(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Information Please!"




ease 



1965- 1966 



INFORMATION PLEASE STAFF 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Rose Kafz 

SECTION CHIEF Befh Brough, Lyn Gregor. 

Ina Hackerman, Gloria Kozak 
Anne Maerwiiz, Pat Murphy 
Frannie Sommers, Jo Toula 

ART EDITOR Leslie Cohen 

ADVISOR Miss Julia Billings 

Assisfanf Dean of Women 

TECHNICAL ADVISOR Mr. Paul E. Thomas 




<Jnh 



Ti^ 



ormatlon r lease 



4Z^ <J~Landl:)ool2 ror lAJomcn t^tMctcnts 



piiblisncd ou tin 



^z/^ssociatcd lAJoynen i^^tudcnts 

LAniversltxf of <yrlat-\fland 
C <ollegfc f^arhf ^yvlayxflancl 

1965-1966 



table 

of 

contents 





DEAN'S PAGE 4 

PRESIDENT'S PAGE 5 

ACADEMIC ASPIRATIONS 6 

Honoraries 6,7 

EXTRACURRICULAR 

EXCURSIONS 9 

CULTURAL CORNER 12 

SOCIAL SCOOP 14 

Graces and Grooming 15 

Suggested Dress 17 

AWS ... A Place for YOU 18 

AWS Organization 19 

AWS Executive CouncU 20 

AWS Committee Chairmen 20 

Special Events 21 

RESIDENCE ROUNDUP 23 

COMMUTERS' CHAT 24 

REGUXATION REMINDERS 26 

Official Rules Concerning Women 26 

Philosophy of Judicial Program _ 26 

Signing In and Out 27 

Weekends at Sororities 28 

2 



Reporting to the Head Resident 

Correct Class Standing 28 

Late Leaves and Overnights 28 

Cultural Late Leaves 29 

Early Morning Leaves _ 28 

Organization Late Leaves _ 29 

Weekend and Holiday 

Late Leaves 30 

Lateness 31 

Quiet Hours 32 

Definition of Noise 32 

Warning System , 32 

Residence Hours (chart) 34 

Curfew Hours 34 

Men's Calling Hours 34 

(residence halls and sororities) 

Calling Hours 34 

(fraternities and men's dorms) 

House Rules 35 

Fire Drills 35 

Room Inspection 35 

Sun Bathing _ 36 

Reception Lobbies 36 

Telephones 36 

Residence Doors 36 

House Personnel 36 

Guests 37 

Overnight Guests 37 

Regulations on who can visit 

on weekends 37 

General Regulations 38 

Mobs and Riots 38 

Alcoholic Beverages 38 

Dress - 38 

Registration for Parties 39 

Presidents of Dorms and Sororities 40 

3 






^c/< 



cot^e 



to 



^^Viar uland 



^' 




We of the Dean of 
Women's Office bid you 
welcome. 

Your main purpose in 
entering the University is 
to acquire an education. 
A great part of this you 
will get in the classrooms 
and the Library, from pro- 
fessors, books, and from 
one another. It is also 
hoped that you will recog- 
nize and take advantage 
of the extra-curricular 
offerings of the University. 
The Associated Women 
Students — popularly re- 
ferred to as A.W.S. — is 
the student government organization to which all 
women belong and through which, cooperatively with 
the Dean of Women's Office, they establish the rules by 
which they live. They also strive to create a desirable 
social environment and through their activities encour- 
age leadership qualities in women. 

Though the University is large and as such may seem 
confusing at times, there are a great many people here 
— fellow students, faculty, administrators and staff — 
who are personally interested in your welfare and hap- 
piness and will be pleased to be of help if you will let 
them know your concerns. 

When you arrive on campus you will be given much 
information to help you learn your way around our 
community. In addition, regulations applicable to all 
students are set forth in a booklet entitled University 
General and Academic Regulations. The catalog of the 
College in which you register will also set forth certain 
requirements with which you must become familiar. 

Remember, this is now YOUR UNIVERSITY. If we 
in the Dean of Women's Office can in any way assist 
you in taking advantage of and enjoying all that is here 
for you, please give us the privilege of doing so. 



JicUn £. CLaxi 



Dean of Women 



ASSISTANT DEANS OF WOMEN: 



Miss Julia Billings, Social Director and AWS Advisor 

Miss Marian Johnson, Commuter Advisor 

Miss Janyce E. Notopoulos, Panhellenic and Judicial 
System Advisor 

Miss Joan McCall, Women's Housing Director and 
Dorm Council Advisor 



L/Ueiconie ryoyn tne 




On behalf of the women students at the University 
of Maryland, I would like to extend a warm welcome 
to you. 

Upon enrolling at the University, you will auto- 
matically become a member of the Associated Women 
Students (A. W. S.), the women's governing body on 
campus. An organization with which you will be in- 
volved either directly or indirectly, A. W. S. promotes 
many activities of interest to all Maryland women. 
Information Please, the A. W. S. publication, has been 
written to acquaint you with these activities as well as 
to answer questions you may have about your Uni- 
versity. 

A. W. S. is your organization and we hope you will 
take every opportunity to become closely associated 
with it. 

Sincerely, 



J a\j <J\ in caid 



AWS President 



Academic 
Achievements 



The wise Maryland coed sets her sights high where 
the University's paramount goal — academics — 
is concerned. 

As a freshman, she acclimates herself to the 
policies and regulations set forth by the University. 
To begin with, she attends classes regularly. These 
sessions last from 50 to 75 minutes each and are 
scheduled two or three times a week. There is no 
such thing as automatic "cuts" for freshmen with 
the exception of second semester freshmen who re- 
ceived a 3.5 average or above for their previous 
semester. This is only one of the signs of confidence 
and rewards for academic excellence at college! 

Honors and honoraries are in store for those who 
maintain high scholastic averages: Alpha Lambda 
Delta (freshman women), Diadem (junior women), 
Mortar Board (senior women). Phi Kappa Phi 
(seniors in the top ten percent of their class), the 
Dean's List (a 3.5 or above), and Phi Beta Kappa 
(our newest pride and joy!). 

Of course, you must realize that not everyone 
can be an honor student but everyone can make an 
effort to succeed. The policy at Maryland is one 
where a student can usually contact his instructor 
for advice or direction. Approximately six weeks 
after the beginning of each semester, "dean's slips" 
are sent out to students doing below average work 
in his courses. Upon receiving such a notice, a stu- 
dent may find it to his advantage, at this time, to 
contact his instructor. Talking with an instructor 
can help to put the course into proper perspective. 
The University's marking system is as follows: 
A (four points, superior work), B (three points, 
above average work), C (two points, average work), 
D (one point below average work), F (zero points, 
failure), and I (incomplete work). 

With expanding classroom facilities, the depart- 
mental and the McKeldin libraries, a Maryland coed 
is presented with many advantages for progress 
and learning. All the opportunities for a rich edu- 
cation are here; it is the student's responsibility 
to look for them and make good use of them. 

