 
Resource Center. 



Dating to the 30th Dynasty (4th century BC), the black granite sarcophagus of Pefthaukhonsu 
is an impressive example of late Egyptian artistry, ritual, and funerary practice. Acquired by Edward Ayer, 
an instrumental figure in the founding of The Field Museum and a life-long benefactor and trustee, the 
sarcophagus (from Greek, literally meaning "eater of flesh") was discovered in 1911 in Saqqara, Egypt, as 
part of a group of sarcophagi in a chamber about 65 feet underground. After a period of some negotiation, 
Ayer secured the sarcophagus for The Field Museum for a sum equal to $48,000 in todays dollars. 

Although little is known of its occupant, Pefthaukhonsu, such an imposing and costly final resting 
place is a testament to its owner's wealth and prestige. Much of the surface of the sarcophagus and its Hd 
is covered with inscribed scenes and text, representing important portions of the Egyptian funerary canon. 
The lid and base are replete on all sides with images of gods and goddesses (including Khepri, Isis, Osiris, 
Nut, Nephthys, and the goddess of the West), as well as worshipping baboons. Pefthaukhonsu, the occu- 
pant, makes two appearances on the lid, dressed once as a prince and once as a scribe. The sarcophagus is 
also inscribed with two spells from the Book of the Dead that served to protect the soul of the deceased 
and guarantee its reunion with the body in the afteriife. 

Before this sarcophagus was buried, the handles were 
removed from the lid in order to impede any grave robbers. 
Despite this and other safeguards, robbers entered 
the tomb, removed the lid, and looted the contents. 
Archaeologists found no mummy when they excavated 
the sarcophagus. 

The base of the sarcophagus in currently 
on display on the Museum's ground floor, near the 
entrance to Inside Ancient Egypt. But the lid, which has 
been displayed in the past, is currently in storage. In fact, 
the hd of the sarcophagus was one of the first pieces 
moved into the recently completed Collections 
Resource Center, and at a weight of between 8,000 
and 10,000 pounds, it was definitely the heaviest! uf 





William J. Pestle, The Field Museum's anthropology 
collections manager, human remains and Old World 
archaeology, chose this Scientist's Pick. 



SUMMER 2006 • JUNE-AUGUST 15 



IN THE FIELD FEATURE 




Our Front Line: Helping Make the Field 
Chicago's Friendliest Museum 

Nanqr O'Shea, Editor 

Photos by Diane Alexander Wliite 

They are the Museum's public face: employees who work in our Membership, Guest Relations 
and Protection Services Departments. Here we introduce you to seven representatives from those 
departments. You can count on them, and our entire front line staff, to rise to the challenge 
of welcoming capacity crowds to the King Tut exhibition, and to make every visit to 
The Field Museum as pleasant and safe as possible. 




VIRGINIA ATKINSON 

What is your title? Guest Relations Representative. 
How long have you worked at the Field? This is my fourth year. 
Wltat do you do? I cashier at the doors, take tickets at exhibitions, check coats, 
work at the switchboard or booking office, and answer questions. I wear many hats. 
How many Museum visitors /callers do you talk to during a typical day? During busy seasons, 
it's several hundred. 
It's a good day when I've tackled every situation with a creative solution. 
-.--.. It's a bad day u'hen I have to break the news that the current big exhibition is sold out. 

J ,w List three words that desaibe your job: Challenging. Interactive. Diverse. 

LYSETTE BELL 

IVliat is your title? Membership Sales Representative Super\-isor. 

How long have you u'orked at the Field? Twelve years. 

li'ltat do you do? I supervise and assist the floor membership staff in signing up new members, 

renewing existing members, assisting members and donors with tickets for special exhibitions, 

and answering any questions about the benefits of being a Field Museum member. 

How many visitors /callers do you talk to during a typical day? We help several hundred... up to a thousand members! 

It's a good day wheti the weather is beautiful and we have lots of visitors. 

It's a had day when we don't have many visitors. 

List three words that describe your job: I try to be: Helpfiil. Patient. Approachable. 



CARYN BENSON 

IVIiat is your title? Membership Revenue Coordinator. 

How long have you worked at the Field? Three years. 

Wliat do you do? I split my time between working in the membership office and working on the floor. 

How many visitors /callers do you talk to during a typical (/ay.' When I'm in the office, I speak to about 

20 members a davWhen I'm on the floor, I help about 250. 

It's a good day when 90 percent of the members are satisfied but I always try to make 100 percent happy, 

then it's a great day! 

It's a bad day when a member has a less than perfect experience. 

List three words that describe your job: Enjoyable. Unique. WeU-rounded. 





16 IN THE FIELD 




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SHERRI BROWN 

Wliat is your title? Guest Relations Representative. 

How long have you worked at the Field? About two years. 

What do you rfo.' Work at the switchboard, or as a cashier, or ticket taker. I try to help 

guests make the most of their visit. 

How many Museum visitors /callers do you talk to during a typical day? It's hard to say, 

but certainly more than 100. On busy days, it can be several hundred. 
It's a good day when I have no complaints from guests. 
It's a had day when a guest is unhappy. 
List three words that describe your job: Challenging. Rewarding. Underestimated. 

STEVE GRISSOM 

Wltat is your title? Protection Officer. 

How long have you worked at the F/cW.' Thirty-one years. I'm one of the few current 

Museum employees who worked here during the 1977 King Tut exhibition! 

Wliat do you (/('.'Assist the general public, protect and secure Museum staff and e.xhibitions, 

and many other things. 

How many Museum visitors /callers do you talk to during a typical (/iiy.' When we're not busy, 
it's about 200 to 300 a day 
It's a good day when everything works well. 

It's a bad day when...vjs\[, I like to think there's no such thing as a bad day! 
List three words that describe your job: Lots of fun. 

KEISHANA MOORE 

Wliat is your title? Membership Reservation Representative. 

How long have you worked at the Field? Two years. 

IVliat do you do? I fulfill member and donor ticket requests for special exhibitions 

like King Tut and for permanent ticketed exhibitions like Evolving Planet. I also update 

membership accounts and organize daily tickets for Will Call. 

How many visitors /callers do you talk to during a typical day? About 60 members. 
It's a good day when I don't get any complaints and I'm able to fulfill all ticket requests. 
It's a bad day when I get a complaint, such as a member not receiving tickets, but I try to solve 
the problem quickly. 
List three words that describe your job: Challenging. Fast-paced. Rewarding. 

WARREN ZIEGLER 

IVliat is your title? Guest Relations Representative. 

How long have you worked at the Field? About six months. 

Wliat do you do? Sell tickets and memberships, hang coats, corral school groups, work the switchboard, 

clean lunchroom tables, answer lots of questions... anything that's needed to make the Museum 

available to our visitors. 

How many Museum visitors /callers do you talk to during a typical day? Probably hundreds, especially 

when working the switchboard. 

It's a good day when visitors thank me for their day at the Field. 

It's a bad day when we disappoint a visitor. But we always try to turn the situation around. 

List three words that describe your job: Necessary. Integral. Stimulating, itf 



SUMMER 2006 • JUNE-AUGUST 17 



OF SPECIAL INTEREST 




Cuttitig the ribbon 
to officially open the 
herbarium u>ere (from 
left): Nancy Searle, 
representing^ the Searle 
family; Christine 
Niezgoda, botany 
collections manager; 
Marshall Field, chairman 
of the Mnseion's board 
of trustees; and Terry 
Mazany, chief executive 
officer of the Chicago 
CommiDiity Trust. 



An Herbarium for the 21st Century 

Michael O. Dillon, Chair and Curator of Flowering Plants, Field Museum Department of Botany 

Christine Niezgoda, Collections Manager, Field Museum Department of Botany 

-^^ 

Un IVl3y ^/ ±7^1/ when The Field Museum first opened its doors at this location, the Botany 
Department had been in existence for about 25 years and the botanical collections numbered nearly 
500,000 items. This building offered a state-of-the-art storage facility: double-walled, steel cabinets with 
heavy brass door handles that replaced the wooden cabinets previously used for specimen storage. 
It was a facility designed to withstand earthquakes or the ravages of war! 

In 1972, the Museum's Board of Trustees designated it the John G. Searle Herbarium in recognition 
of Mr. Searle's great interest in The Field Museum and his support of the Museum's scientific programs. 
As the Field's botany collections grew in size, the herbarium's fixed cabinets 
became increasingly crowded until the flowering plant collection storage reached its 
limit in the early 1980s. The department's first response was to purchase additional 
free-standing cases and place them in the hallways of the herbarium. 

In 1993, the first of the department's expansion projects moved some of 
the collections into a former hghtwell area of the building and introduced manually 
operated storage cases on rails. This "compactorized" system allows cases to roll on 
rails so that they can be pushed together, eliminating aisles when not needed and 
thus saving space. 

Today, some 75 years after moving into this building, the Botany Department 
has finished moving all of its remaining collections into a completely new space with 
insect-and-moisture-proof cabinets that run electrically on rails. The physical modifications of the room 
also include new lighting of the entire space, computer connections, additional countertop workspace, 
and installation of rubber flooring. The project was completed thanks to the generosity of The Searle 
Funds at the Chicago Community Trust. 

The John G. Searle Herbarium now numbers 2.7 million specimens and is one of the great research 
collections in the world. It is among the five largest herbaria in North America and is especially rich in 
neotropical plants and fungi, especially from Central America and Andean South America. The herbarium 

performs a dynamic and vital pubhc service of 
providing collections (as loans) to researchers 
throughout the world's universities and botanical 
research institutes. 

Over the last 30 years, The Field Museum's 
Botany Department has provided over 6,200 
loans to some 1,100 institutions in 104 countries 
worldwide. These loans represent nearly 750,000 
individual sheets of pressed specimens sent and 
received. Over that same time period, the depart- 
ment has sent out another 250,000 collections as gifts and exchange. Through continued collecting efforts, 
often from environmentally threatened regions, the collection is still growing by approximately 15,000 
specimens per year from joint programs with overseas colleagues, expeditions, gifts, and exchanges 
with other institutions, itf 



'The John G. Searle 
Herbarium now numbers 
2.7 million specimens and 
is one of the great research 
collections in the world.' 



TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE FIELD MUSEUM'S 

HERBARIUM, PLEASE VlSlTwww.fieldmuseum.org/ 
researchcollections/botany/collectionsherbarium.htm 



18 IN THE FIELD 




OF SPECIAL INTEREST 



The Cudahy-Massee Collection 

A Rare Look at African Wildlife 

The early 20th century was a goWen age of collecting for natural 
history museums. Driven by civic pride and a desire for adventure, wealthy 
industriahsts, politicians and prominent families routinely sponsored and took 
part in daring, far-flung expeditions, with the mission of bolstering their city's 
claim to the biggest, best or rarest exhibitions and collections. In early 1928, 
civic philanthropists B. A. Massee and John S. Cudahy approached the directors 
of the Milwaukee Public Museum (MPM) with the idea of mounting the 

largest East African expedition to 
date to collect "families" of animals 
that would be used to create 
a grand exhibition hall depicting 
Africa's plains. The idea was met 
with great enthusiasm, and on 
July 21, 1928 the Cudahy-Massee 
Expedition departed Nairobi on 
a 10-month, 12,000-mile journey 
through Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, 
Rwanda, Congo and Sudan. 



