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Maryland Room 

Unrrersity of Maryland Library 

CoUegc Parle Md. 







ormation 



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INFORMATION PLEASE STAFF 



CHAIRMAN Donna Skoglund 

COMMITTEE Camilla Deira, Frances Dunkle, 
Cecilia Hanna, Marilyn Miller, 
Sally Reed, Diana Sklrven, 
Barbara Walfon 

ADVISOR Miss Julia Billings 

Assistant Dean of Women 




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1964-1965 



A W S EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 



President 

First Vice-president 

Second Vice-president 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Senior Class Representative 

Junior Class Representative 

Sophomore Class Representative 

Freshman Class Representative 

Mortar Board President 

WRA President 

Panhellenic President 

U C A Representative 

Judicial Board Chairman 

Coordinator of Academic Boards 



Jan Browning 
Betty Dunn 
Mattye Messeloff 
Sue Fraley 
Betty Jo Mullen 
Sally Reed 
Tay Kincaid 
Shelah Rappoport 
To be elected in fall 
Karen Dorn 
Jean DeGaston 
Helen Hyre 
Caren Harnest 
Sue Odgers 
Iris Esau 



A W S COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 



Constitution 

Cultural 

Elections 

lAWS Liaison 

Information Please 

Installation Banquet 

Publicity 

Social and Activities 

Dormitory Big Sister Program 

Day Dodger Big Sister Program 

AWS Reception for Head Residents 

Orphans' Party 

Bridal Fair 

Leadership Workshop 

Christmas Program 

Campus Chest Liaison 

Historian 

(2 



Jean Buckingham 

Carol Lee Foley 

Sorority — Phyllis Laborwit 
Dormitory — Frances Dunkle 

Sharon Goldstein 

Donna Skoglund 

Marilyn Salsbury 

Art — Connie Sandburg 
Diamondback — Beverly Colona 
Newsletter — Barbara Loveless 

Janet Brown 

Dotty Pritchett 

Karen Tulin 

Pat Edwards 

Elizabeth Jiles 

Joan Weaver 

Betty Dunn - Mattye Messeloff 

To be appointed 

To be appointed 

To be appointed 

) 



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It is my pleasure to welcome all of you to the University of 
Maryland and to membership in the Associated Women Students. 

AWS is your organization; it is composed of all the women 
students attending the University, including dorm residents, com- 
muters, and sorority women. AWS cannot exist without your con- 
tinued interest and participation, and, in turn, it offers you a richer 
and more fulfilling college career. The AWS is primarily concerned 
with the maximum development of each individual woman student. 
Learning to get along with members of our individual group and 
other groups as well, assuming responsibility for self and others, 
as well as representing the women students intelligently, are some 
of the goals and concerns of your AWS organization. 

AWS, through its varied programs, offers you a series of chal- 
lenges in the fields of leadership and service. It is up to you, the 
women of the University, to accept these challenges. 

Through AWS the women students' interests and opinions are 
expressed and formulated into policies. AWS is here for you, de- 
signed for you, and is at your service. Your AWS officers are avail- 
able for your suggestions and consultation. On behalf of the AWS 
oflficers I would again like to welcome you to AWS, and to all 
the pleasures and challenges it offers you. 

JAN BROWNING 
AWS President 



AWS Officers: Sue Fraley, Betty Dunn, Jan Browning, 
Mattye Messeloff, Betty Jo Mullen. 



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We of the Dean of Women's Office 
bid you welcome. 

Your main purpose in entering the 
University is to acquire an education. 
A great part of this you will get 
in the classrooms and the Library, 
from professors, books, and from one 
another. It is also hoped that you 
will recognize and take advantage of 
the extra-curricular offerings of the 
University. 

The Associated Women Students — 
popularly referred to as A.W.S. — is the student government organi- 
zation to which all women belong and through which, cooperatively 
with the Dean of Women's Office, they establish the rules by which 
they live. They also strive to create a desirable social environ- 
ment and through their activities encourage leadership qualities 
in women. 




Though the University is large and as such may seem confusing 
at times, there are a great many people here — fellow students, fac- 
ulty, administrators and staff — who are personally interested in 
your welfare and happiness and will be pleased to be of help if you 
will let them know your concerns. 

When you arrive on campus you will be given much information 
to help you learn your way around our community. In addition, 
regulations applicable to all students are set forth in a booklet 
entitled University General and Academic Regulations. The catalog 
of the College in which you register will also set forth certain re- 
quirements with which you must become familiar. 

Remember, this is now YOUR UNIVERSITY. If we in the Dean 
of Women's Office can in any way assist you in taking advantage 
of and enjoying all that is here for you, please give us the privilege 
of doing so. 

HELEN E. CLARKE 
Dean of Women 

(4) 



Miss Julia Billings graduated from Wilson Col- 
lege as a Latin and French major. She later 
received her M.A. at Bryn Mawr College. In- 
cluded in her experience is teaching at private 
schools and in college. Miss Billings is the 
advisor t o AWS Executive Council, Diadem, 
Campus Chest Council and Alpha Lambda Delta. 
She is also Social Director and Coordinator of 
the Student Calendar of Events. Reading, sports, 
dancing, bridge, gardening and people are a part 
of her special interests. 

Having graduated from Vassar College, Miss 
Marian Johnson taught French in a private 
school in Buffalo. She received her Master's De- 
gree in Student Personnel Administration at 
Columbia University and came to the University 
of Maryland as Assistant Dean of Women in 
1942. Serving a variety of functions, she is now 
particularly interested in individual personal 
problems of women students and in their voca- 
tional and educational goals. Especially con- 
cerned with commuter students, Miss Johnson 
has personal interviews with new women student 
commuters and advises the University Com- 
muters Association. 

