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Full text of "Investigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field"

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INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 



HEARINGS 

BEFOBE THE 

SELECT COMMITTEE 

ON IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 

LABOR OR MANAGEMENT EIELD 

EIGHTY-FIFTH CONGRESS 

FIRST SESSION 
PURSUANT TO SENATE RESOLUTION 74, 85TH CONGRESS 



APRIL 29, NOVEMBER 12, 13, 14, 15, AND 16. 1957 



PART 17 



Printed for the use of the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the 
Labor or Management Field 




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INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 



HEARINGS 

BEFORE THE 

SELECT COMMITTEE 

ON IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 

LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 

EIGHTY-FIFTH CONGRESS 

FIRST SESSION 
PURSUANT TO SENATE RESOLUTION 74, 85TH CONGRESS 



APRIL 29, NOVEMBER 12, 13, 14, 15, AND 16, 1957 



PART 17 



Printed for the use of the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the 
Labor or Management Eield 




PUB 



UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
89330 WASHINGTON : 1957 



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Boston Public Library 
Superinterticnt of Documents 

JAN 2 9 1958 



SELECT COMMITTEE ON IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR OR | 

MANAGEMENT FIELD j 

JOHN L. McCLELLAN, Arkansas, Chairman \ 

IRVING M. IVES, New York, Vice Oniinnan .' 

JOHN F. KENNEDY, Massachusetts KARL E, MUNDT, South Dakota j 

SAM J. ERVIN, Jr., North Carolina BARRY GOLDWATER, Arizona i 

PAT McNAMARA, Michigan CARL T. CURTIS, Nebraska ' 

Robert F. Kennedy, Chief Counsel .j 

Ruth Young Watt, Chief Clerk ' 

n ! 



CONTENTS 



Private Carting Industry (New York and Los Angeles, Calif.) 

Page 

Appendix 7025 

Testimonv of — 

Adelstein, Bernard 6659, 6965, 7004, 7006, 7017 

Amator, Joseph 6739 

Conley, Stephen A 7005 

Costigan, Matthew 6847 

Daria, Anne 6905, 6907, 6915 

DeCabia, Carmen 6789, 6796 

Devine, Charles 6837 

Donno, Dante 6885 

Button, Alfred C 6881 

Doyle, Everett 6688, 6694, 6695, 6715, 6717 

Frame, Maurice 7001 

Goldfarb, Harrv B 7014 

Green, Robert W 6690, 6703, 6717, 6725, 6753, 6923, 6937 

Hamilton, Capt. James E 6672 

Kellv, James P 6691, 

6694, 6706, 6707, 6708, 6712, 6758, 6804, 6829, 6852, 6860, 6862, 
6863, 6868, 6907, 6908, 6938, 6991. 

Kellv, Patricia 6843 

Lent, Thomas 6772, 6775 

Mancuso, Gennaro 6941 

Modica, C. Don 6867, 6869 

Montesano, Anthony 6721, 6725, 6745, 6754, 6759, 6765, 6773 

Montesano, John 6721, 6725, 6745, 6754, 6759, 6765, 6773 

Morvitz, Milton 7004, 7009 

Nolan, Thomas F 6853, 6892 

Palminteri, Albert R 6891 

Parise, Peter J 6797 

Recchia, Angelo 6777, 6794, 6796 

Rombauts, William 6813 

Rosetti, James 6902 

San Pietro, Joseph A 6963 

Spiak, Stephen 6704, 6706, 6707, 6708, 6709 

Squillante, Nunzio 6854, 6861, 6863 

Squillante, Vincent J 6916, 6928, 6940 

Strelzin, H-^rvey L : 6823, 6831 

Van Ness, Sherman 6766 

Villano, Carmine 6944, 6957 

Wells, William . _ . 6710 

Wolpert, Melville B 7012 

EXHIBITS 

Introduced Appears 
on page on page 

1. Check No. 8954, dated January 28, 1955, payable to 

William Crowder in the amount of $25, drawn on Pack- 
age & General Utility Drivers Local 396 6677 7025 

2. Bylaws of the State Rubbish Collectors Association 6678 (*) 

3. Minutes of board meeting of the State Rubbish Association 

December 6, 1954 6678 (*) 

4A. Letter of transmittal dated May 14, 1953, to Frank Matula 
and signed by State Rubbish Collectors Association, per 

Peter A. Tolmasov 6680 (*) 

Footnotes on p. V. 

Ill 



IV CONTENTS 

Introduced Appears 
on page on page 
4B. List of names sent by John N. Andikian of State Rubbish 
to Mr. Matula, showing members in good standing and 

ones that were independent 6680 (*) 

4C. Letter dated October 14, 1953, to Frank Matula from State 

Rubbish Collectors Association, by John Andikian 6680 (*) 

5. Check No. 422 dated September 14, 1955, payable to pri- 

vate Sanitation Union Local 813 in the amount of $1,200, 
drawn on Lents Garbage and Ash Removal bv Thomas 
Lent I 6764 7026 

6. Letter dated May 23, 1955, to Uniondale Carting signed by 

Jerry Mancuso, Inter-County Cartmen's Association, 

Inc 6767 7027 

7. Letter dated May 25, 1955, to Uniondale Garbage & Dis- 

posal Co., from Bernard Adelstein, secretary-treasurer of 

Private Sanitation Union Local 813 6767 7028 

8. Check No. 1701 dated June 20, 1955, payable to local 813 

in the amount of $4,200 signed by Sherman Van Ness 

and George McCahell 6769 7029 

9. Letter dated December 17, 1956, addressed to Insurance 

Trust Fund, attention Mr. B. Adelstein and signed by 

Sherman Van Ness, Uniondale Garbage & Disposal Co__ 6769 7030 

10. Letter "To Whom It May Concern" dated January 21, 

1955, and signed by Peter Parise, Nassau Sanitation Co.. 6799 7031 

11. Letter dated February 14, 1956, addressed to Nassau Sani- 

tation Co., and signed by Bernard Adelstein, secretary- 
treasurer. Private Sanitation Union Local 813 6812 7032 

12. Latter dated March 12, 1956, addressed to Nassau Sanita- 

tion Co., signed by Julius J. Manson, district director. 

New York State Board of Mediation 6812 7033 

13. List of garbage-collecting companies given to Mr. Devine 

of M. H. Lamston Variety Store by Mr. Marks, secre- 
tary-treasurer of M. H. Lamston that would be satis- 
factory to the union 6840 7034 

14. Personal card of Thomas F. Nolan, business agent. Union 

Local 813, I. B. of T 6844 7035 

15. Bill dated July 31, 1955, to Arnold Constable from Estate 

Carting Co 6846 7036 

16. Picture of Nunzio Squillante 6849 (*) 

17. Letter dated November 13, 1957, to Chief Counsel Robert 

F. Kennedy, from John P. Constandy, assistant district 
attorney of New York confirming that General Sanita- 
tion was not on the list as being organized 6853 (*) 

18. Letter dated Novsmber 12, 1957, to Hon. John L. McClellan 

from Patrick Beary, attorney for witness, Nunzio Squil- 
lante, together with a statement 6855 (*) 

19. Check No. 187, dated April 5, 1955, payable to cash drawn 

on Westbury Paper Stock Co. and signed by Enrico 
Fazzini and Emedio Fazzini in the amount of $500 
"paid for Sunrise market, one note" and endorsed by 
Nunzio Squillante 6860 7037 

20. Check No. 198, dated May 3, 1955, payable to cash drawn 

on Westbury Paper Stock Co. in the amount of $500 

and endorsed by Nunzio Squillante 6862 7038 

21. Check No. 262, dated August 3, 1955, payable to General 

Sanitation, in the amount of $305, drawn on Westbury 
Paper Stock Co. and endorsed by N. Squillante, "Sun 
Rise store account" 6863 7039 

22. Check No. 214, dated June 7, 1955, payable to cash in the 

amount of $500, drawn on Westbury Paper Stock Co., 
endorsed by Santa Fazzini, "Squillante for Sun Rise 
Store"__... 6864 7040 

23. Check No. 280, dated September 12, 1955, payable to cash 

drawn on Westbury Paper Stock Co., in the amount of 
$1,000 and endorsed by Emedin Fazzini, "Cash for 
Squillante, Sun Rise Stores" 6865 7041 

Footnotes on p. v. 



CONTENTS T 

Introduced Appears 
on page on page 

24. Minutes of Greater New York Cartmen's Association, Inc., 

dated July 8, 1953, held in Yorkville Casino 6868 (*) 

25. "The Hired Broom," dated October 1, 1956, newspaper 

published by Greater New York Cartmen's Association, 

Inc., New York 6870 (*) 

26. Minutes of meeting of Greater New York Cartmen's As- 

sociation, Inc., held June 7, 1956, at Vasa Temple, 

Bronx, N. Y 6910 (*) 

27. Check No. 9290, dated June 14, 1956, payable to Vincent 

J. Squillante, in the amount of $14,215.99, drawn on 

Royal State Bank of New York 6911 7042 

28. Check dated June 14, 1956, payable to Royal State Bank of 

New York, in the amount of $14,215.99, "Cartmen's 

defense fund" 6911 7043 

29. Check dated June 15, 1956, payable to Royal State Bank 

of New York, in the amount of $1,433.75, "Cartmen's 

defense fund" 6912 7044 

30. Check No. 9305, dated June 15, 1945, payable to H. 

Jordan Lee, in the amount of $1,433.75, drawn on Royal 

State Bank of New York 6912 7045 

31. Check dated June 15, 1956, payable to Royal State Bank of 

New York, in the amount of $1,564.20, "Cartmen's 

defense fund" 6912 7046 

32. Check dated June 15, 1956, payable to H. Jordan Lee, in 

the amount of $1,564.20, drawn on Royal State Bank of 

New York 6912 7047 

33. Letter dated October 31, 1956, to Cartmen's Defense Fund 

and signed by Vincent J. Squillante 6914 (**) 

34. Memorandum to Vincent J. Squillante, dated July 25, 

1956, from Cartmen's Defense Fund 6914 (*) 

35. Check dated June 9, 1956, payable to Lillian Carfano in the 

amount of $12,000 drawn on Manufacturers Trust Co_- 6926 7048 

36. Letter dated September 21, 1956, addressed to Carter's 

Land Fill, Inc., from Vincent J. Squillante 6933 (**^ 

37. Letter dated September 21, 1956, addressed to Carter's 

Land Fill, Inc., and signed by Vincent J. Squillante 6934 (*) 

38. List of names and addresses of prisoner's criminal record 

from the Police Department of New York 6938 (*) 

39. Analysis of cash disbursements from October 1951 through 

March 1957 of local 813 7007 (*) 

40. Worksheets drawn up by Melville Wolpert at the meeting 

with Mr. Squillante, listing certain assets of the General 
Sanitation Corp., and certain principals who were in- 
volved 7013 (*) 

41 A. Check dated February 1956, payable to Melville Wolpert 

in the amount of $20 and signed bv Harrv B. Goldfarb, 7017 7049 
41 B. Check dated March 14, 1956, payable to Melville Wolpert 

in the amount of $20 and signed by Harrv B. Goldfarb_ 7017 7050 

41C. Check dated May 1, 1956, payable to Melville Wolpert in 

the amount of $20 and signed by Harry B. GoIdfarb.._ 7017 7051 

41 D. Check No. 105 dated July 25, 1956, payable to Melville 
Wolpert in the amount of $40 and signed by Harry B. 

Goldfarb 7017 7052 

Proceedings of — 

April 29, 1957 6659 

November 12, 1957 6671 

November 13, 1957 6721 

November 14, 1957 6837 

November 15, 1957 6881 

November 16, 1957 6957 

*May be found in the flies of the select committee. 
**May be found in the printed report. 



INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 



MONDAY, APRIL 29, 1957 

United States Sexate, 
Select Committee on Improper Activities 

IN the Labor or Management Field, 

Washington., D. G. 

The select committee met at 4 : 30 p. m., j)ursuant to Senate Resolu- 
tion 74, agreed to January 30, 1957, in the caucus room, Senate Office 
Building, Senator John L. McClellan (chairman of the select com- 
mittee) presiding. 

Present : Senator John L. McClellan, Democrat, Arkansas ; Senator 
Irving M. Ives, Eepublican, New York; Senator Pat McNamara, 
Democrat, Michigan; Senator Karl E. Mundt, Republican, South 
Dakota. 

Also present : Robert F. Kennedy, chief counsel of the select com- 
mittee ; Lavern J. Duffy, investigator ; Ruth Young Watt, chief clerk. 

(Members present at the convening of the session: Senators Mc- 
Clellan, Ives, McNamara, and Mundt.) 

The Chairman. The committee will be in order. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Adelstein. 

The Chairman. You will be sworn, please, sir. 

You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give before this 
Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and noth- 
ing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF BERNARD ADELSTEIN, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, 

DAVID I. SHIVITZ 

Mr. Shivitz. Mr. Chairman, may the witness remain in the seat he 
is in now ? His right ear has no eardrum, and he cannot hear on that 
side. The only ear I can speak into is the left ear. 

The Chairman. If it is all right with the witness, you may occupy 
that seat. 

Mr. Shivitz. May I also say to the chairman that I understood 
from my conversation with counsel that this was going to be an 
executive session and not an open session. 

Mr. Kennedy. I said I thought it would be. I have nothing to do 
with it. 

The Chairman. The counsel does not make tliat determination. I 
have no objection to an executive session. 

Mr. Shivitz. I think we can close much faster in an executive 
session than we can in an open hearing, Mr. Chairman, and I re- 

6659 



6660 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

spectfully ask the Chair and the committee to indulge us to that 
extent. 

The Chairman. I am going to ask a few questions in public of your 
client. 

You testified before the subcommittee in New York last Friday, 
did you not, sir ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I did. 

The Chairman. For the record, will you state your name, your 
place of residence, and your business or occupation ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Bernard Adelstein. I live at 60 Grist Mill Lane, 



Great Neck, N. Y. I am secretary-treasurer of local 813, Private San- 
itation UnioUj affiliated with the International Brotherhood of Team- 
sters and affiliated with the AFL-CIO. The offices are at 147 Fourth 
Avenue, New York City. 

The Chairman. Thank you. 

Counsel, would you again identify yourself for the record? 

Mr. Shivitz. My name is David I. Shivitz, an attorney, 271 Mad- 
ison Avenue, New York City, of the firm of Halperin, Natanson, Shiv- 
itz, Scholer & Steingut. 

The Chairman. Mr. Adelstein, you have been previously served 
with subpenas to deliver certain records to the committee; is that 
correct ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

(At this point. Senator Goldwater entered the hearing room.) 

The Chairman. We discussed these subpenas and the records in 
your testimony in New York last Friday ? 

Mr. Adelstein. We did. 

The Chairman. You are, of course, familiar with the subject mat- 
ter of the investigation and the records and documents that the com- 
mittee seeks to secure ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That I am. 

The Chairman. You were ordered last Friday to bring those rec- 
ords called for in the subpenas, to bring those records and present 
them here to the committee today. Have you complied with the 
request, with the order, to bring your records here ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Shivitz. May I interrupt ? 

The Chairman. No, sir. The question is directed to the witness. 
You may confer with him. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Chairman, the records that you have re- 
quested are all downstairs in an automobile. We were asked to be 
present here at about a quarter to 3, in room 101. We waited there 
up until a little while ago, when we were informed that we should 
come up here. The records are in a car downstairs. 

The Chairman. That is all right. Then, are you prepared to turn 
them over to the committee ? 

Mr. Shivtiz. At this time. Mr. Chairman, may I niake a statement? 

The Chairman. I am asking the witness a question. He can an- 
swer whether he is prepared to turn them over. 
(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Chairman, at this time I would like to answer 
you in the form of a statement. 



IMPBOPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6661 

The Chairman. The Chair will permit you to make a statement, 
but answer first, if you can, whether you are going to turn over the 
records as you have been directed. The Chair then will permit you 
to make a statement of explanation. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Chairman, I know that you will receive your 
reply in the form of a statement. 

The Chairman. All right. Proceed. I will see what it is. 

Mr. Shivitz. Mr. Chairman, if I may, before the witness reads the 
statement, I would like to say that this is the exact same statement 
that was read to the Chair, sitting as a subcommittee of one, on Mon- 
day. But, in addition to that, and that was the reason that I felt that 
a closed session might be more efficient, practical, and timesaving, I 
have some additional suggestions to make which I think will be 
acceptable to counsel and the committee. 

The Chairman. Let us get the witness' testimony and then we will 
see whether we are going to get the records or not. 

Mr. Adelstein. On Monday, March 11, 1957, Robert Greene and 
James P. Kelly, employees of this committee, called at the offices of 
our union at 147 Fourth Avenue, New York City. They told us they 
were investigators from this committee, and served subpenas on the 
union, the welfare fund, and on me, personally. They conferred 
with Michael Wolpert, attorney for the union, and with me. They 
asked to see various documents and records and correspondence, all of 
which were shown to them. 

They took certain correspondence from the files and asked permis- 
sion to take it from our office in order to photostat it, saying they 
would return it the following day. Not until at least 2 weeks later 
were the papers returned, and then only after Mr. Shivitz made re- 
peated requests for them. 

In the course of this visit, which lasted for several hours, Mr. 
Greene and Mr. Kelly examined, among other things, a personal tele- 
phone index belonging to me, which I had kept for many, many years. 
Prior to leaving the office, they said they wanted to take that, book 
with them, also. I told them I did not wish them to take it ; that they 
could look at it as they had been doing, but I did not feel they should 
take it with them. They were free to copy anything they looked at. 

After that, additional subpenas were served, and the union, the 
welfare fund, and I, as well as my wife, retained the services of the 
firm of Halperin, Natanson, Shivitz, Scholer & Steingut to advise us 
in this matter. Mr. David I. Shivitz is the partner in charge of this 
matter for the firm. 

After Mr. Shivitz arranged with the representatives of the commit- 
tee for service to be made on Mrs. Adelstein at his offices, blanket sub- 
penas and subpenas duces tecum were served on Mrs. Adelstein, indi- 
vidually and as an officer of Shapco Corp., for all books and records, 
et cetera. 

After further consultation with representatives of your committee, 
Mr. Shivitz advised us that he had arranged with the representatives 
of the committee to have all the books and records requested brought 
to our attorney's offices, where a room would be made available to the 
committee representatives to examine the same. Melville Wolpert, a 
certified public accountant who has been the accountant for all of the 



6662 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

witnesses and is familiar with their books and records, was present 
with the books and records while they were being examined by repre- 
sentatives of the committee. Committee representatives attended at 
the offices of our attorneys for a period of a little more than 1 week, 
and all the material requested by them was produced for their exami- 
nation. 

I am now advised by my counsel that the committee representatives 
are not satisfied with this arrangement, but wish to have the commit- 
tee representatives remain alone with all our books and records. Our 
attorneys advise us that we are within our rights in placing a repre- 
sentative with this material while representatives of the committee 
examine it. 

We desire to assert these rights. ^AHiile we are informed that no 
reason need to be given to support our assertion of riglits, I should like 
the committee to understand my reasons for doing so. I have been 
interrogated and investigated by the district attorney's office in New 
York County and Nassau County as well as by the attorney general of 
the State of New York. As a union official I anticipate that this will 
not be the end of such investigations or interrogations. The business 
of our union is substantial. We have over 1,800 members. The wel- 
fare and pension funds have assets of more than $li/^ million. I am 
in a position of trust with respect to the records of the union, and am 
responsible for the same. 

I feel that the only proper safeguards of these books and records is 
the continued exercise of the right to retain custody over this 
property. 

M}^ attorney advises me that the committee may require the produc- 
tion of this material and compel me to testify with respect thereto. 
This I am ready to do. I have already done more than this. I have 
made this material available in the manner heretofore stated. 

Another reason for me to insist on exercising my rights is that I 
desire to know what material the committee wishes to copy or photo- 
stat in order that I may be prepared to testify with respect to such 
time .as I may be called upon to do so. 

Since the material called for here covers several years and numerous 
transactions too numerous for me to inform myself about in its en- 
tirety, I feel that I have a right and obligation to ascertain by proper 
means the subject of any future questioning which the committee may 
have for me, so that I may be an informed, intelligent and cooperative 
witness. 

The Chairman. Then I understand that you are refusing to turn 
over your records ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Chairman, as outlined in this statement, I am 
willing to comply, as outlined in the statement, and as my counsel 
would also request. 

The Chairman. If I understand you correctly, you want to name 
all the conditions upon which the records can be looked at. The 
Chair is not going to do that, unless the committee requires him to 
do so. He is not going to adopt any such policy. We discussed this 
quite extensively in New York last Friday. I ordered you to bring 
your records here so that the committee can determine whether it is 
going to let you name all the conditions or whether we are going to 
receive the records. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6663 

I think it is a pretty vital thing for the committee to decide. We 
have the authority under the law, under the resolution, to get the 
records from others, and I do not know any reason why we should 
show some favoritism to you. I will submit the matter to the com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Shivitz. Mr. Chairman, before the matter is submitted to the 
committee, may I respectfully ask the Chair and the committee's 
indulgence to explore this further, if it is possible to do so, at a closed 
session? I am ready to go into one at this point. If you feel you 
would like to have it aired at a public hearing, where I don't think we 
can be nearly as effective, I am ready for that. 

Senator Mundt. Mr. Chairman, I think this is a very vital public 
point, and I think the public is entitled to know whatever reasons 
Mr. Shivitz has. I would like to hear them, but I do think it is public 
business. 

There would be no purpose served in going into executive session. 

Mr. Shtv^tz. As I stated at the outset. Senator Mundt, counsel in- 
formed me that we were going into executive session. He has 
explained that he assumed that. He does not, of course, run the 
committee. 

Mr. Kennedy. Say what I told you, that I thought that the session 
would be held in executive session. I did not say that the committee 
would hold an executive session on it. 

Straighten it out. 

Mr. Shivitz. I think there is a difference without any distinction. 

But in any event. Senator Mundt, I am only saying this because 
of the great patience with which your chairman indulged me on Fri- 
day, and we made a great deal of progress on it. I felt if we con- 
tinued on that vein, we would close the matter to everybody's satis- 
faction. I am perfectly ready to go ahead in an open hearing. 

Senator Mundt. I am hoping for the same eventuality, but I do 
not see any purpose to be served in going into executive session. This 
is a public session, and you should have your reasons spread on the 
record in public. 

Mr. Shim:tz. May I be heard, Mr. Chairman ? 

The Chairman. The Chair will listen to you, but I do not want a 
long statement. 

Mr. Shivitz. Mr. Chairman, the facts as outlined by the witness, 
I think, speak for themselves. 

In addition to that, as you stated a moment ago, this Senate com- 
mittee, this select committee, is vested with very broad powers. From 
the resolution granting the powers and which gave birth to the com- 
mittee, we find in section 4 the power to issue subpenas. That power, 
in subdivision 4 of section 4, is specifically enumerated as follows: 
"Kequire by subpena or otherwise the attendance of such witness" and 
here are the important words "and production of such correspondence, 
books, papers, and documents." That is what it requires. 

It can require the production of books, records, and documents. 

The courts have spoken on the interpretation of the word "produc- 
tion" in civil and criminal cases, with prosecutors, attorneys general, 
complainants, and parties to litigation. The courts have repeatedly 
held that the right of a party, or body, to call for the production of 
books and records does not carry with it the right to obtain or retain 
possession thereof. In order to do that, under our form of Govern- 



6664 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

ment a warrant of attachment must issue from a court of competent 
jurisdiction. 

That the Congress, except in cases where it sits as a trial court, has 
no power to issue. 

A subpena for the production of books and records is for just that, 
(At this point. Senator McNamara withdrew from the hearing 
room.) 

Mr. Shivitz. We have gone further. We have gone further to the 
point where we are ready, and we have made avaihable, and those books 
and records have been examined for a period of several weeks. 

I would like to point this out, Mr. Chairman, and gentlemen : The 
only thing, the only thing that distinguishes our Government from 
practically every other government in the world is the fact that the 
state itself is the servant of the people. 

The Chairman. Mr. Counsel, I do not believe the committee needs 
a lecture on our form of Government. I believe we are pretty familiar 
with it. 

The question is : Are you going to turn over the records ? That is all 
I want to know. 

Mr. Shivitz. I think, Mr. Chairman, that that question lends itself 
to an oversimplification. I would like to say this 

The Chairman. Just a moment. We are going to keep it simplified. 

Are you going to deliver the records or not ? 

Mr. Shivitz. We are here to produce them, to testify from them. 
In default of that being acceptable, except as the witness has testified, 
we assert the right to retain possession of them. We will exhibit 
them as we have, to a representative of the committee, who can make 
copies from them at will, who can examine them at great length. I 
have just been informed by Mr. Adelstein that his office in the union 
offices in New York City, where I am told your investigation is being 
conducted, which is an airconditioned office, four times the size of the 
room that they are now working in, will be made available to them. 

The Chairman. Again let the Chair determine. You give the 
answer, but I want your client to answer. I suppose he is answering 
on your advice. 

All I want to know now and all the committee wants to know, and 
you say you have the records here, is : Are you going to deliver them to 
the committee ? 

The question is directed to your client. He may say yes or no. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Chairman, as I and my counsel have indicated, 
that I am prepared to do, based on the statement I read, and I am, as a 
result of that, prepared to testify. 

The Chairman. I think we can get this concluded a little quicker by 
this. The Chair, with the permission of the committee, with its ap- 
proval, now orders and directs you to deliver the records that you have 
brought here in response to the subpena, to the custody of the com- 
mittee. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Chairman, I cannot do so for the reasons that 
I have already stated. I will produce them and am prepared to 
testify 

The Chairman. The Chair will accept your answer as a refusal. 
Unless you immediately mdicate otherwise the Chair accepts your 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6665 

answer as a refusal to comply with the subpena and to comply with the 
order of the Chair, with the approval of the committee, at this time, 
that those records that you have brought in response to the subpena, 
be physically delivered to the custody of this committee. That is the 
order of the Chair and of the committee. 

Senator Mundt. Before you answer, may I say that there was a 
slight inaccuracy in the grammer that you used a moment ago. You 
said "I cannot do so." You may say correctly that you will not do so. 
You can do so, because you now have the records in an automobile 
parked just outside the Senate Office Building. But you elect not to 
do so, in which case your answer should be "I will not do so." You can 
if you want to. 

The Chairman. All right. The order of the Chair stands, the order 
of the committee remains in effect. 

The Chair would like to ask you 2 or 3 questions. 

You were asked in New York last Friday at the executive session 
the question, "Did you receive any moneys directly or indirectly from 
any employer ?" And that question you refused to answer, saying "On 
advice of counsel I have been advised that I have been here for no 
other purpose but to produce books and records." 

The Chair at that time pointed out to you that the subpena called 
for your presence and for you to testify. I need not reread the 
subpena. I now^ propound the question to you : Did you receive any 
moneys directly or indirectly from any employer? 

Mr. Shivitz. Mr. Chairman, may I make a statement, a very short 
statement, addressed to any questions ? I will not be long. 

The Chairman. Make it very brief. 

Mr. Shivitz. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the committee, the 
status of this witness at the present time is clear to each and every one 
of you. He has, in our opinion, up to this point, been a cooperative wit- 
ness, in that each and every document that he has been asked to pro- 
duce has been produced and turned over to the committee staff. He is 
prepared to testify before this committee and answer all the questions 
that the committee or its counsel propound to him. 

I feel, however, from a sense of fairness alone, that in the present 
posture of this hearing, with tlie record condition as it is, that it is un- 
fair to press this witness to make answers. We are ready to have you 
examine our records and then question the witness as is usual. That is 
usual procedure. But in this present position, I submit that to have 
the witness in this present position of not having produced the records 
and then being asked to answer questions, puts him in a position of 
conflict which I do not think is proper when the witness has indicated 
his readiness and willingness to cooperate. 

In the event the Chair will press for answers, this witness is ready 
to testify. He has nothing to fear. But out of a sense of fairness, 
I believe that it would be improper to proceed with the questioning 
of the witness while the question of the books and records is undis- 
posed of. 

The Chairman. The question of the books and records has already 
been disposed of. I am asking a question which is wholly unrelated to 
books, documents, and records. 

It is simply : Did you receive any moneys directly or indirectly from 
any employer ? 



6666 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Shivitz. May I ask the Chair to poll the committee, please, on 
my objection ? 

The Chairman. If there is any member of this committee that agrees 
with counsel, speak up. 

All right. The question is still directed to you. 
(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Shivitz. May we have the question read again, please? 

The Chairman. Did you receive any moneys directly or indirectly 
from any employer ? 

Mr. Shivitz. Mr. Chairman? 

The Chairman. The Chair has indulged counsel. If you want to 
consult with your clients, you may do so. In fact, the Chair has been 
very indulgent all day, and also last Friday, trying to work this thing 
out. 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Chairman, I would just like that qualified 
to the extent, and I believe you do mean, as a representative of the 
-local union and from employers in the industry. 

Is that what you mean ? 

The Chairman. I mean did you receive any moneys directly or in- 
directly from an employer. I say you, meaning you a person, one 
human individual. Did you receive any ? 

Mr. Adlestein. Now, Mr. Chairman, the reason why I ask that this 
be qualified is I am very active in various organizations where I am 
on committees and raising funds, and there are employers out of our 
industry that make contributions to these organizations. I would like 
to have your question qualified. 

The Chairman. You know what I mean by this question. 

Mr. Adelstein. I don't, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Everyone present in the sound of my voice knoAvs 
wlv A I mean. 

The collection of money for some charity is not implied in the 
question at all. The question is did you receive? 

Mr. Adelstein. I personally have never received any money from 
any employers. 

The Chairman. Directly or indirectly ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Directly, indirectly, or in any form or way. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 

You were asked another question in the hearing last Friday. "I 
want to know what his relationship has been with Anthony Corallo, 
who is known as Tony 'Ducks' Corallo." That is a question you 
also refused to answer last Friday. The Chair now asks you that 
question. 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Corallo is a member and an officer of a local 
union. 

The Chairman. Which local? 

Mr. Adelstein. Offhand, I don't remember the number, but I know 
it happens to be a teamster local union. 

The Chairman. Is that union located in Xew York ? 

Mr. Adlestein. It is in New York City, and do- 

The Chairman. In that capacity or in any other, what relationship 
have you had with him ? 

Mi\ Adelstein. As an officer of the Joint Council of Teamsters in 
New York, I would meet many of the officers of local unions, and so 
I have met Mr. Corallo. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6667 

Aside from that, I have had no other rehitions with him. 

The Chairman. Are there any further questions ? 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Not at this time. 

Senator Mundt. Mr. Chairman? 

The Chairman. Senator Mundt. 

Senator Mundt. Mr. Adelstein, in your responses to the last two 
questions, it would seem to me that you indicated willingness to be 
a cooperative rather than a recalcitrant witness. But in our earlier 
colloquy, I came to a diU'erent conclusion. I would now like to ask 
you specifically this question : Will you now in response to the sub- 
pena which has been served upon you today deliver to room 101 the 
records covered in that subpena ^ 

(At this point, Senator McClellan withdrew from the hearing 
room.) 

Mr. Adelstein. Senator, I can't 

Senator Mundt. You cannot? I asked you whether you will or 
not. 

Mr. Adelstein. I have the records present. I am willing to pro- 
duce them, providing a rei^resentative on behalf of myself and the 
local union is present with the investigators wiio will investigate the 
records. 

Senator Mundt. Do I interpret that to mean that you will produce 
them, turn them over to the custody of our committee in room 101, 
provided somebody representing you san stay there. Is that what 
you care to tell me ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Senator Mundt. In substance, that is what you said in your 
statement ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Senator, we, for over a week, had the books and 
records 

Senator Mundt. Do not give me a lot of history. I want to know 
the answer to the question. You said you would turn them over if 
you could have somebody present with the committee. If we accept 
that, will you, under those terms, deliver them to our committee in 
room 101 now, leaving with them as custodian wdiomever you please ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Shivitz. Senator, may I speak ? 

Senator Mundt. You may talk to your client. 

Mr. Shivitz. May I respond for him? 

Senator Mundt. I want the witness to respond. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Adlestein. Senator, I am willing to produce the books and 
records as we have done in New York City. 

Senator Mundt. I know what you have been doing. But you said 
a little while ago, and it is in the written record now, you were willing 
to deliver them to room 101 and give them to the custody of our com- 
mittee, provided you could have somebody representing you be pres- 
ent in the room. We will accept that. If you want to quibble and 
back away from that, that is another thing". We accept that. Are 
you prepared to produce them now ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Senator, I am not here to quibble. I would like to 
get this over with. We are prepared to continue, to have our books 
-and records produced in New York as we have 



6668 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES INI THE LABOR FIELD 

Senator Mundt. That is a quibble, because you are backing away 
from what you said earlier. 

Mr. Adelstein. Senator, I am sorry. You misunderstood me. 

Senator Mundt. We will let the record speak for itself on that. 

Mr, Adelstein. That was a misunderstanding. 

Senator Mundt. Mr, Reporter, will you go back and read your rec- 
ord, the agreement that I understood Mr. Adelstein to make ? 

He will go back and examine the transcript. 

(The reporter read from his notes, as requested, as follows :) 

Senator Mundt. Mr. Adelstein, in your responses to the last two questions, it 
would seem to me that you indicated willingness to be a cooperative rather 
than a recalcitrant witness. But in our earlier colloquy I came to a different con- 
clusion. I would now like to ask you specifically this question : Will you now, 
in response to the subpena which has been served upon you today, deliver to 
room 101 the records covered in that subpena? 

(At this point, Senator McClellan withdrew from the hearing room.) 

Mr. Adelstein. Senator, I can't 

Senator Mundt. You cannot? I asked you whether you will or not. 

Mr. Adelstein. I have the records present. I am willing to produce them, 
providing a representative on behalf of myself and the local union is present 
with the investigators who will investigate the records. 

Senator Mundt. I did not misunderstand you. I understood you 
correctly as to what the record says. 

Mr. Adelstein. Senator, I said it before, and I will say it again. I 
am willing to produce the records as we have in the past, in an office 
in New York City. 

Senator Mundt. Mr. Adelstein, that has no relationship whatever 
to do with my question. We have just read the question that we just 
asked you. We have just read your answer. Your answer said you 
would produce them in room 101 if you could have a representative 
of your teamsters union or a representative of yours present. 

If you want to back away from that answer, of course, it is your 
privilege. But you cannot change what you have already said. That 
is in the record. 

(At this point. Senator McClellan entered the hearing room.) 

Mr. Adelstein. I am sorry. There is a misunderstanding here, 
Senator. I am ready to produce the records. Your investigators 
have had them, and investigated them, for over a week. 

One of our representatives has been present during that investiga-. 
tion. It wasn't I, or my representative, that broke off that rela- 
tionship. Your investigators stated 

Senator Mundt. We have heard you say that many times. It has. 
no relationship to my question. It has nothing to do with my 
question. 

Mr. Adelstein. I am ready to go on with that investigator, Sen- 
tor. But I am not quibbling. I would like you to know that I would 
like to get this over with. 

Senator Mundt. There is an easy way. Just deliver the records 
to room 101. 

Mr. Adelstein. What do we do, close up our union office and go out 
of business ? Mr. Senator, it so happens you have done this for others 
people. Why not for us? 



IMPROPER ACTIVmES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6669 

The Chairman. Counsel I will make a brief statement about the 
problems we have had on this. 

Mr. Kennedy. As Mr. Adelstein says, we have done this in other 
instances. We have allowed the people whose books we are examining 
to keep the books and have an investigator in the office. 

Mr. Adelstein and his — or I believe it is Mr. Adelstein, personally — 
had made the conditions so difficult working in his office as to make 
it impossible for our investigators to work. There has been an 
accountant looking over the shoulder of our investigators as they 
write anything down, as they take any notes. It is completely 
impossible. 

Where we made the arrangements in prior cases, it is where we 
have gone into an office and we have been allowed to stay in that 
office. They have set an office aside with the records; we have been 
allowed to stay in that office by ourselves, examine the records and 
make copies of anything that we want. We wanted to continue that 
arrangement with Mr. Adelstein. He wants to keep his office open 
from 9 o'clock or 9 : 30 in the morning until 4 : 30 in the afternoon. 
We are not allowed to go in there after that, or Saturdays and 
Sundays. It makes an impossible situation. As I said, we have 
tried to make some arrangements, but it has been back and forth 
over the period of the past 4 or 5 weeks. This is a very important 
investigation, dealing with collusion between management and labor. 

Mr. Shivitz. Mr. Chairman, may I say something at this point, a 
brief statement? 

The Chairman. The Chair will bring this to a pretty sudden 
conclusion. 

Mr. Shivitz. Mr. Chairman, the counsel has made a statement based 
on statements given to him not of his own knowledge. These records 
were in my office. I would like to say first that we were informed 
today that the books and records of the International Teamsters Union 
here in Washington have been under investigation by this commit- 
tee, but that a representative of the international has been present 
with the investigators with these records at all times, which is all 
that we are asking for. 

(At this point. Senator Ives withdrew from the hearing room.) 

Mr. K!ennedy. You are wrong. 

Mr. Shivitz. I am only telling you that that is what I have been 
told. So we have both been misinformed, apparently, Mr. Counsel. 

I would also like to say this. We are ready to correct the working 
conditions as I have outlined them. I submit that that can be done, 
the men can have complete freedom of action, and the books can stay 
where they belong, in the offices of the union. 

The Chairman. May I say this: I think we are going to get the 
books one way or another. I think we will. 

Mr. Shivitz. I am sure the chairman means only by proper methods. 

The Chairman. Well, yes ; and there are proper methods. I think 
this committee knows what proper methods are. I think it is its 
purpose to observe them. 

Mr. Shivitz. No ; I said that I knew the Chair meant that, 

89330— 57— pt. 17 2 



6670 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman, All right. There is no misunderstanding. 

Are there any further questions ? 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all. 

The Chairman. You may stand aside. 

Are there any further witnesses? 

If not, the cormnittee will stand in recess until the call of the Chair. 

(Whereupon, at 4: 55 p. m., the committee recessed, subject to the 
call of the Chair.) 

(Present at the taking of the recess: Senators McClellan, Mundt, 
and Goldwater.) 



INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 



TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1957 

United States Senate, 
Select Committee on Improper Activities 

IN THE Labor or Management Field, 

Washington^ D. G. 

The select committee met at 10 a. m., pursuant to Senate Resolution 
74, aofreed to January 30, 1957, in the caucus room of the Senate Office 
Building, Senator John L. McClellan (chairman of the select com- 
mittee) presiding. 

Present : Senator John L. McClellan, Democrat, Arkansas ; Senator 
Irving M. Ives, Republican, New York. 

Also present : Robert F. Kennedy, chief counsel ; Jerome Adlerman, 
assistant chief counsel; Robert W. Greene, investigator; James P. 
Kelly, investigator ; Ruth Young Watt, chief clerk. 

The Chairman. The committee will be in order. 

(Members of the committee present at convening of the session : Sen- 
ators McClellan and Ives.) 

The Chairman. We begin this morning a new series of public hear- 
ings, in a new area of the field of management-labor relations. As has 
been the practice heretofore, as we start this new series, the Chair will 
make a brief opening statement. The subject of these hearings pri- 
marily will be private carting industry hearings. New York and Los 
Angeles. 

The private sanitation industry — collection of refuse from homes 
and businesses by private cartingmen — is an important but little 
heralded industry in tlie United States. This industry has grown 
particularly large in Los Angeles and the Greater New York area. 
With the growth of this industry, both Los Angeles and New York 
are faced with similar problems arising from attempts to create 
monopoly situations by association and union factions. 

In the Greater New York area alone, the annual volume of the pri- 
vate carting industry has been estimated in excess of $50 million; 
private cartmen in this area serve 122,000 individual businessmen and 
nearly 500,000 private homeowners. The New York picture is re- 
peated on a smaller scale throughout the country. 

The importance of this industry cannot be equated in financial 
volume alone. For health and business reasons, the removal of com- 
mercial and private refuse is a vital, everyday function in all commu- 
nities. Any arbitrary halt in such collections can become a serious 
menace not only to the individual businessman but to the general wel- 
fare of the community as a whole. 

6671 



6672 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES US' THE LABOR FIELD 

This hearing shall attempt to show how individuals, some of them 
imderM'orld hoodlums, have attempted to build business empires in 
the private carting industry through a system of monopoly enforced 
by trade associations and cooperative labor unions. Illustrative of the 
hoodlum control in this industry is the fact that the names of at least 
more than 40 underworld figures will be mentioned during the course 
of committee hearings this week. 

In particular, these hearings will chart the activities of labor-rela- 
tions man Vincent J. Squillante, a person with an underworld back- 
ground and no previous exjDerience in the labor-management field. 
Squillante used his position as a "labor expert" in the New York pri- 
vate carting industry to establish a stranglehold on industry trade as- 
sociations for his own personal profit and that of his associates, a num- 
ber of them being prominent hoodlums. 

These hearings will attem23t to present the details of Squillante's rise 
to power and the methods that he employed to set up this business 
empire with the assistance of both management and labor factions. 
The hearings shall also demonstrate that private cartmen who sought 
to break with Squillante-controlled trade associations were penalized 
by the union and forced back into line by "whip" companies operated 
by Squillante and his relatives. 

The committee shall also attempt to show that certain underworld 
characters, by virtue of their association with Squillante or the union 
he dealt with, were able to escape union and/or association restrictions 
and were thereby put in an advantageous competitive position with 
respect to the rest of the industry. 

The hearings shall also demonstrate that the natural result of such 
a situation were outbreaks of violence and eventually coercion, extor- 
tion, and fraud. 

Is there any statement, Senator Ives ? 

Senator Ives. No, Mr. Chairman. I fully concur in your statement. 

The Chairman. All right, Mr. Kennedy, call the first witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Captain James Hamilton of the Los Angeles Police 
Department. 

The Chairman. You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God. 

Captain Hamilton. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF CAPT. JAMES E. HAMILTON 

The Chairman. Will you state your name, your place of residence, 
and your business or occupation or official position ? 

Captain Hamilton. James E. Hamilton, 1314 Eoseway Street, West 
Lovena, captain of police, Los Angeles Police Department, command- 
ing the intelligence division. 

The Chairman. How long have you been with the police depart- 
ment, Captain? 

Captain Hamilton. About 21 years. 

The Chairman. How long have you held your present position of 
commanding the intelligence division ? 

Captain Hamilton. Since April of 1950. 

The Chairman. You are familiar with the rules of the committee, of 
course, with respect to counsel. Do you waive counsel ? 



EMPROPER ACnVITIES IN THE LABOR FIEIjD 6673 

Captain Hamilton. I do. 

The Chairman. Thank you. 

Mr. Kennedy. Captain, could you tell us a little about the intelli- 
gence division, and what the purpose of it is ? 

Captain Hamilton. Well, the responsibility of the intelligence divi- 
sion is the investigation of organized crime. We are a nonenf orcement 
unit, rather, an intelligence investigative unit. Perhaps it is some- 
what similar to the military intelligence, except that we do not infil- 
trate our own ranks, and we are not responsible for the conduct of the 
men of the department. That is the responsibility of another division 
of the department. Otherwise, our job is to obtain the information 
and channel it to the enforcement section. 

Mr. Kennedy. Approximately how many men do you have work- 
ing under you in the intelligence division ? 

Captain Hamilton. About 40 sworn employees. There are six 
civilians, clerical help. 

Mr. Kennedy. You chiefly deal with organized crime, is that right? 

Captain Hamilton. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. In the course of the work that you have done, and 
the people under you, did you make an investigation or a study of the 
carting industry in Los Angeles ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, we did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us when that started, and how it was 
brought to your attention ? 

Captain Hamilton. We started on that investigation in 1954. It 
first came to our attention by complaints being received in 2 or 3 
departments of the city government, from householders concerning 
the pickup of the combustible rubbish. I might explain that in Los 
Angeles or in the city of Los Angeles for a number of years the city 
government has picked up the wet garbage, and the noncombustibles, 
or cans and ashes. That is a free city service which is absorbed in the 
tax rate. However, the combustible rubbish, which includes the waste 
paper and yard trimmings, and so forth, has been with the householder 
and with a number of business and industrial establishments, burned 
in their own incinerators. The householders have had a small single 
chamber incinerator, and of course the larger the business, the larger 
the incinerator. Some have burned that way ; others have hired pri- 
vate collectors to collect the combustible rubbish. 

The complaints that came in were from primarily householders who 
were dissatisfied with their pickXip service of combustible rubbish. 
As an example, one of the first complaints that we received was from 
the San Fernando Valley area where a man complained that he had 
contracted with a rubbish pickup service to pick up rubbish from his 
home, that when he talked to this company over the telephone they 
said, "We will deliver a barrel and start pickup immediately." 

After several phone calls, and some 3 weeks later, a barrel was final- 
ly left at this place, and in the meantime his yard trimmings had piled 
up, and they charged him $7.50 to pick up the accumulated clippings, 
although they had agreed that they would start the service immedi- 
ately. I believe in that case it was a monthly charge or approximately 
$3 a month. 

We found other complaints such as 1 service station that com- 
plained that their weekly pickup had been at a price of $2 a week, and 



6674 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

in 3 raises, over about a 4-montli period, the price had jumped to $8 per 
week. 

When they attempted, in both cases when they were dissatisfied with 
the service and attempted to locate, shall we say, a competitor to bid on 
the job, they were told that there was no competitor in the area, that 
the zone in which the individual lived or was in business belonged to a 
specific rubbish company, and that was the only rubbish company that 
could pick up in that area. 