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lop, left: Members oj the 
Cudahy-Massee expedition 
(left to right) John Cudahy, 
Carveth Wells, James L. 
Clark, S.A. Barrett, 
and Leslie Carlisle. 

Top, right: Tlie camp's 
mascot Sim on the side 
of a motor car in which 
he usually rode. 

Above: Camera car 
used in photographing 
in East Africa. 

In background: Outline 
measurement chart 
of zebra. 



Because the expedition's primary purpose 
was to collect animals for dioramas, trained taxi- 
dermists from the MPM accompanied the party 
and animals were extensively photographed in 
their natural environments before being collected. 
The taxidermists also took unusually extensive 
notes on each specimen's measurements and 
appearance, which were recorded on an elaborate 
system of field cards. Finally, they preserved the 
skin and entire skeleton of each animal with the 
intention of subsequently mounting the specimen, 
rather than the normal (and easier) practice of 
collecting just the skin and skull. 



Ultimately, the Cudahy-Massee Expedition 
amassed 266 large mammals, 1 ,300 birds, 3,000 
photographic plates, 40,000 feet of motion picture 
film, over 100 plaster casts, thousands of scientific 
illustrations, and one live lion cub (that lived in 
the MPM's taxidermy studio before becoming a 
star of the Milwaukee Zoo)! However, this success 
created a fundamental problem: where to store and 
display the massive collection? When the Depression 
hit, plans for a grand Africa Hall fell by the wayside 
and the collection was stored for nearly six decades 
in a Milwaukee warehouse. 

Recognizing the importance of the 
Cudahy-Massee collection to researchers world- 
wide, the MPM donated it to The Field Museum 
in 1984. With support from the National Science 
Foundation, Museum stafl^and volunteers prepared 
three truckloads of specimens over a six-year 
period, ranging from juvenile hyenas to an entire 
hippopotamus. 

Today, biodiversity researchers regard the 
Cudahy-Massee collection as one of the world's 
finest assemblages of East African large mammals. 
In addition to its unparalleled variety, the collection 
contains a number of rare and endangered species 
from places where the animals no longer exist. 
The preservation of the animals' skeletons, especially 
of females and young animals, was also a rarity 
for the time — providing researchers with a unique 
set of data unavailable anywhere else. As a result, 
the collection offers an in-depth portrait of East 
African wildlife before large-scale habitat alter- 
ation forever changed the region. 

This year, the preserved skins of the 
Cudahy-Massee collection will be moved into 
The Field Museum's new Collections Resource 
Center, providing even greater long-term protection 
of, and access to, the collection for researchers. 
This move will benefit studies of African wildlife 
for generations to come, itf 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE HISTORY OF 
THE FIELD MUSEUM'S ZOOLOGICAL COLLECTIONS, 
PLEASE VISIT http://www.fieldmuseum.org/research 
_collections/zoology/collections_mammals.htm 



SUMMER 2006 • JUNE-AUGUST 19 



SPECIAL MUSEUM NEWS 



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King Tut Membership Upgrades Offer Value 



Ti  •riTiTT/*jiTr rJiTiT: 

CONSIDER RENEWING OR UPGRADING TO OUR EXCLUSIVE, LIMITED-EDITION KING TUT MEMBERSHIPS! 

(Upgrades based on eligibility. ) 



Royal Tut ($125) includes: 

• Four tickets to Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs (a $40 value!) 

• Exclusive ticketing hotline 

• Concierge services including an express line to obtain any available tickets for that day or future 
dates during the run of the exhibition 

• Two limited-edition, collector membership cards 

• Members-only priority admission line 

• Plus all the benefits of our Family Membership 

Tut at Twilight ($250) includes: 

• Two tickets to one of 20 exclusive connoisseur viewing nights for 
Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs (a $100 value!) 

• Two audio tours to enhance your connoisseur viewing night 
(a $14 value!) 

• Four tickets to the exhibition (a $40 value!) 

• No ticket reservation service fees 

• Plus all the benefits of the Royal Tut Membership 

Have a question about your membership? 

Gotowvvw.fieldmuseum.org/membershiporcall312.665.7700 
The Museum is finalizing preparations 

(weekdays 8:30am-4:30pm). Or, the next time you visit the Museum, stop 
/br King Tut. Above: LaTasha Jimenez 

by our Membership Services desk at the south and east entrances. 
of the Membership Department. 




Special Field Associates Event 



CALLING ALL YOUNG PROFESSIONALS! BEGIN YOUR SUMMER WITH A SPECIAL FIELD ASSOCIATES "TOAST TO TUT" 
EVENT ON FRIDAY, JUNE 9. VIEW THE TUT EXHIBITION AND ENJOY LIGHT FARE, COCKTAILS, AND ENTERTAINMENT. 
TO PURCHASE TICKETS, VISIT WWW.FIELDMUSEUM.ORG FIELDASSOCIATES OR CALL 1.866. FIELD. 03. 




or write Nancy O'S' 



Store Expands Collection of Egyptian Products 



Be siire to visit both the main Museum Store at the south end of Stanley Ffeld Hat! 
and the Egypt Store on the ground level to see the newly expanded collection of Egyptidn 
products. The main store also carries a stunning array of jewelry featuring gemstones, 
silver and gold in Egyptian designs. And world renowned perfumer, Marilyn Miglin, 
has created an elegant box set of Seven Sacred Oils, which will 
be offered exclusively at The Field Museum Stores at the Museum, 
at the O'Hare Store, and online at www.fieldmuseum.org 



King Tut on his throne makes a good gift for any 
Egypt bufPs collection ttneasiires 12 inches talli. 



Th. Field 

Museum 

1100 South Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, IL 606252496 



For questions about the magazine, call 312.665.7115, email noshea@fmnh.org 
membership inquiries, including address changes, call 866.312.2781. 




INTHEFIELD 



THE FIELD MUSEUM'S MEMBER PUBLICATION 



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using soy-based inks. 

Ali images © The Field Museum 



IS Dubiisned quarterly oy Tlie Field , 
Museum. Annual subscriptions 
are $20; $10 for schools. 
Museum membership includes 
!N THE FIELD subscription. 
Opinions expressed by authors are 
their own and do not necessarily 
reflect the policy of The Field 
Museum. Notification of address 
change should include address 
label and should be sent to 
the membership department. 

POSTMASTER 
Send address changes to: 
Membership, The Field Museum 
1400 South Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, IL 60625-2496 
Periodicals postage paid at 
Chicago, Illinois, and additional 
mailing offices. 

COVER, TOP: Using the latest 
technology, scientists conduct 
research in the Museum's Pritzker 
Laboratory for Molecular- 
Systematics and Evolution. 
Shown are (from left) Lydia Smith 
and Sushma Reddy, PhD. 

JOHK WEINSTEIN/GNWSn 6CD 

COVER, BOTTOM: A portrait 

of Gregor Mendel (left), after he 
became an abbot in 1868. Dated 
1862, this photo (right) shows the 
Augustinian friars at the Abbey 
of St. Thomas. Mendel is second 
from rinhi in the back row. 

S e STEPAH BARTOS 



Field 



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useum 



. -.^r.e Shore Drive 
_ 60605-2496 

-.12. '^22. ^410 

■rtww. fietdmuseum.org 

■.- of Ciiicago •: 




4 



Gregor Mendel is known as the Father of Genetics. Learn about his research 
involving experiments with pea plants and meet some of The Field Museum's 
own "modern Mendels" in a new exhibition, Gregor Mendel: Planting the Seeds 
of Genetics (Sept. 15 -April 1,2007). 



6 



Bill Stanley, The Field Museum's Negaunee Collection Manager of Mammals, 
tells about the discovery of a monkey (pictured left) that represents a new genus. 
The find involved an international team of scientists. 



10 



Many Field Museum staff members are also authors, sharing their expertise 
with audiences that include students, conservationists, and children. In a special 
four-page article, nine Field Museum authors discuss their books. 



14 




The Field Museum is restoring its archive of films that date from the 1920s. 
Many of the films were originally used for educational programs about 
Museum research and expeditions; today they provide an invaluable 
glimpse into the past. 



m Campus Neighbor 



Egyptian skies come alive 
at the Aidler Planetarium w/ith Stars of the Pharaohs, 
and Egyptian Nights: Secrets of the Sky Gods. 
These two planetarium shows transport visitors to 
ancient Egypt to experience the night sky as the 
pharaohs saw it more than 2,000 years ago. 
Planetarium visitors can also take a journey alongside 
astronaut Jim Lovell in Shoot for the Moon, a new 
permanent exhibition highlighting stories of space 
exploration. Shoot for the Moon features the fully- 
restored Gemini 12 spacecraft. The exhibition opens 
on Nov. 11, the 40th anniversary of the Gemini 12 
mission. Visit vv\«w.adlerplanetarium.org or call 
312.922.STAR for additional information. 




Experience Lizards anO 
the Komodo King at the Shedd Aquarium, where it's 
absolutely reigning reptiles! Meet a six-foot crocodile 
monitor, six-inch green day geckos, a rainbow-hued 
panther chameleon, and that master of arboreal 
camouflage, the Fiji banded iguana — just a few of 
the more than 25 stunning species on display. Of course, 
you can't miss Faust, the majestic eight-foot Komodo 
dragon. One look at this lordly lizard and you will 
believe in dragons! Lizards and the Komodo King 
runs through Feb. 28, 2007 at the Shedd Aquarium. 
For more information, visltwww.sheddaquarium.org 
or call 312.939.2438. 





Museum Names Two 
New Trustees 

John A. Canning Jr., chairman of The Field 
iVIuseum's governance committee, and Miles 
D. White, chairman of the Museum's board of 
trustees, recently announced the appointment of 
two new trustees: JOHN R. ANDERSON (below, 
top), senior partner of Anderson Enterprises, 
a holding company, and Spring Creek Partners, 
a venture capital firm with offices in Rocl<ford; 
and W. JAMES McNERNEY JR. 
(left, bottom), chairman, president 
and chief executive officer of the 
Boeing Company. They will serve 
three-year terms. The appointments 
further strengthen the board, and 
the skills of the new trustees will 
help promote the mission of 
The Field Museum. 



