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Full text of "Inglenook, The (1904)"

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| Tl „, ifce Inglenook,Jul-jD,1904 


Re 9. 05 

Accc»«i«»n No.j7*7.3.7 Call NocV'Sj- 

Bethany Theological Library 

343S W. VanBuren St. 
Chicago, III. 


RULES 

Tin-, book may he kept for two weeks 
with privilege of renewal for two weeks. 

Fine of two cents charged for each day 
hooks are overdue. 





DATE DUE 







































































































































































A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 






V 






^ C 



Q 
00 

A 








Dear Lord, may I be ever as a saw, 

A plane, a chisel, in thy hand, — 
No, Lord, I take it back in awe, 

Such prayer for me is far too grand; 
I pray, O Master, I may lie 

As on thy bench the favored wood; 
Thy saw, thy plane, thy chisel ply, 

And work me into something good. 

— George MacDonald. 





i | c j .i t ' j '' i ' ;"i"t i 'i '' t '' i"l '' i ' | t ' i t i ' | '' t i T ' l '' l i 



a 



m 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



July 5, 1904 



$ 1 .00 per Year 



Number 27, Volume VI 



The Kinkaid Homestead Act 



Sidney, Nebraska, May 9th. 1904. 
bo. L. McDor 
lization Agent. U. P. R. R. Omaha, Nebr. 
Dear Brother: — Hope that the Colonization Department of 
Iflc Railroad will let It be generally known amongst 
the Brethren that they can secure MO acres of government 
under the new homestead law In this district. There la 
between 150,000 and 200,000 acres of it for fi 

eed members here, as we are bul few in number and have 
a good churchhouse. Here Is a town of 1,200 to 1.300 Inhab- 
itants, good churches of other denominations and good schools. 
e lived here eighteen years. 

edi J. U. Sllngluff. 
Minister. 

y. Nebraska, May 9th, 1904. 
"igh, 

R, Omaha. Nebr. 
Dear Sir: — I hope you will gel a larg< >1 Brethren 

lea Land can be obtained easily 
: the new Kinkaid law. The possibilities in western 
breaks Youra truly. 

(Slgi 

iugh. 
Izatlon Agent. l\ P. R. R, Omaha. Nebr. 

Itigle- 

nook it permits a settler to 

enter t">40 »■ ' In Nebraskn instead of 160 acres. 

Tl • ould like to have 

Brethren In I There Is also 

those 
ice raw land un-h I law 

■ 
more meml 

Hope you will maki tmongat the : & and 

m will avail themselves of tl i»me- 

■ for them- 
Fraternally yours. 

M M. Kline. 

P. s. — W< originally. ' 

M. If. Kl: 



gh, who fnr years has been favorably 
known to the Brethren of 1 1 (s the Coloniza- 
tion Agent of the Unit 1 will be at the 
service of all Br< mg the line 
of this road. Write him at I • raaka, for FREE prlnt- 
tter. 



(9 



Homeseekers' Excursions 

To enable intending settlers to reach Western Nebraska and the lands affected under the Kinkaid Act the 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Has put in effect Homeseekers' rates on the first and third Tuesdays of each month at ra fare 

plus S2.00 from its Eastern Terminals, Council Bluffs, Omaha, Kansas City 
and Leavenworth to Sidney and North Plan 

Homesteaders can thus visit the United States Land Offices and get proper information 
without any unnecessary expenditure of time and mon- v. 




i PRIZE CONTEST Bow t0 Get a V alnable Preminm " 

WE ARE GOING TO GIVE A FEW VALUABLE PREMIUMS, AND ALL OUR INGLENOOK FRIENDS 

ARE INVITED TO ENTER THE CONTEST. 



1. The one sending us the most new subscribers to the Inglenook for the remainder of the year at 25 

cents each, or with premium as per our offer* at 75 cents each, will receive one set Literature of All 
Nations, containing 10 volumes, weight, 26 pounds. Subscription price, 

2. The one holding second place will receive a splendid ladies' or gentlemen's watch (whichever pre- 

ferred). The watch is equal to one that regularly retails for about, 

3. The one holding third place will receive a good Teacher's Bible, Arabian Morocco, divinity circuit. \v<>rth 

4. The one holding fourth place will receive the book " Modern Fables and Parables," worth 

5. Each person sending 10 or more subscriptions receive a good fountain pen, either ladies' or gentle- 
men's, worth, 

Cash must accompany each order. 



$25.00 
8.00 
3.00 
1.25 
LOO 



*See our offer on page following reading matter, this issue. 

THE LUCKY ONES. 

Here is your chance, dear reader, to get a valuable premium. All have the same opportunity. The one who- 
goes at it at once, with a determination to win, stands a good chance to get a $25 set of books free. 

. It is an easy matter to get subscriptions for a paper like the Inglenook. especially when you offer it for half 
price. You ought to be able to get nearly all your neighbors and friends. 

Do not say that you do not have a good territory and it's no use to try. Our experience leads us to believe that 
one place is as good as another. Some places where we least expect subscriptions we get the most. It is up to you 
whether or not you get this fine set of books. SOME ONE IS GOING TO GET THEM. Let every loyal 
Nooker get out and hustle. Aim at the top. Don't be satisfied with anything less. All these prizes are going to 
be given to some one, and time will tell who the lucky ones are. Go to work at once. Don't delay. Who will 
send the first list? (In sending your list, please mention that you are entering the contest.) Send all orders to 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



I 382,000 Acres 

| Open for Settlement 

Rosebud Indian Reservation, South Dakota, open for 
settlement in July. Registration for these valuable lands, 
and permits to go on the reservation, at Chamberlain and 
Yankton, S. Dak., July 5 to 23. Drawing of lots, under 
Government control, at Chamberlain on July 28. 

The best places from which to enter the reservation are 
Chamberlain, Geddes and Platte, reached only by the 

Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railway 

Round-trip tickets to above points will be sold for one 
and one-third fare of the one-way rate July I to 22 (min- 
imum rate, $9.00), good to return until August 31. Lib- 
eral stop-over privileges. 

For illustrated folder with valuable maps and complete 
information about rates, routes and train service, ask the 
ticket agent or send two cents for postage to 

F. A. MILLER, 

General Passenger Agent, 
CHICAGO. 




* 
* 

! 
i 



Via Dubuque, Waterloo and Albert Lea. 
Fast Vestibule Night train with through 
Sleeping Car, Buffet- Library Car and Free 
Reclining Chair Car. Dining Car Service 
en route. Tickets of agents of I. C. R. R. 
and connecting lines. 

I A. H. HANSON. G. P. A., CHICAGO. 



In the Inglenook... 

There is always room for wide- 
awake advertisers, who can appre- 
ciate the superior advantages of 
our journal. Write us. 



-the: inglenook. 



The 
Mount 
Campbell 
Tract 



in Fresno County, 

California, 

Promises to become ilic leading 
fruit-growing section of California. 
Land is cheap, water abundant, loca- 
tion healthful and soil unsure 
The soil is especially adapted to the 
orange, grape, fig, orchard fruil 
falfa and general farming. 

Plans are now forming for a colo- 
ny of the Brethren on this tract. J. 
S. Kmis. proprietor of the old 
sion farm at Covina, Cal., having al- 
ready purchased land in thi- district, 
which has been inspected by other 
prominent members of the church. 

Maps and information by 

W. M. ROHRER, 

Fresno, Cal. 

I CAP GOODS f 

? ======= $ 

* LARGEST ASSORTMENT, f 

1> BEST VALUES . f 

i I 

* + 

* Send postal card for ires samplai •> 
.;. and NEW premium list. 

A. L. GARDNER, 

* 229 12 St., H. £., Washington, D. C. .5. 

Mention the [ROLBKOOX «hen wrtttnr. jtll'-i'.* 



The Real Attraction 

of a College is its educational atmos- 
phere. Our courses range from Busi- 
ness up through the regular College . 
Do you want music? Mount Morris of- 
fers superior advantages, not at Chicago 
prices, but within your reach. Gradu- 
ate from our Music Course are well 
trained and become successful teachers. 
Not all can be expert musicians but all 
can be materially aided by a good teach- 
er. Our Music Department is first-class 
in every particular. 

MOUNT MORRIS COLLEGE. 
J. E. Miller, Pros. Mt. Morris, HI. 



ORANGE AND WALNUT 

grove for sale. Five acres in south- 
ern California; 4!4-year-old trees, al- 
ternate rows. The choicest of land. 
trees, and location. An unusual op- 
portunity for a person with small 
capital who desires quality. Must 
sell to clear another place in same 
locality. 

Address: 

E. I. AMES. 

6332 Peoria St. Chicago, III. 

30U3 ""> 



■ IK .1.11 wrilitu 




COLORADO 



SEND FOR A BOTTLE OF 

Q UELINE! 



It Will Stop that Redness, 
Burning and Soreness of Your 
Eyes. Oood for all Inflamma- 
tions of the Eye. Only 35 cts. 

THE YEREM1AN MEDICAL CO., 

Quels M. Yercmlan, President, 

BATAVIA. - - ILLINOIS. 

IBI-SH I *h»n wrUliw 

FEW PEOPLE 

Know the value of X*lqald Spray as a 
horr.« cure for Catarrh. Hay Fever. Head 
colds and other diseases of the respira- 
tory organs. 

Persons desiring to try this highly 
recommended treatment should Immedi- 
ately write to E. J. Worrt, 61 Main St., 
Ashland Ohio. 

He will gladly mall any reader of the 
Inglenook one of his new Atomizers and 
Liquid Spray treatment on Ave days' tri- 
al, free. 

If It gives satisfaction, send him $2.00. 
two-fifths regular price; If not, return 
It at the expired time, which will only 
cost you twelve cents postage, and you 
will not owe him a penny. It kills the 
Catarrh microbes In the head and throaL 

23tl3 



AT ANNUAL MEETING. 

We were at Carthage. Mo., during 
the Annual Meeting and met many 
of our old friends and correspondents 
among the Brethren. 

THE NEW BOOKS. 

We distributed five thousand of the 

new I'm"!] Pacific Railway folders. 
"What People Say about the South 
Platte Valley," while there. 

SEND FOR ONE. 

We have a iew hundred "t these 
books left for free distribution and if 

you will drop us a runt will send you 
a copy by lir^t mail. 

OUR CARTHAGE EXCURSION. 

Several members accompanied us 
on our excursion t" Sterling and Sny- 
der and are well pleased with the 
country and some will locate. 

AGENTS WANTED. 

We would like t.. arrange with a 
member in every town in the country 
1.1 distribute these folders and get up 

a party i'w I 

LIBERAL COMMISSIONS. 

We offer liberal commissions and 

11 any lands you may 
Lirself. 

A FREE PASS. 

We also arrange lor special I 

ursion parties and free trans- 
ient who gets up the 
party to Colorado and return. 

SPECIAL BARGAINS. 

We have special ba n irri- 

] town property dur- 
ing the summer month- and now is 
the nine to see the country and in- 

SNYDER TOWN LOTS. 

Parties who will agree t.. distribute 

dvertising matter .nii"ng their 

friends can secure six Snyder town 

lots for $100. 1 h -.11 for $25 

each and you can make $50 profit by 

ng them at this 1 

TROUT FISHING IN MOUN- 
TAINS. 

We will run special cheap rate cx- 
cursions from Sterling to Cherokee 
1'ark every week tins summer. This 
l- one of the finesl resorts in Colo- 
The iri'iii fishing is grand and 
the scenery sublime. 

COME TO COLORADO. 

If j cmplate a trip for 

health, pleasure, recreation or invest- 
ment let us hear from you and wc 
will be pleased to give all information 

The Colorado Colony Co., 

Sterling, Colorado. 

I7tl3 M.ni.f.fj llM IX3LISOOI whM) <mUn|. 



Over lOO Yea 

Of severest trials and tests in all climes, in all lands, in all seasons, 
has demonstrated the fact that 

of 

All remedies ever used or compounded to purify, cleanse and strengthen 

the blood and rid the human system of disease, 

none has met with the 



That has attended the use of that purest and best of 
household remedies, 

DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER 

It is beneficial and an absolute cure for all ailments originating in the 
BLOOD, the fundamental principle of life. 



Diver Complaint, Constipation, Headache, Biliousness, Rheumatism, Dyspepsia, Drop- 
sy, Erysipelas, Ague, Scrofula and all skin diseases and pains in the bone 
system yield to the powerful influence of this tried 
and true greatest of all remedies. 

DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER 

Is handled through specially appointed retail agents onlv. If there is no agent in 

your locality, address the sole manufacturer of the genuine article, 

who is a grandson of the original discoverer, 

DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 

112=114 S. Hoyne Avenue, 

CHICAGO, ILL. 

(Cannot be had at drugstores. Remember this.) 



^ V*> \*> \*> \*/ V*/ \l> V*> \*/ \l> \^ \*/ \*/ \*/ i*/ ii> \*> V*/ \l/ \*/ \^/ \*> i*/ \*> \*/ i#> \*/ V*/ \*/ U/ \l/ v*> \*> \*/ \*/ \*> **/ \*/ 1#> \i/ 'fe- 

Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



1 IDAHO 



$ 



is the best-watered arid State 
winds, destructive storms and 
mate it makes life bright and 
We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer 
change for the general improvement in your condi 
account of health, we believe that Idaho will meet b 
and sensible thing to do; that is, go and see the coun 
swer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger 
fares to investigate thoroughly a new country saves 
Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all prin 
for yourself. Selecting a new home is like selecting 



in America. Brethren are moving there because hot ^ 

:yclones are unknown, and with its matchless cli- ^ 

worth living. ^ 

to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a ^ 

tion in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on ^ 

oth requirements. There is, however, only one wise '^ 

try for yourself, as there are many questions to an- £ 

work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad ^ 

thousands of dollars in years to follow. ^ 

cipal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see ^. 

a wife — you want to do your own choosing. ^ 



Round=Trip Homeseekers' Excursion Tickets 

Will be sold to points in Idaho as follows: West of Pocatello on first and third Tuesday of May, 
August, September and October, 1904. To points north of Pocatello tickets will be sold only in May 
and October, 1004. The rate will apply from Missouri river points, and from St. Paul, Chicago, Bloom- 
ington, Peoria and St. Louis. Tickets to Idaho points will also be sold by the Union Pacific, from sta- 
tions on their lines in Kansas and Nebraska. Rate will be one regular first-class fare for the round trip 
plus $2.00, with limit of 15 days going. Return passage may commence any day within the final limit of 
21 days from date of sale of tickets. Tickets for return will be good for continuous passage to starting 
point. 




PAYETTE VALLEY HOME.-Five Years from Sagebrush. 



Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 80-acre tract, covered with sage brush. 
Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to wheat. Yielded 30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres 
to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sown in February 
or March the yield would have been much larger. 

Alfalfa was sown with the grain and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 
oats. 

Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to 5 pounds each, four of 
the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) E. L. Dotson. 



S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. 

J. E. HOOPER, Agent, Oakland, Kansas. 

Mention the INGLENOOK i 



D. E. BURLEY, 
G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R., 



Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. Fine ^ 
Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat, Oats and Barley. 



Salt Lake City, Utah. ^_ 



-felMSLEMSOK 



Vol. VI. 



July 5, 1904. 



No. 27. 



OLD-FASHIONED NOOKERS. 



There's an old-fashioned house in a quiet, shady grove 

And an old-fashioned couple live there; 
There's an old-fashioned gate by the old-fashioned road 

And an old-fashioned mat by the chair. 
There's an old-fashioned woman sitting there 

Knitting a pair of old-fashioned hose. 
She's an old-fashioned cap on her old-fashioned head 

And she's dressed in her old-fashioned clothes. 

There's an old-fashioned clock on the old-fashioned wall 

With an old-fashioned pendulum and hands. 
There's an old-fashioned shelf o'er the old fireplace, 

With its bright pots, kettles and pans. 
There's an old-fashioned man sitting there — 

He's dreaming the hours away. 
May he live many years with his old-fashioned wife, 

May his dreams grow brighter every day. 

There's an old-fashioned carpet on the old-fashioned floor, 

It was woven in an old-fashioned loom. 
There's an old-fashioned latch on the old-fashioned door; 

In the corner stands an old-fashioned broom. 
There's an old-fashioned Bible on the stand 

And an old-fashioned hymn book near by. 
They have sung those songs, lo! these many, many years. 

May they sing them when in glory up on high. 

* ♦ * 
SHOTS AT RANDOM. 



The greatest rogue is the pious one. 

Wild oats never produce solid grain. 

A wild goose never lays a tame egg. 

Sift a sluggard — all chaff — no grain. 

Better kill a lion while he is a cub. 

* 
Taffy is always preferable to epitaphy. 

You can't pick up sand with a magnet. 

Idle men tempt the devil to tempt them. 



An ant can be busy, but he can't make honey. 
Flowers are larger in fragrance than in form. 
Grown people feel the truth, but children tell it. 

Truth is truth, even when dressed in homespun. 

* 
They zvho knozv nothing are confident of everything. 

* 
The world's shepherd can never feed the Lord's 
sheep. 

A civil tongue is a better weapon than a loaded re- 
volver. 

* 

A stingy man would have to stand on his head to 
see heaven. 

* 

An ugly thing is ugly and you can't make it pretty 
by liking it. 

It is possible to misrepresent some people by speak- 
ing well of them. 

* 

The true artist is always telling the zvorld what 
God has told him. 

* 

It will puzzle posterity to tell why some men have 
been given statues. 

* 

A single rose in the sickroom is worth more than a 
bouquet of carnations on a grave. 
* 
One of the best proofs that the Lord knows all 
things is that he did not put eyes in tlie back of a 
titan's head. 

* 

You may notch it on de palin. sir. 
You may carve it on de wall, 
Dot de lii'er up a toad frog jumps 
De ha'der he will fall. 



626 



THE INGLENOOK. 



A WORTHY MARK OF RESPECT IN INDIA. 



BY GALEN B. ROYER. 

Through the kindness of Elder Wilbur Stover, 
missionary for the Brethren at Bulsar, India, the writ- 
er was permitted to read the pages of a copy of the 
Christian Patriot published in that country. In it was 
an interesting editorial on the late move of Lord Cur- 
zon, viceroy of India. This ruler of India has directed 
that the buildings where leaders in missions once la- 
bored shall be set apart and preserved, in token of 
the high esteem in which the Indian government holds 
the men who labored. It is a grand idea, not so much 
that one place on this earth is better than another, but 
because those who come after and know of the work 
done by a Carey, a Hartin, and men who have lived 
likewise, will realize that they are standing in the very 
spot where those noble men labored, and will be in- 
spired to still greater efforts. Then, too, where does 
Christianity want a better compliment from the gov- 
ernments of the world? Not that she should stoop to 
them, but that they who are in power should be will- 
ing to recognize the silent influence of the Gospel in 
heathen lands. But let the following interesting lines 
be read and the reader will see a new phase to mission 
work in foreign lands : 

What Indian that knows what is the blessedness 
of being a Christian will not feel proud, if pride is 
justifiable in any case, that the house of William Ca- 
rey, the building used by the missionary chaplain, Hen- 
ry Martin, for public meetings and private prayer, 
the church built and the house occupied by Schwartz 
at Tanjore, and the residence of Dr. John Wilson — 
Ambroli House, Girgaum, Back Road, Bombay, are 
to be permanently marked as holy places to be visited 
and venerated by all pilgrims in the future. They 
were one and all spiritually-minded men, who set no 
value on earthly gains and honours, though thev were 
thrust upon them and who, while serving the God 
that they loved and worshiped, habitually identified 
themselves with the people of this country for whom 
they had left their country and race. William Carey 
was the father and originator of all vernacular liter- 
ature in northern India and Maharashtra, and it was 
he who produced the literary languages that the mod- 
ern Babu and Maratha write. Henry Martin was a 
being of seraphic character, whose fervor glorified the 
chastity of his cultured natives. Schwartz was as 
simple and unsophisticated as a child of nature, whose 
Christian piety therefore was of universal attraction 
and power; and in Dr. John Wilson manifold charms 
blended into one harmonious whole and produced a 
melody of life and character that regaled the imagina- 
tion and gladdened the hearts of all races and classes 



of people. He was not an ascetic in appearance, but 
essentially so in spirit. He had not taken the vow of 
poverty and did not wear a costume of outward sin- 
gularity; but his innate humility and amiability of 
spirit raised him to the position of the highest saints, 
whether of antiquity or the Middle Ages ; and his ever 
youthful countenance, glorious with a smile of supreme 
benignity, produced sunshine wherever he went. 
None feared to go to him ; none was ever repulsed 
by him. While a Governor or Viceroy sat in his sim- 
ply furnished drawing-room conversing with him, the 
humblest native student or acquaintance could have 
access to him, his door being never guarded by a surly 
chaprasi or a wolfish dog. The Ambroli Mission 
House was not like a bungalow of a European mis- 
sionary or layman ; it was a dharma shala, a temple, 
or church, where all found free admittance. There 
was no social feast held under the Padri's roof at 
which some Indians were not present or a prayer-meet- 
ing convened to which Indians, Christians and non- 
Christians were not invited. No matter where Dr. 
Wilson was, or what he was doing, he was always as- 
sociated with the people of this country; and he was 
proud to feel that he had loyal Indian friends and 
students about him to participate in his joys and sor- 
rows. To the Europeans he was equally attached, 
and his highest joy was to see both these races — the 
Indians and Europeans — meet each other as members 
of a common brotherhood under his roof. This re- 
ligious enthusiasm did not narrow his sympathies, but 
widened them ; and the man who had assailed the re- 
ligions of the Hindus and Parsees and Mohammedans 
with such success that they were enfeebled forever, 
at least, so far as Bombay was concerned, had his 
most devoted friends and admirers among the highest 
and most erudite of their adherents ; and they would 
wait on him at his house to do him honor. He was 
as generous in his benefactions as he was ardent in his 
sympathies, and there were, all sorts and conditions of 
men besieging his door and occupying his parlor with 
petitions, verbal or written, for help. There was the 
Englishman that came for a recommendatory note for 
some post of high honor and emoluments in the serv- 
ice of the government ; or a Parsi for light on the tra- 
ditions of his race and religion ; or a Hindu to go with 
him to some temple to decipher its hieroglyphics and 
read its history ; or a Jew from Arabia or Tartary 
needing funds to retrace his steps homeward, or to 
visit the holy land of his fathers. There was no one 
that met with any rudeness from that absolutely per- 
fect gentleman. 

The government found in him a pillar of strength 
whose counsels helped them to steer their ship of 
state in safety between the rocks of European and 
Indian interests. While he lived and labored as the 



THE INGLENOOK. 



627 



friend of the native and foreigner, the government did 
not need the aid of its regiments of soldiers or parties 
of marines to keep the peace of the town ; and even 
when in 1857 the Europeans in the city of Bombay 
were alarmed by reports of secret plots and seditious 
unrest, the word of Dr. Wilson calmed equally the 
official and the unofficial sections of the European com- 
munity. Dr. Wilson offered to walk through the lanes 
and gullies of the most dangerous parts of the town 
alone in the dead of night without any fear of moles- 
tation, and the government listened to his pacifying 
demonstrations. 

The Ambroli Mission House, consecrated by the res- 
idence and labors of the Rev. Dr. John Wilson, for 
nearly half a century, was the cradle of young Bom- 
bay's birth and childhood. In it men of the first gen- 
eration of educated Indians received their training, 
and met, afterwards, for discussing questions of so- 
cial and moral improvement. The first English essay 
on social subjects composed by Dr. Bhau Daji, Ganpat 
Lakshamanj.i, Daboda Pandurang, Bal Shastri Jam- 
bekar and a host of others were produced under the 
inspiration of the apostle of Ambroli and read under 
his presidency before the Debating Society, started 
by him under his roof. 

* * * 

THEY DIED BY VIOLENCE. 



PIKE'S PEAK. 



BY J. G. FIGLEY. 

I have somewhere seen the statement that the mur- 
der of rulers of countries goes in cycles and periods, 
that the " stars " proclaimed it ! At any rate the fol- 
lowing rulers have died by violence : Eglon, king of 
Moab, was killed by Ehud ; Absalom, who revolted 
against his father, David, was caught by the head in a 
tree and was killed by darts ; king Nadab, son of Jero- 
boam, was killed by Baaza ; king Ela was killed by 
Zimri ; king Ahaziah was killed by Jehu ; Athalia was 
killed by Jehoida ; Jehoiakim, Jeconiah and Zedekiah 
died in captivity ; Crcesus, Astyages, Darius, Dionysius 
of Syracuse, Pyrrhus, Perseus, Hannibal, Jugurtha, 
Ariovistus, Cassar, Pompey, Nero; some think Alex- 
ander the Great was poisoned ; Otho, Vitellius, Domi- 
tian, Richard II., Edward II., HenryVI., Richard III., 
Mary Stuart, Charles I., of England ; kings Henry I., 
II., III., IV., V., and President Carnot of France; 
Alexander II., czar of Russia ; Alexander and Draga, 
of Servia ; Elizabeth, of Austria ; Presidents Lincoln, 
Garfield and McKinley, of the United States. Verily, 
it is true that " uneasy lies the head that wears a 
crown," for where one attempt to kill a ruler has been 
successful, there are many that failed to accomplish 
their object. 

Bryan, Ohio. 



BY RILLA ARNOLD. 

Pike's Peak is the Mecca of American tourists, 
if one is to judge by the crowds of people from every 
section of the country who go there annually. Ranch 
men and cattle men from the plains, miners from the 
mountains, farmers from the Middle West, merchants, 
office .men, students and teachers from everywhere, 
mountaineers and " Colonels " from old Virginia and 
farther south, and even the little old lady from " Bost- 
ing," are to be seen there. Capitalists and laborers, 
the strong and the sick, young and old, they are all 
there, and are all one people, for the time being, with 
the same aims and ambitions, to see all that can pos- 
sibly be seen and to go up the Peak. 

There are three ways of ascending the mountain, 
the old way of walking by the trail, riding a burro 
or by the Cog Road. A great many walk — the air 
and scenery intoxicate — they want to walk. One lady 
went there for her health last summer who could not 
walk a block when she arrived, but was there only 
one week until she walked to the top and back — twen- 
ty-six miles in all. A good way is to go by easy stages 
as far as your strength will allow. It may be only 
a few miles or to the Halfway House, but it is well 
to remember that life is too precious to risk it un- 
necessarily. The effects of the high altitude are very 
severe on most people — hemorrhages and prostration 
resulting frequently. Riding a little burro is a very 
good way — slow but sure ; but if one is rather timid 
the shocks received by watching the animal balance 
himself on a rock almost in midair are more than the 
effects of walking. The Cog Road is the safest and 
easiest, but it lacks the spice of adventure of the other 
two and, amid such grandeur, to get into a car and 
have a little engine push you, does not appeal very 
strongly to most tourists. This Cog Road is said to 
be the most remarkable of the climbing passenger 
railroads in the world. It was completed in 1891, 
at a cost of a half million dollars. It climbs, in the 
nine miles of its length, to a height of 14.147 feet 
above sea level. It makes the ascent in three hours, 
and a hundred people make a load. The cost of a tick- 
et is five dollars. 

The best time to be on the Peak is at sunrise, when 
the scenery is gorgeous. There are several places 
along the trail where a magnificent view of the plains 
can be had. There are many beautiful pines and 
springs of cool, sparkling water along the trail. As 
seen from Colorado Springs or the Gateway of the 
Garden of the Gods, Pike's Peak is very beautiful. 
It was discovered November 13, 1806, by Major Pike. 

Milford, hid. 



628 



the inglenook. 




MARLBOROUGH, MICHIGAN. 



MARLBOROUGH, MICHIGAN, HAS SOLVED THE 
TEMPERANCE PROBLEM FOR ALL TIME. 



BY C. R. KELLOGG. 

An Important Suggestion for Those Interested in this 
Great Work. 

There is perhaps no greater problem confronting 
the American people to-day than that of temperance. 
Many and various are the plans by which its advocates 
are attempting to cope with this great evil. The ef- 
fort has chiefly been along the lines of law. In Ohio, 
any city, ward or township that votes against the liq- 
uor traffic can have it prohibited. Local option is a 
feature in other States. Yet to face the question fair- 
ly, it must be admitted that all these methods do not 
eradicate the evil, and the problem is by no means set- 
tled along such lines. 

Under such circumstances the fact that ordinary 
business men, bringing to this problem only native 
shrewdness, have succeeded in settling it in a way 
which it seems no human ingenuity can surmount, 
calls for more than a mere passing notice. It offers 
interesting and valuable suggestions. 

The town of Marlborough, Mich., in which this 
problem has had such a fortunate solution, is in what 
was once the lumber district of western Michigan. 
When the lumber passed away, the rough and lawless 
elements drifted into the small towns and hamlets, 
and this made the liquor interests very strong there. 
There was little for the people left, as the land had 
only pine stumps interspersed with second growth oak, 
making it fit for grazing only, but whatever else failed, 
the liquor interests seemed to thrive, and this too at 
the expense of what improvement might have been 
made. 

There was a general mark of unprogressiveness on 
everything. At Baldwin Junction, some three miles 
north of Marlborough, there were only two painted 
houses in the entire town, when the company first be- 
gan operations. With no organized resistance against 
the elements of rum and lawlessness, it was realized 
that it would never do to let them exert any influence 
with the workmen of the company. The officers of 
the company, every one of whom is a firm Christian, 
were especially concerned, lest such a state of affairs 



should occur, and in this emergency they consulted 
with Mr. Howard H. Parsons, one of the leading and 
most active directors of the company. Mr. Parsons 
entered into this matter heart and soul, — making it 
his sole aim to establish here a community that would 
be the center for good Christian influence, sobriety and 
thrift. 

He encouraged ministers to visit the new town, hold- 
ing meetings at the hotel, and advocated very strict 
regulations. But it soon became evident that the liq- 
uor element would gain a foot-hold unless radical 
measures were resorted to. 

It was then decided to incorporate Marlborough as 
a village, and a charter was drawn up, and presented 
in the form of a bill at the legislature in Lansing. The 
limits of the village were included in the land be- 
longing exclusively to the Cement Company, and the 
latter in all its deeds inserted the provision of for- 
feiture of land and buildings thereon as the penalty 
for selling or giving away any liquors, except such 
as are prescribed as a medicine, and these can be ob- 
tained only at a drugstore. 

The result has worked admirably. There is not a 
cleaner or more model town in Michigan. There is 
not a saloon or jail. The workmen are steady, sober 
and reliable. The contrast is a matter of comment. 
Not a more quiet or orderly village can be found any- 
where. 

This plan puts an effectual motive in the way of 
liquor selling for all time, and is worthy the serious 
attention of all who are fighting this evil. The 
Marlborough Land and Improvement Company, with 
Mr. Parsons as president, was one of the results of 
this work. They purchased the land of the cement 
company and organized themselves to build up a tem- 
perance town. The officers of this company co-oper- 
ating with Mr. Parsons are all like him, practical 
business men, — yet men of high ideals. Col. F. E. 
Farnsworth, the manager and treasurer of the com- 
pany, gave up his position as cashier of the Union 
National Bank of Detroit, to come and live at Marl- 
borough. He is a director of the Union National 
Bank. 

There are now about five hundred people here. The 
town is beautifully laid out with wide streets, parks 
and a boulevard skirtings the lake front. It has a beau- 






THE INGLENOOK. 



629 



tiful hotel lighted by electricity, heated by steam and 
modern in every way, a school and business blocks, 
with large hall in which Sunday services, Sunday 
school and Christian Endeavor meetings are held. 
$2,500 has been raised toward a $10,000 church. It 
is not yet decided what denomination it will be. Ev- 
ery dollar subscribed is entitled to a vote in this de- 
cision. 

No man not sober and industrious will be employed 
by the cement company, nor will he be allowed to locate 
in the village. 

The number of people employed by the Great North- 
ern will eventually be 1,200 to 1,500, which will make 
a town of 4,000 people. Healthfulness of locality in 
such a case is very important. Marlborough has es- 
pecial advantages in this way. Anyone afflicted with 
asthma and hay fever can find almost instant relief. 
The air is cool and dry, and there is an abundance 
of pure water. Its chief distinction, however, lies in 
the fact that it is the only town in Michigan that has 
settled the liquor question forever. 

Detroit, Mich. 

♦ * * 
BILLIARD BALLS MADE OF MILK. 



A CALIFORNIA HOSPITAL AND ALMSHOUSE. 



" Milkstone," or galalith, is manufactured in the 
following manner : By a chemical process the casein 
is precipitated as a yellowish brown powder, which is 
mixed with formalin. Thereby a hornlike product is 
formed. The substance, with various admixtures, 
forms a substitute for horn, turtle shell, ivory, cellu- 
loid, marble, amber and hard rubber. Handles for 
knives and forks, paper cutters, crayons, pipes, cigar 
holders, seals, marble, stone ornaments and billiard 
balls are now made of skimmed milk. The insolubil- 
ity of galalith, its easy working, elasticity and proof 
against fire make it very desirable. Already 20,000 
quarts of skimmed milk are daily used for this purpose 
in Austria. 

$ $ $ 

AN UNSENTIMENTAL FACT. 



The fact that Andrew Jackson had no children 

slightly mars the sentiment of the announcement that 

his granddaughter will have a prominent position at 

the Woman's Building at the St. Louis Exposition. — 

Washington Post. 

$ * $ 

READ GOOD LITERATURE. 



Young man, young woman, get the best thoughts 

of best writers ; you cannot afford to be without the 

constant companionship of good thoughts, and good 

thoughts of others create good thoughts in yourself. 

*J» *$» ♦ 

Men lose wisdom just in proportion as they are 
conceited. — Beecher. 



BY M. M. ESHELMAN. 

Five miles south of Stockton, California, on the 
Southern Pacific Railway, on the right side, one may 
read, over a three-arched gateway : " San Joaquin 
County Hospital and Almshouse," and a walk of about 
one-fourth of a mile brings one to a set of grand 
buildings in a ten acre park set to beautiful shrubbery 
and flowers. There are six large buildings and an 
annex, besides an electric power house and a steam 
plant and many other smaller buildings to the rear 
of the main structures. Surrounded by the six main 
edifices is a patoi or park green with grass the year 
round and set to flowers in nice niches. Five of the 
large two story buildings, used for wards for the sick 
and dining and cook, rooms, have lower and upper 
porches. Those facing on the patoi or inner park 
afford pleasant seating places for both the poor and 
the hospital invalids. Indeed the entire surroundings 
impress one rather with the idea that it is a series of 
magnificent hotels for the enjoyment of the rich than 
a hospital for the poor and infirm. 

The county owns 440 acres of land. The buildings 
cost $75,000, and their capacity is 240. The average 
attendance is about 175. Thirty-five cows afford 
enough milk but not quite enough butter. The garden 
furnishes enough vegetables. The poultry yard is 
kept up with four incubators, and the hens do a great 
deal in supplying the thousands of dozens of eggs 
used each year. The land cost $17,600. The heating 
plant cost $9,000, the electric plant $5,000 and a fire 
protection is going in at a cost of $4,000. 

My wife and I were shown through the wards where 
the beds and walls and floors are kept scrupulously 
clean and the cooking and eating rooms are also spa- 
cious and cleansed every day. The cellar, with its 
dairy products, is neat and sweet. We were in the 
room occupied lately by Elder H. R. Holsinger who 
took treatment for his ailments and had an attendant 
day and night and an excellent doctor. Such patients 
are not paupers but hospital patients and pay their ex- 
penses, which are very moderate. In fact if a man 
or woman cannot pay they get the treatment free. It 
is not " a poor house " as eastern people are taught 
a poor house. California puts forth her best for the 
afflicted and if too poor to support himself lie is given 
a good bed, good food and good enough shelter, flow- 
ers to look at and to smell, and papers and hooks to 
read and the Gospel preached to him free. Some very 
wealthy people are found at these hospitals, having 
undergone surgical operations. 

A complete drug department, surgical outfit, baths 
and every modern convenience grace this humane in- 
stitution. An artesian well affords pure soft water. 



630 



THE INGLENOOk. 



THE MEAT PACKING INDUSTRY. 



BY W. C. FRICK. 

Very few people have the slightest idea of the enor- 
mity of the packing- industry as it is carried on in the 
United States. 

The plains and corn lands of the western and west 
central part of the country furnish grazing and other 
food for thousands of cattle, horses, sheep and swine, 
which, having attained their growth, are shipped to 
the various stock markets of the world to be sold or 
converted into food products. 

In the United States upward of one hundred and 
fifty firms are extensively engaged in the packing busi- 
ness and nearly all have their products inspected by 
officials of the United States government. 

The bulk of the packing industry is carried on in 
the middle west, though most every State in the north- 
ern half of the Union claims a greater or less share 
of it. 

The most important firms engaged in this industry 
together with their most extensive plants are : 

Armour and Company, at Chicago, Kansas City, St. 
Joseph, South Omaha, and Ft. Worth. 

Swift and Company, at Chicago, Kansas City, St. 
Joseph, South Omaha, and Ft. Worth. 

Nelson Morris and Company, at Chicago, Kansas 
City and St. Joseph. 

Omaha Packing Company at Chicago, St. Joseph 
and South Omaha. 

Swartzschild and Sulzberger at Chicago, Kansas 
City and New York. 

G. H. Hammond and Company at Chicago, Detroit, 
St. Joseph and South Omaha. 

Cudahy Packing Company at Wichita, Kansas City, 
South Omaha and Portland, Oregon. 

Libby, McNeil, and Libby at Chicago, concerned 
mostly in canning meats. 

Indianapolis, St. Paul, Cincinnati, Los Angeles and 
various other cities are quite extensively engaged in 
the packing business also. 
'Chicago is the largest packing center in the world. 
The Union Stock Yards of Chicago, packing district 
■included, covers an area of nearly seven hundred acres. 
In these yards are facilities for handling over 450,000 
animals proportioned as follows: cattle, 75,000; hogs, 
50,000 ; sheep, 80,000 ; horses, 6,000. ■ Horses, sheep 
anasswine are sheltered during cold weather but cattle 
are exposed at all times. 

The Stock Yards and Packing Companies furnish 
their own water, light and sewer accommodations. 
Two hundred and fifty miles of railroad and twenty- 
five miles of streets furnish ample facilities for hand- 
ling cattle and meat products. 



Each company is equipped with from twenty-five 
to one hundred teams of the finest horses and wagons 
on earth. Armour and Company have progressed so 
far as to install an electric car line for the purpose 
of handling freight between the various parts of their 
plant. 

Upward of 35,000 people are employed by the com- 
mission and packing firms of Chicago. The greater 
part of these workmen are organized. 

Forty minutes witness the complete slaughter and 
dressing of a beef, thirty-three of a porker, and thirty- 
five of a sheep. 

The following figures will give an idea of the enor- 
mity of the packing business as operated in Chicago 
during the past winter. These figures represent the 
number killed per hour : 

Cattle. Sheep. Hogs. 

Armour and Co 225 560 1,000 

Swift and Co., 240 560 860 

Nelson Morris and Co., 195 350 500 

G. Hammond Co., 170 225 400 

Swartzschild and Sulzberger, . 100 230 450 

Anglo-American Co., 25 55 600 

Boyd and Lunlam. . .". no no 400 

Besides these over a dozen smaller, but by no means 
unimportant, plants operate in Chicago. 

Packing house employees work on an average about 
eight hours a da)' the year round. 

To get a well-defined idea of the way the work is 

conducted one must see it done. This is but a weak 

description of the greatest industry of the middle west. 

* * <-> 

THE CITY OF KEY WEST. 



BY W. R. FRY. 

The city of Key West is the most southerly city 
of the United States. It is built on a coral reef two 
hundred miles south of Tampa Bay and about sixty 
miles west of the mainland. Its population is some- 
where near twenty thousand. The people are distinct- 
ly classed by four nationalities, viz., Conchs, Cubans, 
negroes and Americans. Mosquitoes are to be found 
at all seasons of the year, much to the annoyance of 
persons from other places who are compelled to make 
a visit to this beautiful place, but the natives do not 
seem to mind it. The climate is essentially tropical 
and it is the only city in the United States where 
neither snow nor frost have ever been seen. During the 
winter months occasionally a northerner strikes the 
city, lowering the temperature, when the poor natives 
shiver and overcoats are in demand. Stoves are un- 
known. Northern people at first wonder why the 
houses, or shacks, have no chimneys. 

Key West is reached by steamers from New York 
to Port Tampa. The city proper covers the western 



THE' INGLENOOK. 



631 



end of the Key and is densely settled. The city boasts 
of only six brick buildings. The rest are one-story 
shacks that never saw paint nor whitewash. The 
business shops are also a failure. On some there is 
not even a sign. As to soil there is none. What takes 
the place of it is merely triturated coral. A pick is 
invariably used with which to make garden. Vege- 
tation is confined to a few cocoanut trees sprinkled 
here and there. 

Living is comparatively cheap. Seventy-five cents 
will satisfy the ordinary man for a week, though the 
unfortunate person from the North is generally 
charged from four to six dollars a week for a little 
"grits" and "grunts" (fish). 

Generally speaking the heaviest work of the natives 
is sitting around doing nothing, and every one takes 
his turn at it without a murmur. Every day an auc- 
tion is held on the open street where anything may be 
bought from a mule to a knitting needle. It is no 
strange sight, when passing a house, to see four or 
five goats, half a dozen hungry-looking children, and 
as many dogs, with pigs and chickens in numerous 
quantities, all of which are privileged characters. The 
restaurants are noted for their power to heal all kinds 
of stomach trouble. A picture of one of these res- 
taurants might interest the Nookers. First it must 
have no ceiling, greasy, smoky walls, lighted with one 
or two kerosene lamps. A limited number of small 
tables of which no two are the same size, and upon 
each of these tables a can of condensed milk and a 
bowl containing sugar and flies. Now we have a stalk 
with six or eight bananas, and some cigars and a lit- 
tle candy. Now introduce twenty or thirty Cubans 
with wrinkled linen trousers, greasy undershirts, straw 
hats, the majority of them with slippers on with no 
stockings. The proprietor must be a dirty fellow too, 
in fact, worse than his customers. And now, around, 
above and over all spread a thick layer of flies, with 
an odor of decaying fruit, olive oil, tobacco, garlic 
and coffee. And then let everybody talk at once, wave 
their hands in gestures, while the proprietor has an 
argument with someone every few minutes, and on 
the outside a lump of boys chewing sugar-cane and 
swearing in Spanish. Now let a cloud of smoke over- 
spread the scene and blot out the whole thing from 
view. 

Key West, Fla., 122 Co. C. A. 

AN IRRIGATION PROBLEM. 



How can any storage reservoirs, which the Govern- 
ment might build at the head waters of the Missis- 
sippi or the Missouri, play any part in the diminution 
of such floods as the present one? is a question fre- 
quently asked. The high-water mark at St. Louis has 



reached over seven feet above the danger line, which 
means an enormous volume of water going by every 
minute and it may well be questioned whether in a 
hundred years the Government could build reservoirs 
with sufficient capacity to appreciably mitigate this 
evil. 

A feature of this flood storage, said Guy E. Mitchell, 
Secretary of the National Irrigation Association, 
which may not be generally understood, but which 
would undoubtedly accomplish the desired results may 
be termed a " secondary storage." The water storage 
proposition applied to the Missouri and its great trib- 
utaries involves the question of the irrigation of the 
vast arid domain through which these rivers flow. 
If irrigation^ storage reservoirs were constructed on 
these rivers, it is estimated that as much as thirty-five 
million acres of present desert land would be reclaimed. 
The principal season of growing crops for this area 
would be April, May, June, July and August, and the 
reason that the lands are not irrigated at present is 
that while there is plenty of water in the first three 
months, during July and August when water is ab- 
solutely necessary to mature the crops, these streams 
are reduced to mere threads. If the storage reservoirs 
were built they would supply water for this land dur- 
ing July and August, during the three preceding 
months the water for this great area of land would 
be drawn directly from the streams themselves. By 
means of canals and ditches almost incalculable quan- 
tities of the flood waters coming down during April, 
May and June, which cannot be stored in the reser- 
voirs, would be taken out of the rivers and spread 
upon this land which would take it up like a sponge, 
water which would go down the Missouri river and 
down the Platte river and down the Arkansas river 
into the Mississippi and thus add to the flow of the 
torrent there. 

Under such a system of irrigation the effect would 
be the same as though it had been possible last week 
to spread out the great flood of the Missouri, the Ar- 
kansas and the Platte, and flood millions of acres of 
farming land in Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas, Ne- 
braska and the Dakolas, thus reducing the flow of 
the lower reaches of the Missouri to below the danger 
point. 

The combined volume of the water impounded in 
storage reservoirs at the head waters of these great 
rivers and their tributaries, and that contained in a 
network of hundreds of miles of irrigation canals and 
ditches, coupled with that absorbed by millions of acres 
of arid land, would have gone a long way toward 
palliating or preventing what will be known as the 
great flood of 1903. 

* * * 

Be thou the rainbow in the storms of life. — Byron. 



632 



THE INGLENOOK. 



THE MASON AND DIXON BOUNDARY. 



BY NELLIE LAMON MILLER. 

The Mason and Dixon boundary line was a dividing 
line between the lands granted to William Penn and 
Lord Baltimore by the king of England. A dispute 
had arisen between the owners and numerous quarrels 
had occurred between the occupants about the enforce- 
ment of certain laws and the collection of taxes which 
were regulated by the product from the lands. A 
reserve was made in that a portion of all mineral dis- 
coveries should revert to the king of England. In or 
about the year of 1760 the dispute as to authority had 
reached the stage when an understanding had to be 
had as to a dividing line, and two surveyors, Henry 
Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, were employed to lay 
out the line as now marked. 

These men were under the direction of a council, 
or board of commissioners, composed of men repre- 
senting both sides of the controversy. It was agreed 
by these commissioners that the line should start at 
a point twelve miles south of the city of Philadelphia 
and on a prolongation of the line running due north 
from a point half way of a line running due west from 
the Delaware Bay near the present site of the town 
of Delmar, Delaware, to the curve or arc with a twelve 
mile radius from New Castle, Delaware, which di- 
vides the States of Delaware and Pennsylvania. In 
the spring of 1762 the active field work on the survey 
was begun under the combined supervision of Messrs. • 
Mason and Dixon. After many hardships and dis- 
couragements the line was completed and partially 
marked with stones four feet long and one foot square, 
of a peculiar composition quarried and brought from 
England. It was intended to mark the line at inter- 
vals of one mile with these stones as far as the proper- 
ties of Penn and Baltimore extended, but after carry- 
ing out the plan as far as the east slope of Sideling 
Hill, five miles west of Hancock, Maryland, the idea 
of putting in cut stones was given up and instead 
mounds of rock and earth, circular in shape, about 
ten feet in diameter and from three to six feet high 
were built at irregular intervals. 

The work was finished as far as Lord Baltimore 
claimed any land in 1767 near the present meeting 
point of the States of Pennsylvania, Maryland and 
West Virginia. 

In 1902 the States of Pennsylvania and Maryland 
agreed to have the old dividing line resurveyed and 
marked. Each State legislature appropriated five 
thousand dollars to pay the expenses of this work. 
The United States Coast and Geodetic Survey De- 
partment were requested to detain an engineer to take 
charge of this work and the matter was put under the 



direction of a commission composed of Dr. W. B. 
Clark, professor of geology at Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, Baltimore, on the part of Maryland, General 
James, Secretary of the Interior, of Pennsylvania, for 
Pennsylvania, and the Superintendent of the United 
States Coast and Geodetic Survey. Capt. W. C. 
Hodgkins of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, an en- 
gineer of national reputation, was detailed to this 
work. 

The method of work was as follows : First the 
old marks were located and identified. Where no 
doubt existed of their position where they were found 
as being set originally they were assumed as correct, 
and the survey to locate the missing ones made these 
assumed places as a basis. Most of the old stones 
were found and identified. Where the missing stones 
could not be found a new one of approximately the 
same size was attained and set in its proper place as 
near as conditions permitted. Stones were placed in 
all the mounds that could be identified and immediate 
locations made, which were marked with cut stones 
with the letter P cut on the north side and M on the 
south side. This work was completed in the fall of 
1903 and the famous boundary line, literally a division 
between the States of Pennsylvania and Maryland, 
and figuratively a division between the North and 
South, is now established and marked. Most of the 
country adjacent to the line is settled and cultivated, 
yet some of the mountain section is still wild and 
rough. 

This line was the first and greatest achievement of 
its time and will always be a noted landmark and a 
monument to Mason and Dixon. 

Washington, D. C. 

♦ 4> ♦ 

MEDICAL OPINIONS. 



Dr. Grosvenor, in the Buffalo Medical Journal, 
sums up his views respecting the medicinal use of 
alcohol as follows : 

" 1. Grave responsibility rests upon the medical pro- 
fession in the use of alcohol as a medicine, on account 
of its deleterious influence upon the system and the 
liability of the patient to contract the habit of using 
it as a beverage. 

" 2. Alcohol being an acrid narcotic poison, the bot- 
tle containing it should be labeled ' Poison,' as a re- 
minder of this characteristic, and a warning to handle 
it with care. 

" 3. Alcohol, containing none of the compounds 
which enter into the construction of the tissues, can 
not properly be termed a tissue-forming food. 

" 4. The evidence in favor of the existence of a 
heat-generating quality in alcohol, is not sufficient to 
warrant the belief that it is a heat-producing food. 



tril 



INGLENOOK. 



633 






" 5. As a narcotic and anesthetic, alcohol has a 
limited sphere of adaptation, and is much less valuable 
than several other narcotics and anesthetics. 

" 6. The stimulating effect of alcohol may be best 
secured by small doses frequently repeated. 

" 7. From the fact that its stimulating effect re- 
sults from its paralytic action, alcohol is more prop- 
erly called a depressant than a stimulant. 

" 8. As an antispasmodic and antiseptic, it may be 
superseded by other remedies, without detriment to 
the patient. 

" 9. Although alcohol is a positive antipyretic, and 
therefore useful in the reduction of bodily tempera- 
ture, it is neither so prompt nor so effective as several 
other antipyretics. 

" 10. In cases requiring a remedy which will rapid- 
ly evaporate, alcohol is useful as an external applica- 
tion. 

"11. So easy is the acquirement of the alcoholic 
habit, and so ruinous its consequences to body, mind 
and spirit that extreme caution should be exercised 
in its use in all cases, and its administration stopped 
as soon as the desired effect has been reached. 

" 12. Alcohol, as a medicine, should be reserved for 
emergencies, unusual conditions and circumstances in 
which a more reliable and less injurious remedy can 
not be obtained. 

" 13. Adulterations of alcoholics are so extensive 
and so pernicious, and their different preparations so 
variable in the amount of alcohol they contain, that 
it is best to demand pure alcohol of a definite strength 
in medical prescriptions. 

" 14. In the prescription of alcohol, the same care 
as to exactness of dosage and times of administration 
should be exercised, as is used in prescribing any 
other powerful medicine. 

" 15. When intended to act therapeutically, alcohol- 
ics should not be prescribed as a beverage and taken 
ad libitum. 

" 16. The fact that methyl alcohol passes very rap- 
idly into and out of the system, is an argument in fa- 
vor of its more general use for internal administra- 
tion. 

" 17. So deleterious are the effects of alcohol upon 
the human body, that it is eminently proper to in- 
quire whether its harmfulness does not overbalance 
its helpfulness, and whether- it could not be dropped 
from our list of therapeutic agents without any seri- 
ous injury to our patients." 

* * * 
EXPOSITION STAMP ISSUE. 



the Commemorative Series of 1904, have been placed 
on sale at post offices throughout the country. These 
stamps are issued because of the St. Louis Expo- 
sition, and the series is one that stamp collectors will 
want to secure. Stamps of the special issue will not 
be sold after December 1 next, and while on sale will 
not take the place of the ordinary issues, which will be 
sold to customers unless the commemorative stamps 
are especially asked for. The denominations and col- 
ors of the new stamps are as follows : 

One cent, green; subject, Robert R. Livingston, 
United States Minister to France, who conducted the 
negotiations for the Louisiana Purchase. 

Two cent, red; Thomas Jefferson, President of the 
United States at the time of the Louisiana Purchase. 

Three cent, purple : James Monroe, special ambas- 
sador to France in the matter of the purchase, who, 
with Livingston, closed the negotiations. 

Five cent, blue; William McKinley, who, as Presi- 
dent of the United States, approved the acts of Con- 
gress, officially connecting the government with the 
St. Louis Exposition. 

Ten cent, brown; United States map, showing the 
territory of the Louisiana Purchase. 

There is no special issue of postal cards, wrappers, 
or envelopes. — Scientific American. 

<§» <$» 4» 
NO BARGAIN COUNTERS.. 



Postage stamps of the special issue to commemo- 
rate the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, and known as 



There are no cheap things in the spiritual >prld. 
There are no bargain days, and spiritual remnants \re 
never offered for sale. The soul that expects to liv> 
in the realms of the spiritual on a low-price basis, 
is likely to miss the richest blessings to be secured 
in the kingdom. 

There is nothing cheap in the realm of grace ; while 
the gifts of God are " gifts," he who would appropri- 
ate them, must pay a high price for them. This isj 
the strange paradox of the inner life, yet those who 
have reached to any height in it, are ready to sa^ 
that the cost of things is high. It is not a Strang 
law, this ; it is the law that rules in the realm of 
love, which is the realm of real life — all other life is 
" existence," merely. 

The law of love is the law of giving — giving to 
the utmost of life, and when the heart has given 
to the full, poured out itself upon the object of its 
love, its richest gain is realized. 

What a willingness to live cheaply in the realm of 
the spiritual life! My heart, be suspicious of thy con- 
dition, when it costs thee little to live! Thou hast tin- 
life truly in the hour that thou layest it down; this 
is the highest price of spiritual attainment — for then 
art thou like unto thy Lord. — Baptist Union. 



634 



THE INGLENOOK. 



AN APOSTROPHE TO THE GRASS. 



BY SENATOR INGALLS. 

Next in importance to the divine profusion of 
water, light and air, those three physical facts which 
render existence possible may be reckoned the uni- 
versal beneficence of grass. Lying in the sunshine 
among the buttercups and dandelions of May, scarcely 
higher in intelligence than those minute tenants of 
that mimic wilderness, our earliest recollections are 
of grass ; and when the fitful fever is ended, and the 
foolish wrangle of the market and the forum is closed, 
grass heals over the scar which our descent into the 
bosom of the earth has made, and the carpet of the 
infant becomes the blanket of the dead. 

Grass is the forgiveness of Nature — her constant 
benediction. Fields trampled with battle, saturated 
with blood, torn with the ruts of cannon, grow green 
again with grass and carnage is forgotten. Streets 
abandoned by traffic become grass-grown like rural 
lanes and are obliterated. Forests decay, harvests 
perish, flowers vanish, but grass is immortal. Be- 
leaguered by the sullen hosts of winter it withdraws 
into the impregnable fortress of its subterranean vi- 
tality and emerges upon the solicitation of Spring. 
Sown by the winds, by wandering birds, propagated 
by the subtle horticulture of the elements which are 
its ministers and servants, it softens the rude out- 
lines of the world. It invades the solitudes of deserts, 
•climbs the inaccessible slopes and pinnacles of moun- 
tains, and modifies the history, character and destiny 
of nations. Unobtrusive and patient, it has immortal 
"vigor and aggression. Banished from the thorough- 
fares and fields, it bides its time to return, and when 
vigilance is relaxed or the dynasty has perished it 
silently resumes the throne from which it has been ex- 
pelled but which it never abdicates. It leaves no bla- 
zonrv of bloom to charm the senses with fragrance or 
splendor, but its homely hue is more enchanting than 
the lily or the rose. It yields no fruit in earth or air, 
yet should its harvest fail for a single year famine 
would depopulate the world. 

♦> «J* ♦ 
TO ANNEX. 



The attention of the world to-day is divided be- 
tween the war in the East, the persecutions in the 
North and the disorder and internal corruption of 
Morocco. Morocco, speaking in general terms, is in 
the northwest part of Africa and is a maritime coun- 
try. On the South it is bound by the Great Desert. 
It has an area of two hundred and twenty thousand 
square miles and has five or six millions of inhabit- 
ants. The climate is just as good as that of France 



or Spain, and probably better. It has a very few 
good harbors. It might have many more were it not 
for the government which controls it. It is under the 
jurisdiction of the Sultan who claims to be a direct 
descendant of the Prophet Mohammed, and is an ab- 
solute monarch. He has six ministers whom he pre- 
tends to consult. He calls them his cabinet, etc., but 
the real facts in the case are that they are his servants 
and execute his orders. They faithfully see that the 
subjects of his empire obey the sweet will of their 
monarch. 

His treasury is a peculiar structure in the way of 
architecture, and is as inaccessible as the Himalayas. 

The thousands of soldiers under his control in dif- 
ferent parts of the country are paid a most miser- 
able, insignificant compensation and are compelled to 
live by robbery and begging. His military force does 
not exceed sixteen thousand men and his marine force 
is insignificant. 

This country of Morocco is a mine of wealth, al- 
most utterly undeveloped. It abounds in mineral 
wealth — copper, iron, and lead, and luxuriant forests 
grow there. They have some specie of oak and Alep- 
po pine. Along the borders grows the date palm 
and it could be made a great article of commerce. 
Agriculture has been neglected and there does not 
seem to be any desire to improve it. Some Indian 
corn is grown and they can raise good wheat, but 
not much of it is done. 

These people want to annex themselves to France. 
They are tired of their government. The Nookman 
remembers quite well when in Palestine of hearing 
scores of people say that they were tired of their 
government and they prayed that the time would 
come when Germany, France, England or the United 
States would dethrone their monarch and install a 
better government. And if these subjects of the Sul- 
tan of Turkey revere him to such a small extent, how 
much less do those of the Sultan in Morocco respect 
him ! Their education is very similar to that in Tur- 
key. A knowledge of the Koran is their entire educa- 
tion. A very small per cent of the populace are able 
to read and write. 

As a matter of fact England and Spain will be 
expected to protest against this country being annexed 
to France. Spain especially because she has been de- 
feated a few times in attempted invasions of Moroc- 
co. And in this melee of trouble they hope to get 
Germany interested, but it is presumed by best au- 
thorities that Germany will keep herself aloof from 
the trouble. 

It is to be hoped that Morocco will get the rays 
of light of civilization sooner or later, and lift their 
benighted people up to a basis where they can enjoy 
life. 



THI 



iNGLENOOK. 



635 



HOW PAPER MONEY IS MADE. 



If you will look at the pictures upon a one-dollar 
bill, you will see that the portrait of Martha Wash- 
ington or of Stanton is composed altogether of curved 
or straight lines — the only kind of engraving that is 
allowed to be done in the bureau ; because unless it is 
done in this manner, and unless the lines are cut very 
deep, the engravings cannot be used. Now this por- 
trait was engraved in a piece of steel by the use of a 
very sharp little instrument known as a graver. 

Every little scratch on the steel plate will, in print- 
ing, s how a bla ck line, so you will see how very care- 
ful the engraver has to be that he shall not make any 
false scratches, and that the lines shall be just so long 
and just so broad. 

Now, steel engraving is the direct opposite of wood 
engraving. The scratches and cuts made on a w ood- 
en block will be jdrite in thejprint. and it is only the 
uncut portions of the block that print black ; while on 
the steel the unscratched portion leaves the paper 
white. 

When a design has been cut on a steel plate, and it 
is ready to be printed, the ink is put on the plate or 
block, and all the cuts and scratches become filled with 
ink. Then the ink is carefully rubbed off of the sur- 
face, so that none remains except what is in the lines. 
When a piece of dampened paper is placed on the 
plate and subjected to very heavy pressure, it sinks 
into the lines ; and when it is taken off it draws the 
ink out with it, and thus the picture is printed on the 
paper. 

It takes an engraver about six weeks or two months 
to complete one portrait, and a man who engraves 
the porJxaits_nyyer does any other kind of engraving. 
Each engraver does only_a certain portion of the work 
1 in a note : no one is permitted to. engrave an entire 
note, so that besides the portrait engravers, there are 
some who do nothing but engrave the figures, the seal, 
the lettering, the border, etc. In this way it would 
be impossible for an engraver to make a complete 
engraving for his own use, if he were dishonest 
enough to want to do such a thing. 

Besides this manual work, some of the engraving 
is done by machinery, as for example the background 
of the portrait and of the borders, and the shading of 
the letters — this being done by what is known as the 
ruling machine, which can rule several hundred per- 
fectly straight lines within an inch. The intricate\ 
scroll and lace-like work around the figures on the 1 
face and the back of the note is done by a wonderful/ 
machine known as the geometric lathe. This machine 
consists of a large number of wheels of all sizes and in 
all sorts of arrangements, together with a complicated 
mechanism of eccentrics and rods, all of which is in- 
comprehensible to any one but an expert machinist. 



By a proper adjustment of its parts, the delicate dia- 
mond point that moves about over the face of the 
steel is made to work out a perfect and artistic pat- 
tern with greater accuracy and much more speed than 
could be done by hand ; and hence this delicate and in- 
tricate part of the engraving is one of the great- 
est obstacles with which the counterfeiter has to con- 
tend, for he finds it next to impossible to imitate it 
cprrectly. 

Fortunately for Uncle Sam, the geometric lathe is 
a very complicated and very expensive machine, and 
the counterfeiter is generally a poor man ; and even 
if he did manage to lay up enough money to buy the 
lathe, it is hardly likely he would live long enough to 
learn how to use it properly, for there arejanlju-fou* 
me n in the .w orld who understand how to operate it. 

Indeed, the man who now has charge of the geo- 
metric lathe at the Bureau of Engraving and Print- 
ing is the only one in the United States at the present 
time who knows how to manage it ; and if anything 
should happen to him it might tangle matters up for 
a while in this important branch of our Uncle Sam's 
big government. — St. Nicholas. 



TEETH 



AND 



DIGESTION. 



The close connection between decayed teeth and 
diseases of the digestion is pointed out by a writer in 
Guy's Hospital Gazette. 

The presence of free acids in the mouth is par- 
ticularly harmful. These may come from various 
sources, but most commonly from the acid fermenta- 
tion of the carbo-hydrate food lodged on or between 
the teeth at the gums, and due to the action of micro- 
organisms present in the mouth. 

Normally the saliva is alkaline, and any acids pro- 
duced in the crevices of the teeth are thus neutralized 
and decay prevented. There are two conditions under 
which the saliva is unable to neutralize the acids pro- 
duced locally, namely : ( 1 ) when it is deficient in 
alkalinity, and (21 when it is deficient in quantity. 
As to the former, it is well known that the saliva be- 
comes less alkaline or even acid in any condition of 
prolonged gastric digestion, a phenomenon which oc- 
curs in nearly all cases of dyspepsia. Moreover, the 
teeth when decayed further tend to keep up the state 
of chronic dyspepsia by rendering mastication imper- 
fect. A vicious circle is thus established. 

To obviate this form of dental disease the teeth 
should be washed frequently with a solution of which 
one of the ingredients is bicarbonate of soda. This 
may prevent one of the most disagreeable results of 
the disease — facial neuralgia. 
4, .;• <fi 

Smiles are the language of love. — Hare. 



636 



THE INGLENOOK, 




EDUCATION AND SOCIAL ECONOMY BUILDING. 



The Education and Social Economy Building of 
the Louisiana Purchase Exposition is of the Corin- 
thian order of architecture. It is situated to the left 
of the main lagoon, and this and the Electricity Build- 
ing are the only two buildings facing the Grand Basin 
with the cascades and approaches to the terrace crown- 
ing the hill on which the Art Building stands. While 
not the largest in area, its position makes it one of the 
most conspicuous buildings in what has been called the 
main picture of the Exposition. 

The building fronts 525 feet on the main thorough- 
fare of the Exposition. The principal entrances are 



prosperity and power largely depends upon the wealth 
and strength of the individual. 

Saving on the part of the individual becomes a na- 
tional advantage; each one contributes his share to 
the support of this great, grand and good free govern- 
ment; its perpetuity is assured, and more than eighty 
millions of people continue in the enjoyment of ad- 
vantages, privileges, and progress that are peculiar 
only to citizens of the United States. 

Let saving in youth become a habit and the future 
prosperity of the individual is assured. To illustrate, 
when a lad of fifteen, I hired to a farmer neighbor, 
whose custom it was to pick up and carefully save, 
every strip of board, strap, bits of wire and iron, 




SCHOOL PALACE. 



on the angles of the building, and somewhat resem- 
tile the well-known form of the triumphal arch. 
At each angle of the building is a pavilion, forming a 
supplementary entrance, and these are connected by a 
colonnade of monumental proportions. The four ele- 
vations are similar in character, varying only as re- 
quired to accommodate the design to the irregular 
shape of the ground plan. A liberal use of architec- 
tural sculpture lends a festal character to the other- 
wise somewhat severely classical exterior. The screen 
wall back of the colonnade gives opportunity for a lib- 
eral display of color as a background for the classic 
outlines of the Corinthian columns, affording liberal 
scope for the mural decorator, 
•j. .5. 4. 
THE ADVANTAGE OF SAVING. 



BY W. R. MILLER. 



A vital subject! 

A nation to be perpetuated, must depend on the 
habits of saving formed by her young people. Her 



found about the farm. He began at once teaching me 
the same habit, though I frequently asked, " What 
was the use of saving such rubbish ? " " Lay it away 
and wait " was invariably the reply ; usually I had not 
long to wait to see the " use." While hauling, plow- 
ing or threshing, accidents would occur, something 
broken about plow, wagon, or machinery, and the in- 
significant hit of wire, bolt, board or leather, was the 
very thing needed for repair, saving much time, and 
perhaps a trip to shop or town. 

The value of the habit became apparent and fas- 
tened itself upon me. 

The advantage of saving will be greatest because of 
the habit formed, out of which will grow a competency 
to furnish a home, later to own one, and still later, to 
rear, educate, and care for the family. 

Department stores are crowded with children barely 
in their teens, few if any having finished the grammar 
school, and many not farther than the sixth grade. 
These children come, largely from parents who do not 
own their homes ; they are launched into the battle of 
life illy prepared to wrestle in the fierce contest, for 



THE INGLENOOK. 



637 



which better education and maturer years would have 
qualified them. 

Because of these environments many think not to 
aspire to a higher calling than a shoveler of mud, a 
domestic, or a cheap clerkship. But learn to save in 
youth and a good home is in reach of all. 

Horace Greeley said, of the Resumption of Specie 
Payment, " The way to resume, is to resume." The 
way to save, is to save ! no sum is too paltry to be 
saved, it may seem even as " rubbish." 

The most difficult element in saving is self-denial, 
yet without it little can be accomplished. 

It is through the small cracks and crevices of every 
day living that our pocket books waste their precious 
earnings and rob us of the comforts of life we long 
for. 

Economical, systematic living, studied and practiced 
is a very great essential in saving. 

It should be the ambition of every individual to have 
a bank account, for it is a wonderful incentive, once 
we have a sum in the bank quietly drawing interest, 
to add to and increase the working capital. 

Once a penny, nickel, dollar, or a week's earnings 
finds its way into the savings account, only extraordi- 
nary circumstances should cause its removal. 

The independence, confidence, and ability to take 
advantage of exceptional offers a bank account af- 
fords, must be experienced to be appreciated. 

The Master said, " Gather up the pieces that noth- 
ing be lost." 

466 Jackson Blvd., Chicago. 
♦ * * 
AUTHOR OF DIXIE. 



BY ADELAIDE M KEE KOONS. 

[Miss Koons, of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, favors us with a 
pen picture of the author of " Dixie " as he appears upon 
the street and in his hermit home. — Ed]. 

Down the snowy road he creeps with the slow, 
shuffling step of old age. A huge, tattered, dirty 
horse-blanket envelops his bent figure, one corner 
drawn tight about his crisp, grizzled hair, the other 
trailing on the ground behind him. From beneath 
the rough, thatched shelter of his eyebrows, powdered 
with snow no whiter than they, his eyes gleam, round 
and jetty and untiring yet in their surveillance of the 
world, despite the fact that they have grown old in 
contemplating its sin and misery. His brown, leath- 
ery skin is seamed and lined with a network of 
wrinkles that move back and forth in response to his 
emotions as if governed by a set of invisible strings. 

The old man turns at last into the path that leads 
up to his tumble-down cabin. Surely, never a mean- 
er or lowlier shanty that affords a shelter to some 
humble one of earth's sons, dared to call itself a home. 



But the four bare walls, the meagre furniture, the 
poor wooden box that serves alike for cupboard and 
table, the tiny, battered stove, have the look of friend- 
ly faces to him, grown dear and familiar through long 
association. He allows his strange outer cloak to 
slip to the floor, revealing garments so thin and tat- 
tered, so pitifully inadequate to the winter season, one 
wonders that the cold had not long since stiffened his 
poor old bones beyond all hope of further motion. 

But there is that within the desolate cabin which 
takes the place almost, of food and fire. He takes his 
old violin from its worn case, his stiffened fingers 
closing over its slender neck as a luckier man might 
clasp the hand of his child. He cuddles it under his 
chin with a gesture that is almost a caress, and as the 
bow glides over the strings, there follows in its wake 
such a flood of memories that he is caught up in the 
stream and swept away from the present back into the 
golden days of long ago, when life was a joke to be 
laughed at, and he took no thought of the morrow. 
What matter if he is but a vagabond, one of a little 
company of strolling players, reeling out their merry 
jigs for the pleasure of open-mouthed country lads and 
their gawky sweethearts ! Their admiration is open, 
their applause unstinted. What matter ! His heart is 
light, his fingers straight and supple. His violin is 
sweet and mellow, and all the day long such jolly, 
rollicking tunes go swinging through his head and 
tingling at the ends of his fingers as they press the 
strings of the violin. 

The little band has done well this evening. The 
rude theater is crowded ; the encores have been many 
and their store of melodies is almost exhausted, and 
their boisterous audience is still demanding more. 
The manager of the orchestra is looking at him, sign- 
ing for him to play again, and he rises to his feet 
scarce knowing what to give them. There is a tune 
that has been singing in his head all day. It is but 
a snatch of negro melody, sweet and wild and clear, 
and he cannot forget it. He will play that for them. 
His bow hovers above the strings, then down and 
away it goes. How the notes come rippling out, fall- 
ing over each other, racing up and down the scale in 
sheer abandon, now lagging behind with a wail of de- 
spair, now leaping again with desperate resolve, laugh- 
ing, sobbing, untii the last breathless tones sink to 
their tender close, and " Dixie " has leaped into the 
hearts of men. What a poor, paltry triumph it was — 
" Dixie," a negro melody, — a catch tune of the 
wharves and fields, and yet the memory of it is sweet 
within him now, flooding the dim little room with the 
sunlight of the South, and wakening in his heart the 
memories of voices long since hushed into eternal 
silence. 

Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 



6 3 8 



XHE INGLENOOK. 




A. Weekly Magazine 



...PUBLISHED BY... 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILL. 
Subscription Price, $1.00 per Annum. 



The Inclenook is a publication devoted to interesting and entertaining 
literature. It contains nothing of a character to prevent its presence in 
any home. 

Contributions are solicited, but there is no guarantee either of their ac- 
ceptance or return. All contributions are carefully read, and if adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine, will be used. The management 
will not be responsible for unsolicited articles. 

Agents are wanted, and specimen numbers will be supplied as needed. 

In giving a change of address state where you are now getting the pa- 
per, as otherwise the change cannot be made. Subscriptions may be made 
at any time, either for a year or part of a year. Address. 

Brethren Publishing House, 
(For the Inglenook.) 22-24 South State St., ELGIN. ILL. 

Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



SALUTATORY. 



It is a bright day. The sun is beaming upon the 
bosom of the waters, showing in all its splendor 
the thousands of little wavelets leaping here and there, 
revealing the constant change that is going on in the 
deep. As one stands on the shore and gazes into the 
distance his mind is bound to think of the great 
ocean of life. There each of us is a tiny wavelet 
skipping here and there, lasting but a brief moment as 
compared to the existence of old Mother Time. 
The sages have not missed it when they talk of life 
as a span and the grass withering, and old Father 
Time ; all these mark changes. 

The time has come when our own family tie, the 
Inglenook, makes its change. The Nook has been 
fortunate during its life and has never had a change. 

The scene is a beautiful summer day. The place, a 
lovely grove. Let the canopy before us be our mantle. 
Let the audience be six thousand strong of honest 
Nookers who have gathered to hear the valedictory 
of the Nookman and the salutatory of the new one. 
These six thousand Nookers represent the territory 
from the Atlantic to the Western Coast, from the 
broad lands of Canada to the keys on the Gulf. The 
matron, the maid, the mother, the seamstress, the old- 
fashioned Nookers spoken of on the first page, the 
farmer, the man at the bench, the man of books, all 
are represented in this motley crowd. The youth 
whose cheek is blushing with life's vigor, the bent 
frame of the father, the wrinkled visage of the care- 



worn mother, all these and more are represented here. 
They have all gathered to say Good-bye to the Nook- 
man. During these years the Nook has been a con- 
stant medium between them. He has touched their 
lives through its columns. All alike were eager to 
grasp it and read its contents. If you have failed to 
read his speech in the last Inglenook you want to 
pick it up and read it again. Remember his blessings 
upon our little magazine. He bows and retires with 
an introduction of the new Nookman. And as the 
Nookman steps upon the platform, what an inspiration 
is given him to see the enthusiasm that is aroused by 
six thousand lives touching each other through the 
medium of our little family magazine. He starts up- 
on his new mission in life with the desires and prayers 
and the united sentiment and hearty co-operation of 
thousands of well-meaning people. As in the days 
gone by, shall we not go hand in hand in the study of 
the great, wide world? Shall we not, by observation, 
study and work, labor for the benefit of mankind? 
It does not fill the place of the church organ, is not a 
political vehicle, is not an educational journal, it is 
simply an Inglenook, a chimney comer magazine full 
of good things, always new because its constituency 
with a steady growth and increase are laboring to 
bring the best to the front. The best is not too good 
for us. May we not have the hearty support of all 
in the days to come ? 

As to the policy of the magazine under the new 
management, in many respects it will remain the same. 
The Nature Stud}' Clubs are solicited to report some 
of their work done in their various clubs and give us 
as a family the fruits of their labors. The Nookers 
who have talents along the line of literary attainment 
will find the columns of the Inglenook open to them. 
It shall be our purpose to have the Nook grow and 
develop. Other departments may be added as the 
demands come. We are in a progressive age, and 
nowhere is it more strongly felt than in the Nook 
family, and as soon as demands are strong enough 
for new departments they will be installed. The pages 
that have been set apart for current news will still be 
reserved for that place. When you come home tired 
from the field and do not have time to read three or 
four dailies which have been brought to your door 
by the rural postman, pick up the Inglenook and re- 
ceive the kernels as they have already been prepared 
for you. 

Now let the good work go on. Let the boys and 
girls in their research dig up some golden gems that 
others should know. Let young men and women 
make a line of union from coast to coast and make 
each others' lives better by a touch of the live wire 
of communication. If you appreciate the Nook, pass 
it on. Tell others about it. Do not be selfish. Do 



THE INGLENOOK. 



639 



not forget other people's needs and wants. Much 
latent talent lies undeveloped because of a neglected 
opportunity. Let us see how soon we can have our 
list of Nookers covering every State and territory 
in the Union. Now, with the full assurance of the 
hearty support and the well wishes of the constituency, 
we set upon our duties. God's blessing upon our lit- 
tle paper. 

* * * 

GEARED TOO SLOW. 



No doubt you have noticed many times in your life 
of people going about you who were moving just as if 
they were in no hurry whatever. They go about their 
work as if it was a secondary matter. Whether they 
be working for themselves or working for any other 
person, it matters not. 

I have in mind a newsboy who was so dilatory about 
the delivery of his papers that he lost his job. George 
Washington, at one time, said to one of his servants 
who was in the habit of being late, and whose ex- 
cuse was that his watch was out of repair, " You must 
either get a new watch or a new job." Here and 
there all over the world you find people who are crip- 
ples from one standpoint; they have a righthand, a 
lefthand, and a little behindhand. Now this class of 
people is not to be despised. They are good people 
in many respects. They have some splendid traits of 
character ; the only thing in the world that is the mat- 
ter with them is that they are geared too slow. A 
man once said to the Nookman that there is as much 
difference in people as anybody. Now, as queer as 
this statement may seem, what an abundance of truth 
there is in it. 

Don't expect everybody to think just as you do, 
and move just like you do, and turn off the amount 
of work you can, but remember there is a difference 
in how they are geared. Some people think slowly, 
decide slowly, but when once they have decided they 
arc stable. The one redeeming feature about these 
people who are geared too slow is that they are not 
fickle and unstable, and when they do arrive at their 
conclusion or destination, they make important factors 
in society, church and state. So do not be too hasty 
in your conclusions about them. Be as patient with 
their slowness as they are with your bustle and con- 
fusion. And when your impatience grows to a 
height which is almost unbearable, read again the old 
fable of the " Tortoise and the Hare." 
♦ ♦ * 
SMOOT'S CASE. 



turn the tables, and apply the same rules of investiga- 
tion upon the honorable members who are the proud 
bearers of divorce. 

After all, how much better is the man who marries 
a good woman, after promising to protect and defend 
her as long as life lasts, then after a time dismisses 
her and marries another and promises her the same 
thing, and so on until he has married the fourth, than 
the man who marries the four all at the same time or 
nearly so, or at the very least, say, he keeps all of them 
in his home and supports them as he had promised to? 
The Nook is not in support of polygamy, bv any 
means, but it is a strong advocate of consistency, ft 
doesn't matter how far up the scale you may have 
gone, you can never hide your own black heart by ex- 
posing the heart of another. 

♦ ♦ 4* 
YOUR CHANCE. 



All you good Nookers now have a new opportunity 
for doing good to our Nook family. Here we are just 
starting on the last half of the year, just beginning a 
new line of Nature study, etc., and we are going to 
let you send the Nook to your friends all the rest of 
the year for twenty-five cents. What more valuable 
present can you make a friend than that: And then 
will you not show your friends a copy of it and tell 
them that they may have it upon the same terms? 
Please do this as a loyal Nooker and as a reward of 
merit rather than a reward of labor, for every ten 
subscribers we will send you one of Laughlin's famous 
fountain pens. Now come along — don't wait till it's 
too late — the sooner the better the offer. Let us see 
what State in the United States has the hardest work- 
ing Nookers. Indeed, this is a remarkable offer and 
it ought to be accepted by thousands of good lovers of 
good things. If you want some sample copies to 
show them, just say so on a postal card and they will 
be coming on the next mail. Who will be the first ? 
* * * 

Our advertisements and advertisers are all respon- 
sible, as we never admit any to our columns that are 
not strictly reliable, which thing proves to both 
parties a valuable support. 



OUR PRIZE-WINNING CONTEST. 



Now that congress has spent considerable time and 
money in the ventilation of the case of Mr. Smoot, 
the Nook thinks that it would be a ?ood time to 



t 
*** 



Who wants a $25 library FREE"- 
Who wants a new watch FREE ? 
Want a Bible as a PRESENT? 
Need a FOUNTAIN PEN? 
See our PRIZE CONTEST page. 



* 
* 



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* 

* 

* 



* 
*********** * ■;■ * * ■:■ * ■!■ ■;■ ******* * * ■;■ ******** 



640 



THE INGLENOOK. 



CURRENT HAPPENINGS | 



A traveler of some note, who has lately been in 
Northern Siberia, noticed a peculiar custom among 
the natives there. Not that their costumes differed 
so greatly from other Siberian people, nor that their 
language was materially changed, but because they 
used as an article of diet a certain kind of wood. 
Upon being asked why they ate the wood, they said, 
" Because we like it," especially when fish is plentiful, 
which forms a part of their meal. They strip the 
large larch logs and proceed to eat the body of the 
log. These people know by experience that the fact 
that they eat wood arouses the sympathy of strangers, 
and they are shrewd enough to use it in the presence of 
strangers to excite their pity, and, by so doing, obtain, 
in many instances, kegs of tea and tobacco. 

They scrape off the thick layers of the wood im- 
mediately under the bark of the log, and then proceed 
to chop it fine and mix it with snow and boil it in 
kettles. Sometimes a little fish, venison, milk or but- 
ter is mixed with it. 

$ 4» $ 

A late cablegram announces the fact that a con- 
cession has been obtained from the Chinese govern- 
ment to install electric street car service and to illum- 
inate the streets in Tien-Tsin, which is a port of Pe- 
king. The company has been trying for a long while 
to obtain this grant. These will be the first lines es- 
tablished in China, if the project is completed. The 
city of Tien-Tsin has one million inhabitants, Canton 
being the only city that exceeds it in size, and it is bad- 
ly in need of rapid transportation for the crowded pop- 
ulace. There certainly are excellent openings for this 
kind of work in the Orient. The white population of 
the large Eastern Chinese cities have been expressing 
their opinions loudly to the authorities for some 
months, that the suburban population were ready for 
rapid transit, but they have been compelled to be con- 
tent with the jinrikisha for the last thirty years, but 
the capital had not seen anything of it until the last 
five years. There are over twenty-five hundred of 
them in Tien-Tsin, and each of these is compelled by a 
municipal law to pay a dollar taxes to the government, 
and of course this makes the transportation too ex- 
pensive for the poorer classes of people, but it is sup- 
posed that the new street car service will more or less 
alleviate their troubles. 

$ 4$» <$ 

It is now reported by Postmaster General Payne 
that with the ending of the fiscal year there are in op- 
eration throughout our republic twenty-five thousand 
rural mail routes, bringing a daily mail service to 
twelve and a half millions of people, which is over 



thirty per cent of the rural population. And now, in 
order that we may have a still better mail service, a 
young man of Montana, by the name of George Mains, 
has perfected a new invention in the way of a mail 
catcher by which our mails may be taken on and 
thrown off of our fast mail trains by machinery with- 
out endangering the lives of the post officials. Here- 
tofore the railroad postmasters have been compelled 
to reach out to the fork at the side of the car and 
draw the mail sack into the car, which, sometimes on a 
curve would put them in danger of being thrown out 
of the door. In this new device there is a small crane 
which will deliver the sack inside of the mail car 
when the train is running at a high rate of speed, 
which makes it unnecessary for the mail clerk to reach 
for the bag. The good thing about the device is that 
at the same time it receives a sack it delivers one at the 
station as well. Mr. Mains has other inventions of 
lesser importance that will prove helpful in the mail 
service. Let some eastern capitalist now come and 
develop these ideas, that they may serve the public. 

* * * 

Mr. Joseph DeWykoff has contracted with the 
government of Cuba to raise the hulk of the battle- 
ship Maine. He has received five thousand dollars 
cash and has unquestionable right to all the goods, 
equipments, munitions of war, machinery, and every- 
thing else that belongs to the Maine. In all proba- 
bility he will find many dead bodies yet in the Maine, 
and he has promised that these will receive a Chris- 
tian burial as fast as brought to the surface; and 
they will be interred in the cemetery at Havana, un- 
less by special act of" our government, in which case the 
bodies will be brought to Arlington for burial. 

* * * 

Last week the National Homeopathic Hospital, at 
Washington, D. C, was begun, the corner-stone hav- 
ing been placed. This building will be one of a large 
group of what is hoped will, in time to come, become 
a great national institution of this branch of the medi- 
cal fraternity. 

Of late there has been a marked increase in the 
price and the market value of iridium. It is, in com- 
mercial importance, second in the group of platinum 
metals. It is reported to have taken this special 
rise during the last month. The effect pro- 
duced in the market value of this commercial 
luxury is due to the fact that it is of par- 
ticular importance to electricians, chemists and den- 
tists. They are excessive consumers of the various 
alloys of iridium and platinum. Recent reports in- 
dicate a very marked shortage in the production of 
this material, while it is claimed that the demand is 
rapidly increasing. 



THE INQLENOOK. 



641 



We are not the only ones ; there are other United 
States besides the United States of America. We 
have such a great, grand country, spreading from 
ocean to ocean and from lakes to gulf, that it has 
been a custom with us to speak of the The United 
States. Secretary Hay, recognizing this fact, has sent 
forth his order, officially, that henceforth and forever, 
the inscriptions, " The United States Embassy," " The 
United States Consul," etc., shall read, " The American 
Embassy," " The American Consul," etc. This may 
appear to some unnecessary ; but when acquainted with 
the form of the business circles it becomes evident that 
it conflicts seriously with other countries, who have 
rightfully selected their title, and to avoid this con- 
flict our Secretary of State has wisely submitted this 
proclamation. 

* * * 

There is a proverb, " Never too late to do good." 
And another, " Never too old to learn." But we be- 
lieve there is a time when one is too old to do wrong, 
and here is a case which will illustrate : Mr. Alfred 
Bennett, who is now past the 104th milestone of his 
life, was fined $20 in the police court the other day 
for stealing a baby cab ; and now he is serving out a 
sentence in jail for stealing a bicycle since he could 
not pay his fine of $50. How old will he have to be 
before he learns to do the right thing? 

4* ♦ 4* 

The Western Union Telegraph Company now col- 
lects and distributes messages for the main service of 
the Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company of Amer- 
ica. The postal telegraph of the Marconi systems 
has for some time past been working under a similar 
management. It is said by the means of these systems 
it will not be difficult to have an interesting daily 
newspaper published on board the transatlantic and 
the transpacific steamships. 

4» <fc ♦ 

Doctor Edmond Klamke, who is a practicing phy- 
sician and a surgeon of more than ordinary note, of 
Ilwaco, Washington, has lately been appointed, by the 
Russian government, to a position in the hospital serv- 
ice at the front. He is of Danish birth and received 
his medical education in Copenhagen, Denmark. He, 
however, has a strain of Russian blood in his veins. 

•J* ♦ ■$» 

The young people of Elgin are the recipients of a 
rare treat in the way of language study. A class in 
Greek has been organized by Prof. D. E. Chirighotis, 
of Asia Minor, who is an instructor of considerable 
ability and speaks the foreign languages with the pe- 
culiar exactness of an Oriental polvglot. 



Miss Estella Reel, who is superintendent of all 
the Indian schools, is said to be the recipient of the 
highest salary paid by the government to any woman. 
She receives three thousand dollars plus her expenses, 
and her expenses are no mean thing. She spends 
nearly all of her time traveling about from one school to 
another all over the country, and utilizes almost every 
known means of transportation. When stage- coaches 
fail, she frequently rides horseback for hundreds of 
miles, and every one who is acquainted with her says 
she earns every cent of her salary. She is, as may 
well be known, quite a remarkable person, and the 
supervision which she exercises, over the rising gener- 
ation of the nation's wards, has already revolutionized 
to a great extent the system of the management that 
has been adopted. 

♦ *J* *$» 

News has been received from Portland, Maine, of 
the monument of Thomas B. Reed, late Speaker of the 
House of Representatives. It is a massive granite 
shaft, and is decorated with a finely-engraved laurel 
wreath and the name of the honored dead. His epi- 
taph is as follows : " His record is with the faith- 
ful, brave and the true of all nations and ages." 

♦ ♦ *t 

Postmaster General Payne says that the Post 
Office Department is not going into the censorship 
business at all. It is entering in no crusade against 
advertising of any character, except such as proves to 
be fraudulent. When the post offices find that certain 
advertisements are wholly worthless and that the pro- 
mulgators of these are doing so to defraud, the Post 
Office Department will exclude all such from the 
mails. 

♦ * * 

The Secretary of the Interior has withdrawn from 
possible settlement about 32,000 acres of land in Colo- 
rado, in the southwestern section, in which it is pro- 
posed to establish a National Park for the preservation 
of the Cliff Dwellers ruins. And it is all right that 
this should be done. It ought to have been done long 
ago. When we look at the Cliff Dwellers in the 
Rocky Mountain region, then we know that they are 
the ancients of the earth. These simple Pueblo farm- 
ers of a pre-Columbian period had their cliff palaces, 
their watch towers, their waterholes and walls when 
the dogs were barking at the foot of the pyramids 
fifty centuries ago. When China was just beginning 
to dream of dragons, when the confusion of tongues 
cut short the tower of Babel, watchers in the towers 
on the Rocky Mountain fastnesses, with pillars of fire 
by night and of smoke by day. communicated with 
each other from hilltop to hilltop in Colorado. — Na- 
tional Tribune. 



642 



THE INGLENOOK. 



The Inglenook Nature Study Club 



***** 



rT~^o-lpnr,nk~i7th7organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized 
^ ^^T«E^^ ^'cannot" b^urS^ X^X- 
t SSS fc^ub ca k „ £eE£. & Sffi of^e by addressing the Editor «^**^™~*^ 



AVES. 

The Book of Nature has for its author the great 
Creator of the universe, and no book in the world is 
so beautifully laid out in sections, chapters and para- 
graphs as the Book of Nature. It matters but little 
where one opens this book, he will find himself ab- 
sorbed in the intense interest with which it is replete. 
It is in a way like other books, in that the more we 
read the more we want to read and the more valuable 
the reading becomes to us, for we widen in scope and 
territory as we progress, and also we are compelled to 
come in immediate touch with the Author, winch is 
of incalculable value. 

Analysis and synthesis are two elements of study 
that lend enchantment to the work. How would the 
Nook family like to take up one single chapter of this 
great book and study it in particular while we study 
it as a unit in a general way? It is summertime now 
and a large number of the Nookers live in the coun- 
try and those who live in the cities and towns have 
access to the beautiful parks; and so we all have more 
or less of a chance to study some of our birds. And 
as we study them let us learn some of the easiest 
things about them in a scientific way, such as their 
scientific names and their branch, class, order, genus, 
species, and so on as far as it seems practical at least 
for our class. 

And this copy of the Nook you should preserve for 
a while, as it will have the primary classification of 
this class in it. For our own convenience we will 
place it here on this first page for reference.. and it is 
as follows: 

AVES. 

1. Land Birds. 

(1) Raptores (Birds of prey). 

(2) Insessores (Perching birds). 

(3) Scansores (Climbing birds). 

(4) Rasores (Scratchers). 

(5) Cursores (Runners). 

2. Water Birds. 

(1) Grallatores (Waders). 

(2) Natatores (Swimmers). 

Now let every Nooker who has joined the class 
commit these names and learn what they mean, as it 
takes only a very few minutes of your time and you 



will be able in the future to get a great deal of gen- 
uine satisfaction out of a systematic study of our own 
birds. 

And just here, before we take up each one in par- 
ticular, let us notice some things that are common 
to all or nearly all in this family. Birds form the 
second grand division, the warm-blooded vertebrates. 
Mammals are to be classed in the first division, and 
we leave them to be studied a little later. 

The class Aves, or birds, differ from the mammals 
in the following points : 

1. They are oviparous, that is, they hatch from eggs. 

2. They do not suckle their young. 

3. They are covered with feathers. 

4. They are constructed for flight. (Few excep- 
tions.) 

5. They have no teeth. (A few animals do not.) 

6. They have bills. (One animal does.) 

7. Their digestive organs differ materially from the 
other class, for most birds have, in the place of a 
process of mastication, a crop in which to soak their 
food and a gizzard with which to grind it. 

The feathers that cover them have some resemblance 
to the hair which covers the animal, and yet they dif- 
fer in some very important respects. There are three 
parts of a feather. The horny tube or quill part ; the 
stem, and the lamina; or vanes, which are generally 
joined together by barbs or teeth on their edges. This 
is what enables them to fly, these being pressed upon 
the air which furnishes sufficient resistance to support 
the fowl. The wings are the hands, or the paws, of 
the fowl, with a feathery appendage, which, when put 
in rapid motion, lift Mr. Bird high in the air, and he 
propels himself skillfully with or against the air, up 
or down, around and around, according to his sweet 
wishes. 

The bones of these little neighbors are hollow ; and 
there are at least two reasons for that. One is that 
it makes them much lighter, which thing is very neces- 
sary because of their aerial transportation; and the 
other reason is that they are very much stronger when 
hollow than solid, that is, the same amount of material 
considered. 

Their caudal appendage, or tail, which they can 
spread or close at will, serves them as a rudder in 
flight, and very ably regulates them in their course. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



643 



And this very necessary appendage is so arranged as 
to be very ornamental to the fowl. Accordingly Na- 
ture has varied it much as to color, shape, size, so 
that it always carefully harmonizes with other features 
of the particular bird. 

In our next lesson we will study some of the " Birds 
of Prey." 

THE ANT THAT FARMS. 



The agricultural ant, or the ant that farms, is a 
large, brown ant. It builds houses and roads, and has 
an army to be called out in time of peril. Really, it 
seems to know more than other ants. It lives prin- 
cipally in western Texas, and its habits are very much 
like those of the ants of the Old Bible times. 

It is very interesting to watch a company of these 
ants build one of their houses. They first select a 
place, and, if the place be on dry soil, they dig a hole 
and heap the dirt up very high around it, at least from 
three to six inches high. But if it be low and moist 
soil, the ant builds a cone-shaped bank from fifteen 
to twenty feet high, with the entrance near the top. 
This low soil may be dry when the ants build, but 
they seem to know in some way that the ground may 
be flooded ; so they build a high house. 

After the house is built they clear a tract of land 
sometimes ten or twelve feet wide all around it. How 
they work! They cut down the grass. While one 
holds the grass down the other cuts it. They carry 
away all the rubbish and then level the ground. All 
weeds are removed, and only the ant rice, as it is called, 
and a certain kind of grass are allowed to grow on the 
outer side of this circle. This circle is called the disk, 
and the door is in the center. Some naturalists claim 
that the ants themselves sow the seed of the ant rice, 
while others hold to the idea that the rice sows its 
own seed. 

Be that as it may, when the grain is ripe they harvest 
it, that is the seed, and carefully carry it into their 
storehouses. If they afterwards find that the seeds 
are damp they will remove them from place to place to 
dry them. The little red ant makes them so much 
trouble in their houses, though he belongs to the same 
family as the agricultural ant. 

When a colony of ants is not disturbed, it increases 
greatly in numbers, and lays out its roads, some of 
which are as many as one hundred yards long. These 
roads lead from the house in every direction. But 
it quite often happens that when a new city is being 
built, an older colony near by looks upon the new peo- 
ple as invaders of their country, and a battle is waged. 
They fight very hard, and the larger colony gains the 
victory over the smaller one, of course. The agri- 
cultural ants are very harmless unless their city is dis- 



turbed. But they are like most people; when their 
rights are not respected they manifest their dislike 
for the intruders. When you are studying them, be 
a little careful of them, for they can bite. 



DOG SAVES A BOY'S LIFE. 



Hakey Steffens, eight years old, of 57 Myrtle 
avenue, Brooklyn, owes his life to Prince, his St. Ber- 
nard dog, and there is nothing too good for the big pet 
to-day. Harry was playing with Prince in Pearl 
street, near Myrtle avenue. He was on roller skates, 
when he suddenly slipped and fell. He was right in 
front of a heavily laden truck, which was coming at 
a rapid pace. 

Prince had been frolicking along at the boy's side, 
and as the lad fell almost under the feet of the horses 
the dog grabbed him by the collar and dragged him 
out of danger. 

After dragging Harry out of the path of the truck 
Prince would not allow any of the men who witnessed 
the incident to touch him, licking the boy's face and 
whining until Harry jumped to his feet. 

After seeing his young master was all right Prince 
jumped about, barking with joy, and allowed the 
women who had assembled to pet him. A physician, 
who was in the crowd, examined Harry and said he 
had escaped injury. The women would have made 
Prince sick feeding him bonbons if Plarry had not 
decided to take him home. — Boston Globe, April 24th. 



SNAKE CHARMED BY MUSIC. 



BY N. R. BAKER. 

A few years ago a Mr. Reeder, a well-known citizen 
of Whistler, Ala., was sitting one evening on his front 
porch with his wife and he was playing on his violin. 

The pillars of the porch were composed of four 
boards nailed together in the form of a hollow square ; 
the posts did not touch the floor by nearly two inches, 
resting on an iron footpiece to prevent decay. As the 
music proceeded, a large " chicken " snake, as they 
are called, about five feet long, crawled out of the hol- 
low post and approached the musician. 

The player ceased: the snake stopped; the serpent';; 
keen eyes watched the instrument ;. the music contin- 
ued ; the snake again slowly approached the violinist 
with upraised head. What would have been the result 
had the music continued longer will never be known, 
for the chill that crept up the player's back stopped 
the music, and a lucky thwack of a cane rendered 
his snakeship " Iwrs de combat " and his ear out of 
tune. 



644 



THE INGLENOOK 




HOME DEPARTMENT 




Each week the Nookers will find on this page some 
articles either contributed, written or selected especial- 
ly for your domestic interests. It shall be our highest 
ideal to meet the wants and needs of your homes both 
in the city and the country, and we assure you that 
your wants are the best known to the editor from you 
yourselves. If the Nookers will write short ' articles 
for this department or send in ideas, we shall have 
one of the nicest round table talks concerning our 
homes, farms, shops and gardens that can be had. 
Let us see how valuable we can make these pages by 
a hearty cooperation. — The Editor. 
*r *5* ♦> 
TAFFY AND EPITAPHY. 



A great many people in this world are strictly 
averse to saying anything in the way of encourage- 
ment to the young people, or anybody else in fact, but 
especially to the rising generations. How many times 
have you heard people say, " Don't brag on them or 
you will spoil them." Again we say how many times 
have you heard fathers and mothers and teachers 
scold the offender and be continually showing his 
weaknesses, and when a good turn or a bright act 
has been given by the young person, no mention is 
ever made of it. It always escapes notice. 

Servants, hired hands and domestics of all sorts 
have all undergone the same trials. Very few peo- 
ple make a practice of making an open commendation 
of the work that is commendable. The Nook stands 
opposed to this kind of work. The good deeds, the 
kind words, a beneficent act of any sort deserves its 
just endorsement. Many more people have been 
spoiled through discouragements than because they 
have been bragged on, and yet in the face of these 
facts the majority of men, upon the loss of a relative 
or friend will spend a large share of his earnings on 
a piece of cold marble and place it out in some se- 
cluded spot and chisel some very much cherished epi- 
taph in honor of the departed. Counting by square 
feet of surface, there are more lies in a cemetery than 
any place else in the world. The people who have 
never thought in their lives of saying one commend- 
able thing about their side companion do not hesitate, 
in the least, after death, to make their graces very 
conspicuous. The long obituaries at funerals have no 
more taste than chalk, when the people know that 
the one writing the obituary has been an enemy of the 
deceased all his life. 



So again we say, could the world be induced to lay 
aside the old idea of not respecting the best acts and 
best thoughts of the young minds which are develop- 
ing, and induce them to lay aside the idea of waiting 
until after death to show the beautiful characteristics 
of their friends, and would carry more flowers to the 
sick room instead of the casket, how much better off 
the world would be. Taffy is decidedly preferable to 
Epitaphy. 

THE COUNTRY GIRL. 



You bright-eyed, rosy-cheeked country girl, don't 
you ever let me hear you say again that you want to 
go to the city to live. Before you go, if it be that you 
get the consent of your mind finally to go, first make 
a short visit to the city and see the pinched counte- 
nances and ansemic faces of the girls who live in the 
city and who are compelled to work for a living, no 
matter who you are, what you know, nor what you are 
worth. Your gifts, whatever they may be, are given 
you by the Lord God Almighty in an earthen vessel, 
and they will yield to the strokes of sin upon it. The 
late hours kept, the late rising, and the poisoned air 
of the crowded street car, the hall of the theater, 
sprinkled streets, the constant din of the hurry and 
bustle, the stale vegetables, canned goods, the stone 
pavements, and thousands of steps to mount, and 
scores of other inevitable things which are enemies to 
the physical man, — all these take away the beautiful 
pink tinge of the rosy cheek and the bright sparkle of 
the eye of the country girl whose pavements have 
been the grassy carpet of the orchard as she gathers 
the luscious fruits, and the blue-glass of the pastures 
as she trips along afler Blossy and Buttercup, and 
whose street cars have been the backs of old Bob and 
Charlie as they came in from work with the trace 
chains dangling at their feet, whose drinking water is 
not the muddy river water forced by a machine through 
the rusty pipes, but the unadulterated ale of the skies 
as it bubbles from the spring when she drinks from the 
long-handled gourd. 

Oh no, hump-uh ; never make the change. And 
you, city girl, look here, you don't have to be altogether 
inferior to your country sisters ; you must be a good 
friend to the laws of nature. You eat your simple 
food, retire early as a rule, exercise in the morning 
air, take your regular baths, and as often as possible 
visit your country cousin. Avoid dissipation, watch 
your diet carefully and eat plenty of fruit. Keep a 



THE INGLENOOK. 



645 



clear conscience. As much as possible, attend places 
of instruction where you get the best thoughts of the 
best people. Remember your environments are not 
what your country sister's are. Instead of being as- 
sembled together as a society once or twice a week, 
as in the country, here you are confronted every day 
with vices that cross the threshold of the city. Above 
all remember that there is a natural law in the spiritual 
world, and vice versa. So your conduct, your 
thoughts, your life in general will make your health. 



THE BLUES. 



CELERY. 



There are more fads these days and hobbyhorses 
than there are people to ride them. Everybody has 
his own hobby or fad and still there are a few stand- 
ing to the hitching post along the sidewalk and nobody 
to ride them. There is the hot water cure and the cold 
water cure, and the morning starvation and the even- 
ing starvation, and the fasting and the feasting, and 
physical culture and fresh air, and last of all a cure for 
the blues. Now hobbyhorses are good things espe- 
cially for children, but there is a time when a man 
ought to outgrow hobbyhorses, but some people insist 
on riding them all their lives. 

In these days of business depression, of financial 
stringency, when more or - less acute attacks of the 
blues are prevalent and have proven to be almost an 
epidemic, a reliable remedy would be a delight. 

We remember one time of a lady who had a very 
severe attack of the most miserable of all human ail- 
ments, and upon her visit to her family physician, and 
unloading the contents of her miserable mind, which 
had been so completely harassed by the worst enemy 
to which the human mind can fall heir, he at length 
said, " Take this according to directions," handing 
her a little box well wrapped. Upon arriving at 
home she at once proceeded to unwrap the box of 
medicine, and found it to contain a single scrap of 
paper with these words : " Let no day pass without 
doing something for someone." We hope if anyone, 
under whose eye this may chance to fall, is suffering 
from this melancholy disease, he will give it a fair 

trial. 

$ * «$» 






A GOOD SALVE. 



BY SARAH A. SELL. 



Fresh butter the size of an egg. Beeswax the size 
of a hickorynut. Put these in a frying-pan and add 
a handful of the inner bark of the elder. Fry well. 
Remove the elder, and add two tablespoonfuls of 
sweet oil and it is ready for use. 



This vegetable should have a place in everybody's 
garden, not only because it is a very delicious table 
vegetable, but because its medicinal qualities in the 
way of a nerve tonic are among the highest, and when 
eaten in large quantities by those Who are suffering 
more or less from nervous trouble, it proves itself to 
be a remedial agent of incalculable value. Medical 
men use it largely in making their nerve tonics, and 
though many of these are splendid and very costly 
too, yet we know of none that are as valuable as the 
raw vegetable itself in producing the desired results. 
It need not be reserved for table use only, but it could 
be eaten whenever convenient through the day, and 
some of our best Nookers say that the morning is the 
time when the greatest benefit is experienced from the 
use of it. 

*5* <5» ♦ 

OLIVES. 



Within the last decade this country has become 
one of the most olive consuming . countries in the 
world. When this fruit was first shipped to our coun- 
try it was considered to be a luxury for the rich, and 
it still remains that they are used in greater quantities 
in the cities of the eastern part of our country than 
in the rural districts and especially in the West. 
When the people once learn to know the value of this 
little fruit the importation of them must necessarily 
be increased. 

•> *> *:» 

CHEAP LAYER CAKE. 



BY MAGGIE OBER. 



One egg, one cup sugar, one cup sour cream, one 
teaspoonful soda, one teaspoonful vinegar, flour suf- 
ficient. This just fills three pie-pans. 



POTATO BUGS, GO. 



BY J. G. FIGLEY. 

One part Paris green, four parts flour. Sprinkle 
vines when dew is on. 
Bryan, Ohio. 

4» *J» <fr 
CUCUMBER BUGS. GO TOO. 



BY J. G. FIGLEY. 

Sifted ashes mixed with chimney soot, equal parts, 
for cucumbers and melons. 
Bryan, Ohio. 



646 



THE INGLENOOK. 



mi- J OUR LITTLE PEOPLE mil'" 
1 



-BONNIE WAYNE. 



Wy say, my mamma she's got black hair, only it's 
grey now sometimes, and there wuz a nuther woman 
who lives over on Douglass Avenue what calls at our 
house most every day, and honest, they talk about 
most everything sometimes and they talk about me 
too, and sometimes when I'm playing with my dollies 
they don't think that I hear, but I do; and then they 
talk awhile about Luke Davis, — that's the other wom- 
an's boy. I don't know what her name is nohow, but 
we hear 'em, and 'en sometimes we talk to ourselves 
about other folks too, 'cause we're playing like we're 
big folks. And 'en one day we had the bestest time. 
My mamma and Luke's mamma got to talking about 
so many things, and pretty soon the other woman said 
to my ma, " Mrs. Wayne, why don't you get your hair 
colored black again ? " And she told her that it looked 
so ugly and that the people wuz a coloring their hair 
this year and a whole lot of things, and my ma would 
stand in front of the lookingglass and look at her hair, 
and say, " Wy, that does look kind 'o old and grey, 
don't it?" And 'en she said, "Less go down town 
and have our hair colored. So they said to us in the 
other room, " Children, will you play here till we come 
back ? " And my ! Luke looked at me and I looked 
at him, and we thought we would have the bestest 
time, and we did too. As soon as they put on their 
best dresses they went out to the car line and waited 
for the street car, and we watched them from the win- 
dow till they got on the car and 'en we knowed that 
they Wouldn't be back for a long time, and so we 
thought we would play that we wuz keeping house, 
and 'en we got all my playthings out and 'en I got 
the dinner while Luke Davis he turned all the chairs 
upside down for horses, and the big rocking chair for 
the delivery wagon; and he wuz a going to bring me 
a whole lot of groceries from down town, and we had 
the piano stool for the ice wagon, and 'en we played we 
had the bestest things for dinner, and 'en I put Dora 
to sleep. Dora she's my dolly and Hattie is too, but 
Hattie wuz so cross 'at she wouldn't go to sleep, and 
I didn't know what was the matter with her, and 
Luke said that he thought she wanted to have her 
hair colored, and 'en I said they wuz all a having their 
hair colored this year and she could if she wanted to, 
and 'en we did not know what to color it with and we 
hunted and hunted, and 'en Luke he took the top of 
my pa's typewriter and stood on that and 'en he could 
reach up to the writing desk and 'en he found the ink- 



bottle, and my pa has red ink too; and 'en he said he 
alius liked to see little girls have red hair, and 'en I 
said, "Do they wear red hair this year?" And he 
said that sometimes they did, and 'en I said we would 
use that, and 'en I held her on her face in my lap and 
he poured the red ink on Hattie's head and she cried 
a little, but we told her that they wuz a wearing red 
hair this year a good deal and she quit crying, and 'en 
when I lifted her up to comb her nice red hair — my 
doodness ! that red ink wuz all over her nice white 
apron and it wuz all over the carpet and it wuz all 
over my blue apron, and Luke's fingers looked like he 
had been eating little red candies. My, I wish he had ! 
So he got the towel and 'en he wiped and wiped on the 
floor and on my apron and on Hattie's apron, and 
doodness, the more he wiped the more it wuz all over 
everything. And just 'en the street car stopped and 
sure 'nuff there wuz mamma and the other woman, 
and mamma looked so funny with her hair all black 
that I did not hardly know her, and Luke said that he 
didn't believe the other woman wtiz his mamma at all, 
but it wuz, and 'en we hurried and tried to pick up all 
the things that we had been playing with and we got 
the chairs all picked up and the piano stool, and my 
pa's typewriter cover, and 'en we just hurried and 
hurried to get the dishes all back in the pantry before 
they got to the house, and Luke he stubbed his toe 
on the big rug by the door and he spilled the sugar 
all over the floor and we just couldn't pick it up. And 
when we were both down on the floor hurrying as 
fast as we could to get it picked up, wy, here they wuz 
at the door, and when mamma opened the door she 
throwed up both hands and said, " Wy, Bonnie Wayne! 
what in the world are you doing? " And they looked 
at each other and Luke looked at me and I looked at 
all of them, and I didn't know what to do just then; 
and when mamma saw that the sugar was all over the 
rug she said, " My goodness, young one, look at my 
nice rug." But Luke and me had been looking at it, 
and I didn't see how we could get the sugar off. By 
this time Luke's mamma saw my dollie,. and 'en she 
said, " Mrs. Wayne, just look at this doll's hair." 
(to be continued.) 

I know not what awaits me, 

God kindly veils my eyes, 
And o'er each step on my onward way 

He makes new scenes arise; 
And every joy he sends me comes 

A sweet and glad surprise. 

P. P. Bliss. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



647 






1 



1 



What and where is the Round Tower? 

Round Tower is an old tower one hundred and 
eleven feet high standing in front of a church in Cop- 
enhagen, Denmark. It was built by king Christian 
the Fourth. It has a spiral driveway paved wilh 
bricks wide enough for six horses to be driven abreast 

(from the bottom to the top. From the top of this 
tower a very splendid view can be had of the pictur- 
esque city of the Danish capital. It is said that when 
Peter of Russia visited Christian, king of Denmark, 
the king took his distinguished visitor to the top of 
this tower to see the magic sight. The Emperor was 
pleased with the sight and remarked that its dizzy 
height reminded him of the power he had over his 
subjects. He said to Christian, " I have such complete 
control of my subjects that I could command any one 
of them to jump from the top of this tower and he 
would obey me." Christian hung his head a moment 
and said, " That may all be, but, friend Peter, I can 
do more. I can place my head in the lap of any one 
of my subjects in the darkest hour of the night and 
feel perfectly safe. This you cannot do, or dare not 
do." 

Who is Jim Key? 

Jim Key is not a person but a very remarkable horse 
which is on exhibition at the present time in the St. 
Louis Exposition. You will find him on the Pike. 
He is indeed a remarkable animal. He can add, sub- 
tract, multiply or divide any numbers less than thirty. 
He can spell any ordinary name and some that are 
not very ordinary. He can quote Scripture, and give 
you the correct reference for it. He can operate a 
cash register and make change with money. He 
knows a one dollar bill from a two or ten. His master 
takes delight in having him " spell down " boys who 
chance to want to spell with the horse. 
* 

Why is a monkey wrench so called? 

The monkey wrench is not so called because of its 
actual or fancied resemblance to a monkey, nor be- 
cause it is a handy tool to monkey with, but it is sim- 
ply because it is the invention of Charles Monchey, 
of Kings County, New York. 

♦ 

Do the Mohammedans believe in Christ? 

Yes, this far; they think he was a great prophet, 
but they do not believe he was the Son of God, and, 
too, they believe that Mohammed was a greater proph- 
et than Christ. 



What is meant by the hexachord system of music? 

A musical system said to have been invented by an 
Italian monk in the eleventh century, but some writers 
give the credit to early English scholars. The sylla- 
bles used in this system were Ut, Re, Mi, Fa, Sol, La, 
Sa, and these were taken from the lines of a hymn 
to St. John the Baptist. 

* 

How much money did the poor widow throw into the 
treasury? 

The Bible says two mites. Now, two mites make 
a farthing, and four farthings make an English penny, 
and an English penny is two cents. So you see one 
mite is a fourth of a cent, and two mites would be 
the half of a cent, what she cast into the treasury. 
* 
When is gold said to be pure? 

Pure gold is said to be twenty-four karats. Thus 
eighteen karats gold contains eighteen karats of pure 
metal out of twenty-four, or three-fourths pure. 

Please explain zero. 

Zero is a point of beginning; the scale of a ther- 
mometer, or, in mathematics, it is a sign to denote a 
place below the beginning of quantity. 
* 
When was Theodore Leschetizky born? 
In the year 1831. He was a musician, and a noted 
one. He received his first music lessons from his fa- 
ther at the age of five. 

* 

Is asafetida an animal or vegetable product? 

Vegetable. It is prepared from the roots of a plant 
extensively grown in Persia, Beloochistan and Af- 
ghanistan. 

* 

For what does the apostrophe in the word o'clock 
stand? 

It denotes the omission of the letter " f " and the 
word " the." 

* 

What is the Mason and Dixon line? 
This has been well answered on another page of 
this issue. 

* 
Which is correct, setting hen. or sitting hen? 
Hens don't sit, they set. 

* 
Does wheat turn to cheat? 

See Gal. 6 : 7. 



648 



HI 



INGLENOOK. 



^ 1 »fr i ^ i ■ $> i ^i > fr > ft > % i^ i >}< >]t » fr >fr >ft i}< ijf * x * ' t' ' t 1 ' t"t ' * t ' ' t * ' t * * t ' ' X * v ' t ' 't * ' X 1 $"?' ' ♦ ' ' t ' ' t ' it 1 ' $ **$**£ ^ ^«^«+l*+l**l«^»*j*^*+j**j*^*»j*+5»+j»+j+^*+j*-^**j«i**j*^*^4+jt*j» 







The most sensational feature any American maga- 
zine has captured in years is Thomas W. Lawson's 
" Frenzied Finance, the Story of Amalgamated Cop- 
per," which begins in the July issue of Everybody's- 
Magazine. 

This magazine has another feature of signal in- 
terest in the new Hall Caine serial, " The Prodigal 
Son," which also begins in the July issue. In this 
story Hall Caine returns to the style of " The Manx- 
man " and " The Deemster," in which his real suc- 
cesses were scored; and, to judge from the opening- 
chapters, " The Prodigal Son " promises to be as ab- 
sorbingly interesting as its great predecessors. 

There are also seven exceedingly good short stories, 
including a capital naval story by Morgan Robertson, 
making altogether the best number of Everybody's 
that has yet been put forth. 