Miss Janyce E. Notopoulos graduated from Car- 
negie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, Pa., 
where she received a B.S. in Psychology. Follow- 
ing her graduation, she attended Indiana Uni- 
versity in Bloomington, Ind. After receiving her 
M.A. she came to the University of Maryland as 
Assistant Dean of Women. She now works with 
the Panhellenic groups and council, advises the 
women's judicial system, and engages in in- 
dividual counseling and guidance. Among her 
interests are sports, particularly swimming and 
tennis, art, music and literature. 

An English major, Miss Joan McCall received 
her B.A. from the state University of Iowa in 
1955. After teaching high school English for 
three years in both Iowa and California, she 
studied Student Personnel Administration at 
Syracuse University. Here Miss McCall obtained 
her Master's degree in 1960. Before coming to 
Maryland, she was an Assistant Dean of Women 
at the University of Connecticut. Miss McCall 
is responsible for the women's residence halls 
and is advisor to the Dormitory Council. Among 
her interests are reading, concerts, plays, and 
bowling. 

(5) 







AWS ... A PLACE FOR YOU 




In high school, no 
doubt, you partici- 
pated in many activi- 
ties — from service 
organizations, pubh- 
cations and sports to 
governmental bodies, 
interest groups and 
social clubs. Now, a 
new student at the 
University of Mary- 
land, you may feel 
lost and insignificant. 
You want to be a con- 
tributing member of 
the University com- 
munity, but you 
wonder where to be- 
gin and how. The 
answer — AWS ! 

The Associated 
Women Students is 
a body composed of 
all women students. 
It functions through- 
out the year to pro- 
mote self government 
in residences, academic excellence, and cultural events as well as many 
special activities such as Bridal Fair, the Big Sister Program, the Or- 
phans' Party, and: the Christmas Pageant. 

THE ORGANIZATION OF AWS is based upon election and appoint- 
ment. The officers are chosen in the spring by a vote of all women stu- 
dents after a week of spirited campaigning. Later, and also in the fall, 
interested students may apply for committees. When these positions are 
available, advertisements will appear in the AWS Newsletter as well as 
in the Diamondback. Application forms for committee chairmen and 
members are available in the Student Union, the Dean of Women's Office 
in the North Administration Building, and in your dormitory. 

On the residence hall level, the executive council is selected by the 
girls in each dormitory. As officers, some of these girls become members 
of an AWS Council or Board, and they can give you more information 
about AWS work. 

The opportunities for serving the campus through AWS are limitless. 
There is always a place for the girl who is enthusiastic and willing 
to work. 



(6) 



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(7) 



SPECIAL EVENTS 



The programs of AWS are numerous and varied. They offer many 
opportunities for leadership, participation, and enjoyment. If you are 
interested in working on any program, please contact the chairman. 



DORM AND DAYDODGER BIG SISTER PROGRAM 

All incoming freshmen women and transfer students, whether dorm 
residents or commuters, receive assistance and information from a spe- 
cially assigned upperclassman. These students introduce and explain 
the problems, privileges, and opportunities, both academic and social, 
Vv^hich are associated with a large university. During Registration Week 
and Orientation Week, a Big-Little Sister dinner and coke date with 
speakers and a fashion show are scheduled. 

Chairmen: Dotty Pritchett, Dormitory Program 
Karen Tulin, Daydodger Program 



BRIDAL FAIR 

In the spring, when thoughts are filled with engagements and June 
weddings, AWS, in conjunction with nationally known companies, pre- 
sents displays of household and personal items such as trousseau fash- 
ions, china, crystal, silver and kitchen ware. In addition to furnishing 
ideas for the bride-to-be, there are many suggestions for gifts. The main 
event of the evening last year was a fashion show and drawing for door 
prizes, including a wedding gown, a wedding cake, and an oil portrait. 

Chairman: Joan Weaver 



ORPHANS' PARTY 

Each year in the spring AWS, together with Panhellenic Council, the 
sororities, and dormitories, treats one of the area's orphanages to a 
party with refreshments, entertainment, and pretend big-sisters. The 
party is held on campus and various individuals volunteer to perform 
for the children. Last year's party, with a circus theme, was a tre- 
mendous success. 

Chairman: Betty Jiles 

(8) 



CHRISTMAS PROGRAM 

The Christmas Program is an annual event sponsored by AWS and 
SAE fraternity. Choral arrangements are sung by the Men's Glee Club 
and Women's Chorus under direction of Mr. Paul Traver. After scrip- 
ture readings and community singing, the congregation divides into 
caroling groups which later meet in a dormitory, sorority, or fraternity 
for hot chocolate and cookies. 

Chairman: To be appointed 



AWS RECEPTION FOR HEAD RESIDENTS 

To honor the new and recognize the old head residents of the men's 
and women's dorms, fraternities, and sororities, a reception is held every 
fall in the Student Union. The head resident, accompanied by the presi- 
dent of the dorm or sorority, meets the Deans of Women and the new 
AWS Executive Council. 

Chairman: Pat Edwards 



Orphans' Party— 1963 



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HONORARIES 



Girls who have made outstanding contributions in some phase of 
University life may be tapped for membership in Alpha Lambda Delta, 
Diadem, Diamond, Mortar Board, Phi Kappa Phi, or Who's Who. All 
of these honoraries with the exception of Phi Kappa Phi and Who's Who 
are solely for women. They provide incentive for outstanding perform- 
ance in scholarship, service, and leadership on the Maryland campus. 