FROM THE PRESIDENT 



Strengthening University Ties 

The Field Museum is a leader in studying evolutionary biology and explaining it 

to the public. Gregor Mendel; Planting the Seeds of Genetics (Sept. 15-April 1, 2007) tells the story of 

a scientific pioneer and how he discovered the rules of biological inheritance. Our new permanent exhibition, 

Evolving Planet, uses the fossil record and genetic research to explore the history of life on Earth. Behind 

the scenes in our Pritzker Laboratory for Molecular Systematics and Evolution, Museum scientists are 

achieving outstanding results as they delve into the genetic detail of evolution and build on the knowledge 

already gained by the study of morphology. The molecular world is adding an entirely new dimension 

to natural history. 

It's an exciting time to announce that Neil L. Sliubin, PhD, one of the 
world's leading evolutionary biologists, has agreed to lead The Field Museum's 
academic department by serving as provost. He succeeds Robert D. Martin, 
PhD, who will move to full-time research as the Museum's A. Wiitson Armour 
Curator of Biological Anthropology. 

Dr. Shubin will divide his time between the Field and the University 
of Chicago where he serves as associate dean for organismal and evolutionary 

biology. He recently made headlines around 
the world with the discovery ot a 375-million- 
year-old fossil that represents a "missing link" 
between fish and land animals. James Macfara, 
MD, PhD, dean Biological Sciences Division 
and the Pritzker School of Medicine and vice 
president for medical affairs at the U of C, 
says Dr. Shubin is "ideally suited to pull 
together the strengths of both organizations." 

Dr. Shubin's appointment deepens 
the long-standing relationship between the 
Museum and the U of C. Decades ago The 
Field Museum acquired the natural history 
collections formerly housed at the university's 
Walker Museum. Many of our scientists teach 
at the U of C and serve on the joint Committee on Evolutionary Biology. 
We have enjoyed successful partnerships with the university's Smart Museum 
and Oriental Institute. The appointment of Dr. Shubin will help further e.xpand 
our access to the university's capabilities. The Field Museum also has built 
important relationships with other area universities including the University 
of Illinois at Chicago and Northwestern. With strong ties to these institutions, 
we have a solid foundation on which to build. 




Neil Shubin, PhD, (above) 
has been iia)Hed prouost of 
The Field Museum. 



^ John W. McCarter, Jr. 
President and CEO 



IN THE FIELD FEATURE 





1(»ri(ftt6ar»B "JSfft 



iiriitn 1114 M< KircdttK 



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Gregor Mendel: 

Planting the Seeds of Genetics 

''Modern Mendels" Work in Museum's Pritzker Lab 

Why do people typically resemble their parents? Why are many illnesses passed from one 
generation to the next? Today we know that genes provide the answers to these questions. 
But in the mid-1800s, genes had yet to be discovered and the laws of biological inheritance 
were still a mystery. 



That's when Gregor Mendel, an Augustinian friar, 
began experiments with plant hybrids at an abbey 
in Brno, in the Austro-Hungarian Empire (now in 
the Czech Repubhc). Mendel reported the results 
of his work in 1865 — offering an insightful sketch 
of how an organism's physical traits are passed 
along to offspring. 

Mendel was one of the first scientists to use 
rigorous experiments and mathematical analysis 
as a means of interpreting the results of biological 
inquiry. His methods were so advanced and results 
so groundbreaking that other scientists of his time 
did not understand the importance of his work. 
Mendel died in 1884. Years later, at the turn 
of the century, his research was rediscovered 
and confirmed. 



Today, Mendel is considered the Father of 
Genetics, although the details of his experiments 
are little known and often misunderstood. The 
Field Museum will help rectify that when it opens 
the exhibition Gregor Mendel: Planting the Seeds 
of Genetics on Sept. 15. This innovative exhibition, 
developed by The Field Museum, tells the story 
of how Mendel came to crack some of science's 
toughest mysteries. The exhibition also traces the 
rise of genetics through its major milestones — 
from the discovery of chromosomes to the DNA 
double helix — and shows how scientists today are 
using genetics to tackle questions in evolution, 
conservation, and crop cultivation. 



IN THE FIELD 



Mendel's Breakthrough 

How did Mendel do it? Through painstaking 
research that meticulously followed the scientific 
method: observation, hypothesis, prediction, 
experimentation, and conclusions. For eight years, 
he grew generation after generation of pea plants 
and carefully observed the results. Over the course 
of these experiments, Mendel grew an estimated 
28,000 pea plants, generating a huge quantity of 
data. He hypothesized that all plants and animals 
have certain "elements" (now called genes) that 
account for the transmission of physical traits from 
parents to offspring. From his studies, Mendel 
derived certain basic laws of heredity: hereditary 
factors do not combine, but are passed intact; each 
member of the parental generation transmits only 
half of its hereditary factors to each offspring 
(with certain factors dominant over others); and 
different offspring of the same parents receive 
different sets of hereditary factors. 

Charles Darwin, a contemporary of Mendel's, 
was unaware of Mendel's research. However, the 
underpinnings of Darwin's theory rested on the 
understanding of inheritance that Mendel's work 
provided. Their theories have since been unified 
into what is now called evolutionary biology — 
a cornerstone of modern science. 

"Mendel presents an exciting opportunity 
to broaden people's understanding of genetics 
beyond human diseases and the human genome 
project into the realm of natural history and mod- 
ern evolutionary biology," said Shannon Hackett, 
PhD, curator in the bird division of The Field 
Museum's Department of Zoology. 




^Without MendeTs discoveries, evolutionary 
biology wouldn't have its foundation/ 



Kevin Feldheim, PhD, manager of The 
Field Museum's Pritzker Laboratory for Molecular 
Systematics and Evolution, added, "Without 
Mendel's discoveries, evolutionary biology wouldn't 
have its foundation. Although we use more sophis- 
ticated tools and analyses, we are still applying 
Mendel's ideas to today's genetic research." (Learn 
more about the Pritzker Lab on page 9.) 



Modern Mendels 

Both Dr. Hackett and Dr. Feldheim are featured in a section of the exhibition 

that highlights the work of "modern Mendels," contemporary scientists who 

use Mendel's findings and their knowledge of genetics to learn about the 

world around them. Some of this research 
includes applying genetics in crop culti- 
vation, studying origins and genealogy, 
mapping genomes, and even solving new 
mysteries of heredity. 

Dr. Hackett is working on a major, 
multi-institutional effort to determine the 
evolutionary relationships among major 
lineages of birds. Dr. Feldheim studies 
sharks and has learned much about their 
mating behavior through DNA research. 
Many other Field Museum scientists 
conduct genetics-based research. 
Mendel incorporates four videos and 10 

hands-on activities to make the fundamentals 

of genetics accessible to everyone. Visitors can 

recreate Mendel's experiments in six easy steps, 

compare what scientists saw through microscopes 

in different eras, and use DNA to place birds on 

their family tree. The exhibition reveals Mendel's 

dramatic story through approximately 100 objects, 

including Mendel's botanical specimens, scientific 

instruments, correspondence, original manuscripts, 

books — and yes, gardening tools. Because Mendel 

was not recognized for his brilliant work during 

his lifetime, very few of his papers or personal 

possessions still exist. This exhibition will display 

most of what survives. The exhibition's life-size 

photo murals illustrate changes in the scientific 

environment over the last 1 50 years. 

A highly unusual and innovative feature of 

the exhibition is the integration of contemporary 

works of art that explore the subject of genetics. 

These works reflect 
the spirit of inquiry 
and creativity that 
inspires scientific 
research as well as art. 
Gregor Mendel: Planting the Seeds of Genetics 

was developed by The Field Museum in partner- 
ship with The Vereinigung zur Forderung der 

Genomforschung in Vienna, Austria, and the Mendel 

Museum in Brno, Czech Republic. The exhibition 

runs through April 1, 2007. It then will travel to 

four other U.S. cities, itf 

Chicago Sponsor: Monsanto Company 



This page: Shannon 
Hackett, PhD, is one of 
The Field Museum's 
"modern Mendels. " 
She studies the evolution 
of birds. 

Opposite, left: Mendel's 
pruning and grafting tools. 

Opposite, center: Among 
Mendel's books was this 
1867 copy of Wonders 
of the Invisible World, 
by Gustav Jiiger 

Opposite, top right: 
A box containing botanical 
specimens dating from 
Mendel's time. 

Opposite, bottom right: 
Slides used by Mendel 
in his research. 



FALL 2006 • S E PTE M B E R- NOV E M B E R 



IN THE FIELD INTERVIEW 

Collection Key to Discovery of New Genus 

A Conversation with Bill Stanley 

By Srcpliiiiiie Lee. I Vriter 

Questions in evolutionary biology are often addressed at multiple levels — for example, by analyzing 
an organism's DNA and its morphology. When a new monkey was found in Tanzania, its DMA placed it 
close to baboons on the primate family tree. Then, Bill Stanley, The Field Museum's Negaunee Collection 
IVianager of Mammals, compared the monkey's skull with specimens in our collection and saw that it did 
not have key anatomical traits common to baboons. Thus, Stanley and his colleagues concluded that 
the monkey represents a new genus— a higher classification than species (a genus can contain several 
related species.) Recently, Stanley talked to In the Field. 




■.e.^'--. 



ITF: How did this disawery come about? 

Stanley: A couple of years ago. a friend of mine, 
Tim Davenport [PhD], who works for the 
Wildlife Conservation Socierv' and founded the 
Southern Highlands Conservation Programme 
in the Mount Rungwe area of Tanzania, noticed 
an unusual primate, one that didn't look hke any 
other he had seen before — it was a monkey with 
a big "mohawk" of spiky hair on the crown of its 
head, gray-brown for on its body, off-white hair 
on the belly and on the tip ot its long, curved tail. 
The more he observed and the more research 
he did. the more he suspected he was observing 
a new species. Later. Tim went to a cafe and began 
talking to another independent researcher who had 
been working in the Ndundulu Forest Reserve. 
Each researcher began describing the unusual 
monkey he had seen and eventually it became 
clear that they were talking about the same t\pe 
of monkey! The Ndundulu team had already sub- 
mitted a paper to the journal Science describing 
the monkey. That paper was retracted so that the 
two research teams could submit a new paper 
together — with more complete information. 



The article appeared in Science in May, 2005 and 
it described the new species. Lopliocehiis kipunji 
[commonly referred to as Kipunji]. However, the 
description was based on a photograph — not an 
actual specimen. There are rules in zoology that 
exist so that scientists go about naming species 
in a congruent way. One rule states that you need 
a holotype — a specimen that is representative of 
the species being described. The researchers had 
not collected a specimen to ser\e as the holorspe, 
because of the possibility that the new monkey 
might be endangered. So in this case, the description 
was based on a photograph because it showed all 
the physical traits that allowed it to be differentiated 
from all other species of primate. The fact that this 
new species was known only from a photograph 
lett many questions unanswered. 



6 IN THE FIELD 




Above, left: Bill Stanley 
holds the skull of the 
monkey that represents 
a new genus. 

Above, right: At first, 
scientists could study only 
photographs of the mon- 
key, which was found on 
Mt. Rungwe in Tanzania. 

