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Full text of "Information Please!"

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1966-1967 



In case of emergency call: 



HEAD RESIDENT- 



Telephone Extension 



GRADUATE ASSISTANT 



Telephone Extension 



INFORMATION PLEASE STAFF 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Befh St Clair 

ART EDITOR Sue Vernay 

SECTION EDITORS Barbara P'lquef, Barbara Soper, 
Connie Llffle, Anne Korab, 
Mary Jane Gill, Joy Rumizen, 
Beffy Parker, Bobbi Walfer, 
Sue Pollara, Karen Hanson 

ADVISOR Miss Helen E. Clarke 

Associate Dean of Students 

TECHNICAL ADVISOR Mr. Paul E. Thomas 




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1966-1967 




Contents 

Note from the Editor 3 

Dean's Page --- 4 

AVVS President's Page -. 5 

AWS ... A Place for YOU 6 

Academic Achievements -. 11 

Commuters' Chat 14 

Cultural Corner .._ -... 16 

Extracurricular Excursions --- 18 

Residence Roundup .- 20 

Social Scoop -- 23 

Regulation Reminders 27 

House Rules --- 35 

Index -- 40 

2 




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A Note from the Editor 

The Associated Women Students, of which every 
University of Maryland woman is a member, is 
primarily concerned with the development of each 
woman student — her intellectual, social, cultural. 
extracurricular, and moral growth. 

Our purpose in preparing this book is to help 
you plan your next four years so that you may 
grow in these areas. 

We hope you will read our book and profit by 
what we have tried to assemble here for you. We 
also hope that this will be a guidebook to help you 
through your stay at Maryland. 

It is our wish that you remember Maryland is, 
above all, a friendly campus. Its students and fac- 
ulty are anxious to make you feel happy and at 
home here. With this in mind and a desire to de- 
velop your talents fully, you can't help but succeed 
and treasure your years at Maryland! 

Editor, Information Please 





Soj/M 



We, of the Dean of Students' Office bid you welcome. 

Your main purpose in entering the University is to 
acquire an education. A great part of this you will get 
in the classrooms and the library, from professors, 
books, and from one another. It is also hoped that you 
will recognize and take advantage of the extracurricular 
offerings of the University. 

The Associated Women Students, popularly referred 
to as A.W.S., is the student government organization 
to which all women belong and through which, co- 
operatively with the Dean of Students' Office, they 
establish the rules by which they live. They also strive 
to create a desirable social environment and through 
their activities encourage leadership qualities in women. 

Though the University is large and as such may seem 
confusing at times, there are a great many people here, 
fellow students, faculty, administrators, and staff, who 
are personally interested in your welfare and happiness 
and will be pleased to be of help if you will let them 
know your concerns. 

When you arrive on campus, you will be given much 
information to help you learn your way around our 
community. In addition, regulations applicable to all 
students are set forth in a booklet entitled University 
General and Academic Regulations. The catalog of the 
College in which you register will also set forth certain 
requirements with which you must become familiar. 

Remember, this is now YOUR UNIVERSITY. If we 
in the Dean of Students' Office can in any way assist 
you in taking advantage of and enjoying all that is 
here for you, please give us the privilege of doing so. 

<Jlelen <3^. v Aarkc 

HELEN E. CLARKE 
Associate Dean of Students 



T^^-^ 





Congratulations! You are now a University of Mary- 
land woman! Accordingly, you are also an automatic 
member of A.W.S. — the Associated Women Students. 
Hopefully, you will want to become an active member 
For it is the A.W.S. that establishes the rules and regu- 
lations you live by; and it is A.W.S. that organizes 
campus activities which provide for the intellectual, 
cultural, and social growth of the coed. These activities 
of A.W.S. function only because of and for you. 

We sponsor a wide variety of events from Bridal Fair 
to Big Sister Orientation; from an Orphan's Party to 
Residence Hall-Commuter Affiliation. These are but a 
few of the many opportunities open for you. The list 
of committee chairmen shows our complete range of 
programs. If a specific program isn't already established 
to fulfill your needs, why don't you start one? It's easy 
to do for the president of your residence hall or the 
Panhellenic representative from your sorority meets bi- 
weekly with the A.W.S. Vice-Presidents. One of the 
functions of A.W.S. is to help you enjoy and get the 
most out of your college experience. So get to know 
your A.W.S. Executive Council. Feel free to call or 
write us. We'd love to have you working with us! 

A.W.S. is an organization that wants to function for 
you. Our accent is on the woman and the woman 
is you. Will your accent be on us? 



MAPvY LAFANS 
A.W.S. President 




AWS 

...a place for you 

As a new student at the University of Maryland, 
you may feel lost and insignificant. You want to be 
a contributing member of the University communi- 
ty, but you wonder where to begin and how. The 
answer — AWS ! ! ! 

The Associated Women Students is an organiza- 
tion established to unify all women students. It 
functions throughout the year to promote self- 
government in residences, academic excellence, and 
cultural as well as many special activities such as 
Children's Party, Bridal Fair, Big Sister Programs, 
and the Christmas Program in the Chapel. 

The organization of AWS is based upon election 
and appointment. The officers are chosen in the 
spring by a vote of all women students after a 
week of spirited campaigning. Later, and also in 
the fall, interested students may apply for posi- 
tions on committees. When these positions are 
available, advertisements will appear in the AWS 
Newsletter as well as in the Diamondback. Appli- 
cation forms for committee chairmen and members 
are available in the Student Union, in the North 
Administration Building, and in your residence hall. 

On the residence hall level, the executive council 
is selected by the girls in each residence. As offi- 
cers, some of these girls become members of an 
AWS Council or Board, and they can give you more 
information about AWS work. 

The opportunities for serving the campus through 
AWS are limitless. Whatever your interest, AWS 
will no doubt have a job or project to match it. 
AWS will use your individual talents and serve 
your particular needs. However you must take the 
initiative to become active in AWS. Work through 
your AWS representative^ — ^your direct link to the 
program and projects of AWS. 





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AWS 

Executive Council 



President 

First Vice President 

Second Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Senior Class 

Representative 

Junior Class 

Representative 

Sophomore Class 

Representative 

Freshman Class 

Representative 

Mortar Board President 

W.R.A. President 

U.C.A. Representative 

Judicial Board Chairman 

Coordinator of 

Academic Boards 



Mary Lafans 
Nancy Benjes 
Kathy Cooney 
Elaine Ewing 
Beth Brough 

Carol Lawson 

Ina Hackerman 

Kathy Burke 

To be elected in the fall 
Lynn Beveridge 
Cindy Salzman 
Diedra Patterson 
Sue Waters 
Paula Munninex 
Sandra Rhodes 



AWS 

Committee Chairmen 



Constitution 

Cultural 

Elections 

I.A.W.S. Liaison 

Information Please 

Installation Banquet 

Publicity 



Residence Hall 

Big Sister Program 

Commuter 

Big Sister Program 

Commuter-Residence Hall 

Affiliation 

Bridal Fair 

Calendar Chairman 

State Day 

Historian 

Philanthropic 

Career Convocation 

Glamour Contest 



Karen Turnball 

Betsy Reynolds 

Ginni Cooper 

Rose Katz 

Beth St. Clair 

Margie Litwin 

Art- 
Diane Laudenslager 

Diamondback — 
Stephanie Valentino 

Newsletter — • 
Susan Cerveny 

Jo Ann Brown 

Barbara Grim 

Pat Harrison 
Sara Foster 
Susan Bond 
Vivian Roslyn 
Judi Hoffman 
Tricia Deming 
Carol Worden 
Kathy Seward 



AWS 

Special 
Programs 



A.W.S. has numerous and varied events that 
offer many opportunities for leadership, participa- 
tion, and enjoyment for YOU! If you are interested 
in working on any programs, please do not hesitate 
to contact the chairman. 