Mr. Kennedy. If a person was dissatisfied with the service that he 
was receiving and wanted to change his rubbish collector, he wasn't 
allowed to do so ? Is that right ? 

Captain Hamilton. He could not do that. 

Mr. Kennedy. He could only use the particular rubbish collector 
that had been assigned or had the rights in his particular area ? 

Captain Hamilton. That is correct. 

The Chairman. I have just one question. 

That assignment had not been made by government ? 

Captain Hamilton. No; there was no government involved. The 
only control or regulation by government in this business at that time 
was the licensing of the trucks and the collectors by the department of 
public works of the city of Los Angeles. 

Now, we had then approximately 900 collectors licensed. The sole 
interest of the board of public works was that the truck was properly 
built so that it would not let debris fall on the public streets. That was 
the only interest they had. 

The Chairman, There was no monopoly of the business or in any 
area of the city emanating from governmental authority ? ' 

Captain Hamilton. No. 

INIr. Kennedy. What is the potential value, would you think, of the 
industry in the city of Los Angeles, in and around the city of Los 
Angeles ? 

Captain Ha^niilton. We have divided that into two general classes. 
One is the household pickup, and the other is commercial, which in- 
cludes both business and manufacturing. In the household pickup it 
is estimated from the number of water meters. We have approximate- 
ly 750,000 water meters in the city of Los Angeles. So we would have 
750,000 residential pickups. 

I cannot estimate the volume or the number of counts of commer- 
cial pickups. It is rather difficult, but a very conservative estimate 
of the value of the pickup service, or the gross cost of pickup would be 
$20 million a year. That is a very conservative estimate. 

Mr. Kennedy. So it is an industry of some volume monetarily? 
Isn't that right? 

Captain Hamilton. It is not only an industry of considerable vol- 
ume, both monetarily and so far as the service that they are rendering, 
but it is also one that is vital to public health and safety. 

Let us take a department store, as an example. A large department 
store in the course of 1 day's business casts off several tons of waste- 
paper, cardboard cartons, and so on. Now if that is not picked up 
daily, I think it doesn't take much imagination to figure the size of a 
pile that will be in an alley in the course of 3 or 4 daj- s. So one of the 
easiest ways to close the doors of a department store is to stop the 
rubbish collection. It is the same with the householder. He has no 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6675 

way to get rid of the combustible rubbish unless he can burn it, and 
now that we have stopped burning in the Los Angeles area, what is he 
going to do with that rubbish? Pie must dispose of it, it is a fire 
hazard, and tlie fire inspectors would soon declare a violation there, 
and it is a health problem as well. The accumulation of combustible 
rubbish in any location for a week's time is not dangerous insofar as 
the householder is concerned, but spread that over about 3 weeks and 
you will have a health problem. 

Mr. Kennedt. So it is a potential position of power to control the 
rubbish collection in a city, isn't that correct? 

Capitain Hamilton. Well, certainly it is an emergency service, 
althougli it has never been so classified. But I would say that it is. 

Mr. Kennedy. If you ran a department store or a restaurant and 
the rubbish collector refused to come around and pick up the trash, 
they could close that department store, or that restaurant within a 
period of 2 or 3 or 4 days, isn't that right ? 

Captain Hamiltion. As soon as that rubbish started to smell, I 
don't think you would have any customers coming into the front door. 

Mr. Kennedy. And then the health authorities would come in also, 
would they not ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So it has a great potential and a necessary service 
for the individual store owner, or for the individual that owns a home 
and has to get rid of his garbage. 

Captain Hamilton. And the same way with a manufacturing plant. 
Some of the plants pay — oh, there may be some that pay into the 
thousands per month to have their rubbish hauled off, because tliey 
have got to keep their area clear in order to manufacture. 

Mr. Kennedy. For that reason, when you received these complaints 
that people couldn't change their mbbish collector, or were dissatisfied 
with the service and could not get a new rubbish collector, their rub- 
bish collectors could arbitrarily lift the price and it was a matter of 
some concern ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, that combined with one other phase that 
we soon identified in our original investigation, and that was what 
ai)peared to be a collusion between the local union, that is, local 396 
of the teamsters union that had the rubbish industry and an associa- 
tion of owner operators that was formed in the San Fernando Valley. 
That is where we first ffot into it and later v\'e went into the rest of 
the city, or other parts of the city, but first we started in the San 
Fernando Valley. 

There were some complaints of, you might say, some independent 
owner-operators. We found that the association, San Fernando Val- 
ley Rulibish Association, and tliat is not quite the correct name, had 
organized and allotted this territory and split up the valley like 
pieces of pie, and if an independent went into an area to try and 
solicit accounts, he was cut off at the dump by a union business agent. 
So, in effect, it appeared that the business agent was the enforcer for 
the association. 

The Chairman. Who owned the dump, and who had control of it ? 

Captain Hamilton. They are privately owned. Senator, but the 
dumps are again under contract with the same local tliat the drivers 



6676 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN" THEf LABOR FIELD 

belonged to. So that the contract, and I have a copy of it here, is 
such that only union drivers should dump there. 

Then, as our investigation into that phase of it progressed, we 
found in talking to some of the industries that had attempted to start 
in business out there — we have one to give you a specific case, one 
ex-GI from World War II said he thought it was a good business to 
get into, and he got himself a truck and fixed up a bunch of barrels 
and he started to soliciting in a new residential tract, where there 
was no pickup service. He had built his route up to about 1,500 cus- 
tomers, all primarily home pickups, when he was stopped at the 
dump one day and told by the checker at the dump that he would 
have to see Matula. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who was Matula ? 

Captain Hamilton. That is Frank Matula, Jr., who is secretary- 
treasurer of local 396. 

So the checker told him that only union drivers could dump there. 
So this man told us that he went over to see Mr. Matula and he gave 
Mr. Matula a check for $25 as his initiation fee to join the union and 
Mr. Matula told him that he would have to go over and see Mr. Visco 
of the San Fernando Rubbish Collectors Association and make peace 
with Mr. Visco. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is V-i-s-c-o ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know what his first name is, Mr. Visco's 
first name ? 

Captain Hamilton. Not offhand I do not. 

Mr. Kennedy. But Matula told him he had to go to see the asso- 
ciation ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, he had to see Visco. 

Well, he said he went over and saw Mr. Visco, and Mr. Visco told 
him, "You can't pick up in that territory, that belongs to a specific 
rubbish company." 

He said, after some discussion of the matter, "We might let you 
in the association, but you are going to have to give 1,000 of your ac- 
counts to this collector that has that territory. Now we will give you 
a piece of territory and you can keep 500 of your accounts and we will 
give you a piece of territory over here." 

Well, this party said that he just couldn't see that, because he had 
worked hard to get this route or develop this route and he wasn't going 
to give up his accounts. So he told Mr. Visco that he thought he would 
get along without the association. 

He went back to Mr. Matula to pick up his membership in the union 
and Mr. Matula told him, "You did not make peace with Mr. Visco, 
we don't want you in the union," and he gave him back his $25. 

Now, I have here a photostatic copy of a check. The maker of the 
check is the Package and General Utilities Drivers Local 396, pay to 
the order of William L. Crowder, $25. The check is dated January 28, 
1955, and signed by Fred Ferrier and Frank J. Matula, Jr., secretary- 
treasurer. 

The Chairman. Is that the check that was not cashed ? 

Captain Hamilton. He gave Mr. Matula's check, which they in 
the interim had apparently put through the bank, and so they gave 
him their union check. 

The Chairman. This is a refund check? 



IMPROPER ACTIVrnES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6677 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That may be made exhibit No. 1. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 1" for refer- 
ence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7025.) 

Mr. Kennedy. So this was an example of an individual that tried 
to get into the union who was told by the head of the union, Frank 
Matula, to see the association. The head of the association told him 
that he could only come into the association if he gave up two-thirds 
of his business. He refused to do that. He went back to the union 
and the union would not allow him to come in. Is that correct? 

Captain Hamilton. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And would not allow him to become a member of 
the union? 

Captain Hamilton. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. So after that he could not dump any of his refuse, is 
that right? 

Captain Hamilton. Well, he was barred at the dmnp that he had 
been using, but arrangements were made for him to dump at another 
dump. By that time, as I say, the police department was in an investi- 
gation and we made arrangements for him to dump at another dump. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was just because of the intervention of the 
police department? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes. 

Mr. ICennedy. But otherwise, he wouldn't have been able to dump 
his refuse? 

Captain Hamilton. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the reason was because he was not a member of 
the union and they would not allow him to become a member of the 
union? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes. The dump that stopped him originally 
was the BKK dump. I have a copy here of the contract between local 
396 and BKK, which states specifically that only union drivers shall 
dump there, and the union may picket if other than union drivers are 
permitted to dump. 

Mr. Kennedy. How did the association operate within the associa- 
tion as far as its members were concerned? Was there disciplinary 
action ? Were they told about their particular areas, that they could 
pick up garbage in ? 

Captain Hamilton. You see, the San Fernando Valley area of the 
city of Los Angeles is an area of^ approximately 220 square miles, 
with some 700,000 people, at least. The association had taken this 
area and divided it up among their members, giving each member 
of the association a specific territory limited by boundaries, and he 
had the exclusive right to pick up within that area. 

Later on in our investigation we found another association in Los 
Angeles, in metropolitan Los Angeles, known as the State Kubbish 
Association, that w^as similar in setup except that they did not allocate 
territory. The board of directors sat as sort of a determining board 
in disputes between members. 

In the San Fernando Valley that wasn't particularly necessary 
because there were not the disputes. The only dispute would be if a 
member infringed on the territory of another. But in both associa- 
tions, any disputes were handled by their so-called board of directors. 
They sat as a mediating board. 



6678 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. Were there stipulations and rules about jumping 
another association member's territory ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes. In fact, that was the basic purpose of 
the association, to allocate territory, and each member shall abide by 
the rules of the association. That was in their bylaws. Their bylaws 
are rather extensive. 

Mr. Kennedy. I have here a copy of the bylaws of the State Rub- 
bish Collectors Association. I would like to have you look at that 
and identify it, and particularly article 15, section 1. 

( Document handed to witness.) 

The Chairman. Do you identify the document presented to you ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes. This is a copy, a printed copy of the 
bylaws of the State Rubbish Association. Article 15, entitled "Duties 
of Members, Section 1," reads as follows : 

It is the duty of all members of this association to at all times work for the 
best interests of the said association, and they shall not in any manner what- 
soever encroach upon the territory of any member, and in case they discover 
that any member is encroaching upon their territory, or is about to, they shall 
immediately notify the secretary in writing, and the association shall take steps 
to prevent any interference with their route. 

The Chairman. That document may be made exhibit No. 2 for 
reference only. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 2" for refer- 
ence and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

Mr. Kennedy. "VYliat steps would be taken if one member en- 
croached upon the territorial rights of another member ? 

Captain Hamilton. I have with me copies of minutes of board 
meeting of several meetings of the State Rubbish Association. As an 
example, if I may read to you from tlie minutes of the board meeting 
of December 6, 1954 

The Chairman. That document may be made exhibit No. 3 for 
reference. You may read the pertinent parts of it. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 3" for refer- 
ence and may be found in the files of the Select Labor Committee.) 

Captain Hamilton. As an example, item 7 in the minutes says — 

Case No. 4.50, Sam Sukissian versus Phillip Schorr. Follow up this job with 
the union and see what the situation is. 

To interpret that, apparently Sam Sukissian made a complaint to 
the association that Phillip Schorr had jumped an account. In other 
words, another pickup truck had taken one of his accounts. John 
Andikian, who was the inspector, as they termed it, for the State 
Rubbish Association, when a case such as this case 450 was called to 
their attention, his action would be to notify Frank Matula of the 
teamsters union that Phillip Schorr had taken an account away from 
Sam Sukissian and Matula in turn would have the business agent 
handling the dump that Schorr was using notify the checker at the 
dump not to accept rubbish from Schorr, that he was out of line, and 
to refer him to either Matula or the association. Then the board of 
the association would get the two collectors together, the one that had 
lost the account and the one that had gained an account, and they 
would enter into a negotiation as to whetlier the man picking up tlie 
account, in this case Mr. Schorr, should pay the other collector for 
taking his account, or should give the other collector another account 
of his to balance off having taken one from him. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6679 

Mr. Kennedy. "VYas there also a penalty clause if somebody was 
found guilty of jumping another man's route? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes. There, again, it was dependent upon the 
ruling of the board. Whatever finding the board of directors made 
was supposed to be abided by by both members of the association. 

One of the best examples of that is the Baldwin Hills Yillage, which 
is a privately owned housing development. The monthly pickup 
charge for the village was about $800 a month. The account belonged 
to a Mr. Pick. A man by the name of S. T. Agajinian obtained that 
account. In our investigation we were told that the Baldwin Hills 
Yillage was dissatisfied and that is why they got a new^ collector. 

This came to the attention of the board of the State Rubbish Asso- 
ciation, and they found that Mr. Agajinian should pay Dave Pick 
$7,200 for taking that account. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. So he was forced to pay this penalty of $7,200 ? 

Captain Hamilton. He was. The agreement on how that was to 
be paid was made in Mr. IMatula's office, according to witnesses. 

Mr. Kennedy. So the union acted as an enforcement arm of the 
association ; is that right ? 

Captain Hamilton. Y^es. It was very simple. At the union office 
they would tell him, "You either get in line or we will run you out of 
the business." 

Mr. Kennedy. And they could run them out of the business by 
either picketing their stops or refusing to allow them to dump ? 

Captain Hamilton. We never ran into any case where they pick- 
eted the stops. They just refused to allow them to dump. Prior 
to 1954, there had been several picket lines on, particularly, Kazarian's 
dumps. He had a couple of them that had picket lines. In no case 
did we find that the picket lines were put on there because of wages 
or working conditions or the normal things that a union is involved in. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you find that he would also refuse to handle the 
material and the garbage of even concerns that were union, if the asso- 
ciation made a request that they refuse to handle the company's 
refuse ? 

Captain Hamilton. Y^es. Well, we are back to the same thing. 
If a customer was dissatisfied with the service and attempted to ob- 
tain another pickup service, in some instances they did and were 
forced to go back to the old pickup service, whether they liked it or 
not. 

Mr. Kennedy. What I am thipking of is the example you gave a 
few minutes ago, where one association member jumped another 
association member's pickup or stop, and then the union w^ould be 
notified. Then Matula would notify the dump and say, "Don't handle 
any of this individual's refuse when he brings his trucks in." Did 
you find examples where tliey would refuse to handle the refuse of 
individuals who were union? 

Captain Hamilton. Many examples. In fact, the so-called hot 
sheets, which was the term applied to the lists of names sent over 
by John N. Andikian, of State Rubbish, to Matula, a list of 10 or 12 
names would have, maybe, half of them union members in good 
standing and half of them that were independents. The list would 
either be given to the business agent handling the dumps involved, 
or in many cases the girls in the office, according to their testimony, 
under Matula's instructions would call the dump and just give them 



6680 IMPROPER AcnvrriES est the' labor field 

the list of names and say, "Do not accept any rubbish from," and then 
read off the names. 

Mr. Kennedy. And those people might be members in good stand- 
ing? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. So, the union activities had nothing to do with in- 
creasing wages or bettering the working conditions of the employee, 
but were just an enforcement arm of the association, to make sure that 
the members stayed in line ; is that right ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes. That was the finding. Mr. Matula, in 
testifying before the State assembly committee in Los Angeles, de- 
nied this repeatedly. Witnesses were put on that contradicted his 
testimony. As a result of his testimony before that committee, he has 
since been convicted of perjury in the superior court of Los Angeles 
and is now awaiting sentence on that. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have any of those lists ? 

Captain Hamilton. The hot sheets ? 

Mr. Kennedy. The hot sheets. 

Captain Hamilton. Yes ; I have some here. 

As an example, here is a letter of transmittal dated May 14, 1953, 
on the letterhead of the State Rubbish Collectors Association, 5710 
East Beverly Boulevard, Los Angeles 22, addressed to Frank Matula, 
840 Union Avenue, Los Angeles. 

Dear Mr. Matula : Enclosed please find a list of names of the people whose 
cases have not been settled. Your cooperation will be greatly appreciated on 
this matter. 

Attached to that would be a list, such as I have here, which is a 
list of names, and starts with Don Kardashian versus Yasuki Mit- 
sueda, and it has a figure at the right-hand side of the paper of $22. 
This is a sample of the lists that would be sent over by Mr. Andikian. 

The Chairman. The letter and the list may be made exhibits 4-A 
and B for reference. 

(Documents referred to were marked "Exhibits 4-A and 4-B" for 
reference, and may be found in the files of the Select Labor Com- 
mittee.) 

Captain Hamilton. Here is a second letter dated October 14, 1953, 
on the same letterhead, addressed to the same individual : 

Enclosed please find a list of names of the people taking jobs, and we will 
appreciate it if you would give a list to the field agents when they work at the 
dumps. Yours very truly. 

There would be a list accompanying that. 

The Chairman. That may be exhibit 4-C. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit 4— C" for ref- 
erence, and may be found in the files of the Select Labor Committee.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Captain, generally, could the union be much help 
or assistance to the employees in this kind of an industry ? 

Captain Hamilton. Well, since we had about 900 licensed col- 
lectors, many of them, in fact, the majority of them, are owner- 
operators of their own trucks, the small 1-man operation. All of 
these men had to be members of the union. I question what value a 
union can have to an owner-operator situation. How can he improve 
his salary ? 

The Chairman. In other words, they were self-employed? 

Captain Hamilton. That is right. 



IMPROPER ACTIVrrrES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6681 

The Chairman-. But the thing they had to do was to belong to that 
association in order to have a place to dump ? 

Captain Hamilton". And belong to the union, too. 

The Chairman. I know ; they had to belong to the union, but, aside 
from their being forced to belong to the union where they got no 
benefit, they were self-employed, the other requirement was, of course, 
that they had to belong to the association to have a place to dump. 

Captain Hamilton. That is right. 

The Chairman, That might be a legitimate requirement for the 
people who join an association and who have a common place to 
dump. I do not know, unless an individual could provide his own 
dumping place, in his independent operation. But, from the stand- 
point of the union, I am trying to evaluate this situation ; the union 
actually performed no service as far as the individual operator, the 
independent operator, was concerned, other than to take his dues, 
and serve the association in making him comply with the association 
requirements. 

Captain Hamilton. That is right. I can't visualize any service 
that the union could perform to an owner-operator. We tried to figure 
that out, but we came to the same conclusion. The union had nothing 
to offer the owner-operator except to take his dues. 

The Chairman. Did the union have anything to do with the con- 
tract price ? Did it establish that ? 

Captain Hamilton. No ; nothing whatsoever. 

The Chairman. The association established the contract price ? 

Captain Hamilton. No ; it seemed that each owner-operator pretty 
much established his own. We find in the minutes of the meeting of 
the State Rubbish Association particularly complaints registered by 
members of the association that individuals would drop their service 
because the individual would request a cut in price and the collector 
would refuse to grant the cut asked for. Why they reported this to 
the association was never quite clear to us. "^Vliether they expected 
the association to contact the business and explain to them that they 
had to take the pickup service at the price set by the operator or eat 
their rubbish we don't know. 

The Chairman. In other words, if a territory was assigned to an 
individual operator, although he was independent in the sense that 
he owned his own truck and was not working for anyone except him- 
self, I wondered if the association established the price and limited 
or restricted his contract relations, the price he would contract for, 
or were they just all free to make any price and charge whatever they 
wanted to ? 

As I understand it, they were free to do that, but the customer whom 
they were serving had no recourse, because if the individual operator 
fixed a price too high or unreasonable or arbitrarily high the customer 
that was being served had no recourse. He couldn't go out and get 
someone else. He still had to use this one individual to whom his 
territory had been allocated. 

Captain Hamilton. That is exactly what we found to be the case. 
I will say that after we got into this investigation — you see, Mayor 
Poulson went to the grand jury. The grand jury was of no help, so 
under the executive authority in the charter, he set what was termed 
as a mayor's hearing, to bring this matter into public focus. Then 



6682 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IIST THE LABOR FIELD 

this State assembly committee came in, and it was after the assembly 
committee met in the fall of 1955 

The Chairman, Is that a legislative committee ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes — that the rubbish industry set up their op- 
eration a little differently. They then would permit a collector to go 
into another territory to service a dissatisfied customer. But that was 
never clone prior to the assembly hearings in the fall of 1955. They 
did make some coj-rections. Of course, there was a measure on the 
ballot, and then tlie controversy came in as to municipal collection 
versus private collection. It was the feeling of the executive branch 
of the city government that the city would have to pick up combustible 
rubbish. Effective October 1, this year, all rubbish of all types in 
the city of Los Angeles from the householder is picked uj) by city 
trucks. There is no more private collection of householder rubbish. 

But for the industry, in order to try and avoid the city taking it 
over, they had a referendum on the ballot which lost, and did organize 
quite a campaign to provide better control on their own service. They 
still pick up the commercial rubbish, but they do not pick up house- 
holder rubbish. They can, if the householder wants to pay, but he 
is getting it picked up free by the city. 

Senator Ives. Mr. Chairman ? 

The Chairman. Senator Ives. 

Senator Ives. I would like to ask Captain Hamilton if the condi- 
tions he has been describing still obtain in Los Angeles. I gather 
they don't. 

There has been considerable improvement, has there not ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes. However, we can't say that it is any- 
thing that may be permanent, because there is still a lack of any 
control. We thought, when we first got into this, that certainly 
this would be a violation of the law. To me it is a conspiracy be- 
tween a local and an association in restraint of trade, as an example. 
But in reviewing the statutes, all the statutes talk about is products, 
not services. We have in the State of California what is termed the 
Cartwright Act, which is an antitrust section of the government 
code, but it talks about products exclusively. The only product in- 
volved in combustible rubbish is actually a byproduct. They do sell, 
the collectors sell the waste paper and the pasteboard cartons. They 
bundle them up and sell them to paper salvage houses. Those are 
used by such companies as Flintcote, that makes roofing paper and 
cardboard products, in making cardboard boxes. That, again, goes 
in interstate commerce, but it is very difficult to prove. It is a by- 
product rather than the principal business of rubbish collection. So 
we found there is a complete absence of enabling legislation in this 
field. 

Senator Ives. Are you in this no-man's land, or zone, that the 
States are bothered with nowadays? As I recall, California does 
not have a State labor relations act. Am I correct on that? 

Captain Hamilton. I believe that is the situation. 

Senator Ives. There are a number of States who do have such acts. 
I think there are around a dozen. There is a twilight zone or no-man's 
land or area there between the States and the Federal Government, 
where nobody has jurisdiction. Of course, it wouldn't make any dif- 
ference in California, if you have no State labor relations act, because 
you don't have any agency of that kind in California. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6683 

Captain HAivnLTON. That is correct. 

Senator Ives. But it is causing a great deal of trouble at the Fed- 
eral and State levels. There is this no-man's land. The Supreme 
Court decision of last spring declared that the States could not take 
it over, and at the same time the Federal Government, through the 
National Labor Eelations Board, would not take it over. So there you 
are. 

I wonder if that enters into it at all. This may be something that 
the States should take over. You say interstate commerce is involved 
here to some extent. But because of that condition, they cannot take 
it over. 

In a very broad sense, it is intrastate. It is inside. 

Captain Hamilton. That is true, it is. It is quite a stretch of the 
imagination to make interstate out of rubbish collection. 

Senator Ives. We have to have legislation at the Federal level to 
straighten this thing out. Unless you have a State labor relations act 
or a similar agency, it probably wouldn't help California very much, 
but it will help quite a number of the States who do have those agen- 
cies. Otherwise, we will have the thing wide open to racketeering 
all over the country. 

Captain Hamilton. We felt that this should be controlled, and 
should be by legislation, but I liave not even seen proposed bills 
come up. 

Senator I\tes. Do you mean Federal ? 

Captain Hamilton. No, on the State level. Or even on the local 
level. 

Senator Ives. Legislation has been introduced here in Washington. 
I have legislation myself. Our problem is to get the Taft-Hartley 
Act amended here, you know. 

The Chairman. The thing I was concerned about, as you testified, 
is I was trying to determine whether it is necessary in this particular 
field, in the conditions that you described so far, to have Federal 
legislation. Why cannot the stand handle it, since it is primarily a 
local item? I can appreciate the Federal Government's interest in a 
union that seeks, possibly, tlie services of the National Labor Relations 
Board, being in a collusion or in a conspiracy, simply to extort or to 
create a trust or something that is detrimental to the public interest 
But what is lacking, if you know from your study of it, in legislation 
that the State cannot take care of, the State or the municipality? 

Captain Hamilton. Well, of course, it could take care of it, but 
then we get into this uniformity or lack of uniformity. If this were 
done — I am thinking solely of the collusion between the labor union 
and the association to effect a joint edict. 

The Chairman. To effect what ? 

Ca])tain Hamilton. A jont or a mutual edict upon members. 
Rather than tliat being done at a local level, with interpretation in each 
area of the country, it would seem that that should be one field in which 
national or Federal legislation would be in order, because I think we 
will all agree that it isn't good unionism, it isn't good business. It 
would seem to me that is a field for Federal legislation. 

Tlie Chairman. That is what I wanted to get spread out here before 
us. Wlierp does the l^ederal Government's responsibility as far as 
legislation enter into this particular field? I have always been in- 



6684 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

clined to believe that if a State law will remedy conditions in a local 
State, State laws should be enacted rather than Federal law. 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, but we are into a principle, or almost a 
principle of unionism or collective bargaining here, aren't we? That 
is where it seems to me to be. 

The Chairman. I didn't think there was any bargaining. 

Captain Hamilton. There isn't but there should be. 

The Chairman. I am not arguing, I am trying to get a record here 
so that we can see what the picture is, and then determine what re- 
sponsibility the Federal Government should take in that particular 
field, and what should the States accept and attend to themselves. 

Senator Ives. May I ask Captain Hamilton a question ? 

Captain Hamilton, was this matter ever brought to the attention 
of National Labor Relations Board, to your knowledge? 

Captain Hamilton. I cannot say whether it was or not. The Fed- 
eral Bureau of Investigation was interested in it. 

Senator Ives. Yes, they would be, but I was wondering about the 
National Labor Relations Board. 

Captain Hamilton. I doubt it very much, because of the fact we 
could not find any statute or rules that applied to the case at hand. 

Senator Ives. Well, that might be true, but, on the other hand, it 
could have been referred to them for advice or something of that 
kind, so that you would know where to move. 

It occurs to me, offhand, that in California you need some State 
legislation before you could really handle it satisfactorily, I cannot 
say very much. I come from New York State, and heaven knows we 
are having trouble with the same situation there. 

Captain Hamilton. You see, we were in a spot at the time because 
the air pollution control board, which is our smog situation in Los 
Angeles, set up by State legislation, had issued an order that all single 
chamber incinerators must be abolished by October 1, 1955. Well, if 
this order was followed, then the whole community would be in the 
hands of this what I call an unholy monopoly. So it may be appealed 
to the board to postpone that date until we could get this situation 
clarified, so we were in a time bind there. They did postpone it for 
2 years, but now, of course, we have no incinerators, and we still have 
a little smog. 

Mr. Kennedy. Also, Captain Hamilton, there was a provision, was 
there not, written or understood among the members of the association 
that there wouldn't be any open bidding, as far as garbage collection 
was concerned ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, many of the complaints in the minutes of 
the State rubbish association meeting were of that nature, where 
someone would bid in on a job, and that was by the bylaws of the asso- 
ciation, when a collector once had a job he was protected, and no other 
association member could come to that job. The only way they could 
trade was to trade jobs. 

Mr. Kennedy. But there was iio open bidding on a job ? One per- 
son was assigned to the job, and he could charge whatever he wanted, 
and the store or the private individual had to make the contract with 
him and with no one else ? 

Captain Hamilton. Tlie only control that there seemed to be there 
was with some of the manufacturing companies, and large retailers. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6685 

Apparently, if the price got too high, they would haul their own 
rubbish, or their volume was such that they could. 

The Chairman. "\^^iere would they dump ? 

Captain Hamilton. They would dump at these dumps. 

The Chairman. And they wouldn't stop them ? 

Captain HL^milton. No; because in the contract the labor agree- 
ment between local 396 and the BKK could — this agreement was dated 
the 26th day of July 1954, and paragraph 7 reads as follows : 

It shall not be a violation of this agreement to picket if nonunion drivers un- 
load at the dump. This applies only to drivers who make a business of waste 
or rubbish or garbage collection, who are licensed for said work by the city or 
county of Los Angeles. 

So in the agreement there is nothing to prohibit a manufacturing 
company from maintaining their own truck and dumping at a private 
dump and paying the regular charges. I will say that we found that 
that was discouraged, and the price might be higher at the dump. 

Mr. Kennedy. They could increase the dumping price ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, sir ; and again there was no control on the 
price that a dump could charge. 

The Chairman. So if one undertook, a department store or a manu- 
facturing plant undertook to dispose of its own refuse, they could 
simply increase the dumping price to discourage it and have him go 
back to the private service ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was there also an arrangement made as far as the 
paper was concerned, and the selling of the paper ? 

Captain Hamilton. That same thing applied to the dumps so far 
as these hot sheets were concerned, applied to mill supply and the other 
wastepaper houses. 

l^Hien the hot sheet list was left with Matula by John Anclikian, 
the dump would be contacted and the wastepaper house contacted, 
and told to cut off these certain men, and post these men on your list 
and don't take any wastepaper from these men, the same as the dump. 

Mr. Kennedy. So when they were trying to sell the wastepaper to 
the paper companies, the paper companies would be informed by the 
union that they should not purcliase, is that right ? 

Captain Hamilton. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Or otherwise they would be in difficulty with the 
union ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So it was both at the dump and at the paper com- 
pany ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, sir; and in many cases the price charged 
for the pickup service, particularly in certain commercial houses, was 
scaled by the volume of usable or salvageable wastepaper ])icked up 
at that stop. So the collector was dependent upon selling that waste- 
paper to break even on the charge. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you find that any teamsters or any teamster 
officials had any interest in any of these dumps or any financial 
interest ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes. Pete Peterman who was a business agent 
of teamsters union, and testified before the assembly committee, 
stated that the Paramount Disposal 

89330 — 57 — pt. 17 3 



6686 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. That is Paramount Disposal Co. 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, let me get the name of that correct. 
The Paramount Eubbish Co., he said, belonged to three men, primarily 
John Filipoff, Ralph Claire, and John C. Stevenson. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who is John C. Stevenson ? 

Captain Hamilton. John C. Stevenson is an attorney, legal adviser 
for the teamsters union in Los Angeles. 

Mr, Kennedy. Did he have any other name, do you know ? Do you 
know anything about his background ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, that is his legal name, and he had his name 
changed several years ago in Washington. He at one time ran for 
office in Seattle, under the name of John C. Radio Speaker Stevenson, 
and it seemed that there were two. It is my understanding that that 
is his legal name, John C. Radio Speaker, because there were two 
John C. Stevensons running for this same office, and he had been doing 
quite a bit of radio advertising for Painless Parker, and he had be- 
come known as that. That is why he inserted the "Radio Speaker" 
in there. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wasn't he also known as John Stockman ? 

Captain Hamilton. John Stockman was the name from which he 
departed to take the name of John C. Stevenson. 

Mr. Kennedy. He w^as known as John Stockman in Buffalo ? 

Captain Hamilton. In Buft'alo, New York, and I believe he was 
indicted there. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was indicted for grand larceny ? 

Captain Hamilton. For grand theft, under that name. 

Mr. Kennedy. Those indictments are still outstanding ? 

Captain Hamilton. It is my understanding that that was, shall we 
say, adjudicated by an out-of-court settlement or something like that. 
Tlie indictments I don't think are still there. 

Mr. Kennedy. He is the attorney for the teamsters ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, he is. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he had an interest in this dump, is that right ? 

Captain Hamilton. No, in the rubbish collection company. Para- 
mount Rubbish Co. The other two members of the company were 
Ralph Claire and Philipoff, who is secretary-treasurer of local 208, 
and Ralph Claire is secretary of local 399. 

The Chairman. As I unclerstand this, the officials of the union own 
the association. 

Captain Ha^iilton. Own the rubbish collection company. 

The Chairman. Own the company ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, one of these companies, the Paramount 
Rubbish Co. 

The Chairman. They are both the union and management ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Is that correct ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, sir, 

Tlie Chairman. If they own the companj^, they also run the union. 

Captain Hamilton. And then we have several letters in the file 
written by Mr. Stevenson trying to settle disputes that Avere sup- 
posedly a union dispute. Also, Mr. Andikian complained, according 
to the testimony we have on file, to Mr. Matula about the Paramount 
Disposal Co. jumping stops of other association members. Mr. Peter- 
man who was a business agent working for Frank Matula, says that 



IMPROPER ACTIVITTES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6687 

he talked to Andikian about this and wanted to know what ISIatula 
had done to settle this matter. He said that Andikian told him that 
Matnla had said that if he didn't keep his mouth shut, they would take 
more stops. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was for Paramount ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. For this company in which the teamster officials had 
the interest ? 

Captain Hamilton. That is right. 

The Chairman. In other words, the rules only applied when they 
could take advantage of them ? 

Captain Hamilton. It applied to everyone else other than Para- 
mount, apparently. 

The Chairman. I have one other question : How were the officers 
of these associations elected or appointed ? 

Captain Hamilton. By their own membership, by their own con- 
stitution and bylaws. 

The Chairman. Did they provide for election of officers of the as- 
sociation ? 

Captain Hamilton. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, as far as the union is concerned, we have this 
situation : No. 1, where the majority of the union members were owner- 
operators; is that right? 

Captain Hamilton. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. No. 2, that the union has denied membership if the 
individual or concern was unsatisfactory to the association? 

Captain Hamilton. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And No. 3, they would deny dumping rights to 
anybody who was unsatisfactory to the association? 

Captain Hamilton. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And No. 4, that they would deny through union 
pressure, or would not allow a company to buy the wastepaper from 
anybody that was unsatisfactory to the association. Is that right? 

Captain Hamilton. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then the association on their part split the Los 
Angeles area into districts? 

Captain Hamilton. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. There wouldn't be any open bidding, and that one 
person would be allowed to have his particular district and get what- 
ever business existed in that district, and that the rules provided 
there would be no jumping in to that district by any outsider, and 
that they would all move against any outside individual who came 
in to their midst and tried to get business. 

Captain Hamilton. The only one that had to move was the union 
official. He moved against the outsider. 

Mr. Kennedy. Through all of this, the business was all done and 
disputes settled in the office of Frank Matula in the union ? 

Captain Hamilton. Either Matula or Visco in the San Fernando 
•Valley Rubbish Asssociation, or Andikian in the State Rubbish 
Association. 

Mr. Kennedy. And it would appear that the purpose for the exist- 
ence of the union was an enforcement arm for the association ; is that 
right? 

Captain Hamilton. That is the way it appeared to us; yes. 



6688 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. How did the public profit from this arrangement 
or benefit in any way ? 

Captain Hamilton. I think any monopoly, it has been pretty well 
established that any monopoly without some Government control is 
not in the public interest, and that is just what the situation was. 

The Chairman. In other words, the customer had no protection. 

Captain Hamilton. That is right, no protection whatsoever. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further? 

Mr. Kennedy. In your investigation did you find that a situation 
similar to this existed in other areas of the country ? 

Captain Hamilton. Well, there was correspondence with other sec- 
tions. I cannot say we found a situation similar to ours existing any 
place else. There is no general pattern of rubbish collection. We 
didn't get into that far enough. 

Mr. Kennedy. I think as we go along in the New York situation 
we will see quite a parallel to what Captain Hamilton has outlined 
here, as far as the Los Angeles situation is concerned. That is the 
reason it is of particular interest to us, I believe. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much, Captain. 

Call your next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Everett Doyle, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Do you solemnly swear the evidence you give before 
this Senate select committee will be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Doyle. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF EVERETT DOYLE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

JOHN C. SHEEHAN 

The Chairman. State j-our name, and your place of residence and 
your business or occupation. 

Mr. Doyle. My name is Everett Doyle, and I live at 90 Pomona 
Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. 

The Chairman. What is your business or occupation ? 

Mr, Doyle. I am the president of the teamsters local 456. 

The Chairman. What union is that ? 

Mr. Doyle. The teamsters. 

The Chairman. How long have you been president of that union? 

Mr. Doyle. I have been president since 1952. 

The Chairman. Is that local 456? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you have counsel present, Mr. Doyle ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes, I have. 

The Chairman. Mr. Counsel, will you identify yourself for the 
record. 

Mr. Sheehan. John J. Sheehan, 51 Chambers Street, New York 
City. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Doyle, you have been in the teamsters for how 
long ? 

Mr. Doyle. About 20 years. 

Mr. K^ennedy. How long have you been an official ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE! LABOR FIEI/D 6689 

Mr. Doyle. Well, about 15 years. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. You Were first secretary-treasurer of local 456 ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you later became president ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. In 1952, is that right ? 

Mr. DoYLE. That is correct. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. And you have been elected to those positions ? 

Mr. DoYLE. Yes, sir. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. And you have had opposition, have you ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the last time you were elected was when ? 

Mr. Doyle. Two years ago this December. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many members do you have in your teamsters 
local? 

Mr. Doyle. About 2,700. 

Mr. Kennedy. It is in Westchester. What is the address, please? 

Mr. Doyle. The address of the office, 53 South Broadway, Yonkers, 
N. Y. 

Mr. Kennedy. What is the jurisdiction of your teamsters local? 

Mr. Doyle. Westchester and Putnam Counties. 

Mr. Kennedy. For drivers ? 

Mr. Doyle. Drivers and helpers. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliile you were secretary -treasurer of the local — I 
believe you were elected in 1944, first elected in 1944 ? 

Mr. Doyle. 1942. 

Mr. Kennedy. While you held the position of secretary-treasurer, 
was the president of the local Mr. John Acropolis ? 

Mr. Doyle. In 1942, I was elected president, and John Acropolis 
went into the Navy, and I was elected to fill in his office. 

Mr. Kennedy. Later on, however, you took the position of secre- 
tary-treasurer, and he had the position of president ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that lasted from 1945, roughly, to 1952 ; is that 
right? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, in the Westchester area, did you have jurisdic- 
tion over the carting industry ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, we had jurisdiction, practically, over everything 
but freight and furniture. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did the carting industry take on some importance 
in 1949? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. In 1949, in late 1949, by ordinance or law, the 
Common Council of the City of Yonkers passed an ordinance that 
they would not pick up any garbage or wastepaper from any of the 
merchants any more. They would have to hire private carters, and 
the city had done that prior to that. 

Mr. Kennedy. The city had done it prior to 1949 ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And then it was decided it would be done by private 
carters ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, yes. In 1949 we were approached by 4 or 5 men 
that worked for a carting outfit; namely, Westchester Carting. 



6690 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN? THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. That was in 19i9, and so, did you begin to try to 
organize them ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes ; that is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us what happened, as far as the West- 
chester Carting Co. was concerned ? 

Mv. Doyle. Well, when we were approached by the men to organize 
them, I contacted the company, and a fellow at that time in charge 
was by the name of Charlie Stearns, and we tried to set up a meeting. 
He told me that he would have to speak to his partners and that he 
would get in touch with me in a day or so. Well, about 2 days 
later. I would say 2 days, he called us up and told us that there was 
another union that came and said they represented the people and 
they needed a lawyer, and he had to go get a lawyer because he didn't 
know what to do. 

Mr. Kennedy. "N-Vliat union did he say that was ? 

Mr. Doyle. 27. 

Mr. Kennedy. Local 27 ; that was in New York City ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat was their jurisdiction ? 

Mr. Doyle, Paper, and paper boxes, and it was a paper union. I 
don't think it was wastepaper, but it was the handling of paper. 

Mr. Kennedy. But they were from New York City ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And they did not have jurisdiction over carting, 
did they? 

Mr. Doyle. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Just paper? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. AYho was the head of that local ? 

Mr. Doyle. The head of 27 was Joe Parisi. 

Mv. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we have some of the background 
of some of these individuals, which Mr. Greene has, or Mr. Kelly has. 
Could we swear him and, as we mention these individuals, they will 
give a little bit of the background. 

The Chairman. Will you be sworn, please? You do solemnly 
swear that the evidence you shall give before this Senate select com- 
mittee will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so 
help 3'ou God ? 

Mr. Greene. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF ROBERT W. GREENE 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
present employment. 

Mr. Greene. My name is Robert W. Greene, 82 Ridge Lane, Levit- 
town, N. Y., presently assigned to the Senate select committee as an 
investigator. 

The "Chairman. What past experience have you had as an in- 
vestigator ? 

Mr. Greene. I was an adviser to the Kefauver committee in 1951 
in its investigation of crime in New Jersey. I was the former senior 
stall' investigator of the New York City Anticrime Committee in 
New York for a period of 4 years. 

The Chairman. All right ; Mr. Counsel, proceed. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIEiS IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6C91 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, just on Joe Parisi, whom Mr. Doyle men- 
tioned as being the head of local 27 in New York City. Do you have 
any background information on Joe Parisi ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. Joseph Parisi has a criminal record, known 
to the New York City Police Department as B56267. He had a rec- 
ord of 11 arrests, including convictions for rape, for which he was 
sentenced to Sing Sing Prison for 21/^ years and convictions for dis- 
orderly conduct. He has a number of indictments for coercion, homi- 
cide, felonious assault, robbery with gun, and felonious assault. Mr. 
Parisi at one time was indicted by a New York grand jury for coercion 
in the paper-box industry, and he was charged with operating in con- 
cert with Charles "Lucky" Luciano and Louis Lepke Buchalter to 
establish a monopoly and force paper-box drivers and manufacturers 
into a situation whereby he could extort and coerce money from them. 
After a trial, Mr. Parisi was found not guilty of this charge. 

Mr. Kennedy. What is the situation as far as Mr. Parisi at the 
present time ? 

Mr. Greene. Mr. Parisi, the secretary-treasurer of local No. 27, 
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, died in 1956 of a heart 
attack. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he have some official position with the teamsters 
in the New York area ? 

Mr. Greene. Mr. Parisi was the secretary-treasurer of local 27, 
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, New York. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he have any position in the joint council? 

Mr. Greene. He was a trustee of the New York Teamsters Joint 
Council. 

Mr. Kennedy. Up to the time of his death ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes ; up to the time of his death ? 

Mr. KJENNEDY. We will have to refer back to Mr. Greene and Mr. 
Kelly on some of these other cases. 

The Chairman. You solemnly swear the evidence you shall give 
before this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Kelly. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation or your present employment. 

Mr. Kelly. My name is James P. Kelly, and my residence is in 
New York City. My employment is staff investigator for this com- 
mittee. 

The Chairman. What is your previous occupation ? 

Mr. Kelly. I was formerly a detective with the New York City 
Police Department. 

The Chairman. For how many years ? 

Mr. Kelly. A detective for 6 years and then with the department 
for 7 years. 

The Chairman. So you are familiar with the New York area? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir ; I am. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 

Proceed. 



6692 IMPROPEiB ACTIVITIES HSP THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Mr. Doyle, so as to Mr. Parisi's local No. 27 operating 
out of New York City, you were informed that they were also interested 
in organizing the Westchester Carting Co. ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you were informed of that by the employer, the 
Westchester Carting Co., and did you make arrangements then to meet 
with them ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, I got a call from the attorney that they had hired 
to be their attorney, and he told me that he had a meeting set up with 
local 27. He asked me what position he could take because there were 
two of us claiming jurisdiction over the carting company. 

I told him that he couldn't take any position, that he would have to 
let it go in before the Labor Board and let them decide it. 

Well, he was having a meeting on that same evening and the next 
morning we were informed that on advice of counsel, Westchester 
Carting signed a contract with local 27. 

Mr. Kennedy. In the midst of your negotiations with them, you 
found or they informed you that they had signed a contract with 
local 27 ; is that right ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Senator I\^s. May I interrupt there just a moment ? I would like 
to ask Mr. Doyle this question : 

You say the "Labor Board." Do you mean the National Labor 
Eelations Board 'i 

Mr. Doyle. At that time, yes. 

Senator Ives. Not the State board ? 

Mr. Doyle. Any board, we didn't know. 

Senator Ives. You referred to the "Labor Board," and I am won- 
dering what one you referred to. 

Mr. Doyle. I used the word "Labor Board," and now I didn't 
know whether it was national or New York State. 

Senator Ltes. Thank you. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know anything about the background of 
Westchester Carting and who owned and oj^erated Westchester Cart- 
ing Co. at that time ? 

Mr. Doyle. At that time all we knew was that Charlie Stern 
and a fellow by the name of Phil Gimerono 

Mr. Kennedy. They operated the Westchester Carting ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know anything about a man by the name of 
Nick Ratteni ? 

Mr. Doyle. At that time, no. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, Mr. Kelly has some of the back- 
ground of Westchester Carting Co., and who had the ownership of 
Westchester Carting Co. at that time, and subsequently, and I would 
like to put that into the record. 

The Chairman. Interrogate Mr. Kelly about it. 

Mr. Kennedy. You made a study of Westchester Carting Co.? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir ; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us about that ? 

Mr. Kelly. Westchester Carting was originated as a company in 
1944 by a man named Austin Samsong, who lived in Yonkers. In 
1947 Samsong sold out his interest to four individuals. One was 
Phil Gimerono, who was a known bookmaker. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIEILD 6693 

Mr. Kennedy. How do you spell his name? 