Opposite: By comparing 
its skull with specimens 
in the Museum's collec- 
tion, Stanley realized he 
couldn't place the monkey 
in any existing genus. 



ITF: How did you come into the story? 



Stanley: I was working in Tanzania when 
I received a text message from Tim saying that 
a Kipunji monkey had died in a farmer's trap. 
Finally, the researchers had a specimen! Tim wanted 
me to come and help preserve it. I couldn't get 
there right away, so it was frozen until I could 
arrive. I eventually joined Tim and the other 
biologists. We dissected the monkey and took 
tissue samples, some of which we deposited in 
Tanzania and the rest we brought back to 
The Field Museum. 

ITF: An international collaboration of scientists 
contributed to this discovery. How did scientists from 
around the globe become involved, and what u>as 
it like working with them? 

Stanley: We depended on the combined expertise 
and independent research of a diverse group of 
individuals to gather and analyze the data we 
needed to come to our conclusions. We brought 
in the morphological expertise of Eric Sargis 
[PhD], a primatologist in the Anthropology 
Department at Yale University, and Field Museum 
Research Associate Link Olson [PhD], now at 
the University of Alaska Museum, to do the DNA 
analysis. The two Tanzanian biologists involved in 
the study are the world's experts on the ecology 
of the Kipunji of Mt. Rungwe. So our collabora- 
tion spanned much of the globe: from the tropical 
forests of Rungwe in Tanzania, to the freezing 
snows of Alaska, we all worked together to make 
this discovery. 



ITF: What did the genetic analyses show? 

Stanley: The tissue samples we had were analyzed and then compared 
to the genetic data of other monkeys to determine the relationship 
among various primate species. We thought the analyses would show 
that the monkey was related to other primates in the genus Lophocehus. 
But we found that this new monkey was more closely related to 

baboons, in the genus Papio. 
Meanwhile, Eric flew to Chicago, 
and he and I compared the Kipunji 
skull with other primate skulls in 
The Field Museum's collections. 
We found that the skull did not 
have three characteristics that are 
typical in baboons — an extended 
snout, depressions in the lower jaw, 
and a particular kind of depression 
under the eye sockets. Suddenly, we 
realized we couldn't place it in any existing genus! 
Our specimen was not a baboon and it wasn't 
like other monkeys, so we had to put it in its 
own genus, which we named Rungwecebus, after 
Mt. Rungwe, the mountain where the monkey 
was found. Our results were published by Science 
this year in the May 1 1 online Science Express. 



'If we had relied on 
DNA analysis alone, we would 
have come to a completely 
different conclusion../ 

ITF: Wiat did you learn from this experience? 

Stanley: To discover a new genus of monkey 
IS exciting, because it shows that the Age of 
Discovery is not over. Also, this is a striking 
example of the importance of collections. If we 
had relied on DNA analysis alone, we would have 
come to a completely different conclusion than 
we did by analyzing both the DNA and the 
observations of the skull. We could not have 
analyzed the skull without the extraordinary set 
of primate specimens housed in the Barbara E. 
and Roger O. Brown Priinate Collection here 
at The Field Museum. ITF 



FALL 2006 



SEPTEMBER-NOVEMBER 



IN THE FIELD FEATURE 




Till' Field Museum 
has installed rooftop 
solar panels to help its 
energy efficiency. 




City Asks Museums to 

Step Up to the Environmental Plate 

By Tiffany Plate, Writer 

On May 31, the leaders of Chicago's lO Museums in the Park-includingThe Field Museum, 
Adler Planetarium, Art Institute, Chicago History Museum, Du Sable Museum, Mexican Fine Arts Center 
Museum. Museum of Contemporary Art, Museum of Science and Industry, Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum, 
and Shedd Aquarium — gathered to honor each other's work in the Chicago Green Museum Program. Mayor 
Richard M. Daley hosted the event, along with the Department of the Environment, to celebrate the first 
year of the program. The message of the Chicago Green Museums program is clear: 
as educational institutions, museums have a unique opportunity to become leaders in the 
environmental charge, and to communicate to the public the importance of thinking green. 



"Millions of people 
from all over the country walk 
through these institutions every 
year. Thousands of school chil- 
dren are educated and inspired 
by exhibitions and outreach," 
commented Mayor Daley. 
"We must prepare our youth 
for the fiiture. And a very 
important part of that future involves keeping our 
environment clean and sustainable for generations 
to come. Let's give our children the education 
and resources that will allow them to respect the 
environment," he continued. 

Mayor Daley has made being green a priority 
for the city, and this newest museum-based project 
is a logical next step in educating Chicagoans and 
visitors about environmentalism.The first major 
goals of the project are to increase energy efficiency 
in the institutions' capital improvement projects, 
make "green procurement" a standard by making 
it cost-effective to buy non-to.xic products that 
conserve resources, and educate visitors through spe- 
cialized events or environmentallv themed exhibits. 



FIELD MUSEUM-MCA COLLABORATIONS 

Don't miss other collaborations between the Field Museum and the MCA. 
The museums are co-producing a public dance exchange movement class (see 
Your Guide to the Field for details) and a professional development workshop 
for teachers that will create connections between the exhibitions Gregor Mendel: 
Planting the Seeds of Genetics and Massive Change: The Future of Global Design. 

The Massive Change exhibition and tour is a project by Bruce Mau Design and the Institute without 
Boundaries, commissioned and organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery. The Chicago presentation 
is generously sponsored by Target. 



The Field Museum's mission of protecting 
biodiversity and conserving Earth's resources makes 
it an ideal vehicle for spreading this message. Our 
recent environmentally themed exhibitions, outreach 
programs, and capital improvements projects have 
also greatly increased our eco-friendliness. Rooftop 
solar panels, fluorescent lighting, energy-efficient 
boilers and chillers, as well as Museum-wide recycUng 
of paper, cardboard, glass, and plastic have all made 
the Field a model for the cause. 

This fall the Museum of Contemporary Art 
(MCA) is also taking up the charge, with the opening 
of Massive Change: Tiie Future of Global Design 
(Sept. 16- Dec. 31). The exhibition celebrates the 
human capacity to change the world and is a call 
to recognize both the power and responsibility of 
design. Massive Change aims to change the way 
we think about design and the very nature of life 
itself. The MCA has made the ideas expressed 
in Massive Change a reality by initiating its own 
sustainable projects, including improved sorting of 
recyclables, a proposed installation of wind turbines 
on the museum's roof, and a weekly farmers' market 
in the summer that supports local, organic growers. 

As the MCA's and The Field Museum's green 
teams work to create more environmentally friendly 
museums, the city's network is putting the staffi of 
the Museums in the Park in touch with each other 
to share best practices. The city is facilitating new 
grant-fianded projects that will serve all the museums, 
and helping to bring the environmental discussion 
to the forefront, nr 



TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CHICAGO'S INITIATIVES, 
CHECK OUT THE MAYOR'S ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION 
AGENDA AT WWW.CITY0FCHICAG0.ORG/ENVIR0NMENT 



8 IN THE FIELD 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS FALL 2006 SEPTEMBER-NOVEMBER 



YOURGUIDE TOTHE FIELD 



INSIDE > EXHIBITIONS FESTIVALS FAMILY PROGRAMS ADULT PROGRAMS 




Two of Us 9/5-9/26, 10/10-10/31 
Overnights 9/8 & 9/15, 11/24 

lola Textile Demonstration 9/9 
Cuatro Performance 9/9 

lazon Creek Fieldtrip 9/16 
DNA Discovery Days 9/16 & 9/17 
Behind-tlie-Scenes Evening 9/22 
IVlundillo Lace Demonstration 9/30 
IVleet King Tut Worl<sliop 11/4 

Cliicago Geology Course/ 
Fieldtrip 9/13, 9/20, & 9/30 

Unraveling Mendel's Legacy Lecture 9/16 

Three Cosmic Tenors Lecture 9/24 

laking of the Fittest Lecture 9/30 

Ceremonial Centers Lecture 9/30 

Nubia Symposium 10/7 

Tut's Tomb and its Treasures Course 
10/7-11/18 

1491 Lecture 10/19 

Botanical Illustration Course 10/21 & 10/28 

Botany of Desire Lecture 11/11 

Tsavo Lion Lecture llZ2i 



Relentless En^ 



Maya Gods & Kings: 

The Mural of San Bartolo 10/25 



Exploring Mars: 

Rovers of the Red Planet 11/15 

A Camera, Two Kids, and a Camel 1 



New Exhibition! 

SEPTEMBER 15, 2006-APRIL 1, 2007 

Meet the brilliant, 19th-century friar who became the father of modern 
genetics. Recreate Mendel's famous pea experiments to discover the laws 
of heredity for yourself, understand the basics of genetics, and meet modern 
Mendels— scientists on the cutting edge of this field today. 



IHllttUlIf 




This exhibition and its North American 
tour were developed by The Field 
IVIuseum, Chicago, in partnership with 
The Vereinigung zur Forderung der 
Genomforschung, Vienna, Austria, 
and The Mendel Museum, Brno, 
Czech Republic. 

Chicago Sponsor; Monsanto Company 



li'ii^^lO^r 

f 



Planting the .Seeds nf Genetics 



Featured Lecture 

Unraveling Mendel's Legacy 

Simon Mawer, Author 

Trace the history of genetics, from its founding up to today's critical 
genetic research. Mawer— a celebrated fiction writer and biology teacher- 
has extensively studied Mendel's life and experiments, and will provide 
an engaging account of Mendel's influence on modern research. Mawer is 
also the author of the exhibition's companion volume, 
Gregor Mendel: Planting the Seeds of Genetics, and 
will be available for book signing after the lecture. 

SATURDAY, SEPT 16, 2pm 

$16, students /educators $i4, members $12 

Mr. Mawer's appearance was made possible by the generous support 
of Restaurace JAMA, Praha, Czech Repubhc. 



j: 




"^i 



Field 



useum 



Please note: Refunds will be issued by Field Museum staff, minus a $10 processing fee, for group and family 
overnights only. Mo refunds or exchanges are permitted for any other pron'?""- foot '."■ •i.-nn.-.T,,,; mnrpiifd 
by The Field Museum will be refunded in full. 



Decode Mendel's genius 

See how modern scientists are using Mendel's legacy to learn more about life on Earth. 
From activity stations to art lessons, there's something for everyone! 



DNA Discovery Days 

Celebrate the exhibition opening with special Scientists 
at the Field demonstrations, an interactive Interpretive 
Station, and a Story Time presentation with Cheryl 
Bardoe, author of the new children's book Gregor 
Mendel: The Friar Who Grew Peas. 

SATURDAY & SUNDAY, SEPT 16 & 17, 11am-2pm 
Free with Museum admission 



Family Behind the Scenes 

Pritzker Lab of Molecular Systematics 
and Evolution 

Dr. Kevin Feldheim, FM Pritzker Lab 

Take a behind-the-scenes tour of the Pritzker Lab, 
where scientists from around the world are studying 
the DNA of plant and animal species. Learn how 
scientists discover new species, and try your hand 
at extracting DNA from a shark fin! For families 
with children ages 7-12. 