Bridal Fair 

When "la Saison de 1' Amour" approaches, when 
thoughts are filled with engagements and June 
weddings, A.W.S. , in conjunction with nationally 
known companies, presents displays of household 
and personal items such as trousseau fashions, 
china, crystal, silver, and kitchenware. In addition 
to furnishing ideas for the bride-to-be, there are 
many suggestions for gifts. The fashion show is 
the highlight of the evening featuring clothes for 
the mother of the bride, attendants, and that all 
important gown and trousseau for the bride herself. 

CHAIRMAN: Sara Foster 



Big Sister Program 
Residence Hall and 
Comfntiter Affiliation 

One of the first new faces to greet an incoming- 
freshman woman or transfer student is that of 
her Big Sister, a specially assigned upperclassman. 
Your Big Sister will introduce and explain to you 
the problems, privileges, and opportunities, both 
academic and social, which are associated with your 
new school. During Registration and Orientation 
Week, a Big-Little Sister dinner and coke date with 
speakers and a fashion show are scheduled. Begin 
now to become less of a number and more of a part 
of the University of Maryland. 

CHAIRMEN: Jo Ann Brown 

Residence Hall Program 

Barbara Grim 

Commuter Program 

Pat Harrison 

Commuter-Residence Hall 
Affiliation Program 



Career Convocation 



This is the newest program sponsored by A.W.S. 
Last spring over 100 companies participated in the 
ALL WOMEN'S CAREER CONVOCATION. The 
100 companies sent representatives to talk with in- 
terested job applicants. Since this is such a new 
program many ideas and helpers are necessary to 
make it a success. 

CHAIRMAN: Carol Worden 



A Wy Reception for 
Head Residents 



To honor the new and the old head residents of 
the men's and women's residence halls, fraternities 
and sororities, a reception is held every fall in the 
Student Union. The head resident is accompanied 
by the president of the group she serves, and meets 
the other head residents at this time. 

CHAIRMAN: To be selected in the fall 




10 




Academic 
Achievements 



The wise Maryland coed begins her college career 
by accepting the numerous responsibilities that are 
bestowed upon her. She should set her sights high 
where the University's paramount goal, academics, 
is concerned. 

As a freshman, she learns the policies and regu- 
lations set by the University. To begin with she 
attends class regularly. These sessions may be 50 
or 75 minutes each and are scheduled two or three 
times a week. Freshmen are not entitled to any 
automatic "cuts" from class except for the second 
semester freshmen who have earned a 3.5 average 
or better the previous semester. 

After attending classes for approximately five 
or six weeks, the coed will begin her first set of 
hourlies. These exams cover the assigned text- 
book chapters, lecture notes, and any required out- 
side readings. When the grades have been com- 
puted, the instructors will have "dean's slips" sent 
to those students who have performed below 
average. In this case, it is to the student's advan- 
tage to consult her instructor about any difficulties 
that may be present in studying the assigned ma- 
terial. This helps to put the course into proper 
perspective. If the student finds that she would 
like to improve her reading and studying skills, 
the Counseling Center in Shoemaker Hall has su- 
perior aids for those who are interested. 

The grade point system at the University of 
Maryland is as follows: A (4 points, superior work) 
B (3 points, above average work), C (2 points, 
average work), D (1 point, below average work), 
F (0 points, failure), and I (incomplete work). 
Anytime during the semester, the student can com- 
pute a tentative average with her known grades. 
Below is a sample semester average which has 



77 



been computed for a student carrying a load of 
16 credit hours. 



Course 


Credit 




Grade Average 


English I 
History 21 
Zoology 1 
Speech 1 
French 1 


3 
3 
4 
3 
3 


X 
X 
X 
X 
X 


C = 2 points 6 
B -- 3 points 9 
B = 3 points 12 
A = 4 points 12 
B = 3 points 9 



16 48/16 = 3.000 

With expanding classroom facilities, the depart- 
mental and the McKeldin libraries, a Maryland coed 
is presented with many advantages for progress in 
learning. All the opportunities for a rich education 
are here; it is the student's responsibihty to look 
for them and make good use of them. 

Honoraries 

Girls who have made outstanding contributions 
in some phase of Uni\ersity hfe may be tapped 
for membership in Alpha Lambda Delta, Diadem., 
Diamond, Mortar Board, Phi Kappa Phi, Who's 
Who or Phi Beta Kappa. All of these honoraries 
with the exception of Phi Kappa Phi, Who's Who 
and Phi Beta Kappa are solely for women. They 
provide incentive for outstanding performance in 
scholarship, service, and leadership on the Mary- 
land campus. 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 

Twice a year, in fall and spring, this honorary 
initiates freshmen women who have maintained 
high academic averages. In order to be eligible 
for membership, a girl must attain a 3.5 average 
for her freshman year. Maryland's Adele H. Stamp 
chapter of Alpha Lambda Delta helps Phi Eta 
Sigma, the Men's scholarship honorary, to sponsor 
a tutoring service for all freshmen students. These 
organizations have as their goal the expansion of 
the cultural and intellectual atmosphere at the 
University. 

DIADEM 

Diadem was established at the University of 
Maryland in 1961 to honor incoming junior women 
for outstanding achievement and potential in lead- 
ership and service. Sophomore women are tapped 
in the spring before their junior year at the 
Women's Convocation. Diadem members also usher 
at school events and lead tours for visitors to the 
campus. The motto of this honorary is "To lead 
and follow with wisdom and understanding." 

12 



DIAMOND 

Sorority women who have made outstanding con- 
tributions to the campus and to their individual 
chapters are given recognition for their achieve- 
ments by membership in Diamond. Tapping is held 
twice each year at Harmony Hall and at the Inter- 
traternity Sing. Each sorority may have a total 
of three girls in Diamond, who may be either 
juniors or seniors. Members serve as hostesses at 
various campus events. 

MORTAR BOARD 

Membership in Mortar Board is the highest honor 
that can be attained by a Maryland coed. The 
national honorary, which was established at the 
University in 1934, recognizes senior women that 
have excelled in leadership, scholarship, character, 
and service. Mortar Board sponsors the Mum Sale 
at Homecoming and entertains freshmen women 
with a 3.0 average at a "Smarty Party." 

