(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Investigation of communist activities in the Pacific Northwest area. Hearings"

^ 



t 



cA' 



V^IsIJ^M 



"Bn 




-II 



Given By 

C/". S. SU? r. Cx-" DGCoIviEi'ITS 



3^ 




INVESTIGATION OF COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE 
PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA— Part 9 (PORTLAND) 



HEARING 



BEFORE THE 



COMMITTEE OX UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



EIGHTY-THIRD CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



JUNE 18, 1954 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 



INCLUDING INDEX 




UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
; -•48069 WASHINGTON : 1954 



^ 



Boston Public Library 
Superintendent of Documents 

OCT 2 7 1954 



. ..-..f*i-'^«jNi 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

United States House of Representatives 
HAROLD H. VELDE, Illinois, Chairman 

BERNARD W. KEARNEY. New York FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania 

DONALD L. JACKSON, California MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri 

KIT CLARDY, Michigan CLYDE DOYLE, California 

GORDON H. SCHERER, Ohio JAMES B. FRAZIER, JK., Tennessee 

Robert L. Kunzig, Counsel 

Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., Counsel 

Thomas W. Beale^ Sr., Chief Clerk 

Raphael I. Nixon, Director of Research 

Courtney E. Owens, Chief Investigator 

n 



CONTENTS 



Page 

June 18, 1954, testimony of — 

Homer Leroy Owen 6606 

John M. Dyhr 6627 

Barbara Hartle (resumed) 6629 

Kenneth Fitzgerald 6650 

John MacKenzie 6652 

Index i 

in 



Public Law 601, T9th Congress 

The legislation under which the House Committee on Un-American 
Activities operates is Public Law 601, 79th Congress [1946], chapter 
753, 2d session, which provides : 

Be it enacted hy the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
of America, in Congress assembled, * * * 

PART 2— RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

Rule X 

SEC. 121. STANDING COMMITTEES 
******* 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 

Rule XI 

POWEES AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 
******* 

(q) (1) Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(A) Un-American activities. 

(2) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcom- 
mittee, is authorized to make from time to time investigations of (i) the extent 
character, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(ii) the diffusion vrithin the United States of subversive and un-American 
propaganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin 
and attaclis the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Con- 
stitution, and (iii) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress 
in any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such inves- 
tigation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such 
times and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, 
has recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Supenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person 
designated by any such chairman or member. 

V 



RULES ADOPTED TO THE 83d CONGRESS 

House Resolution 5, January 3, 1953 
******* 

Rule X 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

1. There shall be elected by the House, at the commencement of each Congress 
the following standing committees : 

******* 

(q) Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 
******* 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 

**>::** 4E * 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(a) Un-American activities. 

(b) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommittee 
is authorized to make from time to time, investigations of (1) the extent, char 
acter. and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States 
(2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and im-Araerican propa 
ganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin anc 
attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitu 
tion, and (3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congresf 
in any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to th< 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such invest! 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-Americar 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such times 
and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, ha; 
recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance ol 
such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, anc 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued undei 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by an3 
member designated by such chairman, and may be served by any person desig 
nated by any such chairman or member. 

VI 



I 



INVESTIGATION OF COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE 
PACIFIC NORTHWEST AEEA— Part 9 (PORTLAND) 



FRIDAY, JUNE 18, 1954 

United States House of Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the Committee on 

Un-American Activities, 

Portland, Oreg. 

public session 

The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
met, pursuant to call, at 10: 30 a. m. on the sixth floor (Judge Claude 
McColloch's courtroom) of the United States courthouse, Hon. Harold 
H. Velde (chairman) presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Harold H. Velde 
(chairman) and James B. Frazier, Jr. 

Staff members present: Robert L. Kunzig, counsel; Raphael I. 
Nixon, research director ; and Earl Fuoss, investigator. 

Mr. Vei.de. The subcommittee vrill be in order, please. Let the 
record show that for the purposes of these hearings I have appointed a 
.subcommittee consisting of Mr. Frazier, of Tennessee ; Mr. Doyle, of 
California ; and myself, Mr. Velde, of Illinois. Mr. Doyle is presently 
attending hearings in Seattle but I understand that he will be present 
tomorrow morning when we begin these hearings. 

Let me say first of all that it is a great pleasure to be in the city of 
roses, in Portland, Oreg. I am sure that my colleague to my left will 
concur in my statement. 

Mr. Frazier. I most certainly do. 

Mr. Velde. The House Committee on Un-American Activities has, 
as its obligation imposed upon it by the House of Representatives, 
the duty to investigate the extent of subversive activities throughout 
the United States and its Territories and to report to the Congress for 
remedial legislation. 

In line with that duty which this committee has, we are in Portland, 
Oreg., today for the first time, I believe, that the House Un-American 
Activities Committee or a subcommittee thereof has been here. The 
investigation will resolve largely around communistic influences in 
"this area. 

Communism is, of course, the clear and present danger to our con- 
stitutional liberties. The Communist Party, we know after long 
periods of study, many long hearings which we have engaged in, is a 
-conspiracy. It is designed to overthrow our form of government by 
force and violence. 

We do not say that by coming to Portland that the communistic in- 
ifluence in Portland or the Northwest is any greater — to any greater 

6605 



6606 COM]MUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

degree — than it is anywhere else in the country. As a matter of fact,. 
I understand that the communistic influence in Portland is not as great 
as it is in Seattle. We were surprised to learn that there were so many 
subversive influences — elements — operating in the city of Seattle. We 
expect and hope to find that here to a lesser degree. 

The committee appreciates greatly the many courtesies that have al- 
ready been extended to us here in Portland. We appreciate the oppor- 
tunity of sitting in this lovely courtroom. The cooperation that the 
Federal judges and the United States marshals have shown is greatly 
aj^preciated. I am sure that there are many others; many public offi- 
cials and many private citizens, who have cooperated with our staff 
and our counsel wiio have been here in this area. I shall attempt to 
thank them all personally later on in the hearings. 

The physical audience present are guests of the United States Con- 
gress. In order for us to conduct our hearings with the proper 
decorum it is necessary that we maintain order in the hearing room. 
The committee cannot tolerate, therefore, any demonstrations, any 
applause, or any type of demonstration whether it be of approval or 
disapproval of what one particular witness is saying or one of the 
committee members is saying. 

I now appoint the deputy United States marshals who are here as 
deputy sergeants at arms of the United States House of Representa- 
tives to carry out any orders of the committee that may be necessary ta 
provide for adequate decorum and proper hearing atmosphere in the 
room. 

Mr. Counsel, do you have a witness ? 

Mr. KuNZTG. Yes, Mr. Chairman, Mr. Homer Leroy Owen. Will 
you stand and be sworn, Mr. Owen ? 

Mr. Velde. In the testimony that you are about to give before 
this subcommittee do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, 
the whole truth, and nothing but the truth so help you God? 

Mr. Owen. I do. 

Mr. Velde. You may be seated, Mr. Owen. 

TESTIMONY OF HOMER LEEOY OWEN 

Mr. IvuNziG. Would you give your full name please, Mr. Owen? 

]\Ir. Owen. Homer Leroy Owen. 

]\Ir. KuNZTG. It might be difficult to hear here so if you will pull 
that microphone just a little closer to you and speak as loudly and 
as clearly as you can so that the reporter here on my right can get all 
of the testimony. 

Mr. Owen, what is your present residence, sir ? 

Mr. Owen. Arlington, Va. 

Mr. KuNziG. Where are you presently employed ? 

Mr. Owen. In private business in Washington, D. C. 

Mr. KuNzio. Could you give the committee a brief resume of your 
educational background, giving us first your age if you don't mind. 

Mr. Owen. Age 30. I received a bachelor of arts degree at Reed 
College in June of 1950, a master of science degree at Cornell Univer- 
sitv, January 1052. 

Mr. KuNziG. "Wliere were you born ? 

Mr. Owen. Ceres, Calif. That is C-e-r-e-s. 

Mr. KuNziG. And where have you lived since that time ? 



i 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6607 

Mr. Owen. I have lived in Washington and in Virginia. 

Mr. KuNziG. I mean where have you lived in your younger boyhood ? 

Mr. Owen. Oh, I see. In California until the war, since the war, 
Portland as of 1945, and then to Ithaca, N. Y., in 1950. 

Mr. KuNziG. What was the total period of time that you lived in 
Portland, Oreg. ? 

Mr. Owen. From September 1945 to September of 1950. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Owen, could you give the committee, please, a 
brief resume of your employment background, the main highlights of 
your employment, from the time that you finished your formal 
education? 

Mr. Owen. In 1948 I was office manager of the Progressive Citizens 
of America and of the Progressive Party. In doing that I interrupted 
my education at Reed. 

Mr. KuNziG. Where was that that you were in this manager position ? 

Mr. Owen. The Progressive Party of Oregon at Portland, Oreg. 

Mr. KuNziG. I see. 

Mr. Oaven. Since that time I have been in Washington. 

Mr. KuNziG. You mean 

Mr. Owen. Washington, D. C. 

Mr. KuNziG. D. C? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. I see. Now did you have any military service, Mr. 
Owen? 

Mr. Owen. Yes, I was in the Air Force from September 1942 to 
September of 1945. 

Mr. KuNziG. And what was your rating ? 

Mr. Owen. I was a technical sergeant and served in Italy. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now, Mr. Owen, in order that the record may be clear 
I note that you are sitting alone here this morning and you are not 
accompanied by counsel. The rules of procedure in the blue rule book 
published by the House Committee on Un-American Activities says in 
rule 7: 

At every hearing, public or executive, every witness shall be accorded the priv- 
ilege of having counsel of his own choosing". 

Do I take it correctly that you are testifying here this morning 
voluntarily without counsel and that you do not desire counsel? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Owen, have you ever been a member of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. "Wlien were you a member ? 

Mr. Owen. From spring of 1947 until January of 1942. 

Mr. Kunzig. You mean '52 ? 

Mr. Owen. '52, I'm sorry. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now will you tell the committee in some detail how you 
became a member of the Communist Party and where this took place? 

Mr. Owen. It took place at Portland, Oreg. I presume that I fol- 
lowed the course of many people who have joined, a desire to improve 
the world and to do it quickly. In my case I became interested about 
doing something about racial discrimination. I came from a strict 
religious background and I grew frustrated with the church because I 
felt that they weren't doing enough about it. I thought that the con- 

48069— 54— pt. 9 2 



6608 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

cept of the brotherhood of man demanded that the churches be in the 
f oreofround to eliminate discrimination. 

And so I approached Eobert Canon 

Mr. KuNZiG. Will you spell that name please ? 

Mr. Owen. C-a-n-o-n. The first name is "Eobert". 

Mr. KuNziG. Who was Robert Canon ? 

Mr. Owen. At that time he was the chairman of the Portland Chap- 
ter of the American Veterans' Committee. 

Mr. KuNziG. Where was he employed, if you know ? 

Mr. Owen. I believe that he was employed at that time at Reed Col- 
lege. He was employed at the Veterans' Guidance Center. 

Mr. KuNziG. I see. Now you say that you approached Robert 
Canon. Would you go on from there please ? 

Mr. Ow^EN. Yes. He suggested that all issues were interrelated, that 
you couldn't work solely at one point, and recommended that I join 
the American Veterans' Committee, which I did, in the summer of 
1946. Later I joined the Progressive Citizens — the Young Progres- 
sives of America I believe it was called at that time — on Reed College 
campus in the fall of 1946. 

Mr. KuNziG. You are giving us then, I take it, steps leading up to 
your membership in the Communist Party? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you feel that these steps were integral points along 
the way, so to speak ? 

Mr. Owen. That's right. And so in the spring of 1947 I attended 
a meeting at which I, along with others, were urged to join the party 
on the grounds 

Mr. KuNziG. Which party ? 

Mr, Owen. The Communist Party — on the grounds that it was tho 
most effective organization to work toward these principles that we- 
felt to be important. 

Mr. KuNziG. Xow who urged you, Mr. Owen, to join the Commu- 
nist Party ? 

Mr. Owen. At the meeting, Mark Haller. 

Mr. KuNziG. Spell that please. 

Mr. Owen. M-a-r-k H-a-1-l-e-r. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did he urge you to join the party ? 

Mr. Owen. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Who else ? 

Mr. Owen. Even 

Mr. KuNziG. Excuse me, go ahead. 

Mr. Owen. I was goinc: to point out that even though at that time I 
knew nothing about the Communist Party, I read none of its literature,. 
I was urged to join because, as I said, it could implement the progres- 
sive program most effectively and I could learn later. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you say at that point that you felt experienced 
politicnlly or naive in this field ? 

Mr. Owen. I must have been considerably naive. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Continue please, who else 

Mr. Velde. Just a moment. 

Mr. KuNziG. Pardon me. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Owen, what were you doing at that time, that 
is, in the spring of 1 947 ? || 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6609 

Mr. Owen. I was attending Eeed College. 

Mr. Velde. I see. 

Mr. KuNziG. Who else urged you to join tlie Communist Party? 

Mr. Owen. Robert Canon and Kingsley Vanier. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Who was Kingsley Vanier ? 

Mr. Owen. At that time he was a student at Reed College and later 
quit the party, the Communist Party. 

Mr. KuNZiG. And so you kneAv these men whom you have named so 
far of your own personal knowledge to be members of the Communist 
Party ? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Tell us how you became a member. What took place ? 

Mr. Owen. Well it grew out of this meeting that I have described. 

Mr. KuNziG. Where was that meeting held, as long as we are dis- 
cussing the meeting ? 

Mr. Owen. I don't recall the place but I do remember that Mark 
Haller, Robert Canon, Kingsley Vanier, Joan Rosenbaum 

Mr. Kunzig. Would you spell that please ? 

Mr. Owen. J-o-a-n R-o-s-e-n-b-a-u-m. Out of that meeting Phiz 
Mezey, Joan Rosenbaum, and myself joined within a matter of weeks. 

Mr. Kunzig. What was that first name, Phiz Mezey I believe you 
said ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Would you spell that please ? 

Mr. Owen. I believe the first name is probably phonetic P-h-i-z, 
the last name M-e-z-e-y. 

Mr. Kunzig. Is that a male or female ? 

Mr. Owen. That is a female. 

Mr. Kunzig. And could you identify her any further ? 

Mr. Owen. She was a student at Reed as was Joan Rosenbaum at 
that time. 

Mr. Kunzig. Please continue, you were discussing how you joined. 

Mr. Owen. That is pretty much the story. I went^in, as I say, with- 
out knowing anything about the philosophy nor the tactics of the Com- 
munist Party on the bases that I pointed out. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Owen, let me say that the committee certainly does 
appreciate your appearing here and giving us the information that 
you have relative to Communist activities in which you were engaged 
and in which others were engaged in this particular area. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities has been in operation 
since 1938 and has put out considerable literature all throughout the 
country and has designated various organizations as front organiza- 
tions in our Guide to Subversive Activities. 

I have often said that it is very difficult to understand why a person 
would join the Communist Party after, or as late as, 1947. It is fairly 
easy to understand why during the war when we were allies, or so- 
called allies, maybe it should be called cobelligerents with Soviet 
Russia, there were a good many who went into the Communist Party 
with the idea of helping win the war. 

I am just wondering if you had any knowledge from the official 
sources such as our committee, or the Attorney General of the United 
States or any of his citations, at the time that you went into the Com- 
munist Party ? 



6610 COMJVIUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. Owen. Not at that time, no sir. Later, of course, I did, but at | 
that time I hadn't taken, prior to joining AVC, any political activity. 
I grew up in a stanch Republican background and it was only shortly 
before — well after, in fact that I joined the AVC — I remember asking, 
""Wliat was a liberal?" and "Wliat was a conservative?" I think my 
ignorance there accounts for some of it. 

Mr. Velde. You stated that primarily your purpose or reason foi 
getting into the Communist Party was the fact that you abhorred 
racial discrimination. Is that right ? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr. Velde, You felt at that time that the Communist Party was 
doing more to prevent racial discrimination than the Republican 
Party or the Democratic Party ; is that right ? 

Mr. Owen. I was advised of that, yes. 

Mr. Velde. And I presume that you have learned differently by 
this time? 

(No response.) 

Mr. Velde. All right, proceed Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Owen, figuring out your age at the present time, 
you were then about 23 when you joined the Communist Party ? That 
is roughly correct ; is it not ? 

Mr. Owen. Roughly, yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. What club of the Communist Party in this area did 
you join? 

Mr, Owen. The John Reed Club. 

Mr. KuNziG. John Reed Club ? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr. KuNziG, Would you tell the committee please something about 
the John Reed Club ; where it met, what it was and as much as you can 
recall. 

Mr. Owen. Basically it was a club composed of college students. 
Most of those students attended Reed College. 

Mr. KuNziG. You mean this particular Communist Party group 
was actually composed of students of college age here in this area ? 

Mr. Owen. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Wliere did you meet? 

Mr. O^VEN. We met at different people's homes, including our own. 
Always, as far as I can recall, in homes and not on campus. 

Mr, KuNZiG. I see. Now roughly what was the membership of this* 
group? 

Mr, Owen. It ranged from oh, approximately 15 at the time I joined 
to about 5 when I quit or left Oregon in late 1950. 

Mr. KuNziG, Did you ever hold office in the John Reed Club ? 

Mr, Owen, Yes, I was the chairman at one point. 

Mr. KuNziG. Wliat took place at these meetings ? Wliat was dis- 
cussed ? 

Mr. Owen. We had educationals. 

Mr. Kunzig. What is an educational ? 

Mr. Owen. An educational is where you discuss Communist theory, 
the works of Marx, Engels, Lenin, Stalin. And we also planned ac- 
tivity for particular campus activity in relation to work in the Young 
Progressives on campus. 

Mr. Kunzig. That is very interesting. Tell us what type of campus 

activity was planned. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6611 

Mr. Owen. Well, of course, when the Wallace campaign was an- 
nounced that was a primary interest of the Communist Party as well 
as other progressive groups and energies were devoted in distributing 
literature, organizing campus sentiment for his candidacy. 

Mr, KuNziG. Are you suggesting that the Communists in this area 
were also part and parcel of the Progressive Party in this area and 
worked through the Progressive Party to attain their ends? 

Mr. Owen. They certainly — many were members and many held in- 
fluential positions. 

Mr Kunzig. You yourself were active in both, is that right. 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now when you were active in the Progressive Party 
did you tell people there that you were a member of the Communist 
, Party? 

Mr. Owen. No. 

Mr. Kunzig. You kept that a secret ? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr. Kunzig. Is that the usual custom of the party, of the Commu- 
nist Party, to keep the members secret and work through other organ- 
izations if the_v could ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did you pay dues in this John Reed Club ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Were there any assessments ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Tell us about the assessments. "VYliy were they made 
and how much did they amount to at various times ? I am talking, 
of course, about the Communist Party assessments now. 

Mr. Owen. They were quite frequently levied. There was a con- 
stant effort to raise more money. I don't remember amounts that I 
paid. I remember frequently paying more than the regular dues. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did you or any of the other members have any idea 
what this money was being used for or where it went ? 

Mr. Owen. We received accountings to some degree or other ? 

Mr. Kunzig. From whom ? 

Mr. Owen. From Mark Haller who was, as I think that I pointed 
pout, the organizational secretary of the party for a while and later 
Ifcecame chairman of the party. 
I Mr. Kunzig. In this area you mean ? 
I Mr. Owen. Yes. 

I Mr. Kunzig. Now I want to ask you, Mr. Owen, to give the com- 
I nittee names of the people whom you knew to be members of the John 
Reed Club during the period from 1947 to 1950 when you were a mem- 
ber. I want to caution you to be extremely careful in your identifica- 
:ions. I want to caution you that the committee is interested only in 
having the names of people whom you knew of your own personal 
knowledge, not hearsay, but of whom you knew of your own personal 
knowledge, to have been members of the Communist Party at the time 
that you were here from 1947 to 1950. If you have any notes on that 
subject, and I see that you have in front of you, please feel free to 
. use your notes. 

Mr. Owen. Yes. Paul Abramson. 

Mr. Kunzig. Will you spell it. 

Mr. Owen. A-b-r-a-m-s-o-n. 



I 



6612 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. KuNziG. Who was Paul Abramson ? 

Mr, Owen. He was a student at Reed. He lived on tlie campus. 
He was a member from 1948 until I left. I don't know what happened 
after that. 

Mr. KuNZiG. All richt, will you continue please ? 

Mr. Owen. Mary Jane Brewster. She was not a Reed student. She 
attended school someplace else but I don't remember where. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you have any idea where she lived ? 

Mr. Owen. She lived with her parents at Portland here. 

Mr. KuNziG. You don't have any address or anything of thai 
nature ? 

Mr. Owen. No, I don't. 

Mr. Kunzig. Incidentally, in all of these names, if you know of an} 
present whereabouts we would appreciate your telliufr us of the mosi 
recent address that you mij^lit h^ve. You have named Paul Abramsoi 
and "Mary Jane Brewster. Were there any others ? 

Mr. Owen. Joan Christofel. C-h-r-i-s-t-o-f-e-1, or Christofer, Sixrm 
spelling with an "r." She was known mainly as Chris. I knew her tc 
be a Communist from 1947 to 1949. She was a Reed student. 

Mr. Kunzig. Was she a resident here in Portland or just came hen 
to school ? 

Mr. Owen. That I don't know. 

Mr. Kunzig. You know only that she was a student at Reed College' 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you have any present address for her ? 

Mr. Owen. No. 

Mr. Kunzig. All right, do you have any other names ? 

Mr. Owen. David Gregg. G-r-e-g-g, and he transferred to thii 
area from southern California. 

Mr. Kunzig. Was he a student ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes, for part time, for a while. 

Mr. Kunzig. Where ? 

Mr. Owen. At Reed College. 

Mr. Kunzig. And you knew him to be a member of the Communis 
Party? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr. Kunzig. Were all these people who were students roughly o 
student age within the normal bounds of a college student's age? 

Mr. Owen. Yes, some of them, usually an older group than yoi 
would find on a campus now because of the war. 

Mr. Kunzig. Any others, Mr. Owen ? 

Mr. Owen. Jan, J-a-n, and Norman Howard. 

Mr. Kunzig. Two people; Jan and Norman Howard? 

Mr. Owen. Yes, Jan the wife of Norman. Transferred from South 
ern California in 1947. Remained here until sometime in 1948. ]N"or 
man was a student at Reed while he was here. 

Mr. Kunzig. Was Jan a student or was she just present and c!asse( 
as his wife? 

Mr. Owen. Wife, and was seriously ill and I believe that that i 
the reason that they left this area. 

Mr. Kunzig. But you did know them both to be members of th' 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Owen. Both attended John Reed meetings ; yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Any others ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6613 

Mr. Oaven. Barbara and William Earl Lewis. 

Mr. KuNziG. L-e-w-i-s ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. Bill Lewis was a student at Eeed until the early 
part of 1948. 

Mr. KuNziG. Was Barbara Lewis his wife ? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you know their present whereabouts ? 

INIr. Owen. I understand by the papers they are in town. 

Mr. KuNziG. I see, but you have no personal knowledge of that 
fact? 

Mr. Owen. No. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now you knew both of the Lewises to be members of 
the Communist Party when you were here ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Any others ? 

Mr. Owen. Phiz Mezey and Joan Rosenbaum I have already 
indicated. 

Mr. KuNZiG. They were both students ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. And you knew them both to be members of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. They joined at approximately the same 
time that I did. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now you knew these people that you are mentioning 
to be members because you met with them, is that correct, at meetings 
of this John Reed Club that we are talking about ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. And those were closed meetings of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Any other names, Mr. Owen? 

Mr. Owen. Bertha Skolnick, S-k-o-l-n-i-c-k, and Jessie Skolnick, 
J-e-s-s-i-e, husband and wife. Jessie was a student at Reed College. 
I knew him to be a member, met with him from 1949 through 1950. 

Mr. KuNziG. And you knew Bertha Skolnick to be a member, also? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. She attended, although not a Reed student, she 
attended the same meetings. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you continue? 

Mr. Owen. Mary Lou Stearns. She attended the John Reed meet- 
ings, a student at Reed. I don't know when she joined, but she was 
there at the time I left in 1950. Marshall Kolin, M-a-r-s-h-a-1-1 
K-o-l-i-n. There again I don't know when he joined, but he resigned 
from the party very soon after the November 1948 elections. 

Mr. KuNziG. But at that period of time, prior to that, you did know 
him to be a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. Dave Lapham, L-a-p-h-a-m, who also quit the 
party in 1949. 
Mr. KuNziG. Was he a student ? 
Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. When you say "quit the party" you know of your own 
personal knowledge that this Dave Lapham left the party ? 

Mr. Owen. That plus the fact that he attended no more meetings 
of the John Reed Club. 



6614 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Owen, was the John Eeed Club of the Communist 
Party organized at tlie time you first enrolled at Reed College ? 

Mr. Owen. I believe it was organized long before, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Do you know approximately how long it had been on 
the campus ? 

Mr. Owen. No; I don't. 

Mr. Velde. "Was there a Labor Youth League on the campus at the 
time you were there ? 

Mr. Owen. No. 

JNIr. KuNziG. The Communists probably didn't need the Labor 
Youth League since they had the Communist membership, itself. 

Mr. Velde. I see. The Labor Youth League is a successor to the 
American Youth for Democracy which in turn was a successor to 
the Young Communist League, so I suppose that your activities as a 
member of the Reed Club of the Communist Party there would be sim- 
ilar to the activities of the Labor Youth League on the various cam- 
puses in the country. Have you heard of the Labor Youth League ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes ; I have. In fact I think there was some discussion 
about having such a group, but felt that it would gain no support. 

]\Ir. KuNziG. Now are there any other members of the John Reed 
Club? You mentioned last Dave Lapham. 

Mr. Owen. Mr. and Mrs. John MacKenzie, M-a-c-K-e-n-z-i-e-, who 
joined the party in tlie fall of 1947. John MacKenzie was expelled 
from the party some time in 1948. 

]Mr. KuNziG. Do you know why ? 

Mr. Owen. Because of statements made against the chairman, Mark 
Haller, to people outside of the party. This was considered antilead- 
ership. 

Mr, KuNziG. Would you continue, please ? 

Mr. Owen. Mr. and Mrs. Kingsley Vanier, V-a-n-i-e-r. Kingsley^ 
his first name, quit the party in writing to me in 1948. His wife had 
been a member for a very short time before that. 

Mr. KuNziG. ^Yhat is his wife's name ? 

Mr. Owen. Barbara. She was formerly Barbara Jackson. 

Mr. KuNziG. I see. 

Mv. Owen. Lew Welch. 

Mr. Kunzig. Just before we get to that can you give me any fur- 
ther identification on the Vaniers ? I knew you mentioned them this 
morning. 

Mr. Owen. I believe they left town, in fact they had left before I 
went to Ithaca. 

Mr. Kunztg. I want to be sure the record is clear. Did you say that 
he was a student ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. At Reed College? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Was she, also ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes, for a short time. 

Mr. Kunzig. I see. Any other members of the John Reed Club? 

Mr. Owen. Lew Welch, W-e-1-c-h, who was in the party a very short 
time. I can't give you dates on that. 

Mr. Kunzig. But it was during the time that you were here? 

Mr. Owen. Tliat's right. 



COMMUNIST ACTI\'ITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6615 

Mr. KuNziG. Is there any further identification that you can give 
us of Lew Welch ? 

Mr. Owen. Otlier than the fact tliat he was a student at Reed, no. 

Mr. KuNziG. Is that a man or woman ? 

Mr. Owen. A man, 

Mr. KuNziG. A man ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mv. KuNziG. Now, Mr. Owen, is that the sum total of the names 
that you can recall of people who were members of the John Reed 
Club? 

Mr. Ow^EN. Yes, 

Mr. KuNziG. As you testified earlier it is pretty clearly a list of 
very definitely college students, is it not ? 

Mr. Owen. Except for the exceptions I have noted, the wives of 
students and the one other exception, Mary Jane Brewster, who is 
now at Reed, it was basically a Reed group. 

Mr. KuNziG. I would appreciate it if you would give us the benefit 
of your knowledge, Mr. Owen, in connection with the Progressive 
Party activity. We have touched upon it briefly earlier this morning. 
Would you tell us about the work, your work with the Students for 
Wallace and so forth ? 

Mr. Owen, Before leaving the campus in 1948, I believe it was in 
December of 1947, I became chairman of Students for Wallace, and 
as I recall our principal effort was a petition campaign urging Wallace 
to run. This was prior to his announcing his candidacy. Since I 
shortly thereafter became office manager for Progressive Citizens of 
America, and then subsequently for the Progressive Party of America, 
little became of Students for Wallace in this part of the country, 

Mr. KuNziG. Who hired you as office manager ? 

Mr. Owen. Thomas G. Moore, who was executive secretary of 
Progressive Citizens of America. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did he have any other employment here in this area ? 

Mr. Oa\t:n. At that time that was his sole employment, as far as I 
know. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you know of any other employment that he has 
had at any later time ? 

Mr. Ow^EN. No. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you know Thomas Moore to be a member of the 
Communist Party, also ? 

Mr. Owen. Not at that time. I learned later that he was. 
^ Mr. KuNziG. Did you learn later of your own personal knowledge 
tliat he was a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now did you at any time enter into any political activ- 
ity yourself on your own behalf ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. I was both a Democratic and Progressive Party 
nominee for the State legislature. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you get in ? 

Mr. Owen. No. 

Mr. KuNziG. How did that come about? Tell us how you became 
a nominee and who decided that sort of thing ? 

Mr. Owen, It was decided in a meeting of the legislative commission 
of the Communist Party of Oregon. At that time, at that meeting it 

48060—54 — pt. n 3 



6616 COailMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

was decided that a slate of Roosevelt Democrats should run and also 
that I should be on that ticket. 

Mr, KuNziG. You mean the Communist Party picked a Roosevelt 
Democrat front slate to cover its activities ? 

Mr. Owen. Well, they certainly selected, decided on the fact that 
there should be a slate running in the Democratic and Progressive — 
this was particularly in the Democratic primaries in its original con- 
ception, and then, of course, later the same candidates were supported 
and nominated by the Progressive Party. 

Mr. Velde. Do I understand that you were defeated in the primary, 
then? 

Mr. Owen. Not in the primary but in the general election. 

Mr. Velde. The general election. You won the nomination in the 
primary. 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Frazier. What year was that? 

Mr. Owen. That was in 1948. 

Mr. Frazier. And you were selected to run by the Communist legis- 
lative committee? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr. Frazier. And were defeated. 

Mr. Velde. Before recessing for 10 minutes, I would like to read 
a couple of letters that I have received, from unions in this area, 
into the record. The first letter is from William Benz, agent for the 
Portland branch of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 

My Dear Mr. Velde : I have been instructed by the membership of the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific to make you and your committee aware of our stand against 
communism, the followers of the Communist Party and their agents and hire- 
lings. The Sailors' Union of the Pacific, its officials and membership have been 
leading the fight against the Communist movement in labor on the Pacific Coast 
for the past 19 years, and it is our objective to put out of business every Com- 
munist and his hireling, not only in labor but in industry as well. You and 
your committee can rest assured that you will get 100 percent support and 
cooperation from this union at any time you may need it. Enclosed are two 
issues of our official publication, the West Coast Sailor, showing our most recent 
efforts in combating this vicious enemy from within. The articles of interest to 
you are marked. 

Very truly yours, 

William Benz. 

We appreciate that letter from the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 
The committee has learned through hearings in San Francisco and 
elsewhere throughout the country that the Sailors' Union of the Pacific 
have been making great strides in preventing any infiltration of the 
Communist Party within its ranks. 

The next letter is fi-om Mr. H. A. Robinson, port agent for the 
Marine Cooks and Stewards, A. F. of L. 

My Deae Mr. Velde : At the regular meeting of the Marine Cooks and Stewards, 
A. F. of L., held June 1.5, 1954, at 7 p. m. the membership went on record by 
unanimous vote to support the action of you and your coniniittee in the coming 
investigation of Communist activities in the Portland area. The Marine Cooks 
and Stewards, A. F. of L., a new organization is the result of a revolt by the 
membership against the Communist rule of the defunct National Union of Marine 
Cooks and Stewards. Yon may depend upon 100 percent support from the Marine 
Cooks and Stewards, A. F. of L., to eliminate communism on all fronts. 

I am sure that the same remarks I made with reference to Sailors* 
Union of the Pacific is true of the Marine Cooks and Stewards as well. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6617 

I did not mention in my opening remarks that the House Committee on 
Un-American Activities operates mider standard rules of procedure. 
The rules are the best we know how to make, which will aid us to get 
the information we desire which the Congi-ess wants, and still protect 
the rights of each and every witness who appears before us and the 
rights of the public, generally. 

With that we will be in recess for 10 minutes. 
(Ten minute recess.) 

Mr. Velde. The hearing will be in order, please. I want to make 
a remark concerning this investigation and hearing. It may appear 
sometimes that we are making a particular investigation into edu- 
cation or into some particular college. I want the record to show 
that the committee has always investigated subversion wherever it 
might be found, and it has never gone into the investigation of any 
particular university or college or any particular school or any partic- 
ular branch or phase of our American institutions. We have a duty 
imposed upon us by the United States House of Representatives to 
hivestigate subversive activities and to report to the Congress for 
remedial legislation. 

Furthermore we are not interested in the hiring or firing of anyone 
in their particular capacities. That is a matter we would leave wholly 
up to the proper authorities to handle. We do, however, make these 
hearings public so that we might get the information for our own 
use and for the use of the Congress as well as to inform the general 
public concerning the nature of Communist subversive influence 
operating in any particular area. 
Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr, KuNziG. Mr. Owen, I'd like to turn now to any other identifi- 
cations of people whom you knew to be members of the Communist 
Party, not necessarily members of the John Reed Club. You've 
already given us the names of those whom you recall to have been 
members of the John Reed Club. Would you let us know the names 
of other individuals who were Communist Party functionaries or on 
the Communist Party Central Committee of Oregon or whatever com- 
mittee or group you knew them to be on. 

Mr. Owen. I knew Jack Dyhr, D-y-h-r, to be a member of the Com- 
munist Party Central Committee of Oregon due to the fact that from 
1949 to September of 1950 1 was also on that committee. 
Mr. KuNZiG. Was this when you were still a student ? 
Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. So you, a student at Reed College, were also actually at 
he same time a member of the Communist Party Central Committee 
Por the State of Oregon ? 
Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. What were the functions of this Communist Party Cen- 
tal Committee for Oregon ? 

Mr. Owen. It was the guiding body of the party, between Com- 
nunist Party conventions. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did it bring down the directives from above and issue 
hem down below and that sort of thing ? 
Mr. Owen. That's right. 

Mr. Kunzig. Where did they get the Communist line from ? Who 
old them ? 



6618 COMIVIUNIST ACTWITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. OwEx. The party, of course, was sensitive and responded to the 
material published in the Communist press; The Dail}^ Worker and 
the magazine Political xVffairs. Most of the policy determined na- 
tionally appeared in those publications, and in addition, I presume, 
the material came in more direct fashion as well, although I don't re- 
call instances where it did. 

Mr. KuNZiG. If you recall — -what position did Jack Dyhr have on 
the central committee of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Owen. A member. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Just a member ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. As you were ? 

Mr. Oaven. That's right. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Can you give us any further identification in the way 
of residence or employment that you know ? 

Mr. Owen. I don't know either where his employment, his place of 
employment, nor his residence. 

Mr. KuNziG. Is he a resident of this area ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes, he is a resident, or was a resident, of Portland. 

Mr. KuNziG. When you knew him ? 

Mr. Owen. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Are there any other members ? 

Mr. Owen. Kenneth Fitzgerald, a member of the Communist Party 
central committee, also a member of the legislative committee of the 
Communist Party. 

Mr. KuNziG. What is the legislative committee of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Owen. It was active principally prior to the election, well dur- 
ing the election of 1948. I don't recall it meeting since that time. In 
other words, from the election of 1948 to September of 1950. 

Mr. Kunzig. What happened between '50 and '54 in this area you, 
of course, have no knowledge of ? 

Mr. Owen. No. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you have any further address or identification that 
you can give us to tie down Kenneth Fitzgerald ? 

Mr. Owen. Only Portland. 

Mr. Kunzig. Only Portland ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Velde. You knew him as a member of the Communist Party 
at the time that you left Portland, is that correct, Mr. Owen? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr, Velde. And an active member at that time I presume ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Any other members ? 

Mr. 0^vEN. Mark Haller. 

Mr. Kunzig. What was his position ? 

Mr. Owen. He was at first organizational secretary. 

Mr. Kunzig. You mean by "first," you mean by that 1947 or so when 
you were first active ? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. And later became chairman of the Com- 
munist Party in the State. 

Mr. Kunzig. That means he was chairman of the central committee 
too, I presume ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 



COMMUNIST ACTWITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6619 

Mr. KuNziG. And in that capacity was, so to speak, your boss I 
presume. 

Mr. Owen. So to speak. 

Mr. KuNziG. In the party ? 

( No response. ) 

Mr. KuNziG. Any others ? 

Mr. Owen. Sam Markson, M-a-r-k-s-o-n, a member of the same 
central committee and a resident of Portland. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you know his employment ? 

Mr. Owen. No. 

Mr. KuNziG. Sam Markson, and the only identification that you can 
give us is that you knew that he was a resident of Portland ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Was he a member of the party still in 1950 when you 
left to o-o to Cornell ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Any others ? 

Mr. O^VEN. Morton Neumann, N-e-u-m-a-n-n, became organiza- 
tional secretary of the party after Mark Haller became the chairman. 

Mr. ituNziG. It might be interesting to note, Mr. Chairman, for the 
record that the committee has information and investigation has 
shown that Morton Neumann has gone underground for the Com- 
munist Party. We were unable to locate him anywhere in this area 
and the evidence is that he is one of those who have gone underground, 
as Barbara Hartle testified to, as she testified to so much in detail ia 
Seattle a day or two ago. Are there any others ? 

Mr. Owen. Herbert Simpson, also a member of the central commit- 
tee, a resident of Portland. 

Mr. Kdnzig. How old a man was Herbert Simpson, to the best of 
your memory ? 

Mr. Owen. Oh, approximately 30. 

Mr. KuNziG. At that time ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. You don't have any further identification on him ? 

Mr. Owen. No. 

Mr. KuNziG. Any others ? 

Mr. Owen. Frank Patterson, P-a-t-t-e-r-s-o-n. He was a member 
of the central committee. 

Mr. KuNziG. Of the State of Oregon ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Communist Party ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. And he also held the position of secretary of the 
Progressive Party. 

Mr. KuNziG. Illustrating again the tieup between the Communist 
Party and the Progressive Party. 

Mr. Owen. He was expelled in 1949, 1 believe, under charges 

Mr. KuNziG. From what party ? 

Mr. Owen. From the Communist Party — under charges that he was 
an F. B. I. agent. 

Mr. KuNziG. Charges, that is, from the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Let the record show, Mr. Chairman, that the investiga- 
tion has shown that that was not correct. The Communist Party was, 



6620 COMMUNIST ACTRITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

shall we say, in error. Do you have any further identification ? Do 
you know the employment of Frank Patterson ? 

Mr. 0\VEN. I understood that he worked for a railroad in some ca- 
pacity, which I don't know, for a time after he no longer was secretary. 
This was on a full-time basis of the Progi-essive Party. 

Mr. KuNziG. I see. Any other names of those whom you knew to 
be members of the Communist Party when you were a member? 

Mr. Owen. Earl Payne. 

Mr. KuNziG. P-a-y-n-e? 

Mr. Owen. P-a-y-n-e, yes, who was chairman of the party here, Com- 
munist Party, until he, too, was expelled. The charges against him 
were gambling with Communist Party funds. 

Mr. KuNziG. How does his position compare with Mark Ilaller 
whom you also said was chairman ? Did the one succeed the other ? 

Mr. Owen. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Haller succeeded Payne ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you have any further identification of Payne, liis 
employment or his residence ? 

Mr. Owen. Not first hand. All I know is what the papers had and 
moving to California. 

Mr. KuNziG. Any other names, Mr. Owen ? 

Mr. Owen. Valerie Taylor. V-a-1-e-r-i-e T-a-y-1-o-r, who is a resi- 
dent of southern Oregon in the Coos Bay area. I knew her as a mem- 
ber of the Central Committee of the Communist Party. 

Mr, KuNziG. In Oregon ? 

Mr. Owen. That's right. 

Mr. KuNZG. I think the record should also show, Mr. Chairman^that 
exactly as I spoke of Morton Newman so also has Mark Haller has gone 
underground for the Communist Party. All efforts to find Mark 
Haller have been unavailing, and our evidence is that he has gone un- 
derground for the Communist Party. Now Mr. Owen 

Mr. Velde. We have received evidence or testimony under oath 
to that effect, is that correct ? 

Mr. KuNziG. Investigation under oath has shown that, sir. 

Mr. Velde. I see. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Owen, I want briefly to cover the period of time 
that you went to Cornell University. Would you give us very briefly 
the evidence that you can about Communist activity when you were 
at Cornell from the summer of 1950 until January of 1952 ? Of course, 
Ithaca in New York. 

Mr. Owen. Yes. We actually didn't become active in the Commu- 
nist Party there until the spring of 1951, until we left the party January 
1952. 

Mr. Ktjnzig. I note you say "we." Since we already have had testi- 
mony and some has been released here in this area of your wife, I take 
it you mean your wife, and was she also a member of the Communist 
Party with you ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. She is also no longer a member? 

Mr. Owen. Thnt is right. 

Mr. Kttnzto. Would you continue, please, about Ithaca, N. Y., and 
Cornell University ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6621 

Mr. Owen. While there we belonged to a small ^roup actually 
composed of only two families, my wife, myself, and Barbara and 
Leonard Marzak, M-a-r-z-a-k. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you know his present employment ? You said you 
met him, of course, there at Cornell. Do you know his present place of 
employment ? 

Mr. Owen. I understand he is teaching at Reed College now. 

Mr. KuNziG. That would be Leonard Marzak ? 

Mr. Owen. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. And you knew Barbara and Leonard Marsak to be 
members of the Communist Party when you were at Cornell ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. How long a period of time did you meet them as mem- 
bers of the party ? 

Mr. 0"\VEN. Approximately 7 months. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now are there any other names of people that you 
can recall who were members with you at Cornell ? 

Mr. Owen. John Marqusee. 

Mr. KuNziG. That is M-a-r-q-u-s-e-e ? 

Mr. Oaven. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. He has already testified before this committee, Mr. 
Chairman, and cooperated with the committee. 

Mr. Owen. Ross Richardson. 

Mr. KuNziG. He was a former FBI undercover agent, Mr. Chair- 
man, who has also testified during the recent Albany hearings of this 
committee. 

Mr. Owen. David and Leila Brownstone. B-r-o-w-n-s-t-o-n-e. 

Mr. KuNziG. Who were they, Mr. Owen ? 

Mr. Owen. David was a student at Cornell Law School, then left 
school and his whereabouts I don't know. 

Mr, KuNziG. It might be noted for the record, Mr. Chairman, that 
the testimony now being given by the witness was corroborated in 
every de1:ail by Mr. Marqusee and Mr. Richardson in their recent tes- 
timony before this committee. 

Mr. Owen. Connie Mitchell, an undergraduate student. 

Mr. KuNziG. At Cornell ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you have any further identification of Connie 
Mitchell ? This was in 1951 and 1952 ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you know where she lived or where she came from ? 

Mr. Owen. She lived in the area of Ithaca, just out of town aways. 

Mr. Yelde. "\^^iat was that last name again? Would you spell it? 

Mr. Owen. Mitchell. M-i-t-c-h-e-1-1. 

Mr. Kunzig. The first name is Connie, is that right ? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now, Mr. Owen. I think the record should show cor- 
rectly that you have cooperated recently with another Federal gov- 
ernmental agency. Is tha t correct ? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. 

Mr. Kunzig. And so has your wife ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. I would like to ask you before concluding the testi- 
mony here this morning to search your mind and memory and make 



6622 COIMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

sure that you have ^iven us the names of all those whom you knew 
to be members of the Communist Party. You've talked about the 
John Reed Club, you've talked about the Communist Party Central 
Committee of the State of Oregon of which you were a member for 
a period of time. Are there any other people whom you met as Com- 
munist Party members who may not have been, let's say, in those vari- 
ous groups you have already talked about ? 

INIr. Owen. I attended a functionaries' meeting of those who were 
officials of various clubs at the home of Dirk DeJonge. D-i-r-k 
D-e-J-o-n-g-e. 

Mr. KuNziG. What are Communist Party functionaries, Mr. Owen? 

Mr. Owen. They consist of the chairman, treasurer, secretaries of 
the individual clubs. 

Mr. KuNziG. Of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Are there any others? Can you identify, before I go 
further, this Mr. DeJonge, his residence, home or anything of that 
nature ? 

Mr. Owen. His home is located in southeast Portland or was at 
that time. 

Mr. KuNziG. This was again between 1947 and 1950? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. Spencer Gill. S-p-e-n-c-e-r G-i-1-1. 

Mr. KuNziG. You knew him to be a member of the Communist 
Party ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. He conducted these educationals I spoke of at 
the John Reed Club around the time that I first joined. 

Mr. Kunzig. How^ old a man was Spencer Gill ? 

Mr. Owen. Again, ap]Droximately 30 or so. 

Mr. Kunzig. At that time? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Kunzig. Do you know his residence or occupation ? 

Mr. Owen. No, only that he was in Portland. 

Mr. Kunzig. Any others ? 

Mr. Owen. Wyman Logan. W-y-m-a-n L-o-g-a-n. He ran for a 
time the bookstore that was located in the Communist Party head- 
quarters and attended a central committee meeting at one time w^ith 
samples of literature. 

Mr. Kunzig. Tell us the function of the — which we find in almost 
every city, that has Communist activity — what is the function of the 
Communist Party bookstore ? 

Mr. Owen. Well, that is the central point of the literature which, 
of course, all members are encouraged to read. It is their books, 
pamphlets, et cetera, that are available at nearly every meeting, at 
every club meeting that I ever attended. 

Mr. Kunzig. The Communist Party bookshops, I take it, are from 
your ])ersonal knowledge run by the Communist Party and 
Communists? 

Mr. Owen. Certainly in this case I would say "Yes." The fact 
that he attended the central committee meeting would certainly indi- 
cate that. 

Mr. Kunzig. I think we should show to be completely fair for the 
record, Mr. Chairman, that of course, this does not mean that those 
who may purchase books at the Communist Party bookstores are, 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6623 

themselves, members of the Communist Party. Are there any other 
names of people whom you met with here, Mr. Owen ? 

Mr. Owen. Tom Moore. Thomas G. Moore. 

Mr. KuNZiG. You mentioned Thomas G. Moore a little earlier this 
morning ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Owen. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you have any further identification as to business 
or home or anything of that nature ? 

Mr. Owen. Well, he was, as I pointed out, the executive secretary 
of the Progressive Party. I attended a Communist Party legislative 
committee meeting w^liich he also attended. 

Mr. KuNziG. And you knew him to be a member of the Communist 
Party ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Any others ? 

Mr. Owen. Mrs. Don Wollam. W-o-l-l-a-m. I attended a meeting 

in her home which she also attended. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Any others ? 

Mr. Owj:n. Michael Loring. L-o-r-i-n-g. 

Mr. KuNziG. Can you go into identification, please ? 

Mr. OwTEN (continuing). Who resided in southeast Portland, was a 
singer, went with the Wallace tour ; I believe also conducted the singing 
at tlie Progressive Party nominating convention in Philadelphia. 

Mr. KuNziG. You knew him to be a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Any other names of people whom you knew to be 
members of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Owen. No. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now Mr. Owen, in conclusion I would like to ask you 
if you would tell the committee in some detail, that is, as graphically 
as you can, your reasons for leaving the Communist Party only very 
recently. 

Mr. Owen. The reasons, firstly, I would say are the reverse of the 
reasons I joined. I became more and more convinced that the Com- 
munist Party was not effectively working for the ideals and the prin- 
ciples which led me to join. In fact, to the contrary I felt the party, 
the Communist Party, to be destructive in that in every activity the 
emphasis was always on putting the party forward, how many were 
recruited, not what was accomplished and no emphasis on what was 
accomplished. 

Secondly, I also became more and more dissatisfied with the way 
the party operated; the expulsion of Frank Patterson indicated a 
degree of ruthlessness. I felt that there was no evidence for the 
charges against him, and particularly this was further emphasized 
when I went to the east coast. 

Mr. KuNziG. Are you suggesting that the Communist Party did 
not practice the democracy that it preaches ? 

Mr. Owen. Precisely. And at Cornell I was under constant criti- 
cism for being a weak Communist. 

I began also to become more critical myself of the other policies. 
Also there was just the desire to lead a normal life. I became com- 
pletely weary of the endless activity, ringing doorbells, what have 

48069—54 — ^pt. 9 4 



6624 COMIHUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

you, and also of the isolation, the growing isolation that membership 
in the Communist Party meant. 

Mr. Yelde. The Communist Party took up quite a bit of your life, 
I suppose ? 

Mr. Owen. It seems at times practically all of it. The meetings 
night after night and while going to school posed quite a problem and 
perpetual conflict between trying to do a good job at school and doing 
this work which you felt had to be done. 

Mr. Velde. We found that experience of yours paralleled through- 
out the countiy. It seems the Communist Party is very demanding 
of its members through direction from the Soviet Union right on 
down through national headquarters of the Communist Party, that 
most of those former Communists who have testified before our com- 
mittee have stated that they were constantly on the go with some 
kind of meeting or other, doing sometliing for the good of the Com- 
munist Party. It is much more demanding of you as a Communist, 
I suppose, than being in public life as my colleague, Mr. Frazier, and 
I are. 

Mr. Owen. This, also, I think helps to delay the process of going 
out. You're so busy, you're so active that you don't have time to stop 
and think. Wliat you do read is in justification of your own day-to- 
day activity of political agitation. 

Mr. KuNziG, Anything further you wish to say about reasons for 
leaving the party ? 

Mr. Owen. I think that pretty well covers it. 

Mr. KuNziG. I certainly wish to thank you for your testimony. I 
have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Yelde. IMr. Frazier, do you have some questions of this witness ? 

Mr. Frazier, Mr. Chairman, I may have 1 or 2 questions. I under- 
stood you to say, Mr. Owen, that you became a member of the central 
Communist committee of the State of Oregon ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes. 

Mr. Frazier. And you were so active that you were elected to that 
or appointed to it within a period of 2 or 3 years ? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. In fact I was selected actually in viola- 
tion of the constitution of the party which I believe reads that you 
have to be a member for 2 years. Well, it was just a little short of that, 
about a month or so. 

]\fr. Frazier. Was that because of your particular activity in the 
party or because you were in that educational group ? 

Mr. Owen. I tliink it all tied in to tlie fact that what I had done plus 
the fact that in those days I was eager. I worked hard. 

Mr. Frazier. I was interested in your statement that you became a 
member of the Communist Party because of your thought tliat the 
Communist Party might contribute to doing away witli racial dis- 
crimination. Is that right? 

Mr. Ovt:n. That is right. 

Mr. Frazier. And you found that that was not correct ? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. I feel that much more has been accom- 
plished from just the recent Supreme Court decisions, the quiet work 
of people, organizations, without fanfare, without the tremendous 
publicity which always accompanies a Communist Party approach to 
a problem. These other things contribute much more to the elimina- 
tion of discrimination. 



J 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6625 

Mr. Frazier. Had you made a study of that problem ? 

Mr. Owen. No, sir. 

Mr. Frazier. You were born here in Portland were you, Mr. Owen ? 

Mr. OwEX. No, sir ; I was born in Ceres, Calif., sir. 

Mr. Frazier. Where ? 

Mr. Owen. Ceres, Calif., sir, in the San Joaquin Valley. 

Mr. Frazier. And when did you move to Portland ? 

Mr. Owen. I came to Portland in 19^5 but I left California in 1942 
to go into the service. 

Mr. Frazier. Is the Negro population of Portland very large ? 

Mr. Owen. Well 

JNIr. Frazier. I am thinking now of in proportion to the white pop- 
ulation. Isn't it rather small ? 

Mr. Owen. Comparatively small ; yes. 

Mr. Frazier. About 1 to every 50 ? A hundred ? 

Mr. Owen. I presume so. 

Mr. Frazier. Even more than that? 

Mr. Owen. No ; I doubt that. 

Mr. Frazier. I mean, you don't have a large Negro population ? 

Mr. Owen. No, 

Mr. Frazier. Very small compared with other parts of the country ? 
You never lived in the South did you ? 

Mr. Owen. Not at that time ; no. 

Mr. Frazier. I understood you to say something about Virginia at 
one time. 

Mr. Owen. Yes, 

Mr. Frazier. Did you live in Virginia, or were you stationed there 
during the war ? 

Mr. Owen, No ; I live in Virginia now. 

Mr. Frazier. You live in the State of Virginia now ? 

Mr. Owen. That's right, 

Mr. Frazier. But you had not lived down there at the time that you 
joined the Commimist Party in an effort to try to, or believing that 
that party was trying to, do something to abolish discrimination? 

Mr. Owen. That is right. I might point out, though, that even 
though there has been a relatively small Negro population there has 
been activity here ; civil rights ordinance committees, and that type of 
thing. I mean the Negro population was large enough to be a prob- 
lem in terms of right to jobs, right to eat in restaurants, and so forth. 

Mr. Frazier. I was just interested in that because I didn't think you 
really had a very serious problem out in this section. 

Now I was interested further in the fact that you say that you were 
nominated to run for the legislature. I suppose from this country? 

Mr. O^VEN. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Frazier. You were nominated by the Communist legislative 
committee back in 1948 ; is that right ? 

Mr. Owen. The slate was selected by the committee, yes, and then 
■we filed for the primary of 1948. 

Mr. Frazier. Now that legislative committee was also supporting 
Wallace at that time wasn't it ? 

Mr. Owen. The same people 

Mr. Frazier. The fall of 1948, that's the election wasn't it ? 

Mr. Owen. That's right, 

Mr, Frazier, That's when you elect the members of the legislature. 



6626 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. Owen. That's ri^ht. The program was developed using local 
issues but it was essentially the same type of program and many of 
us, of course, were for Wallace, probably all. 

Mr. Frazier. Were there quite a number of other gentlemen selected 
to run on the — by the legislative, Communist legislative committee at 
that time for the legislature ? 

Mr. Owen. Pardon ? 

Mr. Frazier. Were there a number of others or were you the only 
one they selected? 

Mr. Owen. There were a number ; yes. 

Mr. Frazier. Do you remember how many ? 

Mr. Owen. No, I don't remember how many. 

Mr. Frazier. All of them were defeated by about 20,000, 25,000 
majorities weren't they ? 