Mr. Kelly. G-i-m-e-r-o-n-o. He has various aliases of that spell- 
ing, but that is the accepted one. 

We have Gimerono's record here from the FBI, the Department 
of Justice, which shows he was arrested on October 4, 1952, suspicion 
of felony. There was no complainant, and the charge was dismissed. 

The New York City Police Department then picked him up on Sep- 
tember 13, 1933, for grand larceny, auto. The charge was reduced to 
petty larceny, and he received a suspended sentence. 

There were other records of arrests not listed on this FBI sheet. 

Mr. Kennedy. He has a number of arrests for bookmaking ; is that 
right? 

Mr. Kelly. He has arrests for bookmaking and operating gaming 
establishments for which he was convicted and fined. 

In 1939 and again, I think, in 1933. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, he took over the Westchester Carting in 1946 ? 

Mr. Kelly. Along with 3 other individuals, 1 of whom was Albert 
Hyduk. There was Charles Stern, and there was William Barron. 
Now subsequently on January 12, 1949, the records of the stockholders' 
meeting, special stockholders meeting held by Westchester Carting, 
indicates that Barron resigned, and that an Alfred Ratteni became 
president and director. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat is the background of Mr. Ratteni ? 

Mr. Kelly. He is known to the New York City Police Department 
under No. B-607066. He was first arrested on July 13, 1926, in White 
Plains, N. Y., on suspicion of burglary. He was released or discharged 
in this case by Judge Holden of city court. 

On December 29, 1926, he was again arrested in Manhattan on a 
grand larceny charge, and on January 27 he was arrested for assault 
and robbery, the final charge being robbery in the second degree, and 
on November 19, 1927, he was sentenced to iy^ to 15 years in Sing Sing, 
State prison, by Judge Leven, in general sessions court. 

The Chairman. Is that on the robbery charge ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct, sir. 

Ratteni continued as president and director in this corporation and 
subsequently ; I have a copy of the special meeting here, on January 12 
and subsequent to it, and it shows that his wife, who was then Char- 
lotte Ratteni, was also mentioned as a stockholder and director for 
this company. 

Other officers were Charles Stern^nd Philip Gimerono. 

Mr. Kennedy. Has the former Attorney General of the United 
States also had a description of Ratteni's background ? 

Mr. Greene. Mr. Ratteni was indicted in 1953 for violation of the 
internal revenue law, with not reporting income. At the time the in- 
dictment was announced, former Attorney General Brownell described 
him as a cheap lieutenant of Frank Costello. 

Mr. Kennedy. We have been attempting to locate Mr. Ratteni? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir ; we have been. 

I have been notified by Mr. Ratteni's attorney that he is out of town, 
that he has been out of town. He left a little more than 2 weeks ago. 

Mr. Kennedy. There doesn't seem to be a prospect that he will be 
back into town ? 

Mr. Kelly. I don't think so at this time. 

The Chairman. Let this be an open invitation to him to get in touch 
with the committee right away. 



6694 IMPROPER ACTivrriES in the labor field 

TESTIMONY OF EVERETT DOYLE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
JOHN C. SHEEHAN— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. So this firm of Westchester Carting headed by Mr. 
Ratteni signed a contract witli local 27 headed by Joe Parisi. Was 
there any other official or officer of local 27 that took an active part or 
role in this period of time ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, there was one fellow who took an active part, a 
fellow by the name of Al Kregel. 

Mr. Kennedy. Kregel ? 

Mr. Doyle. Kregel ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. What about Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. Doyle. Adelstein attended, I believe, a meeting, when the con- 
tract was signed. From there on in he took a big part in it. But up 
to that time he didn't play too big a part. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was an officer in local 27, was he — Mr. Adelstein? 

Mr. Doyle. I don't know if he was an officer, but he was a business 
agent. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. Do we have anything on Mr. Bernie Adelstein's back- 
ground ? 

Mr. Kelly. On Adelstein's background we do, sir. 

The Chairman. The business agent becomes a pretty important 
factor in the operation of a local ; does he not ? 

TESTIMONY OF EVERETT DOYLE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
JOHN C. SHEEHAN— Resumed 

Mr. Doyle. A business agent is a fellow who goes on the road and 
handles the complaints. 

The Chairman. He is a troubleshooter ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

The Chairman. He makes decisions out in the field ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

The Chairman. And gives orders and directions ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. 

The Chairman. He becomes a pretty important official ; does he not ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Wliile we are getting Mr. Bernie Adelstein's record 
together, what was Mr. Kregel 's position in local 27 ? 

Mr. Doyle. He was a business agent, too. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have the backgromid on Kregel ? 

Mr. Kelly. His first name is Alfred. He was the business repre- 
sentative or business agent for local 27 and subsequently local 813, pri- 
vate sanitation Kregel was arrested in January 1946, taken in custody 
by the United States marshal in New York for theft of goods in 
foreign shipment. There is no disposition shown on this sheet of 
that particular charge, but I have been told that he received a sus- 
pended sentence on it. 

He was also picked up in July of 1942 by the New York City Police 
Department under B709928 on homicide and he was released. 



IMPEOPER ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6G95 

Mr. Kennedy. What year was that ? 

Mr. Kelly. 1942. 

Mr. Kennedy. What about Bernie Adelstein '? 

Mr. Kelly. His official New York City Police Department criminal 
record indicates that on March 25, 1931, Bernard Adelstein, New York 
City, was arrested for grand larceny, check. Pie was acquitted in 
court. He went on trial and was acquitted in court. 

There are other indications of a record for Adelstein. On March 
24, 1931, he was arrested in the 42d precinct in the Bronx, as Bernard 
Adelstein. On February 16, 1938, he was arrested in the 18th pre- 
cinct and charoed with disorderly conduct, profane language, on 
February 16, 1938, at 2 : 45 a. m. The remarks indicated that he 
caused a disturbance with a number of others and used loud and pro- 
fane language to the officer. 

On December 4, 1948, he was arrested in the 47th precinct, again 
charged with a violation of 722 of the penal laws, disorderly conduct. 
On December 4, 1948, at 8 : 30 p. m., he was charged with fighting in 
a public place, causing a disturbance. 

On November 30, 1949, in the 48th precinct he was arrested at 
6 : 30 a. m. and charged with using threatening and vulgar language. 
The complainant at this time withdrew the charge in court. 

Mr. Kennedy. So this is the local that took over and made the 
contract with Westchester Carting. 

TESTIMONY OF EVERETT DOYLE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
JOHN C. SHEEHAN— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. How did Mr. Acropolis and yourself accept this 
idea of local 27 of the teamsters coming in and taking over the 
jurisdiction? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, we didn't like it, and we put up a protest with 
the company and with local 27. We kept talking to the people. We 
were going to contest it to the New York State Labor Board. We 
had all those plans, of doing that, but we didn't go through with 
them. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you arrange a meeting at that time ? 

Mr. Doyle. No. I met the next daj^ — I didn't meet with 27. I did 
speak to Charlie Stern of Westchester Carting. 

Mr. Kennedy. Subsequently, did you speak with the officers of 27? 

Mr. Doyle. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was there any arrangement made at the convention 
or later on ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. there was. 

Mr. Kennedy. Go ahead with that. 

Mr. Doyle. That was later on in 1950. In 1950 is when the city of 
Yonkers stopped picking up revenues from the merchants. I believe 
it was January 1, 1950, that the ordinance went into effect. There 
was a move out then to grab all the private carting. So there was a 
convention in New York in 1950, New York State Federation of Labor. 
At this meeting, Parisi and Adelstein and 2 or 3 other fellows wdiose 
names we don't know cornered Acropolis and another fellow by the 
name of Tocci, from New Rochelle, in the lobby of the Hotel 
Commodore. 

Mr. Kennedy. Tocci ? 



6696 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES ESP THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Doyle. Tocci, T-o-c-c-i. 

Mr. Kennedy. Go ahead. 

Mr. Doyle. An argument started. 

Mr. Kennedy. Tocci was who ? 

Mr. Doyle. He represented the hod carriers union from New 
Rochelle. 

Mr. Kennedy. He had been a friend of your local ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. ICennedy. An argument started ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. He was with Johnny Acropolis. An 
argument started there which resulted in Tocci being kicked by Parisi, 
and then the argument was broken up. A meeting was arranged in 
the same hotel, upstairs, by Tommy Lewis. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who is Tommy Lewis ? 

Mr. Doyle. Tommy Lewis is a fellow who was the head of Local 
32-E, Building Service Employees Union, in the Bronx. 

Mr. Kennedy. What happened to Mr. Tommy Lewis ? 

Mr. Doyle. Tommy Lewis was shot and killed. 

Mr. Kennedy. When was that? 

Mr. Doyle. I thinlv it was in 1953. 

Mr, I\j<:nnedy. He was murdered in 1953? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was head of local 32-E ; is that right? 

Mr. Doyle. Of the building trades ; that is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he was a friend of Joe Parisi 's? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. A close associate of Parisi's ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. He arranged a meeting between Johnny Acropolis 
and yourself and Parisi ? 

Mr. Doyle. Parisi and Adelstein. 

Mr. Kennedy. What were the results of that meeting ? 

Mr. Doyle. At that meeting they tried to talk us into giving 
Parisi — that is, local 27 — the jurisdiction in Westchester County of all 
the private carting, and letting him come in and organize it. We dis- 
agreed and wouldn't go along with it. 

But we did say this : Acropolis told Parisi to have Westchester Cart- 
ing and not put the people in the middle. "You can keep Westchester 
Carting but from here on any organizing done in the county, we will 
be in the middle of it doing our share of the organizing." In other 
words, he didn't want Parisi to come into Westchester. 

Mr. Kennedy. You would allow them to keep Westchester Carting, 
but all other companies to be organized would be organized by your 
local ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. No. 27 to keep the one company but would not have 
other companies. 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did they agree at that time with Johnny Acropolis 
that they would do this and stay out of Westchester ? 

Mr. Doyle. That was agreed. 

Mr. Kennedy. They would stay out of this area and just keep the 
Westchester Carting Co. ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. 



IMPRIOPER ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6697 

Mr. Kennedy. So you had this meeting; you had this agreement. 
Then what occurred after that ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, what occurred then, it seems as though they didn't 
try to live up to their agreement. There was only about four men 
involved in the Westchester Carting. Then it spread out to control 
the whole private carting industry, to try to take it all over in the city 
of Yonkers, and wherever they could, and operate it under Westchester 
Carting. 

Mr. Kennedy. They tried to set up other companies, other opera- 
tions, so they could take over all the carting in Yonkers and in the 
cities around there ? 

Mr. DoYT.E. That is correct. The little guys would come in and 
they would squeeze them out. They would take over the business and 
operate it imder their name. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat was the point of this, Mr. Doyle ? It wasn't 
just a question of obtaining the dues from 4 or 5 employees of the com- 
pany. What was the point of all this, the attempt to gain control of 
the carting ? 

Mr. Doyle. Do you mean by me or by 27 ? 

Mr. Kennedy. By 27. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, I don't know. The private carting when the city 
of Yonkers gave it up became a very big thing. 

Mr. Kennedy. It is a very profitable business ? 

Mr. Doyle. I imagine it sure is. 

Mr. Kennedy. And was there also, so far as the power is concerned, 
squeezing businessmen and things like that ? It gives men power ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. I don't know how it would have power, 
but it played a big part in anything they wanted to do, once they got 
control. 

Mr. Kennedy. As far as businessmen are concerned, if they couldn't 
get their garbage or refuse picked up, it would be a matter of great 
concern to them, would it not ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. And this power to decide whether you were going to 
get this garbage picked up would be a matter of some power to those 
who controlled it ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes, definitely. 

Mr. Kennedy. And it is also a very profitable business ? 

Mr. Doyle. Definitely. 

Mr. Kennedy. So it went beyond just the question of the dues of 
the individual employees, did it not ? 

Mr. Doyle. I imagine it did ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. You say they started the squeeze on the small opera- 
tors out there ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. How clicl that happen ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, fellows were threatened to get out of the business, 
people's trucks and equipment were burned. Storekeepers were 
threatened that they would picket their place — they did picket a few 
of them — if they didn't do business with Westchester Carting. 

It was a regular push to gain control of it all. They didn't want 
nobody else in it. They used all kinds of tactics. 

The Chaieman. In other words, operated in plain racketeering 
fashion ? 



6698 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr, Doyle. That is right. 

JNIr. Kennedy. AVas there any violence out there ? 

]Mr. Doyle. The only violence was done was trucks being burnt, 
maybe offices or shacks being burnt. 

Mr. Kennedy. This was during the period after the agreement had 
been made ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And they were violating the agreement in this period 
of time that they had made with you in 1950 ? 

]\Ir. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. During this period of time, did you see Joe Parisi 
and Bernie Adelstein and Nick Katteni in the Yonkers area? Did 
you see them together at all in the Yonkers area 'I 

Mr. Doyle. Yes ; I did. I would say a few times I have seen them in 
a restaurant in Yonkers. The restaurant is only a few dooi*s down 
from my office. 

Mr, Kennedy. Was there another company out there, Rex Carting 
Co.? 

Mr. Doyle. Rex Carting ; yes. Rex Carting came into the business 
in the spring of 1951, 

Mr. Kennedy. Did your local organize them ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. 

Mv. Kennedy. Was there then a dispute between Rex Carting and 
Westchester Carting Co. ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes; there was a big dispute. There was arguments 
every day ; threats. Well, at that time, when Rex Carting came into 
the business, 27 did not have any refuse up in Westchester at that time. 
They had got a new charter and made it local 813. 

Mr, Kennedy, So 27 became local 813 ? 

Mr, Doyle, No; not 27. 

Mr. Kennedy. The part dealing with the carting became 813 ? 

Mr, Doyle, Yes. 

Mr, Kennedy, Who became the head of that ? 

Mr, Doyle, Bernie Adelstein, Rex Carting came into the business 
and they bought themselves a couple of new trucks. They went out 
and they got quite a bit of the customers. Let me tell you how they 
got into it so you will understand. 

The way I understand, this fellow Polose spoke to the chamber of 
commerce and they promised him if he got himself a couple of trucks 
they would see that he got a lot of the private carting business. The 
prices were too high; they couldn't stand them from Westchester, 

The Chairman. The chamber of commerce entered into the pic- 
ture to assist the businessmen in getting better service at a more 
reasonable rate ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right ; at a more reasonable rate. 

Senator Ives. Is this the Cham-^ber of Commerce of Yonkers ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Well, Polose went out. Rex Carting went out, and did a pretty good 
job iretting customers. All the customers they had were customers 
that belonged to Westchester Carting. So then local 813 came into the 
picture again and tlie fight was on again to try to put Rex Carting out 
•of business. 

Mr. Kennedy. How did they go about trying to do that ? Can you 
give us any examples of that ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIEiS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6699 

Mr. DoYUE. They went into stores, threatening storekeepers they 
were going to put them out of business, they were going to picket 
pkices. There was one pkice, Safeway Store on Romaine Avenue, 
Romaine and McLean in Yonkere, where Rex Carting was picking 
up the garbage and 813 tried, I guess, everything under the sun to 
try to get this away from Rex Carting. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you understand they put a boycott on Safeway 
and in other sections of the city? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. When they coukln't do anything with 
all of their pressures, up in Yonkers they couldn't get the Safeway 
Store, then the boycotted all the Safeway stores in the Bronx. They 
didn't pick up their refuse and it just piled up on the streets. 

The Chairman. Do you mean to say they refused to handle their 
own customers? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. They refused to handle them in the 
Bronx. 

The Chairman. Which company was that ? 

Mr. Doyle. Safeway ; Safeway Stores. 

Mr. Kennedy. The refuse companies refused to pick up? 

Mr. Doyle. It was the union, 813. 

The Chairman. That is the union you were competing with ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. They wouldn't allow the refuse of the other stores 
to be picked up ; is that right ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

The Chairman. Where you had contracts? 

Mr. Doyle. No. This happened in New York City, in the Bronx. 
We don't go into the Bronx. 813 has jurisdiction there. 

The Chairman. I don't quite understand, but go ahead. 

Mr. Kennedy. 813 had jurisdiction in the Safeway Stores in the 
Bronx, right? 

]Mr. Doyle. They had contracts w^th Safeway Stores in the Bronx, 
right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then Rex Carting Co., which had a contract with 
you, came along and picked up the contract of the Safeway Stores in 
Yonkers ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. When that happened, 813 brought pressure on all 
the other Safeway Stores in the Bronx and other sections of the city 
so they couldn't get their refuse picked up? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. 

The Chairman. The purpose being trying to force them into their 
union instead of dealing with you, all of them? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr, Kennedy. And it was successful ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes, it was. 

Mr. Kennedy. The Safeway Store in Yonkers went back to West- 
chester Carting? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, I would say "Yes." 

Mr. Kennedy. You explain what they did. 

Mr. Doyle. Well, what they did, another outfit started picking up 
from Safeway Stores. I think it was Rusco or Russo. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was that a company actually operated by West- 
chester ? 



6700 IMPROPEIR ACTIVmES ESF THE' LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Doyle. To my belief, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. So the owners of Westchester had a number of 
different companies operating in that area, the Yonkers area? 

Mr. Doyle, That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. So Safeway took one of the other companies of 
Westchester ? 

Mr. Doyle. Tliat is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And they made threats against individual store 
owners ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. They would have fellows go in and tell the store 
owners to drop Rex and do business wdth Westchester. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did they burn any of the Rex offices? Were they 
burned ? 

Mr. Doyle. They burned Rex Carting's office. That was burned. 

Mr. Kennedy. During this period of time, did Mr. Acropolis or 
yourself receive any threats ? 

Mr. Doyle. We got numerous threats, numerous threats. 

Mr. Kennedy. On your lives ? 

Mr. Doyle. On our lives, yes; even right up until, I would say, 
2 weeks before John Acropolis was killed we got threats. 

Mr. Kennedy. Prior to that time did you have a convention in 
1952? Is that right? 

Mr. Doyle. 1952, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you and Johnny Acropolis attended the con- 
vention ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you meet Bernie Adelstein and Joe Parisi 
there? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell me about that? 

Mr. Doyle. I met Bernie Adelstein in Convention Hall, I think 
it was, in Rochester, and he talked to me about Rex Carting, and 
demanded that I turn over Rex Carting to local 813. He didn't 
think it was right that we should have any of the private carting. 

I reminded him about the agreement, and he said, "There is no 
such an agreement made." So we got into an argument, Bernie and I, 
in the meeting, and I walked away from him. The meeting had 
started to call the convention to order. 

After the meeting, we met outside — myself, Acropolis, and Bernie 
Adelstein. I had told Acropolis what took place when I met Adel- 
stein, and an argument started outside between Acropolis and Adel- 
stem. There were some pretty harsh words spoken. 

Adelstein said to Johnny, "You are not that tough. Don't think 
you are too tough that we can't take care of you. Tougher guys than 
you have been taken care of."" 

Mr. Kennedy. Bernie Adelstein said that to Acropolis? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. And Johnny, I think his words were, 
"It is too bad you are crippled or I would flatten you right here." 

The Chairman. Too bad wliat? 

Mr. Doyi.e. "Too bad you are crippled or I would flatten you here."* 
Acropolis told that to Adelstein. 

The Chairman. Adelstein is a cripple? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. He lias a wooden leg. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIEiS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6701 

Mr. DoTLE. That is right. The meeting broke up and we went 
back to our hotel. "VVliile we were in the hotel, we got a call from 
Parisi. Parisi wanted to see John. He wanted to talk to John and 
John wouldn't go down. He said, "If you want to see me, come up 
here." So Parisi came up to our room. 

They got talking all over again about the private carting, that they 
wanted the Eex Carting, and no matter what happened, they were 
going to get it. Acropolis got into an argument with Parisi and 
Parisi pleaded, "Gee, I don't want to argue with you no more." I 
think his words came out, "I am through arguing with you. I have a 
bad heart. I am not going to argue with you. There is other ways of 
talking care of you." And "We can see that it is done." 

Mr. Kennedy. This is what Parisi said to Acropolis ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were present at the time ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. Acropolis told him to leave the room ; he told him 
to get out, and we didn't see Parisi no more at the convention. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Then did you have some conversations with Acrop- 
olis during the next week or two ? 

Mr. Doyle. During the next week, we came back into the conven- 
tion and then during that week there was conversations with Acrop- 
olis. Every night he would come to me, or the next morning, and 
tell me that he had received threats, that they were out to get him, and 
even warned me to watch myself. 

"Don't park the car when you go home in a dark spot. Make sure 
you park it out in front of your house and walk into the house." 
There were numerous threats. He told me other fellows brought the 
threats to him, delivered them to him. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who were some of the other people ? 

Mr. Doyle. One fellow was a fellow by the name of Tom DiSalvo. 

Mr. I^NNEDY. And he was from Scalise's ? 

Mr. Doyle. He was business agent or delegate of local 32-E. 

Mr. Kennedy. Tommy Lewis f 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. He told John in these words : "The heat 
is on. They are out to get you. Why don't you drop all tliis stuff and 
come down and let me let you meet these guys and be friends with 
them ?" But Jolm wouldn't have anything to do with it. 

In my office I received a call — it was at my house — I got a call from 
somebody who just called and said, "Within the next week four of you 
are going to die." Numerous threats came to my house. They would 
call my house and I woukhi't be home. They would give the threats 
to my wife. The same thing would go with John. 

The Chairman. How many died as a result of those threats 2 

Mr. Doyle. One that I know of. 

The Chairman. Acropolis? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

The Chairman. Wlien was he killed ? 

Mr. Doyle. He was killed on August 26, 1952. 

The Chairman. 1952? 

Mr. Doyle. August 26, 1952. I would say about 3 weeks after the 
meeting at the convention in Rochester. 

Mr. Kennedy. How was he killed ? 

Mr. Kelly. He was shot in the head. 

89330 — 57 — pt. 17 4 



6702 mPROPEK ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIE[LD 

Mr. Kennedy. Whereabouts? What were the circumstances? 

Mr. Doyle. He was shot at his home, probably around 2 : 30 in the 
mornino;, when he was going into his home, inside his house. He got 
shot in the head and then he got shot again when he was laying down, 
through the head. He had two shots in the head. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did it appear that he was shot by somebody that he 
knew? 

Mr. Doyle. From all the indications, knowing Acropolis, he had 
very fast reflexes. The fellow was an athlete. The way I can see it, 
no one could have gotten into that house unless he knew him. But 
the indication was — John still had his suit in his hand, he had a suit 
in his hand that he had picked up from the tailor's ; he had the keys 
to his car in his hand, and still with his topcoat and everything on. 

He just got it as he walked into the house. The indications showed 
that he was bringing someone into the house with him. He has a light 
in his parlor that shines on the side of the wall to show up some 
knickknacks that he had on the wall. He would generally go in, if 
he had someone with him, turn that light on, and then light a table 
lamp and then put that light out. We found that that parlor light 
was on. 

The Chairman. Was anyone ever apprehended for his murder ? 

Mr. Doyle. No one was ever apprehended. 

The Chairman. Are you still apprehensive ? 

Mr. Doyle. What? 

The Chairman. Are you personally still apprenhensive about your 
own safety? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, I don't know. You got to die some time. Senator. 
You can't live forever. 

The Chairman. Are you still getting threats ? 

Mr. Doyle. No. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Doyle. No; I haven't had any threats since the death of 
Acropolis. 

The Chairman. No threats since then ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Does Westchester Carting Co. pretty well control 
the carting in that area in Yonkers now? 

Mr. Doyle. Definitely. 

Mr. Kennedy. They have a virtual monopoly ; is that right ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. Are they union? Are they still union, teamsters 
union ? 

Mr. Doyle. No; they are not. 

Mr. Kennedy. So, after all this effort that was made by 27 and 
local No. 813, Westchester Carting Co. is not union at the present 
time? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. I believe they formed an independent 
union and pulled away from 813. 

Mr. Kennedy. They formed an independent company union? 

Mr. Doyle. I believe that is wliat happened. 

Mr. Kennedy. There is one other matter that I wanted to discuss 
with Mr. Doyle, Mr. Chairman, that I would like to call him back for. 
We have another witness on this company. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIElS IN THE LABOR FIEUD 6703 

Mr. Doyle. I would like to say this : Rex Carting, after the death of 
Acropolis, went out of business. 

Mr. Kennedy. What ? 

Mr. Doyle. Eex Carting went out of business. 

Mr. Kennedy. Eex Carting Co. ? 

Mr. Doyle. Right after the death of Acropolis. I would say about 
a month afterward they sold out to Westchester Carting. 

Mr. Kennedy. On that, I say that some of these threats were carried 
to you by Mr. DiSalvo ; is that right ? 

Mr. Doyle. Carried to Acropolis. 

Mr. Kennedy. Carried to Acropolis. He came from Tommy Lewis' 
local 32-E. Do you know who appointed Tommy Lewis, who was 
murdered in 1953 ? Do you know who appointed him to his job ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, after he was slain, from the newspaper reports; 
yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who appointed him ? 

Mr. Doyle. I think I did read in the newspaper where he was 
appointed by Scalise. 

Mr. Kennedy. Frank Scalise ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. George Scalise. 

TESTIMONY OF ROBERT W. GREENE— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell us about him, please ? 

Mr. Greene. George Scalise was the international vice president in 
the building service employees union. In connection with extortions 
made by that union, George Scalise was convicted for extortion and 
sent to prison for a term of 5 years. Subsequently he was paroled and 
became involved with Anthony Carfano, a prominent New York 
hoodlum, known as Little Augie, in handling or siphoning off com- 
missions from the insurance welfare fund of the wine, liquor, and 
distillery workers union. 

The New York district attorney's office handled the trial directly, 
and Scalise was indicted in 1953 on charges of coercion, bribery and 
extortion. The charges against Mr. Carfano were dismissed. An 
attempt was made to murder Mr. Saperstein, with four bullets in his 
head, but he didn't die. 

Mr. Scalise was subsequently convicted and is now serving a prison 
sentence in connection with this case: 

The Chairman. Mr. Doyle, you may stand aside for a little while. 
We think we may have to recall you. We are trying to run on through 
and conclude the hearings today during the morning session. 

We will presently take a brief recess. 

(Brief recess.) 

The CiiAiRiMAN. The committee will be in order. 

]Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, Mr. Doyle testified that there was this 
dispute that went on over a period of several years, which resulted 
finally in the death, the murder, of John Acropolis, over the organ- 
izational rights in the city of Yonkers and the surrounding area. 

So, finally, or ultimately, Westchester Carting Co. got control of 
that area, and was organized with local 813. 

As he testified, in 1953 the teamsters local gave up its jurisdiction, 
local 813, and the company installed a company union. 



6704 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

I would like to call at this time Mr. Stephen Spiak, who was the 
first head of the company union, so that he can explain how the union 
was organized and try to explain to the committee why the teamsters 
union, local 813, never picketed any of their shops. 

The Chairman. Mr. Spiak, you do solemnly swear that the evidence 
you shall give before this Senate select committee will be the truth, 
the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Spiak. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF STEPHEN SPIAK, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, 
ROBERT S. FRIEDMAN 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Spiak. Stephen Spiak, 23 Dudley Place, Yonkers, N. Y., gar- 
bageman. 

The Chairman. You have counsel with you ? 

Mr. Spiak. I do, sir. 

The Chairman. Will you identify yourself ? 

Mr. Friedman. Robert S. Friedman, 172 South Broadway, White 
Plains, N. Y. 

The Chairman. All right ; Mr. Kennedy 

Mr. IvENNEDT. Mr. Spiak, as I understand it, you were the first 
president of the Westchester Carting Co. union; is that correct? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me. I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitution, 
and upon the further ground that the question put is not within the 
scope of this inquiry or relevant thereto. 

The Chairman. The reason stated for refusing to answer, with 
respect to the question not being within the scope of this inquiry or 
relevant thereto, is overruled. Your taking the fifth amendment, of 
course, we recognize. May I ask you, Mr. Spiak, if you are taking 
the fifth amendment out of a sense of fear ? Are you afraid that if you 
told the truth, you would be in some danger from bodily harm? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to ansv.'er the question on the 
ground that an answer my tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitution, 
and upon 

Senator Ives. Mr. Chairman, I want to find out if this witness is 
under indictment or anything of that kind. 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully 

Senator I\^s. I am not asking you. I am asking your counsel. You 
can't do anything, apparently, but take the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Counsel, how about that ? 

Mr. Kennedy. No, Senator; we have no information that he is 
under indictment or under investigation at the present time. He does 
have, as we understand it, a criminal record, the background of which 
Mr. Greene might give us, or Mr. Kelly. 

Mr. Kelly. I have been told^ — the record is supposed to be on the 
way to this committee. I have been told that Mr. Spiak was arrested 
and charged with petty larceny sometime around 1945, involving the 
theft of bicycles, while he was a police officer in the city of Yonkers. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITTE'S IN THE LABOR FIE!LD 6705 

Mr. Spiak. I would like a correction on that. I have been acquitted 
of that charge. 

The Chairman. I beg your pardon ? 

Mr. Spiak. I have been acquitted of that charge. 

The Chairman. That doesn't seem to incriminate you. You say 
you have been acquitted ? 

( The witness conferred with his counsel. ) 

The Chairman. Maybe you can tell us some other things that will 
not incriminate you. Have you ever been convicted ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitu- 
tion, and upon the further ground 

The Chairman. You may omit the further grounds. They are over- 
ruled. You need not repeat them. 

The record may show that each time you read your statement, down 
to the point where you say "the fifth amendment," the rest of it may 
be considered read and overruled. We can save a little time in that 
respect. Well, I thought, maybe, since you wanted the record to re- 
flect the truth with respect to the one charge of stealing a bicycle, that 
you would be willing to help us make the record speak the truth with 
respect to some other activities. Are you unwilling to do that ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitution. 

The Chairman. All right. Each time, the rest of his prepared 
statement may be considered read and overruled. Proceed, Mr. 
Counsel. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, the primary importance of Mr. Spiak 
is the formation of the company union, the circumstances under which 
it was formed, and what arrangements were made to keep the team- 
sters local 813, Mr. Bernie Adelstein's local 813, from coming in. Can 
you tell us anything about that, Mr. Spiak ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the Constitution. 

The Chairman. Do you belong to some gang of hoodlums ? Is that 
one reason why you are not testifying ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to. incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitution. 

The Chairman. I first got the impression, probably erroneously, 
that you were under some duress or threat, and, therefore, you were 
hesitating to testify. But you may be correct, that if you told the 
truth it might tend to incriminate you. I may have to yield to your 
better judgment about that. But I got the wrong impression, I am 
afraid, when you first started to testify. 

Go ahead, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we have information that this com- 
pany union was formed at the suggestion of Mr. Joseph Feola. 

Can you tell us if that is correct, Mr. Spiak, that you formed this 
company union at the suggestion and upon the advice of Mr. Joe 
Feola ? 



6706 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer might tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitution. 

The Chairman. Mr. Counsel, proceed to ask him all of the ques- 
tions. Let's find out what it is that might tend to incriminate him. 

Mr. Kennedy. We have this on good authority about Mr. Feola, 
Mr. Chairman. I would like to have Mr. Kelly give us whatever back- 
ground information he has on Mr. Joseph Feola. 

The Chairman. Do joii know Joseph Feola, or did you know him, 
if he is now dead ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitution. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you got Mr. Feola's record ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir. 

Joseph Feola, also known as Joey Surprise. 

The Chairman. Joey Surprise ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes. S-u-r-p-r-i-s-e. 

Mr. Kennedy. S-u-r-p-r-i-s-e ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes. 

TESTIMONY OE STEPHEN SPIAK, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
ROBERT S. FRIEDMAN— Resumed 

The Chairman. Was he a surprise to you, Mr. Witness ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
grounds that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitution. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

The Chairman. All right, Mr. Kelly, proceed. 

Mr. Kelly. Joseph Feola's record shows that on October 17, 1931, 
he was arrested under that name in Manhattan and charged with 
violation of 1897 of the penal law, known as the Sullivan law. 

On November 23, 1931, he was convicted and received a suspended 
sentence in the court of special sessions. 

On November 29, 1934, as Joey Surprise, he was arrested in New 
York City and charged with felonious assault. 

The final charge was pistol. 

On November 27, 1934, he was sentenced to a reformatory by Judge 
Donlan in special sessions court. 

On November 20, 1937, as Joey Feola, Manhattan, he was arrested 
and charged with homicide, gun. 

On December 1, 1937, he was discharged by Magistrate Murphy in 
homicide court. 

On December 1, 1937, as Joseph Feola, New York City, murder in 
the first degree. 

On April 28, 1939, he was sentenced to death by Judge Knott in 
general sessions court. 

On March 5, 1940, the conviction was reversed by the court of 
appeals, and on March 7, 1941, Feola plead guilty to a manslaughter, 1. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIEiS IN THE^ LABOR FIELD 6707 

On July 1 he was sentenced — he was sentenced subsequently to 7i/^ 
to 15 years by Judire Mullen in general sessions court. 

Incidentally, Senator McClellan, this homicide was the murder of a 
police officer in New York, whom Feola shot. 

Mr. Kennedy. He shot and killed one police officer and shot an- 
other one? 

Mr. Kelly. Leaving the scene, a sergeant stopped him as he was 
running away and asked him why he was running, and he said a police 
officer had been hurt, and the sergeant said "All right, you come 
back with me." Instead of coming back, he shot the sergeant. 

TESTIMONY OF STEPHEN SPIAK, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
ROBERT S. FRIEDMAN— Resumed 

The Chairman. Were you on the police force at that time ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question the ground 
that an answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did you know the policeman that was killed ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I further 
assert my privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States 
Constitution. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. We have the full record on Mr. Spiak. 

Is there a question about the record that he read before about you, 
Mr. Spiak? 

We have the full record. If you want to tell the story yourself, 
you can do it. Otherwise, we will have to put it in the record. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
grounds that an answer may tend to incriminate me. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

The Chairman. Read his record, then. I will ask him if it is true. 
See if he will tell it then. 

Mr. Kelly. On March 14, 1937, in Yonkers, N. Y., he was 
arrested 

The Chairman. That is this Avitness? 

Mr. Kelly. That is right ; Stephen Spiak. 

He was released on $500 bail to appear the following day in New 
York City. The alcohol tax agents were George Denning and C. 
Pagnina. The case was referred by Federal court to the city court 
of Yonkers, where he was then charged with violation of section 100 
and 108 of the ABC law, the alcoliolic-beverage-control law. 

On April 13, 1937, the case was dismissed by Judge Martin Faye, 
of the city court in Yonkers. 

TESTIMONY OF STEPHEN SPIAK, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
ROBERT S. FRIEDMAN— Resumed 

The Chairman. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 



6708 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitu- 
tion. 

The Chairman. Here is another case where you got acquitted. 
Why were you so interested in making the other fact known to the 
other charge that you were released from it or acquitted of it? If 
that wouldn't incriminate you, why would this incriminate you, to 
say you were released from it ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitu- 
tion. 

The Chairman. I just wanted to see how consistent you are. Do 
you honestly believe tliat if you told the truth with reference to these 
convictions and acquittals, that a truthful answer might tend to in- 
criminate you ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitu- 
tion. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

The Chairman. Eead the rest of his record. 

Mr. Kelly. On November 27, 1946, as Stephen Spiak in Yonkers, 
N. Y., he was arrested on three counts of petty larceny, the theft of 
bicycles. 

On April 3, 1947, he was convicted of criminally receiving, conceal- 
ing, and withholding stolen property. 

On April 23, he was sentenced to 6 months in the Westchester 
County Penitentiary on count No. 2. He was also fined $500 on the 
other counts. 

The Chairman. "\Yliat was the date of that ? 

Mr. Kelly. The date of the arrest was November 27, 1946. 

TESTIMONY OF STEPHEN SPIAK, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
ROBERT S. FRIEDMAN— Resumed 

The Chairman. Could there possibly be any error in that record ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitution. 

The Chairman. You appreciate the committee giving you an op- 
portunity to correct any erroneous record, do you not? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question 

The Chairman. I think we are entitled to that much gratitude. 
Don't you ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
grounds that an answer might tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitution. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

The Chairman. All right, Mr. Kelly, read the next one. 
Mr. Kelly. He was again arrested on August 10, 1951, in Yonkers, 
N. Y., and charged with the possession of a pinball machine. 



IMPROPER ACnVmElS EST THE LABOR FTELD 6709 

On September 6, 1951, he was fined $50 and placed on probation by 
Judge Faye in Special Sessions Court in Yonkers. 

That concludes the record. 

Senator Ives. May I get one tiling clear in my own mind ? 

I may not have been here at the time it came out. When was this 
witness a policeman in Yonkers ? 

The Chairman. Let the witness tell us. 

Senator Ives. He can't say anything. He wouldn't dare. 

TESTIMONY OF STEPHEN SPIAK, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
ROBEET S. FRIEDMAN— Resumed 

Senator Ives. Is that going to incriminate you ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Constitution. 

Senator I\'es. Now, Mr. Chairman, I would like to ask Mr. Kelly 
if he will tell me. 

Mr. Kelly. Senator Ives, the record doesn't indicate when he was, 
but I had an independent conversation with Commissioner McHugh, 
the deputy commissioner of public safety, in Yonkers, yesterday, in 
which he told me that Spiak was a policeman when these petty lar- 
cenies occurred, and as a result of this he was dismissed from the 
force. He said he came on the force about 1941. 

The Chaipjman. You mean he was dismissed from the force, ac- 
cording to this information, because of these crimes he committed 
while he was a policeman ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct. 

The Chairman. How about that? Is that true? Were you com- 
mitting these offenses while you were a policeman ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment to the United States Consti- 
tution. 

Senator Ives. One thing more I would like to clear up, Mr. Chair- 
man, is this: I am not quite clear, but were some of these offenses 
committed prior to the time he was put on the police force? 

Mr. Kelly. The record indicates he was arrested in 1937, but the 
case was dismissed. That was the alcohol charge. As far as I know, 
from what the commissioner told me, he was not then on the police 
force. 

Incidentally, the complainant in the bicycle thefts, I believe, was 
his brother-in-law. 

The Chairman. Do you have a brother-in-law ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer on the ground that an 
answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my privilege under 
the fifth amendment of the Constitution of the United States. 

The Chairman. Do you think it might tend to incriminate you to 
admit that you stole a bicycle from your brother-in-law ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Consti- 
tution. 



6710 IMPROPEK ACTIVrTIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all I have, Mr. Chairman. I understand 
Mr. Spiak is still head of the Westchester Carting Co. local, which 
consists of maybe a half dozen or 10 members. As I said, the im- 
portance of his testimony is in view of the fact that 813, under Bernie 
Adelstein and Joe Parisi, made such an effort to organize this com- 
pany, to control Yonkers, and shortly after Mr. Acropolis was killed 
the company union was formed and they no longer have a contract 
with the teamsters local. I was trying to get an explanation for that. 

The Chairman. Are you a member of that little independent union ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Consti- 
tution. 

The Chairman. Is that little union engaged in a racket? Is it 
racketeering ? Is that Avhy you are a little bit sensitive about it ? 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Consti- 
tution. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know your boss, Nick Ratteni ? Could you 
tell us where he is right now ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Spiak. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the 
ground that an answer may tend to incriminate me, and I assert my 
privilege under the fifth amendment of the United States Consti- 
tution. 

The Chairman. As I dismiss you, sir, all I want to say is I am 
sorry for men who work, possibly in an honest occupation, who 
have to be subjected to the official administration of a man who can't 
answer questions about his conduct of their affairs without tending 
to incriminate himself. I am sorry for those men. 

Stand aside. 

Call your next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. William Wells, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. You do solemnly swear tliat the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Wells. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM WELLS 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Wells. My name is William Wells. My home is at 46 North 
Summit Avenue, Chatham, N. J. My place of business is 300 Mercer 
Street, Jersey City, Safeway Stores, Inc. 

The Chairman. Do you have counsel to represent you ? 

IMr. AVells. No ; I do not. 

The Chairman. You waive counsel ? 

Mr. Wells. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Thank you. 

Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, this witness will be a relatively short 
witness. 



IMPROPER ACTIVrriEiS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6711 

I want to find out back in 1952 what position you held in Safeway 
Stores, Mr. Wells. 

Mr. Wklls. The same position as now, public-relations manager of 
the New York division. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you understand in 1952 that your representative 
in Yonkers, the Safeway Stores representative in Yonkers, was having 
some difficulty with their carting ? 

Mr. Wells. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had they had a contract with the Westchester Cart- 
ing Co. ? 

Mr. Wells. They were dealing with the Westchester Carting Co. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were they dissatisfied with the services that were 
being performed by the Westchester Carting Co. ? 

Mr. Wells. Yes, sir ; they were. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did they decide, therefore, to change to the Rex 
Carting Co. ? 

Mr. Wells. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did they make that change ? 

Mr. Wells. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was it reported to you that they began to have diffi- 
culty with the union because of this change ? 

Mr. Wells. We had difficulty with the collection of refuse in the 
Boroughs of the Bronx and Manhattan. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Would you tell what happened? You changed 
from Westchester to Eex ? 

Mr. Wells. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell the committee briefly what occurred 
after you did that ? 

Mr. Wells. Shortly after that, we received calls in the office from 
the stores reporting that collectors were refusing to pick up refuse at 
various stores in the Bronx and Manhattan. Perhaps there were 12 
or 15 stores involved. The reason given was that we had changed the 
collectors and unions in our store on Romaine Avenue in Yonkers. 
We tried to find a solution to this problem, some solution to get the 
collectors to pick up the refuse without going back to the Westchester 
Carting Co. 

After several days we had a rather serious problem with both the 
quantity of the refuse in the stores and tlie condition or the smell, and, 
therefore, the concern of whether the board of health might, possibly, 
close the stores. 

This, of course, meant that we had to make a decision rather prompt- 
ly. After exploring all possibilities, it was decided that we had noth- 
ing to do but to try to make a deal with these people. We were told 
that the person who could make this deal for us to straighten us out 
was a gentleman by the name of Adelstein. So, a contact was made 
with Mr, Adelstein, Avho told us that if we would go back to his union, 
union 813, that our problems would be over. We requested, however, 
that we not use the same carting company, and he agreed to that 
request. Another carting company, I believe it was Rusco, came in 
and picked up the refuse, and immediately our problems were over 
and collections were made in all the stores. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you understand that this carting company 
that you did take out in Westchester was, in fact, owned and operated 
by Westchester Carting ? 



6712 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Wells. Yes, sir. We were told that. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you, in fact, took back Westchester Carting Co 
under a different name ? ^ 

Mr. Wells. That is our miderstanding. 
. Mr. Kennedy. You were forced to do that because of the condition 
in your stores as far as health was concerned, and the condition of the 
rubbish m your stores m the Bronx and 13 or 14 stores « 

Air. Wells. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that pressure was all brought, as you under- 
stood It from the conversations, all brought about by local 813, which 
wanted you to have Westchester Carting Co. in Yonkers « 

Mr. Wells. That was the understanding. 

Mr. Kennedy. But, during this period of time, Rex Carting Co. 
was a union outfit ; was it not ? 

Mr. Wells. Yes, sir ; it was. 

Mr. Kennedy. And it had a contract with local 456 in Yonkers of 
the teamsters ? 

Mr Wells It was a different union. I believe that was the local. 
But it was dehnitely a different local ; yes. 

Mr. ip^NNEDY. So this pressure was brought for you to change 
^^^i-^^^,/''^ company that had a contract with one particular local ? 

Mr. Wells. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You said a different union. Was it a different 
local or a different union ? 

Mr. Wells. A different local. 

T}^^ Sr^^^^^^^^- ^ different local within the teamsters union « 

Mr. Wells It was a different local number. I don't know about 
"\r ^ f^^^*^^ ^^ ^ different union, but it was a different local number 

Mr. Kennedy. Of the teamsters ? 

Mr. Wells. I don't know that, sir. 

Mr Kennedy. After you signed and took back this other company, 
was the boycott lifted in the Bronx and these other stores « 

Mr. Wells. Immediately ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 

Call the next witness. 

Senator Ives. Mr. Chairman, while you are waiting for the next 
witness, I would like to bring this to your attention. As I under- 
stand, you have been receiving help, have you not, from the depart- 
ment of law, the attorney general of the State of New York, and 
from his department ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes ; we have. 

Senator Ives. That is what I understood. I think we ouo-ht to 
express our appreciation to all of those law-enforcement agencies 
right now. '^ 

Mr. Kennedy. Both of those agencies have been particularly 
TESTIMONY OP JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Kelly, can you testify to the situation as far as 
Westchester Carting Co.'s control of the Yonkers area? 

Mr. Kelly. I think the classic example of it, Mr. Kennedy, would 
be m connection with the testimony given by the previous witness I 
would like to enlarge on that, if I may. 



IMPROPER ACTIVirrES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6713 

Mr. John Jiiban, who is now deceased, was the manager of the 
Safeway Stores, store No. 1272, located at 28 Romaine Avenue, Yon- 
kers. The store was opened on May 16, 1951. Their first carter was 
the company known as Little Abe. I believe the principal of that 
company was a man named Benedetto Piarullo. They were charg- 
ing $15 a week for 6- day service. The store opened, as I said, on 
May 16. Two days later, Juban testified before the State commis- 
sioner of investigations office, Piarullo came out and said "I want to 
get out in one piece, and I don't want any trouble. I don't want my 
trucks burned to the ground." 