PHI KAPPA PHI 

Phi Kappa Phi recognizes superior scholarship 
among seniors in the top 10 per cent of their class. 
Its members, both men and women, are dedicated 
to the maintenance of unity and democracy in 
education. A scholarship is presented by Phi Kappa 
Phi each year to the graduating senior with the 
highest academic average. 

WHO'S WHO 

The selection committee of Who's Who, which is 
made up of a group of student leaders and faculty 
members, can pick a maximum of thirty-six stu- 
dents for membership in this nationwide group. 
Graduating seniors are selected for excellence in 
publications, religion, drama, speech, activities, and 
athletics. Who's Who Among Students in Ameri- 
can Colleges and Universities sponsors a placement 
service for those it honors and also publishes a 
national biography of all the selected students. 

PHI BETA KAPPA 

Phi Beta Kappa is a national honor society which 
extends membership to junior and senior students 
in the College of Arts and Sciences who have 
achieved scholastic excellence. To be eligible for 
consideration for Phi Beta Kappa, juniors must 
have achieved a 3.75 cumulative average and a 
senior must have an overall average of 3.25 or 
higher. There are also total semester-hour require- 
ments in the candidate's major area of study. The 
University of Maryland Phi Beta Kappa Chapter 
held its first undergraduate initiation in 1965. 

75 




Commuters^ 
Chat 



Commuters, don't look so lost and lonely! As a 
commuter, you play an important part on the 
University of Maryland campus. You have your 

74 



own University Commuters' Association which is 
the only body that represents exclusively the com- 
muters' point of view. This organization has three 
very fundamental functions: political representa- 
tion, service to the commuting student, and social 
functions to help the commuter become involved 
in campus activities. 

The first main function of U.C.A. is poUtical 
representation. This year the commuter has two 
representatives voting in the Student Government 
Association. The President and Vice President of 
U.C.A. serve as cabinet members. 

Services to the commuting student is the second 
function. One of the main services is the car pool. 
Through this service, which is co-ordinated in the 
Commuters' Office in the Student Union, commuters 
can find a ride or riders to and from campus. Be 
sure and watch out for this service during Registra- 
tion Week. To the Commuters' Den in the Student 
Union you may come any time to eat your lunch, 
play a game of bridge, study, or just chat with your 
friends. 

Socially, the U.C.A. offers commuters' dances, 
parties, and an annual Play Boy Ball. Intramural 
programs are set up for both men and women, in- 
cluding football, basketball, Softball, swimming, 
and cross country. 

A new program has been formulated by AWS to 
bring commuters closer to the campus through 
association with the women's residence halls. This 
Commuters Affiliation Program gives girls an hon- 
orary membership with a residence hall and an op- 
portunity to participate in parties, fireside chats, 
and service projects. AWS also has a Big Sister 
Program for Commuters which takes place during 
Registration Week. This program includes a coke 
date and a Big-Little Sister dinner, which helps new 
commuters to become acquainted with some aspects 
of campus life. 

As a commuter, it is easy to feel a little with- 
drawn from campus affairs, but there is no reason 
to be. In addition to your own University Com- 
muters' Association, you are welcome to join in 
all the usual campus activities. It's up to you 
to make the same effort to participate in Maryland 
affairs as you would if you lived right on the 
campus. 

The best way to take that first step is to join 
the University Commuters' Association! If you 
wish any additional information or have any ques- 
tions about the U.C.A., don't hesitate to call Sam 
Powell, President of U.C.A. at GR 4-4489 or Mere- 
dith Wilson, Vice President at 656-2571. See you 
in the Commuters' Den ! ! ! ! 

15 



Cultural 
Comer 




Education is a rich and meaningful experience 
which far exceeds the Hmitations of the classroom. 
The cultural program of a college is a major por- 
tion in the learning process of its students. 

The Cultural Committee of the Student Govern- 
ment Association here at Maryland is responsible 
for many of the special cultural events that come 
to the University. Among the personalities to per- 
form here this past year were Ferrante and Teicher, 
Stan Getz, and Boris Goldovsky and his orchestra. 
Also, at the invitation of the Interfraternity Coun- 
cil, Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops Orchestra 
presented a most delightful concert. IFC Presents, 
in the spring, featured Sammy Da\is, Jr. The Sen- 
ior Class brought Roger Miller to perform for the 
campus community. 

16 



Often throughout the year a variety of speakers 
come to campus. The different college organizations 
invite speakers to discuss interesting and current 
topics in their fields. Dr. Galbraith of our history 
department gave a series of lectures on Anglo- 
Saxon History. Authorities on LSD presented a 
panel on the use of the drug. These are only two 
of many lectures that were open to the entire 
campus. The Student Union Board's Speaker Com- 
mittee arranged for speakers in a variety of fields 
with varied backgrounds, for the benefit of the stu- 
dent body. Among those appearing during the past 
year were Dr. Edward Teller, and Senator Joseph 
Tydings. We were especially privileged to have 
Governor J. Millard Tawes speak at the Prayer 
Breakfast. 

Members of our own campus do much to aid the 
cultural program. Maryland's Symphony Orchestra 
presents concerts every Monday, as well as special 
concerts at other times through the year. Last 
Easter our Chapel Choir presented Handel's Mes- 
siah which was particularly well received. Several 
organizations performed shows which were out- 
standing. Modern Dance performed "Catulli Car- 
mina," Aqualiners, "Aquademics," and Gymkana, 
"As We See It." These performances reveal the 
talent of our own students, and offer non-perform- 
ers as well as performers many opportunities for 
becoming acquainted with new types of entertain- 
ment. 

Our drama department during the past year pre- 
sented a wide variety of productions ranging in 
scope from the colorful musical of the University 
Theater's "Showboat," to the stirring tragedy 
of Shakespeare's "Othello." The Experimental 
Theater produced "AHce in Wonderland." Flying 
Follies presented a terrific display of student talent 
in dancing and singing in their production "Pot- 
pourri." We are especially proud of our Madrigal 
Singers who were invited to sing for President and 
Mrs. Johnson in the White House at Christmas. 

It would be impossible to detail all the opportuni- 
ties the University of Maryland provides for its 
students to further their cultural growth. You may 
participate or be a casual observer and still learn 
and find each event enlightening. This year we shall 
have a special show. The Arnold Air Society and 
the Angel Flight are presenting Bob Hope and his 
group of performers who entertain the troops 
overseas. Many other exciting personalities will be 
coming to campus this fall and spring, so watch 
for their posters. We hope you will be a partici- 
pator or a spectator, or both. In any case, enjoy 
the cultural events offered by the University. 

17 




Extracurricular 
Excursions 



As a student at the University of Maryland you 
will find an activity to fulfill your every need. Par- 
ticipation in these activities is an important part 
of your college years. Your talents and services 
are wanted and can be used in many campus com- 
mittees and organizations. There are many oppor- 
tunities for work with the Student Government 
Association and legislative and judicial groups, 
such as the Central Student Court. AWS com- 
mittees include a variety of responsibilities for a 
variety of talents; for instance, the Constitution, 
Cultural, Elections, Bridal Fair, Social and Activi- 
ties, and Big Sister Program Committees. 

