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Full text of "Investigation of communist activities, New York area. Hearing"

us c 



HARVARD COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 




GIFT OF THE 

GOVERNMENT 
OF THE UNITED STATES 



A. 

INVESTIGATION OF COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES 
NEW YORK— PART II 

(YOUTH ORGANIZATIONS) 



HEARING 

BEFORE THE 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OE REPRESENTATIVES 

EIGHTY-FOURTH CONGRESS 

FIRST SESSION 



MARCH 16, 1955 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 




UNITED STATES 

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 

WASHINGTON : 1955 



HAtCVAr'O CO! L£GC !.)«KAKY 

DEPOSITED BY l.iC 

MWTEB STATES QOVERNMENT 



ItfUN 2/1955 



COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
United States House of Representatives 

FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania, Chairman 
MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri HAROLD H. VELDE, Illinois 

CLYDE DOYLE, California BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York 

JAMES B. FRAZIER, Jr., Tennessee DONALD L. JACKSON, California 

EDWIN E. WILLIS, Louisiana GORDON H. SCHERER, Ohio 

Thomas W, Beale, Sr., Chief Clerk 



CONTENTS 



March 16, 1955: 

Testimony of — Page 

Leon Wofsy _ ___ 219 

Joseph Bucholt __ 229 

Robert Fogel _ 236 

Ernest Parent 243 

Sam Engler _ 244 

Index I 

HI 



Public Law 601, 79th Congress 

The legislation under which the House Committee on Un-American 
Activities operates is Public Law 601, 79th Congress [1946], chapter 
53, 2d session, which provides: 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States 
f America in Congress assembled, * * * 

PART 2— RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 
Rule X 

SEC. 121. STANDING COMMITTEES 
******* 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 
Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 
******* 

(q) (1) Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(A) Un-American activities. 

(2) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommit- 
ee, is authorized to make from time to time investigations of (i) the extent, 
haracter, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
ii) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propa- 
;anda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and attacks 
he principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitution, and 
iii) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress in any necessary 
emedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
^lerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
;ation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such 
imes and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, 
las recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
f such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
he signature of tlie chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
aember designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person 
lesignated by any such chairman or member. 

V 



r 
III 

RULES ADOPTED BY THE 84TH CONGRESS | 

House Resolution 5, January 5, 1955 
* * * * * * * . 

Rule X I 

STANDING COMMITTEES ■ 

1. There shall be elected by the House, at the commencement of each Con <( 
gress, the following standing committees: j 

******* 
(q) Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members. 
******* 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 
******* 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities. i 

(a) Un-American activities. i 

(b) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommittee j, 
is authorized to make from time to time, investigations of (1) the extent, chajl 
acter, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States | 
(2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American prop 
aganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin an' 
Ettacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitu 
tion, and (3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congres 
in any necessary remedial legislation. , 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to tbj f 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi ^ 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. _ || 

I For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-America)i l 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such timej jl 
and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, ha , 
recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance sj 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, anc! \ 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued unde; ', 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by anv 
member designated by such chairman, and may be served by any person desigii j 
nated by any such chairman or member. c I 



INVESTIGATION OF COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES— NEW 
YOEK-PART II (YOUTH ORGANIZATIONS) 



WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 1955 

United States House of Repkesentatives, 

Subcommittee of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington, D. C. 
public hearing 

A subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities met, 
jrsiiant to notice, at 10:05 a. m., in room 346, Old House Office 
Jiilding, Hon. Francis E, Walter (chaii-man) presiding. 

Committee members present: Representatives Francis E. Walter 
iiairman), Edwin E. Willis, and Donald L. Jackson. 

Staff members present: Thomas W. Beale, Sr., chief clerk, and 
(3orge C. Williams, investigator. 

The Chairman. The meeting will come to order. 

This hearing is a continuation of the inquhies conducted by this 
(inmittee into the question of infiltration in youth organizations 
1' Communists. 

Let the record show I have appointed a subcommittee consisting of 
jr. Edwin E. Willis of Louisiana, Mr. Donald L. Jackson of Cali- 
irnia, and myself of Pennsylvania, as chairman, for the purposes of 
lis hearing, 

Mr. Beale, have you a witness? 

Mr. Beale. Mr. Leon Wofsy. 

The Chairman. Step forward, Mr. Wofsy. Will you hold up your 
],'ht hand, please. 

Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give 
"-11 be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth? 

Mr. Wofsy. I do. 

The Chairman. Be seated. 

'USTIMONY OF LEON WOFSY, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
SAMUEL GRUBER 

Mr. Beale. Will you state your name for the record, please? 
Mr. Wofsy. Leon Wofsy, W-o-f-s-y. 
Mr. Beale. Are you represented by counsel? 
Mr. Wofsy. Yes, I am. 

Mr. Beale. Will counsel please identify himself? 
Mr. Grubee. Yes. My name is Samuel Gruber, G-r-u-b-e-r, from 
iamford. Conn. 

Mr. Chairman, may I respectfully request that photographs of the 
itness not be taken now during the course of the hearing? 

219 



220 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 






The Chairman. Yes. The photographers know the rules, and th 
usually comply with them. 

Mr. Gruber. Mr. Chairman, I am advised by the clerk that , 
this time I could present a motion which I have for the considerati 
of the committee, and I would like to present it, if I may. 

The CHAIRMA^J. Of course, this is not the proper place to prese. 
the motion which you have presented. 

You may proceed, Mr. Beale. |i 

Mr. Gruber. May I have it in the record? 

The Chairman. It is in the record. I have just stated that tlW 
is not the proper place to make the motion which has just been ma(!|Jl 
and the motion will be made a part of the record. 

(The document above referred to marked "Exhibit No. 1" i'l 
identification only, is filed herewith and made a part of the committ; 
files.) fl 

Mr. Gruber. Thank you. 

Mr. Beale. When and where were you born, Mr. Wofsy? 

Mr. Wofsy. I was born in Stamford, Conn., November 23, 19^| 

Mr. Beale. Where do you presently reside? 

Mr. Wofsy. In the Bronx, at 1308 Findlay Avenue. 

Mr. Beale. Will you give us a brief statement of your educatior 
training? 

Mr. Wofsy. I went to public school in Stamford, continued 
New Haven, and graduated from New Haven High School, and I a 
a graduate of the City College of New York. 

Mr. Beale. What year? 

Mr. Wofsy. 1942. 

Mr. Beale. What has been your record of employment? 

Mr. Wofsy. May I consult with counsel? 

Mr. Beale. Yes; surely. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Wofsy. I worked at a number of jobs in the field of chemist« 
after getting out of college for a period of approximately^ — ^in su 
total, I would imagine, a year and a half or so. 

Beyond that, I would regard further inquiry into my employme 
as a sphere in which I would not answer on the grounds that to do 
would violate my rights under the first amendment and would can 
me to be a witness against myself, and I invoke the privilege of tl 
fifth amendment against further answer to that question. 

Mr. Beale. You do invoke that privilege, then? 

Mr. Wofsy. I do. 

Mr. Beale. In other words, you are willing to tell of your emplo.^ 
ment record up to 1944, but you are not willing to disclose what yot 
employment has been since that time; is that correct? 

Mr. Wofsy. That is correct. 

The Chairman. Are you the national director of the Communii 
Party youth movement? 

Mr. Wofsy. I would decline to answer that question on the grounc 
that to do so would violate my rights under the first amendment t 
the Constitution, and I also invoke my privilege under the fifth ament 
ment against giving testimony which may be used against me. 

The Chairman. You said, "I would." By that do you mean yo 
do? 

Mr. Wofsy. That is so. 



I 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 221 

jMr. Beale. Mr. Wofsy, the Daily Worker of April 9, 1946, has an 

rticle calling attention to meetings of 300 Communist Party clubs in 

'ew York, and urging the people to hear the outstanding leaders of 

le Communist Party speak at these meetings on the subject. The 

ruggle for Peace and BuUding the Communist Party. vScheduled 

nong the speakers for Bronx County is one Leon Wofsy. Are you 

le Leon Wofsy mentioned in that article? 

Mr. Wofsy. May I consult? 

Mr. Beale. Surely. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Wofsy. I would decline to answer that question on the same 

•ounds as the previous one. 

Mr. Beale. Did you speak for or on behalf of the Communist Party 

iiring the month of April 1946? 

Mr. Wofsy. Similarly. 

Mr. Beale. Similarly what? 

Air. Wofsy. I decline to answer that question on the grounds that 

• do so would violate ni}^ rights under the first amendment to the 

onstitution 

The Chairman. Let us save time by saying, "I refuse to answer 

1 the grounds I have stated." 

Mr. Wofsy. Yes, I agree to that. 

