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Full text of "Introductory Sight-Singing Meodies"

SIGHT 




III 







MELODIES M 




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GINN AND COMPANY PUBLIS 




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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 
Brigham Young University- Idaho 



http://archive.org/details/introsightsingingOOnewton 



INTRODUCTORY 



SIGHT- SINGING MELODIES 



BY 

E. W. NEWTON 



GINN & COMPANY 

BOSTON • NEW YORK ■ CHICAGO • LONDON 



Copyright, 1907 
By GINN & COMPANY 



ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 



511.2 



W\)t gtftengum gtegjj 

GINN & COMPANY • PRO- 
PRIETORS • BOSTON • U.S.A. 



INTRODUCTION 

This book provides easy melodies for the beginning of sight singing. It is designed 
to accompany the New Educational Music Course, and in order that its purpose may 
be more readily understood, a brief, comprehensive view of the Course is necessary. 

The Aim of the New Educational Music Course 

The aim of this Course is to develop in the pupil an intelligent appreciation and enjoy- 
ment of good music, a musical and expressive voice, the ability to read music at sight, 
and the power of musical interpretation. 

To inspire love of good music. To appreciate the power and beauty of music, the 
pupil must become familiar with well-written music of various kinds in selections that 
shall be interesting from his own point of view as well as admirable from that of the 
critical musician. By familiar association with such music and wisely directed study of 
it the pupil's taste is cultivated and a love of good music is fostered. With this in view 
the Course provides a great variety of selections culled from the best available sources. 

To develop a musical voice. The proper treatment of the child voice is of great im- 
portance, and has received the utmost attention in these books. No elaborate scheme of 
voice culture is desirable or practicable in the elementary schools ; but, beginning with 
the cultivation of the head-tone quality of the child voice through the descending scale, 
the few simple vital principles which induce breath control, proper tone direction, voice 
quality, and enunciation are presented in specific voice drills and underlie the material 
of the entire Course. 

In each grade all selections are so placed in pitch and range as to conserve and foster 
the pupil's voice at that stage of his development. The aim is to establish early and thor- 
oughly a correct use of the voice, in order that the vocal poise shall not be lost when 
the attention is given to the intellectual demands of sight singing. 

To teach sight singing. Sight singing is the process of determining by an act of 
reasoning the meaning of signs in musical notation, and singing accordingly. When 
rightly taught, it furnishes the very essence of intellectual training and deserves to rank 
with any other disciplinary study. 

In sight singing, deductions are made conjointly in time and tune. Various intervals 
in melodic order, the beat, accent, tones of different duration, measure, rhythm, inter- 
mediate tones, and the minor mode — in a word, all musical effects — should be experi- 
enced before they are represented. 



IV 

An abundance of attractive sight-singing material is given for reading. New problems 
are presented one at a time, always carefully graded in difficulty, and thus logical mental 
progress is assured. 

It must be borne in mind that valuable as sight singing is as a disciplinary study, it 
is, nevertheless, only a means to the use of music as a cultural study, and to that awak- 
ening of the aesthetic faculties which is manifested in musical interpretation. 

To induce musical interpretation. Musical interpretation is the discovery and expres- 
sion of the significance and beauty of musical ideas, and it therefore demands the use of 
material in which there are beauty and meaning to be expressed. This indispensable 
condition has been abundantly satisfied in the character of the music selected for this 
Course. Furthermore, aids to interpretation are provided not only in the marks of 
expression — dynamic and tempo signs, phrase and breath marks — but also in the great 
care with which the relation of words and music has been considered. 

The character of the poem is always a key to the spirit of the music, and a thought- 
ful study of the verse as to accent, rhyme, phrasing, and the development of climax will 
reveal the rhythmical form and melodic structure of the music. The poems have been 
selected with quite as much care as the music, to make sure of intrinsic worth, interest, 
and beauty from the pupil's standpoint as well as from the literary point of view. In all 
cases a right and beautiful interpretation of the spirit and content of the words helps to 
the understanding and expression of the music. 

The Material of the Course 

A distinguishing feature. A distinguishing feature of the material throughout the 
Course is that each number illustrates some well-known characteristic of music, racial 
or individual, and contains that vital quality called musical content, which appeals to the 
inexperienced learner as well as to the trained musician. 

Basis of choice. Aside from the elements in notation of music, which are noted as 
they occur in the Course, there has been in the choice of material a constant recogni- 
tion of the ideal development of the pupil. This includes the physical development 
resulting from deep breathing, the intellectual development involved in a systematic 
study of the subject, and the subtle development of character which comes from famil- 
iarity with good music. 

The Plan of the Course 

In planning the New Educational Music Course the editors have kept constantly in 
mind the fourfold object of the Course and the results which may reasonably be expected 
in the average public-school environment. 

Arrangement of the material, an outline for study. The books are adapted for study, 
page after page, as arranged in the successive readers. Where teachers find it advisable 
or desirable to vary the order of presentation, to give special attention to one problem 
rather than another, or to carry on several lines of study simultaneously, the grouping 



V 

of the material makes such adjustment an easy matter. In this case the index serves 
as a guide. 