Honoraries 

Girls who have made outstanding contributions 
in some phase of University life may be tapped for 



membership in Alpha Lambda Delta, Diadem, Dia- 
mond, Mortar Board, Phi Kappa Phi, Who's Who 
or Phi Beta Kappa. All of these honoraries with 
the exception of Phi Kappa Phi, Who's Who and 
Phi Beta Kappa are solely for women. They pro- 
vide incentive for outstanding performance in schol- 
arship, service, and leadership on the Maryland 
campus. 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 

Twice a year, in fall and spring, this honorary 
initiates freshman women who have maintained 
high academic averages. In order to be eligible for 
membership, a girl must attain a 3.5 average during 
the first semester or a 3.5 overall average for her 
freshman year. Maryland's Adele H. Stamp chapter 
of Alpha Lambda Delta helps Phi 
Eta Sigma, the men's scholarship 
honorary, to sponsor a tutoring 
service for all freshman students. 
These organizations have as their 
goal the expansion of the cultural 
and intellectual atmosphere at the 
University. 

DIADEM 

Diadem was established at the 
University of Maryland in 1961 to 
honor incoming junior women for 
outstanding achievement and po- 
tential in leadership and service. 
Sophomore women are tapped in 
the spring before their junior year 
at the Women's Convocation. Dia- 
dem members also usher at school 
events and lead tours for visitors 
to the campus. The motto of this 
honorary is "To lead and follow! 
with wisdom and understanding." 

DIAMOND 

Sorority women who have made 
outstanding contributions to the 
campus and to their individual 
chapters are given recognition for 
their achievements by membership 
in Diamond. Tapping is held twice 
each year at Harmony Hall and at 
the Interfraternity Sing. Each soro- 
rity may have a total of three girls 
in Diamond, who may be either 
juniors or seniors. Members serve 
as hostesses at various campus 
events. 

MORTAR BOARD 

Membership in Mortar Board is 
the highest honor that can be at- 




JA 



tained by a Maryland coed. The national honorary, 
which was established at the University in 1934, 
recognizes senior women who have excelled in lead- 
ership, scholarship, character, and service. Mortar 
Board sponsors the Mum Sale at Homecoming, en- 
tertains freshman women with a 3.0 average at a 
"Smarty Party", and sponsors a "Last Lecture" 
series annually. 

PHI KAPPA PHI 

Phi Kappa Phi recognizes superior scholarship 
among seniors in the top 10 percent of their class. 
Its members, both men and women, are dedicated 
to the maintenance of unity and democracy in edu- 
cation. A scholarship is presented by Phi Kappa 
Phi each year to the graduating senior with the 
highest academic average. 

WHO'S WHO 

The selection committee of Who's Who, which 
is made up of a group of student leaders and fac- 
ulty members, can pick a maximum of thirty-six 
students for membership in this nationwide group. 
Graduating seniors are selected for excellence in 
publications, religion, drama, speech, activities, and 
athletics. Who's Who Among Students in American 
College and Universities sponsors a placement serv- 
ice for those it honors and also publishes a national 
bibliography of aU the selected students. 

PHI BETA KAPPA 

Phi Beta Kappa is a national honor society which 
extends membership to junior and senior students 
in the College of Arts and Sciences who have 
achieved scholastic excellence. To be eligible for 
consideration for Phi Beta Kappa, juniors must 
have achieved a 3.75 cumulative average and a sen- 
ior must have an overall average between 3.25 and 
3.5. There are also total semester-hour require- 
ments in the candidate's major area of study. The 
University of Maryland Phi Beta Kappa chapter 
held its first undergraduate initiation last year. 



Extracurricular 
Excursions 



There is at least one activity at Maryland just 
for YOU; being an active member of a campus or- 
ganization can be an important part of your college 
career. Your talent and services are needed for the 
Associated Women Students every year on councils 
and committees. Other committees open many op- 
portunities for work with the Student Government 
Association and legislative and judicial groups, 
such as the Central Student Court. AWS com- 
mittees include a variety of responsibilities for a 
variety of talents; for instance, there are the Con- 
stitution, Cultural, Elections, Bridal Fair, Social 
and Activities, and Big Sister Program Committees. 
For those who have literary inclinations, the Ter- 
rapin, Diamondback, and Calvert Review provide 
outlets for your abilities. In addition, radio sta- 
tion WMUC and the University Theater welcome 
you to learn while entertaining and exercising your 
talents. 

If you are musically inclined, the Madrigal Sing- 
ers, the Maryland Glee Club, orchestra and band 
are for you. If you prefer to dance, you may find 
the Modern Dance Club the perfect thing for you. 
Moreover, the Flying Follies provides opportunities 
for anyone who wishes to participate in an overseas 
tour group of entertainers. 

For those who enjoy sports there is the Women's 
Recreation Association which plans and sponsors 
varied recreational and sports activities. Each 
season brings forth popular activities in WRA 
Intramurals, such as tennis, badminton, archery, 
bowling, volley ball, soft ball and many others. 

If you love the color of a uniform, then you may 
find Angel Flight perfect for you. Angel Flight 
women operate in conjunction with the campus 
military organizations: Pershing Rifles, the Van- 
denberg Guard, and the Air Force Reserve Oflflcers 
Training Corps. Perhaps you would like to wear 
the uniform of the color guard or the majorettes; 
either of these organizations provides opportuni- 
ties for an enthusiastic co-ed. 

Are you interested or active in the world of poli- 
tics? If so, you will find that Maryland offers a 
political organization far everyone. If your in- 
terests are with national politics then you may 
wish to join the Young Democrats or the Young 

9 



Republicans. If you are interested in campus poli- 
tics then the Chesapeake Bay Party, Old Line 
Party, or Free State Party may appeal to you. In 
addition, you will find an array of student organi- 
zations whose concern is for student involvement 
in either national or campus policies, such as the 
Students for a Democratic Society. 

If community service interests you, investigate 
the possibilities of working with the Campus Chest 
Council (philanthropy), the Red Cross Blood Drives 
(fall and spring), the Community Service Council 
(colleges in the area), or Volunteers for Mental 
Health. The religious groups on campus also have 
much to offer in this area as well as in many others. 
If you excel academically, you may be accepted 
into one of the campus honoraries. For instance. 
Alpha Lambda Delta, the freshman honorary, initi- 
ates first-year co-eds who attain either a 3.5 average 
during the first semester or a 
3.5 overall average for their 
freshman year. Incoming jun- 
ior women may be initiated 
into Diadem for outstand- 
ing character and leadership, 
while Mortar Board initiates 
senior women who have ex- 
celled in leadership, scholar- 
ship, character and service. 
In addition Phi Kappa Phi 
recognizes senior women who 
stand in the top ten percent 
of their class. Sorority women 
who have made outstanding 
contributions to the univer- 
sity and to their particular 
chapters may be tapped for 
membership in Diamond. 
Furthermore, up to thirty- 
six students may be selected 
for the national publication, 
Who's Who Among Students. 
Just last year, the University 
of Maryland installed a chap- 
ter of Phi Beta Kappa, the 
national honorary for students 
with outstanding scholastic 
achievements. Campus hon- 
oraries also include numerous 
departmental and college 
scholastic fraternities. 