For those of you who prefer to lend your talents 
toward your academic endeavors, the University 
sponsors numerous departmental organizations. 
If you are headed for a career in Nursing, the 
LOUISA PARSONS NURSING CLUB might strike 
your fancy. If you have teaching in mind try mem- 
bership in the STUDENT NATIONAL EDUCA- 
TION ASSOCIATION. 

18 



If you are musically inclined, the MADRIGAL 
SINGERS, the MARYLAND GLEE CLUB, OR- 
CHESTRA and BAND are for you. If you prefer 
to dance, you may find the MODERN DANCE 
CLUB the perfect activity. Moreover, the FLYING 
FOLLIES provides opportunities for anyone who 
wishes to participate in a group of entertainers. 

For those who prefer sports and the great out- 
doors, the WOMEN'S RECREATION ASSOCIA- 
TION offers activities in every sports area. Per- 
haps you would like to try the AQUALINERS, 
the FENCING CLUB, or GYMKANA. Or maybe 
you're the adventurous and daring type who would 
prefer the excitement of the SKI CLUB or the 
TRAIL CLUB. 

Perhaps you have literary inclinations, then 
working on the DIAMONDBACK, the CALVERT 
REVIEW, the TERRAPIN, or the ARGUS would 
be just the thing you want. 

If you enjoy the dash and color of a uniform, 
membership in ANGEL FLIGHT is for you. Angel 
Flight is a women's service organization sponsored 
by the Arnold Air Society. As a member of Angel 
Flight you would proudly wear their blue and white 
uniform. Or you might be interested in the Uni- 
versity MAJORETTES or COLOR GUARD. They 
have try-outs in the early fall. 

For the more politically inclined, the University 
political parties, FREE STATE and OLD LINE, 
offer all the limelight and excitement of a national 
political party. If you are more interested in 
national affairs, the YOUNG DEMOCRATS and 
YOUNG REPUBLICANS are for you. 

If community service interests you, investigate 
the possibilities of working with the CAMPUS 
CHEST COUNCIL (philanthropy), the RED 
CROSS BLOOD DRIVES (fall and spring), the 
COMMUNITY SERVICE COUNCIL, or VOLUN- 
TEERS FOR MENTAL HEALTH. The religious 
groups on campus also have much to offer in this 
area. COLLEGE LIFE meets once a week in vari- 
our residence halls and Greek houses. The NEW- 
MAN CLUB, HILLEL, WESLEY FOUNDATION, 
and numerous other religious groups are anxious 
to have you join. 

If your interests are strictly academic, set your 
goals towards a women's honorary. All freshmen 
women obtaining a 3.5 overall average are invited 
to join ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA. 

Whatever your abilities and your interests, the 
University offers YOU an abundance of extra- 
curricular activities. Make your college years 
fruitful ones. Take a few EXCURSIONS into the 
field of activities. You will find it very rewarding! 

19 




Residence 
Roundup 



Congratulations! You're now settled in your 
campus home, and you'll love every minute of it. 
Living in a residence hall is a new and exciting ex- 
perience. The time you spend at your residence 
hall — the many close friendships, the numerous 
study hours, the surprise birthday parties, and the 
nights you stay up studying with other girls — will 
all make up a great part of your pleasant college 
memories. 

When you arrive at your residence hall, you will 
be greeted by your head resident and your big 
sister. At the University of Maryland the head 
resident is your adopted mother, your counselor, 
and your friend. She is always available and al- 
ways eager to have you visit with her. Your big 
sister is an upper classman in the residence hall 
whose purpose is to help you have a pleasing and 
successful orientation period. She will do every- 
thing to make this so. In the larger residence halls 

20 



graduate assistants on every floor. (Don't forget 
to write your head resident's and graduate assist- 
ant's name and telephone extension in the front of 
the book.) These assistants will explain regulations 
and policies to you. They are anxious to answer any 
questions that may arise while adjusting to college 
and residence hall life, and they encourage you to 
come in from time to time for a friendly chat. 

When you enter your residence hall you will have 
at least one, and possibly two roommates. These 
girls, plus the girls on your floor, and even in the 
entire hall may become your closest and lifelong 
friends. The new friendships that you form in your 
residence hall will be a stimulating and educational 
part of your college life. 

Each residence hall elects ofl^icers to help make 
the residence hall an active part of your campus 
life. Once you're settled in your residence hall, try 
to make a special effort to become acquainted with 
your residence officers, judicial board chairman, 
academic, and social chairmen. These girls help to 
insure an orderly and enjoyable living atmosphere. 
The various committees which plan and direct resi- 
dence hall events throughout the year are eager 
to have you as a committee member. By participat- 
ing on these committees you will surely gain the 
maximum enjoyment from each activity. You will 
find that there are numerous committees on which 
to work, as well as many activities to attend. 

Every residence hall is furnished attractively and 
comfortably. In addition, it is equipped with many 
facilities for your convenience, such as a large 
laundry room, candy, soft drink, and milk machines. 
Kitchenettes are provided for storing and heating 
foods. This year, to the delight of every resident, 
the University is doubling the number of telephones 
in the residence halls. All residence halls have 
study rooms furnished with desks, chairs, and com- 
fortable sofas that provide a quiet and relaxing 
study atmosphere for you. When you entertain 
your guests, the residence hall lobby and recreation 
room are always available for your enjoyment. The 
recreation room offers a piano, a television, and a 
ping pong table for your relaxation. 

Your stay in any one of the residence halls — 
one of the new modern high rise residences or in 
one of the residences on the hill — will be thoroughly 
enjoyable if you understand and cooperate with the 
residence hall and AWS rules. Residence hall living 
is certainly a major part of campus life. You will 
soon realize that it means much more than just a 
place to sleep. Becoming acquainted with girls from 
various families and geographical backgrounds will 
surely be an extremely rewarding and enjoyable 
phase of your college life. 

21 



Residence Halls 
Presidents 



Anne Arundel 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Centreville North 

Centreville South 

Denton 

Dorchester 

Elkton 

Montgomery East 

Montgomery West 

Montgomery Center 

Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Wicomico 

Worchester 



Sue Barnes 
Monice Gabor 
Jane Branyan 
Kay Gregory 
Gail Blackmore 
Sharma Wright 
Sue Ann Glackin 
Elaine Ewing 
Nancy Rawlings 
Karen Bradley 
Angelica White 
Betty Pritchett 
Judith Duvall 
Anna Young 
Martha Kazlo 



Sorority 
Presidents 



Alpha Chi Omega 

Alpha Delta Pi 

Alpha Epsilon Phi 

Alpha Gamma Delta 

Alpha Omicron Pi 

Alpha Phi 

Alpha Xi Delta 

Delta Delta Delta 

Delta Gamma 

Delta Phi Epsilon 

Gamma Phi Beta 

Kappa Alpha Theta 

Kappa Delta 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Phi Sigma Sigma 

Pi Beta Phi 

Sigma Delta Tau 

Sigma Kappa 



Terry O'Neill 
Carol Lawson 
Carol Coburn 
Elaine Folk 
Susan Laundrieu 
Pat Roach 
Jane Terzick 
Anne Ulman 
Jan Milliken 
Sheila Deitz 
Gail Holland 
Dannye Crawford 
Gail Bloch 
Marilyn Quinn 
Nancy Chotiner 
Nancy Mott 
Joyce Epstein 
Karen Yablonski 



22 




Social 
Swop 



As you are starting life here at the University, 
don'i neglect the social side of the college scene. 
These years in college will offer you a greater 
number and variety of social experiences than any 
other period in your life. Admittedly, there is more 
to do here than you could possibly fit into four 
years, but that's no excuse to let everything pass 
you by! 