AI.PHA LAMBDA DELTA 



Twice a year, in fall and spring, this honorary initiates freshman 
women who have maintained high academic averages. In order to be 
eligible for membership, a girl must attain a 3.5 average during the first 
semester or a 3.5 overall average for her freshman year. Maryland's 
Adele H. Stamp chapter of Alpha Lambda Delta helps Phi Eta Sigma, 
the men's scholarship honorary, to sponsor a tutoring service for all 
freshman students, as well as a lecture series each year. These services 
have as their goal the expansion of the cultural and intellectual atmos- 
phere at the University. 

(10) 



DIADEM 

Diadem was established at the University of Maryland in 1961 to 
honor incoming junior women for outstanding achievement in leadership 
and service. Sophomore women are tapped in the spring before their 
junior year at the AWS Diadem Convocation. Besides sponsoring this 
convocation, at which all outstanding women on campus are honored, 
Diadem members also usher at school events and lead tour groups which 
visit the campus. The motto of this honorary is "To lead and follow 
with wisdom and understanding." 

DIAMOND 

Sorority women who have made outstanding contributions to the 
campus and to their individual chapters are given recognition for their 
achievem.ents by membership in Diamond. Tapping is held twice each 
year at Harmony Hall and at the Interfraternity Sing. Each sorority 
may have a total of three girls in Diamond, who may be either juniors 
or seniors. Members serve as hostesses at various campus events. 

MORTAR BOARD 

Membership in Mortar Board is the highest honor that can be attained 
by a Maryland coed. The national honorary, which was established at 
the University in 1934, recognizes senior women who have excelled in 
leadership, scholarship, character, and service. Mortar Board sponsors 
the Mum Sale at Homecoming, entertains freshman women with a 3.0 
average at a "Smarty Party," and sponsors a "Last Lecture" series 
annually. 

PHI KAPPA PHI 

Phi Kappa Phi recognizes superior scholarship among seniors in the 
top 10% of their class. Its members, both men and women are dedicated 
to the maintenance of unity and democracy in education. A scholarship 
is presented by Phi Kappa Phi each year to the graduating senior with 
the highest academic average. 

WHO'S WHO 

The selection committee of Who's Who, which is made up of a group 
of student leaders and faculty members, can pick a maximum of thirty- 
six students for membership in this nationwide group. Graduating 
seniors are selected for excellence in publications, religion, drama, 
speech, activities, and athletics. Who's Who Among Students in Ameri- 
can Colleges and Universities sponsors a placement service for those 
it honors and also publishes a national bibliography of all the selected 
students. 

(11) 



LOOKING AROUND 



It takes a brave coed to 
strike out and explore her 
vast new "home" when she 
arrives. Maryland is a big 
campus but it is easy to 
learn what it can offer 
you in cultural events and 
extracurricular activities. 

A tour of the Student 
Union reveals everything 
from art exhibits, to 
dances, classical films and 
guest speaker series. Its 
spacious, modern bowling 
alley and pool room entice 
sports fans. If you are 
more socially inclined, you 
can find a dance being 
held in the ballroom every 
other Friday night. Re- 
cent popular films pro- 
vide entertainment Friday 
through Sunday nights. 

Maryland has been hit 
by the hootenanny craze, 
and besides the impromptu 
gatherings to sing on the 
mall, you can find special 
hoots featuring guests 
such as Hedy West. You 
are always welcome to 
sing, strum along or just 
to sit and listen. On the 
more serious side, you can 
attend the performances of 
the National Symphony 
Orchestra which appears 
on campus each semester, 
or the musical recitals 
which are also open to the 
general student body. 

If you like informal in- 
tellectual situations, the 
coffee hours held by sev- 
eral of the religious or- 
ganizations are ideal. They 
give you a chance to ex- 
press your feelings and 
listen to those of others 
too. Or maybe you'd rather 




just sit and listen. The lecture series which the English Department 
sponsors is always stimulating and interesting. 

The coming of spring brings four very special occasions — the class 
proms. The alternating strains of ballroom music and rock-and-roll are 
interrupted just long enough for the evening's climax — the crowning 
of the class queens. 

The University Theater productions are always well publicized and 
worth attending. Whether you are an aspiring actress or a handy helper 
you are welcome to join this group which produces all the University 
plays. Acting on the stage, constructing the sets, making the costumes, 
and applying make-up are all part of the intricate world of the theater 
which the U. T. members are willing to introduce to you. 

Students who have a flair for writing or a fascination for the field 
of journalism have come to the right place. Just about every type of 
publication from the Terrapin, our year book, to Calvert Review, our 
literary magazine can be found on campus. Staff openings are published 
in the Diamondbacks the campus newspaper, but you don't have to wait 
for these announcements, because your help is always eagerly awaited. 

Religious groups are quite active on campus. Besides their regular 
business meeting and seminars, they sponsor several campus- wide proj- 
ects. Probably the most active organization on campus, the Student 
Government Association, has openings on its committees for students 
interested in helping to manage the political scene. 

This is just a peek at several of the many, many activities and oppor- 
tunities for you on our campus. With a campus the size of Maryland's, 
the school can and does offer an outlet for almost any interest you may 
have. Two words — look and listen — are the keys to any activity or event 
you wish to take advantage of. Look for poster, flyers, and advertise- 
ments in the paper, and listen to the people who are in a number of 
activities and to the general campus conversation about the coming 
events. Then, if you need further information, don't hesitate. Ask! 