FRIDAY, SEPT 22, 6-8pm 
$15, members $12 




Adult Lecture 

The Botany of Desire: 

A Plant's-Eye View of the World 

Michael Pollan, Author 

Come hear celebrated author Michael Pollan discuss 
his best-selling book The Botany of Desire: A Plant's- 
Eye View of the World, and 
get a better understanding of the 
complex relationship between 
humans and plants. 

SATURDAY, NOV. 11, 2pii 
$20, members $18; 
CPDUs available 



Adult Class 



Botanical Illustration 

Alarlene Hill Donnelly, FM Dept. of Geol<^ 

Explore the delicate beauty of some of Mendel's most 
important experimental subjects through the basics of 
botanical illustration. Learn how to utilize close obser- 
vation to create beautiful and accurate drawings from 
live plants and Museum replicas. All levels welcome. 

SATURDAYS, OCT 21 & 28, 9am-4pm 
$56, members $45 




Celebracion: Latin Heritage Festival 

Learn more about the vibrant music and artistic traditions of Latin America. 

All events are free with Museum admission. 



Mola Textile-Making 
Demonstration 

Irvia Vimr, Mola artist 

Experience the beauty and artistry of the Mola, 
a textile-making craft that's been handed down through 
generations of Panamanian women. Vivar, a Kuna Indian, 
will share how her Mola craft reflects a synthesis of 
traditional Kuna culture with contemporary themes. 

SATURDAY, SEPT. 9, 11am-2pm 



Family Performance 

Puerto Rican Cuatro Ensemble 

Discover the wonders of vibrant Cuatro music — 
an important creative expression that highlights feelings 

of pride and community 
among Puerto Ricans. 



SATURDAY, SEPT 9, 2pm 



^ U- V'i^ 



Adult Symposium 



Nubia and Egypt: 
Neighbors on the Nile 

Dr. James Phillips, Dr. Chap Kusimba, 
FM Dept. of Anthropology; Dt Bruce Williams, 
Oriental Institute; Dr Stuart Tyson Smith, 
University of California, Santa Barbara 

Examine the complexities of Nubian culture, 
kingship, and its relations to ancient Egypt. 
Hear about the recently renovated Nubia exhibition 
at the Oriental Institute, and get an insider's 
glimpse into current archaeology in Nubia. 

SATURDAY, OCT 7, 1-4pm 

$16, students /educators $14, members $12 



Special Artists at the Field 

Nellie Vera, Artist 

See the intricate processes through which Puerto Rican 
craftspeople like Vera have been making sumptuous 
Mundillo lace for centuries. You'll learn more about 
Moca, "the capital of lace" on the southwestern coast 
of Puerto Rico, and how this painstaking lacework has 

been commissioned 
by aristocrats and 
collectors alike. 

SATURDAY, SEPT 30, 
11am-2pm 







Lecture 




Ceremonial Centers of the Caribbean 

Dr. Antonio Curct, FM Dept. of Anthropology 

Follow Dr. Curet as he travels to southern Puerto Rico 
in search of clues about the earliest ceremonial center 
of the Caribbean. Curet is studying the site to discover 
the evolution of the social organization and economy 
of domestic groups in 
ancient Puerto Rico. 

SATURDAY, 
SEPT 30, 2pm 




r 

'<■• 



Family Overnights 

Dozin' With The Dinos 

Sue the T. rex is having a sleepover! 

Join us for a night of family activities, 

tours, and performances, then spread your sleeping 

bag amid some of our most popular exhibitions. 

The event includes an evening snack and breakfast. 

For families w/ith children ages 6-12. 

FRIDAYS, SEPT. 8, 15, & NOV. 24 

5:45pm in THE EVENING UNTIL 9am THE FOLLOWING DAY 

$47, groups S42, members $40 



Family Workshop 



Meet King Tut 

See the boy king in a whole new light! Take a tour of 
Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs and 
learn fascinating ancient mummification techniques. Then 
travel to the Oriental Institute, where you'll make your own 
version of Tut's golden royal headdress and get your picture 
taken alongside the OI's colossal ancient statue of King 
Tut. For families with children ages 6-12. 

SATURDAY, NOV. 4, 10am-2:30pm 

$34, members $29 (includes admission to museums 

and special exhibitions; please bring a lunch) 



In partnership with the Museum of Contemporary Art 

Liz Lertnan Dance Exchange Movement Class 

Museum of Contemporary Art 

Learn how to stimulate the brain and the body through dance! Follow these experts who created the dance 
"Ferocious Beauty: Genome" in partnership with genetic scientists, with performances at the MCA Sept. 28-30. 

For families with children 8 years and older. 

SATURDAY, SEPT 30, 2pm 

Free, but pre-registration is required. For tickets and more information 

please call the Museum of Conternvomry Art Box Office 

iit 312.397.4010. 




"'mj^' 



Adult Lecture 

Three Cosmic Tenors: Exploring the Frontiers of Matter, Energy, Space & Time 

fames Gates, University of Maryland; Larry Gladney, University of Pennsylvania; 
and Herman White, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory 

Explore today's energy frontier with our three cosmic tenors. These scientists' songs speak to us of how theoretical 
models and the use of technology will help us understand the fundamental nature of energy. Their concert 
will be a harmonious presentation of ideas from different scientific perspectives. 

SUNDAY, SEPT 24, 2-4:30pm 

Free, but pre-registration is required for this event. Please call 312.665. 7400 to reserve your space. 




Gregor Mendel: Planting the Seeds of Genetics 

OPENS SEPTEMBER 15, 2006 



Cheyenne Visions 

OPENS NOVEMBER 17, 2006 



duV 



Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs is an exhibition from National 
Geographic. Organized by Arts and Exhibitions International and AEG Exhibitions in 
association with The Supreme Council of Antiquities of Egypt and The Field Museum. 

Tour Sponsor; Northern Trust 

Chicago Sponsor: Exelon, Proud Parent of ComEd 



Adult Course 

Advanced Chicago Geology 

Dave Dolak, Columbia College 

Join this combination class and fieldtrip especially 
for adult amateur geologists! Learn and practice field 
techniques, then try them out at site visits to the Chicago 
Portage, Palos Hills, Camp Sagawau Forest Preserve, 
and Mazon Creek. 

WEDNESDAYS, SEPT. 13 & 20, 6-9pm; 
FIELDTRIP: SEPT. 30, 8am-4pm 
$95, members $85 




Family Workshop 



Two of Us 



jf£1k 



Join us in one of these four-week excursions through the wonders 
of The Field Museum! You and your little one will travel the 

Museum's exhibition halls, 
sing songs, hear stories, touch 
objects, and make art projects. 
Ideal for homeschoolers! 
Choose from one or more 
of the sessions to the right. 




Adult Course 



Tutankhamun: His Tomb and Its Treasures 

Dr. Emily Teeter, Oriental Institute 

Unearth the magnificent objects found in the tomb of 
Tutankhamun, from his royal scepters and ritual regalia to 
funerary shrines and coffins. You'll learn about their symbolism 
and function, then examine the rediscovery of the tomb through 
visits to permanent galleries and special exhibitions at the 
Oriental Institute and The Field Museum. 

SATURDAYS, OCT. 7, 14, 21, 28, IOam-NOON AT 01 
SATURDAYS, NOV. 11 & 18, IOam-NOON AT FM 
$214, FM and OI members $184 
Register through the Oriental Institute 773.702.9507 



Adult Lecture 



1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus 

Charles Mann, Author 

Journey back in time to an American land you've never known. Mann will discuss his best-selling book, which traces 
the "pre-history" of the Americas and debunks myths about the first inhabitants of this land. You'll learn about the sophisticated 
cities of the Aztecs, the agricultural advances of pre-Columbian Indians in Mexico, then hear how the Field's own 
anthropological research is contributing to this story. Books will be available for purchase and signing after the lecture. 

THURSDAY, OCT. 19, 7pm 

$8, students /educators $7, members $6 



1X91 



new MEVElATIONt Of T* 
i AMEKICAS BEFORE COIUMI 



CSAmX<XS O. MAI 



The Auschwitz Album: The Story of a Transport 

EXTENDED THROUGH OCTOBER 15, 2006 



Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs 

THROUGH JANUARY 1, 2007 



Egypt: Explore ancient Egypt and the reign of King Tut. 

TUESDAYS, SEPT. 5-26, 10-IIam 

(NOTE: DOES NOT INCLUDE TICKETS TO TUTANKHAMUN) 

Folklore and Rituals: Explore the ways different cultures 
around the world celebrate fall festivals like Halloween. 
TUESDAYS, OCT 10-31, 10-11am 

$32, members $27 

For each 3-5 year old child with paid attendance, 

one parent or adult chaperone attends for free. 



Evolving Science Lecture 

The Making of the Fittest 

Dr. Sean Carroll, Howard Hughes Medical Institute 
and University of Wisconsin-Madison 



Investigate how all of evolution's adaptations involve 
a change in DNA, providing us with an outstanding record. 
See how biologists are mining this record to understand how 
species have adapted to the planet's varied and diverse habitats. 
From fish that live in sub-freezing water to birds that communi- 
cate in ultraviolet colors, you'll get a new understanding of 
how the fittest are made. 

SATURDAY, SEPT 30, 2pm 
Free with Museum admission 




Family Fieldtrip 

Fossil Hunt at Mazon Creek 

Dave Dolak, Columbia College 



<\ 



Get out your hiking boots and join us 

for a fossil hunt at the world-famous 

Mazon Creek site. Plan on a one-quarter mile walk to 

fossil locations. For families with children ages 8-17. 

SATURDAY, SEPT. 16, 8am-3pm 
$40, members $30 



IV^. 



Fieldtrip 




Experience Thornton Quarry 

Dave Dolak, Columbia College 

Get a behind-the-scenes look at one 

of the world's largest exposed fossil 

reefs in this giant limestone quarry. 

Tour the active quarry operations then collect fossils of 

the organisms that lived on a coral reef in Illinois 420 million 

years ago, including trilobites, cephalopods, brachiopods, 

and crinoids. 

SATURDAY, OCT 7, 8:30AM-2PM 

$65, members $55 

Adults only, please. Space is limited. Please register by June 20. 



Adult Lecture 

Investigating Tsavo's Legendary Lions 

Bruce Patterson, Curator of Mammals, FM Dept. of Zoology 

Uncover the mysteries of Kenya's Tsavo region, where Patterson and his colleagues 
are collecting data to explain why the area's lions are maneless. Come find out how citizen 
scientists from all walks of life are studying these unusual animals and helping to write 
a new chapter for the King of Beasts. 