Mr. Beale. According to information in the files of the committee, 

IB Second National Convention of the American Youth for Democ- 

icy was held in New York City June 13-16, 1946. The report of 

lat convention reflects that Leon Wofs}^ of New York, made a 
import of the resolutions committee on peace policy at the Friday 
lorning session. Are you the Leon Wofsy referred to in that report? 

Mr. Wofsy. The answer is the same as previously. 

Mr. Beale. Were you ever affiliated in any manner with the Ameri- 
m Youth for Democracy? 

Mr. Wofsy. The answer is the same as previously. 
! Mr. Beale. A pamphlet published b}^ the United May Day Com- 
littee for May Da^^ 1947 reflects the membership of the United May 
)ay Committee, and contains the name of Leon Wofsy, executive 
icretary, New York State American Youth for Democracy. Are 
■ou the Leon Wofsy mentioned in that pamphlet? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Were you ever a member of the United May Day 
Committee? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Another pamphlet published by the Committee for 
•lay Day, 1948, reflects the name of Leon Wofsy as executive secre- 
ary, American Youth for Democracy of the New York State Council 
s a member of the May Day Committee for 1948. Are you that 
ieon Wofsy? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. On May 7, 1948, the Civil Rights Congress addressed 

letter to all Members of Congress to which was attached an open 
itter, signed by numerous people, in opposition to H. R. 5852, then 
nown as the Mundt bill. Among those signing that open letter 
ppears the name of Leon Wofsy. 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 



222 COMIMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 

Mr. Beale. Wait until I ask the question, please. Are you tl 
Leon Wofsy referred to in that open letter? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Did you join with the Civil Rights Congress or ai 
other organization in opposing any bill to control subversive activitie 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Did you ever file an application for a passport with tl 
State Department? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Jackson. Mr. Chairman, I request that the witness be direct( 
to answer that question, whether or not he filed an application for 
passport with the State Department. It seems to me that mar 
people have so filed applications for passports, and that is a questi( 
which is well within the scope of this inquiry. 

The Chairman. Yes, I thinly the witness certainly should answc 
I could imagine questions that might be asked in that connecti( 
which might involve you in crime, but the mere question whether 
not you have applied for a passport certainly cannot involve you 
criminal prosecution, and I direct you to answer the question. 

Mr. Wofsy. May I consult with my attorney? 

Mr. Beale. Yes. m 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 'W 

Mr. Wofsy. I would answer "Yes," that I did apply. 

Mr. Beale. I show you a photostatic copy of a passport applic 
tion, and ask you if the signature of Leon Wofsy on that apphcati( 
is your signature? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Wofsy. I decline to answer that question on the same grouni 
as previously stated. 

The Chairman. Do you decline to answer? 

Mr. Wofsy. I do, sir. 

Mr. Beale. Will you look at the application and state whether 
not the photostatic copy of the picture on that is a reasonable likene 
of yourself? 

Mr. Wofsy. Shall I request each time I want to consult with m 
attorney? 

The Chairman. No. ^ _ «■ 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) * 

Mr. Wofsy. I decline to answer that question on the same grounc 
as previously indicated. 

Mr. Beale. Was this application for passport granted or deniecl 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

The Chairman. Wliat is the date of it, Mr. Beale? 

Mr. Beale. It appears to be the 11th of June 1948. 

Mr. Wofsy. I would decline to answer that question on the sam 
grounds. 

The Chairman. Do you decline to answer? 

Mr. Wofsy. Yes, I do. 

Mr. Beale. According to an article in the Daily Worker of July 1^ 
1948, Leon Wofsy, national educational director of the America' 
Youth for Democracy, filed an application for a passport on June 1 
for the purpose of attending the Young Workers Conference and a 
executive meeting of the World Federation of Democratic Youth 
According to this article the passport had not been issued, and 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 223 

rotest was filed with the State Department by the American Youth 
)r Democracy. Are you the Leon Wofsy referred to in this article? 

Mr. Wofsy. I decline to answer that on the same grounds. 

Mr. Beale. Had you made arrangements to attend the World 
'ederation of Democratic Youth? 
' Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Who made those arrangements? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. In the March 1949 issue of Political Affairs appears an 
rticle entitled "Fighting for the Needs of the Young Workers," by 
ieon Wofsy. According to Political Affairs, this article was based on 

report to the national committee of the Communist Party made on 
anuary 24, 1949. Were you the writer of that article? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Did you make such a report to the national committee 
f the Communist Party on January 24, 1949? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. According to an article in the Daily Worker of April 1, 
949, the 8 youth leaders from New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, and 
California were to meet to consider plans for a new working class youth 
•rganization. Among those who issued a statement about this meeting 
i^as Leon Wofsy. Are you the Leon Wofsy mentioned in this article? 
I Mr. Wofsy. I decline to answer that question on the grounds that, 
n my opinion, any question in that sphere would interfere with due 
)rocess and any semblance of justice for the Labor Youth League in 
,he McCarran proceedings which are now underway and which the 
liabor Youth League is contesting, 

Mr. Jackson. Do you decline to answer on any grounds other than 
that? 

Mr. Wofsy. In my opinion, that is an adequate ground for the time 
3eing. 

The Chairman. I direct you to answer the question, Mr. Wofsy. 

Mr. Wofsy. I answer it on that ground the same way, as well as on 
the grounds of the first amendment and the fifth amendment privilege 
w^hich I have used previously. 

Mr. Jackson. I interposed that question in order that he might 
not place himself in jeopardy by overlooking the fifth amendment in 
this question. The previously stated grounds I do not consider to 
be legal grounds for refusing to answer the question. 

Mr. Beale. What was the purpose of that meeting? 

Mr. Wofsy. I maintain the same position on all three grounds. I 
would regard this as an inquiry upon an inquiry not provided for by 
the laws of Congress. I think it would be an interference with the 
procedures of Congress 

The Chairman. I would like to remind you that this committee is 
charged with the responsibility of making the American people aware 
of the existence of activities which are not in the best interests of the 
United States. It is not a punitive operation. It is for information. 
That is what we are seeking now. We would be very grateful if you 
would give us assistance in this ver}^ patriotic movement which we 
know you can give us. 

Mr. WoFSY. If I may 

The Chairman. This is purely a case of informing the people. I 
am going to ask you, are you a member of the Labor Youth League? 



224 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 



I 



Mr. WoFSY. I decline to answer that on the same grounds as prevl 
ously stated. I 

The Chairman. You are the national chairman of the Labor Yout' 
League, are you not? 

Mr. WoFSY. If I may, I believe I have a strong position which -r 
believe in deeply, and I believe it is a patriotic position, and I belies' 
that it is perfectly in line with the facts. Certainly the Labor Yout 
League hearings have been given extensive publicity, very extensi\; 
publicity, and it is our understanding — we have consulted with coui 
sel, and it is our understanding that it is an infringement on the righi 
of Congress 

The Chairman. With what counsel did you confer? Who gave yo 
that opinion? 

Mr. WoFSY. We have consulted, if I may consult further at th 
moment — ^if I may consult at this moment on that question before 
answer it. 

The Chairman. Yes, surely. i- j 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) | 

Mr. WoFSY. I have consulted with my attorney, and that positio* 
was indicated in the motion which Mr. Gruber placed here before tb 
committee at the outset. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Beale. Getting back to this meeting, what was the result c] 
the meeting? 

Mr. WoFSY. I must refuse to answer that on the same grounds ai 
previously indicated, that it does not represent a legitimate questioi 
within the sphere of this inquiry. f j 

Mr. Beale. In addition to that, do you also plead the provisioE 
of the fifth amendment? 

Mr. WoFSY. If I am so directed, I believe I am also entitled to th 
privilege under the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Beale. I ask that he be directed to answer. 

The Chairman. I direct you to answer. 

Mr. WoFSY. Yes; I am basing myself, in that case, on all thre 
grounds previously indicated. '] 

Mr. Beale. Mr. Wofsy, isn't it true that this meeting resulted i: 
a gathering in the People's Auditorium in Chicago, 111., on Ma; 
28-29, 1949, at which time the national organizing conference for : 
Labor Youth League was launched? 

Mr. WoFSY. I refuse to answer that on exactly the same ground 
as previously indicated. 

Mr. Beale. Did you attend that meeting in Chicago? 

Mr. WoFSY. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Isn't it true that you were named chairman of th<| 
national organizing conference for a Labor Youth League? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Did you prepare a report of the meeting? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

The Chairman. I think there is a newspaper account of his electior 
as chairman; is there not? I 

Mr. Beale. I will get to that, Mr. Chairman. ; 

I show you a photostatic copy of a pamphlet entitled, "For a Ne^f 
Youth Organization Dedicated to Education in the Spirit of Socialism,' 
which is also called a Report to the Gathering of Youth Leaders whicl: 



coMivruisrisT activities in the new york area 225 

Jjiiched the national organizing conference for a Labor Youth 
jague at the People's Auditorium in Chicago, 111., May 28-29, 1949. 
"ere you the author of that report? 