(13) 



SUGGESTED DRESS 



ATHLETIC EVENTS 



CA3IPUS WE.VR 



CULTURAL EVENTS 



DANCES 



FRATERNITY PARTIES 



RUSH 



DINING HALLS 

Monday-Friday 
Saturday Breakfast, 
Saturday Dinner 
Sunday Breakfast 
Sunday Dinner 



Lunch 



STUDENT UNION 

First and Second Floors 
Lower Level 

Monday-Friday 



Saturday 
Sunday 



Bowling 



ADMINISTRATION BUILDINGS 
CLASSROOMS, LIBRARY 
RESIDENCE LOBBIES 



-sport suit, sheath, 



Fall sports- 
heels 

Spring sports — skirt and blouse, 
shirtwaist, flats 



Skirts and blouses, sweaters, 
shirtwaists, knee-hi's, hose, 
sneakers, flats 



Suit, sheath, heels, gloves 



Cocktail dress, dressy sheath, 

heels, gloves 
Junior and Senior proms: Long 

dresses are often worn 



Rush — sheath, dressy shirtwaist, 

flats or heels 
Weekend parties — school clothes 

or specified 



Suit, sheath, heels, or specified 



Skirt and blouse, shirtwaist, flats 
Bermudas or slacks 
Skirt and blouse, flats 
Skirt and blouse, flats 
Dress or coordinated outfit, 
hose, heels 



Skirt and blouse, flats 

Skirt and blouse before 3:00 p.m., 
slacks or bermudas after 
3:00 p.m. 
Bermudas or slacks 
Buffet in cafeteria — dress, heels 
Snack Bar — skirt and blouse, flats 
Bermudas or slacks at any time 



Skirt and blouse 
Skirt and blouse 
Skirt and blouse 



(14) 



HELPFUL HINTS 



FIRST AND FOREMOST— A STUDENT 

The main reason for attending the University is to obtain an education. 
The quality of this education is up to the individual. There will be more 
freedom and more advanced assignments than in high school. There 
will be no one forcing you to study or checking up on you. The tempta- 
tion to let things pile up is great — DON'T! If you keep up with daily 
and long-range assignments, you will find that you have plenty of time. 

Become familiar with your university and especially with your college. 
Know its course offerings, its requirements, and don't depend on your 
advisor to do all your planning. 

Help is offered in many places for those who are willing to look for it. 
Make appointments with your instructors, go to the Counseling Center, 
talk with your advisor and big sister, and, by all means, become familiar 
with the library. 



YOUR INFORMAL EDUCATION 

Equally as important as your formal instruction is your chance to 
build your individuality and to form opinions. Perhaps at no other time 
in your life will you have so many opportunities to enjoy new experiences. 
Large as it may seem to you now, the University is really a compact 
community, made up of people from all over the world, which offers 
many cultural, social, and athletic events each week. Sure, you'll prob- 
ably feel homesick at first, but don't pack up each weekend and run home 
with complaints that you don't feel you belong or that there is nothing 
to do. Give yourself and the University a chance to adjust to one another 
and, instead of feeling sorry for yourself, take advantage of your many 
opportunities at the University. 



OTHERS 

The first and most important person that you meet will be your room 
mate. You probably will have some problems — everyone does. Respect 
her ideas, learn to compromise and everything may work itself out 
satisfactorily. In case of serious problems, see your head resident. 

During your years at the University, you will have the opportunity 
to meet many varied and Interesting people. Make sure to become ac- 
quainted with as many as you can. Because of the size of the University, 
you will find that you are no longer bound by cliques and conventions. 
Go ahead— talk to strangers and accept that blind date (if introduced 
by someone you know!) 

In spite of the informal atmosphere here manners should not be 
neglected. Common courtesy and kindness will cover most situations. 
Remember to stand whenever a dean, housemother, or older woman 
enters the room. Avoid chewing gum in public, smoking while walking 
across the campus, and public displays of affection in the dining hall, 
on the Mall, and at parties. 

(15) 



DINING HALL HOURS 



WEEKDAYS 








Breakfast 


6:30 AM- 


-8:15 AM 


Lunch 


11:10 


AM- 


-1:10 PM 


Dinner 


4:30 


PM- 


-6:15 PM 


SATURDAY 








Breakfast 


7:30 


AM- 


-8:30 AM 


Lunch 


11:30 


AM- 


-1:00 PM 


Dinner 


4:30 


PM- 


-6:00 PM 


SUNDAY 








Breakfast 


8:30 


AM- 


-9:30 AM 


Dinner 


11:30 


AM- 


-1:20 PM 



AS A COMMUTER 



As a commuter, you play an important part on the University of 
Maryland campus, and have your own University Commuter's Associa- 
tion. This is the only body which represents exclusively the commuters' 
point of view. The UCA President is a member of the SGA Cabinet and 
its highest elected woman officer is on the AWS Executive Council. 

In addition to political representation, the UCA offers social, sports, 
and service programs. Socially, it offers commuters' dances, parties, and 
a place to meet other commuters in the Den in the Student Union. Intra- 
mural programs are set up for both men and women, including football, 
basketball, softball, swimming, and cross-country. 

As for service activities, the most important is the car pool service. 
Through this commuters can find a ride to and from campus. Commuters 
who wish to offer transportation can locate others who need transporta- 
tion. Also, car pools may be arranged. Watch for the car pool service 
during registration week. 

A new program is now being formulated by AWS to bring commuters 
closer to the campus through association with a women's dorm. This 
proposed affiliation would give girls an honorary membership with a 
dorm and a chance to participate in parties, fireside chats, and service 
projects. 

As a commuter, it is easy to feel a little withdrawn from campus 
Eiffairs, but there is no reason to be. In addition to your own University 
Commuters' Association, you are welcome in all the usual campus activi- 
ties. It's up to you to make the same effort to participate in Maryland 
affairs as you would if you lived right on the campus. 