The one magazine we take up every month with the 
anticipation of a rare intellectual treat is the Arena, 
published at Boston and edited by B. O. Flower, a 
fearless reformer, who is doing the world a great good 
by exposing its shams, hypocrisy and iniquities. In 
this crusade the editor knows no politics, creed or 
doctrine. What is wrong is wrong, no matter under 
what form it is masked. The policy of the Arena is 
liberal in its treatment of all views. The expression 
of all policies professing to reform and improve are 
given a free and impartial hearing, but the editor 
doesn't hesitate to handle without gloves anything 
characterized by more sophistry than solid sense. 
The Arena makes the world better by its existence, 
something that cannot be said of every magazine. 



SPICY THINGS FOR THE FUTURE INGLENOOKS. 



For a weekly magazine, the Inglenook is a great 
success: it is strictly a chimney corner journal: it 
meets the wants of the family ; the home, the farm, the 
study, all receive their due notice, and each individual 
in turn is anxious for the arrival of their weekly 
companion. It shall be the policy of the Inglenook 
to fill an important place in the needs of our young 
people along the lines of science and literary attain- 
ments. Its pages are full of spicy articles from the 
best pens in the country. 

One of the attractive features within the next year 
will be a series of articles of more than ordinary in- 
terest from the pen of Eld. D. L. Miller, of Mount 
Morris, Illinois, under . the title " With Kodak and 
Pencil in the Southland." Eld. Miller is the author 
of " Europe and Bible Lands," " Wanderings in 
Bible Lands," " Seven Churches of Asia," " Gird- 
ling the Globe," and " The Eternal Verities," and is a 
writer of more than ordinary ability. The present 
journey will make his fourteenth trans- Atlantic voy- 
age, and our readers can promise themselves a rare 
treat. Some of his objective points are France, Swe- 
den, Denmark, the Holy Land, Egypt, India, New 
Guinea, Australia, New Zealand, Madagascar, South 
Africa, up the Congo and home again. This will be 



one of the cheapest trips around the world of which 
our Nookers have had an opportunity to avail them- 
selves. Eld. Miller has reached his sixty-second 
milestone and is traveling under the direction of no 
one except his Heavenly Father, himself and his wife, 
who will be his constant companion. He is paying 
his own expenses and if all goes well he will make the 
journey as outlined above. But at his age in life it is 
not possible to outline for very many months ahead, 
but in all probability the good Lord will care for 
them and prosper their journey as in former ones. 
The Nook family wishes them a safe journey and that 
they may return to their own native land to live more 
years of usefulness to man. 

Demetrius Chirighotis, of Smyrna, Asia Minor, who 
is professor of English in the colleges in that city, has 
promised a number of articles on the customs of the 
Oriental people and historical points of interest con- 
cerning Greece, Turkey, the Seven Churches of Asia, 
and the Islands of the JEgean sea. 

The Nature Study Department will fill a place that 
few journals care to notice, but which is of untold 
value. We meet our little people face to face in the 
Bonnie Wayne articles. 

Our magazine is $1.00 per year regularly, but see 
next page for our unprecedented offer. 



OrSTI^Y HALF-FR.ICE 

(to new subscribers only.) 

Inglenook to Jan. I, 1905, regular price $ 5° 

Our Special Trial Offer, only, 2 ' 




An Easy Way to Secure a Valuable Book. 

Inglenook to Jan. 1, 1905, $ 50 

Modern Fables and Parables 1 25 



Both for only 



$1.75 
.75 



The book we offer is a late one, by Rev. Harris, author of Mr. World and Miss Churchmember. The object of 
this book is to teach morality and to correct social evils. It is a splendid book for the home. If you do not already 
have it you will do well to take advantage of this offer. 

Get a Good Fountain Pen. 



iie^s>»w^^ 



Inglenook to Jan. 1, 1905, $ 5° 

Ladies' or Gentlemen's Fountain Pen 1 00 



Both for only 



$1.50 
.75 



This fountain pen is a good one and would be highly prized by any boy or girl. It is worth $1.00 to any one 
in need of a pen. 

THE INGLENOOK has a host of friends scattered all over the United States and into Canada. However, we 
are not yet satisfied. The Nook is a good thing, so say our subscribers, and we want to enlarge its scope of use- 
fulness. That's the reason we are making you this wonderful offer. It's an offer you can't afford to miss. 

The pages of the Inglenook are filled with things you ought to know and could not find out in any other way. 
It is a splendid paper for the young folks, and the older ones enjoy it also. You need its helpful pages in your 
home. We need your assistance in making this magazine the best of its kind to be found. In fact it is a mutual 
affair. You can't well get along without the Nook and we need your support. 

If you are not already a subscriber fill out .the blank below at once and forward it to us and we will do the rest. 
It's only twenty-five cents. You are sure to get double your money's worth and more. Come on now: — We are 
anxiously awaiting your letter. (If you are a regular subscriber, do us the kindness to show this offer to your 
friends, please.) 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



Date,. 



Brethren Pub. House: — 

Enclosed please find , for which please send me the Inglenook to Jan. 1, 1905, and 

your premium, (If premium is wanted, state which one.) 

Name 

Address 



THE INGLENOOK. 



i^^t^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^M^}^^^*******^ 




The Pecos Valley lies in the Southeastern part of New ♦ 

Mexico and is one of the most famous irrigated countries of % 

the world. By filling out the attached coupon full informa- £ 

tion will be mailed. * 



Add 

O 
O 

5 
be 


ress: W 

Name 
Street 
City a 


G. BLACK 
Atchison, To 


G. P 
peka 


A., 
& Santa 


Fe 


Ry. 


Ch 


cago. 


No., 
















id State, 

















♦^„j«$^*„*..;«*«^*j«^j^^^ ►VJ^«£fMi H $ H M5 , ^ H $ H $ H $ H $ t 



To See the World's Fair 

Get a Katy Album containing 
views of all the principal buildings, 
reproduced in colors. Leaves loose- 
ly bound, suitable for framing. Send 
25 cents to Katy, 644 Katy Building, 
St. Louis, Mo. Liberal commission 
to agents and newsdealers. Write 
for particulars. 

SPECIAL OFFER. 

If you prefer, instead of sending 25 
cents, send me a receipt showing pay- 
ment of fare or purchase of ticket via 
M. K. & T. R'y, amounting to $3.00 
or more, and I will gladly send you 
one of my albums. 

KATY, 

St. Louis. 




THE BLACK HILLS. 



The Richest Hundred Square Miles 
in the World. 

The Black Hills, in the southwest- 
ern part of the State of South Da- 
kota, produce one-third of the gold 
found in the United States, and are 
said to be the richest one hundred 
square miles in the world. A new 
booklet on the Black Hills has been 
issued by the North-Western Line, 
with a fine detailed map of this won- 
derful region. Send four cents in 
stamps for a copy of the booklet to 
W. B. KNISKERN, P. T. M. Chi- 
cago & North-Western R'y, Chicago, 
111. 




SieascL CtvrZ£**A-&f' 



Nearly every person has money at 
some time which it is desirable to 
invest. To do this wisely and well 
is what each one wishes; and with 
ordinary care and forethought this 
result may be attained. 

This is an age of great material 
blessings in which large manufac- 
turing industries take an important 
place. To find such an industry in 
the hands of careful, conservative and 
experienced business men, who have 
achieved a reputation for strict up- 
rightness, is itself a guarantee of suc- 
cess. If in addition to this you find 
that the company is progressive, and 
has the latest and most economical 
processes for manufacture, besides an 
unlimited supply of raw materials all 
conveniently located, and immediate- 
ly adjoining the company's works, 
the investment then partakes of a pe- 
culiarly safe and substantial charac- 
ter without any elements of specula- 
tion, and this is what the Great 
Northern Portland Cement Company 
has to offer. It is an assured suc- 
cess. 




Perhaps you know some of the fol- 
lowing people who have visited the 
works of the Great Northern Port- 
land Cement Company at Marlbor- 
ough. If so, you are at liberty to 
write any one or all of them, enclos- 
ing stamp for reply: — 

Henry E. Witmore Findlay, Ohio 

Israel B. Miller, Gettysburg, Ohio 

Dr. Geo. L. Shoemaker 

North Manchester, Ind 

William A. Dickey, ..N. Manchester, Ind 
Rev. Frank Fisher, Mexico, Ind 

At present you have an opportuni- 
ty to purchase stock in the Great 
Northern Portland Cement Company 
on terms decidedly to your advan- 
tage. Descriptive booklet and com- 
plete detailed information can be ob- 
tained by writing to 

HOWARD H. PARSONS, 
82 Griswold St. Detroit, Mich. 

25t3 



the: inglenook. 



THE COLONY 



...ON... 



LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 

...IN THE... 

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 










BRETHREN OAK GROVE CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL. 

Still continues to attract the attention of homeseekers. 

The uniform success of those who have settled here and the immense growth of 
every variety of crop which is again in evidence establishes the fact that here is the 
place where the industrious man of small means can make a California home. 

EASTERN PEOPLE SO EASTERN FARMING-. 

You don't have to spend years learning a new business. 

ALFALFA, CATTLE, CORN, HOGS, 

besides the California fruits, are the products which enable the farmer to pay for 
his land and make a good living while doing it. 

SPECIAL LOW BATES TO CALIFORNIA. 

From August 15th to Sept. 10th the railroads will sell Round Trip excursion 
tickets to San Francisco (with stop-overs). 

From Chicago $50 00 

From Mississippi River 47 50 

From Missouri River,. 45 00 

Final return limit, Oct. 23. 

ALSO SEPTEMBER 15th TO OCTOBER 15th COLONIST ONE-WAT TICKETS 
TO ANY CALIFORNIA POINT. 

From Chicago $33 00 

From Mississippi River, 30 00 

From Missouri River, 25 00 

By this arrangement you can come to Laton on the excursion rate and see our 
land. If it suits you, go back and bring your family out on the colonist rate. 

Land sells for $30 to $60 per acre, including perpetual water right. Terms, one- 
fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. 

From twenty to forty acres will support the average family in comfort. 

If interested send your name and address and receive printed matter and our 
local newspaper free for two months. "Write to 

NARES & SAUNDERS, ■ Laton, California. 

2(1 1 1 3 HeiitiOD the INRLENOOK when vntuu 



YOUNG WOMEN WANTED! 

At Sherman Hospital to receive in- 
struction and take the two years' course 
of study to become trained nurses. 
Graduates always in demand and receive 
good pay for their services. 

For .information apply to Supt. of 
Sherman Hospital, Elgin, 111., or 

MRS. E. "W. HIGrGINS, 
262 Du Page St. Elgin, 111. 

y 27t3 

$2,500 buys highly improved fruit 
farm of 20 acres, including stock and 
tools. One and one-half miles to fine 
market. 

J. L. BXiICKENSTAPF, 

.Bangor, Michigan. 

Iot26 Mention lliii IVfil.KNOOK when wnnnt- 

plUOrUP Fortunes in this plant. Easily 
U I ™ *3L|" U grown. Koots and seeds for sale. 
Room in your garden. Plant in Fall. Booklet 
and Magazine, 4c. Ozark Ginseng Co.. Dept. W-8, 
Joplin. Mo. 24-ti3 

FREE SAMPLE 

Send letter or postal for iree SAMPLE 
HINDOO TOBACCO HABIT CURE 

We cure you of chewing and smoking 
lor 60c, or money back. Guaranteed perfectly 
harmless. Address Milford Drug Co., Milford, 
Indiana, "We answer all letters. 

2jtM Mention M'*- INHLK^'mmK wmen -mting 

Cap Goods! 

Our business has almost doubled itself 
during the last year. We are sending 
goods by mail to thousands of perma- 
nent, satisfied customers throughout the 
United States. The reason is simple. 

Our Goods are Reliable. Our Variety Is 
Large. Our Prices are Low. 

All orders filled promptly, postpaid. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or your money 
refunded. Send us a sample order and 
be convinced. Write us for a booklet 
of unsolicited testimonials and new line 
of samples, which will be furnished free. 
Send at once to 

R. E. ARNOLD, Elgin, 111. 

HOMESEEKERS' EXCURSIONS 




To the Northwest, West and South- 
west, and Colonist Low 
Rates West, 



Via the North-Western Line. Ex- 
cursion tickets at greatly reduced 
rates are on sale to the territory indi- 
cated above. Standard and Tourist 
Sleeping Cars, Free Reclining Chair 
Cars and " The Best of Everything." 
For dates of sale and full particulars 
apply to Agents Chicago & North- 
Western R'v 

SPECIAL REDUCED EXCUR- 
SION RATES 
Will be in effect from all points on 
the Chicago & North-Western Rail- 
way for the occasions named below: 
Cincinnati, Ohio, July 18 to 23. 
Louisville, Ky, Aug. 16-29. 
San Francisco, Sept. 5th to 9th. 
San Francisco, Sept. 19th to 25th. 

For information as to rates, dates 
of sale, etc., of these or other occa- 
sions, call upon the Ticket Agent of 
the North-Western Line. 



QtTTTTtTTTt^TTTTTTTTTYT TTTT TTTTTTv 



I The Price of Equity Shares 
is $25 each par value. 



O '!""!'' *I"I* "I" "i~ "I" *i^ "I* *J* *!"' *J~ *I* "i - * 'J* *1" *■*'' "I* ■"1"' *J~ 'it* "t" 1 "1" *■" "l" 'i"' ""I" '"I7 "i^ ^S* ^I" *!"■ ^5 

On each subscription received during 
the next 3o days, and this advertisement 
planed fast, earnings will be counted 
from June 1st. 



^^ *?* »Jj *f* »?* *J* *j- *T* ^ vl* »-|* *Tj »f * ^T* vT* *?* *f* vf* J**J**T,,»j. *!**.?-* -J* »J* -J* i-T*~? "X -l 'J'*T* t T£J 



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WANTED! 

SHAREHOLDERS EVERYWHERE 

Established, 1896. Incorporated, 1902. 



* 

* 

* 

* 

* 



Dear Nooker:-- 

We want 200 persons to distribute our "EQUITY" 
General Merchandise Catalogues where we do not have 
shareholders. The large Catalogues are bringing in lots of 
business and we are needing more help. 

If you are interested in this proposition, write us at 
once. 

EQUITY MFG. AND SUPPLY COMPANY, 

153, 155, 156, 159 So. Jefferson St., 

Chicago, Illinois. 



* 
* 



f s -J-* "."j- -"i"- •-'j- "-J- «-j- ■■ J- •-[-■ -j- ~-j-» •■j-' ~-j- •■}- -J- "-J* »-"j-i *-j* »^f* >^j «-j-» "-f- *-j* •-'J- ~j-« *^J- »-f- «-j- -j- *j» »^f* »i« *y»»j* *!'■* **T"* "T - **('* *"X J *X* *^~* "T* ^I" *X* *T* *^l* •I-' *^f* •'(■■ •-j-' •-J-" ■» j ■• •■ J-* •■ j- -J-* *-j- »-j- ■'f- "I-" -J-* -f-* «-{■* -J- 'J-* *-f" "-Jr "J - * »-j-" » j- •-*■■ »-j- ■^Jj k-f-* *Jj ■►Ij *^jj *^f- «-j» •-f- i-j-* vj. |(^* 



Now is Your Opportunity to Join 
a Successful Enterprise. 

SIX per cent paid on the investment, besides the FIVE per cent discount to 

shareholders from our catalogue prices. How is it done? Why, the 

shareholders all over the country do the advertising in 

turn for their 5 per cent discount. 



© 1* *1" 'i* jr "i" *J"l* V ■{'"1**1* *|* >£■» r^> -]* rji »J* fji -J* -J* -|* ■■]!* -J* fjwji -|- - J- -J> i^J- -J. - [. -J- Q 



* 

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EQUITY SHARES are getting scarce 
and present indications show a tendency 
of doubling their face value. 



01 , M+MfH , M+fH"H'HH4"M4tHHW l 

* We have 30,000 prospective customers + 
7. who will hold our catalogues in readiness 4- 

* to show to their 60,000 thousand neigh- J 
4- bors and friends, and it is in this way the "r 
J. great volume of business is created. >$• 

* * 



The Brethren Colonies 



IN THE 




Belt of Michigan 



are an actual success. The colony of the Lakeview church is located on lands 
surrounding the village of Brethren, Michigan. Brethren, Michigan, is lo- 
cated on the main line of the Pere Marquette System, 105 miles north of 
Grand Rapids and about 14 miles east of Lake Michigan. All conditions of 
soil, climate and location make this spot an ideal one for general farming, 
fruit-growing and stock-raising. Lands have been sold to about 120 families 
of the Brotherhood and their families, of which number about one-hajf have 
already located and are clearing up their places. The possibilities of this dis- 
trict are exceptional. The Brethren tract embraces about 20,000 acres, of 
which over 11,000 acres have already been sold. There are just as good and 
as desirable locations remaining as those that have been bought and the 
prices have not yet been advanced, but with the improvements now going on, 
developing the country so rapidly, it is only a short time till prices advance 
considerably. THE TIME TO BUY IS NOW. Present prices range from 
$7 to $15 per acre, on easy terms, or less five (5) per cent for cash. 



The Cadillac Tract— 25,000 Acres of Rich Agricul- 
tural Lands, Excellently Situated and Splen- 
didly Adapted for Farming, Fruit-growing and 
Stock-raising. 

These lands are located from one-half mile to 6 miles from the hustling city of Cadillac, the seat of Wexford 
county, 8,000 inhabitants, all alive, and its location on the Grand Rapids and Indiana R'y (part of the Pennsylvania 
System) and on the Ann Arbor Railroad (part of the Wabash System) together with its other advantages render 
it the best trading point and' market place in Northern Michigan. Cadillac and the lands controlled by the ad- 
vertiser are located about 98 miles north of Grand Raptds and 50 miles east of Lake Michigan. They are well wa- 
tered with springs, creeks, rivers and lakes of pure, sparkling water teeming with gamy fish. The soil varies from 
a sandy loam to a clay loam, all of it underlaid with clay and gravel subsoil, which responds eagerly to cultivation. 

For illustrated booklets, maps and information as to reduced rates to these locations, address: 



s^-^^-cte: 



XSOIESIE'E, 



district -/i-g-errt n^icl^ig-aon. I^sm-d. Assn., 

3Z>ept. n^C, 



c-^dhl.i^a.c, ^v/niaxiioAssr. 




Grasp this Opportunity 
to Make Your 

Savings Work 



Investors. 

Consumers. 



We are drawing to the close of ourfirst series 
of voucher contracts, and if you want to take 
advantage of our truly wonderful opportunity 
to invest your savings in our Co-operative 
association, upon our original and scien- 
tific plan you should get your application in 
at a very early date. 

No matter how modest your means, you can 
become a shareholder in this company and at 
once begin to take advantage of its many eco- 
nomic features, every one of which will have 
your approval and endorsement. Our com- 
pany means a new era in the co-operative field. 
a new low-price level and a new degree of 
purchasing power. 

Send your application at once. Grasp 
this opportunity to make your sav- 
ings work. 



How and When 
to Invest 



The Time is Now. Do not postpone 
the day when you are going to make a start for 
prosperity. If you do, the chances are you'll 
never start. Get out of the rut of the man who 
just lives each day so he can work the next. 
Have an investment to look after your interest 
in daysof adversity. 

Some people believe in investing their sav- 
ings but are not satisfied with reasonable 
returns on their money. They want to become 
millionaires in a night. They invest their mon- 
ey in all sorts of "get-rich-quick" schemes and 
usually pay dearly for their experiences. It is 
useless to save money and then invest it where 
it will be lost or even where you cannot help 
but worry about it. 

In the springtime of life — in the heyday of 
prosperity, every man and woman should in- 
vest in an enterprise which is a credit to Christ- 
ianity as well as to the Commercial World; so 
that in the days to come they will not have to 
look back upon the past with feelings of regret. 

Our plan of Scientific Co-operation elimi- 
nates all elements of failure and worry. Make 
your savings work antl do good. 



Profits on 
Savings Assured 

Of all the great i joney-making department 
stores the Mail Order Store is the greatest. 
Its line comprises everything from a toothpick 
to a traction engine. Every thing people eat, 
wear and use from youth to old age. Its field 
is not limited by city and suburban limitations, 
but extends to every farm and town of this 
country and every country of the globe. Its 
expenses — selling and fixed — are less than any 
other business. It's a strictlycash business. It 
has few losses. It does not depend on sea- 
sons or local conditions. It is a "hard times" 
business. It does not even depend upon pros* 
perity. Its profits are large in comparison to 
the amount invested. We advise you to be- 
come a co-partner of, our company on this 
series of vouchers as soon as possible, even if 
you start with but one share, and thereby 
obtain the advantages of our original co-op- 
erative idea. You will find your investment 
the best and safest you have ever made — you 
buy into an established, growing and success- 
ful business. 



Satisfaction 



Guaranteed 



A reputation for honest advertising is 

extremely valuable, and can be retained only 
by the most painstaking care: a single misrep- 
resentation may do more harm than months 
of eaniest effort can repair. Advertisingintro- 
duces our goods. Merit sells them. We 
know a satisfied customer is our best advertise- 
ment. Our Rule: "No Disappointment in 
What Lies Behind the Advertisement." We 
invite you to send orders from our catalogs, 
circulars or advertisements with absolute 
assurance that you will be protected. If the 
price is lower at the time your order reaches us 
we will give you the advantage of the reduction 
and never charge you more than the price 
named without first writing you with full 
explanations and getting your consent to the 
higher price. Do not hesitate to order any 
article we advertise as our positive guarantee 
goes with each shipment, and there is no risk 
on your part. There is no discount on the 
quality of the goods we send out and our 
representations are always exact. No bluster, 
no display, just straightforward facts. Now, 
would you not like to be a co-partner and cus- 
tomer of a company which stands for the appli- 
cation of the Golden Rule in business, and 
Christian character upon the part of each 
worker, from the office boy to the President? 
Contracts to the extent of $135,000 made 
since February 1st, 19t*4. Write for partic- 
ulars. 



Remember ! 

While we are working together, each for the 
other and conscientiously and earnestly en- 
deavoring to build up a large business, we do it 
on thebasis of treating each individual fairly and 
under no circumstances place any of our pa- 
trons, co-operators or stockholders in an em- 
barrassing position. 

We consider all correspondence, business 
transactions, contracts on co-operation, etc. as 
sacred and never embarrass any one by publish- 
ing extracts from letters, names or addresses 
of co-operators or customers without having 
the written con.ent on file in our office. 



Albaugh Bros., 
Dover & Co. 



The Mail Order House 



341-43 Franklin St., 

Chicago, - - Illinois. 



Our New General 
Catalog Free,. 



Our new general merchandise catalog will be 
ready the last of August and will be sent free 
to every reader of the Inglenook answering: 
this advertisement. We will also take pleasure 
in sending a 64-page book of testimonials from 
satisfied patrons, the consent to ^use name 
having been secured in each case. Our large 
general Co-operative Catalog and Price List, a 
magnificent book, contains a complete line of 
high grade General Merchandise at co-op- 
erative money-savini; prices. 

Careful attention is being given to the illus- 
trations, descriptions, prices, etc. Each articlt 
will be described as if it were the only one 
offered for sale, for the catalog must appeal to 
the reason of the one who receives it, and 
answer questions that may arise in his mind 
concerning the goods offeredand thecompany. 
We work at all times for the interest of our 
customers, and after a most careful study we 
have originated a new plan of Freisrht and 
Express Rebates, about which this Big 
Catalog will tell you in detail, This means 
the saving to our patrons of thousands of 
dollars, yet our prices have not been advanced 
one cent. It is harder to save money than to 
make money. Make saving easier by ordering 
your goods from our catalog. Make your 
savings make you money by investing your 
savings in our co-operalive institution. 

Won't You Join Hands With Us? 



fltlNMSOK. 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 




LOUISIANA PURCHASE EXPOSITION.— Looking Past the Palace of Education. 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



uly 12, 1904 



$1 .00 per Year 



Number 28, Volume VI 



The Kinkaid Homestead Act 



Sidney, Nebraska, May 9th, 1904. 
Mr. Geo. L. McDonaugh, 

Colonization Agent, U. P. R. R., Omaha, Nebr. 
Dear Brother: — Hope that the Colonization Department of 
Union Pacific Railroad will let it be generally known amongst 
the Brethren that they can secure 640 acres of government 
land under the new homestead law in this district. There is 
between 160,000 and 200,000 acres of it for free homesteads. 
We need members here, as we are but few in number and have 
a good churchhouse. Here is a town of 1,200 to 1,300 inhab- 
itants, good churches of other denominations and good schools. 
We have lived here eighteen years. 

(Signed) J. U. Slingluff, 
Minister. 

Sidney, Nebraska, May 9th, 1904. 
Mr. Geo. L. McDonaugh, 

Colonization Agent, U. P. R. R., Omaha, Nebr. 
Dear Sir: — I hepe you will get a large number i.f Brethren 
to locate in western Nebraska. Land can be obtained easily 
under the .new Kinkaid law. The possibilities in western Ne- 
braska are great. Yours truly, 

(Signed) Ira S. Kline. 



Sidney, Nebraska, May 9th, 1904. 
Mr. Geo. L. McDonaugh, 

Colonization Agent, U. P. R. R-, Omaha, Nebr. 

Dear, Brother: — Referring to the advertisement in the Ingle- 
nook about the new homestead law that permits a settler to 
enter 640 acres of land in Nebraska instead of 160 acres. 

There is plenty of good land here and we would like to have 
the Brethren in the East come and take it up. There is also 
good improved land that can be bought reasonable by those 
who do not care to take raw land under the homestead law. 
We have a churchhouse in Sidney and good schools. We need 
more members and a good missionary to work in the town. 
Hope you will make this known amongst the Brotherhood and 
that some of them will avail themselves of the cheap home- 
seekers' rates and come to Sidney, Nebraska, and see for them- 
selves. Fraternally yours, 

(Signed) M. M. Kline. 

P. S. — We came from Valley of Virginia originally. Have 
been here sixteen years. M. M. Kline. 



George L. McDonaugh, who for years has been favorably 
known to the Brethren of the United States, is the Coloniza- 
tion Agent of the Union Pacific Railroad, and will be at the 
service of all Brethren who may desire to settle along the line 
of this road. Write him at Omaha. Nebraska, for FREE print- 
ed matter. 



Homeseekers' Excursions 

To enable intending settlers to reach Western Nebraska and the lands affected under the Kinkaid Act the 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Has put in effect Homeseekers' rates on the first and third Tuesdays of each month at rate of one fare 

plus 82.00 from its Eastern Terminals, Council Bluffs, Omaha, Kansas City 

and Leavenworth to Sidney and North Platte. 

Homesteaders can thus visit the United States Land Offices and get proper information 
without any unnecessary expenditure of time and money. 



PRIZE CONTEST 

HOW TO GET A VALUABLE PREMIUM 

WE ARE GOING TO GIVE A FEW VALUABLE PREMIUMS, AND ALL OUR INGLENOOK FRIENDS 

ARE INVITED TO ENTER THE CONTEST. 



Her© Tliey -A.r© ! 




1. The one sending us the most new subscribers to the Inglenook for the remainder of the year at 25 

cents each, or with premium as per our offer* at 75 cents each, will receive one set Literature of All 
Nations, containing 10 volumes, weight, 26 pounds. Subscription price, 

2. The one holding second place will receive a splendid ladies' or gentlemen's watch (whichever pre- 

ferred). The watch is equal to one that regularly retails for about, 

3. The one holding third place will receive a good Teacher's Bible, Arabian Morocco, divinity circuit, worth 

4. The one holding fourth place will receive the book "Modern Fables and Parables" worth 

5. Each person sending 10 or more 
men's, worth 

Cash must accompany each order. 



Each person sending 10 or more subscriptions receive a good fountain pen. either ladies' or gentle- 
men's, worth 



*See our offer in this issue. 




3NTOT7C- is Your Tj-me. 



$25.00 
8.00 
3.00 
1,20 
l.OO 



No. 4 



Right now is the time to make things count. Get a good start and you will come out all 
right in the end. The one who goes at it at once with a determination to win stands a good 
chance to get a S25.C0 set of books FREE. 

It is an easy matter to get subscriptions for a paper like the Inglenook, especially when 
you offer it for half price. You ought to be able to get nearly all your neighbors and friends. 

Do not say that you do not have a good territory and it's no use to try. Our experience 
leads us to believe that one place is as good as another. Some places where we least expect 
subscriptions we get the most. It is up to you whether or not you get this fine set of books. 
SOME ONE IS GOING TO GET THEM. Let every loyal Nooker get out and hustle. Aim 
at the top. Don't be satisfied with anything less. ALL THESE PRIZES ARE QOINO TO 
BE O.IVEN TO SOME ONE. Go to work at once. Who will send the first list? (In sending 
your list, please mention that you are entering the contest.) This contest will not last long. Wilt 
announce closing date soon. Send all orders to 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



■s> \A> \fer \d> il> %#/ \l> il> \d> \i> %<!> \#> U> i^> \#/ ^|> \4> \|i> \|> \|> \|> \|> \4> \^> \l> \4> %^/ \^/ \i> ^ %A> \i> Vd> i#> Vl> \d^ \d/ \#> \l> xl> <S^. 

Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



1 IDAHO 



3 

a 



is the best-watered arid State 
winds, destructive storms and 
mate it makes life bright and 
We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer 
change for the general improvement in your condi 
account of health, we believe that Idaho will meet b 
and sensible thing to do; that is, go and see the coun 
swer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger 
fares to investigate thoroughly a new country saves 
Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all prin 
for yourself. Selecting a new home is like selecting 



in America. Brethren are moving there because hot 
cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless cli- 
worth living. 

to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a 
tion in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on 
oth requirements. There is, however, only one wise 
try for yourself, as there are many questions to art- 
work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad 
thousands of dollars in years to follow. ^' 

cipal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see S 1 
a wife — you want to do your own choosing. ^ 



Round=Trip Homeseekers' Excursion Tickets 

Will be sold to points in Idaho as follows: West of Pocatello on first and third Tuesday of May, 
August, September and October, 1904. To points north of Pocatello tickets will be sold only in May 
and October, 1904. The rate will apply from Missouri river points, and from St. Paul, Chicago, Bloom- 
ington, Peoria and St. Louis. Tickets to Idaho points will also be sold by the Union Pacific, from sta- 
tions on their lines in Kansas and Nebraska. Rate will be one regular first-class fare for the round trip 
plus $2.00, with limit of 15 days going. Return passage may commence any day within the final limit of 
21 days from date of sale of tickets. Tickets for return will be good for continuous passage to starting 
point. 



fj^l 




buw^y*--' — ••-:£ 


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&!r^S2 


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fsjiJ|| 




"ST*^", 


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PAYETTE VALLEY HOME.— Five Years from Sagebrush. 



3 Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. 
Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat, Oats and Barley. 



Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 80-acre tract, covered with sage brush. 
Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to wheat. Yielded 30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres 
to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sown in February 
or March the yield would have been much larger. 

Alfalfa was sown with the gram and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 
oats. 

Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to 5 pounds each, four of 
the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) E. L. Dotson. 



^ S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. 

J. E. HOOPER, Agent, Oakland, Kansas. 



Mention the INGLENOOK when wntin,. 



D. E. BURLEY, 

G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R., 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 



Fine $i 



Vol. VI. 



July 12, 1904. 



No. 28. 



REMEMBER WHAT I SAY, MY BOY. 



C. B. Gibbs, 13 West Market street, Indianapolis, thinks 
this poem, which appeals to him, may appeal to others. 
It was written by Cortland Ball in Detroit, 1873. 

Remember what I say, my boy, 

Wherever you may be; 
Be sure and treat your fellow-man 

With due civility; 
And if you see a man that's down, 

His good try to promote, 
And never, never, slight a man 

That wears a ragged coat. 

You'll find there's many in this world 

Who claim to be of note, 
Tbat say there is no honesty 

Beneath a ragged coat; 
But heed not what they say, my boy, 

And reason on this plan — 
That oft a ragged coat is wrapped 

Around an honest man. 

The squirrel gnaws the bitter shuck 

For what he finds within; 
He's found that though the outside's rough, 

There's sweet beneath the skin, 
So you will find through life, my boy, 

As down the stream you float, 

That oft an honest heart doth beat 

Beneath a ragged coat. 

* * * 
SNAPSHOTS. 



No man lives right who does not live for Cod. 



A man can kill an elephant, but he can't create a 
gnat. 

* 

Love can see beauty where the world can only see 
deformity. 

* 

The man who borrows trouble always pays a big 
rate of interest. 

* 

Men are builders of their own destiny and especially 
of their children. 

* 

Everything good in a man thrives best when prop- 
erly recognised. 

* 

If we had no suffering in this life nobody could un- 
derstand what love is. 

* 

You arc not helping your own crop by censuring 
your neighbor's plowing. 

* 

No man willfully wrongs another more than he 
wrongs his nature in the act. 



The keenest ax with ivhich to hew dozvn the tree of 
love is the ax of ingratitude. 
* 

The man who is willing to obey God and decides to 
do it, is very likely to succeed. 



Sympathy is something you can't learn at college. 

* 
Success anywhere requires singleness of purpose. 

* 
Common sense is a hard thing to have too much of. 



Do something every day that you would not be 
ashamed to have known in heaven. 



It is never hard to do the right thing. Where the 
rub comes in is in deciding to do it. 



The man who goes out to meet trouble alivays does 



ludaj Iscariot was not the last man zcho lost all by 
getting his heart set on money matters. 



Where hard ivork kills one man, 'worry buries a 
dozen. 



ll<\51 



When a man finds out that he needs knowledge he 
has his hand on the gate that leads to it. 



THE INGLENOOK. 







' 3 "< m;^~\ 













;;;~V 



THE INGLENOOK. 



653 



ILLINOIS BUILDING. 



That the architects might have free scope in carry- 
ing out their elaborate plans, a site was selected for 
the Illinois State building on the brow of a hill in 
the Western part of the grounds from which a vista 
of nearly the entire Exposition picture is obtainable. 

So large is this pretentious building that it is easily 
mistaken for one of the exhibit palaces. Its front is 
200 feet in length and its sculpture-crowned roof may 
be seen from any part of the grounds. The Trail, 
leading from the foreign section to the Plateau of 
States, passes in front of the buildings. 

Neighbors of Illinois are California, Idaho, Tennes- 
see and Virginia. The Temple of Fraternity is nearby 
and across the broad avenue is the Japanese reserva- 
tion where is to be seen the most beautiful of Oriental 
landscape and architecture. 

The interior of the building has two monumental 
features. A rotunda into which the main entrance 
opens reaches from the mosaic floor to the vaulting 
dome, running through all three floors of the build- 
ing. Another feature is the State room just behind 
the rotunda which supplies, exclusive of foyer and 
stage, a floor area 50x60 feet. This room has a deep- 
ly paneled ceiling and on its walls is a mural painting 
— an epic frieze 6 feet wide telling the history of Illi- 
nois. This space is spanned by trusses without a 
single column. 

The interior court follows the general outline of 
the building in form and style, and is laid out in the 
form of a plaisance or garden of a formal type. It 
is also suggested that this buliding, the roof of which 
is practically on a level with the terrace of the Art 
Building, could be successfully utilized as a prome- 
nade, with a roof garden and restaurant attachment. 

The contract price of the building was $319,399, and 
its builder was John J. Dunnavant & Co. It was com- 
pleted by Dedication Day, was occupied at that time 
by the U. S. regular troops and later was used as a 
sculpture shop. 

Howard J. Rogers, Chief of the departments of 
Education and Social Economy has charge of the ex- 
hibits to be placed in this building. 

* * * 
MARY HAD A LITTLE LAMB. 



Is there a boy or girl in all this broad country who 
has not heard of Mary and her little lamb? The 
one, you know, who followed her to school one day 
and made the children laugh. Of course, every- 
body knows about the little creature, and perhaps 
has sighed to think that it went the way of all 
mutton vears and vears ago. 



Perhaps the great majority of readers, when they 
grew up to be men and women, came to the con- 
clusion that Alary and her lamb were both fictions. 
as much so as the old woman who lived in a shoe, 
or Cinderella ; but, strange to say, there was a Mary, 
and also a lamb, and the world-famous ditty was 
founded on fact. The author was Sarah J. Hale, 
who died in Philadelphia at the age of eighty-six. 
The lamb, as previously remarked, must have died 
long ago. and on Dec. 10, 1889, the heroine of the 
poem breathed her last. 

Her name was Mary F. Sawyer. She was born 
in Sterling, Mass., in 1806, and in that town the 
lamb episode is said to have occurred. It does not 
appear that Mary otherwise distinguished herself 
than in owning the lamb, but the poem gives us the 
assurance that Mary was a kind-hearted girl, and 
in that respect she maintained her reputation until 
the day of her death. 

Her maiden name was Tyler, and as Aunt Mary 
Tyler she was known by everybody near, and es- 
teemed by all. 

Thus the famous trio disappears from the earth, 
Mary and her lamb and the woman who made them 
both renowned. The poem itself is one of those 
imperishable things like the " Iliad," which genera- 
tions yet to come will read with undiminished pleas- 
ure. There is no use speculating as to the cause of 
its popularity — it has come to stay. 

* * * 

FEMININE MEASUREMENTS. 



Ten thousand women having been measured by sci- 
entific authority, it is discovered that English women 
are the tallest, the Americans next and the French 
last. American women, however, had the greatest 
weight, which will surprise a good many, while the 
English came second and the French again last. The 
savants who made inquiry into these delicate matters 
did not regard the age of the ladies, nor did they 
measure their waists. Singularly enough, Americans 
are said to have the largest waists and the narrowest 
chests, while women of the Latin races have precisely 
the reverse. The Viennese ladies and women of the 
lower class are proverbial " lacers." but the pulling 
of the corset string does not seem to impair their 
health or in any way affect their appearance beyond 
giving them figures renowned in song and story. A 
superb pair of shoulders, the deep-bosomed beauty of 
the peasant girl and a tapering waist associated with 
youth and refinement are characteristics of the women 
of European centers. It will be conceded by statistics 
that these women live quite as long as American 
women, whose average shape represents no such spe- 
cific charm of outline. — Boston Herald. 



654 



THE INGLENOOK. 



WORMS AND BUGS. 



BY J. G. FIGLEY. 

In this part of Ohio apple and other fruit trees are 
annually pestered by a species of worm, the tent 
caterpillars, which make their nests in the limbs of 
the trees in April or May, and sometimes in June. 
The nests are covered with a tough web, and when 
the creatures are fairly well grown they leave the 
nests and, trailing a thread after them, if let alone, 
will cover the entire tree in a web, and of course 
it is of no more use that year. Some spray the 
trees with London purple, others tie corncobs on 
long poles, and, keeping the cobs soaked in coal 
oil, at intervals go about and burn the nests to 
destroy them. There is danger in this hurting the 
trees, as well as in some of the worms getting away 
to do further mischief. My remedy is to put coal 
oil on the nest, which absorbs the oil, or else ampu- 
tate the twig or limb if not too large. This gives 
me no further trouble with them that year. I do 
not know where the worms come from or how they 
manage to make their nests on the tree. They can 
do any amount of damage to a tree by eating off the 
leaves. 

As a rule, after these worms are annihilated, a 
few days will elapse before another species of worm 
I call the measuring worm (from its habit of trav- 
eling by putting head and tail together and then 
stretching out again), puts in its appearance. Ap- 
parently all at once the trees are full of them, busi- 
ly " munching " the leaves. If the limbs are shak- 
en, the worms spin down on threads, and if left 
alone will go back to the tree and begin business 
again. They can in a very short time make a tree 
look as though it had been blasted by fire. Some 
spray the trees after the buds for fruit are formed, 
either with Paris green or London purple, and say 
that if the spraying is done at any other time it will 
be of no value. For my part, I think as effective a 
way as any is to shake the limbs of the tree or 
tap them with a long pole, and by " swishing " the 
pole about, break off the worms' connection with 
the tree, and if you have any chickens that are 
half-way sociable and friendly, they will follow 
from tree to tree and attend to the worms. I think 
some call these " army worms," but cannot get the 
scientific name, though they likely belong to the 
order lepidoptera, as do the caterpillars, which are, 
I believe, called CUsiocampa Americana. I pre- 
sume it might be correct to say that these worms 
are propagated or produced from eggs laid by the 
butterfly or adult imago. 

As for the worms that infest currant and other 
berry bushes, some to destroy them spray the 



bushes with Paris green or London purple, some 
use white hellebore, but from the rather unsafe 
nature of these remedies, I never used them, rely- 
ing first upon strong soap-suds, and afterward, by 
way of experiment, found that a not too strong 
solution of alum water was the most effective way 
to get rid of the worms. 

For the pieris oleracea which leaves its marks up- 
on our cabbage patches, I think that instead of ren- 
dering the vegetable rather unsafe for use by sprink- 
ling with a solution of Paris, green, it is more ef- 
fective and sanitary to take some common barrel 
salt, heat it well in an oven, but do not scorch it, 
then make it fine with a rolling-pin, and sprinkle 
each cabbage head with about a tablespoonful in 
the morning while the dew is on, and the sun will 
see that it is dissolved and scattered all through the 
head. It also invigorates the vegetable. In a lit- 
tle patch among the potatoes I have seen chickens 
leisurely walking from head to head, deftly picking 
clean each one from worms. 

Bryan, Ohio. 

*> *z* *> 

RAILWAY CAR FOR DOCTORS. 

There has just been constructed at Preston, Eng- 
land, for the exclusive use of the medical officer 
of the Rhodesia Railway, in Africa, a unique car, 
which provides for comfortable accommodations by 
day and night, and suitably arranged for the climat- 
ic conditions of South Africa. Each window open- 
ing provides for a glass frame, a louvre frame and a 
gauze dust-proof frame, each of these acting inde- 
pendently in separate runs. The glass frame is 
provided with spring sash balances, and the louvre 
and gauze frames furnished with springs and lifts. 
The independent gauze frame is entirely an innova- 
tion, and one which is absolutely essential, if com- 
fort is to be considered, owing to the sand and dust 
storms so prevalent in South Africa. The body of 
the carriage is divided into four compartments — 
namely, living room, surgery, lavatory and kitchen, 
with a balcony at one end for the cook's use. The 
living room is fitted up complete, with a woven 
rattan spring couch, two revolving armchairs, flap 
tables, wardrobe with mirror front, writing desk 
and cupboards and drawers, and two basket racks 
over side windows. The surgery is fitted up with 
hooks and rings in roof, and also with a guard's 
valve to the vacuum brake. The kitchen is fitted 
with an open and closed coal stove, having two 
ovens and water boiler complete. 

The Pennsylvania Railroad has ordered a some- 
what similar equipment for its line. — Cincinnati En- 
quirer. 



INGLENOOK, 



055 



BEE HUNTING IN PENNSYLVANIA. 
BY ORANGE H. HINKLE. 

As bees are not so plenty in Pennsylvania as in 
some western States, it is more difficult to find 
them. We choose a clear, calm day and in the 
morning proceed to a hill where we set bait, us- 
ing honey and oil of myrrh, or some other oil with 
strong scent to draw the bees. If this will not 
bring them we burn a few combs, which is sure to 
bring them. Soon one will come, then two, then 
four or five, until there are a number of them. Aft- 
er we get a course, we take sulphur and drop a lit- 
tle on one bee, and when it leaves we time it to see 
about how far it goes. Now we close the bait box, 
keeping some of the bees in it, and go to another 
hill and open it, getting a course from that place. 
If the two courses are at different angles you are 
almost sure to find the bee where the two courses 
come to a point. For example take a triangle. The 
two courses being from the two points opposite 
the base line, come together at the top. 

They ^re found in nearly all kinds of trees that 
grow here ; and are from ten to fifty feet above the 
ground. They go into the tree through small knot 
holes or cracks caused by lightning or storm. How 
do .you capture them, asks some one? Well, we 
wait till the sun has set ; and then we take an axe 
and generally three times as many buckets as the 
honey will fill and proceed to the tree. After fell- 
ing it we cut a hole in where the bees are, and by 
that time the bees are cross and are flying in every 
direction. Now the Pennsylvania bee hunter does 
not bother with mosquito netting or anything else 
to protect his face (which is the proper way), but 
he trusts in his cigar and the biting of his tongue. 
So he ventures to get the honey, watching carefully 
for the queen ; and as his nose is the largest pro- 
jection on his face it is sure to get the first dab, 
which almost knocks him over. But he is bound 
to win ; soon he gets the queen and putting it into 
the hive the bees follow very rapidly and in a few 
hours the majority will be captured. By this time 
some bees have eaten a great amount of honey and 
crawl around over the ground. Suddenly the old 
hunter jumps a tremendous height and pulls up his 
pant leg to find the bee about his ankle somewhere. 
I have had this experience and it is as good as an 
electrical shock. The hive is left at the tree over 
night and in the morning it is wrapped in a sheet 
and brought home, and the bees go to work. Gen- 
erally from four to five pounds of honey and two 
large buckets of comb are procured from a single 
tree. 

Bakers Summit, Pa. 



TRANSIT IN LONDON. 



This metropolis of the world has more than six 
and one-half million souls. Of course when we 
talk about millions it is an incomprehensible thing. 
The only way we can think of it is to endeavor 
to think of a single thousand and then try to imag- 
ine a thousand times that number, and then multi- 
ply it by the number of millions you wish to think 
of. 

Well, six and one-half millions of souls ; where 
do they live, and what do they all do, and how do 
they get from one place to another? In trying to 
solve this problem, the officers of the great munici- 
pality have first placed the belt of suburban train 
services and the great quantity of depots for the 
accommodation of the public. And there is an al- 
most innumerable quantity of street cars running 
hither and thither through the broad, straight 
streets. These street cars are electric, cable and 
horse cars. There are ancient and modern styles, 
but with all these styles every single one which the 
Nookman has ever seen was double decked. That 
is, for first-class passengers, you ride inside the car, 
and for half price you ride on top of the car where 
nice seats are provided which, in good weather, is 
the more desirable place. 

On the crooked and narrow street, and the streets 
toward the corporation line, we find omnibuses, 
cabs and cabriolets which assist the street cars in 
the surface transit. These omnibuses, like the 
street cars, are double decked. Passengers make 
their ascsnt by means of a narrow, spiral stairway 
at the rear of the vehicle. As the city develops, 
the means of transit are found to be entirely inade- 
quate to the demand. So a few years ag'o the sub- 
terranean systems were installed. The regular sys- 
tem of cars, of no inconsiderable size, penetrates 
the earth in a regular network about thirty feet 
beneath the surface. This is quite convenient to 
the working class of people, although it is a more 
dirty way of traveling because the smoke does not 
have a chance to escape, and in several ways it 
makes it unpleasant. And now in the last few 
years the higher class of people, and those who re- 
quire several trips up and down through the city, 
have asked for their accommodation that a subter- 
ranean system be made, and to meet this demand 
the two-penny (tuppany) tube has been construct- 
ed, and to the visitors this two-penny (tuppany) 
tube is quite a sight. It is ninety feci under the 
ground. 

When you wish to take a ride upon it, you pass 
along the street car until you come to a building 
made of beautiful white bricks which are glazed. 
On entering the door, you step to the ticket win- 



6 5 6 



THE INGLENOOK, 



dow, hand the gentleman two pence, which is four 
cents in our money, and he gives you no ticket in 
return but passes you through the door into an 
adjoining room which, afterwards, you find to be 
an elevator. When the hand of the clock is ex- 
actly on the dot, your elevator drops beneath you 
like a shot, and you find yourself ninety feet below 
in the beautiful station made of these same white, 
glazed bricks. Everything is scrupulously clean 
and neat. The tube in itself is double and is only 
large enough for the passage of a single train. The 
whole thing is moved by electricity and not one 
speck of dirt of any sort. When the train stops at 
one of these stations the gates open automatically. 
The people who board the cars enter one door, 
and they who make their exit from the cars do so 
from the other end of the car. In this way no time 
in loading and unloading passengers is lost un- 
necessarily. And when the last passenger is in, a 
lever is moved, and the gates and doors are all 
closed, then the train starts and shoots through the 
earth like an airship through the canopy above. 
And so the swerving crowds of the populace of the 
capital city of the world are carried from one place 
to another. 

A STAPLE INDUSTRY. 



In these days when the world is studying the ques- 
tion of how to satisfy the appetite, the niind and 
heart, we often find new features rising in the dif- 
ferent fields which at first attract our attention, 
and later become very commonplace things. A 
few years ago when we were studying about bet- 
ter means of transportation, and the people spoke 
about men and women riding along the road on 
two wheels, one ahead of the other, it was spoken 
of as being impossible. We said something about 
talking miles and miles over a wire, and only a 
few months ago we have been guilty of giving 
birth to such expressions as this, " that the airship 
is an impossibility." And here comes another 
thing that has gone beyond the experimental stages 
and has settled itself down to be a real article, of 
commerce with which the Nook family may be 
more or less statistically surprised. 

In the cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis we find 
the largest frog markets in the world. It is said 
by one of the exchanges that the total receipts of 
the last year of all frog catchers in the Stafe of 
Minnesota exceeded over half a million legs, which 
is the only part of the animal used, which required 
the massacre of more than two million frogs. This 
new industry is not more than five years old in the 
city of Minneapolis. It is older than in some of 
the other cities. 



It is very probable that the supply of the South- 
ern cities will never be exhausted. In the North 
the frost drives them into their winter homes, 
but in the South the seasons are much longer. It 
is said that the frogs in Minnesota are the very 
best produced, and the best thinkers attribute it 
to this fact, that the State has over ten thousand 
fresh water lakes where these animals live and 
have their nests. The frog legs are purchased by 
merchants who deliver them to the shippers and 
then they are distributed throughout the States ac- 
cording to the demand. The occupation gives em- 
ployment for more than one hundred families who 
make a good living all the year round. Demands 
come flocking in for Minnesota frogs from the At- 
lantic to the Pacific, and are constantly increas- 
ing. The largest demands come from hotels and 
restaurants through the mining districts. 

In New York it is a common thing to see Minne- 
sota frogs catalogued on the bill of fare in almost 
any restaurant or hotel. The frog catchers live 
near small lakes throughout the State and study 
the nature of the frog, to know where to catch him 
and how to catch him. The heaviest catches are 
in the fall and spring. These animals breed very 
fast and will attain to full size in three months' time. 
This renders the supply almost inexhaustible. 
While the oyster is in demand only for a season, 
the frog legs are good the year round. It seems 
that it would be almost impossible as far north as 
Minnesota is, when the ice is two or three feet 
thick, that a man can go out on the water and catch 
frogs, and yet it is not a very difficult thing to 
gather ten dollars' worth in a day. A man who is 
strictly up to his business spends many a sleepless 
hour in the fall of the year watching where these 
frogs nest, which aids him materially in scooping 
them out in the winter when he cuts the ice from 
over them. Sometimes it is possible for him to 
catch as many as a thousand in one of these nests. 
When these are carefully corralled it keeps up the 
supply the year round and makes the market a 
steady one. When he wishes to slaughter some 
for the market he does it with a stick. 

This occupation requires no investment of capital 
whatever, and yet he realizes from three to ten 
dollars a day for the time he is employed in his 
occupation. The average price of frog legs at 
Boston, wholesale, ranges from five to eight cents 
a dozen, during the summer, and the highest is 
fifteen cents in the colder months. One of the best 
hotels in New York has a standing order for fifty 
dozen per day. 

No possession can surpass or even equal a good 
library. — Langford. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



657 



CHIROGRAPHY. 



RAISING DISHRAGS. 



About as interesting an excursion as could well be 
thought of would be to bring the whole Nook 
family to the office of the Inglenook and then have 
a blackboard large enough to contain the auto- 
graphs of every single Nooker. What an inter- 
esting study it would be to study the individual 
handwriting of each one of us ! Has it ever oc- 
curred to you that handwriting changes styles 
and fashions just like clothing and customs of oth- 
er kinds? Indeed, within the last fifteen years, 
since the Nookman was in the schoolroom, what a 
wonderful change of chirography has taken place. 
In the correspondence that comes to this office we 
notice that young girls usually write in large, 
round, firm characters, while a surprising number 
of young men who have not been especially trained 
to any clerkship, and struggling between several 
recognized standards of good masculine handwrit- 
ing, produce letters of a nearly childish style of 
penmanship. But it is supposed in these periods 
of youth and transition there will be more or less 
fascinating suggestions of all sorts. 

And, too, there is an inexhaustible interest in the 
study of handwriting, from the point of view of 
the subtle clairvoyant interviewer of other people's 
minds and methods. The manuscripts of the most 
literary men that come to this office to-day are 
written in a small hand. The term literary man 
here used should not be limited to the producer 
of pure literature, but it must be taken in its most 
sweeping connection. In that case there will be 
next to nothing to say, especially if the literature 
produced was restricted to that which is generally 
imbibed with style. 

In all probabilities the typewriter should be cred- 
ited for a good deal of bad penmanship. It matters 
not how well a man may know the principles of 
penmanship, or music, or any other of the arts, 
but it requires constant practice to retain or even 
to keep perfection. And, too, we dare say that 
should an article be well written it has more or 
less lost its beauty from bad spelling, which is due 
to-day, in a greater or less degree, to our phonetic 
methods of instruction. 

If you have never taken any special pains to 
study the chirography of people, take up some of 
your old correspondence and look over its pages 
carefully. Note the size of the handwriting, the 
slant of the letters and the peculiar individuality of 
each. Compare that with the individual as you 
know his character and it makes one of the most 
interesting studies that you can pursue. 

Yes, chirography is changing, as is everything 
else under the sun. 



A novel enterprise, that of raising dishrags, is be- 
ing exploited by a number of Southern California 
horticulturists, who received the inspiration for the 
scheme from Charles Richardson, whose gardens in 
Pasadena are becoming famous for their remarkable 
productions. Mr. Richardson has successfully 
raised many growths new to American soil, and this 
year is exceeding all his previous triumphs by rais- 
ing thousands of dishrags. 

Last year Mr. Richardson's stringbeans, which 
measured forty-three inches in length, created a stir, 
but dishrag vines, which, with their pendant dish- 
rags, twine about orange trees, palms, evergreens 
and peach trees, and peek in at the two-story win- 
dows, bid fair to win the championship from the 
beans. 

These dishrags, or vegetable sponges, as they are 
sometimes called, are indigenous to Africa, but now 
it has been demonstrated that they will thrive in 
this country, and they are bound to become a popu- 
lar production. 

The graceful, well-foliaged vines are not only or- 
namental, but they bear in profusion a fibrous 
sponge that is eminently useful for bathing, as well 
as for scouring pans and kettles. Imagine picking 
dishrags in one's garden just as one would pick 
blackberries, or imagine having vines all laden with 
dishrags clambering over one's kitchen windows, so 
that all one needs to do is to stretch out an arm and 
pull one in. Such an arrangement would be much 
easier than going to the ragbag or buying dishrags 
at stores. 

These curious vegetables assume the form and 
appearance of cucumbers, and hang on the vines 
until their green coats become brown and dry like 
parchment. At this stage they are ready to har- 
vest. After they are picked the brown coat is re- 
moved, and an extremely strong and compact fib- 
rous sponge is revealed. Through the center of 
this sponge, in three lengthwise compartments, are 
many black seeds which shake out easily. In the 
Pasadena garden these sponges have averaged eight 
inches in length. — National Tribune. 

* * * 
PARTNERSHIP. 



In southern Germany a man has the following in- 
scription on the front of his humble domicile: 
"Dieses Hans geh'ori Gott 11 ml inir" (This house 
belongs to God and me). It would be infinitely 
better if some Americans would go partners with 
the same Capitalist. 



6 5 8 



THE INGLENOOK. 



JOAN OF ARC. 



BY MAGGIE G0BLE. 

Joan of Arc, the maid of Orleans, was born in 
the village of Domremy in 1412. She was taught 
to sew and spin, but could neither read nor write. 
Her parents were poor and she was a peasant girl 
in a country inn. She was accustomed to ride her 
master's horse to the watering-place and to do the 
things which in most cases fall to the share of men. 
She was distinguished by her modest, industrious 
and gentle ways. She always attended her church. 
Joan, like most people then, believed in fairies and 
when rambling in the woods, believed them to come 
from the bushes. This was more especially true of 
the ignorant classes. 

When about thirteen years of age she believed 
she saw a flash of light, and heard an unearthly 
voice, which commanded her to be modest, and at- 
tend to her religious duties. When eighteen she 
imagined she heard a voice which commanded her 
to go and fight for the king. At first she hesitated, 
and said that she knew nothing about soldiers, 
but at last she declared to her parents that she was 
going. They, of course, objected, and tried to mar- 
ry her to an honest man in the village. 

She succeeded in making her way to Baudri- 
court, stopping at every church she passed to pray, 
and informed him of her errand. After some hesi- 
tation the governor furnished her with attendants, 
and sent her to Chinon, where Charles and his little 
court resided. When Joan came into the court she 
at once pointed out the king from among the court- 
iers which surrounded him, and on going to him re- 
lated her heavenly mission. At first he was in 
doubt of her real call, and demanded some evi- 
dences of her inspiration, whereupon she told 
him a secret which he knew was known to no one 
but himself, and described and demanded to be 
armed with a certain sword which was in the 
church of St. Catharine of Flerbois, which they 
knew she had never seen. She was attired in a 
martial dress, mounted on a warhorse, and placed 
at the head of the army with the sword which she 
had desired to be brought her. Men followed her 
that would follow no one else. 

On account of her youthful gladness of counte- 
nance, and her graceful as well as fearless ways, 
she was admired by many. She set out for Blois 
to head the escort of a force which was about to be 
sent to the relief of Orleans. After ordering every 
man in the army to confess himself before march- 
ing, and at the head of her troops, carrying in her 
hand a consecrated banner, which was a picture of 



the Supreme Being grasping the earth, she pro- 
ceeded to Orleans. 

In April, 1429, she arrived at Orleans and ordered 
that it -should be entered on the side of Beansse. 
Dunois knew the English were strongest there, and 
caused the other side of the river to be taken,, where 
the English were the weaker. They then crossed 
the river in boats, entered the city, defeated the 
English, and on May 4, compelled them to raise the 
siege. On one occasion the French were repulsed, 
and Joan received an arrow in the neck, but she led 
back the French, and would hardly wait for the 
surgeon to dress her wound. They overcame the 
fort. 

She succeeded in inducing the king to go with 
hef to Rheims, accompanied by an army of twelve 
thousand men, where he would be crowned king. 
Jul}', 1429, she saluted the king at Rheims with 
many tears. 

She then declared her mission ended and wanted 
to go home, but Count Dunois persuaded her to 
stay. Soon afterward she was captured and cast 
into prison, where she remained many days ; then 
she was taken before the judge at Rouen. She 
defended herself, and declared that she would do 
the same thing again if she had the opportunity, 
and again she was thrown into prison without 
other food than bread and water. Her captors 
caused her suit of male attire to be taken from her. 
When placed within her reach, as soon as she 
saw it she proceeded to put it on again. No soon- 
er had she done this than her captors rushed upon 
her, and she was bound to a stake in the market- 
place. She made a cross from one of the soldier's 
staves, placed it on her breast, and was burned to 
death as a witch. 

There are over three hundred statues of this 
noble character in France unto this day. . 
<• * * 
SWISS GIRLS TO SERVE THE STATE. 



Switzerland is to be the first country in the world 
where young girls are to serve a term in the service 
of the state, as young men of other countries are 
compelled to serve in the army. The Swiss govern- 
ment is seriously thinking of adopting the plan of a 
female physician of Zurich, who advocates that all 
unmarried girls be compelled by the state to work 
one year in the hospitals without any remuneration. 
She claims that not only would the hospitals be 
benefited, but that the girls themselves would get 
a training which would be of great value to them 
in after life. 

Be economical in expenditure, always living with- 
in vour income. 



THE - INGLENOOK. 



659 



BAALBEK. 



Baalbek is one of the most wonderful ruins of the 
world. Perhaps no ruins can exceed it in magnif- 
icence with the exception of Karnac or Palmyra. The 
word Baalbek is the same as the Greek word Heliop- 
olis, which means " The City of the Sun." The great 
structure is about 1,000 feet in length and not quite 
as broad as long. It was built by the worshipers of 
Baal, somewhere between the first and fourth cen- 
turies. In all probability it was an attempt at the re- 
production of what Solomon had built at the time 
when he built the great temples at Jerusalem and Tad- 
mor in the wilderness, as referred to in the Scrip- 
tures. Baalbek was destroyed by the Arabs in the 
seventh century. Under Constantine some of the idol 
temples were converted into Christian churches. The 
City of the Sun is a colossal affair and worthy to be 
numbered as a masterpiece of architecture. Alto- 
gether there are niches, exedras or alcoves for two 
hundred and fifty idol gods. 

In the great pantheon proper, which is a rectangle, 
there were twelve gods, — ^six males and six females, 
the same as in the Pantheon at Rome. Near the cen- 
ter of this wonderful quadrangle is a magnificent altar 
thirty feet square and seven feet high, built of huge 
stones, with an immense laver on either side, where 
sacrifices were made to the gods of the temple. 
Around the Temple of the Sun were ninety columns 
seventy feet high and seven feet in diameter. These 
granite columns were brought from Assouan, Egypt, 
and are truly magnificent. They stand on pedestals 
much larger than the columns themselves and their 
capitals are beautifully engraved by a master hand. 
The cornice shows the architectural skill of that won- 
derful age and is most colossal. 

To the south of this wonderful building is the temple 
of Bacchus which is surrounded by fifty of these gi- 
gantic columns, sixty feet high and six feet in di- 
ameter. In both of these temples the workmanship 
displayed on these columns is something to be coveted 
by our modern mechanics. The separate parts of each 
column are so neatly joined together that the casual 
observer cannot tell where one ends and the other 
begins. Not all of these columns are standing. The 
reader will have to imagine himself standing amid the 
acres of ruins. At the rear of this great court, where 
the altar and the lavers are, is the temple of Jupiter ; 
in approaching this place there are thirteen immense 
steps leading up to the colonnade. In this vast struc- 
ture there are huge stones that commonly measure 
thirty feet long, fourteen feet wide and nine feet high, 
and on one occasion the Nookman actually measured 
one which was lying on the ground, which was seven- 
ty-two feet long, sixteen feet wide and fourteen feet 



high, and took a photograph of it. This one, how- 
ever, does not lie within the walls of the great struc- 
ture, but lies just outside of the quarry, nearly a 
half mile from the temple itself, and probably was nev- 
er used by the workmen. How these immense stones 
were ever conveyed to the place of building is a ques- 
tion that perhaps will never be answered. One thing 
is true, many thousand workmen must have been em- 
ployed in the erection of such a huge structure. 

In the front building is a hexagonal court which, 
too, is surrounded by smaller columns not so high. In 
front of the hexagonal court is a great portico, and 
in front of the portico is a large pair of stone steps 
all carved from one piece of stone. The entire city of 
temples is surrounded by a wall. And if this present 
building compares at all favorably with the great city 
of temples that was built by Solomon in his day, it 
is no wonder that in the time of Elijah it took 450 men 
to minister in this great place of worship, and that 
there was sufficient room in the various exedras to 
contain all the gods of myth and idolatry. 

In 1759 an earthquake made ruins of the fortifi- 
cations of the Arabs into which a great temple had 
been converted. Thousands of stone cannon balls are 
found there now in the excavations that are being 
made by Germans. The principal work of the exca- 
vation was completed twenty years ago, but a little 
was still going on on the fifteenth day of October, 1902, 
when your editor visited that place. 

If, in the days when the true religion was in the 
background, and idolatry was at its height, people were 
taught to make sacrifices and expend the amount of 
money that it must have required to complete such 
structures as above described, how much more ought 
people to do to-day when surrounded by free religious 
liberty, modern invention and enlightenment of the 
twentieth century and widespread effort to evangelize 
the world. 

•2* * * 

HAPPINESS FROM WITHIN. 



BY ELLA WHEELER WILCOX. 

How much happiness are you getting out of life? 
How much enjoyment of the days of each week? 
You had better stop and ask yourself this question. 
If you are merely getting through the present, with 
an idea of being happy in the future. I fear you are 
making a mistake. 

Happiness is a habit. It is influenced more or 
less by environment or circumstances, to be sure. 
and it can be shadowed temporarily by sorrow and 
augmented by good fortune: but in the main hap- 
piness must come from within you. 

Unless you obtain some happiness every day 



66o 



THE INGLENOOK. 



now, you will not find it on any to-morrow. If 
you are restless, despondent, irritable, and discon- 
tented, from dawn till bedtime, and wear the hours 
away in an impatient waiting for better times, you 
are forming a habit which will pursue you when 
the better time comes. 

I know what I am talking about. I have seen it 
proved over and over again. You are building 
your brain cells hour by hour, day by day, to think 
a certain kind of thoughts, and no change of exter- 
nal conditions will undo this work which you are 
now engaged in. Of course I am not addressing 
people suffering from some great loss or sorrow. 
Experiences of that nature must wear away. They 
cannot be overcome in a moment, or argued out of 
the heart, but they do not last — God has sent time 
to comfort the sorrowing. 

It is the people who are discontented with their 
-work, and with their environment, whom I address, 
people who are working for the future, and hating 
the present. I believe in a progressive discontent. 
It is a means of growth ; but I believe in forming a 
habit, of being happy about SOMETHING every 
day. While you work and strive to change your 
conditions, look around you and find a cause for 
enjoyment. 

Think of yourself as one who sets forth on a 
journey to a desired goal. Instead of shutting 
your eyes and straining forward to an end, open 
them and take note of the blue sky, the green world, 
the birds, the children and the lovers as you jour- 
ney along. Be glad that you are alive; enjoy the 
rainstorm; take pleasure in passing a word with 
the friends you encounter and sit down by the 
roadside and converse with them now and then. 
Say to yourself, " This is very cozy and cheerful. 
I will be happy with my friend," and all the time 
rejoice that you have a goal toward which you are 
pressing. 

Get something out of the journey every day, — 
some hour of enjoyment, and even if some accident 
prevents you from reaching your dreamed-of desti- 
nation, or delays you long, still you have some 
golden hours of pleasure strung upon the thread 
of life. And, better still, you have formed the 
HABIT of enjoyment — you have practiced being 
happy! And when you DO reach your goal you 
will know how to appreciate the things that you 
have longed for. 

Do not tell me that you have nothing to enjoy, 
nothing to be glad of in your present ; I know bet- 
ter. God never made a day that did not possess 
some blessing in it if you look for it. LEARN TO 
BE HAPPY while you strive for things to make 
you happier. 



PEANUTS. 



It is the custom in this country, especially with our 
boys and girls, to look at a sack of peanuts as a special 
incident of some holiday, and it is ranked along with 
the sugared popcorn, crackerjack, ice cream, etc., and 
has something especially to please our organs of taste, 
but with no other value worth mentioning. Dr. Fur- 
binger in one of our late foreign exchanges writes 
a letter to older heads on the peanut question and in 
a thoroughly scientific way he demonstrates that pea- 
nuts as an article of food are a very rich treasure. 
They contain forty-seven per cent albumen, nineteen 
per cent fat and nonnitrogenous extractive matters. 
He recommends the use of roasted peanuts in the form 
of soup and mush, something like the Turks in Pales- 
tine use roasted pulse. We should think that peanuts 
might be recommended as a popular article of food 
on account of their cheapness, especially among the 
poorer classes of people. 

Medical men say they are a splendid- food for the 
corpulent folk. People troubled with diabetes and 
kidney diseases should be careful in using too much 
of this class of food. But it is a failing among Amer- 
ican people, especially among farmers, that we eat 
too much animal food. And it is a glad day for us 
when we can add one more item to the list of good, 
nourishing articles of diet that do not militate against 
physical health and necessitate the destruction of life. 

* * * 

DAY DREAMS. 



BY LULA C. MOHLEE. 

A bright sunny summer day, a girl in a hammock, 
out under the trees with the sun flecks dancing over 
her face ; a book half slipping from her listless fingers, 
and you are where dreams are dreamed. 

If you are a girl or have been a girl, you know 
what it is to dream dreams. I mean the ones this girl 
is dreaming. If you have never been a girl nor never 
will be, perhaps you have read enough about these 
dreams to give you an idea of what they are like, but 
you will miss something, and nothing in your ex- 
perience will be so delightful. 

She dreams of the woman she means to be. She 
may never attain to this dream lady, but she does not 
think of that now, for she is dreaming not working 
to that noble end just yet. Give her time and she 
will work hard enough. The dreaming helps her to 
ideas and to plans how to gain that wonderful woman- 
hood. 

Now don't be surprised if that vision of just a 
" mere man " comes before her. What is the harm ? 
He isn't a " common " man. Will he ever material- 
ize? 



the: inglenook. 



66 i 



Then she thinks of the time when the home as they 
know it at present will be no more. It brings sadness 
to take the place of the pleasure the first dreams gave 
her and in comes the thought and the wish that she 
could always be a girl. Such a happy time. She 
looks almost with dread in her heart of what the fu- 
ture may bring. 

Sorrows may come to her, and the pain of knowing 
that she is a failure where she meant to be so much, 
and of her hopes that will nearly all prove to be dead 
when she thought she had almost gained them. 

This, of course, is the darkest side and it does not 
show up so plainly as the brightest part, but it looks 
dark enough to make her wish her girlhood would 
never come to an end. 

But it is the dreams that make us braver. We nev- 
er get too old to dream, and they only change as our 
condition in life changes. We plan for ourselves and 
we plan what life will be to those who are dear to us. 

The hope the girl has of having her dreams come 
true gives her courage and it seems when we have 
given us some pleasure, we pay for it by having to 
give up something equally as dear. But every girl 
can wish this wish " three times three " and put her 
whole soul into it, and wish " she could always stay 
a girl." 

To always stay a girl is an impossibility and to 
those to whom the troubles come — and that means every 
one, — if we will, it will help us nearer our dream lady. 
How is that? -By not allowing them to crush our 
spirits nor make us ill and cross, and by keeping the 
petty, spiteful thoughts out of mind. 

Failures and sorrows are sure to come and the 
women who mean the most to the world are those that 
have lived close to the meaning of it all and have come 
through it with more wisdom than they had before 
and see the need to give their love to those who go 
through the same burning way. Such women never 
falter, for they know it softens their natures, and gives 
them understanding they would never otherwise gain. 

Leeton, Mo. 

TWO NEW ELEMENTS. 



TiiiL discovery of two new elements by an Ameri- 
can chemist, Prof. Charles Baskerville, of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, is an event of consider- 
able importance, if the chemical world accepts the 
work of this scientist, as there is every reason to 
expect. The discovery was made in the course of 
an extended investigation on thorium, an element 
originally discovered by Berzelius, and which, in 
the form of an oxide, is an important constituent of 
the mantle of the Welsbach incandescent gaslight. 
Thorium is a radioactive substance of large atomic 



weight, and the same properties are also possessed 
by the new elements, to which the names carolinium 
and berzelium have been assigned by Prof. Basker- 
ville, the former in honor of the State of North 
Carolina and the latter for the famous Swedish 
chemist. Samples have been submitted to Sir 
William Crookes, the veteran British authority in 
chemistry, and he will endeavor to verify Basker- 
ville's work, which, however, has been received 
favorably by chemists at large. With every dis- 
covery of this kind, and especially of the recent 
radioactive elements, there is a general discussion 
as to the nature of elements, and a large number of 
scientists now believe that they are all essentially 
the same substance, but existing under different 
conditions. Nearly all the elements of high atomic 
weight are radioactive, and it is believed that they 
are breaking up or undergoing some change. — Cin- 
cinnati Enquirer. 

* * * 

SOMETHING NEW. 



The Chicago papers say that a certain Mr. A. B. 
Hulet has a scheme by which he expects to furnish the 
infantiles of Chicago with a new fresh milk. He 
wants to import ten thousand goats for this purpose. 
He says that he knows it is better than cow's milk be- 
cause it has been demonstrated in other lands and 
l'.e demonstrated this fact to the board, which he met, 
by a book which was in his possession, showing the 
superiority of goat's milk. He proposes to introduce 
a breed of goats which he claims is the best kind of 
breed after ten years of expert breeding. 

He wants that the Oriental style of delivering milk 
be installed with one exception. In the Oriental cities 
some one drives these goats from house to house and 
they are milked by a servant of the hotel or residence, 
and then are driven on to the next place. Now he 
suggests that the goats be driven to the homes of the 
infants and the children be permitted to nurse from 
the goat, instead of drawing the milk into the pail and 
then again giving it to the infant. He says this plan 
;s followed in some countries and that the boards of 
health in these countries report a low death rate. It 
does away with all danger of the milk not being fresh, 
and with contamination and adulteration. Just to 
what extent Mr. Hulet and his allies will be able to 
get the mammas of Chicago to let their darlings root 
around among the long hair of a nanny, run the risk 
of being butted and being subject to the derision of 
the public is a problem yet to be solved, but it is evi- 
dent that something along the line of pure foods, and 
especially for our children in the large cities, ought to 
be obtained. And we hail with joy this unique ef- 
fort, whether or not it be accomplished in full. It 
may be a stepping-stone to something final. 



662 



THE iNGLENOOC. 



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Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



DEADHEADS. 



One day when we were sailing from Naples to 
Beirut we chanced to lie four days in the harbor of 
Piraeus on a broken vessel. After supper, while lean- 
ing over the taft'rail, beholding the beautiful illumi- 
nation of the city in the distance, we noticed a num- 
ber of men descending from a small boat near our 
vessel into the water. Each of them had an electric 
light in his hand, which, of course, was connected with 
our vessel by a cord long enough to reach to the bot- 
tom of the harbor. The men who remained in the 
boat continually pumped air to them. We knew the 
vessel had been broken but at the same time we knew 
they were not repairing the vessel. Upon inquiry as 
to what these men were doing one of the shipmen 
told us that they were taking shellfish from the bottom 
of the vessel. We found that these parasites were 
clinging to the bottom of that vessel to the extent that 
we could not make more than two-thirds the speed 
that was scheduled for our vessel to make. 

A sailor told us that this was no uncommon thing, 
that they frequently stopped to rid themselves of these 
parasites. No man can see such things as these with- 
out gaining a lesson from them. Here we are again 
on the ocean of life. How many times we are com- 
pelled to stop to clean the parasites from our skirts. 
It begins at the opening up of life. How well do you 
remember when attending public school that your 
seatmate would hold one finger on the multiplication 
table and another on the problem, and perchance 
would ask you how much was seven times eight ! 



Here the little fellow shows this characteristic by not 
being willing to pass through the labor to achieve the 
success he desires. A little later on the same boy, 
when he becomes a teacher, will, in spite of the super- 
intendent or examiner, obtain help from a superior 
under false pretenses in order to get a certificate of 
proficiency so that he may- be a preceptor in some 
schoolroom, to turn out more deadheads like himself. 
Or it may be that this boy, instead of reaching the 
pedagogue's chair, seeks a more dependent pursuit, 
tries farming. But this parasitical characteristic mani- 
fests itself. Instead of keeping up all his fences, trim- 
ming his orchards, fertilizing his land to improve his 
crops, he would rather spend his time in criticising 
his neighbors, growling about hard times, and making 
an existence and nothing more. Of course he bor- 
rows his tools from his neighbor, is never able to buy. 
He isn't able to shelter his cattle, never paints his 
buildings, he is simply riding through on the credit 
of the agriculturist and makes the community look 
horrible because of his presence in it. 

These parasites sometimes find their way to the 
pulpit. Instead of drinking deep from the fountain 
of the Almighty and bearing gems of truth and beauty 
by the score to his anxious hearers and receiving the 
baptism of the Holy Spirit as a crown for his efforts, 
he is perfectly satisfied to buy, for so much a dozen, his 
porous counterfeits and palm them off to his congre- 
gation at a thousand dollars a year. He does not 
mind receiving compliments for somebody else's hard 
labor, — a literary thief, and a religious parasite. 

It is a remarkable fact that our society must have its 
life-blood drained from its veins by these detestable 
deadheads. All that is necessary to see some of these 
social enemies is just to place yourself on the corner 
of the street where every storebox is loaded and listen 
to the trend of the conversation. Not a respectable 
character in the community escapes their vile tongues. 
The man who makes a success in that neighborhood in 
any line of life stands no more chance for escape of 
derision and ridicule by them than the splinters on the 
box do of being whittled by their jackknives. 

These fellows say that the world owes them a liv- 
ing. They are simply social parasites, like a louse on 
a hog's back or a flea on a dog, or a prodigal son 
on the truss rods of the freight car, or the man waiting 
for a handout at the back door, or the Christian 
who only wants the cloak of the church and nothing 
more. These, and all others of a similar character, 
are nothing more than the shellfish are. They are 
impeding the progress of the old ship of state, the old 
ship of Zion, and the ship of the commonwealth. 

Dear Nooker, are you willing to be classed with 
these deadheads ? Do not let it ever be said of one 
of our family that he is marked a deadhead. Do- not 



THE INGLE NOOK. 



663 



be tagged that way. Do not be satisfied with slip- 
ping through, escaping by the skin of your teeth. Do 
not float down, — only dead fish go that way. Get 
up, stand up, stay up, be a social factor, amount to 
something, do not always be limping around on 
crutches. Whenever you see a man carrying a cane 
it is evidence that he is lame somewhere, either in his 
limbs or in his head. Do not allow yourself to at- 
tract attention by your inactivity. Do not compel 
your friends to tell the untruth in your epitaph after 
your departure. 

JUST A MINUTE. 



The other day the Nookman was in Chicago and 
while calling upon a certain business man there, he 
saw a notice on his desk which read as follows : " For 
every minute you detain me during business hours I 
must work one minute overtime." Ah, pooh! 
What's a minute? How often you see men stand by 
a fence and talk for five, ten, or fifteen minutes, which 
may not be at all necessary to themselves or the gen- 
eral public. Again it happens that business men, 
those who especially ought to know better, waste pre- 
cious time in loitering around when at that very mo- 
ment they should have been looking after the best in- 
terests of the house. Young men and women are apt, 
for want of knowledge of the value of time, often 
carelessly to toss away the moments of incalculable 
value which in after years they should redeem at a 
high premium were it at all possible. How often have 
you heard the expression, "Just a minute"? Dear 
Nooker, do you realize what you ask? Did you ever 
stop to think what a minute is worth to the world ? 
Here are a few carefully selected statistics that will 
give you a faint idea what is going on on this little, 
insignificant planet which we call our home. Here is 
what happens in a minute in the United States : 

A ray of light travels 188,000 miles. 

The United States uses the telephone 5,950 times. 

The lowest musical tone creates 990 vibrations. 

The highest musical tone reaches 2,228,000 vibra- 
tions. 

A fast train travels a mile. 

A street car goes 32 rods. 

A fast trotting horse covers 150 rods. 

A pedestrian walks about 16 rods. 

There are 925 pounds of tobacco raised, 6.773 cigars 
made, and 2,292 cigarettes disappear in smoke. 

We travel 1,086 miles on our journey around the 
sun. 

Six hundred pounds of wool grow. 
• We dig 61 tons of anthracite coal, and 200 tons of 
bituminous coal. 



Twelve tons of pig iron are mined. 
, The shops turn out three tons of steel rails. 

Our country makes fifteen kegs of nails. 

Twelve bales of cotton come from the field. 

Sixty-six dollars in gold is dug from the earth. 

Sixty souls are born, and sixty have passed over 
the river. 

If each person in the United States would lose a 
minute, there would be lost over 152 years, or more 
than have elapsed since the Declaration of Independ- 
ence. 

But it takes about five hours to read all the good 
things in a single Inglenook. 
* 4* * 
FALSE FACES. 



False faces, as a rule, are used to mask the features 
of someone to make him irrecognizable. As a rule, of 
course, they are used in sport. Sometimes bad men 
use them as a means of shielding their devilishness. 
But there are cases in this world where angels are 
known to wear them to throw a mantle over their 
graces and virtues that are given to the world. The 
Good Book tells us that it is possible to entertain 
angels unawares. Experience has taught us that it is 
impossible to know some people until you have thor- 
oughly learned them by the closest intimate life. 

Here comes an example from Washington City of 
one of these ministering spirits who we have reasons 
co believe is guided by the Almighty Hand. The 
District Commissioners of Columbia say that about a 
year ago a certain man, whose name the} - are bound to 
withhold, ordered an ice company to furnish all of the 
worthy poor .with ice, and all last summer the poor of 
our Capitol city enjoyed one of the luxuries of the 
wealthy. No doubt in many instances it helped to 
drive away the clouds from many a humble domicile. 
Such a philanthropic act as this causes joy in Heaven. 
And again the corridors above were made to ring 
with angelic strains the other day, when the same man 
came to the same company for the same purpose that 
he did last year. And the poor are to be made happy 
this year. One of the admirable qualities of this 
lovely character is that he will under no circumstances 
allow the world to put his name in gold letters or cold 
type, or on blazing circulars. He prefers to let the 
angels record it above. 



i 



% Notice the marked page in this issue. It j> 
* will interest you. £ 

£.;„;•.}.*** ***************** ***«*'!'*****'M"M"i 



664 



THE INGLENOOK. 



CURRENT HAPPENINGS 



DEATH OF DR. THEODORE HERZL. 



Dr. Theodore Herzl, the noted author, and the 
father of the Jewish Palestine ptan, died July third at 
Vienna. He was one of the men of this world that 
dared to let the people know what he believed, and his 
life corresponded with his teachings. He was a strong 
advocate of the Old Testament doctrine that the Jews 
will make a literal return to Palestine. 

Dr. Herzl was born in Budapest, Austria, May 2, 
i860. There he was graduated from the high school, 
and in 1878 he entered the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Vienna. He was graduated from the uni- 
versity, receiving the title LL. D., and afterwards prac- 
ticed law in Salzberg. While there, an appointment as 
a judge was offered him by the government on condi- 
tion that he would accept Christianity. He angrily 
rejected the offer, and soon afterward left that city. 
He then entered journalism. 

From 1891 to 1895 Herzl lived in Paris as the cor- 
respondent of the Vienna Neue Freie Prcsse. In 1896 
he went to London. There he met Zangwill and other 
Hebrew writers, and there, like Mordecai in " Daniel 
Deronda," he began to dream of the regeneration of 
Israel. In the same year he was appointed one of the 
editors of the Presse, which he formerly represented at 
Paris. In 1896 he wrote " Die Judenstadt," the book 
which made him known among his people. 
* * * 
AN INTERESTING RELIC. 



In a room of the National Palace, which had not 
been opened for many years, is an interesting relic, evi- 
dently left there from the time of the old Museum of 
the Sovereigns. It is nothing less than the charger of 
the great Napoleon. 

The horse, which the Emperor had stuffed, is in 
excellent condition and of great beauty. 

It is white, with brown spots, rather small and is 
branded on the lift hip with an " N," surmounted by 
the imperial crown. 

During the Second Empire this horse was offered 
to the French Government by the Society of Natural 
History of the City of Manchester. The offer was ac- 
cepted, but until now the whereabouts of this interest- 
ing historic relic had been unknown. 
4* 4» *J* 
LORD CURZON'S INSTALLATION. 



Dover, England. — Lord Curzon of Kedleston, vice- 
roy of India, was installed as a lord warden of the 
Cinque ports, with all the customary picturesque cere- 
monial. Dover was elaborately decorated with flags 



in honor of the occasion and great crowds flock«d 
in to witness the quaint and interesting proceedings. 

Lord Curzon first made a triumphant tour of the 
town and then proceeded to Dover castle, at the en- 
trance of which he was welcomed by the barons of 
the Cinque ports in gorgeous robes. 

A procession was formed, headed by the mace-bear- 
ers and bands and accompanied by all the local notabil- 
ities, and proceeded along a troop-lined route through 
the town to the college grounds, where the installation 
ceremony, which dates from the year 1265, was carried 
out. The castle batteries saluted as the barons of the 
Cinque ports promised allegiance to their new lord 
warden and admiral. 

* * * 

There is an old adage, " It is an ill wind that blows 
nobody good." Owing to the Oriental troubles of late, 
the attention of the world has been upon Russia and in 
some measure Russia has found favor in the eyes of 
the public. Here comes the knowledge of a most beau- 
tiful trait of character that tells that there are some 
hearts in Russia which know the value of kindness. 
Among the curious things that arrest the attention of 
the traveler in Moscow, which is one of their largest 
cities, is the absence of horsewhips. There is a law 
forbidding the use of whips on all vehicles whatsoever, 
and the excellent condition of the Russian horses is a 
living evidence that the above described law is abso- 
lutely humane. Nothing can exceed the beauty of 
the sleek, well-groomed horses of Moscow. This 
thing is very contrary to what one may see in Paris. 
We remember very distinctly that the last thing we 
heard on going to sleep and the first thing we heard 
on awakening during our sojourn in the first city of 
France was the crack of the driver's whip. 

The situation in Colorado is attracting world-wide 
attention. The Colorado governor justifies the depor- 
tation of men and other unusual proceedings by an 
opinion delivered by the Colorado supreme court, in 
which opinion the court said that when any portion of 
the State was in insurrection, the governor's power was 
supreme. Many thoughtful citizens express great 
doubt as to the wisdom of the course adopted by the 
Colorado governor; but those who approve of that 
course point to the destruction of the lives of the four- 
teen non-union men, together with other lawless acts 
which they charge against the union miners and they 
say that under the circumstances strong and unusual 
measures are necessary to the reestablishment of laws 
and order. Representatives of the labor unions, how- 
ever, deny that they are at all responsible for this law- 
lessness and they even go so far as to intimate that 
the destruction of the Independence depot was the 
work of detectives in the employ of the mine owners. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



665 



Every one agrees that South American trade is 
worth cultivating, and the Chicago Tribune directs at- 
tention to the fact that while Germans and Englishmen 
seem to know how to cultivate it, the Americans do not. 
The Tribune concludes : " It ought to be easier to 
drum up customers in Argentina or Brazil than in 
China, but apparently it is not. There is no difficulty 
about selling goods to Mexicans, but there is when it 
comes to selling them to Chileans or Venezuelans. 
The larger trade with Mexico is due to the extension 
of the American railroad system into that country. It 
may be that the Panama canal will stimulate commer- 
cial intercourse between the United States and the 
States on the west coast of South America, but 
without the canal that intercourse should be more ex- 
tensive than it is. The slow growth of American trade 
with the southern half of this hemisphere is inexpli- 
cable and a little mortifying. 
.$. <{» $ 

There certainly are some big holes in the bottom of 
the ocean, and in all probability the depressions of the 
surface of the earth that are submarine are greater than 
the highest mountains that we have above the surface 
of the earth. This was vividly demonstrated a few 
days ago near the island of Guam. The men in sur- 
veying a cable route from Honolulu to Manila made 
the deepest sounding yet on record. They record 
5,269 fathoms, which in our measurement is 31,614 
feet, which lacks only sixty-six feet of being six miles. 
This is more than two thousand feet greater than the 
altitude of Mt. Everest, the highest mountain in the 
world. If the water were drawn from the ocean and 
we could stand above it and gaze down into the depths 
and then in turn ascend the highest mountain we prob- 
ably could more ably appreciate the handiwork of the 

great Creator. 

* «J* ♦ 

It is very difficult to get the very best information 
concerning the war in the Orient. The Japanese claim 
to be closing in on Hai-Cheng from the east and south, 
and think they will soon be in possession of another 
prize ; while the Russians claim that General Kuro- 
patkin reports that General Kuroki's forces are gener- 
ally falling back. They have evacuated Khanze and 
other villages. General Oku's forces, he also reports, 
have retreated to the southward from points between 
Hwan Jin Siang and Sin-Tin,Ting. General Kuropat- 
kin is in personal command of his troops, who are in 
splendid spirits. The Russians are holding Dalin Pass. 
Major General Mistchenko's troops are fighting con- 
stantly. 

»$. .♦. .5. 

John Alexander Dowie in his first sermon on his 
return to Zion City announces that he will invade Lon- 
don with a " restoration host." 



Miss Clara Barton has lately resigned the presiden- 
cy of the Red Cross Society and will be succeeded by the 
widow of General John A. Logan. It is to be remem- 
bered that this is no humiliation to the great service 
to humanity which Miss Barton has so cheerfully ren- 
dered ; nor is it the result of any financial irregularities 
of her administration, but let the world know that our 
gifts are given in earthen vessels which do yield to a 
certain amount of pressure. There is a limit to every- 
one's capacity and in order to still be of service to hu- 
manity there is a time when we must have a vacation, 
and so with Miss Barton. 

*> •£•* ♦> 

Engine No. 2,400, built at the local plant of the 
American Locomotive Company for the Baltimore & 
Ohio Railroad, is the heaviest and most powerful lo- 
comotive ever constructed. It follows the French type 
used for heavy hauling. There are six pairs of driv- 
ing wheels. Three pairs are under the forward end 
of the boiler and the remaining three beneath the fire- 
box. The boiler is thirty-eight feet in length, and is 
seven feet in diameter. It has 5,585 square feet of 
heating surface. The grate surface is seventy-two 
square feet. The total weight of the locomotive is-over 
320,000 pounds. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Uncle Sam can boast of having four of the fastest 
torpedo boat destroyers in the world after their de- 
monstration of speed and durability in their race from 
Norfolk to the torpedo station, which began late Thurs- 
day night and ended at an early hour this morning. 
The Lawrence, Worden, Whipple and Trnxton left one 
after the other in the order named and ran down the 
Atlantic coast. In choppy seas they made an average 
speed of twenty-seven knots an hour, using all but one 
boiler. Throughout the run they behaved superbly. 

The fruit growers of Kentucky are happy this year. 
They have a very large crop; so much so that many of 
them are compelled to shake oft' a great deal of the 
fruit to keep it from damaging the trees. It is the 
first real large crop they have enjoyed for several 
years and they are quite jubilant over it. Especially 
apples, peaches, plums and berries are found in abun- 
dance. 

* * 4» 

" During the eighty-eight years of my career," says 
Russell Sage, " I have never taken a vacation." This, 
doubtless, is due to the fact that Mr. Sage has been 
extremely busy taking everything else. — Commoner. 
4» <& * 

Again the reaper whose name is Death has visited 
our harvest fields, and taken from our midst one of tin- 
sweet singers of Israel in the person of Eva Bixler 
Tenks, of Medford, Ohio. 



666 



THE INGLENOOK. 



^^^«^^*^M^****s^.*>*:**x*<*^^»4 



». .». .«. .9. .*- * 

V TTTT V 



The Inglenook Nature Study Club 



E This Department of the Inglenook is the organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized £ 

t over this country Each issue of the magazine will be complete in itself. Clubs may be organized at any time, <|> 

P taking the work up with the current issue. Back numbers cannot be furnished. Any school desiring to or- f 

I ganize a club can ascertain the methods of procedure by addressing the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin, III. ;, 









[No lover of nature can afford not to study thoroughly 
-the following extract from the Indiana Geographical 
series of textbooks: — Ed.] 

" The flowery leaf 
Wants not its soft inhabitant. Secure 
Within its winding citadel the stone 
Holds multitudes. But chief, the forest boughs 
That dance unnumbered to the playful breeze 
The downy orchard, and the melting pulp 
Of mellow fruit, the nameless nations feed 
Of evanescent insects. Where the pool 
Stands mantled o'er with green, invisible 
Amid the floating verdure, millions stray. 
Each liquid, too, whether it pierces, soothes, 
Inflames, refreshes, or exalts the taste, 
With varying forms abound. Nor is the stream 
Of purest crystal, nor the lucid air, 
Though one transparent vacancy it seems 
Void of their unseen people." 

& ♦ ♦ 
RAPTORES OR BIRDS OF PREY. 



1. Eyes lateral, head naked, claws blunt — vulture. 

2. Eyes lateral, head feathered, claws sharp — hawk. 

3. Eyes directed forward, outer toe versatile — owl. 

There, my dear Nookers, is a simple little outline 
which, if followed on general principles, will give 
you a speaking acquaintance with this family, and 
as I introduce them to you I feel like making an 
apology for them as so many people have been 
misrepresenting them. They have been called rob- 
bers and burglars and everything that is not nice, 
just as if they could help their likes and dislikes 
any more than the lark. Their carnivorous propen- 
sities are only in accordance with their physical 
structure, which demands animal food. 

Their place in the economy of nature is just as 
fixed as that of the animals on which they prey ; 
and so to associate them with notions of cruelty 
and rapine is both unwarrantable and irreverent. 
It is in the province of ever}' Nooker to know that 
they do not charm us with their music nor delight 
our eyes with their fancy colors, for you all know 
that if they had either of the above-mentioned 
qualities it would betray their presence to their 
victims and frustrate the design of their creation. 
But they very faithfully perform their mission as 
scavengers, and some naturalists think that like the 
carnivorous animals, they serve to prevent the 



herbivora increasing unduly. Both sight and 
smell seem to guide them in their search for food. 
The latter sense is remarkably keen, and they have 
been seen to descend directly from a great height 
in the air to putrefying food that was concealed 
from their vision. 

Notice, the above outline will show that this fam- 
ily have different heads and claws, but some points 
are similar; for instance, they all have hooked bills, 
so they can tear their meat to pieces ; their legs 
are very short and very muscular, which makes 
them real stout birds. Their wings are especially 
adapted to their peculiar habits, as the eagle that 
pounces down upon his prey has great strength of 
wing, while the owl which approaches his prey 
very cautiously, has very small and feeble wings. 

This class of birds always live in pairs, and they 
choose their mates for life ; the)' are not polyga- 
mists, nor do they grant divorce. It is rather re- 
markable that in a large proportion of this class 
the females are larger than the males; but it is 
probably for the reason that they always have the 
care of the young, which are at first weak and blind, 
like the young beasts of prey among mammals. 

The Andean condor is in all probability the most 
remarkable of the vultures in regard to size and 
strength, and the height to which he soars. He is 
about four feet long and in many instances he 
measures ten to thirteen feet from tip to tip ; he 
lives away up in the mountains from ten to fifteen 
thousand feet above the sea level, and he is often 
seen soaring higher than this. He not only feeds 
on carrion or putrefied meat, but he will attack 
lambs and young goats, and sometimes when two 
or more of them are together they will go so far 
as to venture upon a puma or a llama, and you 
know these are the South American lions. How- 
ever it is seldom that he attacks living prey unless 
driven to it and to man he is entirely inoffensive. 

The Nookers are best acquainted with the turkey 
buzzard; he is purely a scavenger, for he not only 
sucks the rotten eggs of their own family and other 
birds, but he especially enjoys the decaying bodies 
of animals and fowls and they will even devour the 
carcases of each other. The first time you get a 
chance watch him sail round and round, up or down, 
to or from a strong wind without even flapping a 



THE INQLENOOK. 



667 



wing. He is a great benefit to us in the United 
States as a scavenger. 

Eagles and hawks belong to this class, but they 
are not in the habit of eating decayed meats; they 
prefer to have theirs fresh and this requires a sharp- 
er mandible or bill ; also a sharper claw. The 
white-headed eagle is the chosen emblem of our 
country, but in some respects the Nook thinks 
that he is not a fit representative; for instance, he 
will sometimes make an honest living and then 
again he will act the part of the freebooter and 
rob the fish-hawk of his well-earned food. When 
he is searching for food he will ascend to a dizzy 
height and then he will descend like lightning by a 
spiral path in preference to a direct line, for he can 
both go faster and he can alight with greater pre- 
cision and ease. 

This is the bird that is sometimes called the bald 
eagle, the short white hair looking at a distance as 
if it were bald. He is a rank coward and can be 
routed by the little king-bird not larger than a 
sparrow. 

Now, Nookers, you read all you can about him 
this week and next week we will have a lesson on 
the hawks and owls. 

* * * 

THE STAG-BEETLE. 



The stag-beetle has a four-sided head, and is armed 
with large, chestnut-colored mandibles. The man- 
dibles, or jaws, of the stag-beetle have a large tooth 
in the center, and two pointed branches on the end. 
The beetle can shut them up or spread them out 
at will. The stag-beetles are found in the warmer 
parts of both continents. 

Tt is true that they are found only where there 
are many oak trees. The grub or the larvae live in 
the wood of the oak, and when they are winged and 
tan search for food they prefer the green, glossy 
leaves of the oak to any other shrub. 

The male beetles can be seen in June at twilight, 
hovering around the tops of the trees, sipping the 
liquid that often oozes from the bough, and they 
make while doing this a very noisy mutter. The 
females remain hidden at night, but in the daytime 
you may see the beetles, both males and females, 
roaming about in the dry leaves, or climbing upon 
the trunks of the trees, and sometimes they hang 
suspended from the limbs in a position almost ver- 
tical. 

It is a queer sight sometimes when an oak tree 
has been cut down and some flies, wasps, bees and 
other insects gather there to drink of the sap, to 
see them try to drive the other insects away, to 



keep them from drinking their much-loved bever- 
age. 

I wish that some of our Nooker boys and girls 
would find a bunch of them dining upon such a 
jolly occasion, and you would think that' some of 
them were not just so polite, for they slap each 
other in the face very cleverly. 

Stag-beetles have great life and strength. They 
have been known to live after having been soaked 
in water for three days and nights, and after having 
been kept in alcohol for a period of forty minutes. 
They have been known to live a year without food. 

♦ * * 
BIG HORNED RABBITS. 



The theory that rabbits are naturally militant is 
perhaps, not as widely accepted as its champions 
could wish, though the evidence adduced from time 
to time appears to be convincing. One difficulty 
has been that the popular conception of a rabbit is 
of a shrinking, small and utterly impotent bundle 
of brittle bones and fur fit for wrapping " Baby 
Bunting in." Doubtless when the public is edu- 
cated up to the conception of the horned rabbit 
of Indian Territory, it will be easier to make them 
out both cunning and bloodthirsty. We are indebt- 
ed to the editor of the Chelsea Commercial for cor- 
roboration of the story that, while the species is 
still scarce, four horned rabbits have been shot on 
one big ranch. It appears that there are two vari- 
eties, one a native of the Creek Nation, which is a 
dwarf and harmless, and the other found in the 
Cherokee County, which is sometimes as large as 
a greyhound. Six of this latter kind, says the 
editor, cornered a cow in a ravine and kept her 
prisoner for several days, because she trespassed on 
their feeding grounds, and would have starved to 
death had she not been discovered in time. The 
cow was crazed with fright, and her nervous system 
so completely prostrated that she is rapidly turning 
white, and in a short time will not have a red hair 
on her body. On the same authority we are able 
to announce one other, and simultaneous, develop- 
ment that appeals to the curiosity born in us. " ( hi 
the Tickeater farm, on Spencer creek, has appeared 
a variety of horned mice with dragon tails, and the 
cats are leaving the neighborhood in droves." It 
is possible that this last bit of information may not 
be accepted at its face value, and it may be that the 
editor weakens his evidence in the matter of the 
horned rabbits by adding it. But it is, after all. 
only the carping critic with a constitutional and 
professional lack of faith in any new discovery who 
will reject the story of the six horned rabbits and 
the frightened cow. — Cincinnati Enquirer 



the: inglenook. 




HOME DEPARTMENT 




Though many be our troubles, 
Our joys are more than double; 
The most of days are cheery. 
And night brings rest when weary. 
There is always love that's caring, 
And shielding and forbearing. 
Dear woman's love to hold us close 

And keep our hearts in thrall. 
There is home to share together 
In calm or stormy weather, 
And while the hearth flame burns 

'Tis a good world after all. 
* * * 

TOO THICK, THAT'S ALL. 



The other day the Nookman happened in a restau- 
rant where Mr. Nulywedd and his bride were en- 
joying a fine lunch, and while waiting to be served 
he overheard the following: 

"Is the salad nice, dear?" "Lovely! Perfect- 
ly superb ! " " And yours ? " " Heavenly ! " 

The temptation to lift the eyes from the daily 
to the two enthusiasts was entirely too strong for 
him, and he tried to imagine what their adjectives 
would sound like, for instance, if they were looking 
from the top of old Rigi or Pilatus upon the bosom 
of Lake Lucerne in a silver moonrise, or upon a 
shimmer of a tinted sea at sunrise, or upon a flock 
of fleecy, ruby clouds, driven by a lazy wind across 
a daffodil sky, or upon Mt. Blanc with a storm 
flag unfurled from her hoary battlements and pur- 
ple in the shadow of the descending night. 

If a single slice of a hard-boiled egg, a pinch of 
lettuce, a sprinkle of vinegar, and a dash of pep- 
per is exquisitely lovely, and too utterly utter, what 
in the world is left for Dame Nature and what can 
be said in behalf of heroism, courage, faithfulness, 
love, mother, home and heaven? Verily, verily, 
we say unto our young Nookers, that wasted ad- 
jectives and superabundant smiles make good com- 
mon sense very tired. 

«& *3* *$* 
TEDDY'S LITTLE HATCHET. 



SELECTED BY ELSIE SANGER. 

Teddy thought George Washington was a great 
man. He had a beautiful book about him and his 
mother had read to him again and again the story 
of the hatchet. Teddy was so truthful himself that 
he would have done just as George Washington did, 



only he would have told the truth and made no re- 
marks about it — that is, he would have done so be- 
fore he heard the story. 

Teddy's cousin, little Jamie, said that he thought 
George was awfully silly for not running away 
when he saw his father coming; but Teddy liked to 
hear that George had said, " I did it father, I can- 
not lie," and that George's father had clasped him 
to his breast and said, " It would have grieved me 
less to lose every tree in the garden than to have 
my son to tell one lie." 

On Tedd}''s fifth birthday, a nice tool-box was 
sent to him. It had a hammer, saw, plane, screws, 
nails, and everything — and a little hatchet with a 
little red stripe on the handle. Teddy worked hard 
for two days sawing, driving, planing and chopping. 

Teddy's father had a nice young pear tree by 
the kitchen window. It was going to bear fruit 
for the first time. Teddy thought it was such a 
little tree that it would not make any difference to 
anybody anyway, so he went out and chopped it 
down with a few strokes of his little hatchet, and 
it was on the ground. 

Then Teddy went and sat on the kitchen porch 
and waited for his father to come, so that he might 
tell him about it and be clasped to his father's arms. 
Just before dinner he heard the gate swing open 
and he ran around to meet his father and said, " O, 
guess what I did, father." His father guessed that 
he had bee'n a bad boy, but Teddy said, " No, in 
deed, you can't guess. I've cut down your pear 
tree." 

Teddy's father said, " Well ! " He looked more 
than he said. Then he went around by the kitchen 
window and saw his nice pear tree cut down and 
lying on the ground in two pieces. Then he said 
that Teddy might be like George Washington, but 
he was not like George's father. He said he was 
not going to have his nice trees cut down ; and he 
looked right at Teddy sharply and broke a little 
switch off the tree. Teddy felt afraid and he ran 
into the house to tell his mother about it ; and by 
this time he was very sorry indeed. His father 
brought his little hatchet in and gave it to his moth- 
er and she locked it in the bureau drawer and said 
that Teddy should have it no more for a month 
She took Teddy upon her lap, and told him that 
cutting down pear trees which belonged to some one 
else was almost as bad as to tell a lie, that a tree 
is a living thing and a useful thing which we must 



the: inglenook. 



care for and not destroy, and that the pretty pear 
tree which his father had carefully planted and 
watered was now dead. Teddy offered his tool- 
box to his papa to pay for the pear tree and he felt 
that if George Washington was good he still might 
have been a little better. 
Bays, W. Va. + + + 

A NEW DISEASE. 



It seems that modern science ever and anon keeps 
ferreting out new enemies to the human body. 
New inventions come which produce new lines of 
labor, which, in turn, create new experiences, which 
subject workmen to new diseases. Not long since 
a lecturer before the Royal Society of London de- 
livered a well-prepared discussion on the work of 
the Simplon tunnel. He illustrated his lecture 
with some specimens of the cuttings from the hy- 
draulic drill which is used by the workmen to pen- 
etrate the Alps, and which machine has made it 
possible to make the unprecedented progress that 
they are making, and explained that this dust, or 
cuttings, which he exhibited and which it is im- 
possible to avoid, was the very thing which was 
causing this new disease among miners. The dust 
comes from the rocks that are penetrated and 
through respiration comes in contact with the 
tissues of the lungs so as to reduce their vitality 
and predispose the miners to attacks of tubercle 
bacillus. The effects thus produced are similar to 
those of steel particles in file works and the dust 
in the stone-mason's trade. 

Miner's acute consumption has only come into 
prominence since these great subterranean ma- 
chines have been introduced, and the reason is be- 
cause they produce a greater amount of the dust 
than when the men are working by hand. And 
again when a hole is drilled in which a blasting 
has been fired, in their hurry to push the work, be- 
cause the miners are now working shorter hours, 
they rush back to the blast before the fume has 
died away and the dust has settled. This new dis- 
ease has been christened phthisis. 

ORANGE AND DANDELION WINE OR 
CORDIAL. 



Cover four quarts of dandelion blossoms with four 
quarts of boiling water and set aside until luke- 
warm. Stir in four pounds of granulated sugar, 
three tablespoonfuls of yeast, the juice of three 
oranges and the grated peel of a lemon. Mix well, 
strain, set in a cold place for two days, then strain 
again. Pour into a keg, leave out the bung and al- 
low the contents to work until clear. Strain off 
and bottle and seal. 



KNOWN TO BE GOOD. 



BY G. W. CRISSMAN. 

Pour a small quantity of Carbon Disulphide on the 
hill and then cover with dirt, and the ants will give 
you no further trouble. 

Russel, Kans. 

♦ «fr 4* 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 



Sift a quart of flour with two rounded teaspoon- 
fuls of baking powder, add a saltspoonful of salt 
and rub into the dry mass two heaping tablespoon- 
fuls of shortening. Add enough cold milk to make 
a dough than can be rolled out, turn upon a floured 
pastry board and roll into a sheet a half inch thick, 
taking care not to have the dough too stiff. Cut 
into biscuit and bake in a quick oven. 

SOUR MILK BISCUIT. 



Mix together two cups of sour milk or of butter- 
milk, two teaspoonfuls of melted butter, a tea- 
spoonful of soda dissolved in a very little scalding 
water and enough flour to make a dough that can 
be rolled out. Roll out, cut into rounds and bake 
in a brisk oven. 

•2* •> * 

VANILLA ICE CREAM. 



Make a custard of a quart of milk, seven eggs and 
two pounds of granulated sugar. Stir until the 
custard coats the spoon, take from the fire and when 
cool, flavor with quart of cream and freeze. 



* * * 
THISTLES. 



When troubled with Canada thistles, see that the 
fence around that field is hog-proof, keep the rings 
out of the hogs' noses and put a sufficient number of 
hogs in the field to root it up entirely. This will put 
an end to your Canada thistles and enrich your land 
for the succeeding crop. 

At this time of the year many of our Nookers may 
be bothered with a small, yellowish-white worm in the 
curled leaf of the new grapeshoot. It comes just 
about this time of year and proves to be very detri- 
mental, as Mr. Worm is generally shielded by the leaf 
and a web which he draws tightly about him, which 
renders him difficult to reach. If you will take about 
one ounce of Paris green to fifteen gallons of water and 
apply it with a spray, Mr. Moth will bid you good-bye. 



6/0 



THE INGLENOOK. 



mil OUR LITTLE PEOPLE 

1- 



BONNIE WAYNE. 



Nen my ma she looked cross at me and they looked 
at each other, nen ma says, " What is the matter with 
Hattie, Bonnie ? " Nen I told her that she cried to 
have her hair colored, and Luke and me we just dot 
some of papa's red ink cause we couldn't find anything 
else, and Luke said a good many of them wuz a 
coloring their hair red this year, and so we just put 
it on and I don't think papa will care for just a 
little ink, will he? And nen she said it wus not the 
ink she cared for at all ; it wuz the ink all over the 
floor and it wuz on Hattie's neck and face, and on 
her dress, and she didn't know what she would do 
with me, and I didn't want her to do anything with 
me at all ; I wuz all right ; it wuz Hattie that looked 
so bad nohow. 

Luke's mamma wuz in the other room and my mam- 
ma went in there and they talked and talked the long- 
est time, and Luke and me we just looked at each 
other; we didn't know what to play any more. Once 
we listened at what they said and all we could hear 
them say wuz " fresh air " once in a while, and so 
we thought they wuzn't a talking about what they 
wuz a going to do with me for spoiling Hattie's hair. 
Luke said he'd like to go home, but couldn't go till 
his mamma come, and I told him I wuz a coming over 
to his house and we would play some more, and he 
said that we wouldn't color hair any more, and I said 
that Dora didn't want hers colored nohow. 

Just then our mammas came out into the other room 
and they said it was time to go home ; and they didn't 
do anything with me either, only my ma asked us 
children if we would like to go to the country, and I 
said, " Down to grandpa's house ? " and nen she said, 
" No, way off, and stay four, five or six weeks." Wy 
say, I just jumped up and down. I said, " Can I 
take my dolls ? " And nen she said, " Yes, I'd say 
dolls if I were you. Just look at Hattie's hair." And 
nen I wished that I didn't say nothing. Luke he 
wanted to take his wagon and ball and top and ever 
so many things, and nen his ma said, " Come on, let 
us go home," and then they said something about 
ten o'clock to-morrow, and away they went. 

Nen I asked my mamma where we wuz a going to- 
morrow and she said that there was a woman over on 
Douglas avenue that wuz a coming after Luke and 
me and she will have a whole lots of children with 
her, and she is a going to take us out in the country 
for a whole long time. She calls them the fresh air 



children, and I don't know what that is, but we are 
a going to have a nice time out in the woods, mamma 
said, and we could get nice flowers and see so many 
funny things too. 

And when they had gone home, mamma and me 
went to the store to get me a new pair of red shoes, 
and my ! they are pretty, and when we wuz a going 
down to the store on the street car there was a man in 
the seat in front of me that didn't have hardly no hair 
on his head, and I asked mamma who planted our 
hair nohow, and she said that nobody planted it, but 
that God made it when he created us, or something 
like that, and nen I said, " God didn't give that feller 
much, did he', mamma ? " And mamma looked most 
worse than she did when I wuz a trying to pick up 
the sugar, and the man looked as cross at me. I guess 
he thought God wuzn't very good to him. 

Mamma, she got me a nice basket to put my things 
in to take to the fresh air country, and she put some 
nice chocolate candies in it and said I must not eat 
them till I got on the train. And so I asked her when 
we could get on the train, and she said in the morn- 
ing. And nen we got on another street car to go 
home again, 'an I guess the man what pushes it was 
in a big hurry, for mamma went in and I followed 
right along after her, and just as she wus a going to 
sit down in a seat, wy that man give it a big jerk 
somehow and I pretty near fell down, and I held on 
tight with one hand to the box that had my red shoes, 
but I didn't have nothing in the other hand and I 
poked two of my fingers in a woman's eyes, and she 
hollered worse than I did. My ! I wuz glad ma had 
the chocolates. Ma she said I ought to be careful. 
Well my, I didn't know how to stop the car. 

Papa said I would have to go to bed early that 
night, and I did, and the next morning I wuz awake 
before they wuz and I told papa if he wuzn't never go- 
ing to get up, and so mamma she hurried and got 
breakfast ; but I wuzn't very hungry. Mamma put all 
my things in my basket, and my red shoes and Dora, 
and she wouldn't let me take Hattie. And nen they 
went with me to the street car and when we got to 
the big house where so many big tootoots is and the 
mostest people, and just then here wuz that woman 
what has so many fresh air children, and a man came 
along and just hollered, " All aboard nexrainfLogans- 
potCinnatrj" and all the children ran and mamma 
kissed me, and a big tootoot wuz right there. 
(to be continued.) 



THE INGLENOOK. 



6/1 



^vpTfie Q* <& &♦ B^epartrnQnt* f^ 



1 



A FEW QUESTIONS FOR THE NOOKERS TO Guess the diameter of a silver dollar in inches. 

ANSWER. 



Why does an icicle grow with its roots upward : 



How big does the moon look to you ? 

Does a robin hop or walk like a chicken ? 

Does a cow pull grass to her or away from herself? Why do the leaves of the trees turn upside down 

sometimes when the wind blows and at other times 
remain right side up? 



Why does the water in a river generally rise just 
before the rain ? 

* 



Does your room door swing to the right or the left? 



How many pickets on your front gate, if you have 
one? 

* 

Why does the moss grow on the north side of a 
tree? 

* 

Has your watch figures or Roman characters on the 
face? 

* 

Which is the larger — a dollar or a twenty-dollar 
gold piece? 

When a train stops at the station what makes the 
engine partt so? 

* 

When a train stops what makes it always go back- 
ward a little bit? 

* 

Why is the outside rail of a railroad track the 
higher on making a curve ? 

* 

A cow's ears — are they above or below her horns, 
and are they in front or behind her horns? 



Why is it that that particular species of ants which 
are called army ants and which have real battles among 
themselves, when they take an enemy captive, always 
take the black, or negro ant? 



Explain how it is that you can sow a handful of 
seeds gathered from the phlox — and the seeds all look 
exactly alike in every way — and when they bloom you 
have every imaginable color? 



Why is it that birds oftentimes will fly along in 
front of a hunter just far enough out of the way to 
be out of the range of the gun? Why don't they fly 
entirely away? Do they know how for the gun will 
shoot ? 

* 

What are Logan berries? 

A Logan berry is a cross between a blackberry and 
a raspberry. It is about the size of a large black- 
berry and looks like a large red raspberry. It is seed- 
less and is a native of California. 

WHO KNOWS? 



What is the reason that a woodpecker, sitting all 
by himself on a tree, when desiring a drink from a 
brook near by, in making his descent, stops several 
times on his way, looks around and listens ? 



How is it that you may find two eggs side and side, 
both white, same size, same shape, and lay them in 
proper incubation for a time and one hatijhes out a 
long, wriggling snake and the other an ugly, moping 

terrapin ? 



Did you ever, about noonday, when walking down 
the road, see ten thousand times ten thousand mos- 
quitoes dancing up and down with the smallest pin- 
head space between them? And yet not one of these 
knocks the other headlong upon the grass or breaks 
a leg or wing, even as long - and delicate as they 
are. Suddenly, without notice, a peculiarly high- 
shouldered, vicious creature, with a long and pendant 
proboscis, darts out of the rising and falling cloud and 
settling on your cheek or nose inserts his hypodermic 
poison. What possessed the little wretch to do this? 
Did he smell your blood while he was dancing? 