Suggestive headings. As a further help to the grade teacher, chapter headings and 
marginal notes make clear the special rhythmic and melodic problems in process of 
development. The marginal notes accompany only the melodies which contain the first 
representation of the problem named, except in Part I of the First Reader, where 
marginal notes are duplicated in each of the nine common keys. 

The glossary, a helpful guide. Each reader of the Course contains a glossary, repre- 
senting and defining all musical signs and terms appearing in that reader. It is an 
authority upon which teacher and pupil may depend. At the same time it summarizes 
for the teacher the technical work which study of the reader develops. The glossaries 
of the successive books contain such analysis as may logically be presented in connection 
with the books. 

Introductory Sight-Singing Melodies 

Introductory Sight-Singing Melodies provides study for the second grade. 
It is equally divided among the nine common keys, — C, G, F, D, B-flat, A, E-flat, 
E, and A-flat. Each key begins with the simplest melodies and progresses with the 

same degree of difficulty. Of the eight familiar rhythmic types (when J = the beat unit) 

*< s J mrnSm J Jm mS J J*J JJJ J J only the first rhythmic type, 

one sound to the beat, represented by the quarter note, is presented in Parts I, II, and 
III. The first rhythmic type, one sound to the beat, represented by the eighth note, 
is presented in Part IV. 

Melodic intervals (aside from stepwise progressions), as used by the masters of song, 
fall naturally into three groups — very frequent intervals, frequent intervals, and 
infrequent intervals. The first two groups only are here illustrated — very frequent 
intervals, 1-3, 3-5, 5-8, 1-8, 5-3, 7-2, 2-5, 5-2, 5-7, 3-8 ; and frequent intervals, 
i-5, 3-6, 5-7, 2-4, 4-7, 5-4, 4-6, 6-8, 1-4, 5-5. 

The melodies presented are pure, simple, complete, and attractive. Not only were 
they selected with the view of illustrating the simple problems of time and tune, but 
they were also required to pass the strictest tests as to their own inherent value as 
music. They have been approved by the best melodic experts, who were purposely kept 
in ignorance of the educational nature of their use. That the child may easily grasp 
its meaning, each melody is phrased. Many of the selections are musical settings of 
carefully selected verse. 



CONTENTS 

PART I 

Melodies for the Beginning of Sight Singing; Two-Quarter Measure; Rhythmic Type, 
One Sound to the Beat, represented by the Quarter Note ; Nine Common Keys 

Chapter Pages 

I. Melodies in Stepwise Progression illustrating the Melodic Tendencies of the Inactive 

and Active Scale Tones 1-5 

II. Melodies illustrating Very Frequent Intervals 5-9 

PART II 

Four-Quarter Measure, Nine Common Keys 

I. Melodies illustrating Very Frequent Intervals — Co?itinued 10-14 

II. Melodies illustrating Frequent Intervals 14-18 

PART III 

Three-Quarter Measure ; Nine Common Keys ; Review 

I. Melodies illustrating Frequent Intervals — Contitiued 19-27 

II. Review of Four-Quarter Measure ; Nine Common Keys 28-32 

III. Melodic Scale Progression; Nine Common Keys 32-33 

IV. Review of Two-Quarter, Four-Quarter, and Three-Quarter Measures; Nine Common 

Keys ; Melodies arranged in Pairs 34-40 

PART IV 

Three-Eighth Measure ; Rhythmic Type, One Sound to the Beat, represented 
by the Eighth Note; Nine Common Keys; Melodies illustrating Frequent 
Intervals — Continued 40-42 



PART I 



MELODIES FOR THE BEGINNING OF SIGHT SINGING; TWO-QUARTER 
MEASURE; RHYTHMIC TYPE, ONE SOUND TO THE BEAT, REPRE- 
SENTED BY THE QUARTER NOTE; NINE COMMON KEYS 

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PART II 

FOUR-QUARTER MEASURE. NINE COMMON KEYS 

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Creep- ing, creep-ing through the house, Comes a hun - gry lit - tie mouse. 



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Hand - y span - dy, Jack - y Dan - dy, Likes plum cake and can - dy. 



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When the trees in gold are clad The bus - y squir - rel chat - ters. 

pp 



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Like a era - die rock - ing, rock - ing, See our ham-mock swing. 



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Tick ! Tock 1 Waste no mo-ment, Time is fly - ing ! Says the clock. 



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Winds that blow a - cross the o - cean, Sing a song to me. 



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O - ver hill and o - ver dale Fair - ies wan - der night - ly. 







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I'm go - , ing to the gar - den Where ti - ger lil - ies grow. 



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Simple Si-mon met a pie-man go-ing to the fair; Said 

Simple Si-mon to the pie-man " Let me taste your ware." 



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Lit - tie mouse, be - ware, be- ware, for Puss - y cat is near. 



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Shin - ing lil - ies, tall and straight, Grow be - side our gar -den gate. 