(16) 



OFFICIAL RULES 



PHILOSOPHY OF THE JUDICIAL PROGRAM 

The women's judicial program operates on the basis of two 
underlying principles. These two principles apply whether discipli- 
nary action is being administered by a judicial body or by a staff 
member residing in a housing unit or by the Dean of Women's Office. 

The first principle is that the disciplinary action is aimed pri- 
marily at assisting the individual involved to realize her mistake 
and to help her to redirect her behavior and energies along accept- 
able lines. The second principle is that every effort is made to en- 
courage students themselves to assume the responsibility for their 
own discipline and behavior. It is the aim of these principles to 
inform each woman student as to her responsibilities as a member 
of the University community. 



SIGNING IN AND SIGNING OUT 

Signing in and out is a means to aid the head resident to know 
a student's whereabouts in case of an emergency, or in the case of 
persons desiring to contact a student. 

This procedure is to be followed whenever you expect to be 
out of the residence after 8:00 P.M. Signing in and out must be 
done by YOU except in cases when you are out of your residence 
past 8:00 unexpectedly. In this case you should call the desk of 
your residence and have your head resident, graduate assistant, 
or the desk receptionist on duty sign out for you. Your residence 
clock is the OFFICIAL TIME and will be the only indicator of your 
return time to the dormitory. 

The dormitory Judicial Board is responsible for penalizing stu- 
dents who make errors in signing in and signing out. 



TYPES OF SIGN-OUTS 

I. DAILY SIGN-OUTS 



Name 


Destination 


With Whom 


How 


Departure 
Time 


Expected 
Return 


Return 
Time 


Initial 


Sue 
Jones 


R.K.O. Keith's 
Washington, DC 


S. Smith 


car 


8:15 PM 


11:00 PM 


10:50 PM 


S.J. 



A. GENERAL REGULATIONS 



1. 



The looseleaf notebook at the reception desk is to be used 

for daily signing in and out if you expect to return the same 

day. 

This procedure is to be followed whenever you expect to be 

out of the residence past 8:00 P.M. 

Your destination must be as specific as possible. 

The first initial and the last name of the person with whom 

you are going should be indicated. 

(17) 



5. Your expected return indicates the time at which you ex- 
pect to sign in. No penalty will be given for returning after 
your indicated "expected return" UNLESS you return to 
the residence after your curfew time. 

6. Record the exact time of your return by the residence clock. 

7. You must initial all sign-ins YOURSELF. 

8. The latest time you may sign out or change your sign-out 
on the daily sign-out sheet is your usual closing hour. 

9. Monday night is a closed night. Every girl must be in her 
residence at 10:00 P.M. 

10. Dormitory students may not spend the night at sorority 
houses or other dorms Sunday through Thursday nights. 



II. SPECIAL TYPES OF DAILY SIGN-OUTS 

A. 12 O'CLOCK LATE LEAVES— These allow you to remain out 
of your residence after your usual closing hour, but not later 
than 12 midnight. 

1. These may be taken on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and 
Sunday nights. 

2. Late leaves are granted according to academic classification: 



Academic standing Late Leaves Overnights 

(per semester) (per semester) 

Freshmen: fewer than 28 credits 3 3 

Sophomores: passed 28 to 55 credits 6 6 

Juniors: passed 56 to 87 credits 9 9 

Seniors: pasced 88 credits or more unlimited unlimited 

B. EARLY MORNING LEAVES— The earliest time you can leave 

the residence is 6:00 A.M. If a special situation arises which 
necessitates your leaving before then, secure permission from 
your head resident the day before you plan to leave. 

C. SPECIAL LATE LEAVES— Special permission to return to the 

residence after your regular closing hours may be granted for 
the purpose of attending social, cultural, and sports events. 

1. GENERAL REGULATIONS: Arrangements for such leaves 
off campus must be made 48 hours in advance except in cases 
of real emergency. The permission must be granted by your 
head resident. You must present your ticket to your head 
resident before you go. If this is impossible, give her your 
ticket upon returning from the event. When you sign out 
for any special late leave, you should indicate your closing 
hour as your "expected return" and write "special late leave" 
above the "expected return" time. 

(18) 



2. TYPES OF SPECIAL LATE LEAVES 

ON CAMPUS — Social, cultural, and sports events 

Daily — Automatic extension of closing hours will be grant- 
ed to those attending special campus events such as the 
following : Aqualiners Water Show, Band and University 
Orchestra Concerts, Gymkana Show, Harmony Hall, 
Interfraternity Sing, Modern Dance Concerts, AWS 
Christmas Program, SGA cultural events, and basketball 
games. 

After the function is over, you are given 20 minutes 
to return to your residence. 

Weekends — Everyone will be granted 2 A.M. permissions 

the Saturday night of Homecoming. 
Monday Nights — Special late leaves for a Monday night 
may only be granted by the Dean of Women with a rec- 
ommendation from the head resident. 
Requests for special late leaves not listed should be taken 
to AWS Dorm Council for general leaves or to Miss McCall 
for individual leaves two weeks in advance. 

OFF CAMPUS — cultural and social events 

Daily — Special permission to attend cultural events such 
as those held at Constitution Hall, Lisner Auditorium, 
National Theater, and Arena Stage may be granted by 
the head resident. 
Weekends — Everyone attending will be granted 2 A.M. 
permissions the night of the Sophomore Prom, the night 
of the Junior Prom, and the night of the Senior Ball. 
ON OR OFF CAMPUS — Organizational events 
Special late leaves for organizations such as University 
Theater and the Diamondback must be cleared through 
the Dean of Women's Office. Request should be made 
at least one week in advance by the secretary or the head 
of the organization. A 2.0 minimum average for the pre- 
vious semester is required. 