672 



THE INGLENOOK. 



f * 

* —~~~~~. ^^^^^ _ * 






1£ISCE. 



A1TEOTJS | 



*I»»*****t** t ' » fr > * » i fr ^ AA^HJ>^^H^A<j^> ^^h^ t y^ t^^>^^y^^^^i^t^^e^i^^^^i ^tAA > fr i$h$h$m» 



HAVE BEGUN RIGHT. 



Last week we received scores of names already 
who are taking advantage of the reduced rates of our 
magazine; the opportunity of doing their neighbors 
some good, and the chance to* get a $25 library free. 
They realize SOMEBODY is going to get it, and they 
are beginning. Every name you send in will be credit- 
ed to you and in the end of the race, the one sending 
the largest list of subscribers, enclosing twenty-five 
cents each, will receice as a reward the $25 LI- 
BRARY, " Literature of all Nations; " the next highest 
a watch, next a Bible and so on. See our prize contest 
page. The articles " With Kodak and Pencil " will 
be worth many times the cost of the six months sub- 
scription. Why not have a large number of Ingle- 
nooks go to your school and Sunday school? Think 
about it, and then write us about it. It would be a 
noble way of doing good. 



CONTENTS OF LIPPINCOTT'S MAGAZINE FOR 
JULY. 



" The Love Affair of a Princess," by Lafayette Mc- 
Laws ; " Old St. David's," by Florence Earle Coates ; 
" Moods and Memories," by George Moore ; " The 
Baby Goes A-Fishing," by Cyrus Townsend Brady; 
" A Guide," by Richard Kirk ; " The Court of Pan," 
by Elizabeth Duer ; " The Maid of Sparta," by Aloy- 
sius Coll; "Moses, Jr.," by Ella Middleton Tybout; 
" Because of Nellie," by Bertha H. Lippincott ; " The 
Cathedral at Burgos," by S. R. Eliott; "The Lazza- 
paroola," by Edward Boltwood ; " The Doorway," by 
Ella Heath ; " The Emancipation of Lydia Duroe," 
by Mabel Nelson Thurston ; " A Thread of Scarlet," 
by Jenette Lee ; " A Delayed Heritage," by Eleanor H. 
Porter ; " The Sunken Fleet," by Francis Halley New- 
ton; "The Ghost in the Red Shirt," B. M. Bower; 
" Morning," by Emma P. Seabury ; " Walnuts and 
Wine." 

* * * 

CONTENTS OF REVIEW OF REVIEWS FOR 
JULY. 



i. " Progress of the Middle West.'' 

2. "The Post Office Scandal." 

3. " Canadian Trade." 

4. " Governmental Irrigation." 



5- 
6. 

7- 
8. 



Press Suppression . in Finland." 
Anemia in Porto Rico." 
Submarine Mines." 
Panama's Health Conditions." 
National Ambitions of Canada." 

SICK-ROOM ADVICE. 



Do not forget that kindness and tenderness are es- 
sential to successful nursing. 

Don't ask "a convalescent if he would like this 
or that to eat or drink, but prepare the delicacies' 
and present them in a tempting way. 

A nurse must never get impatient. A sick per- 
son is often irritable and sometimes obstinate, but 
this must be overcome by kindness and firmness. 

Do not fan a sick person unless you are requested 
to do so, or there is good reason why you should. 
A nervous person is often made very uncomfortable 
by it. 

The nurse must learn to be cool and collected 
in time of trouble. Any expression of alarm or anx- 
iety, at a critical moment, may result disastrously 
to the patient. 

In the early morning hours the vital forces of the 
patient are at an ebb, and it is often necessary to 
add additional clothing to the bed or provide some- 
thing stimulating at this time. 

In bedside watching the nurse's work is often 
very responsible and trying. And it is here that 
the observing physician can readily determine 
whether the nurse is experienced or not from her 
general bearing. 

Avoid jarring the bed and do not allow anyone 
to sit on the bed. Avoid haste. Do things quickly 
by knowing what to do and how to do them. All 
appearance of haste and uncertainty is annoying to 
the patient. 

Unnecessary noise and confusion should not be 
permitted in the sick room. Nothing is more ir- 
ritating to a nervous patient than loud talking. 
When it is necessary to converse with the sick let 
the voice be sufficiently loud and clear to enable the 
hearer to understand without special effort. 



J 



•$»•$»•£ 



The true university of these days is a collection of 
books. — Carlyle. 



The Brethren Colonies 



IN THE 



Fruit Belt of Michigan 




The basis of my business is absolute and 

unvarying integrity. 

SAMUEL S. THORPE. 



are an actual success. The colony of the Lakeview church is located on lands 
surrounding the village of Brethren, Michigan. Brethren, Michigan, is lo- 
cated on the main line of the Pere Marquette System, 105 miles north of 
Grand Rapids and about 14 miles east of Lake Michigan. All conditions of 
soil, climate and location make this spot an ideal one for general farming, 
fruit-growing and stock-raising. Lands have been sold to about 120 families 
of the Brotherhood and their friends, of which number about one-half have 
already located and are clearing up their places. The possibilities of this dis- 
trict are exceptional. The Brethren tract embraces about 20,000 acres, of 
which over 11,000 acres have already been sold. There are just as good and 
as desirable locations remaining as those that have been bought and the 
prices have not yet been advanced, but with the improvements now going on, 
developing the country so rapidly, it is only a short time till prices advance 
considerably. THE TIME TO BUY IS NOW. Present prices range from 
$7 to $15 per acre, on easy terms, or less five (5) per cent f®r cash. 

For illustrated booklet and information in regard to rates address Samuel 
S. Thorpe, District Agent Michigan Land Association, Cadillac, Mich. 



The Cadillac Tract— 25,000 Acres of Rich Agricul- 
tural Lands, Excellently Situated and Splen- 
didly Adapted for Farming, Fruit-growing and 
Stock-raising. 

These lands are located from one-half mile to six miles from the hustling city of Cadillac, the seat of Wexford 
county, 8,000 inhabitants, (all alive.) and its location on the Grand Rapids and Indiana R'y (part of the Pennsylvania 
System) and on the Ann Arbor Railroad (part of the Wabash System) together with its other advantages render 
it the best trading point and market place in Northern Michigan. Cadillac and the lands controlled by the ad- 
vertiser are located about 98 miles north of Grand Rapids and 50 miles east of Lake Michigan. They are well wa- 
tered with springs, creeks, rivers and lakes of pure, sparkling water teeming with gamy fish. The soil varies from 
a sandy loam to a clay loam, all of it underlaid with clay and gravel subsoil, which responds eagerly to cultivation. 

For illustrated booklets, maps and information as to reduced rates to these locations, address: 

S-^-2v£TJ'E!I- l S_ THOEPE, 

IZHstxict -^g-erxt ^dlxclxigrara. I_.a,rxd. ^Issn., 

3Z>ept. 2*JL r 

OAODDLiI— AjO, 1£ICHIG-^11T. 



OKTLY HALF-PRICE 

(to new subscribers only.) 



Inglenook to Jan. I, 1905, regular price $ 50 

Our Special Trial Offer, only, ■ C p 

An Easy Way to Secure a Valuable Book. 

Inglenook to Jan. 1, 1905, $ 50 

Modern Fables and Parables 1 25 




Both for only 



SI 75 

.75 



The book we offer is a late one, by Rev. Harris, author of Mr. World and Miss 
Churchmember. The object of this book is to teach morality and to correct social evils. 
It is a splendid book for the home. If you do not already have it you will do well to 
take advantage of this offer. 



Get a Good Fountain Pen. 




Both for only 



This fountain pen is a good one and would be highly prized by any boy or girl. It is worth $1.00 to any one 
in need of a pen. 

. . _ 

Hundreds of New Subscribers. 

We are receiving hundreds of new subscribers, who are taking advantage of the above unprecedented offer. 
Our aim is to increase our list by several thousand within the next few weeks. From present indications our aim 
is not too high. The Nook is starting on a new era and we want all our friends and neighbors to join hands with 
us. You will never have a better opportunity to give the magazine a trial. 

If you are not already a subscriber fill out the blank below at once and forward it to us and we will do the rest. 
It's only twenty-five cents. You are sure to get double your money's worth and more. Come on now: — We are 
anxiously awaiting your letter. (If you are a regular subscriber, do us the kindness to show this offer to your 
friends, please.) 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



Date, 



Brethren Pub. House: — 

Enclosed please find for which please send me the Inglenook to Jan. 1, 1905, and 

your premium, (If premium is wanted, state which one.) 

Name 

Address 



THE 



INGLENOOK. 



THE COLONY 



..ON... 



LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 



...IN THE... 



SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 




BRETHREN OAK GROVE CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL. 

Still continues to attract the attention of homeseekers. 

The uniform success of those who have settled here and the immense growth of 
every variety of crop which is again in evidence establishes the fact that here is the 
place where the industrious man of small means can make a California home. 

EASTERN PEOPLE DO EASTERN FARMING. 

You don't have to spend years learning- a new business. 

ALFALFA, CATTLE, CORN, HOGS, 

besides the California fruits, are the products which enable the farmer to pay for 
his land and make a good living while doing it. 

SPECIAL LOW RATES TO CALIFORNIA. 

Prom August 15th to Sept. 10th the railroads will sell Round Trip excursion 
tickets to San Francisco (with stop-overs). 

From Chicago, $50 00 

From Mississippi River 47 50 

From Missouri River 45 00 

Final return limit, Oct. 23. 

ALSO SEPTEMBER 15th TO OCTOBER 15th COLONIST ONE-WATT TICKETS 
TO ANY CALIFORNIA POINT. 

From Chicago $33 00 

From Mississippi River 30 00 

From Missouri River 25 00 

By this arrangement you can come to Laton on the excursion rate and see our 
land. If It suits you, go back and bring your family out on the colonist rate. 

Land sells for $30 to $60 per acre, including perpetual water right. Terms, one- 
fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. 

From twenty to forty acres will support the average family, in comfort. 

If interested send your name and address and receive printed matter and our 
local newspaper free for two months. Write to 

NARES & SAUNDERS, ■ Laton, California. 

26tl3 Mention the INOLENOOK wnen vi-IUng 



S. D. KIQER, 

Bridges, Road Machinery. 



Township and School Supplies 
and Furniture. 



"We Study to Please.'' 



INDIANAPOLIS, 



IND. 




FREE SAMPLE 

Sendletteror postal for free SAMPLE 

HINDOO TOBACCO HABIT CURE 

We cure you of chewing and smoking 
for 60c, or money back. Guaranteed perfectly 
harmless. Address Milford Drug Co., Milford, 
Indiana. We answer all letters. 

24tl ; Mention the INGLENOOK when writing. 

Brethren 

Lesson 

Commentary 

For 1904 



It contains valuable aid on each 
lesson and should be in the hands of 
every Sunday-school teacher in the 
Brethren church. Anyone who is in- 
terested in Sunday-school work, or 
the extension of Christ's kingdom 
(and we all should be), will find 
much help and inspiration in this 
commentary. 

Price, Only 



35c 



We have a number of copies on 
hand yet which we wish to dispose 
of at once and will fill all orders from 
now on at thirty-five cents per copy, 
prepaid. To insure a copy order at 
once.. 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
Elgin, Illinois. 



f O ADVERTISE 



Judiciously is an art, and many make 
a failure because they lack knowl- 
edge. Advertisers will be helped by 
our advertising experts in securing 
the best possible results. 

Brethren Publishing House, 
Elgin, Illinois. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



Bonnet Straw Cloth! 

Samples Sent Free. 14 Styles and Colors. 



Rice Net, Wire Chiffon, Braid, Ribbon 
and Mousseline de Soie for Strings. 

We carry large stock, manufactured especial- 
ly; our own designs. Prices remarkably low. 



Only flonse Making a Specialty of these Goods. Write for Free Samples. 



Albaugh Bros., Dover & Co., 

341-343 Franklin Street, - = Chicago, III. 

M anchester 
follege. 



A Delightful 

Home 

for Students 

X 

The school 
has entered up- 
on a new era of 
prosperity. 

The steady increase in enrollment prophesies a bright future for the school. The faculty em- 
braces an able corps of instructors. A course of study here is inexpensive. 

Help for Bible Students.— We have a plan to help Bible students who are aiming to devote 
their lives to the work of the church. There are many such young people in the church who should 
write at once for this plan. Our new catalogue will take your eye. For further information address 
the President. North Manchester. Ind. (2-26,28 






To Advertise 








Judiciousb 
because tl 
be helped 
ing the be 

BRE1 


7 is an art, and many make 
ley lack knowledge. Adverl 
by our advertising experts. 
=t possible results. 

HREN PUBLISHING BOUSE, 


a failure 

.isers will 

in secur- 

Elgin, 111. 



Change of Clivate Beneficial 

After your years of toil and suc- 
cess, don't you want to rest the re- 
maining? If you do, come to south- 
ern California, where roses bloom all 
the year, grass is evergreen, some 
kind of fruit ripening every month, 
vegetables a perpetual luxury. To 
make these declining years a delight, 
to combine work and play, purchase 
a walnut, almond, fig, olive, orange, 
or lemon grove; each has its profit, 
pleasure and beauty. For particulars 
of each write A. Hutsinpiller, P. O. 
Box 1 194, Los Angeles, Cal. 



r 



K 



< Gospel Songs and* 
JL. Hymns, No. I.. A 



Has a wonderful sale, and the book 
still LIVES. We are receiving or- 
ders daily for this book and have 
sold more than 40,000 copies since it 
has been published. There is only 
one reason for this. It is simply be- 
cause 

THE SONGS AND HYMNS IT 
CONTAINS STILL LIVE. 

This book is used by thousands in 
the Sunday school, young people's 
meeting and general song service. It 
contains 208 pages and sells at 30 
cents each, or four for $1. Send 
your orders to 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
Elgin, Illinois. 

The Inglenook 
COOK BOOK 



We have sent out thousands of 
these Cook Books as premiums. 
So great was the demand that a 
second edition was published. 
We are still receiving numerous 
calls for this Cook Book. For this 
reason we have decided to dispose 
of the few remaining copies at 
25 cents per copy. To insure a 
copy it will be necessary for you 
to order at once. . . Send to 

Brethren Publishing Bouse 

Elgin, Illinois. 

TO CALIFORNIA, 
Via the Chicago, Union Pacific & 
North-Western Line. Two solid fast 
trains through to California daily. 
The Overland Limited (electric light- 
ed throughout) less than three days 
en route, leaves Chicago 8 P. M. An- 
other fast train leaves Chicago, 11:3s 
P. M. Apply to Agents. Chicago & 
North-Western R'y. 



* 
* 



I The Price of Equity Shares 
is $25 each par value. 



* 

* 



* On each subscription received during 

■f the next 3o days, and this advertisement 

j; pinned fast, earnings will be counted 

T from June ist. 



O "^" *^" "^* "f**I" -f- -f"!- ^ *?* -f- *J- -J- *I* ^ *l* "^- -f™l- -j- -j- -f- -{- -j- -f- -f- -j- -f* *J- -j- -f- -I Q 



WANTED! 

SHAREHOLDERS EVERYWHERE 

Established, 1896. Incorporated, 1902. 



Of *++* -J.****** * * 4 44444^.44,444 444444 4. 4 4 444444 4.4.4.4. 4. 4 44.4444444 4. 4. 4 4.4.4.4. 4444444444444.4444.0 



Dear Nooker:-- 

We want 200 persons to distribute our "EQUITY" 
General Merchandise Catalogues where we do not have 
shareholders. The large Catalogues are bringing in lots of 
business and we are needing more help. 

If you are interested in this proposition, write us at 
once. 

EQUITY MFG. AND SUPPLY COMPANY, 

153, 155, 156, 159 So. Jefferson St., 

Chicago, Illinois. 



* 



* 
* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 

* 

* 
* 
* 

* 
* 
* 

* 

* 

* 
* 
* 

* 

* 



* 
* 

* 



Now is Your Opportunity to Join 
a Successful Enterprise. 

SIX per cent paid on the investment, besides the FIVE per cent discount to 

shareholders from our catalogue prices. How is it done? Why. the 

shareholders all over the country do the advertising in 

turn for their 5 per cent discount. 



+ T 

+ t 

+ EQUITY SHARES are getting scarce J 

i * 

T and present indications show a tendency j£ 

4. of doubling their face value. * 

* 1 



OI.4. 4. 4. 44. 4, 4.4. 4^, 4. 4,4.44. 4.44.4.4.4, 4. 4.4.44,4, 4,4.4,40 

■J We have 30,000 prospective customers + 

who will hold our catalogues In readiness 1 

to show to their 60,000 thousand neigh- jt 

bors and friends, and it is in this way the J 
great volume of business is created. 



0*++-J"r-r**++++++++++++++++++-!"!-++++C 



THI 



INGLENOOK. 



ARE YOU GOING TO 

California, Washington, 
Oregon, Idaho 

Or Any Other Point? Take the 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Daily Tourist Car Lines 



Chicago, Missouri River, Colorado, Idaho, Oregon, 
Washington and California Points. 



ROUND TRIP RATES 



From Chicago, 
From Missouri River, 



$50.00 
45 00 



To San Francisco or Los Angeles, Cal., and Re- 
turn. Tickets Sold Aug. 15 to Sept. 10, inclusive. 
Return Limit, October 23, 1904. 



One-Way Colonist's Rates. 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, Sept. IS to Oct. 15. 

From Chicago, $33 00 

From St. Louis 30 00 

From Missouri River 25 00 

Proportionate Rates from all Points East. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 

IS KNOWN AS 

"The Overland Route" 

And is the only direct line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West. Business men and 
others can save many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal card to your nearest ticket agent, or 
Geo. L. McDonaugh, Colonization Agent. Omaha, 
Neb. 

E. L. LOMAX. G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



A Town With a Future 



Snyder, Colorado, Has all the Ear-marks of a Comer and 
is Surely Destined to be One of North- 
eastern Colorado's Leaders. 



Snyder is beautifully located on the South Platte river 
and Union Pacific Railway, between Sterling and Denver, 
extending from the river to the brow of a mesa, one-half 
mile away. The main street running north and south is 
80 feet wide; all other streets, 60 feet; alleys, 20 feet; all 
lots are 25x125 feet, excepting those fronting on the main 
street, which are 25x120. 

For further information about Snyder or South Platte 
Valley, address Geo. L. McDonaugh, Colonization Agent 
Union Pacific Railroad, at Omaha. Neb., for FREE print- 
ed matter. 

Still better, see some of those who have bought land 
near Snyder, Colorado, or write to them for further in- 
formation. 



The following parties have bought land near Snyder, 
Colo.: 

Louis E. Keltner, Hygiene, Colo.; W. W. Keltner, 
North Dakota; A. W. Brayton, Mt. Morris, 111.; Daniel 
Grabill, Lemasters, Pa.; J. L. Kuns, McPherson, Kans.; 
D. L. Miller, Mt. Morris, 111.; Daniel Neikirk. Lemasters, 
Pa.; Galen B. Royer, Elgin, III: E. Slifer, Mt. Morris, 111.; 
I. B. Trout, Lanark, 111.; R. E. Arnold, Elgin, 111. 



Geo. L. Studebaker, of Muncie, Indiana, says : 

" Sterling is a growing town with a good country 
surrounding. The members are active." 



HOMESEEKERS' EXCURSION 
to Snyder, Colorado, 

With Privilege of Stopping off at Sterling. Colo., 

AVE piDC Pl " s $3.oo, for the Round Trip First 
UnC rARE and Third Tuesday of Each Month via 

Union Pacific Railroad. 



PRIZE CONTEST 

HOW TO GET A VALUABLE PREMIUM 



WE ARE GOING TO GIVE A FEW VALUABLE PREMIUMS, AND ALL OUR INGLENOOK FRIENDS 

ARE INVITED TO ENTER THE CONTEST. 



Here Tliey Are ! 




No. 5 



The one sending us the most new subscribers to the Inglenook for the remainder of the year at 25 
cents each, or with premium as per our offer* at 75 cents each, will receive one set Literature of AH 
Nations, containing 10 volumes, weight, 26 pounds. Subscription price 

The one holding second place will receive a splendid ladies' or gentlemen's watch (whichever pre- 
ferred). The watch is equal to one that regularly retails for about 



The one holding third place will receive a good Teacher's Bible, Arabian Morocco, divinity circuit, worth 

s-orth 



4. The one holding fourth place will receive the book " Modern Fables and Parabl 

5. Each person sending 10 or m< 
men's, worth, 

Cash must accompany each order. 



Each person sending 10 or more subscriptions receive a good fountain pen, either ladies' or gentle- 
men's, worth 



*See our offer this issue. 




3NTo-**7- is Your Time. 



$25.00 
8.00 
3.00 
120 
l.OO 



No. +. 



Right now is the time to make things count. Get a good start and you will come out all 
right in the end. The one who goes at it at once with a determination to win stands a good 
chance to get a S25.ro set of books FREE. 

It is an easy matter to get subscriptions for a paper like the Inglenook, especially when 
you offer it for half price. You ought to be able to get nearly all your neighbors and friends. 

Do not say that you do not have a good territory and it's no use to try. Our experience 
leads us to believe that one place is as good as another. Some places where we least expect 
subscriptions we get the most. It is up to you whether or not you get this fine set of books. 
SOME ONE IS GOING TO GET THEM. Let every loyal Nooker get out and hustle. Aim 
at the top. Don't be satisfied with anything less. ALL THESE PRIZES ARE (JOI^O TO 
BE OIVEN TO SOME ONE. Go to work at once. Who will send the first list? (In sending 
your list, please mention that you are entering the contest.) 

Watch for closing date of contest next week. 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois 



-the: inglenook. 



The 



Mount 

Campbell 

Tract 



in Fresno County, 

California, 

Promises to become the leading 
fruit-growing section of California. 
Land is cheap, water abundant, loca- 
tion healthful and soil unsurpassed. 
The soil is especially adapted to the 
orange, grape, fig, orchard fruits, al- 
falfa and general farming. 

Plans are now forming for a colo- 
ny of the Brethren on this tract, J. 
S. Kuns, proprietor of the old Mis- 
sion farm at Covina, Cal., having al- 
ready purchased land in this district, 
which has been inspected by other 
prominent members of the church. 

Maps and information by 

W. M. ROHRER, 

Fresno, Cal. 

YOUNG WOMEN WANTED! 

At Sherman Hospital to receive in- 
struction and take the two years' course 
of study to become trained nurses. 
Graduates always in demand and receive 
good pay for their services. 

For information apply to Supt. of 
Sherman Hospital, Elgin, 111., or 

MBS. E. W. HIGGINS, 
262 Da Page St. Elgin, HI. 

27t3 

$2,500 buys highly improved fruit 
farm of 20 acres, including stock and 
tools. One and one-half miles to fine 
market. 

J. L. EUCKENSTAPP, 

.Bangor, Michigan. 

Iot26 Mention lh- IVflLKNOOK "h*n writing. 



It Does Not Pay to Neglect Your Eyes ! 

GUEL1NE 

Is good all for inflammations of the Eyes. 
It has cured thousands of others. It 
will cure you. :: DO YuU KNOW 

LUCINE? 



Dr. Yeremian uses it in India every day. 
It is for Diarrhoea. It works like a 
charm. It rids the intestines of all 
germs. If not satisfied send us the pills 
and we will return your money. 

Gueline, 35c. Lucine, 25c. 

THE YEREMIAN MEDICAL CO., 

BATAVIA. ILLINOIS. 

IHifl Mention the FNGLENOOK when writing. 

ORANGE AND WALNUT 

grove for sale. Five acres in south- 
ern California; 4^2-year-old trees, al- 
ternate rows. The choicest of land, 
trees, and location. An unusual op- 
portunity for a person with small 
capital who desires quality. Must 
sell to clear another place in same 
locality. 

Address: 

E. I. AMES, 

6332 Peoria St. Chicago, 111. 

20tl3 Mention the IXGLENOOK when wntinn 

FEW PEOPLE 

Know the value of liquid Spray as a 
home cure for Catarrh. Hay Fever, Head 
colds and other diseases of the respira- 
lory organs. 

Persons desiring to try this highly 
recommended treatment should immedi- 
ately write to E. J. Worst, 61 Main St., 
Ashland Ohio. 

He will gladly mail any reader of the 
Inglenook one of his new Atomizers and 
Liquid Spray treatment on five days' tri- 
al, free. 

If it gives satisfaction, send him $2.00, 
two-fifths regular price; if not, return 
it at the expired time, which will only 
cost you twelve cents postage, and you 
will not owe him a penny. It kills the 
1 'atarrh microbes in the head and throat. 
23U3 

Educate for the Farm 

is the song of the modern educator. It 
is now generall}- admitted that the 
schools have too long neglected the 
training of young 1 men for Farm Life 
and Business. In this new movement 
Mount Morris College is fully abreast 
of the times and, along with the other 
work offers a practical course in agricul- 
ture that meets present day conditions 
and prepares thoroughly for this most 
independent and highly remunerative 
profession. Every farmer boy should 
write to-day for further information. 

MOUNT MORRIS COLLEGE, 
J. E. Miller, Pres. Mount Morris, 111. 



COLORADO 



AT ANNUAL MEETING. 

We were at Carthage, Mo., during 
the Annual Meeting and met many 
of our old friends and correspondents 
among the Brethren. 

THE NEW BOOKS. 

We distributed five thousand of the 
new Union Pacific Railway folders, 
" What People Say about the South 
Platte Valley," while there. 

SEND FOR ONE. 

We have a few hundred of these 
books left for free distribution and if 
you will drop us a card will send you 
a copy by first mail. 

OUR CARTHAGE EXCURSION. 

Several members accompanied us 
on our excursion to Sterling and Sny- 
der and are well pleased with the 
country and some will locate. 

AGENTS WANTED. 

We would like to arrange with a 
member in every town in the country 
to distribute these folders and get up 
a party for Colorado. 

LIBERAL COMMISSIONS. 

We offer liberal commissions and 
special prices on any lands you may 
decide to purchase yourself. 

A FREE PASS. 

We also arrange for special rates 
for excursion parties and free trans- 
portation for agent who gets up the 
party to Colorado and return. 

SPECIAL BARGAINS. 

We have special bargains in irri- 
gated farms and town property dur- 
ing the summer months and now is 
the time to see the country and in- 
vest. 

SNYDER TOWN LOTS. 

Parties who will agree to distribute 
our advertising matter among their 
friends can secure six Snyder town 
lots for $100. These lots sell for $25 
each and you can make $50 profit by 
reselling them at this price. 

TROUT FISHING IN MOUN- 
TAINS. 

We will run special cheap rate ex- 
cursions from Sterling to Cherokee 
Park every week this summer. This 
is one of the finest resorts in Colo- 
rado. The trout fishing is grand and 
the scenery sublime. 

COME TO COLORADO. 

If you contemplate a trip for 
health, pleasure, recreation or invest- 
ment let us hear from you and we 
will be pleased to give all information 
wanted. 

The Colorado Colony Co., 
Sterling, Colorado. 

I7tl3 Mention the INGLLNOOK when writing. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



THE COLONY 



.ON... 



LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 

...IN THE... 

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 




BRETHREN OAK GROVE CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL. 

Still continues to attract the attention of homeseekers. 

The uniform success of those who have settled here and the immense growth of 
every variety of crop which is again in evidence establishes the fact that here is the 
place where the Industrious man of small means can make a California home. 

EASTERN PEOPLE DO EASTERN FARMING. 
You don't have to spend years learning a new business. 

ALFALFA, CATTLE, CORN, HOGS, 

besides the California fruits, are the products which enable the farmer to pay for 
his land and make a good living while doing it. 

SPECIAL LOW RATES TO CALIFORNIA. 

From August 15th to Sept. 10th the railroads will sell Round Trip excursion 
tickets to San Francisco (with stop-overs). 

From Chicago $50 00 

From Mississippi River 47 50 

From Missouri River 45 00 

Final return limit, Oct. 23. 

ALSO SEPTEMBER 15th TO OCTOBER 15th COLONIST ONE-WAT TICKETS 
TO ANY CALIFORNIA POINT. 

From Chicago $33 00 

From Mississippi River 30 00 

From Missouri River, 25 00 

By this arrangement you can come to Laton on the excursion rate and see our 
land. If it suits you. go back and bring your family out on the colonist rate. 

Land sells for $30 to $60 per acre, including perpetual water right. Terms, one- 
fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. 

From twenty to forty acres will support the average family in comfort. 

If interested send your name and address and receive printed matter and our 
local newspaper free for two months. Write to 

NARES & SAUNDERS, - Laton, California. 

26tl3 Wpotmn il- iv:i KNOOK wnen wntinv 



50 Brethren Wanted 

with their families to fettle in the 
vicinity of Tyvan, Canada. A good 
working church, one churchhouse 
built and steps taken for another one. 

Best of soil, $10 per acre. 



near railroad town 
Good water, good 
and roads. 

This chance will last only 
weeks. Address: 



on easy terms, 
people, schools 

few 



29t4 



H. M. BARWICK, 

McPherson, Kans. 



Cap Goods! 

Our business has almost doubled itself 
during the last year. We are sending 
goods by mail to thousands of perma- 
nent, satisfied customers throughout the 
United States. The reason is simple. 

Our Goods are Sellable. Our Variety is 
Larg-e. Our Prices are Low. 

All orders filled promptly, postpaid. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or your money 
refunded. Send us a sample order and 
be convinced. Write us for a booklet 
of unsolicited testimonials and new line 
of samples, which will be furnished free. 
Send at once to 

R. E. ARNOLD, Elgin, III. 

FREESAMPLE 

Send letter or postal for rree SAMPLE 
HINDOO TOBACCO HABIT CURE 

We cure you of chewing and smoking 
for 60c, or money back. Guaranteed perfectly 
harmless. Address Milford Drug Co., Milford, 
Indiana, We answer all letters. 

24tl M - % ' v, " ,, ' '" 

Change of Climate Beneficial 

A-fter your years of toil and suc- 
cess, don't you want to rest the re- 
maining? If you do, come to south- 
ern California, where roses bloom all 
the year, grass is evergreen, some 
kind of fruit ripening every month, 
vegetables a perpetual luxury. To 
make these declining years a delight, 
to combine work and play, purchase 
a walnut, almond, fig, olive, orange, 
or lemon grove; each has its profit, 
pleasure and beauty. For particulars 
of each write A. Hutsinpiller, P. O. 
Box 1194, Los Angeles, Cal. 




THE OVERLAND LIMITED. 
The Traffic Department of the Chi- 
cage & North- Western R'y has issued 
a handsome booklet descriptive of the 
Overland Limited, the most luxurious 
train in the world, and of the Chicago, 
Union Pacific & North-Western Line, 
the route of this famous train to the 
Pacific Coast. Fully and interesting- 
ly illustrated. Copy mailed to any 
address on receict of two-cent stamp, 
by W. B. Kniskern. P. T. M., Chi- 
cago. 



Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



I IDAHO 



is the best-watered arid State 
winds, destructive storms and 
mate it makes life bright and 
We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer 
change for the general improvement in your condi 
account of health, we believe that Idaho will meet b 
and sensible thing to do; that is, go and see the coun 
swer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger 
fares to investigate thoroughly a new country saves 
Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all prin 
for yourself. Selecting a new home is like selecting 



in America. Brethren are moving there because hot 
yclones are unknown, and with its matchless cli- 
worth living. 

to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a 
tion in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on 
oth requirements. There is, however, only one wise 
try for yourself, as there are many questions to an- 

work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad 
thousands of dollars in years to follow. 

cipal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see 
a wife — you want to do your own choosing. 



Round=Trip Homeseekers' Excursion Tickets 

Will be sold to points in Idaho as follows: West of Pocatello on first and third Tuesday of May, 
August, September and October, 1904. To points north of Pocatello tickets will be sold only in May 
and October, 1904. The rate will apply from Missouri river points, and from St. Paul, Chicago, Bloom- 
ington, Peoria and St. Louis. Tickets to Idaho points will also be sold by the Union Pacific, from sta- 
tions on their lines in Kansas and Nebraska. Rate will be one regular first-class fare for the round trip 
plus $2.00, with limit of 15 days going. Return passage may commence any day within the final limit of 
21 days from date of sale of tickets. Tickets for return will be good for continuous passage to starting 
point. 




PAYETTE VALLEY HOME.-Five Years from Sagebrush. 



r$ Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. Fine 
Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat, Oats and Barley. 



Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 80-acre tract, covered with sage brush. 
Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to' wheat. Yielded 30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres 
to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sown in February 
or March the yield would have been much larger. 

Alfalfa was sown with the grain and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 
oats. 

Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to 5 pounds each, four of 
the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) E. L. Dotson. 



S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. 

J. E. HOOPER, Agent, Oakland, Kansas. 



Mention the INGLENOOK when frntict- 



D. E. BURLEY, 
G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R., 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 



*■: 



*lN5bEH90K 



Vol. VI. 



July 19, 1904. 



No. 29. 



OUR OWN. 



If I had known in the morning 

How wearily all the day 

The words unkind 

Would trouble my mind 

I said when you went away, 

I would then have been more careful, 

Nor given you needless pain; 

But we vex "our own" 

With look or tone, 

We may never take back again. 

For though in the quiet evening 

You may give me the kiss of peace, 

Yet it might be 

That never for me 

The pain of the heart should cease. 

How many go forth in the morning 

That never come home at night? 

And hearts have broken 

For harsh words spoken, 

That sorrow can ne'er set right. 

We have careful thoughts for the stranger, 

And smiles for the sometime guest; 

Yet oft for " our own " 

The bitter tone, 

Though we love "our own" the best. 

Ah! lips with the curve impatient; 

Ah! brow with look of scorn; 

'Twere a cruel fate .' 

Were the night too late 

To undo the work of the morn. 

— Margaret E. Sangster. 
•J* •§» *$t 

SNAPSHOTS. 



Knozvledge is valueless if ignored. 

* 
Men do not rise by always looking down. 

God can't lift you up until you get down. 
* 

Contentment 'is the death knell to Christian prog- 
ress. 

* 

A sunny temper glides the edges of life's blackest 
cloud. — Guthrie. 



Happiness must come from within you. — Ella 
Wheeler Wilcox. 

* 

Every man knows how good he would be, were he 
some other man. 

* 

Praise is sunshine; it warms, it inspires, it promotes 
growth. — Mrs. Stowe. 

The ideal man only exists in the mind of a woman 
before she marries him. 

* 

We woidd like to knozv a man personally, zvhose 
father was not at one time well off. 
* 
This would be a dismal world if all men were suc- 
cessful financiers and none were dreamers. i 
* 
The average man would rather believe he is right 
and suffer, than be convinced he is wrong. 
* 
As soon as a man dies, his friends begin to wonder 
why other people are not as good as he was. 
* 
A tender conscience is as sensitive to evil as the 
apple of the eye is to the dust. — Doctor Davies. 

* 
True religion is like pure brass: the harder it is 
rubbed the brighter it shines. — Mrs. T. N. Wisdom. 



When it comes to standing up for their rights, some 
men have about as much backbone as a soft boiled 

egg- 

* 

As long as you do not take your own advice, you 
cannot blame the doctors for not taking their own 
medicine. 

True religion is the poetry of the heart ; it has en- 
chantments useful to our manners; it gives us both 
happiness and virtue. 



674 



THE INGLENOOK. 



ANOTHER TIME. 



The old story of Haman and Mordecai has been re- 
peated in our presence. It has become proverbial 
that he who digs a pit for another falls into it him- 
self and ever has history borne out this proverb. 
We are indebted to the Cincinnati Enquirer for 
the following extracts taken from an article in one 
of their recent issues concerning Peter the Great 
of Russia. He was one of the most ambitious 
monarchs of which history abundantly attests. The 
supreme aim and aspiration of his entire life was 
the aggrandizement of his country and the exten- 
sion of its domain. Long had he cherished in his 
heart the thought of conquering the entire conti- 
nent of Europe. This fact is known best by the 
will that he left on record at his death, and com- 
mitted to his successors upon the throne, the plan 
of their future conduct. This testament having 
been brought to light furnishes a key to the policy 
of the present czar. 

The instrument itself bears this heading or title : 
" Copy of the Plan of European Domination by 
Peter the Great and His Successors to the Throne 
of Russia and Deposited in the Archives of the 
Palace of Peterhof near St. Petersburg." In the 
preamble he has inserted the most highly pietistic 
title, " Most Holy and Indivisible Trinity." The 
monarch claims that his judgment dictates that 
Providence has especially called the Russians to 
the general domination of Europe. This is equal 
to some of our modern divines opening their dances 
with prayer, equally sacrilegious. The following 
are a few of the articles of the testament which the 
great anarchist has left to his most ardent admirers : 

1. The Russians must be kept in a continual state 
of Avar. This is to educate soldiers to warlike dis- 
positions. Nothing shall prevent a continuance of 
said preparation except financial depression. 

2. By all means we must draw toward us out 
of the best nations of Europe generals in time of 
war and educated men in time of peace, so that 
Russia may profit by the advantages of other coun- 
tries without losing any of her own. 

3. In every instance we must take part in all 
public affairs and discussions of an}- kind in Eu- 
rope, especially in Germany, which is our nearest 
neighbor. 

4. Poland must be divided and we will do this 
by keeping up a continual disorder and perpetual 
jealousy between the two divided portions. Should 
surrounding nations interfere with our policv we 
will parcel territory to them temporarily until we 
can retake what we have yielded. 

5. We must take from Sweden sufficient terri- 
tory as to cause ourselves to be attacked by her 



in order that we may have an excuse to subjugate 
her. In order to stir up a wrangle we must in 
some manner inaugurate a rivalry between Den- 
mark and Sweden. 

6. A strong endeavor must be made to have the 
Russian princes choose for wives German princess- 
es to multiply family alliances. 

7. We must seek alliance with England for com- 
merce, because it is the power most in want by us 
for its navy, and which can be the most useful in 
the development of ours. We can trade timber 
for gold and establish continuous relations between 
her seamen and ours. 

8. We must extend our territory along the Baltic 
and Black Seas. 

9. At all hazards we must press towards Con- 
stantinople. Whoever shall reign there shall be the 
true master of the world. We must excite con- 
tinual warfare, sometimes with Turkey, sometimes 
with Persia. Take possession, little by little, of 
whatever shores it is possible. The Baltic and the 
Black Seas will be doubly necessary for the suc- 
cessful downfall of Persia. Penetrate as far as pos- 
sible the Persian Gulf. Re-establish ancient com- 
merce through Syria and advance to India. When 
once through we can do without the gold of England. 

10. We must seek an alliance with Austria. We 
must appear to endorse her future aspirations of 
the domination over Germany ; and, underhandedly, 
excite the jealousy of the princes. In both cases 
we must induce them to apply to us for help. 

11. We should try to get Austria to undertake 
the expulsion of the Turk from Europe, and con- 
centrate a united effort of all powers in a conquest 
of Constantinople. 

12. We must gather around lis all of the divided, 
or schismatic, Greeks, who are in Hungary, Turkey, 
and Poland, making ourselves their center and sup- 
port, and by so doing gain a universal dominance 
or a sort of sacredotal supremacy. They will be 
so many spies in the midst of our enemies. 

13. Sweden dismembered, Persia overcome, Po- 
land subjugated, Turkey conquered, our armies 
united, the seas guarded, we will then offer to share 
and share alike the universal monarchy of the 
world to Vienna and Versailles. If one of these 
two acquiesce, which is probable, then we must 
make use of that one for the destroying of the oth- 
er. In turn we must annihilate the remaining na- 
tions by beginning a struggle which would be prob- 
lematical because Russia will then possess the en- 
tire East and the major part of Europe. 

14. In case both refuse our proposition we will 
excite one against the other and compel them to 
mutual exhaustion. Then at the decisive moment, 
Russia will launch upon Germany her traps set 



THE INGLENOOK. 



beforehand, whilst the two Meets, one from the 
Azov and the other from the port of Archangel, 
will come out under the convoy of the armed fleet 
of the Black Sea and the Baltic. Advancing upon 
the Mediterranean and the Atlantic they will in- 
undate France on one side, attack Germany on the 
other, and when these two are vanquished the rest 
of Europe will bend under the yoke without pro- 
longed resistance. Thus can Europe be subdued. 

The more one studies the plan of this hard diplo- 
mat the more he is able to see in the war to-day 
between Russia and Japan. 

The outlined policy has well delineated the char- 
acter of the great despot. In a degree he was right 
when he said he who rules at Constantinople rules 
the world. But the difficulty has been that the 
sultan of Turkey has been a match for the success- 
ors of Peter the Great and it has been impossible 
to carry out all the requests of his last will and 
testament. To say the least, the discovery of the 
paper alluded to above will be of incalculable value 
to the manipulators of the Eastern campaign. 
* * * 
A WONDERFUL CAVERN. 



Lehman's cave is seventy miles northwest of Mo- 
dena, Utah, in White Pine county, Nevada, at the 
foot of the Jeff Davis Peak. It is a marvel, and aft- 
er the completion of the San Pedro Railway is cer- 
tain to become the Mecca of thousands of tourists. 

An English traveler who had explored the sub- 
terranean wonders in Switzerland and Germany, the 
Mammoth Cave of Kentucky and Australia's big- 
gest caverns, pronounced Lehman's cave grander 
than anything he had ever visited. 

This cave has been explored for about a mile. 
A. B. Lehman, after whom the cave was named, 
took up the land at the entrance, for eighteen years 
lived there improving the accessibility of many of 
the wonders. The place is now in the hands of 
Charles Rowland. 

One dollar is collected from persons who visit 
the curiosity. No less than twenty noteworthy fea- 
tures are contained in the cave. 

One enters first the large cavern, the " Temple 
of the Gods," and stands bewildered. Within this 
chamber is "Washington's Column," four feet in 
diameter and forty feet high; "Lincoln's Column," 
" Grant's Column " and " Garfield's Column," each 
three feet in diameter and thirty feet high. These 
four stalagmites are pure white. 

Next comes the " Bridal Chamber," fifteen feet 
by twenty feet and thirty feet high, the walls of 
which are resplendent with sparkling lime crystals. 
The " Musical Gallery," forty feet high, twelve feet 
wide and fifty feet long, contains a crystal piano. 



From one side of this gallery crystals shaped like 
the fins of a fish project from the wall three or four 
feet. L T pon these some one has marked the musical 
notation, enabling one to produce chords with a 
purity of tone. 

" The Needle's Eye," " Cabinet Room " and 
" Round Room " all contain interesting specimens 
of nature's fancies. 

One of the most beautiful features is " Shoshone 
Falls," thirty feet high and eighty feet wide, a lime 
foundation built up from the bottom until it 
resembles a foaming deluge, frozen while in action. 

The " Skating Rink " is a room probably fifty by 
seventy-five feet, the floor of which is covered six 
inches deep with placid cold water, seemingly all 
ice. This illusion is hard to dispel until the visitor 
has stepped into it. 

The " Cypress Swamp " is fully an acre in extent. 
The floor is covered with beautiful, fernlike stalagmatic 
growths, with eroded passageways in and about, 
filled with cold water. 

The " Angel Grotto " exhibits a facsimile of an 
angel with one wing broken. 

The " Grand Museum," " Cleopatra's Needle," 
" Liberty Enlightening the World," " Pillar of Beau- 
ty " and the " Crystal Palace " are remarkable. In 
some of these wonderful chambers the stalactites 
combine with the stalagmites in fanciful forms that 
one could spend hours studying. 

The form of a life-size deer greets one in the 
" Grand Museum," while the great organ is not 
all illusion, having an altar-like base, with stalag- 
mites running to the roof of the chamber like organ 
pipes. 

The largest single passageway so far discovered 
is two hundred feet long, eight feet wide and one 
hundred feet high. 

The greatest cavern is known as the " Large 
Room," being twenty feet long, one hundred feet 
high and one hundred feet wide. 

" Chaos " is appropriately named. One looks 
down into this chamber and the floor presents a 
view of confusion. Huge blocks of stone, weighing 
tons, lie about as if a cyclone had started to demol- 
ish the earth. 

Numerous side apertures indicate the presence of 
a network of still unexplored chambers In several 
places fissures, the depth of which are unknown, 
would indicate wonderful areas below. 

A current of air plays through the chambers, 
giving rise to the belief that an undiscovered exit 
remains to be found on the opposite side of the 
mountain. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 
* * * 

When a dog howls ai night, it is a sign there is no 
mischief in which he can engage. 



676 



THE INGLENOOK. 



THE PROBLEM OF THE HOME. 



BY C. R. KELLOGG. 

" The jest of one age becomes the truth of the 
next," said one of our leading papers, the Youth's 
Companion, recently. Newspapers now jokingly 
say that the State of Illinois is situated in Chicago ; 
but a professor at Columbia University seriously as- 
serts that " we will one day see a continuous city 
from northern Massachusetts to Virginia along the 
Atlantic seaboard." At the present time there is 
almost a continuous city from Cleveland to Lorain, 
Ohio, and it is nearly the same way along the en- 
tire shore of the Detroit River on the American 
side from Grosse Isle to Lake St. Clair, a distance 
of thirty miles. One authority states that it is 




CEMENT HOUSE IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA. 

necessary to build thirty thousand homes every 
week in the United States. If immigration con- 
tinues, this ratio must increase. The home ques- 
tion is a very serious one in this country. Rents 
were never higher. People are forced into flats 
and apartment houses because, if ordinary building 
materials are used, it is not economical to build 
anything else. More and more, as the country is 
being deforested, the impossibility of erecting frame 
houses is becoming evident. One of our daily pa- 
pers took the figures of an architect that were made 
three years ago for building a $1,200 frame house, 
and comparing them with the present prices, the 
cost was over $1,500. 

It is fortunate for us that in such circumstances, 
Portland cement construction promises to preserve 
the home life of our people in the country without 
driving them to other cities, by enabling them to 
erect " homes." The cost is no more than the 
cheapest wooden construction, if put up by one who 
understands its manipulation. It is one-half that 
of stone. The advantages of its being permanent 
and fireproof are enough of themselves, even if the 
matter of economy were not considered. 



There is a natural softness of color in such struc- 
tures that beautifully harmonizes with any sur- 
roundings, but any coloring desired may be mixed 
in the cement when it is being used. While 
Portland cement lends itself admirably to cheap 
construction, yet beautiful structures, embodying 
the highest artistic skill, have been erected with this 
material, notably so the " Pompeii," at Saratoga, 
N. Y., in imitation of the Roman house of Panza, 
as well as many others in various parts of our coun- 
try. 

Engineers and architects are beginning to give 
cement the palm for being the best and strongest 
material yet discovered for all structural purposes. 
We may yet live to see almost entire cities con- 
structed of this imperishable and most useful ma- 
terial. 

In ages past, people in other countries used such 
a composition for houses. In the ruins of Pompeii 
are to be found stores, houses, public places of all 
kinds made of stone, brick and cement ; the Pan- 
theon at Rome is another example. 

THE PANTHEON AT ROME. 

In the southern part of Rome, or the old city, 
is to be found yet to this da)' what is to be called 
the Pantheon. It is so named because " pan " 
means many, and " theon " means God, which is a 
literal description of a building, because it is a 
house of twelve gods. There are six males and six 
females in the twelve different alcoves or exedras 
which are set back in the circular walls of the great 
temple. It is not as large as some of the more 
pretentious buildings of Rome, but was of great 
importance, no doubt, in the age in which it was 
built. It was built by Augustus Caesar in 26 B. C, 
and is constructed of stone, overlaid with cement. 

Upon entering the door and turning to the right 
and following the circular wall back to the place 
of beginning, you find Mars, Jupiter, Uranus, Sat- 
urn, Vulcan, Mercury, Apollo, Diana, Vestra, Jul- 
ius, Neptune and Venus, each in its own separate 
alcove. 

In all probability the Pantheon was to ancient 
Italy what Westminster Abbey is to England. Un- 
der the dome of this building rest the bodies of 
Raphael and king Victor Emanuel and other celeb- 
rities of like form. Standing under the dome of 
this ancient temple, one can but reflect upon the 
history of the past and pay some deference to men 
who have made history what it is. 

THE RUINS OF POMPEII. 

At the foot of Mt. Vesuvius lie the ruins of the two 
cities; on one side Herculaneum, on the other Pom- 



THE fNGLENOOK. 



677 



peii. The former will probably never be brought to 
light ; the latter is being uncovered day by day. 

About 200 years B. C. Vesuvius first spoke to the 
world that internal disturbance would not longer 
allow her to remain silent, and the wonderful ex- 
plosion occurred. Nothing more was known of her 
in particular until 79 A. D. This later explosion 
simply annihilated this city, Pompeii being covered 
with ashes to the depth of twenty-six feet. Her 
populous streets, gigantic buildings, history, gener- 
al education, all received an instantaneous inter- 
ment. She has remained as silent as the grave 
until recently. With pick and shovel the student 
of ancient lore has divulged some of her secrets, and as 
one walks along the streets of that ancient city to- 
day, he is constantly confronted with the fact that 
civilization was much higher in those days than we 
sometimes give credit for. Among the many things 
that may be seen by a visit to the old city are : 

First, a large Pantheon very similar in construc- 
tion perhaps, to the one we have described above in the 



^M^ ; ; r ,y.'. 





BAKESHOP AT POMPEII. 

great city of the Caesars, but it was a god-house of 
many idols, and by the looks they had been worshiped 
by millions. 

Second, there are hundreds of skeletons of horses, 
dogs, cats, chickens, mice, human beings, and many 
other things that are not worthy of mention, which 
show that they were buried in an instant, — in a 
moment, right in the midst of busy, active life. Re- 
productions of these objects are secured by drilling 
a hole through the casing that has been formed by 
the solidifying of the ashes and plaster of Paris is 
poured in, which, when solid, is taken out and the 
cast shows an exact feature of the object buried. 

Third, private residences, with parlor, kitchen, 
dining room, water fountains, toilet rooms, bath 



tubs, statues, decorations, paintings, and many more 
things we have not space to mention. 

Fourth, the palace of justice, a large building in 
which the supreme court was held, is in a good 
state of preservation. The different rooms and of- 
fices tell the story that their work was very well 
organized. 

Fifth, in some of the stores is to be found what is 
known to have been clothing, lamps, bread, grocer- 
ies, jewelry, and in some instances money safes are 
to be found, things which we think are very modern 
inventions. In one house are to be found window 
panes and glass ten by twelve inches, which are as 
old as the Christian era, which fails to corroborate 
the statement of modern scientists " that glass is 
a modern invention." 

Sixth, the street crossings are plainly to be seen, 
for they stand up higher than the street itself, to 
protect the people from the filth from the street 
in times of rain and mud. 

Seventh, the gutters worn in the pavement by the 
chariot wheels to the depth of.iaur_inches are to be 
found, showing that the city was not new at the 
time of its destruction. 

Eighth, in one of the best private residences, 
which is a magnificent structure, is to be found on 
the front doorstep in mosaics, set in solid marble, 
the letters H A Y E. which in all probability 
means " welcome." 

Ninth, many gardens are there which are full of 
statuary, beautifully done. 

Tenth, restaurants in which large stone casks are 
found, with large vats which are supposed to have 
been used by wine-sellers. One of the most inter- 
esting things to be seen is the old grist-mill, with 
three conical burrs, part of which is preserved and 
part of which has been broken off and lost. Near 
by it stands an old bakeshop which is to be seen 
in the accompanying photogravure and within are 
to be found eight y loaves of br ead which were, just 
read}- to be put in the oven, or were in the oven at 
the time of the explosion. Each one of these loaves 
bears the name of the baker. 

Eleventh, at the corners of many of the public 
streets, fountains and watering troughs are to be 
found for the convenience of the public, showing 
that they were not forgetful of their dumb animals. 

Twelfth, the saddest things to be seen are the 
lewd paintings in many of the public and private 
houses which tell plainly to what low degree the 
virtue, morality and social status had come. In 
looking at these living monuments of their wick- 
edness, one is compelled to say to himself. " It is 
no wonder that God punished these cities as he 
did Sodom and Gomorrah of old." 



678 



THE INGLENOOK. 



SOMETHING ABOUT MARBLE. 



SPIDER SEEMS TO REASON. 



Very few people who stand by monuments, or 
mantel-board or even an ordinary soda-fountain are 
at all able to realize the amount of time and labor 
that is expended in the evolution of the completed 
structure from the raw material. The ordinary 
white marble, which is the most common to the Nook 
family, is to be found in several States in our Re- 
public. The beautiful chalk marble found upon the 
market is a native of Tennessee. The beautiful 
high colors in the precious stone generally come 
from Italy, Spain, Belgium and France. The white 
marble when dull or dingy is hard to resuscitate, 
but the variegated kinds may be refreshed by a 
few hours' polishing, when it becomes as new. 

When taken from the raw material it is generally 
in large, square blocks. The workers then place 
these blocks under gang saws. A gang saw is 
simply a collection of many saws side by side. 
These gang saws have an oscillating movement 
something like a pendulum, and they generally cut 
these slabs from the block aforementioned one- 
eighth of an inch thick. Before these are taken 
away they are carefully inspected by an expert, 
after which they are removed to another depart- 
ment where the perfect ones are cut up by rip- 
saws to the desired length. 

Now the next process is the rubbing bed, which 
is a solid box imbedded in stone, over which is a 
solid, cast iron wheel, generally about thirteen feet 
in diameter and four inches thick on a vertical 
shaft fitted with ball bearings. This rubbing bed 
must be kept exactly true, which can only be done 
by the most expert mechanism. Sometimes when 
it gets a little out of level it must be rubbed for a 
week with blue stone in order to bring it to the 
proper position to work to raw material. 

The next process to which the slabs are subject- 
ed is hand work, and here they are cut into their 
final shape, whether it be for mantel, soda fountain, 
center table, sideboard or whatnot. The last of all 
it enters the polishing room. The principal tool in 
the polishing room is a roll of ticking about twelve 
or fifteen inches long. The workman first applies 
grit, next pumice, third hone. Should it be white 
marble upon which he is working, he might use 
oxalic acid, or putty of zinc for finishing, but in 
case he is working on colored or variegated marble 
his preference is eraory finishing putty or lead. 
Each square foot of such work costs one of the 
best workmen four hours of hard labor. While the 
snowy white variety is very beautiful and endures 
for quite a while, yet the variegated, though it is 
very expensive, is generally harder, more beautiful, 
and altogether more durable. 



If you anchor a pole in a body of water, leaving 
the pole above the surface, and put a spider upon 
it, he will exhibit a marvelous intelligence by his 
plans to escape. At first he will spin a web several 
inches long and hang to one end, while he allows 
the other to float off in the wind, in the hope that 
it will strike some object. Of course, this plan 
proves a failure. He waits until the wind shifts, 
perhaps, and then sends another silken bridge float- 
ing off in another direction. Another failure is fol- 
lowed by several other similar attempts, until all the 
points of the compass have been tried. 

But neither the resources nor the reasoning pow- 
ers of the spider are exhausted. He climbs to the 
top of the pole and energetically goes to work to 
construct a silken balloon. He has no hot air with 
which to inflate it, but he has the power of making 
it buoyant. When he gets his balloon finished he 
does not go off upon the mere supposition that it 
will carry him, as men often do, but he fastens it 
to a guy-rope, the other end of which he attaches 
to the island pole upon which he is a prisoner. 

He then gets into his aerial vehicle, while it is 
made fast, and tests it to see whether its dimensions 
are capable of bearing him away. He sometimes 
finds that he has made it too small, in which case he 
hauls it down, takes it apart and constructs it on a 
larger and better plan. A spider has been seen to 
make three different balloons before he became . sat- 
isfied with his experiment. Then he will get in, 
snap his guy-rope and sail away to land as grace- 
fully and as supremely independent of his surround- 
ings as could be imagined. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 



SOME LINES OF WORK FOR YOUNG MEM- 
BERS. 



BY M. M. ESHELMAN. 

"Use or lose," is a solid truism. Work or rust; 
act or die ; grow or wither. The unchecked worm 
at the root means decrease of sap ; loss of the need- 
ful juice is loss of leaf, of bud, blossom, fruit — tree 
gone. Disuse of trained faculties will end in blight, 
blasting the beautiful blendings. 

Having been trained in the power of that thought 
which gives strength " to see, to foresee, to reason, 
to judge, to infer," to take apart and to put together, 
what shall be your specialty? 

The church is a wide, a fruitful field. The rocks 
of unbelief and doubt must be removed ; the sloughs 
of ignorance drained ; the brush of inaction and in- 
animation cut down, and in their stead the tree of 



THI 



INGLENOOK. 



679 



life nourished, the temple of the Holy Ghost bur- 
nished. 

One of the best and I may say the most inviting 
because of the vastness of the possibilities for good 
results, is illustrating truth by means of the black- 
board. Chalk has a quickening effect. Not a di- 
vine truth but that can be sent home to both cul- 
tured and uncultured heart by the picture method. 
Some one ready with chalk, fertile in means and 
quick in thought, ought to engage the attention of 
each Sunday school five or ten minutes at its close 
with apt cartoons, fixing the teaching so firmly up- 
on every pupil that the coming week will hear it 
discussed in every family in the Sunday-school area. 

Brother, sister, you are pining to do something — 
waiting for votes to panoply you with the minister- 
ial robe, are you? Go hunt chalk, hang up a black 
surface, make marks, marks ! then more marks. 
Study perspective — copy, imitate, work and Work 
until you can, with free hand and ease of mind, 
sketch in simplest form. When you can make a 
picture of a doctrine, of a truth past, a truth present, 
a truth to come, the church that lives will find you. 

Primary teachers should be able not only to use 
blackboard sketches, but be qualified to paint in 
color at home for class use on Sunday. Make re- 
lief map of Palestine for your .little ones. Use one 
and a half yards of blue cambric, stretched on frame 
or box with edges three inches high. Use clean 
sand for hills and mountains. Leave blue ground 
for seas and rivers. Use pegs to represent towns 
and cities. Jerusalem the center; all the other 
places measured from there. After some practice 
each of your little ones will be able to set the pegs 
as you name the places. What a field to fix place 
in the minds of children! Is the field overworked? 
Almost wholly neglected. Go, occupy and educate 
the little ones in Bible geography and with it other 
truths of God. 

* * * 
SLACK WATER NAVIGATION. 



BY HARVEY H. SAYLOR. 

In our study of rivers, we find that there is a vast 
difference as to the amount of fall that they 
have from their source to their mouth. Some 
rivers have comparatively little fall, while oth- 
ers are very turbulent and noisy as they go 
on their way to the ocean. A river with a 
great deal of fall is of little or no value for navi- 
gation, while on the other hand those that have 
little fall can be made of great service in transport- 
ing products to the different markets. The Monon- 
gahela River is one that has very little fall and 
during the dry seasons of the year many miles of 



its length are made navigable by means of locks ; 
a lock ten or fifteen feet high dams up the water 
for from ten to twenty miles, and were it not for 
this the river would be useless for navigation for 
the greater part of the year. The river is used 
largely for the transportation of coal and food sup- 
plies. During the drier parts of the year when 
navigation is impracticable for large barges or flats, 
loaded with coal, they are loaded and left at the 
mines until the river raises ; ofttimes one mine has 
a fleet of fifty of these barges each containing about 
twenty-five thousand bushels of coal. When the 
barges are loaded it becomes necessary to employ 
a pumping boat to keep the water out that has 
leaked into them ; if this is not done many of them 
will sink. After the river raises sufficiently these 
barges are towed by steamboats down the river 
even as far as New Orleans and points between. 
Roscoe, Pa. 

CANNIBAL FISH. 



Frank McHaffie, who is one of the most enthu- 
siastic sportsmen in western Montana, says that he 
is viewing with alarm the ultimate destruction of 
all the smaller varieties of fish in the streams within 
the vicinity of Missoula. The char, or bull trout 
species, he says, are the most destructive fish can- 
nibals in the waters to-day, and there is no telling 
what they are liable to do. Not only do they eat 
fish, but they are likely to come on land and take 
after sheep and other live stock. Mr. McHaffie, 
who may always be relied upon for truthfulness 
when it comes to a fishing story, recalls an instance 
when the Montana bull trout actually swallowed a 
litter of some seventeen pigs. The old sow, he 
said, had been in the habit of swimming across 
the Big Blackfoot River every day, the seventeen 
little pigs following after her. One by one the little 
ones were found missing and considerable appre- 
hension was felt as to their whereabouts. Finally 
a bull trout which weighed about eleven pounds 
was caught in the act of trapping the old sow and. 
had it not been for the timely interference of Mc- 
Haffie, the animal would have perished. It is no 
unusual thing, Mr. McHaffie says, to find boots and 
shoes in their stomachs when they are hooked. 
They are the most destructive of fish, and Mr. Mc- 
Haffie is looking forward to the time when a bounty 
will be offered on them. — Selected. 

A LINEAL descendant of Mohammed lives the life of 
a small shopkeeper in Cairo, Egypt. The famous an- 
cestry of the tradesman is familiar throughout the city 
and insures good trade, especially among the tourists. 



68o 



THE iNGLENOOK. 



HIS UNKNOWN FRIEND. 



Mrs. Willis was a kind-hearted woman, who lived 
in a little college town. It was the habit of the friends 
of members of the graduating class to present to them, 
on commencement day, flowers, books, or other little 
gifts expressive of their affection and good wishes. 
Mrs. Willis had observed that while some of the more 
popular lads were loaded with tokens of friendship, 
there were others who seemed to have no friends, and 
were unnoticed. 

On the next commencement day, therefore, she made 
• up a bunch of flowers, and attached to it a card, con- 
veying a kindly message. This she sent to the usher, 
with a request that he should give it to any one of the 
students who happened to be neglected. A shy, awk- 
ward lad received it, and took it with evident surprise 
and pleasure. 

The incident soon passed from her mind. Ten 
years later, however, she visited an inland city, and 
there became acquainted with a young physician who 
had already attained a high standing among his broth- 
er practitioners. 

One day, just before returning home, she noticed 
in his office a faded bunch of flowers under glass. 

" That has a story, which I should like to tell you 
before you go," he said. " I began life as a poor 
farm-boy. I had no family. I saved money enough 
to go to school, and afterwards to college. 

" But I lived during three years in dire poverty. I 
wore the coarsest clothes ; I rented a room, and cooked 
my own food, which was so scant}' that I used to 
stagger as I walked up to recitation. My poverty 
made me dread to meet even my fellow-students. 

" Young people need approbation and affection. 
An occasional word of sympathy would have strength- 
ened me like wine. No such word came ; there were 
days when all my struggles seemed useless to me, for 
— who cared ! 

" When at last I stood on the platform, and re- 
ceived the diploma earned by four years of work and 
privation I looked over the masses of faces and 
thought, ' Not one of them is turned to me with a 
kind look.' All the other men had their families and 
friends. There was nobody to give me a good wish 
at my entrance into the world. I was tired, and my 
heart was sick and bitter. 

" But just before we left the platform, that bunch 
of flowers was handed to me. A card was tied to it, 
on which was written, ' From a friend who hopes that 
your life may always bring you, as to-day, the reward 
for honest endeavor." 

The doctor's voice grew husky. 
" Why, madam, those words saved me ! I had a 
friend ! Somebody had approved me. cared for me ! 



Never were roses as sweet as those ! I vowed I would 
not disappoint my friend; that I would work as I 
had never done before. I have tried to do it ; I have 
many dear friends now, but not one of them has ever 
given me such a help as came to me through those 
faded roses." 

Mrs. Willis thanked him for his story, with tears in 
her eyes, and bade him farewell. 

The little seed which she had carelessly planted 
had given back to her this little rich flower and fruit. 
Every seed that we plant brings forth its fruit and 
flower. 

* ♦ *J» 

DON'T BE TRAGICAL. 



BY ANITA METZGER. 

Girls, whatever else you are guilty of, don't be 
tragical. Don't try to " let on " as if there were 
some sad secret in your life, and you were a sort 
of martyr in enduring your fate. Nine-tenths of 
the girls I meet in college life seem to think there's 
some sort of honor to be gained if they can succeed 
in impressing people with the fact that they have 
a secret trouble. 

Then, too, so many make their religion a sort 
of daily tragedy. Can't you be a wholesome, hon- 
est Christian girl, without acting as if it were a 
mighty thing, this religion, and you had to strain 
every nerve to keep your comprehension of it cor- 
rect? And if someone makes a mistake, don't shake 
your head and say in that tragical way that " it's a 
terrible thing," " horrid," and " something fierce." 
Try to think that people make mistakes as a matter 
of course, and it's your business to cheerfully lend 
a helping hand and then go on your way and forget 
their fault. 

Don't make a tragedy of every love and friend- 
ship that comes into your life. Love and admire 
people, honestly and sensibly, but don't work your- 
self up to a tragical worship of every person you 
have a regard or respect for, for when you discover 
they are human you'll be going around saying how 
your faith in humanity is hurt, and a lot of such 
things that ought never to be said. 

I'm sorry to say I believe girls are much more 
given to these tragical tendencies than boys are, 
but in either case it is a pity. And if you knew 
how much better, happier and more useful a cheer- 
ful, sensible Christian girl is than the tragically 
good (?) girl, you'd surely give up tragedy in favor 
of common sense and perfect honesty. If you want 
to be really original, give up stage actions — be nat- 
ural. 

McPherson, Kans. 



"HE 



INGLENOOK 



68 1 



SOME QUEER CHINESE CHARACTERISTICS. 



BY SADIE WINE. 



NO POSTERITY. 



BY J. G. FIGLEY. 



An American residing in the Celestial Empire is 
impressed with many curious customs of the peo- 
ple. 

Their lack of progress is partly due, no doubt, 
to the custom of ancestry worship. They regard 
their ancestors models of perfection and to depart 
in the slightest degree from their beliefs or their 
mode of performing labor is to show them dis- 
respect. Thus the idea of making improvement in 
any line is never so much as dreamed of. 

One notable trait is their inaccuracy in express- 
ing time or distance. Their standard of measuring 
distance is the " lie," which is equal to about half 
a mile. On being asked the distance to a certain 
point they say, for instance, " twenty lie " — the road 
is level ; on inquiring of another place of equal dis- 
tance but up grade, they say it is " forty lie." 
Their reason for this is that it requires twice the 
amount of energy to travel the latter road. In re- 
gard to age, a man tells you he is sixty years old, 
but on closer inquiry you find he is near seventy. 
On being reminded of his mistake, he is surprised 
that you should take account of so slight a dis- 
crepancy. 

The Chinese are said to be very economical, not 
only do they eat rats, dogs and other unclean ani- 
mals, but all manner of dead animals they chance 
to find ; even the temptation to eat a dog that had 
died of poisoning could not be resisted and, strange 
to say, no bad results followed. 

An old lady feeling that her earthly career was 
about to close, walked to the house of a friend who 
lived near the cemetery and there awaited death, 
her object was to curtail her burial expenses. 

But the most singular custom of all is their man- 
ner of taking revenge. For example, a woman re- 
ceives an insult or an injury from a neighbor, in- 
stead of flinging mud into the neighbor's face or 
engaging in a war of words with her, she very 
promptly commits suicide. 

* ♦ * 
FAME. 

One thing is certain in regard to the fame to 
which we sometimes aspire. At the best it will be 
transient in our enjoyment of life. When death enters 
we hear no more applause. Doubtless we do not 
realize how quickly it will die away in silence while 
the audience turns to look at the new actor and the 
next scene, and our place in society will be filled as 
soon as it is vacant. 



Queer as it may seem it is nevertheless a fact that 
some of the most prominent characters in the world's 
history have either no children at all or those who are 
very inferior in intellect. History says that Chaucer, 
Shakespeare, Spencer, Milton, Cowley, Butler, Dryden 
and Pope have not a single living descendant in the 
male line. And Cowper, Goldsmith, Byron and 
Moore should be classed with them. No children were 
born to, Sir Philip Sydney, nor Sir Walter Raleigh, 
nor Sir Francis Drake. Cromwell, Hampden, Nel- 
son, George Washington and Andrew Jackson were 
childless. To this list should be added Bollingbroke, 
Walpole, Chatham. Pitt, Fox, Burke and Channing. 
The list is increased by such names as Bacon, Locke 
and Davy, Hume, Gibbon and Macaulay. Washington 
Irving and Sir Isaac Newton were celibates. 

Bryan, Ohio. 

* * * 

THE GREAT NEED OF AN EDUCATION. 



BY OLIVE MAY. 

"' Our school days are our best days," we often hear 
said, and truly they are, and how often after they 
are over so many of us have reason to regret that 
we did not make better use of them. Oh. how very 
important it is that parents should send their chil- 
dren, though it cost them no small sacrifice, to 
school or some institution of learning, where they 
will have the advantage of good teachers to instruct 
them that they may not be, as I've often heard said, 
dummies all their lives. Lost opportunities ! How 
sad it is to hear some grey-haired father or mother 
say, " Oh. children, do not miss such golden oppor- 
tunities as you have to-day for acquiring an edu- 
cation, for we did not have such when young and 
how often we have felt the need of it." 

There are so many positions open to those who, 
though they have not graduated, and it is not neces- 
sary that they have some big letters after their 
name, have but a common school education. It is so 
much harder for an unlearned person to obtain al- 
most any kind of a position than one who has tried 
to raise himself to a nobler manhood or womanhood 
by studying and taking advantage of the spare 
moments. 

Then let us, dear readers, take advantage of these 
opportunities, for there are schools on even,- hand. 
Go there, hecome useful men and women in this 
world and finally win a crown in the world to come. 

Mason & Dixon, Pa. 



682 



THE INGLENOOK. 



RAISING ALFALFA. 



The value of alfalfa as a forage crop, when it can 
be grown successfully, is undoubted. Our impres- 
sion is that sufficiently comprehensive experiments 
with it have not been made through the great cen- 
tral region of our country. The principal difficulty 
seems to be in getting it started properly. When 
once a good stand has been obtained, it shows re- 
markable power in resisting drouth. To procure a 
good stand the proper preparation of the land for 
a seed bed is first essential. It needs a rich soil, 
a permeable and well-drained subsoil, completely 
free from the roots of perennial weeds and from 
weed seeds of all kinds. The ideal soil should be 
a well-set blue grass pasture, or new prairie from 
which the sward has been taken up and removed. 
The next best would be a field which has been put 
through such a system of soil stirring and summer 
fallow as to make it entirely clean. The seed should 
be sown a week or ten days before corn planting 
time, at the rate of twenty pounds an acre, if broad- 
casted, and fifteen pounds if drilled. The crop 
needs no attention after sowing until the first blos- 
soms appear and the leaves begin to turn yellow. 
Then the growth should be cut off at once, clear 
down to the surface of the ground, even if its height 
should not exceed three inches. It is right here that 
many fail, because they think it is no use to cut 
the scant growth. The neglect to do this accounts 
for nine-tenths of all the failures with this crop. 
Almost as soon as this first growth is cut a new 
growth starts, and in a few weeks makes double 
the amount of the first crop. From that on each 
succeeding crop becomes larger, and it is not until 
at the fourth year that the maximum yield is ob- 
tained. After the third year something must be 
done to subdue the weeds and grasses which will 
invade the alfalfa field, no matter how clean your 
land was at the start. This work is best accom- 
plished by the use of a sharp-toothed harrow as 
soon as the frost is out and the ground settled in 
the spring. The harrow can be safely used even 
though its teeth seem to tear everything up by the 
roots, as the alfalfa will be so well rooted by this 
time that it is almost impossible to disturb it. The 
mistake is often made in harrowing too little instead 
of too much. Nothing except such a thorough stir- 
ring of the soil will enable the alfalfa to hold its 
own ; but with such cultivation, and some applica- 
tion of good fertilizers, a field of alfalfa should re- 
main profitable for ten years or more. It is better 
to use commercial fertilizers than barnyard ma- 
nures, as the latter will inevitably carry weed seeds 
into the field. The feeding value of alfalfa is prob- 
ably greater, to the acre, than any other forage crop 



we have, and it cannot be too widely distributed. 
By such careful methods as we have indicated here 
it may be made profitable in many regions to which 
it has not been thoroughly adapted. We advise 
our readers to try an experimental plot this season. 
It will perhaps lead to increasing its extent another 
year, but do not try it at all unless you mean to 
be thorough with it. Failures are discouraging, not 
only to yourself, but they have the effect of setting 
others against the crop. Men will note the failure, 
but may not investigate the cause which led to it. — 
Plowman. 

CHOOSE A MOTTO. 



BY L. MARGARET HAAS. 

An honored professor in one of our public schools 
used to close his morning talks to his scholars with 
this injunction: "Do good because it is right." 
The firm lips, the broad forehead, the kindly face, 
the square set shoulders, the upright bearing, and 
withal the scholarship of the man made him at 
once an ideal leader, teacher and friend. And his 
simple words, how they rooted themselves deep 
down in the hearts of the young people to whom 
they were uttered. 

Do good because it is right, not from fear of 
detection and punishment for other than right-do- 
ing; not for the acclamation of the onlookers; not 
because " Honesty is the best policy," and will 
eventually bring you in so many dollars and cents, 
— but because it is right. 

I wish every boy and girl reader of the Ingle- 
nook would adopt some good maxim and make 
it a rule of his life. The favorite motto of the 
Prince of Wales is " Ich dien," " I serve." To 
make that a daily thought could not be otherwise 
than helpful. It would teach us the needful lesson 
of humility. It would enforce obedience. It would 
make of each of us a minister, which means, primar- 
ily, a servant. It would teach us to obey in all 
things the mandates of the One who does not err. 
Let us, then, serve our friends, by giving them love 
and sympathy, and a helping hand; our country, 
by observing the laws which our countrymen have 
laid for the protection of its people ; and our God, 
by searching his Word and doing his will. 

Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

*> * •!« 

FORM A HABIT. 



Habits are a part of you ; then habits should be 
good habits by all means : set apart a time for read- 
ing good things at least a few minutes each day. 






THE INGLENOOK. 



683 



THE FOOTPATH TO PEACE.. 



BY HENRY VAN DYKE. 



To be glad of life, because it gives you the chance 
to love and to work and to play and to look up at 
the stars; to be satisfied with your possessions, but 
not contented with yourself until you have made 
the best of them ; to despise nothing in the world 
except falsehood and meanness, and to fear nothing 
except cowardice ; to be governed by your admira- 
tions rather than by your disgusts ; to covet nothing 
that is your neighbor's except his kindness of heart 
and gentleness of manners: to think seldom of vour 



north and 525 feet toward the east, facing the main 
lagoon. 

The design is a bold, columnated treatment of 
the Corinthian order. The columns are carried 
well down toward the ground, to give height to the 
facades. The latter are well accentuated by ele- 
vated pediments and tower effects over the four 
main entrances and at the corners. Over the ac- 
centuated places, as well as over the twin columns, 
which form a pleasing variation of the treatment 
of the facades, opportunity for ample sculptural 
decoration is supplied. 

The fenestration is bold and appropriate, giving 
ample light and substantial wall treatment. On 




PALACES OF ELECTRICITY AND VARIED INDUSTRIES. 



enemies, often of your friends, and every day of 
Christ ; and to spend as much time as you can, with 
body and with spirit, in God's out-of-doors — these are 
little guide-posts on the footpath to peace. 
# # ♦ 
ELECTRICITY BUILDING. 



The Electricity Building was erected by the Wil- 
liam Goldie Sons Company, the contract price be- 
ing $399,940. The structure was planned by Walk- 
er and Kimball, of Boston and Omaha, who were 
the chief architects of the Omaha Exposition. It 
is located on the main central avenue and forms 
one of the leading elements of the main Exposition 
picture. It has a frontage of 650 feet toward the 



two sides of the building are loggies which add 
pleasing effects of light and shadow. There are 
numerous openings on the facades, such as exhibit- 
ors always seek in selecting their exhibit space. 
The plan of the building is simple and well treated, 
showing an effort to supply as much exhibit space 
as is possible with the 292.000 square feet of floor 
space. The exhibit space is compact and sym- 
metrical. An extensive balcony sweeps around 
four sides of the building, supplying 100.000 square 
feet of additional space. The doors of the build- 
ing are of gigantic dimensions. 11 by 18 feet. The 
structure has 176 trusses, the largest span ben,; 
S2 feet in length. One hundred and eighty-five 
tons of iron and steel were used. 



68 4 



THE INQLENOOr.. 



THE COLOR OF SEAWATER. 



The color of sea-water as we look off upon its sur- 
face is one thing, and the color of the water as we 
look down into its depths is quite another matter. In 
the former case there is shown, to a great extent a 
reflection of the sky. The sea is bright or dark as the 
sky is clear or cloud}'. Again, the breeze that just 
ruffles the surface changes, for a time, the appear- 
ance of the sea. This aspect of the water is always 
changing. 

But when we look at the water in a mass, it shows a 
permanent color. We see this color of the water best 
in the billows raised before us. It is blue, tinged 
more or less with green. 

Travelers often express great admiration for the blue 
of the Mediterranean. The same blue is found in in- 
land seas like the Great Salt Lake. On the other 
hand, those who have sailed into the Arctic regions say 
that the water there is green. 

The explanation of these facts was easily found 
from observations made from the German ship Ga- 
jselle, which went out on a voyage of scientific explor- 
ation a few years ago. It was found that the color of 
the sea, varied according to the percentage of salt 
-which its waters contain. The more salt, the 
more intensely blue is the water. 

In the tropics, where the evaporation is greater than 
the rainfall, there is an excess of salt as compared 
with the Arctic regions, where the conditions are re- 
-versed. Accordingly, the water about the equator 
is described as intensely blue, and that towards the 
poles is said to be comparatively green. 

Whenever green water is met with in the tropics, 
it is found either to belong to a current from the neigh- 
borhood of the poles, or else it is near the shore where 
a large quantity of fresh water is being discharged 
into the sea. In a singular manner the blue water is 
carried toward the poles by the gulf stream and other 
currents in the ocean. 

In the case of' inland seas in which the water is 
more salt than any part of the ocean, the blue is 
correspondingly intense. This is what is reported of 
the Caspian, and the Dead Sea. 

•> ♦> •> 
SOME INDIAN DISHES. 



BY MARY STOVER. 

Curry is of many kinds and differs according to 
the variety and amount of spices used to form the 
basis or mussalo. The way we make it is as fol- 
lows : Turmeric, coriander seed, cummin seed, 
kuss-kuss are each browned separately and pound- 
ed fine, and about a teaspoonful of each kind is 



taken to make a curry for from four to six persons. 
To this is added a small piece of green ginger, two 
or three cardamon seeds, a very little mustard, 
two large or three small dried red peppers, and one- 
third of a cocoanut. These are all ground together 
on the curry stone, which is a flat, rough stone with a 
long round stone to roll back and forth on it. 

When these ingredients are ground to a fine pulp, 
a little butter is put into the cooking vessel and 
an onion cut up is browned in the butter. To this 
is added the ground up mass and browned thor- 
oughly. Then water is added to make the proper 
amount. This is common to all curries. Now the 
kinds of curry are almost unlimited. If meat, cur- 
ry is wanted, meat is cut up and cooked until tender 
in the curry. Vegetable curry has different kinds 
of vegetables cooked in the curry. Chicken curry 
is made by cutting up the chicken and stewing it 
in the curry. If bits of cold meat and vegetables 
are left over from one meal, these may be made in- 
to a curry for the next. Then there is the egg 
curry, plantain curry, lobster, oyster, fish, duck, etc. 

Now to make the dish a success, the cooking of 
the rice is equally important. There are different 
ways of which this is one: After the rice is well 
cleaned, throw it into a vessel of boiling water and 
allow it to boil rapidly until soft. Then pour off 
the water, and dash plenty of cold water over it. 
Pour this off and tip the vessel sidewise over a 
bed of coals, allowing the rice to drain and 
steam, and when turned out it will be white and 
all the grains dry and separate. In serving it the 
rice and curry are dished separately, the rice is 
passed first and the curry put over it. 

I would not advise any of our American sis- 
ters to try to make curry by the process we do here. 
If you want to try, you can get the bottled curry 
powder with directions to prepare it, which will be 
a much simpler process than the way we have. 
But having the ingredients at hand we have them 
prepared fresh, and we think it better, as the mus- 
salo prepared and kept in this climate soon loses its 
flavor. 

Some people do not learn to like curry even after 
having lived in India for some time. Others soon 
learn to like it. and those who relish it find nothing 
so palatable these hot days as a good plate of rice 
and curry. 

Bulsar, India. 

♦ ♦> *S- 

Germany" is now the best educated nation of the 
continent, yet only one hundred years ago German 
teachers in many parts of the country were so 
poorly paid that they used to sing in front of the 
houses in order to add to their income by odd pence. 



"HE INGLENOOK. 



68; 



WIGAM. 



BY ADA KIRCHER. 

William David, or as everyone called him, Wig- 
am, was little more than a baby when his father 
died, leaving his mother without any support ; but 
with four small children to support, of whom Wig- 
am was the eldest. Next was Tommy who gave 
Wigam his strange cognomen in trying to pro- 
nounce his full name when he was learning to talk. 
Roxy was the third and little baby sister was only 
a few weeks old. Poor Mrs. Jones was so heart- 
broken at first she hardly knew what to do. Her 
neighbors were very kind, but she could not always 
depend upon them. So she did the next to best 
thing; took in washing, wove carpet, sewed, 
scrubbed, or did any work she could get. She sent 
Wigam to school until he was twelve years old ; 
then he began to try to help his mother. 

During the summer he would go out into the coun- 
try and work for a farmer. It was hard work and 
Wigam was not used to hard work, but he stuck 
to it. Oftentimes when night came he would be 
so tired he could hardly keep his eyes open until 
he got to bed and one night he sat down on the 
hay in the hallway of the barn, just to rest his tired 
limbs and before he knew it he was fast asleep. 
There was a great commotion in the farmer's house- 
hold when Wigam's place was vacant at the supper 
table, for he was a very kind-hearted boy and won 
the affection of all those with whom he came in 
contact. 

After that Wigam was allowed to retire earlier 
and finally the long week had passed and it was 
Sunday. Wigam was so glad for he longed to see 
his mother and Tommy and the rest. How his lit- 
tle heart thumped when he thought that he was 
really helping his dear mother who had worked so 
hard to keep him in food and clothing and to send 
him to school. He kept at his job on the farm 
all summer long. Sometimes it was hot and he 
felt more like resting in the shade than working, 
but he never shirked. One day the farmer went to 
the village and as it was drizzling he left nothing 
for Wigam to do. What do you think he did? 
If he had been like most boys that question would 
be easy to answer, but not so with Wigam : he had 
noticed the little pigs were standing in the rain and 
were looking so wet and shivery. He remembered 
hearing the farmer say that the pigs needed a shel- 
ter. Why could he not build a shed for them! 1 
He had helped his mother build chicken coops and 
knew just how it was done. He believed chicken 
coops were not so much different from pig sheds. 
So he went to work and when the farmer returned 



the shelter for the pigs was finished and they were 
snugly nestled in some straw that thoughtful Wig- 
am had placed inside the shed. 

Of course the farmer was very much pleased 
with Wigam's work and said so to Wigam ; and 
Wigam did not expect a quarter or half dollar ex- 
tra for his work, but felt himself well paid because 
he had pleased his friend, the farmer, and because 
the pigs had a snug little bed. 

At last the summer months were over and Wig- 
am was allowed to go home and start to school on 
the following Monday. 

Every summer he spent on the farm and his earn- 
ings were used to defray the expenses of the family. 

One day, not many years after, a real estate agent 
whose name I forbear to mention, called at Mrs. 
Jones' home, wishing to sell her a small home at 
the edge of town. He told her she might pay for 
it by installments. She accordingly bought the 
home and by her thrift and economy succeeded in 
meeting every payment. 

Mrs. Jones little knew the man she had to deal 
with, else she would never have entrusted Wigam 
to take the money to the agent one morning when 
she was busy. On the said morning the agent was 
also busy, or so it seemed, at least he did not have 
time to give Wigam a receipt. 

When at last Mrs. Jones had the last payment 
ready, and was getting ready to take the money to 
the agent for final settlement, she told W T igam that 
they might now consider the home as entirely theirs, 
but alas! the dishonest agent took advantage of the 
poor widow and her son. 

He claimed that Wigam had never given him 
that one payment, and as Mrs. Jones had no re- 
ceipt to show for it, there was nothing else to do 
but to pay it again. Ah ! little did that dishonest 
agent know what that meant to the poor widow 
and family: another month of hard work and econ- 
omy, with scarcely enough food and clothing, and 
cold winter coming on. The hard work began to 
tell on Mrs. Jones' health, so Wigam had to stay 
out of school. He liked to go to school and no 
one knew what an effort he had to make to keep 
his mother from seeing his disappointment. He 
tried to keep a cheerful face and succeeded so well 
that she never guessed what was going on in his 
troubled mind. 

The payment was met but Mrs. Jones ruined 
her eves in sitting up late sewing and now the chil- 
dren care for their mother very tenderly, for they 
are all very grateful children. 

Harrisonville, Mo. 

^ 4j» «J. 

Ideals are the world's masters. — Holland. 



686 



INGLENOOK. 



A Weekly Magazine 

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(For the Inglenook.) 22-24 South State St.. ELGIN, ILL. 



Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



UP AGAINST A STUMP. 



To the many Nookers who live on the large West- 
ern prairies and in the large cities, the above may not 
appeal, because in all probability they have never had 
the joyful privilege of running " up against a 
stump." But to part of our family, who have been 
reared in the wooded countries, it will appeal very 
forcibly. It requires no extraordinary memory to 
recollect the time when, plowing along very smoothly, 
everything going well, all at once they were " up 
against a stump." And you who turn over the sod 
of the western prairie, it may not require any strong 
imagination to think what your surprise would be if at 
an unexpected moment, when thinking about the fu- 
ture crops, in the twinkling of an eye, you would 
find your three horses astride a stump and the nose 
of your plow well into the solid wood. Then imagine 
yourself twisting, jerking and pulling, trying to get 
loose from the stump. This is no more real than what 
happens in many a life. Sometimes when our sky is 
clear, when our road is level, when no enemy is in 
sight, in an unguarded moment, in a little spell of 
thoughtlessness, we are " up against a stump." 

Those who have had experience with stumps know 
that some stumps when severed from the tree soon 
yield to the forces of nature, when they are cut off 
from the source of life they soon become dead. So 
it is true with our lives. When we are separated from 



the uncultivated forces, of which our youthful mind 
is a very good picture, we soon become dead to our 
former state, and those old reminders of the once pre- 
vailing forces are easily extracted. 

But there are other stumps which are not so easily 
drawn. You see men sometimes with crowbar and 
shovels, spades and rails, and they dig, and pry, and 
work and sweat, trying to extricate the roots. So it is 
again with some of the preconceived ideas that we get 
in early boyhood days, or through father's spectacles, 
and it takes an endless amount of digging and prying 
with the instruments of investigation before we are 
able to get our mental ground clear, so it is tillable. 

Again we see stumps whose roots penetrate the 
earth to such a depth that the man who is doing the 
digging becomes disgusted and ceases to dig. He is 
well convinced that it will never rot out, and so he 
gives it up. He is, for sure and certain, " up against 
a stump." So it is in our lives when we come to places 
where the natural course of a man's development 
will not allow those stumps to be pried out by investi- 
gation. They must be burned out. They must be 
set on fire with inspiration from the love of humanity 
at large, the love of our friends in a special way, and, 
above all, a glimpse of the character of the great Deity 
who has formed all things. Such an incessant fire 
as this, when ignited upon the stump of a man's in- 
dividuality, will penetrate the very roots in most cases. 
Of late years men have learned that one of the most 
expeditious means in this kind of work is the use of 
dynamite. This kind of power, if rightly applied, puts 
the elevation of the stump beyond question and scat- 
ters the remaining fragments to the four winds. Dy- 
namite acts upon the stump very much in the same way 
that truth acts upon the life of a man who has been 
laboring under false impressions. 

It has been well said by someone that " truth 
crushed to earth will rise again," and if the roots of 
higher criticism and infidelity and superstition, and 
idolatry in some form, and above all the forces of 
ignorance have been holding down the stump in your 
field, up against which you have run time and again, 
allow several charges of the dynamite of truth to be 
set under the stump and ignited with the fire of in- 
spiration and love, and see the old obstacle go ; and 
as you stand back and admire the ease with which it 
was done, you will be inspired to make this a useful 
element in your life, and then and there learn to know 
the value of this wonderful power of truth. Do not 
allow yourself to wish there were no stumps ; not 
everybody can own a farm in the smooth prairie. 
Some must plow around the stumps. If these meth- 
ods of removal will be of any assistance to you, tack 
them on the beam of your plow so they will be con- 
venient when you are " up against a stump." 



THE INQLENOOK, 



687 



JUST ORDINARY FOLKS. 



In the eighty millions of souls in the United States, 
how many would be classed as extraordinary ? Where 
can you put your hand on a man to-day that will in- 
vent a new philosophy, write a state constitution, elec- 
trify a senate or be the founder of a religious reform- 
ation? And yet, as few in number as these extraor- 
dinary people are, the public in general spends its 
time in weaving wreaths for remarkables, making 
crowns for philanthropists, and throwing laurels at the 
feet of great men, while the ordinary man in life sel- 
dom meets a word of encouragement. Carelessly 
throwing aside every risk, let us make a calculation 
that there cannot be more than one million of extra- 
ordinary people in the United States. (If there be 
-the one-thousandth part of this number.) What shall 
we do with the other seventy-nine millions ? Shall we 
pay them no tribute? Shall we give them no en- 
couragement ? Shall we not recognize them as heroes ? 
Did you ever see a hero come to town, and every single 
person in the city would rush out into the street to 
greet him with open hand to pay him a tribute, when 
behind the counter, in the kitchen, or on the pave- 
ment are people who deserve to be classed much high- 
er than he, — mothers who have made more sacrifice 
to raise their little families than Alexander did to 
conquer the world, fathers who have fought a greater 
battle, to overcome the difficulties of life, than 
was fought at Waterloo? And yet, who ever thinks 
that they made any extraordinary effort? And, after 
all, is it not for the best? They would not under- 
stand it. They could not appreciate eulogy, they are 
so unused to it. Which one of us wants to be a Wash- 
ington, to be the father of his country? Who desires 
to be a Lincoln, the emancipator? Who is ready to 
make the sacrifice that it costs to be a Martin 
Luther? Or Paul, an apostle, or Moses, a law-giver? 
No, we are ordinary people, in ordinary. circumstances, 
with ordinary duties before us. Let us be content 
with our lot, but not content with the present con- 
dition of things. Let us make our services in life use- 
ful to mankind. The pendulum in twenty-four hours 
swings 86,400 times, but this does not stop the clock. 
The future lies before us with all that it means to us ; 
let us perform one by one our everyday duties as 
they come, and cheerfully awnit those that wait for us. 

•5* •■> *> 
CHANGE CARS. 



because you have to make the one mile and make it 
back again and then make the mile in the right di- 
rection, which should have been the first one made. 
The life that you have, the opportunities that are be- 
fore you and the ability that the Creator has blessed 
you with are things for material use in this world. 
We are to use and not abuse these God-given faculties. 
When one sees that he is beating the air and climbing 
•.insurmountable obstacles and trying to swim a river 
that cannot be passed over, in other words, trying to 
defy the inevitable, it is simply a matter of being on 
the wrong train. Change cars. 

How often we find a farmer behind the counter, or 
igain, how often does it occur that whenever a man 
has health that is insufficient for any other occupation 
he is directed to the ministry ! If he has not sense 
enough to learn anything else he is sent to the farm. 
A large majority of men would be found mauling a 
horse over the head with a club if he would get into 
the wrong stall, but there is no one to maul the man 
who gets on the wrong train. He only awaits the re- 
ward of merit that fate has for him in the end. So 
the more sensible thing to do, my dear Xooker, is to 
examine your ticket and see whether or not you are 
on the right train. If you find that you are not. 
change cars. The earlier you do this in life the soon- 
er you will reach your desired haven. It matters not 
how much money you have, it matters not what knowl- 
edge you may be in possession of, — the more knowl- 
edge and the more money, if on the wrong train, the 
faster you will travel in the wrong direction. Would 
to God that some kind canopy might thunder out 
above you in tones that reverberate through the uni- 
verse, "Change cars!" 

TOO MUCH FOR WEAK HEARTS. 



When you see you are on the wrong train why 
don't you change cars? What is the use to be going 
in the wrong direction and keep on going when vou 
"know you have to turn around and come back? It 
is a waste of energy. Every mile you go in the wrong 
■direction means two miles ; yes, it means three miles. 



It is a good thing that some of our old misers 
were not standing on the platform in Paris on .Mux 
21, or there would have been several cases of heart 
failure. The officials that day delivered one hundred 
and seventy-eight barrels of gold coin to the French 
government. These one hundred and seventy- 
eight barrels contained nine millions of dollars in 
gold. As it was, an intense excitement arose and 
a heavy police protection was necessary. This pay- 
ment, with what has been paid before, amounts to 
fifty millions of dollars' worth of the yellow stuff 
that we have shipped to Europe in the last two 
months. And the good thing about it is that we 
have more if it is needed, and it probably will be 
before the Panama canal purchase is all settled up 
satisfactorily with the French government. 
♦ •!• *f 

The praise of a fool is incense to the wisest of us. — 
— Disraeli. 



688 



THE INGLENOOK. 



CURRENT HAPPENINGS 



A STRANGE LAKE. 



There is a lake in Southern Austria whose waters 
maiyelously disappear and reappear. It is on the is- 
land of Cheris, in the middle of the Gulf of Quarnero. 
This strange lake, Zirknitz by name, is about four miles 
long. Villages, chapels, castles are reflected in its 
waters. Some years, in midsummer, the basin of the 
lake, fifty feet deep, will be so entirely emptied that 
peasants plant barley where, four weeks before, they 
were drawing their nets. When the waters at length 
return the basin may be filled in the course of twenty- 
four hours. They come up through funnel-shaped 
limestone openings which connect with caverns and 
subterranean passages penetrating beneath the sur- 
rounding mountains. In this neighborhood is the 
Grotto of Adelsberg, the largest known cavern in Eu- 
rope and one of the most beautiful in the world. 

♦ * <$* 
DOWIE TO ASSAIL ENGLAND. 



In his tabernacle in Zion City, 111., Dr. Dowie an- 
nounced a plan for the invasion of England with his 
restoration host, saying: " We will knock at the door 
of every house in London including the palace of the 
King, and before we leave England will be aroused to 
the need of her own salvation. We will go there in 
our own fleet and conduct a peaceful war." Six thou- 
sand people made known their desire to go with him. 

•5* ♦ ♦ 

Ex-President Cleveland has evidently not forgot- 
ten all his diplomacy, for the other day when some 
dishes of the White House were sold and he knew it 
and wanted them, he had a man up there to bid them 
off for him, and the crowd did not at first suspect it 
but when they did they made the man pay for the 
rest. One dish that got away he has to pay fifty dol- 
lars for if he gets it. Some men would run a corner 
on a round plate if they couldn't go higher in gambling 
circles. 

Paul Morton, the Nebraska man who has been of- 
fered the secretaryship of the navy, has accepted the 
offer. Victor H. Metcalf, of California, has been ap- 
pointed secretary of commerce and labor, and William 
H. Moody, the present secretary of the navy, has been 
appointed attorney general. Attorney General Knox 
leaves the cabinet to enter the Senate, in place of the 
late M. S. Quay. Secretary Cortelyou leaves the cabi- 
net to become the President's trusted lieutenant as 
Chairman of the Republican National Committee. 



On Sunday, the third of July, there was a scene in 
the streets of Portland, Indiana, that will long be re- 
membered by the people who live there and especially 
by those who took an active part in the battle of rail- 
roads. The Lake Erie & Western, which has been 
running through the town for years, undertook the 
job of keeping the Cincinnati, Bluff ton & Chicago 
railroad from using a part of a certain street that they 
thought thev owned and controlled. The new road 
suspected trouble by the way the other road acted, so 
they took time by the forelock, and to avoid a conflict 
they laid track on Sunday, when they knew it was im- 
possible to be sued. 

The local authorities of the Lake Erie reported the 
action at once and they sent a wreck train to toss a 
few cars across the disputed territory which would 
retard the work until the next day, but the citizens, 
who were decidedly in favor of seeing fair play, soon 
put a few ropes around the cars and turned them over 
out of the road. The war soon became exceedingly 
interesting and the Superintendent of the Erie was tele- 
graphed for and upon his arrival he stated that their 
franchise did not cover the disputed territory, and the 
war ceased. 

What is it people will not do in order to have their 
own way ? 

•> •> •:• 

At Booneville we have another example of how the 
public appreciates the public services of an upright 
man. A certain Mr. Union W. Youngblood, of that 
place was defeated there in a convention because of 
his attitude toward the saloon. During his present 
term of office which was an unexpired term, he has 
prosecuted more criminals, and indicted more offenders 
of the liquor law than any of his predecessors. 

When he entered upon the duties of his office there 
was a slot machine in every saloon and gambling den 
in the town, and now not one can be found. He is 
strict in the enforcement of the law. It is very queer 
how people will clamor for good laws and how much 
they can rally around the flag . when nothing is in 
sight, but when the time comes to support a man who 
will do the loyal thing, he is turned down like a tramp 
at the back door. 

It remains clearly to be seen that if the people want 
a clean land they will have to fight continually for it. 
4» .> 4» 

The little ship " Nostra Madre," lately, in making a 
return voyage from Buenos Ayres was followed by a 
school of hungry sharks who evidently thought they 
would get a meal, when they smelled the bones with 
which the ship was laden. The prospect was so good 
for them to accomplish their purpose that the sailors 
did not sleep any during the night and even the cap- 
tain felt better when they left the ship unharmed. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



689 



The steamship " Norge " sailed from Copenhagen 
June 22 and was last seen off the Hebrides on the 
27th. Two small boats, containing twenty-seven men, 
were picked up by the " Salvia " who report that the 
illfated boat struck a rock in a dense fog and that 
she carried seven hundred emigrants, bound for New 
York. The twenty-seven are all that were saved, 
and they saw the rest go down. After they were 
driven to the small boats, they drifted for about 
twenty-four hours before the " Salvia " hove in sight. 
It looked hard to be compelled to witness such a sight, 
and worst of all, perhaps, was to see the helpless 
women and the innocent little children go down who 
could not understand what it was all for. 



A writer in the July Review of Reviews says that 
the industrial distress in Porto Rico is not due to the 
lack of markets or the low wage rate, but to a disease 
known as uncenariaesis, which is prevalent among 
ninety per cent of the peasantry of the island. It is 
caused by a tiny parasite which destroys the haemeglo- 
bin of the blood. A campaign is under way for the 
suppression of the infirmity, and if this can be accom- 
plished the writer says that a new life will be infused 
into the laboring people, with which will come ambi- 
tion, and Porto Rico will be transformed into a hive 
of agricultural industry. 

<s> <g. *> 

Over in Ohio the other day there was a man who 
fell dead while he was having a quarrel with his neigh- 
bor over a little hay in the field. He was seventy years 
old and his name was David Grossnickel. He be- 
came so enraged that his anger was too much for his 
heart and he fell dead. At the post mortem examina- 
tion the coroner said it was caused by a bad heart. 
We believe he was exactly right, for a man seventy 
years old who would stand up and quarrel with a 
neighbor over a little hay when he was so busy must 
surely have a bad heart. Wonder more men don't die 
of a bad heart. 

Alton B. Parker, of New York, has been nomi- 
nated as Democratic candidate for President. Thomas 
T. Taggart, of Indiana was selected as chairman of the 
Democratic campaign committee, and it is said that his 
selection will prove entirely satisfactory to the presi- 
dential candidate. 

* * * 

Kansas is flooded. The Kansas river is out of the 
banks and is frightfully high. It is higher than it 
was last year at any time during the flood and is still 
rising very rapidly. The residents of the smaller 
towns along the river are compelled to move out, and 
the packing houses and business rooms are vacated. 



South Africa has her share of troubles in the way 
of scourges, and now, of late, leprosy is to be classed 
with the rest. The fact is it was hardly known to 
exist, except possibly by a few, yet Dr. Turner says 
that he had 109 cases as far back as 1895, and that 
there are now over 200 cases. The disease is defying 
the most heroic efforts of the physicians. The tribes 
of the Hottentots and the Kaffirs are suffering more 
from the plague than anyone else. The Europeans are 
not bothered badly with it. Some think it is because 
they eat so much fish, but that can hardly be, for the 
most of the fish is sent to Johannesburg. 

Zion City, as well as the rest of northern Illinois, 
is suffering from the long-continued drouth, and the 
other day the followers of the third Elijah got very 
tired of the dry weather and they told their leader that 
they would prefer a little rain, whereupon the prophet 
took the matter to the only one higher power, and 
while he yet prayed it rained. At least so say the loyal 
disciples of the overseer of Zion City. Well, why 
not? 

* * # 

The Armenian bishops in Persia, by cabling an ap- 
peal to Secretary of State, Hay, " in the name of Chris- 
tianity and humanity, to save innocent lives from 
Turkish barbarians, who were massacring thousands," 
have again raised the question of American interven- 
tion in Turkey. The matter has been under consider- 
ation by the American Cabinet and opportunity may be 
taken of the approaching visit of the American fleet to 
Turkish waters. 

* * •:♦ 

Edwin Forrest, of Wabash, Ind., has struck it rich 
at High Rolls, N. M., where he has discovered a 
twelve-foot vein of copper ore on a mineral claim 
owned by him. Mr. Forrest is now at High Rolls 
superintending the working of the mine, which is turn- 
ing out ore assaying $30 a ton. The shaft is down 
forty feet, and it is expected to become one of the 
greatest producers in the Sacramento mountains. 

* ♦ ♦ 

Telegraphic advices received at Mexico City show 
that there is danger of war between the republics of 
Salvador and Guatemala, and that the troops of the two 
countries are marching to the border region. There 
are also reports of a coming revolution in Honduras. 



Felix Tanner, who achieved fame by a forty-day 
fast, has built a boat in the shape of a barrel and in 
it will make the attempt to sail around the world. 
Wellington, X. Z.. his present residence, will be the 
starting point. 



690 



THE INGLENOOK. 



' + I*V*.*VW* 






j«»Jm5**> »!***. 



The Inglenook Nature Study Club 



This Department of the Inglenook is the organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized A, 

over this country. Each issue of the magazine will be complete in itself. Clubs may be organized at any time, * 

taking the work up with the current issue. Back numbers cannot be furnished. Any school desiring to or- *£ 

ganize a club can ascertain the methods of procedure by addressing the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin, 111. X 

?**' '*' 'I 1 '** l 4***' '*' '*' '*' '»' 'I' 'I' 'I' *X+ 



OWLS AND HAWKS.— Lesson 3. 



The owl family is the only family of Raptores that 
are nocturnal. They make their living after night by 
prowling around and pouncing upon the little, harm- 
less vermin which chance to be belated for some rea- 
son. In order that they may be successful in their 
search they are provided by nature with the very- 
softest of feathers that make no more noise than a 
shadow. Their sense of hearing is the most acute, 
which enables them to hear the slightest noise or 
rustle in the leaves, which leads to the capture of the 
victim. 

There are about two hundred species of them, but 
we will study only a few of them now. Here are 
the names of a few: 

1. The Snowy Owl. 

2. The Great Horned Owl. 

3. The Barn Owl. 

4. The Screech Owl. 

The Snowy Owl is the largest one of the family and 
is so called from the beautiful white feathers that 
cover him. But his voice is not so beautiful, for he 
utters a shrill cry that horrifies the other birds and 
sounds terrible in the cheerless places which he in- 
habits. 

The Great Horned Owl is distinguished from the 
others by the tufts of feathers upon his head which 
he can raise at will, which makes him look like a cat, 
and for that reason he is sometimes called the " cat 
owl." 

The Barn Owl is a native of Europe, and this 
country. He is a very useful animal in destroying 
rats and mice. He conceals himself in the daytime 
and in the night he sallies forth in search of prey. 

The little Screech Owl is the smallest of the family 
and probably the best known to you all. He is the 
fellow that you hear when you are coming home a 
little late and you quite well remember the shrill cry 
that starts the little animals with horror. 

There are some features that are common to all 
the owl family. For instance: 

They are the only birds whose ears are on the out- 
side, or external ears. 

Their heads are very large and compiratively 
Tound. 



Owls are the only birds that can bring both eyes 
simultaneously to bear upon an object. 

Their eyes are very large and round and have large 
pupils, so as to admit a great deal of light ; the eye is 
protected by a disc of feathers around it. 

The Hawk family constitutes a section of the Falcon 
division of the Raptores. They are closely allied to 
the Falcons, but they have short legs and tails. The 
Goshawk is probably the finest bird of the tribe, dis- 
tinguished for its large size, its beautiful plumage, 
and its elegant shape. It has a very peculiar way of 
killing its prey ; it generally swoops down upon a 
rabbit, squirrel, or pheasant and carries it high into 
the air and then brings it to the ground with a dash, 
and just before reaching the ground it will let loose 
of it so it will be stunned by the fall, and the bird 
passes on with a swoop, only to return in a second 
or as soon as he can get his equilibrium. Manv of 
these are found in northern Europe, and something 
similar here. 

Kites are another section of the Falcon family. 
They have long wings and forked tails. They have 
the peculiar power of remaining poised in the air 
almost without motion. Their prey consists mostly 
of rats, mice, young poultry and small reptiles. 

The little Sparrow Hawk, though one of the small- 
est, is a typical Falcon. He has a notched bill. When 
he lights he closes his wings so that he seems to dis- 
appear, which assists him to avoid the gun of the 
hunter and not to allow his prey to know of his 
proximity. And, to assist him further, he has the 
power to imitate a young bird's cry, which thing often 
brings the parent birds out of the nest, and then he 
gets the young birds for his prey. In the Philippine 
Islands, South Africa, and Senegambia, the Secretary 
Bird is the principal representative of the order of the 
Raptores. 

•3* «■!• *;* 

NEIGHBORLY. 



Mrs. J. S. Stutsman, of Virginia, Nebr., sends the 
Nature Study Nookers an interesting note concern- 
ing- her buff bantam cockerel. 

The mother of fifteen little chicks had weaned 
them entirely too early to suit them, and their loud 
cries of distress aroused the sympathy of this little 
hero, and to show his appreciation of their position. 



THE. INGLENOOK. 



691 



he called them to him and began to feed them, 
and care for them, which kind treatment they heart- 
ily appreciated. It was entirely satisfactory to all 
parties concerned. He is since with them constant- 
ly and protects them, feeds them, and roosts with 
them at night. Charity is found elsewhere than in 
the human family. 

* * * 

TABBY, THE CAT, AND THE YOUNG ALLI- 
GATOR. 



eats them. If grown-up birds come in his way, he 
kills and eats them. He is as cruel as a hawk. 



CROCODILE A GOD. 



Our Tabby, the cat, showed great curiosity, not un- 
mixed with jealousy, when Beelzebub, the young 
alligator, was installed as another family pet. And 
she acquired the unkind habit of walking up to 
him at every chance and showing her displeasure 
by deliberately cuffing him with her paw. Then 
she would retire with a show of dignity, as if she 
had performed a duty. This was done once too 
often, for the little alligator had evidently remem- 
bered her former insults, and this last proved too 
much. His eyes flashed, and when Tabby was 
walking away he scrambled after her, seized her 
tail and clung to it viciously. This frightened the 
bullv, and she started on a race around the room, 
taking flights over chairs and tables, with the alli- 
gator clinging desperately to her tail. When we 
released the frightened Tabby we were surprised 
to find the alligator none the worse for his wild ex- 
perience, and with widely distended jaws breathing 
a general defiance; but Tabby treated the alligator 
ever after with due respect. — Our Dumb Animals. 

* * + 

THE BLUE JAY. 



CY BESSIE WEDLOCKE, AGE 13. 

The blue jay is a brave, busy bird. He is not 
afraid of the cold weather. After all the song birds 
have gone away, you may see him dodging among 
bare trees. If he can find enough food to keep him 
alive, he will stay with us all winter. 

Mr. Blue Jay is dressed in grand style. His tail 
is blue, with black bars across it, and the ends of his 
long feathers are tippel with white. He has a black 
collar around his neck, his face is white, his bill is 
black, his crest and back are light purple, with here 
and there pretty marks in black and white. His eyes 
are brown. He makes his nest of twigs and leaves. 
His mate lays five eggs every year. Mrs. Blue Jay's 
eggs are greenish-gray spotted in brown. 

Mr. Blue Jay's faults arc many. He steals other 
birds' eggs and breaks and eats them. If there are 
young birds in the nest, he tears them in pieces and 



Many beasts and some reptiles are worshiped as 
sacred by the Malays along the Malacca Straits. 
They are particularly impressed with the belief that 
the crocodile is a spirit of the water. Therefore, 
these ugly monsters are not only extremely plenti- 
ful there, but they are so daring that they make 
most of the waterways dangerous even for persons 
in boats. 

The Englishmen who dwell in that part of the 
country declare that hardly a week passes without 
the killing of a native by a crocodile. The brute 
swims slowly along behind the rude, flimsy canoes 
and dugouts used there and suddenly switches his 
terrible tail around in such a way as to sweep the 
man out of the boat into the water. 

Here and there along the banks of the- black riv- 
ers will be seen strips of white cloth and baskets 
full of fruit and rice, attached to trees or saplings 
close to the water. These are offerings made by the 
natives to some crocodile that has his haunt just 
under the bank. 

Now and then, however, a crocodile becomes so 
ferocious and kills so many persons that even the 
superstitious natives feel it necessary to dispatch 
him. Then they use an ingenious and curious meth- 
od. They make a small bamboo raft about three 
feet square, and to this they attach a long rope made 
of loosely plaited cotton. At the end is a huge 
hook, to the shank of which they tie a live chicken. 

They set the chicken on the raft and shove it out 
into the stream. The poor fowl cackles and 
screams, trying to release itself from the line ; this 
attracts the crocodile, who darts at it and gulps it 
down. The next moment the raft bobs below the 
surface. 

The villagers follow the course of the raft as it 
goes down the stream, and after a day or two, when 
the crocodile has wearied himself thoroughly by his 
struggles, they paddle out and haul it in. The 
crocodile comes ashore without much fighting 
and is killed with ease. 

It is very rare for a crocodile to escape once he 
has swallowed the bait, for the hook goes deep 'into 
his stomach and the loosely plaited rope is so soft 
that the brute's teeth have no effect on it. — Cincin- 
nati Enquirer. 

•:• •:• * 

You overpray when you ask the Lor. I to do things 
that you ought to do yourself. 



692 



the: inglenook. 




HOME DEPARTMENT 




AN OLD-FASHIONED GARDEN. 



BY SUSIE M. BEST. 

Hollyhocks and four-o'clocks, 

Oleanders in a line. 
Morningglories, red and white, 

Blossoming upon the vine. 

Lady's-slippers, fine and frail, 

Bouncing-betties, I declare, 
And petunias, subtly sweet, 

Shed their fragrance on the air. 

Look, the larkspur lifts its head 

Right beside the marigold! 
In a corner, topping all, 

Stands the sunflower, bright and bold. 

Quaint old garden! Others may 
Praise the florist's cultured art, 

Thou forevermore shalt be 
First and fairest in my heart. 

THE MODEL KITCHEN. 



BY CHARLES MARTIN. 

(Next week will appear, under this same head by the 
same author, an article worthy of every housekeeper's 
attention. This article precedes the other for the reason 
that these practical points ought to be studied first. — Ed.) 

1. Its most convenient shape. 

2. Its perfect system of ventilation. 

3. Its overhead transoms furnish volumes of fresh 
air without any draughts. 

4. Its absolute freedom from smoke, steam and 
smell of cooking. 

5. Its unique arrangement of windows. 

6. Its novelty of being perfectly lighted with 
only two lamps. 

7. Its proper distance from and connection with 
the dining room. 

8. Its great amount of table and closet room. 

9. Its faultless arrangement of tables, closets, cab- 
inets, meal bins, drawers, coffee and spice mills, 
water tanks, sinks, wash bowl, etc.. etc. 

10. It provides the best and most convenient 
place for everything. 

11. It has no waste room, nor dark corners. 

12. It is the easiest kitchen in the world to keep 
clean. 

13. It provides the only way that one-half of the 
kitchen may always be kept cool. 



14. It supplies abundance of fresh air to every 
part of the room. 

15. It has a hot and cold water sprinkler over 
the kitchen catch basin for washing vegetables. 

16. It possesses the advantage of enabling the 
housewife or servants not only to perform their 
work in pure, cool, healthful atmosphere, but with 
one-third less actual labor than any kitchen yet 
discovered to me. 

Hampton, Tenn. 

* * ^ 

SANITARY. 



There exists a large company of women, who, with 
the best intentions for the care of their houses and 
their children, still commit one heinous, hygienic sin 
by what may not be inaptly called " furniture wor- 
ship," and so careful are they of carpets, soft cover- 
ings and curtains that some rooms in their houses are 
maintained in a cellar-like darkness except for short 
intervals when they are thrown open for " company." 
If one thing is more certain than. another it is the fact 
that all sorts of microscopic growths love the dark- 
ness. One has only to search a dark spot in the for- 
est to find myriads of them, and dark, sunless closets 
and corners come a close second, with molds, and if 
we examine carefully, a dust filled with spores. The 
army of scientists who are studying the nature and 
habits of the microbes inimical to health and life have 
lately been making extensive experiments on the effect 
of exposing them to the action of light, and with one 
accord they tell us that the ceratures were principally 
killed outright, but the residue had their vitality so 
interfered with that they could not and did not develop 
normally if at all. Sunshine is a very cheap article, 
has no offensive odor like sulphur, and can be easily 
applied ; and what matters it if the carpet does fade 
a few shades, if the room can be wholly sweet and 
wholesome. There are some parlors, especially in 
country houses, haunted by an abiding musty odor ; 
they never had a thorough bathing in sunlight. — 
The Independent. 