These are just a few of the 
many activities and opportu- 
nities for you at Maryland. 
Whatever your interests or 
abilities are, this is the place 




10 



for you; the scope of your life at Maryland can be 
expanded immensely through any of these organiza- 
tions. Maryland is a haven for you — an enthusiastic 
co-ed who is willing and able to participate in the 
functions of her school! 



11 



Cultural 
Corner 



Throughout the academic year, the University 
of Maryland campus is constantly showered with 
a variety of cultural events. In whatever area your 
interests lie, you will find something of value in the 
campus cultural program, which includes music, 
drama, politics, variety shows, and lectures which 
touch upon every facet of the aesthetic and con- 
templative part of our lives. 

The Cultural Committee of the Student Govern- 
ment Association is responsible for bringing us the 
very best from all over the country. Several times a 
year, they sponsor such talent as the Boston Pops 
Orchestra, "Spoon River Anthology", and many 
others. Also in connection with the Student Union 
Board is the Speaker's Committee which sponsors 
speakers of varied backgrounds and interests for 
the benefit of the students. Among last year's 
speakers were authors of controversial books, an 
ambassador from the Russian Embassy, and a 
Delegate from the Steel Worker's Union. Along 
these same lines, many of the interest groups on 
campus sponsor speakers on a variety of topics; 
these lectures are open to the general student body. 
Also the academic departments bring noted authori- 
ties to speak about their fields of study. 

Another fascinating group which adds greatly to 
the stimulating atmosphere of Maryland's campus 
is the Experimental Theater Group. These students 
of drama and speech enact various plays and ex- 
cerpts without the benefit of scenery or costumes. 
Through their ingenuity and talent they create 
productions worthy of the highest praise. 

The Infraternity Council and the Senior Class 
both bring the best of professional entertainment 
to this campus. In the past years, we have had the 
great experience of listening to the Chad Mitchell 
Trio, Peter, Paul and Mary, and Ella Fitzgerald. 

The students at Maryland also contribute their 
own talents to our cultural program. University 
Theater, the campus drama group, presents plays 
and a musical show each year which rate with the 
best in the area. These student productions have 
proved so successful that last year's show "Any- 
thing Goes," went abroad for several months to 
play before European audiences. 

12 



The Flying Follies is another fabulous student 
group which brings talent to the campus spotlight. 
This unusual group possesses talent in every field 
imaginable. Singing, dancing, acrobatics, comedy 
and music are only a smattering of what this 
unique troup has to offer. 

These events are only a sample of the talent and 
variety that the University has to offer. Every 
day, every week, there is a stimulating experience 
in some form available for every student. What- 
ever your interests may be, the University pro- 
vides some opportunity to learn in that area. In 
this whirlwind of activities, the problem is not 
finding new knowledge or entertainment, but de- 
ciding how much one can absorb. Not only can one 
further his present interests, but more important, 
he can develop new ones and enjoy fuller experi- 
ences in the world of culture. 




13 



Social 
Scoop 

Realizing that all work and no play makes Jack 
a dull boy, our university coeds do their part to 
liven him up. The varied activities, sponsored by 
the university and its affiliated groups, give our 
coed the opportunity to do just this. 

Beginning chronologically in the fall, there is 
FRESHMAN ORIENTATION WEEK. This con- 
sists of conferences, discussions, dorm meetings, 
dances (called Dink Debuts), and teas. Soon after 
this, SORORITY RUSH begins. This is the time 
when the eighteen sororities on campus open their 
houses to new members. The rushee comes to know 
the Greek system through a series of parties and 
teas, and can then decide whether or not to "go 
Greek". In the fall home football games bring ex- 
citement to the campus. HOMECOMING is also 
held. Homecoming is the time when graduates re- 
turn to reminisce about the past and to observe 
the new happenings at their Alma Mater. I.F.C. 
PRESENTS, a program of professional entertain- 
ment, FALL GREEK WEEK, a week of athletic 
and social activities sponsored by Panhel and I.F.C., 
and numerous mixers, dances, socials and concerts 
take place during the autumn months and on into 
the winter. Also many of the residences and vari- 
ous campus groups hold Christmas parties at this 
time. 

Toward the beginning of the second semester, 
classes start holding their proms. Spring rush is 
held also. The main events of second semester are 
SPRING WEEK, GREEK WEEK and (for the 
women) BRIDAL FAIR. Spring Week includes 
campus-wide Olympics, Ugly Man on Campus and 
Campus Chest Queen Contests, College Casino, and 
Senior Class Presents. The highlight of Spring 
Greek Week is I.F.C. Sing, a vocal competition 
among the Greeks. There are also many Campus 
Chest projects going on during second semester. 
And finally, the highlight of the year— the SENIOR 
PROM. 

To use another cliche, on Maryland's campus, 
there is never a dull moment. If you're willing to 
try your hand at a little bit of each type of pro- 
gram — concerts, parties, sports, etc. — life, socially, 
can be very exciting. 

14 



Graces and Grooming 

Being a student at the University not only en- 
ables you to mature academically but socially as 
well. You will meet many new people, be faced 
with many difficult situations and have many ex- 
citing experiences. And through it all you will 
want to act as you are — as a lady. 

Remember to stand whenever a dean, house- 
mother, or an older woman enters the room or 
comes over to speak to you. Women do not usually 
shake hands with one another, but men and women 
often do. Shake hands firmly — a hand shake is 
often the basis for forming those important first 
impressions. 

When introducing people to each other, introduce 
the msm to the woman first; or a younger person 
to an older person if they are of the same sex. 
Relax and be as in- 
formal as you can. After 
a while introductions are 
as easy as smiling. 

Dress in the style 
most becoming to you, 
but try not to go to ex- 
tremes. The most strik- 
ing women wear stun- 
ning color combinations 
and dress simply. If 
you're invited to a party, 
school clothes are us- 
ually a safe thing to 
wear. Don't wear slacks 
or bermudas unless 
you're told to. 

The University offers 
you freedom — freedom 
to meet new people and 
to accept blind dates. 
There are innumerable 
activities during the 
week and on weekends, 
so don't go home all the 
time. Remember that 
class, clubs, mixers, des- 
serts, parties in houses 
are acceptable ways to 
meet others. Just walk- 
ing across the campus is 
a good opportunity, too. 

And while you're 
walking, remember : a 
cigarette looks bad dam- 
gling from your mouth 
or your hand. Don't 



15 




talk with a cigarette in your month, it looks funny 
bouncing up and down; don't chew gum in public; 
and that although you're madly in love with your 
boy friend, public displays of affection anywhere 
on campus make less fortunate girls jealous and 
are just plain embarrassing to many. 



16 



Suggested Dress 



Athletic Events 


Fall Sports — sport suit, sheath, 
heels 

Spring Sports — skirt and blouse, 
shirtwaist, flats 


Campus Wear 


Skirts and blouses, sweaters, 
shirtwaists, knee-hi's, hose, 
sneakers, flats 


Cultural Events 


Suit, sheath, heels, gloves 


Dances 


Campus Wear — for informal 
dances 

Cocktail dress, dressy sheath, 
heels, gloves 

Junior and Senior Proms — long 
gowns are often worn 




Rush — sheath, dressy shirtwaist, 
flats or heels 



Fraternity Parties 



Weekend Parties 
or specified 



school clothes. 