Mr. Owen. Yes, in the general election. 

Mr. Frazier. That's all. 

Mr. Velde. I have no questions, Mr. Owen, but I do wish to make 
a statement relative to your testimony. I congratulate you, first 
of all, on getting out of the Communist Party before it is too late. 
Secondly, on the very fine style in which you have presented your 
testimony here. There can be little doubt because of the investigation 
which we have made of your testimony prior to this session that you 
are telling the truth in every regard. As our counsel has stated, the 
testimony of Mr. Owen has been corroborated by other witnesses whom 
Mr. Kunzig mentioned. 

Mr. Owen, I feel, and personally I feel and am satisfied that other 
members of the committee will feel, too, that you have rendered your 
country a great patriotic service in exposing the Communist apparatus 
as it operated in this particular area as to what you knew about it. 
You have given this committee some very valuable information upon 
which we can base legislation to meet the problem. 

I would say that we have found a good many people have gotten 
into the Communist Party unselfishly with a desire to serve society 
and have been disillusionized just like you were. They found, for 
instance, that instead of the Communist Party helping the Negro and 
preventing discrimination that actually they used the Negro to gam 
their own selfish ends, which is the overthrow of our form of govern- 
ment by force and violence. 

Again I say, the committee is deeply appreciative of the information 
that you have given. You are now discharged and dismissed with the 
committee's thanks. 

The committee will stand in recess until 2 o'clock. 
(Whereupon, at 12 : 10 p. m., the hearing was recessed to 2 p. m. of 
the same day.) 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

(The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
met at 2:10 p. m., pursuant to recess, Representatives Harold H. 
Velde (chairman), and James T*). Frazier, Jr., being present.) 

Mr. Velde. The committee will be in order, please. Are you ready 
to ])roceed, Mr. Counsel ? 

Mr. KuNziG. Yes ; Jack Dyhr. 

Mr. Velde. Will you raise your right hand and be sworn, please? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6627 

In the testimony that you are about to give before this subcommittee 
do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing- but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Dyhr. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN M. DYHR, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS ATTORNEY, 

THEODORE S. BLOOM 

Mr. KuNziG. Will you give your full name, please ? 
Mr. Dyhr. John M. Dyhr. 

Mr. KuNziG. I note that you are accompanied by counsel. Would 
counsel please state his name and office address for the record ? 
Mr. Bloom. Theodore S. Bloom, 1123 Southwest Fifth Avenue. 
Mr. KuNziG. Would you repeat that last name ? 
Mr. Bloom. B-1-o-o-m. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did the reporter get the address ? 
The Keporter. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Dyhr, would you please give your present resi- 
dence ? 

Mr. Dyhr. Mr. Chairman, I decline to answer that question on the 
grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Velde. What was that question again? I'm sorry I didn't 
hear it. 

Mr. KuNziG. For his present residence, Mr. Chairman. 
Mr. Velde. That is a matter of information which this connnittee 
should have, and is entitled to have in doing its work as directed by 
the Congress of the United States. Therefore, you are directed to 
answer that question, Mr. Witness. 

Mr. Dyhr. Mr. Chairman, I wish to consult my counsel. 
INIr. Velde. You may have the privilege of conferring with your 
counsel. 

(Witness consults with counsel.) 

Mr. Dyhr. Upon advice of counsel I assume that the committee has 
my address. 

Mr. KuNziG. That is not the question, Mr. Chairman. He has no 
right to assume anything. We are asking, to get the record straight, 
what his address is. We wish to hear it from himself. 

Mr. Dyhr. I decline to answer on the grounds of the fifth amend- 
ment. 

Mr. KuNziG. All right, Mr, Chairman, that is a clear declination 
And now I wish to ask you, so that the record may be straight, if you 
live at 7204 North Wilbur, Portland, Oreg. ? 
Mr. Dyhr. I wish to consult counsel, please. 
(Witness consults with counsel.) 

Mr. Dyhr. I decline to answer that question on the grounds of the 
fifth amendment. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Chairman, I respectfully request that the witness 
be ordered to answer the question. 

Mr. Velde. Yes, you are directed to answer that question, Mr. 
Witness. 

Mr. Dyhr. Mr. Chairman, I decline to answer that question on the 
grounds of the fifth amendment. 



6628 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Chairman, just bee? e of -a desire to be completely 
fair to this witness and because he may well be subjecting himself to 
a contempt citation at this time, I would like to call his attention to 
the fact that there have been contempt citations issued for this exact 
point, and that recently in St. Louis for a very similar point a person 
was put immediately in jail by a district judge out of a hearing which 
arose from a grand jury proceedings. It went to the Supreme Court 
of the United States and he stayed there. 

Do you still wish to answer the question? I would like to ask you 
again : Do you live at 7204 North Wilbur in Portland, Oreg.? 
Mr. Dyiir. May I consult counsel, please? 
Mr. KuNziG. I suggest that you do. 
(Witness consults with counsel.) 

Mr. Dyhr. Upon the advice of counsel, I decline upon the same 
grounds. 

]\Ir. KuNziG. Where are you presently employed, Mr. Dyhr? 
Mr. Dyhr. I decline to answer that question on the grounds of the 
fifth amendment. 

Mr. KuNziG. I respectfully request that the witness be directed to 
answer, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. That, too, is another bit of information to which this 
committee is entitled under the laws under which we operate and, 
therefore, you are directed to answer the question. 
(Witness consults with counsel.) 

Mr. Dyhr. Upon the advice of counsel I decline to answer that ques- 
tion upon the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

]yir. A'elde. Are you in the frame of mind now where you intend 
to refuse to answer any question that this committee might ask of 
you on the grounds of the fifth amendment ? 
Mr. Dyhr. May I consult counsel ? 
(Witness consults with counsel.) 

IVIr. Dyhr. Mr. Chairman, may I say I would say not necessarily so. 
INIr. KuNziG. May I continue, Mr. Cliairman ? 
Mr. Velde. All right, proceed, see if he will answer you. 
Mr. KuNziG. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party, as you were identified this morning by the witness under oath? 
Mr. Dyhr. I decline to answer that question on the grounds of the 
1st, the 5th, the 9th, the 10th and the 14th amendments. 

Mr. KuNziG. Are you sure that you've cited all the amendments that 
you've desired to ? 

Mr. Dyhr. At the moment, yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. All light, are you now a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. D^TiR. I decline to answer that question on the grounds of the 
fifth and the first amendments. 

]Mr. KuNziG. Now isn't it a fact that you were a member of the ex- 
ecutive committee — I will change that. Mr. Chairman, evidence 
shows that this man has been a member of the executive conunittee of 
the Communist Party, has been active in the Communist Party for 
many years, and is even today, in 1954, a member of the Oregon State 
Committee of the Communist Party. 

Are you today a member of the Oregon State Committee of the Com- 
munist Party ? 






COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6629 

Mr. Dyhr. I decliritrto a^y^^^er that question on the grounds of the 
first and the fifth amendments. 

Mr. KuNziG. Were you ever in the Armed Forces of the United 
States? 

Mr. Dyhr. May I consult counsel ? 

(Witness consults with counsel.) 

Mr. Dyhr. Will you repeat the question again please ? 

Mr. IvuNziG. To the best of my knowledge it was : Were you ever in 
the Armed Forces of the United States of America ? 

Mr. Dyhr. No sir. 

Mr. KuNziG. You were not ? 

Mr. Dyhr. No. 

Mr. KuNziG. Were you a member in your younger years of the 
Young Communist League ? 

Mr. Dyhr. I decline to answer that on the grounds of the first and 
the fifth amendments. 

Mr. KuNziG. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Frazier? 

Mr. Frazier. No questions. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Witness, we called you here with the idea in mind 
that you might possibly give us some information which would be 
of benefit to the committee in making recommendations to Congress 
for remedial legislation to meet the problem of Communist subversion. 

It is very disappointing to us and should be a disappointment to all 
within the sound of my voice that you do refuse to give your Govern- 
ment of which you are a citizen the benefit of any information which 
you might have concerning subversive elements. 

The witness is dismissed and will you call your next witness, please, 
Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mrs. Barbara Hartle. 

Mr. Velde (addressing Mr. Dyhr). You may sign your voucher 
here at the desk. 

Mr. Dyhr. Am I to understand that I am discharged now ? 

Mr. Velde. Yes, you are discharged from your subpena. 

Mr. Dyhr. Thank you. 

Mr. Velde. Will you stand and be sworn, please ? 

In the testimony that you are about to give before this subcommit- 
tee, do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mrs. Hartle. I do. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you state your full name please ? 

TESTIMONY OF BARBAEA HAETLE, ACCOMPANIED BY SPECIAL 
UNITED STATES DEPUTY MARSHAL DOROTHEA HALL 

Mrs. Hartle. Barbara Hartle, B-a-r-b-a-r-a H-a-r-t-1-e. 

Mr. KuxziG. Mrs. Hartle, I note that you have no attornej'^ present. 
You understand that by the rules of this committee, of course, you are 
entitled to be advised by counsel at all times during the course of the 
hearing. It it my understanding that you do not wish to have an 
attorney to advise you ^ 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes, that is correct, I wish no attorney. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Let the record show that the deputy United States 
marshal is accompanying Mrs. Hartle and tliat she is in the custody of 
the United States marshal. 



6630 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. Velde. Would you pull the microphone just a little closer 
to you Mrs. Hartle, please, so that we might be able to hear you ? 

Mr. KuxziG. Mrs. Hartle, am I correct in saying that you are re- 
cently convicted in the Smith Act trial in Seattle, and that you are 
presently beginning the serving of your sentence? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes, that is correct. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you appeal that sentence, Mrs. Hartle ? 

Mrs. Hartle. I did appeal it and abandoned my appeal. 

Mr. KuxziG. I see. And you have just been testifying, so that the 
record may be straight, before this conmiittee in Seattle, Wash., for 
the last several days ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. As a matter of fact, you testified there this morning. 
Is that correct ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes. 

Mr. KuNZiG. xVnd have just flown down here just now ? 

Mrs. HiVRTLE. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mrs. Hartle, would you tell the committee a bit of your 
background briefly, in summar}', and how you became a member of 
the Communist l^arty, briefly your education, employment, and so 
forth? 

Mrs. Hartle. I was reared on a farm in eastern Washington. I was 
graduated from high school in Grants Pass, Oreg. I was graduated 
from Washington State College in 1929. After that I went to work in 
Spokane for a weekly women's newspaper called the Spokane Woman 
for a few months. And after that I went to work in 1929 in the Cres- 
cent Department Store in the advertising department. I worked 
there about 4 years, was laid off in the reduction of force in 1933. 

After that I borrowed a few hundred dollars and started a circu- 
lating library in the Palace Department Store which moved shortly 
after I started it to the Peyton Building, and I had that circulating 
library and gift shop for about 4 years to 1937. 

It was in late 1933 that I joined the Communist Party. The way 
that I came to join the Communist Party was rather a roundabout way. 
I had wanted to be a writer. That is what I had studied in school, 
majored in english and journalism, to be a writer and I had read 
in a small writers' pamphlet that if you want to write great books, 
important books, that you want to read all sides of a subject, and one 
of the sides of one of the subjects was to read Karl Marx's Kapital, 
volume I. I found that quite difficult to read and so I studied it dur- 
ing most of a winter trying to answer the arguments, but having not 
been fortified with any political economy in school I became convinced 
that Karl Marx had a very good analysis of some of the difficulties 
that people were then experiencing during the depression, and since 
Karl MiU'x talks about the Socialist Party in Kapital, volmne I, I 
thought that, "Well, I must join the Socialist Party." I felt that I 
didn't really want to join it very badly but I thought that if this was 
also correct that I sliould do it, that it was the right thing to do. 

And so I did join the Socialist Party in Spokane about 1932. 

Mr. Velde. That was more or less of your own wishes and desires? 
You were not controlled by any other person in that feeling, is that 
correct ? 

Mrs. Harixe. That was my own idea upon reading volume I and 
studying really volume I of Kapital. 



I 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6631 

Mr. Velde. I believe that you had obtained some scholastic honors 
when you were in college, is that not true Mrs. Hartle ? 

Mrs. Hartle. At college I was graduated with the term "high 
honors" and I was a member of Phi Beta Kappa at Washington State 
College. 

I joined the Socialist Party and went to a few meetings. I do not 
recollect exactly how I got in contact with the Communists. I clo know 
that the Communists were then very active among the Socialists and 
were recruiting out of the Socialist Party into the Communist Party. 
Since I can't remember looking up the Communist Party, I am certain 
that they must have looked me up. 

I also remember though, from my past reading, of having some 
doubts about Soviet Russia. I had read about the prison camps in 
Siberia, some other things, and I am sure that the Communists heard 
me question about these things and decided that I had to have some 
doubts resolved about Russia. And so instead of recruiting me imme- 
diately into the Communist Party they invited me to become a member 
of the Friends of the Soviet Union, which was a front, a Communist- 
front organization in Spokane at that time. 

After being in that organization for about a year and being told of 
the very fine system that they had in Soviet Russia where there would 
be practically a heaven on earth, and feeling that that must be a won- 
derful thing, it was then possible for the Communists to recruit me. 

Mr. KtJNziG. I think that the record should show at this time, Mr. 
Chairman, that the Friends of the Soviet Union, a predecessor of the 
American Council on Soviet Relations, was cited as Communist by 
Attorney General Tom Clark in 1947, by this committee as early 
as 1940, and by other committees, especially in California and Massa- 
chusetts as a Communist front. 

Would you continue please Mrs. Hartle ? 

Mrs. Haetle. In 1933, late 1933 then, I joined the Communist Party. 
I did not do this completely of my own volition. I had been around 
the Communists. They had given me lots of literature and one day 
the section organizer of the Communist Party came up to my book- 
store while I was still in the Palace Department Store and ho said, 
"Well, Barbara, we've known you for a long time. You know what 
the right thing is to do. We have had a meeting and discussed it and 
we have decided that if you're going to join the Communist Party you 
will have to join it now." 

I didn't stop to consider then that there was any unusual pressure 
m that, but I felt that, "Well, if it is the right thing to do that I 
shouldn't hang back from doing it." And so I did join and I have 
been a member of the Communist Party from then until at a later 
time when I quit the Communist Party. 

Mr. KuNziG. And you quit it very recently, did you not? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes, I really quit the Communist Party on March 12 
of this year when I went to the FBI, although I thought that I had 
quit it at the beginning of 1952 when I broke contact in the under- 
ground. 

Mr. KuNziG. You did go through the entire trial, did you not, with- 
out publicly breaking in any way from the Communist Party? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes. 



6632 coMivnjNiST actr'ities ix the pacific northwest area 

Mr. KuNziG. I would like to — just before I ask you the next field I 
wish to turn to — would you tell us very briefly a few of the main posi- 
tions that you have held in the Communist Party over the years? 

Mrs. Harti-e. In Spokane, "Wash., I was first a branch secretary 
in unit 4. That was the first neighborhood unit of the Communist 
Party in Spokane, Wash. 

Later I became what was then known as agit-prop director, agita- 
tional propaganda director. Now the Communist Party uses the 
term "education director." 

Mr. KuNziG. That is a-g-i-t dash p-r-o-p, is that right? 

Mrs. Hartle. That is right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Agit-prop ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes. I had other positions as branch chairman and 
other jobs, but one of the main next jobs that I had was organizational 
secretary of the Spokane section. After a leaA'e of absence for about 
a year while I was in Montana upon my return in about 1941 1 became 
the organizer, the full time organizer, of the Communist Party in 
Spokane. A few months later Idaho was added to my territory and 
I was the organizer of the Inland Empire Council of the Communist 
Party which included Spokane and environs, eastern Washington and 
Idaho, the State of Idaho. 

In about 1942, in June of 1942, 1 was assigned to come to Seattle as 
full-time district worker. I did come to Seattle and I became secre- 
tary of the King County, that is the Seattle county, of the Commu- 
nist Party for about a year. I was the chairman of the King County 
Communist Party for about 3 years. I was educational director of 
the Northwest district for about a year and a half on two separate 
occasions. I was the Northwest district executive secretary for about 
a year and a half, 

Mr. KuNziG. Mrs. Hartle, I would like to turn to a specific sub- 
ject, if I may, and ask you whether it is correct to say that the Com- 
munist Party is an international conspiracy, and tlien ask you to 
give us the benefit of your knowledge from your intimate connec- 
tion w^th the Communist Party on that general subject; the inter- 
national conspiracy aspect of the party. 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes, it is correct to say that the Communist Party 
is an international conspiracy. Marxism-Leninism, the theory on 
which the Communist Party of the U. S. A. bases itself, is recognized 
by all Communist Parties of all countries as their basic theory, and 
this, of course, includes the Soviet Party of Soviet Kussia. The in- 
ternational character of communism was organizationally expressed 
in the Third International, the Third Comintern, which was formed 
in 1919 under the leadership of V. I. Lenin. 

The Communist Party of the U. S. A. became a part of this Inter- 
national in 1928 or 1929 and stayed in it until 1940. The Communist 
Party of this country disaffiliated in 1940 from the Comintern and 
stated its reason for doing so as being the Voorhis Act. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you spell that act please ? 

Mrs. Hartle. V-o-o-r-h-i-s. Tlie International itself was dissolved 
during World War II. The reasons given in tlie Comnmnist Party 
were that a new world situation had been reached, that the respec- 
tive Communist Parties were now able to stand on their own feet with- 
out sucli formal organizational ties, and that in any event the Inter- 
national couldn't function during wartime. It was also said that dis- 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6633 

solution would be a contribution to the war for national liberation, 
which is a name that Stalin gave World War II after the Soviet Union 
was attacked by Hitler. 

The formation of the Cominform after the war was presented in the 
Communist Party as not being another Communist Internationa] 
but as being an information bureau for exchange of opinions. This 
Communist information bureau was composed of the parties of nine 
countries and did not include the Communist Party of the United 
States. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did I understand you to say that the Cominform was 
a successor to the Comintern ? 

Mrs. Hartle. I say that the Communist Party said that it was not 
another Communist Party International. 

Mr. KuNziG. That's words of the Communist Party ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes; that is what the Communist Party said. The 
impression was given that this setup did not have the authority of 
the CI, but that it was a loose fraternal type of relation. That is the 
way that it was presented within the Communist Party while I was 
a leader in the Communist Party. 

In these various maneuvers, including the C. P.'s U. S. A. disaffilia- 
tion, and including the dissolution of the Comintern, there was never 
a word or a hint that the national parties should ever find themselves 
at odds on principle. Marxism-Leninism continued to be the guiding 
theory of all of them and was recognized by all of them. 

Different attitudes of the National Communist Party toward a prob- 
lem were possible but this would be a matter of tactics only. 

The heavy exchange of literature between the Communist Parties, 
with much emphasis on literature from the Communist Party of the 
Soviet Union and from the Government of the U. S. S. R. into the 
Communist Party of the U. S. A. is a concrete expression that this 
common tie of Marxism-Leninism w^as never abandoned. The litera- 
ture from Red China and other places, other countries, eastern Eu- 
ropean countries, also come under this exchange. _ 

The theory of Marxism-Leninism expressed in books that I circu- 
lated and talked from prove without a possibility of doubt that com- 
munism is an international movement and this is not something that 
is hidden in the basic theory but that is emphasized in the basic theory 
of Marxism-Leninism. I "was taug^ht in a national training school, 
which I attended in 1946, an 8- or 10-week full-time training school 
that was held for propaganda leaders at Camp Beacon on the Hudson 
near New York City. There I was taught that for the Communist 
Party to depart from general principle vfas revisionism. The general 
principle referred to was Marxism-Leninism. 

Mr. Velde. You say that was in 1945 ? 

Mrs. Hartle. 1946. 

Mr. Velde. Well, that was after the Duclos letter and after the 
break in the party, wasn't it ? 

Mrs. Hartle. That was after the reconstitution of the Communist 
Party. The school, I might add, set its objective to root revisionism 
out of the Communist Party of the U. S. A., and to have it on the high 
road of Marxism-Leninism. That was the objective of the school. 
In many Marxist-Leninist theoretical works the ideas expressed were 
that communism is not a movement for communism in any single coun- 



6634 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

try or even group of countries, that it is an international movement, 
and that its aim is world communism, and this is also not hidden in 
the basic work. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did the Communists feel that capitaJism and com- 
munism were compatible or incompatible '? I'm thinking in terms of 
the Duclos letter. Perhaps you could explain briefly about that letter. 

Mrs. IIartle. The Communist-JSIarxist-Leninist theories on which 
they base themselves are very clear, that communism and capitalism 
are not compatible, that they are directly opposed to each other, that 
this is evidenced in the class struggle, the struggle of the two main 
classes. The Communist theory says tliere are two main classes of 
society — the working class and the capitalist class, which are in con- 
stant war. The working class has as its representative the Commu- 
nist Party, That is the representative of the working class. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Self-imposed, I suppose, upon the working class? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes. They haven't taken a vote about that yet. The 
Republican and Democratic Parties and all the rest of the parties, they 
all represent the bourgeois class, the capitalist class. 

Mr. KuNziG. What was the Duclos letter and would you spell it for 
the reporter ? 

Mrs. Hartle. The D-u-c-1-o-s letter was an article written by Jac- 
ques Duclos, a Communist Party leader of France and was printed in 
the theoretical organ of the Communist Party of France. This letter 
discussed the Communist Party of the U. S. A. and specifically the 
kind of program and leadership that Earl Browder was giving the 
Communist movement in the United States. 

Mr. KuNziG. What period of time was this, Mrs. Hartle ? 

Mrs. Hartle. That was the period of time after the Communist 
Party had been dissolved and the Communist Political Association had 
been formed. 

Mr. KuNziG. What year ? 

Mrs. Hartle. In 1944. In this letter Jacques Duclos said that this 
move and these policies of Earl Browder were revisionism of Marxism- 
Leninism ; said that Earl Browder had abandoned the class struggle 
and become a class collaborationist, that Earl Browder's perspective 
that the countries of the world could get along peacefully now that 
fascism had been defeated was an empty illusion, and said that the 
class struggle never ends until the working class is victorious — the 
working class led by the Communist Party, no one else. 

Mr. KuNziG. At that point the Communist Party clearly became a 
militant party against the United States of America ? 

Mi's. Hartle. Yes. At that point it did become so. Instead of 
trying to have labor-management relations, peaceful ones with negoti- 
ations where that was possible to make gains without resorting to large 
struggle and large demonstrations and a large uproar, that that should 
be done. 

Mr. KuNziG. Are you suggesting tliat if there could l)e a peaceable 
labor settlement of a strike, for example, or any dispute between labor 
and management, the Communist Party would ])refer not to have a 
peaceable settlement but would prefer strikes and trou])le ? 

Mrs. Hartle. That is correct. I was taught in the national train- 
ing s(!hool in 1946 that the aim of the Connnunist Party is to teach the 
working class how to unite and fight, and that they cannot learn this 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6635 

by getting concessions, that they can only learn this by putting up a 
light and wresting concessions, if you please, in the course of struggle, 
in the course of strife, in the course of mobilizing public opinion and 
getting it aroused up. 

Mr. KuNziG. Since you have mentioned it at this point, where was 
this national training school and what was it '? 

Mrs. Hartle. It was in Camp Beacon. 

Mr. KuNziG. What State? 

Mrs. Hartle. It was held at Camp Beacon in New York State. 
That is on the Hudson, not too far from New York City. 

Mr. KuNZiG. What was this a national training school of ? 

Mrs. Hartle. It Avas a training school for propagandists, of the 
Communist Party. It — district educational directors, persons with 
important assignments on Communist newspapers, organizers of im- 
portant districts, and such persons came to this school. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Did you ever know a Mark Haller ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes ; I did. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you ever know him in connection with this na- 
tional training school ? 

Mrs, Hartle. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. And if so, would you tell us about it ? 

Mrs. Hartle. He was a student, a fellow student of mine at that 
national training school and came from the State of Oregon. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you know him to be a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes; I knew him to be a member of the Communist 
Party. I had known him to be a member of the district committee of 
whicii I, also, was a member. I have met with him in many, many dis- 
trict functionary, district committee meetings. I was in the same 
group with him at the national training school. 

Mr. Velde. 'NAlien was the national training school again ? 

Mrs. Hartle. In 1946. 

Mr. KuNziG. What district was it that you were referring to, Mrs. 
Hartle? 

Mrs. Hartle. That I represented ? 

Mr. KuNZiG. When you said that you met in district meetings with 
Mark Haller. 

Mrs. Hartle. Northwest district meetings, when Oregon was a part 
of the Northwest District 12 of the Communist Party. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Of the Communist Party ? 

Mrs. Hartle. That's right. 

Mr. Velde. Can you tell me what district Oregon is in now? As 
far as the Communist Party is concerned. 

Mrs. Hartle. In 1947 the Oregon section of the Communist Party 
was attached directly to the national organization as a separate State 
organization and was withdrawn as a part of the Northwest district, 

Mr. Velde. Thank you. 

Mr. KuNziG. What district is it now, what number, if you know? 

Mrs. Hartle. Oregon ? 

Mr. KuNziG. Yes. 

Mrs. Hartle. No; I don't know what number they gave Oregon. 

Mr. KuNziG. I want to ask you a very serious question, Mrs. Hartle. 
What would be the position of a Communist, either underground or 
not underground at the present time in the United States of America 



6636 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

in the event of war with the Soviet Union, from your own personal 
knowledge ? 

Mrs. Hartle. From my own personal knowled<:?e, from reading the 
statement of William Z. Foster, which was discussed in our district 
party meetings, the position would be that in the event that the United 
States would launch a war of aggression against Soviet Russia that 
the Communist Party would not support that war. This, you will 
note, is a quite careful formulation, it is like many other Communist 
formulations. In that statement is the idea that if there were any war 
between our country and Soviet Russia that if there were any war 
that the only war that the Communists would oppose would be an 
aggressive war on the part of the United States. However, in all of 
the Communist material and in all of the communistic policies and 
discussions it is possibly said that the Government of the United 
States is a government of imperialists and that the imperialists are 
seeking to launch an aggressive world war III to save their system 
and to get new markets and so forth. And so it is understood that 
when this formulation is made that in the event of war between the 
United States and Soviet Russia that the Communists would not 
support the United States. 

Mr. Velde. And it has been predetermined then that if the United 
States gets into any kind of a war whatsoever whether it is to 
defend our own shores or to defend the free nations of the world, 
it is predetermined by the Communist Party that that is a war of ag- 
gression on the part of the United States caused by imperialism, Wall 
Street, and so forth. Is that correct ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes. There is no doubt in my mind about that. The 
attitude in all of its publications, in its basic theory, the attitude of 
the Communist Party toward Soviet Russia is that that is a socialist 
country, that this country has no reason for launching an aggressive 
war and a lot of other material along that line, and that on the con- 
trary the United States Government has every reason for launching 
aggressive war because it is a capitalist country and it is just a fore- 
gone conclusion with this attitude toward Soviet Russia that what 
Foster meant when he said, "In the event of an aggressive war by the 
United States against Soviet Russia," that he meant any war that 
might happen between this country and Soviet Russia. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mrs. Hartle, I would like to turn to the work of such 
front organizations as the Civil Rights Congress, and ask you if you 
have any personal knowledge yourself of the Civil Rights Congress, 
its position with relationship to the Communist Party and its function 
t()day in the United States of America? I want to carefully draw a 
distinction between the Civil Rights Congress and the A. C. L. U., the 
American Civil Liberties Union which is, of course, an entirely dif- 
ferent organization. I am speaking about tlie Civil Rights Congress. 

Mr. Velde. Perhaps you might note the citations of the Civil 
Riglits Congress, Mr. Counsel, if you could supply — find them — in 
a hurry? 

Mr. KuNziG. The Civil Rights Congress, Mr. Chairman, and for 
the record, has been cited as subversive and Communist by Attorney 
General Tom Clark in 1947, and again in 1948. It has been cited by 
this committee in 1947 as an organization formed as a merger of two 
other Communist-front organizations: the International Lnbor De- 
fense and the National Federation for Constitutional Liberties, dedi- 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6637 

cated not to the broader issues of civil liberties but specifically to the 
defeuse of individual Communists and the Communist Party and con- 
trolled by individuals who are either members of the Communist Party 
or openly loyal to it. 

Would you give us the benefit of any knowledge that you have from 
your own personal experiences, Mrs. Hartle, in the Communist Party ? 

Mrs. Hartle. After the first arrest under the Smith Act, the arrests 
of 12 national committee members of the Communist Party, the civil 
rights work of the Communist Party in district 12 became a very im- 
portant part of its work and took up a great deal of its time and energy. 
After about a year of operating in this way the Communist Party itself 
carrying its own defense work on directly right within its organiza- 
tion with the aid of a few undeveloped front setups, as for a fund drive, 
the advice was transmitted from national headquarters, Henry Huff, 
H-u-f-f , reporting William Z. Foster's words that, "The Communist 
Party could not be its own defense organization, that a separate organ- 
ization was necessary." The reason given was that the Communist 
Party was the political party of the working class and had to give 
political leadership, and that carrying out all of its own defense work 
within the organization would prevent it from fulfilling its basic mis- 
sion. 

This report was given by Henry Huff to the district boards of the 
Communist Party and of which I was a member. 

A short time later Huff made the proposal that John Daschbach • 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you spell that please ? 

Mrs. Hartle (continuing). D-a-s-c-h-b-a-c-h. Take the assign- 
ment of heading the Civil Rights Congress and infusing some real life 
and activity into it. Huff emphasized the importance of this task, the 
necessity of building up the Civil Rights Congress, the necessity of its 
taking on the immediate defense work such as mobilizing public sup- 
port, raising funds, getting signatures to petitions, holding public 
meetings and things of that nature. 

John Daschbach was a member of the district committee and this 
assignment was a district board and committee assignment and of 
leading importance. 

Daschbach accepted this assignment and began to work on it for 
some time before I left Seattle in July of 1950 at which time I was sent 
underground by the Communist Party. 

Besides Daschbach's assignment, which was an important step. Huff 
made it clear in a district conference that — a district conference of the 
Communist Party — that it was important to support the CRC. 

Mr. Velde. Mrs. Hartle, you mentioned that you were directed to 
go underground in 1950. Could you explain that a little more fully 
what was meant by that and so forth ? If you are coming to it later 
in your testimony I will be glad to withdraw that question. 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes, please. I will be glad to now. Do you wish me 
to do it? 

Mr. Velde. No; I withdraw the question. By the way, you do 
have notes there I notice. Will you tell the committee how those were 
prepared and when they were prepared ? 

Mrs. Hartle. These notes were prepared by myself on the basis of 
what I could remember of the activities of the Communist Party that 
I had engaged in. 

Mr. KuNziG. Where have you prepared these notes ? 



6638 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mrs. Hartle. They were prepared in the marshal's office while I 
was in custody as I am serving my sentence. 

Mr. KuNziG. Just recently in other words ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Just recently. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you continue in your discussion of the Civil 
Rights Congress ? 

Mrs. Hartle. The assignment of John Daschbach to head the Civil 
Rights Congress was an important step but despite this Huff made a 
report in a district conference in which he stressed that the sections of 
the Communist Party needed to assign members to work in the CRC 
and he criticized what he considered to be some inattention to its im- 
portance. He pushed for the building of the Civil Rights Congress. 
The term he used was that we had to overcome a lackadaisical attitude 
toward this very important work of this very important organization. 

The Civil Rights Congress in Seattle was completely under Commu- 
nist domination at the time that I left Seattle. It did carry out other 
campaigns but — ^by this I mean other campaigns besides defending 
those indicted under the Smith Act — and some of those campaigns 
were in the Negro rights' field, but it was the Communist Party policy 
to make the Civil Rights Congress appear to be a genuine civil rights' 
organization in order to gain broader support for its basic program. 

After I returned to Seattle after my arrest and after I was released 
on bond I spoke at some house gatherings of the Civil Rights Congress 
in raising funds for the Seattle Smith Act case, and I found that two 
persons were in the leadership of the Civil Rights Congress in particu- 
lar whom I had known as Communists before I liad left Seattle. 

Besides Jolm Daschbach there was Harriett Pierce, H-a-r-r-i-e-t 
P-i-e-r-c-e, who was in a full time capacity in the Civil Rights Con- 
gress office in the third floor of the Bay Building, and Bernard Sreyd, 
B-e-r-n-a-r-d S-r-e-y-d 

Mr. KuNZK}. You knew both of these to be members of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes; I knew them both to be members of the Com- 
munist Party until the time that I left Seattle. 

Mr. KuxziG. When they made speeches for civil rights all around 
the area about the Civil Rights Congress and so forth, did they an- 
nounce to the people whom they were speaking to, "I am a member of 
the Communist Party"? 

Mrs. Hartle. I did not hear any of them do so and I spoke at a 
number of meetings and did not hear anyone say that tliey were a 
member of the Communist l^arty, not even John Daschbach who did 
say that he was a member of the Communist Party in tlie Smith Act 
trial. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you have any further testimony on the Civil Rights 
Congress ? 

Mrs. Hartle. I think that 1 — in giving a definition of the Civil 
Rights Congi'oss T would say that it was a ('ommunist-front organiza- 
tion in the field of civil rights. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mrs. Hartle, I would like to read you a few words that 
appeared in today's JMorning Oregonian before I ask you the next 
question wliich I would like you to answer as these other questions 
from your own ]:>ersonal knowledge, of course, as a Communist for 
many, many years. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6639 

There has been testimony before this committee referring to a Dr. 
Stanley Moore who is at the present time on the east coast but who 
recently in the last several days sent back a letter here which was 
published in all the newspapers about his position. He appeared be- 
fore this committee and took the fifth amendment and two other people 
appeared before this committee, former Communists, and said they 
knew him as a member of the Communist Party. 

He says in his letter, "I have fooled nobody. I have committed no 
crimes. The worst thing that I could be guilty of is being unpopular." 
And then one asked, apparently long distance, by a newspaperman 
whether he was a member of the Communist Party and he answered as 
usual, "That is my own affair." 

What I would' like to ask you, Mrs. Hartle, with that preface, is — 
what are the instructions given to members of the Communist Party 
on behavior before this committee when they come in to testify? Is 
that a matter discussed? Are there arrangements on that sort of 
thing ? Wliat are people told to do ? 

Mrs. Hartle. There are general instructions on such matters that 
are always given and taught to people in the Communist Party, and 
then there are specific instructions and arrangements made over 
specific events such as the Velde committee subpenaing a person. The 
general instructions that one learns in the Communist Party is that 
wherever he appears and whatever he does, it is his duty and respon- 
sibility to put forth the Communist Party line in the most effective 
possible manner that the situation allows, and that ap])lies to courts 
and committees, to trade-union meetings and to all other activities, 
including your own family whom you are also supjDOsed to propagan- 
dize to the best of your ability. 

The specific instructions on committees such as the Velde committee, 
the general line is to refuse cooperation. The specific method of re- 
fusing cooperation is to rely on the fifth amendment. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now, of course, we know and to be completely fair 
we know that a person has every right in this country to use the fifth 
amendment if he feels that his answer may tend to incriminate him, 
but beyond that point we are interested in your personal testimony 
as a former member of the Communist Party, and if I understand it 
correctly, you are telling us that this is arranged and worked out in 
advance in Comnumist Party meetings as to how to behave and how 
to disrupt congressional investigations. Is that correct ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes. Meetings are held on such matters and as much 
detailed preparation as possible is made before such an event. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you, yourself, participate in such meetings where 
arrangements were made as to how to disrupt congressional commit- 
tees ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes, I have participated, I don't believe on congres- 
sional committees, but I had a great deal of experience along that line 
with the Canwell committee in the State of Washington. 

Mr. Velde. What about some of these witnesses, these fifth amend- 
ment witnesses that appear who rant and rave and abuse the com- 
mittee and won't even take the fifth amendment until they are through 
talking and ranting and raving. Are they given instructions by the 
Communist Party to do that or do they do that on their own accord? 



6640 COMMUXIST ACTRITIES IX THE PACIFIC XORTHWEST AREA 

Mrs. Hartle. It comes from the general instructions of the Com- 
munist Party as best they are able to put forth the Communist Party 
line. 

iSIr. Velde. Some person with an education such as, a good education 
such as a lawyer or a professor could very well put forth the party 
line by abusing the committee and its members ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes, that is definitely a part of it. Tliere ai-e many 
possible tactics as I am sure the Velde committee is well aware. They 
are delaying tactics, there are evasive tactics, there are direct refusal 
sharp refusal, and many other tactics are possible, and this depends 
somewhat upon the capacities of the individual Communist. 

Mr. KuNziG. Have you noticed, yourself, personally in the last few 
days any of these tactics being used in a certain nearby city known as 
Seattle? 

Mrs. Hartle, Yes, I have noticed quite a variety of tactics being 
used there with about the same general impression, though, on the 
public mind, I think. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Chairman, I think this might be a good moment 
for a 5 or 10 minute recess. 

Mr. Velde. All right. The committee will be in recess for 15 
minutes. 

(Fifteen-minute recess.) 

Mr. Velde. The committee will be in order, please. Proceed, Mr. 
Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mrs. Hartle, I turn now to the position of the Com- 
munist Party concerning sabotage in the United States, and I should 
like to ask you from your own personal experience to testify on that 
question, sabotage. 

Mrs. Hartle. In the selected and in the collected works of V. I. 
Lenin which I have studied as a Communist leader and teacher, I have 
read that a true party of the working class must do work in the armed 
forces of its country. I remember hearing discussions along this line 
in the first couple of years that I was in the party in 1934-35, but after 
that the position of the C. P. U. S. A. evident to me was that such work 
was not done by the Communist Party in this country. Work in tlie 
Armed Forces was not done by the Communist Party here. However, 
during World War II a Communist did go into the Armed Forces and 
at that time they were given leave of absence from the Communist 
Party and were reregistered upon their return in order to be what 
the Communist Party called full members again. 

My understanding as a Communist leader was that Communists in 
the Armed Forces during World War II had no special mission to 
fulfill except to be the best possible soldiers to help win the war against 
Hitlerism, against fascism. When Leo Canafax, C-a-n-a-f-a-x, was 
in the Armed Forces after World War II in 1947 and spoke with mo 
and evinced an interest in the Communist Party, I explained to him 
that he could not be recruited into the party until after he had been 
discharged from the Army. I have never learned yet how this basic 
Leninist position that I studied in the basic works is reconciled with 
the official and apparent practice of the Communist Party of the 
IT. S. A. It is made very clear by Lenin tliat a revolutionary party 
of tlie working class must do work in the Armed Forces of its country 
so there is a contradiction between theory and practice that was never 
explained to me. 



COMMUNIST ACTR'ITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6641 

I do remember one formulation expressed by Andrew Remes who 
was acting district organizer of the Communist Party of the northwest 
district at the time that Hitler attacked Russia. In explaining why 
Communist Party members would willingly enter the Armed Forces 
and serve to the best of their ability, he said in a district conference of 
Communists, "We are going to build a people's army under brass hats." 
That to me at least is somewhat contradictory to a leave of absence and 
being the best possible soldier approach. 

Further, on the question of sabotage, the Communist Party position 
is that, its open position, is that it does not condone sabotage, and it 
tries to laugh that off as being something that it has no thoughts of. 
However, a closer examination into its basic theory and position into 
literature that it circulates will show that the blind allegiance to Russia 
and the world Communist movement would, if a person remained a true 
Communist, lead to acts of sabotage in wartime if our country were en- 
gaged in a war with the Communist country like Soviet Russia. That 
is my own belief, that that would be the outcome of remaining a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party until any such eventuality would come 
about. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mrs. Hartle, from your experiences in the Communist 
Party, what is the viewpoint expressed at meetings, district meetings, 
among the leaders of the Communist Party and so forth on the sub- 
ject of attempts to either infiltrate or — to infiltrate religion or to use 
religion for the benefit of the Communist Party ? Would you explain 
briefly your knowledge on that point? 

Mrs. Hartle. The Communist Party in my experience in the north- 
west district has had practically no success, and has made very little 
effort to recruit members of the ministry into the Communist Party. 

Mr. KuNZiG. You are talking now about recruiting ministers into 
the party itself? 

Mrs. Hartle. As members. 

JMr. KuNziG. As members. 

Mrs. Hartle. Of the Communist Party. There has been more 
success and a great deal more effort to involving members of the minis- 
try in front work and on front issues. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you explain, please, in a little more detail what 
you mean by that? 

 Mrs. Harti.e. Well, for instance, a peace petition, the peace program 
of the Communist Party always coincides with the Foreign policy of 
Soviet Russia. And when the Communist Party puts out a peace 
program, it's a peace program that furthers the interest in one way or 
another of the foreign policy of Soviet Russia. 

However, the members of the clergy will be approached on the basis 
of the deep interest that the Communists know that members of the 
ministry have in peace. 

'. Mr. KuNziG. You are talking now, of course, about non-Commu- 
nists, perfectly fine, decent ministers, who have a sincere desire for 
peace ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes, that is true, and who have no idea of the con- 
notations of this particular peace policy, and will attempt to secure 
their names to petitions, secure the use of their names for committees, 
attempt even to involve them in peace organizations like in neighbor- 
hoods, and thereby to lend dignity and credibility to the peace, so- 
called peace program, that is being put forth by the Communist Party. 



6642 coMivruNiST actr'ities in the pacific northwest area 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you know of your own personal knowledge that the 
Communist Party did attempt to do this sort of a thing ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes, I have known of my own personal knowledge 
that this has been done on a number of issues. I remember its being 
done in the 1930's in Spokane in connection with unemployed demands, 
relief demands, impossible ones they were, too, that were made by the 
Communist Party and were able to involve a large group of ministers 
to go along with this demand until they found out that it was spon- 
sored by the Communist Party. 

I have heard since my arrest and was in Seattle during- the trial 
that a number of ministers were gotten to sign a petition in connec- 
tion with the Rosenbergs. And in addition to that, I also heard that 
someone by mistake put down the names of a number of ministers 
Avithout having previously consulted them, too. This was a mis- 
take and those ministers whose names were put on that way plus 
some otliers who willingly gave them repudiated that in the Seattle 
newspapers. 

There have been other things like the Stockholm Peace Pledge and 
other matters on which the names of clergymen have been secured 
and used in front worJc, not knowing in almost all cases the direct tie 
to the Communist Party of the issue or the committee or organization. 

Mr. Velde. Do you know of your own personal knowledge that the 
Committee to Defend the Rosenbergs, the Stockholm Peace Movement, 
and those were actually controlled by the Communist Party itself? 

Mrs. Hartle. I do know that the Communist Party started, organ- 
ized, planned, and carried through the whole Stockholm Peace Pledge 
campaign in the State of Washington. 

Mr. Velde. Proceed. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mrs. Hartle, I turn now to something that you men- 
tioned a little earlier and we put it off for a few moments to complete 
the testimony that you were giving at that time. That is the question 
of your having gone into the underground in the last few years of 
your membership in the Communist Party. I wish that you would 
give the committee the benefit of your knowledge in this field of the 
underground. What is it when someone goes underground? What 
does it mean? How does he or she go underground and are there 
people underground for the Communist Party today ? It is my under- 
standing that a great deal of your experience underground was in 
the State of Oregon and I wish that you would testify in detail on 
that point. 

Mrs. Hartle. At the end of June 1950 the Northwest district secre- 
tary of the Communist Party, Clayton Van Lydegraf— — 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you spell that please ? 

Mrs. Hartle. V-a-n L-y-d-e-g-r-a-f. (Continuing:) Came to the 
house where I was living and told me, "This is it. Conditions are very 
serious and it looks like someone is going to have to leave town." And 
he meant to go underground. He said that I should come to a park 
in Seattle for a meeting about it in a couple of hours and to be careful 
how I entered the park that no one would see me. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Did you say that was in June of 1950^ 

Mrs. Hartle. 1950. 

]VIr. Velde. How did that coincide with the sending of troops to 
Korea and the Xortli Koreans' attack upon the South Koreans? 






COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6643 

Mrs. Hartle. It was almost immediately after that. I was still in 
Seattle when that took place. I met in the park with 4 district leaders : 
Henry Huff, Van Lydegraf, Ralph Hall, and myself met in the park, 
and Henry Huff, who was district chairman of the Communist Party 
explained that some people, at least 2 people, had to go underground 
immediately, that the situation was getting very critical and that there 
had to be reserve leaders away somewhere, someplace in case the present 
leadership were arrested. 

The upshot of the decision was that Ralph Hall and I should go 
underground, although in most districts it was said that the very top 
leaders should go underground. 

Going underground simply meant that you disappeared from the 
present scene ; you took another name, you took another social-security 
number, you took another age, you changed your identity in such a 
way that you would not be recognized by anyone, by authorities or 
■others. 

Mr. KuNziG. What did you tell your friends ? 
Mrs. Hartle. I told them nothing ; I just left. 
Mr. KUNziG. You just disappeared from view? 
Mrs. Hartle. Yes, I just disappeared and the Communist Party 
leadership was explaining in those days to the membership that when 
someone disappears, if you don't see someone around, the best thing 
to do is not to ask questions, and they were thus informed not to ask 
questions about people that were not around, that there was good 
reason for them not to be there. 

Mr. KuNziG. How did they keep in contact with you? How did 
the Communist Party leaders keep in contact ? 

Mrs. Hartle. The contact was kept with a courier, a contact person 
who kept contact with you, knew where you were, knew where he 
could meet with you again, who would bring literature and who would 
bring or take messages as the occasion seemed to require. 

Mr. Ktjnzig. Where did you go when you went underground? 
Mrs. Hartle. First I went to Tacoma, Wash. I rented an apart- 
ment. I didn't work at that time. I stayed in that apartment morn- 
ing, noon, and night and went out only for groceries and just sat there, 
not for anyone to see me at all that might recognize me. Later I went 
to Puyallup, Wash., and secured work as a cook in a restaurant. I was 
told that that was entirely too open a place, that too many people were 
coming in there and that I had to move. 

At that time I came to Portland and then went to Oregon City. In 
Oregon City I rented an apartment and I worked about a month in 
restaurants in Oregon City. 

Mr. KuNziG. Roughly when was this, Mrs. Hartle ? 
Mrs. Hartle. That was in — after working in Puyallup, that was in 
1951. I worked in Oregon City for several weeks in Seid's Restaurant 

as a waitress while I was 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you spell that please ? 

Mrs. Hartle. S-e-i-d-'-s Restaurant in Oregon City. (Continu- 
ing:) As a waitress. It was, I realized from my instructions, not a 
very good place and I went then to Salem, Oreg. I stayed at Salem, 
Oreg., for about a month and worked in a printshop tliere. I learned 
one day that an FBI agent had been in tlie printshop, so I departed 
posthaste from Salem and went to Eugene, Oreg. In December 19.51 
I went to work in a restaurant in Eugene, Oreg. — the River Road 



6644 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES m THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Cafe — as a combination cook and waitress. It was quite far out of 
town. 1 didn't see people — I didn't run across people that I knew 
there. 

And there I stayed. I had a steady and a good job. I liked it and 
about the beginning of 1952, when I saw how tlie American people 
were living without benefit of the Communist Party, I decided to 
break contact with the underground and quit the Connnunist Party. 
I tried to break the underground contact but contrary to what I had 
been told the Communist Party leadership was able to keep contact 
with me. They took precautions to find out where I was living, 
although I did not know that they were supposed to know that. They 
came after me from time to time and tried to get me to come to meet- 
ings. I refused to go. I was still on that job, on which I stayed 9 
months, far longer than an underground worker should, and stayed 
there and was arrested by the FBI on September 17, 1952. 

The purpose of going underground, as it was explained to me, was 
the purpose of having capable leading Communists out some place 
not known to anyone who, if the operating leadership of the district 
were arrested or anything else should happen to them, that those 
underground members would then be able to step in and assume the 
leadership of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Velde. But in so assuming that leadership, in case the real 
leader was arrested, you would have to then come aboveground, 
wouldn't you ? 

Mrs. Hartle. There was a choice there. It w^ould depend upon the 
situation and that was explained that that then would depend upon 
the situation, but since I was in the third echelon it was pretty well 
understood that by the time that we came to that third reserve com- 
mittee, the deep underground committee, that that leadership would 
then have to function underground as well. 

Mr. Velde. I see. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you explain what the third echelon is, please? 

Mrs. Hartle. It meant the third l-eserve committee. There was an 
operating committee, there was a second committee underground to 
take the place of the first committee, and there was a third committee 
to take the place of the second committee, and I was in the third 
committee. 

Mr. Velde. I see. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now either in this underground experience or other- 
wise in your Communist work did you ever have occasion to have it 
brought to your attention of Communist groups operating with stu- 
dents of college-level age ? 

Mrs. Hartle. In underground work ? 

Mr. KuNziG. Well first in underground work and then in any Com- 
munist work, in general, in other words. 

Mrs. Hartle. Well as far as the underground work is concerned 
the only opinion there was that it would be very well to have able, 
tested, young, physically able-bodied people for underground work, 
people who could work and earn their living while they were under- 
ground and who could stand that strenuous kind of an existence. 

But as far as youth in general is concerned, the Communist Party 
attaches a great deal of importance to work among youtli. This is 
true internationally and it is true of the Communist Party of the U. S. 
A. In the Northwest district, as a district board member, I was as- 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6645 

signed to head the district youth work and it was considered an im- 
portant assignment to build the Labor Youth League, to penetrate the 
universities, the campus organizations of the University of Washington 
and other colleges and to do work in high schools as well. 

Mr. KuNziG. I realize that to a gi-eat extent that you were largely 
in the Washington area. We had testimony here this morning, sworn 
testimony, about a Communist Party cell at Reed College. I wonder 
if that in any way came to your attention '( 

 Mrs. Hartle. Especially during the 1930's I heard many reports at 
district plenums, that is enlarged district committee meetings, I heard 
many reports that spoke of the success and work of the Communist 
Party at Reed College. By the 1940's, and that was at those times 
fairly well detailed and fairly well given in detail; however, by the 
time of the 1940's while Oregon was still in the district, the reports 
would be more general, but it was well understood by the district 
leadership and spoken of in private conferences that from time to 
time there was varying success at Reed College. I have always known 
that the Communist Party in Oregon had some kind of contact 
through students and sometimes through teachers at Reed College. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you know Haller that we've talked about here 
earlier today, Mark Haller, in the underground ? Did you know him 
to be underground ? 

Mrs. Hartle. No, I did not. 

Mr. KuNziG. I see. That didn't come to your personal attention? 

Mrs. Hartle. No. No other underground was ever revealed to the 
underground of the district of Washington. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you say chat again. In the district of Wash- 
ington — I didn't quite understand that. 

Mrs. Hartle. What I mean is that if there is an underground in 
one State, it will not reveal its membership to the underground of 
another State. 

Mr. KuNziG. I see, because you did testify about some other people 
who were underground with you in the State of Washington. What 
you mean is that you didn't know anybody from Oregon in the under- 
ground ? 

Mrs. Hartle. That's right. They had their own underground, but 
there were contacts between all of these State organizations. 

Mr. KuNziG, I see. Now as we draw toward the conclusion of your 
testimony, Mrs. Hartle, I would like to turn your attention to what- 
ever knowledge you had of Communist activities in the State of Ore- 
gon. I believe you have already said that the State of Oregon was 
a part of the Northwest at one time, the Northwest district, at an 
earlier period. 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes. From the time that I joined the Communist 
Party in 1933 until in 1947 the territory of Oregon, the State of 
Oregon, was part of the northwest or 12th district territory, and I 
knew this from reports of district organizers, Morris Rapport, 
M-o-r-r-i-s R-a-p-p-o-r-t, Andrew Remes, Phil Frankfeld, P-h-i-1 
F-r-a-n-k-f-e-1-d, and Henry Hutf. I knew it from reports of Oregon 
Communist Party leaders who came to district functionaries' meetings 
in Seattle, and from district dues charts and other documents listing 
Oregon as a part of the district. 

In 1947, I believe I have mentioned that, Oregon became a separate 
State Communist Party organization, directly under the national 



6646 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

organization. This organizational step was taken, but Henry Huff 
told me that he would continue to take some responsibility for Ore<ron 
and that he had been instructed to do so by national Communist Party 
leaders. In the middle and latter lO^O's I attended in laro-e district 
committee meetings as the delegate from Spokane and at those meet- 
ings I heard Oregon State leaders of the Communist Party make 
reports and take part in the ]:)roceedings. 

jMr. KixziG. Can you tell us who some of these leaders were? 

Mrs. Hartle, One of them was James Murphy, M-u-r-p-h-y, known 
as Jim Murphy, and he was organizer of the Oregon section. 

Mr. KuNZiG. About what period was this, Mrs. Hartle? 

Mrs. Hartle. That was in the 1930's, the middle and latter 1930's. 
I remember reports and discussions at some of the meetings about the 
fact that James Murphy had run for office on some sort of an independ- 
ent ticket here in the State of Oregon, and that he had received a rela- 
tively high vote, and the discussion brought out that there were differ- 
ent election laws in the State of Oregon from those in the State of 
Washington, and that it was possible for the Communist Party in 
Oregon to use different tactics to achieve support to the Communist 
Party program than would be pursued in Washington in view of the 
difference in the election laws. I did know then that Jim Murphy 
was a committee member. He was a district committee member at that 
time. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you know a Harry Pilcher ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes, I knew a Harry Pilcher from those same district 
committee meetings. I knew him as a Communist Party leader in 
Oregon in trade-union work, and his reports centered around the long- 
shore work of the Communist Party in the longshore union in Port- 
land. 

Mr. KuNziG. And you knew Harry Pilcher to be a member of the 
Communist Party ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes, I knew him to be a member of the Communist 
Party and as a leader of the Communist Party in Oregon. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you continue, please? 

Mrs. Hartle. In the latter 1930's, another one of the persons attend- 
ing these district plenums was Henry Huff. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you spell plenums, please ? 

Mrs. Hartle. P-1-e-n-u-m. 

]\Tr. KimziG. Wliat do you mean by that? 

Mrs. Hartle. That is an enlarged district committee meeting. It 
comes from the Latin word, full. Henry Huff was an officer of the 
Oregon section at that time, and I heard him make reports about Ore- 
gon Communist Party activities at these district meetings. Then after 
I came to Seattle to become a full-time functionary forUie Communist 
Party m 1942 and then until in 1947 when Oregon became a separate 
State organization, I attended numerous district committee meetings, 
enlarged district committee meetings, functionary meetings of various 
kinds at which delegates and representatives of 'the Oregon Commu- 
nist section were present. 

Mr. KuNziG. Can you remember any of those people who were 
present ? 

JJ^^vJ^^"^^'^^^^^'- ^"^ong those present again was James Murpliv 
Mr.KuNziG. You've just testified about him. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6647 

Mrs. Hartle. That I have testified about. He was still or^ranizer 
of the Oregon section. However, by the late 1940's he was expelled 
from the Communist Party. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you know why, if it lies within your personal 
knowledge ? 