SATURDAY, NOV. 25, 1:30pm 
Free with Museum admission 



Eskimo and Inuit Carvings: 
Collecting Art from the Arctic 

THROUGH JUNE 17, 2007 



Impressions of Tsavo 

THROUGH JULY 7, 2007 




NATIONAL 
GEOGRAPHIC 



i&^f 



Travel to the wilds of Africa, tlie surface of IVlars, even 
back to tlie time of the iVIaya with these dynamic men and 
women. They'll share brilliant photographs and compelling 
stories in each of the four sessions of the fall series. 




Relentless Enemies: 
Lions and Buffalo 

Dereck and Beverly Joubert, 
Naturalists and Filmmakers 

Get a glimpse into the daily life of this 
daring duo that has made the African 
wilderness their home for the last 
25 years. Hear tales of life-and-death 
struggles— played out against a backdrop of breathtaking 
landscapes— from their new book detailing the ongoing 
battle between the majestic lions and massive buffalo 
of Botswana's Okavango Delta. 

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 4, 7:30pm 

Maya Gods & Kings: The Mural of San Bartolo 

William Saturno, Archaeologist 

Examine one of the greatest Maya finds of all time— 
a chance discovery by Saturno's team in Guatemala in 
2001. This breathtakingly well-preserved mural, dating 
to 100 BCE, shines new light on 
the religion and political structure 
of the preclassic Maya civilization. 

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 25, 7:30pm 



Series Subscriptions > On Sale Now! 

Explorers Circle: Ensure the continuation of National Geographic 
Live! These limited-run tickets include free parking in the west lot 
or vouchers for free North Garage parking; prime reserved seating; 
a private reception with Dereck and Beverly Joubert prior to the 
October 4 event and signed copy of their book; acknowledgement 
of your support of the series in each program; and $150 of ticket 
price is tax-deductible. $360; TFM, NG and Geographic Society 
of Chicago members $350. 

Patron (reserved seating); $110; TFM, NG and Geographic Society 
of Chicago members $100. 

General admission: $84; TFM, NG and Geographic Society 
of Chicago members $70; educators/students $48. 





A Camera, Two Kids, and a Camel 

Annie Griffiths Belt, Photographer 

Go behind the lens with this master 
photographer as she shares her experiences 
in Africa, among the women of the Arab 
world, and other places where her camera 
has been her passport. With her two children in tow. 
Belt has been able to find common ground with her 
subjects through her experiences as a mother, helping 
her to immerse herself in other cultures. 

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 6, 7:30pm 

Exploring Mars: Rovers of the Red Planet 

Kobie Boykins, Space Engineer 

Journey to the surface of Mars with this young engineer 
who helped design the Expedition Rovers, Spirit and 
Opportunity. Still drawing energy through solar panels 
designed by Boykins, the rovers are 
working to examine rocks and soils 
that might contain evidence of the 
past existence of water on 
the Martian surface. 

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 15, 7:30pm 



Individual Events > On Sale mid-September 

Patron (reserved seating): $30; TFM, NG and Geographic Society 
of Chicago members $28. 

General admission: $24; TFM, NG and Geographic Society 
of Chicago members $22; educators/students $15. 

Educators-Student programs, teacher workshops, and online 
lesson plans are provided in conjunction with the series. 
For more information, go to nationalgeographic.com/nglive 
or call 312.665.7500. 

National Geographic Live! Educational programs are made possible 
by the generous support of Plum Creek. 



[njoy this year's intercultural dialogue among Chicago's ethnic communities on the theme of teaching. 
For more information call 312.665.7474, or visit www.fieldmuseum.org/ccuc. 



Ponder the reaches of nature and humanity 



Impressions 
of Tsavo 

THROUGH JULY 7, 2007 
Dazzling color photographs 
reveal the remarkable wildlife, 
landscape, and people of the 
Tsavo region in East Africa. 

This exhibition was organized by 
The Field IWuseum. 



Eskimo and Inuit Carvings: 
Collecting Art from the Arctic 

THROUGH JUNE 17, 2007 

Discover historic and contemporary carvings in stone 
and animal bone created by Esl<imo and Inuit artists 
from Alaska and Canada. 

This exhibition was organized by The Field Museum. 





The Auschwitz Album: 
The Story of a Transport 

EXTENDED THROUGH OCTOBER 15 

Striking black-and-w/hite photographs taken by 
Nazi S.S. officers provide the only visual record 
of the arrival and imprisonment of Hungarian Jews 
in the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp. 

This exhibition was created by Yad Vashem, The Holocaust Martyrs' 
and Heroes' Remembrance Authority in Israel. The Field Museum 
presentation is made possible by the American Society for Yad Vashem. 

Generous support has been provided by the Crown Family. 



Live Carving and Drumming Demonstration! 

Come enjoy the true culture of art from Nunavut by seeing it created 
in front of your eyes by expert Arctic Canadian craftsmen. 

FRIDAY-SUNDAY, OCT. 20-22, 11am-1pm 
Free with Museum admission 

Sponsored by the Canadian Consulate General of Chicago. 



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GETTING HERE 

Field Museum visitors can park in Soldier 
Field's parking garage. Visit www.fieldmu- 
seum.org for information on parking 
lots/rates, free trolleys and public transit. 

HOURS 

Summer hours are 8am-5pm daily. 
Last admission at 4pm. Hours are subject 
to change. Please consult the Museum's 
website for the most up-to-date information. 
Please note the Museum closes at 5pm even 
when an evening event is scheduled. 
Event participants will be asked to leave 
the building until 30 minutes before 
their event begins. 



ADMISSION AND TICKETS 

For this special engagement of 
Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the 
Pharaohs, members (except for Royal Tut 
and Tut at Twilight members) will be eligible 
to purchase exhibition tickets at a reduced 
rate of $10 (versus $25 for non-members). 
Family members are eligible for up to 4 
discounted tickets; Individual, Senior and 
National Affiliate members are eligible for 
up to 2 discounted tickets; Student members 
are eligible for 1 discounted ticket. Tickets 
can be purchased by calling 312.665.7705 
Monday-Friday from 8:30am-4:30pm or 
picked up at the Membership Services Desk 
at the South or East Entrance during your 
next visit. Royal Tut and Tut at Twilight 
Members should call 312.665.7929 to 
reserve their exhibition tickets. For more 
information, please visit www.fieldmuseum. 
org/membership. 

For non-members, The Field Museum's gold 
pass, which includes general admission plus 
one of our other special exhibitions such as 
Tutankhamun or Underground Adventure, 
ranges in price from $8 to $25, depending 
on your age category and whether you are 
a Chicago resident Please bring your ID to 
receive the appropriate ticket price. Tickets 
are available at the Museum's admission 
desks, or in advance via www.fieldmuseum.org 
or 866.FIELD.03. For all admission and 
ticket details, visit vwi/w.fieldmuseum.org. 



ACCESSIBILITY 

Visitors using wheelchairs or strollers may 
be dropped off at the new East Entrance. 
Handicapped parking and wheelchairs 
are available on a first-come, first-served 
basis. The West Museum parking lot is 
also available for handicapped parking 
on a first-come, first-served basis, and the 
West Entrance is also handicap-accessible. 
Call 312.665.7400 to check on the accessi- 
bility of programs that take place outside 
of the Museum. 

INFORMATION 

312.922.9410 orvyflAftv.fieldmuseum.org 



The Field Museum salutes the people of Chicago 
for their long-standing, generous support of 
the Museum through the Chicago Park District. 
In addition. Museum programs are partially 
supported by a CityArts Program 4 Grant from 
the City of Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs 
and the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency. 

In accordance with Title IX of the Education 
Amendments Act of 1972, we do not discriminate 
on the basis of sex in our programs or activities. 
Please call 312.665.7271 to contact our Title IX 
Coordinator in the human resources department 
should you have any questions or concerns. 



SCIENTIST'S PICK 



The 3730 Genetic Analyzer: 
Workhorse of the Pritzker Lab 



The Field Museum's Pritzket- Laboratory for Molecular Systematics and Evolution is 
a multi-user facility dedicated to tlie genetic analysis and preservation of the world's biodiversity. 
The Pritzl<er Lab provides scientists state-of-the-art equipment for the study of molecular biology. 
At the heart of the lab is the 3730, short for Applied Biosystem's 3730 Genetic Analyzer, 

a workhorse that processes countless pieces of DNA daily. 



From sharks to mushrooms to birds, the 3730 helps scientists answer a multitude 
of questions. How is a flamingo related to a grebe? Which male sired that shark pup? 
How many species of fungi are in that soil sample? The methods used to address these 
questions are remarkably similar across projects. Essentially, scientists compare DNA 
among individuals, species, genera, or even at higher taxonomic levels. 




k 



Above, top: Several 
scientists who conduct 
genetics-based research 
gather in the Museurfi's 
Pritzker Lab. 



Above, bottom: Scientists 
have placed good-luck 
charms on top of 
the 3730. 

Right: An electrophero- 
gram is a DNA pattern 
of different colors. 



Sequencing technology 
has made amazing strides. 
As recently as the early 1990s, 
scientists labeled DNA with radioactive molecules, 
ran the radio-labeled DNA on a gel, and exposed 
the gel to film. This cumbersome method took 
several days and exposed researchers to potentially 
harmful radiation. Automated sequencers, like the 
3730, produce results in about one day and forego 
radiation altogether. 

Museum scientists working in the lab have 
covered the 3730 with good-luck charms, recalling 
the days when science and superstition were 
intertwined. But there's really nothing mysterious 
about the process of analyzing DNA. For instance, 
when analyzing animal DNA scientists first grind 
or chop small pieces of tissue. They add chemicals 
to break down cell membranes and proteins. 
Regular table salt is used to take proteins out 
of the solution, and then DNA is removed with 
alcohol. Scientists use one of four florescent dyes 
(green, blue, red, or yellow) to label the DNA. 
Next, the samples are loaded into the 3730 where 
they run through glass capillaries filled with 
a polymer matrix. Because DNA is negatively 
charged and will move towards a positive charge, 
the 3730 runs an electric current through 
the capillaries causing the DNA to migrate 



through the polymer. Then a laser makes the dye 
molecules fluoresce and these florescent emissions 
are focused onto a charge-coupled device camera. 
Each dye has a different emission pattern enabling 
the 3730 to differentiate among the four colors. 
Scientists obtain a DNA pattern of different colors, 
called an electropherogram, which allows them 
to examine genetic relationships. Two organisms 
(even organisms that look very different) are closely 
related if the patterns of their electropherograms 
are similar. Thanks to the Pritzker Lab and equip- 
ment such as the 3730, Museum researchers are 
solving key questions about relationships among 
the diverse forms of life on Earth, itf 



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Kevin Feldheim, PhD, manager of the Pritzker 
Laboratory for Molecular Systematics and Evolution, 
contributed to this Scientist's Pick. 