Rush 



Suit, sheath, heels, or specified 



Dining Halls 

Monday — Friday 
Breakfast and 



*Casual clothes 



Lunch 
Dinner 

Saturday 

Sunday 
Breakfast 
Dinner 


Skirt or dress 
*Casual clothes 

Skirt and blouse, flats 
Dress or coordinated outflt, hose, 
heels 


Student Union 
First and 

Second Floors 
Lower Levels 


Skirt or dress, *casual clothes 

for evening movies 
*Casual clothes 


Administration 
Buildings, 
Classrooms, 
Library, Chapel, 
Residence Lobbies 


Skirt or dress 


Inclement Weather 


*Casual clothes according to your 
discretion 



^Casual Clothes: 

1. Casual clothes include tailored slacks and bermudas 

2. Sweatshirts, dungarees, levis and cut offs are not 
considered casual clothes, and are not worn on 
campus 



17 



A WS... 

A Place for You 

As a new student at the University of Maryland, 
you may feel lost and insignificant. You want to be 
a contributing member of the University commu- 
nity, but you wonder where to begin and how. The 
answer — AWS ! 

The Associated Women Students is an organiza- 
tion to unify all women students. It functions 
throughout the year to promote self-government 
in residences, academic excellence, and cultural 
as well as many special activities such as Children's 
Party, Bridal Fair, Big Sister Programs, and the 
Christmas Program in the Chapel. 

The organization of AWS is based upon election 
and appointment. The oflScers are chosen in the 
spring by a vote of all women students after a week 
of spirited campaigning. Later, and also in the fall, 
interested students may apply for committees. 
When these positions are available, advertisements 
will appear in the AWS Newsletter as well as in 
the Diamondback. Application forms for committee 
chairmen and members are available in the Student 
Union, the Dean of Women's Oflace in the North 
Administration Building and in your dormitory. 

On the residence hall level, the executive council 
is selected by the girls in each dormitory. As offi- 
cers, some of these girls become members of an 
AWS Council or Board, and they can give you more 
information about AWS work. 

The opportunities for serving the campus through 
AWS are limitless. Whatever your interest, AWS 
will no doubt have a job or project to match it. 
AWS will use your individual talents and serve 
your particular needs. However you must take the 
initiative to become active in AWS. Work through 
your AWS representative . . . your direct link to 
the program and projects of AWS. 



18 





Auxiliary Organizations 
Mortar Board 
W.K.A. 
l.C.A. 



Campus 
Judicial Board 



Sorority 
Judicial 
Council 



Panhellenic 
Council 



Sorority 

Academic 

Board 



Constitution 

Cultural 

Big Sister Programs 

Elections 

lAWS Liaison 

Information Please 

Installation Banquet 

Publicity 

Social and Activities 

Leadership Workshop 

State Day 

Calendar 

Bridal Fair 

Children's Party 

Christmas Party 

AWS Reception for Head Residents 



YOU 



ly 



AWS 

Executive Council 



President 

First Vice President 

Second Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Senior Class 

Representative 

Junior Class 

Representative 

Sophomore Class 

Representative 

Freshman Class 

Representative 

Mortar Board President 

W.R.A. President 

U.C.A. Representative 

Judicial Board Chairman 

Coordinator of 

Academic Boards 



Tay Kincaid 
Carolee Foley 
Nancy Chotiner 
Karen Tulin 
Kathy Seward 

June Toye 

Anne Ulman 

Ellie Kurtz 

To be elected in fall 
Joan Weaver 
Carol Taylor 
Sandy Thompson 
Gretchen Schwarting 

To be appointed 



AWS 

Committee Chairmen 



Constitution 

Cultural 

Elections 

I.A.W.S. Liaison 

Information Please 

Installation Banquet 

Publicity 



Social and Activities 

Dormitory 

Big Sister Program 

Commuter 

Big Sister Program 

Commuter 

Affiliation Program 

A.W.S. Reception 

for Head Residents 

Children's Party 

Bridal Fair 

Leadership Workshop 

Christmas Program 

Campus Chest Liaison 

Calendar Chairman 

State Day 

Historian 



Beverly Colona 
Judi Hoffman 
Betty Jiles 
Karen Turnbull 
Rose Katz 
Vivian Roslyn 
Art — Ann Herron 
Diamondback — 
Anne McLaughlin 
Newsletter — • 
Barbara Loveless 
Beth Schefiier 

Beth Drydale 

Sherrie Jackson 

Ellen Kaplan 

Dianne Rice 
Tricia Deming 
Marilyn E. Quinn 
June Toye 
Pat Caldwell 
To be appointed 
Joan Weaver 
Karen Knabe 
Susie Denton 



20 



special Events 



The programs sponsored by A.W.S. 
are numerous and varied. They offer 
many opportunities for leadership, 
participation, and enjoyment. If you 
are interested in working on any pro- 
gram, please do not hesitate to con- 
tact the chairman. 



BIG SISTER PROGRAM — DORM AND 
COMMUTER AFFILIATION 

One of the first new faces to greet an incoming 
freshman woman or transfer student is that of her 
big sister, a specially assigned upperclassman. Your 
big sister will introduce and explain to you the 
problems, privileges and opportunities, both aca- 
demic and social, which are associated with your 
new school. During Registration and Orientation 
Week, a Big-Little Sister dinner and coke date with 
speakers and a fashion show are scheduled. Begin 
now to become less of a number and more of a part 
of the University of Maryland. 

CHAIRMEN : Beth Dry dale, Dormitory Program 

Sherrie Jackson, Commuter Pro- 
gram 

Ellen Kaplan, Commuter-Dorm 
Affiliation Program 



^ 



BRIDAL FAIR 

When "la saison de I'amour" approaches, when 
thoughts are filled with engagements and June 
weddings, A.W.S. , in conjunction with nationally 
known companies, presents displays of household 
and personal items such as trousseau fashions, 
china, crystal, silver, and kitchenware. In addition 



21 



to furnishing ideas for the bride-to-be, there are 
many suggestions for gifts. The main events of the 
evening last year were a fashion show, a drawing 
for door prizes, including a wedding gown, a wed- 
ding cake, and an oil portrait. Surprise packages 
for engaged girls were an added treat. 

CHAIRMAN: Marilyn E. Quinn 

CHILDREN'S PARTY 

Every spring, A.W.S., together with the Pan- 
hellenic Council, the sororities and dormitories, 
treats one of the area's children's homes to a party 
with refreshments and entertainment, and pretend 
to be big sisters. The party is held on campus and 
various individuals volunteer to perform for the 
children. Last year's party was a huge success. 

CHAIRMAN: Tricia Deming 

CHRISTMAS PROGRAM 

Holiday sounds echo throughout the University 
of Maryland campus with the presentation of the 
Christmas Program, an annual event sponsored by 
A.W.S. and SAE fraternity. Choral arrangements 
are sung by the Men's Glee Club and Women's 
Chorus. After scripture readings and community 
singing, the congregation divides into caroling 
groups which later meet in a dormitory, sorority 
house or fraternity house for hot chocolate and 
cookies, a welcome treat for cold carolers. 