Mrs. Hartle. The main difficulty seemed to be that he was anti- 
leadership, that he didn't go along with all the party policies, and that 
specifically he was having a very hard factional fight with Earl Payne,^ 
P-a-y-n-e, who had by then been made organizer of the Oregon section. 

Mr. KuNziG. You knew Earl Payne to be a member of the Commu- 
nist Party ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes ; he became organizer of the Oregon section of the 
Communist Party and I knew him as a member of the district com- 
mittee. I had also known him in Seattle as chairman of the King 
County Communist Party in the early 1940's at a time when I was 
secretary of that same organization, and I worked closely with him in 
that work. 

Mr. KuNziG, I take it that you are suggesting by that testimony, 
Mrs. Hartle, that it is possible for someone to be a leader in one capacity 
of the Communist Party, let's say in King County in "Washington, and 
then drop out of that and be moved to another part and become a lead- 
er in Oregon or, if you will, in Philadelphia or any other part of the 
United States of America in a different capacity ; also in a top leader- 
ship position in the Communist Party ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes ; that is highly possible and it is practiced espe- 
cially more among the top leaders of the Communist Party, although it 
is also practiced in the concentration policy in order to get persons 
into a basic industry, like when the national concentration was steel ; 
and then I heard discussions that people would have to be sent out from 
centers where there were a lot of Communists and sent to go to work 
in these steel towns, get into the union and to build the Communist 
Party. I have heard such discussions held that such things should be 
done. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you have any further information about Earl 
Payne ? 

Mrs. Hartle. I did learn from Earl Payne that he had been a sea- 
man by trade and that he had participated in the armed conflict in 
Spain in 1936 as a member of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade. 

In the latter 1940's Earl Payne was removed from his position as 
organizer of Oregon for failure to carry out his responsibility as 
organizer. 

Mark Haller 

Mr. KuNziG. You've already mentioned Mark Haller; is that cor- 
rect? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes. He became in his place to fill that position, he 
became the organizer of the Oregon organization of the Communist 
Party. 

Mr, KuNziG. And he succeeded Payne ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Succeeded Payne. I knew him as a meiuber of the 
Oregon section committee and knew him to take Earl Payne's place in 
the latter 1940's. I knew him at the national training school that I 
had mentioned 

Mr. KuNziG. Yes. 

Mrs. Hartle. As a representative, and through that knew that he 
was to become the organizer, the State organizer, and that was why 



6648 COMIVIUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 



he was sent to the school was because he was going to be the State organ- 
izer of the Oregon party, 

Mr. KuNziG. In your knowledge of Earl Payne, did you have any 
occasion to know his wife, Rose Payne ? 

INIrs. PIartle. Yes ; I knew his wife as a member of the Communist 
Party in King County when she and Earl Payne were married and 
were living there. I have attended Communist Party functionary 
meetings with her in Seattle in the early 1940's. 

Mr. KuNzio. Any other people in Oregon whom you knew of your 
own personal knowledge to be members of the Communist Party ? 

Mrs. Hartle. I knew a James M-e-i-s-s-n-e~r, and knew him as 
literature director of the Oregon section of the Communist Party and 
have worked with him in that capacity and have attended district 
and Oregon functionary meetings with him. 

Mr. KuNzia. Do you have any personal knowledge of any address or 
further identification on James Meissner? 

Mrs. Hartle. No; I did not know from attending this type of meet- 
ing where he lived. I understand that he left Oregon. I was told that 
he left Oregon and that he is somewhere in the State of Washington. 
That was told to me by someone as an explanation of what had 
happened to him. 

Mr. KuNziG. Any other names ? 

Mrs. Hartle. I remember a Valerie Taylor, V-a-1-e-r-i-e T-a-y-1-o-r, 
as a member of the Oregon section committee. I remember discussions 
in a section committee meeting that I attended down here about her 
important work in a trade union, important Communist work in a 
trade union. I remember particularly because it was a woman who 
was doing trade-union work. It made that impression upon me at the 
time. 

Another person that I remember from Oregon is Sam Markson, 
M-a-r-k-s-o-n, I knew him as a member of the Oregon section com- 
mittee, having attended district and Oregon functionary meetings 
with him, and worked with him as a fellow member of the district 
Negro commission. 

Mr. KuNziG. Any other names, Mrs. Hartle ? 

Mrs. Hartle. I knew a Carl Syzanen, C-a-r-1 S-y-z-a-n-e-n as a 
member of the Vancouver, Wash., branch of the Communist Party. 
This Vancouver branch at that time was attached to the Oregon sec- 
tion. I had attended his branch meetings with him in Vancouver, 
Wash., and have known him as a member of the district Communist 
Party or Communist political action committee. I remember his name 
and him being elected to the district committee at one time. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you know a Ralph Nelson ? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes; I knew a Ralph Nelson. He was transferred. 
I knew him as a member of the Communist Party and a functionary, 
an officer, in the northwest Washington section of the Communist 
Party and knew of him being transferred from that area to Oregon 
as a part of the district carrying out its lumber concentration pro- 
gram. I was told that he went to Coos Bay to carry on Communist 
Party work among lumber workers; and the reason given by the dis- 
trict leadership for sending Ralph Nelson to Oregon was that the 
center of the hnnber industry was shifting to Oregon and that it was 
important to send forces into Oregon to keep the Connnunist influences 
in the lumber unions and lumber industry up and not to let it die down. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6649 

In one of my trips down here to Portland, in my capacity as a dis- 
trict officer, I saw him and spoke with him and also with Mark Haller 
at the same time in the Communist Party bookstore that was in a 
building here in Portland. I remember it being on the second or third 
floor of a building in Portland where I saw Ralph Nelson here. 

Mr. KuNziG. You said that the concentration policy of the Oregon 
section was directed toward lumber. Is there any other concentra- 
tion of any other kind in any other direction in addition to that? 

Mrs. Hartle. One of the other concentrations in Oregon, and 
especially the Portland area, was the concentration of the maritime in- 
dustry and unions. That was another important Oregon concen- 
tration. 

Mr. KuNziG. Can you give us in conclusion any estimate of the 
Oregon section's work in the Negro field ? 

Mrs. Hartle. In the Negi'o field the estimate of the district of the 
Oregon section's work, especially the Portland area, was that the Com- 
munist Party here was able to develop Negro rights' work on quite a 
broad front basis, that it was able to involve some non-Communist 
organizations in some of its campaigns. I learned this from reports 
of Mark Haller, at district conferences, and in personal discussions 
with him, especially in view of the fact that I had been a member and 
most of the time the chairman of the Negro district commission and 
v^as interested especially in that field of activity while active as a Com- 
munist. 

Mr. KuNZTG. Mr. Chairman, at this time I have no further ques- 
tions of Mrs. Hartle. 

Mr. Velde. Do you have some questions, Mr. Frazier ? 

Mr. Frazier. No. 

Mr. Velde. Mrs. Hartle, I have no further questions at this point. 
I think that you have given all of the information that you had, 
have you not, with reference to the State of Oregon and the Com- 
munist activities here? 

Mrs. Hartle. Yes ; I have. 

Mr. Velde. But I do want to say this to you, Mrs. Hartle, you have 
I)een so cooperative with our investigators in unraveling the story of 
communism in the Northwest and that after you had been sentenced 
to 5 years in prison and fined $1,000. Is the statement I made about 
your fine and sentence correct ? 

Mrs. Hartle. That's correct. 

Mr. Velde. The fact that you waited until after your conviction 
under the Smith Act to reveal your break with the Communist Party 
makes your testimony here all the more credible and believable. Then, 
too, we know that there have been sources of information from the 
Government that have likewise concurred with the things that 3^ou 
have stated in Seattle and I know will concur with the things that you 
have stated here. 

The committee is deeply appreciative of the fine testimony, the fine 
manner, in which you have presented your testimony here and we 
will gain a lot of good from that testimony. It is only with regret 
that, of course, there is nothing that we can do to prevent your serving 
your sentence in prison, but you are now dismissed from this hearing 
\\ ith the committee's thanks for your efforts. 

Mrs. Hartle. I wish to thank the committee for giving me the op- 
portunity to express my real sincere convictions about the Communist 
Party at the present time. 



6650 coMI^iUNIST activities in the pacific northwest area 

Mr. Velde. I wish that more would be like you are in that regards 
At this time I do want to extend, as has been a policy of this com- 
mittee, to anyone who has been named by Mrs. Hartle or the wit- 
ness that we had this mornin^^, Mr. Owen, as a member of the Com- 
munist Party or in any derogatory fashion whatsoever an invitation; 
to contact the committee or committee counsel or a member of its staff 
and admit, deny, or explain the things that have been testified about 
him. He will most certainly be more than welcome. 

Mr. KuNziG. Kenneth Fitzgerald. 

Mr. Velde. Will you raise your right hand and be sworn please? 

In the testimony that you are about to give before this subcommittee 
do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Fitzgerald. I do. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you give your full name, please ? Would yom 
pull the microphone closer, it is hard to hear ? 

TESTIMONY OF KENNETH FITZGEEALD, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 

ATTORNEY, NELS PETERSON 

Mr. Fitzgerald. Kenneth W. Fitzgerald. 

Mr. KuNziG. Kenneth W. Fitzgerald ? 

Mr. Fitzgerald. Yes. 

Mr. KuNZiG. I notice that you are accompanied by counsel. Will 
counsel please state his name and office address for the record? 

Mr. Peterson. My name is Nels Peterson, 901 Loyalty Building,, 
Portland, Oreg. 

Mr. KuNziG. I didn't hear. 

Mr. Velde. I didn't either. 

Mr. Peterson. My name is Nels Peterson, 901 Loyalty Building^ 
Portland, Oreg. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Fitzgerald, what is your present address please,, 
sir? 

Mr. Fitzgerald. 6325 Southwest 50th Avenue. 

Mr. KuNziG. 6325 Southwest what was that ? 

Mr. Fitzgerald, 50th Avenue. 

Mr. KuNziG. 50th Avenue ; and where are you employed, sir ? 

Mr. Fitzgerald. I'm a freelance writer and publicity man. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now your name has been mentioned in connection witli 
Communist Party activity, Mr. Fitzgerald. Have you ever been a. 
member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Fitzgerald. I wish to decline to answer that question for a 
number of reasons. One of the reasons I wish to offer at this time is- 
a document prepared by a very learned professor of law at the Uni- 
versity of Oregon. The University of Oregon is the leading law school 
in the State of Oregon, and this professor is Edward Morton. He 
prepared this document at the request of the American Association 
of University Professors. He makes three points in this document 
which I offer as one of my reasons for my refusing to answer questions. 
The first of these points is that Congress is not empowered to legislata 
concerning political belief and is, therefore, barred from questioning 
witnesses concerning individual beliefs. 

Mr. Velde. Now let me ask you a question before you go ahead 
there, Mr. Fitzgerald. In view of all the testimony that we have and 



■COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6651 

;all the statements from famous jurists that we have had, do you 
believe that the Communist Party is a political party ? 

Mr. Fitzgerald. I have declined to answer questions of that nature, 
.and I want to state the reasons why I decline to answer questions of 
that nature. I want to point out the second reason that Mr. Morton 
lists. 

Mr. Velde. We've had people like you appear before this com- 
mittee before who tried to tell us what the law is and one thing and 
another. We've heard it all over the country, and we are not mter- 
-ested in that. I wish you would get to your real reasons for refusing 
to answer the question just as soon as possible. 

Mr. Fitzgerald. Mr. Chairman, I am trying to base my answers 
on the law. 

Mr. KuNziG. We're basing our answers and our questions on the 
•decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States of America. This 
jnay be a very distinguished lawyer, but we'll abide by the Supreme 
Court of the United States of America, which has empowered and 
■backed up this committee in its decisions in our right under the law 
.and under the Constitution to ask such questions, so I again ask, Have 
jou ever been a member of the Communist Party ? It is really quite 
simple to answer. 

Mr. Fitzgerald. I decline to answer that question, and I decline 
to answer it ; first, it is an invasion of rights guaranteed under the tirst 
amendment of the Constitution of the United States, of freedom of 
speech, press, religion, and assembly. Second, I invoke my right and 
privilege provided for under the 4tli, the 9th, the 10, and the 14th 
amendments of the Constitution of the United States and the consti- 
tution of the State of Oregon. 

Mr. Kunzig. You haven't forgotten the fifth, have you? You 
passed that one by. 

Mr. Fitzgerald. I am not through, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Kunzig. Oh, you're coming to the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Fitzgerald. The 14th amendment of the constitution of Oregon 
respecting substantive and procedural due process, freedom of con- 
science, speech, assembly, and elections, and I maintain under the 14th 
amendment which gives the authority of citizenship to the States that 
this committee is interfering with the constitution of the State of 
•Oregon which goes even beyond the Constitution of the United States 
and guarantees freedom of conscience. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now would you answer the question, please? 

Mr. Fitzgerald. Answer the question ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes ; would you answer the question ? 

Mr. Fitzgerald. I'm giving my reasons. 

Mr. Kunzig. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Fitzgerald. I am giving my reasons for not answering that 
■question. 

Mr. Kunzig. I see. 

Mr. Fitzgerald. And I would like to state those reasons. 

Mr. Kunzig. I guess there is still one more left. Go ahead. 

Mr. Fitzgerald. I invoke my right and privilege under the fifth 
amendment of the Constitution that guarantees that I shall not be 
compelled to be a witness against myself nor that I be deprived of 
liberty or property without due process of law. 



6652 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. KuNZiG. All right. Now here's another question, Mr. Fitz- 
gerald, and just so that we can make this thing easier and so that you 
won't have to go through that strain of making that speech again, I 
will just, we will assume that if you say, "The same reason," if you 
refuse to answer, that you mean all the reasons that you have just given. 
Are you now a member of the Communist Party ? that is the question. 

Mr. Fitzgerald. I refuse to answer on the basis of the reasons I have 
just given. 

Mr. KuNziG. Isn't it a fact that you were on the legislative com- 
mittee of the Communist Party in the fall of 1947 ? 

Mr. Fitzgerald. I refuse to answer that question on the basis of 
the reasons I have just given. 

Mr. KuNziG. Isn't it a fact that you have been in the party since as 
early as 1935 continuously? 

Mr. Fitzgerald. I decline to answer that question on the reasons I 
have given. 

Mr. Kunztg. And were you not on the State board of the Communist 
Party in 1950? 

Mr. Fitzgerald. I refuse to answer that question for the same 
reasons. 

Mr. KuNZiG. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Do vou have any auestions, Mr. Frazier ? 

Mr. Frazier. No questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. If not, the witness is excused. Call your next witness. 

Mr. KuNZiG. John MacKenzie. 

Mr. Velde. Will you raise your right hand and be sworn, please? 

In the testimony that you are about to give before this subcommit- 
tee do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Mackenzie. I do. 

Mr. Velde. Will you be seated. 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN MacKENZIE. ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
ATTOENEY, IRVIN GOODMAN 

Mr. KuNziG. Would yon give your full name please, sir? 

Mr. Mackenzie. John MacKenzie. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you spell it please? 

Mr. Mackenzie. M-a-c-K-e-n-z-i-e. 

Mr. KuNziG. I notice that you are accompanied by counsel. Would 
counsel please state his name and office address for the record ? 

Mr. Goodman. My name is Irvin Goodman. My Portland address 
is Portland Trust Building. Telephone Atwater 7494. 

Mr. "^^ET.DE. Thank vou. sir. 

Mr. KuNZTG. Mr. MacKenzie, what is your present residence? 

Mr. Mackenzie. Mr. Chairman, I refuse to answer that question 
for the followiiiff reasons: On the grounds of the fifth amendment, I 
refuse to answer that question upon the grounds of the first and the 
fi.fth amendments. 

Mr. KuNZiG. I respectfully request, Mr. Chairman, that the witness 
be directed to answer the question as to what is his residence. 

Mr. Velde. Yes, again that is a simple question, one that you can 
understand, one that this committee is entitled to ask under the law> 
and you are, therefore directed to answer the question. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6653 

Mr. Mackenzie. Mr. Chairman, I respectfully submit I decline 
to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Reporter, in order to be absolutely certain because 
of the possibility of a contempt citation here of the question would 
you go back and repeat the question as I asked it first before the direc- 
tion of the chairman that the man should answer the question. I 
want to be sure that I used the same words. 

(The question is repeated as follows :) 

''Mr. MacKenzie, what is your present residence?" 

Mr. KuNziG. The question was, "What is your present residence?" 
You then refused to answer and in order that the same exact words 
may be asked again, Mr. Chairman, I respectfully ask again that the 
witness be directed to answer the question: What is your residence^ 
your present residence ? 

Mr. Mackenzie. Mr. Counsel, I refuse to answer that question on 
the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you so direct the witness, Mr. Chairman, please ? 

Mr. Velde. Yes, you are directed to answer that question as to 
your residence. 

Mr. Mackenzie. Mr. Chairman, I refuse to answer that question on 
the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. KuNZTG. Mr. MacKenzie ; where are you employed ? 

Mr. ]\IacKenzie. Mr. Counsel, I refuse to answer that question 
on the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Velde. You are directed to answer that question. Again this 
committee certainly has the legal right to determine your legal 
employment. 

Mr. MacKenzie. Mr. Chairman, I refuse to answer that question 
on the crounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. KuNziG. Were you ever a member of the John Reed Club of 
the Communist Party? 

Mr. MacKenzie. Mr. Counsel, I refuse to answer that question 
on the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you ever attend Reed College? 

Mr. MacKenzie. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds of 
the fifth amendment. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Chairman, I didn't know that it was incriminating 
to attend Reed College. 

I therefore respectfully request that the witness be directed to 
answer the question. 

Mr. Velde. Yes, the witness is directed to answer that question. 

Mr. MacKenzie. Mr. Chairman, if I may, I refuse to answer that 
question on the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Velde. I want to say right here, I would like to make the 
statement, that as far as Reed College is concerned let there be no 
inference drawn of disloyalty on the part of any of the professors or 
students at Reed University unless there is actual evidence presented 
here concerning subversive influences. The fact that there might be 
Rome Communists on the campus at the Reed University is no different 
from any other educational institution in the country. I, therefore, 
want it particularly known that people in this community and 
elsewhere should not draw any unreasonable inferences of disloyalty 
on the part of Reed University generally. 



6654 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

We are interested, as I said before, in uncovering communistic 
activities, subversive activities, wherever tliey might be found a,nd 
we will continue along that line. We are not investigating education 
by any stretch of the imagination in any way. 

Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. AVliat is your present age, sir ? 

Mr. Mackenzie. Mr. Counsel, I refuse to answer that question 
on the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. KuNziG. jNIr. Chairman, I respectfully request that the witness 
be directed to answer the question as to his age. 

Mr. Velde. Certainly you are directed to answer the question as to 
your present age. 

Mr. Mackenzie. Mr. Chairman, I refuse to answer the question 
on the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Velde. You're just not going to answer any question; are you? 

Mr. Mackenzie. Mr. Chairman, if you'll ask the questions I will 
give my answers. 

Mr. Velde. If I ask the questions, you'll what ? 

Mr. Mackenzie. Give my answers. 

Mr. Velde, Well, all right, I will. Have you ever been a member 
of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Mackenzie. Mr. Chairman, I refuse to answer that question on 
the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Velde. Now you just got through telling me that you would; 
if I'd ask you the questions you would answer them. Now you refuse 
to answer them. Go ahead, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Kdnzig. Isn't it a fact, Mr. MacKenzie, that Communist Party 
meetings were held in your home ? 

Mr. Mackenzie. Mr. Chairman, I refuse to answer that question 
on the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. MacKenzie, isn't it a fact that you have been a 
member of the Communist Party within the knowledge of this com- 
mittee to at least February of 1954 ? 

Mr. MacKenzie. Mr. Chairman, I refuse to answer that question 
on the gi'ounds of the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I have no further questions to ask of 
this witness. 

Mr. Velde. Do you have any questions, Mr. Frazier ? 

Mr. Frazier. No questions. 

Mr. Velde. I have no further questions and the witness is dis- 
charged. I would like to make a statement that the testimony of the 
witnesses who appear here before the committee will be studied at a 
later date to resolve the question of contempt. At the present time we 
do not have a quorum of the full committee here, we do not have the 
time otherwise to make a study of this testimony and it will have to 
be in executive session at a later date. However, I must say that in 
my opinion, my humble opinion, there certainly has been contempt 
of this congressional committee and contempt of Congress displayed 
here today. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, just so that the record is clear, I want 
the record to show — you just mentioned there wasn't a quorum of the 
full committee and t want that to be clearly understood. There is, 
of course, a quorum of the subcommittee. 



COMMUNIST ACTWITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6655 

Mr. Velde. Yes, certainly, that is the case. The recommendation 
has to be made by a quorum of the full committee after being sub- 
mitted by a quorum of the subcommittee which is present here. 

Do you have anything more for today, Mr. Counsel ? 

Mr. KuNziG. No, Mr. Chairman, except for the fact that you have 
already stated. We will study the MacKenzie and Dyhr cases which 
are clear contempt matters. 

Mr. Velde. The committee will stand in recess until 10 o'clock 
tomorrow morning. 

Mr. KuNziG. All witnesses then are continued until tomorrow morn- 
ing. All witnesses are continued until tomorrow morning. 

(Whereupon, at 4:20 p. m., the hearing was recessed to 10 a. m. of 
the following day.) 



INDEX TO PART 9 



Individuals 

Pago 

^bramson, Paul 6611, 6612 

Benz, William 6616 

Bloom, Theodore S 6627-6629 

Brewster, Mary Jane 6612, 6615 

Browder, Earl 6634 

Brovvnstone, David 6621 

Brownstone, Leola 6621 

Canafax, Leo 6640 

Canon, Robert 6608, 6609 

€anwell 6639 

Christofel, Joan 6612 

Christofer, Joan 66:^2 

Clark, Tom 6631, 6636 

Daschbach, John 6637, 6638 

DeJonge, Dirk 6622 

Duclos, Jacques 6633, 6634 

Dyhr, John N 6617, 6618, 6626, 6627-6629 (testimony), 6655 

Fitzgerald, Kenneth 6618, 6650-6652 (testimony) 

Foster, William Z 6636, 6637, 6645, 6646 

Frankfeld, Phil 6645 

Oill, Spencer 6622 

Goodman, Irving 6652-6655 

Gregg, David 6612 

Hall, Dorothea 6629-6650 

Hall, Ralph 6643 

Haller, Mark 6608, 6609, 6611, 6614, 661&-6620, 6635, 6645, 6647, 6649 

Hartle, Barbara 6619, 6629-6650 (testimony) 

Howard, Jan (Mrs. Norman Howard) 6612 

Howard, Norman 6612 

Huff, Henry 6637, 6638, 6643 

Jackson, Barbara (Mrs. Kingsley Vanier) {see also Vanier, Barbara) 6614 

Kolin, Marshall 6613 

Lapham, Dave 6613, 6614 

Lewis, Barbara (Mrs. William Earl Lewis) 6613 

Lewis, William Earl 6613 

Logan, Wyman 6622 

Loring, Michael 6623 

MacKenzie, John 6614, 6652-6655 (testimony) 

MacKenzie. Mrs. John 6614 

Markson, Sam 6619, 6648 

Marqusee, John 6621 

Marsak, Bai-bara (Mrs. Leonard Marsak) 6621 

Marsak, Leonard 6621 

Meissner, James 6648 

Mezey, Phiz 6609, 6613 

Mitchell, Connie 6621 

Moore, Stanley 6639 

Moore, Thomas G 6615, 6623 

Morton, Edward 6650, 6651 

Murphy, James 6646 

Nelson, Ralph 6648, 6649 

Neumann, Morton 6619, 6620 

Owen. Homer Leroy 6606-6626 (testimony) 

Patterson, Frank 6619, 6620, 6623 



ii 



INDEX 



Page 

Payne, Earl 6620, 6647, 6648 

Payne, Rose 6648 

Peterson, Nels 6650-6652 

Pilcher, Harry 6646 

Pierce, Harriet 6638 

Rapport, Morris 6645 

Remes, Andrew 6641, 6645 

Robinson, H. A 6616 

Roosevelt 6616 

Rosenbaum, Joan 6609, 6613 

Rosenberg, Ethel 6642 

Rosenberg, Julius 6642 

Simpson, Herbert 6619 

Skolnick, Bertha (Mrs. Jessie Skolnick) 6613 

Skolnick, Jessie 6613 

Sreyd, Bernard 6638 

Stearns, Mary Lou 6613 

Syzanen, Carl 6618 

Taylor, Valerie 6620, 6648 

Vanier, Barbara (Mrs. Kingsley Vanier) (see oZso Jackson, Barbara) 6614 

Vanier, Kingsley 6609, 6614 

Van Lvdesrraf, Clayton 6642, 6643 

Wallace, Henry A 6610, 6623, 6626 

Welch, Lew 6614, 6615 

Wollam, Mrs. Don 6623 

Organizations 

Abraham Lincoln Brigade 6647 

American Association of University Professors 6650 

American Civil Liberties Union 6636 

American Council on Soviet Relations 6631 

American Veterans' Committeee 6610 

American Veterans' Committee, Portland Chapter 6608 

American Youth for Democracy 6614 

Camp Beacon, N. Y 6633, 6635 

Civil Rights Congress 6636, 6637 

Cominform 6633- 

Comintern 6632, 6633 

Committee to Defend the Rosenbergs 6642 

Communist International 6633 

Communist (Third) International 6632 

Communist Party : 

District 12 6635 

Oregon 6615, 6622, 6635, 6645-6647 

t:entral Committee 6617-6620, 6622, 6624 

State committee 6628 

John Reed Club 6610-6615, 6617, 6653 

Washington State: 

Inland Empire Council 6632 

King County 6632, 6647, 6648 

Northwest section 6648 

Spokane 6632 

Vancouver 6648 

Cornell University 6606, 6619-6621, 662$ 

Cornell University Law School 6621 

FBI 6619, 6621, 6631, 6643, 6644 

Friends of the Soviet Union 6631 

Independent Progressive Party 6007, 6615, 6616, 6619, 6620, 6623: 

Independent Progressive Party of Oregon 6607, 6611 

International Labor Defense 6636 

Labor Youth League 6614, 6645 

Marine Cooks and Stewards, A. F. of L 6616 

National Federation for Constitutional Liberties 6636 

National Union of Marine Cooks and Stewards 6616 

Progressive Citizens of America 6007, 6615 

Reed College 6606-6610, 6612-6615, 6617, 6621. 6645, 6653 



INDEX m 

Page 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific 6016 

Sailors' Union of tlie Pacific, Portland Branch 6616 

Socialist Party 6631 

Stockholm Peace Pledge 6642 

Students for Wallace 6615 

University of Oregon 6650 

University of Washington 6645 

Washington State College 6631 

Young Communist League 6614, 6629 

Young Progressives of America 6608, 6610 

Publications 

Daily Worker 6618 

Morning Oregonian 6638 

Political Affairs 6618 

Spokane Woman 6630 

West Coast Sailor 6616 

o 



INVESTIGATION OF COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE 
PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA— Part 10 (PORTLAND) 



HEARING 



BEFORE THE 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 



EIGHTY-THIRD CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



JUNE 19, 1954 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 



INCLUDING INDEX 




UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
48069 WASHINGTON : 1954 



i 



Boston Public Library 
Superintendent of Documents 

OCT 2 7 1954 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

United States House of Representatives 

HAROLD H. VELDE. Illinois. Chairman 
BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania 

DONALD L. JACKSON, California MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri 

KIT CLARDY, Michigan CLYDE DOYLE, California 

GORDON H. SCHERER, Ohio JAMES B. FRAZIER, Jr., Tennessee 

Robert L. Kunzig, Cotmsel 

Frank S. Tavenner, Jr.. Counsel 

Thomas W. Beale, Sr., Chief Clerk 

Raphael I. Nixon^ Director of Research 

Courtney E. Owens, Chief Investigator 

U 



CONTENTS 



June 19, 1954, testimony of^ Page 

Thomas G. Moore 6657 

Fra-ik V. Patterson 6661 

Herbert Simpson 6665 

Robert \¥ishart Canon 6668 

Lloyd Reynolds 6698 

Leonard Marsak 6701 

Spencer John Gill 6707 

Sam Markson 6709 

David B. Lapham 6711 

Donnelly David Gregg 6713 

Donald 'M. Wollam 6716 

William Earle Lewis 6720 

Index i 

m 



Public Law 601, 79th Congress 

The legislation under which the House Committee on Un-American 
Activities operates is Public Law 601, 79th Congress [1946], chapter 
753, 2d session, which provides : 

Be it enacted hy the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
of AmeiHca, in Congress assembled, * * * 

PART 2— RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

Rule X 

SEO. 121. STANDING COMMITTEES 

* * * * * :tc * 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 
*****  * 

(q) (1) Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(A) Un-American activities. 

(2) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a vphole or by subcom- 
mittee, is authorized to make from time to time investigations of (i) the extent, 
jharacter, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(ii) the diffusion vrithin the United States of subversive and un-American 
propaganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin 
and attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Con- 
stitution, and (iii) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress 
in any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
I Clerk of the House if the House is not in session ) the results of any such inves- 
tigation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such 
:imes and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, 
las recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
)f such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
he signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
nember designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person 
lesignated by any such chairman or member. 

V 



1 



RULES ADOPTED TO THE 83d CONGRESS 

House Resolution 5, January 3, 1953 

* ^ * * * * * 

Rule X 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

1. There shall be elected by the House, at the commencement of each Congress, 
the following standing committees : 

t ^ iti if * * * 

(q) Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 
******* 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 
******* 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(a) Un-American actiAdties. 

(b) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommittee 
is authorized to make from time to time, investigations of (1) the extent, char 
acter, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States 
(2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propa 
ganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin anc 
attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitu 
tion, and (3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress 
in any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to th( 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such invest! 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-Americai 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such time; 
and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, ha.' 
recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance o: 
such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, anc 
to take .siich testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued unde] 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by anj 
member designated by such chairman, and may be served by any person desigl I 
nated by any such chairman or member. | ) 

VI 



, 



ire 
]| 
II 



INVESTIGATION OF COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE 
PACIFIC NOETHWEST AEEA— Part 10 (PORTLAND) 



SATURDAY, JUNE 19, 1954 

United States House of Representatives, 
Subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Portland^ Oreg. 

public session 

The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities met, 
pursuant to call, at 10 a. m., on the sixth floor (Judge Claude McCol- 
loch's courtroom) of the United States Courthouse, Hon. Harold H. 
Velde (chairman) presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Harold H. Velde 
(chairman) and James B. Frazier, Jr. 

Staff members present: Robert L. Kunzig, counsel; Raphael I. 
Nixon, research director; and Earl Fuoss, investigator. 

Mr. Velde. The committee will be in order, please. As I men- 
tioned in opening the meetings yesterday morning, the physical audi- 
ence present are guests of the United States Congress. We are very 
^lad to have you here but in order to do our work most efficiently and 
affectively it is necessary that we maintain order in this hearing room. 

The deputy sergeants at arms are here for that purpose. I was very 
pleased — the committee was very pleased — to see the decorum in the 
hearing room yesterday. I hope that it continues in the same fashion 
today. 

Are you ready to proceed, Mr. Counsel ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes, Mr. Chairman. Will Thomas G. Moore please 
step forward ? 

Mr. Velde. In the testimony that you are about to give before 
this subcommittee do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, 
the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Moore. I do. 

Mr. Kunzig. Would you state your full name please, sir? 

TESTIMONY OF THOMAS G. MOORE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
ATTORNEY, LEO LEVENSON 

Mr. Moore. My name is Thomas G. Moore. 

Mr. Kunzig. Would counsel please state his name and address for 
the record ? 

Mr. Levenson. Leo Levenson, Portland Trust Building, Portland 4, 
Oreg. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Moore, what is your present address, sir ? 

Mr. Moore. 5112 Southwest Maplewood Road. 

6657 



6658 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. KuNziG. Is that Portland ? 

Mr. Moore, Portland 19. 

Mr. KuNziG. And your present employment, Mr. Moore? 

Mr. MooRE. May I confer with counsel ? 

Mr. KuNziG, Yes sir, please do. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Moore. Mr. Kunzig, in order not to waste your time and that 
the record may be clear, I would like to advise that I do not wish to be 
compelled to testify against myself in any way, and therefore, since 
it is my privilege and my duty to invoke my right under the Constitu- 
tion of the United States, I decline to answer that question under the 
fifth amendment to the Constitution of the United States guaranteeing 
that I shall not be compelled to be a witness against myself nor that I 
be deprived of liberty or property without due process of law, and 
secondly under the first amendment, as it is an invasion of rights 
guaranteed under the first amendment to the Constitution of the 
United States of freedom of speech, press, religion, and assembly. 

Mr. Velde. Now, Mr. Moore, under the fifth amendment you are 
given a privilege not to testify against yourself. It is a privilege 
against self-incrimination. Is there something about your employ- 
ment that is incriminating ? 

Mr. Moore. May I confer with counsel ? 

Mr. Velde. Certainly. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Moore. Mr. Velde, for the reasons heretofore given I hereby 
decline under the provisions of the fifth amendment to not to be a 
witness against myself. 

Mr. KuNziG, I respectfully request, Mr. Chairman, that the witness 
be warned of the contempt possibilities inherent in his answer and 
that he be directed to answer the question. 

Mr. Velde. Yes; there is no question about it, your employment 
is a matter whicli this committee can legally inquire about, and you 
are therefore directed to answer the question as to your employment. 
(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Moore. Mr. Velde, I again decline under the constitutional 
guaranties afforded myself and all citizens in the fifth amendment to 
the Constitution of the United States gviaranteeing that I shall not 
be compelled to be a witness against myself and, secondly, I invoke 
my rights and privileges provided for under the fourth, ninth, tenth, 
and fourteenth amendments to the Constitution of the United States, 
and the Constitution of the State of Oregon respecting substantive 
and procedural due process, freedom of conscience, speech, assembly 
and elections. 

Mr. KuNzTG. Mr. Moore, have you ever been a member of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. Moore. For the reasons that liave been heretofore stated, Mr. 
Kunzig, I again invoke my rights under the fifth amendment and de- 
cline to answer the question, and also under the first amendment to the 
Constitution of the United States. 

Mr. Kunzig. Are you now at this very moment a member of the 
Communist Party ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6659 

Mr. Moore. Mr. Kiinzigf, again I invoke my rights as a citizen of 
the United States and of the provisions of the fifth amendment I de- 
cline to answer respectfully. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Moore, when we see what the Communist Party 
has done in Korea, when we realize what is going on in Indochina, 
when we see the problems all over the world today, it becomes of im- 
portance to the people of this country and of interest to 3^our Congress 
just what tliis Communist conspiracy is and how extensive it is in the 
United States of America. 

Won't you, therefore, cooperate with a duly authorized committee 
of your Congress which has received unanimous votes every time the 
problem has come up involving this committee, backing this commit- 
tee, and in giving the committee the power to ask these questions, the 
Supreme Court has backed the committee and proven the power to 
ask these questions, won't you therefore cooperate with this committee 
duly constituted and answer the questions because we believe that you 
have knowledge about the Comumnist conspiracy? Won't you even 
answer the question : Are you a member of this Communist conspiracy 
at this moment as you sit in this courtroom ? 

Mr. Moore. May I confer with counsel ? 

Mr. KuNziG. Please do. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Moore. Mr. Kunzig ; I decline to answer. It is clear that I do 
not understand the procedural tactic that you are using. Therefore, 
I have no alternative but to stand on my constitutional rights and in- 
voke the fifth amendment, that I shall not be compelled to be a witness 
against myself and that I be deprived of liberty of property without 
due process of law. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr, INIoore, isn't it a fact that in the spring of 1948 
you attended a select Communist Party caucus meeting at the home of 
Kenneth Fitzgerald the purpose of which was to select candidates for 
nomination to the office of State legislator and it was at this meeting 
that Homer Owen, Robert Canon, and Mike Loring were selected as 
the party candidates for nomination to the office of State legislator ? 
Isn't that a fact? 

Mr. Moore. Mr. Kunzig, it appears that that is a continuing question 
of the same type. Therefore, I again respectfully decline to answer the 
question under the provisions afforded me by the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Kunzig. Have you ever been employed as executive secretary 
of the Progressive Party in Portland ? 

Mr. MooRE. Mr. Kunzig, I decline to answer that question as I do 
not wish to be compelled to testify against myself or to be in position 
to incriminate myself in any manner now or hereafter whatsoever. 
Therefore, I decline under the provisions of the fifth amendment and 
under the provisions of the first amendment. 

Mr. Kunzig. Well now, Mr. Moore, the Progressive Party was a duly 
constituted party on the ballot here. It was on the ballot in many 
States throughout the United States of America, if not all. Are you 
suggesting that to answer the question that you were a paid employee, 
the executive secretary of the Progressive Party, would in some way 
incriminate you ? It is difficult to see how it could. 

Mr. MooRE. Mr. Kunzig, I am not suggesting, I am standing on my 
rights as a citizen that all citizens have the right under due process 

48069 — 54 — pt. 10 2 



10 



6660 coMivruNiST activities in the pacific northwest area 

of law that they shall not be compelled to witness against themselves. 
I am not able to know when or where questions may lead or may not 
lead. I am not assuming or suggesting or insinuating to you that I 
am guilty because of my silence. I am invoking my constitutional 
right under the fifth amendment and the first amendment, if you 
please, sir. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Did you ever work for the Federal Government? 

Mr. Moore. Again, Mr. Kunzig, I decline to answer. 

Mr, Kunzig. Well now, don't tell me that it is a crime to work for 
the Federal Government. We're all working for it. Are you assuming 
that to work for the United States Government is a crime ? Now the 
question is yery simple. Did you ever work for the Federal Govern- 
ment? 

Mr. MooRE. Mr. Kunzig, since my employment, my conduct is a mat- 
ter of public record for many years, I do not feel that at this point 
it would be of advantage for me to discuss it further inasmuch as it 
might be used as testimony against myself and since I am not, cannot 
be compelled to testify against myself, I decline to answer your ques- 
tion under the provisions of the fifth amendment, if you please, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Moore, you say that your conduct is a matter 
of public record. Can you tell us where we can get that record ? 

Mr. Moore. jNIay I confer with counsel? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Moore. Mr. Velde, upon advice of counsel, I decline to answer 
the question under the protection afforded me by the fifth amendment 
and the first amendment. 

Mr. Velde, I want to ask you again. Have you ever worked for 
the Federal Government ? 

Mr. Moore. Mr, Velde 

Mr. Velde. That is, been employed by the Federal Government 
in any capacity? 

Mr. MooRE. Mr. Velde, I respectfully decline to answer under the 
provisions of the fifth and first amendments. 

Mr. Velde, And you are directed to answer that question. Cer- 
tainly it cannot be a crime to work for the Federal Government, and 
you are therefore directed to answer the question. 

Mr. Moore. May I confer with counsel? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr, MooRE, Sir, I respectfully decline again to answer the question 
under the provisions of the fifth amendment, that I shall not be com- 
pelled to be a witness against myself and under the provisions of the 
first amendment that all citizens are guaranteed that there shall be no 
invasion of their rights of freedom of speech, press, religion, and 
assembly. 

Mr. Velde. Have you ever been in the armed services of the United 
States ? 

Mr. Moore. Mr. Velde, I respectfully submit that I shall decline to 
answer that question under the constitutional protection afforded me 
under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Velde, And again you are directed to answer that question, 
Mr, Moore, 

Mr. MooRE, May I confer with counsel ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6661 

Mr. Moore. Upon advice of counsel I again continue to refuse to 
answer under the protection afforded me by the fifth amendment. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now Mr. Moore, you stated or suggested a few minutes 
ago that your life was an open book and your record was a public 
record that could be looked at. I somehow doubt that fact, and I 
would like to ask you this question. Were you ever — isn't it a fact that 
you were on the Oregon State legislative committee of the Communist 
Party through 1947 and 1948 ? 

Mr. Moore. May I confer with counsel ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Moore. IVIr. Kunzig, I respectfully decline to answer under the 
protection afforded by the first amendment and the fifth amendment, 
if you please, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. Since everything you've done has been an open book, 
do your neighbors have knowledge of the fact and did you tell your 
neighbors that you were on the Oregon State legislative committee of 
the Communist Party in 1947 and 1948 ? 

Mr. Moore. Again, Mr. Kunzig, I decline to answer, the fifth B.nd 
the first amendments. 

Mr. Kunzig. Are you on the State committee of the Communist 
Party at the present time ? 

Mr. Moore. Mr. Kunzig, again I decline to answer under the pro- 
tection of the fifth and the first amendments. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I have no further questions. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Frazier? 

Mr. Frazier. No questions. 

Mr. Velde. I have no further questions. It does appear to me 
to be a shame that a citizen of the United States cannot answer some of 
the most simple questions for a committee of the United States Con- 
gress. You're excused and dismissed. Call your next witness, Mr. 
Counsel. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Frank Patterson. 

Mr, Patterson, I have no desire to be televised, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Will you be sworn, first. In the testimony that you 
are about to give before this subcommittee do you solemnly swear that 
you will tell tlie truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so 
help you God ? 

Mr. Patterson. I do. 

Mr. Velde. And now you say you desire not to be telecast? 

Mr. Patterson, Yes. 

Mr. Velde. The cameras will please desist from telecasting the 
witness during the process of this hearing. 

Mr. Kunzig. Would you state your full name, please, Mr. Patterson ? 

TESTIMONY OF FRANK V. PATTERSON, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 

ATTORNEY, LEO lEVENSON 

Mr. Patterson. Frank V. Patterson, 

Mr. Kunzig, I see that you are accompanied by counsel. He has 
been here before, but would counsel kindly state his name for the rec- 
ord here ? 

Mr. Levenson. Leo Levenson, Portland Trust Building, Portland, 
4, Oreg. 



Ita 



(t 



!^ 



6662 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Patterson, what is your present address ? 

Mr. Patterson. 4223 Northeast Rodney, Porthmd. 

Mr. KuNziG. And your present employment, Mr. Patterson ? 

Mr. Patterson. I am a bookkeeper, but at the present time I an 
unemployed. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you give the committee a brief resume of you 
educational background, please? 

Mr. Px\TTERS0N. B. A., University of Washington. 

Mr. KuNziG. Wlien ? 

Mr. Patterson. Pardon? 

Mr. KuNziG. Wlien was that ? 

Mr. Patpkrson. 1989. A year of graduate work, Washington, anc 
LIj.B. Northwestern College of Law, 1953. 

Mr. KuNziG. Are you a member of the bar ? 

Mr. Patterson. I will confer with counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. Go right ahead. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Patterson. No. 

Mr. KuNziG. You are not a member of the bar at the present time  

Mr. Patterson. That is correct. 

Mr. KuNziG. Have you ever been a member of tlie Communisi 
Party? 

Mr. Patterson. Sir. I decline to answer that qviestion on constitu- 
tional grounds. First, on the grounds of the first amendment in thai 
it is an invasion of a person's rights of freedom of s]:)eech, press, anc 
assembly, and, second, on the fourth amendment in that it is an inva- 
sion of a person's person, and, third, on the grounds of the fifth amend 
ment, 2 parts thereof ; 1 of them being that a person shall not be com 
pelled to testify against himself, and, second, also under the fifth 
amendment, that a person shall not be deprived of life, liberty, or prop- 
erty without due process of law, and I feel that this type of a hearing is 
an invasion of that feature of the fifth amendment because of the unfair 
procedures of the committee. 

Mr. KuNziG. Well now, Mr. Patterson, aside from your viewpoint 
about what is fair and what is unfair, you are here today, you are 
being asked very simple questions, you are being asked the questions I 
hope in a couvteous vein, there is no excitement here and we are just 
interested in finding out about the extent of the Communist conspiracy 
in this country. We feel that we have evidence— we know that we have 
evidence — that you know something about this, that you were part of 
it. We would like to have your testimony cooperating with the com- 
mittee telling us all that you know about the Communist conspiracy. 

Have you applied for membership in the bar? 

Mr. Patterson. I shall consult with counsel, sir. 

Mr. IvuNziG. Please do. 
(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Patterson. Sir, if a person's application is currently under con- 
sideration by the Supreme Court of Oregon would it not be improper 
for me or for this body to inquire further into that ? 

Mr. KuNZTG. I didn't know that your application was under consid- 
eration. T am not from this part of the country. Your application you 
say is at the present time being considered by the Supreme Court of the 
State of Oregon ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6663 



Mr. Paiterson. I was asking if that were the case would that make 
i difference in your question ? 

Mr. KuNziG. If your application is at the present time being consid- 
•red by the supreme court I will ask no further questions about your 
ipplication. Is it presently being so considered ? 

Mr. Patterson. That is the case, sir. 

Mv. KuNziG. All right, I do not wish, nor do we wish in any way to 
nterfere with what is afoing on presently before the supreme court 
►f this State. 

Mr. Patterson. Thank you. 

Mr. KuNziG. NoAv, Mr. Patterson, let me ask you a few questions 
hat may not be going on before the supreme court of this State. Isn't 
t a fact that you haye been secretary for the Progressiye Party of the 
>tate of Oregon, the Progressive Party, I said? 

Mr. Patterson. Well, sir, I decline to answer that on the grounds 
if the first and fifth amendments to the Constitution. 

Mr, KuNZiG. You are the second witness today that apparently feels 
hat there is something incriminating about being connected with the 
Progressive Party. How could the Progressive Pai'ty, a perfectly 
egal party on the ballot, possibly incriminate you ? 

Mr. Patterson. ]May I say two words : "same reason," as you ask 
hese questions? 

Mr. KuNziG. Yes, "same reason," and I will understand means the 
ifth amendment and that your answer — when you say "same reason" 
ce will understand that you feel that your answer would tend to in- 
riminate you and you, therefore, refuse to answer. Is that right ? 

Mr. Patterson. Well, the "same reasons," meaning the first and 
iftli and I also want to mention the 9th and 10th amendments. 

Mr. KuNziG. All right. Were you a member of the Progressive 
*arty at all ? 

Mr. Patterson. I decline, same reason. 

Mr. KuNziG. Have you ever been secretary of the executive com- 
littee of the Communist Party in the State of Oregon ? 

Mr. Patterson. I decline, same reason. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now isn't it a fact that you were one of the men who 
ave "educationals" as has been already testified here before this com- 
littee at Communist Party meetings, "in other words, you instructed 
n the Communist Party line? 

Mr. Patterson. Decline, same reason. 

Mr. KuNziG. Isn't it also a fact that you also gave Communist Party 
educationals" at public meetings held under the auspices of the Com- 
junist Party? 

Mr. Patterson. Decline, same reasons. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now, Mr. Patterson, the reason why— oh, pardon me, 
:o right ahead and confer with your counsel. 

Mr. Patterson. Excuse me, please. 

Mr. KuNziG. Go right ahead and confer. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Patterson. Go ahead, sir. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Mr. Patterson, the thing that makes your particular 
ase so interesting is that you probably heard testimony here yesterday 
hat you were expelled from the Communist Party iii and about 1949 
ecause of the belief of the party— wrong belief as it turned out — 
hat you were an informant for the FBI. And so I ask you now very 



6664 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

definitely, and here is your opportunity to explain clearly, before this 
committee and before the public, were you expelled from the Com- 
munist Party? 

Mr. Patterson. May I again point out, sir, that I am here undei 
protest and I decline to answer on the grounds of the 1st, 5th, Otl" 
and 10th amendments: 

Mr. KuNziG. You were subpenaed to come here, is that correct ? 

Mr. Patterson. Yes. 

Mr. Velde. I might say to you, INIr. Patterson, that in the his 
tory of the House Committee on Un-American Activities there ha; 
never been a witness appear before it who has answered questions pu 
to him truthfully who has ever been prosecuted for a crime. Now i 
is true, as you know, that many witnesses have been prosecuted foi 
contempt growing out of their testimony before this committee. Sonn 
have been prosecuted for perjury gi-owing out of their testimony 
But I can guarantee you this that as long as you come here and tel 
the truth and answer the questions truthfully that, in my opinion 
you will never be prosecuted for any crime. 

With that in mind, I wonder if you will give your country th< 
benefit of your experience in the Communist Party, especially in viev 
of the fact that you were expelled from the Communist Party? 

Mr. Patterson. I decline to answer on the grounds as heretofon 
stated. 

Mr. KuNziG. I ask you now, Mr. Patterson, if after your expulsior 
from the Communist Party in 1949 you ever made any effort to ge 
back into the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Patterson. I decline for the same reasons; the 1st, 5th, 9tl 
and 10th amendments. 

Mr. KuNziG. Were you ever in the Armed Forces of the Unitec 
States? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Patterson. Yes, sir; honorable discharge. 

Mr. KuNZiG. What branch of the service did you serve in ? 

Mr. Patterson. Army, the Army of the United States. 

Mr. Kunzig. From what period of time until what period of time' 

Mr. Patterson. June of 1942 to September 1943. 

Mr. Kunzig. From '42 to '43 ? 

Mr. Patterson. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. Where were you assigned during that period of time: 

Mr. Patterson. I shall confer with counsel. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Patterson. Fort Lewis for the first 9 months, Pittsburg Re- 
placement Depot, Calif., for the ensuing 6 months. 

Mr. Kunzig. Were you a member of the Connnnnist Party at the 
time that you were in the Armed Forces of the TTnited States? 

Mr. Patterson. I decline on the grounds of the 1st, 5th, 9th anc 
10th amendments. 

Mr. Kunzig. I have no further questions of this witness, Mr. Chair- 
man. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Frazier, do you have some questions ? 

Mr. Frazter. No questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. As a lawyer, or rather as a graduate of law school 
with an LL. B. degree, it is ver}-- disappointing to see 

Mr. Patterson. I didn't hear you, sir. ' 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6665 

Mr. Velde. I say as a graduate of Northwestern University with 
an LL. B. degree it is very disappointing to me and I ani sure to 
this committee that you are unable and unwilling to give us the infor- 
mation that we know you possess, information we know would help 
us destroy the Communist Party conspiracy operating here in this 
country. You are dismissed. Call your next witness, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Chairman, may I say that I hope and trust that 
the distinguished officials of the Bar Association of this county and 
this State will see fit to bring the actions of this witness before the 
supreme court of this State. 

Herbert Simpson. 

Mr. Velde. Will you raise your right hand and be sworn, please? 

In the testimony that you are about to give before this subcom- 
mittee do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Simpson, I do. 

Mr. Velde. Will you be seated. 

Mr. Simpson. I wish to also request without TV. I don't like to 
deprive the TV audience of this opportunity, but I am here under 
protest, and I feel that it is strictly a disadvantage. I have no right 
to cross-examine 

Mr. Velde. Well now, would the TV cameras disturb you in your 
testimony? If we do turn the TV cameras off, if I direct that the 
TV cameras be turned off, will you then come forward and answer 
the questions that are put to you by counsel and by coinmittee mem- 
bers? 

Mr. Simpson. I would say to that I will answer them protecting my 
rights as you will soon know. 

Mr. Velde. Under the rules of the committee on the request by 
any witness that he not be telecast, the Chair must regretfully ask 
the television cameras to desist in photographing or telecasting the 
witness himself. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Would you state your full name, sir ? 

TESTIMONY OF HERBERT SIMPSON, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
ATTORNEY, REUBEN LENSKE 

Mr. Simpson. Herbert Simpson. 

Mr. KuNziG. Go ahead and confer with your attorney if you wish. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. KuNziG. Would counsel please state his name and office address 
for the record ? 

Mr. Lenske. Reuben Lenske, Lawyers' Building, Portland, Oreg. 

Mr. KuNziG. Thank you, Mr. Lenske. Mr. Simpson, would you 
please state you residence ? 

Mr. Simpson. I refuse to answer on the basis of the 1st, 5th, 9th, 10th 
and 14th amendments of the Constitution of the United States. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Chairman, I respectfully request the witness be 
directed to answer this question. 

Mr. Velde. Yes. Again let me say that the matter of your address 
is a matter which this committee has a right to inquire into, and I 
can see no reason how that could possibly incriminate you in any way, 
and you are directed to answer the question, Mr. Simpson. 



6666 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. Simpson. I respectfully submit that I feel that this would be 
a violation of my rights under the Constitution. I decline to answer 
that question under the 1st, 5th, 9th, 10th, 14th amendments of the 
Constitution of the United States. 

Mr. KuNziG. Isn't it a fact that you live at 9115 North Geneva, 
Portland, Oreg. ? 

Mr. Simpson. I decline to answer that question under the Consti- 
tution of the United States, articles 1, 9, 5, 10, and 14. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Chairman, I respectfully request that the witness 
be directed to answer that question. 

Mr. Velde. Yes ; again you are directed to answer the question. 

Mr. Simpson. I respectfully submit, Mr. Velde, that I feel this 
would be a violation of my constitutional right, under the Constitu- 
tion of the United States, under articles 1, 5, 9, 10, and 14. 

Mr. KuNZiG. ^Vliere are you presently employed, Mr. Simpson ? 

Mr. Simpson. I refuse to answer that question on the Constitution 
of the United States under articles 1, 5, 9, 10, and 14. If I may, I 
would like to read those articles. 

Mr. KuNziG, We know those articles quite well, Mr. Simpson. I 
respectfully request that the witness be directed to answer the ques- 
tion. 

Mr. Velde. Yes. Your employment is a matter of which this 
committee has the right and duty to inquire into, and can see no way in 
which it could possibly incriminate you, to give an honest answer to 
that question, so you are directed to answer the question, sir. 

Mr. Simpson. I respectfully submit, Mr. Velde, that I refuse to 
answer that question under the Constitution of the United States 
under articles 1, 9, 5, 10, and 14. 

INlr. KuNziG. Would you give this committee, please, a brief resume 
of your educational background ? 

Mr. Simpson. I refuse to answer that question under the Constitu- 
tion of the United States under articles 1, 5, 9, 10, and 14. 

Mr. KuNziG. I respectfully request that the witness be directed to 
answer that question, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Yes, again you are directed to answer the question. 

Mr. Simpson. I respectfully submit that I refuse to answer that 
question under the grounds of the Constitution of the United States 
under articles 1, 5, 9, 10, and 14. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Now Mr. Simpson, did you ever go to high school ? 

Mr. Simpson. Mr. Kunzig, I respectfully submit that I refuse to 
answer that question under the Bill of Rights of the Constitution, 
specifically articles 1, 5, 9, and 10. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, warning the witness of the dangers of 
contempt and that the committee may well consider him in contempt, 
I respectfully submit that he be directed to answer that question. 