It will take a little courage on your part to strike 
out and explore your new **home." So, don't pack 
up each weekend and run home with the com- 
plaint that you don't feel you belong or that there 
is nothing to do. Give yourself a chance to become 
a part of the activity here at Maryland. 

First of all, you should GET OUT AND MEET 
PEOPLE. Of course, you will get to know your 
roommate and the other girls in the residence hall 
right away, but don't stop there. The University 
is full of interesting people. Go ahead — talk to 
strangers and accept that blind date (if introduced 
by someone you know). If you want to meet more 
people, go to the activities of Freshman Orientation 
Week, the Dink Debuts, and, later on, the Student 
Union dances (every other weekend^ — admittance 
by I.D. card), and the residence hall parties. You 
can even meet people while walking across campus. 
Secondly, you should EXPAND YOUR FIELD OF 
INTEREST. Try doing something "different" now 
and then. Get out of the rut and go to a concert, 
or a discussion, or a play. They are usually a lot 
more interesting than their titles suggest. And, 

23 



finally, don't let things pass you by — FIND OUT 
WHAT IS HAPPENING ON CAMPUS. Looking 
and listening are the keys to any event or activity. 
Look for posters, flyers, and advertisements in the 
"Diamondback". Listen to the people who are in a 
number of activities and to the general campus 
conversation about the coming events. If you need 
further information, don't hesitate. Ask! If your 
fellow classmates don't know the answer, go to the 
Student Government office in the Student Union. 
The S.G.A. members have regular office hours and 
will be glad to answer your questions. 

Here are a few major campus events that you 
may enjoy. Sorority RUSH begins soon after Ori- 
entation is over. Even if you don't care to pledge 
a sorority, it is fun to participate in rush. FRESH- 
MAN ELECTIONS are held during the first weeks 
of school. In the fall there are FOOTBALL GAMES, 
HOMECOMING, and I.F.C. PRESENTS (a pro- 
gram of professional entertainment). FALL 
GREEK WEEK is a week of athletic and social 
activities sponsored by Panhel and I.F.C. Numer- 
ous mixers, socials, and concerts take place during 
the autumn months and on into the winter. Toward 
the beginning of the second semester, classes start 
holding their PROMS. SPRING RUSH is also held. 
The main events of the second semester are 
SPRING WEEK, GREEK WEEK, BRIDAL FAIR, 
and HILL AREA COUNCIL PRESENTS. Spring 
Week includes campus-wide Olympics, Ugly Man 
on Campus and Campus Chest Queen Contests, 
College Casino, and Senior Class Presents. The 
highlight of Spring Greek Week is I.F. Sing (a 
vocal competition among the Greeks). There are 
also many Campus Chest projects going on during 
second semester. Campus wide ELECTIONS also 
create quite a stir with their conventions and 
campaigning. 

Maryland's campus is never dull! If you're will- 
ing to attend programs — concerts, parties, sports, 
etc. — life, socially, can be very exciting! 



24 



Graces and Grooming 



Part of your social responsibility as a lady is 
your appearance. Often this is the only criterion 
by which you are judged. Dress in the style most 
becoming to you. The most striking women wear 
stunning color combinations and dress simply. 
When you are in doubt about what to wear to an 
event, choose school clothes. Most often they will 
be appropriate. And remember, that while you are 
walking a cigarette looks bad dangling from your 
mouth or your hand. Don't talk with a cigarette 
in your mouth, it looks funny bouncing up and 
down. Finally, don't chew gum in public, the dairy 
is where a cow belongs. 

In spite of the informal atmosphere here, man- 
ners, the mark of a lady, should not be neglected. 
Common courtesy and kindness will cover most 
situations. Remember to stand whenever a dean, 
housemother, or an older woman enters the room 
or comes over to speak to you. Women do not 
usually shake hands with one another, but it is 
quite proper for a woman to offer her hand to a 
gentleman. Shake hands firmly — a hand shake is 
often the basis for forming those important first 
impressions. 

When performing introductions, introduce the 
man to the woman first ; or a younger person to an 
older person if they are of the same sex. In other 
words, the honored person has people introduced 
to him. Fox example, "Miss — , may I introduce my 
Father? Father this is Miss — ." Relax and be as 
informal as you can. After a while, introductions 
are as easy as smiling. 

Contrary to earlier rules of etiquette which com- 
pletely forbade kissing in public places, it is now 
permissible to give family or friends a brief kiss 
of greeting. However, it is in very bad taste to dis- 
play affection that will attract the attention of the 
passersby. This is embarrassing to many people. 

Sometimes it is necessary to discreetly indicate 
some of the finer points of etiquette to your date. 
For example, remain in the car until he opens the 
door for you. When in a crowd looking for seats 
without aid, your date always proceeds you. Hesi- 
tating at closed doors gives him the opportunity 
to open it for you. Remember girls, guys are gen- 
tlemen only if you are ladies. 

Being a student at the University enables you 
to mature socially. You will meet many new people 
in many different situations. Through it all you 
will want to act as you are — as a lady. 

25 



Suggested Dress 



Athletic Events 



Fall Sports 
heels 



sport suit, sheath, 



Spring Sports — skirt and blouse, 
shirtwaist, flats 



Campus Wear 



Skirts and blouses, sweaters, 
shirtwaists, knee-hi's, hose, 
sneakers, flats 



Cultural Events 



Suit, sheath, heels, gloves 



Dances 



Campus Wear — for informal 

dances 

Cocktail dress, dressy sheath, 
heels, gloves 

Junior and Senior Proms — long 
gowns are often worn 



Fraternity Parties 



Rush — sheath, dressy shirtwaist, 
flats or heels 

Weekend Parties — school clothes, 
or specified 



Rush 



Suit, sheath, heels, or specified 



Dining Halls 

Monday — Friday 
Breakfast and 



*Casual clothes 



juuncn 
Dinner 

Saturday 

Sunday 
Breakfast 
Dinner 


Skirt or dress 
*Casual clothes 

Skirt and blouse, flats 
Dress or coordinated outfit, hose, 
heels 


Student Union 
First and 

Second Floors 
Lower Levels 


Skirt or dress, *casual clothes 

for e\ening movies 
^Casual clothes 


Administration 

Buildings, 
Classrooms, 
Library, Chapel, 
Residence Lobbies 


Skirt or dress 


Inclement Weather 


*Casual clothes according to your 
discretion 



'Casual Clothes: 

1. Casual clothes include tailored slacks and bermudas 

2. Sweatshirts, dungarees, levis and cut offs are not 
considered casual clothes, and are not worn on 

campus 



26 



Please read the following rules carefully. 
They are the official regulations at the 
University. If you are living on campus 
they will be an invaluable aid when you 
are studying for your residence test. 