CHAIRMAN: Pat CaldweU 



S 



AWS RECEPTION FOR HEAD RESIDENTS 

To honor the new and the old head residents of 
the men's and women's residences, fraternities and 
sororities, a reception is held every fall in the Stu- 
dent Union. The head resident, accompanied by the 
president of the dorm or sorority meets the Deans 
of Women and the new A.W.S. Executive Council. 

CHAIRMAN: Dianne Rice 
22 



Residence 
Roundup 



Living in the residence hall is a new and exciting 
experience. Upon your arrival at the residence hall 
you will be greeted not only by your big sister but 
by your head resident or graduate assistant. In 
college the head resident is your adopted mother, 
a counselor, and a friend and is always available. 
In the larger residence halls there may be two 
head residents and there are graduate assistants 
on every floor. These assistants will explain regu- 
lations and policies to you. They are adequately 
informed to answer questions you encounter while 
adjusting to college and residence hall life. 

Each of you will have at least one and possibly 
two roommates to become acquainted with, as well 
as the others on your floor and in the entire hall. 
Each residence hall has officers who will help to 
make your residence hall an active part of your 
campus life. You should make a special effort to 
become acquainted with your judicial board chair- 
man, your academic and social chairman; they can 
be especially helpful as the year begins. There are 
committees which plan and direct the activities for 
the year. You will find there are many committees 
to work on and many events to help with as well as 
to attend. 

All the residence halls are furnished attractively 
and are equipped with many facilities such as laun- 
dry rooms, candy machines, and soft drink ma- 
chines. For studying, several floors of the residence 
halls have study rooms with desks and chairs and 
comfortable sofas to relax as you study. For en- 
tertaining guests social areas with pianos, tele- 
visions and ping pong tables are provided and add 
to your pleasant surroundings. 

Life in any one of the residence halls is thorough- 
ly enjoyable — if you understand and cooperate with 
the reasonable house and AWS rules. Residence 
halls are a major part of campus life and you will 
soon realize that they mean more than simply a 
place to eat and sleep. Learning to get along with 
girls from different families and regional back- 
grounds will be a rewarding phase of your college 
life. 



23 



Commuters' 
Chat 



As a commuter, you play an important part on 
the University of Maryland campus, and have your 
own University Commuters' Association. This is 
the only body which represents exclusively the 
commuters' point of view. The UCA President is a 
member of the SGA Cabinet and its highest elected 
woman officer is on the AWS Executive Council. 

In addition to political representation, the UCA 
offers social, sports, and service programs. Socially, 

it offers commuters' 
dances, parties and a 
place to meet other 
commuters in the Den 
in the Student Union. 
Intramural programs 
are set up for both 
men and women, in- 
cluding football, 
basketball, softball, 
swimming, and cross- 
country. 

As for service ac- 
tivities, the most im- 
portant is the car 
pool service coordi- 
nated in the commu- 
ter office in the Stu- 
dent Union. Through 
this commuters can 
find a ride to and 
from campus. Com- 
muters who wish to 
offer transportation 
can locate others who 
need transportation. 
Also car pools may be 
arranged. Watch for 
the car pool service 
during registration 
week. 

A new program has 
been formulated by 
AWS to bring com- 
muters closer to the 
campus through asso- 



24 




elation with a women's dorm. This Commuters' 
Affiliation Program gives girls an honorary mem- 
bership with a dorm and a chance to participate 
in parties, fireside chats, and service projects. AWS 
also has a Big Sister Program for Commuters which 
takes place during Registration Week. This pro- 
gram includes a coke date and a Big-Little Sister 
dinner, which helps new commuters to become ac- 
quainted with some aspects of campus life. 

As a commuter, it is easy to feel a little with- 
drawn from campus affairs, but there is no reason 
to be. In addition to your own University Com- 
muters' Association, you are welcome to join in 
all the usual campus activities. It's up to you to 
make the same effort to participate in Maryland 
affairs as you would if you lived right on the 
campus. 



25 



Regulation 
Reminders 



Ojficial Rules 



PHILOSOPHY OF THE JUDICIAL BOARD 

The women's judicial program operates on the 
basis of two underlying principles. The two prin- 
ciples apply whether disciplinary action is being 
administered by a judicial body or by a staff mem- 
ber residing in a resident unit or by a member of 
the Dean of Women's Office. 

The first principle is that the disciplinary action 
is aimed primarily at assisting the individual in- 
volved to realize her mistake and to help her to 
re-direct her behavior and energies along accept- 
able lines. The second principle is that every effort 
is made to encourage students themselves to as- 
sume the responsibility for their own discipline and 
behavior. 

In carrying out these principles, great emphasis 
is placed on the consideration of each individual 
case rather than attempting to have matching 
penalties for specific offenses. In order to assure 
students of every opportunity for a fair hearing, 
due process is carefully observed and every student 
has the right to appeal any action of a lower ju- 
diciary body to one of a higher nature. 

Because of the individual nature of discipline, 
emphasis is placed upon the due process procedure 
to insure a fair hearing rather than upon elaborate 
codes of laws and regulations. By insuring a fair 
consideration of all factors and evidence in the 
case, arbitrary and authoritarian action by an ad- 
ministrator or by student groups is avoided. 

Emphasis is also placed upon patterns of be- 
havior. A student who consistantly violates a rule 
or rules is in much greater need of attention than 
one who makes a small error and corrects herself 
immediately. 

SIGNING IN AND OUT 

Signing in and out is a means to aid the head 
resident to know a student's whereabouts in case 
of an emergency, or in the case of persons desiring 
to contact a student. 



26 



This procedure is to be followed whenever you 
expect to be out of the residence after 8:00 P.M. 
Signing in and out must be done by YOU except 
in cases when you are out of your residence past 
8:00 unexpectedly. In this case you should call 
the desk of your residence and have your head 
resident, graduate assistant, or the desk recep- 
tionist on duty sign out for you. Your residence 
clock is the OFFICIAL TIME and will be the only 
indicator of your return time to the dormitory. 

The dormitory Judicial Board is responsible for 
penalizing students who make errors in signing in 
and signing out. 



TYPES OF SIGN-OUTS 



I. DAILY SIGN-OUTS 



Js'ame 


Destination 


With Whom 


HO. 


Departure 
Time 


Expected 
Return 


Rolurn 
Time 


Initial 


Sue 
Jones 


R.K.O. Keith's 
Washington. DC 


S.Smith 


car 


8:15 PM 


11 :00 PM 


10:50 PM 


s.jr. 



N.B. — In large dorms room numbers and class 
might also be required. 

A. GENERAL REGULATIONS 

1. The looseleaf notebook at the recep- 
tion desk is to be used for daily sign- 
ing in and out if you expect to return 
the same day. 

2. This procedure is to be followed 
whenever you expect to be out of the 
residence past 8:00 P.M. 

3. Your destination must be as specific 
as possible. 

4. The first initial and the last name of 
the person with whom you are going 
should be indicated. 

5. Your expected return indicates the 
time at which you expect to sign in. 
No penalty will be given for return- 
ing after your indicated "expected 
return" UNLESS you return to the 
residence after your curfew time. 