Mr. Velde. Well, of course, Mr. Kunzig, the witness has the advice 
of counsel and I see no duty upon our part to further advise him as 
to the possibility of contempt citations. 

Mr. Simpson. I would submit that my counsel is not able to cross- 
examine any of the witnesses. 

Ml". Velde. I do want to say that you are placing yourself in a very 
good place for contempt action by this committee and by the Congress 
of the United States. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6667 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you direct him please, Mr. Chairman, to answer 
that last question ? . 

Mr. Velde. Yes, you are directed to answer the last question. Do 
you remember the question, Mr. Kunzig ? 

Mr. Simpson. It isn't necessary. My answer will be the same. 

Mr. Kunzig. In other words, no matter what the question put to 
you this morning your answer will be that you refuse to answer on the 
grounds of the fifth amendment ? 

Mr. Simpson. Is that a question ? 

Mr. KuNziG. It sounds like it to me. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Simpson. Not necessarily so. 

Mr. KuNziG. Not necessarily, all right. Then let me ask you this 
question: Were you ever chairman of the finance committee of the 
Communist Party for the State of Oregon ? 

Mr. Simpson. I refuse to answer that question under the Constitu- 
tion of the United States, articles 1, 5, 9, 10, and 14. 

Mr. KuNziG. Were you ever chairman of the finance committee of 
the Communist Party for the city of Portland ? 

Mr. Simpson. I refuse to answer that question under my rights 
under the Constitution of the United States, articles 1, 5, 9, 10, and 14. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now isn't it a fact, Mr. Simpson, that you have been 
in the Communist Party for 15 years and that this very moment as 
you sit before this committee of your Congress that you are a member 
of the State committee of the Communist Party of Oregon ? 

Mr. Simpson. I refuse to answer that question on the rights — on my 
rights under the Constitution of the United States, articles 1, 5, 9, 10, 
and 14. 

Mr. Kunzig. Were you ever in the Armed Forces of the United 
States ? 

Mr. Simpson. I refuse to answer that question under my rights under 
the Constitution of the United States under articles 1, 5, 9, 10, and 14. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I cannot see how it possibly incrim- 
inates anyone to be in the Armed Forces of the United States and, 
therefore, I respectfully request that this witness be directed to answer 
this question. 

Mr. Velde, Yes, you are directed to answer the question Mr. Witness. 

Mr. Simpson. I respectfully submit, Mr. Velde, that I refuse to 
answer that question under the Constitution of the United States, 
articles 1, 5, 9, 10, and 14. 

Mr. Kunzig. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Do you have any questions, Mr. Frazier ? 

Mr. Simpson. I would like to point out that these articles are amend- 
ments to the Constitution of the United States and are known, except 
for the 14th, are known as the Bill of Rights. They are contained 
in the Bill of Rights. Thank you. 

Mr. Velde. Just a moment. 

Mr. Kunzig. You are not finished yet. 

Mr. Simpson. I'm not in any hurry. 

Mr. Frazier. What is that printed paper that you have been refer- 
ring to there and reading from ? 



48069— 54— pt. 10- 



6668 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTETW^EST AREA 

Mr. Simpson. I refuse to answer that question under my rights 
under the Constitution of the United States, articles 1, 5, 9, 10 — just 
a moment before I'm through answering. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Simpson. Under advice of counsel, this is a copy, a very beau- 
tiful copy, of the Bill of Eights as provided in the 10 original amend- 
ments to the Constitution of the United States in force December 
15, 1791. 

Mr. Frazier. And who furnished you that ? _ 

Mr. Simpson. I refuse to answer that question under my rights 
under the Constitution of the United States, articles 1, 5, 9, 10, and 14. 

Mr. Frazier. Was it furnished to you by the Communist Party? 

Mr. Simpson. I refuse to answer that question under my rights 
under the Constitution of the United States, articles 1, 5, 9, 10, and 14. 

Mr. Frazier. That's all, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. I wonder if you realize, Mr. Simpson, that if the 
Communist conspiracy took over in this country that you wouldn't, 
be allowed to bring that beautifully drawn up Bill of Rights and 
Constitution before a body of commissars in this country and do as- 
you have done here today ? I hope you realize that. Do you? 

Or do you believe that we would go right on in this country with 
the same United States Constitution, the same Bill of Rights, that we 
have lived under for so long if the Communist conspiracy took over? 

Mr. Simpson. I refuse to answer that question on my rights under 
the Constitution of the United States, articles 1, 5, 9, 10, and 14. 

Mr. Velde. Tlie witness is dismissed. Call your next witness. 

Mr. KuNziG. Robert Canon. 

Mr. Velde. Will you raise your right hand and be sworn please? 

In the testimony that you are about to give before this subcommittee 
do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Canon. I do sir. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you give your full name please, sir ? 

TESTIMONY OF ROBERT WISHART CANON 

Mr. Canon. Robert Wishart Canon. 

Mr. Kunzig. Would you spell the name, the middle name and the 
last name ? 

Mr. Canon. W-i-s-h-a-r-t C-a-n-o-n. 

Mr. Kunzig. I note that you are not accompanied by counsel. Under 
the rules of this committee published in the blue pamphlet, the rules 
of procedure of this committee, you are entitled to have counsel. Rule 
VII says that, "At every hearing, public or executive, every witness 
shall be accorded the privilege of having counsel of his own choosing."" 
Do you desire to testify without counsel, Mr. Canon ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, I do. 

Mr. Kunzig. Would you state your address please, sir ? 

Mr. Canon. I live at 2737 North East 11th. 

Mr. Kunzig. And where is that? 

Mr. Canon. Portland, Oreg. 

Mr. Kunzig. AVhere were you born, Mr. Canon ? 

Mr. Canon. I was born at Kansas City, Kans. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6669 

Mr. KuNziG. When? 

Mr. Canon. 1919. ^ 

Mr. KuNziG. Could you give the committee a brief resume of your 
educational background please 'i 

Mr. Canon. Yes. I graduated from high school in Denver, Colo., 
went 2 years to the University of Colorado, and 2 years to Worcester 
College in Ohio. 

Mr. KuNZiG. When did you graduate from Worcester College m 

Ohio? 

Mr. Canon. 1940. 

Mr. KuNziG. Was that the end of your formal education ? 

Mr. Canon. That's right, yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you serve in the Armed Forces of the United 
States? I might warn you that is considered an incriminating tiling 
here, but would you tell us when you served in the Armed Forces of 
the United States. 

Mr. Velde. It is considered by some as incriminating here. 

Mr. KuNziG. By a very, very small minority I'm afraid, Mr. 
Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. We hope. 

Mr. KuNziG. We hope, yes. 

Mr. Canon. I volunteered for the Air Corps in 1940 and served for 
2 or 3 months, washed out, and then I volunteered again in 1943. I 
spent, about a year in Army specialized training program, and then in 
the combat engineers. I was discharged in October of 1944. 

Mr. KuNziG. Going on from that time, Mr. Canon, could you please 
tell the committee your employment, at least the highlights of your 
employment, from that time until the ]3resent ? 

Mr. Canon. Wlien I left the Army I came directly to Portland. 
My principal jobs were first with the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the 
United States Department of Labor, and then I went to work at Eeed 
College in the Veterans' guidance center counseling veterans. I 
worked there from 1945 to 1948. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now you were at Reed College counseling veterans, 
but I take it that you were actually and technically employed at that 
time by the Veterans' Administration. Is that right ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Situated at Reed College ? 

Mr. Canon. That is right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now in 1948 did there come a change in your employ- 
ment ? 

Mr. Canon. In 1948 I became director of admissions at Reed College 
and held that position until the last of May of this year. 

Mr. KuNziG. As director of admissions of Reed College you were 
then an employee of Reed College ? 

Mr. Canon. That is right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you have any other position beside being director 
of admissions ? 

Mr. Canon. Last September I became also dean of students. 

Mr. KuNziG. Dean of students ? 

Mr. Canon. Dean of students, yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. I see. 



6670 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. Velde. I wonder if you would tell the committee a little bit 
more about your position as director of admission at Reed College? 
Just what duties did you have as director of admissions there ? 

Mr. Canon. Well the director of admissions there is simply the 
public relations man for the college in a sense, the salesman if you will. 
My job was to travel about the country interesting students in a Reed 
education, reviewing their credentials, admitting the new class. 

Mr. Frazier. Mr. Chairman, I didn't understand when he became 
dean of students ? 

Mr. Canon. I became dean of students in September of 1953. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now I understand that you are no longer employed by 
Reed College. What is your present employment situation ? 

Mr. Canon. Well at the present time I am unemployed. I resigned 
on the 31st of May of this year. I am going to seek new employment 
shortly. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now, Mr. Canon, before we go into further details of 
your testimony, let me ask you if you have ever been a member of 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, I have. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Would you tell this committee in some detail how and 
why you got into the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. Well I got into the Communist Party primarily be- 
cause I felt that it was working a lot harder for democracy than — and 
with considerably less cynicism — than either of the other parties. It 
had a very strong idealistic appeal and I felt that times were such that 
it was necessary to join in with other people in trying to accomplish 
some of the social aims that seemed important to me at the time. 

The Communist Party was actually a subsidiary in a sense and my 
primary interests were in many other organizations; in racial organi- 
zations, in veterans' organizations and so forth, and civil rights, and 
through these organizations I came into contact with people who iden- 
tified themselves as Communists. And from what I could see of these 
people, they were perfectly loyal Americans and seemed to be doing a 
very splendid job along the lines of my interest. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now Mr. Canon, I note that you mention that there 
were other groups that you were connected with, I think that it would 
be of interest to the community and of great value in our overall testi- 
mony for you to explain in detail the different types of groups that you 
belonged to and how, one after the other, they led to the final step 
which was the joining of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Canon. The first organization which I joined in moving to 
Portland was the Urban League. 
Mr. Ktjnzig. Urban League ? 

Mr. Canon. Urban League, U-r-b-a-n. 

Mr. KuNziG. Tell us somthing about the Urban League, please. 
Mr. Canon. Well the Urban League was and is a nationwide organ- 
ization dedicated to the task of trying to bring greater understanding 
amongst both white and Negro peoples as to their problems of living 
compatibly together. It is an organization which in Portland has 
concentrated primarily on finding for Negro people equal job oppor- 
tunities, equal economic opportunities. They have done a very excel- 
lent job. 



i 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6671 

I became active in the Urban League first. And then almost simul- 
taneously I became active in what is loiown as the I. C. C. A. S. P., the 
Independent Citizens' Committee of the Arts, Sciences, and Profes- 
sions. I might say that when I got out of the Army and came to Port- 
land it was just prior to the 1944 elections and I worked very actively 
for the reelection of Franklin Eoosevelt, and then I got into the I. C. C 
A. S. P., which later developed into the Progressive Citizens of Amer- 
ica, which in turn developed into the Progressive Party, and I was 
interested and active in all those organizations. 

Mr. KuNziG. What sort of work did you do in the Independent 
Citizens' Committee of the Arts, Sciences, and Professions ? 

Mr. Canon. Well I did practically no work there. It was more of 
a discussion group. 

Mr. KuNziG. I tliink that the record should show at this time, Mr, 
Chairman, that the Independent Citizens' Conunittee of the Arts, 
Sciences and Professions is a cited Communist- front organization from 
as early as this period, 1950-51, and it was cited, of course, after the 
period of time that you were active in it at that period but, of course, 
it was cited for the activities throughout the country that took place 
during the period of time that you were a member. 

Mr. Canon. All that I knew of that organization is that it had as- 
sisted materially in the reelection of President Roosevelt. And then 
I helped to organize and became one of the first chairmen of the Amer- 
ican Veterans' Committee which I presume that you know sometliing 
of. I became very active in veterans' affairs. 

Mr. Velde. That isn't to be confused with what is known as Amvets 
is it? 

Mr. Canon. No, no, those are two separate organizations. This was 
organized by Charles Bolte. It was an organization which — I beg 
your pardon. 

Mr. KuNziG. How do you spell Bolte ? 

Mr. Canon. Bolte, B-o-l-t-e. Its principal appeal was that they 
were calling upon veterans to join together briefly to try and help in 
the period of readjustment, but that then they would dissolve, that 
this was not to become another political pressure group or something 
of the sort. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now did people that you met in these various groups, 
such as the Independent Citizens' Committee of the Arts, Sciences and 
Professions, the A. V. C, and so forth, did people that you met in 
there turn out later to be also people that you knew later as Com- 
munists ? 

Mr. Canon. Some, yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Was it association with those people that gradually 
led you into association into the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. I would think so to some extent. As I became more 
and more active in organizations. I became a joiner, in a sense. I 
was tremendously enthusiastic about being a citizen, my responsibil- 
ities of citizenhip, and so on and so forth, and as I became more active 
I couldn't help but become more and more interested in the problems 
of civil rights. ^ I would say that this alone was the most important 
factor in carrying me into the Communist Party. As a veteran, for 
example, as the State director of the American Veterans' Committee, 
I was frequently labeled a Communist. I was not a Communist. I 
became resentful. 



6672 cojvcmijnist activities in the pacific northwest area 

Mr, KuNziG. You weren't at that time. 

Mr. Canon. I was not at that time, and I became resentful. I realize 
that civil rights must be protected, and the right of an American to 
stand up and say what he believed, and so forth, but as I became inter- 
ested in veterans' affairs, in Negro affairs, and so forth, I saw that 
publicly the Communist Party was standing for each of these things 
which I stood for, and, since I joined a dozen organizations anyway, 
T thought this was another excellent one to join. 

Mr. Velde. Let's get it straiglit, again, professor. During what 
period of time was this, that you were gradually indoctrinated? 

Mr. Canon. This was from the time that I came to Portland in late 
1944 up until January of 1947 when I actually affiliated with the Com- 
munist Party. 

Mr. Velde. Thank you. 

Mr. Ktjnzig. Which came first, your affiliation with the Communist 
Party — I want to get the dates straight — or your employment, vour 
actual switch-over of employment to be director of admissions of Reed 
College? 

Mr. Canon. My joining the Communist Party came first. 

Mr. KuNziG. So that when you were emploj^ed as director of admis- 
sions at Reed College you were at that very moment a member of the 
Communist Party? 

Mr. Canon. Well, no. Actually I had pulled out so far as I was 
concerned. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Now what was the date that you became director of 
admissions? That was in 1948; is that right? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. I became director of admissions in De- 
cember of 1948. 

Mr. KuNZTG. And when did you get out of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. Well, as near to that date as I possibly could. 

Mr. KuNziG. Just prior to it, in other words? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. So you were in the party from 1947 until roughlv the 
end of 1948? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. After the elections of 1948 ? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now those elections were elections in which you your- 
self ran; is that correct? 

Mr. Canon. That's correct. I had also become a member of the 
Young Democrats of Oregon and was a registered Democrat. I de- 
cided to run in the May primaries of 1948. 

Mr. Ktjnzig. For what position ? 

Mr. Canon. For the house of representatives of the legislature in 
Salem. I ran in the primaries as a Democrat, as a Roosevelt Demo- 
crat, somewhat distinguished from more conservative Democrats, and 
did receive the nomination through the primaries. 

Mr. KuNziG. So you were nominated on the Democratic ticket as 
you say on the Roosevelt Democratic ticket to run for the State legis- 
I'riture, but at that time you were actually a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. I was. 

Mr. KuNziG. You were probably also endorsed by the Progressive 
Party, were you? 



COlVIiVIUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHTV^EST AREA 6673 

Mr. Canox. Then the Progressive Party was organized formally in 
the simnner of 1948, and I received their coendorsement, and on the 
ballot in November I was listed Democrat-Progressive. 

Mr. KuxziG. But it didn't say Democrat-Progressive-Communist ? 

Mr. Canon. No, it did not. 

Mr. KuxziG. I think, Mr. Chairman, before we go further into de- 
tails about how he received his nomination, that this would be a good 
moment for perhaps a 10-minute break. 

Mr. Velde. Yes. The committee will be in recess for 10 minutes. 

(Ten-minute recess.) 

Mr. Velde. The committee will be in order, please. You may 
proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Canon, at the time we took the break, we were dis- 
cussing your nomination to run for office here for the State legislature, 
and I wish you would, please, give us in some detail how that took 
place, whether you volunteered, whether the Communist Party selected 
you, how they managed to get you put across to the Progressive Party, 
how they managed to put you across to the Democratic Party on which 
ticket you were finally nominated. Would you describe the whole situ- 
ation in detail, please ? 

Mr. Canon. I don't remember too much detail actually. I know 
that the initiative did not come from me. I was asked by a number of 
people, I think people primarily in the Young Democrats, if I would 
run for the State legislature, and I did agree to run. 

Mr. KuNziG. In fairness to the whole picture, they, of course, did 
not kiiow that you were a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. Well, the Young Democrats at this time were quite a 
small organization, and I think a good many of the members were at 
that time rather interested in the Communist Party. 

Mr. Ktjnzig. Are you suggesting that there were others who were 
members of the Communist Party, too ? 

Mr. Canon. I don't understand you. 

Mr. KuNziG. Are you suggesting that there were other members of 
the group — you have just discussed the Young Democrats, who were 
members of the Communist Party, too. 

Mr. Canon. Yes, I would — that is what I meant to say. I can't 
remember exactly from what official organization I received an invita- 
tion to run because there was something of an interlocking directorate. 

Mr. KuNziG. An interlocking directorate by and between whom ? 

Mr. Canon. Wliat I'm trying to say is that a group of people who 
were interested in a number of organizations, among them the Com- 
munist Party, discussed this matter with me, and I wouldn't say that 
the call came expressly from the Communist Party, but I think it 
came from, in the name of the Young Democrats. 

Mr. KuNziG. Who were the people who discussed this with you? 

Mr. Cannon. Well Kenneth Fitzgerald was the man who was most 
instrumental I would say in having me run for office. 

Mr KuNziG. Kenneth Fitzgerald is the man who testified here yes- 
terday ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, sir. 

Mr. KuNziG. He refused to answer questions when put to him. Let 
me ask you now. did you know Kenneth Fitzgerald to be a member of 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes ; I did. 



6674 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. KuNziG. He was a member with you ? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. No doubt in your mind whatsoever ? 

Mr. Canon. No, sir. 

Mr. KuNziG. Who were some of the others who persuaded you to run 

for public office ? 

Mr. Canon. That I simply can't remember. 

Mr. KuNziG. You remember Kenneth Fitzgerald, and you can't 
remember any others ? 

Mr. Canon. I remember him particularly. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now this running for office, I presume, was the same 
type of situation as in the case of Homer Owen who testified here yes- 
terday ? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. Kunzig. He, also, ran at the same time ? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. Kunzig. And also in the same circumstances and the same 
auspices and so forth ? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. Kunzig. And you knew him, of course, well ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes; I did. 

Mr. Kunzig. You still know him ; is that right ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. And you knew him to be a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Canon. Yes ; I did. 

Mr. Kunzig. His identification of you as a member of the Commu- 
nist Party was, of course, correct ? 

Mr. Canon. That is correct. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now when you ran for office did you win ? 

Mr. Canon. I did win in the primaries. I won by a rather over- 
whelming majority as I recall. And then when I accepted the coen- 
dorsement of the Progressive Party I lost — either the bottom man or 
the second from the bottom, I don't know which. 

Mr. VrxDE. In the November election you were on the regular 
Democratic ballot and on the Progressive ballot also ; is that right ? 

Mr. Canon. I was a regular nominee — I was a nominee of the Demo- 
cratic Party by virtue of the May primaries. I was a nominee of the 
Progressive Party by virtue of a convention nomination. But on the 
ballot I was listed as "Democrat-Progressive." 

Mr. Velde. I see. 

Mr. Canon. You are able in this State to run on two tickets. I was 
not registered as a Progressive, however. 

Mr, Velde. Did you do anything publicly to accept the Progressive 
Party nomination? 

Mr. Canon. Oh, yes ; I went to the Progressive Party Convention, 
participated in it and publicly accepted the endorsement of the Pro- 
gressive Party. 

Mr. Velde. I see. I don't want to go back over old testimony, 
but you mentioned some of the organizations which you belonged to 
in the 1940's, the early 1940's, that you thought led you to joining 
the Communist Party. Did you mention all those organizations now? 
Have you mentioned all of the organizations that you belonged to? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6675 

Mr. Canon. I gave you the names of all of the organizations to 
which I belonged prior to going into the Communist Party, I believe. 
I did take part in other organizations at a later time. 

Mr. Velde. I see. 

Mr. KuNziG. In order to get those dates straight that the chair- 
man was just talking about, that was in 1946, 1947, that period of 
time ; is that right ? 

Mr. Canon. That is right, 1946, 1947; I should say the middle 
1940's. 

Mr. Velde. The middle 1940's instead of the early 1940's. 

Mr. Kunzig. One of the groups that you mentioned was the Urban 
League. I want to give you an opportunity to say more about the 
Urban League so that under no circumstances is there an implication 
that there is any subversive tint to the Urban League. Would you 
testify further along that at the present time? 

Mr. Canon. I would appreciate that. The Urban League was or- 
ganized, I believe here in Portland, in 1945, under the leadership of 
Bill Berry. This organization did attract, of course 

Mr. KuNziG. How do you spell Berry '? 

Mr. Canon. B-e-r-r-y. 

Mr. Canon. The organization did attract a considerable number of 
people of all political colorations. We had quite a problem in Port- 
land at this time with a vast inmigration of Negro people and we 
were all of us seriously concerned about the problem of integration. 

Among those people who were attracted were naturally many peo- 
ple in the Communist Party. However, Bill Berry made it quite clear 
from the beginning that his organization was a service group, was not 
in any way to become a political football, and I think that he scrupu- 
lously avoided a tie-in with any special interest group. A little later, 
I would say in 1947 or so, the Urban League became quite unpopular 
with the Communist Party because of the attitude which Mr. Berry 
had taken, that he was considered a social democrat, something of this 
sort, that he was not interested in a mass organization, he was inter- 
ested in an elite organization, the intellectuals of both Negro and 
white groups, and that this was not something to which the Com- 
munist Party could lend its support. 

I don't think that the Urban League has been at any time involved 
in Communist Party activities here. 

Mr. KuNziG. I think that the record should show, Mr. Chairman, 
that no inference should be taken in any way against the Urban 
League due to testimony given here in public session. 

Mr. Velde. Yes ; the record will so state. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Canon, did you ever have any connection with 
the Civil Rights Congress of Oregon about which there was some testi- 
mony yesterday ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes ; I was the cochairman of the Civil Rights Congress 
when it was organized. I don't recall the year. I would judge 1947. 
I would think that it was 1947. Don Wollam and I 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you spell that name please ? 

Mr. Canon. I believe that it is W-o-l-l-a-m. I can't tell you. I 
don't know. 

Mr. KuNziG. W-o-l-l-a-m, Don Wollam ; yes 



48069— 54— pt. 10- 



6676 COMMUNIST ACTH'ITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. Canon, I had been working just prior to this on a problem 
of some Spanish boys, Spanish refugee boys, who were stranded in 
Porthmd. I was interested in their plight and in that connection 
came to know, I came to know, Irvin Goodman and 



Mr. KuNziG. Came to know who ? 

Mr. Canon. Irvin Goodman, an attorney here, who was also inter- 
ested in the plight of these boys. He then later, on the basis of that 
friendship, asked me if I would be interested in helping — if he would 
serve as counsel if I would be interested — get together a group who 
would be able in the event that something of this sort happened to offer 
protection for people on the basis of civil rights, to help protect their 
civil rights.. 

Don Wollam and I did cochair it. We went about as far as to have 
letterheads, stationery printed, a number of national officers. Actually 
we did practically no work. There was no issue before us. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now let me ask this. You say that it was roughly in 
1947 when you became active in the Civil Rights Congress. How long 
did you remain active ? 

Mr. Canon. That I can't tell you. 

Mr. KuNziG. A year ? 

Mr. Canon. Well, it was an organization which was founded for 
future need. The only time that I did anything in the name of the Civil 
Rights Congress, I did receive a wire from somebody in New York 
asking me to arrange a meeting for Gerhart Eisler. I am still fuzzy 
on the details of that but apparently Gerhart Eisler was out on bail 
and wanted to take a national tour to explain his point of view. He 
wanted to explain that he was a political prisoner. I received a wire 
asking that I set up a meeting in Portland under the auspices of the 
Civil Rights Congress, which I did. I got into a great deal of difficulty 
because I arranged for the meeting in one of the public schools and 
the school board heard about it, denied me the use of the school build- 
ing, and I went before the school board and fought a battle on it. I 
was defeated, but prior to this Gerhart Eisler left for Germany and 
so the whole thing was without avail. And so that was the only time 
that I did any work for the Civil Rights Congress, and where the 
letterhead stationery went, I don't know. 

Mr. Velde. Was that in line with what Irvin Goodman asked 
you to do, that is, to take it up with the Civil Rights Congress in order 
to defend so-called political prisoners and people who appeared before 
the Un-American Activities Committee and so forth ? 

Mr. Canon. Well as I recall Mr. Goodman felt that the American 
Civil Liberties League [Union] was not going to be willing in the fu- 
ture to militantly defend the rights of people on the leftwing. He be- 
lieved that it was necessary, regardless of whether or not you believed 
in conmiunism, it was necessary until such time as the party was made 
illegal, that Communists be afforded adequate protection and ade- 
quate audience. Mr. Goodman, I am sure, wanted to see this organiza- 
tion organized for the sole purpose of providing legal assistance to 
those who might otherwise be denied legal assistance. 

Mr. Velde. And were you a Communist at that time, INIr. Canon? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, I was. 

Mr. Velde. Did Mr. Goodman know that you were a Communist? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6677 

Mr. Canon. I can't answer that. I don't know. I was always told 
that Mr. Goodman was not a Communist himself. Wliether he knew 
about me, I can't say. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Mr. Chairman, I think the record should show that, at 
this point, that the Civil Eights Congress was declared subversive and 
Communist by Attorney General Tom Clark on December 4, 1947. 
That was released at that time all over the country. 

I would like to ask you this question. Wlien that happened did you 
make any effort to disassociate yourself with this group which the 
Attorney General of the United States cited as subversive and Com- 
munist ? 

Mr. Canon. No, I did not because at that time it seemed to me that 
almost everything which people were attempting to do in the name 
of greater democracy was being cited as un-American, and I was con- 
temptuous of the charges. I knew perfectly well that the Civil Eights 
Congress did have the blessing of the Communist Party but on the 
other hand it seemed to me perfectly legitimate that Communists 
should have the protection of some such organization and so it made 
no difference to me whatsoever. ^ 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you feel today that the Communist Party is sub- 
versive and un-American as you said ? 

Mr. Canon. Is subversive and un-American? 

Mr. KuNziG. Today I am talking about. 

Mr. Canon. I have very little personal knowledge today. I will 
just have to say what I read in the papers. 

Mr. KuNziG. Well, what is your viewpoint as to the Communist 
Party at the present time today ? 

Mr. Canon. Frankly, I don't know. I would say that I think that 
it is highly likely that in any organization which is a critical organiza- 
tion, or an organization which is dedicated to social change, that there 
would be people within that group who would be willing to indulge 
in sabotage and so forth. This I can well believe. 

As far as its being subversive, I would believe that there are many 
people in the Communist Party who would like very much to change 
our form of government by one means or another. The word "sub- 
versive" makes me a little hesitant. I don't know quite what I mean 
by it. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you ever have any connection or did you ever go 
to the Communist Party headquarters in Portland, Oreg. ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, many times. The first time I went to the Com- 
munist Party headquarters was just prior to joining the party. I had 
met a man in the American Veterans' Committee who identified him- 
self as a Communist and told me that I might consider joining the 
party, that it was an organization which militantly supported all the 
things which I apparently did believe in. And so I took the direct 
approach, went to Communist Party headquarters, talked to Earl 
Payne who was at that time the chairman of the Oregon Communist 
Party. . . 

I remember my first question. It seems a little naive but I asked 
him if there was any truth to the stories that the American Commu- 
nist Party was tied up with the Soviet Union, the Soviet gold stories, 
were the American Communists actually receiving funds and direc- 
tions from the Soviet Union and so forth. 

Mr. KuNziG. What did he say ? 



6678 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. Canon. He said that this was absolutely not true, that this 
was a basic American party, that they looked to the Soviet Union in 
very much the same way that our own Jeffersonian Democrats looked 
to the French Revolution as a point of inspiration. 

I also asked him at that time about the Communist Party attitude 
concerning religion. Was it true that the party was attempting to 
stifle religion? What was their intolerance within the party? He 
said that this was not true, that they hoped under a Socialist regime 
that religion would just cease to be a need of people, but that they were 
not actively opposing it, and after my talk with Mr. Payne at that 
time, I felt that most of the charges that had been levied agamst 
the Communist Party were probably untrue. 

Mr. KuNziG. That was what you felt at that time. 

Mr. Canon. At that time. . . 

Mr. KuNziG. Now, you said that someone had urged you to ]om 
the party. Who was that? 

Mr. Canon. This was Frank Patterson. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Frank Patterson testified here this morning, or rather 
refused to testify. Let me ask you the question very clearly. Did 
you know Frank Patterson to be a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, I did. 

Mr. KuNziG. And he was the person who urged you to join the Com- 
munist Party? . 

Mr. Canon. He was to my knowledge the first man who identified 
himself to me as a Communist, and I worked with him for several 
months in the American Veterans' Committee and had a high regard 
for his judgment and his integrity, and I was tremendously impressed 
when he stood up and said that he was a Communist and that perhaps 
I might be interested. 

Mr. Velde. This was in 194Y, was it, Professor ? 

Mr. Canon. I would say this was in 1946. The American Veterans' 
Committee was organized in the fall of 1946 and this was in the first 
several months of its organization, when Mr. Patterson was a very 
active member of AVC. 

Mr. Velde. By that time, of course, I imagine you had studied 
quite a little of the Communist literature, hadn't you ? 

Mr. Canon. No, sir ; I don't believe I had seen any Communist liter- 
ature at that time. 

Mr. Velde. Not at the time that you joined the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. No. 

Mr. KuNziG. You said that you went frequently to the headquarters 
in Portland. Where were the headquarters ? 

Mr. Canon. At the time I first started going, they were in what is 
known as Redman Hall, in the southeast part of town. I don't remem- 
ber, I think it was on Hawthorne Street. I'm not sure, and they 
moved over in the northeast district on Union Avenue, but my position 
at that time was that it seemed to me from my observation there was 
nothing illegal or un-American about the Communist Party and that 
I was a perfectly free American, and if I was going to have any busi- 
ness with communism, I wanted to have it openly, and I just walked 
right in to party headquarters and continued to do so, and it wasn't 
until after I was in the party for some time that I began to realize the 
necessity for a certain amount of secrecy on this. My initial reaction 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6679 

was if I'm a Communist, I want to say I'm a Communist, but that 
changed gradually as I became more intimate with the party. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now you knew Earl Payne then. You've mentioned 
Kenneth Fitzgerald, Homer Owen, Payne, and Frank Patterson as 
people you knew in the Communist Party. 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now did you join any particular club of the Commu- 
nist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, I joined what was known as the professional club. 

Mr. KuNZiG. The professional club of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. What did that mean, the professional club? 

Mr. Canon. Well, there were many clubs. Each had a name. Ours 
was no more exclusively professional than several others. Our par- 
ticular club was made up primarily of people whose interests and live- 
lihood were centered around Reed College. It was a very small club, 
and the party went through several reorganizations at that time, 
organizing clubs on the basis of neighborhood and then orgaTiizing 
clubs on the basis of common industry, and so forth, but ours remained 
stable throughout the period as a group of people who normally asso- 
ciated in Reed College. 

Mr. KuNziG. Suppose you give us the names, please, of the members 
of this small group you called the professional club of the Communist 
Party here in Portland ? 

Mr. Canon. The stable membership was myself and my wife 

Mr. KuNziG. Your wife was a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. She went along with me. 

Mr. KuNziG. She is also out of the Communist Party now as you 
are? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. We'll cover that a bit later. Now who were the other 
members ? You and your wife 

Mr. Canon. And Spencer and Mrs. Gill. 

Mr. KuNziG. Wlio is Spencer Gill ? 

Mr. Canon. Well, at that time, at the time I joined, Mr. Gill was — I 
think it was at the time I joined — working at the guidance center at 
Reed College as I was, so, although we were not affiliated, officially affi- 
liated with the college, we were still working together at the college. 
Wliat he does now I'm not certain. 

Mr. KuNziG. Wliat sort of work did he do at the guidance center ? 

Mr. Canon. Veterans' counseling. Our job was to test and evaluate 
capabilities of veterans and advise them in the use of their Public Law 
346 money. 

Mr. KuNziG. The man that was then advising veterans and guiding 
them in the use of laws, and so forth and so on, and what rights they 
had was a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Canon. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Name was Spencer Gill ? 

Mr. Cannon. Yes, that's right, yes sir. G-i-1-1. 

Mr. KuNziG. And his wife was also ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes sir. 

Mr. KuNziG. A member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes sir. 

Mr. KuNziG. And who else ? 



6680 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. Canon. And Prof. Lloyd Reynolds and his wife. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now you say "Prof. Lloyd Reynolds." Where is he a 
professor ? 

Mr. Canon. At Reed College. 

Mr. KuNziG. And what subject does he teach ? 

Mr. Canon. Does he teach ? He teaches graphic art. 

Mr. KuNziG. And you knew him and his wife, and Spencer Gill and 
his wife, of your own personal knowledge, to be members of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. That is right, sir. And then Dr. Stanley Moore joined 
our group in September or August of 1948. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now Stanley Moore is the man who appeared before 
this committee recently in Washington, D. C, and took the fifth amend- 
ment and who has been recently writing letters to newspapers here and 
making all sorts of public statements not under oath, of course, we 
must never forget that, not under oath — wlien he was under oath he re- 
fused to answer the questions — and he intimates that there is all just 
nothing to this and totally unimportant, and therefore I want to make 
very sure that we have his identification clear, positive and definite. 

You knew Stanley Moore of Reed College, presently on a year's 
leave of absence, to be a member of the Communist Party and you met 
with him as a member of the Communist Party. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Canon. That is right sir. 

Mr. KuNziG. That is Lloyd Reynolds and his wife, Spencer Gill and 
his wife, you and your wife, and Stanley Moore ? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Does that comprise the group of the professional club ? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. How often did you meet, Mr. Canon ? 

Mr. Canon. Too frequently, oh, twice a month I would say on the 
average. 

Mr. KuNziG. Where did you meet ? 

Mr. Canon. In one of our homes. We would rotate in our homes. 
This probably would not have appeared to the casual observer as any- 
thing approachins: a Communist Party meeting. 

Mr. KuNziG. But it was ? 

Mr. Canon. Pardon. 

Mr. KuNziG. But it was ? 

Mr. Canon. But it was, but we had all known each other, with the 
exception of Stanley Moore, who was a late arrival, we had all known 
each other for several years and were brought together on a social — 
a common social plane and work interest as much as we were on the 
basis of any other. It was quite disturbine; to the party leadership that 
we spent so much time socializing and talking about our families, and 
so forth, and so little time in party business. 

Mr. KuNziG. How did the party leadership know that? 

Mr. Canon. The party leadership would periodically visit our club. 

Mr. KuNziG. Who would visit the club ? 

Mr. Canon. Earl and Rose Payne — his wife. Rose. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you know her to be a member of the Communist 
Party? 

]\[r. Canon. Oh, yes; yes, sir. They visited us frequently, and then 
after Mr. Payne was expelled from the party Mark Haller visited us on 
several occasions. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6681 

Mr. KuNziG. And so you knew Mark Haller to be a member of th3 

Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. That is right ; yes, sir. 

Mr. VrxDE. I presume, Professor Canon, that you knew at that 
time, your group knew, that the FBI and other intelligence agencies of 
the Government were making an investigation of communistic activi- 
ties, didn't you ? 

Mr. Canon. That is right ; yes. 

Mr. Velde. And you knew also that this committee, or rather 
the predecessor of this committee, had been making investigations ? 
Mr. Canon. That is correct. 

Mr. Velde. I was just wondering whether your group took any 
security measures to protect yourselves from investigations by the 
FBI, for instance ? 

Mr. Canon. Well not elaborate security measures because it was 
such a normal and natural association of 6 or 7 people. 
Mr. Velde. More like a bridge club? 

Mr. Canon. That is right. And we frequently had pot-luck din- 
ners, and so forth, but it was perfectly natural that all of us should 
under normal circumstances come together. We did try to vary our 
meeting times, vary the houses in which we met, so that there would 
not be any pattern of consistency. Later on in the 1948 period, the 
party became somewhat apprehensive and we began parking our cars 
a block or so away, and so on. But in 1947, 1948, the early part of 
1948, even Mark Haller would drive right up to the front door and 
park his car. We weren't particularly security conscious. 

Mr. Velde. Now how were you advised of the place and the time 
of the meeting? 

Mr. Canon. Just seeing each other in the halls at the college. 
Mr. Velde. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Ktjnzig. Now at the same time that you were meeting with this 
small professional club of the Communist Party, we have already had 
testimony that Homer Owen was meeting with the John Reed Club, 
which is composed almost entirely of students of Reed College. 

It is interesting to me to note that you were a member of one group 
and that the student group was apparently a different group. Could 
you explain a little bit in detail why that was? Why they were kept 
separate ? 

Mr. Canon. Well our particular group of people were, to my knowl- 
edge, always kept quite isolated from the main body of the party. 
We were, with respect to the students, we were encouraged to do 
whatever we could to uncover latent interest among the students and 
to encourage it into party membership, but to keep ourselves protected 
as much as possible. I don't think that we often identified ourselves 
actually to students. Now I knew that there was a John Reed Club 
at Reed. 

Mr. KuNziG. Oh, you did know that there was a John Reed Club ? 
Mr. Canon. I did know that tliere was a John Reed Club, and I 
think that I had something to do with activating it again. As I under- 
stand, it was active prior' to the war and then had dropped by the 
wayside during the war. I had something to do with reactivating it, 
but we never met with them nor did they meet with us. 
I Mr. KuNziG. Now this is very important and I would like to go into 
this in detail. I realize that some of this is quite difficult for you to 
go into in detail, but I think that it is very important. 



6682 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST /REA 

In other words, what you are telling this committee is that in a 
major and an important college of the United States of America you, 
as a member of the staff and in a very important position as director 
of admissions 

Mr. Canon. No, not a member of the staff. 

Mr. KuNziG. You were not yet a member of the staff ? 

Mr. Canon. No, no, I was still at the guidance center. 

Mr. Kunzig. You were still at the guidance center? 

Mr. Canon. That is right. 

Mr. Kunzig. But situated right on the Reed College campus? 

Mr. Canon. That is correct. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now I want to get the dates straight just for this 
purpose. Now in that capacity in the guidance center you were in 
some way responsible for attracting young students who went to that 
college to become members of the Communist Party. Is that right ? 

Mr. Canon. That is correct. But in my position there I wasn't 
considered as an official staff member of the college. I was very prom- 
inent in the American Veterans' Committee and there were niany, 
many students on the campus who were eligible for this veterans' 
organization. 

Mr. Kunzig. And of course immediately after this point of time, 
in the fall of 1948, December 1948, you then became dean of admissions. 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. Kunzig. Director of admissions. 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. Kunzig. And later dean 

Mr. Canon. But during this time when I was in the guidance center 
I came to know a number of the students and those who indicated 
that they were more than sympathetic to the left-wing cause, I did 
what I could to encourage them along the road. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now a perfect example, from the testimony of Homer 
Owen, he comes to college as a young man, comes in there, eventually 
gets into these various groups, finally becomes a Communist Party 
member and within 2 years is a member of the State committee of the 
Communist Party of the State of Oregon while at the same time a 
student at Reed College. 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. Kunzig. That was the testimony that was given here yesterday. 

Mr. Canon. That is right. 

Mr. Kunzig. Well now, did you pay dues, Professor Canon? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, it isn't professor. I have only a B. A. degree. I 
am not a professor. I want to clear that up. 

Mr. Kunzig. What shall we say : "dean," or "mister"? 

Mr. Canon. "Mister" is more appropriate. We did pay dues. I 
don't remember the amount. I think it was — I think there was a scale 
worked out depending upon your level of income. I don't remember 
that. I remember my wife paid 10 cents. Housewives and unemployed 
people paid 10 cents a meeting. 

Mr. Kunzig. You are not suggesting by that that housewives are 
considered unemployed people? 

Mr. Canon. No, I think not. 

Mr. Kunzig. I am sure that all the housewives would rise with in- 
dignation at that. They pay 10 cents, is that right ? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 



i^JTMpNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6683 

Mr. 'KxjNziG. Now, how about assessments, Mr, Canon ? 

Mr. (iUnon. This was the major source of income. 

Mr. KuNziG. How did assessments come about? Tell us something 
about that. 

Mr. Canon. Well in various ways — in my early months in the party 
assessments were almost always voluntary. Simply each week, or each 
2 weeks, ihire would be a new crisis and we would be asked to con- 
tribute as heavily as we could. We were also asked to seek out as 
many sympathetic people on the outside of the party as possible and 
solicit fundus from them. 

Mr. Ku: ziG. P'or what sorts of purposes would these funds be 
solicited ? 

Mr. Canon. Well practically the whole gamut. We would fre- 
quently raise money for our own central office expense. 

Mr. Kunzig. Of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. Of the Communist Party. It cost four or five hundred 
dollars a month to maintain an office and to pay Mr. Payne and secre- 
taries and so forth. 

Mr. Kunzig. Well now you certainly didn't go outside of the Com- 
munist Party and say to outsiders or 

Mr. Canon. No, not to those. 

Mr. Kunzig (continuing). To, as you say, sympathetic people, 
"We want money for the office of the Communist Party." You didn't 
say that ? 

Mr. Canon. No, that is correct, but our basic office expenses had to 
be underwritten. Mark Haller was sent east to a training school. 

Mr. Kunzig. We had testimony about that yesterday. You know 
then, of your own personal knowledge, that Mark Haller was sent to 
a training school of the Communist Party in the east ? 

Mr. Canon. That is right. 

Mr. Kunzig. In New York State ? 

Mr. Canon. That is right. And we raised money for that and so 
on. But almost anything that would come up, if you read the left- 
wing press you know that there is a crisis brewing constantly. 

Mr. Kunzig. The Communist Party prefers constant crises. Is 
that correct ? 

Mr. Canon. Well I won't say that they prefer it, I will say that 
they seek diligently to find the flaws in the system, the isolated cases, 
and from that build up the whole fabric. This Negro in South Caro- 
lina is being deprived of his civil rights which is indicative of the 
trend toward fascism which is so on and so on and so on. But we 
did contribute heavily for those causes. 

Mr. Kunzig. What does "heavily" mean? Give us an example of 
amounts that were contributed 

Mr. Canon. Oh, $25, $30. I don't know that I ever gave that much 
at one time. Usually it was — it was heavy on the amounts that we 
were living on, on the income that we were living on. 

Mr. Kunzig. How often would these $25 bites come along ? 

Mr. Canon. Well, the bites were constant. There were always a need 
for money. 

Mr. Kunzig. And so the party is kind to housewives by letting 
them off for 10 cents, for 10-cent dues, and then come along for $25 
bites. Is that the way it works ? 

Mr. Canon. Well^ — 

48069— 54— pt. 10 5 



6684 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IX THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. KuNziG. Called assessments ? 

Mr. Canon. That is right, we were asked to pay in accordance with 
our convictions. There was always an attempt to persuade us first 
that there was a need for this so that'  

Mr. KuxziG. The more money you gave, the better a Communist 
you would seem to be ? 

Mr. Canon. No, well, that's right, the more really you saw a prob- 
lem, but — and we were criticized frequently for being as niggardly in 
our contributions as we were. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now you have mentioned various people so far that 
you knew to members of the Communist Party. Let's see, Fitzgerald, 
you mentioned him ; you mentioned Owen. Did you know Herb Simp- 
son to be a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, I knew Herb Simpson to be a member of the party, 
to be on the board, the central board, not by observing him there but 
by the role that he played. Herb Simpson was the man who came to 
my house to notify us that Earl Payne had been expelled by the party 
and to ask us — not ask us, tell us — to have nothing further to do with 
him. 

Mr. KuNziG. Herb Simpson appeared here this morning also and 
refrained from answering questions. You knew him definitely to be a 
member of the Communist Party, at least at the time that you were a 
member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. That is right. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now roughly how many members were there in the 
Communist Party in Oregon during the time that you were a member, 
an all-around figure to the best of your knowledge? 

Mr. Canon. I was told 400. 

Mr. KuNziG. 400 ? 

Mr. Canon. 400 in the State of Oregon. And how they w^ere dis- 
tributed, I can't tell you, I do know tiiat the major concern of the 
party at that time was that we were recruiting too heavily from the 
ranks of middle class bourgeoisie people, that a party could only be 
based in laboring people and that we must try and weed out as much 
of the middle-class element as possible. 

Mr. KuNziG. Is there any further information that you can give the 
committee concerning your personal experiences, and remember the 
committee is only interested in things of which you can testify of your 
own personal knowledge about the Communist Party when you were 
in it? 

Mr. Canon. The only other significant role that my wife and I took, 
we were for a short period of time, I don't remember the dates or the 
time, but what might be called a mail drop for the downstate party 
people. I think it was at the time that the party was becoming a little 
apprehensive about its mail being tampered with and club dues were 
sent to us, addressed to us personally, and came to our house, and we 
then in turn, turned the dues over to Mrs. Simpson who would come 
from the party office to pick them up. 

Mr. KuNziG. ( rive us a little further information. We have heard 
that term before, but there might be many who don't understand what 
the term "mail drop" means. Tell us a little more about a mail drop. 

Mr. Canon. I don't know that I can tell you much more about it. 
We were simply asked if we would mind using our address as a receiv- 
ing address for Communist dues around State, and we said, "All right," 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6685 

and so the dues from the various parties, from the various clubs, were 
sent to us, and we didn't open the mail. We simply collected it and 
passed it on to a courier from the central office. 

Mr. KuNziG. Where did you live at this time, at the college ? 

Mr. Canon. No, at the same address I gave you earlier. 

Mr. KuNziG. I see. Now you, of course, since you didn't open the 
letters, really then had no idea what sort of thing's were goino; through 

' .' to te to to 

your hands « 

Mr. Canon. No; I suppose we didn't. 

Mr. Velde. To whom would you deliver the letters then, what 
courier? 

Mr. Canon. Well, Mrs. Simpson, I don't remember her Hrst name, 
Herb Simpson's wife, was at this time working in the Communist 
Party office, and ske would usually come by and pick them up, or occa- 
sionally I would drop them off at the party office, myself. 

Mr. KuNziG. You say Simpson's wife was working in the Com- 
munist Party office, itself, as a paid employee? Or a voluntary one? 

Mr. Canon. I don't know whether she was paid. I think she was 
working there. At least she came to our house frequently. 

Mr. KuNziG. Do you know whether she was a Communist Party 
member ? 

Mr. Canon. Only by that. 

Mr. KuNziG. It would be difficult, you mean, to assume that the 
Communist Party would have someone working in its own office who 
was not a member? 

Mr. Canon. Well, I think it is a little unlikely. 

Mr. Velde. You knew that the mail that you got and did you get 
it under your own name ? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. Velde. You knew that the mail you got contained money, 
is that right? 

Mr. Canon. Yes; that was the purpose of it. 

Mr. Velde. Funds collected from the various groups in the Com- 
munist Party here in the State of Oregon ? 

Mr. Canon. That's correct. 

Mr. Velde. And then naturally if you turned those funds over 
to any person, you would expect that they would be delivered to the 
Communist Party headquarters, is that right? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. Velde. So, therefore, it would be very unlikely if you would 
turn over the mail to anybody except a regular Communist Party 
member ? 

Mr. Canon. That would be correct. But I would say that the charge 
about Moscow gold certainly seemed to us to be absurd wlien we were 
made aware of the financial straits in which the party operated. 

Mr. Velde. Well, of course, Mr. Canon, it probably was some- 
what different in Oregon than it has been in other sections of tlie coun- 
try. We do know that the Communist Party did and probably still 
are milching a lot of Hollywood stars, for instance, of funds in consid- 
erable amounts, and they were getting good money from the Holly- 
wood colony and other places throughout the country and probably 
still are doing fairly well. Do you have any idea how much money 
was collected through using your home as a mail drop ? 

Mr. Canon. I have no knowledge of that. 



6686 C0M]\ruNiST activities in the pacific northwest area 

]Mr. Velde. Do you have anythino; fiirtlier, Mr. Counsel? 

INIr. KuNziG. I was |;oing to ask you, I want to just mention as was 
me^itioned then, the vohime of this maiL Would you touch upon that ? 

Mv. Canon. I don't think I could tell you that with any accuracy. 
J Avould saj', oh. a dozen letters a week, something of that kind. 

Mr. Velde. Do you remember any of the postmarks that were 
on them ? 

Mr. Canon. No, sir: I don't. 

Mr. Velde. But thev came from all sections of the State of Oregon? 

Mr. Canon. They came from all sections of the State. 

Mr. KuNziG. One further major question. Would you tell this 
committee in detail why you got out and left the Communist Party? 

Mr. Canon. Well, I did lose interest in the party shortly after I 
joined. I lost interest, my primary activities were still in such things 
as the American Veterans' Committee and so on, and the party was 
something of a nuisance to me. It actually, I didn't see that we ever 
did anything in club meetings. We were going out, my other organiz- 
ations were taking six nights out of every week, and the party meetings 
would just take another, and shortly after I joined I really didn't see 
a heck of a lot of point in it, but I didn't become too dissatisfied until 
in '48, well, I'll go back a bit. I say my first real dissatisfaction came 
on the expulsion of Earl Payne, whom I had grown to respect and 
like, and he was summarily dismissed. I felt this was arbitrary, and 
it did give me pause certainly, and then the party began to tighten 
up a bit, urging us to become more party conscious. 

Mr. Velde. IMa^^ I interrupt 3'ou just a minute ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes. 

Mr. Velde. I don't want to ruin your line of thought, but in expell- 
ing Earl Payne, Avhat was the process involved ? 

Mr. Canon. I really don't know. 

Mr. Velde. Do you know by whom he Avas expelled ? 

ISIr. Canon. Well, I believe by the central committee of the hier- 
archy. I can't tell you much more about it than that. We were not 
encouraged to ask questions, but that did give me some pause, and 
then in the early months of the party, we, as I say, were somewhat 
isolated. We spent most of our time in our club meetings just dis- 
cussing our own interest in our outside organizations, and then the 
party began to ask us to become more party conscious, to, as the term 
was, put the face of the party forward, to spend more and more of 
our time in actual party work. 

We were criticized, in '48 for example, for becominsr too enthusiastic 
about Henry Wallace and the Progressive Party. They kept remind- 
ing lis, "Henry Wallace is not a Communist. He is a capitalist. This 
is a fine organization, the Progressive Party, in getting people inter- 
ested in issues, but for heaven's sake don't co overboard for it. The 
Com rnunist Party is the only one that is significant." 

This discipline — we were introduced more and more to the party 
concept of what is known as self-criticism where you sit around a 
circle and tear yourself to pieces. 

And the ritualistic nonsense just began to pall on me. They began 
to^ be asked to address each other as comrade and so forth and 
"ti.o-hten, tighten, tighten up." 

Mr. Velde. Did that instruction come down from the central com- 
mittee here in Oregon ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6687 

Mr. Canon. Yes, and they began to talk and more and more in 
terms of FBI, infiltrating spies and so on, and the whole framework 
actually became rather foolish, as far as I was concerned. I knew 
that w^e weren't plotting to blow up any bridges or anything of the 
sort, and all of this ritual just seemed a little bit ridiculous. 

And then the second thing that began to push me out of the party 
was the realization of the extent of the intolerance in the party. One 
of the primary reasons that I was interested in the first place was 
because I had met a group of people who I thought were idealistic, 
were outlooking, sympathetic and tolerant people, broadminded 
people, and I came to find out that most Communists, I think, are 
the most intolerant of all people. We began to move in a smaller and 
a smaller circle. As you concentrate on party literature, which you are 
urged to do, and began to confine your friendship to those people who 
are members of the Communist Party, you become excessively critical 
of anybody who can't go along with you a hundred percent. 

And this was also a period when we were moving away from the 
Earl Browder idea of the so-called united front; Earl Browder's con- 
cept of working in cooperation with other groups of people. But 
the party was now moving to the point where it said, "No ; we must 
solidify the party itself." And so there was a social and an intellectual 
isolation which I resented very much, a loss of perspective. I don't 
think that you can help but lose one's perspective when you live in 
such an environment. 

The party overworks you terribly. They exploit initial enthusiasms, 
as in the case of Homer Owen. A perfectly fine, idealistic boy who 
gets interested and they load work on him to the point where it would 
practically break him. Well the same thing is true of us. We got 
to the point where if we stole 1 night one of 7 for our family we felt 
guilty for having let down the great people's movement. 

The whole thing just became irritating. I thought it was out of 
focus, out of perspective, intolerant and so forth. And so we really 
wanted to pull out in '48, however we were involved in the Progressive 
Party elections, and the Democrat Party elections, and there was no 
convenient way of extricating ourselves overnight. So far as I know, 
my wife and I were never expelled from the party nor did we ever 
indulge in histrionics in getting up and making a tirade against the 
party or anything of the sort. We more or less drifted away. 

Mr. Velde. Did you do anything formally to quit the party ? 

Mr. Canon. No ; I did not. I didn't. " I think that they were 
delighted to get rid of me, and I think that I was delighted to be rid 
of them, and so we lived in a case of mutual acceptance. 

Mr. Velde. In other words, your quitting the party amounted to 
just about this that you didn't attend any of the meetings any longer, 
nor did you pay any of the dues, nor did you allow your home to be 
used as a mail route. 

Mr. Canon. That is right. 

Mr. Velde. When was that now ? 

Mr. Canon. When I went to work for Reed College in December of 
'48 I told Mr. MacNaughton, who was then president, that I had been 
active — ^I didn't tell him about my Communist background — very 
active in politics and that I would not take the job unless I were willing 
to put myself under a personal Hatch Act. And I meant it. From 
that time on I had nothing whatsoever to do with any sort of political 



6688 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

activity. But as far as my Communist connection was concerned, 
1 do continue to know people, good friends, whom I had known in the 
party and, for example, Mr. Reynolds and I remained colleagues for 
another 5 or 6 years and we just simply stopped talking politics, and 
so I have no knowledge of him since that time. He had very little 
knowledge of me. 

Mr. Velde. Do you have anything further, Mr. Counsel ? 

Mr. KuNziG. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

]VIr. Velde. Mr. Frazier ? 

Mr. Frazier. No. 

Mr. Velde. Can you come back very briefly this afternoon, Mr. 
Canon ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Velde. All right. The committee will be in recess for the 
lunch hour now until 1 : 30. 