Mr. WoFSY. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Doesn't that report reflect the words, "By Leon 
^ofsy"? _ 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. WoFSY. That name appears here. 

The Chairman. Do you contend that that Leon Wofsy and you 
{e two different people? 

Mr. Wofsy. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds 
jeviously stated. 

Mr. Beale. In an advertisement appearing m the July 28, 1949, 
iue of the Daily Worker, there is mention of a Dimitroff, 
]-i-m-i-t-r-o-f-f, memorial meeting to be held under the auspices 
( the Communist Party of New York State. Listed in the advertise- 
i3nt as speakers are Benjamin J. Davis, John Gates, and Leon 
"'ofs}^ chairman, Labor Youth League. Are you the Leon Wofsy 
imtioned m that advertisement? 

Mr. Wofsy. I decline to answer on the same grounds. 

Mr. Beale. Did you speak at that meeting? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

iMr. Beale. Did you attend that meeting as chairman of the Labor 

")uth League? 

,Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

|Mr. Beale. The Daily Worker of August 25, 1949, carries a "Dear 

hn Gold" column. This column is devoted to pleas by Ben Gold 

J ■ funds for the defense of the 12 Communist leaders. In the column 

i pears a letter to Ben Gold which reads: 

We who have just attended the first national leaders' meeting of the national 
(ranizing conference for a Labor Youth League are proud to second Pen Gold's 
Dtion. We pledge our efforts to win young people for the freedom of Winston, 
teen, and Hall, and for the smashing of the frameup on Foley Square. 

I Among the names appearing as having signed that letter is one Leon 
'ofsy. Are you the Leon W'ofsy referred to? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Jackson. May I ask a question? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Jackson. Counsel, what was the oft'ense for which Ben Gold 
^is indicted? 

Mr. Beale. This was a movement to raise funds launched by Ben 
'old on behalf of the 12 Communist leaders, . 

Mr. Jackson. Was he not later indicted? 

(Conference at the committee table, off the record.) 

Mr. Jackson. Falsification of non-Communist affidavit under the 
'ift-Hartley Act. Thank you. 

Mr. Beale. According to the Daily Worker of December 5, 1949, 
Iree youth leaders were added to the staff of the national organizing 
(nference of the Labor Youth League. This article further states 
lat the new leaders joined Leon Wofsy, who was elected national 
(airman at the organizing conference held at Chicago on Memorial 
lay weekend. Are you that Leon Wofsy? 

Mr. WoFSY. The same answer. 



226 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 

W Mr. Beale. According to the Daily Worker of January 12, 195C 
there was a Bronx County Communist Party Lenia memorial meet 
ing to be held January 19 at 7:30 p. m. Scheduled as speakers wepj 
Robert Thompson, Pearl Lawes, Leon Wofsy, chairman of the Natione 
Labor Youth League. Are you the Leon Wofsy mentioned in thai 
article? ' 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Did you speak at the Lenin memorial meeting? , 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. In the May 1950 issue of Political Affairs appears a, 
article entitled, "Toward Unity of the Working Youth for Peac<J 
Jobs, and Democracy." This is an article by Leon Wofsy. In thi 
article I direct your attention to one sentence which reads: i 

Despite the angry attention that the league is already receiving from witc 
hunters, it has begun to answer the vital need in our country for an independei 
youth organization with a working-cla3s content and direction, with a program i 
education in the spirit and principles of Marxism, of scientific socialism. ' 

Do you recall that statement? , 

Mr. Wofsy. The same ans\yer. 

Mr. Beale. What does that statement indicate? , 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Did you ever hear of a publication called Challengt 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) , 

Mr. Wofsy. Yes. 

Mr. Beale. Is not Challenge the official organ or publication < 
the Labor Youth League? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Wofsy. I decline to answer that question on the same grouiK \ 
previously indicated. 

Mr. Beale, Mr. Chairman, I ask that he be directed to answe 
The witness has identified it. He said he has heard of it. 

The Chairman. Yes; the witness is directed to answer the questio 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Wofsy. I don't believe I have to answer that. It woui 
seem to me that it is two entirely different questions: what I heaij 
about it, and what I may or may not know about it. 

Mr. Beale. You are directed to answer it. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Wofsy. Well, I must respectfully decline on the grouiK 
previously indicated, all three. 

The Chairman. You are not under any compulsion. Do y( 
decline to answer that question? 

Mr. WoFSY. I do. 

Mr. Jackson. May I ask a question, Mr. Chairman? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Jackson. The witness has stated that he does know of 
publication called Challenge. I should like to ask the witness tlj 
extent of his knowledge relative to Challenge. 

Mr. Wofsy. I would decline to answer that question on the sani 
grounds as previously indicated. j 

Mr. Jackson. The witness has testified that he has knowledge l \ 
the publication, and I would ask that the witness be directed 
answer the question. 



COMJVIUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE NEW YORK AREA 227 

The Chairman. The witness is directed to answer the question. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

iA'Ir. WoFSY. I would answer that in the following way: I have seen 
le publication many times; and as to any further knowledge of the 
jiblication, I would decline to answer that question on the grounds 
jeviously stated. 

The Chairman. Have you contributed anything to the magazine? 

Mr. WoFSY. I would decline to answer that question on the grounds 
jeviously stated. 

Mr. Beale. In the May 1950 issue of Challenge appears an article 
( titled "Peace Can Be Won Only If We Fight for It Now." On the 
sme page appears a picture, and under the pictiu-e the name of 
'ofsy. It is apparent that Wofsy was the author of this article. 
'Ul you look at this photostatic copy and tell the committee whether 
< not the picture appearing there is a reasonable likeness of yourself? 

Mr. WoFSY. I decline to answer that on the same grounds previously 
jdicated. 

Mr. Beale. Does not that article appear on that page of Challenge, 
• e article that I previously mentioned? 

The Chairman. Offer in evidence the article. The article is the best 
. idence, Mr. Counsel. 

(The photostatic copy of the article appearing in the May 1950 issue 
■ Challenge was made a part of the record.) 

Mr. Beale. According to information in the files of the committee, 

e first national convention of the Labor Youth League was held in 

ew York City on November 23-26, 1950. A report of that conven- 

)n reflects the names of those elected to a national council of the 
ibor Youth League. Among those names appears that of Leon 

ofsy, national chairman. Were you elected to the national council 

the Labor Youth League in November 1950? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. According to an article in the Daily Worker of July 5, 
)51, there was a meeting held at Park Palace on 110th Street and 
,h Avenue, by the Committee to Defend Roosevelt Ward, Jr. Among 
IB scheduled speakers were Claudia Jones and Leon Wofsy, national 
lairman of the Labor Youth League. Are you the Leon Wofsy 

entioned there? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Did you speak at that meeting? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. The Daily Worker of August 26, 1952, carries an 
'tide that Leon Wofsy 's new 15-cent pamphlet entitled, "Youth 
ights for Its Future," is now available for distribution. Were you 
le author of such a pamphlet? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. I show you a photostatic copy of that issue of the 
•aily Worker and ask you if you can recognize the picture on there 
5 a likeness of yourself. 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. According to an article in the Daily Worker of March 
2, 1954, it is reported that— 

'^ofsy proudly stated the Labor Youth League's fraternal relations with the 
ommunist Party, as well as the fact that he personally is a Communist. 






228 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE NEW YORK AREA 

Were you correctly reported in that article? 

Mr. WoFSY. The same answer. 

The Chairman. When was that, Mr. Beale? 

Mr. Beale. March 22, 1954. 

The Chairman. Do you know anything about a petition whicl 
was circulated among teen-agers having to do with peace? 

Mr. WoFSY. The same answer. 

The Chairman. I think, Mr. Beale, that this is of terrific impor 
tance. When 50,000 gullible children were prevailed upon by obvi 
ously Communist leaders to become enmeshed in this internationa 
conspiracy, it calls for further investigation. I would like to knoT 
who circulated the petition, what means were used to induce thes' 
unsuspecting children to sign, how many signed, and who is respon 
sible for the actual circulation. 

Mr. Beale. I will have it looked into. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. WoFSY. That was not a question? 

The Chairman. I was making a speech for your benefit. 

Mr. WorsY. I wish we had the same opportunity. 

The Chairman. I know it would make no impression, any moK 
than yours would make on me. 

Proceed, Mr. Beale. 

Mr. Beale. What are the fraternal relations existing between thi 
Labor Youth League and the Communist Party? 

Mr. WoFSY, The same answer; the same three grounds as previously 
indicated. 

Mr. Beale. The September 1954 issue of Political Affairs is en 
titled, "Reports and Documents, National Election Conference of tb 
Communist Party, New York City, August 7-8, 1954." This issui 
carried an article entitled, "For Democratic Youth Unity," by Leoi 
Wofsy, and has a footnote that it was a speech made at the conference 
Did you attend the national election conference of the Communis 
Party held in New York City in August 1954? i»j 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. ^ 

Mr. Beale. Did you make that report at the conference? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Mr. Wofsy, how long have you been a member of tb 
Communist Party? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Are you now a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Wofsy. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. I have no further questions of this witness. 