It is true that love cannot be forced, that it cannot 
be made to order, that we cannot love because we 
ought or even because we want to: but we can bring 
ourselves into the presence of the lovable ; we can 
enter into friendship through the door of discipleship ; 
we can learn to love through service. — Hush Black. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



693 



LITTLE THINGS. 



If we will only rightly use little things, it is sur- 
prising how much may sometimes be done with them. 
A vizier, having offended his royal master, was 
condemned to life-long imprisonment in a high tower, 
and every night his wife used to come and weep at its 
foot. " Go home," said the husband, " and find a 
black beetle, and then bring a bit of butter and three 
strings — one of fine silk, one of stout twine, another 
of whip-cord — ahd a strong rope." When she came 
provided with everything, he told her to put a touch 
of butter on the beetle's head, tie the silk thread around 
him and place him on the wall of the tower. De- 
ceived by the smell of butter, which he supposed was 
above him, the insect continued to ascend till he reached 
the top, and thus the vizier secured the silk thread. 
By it he pulled up the twine, then the whip-cord, and 
then the strong rope, by which he finally escaped. 
It was a little stone that slew Goliath. 
It was a. common basket that saved the life of a 
great apostle. 

It was a spider's web spun across the opening of the 
cave in which the great Scottish patriot was hid that 
made the soldiers not think of searching for him 
there. 

Let us never despise small instruments, for by them 
God sometimes works in bringing about great re- 
sults. 

There were only two small fishes, but from them 
Jesus fed the multitude, so that it says, " Likewise of 
the fishes as much as they would." — Housekeeper. 

KING EDWARD'S COFFEE MAKER. 



The king is most particular, not only as to the 
way his own food is prepared, but also as to that 
served to his guests. But on no particular is he so 
fastidious as he is over the making of his coffee, and 
he takes about with him everywhere his own special 
coffee maker, a Turk, whose services he secured 
abroad. The king and queen possess many lovely sets 
of China, but none of which they are more fond than 
of the coffee service v/hich was given to them on the 
occasion of their silver wedding by the king of Den- 
mark. — London Mail. 

♦ •> ♦ 

" Do not worry, eat three square meals a day ; say 
your prayers, be courteous to your creditors ; keep 
your digestion good, steer clear of biliousness; exer- 
cise, go slow, and go easy. Maybe there are other 
things that your special case needs to make you 
happy, but my friend, these I reckon will give you a 
good lift." — Abraham Lincoln. 



LIGHT DUMPLINGS.— Bake Day Dinner. 



BY SARAH A. SELL. 

Tajce a piece of bread dough the size of a large 
tin cup when worked. Into this work one egg, and 
make into cakes the size of an egg, and set to raise. 

Put one quart of water in a kettle, drop in a lump 
of butter size of a hickorynut ; when it boils drop in 
the cakes and cover tight ; boil ten minutes ; do not 
remove the lid until done. Serve with milk and sugar. 



SPICE CAKE. 



BY SISTER J. E. PRICE. 

Yolks of four eggs, whites of two eggs, two cups 
of brown sugar, one-half cup of melted butter, one- 
half cup of sour milk, one teaspoonful of soda, one 
and one-half teaspoonful of cinnamon, one teaspoonful 
of cloves, one-half teaspoonful nutmeg, two cups of 
flour. Dissolve the soda in the sour milk, bake in 
layers. Beat whites of two eggs, sweeten and put 
between layers. 

Dallas Center, Iowa. 

«& ♦ •£ 
FLOUR PUDDING. 



BY SISTER PEARL STIVER. 

Take one quart of flour, one pint of sweet milk, two 
eggs, one tablespoonful of butter, one tablespoonful 
of sugar, one teaspoonful of salt, two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder. 

*> ♦ ♦ 

CURRANT JELLY. 



BY SISTER MARY SHINHAM. 

Take one quart of currant juice, one pint of water, 
add as much sugar as water and juice. Boil until it 
jellies. 

C ear f oss, Md. 

$ <gi 4 

CORNBREAD. 



One pint of corn meal, one pint of wheat flour, one- 
half cup butter or lard, one-half cup sugar, two well- 
beaten eggs, one cup buttermilk, one teaspoonful soda. 
Bake in a well-greased pan forty-five minutes. 

* * * 

Better try and fail than to fail to try. 



694 



THE INGLENOOK. 




OUR LITTLE PEOPLE 




BONNIE WAYNE. 



Nen I vvuz most scared to death when I first saw the 
big toot-toot a coming right toward me, and I cried 
to get away from it a little, and that woman that had 
so many little fresh-air children took me from papa and 
said she would not let anything hurt me ; nen papa and 
mamma waved a dood-bye to me and the woman car- 
ried me up the steps into the cars, and you never saw 
so many children. Wy, the whole car was full of them, 
and some of them had little boxes with their little 
dinners and things in, and some had their playthings 
wrapped up in paper- but I kept hold of that little 
basket mamma got for me down town. 

I had lots of nice things in it, I had an orange, a ba- 
nana, and some cakes ; then I had Dora, and when mam- 
ma wuzn't looking I put Hattie in. I didn't open my 
basket when I was in the car, 'cause I was afraid some 
of the children would get Dora, and nen I wuz afraid 
that woman would see Hattie's red hair, 'cause I don't 
think she knows they are wearing their hair red this 
year sometimes nohow. 

Nen Luke Davis, he wuz away down to the other 
end of the car and he wanted me to come where he 
wuz and nen I went and the old car wiggled so that 
I couldn't walk very good, and nen I got pretty near 
to where Luke wuz and I fell down awful hard and 
I bumped my nose on the seat and made it bleed and 
I said I wished I wuz home, and the woman said 
that I would be all right in a little while, but I wuzn't, 
for when I went to go back to my seat I saw every- 
body a laughing and I though they wuz a laughing at 
me ; but nen Luke looked at Hattie, and there I had 
spilled her out of my basket when I fell down and all 
the people saw her red hair, and it made me cry, and 
Luke he saw that I wuz pouty and he came where I 
wuz and he opened his box and showed me what he 
brought, and th' laws-a-me — wy say — he had a ball, a 
top, some string, a whole handful of marbles, two 
nails, 'nd he had got his Uncle Tom's knife, and he 
said that we would have a nice time out in the country, 
and I forgot what I wuz a crying about and he 
wouldn't tell me, so I quit. 

Nen the train stopped at a big town and there wuz 
lots of people out there, and nen I asked that woman 
if my papa was out there, and she said that he wus 
away off and I come pretty near crying again ; nen 
some more fresh-air children got on the train. Nen 
that woman told us all to eat our dinners, 'cause we 



would be to our place pretty soon, so I got out one 
of my cakes and took a bite off of it and nen there 
wuz a dog came along that belonged to one of the 
boys as he wuz a taking him along with him to the 
country to play with ; and that bad dog took my cake 
and ran off with it, and nen I did want to cry and 
nen that woman gave me a nicer cake than I had. 

Nen a man with a blue coat and lots of nice gold 
buttons on his coat came in the cars and hollered big 
loud " ANN ! " something and I didn't know what he 
said, and Luke asked the woman what he said and she 
said he said Anoka. Nen the woman said here wuz 
where Luke and me wuz to get off, and so I got my 
basket, and Luke got his box and nen I couldn't find 
my mamma and Luke said, " Don't you know we left 
them to home ? " Wy, say I wuz scared awful bad. 
That woman took me by one hand and Luke by the 
other and we went out, and I said, " Are you going 
with us too?" and she said she wuz not a going with 
us, and nen I thought I would cry again, and nen she 
said that she had a nice lady there that would take 
care of us every day till she came back. 

Nen that woman she gave us to a nice lady and told 
us that her name wuz Mrs. Marshal, and she gave her 
a letter and said that she would find our names in 
that, nen she kissed us, nen the cars started off and 
I wanted to go too, but Mrs. Marshal said, " I want 
you to go with me and see lots of nice things." Nen 
she took my basket and Luke's box and we went with 
her and I went to get off of the steps there by that 
train house and I fell off and rammed my hands into 
the mud and Mrs. Marshal didn't see me and I thought 
I would hurry and rub it off, so I rubbed it on my 
apron and it made it all black, and nen she looked 
around and saw it and nen she said, " Wy, wy, wy ' " 
My, I wuz glad I didn't spill my basket again, 'cause 
she would have seen Hattie. 

Mr. Marshal wuz a holding the pretty horses and 
he had a nice little doggie sitting on the seat with 
him, and he said that the little boy could sit with 
him and the little girl with mamma, so I looked for 
mamma, and she wuz not there. I knowed she wuzn't 
my mamma if he did call her so. I wanted to sit 
where that nice doggie wuz, but just nen Mrs. Mar- 
shal opened a pretty box and said, " Are you children 
hungry ? " And nen I said I wuz, for the dog had 
got my cookie on the train. My ! she had a lot of 
fine strawberries, and some cake with red candies on 
Continued on page 696. 



■HI 



INGLENOOK. 



695 



"^ 



J Tfis Q. & &. department. M^ 



t 



J 



What is the trouble between Japan and Russia? 

Russia wants a good outlet to Oriental waters, and 
doesn't want to pay for it; she tried to get through 
India once and failed ; she has established Port Ar- 
thur and Dalny,. but these ports are frozen four or 
five months in the year and now she wants to go 
down through Korea and have a more southern route. 
After all, it is only the carrying out of the last will 
and testament of Peter the Great. 



What is the difference between a square mile and a 
mile square? 

No difference : but two miles square is twice as 
much as two square miles. A square mile is a tract of 
land in the form of a square, each side of which is 
a mile, and two square miles would be two such 
tracts ; while two miles square would be two miles 
on each side, and would contain four square miles, 
or twice as much as two square miles. 
*i* 

Why is foolscap paper so called? 

This is old ; it dates back to the time of Charles II. 
When he wanted to use some government paper and 
saw the stamp of the liberty cap that Cromwell had 
put on it, he asked what it meant, and upon being in- 
formed, he said, " Take it away, I will have nothing 
to do with a fool's cap." That size of paper has long 
borne the name. 

♦ 

What is the highest city in the world? 

It is said that the capital of Ecuador, Quito, is two 
miles above the sea level ; Denver, Colo., is only a little 
over a mile, and that is high. 
* 

How long has it been since the first president was in- 
augurated? 

Subtract April 30. 1789, from July 20, 1904, and 
you have it. 

* 

Who was "Old Silver Leg"? 

Peter Stuyvesant, the fourth and last governor of 
New Amsterdam, 1647-1664. 
♦ 
What was Mark Twain's real name? 
Samuel Langhorne Clemens. 



Is it a fact that the dragon fty can fly backward as well 
as forward? 

Yes, it is a fact ; he darts from angle to angle with 
the rapidity of a flashing sword, and just as rapidly in 
the air without ever turning around. It is said that 
his eye has twelve thousand lenses which enables him 
to see equally well in every direction. 



How can I retain the color in canned fruits? 

Either hang a thick cloth in front of the fruit cup- 
board to exclude the light or else wrap each can with 
paper and mark on the outside what is in the can. 

* 
What is good for bee stings? 

Ammonia ; if you have none, use baking soda ; or 
wet some wood ashes and lay on. The bite is acid, 
the cure is alkali. 

* 

Why do my turkeys mope around and look sick? 
Lice, woman, lice! Catch one and look at him; 
that is, the turkey and the louse too. 

* 

What is the origin of asparagus? 

The farthest we can trace it brings it to the time 
when it was a wild seacoast plant of England. 

* 

Where are the richest tin mines in the world? 
The island of Banca is almost a solid block of tin 
and of a superior quality. 

* 

What is the best way to remove freckle-? 
Dip the finger in water and then in saltpeter, and 
touch each spot. 

Our cellar floor has moldy spots on it often; how reme- 
dy? 

Ventilate often, and throw some lime on the spots. 



How old is Bonnie Wayne? 

She was three years old the nineteenth day oi last 
March. 



Does the greyhound run by siglit only? 
Yes; and the bulldog by scent only. 



Where is Eddy-tone lighthouse? 

Off the south coast of Cornwall. England. 



696 



the: inglenook. 



^'I"^!**^^}"^^"^^^"^^ 



A 



I 1£ISC 



ELL 



-A. 3 TBO 0"S [ 






(Concluded from Page 694.) 
it, and I picked the candies oft" and ate them and gave 
the cake to Luke. Nen we saw so many piggies in 
the field, and little colties. Nen we come to a big 
white house and a girl wuz standing there, and Mrs. 
Marshal said, " Hello, Mabel," and I said, " Whose 
little girl is that ? " and she said, " That is my little 
girl, and you may play with her." 

(to be continued.) 

* * * 
TITULAR CHRONOLOGY OF A GREAT MAN. 



Infancy, Baby 

Childhood, ' Willy 

At school, Jonesey 

In the office, Bill 

At the bar, William Wirt Jones, Esq. 

During the war, Corporal Jones 

After the war, General William W. Jones 

On the stump,. ..." Our distinguished fellow-citizen " 

In Congress, Representative William W. Jones 

After the landslide, Ex-Congressman Jones 

" Taken care of," U. S. Consul W. W. Jones 

For his bread and butter, " Our elevator man " 

Pensioned, No. 1,935,610 

Superannuated, Old Bill Jones 

In the obituary column 

"A once famous soldier and politician." 

— Smart Set. 
* * * 

WHAT SHE WANTED. 



Little three-year-old Helen had been put to bed, 
but soon there was a call, " Mamma,' I don't like it up 
here alone." So I carried up her doll, Happy. She 
cuddled it in her arms and I went down again. By 
and by the same call, " Mamma, I don't want to be 
alone with Happy." As I had never stayed with her 
till she slept, and it was very inconvenient then, I ran 
up hastily and said, " Helen, you have Happy in your 
arms, and papa and mamma downstairs, and God all 
about you, watching over you with love. You must 
be a good girl and go to sleep." " Is God really 
here? " " Yes, really." So she laid her cheek in her 
hand and prepared to fall asleep, and I went down 
a second time. In a few minutes I heard again the 
half wail, and rushed up-stairs impatiently, " Well, 



Helen, what now? " " Oh mamma! " and she put out 
her arms imploringly, " I don't want Happy, and I 
don't want God. I want somebody with a skin face." 
Wives and Daughters. 

NOBODY. 



Mrs. L. W. Owen, 547 North County street, Waukegan, 
111., contributes a number of poems worth keeping, and 
also this literary curiosity in rhyme: 

" If nobody's noticed you, you must be small, 
If nobody's slighted you, you must be tall, 
If nobody's bowed to you, you must be low, 
If nobody's kissed you, you're ugly we know, 
If nobody's envied you, you're a poor elf, 
If nobody's nattered you, flatter yourself. 
If nobody's cheated you, you are a knave, 
If nobody's hated you, you are a slave, 
If nobody's called you a ' fool ' to your face, 
Somebody's wished for your back in its place; 
If nobody's called you a ' tyrant ' or ' scold ' 
Somebody thinks you of a spiritless mold; 
If nobody knows of your faults but a friend, 
Nobody will miss them at the world's end, 
If nobody clings to your purse like a fawn, 
Nobody'll run like a hound when it's gone; 
If nobody's eaten his bread from your store, 
Nobody'll call you a 'miserly' 'bore'; 
If nobody's slandered 'you — here is our pen — 
Sign yourself nobody, quick as you can." 

♦ * •> 

THE SALOON AS A BANK. 



You deposit your money — and lose it! 

Your time — and lose it ! 

Your character — and lose it ! 

Your strength — and lose it ! 

Your manly independence — and lose it ! 

Your self-control — and lose it ! 

Your home comfort — and lose it! 

Your wife's happiness — and lose it! 

Your own soul — and lose it ! 

.5. 4f *$. 

This world is God's work-house, in which he is 
working out the plan of salvation for fallen man ; and 
he will give us, as members of his body, plenty to 
do — some one thing and some another thing. If we 
can only work, not as men-pleasers, but as clay in 
the hands of the potter, to be made into vessels of 
honor for his service. — The Bible Advocate. 



The Brethren Colonies 



IN THE 



Fruit Belt of Michigan 




are an actual success. The colony of the Lakeview church is located on 
lands surrounding the village of Brethren, Michigan. Brethren, Michigan, 
is located on the main line of the Pere Marquette System, 105 miles north 
of Grand Rapids and about 14 miles east of Lake Michigan. All conditions 
of soil, climate and location make this spot an ideal one for general farm- 
ing, fruit-growing and stock-raising. Lands have been sold to about 120 
families of the Brotherhood and their friends, of which number about one- 
half have already located and are clearing up their places. The possibili- 
ties of this district are exceptional. The Brethren tract embraces about 
20,000 acres, of which over 11,000 acres have already been sold. There are 
just as good and as desirable locations remaining as those that have been 
bought and the prices have not yet been advanced, but with the improve- 
ments now going on, developing the country so rapidly, it is only a short 
time till prices advance considerably. THE TIME TO BUY IS NOW. 
Present prices range from $7 to $15 per acre, on easy terms, or less five 
(5) per cent for cash. 

For illustrated booklet and information in regard to rates, address 
Samuel S. Thorpe, District Agent Michigan Land Association, Cadillac, 
Mich. 



THE CADILLAC TRACT. 



The basis of my business is absolute and 
unvarying integrity. 

samuel s. thorpe. 25,000 Acres of Rich Agricul- 

tural Lands, Excellently Situated and Splen- 
didly Adapted for Farming, Fruit-growing and 
Stock-raising. . 

These lands are located from one-half mile to six miles from the hustling city of Cadillac, the seat of Wexford 
county, 8,ooo inhabitants, (all alive,) and its location on the Grand Rapids and Indiana R'y (part of the Pennsylvania 
System) and on the Ann Arbor Railroad (part of the Wabash System) together with its other advantages render 
it the best trading point and market place in Northern Michigan. Cadillac and the lands controlled by the ad- 
vertiser are located about 98 miles north of Grand Rapids and 50 miles east of Lake Michigan. They are well wa- 
tered with springs, creeks, rivers and lakes of pure, sparkling water teeming with gamy fish. The soil varies from 
a sandy loam to a clay loam, all of it underlaid with clay and gravel subsoil, which responds eagerly to cultivation. 

For illustrated booklets, maps and information as to reduced rates to these locations, address: 



S^^2v£TTE 



S_ THORPE. 



^Istiict Agent !L^EIc3n,igra,n. I_ja,n-d. Assn., 

iDept. :L/£, 



^txi^lxxxxox' Dansrers. 










A 

1 HSyF*, 'Ljtk yK**<-f*'^~ ^?r3\ 







fi FARMHOUSE ; an orchard ; a little girl. Out 
from the trees the tart little apples peep. The 
berries are beginning to ripen on the bush. The 
little rogue wipes her mouth on her apron so mother 
shall not discover that she has poached on forbidden 
ground. It's such fun to munch green apples, even 
if they are dreadfully sour. 

A sick girl. The unripe fruit has taken its re- 
venge and the little poacher groans with pain. The 
alarmed mother looks with anxiety on the contorted 
features of her darling girl while the movement of the 
little one's hands to her stomach indicate more clearly 
than words could convey what the trouble is. What 
can mother do? Father is far away in the field and 
it is miles to the village doctor. All at once she re- 
members the little bottle on the shelf, which father 
brought from the city only the other day just for 
such emergencies. Grandma put it in his pocket, say- 
ing it was a good medicine for the bowels and stomach. 
" You don't know, John," she added, " how soon you 
might need it for the little ones." 

It did not take the mother long to get the bottle and 
give her sick girl a liberal dose of the Stomach Vigor. 
She repeated the dose at frequent intervals according 
to directions. The child became restful and quiet and 
■after a refreshing slumber she was up bright and 
early the next morning, chasing the ducks in the yard 
and otherwise making her presence known. On mam- 
ma's advice, combined with her own experience, she 
kept away from green apples. 

Such in brief is the history of the use of DR. 
PETER'S STOMACH VIGOR repeated hundreds of 



times each recurring season. It is not, however, only 
in instances where unripe and unwholesome fruit has 
been par-taken of that it shows its remarkable efficacy, 
but in all relaxed conditions of the bowels in young 
and old. To use the words of a grateful mother, — 
one who knows, " It is worth its weight in gold." 
It is a true helper in time of emergency. 

There are few if any readers of the Inglenook 
who are not familiar with DR. PETER'S BLOOD 
YITALIZER and with DR. PETER'S STOMACH 
VIGOR as well. It will not be out of place, however, 
to call attention to the distinction between the two. 
DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER is used with 
marked success in the treatment of blood and consti- 
tutional diseases, including many forms of stomach 
trouble, such as indigestion, constipation, flatulency, 
etc., while DR. PETER'S STOMACH VIGOR has 
established its reputation in the cure of all relaxed 
and weakened conditions of the stomach and bowels 
in which class we find diarrhoea, cholera morbus, dys- 
entery, cramps, bloody flux, summer complaint, etc. 
There is also a form of dyspepsia, known as acid dys- 
pepsia, for which this remedy has proven a real boon. 
DR. PETER'S STOMACH VIGOR is, as its name 
indicates, a stomach strengthener — a remedy for such 
bowel troubles as are particularly prevalent during the 
summer season. The only satisfactory remedy in the 
treatment of this class of ailments is one which will 
strengthen the relaxed condition of the bowels, allay 
the irritation which is always present and remove 
the inflammation. Such a remedy is DR. PETER'S 
STOMACH VIGOR. 

A little pamphlet descriptive of this remedy, with 
many valuable hints on the proper treatment of sum- 
mer ailments, replete with testimonials, will be sent 
gratis to anyone desiring it. It will be found particu- 
larly valuable to mothers who have little ones under 
their care. 

FIVE PERSONS IN ONE FAMILY CURED. 

Dayton, Ohio, February 15, 1904. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111.: 

Dear Sir, — The past summer was a bad one for our lo- 
cality. A great many people had the bloody flux, and 
many babies died from cholera infantum. In one family 
five persons were taken sick, but they all escaped, as they 
used Dr. Peter's Stomach Vigor and Oleum. I can give 
to any one who should feel interested the name of these 
people. Respectfully. 

Mrs. E. Sweibat. 

The popularity of DR. PETER'S STOMACH VIG- 
OR increases with every season and thousands of tes- 
timonials received bespeak the merits of this prepara- 
tion. Like the DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER 
it is not to be had in drugstores, but can be procured 
from the agents who supply the BLOOD VITALIZ- 
ER, or direct from the manufacturer. 



a^jv o jiWiU.^Lii v ±vjwr\. itrpeaieu nunureus 01 iljx, 01 uiieci 110111 uie iiianuiaciuiei , 

Dr. Peter Fahrney, 112=114 S. Hoyne Ave., Chicago, 111 



THE INGLENOOK. 



Bonnet Straw Cloth! 

Samples Seat Free. 14 Styles and Colors. 



Rice Net, Wire Chiffon, Braid, Ribbon 
and Mousseline de Soie for Strings. 

We carry large stock, manufactured especial- 
ly; our own designs. Prices remarkably low. 



$51.00 California and Return. 



Only House Making a Specialty of these floods. Write for Free Samples. 



Albaugh Bros., Dover & Co., 

341-343 Franklin Street, - - Chicago, III. 



Personally Conducted Trains 

From Chicago to San Francisco 
without change, via the Chicago, 
Union Pacific and North-Western 
Line. Special personally conducted 
parties leave Chicago Aug. 18th and 
Aug. 25th. Itinerary include; stop- 
overs at Denver, Colorado Springs 
and Salt Lake City. Low rates; 
choice of routes returning. Tickets 
on sale from all points at low rates 
daily August 15th to Sept. 10. Two 
fast daily trains over the only dou- 
ble-track railway between Chicago 
and the Missouri river, and via the 
most direct route across the Ameri- 
can continent. The Overland Limit- 
ed, solid through train every day in 
the year, less than three days en 
route. For itineraries of special 
trains and full information apply to 
ticket agents Chicago & North-West- 
ern R'v. 



Tne Inglenook Only Half Price! 



To New Subscribers On Ij 



Inglenook to Jan. I, 1905, regular price $ 50 

Our Special Trial Offer, only, 2 5 C 

An Easy Way to Secure a Valuable Book. 

Inglenook to Jan. 1, 1905 $ 50 

Modern Fables and Parables, 1 25 




Both for only 



$175 
.75 



The book we offer is a late one, by Rev. Harris, author of Mr. World and Miss 
Churchmember. The object of this book is to teach morality and to correct social evils. 
It is a splendid book for the home. If you do not already have it you will do well to 
take advantage of this offer. 

Get a Good Fountain Pen. 




Inglenook to Jan. 1, 1905 

Ladies' or Gentlemen's Fountain Pen, 



1 00 



Both for only = 

This fountain pen is a good one and would be highly prized by any boy or girl. It is worth S1.00 
in need of a pen. 



$1.50 
75 



Hundreds of New Subscribers. 

We are receiving hundreds of new subscribers, who are taking advantage of the above unprecedented offer. 
Our aim is to increase our list by several thousand within the next few weeks. From present indications our aim 
is not too high. The Nook is starting on a new era and we want all our friends and neighbors to join hands with 
us. You will never have a better opportunity to give the magazine a trial. 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



For the Brethren 



It's a new country to you, possibly, and it is new, and also a good one. We are talking of 
northern Texas around Dallas and Fort Worth, and along the line of the great Rock Island Sys- 
tem through that country. You want to read this page of the Nook from week to week. 
There's going to be something in it about that country from people who were down there a 
week or so ago, and we will give you their views and opinions as to the availability of that coun- 
try for the kind of people that read the INGLENOOK. They are people who know because 
they have seen it all. You ought to see it, and maybe will. When you get ready, we are. 
Here's what some of them say about their trip: 

David C. Bosserman: "The country impressed us as being a favorable place for the agricul- 
turist who is looking for a good, new location." 

D. R. Yoder, of Goshen, Ind.: "'Such as would want to go would find good openings in 
the vicinity of Ft. Worth and Dallas, Texas." 

H. T. Williamson writes: "Two carloads of this party from Carthage, Mo., took in what was 
termed i:he "Circle Trip," and. as far as I know, were delighted with the country from the time 
they left Carthage till the} 1- reached Ft. Worth, Texas." 

C. M. Wenger, of South Bend, Ind.: " I was favorably impressed with the general appear- 
ance of the country, the rich soil and large per cent of smooth, tillable soil to be found through- 
out." 

A. B. Barnhart, Hagerstown, Md., has this as his view: "I was favorably impressed, so 
much so that I would recommend to any of our people who contemplate a change to consider 
the great Southwest as to its agricultural and industrial advantages." 

Isaac Frantz, Pleasant Hill, Ohio, one of the tourists accompanying the party says: "And my 
impressions of the Southwest are so favorable that if I were young again Ohio could not hold 
me." 

John E. Mohler, Des Moines, Iowa, says this, speaking of his Rock Island trip; "There were 
about seventy of us who made the trip after the Conference at Carthage and I think all of them 
were delightfully surprised. The country itself was a revelation, worthy of the trip." 

S. M. Goughnour, of Ankeny, Iowa, has this to say: "Yes, I must say the country, especially 
Oklahoma, impressed me much more favorably than I expected." 

R. E. Burger, of Allerton, 111., writes as follows: "I now feel that I can conscientiously rec- 
ommend the South and Southwest as a good place to invest money." 

Henry Studebaker, Tippecanoe City, Ohio, thinks that. "The country we were through 
promises great things for the future. From Ft. Worth to Enid the crop indications surpass any- 
thing I ever saw/' 

For copies of our Southwest printed matter free (name State interested in) and for full in- 
formation about our reduced homeseekers' rates lo points in the Southwe t on the first and third 
Tuesdays of each month, write 



Rock Island 
1 System ' 



Jolin Sebastian, 



Fasseiiger TrafBc BCanager, 



diicago. 



* t 

\ The Price of Equity Shares f 
is $25 each par value. | 



0*+*+**+++**++*+*+*-H-**+++++4-l.++4.Q 



On each subscription received during 



* 

* the next 3o days, and this advertisement 

* pinned fast 
+ from June 

* 



earnings will be counted ][ 

•5- 
O ■f*"T"T" *T" "f* t "f* t t "t* "1* "T* "J* *»* *J" *T" "I* T"T" "T* *T* *T* *I* "I* -I* "I* *[* •{*•¥• •¥■••¥■ •i Q 



St. 



WANTED! 

SHAREHOLDERS EVERYWHERE 

Established, 1896. Incorporated, 1902. 

^M**r t "f* *l"i* >l"i"f"t , 'l"4"J"J' *(* *1* *J- »^- -I* *J- "I* *t**i"l* *i* *4* 'i' *i* "t" -It "I- '1* "1" "t"l**t"t' "I? *I* ■!" "t -t» "■J' »1^ '^t* p t"t"t**t" r " t 1 *t* *t" *J"t"i* "i"!* "t" *t* "I* "1* *t" *1" "l" "t* "1* *t "l" "i? *t"t"J* *lr *&* r l i* 'l 1 * i t * * t * '1* O 



Dear Nooker:-- 

We want 200 persons to distribute our "EQUITY" 
General Merchandise Catalogues where we do not have 
shareholders. The large Catalogues are bringing in lots of 
business and we are needing more help. 

If you are interested in this proposition, write us at 
once. 

EQUITY MFG. AND SUPPLY COMPANY, 

153, 155, 156, 159 So. Jefferson St., 

Chicago, Illinois. 



* 
* 

* 

* 

* 

* 
* 

+ 

* 



Now is Your Opportunity to Join 
a Successful Enterprise. 

SIX per cent paid on the investment, besides the FIVE per cent discount to 

shareholders from our catalogue prices. How is it done? Why, the. 

shareholders all over the country do the advertising in 

turn for their 5 per cent discount. 



1 * 

* ± 

EQUITY SHARES are getting scarce + 

and present indications show a tendency 1 

•r 
. of doubling their face value. 4- 

;„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„! 



O l--I"I"l"!"t"l"I'-l-^-l-^-t^-I"!"l--l"t"l'-l"l'^-l"I--l-4'4*4"l"l"l'0 

* ¥ 
+ We have 30,000 prospective customers * 

4. who will hold our catalogues in readiness i 

7 to show to their 60,000 thousand neigh- £ 

* bors and friends, and it is In this way the + 



way 

X great volume of business Is created. 
* 



f 
* 

* 




Grasp this Opportunity 
to Make Your 

Savings Work 



Investors. 



Consumers. 



We are drawing: to the close of our first series 
of voucher contracts, and if you want to take 
advantage of our truly wonderful opportunity 
to invest your savings in our Co-operative 
association, upon our original and scien- 
tific plan you should get your application in 
at a very early date. 

No matter how modest your means, you can 
become a shareholder in this company and at 
once begin to take, advantage of its many eco- 
nomic features, every one of which will have 
your approval and endorsement. Our com- 
pany means a new era in the co-operative field, 
a new low-price level and a new degree of 
purchasing power. 

Send your application at once. Grasp 
this opportunity to make your sav- 
ings work. 



How and When 
to Invest 



The Tinie is >*ow, Do not postpone 
the day when you are going to make a start for 
prosperity. If you do, the chances are you'll 
never start. Get out of the rut of the man who 
just lives each day so he can work the next. 
Have an investment to look after your interest 
in daysof adversity. 

Some people believe in investing their sav- 
ings but are not satisfied with reasonable 
returns on their money. They want to become 
millionaires in a night. They invest their mon- 
ey in all sorts of "get-rich-quick" schemes and 
usually pay dearly for their experiences. It is 
useless to save money and then invest it where 
it will be lost or even where you cannot help 
but worry about it. 

In the springtime of life — in the heyday of 
prosperity, every man and woman should in- 
vest in an enterprise which is a credit to Christ- 
ianity as well as to the Commercial World: so 
that in the days to come they will not have to 
look back upon the past with feelings of regret. 

Our plan of Scientific Co-operation elimi- 
nates all elements of failure and worry. Make 
vi.ui savings work and do good. 



Profits on 
Savings Assured 

Of all the great i joney-making department 
stores the Mail Order Store is the greatest. 
Its line comprises everything from a toothpick 
to a traction engine. Everything people eat, 
wearand use from youth to old ase. Its field 
is not limited by city and suburban limitations, 
but extends to every farm and town of this 
country and every country of the globe. Its 
expenses — selling and fixed — are less than any 
other business. It's a strictlycash business. It 
has few losses. It does not depend on sea- 
sonsor local conditions. Itis a "hard times" 
business. It does not even depend upon pros- 
perity. Its profits are Jarge in comparison to 
the amount invested. We advise you to be- 
come a copartner of our company on this 
series of vouchers as soon as possible, even if 
you start with but one share, and thereby 
obtain the advantages of our oriental co-op- 
erative idea. You will find your investment 
the best and safest you have ever made — you 
buy into an established, growing and success- 
ful business. 



Satisfaction 



Guaranteed 



A reputation for honest advertising: is 

extremely valuable, and can be retained only 
by the most painstaking care: a single misrep- 
resentation may do more harm than months 
of earnest effort can repair. Advertisingintro- 
duces our goods. Merit sells them. We 
know a satisfied customer is our best advertise- 
ment. Our Rule: "No Disappointment in 
What Lies Behind the Advertisement." We 
invite you to send orders from our catalogs, 
circulars or advertisements with absolute 
assurance that you will be protected. If the 
price is lower at the time your order reaches us 
we will give you the advantage of the reduction 
and never charge you more than the price 
named without first writing you with full 
explanations and getting your consent to the 
higher price. Do not hesitate to order any 
■ article we advertise as our positive guarantee 
goes with each shipment, and there is no risk 
on your part. There is no discount on the 
quality of the goods we send out and our 
representations are" always exact. No bluster, 
no display, just straightforward facts. Now, 
would you not like to be a co-partner and cus- 
tomer of a company which stands for the appli- 
cation of the Golden Rule in business, and 
Christian character upon the part of each 
worker, from the office boy to the President? 
Contracts to the extent of $135,000 made 
since February 1st. 1904, Write for partic- 
ulars. 



Remember! 

While we are working together, each for the 
other and conscientiously and earnestly en- 
deavoring to build up a large business, we do it 
on thebasisof treating each individual fairly and 
under no circumstances place any of our pa- 
trons, co-operators or stockholders in an em- 
barrassing position. 

We consider all correspondence, business 
transactions, contracts on co-operation, etc as 
sacred and never embarrass any one by publish- 
ing extracts from letters, names or addresses 
of co-operators or customers without having 
the written consent on file in our office. 



Albaugh Bros., 
Dover & Co. 



The Mail Order House 



341-43 Franklin St., 

Chicago, - - Illinois. 



Our New General 
Catalog Free. 



Our new general merchandise catalog will be 
ready the last of August and will be sent free 
to every reader of the Inglenook answering" 
this advertisement. Wewill also take pleasure 
inseiidiug a M -page book of testimonials from 
satisfied patrons, the consent to ^use name 
been secured in each case. Our large 
general Co-operative Catalog and Price List, a 
magnificent book, contains a complete line of 
high grade General Merchandise at co-op- 
erative money-saving prices. 

Careful attention is being given to the illus- 
trations, descriptions, prices, etc. Each article 
will be described as if it were the only one 
offered for sale, for the catalog must appeal to 
the reason of the one who receives it, and 
answer questions that may arise in his mind 
concerning the goods offered and the company . 
Wework at all times for the interest of our 
customers, and after a most careful study wc 
have originated a new plan of Freight and 
Express Rebates, about which [hi 
Catalog will tell you in detail. This means 
the saving to our patrons of thousands of 
dollars, yet our prices have not been advanced 
one cent. Itis harder to save money than to 
make money. Make saving easier by ordering 
■■■<>. from our catalog. Make your 
make you money by investing your 
savings in our co-operative instil 

Won't You Join H^nds With Us? 



ftl N5L-EIC0K, 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 




PALACE OF ELECTRICITY.— Louisiana Puurchase Exposition. 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



ly 26, 1904 



$ 1 .00 per Year 



Number 30, Volume VI 



THE INGLENOOK. 



ARE YOU GOING TO 

California, Washington, 
Oregon, Idaho 

Or Any Other Point? Take the 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Daily Tourist Car Lines 



Chicago, Missouri River, Colorado, Idaho, Oregon, 
Washington and California Points. 



ROUND TRIP RATES 



From Chicago, 
From Missouri River, 



$50.00 
4500 



To San Francisco or Los Angeles, Cal., and Re- 
turn. Tickets Sold Aug. 15 to Sept. 10, inclusive. 
Return Limit, October 23, 1904. 



One-Way Colonist's Rates. 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. 

From Chicago $33 00 

From St. Louis 30 00 

From Missouri River, 25 00 

Proportionate Rates from all Points East. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 

IS KNOWN AS 

"The Overland Route" 

And is the only direct line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West Business men and 
others can save many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal card to your nearest ticket agent, or 
Geo. L. McDonaugh, Colonization Agent, Omaha, 
Neb. 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



A Town With a Future 



Snyder, Colorado, Has all the Ear-marks of a Comer and 
is Surely Destined to be One of North- 
eastern Colorado's Leaders. 



Snyder is beautifully located on the South Platte river 
and Union Pacific Railway, between Sterling and Denver, 
extending from the river to the brow of a mesa, one-half 
mile away. The main street running north and south is 
80 feet wide; all other streets, 60 feet; alleys, 20 feet; all 
lots are 25x125 feet, excepting those fronting on the main 
street, which are 25x120. 

For further information about Snyder or South Platte 
Valley, address Geo. L. McDonaugh, Colonization Agent 
Union Pacific Railroad, at Omaha, Neb., for FREE print- 
ed matter. 

Still better, see some of those who have bought land 
near Snyder, Colorado, or write to them for further in- 
formation. 



The following parties have bought land near Snyder, 
Colo.: 

Louis E. Keltner, Hygiene, Colo.; W. W. Keltner, 
North Dakota; A. W. Brayton, Mt. Morris, 111.; Daniel 
Grabill, Lemasters, Pa.; J. L. Kuns, McPherson, Kans.; 
D. L. Miller, Mt. Morris, 111.; Daniel Neikirk, Lemasters, 
Pa.; Galen B.' Royer, Elgin, 111.; E. Slifer, Mt. Morris, 111.; 
I. B. Trout, Lanark, III.; R. E. Arnold, Elgin, 111. 



Geo. L. Studebaker, of Muncie, Indiana, says: 

" Sterling is a growing town with a good country 
surrounding. The members are active." 



HOMESEEKERS' EXCURSION 
to Snyder, Colorado, 

With Privilege of Stopping off at Sterling, Colo., 

AVC pi DP plus $ 200 ' for the Round Trip First 
VllE TAIIC and Third Tuesday of Each Month via 

Union Pacific Railroad. 



PRIZE CONTEST 

HOW TO GET A VALUABLE PREMIUM 



WE ARE GOING TO GIVE A FEW VALUABLE PREMIUMS, AND ALL OUR INGLENOOK FRIENDS 

ARE INVITED TO ENTER THE CONTEST. 



TTere They Are ! 




No 2 





No 3 



N. 5 






1. The one sending us the most new subscribers to the Inglenook for the remainder of the year at 25 

cents each, or with premium as per our offer* at 75 cents each, will receive one set Literature of All 
Nations, containing 10 volumes, weight, 26 pounds. Subscription price 

2. The one holding second place will receive a splendid ladies' or gentlemen's watch (whichever pre- 

ferred). The watch is equal to one that regularly retails for about, 

3. The one holding third place will receive a good Teacher's Bible, Arabian Morocco, divinity circuit, worth 



The one holding fourth place will receive the book " Modern Fables and Parables," worth 

riptions receive a good fountain r. 

Cash must accompany each order. 



Each person sending 10 or more subscriptions receive a good fountain pen, either ladies' or gentle- 
men's, worth 



$25.00 
8.00 
3.00 
120 
l.OO 



*See our offer this issue. 

Notw is Your Time. 

Right now is the time to make things count. Get a good start and you will come out all 
right in the end. The one who goes at it at once with a determination to win stands a good 
chance to get a S25.ro set of books FREE. 

Do not say that you do not have a good territory and it's no use to try. Our experience 
leads us to believe that one place is as good as another. Some places where we least expect 
subscriptions we get the most. It is up to you whether or not you get this fine set of books. 
SO E ONE IS GOING TO GET THEM. Let every loyal Nooker get out and hustle. Aim 
at the top. Don't be satisfied with anything less. ALU THESE PRIZES ARE GOI*G TO 
BE (IIVEN TO SOME ONE. Go to work at once. Who will send the first list? (In sending 
your list, please mention that you are entering the contest.) 

Contest Closes. 

To give all a fair chance we have decided not to close this INGLENOOK CONTEST until 
August 31. All orders received by us up to and including last mail on August 31, 1904, will be 
counted. Many are taking an active part in the contest. The fortunate ones are going to be the -™°" *' 

ones who keep continually at it. Remember, at the close of the contest should you not have been fortunate enough to 
receive one of the four prizes named, you will be entitled to prize No. 5, a good Fountain Pen, for each ten subscriptions sent 
us. It is worth your while to try for No. 1. Don't procrastinate. Now is your time to do the best work. 




BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



THI 



INGLENOOK. 



The 



Mount 

Campbell 

Tract 



in Fresno Connty, 

California, 

Promises to become the leading 
fruit-growing section of California. 
Land is cheap, water abundant, loca- 
tion healthful and soil unsurpassed. 
The soil is especially adapted to the 
orange, grape, fig, orchard fruits, al- 
falfa and general farming. 

Plans are now forming for a colo- 
ny of the Brethren on this tract, J. 
S. Kuns, proprietor of the old Mis- 
sion farm at Covina, Cal., having al- 
ready purchased land in this district, 
which has been inspected by other 
prominent members of the church. 

Maps and information by 

W. N. ROHRER, 

Fresno, Cal. 



FREE SAMPLE 

Send letter or postal for rree SAMPLE 
HINDOO TOBACCO HABIT CURE 

We cure you of chewing and smoking 
for 60c, or money beck. Guaranteed perfectly 
harmless. Address Milford Drug Co., Milford, 
Indiana, We answer all letters. 




ELQIN & WALTHAM WATCHES 1 

I Of all sizes and kinds. Men's size Elgins as 3 

I low as 34.95- Other watches from 88 cents to « 

S3$.ooeach. I sell all kinds of good watches, ' 



► i 



* S3 5 .ooeacn. l sell all kinds oi good watches, J 

I cheap. Catalogue free. Also samples and 3 

price list of CAP GOODS free upon applica- I 

tion. H. E- Newcomer, Mt. Morris, 111. \ 



30tl3 Mention the INGLENOOK when writing. 



It Does Not Pay to Neglect Tour Eyes ! 

GUELINE 

Is good all for inflammations of the Eyes. 
It has cured thousands of others. It 
will cure you. :: DO YOU KNOW 

LUCINE? 



Dr. Yeremian uses it in India every day. 
It is for Diarrhcea. It works like a 
charm. It rids the intestines of all 
germs. If not satisfied send us the pills 
and we will return your money. 

Gueline, 35c. Lucine, 25c. 

THE YEREMIAN MEDICAL CO., 

BATAVIA. ILLINOIS. 

11126 Mention the INGLENOOK when writing. 

ORANGE AND WALNUT 

grove for sale. Five acres in south- 
ern California; 4j^-year-old trees, al- 
ternate rows. The choicest of land, 
trees, and location. An unusual op- 
portunity for a person with small 
capital who desires quality. Must 
sell to clear another place in same 
locality. 

Address: 

E. I. AMES, 

6332 Peoria St. Chicago, 111. 

20tl3 Mention the INGLENOOK when wntln& 

FEW PEOPLE 

Know the value of Liquid Spray as a 
home cure for Catarrh, Hay Fever. Head 
colds and other diseases of the respira- 
tory organs. 

Persons desiring to try this highly 
recommended treatment should immedi- 
ately write to E. J. "Worst, 61 Main St., 
Ashland Ohio. 

He will gladly mail any reader of the 
Inglenook one of his new Atomizers and 
Liquid Spray treatment on five days' tri- 
al, free. 

If it gives satisfaction, send him $2.00, 
two-fifths regular price; if not, return 
it at the expired time, which will only 
cost you twelve cents postage, and you 
will not owe him a penny. It kills the 
Catarrh microbes in the head and throat. 

23tl3 

It Costs Nothing 

to learn full particulars about Mount 
Morris College Scholarships. They 
were established to aid worthy young 
people. Tou may be able to secure one. 
The founders furnish, the College 
awards them. Tour part is to try for 
one. Many a man never succeeds be- 
cause he never tries. Don't let this be 
true of you. Better write for particu- 
lars at once. It costs you nothing. 
Yours to please and help, 

MOUNT MOBBIS COLLEGE, 
J. E. Miller, Pres. Mt. Morris, HI. 



COLORADO 



AT ANNUAL MEETING. 

We were at Carthage, Mo., during 
the Annual Meeting and met many 
of our old friends and correspondents 
among the Brethren. 

THE NEW BOOKS. 

We distributed five thousand of the 
new Union Pacific Railway folders, 
" What People Say about the South 
Platte Valley," while there. 

SEND FOR ONE. 

We have a few hundred of these 
books left for free distribution and if 
you will drop us a card will send you 
a copy by first mail. 

OUR CARTHAGE EXCURSION. 

Several members accompanied us 
on our excursion to Sterling and Sny- 
der and are well pleased with the 
country and some will locate. 

AGENTS WANTED. 

We would like to arrange with a 
member in every town in the country 
to distribute these folders and get up 
a party for Colorado. 

LIBERAL COMMISSIONS. 

We offer liberal commissions and 
special prices on any lands you may 
decide to purchase yourself. 

A FREE PASS. 

We also arrange for special rates 
for excursion parties and free trans- 
portation for agent who gets up the 
party to Colorado and return. 

SPECIAL BARGAINS. 

We have special bargains in irri- 
gated farms and town property dur- 
ing the summer months and now is 
the time to see the country and in- 
vest. 

SNYDER TOWN LOTS. 

Parties who will agree to distribute 
our advertising matter among their 
friends can secure six Snyder town 
lots for $100. These lots sell for $25 
each and you can make $50 profit by 
reselling them at this price. 

TROUT FISHING IN MOUN- 
TAINS. 

We will run special cheap rate ex- 
cursions from Sterling to Cherokee 
Park every week this summer. This 
is one of the finest resorts in Colo- 
rado. The trout fishing is grand and 
the scenery sublime. 

COME TO COLORADO. 

If you contemplate a trip for 
health, pleasure, recreation or invest- 
ment let us hear from you and we 
will be pleased to give all information 
wanted. 

The Colorado Colony Co., 

Sterling, Colorado. 

I7tl3 Mention the INGLENOOK when writing. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



Bonnet Straw Cloth 



»»», 




SISTER, have you a knack of mak- 
ing your own bonnet? Here's 
news for you — money saving news 
We carry a large stock of bonnet 
straw cloth, manufactured especially 
for us, from our own designs. Four- 
teen different styles and colors. Rice 
Net, Wire Chiffon, Braid, etc., with a 
large assortment of Ribbon and Mous- 
seline de Soie for strings. Weare the 
only house making a specialty of these 
goods. Write for free samples and 
prices. 



Albaugh Bros., Dover & Co. 



34' =343 Franklin Street, 



Chicago, 111. 



Farms You Will Buy 

East Central Kansas is the best part 
of the State for general farming and 
raising stock. Well watered, Marion 
county's average crop acreage is 110,000 
acres corn, 90.000 acres wheat. 40.000 
acres oats, 20,000 acres alfalfa. We 
have some good farms for sale at a bar- 
gain. Will say to the Brethren that are 
thinking of changing their location that 
they will do well to investigate our 
country. Good bargains near church. 
Any information cheerfully furnished. 



GARRISON 



STUDEEAKEE, 
Florence, Kansas. 



50 Brethren Wanted 

with their families to settle in the 
vicinity of Tyvan, Canada. A good 
working church, one churchhouse 
built and steps taken for another one. 

Best of soil, $10 per acre, 
near railroad town, on easy terms. 
Good water, good people, schools 
and roads. 

This chance will last only a few 
weeks. Address: 

H. M. EARWICK, 

29t4 McPherson, Kans. 



Tne Inglenook Only Half Price! n 



Ntw Subscribers Only. 



Inglenook to Jan. r, 1905. regular price * 5° 

Our Special Trial Offer, only, 25C 




An Easy Way to Secure a Valuable Bock. 

Inglenook to Jan. 1, 1905, $ 50 

Modern Fables and Parables, 1 2 5 



Both for only 



SI 75 
.75 



The book we offer is a late one, by Rev. Harris, author of Mr. World and Miss 
Churchmember. The object of this book is to teach morality and to correct social evils. 
It is a splendid book for the home. If you do not already have it you will do well to 
take advantage of this offer. 

Get a Good Fountain Pen. 




Both for only 



This fountain pen is a good one and would be highly prized by any boy or girl. It is worth $1.00 to any one 
in need of a pen. 

Hundreds of New Subscribers. 

We are receiving hundreds of new subscribers, who are taking advantage of the above unprecedented offer. 
Our aim is to increase our list by several thousand within the next few weeks. From present indications our aim 
is not too high. The Nook is starting on a new era and we want all our friends and neighbors to join hands with 
us. You will never have a better opportunity to give the magazine a trial. 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



^» %l> \*/ \|/ il> nl/ Vl> til/ V4/ Vl> \l> Vi/ it/ <ii/ )i^ v^/ \l/ \l> \*/ \*/ \l/ Vl> \i/ \*/ \i/ \i/ Vi/ vl/ \4/ \^ «^ tti/ \i> \l/ \|/ «Lt/ \^ %iAi/ \«/ <^ 

Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



1 IDAHO 



is the best-watered arid State 
winds, destructive storms and 
mate it makes life bright and 
We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer 
change for the general improvement in your condi 
account of health, we believe that Idaho will meet b 
and sensible thing to do; that is, go and see the coun 
swer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger 
fares to investigate thoroughly a new country saves 
Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all prin 
for yourself. Selecting a new home is like selecting 



in America. Brethren are moving there because hot ^ 

cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless cli- i 

worth living. 5 

to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a ^ 

tion in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on ^ 

oth requirements. There is, however, only one wise ^ 

try for yourself, as there are many questions to an- £ 

work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad i 

thousands of dollars in years to follow. ^ 

cipal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see ^ 

a wife — you want to do your own choosing. ^ 



Round=Trip Homeseekers' Excursion Tickets 

Will be sold to points in Idaho as follows: West of Pocatello on first and third Tuesday of May, 
August, September and October, 1904. To points north of Pocatello tickets will be sold only in May 
and October, 1904. The rate will apply from Missouri river points, and from St. Paul, Chicago, Bloom- 
ington, Peoria and St. Louis. Tickets to Idaho points will also be sold by the Union Pacific, from sta- 
tions on their lines in Kansas and Nebraska. Rate will be one regular first-class fare for the round trip 
plus $2.00, with limit of 15 days going. Return passage may commence any day within the final limit of 
21 days from date of sale of tickets. Tickets for return will be good for continuous passage to starting 
point. 




PAYETTE VALLEY HOME.-Five Years from Sagebrush. 



S Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. 
Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat. Oats and Barlev. 



Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 80-acre tract, covered with sage brush. 
Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to wheat. Yielded 30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres 
to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sown in February 
or March the yield would have been much larger. 

Alfalfa was sown with the grain and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 
oats. 

Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to 5 pounds each, four of 
the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) E. L. Dotson. 



A S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. 

£ J. E. HOOPER, Agent, Oakland, Kansas. 



Mention the tHGLENOOK ■ 



D. E. BURLEY, 
G. P. & T. A., 0. S. L. R. R., 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 



f 



Fine $i 



^wvfwyMVfvtvtwvfMfl'^ 



*lN5LtN50K: 



Vol. VI. 



July 26, 1904. 



No. 30. 



A JULY QUESTION. 



When within the coolest glade 
It is ninety in the shade, 
When the butter turns to oil 
And the ice begins to boil; 
When you're burning through and through- 
Is it hot enough for you? 

When you're charged to not forget 
Sundry items for your pet, 
When you let it slip your pate 
Till it comes, alas, too late, 
When your wife gets through with you — 
Is it hot enough for you? 

When your creditors some day 
Draw for bills you cannot pay, 
And your banker crustily 
Says you're checks are all n. g., 
When you're harrassed till you're blue — 
Is it hot enough for you? 

Then when we get through this world, 
And to somewhere else are hurled, 
When we reach that other life 
And are freed from worldly strife, 
Shall we hear 'mid steam and stew — 
" Is it hot enough for you? " 

*> ■!* •> 

SNAPSHOTS. 



A little love will leaven a long life. 
The true prayer is a humble petition. 
Misery loves company and generally gets it. 

A heart full of hate is a poor field for hope. 

* 
A thing is not necessarily honest because it is legal. 

* 

The pessimist regards everything that glitters as a 
gold brick. 

* 
■ Open the windows and live all over the house, 
will enjoy the neighbor's call better and he will think 
more of you. 




We must live for Christ here if we would live with 
Him hereafter. 

* 

Prosperity becomes a poison when it grows at the 
expense of piety. 

* 

7/ we had the nerve of some book agents, we'd be 
riding in a private yacht. 

* 

If Truth had the speed of a lie, some gossips would 
have to go out of business. 

Paradoxical as it may seem, you can save yourself a 
lot of trouble by getting rid of it. 
* 
Blessed is the man who will take hold of the cold 
end of a prayer meeting. — Talmage. 
* 
A practical education is not a practical one if it in- 
duces only the desire to make money. 
* 
One swallow- does not make a spring, but some- 
times a swallow (of whiskey) causes a fall. 

* \ 

The greatest university in the world is in the home\ 

where the youth sits at the feet of a devoted mother. J 

When a man is tinder a cloud, the silver lining theory 
don't look so nice as it does when we are telling the 
other fellow all about it. 

* 
Russell Sage says he never took a vacation. We 
would rather have the good times he has missed than 
all the money he has, and his cares. 
* 
Are you acquainted ivith a lot of people zvho are 
continually putting medicine down their throats into 
their stomachs hoping to cure a bad imagination? 
$ 
Some men say they don't join church because there 
are hypocrites in the church, and they knozv as well as 
they are living that there arc more of them outside 
tlian there are inside. 



6g8 



THE INQLENOOC, 



HABITS OF SEA DWELLERS. 



The ancients had many quaint ideas, about the fishes 
inhabiting the seas, and legends illustrating their per- 
sonal habits are legion, says the New York Tribune. 
According to them, they held converse with man, and 
in many instances aided him in his daily occupations, 
thus showing that they possessed nearly all the at- 
tributes of human beings, though in a lesser degree. 
During the early historical period so many of these 
legends were proved to be false that it became fashion- 
able, except among the uneducated, to deny to fishes 
almost all human passions or emotions, and to refer 
to them as " voiceless and emotionless creatures." 
More recent investigations, however, have demonstrat- 
ed that fishes, as well as land animals, are largely 
swayed by the same emotions, and, in their own limited 
way, give expression to these. 

Fishes have certain means of demonstrating their 
emotions, such as erecting their scales or fin rays when 
under the influence of anger or terror, as feathers or 
hairs are erected in birds and mammals. As fishes 
have eyes without movable eyelids, cheeks incased with 
bony plates or covered with hard scales, which are 
scarcely suitable for smiling, while external ears are 
wanting, one can hardly expect to find special expres- 
sions, as of joy, pain, astonishment, etc., so well 
marked as in some of the higher grades of animals, in 
which the play of features often affords an insight in- 
to their internal emotions. 

Change of Color. 

Change of color is one of the best indexes to the 
emotions. When the fish is sick its color is apt to be 
faint, while when in health, angry or breeding, the 
colors stand out brightly and vividly. One of the 
best examples of the effect of the emotions on color 
is that of the stickleback. This species has a violent 
temper, and appears to be always- carrying an imagin- 
ary chip on its shoulder. During the breeding season 
combats between the males are exceedingly common. 
When fighting their brilliant colors stand out vividly, 
but after the combat is over, the defeated one, his 
gay colors faded, hides his disgrace among his more 
peaceable companions. Even then he is not left in 
peace, as the victor seems to take delight in persecut- 
ing him in many ways. 

The parrot fishes are also noted for their " scrappv " 
proclivities, and the same color changes are noted in 
them as in the sticklebacks. 

Fishes, again, are charged with being voiceless, but 
nothing could be farther from the truth, as more than 
three hundred species are known to produce sound. 

Fish That Make Noise. 

The Sclcenidaj are probably the best examples of 



the falsity of the above charge. These fishes, which 
are called " maigres," emit sounds having a mean of 
about twenty-five seconds, and also various notes, usu- 
ally degenerating into a humming sound, either from 
excess or want of intensity. When traveling in 
schools, these sounds may be heard from a depth of 
twenty fathoms. It has been suggested that the story 
of the songs of the fabled sirens had its origin in the 
utterance of schools of these fishes. 

When captured, the scad, or horse mackerel, the 
globefish, the grunt, the pigfish and the hogfish make 
sounds resembling the grunting of a pig, while one of 
the best known of the fishes along the South Atlantic 
seaboard, the croaker, gets its name from the croak 
it gives when taken into the boat. The barbel and 
carp also croak when taken out of the water. 

A species of Tetrodon is called " seafrog " by the 
natives of Malabar, India, on account of the noise it 
makes when captured. The red gurnard has earned 
the name of " seacock " from the crowing noise which 
it makes, while another species is called the " piper " 
for the same reason. 

Sounds Like a BelL 

A siluroid found in the Rio Parana, and called the 
armado, is remarkable for a harsh, grating noise which 
it emits when caught with hook and line, and this can 
be distinctly heard while it is still beneath the sur- 
face. The Corina nigra, a fish in the Tagus, emits 
sounds resembling the vibrations of a deep-toned bell, 
gong or pedal pipe of an organ. Sea herrings, when 
the net has been drawn over them, have been observed 
to do the same, also the fresh water bullhead of our 
waters. According to Francis Day, he obtained sev- 
eral sheat fishes, macrones vittatus, locally termed " fid- 
dler fish," at Madras, India, and " on touching one 
which was lying on some wet grass, it erected its 
armed spines, emitting a sound resembling the buzzing 
of a bee, and apparently in anger or fear." 

An amphibious siluroid fish, clarias macracanthus, 
on being taken into the hand, is said to squeal and 
shriek. Certain of the blennies also make a noise sim- 
ilar to this. The big Jewfish of the Gulf of Mexico 
will often break the stillness of the night with his 
" Boom! Boom! " delivered monotonously for a con- 
siderable time. 

Legend of Pascagoula River. 
The legend of Pascagoula river and its mysterious 
music, deemed supernatural by the Indians and the 
early whites who heard it, has since been explained as. 
the noise made by the sea drums. In speaking of this 
still current legend a recent writer says : " It may of- 
ten be heard there on summer evenings. The listener 
being on the beach, or, yet more favorably, in a boat 
floating on the river, a low, plaintive sound is heard 
rising and falling like that of an aeolian harp, and 



the: inglenook. 



699 






seeming to issue from the water. The sounds, which 
are sweet and plaintive, but monotonous, cease as soon 
as there is any noise or disturbance of the water." 

In the days of old Rome the muranas, or sea eels, 
were supposed to have a regular language, " low and 
sweet," says an ancient writer, " and with an intona- 
tion so fascinating that few could resist its influence," 
and it is also said that the Emperor Augustus even pre- 
tended to understand their words. 

In the South Seas. 

When Humboldt visited the South seas in 1803, 
about 7 P. M. on Feb. 20 an extraordinary noise start- 
led the crew. At first it was like the beating of many 
drums in the distance, and then the sounds seemed to 
come from the ship itself, near the poop. At first the 
terrified crew thought that breakers were at hand, and 
then that the vessel had sprung a leak ; but it was soon 
discovered that the sounds were produced by fishes. 

Musical Shellfish. 

Sir J. Emerson Tennent tells of a visit he made to 
Ceylon in 1848, when he went in a boat to hear some 
of the famous water music at Batticalva. He was 
rowed quietly to the spot by moonlight, where the 
sounds came up from the water like the gentle thrills 
of a musical chord or the faint vibrations of a wine- 
glass when the rim is rubbed with a moistened finger. 
It was not one sustained note, but a multitude of tiny 
sounds, the sweetest treble mingled with the lowest 
bass. The natives said that the music was made by a 
shellfish at the bottom, which they called the " crying 
shell." 

Fishes are supposed to make these noises for the 
purpose of attracting their mates. It is said that fish- 
ermen often take fish during the spawning seasons 
by imitating the sounds. 

Formerly it was believed that fishes could not hear, 
as they had no ears, but anatomists have proved that 
they have organs of hearing, though not external ones. 
As water is denser than air, the sounds made in the 
latter do not penetrate the former readily and, unless 
they are sufficiently loud to produce well-defined me- 
chanical vibrations in the water, are not apt to be 
heard by fishes unless they should happen to be close 
to the surface. It is very probable that most of the 
fishes cannot distinguish and appreciate differences of 
tone as the higher animals are enabled to do. There 
are numerous well-authenticated instances of fishes re- 
sponding to noises in the air, which would seem to in- 
dicate that certain species have their hearing much 
better developed than others. 

Shad Dance to Music. 
Many ancient writers have described the fishes' love 



of music, and Rondolet, the famous naturalist, tells 
how on one occasion he made a school of shad dance 
to his fiddling. 

It is said that in Germany clupeat finta delights in 
musical sounds. Therefore, when fishing the fisher- 
men fasten to the nets bows of wood, to which are 
suspended a number of small bells, which chime in 
harmony together on the nets being moved. The fish 
are thought to be thus attracted to their destruction 
and as long as the alluring sounds continue they cease 
all efforts to escape. The same method is followed on 
the Danube river when fishing for certain species. 

The legend that they were caught in Egypt by sing- 
ing to them is not without its plausibility. In Japan 
the tame fish are summoned to dinner by melodious 
gongs, while on the Dholpore river, in India, they are 
called up out of the muddy depths by the ringing of 
a handbell. In Europe it is common for carp and 
goldfish in private ponds to respond to the whistle of 
the person who feeds them, no matter at what time 
he calls. In Tahiti the native chiefs have pet eels, 
which come to the surface when their master whistles, 
while they pay no attention to the calls of strangers. 

Fear to Scare Fish Away. 

In Sweden at the present time the church bells are 
not rung during the bream season lest the fish should 
take flight and desert the region, while during the 
pilchard fishery the people are no less careful of their 
sensitiveness to sound. 

The natives of the Gold Coast colony, West Africa, 
when fishing on the inland waters or rivers on moon- 
light nights, make use of a piece of glass — broken 
bottle generally — and metal, thereby making a musical 
tinkle to attract the fish before the handnet is cast. 

The sense of taste is evidently not well developed 
in fishes, and this is very evident from the circum- 
stances under which fishes seize and swallow their 
prey. Those species which are carnivorous are of 
necessity compelled to catch with their mouths and 
retain a firm hold of the active and slippery food they 
are destined to devour; to divide or masticate their 
food would be impracticable, and even were they per- 
mitted to do so the water which perpetually washes 
over the exterior of their mouths obviously precludes 
the possibility of appreciating savors. 

Have Acute Sense of Smell. 

As the olfactory nerves are of large size and cover 
a wide service, the sense of smell in fishes is acute, and 
this is evident from the selection they make in their 
food. Fishermen know well that tainted bait is not 
so tempting as fresh bait ; a very hungry fish will not 
be particular, but the odor of stinking bait is repug- 
nant to fishes generally. Fishes are also attracted by 
agreeable scents, as was first proved by Aristotle. 



yoo 



THE iNQLENOOK. 




< 
x 

u 

X 
St 



THE INGLENOOK. 



701 



THE CASCADES. 



COMMUNING WITH NATURE. 



The focal point of the Louisiana Purchase Expo- 
sition is a composition made up of three big cascades, 
the largest in the world ; the Colonnade of States, an 
ornamental screen of Ionic columns forming a back- 
ground for fourteen statues each symbolical of one 
of the States or Territories in the purchase ; three 
highly ornate buildings, including Festival Hall in the 
center and two ornate restaurant pavilions at either 
end. Added to this and filling in the picture are lawns, 
gardens, flower beds, trees, vases, walks and approach- 
es. 

No decorative feature of the Exposition has attract- 
ed so much attention throughout the world as the Cas- 
cade Gardens, nor does any other portion of the Fair 
approach it in grandeur. The dome of the Festival 
Hall, in the center of the peristyle, is much larger than 
that of St. Peter's at Rome. It was designed by Cass 
Gilbert of New York. Restaurant pavilions, peristyle 
and cascades and the general scheme of the Grand Ba- 
sin was done by Mr. E. L. Masqueray, Chief of De- 
sign of the Exposition. 

The statutes which ornament the approaches to 
the cascades, represent famous characters in Amer- 
ican history. Marquette, Joliet, Lewis and Clarke, De- 
Soto and Laclede appear in the approach to the 
eastern cascade. Keokuk, Robert Livingston, James 
, Monroe, Franklin, Hamilton, Narva;z, Boone and Sit- 
ting Bull appear in the approach to the western cas- 
cade. These side cascades symbolize the Atlantic and 
Pacific oceans. 

On the center fountain at the head of the main cas- 
cade, in front of Festival Hall, appears a gigantic 
statue of Liberty raising the veil of Ignorance and pro- 
tecting Truth and Justice. The entire stretch of the 
gardens is 1,900 feet wide by 1,100 feet in depth 
as they recede from the edge of the Grand Basin. The 
main or center cascade is 290 feet long and the two 
side cascades each 300 feet long. The approaches to 
each cascade are each 390 feet long. The paths be- 
side the Grand Basin are 50 feet wide. 

Sculpture for the main cascade was designed by 
H. H. McNeil, and that for the side cascades by Isadore 
Konti. The open space between the cascades is 
parked in lawn with borders of flowers, which 
change with the seasons during the Exposition period. 
Jets of water along the sides of the cascades are 
thrown 100 feet. Under the main cascade where 
the water takes its deepest plunge is a subterra- 
nean grotto, beautifully lighted, supplying a view of 
the tumbling waters of the cascade through three big 
arcaded openings. Here refreshments are served 
amid the coolness induced by the curtain or veil of 
water which forms one side of the grotto. 



BY ORA V. BOWMAN. 

Oftentimes, when wandering about, I recall the 
words of Job, " Speak to the earth and it shall teach 
thee," and wonder at the beauties that lie yet untold 
to us, which might reveal themselves did we but speak 
to Mother Earth. 

The beauties of life are numberless and how few 
appreciate them. Many of us are in the world but 
not of it. We stroll through the fields and wood, 
choosing some secluded spot where we can spend a 
few hours with some book, telling of the beauties of 
nature, while all about us myriads of living beings ex- 
ist, each with a special history of its own, and offering 
great problems of interest. Why not make our Na- 
ture study a reality? 

The hours are not lost which we spend with nature. 
They develop character. The soul that has crushed 
out the love of Nature can hardly fail to suffer from 
the loss. I do not mean that such a person is neces- 
sarily bad, but his ideals cannot be high and his rev- 
erence for his Creator cannot be so great. 

Perhaps there may be some to whom Nature has 
never spoken ; who see no beauty in the towering hills, 
feel no rapture at the sight of a glorious sunset, ex- 
press no emotion at the sight of the mighty billows 
or shed no tear at the sight of a little lonely flower 
peeping out from a snow-covered earth. Who can 
wonder that such ones say life is cold and hard? 

No doubt, to some of us, on a bright summer day, 
life seems a luxury, when the blue sky dazzles with 
brightness, the air full of song and sweet scents of 
flowers. But have you ever enjoyed the sight of the 
wildness of Nature, — when the heavens were lighted 
with flashes of lightning, the air groaning with peals of 
thunder and the heavy black clouds heaving forth 
their deluge of water? Commune often with Nature 
and your life will become stronger, better and nobler. 

" And thus our life exempt from public haunt. 
Finds tongues in trees, books in running brooks. 
Sermons in stones, and good in everything.'' 

Morrill, Kansas. 

* * ♦ 

LOSS FROM FLOODS. 



As a result of cloudbursts at Little Rock, Arkansas, 
which caused the rise of the Arkansas river, thou- 
sands of acres of growing cotton crops were under 
water and in some places entirely washed out. The 
damage is the greatest experienced, and the Agricul- 
tural Department has recommended the planting of 
corn, sweet potatoes or peas instead of cotton. 



JQ2 



THE INQLENOOr. 



UNITED STATES INSPECTOR OF MEATS. 



BY WALTER C. FRICK. 

All firms in the United States engaged at all ex- 
tensively in the slaughter and dressing of horses, cat- 
tle, sheep, and swine, or the salting, canning, and 
packing of their products must have these animals and 
their products inspected by officials of the United 
States Government. 

By means of competitive civil service examinations, 
meat inspectors, .assistant meat inspectors, and other 
employes are secured to conduct the examinations of 
animals and the stamping of their carcasses and prod- 
ucts. 

Only licensed veterinary surgeons are eligible to the 
position of meat inspector. Other employes of this 
department need to be possessed of only a common 
education. 

All inspectors and assistants have free access to all 
parts of a packing plant and wear numbered badges 
by which to identify themselves. 

Each abattoir is designated by an official number. 
All its products are identified by its number, each case 
of meat put on the market by the firm bearing it. 

An ante-mortem (before death), and post-mortem 
(after death) examination is made of all animals 
slaughtered, and no animal is allowed to enter or leave 
such an establishment except it has passed both these 
tests. 

No animal is slaughtered except in the presence of 
a government inspector. 

During inspection an animal or carcass found to be 
diseased or otherwise unfit for human food is marked, 
during ante-mortem inspection by placing in the 
ear a metal tag bearing the words " U. S. Condemned " 
and a serial number, during post-mortem inspection by 
sealing to the carcass a red tag bearing the same words. 
It is a criminal offense to remove these tags except 
so directed by an inspector. 

Condemnation is pronounced on all animals affected 
with the following diseases or ailments : Hog cholera, 
swine plague, anthrax, rabies, scab, and lumpy jaw in 
advanced stages, tuberculosis, advanced stages of preg- 
nancy, animals too young or emaciated to produce 
wholesome food, and various other causes needless to 
mention here. 

During the slaughter of an animal all parts of the 
carcass are retained separate from all others of its kind 
so that they may be identified in case the carcass is 
condemned. 

A separate room under Government lock and key 
is provided for the retaining of condemned meat until 
such a time as the inspector can supervise the destroy- 
ing of it. 



Destroying of condemned meat, " tanking," the in- 
spector calls it, is done as follows; Large, deep, iron 
tanks are provided for the final condemnation. These 
have an opening in the bottom through which to empty 
the contents. When condemned meat is to be de- 
stroyed this outlet is sealed shut by the inspector. 
The condemned carcasses are then thrown in, the top 
opening sealed shut, and a sufficient head of steam 
turned on to destroy it for all food purposes. 

A detailed report of all animals killed, the num- 
ber condemned, and their final disposition is made to 
Agricultural Department at Washington each day. 

Carcasses or parts of carcasses of animals intended 
for canning purposes are not stamped. Those shipped 
from one abattoir to another for the same purpose, 
even though the abattoirs are in two different States, 
are not stamped. A car containing such a shipment 
of meat is securely sealed with Government seals. 
These seals must not be broken except in the presence 
of an inspector or his assistant or with his permis- 
sion. 

All cases, barrels, kegs, etc., of inspected meat must 
be marked with an official stamp to certify to the in- 
spector of their contents. Grooved spaces are cut into 
the cases sufficiently large to admit the stamps to pre- 
vent their being torn off. These stamps are affixed by 
means of transparent varnish or glue, and are coated 
over with the same substance. After being affixed 
they are immediately cancelled by means of a rubber, 
stamp containing five parallel waved lines, the name 
of the inspector and the number of the abattoir over 
which he has charge. 

The affixing of these stamps is done by employes of 
the firm using them, but under the supervision of a 
Government employe. 

A complete record of these stamps is kept by the 
Department at Washington. 

Each case, barrel, keg, etc., of inspected meat used in 
foreign trade must have stenciled upon it the official 
number of the establishment in which it was packed, 
the weight and number of pieces contained therein, the 
marks under which it is shipped, and the words, " For 
Export, Inspected according to act of Congress," of 
certain date. If the products are to be consumed with- 
in U. S. Territory the words, " For Interstate Trade," 
are substituted. For all shipments a certificate of in- 
spection, in addition to the regular stamp, must be ob- 
tained from the inspector in charge. 

All packages containing inspected horse meat are 
marked to indicate the species of animal from which 
taken. Special stamps are used in marking inspected 
horse meat. 

No other animals are allowed to be slaughtered or 
certified to in an establishment engaged in the slaugh- 
ter and packing of horse flesh. 



ThE IN6LENOOK. 



703 



Only one company engaged in the packing of horse 
flesh has U. S. Inspection. This company operates a 
plant at Linnton, Oregon. 

Microscopic Inspection of Pork. 

Germany, France and Austria have strict laws re- 
garding the importation of American meats. Because 
of this fact all pork products intended for export to 
these countries are subjected to a microscopic examina- 
tion for trichinea in addition to the regular inspec- 
tion. 

Three samples of muscle are taken from each car- 
cass intended for such inspection. Each set of samples 
is placed into a small tin box together with a num- 
bered tag. A duplicate of this tag is attached to the 
carcass to which the samples belong. This is to in- 
sure identification in case the carcass is rejected. 

Separate cellars are provided at all abattoirs in which 
to store and cure microscopically inspected meat, and 
no other meats are allowed to be placed therein. These 
cellars are securely locked, the keys remaining in the 
possession of a trusted employe of the inspection bu- 
reau. No meat can be stored or removed without his 
knowledge. 

An accurate account of all meat handled in these 
cellars must be kept. 

During the cutting of carcasses extreme care is taken 
that the two classes of meat are not mixed. Work 
is suspended long enough to clear away all other meat 
before micro, meat is cut. 

A stamp, similar to those placed upon carcasses of 
export meat, is used to certify microscopically inspect- 
ed meat. It is purple in color, however, and is cov- 
ered with a tin having a raised center to prevent it's 
being rubbed off in transit. 

This inspection is the most rigid that is held. 

While U. S. Inspection is a great advertisement 
to the firms whose products are inspected, it serves the 
country in a great measure because of the fact that 
it serves to destroy all meat affected by disease which 
would otherwise be imposed upon the public. 

Nearly one hundred and twenty firms, representing 
one hundred and fifty abattoirs, and controlling prac- 
tically the whole packing industry have their products 
inspected by the United States Government. 

Chicago, III. 

<$» & * 

HARVEST OF SALT. 



The most remarkable harvest field in the 'bhiited 
States, if not in the whole world, is located in the Heart 
of the Colorado Desert. The spot is known as SalSpn, 
and it lies 265 feet below the level of the sea. 

The crop which is harvested is salt. So plentiful 1. 



the natural deposit of this necessary article that it is 
plowed with gang plows, is scraped into windrows as 
hay is raked in the field, and, like hay, it is stacked 
into heaps from the windrows and is then loaded into 
wagons and later into cars to be carried to the reduc- 
tion works three miles away. 

This field is literally white to the harvest, and a most 
phenomenal harvest it is. Over a briny, oozy marsh 
lies a crust of salt six to sixteen inches thick. As 
often as removed the crust quickly forms again, so 
that crop after crop is taken from the same ground. 
In fact, although these harvests have been going on 
nearly twenty years, and two thousand tons of market- 
able salt are annually taken from the beds, but ten 
acres of the 1,000-acre field have been broken. 

The laborers employed in breaking up the salt crust, 
in loading the salt on the wagons and taking it to the 
mills, in cleaning and preparing it for market, are 
mostly Japanese and Indians. In the summer season 
the temperature reaches 130 to 140 degrees at Salton, 
and white men are unable to endure the work, exposed 
to the burning rays of the sun. 

The Coachella Valley, in which this great field of 
salt lies, is ninety miles long and from ten to thirty 
miles wide. Its 1,600 square miles of territory lie 
wholly below the level of the sea, its greatest depres- 
sion being 275 feet. The southern portion of the val- 
ley is devoid of vegetation save where irrigation has 
been introduced, but about the northern portion of the 
valley the sage and mesquite have obtained a foothold 
in the sandy soil. 

Near Indio, in the northern portion of the valley, 
an artesian well was drilled a few years ago and a 
copious supply of water was obtained. Now more 
than 250 of these wells are pouring their waters over 
the thirsty soil, and a large tract of land has been 
brought into a high state of cultivation. The lands t 
about the salt fields, however, are too strongly impreg- 
nated with salts and alkali to offer any inducemen^s'to 
the rancher now or in the future. — Cincinnati Enquir- 
er. 

•S* * * 

A Parliamentary return shows that since 1851 
and to 1903, nearly 4,000,000 of Irish have emigrated, 
the exact total being 3,981,011, equivalent to 74 per 
cent of the average population of Ireland. 

During the year 1903, 40,659 Irishmen emigrated, 
of which number the United States received 33,501. 

In 1585 the corps pique (a corset) was a hard wood- 
en mold into which the wearer was compressed and 
suffered from the splinters of wood that penetrated 
the flesh. It took the skin off the waist and made 
the ribs ride up, one over the other. 



704 



THE INGLENOOK. 



TO COMMON SCHOOL GRADUATES. 



BY PROF. C. M. JAMES. 

This event marks an epoch in your lives. It says to 
the world that you have passed a creditable examina- 
tion in the common school branches. You have hon- 
ored your parents and your teacher; and I trust the 
taxpayers throughout the States will be recompensed 
for the money they have expended. 

While there is much we can commend in your pres- 
ent attainments, and while we are all proud of you, 
yet you must remember that you have only begun that 
great struggle for an education. 

Although you may have passed a very creditable ex- 
amination in Arithmetic and while you may be quite 
proficient in that branch, I must admonish you that you 
have scarcely started upon the realms of Mathematics. 
There yet lies before you Algebra, Geometry, Trigo- 
nometry and perhaps Calculus. While you are to re- 
ceive a certificate of proficiency in Grammar, yet I 
would remind you that you have not passed the first 
mile post in your language studies ; you have as yet 
only become familiar with a part of one language, 
while there yet lie. before you, at least four or five 
languages to acquire, before you can be said to be 
educated. 

You have learned just the surface of Geography. It 
is yet within your educational career to explore the 
earth's interior, for every stratum has been analyzed 
and made an object of study. There yet lies before 
you in this field the great promise of Astronomy. The 
earth must be followed in its billions of miles around 
the sun, and the planets and stars are to be made an 
object of research. 

You, no doubt, are able to read intelligently a page 
of printed matter and have read a few good books, 
yet there is the Literature of a thousand years and of 
a hundred bards with which to become familiar. You 
are to be granted a diploma in United States History, 
yet I would remind you that this comprises, in a very 
indefinite way, the study of four hundred years of his- 
tory of one country, while you have yet to work out six 
thousand years of World's History before you can 
begin to claim authority in this one field. 

That great field of science lays before you a realm 
of undiscovered possibilities. The beasts of the field, 
the fowls of the air, the shining minerals of the deep 
earth, seed time and harvest, bud and flower, blossom 
and fruit, are all to be made the source of lessons of 
usefulness as well as joy. The great possibilities of 
transportation and communication are to be studied. 

And then there are the social and moral problems 
to be solved, which are to save the world. While I 
would exhort you not to stop short of these high at- 
tainments ; yet I would have you complete first a four 



years' course in a high school, and then a good strong 
course in some university or technical school. My 
young friends, if one iota of your education has had 
for its ultimate object such a low object as money 
making only, your instructors have failed to give you 
that which was most helpful. No, my young friends, 
the function of the common schools is to produce noble 
young men and women ; men and women to exemplify 
the religion of Christ ; men and women more able to 
fulfill the duties of citizenship and to enlighten their 
fellowmen ; men and women with common sense and 
the ability to do. 

If you have no higher ideal in the use of your di- 
plomas than that they will enable you to better earn 
a 'livelihood, I must frankly tell you that your educa- 
tion has failed in its fullest sense and you are obtain- 
ing these documents under false pretense. This par- 
ticular view of our common schools has given the op- 
ponents of popular education an opportunity to get in 
their work against higher education. They tell you 
high schools are all right and quite necessary in cities, 
but are useless and will not pay in the country. I have 
always been unable to understand that high form of 
reasoning, which seeks to find an excuse for educating 
one class of people and denying it to another. If a 
high school education is a good thing for a banker's 
son and daughter, it is a good thing for a farmer's 
son and daughter, and if the banker's son and daughter 
have the privilege of a high school education, just so 
should the farmer's son and daughter have the same 
privilege by having" the seat of learning established 
in their own locality. 

Again let me urge upon you that graduating from 
the common schools does not indicate that your train- 
ing has ceased or has obtained any degree of com- 
pleteness. It simply signifies that you have completed 
the first step in this great scheme of education and are 
thus ready for further development. May you nor 
any of your friends never offer that intolerable excuse 
for not entering school again in the fall, that you have 
graduated. 

The matter of obtaining an education is a struggle 
as is everything else, but by grasping the present op- 
portunities we will in the end certainly succeed. 
Strive to turn your power already acquired to the art 
of observation. I say to you, it was Martin Luther's 
ability to observe the time, place and manner of swing- 
ing the rock of the Reformation into position and pro- 
duce the great lake of Religious Independence that 
made him great. Abraham Lincoln observed the great 
rock of governmental authority and swung it into 
power and the lake National Freedom was the result. 
May we thus be able to see our opportunities for good 
and utilize them in every way possible. 
Fairfield, Ind., July 4. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



/OS 






PETERS' MOUNTAIN. 



BY H. B. FLESHMAN. 

Peter's Mountain is a range of the Alleghany sys- 
tem. It takes the name of Peter's Mountain after it 
• leaves Alleghany county, in Virginia, and is the boun- 
dary line between Monroe county, West Virginia, and 
Giles county, Virginia, the top of the mountain being 
the line. It extends to New River in Giles county, 
where the river breaks through the mountain and is 
called Narrows of New River, where a little town is 
situated among the hills called Narrows ; from there 
the mountain is called East River Mountain. It was 
named for Christian Peters, one of the first settlers of 
Peters' Mountain valley. 

This old mountain presents a beautiful scene in win- 
ter when covered with frozen fog and snow. With the 
sun shining bright upon it, it presents a scene which 
no artist can paint. Then we have here what we call 
mountain storms. Wind will blow from twelve to 
forty-eight hours, seemingly without ceasing, with 
such fury that farmers have quite a job picking up 
scattered fence rails. The most remarkable feature 
about the wind is that it rages only on the north and 
in the valley, while on the south it is calm. Another 
beautiful sight is the mountain when fired. Some- 
times it originates on the north side, and again on the 
south. When it comes over from the south, it comes 
down on the farmers on the north. And then it's 
" Hurrah ! boys, the fire is out," and such a time to 
keep it off the fences, sometimes fighting fire all night 
long and where is the man or boy who does not enjoy 
fighting fire. It is a grand sight to see a zig-zag 
string of fire, several miles long, burning at night. 
The north of this mountain is rich and fertile, produc- 
ing good crops of corn, and is well timbered. The 
south is rocky and barren, with short underbrush and 
scrubby oaks. A large portion is covered with huckle- 
berry bushes, which yield an immense crop of fine, 
delicious berries, especially the big blue berrv. The 
bushes do not bear every year. In the year 1903 was 
the largest crop known for years. It was estimated 
that one thousand bushels were gathered in that year. 
The people went in wagons, buggies, on horseback and 
on foot, some would camp over night and bring back 
gallons of berries, in spite of the copperhead and rattle- 
snake which abound in that region. The latter having 
rattles on its tail, gives warning when approached. 
The Big Marsli has bushes five and six feet high. One 
can sit on a horse and pick berries. The Pine Swamp 
and Huckleberry Ridge are noted places for this splen- 
did fruit. The lowest depression on the mountain is 
the Low Gap, one half mile to top. The highest 
point is the Big Butt, close to the Gap. One can stand 
on the top and see into Monroe. Greenbrier, Sum- 



mers, Raleigh, Fayette and Mercer counties, West 
Virginia, and Giles county, Virginia. 

We have here several large sugar orchards along 
the foot. In February and March the trees are tapped. 
Then comes sugar making. I have spent several days 
at the sugar camp, carrying water and boiling it down 
into syrup. Then the best time of all — " stirring off." 
And we have here also some of the finest springs gush- 
ing out of the mountain, flowing down through the 
valley. Its crystal water is as pure as ever run out 
of the earth. The springs never freeze nor go dry. 
Every family is supplied with good water. The moun- 
tain is a guide to the farmer in planting corn. They 
are safe in planting until the mountain gets green to 
the top. The game of the past was deer, bear, wolves 
and smaller game. The old hunter would put on his 
moccasins, shoulder his rifle, and go in search of game. 
He generally brought back a deer or bear as his spoil, 
but they have most all disappeared before the hunters' 
leaden bullets. Many changes have taken place, many 
who have looked upon Peters' Mountain have taken 
their last look. They are gone to return no more. 
But I see no change on this old mountain. It stands 
as a sentinel down through the ages, showing us the 
wonderful works of nature. 

Dear Mount, from here I often see 

Your towering height that's plain to me. 
The closing aspect I have seen 

Changing by turns from blue to green. 
The azure that I now behold 

In Autumn will be turned to gold. 
In winter time it's spotless white 

Angelic brightness — noonday light; 
Sometimes in joy you roll your head; 

And sometimes weep for those who're dead. 
My youthful days will soon be past 

And hoary age will come at last. 
With fondest hopes, to endless day 

I soon will tread the shining way. 
Blest guardian! Thou hast pointed me 

Up to that land — Eternity. 

Lindside, Va. 

4. <{» * 

VERY IMPORTANT ABOUT THE HORSE. 



The stomach of a horse is a single bag and a very 
small one. It is too little to contain even an ordinary 
feed of oats. By the time that two-thirds of it has 
been swallowed, as much is passing out of the stom- 
ach as is being eaten. In consequence of this a very 
large proportion of a horse's food is not digested in 
the stomach, but is shoved along into, the bowels. 
The horse in a state of nature is an animal that is 
almsot always feeding. He cannot, like the cow or 
ox, pack away a large quantity of food, and then lie 
down and chew it thoroughly, nor indeed at all. — The 
New York Livery Stable. 



706 



THE INGLENOOK. 



EARTH'S STRANGEST PEOPLE. 



BY RICHARD SPAMER. 

The history of the Cliff Dwellers who to-day inhabit 
the famous Painted Desert of the Colorado in Ari- 
zona and adjacent territory in our great Southwest, 
goes back to the dawn of time. By their daily lives 
they form the connecting link between the nomadic 
tribes of our North American Indians and the modes 
and customs as now pursued by ourselves. They are 
called the Cliff Dwellers because they live in the cliffs 
and canyons of the vast region that stretches through 
Arizona and New Mexico. Their habitations are the 
former cavern occupied by the cave bear, the tiger 
and other big and terrible quadrupeds from whence 
the ancestors of the Cliff Dwellers drove the beasts and 
made their caves their semi-human abode. This dis- 
possession of the wild animals by these men was a 
labor of fiercest necessity. Their picturesque folk-lore 
tells of the invasion of their erstwhile homes in the 
river valleys by an implacable foe from the North, 
probably the ancestors of the Apaches, thousands of 
years ago. To forefend their own extermination and 
henceforth oppose the invaders, these Cliff Dwellers 
battled with the beasts of the mountain for possession 
of their dwelling places. They won, at what fearful 
cost no history tells, and in their victory they lost their 
very name. They henceforth were designated by their 
habits. Men called them Cliff Dwellers. But a meas- 
ure of compensation came to them. By reason of their 
now fixed abode the arts of peace grew among them. 
They became expert in the domestic arts. The weav- 
ing of blankets that puts to shame the mechanical 
skill of the white man's power loom, bead-work, iron- 
work and wondrous pottery began to be turned out 
"by them. They cultivated marvelous tribal customs ; 
they produced dancers the most agile and actors the 
most facile; a luminous oratory flourished among 
them, and this advancement was made by them, in all 
human probability, hundreds if not thousands of years 
before the keels of Columbus first vexed the Atlantic's 
waves. In modern times the Cliff Dwellers came to 
be known as Zunis and Mokis, and to-day for the first 
time in all their strange, eventful history, three hun- 
dred handsome and impressive members of the Zuni 
and Moki tribes have been brought to St. Louis where, 
in the Cliff Dwellers' concession they pursue their 
daily avocations precisely as in their mountain fast- 
nesses of the Colorado. An immense rock, over one 
hundred fee? in height, and otherwise massive and im- 
posing, has been placed at the disposal of these Cliff 
Dwellers, who straightway went to work to make it 
fit for their habitation. They modeled rooms and 
carved mysterious passages into it, and into these apart- 
ments they brought all their implements so that to all 



intents and purposes they might live in the heart of 
the metropolis of the Mississippi Valley just as they 
do at home. They have built a theatre in the center 
of a vast mountainous quadrangle, and in it they per- 
form the strangest of semi-savage rites, the eagle 
dance, the war dance, the peace dance and for the first 
time away from the Wolpi where, in. 1897, white men 
first saw this wondrously fascinating pagan ceremony, 
the Snake Dance, by which the Mokis implore their 
God, Gitche Manitou, for rain. At Wolpi, four days 
before the actual ceremony, the swiftest runners of 
the Mokis are sent forth by the tribe priests to gather 
in the hundreds of rattlesnakes, blue racers and every 
variety of poisonous reptiles employed in this strange 
pageantry, and the Moki priests not only handle them 
with impunity, but at the proper moment set them 
free so that in hunting their holes these serpents may 
tell the earth spirit that the priests have commanded 
them to open the clouds. It is authenticated that be- 
yond cavil that it always rains five days after the 
Snake Dance of the Mokis of Wolpi. This dance is 
reproduced at the Cliff Dwellers' concession at the 
World's Fair in all its native wizardy. It is the talk 
of the World's Fair to-day that no educational or scien- 
tific society, no aggregation of travelers, no coterie of 
cultured people has so far visited the Fair without go- 
ing to see the Cliff Dwellers and their weird and fas- 
cinating ceremonies. 

* ♦ ♦ 

THE SWEDE AHEAD. 



The Yankee is not the only fellow whose head is 
full of tricks, nor is he the only one who has the power 
of invention. Occasionally we find people from for- 
eign shores whose ideas make us open our eyes in 
surprise. This has been demonstrated recently by a 
Swede who has invented a telephone for army service. 
The telephone is peculiarly constructed by placing a 
dry cell within the cylinder of the 'phone, which in- 
cludes both the receiver and the mouth piece, and yet 
small enough to be carried in the pocket. Accom- 
panying each instrument may be carried 13,000 feet 
of thin copper wire by the aid of which he is constant- 
ly kept in connection with those who are his directors 
and superiors. Headquarters, fire brigades, police 
protection, scouts, spies and all of these are near at 
hand when this new invention becomes universal. It 
seems that the world is bent on turning all the blessings 
into cursings. This new device might be used in fur- 
thering civilization and for pleasure of the populace 
instead of being used for war. 

It is being gobbled right away by France, Italy. 
Spain, Portugal, United States, Great Britain, Austria, 
Russia, Greece and Turkey, which shows that we are 
seeking after a more rapid destruction of our fellow- 
man rather than the development of him. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



707 



THE POWERS OF WOMEN. 



BY CLEVELAND HOLLAR. 

Having read in the Inglenook and other papers 
about the attainments of women in this present age, I 
shall endeavor to write concerning the general powers 
of women, and their effect upon civilization. 

In the last several decades women have come very 
prominently to the front and have wrought many 
things so peculiarly characteristic of their natures that 
they have attracted a great deal of attention. They 
have become so popular and so accomplished in many 
works that, when in competition against men, the 
preferences are given to them instead of men. They 
are given much more respect by the public at large 
than it is customary to respect men. There must be 
some cause for this and many men have probably at- 
tributed this distinction to their own personal ability; 
but this does not coincide with the facts of history. 

In the days when the Pharaohs and the Shepherd 
kings ruled the land of Egypt, women were seldom 
mentioned; at the time of the Athenian supremacy 
they were looked upon as a degrading factor in society ; 
and even in the days of Rome they were still very far 
in the background. Surely if personal ability be their 
secret of success it would have manifested itself long 
before this, and they would have been recognized. 
Finding this improbable, we must look for some other 
cause. 

By tracing history from the time of the Roman su- 
premacy, we find a marked change in affairs, after the 
peoples who came in to possess the bequests of the 
dying empire had become settled and things began to 
take to themselves shape and form again. With the 
close of the Dark Ages woman seems to have emerged 
from her former state of obscurity, and to have donned 
in its embryonic stage, the brilliant attire in which she 
presents herself to the world to-day. But why was 
this ? And how was it brought about ? 

The facts are these : When these Germanic tribes en- 
tered the Roman provinces they were barbarians who 
had nothing to present to civilization except personal 
worth, respect for the gentler sex, and an aptitude for 
civilization. Their personal worth, however, was the 
most striking feature. It was the thing the world 
most needed at that time. But it must be remembered 
that was only an effect of a visible cause. Their per- 
sonal worth would not have been so great had it not 
been augmented by their respect for women ; and yet, 
queerest of all, their reverence for them was due only 
to the then prevalent idea that woman is peculiarly 
divine, excelled by the gods only. So it may plainly 
be seen that the whole thing hinges upon an old super- 
stition. And, though women surpass men in some 
works, it has been proven that man's brain power is 



the greater ; and that woman's great distinction to-day 
is due to the fact that we have inherited a great deal 
of our forefathers' superstition. 

This is an age wherein superstitious ideas are still 
prevalent. Many of the ideas and customs of the 
Germanic barbarians, our progenitors, have clung 
to us despite the tide of civilization that has swept 
over us. Take the case of Harriet Beecher Stowe, 
for instance. Were there not many other writings 
produced upon the same subject? Were not their 
authors as well qualified and of as brilliant intellects 
as she? And were not their words as well chosen 
and their points as well fixed? But did any of them 
produce the profound enthusiasm that Uncle Tom's 
Cabin has witnessed? Of course not. Uncle Tom's 
Cabin was produced' by feminine hand, and was so 
enthusiastically received rather for its feminine touch 
than for its superiority over man's productions, due 
to the old superstition that woman is ever man's su- 
perior. Joan of Arc presents a similar illustration. 

Personal ability, therefore, will not stand the test, 
and woman would be as far in the background to-day 
were it not for this old superstition, as she was in the 
days of the Pharaohs ; and Socrates, Plato, and Aris- 
totle and Caesar, Cicero and Cato. 

Their effect upon civilization has been wonderful in 
a moral way. Men in their reverence for them have 
omitted many of their former evil practices. And in 
a political sense, if we desire to carry it further, they 
have, through the instrumentality of the personal 
worth of men and the old superstition, blotted forever 
from the face of the earth the archaic age of civili- 
zation and are the grand ushers of this golden indus- 
trial age. 

We will all acknowledge that to cling to these old 
superstitious ideas is not the best ; yet it may be well 
that this one at least has clung to us, for whatsoever 
man worshipeth, if he thinks it to be divine, tendeth to 
draw him unto his best thoughts and actions. 

So it may be plainly seen that woman is not general- 
ly more worthy than man, for even her high esteem 
in social circles is only an assumed one, as proven 
above ; but that with popular sentiment in her favor, 
she has a greater influence and thus she has gained the 
ascendency. 

Hardin, Mo. 

«p «j* .j. 

Of the twenty-six barons who signed the Magna 
Charta, three wrote their names and twenty-three 
made their mark. This is all changed now. Every 
baron can write, but only a few succeed in making 
their mark. 

•> * * 

You can cry in secret, but you can't enjoy a joke 
alone. 



7o8 



HI 



INGLENOOK. 



GRAPE CULTURE IN KANSAS. 



BY ALPHA L. MILLER. 

Grapes as a moneymaker in Kansas are not as suc- 
xessful as they would be if higher cultivated or more 
.carefully cultivated, nevertheless grapes are produced 
in Kansas of excellent flavor, rich, dark color and of 
good size and compact bunches. They find a ready 
-market in nearby cities and towns. 

The peculiar soil of Wyandotte county, Kansas — a 
rich, sandy loam, deep subsoil and good drainage is 
-adapted to the culture of a good grade of grapes, and 
-many tons of the fruit are grown annually near Kan- 
sas City, Mo. 

The varieties grown are the Champion, Moore's 
Early, Warden and the Concord. 

The vineyard is started from cuttings, planted in 
rows. The plants or cuttings are planted in rows 
eight feet apart and set seven feet apart in the row. 
"The first year the young plant makes little progress. 
Cultivation is kept up all summer, and the plant is 
; also hoed and ~kept free of all weeds. No trellis is 
needed at this period of the plant's existence; but a 
.-stake is driven close to the plant to protect it from 
-the passing plow. 

The second year the vine is trimmed rather close; 
-only a couple of shoots are left, these are tied to the 
-trellis — a wire stapled to posts set two rods apart 
in the vine row, and are kept well cultivated and hoed 
during the summer. The vine does not yield much 
the first year, — some kinds not at all, and the fruit 
is of poor quality. 

The third year two more wires have been added 
to the trellis, making three wires in all ; this is all that 
is required. 

The vines are trimmed in early spring, all the vines 
or branches are removed except four of the thriftiest 
branches of the stalk. These are usually the branches 
that grow near the bottom of the stalk next the 
ground. On these branches are left four joints or buds, 
and the branch is severed a little past the fourth bud 
or joint, then these branches are tied to the trellis 
wire with wrapping yarn. The two top branches are 
tied to the second and third wire, the other two 
branches, the lower and the outside ones, are tied to 
the first and second wire. 

In the latter part of May the branches are trimmed 
again, this is called summer trimming. Each bud on 
the four branches sends out a fruit stem or branch, 
this is what bears the fruit, and to get firmer and bet- 
ter bunches this fruit stem is severed at the fourth 
bud, leaving just four bunches of grapes to the start- 
ing bud, sixteen to the branch and sixty-four to each 
„-stalk or vine. A little later in the summer the new 



bearing branches for the next year are selected and 
tied to the trellis. 

The cultivation for the third year is even more 
thorough than before and every weed is destroyed. 

The vine bears pretty well on this year, and just as 
soon as the fruit begins to ripen it is removed with a 
sharp knife from the stalk, all the green and imperfect 
berries are removed, and the bunches are placed in ten 
pound baskets to be sent to market. 

The yield of a vine four or five years old is about 
ten pounds and from one ton to three tons to the acre. 
Many bunches measure eight inches in length and are 
plump and compact. 

I will illustrate the varieties of planting and the dif- 
ferences in the ripening of the fruit. One vineyard is 
on a northern slope, the rows are fully nine feet apart 
and run north and south. This fruit ripens a little 
late, it is of extra fine flavor and very juicy, with large 
berry and long bunches. 

Another vineyard is one planted on a terraced south- 
ern slope, each row rising above the other. The 
vines are planted east and west and the rows are scant 
eight feet apart. This fruit, although of the same 
variety as the former, ripens much sooner and the 
bunches are not near so large. The berry is of good 
flavor, but smaller. 

Another vineyard on the same place, of the Concord 
variety, is twenty-six years old and still bears good 
fruit. 

The fruit is nearly all marketed in Kansas City, Mo. 
From there it is hauled or shipped to suburban towns. 
It commands a fair price, depending on the yield and 
quality. The price varies from one-fourth cent a 
pound to five cents and sales are either by the single 
basket or by the whole load, one hundred baskets mak- 
ing a fair sized load. The grape market was good 
last year in Kansas City, owing to the scarcity of 
blackberries and raspberries. The price averaged 
about or nearly two cents a pound. 

Olathe, Kans. 

* * * 

OILED ROADS IN CALIFORNIA. 



Santa Clara county, in California, began oiling 
roads in 1892, and now has about seventy miles of 
such highways. The results have been, according to 
the State Bureau of Public Highways, on the whole, 
highly satisfactory. In the first stages of the experi- 
menting with oil sprinkling there were strenuous ob- 
jections by some of the people to this method of im- 
proving the highways. The chief grievance was the 
fact that when the oil was first applied it rendered the 
road disagreeable to travel upon and had a tendency to 
soil vehicles and clothing. This, however, proved to 
be only a temporary trouble, as in a few days, when the 



-r hi 



INGLENOOK. 



709 



oil had been properly worked in and the surface 
smoothed and packed by thorough rolling, sufficed to 
harden the surface and keep it clean. It was soon 
realized that the inconvenience caused by the first ap- 
plication of oil was not nearly so great as was caused 
by the first application of gravel. In the latter case it 
requires nearly a year for the road to become packed 
and smooth, while with oil the time required to put 
it in readiness for easy and dustless travel is only a few 
days. Oil has the advantage over water in the fact 
that where applied there is absolutely no dust, and 
where the roadbed is properly prepared there is prac- 
tically no mud during the rainy season. 

The cost per mile of watering the valley roads of 
Santa Clara county has averaged about $87 per season, 
exclusive of the cost of water, expenditures for water 
wagons, repairs, etc., and with that added the cost per 
mile per annum has been about $123. The cost of oil- 
ing a mile of road the first season is about $90. For 
the second season about $50, with a decreasing expense 
each season following. This estimate includes the en- 
tire expense of oiling, and shows a saving over water 
of $33 per mile the first year and $73 per mile the sec- 
ond year, a saving in expense which is pretty 
sure to appeal strongly to the taxpayers. In applying 
the oil, Glover's road-oiling wagon and other wagons, 
with tank and sprinkler attached, have been used. 
From 100 to 400 barrels a mile have been used on the 
first application of oil to the roadbed, depending to 
some extent upon the width oiled, ordinarily about 
twelve feet. The famous " Alameda," between San 
Jose and Santa Clara, is oiled to a width of sixty feet. 
The oil is heated by steam to a temperature of 300 de- 
grees at a cost of eight cents a barrel, the expansion 
resulting being about three per cent. The quantity 
used per mile is estimated after heating. Bakersfield 
oil is used, of a specific gravity of fourteen to seven- 
teen degrees, costing ninety cents per barrel and up- 
ward, according to the distance to be hauled from the 
railroad station. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 

PENNSYLVANIA GERMAN AND THE COLLEGE. 



DY D. C. REBER. 

First, the amount of Pennsylvania German spoken. 
Second, the amount of educational advantages enjoyed 
in the public schools before going to college. 

The Pennsylvania German dialect affects the col- 
lege student most in the acquisition of correct articula- 
tion and pronunciation of the English language. He 
will therefore realize the greatest difficulty in acquir- 
ing the English accent and in overcoming the German 
brogue. But his vernacular will also prove disad- 
vantageous to him somewhat in constructive work in 
English both oral and written, such as debating, ex- 



temporaneous speaking and formal composition work. 
German idioms which present themselves continually 
must be overcome and English idioms have to be 
learned. 

To suppose a case, a young man is reared in a home 
where Pennsylvania German is spoken exclusively, but 
.he receives a good common school education, even 
through a village high school. At seventeen or eight- 
een he attends college. If he stays in college long 
enough to finish a course of two years or more, and 
speaks English exclusively during this time, he may 
leave college experiencing no hindrance in thinking or 
speaking. 

The most unfavorable case to be supposed, on the 
other hand, is where Pennsylvania German is the 
mother tongue and no school advantages are had after 
the age of ten or twelve years. If such an individual 
enters a college at eighteen or twenty, it is very likely 
that he will have great difficulty in thinking in Eng- 
lish as well as in expressing his thought orally. The 
odds are very much against such an individual. And 
it is only by the proper kind of sympathy and en- 
couragement on the teacher's part and a great deal of 
determination on the pupil's part that success in school 
can be obtained under such circumstances. 

Another source of discouragement to the Pennsyl- 
vania German in college is that his peculiar brogue 
noticeable in conversation and recitation may furnish 
occasion for amusement or even ridicule for his fel- 
low-students. If he is timid or backward, this may 
be a serious annoyance to his comfort and may prove 
an obstacle in his career as a student. 

But fortunately, in the onward march of education- 
al progress, Pennsylvania German as a mother tongue 
is rapidly going into disuse, so that what has proven 
a perplexing problem to the professor of elocution is 
now no longer such, comparatively speaking. 

Thus far I have discussed only the unfavorable 
phase of the question. May there not, however, be 
some advantage in a young man's being able to speak 
this local dialect? If he ever takes up the study of 
classic German, it will prove helpful in getting a Ger- 
man vocabulary and German word-order more easily 
than his English classmate can get them. 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

+ * + 

SOMEBODY. 



Somebody did a splendid deed; 
Somebody proved a friend in need; 
Somebody sang a beautiful song; 
Somebody smiled the whole day long; 
Somebody thought. " 'Tis sweet to live;" 
Somebody said. " I'm glad to give; " 
Somebody fought a gallant fight; 
Somebody lived to shield the right; 
Was that somebody you? 



710 



THE INGLENOOK. 



mlKSLtKSOK: 



A Weekly Magazine 



DON'T EXAGGERATE. 



...PUBLISHED BY.. 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILL. 
Subscription Price, $1.00 per Annum. 



The Inglenook is a publication devoted to interesting and entertaining 
literature. It contains nothing of a character to prevent its presence in 
any home. 

Contributions are solicited, but there is no guarantee either of their ac- 
ceptance or return. All contributions are carefully read, and if adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magaz.ne, will be used. The management 
will not be responsible for unsolicited articles. 

Agents are wanted, and specimen numbers will be supplied as needed. 

In giving a change of address state where you are now getting the pa- 
per, as otherwise the change cannot be made. Subscriptions may be made 
at any time, either for a year or part of a year. Address, 

Brethren Publishing House, 

(For the Inglenook.) 22-24 South State St., ELGIN, ILL. 



Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



GOT A MATCH? 



Not long since while walking down the street we 
chanced to meet two young Americans who attracted 
our attention on their approach. On coming closer, 
one of them looked up into our faces and said, " Mr., 
got a match?" We shook our heads and passed on. 
The longer we thought, the more we thought. It was 
easy to tell, by the pinched-up face, sallow complexion, 
sunken eyes, stooped shoulders, careless gait, what 
he wanted with a " match." On his face in glowing 
letters of truth was it written, " This boy is a cigar- 
ette fiend." WANTED A MATCH! Poor fellow; 
little did he realize that inch by inch, hour by hour, he 
was burning away his young manhood. The dearest 
friend he had in the world might tell him in tender- 
est words of the appalling danger into which he was 
falling, and it would have sounded to him foolishness, 
for the influence of his enemy had become so fixed 
in the tissues of his body that he could not longer 
resist the temptation. 

Got a match? We could hardly keep from telling 
him that his match was in the inebriate asylum, the 
hospital, and the grave. 

It is a battle to fight when one is compelled to re- 
sist the temptation of preaching sermons to such speci- 
mens of fallen humanity. - 

Would to God that some means might be' brought 
to bear upon such conditions as this, so that the young 
men might " see themselves as others see them." 



Hardly a day passes by but some or all of us are 
more or less guilty of exaggerating. It is one of the 
easiest habits into which one can fall. There are so 
many names for it. Some people call it a " white lie," 
some " a stretched blanket " and a multitude of other 
names, any or all of which are very significant. And 
while exaggerate sounds rough, yet it is about the 
smoothest name that can be applied. One is hardly 
cognizant of how some things sound until he has had 
time to reflect. 

The other day there were some men on the street 
talking about the many things that street-talkers talk 
about ; among other things the question of " poor 
land " came in their way. One fellow was from 
southern Illinois ; he said they were bothered with 
hardpan in their soil, and that the soil was so thin 
that the hardpan stuck out of the ground as high as 
the third wire of the fence. The other fellow, who 
had become dissatisfied with his home in southern 
Indiana, said they were not bothered with hardpan 
down there, but with hills and clay knobs, and that 
their soil was so thin that a man could not raise any- 
thing; not even the interest on a note. 

The Kentuckian standing by said they had 
land at home that was poorer than that. He said they 
had some that was so void of fertility that a man 
could not even raise his voice. This seemed to end 
the controversy on that point. The conversation then 
drifted towards the weather, and several passing re- 
marks were made about the excessive heat. When 
they were through a man from Nebraska said, " You 
fellers hain't got it hot here. Out West we had to 
put ice in the ponds to keep the ducks from laying 
hard-boiled eggs." 

Now you can see, by listening to a conversation 
of this kind how it sounds when you get to exag- 
gerating. While a great many times such things are 
said or spoken for the fun of the thing, yet some 
people are not prepared to take such things in jest, 
but insist on taking them in earnest. Here is where 
the folly of exaggeration comes in. We are not al- 
ways able to know upon whom we have influence 
in speech, action and life. 

* * * 
WHITE LIES. 



It is possible that you may be able to recall from 
the time of your earliest recollections many references 
that have been made in your presence of " White 
Lies." Have you ever considered the subject closely? 
Did it ever occur to you that a lie was a lie, whether 
it was large or small, white or black, bond or free? 
And has it been demonstrated to you that a little white 



THE - INGLENOOK. 



711 



lie becomes black the moment it strikes the air, and is 
as black as any lie that hell can invent. 

The object that some people have in using these 
zvhite lies is to evade the truth, and in the evasion of 
the truth it is equal to telling the untruth. It is ad- 
missible that it is not always compulsory nor absolute- 
ly necessary to tell all the truth all the time, at all 
places, not as a matter of legality, but a matter of ex- 
pediency. However, this admission does not legalize 
the evasion of the truth when it should be spoken. 
There are people in the world who could not be hired 
for any reasonable amount of money, to go into one's 
bedroom and take money out of their clothing, but 
these very same individuals would cram a fifteen- 
year-old boy down in the car seat to evade the pay- 
ment of a rightful fare that rightfully belongs to the 
railroad company. There are men who would pay 
every cent they owe in a business transaction and 
would not be guilty of obtaining goods under false pre- 
tense from their neighbors, but would sit down on 
the rail fence by the cornfield, under a shade tree, 
and deliberately lie to the assessor about the amount 
of goods they possess that are assessable. They try to 
make themselves believe that it is all right to evade the 
payment of taxes because they go to the government. 
These men have neighbors, no doubt, who would not 
think of cheating any of their neighbors or friends in 
a trade, but who would coolly and calmly haul two- 
thirds of a load of gravel on the roads and charge the 
supervisor up with a full load. This little white lie is 
all right because they are working for the township. 

Have any of these little zvhite lies ever come under 
your observation? Has the devil ever come right close 
to you and whispered in your ear that these little 
evasions are only white lies and are not wrong, and 
that it is necessary to stretch the truth a little some- 
times in order to get there? Has the devil ever suc- 
ceeded in getting you to ridicule the " George Wash- 
ington-hatchet-cherry-tree-story " ? Be it remembered 
that these white lies not only turn black as soon as 
the air strikes them, but they are the most contagious 
of all poisonous contagions. No sooner do you give 
birth to one of them than it makes you free and easy, 
and unconscious of the pain that it requires to be the 
parent of another which is greater in dimensions and 
more far-reaching in its influence. These white lies 
are detrimental to society, church and state. They 
are the mask of the hypocrite and the sword of the 
political demagogue and shield of the social impostor. 

Would to God that the Inglenook family would 
make a strong effort to renovate our homes of this 
terrible enemy to better civilization. It is our desire, 
wishes and prayer that the boys and girls of the 
Inglenook fraternity may become flowers of society, 
pillars of the church and state, and angels in heaven. 



TOO SLOW FOR US. 



Amid the hustle and bustle of the Western civiliza- 
tion we find that most of us become so impatient that 
we say " things are very slow." But in this country 
we do not understand the meaning of the term " slow." 
If our commercial men who leave the hotel two min- 
utes before train time and stand around the ticket 
window waiting for mileage, on one foot, under the 
extreme pressure of half a minute, then pace up and 
down the platform for about fifteen seconds, looking 
up and down the track to see if " she's coming," — if 
they could only see the leisure with which European 
commercial men saunter down the street or in the cab, 
smoking their cigar, it would put them to utter dis- 
gust and impatience. 

If, on entering the hotel, they could see the stewards 
taking an order, going to the nearest shop for steak 
and preparing it, giving them plenty of time to deliber- 
ately read the morning news, it would so shock the 
nerves of the Western men that they would not enjoy 
their dinner when they had it. 

If our business men who are in the habit of using 
eight or ten stenographers to discharge the volume of 
their daily work could just once be entangled in a 
business transaction with some oriental man, who is 
called a splendid business man in that country, and 
bargain and bargain with him for half a day, getting 
very impatient only to return and take up the business 
another day, etc., for a period of weeks before the 
trade could be completed, they would wish themselves 
back on American soil. These people who growl and 
grumble at our limited express trains and our three- 
railed trolleys that run fifty miles per hour, and our 
rapid street transit, if they could only be in Japan and 
get into a little railroad car, just large enough to hold 
four persons, propelled by three Japs walking along 
behind pushing the car on a two-foot gauge track over 
a very hilly and crooked route, their impatience no 
doubt would reach its zenith. 

It would be delightful to see some of our nervous 
westerners, who, sitting at their desk with the receiver 
in one hand and the mouthpiece in the other, yelling 
at the central girl to give them a certain connection, 
and wondering why they all wanted to use the 'phone 
at once. If they could only be in Turkish dominion 
just a little while and endeavor to send a telegram 
across the country, and the agent would hand the dis- 
patch to some Arab, who would deliver it on horseback. 
and they would find that it had not arrived within a 
week from the time of sending, then their Yankee 
blood would boil until Fahrenheit would not be able 
to register it. 

* * * 

It is sometimes easier to prove a lie than it is to 
prove the truth, but you cannot prove so long. 



712 



THE INQLENOOK. 



CURRENT HAPPENINGS 



WILL BE PHOTOGRAPHED. 



HE GOES A-WOOING. 



King AlphonsoXIII is donning himself in his best, 
preparatory to go a-wooing. Unless something ma- 
terially changes his plan, the latter part of July will 
find him in England asking for the hand of Princess 
Victoria, who is the daughter of the Duke of Con- 
naught. He goes under the blanket of the office, as his 
visit is to be to the courts of the king and his fellow- 
rulers, but society gossips say that Cupid has been 
getting in his effective work. 