3. ERRORS 

a. Serious Errors 

(1) Failure to sign in 

(2) Failure to sign out 

(3) Deliberate falsification of destination 

(4) Signing in or out for another resident student 

b. Common Errors 

(1) Incorrect use of A.M.'s and P.M.'s 

(2) Incorrect date 

(3) Failure to sign in or out in the correct book 

(4) Failure to sign in or out in the correct space 

(5) The use of dittos on sign-outs 

(6) Failure to initial sign-in sheet 

(7) Failure to put time under "expected return" 

(19) 



ni. OVERNIGHT SIGN-OUTS 

An overnight leave is a leave allowing you to spend the night away 
from your residence and is based on the range of permission granted 
by your parents on the Parents' Authorization Form. 



Companion, people to be 
visited, mode of travel 


Destination 


Departure 


E.xpected 


Return 


Initials 




Return 


Date 


Time 


M. Smith — Home 


313 Lucky La. 
Bait.. Md. 


Date 


Time 


Date 


Time 


12 1 


2:00 
P.M. 


SJ 


bus 


11 30 


2:00 
P.M. 


12 1 


9:00 
P.M. 



A. GENERAL REGULATIONS 

If you plan to be away from your residence overnight, sign 
out on your card at the reception desk. Indicate the necessary 
infoiTnation and move your tab. As you face the book, move 
tab to the left when you go out, to the right when you return. 

The latest time you may sign out for an overnight is 11:00 
P.M. on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday nights if 
you are a sophomore, junior, or senior; and 10:30 P.M. if you 
are a freshman. On Friday and Saturday nights the latest 
sign-out time for an overnight is 12:00 midnight for all women 
students. 

After leaving the dorm, you MAY NOT CHANGE your sign- 
out to an overnight by calling in unless your parents call to 
ask that you stay at home overnight. 

Monday night is a closed night and everyone must be in her 
residence by 10:00 P.M. Overnights cannot be taken. 

Weeknight overnights are granted according to academic 
classification as stated on a previous chart. 

B. TYPES OF OVERNIGHTS 

1. DAILY OVERNIGHT— An overnight taken on Tuesday, 
Wednesday, or Thursday nights is considered as one of your 
overnight leaves. 

2. WEEKEND OVERNIGHT— All women students have un- 
limited weekend overnight leaves. The weekend includes 
Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights. 

3. SPECIAL OVERNIGHT LEAVES 

Overnight leaves, such as choir trips, are cleared through 
the Dean of Women's Office and request should be made at 
least two weeks in advance. 

All women have free overnights or late leaves on the night 
preceding a one-day holiday and the nights closing all vaca- 
tion periods. 

Dormitory residents visiting the sorority house for the 
weekend must sign out on their dormitory sign-out card. 
They must sign in at the sorority house in the overnight 
book. While at the sorority house, they must sign out on a 
daily sign-out sheet that is designated for guests. Upon 
leaving, the dormitory resident has the sorority head resi- 
dent give her a form that states any errors that she has 
made. This form must be turned in to the dormitory head 
resident when the girl signs in. 

(20) 



C. ERRORS ON OVERNIGHTS 

1. Serious offenses: 

a. Failure to sign in 

b. Failure to sign out 

c. Deliberate falsification of destination 

d. Signing in or out for another resident student 

2. Common Errors 

a. Incorrect use of A.M.'s and P.M.'s 

b. Failure to move tab 

c. The use of dittos on sign-outs 

d. Failure to initial the sign-in column of the card 

e. Incorrect dates 

f. Failure to put time under "expected return" 

g. Failure to sign out on the correct card 



LATENESS 

Being prompt in signing in is viewed as a part of an undergraduate 
woman's responsibilities. Promptness is not only a habit that should 
permeate all aspects of a student's life, but it is also a consideration 
offered by the resident woman to the head resident and others whose 
work includes the care of the desk and sign-in procedures. 

Being late is viewed as a lack of responsibility of an individual in that 
it involves being unaware of time and or distance. It also indicates a cer- 
tain amount of carelessness on the part of the individual. Lateness 
causes concern on the part of the housemother in that she must call 
the parents of a student if that student has not appeared within thirty 
minutes after her curfew. Resident women are urged to call the desk 
of their residence if they have the slightest reason to doubt that they 
will be able to sign in by their curfew. 

Ten emergency minutes are alloted each girl per semester. These are 
to be used only in the case of emergency. Judicial Board Chairmen, 
graduate assistants, and house directors keep a record of late minutes. 
Any lateness over these ten emergency late minutes will be viewed with 
concern and will require an appearance before the residence judicial 
board. 



QUIET HOURS 

The women of the University are expected to behave at all times with 
consideration toward others. One area in which this consideration is 
particularly important is quietness within the living unit. The Univer- 
sity recognizes the importance of a quiet atmosphere in relation to good 
study conditions. To help effect quiet conditions, the Judicial Board 
and Executive Government in the residence hall are asked to set certain 
standards and controls which will be helpful in maintaining and per- 
petuating an atmosphere of quietness. 

Below is a basic poUcy regarding quiet hours that is followed withm 
your resident unit. 

(21) 



DEFINITION OF NOISE 

1. Noise is the sound(s) heard outside of a room with the door and/or 
the window (s) closed. If in doubt as to just how much can be heard, 
it is suggested that students be educated to check themselves by 
closing the door to their room, and listening to sounds (music, etc.) 
from the hall. 

2. Noise is a sound which can be heard by a girl in her room with her 
door closed. This may be noise from the hall, phone or another 
room. 

3. Noise is not necessarily an occasional outburst such as a spatter of 
laughter or a solitary shout for someone. Noise is that disturbance 
in the quietness that is continuous and bothersome to anyone within 
the immediate area. 