Regulation 
Reminders 



Official Rules 



SIGNING IN AND OUT 

Signing in and out is a means to aid the head 
resident when trying to locate a student in case 
of an emergency. 

This procedure is followed whenever you expect 
to be out of the residence after 8:00 P.M. Signing 
in and out must be done by YOU except in cases 
when you are out of your residence past 8:00 un- 
expectedly. In this case, you should call the desk 
of your residence and have your head resident, 
graduate assistant, or the desk receptionist on duty 
sign out for you. Your residence clock is the OFFI- 
CIAL TIME and will be the only indicator of your 
return time to the residence hall. 

The residence hall Judicial Board is responsible 
for penalizing students who make errors in signing 
in and signing out. 

27 



Types of Sign-Oiits 



I. DAILY SIGN-OUTS 



A. GENERAL REGULATIONS 

1. The looseleaf notebook at the reception desk 
is to be used daily for signing in and out 
if you expect to return the same day. 

2. This procedure is to be followed whenever 
you expect to be out of the residence past 
8:00 P.M. 

3. Your destination must be as specific as pos- 
sible. 

4. The first initial and the last name of the 
person with whom you are going should 
be indicated. 

5. Your expected return indicates the time at 
which you expect to sign in. No penalty will 
be given for returning after your indicated 
return time unless you return to the resi- 
dence after your curfew. 

6. Record the exact time of your return by the 
residence clock. 

7. You must initial all sign-ins YOURSELF. 

8. The latest time you may sign out or change 
your sign-out on the daily sign-out sheet is 
your usual closing hour. 

9. Monday night is a closed night. Every girl 
must be in her residence at 10:00 P.M. 

10. Residence Hall students may not spend the 
night at sorority houses or other Residence 
Halls Sunday through Thursday nights. 



II. SPECIAL TYPES OF DAILY SIGN-OUTS 

A. EARLY MORNING LEAVES — The earliest 
time you can leave the residence is 6:00 A.M. 
If a special situation arises which necessitates 
your leaving before then, secure permission 
from you head resident the day before you 
plan to leave. 

B. SPECIAL LATE LEAVES— Special permission 
to return to the residence after your regular 
closing hours may be granted for the purpose 
of attending social, cultural, and sports events. 

28 



1. GENERAL REGULATIONS: Arrangements 
for such leaves off campus must be made 
with your head resident in advance. You 
must present your ticket to your head resi- 
dent before you go. If this is impossible, 
give her your ticket upon returning from 
the event. When you sign out for any special 
late leave you should indicate your closing 
hour as your "expected return" time. 

2. TYPES OF SPECIAL LATE LEAVES 

ON CAMPUS — Social, cultural, and sports 
events which are University sponsored. After 
the function is over, you are given 20 min- 
utes to return to your residence. 

Monday Nights — Special late leaves for a 
Monday night may only be granted by the 
head resident. 

Requests for special late leaves not listed 
should be taken to AWS Residence Hall 
Council for general leaves two weeks in 
advance. 

OFF CAMPUS — cultural and social events. 

Daily — Special permission to attend cul- 
tural events such as those held at Constitu- 
tion Hall, Lisner Auditorium, National The- 
ater, and Arena Stage may be granted by 
the head resident. 

Weekends — Everyone attending will be 
granted 2 A.M. permissions the night of the 
Sophomore Prom, the Junior Prom and the 
Senior Prom. 

ON OR OFF CAMPUS — Organizational 
events. 

Special late leaves for organizational events 
such as University Theater and the Diamond- 
back must be cleared by the Head Resident. 
Request should be made at least one week 
in advance by the secretary or the head of 
the organization. A 2.0 average for the pre- 
vious semester is required. 



in. OVERNIGHT SIGN-OUTS 

An overnight leave is a leave allowing you to 
spend the night away from your residence and is 
based on the range of permission granted by your 
parents on the Parent's Authorization Form. 

A. GENERAL REGULATIONS 

If you plan to be away from your residence 
overnight, sign out on your card at the recep- 



29 



tion desk. Indicate the necessary information 
and move your tab. As you face the book, move 
the tab to the left when you go out, to the right 
when you return. 

The latest time you may sign out for an 
overnight is 11:00 P.M. on Tuesday, Wednes- 
day, Thursday, and Sunday nights if you are 
a sophomore, junior, or senior; and 10:30 P.M. 
if you are a freshman. On Friday and Satur- 
day nights the latest sign-out time for an over- 
night is 12:00 midnight for all women students; 
a woman who wants to sign out for an over- 
night must come in and sign out herself. 

After leaving the dorm, you MAY NOT 
CHANGE your signout to an overnight by call- 
ing in unless your parents call to ask that you 
stay at home overnight. 

Monday night is a closed night and everyone 
must be in her residence by 10:00 P.M. Over- 
nights cannot be taken. Weeknight overnights 
are granted according to academic classification. 
Freshmen (fewer than 28 credits) are allowed 
three overnights per semester. Sophomores 
(passed 28 to 55 credits) are allowed six over- 
nights per semester. Juniors (passed 56 to 87 
credits) are allowed nine overnights per semes- 
ter. Seniors are allowed unlimited overnights. 

B. TYPES OF OVERNIGHTS 

(A woman student may take overnights in ac- 
cordance with her parents permissions.) 

1. Daily Overnight — An overnight taken on 
Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday night is 
considered as one of your overnight leaves. 

2. Weekend Overnights — All women students 
have unlimited weekend overnight leaves. 
The weekend includes Friday and Saturday 
nights. 

3. Special Overnight Leaves 

Overnight leaves, such as Choir trips, are 
cleared through the Dean of Students' Office 
and requests should be made at least two 
weeks in advance. 

All women have free overnights or late 
leaves on the night preceding a one-day 
holiday and the nights closing all vacation 
periods, not on the holiday itself. 

Dormitory residents visiting the sorority 
houses for the weekend must sign out on 
their residence hall sign-out card. They must 
sign in at the sorority house in the overnight 
book. While at the sorority house, they must 

30 



sign out on a daily sign-out sheet that is 
designated for guests. Upon leaving, the 
dormitory resident has the sorority head 
resident give her a form that states any 
errors that she has made. This form must 
be turned in to the residence hall head resi- 
dent when the girl signs in. 



IV. ERRORS ON OVERNIGHTS AND DAILY 

1. Serious Offenses (A serious offense could 
result in your being dismissed from the 
residence) 

a. Failure to sign out on an overnight sign- 
out. 

b. Deliberate falsification of destination. 

c. Signing in or out for another resident 
student. 