The Chairman. Any questions, Mr. Willis? 

Mr. Willis. No. 

The Chairman. Mr. Jackson? 

Mr. Jackson. I have no questions, Mr. Chairman, but I certainlj 
hope that the transcript of this witness' testimony will be read bj 
every educator in the country, in order that the Labor Youth League 
may be adequately evaluated for what it is. Nothing further. 

Mr. Gruber. May I address the Chair and ask one question? 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Gruber. Are these exhibits mentioned by the examiner to bfj 
made a part of the record? 

The Chairman. We will determine that. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 229 

Mr. Gruber. Except the one that you indicated was to be? 

The Chairman. We will determine which of those we will make a 
irt of the record for the purpose of bringing home to decent Ameri- 
ms just what this is. 

Mr. Gruber. I just wanted to know which 

The Chairman. We are not concerned so much with the witness' 
istimony as the use of it in connection with information we have. 

Mr. Gruber. I was just inquiring whether all of the exhibits that 
ere read from are to be made a part of the record, and you have in- 
icated that the committee will decide which of them. 

The Chairman. That is right. 

Mr. Gruber. Thank you. 

Mr. WoFSY. If I may say so, this is so obviously unfair that I 
on't believe it will make much of an impression on young people 

The Chairman. It won't on some people. 

Mr. WoFSY. Who know that they can hear everything the Labor 
outh League has to say and judge it for themselves, if they go to 
le Labor Youth League office, I would imagine. 

(Whereupon the witness was excused.) 

The Chairman. Call another witness. 

Mr. Beale, Joseph Bucholt. 

The Chairman. Will j^ou hold up your right hand? 

Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give 
Ul be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth? 

Mr. Bucholt. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF JOSEPH BUCHOLT, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, SAMUEL GRUBER 

Mr. Beale. Will you state your name for the record, please? 

Mr. Bucholt. Joseph Bucholt, B-u-c-h-o-l-t. 

Mr. Beale. Are you represented by counsel? 

Mr. Bucholt. I am. 

Mr. Beale. May the record show that the same counsel is repre- 
enting Mr. Bucholt as represented the preceding witness? 

The Chairman. Yes, 

Mr. Beale. Wlien and where were you born? 

Mr. Bucholt. I was born in the Bronx, N. Y., on April 25, 1920. 

Mr. Beale. \Yliere do you now reside? 

Mr. Bucholt. I now reside in the Bronx, N. Y., at 109 West 
3urnside Avenue. 

! Mr. Beale. Wliat has been your educational training? 
I Mr. Bucholt. I went to several public schools in Bronx and Man- 
lattan. I was graduated from Tilden High School in Brooklyn. 

Mr. Beale. What year? 

Mr. Bucholt. In 1936. 

Mr. Beale. Did that complete your formal education? 

Mr. Bucholt. I had about half a year in engineering school at 
Oity College, New York. 

Mr. Beale. What has been your record of employment? 

Mr. Bucholt. Upon graduating from high school, for several years 
[ had a job in a hardware estabhshment and in two real estate offices. 
[ spent Sji years in the United States Army; and in relation to my 

61438—55 3 



230 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 

employment after that, I decline to answer on the basis of my right 
imder the first and fifth amendments to the United States Constitutior 

Mr. Beale. I don't want to mispronounce yom- name. How di 
you pronounce it? 

Mr. BucHOLT. Bucholt. 

Mr. Beale. One ''h" or two? 

Mr, Bucholt. One. 

Mr. Beale. Did you ever hear of a publication called the Weekl; 
Review? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Bucholt. I decline to answer that question on the basis o 
my rights guaranteed under the fii-st and fifth amendments. 

Mr. Beale. Mr. Chairman, there has been no identification of th( 
publication so far. 

The Chairman. He probably knows all about it. That is why h 
has invoked the Constitution. 

Mr. Beale. Undoubtedly he does. 

The Chairman. That is why. 

Mr. Beale. Wasn't the Weekly Review the publication of th' 
Young Communist League? 

Mr. Bucholt. I decline to answer on the same constitutiona 
grounds. 

Mr. Beale. Let me call your attention to an item appearing i 
the January 27, 1942, issue of the Weekly Review: 

As Comrade Max Weiss, national chairman of the Weekly Review circulatioi 
drive, has said, it requires the entire energy of our league members to overcom 
this weakness, and increase the Review circulation. There is no single questio 
before our YCL that comes before this task, and if our members realize th: 
fundamental truth then we will achieve any and all tasks before us. Therefoi 
we, the section organizers of the New York State YCL, assume personal respor ' 
sibility for organizing and leading the Review circulation drive from February 
to May 1 to gain a stable circulation of 18,000 weekly in New York State. 

Going then to the March 31, 1942, issue of the Weekly Revie\^ 
concerning this drive, there appears the following article: 

Bronx Versus Brooklyn I 

From our corner of Brooklyn — Brownsville, East New York, and the 18t > 
Assembly District — we're takino: this opportunity of making public our challeng 
to three brother sections from the Bronx — East Bronx, West Bronx, and Nort 
Bronx. 

Skipping further down it discloses this article, it is signed by Rutl 
Osherow, Herb Mahbow, and Joe Bucholt, 18th A. D. — S. O. Ak 
you the Joe Bucholt mentioned in that article? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same as previously stated. 

Mr, Beale. That is, you decline under the privilege of the fiftl 
amendment? 

Mr. Bucholt. On the basis of my privileges under the first anc 
the fifth amendments. 

Mr. Beale. The Daily Worker of April 9, 1946, contains an artick 
callmg attention to special meetings of 300 Communist Party clubs 
in New York in which the people are urged to hear the outstanding; 
leaders of the Communist Party speak on the subject. The Struggle 
for Peace and the Building of the Communist Party. 

Scheduled among the speakers for Bronx County appear Robert 
Thompson, Alexander Trachtenberg, Joe Bucholt, and others. Are 
you the Joe Bucholt mentioned in that article? i 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE NEW YORK AREA 231 

Mr. BucHOLT. My answer is the same, 

I Mr. Beale. Were you on April 9, 1946, a member of the Communist 
arty? 

Mr. BucHOLT. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. Did you speak at any of these Communist Party 
leetings during that week? 

Mr. BucHOLT. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. According to the information in the files of the com- 
littee, the American Youth for Democracy held its second annual 
mvention in New York City, June 13-16, 1946, and in the report 
■ the proceedings of that convention, one Joe Bucholt was a member 
: the New York State National Council of the A YD. Are you the 
)e Bucholt mentioned? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. Were you at any time a member of the American 
outh for Democracy? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. According to the Daily Worker of September 20, 1948, 
cketing of the Federal Building at Foley Square, New York City, 
as to begin the next day, the purpose being to demand the dismissal 
' the indictments against the 12 Communist Party leaders. This was 
ider the auspices of the New York State division of the Civil Rights 
ongress. 

According to the article, those scheduled to lead the pickets were, 
nong others, Joseph Bucholt, executive secretary. New York State 
merican Youth for Democracy. Are you the Joseph Bucholt men- 
oned in the article? 

Mr. Bucholt. I decline to answer that on the basis of my rights 
ader the first and fifth amendments. 

Mr. Beale. Did you participate in the picketing of the Federal 
uilding? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. The Daily Worker of March 31, 1949, carries a news 
em to the effect that Joseph Bucholt, assistant New York State youth 
irector of the Communist Party, told United States District Judge 

arold Medina's law assistant yesterday, young men and women in 
le Communist Party charge the judge is unjustly permitting the 
arty and its program to be placed on trial and condemned without 
srmitting the jury to hear testimony of the main defense witness, 
/illiam Z. Foster. Are you the Joseph Bucholt mentioned in that 
3WS item? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. The Daily Worker of July 15, 1949, carries a picture 
ititled, "At the Reunion Dance of Former YCL'ers." Under the 
icture appears the following: 

Joseph Bucholt and Julian Lowitt, leaders of the organizing conference for 
Labor Youth League, sell honorary memberships in the league to four Com- 
unist Party leaders at a reunion dance of former Young Communist League 
embers * * *. 

re you the Joseph Bucholt mentioned in that article? 

Mr. Bucholt. I decline to answer that on the basis of my rights 
ider the first and fifth amendments of the United States Constitu- 
on. 

Mr. Beale. Were you a member of the organizing conference for a 
abor Youth League? 



232 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 

Mr. BucHOLT. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. Did you sell honorary memberships in the league t( 
Communist Party leaders? 

Mr. BucHOLT. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. The Daily Worker of August 25, 1949, carries ; 
column headed, "Dear Ben Gold." In that column appears th 
following: 

We who have just attended the first national leaders' meeting of the nationji'j 
organizing conference for a Labor Youth League are proud to second Ben Gold' 
motion. We pledge our efforts to win young people for the freedom of Winstoi 
Green, and Hall, and for the smashing of the frameup on Foley Square. 