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Soft - ly up the stairs we creep ; Ba - by's a - sleep, 

Chapter II — Melodies Illustrating Frequent Intervals 



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Dy, Here and there and ev - 'ry - where. 



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The wil - low trees be - side the stream, Bow be - fore the breeze. 



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Boats of down now float in air, Bear - ing seeds to rest. 
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Then gay go up and gay go down To ring the bells of Lon-don town. 



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Hark ! The ves - per hymn is steal - ing O'er the wa - ter soft and clear. 
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'Tis May- time ! The fields are green ; 'Tis play - time, O heigh - O ! 



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We're swing - ing ! We're swing - ing Be - neath the ap - pie tree. 



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On the ice we're skat - ing, swift - ly to and fro. 

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Left ! right! left! right! Come the march - ing sol - diers. 

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I won- der what the lil - y dreams Be - side the riv - er grow - ing. 



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Hur - rah ! See our ban - ner wave, Hur-rah, Red and white and blue. 

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Oh ! speak the truth and nev - er fail, Cost what it may 
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our coun 
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Birds are call - ing through the dusk, Soft and clear. 



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Say good-night, stars are bright ; Sleep till break of day. 






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Fly, lit - tie swal - low, fly 1 Sum - mer is o - ver. 

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The birds up - on the tree - tops sing, In bright sum - mer weath - er. 



PART III 

THREE-QUARTER MEASURE; NINE COMMON KEYS; REVIEW 



Chapter I — Melodies Illustrating Frequent 
Intervals : — Continued 



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145 



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"Come,lit- tie leaves," the ma -pie said; "Put on your dresses of yel- low and red." 



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Green was the clo-ver and sweet the hay Where we played the long summer day. 
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O have you heard the story sweet, the birds and bees and brooks repeat ? 
The world awakes the spring to greet, and merry 



winds are blowing. 



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Interval 
6-4 



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All the grape-vines are in blos-som, Sweet is the fragrance that fills the air. 

19 



20 



153 




154 




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Run, oh run as fast as you can! Down the street is an or - gan man! 



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O bells, ring out, now high, now low ! Ring,hap- py bells, a - cross the snow. 



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O-verthe sea, o-ver the sea, Mer- ri - ly on we are sail - ing. 



Interval i6q 

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Glad at heart the o - ri-ole sings ; Gay are the bees in the clo - ver ; 
All are now as hap-py as kings, For the cold winter is 



o - ver. 



21 



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Crimson and gold the leaves flut-ter down, Leaving the trees all gray and brown. 




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When the house is dark and still Our pus- sy cat goes a - hunt - ing. 



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Oh, what joy the morn-ing holds Down by the rush -ing riv - er 

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166 



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Interval 
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Ring, hap - py bells, Loud - er and loud - er, — O 
ring, hap - py bells, Greet the new day 



22 



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Brown-ies,be - ware 1 Frol-ic with care ; Mortals are sleeping ;Brownies,beware 1 

p^ ~^pp 

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Sum- mer breez - es mer-ri-ly blow; High in the air my kite will go. 



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A bird in the tree top is swing - ing, En - joy-ing the morn-ing- breeze. 



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"O play with me,you little waves, Why turn and run away ?" 
"We must not come, "the waves reply ; "We do not dare to stay. 1 



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Bub - bles bright we are blow - ing, High in the air. . . 



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O hap-py fa- - ces in drear -y plac-es Make glad the hearts that are sad. 



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Down the lane the farmer boy goes, And lon-ger the shadow be - fore him grows. 

PP ^ ^ / ^ rr^. 



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Soft - ly chimes the bell — ting-ting ; Now we may go and play. 
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178 



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179 



Interval 
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g interval 
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_o_ Interval 
151 4-6 



182 



183 



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184 



Oh, what fun 'neath sum- mer sun, Home on the hay to be rid - ing 



24 



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185 



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A fair lit -tie girl sat un-der a tree, Sew-ingas long as her eyes could see. 



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Out in the gar-den in shad-ows gray, Gauzy winged fair - ies dance till day. 



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All the glow has left the west ; Ev' - ning calls the world to rest. 



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Al - ways cheerfully, nev - er tear-ful -ly,Work and stud - y and rest and play. 



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But-ter-fly, but-ter- fly ,haste your flight, Darkness is coming, 'twill soon be night. 
PP ^- -^/ , 



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To mar-ket, to market,to buy a fat pig IThen home again, home again, jiggity- jig 1 



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Ho, heigh - O I Ho, heigh - O ! See, like birds o'er the ice we go ! 



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Look o - ver head 1 Look o - ver head ! Ma- pies are changing their green to red. 



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Chapter II — Review of Four-Quarter Measure ; Nine 

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PART IV 



THREE-EIGHTH MEASURE; RHYTHMIC TYPE, ONE SOUND TO THE BEAT, 
REPRESENTED BY THE EIGHTH NOTE ; NINE COMMON KEYS ; MELO- 
DIES ILLUSTRATING FREQUENT INTERVALS, CONTINUED 



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Brook,why are you wandering here, Leaping air-i - ly, Laughing mer-ri-ly ? 

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