So subsequently, or right about this time, Westchester Carting 
came on the scene, and a representative, Joseph Picaria, who had 
been a principal in Pecaria Carting, which had been absorbed by 
Westchester, said if this Safeway Store did not take AVestchester 
Carting, then they would boycott the other stores that Safeway had 
in the Yonkers area. 

Juban agreed to take Westchester Carting on May 21. They were 
giving 5-day service, and the rates were set at $21.50 a w^eek. They 
tried to raise these to $30. 

On July 21, Rex Carting came, and Mr. Juban was having increas- 
ing troubles with Westchester, particularly because the men from 
Westchester Carting were storing refuse from collections they made 
from other locations in the city in the back of his store and waiting 
for another truck to come around and take it to the dump, which 
represented a health problem. He was receiving summonses from the 
board of health, 

Mr. Kennedy. They were bringing the garbage from all the other 
stores and putting it in Saf eway's back ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct. I guess that was a safe place to keep 
it. On the 21st of July, Rex Carting — the rate had been raised to 
$28 a week — Rex came and agreed to do it for $23 and collect 6 days 
a week. Juban spoke with his superior, Tom Reedy, who has since 
left Safeway, and they took Rex Carting. On the first day that Rex 
made the pickups, all the Safeway stores in the Bronx and Manhattan 
were boycotted by members of local 813, Private Sanitation. I under- 
stand the other six Safeway stores were boycotted by Westchester 
Co. This was subsequently straightened out. I had an opportunity 
to talk to Mr. Reedy, at Brewster, N. Y. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who is he ? 

Mr. Kelly. He was the district manager, who was Juban's super- 
ior at that time. Reedy told me 

Mr. Kennedy. He is ill now ? 

Mr. Kelly. I asked him if he could come down, and he said he 
retired under a disability, and he said he didn't feel well enough to 
come down. He recalls Juban saying to him at that time that Ber- 
nard Adelstein of local 813 called him at the Westchester store. No. 
1272, and he recalls Juban telling him that Adelstein said if Juban 
didn't knuckle under to Westchester Carting, that he, Adelstein, 
would tie up all the Safeway stores right out to Queens. They had 
already boycotted them in the Bronx and Manhattan. 

Safeway was faced with a dilemma. Reedy said that they then 
asked the principals of Rex Carting, Polose and Triano if they would 
take over the servicing of all of these stores in the Bronx, Manhattan, 
and Yonkers. Unfortunately, they were limited and couldn't handle 



6714 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

the job. As a result of this, Safeway was forced to take the alterna- 
tive course and hire Eusco Carting. When the trucks from Eusco 
Carting came around to pick up the refuse from Safeway they had 
Westchester Carting written on the side. He felt from that that there 
was a very close relationship and interchange of equipment and inter- 
company relations between the two. 

A short while after that a man whom he only knew as Joe came 
around to see Juban, and his description, incidentally, fits Joseph 
Feola, who was working for Westchester at the time, as sort of an 
efficiency man. He was efficient in other ways, too, as his record indi- 
cates. Here he was supposed to be solving their carting problems b}'- 
indicating the correct rate to be charged. He promptly told Jubaii 
that they Avould have to pay Westchester a higher rate. He said, 
"What about Eusco?" And he said, "Eusco isn't able to handle it any 
more. We are taking over again." Westchester then resumed the 
picking up of rubbish from this store. I believe they do so today. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Doyle testified to the fact that there was vio- 
lence—threats — made against vai'ious of the other small carting firms 
in the Yonkers area, as well as against small businesses. Can you give 
us any testimony or examples that we have learned of any threats that 
were made? 

You have an affidavit ; have you ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir. We have an affidavit from a woman named 
Katherine Embree, who lived at 58 Woodland Street, Yonkers. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was her business ? 

Mr. Kelly. She was the principal in a company known as Alpine 
Carting. I will read the affidavit to you : 

State of New York," 

County of Westchester, ss: 

Katherine Enibrie, duly sworn, deposes and states : 

I make this statement at the request of Milton Morvitz, known to me to be 
an investigator assigned to the United States Senate select committee investigat- 
ing into the improper activities of labor and management. 

This statement is made of my own free will. I have been informed that this 
statement may be introduced into evidence in a public hearing before the United 
States Senate select committee ivestigating tlie improper activities of labor and 
management, and swear that the statements contained herein are true. 

I was the owner of the Alpine Carting Service. In the early part of 1950 I 
started to experience difficulty in the operation of the carting service because 
of opposition of one of the unions, Local 27, Private Sanitation Unit. About 
February of 1950 I was approached by a man whom I later identified to be Nick 
Ratteni, who was the owner of tlie Westchester Carting Co., at which time 
Ratteui told me, "We bettpv get together or one of us will be out of business.'' 

Subsequent to that time I received threats over the telephone from an 
unknown person. 

On March 19, 1950, at 11 : 55 p. m., 2 trucks that I owned and which were 
parked 75 feet apart on a lot at 509 Riverdale Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y., were 
sprinkled v\ith gasoline and burned. 

I related the threats to the detectives of the Yonkers Police Department and 
described Mr. Ratteni to them. They took me to Baran's Tavern at 37 Lock- 
wood Avenue and I identified Mr. Nicholas Ratteni as the person who had 
previously threatened me. 

Subsequently, I was questioned by the ofiice of the New York State Investiga- 
tion Commission by a man named Reuther. Newspaper articles appeared in tlie 
Daily Mirror, Daily News, and other papers relating to the burning of my trucks 
and the difficulties I had in the cartage business. 

Soon after these newspaper articles appeared I received another telephone call 
from an unknown person who told me, "Embree, you did pretty good, don't 
forget you've got grandchildren." 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIEiS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6715 

I make this statement in lieu of personal appearance before the committee 
because I feel that I am too ill to travel to Washington to testify. 

Katherine Embree. 
Sworn to before me this 6th day of November 1957. 
[seal] M. Louis Michaels, 

Notary Puhlic, State of New York. 
Term expires March 30, 1958. 

Mr, Kennedy. And the Westchester Carting Co. took over these 
various smaller companies subsequently, did they not ? 

Mr. Kelly. They subsequently absorbed the majority of these small 
companies. 

Mr. Kennedy. And their businesses ? 

Mr. Kelly. And their businesses. 

Mr. Kennedy. And now they control the carting in the Yonkers 
area ? 

Mr. Kelly. I think that could be safely said. 

Incidentally, from a report of the Council Committee on Trade 
Ways, dated April 8, 1952, there is a list of the carting companies who 
had coupon books for dumping for the year 1951. This record re- 
veals the following: That Westchester Carting in 1951 had 9 trucks 
and during the year obtained a total of 607 coupon books, which were 
sold for $10 each. 

Little Abe Carting Co. in 1951 had two trucks and 87 coupon books. 

Kusco Carting had 2 trucks and 137 books. 

Community had one truck and no coupons. 

Monarch Carting had 1 truck and 1 coupon. 

Little Abe was subsequently absorbed, and Rusco had a close rela- 
tionship with Westchester. 

It would be simple to find out who was dumping the garbage and 
who was picking it up. 

Mr. Kennedy. So a short time after that, after the murder of xlcrop- 
olis, Westchester Carting took over complete control of the carting 
there? 

Mr. Kelly. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to recall Mr. Doyle. 

TESTIMONY OF EVERETT DOYLE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
JOHN C. SHEEHAN— Resumed 

The Chairman. Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

JSIr. Kennedy. This is on an unrelated matter, but a matter which 
will be of some interest to the committee, Mr. Chairman. That is in 
connection with the Yonkers Raceway. 

You are familiar with that, Mr. Doyle ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were there arrangements made at Yonkers Raceway 
as to who was to have the union contracts ? 

Mr. Doyle. Well, arrangements were tried to be made when the 
racetrack was under construction, changing it from a flat track to a 
night trotter. Acropolis was the president of the Westchester Fed- 
eration of Labor. He appointed a committee to go into the racetrack 
and find out what jobs would be available in the track when it was 
completed, what classifications, like electrician, carpenter, and all that 
type of work. 



6716 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Tommy Lewis was appointed on that committee. There was Tommy 
Lewis and a fellow by the name of Joe DiBucci. 

Mr. Kennedy. What were the names ? 

Mr. Doyle. Tommy Lewis. 

Mr. Kennedy. Of32-E? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. And Joseph DiBucci. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who else was on the committee ? 

Mr. Doyle. There was a fellow by the name of Lou Stauder, who 
has since passed away. 

Mr. Kennedy. And they met, did they ? 

Mr. Doyle. Then there was some fellows from the buildmg trades. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who did Stauder represent ? 

Mr. Doyle. Stauder represented the electricians. 

Mr. Kennedy. And they had a meeting ? 

Mr. Doyle. They had a meeting with the track officials and they 
asked for a list of the jobs that were going to be at the track when it 
was completed. Track officials promised them within a week they 
would have that list in the hands of Mr. Acropolis. Then they could 
sit down and decide which unions had the jurisdiction and who would 
sign contracts. 

Well, about 2 weeks passed and they heard nothing from the track ; 
they got no word. Mr. Acropolis called up the officials at the track 
and asked what the delay was. He was informed then that a blanket 
agreement was signed by Tommy Lewis with the building service 
employees. 

The Chairman. And he was one of the committee ? 

Mr. Doyle. He was one of the committee. Right away Mr. Acrop- 
olis raised a protest. The building trades put picket lines around the 
racetrack, which stopped the construction. The construction was 
stopped to a standstill. A protest was made to the contract signed 
by Tommy Lewis. 

The strike went on for about 10 days. There was an injunction 
issued by the supreme court in White Plains which barred the picket- 
ing. Picketing was stopped, but no one went to work. The job 
still laid idle. At this time I think it was Charlie Johnson 

Mr. Kennedy. Before that, w^ere you informed that the track had 
appointed 

Mr. Doyle. Oh, yes. They had appointed, when Acropolis got 
called up and found out that Lewis signed a blanket agreement, he 
wanted to know why, and he put up a protest, they said they had hired 
a labor-relations man, and it was on the advice of him. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who was the labor-relations man ? 

Mr. Doyle. Joseph Pizzo. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you learn subsequently of any financial connec- 
tions between Mr. Pizzo and Mr. I^wis '^ 

Mr. Doyle. Well, I believe they ran an insurance company, Alcor 
Insurance Co. 

Mr. Kennedy. Alcor Insurance ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did they handle any of Tommy Lewis' insurance ? 

Mr. Doyle. They handled all the welfare insurance. 

Mr. Kennedy. So all the welfare insurance from 32-E, Mr. Lewis' 
local, went to Alcor Insurance Co., in which Mr. Lewis and Mr. Pizzo 
had the interest ? 



IMPROPER ACnVmES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6717 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And Mr. Pizzo was appointed labor-relations con- 
sultant with the raceway, and he was the one who made the contract 
with Mr. Tommy Lewis to give I^ewis the blanket contracts for han- 
dling all the labor for the raceway ; is that right ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. 

TESTIMONY OF ROBERT W. GREENE— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Greene, have you any of the background of Mr. 
Pizzo, other than his interest in the Alcor Insurance Co. ? 

Mr. Greene. Sir, Joseph Pizzo was questioned by the Bronx district 
attorney's office in connection with the murder of Thomas Lewis in 
1953, but released. His record shows no other arrests. 

However, sir, as an investigator for the New York City Anti-Crime 
Committee in 1953, I personally observed Mr. Pizzo in a party at the 
Vogue Room, a West 5 ^th Street restaurant in Manhattan. I was sent 
there to observe the operations of John Biello, notorious hoodlum who 
served 71/2 to 15 years for armed robbery with Nicholas Ratteni at 
Sing Sing Prison. 

In the party I observed Frank Costello, Anthony "Little Augie" 
Carfano, John Dioguardi, John Biello, Joseph "Stretch" Stracci, and 
Big Jim O'Connell, who has been arrested a number of times, and who 
is closely associated with syndicate gambler Frank Erickson. 

I conversed with Mr. Pizzo at this time, and he informed me that 
these gentlemen were his friends. He was very obviously in their 
company. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you also learn that Mr. Pizzo had also certain 
business interests with Mr. Biello ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. Mr. Biello, a very close associate of Mr. 
Nicholas Ratteni, the "Westchester Carting Co., and Mr. Joseph Pizzo 
were the co-owners of a large commercial office building in the Bronx, 
N. Y., at the time that Mr. Pizzo was associated with Mr. Lewis in the 
Alcor Insurance Agency. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Biello did 7i^ to 15 years for the armed robbery 
with Nicholas Ratteni ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. They committed the robbery together, and 
were both sentenced and jailed together. 

TESTIMONY OF EVERETT DOYLE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
JOHN C. SHEEHAN— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. You found out that Lewis received these blanket 
contracts for all the labor out at the raceway ? 

Mr. Doyle. A strike was on, the injunction was issued, and Charlie 
Johnson was called into the picture. He had ordered the carpenters 
to go to work. 

Mr. Kennedy. Charlie Johnson had what position ? 

Mr. Doyle. Charlie Johnson is an international vice president, I 
believe, of the Carpenters International. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was called in ? 

Mr. Doyle. He was called in. One of the carpenters' delegates 
called his office to see what he could do. 

89330— 57— pt. 17 5 



6718 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. So what did lie do ? 

Mr. Doyle. He first ordered the carpenters back to work. 

Mr. Kennedy, He ordered them not to stay and picket the raceway ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. Before the pickets were taken off, he 
ordered them to go through the picket line. So the carpenters went 
through. 

Mr. Knnedy. Did you understand or learn later on that he received 
anything for that ? 

Mr. Doyle. Later on we found out that Charlie Johnson had re- 
ceived $30,000 from the track. That was released in the newspapers 
when it came out, 

Mr. Kennedy. He is still a vice president of the carpenters union ? 

Mr. Doyle, That is correct, I believe he was questioned by the dis- 
trict attorney on that at that time, too, but there was no news story 
broke on it. 

The Chairman. Did he get that for his union ? 

Mr. Doyle, He got that for his services. He was supposed to be 
representing the labor unions in this track, but he got that from the 
track officials. 

The Chairman. For his mediation services ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. 

The Chairman. He was representing the union ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes, 

Mr. Kennedy. Then what occurred? 

Mr, Doyle. Well, finally, after about 10 or 12 days, they finally 
settled. They came to an agreement where a blanket agreement with 
32-E was disallowed, and through negotiations with the track Pizzo 
and Lewis and all the trades came in and got their respective work. 
Then the track ran smoothly, 

Mr, Kennedy, Did you hear anything about that situation again 
subsequently? 

Mr, Doyle, Not of that same situation, no ; but later on. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were called in on the track ? 

Mr. Doyle. Later on, about 1951, I believe, just before the racing 
season, I would say, about 2 weeks before the racing season started, we 
were in Mount Vernon, Mr. Acropolis and myself, and we made a call 
to the office. There was a message that Mr. Wolf of the racetrack, 
who was the secretary-treasurer of the racetrack, wanted to see us. 

We went to the racetrack. When we got there we saw picket lines 
around the track. So we went down around the side gate and we went 
in and saw Mr. Wolf. He was in there running around the room mad, 
yelling, and he said to John, "I am in trouble. 445 is picketing me." 

Mr, Kennedy. Local 445 of the teamsters ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. He said, "They are picketing. It is a 
damn shakedown. They are trying to shake us down," 

Mr, Kennedy. Who were the heads then ? 

Mr, Doyle, Lester Stickles was the head, 

Mr. Kennedy. Who else ? Who was his chief assistant ? 

Mr. Doyle. His assistant with him was Phil Massiello, 

Mr. Kennedy. They ran 445 at that time ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. Of the teamsters ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. So Johnny asked Wolf, he says, "What 
is the matter with your labor-relations man, Joe Pizzo ?" 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6719 

He said, "We fired him." He said, "Wliat did you fire him for?" 

He said, "Because he is getting us in all of this trouble. It cost us 
a lot of money. It cost us in the neighborhood of $90,000 that we 
gave him, and these guys claim they didn't get none of it." 

Mr. Kennedy. He said "these guys" referring to Stickles and 
Massiello ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. He said, "They want a contract, but 
they won't tell us what they want, the terms or anything. They just 
got the picket line." So Johnny referred him to Tommy in New York 
and gave him Tom's number, and he called from the office and set up 
a meeting with Hickey. Hickey called back and said he had set up a 
meeting with 445 officials that evening at their offices, for 6 o'clock 
that evening, I believe, that the meeting was set for. 

They were to go there and see if they couldn't work out the contract. 
]Mr. Wolf asked if Johnny Acropolis and myself could attend the 
meeting. Hickey told them, "By all means," he says, "insist that you 
have Acropolis at the meeting." 

So at 6 o'clock we went to the meeting. We waited dovrn at the 
offices of local 445; about a quarter after 7, Stickles showed up. 
When he showed up he went into the little room by himself and 
Massiello and one of his other business agents, and Tommy Lewis. 

Mr. Kennedy. Tommy Lewis was there ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. Tommy Lewis was there. As soOn as 
Stickles sat down he said, "I just got through talking to Tom Hickey, 
and I have orders that no one is to be in this meeting Init myself, Mr. 
Wolf, Mr. Cane, and my business agents and Tommy Lewis. Every- 
body else has to get out." 

So Mr. Wolf objected to that, and he said that Mr. Hickey had 
told him that Acropolis and myself would be at the meeting. So he 
said, "Can I use your phone?"' and he told him "Xo." He grabbed 
the phone anyhow and he made a call to Hickey's office. Hickey got 
on the phone and instructed Stickles that we should stay at the meet- 
ing. ^ 

Well, there was notliing done at tliat meting. They wouldn't talk; 
they wouldn't talk contract; they wouldn't talk anything. I had to 
leave. I left there about a quarter to 8. I understand from Acro- 
polis tliat they went down to Paul's restaurant on Broadway, and 
they stood there until about 10 o'clock and they decided they would 
meet at Tom Hickey's office at 10 o'clock the next morning. They 
met at 10 o'clock the next morning in Tom Hickey's office and ne- 
gotiated a contract which stopped the pickets. 

Mr. Kennedy. So through the intervention of Tom Hickey the 
strike was subsequently settled ? 

Mr. Doyle. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Where are Mr. Massiello and Mr. Stickles at the 
present time ? Do you know ? 

Mr. Doyle. I believe they are in a Federal penitentiary some- 
where. 

Mr. Kennedy. For extortion ? 

iVIr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. They were convicted ? 

Mr. Doyle. Convicted and sentenced to 5 years. 

Mr. Kennedy. It amounted to about $50,000 ? 

Mr. Doyle. $50,000 or $60,000. 



6720 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. Was that in connection with this racetrack? 

Mr. Doyle. No. That was in connection with milk. 

The Chairman. With milk ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you understand that Mr. Pizzo and Mr. Tommy 
Lewis had a falling out, subsequently ? 

Mr. Doyle. No. We weren't that close to the situation. We heard 
rumors of it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Prior to the time that Mr. Lewis was murdered ? 

Mr. Doyle. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. I guess that is all. 

Senator Ives. I want to thank the witness for being so cooperative. 

Mr. Doyle. Thank you. 

The Chairman. If we can get that kind of cooperation from all 
of those who have knowledge, the work of this committee would 
be more pleasant, and it would also be more fruitful. Thank you 
very much. 

Mr. Kennedy. Thank you Mr. Doyle. 

The Chairman. The committee will stand in recess until 10 o'clock 
in the morning. 

(Members of the select committee present at time of recess: Sena- 
tors McClellan and Ives.) 

(Whereupon, at 1 p. m., the select committee recessed, to recon- 
vene at 10 a. m., Wednesday, November 13, 1957.) 



INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 1957 

United States Senate, 
Select Committee on Improper Activities 

IN the Labor or Management Field, 

Washington^ D. C. 

The select committee met at 10 a. m., pursuant to Senate Resolution 
74, agreed to January 30, 1957, in the caucus room of the Senate Office 
Building, Senator John L. McClellan (chairman of the select com- 
mittee) presiding. 

Present : Senator John L. McClellan, Democrat, Arkansas ; Senator 
Irving M. Ives, Eepublican, New York; Senator Pat McNamara, 
Democrat, Michigan. 

Also present : Robert F. Kennedy, chief coimsel ; Jerome Adlerman, 
assistant chief counsel; Robert W. Greene, investigator; James P. 
Kelly, investigator ; Ruth Young Watt, chief clerk. 

The Chairjvian. The committee will come to order. 

(Members of the committee present at the convening of the session : 
Senators McClellan, McNamara, and Ives.) 

The Chairman. Call your first witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Messrs. Anthony and John Montesano. 

The Chairman. Do you gentlemen solemnly swear that the evi- 
dence you shall give before this Senate select committee will be the 
truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. John Montesano. I do. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN MONTESANO AND ANTHONY MONTESANO 

The Chairman. Mr. Montesano, each of you give your name, your 
place of residence, and your business or occupation. You may give 
yours first. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Anthony Montesano, 101 Hazel Street, 
East JSIeadow Sanitation Service, Inc. 

Mr. John Montesano. John Montesano, 354 Stanley Road, East 
Meadow, vice president. East Meadow Sanitation Service. 

The Chairman. Do you waive counsel ? 

Mr. John Montesano. We do. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. John Montesano, how long have you been in the 
sanitation business? 

Mr. John Montesano. Roughly 11 years, sir. 

Mr. I^NNEDY. Could you tell us a little bit about your company, 
how large it is ? 

6721 



6722 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr, John Montesano. At present it is operating 6 trucks, but we 
liave been awarded a contract by the department of Hempstead and 
we expect to be running approximately 14 to 16 trucks in January. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many employees do you have ; how many peo- 
ple are working for the company ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, we have 7 different employees, sir, 
but we are all stockholders and we have 1 strange employee. In other 
words, we all belong to the union. 

Mr. I^NNEDT. You what ? 

Mr. John Montesano. We all belong to the union. We hold books, 
but we have one woman employee. 

Mr. Kennedy. You are all members of the union ; is that right ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who makes up the seven employees; relatives of 
yours ? 

Mr. John Montesano. There is my father, my brother, my brother- 
in-law, my 2 other brothers, and I have another brother-in-law, and 
a stranger, 1 man working for us. 

Mr. Kennedy. Six out of the seven are members of your family ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Mr. Ivennedy. But all seven of you belong to the union ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Mr. Ivennedy. And six members of the family are, in fact, the 
employers, but they all pay union dues, as well; is that right? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

The Chairman. I understand there are 6 members of the family, 
and you have 7 altogether, and 6 members of the family actually own 
an interest in the business ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Three actually own an interest in the 
business. They are the stockholders. 

The Chairman. Three actually own an interest. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Out of the six. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. So there are 4-— 3 in the family and 1 outside the 
family that have no interest in the business — that are employees ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. But 3 out of those 4 are members of the family ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long have you been in the union ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. I would say about 6 years now. 

Mr. Kennedy. Where does your company operate ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. In East Meadow, Long Island; that 
would be the township of Hempstead, Nassau County, New York 
State. 

Mr. Kennedy. "Wliat union are you a member of ? 

Mr. John Montesano. 813, local. 

Mr. Kennedy. Of the teamsters ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr, Kennedy. Wlio operates that union ? 

Mr. John Montesano. To my knowledge, at that time, Mr. Bar- 
nard Adelstein was the president and now they have a Carmine Val- 
lano. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIEiS IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6723 

Mr. Kennedy. Is Mr. Bernie Aclel stein still an officer in that local ? 

Mr. Anthony INIontesano. He is business manager. 

Mr. Kennedy. And is secretary-treasurer? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. On Long Island, did they have an association of gar- 
bage collectors ? 

Mr. John Montesano. We did. 

Mr. Kennedy. ^^Hiat is the proper term to use, "garbage collector" 
or "sanitation collector" or "cartage collectors" ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Sanitation engineers. It seems like every- 
body wants to be an engineer today. It is just "garbage collector." 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you operate with an association out in Long 
Island? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes ; we did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wlien did that originate? 

Mr. John Montesano. The association originated, I would say, in 
the beginning of 1954 or 1953, and I am not sure on that, sir, but the 
State gave us our charter and you can find the exact date from that. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was the association very active during that period 
of time ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No ; it wasn't too active ; we had meetings 
and all, and it was mostly get together with the local people, and there 
was no real dues being paid or anything. 

Mr. Kennedy. It was sort of a loose association ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. '\'\^iat was the name of the association ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Intercounty Cartmen's Association. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wlio was head of the association originally ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Originally, we had a Mr. Joe Caputo. 

Mr. Kennedy. How do you spell his name ? . 

Mr. John Montesano. C-a-p-u-t-o. Then we elected to office a Mr. 
Roy Brown, and after that, I think, I became the president of that 
organization. 

Mr. Kennedy. '\'\^ien did you become president, approximately. 

Mr. John Montesano. I think it was November or December of 
1954. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, this is in Nassau County, is it ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. "Wliere this association operated ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many cartmen were members of the association ? 

Mr. John Montesano. At one time we had a force of 60 cartmen 
on our books, on our rolls. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was that when it was very active ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes; when it was very active; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. It didn't become very active until about 1955 ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Prior to that, there were just a few members ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Prior to that, I would say that we had about 
1 or 25 members. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many cartmen operate in that district? You 
say you had 60 members of the association, and how many operated 
independently, or would you know ? 



6724 mpROPER activities est the labor field 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, it is a funny thing, sir, where we had 
our association — in the immediate area of our association, I would say 
there was only about 40 or 50 cartmen, but not all of them belonged. 
In all of Nassau, I would say, there is much more than that, and the 
exact number I don't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. But the biggest operators, and the most active oper- 
ators, were members of the association in 1955; is that right? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were your members of the association in the union 
when you were president, in 1954 ? 

Mr. John Montesano. We had some that were in, sir, and we had 
some that were not. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you decide at that time that you had better make 
a determination as to whether all of you should belong to the union 
or not. 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir ; there was no decision made by me 
or anyone that I know of. The decision was made, however, after 
Mr. Squillante came out. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is Vincent J. Squillante, S-q-u-i-1-l-a-n-t-e ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You say Mr. Vincent Squillante came out and became 
associated with your association ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us the circumstances that brought 
about his coming with you ? 

Mr. John Montesano. We had some members that were in the union, 
and we had some members that weren't. Now, the union contracts 
terminated January 1, 1955. The union men naturally didn't want to 
have a strike on their hands. So we had an open meeting on the floor, 
and the men decided to turn around and have a negotiation board set 
up, a committee to negotiate a new union contract, and I was on that 
committee. 

After I was on the committee, I felt that I could not deal with the 
union, due to the fact that they had legal men with them and I am not 
capable of dealing with lawyers, and I felt it was too much of a 
responsibility for me to take that. So, with that, I met Ned Fazula. 

Mr. Kennedy. How do you spell that ? 

Mr. John Montesano. F-a-z-u-1-a. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wlio was Freddy Fazula ? 

Mr. John Montesano. He was Rapid Rubbish Remover ; that was 
his business name, but he was also at that time our sergeant at arms. 
He introduced me to Joe Feola. 

Mr. Kennedy. Fazula introduced you to Feola ? 

Mr. John Montesano. He goes under the name of Jamaica Sanita- 
tion, or Jamaica Ash & Rubbish, and I am not sure which, but he in- 
troduced me to Feola, and he, in turn, took me to New York, to 
Madison Avenue, and I met Mr. Squillante. Wliile we were there 
we were speaking, and the way he was built up to me through Feola 
was, if anybody could help us, Squillante was the man, with this union 
contract. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know anything about the background of 
Fazula or Feola ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I knew the backeround of none of them. 



IMPROPER ACTIVirrEiS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6725 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, I would like to have Mr. Greene put 
on the backgrounds, first, of Mr. Fazula, who was the sergeant at arms, 
who introduced Mr. Montesano to Mr. Feola, who then introduced Mr. 
Montesano to Mr. Squillante. 

TESTIMONY OF ROBERT W. GREENE 

Mr. Greene. The criminal record of Alfred Fazula, alias Posta 
Fazula 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat is his first name ? 

Mr. Greene. The criminal record of Alfred Fazula, F-a-z-u-1-a, 
address 2033 Stillwell Avenue, Bronx, at the time this record was 
compiled by the New York City Police Department, the following 
record is listed : 

Fred Fazula, Brooklyn, burglary, 1934, reduced to petty larceny, 
sentence suspended, probation 3 years ; 1934, Fred Fazula, Greensburg, 
Pa., larceny, discharged; 1934, Fred Fazula, Baltimore, Md., auto 
theft, sentenced to 2 years in the State house of correction ; 1938, as 
Fred Fazula, Brooklyn, vagrancy, dismissed; 1942, as Fredinand 
Fazula 

Mr. Kennedy. How do you spell that ? 

Mr. Greene. F-r-e-d-i-n-a-n-d. 

Mr. Kennedy. It is supposed to be Ferdinand ? 

Mr. Greene. I presume so. 

Queens, N. Y., attempted burglary, and burglars tools, acquitted. 

That is the complete record of Alfred Fazula. 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN MONTESANO AND ANTHONY MONTESANO— 

Resumed 

The Chairman. What position did Fazula occupy at the time ? 

Mr. John Montesano. He was sergeant at arms of our organization. 

The Chairman. Sergeant at arms s 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Was he selected in that position or chosen or ap- 
pointed to that position, or did he get it by reason of his past experi- 
ence or some special proficiency ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I don't remember. Senator. I don't remem- 
ber if he was elected to that position or if he was appointed. I think, 
if I am not mistaken, sir, that the position was open and no one 
wanted it, to be sergeant at arms, and that is how Fazula got the job. 

The Chairman. No one wanted it and he took it ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right, I think. 

Mr. Greene. This is the criminal record of Joseph Feola 

Mr. Kennedy. What was Fazula actually known as ? 

Mr. Greene. Fazula's proper name is Alfred Feola, and, in the 
course of interrogation of various people who knew Fazula, and various 
police agencies that were acquainted with him, we determined that he 
was nicknamed Posta Fazula. 

Mr. John Montesano. That means beans and macroni. 

Mr. Kennedy. Fazula introduced Montesano to Feola. Will you 
tell us about Feola ? 

Mr. Greene. The criminal record of Joseph Feola, as listed by the 
New York City Police Department, is as follows: 1931, arrested for 



6726 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

carrying a gun, violation of the Sullivan law, sentence suspended; 
1934, arrested as Joseph Surprise, felonious assault, final charge, pistol, 
sentenced to Elmira Reformatory ; 1937, as Joseph Feola, Manhattan, 
homicide, gun, discharged. 

In 1937, as Joseph Feola, New York City, murder, first degree, 
April 28, 1937, sentenced to death by Judge Knott, general sessions. 
On March 5, 1940, the conviction was reversed by the court of appeals. 
Mr. Feola on March 7, 1941, pled guilty to manslaughter, first degree, 
and was sentenced to 7iA to 15 years in Sing Sing State Prison. This 
manslaughter final charge involved the shooting and killing of a police 
officer and the wounding of another police officer. 

That is the complete criminal record of Joseph Feola as known to us. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. So he introduced you to Mr. Squillante ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did you understand Mr. Squillante's back- 
ground was ? 

Mr. John Montesano. From what Mr. Feola told me, he controlled 
the Greater New York Cartmen's Association ; that is exactly how it 
was put to me. 

Mr. Kennedy. The Greater New York Cartmen's Association ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right, sir, and if anyone could do 
anything with the union in getting a good contract or a contract to 
benefit anyone, Jimmy Squillante was the man who could doo it. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you had a talk with Jimmy Squillante ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I had a talk with him, and I told him I 
had an association in Long Island and we had a contract that was going 
to terminate, and I was wondering if he could possibly handle the con- 
tract for us rather than have a strike on our hands, and possibly have 
garbage laying in the street. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did Mr. Squillante tell you? 

Mr. John Montesano. The first thing he did, he got on the phone, 
and he called up the union office, and the reason I know that is because 
he asked the girl to get Bernie Adelstein on the phone. What went on 
during the conversation I don't know, because he was on the other 
side of the room. But then he came back and he said, "Well, first, 
we will have to meet the members." 

He said, "We will have to see just how far we can go in speak- 
ing to these boys, and what their demands are, and what the union 
wants," and so I invited him out to a meeting where we held our 
meetings. He came out there, and he spoke to the fellows, and after 
that he started making new meetings, and new times, and this fellow 
was here and that fellow was there, and the next thing we knew he 
put this guy in office and that guy in office and he controlled the organ- 
ization. 

The Chah^man. He took charge of it? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir ; that is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. He put his people in ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Whom did he bring in and put in these positions ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, his nephew ; there was Jerry Mancuso. 

Mr. Kennedy. How do you spell his name ? 

Mr. John Montesano. M-a-n-c-u-s-o, and he became an executive 
director. First, Mr. Squillante was the executive director, and then 



IMPEOPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6727 

it seems he had to give tliat title up for some reason, he was having 
trouble with the Government, income tax or something. 

The Ch^virman. He had a little income-tax trouble ? 

Mr, John Montesano. Yes, sir, and he gave that position up, and 
lie gave it to Mancuso, and he became labor-relations expert. 

The Chairman. What experience had he had in that capacity ? 

Mr. John Montesano. As a labor-relations expert, I don't know. I 
don't know, Senator. 

The Chairman. Didn't you find something out about these things 
before you turned over your whole organization to them ? 

Mr. John Moni^sano. Sir, the organization wasn't exactly turned 
over to the man. The man came out there, and there was no oppo- 
sition from anyone else. 

The Chairman. He just took it over ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir, and the few people who did oppose 
him eventually got out of the organization like I did, sir. After all 
there was still a majority rule, and if enough of the people didn't 
want to get together to fight for their own business, why should I? 
When I did oppose the man several times, we used to go around and 
around on different things. 

The Chairman. You didn't oppose him at this initial meeting? 

Mr. John Moni'esano. At the initial meeting; no, sir. 

The Chairman. You had employed him ? 

]Mr. John Montesano. I had requested him to come down. 

The Chairman. To help you out ? 

]Mr. John Montesano. Yes. 

The Chairman. And he came down and helped you out? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes; and he helped himself, too. 

The Chairman. Go ahead. 

j\fr. John Montesano. He put all of these people in these posi- 
tions and he negotiated the union contract for us. 

jMr. Kennedy. Who else did he bring out there ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, at one time, I will tell you, Mr. Ken- 
nedy, he brought a lot of people out there with him. When he 
used to come, he came with 4 or 5 different people. I remember one 
time there was a man introduced there as the "pro." And his 
name was, if my memory serves me right, Modica, IM-o-d-i-c-a, a 
gray-headed man with a mustache, wearing glasses, and he sat in 1 
or 2 of our meetings. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that C. Don Modica ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. I think that is the name 
he used. 

Mr. Kennedy. But they called him the "pro" ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes; the professor. 

Mr. I^NNEDY. Do you know why they called him the "pro"? 

Mr. John MonteSxVno. He was supposed to be a professor. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. What was his position out there? What was he 
doing ? 

Mr. John Montesano. To me it seemed like he was in the capacity 
of an adviser. He used to sit at the table with Jinnny and make 
suggestions. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. He would make suggestions? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. He would just sit tliere and make suggestions? 



6728 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. John" Montesano. That is right. At the few meetings he 
attended. This was in Long Island. 

Mr. Kennedy. Pie would just come in and attend your meetings? 

Mr. John JSIontesano. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. He didn't have any official position with your asso- 
ciation ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why didn't you object to this stranger coming in 
and sitting in ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Nobody else objected. Why should I? 
That is how I felt. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ask about him at all ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I asked Squillante who he was. 

Mr. IVENNEDY. What did he say ? 

Mr. John Montesano. He said, "He is just a friend of mine." 

Mr. Kennedy. A friend of his ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. I^nnedy. Did you find anything else out about him? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir ; not at that time. 

Mr. Kennedy. What kind of a professor was he ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I didn't ask. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why didn't you ask more about him ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, it really didn't occur to me. The 
man just used to sit in at the meetings. We used to have meetings 
where at times I used to bring friends of mine. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever get any further identification of him? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, later on as the investigation camo 
along, I found out through Mr. Greene and Mr. Kelly that he was 
associated with a Mr. Anastasia, Albert Anastasia. That is the only 
association. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you see him with anybody ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, in New York, on three different oc- 
casions, I saw him with Albert Anastasia, Jr. This is just before I saw 
the light. This is just before I resigned or was put out of the organ- 
ization. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you saw him yourself, and you knew of his con- 
tact with Albert Anastasia ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir; but this was much later after he 
took over the organization. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to get cleared up about the professor. 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir, 

Mr. Kennedy. How did you first learn of his association with 
Anastasia ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Through his son. 

Mr. Kennedy. Through his son? How did you learn about his 
son? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, we were up in New York. You see, 
after a while they no longer had board of director meetings in Long 
Island, and we were told to go to Madison Avenue and have our 
meetings. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was an interlocking meeting between your 
association and the association in New York City ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right, sir. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6729 

Mr. Kennedy. So you had your meetings together in New York 
City? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. All right. 

Mr. John Montesano. We went all the way to New York, and while 
we were there, on three different occasions, I saw this young boy come 
in, and it seemed to me that the professor was tutoring him. That 
is the truth. He was tutoring him. 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, how 

Mr. John Montesano. He had a blackboard and he had all kinds 
of symbols and numerals and different things. It didn't bother me at 
first, but after the third time I said to myself, "Wlio is this fellow?" 
I asked Beansie Fazula, "Who is this fellow ?" And he turned around 
and tells me "That is Albert's boy." I drew my own conclusions after 
that. 

Mr. Kennedy. Just on the basis that it was Albert's boy ? Didn't he 
say Albert who ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, it was common knowledge. I mean, 
after a while I found out that Jimmy was supposed to be — this is 
later, after I got out of the organization. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Jimmy was what ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Linked to Albert Anastasia. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you had the tutor of Albert Anastasia's son and 
Jimmy, who was very close to Albert, you had them in your as- 
sociation ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you knew when he said it was Albert's boy, you 
knew it was Albert Anastasia ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes ; but then I figured the link between the 
two of them. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ask any more questions after that ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No ; I didn't ask questions. 

Mr. Kennedy. You didn't complain or object about the tutoring 
that was going on in your organization ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You just let it go ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Was it safer to let it go ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I felt so. 

The Chairman. You felt it would be a little safer just not to ask 
questions but to let it go ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right, Mr. McClellan. 

Mr. McNamara. Mr. Chairman? 

The Chairman. Senator McNamara. 

Senator McNamara. This fellow you identified as the sergeant at 
arms, did you hire him ? Did you put him on the payroll ? 

Mr. John Montesano. He got no salary, Mr. McNamara. 

Senator McNamara. He got no salaiy ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir. 

Senator McNamara. What was the job of the sergeant at arms? 
To begin with, was the sergeant at arms of your organization or of 
the union ? Which ? 

Mr. John Montesano. The employers association, sir. 

Senator McNamara. The employers ? 



6730 IMPROPER AcnvrriES in the labor field 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. What were his duties ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Originally his duties were to make sure 
that no unauthorized people were at our meetings, people that 
didn't belong to our association, to keep order, generally. Well, I 
don't know what else you want to say. I guess that is all. 

Senator McNamara. It sounds like the ordinary function of a 
sergeant at arms. 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. Stationed inside the room where you held 
your meeting? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. lie was to maintain order and see that nobody 
but members got in or out, no unauthorized person ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Originally ; yes. 

Senator McNamara. He got no salary ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Not to my knowledge. 

Senator McNamara. How did he make a living? Do you know? 

Mr. John Montesano. He had a private carting company, under 
the name of Rapid Rubbish Removal. I think I stated that earlier. 

Senator McNamara. Did he have several trucks or one truck? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir; he had one truck. 

Senator McNamara. One truck ? 

Mr. John Montesano. One truck. 

Senator McNamara. He could make a living with one truck, in 
your estimation ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. You said there were six members of your 
firm who were members of the teamsters union. Were any of them 
officers of the teamsters miion ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. No, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Were you both members of the teamsters 
union ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

]\Ir. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Did you participate in the union meetings 
or did you just pay dues ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. When we were notified of a union meet- 
ing, we attended. 

Senator McNamara. You attended ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. When we were notified. 

Senator McNamara. Do you mean you were not notified of some 
meetings ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Well, we were only notified in the 5 
years, the 6 years that we belonged to the union, we were notified of 
roughly about 4 meetings in that length of time. 

Senator McNamara. You were notified of less than one union meet- 
ing a year ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamar.\. Do tliey hold regular meetings ? 

Mr. Anthony INIontesano. Not to my knowledge, sir. 

Senator McNA]\rARA. How many members are there in the union ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. I would imagine there were — on Nassau 
there are a couple hundred at least. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITTES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6731 

Senator McNamara. A couple himdred ? 

Mr, Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. And you were notified of meetings less than 
one a year ? 

Mr. xVnthony Montesano. Just about that. 

Senator McNamara. Do you think other members were only noti- 
fied of the same number of meetings ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir ; I am almost sure of that. 

Senator McNamara. It was a peculiarly functioning union ; wasn't 
it? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Who was the president of the union ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. At the beginning it was this Mr. Ber- 
nard Adelstein. Later on, Mr. Carmine Valento took over. Pie was 
made president and Adelstein made secretary-treasurer. 

Senator McNamara. Did this Adelstein work at the business ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. I imagine so, sir. 

Senator McNamara. You don't know ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. No. 

Senator McNamara. You don't know who his employer was ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. I don't think he actually worked in the 
carting industry ; no. He actually worked for the union, is what he 
did. 

Senator IMcNamara. He had never been in the carting business ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. I don"t think so ; no. 

Senator McNamara. This also goes for his successor, I take it ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. I think Mr. Valento was. I think he 
worked for an outfit in New York, if I am not mistaken. 

Senator McNamara. How far is East Meadow from New York 
City? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. About 30 miles, sir. 

Senator McNamara. You say that your organization was chartered 
by the State of New York ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right, sir. 

Senator McNamara. This was an A. F. of L. union, American Fed- 
eration of Labor union, and they had a charter from the A. F. of L. ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Who did you sign contracts with ? You as an 
employer sign contracts with the East Meadow community? ^Vlio 
did you sign your contract Avith to remove the garbage ? 

oSIr. Anthony jMontesano. At one time it was entirely private. 
What we did is we made contracts individually with each and every 
liome owner in the section. For instance, if there was 500 people in 
the section we made 500 contracts, with each individual homeowner, 
to remove the garbage at a set price per month. 

Senator McNamara. With each one of the individual homeowners? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. That is true. 
Senator McNamar^v. You didn't have a permit to operate? 
Mr, Anthony Montesano. Yes; we had a permit by the Nassau 
County Board of Health. That was the only permit we had. 
Senator McNamara. The Nassau County Board of Health ? 
Mr, Anthony Montesano. Yes, 

Senator McNamara, And you were required to have a permit to 
collect the jrarbaiie? 



6732 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIEIiD 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. What is that, a local ordinance ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes ; m Nassau. 

Senator McNamara. Then did you have to have a contract to dump 
somewhere ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Well, you had to sign a contract with 
the township of Hempstead, due to the fact that you were working in 
the township of Hempstead, to dump all refuse in their incinerator 
at a set rate. We paid $5 a ton. 

Senator McNamara. $5 a ton ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. What was the procedure in getting this per- 
mit from Nassau County? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. The procedure is very simple. All it 
entitled was to obtain an application, fill it out, and bring your truck 
down to the board of health to have it inspected, seeing that it passed 
all their rules and regulations, that it was correctly painted and cor- 
rectly leaded. They would issue the permit within a few minutes. 

Senator McNamara. How much did you pay ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. I think it was, if I am not mistaken, 
about $5 a year, at the very most. 

Senator McNamara. Anybody can get a permit ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Anybody. 

Senator McNamara. There was no racket as far as controlling 
permits ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Definitely not. However, sir, I would 
like to say that since the district attorney of Nassau County started 
his investigation into the carting industry, they have altered the law 
considerably, due to the fact that now if you have a criminal record, 
you must state it, and they must know who else is involved in your 
business, directly or indirectly. 

Senator McNamara. This is in the securing of the permit? 

Mr. John Montesano. This is now, yes, sir, at the present time. 

Senator McNamara. It seems as far as the local officials are con- 
cerned, this would be an easy way to control it, by the issuing or with- 
holding of permits to improper people. 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. It seems this might be easily the key to clean- 
ing up the situation. 

Mr. John Montesano. I think that is what Mr. Galatto, our 
Nassau County district attorney, had on his mind. 

Senator McNamara. Thank you. 

Senator Ives. Has this matter been largely cleaned up now in 
Nassau ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, sir, the association has been. 

Senator Ives. That is what I mean. 

Mr. John Montesano. Let's put it that way, yes, sir. The asso- 
ciation has been. 

Senator Ives. The rest of it has not been ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir. 

Senator Ives. Thank you. 

The Chairman. Do I understand that you were self-employed, 
actually ? 



IMPROPER ACnVmES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6733 

Mr. John Montesano. We still are, sir. 

The Chairman. You still are ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. But you had to belong to the union ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right, sir. 

The Chairman. And. then you had to contract with the union? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What kind of service did the union give you when 
you made a contract with them? It couldn't fix your wages, could 
it ? You were working for yourself. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. That is correct. 

The Chairman. "VVliat service did the union perform for you ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Well, you had to be in the miion, sir. 

The Chairman. I understand that. You had to be in. But what 
service did you get out of it ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. None whatsoever. Everything we got 
we paid for. 