Among the signers to the letter appears the name of Joseph Bucholl 
Ai*e you the Joseph Bucholt mentioned in that? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. Did you ever hear of a publication called the Challengel 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. Isn't that a publication of the Labor Youth League, 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. On page 6 of the issue of March 1950 appears a I 
article about Jose Marti, a Cuban revolutionary hero. The article ' 
by Ted Veal and Joe Bucholt. Did you prepare, or take part d 
participate in the preparation of, that article? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. On the same page appears the picture of Ted Veai 
Joe Bucholt, and Flavio Bravo, a leader of the Cuban Socialist Yout); 
Will you look at the picture and tell the committee if that is a reasoi 
able likeness of you? 

Mr. Bucholt. I decline to answer that question based on my coil 
stitutional rights as guaranteed under the first and fifth amendment 

Mr. Beale. According to information in the files of the committe , 
the Labor Youth League held its first national convention on Noveri 
ber 23-26, 1950, in New York City. Did you attend that conventioi 

Mr. Bucholt. I decline to answer that question based on my righ 
under the first and fifth amendments to the United States Constiti 
tion, as well as on the ground that hearings in relation to the Lab( 
Youth League, as indicated in the motion filed by my attorney th 
morning, are now pending before other bodies. 

The Chairman. Where is the hearing pending? 

Mr. Bucholt. It is pending before the Subversive Activity 
Control Board. 

The Chairman. Have you been subpenaed as a witness in tbji 
proceeding? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Bucholt. No. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether the preceding witness i' 
this hearing was subpenaed in that proceeding? 

(The witness conferred ^vith his counsel.) 

Mr. Bucholt. I decline to answer that question, based on mi 
rights as guaranteed under the first and fifth amendments. 

The Chairman, I direct you to answer that question. 

Mr. Bucholt. I decline to answer that question, based on mi 
rights under the first and fifth amendments. 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 233 

'The Chairman. These proceedings were brought after the Attorney 
leneral found this organization, with which it is alleged you have 
!>en associated, to be a Communist organization; is that not correct? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. BucHOLT. I decline to answer that, based on my rights under 
ie first and fifth amendments. 
■ The Chairman. I direct you to answer the question. 

Mr. BucHOLT. I decline to answer that, based on ni}^ rights under 
le first and fifth amendments. 

The Chairman. Proceed, Mr. Beale. 

Mr. Beale. We were talking about the report of the first national 
)nvention of the Labor Youth League. I want to show you a 
lotostatic copy of page 22 of that report, which is an article entitled, 
Education for Peace, Excerpt From the Report on Education." 
ask you to look at that and state whether or not that photostatic 
ipy says that that article was by Joe Bucholt. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Bucholt. Yes; that article says it was by Joe Bucholt. 

The Chairman. Are you the Joe Bucholt who wrote that article? 

Mr. Bucholt. I decline to answer that question on the same 
•ounds. 

Mr. Beale. The Daily Worker of December 29, 1950, carries a 
^,ws item about the 15th National Convention of the Communist 
arty, and about meetings held in Manhattan, Brooklyn, and the 
ronx. According to this article, Joseph Bucholt spoke at the 
Itanhattan meeting. Are you the Joseph Bucholt mentioned in the 
•tide? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same as previously stated. 

Mr. Beale. Did you speak at this Communist Party meeting? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 
! The Chairman. Wliat was that date? 
' Mr. Beale. December 29, 1950. 

According to the Daily Worker of September 26, 1951, a rally was 
) be held the following day sponsored by the Committee to Defend 
oosevelt W^ard, Jr. Among the speakers scheduled were Joseph 
ucholt, State cliairman of the Labor Youth League. Are you the 
pseph Bucholt mentioned in that article? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. Are you acquainted with Roosevelt Ward, Jr.? 
j Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

I Mr. Beale. The Daily Worker of June 12, 1952, carries an open 
ktter to Claudia Jones and Betty Gannett. The letter closes with 
aese words : 

Warmest fraternal greetings. New York State Board, Labor Youth League; 
jc Bucholt, chairman; Mary Morris, organizational director. 

-re you the Joe Bucholt mentioned there? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. Were you the chairman of the New York State board 
f the Labor Youth League? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. Do you know Claudia Jones? 
I Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. Do you know Betty (jannett? 



234 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 

Mr. BucHOLT. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Who is Mary Morris? 

Mr. BucHOLT. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. According to the Daily Worker of Wednesday, Janu' 
ary 20, 1954, members and leaders of the Labor Youth League will 
join in celebrating the 30th anniversary of the Daily Worker thil 
following Friday. This was a statement supposedly made by Joi': 
Bucholt, New York State chairman of the Labor Youth League 
Are you the Joseph Bucholt mentioned there? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. According to the Daily Worker of February 25, 1954 
a new national council of the Labor Youth League was elected at it 
second national convention. Joseph Bucholt is listed as a member o 
the new national council. Are you that Joseph Bucholt? 

Mr. Bucholt. I decline to answer that, based on my constitutiona 
rights as guaranteed under the first and fifth amendments. 

Mr. Beale. According to the Daily Worker of March 7, 1955 
Robert Fogel was elected as State chairman of the Labor Youtl 
League to succeed Joseph Bucholt, who had served 4 years in tha 
capacity. Are you the Joe Bucholt mentioned there? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. The ^Daily Worker of March 10, 1955, carries ai 
article in which appears the following: 

The convention, on behalf of the national membership of the LYL, said farei 
well to the former State chairman of the New York State organization, Josep; 
Bucholt, who was released from activity in the LYL and the national youtj 
movement. Mr. Bucholt was paid tribute to by the delegates with speeches am 
gifts and warmly saluted for his many years of service to American youth an - 
the Labor Youth League. 

Are you the Joseph Bucholt referred to in that article? 

Mr. Bucholt. I decline to answer that, based on my constitutiona • 
rights as guaranteed under the first and fifth amendments. 

Mr. Beale. What does the article mean when it says you wer 
released from activity in the Labor Youth League? 

Mr. Bucholt. I dechne to answer that on the same grounds. 

Mr. Beale. Are you today active in the Labor Youth League? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. Isn't it true, Mr. Bucholt, that you were released fron 
activity in the Labor Youth League to take a position of importanc 
with the Communist Party underground? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Bucholt. I decline to answer that question on the basis o 
my rights as guaranteed under the first and fifth amendments. 

Mr. Beale. Are you today a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. Have you ever been a member of the Communis 
Party? 

Mr. Bucholt. My answer is the same. 

Mr. Beale. I have no further questions. 

The Chairman. When were you commissioned in the Army 
Mr. Bucholt? 

Mr. Bucholt. I was commissioned, I think it was, the summer o:j' 
1943. 



I COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE NEW YORK AREA 235 

I The Chairman. Were you a member of the Communist Party when 
jie oath of allegiance was administered? 

Mr. BucHOLT. I decline to answer that question on the basis of my 
)nstitutional rights as guaranteed under the first and fifth amend- 
lents. 

' Mr. Willis. Did you take an oath of allegiance at the time. 
' Mr. BucHOLT. I did. 

The Chairman. As a matter of fact, at that very moment you were 
a organizer for one of the Communist organizations; were you not? 
(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr, BucHOLT. Without relinquishing any of my rights under the 
fth amendment and fu'st amendment of the Constitution, I was fully 
30 percent of my time, thinking and activity, devoted to service in 
le United States Army and in the efforts to defeat the Nazi armies 
hich we were fighting. 
The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Beale. He still hasn't answered the question, Mr. Chairman. 
Mr. Jackson. Was the oath of allegiance which 3^ou took at that 
me taken in good faith? 
Mr. BucHOLT. Absolutely. 

Mr. Jackson. In the event of hostilities as between this country 

nd the Soviet Union, would you again take such an oath in good faith? 

Mr. BucHOLT. I have taken the oath under good faith. I always 

ake oaths of allegiance and loyalty to my country in good faith, and 

: reject and feel that the question as posed in relation to conflict 

etween the United States and the Soviet Union is an unreal one, and 

ne which stems from, and is part of an anti-Soviet war hysteria, which 

aany forces in our country are seeking to perpetrate at this time. 

Mr. Jackson. That is a very fine statement. It does not, of course, 

nswer the question which I asked, whether or not in the event of 

lossible hostilities between this country and the Soviet Union, would 

ou take in good faith such an oath of allegiance as might be required? 

Mr. BucHOLT. I answered that question. 

Mr. Jackson." No. Let the record show you did not answer it. 
fou gave a very evasive and roundabout reply, but it was in no sense 
n answer. I have no further questions. 