2. Common Errors 

a. Failure to sign in and/or out on daily 
sheet 

b. Incorrect use of A.M.'s and P.M.'s 

c. Failure to move tab 

d. The use of dittos on sign-outs 

e. Failure to initial the sign-in column of 
the card or to sign in or out in the cor- 
rect space. 

f. Incorrect dates 

g. Failure to put time under "Expected Re- 
turn" 

h. Failure to sign out on the correct book 
or card 



LATENESS 

Resident women are urged to call the desk of 
their residence if they have the slightest reason 
to doubt that they will be able to sign in by their 
curfew. 

Ten emergency minutes are alloted each girl per 
semester. These are to be used ONLY IN CASE 
OF EMERGENCY. Judicial Board Chairmen, 
Graduate assistants, and house directors keep a 
record of late minutes and will view chronic or ir- 
responsible use of your late minutes with concern. 
Any lateness over these ten emergency late minutes 
will require an appearance before the residence 
judicial board. 



31 



QUIET HOURS 

The University recognizes the importance of a 
quiet atmosphere in relation to good study con- 
ditions. Below is a basic policy regarding quiet 
hours that is followed within your residence. 
Quiet Hours are continuous except: 

11:30 A.M.— 1:30 P.M. Monday through Friday 
4:30 P.M.— 7:30 P.M. Monday through Friday 

Saturday and Sunday quiet hours are somewhat 
relaxed in the afternoon. 

DEFINITIOX OF NOISE 

1. Noise is the sound (s) heard outside of a room 
with the door and/or the windows closed. If in 
doubt as to just how much can be heard, it is 
suggested that students be educated to check 
themselves by closing the door to their room, 
and listening to sounds (music, etc.) from the 
hall. 

2. Noise is a sound which can be heard by a girl 
in her room with her door closed. This may be 
noise from the hall, phone, or another room. 

3. Noise is not necessarily an occasional outburst 
such as a spatter of laughter or a solitary shout 
for someone. Noise is that disturbance in the 
quietness that is continuous and bothersome to 
anyone within the immediate area. 

WARNING SYSTEM 

1. Any girl may issue a warning by informing her 
Judicial Board representative after having in- 
formed the offender. 

2. Warnings are cumulative on a yearly basis. 

3. The warning (in duplicate) must have the fol- 
lowing information: 

a. Name of offender 

b. Name of reporter 

c. Reason for warning 

d. Time and place 

4. A copy of the warning is given the offender by 
a Judicial Board representative. The second 
copy is placed in the Judicial Chairman's file. 

5. Warnings may constitute an automatic penalty 
as prescribed by the Judicial Board. A prescrib- 
ed number of warnings necessitates the offend- 
er's appearance before the residence Judicial 
Board. 

6. The offender has, at all times, the right to appeal 
a warning or a penalty to her residence Judicial 
Board. 

32 



Philosophy of the Judicial Board 

The women's judicial program operates on the 
basis of two underlying principles. The two prin- 
ciples apply whether disciplinary action is being 
administered by a judicial body or by a staff mem- 
ber residing in a resident unit, or by a member 
of the Judiciary Office. 

The first principle is that the disciplinary action 
is aimed primarily at assisting the individual in- 
volved to realize her mistake and to help her re- 
direct her behavior and energies along accepted 
lines. The second principle is that every effort is 
made to encourage students themselves to assume 
the responsibility for their own discipline and be- 
havior. 

In carrying out these principles, great emphasis 
is placed on the consideration of each individual 
case rather than attempting to have matching 
penalties for specific offenses. In order to assure 
students of every opportunity for a fair hearing, 
due process is carefully observed and every student 
has the right to appeal any action of a lower ju- 
diciary body to one of a higher nature. 

Because of the individual nature of discipline, 
emphasis is placed upon the due process procedure 
to insure a fair hearing rather than upon elaborate 
codes of laws and regulations. By insuring a fair 
consideration of all factors and evidence in the 
case, arbitrary and authoritarian action by an ad- 
ministrator or by student groups is avoided. 

Emphasis is also placed upon patterns of be- 
havior. A student who consistently violates a rule 
or rules is in much greater need of attention than 
one who makes a small error and corrects herself 
immediately. 



^ 



RESIDENCE HOURS will be found on the next 
page. 



33 



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34 




House Rules * 

FIRE DRILL REGULATIONS 

Fire drills are held frequently to insure familiar- 
ity with the procedure to follow in case of a real 
fire. 

All girls must wear a long coat and street shoes. 
They must carry a towel (which may be held over 
the face) for protection against smoke and flames. 

The room windows must be shut, the lights on, 
and the door open. The fire drill proctors will 
check the rooms. Girls must leave the building 
silently, walking in a single file, and remaining 
silent throughout the entire drill. 

Each of the following offenses requires appear- 
ance before the residence Judicial Board: 

1. Failure to appear 

2. Failure to appear in proper attire 

3. Misconduct during the drill 

ROOM INSPECTION 

Room inspection will be made once a week by 
the head resident or graduate assistant. For safety 
and health reasons these rules should be followed: 

1. Food and dishes must not be taken from 

the Dining Hall. 

2. Coke bottles should be rinsed and returned 

to the cases provided for this purpose. 

3. The only electrical appliances allowed in 

the rooms are fans, hairdryers, electric 
clocks, radios, and phonographs. 

4. Shades must be drawn after dark when the 

lights are on. 



Safety, security, and maintenance regulations 
which AWS helps to enforce. 

35 



5. Calling or talking from windows is pro- 

hibited. 

6. Food must not be kept on window sills. 

7. Food kept in rooms must be stored in metal 

containers with tight covers. 

8. Only coffee, tea. or soup may be prepared 

in residence kitchens, except for a resi- 
dence party. 

9. Except for residence party food, only milk, 

juice or fruit may be kept in residence 
refrigerators and these articles must be 
plainly labeled with the name of the 
owner. 

10, No hot plates, coils, irons, or sunlamps are 
permitted in the rooms because they are 
fire hazards. 

SUX-BATHING 

Sun-bathing is allowed only in those areas speci- 
fied by the AWS. Girls will be notified in the spring 
as to specific locations. 

Sun-bathing is not permitted on sorority prop- 
erty except in enclosed areas which have been ap- 
proved by the Panhellenic advisor. It is not per- 
missible to sun-bathe on porches overlooking town 
streets. 

RECEPTION LOBBIES 

With the head resident's consent, reception lob- 
bies may be used for studying after closing hours. 

RESIDENCE DOORS 

All doors except the front door must be kept 
locked after dark or no later than 8 p.m. The 
doors will remain locked until 8 a.m., which is the 
earliest time one can enter the residence. 

PETS 

Pets of any sort are not allowed in the residence. 

RESIDENCE HALL PERSONNEL 

As a member of the University Housing Office, 
the Head Resident has responsibility for the wel- 
fare of all women students living in her residence 
hall. She is the official hostess for the hall, the 
house manager, the advisor to hall student govern- 
ment, and a counselor to the students in the hall. 
The staff in each hall is supplemented by either 
an Assistant Head Resident or Graduate Assistants 



who aid and assist the Head Resident. The resi- 
dence hall staff is available to all students with 
problems or those who need assistance in planning 
and carrying out programs and activities in the 
residence. 