The Chairman. What did you get that you paid for ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. We have a welfare benefit we paid $3 
a week for, and we got hospitalization from it. 

The Chairman. Hospitalization ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. I am talking with respect to wages and working 
conditions. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Nothing whatsoever. 

The Chairman. Yet you have to belong ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. If you don't, what happens ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Well, the first thing that would happen 
is if you had any commercial work, that would be any large accounts, 
A. & P.'s, or big markets like that, they would go in there and consider 
you a nonunion man and you would lose them automatically. That 
is the main reason why we had to join the union. But because we had 
Hill's markets, and A. & P., and such as that, we had to join. 

The Chairman. In other words, if you had accounts like with 
department stores ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. That is right, commercial accounts. 

The Chairman. In other words, if you did not belong to the union, 
even though you owned your own truck and were driving it yourself, if 
you did not belong to the union, you would lose that account because 
the union would picket the store or something ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Definitely. Immediately. 

The Chairman. I am trying to find what service was rendered by 
the union so far as working conditions and so forth. You said the 
association has been cleaned up. What hasn't been cleaned up ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Our union, sir. 

The Chairman. What is there about the union that needs cleaning 
up? 

Mr. John Montesano. I think the whole thing, sir, has to be cleaned 
up, to tell you the truth. There is nothing right with the union, with 
our union. 

The Chairman. Nothing? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir. 

89330 — 57 — pt. 17 6 



6734 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. What is wrong with it ? Wliat is not right with it ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, No. 1, sir, it is lilce my brother just ex- 
plained, these secondary boycotts, I guess that is what you would call 
them. If a man has a commercial stop, why should he be forced to 
join the union ? These practices are still being practiced in New York, 
with the unions. 

The Chairman. In other words, the union membership is still im- 
posed on all of you ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Mr. Anthony MoNTESANO. Definitely. 

The Chairman. You pay $3, 1 believe, for some benefit plan ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

The Chairman. How much else do you pay in addition to that for 
union services ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. $6 a month in dues. 

The Chairman. $6 a month in dues plus 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. $3 per week for welfare benefits. 

The Chairman. $3 a week for welfare benefits. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That is $12 a month, counting 4 weeks a month ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. That is correct. 

Mr. John Montesano. It is $18. 

The Chairman. $18 a month you pay ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. For each man. 

The Chairman. For each man ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you know where that money goes ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Well, the welfare money is supposed to 
go into the welfare fund to pay for our hospitalization and Blue 
Cross, and the dues are to maintain the union. 

Tlie Chairman. $6 a month per man to maintain the union, for no 
service rendered ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. None to my knowledge. I mean, we 
only have 

The Chairman. How long have you been in the union ? 

Mr. Anthony^ Montesano. About 5 years now. 

The Chairman. Five years? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do they tell you how much to pay yourself ? 

Mr. Anthony" Montesano. No; not ourselves. They tell us what 
to pay our men. 

The Chairman. You have only one employee ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Just one employee, and he gets union 
scale. 

The Chairman. What is union scale ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. $89 for chauffeurs and $82 for helpers; 
$89 a week for chauffeurs and $82 a week for helpers. 

The Chairman. $89 for the fellow who drives the truck and $82 for 
the fellow who helps him load and so forth ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. That is correct. 

The Chairman. I am trying to get the picture. 

Mr. Kennedy". In addition to that, you don't have any right to vote ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No. 

Mr. Kennedy'. You have no riffht to run for office ? 



IMPROPER ACnVITTES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6735 

Mr, John Montesano. No, sir. 

The Chaieman. Do you mean as a member of the union you can't 
vote ? 

Mr. John Montesaxo. Nothing. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. That is correct. 

The Chairman. If you go to a meeting, you can't vote? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. You are not allowed to speak at a meet- 
ing. 

The Chairman. You are not allowed to speak ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I am surprised they even let us in the union 
hall, believe me. 

The Chairman. I mean the question asked you here about did you 
attend union meetings, and you said when you got notice. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes. 

The Chairman. And you had four notices in 5 years ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And you did attend ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you try to speak ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. ^^^lat happens to you ? 

Mr. John IMontesano. You are out of order. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. If you raise your hand and ask a ques- 
tion, they overlook you. They ask everybody else in the room and they 
say "You are an employer. You have nothing to say here." 

The Chairman. You are an employer, you have nothing to say ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Have you tried to vote? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. I don't think there has been any ballots 
taken on anything, Mr. McClellan. 

The Chairman. No ballots taken in the union ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. None to my Imowledge. All they do is 
if they are trying for a new contract, we go — w-e went down to the 
meeting 2 weeks ago and on the new contract, all that was said, Mr. 
Adelstein got up there and after a long and lengthy speech, about 2 
hours, he said, "Well, these are the demands that the people in New 
York want, the cartmen in New York City. I think it is a good idea 
to go along with it." 

The men of course said "Yes." That was it. "All in favor say aye," 
and everybody says aye. 

The Chairman. That is a vote of some kind, isn't it? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Well 

The Chairman. There wasn't anybody voting no? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. They just don't vote no. 

The Chairman. ^yhJ ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. I have never been to a meeting yet 

The Chairman. Suppose they felt like voting no? 

Mr. John Montesano. I guess you could feel like it, but you can't 
say it, sir. Nobody ever said it. 

The Chairman. ^YhJ ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I don't know. 

The Chairman. You are bound to have some reason. Can't you 
make anv deductions? 



6736 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. We are not allowed to say anything. 
As employers, we are not allowed to say anything at all. We can't 
vote, right off the bat, and secondly, if we have anything to say what- 
soever, we are out of order, because we are employers. 

The Chairman. You can't vote even aye ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. We have to go along with the majority^ 
I imagine. 

The Chairman. You have to do what you are told ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Definitely. 

The Chairman. Who does all the telling now ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Mr. Adelstein does all the talking. 

The Chairman. All the talking? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. All the talking. 

The Chairman. No one else does ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. No, sir. 

The Chairman. In other words, he has it under control ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Definitely. 

The Chairman. No doubt about it ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. Out of the 200 members of the union, how 
many are employers ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. I would say most companies have 2 or 
3 functions, and most of them are employers. I would say there is 
only one large outfit that has quite a few workingmen. He has, I 
would say, about 30 or 40 in Nassau. 

Senator McNamara. Probably 60 percent or more would be em- 
ployers ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. I would say at least 50 percent, sir. 

Senator McNamara. These 60 percent have no right to vote ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. None whatsoever. 

Senator McNamailv. Because they are employers ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. You say you get no service as employers 
from the union. You still belong to it because it is more or less 
necessary ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Don't they sort of serve as policemen for 
your business ? Don't they decide what stops you can make and what 
stops you don't make ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. No. 

Senator McNamara. Who decides this ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Actually, no one decides it. What 
they do in a case like that is as long as you are not touching what 
they call commercial stops, you don't have to belong to the union, 
because they can't force you into the union. 

Senator McNamara. Then it is voluntary, belonging to the union ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. If you want commercial work, you 
have to belong to the union. 

Senator McNamara. But as far as picking up from the house- 
holder, you don't have to ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. No, there they can't do anything to you. 

Senator McNamara. How much a month do you charge a house- 
holder ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. The last figure was $2.50 per month. 



IMPROPER ACTIYITTES EST THE' LABOR FIELD 6737 

Senator McNamara. $2 ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. $2.50 per month. 

Senator McNamara. $2.50 per month. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. That is 4 service days a week we give, 
4 pickups a week. 

Mr. John Montesano. That would be about 12 pickups a month, 
roughly. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Or 16. 

Mr. John Montesano. Sixteen. Excuse me. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, as we understand it, also, about a 
third of this union are employers, and there are approximately six- 
teen or eighteen hundred members of the union, Mr. Adelstein's 
union, and approximately a third are employers. 

The Chairman. Are we going to be able to show, Mr. Counsel, 
where the dues, the $6 a month, goes ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes; as the investigation develops, we are going 
into how that money was used. I might say initially that 75 cents 
of the $6 goes to the officers' retirement fund. 

The Chairman. Just officers ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Officers' retirement fund, of which Mr. Adelstein is 
the principal beneficiary, Mr. Adelstein and his family. 

The Chairman. All right. This fellow Squillante, are you going 
into that subject? 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to get one other thing cleared up. On 
the professor, where the meetings took place in New York City, where 
the professor was teaching young Albert ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Where did those meetings take place ? 

Mr. John Montesano. On Madison Avenue and 80th Street. That 
was in the Greater New York Cartmen Association office or head- 
quarters. 

Mr Kennedy. The Greater New York Cartmen Association? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Your association came in and met with them ; is that 
right? 

Mr. John Montesano. Originally we started out just our board of 
directors had to meet in New York. Then I received a telegram 
from Mr. Squillante that it was voted upon, by who I don't know, 
but it was voted upon, that a merger existed between the Inter- 
County, the Greater New York Cartmen, and the Suffolk Cartmen 
Association. 

Mr. Kennedy. Inter-County, Suffolk, and Greater New York? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. The three associations in the Greater New York 
area? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. And we used to have one big 
board of directors' meeting. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you were informed that you had combined and 
you were going to have one meeting? 

Mr. Jokn Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had you voted on that ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir; we weren't even aware that there 
was a meeting pertaining to that. 



6738 IMPROPEIR ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 

Mr, Kennedy. Were you on the board of directors ? 

Mr, John Montesano, Yes, 

Mr. Kennedy, And you never voted on it ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir. At that time I was also vice presi- 
dent of the Inter-County. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never heard of it ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were just told that you were to meet in there ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I received a telegram and that was the end 
of it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wlio was the telegram from ? 
~ Mr. John Montesano. Squillante. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you were just informed all of these organiza- 
tions had merged and were going to meet in New York ? 

Mr. John Montesano, Right, I think I have the telegram here. 
It is 2 years old. 

The Chairman, Do you know who voted on that ? 

Ml*. John Montesano. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you ever inquire ? 

Mr, John Montesano (reading) : 

Effective as of Tuesday — 

this is a direct quote from the telegram — 

effective as of Tuesday, January 25, 1955, a merger is announced between and 
among the Inter-County Cartmen's Association, Inc., the Greater New York 
Cartmen's Association, Inc., and the Suffolk Cartmen's Association, Inc. Such 
an association of associations strengthens each individual group because of 
numbers and redounds to the benefit and general welfare of all participants iu 
the private sanitation industry as well as to the general public welfare. 

Vincent Valenti, Executive Director. 

The Chairman, He had become executive director of the merged 
associations ? 

Mr. John ISIontesano. That is right, sir, according to this. 

The Chairman. That telegram may be printed in full in the record. 
What is the date of the telegram ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I think it is the 25th, sir, January 25, 1955. 

The Chairman. All right, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Kennedy. Just on the professor, what subjects was he teaching 
young Albert ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I really don't know, Mr. Kennedy. All I 
know is that to me it looked like algebra or something a little deeper 
than I can understand. I w^ill be honest with j^ou. But he had 
symbols on the blackboard and Albert was asking him questions, and he 
was answering. 'Wliat they were, I really wasn't that interested. I 
just glanced over and I seen him and I asked Fazula, who was the 
closest to me, I said "Who was that," and he explained to me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know anything else about Vincent Squillante 
when you brought him out to Long Island, did you know anything 
about him other than the fact that he had been associated with the 
New York City Cartmen? 

Mr, John Montesano, No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know anything else about his sources of 
income or his associations or anything like that ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir. 



IMPROPER ACTIVmES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6739 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not? 

Mr. John Montesano. I did not. 

Mr. Kennedy. "\Miat about the man that he put in to take his place, 
Jerry Mancuso ? Did you know anything about him ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir ; my only knowledge of Mancuso was 
that he was a nephew of Squillante. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you knew nothing about them ? 

Mr. John Montesano, No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You knew nothing about their backgrounds or 
associations ? 

Mr. John Moni'esano. No, sir ; none at all. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, I wonder if we could interrupt Mr. 
Montesano's testimony just to put on a little bit of the background of 
Mr. Squillante and Mr. Mancuso. 

The witness is a witness from the Narcotics Bureau. He is head of 
the special investigations squad, with particular reference to the Mafia. 
He does undercover work. Mr. Anslinger has requested that he not 
have his picture taken, either by still cameras or by television cameras. 

The Chairman. Is he now in the Government service ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

The Chairman. The cameras, movie, still and otherwise, will be 
inoperative during the time this witness testifies. 

Call the witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Joseph Amato. 

The Chairman. Will you be sworn, please ? 

You do solemnly sw^ear the evidence you shall give before this Sen- 
ate select committee will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but 
the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Amato, I do, sir. 

TESTIMONY OF JOSEPH AMATO 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Amato. My name is Joseph Amato. I work at the Bureau of 
Narcotics in New York City, where I have been stationed for 17 years. 
I also live in New York. I am in charge of the section of enforcement 
relating to Mafia gangsters and traffickers. 

The Chairman. How long have you been in charge of it ? 

Mr. Amato. About 6 years. 

The Chairman. How long have you been with the department ? 

Mr. Amato. About 17 years. 

The Chairman. All right, Mr. Kennedy, proceed. 

Mr, Kennedy. In addition to your duties as head of this unit, you 
also do undercover work yourself, Mr. Amato ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes ; I have. 

Mr. Kennedy. This unit was set up about 6 years ago to deal chiefly 
with those who were prominent in the ]\Iafia ; is that right ? 

Mr. Amato. Major Italian racketeers. 

Mr. Kennedy. In and around the New York area or throughout the 
country ? 

Mr. Amato. Primarily in the New York area. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you are head of a squad that deals with that; 
is that riirht ? 



6740 IMPROPER AcnvrriES in the' labor field 

Mr, Amato. That is right. 

Mr, Kennedy, In the course of the work that you have done, or 
the agents under you, have you come across the name of Vmcent J. 
Squillante? 

Mr, Amato, Yes, sir, 

Mr, Kennedy. Have you also come across the name of Mr, Jerry 
Mancuso ? 

Mr, Amato, Yes, sir, 

Mr, Kennedy, Could you tell the committee first the general repu- 
tation of Mr, Vincent J. Squillante, as far as the work that you are 
doing ? 

Mr. Amato. He is considered by me and my New York office as a 
major source of supply for narcotics, as well as being a prominent 
racketeer. 

Mr, Kennedy, Have you received reports at your office over the 
period of many years on Mr, Vincent Squillante ? 

Mr, Amato, Yes, sir ; we have, 

Mr, Kennedy, Is there any particular area in which he is alleged 
to be active ? 

Mr, Amato, He has been quite active, in addition to the narcotic 
traffic, in policy and dock rackets, 

Mr, Kennedy, In the dock rackets ? 

Mr. Amato, Yes, sir, 

Mr. Kennedy, In policy and narcotics ; is that right? 

Mr, Amato, Yes, sir, 

Mr. Kennedy. He has been prominent in all three ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. x\nd he is considered by your unit as a major figTire 
in this and a major racketeer ; is that right 'i 

Mr. Amato. Yes, he is. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have any particular incident that you could 
tell us about the activities of Mr. Vincent J. Squillante? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell us that ? 

Mr, Amato, In 1949, our New York office had received informa- 
tion — in fact, it was known — that he was the source of supply for 
several cases which had been developed and concluded. 

Mr. Kennedy. What do you mean by source of supply ? 

Mr. Amato. He was one of the major sources of supply for these 
cases which we had developed. 

Mr, Kennedy. Of narcotics ? 

Mr, Amato, Of narcotics. We had nothing tangible at the time, 
just hearsay information, 

Mr, Kennedy, I see. 

Mr. Amato. In 1949, my partner and I developed a special em- 
ployee, a gangster from that area who had done 26 years from Sing 
Sing, and he agreed to assist us on our investigations of Squillante, 

Mr, Kenne'dy, Had he heard from Squillante before that? 

]Mr, Amato. He had had several conversations with Squillante, 
and he incorporated this in a narrative statement which we took at 
the time. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that was in connection with Squillante's activ- 
ities in the narcotics field ? 

Mr. Amato. In the narcotics traffic. 



IMPRiOPER ACnVriTElS IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6741 

Mr. Kennedy. Before you get into this particular incident, how 
did SquiHante operate, generally, according to the investigation that 
you had made ? 

Mr. Amato. According to our special employee, SquiHante had in- 
formed him that he wouldn't touch narcotics personally, that he 
would supervise deliveries and all that, but he personally would not 
touch narcotics. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. He was too big a figure to touch it himself ? 

Mr. Amato. We assumed that much. 

Mr. Ejennedy. That he would give it to people that were working 
under him to actually make the deliveries ; is that right ? 

Mr. Amato. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Ejinnedy. Wliat occurred after that ? 

Mr. Ajviato. My partner and I placed SquiHante under surveillance 
over a period of weeks, and while we saw him meet with the local 
known criminals in that area, we also saw him meet with other col- 
ored people in the area, and SquiHante we apprehended and detained 
four Negroes whom we had followed. As a result, as you know, we 
made a tax case. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you explain about foHowing the Negroes 
and what occurred there ? 

Mr. Amato. We apprehended these Negroes after some surveH- 
lance, and we found them in possession of policy number slips. We 
turned them over to the local police and they subsequently were con- 
victed on that charge. They gave us some verbal statements at the 
time, but subsequently we turned the information over to our intelli- 
gence unit. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who did they give you the statements about? 

Mr. Amato. About SquiHante. 

Mr. Kennedy. They said they were taking instructions and orders 
from SquiHante ? 

Mr. Amato. That they were turning the policy numbers over to 
him. 

Mr. Kennedy. You turned that information over to the intelli- 
gence bureau ? 

Mr. Amato. And they subsequently made a tax case based upon 
income that he had derived in years in which the colored operators 
had been operating for him. 

Mr. Kennedy. They made a tax case against Vincent J. SquiHante, 
based upon the policy rackets that he was in ? 

Mr. Amato. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that was originally instigated by your arrest 
of these four Negroes ; is that right ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes. 

Mr, Kennedy. This was during the period of time in which you 
had this informant who told you about Squillante's activities in the 
narcotics field. Was he still working with SquiHante during this 
period of time? 

Mr. Amato. During this period of time, he was not exactly work- 
ing with SquiHante, but he would meet with him occasionally. When 
SquiHante offered to sell him narcotics, we suggested to our special 
employee that he make a purchase for us under our supervision. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did he say ? How much did he say he would 
seH? 



6742 IMPROPER AcnvrriES in the labor field 

Mr. Amato. Well, he said he would only sell in pound quantities, 
at $1,600 a pound. 

Mr. Kennedy. $1,600 a pound. What was that for? 

Mr. Amato. That was for a pound of heroin. 

Mr. Kennedy. Heroin ? 

Mr. Amato. A pound of heroin. We had previously instructed our 
informant, however, to get a sample and to limit the purchase to a 
smaller quantity. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that a large amount ? 

Mr. Amato. A pound of heroin is a lot of heroin. 

Mr. Kennedy. O. K. 

Mr. Amato. According to instructions which our informant had 
received from Squillante, Squillante had called his nephew, Jerry 
Mancuso 

Mr. Kennedy. Jerry Mancuso? 

Mr. Amato. Jerry Mancuso — into the restaurant where this last 
conversation had taken place, and instructed Mancuso to take care of 
the informer. As a result, a meeting was made for the following day 
for the delivery of 1 ounce of heroin for $250. 

Mr. Kennedy. So Squillante called in Jerry Mancuso, introduced 
him to your informer, and told him to take care of it ? 

Mr. Amato. I believe the informer knew him anyway. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he was to deliver an ounce of heroin to him the 
following day? 

Mr. Amato. The following day. At the appointed time, I saw 
Mancuso meet with the informant and sell him an ounce of heroin. 

Mr. Kennedy. You saw that meeting? 

Mr. Amato. We saw that meeting. 

Mr. Kennedy. Prior to your informant meeting with him, did you 
give him marked bills ? 

Mr. Amato. Well, we used the usual investigative procedure. In 
that case it would be to search the informer just prior to his meeting 
the suspect, and, having searched him and having found no narcotics 
or contraband, we furnished him with Government funds. Pie re- 
mained constantly within our view. 

Mr. Kennedy. When he came back, when he returned, did he have 
the ounce of heroin? 

Mr. Amato. Yes; as a matter of fact, on that occasion Mancuso 
arrived with the brother of a previously convicted narcotic trafficker. 

Mr. Kennedy. What ? 

Mr. Amato. He had arrived with the brother of a previously con- 
victed narcotic trafficker from that area. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wlien they had this meeting ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us what occurred, what happened, 
after that? 

Mr. Amato. Well, shortly thereafter our special employee got him- 
self arrested for armed robbery, and we had to close out several cases. 
We couldn't locate Mancuso. Wlien we tried to prosecute him, in view 
of the nature, the character of our special employee, and we had only 
made one purchase, the prosecutors were reluctant. 

Mr. Kennedy. This informant of yours was used successfully 
against a number of narcotics people ; is that right ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes. 



IMPRiOPER ACTIVITIEIS IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6743 

Mr, Kennedy. But the fact that you only made one purchase from 
Mancuso, and the fact of his bad record in Sing Sing 

Mr. Amato. He had been involved in four felonies, I think, in 
New York State. 

Mr. Kennedy. You felt you could not use him ? 

Mr. Amato. We could have used him, but our case was not as strong 
as we ordinarily present. 

Mr. Kennedy. As I understand, you could not wait to make a sec- 
ond or third purchase, because you had to move against these other 
people that were involved ? 

Mr. Amato. That is correct. 

Mr. KENNEDY. Bringing it up to date even more, what is Mr. 
Squillante's general reputation at the present time? Are you still 
receiving reports, or have you received reports over the period of the 
past year on Mr. Squillante ? 

Mr. Amato. We are still working on Squillante. 

Mr. Kennedy. You are receiving reports regarding his activities in 
the drug field ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is, narcotics. Just on this question of this 
pound of heroin, how many — what do you call it ? Decks ? 

Mr, Amato. That is a fantastic sum. That is a half a kilo. A kilo 
has 1.2 pounds. A pound would constitute — well, there are 437 grains 
to an ounce, and 16 ounces, and the average addict would only use — • 
well, he would have to cut that several times before he would use it. 
The usual dose would be 5 grains, maybe. So it is a lot of heroin. 

Mr. Kennedy. It would be about 6,000 decks ; would it not ? 

Mr. Amato. Probably more than that. 

Mr. Kennedy. Over 6,000 ? 

Mr. Amato. Well, I haven't stopped to figure it out yet. 

Mr. Kennedy. Each one of those sold for about $10 at that time. 

Mr. Amato. At that time, I believe heroin was selling for about 
$2 a grain, roughly. 

Mr. Kennedy. About $10 a deck ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes ; $10 a deck. 

Mr. Kennedy. So that would have been worth over $60,000 ? 

Mr. Amato. It is worth several thousand dollars. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is, when it was sold subsequently. 

Senator Ives. Mr. Chairman ? 

The Chairman. Senator Ives. 

Senator Ives, I would like to ask the witness a question. 

I don't want to put the witness on any spot. How well are you 
acquainted with the Mafia ? 

Mr. Amato. Very well, sir. 

Senator Ives. There is a question I am directing at you which is 
rather a leading question. You have heard these characters that we 
have been talking about this morning? Have you been here through 
this testimony this morning? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir. 

Senator Ives. To your knowledge, are these people with these crim- 
inal records that have been mentioned, members of the Mafia ? 

Mr. Amato, I have only heard the name of Squillante and Mancuso 
mentioned. With those I am familiar. I would say "Yes," But Man- 
cuso on a lower level than Squillante. 



6744 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE^ LABOR FIEILD 

Senator Ives. From your knowledge of the Mafia, would you say 
that this operation being carried on, from which the gentlemen before 
us are the victims, is something being operated by the Mafia ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that is what you consider the Mafia ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir. 

Senator Ives. The Mafia, as I recall, is the old Black Hand ? 

Mr. Amato. It is the old secret society. 

Senator Ives. Mr, Kennedy ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Is there any organization such as the Mafia, or is 
that just the name given to the hierarchy in the Italian underworld? 

Mr. Amato. That is a big question to answer. But we believe that 
there does exist today in the United States a society, loosely organized, 
for the specific purpose of smuggling narcotics and committing other 
crimes in the United States. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that is what you consider the Mafia ? 

Mr. Amato. It has its core in Italy and it is nationwide. In fact, 
international. 

Mr. Kennedy. You would consider Vincent J. Squillante an im- 
portant figure ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Were you also aware of his tie-in with Albert 
Anastasia ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, we were. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could I ask you about a few other people ? If you 
don't wish to answer, don't. 

For instance, Mr. Ricci. Do you know anything about Anthony 
Kicci? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is he a figure in the Mafia ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. An important figure ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he have a nickname as Mr. Mafia? Did you 
ever hear of that ? 

Mr. Amato. No, I don't recall that. But I know that he has been 
known as Tony Goebles. 

Mr. Kennedy. Tony Goebles ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. But he has been prominent ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir. In fact, we have him listed way up in the 
Mafia. 

Mr. Kennedy. Johnnie Biello. Do you know him ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir, 

Mr. Kennedy, Is he also in the Mafia? 

Mr. Amato, Yes, sir. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Frank Casino ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir. We don't know too much about him. 

Mr. Kennedy. Anthony Carfano? 

Mr. Amato. Yes. He is well known to us, 

Mr. IvENNEDY, The Bum Brothers ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Benny the Bum ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes. We know him very well. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIEI>D 6745 

Mr. Kennedy. That is Benjamin De Martino ? 

Mr. Amato. And Teddy. 

Mr. Kennedy. Both of them ? 

Mr. Amato. Both. 

Mr. Kennedy. How about Jolin "Buster" Ardito ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes. 

Mr. I\JENNEDY. He is very prominent ? 

Mr. Amato. Very prominent. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Joe Feohi? 

Mr. Amato. I don't know too much about Feola. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Vito Genovese? 

Mr. Amato. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Dante Gallo? 

Mr. Amato. Yes. Dante Gallo has come to us only in recent 
times. 

Mr. Ivennedy. lannacine? 

Mr. Amato. Yes. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Louis lannacine? 

Mr. Amato. No, I don't know that one. 

Mr. I^JENNEDY. I-a-n-n-a-c-i-n-e. He is also known as Benny Indi- 
viglio ? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, we know him very well. 

Mr. Kennedy. You do know him? 

Mr. Amato. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Under that name. 

How about Nick Rattenni ? Rocco Mazzie ; do you know him ? 

Mr. Amato. We know him very well. In fact, we have always 
associated him with Squillante. 

Mr. Ivennedy. He is one of Squillante's closest friends; is that 
right? 

Mr. Amato. Yes. 

Mr. I^NNEDY. Frank Scalise? 

Mr. Amato. Well, he is gone. 

Mr. Kennedy. Thank you very much. 

The Chairman. Counsel advises us that Mr. Anslinger, the Chief 
of the Narcotics Bureau, has been very cooperative with the com- 
mittee, and has made information available to us that establishes 
links that the committee is interested in. We are vei-y grateful to 
liim for that assistance. 

All right, Mr. Counsel. 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN MONTESANO ANB ANTHONY MONTESANO— 

Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. On Vincent J. Squillante, did you know anything 
about the background of him when he was brought to your associa- 
tion? 

Mr. John Montesano. Not a bit ; no, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. He came out and spoke to the association originally 
in 1955, and you accepted him at that time? 

Mr. John Montesano. It was, I think, November of 1954. 

Mr. Kennedy. Noveml)er of 1954? 

Mr. John Montesano. Would you clarify that for me? 



6746 IMPROPEIR ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. Was he given an official position with your associa- 
tion ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Not right away. He was just goin^ to 
negotiate the contract. He was going to sit in on it, with the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was brought out, as I understand it, chiefly be- 
cause of the fact that he had a close association with the union? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And would be able to do something with the union 
for you ; is that right ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. For the association ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Subsequently, perhaps not at the first meeting, but 
subsequently, as he attended these meetings, did he tell you how the 
association should operate, and what you should do ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir; he did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you describe some of the things that he said 
should be put into efTect as far as the association was concerned ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

He brought out the point of what we call property rights. In the 
event a man has a customer or a stop, and another customer — and that 
customer moves f I'om tliat stop, that man claims that empty store and 
his customer. No matter what customer shall move back into the 
store, that man has the property rights. No other cartman can go 
in there and solicit the stop. 

This was one of the basic things brought up to us. 

(Members of the select committee present at this point in the pro- 
ceedings : Senators McClellan, Ives, and McNamara.) 

Mr. Kennedy. In other words, it would be a monopoly. 

Mr. John Montesano. If a man had a stop, it was his customer, and 
no one could take it from him. The only way he could take the stop 
from him was if the board of directors decided that the man was in 
arrears, or he was a delinquent association member, and they would 
throw him out and then his work would become open work for every- 
one. 

Mr. Kennedy. To go one step further, what if someone did jump 
someone else, and did take his ]jroperty rights, then what did happen ? 

Mr, John Montesano. We would have meetings at the board of 
directors in New York, and we would penalize the man in some cases, 
$10 for every dollar collected from the customer. For instance, if the 
customer was paying $10 a montli, the cartmen who took the stop had 
to pay to the cartman who previously had it, $100. 

Mr. Kennedy. So there was this penalty clause of 10 to 1. 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Anybody who jumped someone else's property rights 
would have to pay a penalty of 10 to 1 ? 

Mr. John Montesano. In some cases, even the 10 to 1 didn't help. 
He had to give the customer back, or he had to give in some cases 2 
customers to the 1. You see, sometimes a person wouldn't accept the 
penalty, and he would rather have 2 customers for the 1 customer that 
he lost. 

Mr. Kennedy. 'V'^Hio made the decision regarding this ? 

Mr. John Montesano. It was brought u]) at the board of dh-ectors' 
meeting, but the last say-so had to be through Jimmie. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6747 

Mr. Kenistedy. Vincent Squillante ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You had some experience regarding these boards ; is 
that right ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. They are sort of courts ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kenedy. Is that what you consider them — courts ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. I am going to come back to that as far as your own 
personal experience is, but I want to lind out what else Jimmie Squil- 
lante suggested as to how your association could be operated. Did he 
suggest you become members of the union ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That was the first thing, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why was it necessary to become members of the 
union ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Because he claimed that he could get us a 
blanket contract with the union, and in so doing he would get us a 
much better deal if he had every cartman in the association in the 
union. That was even though some of us didn't need the union at all, 
because in some instances there was a father and 2 or 3 sons, and he 
didn't need the union. So Jimmie said, ''Well, if we can get you all 
in the union, in the long run you will all make money, because if you 
all have to go out and raise your customers, you can always fall back 
on the union, and say due to the fact you have to pay union scale, and 
things like that there, which we were paying union scale, then you can 
turn around and say you can raise your customers. No one would take 
your customers due to the fact that the union would always step in." 

The Chairman. When you make a contract with the union, what 
do you contract for ? All you contract for is what you will pay any- 
one whom you employ ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

The Chairman. As to the rates you would pay your employees ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That is all that is in the contract. What else was 
at issue ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, in this one contract, sir, we had a para- 
graph that in the event any cartman, and I don't know if I am jumping 
the gun on this, but if any cartman should leave the organization he 
would have to post with the union a $300 bond per man. 

Mr. Kennedy. You had better explain all of that, how they ar- 
ranged the security clause. 

The Chairman. That is what you call the security clause? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Tliis is in a union contract ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. A security clause? Let us see what that means 
now, and go ahead and tell us. 

Mr. John Montesano. In the event you weren't happy with the 
way the association was going 

Mr. Kennedy. You had better get back to what you would do if 
you were in the association as far as the security clause was concerned. 

Mr. John Montesano. Would you clarify that for me ? 



6748 IMPROPER ACTTIVrriES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. If you were in the association, you had to pay to 
the union $25 ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That came later. Up until that time there 
was no mention of anyone paying any security because after 4 or 5 
cartmen had left, then Jimmie turned around and said, "We have to 
put up $25 for each business." 

But originally the security clause read that if any cartman left the 
association, he would have to post with the union $300 per man. That 
is the way it reads. In the event. Senator McClellan, you weren't 
happy with the way the association was going, or you were being 
brought up on charges or your work was continually in jeopardy, 
you would leave the association. Then they would notify the union 
and the union would come down and take off you $300 for each man 
you had working for you, to be held until such a time as your contract 
terminated. That would be with us, February 1. 

The Chaikman. If you had 4 or 5 men working for you, it meant 
$1,000 or $1,500? 

Mr. John Montesano. .That is $1,800. 

The Chairman. Where did the money go to ? 

Mr. John Montesano. They were supposed to hold it in trust. 
The union was supposed to hold it in trust. 

The Chairman. It is still there ; is it not ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. We think so. 

Mr. John Montesano. We hope so. 

The Chairman. All right. Proceed. 

Mr. John Montesano. To get back to the question Mr. Kennedy 
asked me, after 3 or 4 cartmen had left the association and there were 
a lot of cartmen complaining to the union, that they had to post 
security because they had left the organization, and the association 
members had posted no security with the union, Jimmie came back 
to us — this is Squillante — and he told us that we had to put up $25 
per company for each association member. That is how you got that 
other security clause in there. 

So if you belonged to the association, it would only cost you $25 per 
company, whether you had 50 men or a thousand men. But if you 
left the organization, it would cost you $300 per man to the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat was the purpose of the security ? 

Mr. John Montesano. To protect your living wages, and to protect 
you in the association. 

Mr. I^NNEDY. Wasn't it true that even where it was a self-em- 
ployed company, where there were 3 or 4 members of 1 family, you 
still had to put up the security ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that was to protect actually the employers from 
themselves; is that right? Then penalized them $300 per man; is 
that right ? Was it not that difficult for many of these individuals to 
operate, to have to put up that amount of money ? 

Mr. John Montesano. It was very difficult, and I know of a case 
of a man who had to put up $4,200. 

Mr. Ejennedy. Was it not the effect of that to force people to stay 
in the association ? 

Mr. John Montesano. It was tlie only effect it had, sir. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6749 

Mr. Kennedy. Then you mentioned 2 or 3 things that Mr. Squil- 
lante pnt into operation. Did he also describe the operation of a so- 
called whip company ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you explain that? 

Mr. John Montesano. He claimed that he had a carting company 
in New York by the name of Corsair Carting, and that was the com- 
pany he named. The function of this company was, in the event any 
cartman got out of line for any reason whatsoever, this Corsair Cart- 
ing would raid his customers and would go out and j>ick up these 
stops. It would be done in some cases for next to nothing, and they 
would go to a customer and say, "You are paying your man $50 a 
month; I'll do it for $5 a month,'' just to take these customers away 
from the cartman and eventually whip the fellow right back into line. 

When he came out to Nassau, he tried to start, another carting com- 
pany out there and he wanted the association at that time to foot the 
bill. He got opposition on that, and so lie said, "Well, I will foot 
the bill myself, but any work that this General Sanitation Co. gets" — 
that was the name he used — "I will keep the work." That was the 
the whole purpose of the association. If a man got out of line, they 
went out and took all of his stops. 

Mr. Kennedy. The whip company in New York City was the 
Corsair Sanitation Co., and out in Nassau County the name was 
General Sanitation Co. ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Who did he have operating the whip company out 
in Nassau ? 

Mr. John Montesano. To my knowledge, Nunzio Squillante, his 
brother. 

JNIr. Kennedy. He was Vincent Squillante's brother ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he was the whip out there ; is that right ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. He w^ould whip other people into line ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Into the association, and, after he took a stop away 
from an individual, could he then sell that stop back to a member of the 
association ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir ; in some instances he did. 

Mr. Kennedy. That would be w^here a profit could be made ? 

Mr. John Montesano. A terrific profit ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Because some of these commercial stops would be 
worth a great deal of money ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes ; a great deal of money. 

Mr. Kenni:dy. Assisting him or assisting the whip company he 
Avould be the union. Is that how^ it was explained to you ? 

Mr, John Montesano. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he also explain that he had this close associa- 
tion with the union, and that is how it would be the basis of the suc- 
cess of the association, would be the close relationship with the union? 

89330— 57— pt. 17 7 



6750 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. John Montesano. That was the only way that the whip could 
function, due to the fact that he had the edge with the union. By the 
edge, I mean, naturally, he could work that much cheaper because the 
union would not bother the whip company, whichever company it may 
have been. Corsair or the other one. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you learn whetlier the whip company, General 
Sanitation, was union or nonunion ? 

Mr. John Montesano. To our knowledge, it was never union, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So, the whip company formed by Nunzio Squillante, 
which the union was going to help, was actually a nonunion operation ; 
is that right ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was active out in Nassau County, General 
Sanitation ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, going back to some of your personal experi- 
ences as far as these courts were concerned, did you have a dispute 
with Mr. Fazula ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes ; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us how that came about, and what 
happened ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, we had a contract that was awarded 
to us by the town of Oyster Bay, Nassau County, and the township 
of South Farmington. 1 took Mr. Fazula in as a partner on that con- 
tract. After certain discrepancies developed as he was performing, 
bad services and so on, w^e decided to break oil' our partnership. We 
had nothing on paper, and it was just an oral agreement between him 
and myself. When the time came to break up the ]:>artnership, Jimmie 
Squillante was bi'ought into the picture. We had to go to New York 
and meet with him, which we did. He turned around and told me, 
"Well, you have to pay this fellow for your half of your contract." 
I don't know if I am making myself clear. 

]Mr. Kennedy. You had brought him in gratuitously ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. He had done a favor for your earlier; is that right? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you wanted to return the favor, and so you 
brought him in and gave him some of your business ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. After a period of a year, you wanted to break up 
the partnership ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he went in and he raised a question about it, and 
you finally had a conversation with Jimmie Squillante, and Jimmie 
said, "If you break up the partnership, you are going to have to pay 
him for your own business" ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you were going to have to pay him to get out of 
the partnership ? 

Mr, John Montesano. Out of my own contract. 

Mr. Kennedy. This was one particular contract ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was the value of the contract ? 

Mr. John Monti<:sano. $28,000 for the year. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIElS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6751 

Mr. Kennedy. How much did he say that you were going to have to 
pay Fazula ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Originally I had to pay Fazula $11,000; 
$11,000 originally. 

Mr. Kennedy. He said you would have to pay $11,000 ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy. This was Mr. Squillante w^ho made that decision ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, it was made at a board of directors' 
meeting in the Belmore, Long Island, and at that board there was Mr. 
Roy Brown, Mr. Carmine Dicavia, Frank Regeria, Fazula, and myself, 
and there were 2 or 3 other association members. There was a Ritchie, 
and his son, Rickie, and there were 2 or 3 Lamagino brothers. 

Mr. Kennedy. So this sort of court met to make a decision and ta 
make a determination ; is that right ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did they decide; that you should pay the 
$11,000? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who represented Mr. Fazula ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Jimmie Squillante. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was his representative ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have representative there ? 

]Mr. John Montesano. At that meeting ; no, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So what did you do? Did you agree to pay the 
$11,000? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, I told them — at first, the way he came 
out with it, we had brought the business of the day up to order and 
then Jimmie Squillante said, "I have a problem here. Jackie comes to 
me that he wants to throw Fazula out of his contract." And I said, 
"Wait a minute. I don't think that that pertains to the association. 
It is a private business arrangement between me and Fazula. I think 
that it should be discussed as such," 

So with that he turned around and he jumps up and he said, "You 
don't know it but you are out of business." I said, "What is this?" 
He said, "You are out of business." 

And I said, "I am out of business for what?" He said, "Because 
you can't do what you want to do to this guy." And I said, "I don't 
want to do anything, as long as he stays in his contract and he does 
what he has to do. He can't jeopardize the public either. I have a 
contract and I have to perform it." ^ 

So one word led to another, and he said, "We will let the board 
decide." 

So wdth that, we had to step away from the table, and the "appel- 
late division" decided Avhat they had to do. 

They sat down there, and they decided that we had to pay $11,000. 
So I told him, "I'll go back to my partners, and my brothers, and we 
will see how they feel about it." 

I went back to them and naturally they protested. They said, "We 
won't pay $11,000." We received a few phone calls from people in 
Brooklyn, and we had to go down and see them. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who did you receive the telephone calls from? 

Mr. John Montesano. From underworld people. 

Mr. Kennedy. They told you what ? 



6752 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. John Montesano. They told us we had to meet with Jimmie 
and straighten this matter out. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you agree to straighten it out ? 

Mr. John Montesano, We agreed to straighten it out for $5,000. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did the underworld people say to you or how 
did you know it was an underworld person ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, I happen to know the person very 
well, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. He is a relative of yours ; is that right ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right, sir. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. He called you and he was prominent in the under- 
world in Brooklyn ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. He called you from Brooklyn ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right, 

Mr. Kennedy. And he said that, or tell the conversation. 

Mr. John Montesano. He told me, he said, "What is wrong with 
you, kid ? Every time I turn around, you are in trouble out on Long 
Island." And I said, "We are not in any trouble." 

I said, "We are trying to protect our business, and we have a little 
run-in with this fellow, and we don't want to pay anything." 

He said, "Don't you realize that they could put you out of business, 
and they can hurt you in other ways?" I said, "If they can hurt 
me, let them hurt me." 

The guy said, "Don't forget, you have got kids." So I said, "What 
do you mean by that ?" 

And he said, "Well, you know, sometimes they won't hurt you, but 
they will hurt the kids." That is the way it was put to me. 

Well, we have a family to think about, and so we called him up and 
we said, "What does this guy want?" And he said, "He wants $11,- 
000." And I said, "I won't pay $11,000." 

He said, "Well, how about this? You pay $5,000, and he guar- 
antees you that as of January 1 " 

Mr. Kennedy. Before you get into that, just without mentioning 
your relative's name, I just would like to have Mr. Greene read his 
background into the record. 

You are familiar with his background? 

Mr. John Montesano. Now we are. 

Mr. Kennedy. You didn't know the full extent of it before? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, sir, look, before there is any reading 
of the background, like I said before, I would like to say it again, 
you can choose youi; friends and you can't choose your relatives. The 
man has a record, but we had no knowledge. We knew he had a 
record and we didn't know the extent of it, but then when a person 
calls you up like that, naturally that was their contact to me. I 
had to participate. 

Mr. Kennedy. The point of it is that there is no question in your 
mind that you heard from him because of the fact that he was prom- 
inent in the underworld. 

Mr. John Montesano. That was the only reason. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he had a record himself? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6753 

Mr, John Montesano. He knew more about the story that I did, 
and I hadn't seem him in 2 years, and he told me everything that 
happened. That is the truth. 

Mr. Kennedy. The reading of the record is no reflection on you, 
but just on the question of the fact that he had this association, and 
I have discussed this with you before. 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, I understand. 

TESTIMONY OF ROBERT W. GREENE— Resumed 

Mr. Greene. This record from the New York City Police Depart- 
ment is being read without name, but it discloses the following record 
for the person in question : 

1927 — Parent at school ; truancy. 

1928 — Parent at school ; truancy. 

1931 — Assault, robbery; case dismissed. 

Subsequently sent to Elmira Reformatory in connection with a 
similar charge. 

1 933 — Assault and robbery ; discharged. 

1933 — Carrying a gun ; dismissed. 

1934 — Felonious assault, gun ; discharged. 

193G — Carrying a gun ; discharged. 

1936 — Homicide; discharged. 

1942 — Assault and robbery; prison term. 

1942 — Assault and a gun; convicted of assault, first degree. On 
motion of district attorney, verdict of jury was set aside on grounds 
of mistaken identity. 

1942 — Carrying a gun; dismissed. 

1942 — Sentenced to Sing Sing Prison, violation of parole. 

1942 — Transferred to Attica State Prison. 

1942— Reparoled. 

1944 — Assault and robbery. 

1946 — Felonious assault. 

1947 

The Chairman. How were those disposed of ? 

Mr. Greene. All charg;es dismissed, Senator. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Greene. 1947 — Homicide; dismissed. 

1948 — Homicide ; discharged. 

1949 — Detained as a released prisoner. On May 24, 1949, returned 
to Auburn State Prison. That is in connection with the previous re- 
parole. He was returned to Auburn State Prison where he served the 
rest of his sentence. 

No record reflected since 1949. 

Senator Ives. Mr. Chairman, may I ask a question in that connec- 
tion ? In what county in New York State were all of these cases tried ? 

Mr. Greene. All of these, with the exception of two cases. Senator, 
all of these cases were tried in Kings County, N. Y. — Brooklyn. 

Senator Ives. Wlio was the district attorney, may I ask? You had 
several DA's, I should judge, from your testimony, and who were they ? 

Mr. Greene. This covers a period from 1927 to 1949. 

Senator Ives. You haven't the list of DA's there, probably. 

Mr. Greene. No. I can only recall one, sir. 



6754 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE' LABOR FIELD 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN MONTESANO AND ANTHONY MONTESANO— 

Eesumed 

Mr. I\JEN"NEDY. So you had this conversation with your uncle, and 
he suggested at that time the payment of $5,000 ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So what happened to that ? 

Mr. John Montesano. The agreement was this, that I would pay 
the $5,000 and then January 1, 1956, when that contract renewed it- 
self, no other association member would bid against me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Where is that? 

Mr. John Montesano. In the South Farmingdale district. 

Mr. Kennedy. You paid the $5,000 with the understanding that no 
association member would bid against you on this work? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right, and then on January 1, 1956, 
the town of Oyster Bay went out and purchased their own trucks, 
and they put them on, and so I lost the contract anyway. 

]Mr. Kennedy. ^Vliy did the town of Oyster Bay take that step ? 

Mr. John Montesano. On account of the racketeers. They had 
heard the story. 