The Chairman. You have testified, and you just stated, that you 
ilways take an oath in good faith. If that is a fact, why don't you 
lelp us in what we are trying to do? We are not trying to prosecute 
myone. We are not trying to get anyone into any trouble. We are 
ust trying to let the young people of this country know that there are 
ierpents creeping about. That is all. If you took the oath in good 
"aith, why don't you tell us what you loiow? Why don't you answer 
hese questions? 

Mr. BucHOLT. My record stands on itself in relation to my devotion 
X) my country and to the young generation. 
The Chairman. Any more witnesses, Mr. Beale? 
(Whereupon the witness was excused.) 
Mr. Beale. Robert Fogel. 

The Chairman. Will you hold up your right hand, Mr. Fogel? 
Do you solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give will 
be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth? 
Mr. Fogel. I do. 






236 COMMUNIST ACTrV'ITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 

TESTIMONY OF ROBERT FOGEL, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL 
SAMUEL GRUBER 

Mr. Beale. Will you state your name for the record, please? 

Mr. FoGEL. Robert Fogel, F-o-g-e-1. 

Air. Beale. Let the record show that the same counsel is represent 
ing Mr. Fogel as represented the two preceding witnesses. 

When and where were you born? 

Mr. Fogel. I was born in New York City on July 1, 1926. 

Mr. Beale. Wliere do you presently reside? 

Mr. Fogel. In New York City. 

Mr. Beale. Do you have any objection to giving us the street 
address? Ij 

Mr. Fogel. 609 West 151st Street. 

Mr. Beale. Wliat has been 3^our educational training? 

Mr. Fogel. I went to various public schools in New York City 
I graduated from Stuyvesant High School, and I graduated froir 
Cornell University in June of 1948. 

Mr. Beale. Did you ever hear of a publication called New* 
Foundations? i 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question under the first and 
fifth amendments. , 

Mr. Beale. According to the spring 1948 issue of New Foundations j 
Robert Fogel of Cornell University is listed as one of the collegiate! 
editors. Are you the Robert Fogel mentioned there? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds 
as I stated previously. 

Mr. Beale. The same issue contains a short story entitled "Mostly 
Love Stories," by Robert Fogel. Are you that Robert Fogel? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds 

Mr. Beale. The same issue lists the names of the contributors, and 
the listing reads: 

Robert Fogel, a senior at Cornell University, is president of the Marxist 
Cultural Society there. 

Are you that Robert Fogel? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question. 

Mr. Beale. While a student at Cornell University, were you pres- 
ident or affiliated in any manner with the Marxist Cultural Society?! 

Mr. Fogel. Wlien I was a student at Cornell, I was active, as many! 
students are, in all kinds of scholastic and extracurricular activities. 
I might say that was a period of time when young people were not as 
intimidated as they are today by committees such as this, and were! 
much less afraid of entering into debate on all kinds of public issues. 

The Chairman. Why do you suppose the 3^oung people are afraid j 
today? 

Mr. Fogel. I think the whole past number of years has been one| 
in which witch hunting stemming from — — 

The Chairman. We are not witch hunting. We are Communist 
hunting. 

Mr. Fogel. That is your opinion. My opinion is that this com- 
mittee and many other committees are carrying out activities which 
are stifling democratic thinking 

The Chairman. Let's get the record straight. This committee is 
doino- nothing of the sort. The Congress of the United States, becom- 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 237 

ig aware of the existence of this movement after a long time, when it 
bould have been obvious that there was a movement afoot to iinder- 
iiine this country, created this committee to make inquiry into these 
ictivities so that the young people in America could be made aware of 
tie existence of these movements. The Congress of the United States 
1 its wisdom, charged with the responsibility of securing this Nation, 
ias set up this committee. 

I You are a college graduate. Why don't 3'ou come clean here? 
iV^hy don't you help us develop the truth? 

Mr. FoGEL. I am clean. I came clean and 1 am trying to help you 
evelop the truth. 

I The Chairman. Good. I am glad to hear it. 

I You said you were going to help us develop the truth. Were 
ou a lecturer at Camp Unity at any tune? 

Mr. FoGEL. I do not think you are really interested in getting at 

16 truth, or else 

! The Chairman. I want to know the truth about that. Did j^ou 

veT lecture at Camp Unity? 

' Mr. FoGEL. I decline to answer that question 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. FoGEL. Under the first and fifth amendments. 
J Mr. Jackson. I think there is a question pending. The witness 
las stated that he entered into all sorts of collegiate and extracur- 
Icular movements on the campus. 

Mr. FoGEL. Activities. 
' Mr. Jackson. Activities on the campus. The question which is 
ending is. Did you enter specifically into Communist Party activities 
hile on the campus? 

Mr. FoGEL. I decline to answer that question on the grounds of 
le first and fifth amendments. I don't see 

Mr. Jackson. What you see about it does not make a bit of 
ifference at this moment. The question has been answered. It is 
ithin the scope of the jurisdiction of this committee to ask. 

The Chairman. Proceed, Mr. Beale. 

Mr. Beale. Now will you answer my question, please? 

Mr. FoGEL. I am not sure what question you are referring to. 

Mr. Beale. I asked you if at any time wiiile you were attending 
'ornell University you were the president of or affiliated in any 
lanner with the Marxist Cultural Society at that university. 
'[ Mr. FoGEL. I would like to indicate that I was active in many 

xtracurricular activities 

1 Mr. Beale. You indicated all that before. Now will you answer 
iiy question, please? 

Mr. FoGEL. Of which I am proud. 

I decline. 

The Chairman. Answ^er this question. 

Mr. FoGEL. I decline to answer this specific question, as I feel it 

an invasion of my rights under the first amendment to the Consti- 
ition, which guarantees me free speech and assembly, and I think 
lat kind of question violates that right and helps to create this 
tmosphere of intimidation which makes many young people afraid 
) enter into that kind of discussion and debate today. 

Mr. Jackson. You mean, then, they are not afraid to enter into 
,n organization at the present time which has been declared to be 



238 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 

subversive by the Congress of the United States, the Communis 
Party? 

Mr. FoGEL. Wliat I mean is that over the past number of yean 
through the activities — what has commonly been known and referre 
to as McCarthyism — an atmospliere has been created in which youE 
people have been intimidated, bullied, so as not to take advantage ( 
the opportunities that they had or that I had, for example, when 
was at college, to learn through discussion and debate of all kinds < 
public issues. 

The Chairman. Then as I understand you, there are now few( 
students who are members of the organizations about which you ha^ 
been asked ; is that it? 

Mr. FoGEL. No; you misunderstand me. I am talking about a 
kinds of activities. 

The Chairman. I am talking about one particular activity, Coe 
munist activity, and for the first time I have heard someone say thi 
our committee has really succeeded in accomplishing something. I a 
very happy that we have. 

Mr. FoGEL. They have succeeded in curtailing academic freedo 
and democratic rights, in my opinion. 

The Chairman. Academic freedom designed — never mind. 

Mr. FoGEL. If you will read the New York Times — ■ — 

The Chairman. There is no question pending. 

Proceed, Mr. Beale. 

Mr. Beale. In order that there- is no misunderstanding and 
order that the record is absolutely clear, are you relying on the fii 
amendment in your refusal to answer the last question? 

Mr. FoGEL. I think that last question is obviously a violation of t 
first amendment. 

Mr. Beale. And you are relying on that solely? ^ 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 11 

Mr. Beale. We just want to make the record clear. 

Mr. Fogel. I don't know what you mean by rely on that. Ci 
you explain that? 

Mr. Beale. You are the one who used the first amendment. Y^ 
ought to know what you are doing. 

The Chairman. That is immaterial, Mr. Beale. The witness h 
answered the question by stating that he refuses to answer becau 
of the constitutional protection given against self-incrimination. 

Mr. Beale. No, sir; he hasn't. He only used the first amendmei 

The Chairman. Only the first amendment? 

Mr. Fogel. I said I felt that this question was a violation of t. 
first amendment. I think it is an improper question. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Fogel. I think it violates other parts of the Constitution 
well. 

Mr. Beale. Are you pleading other parts of the Constitution? 

Mr. Fogel. I am pleading — first of all, I am indicating — I doii 
know what you mean by "pleading," exactly. [ 

Mr. Beale. You have counsel there. You may confer with him.] 

Mr. Fogel. As I understand, you asked a question, and I indicat 
that in my opinion that was an improper question. 

Mr. Jackson. Do you decline to answer that? 

Mr. Fogel. Yes, I do. 






i 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES EST THE NEW YORK AREA 239 

I Mr. Jackson. Upon what grounds do you decline to answer it? 
t Mr. FoGEL. I decline to answer it, first of all, as I previously indi- 
ated, on the grounds that I think it is improper and violates the first 
mendment. I also decline to answer it under the fifth amendment. 