Alphonso was eighteen years old last spring; his 
sweetheart celebrated her eighteenth birthday last win- 
ter. The father of his intended is wealthy and it may 
be seen with eyes that are not the eyes of a prophet 
that there is just a tincture of state policy in the whole 
affair. Alphonso needs money. Spain needs the al- 
liance of the British Empire, and besides the marriage 
of the young king into the family of a brother to the 
king of England is no mean thing. 

This little piece of diplomacy is said to have been 
planned by Maria Christina, who is delighted at the 
present prospect of affairs, however there is no pos- 
sibility of a conflict. 

The king of Spain is a Catholic, while his lady is a 
Protestant, but it is said that Sarto has made satisfac- 
tory arrangements, and it is quietly reported that the 
young princess may become a Catholic before long. 

* * * 

STATISTICS OF THE STRIKE. 



Strikers in Chicago, 18,000. 

Others thrown out of work, 10,000. 

Strikers in all cities, 50,000. 

Idle in St. Joseph, Mo., 8,000; in Kansas City. 
8,000; in Ft. Worth, Texas, 1,500; in South Omaha, 
4,000; in East St. Louis, 5,000; in St. Paul, Minn., 
1,000; in New York, 1,000; at minor points, 4,000. 

Cities affected, nine. 

Strikers' demands : Uniform wage scale ; the mini- 
mum pay for unskilled labor to be the maximum here- 
tofore, 1834 cents an hour and ten hours. 

Agreements for all departments ; above all else, rec- 
ognition of the Union. 

Daily loss in wages, $50,000. 

Daily loss in business to packers, estimated, one 
million dollars. 
Average daily receipts of cattle, 12,000. 
Average daily receipts of hogs, 20,000. 
Average daily receipts of sheep, 11,000. 
Average daily receipts of calves, 800. 



The Dowager Empress of China, has, so it is re- 
ported, commanded the attendance of a Japanese pho- 
tographer at the palace to take her portrait. The rea- 
son for Her Majesty's decision to be photographed is 
that the people may be able to worship her imperial 
image, as in Japan. Having her photograph taken is a 
new experience to the Empress, and is a proof of her 
progressive ideas, for in days past any attempt to de- 
pict her would have been considered an act of sacri- 
lege. 

* * * 

Fred Pacik, a boy fourteen years of age, has made 
himself famous as a traveler, although he is nothing 
but the ordinary boot-black. Four years ago, when he 
was a boy of ten, he left his home in San Francisco, as 
a mascot of Company A, First California Regiment, 
going to the Philippines, arid Fred has continued wan- 
dering ever since. He has never paid any railroad 
fare nor steamship fare, and seems to be proud to 
boast of it. He carries no baggage and has no valise. 
The clothes he wears and his " shine box " is his en- 
tire paraphernalia. This " shine box " is a queer-look- 
ing sight. Fred has been in almost every country in 
the world, having traveled from San Francisco, around 
to New York, and his " shine box " on the sides and 
ends is literally covered with coins, beer checks and 
medalions that he has gathered through the countries 
where he has shined. This shows what a boy of de- 
termination will do under adverse circumstances. If 
boys of good raising could be endowed with that sort 
of determination, they would turn the world upside 
down. 

* ♦ * 

A sad accident has happened to the Doremus Con- 
gregational Sunday school at 6:55 last Wednesday 
evening, near Glenwood, 111. Engineer F. E. Hoxey 
of engine No. 144 must bear the blame ! On passing 
through the village of Glenwood he was accosted by 
J. W. Smott who had overheard the orders to stop 
No. 144 and allow an excursion of Sunday school 
scholars to pass. Smoot begged Hoxey to get off the 
south-bound track, and after a while he consented, but 
it was too late, the excursion came crashing into a 
few of the coal cars which had been lost at a small 
grade not far behind, killing seventeen and injuring 
one hundred and twenty. If Hoxey had had ten sec- 
onds more he would have removed the cars and pre- 
vented the accident. 

*•> •$• ♦ 

One day last week, near Oakford, 111., a terrible 
cyclone passing through the country, caught a mov- 
ing passenger train, lifting the cars high into the air 
and instantly killing the baggagemaster. No other 
serious damage done. 



the: inglenook. 



713 



Mrs. Mary Baker G. Eddy, the founder of the 
Christian Science denomination, has caused a new 
rule to be added to the laws of her church for the pro- 
tection of herself from annoying intrusion by her ad- 
miring followers: It is headed: "Thou Shalt Not 
Steal." It says : " Neither a Christian Scientist, his 
student, or his patient, not a member of the Mother 
Church, shall daily and continuously haunt the Eddy's 
drive by meeting her one hour every day when she 
goes out, on penalty of being disciplined and dealt 
with justly by her church. Mrs. Eddy objects to said 
intrusion, inasmuch as she desires one hour for herself. 
And she who, forty years, has ' borne the burden and 
heat of the day ' should be allowed this. The only 
exception to this by-law is on public occasions when 
she has the privilege of seeing others and of being 
seen." 

* * * 

German papers say that the present condition of 
Colorado is a disgrace to civilization. Wonder what 
they think about the condition of affairs in Russia, 
Armenia, Manchuria, and the Mountains of Lebanon, 
and other places closer home. It might stir up a feel- 
ing of barbarism or uncivilization when Germany suc- 
ceeds in stopping the Russian ships from relieving 
the German Lloyd steamships of their mails. It is 
easy to tell our neighbors how to do when they are 
in trouble, but when we have troubles of our own 
sometimes we are subject to their remarks as well. 

* * * 

During the past year the American Sunday-school 
Union has established 2,542 new Bible schools. There 
have been many conversions in these schools and 
those previously established by the society; has estab- 
lished 133 churches, developed from the schools. Its 
agents have made 221,568 visits to families in sec- 
tions where there are no churches or pastors ; have dis- 
tributed 27,161 copies of the Bible among needy fam- 
ilies and in the school established by the society ; and 
259 missionaries have labored in the neglected sections 
in forty-two States and Territories. 



At Boston, Mass., one of the largest grain elevators 
in the world was destroyed by fire during the past 
week. The flames from this building damaged two 
other buildings, owned by the same company, which 
caused a loss of one million dollars. The fire was 
caused by lightning. 

*fr 4» •$• 

" Their fate is but the common fate of all." Mark 
Twain (Samuel L. Clemens) and his two daughters 
arrived, last week, from Italy, on the steamship "Prinz 
Oskar," bringing with them the body of Mrs. Clem- 
ens, who died recently in that country. Interment at 
Elmira, New York. 



A cloudburst over the hills northeast of Manila 
caused a flood which has destroyed San Juan del 
Monte. Two hundred lives were lost. The low-lying 
districts were inundated. The homes of Americans 
and foreigners are isolated. Transportation through 
the streets is carried on in boats only. Rain has fall- 
en for twenty-seven hours, totally seventeen and one- 
fifth inches, which is unprecedented. Communica- 
tion with outside places is interrupted. The damage to 
property is estimated at $2,000,000. 

* * * 

The French government is prepared to adopt for- 
cible measures to obtain order in Morocco and carry 
out the plans for French supervision of the customs. 
Three cruisers are held in readiness to proceed to Mo- 
rocco if tribal disturbances near Tangier threaten to in- 
terfere with the execution of these plans. France is 
acting in cooperation with the Sultan, but advices in- 
dicate that some of the tribes, including the followers 
of Raisuli are seeking to prevent the carrying out of 
the customs supervision which the Sultan granted to 
France. 

*s» * * 

The London Times correspondent at Ragoon says 
that Captain E. R. Rost, of the Indian medical service, 
has succeeded in cultivating the bacillus of leprosy and 
has made a substance from the cultures which he calls 
leprolein, and which, when injected into lepers has 
marked beneficial action, alleviating the symptoms of 
the disease. Over one hundred cases of leprosy are 
being treated in Burmah by injection of this substance 
and the treatment is also being tried in thirty places in 
India. Already four cases have been reported cured 
and in the great majority of those under treatment the 
improvement is marked. 

* ♦ «> 

During the revolution of Ecuador, and prior to this 
time, General Flores had taken great part in Ecua- 
doran politics. During the latter part of the revolu- 
tion, about 1895, General Flores was exiled, the con- 
servative administration having been overthrown by 
the revolution. News now comes under the Associ- 
ated Press Dispatch that General Reinaldo Flores died 
at Lima, July 4. 

* * * 

Russf.ll Sage says that he is in favor of the Presi- 
dential candidates running on their merits without 
using any money in the campaign. This is certain- 
ly right from a financial, social and patriotic stand- 
point. 

.j. $ $ 

Professor Marks, of the Training School of Louis- 
ville, Ky., refused admission to four Filipino stu- 
dents on the ground that they were colored. 



714 



THE INGlENOOK. 



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The Inglenook Nature Study Club 



This Department of the Inglenook is the organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized 
over this country. Each issue of the magazine will be complete in itself. Clubs may be organized at any time, 
taking the work up with the current issue. Back numbers cannot be furnished. Any school desiring to or- 
ganize a club can ascertain the methods of procedure by addressing the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin. 111. 

t* V 'I 1 '*' 'I' V ^ 



, A ■*,.<*«> . t . . ♦ . fr ■ * . .fr ■ ?■ ■!■ •%> ' H' ■ ! ■ ' ! ■ ■ !"* ■ ■ > *?"$* 



NAMING THE FORGET-ME-NOT. 



FIGHT WITH ALLIGATOR. 



F. C. Woods, Muncie, Ind., sends this little gem, the au- 
thorship of which he does not know. 

When to the flowers so beautiful 

The Father gave a name, 

Back came a little blue-eyed one; 

All timidly it came. 

And standing at its Father's feet, 

And gazing in His face, 

It said in low and trembling tones, 

" Dear God, the name Thou gavest me, 

Alas, I have forgot!" 

Kindly the Father looked Him down 

And said, " Forget-Me-Not." 

REVIEW QUESTIONS. 



How many known species of birds are there? 

In what way are they classified? 

What are the two divisions ? 

What are the orders of land birds? 

Name the orders of water birds. 

Describe the characteristics of the Raptores. 

What is said of their habits? 

What is noticeable in their plumage? 

Name the families of this order. 

How do hawks differ from owls? 

Describe the characteristics of the Raptores. 

Which family of this order is nocturnal ? 

Describe the turkey buzzard. 

Note. — These questions are put here for your bene- 
fit. If you look at them and do not review them for 
the sake of the study it will not be the fault of the 
class or the Inglenook. We hope all our boys and 
girls will do this and thus prepare for an examina- 
tion on the whole class of Aves sometime in the fu- 
ture when we have covered the ground. No doubt 
while you have been studying these lessons you have 
found a great deal more than was in the lesson text. 
Next week we will have a lesson on another family 
of this order that always sit or perch on a branch or 
pole. They are called preaching birds or Insessores. 
See what you can find out about them until the Nook 
reaches vou. 



Of late years alligators seem to be acquiring a bad 
habit of prowling around the harbor foreshores of 
Port Darwin, South Africa. At dusk one day an 
aboriginal, rejoicing in the name of Mubbleburra, em- 
ployed on a pearling lugger, divested himself of his 
scanty attire with the intention of having a dip. 
He was swimming and was about midway between 
the shore and the boat when a huge alligator sud- 
denly arose alongside of him. The reptile struck 
Mubbleburra on the side of the head with one of 
its forepaws, one of the claws penetrating the man's 
face and inflicting a severe injury. In the next 
instant it seized its victim in its jaws and inflicted 
some terrible wounds in the man's shoulder and 
back. A more horrible and apparently hopeless po- 
sition cannot well be conceived. Any white man 
similarly circumstanced would probably have yield- 
ed up the ghost forthwith. 

Probably some old tribal stories of hair-breadth 
escapes from similar tight corners flashed through 
his mind. In any case, with great courage and 
coolness he wriggled himself around and managed 
to insert his thumbs in the eye sockets of the alli- 
gator with such force and effect that the brute let 
go its hold and beat a temporary retreat. Muddle- 
burra, torn and bleeding as he was, immediately 
dived to the bottom, and struck out in the direction 
of the boat. Coming up occasionally for breath, he 
appears to have dodged the alligator and succeeded 
in scrambling into the dingy. As he did so the 
brute, which had been following him, made a rush 
and bit through or broke the painter of the boat — 
a new I %-inch rope — within six inches of the stem. 
Muddleburra broke a limb from one of the man- 
grove trees and paddled himself ashore. Ques- 
tioned concerning his adventure later, Muddleburra 
said : " My word, suppose that one young, strong 
pfeller alligator, me die quick ; that one old pfeller 
— no more too much strong quick pfeller." 

We learn that Muddleburra is in a fair way 
toward complete recovery after his unique, or, at 
least, sensational experience; but until he is planted 
away in some tree in his final bark envelope, he 
will be able to show scars on his person attesting 
to the truth of his tale. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



715 



A LION. 



We think it would be an excellent thing if all chil- 
dren were as sensitive to praise and blame as the dog 
in the following story. And if Lion felt so much 
mortification over coming into the parlor with muddy 
feet, cannot our boys be a little more careful than 
he was even? 

A Newfoundland dog owned by a New Orleans 
lady gave an entertaining illustration of the fact that 
in some way dogs comprehend what is said to them. 

One day a lady called on his mistress, and during 
her visit Lion came in rather shyly, lay down on the 
parlor carpet and went to sleep. The conversation 
ran on, and the visitor finally said : 

" What a handsome Newfoundland dog you have." 

Lion opened one eye. 

" Yes," said the mistress, " he is a very good dog, 
and takes excellent care of the children." Lion 
opened the other eye and waved his tail complacently 
to and fro on the carpet. " When the baby goes out 
he always goes with her and I feel sure that no harm 
can come to her," his mistress continued. Lion's tail 
thumped up and down violently on the carpet. " And 
he is so gentle to them all, and such a playmate and 
companion to them, that we would not take $1,000 
for him." Lion's tail now went up and down, to 
and fro, and round and round with great, undis- 
guised glee. " But," said the mistress, " Lion has 
one serious fault." Total subsidence of Lion's tail, 
together with the appearance of an expression of great 
concern on his face. " He will come in here with 
his dirty feet and lie down on the carpet when I have 
told him time and again that he mustn't do it." 

At this point Lion would doubtless have remon- 
strated if he could ; but, being speechless, he arose 
with an air of the utmost dejection and humiliation 
and slunk out of the room, with his lately exuberant 
tail totally crestfallen. — D\imb Animals. 
* * * 
THE TREE TOAD. 



Early in the Spring he crawls from the water, and 
:. little later he climbs trees where he peeps and 
chirps because it is going to rain or because it is not, 
as the case may be, and according to your own idea of 
things. Some think it is because the sun is going 
to shine or because the wind is going to blow and 
some don't, it is owing to how much superstition you 
have been raised on as to these things. 

In fact he is a croaker; some of these tree toads 
are brown with white spots ; some are olive brown 
with red spots ; others have yellowish colors with 
black and white spots, and still another kind of a 
light color with a black cross on his back. They are 
about two inches long when standing on the ground. 
When winter shuts down on him he sneaks away in- 
to his hiding place until Spring comes again. 

MANY A TIME. 



A gkeat many of our Nature Study class on a sum- 
mer evening, no doubt, have heard, in the tree near 
by, a screeching tree toad. And in all probability 
some who read this article have been guilty of trying 
to find the little fellow, and after a long, long search 
\<>u may have been successful. 

If you have been the lucky one, you have found 
that this little fellow is exceedingly small accdrding 
to the amount of noise he makes. Strange as it mav 
seem to you this dry land tree toad is hatched in the 
water; In- is hitched from a jelly covered e^s^; next he 
becomes a tadpole, and finally he comes out of the wa- 
ter .1 little froq-. 



The size and weight of the body of fowls figures 
largely in their being able to move quickly. Have 
you ever driven down the road in your carriage and 
suddenly come upon a flock of geese on the narrow 
road? And did you drive straight through the flock? 
If you did, did you run over one? Not one time in 
ten thousand can you succeed in getting a wheel of 
the vehicle across the neck of one of these lubberly 
fowls, even if one were mean enough to desire such 
a thing. They are under the very wheels of the 
carriage and between the hoofs of the horses, and 
yet they manage somehow to flap and waddle until 
they are across the dead line and reach the realm of 
safety. Bodily they are very stupid, corpulent and 
lazy, nevertheless they are generally equal to any 
emergency. 

THE SANDPIPER. 



Sometime ago the Philadelphia Times gave an in- 
teresting account of a naturalist of Brazil who made 
an expedition up the Amazon river to one of the many 
islands there for the purpose of shooting spoonbills, 
ibises and other magnificent birds which abounded 
there. His design was completely baffled. By the 
time he had reached the coveted spot a wretched little 
sandpiper, having taken notice of his approach, pre- 
ceded him continually and constantly uttering his 
telltale cry, which arouses the feeling of fear of every 
single bird in hearing distance. Throughout the en- 
tire day did this individual bird continue its self-im- 
posed duty of sentinel to others, effectually prevent- 
ing the approach of the hunter to the game, and he 
managed to keep out of range of his gun. 

This instance shows an extra amount of instinct. 



yi6 



THE INGLENOOK. 




HOME DEPARTMENT 




THAT FEATHER BED. 




/ 

NEATNESS IN DRESS AT HOME. 



BY M. C. WILCOX. 

Sing we of that feather bed, 

Cause of dull and aching head, 

Cause of lassitude and languish, 

Cause of sleepless nights and anguish, 

Friend of nightmares— horrid visions, 

Never bringing sweet Elysians. 

Lingereth its memory yet, 

For we never can forget, 

All the evil it hath brought us, 

All the lessons it hath taught us, 

All the headache, stupor, dullness — 

Of all evils, complete fullness, 

Coming from " the long ago." 
" Grandmother's feather bed, you know," 
" Her grandmother's too," they say, 
" Nursed the sick ones all the way." 

Yes, it did, and still it holds 

Disease germs within its folds, 

Typhoid, typhus leave their stamp, 

Foul and poisonous gases damp. 

Fetid exhalations foul, 

Like infernal demons prowl, 

Driving all sweet thoughts away, 

Bringing longings for the day, 

Bringing aches in heart and head, 

Oh, that cruel feather bed! 

Hydra head and forked tongue, 

Lurk the feather beds among, 

Lurking demons dwell within 

That compendium of sin, 
" Multum in parvo " can be said 

Of that fertile feather bed. 

If my rhyme doth merit meed, 

'Tis by chance we're all agreed; 

But if it doth merit blame, 

On the feathers rest the shame; 

Feather beds have been the cause 

That has altered freedom's laws 

Brings no rest to tired head, 

Brings but pains and aches instead. 

Give us straw, or husks, or springs, 

Hair or cotton — that which brings 

Sweet repose to weary brain 

With no evil in its train. 

Hear us mothers! Hear us wives! 

Hear for sake of human lives! 

Hear us maidens, daughters hear! 

Away with feathers, never fear, 

Give us floor with blanket spread 

Rather than " that feather bed." 
* * * 
It isn't a good plan to make the home attractive. 
Life is a serious matter and shouldn't be wasted in 
enjoyments, no matter if they are innocent. 




The importance of neat, tasteful house dressing 
can not be over estimated. The matron who appears 
before the members of her family in a shabby, soiled 
■' wrapper, and makes the excuse — if, indeed, she takes 
the trouble to make one at all — that " it is so much 
more comfortable," has little idea of the possible con- 
sequences of such a course. 

Could she but realize that her dress is an evil ex- 
ample to her daughters, and one productive of con- 
sequences that will reach far beyond her own span 
of life; that her husband and sons cannot fail to 
draw comparisons between her dress and that of the 
ladies they meet in other homes, and that these com- 
parisons cannot fail to decrease their respect for her, 
she might be induced to give more attention to her 
personal appearance. Not even the burden of care 
and constant employment can furnisli a sufficient ex- 
cuse for careless personal habits, for few things are 
more important to the well-being of a family. 

There is an old saying to the effect that an untidy 
mother has disobedient children ; and while neither 
parents nor children may realize the wherefore of it, 
yet there is always a lack of respect and indifference 
to the authority of a mother who takes no pride in 
her personal appearance. 

And it is not the mother alone upon whose shoulders 
rests the burden of responsibility for home neat- 
ness and order in dress, the father has his duties to 
after as well, and should never fail to insist up- 
n the younger members of the family presenting 

mselves with well-kept hands, clean faces, neatly 
ed hair and orderly dress at least at every meal 
the family should all be present if possible. 
$ $ .j. 
IT PAYS. 



Plants cannot live without leaves, and when such 
pests as thistles and sassafras abound it is only neces- 
sary to keep them cut down to destroy them. It is 
true that some farmers cut them down frequently 
and yet they continue to grow, but they live because 
they get breathing spells ; that is, the farmer allows 
them to grow some before he cuts them down again. 
They must be cut down close to the ground and again 
chopped off as soon as they make the least growth. 
They may appear vigorous and full of life, but sooner 
or later they will be suffocated and perish, as they 
cannot live without leaves. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



7i7 



FRESH AIR. 



SWEET PICKLE. 



The air is a cordial of incredible value. 

It is the close confinement indoors that kills, for 
human beings were not made to live constantly 
within walls. 

Luxurious homes and habits of indolence are re- 
sponsible to no inconsiderable degree for the ill- 
health of civilized communities. 

Eat out of doors, rest out of doors, if possible, 
work out of doors, and consider it a high privilege 
to sleep with windows wide open. 

Breathe pure and fresh air, and get all you can 
of it, for it is food as essential as bread and other 
articles of daily necessity.— Presbyterian Banner. 

* <t> * 
MY MONKEY. 



I wish to tell you about a rare and valuable white- 
faced monkey which was brought by a friend of mine 
from Central America. He was no ordinary monkey, 
even in Central America, where many varieties of 
monkeys abound. Indeed, he was such an unusual 
and interesting specimen that a man connected with 
a circus offered a price for him which would buy a 
handsome pony. He had a beardless and wrinkled 
face, resembling a thoughtful and wise old man. 
Like most monkeys, he was very mischievous, and 
would take useful articles from their places and hide 
them where they could not be found for days. He 
was very proud of a red jacket which had been given 
him, and would scream with rage when anyone at- 
tempted to take it from him. 

In this country his environments were quite dif- 
ferent from those in his native land, for there he was 
with his monkey friends and companions, playing in 
the trees, eating tropical fruit and sleeping in his 
rustic woodland home, but here it was very different, 
as he was a stranger, with no monkey friends, no na- 
tive food and no rustic woodland home. With all 
these changes he naturally became lonely and longed 
for a playmate and companion ; therefore he sought for 
and won the heart and paw of a little kitten, a Miss 
Tabby. It was sweet to see their affection, playing and 
sleeping together. It seemed that this climate did 
not agree with him, for he had not been in this coun- 
try very long before he became sick, but was never 
too sick to caress and care for the little kitten. One 
day the kitten went to sleep nestled in the arms of 
the sick little monkey. He fell asleep also, never to 
wake again. The household witnessed a sad but pret- 
ty scene. There lay the monkey with his lifeless 
arms folded around the kitten in his last tender em- 
brace. — Home Magazine. 



BY AMY ROOP. 

For seven pounds of fruit pared, take four pounds 
of sugar, one pint of vinegar, mace, cinnamon and 
cloves ; boil this together and pour hot over such fruit 
as does not need cooking. 

Westminster, Md. 

MIXED PICKLE. 



BY ADALINE HUSTON. 

Take small green tomatoes quartered, cucumbers 
cut in small pieces, celery, cauliflower, green beans, 
cabbage cut coarse, a few onions cut in quarters, 
mango peppers, quartered, a few small peppers, some 
small pieces of horse radish ; boil the onions and beans 
separately a few minutes in salt water, scald the to- 
matoes in vinegar ; let all lay in salt water twelve 
hours except the onions and beans, drain as dry as 
possible; mix white mustard seed through it, a tea- 
spoonful of ground mustard to the gallon, then pour 
over good vinegar cold. 

Mishawaka, Ind. 

MIXED PICKLE. 



BY J. E. PRICE. 

One peck of green tomatoes cut in small pieces, 
one gallon of small onions, let stand over night in 
salt, drain, chop fine one-third of the tomatoes, cook 
all in one gallon of vinegar. While hot put in three 
quarts of sour cucumbers cut in small pieces, some 
chopped celery and cooked cauliflower. 

Dressing. One cup of flour, one cup of ground 
mustard, one pint of sugar, turmeric for coloring, 
add mixed spices and celery seed, pour over the pic- 
kles, seal in glass jars. 

Dallas Center, Iowa. 

VINEGAR PICKLE. 



BY ELSIE HUFF. 

One peck of peaches, three pounds of sugar, one 
pint of good vinegar. Dip the peaches with the peel- 
ing on into hot water, wipe dry, put them into a 
kettle with enough water to cover them, boil until 
soft. Take them out of the kettle, put in the vinegar 
and sugar, boil fifteen minutes. Put the peaches in- 
to the hot syrup and while hot put in glass cans and 
seal. Cling peaches are the best kind to use. 

Ft. Defiance, Va. 



7 x8 



THE INGLENOOK. 




OUR LITTLE PEOPLE rl||i 



BONNIE WAYNE. 



Nen Mr. Marshall he went out to the big barn 
and took the horses in there and Mrs. Marshall said 
for Luke and me to go with her and so we did and 
'en Mabel she kissed me, nen she kissed Luke and 
she said that she wuz glad to see us, but I don't see 
what fur, 'cause I never saw her before. I set my 
basket down on the porch and old Bux, that's Mabel's 
dog, he came and smelled of my basket and he wuz 
going to take it away and Mabel she just hollered 
at him and he looked awful shamed and went off 
and I guess he didn't feel glad 'cause we had come. 

Mabel, she said, " What have you got in your bas- 
ket?" and before I could tell her to save my life she 
had the top off of it and she took everything out, 
and there wuz Dora and Hattie. When she saw Hat- 
tie with her red hair, she nearly had a fit and I didn't 
like it very well, and Luke saw that I wuz mad, and 
he took me out in the yard for a walk and we got 
some of the prettiest roses and we made some bou- 
quets and he trimmed my hair with them and he said 
I wuz his little queen, and I don't know whether that 
wuz nice or not. Do you know whether they are nice 
folks or not? 

Mr. Marshall came in from the barn and he saw 
me with the roses and he said, " There's my little 
girl all trimmed up a'ready," and I don' think I am 
his girl at all 'cause I wuz always papa's girl when 
I wuz at home, but I guess I can be his girl while I 
am out here in the country with Luke. 

Nen there wuz a big boy there that wuz a helping 
Mr. Marshall to feed the horses and he came to the 
house and got a tin pail out of the house and he went 
out to the barn and he called old Bux. He said, 
" Huh Bux ! huh Bux ! huh Bux ! " and old Bux he 
just run as fast as he could and I asked Mrs. Mar- 
shall where he wuz agoing and she said he wuz a 
going after the cows, and I said, " What is the 
cows ? " and she said, " They are the old bossies that 
we milk to get milk from." Nen I told her that we 
get ours from Mike Johnson's wagon when he comes 
around every morning. And pretty soon here came 
the cows and old Bux after them and they wuz the 
biggest cows too; my! I wuz afraid of them, but 
Mrs. Marshall said they would not hurt me so I asked 
her if I might go with her big boy to the barn to see 
them, and nen Mr. Marshall took me by the hand 
and led me down the long path to the door of the 



barn. And don't you think Frank wuz a sitting down 
by the side of one of the cows on a little stool and he 
wuz just making the milk run into the pail in just 
tiny little streams. Nen Mr. Marshall asked me what 
I thought about it and nen I said, " When you get 
done milking, how do you turn the milk off?" and 
nen they both just laughed at me as hard as they 
could and I don't know what they wuz a laughing 
at for we turn off the hydrant when we want the 
water to stop running. But they have such funny 
things out here in the country nohow. 

Nen Mr. Marshall took me around in the barn in 
front of the cows and he gave me some corn in my 
hand and he told me to give it to the cows and so I 
did, and my! I wuz afraid. She just run out her 
long tongue at me and f runned back a little, and 
they laughed again at me, and I wuz a going to the 
house but Frank coaxed at me to stay, and I tried it 
again and she got the corn out of my hand and she 
touched my hand with her tongue and it was all rough 
like my mamma's nutmeg grater. And I asked Mr. 
Marshall if that hurt the poor cow to have such a 
rough tongue, and he said that wuz the nature of the 
critter. 

When we came out of the barn, Luke he saw me 
and he hollered at me and said, " Oh Bonnie, Oh 
Bonnie." Nen I saw him and I hollered, " Whoop- 
ee ! " Nen he said, " Just come here and see what 
I have found," and nen I told Mrs. Marshall if I 
could go, and she let me go, and when I got over 
there by the fence, what do you suppose wuz there? 
There wuz the funniest things that went weee — weee 
— weee — , and they had the funniest tails that wuz 
all curly and looked like they wuz done up on papers 
so they would curl better and I said, " Wy, what is 
them, Luke?" And nen he said that they wuz pigs. 
And there wuz one big one that went Booh hooh and 
I was scared again. My ! but the piggies wuz red 
and Luke thought they wuz pretty near as red as Hat- 
tie's hair. 

I wanted to take one of the pigs to the house to 
play with, and Luke said all right so I got down by 
the fence and reached my hand through and got a 
hold of one of them and then he began to cry weee — 
weee — weee — , and I pulled harder and the great 
big one said Booh booh — hooh — hooh, and she had 
her mouth wide open and she came right at me and 
I wuz afraid she wuz agoing to eat me all up and I 
(continued on page 720.) 



"HI 



INGLENOOK. 



719 



«#jTfie Q. & &. EepaHmewt. *>H^ 



I 



« 



What is a good antiseptic for bath tubs? 

Ammonia has been quite generally used for some 
years to dispel the odor of perspiration, but sweet 
spirits of niter, perhaps, is superior to it in most 
respects. Use only a few drops in the tub. 

* 

What is Caffeine? 

Caffeine is the active agency in coffee. It bears 
the same relation to coffee as theine does to tea, and 
as nicotine does to tobacco and alcohol to whiskey, 
and we might say the active agent in any narcotic. 
It is the one thing that is detrimental to coffee topers. 

Who was Philip Nolan? 

Philip Nolan is the hero of the story, " The Man 
Without a Country," by Edward Everett Hale. 
Whether Nolan was ever a real character may be \ 
question by some, but at any rate this character rep- 
resents the times in which he is supposed to have 
lived very admirably. 

* 

Why are cloves so called, and from whence did they 
come? 

They are called cloves from the Latin word clavus, 
which means " nail," to which they have a very strik- 
ing resemblance, and as an article of commerce they 
come principally from the Indies, which it is said 
is their native home. 

* 

What is the best way to get rid of the new weed that 
we farmers call the Russian thistle? 

There are several ways given by experts, some of 
which harmonize and some of which conflict in the- 
ory. We think the best method is to watch with 
patience, for ere long a bug will appear on the scene 
which is a stranger to scientists, with a name as long 
as a hypocrite's prayer, and it will go for that thistle 
and destroy it root and branch. 

* 

Who may contribute articles to the Nook? 

We solicit articles for the columns of the Nook 
from all well-meaning persons who are unprejudiced 
and unbiased in their ideas, and are conservative, not 
radical, who will write their articles, leaving out per- 
sonalities. We want those who are able to feel happy 
if their articles are rejected altogether ; those who write 
for the upbuilding of our young people upon sub- 
jects of universal interest. 



What is the best means of ridding a house of flies? 

First sweep the house with a broom that has been 
dipped in water containing carbolic acid, and then 
wipe all the upholstery furniture with a rag or a 
sponge dampened with the same solution, and then 
keep the dog out of the house. 

* 
What is parsley? 

Parsley is an aromatic, umbelliferous garden vegeta- 
ble with divided leaves, and is used in cooking and 
sometimes in garnishing. It comes from Egypt or- 
iginally, and mythology tells us that it was used an- 
ciently to adorn the head of Hercules. 



Our chrysanthemums this year are attacked by small 
aphides or flies, and they seem to do no good at all? 
What shall I do to get rid of them? 

One of the best means is to take a shovel of hot 
coals and drop some smoking tobacco on the fire and 
hold it immediately underneath the leaves and Mr. 
Aphides will take his departure. 



Do sponges belong to the animal kingdom, or to the 
vegetable kingdom? 

Sponges verily belong to the animal kingdom, how- 
ever, they should be classed with the very lowest 
forms of animal life, and they approach the vegetable 
kingdom so clo'sely that they have some traits of 
character that belong to vegetables. For instance, 
they are local, that is, they become fixed to rocks and 
increase in size by a regular process of growth, simi- 
lar to vegetables. They consist of a framework 
which is sometimes of a series of elastic, fibrous sub- 
stances and sometimes it is made up of a collection 
of hard, silicious spicules and they contain a jelly-like 
substance which without question is animal matter, 
which is their real life, and when they are caught 
they must be buried for some time in the sand and 
afterwards soaked and washed before they can be 
used. They are obtained by diving. The best 
sponges grow about eight or ten fathoms beneath the 
surface of the water. In some instances, however, on 
the Bahama Islands, for instance, sponges are ob- 
tained by means of a long fork or hook. The 
sponges which we have on our markets here are the 
most inferior quality, as a rule. 



J20 



the inglenook. 







(Concluded from Page 718.) 
told Luke to make her go away and he said he 
couldn't, and he thought she wuz a biting me and he 
began to cry, and when he cried I thought she wuz 
a biting him, and nen I cried too, and nen Frank came 
running out there and he hollered to me to let it go, 
and I said, " I don't want to let it go, I want to take 
it to the house to play with, and just then Mrs. 
Marshall came and she had a broom in her hand. 
(to be continued.) 

♦ ♦ •£* 
GRANDMA'S PUMPKIN PIES. 



Grandma was expecting company for dinner — the 
minister and his wife and little girl. So she was very 
busy that morning cooking all sorts of good things 
and among the other things were the famous pumpkin 
pies made just as her grandma had made them. 

Her grandma! Why, it almost made Nannie dizzy 
to think about grandma's grandma. 

Nannie was standing on a chair close beside the 
table, helping grandma cook. She had come out in 
the country the day before to try and get over la 
grippe. 

" I should think," said Nannie, " that that way to 
make pumpkin pies wouldn't be very good, 'cause it's 
such old style. 

" Old style's the best for pies, I guess," laughed 
grandma. " You see if it ain't. Now I suppose, 
child, you never do have 'em in the city, do you?" 

" Only the kind that lives in cans," answered Nan- 
nie. " And papa says they can't hold a candle to 
yours ; but I never could see why they'd want to." 

" I should think they couldn't ! " said grandma, de- 
cidedly. " And now, child, we are ready for the sea- 
soning. Just hand grandma the spice box over there, 
won't you ? " 

Nannie put her nose down to smell when the box 
was opened. 

" Ah, how good, grandma ! It smells more like 
Christmas than minister's folks, I think." 

" There's ginger and mustard standing right be- 
side each other," said grandma. " That's the beauty 
of doing your own work, dear, 'cause they look just 
alike ; but I could go to them in the dark, and not 
make a mistake." 

Just then some one knocked at the sitting-room 
door and grandma had to go. 



"Now, dearie, don't get into mischief, will you?" 
she said, as she started. 

And Nannie did not really intend to, but grandma 
was gone a long time, and by and by Nannie began 
to think it would be a good joke to put the mustard 
in the place of the ginger. 

" Papa dearly loved a joke," she thought, " and so 
do I. How they all will laugh ! " 

So, quick as a thought, she changed them. 

" Now, p'r'aps it will be better than ginger. May- 
be I'll discover something," she thought, trying to 
quiet her conscience. 

When grandma came back everything looked all 
right, and she hurriedly seasoned the pies and put 
them in the oven. 

" The land knows Mrs. Pipkin is the beater of a 
stayer," she said, as she shut the oven door and 
looked at the clock. 

But everything was ready when the minister's fam- 
ily came, and grandma's cap and Nannie's apron were 
stiff and spotless. 

The dinner was good, and they all ate as though 
they enjoyed it. And grandma who justly prided 
herself on her cookery, beamed with delight over the 
way things disappeared. 

When the pies were brought on the minister's wife 
said : " Now we are to have some of the famous 
pumpkin-pie that we have heard so much about." 

Nannie's heart plumped down like lead as she 
looked at grandma's happy face as she handed around 
the great golden wedges. 

But what was the matter with it? 

They all took one mouthful and then a hasty drink 
of water. 

Grandma quickly tasted hers, then looked at Nan- 
nie's crimson face, and Nannie burst out crying: 

" O grandma, it was a joke," she sobbed on. 

No one laughed at all, but grandma rose and took 
Nannie's hand and took her upstairs and put her to 
bed right in broad daylight. 

" O grandma," said Nannie, when they had all 
gone, and grandma had come up stairs, "I am dis- 
graced forever! I'll never play a joke again." 

" It's no joke at all when it hurts folks' feelings," 
said grandma. 

And Nannie has been very careful ever since to 
remember that. 



The Brethren Colonies 



IN THE 



Fruit Belt of Michigan 




are an actual success. The colony of the Lakeview church is located on 
lands surrounding the village of Brethren, Michigan. Brethren, Michigan, 
is located on the main line of the Pere Marquette System, 105 miles north 
of Grand Rapids and about 14 miles east of Lake Michigan. All conditions 
of soil, climate and location make this spot an ideal one for general farm- 
ing, fruit-growing and stock-raising. Lands have been sold to about 120 
families of the Brotherhood and their friends, of which number about one- 
half have already located and are clearing up their places. The possibili- 
ties of this district are exceptional. The Brethren tract embraces about 
20,000 acres, of which over 11,000 acres have already been sold. There are 
just as good and as desirable locations remaining as those that have been 
bought and the prices have not yet been advanced, but with the improve- 
ments now going on, developing the country so rapidly, it is only a short 
time till prices advance considerably. THE TIME TO BUY IS NOW. 
Present prices range from $7 to $15 per acre, on easy terms, or less five 
(5) per cent for cash. 

For illustrated booklet and information in regard to rates, address 
Samuel S. Thorpe, District Agent Michigan Land Association, Cadillac, 
Mich. 



THE CADILLAC TRACT. 



The basis of my business is absolute and 

unvarying integrity. 

SAMUEL S. THORPE. 



25,000 Acres of Rich Agricul- 
tural Lands, Excellently Situated and Splen- 
didly Adapted for Farming, Fruit-growing and 
Stock-raising. 

These lands are located from one-half mile to six miles from the hustling city of Cadillac, the seat of Wexford 
county, 8,ooo inhabitants, (all alive,) and its location on the Grand Rapids and Indiana R'y (part of the Pennsylvania 
System) and on the Ann Arbor Railroad (part of the Wabash System) together with its other advantages render 
it the best trading point and market place in Northern Michigan. Cadillac and the lands controlled by the ad- 
vertiser are located about 98 miles north of Grand Rapids and 50 miles east of Lake Michigan. They are well wa- 
tered with springs, creeks, rivers and lakes of pure, sparkling water teeming with gamy fish. The soil varies from 
a sandy loam to a clay loam, all of it underlaid with clay and gravel subsoil, which responds eagerly to cultivation. 

For illustrated booklets, maps and information as to reduced rates to these locations, address: 



s-^-i^tte: 



S. THOBPE, 



^istiict Ag-ent 3\/£icl2.ig , a.n. I^ar^d ^.ssn., 

IDept. ILvdl, 

C-A-IDXX-i31._A-C, MICHIGAN. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



THE COLONY 



...ON.. 



LAGUNA DE TACHE GRAM 

...IN THE... 

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 




BRETHREN OAK GROVE CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL. 

Still continues to attract the attention of homeseekers. 

The uniform success of those who have settled here and the immense growth of 
every variety of crop which is again in evidence establishes the fact that here is the 
place where the industrious man of small means can make a California home. 

EASTERN PEOPLE DO EASTERN FARMING. 
You don't have to spend years learning a new business. 

ALFALFA, CATTLE, CORN, HOGS, 

besides the California fruits, are the products, which enable the farmer to pay for 
his land and make a good living while doing it. 

SPECIAL LOW RATES TO CALIFORNIA. 

From August 15th to Sept. 10th the railroads will sell Round Trip excursion 
tickets to San Francisco (with stop-overs). 

From Chicago $50 00 

From Mississippi River 47 50 

From Missouri River 45 00 

Final return limit, Oct. 23. 

ALSO SEPTEMBER 15th TO OCTOBER 15th COLONIST ONE-WAT TICKETS 
TO ANT CALIFORNIA POINT. 

From Chicago $33 00 

From Mississippi River 30 00 

From Missouri River , 25 00 

By this arrangement j'ou can come to Laton on the excursion rate and see our 
land. If it suits you, go back and bring your family out on the colonist rate. 

Land sells for $30 to $60 per acre, including perpetual water right. Terms, one- 
fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. 

From twenty to forty acres will support the average family in comfort. 

If interested send your name and address and receive printed matter and our 
local newspaper free for two months. "Write to 

NARES & SAUNDERS, = Laton, California. 

26tl3 Mention the INiiLKNOOK wnen wrtOm; 



p&\ 






(olive 




|c"^«£J{ 




[Bakers 


;° e Tc» 




1— J -+- |"t.,.CLL, 


J^*\ 


Im 5 - a 


i -. --.. 




ujcc-c n 


vcljJ 1 



i:i( 



]QUAL|:, 

icEMEN.rral! 



Mm i 



',:.■/-■ 



GROCERIES 

In our Equity Grocery De- 
partment as all our other de- 
partments, QUALITY is the 
cement that binds the inter- 
ests of Equity people. Send 
your next order for groceries 
to :: :: :: :; 

Equity Mfg. and Supply Co., 

"53-i55-'57-'59 S. Jefferson St. 
CHICAGO. 

Change of din-ate Beneficial 

After your years of toil and suc- 
cess, don't you want to rest the re- 
maining? If you do, come to south- 
ern California, where roses bloom all 
the year, grass is evergreen, some 
kind of fruit ripening every month, 
vegetables a perpetual luxury. To 
make these declining years a delight, 
to combine work and play, purchase 
a walnut, almond, fig, olive, orange, 
or lemon grove; each has its profit, 
pleasure and beauty. For particulars 
of each write A. Hutsinpiller, P. O. 
Box 1 194, Los Angeles, Cal. 2 8ti3 



YOUR IDLE MONEY 

carefully and properly invested will 
earn 7 to 20 per cent per annum 
for you, regularly and safely. For 
eight years we have been dealing in 
high-grade interest-bearing invest- 
ment securities, and if you have any 
idle funds on hand, large or small, 
we will tell you how and where you 
may invest it honestly and profit- 
ably, and we use the greatest possi- 
ble care to make every dollar invest- 
ed absolutely secure. "Write to us 
for full particulars. Address : 

NEWCOMER AND PRICE, 
30eow Mt. Morris, HI. 



$2,500 buys highly improved fruit 
farm of 20 acres, including stock and 
tools. One and one-half miles to fine 
market. 

J. I. BLICKENSTAFF, 

Bang-or, Michigan. 

I0t26 Mention Ihp PfRLETVOOK whim writing- 



BLOOD AND BRAIN 



Have everything to do with each other. Your mental accomplish- 
ments are measured by the condition of the vital fluid. If 
it fails to nourish the organs of the body, your sup- 
ply of brain power is largely diminished, your 
your mind is foggy, and you are 
generally miserable. 

DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER 



Will set things going right again. It is the greatest cleansing and 
vitalizing agent known to medicine. 



Rev. R. I. Agricola, Marietta, Ga., says: "The 
BLOOD VITALIZER is the best and cheapest medi- 
cine on the market. It should be in every household." 



DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER was compounded more than one 

hundred years ago by an old German physician who, for 

many years, used it only in his daily practice. 



It is sold to the people direct by local retail agents, but 
never by druggists. Address: 

DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 

112=114 S. Hoyne Avenue, 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



For the Brethren 



It's a new country to you, possibly, and it is new, and also a good one. We are talking of 
northern Texas around Dallas and Fort Worth, and along the line of the great Rock Island Sys- 
tem through that country. You want to read this page of the Nook from week to week. 
There's going to be something in it about that country from people who were down there a 
week or so ago, and we will give you their views and opinions as to the availability of that coun- 
try for the kind of people that read the INGLENOOK. They are people who know because 
they have seen it all. You ought to see it, and maybe will. When you get ready, we are. 
Here's what some of them say about their trip: 

David C. Bosserman: "The country impressed us as being a favorable place for the agricul- 
turist who is looking for a good, new location." 

D. R. Yoder, of Goshen, Ind.: "Such as would want to go would find good openings in 
the vicinity of Ft. Worth and Dallas, Texas." 

H. T. Williamson writes: "Two carloads of this party from Carthage, Mo., took in what was 
termed the "Circle Trip," and, as far as I know, were delighted with the country from the time 
they left Carthage till they reached Ft. Worth, Texas." 

C. M. Wenger, of South Bend, Ind.: " I was favorably impressed with the general appear- 
ance of the country, the rich soil and large per cent of smooth, tillable soil to be found through- 
out." 

A. B. Barnhart, Hagerstown, Md., has this as his view: "I was favorably impressed, so 
much so that I would recommend to any of our people who contemplate a change to consider 
the great Southwest as to its agricultural and industrial advantages." 

Isaac Frantz, Pleasant Hill, Ohio, one of the tourists accompanying the party says: "And my 
impressions of the Southwest are so favorable that if I were young again Ohio could not hold 
me." 

John E. Mohler, Des Moines, Iowa, says this, speaking of his Rock Island trip: "There were 
about seventy of us who made the trip after the Conference at Carthage and I think all of them 
were delightfully surprised. The country itself was a revelation, worthy of the trip." 

S. M. Goughnour, of Ankeny, Iowa, has this to say: "Yes, I must say the country, especially 
Oklahoma, impressed me much more favorably than I expected." 

R. E. Burger, of Allerton, 111., writes as follows: "I now feel that I can conscientiously rec- 
ommend the South and Southwest as a good place to invest money." 

Henry Studebaker, Tippecanoe City, Ohio, thinks that, " The country we were through 
promises great things for the future. From Ft. Worth to Enid the crop indications surpass any- 
thing I ever saw." 

For copies of our Southwest printed matter free (n;ime State interested in) and for full in- 
formation about our reduced homeseekers' rates to points in the Southwest on the first and third 
Tuesdays of each month, write 



Rock Islandi 
System ' 



Jolm Sebastian, 



••ns^oiagoi- Traffic Manager, 



Cliicaso. 



ADVANCE IN "EQUITY" STOCK 



Established 1896 A IVAN HN "HI Y Mlll.K Incorporated 1902 



BECAUSE 



Merit Creates the Demand! Demand Maintains Standard and Price! 

This is the result of practical and valuable co-operation. Two-hundred people have bought Equity 
shares at 825.00 par value, and they have received 6 percent per annum, besides participating in all other 
co-operative advantages. . 

September 1st the Price of Equity Shares Goes to $35.00 

Send in your applications now for whatever shares you wish before the price goes up. If you don't 
have the ready cash send in the application and the shares will be reserved for you. 



- CUT OUT HERE 

Form A-i 

* 

Equity Mfg. & Supply Co., Cash Subscription Blank 190 %■ 

153 S. Jefferson St., Chicago, III. T 

Gentlemen: — I hereby subscribe for shares of the capital stock of the Equity Mfg. * 

and Supply Co., (fully paid and non-assessable) at the rate of ($25.00) Twenty-five dollars per share, Par T 

Value, for which please find enclosed Dollars, for ^ 

shares, being payment in full for said shares at the above price. 

This stock is to be issued to (Name) .and forwarded 

to the undersigned. % 

Signature *> 

Date Issued 190.... Town 3. 

Certificate Number State a 

If you prefer to join on the installment plan use application Form A 2. 



* 



CUT OUT HERE 



Form A-2. 

•> Equity Mfg. & Supply Co., Installment Subscription Blank 190 

153 S. Jefferson St., Chicago, III. 

Gentlemen: — I hereby subscribe for shares of the capital stock of the Equity Mfg. 

','. and Supply Co., (fully paid and non-assessable) at the rate of $25.00 per share, Par Value, for which please 

" find enclosed as first installment Dollars. Balance to be paid in ? 

!j installments of Dollars each; when the last installment is paid, the stock is to be issued 

• > to (Name) and forwarded to the undersigned when earnings and bene- 

*J fits will begin. 

Signature 

Date Issued 190 Town ". 

. • Certificate Number State 

^^,^,^*j,»j»*j*^**j«»i«»j»*i»*t**j4*j»»l»*t«i*»i**j+»J**l»»i*»i»*J«»t«*}"J**;**t«fct»*J*»J»*J«*J**jM5,»i«»i«»t* 4* 't* *!**!* ***•!**!* •»• *♦**!* *t**5 M I**t*****t**J , ** , *t**! 



Address all Communications to 



^"iTr?,"'"' Eq u 'ty Mfg:- & Supply Co., 

i eral Merchandise Catalogue > 

tvvvvvTTTV TTrv^ ISJ-'SS-'ST-'SO 5. Jefferson St., CHICAGO, ILL. 




Grasp this Opportunity 
to Make Your 

Savings Work 



Investors. 



Consumers. 



We are drawing- to ibe close of our first series 
of voucher contracts, and if you want lo take 
advantage of our truly wonderful opportunity 
to invest your savings in our Co-operative 
association, upon our original and scien- 
tific plan you should get your application in 
at a very early date.. 

No matter how modest your means, you can 
become a shareholdi-r in this company and at 
once begin to take advantage of its many eco- 
nomic features, every" one of which will have 
your approval and endorsement. Our com- 
pany means a new era in ihe co-operative field, 
a new low-price level and a new degree of 
purchasing power. 

Send your application at once. Grasp 
tliis opportunity to wake your sav- 
ings work. 



How and When 
to Invest 



The Time is Now. Do not postpone 
the day when you are going to make a start for 
prosperity. If you do. the chances arc you'll 
never start, (l.et out of the rut of the man who 
just lives each day so lie can work the next. 
Have an investment to look after your interest 
in days of adversity. 

Some people believe in investing their sav- 
ings but are not satisfied with reasonable 
returns on their money. They want to become 
millionaires in a night. They invest their mon- 
ey in all sorts of "get-rich-quick" schemes and 
usually pay dearly for their experiences. It is 
useless to save money and then invest it where 
it will be lost or even where you cannot help 
but worry about it. 

In the springtime of life — in the heyday of 
prosperity, every man and woman should in- 
vest in an enterprise which isa credit to Christ- 
ianity as well as to the Commercial World; so 
that in the days to come they will not have to 
look back upon the past with feelings of regret. 

Our plan of Scientific Co-operation elimi- 
nates all elements of failure and worry. Make 
your saving's work and do cood. 



Profits on 
Savings Assured 

Of all the great i />ney-making department 
stores the Mail Order Store is the greatest. 
Its line comprises everything from a toothpick 
to a traction engine. Everything people eat, 
wearanduse from youth to old age. lis fi^lat 
is not limited by city and suburban iimiuuimis, 
but extends to every farm and town of this 
country and every country of the globe. Its 
expenses — selling and fixed — are less than any 
other business. It's a strictlycash business. It 
has few losses. It does not depend on sea- 
sonsor local conditions. Itis a "hard times" 
business. It does not even depend upon pros* 
perity. Its profits are large in comparison to 
the amount invested. We advise you to be- 
come a co-partner of our company on this 
series of vouchers as soon as possible, even if 
you start with but one share, and thereby 
obtain the advantages of our original co-op- 
erative idea. You will find your investment 
the best and safest you have ever made — you 
buy into an established, growing and success- 
ful business. 



Satisfaction 

Guaranteed 



A reputation for honest advertising is 
extremely valuable, and can be retained only 
by the most painstaking care: a single misrep- 
resentation may do more harm than months 
of earnest effort can repair. Advertising intro- 
duces our goods. Merit sells them. We 
know a satisfied customer is our best advertise- 
' ment. Our Rule: "No Disappointment in 
What Lies Behind the Advertisement." We 
invite you to send orders from our catalogs, 
circulars or advertisements with absolute 
assurance that you will be protected. If the 
price is lower at the time your order reaches us 
we will give you the advantage of the reduction 
and never charge you more than the price 
named without first writing you with full 
explanations and getting your consent to the 
higher price. Do not hesitate to order any 
article we advertise as our positive guarantee 
goes with each shipment, and there is no risk 
on your part. There is no discount on the 
quality of the goods we send out and our 
representations are always exact. No bluster, 
no display, just straightforward facts. Now, 
would you not like to be a co-partner and cus- 
tomer of a company which stands for the appli- 
cation of the Golden Rule in business, and 
Christian character upon the part of each 
worker, from the office boy to the President? 
Contracts to the extent of J135.000 made 
since February 1st, 19M. Write for partic- 
ulars. 



Remember I 

While we are working together, each for the 
other and conscientiously and earnestly en- 
deavoring to build up a large business, we do it 
on the basis of treating each individual fairly and 
under no circumstances place any of our pa- 
trons, co-operators or stockholders in an em- 
barrassing position. 

We consider all correspondence, business 
transactions, contracts on co-operation, etc as 
sacred and never embarrass any one by publish- 
ing extracts from letters, names or addresses 
of co-operators or customers without having 
the written con unt on file in our office. 



Albaugh Bros., 
Dover & Co. 



The Mail Order House 



341-43 Franklin St., 

Chicago, - - Illinois. 



Our New General 
Catalog Free. 



Our new general merchandise catalog will be 
ready the last of August and will be sent free 
to every reader of the Inglenook answering 
this advertisement. We wil 1 also take pleasure 
in sending a K4-page book of testimonials fron. 
satisfied patrons, the consent to luse name 
having been secured in each case. Our large 
general Co-operative Catalog and Price List, a 
magnificent book, contains a complete line of 
high grade <jencral Merchandise at co-op- 
erative money-savinc prices. 

Careful attention is being given to the illus- 
trations, descriptions, prices, etc. Each article 
will be described as if it were the only one 
offered for sale, for the catalog must appeal to 
the reason of the one who receives it, and 
answer questions that may arise in his mind 
concerning the goods off eredand the company. 
We work at all times for the interest of our 
customers, and after a most careful study we 
have originated a new plan of Freight and 
Express Kehates, about which this Big' 
Catalog will tell you in detail. This means 
the saving to our patrons of thousands of 
dollars, yet our prices have not been advanced 
one cent. Itis harder to save money than to 
make money. Make saving easier by ordering 
your goods from our catalog. Make your 
savings make you money by investing your 
savings in our co-operative institution. 

Won't You Join Hands With Us? 



ftlNSL-ENOOIt 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 






* •j«j«I«j«It-»i*-»t**T* , v**l* ****I*»I«-»I**I**1' 



* * 

* * 

* ■ 

•:■ 
■■■ 
* 



PARTIAL TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



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-> * 

•:• *:* 

•> * 

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* •:• 

* * 



•:• * 

-:• •:• 

+ * 

4. <. 



POEM. 

REAPING AND SOWING.— By Agnes Neff. 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 

THE KRITIK ON THE TRANE.— By Geo. Haldan. 
DRINKING FOUNTAIN FOR BIRDS.— By D. L. Miller. 
THE BLACK BELT.— By Roscoe Conklin Bruce. 
ON TO YOUR JOB.— By Prof. C. M. James. 
COMMERCIAL VALUE OF MUSIC— By Etha A. Evans. 
TEMPORARY TEETH.— By E. E. Blickenstaff. D. D. S. 
SERVICE.— By Lina N. Stoner. 
WHO SENT THE DREAM?— By Mary P. Ellenberger. 



v •.* 

♦:• * 

•*• * 

•:• •:- 

* * 
•> * 
... .*. 
•:- * 
•> *> 

* -:- 

* •:• 
•I* •> 
*:* <• 

* * 



* + 



* * 

+ * 



EDITORIALS. 

MAKING A MARK. 
TIP. 

♦ ■ H"H "fr-M 

.*. .1 . A A ■*■ t*r I*. A A A A A • 



LITTLE THINGS. 
PRAYING BY MACHINERY 



* * 






ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



vugust 2, 1904 



$ 1 .00 per Year 



Number 31. VcHuma VI 



THE INGLENOOK. 



ARE YOU GOING TO 

California, Washington, 
Oregon, Idaho 

Or Any Other Point? Take the 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Daily Tourist Car Lines 



Chicago, Missouri River, Colorado, Idaho, Oregon, 
Washington and California Points. 



ROUND TRIP RATES 



From Chicago, 
From Missouri River, 



$50.00 
45.00 



To San Francisco or Los Angeles, Cal., and Re- 
turn. Tickets Sold Aug. 15 to Sept. 10, inclusive. 
Return Limit, October 23, 1904. 



One-Way Colonist's Rates. 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. 

From Chicago ?33 00 

From St. Louis, 30 00 

From Missouri River, 25 00 

Proportionate Bates from all Points East. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 

IS KNOWN AS 

"The Overland Route" 

And is the only direct line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West. Business men and 
others can save many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal card to your nearest ticket agent, or 
Geo. L. McDonaugh, Colonization Agent, Omaha, 
Neb. 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



A Town With a Future 



Snyder, Colorado, Has all the Ear-marks of a Comer and 
is Surely Destined to be One of North- 
eastern Colorado's Leaders. 



Snyder is beautifully located on the South Platte river 
and Union Pacific Railway, between Sterling and Denver, 
extending from the river to the brow of a mesa, one-half 
mile away. The main street running north and south is 
80 feet wide; all other streets, 60 feet; alleys, 20 feet; all' 
lots are 25x125 feet, excepting those fronting on the main 
street, which are 25x120. 

For further information about Snyder or South Platte 
Valley, address Geo. L. McDonaugh, Colonization Agent 
Union Pacific Railroad, at Omaha, Neb., for FREE print- 
ed matter. 

Still better, see some of those who have bought land 
near Snyder, Colorado, or write to them for further in- 
formation. 



The following parties have bought land near Snyder, 
Colo.: 

Louis E. Keltner, Hygiene, Colo.; W. W. Keltner, 
North Dakota; A. W. Brayton, Mt. Morris, 111.; Daniel 
Grabill, Lemasters, Pa.; J. L. Kuns. McPherson, Kans.; 
D. L. Miller, Mt. Morris, 111.; Daniel Neikirk, Lemasters, 
Pa.; Galen B. Royer, Elgin, I1L; E. Slifer, Mt. Morris, 111.; 
I. B. Trout, Lanark, 111.; R. E. Arnold, Elgin, 111. 



Geo. L. Studebaker, of Muncie, Indiana, says: 

" Sterling is a growing town with a good country 
surrounding. The members are active." 

HOMESEEKERS' EXCURSION 
to Snyder, Colorado, 

With Privilege of Stopping off at Sterling, Colo., 
UllE TAnX and Third Tuesday of Each Month via 

Union Pacific Railroad. 



PRIZE CONTEST 

HOW TO GET A VALUABLE PREMIUM 



WE ARE GOING TO GIVE A FEW VALUABLE PREMIUMS, AND ALL OUR INGLENOOK FRIENDS 

ARE INVITED TO ENTER THE CONTEST. 



Here Tliey _A_r-e ! 

c,\v^E50/ 






N... 3. 




1. The one sending us the most new subscribers to the Inglenook for the remainder of the year at 25 

cents each, or with premium as per our offer* at 75 cents each, will receive one set Literature of All 
Nations, containing 10 volumes, weight, 26 pounds. Subscription price 

2. The one holding second place will receive a splendid ladies' or gentlemen's watch (whichever pre- 

ferred). The watch is equal to one that regularly retails for about 

3. The one holding third place will receive a good Teacher's Bible, Arabian Morocco, divinity circuit, worth 

4. The one holding fourth place will receive the book " Modern Fables and Parables," worth 

riptions receive a good fountain p 

Cash must accompany each order. 



5- Each person sending 10 or more subscriptions receive a good fountain pen, either ladies' or gentle- 
men's, worth, 



$25.00 
8.00 
3.00 
120 
l.OO 



*See our offer in this issue. 

No-w is Your Tizrxe. 

Right now is the time to make things count. Get a good start and you will come out all 
right in the end. The one who goes at it at once with a determination to win stands a good 
chance to get a S25.ro set of books FREE. 

Do not say that you do not have a good territory and it's no use to try. Our experience 
leads us to believe that one place is as good as another. Some places where we least expect 
subscriptions we' get the most. It is up to you whether or not you get this fine set of books. 
SOME ONE IS GOING TO GET THEM. Let every loyal Nooker get out and hustle. Aim 
at the top. Don't be satisfied with anything less. ALL THESE PRIZES ARE GOING TO 
BE GIVEN TO SOME ONE. Go to work at once. Who will send the first list? (In sending 
your list, please mention that you are entering the contest.) 

Contest Closes. 

To give all a fair chance we have decided not to close this INGLENOOK CONTEST until 
August 31. All orders received by us up to and including last mail on August 31, 1904, will be 
counted. Many are taking an active part in the contest. The fortunate ones arc going to be the Ao * 

ones who keep continually at it. Remember, at the close of the contest should you not have been fortunate enough to 
receive one of the four prizes named, you will be entitled to prize No. 5, a good Fountain Pen, for each ten subscriptions sent 
us. It is worth your while to try for No. 1. Don't procrastinate. Now is your time to do the best work. 




BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



-the: inglenook. 




MANCHESTER COLLEGE! 



A* Delightful Home for Students. Thirteen Desirable Courses. Faculty Sub* 
stantially Augmented. Nine Universities Represented in the Train- 
ing of the Faculty. Enrollment Making Harked Increase. 



Write for plan to help Bible Students who are preparing to do 
more efficient work in the church. Fathers and mothers, sons and 
daughters are interested in this institution because of the thorough- 
ness of the work and the uplifting, moral influence. FALL TERM 
OPENS SEPTEMBER 6. For catalogue and particulars address the 
President, North Manchester, Indiana. 3U2 



Cap Goods! 

Our business has almost doubled Itself 
during the last year. "We are sending 
goods by mall to thousands of perma- 
nent, satisfied customers throughout the 
United States. The reason is simple. 

Our Goods are Sellable. Our Variety la 
Large. Our Prices are Low. 

All orders filled promptly, postpaid. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or your money 
refunded. Send us a sample order and 
be convinced. Write us for a booklet 
of unsolicited testimonials and new line 
of samples, which will be furnished free. 
Send at once to 

R. E. ARNOLD, Elgin, I1L 

Change of Climate Beneficial 

After your years of toil and suc- 
cess, don't you want to rest the re- 
maining? If you do, come to south- 
ern California, where roses bloom all 
the year, grass is evergreen, some 
kind of fruit ripening every month, 
vegetables a perpetual luxury. To 
make these declining years a delight, 
to combine work and play, purchase 
a walnut, almond, fig, olive, orange, 
or lemon grove; each has its profit, 
pleasure and beauty. For particulars 
of each write A. Hutsinpiller, P. O. 
Box 1 1 94, Los Angeles, Cal. 23,3 



$2,500 buys highly improved fruit 
farm of 20 acres, including stock and 
tools. One and one-half miles to fine 
market. 

J. L. BUCKENSTAPP, 

Bangor, Michigan. 

IOt26 Mention tlf TN'OLLNOOK wh.n writta*. 




GROCERIES 

In our Equity Grocery De- 
partment as all our other de- 
partments, QUALITY is the 
cement that binds the inter- 
ests of Equity people. Send 
your next order for groceries 
to :: :: :: :: 

Equity Mfg. and Supply Co., 

'53-i55-'57">59 S. Jefferson St. 
CHICAGO. 



o^s 



Sent on Approval 

TO RESPONSIBLE PEOPLE 

Laughlin 

FOUNTAIN 
PEN 



diiaraateed Finest (trade IA. 

SOLID GOLD PEN 

To test the merits of this pub- 

; llcatlonasanadvertlslngme- 

dlum we offer you choice of 



$1.00 

I Postpaid 
I to any 
| I address 



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Two 

Popular 

Styles 

For 

Only 

(By registered null Sc extra) 

Holder Is made of the finest 

quality hard rubber, In four 

| simple parts, fitted with very 

highest grade, targe size 14k. 

gold pen, any flexibility de- 

| sired— Ink feeding device 

j perfect. 

Either style— Richly (fold 
Mounted for presentation 
purposes $1.00 extra. 

Grand Special Offer 

You may try the pen a week 
Ifyou do not find Itas repre- 
sented, fully as fine a value 
as you can secure for three 
times the price In any other 
makes, If not entirely satis- 
factory In every respect, re- 
turn It and ire tuIU sendyoa 
$1.10 for it, the extra 10c. is 
for your trouble in writing as 
and to shoiv our confidence In 
the Laughlin Pen— (Not one 
customer In 5000 has asked 
for their money back.) 

Lay this Publication 
down and write NOW 

Safety Pocket Pen Holder 
sent free of charge with each 
Pen. 

ADDRESS 

Laughlin Mfg. Co. 

' ' Orlswold SI. Detroit. Mich. 



FEW PEOPLE 

Know the value of Liquid Spray as a 
home cure for Catarrh, Hay Fever, Head 
colds and other diseases of the respira- 
tory organs. 

Persona desiring to try this highly 
recommended treatment should immedi- 
ately write to E. J. Worst, 61 Main St., 
Ashland Ohio. 

He will gladly mall any reader of the 
Inglenook one of his new Atomizers and 
Liquid Spray treatment on five days' tri- 
al, free. 

If it gives satisfaction, send him $2.00, 
two-fifths regular price; If not, return 
it at the expired time, whick will only 
cost you twelve cents postage, and you 
will not owe him a penny. It kills the 
Catarrh microbes in the head and throat. 

23tl3 



THE INGLENOOK. 



THE COLONY 



.ON. 



UGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 

...IN THE... 

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 




BRETHREN OAK GROVE CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL. 



Still continues to attract the attention of homeseekers. 

The uniform success of those who have settled here and the immense growth of 
every variety of crop which is again in evidence establishes the fact that here Is the 
place where the industrious man of small means can make a California home. 

EASTERN PEOPLE DO EASTERN FARMING. 
You don't have to spend years learning a new business. 

ALFALFA, CATTLE, CORN, HOGS, 

besides the California fruits, are the products which enable the farmer to pay for 
his land and make a good living while doing it. 

SPECIAL LOW BATES TO CALIFORNIA. 

From August 15th to Sept. 10th the railroads will sell Round Trip excursion 
tickets to San Francisco (with stop-overs). 

From Chicago ?50 00 

From Mississippi River 47 50 

From Missouri River, 45 00 

Final return limit. Oct. 23. 

ALSO SEPTEMBER 15th TO OCTOBER, 15th COLONIST ONE-WAY TICKETS 
TO ANT CALIFORNIA POINT. 

From Chicago $33 00 

From Mississippi River 30 00 

From Missouri River 25 00 

By this arrangement you can come to Laton on the excursion rate and see our 
land. If it suits you, go back and bring your family out on the colonist rate. 

Land sells for $30 to $60 per acre, Including perpetual water right. Terms, one- 
fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. 

From twenty to forty acres wili support the average family In comfort. 

If interested send your name and address and receive printed matter and our 
local newspaper free for two months. Write to 

NARES & SAUNDERS, - Laton, California. 

2btl3 Mention the INOLEMOOK when writtag. 



COLORADO 



AT ANNUAL MEETING. 

We were at Carthage, Mo., during 
the Annual Meeting and met many 
of our old friends and correspondents 
among the Brethren. 

THE NEW BOOKS. 

We distributed five thousand of the 
new Union Pacific Railway folders, 
" What People Say about the South 
Platte Valley," while there. 

SEND FOR ONE. 

We have a few hundred of these 
books left for free distribution and if 
you will drop us a card will send you 
a copy by first mail. 

OUR CARTHAGE EXCURSION. 

Several members accompanied us 
on our excursion to Sterling and Sny- 
der and are well pleased with the 
country and some will locate. 

AGENTS WANTED. 

We would like to arrange with a 
member in every town in the country 
to distribute these folders and get up 
a party for Colorado. 

LIBERAL COMMISSIONS. 

We offer liberal commissions and 
special prices on any lands you may 
decide to purchase yourself. 

A FREE PASS. 

We also arrange for special rates 
for excursion parties and free trans- 
portation for agent who gets up the 
party to Colorado and return. 

SPECIAL BARGAINS. 

We have special bargains in irri- 
gated farms and town property dur- 
ing the summer months and now is 
the time to see the country and in- 
vest. 

SNYDER TOWN LOTS. 

Parties who will agree to distribute 
our advertising matter among their 
friends can secure six Snyder town 
lots for $ioo. These lots sell for $25 
each and you can make $50 profit by 
reselling them at this price. 

TROUT FISHING IN MOUN- 
TAINS. 

We will run special cheap rate ex- 
cursions from Sterling to Cherokee 
Park every week this summer. This 
is one of the finest resorts in Colo- 
rado. The trout fishing is grand and 
the scenery sublime. 

COME TO COLORADO. 

If you contemplate a trip for 
health, pleasure, recreation or invest- 
ment let us hear from you and we 
will be pleased to give all information 
wanted. 

The Colorado Colony Co., 
Sterling, Colorado. 

17U3 Mention the INOLKNOOK when wriUn*. 



^> il> V*> \i/ \l/ \l> \<i> \4/ \#/ Vli \ij tidi \l/ \4> \l/ %^> U/ \|> \|/ \A/ \|/ \|/ \^y \|/ \d> \d/ \^> \i/ \A/ Ui> \</ \i> >i> vA/ 1^/ %d> \#^ \#> \4>\^i <S& 

Irrigated Crops Never Fail I 



1 IDAHO 



is the best-watered arid State 
winds, destructive storms and 
mate it makes life bright and 
We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer 
change for the general improvement in your condi 
account of health, we believe that Idaho will meet b 
and sensible thing to do; that is, go and see the coun 
swer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger 
fares to investigate thoroughly a new country saves 
Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all prin 
for yourself. Selecting a new home is like selecting 



in America. Brethren are moving there because hot 
yclones are unknown, and with its matchless cli- 
worth living. 

to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a 
tion in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on 
oth requirements. There is, however, only one wise 
try for yourself, as there are many questions to an- 

work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad 
thousands of dollars in years to follow. 

cipal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see 
a wife — you want to do your own choosing. 



Ronnd=Trip Homeseekers' Excursion Tickets 

Will be sold to points in Idaho as follows: West of Pocatello on first and third Tuesday of May, 
August, September and October, 1904. To points north of Pocatello tickets will be sold only in May 
and October, 1904. The rate will apply from Missouri river points, and from St. Paul, Chicago, Bloom- 
ington, Peoria and St. Louis. Tickets to Idaho points will also be sold by the Union Pacific, from sta- 
tions on their lines in Kansas and Nebraska. Rate will be one regular first-class fare for the round trip 
plus $2.00, with limit of 15 days going. Return passage may commence any day within the final limit of 
21 days from date of sale of tickets. Tickets for return will be good for continuous passage to starting 
point. 




PAYETTE VALLEY HOME.-Five Years from Sagebrush. 



Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. 
Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat, Oats and Barley. 



Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 80-acre tract, covered with sage brush. 
Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to wheat. Yielded 30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres 
to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sown in February 
or March the yield would have been much larger. 

Alfalfa was sown with the grain and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 
oats. 

Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to 5 pounds each, four of 
the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) E. L. Dotson. 



S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. 

J. E. HOOPER, Agent, Oakland, Kansas. 



D. E. BURLEY, 
G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R„ 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 



Mention the INGLEN'inK * 



* 



Fine s 



AlNSbENSOK 



Vol. VI 



August 2, 1904. 



REAPING AND SOWING. 



BY AGNES NEFF. 

If you would reap rich golden grain 
Be careful what you sow; 

If carelessly we scatter weeds 
Among the grain they'll grow. 

If idle words and thoughtless deeds 
Our time spent all in vain 

Are seeds that we are sowing here 
We'll gather them in pain. 

But should we scatter them with care 
The precious seeds of truth 

The harvest time will then be joy 
We'll reap the golden fruit. 

Milford, Ind. 

+ * * 

SNAPSHOTS. 



You don't have to pray loud to reach the Father's 
ear. 

* 

The worst bore on earth is the man with a griev- 
ance. 

* 

Less theology and more Christianity might help 
some. 

* 

The wages of sin may be paid in money or in ali- 
mony. 

The trouble ivith the chronic borrower is that he is 
ahvays looking for an encore. 
* 
Even the man who believes in the efficacy of prayer 
should keep one eye on the devil. 
* 
Don't strew flowers on the coffin of those in whose 
pathway during life you've strewn thorns'. 

Many a candidate zvho runs for office discovers that 
his opponent has a walkover. 



If a man is sensitive he should keep 
of other people's business. 



There is no harm in talking about your neighbor 
you find only good things to say. 



No. 31. 

his nose out \ 
ou \ 



You are excusable if a man deceives you once. You 
get what you deserve if he deceives you twice. 
* 

It does not take long after you have met the average 
old bachelor to discover the reason why he is. 

When a young man works his way through college 
he demonstrates, at least, his ability to get a job. 
* 

Do good unto those who hate you. You may run 
for office some day and will need their vote. 
* 

If it wasn't for the fact tliat a fool and his money 
are soon parted, a lot of promoters would have to go 
to work. 

* 

Making a child happy requires a very small invest- 
ment, but its dividends beat the Standard Oil com- 
pany's stock. 

* 

You may be able to watch a fool to some extent, 
but the Nook does not know of any protection from 
the careless man. 

* 

Some men are so mean that they cannot see a crime 
denounced in a newspaper but that they feel that tltey 
have been attacked. 

* 

Somehow we have a great admiration for the woman 
who likes onions and would rather eat them than go 
to a social function. 

* 

It may be that your wife would rather have a kind , 
word and some new clothes now, than to have silver 
handles on her coffin and a big brown tombstone with 
a five-dollar lie chiseled on it by and bv. 



"HI 



INQLENOOr. 



J THE KRITIC ON THE TRANE§ 

* BY GEORGE HALDAN. $ 

The visitor to the St. Louis Fair is struck first of 
all by the vast extent of the grounds and the beautv of 
the exhibition palaces. No fair was ever built on 1240 
acres of land before, and if future companies learn the 
lesson of convenient sight-seeing from the worn-out 
millions who come here, the fairs of the future will not 
be so widely scattered. President Francis said re- 
cently, in a public address, that if no criticism except- 



earth meet to admire and praise the triumphs of art, 
science and philosophy which spring from the entire 
earth at the touch and beck of intelligent industry — 
here but three short years ago stood the forest primeval. 
This part of Forest Park, so wild and tangled, which 
furnished the people of St. Louis so close a communion 
with the heart of nature, was not given up without a 
keen sense of losing something which could never be 
replaced. But all is over now — the transformation, al- 
most a miracle — is full and complete. The stately 
trees have fallen by the woodman's axe ; underbrush 
and debris have melted away ; winding paths, rugged 
gorges, slimy pools, mud, mire, all things ugly or inar- 
tistic have vanished, or, by the touch of labor, been 



~ 




LOOKING NORTH FROM THE CASCADE. 



ing "too large" came to them the exposition company 
would feel highly satisfied with the fair. A good wit 
said to me yesterday that the fair was larger in the 
evening than in the morning, because at night every 
"foot" was an "acher." 

Viewed from the outside by day or night, the eye is 
greeted with a beauty and grandeur of architecture 
which leads one on and on or causes him to stop and 
exclaim: "What wonders have been wrought!" The 
wonder increases too with the recollection that here, 
where to-day numberless spires and domes are upheld 
by thousands of massive columns, here, where by night 
myriads of incandescent bulbs flash forth the glory of 
invention ; here where the high and lowly of all the 



changed into open plazas, fresh water lagoons, with 
playing fountains above them, shaded walks, skirted 
by variegated flower gardens, with heroic statues 
standing everywhere among them, or broad fields over 
which man has "framed the roof, to gather and roll 
back the anthems" of the anvil and the loom. From 
any angle by day or night, the splendid outlook pro- 
claims the highest forms of modern thought. 

Just through the gate on the right of the main en- 
trance the snow-topped Tyrolean Alps, a grand repro- 
duction of the Swiss mountains lift themselves far 
above the clamor and dust of the street. On the left 
hand lies the model street of a model city, showing the 
latest and best street pavings, waterworks, public 



THE INGLENOOK. 



7 2 3 








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724 



THE INGLENOOK, 



buildings, playgrounds, and other municipal equip- 
ments. Just in front, stretching between the palaces of 
Manufactures and Varied Industries, guarded on either 
side and at the north end by an heroic statue, and 
crowned at the farthest point by the historic Louisiana 
Purchase monument, the St. Louis plaza leads one di- 
rectly to the north end of the Grand Basin with three 
famous pieces of statuary looking over it. Among 
these the one of the Cowboy at rest at the feet of his 
faithful steed is a favorite. 

The views from this point beggar any description. 
That thrill of admiration and that expanse of soul 
which come to one with glimpses of the sublime in Art 
or Nature, sifts between the lines and refuses to be 
transferred to paper. 



tains, wrapped in a halo of summer sun by day and 
electric glory by night, compose what is for me the fin- 
est sight in the world, because it is the grandest I have 
yet seen. Since the nations and tribes of men were 
shaken together by the crusades, the cosmopolitan 
spirit, which improves on every past achievement, rules 
the minds of men and no one dares to predict the splen- 
dors of the future; but to-day the Terrace of States 
holds first place among the works of architectural dec- 
orations, designed and erected in modern times. 

From Festival Hall occupying the central position 
with a diameter of 200 feet, a seating capacity of 3,500, 
the colonnade extends a distance of 750 feet on either 
side, passing the fourteen statues erected in commem- 
oration of the fourteen states included in the Louisiana 




VIEW FROM EAST CASCADE. 



Looking toward the south the eye catches at one 
grand sweep, the basin 200 feet wide and a quarter of 
a mile in length, lined on either side with a double row 
of maple trees, through which the greensward and the 
white cement walks, backed by the palace of education 
on the one hand and the palace of electricity on the 
other, form a picture able to entrance the attention of 
an artist, were it not for the bewitching Terrace of 
States beyond. That veritable marble crescent, 1.500 
feet in length, so far transcends all other details of 
this view as to rivet the attention of every eye. Rising 
by steps and slopes from the water's edge to a height 
of 200 feet, bearing the statue of peace against the 
hazy blue of the sky, and variegated every foot of the 
distance with gay gold and silver figures, fountains 
and flowers, every detail blending in perfect harmony 
with every other part, the whole tempered with falling 
floods from the cascades and sprays from the foun- 



territory and ends in the Rotunda restaurant pavilions. 
The water falls 90 feet, has a forward flow of 300 feet 
and spreads gradually downward from 45 feet at the 
top to 350 feet at the base. As one gazes on this beau- 
tiful structure erected at a total cost of a million dollars 
he experiences a keen sense of regret that a creation so 
magnificent must endure for so short a season. 

The main exhibition palaces cover about fourteen 
acres of ground each, with the exception of the Agri- 
culture structure, which roofs twenty-three acres. 
These gigantic buildings differing in style of architec- 
ture, but all agreeing in the grandeur of massive- 
ness, stretch one and one-half miles west from the 
government building. The best idea of the grounds 
may be had from a ride on the intramural railway 
which winds and turns for a distance of several miles 
in and out among the trees and roadways, while the 
buildings may best be seen from a ride on the la- 



THE INGLENOOK. 



725 



goon about 8:30 P. M., just when the fountains and 
electricity have been turned on. The accompanying il- 
lustrations are intended to give the reader a faint idea 
of the splendor of the greatest achievement of the 
twentieth century. 

* * * 

ILLINOIS AT THE WORLD'S FAIR. 

BY EMILY GRANT HUTCH1NGS. 



Third Brilliant Military Reception at the State Building — 

How the Prairie State Looms up Largely in 

Mining and Agriculture. 

St. Louis, July 13. — The third of a series of bril- 
liant military receptions was given last night at the 



home on the hill west of the Cascades is almost with- 
out an exposition rival. However, the World's Fair 
has something more of Illinois than social attractions 
to offer to the visiting public. 

The advantage of nearness to the seat of the World's 
Fair, which made possible the great displays of Mis- 
souri, was enjoyed and made use of almost as fully 
by the sister State of Illinois. In every department 
of the Exposition the great resources of Illinois are 
shown. 

The State home is, with possibly two exceptions, the 
most pretentious of all the State buildings, and cer- 
tainly its location is the most commanding. From the 
intramural cars this great, white structure, with its 
generous verandas and its wealth of ornament, can be 




SECTION OF PALACE OF MACHINERY. 



Illinois building on the World's Fair grounds. The 
Second regiment, with General Scott at its head, acted 
as host, and the receiving line included, in addition to 
the officers of the regiment and their wives, the two 
hostesses, Mrs. Craig and Mrs. Coleman, wives of 
two of the commissioners, who are detailed to preside 
over the building during the first two weeks of July. 

The reception was tendered to Governor and Mrs. 
Yates, and it afforded an opportunity for the personnel 
of the Exposition and the social leaders of St. Louis 
to meet the Governor of Illinois. In the course of the 
evening elaborate refreshments were served and the 
charming affair closed with a grand military ball. 

As a center of social gayety the magnificent State 



seen at several points. It is not on the Plateau of 
States, but is the important member of another State 
group on The Trail, directly west of the Cascade Gar- 
dens. Across the way lie the beautiful gardens of 
Japan, and the Lincoln museum is directly north. 

The building is designed along the lines of the 
French Renaissance, but it is entirely modern in 
treatment. For instance, in the relief ornament of 
frieze and cornice the fleur-de-lis is replaced by the 
ear-of-corn motif. This is Illinois Renaissance and is 
something more than cut and dried ornament. It is 
symbolic of the State. 

The two great statues that greet the visitor are 
those of Lincoln and Douglas. The grand central re- 



726 



THE INQLENOOK. 



ception hall is done in tones of ivory, green and gold, 
with floor of tile. The medallion center of the tile is 
the great seal of the State. At one side of the broad 
staircase is a raised platform on which stands a grand 
piano. This elevated apartment serves as a reception 
and music room. 

Opening from the great hall are reading rooms, rest 
rooms and the office of the Commission. On the floor 
above are the suites of apartments for the governor, 
the Commission and the officers of the building. The 
wives of the Commissioners serve as hostesses, each 
one doing the honors for a period of ten days at a 
time. 

One of the most noteworthy features of the Illinois 
State home is its verandas. From these every part 
of the Exposition grounds can be seen, and the night 
view is especially glorious. The building was de- 
signed by Illinois architects, erected by Illinois labor 
and furnished, for the most part, by Illinois firms. 
Hence it is really an expression of the State it repre- 
sents. Its cost was ninety thousand dollars. 

Aside from the State home, the most remarkable ex- 
hibits of the State are those in the Palace of Mines 
and Metallurgy and the Palace of Agriculture. In the 
former there is abundant evidence that Illinois is pri- 
marily a mining State, while the latter wholly contra- 
dicts this notion. As a matter of fact, Illinois ranks 
second to Pennsylvania in the production of coal, and 
its quarries yield a fine quality of both sand and lime 
stone. The booth in the Palace of Mines contains 
the largest block of soft coal ever removed from a 
mine. It is 6x7x8 feet in size and was hoisted 335 
feet from the shaft. In the coal exhibit there are 
specimens of the product of over fifty mines, with 
chemical analysis showing their respective heating ca- 
pacity. 

There is a large display of the clay industry of the 
State, including bricks, tile and pottery. In addition 
there are shown splendid specimens of flur spar, lead 
and zinc. If these varied mineral products suffice to 
convince the visitor that Illinois is primarily a mining 
State, he should straightway inspect the two Illinois 
displays at the west side of the grounds. 

In the Palace of Horticulture there is an extensive 
table exhibit of fresh fruit, especially of apples and the 
more ephemeral fruits, such as berries and plums. 
However, the best display of all is in the Palace of 
Agriculture. In the cold storage case in the dairy 
section are two exceptionally good pieces of butter 
sculpture. They are the busts of those two great 
Illinoisans, Lincoln and Grant. 

By far the largest and most significant part of the 
exhibit is the collection of samples of corn, planted, 
cultivated and harvested by boys. The league of corn 
growers now numbers nine thousand members and 
there are eleven hundred prizes each year, the first 



being five hundred dollars. Each boy submits ten 
ears of corn from his own patch, together with an ac- 
count of his experiences and methods. The prize win- 
ners have attached their photographs to the little pyra- 
mid of ten ears of fine corn. For the farming indus- 
try of the State nothing could possibly be better than 
this annual contest. The boy is taught to look upon 
the scientific cultivation of the soil as something worthy 
his best effort. That in which he takes a personal 
pride ceases to be drudgery. As a result of this corn 
contest, much of the danger that all the farmer boys 
will seek the great cities may be averted, and it is well 
that the great Exposition should encourage the boys 
in their worthy enterprise. 

* * * 
A DRINKING FOUNTAIN FOR BIRDS. 



BY D. L. MILLER. 

Outside my library window, just at the edge of the 
lawn, where the green grass gives place to the pansy, 
gladiolii and rose beds I have placed a drinking foun- 
tain and bathing fountain for the birds. For years, 
during the long, hot, thirsty days of summer, thou- 
sands of God's feathered songsters have been made 
glad and happy at the fountain of fresh water. This 
summer the rains have been scanty and the birds, not 
finding water in the usual places, come in great num- 
bers to drink and bathe. I sat at my window a few 
days ago and counted sixty-four birds in a single hour, 
and at another time ninety-five in the same length of 
time that came to the refreshing fountain to quench 
their thirst and to take a plunge bath in the water. 
Among the number I observed robins, blue jays, black- 
birds, cat-birds, sparrows, flickers, red-headed wood- 
peckers, and golden robins. 

It was from the grass at the side of the drinking 
fountain that the red-headed woodpecker so industri- 
ously carried away the corn and hid it in nook and 
cranny, crack and crevice wherever a secret place 
could be found, reported in the Nook several years ago. 

A little kindness like this shown the birds pays a 
large per cent in satisfaction that comes from seeing 
them enjoy themselves. My presence in the garden 
among the flowers is taken as a matter of course by 
them and they have become quite tame. All of God's. 
creatures are susceptible to acquaintanceship if treat- 
ed kindly. 

The drinking fountain is nearly under the shade of 
an old Siberian crab apple tree of great size and dense 
foliage. Where the heavy boughs part a platform has 
been placed with railing around it and here one may 
rest in the shade among the leaves of the tree and come 
in close touch with the nesting birds. In a box close at 
hand a couple wrens have taken up their abode and 
on a bough just above your head a pair of robins set up 



the: inglenook, 



727 



housekeeping this summer. While the nest building 
was in progress, owing to the prevailing drought, the 
birds found a great scarcity of mud with which to 
daub the nest to make it secure. Noticing the diffi- 
culty I moistened the ground with water beneath my 
window. The birds at once found the little bed of 
mortar, ready made, and soon had the inner coating 
of mud ready to receive the softer layer of feathers 
and down for the tiny eggs that soon came. 

Later in the season one of the young birds more am- 
bitious than the rest tried his wings and came half 
flying and tumbling to the ground. Fearing that the 
youngster might fall a prey to the cat I caught it with 
the purpose of replacing it in the nest. It gave a sud- 
den cry of fear and alarm and instantly the parent 
birds came darting at me with loud, shrill cries. The 
notes of alarm sounded by the old birds were taken 
up in the maples, with which the street is lined, and 
in half a minute or less more than a score of robins 
had joined in their protest against my interference 
with the fledgling. I placed it on the ground and it 
hopped to a place of safety under a rosebush near at 
hand. Up to this time there had been complete har- 
mony in the action of the robins, but now that the 
young bird had escaped the parents changed their 
tactics and made it apparent that they no longer want- 
ed the help of their neighbors. One or two who lin- 
gered were promptly driven away. 

How like that of some people, I thought, was the 
action of the robins. In time of distress and trouble 
our souls melt within us and we are glad for help. 
But when the storm is over and the clouds clear away 
we are sufficient unto ourselves and even forget and 
show ingratitude to our helpers. 

Mt. Morris, III. 

COMMERCIAL VALUE OF MUSIC. 



BY ETHA A. EVANS. 

What is it that one musician, who does not work 
any harder, composes more pieces, or in other ways 
burns more of the inspiration oil, is accepted more 
quickly than his next studio neighbor as a man 
of transcendent genius, while the other is simply ig- 
nored ? 

What is there, in short, in the make-up of any 
man that induces the world to accept him at his 
own valuation? 

One composer, faithful to his art, goes through 
this life unnoticed and perhaps dies in poverty ; 
while after his death people praise his works and 
call him great. Then it is that an original manu- 
script of his might command a good figure, but the 
faithful old master is past enjoying it. Another 
man will compose, say one or two pieces, and be 
placed in comparative affluence. 



Although popular music is short lived it brings 
large returns for little work. 

The most popular song, from a publisher's stand- 
point, composed within the last twenty years was, 
" After the Ball." Six hundred thousand copies 
were sold during its popularity of a few months. 
It is never heard now, but these figures indicate 
the commercial value of music in the United States. 

When the Italian impresario with the street pi- 
ano, grinds out that quaint burst of melody, " Hia- 
watha," it may interest one to know that four hun- 
dred thousand copies have been sold. Hiawatha 
was the reigning success of last summer and was 
bought of the publishing house of another, after it had 
been published but six months, for ten thousand dol- 
lars. 

When the strains of " In the Good Old Summer 
Time " greet one's ear it may alleviate one's grief 
to know that two hundred and fifty thousand copies 
of the piece were disposed of before the public was 
sated. 

" Bedelia " some time ago was valued by one 
music publishing company, which sold it to another, 
at twenty thousand dollars. 

"The Gondolier," a composition popular in the 
west for the last five months, was sold for five thou- 
sand dollars in cash. 

A popular bass solo by W. H. Petrie, namely 
" Asleep in the Deep," sold to the extent of two 
hundred thousand copies and brought its composer 
five thousand dollars. 

The author of more serious and what is intended 
to be " great literature " may well look about him 
in amazement. But, he may argue, does art also 
comprehend the requirements of the landlord, the 
butcher and the baker? If so, the composer of so- 
called popular music is the J. Pierpont Morgan of 
the studio. 

Songs are sold to jobbers and retailers by the 
publishers at seven cents to fifteen cents each. 
Of this the author gets from four to seven cents, 
according to his standing and the regard the pub- 
lisher may have for' his future. 

An author drawing four cents on each of two 
hundred thousand copies would have eight thou- 
sand dollars to spend. If he scored such a success 
as " After the Ball " or " On the Banks of the Wa- 
bash " he would have sixteen to twenty thousand 
dollars. 

When one contrasts the returns with the work 
done it seems out of proportion. It is said that 
" Dolly Gray " was composed in three hours. " Be- 
delia " in one day. 

Compared to the rewards of literary efforts these 
profits are enormous. That charming historical 
novel, " When Knighthood was in Flower," by 
Chas. Major, whose pen name is Fdward Caskoden. 



728 



THE INGLENOOK. 



was the product of a year's work and sold about 
300,000 copies. This brought the author something 
less than ten cents a copy and yielded $30,000 for 
the work of a year. 

A book such as " Kim," on which Kipling spent 
a year, netted him ten thousand dollars. This book 
sold less than fifty thousand copies and Kipling re- 
ceived a royalty of ten per cent. 

Buford, N. Dak. 

-£•-:-•:• 

ON TO YOUR JOB. 



BY PROF. C. M. JAMES. 

Nine-tenths of the failures in this world are due 
to the fact that people are not prepared to meet 
their battles successfully. They hurry through 
school, if through at all, hustle to the front, anxious 
to get into business, and choose a profession on 
the spur of a moment or as the circumstances seem 
to dictate, regardless of the fact that they are whol- 
ly unprepared for it. My friends in this condition, 
you will be forever handicapped in whatever calling 
you embark, be it farming, housekeeping, or exe- 
cuting great commercial enterprises, if you do not 
seek to acquire a considerable amount of education ; 
yet you may have all these attainments and without 
common sense and the ability to do, you will be a 
failure. 

Though you speak with the tongues of college 
professors and of philosophers, and have not com- 
mon sense, you will become as sounding brass or 
tinkling cymbals. 

William Hawley Smith, that great apostle of edu- 
cation and preacher of righteousness to unregener- 
ate schoolteachers, tells a story of one evening 
when he was going from Chicago to Quincy, 111., 
to deliver a lecture. The evening was cold and 
rainy and the night dark, and as he was hurrying, 
through the train sheds he was accosted by a grimy- 
visaged and stalwart Irish gentleman. He had on 
clothes which marked him as one of the engineers 
on the great trains that go out from that city. Up- 
on conversation with him he proved to be an old 
schoolmate of Mr. Smith ; he begged of Mr. Smith 
to make the run down to Quincy in company with 
him. The invitation was accepted and his friend 
found him a comfortable seat in the engine cab, 
and when the signal was given the engineer put 
his hand on the throttle and the ponderous machin- 
ery began to move. Soon they were passing 
through the company's switch yards, guided by a 
hundred signal lights, on out over the broad prairies ; 
then quietly admonishing the fireman to " feed her 
up a little," he turned the throttle wide open. They 
flew through hamlets and then rounded curves. 
Now he turned a lever; once he left his seat and 



tightened up a tap which he said might have de- 
railed the whole train had it been lost. 

Upon a given signal, wholly unintelligible to Mr. 
Smith, the engineer side-tracked the train and in ex- 
actly three-fourths of a minute a train going in the 
opposite direction whirled by. In three hours and 
fifty minutes they arrived at Quincy, 111., a distance 
of 225 miles. Mr. Smith asked his friend to come to 
his lecture that night, to which he consented, and 
Mr. Smith hurried on with his committee to meet 
his engagement. A vast throng had assembled and 
he lectured on " Education." He tried to show 
what it included and what a failure we would make 
in case we were deficient in some of the subjects of 
the curriculum. In the course of his remarks he 
tried to give a definition of an educated man. He 
said, " An educated man is one in whom all the 
faculties of the individual are harmoniously and 
systematically developed." 

After the lecture, as he was passing out through 
the vestibule, he was again accosted by his old friend 
and schoolmate, who said, " An' Billy, that was a 
foin lecture of yours, but I am thinking I can give 
you a definition of an educated man that will beat 
yours." Mr. Smith told him to proceed. " Well 
sir, Billy, an educated man is one who is on to his 
job." 

So, my young friends, we would have you be on 
to your job. That Irishman may not have known 
how to extract the cube root of a given number, 
but he did know how to run an engine, and have 
common sense enough to apply it, to gain the side- 
track safely and allow the lightning express to 
pass, and lose the least possible amount of time. 
The engineer may not have been able to tell the 
difference between a participial adjective and a 
participle with the use of adjectives, but he was 
able to make a very close discrimination in the rat- 
tle of his machinery which told him of a loosened 
tap, which if neglected might have hurled a score of 
lives into eternity. 

An old Arabic legend tells the story of a wise 
people who lived in the valley of Vir. Understand- 
ing the influence of a wise leader, they had long 
desired to have a king whom the beasts would fol- 
low, the sun worship, the waters obey and the peo- 
ple love. Long years of search had failed to reveal 
to them a man of the desired kind. One day Rai- 
ma, their wisest sage, went up into a mountain to 
pray to the gods for the long-wished-for king. Aft- 
er offering a prayer he arose to descend the moun- 
tain, when there came toward him a man clad in 
the native garb of the forests. The man was fol- 
lowed by a lion on which were sores. As the 
strange man accosted Kalma, the lion licked the 
stranger's hands, and immediately the sores were 



THE INGLENOOK. 



729 



healed. Pleased, at least, to find a man whom the 
beasts would follow, Kalma asked permission to 
visit the stranger's house. Following a winding 
mountain path they came upon a cleft of rocks on 
which was built a log cabin, into which apparently 
no sunlight had ever shed its golden rays. As the 
two men entered the light shone in every crevice 
of the rude structure and even the knots changed 
into the brilliancy (?) of diamonds. 

The stranger then took Kalma farther up the 
mountain where he showed him a silvery lake, rest- 
ing pleasantly between two great mountains. The 
strange man told Kalma that once no lake occupied 
this place and that only a stream of water flowed 
down the recess. One day he observed a rock far 
up the mountain side, which if placed at the point 
where the stream flowed out from between the 
two mountains, would effectually dam in the wa- 
ters and produce a great lake. He accordingly ac- 
complished his work and the lake was the result. 
Whenever the people of the valley below were suf- 
fering from drought, he pushed the rock aside and 
permitted some of the water to flow down and water 
the lowlands. 

Kalma shouted in triumph: "I have found the 
man for whom we have been so long searching. 
For I have seen the beasts follow him, the sun break 
the opaque denseness of the fogs in its effort to 
worship him. I have seen the waters compelled to 
obey his command, and I know the people in the 
valley have cause to love him. Come," he said, 
" and be crowned our king." 

Therefore be strong, valiant, observant ; be ready, 
prepared, willing; be " on to your job." The world 
is looking for leaders ; thousands are ready to fol- 
low. Do your part well; compel the world to ad- 
mire you and your accomplishments while you are 
here, and miss you when you are gone. Be " on to 
your job." 

Fairfield, Ind. 

♦ ♦ «$* 

ARIZONA CACTUS FARM. 



A mile south of Phoenix, close to the usually dry 
channel of Salt River, is one of the oddest farms in 
America. It is planted to nothing but cactus, of every 
form found within Arizona. Each kind is cultivated 
under the same conditions that prevail upon its native 
heath, to as great an extent as is possible, and most of 
them thrive well under the hot skies of southern Ari- 
zona, cared for by experts. 

The main owner of the farm is Dr. R. E. Kunz, a 
college-bred German scientist, who has taken up the 
study of cacti and their cousins as his life work. A 
physician, he has particularly studied the plants for the 
possibility of securing products valuable in medicine. 
And the utilitarian side has appealed to him in other 



ways and he knows the plants wherefrom come good 
fruit, those that bear good water for the thirsty desert 
traveler and those useful to the architecture of the ab- 
original housebuilder. Arizona has become the source 
of supply for cactus for most all the botanical gardens 
of the world, and this demand for plants has increased 
till a lucrative industry has arisen from what would 
seem to the uninitiated one of the most unpromising 
floral fields of the world. 

The most prominent of the cacti of the garden is 
the saguaro. It is one of the landmarks of the deserts. 
Its large white flowers cover the end of everv branch 
in April and May, followed by a greenish yellow fruit, 
which, when it bursts, discloses a scarlet pulp filled 
with black seeds. This is very nutritious. 

Another species of far greater use, if not attraction, 
is cereus thurberi or pitaya of the natives, which was 
named after the late Dr. George Thurber. editor of the 
American Agriculturist of New York. Its northern 
limit is 115 miles from Phoenix in a southwesternly 
direction, and extends into Sonora southward. The 
flower is white, nocturnal and smaller than that of the 
saguaro. 

The fruit of this species is of delicious taste, and for 
months is the support of tribes of Indians, who then 
feast upon it. The pulp is also dried for future use, 
and a syrup, as well as an intoxicating liquor, is made 
from the fresh fruit. The Yaquis, Papagoes and 
Pimas largely subsist on the fruit of this cactus. The 
stems of this cactus grow from 6 to 20 feet high. 

Perhaps the queerest cactus of all America is Cereus 
greggii of Arizona, known to Mexicans as Jara )natra- 
ca. Unlike any other cactus, it has a very large tuber 
in place of fibrous roots, and it resembles a great 
sugar beet below the surface, weighing from two to 
14 pounds. The stems are not more than two to four 
feet high, as thick as a finger and covered with very 
short pines. The tuber is medicinal, used externally in 
Mexico. It is the Arizona night-blooming cereus, 
fragrant, the flower white and large as a saucer. 

Englemann's hedgehog cereus known as Echino- 
ccreits cngehnanni, grows in clumps of from two to 
twenty joints, having very large brownish white spines, 
from one to one and one-half feet in height. Its bril- 
liant rose-colored flowers, very fragrant, appear in 
April, and by the latter part of May are followed by a 
crimson edible berry of the size and flavor of a large 
strawberry. 

"Opintia" is the prickly pear family, of which we 
have many species of various colors. The flat-jointed 
bear in some cases fine fruit, while the round-branched, 
often twisted like a rope, have a woody fruit unfit for 
food. These are met with on the desert, tableland and 
mountains. But most of these are seen together culti- 
vated on the cactus farm near Phoenix. — Cincinnati 
Enquirer. 



73° 



the: inglenook. 



THE BLACK BELT. 



BY ROSCOE CONKLING BRUCE. 



Not long ago I had the pleasant duty of driving Mr. 
N. T. Bacon about Macon county. Mr. Bacon is 
the author of an intensely interesting series of ar- 
ticles in the Yale Review upon the present condi- 
tion of Russia. Though specially interested in the 
industrial and financial status of Russia, Mr. Bacon 
makes some very acute observations on the so- 
cial condition of the Russian peasant. Before com- 
ing to Tuskegee he had been at some pains to as- 
certain, by horseback inspection, the status of the 
negro peasantry in another county of the Alabama 
black belt. It must be remembered that this gentle- 
man is a trained observer, — indeed I may say with- 
out inaccuracy that his business is that of observ- 
ing; and hence he observes with a caution, a close- 
ness, a justness, that are quite beyond the powers 
of the ordinary man. 

" The negro has one difficulty," says Mr. Bacon 
in his last article, " from which the ex-serf is free. 
There is no difference in race between peasant and 
noble, so that the peasant has no social obstacle to 
overcome to rise to the highest position in the state, 
if he has the ability and energy ; while the faintest 
trace of negro blood condemns the individual in 
our country to social ostracism. But even this 
seems to be turning to the negro's advantage. 

" Its first effect was to drive the negroes together 
for mutual support. Whereas, at the close of the 
war, they were fairly well distributed over the rich- 
er parts of the South, they have drifted together 
so that many counties show now over eighty per 
cent of the population colored. They have been 
most degraded where the whites are fewest, the 
remnant being mainly Jewish merchants who were 
exploiting the negroes most usuriously, as the Jew- 
ish middlemen have done with the peasants of Rus- 
sia. But three new features have lately developed 
which cooperate to improve the situation. First, an 
improved demand for labor has led the planters to 
improve the quarters, so that the scandal of the 
one room cabin for a whole family is slowly passing 
away. Second, the concentration has made the ne- 
groes easier to reach, and the industrial missions 
are beginning to exert an influence all the more 
powerful because nominally they do not aim at the 
negroes' morals or religion, but only to improve his 
temporal state. These institutions are making the 
negroes' path easier in enough neighborhoods to 
affect the general average sensibly. The region 
around Tuskegee is notably less degraded than 
similar districts fifty miles away. Its radius is plain 
for at least ten miles. The number of one-room 
cabins for that distance is very small, and many 



farmers have patent seeders and other simple ma- 
chinery, and they are fairly provided with cattle. 
There is scarcely a white farmer in this district." 

This relatively prosperous condition of the negro 
peasantry in the neighborhood of Tuskegee Insti- 
tute is unmistakable, and is again and again re- 
marked by persons who have some standard of com- 
parison. The school raises the level of life in this 
community not only by the well-known farmers' 
conferences, of which I shall speak, but also indi- 
rectly by enrolling young men and women, and boys 
and girls from the surrounding district. Just a few 
evenings ago I happened to be driving through a 
neighboring plantation, when to my delight I heard 
in an old unreconstructed cabin some little children 
singing songs which they had learned at the gra- 
cious kindergarten " ovah thah to de No-ormal," 
and with the little songs those children took home, 
I'm sure, something of the sweet spirit of the kin- 
dergarten. 

Thirteen Annual Farmers' Conferences have 
been held at Tuskegee, and at the twelfth some 
statistical data were gathered. The total number 
of persons attending that session was in the neigh- 
borhood of 1,500, and of these the enumerators 
were able to register 503, of whom 150 were fe- 
males. The purpose of the conference is, of course, 
to come at the heads of families ; the conference is 
a means of utilizing the insight of the shrewdest 
of these older men and women for the benefit of 
all, and of impressing the stupid and shrewd alike 
with modern ideas upon farming, and wholesome 
views of life and living. Fifty per cent of the per- 
sons registered were male heads of families, and 
333 were between twenty and forty-nine years of 
age, inclusive. Some eighty-two per cent of the 
503 persons were born in Alabama and Georgia, and 
to-day eighty-six per cent of them live in Alabama. 
Almost every county in Alabama was represented. 

The statistics of conjugal condition show rather 
plainly that the males in this group of persons marry 
relatively . late, that is to say, comparison with cer- 
tain other groups of negroes show this. Sandy 
Spring, Maryland, and Farmville, Virginia, have been 
studied intensively by experts, working under the 
United States Bureau of Labor, and the negro males 
in those two communities marry appreciably earlier 
than the males of the Tuskegee conference. I am 
clearly of the opinion that a higher development of 
thrift accounts for this postponement of marriage. It 
marks a development of foresight and self-control. 
Out of ninety-seven women of marriageable age, — 
fifteen years and over, — there were seventy-nine moth- 
ers, to whom, up to date, 357 children had been born ; 
and seventy-six per cent of the children were living. 
In connection with this it is important to note that 



THE INGLENOOK. 



731 



the number of children is small enough to indicate 
prudence, while large enough not to be available as 
an illustration of race suicide. President Roosevelt 
certainly should not feel injured because the ladies 
of the conference had an average of 4.52 children. 
A very important matter is the fact that so large 
a percentage of the children are living. Of a sim- 
ilar group of 268 children, counted at Cinclare and 
Calumet, in Louisiana, only 57.5 per cent were liv- 
ing, as against 76.4 per cent of the conference chil- 
dren. While the conference women are fortunately 
less prolific than those of Cinclare and Calumet, the 
mortality of the children among the conference peo- 
ple is sensibly smaller, — in both aspects an important 
advance in civilization. 

In view of the fact that for so many years the con- 
ference has utilized every source to stimulate the ne- 
groes in the black belt to increase the efficiency of 
the rural school, the answers to the inquiry as to 
" length of school term in negro school nearest your 
residence " are interesting. At the earlier conference 
it was found, in the words of Principal Washington, 
" that in what is known as the black belt of the South 
the schools lasted in most cases but three months." 
The statistics of this recent conference happily show 
that at the school available to eleven per cent of the 
309 families the terms were three months or less ; to 
14.9 per cent the terms were three months or less : to 
per cent were five months ; to 10.7 per cent six months ; 
and to 38.2 per cent more than six months ! Now 
for only eleven per cent of the schools to last but 
three months and 38.2 per cent to last more than six 
months registers an advance in civilization, — an ad- 
vance largely attributable to the annual Tuskegee Ne- 
gro Conference. At the tenth conference Mr. W. E. 
B. DuBois reached the conclusion that in the case 
of over twenty-five per cent of the schools the patrons 
voluntarily contributed taxes, which lengthened the 
term from one to two months each year; and a very 
careful study of the twelfth and thirteenth confer- 
ence convinces me that the support of the negro rural 
schools through voluntary local taxation is increas- 
ingly popular and effective. In tragic contrast with 
these opportunities for the young men and women, 
the boys and girls of to-day, is the naked fact that 
forty-two per cent of the heads of families answering 
the question have had in all their lives no schooling at 
all ! To these conference people, — Mr. Washington's 
children, every one, — I would apply the words by 
which Shakespeare described the minutes of our life, — 
" In ceaseless toil all forward do contend." 

Director Tuskegee Institute, Alabama. 
♦ ♦•* 

When love and wisdom drink out of the same cup 
in this every-day world, it is the exception. — Mine. 
Neckar. 



PRAYING BY MACHINERY. 



In the country of Thibet, north of the Himalaya 
mountains is to be found a people who are martyrs 
of folklore. These people think their spiritual life is 
to be a. continual struggle against demons which are 
as hard to conquer as the mountain passes of the 
Himalayas. They have many gods to whom they 
pray which are classified according to rank and func- 
tion, and each one has a special name, besides they 
have general names. For instance here is a form of 
one of their common prayers in general terms : " To 
the yellow god, black god, white god, and the green 
god, please kindly take us all up with you and do 
not leave us unprotected, but destroy our enemies." 

In order to pray to so many gods about so many 
things as the people have to pray in a superstitious land, 
these people find human agencies entirely inadequate 
to the demand. So they have invented a little wheel 
about the size and shape of a pint tin cup. except that 
it has no handle on like a tin cup, and that it has a 
cover on the top as well as on the bottom. Then it 
has a wire running through the cup from top to bot- 
tom, and on the end of this wire is placed the handle. 
Then on the top of the cup is a little chain about three 
inches long on which is fastened a heavy metal bulb. 
One offering prayers takes this machine in his right 
hand, gives it a little simple whirl by which means 
the bulb is started in a circular motion around the 
stand. Each revolution is one prayer, and by this 
method one may offer a number of prayers, and it is 
to be supposed very eloquent ones in a very short 
time. 

It seems that this would be a splendid thing for 
American people who are so busy that they do not 
have time to pray. In all probability they would be 
but very little more mechanical than these prayers that 
are offered here. The novel feature of this prayer 
wheel which the people of Thibet spend much of their 
time in turning is, " that if turned the wrong way, 
everything that was done before is now undone." 

Elder D. L. Miller, with whom many of the Nookers 
are acquainted, visited that country one time and suc- 
ceeded in procuring one of these Thibetan prayer 
wheels. When coming home on the train, and while 
explaining to some of the passengers this invention of 
the man of Thibet, a certain gentleman asked to have it 
in his hands. To this Brother Miller kindly assented, 
and after the gentleman had given it several whirls his 
wife tauntingly remarked, " Jim, you have prayed 
more in the last two minutes than you have done before 
in all your life." While this was given in a jest it 
meant a great deal to Jim, and to all the others who 
were listening. 

* + * 

Unbidden guests are often welcomest when they 
are gone. — Shakespeare. 



732 



THE INGLENOOK 



WHO SENT THE DREAM? 



BY MARY P. ELLENBERGER. 

It was settled. All the plans and arrangements for 
the first burglary were made. 

A very suitable outfit of «ools, consisting of crow- 
bars, chisels, etc., were safely stowed away in the loft 
of the old barn in one of Mrs. Heath's best hemstitched 
pillowslips, and Dick Heath, who, under the capable 
tutorship of Jack Evans was fast developing into a wild, 
bad boy, crept stealthily up the stairs to his small but 
cozy and comfortable room to bed. He felt very brave 
and quite grown as, standing tip toe, he touched 
the low ceiling with the tips of his long, slim fingers. 
True, there was a creepy sensation once in a while in 
the region of his spine, but pooh ! that amounted to 
nothing. At heart Dick was not really a. bad boy, 
but he had read quite a number of yellow books, with 
glaring picture covers, and his brave soul cried out 
to him for an opportunity to revel in heroic deeds of 
daring. And then his mother was dead and Dick 
was only sixteen, and felt much honored by the de- 
cided preference shown him by Jack Evans, the swag- 
gering bully of school yard and street. Jack was 
eighteen, his father was by far the richest man in the 
village, in fact was considered quite a merchant prince 
when his new brick store was opened to the public. 

Jack was deep, vicious and cunning and as great a 
coward as ever closed teeth over vile cigarettes or 
stole drinks from the family medicine flask. And 
when with ignoble ingratitude he conceived the plan of 
robbing his own father's store Dick Heath occurred 
to him as the most likely accomplice at his command. 

Dick was shocked with the idea at first, but he soon 
found that Jack would brand him with cowardice if he 
refused, and as Jack explained, " If we are caught, 
why it's nobody but pa, and he would never expose 
-us, and besides we're not going to be caught, we're 
too sharp," with a shrewd wink and a well-met slap 
on Dick's back. Jack was to tamper with a window 
in the rear of the store room when secure from de- 
tection, and they were to make their entrance into the 
store in the dead of night, secure a new suit of clothes, 
with hat, boots, etc., for each of them, with fifty dol- 
lars apiece and a supply of cigarettes and chewing 
tobacco and were to flee to a place unknown. Every- 
thing was to be done in skillful haste. 

As Jack lay down in his clean, white bed he felt 
quite a hero in anticipation of the great and daring 
deed. He had scarcely fallen asleep when a pebble 
struck the window of his room (this being the signal 
agreed upon), he sprang from the bed, struck a match 
and let it flare an instant before the window in answer 
to Tack's signal, and hastily donned his clothing which 



lay near to hand and in a few seconds they were on 
their way to the store. 

It was a small job to open the window with which 
Jack had tampered, secure the coveted booty, and slip 
out again, when to Dick's horror he heard approach- 
ing footsteps and missed Jack from his side. Jack had 
the money, Dick had the bundle of goods which he in- 
stantly dropped. He sprang forward; he was light 
and agile and ran like the wind, but his pursuers kept 
hot on his trail. On and on he ran, his eyes starting 
from his head, his hair standing on end in terror, the 
cold air like ice to his burning lungs. Nearer, nearer, 
his pursuers came, he tried to cry for mercy, his tongue 
was stiff, his blood congealed with horror at his ter- 
rible situation, and just as he fell staggering against 
the fence his palsied limbs refused to mount, a hand 
closed about his weak young arm with a grasp of 
steel. 

"Oh! oogh!" 

" Dick Heath, in the name of all that's wonderful, 
what's a ailin' you ? I say wake up ! wake up ! I nev- 
er hearn sech goins on in all my born days, turn over 
and lay on tother side. I just thought when I saw 
you a takin' the third help of fresh sausage for your 
supper that you'd have bad dreams over it. I declare 
I thought the hul house wus full of pesty thieves." 

Now Dick had always felt a sort of contempt for 
his quiet stepmother, she seemed such a very ordinary 
person when compared with the heroines of the sen- 
sational tales he had read. 

But when he became fully awake and saw her stand- 
ing calm and strong by his bedside, his sentiments 
took a sudden change. Dick had always been con- 
sidered a very smart boy, but there in that moonlit 
room he did the brightest thing of his life when he 
threw his trembling arms about his stepmother's neck 
and with his face hidden on her shoulder sobbed out 
the whole shameful story of his temptation and his 
weakness. 