Mr. Kennedy. So they put on their own trucks and you never got 
the contract ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. But you did pay the $5,000. 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So did you continue in the association at that time? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

Mr. I^NNEDY. Did you have any other experiences regarding this 
board ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Oh, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Or this court? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Were you on the court yourself? 

Mr. John Montesano. At one time I was. 

Mr. Kennedy. You are judging other people? 

Mr. John Montesano. I was on the board of directors; yes, sir. 
And I was on the board of directors when we had the Trio Carting 
case. That was Angelo Derichio. 

Mr. Kennedy. "\Vliat is the situation as far as your representative 
when these court cases were held ? Would you have a lawyer or what 
would you do ? 

Mr. John Montesano. You would bring whoever you knew from 
the underworld. If someone knew you, he would act as your repre- 
sentative, and the bigger the overlorcl, the easier your case was to win. 

Mr. Kennedy. The bigger gangster or hoodlum that you could get 
to come and represent you before the board, the better off you were? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. That is exactly how it was put. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is why your uncle was able to get it lowered 
from $11,000 to $5,000? 

Mr. John Montesano. That was a favor. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was a favor that he did ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes. Some favor. 

Mr. Kennedy. "VVlio was Fazula's attorney ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITTEIS IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6755 

Mr. John Montesano. Fazula's attorney, he was represented once 
by Joe Feola, and once by Squillante. After Feola had represented 
him, SquiHante became his representative. 

Mr. Kennedy. But he had Feola originally. 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir 

Mr. Kennedy. Tell me what other troubles or difficulties you have 
had. 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, I had sold a route to a Mrs. Rose 
Anelli. She is under the name of Sunrise Sanitation Service. Wben 
I had sold her the route, she had the route for 15 months, and she had 
to pay me through notes, and I sold the route with so much money 
cash, and the rest of that being notes, and she paid me $580 a month 
in notes. 

After 15 months had gone by, this woman became delinquent in her 
payments, and we had received a phone call from one of her brothers 
by the name of Sal Fadancie, and he called up my father's home on 
Sunday afternoon, and he told my father, "Your boys have short- 
changed my sister on 90 stops. Tell them I am going to keep this note, 
and three more notes in payment." And he was just going to keep it. 

With that, we turned around. My father gave me the message, and 
I said, "If they continue to be delinquent, we have a chattel mortgage 
on their trucks, we will pick up the trucks." 

Mr. Kennedy. So they called and said that you had misrepresented 
on 90 stops, is that right ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So they weren't going to pay you on the notes ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you in turn said, "If you don't pay me on the 
notes, we have chattel mortgages on your trucks, and we will pick them 
up," is that right. 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. Then we received a telegram 
from the association. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you understand that Rose Anelli had some con- 
tacts with the underworld ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Not at that time. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you learn tliat? 

Mr. John Montesano. Oh, yes. Did I learn? At that time we 
had no inkling of it, and we just thought she was a business woman. 
Then we received a telegram from the association. By this time I 
had more or less washed my hands with the association, and I was 
no longer attending any meetings, and I was more or less disgusted 
with it and I was thoroughly finished with it, and my brother went 
down to that meeting and he can tell you what transpired better 
than I can. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Well, it was a board of directors' meet- 
ing, and I walked into it and the board was set up like it always is. 
In the telegram it just said we were being brought up there on 
charges, and what they were we didn't know. 

So I sat down, and Mrs. Anelli sat opposite me, and she went into 
detail about the story, that Ave had done her out of 90 stops for 15 
months, and about what a good person she was, more or less. 

So, the board at that time was Mr. Jerry ]\Iancusco, and lie was 
the director, and Mr. Carmine Decavia, and a brother-in-law of 



6756 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Carmine Decavia, and Bi^ Dave, and 2 Regirio boys, and I think 
there was 2 or 3 other fellows from Suffolk, and I don't know the 
names or one I knew. 

As things progressed in the meeting, they said, "Tell us your 
story." And I said, "I don't think I have to tell my story. This 
has nothing to do with the association at all. This is 15 months. 
If we had done her out of 90 stops, which she said we did, which I 
know I didn't " 

Mr. Kennedy. You didn't do her out of the 90 stops ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Will you explain that? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. What happened was she went into 
business, and first we sold her trucks for this route, and the first 2 
weeks she was in business she had inexperienced help and they 
turned one of the trucks over. Of course, when the truck goes over 
like that, it doesn't get repaired for at least 2 or 3 weeks because 
there was a lot of damage. By the time they got back on tlieir feet, 
with the help of us, we even sent out a truck to help her, they w^ere 
so far behind their route, all of these customers were calling up and 
complaining, and these 90 stops are homes. Homeowners are funny. 
If you are not there the day you are supposed to be there, they will 
change you like that. 

Some fellows that weren't in the association went in and took 
about 90 of these stops off her. 

So after 15 months she called us up and told us that she wants 
an adjustment on tliese 90 stops. 

So, I explained this all to them, and first I said it wasn't any of 
their business. And they said "This is an association, and it has to 
be settled right here and now, and you have to make a commitment." 

So, I said, "Well, I can't make a commitment. I don't think I 
am going to, but I will find out from my brothers and see what they 
say." 

So, they said, "You will have to make a commitment. Either 
promise to pay her for the stops or give her 90 stops some place else, 
or forget about these notes she owes you." 

So, I was a bit perturbed, and I said, "Well, I'll go back to my 
brothers." That afternoon I went back and they said, "If they want 
to fight, they are going to get a fight this time." 

And that afternoon we went and picked up our trucks. We picked 
up our trucks and that was the last time we stopped in the associa- 
tion's hall. 

The Chairman. You picked up your trucks ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. The chattel mortgage trucks. 

The Chairman. You picked them up ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, 

The Chairmx\n. Did you ever collect your notes ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, we did, after about 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, after that, Mr, McClellan, we had 
another so-called meeting. We received a phone call from Brooklyn 
again. 

Mr. Kennedy. From the same man ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. From the same person ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6757 

Mr. John Montesaxo. Yes. He told iis, he says, "As a friend of 
mine'*' — he is rehited to Rosie, that is the story, this Rosie Aiielli. 
He said, "'He wants to meet with you."" I said, "Nobody wants to 
meet with us. The hist time we did it your way, it cost us money. This 
time we will go in front of the lawyers, let the law^yers decide, and 
go to court." He said, "Why don't you meet with the fellow T' I 
said, "I don't think I have to meet with him." He said, "All right, 
someday I am coming up there for dinner." 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he tell you wdio the fellow w\as that you 
should meet with? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, at that time he didn't, I found out 
that Sunday. 

Mr. Kennedy. He said he was going to come for dinner ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did he say ? 

Mr. John Montesano. He said, "Well, I will be out there Sunday 
for dinner." I said, "If you want to come for dinner, you are wel- 
come, but I don't want you to bring anyone out here." He said, "No, 
I will probably come alone." 

I don't know if you are familiar with Long Island, but — I have to 
tell this, this is cute — ^you come from Brooklyn, and you have to take 
the Southeastern State Parkway and to come from New York you 
have to take the Northeastern State Parkway, a difference of about 
10 miles. They pull up in front of my house, and my uncle gets out 
of his car, and all of a sudden I see this guy coming down the street, 
a real Brooklyn character, all dolled up. He comes walking doAvn 
the street and he says, "Hello, Paddy. Hello, Carmine." He says, 
"I thought that was you I passed on the highway." How could 
these guys pass one another? I figured then this is a setup job. So 
we go inside 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he introduce you to the man ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes. He said, "This is a friend of mine 
by the name of Carmine." I shook his hand, walked out of the room, 
and he said, "I want to see you." I said, "I don't want that man in 
my home." He says, "He just wants to talk to you." I said, "He 
came here uninvited, unwelcome. I don't want him here." He said, 
"He wants to straighten this out about Rosie." I said, "There is 
nothing to straighten out. I got her notes. She has the trucks. 
Wlien she pays the money, she will get the notes back." 

Finally my mother came into my home. She knew her brother 
would be there. And he says, "Why don't you talk to the kids ?" She 
said, "I will go in and talk to this friend of yours." As they were 
speaking, I went into the room. He was talking and he says, "You 
know, your lawyer sent my aunt a very fresh letter." Pie showed me 
the letter, and I said, "Pie done wdiat I told him to do." I said, "She 
owes me money and if she does not pay me, I will take her to court. 
Not only that, she had a chattel mortgage on my truck and she bought 
another truck without telling them about the chattel. I could have 
her locked up." 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know who Carmine was by this time? 

Mr. John Montesano. He told me after Carmine left the house. 
He said he was a very good friend of his, and came from New York. 
I surmised 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you learn his last name ? 



6758 IMPROPER ACTivrriES nsr the labor field 

Mr. John Montesano. Tramunti. 

Mr. Kennedy. Carmine Tramunti ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I think that is the way you pronounce it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know anything about Carmine Tramunti ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, outside of the fact that he came with 
him. That is the only thing I knew about. I figured there must 
be something. With that, they walked out of the house and said, 
"Well, if there is nothing else we can do, if they want to go according 
to law, we will have to go according to law." So they left. 

We went to the lawyers and her lawyers did not want to handle her 
case. He said, "These boys did not beat you out of anything," so she 
paid the notes. But they wanted to use undue pressure. 

The Chairman. So she did pay the notes and get the trucks back ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir; that is because we went to the 
attorneys on it. The attorneys said she had a weak case. There was 
no malice. When we had the contract, we contracted to sell her 
12,000 stops, and we originally had given her 13,000. 

The Chairman. Being a little bit identified with the law profes- 
sion, I frequently recommend that folks see a lawyer. That time it 
paid off. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. It certainly did. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, I might say about Carmine Tra- 
munti, he is one of those who has been identified as 1 of the 2 
chief lieutenants of Tony "Ducks" Corallo, and has a long criminal 
record. He played a rather prominent part, you might remember, 
in our New York hearings conducted about 6 weeks ago. He was 
active with Tony Ducks and with Johnny Dio. We have been look- 
ing for him for approximately 6 months and have not been able to 
locate him. 

The Chairman. Wliat is his name ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Carmine Tramunti. 

The Chairman. Is that the man you have been talking about? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Let us see what he looks like. 

TESTIMONY OP JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

Mr. Kelly. The following is the arrest record of Carmine Tra- 
munti, 14579 Sixth Avenue, Wliitestone, Queens, N. Y. 

He has been arrested for robbery, discharged ; assault and robbery, 
discharged; felonious assault. No. 11, December 8, 1932, 6-15 years, 
Sing Sing; robbery, first degree, discharged; assault, second degree, 
no disposition; robbery, discharged; assault, second, in 1932, sen- 
tenced to Sing Sing Prison for 10 years ; arrested by State troopers, 
disorderly conduct, 30 days, Westchester County Jail ; again arrested 
by State troopers, Eastview, N. Y., disorderly conduct, 30 days in 
jail; felonious assault with gun, New York, 1945, discharged; he 
has been also arrested for truancy, as a delinquent child, and for vio- 
lation of parole. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6759 

The Chairman. He had 2 prison terms, 2 jail terms? 
Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir, each for robbery. 
The Chairman. Both for robbery ? 

Mv. Kelly. Yes, sir. In Sing Sing Prison, New York State. 
The Chairman. And a number of other arrests where convictions 
were not secured. 
Mr. KJELLT. Yes, sir. 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN MONTESANO AND ANTHONY MONTESANO— 

Resumed 

The Chairman. Do you know where he is now ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir. That was the only meeting I ever 
had with the man. 

The Chairman. The last time you ever saw liim ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir, first and last, believe me. I hope 
I never see him again. 

Mr. Kennedy. Has your relative helped you out since that time? 

Mr. John Montesano. I have not seen or heard from him since. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you leave the association after that? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. That was the breaking point. 

Mr. Kennedy. Under what circumstances did you leave? Was it 
then that you heard about paying the $1,800 ? 

Mr. John Montesano. The union sent us a letter, as a matter of 
fact 

Mr. Kennedy. Had you had any trouble with the union up to this 
time when you were in the association ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never had any trouble or difficulty with, the 
union ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No. After we signed the contract, we never 
seen the union. If you wanted anything, even to find out benefits or 
anything like that, you had to call up for a delegate to come down to 
see you. You never even saw a delegate. 

The Chairman. Call up who ? 

Mr. John Montesano. For a delegate from the union to come down 
to see you, if you wanted to find out any information. 

Mr. Kennedy. They were never coming near you, never saying 
that you were not following union rules or anything like that ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. On Sunset, Kose Anelli's company, she was union, 
was she not? 

Mr. John Montesano. She was supposed to have been. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did she follow union rules? Did she pay union 
wages ? 

Mr. John Montesano. From what we paid in the industry, she was 
not. That is right. 

]\Ir. Kennedy. Paying nonunion wages and the union was not en- 
forcing the union wages on her ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. What happened after you left the association ? 



6760 IMPROPER ACTIVrriES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. John Montesano. We received a letter from the union, not the 
association. 

Mr, Kennedy. How long afterward ? 

Mr. John Montesano. A month or so after we left the association. 
We did not leave the association officially ; we just stopped going. We 
received a letter from the union stating that the association notified 
them that we had to post $1,800 with the union for security. We sent 
them the check. We sent them the $1,800 check, and after that every 
time we would turn around we would see a union delegate or a union 
representative following our trucks. We have a practice in our indus- 
try where, as you ride down the incinerator with the truck, you drop 
your helpers off at a coffee shop or a luncheonette, and that man has 
coffee or has a hamburger, and in that hour tliat it takes you to ride 
down to the dump and back, the man feels like it is a rest for him. 
Sometimes you do this 2 or 3 times a day, depending on the loads that 
you take. It has been a common practice throughout the industry. 

After this happened, I would drop a man off at the luncheonette, and 
the union delegate would catch me and say, "Where are you going?" 
And I would say, "I am going to dump the truck." He would say, 
"Where is your helper ?" I would say, "I dropped him off." He would 
say, "You are in violation of the union contract. You are supposed 
to have the helper on your truck at all times." I would say, "Well, he 
does not mind it. Why should you? All I am going to do is dump 
the truck." He would say, "You can't do that. You have to have the 
iniion man on the truck." 

The Chairman. You were a union man, weren't you ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I still have to have a union man. According 
to our contract, my brother cannot work with me, because he is a stock- 
holder and a partner in our corporation. It has to be one boss and 
one stranger on each truck. That is the way it reads. 

The Chairman. It is pretty tight. What did they do to you then ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Nothing. The just made sure. All in all, 
they tried to make life pretty unbearable. 

the Chairman. What was the $1,800 security for ? 

Mr. John Montesano. To protect us, that our wages would not be 
fluctuating. 

The Chairman. That you would pay union wages ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Suppose you got sick and laid off a few days ? Did 
you get anything out of the union ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. No, sir. It is not for that. 

The Chairman. You were working for yourselves. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. That is right. When we called up, we 
said, "Why do we have to post the bonds ? We are all brothers. There 
is only one stranger." He said, "I am sorry, you are all in the union, 
each has to put up $300, the corporation has to put up $300 for each 
man working." 

The Chairman. Does that include $300 for yourself ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Definitely. We are all brothers, and my 
father, and one stranger. 

The Chairman. You had to put that much up ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Well, they figured $300 for each man, 
and 6 men, that would be $1,800. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6761 

The Chairman. But as I understand, you owned the business and 
you had to put up $300 for yourselves. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Correct. 

The Chairman. Wliat became of the money ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. It was held in a security fund. 

The Chl\irman. \'\^iei'e is it now ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. They still have it. Our contract does, 
not end until February 1, 1958. That is when we are supposed to get 
our money back. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, in that connection, I would like per- 
mission to call another witness who will be very brief. It is in this 
same connection. Mr. William Lent. 

Senator McNamara. May I ask a couple of questions first, Mr. 
Chairman ? 

The Chairman. Surely. 

Senator McNamara. How long have you been in business? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. About 9 years, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Nine years ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. How did you get started? 

Mr. John Montesano. Originally my father owned the carting 
company and then he sold it to us, originally. 

Senator McNamara. He owned the carting company ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. How long was he in business before he with- 
drew, or was this part of the 9 years ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. About a year or so he was in the busi- 
ness, 

Mr. John Montesano. About a year before we took over. It is 
about 10 or 11 years, all told. 

Senator McNamara. How did he establish the business? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. He bought the business from a pred- 
ecessor. 

Senator McNamara. He bought it from somebody who had already 
organized it? 

JVIr. Anthony Montesano. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. So you bought into the business ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Correct. Then the big boom came on 
Long Island and we built up with it. 

Senator McNamara. What part of the business was connnercial 
and what part residential ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Well, at the time that w^e signed a con- 
tract, we had, I would say, roughly about 20 percent of our business 
as commercial work. That is why we signed. 

Senator McNamara. Eighty percent was residential ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. Definitely. 

Senator McNamara When you say you picked uj> tlie trucks he- 
cause you had a chattel mortgage on tliem, what was tlie jirocedure? 

Mr. John Montesano. We called a tow truck and we picked 't up. 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. We called our attorney first, and our 
attorney told us to go and get a detective, and to present him with 
tliese papers, and he made out all the papers. The detective came 
down with us, and lie hired a public tow truck and towed it into just 
n garage, and we had to pay rent on it and things like that. 



6762 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 

Senator McNamara. Then you took legal procednre. It was not a 
mnscle job. 

Mv. Anthony Montesano. It was legal. 

Senator McNamaka. When you left the association, did yon also 
leave the union ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano, No, sir. 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir. 

Senator McNamara. When you left the association, you say you 
did not notify them, but you just did not go to the meetings, and you 
continued to pay your 

!Mr. xVnthony Montesano. Union dues. 

Senator McNamara. No. Did you continue to pay the fees into 
the association ? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. No, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Then by nonpayment, you would be expelled 
auembers? 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. But you continue to pay to tlie union ? 

Mr. Anthony jNIontesano. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. That is all. 

The Chairman. Will you be sworn, please, sir { You do solemnly 
swear the evidence you shall give before this Senate select committee 
shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help 
you God ? 

Mr. Lent. I do. 

TTESTIMONY OP THOMAS LENT 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Lent. Thomas Lent, 2704 Falcon Street, East Meadow; I am 
a garbage man with Lent's Refuse and Ash Removal. 

The Chairman. You are in the garbage business, too ? 

Mr. Lent. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You own your own business ? 

Mr. Lent. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you waive counsel ? 

Mr. Lent. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You are in the Lent's Refuse and Ash Removal 
business i 

Mr. Lent. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. It is in East Meadow, N. Y. ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You vrere a member of tlie Ii\ter-County Cart 
i\Ien*s Association for a while { 

JNIr. Lent. That is right. 

]\ir. Kennedy. And Vincent J. Gilante came into the association? 

Mr. Lent. The first night he came, I was not there, but I was 
there the following meeting. 

Mr. Kennedy. After he came in, and the dues of the association 
Avere upped — is that right? 

Mr. Lent. After he came in ; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. They were increased ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right, sir. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE K\BOR FIELD 6763 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you decide at that time that you would resign 
from the association ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many people do you have working, or how many 
people did you have working for you at tliat time 'i 

Mr. Lent. Well, I had my two sons and my brother and myself. 

Mr. Kennedy. Your two sons, your brother and yourself; is that 
right? 

Mr. Lent. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you own the company ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you decided to leave the association ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were a member of the union at the time ? 

Mr. Lent. No. When I belonged to the association we started this 
association — I don't know the year. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you become a member of the union ? 

Mr. Lent. Not right away; no, sir. Not until Mr. Gilante entered 
the picture. 

Mr. Kennedy. After Mr. Gilante entered the picture, you became 
a member of the union ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then you decided to leave the association; is that 
right ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you had working for you, your two sons, your 
brother, and yourself ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. After you left the association, did you hear from 
the miion that you would have to post security ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Plow much money ? 

Mr. Lent. I put up $300 for each man. 

Mr. Kennedy. A total of $1,200 ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. xVnd that $1,200 was to insure that you pay yourselves 
the proper amount of money ; is that right ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you pay the $1,200 ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was for. your two sons, your brother, and 
yourself ? 

Mr. Lent. Well, I believe there was a loader on that, and I did not 
put in for him. I hired him after that, then. He went into the union, 
but I didn"t put up the $800. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never put up the $300 for the actual employee 
who came in later. 

Mr. Lent. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you did put up the $300 for each of your 
relatives. 

Mr. Lent. YcvS, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is this the check ? 

(Document handed to witness.) 

Mr. Lent. That is it, sir. 



6764 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

(At this point Senator Ives left the room. ) 

The Chairman. That may be made exhibit No. 5. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 5" for refer- 
ence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7026.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you attended any meetings of the union ? 

Mr. Lent. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you been notified of any meetings ? 

Mr. Lent. I will be in there 3 years come January, and I have 2 
cards — in fact, 1 card and 1 letter. One card was for a meeting. 

Mr. Kennedy. When was that ? 

Mr. Lent. About 2 weeks or 3 weeks ago, I believe. The letter came 
after that, which stated that the only ones who were excused from 
the meeting would be the truckowners. In other words, the bosses. 

The Chairman. So you were excused ? 

Mr. Lent. According to the letter, yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So in the 3 years that you have been a member of the 
union, you have only been notified of a meeting within the last 3 
weeks, after this committee made public the fact that they were going 
to hold these hearings? You have only been notified since that time 
in 3 years, is that right? 

Mv. Lent. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you received one card saying that there was 
going to be a meeting, and a letter followed it up saying that you did 
not have to come ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all. 

Senator McNamara. Was this refund returned or not ? Was this 
refunded? I missed that point, Mr. Counsel. That, apparently, is 
a refund check, and so marked. Did you get the money back? 

Mr. Lent. No, sir. 

Senator McNamara. They still have it? 

Mr. Lent. That is right, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Did you understand you were to get it back? 

Mr. Lent. That is what they said. I don't know. 

Senator McNamara. It says at the expiration of the contract. Has 
the contract expired ? 

yiv. Lent. No, sir. We would not expire until January, come the 
last day of January. 

Senator McNamara. Then at the expiration of this contract, you 
are to get it back, according to what you typed on the check. 

Mr. Lent. My wife typed the top part and the union typed the bot- 
tom part of that sentence. 

Senator McNamara. It is your understanding now that you are to 
get this money back ? 

Mr. Lent. So they say. I don't know. 

Senator McNamara. The contract has not expired, and you will not 
know until then ? 

Mr. Lent. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. But you now expect to get it back? 

Mr. Lent. Well, I don't know. I expect to, yes. Whether I do 
or not, that is another thing. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6765 

Senator McNamara. Your understanding is tluit this was just a 
deposit, as a guaranty of performance? 

Mr. Lent. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. Have you ever known anybody who got any 
back, any of you fellows ? 

Mr. Lent. No, sir; I don't. 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN MONTESANO AND ANTHONY MONTESANO— 

Resumed 

Mr. John Montesano. I don't. 

Senator McNamar,\. Some of the contracts have expired ? 

Mr. Anthony Monitssano. I don't think anyone ever posted any 
money yet. We are the only ones who have posted it. 

Senator McNamara. Then the time has not come for vou to get it 
back> 

Mr. Anthony Montesano. We hope to. 

Senator McNamara. Well, you have a legal case to get it back, if 
it is a deposit. Since you followed legal procedures on the claim on 
the truck, I expect you to have the same kind of case here. 

Mr. John Monitisano. We will. 

TESTIMONY OF THOMAS LENT— Resumed 

The Chairman. This check apparently was not signed. 

Mr. Lent. The check was signed, Senator McClellan. I had two 
photostat copies. I believe I gave one to Mr. Greene. I believe one, 
Mr. Gallata, the district attorney, has. That was signed with green 
ink. If you will notice, that is what come off. You can actually see 
the print on it. 

The Chairman. You signed this check yourself ? 

Mr. Lent, Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. So the original was signed, but the signature has 
faded out? 

Mr. Lent. That is right, 

Mr. Kennedy, It cleared through the bank. 

The Chairman, I see it cleared through the bank and you wrote 
on the check or your wife did for you on the back of it : 

To be refunded on termination of present contract if not used per contract. 

Mr, Lent. They added that "if not used." 
The Chairman (reading): 

If not used as per contract. 
Mr. Lent. That is right. 

The Chairman. How did the contract authorize it to be used? 
They added that to it before they cashed it ? 
Mr, Lent, I presume so. 

The Chairman, Well, it was not on there when it left you, 
Mr, Lent, It was not on there when I made it out, no, sir. 

89.3.30— 57— pt. 17 8 



6766 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. When it got back from the bank, that is what was 
on there ? 

Mr. Lent. That was added, yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Is there anything else ? 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all from him. 

The Chairman. Call the next witness. 

JNIr. Kennedy. Sherman Van Ness. 

(Members of the select committee present at this point were Sena- 
tors McClellan and McNamara.) 

The Chairman. Yon do solemnly swear the evidence you shall give 
before this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

TESTIMONY OF SHERMAN VAN NESS 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Van Ness, My name is Sherman Van Ness. I live at 707 
Colonial Street, Uniondale, Long Island, N. Y. I operate under the 
business name of Uniondale Garbage & Disposal Co. 

The Chairman. You are in the garbage business ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. The carting business ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you waive counsel ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were a member of the Inter- County Carting 
Association ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And then Mr. Vincent Squillante came in; is that 
right? 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. At that time did you become a member of the union ? 

Mr. Van Ness. No, sir. I was already a member of the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were a member of the union already ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you decide, after Mr. Squillante came in and 
suggested the raising of the dues for the members of the association 
that you would leave the association ? 

Mr. Van Ness. When I received the first notice of an increase in 
dues I wrote them a letter and told them I thought they had made a 
mistake. At that time I think there was an $80 proportionate fee for 
legal representation before the union, before the negotiation of a new 
contract. I sent my original $18 per month — I think I owed them for 
2 months, whicli was $36 plus $80, which would be a total of $116, 
the total check that I sent, and asked for an explanation as to why the 
dues were so high. I got a telephone call from Jerry Mancuso, I think 
it was, and he said he was very happy that he received the letter from 
me. He did not even know I was a member of the association. I 
told them I was a member of the original association, and I don't 
know where he came from. But I asked him why the increase, 
and he said that he was my business representative. I explained that 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIEiS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6767 

I started my business with nothing and worked up to a 5,000 account 
business, and I did not need a business associate or representative, 
and, therefore, I did not think that the charge was just. So I refused 
to pay. 

Then I received a registered letter from them saying I was put out 
of the association for nonattendance of meetings. In the next mail, I 
got a registered letter from the union saying I was in violation of my 
contract, pertaining to the security clause risk. J went in to see 
Bernie Adelstein, and I told him I did not have $4,200 and I wanted 
to know what we could do, if I could pay payments, so much a month, 
or something like that, and he said no, I had to pay the $4,200. 

Mr. Kennedy. The $4,200 was for security ? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Immediately after you received a letter from th^i 
association that you were kicked out of the association, in the follow- 
ing mail you received a letter from the union saying you owe $4,200 of 
security i 

Mr. Van Ness. I did not owe the $4,200. I was in violation of the 
security clause in the contract. 

Mr. Kennedy. In that you had not paid the money ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Well, I didn't pay it, because I did not know I was 
in violation. I did not know the clause was in the contract. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know that Mr. Squillante offered a $1,000 
reward to any association member, to the association member who 
could take the most business away from you ? 

Mr. Van Ness. I heard it; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy'. That was when you left the association. 

lyir. Van Ness. When they threw me out. 

Mr, Kennedy'. That he said he would give $1,000 to the association 
member who could take the most business away from you ? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy'. We have these letters. 

The Cpiairman. I hand you a letter dated May 23, 1955, addressed 
to Uniondale Carting, Mr. Van Ness, signed Jerry Mancuso, executive 
director. It is on the Inter-County Cartmen's Association, Inc., sta- 
tionery. I ask you to examine that letter and state if that is the 
original letter that you received. 

(Document handed to witness.) 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir ; this is the original. 

Tlie Chair^ian. That may be made exhibit No. 6. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 6" for refer- 
ence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7027.) 

The Chairman. I hand you another letter dated May 25, 1055, 
addressed to Uniondale Garbage & Disposal Co., signed by Bernard 
Adelstein, secretary-treasurer of local 813. I ask you to examine the 
letter and see if you identify it, if that is the original that you 
received. 

(Document handed to witness.) 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir ; it is. 

The Chairman. That may be made exhibit No. 7. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 7"' for refer- 
ence and will l:)e found in tlie appendix on p. 7028.) 



6768 IMPROPER ACTIVmES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. As I understand it, you got a letter on May 23 from 
the carting association, saying that you were being suspended because 
you had failed to attend three consecutive meetings of the association. 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you have any notice of those meetings ? 

Mr. Van Ness. I believe so, sir. 

The Chairman. Was there any rule that you knew of that you had 
to attend ? 

Mr. Van Ness. I think they sent me a card at one time stating that 
the board of directors or something put that clause in the bylaws, 
that you must attend, or if you miss three consecutive meetings, you 
are automatically- 

The Chairman. Were you purposely trying to get out of the asso- 
ciation at that time ? 

Mr. Van Ness. No, sir. My personal life and community life kept 
me very busy and I did not have time to give to the association. 

The Chairman. In other words, you were not trying personally to 
get out of the association? 

Mr. Van Ness. No, sir. 

The Chairman. When you got that letter, what did you do about it? 

Mr. Van Ness. Nothing, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you attend the association ? 

Mr. Van Ness. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you complain about being expelled ? 

Mr. Van Ness. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Then you got this letter from the local, the team- 
sters local, with Adelstein as secretary-treasurer, dated May 25. It 
says : 

You have failed to deposit security and are otherwise in violation of contract 
with the union. You are hereby directed to appear at the union office, 147 
Fourth Avenue, New York 3, N. Y., on Tuesday, May 31, 1955, at 2 p.m. Upon 
your failure to appear and comply with our agreement, the matter will be 
referred to the New York State Department of Labor for action as provided in 
the contract. 

Did you appear ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. Before I appeared, I called them on the 
phone and told them I did not know there was such a clause in the 
contract, and he said it was in the previous contract, and I disagreed 
with him. When I Avent to see him, I took my original contract, and 
the contract that had the security clause risk, and I showed it to him, 
and he a]:)ologized and said, "I thought it was in there." I said to 
him, "Well, if our association went on with this cartmen's association, 
what happens? "V^^iat protection do the employees have?" And he 
said tlie association would post a bond for the employers protecting 
the employees. I said "I would like to see that bond." In the usual 
profanity, he told me it was none of my business. In other words, I 
could not see that bond. 

The CiiAiRaiAN. He claimed that as long as you were a member of 
the association, the association M'as supposed to post the bond for you, 
to protect your men ? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right. 

The Chairman. And since you were not now any longer a member 
of the association, you had to put up the cash ? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right. 

The Chairman. How much did the cash come to ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVirrES IN THE LABOR FIEIiD 6769 

Mr. Van Ness. $i,200. 

The Chairman. I hand you here what purports to be a photostatic 
copy of a check dated June 20, 1955, made payable to local 813, in the 
amount of $4,200, signed Sherman Van Ness and George McCahell. 
I ask you to examine that and state if you identify it as a photostatic 
copy of the original check ? 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Are you kissing the money goodby? All right. 
That may be made exhibit No. 8. 

(The "document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 8" for ref- 
erence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7029.) 

The Chairman. AYhen do you expect to get that money back ? 

Mr. Van Ness. I wrote a letter last December, I think it was, stat- 
ing that the organization that was responsible for the clause and the 
people that represented it were no longer active and I would like to 
have the money returned to me plus interest so I could reinvest it in 
my growing business. To this date, sir, I have not received an answer 
to that letter. 

The Chairman. Has your contract expired ? 

Mr. Van Ness. No, sir, not until January 31, 1958. 

The Chairman. I hand you what appears to be a carbon copy of 
the letter you referred to dated December 17, 1956, addressed to "In- 
surance Trust Fund." 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right, sir. That is where the money is de- 
posited. I tried to get them to deposit the $4,200 and give me the 
bank book. 

The Chairman. Would you identify the cai'bon copy of the letter. 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That may be made exhibit No. 9. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 9" for ref- 
ence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7030.) 

The Chairman. You deposited the money on — what is the date of 
that check? The check is dated June 20, 1955. In June 1955, you 
paid in the $4,200 ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You tried to get it back in December 1956 ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Why were you trying to get it back then ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Because the organization Avas no longer in exist- 
ence, to my knowledge. 

The Chairman. What organization ? 

Mr. Van Ness. The Inter-County Cartmen's Association, and they 
were the responsible parties for the clause in the contract. 

The Chairman. And that association had gone out of business ? 

Mr. Van Ness. As far as I know, sir. 

The Chairman. As far as you know ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman, But you had paid the money to the local. Why 
didn't you write the local and ask for your money back ? 

Mr. Van Ness. I did, sir. That is addressed to the local. The 
insurance trust fund, that is where it was deposited. 

The Chairman. I understand. That letter is addressed to whom ? 



6770 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The letter is addressed to the Insurance Trust Fund? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right, local 813. 

The Chairman. It is not quite clear from the letter itself as I read 
it. Oh, yes. Attention Bernard Adelstein. 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right. 

The Chairman. He was the head of the local or secretary-treasurer 
of it? 

Mr. Van Ness. Eight, sir. 

The Chairman. And you never received a reply to this letter ? 

Mr. Van Ness. No, sir ; I have not. 

The Chairman. All right. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. I have just one last question. "We had some testi- 
mony here about Rose Anelli. 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And she, according to the testimony, has a union 
contract. From your own personal knowledge of experience, does that 
company, Sunset Cartage Co., Sanitation Co., do they live up to the 
terms of the contract? 

Mr. Van Ness. I don't think any part of it, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. They do not ? 

Mr. Van Ness. I don't think so. 

Mr. Kennedy. In fact, their company flagrantly Anolates the terms 
of the contract, does it not ? 

Mr. Van Ness. I think mostly all the time. 

The Chairman. Do you violate it ? 

Mr. Van Ness. No, sir, not to my knowledge. I still have men — 
when we signed with the union, they were getting above union scale 
and they are still getting that today. I pay $3 to $6 a week over the 
union scale. 

The Chairman. You pay from $3 to $6 a week over the union scale ? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right. 

The Chairman. That is, over your contract with the union? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right. When we joined the union, this is 
probably a scarce case, we were actually paying more money than the 
union was. 

The Chairman. When you joined? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right, sir. 

The Chairman. What benefit have your men gotten from the union ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Possibly through the hospital plan, the welfare plan, 
that we pay $3 a week for. 

The Chairman. That is the $3 a month you pay? 

Mr. Van Ness. No, it is $3 a week. It is not a 4- week month. It 
is a 5-week month. I tried that and I got a notice to remit for the 
other week. 

The Chairman. It is $3 a week? 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir; $3 a week, 52 weeks, $156 a year. 

The Chairman. How much do you pay in addition for dues? 

Mr. Van Ness. I don't pay, sir. My partner and I are members of 
this, too. We can't drive our own equipment unless we are members. 
We pay the $6, the company pays for us. The men pay their own 
dues at $6 a month. 

The Chairman. They have to pay? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 6771 

The Chairman. And you have to pay or j^oiir company pays for you, 
you and your partner? 

Mr. Van Ness. Definitely. 

The Chairman. AYhat do you get for the $6 a month? What do 
the men get for the $6 a month? I can appreciate they might get 
something for the $3 if it is administered properly, but what do you 
get for tlie $6 a month? 

Mr. Van Ness. I suppose they feel they have protection, sir. I 
don't know. 

The Chairman. Protect what ? Your life, your property, or what ? 

Mr. Van Ness. No, to protect their job. 

The Chairman. That means you could not discharge one of them? 

Mr. Van Ness. No, sir, not unless I had a very good reason. 

The Chairman. In other words, they pay for the protection of the 
job, and you pay $6 for you and your brother, each 

Mr. Van Ness. My father, sir, not my brother. 

The Chairman. I beg your pardon — your partner, to protect your 
job? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right, and we pay $300 to guarantee our own 
salary, too. 

The Chairman. Do you pay yourself a salary ? 

Mr. Van Ness. No, sir, I have a wife, sir. 

The Chairman. You just take the profit ? 

Mr. Van Ness. We call it a withdrawal, sir. 

The Chairman. You call it a withdrawal ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. I guess those withdrawals vary, do they not? 

^Mr. Van Ness. What is that, igir ? 

Tlie Chairman. I imagine tlie withdrawals vary, depending on the 
amount of profit you make ? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right, sir. 

The Chairman. So it is not a salary ? 

Mr, Van Ness. No, sir ; definitely not. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you talked to Rose Anelli's — any of her em- 
ployees or former employees ? 

Mr. A^AN Ness. About the union ? 

]Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

Mr. Van Ness. No, but I have had men that have worked for her 
come to me looking for a job. 

]\Ir. Kennedy, How much did they say they were working ? 

Mr, Van Ness. Tliey said they were working 6 days a week for $66, 
and I pay $123.60 for 6 days a week. 

Mr. Kennedy. What is she supposed to pay under the union scale ? 

Mr. Van Ness. $82 and $89. $82 for helpers and $89 for chauffeur. 

The Chairman. $82 and $89, and she is paying $66 ? 

Mr. Van Ness. The salary I quoted is for 40 hours, 5 days a week. 

The Chairman. And her employees work 

Mr. Van Ness. Work many hours, many days, for $66. 

The Chairman. They work a much longer time than yourself and 
only get $66, is that right ? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right. 

Tlie Chairman. You are actually paying yourself how much ? 

]Mr. Van Ness. We have 1 man who works 6 days. He acts as our 
foreman, I would say. He gets $123.50, 



6772 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. $123.50 per week. 

Mr. Van Ness. Rifrht, sir. 

The Chairman. Whereas hers working for the same time get $66 ? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right. 

The Chairman. You are paying more than double. 

Mr. Van Ness. Right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we have subpenaed her to testify 
before the committee, but she has notified us that she is ill and will 
not be able to attend. She is getting a doctors certificate. 

Senator McNamara. Mr. Chairman, I have a couple of questions. 
You heard the testimony of previous witnesses that they were only 
notified of 4 union meetings in 5 years. 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Did you have the same experience ? 

Mr. Van Ness. I presume so, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Then you were charged wdth not attending 
three consecutive meetings ? 

Mr. Van Ness. That was the association. That had nothing to do 
with the union. 

Senator McNamara. Did you ever attend a union meeting ? 

Mr. Van Ness. No, sir. 

Senator McNamara. You could not vote if you did ? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is what they tell me, sir. I don't know. I 
have not attended. 

Senator ]McNamara, You don't know that that was a condition. 

Mr. Van Ness. No. 

Senator McNamara. You have every reason to believe that if you 
went to a union meeting, you could participate ? 

Mr. Van Ness. Well, I would certainly try. 

Senator McNamara. But you were too busy with other things to 
even go to the union meetings ? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right. To me it was secondary. I have too 
many important things to woriy about. 

Senator McNamara. You were just paying the money into the 
association and the union so you could continue your business, 
actually ? 

Mr. Van Ness. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. That is all. 

The Chairman. Messrs. Montesano, you gentlemen will return after 
lunch. We have not quite completed your testimony. 

The committee will now recess until 2 o'clock. 

(Members of the select committee present at this point were Sena- 
tors McClelland and McNamara.) 

(Thereupon at 12:30 p. m., a recess was taken until 2 p. m,, the 
same day.) 

afternoon session 

The Chairman. The committee will be in order. 
(jNIembers of the select committee present at the convening of the 
afternoon session : Senators McClellan and Ives.) 
The Chairman. Will the witnesses come around, please? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE L.\BOR FIELD 6773 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN MONTESANO AND ANTHONY MONTESANO— 

Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Montesano, I want to ask you to go back to 
aiiotlier incident regarding these courts, and the operation of the 
court. Was it understood when Mr. Squilhinte came into the asso- 
ciation that there would not be any bidding against one another? 

Mv. John Monit.sano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You would have your property rights and terri- 
tories and there would not be any bidding against another indi- 
vidual ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy. The one who had that territory would have it? 

Mr. John Montesano. There would be no competitive bidding. 

Mr. Kennedy. What rules were laid down as far as new stops 
were concerned? Was it generally understood that anyone could go 
in on new stops ? 

]Mr. Anthony Montesano. NeAv stops were considered open work, 
and anybody could bid on it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was there an incident that happened in connection 
with the Mitchel Field bidding? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that involved Mr. Recchia ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

]\Ir. Kennedy. Is that how you pronounce his name ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us what his personal experience was 
about that bid and what you learned about that ? 

Mr. John Montesano. In the beginning, we had no word of Mr. 
Eecchia. 

Mr. Kennedy. He had a company ? 

Mr. John Montesano. The Trio Carting Co. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. How do you spell that ? 

Mr. John Montesano. T-r-i-o Carting Co. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was operated by Mr. Eecchia ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

]\Ir. Kennedy. How do you spell his name ; do you know that ? 

Mr. John Montesano. R-e-c-c-h-i-a. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is Angelo Eecchia ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, and we had an association meeting 1 
day, and it pertained to a Mitchel Field contract. It seemed that 
Angelo Recchia had come to the board and complained that he had 
lost the Sunrise Supermarkets. 

Mv. Kennedy. lie had been picking up the garbage at the Sunrise 
Supermarkets and he was complaining to the board that he had lost 
that? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes; and so the board had no knoAvledge of 
it, and why he had lost it or anything or who had taken these ac- 
counts. Then we found out that the accounts were taken by General 
Sanitation. 

Mr. Kennedy. Which was Nunzio Squillante's firm? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 



6774 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. The "whip" firm ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Right. So when Jimmie was consulted on 
this, what had happened, he said that Angelo had stepped out of 
line on the Mitchel Field contract and that when he bid the job, the 
job was supposed to be given to Carmen DeCabia and the Mirable & 
DeCabia Cartage Co. He said that Angelo wouldn't "go along with 
them" ; that was the term "he" used. 

Mr. Kennedy. Jimmie said this ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes; and that this was to teach Angelo a 
lesson, and he had taken these Sunrise Supermarkets off Angelo to 
more or less straighten him up and keep him in line. 

Mr. Kennedy. As Jimmie Squillante explained to you, DeCabia 
had refused to go along on the bidding to Mitchel Field job? 

Mr. John Montesano. Not DeCabia, but Angelo Recchia. 

Mr. Kennedy. He had refused to go along on the bidding at the 
Mitchel Field job, and for that reason the "whip" firm, General 
Sanitation, was coming in to take away some of his stops ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Those stops were at the Sunrise Stores ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Sunrise Supermarkets. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was there any further discussion on it ? 

Mr. John Montesano. There were 3 or 4 meetings pertaining to 
this Sunrise Supermarkets, because Angelo naturally always would 
come back and he would want to know why his stops were taken. 
After all, it was competitive bidding, and he had bid on the job, and 
for no reason at all he lost his supermarkets. In one meeting, in 
particular, Squillante got very violent with him and he used very 
abusive language, and he just told Angelo, "Well, that is the straight 
of it," and that was the end of it. 

And Angelo had to sit down and keep quite and be thankful he only 
took the Sunrise Supermarkets. 

When anybody started to protest, there was nothing to protest. 
Jimmie had the stores and that was it. 

Mr. Kennedy, And he just lost them? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy, Was there any further discussion about this matter 
at the board ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Well, we stayed around awhile and we tried 
to straighten it out, and we felt Angelo didn't have a right to lose 
the stops because he hadn't done anything that was bad, 

Mr, Kennedy, Because this was a new bid ? 

Mr, John Montesano, Yes ; the way they had it worked out, it was 
new. 

Mr. Kennedy, And supposedly anyone could go in on that? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy. But Squillante said the bid belonged to Carmen 
DeCabia? 

Mr, John Montesano, That is what he said. 

Mr, Kennedy. Was it ever resolved that you know of personally ? 

Mr, John Montesano, No, sir, 

Mr, Kennedy, There was no further discussion on the board that 
you knew about ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Not at the board ; no, sir. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6775 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, Mr. DeCabia, did he complain also about the 
fact that Angelo Eecchio had done? Do you remember that? 

Mr. John Montesano. If my memory serves me right, on Madison 
Avenue one day, the day of this meeting, Carmen DeCabia did get 
up and say Angelo had bid on him and due to the fact that he at that 
time had the messhalls, he was serving all of the messhalls and the 
field became one big Held, and it was no longer the messhalls but 
the whole field, he was entitled to the whole field, due to the fact he 
was the first cartman in there, you see. 

That is when the meeting started with Jimmie, and Jimmie repre- 
sented Carmen, and that was it, and he told Angelo that Angelo was 
wrong in taking the stops. 

The Chairman. Was that a bid job ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir; it w^as a Government bid. 

The Chairman. A Government job put out to bidders ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. The Government invited people to bid on the con- 
tract, to get the job ? 

Mr. John ]\Iontesano. That's right, sir. 

The Chairman. As I understand you, it was arranged that no one 
would bid except one man. 

Mr. John Montesano. It was arranged this way, sir: If you re- 
ceived the specs on it, the specifications on the bid, you had an al- 
ternative, either not to bid or to bid a higher price than the man 
that was supposed to get the contract. 

The Chairman. In other words, it was collusion, and it was pre- 
arranged, and rigged bidding. 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You could either not bid, if you received an in- 
vitation to bid or you could not bid at all, or if you did bid you were 
supposed to bid higher than the man that was designated to get it by 
your association ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

(At this point. Senator McNamara entered the hearing room.) 