The Chairman. Proceed, Mr. Beale. 
i Mr. Beale. According to the information in the files of the com- 
littee, there was issued a call for- a Conference on Democracy in 
Iducation to be held in New York City, December 17-18, 1949. 
.ecording to this call, Robert Fogel, New York State chairman of the 
budent conference for the Labor Youth League, is listed as one of the 
ponsors. Are you the Robert Fogel referred to in that article? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds 
tiat I previously mentioned. 

Mr. Beale. Were you a member of the student conference for the 
jabor Youth League? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Beale. According to an article in the Daily Worker of Monday, 
.ugust 15, 1949: 

Last Thursday, a gang attacked the speaker's stand at an outdoor rally, where 
:,obert Fogel, chairman of the student division of the Communist Party, was 
aeaking. 

j-e you the Robert Fogel mentioned in that article? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds 
hat I previously mentioned. 

Mr. Beale. Were you the chairman of the student division of the 
Communist Party? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Beale. According to an article in the Daily People's World 
f November 22, 1949, there was a walkout of students at the New 
fork City College. The following appears in this article: 

Robert Fogel, organizational secretary of the student division of the New 
.^ork Communist Party, and Jack Cohen, a Jewish youth leader, described the 
ituation in the June 1949 issue of Jewish Life. 

Lie you the Robert Fogel referred to there? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the grounds which 
, have previously mentioned. 

Mr. Beale. Were you the organizational secretary of the student 
livision of the New York Communist Party? 

Mr. Fogel. I also decline to answer that question on the same 
;rounds. 

I Mr. Beale. In the summer 1949 issue of New Foundations appears 
in article entitled "Free Our Schools," by Robert Fogel, and a foot- 
lote to the article appears: 

■ Mr. Fon;el, a 19-18 graduate of Cornell University, is now organizational secre- 
ary for the student division of the New York Communist Party. 

Vre you the Robert Fogel referred to in that article? 
I Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question. 

Mr. Bfale. Did you ever hear of a publication called Challenge? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds. 
I Mr. Beale. Isn't that the publication of the Labor Youth League? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds. 

Mr. Beale. In the May 1950 issue of Challenge appears an article 
entitled, "A Better Future for Students," by Bob Fogel. Did you 
vrite that article? 



I 
I 



240 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 

Mr. FoGEL. I decline to answer that question on the same ground 
Mr. Beale. The article deals with the second Warld Student Co:! 

gress to be held in Czechoslovakia, and the following is quoted fro 

the article: 
The Congress — 

and that refers to the second World Student Congress — 

will help to expose the lies about the Soviet Union which are sold as fact in o 
schools. 

Did you write that? 

Mr. FoGEL. I decline to answer that question on the same ground 

Mr. Beale. What did you mean when you said, "the lies abo| 
the Soviet Union which are sold as fact in our schools"? | 

Mr. FoGEL. I decline to answer that question on the same ground J 

Mr. Beale. According to information in the files of the committf ^ 
the Fnst National Convention of the Labor Youth League was he! 
in New York City, November 23-26, 1950. The report of that col 
vention states that Bob Fogel, among others, had been elected to J 
national council to lead the Labor Youth League. Are you t] 
Robert Fogel mentioned in that? ' 

Mr. Fogel. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Were you ever elected to membership on the nation 
council of the Labor Youth League? 

Mr. Fogel. The same answer. 

Air. Beale. According to the Daily Worker of January 31, 19t 
leaders of the New York Labor Youth League pledged active suppc' 
to the circulation of the Daily Worker. Among those who pledg 
their support appears the name of Bob Fogel. Are you the Bob Fo^ 
referred to? 

Mr. Fogel. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. According to the Daily Worker of September 10, 19^ 
an investigation of the Board of Education of New York City wl' 
referred to by the National Council of the Ai'ts, Sciences and Pi 
fessions, and the New York State council of the Labor Youth Leagi 
as a witch hunt. The same article quotes Robert Fogel, Labor You 
League student director, as demanding that the McCarran commit! 
immediately discontinue its witch hunt and leave this city, a] 
further quotes Fogel as saying: 

Using the inquisition as their weapon, lies and slander as their ammunitio 
stool pigeons as their witnesses, the committee hopes to be able to smash t 
unions and other democratic organizations of teachers. 

Are you the Robert Fogel who wrote that article? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the same ground 

Mr. Beale. According to the Daily Worker of February 25, 195 

the Second National Convention of the Labor Youth League elected 

new national council. Among those elected to the council was oi 

Robert Fogel. Are you the Robert Fogel referred to? 

Air. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the same ground 
Mr. Beale. Were you elected a member of the national council 
the Labor Youth League? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the same ground 



COMMUNIST ACTR'ITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 241 

Mr. Be ALE. In the Daily Worker of April 12, 1954, appears an 

-tide entitled, "Freedom Rallies To Be Held This Week on Many 

loUege Campuses." This article is written b}^ Robert Fogel. 

The Chairman. When was that? 

Mr. Beale. April 12, 1954. 

' According to the article, the Labor Youth League issued 20,000 
!)pies of the statement urging students to reject the "big lie" that 

)mmunism menaces America, and to unite to defend academic 

eedom and the Bill of Rights. Were you the author of that article? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question. 

1 The Chairman. What information have we concerning those rallies 
1 the college campuses? Were they actually held? 

Mr. Beale. I haven't checked on that. This is the notice that 

ley Avould be held. 

The Chairman. Let us complete the investigation and, wherever 
ley were held, inform the college authorities the source of the 
Lspiration for the meetings. 

Mr. Beale. That will be done. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Beale. The Sunday Worker of July 4, 1954, carries an article 
ititled, "Draft Program of the Communist Party." This article 

as written by Robert Fogel. It is a review of the Communist Party 
rogram which is entitled "The American Way — to Jobs, Peace, and 
'emocracy." Were you the author of that article? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the same ground. 

Mr. Beale. In the March 7, 1955, issue of the Daily Worker 
ppears a news article to the effect that Robert Fogel was the newly 
.ected chairman of the New York State Labor Youth League, suc- 
'ieding Joseph Bucholt. Are you the Robert Fogel referred to there? 

Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question on the same grounds. 
' Mr. Beale. Were you elected chairman of the New York State 
labor Youth League? 

Mr. Fogel. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Are 3^ou presently the chairman of that organization? 
' Mr. Fogel. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Are you today a member of the Communist Party? 
1 Mr. Fogel. I decline to answer that question under the first and 
fth amendments. 

Mr. Beale. Have vou ever been a member of the Communist 
farty? 

' Mr. Fogel. I decline for the same reason. I think that violates 
ly constitutional rights, and not only mine but many other young 
Lmericans. 

Mr. Beale. I have no further questions. 

The Chairman. Any questions? 

Mr. Fogel. I would like to say something before 

\ Mr. Beale. You are excused. Step down. 

Mr. Willis. I refer to the article Mr. Beale questioned you about, 
ppearing in the Worker, Sunday, July 4, 1954, wherein one Fogel 
uoted Robert Thompson as saying: 

In all truth we can say that the forces that win the youth of our country will 
in our country. 



!f 



242 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 

Do you agree to that? ^ 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) # 

Mr. FoGEL. I am not clear on that question. Could you indi 
what you are trying to get at? 

Mr. Willis. The article quoted states — and I will not take 
out of context; I will read the two sentences: 

Work among j^outh is not just another important field of work for our party- 
meaning the Communist Party — 

and for the progressive forces; it is a decisive field of work. In all truth we ca; 
say that the forces that win the youth of our country will win our country. 

I ask you, do you agree to that statement? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) ^ 

Mr. FoGEL. Are you interested in my opinion, on what I thin] ' 
on this question? 

Mr. Willis. I will be frank with you, m}^ next question was goin; 
to be: Did you participate, as the article indicates, in winning th 
youth of the country to the draft program of the Communist Party 
which is the title of the article you are alleged to have written? ^ 

Mr. FoGEL. If you want my opinion on the problems confrontinjiT 
young people in our country today and what I think they should d( "' 
about it, I will be very glad to answer it. 

The Chairman. We know the answer without putting you to tha ^^ 
trouble. 

Mr. FoGEL. If the question is tiying to undermine my constitu 
tional privileges, I won't. 

Mr. Willis. I don't care for your opinion generally. 

Mr. FoGEL. I thought that was one of the reasons I was calle* 
here. 

Mr. Jackson. If that was one of the reasons, the committee am 
the Congress and the country certainly have not benej&ted to any de 
gree by your answers. 

Mr. FoGEL. I think if I had been given a full and fair opportunit; 
to present my ideas and point of view, and not just^ — ^I think anyon^ 
who was called before the committee would have benefited. 

Mr. Jackson. If you had answered the questions which have beei 
put to you, you would have done a much more rapid and greate 
service to the country than by the delivery of propaganda speeche| 
you might care to deliver. 

This committee has listened for many years to everything that yoi 
might be expected to deliver in the way of a speech. We have beei 
harangued, vilified, much the same as you would do, if you had th( 
opportunity. I, for one, do not intend that you shall have an oppor 
tunity to use this committee as a sounding board for the Communisi 
Party. 