WARNING SYSTEM 

1. Any girl may issue a warning by informing her Judicial Board rep- 
resentative after having informed the offender. 

2. Warnings are cumulative on a yearly basis. 

3. The warning (in duplicate) must have the following information: 

a) Name of offender 

b) Name of reporter 

c) Reason for warning 

d) Time and place 

4. A copy of the warning is given the offender by a Judicial Board 
representative. The second copy is placed in the Judicial Chairman's 
file. 

5. Three warnings constitute an automatic penalty as prescribed by 
the Judicial Board. The fourth warning necessitates the offender's 
appearance before the residence Judicial Board. 

6. The offender has, at all times, the right to appeal a warning or a 
penalty to her residence Judicial Board. 

Quiet Hours are continuous except: 

11:30 A.M. -1:30 P.M. Monday through Friday 

4:30 P.M. -7:30 P.M. Monday through Friday 

Saturday and Sunday quiet hours are somewhat relaxed in the 
afternoon. 

(22) 





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(23) 



HOUSE RULES * 



FIKE DRILL REGULATIONS 

Fire Drills are held once a month to insure familiarity with the pro- 
cedure to follow in case of a real fire. 

All girls must wear a long coat and street shoes, and must carry a 
towel for protection against smoke and flames (may be held over face). 

The room windows must be shut, the lights on, and the door open. 
The fire drill proctors will check rooms. The girls leave the building 
silently, walking in a single file, and remain silent throughout the entire 
drill. 

Each offense requires appearance before the residence Judicial Board. 
Common errors are: 

1) Failure to appear 

2) Failure to appear in proper attire 

3) Misconduct during the drill. 

ROOM INSPECTION 

Room inspection will be made once a week by your head resident or 
graduate assistant. For safety and health reasons these rules should 
be followed: 

1) Food and dishes must not be taken from the Dining Hall. 

2) Coke bottles should be rinsed and returned to the cases provided 
for this purpose. 

3) The only electrical appliances allowed in rooms are fans, hair- 
dryers, electric clocks, radios, and phonographs. 

4) Shades must be drawn after dark when lights are on. 

5) Calling or talking from windows is prohibited. 

6) Food must not be kept on window sills. 

7) Food kept in rooms must be kept in metal containers with tight 
covers. 

8) Only coffee, tea, or soup may be prepared in dorm kitchens, 
except in the event of a dorm party. 

9) Except for dorm party food, only milk, juice, or fruit may be 
kept in dorm refrigerators, and these articles must be plainly 
labelled with the name of the owner. 

10) NO hot plates, coils, irons, or sunlamps are permitted in the 
rooms for they are fire hazards. 

SUN-BATHING 

Sun-bathing is allowed only in those areas so specified by the Dean 
of Womens' Office. You will be notified in the spring as to specific lo- 
cations. 

Sun-bathing is not permitted on sorority property except in enclosed 
areas which have been approved by the Panhellenic advisor. It is not 
permissible to sun-bathe on porches overlooking town streets. 

(24) 



RECEPTION LOBBIES 

Reception lobbies may be used for studying after closing hours with 
the head resident's consent. 

RESIDENCE DOORS 

All doors except the front door must be kept locked after dark or 
no later than 8 p.m. They will remain locked until 8:00 a.m., the earliest 
one can enter the residence, and may not be used until this time. 

TELEPHONES 

There are limited numbers of telephone lines available for incoming 
calls to the University, so limit your calls to three minutes, especially 
between the hours of 8 and 11 p.m. Off-campus calls are processed until 
10:30 p.m., except on Monday nights when they will only be accepted 
until 10:00 p.m. You may make and receive calls on campus from 8 a.m. 
to 11 p.m. on the hall phones. In case of an emergency which would 
require the use of these phones at other times than these hours, see 
your head resident or graduate assistant. All outside calls must be made 
on pay phones. 

PETS 

Pets of any sort are not allowed in the residence. 

RESIDENCE HALL PERSONNEL 

As a member of the Dean of Women's staff, the Head Resident has 
responsibility for the welfare of all women students living in her resi- 
dence hall. She is the official hostess for the hall, the house manager, 
the advisor to hall student government, and a counselor to the students 
in the hall. The staff in each hall is supplemented by either an Assistant 
Head Resident or Graduate Assistants who aid and assist the Head 
Resident. The residence hall staff is available to all students with prob- 
lems or who need assistance in planning and carrying out programs 
and activities in the residence. 

* Safety, security, and maintenance regulations which AWS helps to 
enforce. 



GUESTS 



OVERNIGHT GUESTS: 

A friend may spend the night in your residence on Friday and Sat- 
urday nights if your head resident agrees and if there is room for 
her. Because of similarities of interests and limited accomodations, 
these overnight guests should be of college age (i.e. no younger 
than sixteen). There are no guest rooms in the residences for 
parents or other adults and adults may not stay in student's rooms 
during the regular session. Guests must be registered 24 hours in 
advance with the head resident. Show your guest how to sign in 
and out and acquaint her with the residence customs. You are 
responsible for her and her infractions. 

(25) 



VISITORS TO WOMEN'S RESIDENCES: 

If a girl comes to visit you for the evening, i.e. not overnight, she 
must leave the residence by the following times: 

Monday 9:45 p.m. 

Tues. - Thurs. & Sun. 11:30 p.m. 

Friday and Saturday 12:45 a.m. 
She should sign in the guest book at the desk when she comes. 

VISITING MEN'S RESIDENCES: 

Women may visit men's residences only when attending registered, 
chaperoned social functions or during calling hours, as follows: 

Mon. through Thurs. 7-8:30 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 5-12:00 p.m. 

Sunday 1-5:00 p.m. 