The Chairman. And the man designated to get it was whom? 

Mr. John Montesano. Carmen DeCabia. 

The Chairman. Who was this other one that bid ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Angelo Recchia, Trio Carting. 

The Chairman. He bid lower ? 

Mr. John Montesano. And he got the contract. 

The Chairman. Then what happened? Was he made to give up 
the contract ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir. He lost 7 Sunrise Stores, 7 or more 
Sunrise Stores. 

The Chairman. They penalized him? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. But the whole intention Avas to prevent competi- 
tive bidding on a Government contract? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

The Chairman. To rig the bidding so one man would get it? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

The Chairman. But someone broke the agreement, if lie was ever 
in it? 



6776 IMPROPEIR ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 

Mr. John Montesano. I doubt if he was in it, or else he wouldn't 
have broken the agreement. 

The Chairman. But he got it ? 

Mr. John Montesano. He got the contract. 

The Chairman. Then he was penalized by taking away from him 
some of his choice businesses, and choice accounts ? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. I see. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was done through the "whip" firm. General 
Sanitation? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. General Sanitation stepped in and took these busi- 
nesses away from him ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

The Chairman. By order of whom ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That we never cleared up, sir, but it must 
have been through Jimmie, because no one else seemed to know about 
it. 

The Chairman. He was giving the orders pretty much at that 
time? 

Mr. John Montesano. Oh, yes, yes, he was; because when it did 
come up on the floor when they had a discussion, one of the cartmen 
in the organization turned around and said, "Well, if the man was 
wrong in his actions, why wasn't tlie association notified? Never 
mind the board of directors, you know the members." So that we 
know that the fellow had broken the rules of the organization. 

So Jimmie turned around and he said, "Well, he was taken care 
of." 

The Chairman. He was what? 

Mr. John Montesano. He was taken care of, and in other words, 
he was taught his lesson without the association being brought in on 
it, without the general organization being brought in on it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Didn't you raise a question on one occasion as to 
why the Sunrise Stores were taken away ? 

Mr. John Montesano. I did, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Didn't you raise that question with Squillante? 

Mr. John Montesano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Didn't he tell you ? 

Mr. John Montesano. He told me because Angelo wouldn't stay 
in line on the Mitcliel Field bid. 

Mr. Kennedy. There wasn't any question that he knew and was 
aware of it ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No question in my mind. 

Mr. Kennedy. He is the one, or it was brother's firm, that took the 
stops away ; isn't that right : Nunzio Squillante ? 

Mr. John Montesano. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all, for now. 

Senator McNamara. Did you bid on the contract ? 

Mr. John Montesano. No, sir; because I didn't receive the specs 
at that time. 

Senator McNamara. That is all. 

The Chairman. You may stand aside for the present. Call the 
next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Angelo Recchia. 



IMPROPER ACTIVirrES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6777 

The Chairman. AVill you be sworn ? You do solennily swear that 
the evidence you shall give before this Senate select committee shall 
be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you 
God? 

Mr. Recchia. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF ANGELO RECCHIA 

The Chairman. State j-our name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Recchia. My name is Angelo Recchia, and I live at 7 South 
Ninth Street, New Hyde Park, and owner of the Trio Carting Co. 

The Chairman. You waive counsel, do you ^ 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Recchia, you are in the carting business ? 

Mr. Recchia. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy. For how long have you been in that business? 

Mr. Recchia. Going on 8 years. 

Mr. Kennedy. What is the name of your company; Trio? 

Mr. Recchia. Trio Carting Co. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many employees do you have ? 

Mr. Recchia. Right now, I have three. 

Mr. Kennedy. Three employees ? 

Mr, Recchia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to point out, Mr. Chairman, that Mr. 
Recchia has, since we first interviewed him, cooperated with the com- 
mittee. 

Back in 1955, were there certain bids put out by Mitchel P'ield? 

Mr. Recchia. This is other bids besides the field itself you mean ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, was Mitchel Field, was that the first bid that 
came out ? 

Mr. Recchia. It was the first bid that came out. 

Mr. Kennedy. When did that come out, approximately ? 

Mr. Recchia. Sometime at the end of January. 

Mr. Kennedy. Of 1955 ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you receive the specifications from Mitchel 
Field? 

^fr. Recchlv. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was that an Air Force contract ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, an Air Force contract, and belongs to the Gov- 
ernment. 

Mr. Kennedy. So did you decide to bid on it ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir ; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell the committee what happened ? Did 
you have any discussions with anybody about the bid ? 

Mr. Recchia. The day the bids were received by these carting firms, 
as myself, we happened to have an association meeting that evening. 
So I went to the meeting. As soon as I opened the door into the meet- 
ing room, on one side of the meeting room there were Jimmie Squil- 
lante, Decreesie, and Carmen DeCabia standing there. In other words, 
as soon as I opened the door to enter, Jimmie calls me over. 



6778 IMPROPEIR ACTIVITIES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 

There was a little session about it, Jimmie asked me did I receive 
a bid sheet from Mitchel Field. 

Well, I said "No," just to see what they wanted to say about it, which 
I did. So he said, "Well, Mitchel Field sent out the bids for the new 
contract" ; and he said, "I want you to go along with Carmen DeCabia 
on the contract, and I want him to get it." 

So I said "O. K." I have worked around there on another contract 
that is practically a Government contract, the housing project, and 
I have been waiting for this contract to come up. It has been coming 
up since 1950 or something, but they always postponed it. In other 
words, they canceled the contract each time the bids were received. 

So, finally, they decided to go ahead. I said, "I'm going to bid on 
the contract regardless of what you say, because it is new business.'^ 

Carmen said he had the messhalls, and I said, "Carmen, I had the 
messhalls before you entered your foot in Nassau County, and that 
contract expired and the Government started picking up the stuff." 

Mr. Kennedy. He said Carmen DeCabia had the messhalls out there, 
and so, therefore, this wasn't new business and he should have the right 
to have it ? 

Mr. Recchia. He said it wasn't new business, but the bids were sent 
out. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you pointed that out ? 

Mr. Recchia. I said to him that that contract expired before Squil- 
lante came to Nassau County, and he said, "Let us forget about that. 
I want you to go along with DeCabia on that bid.'' And I told Squil- 
lante, "Well, you do what you want ; if you want to bid on it yourself, 
you go ahead ; but I am going to bid on it regardless of what you say." 
He said, "Well, you are going along or j^ou are out of business," 

]Mr. Kennedy. What is that ? 

Mr. Recchia. "If you don't go along, you are out of business." I 
said, "If you want to play rough, I am just as strong as you are in 
one w^ay." 

So. then I sat down, and that is it. Two days later, I got a phone 
call from the head guy from Sunrise Supermarkets. He said, "Dis- 
continue the service from January 31. There is a new outfit coming 
in February 1." There were 10 supermarkets involved in that con- 
tract. So I guess the whip that was General Sanitation started 
taking over. 

Mr. Kennedy. General Sanitation started to take over your 
business ? 

Mr. Recchia. That's right. 

JNIr. Kennedy. Ten stops from the supermarket ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

^Ir. Kennedy. You were notified of that within a few days ? 

Mr. Recchia. A few days before the end of January, he gave me 
notice to discontinue service. 

Mr. Kennedy. This was a few days after you had the conversation ? 

Mr. Recchia. It was before the contract was awarded; they took 
that work away. 

Mr. Kennedy. But it was a few days after the conversation that you 
had with Squillante in which he said, "We are going to break you" ? 

Mr. Recchia. That is the time I lost the Sunrise, even before the 
contract with Mitchel Field was awarded. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIEI^D 6779 

]Mr. Kennedy. But it was before tlie contract was awarded, but after 
you notified them that you were going to bid on it, and he told you that 
he was going to take your business away ? 

Mr. Recchia. That's right. 

jNIr. Kennedy. So that, within a few days of that, you were notified 
that 10 of your supermarlcet stops had been taken ; is that right ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, plus Anunzio himself ; they went to the corpora- 
tion which is the housing project which is on the base, and that contract 
expired at tliat time, too, and so Anunzio went in and tried to take 
that contract away from me by giving a low, ridiculous price. I over- 
heard the price, and so I underbid him again. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wait a minute. Let us go back. You put your 
contract in for the Mitchel Field situation ; is that right ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you bid $70,000 ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you received that contract ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir ; that is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, there was another contract out there. 

Mr. Recchia, Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is Mitchel Manor ? 

Mr. Recchia. No ; that contract was mine, but it lasts 4 years. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was the second contract ? 

Mr. Recchia. The second contract came out ; Santini housing project 
on the Air Force base. 

Mr. Kennedy. Which contract is the one in wliich you overheard 
his bid ? 

Mr. Recchia. That was Mitchel Manor. 

Mr. Kennedy. Let us go back to that. That was during 1955 ? 

Mr. Recchia. During 1955, and 

Mr. Kennedy. That was an oral bid ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you had gone to INIitchel Manor to bid there? 

Mr, Recchia. Yes, and, in other words, my contract expired for 
Mitchel Manor, and so I went in and gave them my new price. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was your price ? 

Mr. Recchia. $2.35 per month per family, and that is 6-day-a-week 
service, which is cheap enough price. That was on a 3-year contract. 
So, as soon as I left the offices going down to my car, I saw these two 
hoodlums — they looked like hoodlums, because I never saw Anunzio 
before, and I knew something was- fishy. So I went back in, and I 
waited a while, and I went back in and I sat in this waiting room by 
tlie door, and I overheard them talking, and they introduced them- 
selves to Mr. Muss, and saying he was "generar' sometliing or other, 
and I didn't get the full name of it, and I heard him giving a price 
of $2 per family to take the contract away from me. 

So, then, before long, I left the office and I went back to my car and 
sat there until tliey left.. I went back in 15 minutes later, and I gave 
them a new price; told them since I got the contract from JNIitchel 
Field I have 3 more trucks and 9 more men, I could do the job faster 
and cheaper and easier. And so they went along with me, and I got 
10 cents more than he did, $2.10. I tried it first and they awarded 
me the contract. 



6780 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. They gave you the contract ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes ; I told them since I have got a 1-year contract 
with Mitchel, I would like to go along with a 1-year contract just in 
case I don't get it next year, and so we went along on a 1-year con- 
tract for $2.10 per family. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was the next thing that occurred ? 

Mr. Recchia. Then two more contracts came out. 

Mr. Kennedy. Santini housing project. 

Mr. Recchia. S-a-n-t-i-n-i housnig project, 

Mr. Kennedy. At Mitchel Field, still an Air Force base contract ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, in the area of Mitchel Field. 

Mr. Kennedy. And Roslyn Air Force Base? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was also on Air Force contract? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You received specifications on those contracts ? 

Mr. Recchia. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did you decide to do on that ? 

Mr. Recchia. I figured if I took Santini housing project I would 
sure have my head chopped off my shoulders, and so I 

Mr. Kennedy. Why did you think that would happen to you ? 

Mr. Recchia. Because I took new work there. And here is what 
this fellow said when he first came into the association. He said "As 
of today," when he stepped foot in the association, "We start fresh. 
Any new business comes up from here on is open. It is open busi- 
ness for anyone. Anyone who has any business, it is theirs until they 
get rid of it." 

That is why I had the brawl on Mitchel Field, which is new busi- 
ness. I knew Carmine made a deal with him somehow, and that is 
why we had this big brawl. So if I ever took that Santini housing 
project, which is another big new thing which came up, since the gar- 
bage disposal had it for 11 or 12 years, and he jumped from the asso- 
ciation and he was not a member. 

Well, I knew I would never underbid Uniondale Garbage Disposal, 
because I have put two bids down there on that job quite a few years 
ago, and it seems like he always underbid everybody. So I knew 
Carmine or myself would never receive that bid. 

Mr. Kennedy. Let me see if I understand. There was already out 
there a company called Uniondale Garbage Disposal, and because they 
had been out there a long time you expected that they would have it"? 

Mr. Recchia. And they had that work some time. 

Mr. Kennedy. You expected they would be able to get that bid ? 

Mr. Recchia. He had that. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you expected when they awarded the new con- 
tract, because of the fact that this other company had operated in 
the area, that they would be able to get the new bid ? 

Mr. Recchia. That is right, and, in fact, he had that contract, and 
he signed a 1-year contract Avith the Federal Housing Association or 
something and they awarded the job to him. So far as I knew, he had 
it for another year. Then Mitcliel Field took this housing project 
under their wing, and they demolished all of the other contracts and 
drew a new type of contract and they sent them on. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6781 

Mr. Kjjnnedy. So, Uniondale had had the contract out there, but 
then the Air Force had taken over that area and thrown the contract 
out, and now it was a question of reawarding the contract. 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You thought because the Uniondale had been active 
out there in that area, that they would get the contract ? 

Mr. Recchia. That he would get it back. As far as his knowledge 
went, he had the contract. 

Mr. Kennedy. You thought that Uniondale would bid under you 
and bid under anybody else ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. So what did you do then ? 

Mr. Reechia. So I called up Carmine. 

Mr. Kennedy. DeCabia ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, and I said "There is a new job coming up, are 
you going to bid on it?" And he said, "No, you go ahead." 

I said "If you want to bid, you go along and tell me the price you 
are going to bid and I will bid over it." 

So the next day he called me up. 

Mr. Kennedy. This is still an Air Force contract ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, and the next night I got in touch with him and 
he gave me his price, and somehow I didn't put it on paper and he 
tolcl me the price to put down. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you didn't write it down ? 

Mr. Recchia. No, because I had time, I just forgot about it and it 
was about a week later I started filling out the sheets. Somehow I 
put the wrong figure on there and it would be in my favor and so 
when the contract was awarded, I didn't go down because I didn't 
intend to get it and I thought Uniondale Garbage Disposal would 
get it. 

Mr. Kennedy. "What happended to Uniondale ? 

Mr. Reechia. So Uniondale didn't put his bid in because when he 
received the sheet he told them something about Mitchel Field and he 
never bothered with that before. 

Uniondale took that envelope and pushed it on the side of his desk, 
that is what he told me when I got in touch with him. So he didn't 
bid on it, and it was only Carmine DeCabia and myself bid on the 
work. Somehow in the bid Carmine was 9 cents or $9 and when 
Carmine heard that, he was fit to call my 

Mr. Kennedy. What had you done then ? You had forgotten the 
figure ? 

Mr. Recchia. It was an error, or my mistake on putting the figure 
on "per homes." So he was fit to kill me and he burned the telephone 
wires. 

Mr. Kennedy. You had the contract ? 

Mr. Recchia. They awarded me that contract, too. 

Mr. Kennedy. You had told him that you would arrange a bid 
so that he would get the contract? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir; and I told him I will pay the lawyer fees 
to draw up a subcontract, and he would subcontract the work. 

Mr. Kennedy. This is that night ? 

89330— 57— pt. 17 9 



6782 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THEi LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Recchia. We had a special meeting with Jimmy Squillante on 
that. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wait a minute. 

The Chairman. Let us get back to where you got your original 
figures. He called you up and told you what he was going to bid ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You forgot to put those figures in ? 

Mr. Recchia. And in fact I didn't bother, because I knew right then, 
that was fresh to me, and a week later it wasn't fresh any more. 

The Chairman. A week later it wasn't fresh, and you didn't re- 
member it ? 

Mr. Recchia. No. 

The Chairman. But you still intended to overbid him ? 

Mr. Recchia. That is right. 

The Chairman. You intended to ? 

Mr. Recchia. That is right, because I didn't care, because I knew 
Uniondale Garbage would get it. 

The Chairman. You underbid him in fact and you got the contract ? 

Mr. Recchia. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you pleased when you heard you got the con- 
tract ? 

Mr. Recchia. No, no, I wasn't because I knew I was in for it, from 
Carmine or Squillante. I knew I was going to get it and in fact I got 
it from both of them. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you talk to them ? Tell the committee how you 
learned that you got the contract. 

Mr. Recchia. Well, Carmine himself called me up and told 
me, and he said "What are you trying to do ? Wliat are you trying 
to take me for, a baby or something ?" 

He thought I was trying to pull a trick on him, finding out his price, 
and I lowered it a few dollars to get the job. It was a high price for 
that job anyway, and the price it was put in was ridiculous, and it 
was more than he should get. That is why I went along, because I 
knew Uniondale Garbage was going to get it for less, and somehow Jie 
didn't put a bid in. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was he mad at you ? 

Mr. Recchia. Who is that. Carmine? I won't say he was mad, he 
was having daggers coming out of his eyes. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was coming out of his eyes ? 

Mr. Recchia. Daggers. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you upset yourself ? 

Mr. Recchia. Sure I was upset because I didn't know which way to 
move, and I almost got down on my hands and knees and pleaded 
to forgive me. I did an error on my part, and I will do anything 
to straighten this out, and still do the work and collect every penny 
that is coming. He just kept making a big fuss about it, that I was a 
such and such and he got hold of Jimmy Squillante, and he wanted 
to throw me out of the association, and have my whole business free 
for all. So I pleaded with Jimmy Squillante at that meeting that 
night and I pleaded with his brother, and his brother-in-law, and 
the board of directors, and I couldn't get head nor tail with the 
whole group. It was practically all relations on the table with 
Jimmy. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIEIS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6783 

Mr. Kennedy. Did they pay any attention to yon ? 

Mr. Kecchia. No, because they all were going against me. 

Mr. IvJENNEDY. What did you say you would do ? 

Mr. Recchia. I told them I would do anything. I would pay the 
whole expense on the lawyers and have the papers made up that 
he would be the subcontractor on the job and he would collect every 
penny, and it would be costing me money each month for the details 
we have to go through. 

So Jimmy was kind enough to say, "Well, maybe we can fix some- 
thing up," and I don't know what happened to him. So DeCabia said, 
"No, you go back to the contract officer and tell him that you did a mis- 
take on figuring, and that you can't do the job," so I went down to the 
contracting officer. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who did you see down there ? 

Mr. Recchia. A lieutenant. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was it Lieutenant Griffin ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, he was in charge of it at that time, and I went 
down there and I told him I had made an error on it and I didn't 
think I could do it, and he said, "Why can't you get out because you 
have 2 contracts around here plus 4 trucks and plus 9 men, why can't 
you make out ? It is right next door and there is nothing to it and you 
only bid the man under a few dollars. If that guy is capable of doing- 
it for a few dollars over you, you can sure do it." 

So he said, "Anyway, it is too late to do anything, the papers are 
already in process.' 

So I Avent back to see the group, the committee. 

Mr. Kennedy. The board of directors ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, the board of directors, and they made another 
fuss, and so that is when Jimmy said, "Maybe we can fix up some 
papers between you two." And finally I got a lawyer and my lawyer 
got in touch with his lawyer and my lawyer sent a letter to the base, 
seeing what they could do about it; and they said, "Well, as long 
as you send us a copy of the subcontract, then you go along with the 
subcontract." 

Mr. Kennedy. So you agreed to subcontract ? 

Mr. Recchia. I agreed to subcontract. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you subcontract ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. I^NNEDY. What arrangements, financial arrangements did 
you make as far as picking up the trash and garbage in the be- 
ginning ? 

]^Ir. Recchia. At the beginning I was picking up the garbage for 
2 months, and at my expense, and DeCabia got the check. He got 
200 percent profit by me doing all of the work. But he helped me 
for half a month because of a little expense on the incinerator. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did all of the work for the first 2 months ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes; and it was an error on my part, and I wanted 
to get the hell out of the association, because I was really hurting in 
all ways. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he got the checks for the first 2 months? 

Mr. Recchia. I received the check from the Government, and I 
just turned around and made one of my checks and sent it to them 
each month. 



6784 niPROPER activities est thei labor field 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you satisfied or were they satisfied with you 
doing this, and were they pleased with you again after you had 
agreed to do all of this ? 

Mr. Recchia. They didn't bother me then. Actually, I was poison 
to them after that. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did you think would have happened to you 
if you hadn't done any of this ? 

Mr. Recchia. Well, I don't think I would be sitting here today. 

Mr. Kennedy. You think something physically would have hap- 
pened to you? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes; because I went up to his office twice, and for- 
feited my loss, not laiowing how bad he was, and the last time I 
went up there — I didn't go back any more because I saw the devil in 
that man. 

Mr. I\JENNEDY. They threatened you at that time ? 

Mr. Recchia. Well, they talked in a round-about way, it was. 
You would say it was a threat. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you understand that they had a close associa- 
tion with certain racketeers ? 

Mr. Recchia. No, I didn't; and I didn't laiow anything about the 
racketeers who were with him, Anastasia or anybody. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Had you had any experience or seen this penalty 
clause used before in comiection with individuals? Did you know 
of the penalty clause of paying 10 to 1 ? 

Mr. Recchia. I was there one night, and I don't remember the 
name of the outfit, and we had a little discussion with Jimmy about 
it. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were aware of the fact that they had a penalty' 
clause of 10 to 1 if you took someone else's business ? 

Mr. Recchia. Plus $500 fine ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you also know the circumstances surrounding 
Sherman Van Ness when he left the association ? 

Mr. Recchia. I was there that night, too. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did Mr. Squillante say about the $1,000? 

Mr. Recchia. He was going to award $1,000 to anyone, to any firm 
that would take the most business away from the Uniondale Garbage 
Disposal. 

Mr. Kennedy. You just last those 10 stores; is that right? 

Mr. Recchia. It is quite a lot. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is worth about $750 a month ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes ; it came to $750 a month. 

Mr. Kennedy. About $8,000 a year ; is that right? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. That they took away from you ? 

Mr. Recchia. That is right. 

The Chairman. Who did they give them to, the "whip" company ? 

Mr. Recchia. In other words, the whip went there and took it 
away, and they tried to take other business, but I managed to keep 
them. I outsmarted them in other parts of my business. 

The Chairman. You saved all of your business except the 10 
stores ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes ; that is right, and maybe 1 or 2 drugstores, the 
Levinstein Drug Co. 

Mr. Kennedy. Are you in the local 813 now ? 



IMPROPER ACnVirrElS IN THE LABOR FIEIyD 6785 

Mr. Kecchia, That is right, 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you been to any union meetings? Have you 
been invited to any union meetings over the last few years? 

Mr. Eecchia. The same as the other fellows. I had 1 or 2 letters 
in so many years, and I have been in there since 1951. 

Mr. Kennedy. You are a member yourself ? 

Mr. Kecchia. That is right. 

The Chairman. Do you ever attend any of the meetings? 

Mr. Recchia. Never ; I have no use for them. 

The Chairman. Why did you have some use for them ? 

Mr. Recchia. Well, I don't know if I was the first or second outfit, 
but at the time I was the largest commercial carting company in Long 
Island. At the time they got me in the union they camped on Levin- 
stein and put pickets in front of my business and forced me to join, 
and, in fact, I almost lost some of them from not signing, and I have 
no use for them. 

The Chairman. You just joined to keep from losing your cus- 
tomers ? 

Mr. Recchia. That is why I signed up, yes; and it was in 1951. 

The Chairman. How much does it cost you ? 

Mr. Recchia. Well, at that time I think we had to pay $75 for the 
book. 

The Chairman. $75 for the book ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes. 

The Chairman. What kind of a book was that ? 

Mr. Recchia. A union book. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Your initiation fee was $75 ? 

Mr. Recchia. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then how much did you pay a month ? 

Mr. Recchia. I think at the time it was $4 a month dues. 

Mr. Kennedy. What are you paying now ? 

Mr. Recchia. $6. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much are you paying for the welfare fund? 

Mr. Recchia. $3 a week, per person. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. $3 a week per person ? 

Mr. Recchia. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. $12 a month ? 

Mr. Recchia. That is right. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. That is, $12 for 4 weeks ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. I just want to ask you this question: The one in 
which you made the mistake, that you were supposed to bid higher 
than Carmine DeCabia was the one at Santini ? 

Mr. Recchia. Santini housing. 

Mr. EJENNEDY. Was there also a Roslyn Air Force Base ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. At the same time the contract was on both 
of them. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you get both of those ? 

Mr. Recchia. No, one of them. On one of them I happened to bid 
the way he told me to bi d. 

Mr. Kennedy. On the Roslyn Air Force Base you didn't make a 
mistake? 

Mr. Recchia. No. 



6786 IMPROPER ACTiyrriES in the' labor field 

Mr. EjENisnEDT. So he got the Roslyn Air Force Base ? 

Mr. Recchia. The reason I didn't make a mistake on that one was 
the year before I knew the price, and I went along on that. 

Mr. Kennedy. You went along with him on the Roslyn Air Force 
Base and you didn't make a mistake ? 

Mr. Recchia. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much is that worth ? 

Mr. Recchia. $635 a month, I think. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much was Santini ? 

Mr. Recchia. $340 a month. It was $4,008 a year. 

Mr. Ej^nnedy. And the Roslyn Air Force Base was about the same, 
about $5,000? 

Mr. Recchia. Around in there, and I think it was 

Mr. Kennedy. Have there been any renewals of those contracts ? 

Mr. Recchia. Well, the last contract I did try to take that away 
from DeCabia, but somehow some other outfit from the north side, 
they got the contract, or I think it was the south side. 

Mr. Ejennedy. Did you have one renewal since this time ? Did you 
have any renewals since 1955 ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes; Mitchel Field, and I have another 3-year con- 
tract from Mitchel Field, on different terms. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the Roslyn Air Force Base ? 

Mr. Recchia. I mean Mitchel Manor. 

Mr. Kennedy. What about the Roslyn Air Force Base? He still 
has that ; is that right ? 

Mr. Recchia. Carmine DeCabia, he lost that. 

Mr. Kennedy. He lost that ? 

Mr. Recchia. To someone else ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had you gone along on that bid ? 

Mr. Recchia. No ; I tried to take that away from him so bad. 

Mr. Kennedy. You had broken with the association and with him ? 

Mr. Recchia. I stood in the association to the end, and sweat it out. 

Mr. Kennedy. So that as I understand it, on the Mitchel Field 
you refused to go along and that is when you lost your stops. On 
Santini you agreed to go along, but you made a mistake and bid lower. 
And on the Roslyn Air Force Base, you agreed to go along and you 
went along successfully ; is that right ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. They were all Government contracts ? 

Mr. Recchia. That is right. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further ? 

Senator McNamara. You have given us a pretty good explanation 
of why you joined the union and it seems to make sense. Why did 
you join the association ? 

Mr. Recchia. Well, at the time I joined the association, this is some 
time ago, this is away before Squillante ever came in, because I was 
working with a group of fellows, and it was good to know each other, 
and that is all we used to do. We had a meeting and see one another. 
There was no set prices or anything was said at the meetings. It was 
just a get-together among ourselves, who worked in the area. 

Senator McNamara. You joined the association just to be a good 
fellow because the other guys in the industry were joining; is that 
ridit? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6787 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir ; and to get to know each other, rather than 
wonder who that is. 

Senator McNamara. You got in rather innocently ? 

Mr. Recchia, Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Now you find that this is the thing that runs 
the business, the strong arm that runs your business. ^ 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, that is since Squillante set foot in it, then it got 
rough and nasty and it got dirty. 

Senator McNamara. You say that your bid at this housing job was 
about $2 per month per family ; was that about it ? 

Mr. Recchia. No, it was more than that. It was about $2.20. 

Senator McNamara. Are those the rates that usually prevail in 
garbage collection in the area ? 

Mr. Recchia. Around this area, guys picking up house garbage for 
$2.25 or $2.50 a month. That is only two times a week service. This 
is 6-day-week service. 

Senator McNamara. Every day ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. You pick up from a central point, is it? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir ; and in other words, it is like station houses, 
there is about 11 station houses, and it takes half an hour to go through 
every day. 

Senator McNamara. The householder brings it to a central point 
and it is easier to pick up and so you can do it cheaper ? 

Mr. Recchia. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. The thing that I am impressed with is that 
the amount you charge the householder here, where the whole opera- 
tion has the appearance of a racket, doesn't seem to be out of line. It 
seems to be a reasonable price. This I don't understand. 

Mr. Recchia. You can do it for less there, because you don't have 
to send a bill to each homeowner and you don't have to go to beg them 
for your money because you are getting one check from the Govern- 
ment every month. It was a good thing, and it was a nice, easy con- 
tract. If you can get that year after year, why not? It was some- 
thing nice. 

Senator McNamara. If it was a real racket setup, you think it would 
be twice as much for the householder ? 

Mr. Recchia, Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. How come the price stays down ? 

Mr, Recchia. Well, if everybody went along, they won't be paying 
that $2,10 or $2.20, they will be paying $2.80, 

Senator McNamara. We had testimony here this morning that in 
Nassau County they picked up from the individual homeowners, and 
not a housing project, for $2.50 per month. It seems cheap on the 
face of it, by comparison to other communities that we are familiar 
with around here. It is 3 or 4 times as much as it costs around here 
in some communities to pick up garbage. 

Mr. Recchia. $2.50 is a good price. 

Senator McNamara, You can do all right at $2,50 ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. $89 a week for the driver, and $82 a week for 
the helper, and at $2.50 a stop you can do all right ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes. 



6788 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Senator McNamara. That is interesting. 

Mr. Kennedy. I think there might be some confusion, Mr. Recchia, 
on this Rosslyn Air Force Base contract. Now, as I understand it, 
you went along successfully with him in 1955. Now, it is my under- 
standing that the contract was renewed in 1956, and that you again 
made an arrangement with him in 1936 and went along successfully, 
and it wasn't until the contract was up again in June of 1957 that you 
started to bid against him ? 

Mr. Eecchia. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you did go along after 1955, you did go along 
in 1956 again? 

Mr. Recchia. That was the last contract, that is right, back to the 
end of the association, and that is when I went against him on the last 
one in 1957. I was trying to take that away from him. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you physically afraid of what might happen 
to you ? 

Mr. Eecchia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. During this period of time ? 

Mr. Recchia. Any period of time I was in there. 

Mr. Kennedy. Are you now ? 

Mr. Recchia. Right now, I don't know. I am not worried about 
myself ; I am worried about my family. I just wanted it understood 
that if anything does happen in the future or at any time, they have 
to be responsible. 

The Chairman. Who do you speak of when you say "they" ? Can 
you identify them ? 

Mr. Recchia. Anyone who has anything to do with Jimmy Squil- 
lante, or any groups. 

The Chairman. Who is that? 

Mr. Recchia. Anyone that does have anything to do with Jimmy 
Squillante. 

The Chairman. You think he is the brains of it ? 

Mr. Recchia. He will be the brain, and he must be the brain, and 
everybody was bowing to him. 

The Chairman. He was the boss ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir; and he was the judge, jury, and the lawyer. 

The Chairman. He is everything? 

Mr. Recchia. That is right ; he is everything. 

The Chairman. So you think anything happened to you, he would 
be responsible for it ? 

Mr. Recchia. Here is one occasion I can mention like the Fair 
contract. I had the Mitchel Air Force contract and then the terms 
came to the end, and they started sending new bids out, and I knew 
they weren't going to go along with me in calling other outfits to go 
along with Trio. I knew that would never happen. So a fellow 
from Nassau, and he calls himself Belmore Sanitation, and he comes 
in and he underbids me, and he is nonassociation and nonunion. He 
underbids me, and he underbid everyone and he got the contract. 
Now, I went to see Jimmy Squillante and the other people, it was 
Jimmy Mancuso, and I said "He is in there; what are we going to 
do?" And he said "It is up to Jimmy." 

I knew he was not worried about me, and there is a nonunion con- 
tract took over at Mitchel Field, which is a big job, and it should 
have union men, but they didn't do anything to the man. It is what- 



IMPROPER ACTIVrriElS EST THE LABOR FIELD 6789 

ever Jimmy says, it goes. If Jimmy tells the miion to go ahead and 
hit that man, they would have done it. 

The Chairman. Jimmy is the boss of the union, too ? 

Mr. Recchia. It seems that way. 

The Chairman. They don't cross him ? 

Mr. Recchia. No ; they don't. 

Mr. I^NNEDY. That is all now. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 

Call the next one. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Carmen DeCabia. 

The Chairman. You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. DeCabia. I do. 

The Chairman. Will you be seated? State your name, and your 
place of residence, and your business or occupation. 

TESTIMONY OE CARMEN DeCABIA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

JAMES J. Mcdonough 

Mr. DeCabia. My name is Carmen DeCabia. My residence is 4 
Center Street, Hicksville, Long Island. 

The Chairman. What business are you in ? 

Mr. DeCabia. I am in the private garbage and rubbish removal 
business, sir. 

The Chairman. Wliat is the name of your firm ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Miraval & DeCabia. 

The Chairman. Miraval & DeCabia ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You have counsel present ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir ; I do, sir. 

The Chairman. Will you identify yourself? 

Mr. McDoNOUGH. James J. McDonough, residence address, 79 
Island Road, Glen Cove, Nassau County. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 

All right, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long have you been in the rubbish-removal 
business, Mr. DeCabia ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Eleven years. 

Mr. Kennedy. And how many do you have employed in your com- 
pany ? 

Mr. DeCabia. We have 5 men, 1 part-time man, my partner, and 
myself. 

Mr. Kennedy. You are head of, or president of, the Inter-County 
Carting Association ? 

Mr. DeCabia. I was for a period, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. "When were you president of that ? 

Mr. DeCabia. I became president either May or June of 1955, until 
June of 1956. 

Mr. Kennedy. During that period of time, was Vincent Squillante 
associated with the Inter-County Carting Association ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir ; he was. 

Mr. Kennedy. He came in the beginning of the year ? 

Mr. DeCabia. He had come away back in 1954. 



6790 IMPROPER ACTIVmES ES" THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. At the end of 1954 ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was his position? Executive director of the 
association, while you were president ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, he was, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did lie actually run the association ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Even though you were president ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. First, are you a member of the union ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir ; I am. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long have you been in the union ? 

Mr. DeCabia. November of 1952. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you have your brother, did you say, in this 
firm, too ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir ; it is an uncle through marriage. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is he a member of the union ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes; he is. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long has he been in ? 

Mr. DeCabia. The same period of time. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have a contract with the union ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir ; we do. 

Mr. Kennedy. Covering whom ; all of your employees ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Are all of your employees members of the union ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Are any of your employees members of the union ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Nobody is a member ? 

Mr. McDonough. If I may interrupt, I would like to have him dis- 
tinguish between this master contract he is now speaking of, and he has 
no individual contract with the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. I appreciate that. You don't have an individual 
contract with the union ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. It is just the association has a contract with the 
union ; is that right ? 

Mr. DeCabia. That's correct, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And so none of your employees, none of the employ- 
ees of your firm are members of the union ; is that right ? 

Mr. DeCabia. That's correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. The only people who are members of the union in 
your organization are the employers ? 

Mr. DeCabia. That's correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. You do not have a contract, an individual contract, 
with the union ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No ; I do not, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, I want to ask you about the bid at Mitchel Air 
Force Base. You are familiar with that ? 

Mr, DeCabia. Yes, sir ; I am. 

Mr. Kennedy. The Mitchel Air Force Base put out specifications 
for that bid, in 1955. 

Mr. DeCabia. I believe it was, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you received those specifications ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIEIS IN THE LABOR FIEIiD 6791 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir ; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any conversations with Mr. Squillante 
about the fact that you should receive that award ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You had no conversations with him ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any conversations with Mr. Angelo 
Recchia regarding the fact that you should receive the bid? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you had no conversations that he should bid 
higher than you, and that you should receive the bid ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never heard of any conversations such as that 
taking place ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy'. Is that right ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy". Going on at a later time, there was a 

Mr. DeCabia. Excuse me, Mr. Kennedy. 

Do you mind having this gentleman put the camera down ? 

The Chairman. Do they bother you ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Just this one. I can't see Mr. Kennedy. 

The Chairman. Will the photographers adjust themselves ? 

Mr. Kennedy'. Later in June of 1955, 1 understand there were other 
specifications put out in connection with the Mitchel Air Force Base, 
namely, the Roslyn Air Force Base and Santini housing project; is 
that right ( Are you familiar with that ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you receive the specifications on those two proj- 
ects? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir ; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy'. Did you bid on those ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy'. Did you have any conversations with Mr. Angelo 
Recchia regarding what you were going to bid or what he was going 
to bid on those contracts ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. He didn't call you and say what he was going to bid ; 
is that right ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you didn't call him and make an arrangement 
for bidding on the contract ? 

Mr. DeCabia. That's ri^ht, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy'. Is that right ? 

Mr. DeCama. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy". And after he received the award at the Santini 
housing project, did you call him and criticize him for putting in a 
bid lower than yours ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir, 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not do anything like that ? 



6792 IMPROPER ACTivrriES in the labor field 

Mr. DeCabl^.. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You didn't curse liim or tell liim that he had be- 
trayed you by putting in a low bid ; is that right ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you receive actually the Roslyn Air Force bid 
because of the collusive agreement between you and Mr. Recchia ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You had no conversations with him about it? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any conversations with ISIr. James 
Squillante regarding what you were going to bid on this contract ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know of any conversations Mr. Squillante 
had with Mr. Recchia regarding the bidding on this contract? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. And you were not familiar at all with the fact that 
Mr. Recchia was called before the board and criticized for bidding on 
this contract ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never heard of this situation as it was described 
by Mr. Montesano in testimony this afternoon, that Mr. Squillante and 
others were sharply critical of Mr. Recchia for having bid on this 
contract ? 

Mr. DeCabia. I don't know of any, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Nothing like that occurred that you know of ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. IvJENNEDY. Mr. Squillante never even discussed these bids with 
you ; is that right ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. When the bid was put out again, in 1956, did you 
have any collusive agreement with Mr. Recchia at that time as to 
what you would bid and what he would bid, so that you would get the 
contract ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Nothing like that occurred ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So that this whole story as told by Mr. Recchia is 
completely false ; is that right ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kjinnbdy. As you have heard it described. 

Mr. DeCabia. To my knowledge, it is. 

Mr. ICJENNEDY. As far as you are concerned ? 

Mr. DeCabia. That's right. 

Mr. EJENNEDY. And as far as any conversations that he had with 
you or any knowledge that you have about the situation, it is com- 
pletely false and untrue? 

Mr. DeCabia. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy, Nothing like this ever occurred ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6793 

Mr, Kennedy. Do you have any explanation as to why he should 
come in here and give this testimony to the committee, which involves 
Mr. Kecchia himself in a crime ? Can you give any explanation as to 
why he should come in here and give that testimony ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir ; I haven't. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. That he would admit to a crime such as he has in his 
testimony today? 

Mr. DeCabia. I don't know of any reason. 

Mr. I^NNEDT. You say it is completely untrue ? 

Mr. DeCabia. It is untrue as far as my knowledge is concerned of 
it, sir. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. That is all. 

The Chairman. This is the contract out at Mitchell Field ? 

Mr. Kennedy. The Santini Air Force housing pro j ect. 

The Chairman. As I understood this witness that preceded you, 
Mr. Angelo Eecchia, did you hear him testify ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir, I did, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you take over that contract ? 

Mr. DeCabia. What contract is that, sir ? 

The Chairman. The Santini contract, did you take it over? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, I did, sir, as a sublet contract. 

The Chairman. Sublet for how much ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Sublet from September 1, for $340 per month. 

The Chairman. Was that the same that it was bid in at? 

Mr. DeCabia. I believe it was, sir. ' 

The Chairman. So that you did get the contract ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, I did. 

The Chairman. At the same price that he had bid it in ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you pay him anything for that contract ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

The Chairman. He just gave it to you? 

Mr. DeCabia. He explained to me at the time, sir, that he had a 
little too much work to handle, and if I was still interested to take 
over the Santini work, I could handle it. 

The Chairman. Just that nice about it. And he had bid it and 
he had gotten it, and he decided he didn't want it and if you wanted 
it you could have it. 

Mr. DeCabia. That is what he said to me, sir. 

The Chairman. That is what he said to you ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Did he tell you why he bid on it ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, he didn't tell me why he bid on it, he just ex- 
plained he was having trouble. 

The Chairman. You are the only two that actually bid on it, were 
you not ? 

Mr. DeCabia. I don't know, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. We do not have the bid sheet on that. 

The Chairman. Well, one of you is not telling the truth. 

Mr. DeCabia. Well, I am telling you the truth, sir. 

The Chairman. If you are, you are doing it with a smile. 

Mr. DeCabia. I have nothing to hide. 

The Chairman. Brine that witness back here. 



6794 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIEILD 

TESTIMONY OF ANGELO EECCHIA— Eesumed 

The Chairman. Would you sit right down there ? 

Now, you boys be a little slow about the pictures for a minute or 
two, and let us see if we can get this thing. 

Mr. Recchia, you have heard Mr. DeCabia testify here, have you ? 

Mr. Recchia. Could I turn around and look at his face and call 
him a goddam liar? I'hat is about the only thing I can say. 

The Chairman. I don't think that that language is quite necessary. 

Mr. Recchia. Excuse my expression. 

The Chairman. You may be on the air, and that is not very becom- 
ing and you can settle those things some other way. You are here 
before a committee, and I want to get the truth. 

Mr. Recchia. I heard him. 

The Chairman. He said you just had too much work and you 
wanted to turn this contract over to him. 

Mr. Recchia. To say the most, it is not afterhours work for my 
men, who start at 5 o'clock in the morning. I have 4 trucks in that 
area, and my men could dump and pull in the garage at 12 or 12 : 30 
and not even have 8 hours of work, and that is proving it. I must 
have had time. 

The Chairman. It is a little difficult to understand you. 

In other words, your men start out on this job 

Mr. Recchia. At 5 o'clock in the morning. 

The Chairman. They are through by what time ? 

Mr. Recchia. At 12 or 12 : 30, as late as 1 o'clock, and not even 8 
hours' work. 

The Chairman. You didn't even have 8 hours' work for your men 
in that area at the time? 

Mr. Recchia. In other words, I could have done that, plus more, 
to put in 8 hours' work per man. 

The Chairman. You could have done that? 

Mr. Recchia. Plus more. 

The Chairman. And you could have done more in order to get in 
8 hours of work ? 

Mr. Recchia. That's right. My men only put in 8 hours' work on 
a Monday morning. That's about all. 

The Chairman. On a Monday morning? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That is the only time they put 8 hours in ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And the rest of the week? 

Mr. Recchia. They put in 7 or 7i/^ hours. 

The Chairman. Did you have to pay them for 8 hours ? 

Mr. Recchia. They always get paid for 8 hours. 

The Chairman. Whether they worked 8 hours or not ? 

Mr. Recchia. Regardless of what hours they worked. 

The Chairman. You had to pay for 8 hours ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Now, do you want to state again that you were 
threatened about this thing ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVmEiS IN THE LABOR FIEIyD 6795 

Mr. Eecchia. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Was he present there ? 

Mr. Recchia. He was president of the association, plus he was 
present at the meeting. 

The Chairman. He was president of the association and present 
at tlie meeting ? 

Mr. Eecchia. That's right. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. You also had the Mitchel Air Force Base contract, 
which was right in that area ? 

Mr. Eecchia. Eight next door, and the Santini Housing is right 
next door to Mitchel Field and Mitchel Manor. They are all in 
one area. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you turned over this contract to Mr. DeCabia ? 

Mr. Eecchia. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did 3^ou have to pay any legal fees ? 

Mr. Eecchia. My lawyer's. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much did you have to pay for that ? 

Mr. Eecchia. I don't remember. 

Mr. Kennedy. $250? 

Mr. Eecchia. I can't tell you, but I had to pay a lawyer's fee. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you had to put out some money ? 

Mr. Eecchia. Yes ; plus the service which I had to do, and he col- 
lected the money. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did that happen? Did he do a month and a half 
service for you ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

Mr. Eecchia. My checks will show, and my checks will prove it. 

The Chairman. They can be made available ? 

Mr. Eecchia. Yes ; and it wdll show that he got II/2 months' collec- 
tion, which I did a month and a half. I did 2 months' collection, and 
he was good enough in the end to give me half a month out of that. 

The Chairman. You did 2 months' work ? 

Mr. Eecchia. That's right. 

The Chairman. On that contract ? 

Mr. Eecchia. Yes, sir ; and I only got paid for half a month. 

The Chairman. As I understood your earlier testimony, the checks 
came in your name ; did they ? 

Mr. Eecchia. Yes. 

The Chairman. The checks from the Government in payment of 
those 2 months ? 

Mr. Eecchia. They came to me ; yes, sir. 

Tlie Chairman. And then you in turn wrote your check? 

Mr. Eecchia. To this company. 

The Chairman. Or to this man for the same amount that you got. 

Mr. Eecchia. Exactly the same amount. 

Tlie Chairman, I think that can be checked pretty well. 

Mr. Eecchia. That will show you that he is making a false state- 
ment. 



6796 IMPROPER AcrrvrriES m the labor field 

TESTIMONY OF CAKMEN DeCABIA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
JAMES J. Mcdonough— Resumed 

The Chairman. You say he didn't do any work on this contract; 
is that right ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir; he worked 2 months on that contract and 
he worked the month of Jvily and August. 

The Chairman. Did you get the money for it ? 

Mr. DeCabia. I did not. 

The Chairman. Did he give you checks ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What for? 

Mr. DeCabia. From September 1, from the year it started in 1955 
to the last day of June, of 1956, sir. There were 10 checks involved, 
$340 apiece. 

The Chairman. Well, I am talking about for this 2 months that 
he actually did the work. 

Mr. DeCabia. I never received anything at all for those 2 months. 

Mr. McDoNOUGH. May I clarify this a bit? 

The Chairman. If someone could clarify it, it would help. 