(Whereupon, at 12 : 02 p. m., the hearing was recessed to 1 : 30 p. m. 
of the same day. 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

(The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
reconvened pursuant to recess, at 1 : 40 p. m. Representatives Harold 
H. Velde (chairman) and James B. Frazier, Jr., being present. 

Mr. Velde. Before commencing with the proceedings this after- 
noon I want to acknowledge the presence of Dallas E. Nollsch, com- 
mander of the American Legion, the Department of Oregon, here pres- 
ent. He gives me this little note to read, and I would like to read it 
into the record at this point. 

The position of the American Legion is that corruption and subversion should 
be uncovered wherever found. As State commander, I wholeheartedly support 
the Velde committee, its aims and purposes. 

And I do want to say, too, that we have always had the complete co- 
operation of the American Legion, the VFW and all the others, the 
Amvets, all the other service organizations throughout the country in 
a similar vein in the support shown to us by the American Legion of 
the State of Oregon. 

Mr. Kunzig, I think that you have a few questions to ask of Mr. 
Canon ? 

Mr. KuNziG. Yes, sir, Mr. Canon, are there any other names of any 
other individuals, whom you knew to be members of the Communist 
Party, of your own personal knowledge, whose names you have not 
yet given before this committee today ? 

TESTIMONY OF ROBEIIT WISHART CANON— Resumed 

Mr. Canon. There are four people whom I could identify with some 

degree of assurance. Kingsley Vanier, whose name I believe 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you spell that, please? 

Mr. Canon. I can't 

Mr. Kunzig. Spell it to the best of your ability. 

Mr. Canon. V-a-n-n-i-e-r, I should imagine. 

Mr. Kunzig. And the first name is Kingsley ? 

Mr. Canon. Kingsley, K-i-n-g-s-1-e-y. 

Mr. Kunzig. Kingsley Vanier? 



COMRIUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6689 

Mr. Canon. He was mentioned in Mr. Owen's testimony the other 
day. 

Mr. KuNziG. Yes. 

Mr. Canon. He was a student at Eeed College. I did know him. I 
think that I had some influence on him in joining the party, and I 
had not mentioned him previously. 

I did have some connection with Mr. Thomas G. Moore, who was for 
a time the director of the Progressive Party here in Oregon. Mr. 
Moore I met once or twice as a Communist although I believe that as 
he became more interested in the Progressive Party he moved out of 
the Communist Party. 

Mr. KuNziG. He testified here this morning, or rather refused to 
testify. Do you, of your own personal knowledge then, know Thomas 
Moore to have been a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. That is correct. 

Mr. KuNziG. Eemember, we are only interested in those whom you 
know definitely and can positively identify. 

Mr. Canon. Yes, Michael Loring was 

Mr, KuNziG. How do you spell that ? 

Mr. Canon. L-o-r-i-n-g. Michael Loring I did meet on several oc- 
casions as a Communist. Most of my associations with him were in the 
Progressive Party but he was certainly a member with us in the Pro- 
gressive — in the Communist Party. 

Mr. KuNziG. Can you give any further identification as to address 
or employment, or something to tie it down ? 

Mr. Canon. Mr. Loring is, I believe, a cantor at a synagogue in 
California. 

Mr. KuNziG. At the present time ? 

Mr. Canon. That is to my best understanding. Michael Russo. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you spell that, please? 

Mr. Canon. R-u-s-s-o. Michael Russo was a man with whom I had 
brief contact in the party, but whom I could identify as having been 
in at the time I was. 

Mr. KuNziG. Here? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, right in Portland. 

Mr. KuNziG. In what capacity was he here ? 

Mr. Canon. He is, I believe, an artist in town now. 

Mr. KuNziG. In town now ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. You don't have any address ? 

Mr. Canon. No ; I don't. 

Mr. KuNziG. And that is the sum total of people whom you can 
identify ? 

Mr. Canon. I think so, yes, sir. 

Mr. KuNzro. Mr. Canon, I want the record to show if it is correct, 
and I believe it is correct that you have fully cooperated with another 
agency of the Federal Government. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, approximately a year and a half ago, the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation asked questions concerning my former politi- 
cal activities, and it is my opinion that this was a legal law enforce- 
ment agency of the country and had every right to inquire into my 
activities in the event that I might inadvertently have violated the 
law of the land, and I did cooperate with them at that time. 



6690 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. KuNziG. I believe you had some questions, Mr. Chairman ? 

Mr. Velde. I yield to .Mr. Frazier for some questions. 

Mr. Frazier. Mr. Chairman, Homer Owen testified yesterday, I be- 
lieve, that you j^ersuaded him to become a member of the Communist 
Party. Is that true? 

Mr. Canon. I'm certain that I did everything I could to get him 
to affiliate. 

Mr. Frazier. Now at that time were you connected with Reed Col- 
lege? 

Mr. Canon. At that time I was in the guidance center of Reed 
College. 

Mr. Frazier. In the what? 

Mr. Canon. In the guidance center. 

Mr. Frazier. "What is the guidance center? 

Mr. Canon. This was a subcontract arrangement between the col- 
lege and the Veterans' Administration whereby the college was assist- 
ing the Government in counseling veterans following World War II. 

Mr. Frazier. Now after that you became director of admissions, I 
believe you stated. 

Mr. Canon. That's correct. 

Mr. Frazier. As director of admissions did you conceive it to be a 
part of your duties to get young men who were coming to Reed Col- 
lege to join the Communist Party or the John Reed Club of Reed 
College? 

Mr. Canon. No, sir. 

Mr. Frazier. You were very active in getting them in there, weren't 
you ? 

Mr. Canon. At the time I became director of admissions in 1948, 
I ceased all political activity. 

Mr. Frazier. Ceased all political activity ? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. I withdrew from the party at the time 
I took on a full-time job for the college. 

Mr. Frazier. And you were never a member of the John Reed 
Club? 

Mr. Canon. No, sir ; I was not. 

Mr. Frazier. You testified that you were a member of the Profes- 
sional Club. 

Mr. Canon. That's correct. 

Mr. Frazier. And was that prior to your becoming dean of students ? 

Mr. Canon. That's correct. 

Mr. Frazier. Had your Communist affiliations ceased when you be- 
came dean of students? 

Mr. Canon. When I became director of admissions in 1948, they 
ceased. 

Mr. P'razier. Could you tell us how many members of the faculty 
of Reed College were members of the Communist Party while you 
were active in it? 

Mr. Canon. Just two. 

Mr. Frazier. Just two? 

Mr. Canon. That's right. 

Mr. KuNziG. To your knowledge. 

Mr. Canon. To my knowledge. 

Mr. Frazier. Do you have any objections to naming them again if 
they haven't been named? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6691 

Mr, Canox. No. Professor Reynolds and Professor Moore. 

Mr. Frazier. Professors Reynolds and Moore? 

Mr. Canon. That's right, sir. 

Mr. Frazier. The president of the university now, at the college 
now, has only been there a short time, hasn't he? 

Mr. Canon. He has been there 2 years. 

Mr. Frazier.. You don't know any of his affiliations with the Com- 
munist Party? 

Mr. Canon. No, sir; I don't. 

Mr. Frazier. I'm just inquiring because I know nothing about Reed 
College at the present time, and I'm trying to get this information for 
my own benefit. The only 2 that you ever knew were the 2 that you 
have mentioned ? 

Mr. Canon. That's correct. I would like to say that in the 6 years 
that I have been a full-time staff member at Reed College, I can say 
that I think there has been practically no Communist activity per se on 
the campus or associated with the college. I think I am in a position 
to have been fairly sensitive to it had it existed, and the college has at 
times been labeled somewhat leftwing, and these charges are based on 
something quite other than mass membership of its student body and 
faculty. 

Mr. Frazier. Well, do you know of your own knowledge whether 
the John Reed Club has ceased to function? 

Mr. Canon. I couldn't say this with any accuracy. I have every 
reason to believe that it has ceased to function. I have heard no men- 
tion of it for 4 or 5 years. 

Mr. Frazier. I am sure the committee hopes that it has ceased to 
function. Unfortunately, that is one of the wavs the Communist Party 
works, trying to interest young people in the party through vaiious 
affiliations. I believe you testified that you were a candidate for the 
legislature back in 1948? 

Mr. Canon. That's correct. 

Mr. Frazier. Mr. Owen also testified that he was a candidate for 
the legislature at that time along with you and various others, and he 
testified that he was selected to run by the communistic legislative com- 
mission to run for the legislature. Now isn't it a fact that you were 
selected by the same legislative committee? 

Mr. Canon. It probably is. I didn't have that much information 
about it. 

Mr. Frazier. Now, I believe that you also stated that you were also 
urged to run by the Young Democratic Club here which you said was 
a very small club? 

Mr. Canon. That is correct. 

Mr. Frazier. Do you know the membership, the number of mem- 
bership ? 

Mr. Canon. There were seldom a dozen or so members present at 
any meetings that I attended. 

Mr. Frazier. Since 1948, I believe you stated that you had no con- 
nection with politics. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Canon. Correct. 

Mr. Frazier. At the time that you became a candidate for the legis- 
lature along with Mr. Owen and quite a number of other people that — I 
believe you said they ran in the Democratic primary ? 

Mr. Canon. That is correct. 



6692 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. Frazier. There were a large number running at that time, 
weren't there ? 

Mr. Canon. Correct. 

IVIr. Frazier. About how many ran in that primary ? 

Mr. Canon. I'm sorry, but I just wouldn't hazard a guess. I don't 
know. 

Mr. Frazier. Fifteen or twenty ? 

Mr. Canon. At least. 

^Ir. Frazier. At least 15 or 20 ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, 

Mr. Frazier. Now during the course of the campaign it developed 
that you were running, I believe, or you stated that you also received 
the Progressive nomination. Is that right ? 

Mr. Canon. That is correct. 

Mr. Frazier. And the Democratic nomination ? 

(No answer.) 

Mr. Fr.\zier. Now you, and Mr. Owen, and various others who, it 
became known, were members of the Communist Party were over- 
whelmingly defeated in the general election ; weren't you ? 

Mr. Canon. That is correct. 

Mr. Frazier. Do you remember what the majority was by which 
you were defeated ? Was it 25,000, or 40,000, or what ? 

Mr. Canon. I just don't retain those figures. 

Mr. Frazier. But it was pretty bad, wasn't it ? 

Mr, Canon. It was a sound defeat. 

Mr. Frazier. And don't you think that came about because of the 
fact that the people of this community out here realized that you were 
running as a Communist candidate, and that you were so overwhelm- 
ingly defeated ? 

Mr. Canon. Well, I won't say that they knew that I was running 
as a Communist candidate as that people were not particularly en- 
thusiastic about the Progressive Party. I was running as a Progres- 
sive candidate. 

Mr, Frazier. Well, Progressive or Communist, whatever it was, I 
mean that you didn't receive the support of the Democratic Party or 
of the Republican Party. 

Mr, Canon, No ; I'm afraid that I did not, 

Mr, Frazier, In other words, they licked you whether it was because 
of the Progressive nomination or whether it was because of the fact 
that it came to be pretty well rumored about that you were a member 
of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon, I think that is correct, 

Mr, Frazier, Now as a mater of fact, your brother was at one time 
the president of tlie Young Democratic Club, wasn't he ? 

Mr. Cannon, I don't remember tliat he held that office. He was in 
the Young Democrats. I don't recall whether he held the office or not, 

]\Ir. Frazier, And he was defeated by a man by the name of Morgan 
back in 1948 for the presidency, wasn't he, for the Young Democratic 
Club? 

Mr. Canon. Yes ; he did run against Howard Morgan 

Mr. Frazier, And Howard Morgan beat him, 

Mr, Canon. At one time, and Howard Morgan did beat him in 
that election. That I do remember. I 'don't think that he had ever 
been president though. 



COMRIXJNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6693 

Mr. Frazeer. Yes ; but he did run for the presidency and was defeated 
by Howard Morgan ? 

Mr. Canon. That is right. That was an internal fight in the Young 
Democrats. 

Mr. Frazier. And as a matter of fact at that time — and I hope, Mr. 
Chairman, you will pardon me for going into these details. 

Mr. Velde. Certainly ; you go right ahead. 

Mr. Frazier. The Democratic Party joined up pretty well to defeat 
the — with the Republicans and others out here — to defeat the can- 
didates of the Communist Party in the 1948 election. And they were 
all overwhelmingly defeated, weren't they ? 

Mr. Canon. That is correct. 

Mr. Frazier. In other words, you were all pretty well purged ? 

Mr. Canon. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Veij)e. Mr. Canon, you have certainly given the committee 
the benefit of a lot of information you had. I don't want to tire you 
or be boring by repetition but I would like to go back to these meet- 
ings which you held of the professional club of the Communist Party 
m each other's homes. I think you made the statement that you were 
directed by the Communist Party to hold self-criticism meetings. I 
wonder if you would explain just what you meant by that ? 

Mr. Canon. I said that we introduced the teclinique of self-criti- 
cism which was a device which apparently has been employed in the 
Communist Party throughout the world. 

Mr. Velde. We have heard much of it before. 

Mr. Canon. It is an attempt to take a neophyte, such as myself for 
example, and have me try and analyze the ways in which 1 handle 
certain situations and how in retrospect I think that these methods 
are incorrect and so on and so on and so on, and then the other mem- 
bers of the club join in to give their opinions, their evaluations, of 
the manner in which you handled yourself and the way in which you 
interpreted events and so forth. 

Mr. Velde. In other words, your meetings were informal more 
or less were they not ? 

Mr. Canon. Quite informal. 

Mr. Velde. And you didn't have a leader who led the discussion. 

Mr. Canon. That is correct. 

Mr. Velde. You talked just as you do with a group of friends. 

Mr. Canon. Correct. 

Mr. Velde. When you came to these self-criticism sessions would 
you — possibly you can give me an example, something that you criti- 
cized yourself of ? 

Mr. Canon. Well, I will give you an example of self-criticism which 
I didn't initiate but which was more or less pushed on me. Frank 
Patterson was a member of the party and a very close friend of mine. 
No, I don't mean Frank Patterson, I mean Earl Payne. He was ex- 
pelled from the party and I was rather upset by the fact that he was 
expelled and felt that we ought to have a more humanistic approach 
to this. The party tried to help me see that this was very much like 
a military situation, that if your comrade is wounded as you are ad- 
vancing toward the enemy that you cannot afford to stop and lend aid 
and assistance to your comrade, you must continue on in the battle or 
the battle would be lost, and that this tendency of mine to want to stop 



6694 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

and give aid and comfort to my friend was a bourgeoisie tendency, a 
weakness of Christian morality and so forth, which didn't have a place 
in the hard struggle that was ahead of us in combating our enemies, 
or the enemies of the people, and so forth, and that these were the 
areas in which we must tighten up, in which we must learn self-disci- 
pline. 

Mr. Velde. In other words, you were criticizing yourself for not 
being a good Communist or not following the Communist Party line ? 

Mr. Canon, That is right, criticizing myself for not being willing to 
accept as infallible the directives of my superiors. 

Mr. Velde. In the dismissal of your friend ? 

Mr. Canon. That is right. 

Mr. Velde. I think that is a good explanation. I wonder what else 
you talked about in these inf onnal meetings which you held ? 

Mr. Canon. The meetings always followed the same pattern. There 
was a brief period devoted to a general review of world affairs in which 
we tried to interpret current events, world affairs. Then there was a 
period devoted to a discussion by each member of the party of the 
organizations in which he has been active or in which he is active. 
Then there is a period in which we collect dues and distribute the cur- 
rent supply of literature. The presses turn out a great volume of 
printed material which it is your obligation to buy and read. Most of 
it was so tedious that in our club we seldom read it. We bought it fre- 
quently but we seldom read it. Fairly tedious but we would discuss 
that. 

And then periodically we would have what we would call educational 
assignments in which we would take a certain problem, such as the 
Negro problem, and spend 3 or 4 weeks on it discussing the Communist 
approach to the Negro problem and so forth and so forth. 

Mr. Velde. Do you honestly think now that the Communist Party 
was out to aid the Negro and prevent discrimination, or was the 
Communist Party out to use the Negro, use the discrimination which 
we know that there still exists in this country? 

Mr. Canon. I think that a great many members of the Communist 
Party are genuinely and sincerely interested in helping and working 
with the Negro. I think that the party itself, in its larger apparatus, 
the more mechanical thing, is not, could not be concerned primarily 
in the plight of the Negro or any other underprivileged or misused, 
person. 

Mr. Velde. Wliere does the hard core begin and where does the 
soft element of the Communist Party begin ? 

Mr, Canon. I don't know that I could tell you that. As Mr. Owen 
brought out the other day, there is some formula, which I am not 
familiar with, by which you after having been in so many months or 
years may move into certain party offices and so on, and I presume 
that what we usually mean by the hard core are those people who have 
over a period of years stuck with the party, not fallen off everytime 
something goes a little wrong, those people who continue to rationalize 
and justify for the party through thick and thin, and these people 
eventually are more trusted and are given more information. 

Mr. Vpj.de. Well I realize that it is difficult to draw a line on 
that, there is no question about it, but I wonder if you could say gen- 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6695- 

erally that beginning with the State officials — the district officials — of 
the Communist Party that you would have your hard core or the revo- 
lutionary type? 

Mr. Canon. I would certainly think so. Certainly it is their life- 
work. They view it far more seriously than many of us who have 
affiliated around the edges. Certainly they do. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Canon, I made a statement yesterday concern- 
ing people who have joined the party as late as 1947 and 1948, as you 
did. I can realize how you could get into the Communist conspiracy at 
that time, but still there was so much information that had been issued 
from Government sources, from official sources, let me say it that way^ 
from our Un-American Activities Committee, from the Attorney Gen- 
eral of the United States, and from the judicial branch of our Federal 
Government. It is difficult for me still to see how a person could 
involuntarily engage in the Communist conspiracy with all of the 
information which we had that it was a Communist conspiracy. 

I will just ask you the same question — ^yes, I asked Mr. Owen this 
too — did you ever read any of the documents that were issued by our 
committee, or any of the citations that had been issued by the Attorney 
General up until 1947 regarding the nature of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, I think I did, Mr. Velde. I do want to say in 
answer to your question, however, that I think that this is part of the 
price that the country has paid for — in the period prior to World 
War II — presenting to its young people a rather distorted view of the 
Soviet Union, that we discovered suddenly that — for years we had 
heard nothing but evil of the Soviet Union and suddenly it has a 
magnificent army and they are allies and we are in friendship witlx 
them and the President recognizes them, and so forth, and we come 
to believe that perhaps we have been cheated somewhat, that there 
may be something in this experiment which would be worth looking 
into. 

We went through a period, I think a good many of us, of being very 
skeptical of anti-Russian charges, that this was an excess 

Mr. Velde. Now you are talking about the period during the 
time when we were allies, or cobelligerents, with Soviet Russia, is that 
right? 

Mr. Canon. Yes, and the period in which I became politically 
conscious was the period in which we had suddenly discovered that 
Russia was a friend, or a potential friend. We were looking for 
common ground then. And then immediately after the war you see 
again the emergence of reports, as you mentioned, pointing out the 
dangers of a Communist conspiracy. But, on the other hand, here 
are people like myself who say that the hope of the world is that these 
peoples must live in peace, and if we have fought together surely we 
can continue finding some common ground to work together, let's try 
it. And there is a great hope there, a great enthusiasm, a great trust,, 
that niaybe there can be friendships between people. 

Mr. Velde. Certainly that would be true up until the time of 
V-J Day, at least. I am satisfied that a great number of American 
citizens got into the Communist Party and the various fronts that 
it offered with an idea that they might be doing something good 
for society generally, and that was not with the idea of overthrow- 
ing our form of government by force or violence. But here after the 



6696 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

war ended and we did recognize officially, that is, practically all the 
governmental officials recognized that communism was a conspiracy 
designed to overthrow our form of government, then I still say that 
it is difficult for me to see just how anyone could get into it after that 
time. 

Mr. Canon. I think that it is difficult, Mr. Velde, unless you recog- 
nize that when you are in the party you confine your reading and your 
friendships and your associations to people who reject criticism of the 
party, who make up magnificient rationalizations for why this is as 
it is, and so forth, and that is what I talked about in losing perspec- 
tive, of being so isolated from the main currents of popular thinking 
that you simply lose your sense of balance. 

Mr. Velde. Well 1 take it anyhow, Mr. Canon, that you wouldn't 
want to go through the experience again would you ? 

Mr. Canon. No, sir, I would not. 

Mr. Velde. I want to ask you 1 or 2 more questions. You have 
heard, I think, or did you hear Mrs. Barbara Hartle testify? 

Mr. Canon. I did hear her ; yes sir. 

Mr. Velde. And you remember her statements regarding the 
attitude fellow Communists should take in case they were subpenaed 
to appear before this committee ? 

Mr. Canon. No, I didn't hear that. I was listening to it on the 
radio. 

Mr. Velde. She made a statement that if a person were subpenaed 
to appear before this committee, he should use his best abilities to 
promote the Communist line and to defeat the purposes of this com- 
mittee. I am wondering now, Mr. Canon, whether you ever discussed 
the Un-American Activities Committee in your meetings which you 
held? What was the attitude that was taken? 

Mr. Canon. In our Communist Party meetings you mean? 

Mr. Velde. Yes, the meetings of the professional group. 

Mr. Canon. Oh, we discussed the committees quite frequently and 
not favorably, of course. 

Mr. Velde. Well our committee was the only one in existence 
at that time, of course. 

Mr. Canon. All right, then, the Dies committee. It was discussed 
very frequently and we did not think very highly of your committee. 

Mr. Vei>de. Can you give me some general statement about the 
attitude of the Communist Party at that time ? 

Mr. Canon. Toward the committees ? 

Mr. Velde. Toward the committees. 

Mr. Canon. The attitude which was expressed officially through 
our party was that the committees such as your own were not primarily 
interested in communism, that you knew that communism was not a 
threat to the country, that you were primarily interested in stifling 
social criticism on a broader scale, that you were primarily interested 
in taking away from the reputation of the Roosevelt administration, 
of the New Deal, and so forth, and eventually to attack labor unions 
and the great liberal movement, and that your main objective was what 
lay beyond the Communist Party rather than the Communist Party 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6697 

per se, and that it was up to the Communist Party to fight, to be the 
vanguard to protect the labor unions behind it from the attacks by 

your committee. 

Mr. Velde. Was this type of criticism directed from higher sources 
than your own professional group ? 

Mr. Canon. This, I think, sifted down through the literature, and 
so forth. 

I didn't know any Communists who didn't agree with this line of 
reasoning. 

Mr. Velde. Just 1 or 2 more questions. Kegarding the mail drop 
that you had for some time. How long did you act as a mail drop ? 

Mr. Canon. I can't remember that. I would say several months, 
but I wouldn't be able to give it to you more accurately than that. 

Mr. Velde. I want to say that this is a little additional infor- 
mation that we haven't had regarding the operations of the Commu- 
nist Party. Do you know, of your own knowledge, whether or not 
the money contained in the mail that you received was in the form of 
checks or in the form of cash ? 
Mr. Canon. No, I don't know. 

Mr. Velde. And of course you don't know what happened to it 
after you gave it to Mrs. Simpson ? 
Mr. Canon. No, I don't know. 

Mr. Velde. You presumed, of course, it went into 

Mr. Canon. To pay party bills. 

Mr. Velde. Party organization funds for the State committee. 
Mr. Canon. To tell you the truth, I had forgotten. I didn't men- 
tion to Mr. Kunzig this mail-drop business. It completely slipped my 
mind until that Captain Brown mentioned it to me this morning. 
Maybe he knows the dates. I didnt. 

Mr. Velde. Maybe Captain Brown knew that you were acting 
as a mail drop at that time, too. He seems to know quite a bit about 
Communist activities around here. 

Mr. Canon. Captain Brown's memory of my activities is quite a 
bit better than my own. 

Mr. Veijde. Well, Mr. Canon, on behalf of the committee — well, 
first of all, I want to say that the gentleman from Tennessee meant no 
reflection on the president of Reed College. 

Mr. Frazier. Oh, no, none whatsoever. I had heard that he had 
only been with Reed College for the past year or two and I just wanted 
to see if the witness knew anything about it. 
I don't know. I don't even remember his name. 
Mr. Velde. On the other hand, I understand that he is quite 
the other way so the committee intends no reflection upon any of the 
faculty or students at Reed College as we have mentioned here before. 
Mr. Canon, like a good number of other people you have prob- 
ably had qualms of conscience in coming before our committee to give 
the story of your participation in Communist activities. We have 
listened to stories similar to yours and we realize that others find them- 
selves in the same state of mind when it comes to testifying before 
a congressional committee. 



6698 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

I want to ask you if you have been mistreated in any way by our 
committee or any of the members of the staff? Do you feel that you 
have been mistreated ? 

Mr. Canon. Not at all, Mr. Velde. They have been very sympa- 
thetic and helpful. 

Mr. Velde. You have, of course, rendered a very patriotic service 
in coming before us and telling us everything that you know. You 
have added a great deal of information to that which we now possess 
which will help us to legislate on this problem, and in doing so I am 
sure that you have done a service to your country which I am sorry 
to say that a number of other witnesses who have appeared here seem 
unwilling to do. I can only say that the committee extends its appre- 
ciation to you for this service and we wish you the best of luck in what- 
ever your future occupation might be. 

And with that, if the counsel has nothing more — do you have any- 
thing more, Mr. Frazier ? 

Mr. Frazier. Nothing. 

Mr. Velde. You are dismissed with the committee's thanks. 

Call your next witness, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. Prof. Lloyd Reynolds. 

Professor Reynolds. Mr. Chairman, I should prefer not to be tele- 
vised. 

Mr. Velde. If you will come forward to be sworn and make your 
request after you are sworn. Will you raise your right hand and be 
sworn, please? 

In the testimony that you are about to give before this subcom- 
mittee do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Professor Reynolds. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF LLOYD REYNOLDS, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
ATTORNEY, KNELAND CLARK TANNER 

Mr. Velde. Now as I understand it you have requested that you 
be not televised. You refuse to be televised? 

Professor Reynolds. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Velde. Then under the rules of this committee, we are obliged 
to ask the television cameras not to take pictures of the witness during 
this hearing. This is not on account of any desire on the part of the 
committee that the public not have the information that this witness 
has or not be able to see him while he is giving that information, but 
it is a rule of the committee and the rules were passed unanimously 
by the membership of the committee, and so the television cameras 
will please desist from taking pictures until this witness has finished 
with his testimony. 

Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. Will you state your full name please? 

Professor Reynolds. Lloyd J. Reynolds. Shall I spell that? 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you, please? 

Mr. Reynolds. L-1-o-y-d, and the Reynolds, R-e-y-n-o-l-d-s. 

Mr. KuNziG. I note that you are accompanied by counsel. Will 
counsel please state liis name and address for the record? 

Mr. Tanner. Kneland Clark Tanner, 1041 Pacific Building, Port- 
land, Ore. My first name is spelled with a K, K-n-e-1-a-n-d. 






COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6699 

Mr. KuNziG. Now, Professor Reynolds, will you please give us your 
present address? 

Mr. Reynolds. 7423 Southeast 31st Avenue. 

Mr. KuNziG. And your present employment please? 

Mr. Reynolds. I am a professor of art. 

Mr. KuNziG. And where are you a professor ? 

Mr. Reynolds. At Reed College. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Would you give the committee a brief resume of your 
educational background, your formal education. 

Mr. Reynolds. I graduated from the Portland public schools. 
In 1924 1 received a bachelor of science degree from Oregon State Col- 
lege, then called the Oregon Agricultural College. In 1929 I received 
a master of arts degree from the University of Oregon. 

Mr. KuNZiG. And now could you give us a brief resume of your 
employment background ? 

Mr. Reynolds. Pardon me, I don't understand the question. 

Mr. KuNziG. The main places where you have been employed 
throughout the years since you finished your formal educational back- 
ground, not 2 weeks or 3 weeks, but the major positions. 

Mr. Reynolds. Surely. Well, ever since 1929 I have been with 
Reed College. 

Mr. KuNziG. In a teaching capacity for that entire time ? 

Mr. Reynolds. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. Well now, Professor Reynolds, you have heard testi- 
mony here to the effect that you were a member of the Communist 
Party. You have heard testimony from the last witness, Mr. Canon, 
to that effect, and that he knew you very well, that he used to meet at 
your home, and so forth. Have you ever been a member of the Com- 
munist Party, Professor Reynolds? 

Mr. Reynolds. I invoke the protection of the Constitution of 
the United States and particularly the fifth amendment and respect- 
fully decline to answer the question for the reason that the answer 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did you ever meet with Mr. Canon and his wife, Spen- 
cer Gill and his wife, and Stanley Moore in meetings of the Communist 
Party, the professional club thereof, here in Portland ? 

Mr. Reynolds. To all such questions, questions to which the answer 
might tend to incriminate me, I intend to answer the same way sir, 
so it would save time if you know that now. 

Mr. Kunzig. Wlien you say the "same answer," you mean by that 
that you refuse to answer 

Mr. Reynolds. I mean that I invoke the protection of the Constitu- 
tion of the United States, as I read it the first time, or simply refer 
back to it. 

Mr. Velde. Now, Professor Reynolds, I suppose that you were here 
in the hearing room this morning when I mentioned the fact to one 
of the witnesses that there has never been anyone prosecuted as a result 
of his testimony before this committee if he told the truth and answered 
the questions. I feel that you do have the information to give us. I 
wonder if there isn't some way that you could decide to cooperate with 
the committee and give us the information that you possess in your 
mind ? 

One thing I want to say to you is this : that a good many people 
say, "Well, you have the information anyway." You just heard this 



6700 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IX THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

last witness testify concerning mail drops. We did. not have that 
information. "We want the information that you have to add to the 
store of information that we already have. 

Now, would you please answer the questions relative to your com- 
munistic affiliations and activities ? 

Mr. Reynolds. Mr. Chairman, I shall only repeat the statement 
that I read before. 

Mr. Velde. That is, that you refuse to answer 

Mr. Reynolds. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Velde. On the grounds that it might tend to incriminate you ? 

Mr. Reynolds. Yes, sir. 

Mr. KuNziG. Are you now 

Mr. Velde. You don't believe what I say then. As I say then, 
there has been no one prosecuted and I'll dare you to find someone 
who has been prosecuted when he answered questions and told the 
truth. I don't see how you can claim the privilege against self-incrim- 
ination. 

Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr, KuNziG. I was going to ask, are you now a member of the Com- 
munist Party at this moment ? 

Mr. Reynolds. I invoke the protection of the Constiution of the 
United States, and particularly the fifth amendment, and respect- 
fully decline to answer the question for the reason that the answer 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. KuNziG. You decline then in any way to assist or help a com- 
mittee of the Congress of the United States of America in trying to in- 
vestigate the Communist conspiracy in this country ? We know that 
you have evidence on this score. We know that you have information 
that you could give us. There has been public testimony about your 
own participation in this. Do you decline to give any information 
about any communistic activities whatsoever ? 

Mr. Reynolds. Yes, sir. 

Mr. KuNziG. And you are still a professor at this moment at Reed 
College. 

Mr. Reynolds. At this moment. 

[Laughter.] 

Mr. Kunzig. I have no further question, no further questions, Mr. 
Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Just a minute please, just a minute. Professor Rey- 
nolds. Were you finished, Mr. Counsel ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Yes ; I have no further questions. 

Mr. Velde. Do you have some questions, Mr. Frazier ? 

Mr. Frazier. I was unable to hear. It is a little bit difficult to hear 
up here, Professor. "V\niat subject is it that you teach at Reed College ? 
I believe that you stated it but I didn't catch it. 

Mr. Reynolds. I said that I taught art subjects; history of art^ 
the graphic arts workshop, and creative writing. 

Mr. Frazier. All right, that is all. Thank you. 

Mr. Velde. Do you have anything further, Mr. Counsel ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Just one thought comes to my mind — have you ever 
made posters, graphic art things, and exhibits of that nature for the 
Communist Party while at Reed College ? 

Mr, Reynolds. I am sorry, I shall have to repeat this and I am 
afraid it will be rather boring. 



COMJVIUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6701 

Mr. KuNziG. You don't have to repeat it. Do you ? 

Mr. Reynolds. I shall repeat it and it is going to prove boring 
to everyone to hear it over and over, and I repeat it now. 

Mr. KuNziG. You refuse to answer on the same grounds is that it ? 

Mr. Eetnolds. Yes, sir. 

Mr. KuNziG. All right. No further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. No further questions. The witness is dismissed and 
the committee will be in recess for 10 minutes. 

Mr, Reynolds. Thank you, sir. 

(Ten-minute recess.) 

Mr. Velde. The committee will be in order, please. You may 
proceed to call your next witness, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. Prof. Leonard Marsak. 

Mr. Velde. Will you raise your right hand and be sworn ? 

In the testimony that you are about to give before this subcommittee 
do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Marsak. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF LEONARD MARSAK, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
ATTORNEY, JAMES V. COLLINS 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you give your full name please. Professor 
Marsak ? 

Mr. Maksak. For the record, Mr. Counsel, the information that was 
given as to my name was incorrect. It is Marsak, M-a-r-s-a-k, with an 
"s'" and not with a "z." 

Mr. KuNziG. And your first name please ? 

Mr. Marsak. Leonard. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now, Mr. Marsak, what is your present address? 

Mr. Marsak. 7735 South East 18th Avenue, Portland. 

Mr. KuNziG. I note that you are accompanied by counsel. Would 
counsel please state his name for the record ? 

Mr. Collins. James V. Collins, 608 Portland Trust Building. 

Mr. KuNziG. Wliere are you presently employed. Professor Marsak? 

Mr. Marsak. Reed College. My rank there is instructor. I have 
not yet reached the rank of professor. 

Mr. KuNziG. Thank you for giving us the correct rank. Wliat ar& 
you an instructor of ? 

Mr. IVIarsak. Humanities, sir, history and humanities. 

Mr. Frazier. History and what ? I didn't get it. 

Mr. Marsak. Humanities. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now, Professor Marsak, you heard testimony here 
identifying you as having been a member of the Communist Party. 
The testimony related to the fact that you had been at Cornell Uni- 
versity and active there in the party. Did you attend Cornell Uni- 
versity ? 

Mr. Marsak. May I confer with counsel, sir ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Marsak. Sir, I respectfully decline to answer that question on 
the grounds of the 1st, the 5th, and the 14th amendments, 

Mr. KuNZiG. Is there anything that could possibly incriminate you 
by merely answering the question as to whether you had attended. 
Cornell University ? 



6702 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

(AVitness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. INIarsak. Sir, in good conscience and with due respect for the 
law, I must submit the same answer to that question. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Chairman, I respectfully request the witness be 
directed to answer the question, "Did you attend Cornell University?" 

Mr. Velde. Before direction — I certainly will direct the witness 
to answer the question — I wonder, Mr. Marsak, if you heard tlie 
remarks that I made to the previous witness regarding the fact that 
there has never once been anyone, any witness, who appeared before 
this committee prosecuted for anything growing out of his testimony 
where he answered the questions, and answered the questions truth- 
fully? 

Mr. Collins. Mr. Chairman, may I raise a point of information, 
a procedural point ? 

Mr. Velde. You may confer with counsel. "^Vliat is the point 
of information ? 

Mr. Collins. Very sincerely, section (B) of your rule 7, I am in 
doubt, just exactly how to advise my client in regard to my position 
here with him. If you might give me your interpretation of that 
please, I would appreciate it. 

Mr. Velde. Our counsel will do that at the present time. 

Mr. KuNziG. You have been present here before and watched some 
of the counsel, have you, in the courtroom ? 

Mr. Collins. Yes, Mr. Kunzig. 

Mr. Kunzig. Rule 7 (B) says, "The participation of counsel during 
the course of any hearing and while the witness is testifying shall be 
limited to advising said witness as to his legal rights. Counsel shall 
not be permitted to engage in oral argument with the committee, but 
shall confine his activity to the area of legal advice to his client." 

The practice has been before the committee that you may at any 
time discuss any matter with your client. You may step back, if you 
feel that you are too near a microphone. If you desire, some counsel 
have even desired to take their witness — or clients — out of the room 
to discuss matters. That will all be permitted. But you may not 
make speeches, or opening addresses or closing addresses, or speak to 
the committee. Is that understood ? 

Mr, Collins. That is substantially as I understand it. I do not 
have the right to cross-examine or to call witnesses, is that right ? 

Mr. Kunzig. I think you know that. You have seen this and you 
have seen the book and you have had this before. I think that is cor- 
rect. Let us go ahead with the questioning, Mr. Chairman. You 
were about, I believe Mr. Chairman, to direct the witness to answer the 
question as to whether he attended Cornell University. 

Mr. Velde. I don't remember whether he answered the question 
about the statement that I made, whether you heard it this morning 
when I made it to the previous witness. 

Mr. Marsak. I am sorry, sir, what question are you asking? 

Mr. Velde. Let me repeat a statement and then ask you a question. 
I stated to a previous witness that no witness who had appeared before 
this committee durino: the nearly 10 years of its existence, who an- 
swered questions truthfully, was ever prosecuted for any crime grow- 
ing out of his testimony. Did you hear me make that statement to 
the previous witness? 

Mr. Marsak. Yes, I think so. 






COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6703 

Mr. Velde. Ill view of that fact, of course, you might be the 
first — there is always that chance — but in view of that fact that wit- 
nesses who do tell the truth and answer questions have not been subject 
to prosecution, will you now answer the question that was asked you 
by counsel a minute ago, "Did you attend Cornell University?" 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Marsak. Well sir, on advice of counsel, if it were possible for 
me to call witnesses and cross-examine them, I would be glad to answer 
that question. Otherwise, sir, I would have to respectfully decline to 
answer that on the — invoking the protection of the first and the fifth 
amendments which state that I may not be compelled to be a witness 
against myself, and in calling witnesses I would like to be confronted 
with my informant and have the opportunity to question him on this. 

Mr. Velde. Well you did hear Mr. Owen, I believe it was, testify 
here that you were a member of the Communist Party with him? 

Mr. Marsak. Yes, I heard that. 

Mr. Velde. Is that true? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Marsak. Sir, again I must respectfully decline to answer that 
question and invoke the protection of the Constitution and particu- 
larly the fifth amendment on the grounds that an answer to that ques- 
tion might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Velde. Proceed Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you belong to the Communist Party group at 
Cornell University in Ithaca, N. Y. ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Marsak. I wish to 

Mr. KuNziG. If you wish to shorten it, you can just say "same 
answer" and we will understand that you are refusing to answer on 
the grounds of the fifth amendment because you fear that the answer 
might tend to incriminate you. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Marsak. I will do that, sir, on the grounds of the first and fifth 
amendment. 

Mr. KuNziG. You refuse to answer on the grounds of the first and 
fifth amendment? Well, are you a member of the Communist Party 
today ? 

Mr. Marsak. Again, Mr. Kunzig, I respectfully decline to answer 
that question on the groimds that I have previously stated. 

Mr. Kunzig. Are you active in any group of the Communist Party 
on the Reed College campus? 

Mr. Marsak. Mr. Kunzig, I cannot answer that question on the 
grounds that I have previously stated. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now many people have stated here today or yesterday 
that they refused to answer these questions. They won't tell this 
committee. As an interesting item, Mr. Chairman, we have just 
received a telephone call from someone who said that they had been 
looking at this on television all day and said why not ask this ques- 
tion, and it was an interesting one and I think that I shall ask you. 

If your next door neighbor, not this committee but your next door 
neighbor, were to ask you, "Have you ever been a member of the Com- 
munist Party ?", would you tell him the answer ? 

Mr. Marsak. Well, sir, we have just moved here. I have been, 1 
think, a little bit too busy to get to know my next door neighbors. 



6704 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. KrNZiG. Well if any citizen here instead of this committee 
should ask you, if any neighbor, if the butcher, if the barber, if any- 
one should say, "Have you been a member of the Communist Party?", 
would you tell him yes or no ? 

(Witness confers with comisel.) 

Mr. Marsak. That depends, Mr. Kunzig, on the nature of the rela- 
tionship that was established. If they were the proper authority and 
T had the opportunity to — well, one of those relationships might be 
if they were the proper authority and I had the opportunity to face 
my informant and to question him. 

Mr. Velde. Let me ask you this, Mr. Marsak. If an FBI agent 
came up to you and asked you if you were a member of the Com- 
munist Party would you tell him ? 

Mr. Kunzig. I might add in addition to your question, Mr. Chair- 
man, that 

Mr. Velde. Just a minute, just a minute, let him answer this ques- 
tion. Let him have an opportunity to confer with counsel. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Velde. For your information, I am satisfied that the FBI 
does not put you under oath when they question you. 

Mr. IVIarsak. Well sir, if it were on the street, well then, no. If 
under certain other circumstances, well, perhaps. 

Mr. Velde. ^^Tiat other circumstances ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Marsak. Under the circumstances that I have related perhaps 
if I could call witnesses. Sir, in answer to your questionSj I would 
like to state some of the reasons why I cannot do so. As I said earlier, 
in good conscience I could not answer the questions because to agree to 
answer would make me a party to an invasion of constitutional rights 
and an invasion of the independence of educational institutions, one of 
which I am a member. 

]\Ir. Velde. The protection of the fifth amendment is a protection 
for you. You are the one who is using it voluntarily. It is one of 
jour privileges. 

Mr. Marsak. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Velde. We are not forcing you to use it, the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Marsak. I know that you are not. I am talking about the first 
amendment at this moment which 

Mr. Velde. We are not forcing you to use that either. 

Mr. Marsak. (continuing) . States that Congress shall make no law 
abridging the freedom of speech, or the press, or of association. It fol- 
lows from this, sir, that Congress has no power to inquire into the 
beliefs and associations, of my beliefs and associations. 

Mr. Velde. All right, proceed, we will listen to it for about the 
"umpteenth" time now. 

Mr. Marsak. Pardon, sir? 

Mr. Velde. Pi-oceed. 

Mr. Marsak. All right, sir, as you yourself have stated the only 
legitimate purpose of this committee is to conduct hearings in order 
to propose legislation. And even if that were so, it would still have 
no authority to inquire into the beliefs or associations of a witness. I 
cite the case of Rwrrdey v. The United States^ March 1953. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6705 

This in sum is my reason for invoking the protection of the first 
amendment. I think that there have been in the past other positions — 
some support for this from the Supreme Court. 

Beyond this, sir, in invoking the protection of the fifth amend- 
ment 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Chairman, I respectfully submit that the witness 
is first of all wasting time, secondly citing law which is not law in the 
United States of America. The Supreme Court has upheld the power 
of this committee to ask these questions again and again and again, 
starting as early as 1947, 1948, 1949 and even before. And this is 1954, 
and the power of this committee to ask these questions and to investi- 
gate into this field has been absolutely and clearly established and I 
don't think that any time is served or any purpose is served by having 
this witness give us a legal lecture in improper and wrong law. 

Mr. Marsak. Mr. Chairman 

Mr, Velde. Let me ask you this question, we are familiar with 
the law in this particular instance. Has an FBI agent ever asked you 
whether you were a member or had been a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mr. Marsak. I cannot answer that question, sir, on the grounds that 
I have already stated. 

Mr. Velde, Well now as a matter of fact didn't an FBI agent 
come to your door and you slammed the door in his face when he at- 
tempted to ask you whether or not you were a Communist, about your 
previous Communist record ? Isn't that the truth ? 

I\Ir. Marsak. Sorry, I cannot answer that question. 

Mr. Velde. You said that under some circumstances you might 
tell an FBI agent about your past connections with the Communist 
Party, possibly about the present, too. What circumstances would 
you tell an FBI agent about your Communist history? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Marsak. If I had counsel, sir, and he could cross-examine the 
witnesses, and if I could testify in my behalf, then 

Mr. Velde. Well, you wouldn't be under oath, of course, in that 
particular case. 

Mr. Marsak, I am under oath now. 

Mr. Velde. It would just be a matter of giving him information. 

Mr. KuNziG. And you can testify in your own behalf now too. This 
is a wonderful opportunity. 

Mr. Marsak. I would like to do so germane to raising the points that 
I think are essential to this hearing, sir. Mr. Chairman, I don't think 
that I am wasting your time. I am trying to be friendly, sir, polite 
and courteous. But this is a hearing and it would seem to me pro- 
cedurally in the past congressional hearings they have heard both 
sides of a question, at least both sides. 

Mr. Velde. Let me disabuse your mind of that, sir. A congres- 
sional hearing is a lot different "than a court of law. 

Mr. Marsak. Yes, indeed, 

Mr. Velde. A congressional hearing is carried on by many com- 
mittees of Congress to obtain information upon which to base legis- 
lation. The witness is never cross-examined or faced with his accuser 
as he is in a court of law. Now in a court of law you don't have the 
right of a counsel sitting at your side by the witness stand advising 
you what to answer as to your constitutional rights. You are up there 



6706 COMIMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

on the stand without your counsel. This is an entirely different pro- 
cedui-e than what you are talking about as far as cross-examination is 
concerned. I am satisfied that if we had witnesses like you and al- 
lowed cross-examination in your particular case that the legislative 
process would be completely destroyed in this country and I am not 
going to stand for that. 

Mr. Marsak. Sir, I don't mean to be argumentative but I think 
that that was the question that T raised, the one of procedure under 
certain amendments. I must rest upon those grounds, sir, and if you 
will allow me to do so, to perhaps state just as briefly as I can some 
of the reasons why in good conscience I do so. 

Mr. Velde. I think that you have already used every possible 
legal grounds. The rest of it is very familiar to this committee. It is 
the same old party line that we have heard time and time again. The 
spectators might be interested in it but certainly we are not and we 
would like to close these hearings. We have been sitting in public 
hearings now for the past 6 days and we would certainly like to close 
these hearings and get a little rest. I think that I can speak for the 
gentleman from Tennessee as to that matter, too. 

And so let's proceed, Mr. Counsel, and see if we can get any infor- 
mation at all out of this witness. 

Mr. KuNziG. I have just one further question, Mr. Chairman? Ara 
you a citizen of the United States ? 

Mr. Marsak. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Were you born in the United States ? 

Mr. IMarsak. Yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. And so you are a citizen here by birth ? 

Mr. Marsak. That is right. 

Mr. KuNziG. I have no further questions. 

Mr. Velde. Just a minute. Do you have any questions [to Mr. 
Frazier] ? 

Mr. Frazier. No questions. 

Mr. Velde. Let me ask you one question. If we were to be in- 
volved in a war with Soviet Russia on one side and the United States 
of America on the other side would you fight for the United States of 
America in such a war ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. KuNziG. I think the record should note the amount of time that 
this is taking to decide the answer to this question. 

(A lapse of 20 seconds.) 

Mr. Marsak. Sir, this is a very complex question. 

Mr. Velde. If the witness were loyal to this country at all he would 
have no hesitancy in answering that question. 

Mr. Collins. Mr. Chairman, I assume full responsibility. I was 
informed that we could even go outside and discuss the answer. 

Mr. Velde. All right, you may have the opportunity. Proceed. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Marsak. Sir, I most emphatically would fight for the United 
States. 

Mr. KuNziG. Have you ever been in the Armed Forces ? 

Mr. Marsak. Yes I have, sir. 

Mr. KuNziG. When ? 

Mr. Marsak. From early — I enlisted in November 1942 and was 
discharged in October 1945. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6707 

Mr. KuNziG. Now let's ask this : Were you a member of the Com- 
munist Party when you were in the Armed Forces at that time ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Marsak. Sir, I respectfully decline to answer that question on 
the ground of the fourteenth and the fifth amendment in that 

Mr. Velde. Anything further ? 

Mr. KuNziG. Nothing further, Mr. Chairman. I think that makes 
clear his position. 

Mr. Velde. The witness is excused and dismissed and you will 
call your next witness, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. Spencer Gill. 

Mr. Velde. Will you raise your right hand and be sworn, please? 

In the testimony that you are about to give before this subcommittee 
do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Gill. I do, 

TESTIMONY OF SPENCER JOHN GILL ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
ATTORNEY, JAMES V. COLLINS 

Mr. Velde. Proceed. 

Mr. Gill. I request that the television cameras be turned away. 

Mr. Velde. Under the regular procedure and rules of the com- 
mittee it will be necessary for me to request that the television cam- 
eras do not take — do not telecast — the witness during the progress of 
this hearing. 

( 10 second pause. ) 

Mr. KuNziG. I think that the record should show that the reason 
that we are waiting is that they are conferring with counsel which is 
perfectly proper. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Velde. Are you finished now ? 

(Witness nods head.) 

Mr. KuNziG. Will you state your full name, please? 

Mr. Gill. Spencer John Gill, G-i-1-1. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Gill, I notice that you are accompanied by coun- 
sel. Will counsel once again state his name for the record? 

Mr. Collins. James V. Collins, 608 Portland Trust Building. 

Mr. KuNziG. Wha.t is your present address, Mr. Gill? 

Mr. Gill. May I confer with counsel, please ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Gill. 923 South East Lambert, Portland 2, Oreg. 

Mr, KuNziG. L-a-m-b-e-r-t? 

Mr. Gill. That is correct. 

Mr. KuNziG. Where are you presently employed, Mr. Gill ? 

Mr. Gill. May I confer with counsel ? 

Mr. KuNziG. Please go right ahead. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Gill. I am self-employed as a free-lance writer. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you give the committee a brief resume of your 
educational background? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Gill. Upon advice of counsel I refuse to answer upon the 
grounds and for the reasons as follows : First, as an invasion of the 



6708 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

rights guaranteed under the 1st amendment to tlie Constitution of 
the United States of freedom of speech, of press, religion, and assem- 
bly; second, invoking my rights and privileges provided for under 
the 4th, 9th, 10th, and 14th amendments to the Constitution of the 
United States and the constitution of the State of Oregon respecting 
substantive and procedural due process, freedom of conscience, speech, 
assembly and elections; thirdly, invoking my rights and privileges 
under the 5th amendment to the Constitution of the United States 
guaranteeing that I shall not be compelled to be a witness against 
myself or that I be deprived of liberty or property without due process 
of law. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Now Mr. Gill, let's take it up this way and let's take 
it bit by bit and we will see where it incriminates you. Now did you 
ever go to elementary school, Mr. Gill ? 

Mr. Gill. May I confer with counsel, please ? 

Mr. KuNziG. You check that up with him ? 
(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Gill. Upon advice of counsel I must respectfully refuse to 
answer on the grounds previously stated. 

Mr. KuNziG^ Now, Mr. Gill 

Mr. Velde. That is a ligitimate question for our counsel to ask and 
certainly one which should be answered. I can see no way in which 
that would tend to incriminate you whatsoever as far as your ele- 
mentary school is concerned and so you are directed to answer the 
question. Now in refusing, if you do refuse, will you please just 
say, "I refuse on the grounds that I have previously stated," or some- 
thing. 

Mr. Gill. Upon advice of counsel, I refuse to answ^er on the grounds 
previously stated. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you ever go to high school ? 

Mr. Gill. Upon the advice of counsel, I refuse respectfully to- 
answer upon the grounds previously stated. 

Mr. KuNziG. Air. Chairman, will you kindly direct the witness to 
answer that question? 

Mr. Velde. Yes, you are again directed to answer that question. 

Mr. Gill. Again, sir, on advice of counsel, I must respectfully refuse 
to answer on the grounds previously named. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you ever go to college ? 

Mr. Gill. Again, sir, upon the advice of counsel, I must refuse to 
answer on the grounds previously stated. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Chairman, I respectfully request that he be di- 
rected to answer that question. 

Mr. Velde. Again you are directed to answer the question. 

Mr. Gill. Sir', iii)on advice of counsel, I must respectfully refuse to 
answer upon the grounds previously stated. 

Mr. KuNziG. Have you ever been in the Armed Forces of the United 
States? 

Mr. Gill. May I confer with counsel ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Gn.L. Upon advice of counsel, I must respectfully refuse to 
answer upon the grounds previously stated. 

Mr. Velde. Again you are directed to answer that question. There 
certainly shouklirt be anything wrong with serving your country. 



COMMUlSriST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6709 

Mr. Gill. Upon advice of counsel, I must respectfully refuse to 
answer upon the grounds as previously stated. 

Mr, KuNziG. Another name to add to the contempt list. 

Mr. Gill, have you ever been a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Gill. Upon advice of counsel, I must respectfully refuse to 
answer upon the grounds as previously stated, 

Mr. KuNziG. Were you State educational director of the Communist 
Party in 1947 here in Oregon ? 

Mr. Gill. Upon the advice of counsel, I must respectfully refuse 
to answer upon the grounds as previously stated. 

Mr, KuNziG. Mr. Canon testified that you and your wife belonged 
to the Professional Club of the Communist Party along with Mr. 
Canon and his wife, and Lloyd Reynolds and his wife, and Stanley 
Moore. Did you belong to that professional club of the Communist 
Party here in Portland, Oreg. ? 

Mr. Gill. Upon advice of counsel, I must again respectfully refuse 
to answer upon the grounds previously stated, 

Mr. KuNziG. Isn't it a fact that you were a member of the Negro 
commission of the Communist Party in 1948, Mr. Gill ? 

Mr. Gill. Upon advice of counsel, I must respectfully refuse to 
answer upon the grounds previously stated. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you ever give "educationals" to Communist Party 
members at closed Communist Party meetings in Portland, Oreg.? 

Mr. Gill. Upon advice of counsel, I must respectfully refuse to 
answer upon the grounds as previously stated. 

Mr, KuNziG, Are you now a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Gill. Upon the advice of counsel, I must respectfully refuse to 
answer upon the grounds as previously stated. 

Mr. KuNziG. If you were in the Armed Forces of the United States 
of America, and of course I don't know that because you wouldn't 
answer that question, but if you were in the Armed Forces, were you 
a member of the Communist Party while you were in the Armed 
Forces ? 

Mr. Gill. Upon advice of counsel, I must respectfully refuse to 
answer that question upon the grounds as previously stated. 

Mr. KuNziG. No further questions, Mr, Chairman. 

Mr, Velde. Do you have any questions, Mr. Frazier ? 

Mr. Frazier. No questions. 

Mr. Velde. I suppose that it would be useless for me to proceed 
further trying to get any information out of this witness, and so the 
witness is dismissed. Call your next witness, please. 

Mr. KuNziG. Sam Markson. 

Mr. Velde. Will vou raise vour right hand and be sworn ? 

In the testmiony that you are about to give before this subcommittee 
do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Marksoist. I do. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you state your full name, please ? 

TESTIMNOY OF SAM MARKSON, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
ATTORNEY, BERKELEY LENT 

Mr. Markson. My name is Sam Markson, M-a-r-k-s-o-n. 
Mr. KtJNziG. I note tliat you are accompanied by counsel. Would 
counsel please state his name and office address for the record ? 