6. Record the exact time of your return 
by the residence clock. 

7. You must initial all sign-ins YOUR- 
SELF. 



27 



8. The latest time you may sign out or 
change your sign-out on the daily 
sign-out sheet is your usual closing 
hour. 

9. Monday night is a closed night. 
Every girl must be in her residence 
at 10:00 P.M. 

10. Dormitory students may not spend 
the night at sorority houses or other 
dorms Sunday through Thursday 
nights. 

II. SPECIAL TYPES OF DAILY SIGN-OUTS 

A. 12 O'CLOCK LATE LEAVES— These 

allow you to remain out of your resi- 
dence after your usual closing hour, 
but no later than 12 midnight. 

1. These may be taken on Tuesday, 
Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday 
nights. 

2. Late leaves are granted according to 
academic classification. 

Late 
Academic standing Leaves Overnights 

(per (per 

semester) semester) 

Freshmen: fewer than 28 credits 3 3 

Sophomores: passed 28 to 55 credits 6 6 

Juniors: passed 56 to 87 credits 9 9 

Seniors: passed 88 credits or more unlimited unlimited 

B. EARLY MORNING LEAVES— The ear- 

liest time you can leave the residence 
is 6:00 A.M. If a special situation arises 
which necessitates your leaving before 
then, secure permission from your head 
resident the day before you plan to 
leave. 

C. SPECIAL LATE LEAVES— Special per- 

mission to return to the residence after 
your regular closing hours may be 
granted for the purpose of attending 
social, cultural, and sports events. 

1. GENERAL REGULATIONS: Ar- 
rangements for such leaves off cam- 
pus must be made with your head 
resident in advance. The permission 
must be granted by your head resi- 
dent. You must present your ticket 
to your head resident before you go. 

28 



If this is impossible, give her your 
ticket upon returning from the event. 
When you sign out for any special 
late leave, you should indicate your 
closing hour as your "expected re- 
turn" and write "special late leave" 
above the "expected return" time. 

2. TYPES OF SPECIAL LATE 
LEAVES 

ON CAMPUS— Social, cultural, and 
sports events which are University 
sponsored. After the function is 
over, you are given 20 minutes to 
return to your residence. 

Monday Nights — Special late leaves 
for a Monday night may only be 
granted by the Dean of Women 
with a recommendation from the 
head resident. 

Requests for special late leaves not 
listed should be taken to AWS 
Dorm Council for general leaves 
or to Miss McCall for individual 
leaves two weeks in advance. 

OFF CAMPUS — cultural and social 

events. 

Daily — Special permission to attend 
cultural events such as those held 
at Constitution Hall, Lisner Au- 
ditorium, National Theater, and 
Arena Stage may be granted by 
the head resident. 

Weekends — Everyone attending will 
be granted 2 A.M. permissions 
the night of the Sophomore 
Prom, the night of the Junior 
Prom and the night of the Senior 
Ball. 

ON OR OFF CAMPUS— Organiza- 
tional events. 

Special late leaves for organiza- 
tions such as University Theater 
and the Diamondback must be 
cleared through the Dean of Wo- 
men's Office. Request should be 
made at least one week in advance 
by the secretary or the head of the 
organization. A 2.0 average for the 
previous semester is required. 



29 



III. OVERNIGHT SIGN-OUTS 

An overnight leave is a leave allowing you 
to spend the night away from your residence 
and is based on the range of permission 
granted by your parents on the Parent's 
Authorization Form. 



Companion, people lo be 
visited, mode of travel 


Destination 


Depa 


r.un. 


Kxp. 


cted 


Return 


Initials 


Return 


Date 


Time 


M. Smith — Home 


313 Lucky La. 
Bait.. .Md. 


Date 


Time 


Date 


Time 


12 .1 


2:00 
P.M. 


SJ 


bus 


n .30 


2:00 

p.>r. 


12 1 


9:00 
P.M. 



A. GENERAL REGULATIONS 

If you plan to be away from your resi- 
dence overnight, sign out on your card 
at the reception desk. Indicate the neces- 
sary information and move your tab. As 
you face the book, move tab to the left 
when you go out, to the right when you 
return. 

The latest time you may sign out for 
an overnight is 11:00 P.M. on Tuesday, 
Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday nights 
if you are a sophomore, junior, or senior; 
and 10:30 P.M. if you are a freshman. 
On Friday and Saturday nights the latest 
sign-out time for an overnight is 12:00 
midnight for all women students; a 
woman who wants to sign out for an 
overnight must come in and sign out 
herself. 

After leaving the dorm, you MAY 
NOT CHANGE your signout to an over- 
night by calling in unless your parents 
call to ask that you stay at home over- 
night. 

Monday night is a closed night and 
everyone must be in her residence by 
10:00 P.M. Overnights cannot be taken. 

Weeknight overnights are granted ac- 
cording to academic classification as 
stated on a previous chart. 

B. TYPES OF OVERNIGHTS 

1. DAILY OVERNIGHT— An overnight 
taken on Tuesday, Wednesday, or 
Thursday night is considered as one 
of your overnight leaves. 

2. WEEKEND OVERNIGHT— All wom- 
en students have unlimited weekend 
overnight leaves. The weekend in- 
cludes Friday, Saturday, and Sunday 
nights. 



30 



3, SPECIAL OVERNIGHT LEAVES 

Overnight leaves, such as choir 
trips, are cleared through the Dean of 
Women's Office and requests should be 
made at least two weeks in advance. 
All women have free overnights or 
late leaves on the night preceding a 
one-day holiday and the nights closing 
all vacation periods, not on the holiday 
itself. 

Dormitory residents visiting the 
sorority house for the weekend must 
sign out on their dormitory sign-out 
card. They must sign in at the soror- 
ity house in the overnight book. While 
at the sorority house, they must sign 
out on a daily sign-out sheet that is 
designated for guests. Upon leaving, 
the dormitory resident has the soror- 
ity head resident give her a form that 
states any errors that she has made. 
This form must be turned in to the 
dormitory head resident when the girl 
signs in. 

IV. ERRORS ON OVERNIGHTS AND DAILY 
SIGNOUTS 

1. Serious Offenses: 

a. Failure to sign out 

b. Deliberate falsification of destination 

c. Signing in or out for another resident 
student. 

2. Common Errors 

a. Failure to sign in 

b. Incorrect use of A.M.'s and P.M.'s 

c. Failure to move tab 

d. The use of dittos on sign-outs 

e. Failure to initial the sign-in column of 
the card or to sign in or out in the cor- 
rect space 

f . Incorrect dates 

g. Failure to put time under "expected 
return" 

h. Failure to sign out on the correct book 
or card 

LATENESS 

Resident women are urged to call the desk of 
their residence if they have the slightest reason to 
doubt that they will be able to sign in by their 
curfew. 



31 



Ten emergency minutes are alloted each girl per 
semester. These are to be used ONLY IN CASE 
OF EMERGENCY. Judicial Board Chairmen, grad- 
uate assistants, and house directors keep a record 
of late minutes and will view chronic or irrespon- 
sible use of your late minutes with concern. Any 
lateness over these ten emergency late minutes 
will require an appearance before the residence 
judicial board. 