All this happened twenty-five years ago. There is 
a grave in an obscure corner of the village churchyard 
where the body of Jack Evans, exconvict, after a life 
of crime was laid in a dishonored grave where it has 
long since returned to dust. Each Sabbath the simple 
village folks flock to the little church to drink in the 
sweet and holy teaching that falls from the lips of 
their gentle pastor, familiarly and lovingly called 
" Dick Heath." 

Turney, Mo. 

*:- * •> 

There's sunshine after rain, dear friends, 

There's sunshine after rain; 
And twilight comes when darkness ends 

To usher day again. 

*> «$» «|t 

Woman's heart is still an unsolved riddle. — Rivarol. 



THE iNGLENOOK. 



733 



SERVICE. 



BY LINA M. STONER. 

" Good evening, Etta, I'm glad to see you, but sorry 
to find you in poor health ; I know of something 
that will bring back the roses to your cheeks and 
make you strong again." " O, Etta is ready and 
willing to go," said Mother Gray, looking at her 
daughter with an air of resignation. " But she has 
a work to do, and we all should want to live as long 
as we can — " " I wonder who would want to live 
in this sinful world ! " replied Etta, with a dismal 
look in her large, blue eyes. Defeated in her pur- 
pose the visitor changed the conversation to a more 
agreeable subject, and after a brief call she left the 
invalid to her meditations. Trained from early 
childhood that this world is a dark and dreary vale, 
through which we pass to joys beyond ; that we 
owe it no service, that the highest purpose in life 
is a bright and happy ending, that the sooner the 
great change takes place, the more interesting and 
impressive ; living in such an atmosphere, was it 
strange that the frail flower soon faded and the 
work she should have done was left for other hands 
to do? 

" I want to be an angel, 

And with the angels stand," 

sang a little boy as he returned from Sunday school. 
"Why do you sing that song, Albert?" asked his 
mother. " Because I want to be an angel, O moth- 
er, may I, can I not be one?" The mother lovingly 
drew her child to her, opened her Bible and read 
that " angels are ministering spirits, sent forth to 
minister for those who shall be heirs of salvation." 
" It is better for you, my son, to want to be a man, 
a noble, useful man ; to do the work God wants 
you to do, to be an heir of God and joint heir with 
Christ, and at last to sit down with Christ upon 
his throne, this is far better than to be an angel." 
The song was left unsung, but a lesson was learned 
that has not been forgotten. 

Was it wrong for Etta, in her view of life, to 
overlook its birds and flowers and see but its sin 
and woe? Had she not read in some uninspired 
book that the good die young? Was not her ear 
trained to catch the discordant notes of earth, while 
melodies rich and beautiful floated by unheeded? 
Was it strange that she longed to see the glories of 
life's setting sun and to hear the harmony of ce- 
lestial music? Was it wrong for the little boy to 
want to be a bright and shining angel, his brow en- 
circled by a golden crown, his hands grasping palms of 
victory ? 

Heaven with its palms and crowns and ajigels is 
a reality, a most inspiring scene to him who is in 
the spirit to catch a glimpse ; but it is not prepared 



for dreamers who would plume their wings and soar 
from cares that belong alone to them ; it is not for 
selfish beings who withhold the cooling draught 
from famishing souls and pant for crystal streams 
in whose waters they have no right to lave. It 
is for little ones on whose robes are no earth stains ; 
it is for willing feet that have been swift on er- 
rands of love and mercy, be their journey long or 
short ; for warriors who have fought and bled 
but whose palms have been cut upon life's battle- 
field. 

My dear young friends, look up. Heaven with 
its unspeakable joys is just above the clouds ; look 
around, earth with its golden harvest is ready for 
the sickle ; look to yourselves, to the temples which 
bear the stamp of the divine Image, then pause and 
listen to the words of the venerable apostle of the 
Gentiles : " I beseech you therefore brethren, by the 
mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a liv- 
ing sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is 
your reasonable service." 

Ladoga, hid. 

•?• ♦ ♦ 

COTTON PROSPECTS. 

Preparations are beginning to be made for the new 
crop, but these have not progressed very far. There 
is some talk of an increase in acreage this season, but it 
is doubtful if there will be any increase in the North- 
ern Alabama district, because of the profound scarcity 
of labor. This has been the serious handicap in the 
past, and it will probably not be without its influence 
this season, because of the fact that the large amount" 
of money the negroes have made as a result of the 
high prices of the staple has rendered them largely 
unfit for the work in hand. Some of the largest 
planters here report the leaving of large numbers of 
their tenants because of this fact, and it is the general 
sentiment here that the labor will be harder to control 
this year than ever before. Furthermore, there is not 
much land available for cotton that has not already 
been seeded the past two or three years. The planters 
have done their best to increase the production of cot- 
ton in accordance with the increasing needs of the 
spinners of the world, and they have exhausted almost 
every expedient in their efforts in this direction, in- 
cluding the planting of practically all of their available 
land. That they have failed is due to nature and not 
themselves. With favorable conditions the last year 
acreage would have produced 12,500,000 bales without 
difficulty, and with even a similar acreage to that of 
last year the largest crop in the history of the United 
States can be produced under favorable climatic con- 
ditions. 

* •:• * 

Next to dressing for a rout or ball, undressing is a 
woe. — Byron. 



734 



THE INGLENOOK. 



TfclNSLtlCOK. 

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..PUBLISHED BY.. 



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Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



MAKING A MARK. 



There can be little doubt, if an)', that mottoes and 
proverbs have their effect on one's life. We often 
hear it said that these mottoes have become the active 
principle in the character of the one who cherishes 
them. This is true to a greater or lesser extent, and 
yet it is not always so ; sometimes there is no appre- 
ciation of them in their fullness. There is an adage 
that has been going the rounds from the graduate of 
the common school until it has reached the professor 
of the university, that we should " set our mark high 
and strive to reach it." And a few men in this world, 
whether the)' know of this motto or not, have done 
well. Some have failed ; but, after all, isn't it a fact 
that everybody makes his own mark in life? 

If you climb to the top of Washington Monument 
you will find the pencil marks of somebody who tried 
to make his mark high. There are hundreds and hun- 
dreds of names written all over these white marble 
walls, although it is strictly forbidden. 

The same thing is true in Paris, France. One may 
climb the dizzy heights of 985 feet of Eiffel Tower, 
only to find that some one, who wanted the people 
to know he had been there, penciled his name there- 
upon. 

Mammoth Cave, Kentucky, the Natural Bridge, of 
Virginia, the Jug Rock, of Indiana, and a hundred 
other places bear marks of those people who are mak- 
ing their mark in life. Not long since we saw a 
man sit right down in the middle of a mud road ; he 
left his mark. It would not take a philosopher to 
know that a man who is free from intoxication would 



not do a thing like that; so his mark meant some- 
thing. 

Last winter you remember seeing some of the boys 
going along the street and emptying their mouths, 
which were full of amber, out on the beautiful white 
snow; of course they made their mark, which meant 
something, and it meant a great deal. 

A few days ago a man walked down the street and 
attracted our attention. He had a large rosy nose. 
This mark had not been placed there suddenly, but 
by years of premeditated effort. It was a mark of 
years of toil and thousands of dollars, but he had 
made his mark in life. Some people do not make a 
mark until after they are dead and their friends make 
it, by chiseling a rosy epitaph on their tombstone. 

And still there is a class of mark-making that we 
have not mentioned that is by no means of lesser val- 
ue. Some characters in the world have the power to 
make an invisible and yet indefaceable mark upon the 
hearts and minds of others. Mt. Vernon and Wash- 
ington's monument may mean a great deal to the world, 
but the character of the father of our country means 
more. The fact that Abraham Lincoln was president 
of the United States and that he was a rail splitter 
may be items that are precious to the historian, but 
the fact that Abe Lincoln had an undaunted character 
is what makes him great in the hearts of the people. 

Harriet Beecher Stowe has not made her mark be- 
cause she wrote a book — thousands of people have 
written books — but because she has caused thousands 
of people to think, therefore she has made her mark 
that cannot be effaced. 

Arnold Winkleried stood before his countrymen in 
the gap of the Alpine mountains and sacrificed his 
life for his country. Other men have done the same, 
only this hero did it at a time when his country de- 
manded it, and it set Switzerland free, and it is free 
to-day. His life's blood, spattered on the rugged Al- 
pine heights, left a mark. The beautiful grassy car- 
pet of nature may have carelessly covered over the 
ugly sight, yet in the hearts of the people of Swit- 
zerland Arnold Winkleried still lives. 

In Bethlehem of Judea, in a little, lonely cavern at 
the foot of the mountain, is an old stable, and in 
front of one of these mangers is a little silver star 
planted in the floor of the solid rock. This is said to 
be the spot where Jesus Christ was born. It may 
be the exact spot and it may be a few feet away from 
there; God knows. Jesus Christ did not make that 
mark; but by the sinless spotless life he lived he 
has made a mark in the lives of millions who will 
be loyal to him until the messenger of death over- 
takes them. 

Dear Nooker, we stand in favor of making a mark ; 
but let us consider where the mark is to be made. Let 
us not be satisfied with chiseling our marks in mar- 



"THE - INGLENOOK. 



735 



ble, and on tablets of memory, or the pages of history, 
which soon yield to the forces of nature, but let us 
establish our sacred memories in the hearts of men. 
And, 

" To live for those who love us 

Whose hearts are kind and true, 
For the heaven that smiles above us, 
And the good that we can do." 

* * *£ 
LITTLE THINGS. 

" Little drops of water, 
Little grains of sand. 
Make the mighty ocean 
And a pleasant land." 

This little poetical gem has been given to the 
world by some one who has been thinking about 
the value of little things. But by the majority of 
people little things are not given the prominent place 
they should occupy. Do we realize that it is 
the two-cent postage stamps that build our govern- 
ment post offices, pay the salaries of thousands of 
mail carriers and postmasters, rural route men, and 
train officials, and that it is the five-cent street car 
fare that builds thousands of miles of track like spi- 
der webs in our cities ? The amount of money that 
is collected in one-cent slot machines surpasses be- 
lief. Most of the missionary money that supports the 
soldiers of the army of Christ on foreign shores is 
obtained by the penny collection. Several large pub- 
lishing houses in the United States are running, print- 
ing Sunday-school supplies because of the penny col- 
lections. Miles and miles of earth, thousands of feet 
deep, measurements that go beyond our calculation, 
show that all this earth of ours is made up of single 
atoms of dirt. The great ocean which is supposed 
to be over five miles deep is, after all, in reality made 
up of single drops of water. Dollars are made of 
cents, hours of minutes, a man's life of a few days. 
a book is made of many thoughts, etc. In every av- 
enue of life we find that large things are only com- 
posites, and it is the little things that are prominent. 
Many of these little things compose large ones. 

Not much can be done in a minute ; not much can 
be bought for a penny ; not much can be accomplished 
with a single drop of water, and yet a sufficient num- 
ber of these drops will turn a mill ; a sufficient num- 
ber of grains of sand will make a seashore ; a sufficient 
quantity of money will buy almost any possession on 
earth ; a sufficient number of minutes, and you have 
time enough to write a history of the world. And so 
it is with our lives, — little deeds, like thoughts, little 
lessons learned, little duties performed go to make up 
the great character of our lives. 

A little gotten here and there from the flower bed 
of truth and beauty, and we have the bouquet of a 
gentle disposition. A little gathered here and there 



from the fountain of knowledge, and we have a use- 
ful education. A little accomplished here and there, 
and we have a life that when done will be a monu- 
ment everlasting, valuable not only to the one who 
has lived that life but to those who came under its 
influence. 

<' ♦ -:* 

TIP. 



In all probability a great many of the Nook fam- 
ily remember a few years ago about one of the larg- 
est elephants in the world in New York City, by the 
name of " Tip." He became so unruly that his keep- 
ers could hardly manage him, and his bad habits and 
bad characteristics grew in him until he had to be 
killed to keep him from killing the men, as he had 
killed several in his lifetime. The poor fellow was 
induced to eat some bread that has been loaded with 
poison, and in a few minutes he was deprived of all 
the power he ever had to kill. It is to be supposed 
that the majority of people were glad to hear of his 
destruction, because of the danger of life in letting 
him live. 

But how inconsistent it is for us to rejoice over 
the destruction of such a monster that is so great an 
evil to mankind, when yet right beneath our doors 
are monsters killing hundreds and thousands of our 
best men, and we let them live from year to year ; 
let them go unchained, and not only that, but we le- 
galize their authority to kill people just as long as 
they " divvy up." We say we are sorry that they kill 
people, and we say we are sorry that the saloon is 
in our midst, and it annoys us so much, and causes 
tears to come in our eyes sometimes when we pray, 
to hear the orphans and widows cry, and we sincere- 
ly pity the fellow with a lost character, lost proper- 
ty, lost home, and the loss of the hope of heaven. 
We teach that it is wrong to murder when a man 
beats your brains out with an ax or a club, but this 
legal way of murdering arouses no suspicion on our 
part. It is one of these monsters that is fastening 
himself upon us like the jelly fish to the bottom of 
the ship, or like the leech fastening itself to the body, 
and is a regular blood-sucker to the financial, social 
and spiritual man. 

Reverence the highest, have patience with the low- 
est. Let this day's performance of the meanest duty 
by thy religion. Are the stars too far distant, pick up 
the pebble that lies at thy feet, and from it learn the 
all. — Margaret Fuller Ossoli. 



For there was never yet a philosopher. 
That could endure the toothache patiently. 

— Shakespeare. 



736 



THE INGLENOOK. 



CURRENT HAPPENINGS 



England has again been insulted by the sinking of 
the British steamer, " Knight Commander." Sufficient 
aggravation had been caused by the seizure of the 
steamer " Malacca " ; and it was very difficult for the 
officials to control the feelings of the people in regard 
to that, but since the sinking of the " Knight Com- 
mander " there is a unanimous pressure demanding 
that the navy be used to secure immediate restitution. 

One of the English papers used this language, " that 
it is an outrage of the most gratuitous and barbarous 
kind." The British battleship has left Hong-Kong to 
guard her interests which are being menaced by the 
Russian squadron, in fact some of the British people 
regard this depredation as an act of war, and are ask- 
ing " what the British government is for, that she does 
not resent the insult." The more conservative men are 
having trouble in holding back the impulsive forces 
that are behind them. Danger of a further complica- 
tion is apparent. 

The interests of the United States have been inter- 
fered with in the sinking of this British vessel, as much 
goods on board belonged to the United States, and 
besides this the steamship " Korea " of the Pacific Mail 
and the " Gaelic " of the O. & O. steamship line are 
among the vessels now on the way from San Francisco 
to Yokohama, and are very much in danger of seizure 
by the Russian cruisers. Things look favorable just 
now for a general mixup, although we hope that the 
greater powers will not get entangled in the melee. 

# * * 

The Philippines are said to be a mine of wealth. One 
of the surgeons, namely, Dr. J. M. Feeney, says in a 
recent communication that he has been in almost every 
part of the archipelago, and he thinks everything be- 
ing considered, it is the richest country in the world. 
He says that in some of the more obscure corners, 
where civilization has not penetrated, he has found 
scores and scores of natives wearing chunks of gold 
just as it comes from nature. They also have 
copper in unlimited quantities. As soon as some way 
is found by which titles may be conveyed to the proper 
authorities so that these mines can be opened, there is 
going to be a grand rush for these mountains. It is 
said that already a goodly number of old miners of the 
Western States are " hugging " claims which they 
expect to make them wealthy. 

* * * 

Santos Dumont, the great airship man, whose aerial 
vehicle was ruined some time since at the Exposition, 
expresses himself as being not defeated by fate, but 
by unfair opponents, and returns home saying he will 
not make another attempt to participate in the contest 
at the Fair. 



At the great international congress of women, at 
Berlin, Germany, not long since, honors were conferred 
upon .Mrs. Mar)' Church Terrell. She stands second ' 
to none, unless it be Susan B. Anthony. She has been 
president of the international association of colored 
women, and was for five years a member of the School 
Board of the District of Columbia. She is a gradu- 
ate of Oberlin College, studied one year in Paris, and 
another in Berlin. In her veins runs the genuine negro 
blood. Mrs. Terrell made an address in Berlin to the 
International Congress of Women, first in English. 
When she was told that her audience did not all un- 
derstand, she immediately proceeded to redeliver the 
address in French, and then in German. No other per- 
son present could have possibly accommodated the en- 
tire convention as did Mrs. Terrell. She is tall, slen- 
der and possesses a fine presence, and is unusually elo- 
quent, with a command of language that is truly won- 
derful. She is not dark, and except that her hair is 
kinky, she might be taken for an Indian. At the con- 
clusion of her address she was forced to come for- 
ward and bowed a number of times before she was 
permitted to take and keep her seat. She was invited 
afterwards to attend the reception of the Empress as 
one of the honored guests. 

* * * 

The last reports from the commercial dilemma in 
Chicago, indicate that more than seventy-five hun- 
dred members of the Allied Trades Unions in the 
Stock Yards obeyed the orders to join the butchers 
already on the strike. Thirty thousand men are idle 
because of the sympathetic measures they have taken 
with their friends who ordered the trouble. The team- 
sters' union made a strong endeavor to reach peace, in 
fact several attempts, but each time a sporadic out- 
break of violence would undo what measures 
had been taken for peace. Chicago's greatest 
industry is practically at a standstill. The most 
conservative thinkers, who are in a position to 
know about the general feelings of the men, 
say that it is altogether probable that the railroad men 
such as the switchmen and the freight handlers, are 
ready to refuse to handle the products of packers at 
any moment they have received orders to that ef- 
fect. This will only add to the already complicated 
disaster. + + ^ 

President Roosevelt has appointed as Commission- 
er of Education of Porto Rico, Dr. Roland P. Falkner. 
Dr. Falkner, of late, has been Chief of Division of Doc- 
uments in the library of Congress. Dr. M. G. Brum- 
baugh, of Pennsylvania, was Commissioner of Edu- 
cation under President McKinley. Dr. Samuel Mc- 
Cune Linsay has resigned to take effect October ist, 
next. Dr. Falkner is thirty-eight years old, is a grad- 
ate of '95 of the University of Pennsylvania. He 
has studied in Halle, Berlin and Leipsic, Germany. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



737 



Some of the cows in the vicinity of Chicago will be 
compelled to sign the temperance pledge. The inspec- 
tors of the city health department have held in sus- 
picion for some time some of the dairy products that 
are being brought to the city, and upon investigation 
it was found that many of the farmers, who have been 
furnishing milk, have been feeding their cows on wet 
malt from the breweries. We do not think the cows 
would be guilty of this misdemeanor themselves if they 
could get anything else, and therefore the fault lies 
with the farmers ; but they cannot be prosecuted as they 
have a right to feed their cows what they want to. But 
the dairymen who dispose of their goods in Chicago 
have been ordered by the authorities to stop selling 
their milk, and a heavy penalty is provided for milk 
dealers who sell milk from any of these farms. Thou- 
sands of gallons have already been returned to the 
farmers as unfit for use. The excitement over the mat- 
ter has caused investigation of over six hundred farms 
and something near thirteen thousand cows, and as a 
result over one hundred and forty of these farms have 
been condemned. 

News from the Orient says that at New Chwang a 
bloody fourteen-hour battle was fought, July 24. in 
which thirty thousand of the czar's troops suffered 
a severe defeat. The battle began at six o'clock in the 
morning and the Russians were put to rout about dark. 
The field was sorely contested and the Russians held 
their ground until 5 P. M. It is said that the Japanese 
line was fifteen miles long. One of the main charges 
in the battle was an incessant storm of shot and shell 
from the Mikado's army, and they fairly had to sweep 
the field clear of Russians before they would flee. 
Considerable damage has been done to Russian prop- 
erty since the battle. The principal part of the en- 
gagement was the artillery operation. It is consid- 
ered a crushing blow to the Russians. This was one 
of their strongholds and the town was definitely evac- 
uated by them in hot haste. Corroborative news has 
been received from the Russians direct, from the Jap- 
anese direct, and later from Paris, which gives but 
little chance for the circulating reports to be anything 
but true. 

♦ *5* ♦ 

Mr. J. Parker Smith died at his summer home at 
Lake Coma, after a lingering illness. He was one of 
Chicago's capitalists, also a cousin of Paul Morton, 
Secretary of the Navy. He was born in Maine, seven- 
ty-six years ago, and has been engaged in the ice busi- 
ness in Chicago for forty-five years. 

Paul Kruger's remains are to be taken to South 
Africa for burial. The British government has at last 
given permission for the remains to be removed. 



Everything is not all peace along the " Pike." 
Some things come very near ending in tragedies. Not 
long since complaint was laid in to the manager that the 
clothing of the Filipinos was rather scanty. Accord- 
ingly pants were ordered for them which were ig- 
nored by the heathen, who cast them to one side and 
run away in the bushes to hide as before. After a con- 
tinued discussion President Francis, and several others, 
have concluded to withdraw further persecution to the 
down-trodden people, and he accordingly rescinded his 
former orders and says that he doubts if it be advisable 
to have them wear clothing they do not like. 

* * •:• 

The National Association of colored women was to 
have held their convention at St. Louis, but to their 
sorrow, found that the fair managers at St. Louis have 
discriminated against the negroes at every crook and 
turn possible, and in one of their late sessions Mrs. 
Booker T. Washington plead that they hold their con- 
vention at some other place. When she had concluded 
her eloquent appeal, every delegate in the conven- 
tion, except those from St. Louis, acquiesced. 

Mrs. Hobart Benson, of Altoona, Iowa, is to be 
recorded with the brave. One day last week, on re- 
turning home she found a large rattlesnake with its 
fangs sunken into the flesh of her little three-year-old 
daughter, as she was sitting on the floor. Our hero- 
ine seized the writhing snake and literally wrung its 
neck. 

*J» «5* «$» 

The little disturbance that has been continually go- 
ing on between the Pennsylvania railroad and the 
Western Union Telegraph Company concerning some 
poles and wires, has just been settled and the hatchet 
buried. The Pennsylvania Railroad Company has con- 
sented to make a present of eleven million dollars to 
the Western Union Telegraph Company, 
•j * ■> 

Sir Chentung Liang-Cheng, a Chinese minister at 
Washington, D. C, left for Mexico City. In his pos- 
session are duplicate credentials from the Emperor of 
China to President Diaz, of Mexico. It will possibly 
take him three or four weeks to accomplish his end. 
This is probably the first legation that China has ever 
sent to the Spanish-American Republic. 

* * * 

Sixty-eight hundred dollars was taken from the 
Custom House safe at San Diego, Cuba, the 1st inst., 
while the cashier was out. 

* •!» «g» 

Ex-President Cleveland, who has been ill, at the 
home of Joseph Jefferson, at Buzzards Bay, Mass., is 
convalescent. 



738 



THE INGlENOOK. 






The Inglenook Nature Study Club I 

This Department of the Inglenook is the organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized X 

over this country. Each issue of the magazine will be complete in itself. Clubs may be organized at any time, •f 

taking the work up with the current issue. Back numbers cannot be furnished. Any school desiring to or- % 

ganize a club can ascertain the methods of procedure by addressing the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin, 111. * 

K ., t ,, t ,, ;MM ' * ' M"M" t "M '* "M"M" t "M"M^ ^ ^ ^ 



LOVING-KINDNESS. 



Be kind to dumb creatures 

Nor grudge them your care, 
God gave them their life 

And your love they must share. 
He who the sparrow's fall tenderly heeds 
Will look lovingly on compassionate deeds 

* * * 

CLASS AVES. 



ORDER INSESSORES. 

Last week we announced that this week we would 
take up the study of the order of Insessores or birds 
which perch, and it is to be remembered that this is 
one of the largest families, numerically, that we have 
in the class AVES. Most of you have learned by 
this time that there are many ways of classifying birds. 
We can classify them by their feet, by their food, by 
their habits, or possibly their feathers. But the first 
classification we chcose to make is according to their 
bills, and so for this lesson to-day we will more par- 
ticularly study the shape of their bills or mandibles. 

First is the Conirostres, or cone-billed, and to this 
classification belong such families as the Crows, 
Finches, Starlings, Woodpeckers, etc. Remember 
that each of these represent families and not single 
individual birds, and all of these families have their 
cone-shaped bill, which means that at the base of their 
bill it is much larger and slopes toward an apex or 
point, which renders their bill almost exactly the shape 
of a cone. 

Second, the Dentirostres, or tooth-billed. To the 
tooth-billed family belong the Thrush family, the fam- 
ily of Shrikes and Warblers. Of course the Thrush 
family is divided into several families, and the Shrikes 
may be divided up into many individual families and 
the Warblers are very numerous, but this is only the 
general classification. 

Third, the Tenuirostres, or thin-bill. The charac- 
teristic family of this division is the Hummingbird, 
and when we undertake to discriminate between all the 
families of the Hummingbird we have a study almost 
wholly within itself. For instance, the Ruby Throat, 
Purple Throat, Nootka Sound, the Anna, the Coste's, 
Broad-tailed, the Mango, etc. 

Fourth, the Fissirostres, or split-bills. To this fam- 
ily belong such birds as have their bills split almost 



to their throat. For instance, the Night Hawk, Whip- 
poor-will, Goat-sucker, Purple Martin, and Chuck- 
wills-widow. These birds and others of like charac- 
ter, when they open their mouth wide, show but very 
little, if any bill, and when closed show but very little 
more; hence the name split-bill. Secure a photograph 
of one of this family, and notice how discriminate the 
name is of their nature. There are other classifica- 
tions in regard to their bills that belong to the land 
and the water birds, but these four classifications ap- 
ply more particularly to the classification of the In- 
sessores or perching birds. And now for a little more 
specific study we return to the first-named division, 

CONIROSTRES. 

The first family under this division, that we named 
above, was the Crow family, and we will have our 
first lesson under this class about the Crow. Many of 
the Nookers remember that we had a study of the 
Crow not so very long since, but there are more birds 
besides the crow individual that belong to this Crow 
family. In the individual crow family we have the 
American Crow, Hooded Crow, Carrion Crow, and 
besides these individual crows we have the Rook, 
Raven, Jackdaw, Magpie and Jay. 

ROOK. 

This bird is not very well known in America, be- 
cause it is an English bird. But it is very much like 
the crow, which our farmer Nookers know so well. 
Rooks invariably live in colonies, many thousands go- 
ing off together and building their nests in the tops 
of neighboring trees. 

In these bird towns, or rookeries, there seem to be 
certain laws which all understand and generally obey, 
at least they do so better than people do in many 
instances. One of these laws is that no rook shall 
build his nest within the limits of the town unless he 
was hatched there and is a full-fledged native. And 
another forbids young rooks going outside the town 
to build. If any rook disobeys these laws, the other 
birds promptly tear down his nest and drive him 
from the town, back to his native town. 

They are said to hold courts for the trial of offenders. 
The birds assemble upon the trees, the guilty one sit- 
ting by himself, with drooping head : and after much 
croaking and flying hither and thither, which we 
may imagine is their way of examining the witnesses 



THE INGLENOOK. 



739 



and hearing the pleas of the advocates, the charge of 
the judge, and the verdict of the jury, after which 
they pounce upon the unfortunate offender and ex- 
ecute the sentence, whatever it may be. 

RAVEN. 

The Raven is the largest bird of the Crow family. 
He is also the largest percher. He is a type of the 
Crow family, and deviates in this that he has bristles 
around his bill and is more solemn looking than the 
other members of the Crow family. He is regarded 
by the natives of Asia as an ill omen. The American 
Raven is a scarce bird in some of the districts, being 
seldom seen, and consequently his characteristics are 
but little known. 

The European species is more abundant and is found 
to be a very familiar bird. Ravens are said to live to 
a great age, and the same pair has been known to 
build their nest in the same spot for many successive 
years. However, these last two named characteristics 
are quite common in the Crow family. First, that of 
great age, and, second, that of the inclination to re- 
turn to their former home each year and rebuild their 
nests. The Raven has been long known to students 
of nature, for we remember that it was the first mod- 
est bird that left the ark family in search of the green 
olive leaf. She was also the messenger that was cho- 
sen by the Almighty God to feed his prophet Elijah 
at the brook Cherith. The young Ravens may be so 
tamed as to become very amusing pets, but they require 
almost constant watching because of their mischievous 
nature. 

While your editor was sojourning through Palestine 
he saw many of these Ravens, on a trip from Jeru- 
salem to Jericho. The strange part of it was that 
these ravens here are of dove color and not of the 
inky black that the raven generally takes. This is an 
exception, however, and not the rule. In studying 
this lesson it will be well for the Nookers to look up 
the work they had on the Crow as a sort of a review, 
and study their manner of building nests, their food, 
their enemies, and their migration ; and next week we 
will take up the other three members of the Crow fam- 
ily, namely, the Jackdaw, Magpie and the Jay. Let 
us see who can have the best lesson on the Crow, Rook 
and the Raven. 

4» 4» .;. 
A TERRIBLE TURTLE. 



Since then he has been tied by a half-inch rope and fed 
on bloodsuckers. Wednesday night the rope gave way 
to the mighty strain put upon it by the turtle, who can 
carry a 160-pound man on its back without experienc- 
ing any inconvenience, and he is now roaming at large, 
although searching parties have made every effort to 
locate him. He was to have been sold to the Forepaugh 
circus in July and exhibited as the largest turtle ever 
taken in Maine's inland waters, and it is understood 
that $50 was offered for him by the circus people. 
Thus his loss is a great misfortune. 

* * * 
A MINIATURE BUFFALO. 



There's a new and strange beast at the Philadelphia 
Zoo, extremely rare in any country but his own, which 
is the island of Celebes, Eastern Archipelago, south of 
the Philippines. 

When his keeper pronounces its name it sounds like 
" I know her." But the animal is a male. It is an 
anoa, a curious specimen of dwarf buffalo, allied to the 
tamarau, and it has 13 pairs of ribs. 

It looks more like a big goat than any animal known 
to the Americans. Its coat is as brown as a bear's and 
furry. It has a pair of short, curved horns and the 
head and legs of a ram, also the bucking propensity of 
both ram and goat. 

It is fed on oats and hay. The best natural history 
book on the subject has anoa listed as " shy and retir- 
ing," but the keeper of the specimen at the Zoo takes 
exception to that designation, recalling readily several 
experiences he has had in being butted. 

* * * 
SQUIRRELS MOTHERED BY CAT. 



At Brewer, Maine, people are staying in at night for 
fear of an eight-and-one-half-foot turtle who has es- 
caped from captivity and is said to be more dangerous 
to meet than a bull dog. 

The ugly brute was captured at Hines's pond a week 
ago, and it took the united efforts of three strong men 
to get him into a wagon without injury to themselves. 



While rambling over the country Henry Miller, of 
Hanover, Penn., found a squirrel's nest that had fallen 
from a tree and which still contained four very young 
gray squirrels. 

Miller brought the squirrels home, and as an exper- 
iment placed them in the nest of a cat whose kittens 
had been drowned. 

The cat took kindly to the squirrels and is giving 
them complete attention, with the result that the chil- 
dren of the forest are thriving splendidly under the 
care of their foster mother. 

* * * 

The bees are in the orchard 

Gathering their honey. 
The hens are in the meadow 

Hatching eggs for money. 
The crops are all agrowin' 

The very be5t they can. 
No excuse at all. sir, 

For the lazy man. 



740 



"HI 



INGLENOOK. 




HOME DEPARTMENT 



WHO IS YOUR BOSS? 



Who is your boss? Does he go on two legs, 

Or is he the demon who lurks in the dregs 

Or a roister's glass? Does he bide from you far 

Or rise in the smoke of a fragrant cigar? 

Who is your boss? In your desk does he lurk 

To drive you all day? Is it Worry or Work? 

Don't cavil, you rascal; you worship some Joss, 

Be it man, thing or habit. Come, who is your boss? 

Who is your boss? Come, be honest; don't hedge. 
Does it bear a stamped eagle and wear a milled edge? 
Whose tag are you wearing? Whose song do you sing? 
For whom do you dance when they pull on the string? 
Whose brand are you wearing? What cult have you 

bagged? 
By whom or by what has your collar been tagged? 
You may be the boss of some one that I sing, 
But this is the question: Who's pulling your string? 

My boss? Ah, I'll tell you: A slip of a girl 
Who fetters my heart with the gyve of a curl 
Straying down on her brow like a thief gone amiss 
On his way to her red lips to steal him a kiss. 
She scolds me and holds me and molds me at will, 
Nor ever my fluttering heart will be still 
When she brushes my cheek with the wisp of her curl, 
But who'd not be bossed by a slip of a girl? 
<$» $ •> 

THE TEMPORARY TEETH. 



BY E. E. BLICKENSTAFF, D. D. S. 

Children have twenty temporary or deciduous 
teeth, the germs of which as well as of the permanent, 
exist in the jaws even previous to birth, and begin to 
make their appearance about the sixth or seventh 
month; however the time varies in different children. 

About the second or third year the temporary teeth 
are complete and fully developed and require and 
should receive the same care to preserve them, both 
for usefulness and beauty, as is exercised toward the 
permanent set. 

All parents should be impressed with the fact that 
the beauty and regularity of the permanent teeth de- 
pend in a large measure upon the care and condition of 
the temporary ones. 

There is no reason why the temporary teeth should 
not remain, comfortably in place, until the permanent 
ones erupt. Many a child would be saved from untold 
suffering, and the parents spared much trouble and 
anxiety, by having these teeth properly cared for. 

Nature never intended that children's teeth should 
be lost or removed by decay ; but that they should re- 



main in place until they give way for the permanent 
ones by the absorption of their roots. This is neces- 
sary for two reasons, at least. First, if the temporary 
or " first tooth " is lost before its time, the space which 
it occupied becomes more or less closed so that the 
" second tooth " is crowded from its normal position. 
Second, if the pulp dies from exposure by decay, the 
tooth-roots are not absorbed and if left in place too 
long, they will change the course of the permanent 
tooth and cause it to erupt out of position, either inside 
or outside the arch. 

We often see the bad results of this condition where 
the cuspid or " eye-tooth," so called tusk, has erupted 
high on the gum or where the bi-cuspids erupt in the 
roof of the mouth, sadly marring both speech and 
beauty. Had the temporary teeth been filled and kept 
in place until time for the permanent ones to erupt and 
then removed, these conditions would not have oc- 
curred. 

Mothers, teach your children to use the brush and 
pick, keep their mouths as clean- as their hands, — 
clean in every sense of the term and there will be but 
little decay. " Happy the child who is suffered to be 
what God meant it to be." 

Flora, hid. 

* •$> * 

HOT WATER. 



Under many conditions hot water is one of the 
most potent remedial agents that can be employed, 
and often, when intelligently used, it accomplishes 
more than drugs. 

But, like many other things powerful for good, its 
abuse may prove injurious, and produce results quite 
opposite to what was intended. 

The effect of warm or moderately hot water ap- 
plied to the surface of the body is to cause the blood 
vessels and tissues of the skin and underlying re- 
gions to become relaxed, and to lose for the time be- 
ing their natural tone. The blood supply of the re- 
gions is much increased and the pores are opened. 
If the entire body has been immersed this action pro- 
duces marked changes in the distribution of the blood, 
and a considerable portion of this fluid is taken from 
the interior of the body and brought close to the sur- 
face. If cold air now strikes the body, a sudden chill 
is very likely to be the result. 

This explains the great ease with which one takes 
cold after a warm bath, particularly if this has been 
prolonged, and it also suggests the natural remedy. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



74i 



This is quickly to sponge the entire surface with cold 
water before using the towel, which should be ap- 
plied briskly. In this way the relaxation is followed 
by prompt contraction, the circulation is made active 
instead of sluggish, and a delicious sense of vigor and 
stimulation is produced. 

Hot water is necessary properly to cleanse the face 
and neck, and to stimulate the pores to cast off the 
fatty material which might otherwise stagnate and 
cause pimples or blackheads. Unless followed by a 
dash of cold water, however, the relaxed tissues are 
not stimulated, and premature wrinkles and flabbiness 
of the skin inevitably follow. Steaming the face and 
throat, although beneficial at the time, is sure to be 
followed by results disastrous to the complexion un- 
less counteracted in this way. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 



* * * 
HOW TO BE HAPPY. 



\ 



" We shall have at least three hours for skating,"\said 
Charlie, and just then they came in sight of old Goftjdy 
Stevens' hut. Infirm as she was, she stood out in the 
cold trying to split some kindlings from a pine stick 

" Let's stop and help her," suggested Charlie. 

" Not I ; I am in a hurry to get to the pond," replie 
Rufus gruffly, and he passed on. 

" Please go in and get warm, and I will bring you 
in kindlings enough to last you a week," said Charlie 
gently taking the wood from her trembling hands. 

" You have lost a good half hour," cried Rufui 
scornfully, when at last he appeared at the pond. 

" But perhaps I have gained a blessing," whispered 
Charlie to himself, remembering how the old woman 
had asked God to reward him. 

Then came an hour of merry strife, cutting circles,-: 
playing " Fox and Geese," etc., till he saw Ned Percys 
standing on the bank with longing eyes, for Ned's } 
mother was too poor to buy him skates. " Mine would I 
just fit him," thought Charlie, and in a moment he hadj 
gained the shore. 

" Halloa, Ned ! " he called cheerily, " I will take 
turns with you, for I should hate to have my skatej 
grow rusty while I am sitting down to rest." And fc 
more than an hour he insisted upon Ned's keepir 
them. 

When they went home Rufus walked sulkily alorfg 
while Charlie whistled all the way. 

" I don't see why you enjoy life so much better 
than other folks," muttered Rufus discontentedly ; " I 
should think it was Easter morning with you all the 
|' year round." 

" I don't know, I am sure," answered Charlie, " un- 
less it is because I have learned that the secret of 
being happy is to try to make somebody else happy 
! too." — Child's Paper. 



TOMATO CATSUP. 



BY SISTER S. C. SMUCKER. 

Take one bushel of ripe tomatoes, wash and cut them 
up, put on to boil. As fast as the juice oozes out, strain 
it through a flour sieve until nothing is left but seeds 
and skins ; boil and strain two green peppers with the 
tomatoes ; put the juice back into the kettle, add one 
pint of vinegar, one pint of sugar, a small teacup two- 
thirds full of salt. Make two bags of cheese cloth 
about six inches square ; in one put one tablespoonf ul 
of ground mustard, two tablespoonfuls each of ground 
ginger, cayenne pepper, and ground black pepper; tie 
up the bag, leaving room to swell. In the other bag put 
two tablespoonfuls each of ground cinnamon, allspice, 
cloves, one tablespoonful of mace, and four ground nut- 
megs ; tie up and put both bags into the juice; boil hard 
for six hours ; mash the bags with a spoon ; when it is 
done take out the bags and bottle the catsup. 

Timberville, Va. 

4» * * 

TOMATO CATSUP. 



BY SISTER MINNIE M. WHISTLER. 

Take one pail of green tomatoes chopped fine ; sprin- 
kle with salt and let stand over night ; take two medium 
sized heads of cabbage chopped fine, one small red pep- 
per, two tablespoonfuls each of ground cinnamon and 
nutmeg, one-fourth cup of celery seed ; pour the water 
from the tomatoes and mix with cabbage and other in- 
gredients, put into granite kettle with enough vinegar 
to cover ; cook one hour, add two cups of sugar, put in 
glass jars and seal while hot. 

Udell, Iowa. 

$ 4$ $ 

CHOW-CHOW. 



BY SISTER MARY REDDICK. 

Take two gallons of green tomatoes, an equal 
amount of cabbage, six green peppers, six red peppers 
(if wanted), one-half dozen onions; chop each separ- 
ately, then mix all together, salt to suit the taste, then 
put in a bag and hang over night to drain ; in the morn- 
ing squeeze it dry with the hands: season with cinna- 
mon, cloves, allspice, celery seed and one quart of 
grated horse-radish; boil vinegar enough to cover. 
put in a pound of sugar (brown preferred) : then heat 
all together. It is much nicer canned. 

Sheridan. Mo. 



742 



THE INGLENOOK. 



•'•"'▼ OUR LITTLE PEOPLE 



BONNIE WAYNE. 



Wy I didn't get that pig at all. You see Mrs. Mar- 
shall just come a running to me and she grabbed me by 
the arm and she jerked me away from the fence so fast 
that it nearly broke my arm, and Frank he hollered 
" Su boy thar " and the big hog pig said " Booh booh," 
and old Bux he said bow wow wow wow, and nearly 
jumped over the fence he was so mad, and Mabel she 
just jumped up and down. Just then here came grand- 
ma with her spectacles on the top of her head and her 
cane in her hand, and she said " wy the laws-ame " 
" what in the world is the matter with the chile? " 

Well, I never did have such a time in all my life, and 
it was all over that little red pig too, and if they would 
have let me alone I would a took him up to the house 
and nen the big one couldn' acted so smart. But Luke 
he said that pigs wasn't to play with nohow, and he was 
the fellow that called me over there in the first place 
too. 

Nen we went to the house and Grandma she told me 
that if my mamma had seen me by the hog pen she 
would have been scared and I told her that I seen her 
run clean upstairs one day when a little mouse got after 
her, and Mr. Marshall he just laughed and laughed and 
old Bux he looked up at me and grinned and he 
wagged his tail at me and he looked as if he wanted to 
talk and I think if he could talk he would say that he 
wuz glad that we came out here to the country. 

Nen I put my hand on his head and patted it, and 
just then he gave a big Kii-yii-kii-yii and a jump and 
ran over me and knocked me down on the ground and 
I cried and Frank he picked me up and wuz a laughing 
and he said, " Sis, the country is a little too rough on 
you, ain't it? " Nen I said, " What was that?" There 
wuz a big bird as big as old Bux after him with its 
wings dragging on the ground and its tail spread out 
like old Granny Baker's fan. And he had a long red 
worm on his nose and he said, " Gobble-gobble-gobble," 
and he just kept on saying it. 

Nen Mr. Marshall he laughed and said, " Bonnie, 
that's a turkey gobbler." My I wuz scared. I wished 
that turkey gobble was after that big pig instead of old 
Bux. Nen I would a got the pig. Luke he took the 
broom that Mrs. Marshall had and he took after the 
gobble-gobble and he run him around the house three 
times and I bet he wuzn't glad we come too. Nen I 
laughed so that the tears wuz all gone again. My ! that 
woman on the cars said I would see so many nice 
things out here in the country, but I don't think that 



that gobble and the big pig is nice at all, and the big 
cows neither. My ! I wuz a getting sleepy and I wished 
my mamma wuz there but she wuzn't and so Mrs. Mar- 
shall put me in a little trundle bed to sleep and she said 
it used to be Mabel's when she was a little girl like me. 
Nen Mabel she went and got Dora and Hattie and she 
put them in bed with me, and she said that she wuz 
afraid that they might cry in the night and want to go 
home so she put them with me. Then they all had to 
take another laugh at Hattie's red hair. Nen Frank he 
wanted to know how she came to have red hair and I 
just wouldn't tell but I bet Luke told him all about it 
for I guess he slept with Frank upstairs. 

Wy, say, pretty soon I heard some one say, " Oh 
Bonnie! Oh Bonnie! " and I couldn't think who it wuz 
but I said " Whoopee ! " and then I knowed that it was 
Grandma and she said, " Haint my little girl a going to 
get up this morning?" My! but they have awful 
short nights out here in the country, don't they? 
When I got up I found that Dora had got out of bed 
on one side and Hattie on the other and Mrs. Marshall 
said, " You must have done a lot of kicking last night, 
Bonnie," and I said that I guess that wuz when the old 
pig wuz after me and the old gobble wuz after old 
Bux, and Grandma said, " Poor Yungun, she was awful 
tired last night." 

♦ «2* 4* 
FROM GRANDMA. 



My Dear Friends: — 

I wish that all the mothers and grandmothers knew 
how much Luke and Bonnie love to hear me read the 
Inglenook to them. They sat on the floor the other 
evening and listened while I read the articles one after 
another and would say, " Now, Grandma, read another 
one," until I nearly gave out and until they both got so 
tired that they fell over on the floor and were almost 
compelled to yield to sleep, and they can hardly wait 
until it comes each week. 

And Mabel and Frank just fairly quarrel to see 
which one gets it first. Of course when Frank is in the 
field when the rural postman comes, Mabel and Bonnie 
skip up to the box and then she has time to read some 
before Frank comes to dinner. During the noon hour 
he reads the long pieces in front and then in the even- 
ing they both get together and study the Natural His- 
tory. I hope Bonnie and Luke will have a good 
time while they are at our house. 

Very truly yours, 

Grandma Marshall. ; 



"HI 



INGLENOOK. 



743 



»# 






,AA AA,*^AAAAAAArAAi 



~I 



.J fds Q. <& <«l. Bspartmsnt. J 



t^Md 



Where is Ft. Thomas? 

It is across the Ohio river from Cincinnati, near 
Newport, Ky. 

* 

Which are the six most powerful nations of the world 
at the present time? 

United States, England, Germany, France, Austria, 
and Japan. 

* 

What is the longest word in the English language? 

Smiles. S-M-I-L-E-S. Because it is a mile from the 
first letter to the last one. (The editor does not know 
exactly whether this question was asked as a pun or as 
a real statistical fact. If the answer is not satisfactory, 
ask again.) 

What is a watershed? 

A watershed is a height of land between two river 
systems. For illustration : In the mountains in 
West Virginia and Western Pennsylvania, notice the 
waters flow west into the Ohio, and east toward the 
Potomac and Susquehanna. 

* 

What is an abstract? 

An abstract is an instrument of writing which shows 
all the transfers through which a piece of real estate 
has gone from the time it was owned by the govern- 
ment up to the present time. Sometimes in municipal 
affairs, an ordinary abstract only dates back as far as 
the completing of an addition to the city. 

In whose writings do we find these words, " The plow- 
man homeward plods his weary way "? 

The above quotation is an extract from the first stan- 
za of an " Elegy in a Country Churchyard," by 
Thomas Gray. The first stanza is as follows : 

" The curfew tolls the knell of parting day, 

The lowing herds wind slowly o'er the lea; 
The plowman homeward plods his weary, way 
And leaves the world to darkness and to me." 

Of all the different kinds of pianos, what make is con- 
sidered the best? 

We hesitate to answer this question directly, for two 
reasons : First, because the Nookman is not a musi- 
cian, and second, because it is our purpose to treat all 
good people alike, and there are several first-class pi- 
anos and it would be wrong for us to say that one is so 
much better than another, and hence we hesitate to 
render a decision on this point. 



Which is the wolverine State? 
Michigan. 

* 
Do all languages have the definite article?. 
No. The English language has one, — the. The 
Latin has none, the German has three and the Greek 
has twenty-four. 

$> 

Are the common crow and the raven the same? 

No, they are not the same. The raven is much larger 
than the crow and has bristles around its bill, whereas 
the crow has not. We also notice that the raven's neck 
is much stronger and the mandible is stouter. How- 
ever, they compare in some respects as well as contrast 
in the above. They are the same color and make the 
same cawing sound. When taken young either will 
make very good pets. Among the natives of Asia the 
raven is regarded with awe and reverence and some- 
times the chiefs and prophets of the tribes will wear a 
bunch of its feathers in their hair, believing that it will 
increase their wisdom. See nature study page. 

* 
Who are the Druses? 

The Druses are a religious sect of people on the 
mountains of Lebanon, north of Palestine. They are 
not Jews, Mohammedans nor Christians. They are 
Transmigrationists, that is, they believe in the trans- 
migration of the Spirit. When a man dies his soul de- 
parts and enters an unknown body or enters a snake, 
horse, rabbit or some other animal, and for this reason 
they will not punish or destroy the animal life in any 
respect. And their belief also makes them fearless and 
bold. They believe their life cannot be taken, of course, 
and in this event they will face death fearlessly. A few 
years ago when the English were trying to conquer 
them they would march right to the mouth of the can- 
non and endeavor to catch the cannon balls, demon- 
strating their faith in their religion. 

* 
How is electricity made? 

Your question is too broad to be discussed in such a 
.•mall space, but the briefest answer possibly that can 
be made is that there are three kinds of electricity, 
frictional, dynamic and static. Electricity really is not 
made, only in the sense that butter is made. Possibly 
it could be said that butter is made by being drawn 
from the milk ; in this sense electricity is made by being 
drawn from the atmosphere. But in a truer sense of 
creation there can be no ingredient or composition of 
ingredients formed to construct the basis called elec- 
tricity. 



744 



THE INGLENOOK. 



* 

* 



. ii .. t ci ; .. ; .i ;o Xi ^ it'it " ; " t " t 'i"t"> ^>#^M^^'^^«> t i ^ ' > ' t 'i t '' ; ''t' ;";" ;'i}''{''t "t 'i ; ' ' i''t'';'' H ' 




THE DIFFERENCE. 



The man who lugs a melon home 

And finds it isn't ripe 
Is very apt to think some words 
That looks like these !* — : 

— **!! — * in type. 

The pa who carries babe at night, 

All through the house and back, 
Is apt to speak this sentence ** — 
!!—*!—!—* when 

He steps upon a tack. 

A lady who is going out 

Has callers come and stay; 
She tries to lightly chat, but this 
n *]* n 

Is what she'd like to say. 

Upon a smooth banana peel 
A deacon chanced to tread, 
And here's !* — !! — * 
— !* — a brief shorthand report 
Of what the deacon said. 

A lady with her parasol 

A passer's optic caught — 
He said: "Pray do not mention it," 
But here *!!—!*!*— 

!*! — is what he thought. 

— Chicago Post. 
* * * 

A GOOD OLD WORLD. 



outcasts that we see around us — it will not do to con- 
demn them as wholly bad. No one is ever wholly 
lost. To deny this is to make of all theology — yes, 
and of religion — a mockery. 

A kind word will awaken a noble response in many a 
man apparently lost to all that is good in life. 

Have you the kind word, or have you the usual 

censure ? — Selected. 

$ * 4t 

THE VALUE OF A LAUGH. 



It's a good old world, no. matter if, at times, it 
does seem that things are going to the " demnition 
bow-wows." 

At a low theater the other day, where the audience 
was made up of a motley crowd of men and boys, 
a player came on the stage and sang a cheap drinking 
song, a song in laudation of the convivial cup. 

He had a good voice and his pantomine was clever, 
but the song drew only a light round of applause. 

For an encore the singer chose a sentimental song, 
another cheap affair but one that had the saving grace 
of a noble theme — the undying love of a mother for 
her boy. This time the audience broke into hearty 
and prolonged applause. 

There was a lot of good in that audience notwith- 
standing its questionable pursuit. From the " seamy 
side " of life it came, and yet the mother-love senti- 
ment touched it deeply, showing that it was far from 
lost to the innate goodness that lurks in every one. 

And so it is wherever you go. The moral and social 



Eighteen hundred persons were in a New York 
theatre a few nights ago when the top floor of the 
building broke into a blaze'. A half a dozen fire en- 
gines thudded out in the street and still the audience 
in the theatre did not know it. It was not until police 
officers appeared and quietly told the men and women 
present that the building was on fire and that the 
performance must be considered as ended that they 
had any intimation of their danger. Then very nat- 
urally there was excitement. Everything was favor- 
able for a panic, and panic under such circumstances 
meant death. " Slowly, don't rush," said the captain 
of police ; " I'll club the first man who starts to run." 
With the opening of the doors the terrifying noises 
had come to the ears of the persons were were want- 
ing to get out, and the smell of smoke added to their 
terror. There was danger and all knew it. Reason 
was about to be cast to the winds and a mad struggle — 
senseless and savage — was about to be entered upon. 
And then someone laughed. The laugh was sane and 
hearty and that minute the trouble was over. No 
panic after that. A man may laugh in the face of 
danger, but not in the face of that sort of danger un- 
less there is cause for it. Not one who heard the 
laugh in this theatre but was reassured. Courage "and 
common sense and a feeling of security returned. If 
one could laugh who need fear? And the result was 
that everybody walked out of the building in safety. 
There is a lesson here that should not be forgotten. 
Nearly all of the disasters in theatres and public halls 
are caused by panic. In practically every instance 
loss of life could have been avoided by coolness and 
self-possession. This is a thing that it is worth while 
to remember. Laugh if you can in such an emer- 
gency, but if you can't do that keep your wits under 
control and thereby save your life and the lives of 
others. — Indianapolis Sentinel. 



The Brethren Colonies 



IN THE 



Fruit Belt of Michigan 




are an actual success. The colony of the Lakeview church is located on 
lands surrounding the village of Brethren, Michigan. Brethren, Michigan, 
is located on the main line of the Pere Marquette System, 105 miles north 
of Grand Rapids and about 14 miles east of Lake Michigan. All conditions 
of soil, climate and location make this spot an ideal one for general farm- 
ing, fruit-growing and stock-raising. Lands have been sold to about 120 
families of the Brotherhood and their friends, of which number about one- 
half have already located and are clearing up their places. The possibili* 
ties of this district are exceptional. The Brethren tract embraces about 
20,000 acres, of which over 11,000 acres have already been sold. There are 
just as good and as desirable locations remaining as those that have been 
bought and the prices have not yet been advanced, but with the improve- 
ments now going on, developing the country so rapidly, it is only a short 
time till prices advance considerably. THE TIME TO BUY IS NOW. 
Present prices range from $7 to $15 per acre, on easy terms, or less five 
(5) per cent for cash. 

For illustrated booklet and information in regard to rates, address 
Samuel S. Thorpe, District Agent Michigan Land Association, Cadillac, 
Mich. 



THE CADILLAC TRACT. 



The basis of my business is absolute and 

unvarying integrity. _ 

samuel s. thorpe. 25,000 Acres of Rich Agricul- 

tural Lands, Excellently Situated and Splen- 
didly Adapted for Farming, Fruit-growing and 
Stock-raising. 

These lands are located from one-half mile to six miles from the hustling city of Cadillac, the seat of Wexford 
county, 8,000 inhabitants, (all alive,) and its location on the Grand Rapids and Indiana R'y (part of the Pennsylvania 
System) and on the Ann Arbor Railroad (part of the Wabash System) together with its other advantages render 
it the best trading point and market place in Northern Michigan. Cadillac and the lands controlled by the ad- 
vertiser are located about 98 miles north of Grand Rapids and 50 miles east of Lake Michigan. They are well wa- 
tered with springs, creeks, rivers and lakes of pure, sparkling water teeming with gamy fish. The s©il varies from 
a sandy loam to a clay loam, all of it underlaid with clay and gravel subsoil, which responds eagerly to cultivation. 

For illustrated booklets, maps and information as to reduced rates to these locations, address: 



s^-h^ittx 1 



ij_j 



THOEPE, 



JDistiict _^_gre33.t ^CxolbJ.g'ari I_ia,rxd. Assn., 

3Z>ept. IL/£, 



THE INGLENOOK. 



Bonnet Straw Cloth 

CJISTER, have you a knack of mak- 
kJ ing your own bonnet? Here's 
news for you — money saving news. 
We carry a large stock of bonnet 
straw cloth, manufactured especially 
for us, from our own designs. Four- 
teen different styles and colors. Rice 
Net, Wire Chiffon, Braid, etc., with a 
large assortment of Ribbon and Mous- 
seline de Soie for strings. We are the 
only house making a specialty of these 
goods. Write for free samples and 
prices. 

Albaugh Bros., Dover & Co. 




34 ,= 343 Franklin Street, 



Chicago, III. 



Farms You Will Buy 

East Central Kansas is the best part 
of the State for general farming and 
raising stock. Well watered, Marion 
county's average crop acreage is 110,000 
acres corn, 90,000 acres wheat, 40,000 
acres oats, 20,000 acres alfalfa. We 
have some good farms for sale at a bar- 
gain. Will say to the Brethren that are 
thinking of changing their location that 
they will do well to investigate our 
country. Good bargains near church. 
Any information cheerfully furnished. 



GARRISON 



STUDEEAKEK, 

Florence, Kansas. 



50 Brethren Wanted 

with their families to settle in the 
vicinity of Tyvan, Canada. A good 
working church, one churchhouse 
built and steps taken for another one. 

Best of soil, $10 per acre, ' 
near railroad town, on easy terms. 
Good water, good people, schools 
and roads. 

This chance will last only a few 
weeks. Address: 



29t4 



H. M. BARWICK, 

McPherson, Kans. 



The Inglenook Only Half Price! * *™ s ' toito *>■ 

Inglenook to Jan. I, 1905, regular price, $ 5° 

Our Special Trial Offer, only, 25C 



An Easy Way to Secure a Valuable Book. 

Inglenook to Jan. 1, 1905, $ 5° 

Modern Fables and Parables 1 25 




Both for only 



$175 
.75 



The book we offer is a late one, by Rev. Harris, author of Mr. World and Miss 
Churchmember. The object of this book is to teach morality and to correct social evils. 
It is a splendid book for the home. If you do not already have it you will do well to 
take advantage of this offer. 

Get a Good Fountain Pen. 




Both for only 



This fountain pen is a good one and would be highly prized by any boy or girl. It is worth $1.00 to any one 
in need of a pen. 

Hundreds of New Subscriber*. 

We are receiving hundreds of new subscribers, who are taking advantage of the above unprecedented offer. 
Our aim is to increase our list by several thousand within the next few weeks. From present indications our aim 
is not too high. The Nook is starting on a new era and we want all our friends and neighbors to join hands with 
us. You will never have a better opportunity to give the magazine a trial. 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



a 



HORSE SENSE." 



Practical wisdom of a particularly high order is 
sometimes referred to as " horse sense." This is a de- 
served tribute to one of man's most useful friends, and 
the compliment might with propriety be extended to 
most of the four-footed kind. Animals live close to na- 
ture, and as a result lead normal, healthy lives. If a 
horse becomes sick, which seldom happens in his natur- 
al state, turn him loose in a pasture and he will quickly 
find and eat the herbs that set him right. That is horse 
sense. A sick cat will cure its ailments by eating cat- 
nip. That is " horse sense " in the cat. When a man 
becomes ill, he generally sends to the nearest drugstore 
for a suppply of medicine of which he knows little or 
nothing and which may contain dangerous drugs and 
mineral poisons. That indicates a lack of " horse 
sense." He would show practical wisdom by taking a 
few doses of DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER, 
the old time-tried herb-remedy which is made on 
" sound sense " principles from medicinal herbs, roots 

and leaves. 

<5> <S> <S> 

RECOMMENDS ITSELF. 



Herndon, Kans. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — On my missionary trips I frequently hear 
your Blood Vitalizer spoken of. When once it is known, 
it increases in demand. The people purchase it without 
any recommendation, as your medicine recommends it- 
self. Yours Truly, 

(Rev.) C. Meyer. 



CURED HIM COMPLETELY. 



Newburg, Wis. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — The trial shipment of Blood Vitalizer I 

ordered last winter has all been used up. It has done 

me great good. It cured me completely of the after 

effects of the grippe. 

Yours very truly, 

Pastor St. Trinity Church. Joseph Huber. 

«> <S> <8> 

EXCELS ALL MEDICINES. 



Schaller, Iowa. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — The Lord's blessings be with you.- Your 
Blood Vitalizer proves its worth in an abundant manner 
and gives satisfaction. I would like to keep it on hand 
as I know I can do a good work by recommending it 
to sufferers. I desire to do this for the following rea- 
sions: First, it has served me as a cure. I was suf- 
fering with stomach trouble for years. I now feel well 
and keep well with careful diet. 

Secondly, your Blood Vitalizer excels all medicines 
which I have used. I can therefore recommend it heart- 
ily, Respectfully, 

(Rev.) H. H. Schwietert. 

<S> <S> <$> 

DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER is not a 
drugstore medicine. It is sold only through agents or 
direct by the maker. Printed matter, chuck full of 
sound advice and health hints, free for the asking. 
Write to 



K 

I 



DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 



112=114 S. lioyne Avenue, 

CHICAGO, ILL 



THE INGLENOOK, 



The 



Mount 

Campbell 

Tract 



fa Fresno Connty, 

California, 



Promises to become the leading 
fruit-growing section of California. 
Land is cheap, water abundant, loca- 
tion healthful and soil unsurpassed. 
The soil is especially adapted to the 
orange, grape, fig, orchard fruits, al- 
falfa and general farming. 

Plans are now forming for a colo- 
ny of the Brethren on this tract, J. 
S. Kuns, proprietor of the old Mis- 
sion farm at Covina, Cal., having al- 
ready purchased land in this district, 
which has been inspected by other 
prominent members of the church. 

Maps and information by 

W. N. ROHRER, 

Fresno, Cal. 



FREE SAMPLE 

> Send letteror postal for tree SAMPLE 
I HINDOO TOBACCO HABIT CURE 

We cure yon of chewing and smoking 
for 60c, or money back. Guaranteed perfectly 
harmless. Address Milford Drug Co., Milford, 
Indiana, _We answer all letters. 

24tH Bennon t!ie 1NGLLNOOK when vniiri- 



| ELQIN & WALTHAM WATCHES j 

t Of all sizes and kinds. Men's size Elgins as < 
P low as S4.95. Other watches from 88 cents to « 
» S3S-00 each. 1 sell all kinds of good watches, J 
I cheap. Catalogue free. Also samples and J 
► price list of CAP GOODS free upon applica- « 
I tion. H. E. Newcomer, Mt. Morris, III. \ 




It Does Not Pay to Neglect Yonr Eyes ! 

GUEL1NE 

Is good all for inflammations of the Eyes.. 
It has cured thousands of others. It 
will cure you. :: DO YOU KNOW 

LUCINE? 



Dr. Yeremian uses it in India every da)-. 
It is for Diarrhcea. It works like a 
charm. It rids the intestines of all 
germs. If not satisfied send us the pills 
and we will return your money. 

Ciueline, 35c. Lucine, 25c. 

THE YEREMIAN MEDICAL CO., 

BATAVIA, ILLINOIS. 

11126 Mention the 1NGLBNOOK when writing. 

ORANGE AND WALNUT 

grove for sale. Five acres in south- 
ern California; 4^2-year-old trees, al- 
ternate rows. The choicest of land, 
trees, and location. An unusual op- 
portunity for a person with small 
capital who desires quality. Must 
sell to clear another place in same 
locality. 

Address: 

E. I. AMES, 

6332 Peoria St. Chicago, 111. 

20tl3 Mention the IMGLENOOK when writing. 

It Costs Nothing 

to learn full particulars about Mount 
Morris College Scholarships. They 
were established to aid worthy young 
people. You may be able to secure one. 
The founders furnish, the College 
awards them. Your part is to try for 
one. Many a man never succeeds be- 
cause he never tries. Don't let this be 
true of you. Better write for particu- 
lars at once. It costs you nothing-. 
Yours to please and help, 

MOUNT MOBBIS COLLEGE, 
J. E. Miller. Pres. Mt. Morris. 111. 



THE OVERLAND LIMITED. 



30-13 



Mention the INOLKXOOK when writing. 



The Traffic Department of the Chi- 
cage & North-Western R'y has issued 
a handsome booklet descriptive of the 
Overland Limited, the most luxurious 
train in the world, and of the Chicago, 
Union Pacific & North- Western Line, 
the route of this famous train to the 
Pacific Coast. Fully and interesting- 
ly illustrated. Copy mailed to any 
address on receipt of two-cent stamp, 
by W. B. Kniskern, P. T. M., Chi- 
cago. 



Absolutely Free! 



We have made arrangements whereby 
.v« can supply each new subscriber to 
the Gospel Messenger with the Eternal 
Verities, by D. L. Miller, ABSOLUTELY 
FREE. You can subscribe for the Mes- 
senger for the remaining six months of 
this year and we will send you the book 
prepaid FREE of charge. The price of 
the book is §1.25, and is worth that to 
any home. 

TEE MESSENGER IN EVERY HOME. 

This is by far the best offer we have 
made. We make this wonderful offer in 
order to place the Messenger in every 
home, as nearly as possible, in the 
Brethren church. If you, dear reader, 
are not on our list, now is your time to 
start. You will never get a better op- 
portunity. If you get the paper in your 
home for awhile you would not want to 
do without it for many times what it 
will cost you. That is the testimony of 
hundreds of our readers. 

OUR OFFER. 

The Gospel Messenger to 

Jan. 1, 1905 $ 75 

The Eternal Verities, ... .$1 25 



$2 OO 



Both (or only, 



THE ETERNAL VERITIES. 

The author has gathered many proofs 
of the truth of the Bible. Several illus- 
trations add to the interest and value 
of this book. This is Eld. D. L. Miller's 
latest work and will be found to be the 
most helpful book he has written. It 
contains 375 pages, bound in good, sub- 
stantial cloth, and sells for $1.25. 

TESTIMONIALS 

It has strengthened my belief in the 
Divine Book. It prepared me better to 
meet the questions that come to Chris- 
tians. — Anna Z. Detwiler, Huntingdon, 
Pa. 

For Bible literature one of the marvels 
of the twentieth century is " Eternal 
Verities," a book that every brother and 
sister should possess and carefully read. 
— Lemuel Hillery, Goshen, Ind. 

Your last, best book, " Eternal Veri- 
ties," is clear, pointed, convincing, and 
so will be a power in the conflict between 
truth and error, light and darkness. It 
ought to find its way into every home. — 
T. T, Myers, Philadelphia, Pa. 

FILL OUT BLANK. 

If you are not already a subscriber 
fill out the blank below at once and 
forward to us, and we feel sure you 
will be delighted with your bargain. 
The quicker you do this the more papers 
you will receive. We await your early 
answer. (If you are a subscriber, kind- 
ly show this offer to your friends, who 
ought to read the paper and do not, 
please.) 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING- HOUSE, 
Elgin, 111. 



Date 

Brethren Publishing House: — 

Please send me the Gospel Messenger 
from now to Jan. 1, 1905, and the Eternal 
Verities, as per your special offer to 
new subscribers. Enclosed find 75 cents 
for same. 



Name, 



(If Eternal Verities is not wanted, re- 
mit only 50 cents.) 



Established 1896 



ADVANCE IN "EQUITY" STOCK 



Incorporated 1902 



BECAUSE 



Merit Createsjie Demand^ Demand Maintains Standard and Price ! 

This is the result of practical and valuable co-operation. Two-hundred people have bought Equity 
hares at S25.00 par value, and they have received 6 percent per annum, besides participating Tn all other 



co-operative advantages 



September 1st the Price of Equity Shares Goes to $35.00 

Send in your applications now for whatever shares you wish before the price goes up. If you don't 
have the ready cash send in the application and the shares will be reserved for vou. 



> Equity Mfg. & Supply Co., 

153 S. Jefferson St., Chicago, 111 
Gentlemen: — I hereby subscribe for. 



CUT OUT HERE 
Form A-l 

Cash Subscription Blank igg 



shares of the capital stock of the Equity Mfg 

and Supply Co., (fully paid and non-assessable) at the rate of ($25.00) Twenty-five dollars per share, Par 

Value, for which please find enclosed Dollars for 

shares, being payment in full for said shares at the above price. ' 

This stock is to be issued to (Name) 

to the undersigned. 

Signature 



• and forwarded 



* Date Issued 190.. 

Certificate Number 



Town 



State 



» » » » » .t, ■ !■ . f, . ^ . » » , t . .t . . f . . ; , . { , , ^ . j, , t , , t , , t . , ? , . j , , t . , t , , | , , t . , . 

If you prefer to join on the installment plan use application Form A 2. 



CUT OUT HERE 



{• 

* Equity Mfg. & Supply Co., 

153 S. Jefferson St., Chicago, 111. 

Gentlemen:— I hereby subscribe for s l la 

and Supply Co., (fully paid and non-assessable) at the rate of $25.00 per share, Par Value, for which pleas, 

Balance to be paid in 

ars each; when the last installment is paid, the stock is to be issued 

( ame) and forwarded to the undersigned when 

' fits will begin. 



Installment Subscription Blank 190 

tares of the capita] stock of the Equity Mfg. 



J find enclosed as first installment Dollars 

[, installments of T)o\\ 

i 
i 



earnings and bene- 



Date Issued 

Certificate Number 



.190. 



Signature . . 
Town 




State 



;. .;. .;. .j. .j».». ,j. ... 



;..;..;..'. 1 



Write for Our Large Gen= > 



Address all Communications to 



eral Merchandise Cologne } Equity Mfg. & Supply Co., 

*r+ >53-i55-i57-i59 S. Jefferson St., CHICAGO, ILL. 






i^i-'^.-r.&r*. 



*^?-i 



Vs&Z 












*&^i: 



^^ 



-;«..i 



ffi 



F-!^ 



Finds Scientific Co=operation 
A Great Success 



Annual Stockholders' Meeting 



OUR ANNUAL SHAREHOLDERS' MEETING was held on July 4th. Twenty-six of our 
leading shareholders, some coming a distance of five hundred miles, were present. All declare 
it was the most enthusiastic and encouraging business meeting they ever attended. Investigation 
showed that the assets of the Corporation are increasing at the rate of nearly two thousand dollars 
per month, and that the dividends this year promise to be 10 per cent or more. The 1904 series of 
voucher contracts ($150,000 worth) was closed out in five months. Thus the first five months of 
Scientific Co-operation, as first inaugurated and applied by us in America, closed in a blaze of glory. 
Already Scientific Co-operation is a success. Already our shareholders are reaping the benefits in 
immense savings and in dividends on their investments. Our merchandise sales are increasing daily, 
and our selling expenditures are decreasing daily. We want you as a partner in our Mail Order 
Business, which is organized on an original, scientific co-operative plan. 



Prompt Action Nec- 
essary. 

Co-operation aims to do for the 
small capitalist what the large 
capitalist is doing for himself. If 
you have $100 you cannot start in 
business with it, at least not in a 
business which yields any kind of 
returns. You must deposit it in a 
savings bank or invest it in secur- 
ities and be contented with small 
interest. 

By co-operation you can make 
the small capital yield the hand- 
some percentage of returns which 
the banker or the merchant secures 
from his large investment. "A. B. 
D. & Co. Stock" through co-oper- 
ation puts you in business for 
yourself, no matter how small your 
capital, and puts you on an equality 
with the powerful merchant as far 
as earning power for your dollar is 
concerned. 

Co-operation puts you in a position for a 
25 per cent, opportunity where otherwise 
you remain shackled to the i per cent, 
dictum of the savings bank. 

Our stock is for sale only to gain the co- 
operation of thousands of customers — past, 
present and future. Remember you buy 
mto an established mail order business 
receiving mora than a thousand dollars 
nearly every day right now. No Experiment. 
No risk. Just Expansion and O-operation. 
. Write to-day for application blanks. 



Our Idea 

To do the right thing, at the right 
time, in the right way; to do some things 
better than they were ever done before; 
to eliminate errors; to know both sides 
of the question; to be courteous; to be an 
example; to work for love of the work; 
to anticipate requirements; to develop 
resources; to recognize no impediments; 
to master circumstances; to act from 
reason rather than rule; to be satisfied 
with nothing short of perfection in 
scientific co-operation. 

Woii't you join our Family? 



Albaugh Bros., 
Dover & Co. 

The Mail Order House 



341=43 Franklin St. 
Chicago, - Illinois. 



What Is Your Capital 
Doing For You? 

Prompt action on your part is 
necessary to secure your stock at 
"ground-floor" quotations. It was 
unanimously decided, at the Stock- 
holder's Meeting, that no more 
stock should be sold at less than 
$125.00 per share, which is a 
premium of $25.00 on each share, 
and judging from past experience, 
it is more than likely that the stock 
will command a heavier premium 
by the end of the business year. 

We now have nearly Five 
Hundred people interested with us; 
and in order to enlist hundreds 
more of co-operators, the manage- 
ment has decided to increase the 
capital stock of the Company to 
$500,000 and issue a new series for 
$150,000 worth of voucher con- 
tracts. 

You should take advantage of this 
exceptional opportunity, by getting your 
application in for a part of this 1905 series. 

Remember: One judicious investmeEtmay 
be worth years of labor. There is nothing: 
to give away in our proposition. It is nut a 
promotor's scheme, but a straight-forward, 
nigh-grade, strictly legitimate mercantile 
enterprise and every dollar's worth of stock 
sold represents an actual 125 cents of value 
— (hat's why the stocks sell at a premium. 
Write to-day/or application blanks. 



ftl NSltNOOK, 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 



w 


1 


>r 1 




V. j ^ 






- (, 





MT. BOOKER WASHINGTON.— State of Washington. 
Painted and Named by Mrs, Frank R. Hill. On Exhibition at St. Louis Exposition,' kjcj 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



gust 9, 1 904 



$ 1 .00 per Year 



Number 32, Volume VI 



THE INGLENOOK. 



ARE YOU GOING TO 

California, Washington, 
Oregon, Idaho 

Or Any Other Point? Take the 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Daily Tourist Car Lines 



Chicago, Missouri River, Colorado, Idaho, Oregon, 
Washington and California Points. 



. ROUND TRIP RATES 

From Chicago, 

From Missouri River, . 



$50.00 
45.00 



To San Francisco or Los Angeles, Cal., and Re- 
turn. Tickets Sold Aug. 15 to Sept. 10, inclusive. 
Return Limit, October 23, 1904. 



One-Way Colonist's Rates. 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. 

From Chicago $33 00 

From St. Louis, '. 30 00 

From Missouri River, 25 00 

Proportionate Rates from all Points East. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 

IS KNOWN AS 

"The Overland Route" 

And is the only direct line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West. Business men and 
others can save many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal card to your nearest ticket agent, or 
Geo. L. McDonaugh, Colonization 'Agent, Omaha, 
Neb. 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



A Town With a Future 



Snyder, Colorado, Has all the Ear-marks of a Comer and 
is Surely Destined to be One of North- 
eastern Colorado's Leaders. 



Snyder is beautifully located on the South Platte river 
and Union Pacific Railway, between Sterling and Denver, 
extending from the river to the brow of a mesa, one-half 
mile away. The main street running north and south is 
80 feet wide; all other streets, 60 feet; alleys, 20 feet; all 
lots are 25x125 feet, excepting those fronting on the main 
street, which are 25x120. 

For further information about Snyder or South Platte 
Valley, address Geo. L. McDonaugh, Colonization Agent 
Union Pacific Railroad, at Omaha, Neb., for FREE print- 
ed matter. 

Still better, see some of those who have bought land 
near Snyder, Colorado, or write to them for further in- 
formation. 



The following parties have bought land near Snyder, 
Colo.: 

Louis E. Keltner, Hygiene, Colo.; W. W. Keltner, 
North Dakota; A. W. Brayton, Mt. Morris, 111.; Daniel 
Grabill, Lemasters, Pa.; J. L. Kuns, McPherson, Kans.; 
D. L. Miller, Mt. Morris, 111.; Daniel Neikirk, Lemasters, 
Pa.; Galen B. Royer, Elgin, 111.; E. Slifer, Mt. Morris, 111.; 
I. B. Trout, Lanark, 111.; R. E. Arnold, Elgin, 111. 



Geo. L. Studebaker, of Muncie, Indiana, says: 

" Sterling is a growing town with a good country 
surrounding. The members are active." 

HOMESEEKERS' EXCURSION 
to Snyder, Colorado, 

With Privilege of Stopping off at Sterling, Colo., 

ftrVP PAftP Plus S 2-00 ' for the R° und t^'p First 
UilE rAttC and Third Tuesday of Each Month via 

Union Pacific Railroad. 



PRIZE CONTEST 

HOW TO GET A VALUABLE PREMIUM 

WE ARE GOING TO GIVE A FEW VALUABLE PREMIUMS, AND ALL OUR INGLENOOK FRIENDS 

ARE INVITED TO ENTER THE CONTEST. 



Her© Tlxoy- _A.r© » . 




No £ 



No 1 





No. 3. 



No 5 



The one sending us the most new subscribers to the Inglenook for the remainder of the year at 25 
cents each, or with premium as per our offer* at 75 cents each, will receive one set Literature of All 
Nations, containing 10 volumes, weight, 26 pounds. Subscription price 

The one holding second place 
ferred). The watch is equal 



will receive a splendid ladies' or gentlemen's watch (whichever pre- 
to one that regularly retails for about 



3. The one holding third place will receive a good Teacher's Bible, Arabian Morocco, divinity circuit, worth 

will receive the book " Modern Fables and Parables, 



4. The one holding fourth place 

5. Each person sending 10 or more subscriptions receive 
men's, worth 



*See our offer in this issue. 



good fountain pen, either 
Cash must accompany each order. 



,'orth 
ladies' o 



gentle- 



$25.00 
8.00 
3.00 
1.20 
LOO 



3NTot*7- Is Tour Tiaaa.©. 

Right now is the time to make things count. Get a good start and you will come out all 
right in the end. The one who goes at it at once with a determination to win stands a good 
chance to get a S25.ro set of books FREE. 

Do not say that you do not have a good territory and it's no use to try. Our experience 
leads us to believe that one place is as good as another. Some places where we least expect 
subscriptions we get the most. It is up to you whether or not you get this fine set of books. 
SOME ONE IS GOING TO GET THEM. Let every loyal Nooker get out and hustle. Aim 
at the top. Don't be satisfied with anything less. ALL THESE PRIZES ARE QOIIVG TO 
BE GIVEN TO SOME ONE. Go to work at once. Who will send the first list? (In sending 
your list, please mention that you are entering the contest.) 

Oontosl; Closest. . 

To give all a fair chance we have decided not to close this INGLENOOK CONTEST until 
August 31. All orders received by us up to and including last mail on August 31, 1904, will be 
Many are taking an active part in the contest. The fortunate ones are going to be the 




No. 4 



counted. 

ones who keep continually at it. Remember, at the close of the contest should you not have been fortunate enough to 
receive one of the four prizes named, you will be entitled to prize No. 5, a good Fountain Pen, for each ten subscriptions sent 
us. It is worth your while to try for No. I. Don't procrastinate. Now is your time to do the best work. 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



THE COLONY 



.ON. 



LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 

...IN THE... 

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 




BRETHREN OAK GROVE CHURCH 

Still continues to attract the attention of Jiomeseekers. 

The uniform success of those who have settled here and the immense growth of 
every variety of crop which is again in evidence establishes the fact that here is the 
place where the industrious man of small means can make a California home. 

EASTERN PEOPLE DO EASTERN FARMING. 

You Gon't have to spend years learning" a new business. 

ALFALFA, CATTLE, CORN, HOGS, 

besides the California fruits, are the products which enable the farmer to pay for 
his land and make a good living while doing it. 

SPECIAL LOW RATES TO CALIFORNIA. 

Prom August 15th to Sept. 10th the railroads will sell Round Trip excursion 
tickets to San Francisco (with stop-overs). 

From Chicago, $50 00 

From Mississippi River 47 50 

From Missouri River, 45 00 

Final return limit, Oct. 23. 

ALSO SEPTEMBER 15tli TO OCTOBER 15th COLONIST ONE-WAY TICKETS 
TO ANT CALIFORNIA POINT. 

From Chicago $33 00 

From Mississippi River 30 00 

From Missouri River 25 00 

By this arrangement you can come to Laton on the excursion rate and see our 
land. If it suits you, go back and bring your family out on the colonist rate. 

Land sells for $30 to $60 per acre, including perpetual water right. Terms, one- 
fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. 

From twenty to forty acres will support the average family in comfort. 

If interested send your name and address and receive printed matter and our 
local newspaper free for two months. Write to 

NARES & SAUNDERS, - Laton, California. 

26tl3 Uonuon the INfiLKNOOK when wilting 



A Free Trip 



We are running cheap excursions 
from Chicago, St. Louis and inter- 
mediate points to Denver, Sterling, 
Snyder and other Colorado points ev- 
ery month. If you can help us to 
get up a party to come out from your 
locality, will furnish free transporta- 
tion for your own personal use to 
accompany them on the above named 
trip. 

MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 

are being expended by the United 
States government on irrigation en- 
terprises and what was once known 
as "The Great American Desert" is 
beginning to bloom and blossom in a 
manner wonderful to behold. 

OUR FARMERS 

are prosperous and contented. It is 
plain to be seen that they are making 
more money on 40 or 80 acres of ir- 
rigated land than can be realized on 
more than double the amount of land 
" Back East," and a trip through the 
South Platte Valley, Colorado, will 
convince you of this fact. 

CHEAP LANDS AND EASY PAY- 
MENTS. 

We sell a few irrigated farms, or 
town lots in Denver, Sterling or Sny- 
der at lowest figures and give easy 
terms of payment. Will sell a limited 
number of Snyder lots on $5.00 
monthly payments. 

WRITE TO-DAY. 

Don't wait for some one else to get 
in ahead of you on the best bargains. 
If you cannot come yourself, let us 
know just what you want and how 
much money you wish to invest and 
will make selections for you. 

We wish to arrange with one mem- 
ber in every town or county to co- 
operate with us in this enterprise. 
Advertising matter free. 

The Colorado Colony Co., 
Sterling, Celorado. 

I7tl3 Mention tho INQLENOOK when writing. 



A POWER FOR GOOD 



When a disturbance appears in the bodily 
functions and your feelings indicate that your 
system is out of order, you will make no mistake 
in resorting to 



i> m 



DR. PETER" 
BLOOD YITALIZER 



without delay. It is a power for good It soothes 
and calms the irritated conditions and gives 
4 health and strength. Thousands have experienced 
its medicinal charm. Not sold in drugstores, but 
by special agents only, or direct from the pro- 
prietor, 

I DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 

112=114 S. Hoyne Avenue, 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



I IDAHO 



is the best-watered arid State 
winds, destructive storms and 
mate it makes life bright and 
We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer 
change for the general improvement in your condi 
account of health, we believe that Idaho will meet b 
and sensible thing to do; that is, go and see the coun 
swer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger 
fares to investigate thoroughly a new country saves 
Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all prin 
for yourself. Selecting a new home is like selecting 



in America. Brethren are moving there because hot ^ 

cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless cli- 5 

worth living. J 

to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a ^ 

tion in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on ^ 

oth requirements. There is, however, only one wise §■ 

try for yourself, as there are many questions to an- ^ 

work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad ^ 

thousands of dollars in years to follow. ^ 

cipal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see ^ 

a wife — you want to do your own choosing. ^ 



Round=Trip Homeseekers' Excursion Tickets 

Will be sold to points in Idaho as follows: West of Pocatello on first and third Tuesday of May, 
August, September and October, 1904. To points north of Pocatello tickets will be sold only' in May 
and October, 1904. The rate will apply from Missouri river points, and from St. Paul, Chicago, Bloom- 
ington, Peoria and St. Louis. Tickets to Idaho points will also be sold by the Union Pacific, from sta- 
tions on their lines in Kansas and Nebraska. Rate will be one regular first-class fare for the round trip 
plus $2.00, with limit of 15 days going. Return passage may commence any day within the final limit of 
21 days from date of sale of tickets. Tickets for return will be good for continuous passage to starting 
point. 



~^F^BSSE?^E*E&dS^ m * *j£- ^mv*slfd 


m 










v , v.. •?-;' >,/* . v.. \ i 





PAYETTE VALLEY HOME.— Five Years from Sagebrush. 



Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. 
Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat, Oats and Barley. 



Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 80-acre tract, covered with sage brush. 
Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to wheat. Yielded 30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres 
to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sown in February 
or March the yield would have been much larger. 

Alfalfa was sown with the grain and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 
oats. 

Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to 5 pounds each, four of 
the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) E. L. Dotson. 



S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. 

J. E. HOOPER, Agent, Oakland, Kansas. 



Mention the 1NGLENOOK when 



D. E. BURLEY, 
G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R„ 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 



Fine §.; 



ft I NSLtNOOK 



Vol. VI. 



August 9, 1904. 



No. 32. 



SERVICE. 



BY MAY C. STONER. 

Do you seek a victor's crown 

And a robe of spotless white? 
Lay your life for Jesus down 

Work for him from morn till night; 
Bring the lost ones to the fold 

To the realms of peace and light. 
Then you'll walk the streets of gold 

In the city of delight. 

You would see his smiling face; 

You would hear his loving voice? 
Then with patience run your race, 

And in trials e'er rejoice. 
Gently lead the wand'rer home, 

Set the captive pris'ner free, 
Then he'll say, " My blessed, come, 

Ye have done it unto me." 

Ladoga, Ind. 

.;. 4. .». 

SNAPSHOTS. 



Self-conquest is the greatest of all victories. 

*> 
Cod created hope when listening to repentance. 

.5. 

In all affairs of vice you can afford to be a fool. 

* 
There is no xvealth like the heart's wealth — content. 

A too-virtuous 'wife is like six consecutive dishes of 
honey. 

* 

A man is usually most distinguished after he is ex- 
tinguished. 






Being honest for policy's sake is neither good policy 
nor good honesty. 

* 

The pursuit even of the best of tilings ought to be 
calm and tranquil. 



Many of those comprising the upper crust of society 
are not even well-bred. , 



Learning is wealth to the poor, and honor to the 



The man without a purpose lives on, but he enjoys 
not life. 

* 

One of the very best of earthly possessions is pos- 
sessions. 

* 

He who kicks a cow kicks a big chunk of profits in- 
to the gutter. 

*• 

In adversity a man sometimes comes to know him- 
self for the first time. 

* 

It pays to take some stimulant now and then; that 
is, it pays the saloon-keeper. 
*:* 

When an American heiress is looking for a title she 
does her shopping in Europe. 

The more you drink to other people's health the more 
you drink to the ruin of your own. 
* 

The measure of success is the degree in which men 
make themselves valuable to others. 



Cooking and self-abnegation are no longer fashion- 
able in a wife, but they make excellent doormats. 
* 
A woman declares to a man that he is perfect, and 
the man never notices that she does not attempt to 
prove it. 

* 

// is the tootsy-wootsy girl, frail and gentle to the 
naked eye, who turns out to be a Gibraltar of prej- 
udices and desires to her astonished husband. 
<* 

None, therefore, who fears or grieves, or worries 
or who is anxious, is free ; but whoever is released from 
griefs, fears and anxieties is by that very tiling re- 
leased from slavery. 



746 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



Ithe kritic on the trane! 






BY GEORGE HALDAN. 

'1 1*1 1*1 i*i i*i 1*1 ,*r 1*1 1*1 iti >*i i*i 1 



The Great Salt Lake is a body of natural brine occu- 
pying the main depression within the Salt Lake valley 
in the north central part of Utah. In all probability 
this lake is a small remnant of what formerly was a 
large inland sea, filling the entire valley extending be- 
yond the present boundaries of Nevada and Idaho on 
the west and north, and almost reaching Arizona on 
the south. The evidences remaining which demon- 
strate almost beyond doubt that such a thing existed 
are the shorelines, terraces, both carved and built. 
The rippling marks of sea waves and other littoral 
phenomena on the mountain slopes that once formed 
its shores and the sediment of its floors. 

This body of water has been an object of attraction 
to scientists from the earliest announcement of its ex- 
istence, and we think that the interest at present is re- 
garded greater than usual perhaps on account of the 
surprisingly rapid shrinkage during the past two years, 
which is much in advance of the more conservative de- 
crease of the last two decades. 

A French traveler of some note learned from some 
of the Indian tribes of the Mississippi valley, the story 
of a great sea lying high amid the solitudes of the 
Western Mountains. His name was Baron La Hon- 
tan, and his accounts date back as far as 1689. At dif- 
ferent intervals since then, men have given certain data 
regarding the existence, size, utility, etc., of this won- 
derful body of water, but no complete survey of the 
lake has been reported since 1869 when it was said to 
be about 50 miles wide and 75 miles long, with an 
area of 2,125 square miles. Of course this cannot be re- 
lied upon as being true at the present date, because the 
valley floor of the lake is conspicuously flat, so that 
with the slight fall of water the level gives rise to what 
appears to be a disproportionately great recession, and 
the rise of a few feet would result in flooding the val- 
ley clear to the Wasatch Mountains. 

Some years ago it was determined by sounding that 
the maximum depth was 30 feet and the average depth 
was 13 feet, which is surprisingly small in both di- 
mensions. 

The river supply of the lake is nearly all derived 
from the Eastern side and consists of the drainage of 
the small basin near the Wasatch Mountains. The Jor- 
dan river is probably the first of importance among the 
tributaries which brings an overflow from the Utah 
Lake. The Weber and Bear rivers are next in impor- 
tance, but the observer can easily see that the source 
of supply is entirely inadequate to the amount of evap- 
oration to which this body of water is subjected, which 
not only decreases the area of its surface and depth, 



but also increases its salinity. Scientists agree that this 
lake is certain to disappear from the map within the 
near future, even the date of its epitaph has already 
been given. Some have placed it at twenty-five years 
and others at forty years. When an examination of 
the surface level of the lake is made, we find that in the 
last sixteen years the net fall has been eleven and one- 
half feet, while in the last three years it has been fully 
three feet ; it has a noticeable increase over the pre- 
vious years. 

Now as the rate of fall is increasing and the deepest 
part of the lake was only thirty-six feet in 1850, it is 
easily calculated that it will be ready for cultivation 
inside of forty years. 

Another man who has been studying the situation, 
figures this way: He compares the cubic contents of 
the lake in 1886, and the same at the present time, 
and by such calculations figures that the disappear- 
ance is scheduled to occur within twenty-five years. 
There may be three reasons, or one of the three rea- 
sons, why the Salt Lake is disappearing. One is the 
evaporation ; another, the extensive use of water for 
irrigation purposes, and the third, a subterranean out- 
let. However, the latter is one of- conjecture. 

We do -not see how anyone would be able to deter- 
mine successfully, as yet, the truth of this, but there 
are evidences that point somewhat in this direction. 
It seems to us that the stronger evidence would be the 
insufficiency of its tributaries to the demand made upon 
it by the large surface it has for evaporation, having 
only three small rivers feeding it, and a surface of 
over 2,000 square miles for evaporation besides the 
heavy draught that is made upon it by irrigation. 
There are indications of a strong character on the sides 
of the surrounding mountains, that this lake at one time 
had a depth of 600 feet more than it now has, and if 
this be true in any rrieasure, it remains evident that we 
are witnessing the speedy completion of the physical 
change that has been in progress for many centuries. 
Most of the physical changes of the globe occur slowly 
and do not give evidence of themselves upon the map 
for generations to follow, but in all probability the 
Great Salt Lake will be an exception to the rule. 

GOVERNMENT INSPECTION OF MEATS. 



BY DR. C. W. JOHNSON, GOVERNMENT INSPECTOR. 

At a time when new food products and pure food 
are so prominently set forth in the columns of both 
newspaper and magazine throughout the country, it 
is especially apropos that considerable importance 
should be attached to the inspection of meats and live 
stock as conducted by the Federal Government. 

Government inspection of meats, while largely 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



747 



known of in a general way, principally through the 
medium of the advertised products, is but vaguely un- 
derstood except by those directly interested in carry- 
ing on the work. There are several reasons for this 
lack of knowledge in a subject which actually concerns 
the vitality and life of the nation. In the first place, 
the inspection of meats as a Government proposition 
is young, having been in operation but some twelve 
years, and for only about half that period has it in any 
way approached its present efficient service. 

Second, the importance of such inspection being so 
little understood by the public may be due to congres- 
sional inaction in not allowing sufficient appropriations 
for extending the service to its ultimate requirements; 
which lack of interest by Congressmen may be due to 
absence of concerted and intelligent influence from 
their constituency. As a result the Bureau is hampered 
and curtailed in its plans and finds it all but impos- 
sible to secure sufficient and competent ability to make 
a reasonable showing. The work calls for a large 
force of high grade Veterinarians possessing a technic- 
al and practical knowledge. 

A third reason for the scarcity of information pos- 
sessed even by those who have watched the Inspectors 
at work, is that the inspection is carried on so system- 
atically, deftly and rapidly by these experts that it 
does not attract especial attention. 

The Bureau of Animal Industry, which is an impor- 
tant factor in the Agricultural Department, is ably 
looked after by Dr. D. E. Salmon, who has been chief 
of the Bureau since its inception, directing its affairs 
from Washington, D. C, with the aid of numerous 
expert assistants, many of whom have been on the 
force ever since Government inspection was inaugu- 
rated. 

All along the Canadian border and the line between 
Mexico and the United States, at the larger towns, as 
well as at the seaports of both the Atlantic and Pacific, 
there are " Stations " located, each in charge of an ex- 
pert inspector detailed to examine carefully every head 
of stock that enters or leaves the United States, thus 
making the introduction or prevalence of an infectious 
or contagious disease certain of detection. The ex- 
amination for Meat Inspector before the Civil Service 
Board is very rigid, calling for an extensive range of 
technical and practical knowledge. In this examina- 
tion none but graduated Veterinarians are allowed to 
compete, and but comparatively few of these meet all 
the requirements. However, the list of eligibles being 
constantly exhausted, success in passing an examina- 
tion usually is equivalent to an appointment. 

The duties of Meat Inspector may be roughly class- 
ified as Ante Mortem and Post Mortem, each requiring 
a large force. 

As to the relative importance of these two classes 
of work there is really no difference. An inspector is 



required to be familiar with both as he often is trans- 
ferred from one to the other as occasion demands. But 
in the case of Ante Mortem inspection, the force is 
spread from the quarantine line at the south where 
they guard against the introduction of Texas fever, to 
the New England States where they have recently 
stamped out an outbreak of malignant foot and mouth 
disease. Located at Fort Worth, Texas, is a dipping 
plant, through which southern cattle are passed to rid 
them of the " tick," which is the means of propagating 
Texas fever, and at the principal packing centers a sim- 
ilar arrangement exists for dipping sheep affected with 
" scab," in charge of competent Ante Mortem Inspec- 
tors. 

A large number of cattle are exported alive and 
these also exact fine judgment on the part of the Ante 
Mortem Inspectors. 

Then, throughout the Western grazing country, they 
are fast freeing from diseased conditions droves of cat- 
tle and sheep by dipping them before making shipment, 
thus saving to ranchmen and others thousands of dol- 
lars each year, it being considered both wiser and 
cheaper to treat the animals in this manner before they 
leave for the packing centers. 

But this work does not end with the ranches, for, 
located at all the principal packing centers the Govern- 
ment Inspectors are to be found condemning animals 
for various causes, such as Ansemia, Hog Cholera, ad- 
vanced cases of Pregnancy and numerous acute in- 
flammatory conditions. 

Another feature in this connection and one amazing 
in proportion even to one who is informed, is the cur- 
tailment of receipts in this class of undesirable animals. 
Where formerly a shipper would send such stock to 
market, willing to take what they would bring, now, 
understanding that they will be condemned by the U. 
S. Inspectors and be practically a dead loss, they re- 
frain from shipping them. All of these points, which 
can be outlined but inadequately in a magazine article, 
are to be found in interesting detail in the Annual Re- 
port of the Bureau of Animal Industry, published in 
Washington, D. C. 

After the Ante Mortem inspection of animals natur- 
ally follows the Post Mortem work as carried on at 
the large abattoirs throughout the country. This sub- 
jecc I believe to be of sufficient importance to be given 
in a later article. 

82 Exchange Building, Chicago, III. 
(To be Continued. I 
4f * ♦ 

With regard to manner, be careful to speak in a 
soft, tender, kind and loving way. Even when you 
have occasion to rebuke, be careful to do it with mani- 
fest kindness. The effect will be incalculably better. 
— Hosca Ballon. 



748 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



LEARNING BY DOING AT TUSKEGEE. 



The Year's Work. 

The contrast between manual training, as taught in 
such a school as Girard College in Philadelphia, or the 
St. Louis Labor Manual Training School, and industri- 
al training, as managed at Tuskegee, is notable. Writ- 
ing in 1887 of the St. Louis School, Samuel Chapman 
Armstrong said : " It is no experiment. It is the con- 
trast to perfection of the fine methods of training head 
and hand together that I know of I only here re- 
mark that such a labor school belongs rather to a high 
civilization. The student's support is assured by the 
accumulated savings of educated generations. At 



Special mention should be made of the steam en- 
gineers, all of whom took this year, in addition to the 
regular theory classes in engineering, a. course treat- 
ing electric currents and dynamo management. 

But the productive work at Tuskegee is funda- 
mental pedagogically, and deserves careful attention. 
For 23 years Tuskegee has been in process of con- 
struction, and has relied upon the student body for 
much skilled labor. To display the effectiveness of this 
labor, it may be worth while to describe the products 
of a few shops during the school year just closed. The 
farm accounts cannot be made up until the farm sea- 
son closes. 

The Tuskegee brickyard made during the year two 




Carnegie Library. 



TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE GROUNDS. 



Hampton, for instance, the bread and butter and 
clothes question is primary, if not paramount. They 
(the students) must have something to eat before they 
can be taught, so we pay them for their work, instead 
of being paid for what work we give them." At Tus- 
kegee also, students are paid for their work. Girard 
secures finished workmanship. Tuskegee secures val- 
uable products and industrious workers. 

Of course it must not be assumed for a moment that 
either in the three Rs or in the industries Tuskegee has 
eliminated class-room instruction. After the tradi- 
tional class-room method, Night School students (who 
accumulate from productive industry such credits at 
the Treasurer's office as will later on defray expenses 
in the Day School) pursue academic studies each night, 
and at certain periods of the day receive instruction in 
mechanical drawing and the theories that underlie the 
respective industries. 



million and one hundred thousand brick — which would 
bring a fancy price in New York. They have a hand- 
some dull red color, and are solid and durable. The 
contrast between the brick in Cassedy Hall, one of the 
earlier buildings, and the bricks in Douglass Hall, which 
has just been completed, exhibits the extraordinary 
advance made in this industry. The improvement is 
due, first, to the fact that the Cassedy Hall bricks were 
laboriously made by hand, (at the rate of 8,900 per 
day of ten hours) ; whereas the Douglass Hall bricks 
were made by steam machinery, (at the rate of 30,000 
per day) ; and second, to the fact that the bricklayers 
have been increasing their efficiency from year to year. 
Anent the use of modern machinery at the brickyard,, 
it is interesting to note that, whereas in the old days 
boys were assigned to the brickyard against their will, 
now the waiting list of eager applicants is a large one. 
These bricks have been laid by the Masonry Divis- 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9. 1904. 



749 



ion, which has this year completed four large buildings 
— The Huntington Memorial and Office Buildings, the 
Douglass Hall, and Emery Dormitory No. I. In ad- 
dition the division has almost completed Emery Dor- 
mitory No. 2, and has done other brick-work such as 
that on cottages, and the building of a new pumping 
station ; Huntington Memorial Building, a three-story 
edifice with two wings and a front projection accentu- 
ating the front entrance, built of machine-made Indian- 
red bricks with red mortar, is a model of Twentieth 
Century school building design and construction. The 
ground space is 11,179 square feet, and the structure 
contains about 900,000 bricks. In the basement is an 
ample gymnasium for girls, and the main center of the 



A part of the lumber used by the carpenters, and all 
the laths used by masons come directly from the divis- 
ion of Sawmilling. 

The roofs put on by the carpenters are covered with 
tin by the students of the Tinsmithing Division. Be- 
sides 105 coffee pots, 394 dippers, 423 dust pans, 446 
slop pans, 763 buckets, and other tinware innumerable 
in kind and quantity, this division made 6,375 square 
feet of gutters and valleys. 

During the year the division of Electricity installed 
one 7-kilowatt dynamo for street lighting, removing 
the street lights from the large monocycle alternator 
to the small dynamo; kept in operation in 27 buildings 
a total of 1717 lights; and installed lights in Douglass 




THE DAIRY HERD. TUSKEGEE INSTITUTE, TUSKEGEE, ALABAMA. 



third story an assembly room seating 300 persons. 
Douglass Hall is a girls' dormitory with 33 bed-rooms 
and a large study hall ; and in style is an outgrowth of 
the colonial type. The Emery Dormitories represent 
the purely colonial type ; each building is of dark red 
brick and mortar, and contains 38 bed-rooms and one 
sitting room. The Office Building, built on Mormon 
lines, contains the offices of Principal, his Secretary, 
the Treasurer, the Auditor, the Business Agent, and 
also contains the Post Office, Bank, etc. Finally, all 
the excavating, lathing and plastering done on the 
grounds were done by the Masonry Division. 

The carpenters follow and work along with the 
brickmasons ; most of the wood-work on the buildings 
mentioned — and an immense amount it was, some of it 
very intricate — and an infinite number of other jobs 
have been done by the students in the division of Car- 
pentry. 



Hall, Emery Dormitory No. I, and the Academic 
Building. For this division the crowning achievement 
for the year was the installation of one 150-kilowatts 
dynamo. 

Even more significant is the year's work of the 
Steam and Engineering Division. Its foundry turned 
out 9 tons of sash-weights for buildings, II tons of 
casting for machinery, stoves, boiler, agricultural im- 
plements, etc. ; besides the castings for 250 iron beds 
for the dormitories. The division filled an important 
order from the German Government for castings for 
cotton-gin machinery. .Moreover, the division repaired 
40 pieces of machinery for other divisions, including 
metalworking, woodworking, agricultural, and steam 
machinery. To increase the steam supply for heating 
the buildings, two new boilers were installed. The 
Douglass Hall and Emery Dormitory No. 1. were fit- 
ted with steam heating system, cast iron radiators be- 



750 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



ing used; and also water works service such as lava- 
tories, sanitary closets, etc. The machine and engineer- 
ing division installed, with the aid of the brickmasons, 
a new water works system ; this plant is equipped with 
a new tower and tank, 40-horse power boiler and du- 
plex pump and has a capacity of 10,000 gallons per 
hour. This plant furnishes the water needed by the live 
stock. During the month of April 637,739 gallons 
were pumped from this plant. The students made the 
installations to which reference has been made in ac- 
cordance with drawings which were made in the Me- 
chanical Drawing Room. Almost daily 13 steam en- 
gines and 11 steam boilers are in operation, and, al- 
though student engineers and firemen are used exclu- 
sively, not one serious mishap or wreck occurred 
during the year. 

In conclusion let me say that in the mass of details 
thus awkwardly presented, the reader will observe, ( 1 ) 
that, although I have purposely dealt with a handful 
of Tuskegee's shops, I have nevertheless dealt with a 
large number of trades; and (2) that each student may 
learn, and often does, more than one trade. The 
student in the masonry division regularly learns what 
in the North and urban South constitutes two distinct 
trades — (1) Lathing and Plastering, and (2) Brick- 
masonry. Similarly, engineering is distinct from the 
work of a machinist, and the machinist may be a " vise- 
hand " or a " machine-tool " man ; finally, the steam 
fitter is distinct from the other three. But, at Tuske- 
gee, the same boy learns the four trades. In addition 
to these, moulding, casting and plumbing are taught in 
the Machine and Engineering Division. The Tuske- 
gee boy does not put all his eggs in one basket ; he is 
equipped for earning his living under the actual in- 
dustrial conditions of the South. — Tuskegee Student. 
«5* *$* ♦> 
CHOICE OF COMPANIONS. 



BY CORA BEARD. 

The chameleon changes its color to agree with that 
of surrounding objects. 

All of us by nature possess this quality to such a 
degree that our character, habits and principles take 
their form and color from those of our intimate as- 
sociates. Association with persons wiser, better and 
more experienced than ourselves, is always more or 
less inspiring and invigorating. 

We enlarge our field of observation through their 
eyes, profit by their experience, and learn not only by 
what they have enjoyed, but which is still more in- 
structive, from what they had suffered. If they are 
stronger than ourselves we become participators in their 
strength. Hence companionship with the wise and en- 
ergetic never fails to have a most valuable influence 
on the formation of character. 

Young men are in general but little aware how 



much their reputation is affected in the view of the 
public by the company they keep. The character of 
their associates is soon regarded as their own. 

If they seek the society of the worthy and the re- 
spectable it elevates them in the public estimation, as 
it is an evidence that they respect themselves and are 
desirous to secure the respect of others. 

On the contrary, intimacy with persons of bad char- 
acter always sinks a young man in the eyes of the 
public. People learn what his taste is, what sort of 
company he prefers, on no doubtful ground, and what 
the result of his own principles and character will be. 

Only those who are elevated in mind and character 
can lift us up, while the ignoble, degraded and debased 
drag us down. No man of position can allow himself 
to associate, without jeopardy, with the profane, the 
Sabbath-breaking, the drunken and the licentious, for 
he lowers himself without elevating them. 

Keep company with persons rather above than be- 
low yourself; for gold in the same pocket with silver 
loseth both of its weight and color. In all society it 
is advisable to associate, if possible, with the highest ; 
not that the highest are always the best, but because 
if disgusted there you can at once descend; but if we 
begin at the lowest, it is impossible to ascend. It 
should be the aim of the young man to seek the so- 
ciety of the wise, the intelligent and the good. He 
that sinks into familiarity with persons much below 
his own level will be constantly weighed down by his 
base connections, and though he may easily sink lower, 
he will find it hard to rise again. Better be alone 
than in bad company. " Evil communications cor- 
rupt good manners." 

It is not alone the low and dissipated, the vulgar and 
profane, from whose examples and society you are 
in danger. But there are persons of apparently decent 
morals, of polished manners and interesting talents, but 
who, at the same time, are unprincipled and wicked, 
who make light of sacred things and scoff at religion ; 
these are the persons whose society and influence are 
most to be feared. 

Many a young man has thus been led on by his 
elders in iniquity till he has been* initiated into all the 
mysteries of debauchery and crime, and ended his 
day a poor, outcast wretch. Live with the culpable 
and you will be apt to die with the criminal. Bad 
company is like a nail driven into a post, which after 
the first or second blow may be drawn out with little 
difficulty, but being driven in to the head it can only be 
drawn by the destruction of the wood. Evil company 
is like tobacco smoke, — you cannot be long in its pres- 
ence without carrying away a taint in it. " Let no man 
deceive himself," says Petrarch, " by thinking that the 
contagions of the soul are less than those of the body. 
They are greater ; they sink deeper and come on more 
unexpectedly." 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



751 



Good company not only improves our manners but 
also our minds, and intelligent associations will become 
a source of enjoyment as well as of edification. Good 
company is that which is composed of intelligent 
and well-bred persons, whose language is chaste and 
good, whose sentiments are pure and edifying, whose 
deportment is such as pure and well-regulated educa- 
tion and correct morals dictate and whose conduct is 
directed and restrained by the pure precepts of religion. 

Water will seek its own level. So do various ele- 
ments of society. Tell us whom you prefer as com- 
panions and we can tell who you are like. Do you 
love the society of the vulgar? Then you are already 
debased in your sentiments. Do you seek to be with 
the profane? In your heart you are like them. Are 
jesters and buffoons your choice companions? He 
who loves to laugh at folly is himself a fool. Do you 
love and seek the society of the wise and good? Is 
this your habit? Had you rather take the lowest seat 
among these than the highest seat with others ? Then 
you have already learned to be good. You may not 
make very rapid progress, but even a good beginning 
is not to be despised. Hold on your way and seek to 
be the companion of those who fear God. So shall 
you be wise for yourself and wise for eternity. 

Uniontown, Md. 

* * ♦ 
THE SUNDAY STONE. 



All our Sabbath deeds are written there, and we shall 
see them at the last. 

Be very careful to keep your Sabbath pure and 
white, and do not allow the dust of worldliness and sin 
to tarnish the purity of the blessed day. 

" Remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy." — 
Christian Treasury. 

.> 4» 4» 

A BARREN WASTE- 



In one of our English coal mines there is a constant 
formation of limestone, caused by the trickling of wa- 
ter through the rocks. This water contains a great 
many particles of lime, which are deposited in the 
mine, and as the water passes off, these become hard, 
and form limestone. 

This stone would always be white, like marble, were 
it not that men are working in the mine, and as the 
black dust rises from the coal it mixes with the soft 
lime, and in that way a black stone is formed. 

Now, in the night, when there is no coal-dust rising, 
the stone is white; then again, the next day, when the 
miners are at work, another black layer is formed, 
and so on alternately, black and white, through the 
week until Sunday comes. Then, if the miners keep 
holy the Sabbath, a much larger layer of white stone 
.than before. There will be the white stone of Satur- 
day night and the whole of Sunday, so that every 
seventh day the white layers will be about three times 
as thick as any of the others. But if they work on 
the Sabbath, they see it marked against them in the 
stone. Hence the miners call it " the Sunday stone." 

Perhaps many who now break the Sabbath would 
try to spend it better if there were a " Sunday stone " 
where they could see their unkept Sabbaths with their 
black marks. 

But God needs no such record on earth to know how 
all our Sabbaths are spent. His record is kept above. 



The coast of Labrador is the edge of a vast solitude 
of rocky hills, split and blasted by the frosts and beaten 
by the waves of the Atlantic for unknown ages. A 
grand headland, yellow, brown and black in its naked- 
ness, is ever in sight, one to the north of you and one to 
the south. Here and there upon them are strips and 
patches of pale green mosses, lean grasses and dwarf 
shrubbery. There are no forests except in Hamilton 
inlet. Occasionally miles of precipices front the sea, in 
which fancy may roughly shape all the structures of 
human art. 

More frequent than headlands and perpendicular sea 
fronts are the sea slopes, often bald and tame, and 
then the perfection of all that is picturesque and rough. 
' In the interior the blue hills and stony vales that wind 
up from among them from the sea have a summer- 
like and pleasant air. 

One finds himself peopling these regions and dot- 
ting their hills, valleys and wild shores with human 
habitants, but a second thought, and a mournful one it 
is, tells that no men toil in the fields away there, no 
women keep the homes off there, no children play by 
the brooks or shout around the country schoolhouse, 
no bees' come home to the hive, no smoke curls from 
the farmhouse chimney, no orchard blooms, no bleating 
sheep fleck the mountain side with whiteness and no 
heifer lows in the twilight. 

There is nobody there, there never were but a miser- 
able and scattered few, and there never will be. It is 
a great and terrible wilderness, thousands of miles 
in extent and lonesome to the very wild animals and 
birds. Left to the still visitation of the light from the 
sun, moon and stars and the auroral fires, it is only fit 
to look upon and then be given over to its primeval 
solitariness. 

But for the living things of its waters, the cod, sal- 
mon and seal, which bring thousands of fishermen to 
its waters and traders to its bleak shores, Labrador 
would be as desolate as Greenland. The time is now 
coming when with good steamship accommodations the 
invalid and tourist from the States will be found spend- 
ing the brief but lovely summer here, notwithstanding 
its ruggedness and desolation. 
* * * 

It is not good that the man should be alone. — 
Scripture. 



752 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



A NIGHT'S RIDE ON THE TRAIN. 



BY H. M. BARWICK. 

10 P. M. All a-b-o-a-r-d ! and the long train began 
to move. The train being heavily loaded with passen- 
gers and our coach being a through one, the Conductor 
was a long time getting to us ; so long that pretty soon 
heads began to nod; some chins resting on the breast 
of the sleeper pressed the lips together so closely that 
there was a hissing from each corner of the man's 
mouth like escaping steam from a steam engine when 
it begins to move ; other heads went backwards until 
they were at right angles to the backbone, and their 
chins were up about where their forehead should be. 
With some their mouths were wide open, looking like 
the entrance to a large sewer pipe, nostrils dilated, and 
one leg stretched beyond its common length until- it 
reached across the aisle and forward past the seat in 
front of the man, but he was sleeping, sleeping, sleep- 
ing. 

For myself I tried to pillow my head on the softest 
edge of the window frame for a while, then on the arm 
of the car seat, then I changed positions half a dozen 
times in a few minutes in order to find some kind of 
duplex folding of joints by which my anatomy of six 
feet two could be comfortably squeezed into three feet 
six without damaging the frame work of my body be- 
yond repair. With my head in the window, my neck 
stretched at tight tension across two sharp wood edges, 
the most of my body in the car seat and my lower ex- 
tremities folded partways, then twisted together and 
hung over the side of the seat and finally tucked out 
of sight beneath my bed, I began to feel sleepy after 
a countless number of painful thoughts, a few groans 
and several notions to give it all up for a bad job. 

But just now hear that snoring apparatus begin 
work just in front of me, low in tone at first but each 
suction increased a little in tensity and much in noise 
until it seemed that unless his head was screwed to- 
gether pretty well, the whole thing would explode. 
Whether or not he ever studied music I do not know 
but unconsciously he struck the various pitches of the 
musical scale with skill. Well even this song got old 

and we were surely go-i-n — g, g-o i . 

What came next ? Why ? " T-ic-k-ets " " Tickets 
I say!!!" "Shake him" said the Conductor to the 
Brakeman and several ligaments were stretched to 
their full limit in the pulling and rolling that it took to 
open the eyes of the sleepy man. Such as this and 
much more continued for some time until we again felt 
sleepy, then came another case of roaring and shouting 
to awaken a man and after showing his ticket he was 
found to be in the wrong car and twenty miles past his 
getting-off place. With the hair around his forehead 
erect like bristles and a few exclamatory remarks about 



such R. R.'s and conductors, he left the car not half 

as sleepy as he had been just ten minutes before. 

So it goes all night and every little event harrows 
one's nerves until they are magnified in our feelings 
and memories many times. Once again something 
goes thump and a tiny little voice let loose a terrific 
solo without invitation from any one in the car. It was 
a little baby that rolled over and off of its bed onto the 
hard floor. Its cries were much out of proportion to 
its damages, just like most of the damage suits of older 
people against railroad accidents. Some people who 
never were babies and yet think there is no place for 
babies, expressed some feelings about different kinds 
of kids which they wished people would learn to leave 
at home. 

In spite of all such things as a snoring quartette, 
crying babies, mad passengers, the trumpet call for 
tickets, the all night long chatter and chitter of a young 
couple in the rear end of the coach and other vicissi- 
tudes to a nervous being, some slumbered and slept. At 
last came a hearty laugh. As we were leaving our car 
in the depot at Minneapolis we saw a frightened man 
make the jump of his life as he thought. While cross- 
ing the many tracks amid the many trains he saw an 
approaching train that to him seemed to mean sure 
death unless he could be miraculously saved by making 
a heroic jump, which he did, but across the wrong 
track for there was no train on that track for ten miles 
in either direction. In his haste and confused state of 
mind he failed to distinguish on which track the train 
was moving. Laughable mistakes as well as distress 
ing accidents accompany railroad travel. 



TRUE GREATNESS. 