6710 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. Lent. My name is Berkeley Lent, B-e-r-k-e-1-e-y, tlie last name 
Lent, L-e-n-t, Loyalty Building, Portland, Oreg. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Markson, what is your present address, sir ? 

Mr. Markson. I live at 6651 North East Roselawn, Portland, Oreg. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you spell that Roselawn ? Is it R-o-s-e-l-a-w-n ? 

Mr. Markson. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kunzig. What is your employment, sir? 

Mr. Markson. I am self-employed. 

Mr. Kunzig. Wliat type of work? 

Mr. Markson. I'm a painter. 

Mr. Kunzig. Painter. Now Mr. Markson, you have heard testimony 
here with regard to your membership in the Communist Party. You 
have been identified as having been a member of the Communist Party. 
Now I ask you : Have you ever been a member of the Communist Party ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Markson. Mr. Kunzig, upon advice of counsel, I refuse to 
answer that question upon the grounds and for the reasons as follows : 
First, that the question constitutes an attempted invasion of rights 
guaranteed to me under the first amendment and to the Constitution 
of the United States the rights of freedom of speech, press, religion, 
and assembly ; second, that the question is in derogation of my rights 
and privileges provided for under the 4th, the 9th, the 10th, and the 
14th amendments to the Constitution of the United States and the 
Constitution of the State of Oregon respecting substantive procedural 
due process, freedom of conscience, speech, assembly, and elections, and 
the right of privacy ; third, I invoke my rights and privileges under 
the fifth amendment to the Constitution of the United States guaran- 
teeing that I shall not be compelled to be a witness against myself and 
that I be not deprived of liberty or property without due process of 
law. 

I further refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer to that 
question might tend to incriminate and degrade me. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now Mr. Markson, isn't it a fact that you have been in 
the Communist Party since at least 1940? If you are going to refuse 
to answer I suggest that you just say that you refuse on the same 
grounds instead of reading the entire speech again. 

Mr. Markson. I refuse on the same ground. 

Mr. Kunzig. Were you a member of the district committee of the 
Communist Party in 1949? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Markson. I refuse to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Kunzig. Isn't it a fact that you were a member of the executive 
committee of the Communist Party of the State of Oregon? 

Mr. Markson. I refuse on the same grounds. 

Mr. Kunzig. Are you a member of the Communist Party now? 

Mr. Markson. I refuse to answer that on the same grounds. 

Mr. Kunzig. Isn't it a fact that even today you are an active member 
of the Communist Party and have been for the last few years in addi- 
tion to your previous activity? 

Mr. Markson. I refuse to answer that on the same grounds. 

Mr. Kunzig. Have you ever been in the Armed Forces of the United 
States? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6711 

Mr. Markson. By the question I take it you mean the Armed Forces 
as a military'- service? 

Mr. KuNziG. Yes. 

Mr. Markson. Wouhl that inchide workin<2; in a shijjyard, say, for 
example ? 

Mr. KuNziG. Let's say first— we will come to that. Now let me say 
first : Were you ever in the Army, Navy, or Air Corps, any of the Arme4 
Forces of the United States, Coast Guard? 

Mr. Velde. How about the Marines? 

Mr. KuNZiG. Marines, part of the Navy, sir. 

Mr. Markson. No. 

Mr. KuNZiG. You were not ? Now I presume that you want me to 
ask whether you ever worked in the shipyards? 

Mr. Markson. I didn't ask you. 

Mr. Kunzig. Well, I will ask you that. Did you ever work in the 
shipyards ? You were trying to get that on the record so I am trying 
to give you the opportunity. 

Mr. Markson. Yes, I did work in the shipyards. 

Mr. Kunzig. Were those ships that were being built for use in the 
armed services ? 

Mr. Markson. I really don't know. I'm not in a position to know. 

Mr. Kunzig. I see. Well now were you a member of the Communist 
Party when you worked in the shipyards ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Markson. I refuse to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Kunzig. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Veldk. Any questions, Mr. Frazier? 

Mr. Frazier. No questions. 

Mr. Velde. The witness is dismissed and the committee will be 
in a short recess for about 5 minutes. 

(Five-minute recess.) 

Mr. Velde, The committee will be in order please. Proceed to 
call your next witness, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr, Kunzig. Dave Lapham. 

Mr. Velde. Will you raise your right hand and be sworn in? 

In the testimony that you are about to give before this subcommittee 
do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God. 

Mr. Lapham. I do. 

Mr. Kunzig. Would you state your full name, please? 

TESTIMONY OF DAVID B. LAPHAM, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
ATTORNEY, KNELAND CLARK TANNER 

Mr. Lapham. David B. Lapham, L-a-p-h-a-m. 

Mr. Kunzig. Would counsel once again state his name for the rec- 
ord, please sir ? 

Mr. Tanner. Kneland Clark Tanner, 1041 Pacific Building in this 
city, 

Mr. Kunzig. Your address, Mr. Lapham ? 

Mr. Lapham. 1520 South West Montgomery Street. 

Mr. Kunzig. What is your employment, sir ? 

Mr. Lapham. I am employed as a social worker. 



6712 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. KuNziG. As a social worker? Is that for a private agency or 
public ? 

Mr. Lapham. For a public agency. 

Mr. KuNziG. "Wliat is the public agency ? 

Mr. Lapham. Multnomah County Public Welfare Commission. 

Mr. KuNziG. How long have you been so employed ? 

Mr. Lapham. Since the 6th of August of 1953. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Lapham, sir, would you give the committee a 
brief resume of your educational background ? 

Mr. Lapham. I attended several grammar schools in the city of 
Portland. I am a graduate from Benson Polytechnic High School. 
I had spent about 4 years at Reed College. 

Mr. KuNziG. You spent 4 years at Reed ? 

Mr. Lapham. As a student ; yes. 

Mr. KuNziG. Are you there now or are you graduated ? 

Mr. Lapham. Neither. I've been there about 4 years. I have not 
received a degree as yet. I have some uncompleted work. 

Mr. KuNziG. I see. And what is your present age ? 

Mr. Lapham.. Twenty-five. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you go right into the social-work employment 
after completing whatever your tour of work was at Reed College? 

Mr. Lapham. Yes ; very shortly after that. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Now Mr. Lapham, there has been testimony here con- 
cerning various people having been members of tlie John Reed Club 
of the Communist Party here in Portland, Oreg. Have you ever been 
a member of the John Reed Club of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Lapham. I must invoke the protection of the Constitution of 
the United States and in particular the fifth amendment and respect- 
fully decline to answer that question for the reason that it may tend 
to incriminate me. 

Mr. KuNziG. Are you now a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Lapham. I am not. 

Mr. KuNziG. You are not? 

Mr. Lapham. No. 

Mr. KuNziG. Were you a member of the Communist Party in Jan- 
uary of 1954? 

Mr. Lapham. No ; I was not. 

Mr. KuNziG. Were you a member of the Communist Partv in July 
of 19.53? 

Mr. Lapham. No ; I was not. 

ISIr. KuNzio. Were you a member of the Communist Party in Janu- 
ary of 1953? 

Mr. Lapham. No ; I was not. 

Mr. KuxziG. I'll keep going as long as you will. Were you a mem- 
ber of tlie Communist Party in July of 1952 ? 

Mr. Lapham. No ; I was not. 

Mr. KuNziG. TTow about January of 1952 ? 

Mr. Lapham. No ; I was not. 

Mr. KiiNziG. How a})out July of 1951 ? 

Mr. Lapham. No ; I was not. 

Mr. KuNziG. January of 1951 ? 

Mr. Lapham. No ; I was not. 

Mr. KuNziG. July of 1950? 

Mr. Lapham. No. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6713 

Mr. KuNziG. Will you save time and tell me when you got out ? 

Mr. Lapham. I have given no testimony that would imply that I 
was a member. 

Mr. KuNziG. Were you a member of the Communist Party in Jan- 
uary of 1950 ? 

Mr. Lapham. No ; I was not. 

Mr. KuNziG. How about, were you a member of the Communist 
Party in July of 1949? 

Mr. Lapham. I invoke the protection of the Constitution of the 
United States and particularly the fifth amendment and respectfully 
decline to answer that question. 

Mr. KuNziG. All right, and that was July of 1949. We now have 
narrowed it down to between July of 1949 and January of 1950. Were 
you a member of the Communist Party in August of 1949 ? 

Mr. Lapham. I decline to answer that question. 

Mr, KuNziG. September of 19 — I will assume that you will answer 
on the same grounds. 

Mr. Lapham. Yes ; the same grounds. 

Mr. KuNziG. In September of 1949 were you a member of the Com- 
munist Party ? 

Mr. Lapham. I decline to answer. 

Mr. KuNZiG. In October of 1949 ? 

Mr. Lapham. I'll make it simple. For the year 1949 I will decline. 

Mr. KuNziG. All right, December 31 of 1949, were you a member 
of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Lapham. I said that for the year 1949 I will decline to answer 
that question. 

Mr. KuNziG. You decline. January 1 of 1950 were you a member 
of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Lapham. No ; I was not. 

Mr. KuNziG. Did it take place on New Year's eve ? 

Mr. Lapham. As I've said before, I have given no testimony before 
this subcommittee that would indicate that I have ever been a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party. 

Mr. KuNziG. I have no further questions of this witness, Mr. Chair- 
man. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Frazier ? 

Mr. Frazier. No questions. 

Mr. Veij)e. I have no further questions. The witness is dismissed. 
Will you call your next witness please? 

Mr. KuNziG. David Gregg. 

Mr. Velde. Will you raise your right hand and be sworn please? 

In the testimony that you are about to g-ive before this subcommittee 
do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Gregg. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF DONNELLY DAVID GEEGG, ACCOMPANIED BY 
HIS ATTORNEY, BERKELEY LENT 

Mr. Velde. You may be seated. 
Mr. Gregg. No television. 

Mr. Velde. If we do not have television would you answer the 
questions when they are put to you ? 
( No response. ) 



6714 COMIMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. Velde. Well, in any event the Chair mnst a<zain direct the 
television cameras to desist from taking pictures of the witness while 
he is testifying. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you state your full name, please, Mr. Gregg? 

Mr. Gregg. Donnelly David Gregg. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Would you spell the first name ? 

Mr. Gregg. D-o-n-n-e-l-l-y D-a-v-i-d G-r-e-g-g, 

Mr. KuxziG. I note that you are accompanied by counsel. Will 
counsel please state his name and office address for tiie record? 

Mr. Lent. My name is Berkeley Lent. The office address is 901 
Loyalty Building, Portland, Oreg. 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Gregg, what is your address, sir ? 

Mr. Gregg. I am now living in a house trailer south of Milwaukie, 
Oreg. It is registered as a trailer court. 

Mr. KuNziG. South of where ? 

Mr. Grego. South of Milwaukie, Oreg. 

Mr. KuNziG. I see. What is your present employment ? 

Mi\ Gregg. I am temporarily laid oif. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you give the committee a brief resume of your 
educational background ? 

Mr. Gregg. Well, I went to grammar school and to high school, 
graduated from Washington High. 

Mr. KuNziG. Where is that ? 

Mr. Gregg. It is in the city of Portland. 

Mr. KuNziG. In Portland? What year did you graduate from 
Washington High, in Portland ? 

Mr. Gregg. 1941. 

Mr. KiiJsrziG. And then did you have any further education ? 

Mr. Gregg. Yes ; I did. 

Mr. KuNziG. Where did vou go after that ? 

Mr. Gregg. I went to Compton Junior College. 

Mr. Kunzig. And did you graduate from Compton Junior College? 

Mr. Gregg. I did not. 

Mr. KuNziG. How long did you go there ? 

Mr. Gregg. Alittleover ahalf aterm. I'm not sure. 

Mr. Kunzig. Is there any further part to your formal education 
or does that conclude it? 

Mr. Gregk^}. No. I went to Reed College. 

Mr. Kunzig, To Reed College; and how long did you go to Reed 
College? 

Mr, Gregg, My college education was interrupted, I started in 
1949, the fall of 1949. 

Mr. Kunzig. You started in the f aU of 1949. 

Mr. Greg(;. That is right. 

Mr. Ki'NziG. Roughly how long did you stay there? 

Mr. Gregg. I left temporarily because of illness in December, I 
believe. 

Mr. Kunzig. Did you go back and finish the work ? 

Mr. (iregg. And I left for a vear. I returned, and I'm not certain of 
these dates. 

Mr. Kunzig. To the best of your recollection, 

Mr. Gregg. I returned in 1951, February, I believe. 

Mr. Velde. Would you put your microphone a little closer? It is 
difficult to hear. Thank you very much. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6715 

Mr. KuNziG. Now then, did you ever graduate then, finally, from 
Keed College? 

Mr. Gregg. No; I didn't. I didn't attend this year. I attended last 
year, and that was the last. 

Mr. KuNziG. I see. While you were at Reed College, were you ever 
a member of any Communist group or organization ? 

Mr. Gregg. I decline to answer that question. 

Mr. KuNziG. On the fifth amendment ? 

Mr. Gregg. On the grounds that that question might tend to incrim- 
inate me, and I invoke the fifth amendment, that I shall not be forced 
to be a witness against myself. 

Mr. KuNziG. We understand that, and if you say "same grounds" 
from now on, I'll understand that that is the grounds. Now were you 
a member of the John Reed Club of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Gregg. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. KuNziG. Same grounds. Were you ever a member of the Henry 
Winston Club of the Communist Party in Portland ? 

Mr. Gregg. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. KuNziG. Are you now a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Gregg. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Kunzig. Were you ever in the Armed Forces of the United 
States? 

Mr. Gregg. Just a moment (confers with counsel). Yes; I was. 

Mr. Kunzig. "VVlien? 

Mr. Gregg. During 1943-44, about 2 years during World War II. 

Mr. Kunzig. During the time you were a member of the Armed 
Forces 

Mr. Gregg. I got my dates mixed up here. I'm trying to think, 

Mr. Kunzig. Well, give them to us to the best of your recollection. 

Mr. Gregg. 1944-45. I was discharged in 1946. 

Mr. Kunzig. I see. Now when you were in the Armed Forces of the 
United States, by the way, was it Army, Navy ? 

Mr. Gregg. I was in the Navy. 

Mr. Kunzig. The Navy. Wlien you were in the Navy, were you a 
member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Gregg. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds 
as previously stated. 

Mr. Kunzig. I have no further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Frazier ? 

Mr. Frazier. No questions. 

Mr. Velde. Just one. What was your occupation up until the 
time that you became unemployed ? 

Mr. Gregg. I worked on the railroad. 

Mr. Velde. Whnt kind of work on tlie railroad? 

Mr. Gregg. Laborer. 

_Mr. Velde. That's all tlie questions that I have. The witness is 
dismissed, and Mr. Counsel, will you call your next witness ? 

Mr. Kunzig. Don Wollam. 

Mr. Velde. Will vou raise your right hand and be sworn, please? 

In the testimony that you are about to give before this subcommittee 
do you solemnly swear that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothng but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Wollam. I do. 

Mr. Kunzig. Would you state your full name, please, Mr. Wollam ? 



6716 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

TESTIMONY OF DONALD M. WOLLAM, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
ATTORNEY, IRVIN GOODMAN 

Mr. WoLLAM. My name is Donald M. "VVollam. W-o-l-l-a-m. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would counsel please state his name and office address 
for the record ? 

Mr. Goodman. My name is Irvin Goodman, Portland Trust Build- 
ing, city. 

Mr. KuNziG. Thank you, Mr. Goodman. Mr. Wollam, what is your 
present address, sir ? 

]\Ir. Wollam. Mr. Kunzig. I refuse to answer that question on the 
first, under the fourth amendment because I believe that counsel is 
aware that people who have given their address over this microphone 
both here and in Seattle have had their homes threatened. I have a 
wife and family at home who I don't propose to put in jeopardy be- 
cause of any action I may take here. 

Mr. KuNziG. Just shorten it up. 

Mr. Velde. You may state your legal grounds. 

Mr. WoLLAM. I don't like your question, Mr. Kunzig, and I will 
certainly not surrender to you any right that I may have to 

Mr. Velde. You may state your legal grounds, young man, but 
we're not going to listen to another tirade. Do you have contempt in 
your heart, when you approach the witness stand, do you have con- 
tempt in your heart for this committee of your United States Congress ? 

Mr. WoLLAM. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds of 
the fifth amendment, the decision of United States judge, James Alger 
Fee, in the case of United States versus 

Mr. Velde. It is apparent that this witness is trying to filibuster. 
We iust can't have that, as I pointed out the other day. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Chairman, I respectfully request, in order that 
the record may be clear and that the witness be warned that there is 
possible contempt here that he be directed to answer the question as 
to, that I have just asked, as to his address. 

Mr. Velde. Yes. You are certainly directed to answer that question. 

Mr. WoLLAM. Mr. Chairman, I ask to continue my reasons for not 
answering that question. 

Mr. Velde. You have already stated sufficiently the grounds. Now 
do you refuse to answer ? 

]\Ir. WoLLAM. I have only stated the fourth amendment. 

Mr. Velde. Do you refuse to answer upon direction the question 
as to your address? 

Mr. WoLLAM. I do refuse to answer that question. First on the 
grounds that I have just stated under the fourth amendment to the 
Constitution. Secondly I refuse to answer again on the grounds that 
I have just stated regarding the Alger Fee decision. I refuse to further 
answer that question under the 1st, the 5th, the 0th, and the 14th 
amendments to the Constitution of the United States and any other 
sections of the Constitution that may apply, and also the constitution 
of the State of Oregon. 

Now this may be funny to you, Mr. Kunzig. 

Mr. Kunzig. It is not funny. 

Mr. Velde. It is very, very serious. 

Mr. Kunzig. It is very, very serious. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIE-S IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6717 

Mr. Velde. You are the one who is taking this as being funny. 

Mr. AVoLLAM. I certainly have no intentions 

Mr. Velde. Proceed to ask the questions, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. You will understand now, Mr. Wollani, so that your 
filibustering may be cut off, we Avill understand and make sure that 
your rights are protected. Any time that you refuse to answer we will 
"understand that it is on the grounds of the fifth amendment. 

Now, Mr. Wollam, what is your present employment ? I am asking 
that question very seriously. 

Mr. WoLLAM. And I will give you a very serious answer. 

Mr. KuNziG. Thank you. 

Mr. WoLLAM. Mr. Kunzig, I refuse to answer it not just on the fifth 
amendment, as you stated that you would understand my refusals 
would be based upon, but upon all of the grounds that I have previ- 
ously stated. 

Mr. Kunzig. All right. Mr. Chairman, may I ask you to please 
direct the witness to answer the question as to where he is presently 
employed, 

Mr. Velde. Yes ; you are directed to answer the question as to your 
employment at the present time. 

Mr. Wollam. I refuse to answer the question upon the grounds of 
the first and fifth amendment to the Consitution of the United States 
pursuant to article 1, section 10, Constitution of Oregon, which pro- 
vides in part ; that every man shall have 

Mr. Velde. Isn't your refusal 

Mr. Wollam (continuing). Remedy by due course of law for in- 
jury done him 

Mr. Velde. Will the witness listen to me for just a minute? Is 
your refusal to answer based upon the same reasons that you gave 
before ? Is that right ? 

Mr. Wollam. My refusal to answer is based upon the reason that 
I just gave plus all else that I have pled here, and I beg leave, Mr. 
Chairman, I beg leave 

Mr. Velde. All right, proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now Mr. Wollam, the next question is as follows : Did 
you ever attend elementary school and if so where ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Wollam. Mr. Chairman, in the dissenting opinions of Justices 
Douglas, Black, and Frankfurter the line of demarcation 

Mr. VELDE. Young man, we are not going to listen to a long 
diatribe or a lot of advice on what the law is, as far as the Su]:)reme 
Court decisions are concerned. Either answer the questions or refuse 
to answer. I will say this that if you will answer the questions as 
put to you by our counsel, then you might have the opportunity to go 
ahead and explain the law or anything that you want to, but you must 
first of all give us the courtesy of giving us an answer. By that I mean 
an answer of yes or no. 

Mr. Wollam. I have refused to answer the question Mr. Chairman 
and I ask you for the courtesy of being permitted to state my reasons. 

Mr. Velde. You have stated the reasons. 

Mr. Wollam. I think these reasons are quite important. They are 
very important to me, 

Mr. Velde. Will you proceed, Mr. Counsel ? 



6718 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Chairman, I think that we also ought to note 
that he was citing the dissenting opinion. This committee usually 
tries to follow the majority opinion of the Supreme Court. 

Now on the last question you have refused. Now let me ask you 
this. Mr. Chairman, I have forgotten the record. Have you directed 
him to answer the question as to whether he went to the elementary 
school or not ? 

Mr. Velde. No. 

Mr. KuNziG. Would you please direct him ? 

Mr. Velde. You are directed to answer the question as to where 
you attended elementary school, or whether you attended elementary 
school. 

Mr. KuNziG. The question was where you attended and where was 
the exact way that I put it. 

Mr. WoLLAM. Mr. Chairman, in view of the fact that I have no way 
of knowing as what time when I answer a question I will be waiving 
my rights to refuse to answer further questions that I know will fol- 
low from this committee, and since I have no intention of becoming 
a member of your stable of stool pigeons I am going to stand upon my 
constitutional rights and decline to answer the question upon the 
grounds of the first and fifth amendments and 

Mr. Velde. Now we are not going to listen to any more of this 
diatribe such as calling us a stable of stool pigeons. I am sure that your 
mother wouldn't appreciate your saying something like that and 1 
am sure that the rest of the decent people in this area don't appre- 
ciate your making such wild and absurd and ridiculous statements, 
and so we are not going to listen to anything further. 

Counsel, do you have any other important questions that you want 
to ask this witness ? 

Mr. KuNziG. Just a few more, Mr. Chairman. I want this witness 
to have a full opportunity to answer these questions. 

Did you ever attend high school, Mr. Wollam? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. WoLLAM. As an overseas war veteran, Mr. Chairman; 11 months 
in German prison camp, I stand upon the Constitution of the United 
States, the same provisions that I cited earlier. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Now did you ever attend college, Mr. Wollam? Mr. 
Chairman, will vou please direct the witness to answer that question? 

Mr. Velde. Yes, you are directed to answer the question as to 
your — was it high school ? Was that the last question ? 

Mr. KuNziG. Yes, high school. The question exactly as it appe;iic 
in the record. 

Mr. WoLLAM. And I will again decline to answer and on the same 
grounds that I gave before. And I might add, INIr. Chairman, that 
if you are interested 

Mr. KuNziG. Did you ever attend college ? 

Mr. WoLLAM. The same answer and the same reason. 

Mr. KuNziG. I respectfully request that the witness be directed, 
Mr. Chairman, to answer the question. 

Mr. Velde. Yes, you are directed to answer. 

Mr. WoLLAM. I refuse to answer, Mr. Chairman, same reason. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now you said that you were an overseas veteran and 
you were in the Armed P'orces of the United States. Were you in 
the Army, or the Navy, or the Marines, or what ? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6719 

Mr. WoLLAM. I was in the Army, 

Mr. KuNziG. And what was the highest rank or grade that you 
achieved ? 

Mr. WoLLA:\r. Private, first class. 

Mr. KuNziG. Private, first class. Now were you a member of the 
Communist Party when you were a private, first class, in the United 
States Army ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. WoLLAM. Will you repeat that question please ? 

Mr. KuNziG. Would the reporter please repeat it ? 

(The record was read by the reporter as follows :) 

Now were you a member of the Communist Party when you were a private, 
first class, in the United States Army? 

Mr. WoLLAM. I refuse to answer that question on the grounds of 
the fifth amendment and the decision of the United States Judge James 
Alger Fee in the case of the United Sfate>< v. Johnson (76 supp. 538, 
pp. 540, 541) . I also invoke the first, fourth, ninth 

Mr. KuNziG. We understand that you invoke those. 

Mr. WoLLAM (continuing) . 10, 14th, the whole works. 

Mr. KuNziG. That is perfectly clear to us now and you know that 
it is perfectly clear and there is no necessity to say anything more. 

Now have you ever been a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. WoLLAM. I will answer all such inquiries as to my association 
with people, as to my religious or my political beliefs, or affiliations and 
so forth with hese refusals and with these reasons. I don't feel that 
you have any right, and I again cite the decision of Judge James Alger 
Fee. 

Mr. KuNziG. We understand that citation now. Now let me ask 
you, are you now a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Velde. Let the record show that counsel is pointing to what is 
apparently a prepared answer to that question and directing the wit- 
ness to answer the questions according to certain printed material 
which he is holding before him. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. WoLLAM. I understand that I am allowed counsel even though 
counsel isn't permitted to address the committee. I can see no harm 
in his being of what small help you permit counsel to be at one of these 
hearings. 

I am going to refuse to answer that last question on the grounds that 
I just gave based on the grounds of the fifth amendment and the deci- 
sion of Judge James Alger Fee in the case of United States v. Johnson^ 
(76 supp., pp. 538, 540, 541). 

Mr. KuNziG. All right, I understand. 

Mr. WoLLAM. Also, all the other — — 

Mr. KuNziG. Now we will go right on and let me ask you if it isn't 
triie, and I repeat what you said a little earlier that we don't consider 
this to be funny at all, isn't it true that you are today — this very minute 
as you are sitting here in this courtroom of the United States court- 
house before the Congress of i\\Q United States of America — a section 
organizer of District 11 Committee of the State of Oregon Communist 
Party right now in 1954 ? Isn't that correct ? 

Mr. WoLLAM. I refuse to answer that question on all the grounds I 
just gave Mr. Chairman. 



6720 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Wollani, have you ever been engaged in any 
espionage activities against the United States ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. "WoLLAM. I consider that to be a trap question, IVlr. Kunzig, and 
I will give you the same answer that I have given you on all of the 
other questions that are in that line. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now just let me refute something that you said a few 
moments earlier. Tliis does not involve associations, personnel, 
friends, religious beliefs, any of those things that you have been talk- 
ing about. This involves loyalty to the United States of America 
and your behavior with regard to espionage. Have 3'ou ever been 
involved in any espionage activities? I ask you once again. 

Mr. WoLLAM. Same question, same answer. 

Mr. Kunzig. I think it is perfectly obvious the position of this wit- 
ness, Mr. Chairman. No further questions. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Frazier? 

Mr. Frazier. No questions. 

Mr. Velde. I must say that by your conduct here you have cer- 
tainly destroyed my faith in you as a witness and you as an Ameri- 
can citizen in refusing to give up any information whatsoever which 
might help us. With that you are excused from the witness stand 
and discharged from your subpena. 

Mr. WoLLAM. Could I have an opportunity to answer your last state- 
ment, Mr. Chairman ? 

Mr. Velde. No ; you are dismissed. 

Mr. Kunzig. William Earle Lewis. 

Mr. Velde, Will you raise your right hand and be sworn ? 

In the testimony that you are about to give before this subcommittee 
do you solemnly sw^ear that you will tell the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Lewis. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM EAELE LEWIS, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 

ATTORNEY, NELS PETERSON 

Mr. Velde. Be seated. 

Mr. Lewis. Mr. Chairman, I respectfully request that I be not tele- 
vised. 

Mr. Velde. Again I regretfully request the television cameras 
to desist from televising the witness as he is giving his testimony. 

Mr. Kunzig. Mr. Lewis, would you please state your full name for 
the record? 

Mr. Lewis. William Earle Lewis. 

Mr. Kunzig. Will counsel please state his name for the record and 
the office address? 

Mr. Peterson. Nels Peterson, Loyalty Building, Portland, Oreg. 

Mr. Kunzig. Will you spell your full name please, the witness first ? 

Mr. Lewis. AVilliam Earle Lewis, the middle name with an "e"' at 
the end. 

Mr. Kunzig. E-a-r-1-e, and how do you spell Lewis? 

Mr. Lewis. L-e-w-i-s. 

Mr. Kunzig. Now would counsel please spell his name for the 
record ? 

Mr. Peterson. Nels, N-e-l-s P-e-t-e-r-s-o-n, 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN TPIE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6721 

Mr. KuNziG, Thank you, Mr. Peterson. 

Mr. Peterson. Yes, sir. 

Mr. KuNZiG. Mr. Lewis, what is your present residence, sir? 

Mr. Lewis. It is 3316 Northwest Vaughn, V-a-u-g-h-n, Portland 
10, Oreg. 

Mr. KuNziG. And your employment? 

Mr. Lewis. It is a matter of doubt at the moment but I had been 
employed with a trucking firm, office work. 

Mr. KuNziG. Trucking firm? What is the name and address of 
the trucking firm? 

Mr. Lewis. May I confer with counsel, please? 

Mr. KuNZiG. Please do. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Lewis. Mitchell Brothers Truck Lines, 2300 Northwest 30th 
Avenue, Portland 10, Oreg. 

Mr. KuNziG. JSIr. Lewis, have you ever been a member of the Com- 
munist Party? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Lewis. Mr. Chairman, I refuse to give an answer on the fol- 
lowing grounds and for the reason as follows : First, as an invasion of 
rights guaranteed under the first amendment of tlie Constitution of 
the United States of freedom of speech, press, religion, and assembly ; 
second, invoking my rights and privileges provided for under the 4th, 
9th, 10th, and 14th amendments to the Constitution of the United 
States and the constitution of the State of Oregon respecting substan- 
tive and procedural due process, freedom of conscience, speech, assem- 
bly, and elections; third, invoking my rights and privileges under the 
5th amendment to the Constitution of the United States guaranteeing 
that I shall not be compelled to be a witness against myself nor that 
I be deprived of liberty or property without due process of law. 

Mr. KuNziG. Were you a member of the John Eeed Club of the 
Communist Party ? 

Mr. Lewis. With your permission, Mr. Counsel, to such further in- 
quiries may I suggest 

Mr. KuNziG. "Same answer." 

Mr. Lewis. "Same answer." Thank you. 

Mr. KuNziG. I will understand when you say "same answer" that 
you are refusing to answer on the grounds that you have just given 
to us. 

Mr. Lewis. Thank you, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. Have you ever been a student at Reed College? 

Mr. Lewis. May I confer with counsel please ? 

Mr. KuNziG. Yes. 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Lewis. Just as an aside, Mr. Chairman, would it be in order 
just as, and without being facetious, please, a point of information? 

Mr. KuNziG. About what ? 

Mr. Lewis. I was wondering, sir, if at this time, I am not familiar 
with the setup, I was wondering if Reed College is now or will shortly 
be on the Attorney General's list ? 

Mr. KuNziG. That is obviously a facetious and an insulting answer, 
Mr. Chairman. We have made very clear, and the chairman has made 
it very clear and I have said it again and again here that in these 
questions that we have been asking that we have a right to ask and 



6722 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

always ask at all places the educational backgi-ound, the employment 
background, of witnesses. It just happens that a great deal 

Mr. Velde. What was the organization that he was referring to? 

Mr. KuNziG. Mr. Chairman, he asked whether Reed College was 
going to be put on the subversive list of the Attorney General and 
we were explaining that no such 

Mr. Velde. Yes; I agree Avitli you. I didn't understand his 
statement. 

Mr. KuNziG. It is a facetious answer. 

Mr. Velde. Yes; that is a facetious answer whether you say it 
is or not. 

Mr. KuNziG. Obviously, there is no such thing even being contem- 
plated or even talked about. Now just answer the question very 
simply. Have you ever been a student at Reed College ? 

(Witness confers with counsel.) 

Mr. Lewis. I must decline on the same previous grounds please. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now. isn't it a fact that you were club chairman of 
a Communist group on the Reed College campus during the time that 
you were there ? 

Mr. Lewis. I respectfully submit, Mr. Counsel, that I decline for 
the same reasons as previously stated. 

Mr. KuNziG. Were you ever a member of the State committee of 
the Progressive Party ? 

Mr. Lewis. I decline for the same reason, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. KuNziG. Are you now a member of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Lewis. I must decline to answer that statement, Mr. Chairman 
and Mr. Counsel for the same reason. 

Mr. KuNziG. Now as a matter of fact, you were in the Armed Forces 
of the United States ; were you not ? 

Mr. Lewis. Yes, sir ; that is correct. 

Mr. KuNZTG. And you had a good record in the Armed Forces and 
1 believe were decorated ; is that correct? 

Mr. Lewis. That is correct. 

Mr. KuNziG. Were you a Communist when you were in tlie Armed 
Forces of the United States ? 

Mr. Lewis. I must decline to answer that question, sir, for the same 
reasons as previously stated. 

Mr. KuNziG. I have no further questions Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Velde. Do you have any further questions ? 

INIr. Frazier. No questions. 

Mr. Velde. No further questions here. The witness is discharged 
from his su])))ena and is discharged at this time. 

Mr. KuNziG. I have no further witnesses Mr. Chairman to call before 
this committee. 

Mr. Lewis, you can sign the voucher. 

Mr. Velde. Mr. Lewis, you can sign your voucher here. 

]Mr. KuNziG. That is perfectly all right. You can sign your voucher 
here. 

Mr. Velde. During the past 2 days this subconnnittee of the House 
Committee on TTn-American Activities has held hearings in Portland, 
Oreg., to publicy ascertain the efforts and success of Communist infil- 
tration into the Northwest area of the I"'^nited States, particidarly in 
this city of Poi-tland. Oreg. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6723 

During the course of this hearing the subcommittee has had the 
benefit of the testimony of Mr. Homer Owen, Mrs. Barbara Hartle, and 
Mr. Robert Canon. Mrs. Barbara Hartle was one of the first witnesses 
to appear here yesterday and gave a very clear ])icture of the Com- 
munist infiltration in the Northwest area. Mrs. Barbara Hartle was 
a witness we brought down here from Seattle yesterday in the custody 
of the United States marshal, as she had been convicted of a violation 
of the Smith Act, and was one of the Smith Act defendants tried in 
Seattle recently. 

Her testimony, in my opinion, indicated very clearly that there is 
a hard core of the Communist Party operating in the Northwest area 
of the United States. Her testimony further indicated that there is 
a hard core of the Communist Party operating here in the State of 
Oregon. 

Mr. Homer Owen, Mr. Robert Canon, both gave us a great deal of 
information about the techniques of the Communist Party, the mem- 
bership of the Communist Party, during their membership in that 
party. 

The testimony of these individuals has added materially to the 
information which the committee is directed to secure for the Con- 
gress of the United States. 

The committee has also had 14 other witnesses who, if they had so 
chosen, could have also assisted the Congress and thereby the people 
of the United States. I do not want to make any claim that because 
a person refuses to answer questions upon constitutional grounds that 
he is a Communist. I feel, however, that the people attending the 
hearings here, and watching and listening to it, may draw their own 
conclusions as to the present loyalty of such people. 

I do want to, on behalf of Mr. Frazier and myself and the other 
members of the committee who are not here, express my appreciation, 
the committee's appreciation, to the very fine people of this city for 
their courtesy and cooperation. Especially would I like to thank 
Judge Claude McColloch for the use of this lovely courtroom and 
all of his staff and assistants, also to thank United States Marshal 
Harold Sexton and his fine staff for the assistance in investigation 
and for maintaining order in the hearing room. 

I want to say to the physical audience present today that we have 
had no outbreaks from the audience. For that the Chair and the com- 
mittee is appreciative. 

And then to the Portland city police, particularly Capt. Bill Brown 
and Detective Bob Beaubelle. They have helped us materially m 
investigative work and they have assisted our staff in all ways possible 
and have, in addition to that, provided members of the committee and 
staff of the committee with transportation here and there through- 
out the city while we have been here, and I do want to thank you very 

nmch. rri -Tk 

And I also want to express my appreciation to Sheriff Terry D. 
Schrunk. It seems that Terry had the fortune, or the misfortune, 
to be in the Navy with my older brother and we were very happy to 
meet here in Portland and visit awhile. 



6724 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Do you have anything further, Mr. Frazier, to mention ? 

Mr. Frazier. Well, Mr. Chairman, I just want to join with you 
and thank the people of Portland for the very cordial reception and 
for their cooperation while the committee was here. 

Mr. Velde. With that, the committee will stand in adjournment 
until further call of the Chair. 

(Whereupon at 4 : 10 p. m., June 19, 1954 the committee adjourned 
subject to call of the Chair.) 



INDEX TO PART 10 



Individuals 

Page 

Beaiibelle, Bob 6723 

Berrv, Bill 6675 

Bolte, Charles 6671 

Browder, Earl 6687 

Brown, Bill 6697, 6723 

Canon, Robert Wishart 6659,6668-6698 (testimony), 6709, 6723 

Canon, Mrs. Robert Wishart 6680, 6684, 6709 

Clark, Tom 6677 

Collins, James V 6701-6709 

Eisler, Gerhart 6676 

Fee, James Alger 6716,6719 

Fitzgerald, Kenneth 6659, 6673, 6674, 6679, 6684 

Gill, Spencer 6679,6680,6699,6707-6709 (testimony) 

Gill, Mrs. Spencer 6679, 6680, 6699 

Goodman, Irvin 6676, 6716-6720 

Greg2, Donnelly David 6713-6715 (testimony) 

Haller, Mark 6680, 6681, 6683 

Hartle, Barbara 6696, 6723 

Lapham, David B 6711-6713 (testimony) 

Lenske, Reuben 6665-6668 

Lent, Berkeley 6709-6711, 6713-6715 

Levenson, Leo 6657-6665 

Lewis, William Earle 6720-6724 (testimony) 

Loring, Michael (Mike) 6659,6689 

MacNaughton. Mr 6687 

Markson, Sam 6709-6711 (testimony) 

Marsak, Leonard 6701-6707 (testimony) 

McColloch, Claude 6723 

Moore, Stanley 6680, 6699, 6709 

Moore, Thomas G 6657-6661 (testimony), 6698, 6691 

Morgan, Howard 6692, 6693 

Nollsch, Dallas E 6688 

Owen, Homer 6659, 

6674, 6679, 6681, 6682, 6684, 6687. 6689-6692, 6694, 6695, 6703, 6723 

Patterson, Frank V 6661-6665 (testimony), 6678, 6679, 6693 

Payne, Earl 6677-6680, 6684, 6686, 6693, 6697 

Payne. Rose (Mrs. Earl Payne) 6680,6697 

Peterson, Nels 6720-6724 

Reynolds, Lloyd 6680,6688,6691,6698-6701 (testimony), 6709 

Reynolds, Mrs. Lloyd 6680,6709 

Roosevelt. Franklin 6671, 6696 

Rnsso, Michael 6689 

Schrunk, Terry D 6723 

Simpson, Herbert 6665-6668 ( testimony ), 6684 

Simpson, Mrs. Herbert 6685 

Tanner, Kneland Clark 6698-6701,6711-6713 

Vanier, Kingsley 6688 

Wallace, Henry A 6686 

Wollam, Donald M 6675,6676,6715-6720 (testimony) 



ii INDEX 

Okganizations 

Page 

American Civil Liberties Union : B676 

American Legion, Department of Oregon 6688 

American Veterans' Committee 6671, 6677, 6678, 6682, 6686 

Amvets 6688 

Civil Rights Congress 6675-6677 

Civil Rights Congress, Oregon 6675 

Communist Party : 

Negro Commission 6709 

Oregon 6663, 6667, 6677, 6682, 6684, 6685, 6710 

District 11 Committee 6719 

John Reed Club 6681, 6690, 6712, 6715, 6721 

Professional Club 6690, 6709 

State Legislative Committee 6661 

Portland : 

Henry Winston Club 6715 

Professional Club 6679 

Compton Junior College 6714 

Cornell University 6701-6703 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 6663, 6681, 6687, 6689, 6704, 6705 

Independent Citizens' Committee of the Arts, Sciences, and Professions 6671 

Independent Progressive Party 6559, 6663, 6671-6674, 6686. 6687, 6689, 6692 

Oregon 6663, 6689, 6722 

Portland 6659 

Mitchell Bros. Truck Lines, Portland, Oreg 6721 

Multnomah County Public Welfare Commission 6712 

Northwestern College of Law 6662 

Oregon Agricultural College 6699 

Oregon State College 6699 

Reed College 6669, 6672, 6679-6682, 

6687, 6689-6691, 6697, 6699-6701, 6703, 6712, 6714, 6715, 6721, 6722 

Supreme Court, State of Oregon 6662 

Supreme Court of the United States 6705, 6718 

United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics 6669 

University of Colorado 6669 

University of Oregon 6699 

University of Washington 6662 

Url)an League 6670, 6671, 6675 

Veterans' Administration 6669, 6690 

Veterans of Foreign Wars 6688 

Worcester College, Ohio 66(>9 

Young Democrats, Oregon 6672, 6673, 6693 



o 



INVESTIGATION OF COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA— Part 11 
(APPENDIX) 



HEARINGS 



BEFORE THE 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIYES 



EIGHTY-THIED CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



APPENDIX TO HEARINGS 



JUNE 14-19, 1954 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 
INCLUDING INDEX 




UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
4K069 WASHINGTON : 1954 



M 



Boston Public Library 
Superintendent of Documents 

OCT 2 7 1954 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

United States House of Representatives 

HAROLD H. VELDE. Illinois, Chairman 
BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania 

DONALD L. JACKSON, California MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri 

KIT CLARDY, Michigan CLYDE DOYLE, California 

GORDON H. SCHERER, Ohio JAMES B. FRAZIER, Jr., Tennessee 

Robert L. Kdnzig, Counsel 

Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., Counsel 

Thomas W. Beale, Sr., Chief Clerk 

Raphael I. Nixon, Director of Research 

CODRTNEY E. Owens, Chief Investigator 



Public Law 601, 79th Congress 

The legislation under wliicli the House Committee on Un-American 
Activities operates is Public Law 601, T9th Congress [1946], chapter 
753, 2d session, which provides : 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
of America, in Congress assembled, * * * 

PART 2— RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

Rule X 

SEC. 121. STANDING COMMITTEES 
* * ^ i^ * * ^ 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 

^ 4: H: « « * * 

(q) (1) Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(A) Un-American activities. 

(2) Tlie Committee on Un-American Activities, as a vphole or by subcom- 
mittee, is autliorized to malie from time to time investigations of (i) tlie extent, 
character, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(ii) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American 
propaganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin 
and attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Con- 
stitution, and (iii) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress 
in any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such inves- 
tigation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such 
times and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, 
has recessed, or has adtourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person 
designated by any such chairman or member. 

HI 



RULES ADOPTED TO THE 83d CONGRESS 

House Resolution 5, January 3, 1953 

******* 

Rule X 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

1. There shall be elected by the House, at the commencemeut of each Congress, 
the following standing committees : 

******* 
(q) Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 
******* 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 
******* 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(a) Un-American activities. 

(b) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommittee, 
is authorized to make from time to time, investigations of (1) the extent, char- 
acter, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propa- 
ganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and 
attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitu- 
tion, and (3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress 
in any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such times 
and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, has 
recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance of 
such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by such chairman, and may be served by any jjerson desig- 
nated by any such chairman or member. 

IV 



APPENDIX 

During the hearings conducted in Seattle, Wash., the following 
communications were received by the committee and were read into 
and ordered to be made a part of the record : 

Mimeographed Memorandum to Local 300 Members 

This is to let you know that I have been subpenaed to appear before the House 
Un-American Activities Committee, known as the Velde committee. 

As I see it, this is a bad committee because its chairman and leading mem- 
bers are hostile to union labor and to all progressive trends and people, especially 
those associated with the Democratic Party. 

Velde himself has recently introduced legislation in Congress for Government 
supervision of unions, which President George Meany of the A. F. of L. said 
would destroy all unions if enacted. 

It was Velde who subpenaed ex-President Truman to inquire into his Ameri- 
canism. Mr. Truman ignored the subpena. Unfortunately, I am unable to do so. 

It appears certain that Velde's interest in me relates to the time when I was 
business agent of the union. He will no doubt want to know which union mem- 
bers were associated with me in such things as the shop stewards system, control 
of the spray machine, the union paper Bulletin 300, and the fight for better 
conditions generally. 

In this way he could establish a long list of members with "guilt by associa- 
tion," publicize their names, and subject them to blacklisting and persecution. 
And since some who associated with me in these things still hold office, he might 
charge that local 300 is now a "subversive" organization. 

Of course I cannot cooperate in such dirty work. I am not a stool pigeon and 
I am not going to become one. I should like to discuss my beliefs and activities 
frankly with the committee — and my Americanism, too. But its McCarthyite 
methods do not allow me to do so without harm to myself and others. 

My attorney advises me that if I answer any questions I must answer all related 
questions. He also advises that my only way to avoid becoming a stool pigeon 
without going to piison for perjury or contempt is to use the fifth amendment to 
the United States Constitution. 

This amendment was designed to protect people from unfair questioning by 
Government bodies. I have no choice but to claim this protection. 

Since I am able to reach only a few members with this statement, I hope you 
will explain my position to as many as you can. 
Sincerely, 

Eddie Friel. 



Seattle, Wash., June 16, 1954- 
House Un-American Activities Committee : 

During the testimony of Mrs. Barbara Hartle yesterday, she identified as a 
member of the Communist Party one Mary Salvus. This person should not be 
confused with Mary Martha Salvus, the same spelling, who resides at 5561 
Phinney Avenue. 



Seattle, Wash., June 16, 195Jf. 
House Un-American Activities Committee : 

Please clarify that the Stan Henrickson mentioned in this morning's hear- 
ings is not Stanley W. Hendrickson of 6505 Beverly Lane, Everett, Wash. 

Stanley W. Hendrickson. 

6725 



6726 COMI^IUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Seattle, Wash., June 11, 195^. 
Velde Un-Amebican Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
George Bailey, locksmith, who lives on East Madison, and owner of Bailey's 
Rebuild, is not and never has been a member of the Communist Party and should 
not be confused with George Bailey, named by Mrs. Hartle. 

Geoegb W. Bailey. 



Seattle, Wash. 

To Whom It May Concern, 

TJn-American Committee, County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

I, Helen Bradley, at 1814 Southwest 98th Street, for over 20 years at White 
Center, wife of Campbell Miller Bradley. Please do not confuse me with the 
Helen Bradley, wife of Keith Bradley. 

Helen Margaret Bradley. 



Seattle, Wash., June 11, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash. 
Mr. Chairman : I, Pearl O. Castle, of West Seattle am not to be confused with 
the Pearl Castle named by Mrs. Hartle as being a Communist. Thanli you. 

Mrs. Pearl O. Castle, 

7512 28th Southwest. 



Seattle, Wash., June 11, 195Jf. 
Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Earl George named yesterday by Barbara Hartle not same as Earl W. George 
of 4806 East 71st, Seattle, who is loyal American citizen and proud of work your 
committee is doing rout the reds. 

Earl W. George. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 195^. 
Congressman H. H. Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
Bill Long was mentioned in your hearings Monday and because of the sim- 
ilarity of names I am being intimidated and I don't like it. I am known on the 
waterfront as Bill Laing. Would appreciate it if it would be made known that 
Bill Long is not Bill Laing. 

Bin Laing, 
65^2 23rd Avenue NE., Seattle. 



Richmond Bex\ch, Wash., Jtme 17, 195-'/. 
Hon. Harold H. Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
At a Tuesday session an unidentified "cannery workers' union" was named 
as a contributor to the Seattle Labor School. It would be appreciated if it was 
made clear to your committee and to the public that the union referred to is not 
to be confused with any cannery union affiliated with the International Bvother- 
hood of Teamsters. 

Russell Gallagher, 
Secretary, Northwest Council of Food Process Workers. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6727 

Seattle, Wash., June 11, 1954- 
Committee on Un-Amebican Activities, 

Care Hearing, Comity-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
I wish to make it very clear to the committee that my father, Henry A. Shane, 
a marine eimineer with Libby, McNeill & Liltby, residing at 9410 3t)th SW., is not 
the Henry Shain named in the hearing, a druggist. 

Mrs. a. J. Shane and Son. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 195 Jt. 

House Un-Amebican Activities Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Robert Becker mentioned this morning is not the Robert R. Becker, of 10833 

Fourth Place SW. 

Robeet R. Becker. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle Wash.: 
To avoid any misunderstanding, we wish to state that the Joseph Butter- 
worth mentioned this morning during your hearing has no connection of any 
kind either through relationship or association, with this firm or its owners. 
We further wish to highly commend your committee for its efforts to bring into 
the open any or all persons disloyal to the United States Government. 

E. R. Buttebworth &, Sons. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954- 
Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle: 

I wish to make it very clear that the R. Furnish, mentioned by Mrs. Hartle 
in her testimony of June 18, has no connection whatever with Ronald Archer 
Furnish, whose residence address is 12050 56th Place, South Seattle, Wash. 

R. Archer Fubnish. 



Vashon, Wash., June 16, 1954. 
Committee on Un-Amebican Activities, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash. 
Gentlemen : I have suffered for years at alleged funny remarks concerning 
affiliation with the Communist Party owing to the fact that my name happens 
to be Henry Huff. 

I am asking that when that name goes out over the air, you pin-point it with 
the middle initial "P.," which in this case does not stand for patriot. 

I can assure your committee that your efforts at ferreting out subversives in 
our country are most heartily endorsed by 
Yours sincerely, 

Henry S. Huff, Route 1, Biloxi Road. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 

Attention: Congressman Jackson, Chairman, 
402 County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
The name Herb Johnson was submitted to your committee by Mrs. Hartle 
as being a Communist. So that there will be no confusion in the minds of the 
public, I wish that this name would not be confused with mine, which is identi- 
cal, and will you state, for identification purposes, that I, Herb Johnson, am 
an automobile salesman employed by the Totem Pontiac Co., and am not and 
have never been connected with the Communist Party or any of its multifarious 
phoney fronts, and wish to compliment your committee on the excellent work 

you are doing. 

Herb Johnson. 



6728 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954- 
Vflde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Dear Siks : I wish to state tliat I am not the Ethel ^ mentioned in yesterday's 
hearings. I have never in any way had connections with the Communist Party. 
My address is 911 West 65th. 

Ethel May Kkaemek. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
ELaisgi.d H. Velde, 

Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

As I operate a resort and it might prove injurious in the south King County 
district and it might prove injurious to my business, I would appreciate it if 
you would publicly announce that the George Russell of Lake Edge Resort on 
Steel Lake is not the George Russell accused by Barbara Hartle. 

George F. Russell. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 19.5J{. 
Senator Jackson, 

Ln-American Activities, 

Room 402, County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Please announce that the Herb E. Zobrist Co. and family of Seattle is in no 
way connected with the John Zobrist appearing before the committee. 

Herb E. Zobrist. 



June 18, 1954. 
Hon. Harold H. Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle Wash. 

Dear Sirs : I am a former member of the Communist Party in this district 
for 10 years. I left the Communist Party in June of 1953, after giving the mat- 
ter careful consideration for a period of more than 2 years. When the leader- 
ship of the Communist I'arty went underground, I was puzzled at their tactics 
and began to lose confidence. At that time I was out of the center of Communist 
Party activity and had lots of time to think and look at both sides. 

For many years I sincerely believed that socialism was inevitable and that 
the Communist Party was necessary to lead the workers on the correct path, that 
is to be prepared to overthrow this Government by force and violence if the 
capitalist class should resist. By getting away from the day-to-day haranguing 
of the Communist Party and through a most disgusting experience in an organ- 
ization in my community, I began to realize how completely my thinking had 
been dominated by the Communist Party. 

In October of 1949 I helped organize the Farmers' Union in the Maple Valley- 
Hobart area. I was elected secretary. We had a very fine organization for a 
year or more, until the Communist Party instructed the comrades in the Farm- 
ers' Union to carry out a campaign against the war in Korea. When a resolu- 
tion was presented in a Farmers' Union meeting opposing the war in Korea, the 
meeting was completely disrupted. There were 35 members in attendance, five 
or six of whom were Communists. The non-Communists immediately recog- 
nized this action as Commuiust tactics. Some members walked out of the 
meeting, others stayed and fought the resolution. We were never able to get 
any sizable attendance at a Farmer's Union meeting again in this area. I was 
thoroughly disgusted with the Communist Party for this action, but hesitated 
to criticize them at the time, as I knew the answer would be that we hadn't 
worked properly with the I'^arniers' Union nioinhers. They weren't advanced 
to the point that they could understand the Communists' policy on the war in 
Korea. I began to realize how often these tactics had been used in other 
organizations in my past experience in the Communist Party, such as trade 
uni(ms, N. A. A. C. P., etc. 

My eyes oj)ened as to why the Communist Party tries to dominate every organ- 
ization of the working people, not to help the workers, but in order to be able to 
control them in the event of a revolution, and I was convinced that their goal 



^ An Individual named Ethel Kramer was mentioned. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6729 

is to force this revolution to come about. I lost all desire to criticize the Com- 
munist Party for their tactics. I only wanted to get away from it. This was 
a difficult decision since I had so many friends and acquaintances in the Com- 
munist Party, whom I lilve personally. When I seriously began shaking off Com- 
munist domination in my thinking and looking at issues from all viewpoints, I 
became aware that the vast majority of workers of all races want to maintain 
our present form of government and find peaceful, intelligent means of airing 
their grievances, and I realized that that was what I wanted, too. 

In April of 19.53 I voluntarily went to the office of the Federal Bureau of In- 
vestigation to make available to them any information I had regarding the Com- 
munist Party's activities in this district. 

I have known Mrs. Hartle since about 1938. From about 1942 to 1949 I worked 
closely with her in many campaigns of the Communist Party. I wish to commend 
this committee very highly for the work they are doing for my country and extend 
my deepest congratulations to Mrs. Hartle for the courageous stand she is taking, 
and concur wholeheartedly in her testimony on the strategy and tactics of the 
Communist Party. 

I am sorry I am unable to attend this hearing due to responsibilities on my 
job. Therefore I have taken this means to express my feelings. 
Very sincerely yours, 

Lois Brookway Blakes, 

Maple Valley, Wash. 



Seattle, Wash,, June 18, 1954. 
Velde Committee. 

County-City Building, Seattle. 

Dear Sib : I wish to advise you that the Victor Case mentioned in Mrs. Hartle's 
testimony today, June 18, is not Victor Ray Cass residing 1804 North 157th. 
My name is often mispronounced and spelled that way. 

Also wish to commend you on the good you are doing here. 

Victor Rat Cass. 



Bellevxje, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
Police Detective John Hoberg, 

For the Un-American Actitnties Committee, 

Identification Seattle Police Department, Seattle, Wash. 
My legal name is Elizabeth E. Collins but am known as Betty Collins. I am 
married to a Seattle attorney Leonard Collins, and we reside at 8429 Northeast 
7th, Bellevue, Wash. I am not the Betty Collins listed by Mrs. Hartle in recent 
testimony as being a Communist. 

Elizabeth Collins. 



Message received by the committee June 19, 1954 : 

Dr. Richard L. Nelson of 1616 West 185th Street, office in the North Gate 
Building is not the Dr. Richard L. Nelson of Kirkland, named by Barbara Hartle. 