Coeds may visit only in the ground floor lounges and lobbies which 
are chaperoned by men's residence hall staff. They must be ac- 
companied by a male resident. 

VISITING FRATERNITIES: 

Women may visit fraternities during house calling hours or those 
functions registered on the University Social Calendar, which is 
sent to all residences each week. The housemother or an approved 
chaperon must be present at all times that co-eds are in the fra- 
ternity house. Before a member may bring a co-ed into the frater- 
nity house, he must obtain permission from the housemother. 
Parties on week nights may last until 8:30 p.m., weekends 12:45 a.m. 



(26) 








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GENERAL REGULATIONS 

MOBS AND RIOTS * 

Any student who participates in a riot or is in the neighborhood of 
a crowd which is creating a disturbance or encourages a disturbance in 
any way is liable to be charged for damages and is subject to suspension. 

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES * 

Possession or use of alcoholic beverages, including light wines or beer, 
is prohibited on the campus, in any residence, or in any fraternity or 
sorority house. 

According to Maryland state law it is unlawful to sell or furnish any 
alcoholic beverages at any time to a minor (i.e. — a person under 21 
years of age) either for his own use or for the use of any other person. 

DRESS - 

Women students may wear Bermuda shorts or slacks on campus 
except in the following locations: classroom buildings, Student Union's 
first and second floors. Library, Chapel, Administration Buildings, resi- 
dence lobbies and living rooms (except upon entering and leaving). 
Tailored bermudas or slacks may be worn in the dining hall for Saturday 
breakfast and lunch but not at other times. At Sunday dinner a dress 
or coordinated outfit with hose and heels or flats are worn. Please re- 
member that short shorts, toreadors, bare feet are not appropriate on 
campus or in campus buildings. 

ACADEMIC 

See handbook General and Academic Regulations. 

* Denotes a general University regulation which is enforced by AWS. 

(27) 



DORMITORY PRESIDENTS 



Anne Arundel 


Catherine (Kay) Whelehan 


7094 


Caroline 


Carolyn Buck 


7297 


Carroll 


Demma Ziegler 


7165 


Centreville North 


Charlotte Debuskey 


7266 


Centreville South 


Leslie Parr 


7275 


Cumberland North 


Ruth Rohrer 


7176 


Denton 


Marie Outlaw 


7503 


Dorchester 


Betty Jo Mullen 


7057 


Montgomery Center 


Gail Korb 


7159 


Montgomery East 


Bev Bierer 


7239 


Montgomery West 


Carol Sullivan 


7108 


Queen Anne's 


Dotty Pritchett 


7258 


St. Mary's 


Verna Trinter 


7025 


Somerset 


Betty Perna 


7029 


Wicomico 


Florence Mason 


7133 


Worcester 


Janet Willsie 


7223 



SORORITY PRESIDENTS 



Alpha Chi Omega 


Barbara Williams 


864-9893 


Alpha Delta Pi 


Tricia Smith 


927-9864 


Alpha Epsilon Phi 


Lois Mazoh 


927-9701 


Alpha Gamma Delta 


Karen Reynolds 


864-9806 


Alpha Omicron Pi 


Maria Valencia 


927-9709 


Alpha Phi 


Carole Anderson 


864-5910 


Alpha Xi Delta 


Robin Trainor 


277-9736 


Delta Delta Delta 


Janie Edwards 


277-9868 


Delta Gamma 


Kay Dougherty 


864-5880 


Delta Phi Epsilon 


Judy Goldberg 


864-9693 


Gamma Phi Beta 


Maureen Watkins 


927-9773 


Kappa Alpha Theta 


Jean Buckingham 


927-7606 


Kappa Delta 


Carol Lee 


927-9759 


Kappa Kappa Gamma 


Sandy Hughes 


927-9886 


Phi Sigma Sigma 


Deena Chesler 


927-9828 


Pi Beta Phi 


Sue Dayton 


779-7345 


Sigma Delta Tau 


Linda Pollack 


779-5671 


Sigma Kappa 


Emmy Lou Moke 


927-9861 



(28) 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



AWS Executive Council 2 

AWS Committee Chairmen .... 2 

President's Welcome 3 

Deans of Women 4, 5 

AWS ... A Place For You 6 

AWS Organization 7 

Special Events 8,9 

Honoraries 10, 11 

Looking Around 12, 13 

Suggested Dress 14 

Helpful Hints 15 

Dining Hall Hours 16 

As A Commuter 16 

Official Rules Concerning Women 17 

Philosophy of 

Judicial Program 17 

Signing In and Out 17 

Weekends at Sororities ... 18 

Reporting to the Head Resident 
Correct Class Standing . . 18 

Late Leaves and 

Overnights 18,19,20 

Cultural Late Leaves .... 19 

Early Morning Leaves ... 18 

Organization Late Leaves . . 19 

Weekend and Holiday 

Late Leaves 20 

Lateness 21 

Quiet Hours 21 

Definition of Noise 22 

Warning System 22 

Residence Hours (chart) .... 23 

Curfew Hours 23 



Men Calling Hours 
(dormitories and 
sororities) 23 

Calling Hours (fraternities 
and men's dorms) 23 

Hours for Dormitory 

Guests (women) 23 

House Rules 24,25 

Fire Drills 24 

Room Inspection 24 

Sun Bathing 24 

Reception Lobbies 25 

Telephones 25 

Residence Doors 25 

House Personnel 25 

Guests 25,26 

Overnight Guests 25 

Regulations on who can 

visit on weekends 25 

General Regulations 27 

Mobs and Riots 27 

Alcoholic Beverages 27 

Dress 27 

Presidents of Dorms and 

Sororities 28