Guests 



OVERNIGHT GUESTS 

A friend may spend the night in a girl's residence 
on Friday and Saturday if the head resident agrees 
and if there is room for her. Because of similarities 
of interests and limited accommodations, these 
overnight guests should be of college age (i.e. no 
younger than sixteen). There are no guest rooms 
in the residences for parents or other adults, and 
adults may not stay in the student's room during 
the regular session. Guests must be registered 24 
hours in advance with the head resident. One 
should show his guest how to sign in and out and 
acquaint her with the residence customs. The resi- 
dent is responsible for her guest and her guest's 
infraction of the rules. 

VISITORS TO WOMEN'S RESIDENCES 

If a girl comes to visit for the evening, i.e. not 
overnight, she must leave the residence by the 
following times: 

Monday 9:45 p.m. 

Tues.-Thurs. and Sun. 11:30 p.m. 
Friday and Saturday 12:45 a.m. 

She should sign in the guest book at the desk when 
she comes. 

VISITING MEN'S RESIDENCE HALLS AND 
OFF CAMPUS RESIDENCES 

Women may visit men's residences during call- 
ing hours (see General and xlcademic regulations) 

or for regularly scheduled parties which are on 
the weekly calendar. Women are not permitted to 
visit men's rooms or off-campus rooms or apart- 
ments. 

VISITING FRATERNITIES 

Women may visit fraternities during house call- 
ing hours or during functions registered on the 
University Social Calendar, which is sent to all 
residences each week. The head resident or an ap- 
proved chaperon must be present at all times that 
coeds are in the fraternity house. Before a mem- 
ber may bring a coed into the fraternity house, he 
must obtain permission from the head resident. 

37 



Parties on the week nights may last until 8:30 
p.m., weekends until 12:45 a.m. 

General Regulations 

MOBS AND RIOTS- 

Any student who participates in a riot or is in 
the neighborhood of a crowd which is creating a 
disturbance or encourages a disturbance in any 
way is liable to be charged for damages and is 
subject to suspension. 

ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES- 

Possession or use of alcoholic beverages, includ- 
ing light wines or beer, is prohibited on the campus, 
in any residence, or in any fraternity or sorority 
house. 

According to Maryland state law, it is unlawful 
to sell or furnish any alcoholic beverages at any 
time to a minor (i.e. a person under 21 years of 
age) either for his own use or for the use of any 
other person. 

ACADEMIC 

See the handbook, General and Academic Reg- 
ulations. 

REGISTRATION OF SOCIAL EVENTS 

Social events are registered in the Social Direc- 
tor's Office by the social chairman of the residence 
where the event is held. The deadline is Tuesday 
for events held the following Friday through 
Thursday. Large events must be planned with the 
Social Director and registered ten days ahead. 

MASTER CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

A master calendar of events for the year is kept 
in the Social Director's office for the convenience 
of students and faculty. The dates of major events 
for the year are submitted by organizations before 
May 15. Dates for the fall printed SGA Calendar 
must be submitted by August 15, for the spring 
calendar by January 15. Consult this calendar be- 
fore you plan a major event. 

SPACE RESERVATION FORM 

This must be filled out for any event where 
campus facilities are used. Forms may be obtained 
in Mr. Weber's office, North Administration Build- 
ing. 



* Denotes a general University regulation which 
is supported by AWS and enforced by Central Stu- 
dent Court. 



DINING HALL HOURS 






WEEKDAYS 








Breakfast 


6:30 


A.M.- 


-8:15 A.M. 


Lunch 


11:10 


A.M.- 


-1:10 P.M. 


Dinner 


4:30 


A.M.- 


-6:15 P.M. 


SATURDAY 








Breakfast 


7:30 


A.M.- 


-8:30 P.M. 


Lunch 


11:30 


A.M.- 


-1:00 P.M. 


Dinner 


4:30 


A.M.- 


-6:00 P.M. 


SUNDAY 








Breakfast 


8:30 


A.M.- 


-9:30 A.M. 


Dinner 


11:30 


A.M.- 


-1:20 P.M. 



Health Service 



The Health Service provides the following ser- 
vices : 

1. Treatment for any illness, including physi- 

cal injury, or referral to outside doctors. 

2. Assistance in cases of mental and emotional 

disturbance. 

3. X-ray and laboratory work deemed neces- 

sary by the Health Service or by a per- 
son's physician. 

4. Hospitalization here when necessary. 

5. Student teacher's Health Certification. 

6. Verification of illness in cases of absence 

where proof (i.e. Health Service records 
or a note from a physician) is given. 

7. Desensitization in cases with allergies when 

requested by a physician. 

8. Recommendations concerning medical rea- 

sons for withdrawal from University or 
readmission, or reinstatement or reduc- 
tion of course load. 

9. Public Health Service function (Food Ser- 

vice; Student residences on campus, etc.) 

10. Modify physical education courses tempor- 

arily or permanently. 

11. Health advice to students. 

12. Physical examination of employees for em- 

ployment. 

The infirmary across from the Student Union 
is always open for your convenience. 

39 




Index 



Academic 


38 


Phi Beta Kappa 


13 


Alcoholic Beverages 


38 


Phi Kappa Phi 


13 


Alpha Lambda Delta 
AWS Committee Chairmen 


12 
8 


Philosophy of the 
Judicial Board 


33 


AWS Reception for 
Head Residents 


10 


Quiet Hours 


32 


Big Sister Program 


9 


Reception Lobbies 


36 


Bridal Fair 

Career Convocation 


9 
10 


Registration for 
Social Events 


38 


Cultural Late Leaves 


29 


Residence Doors 


36 


Curfew Hours 


34 


Residence Hall Per:onnel 


36 


Definition of Noise 


32 


Residence Hall Presidents 


22 


Diadem 


12 


Residence Hours (chart) 


34 


Diamond 


13 


Room Inspection 


35 


Dining Hall Hours 


39 


Signing In and Out 


27 


Early Morning Leaves 


28 


Space Reservation Forms 


38 


Fire Drills 


35 


Special Late Leaves 


28 


General Regulations 


28 


Sorority Preiidents 


22 


Graces and Grooming 


24,25 


Suggested Dress 


26 


Infirmary 


39 


Sun Bathing 


36 


Late Leaves and Overnights 


29 


Types of Overnights 


30 


Lateness 

Men's Calling Hours 


31 


\'isiting Men's Residences 
on and oflF Campus 


37 


(residence halls and 
sororities) 


34 


Visitors to Women's 
Residences 


37 


Mobs and Riots 


38 


Warning System 


32 


Mortar Board 
Organization Late Leaves 
Overnight Guests 
Overnight Sign-outs 


13 

29 

37 

29,30 


Weekend and Holiday 
Late Leaves 

Who's Who 

Women's Calling Hours 
(fraternities and men's 


29 
13 


Pets 


36 


residence halls) 


34 



40 



^<Mt 'pon^ 



KSSfS 

has a place for YOU in its 
many activities.