Renton, Wash., June 19, 1954 
Dear Sirs : Would you please let it be known publicly that the Hazel McCan- 
non in the testimony of Mrs. Hartle is not the Hazel McKenuon residing at 8977 
147th Street, Renton, Wash., P. O. 568, due to the similarity of the last name 
and the fact many people do not know the spelling of my last name. Thanking 
you for the good work you have done in this State. 
Tours truly. 

Hazel A. McKennon, 

Renton, Wash. 

Message received by committee June 19, 1954: 

J. W. Bitterman, 116 12th North, L. S. Bitterman Co., April 23, 1914, Jack A. 
Bitterman, 10611 39th SW, L. S. Bitterman Co., Nathan J. Bitterman, 116 15th 
North, Lew S. Bitterman, 8420 13th SW. 

I would like to have these names clarified in regard to the Velde committee 
hearings. They all work at L. S. Bitterman Co. 

48069—54 — pt. 11 2 



6730 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

To Whom It Mat Concern ; 

Identical name : Please clarify name of Earl Eugene Payne, which is my name. 
I am not Earl Payne given by committee. I was born in Denver, Colo., year 1905, 
graduated from West Denver High. I came to Seattle in 1936. I live at 1302 
Yesler, apartment 35. Have lived here since 1949. I work for Al's Lucky Hour 
Tavern as a bartender. Have been there since 1943, at 1315 Yesler. I know 
nothing of Earl Payne that is claimed to be Communist. 



Thank you, kindly. 



Eabi, E. Payne. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Congressman Donald Jackson, 

Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, Seattle, Wash.: 
Rush. Important. Reply Requested. 

Am informed a name similar to mine has been mentioned several times on your 
show. Wish to inform you I am not the party mentioned. Request you announce 
same on your show. Am strongly protesting the indiscriminate use of names 
similar to mine without proper clarification and hereby advise. I intend to refer 
the matter to my attorneys for possible legal action if there are any further uses 
of name similar to mine on your show without proper identification of said names. 

Ralph B. Hall, 
Owner and Operator of Hall's Music Co., 

2722 East 84th Street, Tacoma, Wash. 



EvEEETT, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Chairman of the Un-American Activities, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
This Ray Campbell is not nor ever has been a member of the Communist Party. 
Has lived in Everett 50 years and member of American Legion. Congratulations 
for your fine work. 

Richard Raymond Campbell. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954- 
Un-American Activities Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Have at various times been mistaken for William K. Dobbins, alleged Com- 
munist. Wish to state for the record there is no relationship whatsoever and I 
have no communistic sympathies whatsoever. 

Willard S. Dobbins. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle: 

Mrs. Hartle named Emma Harman and Elmer Harman of Seattle last Thursday 
as members of the Communist Party. However, their names were misspelled in 
the newspaper which gave their names as Emma and Elmer Herman. This has 
embarrassed and shamed me as my name is Elmer Herman of Seattle. Hope 
you will clarify. 

Elmer Herman. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Chairman Velde, 

House Un-American Committee, County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Wish to have it publicly announced that the Gus Carlson named by Mrs. Hartle 
is not the Gus J. Carlson residing 15022 12th Avenue NE. Congratulations on 
the committee's good work. 

Gus J. Carlson. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6731 

Seattle, Wash., July 19, 1954- 
Chairman Jackson, 

House Un-American Activities, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

The Ralph E. Hall mentioned in youv hearings is not to be confused with 
the Ralph E. Hall of Seattle Fire Department, residing at 3255 44th SW. 

Ralph E. Haix. 



Kingston, Wash., June 19, 195^. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle: 

This is to inform the committee that I, Raymond David Glover of Kingston, 
Wash., am no relation to the Ray Glover of Enumclaw. Wash., identified by Mrs. 
Hartle. I am a retired salesman of the Graybar Electric Co., a member of 
American Legion Post No. 1, also the Masonic Lodge and a Shriner. Thanks 
to the committee for the fine vpork they are doing. 

Ray Glovek. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash. : 
I want it clearly understood I am not the man with the same name as Capt. 
Elmer Strom mentioned in the hearing. We are annoyed with his phone calls 
as he has a nonpublished telephone number. 

Elmer Strom, ^510 20th NE^ 



Bellingham, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
House Un-American Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Gentlemen : There is no connection between Algot Starr and the W. W. 
Starr, Jr. and Sr., at Bellingham. 

W. W. Starr. 



Wilkeson, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

I am not a Negro and the general I referred to was in 9th Cavalry, United 
States Army. He was a Negro and he became a major general in the United 
States Army. I was under supervision in Peekskill, N. Y. Also know his son 
who also was Negro. He graduated from West Point. 

A. K. Hawkesworth. 



The Marine Cooks and Stewards, AFL, goes on record in supporting the 
committee's meeting in Seattle. We look forward to cooperating to the fullest 
extent in any manner that we might be called upon. We deplore individuals 
who use organized labor as a foothold to further the Communist conspiracy. Rest 
assured that Mr. Kirkwood, and his illiterate language, does not speak for the 
rank and file in the maritime industries. 

James Willoughby, 
Port Agent, Marine CooTcs and Stewards, A. F. of L. 



Mr. Harold H. Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Dear Sir : At a special meeting of more than 700 members of the Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific Marine Cooks and Stewards, AFL, and the Seafarers' Inter- 
national of North America, Atlantic and Gulf, held at 3 p. m. today, went on 
record unanimously in a standing vote to endorse and support the action of 



6732 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

your committee in this hearing ; and, further, all witnesses invoking the fifth 
amendment be considered supporters of the communistic element. 

Our membership will support your committee wholeheartedly, and we further 
denounce the filthy rag that was distributed by one Mr. Kirkwood. 

Our unions have always been in favor of your committee and are 100 percent 
Americans. 

It has been a long struggle made by our unions to get rid of all the ratty 
communistic elements off the waterfront. 
Very truly yours, 

Maxie Weisbarth, 
Business Agent, Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 



Seattle, Wash., June 15, 1954. 
Representative Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

The Seattle branch of the National Maritime Union, CIO, wishes to go on 
record in favor of the hearings being conducted by your committee. The mem- 
bership of the NMU years ago recognized the Communists for whar they are 
and passed resolutions which bar Communists from holding membership in 
our organization. Ninety-five members present at a meeting voted unanimously 
that this telegram be sent to your committee. 

Alvin Hoqan, Agent, 

A. B. Stallings, Chairman, 

Jules Rubin, Recording Secretary. 



Seattle, Wash., June 15, 1954. 
Haeold H. Velde, 

Chairman, Un-American Committee, 
Seattle, Wash., Olympic Hotel: 

Our aflSliates in the Fisheries and Allied Crafts in Alaska and Puget Sound 
endorse the intent of your committee in exposing un-Americans, and our mem- 
bership will support your committee wholeheartedly. 
Very truly yours, 

Ted Nakkerud, 
Representative, Seafarers' International Union of North America. 



Building Service Empix)yees' 

iNTEaiNATIONAL UNION LoCAL No. 6, A. F. OF L. 

Hon. Harold H. Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee. 

Dear Sir : A witness who testified before your committee yesterday identi- 
fied as Communists in the mid-1940's five former officers of the Building Service 
Employees' International Union, local G, and. accordiui? to a press report, stated 
that this union was "for a long time Communist-dominated." 

This testimony we feel left the false impression that local 6 may still be 
officered by Communists or former Communists. In fairness to the union's 
present officers and its membership, this false impression should be corrected. 

In 1947 William L. McFetridge, the general president of this international 
union, following a trial which was conducted in this city, removed from office the 
Individuals identified by the witness as Communists. Local 6 was thereupon 
taken Into trusteeship and placed under new leadership. None of the former 
officers have ever since had any connection whatever with this union. 

It niiu'ht be of interest to your committe and to the public that subversives are 
barred from membership in this union. 

The constitution of the international provides : 

"No member or officer of the Communist Party or any subversive organization, 
nor any person who subscribes to their doctrines, shall be allowed to hold mem- 
bership or office or be admitted to membership in any local union of this inter- 
national organization. It is not necessary that the individual charged with 
membership in the Communist Party or any subversive organization admit his 
membership in said party or organization. If the local executive board, by 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6733 

majority vote, shall find from the evidence presented that the individual is a 
member of the Communist Party or of any other subversive organization, or sub- 
scribes to their doctrines, the local executive board shall expel such individual 
after he has obtained a proper trial." 

May we assure your committee, the membership of local 6 and the public gen- 
erally that this provision of the constitution has been and will be stx'ictly enforced. 

Respectfully yours, 

Aethub T. Hare, 

President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 16, 1954. 

Harold Velde, 

Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash. 
C. H. (Harvey) Jackins was suspended from Local Union 46, International 
Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, on January 13, 1948. He refused to sign a 
statement before our executive board that he was not a member of the Commu- 
nist Party. The executive board further recommended to our international 
president that C. H. Jackins be expelled from the International Brotherhood of 
Electrical Workers. This organization does not tolerate our members belonging 
to subversive organizations and any assistance desired by your committee will be 
granted with our utmost cooperation. 

L. E. Thomas, 
Business Manager, local 46, 
International Brotherhood of Electrical Worlcers. 



Seattle, Wash., June 16, 1954. 
Hon. Harold Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash. 

Dear Congressman : Without any attempt on my part to pass on the guilt or 
innocence of the members of our union who were named in testimony given before 
your committee as being or having been members of the Communist Party, I wish 
to assure you the members of your committee and the people of our community 
that by far the vast majority of our 5,000 members are good, loyal American 
citizens. Our union does not condone membership in the Communist Party nor 
does it approve of any communistic activity on the part of any of our members. 

John A. Warmell, 

President, local 19, 
International Association of Machinists. 



Seattle, Wash., June 16, 1954- 
Hon. Harold Velde, 

House Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

In the testimony by Mrs. Hartle, former Communist Party leader, Pacific 
Noi'thwest, this a. m. one Charles Nichols was identified as being an oflScial of 
Marine Cooks and Stewards Union. Please be advised that the late Charles 
Nichols was port agent for the National Union of Marine Cooks and Stewards 
Independent. You perhaps recall that the National Union Marine Cooks and 
Stewards Independent was expelled from the CIO as Communist-dominated 
several years ago. That organization now known as International Longshore- 
men and AVarehousemen's Union, Stewards Department Organizing Committee 
and is headed by Harry Bridges. This renaming was calculated in furtherance 
of the conspiracy to thwart the justice of the courts in order to evade the pay- 
ment of $495,000 which awarded as damages to 96 members of the Marine Cooks 
and Stewards, A. P. of L. for libelous and slanderous blacklisting. 

On behalf of the members of the Marine Cooks and Stewards, A. P. of L., 
I wish to again congratulate your committee for a job well done. We wish fur- 
ther to take this opportunity as members of a loyal American trade union to 
congratulate you and thank Mrs. Hartle for her assistance in her testimony in 



6734 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

rendering to our organization in its continuing drive to eliminate communism 
from tlie maritime industry. 
Cordially, 

James O. Willoughby, 
Port Agent, Marine Cooks and Stewards. 



Seattle, Wash., Jiine 16, 1954- 
Congressman Harold Velde, 

Chairtnan, House Un-American Activities, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Dear Sib : Referring to testimony by Barbara Hartle regarding Pacific North- 
west Labor School, our organization, upon recognizing the presence of Com- 
munist influence in that school, immediately, on our own initiative, withdrew 
from the school early in 1947. We are in complete sympathy with the objectives 
sought by your committee. 

The ofiicers and executive board members, Division 587, Streetcarmen's Union. 



Seattle, Wash., June 16, 1954. 
Chairman Velde, 

Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

The oflScers and members of Bartenders Union, local No. 487, endorse the 
hearings of the Un-American Activities Committee which are now in progress. 

Babtendebs Union, 
Tommy Bibby. 



Seattle, Wash., June 16, 1954. 
Chairman Harold Velde, 

Un-American Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 
Speaking for the entire membership of the Bering Sea Fishermen's Union, we 
commend you for holding these hearings in Seattle in order to dig out the com- 
rats and their commie dingbats. Keep up the good work. You may count on our 
complete cooperation. 

R. H. WiNKLEE, 

Bering Sea Fishermen's Union, 
Affiliated with Seafarers' International Union, A. F. of L. 



Renton, Wash., June 16, 1954. 

Hon. Harold H. Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
We wish to commend your committee on its work in ferreting out the Com- 
munist elements in our area. We wish to express our appreciation for your kind 
reception of our representative at your hearing yesterday. 

James E. Hurner, 
President, Renton Junior Chamber of Commerce. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Hon. Harold Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle: 
Please be advised that the individual identified as Edward Friel, in his appear- 
ance before your committee on Tuesday, June 15, 1954, as a member and former 
business agent of Painters Local Union 300, was formally charged in June of 
1947 and convicted of Communist activities by Painters Local Union 300. Con- 
tained in the penalty, among other things, as result of this conviction, was denied 
the right to ever represent the painters union in any way in the future. 

Painters Council No. 5, 
L. E. Osborne, President, 
Tom Fullerton, Secretary, 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6735 

Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
House Committee on Un-American Activities, 
Room 402, County-City Building, 
Seattle, Wash. 
Gentlemen : We, the members of the Townsend organization, have been both- 
ered with inquiries as to information wanting to know if we are connected with 
the Washington State Pension Union. The Townsend organization is in no way 
connected with the pension union and never has been. We also at this time want 
to commend you on your activities in uncovering Communist activities in our 
grand country. 

Sincerely yours, ^ 

Washington State Council of Townsend Clubs, 

Frank R. Britton, 

Member of Washington State Council. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Hon. Harold H. Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 

County Commissioner's Chambers, County-City Building, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
The Aero Mechanics, district lodge 751 International Association of Ma- 
chinists, AFL, wholeheartedly endorses the important work and principles of 
your committee in its efforts to combat the Communist conspiracy in our Nation, 
Our union has gone on record as far back as 1924 in opposition to the philosophy 
of communism, for our members long have recognized the dangers of that 
ideology. Because our membership comprise the working force at Boeing Air- 
plane Co., which long has been one of the prime producers of aircraft for our 
Nation's defense, we realize that our organization could be a constant target for 
infiltration. We have met this challenge by an unrelenting search, exposure and 
expulsion of any and all persons advocating or encouraging communism, and 
the record shows that we have been successful in our vigilance. We believe it 
is the duty and obligation of all American citizens to support the Congress of 
the United States and your committee in exposing Communist conspiracy where- 
ever it might arise. Congratulations to your committee on the fair and impartial 
manner in which your hearings are being conducted. 

Harold J. Gibson, 

President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 16, 1954. 
Chairman Harold Velde, 

House Subcommittee on Un-American Activities, 

Hearivff Room, County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Dear Mr. Chairman : The majority of men handling microphones for public 
broadcasting of your hearings belong to the Seattle local of the American Fed- 
eration of Television and Radio Artists, as do most of the people who broadcast 
news of the hearings and perform other duties necessary to keep the public 
informed of the proceedings in a fair and unbiased manner. 

Not many years ago this local was confronted with the task of weeding out 
persons of questionable loyalty and affiliation. This we did after many difficult 
and unpleasant procedures. We therefore appreciate the problems confronting 
your organization. 

Therefore, Mr. Chairman, the members of the Seattle local of the American 
Federation of Television and Radio Artists wholeheartedly endorse and support 
your work in unearthing and bringing to light of public view those persons and 
elements which seek to undermine and destroy the Government of the United 
States or the American way of life. 

This message may be read into the oflScial record and disseminated publicly as 
you desire. 

Our sincere best wishes for the success of your organization. 
Respectfully, 

Pat Hayes, 
President, Seattle Local, American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. 



6736 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Seattle, Wash, June 17, 1954. 
Hon. Harold Velde, 

United States Congressman, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities, 

Vouutu-City Building, Seattle: 

You and the members of your committee are to be commended on great service 
you are doing in bringing to light the insidious propaganda and program of the 
Communist Party and exposing those whose activities and lip service are dedi- 
cated to the overthrow of our American form of government. 

Jaspee Reynolds, 
State Commander, the American Legion. 



Seattle, Wash., June 16, 1954. 
To : Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

At a regular meeting assembled this IGth day of June, the oflBcers and mem- 
bers of the University Post No. 11, the American Legion, extend to your com- 
mittee our sincere wishes for continued success of your program in exposing 
the Communists in this area and throughout the Nation. 

Dave Wood, 
Commander, University Post No. 11, American Legion. 



Seattle, Wash., June 16, 1954. 
To : Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle: 

At regular meeting assembled this 16th day of June, the ofl3cers and members 
of University Auxiliary No. 11, the American Legion, extend to your com- 
mittee our sincere wishes for continued success of your program in exposing the 
Communists in this area and throughout the Nation. 

Mrs. William Barkxey, President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Representative Velde, 

Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
The oflScers and delegates of the Americanization bureau wish to extend con- 
gratulations to your committee for the splendid work being done by you in 
exposing the work of communism. 

Clara Deaton, 

President, 
Virginia Mahnket, 

Recording Secretary, 
Ella Rauth, 

Junior Past President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Hon. Harold Velde, 

Chairman, House Committee, Un-American Activities, 
402 County-City Building, Seattle. 

Honorable Sir: It is my desire to herewith congratulate your committee on 
the service it is rendering the American people and to assure you that we as 
representatives of the transportation industry will neither condone nor tolerate 
un-Americanism in general and communism in particular in the railroad industry. 

A. Robert Eckberq, 
Local Chairman, Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, 

Union Pacific Railroad, Seattle. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6737 

Spokane, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Representative Harold H. Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee. 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

The officers and ex-board of Seattle Local No. 27, International Association 
of Fire Fighters, affiliated with the American Federation of Labor, for them- 
selves and individually on behalf of its membershii), advise that they are unalter- 
ably opposed to subversive or un-American activity in any form whatsoever. 

F. J. Arena, 

President. 
Axel Drugge, 
Secretary-Treasurer. 



International Union of Operating Engineers, 
Affiliated With American Federation of Labor, 

Local 302 and Branches A, B, C, and D, 

June 16, 1954. 
Hon. Harold H. Velde, 

Chairman, House Committee on Un-American Activities, 
County-City Building, Seattle. 

Mr. Chairman : My name is Jack McDonald, and I am business manager of 
Local 302 of the International Union of Operating Engineers, a position I have 
held for a period in excess of 20 years. 

I know that every word contained herein has the unqualified endorsement 
of the entire membership of this union which, at the present time, approxi- 
mates 5,000 members. 

We want you to know that we believe with all our hearts in the work you 
are doing. We hate Communists and the principles for which they stand and 
wish the record to show that we stand 100 percent behind your Un-American 
Activities Committee. 

While I have not personally attended the hearings, I have been following 
your work here through the medium of television, radio, and the press. On the 
basis thereof, I do have several comments to make which I wish to be made a 
part of the record also. 

Some witnesses who have appeared before your committee or who have been 
named to your committee as members of the Communist Party have been 
labeled "Labor leaders." With possibly 1 or 2 exceptions, those named have 
never been labor leaders, at least in the Seattle area, and the exceptions 
have been ousted from their union affiliations. Now I am sure it is neither 
your intent or purpose to leave the general public with the false impression 
that these witnesses or those named as Communists were or are labor leaders. 
A great majority of those heard or named who were members of a labor organ- 
ization may have been successful in gaining elections as delegates to central labor 
councils or other federations of local unions but certainly that distinction in 
nowise cloaks them with the generally accepted connotation of the term "Labor 
leaders." It is obvious that the creation of such an impression with the general 
public can only prove a great disservice to those in the area who are in basis 
and in fact labor leaders. We would suggest, therefore, that in this regard 
the record be made clear, and such erroneous impression will not then find its 
way into the daly press. 

Secondly, we should like to comment and make a part of the record the posi- 
tion unions find themselves in when it appears that a Communist has somehow 
gained membership in an organization. I think the committee well knows the 
provisions of the Taft-Hartley Act and the resultant problems confronting labor 
unions when they wish to relieve themselves of such members. One of the wit- 
nesses during the Seattle hearing has, I believe, instituted suit against a union 
who attempted to purge itself of his membership and stigma. We know you are 
not conducting these hearings relative to what pros and cons there may be with 
reference to the Taft-Hartley Act, but we call this particular point to your atten- 
tion in the hope that you will carry it back to the Congress of the United States 
with a recommendation that said act be amended to the end that legitimate labor 
unions will be provided with the weapons necessary to keep their houses free of 
Communist infiltration. 

48069—54 — pt. 11- 3 



6738 CORIMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

With all the good wishes for success in your endeavors that you may possibly 
wish for yourself, I remain, 



Respectfully yours. 



Jack McDonald, 
Business Manager, IJJOE, Local 302. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954, 

VeLDE COSfMITTEE, 

County Commissioner's Chambers, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Lake City Commercial Club highly commends committee's good work in expos- 
ing commuuistic activities in our city and in a truly democratic manner. 

Lake City Commercial Club. 



Renton, Wash. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

We, members of Local Machinists Union 751, employees of Boeing's Aircraft, 
department 631, second shift, tool grinding, Renton, Wash., wish to go on record 
that we wholeheartedly endorse and support the efforts of your committee ex- 
posing Communists and fellow travelers. 

Harold V. Wesseling, 

Union Committeeman. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954, 
Congressman Harold Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle: 

The officers and members of the Lumber and Saw Mill Workers Union, Local 
2519, A. F. of L., wishes to take this opportunity to express our appreciation to 
your committee in exposing those that would undermine our Couslitution and 
form of government. Rest assured that those members so exposed as Communists 
cannot remain members of this union as per the constitution and bylaws of this 
union. 

John M. Christen son. 
President, Luniher and Saw Mill Worke?s Union, A. F. of L. 



Steamship "Aleutian," Via KLB, Mackay Radio, 

Seattle, June 17, 1954. 
Representative Velde and Committee on Un-American Activities, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash. 

Gentlemen : Much success in your endeavors. We are behind you lOG percent. 

Marine Cooks anb Stewards, AFL, 

Steamship "Aleutian." 

Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Congressman Velde, 

Un-American Activities Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

As a visitor to Seattle, I heard the Rod warning whistle at noon on Wednes- 
day. It was not nearly as alarming as the testimony your committee is now 
hearing. Your line work, gentlemen, is the only bomb shelter that can save us. 

Madge Demmer, 
Southwest Florist Representative for Telegraph Delivery Service, Los 
Angeles, Calif. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6739 

Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954- 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wanh.: 
(Attention of Mr. Velde.) 
Local Union 1208, United Steelworkers of America, CIO, assembled in special 
meeting last evening, June 16, directed that a wire be sent to the committee of 
which you are chairman, commending it for the part it has played in helping to 
open the eyes of a lot of our own members, as well as the general public, to the 
communistic conspiracy which is a dangerous influence today right here in the 
State of Washington. We wish to offer any cooperation to the committee which 
it feels might further enlighten the public to state that the majority of the 
members of local 1208 are loyal trade union and true Americans who do not 
wish to be smeared by a few self-appointed leaders of any subversive organi- 
zation. 

We further commend your patience and forbearance to sit and listen to the 
same line which we in the trade-union movement have had to put up with before 
the United Steelworkers of America was founded right up to the present time, 
and as believers in the Constitution of the United States of America, which 
guarantees freedom of speech to all our members, also feel we have listened too 
long to these of the flfth amendment when it certainly appears they are not 
acting as true Americans should act if guilt were not present. 

United Steelworkers of America, Local Union 1208, 

Harry Nelson. Vice President. 

Johnson Massuco, Recording Secretary. 

L. Ferguson, Financial Secretary. 



Seattle, Wash., June 16, 1954. 
Chairman Velue. 

House Un-American Activities Committee. 

King County Courthouse. Seattle. Wash.: 
The Washington State CIO Council and its affiliates have for many years 
been engaged in a battle to eliminate the influences of the Communist Party and 
the members of the Communist Party from the affairs and business of CIO unions 
in the State of Washington. The Washington State CIO Council welcomes the 
help of your committee in exposing to the union membership and to the public 
at large the policies and internal workings of the Communist Party. The pro- 
ceedings of your committee plainly show to the public the magnitude of the 
task that our loyal membership has so courageously carried on to help to protect 
our heritage and our way of life against this subversive element. 

Harold Slatek, 
Secretary-Treasury, Washington State CIO Council. 



Olympia, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Chairman Velde, 

House Committee on Un-American Activities. 

Seattle, Wash.: 

The Washington State Townsend Council, representing 72 chapters in this 
State, comnieiul yonr coinmittee for Vdur effective work in the Pncitic North- 
west in exposing Communists and Communist Party activities. During your 
hearings references have been made to the Washington Pension Union and its 
activities among senior citizens. The Washington State Townsend Council wants 
the record to show that our organization and its officers have never participated 
in or associated with the Washington Pension Union. We do not approve of 
that organization's tactics or its leaderships. 

M. A. Yarboro, 
Legislative Director, Washington State Townsend Council. 



6740 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Velde COMMrrTEB, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

On behalf of 99 percent of the 96,000 residents of the West Seattle area, which 
includes Alki, may we congratulate the Velde committee for an outstanding pub- 
lic service which you are rendering our great city. 

West Seattle Commercial Club, 
Orlyn Haws, President. 
Ted Best, Secretary. 



Bellingham, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
House Un-Amebican Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

We wish to commend your committe for its aims and for the fairness it has 
demonstrated. As the city of Bellingham and the Democratic Party has been 
mentioned by some witnesses we wish to state from bitter experience we have 
learned that the Communists only infiltrate an organization they consider im- 
portant for the purpose of destroying it. Therefore we of the Democratic 
Party of Whatcom Coimty expelled all members suspected of Communist lean- 
ings over 6 years ago. 

F. F. Merrick. 
Chairman, Whatcom County Democratic Central Committee. 



Bellingham, Wash. 
Hon. Harold Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 

('are Federal Courthouse Hearing Room, Seattle, Wash.: 

Whatcom County Republican Club of over 550 members in monthly meeting 
by unanimous vote wishes to commend your committee for the notable work in 
exposing a hotbed of Communists, fellow travelers, and dupes in our Paoiflc 
Northwest. You can be assured that this work so ably done by your committee 
is welcomed by Republicans and all good Americans who have been worrying 
over this disgraceful situation. Keep up the good work. We are behind you. 

Whatcom County Republican Club, 
Barney Stewart, President. 



Bellingham, Wash., June 16, 1954. 
Hon Harold Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 

Care Federal Courthouse Hearing Room, Seattle, Wash.: 
Whatcom County Young Republicans meeting tonight commend your commit- 
tee for its untiring work in exposing Communist menace as an agency of Soviet 
aggression. We urge and support your continued effort maintaining, as always, 
the American traditions of fair play while overcoming the obstacles of organized 
subversives and fifth amendment Communists. Your efforts will continue to 
command the admiration and respect of our organization. 

Whatcom County Young Republicans Club, 
Robert W. Tesheea, President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Chairman of Hearing of Un-American Activities, 

Seattle, Wash.: 
The Women's Christian Temperance Union of western Washington wish to 
commend the investigation of un-American activities in our State. 

Women's Christian Temperance Union of Western Washington. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6741 

Washington State Fedeeation of Labob, 

Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954. 

Hon. Clyde Doyle, 

United States Congressman, 

Member, Un-American Activities Investigating Committee, 
Seattle, Wash. 

Dear Congressman Doyle : In order that the record may show that the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor has, over the years and on a worldwide basis, fought 
communism and other forms of dictatorship, I wish to request that you have 
placed in the record the following extracts from speeches by a few of our prom- 
inent statesmen who display a personal knowledge of our broad opposition. 

Presidential Candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower in an address to the 71st annual 
convention of the American Federation of Labor, Commodore Hotel, New York 
City, September 17, 1952 : "I want now to pay tribute to the magnificent work 
you have done in opposing communism and Communist influence among the 
working people in other countries." 

Lewis K. Gough, commander of the American Legion, in an address to the 71st 
annual convention of the American Federation of Labor, Commodore Hotel, New 
York City, September 17, 1952 : "When you moved against communism in your 
unions you did not do it by preaching more perfect unionism; you did it by 
throwing the Communists out." 

Presidential Candidate Adlai Stevenson in an address to the 71st Annual Con- 
vention of the American Federation of Labor, Commodore Hotel, New York City, 
September 22, 1952 : "I am not courting or embracing you when I applaud the job 
you have done rejecting the Communist World Federation of Trade Unions, 
pressing the case in the United Nations against forced labor in the Soviet Union, 
supporting free trade unions in Europe and Asia and in South America, helping 
build up popular resistance wherever the spiked wall of Russia throws its 
shadow over free men and women." 

Secretary of State John Foster Dulles in an address to the 72d Annual Con- 
vention of the American Federation of Labor, Jefferson Hotel, St. Louis, Mo., 
September 24, 1953 : "You have done more than any other single body to explode 
the Communist myth. You have not always received the oflBcial backing and 
support you deserve. Here at home you have striven, with much success, to 
make the American record one of which all of us can be proud. Also you have 
vigorously and successfully combatted the Communist menace on foreign fronts. 
In so doing, you have made a great contribution both to the glory of America and 
to the safety of America." 

Vice President Richard Nixon in an address to the 72d Annual Convention of 
the American Federation of Labor, Jefferson Hotel, St. Louis, Mo., September 
23, 1953 : "No institution in America — and I include our Government, our educa- 
tional institutions, and other organizations — has done a better job than the labor 
movement in removing Communists from positions that they hold in the labor 
movement, and I may say in that connection, the American Federation of Labor, 
to its credit, has been in the forefront of this fight." 

The A. F. of L. in the State of Washington has made a substantial contribution 
to this overall record established over the years, even before there were expensive 
traveling committees checking on subversive activities. Practically all of those 
with former A. F. of L. membership, who have been named in your deliberations, 
have been expelled years ago from our various A. F. of L. unions. 

There is no desire or intention on the part of the A. F. of L. to relax on their 
vigilance and the protection of American institutions. 

Thanking you in advance and with all good wishes, I remain. 
Sincerely, 

B. M. Weston, 
President, Washington State Federation of Lahor. 



KiRKLAND, Wash., June 18, 1954. 

Mb. Velde. House Un-American Activities Committee, 
402 County-City Building, Seattle, Wash. 

Congratulations to your committee on your fine work. 

American Legion Auxiliary, Kibkland, Wash., 
Janet Shepley, President. 



6742 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Marts\t;lle, Wash., June 18, 195h 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash. 

Gentlemen : The members of this unit wholeheartedly support you in the fine 
work you are doing and wish you continued success. 

Marysville Unit No. 178, American Legion Auxiliary. 



American Legion Post No. 78, 

Auburn, Wash., June 16, IdSJf. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash. 

Gentlkmkn: At the regular meeting of June 16, 1954, Auburn Post No. 78, 
American Legion, unanimously voted to write your committee and commend 
you for the excellent work you are doing, representing the people of the United 
States. 

We wish to conirrntnlate and thank you for the gentlemanly and fair manner 
you have used in conducting these hearings, against the abuse and evasions you 
have encountered through the whole investigation. 

As a veterans' organization we have been sickened by the thinly veiled at- 
tempts of the witnesses to hide behind the so-called patriotism and service 
experiences in the Armed Forces of the United States. 

Allow us at this time to state that their usage of these terms do not reflect 
the true meaning of the words — patriotism and pride in the service of the United 
States Armed Forces. 

We believe it to be obvious to any true American that only a Communist has 
any reason to hide behind the Constitution or otherwise evade the questions of 
your committee. 

Again may we offer our sincere thanks and any cooperation we may be able 

to give. 

T. B. Pollard, 
Adjutant Post No. 78. 
Robert Morse, 
Commander, Post No. 78. 



Seattle, Wash, June 17, 195 Jf. 
Committee on Un-American Activities, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

We, the Children of the American Revolution, wholeheartedly approve of the 
work your committee is doing to help expose communism in this city. 

Ada L. McCleary, 
Bruce Fiau, Secretary. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Houss Un-American AcnvmES Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

The executive committee of the 31st District Democratic Club, in special ses- 
sion tonight has unanimously voted commendation of your committee for the 
enlightened attitude and spirit of fairness displayed in the conduct of your 
current hearings. Our club, centered in the Nation's largest voting district, 
conducted a thorough housecleaning several years ago as our contribution to the 
integrity of the American political system. 

31ST District DE?^rocRATic Club, 

Jerry Hagan, President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 195Jf. 
VELnE Committee, 

County-City livilding, Seattle, Wash.: 

Wish to congratulate your committee on its fine work here in Seattle. If Dr. 
Keller is an Intellectual, then I am glad to be just a simple-minded American 
cab driver. Keep after them and I hope Joe doesn't go. 

My name is unimportant. 

B. J. L. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6743 

IssAQUAH, Wash., June 18, 1954. 

Un-American Activities Investigating Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

God keep you safe and in good health so as you can continue to help Him take 
care of the safety and security of thousands of little people like me. We need you. 

Minnie Russell Erickson. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 195^. 
House Committee on Un-American Activities, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash. 
Gentlemen : Fortson Thygensen Camp, United Spanish War Veterans, want 
to be numbered with all other patriotic organizations as wholeheartedly support- 
ing your efforts to rid the United States of Communists and all other similar 
un-American organizations. 

James Quam, Commander. 
Habey E. Hilton, Adjutant. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
Mr. Velde, Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash. 
Dear Sir : I have been a member of the Armed Forces for 26 years. I have 
been honorably retired from the United States Army. As far as discrimination 
is concerned we never had that in the United States Army. A sergeant that 
I know that tried the rank of major general. United States Army, and his son, 
graduated from West Point. A man is a man in the Army. 

I congratulate the committee on the work they are doing and wish you could 
go farther. 

Master Sergeant Hawkesworth (Retired). 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Hon. Donald L. Jackson, 

House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
Recognizing the menace of communism, the Highline Junior Chamber of Com- 
merce wish to go on record wholeheartedly supporting the work of the Velde 
committee. We would like to extend to the members of this committee our 
thanks and gratitude. If there is any way we young men of the south King 
County area can be of service, we stand ready to do everything in our power 
to help preserve the American way of life. 
Sincerely, 

Roy Moore, 
Chairman, Puilic Affairs Committee, 
Highline Junior Chamber of Commerce. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 18, 19.54. 
non. Harold H. Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 

Many of my friends and myself have been listening to your investigations and 
we certainly wish to commend and congratulate you and your committee on the 
manner in which you are conducting investigations. Further, we wish you all the 
Buccess in the world in your future investigations. 

S. J. Rice, 
Manager, Independent Order of Foresters. 



6744 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
Hon. Harold H. Velde, 

Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

The oflScers and members of local union 843 of the International Union of 
Operating Engineers, AFL, wish to commend your committee for the work it is 
doing. We would also like to advise you of our disgust of those who hide behind 
the Constitution of the United States of America while trying to tear it to pieces. 

John G. McCaxlum, President, 
RiCHAED Oldemab, Vicc President, 
M. A. Bakeb, Treasurer, 
Fred and Gay Finaoils, 
Secretary and Business Representative. 



PUYALLUP, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
Representative Harold H. Velde, 

Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 
House of Representatives, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

The fourth degree of the Knights of Columbus, Tacoma Assembly, wish to 
extend our congratulations for the excellent work of your committee in exposing 
subversive activities in the Pacific Northwest. We further congratulate each 
and every member of your committee in the excellent manner with which they 
conduct their inquiries, with men of this type doing their patriotic duty aU 
Americans can be justly proud. We know it is imperative that the work of this 
committee continue which is protecting the ideals for which our Republic was 
founded. 

Sincerely, 

R. J. Moreland, 
Faithful Navigator, 
Fourth Degree Knights of Columbus, Tacoma. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Representative Harold H. Ve^^de, 

Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 
House of Representatives, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

James Shields Assembly, Knights of Columbus, fourth degree, Seattle, Wash., 
extends congratulations to your committee for its expose of subversive activities 
in the Pacific Northwest. Your presence in Seattle and hearings you conducted 
here have enlightened the entire community and focussed its attention upon 
the evil menace of communism. We as the patriotic degree of our order oppose 
communism and every other group or force whose program is contrary to the 
ideals upon which this Republic was founded. We are proud, therefore, to sup- 
port you to the fullest in your commendable work of rooting out subversive 
persons and groups in the United States. It is our sincere hope that your pro- 
gram can be continued until every single person becomes familiar with the 
Un-American activities of the Communist Party. 

William Marpe:rt, 
Faithful Navigator. 



Seatfle, Wash., June 18, 1954- 
Hon. Donald L. Jackson, 

Acting Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

The entire Marine Cooks and Stewards, AFL membership on board the Steam- 
ship Denali go on record to support your committee's fine work 100 percent in 
exposing the Communists in this area. 

ViRGiii Rogers, 
MCS-AFL Delegate. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6745 

Seattle, Wash., June 18, 195-^. 

Velde House Committee on Un-Amekican Activities, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Municipal Employees' Union, Local 57, is heartily in accord with your work 
and wishes your continued success in your investigation of un-American 
activities. 

Ancil Rich, President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 195^. 
Hon. Congressman Jackson, 

Chairman of the House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 

As the head of the Approved Order of Redmen, Chief, Seattle Tribe No. 25 
and an American organization who feel proud of their congressional charter and 
of which was foimded in 1765 at Boston by Patrick Henry and the patriots who 
threw the tea into Boston Harbor, we as loyal American citizens who believe 
that communism and totalitarianism would destroy our American institutions 
and the American way of life wish to compliment the committee on the fine job 
they are doing in exposing communism. 

Col. Geoege H. Nelson, 

Sachem. 



Renton, Wash., June IS, 195Ji. 
Velde Committee, 

Chairman, City-County Building, 
Seattle, Wash.: 

We deeply appreciate the privilege of hearing and seeing the excellent work 
you are doing. We wish you could remain longer. Congratulations. 

Renton Highland Improvement Club. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, Wo.'i. 
Harold Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash. 

Dear Sir: On behalf of the Russian All Cossack Association of Seattle and 
the State of Washington, we wish to express to you and the members of your 
committee our admiration for your untiring efforts in ferreting out the Com- 
munist subversives. We who have fought usurpers in our mother country and 
suffered at their hands have the interests of our new homeland, the United States, 
close to our hearts and certainly will do our best to defend it from all foes, both 
at home and abroad. 
Respectfully, 

A. MiHAiLOFP, President, 
G. Kalfov, Secretary. 



Sequim, Wash., June 18, 195Ji. 
Chairman of the House Un-Amerioan Activities Committee], 

Seattle, Wash.: 
We are 100 percent behind you. Go get 'em. 

Sequim Chapter, Order of De Molay. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 195^. 
Velde Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

We, the members of the Ship and Dock Foremen's Associations of Washington, 
independent, wish to express our appreciation of the excellent work that is being 
done by your committee in the State of Washington. 

Robert Winthers, President. 
48069 — 54 — pt. 11 4 



746 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Seattle, "Wash., June 18, 1954. 
Congressman Harold Velde, 

Chairman, House Committee Un-American Activities, 
Seattle, Wash. 
Dear Sir: At our union meetings, June 17, 1954, our membership voted unani- 
mously to concur in the action of the officers and the executive board in their 
telegram sent Wednesday, June 10, W'A, to your committee, in which was stated, 
"We are in complete sympathy with the objectives sought by yuur committee." 

OfFICEUS and MEMnEKSIIIP, 

Local oSl, Streetcarmen's Union. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
Committee on Un-American Actittties, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Our group, composed of representatives of veteran, fraternal, and civic organ- 
izations worliing together to celebrate our "1 am an American Day," heartily 
approve and wish you success in your investigation of disloyal persons. 

Tacoma AAfERicANizATioN Council, 
Mrs. N. V. Genna, Treasurer. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
Congressman Velde, 

Chairman, Committee on Un-American Activities, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

The United Bakery Workers, Local 1807, CIO, want to congratulate your com- 
mittee in exposing to the union membership and to the public at large the policies 
and internal workings of the Communist Party. We feel that you have done a 
wondei'f ul job and keep up the good work. 

Feed Gray, Financial Secretary. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
Representative Donald L. Jackson, 

Chairman, Bouse Committee on Un-American Activities, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash. 

This department wishes to express its appreciation and confidence in your 
committee as we have seen it in operation in our city. The Veterans of Foreign 
Wars has long realized the danger of communism, particularly in the Puget 
Sound area, as well as other defense areas, and our own Americanism committee 
has been vigilant in preventing infiltration in its own ranks and has been and is 
heartily in accord with exposing the activities of all subversive organizations. 
Your committee is to be complimented on its conduct in the investigation being 
held in this city. This conduct has been above I'eproach and should be approved 
by all patriotic organizations. 

S. Dean Helbiq. 
Department Commander, Department of Washington, Veterans of Foreign Wai:8. 



Bothell, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
Chairman, Committee ov Un-American Activities, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

We want to go on record with the rest of the patriotic organizations in con- 
gratulating you upon the fine work which you have done. 

Veterans of Foreign Wars, 
Post and Auxiliary, Bothell. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6747 

Bremerton, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
House Committee on Un-American Activities, 
County-City Building, Seattle: 
(Attention Mr. Velde, chairman) 
Onr conirratulations for the wonderful work you are performing m cleaning 
up unime^iSfn activities in our State. May God bless each and every one of 
you for a job well done. ^^^^^^ ^ rosecrants Auxiuary No. 7297, VFW, 

Babeite Powell, President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 17, 1054. 

Velde Committee, 

Comity-City Building, Seattle: 

Ballard Auxiliary to Post 30G3, Veterans of Foreign Wars wishes to commend 
the Velde Committee for the wonderful work they are doing in bringing to light 

the communistic activities in our area. ^„,v7«-„» 

Patricia Hulslander, President. 

Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954. 

Representative Velde, . .. .^. 

Chairman, Houae Committee on Un-American Activities, 
County-City Building, Seattle: 
Congratulations to you and your committee for the great service you are ren- 
derin<- the patriotic citizens of our great Northwest in uncovering the growing 
cancer of communism among us. Only through your efforts have we been en- 
lightened of the seriousness of this terrible menace that exists at tne present 
time. May the good Lord bless you and strengthen your hand. Yours in com^ 

rades ip. George E. Gosa, Chaplain, 

Department of Washington, Veterans o/ Foreign Wars. 



Bellinqham, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Velde Committee. 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash. 
We would like at this time to go on record as a patriotic organization to com- 
mend you on the fine work you are doing. You are not only exposing prominent 
members of the Northwest Communist Party, but are bringing to the alteution 
of the general pubUc the methods, functions, and operations of the Communist 

Party. ,„ ^ taat> 

Chief, Whatcom Chapter, DAR. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954> 

Committee on Un-American Activities, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

As wives of men who are or who have been members of the Seattle Fire De- 
partment and as wives of members of Fire Fighters Post No. 311 of ihe Ameri- 
can Legion, we make this public plea to Capt. Elmer Strom to cooperate fully 
with the committee. Congratulations on the fair way in which the hearings 

have been conducted. 

Iris Fox, 
President, Fire Fighters Auxiliary 311 American Legion. 



Sbiattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee on Un-American Activities, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
Public trust in the Seattle Fire Department should not waiver. The fire fight- 
ers will not condone nor permit Communist infiltration. Thanks for the fair 
hearings. 

Capt. John Philbin, 
Engine Company No. 19, Seattle Fire Department. 



6748 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Seattle, Wash., June 19 195-'i. 
House Committee on Un-American Acti\ities, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

No mention of name of company, please. Speaking for my station we regret 
the mention of the fire department as Communist dominated. We treat com- 
munism as we do a fire, a dangerous evil. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Capt. Elmer Strom, 

City-County Building, Seattle, Wash., 

Care of Committee on JJn-American Activities: 
Please clear your name and that of the fire department. My husband is in 
the department and I must say that I feel your testimony affects us personally. 
Sincerely, 

Mrs. Gordon Mann. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 195 Jf. 
Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle: 

Sir : It is our desire to convey our wholehearted thanks and congratulations 
to the committee for the work they are doins. We also wish to state that we 
of Fire Station 10, Platoon C, are in accordance with the committee that Capt. 
E. Strom's testimony was evasive and very detrimental to the members and 
fire department as a whole. Keep up the good work. 

Fire Station 10, Platoon C. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 195-'f. 
TJn-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Suggest amendments to Constitution to prevent Communists from hiding behind 
our laws. Keep up good work. 

AiriHUR W. CoLLiiNS, Tacoma, 
Edward O. Rhodes Post Ameriean Legion. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1951f. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

I am a freedom-born citizen of the United Slates of America. I am a graduate 
of the University of Washington. Under the first and fifth amendments of the 
Constitution of the United States of America, I believe you are violating the 
principles of freedom of speech, of the press, and religion. In my pipe, your 
work is unconstitutional. 

Richard Jones. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
The Velde Committee, 

Seattle. 

Dear Sirs : I see by the paper that Mrs. Hartle names one Ed Carlson as a 
member of the Communist Party in the Machinists Union. I presume I am the 
individual referred to. So that the record is straight, let me insert this into 
the record for all to see and hear. 

It did not take me 20 years to decide that the Communist Party was not the 
answer to the problems as I see them. In fact, I am very nearly positive it was 
Mrs. Ilartle who tried to persuade me to reconsider my decision to discontinue 
my aflSliations, which is now approximately 5 years ago. 

I do believe that my many friends and acquaintances are entitled to this addi- 
tional clarification of the facts. 
Sincerely, 

Ed. Carlson, 
Member of Machinists Union. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6749 

Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Committee on Un-Amebican Activities. 

Gentlemen : It has been brought to my attention that Mrs. Barbara Hartle 
mentioned my name in the course of her testimony as having been at one time 
a member of the Communist Party. I wish to state to this committee that my 
former husband, Robert L. Barnes was a member of the Communist Party and 
has associated with this group resulting in a divorce between us in 1954. 

I wish to state to the committee that Mrs. Hartle in all probability is con- 
fused concerning my membership in the Communist Party. To the best of my 
knowledge, I never became a bona fide member of this organization. I wish to 
state, however, that due to my husband's activities in the Communist Party 
there is a possibility that my name has been carried on a Communist Party 
membership list. I wish to advise the committee that to the best of my knowledge 
I never knowingly became a member of the Communist Party nor took any 
part in the activities of said organization. 

My position is that I have always been against the principles of the Com- 
munist Party during my marriage and at the present time. I wish to offer my 
cooperation to this committee and will make myself available upon the request 
of the committee or any member of its staff at any time. 
Sincerely, 

Maegaret Barnes. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 19-54. 
Velde Committee, 

Seattle: 
If they don't like the country, put them on a boat and let them go to Russia, 
and if Russia don't accept them put them overboard. 

E. H. Carlson. 



James M. Eagleson, Post No. 1416, 

Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, 

June 18, 1954. 
Hon. Harold H. Velde, 

Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Dear Sib: Our membership of 665 overseas veterans heartily commend you 
and the members of your committee for your untiring and impartial investiga- 
tion of un-American activities and the uncovering of Communists in Seattle and 
the Pacific Northwest. 
Yours very truly, 

Alfred N. Goss, Commander, 
Julian Brown, Adjutant. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1594. 
Congressman Harold Velde, 

Chairman, or Jackson, Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

You have the wholehearted support of 32d District Republicans. Y'our com- 
mittee is performing a great service to the American people. 

Richard Ruofk, 
State Representative, 

District, King County. 



Seattle, TFash., June 18, 1954. 
Hon. Donald Jackson, 

Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle: 

We the members of Seattle Aerie No. 1, Fraternal Order of Eagles in regular 
session assembled on this 18th day of June 1954, voted to commend your commit- 
tee on the splendid work you are doing on behalf of the honest American citizens 
of these United States. 

Emil Lains, 
Secretary for the Mother Aerie of Eagledom. 



6750 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Seattle, Wash., June 18, 195^. 
House Un-Amekican Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Gentlemen : The work that you have been doing here in Seattle should be a 
warning to citizens of our Nation that communism has and is still flourishing 
right under their noses. The Catholic War Veterans of the State of Washington 
say to you, Keep up this great work. 

Gordon Banbury King, 

County Commander. 

Bellingham, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Chairman Jackson, 

Souse Un-American Committee, 

Seattle: 
Congratulations on the fine work you are doing. Keep punching. Don't just 
drive them under the ground. Drive them into the oceau. 

Lois Anderson, 
President, Auxiliary, 
Boyd Staggs, 
Commander, Albert Hamilton Post, American Legion. 



Burlington, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
Our organization at its regular meeting June 18, 1954, went on record 
unanimously supporting your committee's actions in exposing communistic and 

subversive activities in the Northwest. 

Washington State Hospital Employees 476, AFL, 
Ed Locken, President. 
Mary Root, Treasurer, 
Mary Fay, Secretary, 

Sedro-Woolley, Wash. 

Morton, Wash., June 19. 195li. 
House Un-Amekican Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

We commend you for work you are doing. Hearing is being conducted in fair 
and impartial manner. You are educating the whole Northwest. Keep it up. 

The MoETOif Chamber of Commebcb. 



Bremerton, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Representative Harold H. Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities, 

Seattle, Wash.: 
The Catholic War Veterans Post lOO.I of Bremerton, Wash., wish to extend to 
you and your committee our congratulations on your excellent job of exposing 
Communist activities in Washington State and Seattle area. Best wishes for 
your continued success. 

Glenn Taylor, Commander, 

Jasper C. Wood, First Vice Commander. 



Morton, Washinqton, June 18, 1954. 
Congressman Velde, 

House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Cit}i-Count]i Building, Seattle: 

We endorse and wholeheartedly support the work yon are doing in exposing 
Communists and subversive activities in the Pacific Northwest. Keep it up 
the country over. 

Ernie G. Culver. 
Post No. 2127 Veterans of Foreign Wars, Morton, Wash. 



COMIiIUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6751 

AtTBUBN, Wash., June IS 1954' 
Velde Committee, 

County-Citu Building, Seattle: 
Tlie Wliite River Valley Post No. 1741 of VFW and Auxiliary of Auburn, 
Wash., wish to commend the committe for the good work carried on by its mem- 
bers ttiroughout the hearings held in Seattle. 

Dean P. Miilee, 

Post Commander 
Bertha Griijble, 
Auxiliary President. 

Blaine, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
nousF, Un-American Activities Committee, 

KING-TV, Channel 5, 320 Aurora, Seattle, Wash.: 
We would like to congratulate you on your handling and successful and hope- 
ful results, we iire sure will result from your administration of the present 
hearing which you are conducting. With all good wishes. 

Peace Arch Post No. 86 and Auxiliary op American Legion. 



Bremerton, Wash., June 19, 1954. 

VELDR CO>fMITTEE, UN-AmERICAN ACTIVITIES, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
TIk' Staff Sergeant Stanley C. Ohison Chapter No. 2 of the Blue Star Mothers 
of America, Bremerton, Wash., extend our congratulations and hearty ar;proval 
of your work in uncovering communism, the greatest threat to our American 
way of life. Keep up the good work. 

Jean M. Williams, President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 

nOUSK UN-Al^fERICAN ACTIVITIES, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
Congratulations and appreciation for your work in dealing with subversives 
In our city. Mrs. C. P. Lovett, 

Chaplain Navy-Marine No. 59 Legion Auxiliary. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash. 

Tlie Oraiul rx)dge of the Northwest of the Sons of Italy in America reaffirmed 
at tlieir grand convention May 29, 1954, in Aberdeen, Wash., their unalterable 
op[tositiuii to conununism and its principles. Through me, they wish to express 
their apjiroval of the function of the un-American Activities Committee of 
tlie United States House of Representatives in bringing into the open the mem- 
bers of the Communist Party in tlie United States and their subversive activities. 

Nicholas Sakro, M. D., 

Grand Venerable. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
House Un-American Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

We commend and endorse the work you are doing investigating communism 
here. 

Claud A. Race, 
4th District National Security, Chairman, American Legion. 



6752 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Buckley, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 
We wholeheartedly approve of the work your committee is doing. Keep up 
the good work. 

Executive Committee, Buckley Boosters Club. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Dear Sirs : You are to be congratulated on the work you are doing here in our 
great Pacific Northwest and you have our congratulations. 

Carl W. Kruse, 
Commander of Post 188, American Legion. 



Everett, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations on the fine work your committee has been doing. Keep up the 
good work. 

Sincerely, 

Harold J. Hall, 
Commander, Old Guard Post 2100, Veterans Foreign Wars. 



Everett, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee. 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations to the committee on work relative to exposing communism in 
the Pacific Northwest. 

Earl Falkner, 
American Legion Post. 



Centralia, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

We highly approve of your way of executing the hearing and the manner which 
same have been handled. 

George M. Speiars, 
Business Representative, Centralia Building Trades Council. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 

House Un-American Activities Committee, 

County -City Building, Seattle, Wash. 
To the Committee: I have been in your hearings every day and I do congrat- 
ulate you on the work you are doing toward Communists. I am a colored min- 
ister and pastor in the city and am with you 100 percent in your work. May God 
bless you. 

Rev. S. S. Phillips, 
The South First Baptist Church. 



Seattle, Wash., Jufie 19, 1954. 
Acting Chairman Jackson, 

Un-American Activities Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
Seattle Lodge BPO-Elks No. 92 heartily approve of committee's action and 
wishes to extend our support of the committee. 

Clyde V. Witte, 

Exalted Ruler. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES m THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6753 

Seattle, Wash., June 19, 195^. 
Un-Amebican Activities Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
CJongratulations. The committee is doing America and mankind a meritorious 
service in exposing the cancer in our Republic. May your efforts be most 

successful. , ,, 

James W. Mullins, 

Past National President, Fleet Reserve Association. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954- 
Un-American Activities Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

You are doing a swell job. More power to you. Can't you send them back 

to where they belong? 

Maurice Beck, 

Past Commander, 
Alice Beck, 

Past President, 
Veterans of Foreign Wars, No. 3348. 



Olympia, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
House Un-Amebican Activities Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Want to commend you for the fine work in exposing communism in our midst. 

midst. 

Mrs. Lester J. Parsons, 
President, American Legion Auxiliary, 

Olympia Unit No. 3. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle: 
We, as members of the Seattle Fire Department, endorse the work of the Velde 
Committee to expose communism and we will make every effort to rid Seattle 
Fire Department of any or all subversive members or activities. 
Sincerely, 

L. S. Dean, J. Cbibbs, S. Davis, J. Holt, Ben Ek, R. E. Adamson, 
W. Olds, J. Donohue, R. S. Morgan. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954- 
Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle: 
Wearers of the Purple Heart heartily endorse your efforts and commend your 
methods in attempting to rout our enemies of America. You have our unfailing 

backing. 

Denny Webber, 
Commander, Washington State Department, 

T. C. Fauntz, 
Commander, Seattle Chapter 12, 

Military Order Purple Heart. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Representative Jackson, 

House Un-American Activities, Seattle. 
Dear Sir: Organized sportsmen in Pierce County serve as you do. Youth 
and better sportsmen under good Government. Our heartiest thanks for making 
this a better area for our kids and their dads to live in. 