QUIET HOURS 

The University recognizes the importance of a 
quiet atmosphere in relation to good study con- 
ditions. Below is a basic policy regarding quiet 
hours that is followed within your residence. 
Quiet Hours are continuous except: 

11:30 A.M. - 1:30 P.M. Monday through Friday 

4:30 P.M. - 7:30 P.M. Monday through Friday 

Saturday and Sunday quiet hours are somewhat 
relaxed in the afternoon. 

DEFINITION OF NOISE 

1. Noise is the sound (s) heard outside of a room 
with the door and/or the window (s) closed. If 
in doubt as to just how much can be heard, it is 
suggested that students be educated to check 
themselves by closing the door to their room, 
and listening to sounds (music, etc.) from the 
hall. 

2. Noise is a sound which can be heard by a girl 
in her room with her door closed. This may be 
noise from the hall, phone or another room. 

3. Noise is not necessarily an occasional outburst 
such as a spatter of laughter or a solitary shout 
for someone. Noise is that disturbance in the 
quiteness that is continuous and bothersome to 
anyone within the immediate area. 

WARNING SYSTEM 

1. Any girl may issue a warning by informing her 
Judicial Board representative after having in- 
formed the offender. 

2. Warnings are cumulative on a yearly basis. 

3. The warning (in duplicate) must have the follow- 
ing information: 

a. Name of offender 

b. Name of reporter 

c. Reason for warning 

d. Time and place 

32 



4. A copy of the warning is given the offender by 
a Judicial Board representative. The second copy 
is placed in the Judicial Chairman's file. 

5. Warnings may constitute an automatic penalty 
as prescribed by the Judicial Board. A prescribed 
number of warnings necessitates the offender's 
appearance before the residence Judicial Board. 

6. The offender has, at all times, the right to appeal 
a warning or a penalty to her residence Judicial 
Board. 



33 



p 


o o 

CO CO 


05 rH 


2g 


30 p.m. 
p.m.** 


2* 

* 

££ 

dd 




6 rH iHCl 
H tH 1— 1 rH 


(N d 

rH r-i 


• • o 

(M 4^ t- 


rHlO 










O . 


O* 










^£ r 


■M * 


^ 


s s a s 






ii 


m 


d d d oj 


O A 


O . 


d* (M 






■^ £ 




* S-i rH 


CM 




tH rH tH rH 




rH t- O ^ 


lOrH 








Bt 


S 


S S £ S 


rH rH 


^^ 


is * O lO 


^i 


fc 


CC C^ Cj Cl3 






COCO g CM 


< 




T-l tH rS tH 






4j;^ d^ 


inrH 


xn 












^ 












p 


O O 






# 




I 


CO CO 






§ 8s 




OrH tH (N 

1— j tH T— 1 T-l 


£ 


£ 


* 

* 






d 


a , 




£ 






o 


O ^ 




d 






IN 


cq fl 






Q 




d 


d.S 


4fr 


o 

CO 


w 


o o 


rH 


rHTJ 


« 




^ 


CO CO 
d tH iH (N 


' 


22 


'^ ° d d 


00 




iH iH rH iH 


£ 
d 




. 






££ 




£ 












rH 


dd 




d 


s 


O O 


rH 


(M CM 

1 1 


* 


i> 


p 


CO CO 




1 I 


"^ ^ 05 Oh 




H 


d rH iH (N 










tH rH iH rH 














c3 a 




















£ 


(N (N 






O 


a £ S £ 


s!?2o 




» 




d d d a 
oooo 

^i-\ t-K t-K r-\ 


dd ^^ 

rH O 0) 05 
rH 4-> tn 




•^' ^ d d 






J 












S o 


































W 




^ 






1— 1 


ai 








g 


I— ( 








& 

g 


S 




C/30 


O 


3Q 


3< 


is 


w 


^ • 


h:i • 




< • 


<; • 


C/3 ^ 


mko 


^ 


o • 


o • 


1 




U 


!2;p 




l§ 


|g 


5o 



34 



House Rules * 



FERE DRILL REGULATIONS 

Fire drills are held frequently to insure familiari- 
ty with the procedure to follow in case of a reed fire. 

All girls must wear a long coat and street shoes, 
and must carry a towel for protection against 
smoke and flames (may be held over face). 

The room windows must be shut, the lights on, 
and the door open. The fire drill proctors will check 
rooms. The girls leave the building silently, walk- 
ing in a single file, and remain silent throughout 
the entire drill. 

Each offense requires appearance before the resi- 
dence Judicial Board. 

Common errors are: 

1) Failure to appear 

2) Failure to appear in proper attire 

3) Misconduct during the drill. 

ROOM INSPECTION 

Room inspection will be made once a week by 
your head resident or graduate assistant. For 
safety and health reasons these rules should be 
followed : 

1) Food and dishes must not be taken from the 
Dining Hall. 

2) Coke bottles should be rinsed and returned 
to the cases provided for this purpose. 

3) The only electrical appliances allowed in 
rooms are fans, hairdryers, electric clocks, 
radios, and phonographs. 

4) Shades must be drawn after dark when lights 
are on. 

5) Calling or talking from windows is pro- 
hibited. 

6) Food must not be kept on window siUs. 

7) Food kept in rooms must be kept in metal 
containers with tight covers. 

8) Only coffee, tea, or soup may be prepared 
in dorm kitchens, except for a dorm party. 

9) Except for dorm party food, only milk, juice, 
or fruit may be kept in dorm refrigerators 
and these articles must be plainly labelled 
with the name of the owner. 



35 



10) NO hot plates, coils, irons, or sunlamps are 
permitted in the rooms for they are fire 
hazards. 

SUN-BATHING 

Sun-bathing is allowed only in those areas speci- 
fied by the Dean of Women's Office. You will be 
notified in the spring as to specific locations. 

Sun-bathing is not permitted on sorority prop- 
erty except in enclosed areas which have been ap- 
proved by the Panhellenic advisor. It is not per- 
missible to sun-bathe on porches overlooking town 
streets. 

RECEPTION LOBBIES 

Reception lobbies may be used for studying after 
closing hours with the head resident's consent. 

RESIDENCE DOORS 

All doors except the front door must be kept 
locked after dark or no later than 8 p.m. The will 
remain locked until 8:00 a.m., the earliest one can 
enter the residence, and may not be used until this 
time. 

TELEPHONES 

There are limited numbers of telephone lines 
available for incoming calls to the University, so 
limit your calls to three minutes, especially between 
the hours of 8 and 11 p.m. Off-campus calls are 
processed until 10:30 p.m., except on Monday nights 
when they will only be accepted until 10:00 p.m. 
You may make and receive calls on campus from 
8 a.m. to 11 p.m. on the hall phones. In case of an 
emergency which would require the use of these 
phones at other times than these hours, see your 
head resident or graduate assistant. All outside 
calls must be made on pay phones. 

PETS 

Pets of any sort are not allowed in the residence. 