Mr. FoGEL. I didn't ask to come before this committee; I was 
subpenaed. 

The Chairman. That is right. 

Mr. Jackson. And quite rightfully. I think that is one of the best 
subpenas we have issued. 

Mr. FoGEL. I think that if this committee wants to get at the truth 
and not to get excited because students had academic freedom, about 
which apparently the chairman is very excited, and I think his reaction 
to that 



* 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 243 

'he Chairman. I am excited because I know a lot of very decent 
ccege students 

At. Fogel. And so do I. 

.'he Chairman. Who have been imposed upon by your ilk. I 
wild like to have the youngsters of this country know just exactly 
WD inspired the sort of thing that apparently was held last year. 
Tit is all. 

Lny more witnesses, Mr. Beale? 

At. Fogel. If you want to give me credit for inspiring activities 
fc academic freedom, I think that is very good, and I think that is 
or of the most democratic, patriotic things that anyone can do. 

?he Chairman. That is enough. 

The next witness, Mr. Beale. Have you any more witnesses? 

Whereupon the witness was excused.) 

klr. Beale. Ernest Parent. 

Representative Donald L. Jackson left the hearing room at this 
pnt.) 

The Chairman. Hold up your right hand, Mr. Parent. Do you 
a.^mnly swear that the testimony you are about to give will be the 
fath, tile whole truth, and nothing but the truth? 

At. Parent. I do. 



TESTIMONY OF ERNEST PARENT, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, SAMUEL GRUBER 



Mr. Beale. Let the record show the same counsel who has ap- 
pu'ed for the preceding witnesses appears for this witness. 
^ Will you state your name for the record? 
1 Mr. Parent. My name is Ernest Parent, P-a-r-e-n-t. 

Mr. Beale. When and where were 3'ou born? 
[?Mr. Parent. I was born in Montreal, Canada, October 2, 1919. 

Mr. Beale. Where do vou presently reside? 

-Mr. Parent. I live at 1049 Fox Street, Bronx, N. Y. 

Mr. Beale. Wliat has been your educational training? 

Mr. Parent. If j^ou mean my formal educational background, I 
Ive gone to various public schools in and around New York City, 
ad went to high school for a period of time but did not graduate. 
Iiat has been the extent of my formal education. 

Mr. Beale. Going back just a minute, what was the date and place 
cyour birth? 

:Mr. Parent. October 2, 1919. 

Mr. Beale. Where? 

Mr. Parent. Montreal, Canada. 

Mr. Beale. When did you come to the United States? 

Mr. Parent. I don't recall the exact month, but I believe it was 
iound August of 1925. I don't want to be held to that, however, 
believe that is the approximate date. 

The Chairman. Give us the best of your recollection. 

Mr. Beale. Have you resided in the United States continuously 
Eice then? 

Mr. Parent. I have." 

Mr. Beale. Have you ever filed an application to become a citizen 
< the United States? 

Mr. Parent. I have. 



244 COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 

Mr. Beale. When and where? 

Mr. Parent. I filed several applications. i 

Mr. Beale. When did you file and where did you file the first or^ 

Mr. Parent. Let me answer the question, Counsel, in my own W£J 

Mr. Beale. I will ask the questions, please. 

Mr. Parent. I filed an application before I entered into the Am 
I believe the date was around 1940. I became a citizen, however,! 
1943 — I believe that is the date — in the Army, Chatham County, C 

Mr. Beale. What has been your employment record? 

Mr. Parent. I started going to work in, I would say, the year 19[- 
I have held various positions and have done many jobs — all of the 
I assure you, honest. I have been a metal worker, a furrier, a laund 
worker, a hospital worker, salesman, laborer. 

Mr. Beale. Wliere are you now employed? 

Mr. Parent. At the moment I am unemployed. 

Mr. Beale. Where were you last employed? 

Mr. Parent. I would refuse to answer that question on the groun 
that I believe that it would leave me open to prosecution and possil 
persecution. Therefore, I refuse to answer that question for the ve 
reasons stated under the fifth amendment. It would leave me op 
to incrimination. 

Mr. Beale. Over what period of time does the employment co^ 
which you don't want to tell us about? 

The Chairman. I think that is immaterial. 

Are you a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Parent. I decline to answer that question on the very sai 
grounds. 

The Chairman. The witness is excused. There is no reason 1 
our wasting time. 

(Wliereupon the witness was excused.) 

The Chairman. Do you have another witness? 

Mr. Beale. One more. Sam Engler. 

The Chairman. Hold up your right hand, Air. Engler. Do yi 
solemnly swear that the testimony you are about to give will be tt 
truth, tiie whole truth, and nothing but the truth? 

Air. Engler. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF SAM ENGLER, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSl 
SAMUEL GRUBER 

Mr. Beale. Let the record show the same counsel who has appean 
for the preceding witnesses appears for this witness. 

State your name for the record, please. 

Mr. Engler. Sam Engler, E-n-g-1-e-r. 

Mr. Beale. Wlien and where were you born? 

Mr. Engler. I was born in New York City, June 27, 1920. 

Air. Beale. Wliere do you presently reside? 

Mr. Engler. 506 West'l22d Street, Manhattan, New York Cit 

Mr. Beale. Wliat has been your education and training? 

Mr. Engler. Pubhc schools in Brooklyn, Boys High School 
Brooldyn, and City College of New York. -p 

Mr. Beale. When? 

Mr. Engler. When what? 



COMMUNIST ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW YORK AREA 245 

Vir. Beale. In City College of New York. Wlien did you finish 
tire? 

Vlr. Engler. I did not graduate. I left in 1941. 

Mr. Beale. What has been your record of employment? 

Vlr. Engler. I have worked most of the time as a publicity writer. 

iVlr. Beale. Wliere have you worked? 

'Vlr. Engler. I work now at Yeshiva University. 

Vlr. Willis. Wliere is that? 

Mr. Engler. New York. 

Mr. Beale. According to the Daily Worker of March 8, 1954, the 
fi;t session of the People's Conference to Repeal the McCarran Act 
\^s held in Washmgton, D. C, the previous day. Among the 
s'akers at that meeting were William L. Patterson, Carl Marzani, 
al Sam Engler, a New York State Labor Youth League leader. Are 
yi the Sam Engler mentioned in the article? 

Mr. Engler. I decline to answer under the first and fifth amend- 
n'nts. 

Vlr. Beale. Were you a member of the New York State Labor 
1 uth League? 

Mr. Engler. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Are you a member of the Communist Party? 

Mr. Engler. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. Have you ever been a member of the Communist 
Irty? 

Mr. Engler. The same answer. 

Mr. Beale. I have no further questions. 

The Chairman. Were you the educational director of the New York 
Site Labor Youth League? 

Mr. Engler. The same answer. 

The Chairman. Any questions? 

Mr. Willis. No. 

The Chairman. That is all. 

(Whereupon the witness was excused.) 

Mr. Beale. That concludes the hearing, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. The meeting is adjourned. 

(Whereupon, at 11:40 a. m., the hearing was adjourned, subject to 
cl.) 



I 



INDEX 



Individuals 

Page 

;avo. Flavio 232 

jcholt, Joseph 229-235 (testimony). 241 

Dhen, Jack 239 

ivis, Benjamin J 225 

:igler, Sam 244-245 (testimony) 

•gel, Robert 234, 235, 236-243 (testimony) 

ister, William Z 231 

innett, Betty 233 

' ites, John 225 

')ld, Ben 225, 232 

'uber, Samuel 219, 229, 236, 243, 244 

.nes, Claudia 227, 233 

:,wes, Pearl.. 226 

ivitt, Julian 231 

alibow, Herb 230 

arti, Jose 232 

arzani, Carl 245 

orris, Mary 233, 234 

•herow, Ruth 230 

: irent, Ernest 243-244 (testimony) 

^ttterson, William L 245 

lompson, Robert 226, 230, 241 

' achtenberg, Alexander 230 

;al, Ted 232 

eiss. Max 230 

ofsy, Leon 219-229 (testimony) 

Organizations 

nerican Youth for Democracy 221-223, 231 

'imp Unity... 237 

'vil Rights Congress 221, 222, 231 

ommittee to Defend Roosevelt Ward, Jr 227, 233 

inference on Democracy in Education 239 

" iban Socialist Youth 232 

ibor Youth League 222-229, 231-234, 239-241, 245 

arxist Cultural Society 236, 237 

itional Council of the Arts, Sciences, and Professions 240 

lited May Day Committee 221 

orld Federation of Democratic Youth 222, 223 

orld Student Congress 240 

)ung Communist League 220, 231 

)ung Workers Conference 222 

Pttblications 

'lallenge 226, 227, 232, 239 

. wish Life • 239 

■ iw Foundations 236, 239 

J'litical Affairs 223, 226, 228 

eekly Review 230 

i 

o 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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