BY EARL EMERSON LICHTEN WALTER. 

True greatness does not inhere alone in the great 
strength of the body, in the craftiness of the mind, 
or even in the development of the intellect, but in 
the development of the religious faculties. In gen- 
eral, greatness is eminence of ability; but there are 
so many different qualities in which a man may be 
eminent, that there are as many different forms of 
greatness. These different forms should be clearly 
marked out, that when we say a man is great, we may 
know exactly what we mean. 

In the rudest ages of the world, physical strength 
was preeminent in work or war. Then, as long as 
human affairs were controlled by brute force, the 
physical giant was considered the great man, and was 
honored for his big bone and stout muscle. 

After man passed this stage and the first signs of 
the development of the intellect were noticed, cun- 
ningness or craftiness became the essential qualifica- 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



753 



tion of greatness. The nimble brain was superior to 
the brawny arm of the giant. 

As man advances in his development, finding qual- 
ities more valuable than physical strength, 'cunning 
and craftiness, he comes to value the higher intel- 
lectual faculties, understanding, imagination and rea- 
son. He has a desire for a higher education, for a 
development of these faculties, that he may be power- 
ful in the world. Power to think is the faculty he 
begins to value most, ability to devise means for at- 
taining ends desired, power to originate ideas, to ex- 
press them in speech and organize them into insti- 
tutions. Power may be thought to be an evidence of 
greatness, as it really is but mere intellectual power 
has control only over the body and intellect, and it is 
the higher nature of man we wish to exalt. He 
who is eminent in ability is thought to be a great man. 

But there are qualities grander and nobler than the 
intellect : the moral, the affectional, the religious fac- 
ulties, the power of justice, of love, of holiness, of 
trust in God and obedience to his laws. These are 
the eternal right. For man to execute the power of 
justice, certain duties to his fellowmen devolve upon 
him, which must be performed. He cannot be great 
and live for self only, but must live for others and 
spend his energies for them, for the protection of 
their lives and to lift them from the crafty or intel- 
lectual sphere into the spiritual. 

Man must fulfill the power of love. If he is truly 
great, his love for others is beyond that of his own 
life. Some one has said that, " Love is of such a re- 
fining, elevating character, that it expels all that is 
mean and base, it bids us think great thoughts and 
do great deeds." To be truly great, man's character 
must be beyond reproach, he must be pure and his 
life fully sanctified to God. Finally he must trust God 
and obey his laws. God is his Creator, all-wise and all- 
powerful, and it naturally follows that man should 
trust him, obey his supreme laws and seek his help 
and guidance in all he undertakes, in fact he can- 
not be truly great without it. These are the highest 
qualities of man. Whoever is most eminent in these 
is the greatest of great men. He is as much above 
the merely intellectually great men as they are above 
mere cunning or force. 

Thus we have four different kinds of greatness : 
bodily greatness, crafty greatness, intellectual great- 
ness, religious greatness. Men in different degrees of 
development will value different kinds of greatness. 
A man who has great strength of body will value the 
giant most. A man who is cunning will think he is 
a great man. An intellectual man will praise a man 
who is an originator of great ideas. But a truly re- 
ligious man will consider him preeminent who is work- 
ing for the best interests of his fellowmen and his 
God. It takes greatness to see greatness. Belial can- 



not honor Christ. How can a little child appreciate 
Plato or Aristotle? The child thinks as a child, and 
every man thinks in his own sphere. If we wish to 
see greatness in others we must be great ourselves. 
The loftiest form of greatness is never popular in its 
own day. Men cannot understand it and their minds 
are not ready to receive it. An African negro would 
consider a juggler a greater man than Franklin. Co- 
lumbus was mocked by the people of his time. Herod 
and Pilate were popular in their day. They were men 
of property and standing. They got nomination and 
honor enough. Jesus of Nazareth got no nomination 
and instead of worldly honor he got a cross between 
two thieves and a crown of thorns, and when he died 
eleven Galileans gathered together to lament their 
Lord. 

Smithville, Ohio. 

* *5* * 

THE EARTH'S AGE. 



What is the age of the earth ? In the remarkable 
address which he delivered in 1894 at the Oxford 
meeting of the British Association, the late Lord Salis- 
bury dealt with the " prodigality of the ciphers " which 
geologists and biologists had put at the end of the 
earth's hypothetic life. But he remarked that the the- 
ories of these savants required at least all this elbow 
room. Now we have another theory to add to its many 
predecessors. If Prof. Rutherford, of New Zealand, 
whose paper, read before the Royal Institution recent- 
ly, has excited the widest interest, is right, the great 
heat which is known to exist in the earth's center is 
due to radium. We must, therefore, entirely recon- 
struct our ideas as to the age of the planet. Turning 
to Lord Kelvin, who was on the platform, Prof. Ruth- 
erford said that the earth was probably not over 20,- 
000,000 years old. Geologists, however, speak of many 
million more years, and at the time that he formulated 
his estimate of 100,000,000 years Lord Kelvin made 
this reservation — " unless some new -source of energy 
were discovered." Prof. Rutherford's idea is that in 
radium this new source has been found. According 
to Prof. Rutherford's theory, if the internal heat is 
due to the presence of radium, the gradual cooling 
down of the earth will be indefinitely postponed, and 
that scientific fear of a time when the heat of the 
sun shall have so far diminished that this earth will 
have ceased to be capable of supporting life in conse- 
quence of the intense cold is postponed for many mil- 
lions of years, for the probability is that the heat of 
the sun is also due not to combustion, as was at one 
time supposed, but to unceasing radio-activity. Here, 
indeed, is food for thought, but, as Lord Goschen said 
at the Royal Society's dinner, science of itself can never 
diminish interest in the mysteries of the soul and hu- 
man heart and the progress of the study of the hu- 
manities. 






754 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



CELTIC ART. 



BY MYLES J. MURPHY. 

The Irish Exhibition at the World's Fair in St. 
Louis presents the most wonderful collection of Cel- 
tic historic art that has been made in modern times, if 
not in the history of the world. The artistic industries 
in which the Irish race for centuries antedating the 
■Christian period excelled, are given prominence in this 
exhibit. These are illustratd from earliest times, chief- 
ly as regards the Celtic period, by facsimiles of the 
bronze and gold work of that time, and also by full 
size casts of architecture and sculpture in stone. The 
famous cross of Muinedach at Monasterboice is among 
the objects there represented. A series of facsimiles 
of the illuminated and also of literary manuscripts 
brings down this representation of an important prov- 
ince of Irish art and scholarship from the 7th century 
Book of Kells to the 14th or 15th century. This il- 
lumination of manuscripts was an art in which old 
Irish scribes surpassed all others in skill. The rare 
grace of the intricate designs would puzzle the most 
skilled chirographist of the present day to imitate 
without special training. Colors which are bright and 
fresh to-day, many centuries after the hand which 
laid them on the vellum has crumbled into dust, are a 
mystery to the painter. With the makers of these won- 
derful inks, the secret has passed away. None to-day 
can tell of what they were composed. From the 15th 
century until the close of the Williamite Wars, there 
was little art work in Ireland. The people were too 
"busy in the struggle for political existence, but from 
the close of the 17th century to the early 19th century 
Ireland was famous for the artistic beauty and technic- 
al mastery of its silver plate manufacture, and the 
generosity of private owners and public bodies has en- 
abled a very interesting and valuable collection of this 
beautiful art to be brought together. 

Some specimens of antique Irish furniture, remark- 
able for beauty of carving are also shown, including 
the only existing example of a member's chair from 
the Irish House of Commons. A fine collection of 
Cork and Waterford art glass of the 18th and 19th 
centuries helps to illustrate the art industries of this 
period. 

Closely connected with the historic art industries 
of the country are the historic relics commemorative of 
distinguished Irishmen or of salient epochs in Irish 
history. Relics commemorative of the Volunteer move- 
ment, the Confederation of Kilkenny, the Williamite 
Wars, and the Insurrection of 1788 have been kindly 
lent by various owners, and personal relics of great 
interest associated with the names of Swift, Grattan, 
Burke, Henry Joy McCracken, O'Connell, Parnell, 
Father Matthew and other distinguished Irishmen have 
been obtained. An extensive series of Irish coins has 



been obtained, and a number of articles representing 
minor arts, industries and social life in Ireland prior 
to the 19th century. 

A collection of Irish prints and engravings is a fit- 
ting completion to these exhibits. This section has 
been formed under the direction of Mr. Strickland of 
the National Gallery, with the double object of present- 
ing a series of portraits of distinguished Irishmen and 
masterpieces of the country, and of its towns as th'ey 
existed in earlier times, and at the same time illustrat- 
ing the art and craft of engraving, which was at one 
time brought to a high point of development in Ire- 
land. The collection of Irish historic portraits is, per- 
haps, the most complete that it has yet been possible 
to bring together. It will include portraits of Hugh 
O'Neil, Earl of Tyron ; of the famous Franciscan, 
Luke Wadding, represented by an example from the 
very rare engraving of the portrait at Rome ; of Sars- 
field, the hero of Limerick ; Walker, the defender of 
Londonderry ; the Great Duke of Ormodo, Provost 
Usshur, Castlereagh, Gattan, Flood, Lord Charlemont, 
O'Connell, Davis, Parnell, James Barry, Crocker, and 
many others who have played on one side or another a 
leading part in Irish history, or been connected with 
Irish literature and art. Malton's interesting series of 
old Dublin views are shown, as well as the scarce views 
of the Dublin Painter, Jonathan Fisher, and others. 
Some interesting and scarce old maps have been ac- 
quired. 

MACARONI. 



Standing on the wharf in Italy, watching the 
swarthy Italians unloading their shiploads of Amer- 
ican flour and taking it up to the macaroni mills, and 
on their return bringing thousands of boxes of the 
prepared article, and filling up these empty vessels 
with these boxes of macaroni and shipping it back to 
our ports, one is made to wonder why, when we have 
the raw material and we have the demand, that the 
thing we are so badly in need of must be the manu- 
facturing skill. And now it remains necessary that 
we must allow these Italians to have this secret of 
macaroni manufacturing all by themselves, and yet 
every year spend enough money in sending flour over 
and bringing macaroni back, to furnish one-fourth 
the demand. 

Our agricaltural department, in 1889, sent an agent 
abroad to buy some seed wheat of the very hardiest 
kinds. He succeeded in getting a good load of sam- 
ples. These were carefully cared for by the depart- 
ment, which has resulted in great things. Consider- 
ably over ten millions of bushels of this hard wheat 
was grown in the Northwest last year. 

The macaroni mills' of this country have been doing 
their utmost to supply our home demand, but there 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



755 



seems to be a disposition on the part of the consumers 
to think that the American macaroni is of an inferior 
quality. Now what is the matter ; is it the inferior 
quality of our wheat? Is it that we lack manufac- 
turing skill, or is it that we love to be duped, as a na- 
tion, by a foreign product, or shall we say that it is 
because we do not like to patronize home industries? 

Statistics show that last year we imported more 
than one million dollars' worth of macaroni and ver- 
micelli. If the consumers of the stuff could make 
just one trip to Naples and see the macaroni fields 
where acres of it is hanging on poles, out in the sun to 
dry, with bushels of flies surrounding it all and hun- 
dreds of dogs tripping here and there through the 
down-hanging vermicelli, and scores of donkeys and 
camels trotting through the rows made for conveni- 
ence in hanging and taking down the product, and as 
they go, raising a cloud of dust with their feet, and the 
dirty, greasy, careless working men and women han- 
dling the material, both green and dry, some ques- 
tions would arise in our minds, and some curious feel- 
ings probably would arise in our stomachs. We 
would naturally question the westerners whether we 
needed a new recipe or whether our women are too 
clean, or whether we have a different kind of flies in 
this country. It does seem that if America would 
wake up to the fact that we have the material and we 
have the laborers, and we need the employment, and 
we have the skill to produce it ; we have the power to 
manufacture it, and we have the demand to use it and 
why not America for Americans? 

* * * 
RUBBER AND SUBSTITUTES. 



cultivated. In addition to the sap, the seeds of this 
tree, it has recently been ascertained, yield a light yel- 
low oil which can be employed as a substitute for lin- 
seed oil, and is worth about one hundred dollars a ton. 
It is obtained by grinding the husk and kernel together, 
one-fifth of their weight in oil being obtained. Brazil, 
Peru and Bolivia continue to furnish more than half of 
the world's supply, and here also improved methods of 
culture have been introduced. In connection with 
vegetable rubber, two mineral hydrocarbons which 
have certain common properties are employed. These 
are gilsonite and elaterite, and they may be so treated 
as to form a mineral rubber which unites perfectly 
with that obtained from trees. Gilsonite, which is an 
asphaltic mineral found in veins, is employed in mak- 
ing waterproof paints and varnishes. Elaterite is a 
soft, elastic variety of asphalt, and is used in making 
waterproof and heatproof varnishes which are also 
flexible. Both of these materials are insulators of elec- 
tricity, and have considerable application. 

* * * 
SWEDISH HOTELS. 



A matter of considerable economic importance is 
the decline in the production of India-rubber, which is 
constantly being required to a greater extent in the 
arts. In many cases the decline is due to wasteful and 
short-sighted methods of obtaining the sap, and in 
certain countries the industry has been put under Gov- 
ernment supervision. In the meantime in various Brit- 
ish colonies experimental culture is being attempted to 
ascertain whether rubber-raising cannot become a per- 
manent agricultural industry. 

In Trinidad, Castillon and Funturnia trees are now 
being grown, and it has been found that the latter 
yield a marketable production when four and one-half 
years old, while the other varieties require twice as 
long. In the Egyptian Soudan there is a fine oppor- 
tunity for rubber culture, especially in the Bahr-el 
Ghazal, and measures have been taken by the govern- 
ment to prevent wasteful and reckless treatment of the 
trees. 

In the Malay Straits settlements the Para rubber 
tree (Hevea Brasilicnsis) has been acclimatized and is 



At Kjeflinge there is a large hotel standing near the 
station. On entering the dining' room door you are 
surprised to see one large table in the center of the 
room filled with black bread, white bread, spis-brod, 
liver wurst, souse, dried beef, horse meat, smoked eel, 
pickeled eel, cheese, butter, and a lot of plates and 
knives and forks. Around the wall are a number of 
small tables, large enough for two persons each, with 
nothing upon them. The guest is expected, without an 
invitation, to walk to this center table and provide 
himself with a plate, knife and fork, and help him- 
self to whatever meats and pastry his appetite dictates, 
and then sit down at one of these small tables at the 
side of the room and partake of the repast. About 
the time a stranger helps himself the second or third 
time and is almost ready to leave the table, he is sur- 
prised to see a ladv coming towards him, having on a 
neat white apron, with her hands full of dishes steam- 
ing with fragrance from the choice vegetables and 
palatable meats of what they call a warm dinner. In 
a moment one realizes that he has partaken too freely 
of the good things that were in the first course. In 
the second course he finds warm potatoes and other 
vegetables, with either boiled or roast beef, and a 
number of other meats, and it is impossible for a man 
to sample all of the good things they bring to him. 
The principal regret that he has is that some one 
did not inform him that the center table was only to 
satisfy his appetite until the waiter could assist him to 
something better. Indeed, it is a man's own fault if 
he goes away from a Swedish hotel without enough 
to eat. 



75° 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



THE VIOLIN. 



BY MARGUERITE BIXLER. 

The exact origin of the violin is unknown — the in- 
strument as we have it to-day is what has come to us 
through evolution, from times unrecorded. Mythology 
dates its birth to a time when the Nile overflowed and 
left on its banks a dead tortoise. In time, nothing 
was left in the shell but nerves and cartilage which con- 
tracted, making it sonorous. One day Orpheus, in 
walking along the shore, struck his foot against the 
shell and was so charmed with the sound that it gave 
him the idea of the lyre. Hence the origin of fiddles 
and catgut is classic, as well as picturesque. Orpheus 
and Apollo are pictured with fiddles but tracing a bow 
seems to be in vain. Three thousands years before our 
era a king of Ceylon invented a four-stringed instru- 
ment played with a bow, but this too is tradition. 

Historically, the early fiddle period shows the instru- 
ment being struck by a plectra, ajid it was not until the 
•early French period that a bow was used to sus- 
tain tones. This instrument was called a Ribee and 
was pear-shape (similar to our mandolin), with first 
two and later three strings. Just where the instru- 
ments with four strings tuned in fifths were made is a 
fact unknown. However, the first crude instruments 
show the origin of all the principal features which 
were brought to so high a state of perfection between 
the closing decades of the seventeenth century and the 
beginning of the eighteenth by makers whose work 
"has never since been surpassed. 

Standing foremost among these great artists are the 
members of the celebrated Amati family who were the 
founders of the " Cremona School " from which so 
many fine old Italian violins have come, and have been 
indiscriminately called " Cremonas." 

Another celebrated family of Cremonese artists was 
that of the Guarneri. The founder, Andreas Guar- 
rierius, whose instruments bear dates from 1650- 1695, 
-was a pupil of Nicolo Amati. 

Another famous Cremonese maker — the last great 
artist of the school — was Antonio Stradivari, 1649- 
1737. Stradivari was Nicolo Amati's most famous 
pupil. His instruments, it is said, yield neither to 
Nicolo Amati nor those of Joseph Guarnerius. There 
are only a few of these in existence and they are sought 
after by millionaires. 

Undoubtedly the greatest of the German violin mak- 
ers was Jacob Stainer, 1621-1683. While less power- 
ful than those given by the great Italian makers, his 
instruments are beautifully finished and of infinite 
sweetness. 

The English violin makers of the so-called " Lon- 
don School " were very numerous, and many of their 
quaint instruments are still deservedly prized. 



The violin is one of the noblest of instruments. 
More can be expressed upon it than any other instru- 
ment, except the organ. It is capable of conveying 
all the various shades of feeling, and its singing pow j 
eFs are beyond description. 

Next to the human voice, for the best interpreta- 
tion of song, I place the violin. 

East Akron, Ohio. 

♦ *$» * 

HARD LUCK AND HARD SENSE. 



One of the keenest politicians that this country ever 
produced took a vacation and went to Europe. At the 
suggestion of friends whom he met in London he de- 
cided to secure the services of that useful functionary 
known as a " man," a combination of valet and com- 
panion. He reduced the applicants to one, and was 
about to complete the negotiations when the fortunate 
person began to tell him of his career, his ambitions, 
opportunities and misfortunes — a genuine hard-luck 
story. The politician listened for a while and then 
suddenly interposed : " I find that I do not want 
you," and when pressed for his reason, added : " I 
never hire hard-luck people, especially the kind who 
talk about it." 

There seems to be an injustice in this, and there 
doubtless is. At the same time this politician was a 
judge of men or he would not have been a successful 
politician. 

Most persons who have achieved success are obliged 
to listen to hard-luck stories despite their efforts to 
avoid them. The main reason the modern merchant 
or manager surrounds himself by an office guard, 
and protects himself by anterooms and swinging gates, 
is to escape callers who want to take up his time by 
narratives of their misfortunes. 

Every large centre of population has its army of 
hard-luck sufferers, and among them are men of edu- 
cation, men of position, men who are almost, but not 
quite, strong enough to reach success. 

Their point of view is out of compass ; their bear- 
ings are wrong; their attitude is that some one who 
has succeeded must make amends for their own short- 
comings. These unfortunates are probably the most 
hopeless persons in the world — hopeless not so much 
in their own ideas as in the possibilities of their ref- 
ormation. When a man places his own inadequacy on 
ill luck he is not worth anything to anybody — not even 
to himself. 

Luck is the tide, nothing more. The strong man 
rows with it if it makes toward his port. He rows 
against it if it flows the other way. Fair or foul, 
flood or ebb, he rows. And the world has very little 
time to waste on the man who complains that the tide 
did not turn at every bend to suit his course. 



THE INGLEXOOK.— August 9. 1904. 



757 



WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA. 



BY E. A. EVANS. 

In Western Xorth Dakota there is some magnifi- 
cent scenery, in fact, in one sense, it is the most 
beautiful portion of the State. Here there are high, 
rugged bluffs, where a full view of Fort Buford, the 
Missouri and Yellowstone rivers can be obtained, 
and deep, cool canons where springs of fresh water 
abound and flowers grow in beautiful profusion. 
There are veins of good coal where man can get 
all the fuel he desires, and plenty of lovely cedar 
trees. 

Here one can see where the Indians once camped 
in their tepees and smoked the peace-pipe. There 
is one circle of stones after another, which they 
used to hold the tepee down at the bottom and 
keep it from blowing away. These are especially 
noticeable on the high bluffs where the Indians 
could command a full view of all military maneu- 
vers at Fort Buford. The government formerly 
kept a detachment of soldiers here to quell all dis- 
turbances that should arise among the Indians. 
Xine years ago the soldiers disbanded, for then the 
Red Man no longer infested the surrounding coun- 
try as he once did. 

There is also a peculiar rock formation here. It 
is old cedar stumps that have petrified. There are 
many interesting relics of the good old times ; times 
that the country will never see again. 

As we are in such proximity to Montana, we have 
some wild animals that are to be feared. Occasion- 
ally a mountain lion or a cougar strolls from his 
native haunts and pays us a visit, but is very un- 
welcome. There are plenty of moose, deer and an- 
telopes, especially in the winter. There are some 
porcupines ; rattlesnakes and coyotes galore. 

The climate is good and the air is delightfully pure. 
The temperature is from ten to seventeen degrees 
higher here than in the central and eastern portions 
of the State. 

Buford, N. Dak. 

* * ♦ 
THE RADIO VIBRATOR. 



An invention which, it is asserted, may revolutionize 
medical science and throw into insignificance such dis- 
coveries as radium and the X-ray. has been brought 
to completion in the laboratories of the State Univer- 
sity by Warren F. Bleeker, formerly instructor of 
chemistry in the University of Colorado. 

For years Mr. Bleeker has worked on his invention, 
which he calls the radio vibrator. For the past three 
months he has worked in the laboratory of Prof. Hu- 
bert C. Carel, Professor of Chemistry at the university. 
• The instrument is based on the theory that the ele- 



ments of the human body, when the body is in per- 
fect health, vibrate in perfect harmony. When the 
body is in a diseased condition this normal tone is 
destroyed. By the therapeutical application of the 
radio vibrator, it is declared, the deranged tone of the 
body may be restored to a normal condition. The in- 
ventor does not claim for his instrument all curative 
power, but by actual trials remarkable results are said 
to have been accomplished in curing nervous diseases. 

The radio vibrator is a small, nickel-plated metal box 
about four inches long, three inches wide and one inch 
in thickness. From one end two wires about four feet 
long extend. These wires terminate in small circular 
disks which are applied to the affected parts of the 
body. The box contains a mysterious compound of 
chemicals known only to Mr. Bleeker and his assist- 
ants. The vibrations of the chemicals within the box 
are transmitted by means of the wires and disks to 
the human body. As soon as applied the action of 
the chemicals within the box is calculated to cause 
sympathetic normal vibrations in the diseased body, 
thus restoring the patient to health. 

Speaking of the invention of Mr. Bleeker, Prof. 
Carel said : 

" The invention involves just four things — first, the 
scientific theory that the normal tone of the human 
body is caused by the vibration of the elements com- 
posing it ; second, the mathematical deduction and de- 
termination of what chemical elements are to be used 
and in what proportion, and this may vary according 
to the temperament of each person; third, the prepa- 
ration for each individual case of the instrument, 
and, fourth, the therapeutic application of the instru- 
ment." 

* * * 

THE CHINESE WAY. 



When a Chinese Duke wishes to marry he gets a 
go-between to select a bride for him. Then he pro- 
poses to the father and haggles over the monetary 
question. That settled, he has his first interview with 
the bride-elect. This interview has its peculiarities. 
He does not see her face nor does he speak a 
word to her ; he bows and scrapes and flourishes his 
hands at her and talks a little to the mother, while a 
band provided by him plays all the time. To those 
who know what Chinese music is like and also that 
the suitor is fashionably perfumed with asafoetida the 
truly exquisite nature of this interview will be fully 
apparent. Others must guess it. It lasts for two 
hours. These visits are repeated at regular intervals, 
and the bridegroom does not see the bride's face or 
talk to her until he has taken her home after the wed- 
ding. To complete the < rilbertian nature of the 
thing, if he does not like her then he can send her 
hack. 



758 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



*lN5bENS0K. 



A. WTeekly Tvlagfazirie 



..PUBLISHED BY.. 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILL. 
Subscription Price, $1.00 per Annum. 



The Inglenook is a publication devoted to interesting and entertaining 
literature. It contains nothing of a character to prevent its presence in 
any home. 

Contributions are solicited, but there is no guarantee either of their ac- 
ceptance or return. All contributions are carefully read, and if adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine, will be used. The management 
will not be responsible for unsolicited articles. 

Agents are wanted, and specimen numbers will be supplied as needed. 

In giving a change of address state where you are now getting the pa- 
per, as otherwise tbe change cannot be made. Subscriptions may be made 
at any time, either for a year or part of a year. Address. 



Brethren Publishing House, 



(For the Inglenook.) 



22-24 South State St.. ELGIN, ILL. 



Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 
LEAKS. 

It is not the financier who takes big risks, operates 
on large scales, works thousands of men and builds 
many large buildings that always succeeds the best fi- 
nancially. While it is true that nothing is gained un- 
less something is ventured, and it is true as well that 
unless some seed is sown no harvest can be reaped, yet 
in the majority of cases our successful business men 
are those who have stopped the little leaks that are sure 
to be found around such a volume of business. The 
farmer picks up the large potatoes because they are the 
pride of his eye; he feels fully satisfied with the ef- 
forts of the year, and in his supreme satisfaction he 
is prone to carelessness and leaves lying around on the 
ground the small, inferior potatoes that would aid 
materially in the saving of the corn crop as well as 
in the hast)' growth of the shoats. And thirdly, it 
would remove from the ground all the transient growth 
that would likely cause his trouble the next year. But 
how often- is this done ? How many times have you 
noticed the farmer's barn with no eaves-troughs to pre- 
vent the water from running down on the manure bed, 
wasting much valuable strength that his clay knobs are 
so much in need of? Hundreds of rails are found off 
the fence lying scattered around over the farm, be- 
cause they are only rails and do not mean anything ; 
but in the aggregate these little leaks mean a great 
sinking fund. 

It isn't the grocer that succeeds in turning out more 
groceries in his delivery wagon from his door than 
all of his competitors that can be counted the most suc- 
cessful man in town, but it is the man who sees that 



every single customer is satisfied ; that not twice as 
much wrapping paper and string is used as Is neces- 
sary, that the scales do not tip sufficiently hard at each 
stroke to cause a great loss in the end of a barrel of 
sugar. 

It isn't the manufacturer that loads the largest for- 
eign steamships and the longest freight trains with his 
product that lives the longest in a business career, but 
it is the man who heats the building with exhaust 
steam, that keeps every wheel in motion, that system- 
atizes labor. 

The sawyer who would succeed finds sale for his 
sawdust, his slabs, and bark, and can so manage 
his work that he may take a load of sawed lumber to 
market and bring back some logs to the mill on his re- 
turn trip and save time. The little leaks, the drains 
constantly dripping, are the things that go to make up 
this great thing that we know to be success in life, or 
the antagonist to success, — -"failure. 

The drygoods merchant may sell thousands of yards 
and empty hundreds of boxes, but unless he success 
fully gets rid of his remnants, unless he has a unique 
way of taking advantage of the fractional purchase, he 
is a loser in the end. 

As a rule it isn't the days and hours that are used 
in a man's life, in the business way, that are so valu- 
able to him as the spare moments that are snatched 
here and there and used judiciously. By working ten 
hours a day for a number of years a man may make 
a livelihood, but after the ten hours are over each day 
he may cultivate the habit of reading at stated periods 
or by having a little workshop where he can turn his 
mind from labor to relief, and with pleasure pursue 
some little side line that is not only a pleasure but a 
profit. 

Men have gained literary and mechanical educations, 
have entered the legal profession and have gained re- 
nown in many different avenues of life simply by stop-] 
ping the little leaks and taking advantage of the waste. 

»:• ♦ ♦ 

WITHOUT MONEY. 



/Many a man is rich without money. Thousands of 
5ien with nothing in their pockets are rich. The man 
l\vho is born with a good, sound constitution, good 
stomach, stout heart, perfect limbs, .and fairly good 
headpiece is rich. Good bones are better than gold ; 
tough muscles are better Tnan silver, and the nerves_ 
that flash fire and carry energy to every function are 
letter than houses and lands. 

le best inheritance that can be left to anyone is the 
memory of a good father and mother. It is an un- 
questionable fact that good breeds and bad breeds of 
men exist, as well as good and bad breeds among herds 
and flocks. 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



759 



It is true that education may do much toward devel- 
oping either good or bad qualities in man ; it may check 
bad qualities and develop good ones, but it is a far 
greater thing to inherit the better disposition to start 
with. 

The man who is born with a congenial disposition 
and is patient, cheerful and hopeful, has a mine of 
wealth that cannot be taken away. Horace Greeley 
once said, " Riches take wings ; fame vanishes like 
vapor ; marble decays ; one thing 'remains, — charac- 
ter." 

When we see a man sitting around with a droop- 
ing head, sunken eyes and bleared countenance, when 
we hear him talk of the hard times and discourage- 
ments, when we see him painting clouds and shadows, 
when we see him wading mud and sloughs of despond- 
ency, and he tells us about how oppressive the rich 
are to the poor, and how the world owes him a living, 
and how the wealth of the world is so unequally di- 
vided, why would it not be a good thing for us to 
help that man take an inventory of his possessions? 
Let us ask him how much money he would take and 
allow us to amputate his right limb, or dig his right 
eye out, or saw off the fingers of his right hand, or 
give him three months' of ague each year, or what the 
size of a check would have to be to induce him to 
lie under the pressure of typhoid fever for three weeks 
each fall ; and then ask him that in case the kidnap- 
pers would take his oldest son and his baby daughter 
what the ransom would be that he would offer for 
them? And should he see the favorite child of his 
"bosom lying in the cold embrace of death, with a little 
bouquet of flowers in the hand that cannot grasp or 
appreciate them, what, then, would be the sacrifice by 
him could he call back to existence that life that he 
had watched over, the one that he has protected even 
with his own life? And then, after his wife has been 
sick, nigh unto death for weeks or months, and he 
has the care of little ones, not until then does he fully 
realize the value of a wife and companion who is inter- 
ested in the home equally as much as himself. In such 
a time ask him, " What is the size of the check that 
would have to be given you to take from your side this 
noble companion of yours ? " Is he not rich ? Does 
he not have wealth? One of the best things in the 
world to dispel our shadows and clouds is to take an 
inventory of our blessings. 

If we would put a price on the pure air that we 
breathe, on the valuable time that is given us, on the 
sweet rest that the evening shades bring, on the sweet- 
ness that comes with the morning air, on the love and 
harmony of the quiet home, on the valued friendships 
that we obtain and maintain, on the opportunities we 
enjoy, and the other thousands upon thousands of 
blessings of almost incalculable value, what an enor- 
mous sum we would have in the aggregate. 



WHAT NEXT? 



Aerial navigation has scarcely been born in the 
world, when already here comes news from The 
Hague that, after a prolonged and heated discussion 
of words in Congress recently, our airships 
are to be used for the destruction of our people. 
A few men, in fact, many men, did their very best 
to prevent, by an enactment of the international 
law in the world's Congress, the use of aerial navi- 
gation in national or international conquest. But 
all this has been repealed, and now it has been de- 
cided that it will be no insult to any government 
to use this deadly machine for the destruction of 
an enemy. Objections to it heretofore were not 
from the phase that it was too deadly a machine, 
but because it was not deadly enough. 

They said that its lack of precision would render 
it unfit for battle. But where will it end and how 
much legislation is it going to take, and what pre- 
cautions will have to be met to keep some black- 
mailer, freebooter or enemy from sailing around 
over a city like London or New York, and throw 
down some letters and say to them, " Hand over 
five hundred millions to me or I'll blow you to 
atoms by to-morrow noon ? " After all it is another 
misuse of the blessings. Not a single blessing in 
this world do we have but what could be made a 
curse by its misuse. Cold water is one of the best 
things in this wide world, and yet we can get into 
enough of it to drown us. 

4» ,$, 4$, 

OUR PRIZE CONTEST CLOSES AUGUST 31, AT 
4 P. M. 



At 4 o'clock is the last mail that we receive at the 
office, and we will close the contest on that mail, be- 
cause this will be the last mail in August, and on the 
first day of September we will find out who gets the 
$25 library. 

We are glad to say that the contestants have been 
sending in subscriptions lively, and we are also happy 
to say that not one has run far in advance of the rest. 
There are several running a nice even race, and there 
is still room for those who have not yet entered the 
contest. If you can, get out and work diligently and 
secure a valuable prize. Every day and almost every 
mail brings us good results of some one's work. 

Let every loyal Nooker speak to someone about this 
valuable offer and see whether we cannot double our 
family in the next few weeks. All it requires is for 
each subscriber to get one more and the task is com- 
pleted. Do it now. The earlier you begin (he longer 
lime they will receive the INGLENOOK for the money. 
* * * 

So teach us to number our days, that we may apply 
our hearts unto wisdom.- — Scripture. 



760 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



CURRENT HAPPENINGS 



A DARK SPOT ON RUSSIA'S HISTORY. 



On the twenty-seventh of July, at 9 : 30 in the morn- 
ing. Minister Von Plehve, of Russia, was assassinated. 
This is a shock to the Russian government, to the czar, 
pope, and in fact to civilization. It is another bold 
dash of anarchy against law and order. The minister 
was born in 1884, studied law and became much at- 
tached to court. He has held several responsible po- 
sitions in the government. He began at Moscow, 
went from there to Vladimir, next to Tula Vologda, 
thence to Warsaw, from whence he was promoted to 
St. Petersburg higher courts. He has distinguished 
himself by his success in investigating conspiracies, 
and it was his ability to uncover such things that led 
to his death. He was not a man of learning, but from 
his youth he was educated in official circles and slow- 
ly but surely pushed himself ahead. 

Prior to the time the emperor called him to the 
Department of the Interior, he had about forty years 
of office. He was appointed Secretary, of State 
for Finland. He is author of the present code of 
laws. His assassin was arrested by a detective on 
a bicycle. At the explosion of the bomb the assassin 
himself was literally filled with splinters, in his face, 
arms and abdomen, yet he endeavored to escape and 
when arrested made no resistance, but refuses to give 
his name. The explosive is believed to have been 
composed of pyroxylin. The force of the explosion 
was so terrific that it broke every window within a 
half mile, reduced heavy pave stones to powder, 
and threw heavy irons across the canal. The second 
bomb was found in the possession of a suspected 
individual, but was rescued by the hotel clerk. 

Pope Pius X expresses his sorrow in these words : 
" How awful ! " Let us hope that worse events than 
war are not impending in Russia. 

The general public has but little idea of the enor- 
mous cost of news from the seat of war. When you 
see the long columns of war items in the papers, how 
manv have ever stopped to think that each word costs 
fifty cents to get it across the waters? It is estimated 
bv men who pretend to know, and ought to know, 
that, comparatively speaking, the newspapers of- the 
Associated Press to-day are paying ten million dol- 
lars a year to get news from the Russian-Japanese war. 
On an average it costs the lives of about two cor- 
respondents each year, and the sickness and wounds 
of about twenty. There are about two hundred cor- 
respondents at the seat of war. Each correspondent 
sends about one thousand words per week, so that 
makes about one hundred thousand dollars per week, 
for messages. These two hundred correspondents 



get about seventy-five dollars per week salary, 
which is fifteen thousand dollars in the aggregate. 
There are other expenses of about fifteen thousand 
dollars, making a total of about one hundred and fifty 
thousand dollars per week for the flock. Some news- 
papers go to the extravagance of chartering dispatch 
boats at fifteen hundred dollars per week. 

Dr. Anita Newcomb McGee, who left this country 
several months ago in charge of ten Red Cross nurses 
to assist the Japanese, has been appointed super- 
intendent of the nurses of the Japanese Red Cross 
Society. The Japanese government has also conferred 
the rank of an afficer upon her. Each American nurse 
in the party will have a Japanese nurse to accompany 
and instruct her in the language, custom, and other 
details while they are pushing to the front. Their 
services are recognized by the Japanese government 
as being very valuable on the field. 
* * * 

Strikes! Strikes! Unions!! Unions!!! It is to be 
hoped that unions will unify some of these days to the 
extent that the whole world will be united, then we 
will have what we had in the beginning. Here comes 
word from Milwaukee, Wis., that the initial step has 
been taken for the formation of an organization, in- 
cluding all the maritime crafts in the world. It is 
said that Daniel F. Keefe and other leaders have been 
working for years to bring this about, and they suc- 
ceeded in having committees appointed to draft reso 
lutions in favor of such an organization. This new 
association has received applications from several ma 
rine labor organizations over the country, including 
Europe, Russia, Japan and others. Some time in this 
month they have a convention in Sweden where thej 
federation will be completed if possible. 
-:*♦*:♦ 

In the House of Commons of English Parliament 
recently, during the discussion of the South African 
affairs. Secretary Lyttleton announced that the gov- 
ernment intended, next year, to give to the Transvaal 
representative institutions by substituting elected for 
nominated members of the Legislative Counsel. 

Third Assistant Postmaster General Madden is 
working at a set of rules by which the business men 
may send third and fourth class mail matter without 
affixing stamps to each individual piece. This is to 
save the business men unnecessary time and labor. 
To avoid discrepancies, restrictions must be placed that 
not less than two thousand identical pieces be mailed 
at one time and even then before these pieces are 
mailed the amount of postage must be paid in cash 
to the Postmaster. Congress made provision for this 
measure at the last session. 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



761 



The White House does not look pretty just now. 
It is just as white as ever, and whiter than it is some- 
times, for it has just gone through the renovation 
process, but no flag floats over it and the great white 
building is dark at night. Not a single light in the 
whole mansion. The presidential family is away, and 
when the President leaves the White House, even for 
a day, down comes the flag ; nothing doing in an of- 
ficial way until he comes back. Then when the whole 
family goes away, of course there are no occupants of 
the White House, except a few servants who hide 
away in the underground regions somewhere. 
* * * 

The work on the Tonto Basin reservoir is being 
pushed along with much rapidity. The government 
can always be relied upon to deal justly with the peo- 
ple. 

A Terre Haute railroad man is to be catalogued 
with the inventors. His name is J. P. Clark. His 
long experience on the railroad has not been spent 
foolishly. In thinking about the needs of his com- 
pany, he has devised means by which torpedoes may be 
placed on the track while the train is running at any 
speed. The magazine is operated from the rear plat- 
form of the train, and the torpedoes are placed, of 
course, to warn the following trains, thus ( preventing 
rear end collisions. He, of course, has it patented. 
$ *£ •> 

Mr. Clark, the railroad inventor, in the above para- 
graph, is fully equalled by an invention of Mrs. Helen 
Tracy Myers, M. D., of Colorado Springs, formerly of 
Jamestown, N. Y., who has invented and patented an 
iceless refrigerator. She has succeeded in cooling by 
means of evaporation so that ice is unnecessary. She 
exhibits at the World's Fair. 
•:• * * 

The work of planting date palms, just received 
from the Sahara desert, on the government experiment 
station farm at Mecca, has been completed by Prof. 
Steubenrauch and Superintendent Mills, of Pomana. 
In the foreign shipment there were one hundred and 
sixty female plants ; forty male plants were taken 
from the Pomona experiment station for pollenization 
purposes. The plants are looking and doing fine. 
Another shipment is expected in a few weeks to ar- 
rive from Asia. It seems that the climatic conditions 
of California are ideal for date palm culture. 

4» 4» »> 

The great flood of Galveston has suggested to peo- 
ple that they need protection and one and a half mil- 
lion dollars has been expended to build a structure to 
protect the city against further destruction by flood. 
Nearlv two years work has been expended and a final 
touch was given to the wall on the last day of July, 



and Galveston money built the wall. The citizens sub- 
scribed freely when the bonds were issued, which 
was another manifestation of their unwavering faith 
in their ability to recover from the hurricane and the 
flood. The whole country has shown their sympathy 
and encouragement during the grief-stricken moments 
of the Galvestonians. Loads of foods and supplies 
were sent, even from as far north as Philadelphia. 
They are making preparations now to raise the grade 
of this city about seventeen feet above the average tide. 
The wall is sixteen feet wide at the bottom and five 
feet at the top, — seventeen feet above the tide. Solid 
granite and concrete are the materials used. It is 
three and one-fourth miles long. It is estimated that 
the grading of the city will cost two and one-fourth 
millions, payment of which will be made possible by 
remission of seventeen years of State tax. Engineers 
think that three years will be required to complete it. 

* * * 

The Pullman Car Company, of Pullman, 111., since 
July 4, have discharged fully two thousand men. 
There has been no strike nor any ill feelings particu- 
larly among the men, but it is simply a matter of no 
demand for the cars as usual, but these' men will all 
have to be employed before winter again, and probably 
more. They cannot use them at the present time, 
which is rather a sad thing on the part of the work- 
men, for many of these workmen can do nothing 
else but work at their special trade. 
.$. .5. $ 

It is given out by excellent authority that the Mis- 
souri Pacific Railroad and the Wabash System have 
consolidated into one company, and that Joseph Ram- 
sey, Jr., who is at the present time president of the 
Wabash System, will be placed in charge of the en- 
tire Gould System. It is supposed by the majority of 
people that Mr. Ramsey will not take charge of the 
work until Mr. Gould returns from Europe, but plans 
along this line are being formulated and official ac- 
tion will be taken as soon as Mr. Gould returns. Two 
things are quite certain : one is that Mr. Ramsey is 
quite competent to handle the entire system, and the 
other is that Mr. Gould already has too much to see 
to. to give sufficient time to the new addition of their 
system, so without question the new arrangement will 
be better for the system. Mr. Ramsey has recently 
completed the Pittsburg extension of the Wabash at 
a great cost, which will no doubt be immensely profit- 
able to the system. 

* * * 

There are now seven hundred million acres of pro- 
ductive forest land in the United States. The annual 
cutting of timber amounts to thirty-five billion feet 
per year ; of timber, three billion feet : for railroad 
ties, twenty-two million : for fence posts, three million. 



7 6 2 THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 

***** ******** ******* I H 1- t-T-T- T * T t ' T frfr*************************** ******************* * 



The Inglenook Nature Study Club 



This Department of the Inglenook is the organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized 
4 over this country. Each issue of the magazine will be complete in itself. Clubs may be organized at any time, 
' ' taking the work up with the current issue. Back numbers cannot be furnished. Any school desiring to or- 
ganize a club can ascertain the methods of procedure by addressing the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin, 111. 

I-H-I'MmM' ! I milll t t ' T" T^ ' T ' 4"f* ff " t ' l t ' ^ ' T ' ** ' I l ** ** *** * * * l l , ** * ** l t ******* * *** *** ********* * **** '**' 



When all the gay scenes of the summer are o'er, 

And Autumn slow enters, so silent and sallow, 
The millions of warblers, that charmed us before, 

Have fle'd in the train of the sun seeking swallow, 
The bluebird, forsaken, yet true to his home, 

Still lingers, and looks for a milder to-morrow, 
Till forced by the horrors of winter to roam, 

He sings his adieu in a low note of sorrow. 
* * * 
CLASS AVES— ORDER INSESSORES. 



Families, Jay, Daw, Pie. Characteristics, Conirostres, 
Noisy, Greedy, Both Modest and Gay in Color. 

THE MAGPIE. 

The Magpie, which in Great Britain is so common 
and familiar, is comparatively little known in the 
United States, its haunts being confined to the terri- 
tory directly west of the Mississippi, where, in some 
districts it appears to be abundant. It is a very rest- 
less bird and keeps moving about from place to place. 
It possesses the voracity of its family, being very fond 
of the eggs and young of other birds, especially those 
of chickens, pheasants and partridges, but is quite well 
satisfied with carrion when other food is scarce. 

Like the crow it feeds on insects, larvae and worms ; 
sometimes alighting on the backs of cattle, eating the 
eggs which are embedded in the skin. 

As to personal appearance there are two kinds of 
Magpies found within the limits of the United States, 
the common and the yellow-billed. The head, neck, 
back and throat of the common Magpie are black, the 
shoulders white, and the tail and small upper wing 
coverlets are a rich green. The yellow-billed species 
are very much the same in size and color as the a"bove 
with the exception that the bill is a bright yellow, 
and crown of the head green. This last-mentioned 
is an inhabitant of upper California. 

THE JAY. 

Many different colored varieties constitute the fam- 
ily of Jays, and they are found in many countries, in 
fact few of the warmer lands are without some kind 
of a noisy bird that belongs to this family. This 
group alone possesses almost all of the bright tints 
in the color of their coats. 

There are about eleven species in the United States. 
In the East is the Blue Jay and the Canadian Jay ; in 
the South the Florida Jay ; and in the West and north- 



west, the Ultramarine Jay, Steller's Jay, Prince Maxi- 
milian's Jay, Mexican Jay and Beechy's Jay. 

More people are familiar with the Blue Jay, how- 
ever, with his high-peaked crest, black whiskers, cun- 
ing disposition and his great fondness for the eggs of 
other birds. His showy plumage, attractive form and 
graceful movements, as well as his restless activity, 
render him one of the most prominent inhabitants of 
our woodland. 

THE COWARD BLUE JAY. 

The Blue Jay is a sneaking, thieving coward, who 
would not dare attack his enemies, but will go, in their 
absence, to their nests and suck the eggs or destroy 
the young. He is spoken of thus by Audubon : " The 
Cardinal Grossbeak will challenge him, and beat him 
off the ground. The Red Thrush, the Mocking Bird, 
and many others, although inferior in strength, never 
allow him to approach with impunity ; the Jay, to be 
even with them, creeps silently to the nest in their ab- 
sence, and devours their eggs or young whenever he 
finds an opportunity. I have seen one go his round 
from one nest to another every day and suck the newly- 
laid eggs of the different birds in the neighborhood 
with as much regularity as a physician would call on 
his patients. I have also witnessed the sad disap- 
pointment it experienced, when, on returning to its 
own home, it found its mate in the jaws of a snake, 
the nest upset, and the eggs all gone." 

The Canadian Jay is very quiet, being the only one 
of the Jay family that seems content without gay dress, 
he being clad in very modest plumage. 

Prince Maximilian's Jay was first discovered in the 
Rocky Mountains. In color, form and habits it differs 
from any other member of this group, being what is 
called an aberrant species, having but one character- 
istic of his brothers, greed. The other members are 
very much like the type, Blue Jay. 

THE DAW. 

The Daw, or Jack Daw, as it is sometimes called, is 
found only in Europe. Their favorite haunts are 
church steeples or ruins. They are very much like the 
type of the crow family, in that they are gregarious, 
noisy and greedy. Where he lives he is known as 
Shakespeare puts it, 

" The loud daw, his throat 
Displaying, draws 
The whole assembly of 
His fellow daws." 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



763 



THE HERMIT CRAB. 



The most disconsolate fellow that walks the beach 
is the hermit-crab whose shell has become too snug 
for comfort. If it were his own, as the clam's is, it 
would grow with his growth, and always be a perfect 
fit ; but to the hermit there comes often a " moving 
day," when a new house must be sought. Discourag- 
ing work it is, too. Most of the doors at which he 
knocks are slammed in his face. A tweak from a 
larger pincer than his own will often satisfy him that 
the shell he considers " distinctly possible," and hope- 
fully ventures to explore, is already occupied by a neat 
but coldly unsympathetic relative. 

Finding no empty shell of suitable size, the hermit 
may be driven to ask a brother hermit to vacate in 
his favor. The proposition is spurned indignantly, 
and a fight ensues. The battle is to the stronger. 
Often the attacking party has considerable trouble in 
cleaning out the shell, having to pick his adversary out 
in bits. A periwinkle or a whelk may be attacked in 
a like manner by a hermit who is hard pressed and 
has taken a fancy to that particular shell. If the 
householder be feeble, the conquest is easy. If lusty, 
he holds the fort. 

At last the search is over. The shell is cleaned and 
ready. 

" Yes, this will do ! But how my back does ache ! 
I mustn't delay a minute ! Is anybody looking ? 
Here goes, then ; and may I never have to move 
again ! " 

In the twinkling of an eye the caudal hooks let go 
their hold deep in the spiral of the old shell, and have 
safely anchored the weak and flaccid body to the in- 
ner convolutions of the new one. 

It is all over ; an empty shell lies on the sand, 
and a larger one is near it with a sleepy-looking her- 
mit crab in it. Poke him, and he leans languidly out 
over his pearly balcony, as if to say: " If this dead- 
ly monotony is not broken soon I shall die ! " 

But behind this " society mask " the cramped 
muscles are stretching out and adjusting themselves 
in absolute contentment to the roomy spaces offered 
them. 

* * * 

ABOUT EAGLES. 



A writer who has studied the habits of eagles 
among the Scottish hills says that the birds construct 
their eyries toward the end of March and the eggs, 
which number two or three, are laid in April. Eagles 
seem to prefer for a nesting site some ancient pine with 
a southern position and wide outlook or a ledge on a 
cliff, but this writer noticed that they sometimes build 
their eyries on quite small rocks, where they can be 
got at without much difficulty, while all around are 
immense precipices where man's foot has never trod. 



It has been- said that the eagles will fearlessly attack 
any one attempting to rob their eggs and young, but 
this is probably much less often the case than is gen- 
erally supposed. When one of a pair if eagles is 
trapped or shot the remaining bird has often great dif- 
ficulty in finding a mate and may haunt its nesting 
site for several years by itself. While soaring round 
and round their eyrie the eagles utter a musical note 
somewhat similar to the cry of the wild goose. 

Young eagles when first hatched are white balls of 
down and many weeks elapse before they are able to 
leave the eyrie. Their parents supply them with a 
very liberal larder, consisting principally of ptarmi- 
gan, grouse and blue hares. The rush of their wings 
as they swoop down on their luckless prey may on a 
still day be heard at a great distance. Eagles at times 
will carry off lambs and young deer and have been 
known to drive deer over a precipice and to tear them 
to bits while lying lifeless at the foot. Sometimes they 
will even condescend to bear off moles and mice to their 
eyrie. Although the eagle, as a rule, prefers to cap- 
ture his prey himself, yet at times he is not above feed- 
ing on the dead carcass of a deer or sheep and often 
gorges himself to such an extent that he is unable to 
rise after his too hearty meal. 

In most localities of Scotland where the eagle has 
its home there will also be found the hooded crow. 

The eagle will seldom if ever attack the hoodie, but 
whenever the king of birds ventures too near the 
former's nesting tree the angry hoodie will immediately 
drive off the intruder. It is laughable to see the eagle 
flying for dear life before the fierce onslaughts of the 
enraged crows, which swoop and dash after him with 
shrill " crass " until he is far from their nesting site. 
4. .$. $ 
HOW OLD IS A FISH? 



Professor J. S. Thomas, an English Biologist, has 
brought to light some very interesting things in re- 
gard to the finny tribe. He claims to have found the 
key by which he may very accurately determine the 
age of a fish. He does it by means of their scales. 
He catches a number of them and carefully examines 
their scales, and then the fishes are labeled and re- 
turned to the sea for future observation. In some 
cases, of course, they are never returned, but in many 
instances he is able to catch them from year to year 
and notice the traces of growth distinctly from year to 
year, with a certain fixed regularity. 

He claims that this means is easily done in species 
of fish like the cod family. Most anyone knows that 
the ordinary mud carp can be caught and liberated 
very easily. And it has already been proven that his 
scales show his age very conspicuously. If this be 
true in fresh water fishes, why not in salt water fishes? 



764 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 




HOME DEPARTMENT 




THE OLD FARM GATE. 



BY S. MINERVA BOYCE. 

The old farm gate at the foot of the hill, 

On rusty hinges is hanging still, 

The winding path that led to the wood, 

And the maple grove where the cattle stood 

In the heat of the day, with half-closed eyes, 

While chewing their cuds and switching the flies — 

1 see them to-day in memory still 

As I stand by the gate at the foot of the hill. 

The sheep on the hillside are bleating again, 

The old horse whinnying there in the lane; 

And down by the roadside are roses of June, 

Where the hermit thrush warbles a plaintive tune, 

And the voice of the brook, as it hastens along, 

Blends softly again with the nightingale's song; 

The vision has passed, and turning at will, 

I leave the old gate at the foot of the hill. 

* * * 
THRESHING TIME. 



At this season of the year a great percentage of 
the Nookers, who live in the country where wheat is 
grown are enjoying a real festival that comes only 
once a year, known as " threshing time," — a thing we 
hold in abeyance with a sort of dread, and yet it comes 
with a sort of relish. Although it is accompanied with 
the severest kind of work, yet it is also attended with 
a sufficient quantity of push and hustle and united ef- 
fort of the business enterprise that it gives it a tone 
of social enjoyment that we cannot afford to be with- 
out. 

How it fills our whole being with joy when we 
hear the first whistle of the steam thresher on the first 
morning of the season, and the boys begin to take the 
wagon beds off and put on the hay racks, and then 
sort out the horses and get the gentlest teams together 
so they are safe to drive up beside the separator ; how 
the women folks make an extra purchase of the meat 
man that morning, — all these signs and more go to 
tell that threshing time has come. Within a few mo- 
ments one, two, three and even a dozen or fifteen, 
sometimes more, of the neighbors, who form the 
" ring " have assembled, awaiting the orders of the 
man whose wheat is to be threshed that day. A few 
instructions are given and they scatter to the fields, 
the stack or to the mow, as the case may be, and be- 
gin with that eagerness which means that something 
is to be done. When once every man has his place 
and work begins, and a quantity of the golden grain 



is tossed high into the air, the anxious farmer makes 
his way to see the precious treasure as it rolls from 
the machine, in triumph. The men work diligently, 
although the temperature is almost more than one 
can stand, being supplied occasionally with a good 
draught of the unadulterated ale of father Adam, by a 
faithful attendant whose business it is to see that 
these men do not famish from thirst. Presently a 
signal is given, either by the dinner bell or the dinner 
horn or the wave of the hand of the maiden on the 
porch, and then the whistle from the engine and the 
broad smile from the engineer indicates that the feeder 
should throw his last sheaf. Everybody drops their 
work and fairly goes on the trot to the house. The 
good housewife has prepared a whole row of wash- 
tubs, basins and bowls in front of the house on the 
green sward, filled with nice cool, fresh water, because 
she knows the men are in a hurry and they are hot 
and impatient, and they all want to wash at once, and 
hence this precaution. On the old picket fence hangs 
a row of nice clean towels so abundantly ample to meet 
the wants of the thresher men. No sooner do they 
pass a comb through their short hair, which has been 
cut short because of the two weeks of dusty work, 
than the good wife shouts, " Dinner is ready." Then 
the men of brawn, the bread-makers of the country, 
file in, sometimes single and sometime in a double 
row, and hastily take their seats along the board that 
is spread with the best that nature affords. 

If the lady of this home has had the proper amount 
of experience or training, she has three or four helpers. 
It is customary, sometimes, for the wives and daugh- 
ters of the men who help to thresh, to come and as- 
sist the lady of the house. Sometimes this is all right 
and sometimes it proves to be a perfect nuisance. The 
old adage that " Too many cooks spoil the broth " is 
only too true in some cases. But we repeat what we 
said before ; she ought to have three or four good 
helpers, and then have their work outlined and have 
them to understand that each one is to do her respect- 
ive work and nothing more. For instance: let Mary 
see that drinks are furnished, that coffee, tea, water and 
milk be supplied according to the wishes of the men. 
Let Jane attend to the pastries, cutting and passing 
of bread, pies and cakes, if there be cakes, — a thing 
which threshermen generally despise. Let Susie be 
responsible for the vegetables and meats, and let the 
lady of the house, unless she has the fourth helper, see 
that nothing is burned up in the kitchen and that the 
necessary " after preparations " are made toward the 



THE INGLENOOK.— August g, 1904. 



76S 



close of the meal. Should she have the fourth helper, 
which is the probable ideal, her business is to see 
that each of the helpers do their part well. 

Nothing pleases a set of threshermen more than to 
have a systematized service at the table ; to see that 
things are first, clean, second, well-cooked, and third, 
promptly served. The lady who fails in either of these 
in any great degree has made a failure to some extent. 
* * * 
SUNDAY SICKNESS. 



INSECT POWDER. 



Amowg the many ills to which the human family 
falls heir, one of the most abominable, damaging and 
unpleasant misfortunes is commonly unnamed, but 
which deserves the name of " Sunday sickness." It is 
that peculiar ailment which renders one unfit to at- 
tend the services on the Lord's day, or to perform any 
other duties whatever, that take on a religious nature. 

For some reason, perhaps not known to all, there is 
an inclination on the part of a great many to want to 
lounge and loaf about home, to lie in bed late on Sun- 
day morning. Among others, to go visiting ; some 
few become peevish and fretful, out of sorts ; rather 
rest, because they are tired from the strain and ten- 
sion of the week's work. 

It might be a happy thought to some of our Nook 
family should it be that any of us are troubled with 
this complaint, to have a recipe here for this kind 
of Sunday sickness, along with other recipes which 
belong to the family household. 

Rise at seven ; not later. Take a cold water bath ; 
not only the face, but the entire body. Let neither sum- 
mer nor winter make a change in this. Eat a plain 
breakfast. Then mix up and take, internally, a dose of 
the following compound : Equal parts of Will, Push, 
Energy, Determination, Self-respect, Respect for God's 
day, Respect for God's Book and for God's house, and 
'a desire to be somebody. Stir well and add just 
enough love to make it sweet. Repeat the dose every 
three minutes until church time, unless the desired 
effect is reached sooner. If the day is stormy, make 
an external application of a good pair of overshoes, 
raincoat and umbrella. 

Many a girl looks sullen and ill at ease if her mother 
comes into the room when she is entertaining a young 
man friend. The young man is sure to notice this and 
mentally mark it down against the girl. A man who is 
worth anything puts a higher estimate on the girl who 
is frankly but unaffectedly affectionate in her home, 
and considerate of her mother. 
* * * 
The love of praise, howe'er concealed by art, 
Reigns more or less, and glows in ev'ry heart. 

— Young. 



A GOOD insect powder for lice is, — One pound of 
sulphur, into which has been thoroughly mixed one 
tablespoonful of carbolic acid. 

•$• * * 
ROASTED APPLES. 



BY SARAH A. SELL. 

Take good tart apples ; pare and halve and place 
them in a pan ; put a pinch of butter on each half, 
sprinkle sugar, cinnamon, a little flour, and put in 
the oven to roast. 

Nezvry, Pa. 

•j. .♦. .». 

TO PRESERVE CORN. 



Boil the corn in the ear for ten minutes, cut from 
the cob and allow a quart of salt to four quarts of 
the kernels. Stir well together, put into a stone crock, 
make a brine strong enough to bear up an egg and 
pour over the corn until it is covered. Stir well with 
a wooden paddle. Spread over the top of the jar a 
thin cloth with salt on it. Whenever you take out any 
corn replace the salted cloth. When you wish to use 
some of the corn take it out and soak for some hours 
in cold water, changing this frequently. If too salty 
you may let it come to the boil in the last water. 

DRYING SWEET CORN. 



Select good ears of sweet corn, husk, take off silk 
carefully, but do not wash ; shave with a sharp knife, 
not too close to the cob, into a large tin pan or wooden 
bowl, scrape cob to get all the milk of the corn ; 
when about three quarts are cut off, line a large drip- 
ping-pan with flour-sack paper, being careful to have 
sides and edges covered ; pour in corn, spread, and put 
at once in moderate oven ; stir frequently, and leave 
in oven fifteen or twenty minutes. Set a table out 
in the sun, cover with a cloth, pour the corn upon it, 
and spread out evenly and thinly. Before sunset bring 
the corn in and spread on a table in the house ; in the 
morning heat again in oven and spread again in the 
sun as before. If directions are closely followed, the 
corn will be thoroughly dried on the evening of the 
second day, and when shaken will rattle ; store in paper 
bag as soon as cooled. Prepare in small quantities, 
because it must not stand long after being shaven, but 
should at once go into the oven to heat. 

When all is dried, put in oven for final heating; 
place to cool, pour into the bag. tie closely, and hang 
in a cool, dry, dark place. 



766 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



OUR LITTLE PEOPLE if 



BONNIE WAYNE. 



Nen when I came out in the room where the folks 
were, Mr. Marshall said, " Good morning, Bonnie ;" 
and Grandma were sitting and reading the Inglenook 
and she looked over her glasses and said, " Bless her 
little heart, she had a big day of it yesterday and she 
had to have a good nap ; go out to the kitchen, honey, 
and Mrs. Marshall will give you your breakfast." 
Mabel said, " There comes the little lady, come right 
along here and wash your face in this nice, cool water 
and you will feel good and you will like your breakfast 
better ; " and she told me that she and Frank had been 
out picking the raspberries and that I might have some 
of them for my breakfast. 'Nen Frank came in laugh- 
ing and said, " Here, Bonnie, is some of the good 
cream from that milk that you saw me milk out at the 
barn last night." 

'Nen I said, "Where's Luke?" and Frank said he 
sent Luke with old Bux to take the cattle to the pas- 
ture ; 'nen I said, " Is Luke coming back any more ? " 
'Cause I wuz afraid that he would go home and leave 
me out here in the country. When I got my breakfast 
and found Hattie and Dora and got them in the little 
wagon that Mabel used to have when she wuz a little 
girl, I took them out to have a ride in the yard and I 
saw Luke and old Bux down by the spring house, and 
Luke just hollered to me and said for me to come down 
there, 'nen I said, " Is there any of those red pigs down 
there ? " And he said there wuz none of them there, 
and so I took the dolls down there to the spring house 
and we had the bestest time for a long time. You see, 
Mrs. Marshall had been down there before breakfast, 
and she had a great big long bucket that had a cover 
on it, and it had a hole in the middle and a long stick 
through the hole and she had the whitest water in there 
that I ever saw ; it looked like that milk that Frank 
got down to the barn last night, and I thought it wuz 
so white that I asked Luke if he thought Mrs. Marshall 
would care if I washed Dora's dress in that and he 
said that he didn't think she would care a bit, so I took 
oft" her dress and lifted up the little lid that wuz on it 
and put the dress in and we just punched that stick up 
and down and the white water got in my eyes, and all 
over Luke's blue coat, and all over the floor ; 'nen there 
wuz little yellow specks come all over the top and Luke 
said, " Let me look in there and see if it is clean." 
And when he looked in he saw that there wuz a whole 
big lots of that yellow stuff in there, and he said, " Oh, 



lookie, Bonnie ! " and he took a handful out and we 
made it into little bailies and stuck them up against the 
wall, and they looked awful nice; and then Luke took 
a little paddle and smeared a lot of it all over the 
screen door to keep the flies out, and it made the door 
look like it wuz painted yellow, and just then Mrs. 
Marshall came in and she said, " What in the world 
are my children doing?" and Luke said, "We are 
keeping out the flies," and she looked so funny and she 
hollered to Mr. Marshall to come there quick, and I 
thought we had done something bad; but when he 
came he just laughed as hard as he could and said, " I 
guess you children had better go with me," and he 
winked at Mrs. Marshall, and she shook her head 
about like Mamma does just before we are getting 
company, or when the minister is at our house for din- 
ner. 

Frank had the harness on old Barney and Charley, 
and Mr. Marshall said to Frank, " Can't you take these 
children with you? " and he said, " Yep," and he lifted 
me up on old Charley, and he put Luke on old Barney, 
'nen he got on behind me and we went with him out to 
the field, where he wuz cutting down some grass, and 
he said that he wuz a going to make some hay. 
" There now, you children, play around here any place 
you want to and I will call you when I go to dinner," 
he said, and we had a good time out there. There wuz 
a little brook there, and there wuz some little fishes in 
it and we waded in and tried to catch them, but they 
would slip out of my fingers every time. 'Nen we 
picked some flowers, and found some pretty shells and 
a lot of nice little stones, and then Luke found a great 
big bird in the corner of the fence, and she had the 
longest neck and she stretched out her neck as far as 
she could and said h-i-s-s-s-s, and I wuz afraid 
of her and Luke got a stick and he hit her and she run 
after him and she bit him on the heel and he cried ; 
.and 'nen I cried too, and so I got a big brush and I ran 
after that big bird and she went back to the fence 
and we went to the gate where Frank left us, and we 
could see him coming and we heard something going 
ding-dong-ding-dong and Luke said, " I wonder if 
they have school out here ? " 

(to be continued.) 

Blessed be the hand that prepares a pleasure for a 
child, for there is no saying when and where it may 
bloom forth. — Douglas Jerrold. 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



767 



J/| 






What are the fifteen decisive battles of the world? 

Marathon, Windfield-Lippe, Hastings, Siege of Or- 
leans, Saratoga, Pultowa, Siege of Syracuse, Metarus, 
Tours, Arbela, Chalons, Blenheim, Valmy, Sedan, 
Gettysburg, Waterloo, Spanish Armada, Siege of Se- 
vastopol, Manila. 

* 

What is our new editor's name? 

Though the editor is strongly in favor of impersonal 
journalism, since this question has been asked several 
times, he will answer the question directly. His name 
is E. M. Cobb and his former address was College Cor- 
ner, Ohio. 



Do bees and other insects have perspiratory glands? 
Yes. But this question will be more fully discussed 
when our Nature Study reaches that point. 



What are some of the very latest words that have come 
into the English language? 

In the International dictionary of 1903 there are 25,- 
000 new words that have come into the language in the 
last ten years, and it is very hard to tell the ones that 
have come in at the very last moment. They are most- 
ly if not altogether brought in through the sciences 
and arts and will be found among their terms. 



How much do animals know? 

This is a question which is under much discussion 
at this time, but if it is studied carefully it will be 
found that most if not all of the actions of the lower 
animals are caused by instinct or by imitation. A cat 
will learn to love a place and if taken away in a bag 
many miles, around many .crooks and turns, it will re- 
turn to the place upon which it has learned the " rat- 
holes." That is instinct, and calls for no knowledge 
on the part of the animal, but it is different with the 
dog. It will follow its master about from place to 
place, as devoted to him as ever, be he in the city or 
country. But this is instinct just the same. God gave 
the dog to man for his companion. The Eskimo has a 
dog which followed him to the extreme northern part 
of the world. The Australian has with him the Dingo, 
the shepherd has the collie, and so on, each class of 
men are provided with a dog to suit his climate, and 
a faithful friend he makes, ready at any time to lay 
down his life for his master. So you see that this is 
God-given instinct and not development of knowledge. 
An animal may be trained and educated and this some- 
times reaches very near to knowledge, but stops there. 

As was said in the beginning, there are two laws of 
sense in the lower creation, instinct, and imitation. 
We have discussed instinct, but imitation is different. 
What teaches a parrot to talk? Why, imitation. He 
hears words said and takes them up and repeats them. 
He has a degree of sense, not intellect, for this special 
faculty, which few of this class have. 

Turn an old farm horse out in the farm-yard and he 
will go and get a drink of water and then go to the 
barn, straight into his respective stall. What law is 
this? It is the law of repetition. He has been led over 
the same route so many times that he is familiar with 
the routine. 



How far back in history can the onion be traced? The 
apple? 

The onion first came from India. Next we find it 
in Egypt, 2,000 years before the Christian era, where 
the people worshiped it as something sacred. The 
apple was brought from the East by the Romans, in an 
early period. The crabapple is indigenous to Great 
Britain. Cherries were known as far back as the sev- 
enteenth century. 

* 

Who is George Haldan? 

George Haldan is one of the subscribers of the In- 

glenook, also a contributor and will be heard from 

quite regularly, under the heading " The Kritic on the 

Trane." He expects to write about objects of interest 

in the different parts of the United States as he is 

hauled to and fro through the country on some of our 

best trains. 

* 

# 
What is the longest word in the English language? 

This question was asked last week and we answered 
it from the point of a conundrum or " pun," but this 
week we answer it according to the decision reached 
by a class of thirty-eight who have been trying to find 
the longest word in the English language. It was de- 
cided by them to be " disestablishmentarianism. " 



Are Oklahoma, Arizona and New Mexico likely t" be 
admitted as States very soon? 

Their chances are favorable, especially Oklahoma 
and New Mexico. Immigration has done much for 
them, and with the industrious class of people that 
have been sent south, and the development they have 
made in the last few years, the probabilities arc that 
the demands for statehood will be made ere long. 



768 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 9, 1904. 



* * 

* * 

i fa > t « iff ij fr i fa i fc i » *j if f i j ji » fr t | i > | i ij )j i t | < + | t tj fr i ff j fr » j i > fr > %c i| « » |i » fr * ^ « » % " $ < *$" *$» *$ » * $ * ' $ * *$* '$* *$ * % ' * t> *$" $ ' T * $ * *♦* V* fc "I* ' ? ' " ? ' " ft ' t" »fr * $ * " X * " t * j " "I * l $ l " t " ' t 1 * " t * * $ 4 ' l $' *$* * $ * 4 * * $ * 

t , A ^ AAAMAAiA .. AA ™ * 

1 j^ „„„„ mmmmm , r ^^ mmm „„ „„ w ^^ mw ^, ,j * 

% t 1 1 ** * * '"" + 



That Everybody's Magazine really has the biggest 
" scoop " of the era in Thos. W. Lawson's " Story of 
Amalgamated " is abundantly shown by the first in- 
stallment of the series proper which is in the August 
number. The foreword was portentous with promise 
of startling disclosures. The initial chapters introduce 
the secret organization of Standard Oil and its actual 
master, who is a person almost unknown to the public. 
It is a wonderful picture Mr. Lawson gives of the 
huge business machine which has its headquarters at 
26 Broadway, New York, and he paints, for the first 
time in his real colors, the man he declares to be the 
greatest business genius of the period, Henry H. Rog- 
ers. Then, with brutal directness, he describes how in 
dividing the profits of the Amalgamated deal the big- 
gest financiers in Wall Street were tricked and de- 
ceived like the veriest crowd of tyros. It is the most 
sensational instance of the double cross in modern 
finance. 

* * * 

TEN MINUTES TO LIVE. 



On board an English steamer, a little ragged boy, 
aged nine years, was discovered the fourth day out 
from Liverpool to New York, and carried before the 
first mate, whose duty it was to deal with such cases. 

When questioned as to his object in being stowed 
away, and who brought him on board, the boy, who 
had a beautiful, sunny face, and eyes that looked like 
the very mirror of truth, replied that his stepfather did 
it because he could not afford to keep him nor pay his 
passage to Halifax, where he had an aunt who was 
well off, and to whose home he was going. 

The mate did not believe the story, in spite of the 
winning face and truthful accents of the boy. He had 
seen too much of stow-aways to be easily deceived by 
them, he said, and it was his firm conviction the boy 
had been brought on board and provided with food by 
the sailors. The fellow was very roughly handled in 
consequence. 

Day by day he was questioned and requestioned, but 
always with the same result. He did not know a sailor 
on board, and his father alone had secreted him, and 
given him the food which he ate. 

At last the mate, wearied by the boy's persistence in 
the same story, and perhaps a little anxious to incul- 
pate the sailors, seized and dragged him on the fore- 
deck, and told him that unless he told the truth in ten 
minutes he would hang him from the yard-arm. 



He then made him sit down under it on the deck. 
All around him were the passengers, and the sailors 
of the middy watch, and in front of him stood the in- 
exorable mate with his chronometer in his hand, and 
the officers of the ship by his side. 

It was the finest sight, said our informant, that I 
ever beheld, to see the pale, proud, sorrowful face of 
that noble boy, his head erect, his beautiful eyes bright 
through the tears that suffused them. When eight 
minutes had fled, the mate told him he had but two 
minutes to live and advised him to speak the truth and 
save his life ; but he replied with the utmost simplicity 
and sincerity, by asking if he might pray. 




The mate said nothing, but nodded his head and 
turned pale as a ghost, and shook with trembling like 
a reed shaken by the wind. And then all eyes turned 
on him, the brave and noble little fellow — the poor boy . 
whom society owned not, and whose own stepfather 
could not care for — there he knelt with clasped hands 
and eyes turned up to heaven, while he repeated audi- 
bly the Lord's Prayer, and prayed the Lord Jesus to 
take him to heaven. 

Our informant adds that there then occurred a scene 
as of Pentecost. Sobs broke from strong, hard hearts, 
as the mate sprang forward to the boy and clasped him 
and blessed him, and told him how sincerely he be- 
lieved his story, and how glad he had been brave 
enough to face death, and be willing to sacrifice his life 
for the truth of his word. — Christian Work. 






The Brethren Colonies 



IN THE 



Fruit Belt of Michigan 




are an actual success. The colony of the Lakeview church is located on 
lands surrounding the village of Brethren, Michigan. Brethren, Michigan, 
is located on the main line of the Pere Marquette System, 105 miles north 
of Grand Rapids and about 14 miles east of Lake Michigan. All conditions 
of soil, climate and location make this spot an ideal one for general farm- 
ing, fruit-growing and stock-raising. Lands have been sold to about 120 
families of the Brotherhood and their friends, of which number about one- 
half have already located and are clearing up their places. The possibili- 
ties of this district are exceptional. The Brethren, tract embraces about 
20,000 acres, of which over 11,000 acres have already been sold. There are 
just as good and as desirable locations remaining as those that have been 
bought and the prices have not yet been advanced, but with the improve- 
ments now going on, developing the country so rapidly, it is only a short 
time till prices advance considerably. THE TIME TO BUY IS NOW. 
Present prices range from $7 to $15 per acre, on easy terms, or less five 
(5) per cent for cash. 

For illustrated booklet and information in regard to rates, address 
Samuel S. Thorpe, District Agent Michigan Land Association, Cadillac, 
Mich. 



THE CADILLAC TRACT. 



The basisof my business is absolute and 
unvarying integrity. 

samuel s . thorpe. 25,000 Acres of Rich Agricul- 

tural Lands, Excellently Situated and Splen- 
didly Adapted for Farming, Fruit-growing and 
Stock-raising. 

These lands are located from one-half mile to six miles from the hustling city of Cadillac, the seat of Wexford 
ounty, 8,000 inhabitants, (all alive.) and its location on the Grand Rapids and Indiana R'y (part of the Pennsylvania 
iystem) and on the Ann Arbor Railroad (part of the Wabash System) together with its other advantages render 
t the best trading point and market place in Northern Michigan. Cadillac and the lands controlled by the ad- 
ertiser are located about 98 miles north of Grand Rapids and 50 miles east of Lake Michigan. They are well wa- 
ered with springs, creeks, rivers and lakes of pure, sparkling water teeming with gamy fish. The sail varies from 
sandy loam to a clay loam, all of it underlaid with clay and gravel subsoil, which responds eagerly to cultivation. 

For illustrated booklets, maps and information as to reduced rates to these locations, address: 

^istiict .Zi-g-ervt ZMZicl^igrsin. I_ia,nci Assn., 

IDept. livdl, 



THE INGLENOOK. 



Bonnet Straw Cloth 

SISTER, have you a knack of mak- 
ing your own bonnet? Here's 
news for you — money saving news 
We carry a large stock of bonnet 
straw cloth, manufactured especially 
for us, from our own designs. Four- 
teen different styles and colors. Rice 
Net, Wire Chiffon, Braid, etc., with a 
large assortment of Ribbon and Mous- 
seline de Soie for strings. We are the 
only house making a specialty of these 
goods. Write for free samples and 
prices. 

Albaugh Bros., Dover & Co. 

341=343 Franklin Street. :: :: Chicago, 111. 




50 Brethren Wanted; 

with their families to settle in the I 
vicinity of Tyvan, Canada. • A good i 
working church, one churchhouse 
built and steps taken for another one. 

Best of soil, $10 per acre, 
near railroad town, on easy terms. 
Good water, good people, schools 
and roads. 

This chance will last only a few 
weeks. Address: 

H. M. BARWICK, 
29t4 McPherson, Kans. 



To ADVERTISE 

Judiciously is an art, and many make 
a failure because they lack knowl 
edge. Advertisers will be helped b? 
our advertising experts in securing 
the best possible results. 

Brethren Publishing House, 
Elgin. Illinois. 



The Inglenook Only Half Price! n 



New Subscribers Only. 



Inglenook to Jan. I, 1905. regular price, 
Our Special Trial Offer, only, 



.$ So 



25c 




An Easy Way to Secure a Valuable Book. 

Inglenook to Jan. 1, 1905, * 5° 

Modern Fables and Parables,' J 2 S 



Both for only 



$175 
.75 



The book we offer is a late one. by Rev. Harris, author of Mr. World and Miss 
Churchmember. The object of this book is to teach morality and to correct social evils 
It is a splendid book for the home. If you do not already have it you will do well tc 
take advantage of this offer. 



Get a Good Fountain Pen. 



Inglenook to Jan. i, 1905, 

Ladies' or Gentlemen's Fountain Pen, 




Both for only 



This fountain pen is a good one and would be highly prized by any boy or girl, 
in need of a pen. 



It is worth $1.00 to any on 



Hundreds of New Subscriber*. 

We are receiving hundreds of new subscribers, who are taking advantage of the above unprecedented offel 
Our aim is to increase our list by several thousand within the next few weeks. From present indications our air 
is not too high. The Nook is starting on a new era and we want all our friends and neighbors to join hands wit 
us. You will never have a better opportunity to give the magazine a trial. 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



THE INQLENOOK. 




MANCHESTER COLLEGE! 



Write for plan to help Bible Students who are preparing to do 
lore efficient work in the church. Fathers and mothers, sons and 
aughters are interested in this institution because of the thorough- 
ess of the work and the uplifting, moral influence. FALL TERM 
PENS SEPTEMBER 6. For catalogue and particulars address the 
resident, North Manchester, Indiana. 3U2 



"S 



Delightful Home for Students. Thirteen Desirable Courses. Faculty Sub= 
stantially Augmented. Nine Universities Represented in the Train- 
ing of the Faculty. Enrollment Making Marked Increase. 



YOUR IDLE MONEY 

carefully and properly invested will 
earn 7 to 20 per cent per annum 
cor you, regularly and safely. For 
Bight years we have been dealing in 
If nigh-grade interest-bearing invest- 
Ill ment securities, and if you have any 
Idle funds on hand, large or small, 
we will tell you how and where you 
tnay invest it honestly and profit- 
ably, and we use the greatest possi- 
ble care to make every dollar invest- 
3d absolutely secure. Write to us 
ml for full particulars. Address: 



NEWCOMER AND PRICE, 

lOeow Mt. Morris, HI. 



change of Climate Beneficial 

After your years of toil and suc- 
ss, don't you want to rest the re- 
aining? If you do, come to south- 
n California, where roses bloom all 
e year, grass is evergreen, some 
nd of fruit ripening every month, 
getables a perpetual luxury. To 
ake these declining years a delight, 

combine work and play, purchase 
walnut, almond, fig, olive, orange, 

lemon grove; each has its profit, 
easure and beauty. For particulars 

each write A. Hutsinpiller, P. O. 
« 1194, Los Angeles, Cal. 23 13 



$3,500 buys highly Improved fruit 
rm of 20 acres, including stock and 
, )ls. One and one-half miles to fine 
irket. 

J. I. BLICKENSTAFF, 

. B.ingor, Michigan. 

26Konuon (he [Wil.KNOnK wt>«n wrum* 



^L2^ 




GROCERIES 

In our Equity Grocery De- 
partment as all our other de- 
partments, QUALITY is the 
cement that binds the inter- 
ests of Equity people. Send 
your next order for groceries 
to :: :: :: :: 

Equity Mfg. and Supply Co., 

'53-'55-'57-'59 S. Jefferson St. 
CHICAGO. 



Church Workers 

will find a new and thoroughly practical 
Bible Course for advanced students and 
more elementary work for beginners. 
"We adapt the work to the student. Our 
Bible teacher has been especially trained 
in city missions, evangelistic work and 
at the university. Look at the class of 
men and women that are being sent to 
the mission field and called to other 
church work and you can readily tell 
how the church views the educational 
work of our schools. If you are pre- 
paring for any kind of Christian activity 
it will pay you to investigate our work. 
As ever, " The Old Reliable, 

MOUNT MOBEIS COLLEGE, 
J. E. Miller, Fres. Mt. Morris, HI. 

NORTH DAKOTA 

Fertile lands on new line of Northern 
Pacific Railway. Sold on crop payment 
plan. For particulars, special excursion, 
etc., address, 

GUTHRIE & CO., 
321.1 P. O. Box 438. Decatur, ILL 

SALMON. IDAHO. 

Any one desiring information regard- 
ing this part of Idaho, I will try and 
give such information as desired. 

2ERBY MNSIBY, 
32-t4 Salmon, Idaho. 

It Dues Not Pay to Neglect Yonr Eyes! 

GUELINE 



Is good all for inflammations of the Eyes. 
It has cured thousands of others. It 
will cure you. :: DO YOU KNOW 

LUCINE? 



Dr. Yeremian uses it in India every day. 
It is for Diarrhoea. It works like a 
charm. It rids the intestines of all 
germs. If not satisfied send us the pills 
and we will return your money. 

Gueline, 35c. Lucine, 25c. 

PIE YEREMIAN MEDICAL CO., 

BATAVIA. ILLINOIS. 

IHJO H-mion II,. IXGLEXOOK when writing. 



FEW PEOPLE 

Know the value of Liquid Spray as a 
home cure for Catarrh, Hay Fever. Head 
colds and other diseases of the respira- 
tory organs. 

Persons desiring to try this highly 
recommended treatment should immedi- 
ately write to E. J. Worst, 61 Main St., 
Ashland Ohio. 

He will gladly mail any reader of the 
Inglonook one of his new Atomizers and 
Liquid Spray treatment on five days' tri- 
al, free. 

If It gives satisfaction, send him $2.00. 
two-fifths regular price; if not, return 
it at the expired time, which will only 
cost you twelve cents postage, and you 
will not owe him a penny. It kills the 
'•-uarrh microbes in the head and throat 

23tl3 



■HI 



INGLENOOK. 



The 



Mount 

Campbell 

Tract 



in Fresno County, 

California, 



Promises to become the leading 
fruit-growing section of California. 
Land is cheap, water abundant, loca- 
tion healthful and soil unsurpassed. 
The soil is especially adapted to the 
orange, grape, fig, orchard fruits, al- 
falfa and general farming. 

Plans are now forming for a colo- 
ny of the Brethren on this tract, J. 
S. Kuns, proprietor of the old Mis- 
sion farm at Covina, Cal., having al- 
ready purchased land in this district, 
which has been inspected by other 
prominent members of the church. 

Maps and information by 

W. N. ROHRER, 

Fresno, Cal 



FREE SAMPLE 

Send letter or postal for tree SAMPLE 

HINDOO TOBACCO HABIT CORE 

We cure you of chewing and smoking 
for 60c, or money beck. Guaranteed, perfectly 
harmless. Address Milford Drag Co., Mllford, 
Indiana. We answer all letters. 

24tll Mention the INGLENOOK -when writing. 

[ ELGIN & WALTHAM WATCHES ] 

t Of all sizes and kinds. Men's size Elgins as 1 
► low as $4-95- Other watches from 88 cents to « 
r S35-oo each. I sell all kinds of good watches, J 
c cheap. Catalogue free. Also samples and 1 
t price list of CAP GOODS free upon applica- j 
\ tion. H. E. Newcomer, Mt. Morris, III. i 

30-13 Mention the INGLENOOK when writing. 




SAD MISTAKES 

Have Been Made 

by locating away from church privileges. 
A Brethren church has been organized 
and a good churchhouse built in the 
midst of the great wheat belt of "West- 
ern Canada. Some fine land can yet be 
bought near the church at reasonable 
prices. 

A party of Brethren and others will 
start to that country on August the 16th. 
Low rates will be in effect with stop- 
over privileges in North Dakota. Infor- 
mation will be cheerfully given. 

DAVID HOLLINGER, 

, Greenville, Ohio, 

ORANftE AND WALNUT 

grove for sale. Five acres in south- 
ern California; 4}4-year-old trees, al- 
ternate rows. The choicest of land, 
trees, and location. An unusual op- 
portunity for a person with small 
capital who desires quality. Must 
sell to clear another place in same 
locality. 

Address: 

E. I. AMES, 

6332 Peoria St. Chicago, 111. 

20113 Mention tin- 1XHLEN00K when wr,tin 6 

Farms You Will Buy 

East Central Kansas is the best part 
of the State for general farming and 
raising stock. "Well watered, Marion 
county's average crop acreage is 110,000 
acres corn, 90,000 acres wheat. 40.000 
acres oats, 20,000 acres alfalfa. We 
have some good farms for sale at a bar- 
gain. "Will say to the Brethren that are 
thinking of changing their location that 
they will do well to investigate our 
country. Good bargains near church. 
Any information cheerfully furnished. 

GARRISON & STUDEBAKER, 

Florence, Kansas. 

THE OVERLAND LIMITED. 



The Traffic Department of the Chi- 
cage & North- Western R'y has issued 
a handsome booklet descriptive of the 
Overland Limited, the most luxurious 
train in the world, and of the Chicago. 
Union Pacific & North-Western Line, 
the route of this famous train to the 
Pacific Coast. Fully and interesting- 
ly illustrated. Copy mailed to any 
address on receipt of two-cent stamp 
by W. B. Kniskern. P. T. M., Chi- 
cago. 



Absolutely Free! 



"We have made arrangements whereby 
w% can supply each new subscriber to 
the Gospel Messenger with the Eternal 
Verities, by D. L. Miller, ABSOLUTELY 
FREE. You can subscribe for the Mes- 
senger for the remaining six months of 
this year and we will send you the book 
prepaid FREE of charge. The price of 
the book is $1.25, and is worth that to 
any home. 

THE MESSENGER IN EVESY HOME. 

This is by far the best offer we have 
made. We make this wonderful offer in 
order to place the Messenger in every 
home, as nearly as possible, in the 
Brethren church. If you, dear reader, 
are not on our list, now is your time to 
start. You will never get a better op- 
portunity. If you get the paper in your 
home for awhile you would not want to 
do without it for many times what it 
will cost you. That is the testimony of 
hundreds of our readers. 

OUR OFFER. 

The Gospel Messenger to 

Jan. 1, 1905 $ 75 

The Eternal Verities, $1 25 



Both for only, . 



$2.00 

7o 



THE ETERNAL VERITIES. 

The author has gathered many proofs 
of the truth of the Bible. Several illus- 
trations add to the interest and value 
of this book. This is Eld. D. L. Miller's 
latest work and will be found to be the 
most helpful book he has written. It 
contains 375 pages, bound in good, sub- 
stantial cloth, and sells for $1.25. 

TESTIMONIALS 

It has strengthened my belief in the 
Divine Book. It prepared me better to 
meet the questions that come to Chris- 
tians. — Anna Z. Detwiler, Huntingdon, 
Pa. 

For Bible literature one of the marvels 
of the twentieth century is " Eternal 
Verities," a book that every brother and 
sister should possess and carefully read. 
— Lemuel Hillery, Goshen, Ind. 

Your last, best book, " Eternal Veri- 
ties," is clear, pointed, convincing, and 
so will be a power in the conflict between 
truth and error, light and darkness. It 
ought to find its way into every home. — 
T. T. Myers, Philadelphia, Pa. 

FILL OUT BLANK. 

If you are not already a subscriber 
fill out the blank below at once and 
forward to us, and we feel sure you 
will be delighted with your bargain. 
The quicker you do this the more papers 
you will receive. We await your early 
answer. (If you are a subscriber, kind- 
ly show this offer to your friends, who 
ought to read the paper and do not, 
please.) 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
Elgin, HI. 



Date 

Brethren Publishing House: — 

Please send me the Gospel Messenger 
from now to Jan. 1, 1905, and the Eternal 
Verities, as per your special offer to 
new subscribers. Enclosed find 75 cents 
for same. 



Name, 



(If Eternal Verities is not wanted, re- 
mit only 50 cents.) 



ADVANCE IN "EQUITY" STOCK 



Established 189b A 1 1 V A V I H N " HI I Y N I IK Incorporated 1902 



BECAUSE 



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CUT OUT HERE 

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153 S. Jefferson St., Chicago, 111. X 

Gentlemen: — I hereby subscribe for shares of the capital stock of the Equity Mfg. X 

and Supply Co., (fully paid and non-assessable) at the rate of ($25.00) Twenty-five dollars per share, Par J* 

Value, for which please find enclosed Dollars, for 

"f| shares, being payment in full for said shares at the above price. 

This stock is to be issued to (Name) and forwarded 

to the undersigned. 



Signature *!• 

i 

* Date Issued 190 Town * 

* X 

X Certificate Number State X 

•:• . X 

If you prefer to join on the installment plan use application Form A-2. 

CUT OUT HERE 

Form A-2. 

* I 

* Equity Mfg. & Supply Co., Installment Subscription Blank 190.... ••. 

* 153 S. Jefferson St., Chicago, 111. * 

Gentlemen: — I hereby subscribe for shares of the capital stock of the Equity Mfg. X 

X ' f 

. : . and Supply Co., (fully paid and non-assessable) at the rate of $25.00 per share, Par Value, for which please ' 

* * 

* find enclosed as first installment Dollars. Balance to be paid in .<. 

* + 
X installments of Dollars each; when the last installment is paid, the stock is to be issued * 

I x 

* to (Name) and forwarded to the undersigned when earnings and bene- X 

t * 

Y fits will begin. 4» 

Signature <• 

X *> 

'* Date Issued 190.... Town % 

% 

X Certificate Number State X 

*•* *!• 



j»iJlrAAAAAAAAAAAJ|| 



Address all Communications to 



Utwv t tvtvtv A «53-'55-i57-'59 5. Jefferson St., CHICAGO, ILL. 












I Jfc 4 ' \-v 



P^i 






sV 



■SfcCR 



Tun 



L*».-visr 



Finds Scientific Cooperation 
A Great Success 



Annual Stockholders' Meeting 



OUR ANNUAL SHAREHOLDERS' MEETING was held on July 4th. Twenty-six of our 
leading shareholders, some coming a distance of five hundred miles, were present. All declare 
it was the most enthusiastic and encouraging business meeting they ever attended. Investigation 
showed that the assets of the Corporation are increasing at the rate of nearly two thousand dollars 
per month, and that the dividends this year promise to be 10 per cent or more. The 1904 series of 
voucher contracts ($150,000 worth) was closed out in five months. Thus the first five months of 
Scientific Co-operation, as first inaugurated and applied by us in America, closed in a blaze of glory. 
Already Scientific Co-operation is a success. Already our shareholders are reaping the benefits in 
immense savings and in dividends on their investments. Our merchandise sales are increasing daily, 
and our selling expenditures are decreasing daily. We want you as a partner in our Mail Order 
Business, which is organized on an original, scientific co-operative plan. 



Prompt Action Nec= 
essary. 

Co-operation aims to do for the 
small capitalist what the large 
capitalist is doing for himself. If 
you have $100 you cannot start in 
business with it, at least not in a 
business which yields any kind of 
returns. You must deposit it in a 
savings bank or invest it in secur- 
ities and be contented with small 
interest. 

By co-operation you can make 
the small capital yield the hand- 
some percentage of returns which 
the banker or the merchant secures 
from his large investment. "A. B. 
D. & Co. Stock" through co-oper- 
ation puts you in business for 
yourself, no matter how small your 
capital, and puts you on an equality 
with the powerful merchant as far 
as earning power for your dollar is 
concerned. 

Co-operation puts you 'in a position for a 
25 per cent, opportunity where otherwise 
you remain shackled to the 4 per cent, 
dictum of the savings bank. 

Our stock is for sale only to gain the co- 
operation of thousands of customers — past, 
present and future. Remember you buy 
into an established mail order business 
receiving mora than a thousand dollars 
nearly every day right now. No Experiment. 
No risk. Just Expansion and C°-operation. 

// 'rite to-day for application blanks. 



Our Idea 

To do the right thing, at the right 
time, in the right way; to do some things 
better than they were ever done before; 
to eliminate errors; to know both sides 
of the question; to be courteous; to be an 
example; to work for love of the work; 
to anticipate requirements; to develop 
resources; to recognize no impediments; 
to master circumstances; to act from 
reason rather than rule; to be satisfied 
with nothing short of perfection in 
scientific co-operation. 

Won't you join our Family? 



Albaugh Bros., 
Dover & Co. 

The Mail Order House 

341=43 Franklin St. 
Chicago, = Illinois. 



What Is Your Capital 
Doing For You? 

Prompt action on your part is 
necessary to secure your stock at 
"ground-floor" quotations. It was 
unanimously decided, at the Stock- 
holder's Meeting, that no more 
stock should be sold at less than 
£125.00 per share, which is a 
premium of §25.00 on each share, 
and judging from past experience, 
it is more than likely that the stock 
will command a heavier premium 
by the end of the business year. 

We now have nearly Five 
Hundred people interested with us; 
and in order to enlist hundreds 
more of co-operators, the manage- 
ment has decided to increase the 
capital stock of the Company to 
§500,000 and issue a new series for 
$150,000 worth of voucher con- 
tracts. 

You should take advantage of this 
exceptional opportunity, by getting: your 
application in for a part of this 1905 series. 

Remember: One judicious investment may 
be worth years of labor. There «s nothing 
to give away in our proposition. It is not a 
promotor's scheme, but a straight-forward, 
high-grade, strictly legitimate mercantile 
enterprise and every dollar's worth of stock 
sold represents an actual Ylh cunts of value 
— that's why the stocks sell at a premium ■ 
// 'rite to-day for application blanks. 






«L-ENOOKL 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 



..t.,t., ; ..t..f»'t<»-t " t " I " t " t " t ";"; '»» <"t"t"i"!"t"t"H"t"t ' t"t"t"t"I"t"t"H ' * ■ * « * * * ■M-H'H-H^ 



PARTIAL TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



POEM. 

THE EVENING HOUR.- 

CONTRIBUTIONS. 



-By L. Margaret Haas. 



MEAT INSPECTION BY THE GOVERNMENT.— By Dr. 

C. W. Johnson. 
THE " N " RAVS.— By J. G. Figley. 
MISTAKES ABOUT SCHOOL.— By D. L. Mohler. 
THE KRITIK ON THE TRANE.— By George Haldan. 
NOTED RELICS IN OHIO.— By Charity Vincent. 
MONUMENTS AND MEN.— By Owen Eldo Metzger. 
THE RANDOLPH FARM.— By B. B. Switzer. 
HOW FRENCHMEN SING THE " MARSEILLAISE."— 

By Marguerite Bixler. 



* •:• 

* * 

* * 
.j. .j. 

•:* * 

* * 

* * 

* * 
•:• * 



* + 



EDITORIALS. 

STROMBOLI. 
A POTTER. 



THE WRONG TITLE. 



» i t i »» . > i > .. t< . » i tMt ii t . t .. : .i t i » . i i t .. t . »» i t ' » ' i ' »< » < ' < ' »»* - t»< ' »< ' <"t"i ' < ' » ' >< '' t - <"t '' t ' i"t"i ' <"t"i ' *»* 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



igust 16, 1904 



$ 1 .00 per Year 



Number 33, Vcrium* VI 



THE INGLENOOK. 



ARE YOU GOING TO 

California, Washington, 
Oregon, Idaho 

Or Any Other Point? Take the 

Union Pacific Railroad 

Daily Tourist Car Lines 



Chicago, Missouri River, Colorado, Idaho, Oregon, 
Washington and California Points. 



ROUND TRIP RATES 



From Chicago, 
From Missouri River, 



$50.00 
45.00 



To San Francisco or Los Angeles, Cal., and Re- 
turn. Tickets Sold Aug. 15 to Sept. 10, inclusive. 
Return Limit, October 23, 1904. 



One-Way Colonist's Rates. 

To Pacific Coast Every Day, Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. 

From Chicago, $33 00 

From St. Louis •. 30 00 

From Missouri River, 25 00 

Proportionate Bates from all Points East. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 

IS KNOWN AS 

"The Overland Route" 

And is the only direct line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West. Business men and 
others can save many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal card to your nearest ticket agent, or 
Geo. L. McDonaugh, Colonization Agent, Omaha, 
Neb. 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



MORE BEETS- 
HIGHER PRICE 



Producers Will Get $400,000 More 
Than Last Year. 



" Denver Poft: " 

The sugar beet crop of Colorado, according to reports 
received from our field men all through the South Platte 
Valley, will be not less than 10 per cent in excess of that 
of last year," said Charles Eoettcher, of the Great West- 
ern Sugar company. " The outlook was never so good 
as it is this year. Last year the yield in tons was slightly 
less than 400,000, and it was marketed at $4.50 a ton. 
This year it will be fully 450,000 tons and the market 
price already agreed on is $5 a ton. This will make a' 
difference to the producer of some $400,000. It is too 
early to make an estimate on the amount of sugar the 
beets will contain. That will not be possible for a couple 
or more weeks. But the general outlook was never bet- 
ter for a large beet crop than it is at present. We have 
had plenty of water and no severe or injurious storms 
over the areas planted in beets. If nothing untoward 
occurs the crop will be a banner one." 



The following parties have bought land near Snyder, 
Colo.: 

Louis E. Keltner, Hygiene, Colo.; W. W. Keltner, 
North Dakota; A. W. Brayton, Mt. Morris, 111.; Daniel 
Grabill, Lemasters, Pa.; J. L. Kuns, McPherson, Kans.; 
D. L. Miller, Mt. Morris, 111.; Daniel Neikirk, Lemasters, 
Pa.; Galen B. Royer, Elgin. 111.; E. Slifer, Mt. Morris, 111.; 
I. B. Trout, Lanark, 111.; R. E. Arnold, Elgin, 111. 



Geo. L. Studebaker, of Muncie, Indiana, says: 

" Sterling is a growing town with a good country 
surrounding. The members are active." 



HOMESEEKERS' EXCURSION 
to Snyder, Colorado, 

With Privilege of Stopping off at Sterling, Colo., 

ONE FA HP Plus S3 - 00 ' for the R°" n< l Trip First 
UllC TAnX and Third Tuesday of Each Month via 

Union Pacific Railroad. 



PRIZE CONTEST 

HOW TO GET A VALUABLE PREMIUM 



WE ARE GOING TO GIVE A FEW VALUABLE PREMIUMS, AND ALL OUR INGLENOOK FRIENDS 

ARE INVITED TO ENTER THE CONTEST. 



ECere T±±e>-y _A.r© J 



C.V^£gg/A. 






No 1 i#*s ..• '- ' N«» ;- 

-n .u J! '" PJ H :r:: ' v '- ;: " -:--'■ ' ■- : ' v ; 

No 5 

The one sending us the most new subscribers to the Inglenook for the remainder of the year at 25 
cents each, or with premium as per our offer* at 75 cents each, will receive one set Literature of All tflC 
Nations, containing 10 volumes, weight, 26 pounds. Subscription price «Jj£c), 

The one holding second place will receive a splendid ladies' or gentlemen's watch (whichever pre- Q 

ferred). The watch is equal to one that regularly retails for about 

The one holding third place will receive a good Teacher's Bible, Arabian Morocco, divinity circuit, worth Jj 

The one holding fourth place will receive the book " Modern Fables and Parables," worth 

Each person sending 10 or more subscriptions receive a good fountain pen, either ladies' or gentle- . 

men's, worth ' I . 

Cash must accompany each order. 

*See our offer in this issue. 



00 



20 
00 



3STOT7C is "5Tc»-u.r Opportunity. 

If you do not enter this contest you may be sorry that you did not when it is once too late. 

All these prizes are going to be given to some one and they will likely go where 
you least expect them. Oo to work at once and you will be surprised to see how easy it 
will be to get up a big list. 

Remember, the price of the Nook is only 25 cents from now to January I, IQ05. 

See our advertisement on another page. 

Oontest Oloses. 

To give all a fair chance we have decided not to close this INGLENOOK CONTEST until 
August 31. All orders received by us up to and including last mail cm August 31, 1904, will be 
counted. Many are taking an active part in the contest. The fortunate ones are going to be the 

ones who keep continually at it. Remember, at the close of the contest should you not have been fortunate enough to 
receive one of the four prizes named, you will be entitled to prize No. 5, a good Fountain Pen, for each ten subscriptions sent 
us. It is worth your while to try for No. 1. Don't procrastinate. Time is fleeting. 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 




THE INGLENOOK. 



THE COLONY 



.ON. 



LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 



.IN THE... 



SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 




BRETHREN OAK GROVE CHURCH 

Still continues to attract the attention of homeseekers. 

The uniform success of those who have settled here and the immense growth of 
every variety of crop which is again in evidence establishes the fact that here is the 
place where the industrious man of small means can make a California home. 

EASTERN PEOPLE SO EASTERN T ARMING. 
You aon't have to spend years learning a new business. 

ALFALFA, CATTLE, CORN, HOGS, 

besides the California fruits, are the products which enable the farmer to pay for 
his land and make a good living while doing it. 

SPECIAL LOW RATES TO CALIFORNIA. 

From August 15th to Sept. 10th the railroads will sell Round Trip excursion 
tickets to San Francisco (with stop-overs). 

From Chicago $50 00 

From Mississippi River, 47 50 

From Missouri River 45 00 

Final return limit, Oct. 23. 

ALSO SEPTEMBER 15th TO OCTOBER 15th COLONIST ONE-WAY TICKETS 
TO ANY CALIFORNIA POINT. 

From Chicago $33 00 

From Mississippi River, 30 00 

From Missouri River, 25 00 

By this arrangement you can come to Laton on the excursion rate and see our 
land. If it suits you, go back and bring your family out on the colonist rate. 

Land sells for $30 to $60 per acre, including perpetual water right. Terms, one- 
fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. 

From twenty to forty acres wili support the average family in comfort. 

If interested send your name and address and receive printed matter and our 
local newspaper free for two months. Write to 

NARES & SAUNDERS, - Laton, California. 

33tI3 Mention the fNfJLKNOOK when "-ntui- 



A Free Trip 



We are running cheap excursions 
from Chicago, St. Louis and inter- 
mediate points to Denver, Sterling, 
Snyder and other Colorado points ev- 
ery month. If you can help us to 
get up a party to come out from your 
locality, will furnish free transporta- 
tion for your own personal use to 
accompany them on the above named 
trip. 

MILLIONS OF DOLLARS 

are being expended by the United 
States government on irrigation en- 
terprises and what was once known 
as " The Great American Desert " is 
beginning to bloom and blossom in a 
manner wonderful to behold. 

OUR FARMERS 

are prosperous and contented. It is 
plain to be seen that they are making 
more money on 40 or 80 acres of ir- 
rigated land than can be realized on 
more than double the amount of land 
" Back East," and a trip through the 
South Platte Valley, Colorado, will 
convince you of this fact. 

CHEAP LANDS AND EASY PAY- 
MENTS. 

We sell a few irrigated farms, or 
town lots in Denver, Sterling or Sny- 
der at lowest figures and give easy 
terms of payment. Will sell a limited 
number of Snyder lots on $5.00 
monthly payments. 

WRITE TO-DAY. 

Don't wait for some one else to get 
in ahead of you on the best bargains. 
If you cannot come yourself, let us 
know just what you want and how 
much money you wish to invest and 
will make selections for you. 

We wish to arrange with one mem- 
ber in every town or county to co- 
operate with us in this enterprise. 
Advertising matter free. 

The Colorado Colony Co., 
Sterling, Colorado. 

I7tl3 lentioii Hit' l.NULKNOOK when writing. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



" i - • : • ■ : ■ * * * ■ : ■ » » . > . i * . ; . * > t < * * * * * * * »»»»»»»<»»*»*♦*** 



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****** 

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AKTESIAN WELL— PECOI VALLKY. 



The Pecos Valley lies in. the Southeastern part of New 
Mexico and is one of the most famous irrigated countries of 
the world. By filling out the attached coupon full informa- 
tion will be mailed. 



Add 

O 
O 

m 

e 


'ess: W 

Name 
Street 
City a 


G. BLACK, G. P 
Atchison, Topeka 


.A., 

& Santa Fe Ry, 


Ch 


cago. 


No., 










id State,. 



















*$**Jn$M5**Jr-^^»J*-*"Jt-^jM$M$* *$r*J**$^^*-^**I* *$^*J^^»-^*-*^~^»-^f-^*-^*^»*J*****J*--^»-^» -^«-^m$*-»$mA» »■ jw-*j» ^ ij»»*- .t< *J"JmJ*+J«+J»+*«J**JmJw.Jh{^. 



VERY LOW EXCURSION RATES 

TO SAN FRANCISCO AND 

LOS ANGELES. 

Via the North-Western Line, will 
be in effect from all stations August 
IS to September 10, inclusive, with 
favorable return limits, on account of 
K. T. Conclave and meeting of I. O. 
O. F. Sovereign Grand Lodge at San 
Francisco. Special trains, personally 
conducted, leave Chicago August IS 
and. 25 on itineraries that provide 
stop-overs and interesting side trips. 
Two solid fast trains through to Cal- 
ifornia daily. " The Overland Limit- 
ed" (electric lighted throughout) less 
than three days en route. Another 
fast daily train is "The California 
Express," with drawing room and 
tourist sleeping cars. For itineraries 
and full information apply to agents 
Chicago & North-Western Railway. 



Change of Climate Beneficial 

After your years of toil and suc- 
cess, don't you want to rest the re- 
maining? If you do, come to south- 
ern California, where roses bloom all 
the year, grass is evergreen, some 
kind of fruit ripening every month, 
vegetables a perpetual luxury. To 
make these declining years a delight, 
to combine work and play, purchase 
a walnut, almond, fig, olive, orange, 
or lemon grove; each has its profit, 
pleasure and beauty. For 'particulars 
of each write A. Hutsinpiller, P. O. 
Box 1194, Los Angeles, Cal. 231 



$2,500 buys highly Improved fruit 
farm of 20 acres. Including stock and 
tools. One and one-half miles to fine 
market. 

J. I. BLICKENSTAPP, 

.Bangor, Michigan. 

IOt26Mcnttnn th« rXfil-ENOOK « 'h«l wntini. 



Farm for Rent 



A choice, highly-improved stock and 
grain farm of 234 acres, more or less, 
to suit the tenant. Situated 40 miles 
north of Chicago, near the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee & St. Paul R. R. Special terms 
to middle-aged, up-to-date farmer (Ger- 
man preferred), who can give good ref- 
erences and is financially strong enough 
to carry on a stock and grain farm. 
Those interested must apply at once, as 
the owner desires to secure a tenant 
now for next season. For further par- 
ticulars apply to 

MARTIN LUX. 
it Wads worth, HI. 




GROCERIES 

In our Equity Grocery 
Department, as all our 
other departments, 
QUALITY is the ce- 
ment that binds the in- 
terests of Equity people. 
Send your next order 
for groceries to :: :: 

Equity Mfg. and Supply Co., 

1B3-1BB-167-1 59 S. Jefferson St.. 
CHICAGO. 



Job Printing 

The Kind that Brings Re- 
sults, the Kind you needn't 
be ashamed of, the Kind 
that is Cheapest in the End 
because Just as You Want 
it, — Furnished by 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
Elgin. Illinois. 



^ t*/ \*/ 1*/ **/ hi/ 1*/ \^/ ^^ x^ %«« «4i ltl^ ^^ 4*^ v«> **y 4^/ |i^ »*^ \4/ \*/ \*> \*> «ii/ %|/\Sji \J> x^ 4fe ^^ ^^/ \ ji ^ ^4y \^ iii; ^y \*> \d> ^ 

Irrigated Crops Never Fail I 



I IDAHO 



is the best-watered arid State 
winds, destructive storms and 
mate it makes life bright and 
We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer 
change for the general improvement in your condi 
account of health, we believe that Idaho will meet b 
and sensible thing to do; that is, go and see the coun 
swer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger 
fares to investigate thoroughly a new country saves 
Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all prin 
for yourself. Selecting a new home is like selecting 



in America. Brethren are moving there because hot 
cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless cli- 
worth living. 

to the prospective settler, and if you have in mind a 
tion in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on 
oth requirements. There is, however, only one wise 
try for yourself, as there are many questions to an- 

work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad 
thousands of dollars in years to follow, 
cipal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see 
wife — you want to do your own choosing. 



Round=Trip Homeseekers' Excursion Tickets 

Will be sold to points in Idaho as follows: West of Pocatello on first and third Tuesday of May, 
August, September and October, 1904. To points north of Pocatello tickets will be sold only .in May 
and October, 1904. The rate will apply from Missouri river points, and from St. Paul, Chicago, Bloom- 
ington, Peoria and St. Louis. Tickets to Idaho points will also be sold by the Union Pacific, from sta- 
tions on their lines in Kansas and Nebraska. Rate will be one regular first-class fare for the round trip 
plus $2.00, with limit of 15 days going. Return passage may commence any day within the final limit of 
21 days from date of sale of tickets. Tickets for return will be good for continuous passage to starting 
point. 




PAYETTE! VALLEY HOME— Five Years from Sagebrush. 



Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. 
Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat. Oats and Barley. 



Fine & 



Arrived in Payette Valley Feb. 23, 1903. Settled on an 80-acre tract, covered with sage brush. 
Cleared 40 acres. May 25 sowed 10 acres to wheat. Yielded 30 bushels to acre. June 12 sowed 10 acres 
to oats, in the dust, not watered till June 20. Yielded 55 to acre. Had this grain been sown in February 
or March the yield would have been much larger. 

Alfalfa was sown with the grain and in October we cut one-half ton to the acre of hay and volunteer 
oats. 

Potatoes yielded 500 bushels to the acre and many of them weighed 3 to 5 pounds each, four of 
the best hills weighing 64 pounds. Quality prime. (Signed) E. L. Dotson. 



S. BOCK, Agent, Dayton, Ohio. 

J. E. HOOPER, Agent, Oakland, Kansas. 



D. E. BURLEY, 
G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R., 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 



Mention the INGLENOOK -. 



*IN5LEN50K 



Vol. VI. 



August 16, 1904. 



No. 33. 



THE EVENING HOUR. 



BY L. MARGARET HAAS. 

When the sunset gleam has faded from the west, 
And the darkling clouds have closed the golden gate, 
Then the wind that sways the spruce trees 
Gently wafts away our burdens, 

Leaving us in sweet communion with our Guest. 

All about us is the stillness of the night, 
Broken only by the whisper of the pines 
To the winds caressing softly 
Their tall forms that ever upward 

Point to realms of love where reigns eternal light. 

Holy Comforter, this hour is thine alone; 
O, bring to our remembrance truths divine; 
In the city street and market 
We are prone to be forgetful — 

Abide in us and keep us near the throne. 

Camp Hill, Pa. 

* * * 

SNAPSHOTS. 






When hope wanes strength goes. 



" Women knozv the way to rear up children.' 



" No ivork in the world pays like the mother-work." 



To have a show these days a man must be an ac- 
cumulator. 

* 
"A child-kiss set on thy sighing lips shall make 
thee glad." 

* 
The true soldier is always ready to help put a stop 
to the lighting. 

* 

To borrow trouble is to pay the interest it takes 
from your work. 

* 

The fellozv zvho thinks he knows it all changes his 
mind after he is married. 

* 

Somehow or other a high hat always seems to ac- 
centuate a low forehead. 




" The eternal God is thy refuge, and underneath 
are the everlasting arms." 



The world is Hooded with papers and books, and we 
can learn something each day. 
* 

A small quantity of carbolic acid will greatly bene- 
fit the whiteivash in killing lice. 



It's generally a man's oziii fault if a bunco roper 
bamboozles him more than once. 
* 
The man who saves his money is alzvays ready to 
take advantage of a profitable investment. 

* . 

" Industry is cheap. It is laziness that costs. It 
has cost many a bright man a bright career." 

* 

One rule for winter is never to lean the back against 
anything cold. New skaters should try and keep this 
law. 

Think once before you act, twice before you speak, 
and spend the day in thought before you commit it to 
paper. 

* 

We would like to read a good story wherein the 
heroine was not tall and willowy, with " sun-kissed 
hair," and the hero was not forever "gnawing his 
tawny mustache." 

It is painful to have trouble and disappointment, 
but that is a part of the course in the school in which 
God has placed us to learn fellowship and useful- 
ness. — C. F. Yoder. 

* 

The design of God's providential dispensations is 
seldom understood at first. We ought, therefore, to 
believe, though zve understand not. and to give our- 
selves up to the Divine disposal. The great work of 
faith is, to embrace those things which we know not 
now, but sliall know hereafter. 



770 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



I THE KRITIC ON THE TRANE | 

& — »*« 

% BY GEORGE HALDAN. T 

♦K"K~K~K-^--t"H^<"H"M":' ■;■ •;■ * »:■ •; " :«■>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦»> 

POPOCATEPETL AS REAL ESTATE. 



It isn't every day that the ordinary man is permitted 
to see such an extraordinary change of real estate as 
was made one day last week in Mexico. Although the 
ultimatum was reached at that time, the trade has been 
going on for practically two years. The men who have 
been bartering were Captain Charles Holt, of New 
York City, and General Gaspar Sochoa, of Mexico. 
The real estate in question was the old extinct Volcano 
of Popocatepetl. Mr. Holt has spent about fifty thou- 
sand dollars of his and other people's money in making 
this contract, but he has only paid this in getting ready 
to make the final transaction which cost three hundred 
million dollars in gold, and for this he is to have a 
clear title of the big mountain and all its contents 

Both parties are aware that the mountain is an almost 
solid bank of sulphur. Besides the mountain itself, 
with its valuable sulphur deposits, the contract covers 
twenty-five hundred acres of park land at the foot of 
the mountain, and forty thousand acres of forest land 
which contain a supply of water power sufficient to 
furnish any amount of horse power required by the 
Company for their contemplated project. In the tim- 
ber they will be able to find lumber necessary to build 
all the other towers for their shafts and trestles for 
their aerial railway, because such a railway will have 
to be constructed to carry their mining products to the 
railway below. A cog railway is to be built on the top 
of the mountain, and it is even hinted that they are to 
build a hotel and sanatorium for consumptive people. 