RESIDENCE HALL PERSONNEL 

As a member of the Dean of Women's staff, the 
Head Resident has responsibility for the welfare 
of all women students living in her residence hall. 
She is the official hostess for the hall, the house 
manager, the advisor to hall student government, 
and a counselor to the students in the hall. The 
staff in each hall is supplemented by either an As- 



36 



sistant Head Resident or Graduate Assistants who 
aid and assist the Head Resident. The residence 
hall staff is available to all students with problems 
or who need assistance in planning and carrying 
out programs and activities in the residence. 
■= Safety, security, and maintenance regulations 
which AWS helps to enforce. 

Guests 

OVERNIGHT GUESTS: 

A friend may spend the night in your residence 
on Friday and Saturday nights if your head resi- 
dent agrees and if there is room for her. Because 
of similarities of interests and limited accommoda- 
tions, these overnight guests should be of college 
age (i.e. no younger than sixteen). There are no 
guest rooms in the residences for parents or other 
adults and adults may not stay in the student's 
rooms during the regular session. Guests must be 
registered 24 hours in advance with the head resi- 
dent. Show your guest how to sign in and out and 
acquaint her with the residence customs. You are 
responsible for her and her infractions. 

VISITORS TO WOMEN'S RESIDENCES 

If a girl comes to visit you for the evening, i.e. 
not overnight, she must leave the residence by the 
following times: 

Monday 9:45 p.m. 

Tues. - Thurs. and Sun. 11:30 p.m. 

Friday and Saturday 12:45 a.m. 

She should sign in the guest book at the desk when 
she comes. 

VISITING MEN'S RESIDENCE HALLS AND 
OFF CAMPUS RESIDENCES 

Women may visit men's residences during calling 
hours (see General and Academic Regulations) or 
for regularly scheduled parties which will be on the 
weekly social calendar. Women are not permitted 
to visit men's rooms or off-campus rooms or apart- 
ments. 

VISITING FRATERNITIES 

Women may visit fraternities during house call- 
ing hours or those functions registered on the Uni- 
versity Social Calendar, which is sent to all resi- 
dences each week. The housemother or an approved 



37 



chaperon must be present at all times that co-eds 
are in the fraternity house. Before a member may 
bring a co-ed into the fraternity house, he must ob- 
tain permission from the housemother. Parties on 
week nights may last until 8:30 p.m., weekends, 
12:45 a.m. 



General Regulations 

MOBS AND RIOTS* 

Any student who participates in a riot or is in 
the neighborhood of a crowd which is creating a 
disturbance or encourages a disturbance in any way 
is liable to be charged for damages and is subject 
to suspension. 

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES* 

Possession or use of alcoholic beverages, includ- 
ing light wines or beer, is prohibited on the campus, 
in any residence, or in any fraternity or sorority 
house. 

According to Maryland state law it is unlawful to 
sell or furnish any alcoholic beverages at any time 
to a minor (i.e. — a person under 21 years of age) 
either for his own use or for the use of any other 
person. 

DRESS 

\Vomen students may wear casual clothes in the 
dining halls for breakfast and lunch Monday 
through Friday and for all Saturday meals. Casual 
clothes include tailored slacks and tailored bermu- 
das, not sweatshirts, dungarees, levis or cutoffs. 

For dinner Monday through Friday, a skirt or 
dress will be required. More formal attire will be 
expected at Sunday breakfast and dinner. 

Skirts and dresses will be standard attire in class- 
rooms, administration buildings, the chapel, the 
library, and women's resident hall lobbies. On the 
two lower levels of the Student Union, casual 
clothes will be permitted at any time, but a skirt 
or dress must be worn at all times on the first and 
second floors. Casual clothes will be permitted at 
the evening movies. 

During inclement weather, casual clothes will be 
allowed according to the student's own discretion. 

ACADEIvnC 

See handbook General and Academic Regulations. 

* Denotes a general University regulation which is 
supported by AWS and enforced by Central Stu- 
dent Court. 



38 



REGISTRATION OF SOCIAL EVENTS 

Social events are registered in the Social Direc- 
tor's office by the social chairman of the residence 
where the event is held. The deadline is Tuesday 
for events held the following Friday through Thurs- 
day. Large events must be planned with the Social 
Director and registered ten days ahead. 

MASTER CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

A master calendar of events for the year is kept 
in the Social Director's office for the convenience of 
students and faculty. The dates of major events 
for the year are submitted by organizations by 
May 15. Dates for the fall printed SGA Calendar 
must be submitted by August 15, for the spring 
calendar by January 15. Consult this calendar 
before you plan a major event. 

SPACE RESERVATION FORM 

This must be filled out for any event where cam- 
pus facilities are used. Forms are obtained in Mr. 
Weber's office, North Administration Building. 

DINING HALL HOURS 

WEEKDAYS 

Breakfast 6:30 AM— 8:15 AM 

Lunch 11:10 AM— 1:10 PM 

Dinner 4:30 PM— 6:15 PM 

SATURDAY 

Breakfast 7:30 AM— 8:30 AM 

Lunch 11:30 AM— 1:00 AM 

Dinner 4:30 PM— 6:00 PM 

SUNDAY 

Breakfast 8:30 AM— 9:30 AM 
Dinner 11:30 AM— 1:20 PM 



39 



Dormitory Presidents 



Anne Arundel 


Adelaide S. Barnes 


7093 


Caroline 


Nancy Benjes 


7297 


Carroll 


Merle Haber 


7164 


Centreville North 


Barbara Bourgeois 


7266 


Centreville South 


Iris Esau 


7275 


Denton 


Elizabeth McPhee 


7502 


Dorchester 


Patricia ZMehlhop 


7140 


Elkton 


Joanna Ritz 


7714 


Montgomery Center 


Barbara Winn 


7014 


Montgomery East 


Joan Norwitz 


7247 


^Montgomery West 


Cheryl Eberlin 


7108 


Queen Anne's 


Mary Bruger 


7258 


St. rvlary's 


Patricia Harrison 


7027 


Somerset 


Elaine Abbott 


7029 


Wicomico 


Patricia Hopkins 


7133 


Worcester 


^Marilyn ^Marshall 


7226 



Sorority Presidents 



Alpha Chi Omega 
Alpha Delta Pi 
Alpha Epsilon Phi 
Alpha Gamma Delta 
Alpha Omicron Pi 
Alpha Phi 
Alpha Xi Delta 
Delta Delta Delta 
Delta Gamma 
Deltta Phi Epsilon 
Gamma Phi Beta 
Kappa Alpha Theta 
Kappa Delta 
Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Phi Sigma Sigma 
Pi Beta Phi 
Sigma Delta Tau 
Sigma Kappa 



Betsy Tait 864-9893 

Elizabeth Field 927-9864 

Bonnie Fox 927-9701 

Betty Beckham 864-9806 

Helen Hyre 927-9709 

Nancy Baker 864-5910 

Sharon Kelbaugh 927-9720 

Joan Quigley 277-9867 

Mary Wright 864-5880 

Sandy Sher 864-9693 

Gail Holland 927-9773 

Cathy Fondren 927-7606 

Ann Bender 927-9759 
Mary Jane Nystrom 927-9886 

Susan Katz 927-9828 

Dawn Sheeler 864-9885 

Carole Schwartz 864-8803 

Diane Chase 927-9861 



40