Harry L. Higgins, 
President, Pierce County Sportsmen Council. 



^6754 COMRTUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 195^. 

'Representative Jackson, 

House Un-American Activities, Seattle. 
Dear Sik : Clean living through good government is our aim. Thanks for help- 
ring to keep it clean. 

Harry L. Higgins, 

Secretary, Oig Harbor Sportsmen's Club. 



Edmonds, Wash., June 19, 195^. 

House Un-American Activities Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

For the betterment of our community, State and Nation, the S. Al. Wilcox 

Post 234, Mountlake Terrace, Edmunds, Wash., American Legion, congratulates 

your committee. 

L. N. Blanchette. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Thanks and congratulations for spotlighting the Communist menace in the 
Northwest. Wish you could remain until very last one of them are exposed to 

the world. 

Harold A. Baunton, Commander, 
Aletha I'HiLT.iPs, President of Col. The- 
odore Roosevelt Post 2.) and Auxiliary, 
Veterans of Foreign Wars. 



Everett, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Committee on Un-Amertcan Activities, 

402 County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations on your good work. 

Women's Catholic Order of Foresters. 



Seattle,Wash., June 19, 1954- 

■Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations on your splendid work. Keep it up. 

Mary Rice, 
Past President, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Auxiliary 4^9, Worcester, Mass. 



Bremerton, Wash., June 19, 1954- 
■Committee on House Un-American Activities, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash. 
Sirs: Congratulations to the committee for the fine work you are doing here 
in the Pacific Northwest. 

Navy Mothers Club No. 256. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle: 

Congratulations on exposing so many Communists in the State of Washing- 
ton. We are wholeheartedly with you in this good work. 

C. M. Riser, 
Secretary, Ballard Eagles No. 172. 



COMMIJlSriST ACTIVmES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6755 

Olympia, Wash., June 19, 1954' 
Chairman, House Un-Amebican Activities Committee, 
406 County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
Appreciate extreme fairness marking your Seattle hearings. Keep up the fine 
work. 

Sam L. Crawford, 
Chef de Gave Voiture, 151-40 and 8. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Congressman Jackson, 

County-City Building, Seattle: 

Because America was asleep, Soviet Russia was successful in stealing the 
atomic bomb from us through the Communistic apparatus operation here in the 
United States. Your committee is performing the same tasks that I'nul Revere 
did for his country. As graduates of an institution which has constantly taught 
the evils of communism based upon dialectic uuiterialism, for the past 40 years, 
we humbly appreciate the work you are doing here. The time has come for 
America to wake up. Fighting communism is fighting for America. 

The Graduates Club, 

Sorrento Hotel, 

Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

The Pioneer Apartment Group, Inc. heartily endorses your investigation in 
Stattle. This organization and its members offer its cooperation in any way to 
jour committee. Keep up the good work, 

A. Zobribt, Secretary. 

Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Committee, Un-American Acttvities, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

We wish to commend you on your good work and wish you lots of success. 

YFW-Bali.ard Post 3063, 
Glen Martin, Adjutant. 



Olympia, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American AcrrviTiES Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulntions on the fine work being done by your committee in your anti- 
subversive hearings. 

Alfred William Leach. Post No. 3, American Legion, 
Fkank O. Setiiek, Adjutant, 
Russell Harris, Commander. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 

402 County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
The courtesy and patience of your committee is symbolic of the outstanding 
service it is rendering our country. We send our congratulations. 

Margaret Mullins, 
Past National President, Ladies' Auxiliary, Fleet Reserve Association. 



6756 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Hon. Habold Velde, 

Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Am wholeheartedly in agreement with the splendid results of your current 
investigation. Sincerely hope this will result in further similar investigations 
until the last remaining Communist is exposed. 

Veenon A. Smith, 
State Representative, 46th Legislative District. 



Seattle, Wash., Jtme 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
Congratulations on your splendid work. Keep it up. 

Cecil E. Libby, 
U. 8. S. Seattle, All Navy Post 3469, Veterans Foreign Wars. 



Bellingham, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
House Un-American Activities Committee. 

Seattle: 
The Past Commanders Association of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of Post 
No. 1585 of Bellingham, Wash., wish to congratulate your committee on its won- 
derful work in northwestern Washington. 

Rot G. Pike, 
President, Past Commanders Association. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, House Un-American Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
We as members of the Seattle Fire Department endorse the work of your 
committee to expose Communists and subversive members in all organizations. 

Members of the Seattle Fire Department, 

Station No. 15. 

Puyallup, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle: 

We want to congratulate your committee for the outstanding work that yoii 
are doing. 

Sincerely, 

Bert Qui^t. 
Secretary, Fraternal Order, Eagles, Aerie 2308. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

We are in accord with you in investigating Communist activities in this area. 
Am hoping that Capt. Elmer Strom will cooperate with your committee in- 
giving the information which they seek. 

Comdr. Stanley A. Sandstrom, 

Seattle Fire Fighters Post 311. 



Sumner, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 

County Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations your splendid work. Urge you Congressmen work for either 
constitutional amendment or congressional law outlawing Communist Party. 

Bill Biereb, 
Past Commander, Disabled American Veterans, Past District and Past 
West Side Commander, the American Legion. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6757 

Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954- 
Kepresentative Jackson, 

Velde Committee, Seattle, Wash.: 
As a member of the Seattle Fire Department and Fire Fighters Local 27, I 
want you to know that I am wholeheartedly behind your committee and want to 
go on record as vigorously protesting action of one of our members, Captain 
Elmer Strom, for not cooperating with your committee, and assure you person- 
ally that everything will be done to clear our union of any subversive members, 
if there are any. I again implore Captain Strom to cooperate with you fully. 

Henrt O. Christiansen. 



SuMNEE, Wash., June 19, 1954' 
Velde Congressional Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

The American Legion Post 53 of Sumner, Wash., sincerely congratulates the 
committee and the witnesses who have testified against communism. 

American Legion Post 53, 
By Henry P. Daniel, 

Vice Gommander-Elect. 



Beixinqham, Wash., June 19, 1954. 

Chairman, House Un-American Subcommittee, 
City-County Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
This is to inform you that on behalf of the Bellingham Central Labor Council, 
affiliated with the AFL, heartily supports the investigating procedures of your 
committee. Regards. 

Glenn Vanderbeink, 
President, Central Labor Council, A. F. of L. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Senator Jackson, 

Chairman, Un-Atnerican Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
Be assured that the 15,000 members of the American Legion Auxiliary in the 
State of Washington are in accord with your committee and the object of your 
investigations in Seattle. You have been more than fair and courteous. We are 
happy that your committee has brought to light facts which will help true 
Americans to protect our country from harm. It has been shown too that honest 
Americans cannot associate with Communists without soiling themselves and 
can only be cleansed by public and voluntary denouncements of communism. 
Good luck and grateful thanks to the committee. 

Mrs. Milton Scheoeder, 
President, Department of Washington, American Legion Auxiliary. 



Anacortes, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
Accept our appreciation for your service to Pacific Northwest. We commend 
you upon your justice of Barbara Hartle in her effort to cooperate with your 
committee. 

Governor Isaac Stevens Chapter, DAR. 



Everett, Wash., June 19, 1954- 
Un-Ameeican Activities Committee Hearings, 
County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
I wish to congratulate you on the fine work you are doing and hope work 
continues throughout the United States. 

Mrs. Frank Spillman, 
Commander, Disatled American Veterans Auxiliary No. 10, Everett. 



6758 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wusli.: 
Concur with the objectives of your committee and think you are doing the 
country a great service. 

N. C. GOODVl'IN, 

Tacoma Chapter No. 1, DisaMed American Veterans. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 195Jf. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle: 
On behalf of this organization's membership, we wish to express our patriotic 
concurrence and heartily commend your committee in its courageous efforts to 
ferret out and expose the evils of communism to the Pacific Northwest. Keep 
up the good worli. 

Washington State Council of Municipal Police Locals, No. G3, 

James S. Miller, President, 
Charles L. Mabsh, Secretary. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Ln-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
Please accept our appreciation for your efforts in upholding the principles 
for which our sons gave their 1^'es. 

Ethel Jewell, Department President. 
IsAiiELL Baktlett, Recording Secretary. 
Department of Washington, American Gold Star Mothers, Inc. 

Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954- 
Hon. Donald Jackson, 

Acting Chairman, ITouse Vn-American Activities Committee, 
County-City Building, Seattle: 
Very sincere congratulations on your efforts to uncover, stamp out the mental 
cancer of communism in the Pacific Northwest. 
Sincerely yours, 

Theodou Nash, 
Mem'ber, Fraternal Order of Eagles, No. 1387, Buckley, Wash, 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Comjiittee, 

House Un-American Activities, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Most sincere congratulations from all of us here. 

Ballard Elks, Lodge No. 827. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 

House Un-American Activities, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
Wish to commend the good work of the committee on ferreting out communism. 

Rainier District EIagle Aerie and Auxiliaby. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6759 

Vashon, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
IIousE Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle: 
We the members of Vashon Maury Grange wish to congratulate the House 
Un-American Activities Committee for its fairness and fine worii in this hearing. 

Lucille Walls, Worthrj Master. 
Opal Axdkidge, Secretary. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 195^ 

VELDE COMiflTTEE, 

Coinilij-CUy Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
Thank you Americans from Americans who have proven it on the field of 

battle. ^ ^ TV- o 

Disabled American Veterans, Seattle Chapter Ao. 2, 

Clarence Snow, Commander, 
Don S. Phillips, Commander, 
June Snow, Commander Auxiliary. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 195^. 

Chairman, 

Un-American Activities Committee, Seattle: 
Wish to endorse fully purposes of committee and praise adept conducting of 

investigation. 

Dale Heady, 

Chief Rancher, Court 563, Independent Order of Foresters. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Chatrmaw, 

Bouse Un-American Activities Committee, 
Cottntu-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations and lieep up the good work. 

The Veterans of Foreign Wars, Auxiliary No. 2713, 
George W. Farwell, 
Patricia Sadler, Legislative Chairman. 



Everett, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Chairman, 

Un-American Activities, Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations on your very fine work that you are doing. Keep it up 
and expose the hidden Communists among us. The Sons of Italy are behind 
you 100 percent. 

Anthony J. Diguardi, 
President, Columbus Lodge of Everett, Sons of Italy of America. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American AcTivrriEs Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Highline Business and Professional Women's Club wishes to congratulate the 
meniliers of the committee on the fine way in which the hearings have been 
conducted. 

Mary Gay Belcham, President. 



6760 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Bellevue, Wash., June 19, 1951^. 
Un-Ameeican Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations on the committee's work. 

Don Johnson, 
Commander, Lake Washington Post No. 2959, 
Veterans of Foreign Wars and Ladies Auxiliary, Bellevue. 



Tacoma Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Committee on Un-Amekican Afpaies, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Heartiest congratulations on work being done on un-American activities In 
our State. 

Mrs. Mary Vowell, 
Commander, Disabled American Veterans, 
Auxiliary Department of Washington. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 195^. 
Un-Ameeican Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 
I wish to congratulate you for the work on the Un-American Committee. 

Mrs. a. Dahlberg, 
Commander, Disabled Veterans Auxiliary. 



Everett, Wash., June 19, 195^. 
Chairman, 

Un-American Activities, Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations and keep up the good work. 

Mrs. Vern Henrt, 
President, Everett High School Parent-Teachers Association. 



Everett, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Chairman, 

House Un-American Activities, 

Seattle: 

Congratulations to you and your committee for the good work so far accom- 
plished. 

John Maltsberger, 
President, Everett Police Local 1149. 



Cle Elum, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle: 

Congratulations on your excellent job exposing communism activities this 
date. Keep up the good work. 

Herbert Irwin, and Auxiliary VFW Post 1373, 
Bullah Hasklbar, President. 
Andy Moschner, Commander, 



Stanwood, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
•Chairman, 

Un-American Actvvities Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations. Keep up your good work. 

Camino Island American Legion Auxiliary, No. 207, 
Clara Harrison, President. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6761 

Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 

Souse Un-American Activities, 

County-City Building, Seattle, Wash.: 
The Loyal Order of Moose wishes to go on record at this time to congratulate 
the splendid worli of the Velde Committee in exposing the cancer of communism 
in this area. We want you to know that we are behind you 100 percent. Keep 
up the good work. 

Paui. Anderson, 
Governor, Seattle Lodge 211. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Chaisman, 

Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle: 

We wish to concur and applaud the presence and action of your committee in 
Seattle, 

Salmon Bay Aerie, Fraternal Order of Eagles, 
Maurice Crum, Secretary, 
Jerome MoManus, President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle: 
We wish to congratulate you on your fine effort of protecting our American 
rights. 

Respectfully, 

St. John Baptist Church, 
Rev. S. L. Singleton, 
Evangelist J. C. DANiEa.. 



Everett, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle: 
Honorable Sirs : I wish to commend your committee on your hearings. To pre- 
serve America for good Americans is paramount to our way of life. 

C Arvid Johnson, 
Mayor, City of Everett, Wash. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

We wish to commend you for the important work you are doing and the fair 
manner in which you are conducting the hearing to expose Communist activities- 
in Pacific Northwest. 

Alfred C. Seaman, 
Commander American Legion Post 220, Parkland, Wash. 

Helen Gen sen, 
President, Auxiliary, American Legion Post 220, Parkland. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle: 

Congratulations on your progress and your committee hearings. Keep up th& 
good work. 

MiLLICENT SnELL, 

President, West Seattle American Legion Auxiliary No. 160. 



6762 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Chehalis, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Chairman Velde, 

House Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

The Wesley Kennedy Post, American Legion, Onalaska, Wash., Auxiliary, 
would like to commend you for the good work you are doing in the Northwest 
Thanking you. 

Mrs. Hazel Muephy, Chaplain. 



Se:attle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 

County-City Building, Seattle: 

Emma Jensen, Americanization chairman for Department of Washington DAV 
Auxiliary, and Louise Stillion, Americanization chairman for DAV, Auxiliary 
23, West Seattle, congratulate the Un-Americanism Committee for the work they 
are doing and want them to know we are with the committee 100 percent. 

Emma Jensen. 



SuMNEE, Wash, June 19, 1954. 
Velde Congressional Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

The American Legion, Auxiliary Unit 53, sincerely congratulate the com- 
mittee on its work and the witnesses who have testified against communism. 

Dorothy Mayfield, President. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
House Un-Ameeican Activities Committee, 

Seattle: 
On behalf of the Sam Brough Post and Auxiliary 6855, Veterans of Foreign 
Wars and members, we commend you and your staff on your great work in these 
hearings. 

Sincerely yours, 

Fred Swanson, 

Post Commander. 
Bebtaliegh Carson, 

Auxiliary President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Donald Jackson, 

Chairman, House Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

We of the Volunteers of America of Seattle and the Theodore Home for the 
Aged, guests and staff, wish to commend you on the wonderful work you are 
doing in our city. 

VOLUNTEEUS OP AMERICA. 



Beemebton, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Congressman Jackson, 

Chairman, Subcommittee of Un-American Activities, Seattle. 

The members of Disabled American Veterans, chapter No. 5, of Bremerton, 
Wash., extend their congratulations to your conmiittee on your splendid work In 
exposing communistic activities in the Northwest. Like other organizations we 
deplore the situation here, but we are doing something about it. We have dis- 
tributed 1,500 scrolls of the Declaration of Independence lo every sixth grade 
student in Kitsap County. This will be our annual contribution to Americanism. 

Charles L. Klinefeltee, 

Commander. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6763 

Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-Amekican Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 

As an individual and labor man, I commend the committee on a fine job. 

.ToiiN J. Green, 
5301 South Asotin Street, Taeoma. 



Seattle, Wask., June 19, 1954- 
Velde Committee, 

Seattle: 

Members of the West Virginia Club of Washington wish to commend you for 
your services to the American people. Please continue the jjood work. 

Ernest C. Goff, President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 

Acting Chairman, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
Members of Carrol Club of Seattle commend your committee for its extremely 
valuable work. Your treatiuent of witnesses is in the best tradition of American 
democracy. Congratulations. 

D. C. Casijn, 
President, Carrol Clul). 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee Anti-Commtjnist Hearings, 
Seattle: 

Congratulations on your wonderful work. Keep it up. 

SHVF.TtN KiTTET.SON, 

Fourth District Anti-Suhversive Chairman, 

Am.erican Legion. 



Port Obchabd, Wash., Jiine 19, 1954. 
Hon. Velde, 

Chairman. House Un-American Activities, 
Seattle, Wash. 
Sir: Congratulations to your subcommittee and self in interest of preserving 
the principles for which we Purple Heart veterans fought. Military Order of 
the Purple Heart is a member organization of World Veterans Federation. 
Respectfully, 

H. .T. TlIIESEN, 

Senior Vice Cotnmander, 
Department of Washington, 
MOPn Commander, Chapter 32',, MOPII. 



Bbemebton, Wash, June 19, 1954. 
House Un-Amekican Activities Committee, 
Seattle: 
Congratulations and commendations on the great work you are doing to fight 
communism. 

Local 9105, Communication Wokkees of America, CIO. 



Seattle, Wash, June 19, 1954. 
House Un-Ameeican Activities Committee, 
Seattle: 

We want to congratulate your committee on the fine work your committee has 
done in routing out those dirty Reds. We are convinced $75 per day expense 



6764 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

account under wliich you operate has not deterred your motives or lengthened 
your stay. 

The Little Men's Mabching and Chowdeb Association. 



Seattue, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Congressional Un-Amebican Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 

By unanimous vote on June 17, 1954, this organization not only endorses but 
congratulates your committee for bringing to the attention of the people of the 
Pacific Northwest for the first time the fact that Seattle and vicinity is and has 
been for many years among the worst hotbeds of communistic activity in the 
United States. 

Sunset Republican Club, 

Mercer Island, Wash. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954- 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle: 

Post 19, American Veterans of Second World War and Auxiliary congratulate 
this committee on their fine work and endorse your program wholeheartedly. 

Wendell C. Roberts, Post Commander. 



Olympia, Wash. 
Committee on Un-American Activities, 

House of Representatives, Seattle. Wash.: 

Dear Congressmen. Please accept our respectful compliments to your com- 
mittee for its effective work in the interest of national security, conducted in the 
best traditions of American justice and fairness. 
Very truly yours, 

Mbs. Douglas Kibk, District Legislative Chairman, 

American Legion Auxiliary, 
Douglas G. Kibk, State Representative, Queen Anne 
Post, Legislative Chairman, American Legion. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-Amebican Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 

I wish to congratulate you and all members of your work on un-American actlr- 
tles in America. 

Renton Sons of Italy, 
Tony Mola, Ex President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
House Un-Amebican Activities Committee, 
Seattle: 

Ridge Forest Post No. 7256 and Auxiliary of Veterans of Foreign Wars wish 
to congratulate the committee on their fine work. 

Rat Lewis, Commander, 
Frances Bbown, President. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities, 
Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations on fine work your committee is doing. 

VFW OF Taooma, 3d Distbiot, 
RiCHABD L. ToBiN, Commander. 



COMMUNIST ACTIYITIES EST THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6765 

Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-Amebican Activities, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
Congratulations on fine work your committee is doing. 

VFW Post No. 1428 and Auxiliaby Members, 
Elias J. Messinger. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 

House Un-Amebican Activities Committee, 

Seattle: 

Congratulations to the committee on their good work bringing Communist 

activities in our area in the open. 

Frank Siccardi, 

President Renton Lodge, No. 1967, Order, Sons of Italy in America. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954- 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities Committee, 

Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations. 

Jordan Veterans Association, 

A. W. Powell, President. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Hon. Donald Jackson, 

Chairman House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
Tour work is greatly appreciated by three past presidents of Fort Lawton 
Auxiliary No. 3694, Veterans of Foreign Wars. 

Evadne Phelps, 
Susan Cain, 
Maida Jaeger. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 

Chaieman, House Un-Amebican Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
Congratulations for fine work. We pledge our support to you. 

Alexandeb N. Jevenoff, 
President of Russian Veterans Society of the World War. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954- 
Hon. Harold Veide, 

Com-mittee Un-American Activities, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
I wish to commend you, sir, and your committee on your investigation of sub- 
version activities in our community. I consider this a very serious situation. I 
also feel that I can speak in behalf of myself and my associates and fellow 
workers at McChord Air Force Base. We wish you Godspeed in the work that 
you are doing. I also hope that some day the drastic situation will come to 
an end. 

Harold B. Leholn, 
Foreman, McChord Air Force Base. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954- 
Un-American AcTrvrriES Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 

Thank you for a wonderful job. 

Edwin C. Poffley. 



6766 COMMUNIST ACTWITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST ARK 

Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 

House U II- American Activities Committee, Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulatiuus and best wishes for better investigation. 

Lyman M. Bracken. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954- 
Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
In behalf of my husband and myself, my daughter, her husband and children, 
and my son who died in the service, we wish to extend congratulations for the 
work you are doing. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Windt. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Was?i.: 
Gentlemen : We of "Office Employees" International Union, A. F. of L., not to 
be confused with "Office Workers" Independent wish to subscribe to the many 
communication of congratulations and felicitations already received by your com- 
mittee and to respectfully request that your committee take back to the Congress 
of the whole the benefit of the experience tlie subcommittee has gained to the end 
that we members of honorable trade unions shall have the machinery to rid our 
organization of Communists and subversives of all types and kinds without fear 
of prosecution under the Taft-Hartley Act and suits for damages in our courts 
and we should like to compliment the committee on the patience that your sub- 
committee has displayed under what were at times the most trying circumstances. 
Kindest regards, 

A. H. O'Brien, 
Business Manager, Local 8, Office Employees International Union. 



Bellingham, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
Chairman Yelde, 

House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wasli.: 
We, the members of City Firefighters Union, Local No. 106, Bellingham, Wash., 
wish to convey to your committee that we are 100 percent in accord with your 
undertaking to seek out subversive elements in our wonderful Pacific Northwest. 

Jack Baker. President. 

Cecil J. Urquhart, Secretary-Treasurer. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
Congressman H. H. Velde, 

Chairman, House Committee on Un-American Activities, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
Local 19 of International Longshoremen's & Warehousemen's Union wishes 
to inform the connnittee that none of the people mentioned or who have appeared 
at tlie hearing are members of Local 11), ILWU. The sheet put out by Washington 
State Labor Defense Committee, signed by Gettings as chairman, did not originate 
from Local 19, ILWU. 

C. Appel, President. 

K. N. Simmons, Acting Secretary. 



Seattle, Wash., Jutie 19, 1954. 
Hon. Harold II. Velde, 

Chairman, House Un-American Activities. Seattle. Wash.: 

Congratulations on your good work. We wish to extend our sincere 
appreciation. 

L. E. K!;v. 
President, Commercial Telegraphers' Union, Local 40, AFL. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6767 

Seattle, Wash., June 16, 1954. 
Hon. Harold Velde, 

Chairman of Un-American Activities Committee, Seattle, Wash.: 

A special meeting of the Seattle branch, Marine Firemens Union, A. F. of L., 
held at 10 a. m. today, took the following action ; Moved, seconded, and carried, 
to commend you and your committee for exposing the Commies and their stooges 
in this area. Keep up the good work. 

Feed Beuette, Port Agent. 



Chehalis, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
United States Si'bcommittee on Communistic Activities, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
The only daily printed in the friendly city, Chehalis, salutes the accomplish- 
ments of your committee. 

Howard H. Holt, 
Editor and Publisher of Scoop. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 17, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
My health doesn't permit my appearance. Congratulations in your work. 

A. Walter Olson, 
Chairman, Americanization, American Legion, Rhodes Post, No. 2. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
Most sincerely support your committee in its investigation of communistic 
activities. 

Edward Faker, 
Fourth District, Commander. American Legion, and Chairman of Pierce 
County Veterans Advisory Council. 



Raymond, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
The Velde Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
Congratulations to your committee for the good work they are performing. 

Roy a. Woodward, 
Commander, Willapa Harbor Post, No. 39, the American Legion, South 
Bend, Wash. 



Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954. 
Congressman Harold Velde, 

Committre on Vn-American Activities, 
Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations for your fine work here in exposing to the public those who 
would overthrow by force the liberties and way of life which we as a group have 
fought and continuously suffered for. 

John W. Carlson, 
Commander, Sunshine Chapter No. 13, Disabled American Veterans. 



6768 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

Genebal John J. Pershiicq Post, 

No. 60, American Legion, 
Suquamish, Wash., June 18, 195i. 

House Investigating Committee on Un-American Activities, 
Seattle, Wash. 

Gentlemen : The televised public hearings your committee is conducting in 
Seattle will make for better local cooperation in our antisubversive committee 
work. 

We find that your effective aboveboard public hearings is opening the eyes of 
real Americans to the menace of communism. Keep up the good work. 

Sincerely, 

Edward R. Brown, Sr., 

Commander. 

Note. — This letter has been approved by the executive committee of General 
John J. Pershing Post, No. 60, of the American Legion, Suquamish, Wash. 



Seattle, TFash., June 18, 1954. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
The Washington State Conference, Daughters of the American Revolution, 
commends the splendid work done by the House Un-American Activities Com- 
mittee in Seattle this week. 

Mrs. Lewis T. Griswold, 

State Regent. 



Bremerton, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
House Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
Congratulations for the good work. The Marines are behind you. 

Carl W. Russell, 
Commandant, Puget Sound Detachment, 

Marine Corps League. 



Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 

Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 

A very wonderful job you are doing. 

Peggy J, Votah, 
Department of Washington and Alaska, Chaplain, Daughters of the 
Union Veterans of the Civil War. 



Port Townsend, Wash., June 19, 1954. 

Committee on Un-American Activities, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
Doing a wonderful job. See it to the end of communism. 

W. D. DOANE, 

West Side Director, 
Washington Institute of Social Welfare. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Representative Jackson, 

House Un-American Activities Committee, Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations on your excellent work in Seattle. 

Howard Frost, 
Manager, Cimarron Insurance Co. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6769 

Deming, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Congressman Jackson, 

Acting Chairman, Un-American Activities Committee, Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations on the wonderful job your committee is doing in exposing 

Communists in Pacific Northwest. Too bad you could not have been here many 

years ago. 

Hugh Galbraith, 

Manager, Galbraith Bros. Logging Co. 



Seattle, Wash., June 15. 
Chairman Harold Velde, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
I wish to compliment you and your committee on a fine effort to expose the 
Communist traitors and their dupes here in the Northwest. In my opinion the 
fifth amendment was made for the guilty so that they would not have to incrim- 
inate themselves ; therefore any one invoking the fifth amendment admits guilt. 
It is high time the American people awake to the dangers of the Communist 
traitors within the borders of this great Nation of ours and take action against 
them. 

Allen M. Reece, 
President, Seattle Chapter, 

Students for America. 

Seattle, Wash., June 18, 1954- 
Donald Jackson, 

Chairman, Subcommittee, Un-American Activities, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
Congratulations, Gentlemen, on a tough job eloquently done. Your exemplary 
fairness and conscientiousness is a tribute to the Congress and bulwark for the 
American people. 

Beatty & Taylor Caterers, 
Cecil S. Beatty, President. 
Marshall W. Taylor 3d, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 

Tacoma, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Un-American Activities Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 
I am impressed by the considerate fairness of your committee in revealing 
information about Communist activity in the Seattle area. Your discoveries and 
disclosures have confirmed my own fears and suspicions regarding Communist 
infiltration in this area. I commend and congratulate your committee on its 
important work in educating our people of the dangers threatening our demo- 
cratic institutions. 

Charles T. Battin, 
Chairman, Department of Economics and Business Administration, 
College of Puget Sound, and Council Member, City of Tacoma. 



Seattle, Wash., June 19, 1954. 
Velde Committee, 
Seattle, Wash.: 

Congratulations on your good work and I hope it is a good clean sweep. 

Pierce's Janitor Service. 



Lake Stevens, Wash., June 19, 1954- 
House of Un-American Activities, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Dear Sir : This is to clarify the name Roy .Tackson and Mrs. Roy .Tackson 
mentioned by Barbara Hartle at hearings is not the same Roy Jackson and Mrs. 
Roy Jackson of Lake Stevens, Wash. 

Congratulations on the good work your committee is doing. 
Sincerely, 

Mrs. Roy Jackson. 



6770 COMMUNIST ACTWITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 

House of Representatives, 
Washington, D. C. July 6, 195Jf. 
Hon. Donald L. Jackson, 

House Office Building, Washington, D. C. 
Dear Don : I wish to personally thank and commend you and the House Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities for the outstanding hearings conducted in 
•Seattle last month. 

It is truth that makes man free, and every citizen, vigilant in his loyalty to tlie 
American ideal, must appreciate the committee's work in that regard. You and 
the other members were just, fair, and courteous. 

Such hearings are a protection to the innocent. They strengthen our America. 

Sincerely, 

Walt Horan, 
Meml)er of Congress. 



House of Representatives, 
Washington, D. C, June 29, 195^. 
Hon. Donald L. Jackson, 

House Office Building, Washington, D. C. 

My Dear Colleague : I call your attention to the enclosed copies of my remarks 
in the House of Representatives on June 28, in connection with the recent hear- 
ings held by the Un-American Activities Committee in Seattle, Wash. Also en- 
<;losed is a clipping from the June 23 issue of the Washington State Labor News. 

Because of the enthusiastic reception accorded the committee by the people 
of Seattle and the unanimously favorable endorsement of its work by the press 
and the individual citizens who have written to me as a result of the hearings, 
I feel it proper for me to express to you in this letter the appreciation of the 
city of Seattle for the fair and effective manner in which they were conducted. 
In a day when congressional investigation is viewed with opprobrium in some 
liighly vocal quarters, the Seattle hearings have stressed the continuing need 
lor disclosure of the Communist menace, and have emphasized the fact that 
congressional endeavors along these lines can be handled in a dignified manner 
without enrlnni'ering the individunl rights guaranteed by the Constitution. 

Speaking both for myself and for those who elected me to serve them in the 
House of Representatives, therefore, I compliment you and the other members 
of the committee on your work in Seattle. 

Kind personal regards. 

Sincerely, 

Thomas M. Pelly. 



House of Representatives, 
Washington, D. C, July 6, 1934. 
Hon. Donald L. Jackson, 

Memher, Un-American Activities Committee, 
House of Representatives, Wushinton, D. C. 
Dear Don : You, as a member of the House Un-American Activities Committee, 
will be interested to know that I have received many letters during the past 2 
weeks praising your committee for the excellent bearings into communism it 
conducted last month in Sentfle. 

These letters spoke of the hearings of your committee as being fair, objective, 
constructive and result producing. 

I followed these hearings, as best I could by reading the newspaper reports 
on them. I concur in the sentiment that the Seattle hearings on communism 
were fair and most constructive. Your committee, in my opinion, deserves all 
the fine things that are being said about it by members of Pacific Ncu'thwest 
business, labor, veterans, patriotic, and other organizations. 

Sincerely yours, 

Russell V. Mack, 

Member of Congress. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AREA 6771 

House of Representatives, 
Washington, D. C, July 1, 195/f. 
Hon. Donald L. Jackson, 

House of Representatives. 

Dear Don : It is a distinct pleasure for me to have tlie privilege of apprising 
you of the very favorable reaction to the hearings conducted by your subcom- 
mittee in Seattle last month. 

As you know, I was in my district for a couple of days immediately following 
the hearings, and I heard nothing but praise for the manner in which they wei'e 
conducted. Particular emphasis has been placed by people to whom I have talked 
and by my correspondents on the great amount of patience and forbearance 
shown by the coimiiittee members in their interrogation of the witnesses. 

There is no doubt whatever in my mind that these hearings were of great 
benefit to the people of the Pacific Northwest in bringing to their attention the 
ever-present threat of the Communist Party to our Nation and its institutions. 
I am entirely sure that as a result of seeing and listening to the hearings, a great 
many people in and around Seattle have an entirely changed perspective regard- 
ing the hearings of congressional investigating committees in general and of the 
Un-American Activities Committee in particular. 

Please convey to the members of your subcommittee the sincere thanks and 
appreciation of a multitude of people in my congressional district. To these I 
most respectfully and forcefully add my own. 
Sincerely yours, 

Jack Westland, 
Member of Congress. 



Jui-Y 2, 1954. 
Hon. Donaxd L. Jackson, 

House Office Building, Washington, D. C. 

Dear Congressman Jackson : I want to let you know that the overwhelming 
consensus of reports reaching me on the recent hearings in Seattle by the House 
Committee on Un-American Activities is that the hearings were extremely well 
conducted. 

While I was unable to be present at the hearings, it is apparent to me that 
the committee and its staff created an atmosphere of fairness and consideration 
for the rights of witnesses and others which is most commendable. 

This corroborates in my mind a view I long have held — that congressional 
committees have a legitimate place in the investigative field so long as they con- 
duct themselves temperately and provide proper safeguards for the rights of 
persons involved in investigations. 
Sincerely yours, 

Don Magnuson, 
Member of Congress. 



INDEX TO PART 11 



Individuals 

Pag« 

Adainson, R. E 6753 

Aldridge, Opal 6-59 

Anderson, Lois 67fiO 

Anderson, Paul 6761 

Appel, C 6766 

Arena, F. J 6737 

Bailey, George 6726 

Bailey, George W 6726 

Baker, Jack 6766 

Baker, M. A 6744 

Barkley, Mrs. William 6736 

Barnes, Margaret 6749 

Barnes, Robert L 6749 

Bartlett, Isabell 6758 

Battin, Charles T 6769 

Baunton, Harold A 6754 

Beatty, Cecil S 6^69 

Beck, Alice 6753 

Beck, Maurice 6753 

Becker, Robert 6727 

Becker, Robert R 6727 

Belcham, Mary Gay 6759 

Best, Ted 6740 

Bibby, Tommy 6734 

Bierer, Bill 6756 

Bitterman, Jack A 6729 

Bitterman, J. W 6729 

Bitterman, Lew S 6729 

Bitterman, Nathan J 6729 

Blakes, Lois Brockway 6729 

Blanchette, L. N 6754 

Bracken, Lyman M 6766 

Bradley, Campbell Miller 6726 

Bradley, Helen 6726 

Bradley, Helen Margaret 6726 

Bridges, Harry 6733 

Britton, Frank R 6735 

Brown, Edward R., Sr 6768 

Brown, Frances 6764 

Brown, Julian 6749 

Bruette, Fred 6767 

Butterworth, E. R 6727 

Butterworth, Joseph 6727 

Cain, Susan 6765 

Campbell. Richard Raymond 6730 

Carlson, Ed 6748 

Carlson, E. H 6749 

Carlson, Gus 67.30 

Carlson, Gus J 6730 

Carlson. .John W 6767 

Carson. Bertaliegh 6762 

Case. Victor 6729 

\ 1 



il INDEX 

Page 

Caslin, D. C 67('3 

Cass, Victor Ray 6729 

Castle, Pearl 6726 

Castle, Pearl O 6726 

Christiansen, Henry O 6757 

Christenson, John M 6738 

Collens, Arthur W 6748 

Collins, Betty 6729 

Collins, Elizabeth E 6729 

Collins, Leonard 6729 

Crawford, Sam L 6755 

Cribbs, J 6753 

Crum, Maurice 6761 

Culver, Ernie G 6750 

Dahlberie:. Mrs. A 6760 

Daniel, Henry F 6757 

Daniel. J. C 6761 

Davis, S 6753 

Dean, L. S 6753 

Deaton, Clara 6736 

Demmer, Madge , 6738 

Diguardi, Anthony J 6759 

Doane, W. D 6768 

Dobbins, Willard S' 6730 

Dobl)ins, William K . 6730 

Donohue, J 6753 

Drugge, Axel 6737 

Dulles, John Foster 6741 

Eckberg, A. Robert 6736 

Eisenhower, Dwight D 6741 

Ek, Ben . 6753 

Erickson. Minnie Russell 6743 

Faker, Edward 6767 

Falkner, Earl 6752 

Farwell, George W 6759 

Fauntz, T. C 6753 

Fay, Mary 6750 

Ferguson, L 6739 

Fiau, Bruce 6742 

Finacils, Fred 6744 

Finacils, Gay — 6744 

Fox, Iris 6747 

Friel, Eddie 6725 

Frlel, Edward 6734 

Frost, Howard 6768 

Fullerton, Tom 6734 

P\irnish, R 6727 

Furnish, Ronald Archer 6727 

Galbraith, Hugh 6769 

Gallagher, Russell 6726 

Genna, Mrs. K. V 6746 

Gensen, Helen 6761 

George, Earl 6726 

George, Earl W 6726 

Gettings 6766 

Gibson, Harold J 6735 

Glover, Ray 6731 

Glover. Raymond David 6731 

Goff. Ernest C 6763 

Goodwin, N. C 6758 

Gosa. George E 6747 

Goss, Alfred N 6749 

Gough, Lewis K 6741 

Gray, Fred 6746 

Green, John J 6763 



INDEX 111 

Paa:e 

Gribble, Bertha JJ^J 

Griswold, Mrs. Lewis T o<o» 

Hawaii, Jerry 0^42 

Hall, Harold J 0^52 

Hall, Ralph B ^^^^ 

Hall, Ralph E o^^l 

Hare, Arthur T oidd 

Harman, Elmer "P" 

Harmau, Emma 6730 

Harris, Russell 6755 

Harrison, Clara 6760 

Hartle, Barbara 6725-6731, 6733, 6734, 6748, 6749, 6757, 6769 

Haselbar, Bullah 6760 

Hawkesworth, A. K 6731 

Hawkesworth, Mr 6743 

Haws, Orlyu 6740 

Haves, Pat 6735 

Heady, Dale 6759 

Helbig, S. Deau 6746 

Heudrickson, Stanley W 6725 

Henrickson, Stan 6725 

Henry, Mrs. Vern 6760 

Herman, Elmer 6730 

Herman, Emma 6730 

Higgins, Harry L 6753, 6754 

Hilton, Harry E 6743 

Hogan, Alvin 6732 

Holt, Howard H 6767 

Holt. J 6753. 

Horau, Walt 6770 

Huff, Henry P 6727 

Huff, Henry S 672T 

Hulslander, Patricia 6747 

Plumier, James E 6734 

Irwin, Herbert 6760 

Jackins, Carl Harvey 6733 

Jackson, Roy 6769 

Jackson, Mrs. Roy 6769 

Jaeger, Maida 6765 

Jensen, Emma 6762 

Javenoff, Alexander N 6765. 

Jewell, Ethel 6758. 

Johnson, C. Arvid 6761 

Johnson, Don 6760' 

Johnson, Herb 6727 

Jones, Richard 6748 

Kalfov, G 6745 

Keller, Abraham Charles 6742 

Key, L. E 6766 

King, Gordon Banbury 6750 

Kirk, Douglas G 6764 

Kirk, Mrs. Douglas 6764 

Kirkwood, Mel W 6731, 6732 

Kiser, C. M 6754 

Kittelson, Severn 6763 

Klinefelter, Charles L 6762 

Kraemer, Ethel May 6728 

Kramer, Ethel 6728 

Kruse, Carl W 6752 

Laing, Bill 6726 

Lains, Emil 6749' 

Leholn, Harold B 6765 

Lewis, Ray 6764 

Libby, Cecil E 6756 

Locken, Ed 6750' 



iv INDEX 

Page 

Long. Bill 6726 

Lovett, Mrs. C. P 6751 

McCallum, John C 6744 

McCannon, Hazel 6729 

McCleary, Ada L 6742 

McDonald, Jack 6737, 6738 

McFetridge, William L 6732 

McKennon, Hazel 6729 

McManus, Jerome 6761 

Mack, Russell V 6770 

Magnuson, Don 6771 

Mahnkey, Virginia 6736 

Maltsberger, John 6760 

Mann, Mrs. Gordon 6748 

Marpert, William 6744 

Marsh, Charles L 6758 

Martin, Glen 6755 

Massuco, Johnson 6739 

Mayfield. Dorothy 6762 

Meany, George 672". 

Merrick, F. F 6740 

Messinger, Elias J 676;") 

Mihailoff, A 6745 

Miller, Dean P 67r.l 

Miller, James S 6758 

Mola, Tony 6764 

Moore, Roy 6743 

Moreland, R. J 0744 

Morgan, R. S 6753 

Morse, Robert 6742 

Moschner, Andy 6760 

Mullins, James W 6753 

Mullins, Margaret 6755 

Murphy, Mrs. Hazel 6762 

Nash, Theodor 6758 

Nelson, George H 6745 

Nelson, Harry 6739 

Nichols, Charles 6733 

Nixon, Richard 6741 

O'Brien, A. H 6766 

Oldemar, Richard 6744 

Olds, W 6753 

Olson, A. Walter 6767 

Osborne, L. E 6734 

Parsons, Mrs. Lester J 6753 

Payne, Earl 6730 

Payne, Earl Eugene 6730 

Pell.v, Thomas M 6770 

Phelps, Evadne 6765 

Philhin, John 6747 

Phillips, Aletha 6754 

Phillips, Don S 6759 

Phillips, S. S 6752 

Pike. Roy G 6756 

Poffley, Edwin C 6765 

Pollard, T. B 6742 

Powell, A. W 6765 

Powell, Babette 6747 

Quan, James 6743 

Quist, Bert 6756 

Race, Claud A 6751 

Rauth, Ella 6736 

Reece, Allen M 6769 

Reynolds, Jasper 6736 

Rice. Mary 6754 



INDEX V 

Page 

Rice, S. J 6743 

Rich, Ancil 6745 

Roberts, Wendell C 6764 

Rogers, Virgil 6744 

Root, Marv 6750 

Rubin, Jules 6732 

Ruogif, Richard 6749' 

Russell, Carl W 6768 

Russell, George 6728 

Russell, George F 6728 

Sadler, Patricia 6759 

Salvus, Mary 6725 

Salvus, Mary Martha 6725 

Sandstrom, Stanley A 6756 

Sarro, Nicholas 6751 

Schroeder, Mrs. Milton 675T 

Seaman, Alfred C 6761 

Sether, Frank O 6755 

Shain, Henry 6727 

Shane, Mrs. A. J 6727 

Shane, Henry A 672T 

Shepley, Janet 6741 

Siccardi, Frank 6765 

Simmons, K. N 6766 

Singleton, S. L 6761 

Slater, Harold 6739 

Smith, Vernon A 6756 

Snell, Millicent 6761 

Snow, Clarence 6759 

Snow, June 6759 

Spears, George M 6752 

Spillman, Mrs. Frank 6757 

Staprgs, Boyd 6750 

Stallings, A. B 6732 

Starr, Algot 6731 

Starr, W. W., Jr 6731 

Starr, W. W., Sr 6731 

Stevenson, Adlai 6741 

Stewart, Barney 6740 

Stillion, Louise 6762 

Strom, Elmer 6731, 6747, 6748, 6756, 6757 

Swanson, Fred 6762 

Taylor, Glenn 6750 

Taylor, Marshall W., 3d 6769 

Teshera, Robert W 6740 

Thiesen, H. J 6763 

Thomas, L. E 6733 

Tobin, Richard L 6764 

Urquhart, Cecil J 6766 

Vanderbrink, Glenn 6757 

Votah, Peggy J 6768 

Vowell, Mrs. Mary 6760 

Walls, Lucille 6759 

Warmell, John A 6733 

Webber, Denny 6753 

Weisbarth, Maxie 6732 

Wesseling, Harold V 0738 

Westland, Jack 6771 

Weston, E. M 6741 

Williams, Jean M 6751 

Willoughl^y. James O 6731, 6734 

Windt, HI. D 6766 

Windt, Mrs. H. D 6766 

Winkler, R. H 6734 

Winthers, Robert 6745 

Witte, Clyde V 6752 



vi INDEX 

Pago 

Wood, Dave <j736 

Wood, Jasper C liToO 

Woodward, Edward C767 

Yarboro, M. A ("'739 

Zobrist, A <>75o 

Zobrist, Herb E 0728 

Zobrist, John 6728 

Organizations 

A. F. of L 6725, 6731-6735, 6737, 6738, 6741, 6744, 6750, 6766, 6767 

Aero Mechanics, District Lodge 751 6735 

Aleutian (steamship) 6738 

American Federation of Television and Radio Artists 6735 

Seattle Local 6735 

American Gold Star Mothers, Inc., Washington Department 6758 

American Legion 6736, 6741, 6756 

Washington State : 

.\nhiirn Post, No. 78 6742 

Bellingham, Albert Hamilton Post 6750 

Edmunds, S. Al. Wilcox Post, 234 6754 

Everett 6730,6752 

Olympia : 

Alfred William Leach Post, No. 3 6755 

Queen Anne Post 6764 

Onalaska, Wesley Kennedy Post 6762 

Parkland, Post 220 6761 

Seattle : 

Fire Fighters Post, No. 311 6747, 6756 

Universitv Post No. 11 6736 

South Bend, Willapa Harbor Post, No. 39 6767 

Sumner I'ost, No. .53 6757 

Suquamish, General John J. Pershing Post, No. 60 6768 

Tacoma 6763 

Edward G. Rhodes Post 0748 

4th District 6751, 6767 

Post No. 138 6752 

Rhodes Post, No. 2 0707 

American Legion Auxiliary : 

Washington State Department 6757 

Washington State : 

Blaine, Peace Arch Post, No. 86 6751 

Kirkland 6741 

l\farysville Unit, No. 178 0742 

Olympia , 6764 

Olvmpia Unit, No. 3 6753 

Parkland Post 220 6761 

Seattle : 

Fire Fighters Post 811 6747 

Navy-Marine, No. 59 6751 

University Po.st, No. 11 P.7.37 

Stanwood, Camino Island, No. 207 676fl 

Sumner Unit 53 6762 

West Seattle, No. 160 6761 

American Veterans of Second World War and Auxiliary, Post 19 6764 

Appi-oved Order of Redmen, Seattle Tribe, No. 25 6745 

Ballard Eagles, No. 172 67,54 

Ballard Elks, Lodge. No. 827 6758 

Bartenders' Union, Local, No. 487 0734 

P.eatty & Taylor Caterers 6769 

Bellingham Central Labor Council, AFL 6757 

Benevolent Perpolual Order of Elks, Seattle Lodge, No. 92 0752 

Bering Sea Fisherman's Union 6734 

TJittennan, L. S., Co 0729 

Blue Star Mothers of America, Staff Sergeant Stanley C. Ohlson Chapter, 

No. 2 0751 



INDEX vu 

Page 

Boeing Airplane Co 6735, 6738 

Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen 6736 

Buckley Boosters Club, Washington 6752 

Building Service Employees' International Union, Local No. 6, AFL. 6732 

CIO 6732, 6733, 6739, 6746, 6763 

Carrol Club, Seattle 6763 

Catholic War Veterans : 

Post 1005, Bremerton, Wash 6750 

State of Washington 6750 

Centralia Building Trades Council 6752 

Chamber of Commerce, Morton, Wash 6750 

Children of the American Revolution 6742 

Cimarron Insurance Co 6768 

City Firefishters Union, Local No. 106, Bellingham, Wash 6766 

College of Puget Sound 6769 

Commercial Telegraphers' Union, Local 40, AFL 6766 

Communication Workers of America, Local 9105, CIO 6763 

Daughters of the American Revolution : 

Governor Isaac Stevens Chapter 6757 

Washington State Conference 6768 

Whatcom Chapter 6747 

Daughters of the Union Veterans of the Civil War, Department of Wash- 
ington and Alaska 6768 

Democratic Club, 31st District, Seattle, Wash 6742 

Disabled American Veterans 6756 

Washington State : 

Bremerton, Chapter No. 5 6762 

Seattle : 

Chapter No. 2 6759 

Sunshine Chapter, No. 13 6767 

Tacoma, Chapter No. 1 6758 

Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary 6760 

Washington State, Everett, No. 10 6757 

Washington Department 6760, 6762 

Everett, Wash., Police Local 1149 6760 

Farmers' Union 6728 

Federal Bureau of Investigation 6729 

Fire Fighters Local 27 6757 

Fleet Reserve Association 6753 

Ladies' Auxiliary 6755 

Forty and Eight, Chef de Gare Voiture 151, Olympia, Wash 6755 

Fraternal Order, Eagles : 

Aerie 2.30S 6756 

No. 1387, Buckley, Wash 6758 

Salmon Bay Aerie 6761 

Seattle Arie No. 1 6749 

Galbraith Bros. Logging Co 6769 

Gig Harbor Sportsmen's Club 6754 

Graduates Club 6755 

Hall's Music Co., Tacoma, Wash 6730 

Highline, Wash. : 

Business and Professional Women's Club 6759 

Independent Order of Foresters 6743 

Court 563 6759 

International Association of Fire Fighters, Seattle, Local No. 27 6737 

International Association of Macliinists, AFL 6735 

Local 79 - 67.33 

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local Union, 46 6733 

International Brotherhood of Teamsters ' 6726 

International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union : 

Local 19 6766 

Stewards Department Organizing Committee 6733 

International Union of Office Employees, Local 302 6738 

International Union of Operating Engineers, AFL 6737 

Local 843 6744 



viii INDEX 

Page 

Jordan Veterans Association- 6765 

Knights of Columbus, Fourth Degree: 

James Shields Assembly, Seattle, Wash 6744 

Tacoma Assembly 6744 

Lake City Commercial Club, Seattle, Wash 6738 

Libby, McNeill & Libby 6727 

Little Men's Marching and Chowder Association 6764 

Loyal Order of Moose, Lodge 211, Seattle 6761 

Lumber and Saw Mill Workers Union, Local 2519, AFL 6738 

Machinists Union 6748 

Local 751 6738 

Marine Cooks and Stewards Union 6733, 6734 

Marine Cooks and Stewards, AFL 6731,6733,6738,6744 

Marine Corps League, Puget Sound Detachment 6768 

Marine Firemen's Union, AFL , 6767 

Military Order of the Purple Heart, Washington State : 

Chapter 324 6763 

Seattle Chapter 12 6753 

Municipal Employees' Union, Local 57 6745 

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People 6728 

National Maritime Union, CIO 6732 

National Union of Marine Cooks and Stewards Independent 6733 

Navy Mothers Club No. 256 6754 

Northwest Council of Food Process Workers 6726 

Office Employees International Union, Local 8 6766 

Order of De Molay, Sequim Chapter 6745 

Pacific Northwest Labor School 6734 

Painters Council No. 5 6745 

Painters Local Union 300 6734 

Parent-Teachers Association, Everett High School 6760 

Pierce County, Wash. : 

Sportsmen Council 6753 

Veterans Advisory Council 6767 

Pierce's Janitor Service 6769 

Pioneer Apartment Group, Inc 6755 

Rainier District Eagle Aerie and Auxiliary 6758 

Renton Highland Improvement Club 6745 

Renton Junior Chamber of Commerce 6734 

Russian All-Coss.';ck Association of Seattle and the State of Washington 6745 

Russian Veterans Society of the World War 6765 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific 6731,6732 

Scoop, Chehalis, Wash 6767 

Seafarers' International of North America, Atlantic and Gulf 6731,6732 

Seafarers' International Union, AFL 6734 

Seattle Fire Department 6731, 6747, 6753, 6756, 6757 

Engine Company No. 19 6747 

Fire Station 10, Platoon C 6748 

Station No. 15 6756 

Seattle Lahor School 6726 

Shop and Dock Foremen's Associations of Washington 6745 

Sons of Italy, Renton, Wash 6764 

Sons of Italy in America : 

Columbus Lodge of Everett 6759 

Grand Lodge of the Northwest 6751 

Renton Lodge, No. 1967 6765 

Streetcarmen's Union Local, 587—^ 6734, 6746 

Students for America, Seattle Chapter 6769 

Sun'^et Republican Club 6764 

Tacoma Americanization Council 6746 

Telegraph Delivery Service, Los Angeles, Calif 6738 

Theodore Home for the Aged 6762 

Totem Pontiac Co 6727 

Townsend Clubs, Washington State Council 6735 

Union Pacific Railroad, Seattle 6736 

United Bakery Workers Ix)cal, 1807, CIO 6746 

United Nations 6741 



INDEX IX 

Page 

United Spanish War Veterans, Fortson Thygensen Camp 6743 

United Steelworkers of America, Local Union, 1208, CIO 6739 

University of Washington 6748 

Vashon Maury Grange 6759 

Veterans of Foreign Wars 6746 

Washington State Department 6746, 6747 

Washington State : 

Auburn, White River Valley Post, No. 1741 _ 6751 

Bellevue, Lake Washington Post, No. 2959 6760 

Bellingham. Past Commanders Association, Post No. 1585 6756 

Bothell - 6746 

Bremerton, Norman E. Rosecrants, No. 7297 _ 6747 

Cle Elum, Post 1373 6760 

Everett, Old Guard Post, 1200 6752 

Morton Post, No. 2127 6750 

Seattle : 

No. 2713 6759 

No. 3348 67.53 

Ballard Post, 3063 6755 

Fort Lawton, No. 3694 6765 

James M. Eagleson Post, No. 1416 6749 

Ridge Forest Post, No. 7256 6764 

Col. Theodore Roosevelt Post, 24 6754 

U. S. S. Seattle, All Navy Post, 3469 6756 

Tacoma : 

3d District 6764 

Post, No. 1428 6765 

Sam Brough Post, 6855 6762 

Teterans of Foreign Wars Auxiliary: 

Massachusetts, Worcester Post, No. 479 6754 

Washington State: 

Auburn, White River Valley Post, No. 1741 6751 

Bellevue, Lake Washington Post, No. 2959 6760 

Bothell 6746 

Bremerton : Norman E. Rosencrants, No. 7297 6747 

Cle Elum, Washington Post, 1373 6760 

Seattle : 

Post 3063 6747 

No. 2713 6759 

Fort Lawton, No. 3694 6765 

Col. Theodore Roosevelt Post, 24 6754 

Tacoma : 

Post, No. 1428 6765 

Sam Brough Post, 6855 6762 

Volunteers of America 6762 

Washington Institute of Social Welfare 6768 

Washington State Council, CIO 6739 

Washington State Council of Municipal Police Local 63 6758 

Washington State Federation of Labor 6741 

Washington State Hospital Employees 476, A. F. of L 67.50 

Washington State Lahor Defense Committee 6766 

Washington State Pension Union 6735, 6739 

Washington State Tovpnsend Council 6739 

West Seattle Commercial Club 6740 

West Virginia Club of Washington (State) 6763 

Wliatcom County Democratic Central Committee 6740 

Whatcom County Republican Club 6740 

Whatcom County Young Republicans 6740 

Women's Catholic Order of Foresters 6754 

Women's Christian Temperance Union of Western Washington 6740 

World Federation of Trade Unions 6741 

Zobrist, Herb E., Co 6728 

o 



I 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Ml lllllll II 



3 9999 05445 3418