Another source of revenue that this new company 
expects is from the almost countless acres of ice on 
the top of this mountain that is so pure and so hard 
that it is fairly blue. This can be quarried and shipped 
to the cities below, especially to the city of Mexico, 
at a very much cheaper rate than they can get it from 
the ice factories. 

The Company proposes to spend about five hundred 
thousand dollars in gold on and around the mountain 
within the next six months. They have received or- 
ders from one New York firm already for twenty mil- 
lion dollars worth of sulphur to be delivered in the 
next five years, at the rate of two hundred thousand 
tons per annum. Ten million tons of sulphur are al- 
ready blocked out and ready for shipment as soon as 
the aerial railway is completed. The mouth of the 
mountain is about seventeen thousand feet above the 
level of the sea. In all probability the majority of this 
stuff will be shipped to Vera Cruz, which will make a 
good gulf market easily reached by the world. 



The Chairman of the Company is Fernando Gon- 
zalez, son of the Mexican president of that name. The 
Vice President is Robert B. Roosevelt, Uncle of our 
President. The government report which has never 
been disputed shows that there are one hundred and 
forty-eight million tons of sulphur in the crater of this 
wonderful volcano, at a depth of seven hundred feet, 
and according to the best calculations it is increasing 
annually, at the rate of one per cent, which means a mil- 
lion and a half tons annual increase. 

No, it isn't every day that an old extinct volcano like 
this is transferred like real estate and it is probable that 
your Kritic will not see another one soon. 

♦ *$• "5* 
MEAT INSPECTION BY THE GOVERNMENT. 



BY DR. C. W. JOHNSON. 

Having reviewed briefly in a previous number the 
inspection of live stock by the U. S. Government In- 
spectors, and considered the work to the point where 
the animals arrive at the large shipping centers, we will 
resume, taking Chicago as the basis of operations. 

Approximately speaking, the " Stock Yards " cover 
700 acres of ground divided into two nearly equal por- 
tions ; one-half being the " Yards " proper for the 
handling of the live animals ; the other half being 
" Packingtown," where the animals are killed and the 
carcasses disposed of. As the hog and sheep sections 
are " double-decked " or two stories high, the actual 
area is much increased thereby. To those who have 
not visited the Yards, it is necessary to know that this 
vast territory is covered with thousands of pens laid 
off in squares intersected by streets and alleys and all 
numbered and lettered like a portion of a city. Lo- 
cated at convenient points are scale houses where the 
animals are weighed, and feed warehouses for the con- 
venience of such stock when " held over," as it is not 
customary to keep the animals in the Yards more than 
a few hours. Following the arrival, a train load of 
stock is unloaded rapidly, taking about ten minutes. 
The animals are then distributed to some of the near 
by pens where they are scrutinized by prospective buy- 
ers and as soon as a sale is made, they are driven 
through one of the scale houses and weighed, when 
the drivers for the packing houses take them to the 
various destinations. 

It is while being weighed that the animals undergo 
inspection by the Federal authorities. Any animal 
showing evidence of disease is tagged with a metal tag 
bearing a serial number and henceforth is isolated and 
kept under Government supervision until finally dis- 
posed of. 
• Using the hog as a type for further considera- 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



771 



tion of this subject and taking for granted it has 
passed the Ante Mortem inspection, we find it in the 
packing house, where, after being killed, passed 
through the scalding vat and divested of its hair, is 
placed with head nearly severed before the Government 
Inspector. Its introduction to the Inspector at this 
juncture is to determine whether there is any evidence 
of tuberculosis. This is done by carefully feeling the 
glands located in the neck at the point of incision. If 
these glands indicate their normal condition the ani- 
mal is passed as healthy by this Inspector. On the 
contrary, if he detects traces of disease, he attaches a 
condemnation tag to the carcass and the animal is held 
subject to his order. The presumably healthy animal 
now passes down the line through various stages of 
the work of conversion into pork and attracts little 
attention from the Inspector until it reaches, what is 
called in the packing houses, " the gutters' bench." 

It is here that the internal viscera is removed from 
the carcass and thrown upon a bench where several 
workmen are busy converting the mass into classified 
products. Here also is stationed one of Uncle Sam's 
Inspectors. As the lungs, liver, heart and intestines 
are exposed in turn he gives each a critical glance to 
discover any abnormal condition, and so expert has he 
become in judging the healthy tissues from the dis- 
eased, that his decisions are both rapidly and accurately 
made. 

There are several diseases made manifest here that 
may easily have escaped the first inspector, viz., among 
others, pneumonia, pleurisy, jaundice, hog cholera and 
even tuberculosis. Should symptoms be found war- 
ranting it, the Inspector attaches a condemnation tag 
as in the previous case and the animal is held for 
further orders. 

Passing rapidly down the line we reach the " split- 
ting rail " where the carcass is divided into two equal 
parts by splitting lengthwise of the backbone. Here 
is located another Inspector, intent upon gathering in 
what may possibly have been overlooked by his asso- 
ciates. He has some advantages here, for the carcass 
has been washed clean from blood, etc., and it is next 
to an impossibility for the slightest abnormal condi- 
tion to escape him. In fact, so thorough are the In- 
spectors that many hogs are tagged as suspicious 
which are afterwards released. Each packing house is 
provided with a closed condemnation room in which 
are placed condemnations for the day and which is 
locked by a Government employe, the key being held 
in his possession until the animals are finally disposed 
of. 

After the animals are allowed to cool thoroughly, 
usually on the following day, the Inspector in charge 
of the house with an assistant goes over the whole 
number condemned, carefully cutting into the different 
groups of glands and examining every portion of the 



carcass critically, taking all the time necessary to ex- 
ercise sound judgment. 

A report of each animal tagged, as to condition and 
disposition, must be forwarded to Washington, D. C, 
each day. Such carcasses as are ultimately condemned 
are placed, under the supervision of an Inspector, in a 
large tank, the tank previously having been sealed at 
the bottom with a government seal, and sufficient offal 
and refuse is placed therewith to make the mass unfit 
for food products, when the tank is again sealed by 
Uncle Sam's representative and the contents are 
cooked for several hours under steam pressure until 
nothing remains but grease and fertilizer. The seal is 
now broken and the oil is drawn off for lubricating 
purposes, etc. 

The Inspection of cattle, sheep and calves is conduct- 
ed under practically the same methods, modified only 
to meet the requirements necessary in the operation of 
dressing the carcass. 

I have refrained from giving statistics and much 
detail matter that can be obtained if desired through 
the Bureau of Animal Industry, Washington, D. C. 

The microscopic examination of pork products in- 
tended for exportation to certain European countries 
is to vouchsafe the shipping of meat not infected with 
Trichinae. A large amount of pork is thus affected, 
but as high temperature is fatal to its being, it is only 
necessary to cook the meat thoroughly in order to ren- 
der it healthful. This work is carried on in Chicago 
by some sixty young women under direction of a 
Meat Inspector from the B. A. I. and is required by 
the Foreign Governments before they will accept the 
meat. 

One more topic worthy of mention and not general- 
ly known is the inspection of meats destined for the 
United States Army. For the past three years the 
Subsistence Department has maintained its own In- 
spectors, selected from the B. A. I. These are sta- 
tioned at the principal points where purchases are 
made, and are held responsible for the character and 
quality of the meat, whether cured and smoked as bacon 
and hams, or canned in one of the numerous products 
now furnished the Army as regular rations. 

The Subsistence Department has specific instruc- 
tions which are carried out to the letter, regarding the 
class of meat furnished the soldiers, and it is no ex- 
aggeration to say that the)- secure the best obtainable, 
the price being a secondary consideration. 

Now, a final word regarding the B. A. I. and its 
work. It is to be regretted that through lack of funds 
or any cause whatever they should be prevented from 
assuming a scope where they can deal effectually with 
the small dealer as well as the large houses and thus 
place all our people in a position to avoid the dis- 
astrous evils propagated through the sale of diseased 
meat. 



772 



THE I NGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



THE N-RAYS. 



BY J. G. FIGLEY. 

Two French philosophers and scientists, the Messrs. 
Charpertier and Blondlot, have invented an instrument 
by which with the aid of electricity and a fluorescent 
screen, they have succeeded in producing or bringing 
out what they call " the N-Rays." in honor of the 
University of Nancy. By following out to a certain 
extent the plans of Dr. Roentgen in the famous X- 
Rays which penetrate any object or substance, and 
turn it inside out, so to speak, for inspection, the 
learned gentlemen in their N-Rays see the illumination, 
aura or radiation, a sort of nimbus or halo, of the op- 
eration of people's muscular apparatuses. An apt com- 
parison would be the light produced by an electric 
plant at work. 

Washington Irving makes Diedrich Knickerbocker 
say in his " History of New York," that the French 
people are essentially gifted with what he calls " a 
ponderosity of thought and a profoundness of reflec- 
tion." However that may be, it is certain that about 
fifty years ago, one Baron von Reichenbach. a Prus- 
sian, succeeded in discovering what he called, for want 
of a better name, " Odic-force " or " Od-Force." This 
was a personal illumination, somewhat in the nature 
of an electric light, surrounding the persons of those 
confined in a darkened room, in which the Baron car- 
ried on his experiments. 

These N-Rays are supposed to be of a silvery color, 
and the more intense the action of the subject, the 
brighter will be the rays. At any rate, this is one step 
toward solving the problem concerning man's psychic 
nature which has worried various classes of people for 
so long, the Spiritualists as usual declaring all to be 
caused by disembodied people. 

There is a psychic condition that some people are, I 
believe, divinely endowed with, which we find men- 
tioned in sacred writings, where they are called 
" seers," and which condition may or may not be self- 
induced, and which in effect often is the same as the N- 
Rays, and in some as powerful even as the X- 
Rays. I refer to what is usually called clairvoyance 
or clear-seeing, a species of mental or spiritual illum- 
ination by the aid of which, with the natural eyes 
closed, the seer may be able to in a general way anni- 
hilate space, nothing apparently, ordinary, can be kept 
from their sight however distant it may be. 

I have heard of some of these seers who claim to be 
able to distinguish the mental attitude of people by the 
color of their personal aura ; it depends upon their per- 
sonality or personal-magnetism so-called. If a persorl 
was angry, his color was red, if in a peaceful, spiritual 
mood, his color was snow-white, etc. The whole mat- 
ter had and has nothing to do with spirits, but is a fac- 



ulty inherent in man, which may or may not be success- 
fully developed or cultivated. 

I think the whole matter goes to prove the trinity of 
the human system, soul, spirit, body, and that the life- 
force is akin to electricity and operative in the same 
way ; and that consequently the soul operating the 
mind is the central battery, located in the upper and 
back part of the brain, and the nerves, the fluid cours- 
ing through which are alive only by the power of the 
spirit unfolding them, are the lines of transmission. 

A person who is stricken by paralysis is affected in 
precisely the same way and with the same results as 
the one who is stricken by lightning. A " glancing 
stroke " sometimes does not kill ; the same may be said 
of a " full stroke." Why so, then ? I think it proves 
what I have been trying to explain. Man is a human 
electric battery, for want of a better name, and by 
studying himself as such, I think he will discover and 
traverse the whole universe of thought and mind and 
allied principles, and by and by be able to prove the 
true philosophy of existence without the aid of a single 
solitary ghost. 

It is by the aid of the God-given electricity inherent 
in man, that mind-reading or telepathy, and thought- 
transfefence or mental telephony is accomplished, pre- 
cisely the same as by the aid of an electric apparatus 
telephone or telegraph messages are received and sent. 
How truthfully does the inspired Psalmist declare that 
man is "fearfully and wonderfully made," Psa. 139: 
14-17. Considering all these things, even speculative 
as they may appear to be, how strongly and how clearly 
it behooves each and every one of us to make practical 
application of the twelfth chapter of Romans, laying 
particular stress upon the opening verse. 

Bryan, Ohio. 

* * * 

MISTAKES ABOUT SCHOOL. 



BY D. L. MOHLER. 

How many of our boys and girls realize and know 
why they are sent to school? It is possible that some 
of them may think they are sent to get them out of 
the way at home. In some extreme cases that may be 
true, but as a general rule it is not. Our government 
would not ask us to pay taxes, build convenient school- 
houses, hire accomplished teachers and expend a lot of 
money for fuel to comfortably heat their buildings, 
through the cold winters, simply to get our little folks 
out of the way of their parents at home. Others may 
think school is simply a place for fun, but it is not 
in the absolute sense. 

Boys and girls, it is true, must have some fun and 
it is all right to have fun at school, too, at the proper 
time ; yet if it were the only purpose, we certainly 
would not need schools. Still others, and, too, we are 



THE INGLENOOK.— August i6, 1904. 



773 



glad to say this class is few in number, think or seem 
to think, that school is the place where all sorts of mis- 
chief are bred, and to see how much trouble they 
can cause their instructors ; and the strongest types 
of this class, in the most extreme cases, possibly seek 
to become famous by winning out in just such so- 
ciety riots as this, but school is not the place, nor is it 
supposed to be the place, where mischief is taught or 
allowed to any great degree. There are schools where 
some such boys and girls are sent that they may learn 
, to behave. Those are reform schools, but they are not 
the ordinary schools about which we are talking. 

It certainly is not the most elevating place to be from 
one standpoint, and yet when one is in need of just 
such training it is an excellent place to be, and we 
ought to be glad that the government provides for the 
unfortunate. We hope none of the Nookers will ever 
need to be sent to such a place. 

The majority of our boys and girls, with their par- 
ents, think the great purpose of our Public School sys- 
tem is to teach the children to read, write, spell and ci- 
pher; these things are taught in the school, it is true, 
and the school in which these are not taught is not 
worth much ; but that is not the sole purpose of the 
school. All these are means to an end ; but the end 
that we wish to accomplish is a purpose of much 
greater importance. 

The chief aim and end of our public school system is 
the intellectual development of our boys and girls to 
useful citizenship ; men and women who can think and 
know for themselves. Have you ever stopped to think 
just how you would feel at the cross-roads if you could 
not read the guide board ? It is almost impossible for 
those who can pick up a daily paper and scan its pages 
and glance through its contents in a few moments to 
appreciate the feelings of those who cannot tell one let- 
ter from another. 

We are well aware that the body grows strong from 
use so long as it is not overworked. The same is true 
with the mind ; each problem you solve, each sentence 
you analyze or diagram strengthens your power of in- 
dividuality, if properly managed, besides aids the de- 
velopment of the intellect. In solving difficult prob- 
lems you have gained the victory and it draws a vital 
thread through your character which leads you on to 
persistent effort in the future. Even the smallest pu- 
pil enjoys victory over such things, or at least should. 

The process of mind-growth is encouraged by 
school work until your mind is strong enough to solve 
the most difficult problems given in our textbooks. 
When we are graduated from such institutions, it is 
supposed that our minds have been sufficiently devel- 
oped that we are not only able to solve the textbook 
problems that have been given to us in the different 
channels of learning, but that we are able to discrim- 
inate the daily problems of life that meet us in every- 



day life, and not only cope with them, but overcome 
them. 

As we step out on the threshold of life, we should 
not only be prepared to meet the individual and domes- 
tic problems that may be ours to overcome, but those 
of church, state, and even the national character which 
are ours to encounter as well. Men and women are 
supposed to have their minds sufficiently developed 
that they may understand the duties of citizenship and 
Christian courage. The government has learned that 
it is cheaper to educate the people and help them to be- 
come citizens than to leave them in ignorance and pun- 
ish them for disobedience, and it is not only cheaper but 
a great deal better and has higher motive. But one se- 
rious mistake is being indulged in by the majority of 
our boys and girls, and here is a word of warning; 
don't quit school too soon ; so many of us think that 
when we are graduated from the common schools, we 
need nothing more; and we are sorry to say that a 
number of our parents are saying to their boys and 
girls that they got along with such an amount of 
knowledge and we can too. Don't be satisfied until 
you have used every opportunity at your command for 
gaining an education. If a high school and an aca- 
demic course are within your reach, avail yourself of 
that privilege by all means. Then do not fail to take a 
good college course, and do not stop short of the uni- 
versity. 

You may say you do not have the means to do this ; 
strive for them, work your way through ; don't be sat- 
isfied until you are at the top. Do not be in a hurry, 
if you are thirty before you have finished your educa- 
tion ; twenty years will count more after vou are pre- 
pared for services than the whole fifty years would 
count were you unprepared for your duty. 

Leeton, Mo. 

* * * 

ICELAND IS AMERICAN. 



Consul Mahin, of Nottingham, reports that Ice- 
land, cut off from the world save for slow mails, is to be 
linked to other countries by wireless telegraph with the 
Shetland Islands or the mainland of the United King- 
dom, more than 600 miles. The Icelandic Parliament 
has voted a yearly subsidy of $9,380 for 20 years, and 
also for similar communication between Reykjavik and 
the principal towns of Iceland. 

Four-fifths of the foreign trade of the Island is with 
Denmark and Great Britain. In 1900 the imports to- 
taled $2,507,902 and exports $2,571,921. 

A single merchant at Reykjavik last year bought salt 
fish for $300,000 cash and exported it mostly to Spain. 
Emigration has not been great in recent years. Farm- 
ing has made great progress owing to the agricultural 
schools. A butter export on the Danish system has 
been commenced and the stock of cows is increasing. 



774 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



MONUMENTS AND MEN. 



Address by Owen Eldo Metzger. 

Monuments and men sustain a very close and pe- 
culiar relation. They are inseparable. If we go back- 
to the earliest dawn of history we find the same re- 
lation existing there as is manifest in our present age. 
Some of the greatest engineering and architectural 
feats in all history have been displayed in erecting 
monuments to commemorate the life of man. For in- 
stance the great pyramids in Egypt which have stood 
for over four thousand years, and been regarded as one 
of the great wonders of the world, were erected by the 
Pharaohs as monuments to mark their last resting 
place. In fact, in the early history of the race, kings 
and men of power would spend the greater part of 
their life in planning and erecting a monument to 
commemorate their life. 

Man as a rule precedes the monument, either in 
person or by his deeds. In looking over a cemetery 
you see it dotted with little white shafts of marble, 
which have been erected as monuments to mark the 
last resting place of the persons who have preceded 
them. They have been erected by persons who have 1 
had an interest in the life of the departed one. 

There are two kinds of monuments, those which 
are erected to commemorate the life of a person after 
he is dead, by way of something in tangible form 
for that purpose, the other kind that which the person 
builds himself by the deeds and acts which he has 
wrought during his life, and are carved in the lives 
of his fellow-men and on the universe itself. This 
monument, which the person erects himself, cannot 
be effaced by the centuries, but stands for all time as 
an imperishable record of his life. 

The monuments of men which have the greatest 
influence, and impress the lives of men are those> 
which have been erected by the persons themselves, 
by their deeds and acts. In 1821 the grand structure, 
" Bunker Hill Monument " was erected in honor and 
remembrance of our patriotic forefathers, who gave 
their life's blood for their country and posterity. It is 
not this imposing structure, which towers toward the 
sky for which we remember and honor these patriots, 
but we honor and respect them for the principles for 
which they fought and the noble deeds which they 
wrought, which still live and grow sweeter and dearer 
as years come and go. Time will efface the monu- 
ment which man has erected and it will crumble to 
dust, but as long as there remains a spark of civiliza- 
tion and a desire for freedom, so long will that monu- 
ment stand which has been erected in the hearts of 
the people. That grand monument which stands in 
Washington city, which was erected in honor of 
George Washington, and stands without a peer in the 
whole world, does not reveal the greatness of the 



man lo us. While it in itself makes an imposing ap- 
pearance, yet it sinks into insignificance compared 
with that grand living monument which survives him 
in the heart of every American citizen, and which 
continues to grow and will survive the cycles of all 
the centuries. 

Not all the grand monumental display that we see 
throughout the land is a sure sign that the life of 
the person to whom the monument has been erected 
was worthy the eulogy given it. The Pharaohs who 
reared those mighty pyramids in honor of themselves 
were despised most of all men, by their subjects who 
were compelled to do the work and supply the means. 
It is the monument that a person builds by his noble 
deeds and good acts which forms a correct repre- 
sentation of what his life has been, and eternity can- 
not change or efface it. 

When man shall be called before his God for judg- 
ment he need not wait to hear what the judgment 
will be, but he will be able to see for himself, when 
God shall unveil the universe, which is the living 
monument upon which is written every deed, act and 
thought of his life. If the theory be true that every 
thought and act causes vibrations in the ether and 
that these vibrations make an impression upon every 
object with which they come in contact, and as ether 
pervades everything and everywhere in limitless space, 
therefore our thoughts and deeds will be written upon 
the whole universe. The inscription upon this monu- 
ment will be enough when revealed to satisfy the mind 
of a person as to his condition, no matter how elab- 
orate may have been the edifices erected by his friends 
to convey the idea to the passer-by that his life was a 
grand and glorious success. 

The fact that a person's life has been eulogized by 
his surviving friends cannot change the record, when 
the final test shall come, which he himself has carved 
out on the lives of his fellow-men. 

We, as a class of 1904, are leaving a little landmark 
here upon the campus of this college, as a mark which 
will convey the fact to succeeding classes and friends 
of the institution that we as a class have been here and 
finished our course of study. I hope that each suc- 
ceeding class may likewise leave a mark of some kind, 
and that this custom may continue until additional 
ground will have to be purchased to place them upon. 
But if this little mark is the only monument by which 
the class of '04 can be remembered, our lives will 
have been one of the grossest failures. It is the monu- 
ment which we will erect after we leave these walls, 
by what we do and what we accomplish in this world, 
that will be a memorial by which this institution will 
be honored and by which it will remember us. The 
greatest monument that any institution of learning 
can have is that which the classes that have gone from 
the institution have erected bv their lives. 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



775 



Let us as a class of '04 erect such a monument by 
our accomplishments and good deeds, which shall tower 
to the very skies, and as the years come and go and 
time will have left its marks upon our brow and 
thinned our number, may the last surviving member 
with hoary head and trembling with age and cares of 
life lay the last stone on the pinnacle of a monument 
which shall be an honor to the class of '04 and this 
institution and one which time and eternity cannot 
efface. 

Rossville, Ind. 

* * # 

NOTED RELICS IN OHIO. 



BY CHARITY VINCENT. 

The State of Ohio is a rich field for archaeological 
research. No other state in the Union can boast of 
more valuable resources of this character. It abounds 
in prehistoric forts, mounds, graves and similar relics. 
The largest and best preserved of these valuable finds 
is Fort Ancient, in Warren County, which is the most 
interesting remains of its character now extant in the 
world. Distinguished scholars from other States and 
foreign countries frequently visit this place to take ad- 
vantage of its fine opportunities for archaeological 
study. Models of Fort Ancient are to be found in 
many of the leading Museums of Europe. 

The walls of this old fort are very irregular. Fol- 
lowing the middle of the embankment the distance 
around it is nearly three and one-half miles. North to 
South it measures less than one mile and about one 
hundred acres are enclosed within these walls. 

Of the many curious relics found at Fort Ancient, the 
copper pieces seem to excite the most interest. There 
are many of these pieces and they represent breast- 
plates, celts, ear ornaments and bracelets. In pre- 
historic days the present art of handling copper was not 
known, of course, and these pieces were rudely made 
by the Indians by simply hammering native copper in- 
to whatever shape they desired. Very remarkable 
bracelets, etc., were made in this manner. The in- 
dividual pieces were found folded and hammered 
together, evidently for the sake of destroying their 
identity. They now appear simply as folded 
pieces of copper, and in many cases are brittle 
with rust. Some of them, however, if straightened 
to their original shape would be plates eight 
and one-half inches long and four inches wide. 
In this collection the bracelets are about the best pre- 
served in shape. What many of the pieces are is a 
matter of mystery, for they are being kept in the folded 
condition in which they were found. 

A few broken slate ornaments and several dozen 
pieces of galenite were found with these copper pieces. 
All these were buried beneath almost a hundred 
sheets of mica. 



For the sake of caring for these rare relics the Ohio 
State Legislature purchased this old fort, together with 
surrounding territory, making in all about three hun- 
dred acres of land rich with prehistoric interest, to be 
converted into a free public park. This has been placed 
in the care of the Ohio State Archaeological and His- 
torical Society and is rapidly being made one of the 
finest historical museums of the country. 
4. *j» «$. 
OLDEST CHESTNUT TREE. 



On the farm of Irwin H. Shantz, who lives near 
Spinnerstown, Bucks County, Pennsylvania, stands a 
mammoth chestnut tree, one that eclipses all the rest of 
the giant chestnut trees in the Keystone State. Two 
feet above the ground the circumference of this tree 
measures exactly 36 feet. The. tree's height is 60 
feet, and 10 feet from the ground are two branches, 
one to the left and the other to the right, and the cir- 
cumference of the former is eight feet, the latter nine 
feet two inches. Ten feet above the ground its great 
branches extend, one of them six feet four inches in 
circumference, each of the others a few inches less. Its 
boughs spread nearly 90 feet. 

The age of this tree is known to be at least 221 years, 
from tales told by ancestors of the proprietors of the 
property on which the tree stands. No one ever 
thought of cutting this giant down except in 1876, at 
the time of the Centennial in Philadelphia, when the 
Exposition Commission offered the proprietor $100 for 
an unbroken section of the trunk one foot from the 
ground. What saved the mammoth tree from de- 
struction was the fact that no saw long enough to cut 

it could be procured. 

3» 4» $ 

SUCCESS. 



SELECTED BY LOVINA S. ANDES. 

Never be cast down by trifles. If a spider breaks 
his thread twenty times, twenty times will he mend it 
again. Make up your mind to do a thing, and you 
will do it. Fear not, if a trouble comes upon you; 
keep up your spirits, though the day be a dark one. 

Men who have the right kind of material in them 
will assert their personality, and rise in spite of a 
thousand adverse circumstances. You cannot keep 
them down. Every obstacle seems only to add to their 
ability to get on. 

Success lies, not in achieving what you aim at, 
but in aiming at what you ought to achieve and press- 
ing forward sure of achievement here, or, if not 
here, hereafter. There may be so-called success which 
is really a failure, and a failure which is truly a 
success. 

Lancaster, Pa. 



776 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



HOW FRENCHMEN SING THE " MARSEILLAISE." 



BY MARGUERITE BIXLER. 

The Russian national hymn, the English " God Save 
the Queen," — of which " My Country 'Tis of Thee " 
is the American version — the German " Watch on the 
Rhine " and the world-famous Marseillaise hymn of 
France are beyond doubt the finest national anthems 
in existence. Bv many critics the " Marseillaise " is 
considered the best. Born of a sudden inspiration of 
its author, Rouget de 1 Isle, it certainly has a marvel- 
ously inspiring strain, and it has. in the course of its 
history, accomplished marvels. 

Colonel Higginson, in writing reminiscences of 
Paris, relates how he heard it sung by a French audi- 
ence at the celebration of the anniversary of the fall 
of the Bastille. " Nothing of the kind in this world," 
he says, " can be more impressive than the way in which 
an audience of six thousand French radicals receive 
the wonderful air. I observed that the group of young 
men who led the singing never once looked at the 
notes, and few even had any, so familiar was it to 
all. There was a perfect hush in that vast audience 
while the softer parts were sung, and no one joined 
even in the chorus at first, for everybody was listen- 
ing. The instant, however, that the strain closed, the 
applause broke like a tropical storm, and the clapping 
of hands was like the taking flight of a thousand doves 
all over the vast arena. Behind those twinkling hands 
the light dresses of ladies and the blue blouses of 
workingmen seemed themselves to shimmer in the air. 
There was no coarse noise of pounding on the floor 
or drumming on the seats, but there was a vast cry 
of ' Bis ! Bis ! ' sent up from the whole multitude, de- 
manding a repetition. When this was given, several 
thousand voices joined in the chorus. Then the ap- 
plause was redoubled, as if the hearers had gathered 
new sympathy from one another, after which there 
was still one more applauding gust, and then an ab- 
solute quiet." 

East Akron, Ohio. 

THE RANDOLPH FARM. 



BY B. B. SWITZER. 

Those who are acquainted with United States his- 
tory know that the Randolphs were among the first 
English settlers ; the farm they occupied contained 
seven thousand acres, and was surveyed by George 
Washington under Lord Fairfax, about the time of 
the Revolutionary War, Lord Fairfax owning all the 
land between the Potomac and the Rappahannock 
rivers. It was then Fairfax county, but in laying out 
the counties this farm fell in Fauquier county, Vir- 
ginia. The house which is still in good repair, was 
built in T783. 



In the yard may be found locust trees which are 
four feet in diameter; mulberry trees that have grown 
three feet in diameter. There is one sassafras tree 
thirteen feet in circumference. The yard is beautiful 
and contains about one acre. 

/ The family graveyard is near by where one gen- 
eration after another have been laid by those who in 
their turn have followed them. The present owner 
fcf the farm, Bishop A. M. Randolph, who resides in 
Norfolk, comes up to the farm two or three months 
each summer. 

They long since have laid away their seventy slaves 
to rest, and hired help has taken their places. Thomas 
Jefferson's mother was a Randolph ; Chief Justice 
Marshall married one of the girls. 

The Randolphs belong to the Episcopal church and 
re a kind and obliging people. 

At the present time the farm contains only about 
sfcc hundred acres, and is called " Eastern View." Not 
faV away is an old water mill, dated 1712, and still 
grimis corn for its customers. 

Midland, Va. 

4» 4> 4» 

A BOON TO THE IRISH. 



Could one be totally ignorant of the conditions of 
the Irish people as regards society, church and state, 
as he wanders through the Island, he would be almost 
in ecstasy as he is wholly occupied in taking in the 
sights, that are thrust upon him. 

He enjoys the novelty of the jaunting car, with its 
two seats which are situated on the sides of the vehicle, 
over the wheels, while the driver is seated almost 
astride the horse. One is compelled to admire the 
beautiful, macadamized roads which are among the 
best in the world, lined on either side with a stone wall 
beautifully whitewashed, overhung with laurel and oc- 
casionally a weeping willow, having for a background 
the emerald mead which is an undulating landscape 
surmounted by an occasional castle, which is a monu- 
ment of the days of yore. Between these tiny hills are 
frequently found loughs or lakes whose waters are like 
crystal. By the roadside, occasionally, are found 
groups of houses which are one story, narrow and very 
long, containing two, three and sometimes four rooms 
which are crowded up against each other in immediate 
succession. These are built of brick or stone and are 
invariably white-washed and are covered with thatched 
roofs. At the end of these houses is an old-fashioned 
chimney. It is veritably true that they keep " the pig 
in the parlor," in some instances. 

Following the jaunting car are groups of bareheaded 
and barefooted children running at the top of their 
speed 'and crying at the top of their voice. " tuppens- 
hapeny-fur-a-scramble-sur " (two-pence-half-penny- 
for-a-scramble-sir) . 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



777 



But as soon as one stops and asks of the farmer his 
condition, and learns that he pays two pounds a year 
per acre ($10.00) and that the land is really on the 
market for five pounds per acre, and, hy figuring, in 
the meantime, find that in two and one-half years he 
would pay the purchase price of the land in rentals, we 
can again see something of the squalor and poverty to 
which the Irish are subjected. Then when we find 
that the English government imposes upon them the 
care of fifty thousand troops, each year, which they 
have no more use for than they do for a quarter sec- 
tion of the moon ; and last of all if we could but know 
the percentage of church taxes that is placed upon 
these poor people, and with what loyalty they cling to 
their religion, regardless of the cost, the picture would 
be intensified. Should the traveler be accustomed to 
our broad prairies of corn and waving fields of golden 
grain, the contrast that meets his eye in Ireland would 
be so vivid that he would never forget the picture. 
When he sees the small, irregular fields of timothy, 
Irish potatoes, mangels and especially whole hill tops 
covered with heather, he would begin to understand 
that the Irish truly have a hard lot. 

About one-seventh of the area of the Island consists 
of peat bogs, which of course is absolutely fit for noth- 
ing but for fuel, and their climate renders it impossi- 
ble for the home consumption to satisfy the large out- 
put. But the day has dawned when a new era has op- 
ened to these people. A bill has finally found its way 
through Parliament by which these Irish may buy 
homes of their own, which, prior to this time, was al- 
most an impossible thing. 

And another great blessing that has come to them 
lately is a clever invention in the way of disposing of 
their over-supply of fuel. They now have a plan by 
which they can compress this peat into briquettes and 
by this means they will be able to dispose of all the pro- 
duct they can get before the public. First of all it is 
cut from the slough or bog, by machinery, something 
like we cut ice, and it is then taken directly to the plant 
without the usual delay of air drying or kiln dry- 
ing. 

When once taken to the factory it is packed into ro- 
tary cylinders which are revolved at a wonderful 
speed, the peat in the interior being beaten while the 
cylinder rotates. The centrifugal force of this cylinder 
expels all or nearly all of the moisture in the product, 
and then by means of electrodes connected by conduct- 
ors with the dynamo, placed for the purpose of dry- 
ing the peat, is included in the electrical circuit. The 
resistance of the peat generates heat and by this means 
is carbonized. A mass of black globules is the result, 
and retains all the properties of the raw material. It 
is then passed to the kneading machines and after 
being well mixed is moulded into briquettes or left 
to dry and harden. If it is dried without being pressed 



into briquettes it must be crushed and screened into 
different grades. 

Some one has quaintly said that in England and Ire- 
land they do not have weather, they only have samples 
of weather, which fact renders it almost impossible to 
dry any sort of product by the heat of the sun ; there- 
fore this process alleviates that sort of trouble. 

This will certainly be a great blessing to the poor 
people of Ireland, because it will make their land as 
valuable as if it were underlaid with coal mines. It 
seems that Northern Germany might well install some 
of these new process methods for development. 

Sweden, at the present time, is taking from Ireland 
two million tons of these compressed briquettes, annu- 
ally. What would the amount of exports be could they 
supply the demand? 

Within fifty miles of the city of Chicago are thou- 
sands of acres -of this peat that might be turned into 
fuel if we would only occupy the field. It is said that 
one ton could be produced at the almost incredibly low 
cost of $1.21. 

The prepared peat is almost entirely smokeless as a 
fuel. It burns to the very last vestige, and leaves clean 
white ashes and no clinkers. 

*> 4* * 

THE COST OF A CAMPAIGN TRAIN. 



How Political Candidates Keep the Money Moving. 

The cost of campaigning by special train is not 
small. A completely comfortable campaign train must 
have a private car for the use of the man who is doing 
the brunt of the work and his secretaries and assistant 
speakers. Then there must be another car for the 
reporters of the press associations, the reporters of the 
particular newspapers of the States through which the 
train is passing, and for the campaign committees of 
the State. There must be a dining-car. Man may 
live by tinned goods alone for a day or two, but a buf- 
fet-car trip of more than two days is simply murderous. 
The Pullman Company charges from thirty to fifty dol- 
lars a day for the use of its cars. Most railroads will 
attach a special car to a regular train, provided seven- 
teen full fares are paid ; most railroads charge a dol- 
lar a mile for running a special train. The commis-j 
sary department costs a hundred and fifty dollars, more 
or less, a day. Speakers who are not candidates re- 
ceive from twenty-five to one hundred dollars a day 
for their services. Frequently the entire company of 
passengers goes to a hotel in a city where there is an 
overnight stop ; in some cases the National Committee 
pays the landlord, at other times the bills are paid 
by the State or the city committee. But it is perfectly 
clear that whatever else campaigning by special train 
may accomplish, it keeps money moving. — Lindsay 
Denison, in Everybody's Magazine for Angust. 



778 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



WASHINGTON ON ZION HILL. 



That Sunday I shall not soon forget. From the 
library that Tuskegee owes to the munificence of Mr. 
Carnegie I had got a pile of magazines and a few 
books and was just making ready to be secretly com- 
fortable when a sharp rap on the door halted my prep- 
arations. Principal Washington extends to me an in- 
vitation to drive with him to the " Rally " of the Bap- 
tist church on the other side of the town ; he is to de- 
liver an address. 

Promptly accepting the invitation I slipped on has- 
tily the whitest, thinnest, coolest clothes my grip could 
muster. The sky was lurid with the blaze of the sun, 
the wind even on these sandhills was beyond resur- 
rection, and the mercury had evaporated. The team — 
a pair of Tuskegee-bred horses, young, clean-limbed 
and eager — was waiting at Mr. Washington's gate 
impatiently. In a moment mine host came briskly 
down the gravel path from his house, greeted me in 
his hearty way, and, lo ! we were whisked down the 
road in a rush of breeze. 

This powerful man by my side, grave and silent, but 
alert and keenly observant, I have grown greatly to 
admire. He has made an oasis of thrift and intelli- 
gence in a desert of shiftlessness and ignorance ; in a 
wilderness he has been true to a great ideal. One 
quality which, as much as any, accounts for the con- 
tinuous, the inevitable, the glacial advance of Mr. 
Washington, is unswerving common sense. Crotchets 
and prejudices, praise and blame, momentary ills and 
joys, none of these disturb this man's balance and 
fixity of purpose; he steadily gazes through sham 
and sentiment and detail, upon the essential, and for 
the essential he unceasingly strives. 

What would he have to say at the rally? I won- 
dered. In New York and Boston and Washington 
and Chicago I had again and again heard Mr. Wash- 
ington address white audiences. Who that was in the 
great audience at Madison Square Garden last Febru- 
ary to hear Mr. Carnegie, President Eliot, Dr. Frissell, 
and Dr. Washington speak in behalf of Hampton could 
forget the overwhelming effect of Mr. Washington's 
words ? " Reduced to the last analysis there are but 
two questions that constitute this country's race prob- 
lem. The answer to the one rests with my people, 
the other with the white race. For my race one of its 
dangers is that it may grow impatient and feel that it 
can get upon its feet by artificial and superficial ef- 
orts rather than by the slower but surer process 
hich means one step at a time through all the con- 
ductive grades of industrial, mental, moral and so- 
cial development which all races have had to follow 
which have become strong and independent. I would 
counsel : We must be sure that we shall make our 
greatest progress by keeping our feet on the earth, and 



by remembering that an inch of progress is worth a 
yard of complaint. For the white race the danger is 
lat in its prosperity and power it may forget the 
Slaims of a weaker people ; may forget that a strong 
|ce, like an individual, should put its hand upon its 
haart and ask, if it were placed in similar circum- 
stances, how it would like the world to treat it ; that 
the snsanger race may forget that in proportion as it 
lifts up the poorest and weakest even by a hair's 
breadth, it strengthens and ennobles itself." 

This is the lofty doctrine of statesmanship. On 
such an occasion, the plane of thought and feeling and 
method of expression is of course immeasurably be- 
yond the range of what I figured his audience at the 
" Baptis' Cha'ch " to have. How would this man, 
with his easy mastery of a cultivated audience in the 
Xorth, master the rally ? 

I began to notice groups of rather quietly-dressed 
colored people, men and women and children, has- 
tening across the fields and along the road toward the 
church, which I could now discern in its shimmering 
whiteness set like a beacon at the utmost top of Zion 
Hill. As we neared the neat little building, Mr. Wash- 
ington ran a very gauntlet of greetings, grotesque but 
genuine, greetings which he scrupulously acknowl- 
edged with a certain shyness which could not quite 
conceal a glow of appreciation. 

At the door of the church the parson, robust and 
dark as night, and good humored, met us. As Prin- 
cipal Washington entered, the choir started up " Swing 
Low, Sweet Chariot," but every eye in the congrega- 
tion, despite the seductions of the song, was fixed 
upon the Moses of the Negro people. The congrega- 
tion, sociologically considered, was transitional : the 
gray-haired, gentle-mannered freedman rubbed shoul- 
ders with the smartly-attired New Issue ; the black 
mammy of the old regime, with beaming face and 
snowy apron, sat without her 'kerchief, — for even she 
has become adjusted to the new order of things — be- 
side the ribbon-bedecked, bright-eyed school girl. 
And the tactful pastor, himself a product of the 
schools and freedom, has kept this place a solace for 
the older generation, and a church for the new. 

After another hymn by the choir and prayer by a 
visiting preacher, the pastor arose in quiet dignity 
to introduce the speaker of the occasion. Reverend 
Gadsen in clear, mellow tones expressed the gratitude 
of his congregation for Mr. Washington's long-con- 
tinued and substantially-expressed interest in them, 
their church and their school — for this congregation 
helps support the Booker T. Washington Public 
School. " Our people," said the pastor, " in their 
preparation for the next world have not forgotten this 
world." And to the evident delight of the guest he 
read a long list of members of the church, who, since 
Mr. Washington's last visit, had bought land, built 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



779 



comfortable homes, painted their houses, developed 
vegetable gardens, begun poultry raising on a larger 
scale, etc. " And there is a brother here to-day," said 
the preacher, looking with a broad smile, while the 
congregation tittered, into the face of a serious voung 
man who sang a shrill tenor in the choir, " there is a 
brother here to-day who painted his house red all 
over this week, so that Mr. Washington, when he came 
to-day, wouldn't think that John lived in an unpainted 
house! " 

After another plantation melody — not a coon song, 
but a genuine plantation melody, unordered and to 
alien ears grotesque, but strangely touching — Prin- 
cipal Washington rose to speak. In his hand was 
that inevitable pencil, and on his face the gentlest smile 
of a stern father who 'wants his children to. be joyful 
occasionally, but always to be sensible, prudent and 
mature. " I rejoice with you," he said, " in your suc- 
cesses, but in your jubilations do not forget the vic- 
tories yet to be won." And then for an hour, to the 
most attentive listeners I have ever seen, he talked 
simply and directly of some of the ways in which they 
could raise the level of their lives. He emphasized 
in minute and telling detail the subtle influence for 
wholesome family life of a comfortable house with its 
gardens of vegetables, its orchard, its pigs and its 
poultry. The deeper sources of social enjoyment are 
in the home, not in the en masse activities of the camp 
meeting and the street. Then, too, the evils of the 
Negro habit of pouring the plantation on court day 
into the gallery of the court room, there to satiate a 
morbid curiosity in the older folks, and develop it in 
the young, were outlined with illustrations, humor- 
ously pathetic, drawn from life — outlined and effect- 
ively denounced. That frailty of taking the quarrels 
of the children to the court for settlement did not elude 
the speaker's fearful irony; he expressed his delight in 
the admirable custom of the judge to fine, with in- 
variable generosity, both defendant and plaintiff ! 
Nor had the searching eye of Mr. Washington failed 
to note the effect of the Saturday excursion to town, 
upon the sales of the dispensary ; ten years ago the 
deacons felt, and now some more youthful members 
of the church feel, in conscience bound to support that 
dispensary, when the wives and children could put 
the nickels and dimes and quarters to infinitely better 
use than does the bar-keeper! And, of course, I\lr. 
Washington paid his respects to the " hollerin' preach- 
er " — the fellow who has an idea that the Almighty 
is a bit deaf, and who therefore fiercely paws the 
Bible, and lifts his voice to the very skies. The " hol- 
lerin' preacher" has gone out of business, at least in 
this community; and this congregation must decently 
support their more modern minister. Finally, the 
speaker emphasized the importance of using the church 
as an instrument for ennobling the actual life of the 



community, and cited as a case in point the practice 
of this church to help support the public school. 

I have spoken of Mr. Washington's noble mastery 
of the Madison Square Garden audience, and of his 
eloquence there, but I am tempted to feel that at the 
rally of the Baptist church on Zion Hill that memo- 
rable Sunday, he displayed in his homely sympathy and 
common sense, an equal, though different eloquence. 
For the heart of Tuskegee's principal, unaffected by 
what men regard as the greater affairs of the spacious 
world, is with the poor and lowly of his people. And 
they strive to realize his ideas, to be sensible and pru- 
dent and mature, because in many ways he is to them 
a father. 

SKILLED ESKIMOS. 



A heavy harpoon line, used in the hunt for securing 
walruses, is made of the skin of the " square flipper " 
seal, an animal about eight feet long. For such use 
the skin is not removed from the seal in the usual way, 
but is pulled off without cutting it, as one might pull 
off a wet stocking. The whole hide is thus preserved 
in the form of a sack. It is then placed in the water 
and allowed to remain there several days, until the 
thin, outer black skin becomes decomposed. This, to- 
gether with the hair, is readily pulled off, and a clean, 
white pelt remains. 

Two men then take the pelt in hand, and with a 
sharp knife cut it into one long, even white line by be- 
ginning at one end and cutting round and round until 
they reach the other end. One skin will make three 
hundred feet of line. In this condition it is allowed 
partially to "dry, after which it is tightly stretched and 
dried thoroughly in the sun. The result is a hard, 
even, white line, three-eighths of an inch in diameter, 
but equal in strength to a heavy Manila rope. 

I have seen such a line imbedded in the flesh of a 
walrus at one end and spiked to the hard ice at the out- 
er end by a stout iron pin. Held by six men. it plowed 
a furrow six inches deep through the ice, bent the spike 
and dragged the six men to the edge of the ice, where 
the tug of war ended ; the victorious walrus took the 
unbreakable line with him into the sea. 

Finer lines, such as those used for fishing or for 
winding whipstocks. ami thread for sewing purposes, 
are manufactured from rainbow sinew. The best is 
that obtained from along the spine, which is always 
saved from the carcass. The Eskimo prepares it by 
drying it and then rubbing it until it grows quite soft. 
Then it is readily flayed out into the libers which are 
used for needlework. 

When coarser thread is required, these individual 
fibers are plaited together with wonderful neatness and 
rapidity. One woman can make fifty or sixty yards of 
this thread in a dav. 



780 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



COUNTRY BOY IN THE CITY. 



At first thought it would be natural that the city 
boy has the best chance to succeed in the city. He 
knows the streets, the prominent officials and business 
men, at least by repute, and, above all, he is acquainted 
with city ways of doing business. He has appar- 
ently every advantage in the start, and ought to make 
a success of town life. 

And yet the undoubted fact remains that the country 
boy who comes to the city will outstrip his city cousin 
nearly every time. Why this is so looks like a conun- 
drum ; but it is not so difficult a matter to solve, after 
all. 

The country boy succeeds mainly because he is not 
afraid of hard work. Perhaps the city boy does not 
appreciate what an easy time he has. His school is 
just around the corner, and he does not have to get up 
before seven o'clock in the morning, and his evenings 
are his own for study or play as it may be. He wears 
good clothes, has plenty of holidays, and there is al- 
ways something in the way of amusement going on. 
He has practically no chores to do, and altogether he 
leads a very pleasant existence. - 

In the country the boy goes to school six months in 
the year and works the other six. He begins to do 
chores about the time he is able to walk, and by the 
time he is ten is doing enough to appall the average 
city boy. 

He learns to plant potatoes and corn and other crops. 
He may complain about his back hurting him. Why, 
that's good for boys — makes 'em grow ! He thinks the 
kink will never come out of his spinal column, and the 
next morning when they rout him out of bed before 
sun up to go to the field for another day till it is too 
dark to see, he is as stiff as a chair. Oh, that's all 
right ! It will do him good. 

Just as soon as he is big enough to hold the plow in 
the furrow, he has to get at it ; and if there is hard- 
er and hotter work than plowing an old cornfield on a 
May day, he does not think it has been revealed. 
Pitching hay makes every muscle ache, but he must 
keep up. Then there are harvesting and threshing; 
and he pulls through them, too, though he falls asleep 
over his supper. There is husking corn, when the 
frosty shucks saw through his chapped skin. There 
are milking and feeding, and a whole lot of chores that 
must be done, whether the boy has worked eighteen 
hours that day or not. If he works in a country store 
he opens up at about five in the morning and goes to 
bed behind or under the counter at ten or eleven at 
night. 

But the country boy is not killed by hard work, and 
when he comes into the city and gets a place where 
he has to open the store at seven in the morning and 
put up the shutters at seven or eight at night, he thinks 
it fun. 



The city boy's perceptions are quicker; his intellect 
has a wider range, and his judgment is fully as good 
as the country boy's ; but he has not the energy and 
perseverance of his sturdy rival, and he does not know 
so well how to save money, for he does not appreciate 
its value. 

The country boy hardly knows what it is to have a 
penny to spend on luxuries. Many a farmer's son 
has never had an entire dollar of his own until he is 
well on in his teens. To such a boy a weekly wage 
of four or five dollars seems like a fortune, and when, 
by dint of saving, he accumulates a hundred dollars, 
he feels that his future is assured. 

He is not afraid of hard work ; he is industrious and 
saving. With the desire to learn comes the power, 
and it does not take him long to master the intricacies 
of business. He feels that this is his life-work, and he 
is not deterred by any obstacle, however great. 

Is it wonderful, then, that the country boy often 
succeeds where the city boy fails? Of course, it is 
not claimed that all, or that the majority of, city boys 
fail ; that would be absurd : but it is beyond question 
that city boys do not use their opportunities as they 
should. They have not enough ambition, or rather, 
perhaps, that quality which has been called " stick-to-it- 
iveness." 

* ♦ * 

RUBBER. 

That " Necessity is the mother of Invention " is 
proved over and over again in the history of nations. 
As our forests go before the woodman's ax, we' dive 
into the earth for coal and petroleum, and into the air 
for electricity ; and as our timber is becoming scarce, 
from the carpenter's standpoint, the man of thought- 
is furnishing us paper, iron, cement, brick, tiling and 
other materials from which to construct our homes. 
So, as one demand comes, a supply follows, and as the 
world progresses other demands come and other sup- • 
plies are made in accordance. 

Only a few years ago most of the men in the United 
States wore leather boots, but at the passing away of 
the boots, being supplanted by the shoe, it was quite 
necessary that we have rubber shoes manufactured in 
order to protect these light leather shoes from the 
rough weather. In order to furnish the world with 
rubber shoes, rubber had to be obtained. It was found 
that in some countries, for instance, in Central Africa, 
East Central South America and some parts of Mex- 
ico, and the Island of Ceylon, there is a plant 
which, if cultivated, produces a great quantity of ma- 
terial from which this rubber is made. Of course in 
the beginning it was found in its natural state but it 
very soon came under successful agriculture, and it 
has been demonstrated already that the world is self- 
supporting on this question. 



THE INGLEXOOK.— August 16. 1904. 



781 



The men have practically abandoned the use of rub- 
ber shoes, but the women, wearing light weight shoes, 
need protection against the wet and cold seasons. 
When one knows of the immense quantity of rubber 
goods that we are consuming by the trade, and would 
now notice the decrease in the consumption of rubber 
goods for footwear, he would suppose that the mar- 
ket would be flooded beyond the power of the public 
to again set it in action. But such is not the case. 
There is a constant increasing demand caused by the 
rapid development of the electrical industry. For in- 
stance, in the last twenty years the use of electricity 
has been many times doubled, and knowing as we do, 
by experience, that rubber is one of the finest insula- 
tors and nonconductors, thousands and hundreds of 
thousands of miles of wire are wrapped each year, and 
this more than makes up for the trade that formerly 
was had in footwear. 

It is said that the plantations in Mexico and South 
America are being enlarged, and in Ceylon many 
flourishing plantations are now found where the trees 
are raised from the seeds and in some places real nur- 
series are found similar to our fruit tree nurseries in 
this country, and where these little trees are raised 
from the seed and then transplanted, the fact is de- 
monstrated that this resource will not soon be ex- 
hausted. And we are in no immediate danger of a rub- 
ber famine so long as capital can be interested in these 
plantations. In this, like other cases, capital and rub- 
ber must be united. 

* *, ♦ 

HALE'S FIRE FIGHTERS. 



The most thrilling exhibition of the art of battling 
with fire that has ever been given is that furnished by 
Chief Hale and his splendid company at the west end 
of the Pike at the St. Louis Fair. The exhibition takes 
place in a great enclosed arena in which a great pano- 
rama of New York City is shown. Feats of dexterity 
in responding to alarms, hose coupling, quick hitching 
and many kindred acts are shown by men who hold 
the world's record for speed. Nor are the men the 
only actors in the drama. Chief Hale has an auxiliary 
company of trained horses whose intelligence seems 
human. The strange sight of horses dashing at 
hoops of fire and leaping through them is an illus- 
tration of what may be done with such intelligent ani- 
mals. 

The performance proper begins when New York 
City is enshrouded in night. At one end of the arena 
is seen the fire station. The firemen are asleep in their 
beds ; the horses munching the hay in their stalls. Sud- 
dently an explosion occurs in a five story house directly 
in front of the audience. Flames and smoke pour from 
the windows, in which soon appear white-robed figures 
appealing for help. An alarm is turned in by a police- 



man. The audience hears the gong in the station and 
the latter place is a scene of excitement instantly. Men 
leap from their beds and, sliding down the brass poles 
to the floor below, catch and hitch the flying horses. 
In an instant the apparatus is out of the house and 
speeding to the scene of the fire. Ladders and hose are 
run up to the top of the burning building, the helpless 
occupants are taken down by life lines and other con- 
trivances and the whole scene is of so realistic and 
thrilling a character that it is indeed difficult to realize 
that it is merely a performance, not an actual scene. 

In addition to the fire-fighting performance there is 
much for the visitor to see in the museum attached to 
the building. A fire -engine purchased by George 
Washington for the Alexandria, Va., Fire Department 
in 1764 stands alongside of the " Torrent," an engine 
which the traitor, Benedict Arnold, often assisted to 
operate. Many other antique pieces of fire apparatus 
line the sides of the building and in the center are the 
most perfect specimens of modern engines. Hale's 
Fire Fighters give a performance that is at once in- 
structive and amusing. 

WHY ICE DOESN'T SINK. 



It is one of the most extraordinary things in this 
extraordinary world, writes Henry Martyn Hart in a 
magazine, that water should be the sole exception to the 
otherwise universal law that all cooling bodies contract 
and therefore increase in density. 

Water contracts as its temperature falls and there- 
fore becomes heavier, and sinks until it reaches 39 de- 
grees. At this temperature water is the heaviest ; this 
is the point of its maximum density. From this point it 
begins to expand. Therefore in winter, although the 
surface may be freezing at a temperature of 32 degrees, 
the water at the bottom of the pool is six or seven de- 
grees warmer. 

Suppose that water, like everything else, had gone 
on contracting as it cooled until it reached the freezing 
point ; the heaviest water would have sunk to the low- 
est place and there become ice. Although it is true 
that eight pints of water become nine pints of ice, and 
therefore icebergs float, showing above the surface an 
eighth of their bulk, still, had the water when at the 
bottom turned into ice, the stones would have locked 
it in their interstices and held it there, and before win- 
ter was over, the whole pool would have become solid 
ice and all I he poor fish would be entombed in clear, 
beautiful crystal. 

* * + 

For it stirs the blood in an old man's heart. 

And makes his pulses fly, 
To catch the thrill of a happy voice. 

And the light of a pleasant eye. — Willis. 



7 8 2 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



felNSLtKSOK. 



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Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



A POTTER. 



Just as you enter the Damascus gate in the north 
wall of the city of Jerusalem, and turn to the left a 
few steps, you find there within the wall the shop of 
an old potter, who has been turning out products from 
his wheel, lo ! these many years. With eagerness we 
watched him make pots and jars of various sizes, 
shapes and kinds. He had only one kind of clay, and 
he tempered all the clay in one vat. He had but one 
wheel, and it was run by the same foot power. He 
had only one furnace, and every piece of earthenware 
was burned in the same fire. But how many different 
kinds of vessels he did turn out ! 

Notwithstanding the years of experience he had, oc- 
casionally he would mar or dint one of his choicest 
vessels, and in an instant of half disgust and half sur- 
prise, he would, with one clap of his hands, crush :he 
vessel into a ball of mud, throw it upon the wheel, start 
it in motion, moisten his hands and try it over again. 
When the finished vessel suited the eye of the artist, 
as to perfection, it was set away to dry, preparatory 
to being placed in the furnace. We -watched and 
wondered and meditated. We thought, How like is 
life ; each man a little ball of clay ; each man himself 
a potter, the old wheel of time constantly, silently and 
carefully turning away the years. Each ball of mud 
was tempered alike ; each man comes upon the stage 
of action through the gateway of birth ; hence " all 
men are created equal," all the same kind of mud, 
all being turned upon the old wheel of time, all being 
fashioned by the hand of some potter, all awaiting the 
crucible furnace to test the mechanism. Could we but 



realize how it is that day by day, as the wheel of 
time turns, we are slowly, but surely, fashioning the 
vessel that we are to be in future years, the probabili- 
ties are that we would be more careful in the execution 
of the vessel. And could we stand back and see the 
vessel as it appears to the observer — in other words, 
" could we see ourselves as others see us " — we prob- 
ably would change its fashion. 

The good Book tells us that we can make one 
vessel unto honor and one unto dishonor. This is 
true. The potter may have made a vessel for the re- 
ception of holy wine which commemorates the shed- 
ding of the blood of the Savior, or the vessel may be 
made to hold the intoxicating drink which condemns 
both body and soul. So may we be transformed, while 
we are being tempered by the powers of the Higher 
Influence, to be receptacles for the higher life, or we 
may be fashioned by the influence of the evil one until 
we become receptacles for base desires, evil communi- 
cations and corrupt thoughts. 

Characters, like buildings, are built one brick at a 
time, and when once fashioned cannot be remodeled 
except by being completely torn down and built anew, 
which in ordinary cases costs as much as if not more 
than, a new building. So it is impossible to make a 
good character out of a bad one. The only way is to 
tear down the old life and begin a new one. The ex- 
perience of years that come to us, serves the same pur- 
pose in our lives as the 'action of the sun does upon 
the potter's clay. It gets it ready for the fiery trials 
of the furnace which are sure to come. As a piece of, 
pottery cannot be transformed after it is burned, so 
are our characters hard to change when once thev 
have been formed. 

We noticed our old friend, the potter, could very 
easily take a ruined vessel when it was in the green, 
and remould or remodel into a new one, but after it had 
been burned, and it was imperfect, small or large, there 
was no recourse and it had to be broken, for it could 
not be made over. It was fit for nothing but to be 
ground to dust and used for mortar in the walls of 
the city. l So it is with us. After our characters have 
been fashioned by the evil one and we have become 
case-hardened in sin and iniquity and immorality, it 
is next to impossible ever to remould or refashion our 
characters and make them fit for the higher class of 
society or the spiritual development which Christianity 
demands. 

STROMBOLI. 



About a half a day's ride from Naples, Italy, toward 
the southern point of the country, on a good steamship, 
brings you in sight of the " Lighthouse of the Mediter- 
ranean." Stromboli is an active volcano submerged in 
the waters of the sea, except the apex of the cone 
which is at a sufficient height above the water to make 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



783 



a beautiful light tower. Almost as accurately as the 
ticking of a watch does the old lighthouse emit her 
volumes of fire, every fifteen minutes. The tourist al- 
most goes into ecstasy as he leans over the taffrail and 
watches the convulsions of the old mountain, four 
times an hour. He willingly awaits the intervening 
moments in contemplation and meditation just to see 
the next repetition of the same thing. It is visible at 
least an hour before the vessel reaches it, and you can 
see it for an hour after the vessel has passed, making 
such impressions, that when once seen they are never 
forgotten. 

It is hard to say just how high these volumes of fire 
are thrown into the air, but it is generally supposed 
from fifteen to thirty feet. These pulsations generally 
come two at a time ; however, not always, but always 
come fifteen minutes apart. The volcano throws out 
fire, smoke, molten lava and ashes, and this stream of 
molten stuff, according to the way the wind is blowing, 
flows down the side of the mountain like a little river 
of fire, and one eagerly watches it until it dies out in 
the darkness of the night. 

One of the interesting things about the mountain is, 
that there are three small cities or towns lo- 
cated at the base of the apex of the cone just 
above the water line, each of which has about 
twelve or fourteen hundred inhabitants. This 
seems almost incredible, yet it is true, and any- 
one passing by in the daytime can easily see them, and 
those passing by night may behold the illumination, 
and one is compelled to believe his own eyes, and yet 
he wonders how many thousands of millions of dollars 
it would take to hire him to live in such jeopardy. It 
seems like open murder and suicide to think of casting 
one's lot in such a place, and yet hundreds of people 
live right there on the top of this volcano in the middle 
of the sea. Who knows what moment it will be wholly 
submerged? Who knows what moment an explosion 
will split the mountain from base to summit and the 
waters of the angry sea roll in on the inhabitants like 
Mount Pelee of the Martinique disaster or old Ve- 
suvius of Pompeian days, when brought face to face 
with jeopardy? In this sort of way one's blood almost 
curdles and refuses to circulate, but due meditation 
and reflection brings one to himself sufficiently that he 
can recall the fact that we do the very same things at 
home in an equally cold-blooded way, with just as little 
concern, and very little is said about it ; in fact, the 
public hardly notices the situation. A few people are 
awakening to the fact that we are in danger, but they 
are very few comparatively speaking. 

We have narrowly escaped the evils of slavery, and 
as the days go by we more heartily appreciate our free- 
dom from it ; but, like the people of Johnstown, we 
have been warned again and again of the danger of in- 
temperance, and yet we trudge leisurely on, not heed- 



ing the warnings of those who awake to the fate of 
the nations and laughing at their earnest endeavors to 
free us from the embrace of death. 

Thousands of men who would shudder at the thought 
of building a home on Stromboli would, without hes- 
itancy, build their home right across the street from a 
saloon, gambling den or hell-hole and run all the risks 
or social, domestic, moral or spiritual contamination, 
and never dream of placing their feet in the devil's 
traps. 

In this world a great deal depends upon getting used 
to things. We see things sometimes that startle us, 
and then when we see them again and again we become 
accustomed to them and they appeal no longer to our 
conscience as being a source of danger, and we do not 
feel that we should be constantly watchful. 

And, too, such things stealthily creep upon us be- 
cause, as a rule, they are concealed, or partlv concealed, 
by the cover of some social fad or charitable institution 
and sometimes wear the cloak of Christianity, to such 
an extent that they seem perfectly safe, and we pass 
them by without criticism. 

«|r ,$. «$, 

THE WRONG TITLE. 



It has always been customary to speak of other life 
than humanity, as the lower animals, and yet when 
their characteristics are studied on a fair and square 
basis, in comparison to that of man, it just seems ap- 
parently that they have the wrong epitaph. 

Man is the only one of the whole lot that shows by 
his action to have lower ideals, lower sentiments than 
the rest. 

To illustrate : How many of the lower animals do 
you suppose could be taught to chew tobacco, eat 
pickles or drink cocktails? How many of them could 
you take with you to one of our first-class hotels and 
have them enjoy a menu as it reads? You could nlace 
a hot coffee pot in every dog kennel in the country 
and yet you could not teach a dog to drink coffee. It 
would be hardly possible for you to teach your fa- 
vorite horse to eat ice-cream. You could lay a chew 
of tobacco by the gate-post or doorstep till after church 
is out and not a dog in town would molest it. You 
could leave your box of cigars open for a week and 
not a rat or a mouse would indulge in your luxury. 

Of course you could shut a hog up in a pen and 
compel him to wallow in the mud, but a man will 
do it out of choice, and if you had a stream of whiskey 
as big as the Amazon river flowing down through the 
United States, man would be the only animal in all 
God's creation that would go crazy over it. 

No, man is the only animal that is capable of doing 
such unreasonable life-killing things; the only one that 
cares to be disobedient to nature and is willing to pay 
the price of disobedience. 



784 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



CURRENT HAPPENINGS 



At a family reunion at Beaver, Pa., last week, forty 
persons died of ptomaine poison, from eating ice 
cream. 

* *> ♦> 

The population of Ireland,, fifty years ago, was eight 
millions. The recent census reports it to be four and 
a half millions. 

* * * 

In Paris there is one police to every three hundred 
and seven persons ; in London to every four hundred 
and eight, and in New York one to every four hundred 
and fifty-eight. 

<£ * * 

Perhaps few of us realize how large Russia is ; she 
is twice and a half as large as the United States and 
Alaska combined. She has thirty thousand miles of 
seacoast, one-half of which is ice bound. 
<$» ♦ *$• 

August 8, at Pueblo, Colo., another horrible train 
accident occurred in which over 100 lives were lost. 
First reports were that one hundred and twenty-five 
had been fatally wounded or killed outright, but the 
latest news say that one hundred and six is the correct 
number. Be it as it may, it is a horrible disaster. The 
World's Fair special on the Denver and Rio Grande 
was passing over a high bridge at a good rate of speed 
and the fireman with torch in hand was endeavoring 
to inspect the condition of the track, knowing about 
the rain and rising waters from the north, when all 
at once, without notice, the entire bridge, train and all 
went down with a crash. Bodies of the unfortunates 
were found for miles below along the stream. This 
is another link in the great chain of horrors and dis- 
asters of the year. 

The last reports from the seat of war is that the 
deadly work at Port Arthur has been resumed. The 
world wonders what the result will be ; both armies 
are well worn and fatigued and have plunged both 
governments hopelessly in debt. 

* * * 

1 An aged lawyer of New York, Judge McCune. who 
so mysteriously disappeared some weeks ago, is still 
missing, and his friends are greatly alarmed. 

The coining of the silver dollar by the United 
States government is now a thing of the past. Special 
provision for such coinage made by the Sherman Sil- 
ver Act expired last week. Best authorities say that 
henceforth the dollar paper bills will be the sole out- 
put of that denomination. 



Admiral Taylor of the United States Navy died 
recently of peritonitis, at the general hospital at Cop- 
percliff, Ontario. He commanded the battleship " In- 
diana " at the siege of Santiago. 



A tunnel twenty-five miles long, reaching a depth 
of eighteen hundred feet below the sea level, is con- 
templated between Vacqueros Bay, Spain, and Tan- 
gier, Africa. If this project is carried into effect it 
will be the deepest tunnel in the world. Another one 
beneath the river Elbe, at Hamburg, Germany, is 
planned to provide a more satisfactory connection be- 
tween the two sides of the harbor. A Frankfort firm 
has a bid of $1,700,000 on the job. 
* * »s 

The government has just put out a new Philippine 
coin ; it is worth about half a cent in our money and 
is called a centavo. They are rather pretty in ap- 
pearance, even better looking than our coin. They are 
about the size of a $2.50 gold piece, one side bearing 
the figure of a man seated at an anvil, looking out 
over the sea at a mountain in the distance. The re- 
verse side bears a spread eagle resting on a shield 

•fr ♦ ♦> 

Washington Monument was struck by lightning 
the other day. It has been struck a number of times 
before, but always happened to be struck when no one 
was in it. But this last time there were plentv of 
people inside to report what the sensation seemed like 
to them. The big elevator inside, which usually .oc- 
cupies fifteen minutes in ascent or descent, was about 
half way down when the bolt struck the monument. 
It extinguished' all the electric lights, burned out all 
the 'phone boxes and frightened the people in the 
elevator almost to fits. No serious damage done. 
«$» *j» * 

A very ingenious method is employed in the Philip- 
pines to secure an adequate amount of gas. Cocoanut 
oil, which is one of their staple native products, is 
slowly fed into strong cast iron retorts ; afterwards 
these retorts are brought to a red heat in furnaces. 
This produces a very high quality of illuminating gas, 
free from smoke and tar. 

It is said in the Electrical Review that the Marconi 
interests in Canada, have successfully completed .ne- 
gotiations with the government there for the estab- 
lishment of a system of seven wireless telegraph sta- 
tions between Montreal and the straits of Belle Isle, 
as an aid to navigation. Four of these stations will 
be in operation by the end of this month, and the 
whole system by the beginning of the year. All pas- 
senger ships in these waters will be equipped with 
signaling and. receiving apparatus. 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



785 



The postmaster at Pleasant Hill, W. Va., was 
caught by post office inspectors and charged with 
sending circular letters through the mail, claiming that 
he was an engraver, and was proposing to use bank 
notes at one dollar for ten dollars' worth of spurious 
money. In his correspondence are to be found the 
names of people from all parts of the country. 

* * * 

It is expected in the near future that the paper 
makers in the country will join in the union strike 
unless special concessions are made by the employers. 
Especially is this true for Fox river valley near Ap- 
pleton, Mich. 

Reports from Berlin, Germany, say that the Em-' 
pire is suffering a severe drought, and that the crops 
are damaged badly. Some of the newspapers of Ger- 
many contain pictures of people exploring the river 
bed at Dresden, where the river may be crossed on 
foot. Some eight hundred canal boats are lying 
stranded in the river Oder, above Berlin, and thirty- 
eight coal boats are unable to discharge their cargo 
because the river boats cannot operate. 
$ 4* $ 

The most beautiful volume in the Congressional Li- 
brary at Washington City is a Bible which was tran- 
scribed on parchment, by a monk, in the sixteenth 
century. The lettering is in the German text and each 
letter is perfect ; there is not a scratch or blot from 
lid to lid. Each chapter begins with a large illumina- 
ted letter in which is drawn a figure of a saint, some 
incident of whose life the chapter tells. 

* * * 

The Czar of Russia has telegraphed Mr. Witte, 
President of the Russian Council of Ministers, of- 
fering him the position of Minister of the Interior, 
which office is now vacant by the assassination of 
Von Plehve. 

* * * 

Capetown, South Africa, is to have an internation- 
al industrial exposition, to continue for three months, 
opening next November. The government proposes 
to make splendid exhibits, and to offer prizes for the 
best products. 

* * * 

Last year the Kansas river floods destroyed twenty 
million dollars' worth of property and about one hun- 
dred lives. The Bureau of Forestry urges the plant- 
ing of trees as a preventative. The Kaw river 
changes its course so often and so quickly that it 
proves disastrous to the surrounding country. It is 
hoped that by planting Cottonwood trees, which are of 
a quick growth, on either side of the belt of about two 
hundred and fifty feet, they will serve as a protection 
against this continual changing of the bed channel. 



The first annual reunion of the United States- 
Spanish war veterans will be held at St. Louis instead 
of Indianapolis, on account of the failure to get stop- 
over privileges from the railroads. 

* * * 

At El Paso, Texas, under the Santa Fe station 
were found eight large sticks of dynamite and two 
dozen nitroglycerin caps, so arranged that a heavv 
jar would cause them to explode. As yet no one 
knows the object nor the perpetrators. 

* * * 

A new fuel is being manufactured in California 
which is made from twigs and leaves of the eucalyptus 
tree, mixed with crude petroleum. It is said to burn 
freely and give good results. This timber is said to 
be immune from the attack of the teredo, and there- 
fore piles are made from it which last, it is said, much 
longer than the yellow pine. The demand for them 
is greater than the supply at the present time. 
•2* ♦ * 

The farmers in the Yakima Valley of Washington, 
have planted one thousand acres of cantaloupes this 
season. The lands are irrigated and produce excep- 
tionally fine specimens of these sweet canta- 
loupes. On this kind of land they ought to be able 
to produce from three hundred to four hundred crates 
of muskmelons to the acre. Their greatest trouble is 
that they will have to be carried to the Eastern cities 
for market, which will cost from $1.50 to $3 per crate 
for transportation. But of course in our modern re- 
frigerator cars and rapid transit, they are supposed to 
arrive in good condition. 

-j. -:♦ .$. 

Another flying machine has been invented by one 
Mr. John P. Holland, who is the successful inventor 
of the submarine torpedo boat. His apparatus differs 
greatly from the other flying machines, in that it 
consists of wings with bamboo frames, and the enlire 
weight of the thing will not exceed twenty-five pounds. 
It is very simple in construction, and he vows that 
any man can use it on sight. He said that it will not 
necessarily cost more than ten dollars. He also states 
that it would be no difficult matter to go from Xew 
York to Chicago in a day. Thirty-four years of his 
valuable life has been spent on the flying machine prob- 
lem. This is the fifth different principle that he has 
tried, the other four having failed. He works several 
years on each principle before giving it up. Before 
he attempted the fifth aeroplane, he spent a few years 
on the study of the flight of birds, after which he has 
modeled his new machine. ( >f course lie holds back 
the details of the construction until the government 
grants him a patent. If Mr. Holland succeeds as lie 
thinks, tin's will help Chicago ami New York to solve 
their transit problems. 



786 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 






Xt .t, ,Ti rTi ttt *t 
rTTTT J 



The Inglenook Nature' Study Club 

This Department of the Inglenook is the organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized 
over this country. Each issue of the magazine will be complete in itself. Clubs may be organized at any time, 
taking the work up with the current issue. Back numbers cannot be furnished. Any school desiring to or- 
ganize a club can ascertain the methods of procedure by addressing the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin, 111. 



AVES.— (Class.) 

Insessores. — (Order.) Swallow. — (Family.) Type.- 

(The Swift.) 



The Swallow family is characterized by their great 
power of wing, wide mouths, and short legs. The 
plumage of their bodies is firm and close ; their wing 
feathers are long and stiff, and pointed, and their tails 
are long, and forked ; all of which are adapted to great 
speed. There are four principal branches of the Swal- 
low family. The Swift is the type. He is sometimes 
called the Chimney Swallow. Then there are the Barn 
and Bank Swallows, which are so well known to the 
most of us, as we have seen them so many times 
around our barns and along the creek. 

The Swift, which is sometimes called the " Jack 
Screamer," spends the most of his time on the wing, 
wheeling with wonderful velocity, occasionally soar- 
ing very high, and uttering his shrill screams. He 
captures great quantities of insects to give to his 
young, retaining them in a kind of pouch under the 
tongue. 

Our Chimney Swallow is a little fellow, and general- 
ly goes and comes in flocks, and builds his nest in the 
hollow of some old trees or in an unused chimney, and 
a great many times he uses a chimney that is in con- 
stant use by the family. These birds seem to have 
great sport when the time comes to go to roost. 

They will all circle round and round a great many 
times and finally those that are nearest the chimney 
will fall into the chimney and so on, until they are all 
in, and in the meantime they all keep up a constant 
chatter as if they were in the greatest glee. When the 
Chimney Swallows are making their migrations they 
often gather by the thousands and roost for several 
nights in the same place before they scatter out to their J 
respective places of nesting. Prof. Audubon once / 
found an old sycamore tree down by Louisville, Ky.,j 
where they had often had a rendezvous as they came ' 
and went from the warmer to the cooler climes and| 
vice versa. He went one morning to see them come} 
from the hollow of the tree where they had roosted the • 
night before and he says that by his watch it took them 
more than thirty minutes to leave the tree in a perfect I 
black stream so one can but faintly imagine the real 
number of birds that will accumulate in such a place. 

The nest of the Chimney Swallow is a nice specimen 



of workmanship. It is composed of only a few sticks 
but is nicely woven and the sticks which are laid up 
similar to a rail fence are all glued together at the cor- 
ners by a secretion of the salivary glands of the bird. 

The Bank Swallow, or Sand Martin as he is some- 
times called, is also called the Republican Swallow, as 
he builds his nests by the hundreds on the side of a 
bank or cliff and the nest is in the shape of a gourd 
and is of fine construction. They come together and 
go together and live as a family, hence the name. 

The Barn Swallow spends his summer months amid 
the rafters of the farmer's barn in a most comfortable 
nest made carefully and artistically of mud and nicely 
lined with the choice feathers which he is able to find 
here and there around the barnyard. Did you ever try 
to watch him as he flies around in the evening? Can 
you follow him with your eye? He almost baffles the 
quickest eye in his skillful curves and zigzags ; and yet 
he flits on, untiringly, mounting and falling, skim- 
ming and sailing, until the eye is tired of the endless 
circuit. 

The Edible Swallow is not a native here and there- 
fore is more or less a stranger to the most of us. But 
he is well known to the Chinese people, for they hunt 
him very successfully. They will pay great prices for 
the nest of this bird. They use it as an article of diet. 
The bird in constructing the nest secretes a gelatinous 
fluid which when soaked in water and dissolved makes 
a very rich soup, which the Chinese prize very highly. 

*t* ♦ +> 

A REMARKABLE BIRD. 



j After seventy-five years of captivity, a female eagle 
6wl has just died in an aviary in England. Brought 
from Norway in 1829, this bird within the last thirty 
years has reared no less than ninety young. Although 
the eagle owl is reputed to live to a great age, there 
appear to be" but a few recorded instances where the 
age could be definitely ascertained. A golden eagle 
which died at Vienna in 1719 was known to have 
been captured one hundred and four years previously, 
and a falcon, of what species is not recorded, is said 
to have attained an age of one hundred and sixty- 
kwo years. A white-headed vulture taken in 1706 
died in the zoological gardens at Vienna in 1824, thus 
living one hundred and eighteen years in captivity. 






THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



787 



NON-DRINKING ANIMALS. 



It is news that there are several other creatures 
beside the camel able to get along for extended periods 
without drinking. Sheep in the southwestern deserts 
of America go for forty to sixty days in winter with- 
out drink, grazing on the green, succulent vegetation 
of that season. 

Peccaries in the desert of Sonora live in little dry 
hills, where there is no natural water for long periods. 
They cannot possibly find water, in fact, for months 
at a time. The only moisture they can obtain comes 
from roots and the fruits of cacti. 

But the most extraordinary case is that of the pocket 
mouse, one of the common rodents of the desert. 

This little creature, by the way, has a genuine fur- 
lined " pocket " on the outside of his cheek. When it 
is hungry, it takes food from this pocket with its paw, 
just as a man would pull a ham sandwich from his 
pocket. 

One of these mice has been kept for three years with 
no other food than the mixed birdseed of commerce. 
During this period it had not a taste of either water 
or green food. 

Other experimenters have found, in fact, that these 
mice in captivity refuse such treats, not seeming to 
know that water is good to drink. 

The birdseed put before this mouse contained not 
more than ten per cent of moisture, which is less than 
is necessary for digestion. Stuff so dry as this can- 
not even be swallowed until it is moistened by saliva. 

Yet this remarkable mouse gave nothing but his time 
to the interests of science. 

He suffered nothing in health or spirits during his 
captivity. The " absolutely abstemious age " of 
which Edward Lear wrote is completely out-classed. 

The question is seriously raised whether this mouse 
is provided with a condensing apparatus by which it 
is able to absorb moisture from the atmosphere. At 
night, and in the burrows, the humidity is much high- 
er than in the daytime above ground, but it never 
reaches the dew point. 

These interesting facts of natural history suggest 
possibilities in the way of cures for the incorrigible 
inebriate. 

It might be possible — there is no limit to the powers 
of science — to inoculate the inebriate with the blood 
of the pocket mouse, and relieve him of the thirst which 
at present requires pints of beer to assuage. 
* It would be too much to hope that the inebriate 
would also become capable of living, like the mouse, 
exclusively on birdseed. But perhaps he would re- 
quire such a quantity of birdseed that it would cost 
him more than an ordinary meat diet. 

The supply of pocket mice for the purpose of what 
might be' called teetotal virus is limited, but the camel 



still remains. On second thought it might be unwise 
to try to graft the capabilities of the camel on to an 
intemperate biped. 

The change would cut both ways. 

The camel, it is true, can go for many days without 
drinking. But it has to take in a corresponding sup- 
ply of drink beforehand. It would be a sad thing 
to evolve a man who was capable of taking in at one 
mighty draught enough drink to last for several days. 
— London Express. 

.;. ♦;* .5. 
A CROW STORY. 



A worthy gentleman who resided on the river Dela- 
ware near Easton, had raised a crow with whose 
tricks and society he used frequently to amuse him- 
self. The crow lived long in the family, but at length 
disappeared, having, as was then supposed, been shot 
by some vagrant gunner, or destroyed by accident. 

About eleven months after this, as the gentleman, 
one morning, in company with several others, was 
standing on the river shore, a number of crows hap- 
pening to pass by, one of them left the flock, and flying 
directly toward the company, alighted on the gentle- 
man's shoulder and began to gabble away with great 
volubility as one long absent friend, naturally enough, 
does on meeting with another. 

On recovering from his surprise, the gentleman in- 
stantly recognized his old acquaintance, and endeav- 
ored, by several civil but sly maneuvers, to lay hold 
of him ; but the crow, not altogether relishing quite so 
much familiarity, having now had a taste of sweet 
liberty, cautiously eluded all his attempts ; and sud- 
denly glancing his eye on his distant companions, 
mounted in the air and left them, soon overtook and 
mingled with them, and was never afterward seen 
to return. — Wilson's "American Ornithology." 

A MONSTROSITY. 



BY MRS. J. S. STUTZMAN. 

In my henyard 1 have a freak of nature that may 

be interesting to our students of nature. I have a 

chicken six weeks old which has three legs, and it 

seems to be in perfect health. In most ways he is 

perfectly normal, but the third limb grows from the 

rear of his backbone, being fast at the top end of the 

thigh. The limb grows and develops some, but it is 

not as large as the oiks upon which he walks because 

they are developed by exercise. He seems to be real 

spry and enjoys living as well as the rest. 

Virginia, .\ T cbr. 

* * + 

In the sprint;- a young man's fancy lightly turns to 
thoughts of love. — Tennyson. 



788 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 




HOME DEPARTMENT 




THE KITCHEN. 



If there is one room in the house which, more than all 
others, should be well equipped as to essential utensils 
and conveniences, it is the kitchen. Yet in the major- 
ity of homes, many of them otherwise well regulated, 
just the reverse of this is the case. The kitchen is lit- - 
erally the base of supplies — the center round which the 
complex and delicate system of home life revolves. 
When things run smoothly and comfortably in the kit- 
chen the chances are that there will be no hitching in 
the rest of the household machinery. On the con- 
trary, if the cooking stove or range is poor or worn 
out, if the fuel is scarce or of poor quality, if there are 
few or no conveniences for lightening the labor or 
making it a pleasant duty, if the kitchen is cold, com- 
fortless and untidy, or hot, dark and stuffy, a corre- 
sponding hitching and jarring in the running of things 
throughout the house may be expected. 

Fine carpets, curtains and chairs in the main part of 
the house, which is oftenest seen by visitors, seems to 
satisfy the ambition of many women, who give no 
thought to convenient kitchen furnishings and uten- 
sils. The first and most important essentials of a kit- 
chen are plenty of air and light, and the kitchen of all 
rooms in the house needs these purifiers. Oiled floors 
are best, but in small families a rag carpet saves much 
scrubbing. Old pieces of carpet or newspapers spread 
over carpet or floor on busy days saves much cleaning 
of carpet or floor. Papers are of service in the 
kitchen in numberless ways. They may be put under 
kettles, or slop pails, and on the kitchen table when 
any especially mussy work is in progress. A sink with 
a pump at each end for hard and soft water should be 
in every kitchen. Nearly all modern houses have a 
cupboard opening into both kitchen and dining room, 
through which food or soiled dishes may be passed. 
Where cupboard room is limited, hooks may be fas- 
tened to the under side of shelves to hang cups, pit- 
chers, etc., on. Another necessity is a table, which 
should be six feet long and three feet wide, with draw- 
ers on each side for dish towels, holders, spices, rolling 
pin, knives and other things oftenest used. A high 
stool and an open space under the middle of the table 
between the drawers on either side, so that the house- 
keeper can sit when her work will permit, are neces- 
sary conveniences. Nothing contributes more to the 
forlorn appearance of a kitchen than the miscellaneous 
throwing and hanging around of coats, hats and rub- 
bers. If these things must be kept in the kitchen, let 



there be a closet for their especial use built in one cor- 
ner, and let there be an unalterable law that every mem- 
ber of the family ghall attend to keeping his own things 
in the closet when not in use. Another kitchen comfort 
is a low rocking chair, where the tired housekeeper, 
when she is waiting for something or has a spare mo- 
ment, can rest. A word as to the kitchen toilet will not 
be amiss here. The best dress for kitchen and other 
housework is a cotton one, not too light colored, and 
of such material as will stand frequent washings. 
Many seem to prefer to work in a woolen dress, and of 
course it may be protected to a great degree by the 
generous gingham apron and gingham sleeves to draw 
over the dress sleeves and reaching above the elbows 
and held in place by a rubber cord run in. 

But any dress subjected to the inevitable happenings 
of the best regulated kitchen, in preparing dinner, or 
the cleaning and scouring which come afterward, can- 
not retain its nice appearance long, unless it will stand 
the ordeal of washtub and ironing table. A nice model 
for a calico or gingham dress, escapes the floor well 
all round, is four yards wide at the bottom, but gored 
at the top of the skirt, to do away with any fullness at 
the waist. Most of the fullness is gathered at the back. 
The waist may be lined with thin, unbleached muslin, 
and the sleeves lined or not, as one prefers. An un- 
lined sleeve irons more easily. If the sleeve has a shir 
run for an elastic band, the sleeve may be readily 
pushed up to any height while at work. The rubber 
can be untied and drawn out when the dress is washed. 
The skirt and waist are joined in one piece. The turn 
down collar and sleeves may be edged with lace or col- 
ored Hamburg edging. A belt like the dress, or any 
other kind preferred, may be worn with it. 

SEEDING THE LAWN. 



If properly prepared in good season, in the fall is 
rather the best time for seeding the lawn, still if proper 
care is taken to prepare the ground and to secure good 
seed so that the first opportunity for doing the work 
can be taken advantage of, spring seeding can be made 
successful. While blue grass makes the best sward 
and will stand closer cutting and more of it than any 
other kind of grass, yet it is very slow to start and re- 
quires two to three years to make much show, but after 
it once gets fairly started it will gradually crowd out 
the other grasses, taking full possession. Coarse 
grasses, like timothy and orchard grasses, are not suit-' 
ed for the lawn.' Neither are any of the large clovers. 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



789 



A very good mixture of grasses is equal parts by 
weight of blue grass, sweet vernal grass and white clo- 
ver. Use plenty of seed in order to secure a good 
stand. Seedsmen sell a mixture of grasses especially 
for lawn purposes, and when these can be secured 
readily it will be advisable to purchase. But it will 
pay to have the ground prepared in good season, to 
sow early and to use plenty of seed, rolling in the 
spring after the grass starts. 
♦ ♦ * 
BUYING SHOES. 



RICE PUDDING. 



" People who buy ready-made shoes would find 
their footgear much more comfortable if only they 
would stand up instead of sitting down to be fitted," 
said an experienced salesman. " Nine out of ten cus- 
tomers, especially ladies, want to sit in a comfortable 
chair all the time they are fitting shoes, and it is with 
difficulty that one can get them to stand a few minutes, 
even after the shoe is fitted. Then, when they begin 
to walk about a little, they wonder why the shoe is less 
easy than when it was first tried on. The fact is that 
the foot is smaller when one is sitting than when one 
is walking about. Exercise brings a larger quantity 
of blood to the feet, and they swell. The muscles, too, 
require a certain amount of room. In buying shoes 
this must be borne in mind, or one cannot hope to be 
shod comfortably." . . . 

COLOR IN DRESS. 



Not one woman in ten realizes the importance of 
ascertaining and making a careful study of one par- 
ticular color most becoming to her and of always hav- 
ing a touch of it introduced in some part of her dress. 
The auburn-haired woman looks best in brown shad- 
ing into the tones of her hair or in rich dark greens. 
The yellow-haired girl can wear red. The greens, too, 
are delightful on her, also certain yellows and black. 
White is less becoming, but she must be brilliant in 
complexion or else most delicate as to the tints to wear 
grays and blues to advantage. Blue, particularly the 
cold and plate blues, are best adapted to brunettes. 
The woman whose hair is a dull brown and whose com- 
plexion and eyes lack brilliancy, may still be most at- 
tractive, but she should avoid bright-hued or glit- 
tering hats. Dull browns, neither yellowish nor red- 
dish, should be selected. Avoid the satin straws. 
Take the dull finish. 

* * * 

Lemons were used by the Romans to keep moth 
from their garments, and in the time of Pliny they 
were considered an excellent poison. They are na- 
tives of Asia. ^ ¥> £ 

Don't furnish your wife with labor-saving appli- 
ances. It is cheaper to get a new wife when the old 
one is worn out. 



Here is a recipe from Good Housekeeping: 

One quart of milk to make it nice 

Only nine teaspoonfuls of rice, 

Nine teaspoonfuls of sugar, too, 

Also a pinch of salt mixed through; 

Two teaspoonfuls of any flavor 

Of which you want the dish to savor. 

I, by my own idea possessed, 

Consider lemon is the best. 

Bake for two hours — not fast nor slow, 

But in a moderate oven — so 

When it is done, it ought to seem 

Thick as the richest kind of cream. 

$ -$ $ 

PICCA LILLI. 



BY SISTER LISETTA BROWN. 

Take one peck of green tomatoes, two large heads of 
cabbage, twelve green peppers, twelve large onions, 
eight tablespoonfuls of salt, two tablespoonfuls of 
ground cloves, three tablespoonfuls of black pepper, 
three tablespoonfuls of ground mustard, three table- 
spoonfuls of cinnamon, one-half pint of white mustard, 
two pounds of brown sugar. Squeeze, and cook in vin- 
egar for two hours. 

Whitewater, hid. 

& 4* * 

TO MEASURE WITHOUT SCALES. 



The following table will be found convenient when 
you are without scales : 

One fluid ounce contains two tablespoonfuls. 

One drachm, or sixty drops, makes a teaspoonful. 

One rounded tablespoonful of granulated sugar, or 
two of flour or powdered sugar, weigh one ounce. 

One liquid gill equals four fluid ounces. 

One fluid ounce (one quarter of a gill) equals eight 
drachms. 

A piece of butter as large as a small egg weighs two 
ounces. 

Nine large or twelve small eggs weigh one pound 
with the shells off. 

One level teacupful of butter or granulated sugar 
weighs half a pound. 

One quart of sifted flour (well heaped) weighs one 
pound. 

A common-sized tumbler holds about one-half pint. 

* * * 
RECIPE WANTED. 



Anna Norman, of Maitland, Mo., wants a recipe 
for putting up cucumber pickles in alcohol. Who can 
answer? Send answer to the Inglenook. 



790 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



miij OUR LITTLE PEOPLE 



BONNIE WAYNE. 



'Nen Frank said " Hurry up children, didn't you 
hear the dinner bell ? " My ! I didn't think it wuz 
time for dinner already but we were having such a 
good time that we forgot all about the time I guess. 
Frank let us ride the horses to the barn and when we 
stopped at the little brook to let the horses drink I came 
very near slipping into the water, for when old Barney 
put his head down to the water to drink he came near 
throwing me over his head, but I took hold of the han- 
dles of the harness and held on as tight as I could. 

When we got to the barn Mr. Marshall said, " Well, 
how did you get along ? " and I said that we had a 
good time for a long time until a great big bird came 
very near getting hold of Luke and we came away in 
a hurry. 'Nen he wanted to know what kind of a 
bird it wuz that wuz after Luke, and I told him how it 
would stick out its neck and would h-i-s-s-s-s-s- at us 
and try to bite us, and he took another big laugh and 
said that he bet it wuz his old pet goose that had a nest 
out there by the pasture fence, and he said that she wuz 
a cross old thing and that it wuz a wonder that she 
did not bite us and we thought so too. 

'Nen we had the bestest dinner, I thought everything 
wuz so good, and Mrs. Marshall gave Luke and me 
some nice milk to drink, and before the dinner wuz 
over I wuz so sleepy that I could hardly hold my eyes 
open and so Grandma said that yungun has to have a 
nap after dinner, and so I went into the bedroom and 
took Hattie and Dora, and we had a long nap and 
when I got up Frank had gone to the field and we did 
not get to go along at all, and I told Luke that I 
thought he might have waited but Luke said he wuz 
in a hurry to get the corn all plowed so he could cut 
wheat and I didn't know what the wheat wuz ; so 
Mabel took us out to the orchard and we looked over 
the fence into the wheatfield and saw the nice long 
wheat straws with the big heads on them and Mabel 
took some of the heads and rubbed them in her hands 
and showed us how the grains are in the heads. 

When we got back to the barn, Mr. Marshall had 
a big red wagon with fans out in the yard, and it wuz 
the funniest thing, and I asked him what it wuz, and 
he said " it wuz a self-binder." 'Nen I said " what is 
that ? " and he told Mabel to tell me all about it and so 
she said " that it wuz to cut that wheat that we saw up 
in the field by the orchard, and it would bind them into 
sheaves ready for the threshing-machine." But there 



wuzn't anything funny about that so we went out to 
the pump to get a drink 'cause they don't have any hy- 
drants here and we always have to go to the pump to 
get a drink. And while we were there Luke put his 
hand on the pump spout and he told me to pump and 
so I did and he would drink from his hand, and all at 
once while he wuz a drinking there wuz a lot of water 
came down from the top of the pump on me and I 
thought I wuz drowned and it went down Luke's back 
and he hollered and Mr. Marshall said, " What is the 
matter?" and we told him nothing 'cause it wuz so 
funny we did not want to go away. 

'Nen we climbed up to see where the water came out 
and we found a big hole where the handle wuz fastened 
on to the pump and we thought we would stop up that 
hole and so Luke got down and I stayed up there and 
he handed me some little stones and I put them in 
there and they went down clear to the bottom I guess. 
I could hear them say plumk-plunkety-plunk, down 
there, and I told Luke that it wuzn't getting full and 
he took his hat and got a big hatful of little stones and 
he held them for me and I put them in the pump and 
pretty soon I couldn't get any more down there and 
'nen we thought we could pump and it wouldn't pour 
out on us like it did before and so we tried and don't 
you think it wouldn't pump at all and 'nen Luke said 
he bet we had done the mischief again and I didn't 
know what that wuz, and he said that he thought we 
had better play somewhere else, so we went up in the 
haymow to get the eggs and when we got up there we 
could look out the window and see all around and it 
wuz fine and just then Frank came home from the 
field, and he waved his hand at me and I waved back 
and I told Luke he wuzn't mad, and he said, " Just 
wait a minute," and sure enough when he tried to 
pump some water for the horses the pump would not 
move. 

(to be continued.) 



P. S. — I just wrote a letter to my mamma a littl 
while ago and I told her what a good time we arl 
having out here on the farm, and I told her that I 
wish she would take the Inglenook, 'nen she could 
see what a good time we have, 'cause Grandma Mar- 
shall always reads about our vacation to Luke and 
me. That woman that had so many fresh air chil- 
dren came to see me yesterday, but you bet I didn'1 
go home with her. I am going to stay here unti' 
school commences this fall if Mr. Marshall will lei 
me. Bonnie Wayne 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



791 



r 






Who is Clara Barton? 

Clara Barton is a lady of more than ordinary ability, 
as well as untiring energy in caring for the oppressed. 
She bore an important part in caring for the sick and 
wounded after the Civil War, in the Franco-Prussian 
War and in the Spanish-American War, and she was 
president of the American Red Cross Society for a 
long time. 

* 

How and when did Christianity become prominent in 
Rome? 

Christianity was no doubt introduced by the apos- 
tles themselves. Notwithstanding the persecution of 
Nero and Diocletian, Christianity spread rapidly in 
the beginning. Constantine the great was the first em- 
peror, and during his reign Christianity was not only 
tolerated, but was the established religion of the state. 

* 

Hqw was the present German Empire formed? 

In the latter part of the year 1870, just at the close 
of the Franco-Prussian war, treaties were concluded 
between Prussia and South German states, whereby 
they were united as a single empire. King Wilhelm, 
of Prussia, was elected emperor of Germany, and was 
crowned at Versailles, June, 1871. 

* 

What does the Inglenook consider as the most im- 
portant events in the history of the last ten years? 

The Spanish-American war by all means, so far as 
America is concerned, because through it the United 
States becomes the world-power and is recognized as 
such by all Europe. 

* 

From what sources does reliable information of ancient 
history come? 

From inscriptions on tablets that have been un- 
earthed, ancient ruins, coins, medals, legends and a few 
good Greek and Roman books. 

* 

What are some of the greatest disasters of 1903-4? 

The Iroquois fire, Chicago ; the Baltimore fire ; the 
General Slocum disaster, of New York Harbor; the 
Mining Strikes of Colorado, and the Meat Strikes. 

Who was Cyrus the Great? 

Cyrus the Great was king of Persia from 588 B. C. 
:o 522 B. C. Some of his principal achievements were 
the conquest of Media, Lydia and Babylon. 



Will the Nook please tell in what States women vote? 

This differs according to what is being voted for. 
For instance in Wyoming, Colorado, Utah and Idaho 
women have equal suffrage with men. In Kansas 
women have equal rights with men in most all of the 
school and municipal elections. And then women have 
school suffrages only in the' following States : Michi- 
gan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, Oregon, Massa- 
chusetts, New York, Vermont, Illinois, Connecticut, 
Nevada, Wisconsin, Washington, Arizona, Montana, 
New Jersey, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Ohio. 
When it comes to voting on the issuing of municipal 
bonds, women are allowed to vote in the States of Mon- 
tana and Iowa. In Louisiana, women who are tax pay- 
ers may vote on questions of public expenditure. In 
England women may vote for all local officers, but not 
for members of parliament. 

What changes were made by the twelfth amendment 
in the manner of electing presidents and vice-presidents? 

Each elector now votes for one person for pres- 
ident and another for vice-president, while in the orig- 
inal clause they each voted for two persons one of 
whom was to be president and the other vice-presi- 
dent, according to the number of votes received. If 
the electors failed to elect, the House chooses from the 
three highest instead of the five highest, as in the orig- 
inal clause: 

* 

What animal does Proverbs 30: 26 have reference to? 

The Coney, as it is called, belongs to the family of 
the Rodents, or gnawing, fur-bearing animals, such as 
rabbits, beavers, etc., and is found in the mountains of 
Syria, Mozambique, and Southern Africa. It is more 
commonly known as the Daman. 
* 

Who were some of the great men who have died re- 
cently? 

Gen. James Longstreet, Gen. John B. Gordon, Ex- 
Governor Chas. E. Foster, Ex-Governor Asa S. Bush- 
nell, Marcus A. Hanna. M, S. Quay, Levi Lciter and 
Paul Kruger. 

* 

Who was Timon of Athens? 

Timon of Athens was the chief character in one of 
Shakespeare's dramas which took its name from its 
hero, Timon the Man-hater. 
*> 

Who wrote "My country, 'tis of thee"? 
S. F. Smith. 



792 



THE INGLENOOK.— August 16, 1904. 



^ . , . .-.« w. swn 



* 



* 



MISCELLA 



ITEOTJS [ 






LIPPINCOTT'S MAGAZINE NOTES FOR 
AUGUST. 



The family of President Roosevelt has other lit- 
erary talent besides his own. Maude Roosevelt, his 
cousin, contributes a novelette, called " Social Logic," 
to the August number of Lippincott's Magazine which 
substantiates the talent of her race. It is a tale of the 
somewhat sordid life well-bred women have to lead in 
New York boarding-houses, but the heroine of Miss 
Roosevelt's story emerges through many thrilling so- 
cial adventures to the lot for which Nature planned 
her — a happy marriage. 

* * 4> 
LESLIE'S MONTHLY MAGAZINE FOR AUGUST. 



'Ralph Conner begins a new novel, " The Pros- 
pector," in the August Fiction number of Leslie's 
Monthly Magazine, and the first chapters promise a 
better story than either " The Sky Pilot " or " Black 
Rock." There are eleven other stories in this number, 
by such people as George Hibbard, Henry C. Row- 
land, Alice MacGowan, Holman F. Day, H. I. Greene 
and Rex E. Beach, and they cover nearly every vari- 
ety of up-to-date fiction. 

J. Adam Bede, the humorist of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, has a most amusing article on " The Spell- 
binders," whom we all expect to listen to during the 
next few months, in which he tells a number of good 
stories. There are also remarkable photographs of the 
St. Louis Fair and portraits of the men who created 
that exposition, and a helpful little sketch of the cost 
of a visit to St. Louis this summer. 

The delightful verses by Kennett Harris, with some 
remarkably good drawings by Reginald Birch, are an 
attractive feature of the number, and Mrs. Call's 
monthly paper on "The Freedom of Life," as usual, is 
well worth reading and thinking about. 
* * *> 
HOW BEER FIRST CAME TO ENGLAND. 



The vineyards wrap Ischia from seashore to moun- 
tain peak in a shimmering screen of green. Vines 
hang from tree to tree, making a leafy roof overhead 
and green, sun-pierced walls to the long alleys, where 
innumerable classic bunches grow. The grapes are 
still small and immature, but exquisite in form and 
color. In October, the season of the vintage, this must 
be the most beautiful place on earth. Here one under- 



stands why the Roman soldiers in Britain, when they 
first saw the Kentish hop-vines, thought they had i 
found the nearest thing to the grape the savage north- j 
land produced. In their efforts to make wine from 
hops they produced the first beer made in England. — 
Maud Howe, in August Lippincott's. 
* * ♦ 
A LITTLE HEROINE. 



" Nannie, dear, I want you to hem those napkins 
this afternoon, without fail. Can I trust you to do 
it? I must go out for the whole afternoon, and can- 
not remind you of them," said Mrs. Barton to her lit 
tie girl. 

" Yes, mother dear, I will; you can trust me," an- 
swered Nannie. 

Now Nannie did not like to hem napkins any better 
than you do, but she went at once to her work-basket, 
took out her needles and thread and thimble, and be- 
gan work. Pretty soon she heard the sound of music. 
It came nearer, and at last it sounded right in front of 
the house. She dropped her sewing to run to the win- 
dow, and then she stopped. 

" No, I promised mother, and she trusted me," said 
Nannie to herself, and she sat down again, and went 
to sewing. Soon the door burst open, and in rushed 
several little girls. 

" Nannie, Nannie, where are you? There's a mon 
key out here, and a trained dog, and they're playing 
lovely tricks. Come on ! " 

" I can't; I promised mother, and she trusted me, 
she answered. 

They coaxed and scolded, but all to no purpose; sc 
they left her. 

Just as she finished the last napkin, her mother cam< 
in. " My little heroine, I know all ! " she said, as sh( 
kissed Nannie. 

" Why, mother, I didn't save anybody's life, nor d< 
anything brave ; I only kept my promise," answere< 
Nannie, wonderingly. 

" It is sometimes harder to keep a promise and di 
one's duty than to save a life. You did a brave, nobl 
thing, and I thank God for you, my dear," said Mrs 
Barton. — Our Little Ones. 

♦ ^/ ♦ 
Lest men suspect your tale untrue, 
Keep probability untrue. 

— Gay. 



The Brethren Colonies 



IN THE 



Fruit Belt of Michigan 




are an actual success. The colony of the Lakeview church is located on 
lands surrounding the village of Brethren, Michigan. Brethren, Michigan 
is located on the main line of the Pere Marquette System, 105 miles north 
of Grand Rapids and about 14 miles east of Lake Michigan. All conditions 
of soil, chmate and location make this spot an ideal one for general farm- 
ing, fru.t-growmg and stock-raising. Lands have been sold to about 120 
families of the Brotherhood and their friends, of which number about one- 
half have already located and are clearing up their places. The possibili- 

™ tHlS d i StriCt 3re exce P tional - Th e Brethren tract embraces about 
20.000 acres, of which over 11,000 acres have already been sold There are 
just as good and as desirable locations remaining as those that have been 
bought and the prices have not yet been advanced, but with the improve- 
ments now going on, developing the country so rapidly, it is only a short 
time till prices advance considerably. THE TIME TO BUY IS NOW 
Present prices range from $7 to $15 per acre, on easy terms, or less five 
(i>) per cent for cash. 

For illustrated booklet and information in regard to rates, address 
Samuel S. Thorpe, District Agent Michigan Land Association. Cadillac 
Mich. 



THE CADILLAC TRACT. 



The basis oi my business is absolute and 

unvarying integrity. 

SAMUEL S. THORPE. 



25,000 Acres of Rich Agricul- 
tural Lands, Excellently Situated and Splen- 
didly Adapted for Farming, Fruit-growing and 
Stock-raising. 

These lands are located from one-half mile to six miles from the hustling city of Cadil.ac. the seat of Wexford 
-my 8 , 000 hab (a „ aHve) and its locat . on on {he Grand Rapjds and ind . ana R>y ^^^ ^ ^^ 

y tern) and on the Ann Arbor Railroad (par. of the Wabash System) together with its other advantages render 
the best trading po.nt and market place in Northern Michigan. Cadillac and the lands controlled by the ad- 
vertiser are located about 98 miles north of Grand Rapids and 50 miles east of Lake Michigan. They are well wa- 
ered with spnngs, creeks, rivers and lakes of pure, sparkling water teeming with gamy fish. The seil varies from 
sandy loam to a clay loam, all of it underbid with clay and gravel subsoil, which responds eagerly to cultivation, 
for illustrated booklets, maps and information as to reduced rates to these locations, address: 

UDistxict Ag^erxt :b^Cic:b.igr£L:n. X.a-r^cL Assn., 

HDept. :Lv£, 



A POWER FOR GOOD 



When a disturbance appears in the bodily, 
functions and your feelings indicate that your 
system is out of order, you will make no mistake 
in resorting to 



BB. PETE 



vm 



Bimn VITALIZES 



without delay. It is a power for good It soothes 
and calms the irritated conditions and gives 
health and strength. Thousands have experiencec 
its medicinal charm. Not sold in drugstores, bu 
by special agents only, or direct from the pro 
prietor, 

DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 

112=114 S. Hoyne Avenue, 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



"THE INGLENOOK. 



Bonnet Straw Cloth 

SISTER, have you a knack of mak- 
ing your own bonnet? Here's 
news for you — money saving news 
We carry a large stock of bonnet 
straw cloth, manufactured especially 
for us, from our own designs. Four- 
teen different styles and colors. Rice 
Net, Wire, Chiffon, Braid, etc., with a 
large assortment of Ribbon and Mous- 
seline de Soie for strings. Weare the 
only house making a specialty of these 
goods. Write for free samples and 
prices. 

Albaugh Bros., Dover & Co. 




34 l= 343 Franklin Street. 



Chicago, 111. 



GREAT IMPROVEMENTS 

are now being made at Mount Morris 
College. The citizens are spending hun- 
dreds of dollars in beautifying the al- 
ready beautiful campus. Furnaces 
thoroughly repaired, new janitor, new 
laboratories, new courses, new ideas. 
Old and new students are sending in 
encouraging reports for the coming 
year. The new catalogue and the new 
magazine are great favorites. Spending 
the year at our college will do a great 
deal towards preparing you better to 
meet the work of life. Don't procrasti- 
nate, but arrange at once to be with us 
Sept. 6 at the opening of the fall term. 

MOUNT MORRIS COLLEGE, 

Mount Morris, HI. 
J. E. Miller, Pres. 



VERY LOW EXCURSION RATES 
TO LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Via the North-Western Line. Ex- 
cursion tickets will be sold August 12, 
13, 14 and 15, limited by extension 
to return until September 15, inclu- 
sive, on account of K. P. Encamp- 
ment. Apply to agents Chicago & 
North-Western Railway. 



The Inglenook 

To January X, 1905, to 
3>3"oT7«r Subscribers, Only 




An Easy Way to Secure a Valuable Book. 



Inglenook to Jan. i, 1905, 
Modern Fables and Parables, 



40 
25 



Both for only 



$165 
.75 



The book we offer is a late one, by Rev. Harris, author of Mr. World and Miss 
Churchmember. The object of this book is to teach morality and to correct social evils. 
It is a splendid book for the home. If you do not already have it you will do well to 
take advantage of this offer. 

Get a Good Fountain Pen. 
■ gjggaiiag 




Inglenook to Jan. 1, 1905 

Ladies' or Gentlemen's Fountain Pen, 



.$ 40 
. 1 00 



Both for only 



$140 
75 



This fountain pen is a good one and would be highly prized by any boy or girl. It is worth $1.00 to any one 
n need of a pen. 



hundreds of New Subscribers. 

We are receiving hundreds of new subscribers, who are taking advantage of the above unprecedented offer. 
)ur aim is to increase our list by several thousand within the next few weeks. The Nook is starting on a new era 
ud we want all our friends and neighbors to join hands with us. Dear reader, help us enlarge the list by Celling youi 
fiends of this offer, please. Better still, solicit their subscription and send it to us, and thus help enlarge the usefulness of the 
Jook. Send to 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



the: inglenook. 



NORTH DAKOTA 

Fertile lands on new line of Northern 
Pacific Railway. Sold on crop payment 
plan. For particulars, special excursion, 
etc., address, 

GUTHRIE & CO., 
uu F. O. Bos 438. Decatur, III. 

SALMON. IDAHO. 

Any one desiring information regard- 
ing this part of Idaho, I will try and 
give such information as desired. 

HENRY LINGLEY, 
32-t4 Salmon, Idaho. 

Cap Goods! 

Our business has almost doubled itself 
during the last year. We are sending 
goods by mail to thousands of perma- 
nent, satisfied customers throughout the 
United States. The reason is simple. 

Our Goods are Reliable. Oar Variety is 
Larg-e. Our Prices are Low. 

All orders filled promptly, postpaid. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or your money 
refunded. Send us a sample order and 
be convinced. Write us for a booklet 
of unsolicited testimonials and new line 
nf samples, which will be furnished free. 
Send at once to 

R. E. ARNOLD, Elgin, III. 

It Dees Net Pay to Neglect Y<mr Ejes ! 

QUELINE 



Is good all for inflammations of the Eyes. 
It has cured thousands of others. It 
will cure you. :: DO YuU KNOW 

LUCINR? 



INAUGURATION OF PARLOR 
CAR SERVICE. 



Dr. Veremian uses it in India every day. 
It is for Diarrhcea. It works like a 
charm. It rids the intestines of all 
germs. If not satisfied send us the pills 
and we will return your money. 

Gueline, 35c. Lucine, 25c. 

THE YEREMIAN MEDICAL CO, 

BAT A VIA. ILLINOIS. 

I't'JR Mentinn thp rNfil.ETiOOK -wh"i wr-'tin* 



FEW PEOPLE 

Know the value of Liquid Spray as a 
home cure for Catarrh, Hay Fever, Head 
colds and other diseases of the respira- 
tory organs. 

Persons desiring to try this highly 
recommended treatment should immedi- 
ately write to E. J. Worst, 61 Main St., 
Ashland Ohio. 

He will gladly mail any reader of the 
Inglenook one of his new Atomizers and 
Liquid Spray treatment on five days* tri- 
al, free. 

If it gives satisfaction, send him $2.00, 
two-fifths regular price; if not, return 
it at the expired time, which will only 
cost you twelve cents postage, and you 
will not owe him a penny. It kills the 
Catarrh microbes in the head and throat. 

23tl3 



Between Chicago, Council Bluffs and 
Omaha. 



500 Bible Studies 



In addition to its already remark- 
ably complete train service between 
Chicago and the Missouri River, the 
management of the North-Western 
Line announces that between Chica- 
go and Omaha there will hereafter be 
included a service of Parlor Cars, 
through without change, on day train 
leaving Chicago daily at 10: IS A. M. 
This is in addition to the service al- 
ready in existence of through Buffet 
Smoking and Library cars, which are 
at the disposal of the Parlor and 
Pullman car passengers without 
charge. 

The Parlor Car service on the Chi- 
cago & North-Western Railway is al- 
ready famous, all of those little de- 
tails which go so far towards per- 
fecting the comfort of patrons being 
looked after with scrupulous care. 
The equipment is of the highest type, 
and rhe inauguration of this service 
between Chicago and Omaha, over 
the only double track railway between 
Chicago and the Missouri River, 
marks another stepping-stone in the 
upward progress of transportation de- 
velopment as exemplified on the 
North-Western Line. 

The Parlor Car leaves Chicago 
daily at 10- 15 A. M., reaching Oma- 
ha 11:40 P. M. Eastbound. train No. 
12. carrying similar equipment, leaves 
Omaha 7:10 A. M.. reaching Chicago 
8:00 P. M. It will be noted that the 
schedules are fast ones. There are 
four trains daily in each direction be- 
tween Chicago and Omaha, with di- 
rect connections for Colorado, Utah, 
Yellowstone Park and the Pacific 
Coast. 



The Inglenook 
COOK BOOK 



We have sent out thousands of 
these Cook Books as premiums. 
So great was the demand that a 
second edition was published. 
We are still receiving numerous 
calls for this Cook Book. For this 
reason we have decided to dispose 
of the few remaining copies at 
25 cents per copy. To insure a 
copy it will be necessary for you 
to order at once. . . Send to 

Brethren Publishing House 

Elgin, Illinois. 



. Compiled by = 



HAROLD F. SAYLESf 



This new book contains 500 short, I 
sharp, conci:e, Outline Bible Read- J 
ings, contributed by prominent work-j 
ers from all over the world. The se-l 
lections cover a larger range of sub- 1 
jects, and will be very useful to one I 
in private study, as well as helpfull 
in preparing to conduct a meeting onl 
short notice. The book will be in-l 
valuable to ministers. It will bel 
found very helpful in preparing out-l 
lines for Bible study and for prayer! 
meeting. It will prove a source ofl 
pleasure and profit for all Bible stu-l 
dents. 

The collection is being enthusias-| 
tically received, and is also sold at a 
price within reach of all. Books of 
this character, but containing far less 
material, often sell for $1.00 or more 

The book includes a complete in 
dex of subjects arranged alphabetic 
ally. Note a few of the outlines: 

JESUS IS ABLE. 

Having been given " all power," Matt 
28: 18, and having destroyed the 
works of the devil, 1 John 
3: 8. Jesus is able to, 
Save to the uttermost, Heb. 7: 25. 
Make all grace abound, 2 Cor. 9: 8 
Succor the tempted, Heb. 2: 18. 
Make us stand, Rom. 14: 4. 
Keep us from falling, Jude 24. 
Subdue all things, Philpp. 3:21. 
Keep that committed to him, 2 Ti 



1: 12 



Perform what he has promised, Rom 

4: 21. 
Do above all we ask or think, Epti 
3: 20. 
Knowing his grace and power, shal 
we not come and say, " Yea. Lord " 
Matt. 9:28. F. S. Shepherd. 



THE BLOOD. — Heb. 9:22. 



1. Peace . has been made through th 
blood. Col. 1: 20. 

2. Justified by the blood. Rom. 5:9. 

3. Redemption by the blood. Eph. 1:1 
Col. 1: 14: 1 Pet. 1: 18. 

4. This redemption is eternal. Heb. £ 
11-14: Heb. 10: 10-15 

5. Cleansed bv the blood. 1 John 1: ' 
Rev. 1: 5; Rev. 7: 14. 

6. We enter into the holiest by Hi 
blood. Heb. 10: 19. 

7. Overcome in heaven by the blooi 
Rev. 12: 11. 

S. Then sing the song forever to tig 
blood of the Lamb. Rev. 5: 9.