FALL 2006 • S E PTE M B E R- NOV E M B E R 



IN THE FIELD FEATURE 



Book Reports by Field Museum Authors 

Compiled by Nmicy O'Sliea, Editor 

When they aren't conducting field research, worl<ing in labs, training students, or planning 
exhibitions, many Field Museum staff members can be found tapping away on computer keyboards, 
writing publications that help share their knowledge. 
Here, nine Museum authors describe their books and 
tell why they were compelled to write them. 




Caribbean 
Paleoderr'ograDt^y 





CARIBBEAN PALEODEMOGRAPHY 
BY L. ANTONIO CURET 

(University of Alabama Press) 

In this book, I review the uses of demography 
in Caribbean archaeology and propose more rig- 
orous and promising ways in which demographic 
factors can be incorporated in our modehng of 
past human behavior, hi the study of all cultures, 
population is an important variable used to explain 
many social, pohtical, and economic processes such 
as migration, changes in subsistence systems, and 
the development of institutionalized social stratifi- 
cation. In the past, however, Caribbeanists have 
used population and other demographic variables 
in a casual and loose manner without considering 
many of the factors and processes involved in pop- 
ulation dynamics. In my book, I analyze a number 
of demographic issues in island archaeology' at 
various levels, including inter and intra-island 
migration, carrying capacity (the number of peo- 
ple that can be supported by natural resources 




without detrimental impact to the environment), 
population structures (sex and age distribution, 
fertilit\', mortality, etc.), variables in prehistory, 
cultural changes, and the relationship between 
material culture and social development. I attempt 
to bring together the diverse theories on Greater 
Antilles island populations and the social and 
political forces governing their growth and 
migration. The book is intended to be used by 
archaeologists working in the Caribbean, but it 
could also be used as a case study for Caribbean 
archaeology or as a paleodemography textbook. 

L. Antonio Ciiret, PhD, is associate curator, Circum- 
Carihbean archaeology. Department of Anthropology, 
The Field Museum. To order his book by phone, call 
800. 621.2736 (reference ISBN 08 17351 85X). 




10 



IN THE FIELD 



IMAGES OF THE PAST 

BY T. DOUGLAS PRICE AND GARY M. FEINMAN 

(IVlcGraw-Hill) 

T. Douglas Price, PhD, (University of Wisconsin-Madison) and I published the first 
edition of Images of the Past in 1 993 when we were co-teaching an introduction to 
archaeology class at the university level that focused on the human past. Over the years, 
we tried various texts, but none seemed to excite either our students or ourselves. 
Rather than try to be encyclopedic, we took a new tack when writing Images. 
We chose to emphasize only certain key discoveries (roughly 80 archaeological sites) 
that had produced major insights into the history of humankind. We also took 
a new approach to format and layout, presenting information in small sections 




FUNCTIONAL ANATOMY OF THE VERTEBRATES 
AN EVOLUTIONARY PERSPECTIVE 
BY KAREL F. LIEM, WILLIAM E. BEMIS, 
WARREN F. WALKER JR., AND LANCE GRANDE 

(Harcourt College Publishers) 



My colleagues Karel Liem, PhD, of Harvard University, Willy Bemis, PhD, 
now at Cornell University, Warren Walker, PhD, of Oberlin College, and I 
developed this college textbook for a university course in comparative anatomy. 
Comparative anatomy is becoming one of the most integrative fields in biology, 
especially as viewed within an evolutionary framework. It now includes descrip- 
tive anatomy, embryology, functional studies of structure, systematics, physiology, 
paleontology, behavior, and ecology. Even molecular studies now play into 
this fundamental field. By integrating all of these fields within an evolutionary 
context, we can much better understand the diversity and history of life. 
We wrote this volume to help enable students to conceptualize vertebrate form 
and function as well as the patterns of key anatomical characters that reveal 
evolutionary relationships among vertebrate animals. We include vertebrate 
species from over 400 million years ago to the present day, but focus mainly 
on living forms. The book has been very well received and has become one 
of the most widely used textbooks in universities around the country for 
teaching comparative anatomy. A fourth edition will be published this fall. 

Lance Grande, PhD, is curator, fossil fishes, Department of Geology, and vice 
president and head of collections and research, The Field Museum. To order his book, 
call 800.354.9706 (reference ISBN 0030223695) or visit the website 
unvw.searchlearning.thomson.com/search 



GREGOR MENDEL: THE FRIAR WHO GREW PEAS 
BY CHERYL BARDOE 

(Abrams Books for Young Readers and The Field Museum) 

1 heard about Gregor Mendel because of The Field Museum's upcoming 
exhibition and I thought he would be a great a subject for a picture book 
biography. Because picture books use so few words, they force writers to focus 
on the essence of a story. And, this story has added power because it is rooted in 
the life of a real person. The heart of Gregor Mendel's story is his determined 
pursuit of knowledge and his abiHty to look at things in innovative ways. 
My book lets readers peek into the mind of this genius as he conducts his 
experiments. Readers can follow the steps of the scientific process and 

discover the basic laws of heredity right 
alongside Mendel! I'm a graduate of the 
Medill School of Journahsm at Northwestern 
University and have been writing children's 
books for about five years. This is the first 
book I've published. It's for children ages 
6—10, so the younger ones will read it with 
adults while older children can read it to 
themselves. This book shows young readers 
how one man saw the natural world as full 
of mysteries that could be solved by hard 
work, creativity, and scientific study. 



Cheryl Bardoe is a senior project manager. 
Exhibitions Department, Tlie Field Museum. 
Her hook is available at bookstores and from 
The Field Museum's Main Store. To order online, 
visit http://store.fieldmuseum.org/index.cfm 




and short modules that were heavy on illustrations. To capitalize on our 
strengths, we divided up the writing according to our areas of knowledge and 
activity. Dr. Price has long studied ancient foraging peoples and the transition 
to farming, while I have focused on the emergence of civilizations and empires. 
Dr. Price has led investigations principaUy in Europe, and I have conducted 
fieldwork in the Americas and China. From the outset, Images of the Past 
has been popular at universities and community colleges. The fourth edition 
of our text is presendy in print and available on college campuses across ^ 



the country. We eagerly anticipate the unveiling 
of the fifth edition by McGraw-Hill this fall. 

Gary Feinman, PhD, is curator and chair. 
Department of Anthropology, Tlie Field Museum. 
His book may be purchased by calling 800.262.4729 
(reference ISBN 007299634X). 



FALL 2006 • S E PTE M B E R- NOV E M B E R 11 







12 IN THE FIELD 



THE LIONS OF TSAVO 

EXPLORING THE LEGACY OF AFRICA'S NOTORIOUS MAN-EATERS 

BY BRUCE D. PATTERSON 

(McGraw-Hill) 



For most of my career, I've studied small mammals 
like chipmunks or wood mice. Half of all living 
mammal species are rodents and nearly half the 
remainder are bats. These species have much to tell 
us about species origins, evolutionary transitions, 
and ecological parmerships; however, few of them 
really hold the interest of lay people and cause 
them to muse, ponder, and deliberate. But Uons are 
completely different. Everyone knows something 
about lions and most people have been awestruck by 
their behavior, ecology, and anatomy. In my book, 
1 tried to use public famiharity and intrinsic 
interest in lions to tell a bigger story: the story of 
human conquest of nature (and the man-eating 
episodes that remind us that our dominion is 
incomplete!) The book also describes the hon's 
adaptation to different climates and environments, 
involving variable traits and behaviors, and 
explains the challenge of conserving biodiversity. 



especially the challenge of saving the apex preda- 
tors which are precariously balanced at the top of 
the food p^Tamid. My book is as much a research 
proposal as it is a siunmary. In the four years since 
I wrote it, my collaborators and I have hosted 
300 volunteers from 23 nations on six continents 
who traveled to Kenya to help us study lions in 
the field. I've never taught in such a well-equipped 
and fascinating classroom! 

Bruce D. Patterson, PhD, is MacArthur Curator 
of Mammals, Department of Zoology, The Field 
Museum. His book may be purchased at The Field 
Museum 's Main Store, or online by visiting 
http://storefieldmuseum.org/index.cfin 



PHILIPPINE BIODIVERSITY: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE 
BY CORAZON CATIBOG-SINHA AND LAWRENCE R. HEANEY 

(Haribon Foundation) 



The Philippine archipelago is a place of outstanding 
biological and environmental diversirv: Although 
the country is small, the number of species of 
animals and plants is remarkably high, especially 
the number of species unique to the country. 
However, massive destruction of the original 
rainforest habitat causes frequent environmental 
disasters (including flooding, landshdes, and 
drought) and poses a high extinction threat to 
a large number of species. In my 25 years of 
conducting biodiversity research and training 
programs there, I have learned that few Filipinos 
know of the \vonderful biota that their nation 
possesses and they have had hnle access to 
information about the management and policies 
by which the rainforest can be protected and 
sustained. My co-author, Cora Sinha, PhD, is the 



former director of the Philippine Protected Areas 
and Wildlife Bureau (she's now at the University 
of Western Sydney.) Our book is intended to be 
used by both universirv- students and government 
employees as a textbook and information source, 
presented at a level that requires Uttle prior knowl- 
edge. It includes 51 pages of color photos that 
enliven the book and stress the primar\' message 
about the amazing biological diversit\' of the nation. 
The book was published in the PhUippines by the 
Haribon Foundation, a conservation organization. 

Lawrence R. Heaney, PhD, is curator and head, 
division of mammals. Department of Zoology, 
Tlie Field Museum. Orders for his book may be 
placed through communication@haribon.org.ph 






PEARLS: A NATURAL HISTORY 

BY RUDIGER BIELER AND SENNET BRONSON 

(Harry N. Aorams, Inc. in association witli tine American IVluseum of Natural History and Tlie Field Museum) 



We wrote Pearls: A Natural History with Neil 
Landman, PhD, and Paula Mikkelsen, PhD, our 
colleagues and fellow curators from the American 
Museum of Natural History, with whom we 
also developed the associated traveling exhibition. 
We were fascinated with a subject that so neatly 
combines nature and culture — after all, one of us 
is a zoologist and the other an anthropologist. 
After several years of background research that 
led us to pearl culture sites in Australia, Japan, 
Tahiti, and China, we expanded the original 
idea of an exhibition catalog to a fully researched 
and extensively illustrated general work on pearls, 
the moDusks that produce them, and the various 
cultural, economic, and conservation issues that 
result from their harvest. Many of the book's 
images stem from our joint travels or explore 
facets of "perhculture" in historic past or present 
that piqued our interest. Much to our dehght, 
this combined approach turned out to be popular. 
The Pearls exhibition, which was shown at 



The Field Museum in 2002, is still traveling 
internationally and nearly 30,000 copies of the 
book have been sold (and hopefully read!) 

Rudiger Bieler, PhD, (pictured left, top) is curator and 
head, division of invertebrates. Zoology Department, 
Tlte Field Museum. Bennet Branson, PhD, (pictured 
left, bottom) is curator of Asian anthropology. 
Department of Anthropology, The Field Museum. 
Pearls: A Natural History may be purchased from 
Tlie Field Museum 's Main Store. To order online, 
visit http://store.fieldmuseum.org/index.cfm 




COMMON MUSHROOMS OF THE TALAMANCA MOUNTAINS, COSTA RICA 
BY ROY E. HALLING AND GREGORY M. MUELLER 

(New York Botanical Garden) 



Common Mushrooms of the Talamanca Mountains, 
Costa Rica is based on 10 years of research by 
my colleague Roy HaUing, PhD, of the New York 
Botanical Garden, and me. While Costa Rica's 
cloud forests are well known for the diversity of 
their plants and animals, their mushrooms have been 
little studied. These incredibly rich forests once 
covered the Talamanca Mountain Range, which 
extends south from the center of the country into 
Panama. Much of the range has been cleared for 
cattle, coffee, etc., leaving scattered patches of 
forests teeming with birds, monkeys, orchids, ferns, 
and fungi. Dr. Halhng and I previously contributed 
to two field guides on Costa Rican mushrooms. 
These field guides were geared for readers 
such as ecotourists, tour guides, and park guards. 



Our new book bridges the gap between the 
typical field guide and treatments written just for 
scientists. We strived to create a book that is fully 
comprehensible for lay people with easily under- 
standable and descriptive commentaries, beautiful 
color photographs and identification aids, plus 
sufficient information to be useful to scientists. 
This book is intended for anyone interested in 
the mushrooms of Central America. 

Gregory M. Mueller, PhD, is curator, fungi. Department 
of Botany, Tlte Field Museum. His book may be 
purchased by calling 718.8i7.872i (reference 
ISBN 089327 4607). UT 



FALL 2006 • SEPTEMBER-NOVEMBER 13 



FROM THE ARCHIVES 





Top of page and above, 
hotloin: In 1961, New 
Trier High School students 
participated in an audio 
visual project at the 
Museum. 

Alxnv, top: This photo from 
1930 sliou's Paul Martin, 
PhD, Held Museum 
curator atni filmmaker 

14 IN THE FIELD 



Natural History Goes to the Movies 

By Theresa Scandiffio, Field Museum Library Motion Picture Archive Researcher 

"There is no doubt but what the moving picture is a very important means of educating 
the public, and we are trying to build up a large library of films." 

Correspondence from Stanley Field, president of The Field Museum, 
to fthimaker George D. Pratt - Sept. 20, 1923. 



You may have read about the extraordinary history behind the creation and con- 
struction of The Field Museum — from its beginnings at the Columbian Exposition 
of 1893, to its move to Grant Park some 85 years ago. But did you know that at 
the same time the Museum unveiled its current building it also began to produce 
and collect motion pictures for public programming? 

As Stanley Fields statement (above) shows, The Field Museum has long 
recognized the value of visual media in augmenting educational programs. In the 
1920s, thanks to the support of the James Nelson and Anna Louise Raymond 
Foundation, the Museum launched the Saturday Morning Film Series — a program 
that screened 16nmi films from the Museum's Library. Along with formal lectures, 
these films educated children of all ages about the Field's collections. The immensely 
popular series was held in the Museum's James Simpson Theatre and filled a great 
public demand, with over 20,000 children attending any given program of films. 

Field Museum curators and scientists created many series films, but some 
of the most popular were produced by Museum members such as George D. Pratt, 
conservationist and amateur filmmaker. Pratt's 1921 film, Egypt: A Nile Trip on the 
Dahabiyeli Bedouin, was a huge success with the Saturday series audience. When Pratt 
donated his films to The Field Museum in the early 1920s, he laid the foundation 
for the Museum's archive of motion pictures. That archive now houses over 300 16mm prints once used for 
educational purposes, including Field Museum-produced early expedition films and non-Museum-produced 
titles. Roughly 50 films feature early Field Museum expedition and research from all four academic depart- 
ments — anthropology, botany, geology, and zoology. The film collection represents the rich history of scientific 
methodologies and documents discoveries of human cultures, plants, mammals, insects, birds, and fossils, in 
diverse and changing environments. The films contain highly relevant and valuable images including scenes 
of archeological sites in Kish, Iraq shot in the 1920s, artist Malvina Hoffman sculpting statues for 
the 1930's Races of Mankind exhibition, and rare views of Tibetan dances. 

Until recently, the unknown physical condition of the films prohibited researchers from viewing them. 
We now know that the films are deteriorating at an alarming rate and the situation is dire. Over the past four 
years, the Museum has taken the initiative to save this unique legacy. Through the assistance of the National 
Film Preservation Foundation, the Museum has preserved and digitized five films and made another dozen 
viewable for research purposes. And, thanks to a joint project launched this year with the Film Studies Center 

at the University of Chicago, The Field Museum has preserved and 
digitized 1 Museum expedition film prints, providing invaluable 
resources for research projects, future exhibitions, and educational 
programs. The goal of the U of C project is to preserve all Field 
Museum-produced films, nr 




'The films contain 
highly relevant and 
valuable images../ 



TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE RESTORATION OF MUSEUM FILMS, PLEASE 
CONTACT STEVEN STROHMEIER AT SSTR0HMEIER@FIELDMUSEUM.ORG 
OR CALL 312.665.7844. 



MEMBERSHIP/ANNUAL FUND NEWS 



Helpful Tips for Your Visit to See King Tut 



ENTER AT MUSEUM'S EAST ENTRANCE 

If you are an Individual, Family, Senior, 
Student, National Affiliate, Associate Life, 
or Life Member; or a Corporate Member 
Employee and you: 

• Already have King Tut tickets 

• Need to obtain King Tut ticl<ets 

• Need to pick up King Tut tickets 
in Will Call 

• Need other membership services 



ENTER AT MUSEUM'S SOUTH ENTRANCE 

If you are a Royal Tut or Tut at Twilight Member; 
or a member of The Founders' Council, Annual 
Fund, or Field Associates and you: 

• Already have King Tut tickets 

• Need to obtain King Tut tickets 

• Need to pick up King Tut tickets 
in Will Call 

• Need other membership services 



Annual Fund Donor 
Appreciation Niglit and 
Founders' Council Update 

Be sure to mark your calendars for the fifth 
Annual Fund Donor Appreciation event that 
will take place Wednesday, Sept. 27. You wiU 
not want to miss this exclusive opportunity for 
Annual Fund donors to view Gregor Mendel: 
Planting the Seeds of Genetics (Sept. 15- April 1, 
2007). If you have not yet reserved your tickets 
for Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the 
Pharaohs, be sure to take advantage of our 
donor ticket hothne at 312.665.7929. For more 
information on these events, or for questions 
concerning The Annual Fund, please call 
312.665.7777. 

The Founders' Council exclusive preview 
of Gregor Mendel: Planting the Seeds of Genetics 
will take place on Tuesday, Sept. 12. For more 
information on The Founders' Council, please 
contact Erica Lee at 312.665.7773. 

We hope you take advantage of your 
many benefits as Annual Fund and Founders' 
Council donors and don't forget the Euoluing 
Planet exhibition is included with your 
complimentary general admission. We look 
forward to seeing you this fall! 



Membership News 

Member tickets for Gregor Mendel: Planting the 
Seeds of Genetics are now available for reservation. 
Family, Royal Tut, and Tut at Twilight members are 
ehgible for four complimentary tickets; Individual, 
Senior, and National AfFiUate members are eligible 
for two complimentary tickets; Student members 
are eligible for one complimentary ticket. Capacity 
for the exhibition is very limited, so securing 
your compUmentary member tickets in advance 
is strongly recommended. Royal Tut and Tut at 
Twilight members, please call 312.665.7929 to 
reserve tickets; Individual, Family, Senior, Student, 
and National Affiliate members, please call 
312.665.7705. 

Calling to purchase tickets for Tutankhamun 
and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs'? Reserve your 
Mendel tickets at the same time! Our membership 
call center is open 8:30am -4:30pm, Monday 
through Friday (312.665.7929). If you are a Tut 
at Twilight Member and have not already secured 
your two complimentary tickets to Tut at Twilight, 
we encourage you to do so now. Join us for Tut 
atTwihght, Sept. 1-4, Nov 24, or Dec. 26-29. 
Call 312.665.7929 to reserve tickets. 

Start your holiday shopping now! 
A Field Museum Meinbership makes a great 
hohday gift. Call 312.665.7700 to order your 
gift membership today! 



ALL MEMBERS should 
enter the Museum at the 
SOUTH entrance for visits 
that do NOT include view- 
ing the King Tut exhibition. 




Above: Tutankhamun's heart 
scarab lies in the center of 
this stone and glass pectoral. 

Below: This mobile by artist 
Christine Borland is in the 
Mendel exhibition. The agate 
stones represent five generations 
of a family that had Huntington's 
disease, an inherited disorder 




\ 



TAKE PUBLIC 
TRANSPORTATION! 



Many buses and rail 
lines provide access to 
The Field Museum. 

For more information, 
call 888.Y0URCTA or visit 
www.transitchicago.com 

Visit www.rtachicago.com 

for regional transit 
information. 



SPECIAL MUSEUM NEWS 



Corporate Corner 



PROGRAM 01 



BENEFITS 



Attention corporate leaders! The Field Museum's Corporate Relations Program is full of exciting 
benefits for your employees and clients. It's easy to administer and will enhance your company's 
existing work/life program. Memberships range from $5,000 -$30,000. 



Free, Unlimited General Admission for Employees 

Applies to all of your employees plus one guest 
per person throughout the year and includes free 
admission to Evolving Planet. 

Discount Tickets to King Tut 

Employees may purchase $10 tickets* to 
Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs 
(compared to general public price of $25). 
*Two ticket maximum per employee, per visit. 

Complimentary Tickets to Tut at Twilight 

Receive up to 20 King Tut exhibition tickets 
(with audio tours) to Tut at Twilight, a series of 
special after-hour viewing events. The perfect gift 
to share with clients! 



Complimentary Guest Passes 

Receive up to 150 general admission guest 
passes per year. 

Corporate Entertaining Discounts 
and Much More 

Receive significant event discounts for 
corporate meetings, client events, or employee 
holiday parties. Customize your event with 
an exhibition viewing. 

Your corporate membership will provide essential 
unrestricted support allowing The Field Museum to achieve 
its ongoing scientific and educational goals. 

For more information and a list of current members, 
visitwww.fieldmuseum.org/edonatlons/c_relations 

To customize your Corporate Membership, 

contact Holly S. Morgan at 312.665.7120, or email 

hmorgan@fieldmuseum.org 




useum 

1400 South Lake Shore Drive 
Chicago, IL 60605-2496 



For questions about the magazine, call 312.665.7115, email noshea@fmnh.org 
or v/rlte Nancy O'Shea, Editor. For general membership inquiries. Including address changes, call 866.312.2781.