Mr. McDoNOUGii. The contract ran from July 1, 1955, to June 30, 
1956, and this contract, the subletting contract, so to speak, ran from 
September 1, 1955 to June 30, 1956. What the witness DeCabia now 
says is that he handled the contract and he was paid for it from 
September 1, 1955 to June 30, 1956, and received no other moneys. 

The Chairman. In other words, he didn't take over the contract 
then according to your version of it, until it had run for 2 months. 

Mr. McDonough. That is correct. 

The Chairman. The question is, let me see, during that 2 months, 
the first 2 months of the contract, when did you make any payments 
to DeCabia here ? 

TESTIMONY OE ANGELO RECCHIA— Resumed 

Mr. Recchia. It took some time. It took about a month arguing 
over this, and then he went away on vacation, and I had to wait until 
he came back, and before he got back I took off on vacation and we 
ha d to wait that long, and that is why it took 2 months. 

The Chairman. Do you have the checks showing what it was paid 
for? 

Mr. Recchia. I don't have them with me. 

The Chairman. I didn't say with you. 

Mr. Recchia. My accountant should have them. 

The Chairman. Someone is not telling the truth here, and some- 
one is just simply perjuring himself before this committee. I am 
going to order you to go back and get your checks and make them 
available to this committee. I want to get this thing straight. If 
we have perjurers up here, and I think we have one right now, I want 
to get it in the proper processes for adjudication. I don't know who 
it is, and it doesn't make any difference to me. I am going to order 
you to get your checks and submit them to this staff at your earliest 
convenience. 

How soon do you think you can have them ? 



IMPROPER ACHVITIElS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6797 

Mr. Kennedy. It is possible that another witness can throw some 
more light on this, and we expect to call him. 

The Chairman. All right, stand by, but in the meantime, get your 
checks that you paid him here for that period of time. 

Let me ask you, after you took over the contract, Mr. DeCabia, did 
the checks come from the Government to you ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

The Chairman. They continued to come through him ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Trio Carting Co., Inc. 

The Chairman. That is your company ? 

Mr. Recchia. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How would you get your money ? 

Mr. DeCabia. He sent his checks to me. 

The Chairman. You mean the Government checks ? 

Mr. DeCabia. No, sir. 

The Chairman. He would always send his checks ? 

Mr. DeCabia. He would always send his checks to me. 

The Chairman. And it always ran $340 a month under the contract ? 

Mr. DeCabia. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Now you get your checks, and we can tell pretty 
well whether you paid him for 12 months or whether you paid him for 
10. I think that will pretty well settle the issue, and you gentlemen 
may stand aside for the present. 

Mr. Counsel, call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. If you could sit right back there. 

Mr. McDoNOTJGH. Mr. Greene indicated you might want to call me 
on some other unrelated matter. Do you, or don't you ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you stand by and we can see. 

The Chairman. You want to be here while your client is here, and 
we will try to determine that. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Parise. 

The Chairman. You solemnly swear the evidence you shall give 
before this Senate Select Committe will be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Parise. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF PETER J. PAEISE 

The Chairman. State your name, and you place of residence and 
your business or occupation. 

Mr. Parise. Peter J. Parise, P.-a-r-i-s-e, 351 Duck Pond Drive, 
Wantagh, W-a-n-t-a-g-h, Long Island, N. Y. 

The Chairman. What is your business ? 

Mr. Parise. Garbage collector. 

The Chairman. You waive counsel ? 

Mr. Parise. I do, sir. 

The Chairman. How long have you been in the garbage collection 
business ? 

Mr. Parise. Eleven years. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. You were a member of the association, Mr. Parise ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

89330— 57— pt. 17 10 



6798 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedt. I am going to go into that in some detail a little later 
on, but I want to ask you and get right to the point immediately, 
regarding the Mitchel Air Force Base contract. Were you familiar 
with that contract ? 

Mr. Parise. In one meeting ; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell us what transpired at that meeting ? 

Mr. Parise. It was a board of directors meeting, and 

Mr. Kennedy. You were on the board of directors ^ 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. It seemed there was some discrepancy be- 
tween Trio, and I don't know his name, and I only know him as 
"Trio," and Carmine DeCabia. And it seemed there had been an 
agreement between them and Trio against the agreement to underbid 
Carmine. 

Mr. Kennedy. How did you understand that? 

Mr. Parise. Well, he was brought up on charges. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who brought him up on charges ? 

Mr. Parise. Carmine DeCabia. 

Mr. Kennedy. Carmine DeCabia brought the Trio man, Angelo 
Recchia, up on charges before the board of directors on the ground 
that he had underbid him on a contract in which they had agreed to 
go along ? 

Mr. Parise. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And on a contract at Mitchel Field where Carmine 
DeCabia was to get the contract ? Is that right ? 

Mr. Parise. So I understand. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was explained to you at the meeting? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And was Mr. Squillante there ? 

Mr. Parise. I don't think so. 

Mr. Kennedy. You do not know ? 

Mr. Parise. I think Jerry Mancuso was there. 

Mr, Kennedy. And what transpired at the meeting, and what did 
you decide to do ? 

Mr. Parise. It was quite a heated argument, and Trio was kind of 
afraid that things were going to be done to him, and he was told that 
he had to give up the contract. I took him saide and I said, "If you 
gave your word or you agreed to a thing, }^ou have to live up to it and 
you have to keep your word," and he said he would like to but he 
doesn't know how to get out of it ; he is afraid. 

The Chairman. That took place at a board meeting ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Was Mr. DeCabia there ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Pie knows about it, then ; does he ? 

Mr. Parise. He should ; he was concerned with Trio. 

The Chairman. He was the one who brought the charges on this 
contract ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. He is the one that made the complaint ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. He is the one who caused the board to meet to con- 
sider the charges ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And you know he knows about it? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6799 

]\Ir. Parise. He should know about it, sir. 

The Chairman. You were there. 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. He was there. 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And Trio was there. 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir ; and other members of the board. 

The Chairman. And that w^as the subject of discussion ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. They claimed that he had made an agreement not 
to bid, or to overbid ? 

Mr. Parise. That is right. 

The Chairman. And he violated it, and therefore he was subject to 
a penalty, or some disciplinary action by the board ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And you know that that took place ? 

Mr. Parise. Absolutely. 

The Chairman. Are there any questions? 

Mr. Kennedy. Hadn't you in fact participated in the penalty 
against Trio ? 

Mr. Parise. In a manner, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Hadn't you in fact written a letter to Sunrise Stores 
recommending that they leave Trio and take General Sanitation. 

Mr. Parise. Oh, no, no. 

Mr. Kennedy. At least you recommended General Sanitation ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you participated in that ? 

Mr. Parise. I had no knowledge that Trio was going to have those 
stores taken away from him. 

Mr. Kennedy. You hadn't known that? 

Mr. Parise. No, sir, 

Mr. Kennedy. You did write the letter recommending General 
Sanitation ? 

Mr. Parise. The reason I wrote the letter or I had the letter written 
was that Anunzio came to me and said, "Nobody knows me and I am 
trying to do business with people and nobody knows me. Why don't 
you write a letter of recommendation?" 

Sometimes you do awfully stupid things, and it turned out it was 
a stupid thing for me to do. 

The Chairman. Is this a copy of the letter that you have referred 
to? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. It may be made exhibit No. 10. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 10" for refer- 
ence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7031.) 

The Chairman. That is in relation to this controversy? 

Mr. Parise. No; I didn't know that had anything to do with it. 

Mr. Kennedy. It does have something to do with it, although your 
testimony is that you did not know, but in fact these stops were the 
ones that were taken away from Trio. 

Mr. Parise. I didn't know that and I didn't know they were going 
to be taken awa}', and in fact 

Mr. Kennedy. Actually, in fact, they did have something to do 
with it. 



6800 IMPROPEIR ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Parise. As it turned out, that is why I say it proved to be very 
stupid to write such a letter, and I had no knowledge, and I never 
would have written the letter had I known that. I don't believe in 
force, because I won't let them apply it against me, sir. 

The Chairman. I can believe you. If I were your size, I wouldn't 
let them apply it against me. They respect you ? 

Mr. Parise. They have to; I am an American. 

The CnAiRMAisr. You didn't believe in force against this other 
fellow? 

Mr. Parise. I don't believe in force. 

The Chairman. You believe in him keeping his word? 

Mr. Parise. That is all. If he had given his word, sure; he should 
have kept it. That is my only interest in that; and if he had given 
his word, he said he made a mistake, an honest mistake. Now, what 
transpired thereafter I know nothing about, nor anything that hap- 
pened before. I didn't know they bid against one another. 

The Chairman. But you do Iniow that DeCabia 

Mr. Parise. I truthfully know, sir. 

The Chairman. That DeCabia brought charges against him and 
had him before the board on this contract, claiming that he had 
violated his agreement? 

Mr. Parise. Truthfully so. 

Mr. Kennedy. We hacl the testimony of Mr. Montesano on the same 
point, and about the board bringing charges. 

The Chairman. Was Mr. Montesano there at the time? 

Mr. Parise. There were quite a few, and there would be other 
members there concerned on other cases, and I would say there were 
30 men in the room. 

The Chairman. Do you know Montesano ? 

Mr. Parise. He just took $7,000 worth of work from me, and I 
know him. 

Correction, $8,000. And I didn't threaten to shoot him, either. 

The Chairman. I believe that would impress your memory for a 
little while at least. What I wanted to ask you — ^you know him — • 
do you recall that he was at that meeting ? 

Mr. Parise. I believe he was. 

The Chairman. Were you there ? 

Mr. Montesano. Yes, sir ; I was. 

The Chairman. You were there? 

Mr. Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You were there when Mr. Parise was there? 

Mr. Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And when they brought the other man, Recchia, 
up before the board ? 

Mr. Montesano. I was. 

The Chairman. And Mr. DeCabia was there bringing the charges ? 

Mr. INIoNTESANO. That is right. 

The Chairman. And raising the dickens about this contract and 
him having breached his word ? 

Mr. Montesano. That is right. 

The Chairman. You swear that positively, and you know it? 

Mr. Montesano. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Both of you do ? 

Mr. Parise. Definitely. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIBS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6801 

The Chairman. Thank you. 

I want Recchia to get those checks up. Is he here ? 

You get those checks. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. You owu the Nassau Sanitation Co. ? 

Mr. Parise. Since September of last year completely ; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And prior to that time ? 

Mr. Parise. My sons and Mrs. Parise, my wife. 

Mr. Kennedy. When did you first hear from the union ? Were you 
requested to become a member of the union ? 

Mr. Parise. Requested? January 1952. 

Mr. Ivennedy. What happened ? 

Mr. Parise. Previously they had come before we had the Levittown 
contract. Joe Capola brought them in. I had given him the Levit- 
town collection service free when it was a private collection service. 
He made such a mess of it they put it out on bids and we were the 
successful bidders, starting January 1, 1952. He said that he was 
going to work in Levittown, would it be all right for him to join the 
union. He was a union man and he had a union contract and had to 
carry on under the contract. 

Mr. Kennedy. When did you first hear from the union ? 

Mr. Parise. That was about July, I would say, of 1951. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you join the union at that time '? 

Mr. Parise. No. I gave them a check. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat about Adelstein ? Had you had conversations 
with Adelstein ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, at that time. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had Adelstein talked to any members of your family 
prior to that time ? 

Mr. Parise. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had there been any threats made against you or 
your family ? 

Mr. Parise. Not at that time, no, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was there subsequently ? 

Mr. Parise. Possibly. 

Mr. Kennedy. What ? 

Mr. Parise. Possibly. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Wliat happened ? 

Mr. Parise. Well, early in January he came to my shop on Merrick 
Road, and said he had the men. I told him I didn't think so. Pie 
said "Well, I have the men." It took him all afternoon and early in 
the evening to convince the men to join the union. Finally he came 
with slips and he said, "You see, I have the men." 

I said "All right, if you got the men, all right. But I don't have 
to join the union. I don't have to." 

He said, "IVhat's the sense of having trouble ? Do you know I can 
do this to you?" 

I said "You can't do anything, because I won't let you. If you want 
to talk like a man, all right, I will let you. If you don't call him 
down, I will throw you out the door." 

He called him down. He held enough votes in his hand. In fact, 
he had nearly 100 percent of them, he said. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Did your wife receive any threatening calls ? 

Mr. Parise. She seemed to think she did. 

Mr. Kennedy. You don't know whether she did or not ? 



6802 IMPROPER ACnVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Parise, Well, she got a call, all right, and she said, "Nobody is 
going to threaten me." He said, "Who threatened you?" And she 
said "I think it was Bernie Adelstein." 

I said, "Over the telephone, you can't prove anything." 

She sa id, "I think it was Bernie Adelstein." 

I said, •'! will go out and get him." 

I went out and got Bernie Adelstein, and I took him home, and he 
said he didn't threaten her. There was no proof. Somebody threat- 
ened her, and I went out and got Bernie Adelstein and took him to 
my house. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were in the association at this time and finally 
joined the union ? 

Mr. Parise. No, not then. I didn't get into the association until 
long after, until just before the new contract come in. The new 
contract come in on January 1, 1954, so I was asked to meet with the 
association members, I think it w^as in November of 1953. Wait a 
minute. 1954. The new contract was 1955, 1956, and 1957. Novem- 
ber of 1954. Our new contract started January 1, 1955. 

Mr. Kennedy. When did you first meet Mr. Vincent J. Squillante?' 

Mr. Parise. About October or November of 1954. 

Mr. Kennedy. He came out ? 

Mr. Parise. Well, I had been asked to join this association, and 1 
didn't want to. Our type of business was entirely different than the' 
rest of them. We only did work for the tov/nships on contract, bid- 
ding. We had no outside work. So I didn't see any reason for us 
to join. But some of the garbage collectors seemed to think that we 
being the biggest, if we didn't come in, they couldn't get together or 
couldn't do anything, and we were keeping them from getting 
together. I didn't want them to think that we were so superior. As 
I went down. 

As I entered the door, I saw this very pleasant young man who in- 
troduced himself to me, and he said "Pete Parise, you are the man I 
want to meet." He was very nice to me. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you liked him ? 

Mr. Parise. I still do. I don't like some of these things he has done.. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you bring him back to the association ? 

Mr. Parise. He was there in the association. I met him there at 
the hall in Belmore. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat was the name of the association ? 

Mr. Parise. Intercounty, I think it is. 

Mr. Kennedy. Intercounty. Did you decide then that you would 
join the Intercounty ? 

Mr. Parise. The way it was put to me, it was that if I didn't go in 
there, they couldn't get anywhere, because I had the most men in the 
union, the biggest amount of work and everything, and so I thought 
maybe we could help our fellow man, and I went in. 

Mr. Kennedy. In being anxious to help your fellow man, did Mr. 
Squillante tell you how the association was going to operate at that 
time? 

Mr. Parise. No ; this was done gradually, very adroitly. 

Mr. Kennedy. He told you what could be done about the whip 
company and that type of operation ? 

Mr. Parise. Not at that time. 

Mr. I^nnedy. Subsequently ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6803 

Mr. Parise. You see, they were worried about me, because I am a 
little stubborn mule. I like to do things my own way. I think I was 
handled extra special, with kid gloves. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he subsequently — I want to move along — did he 
subsequently tell you about the whip company and how it would 
operate ? 

Mr. Parise. That is right. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. And how this would make the industry more stable, 
having you belong to the union and having this association and all of 
the operations we have had discussed here the last day or so ? Is that 
right ? 

Mr. Parise. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you familiar with Mr. Gerdich ? 

Mr. Parise. Gerdich, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. He operated a carting company out there ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And had local 813 struck his shops ? 

Mr. Parise. No. They took — well, let's say he lost work because 
he wasn't a member of the union. 

Mr. I^nnedy. Did you take him to see Vincent J. Squillante ? 

Mr. Parise. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you take him to get him back into the 
association ? 

Mr. Parise. I took him back. Louis wanted to get his work back, 
and Louis asked me would I intercede with Jimmy for him. I did. 
I took him to New York. I think it is 1078 Madison Avenue. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was there some discussion about particular stops? 

Mr. Parise. Yes ; he had lost particular stops. 

Mr. I^NNEDY. Helena Rubenstein ? 

Mr. Papjse. That was one of them. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was there a discussion about payment to get the 
stop back ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much ? 

Mr. Parise. $2,500 was to be paid by Louis Gerdich. 

Mr. Kennedy. $2,500 was to be given to whom ? 

Mr. Parise. Squillante or someone. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Gerdich, to get back into the association and get 
the stop back, he had to pay $2,500 to Mr. Squillante ? 

Mr. Parise. That is right, just for that one stop, Helena Ruben- 
stein. 

Mr. Kennedy. That stop had been taken by General Sanitation? 

Mr. Parise. No ; I don't think it was General Sanitation. 

Mr. Kennedy. But $2,500 had to be paid ? 

Mr. Parise. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was that $2,500 paid ? 

Mr. Parise. $500 was paid, to my knowledge. 

Mr. Kennedy. What happened ? 

Mr. Parise. I bought a truck from Louis Gerdich. 

Mr. Kennedy. What happened to the rest of the money ? 

Mr. Parise. I don't Imow. I don't think it was ever paid. He 
died. 

Mr. Kennedy. Without the $2,500 being paid ? 

Mr. Parise, Yes. He died naturally, by the way. 



6804 IMPROPER ACnVITIElS IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chaikman. That is worthy of note. 

Mr, Parise. I didn't want to get a misconception of the thing. 

Mr. Kennedy. What about the General Sanitation, the so-called 
whip firm. How did that originate ? 

Mr. Parise. Jimmy asked me to help his brother. He said he 
wanted to get him off his back, and he would like to have his brother 
do something on his own. I helped him organize the General Sanita- 
tion. It was he and Lou Michaels, and tlieir wives, who were the 
owners of stock and officers in the corporation. 

Mr. Kennedy. Louis Michaels ? Has he got another name ? 

Mr. Parise. Well, I now know that his name is — lannacine, is it? 

Mr. Kennedy. Louis lannacine? 

Mr. Parise. I believe that is it. 

Mr. Kennedy. We have not put his record in yet. 

The Chairman. lannacine's record? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Eesumed 

The Chairman. Do we have lannacine's record ? 

Mr. I^LLY. We do, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kelly. The following is the criminal record of Louis lan- 
nacine, known to the New York City Police Department as B-186102. 
Arrested on December 5, 1939, New York City, by the New York 
County district attorney's office as Louis lannacine — extortion and 
conspiracy. On June 10, 1940, received 7 to 14 years in Sing Sing 
Prison. Details of that case were noted in the New York Post of 
June 10, 1940, as follows : 

General Sessions Judge Wallace today sentenced to long prison terms 4 of 6 
men convicted last month on charges of operating a labor shakedown in the retail 
fruit and vegetable industry. He called the defendants labor racketeers who 
gained control of a union, Local No. 1204, Retail Food Clerks, A. F. of L., solely 
to use it to extort money. Those sentenced today were 

and it names four men, and among them is Louis lannacine, 28, treas- 
urer of the local, that is, local 1204, sentenced to 7 to 14 years, Sing 
Sing Prison. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he has another name also, does he? 

Mr. Kelly. Louis lannacine is also known as Louis Michaels. 

Mr. Kennedy. So Louis lannacine was the first partner of Nunzio 
Squillante ? 

Mr. Parise. And their wives. 

Mr. Kennedy. The names of their respective wives ? 

Mr. Parise. The wives were in with them. Two men and two wives. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you put up the money to establish General Sani- 
tation ? 

Mr. Parise. I foolishly did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you understand that this was to be the whip firm 
out there ? 

Mr. Parise. No, sir. I would not have given them the money. This 
was distinctly, as explained to me, to help them get some work. They 
did go out to get some work, but I don't think they ever got any in 
the first 6 or 7 weeks. 



IMPROPER ACTnVITIES EST THE LABOR riELD 6805 

Mr. Kexxedy. As I understand, you understood that the area was 
to be split into districts and territories ? 

Mr. Parise. That was the general idea of the association ; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that was all operated by Jimmy Squillante, is 
that right ? He was the head of it ? 

Mr. Parise. You see, everything was passed by the meeting there. 
They are all running away from their responsibility. All these things 
were voted at a meeting held there. They are all running away from 
their responsibility. AH these things were voted at a meeting held 
there. 

Mr. Kennedy. Including yourself ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. You participated ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ultimately or subsequently withdraw from 
the Inter-County Cartmen's Association ? 

Mr. Parise. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why was that ? 

Mr. Parise. I didn't like things that were going on. It became 
evident then that we weren't going to have an association to better 
the bargaining business or the people. It was just to better the gar- 
bage collector, and some of the ways I didn't like. I didn't want to 
become part of it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you requested at that time when you withdrew 
to put up security ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ivennedy. How much money did the union want you to put 
up as security ? 

Mr. Parise. It would have been around $24,000. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was it actually $28,000 ? 

Mr. Parise. It could be ; yes. I had that many men. 

Mr. Ivennedy. About $28,000 ? 

Mr. Parise. It could be ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. It could be? Did they request that money? 

Mr. Parise. Yes. They requested $300 plus $3,000 per man, and 
at that time I think I had 82 workmen. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is a lot of money. About $26,000, is that 
right? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ejennedy. Did you refuse to put up the security ? 

Mr. Parise. I certainly did. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Had you put up security prior to that time ? 

Mr. Parise. No, sir. 

Mr. Kjinnedy. Had you been bothered by the union while you were 
in the association ? 

Mr. Parise. No, not while I was in the association. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. After you got out of the association were you ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you refused to put up the $26,000 ? 

Mr. Parise. Absolutely. 



6806 IMPROPER ACTIVITIEiS IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. Did anybody come to you and say they could end 
your union troubles ? 

Mr. Parise. Did they what? 

Mr. Kennedy. Did anybody come to you after that and say they 
would end your union difficulties ? Rose Anelli ? 

Mr. Parise. This was recently. The union and I have never got- 
ten along. 

Mr. I^nnedy. Wliat did Rose Anelli 

Mr. Parise. I am not against unions. I want that understood. I 
am against the way unions are run. I am for unions. 

Mr. Kennedy. Some unions. 

The Chairman. What about the one you had an experience with ? 

Mr. Parise. I am against the way it is run. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Wliat did Rose Anelli tell you ? 

Mr. Parise. She and her brother Mike said that it could be fixed 
through a rabbi that they knew. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did they mean by a rabbi ? 

Mr. Parise. I don't know. You better tell me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you understand what was meant ? 

Mr. Parise. I understand what was meant, but I took it up with 
the union delegate. 

Mr. Kennedy. Explain the term, "getting the rabbi." 

Mr. Parise. I don't know. They knew somebody who had some 
power in the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. A rabbi is another word for a fixer, is that right? 

Mr. Parise. That is right. And if I put somebody on my payroll, 
1 would not have any more union trouble. I would rather have the 
union trouble, which I am still having. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much did you have to pay the union rabbi ? 

Mr. Parise. $100 to $150 a week. Possibly $200 a week. 

Mr. I^NNEDY. You refused to do that ? 

Mr. Parise. I asked the delegate if anything was possible, and he 
said, "If you got any money, give it to a charity. It will do you 
more good. Nobody can fix anything." 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know of her association with Carmine Tra- 
munti ? 

Mr. Parise. I don't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. Or Tony "Ducks" Corallo ? 

Mr. Parise. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know if she was having to live up to the 
terms of the contract ? 

Mr. Parise. I know she didn't. 

Mr. Kennedy. You know she did not ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know what arrangements she had with the 
union that allowed her not to live up to the terms of the contract ? 

Mr. Parise. No. But some of her men came to work for me and 
when I paid them the first week, they brought the check back, think- 
ing I made a mistake. 

Mr. Kennedy. "What about the dance that was held by Mr. Adel- 
stein ? Did he run a dance ? 

Mr. Parise. I think it is once a year ? 

Mr. Kennedy. What arrangements were made about that? Was 
that a union dance ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6807 

Mr. Parise. Yes. Men were sent tickets and I was told to take $5 
out of the men's pay and forward it to them. 

Mr. Kennedy. You had to do that ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. $5 for every employee ? 

Mr. Parise. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And send it in to Mr. Adelstein, is that right ? 

Mr. Parise. To the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who ran tlie union ? Adelstein, did he not ? 

Mr. Parise. I don't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. ^V\\o did you understand ? Of course you know who 
ran the union. Who did you understand operated the union? 

Mr. Parise. I couldn't get anywhere with Bernie Adelstein, so I 
don't know who ran the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Bernie Adelstein was the one who was operating 
the union ; was he not ? 

Mr. Parise. Presumably ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any discussions with Mr. Migliore re- 
garding the directions for the dance ? 

Mr. Parise. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did you tell him? 

Mr. Parise. I asked what if the men complained, and he said "If 
they complain, have them get in touch with me, but take the money 
out." 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Take the money out of their pay ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you do that ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And sent it in ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Are you a member of the union ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes; not that they wanted me, but I wouldn't sign 
unless they took myself and my sons. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Squillante used to bring individuals out 
to the association meetings ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. A lot of different people ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was anybody out there more frequently than others ? 

Mr. Parise. His nephew Jerry. 

Mr. Kennedy. Jerry Mancuso ? . 

Mr. Parise. And Jimmy Rosetti. 

Mr. Kennedy. 'Wliat was Mr. Rosetti 's position ? 

Mr. Parise. He was j)resident of the New York Cartmen's Asso- 
ciation. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever meet the "Professor" ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he ever have any official position ? 

Mr. Parise. Not that I know of. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was C. Don Modica ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was at your association's meetings ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat was he doing out there ? 



6808 IMPROPER ACTIVITTElS IN THE LABOR FIELD " 

Mr. Parise. I don't know. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Did you know what his connection was ? 

Mr. Parise. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he just come to all the meetings ? 

Mr. Parise. No ; he didn't come to all the meetings. 

Mr. Kennedy. But he came to a number of them ? 

Mr. Parise. Some of them. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was he doing there ? 

Mr. Parise. I don't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ask about him ? 

Mr. Parise. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. You didn't ask ? Why didn't you ask ? 

Mr. Parise. I like to mind my business. I don't mean this as 
fresh. But I didn't know what his connection was. I had had an 
experience in New York. I was talking to the professor one day 
at 1078 Madison Avenue, and Jimmy called me and said "Don't 
talk to him." I said "What's the matter? What's the matter?" He 
said "I don't want you to talk to him." I said "He is your man 
here, isn't he?" And he said "Don't talk to him. Mind your busi- 
ness." So from then on I had nothing to do with him. 

The Chairman. Jimmy told you that, the one running the associa- 
tion? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

INIr. Kennedy. How did Jimmy and the professor get along? 

Mr. Parise. I don't know. I don't think so. 

Mr. Kennedy. They didn't get along ? 

Mr. Parise. There was no open conflict, but when Jimmy told me 
he didn't want me to talk to the professor, I am over 21, I assume 
there is a line between them somewhere. 

Mr. Kennedy. Can you give us any explanation as to why Jimmy 
kept bringing him out there, if he didn't like him ? 

Mr. Parise. I don't know, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. What impression did you get about what his posi- 
tion was out there ? 

Mr. Parise. Well, I would say he was a watchdog. 

Mr. Kennedy. For whom ? 

Mr. Parise. I don't know, honestly. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Who did you think, who did you presume he was 
watching for ? 

Mr. Parise. I didn't know until the last couple of weeks, until I 
read it in the papers. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. But you thought he was watching for someone? 
You thought he was a watchdog for someone ? 

Mr. Parise. Evidently ; yes. It was very evident. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you come to the conclusion now who he was a 
watchdog for? 

Mr. Parise. The newspapers are telling all of us that he was An- 
astasia's man. That is the first I knew he was. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you knew he was a watchdog for someone ? 

Mr. Parise. It appeared to be ^ yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. He kept commg out with Jimmy, he came with 
Jimmy but Jimmy didn't seem to like him ; is that right ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIEiS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6809 

Mr. Parise. No ; there was no apparent hatred. But it is as if you 
and I went to a place, and we didn't like one another, but we went to 
the same place. 

The CHAiRMAisr. In other words, Jimmy would consult this profes- 
sor about decisions he made ? Did you observe that ? 

Mr. Parise. No, sir. He may have done it at other times, but I 
never observed that. 

The Chatrman. I am just trying- to get your impression. But he 
was there, as you thought, from your observations, he was there for a 
purpose. He wasn't just there for a visit ? 

Mr. Parise. I believe so, sir. But as I said, he didn't come too often 
to the meetings out here. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know what relationship he had with the 
New York City Cartmen's Association ? 

Mr. Parise. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know if he was a salaried employee of that 
organization ? 

Mr. Parise. I couldn't tell you. You see, after Jimmy told me not 
to talk to him, I had to avoid the gentleman. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever know him to be the acting secretary 
of the Inter- County Cartmen's Association, your association? 

Mr. Parise. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never knew that ? 

Mr. Parise. He may have been before I got into it. I don't know. 

The Chairman. Wlien did you get into it i 

Mr. Parise. Around November of 1954, sir. It could be October 
of 1954. You see, we were in a discussion with the union for a new 
contract, which expired on December 31, 1954. It was at that time 
that these meetings began to occur. 

The Chairman. What was this professor's name ? 

Mr. Parise. Modica. 

The Chairman. For your information, and I will place it into the 
record, we have here what appears to be the minutes of the meeting of 
the Inter-County Cartmen's Association, Inc., board of directors meet- 
ing, February 9, 1955. These minutes of that meeting appear to be 
signed by Don Modica, C. Don Modica, Director of Public Relations — 
: acting as secretary. 

Mr. Parise. I think Mr. Monesanto could tell who he had there as 
secretary. There was a yoimg fellow there. I don't recall his name. 
The association had appointed a young man. 

The Chairman. Well, he says director of public relations. 

Did you know that as his capacity ? 

Mr. Parise. No, sir. 

The Chairman. At that particular meeting, it indicates that he 
was acting as secretary of that meeting. 

Mr. Parise. Either that or the notes could have been taken to New 
York and transcribed, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why was that done: that they were taken to New 
York? ^ 

Mr. Parise. I don't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all. 

The Chairman. Senator McNamara. 



6810 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Senator McNamara. I just have a couple of questions. 

You indicate that you are a member of the union 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Because you insist on being a member. The 
witnesses we have had here previously indicate that they are members 
of the union because they felt they were compelled to be members of 
the union. So you are in quite a different role. 

Mr. Parise. May I explain why, sir ? 

Senator McNamara. Yes. 

Mr. Parise. Because if ever I had any trouble, I was going to take 
those trucks out and work. I wanted to make sure that we would 
be able to drive those trucks. We were committed by bond. At times 
I have carried $600,000 worth of bonds. 

Senator McNamara. Performance bonds ? 

Mr. Parise. Everything we owned was placed to it, and I wasn't 
going to lose it, sir. Thank God I will conclude December 31, very 
honorably but broke. I would rather have it that way. I would 
rather lose the work than have anyone tell me what I should do and 
what work I shouldn't take. 

Senator McNamara. So you were a member of the union because 
if there was any trouble 

Mr. Parise. My sons also. I am not allowed at any meetings, you 
understand. Not even my employee meetings. 

Senator McNamara. You are not allowed to attend ? 

Mr. Parise. No, sir ; not even of my employee meeting held about 
a month ago. I cannot meet with my employees. 

Senator McNamara. Did you protest that ? 

Mr. Parise. No, sir ; because it doesn't worry me. If men don't like 
what I say, then they can look for another job. I fire them. 

Senator McNamara. Have you fired some of them ? 

Mr. Parise. You bet I have. 

Senator McNamara. And you don't get into any particular trouble 
over it ? 

Mr. Parise. No. Just like the threat that they were going to go on 
strike if I didn't put the security money up. They took me to the 
mediation board. 

Senator McNamara. The New York State Mediation Board ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. And I told them I wouldn't pay it, and I 
would still stay in business. 

Senator McNamara, Did they order you to pay it ? 

Mr. Parise. Sure they did. I didn't pay it. 

Senator McNamara. The New York State Mediation Board ordered 
you to pay it? 

Mr. Parise. Yes. They kept postponing the case, until finally they 
forgot about it, I guess. They may take it up tomorrow, because we 
are not friendly. 

Senator McNaiviara. You are a member of the union, but you are 
not participating in the union affairs ? 

Mr. Parise. I am not concerned. 

Senator McNamara. You just want to be a member 

Mr. Parise. I am a very selfisli person. I am interested in my 
family, first. I am going to take care of my sons and my family. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6811 

Senator McNamara. Well, I presume everybody else is in that same 
category. That is why these other people do some of the things tliey 
do, for tliat same reason, apparently. 

Mr. Pakise. But I wasn't frightened, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Weren't what ? 

Mr. Parise. I wasn't frightened, sir. I carry a lot of insurance, 
sir, and I am going to make my widow rich either by working or by 
death, and it makes no difference to me which way. I have a very 
beautiful wife, too. She feels the same way I do. If we can't live 
free, it is best not to live. 

Senator McNamara. Well, that sounds veiy good, but being a mem- 
ber of the union, insisting on being a member of the union, and not 
going to meetings, not caring when they held meetings, it just doesn't 
hang together very good. 

Mr. Parise. We don't get a notice of the meetings, sir. 

Senator McNamara. You don't get a notice ? 

Mr. Parise. No. I got one since you people started. Here is my 
card. I insisted on this, but they didn't want to give it to me. 

Senator McNamara. You don't complain about the fact that they 
do not hold meetings ? 

Mr. Parise. It would probably start a riot if I went in there. 

Senator McNamara. tVlien you were told not to talk to the pro- 
fessor, your courage seemed to leave you at that jDoint. I didn't 
understand. 

Mr. Parise. No ; you are mistaken. 

Senator McNamara. Tell me why I am mistaken. 

Mr. Parise. As far as I knew, the professor had no stanuing in 
anything, so there was nothing I could discuss with him, because when 
we were discussing a subject, it was compost, it was not union. We 
are one of the few garbagemen that can make compost out of garbage. 
We enjoy the rights to a patent. 

Senator McNamara. What has this got to do with talking to the 
professor ? 

Mr. Parise. That is what I was talking to the professor about. 
Compost. It wasn't union. I wanted you to know what it was 
about. Jimmie said, "Don't talk to him." So, all right, don't talk 
to him. The hell with him. 

Senator McNamara. Don't talk to him ; so you don't talk to him ? 

Mr. Parise. Don't talk to him. 

Senator McNamara. Not that you were afraid of talking to him? 

Mr. Parise. No. 

Senator McNamara. You just didn't want to talk to him any more 
because Jimmie said not to? 

Mr. Parise. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. That is all. 

The Chairmax. When you spoke about going before the media- 
tion board, about your being ordered to put up the $300 per man as 
security, was Mr. Merlyn S. Pitzele chairman of the board at that 
time? 

Mr. Parise. I wouldn't know, sir. 

The Chairman. When was it that you were carried before the 
board? 



6812 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. P ARISE. On three occasions. This is one of them. 

The Chairman. I am talking about the one with respect • 

Mr. Parise. I don't know who was there. 

The Chairman. I didn't ask who was there. I said, What time; 
what year ? Do you remember when it occurred ? 

Mr. Parise. That would be possibly 1955 or 1956, sir. 

The Chairman. What is the name of your company ? 

Mr. Parise. Nassau Sanitation Co., Inc. 

The Chairman. I hand you here a photostatic copy of a letter 
written on local union 813 stationery, dated February 14, 1956, ad- 
dressed to Nassau Sanitation Co., signed by Bernard Adelstein. Will 
you examine that, and state if you identify it ? 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

The Chairman. Do you identify the letter? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That may be made exhibit No. 11. 

(Document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 11" for reference 
and will be found in the appendix on p. 7032.) 

The Chairman. Now I hand you a letter from the New York State 
Board of Mediation, dated March 12, 1956, addressed to jouv com- 
pany. It says : 

The issue : Payments to insurance fund, security deposit, union help, not 
compliance with contract, 

_ That is the subject of the letter. It is signed by Julius J. Matson, 
district director. Will you examine that letter and state if you iden- 
tify it and if you received it ? 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. I believe that letter, if you will look at the sta- 
tionery, shows that Pitzele was chairman of the board at the time; 
is that correct ? 

Mr. Parise. Well, I don't think he necessarily would be the hear- 
ing judge. 

The Chairman. I didn't say that. But he was chairman of the 
board. 

Mr. Parise. I didn't notice. I know what you are getting at now. 
Yes. 

The Chairman. The stationery shows it ? 

Mr. Parise. I know now what you mean. 

The Chairman. Yes. The first letter was notifying you, since you 
were out of the association, that the money was due for the security, 
and to pay it in 48 hours ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Parise. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. They gave you 48 hours to get up some $26,000 or 
^28,000 V 

Mr. Parise. Yes. 

The Chairman. That last letter will be made exhibit 12. 

(Document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 12" for reference, 
and will be found in the appendix on p. 7033.) 

The Chairman. Exhibit 12 was notice to you from the mediation 
board, and you have never complied with it, you never paid it? 

Mr. Parise. Because I was going to go to work anyhow. 

The Chairman. You were going to work anyhow, whether you 
paid or didn't ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIEiS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6813 

Mr. Parise. I wouldn't pay it, but I was going to go to work with- 
out paying it. They couldn't stop me, and I wouldn't let them. 

The Chairman. You did go to work ? 

Mr. Parise. I did. I told the men if they didn't like the way I was 
doing things, they could get out, and I would put new men in their 
place. That is why I insisted on having a union card. 

The Chairman. AVhat does that union card do for you ? 

Mr. Parise. I would go on as a union man. They couldn't take any 
stops away from me for being nonunion. 

The Chairman. It is a'matter of protection that they couldn't take 
stops away from you as long as you were in the union yourself? 

Mr. Parise. Yes; that is right. Even though the union gave out 
lists without my name on them, and I was the biggest member of 813. 

The Chairman. They would give out a list without your name? 

Mr. Parise. They gave a list without my name on it. They gave a 
list of names, of member firms, but my name wasn't on there. 

The Chairman. Did you make a contract w^th the union ? 

Mr. Parise. I sure did. 

Tlie Chairman. As a member of the union, you, in effect, made a 
contract with yourself? 

Mr. Parise. No. What isn't right, sir, isn't right, and no one is 
going to force me to do it. 

The Chairman. I understand, I understand that. I am talking 
about the situation. You belong to the union that you make a con- 
tract with. 

Mr. Parise. If they don't want me in, they can throw me out any 
time they want. I will still work and I will Sciil collect garbage. 

The Chairman. Well, I believe you will work, too. I am not 
arguing about that. 

Is there anything further ? 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all. 

Thank you. 

Mr. Parise. You are welcome. 

The Chairman. We will take a 5-minute recess. 
(Thereupon, a brief recess was taken.) 

(Members of the select committee present at the taking of the recess 
were Senators McClellan and McNamara.) 

The Chairman. The committee will be in order. 
(Members of tlie select committee present at this point in the 
proceedings: Senators McClellan and McNamara.) 

Mr. Kennedy. The next witness, Mr. Chairman, is William Rom- 
bauts. 

The Chairman. Do you solemnly swear that the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 
Mr. RoMBAUTS. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM EOMBAUTS 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Ro::\rnAUTS. William Rombauts, 45 Arlington Avenue, West 
Babylon, doing business as Rombauts Refuse Removal. 

S0?.30— 57— pt. 17 11 



6814 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THiE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 

Do you waive counsel ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. How do you spell your name, please ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. R-o-m-b-a-u-t-s. 

Mr. Kennedy. William Rombauts ? 

Mr. Rombauts. That's right. 

Mr. Kennedy. You are president of the Rombauts Refuse Re- 
moval ? 

Mr. Rombauts. Right. 

Mr, Kennedy. And you are president of the Suffolk County Gar- 
bagemen's Association ? 

Mr. Rombauts. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy". When did you first become a member of that? The 
association was formed in the spring of 1954 ? 

Mr. Rombauts. About the spring of 1954. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you had just a few members at that time? 

Mr. Rombauts. We had about 7 or 8 members. 

Mr. Kennedy. At that time, each member was paying $5 per truck 
per month as his dues ? 

Mr. Rombauts. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. And only 1 or 2 of the members, in 1954, were mem- 
bers of the union ; is that right ? 

Mr. Rombauts. In the beginning, no, there wasn 't any that belonged 
to the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. But subsequently one or a couple joined ? 

Mr. Rombauts. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were an elected president in December of 1954 ? 

Mr. Rombauts. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy'. There was an attempt to organize the association 
members in early 1955 ? 

Mr. Rombauts. Right. 

Mr. Kennedy. At that time, did Mr. Parise, who testified here just 
prior to your appearance, bring Mr. Joseph Parisi of local 27 out ? 

Mr. Rombauts. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Joseph Parisi come ? 

Mr. Rombauts. Mr. Parisi did come later on, but it was not through 
Mr. Peter Parise. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Parisi come to your association meeting? 

Mr. Rombauts. He came to one meeting when they had a fellow from 
the union come out. 

Mr. Kennedy-. And to address the members, urging them to join the 
union ? 

Mr. Rombauts. No. I don't think Mr. Parisi said anything at that 
time. 

Mr. Kennedys He did not address the association ? 

Mr. Rombauts. No. 

Mr. Ivennedy\ Who addressed the association for the union ? 

Mr. Rombauts. It was some gentleman, I do not know his name, but 
he got up and was speaking about the trust fund of the union. 

Mr. Kennedy'. Was there any explanation at that time as to what 
the union could do for the association? 

Mr. Rombauts. No. The union itself did not say anything about 
that. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6815 

Mr. IvjENi>rEDY. Did anybody 'i 

Mr, RoMBAUTS. Before that, Mr. Squillante did. 

Mr. Kennedy. You had retained Mr. Squillante by that time ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes. 

JNIr. Kennedy. Who brought Mr. Squillante out? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. I think Mr. Peter Parise. 

Mr. Kennedy. Peter Parise? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he introduced him to the association ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Squillante at that time explain what the 
union could do for the association, and what he could do for th& 
association ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. At that particular meeting, no. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he subsequently ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Subsequently, yes. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Did he explain that there would be no undercutting, 
that you would have certain districts, have a monopoly in certain dis- 
tricts, that there would be a whip firm formed, and that type of 
operation ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. In Sulfolk County you couldn't do that, because he 
claimed we was out there with the rest of the Indians. 

Mr. Kennedy. You what ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. We were out there with the rest of the Indians. 
It was spread out too far. 

Mr. Kennedy. You couldn't do that in Suffolk County ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you going to be able to do that anywhere? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. We only had Suffolk County. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you couldn't do that. What was he going to do 
for you, then ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. It was supposed to be set up that you wouldn't lose 
a stop, and you would have property rights, the same as the rest of 
the fellows said before. 

Mr. Kennedy. There wo\dd be a whip firm, would theie not ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes. In the beginning, there was no such mention 
of a whip firm. 

Mr. Ke^tnedy. And you would have the property rights, and the 
whip firm, and subsequently brought in the whip firm? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. And there would be no undercutting, no bidding 
against one another on business you already had ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. You had those four elements that were going to be 
present ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the union was going to assist ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. But those four elements, we only got them one at a 
time. 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, it didn't work perfectly, I understand. 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then the union was going to come in. Was it ex- 
plained that Mr. Squillante had a close association with the union? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Well, it was explained that Mr, Squillante couldn't 



6816 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

do much for the association unless all the members did belong to the 
union. 

Mr. Kennedy. So he urged you to belong to the union ; is that right ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you told that he had a close association with 
the union ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. Not at that time ; no. 

Mr. Kennedy. Subsequently were you told ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Regarding the operation of the whip firm, did he 
appoint a whip, a whip company ? 

JNIr. RoMBAUTS. There was one whip company that did come out. 
That was the company from Nassau County. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was the name of that company ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Rapid Sanitation. 

Mr. Kennedy. Rapid Rubbish ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Rapid Rubbish. 

Mr. Kennedy. Headed by w^hom ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Freddie Fasula. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we have already put Mr. Fasula's 
background into the i-ecord. 

Did you meet Mr. Fasula ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. At one meeting, yes, I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was your impression of Mr. Fasula ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Well, all he said to me was that he was sent out here, 
and he was supposed to do a job out in Islip. He claimed that lie 
started his job, and then, one of the fellows from the association called 
him off, that he shouldn't take any more of the fellows' stops. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was he made sergeant at arms, or was he sergeant 
at arms ? 

Mr. RoMBATJTS. Not in our association ; no. 

Mr. Kennedy. But he was at the intercounty ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. At the intercounty. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he take work and operate out there to take stops 
away from nonassociation members — Fasula? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Subsequently, you had the meeting as to whether you 
would belong to the union, did you not ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Squillante urged you all to become members of 
the union? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you want to become a member of the union ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. I had no choice. 

Mr. Kennedy. How did that work out ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. Because I was one of the very few out in Suffolk 
County that had any large commercial stops. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you decided to become a member ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. When was that ? When did you become a member ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. About 2 or 3 years ago. 

Mr. Kennedy. About 1955 ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. Around that. 



IMPROPER ACrrV'ITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6817 

Mr. Kennedy. Was Mr. Parisi out there at that time, or Mr. Meg- 
leoria ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. Mr. Megleoria and Mr. Parisi are the only two I 
knew, outside of Squillante. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you all decide to come into the union at the one 
time? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. All except three fellows, and they wanted to take a 
copy of their contract to their lawyers. 

Mr. Ivennedy. When they explained it to you, did you decide right 
away that you would become a member of the union ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. No; I did not. I was going to go along with the 
rest of the fellows in the association. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have a recess in the association meeting? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. We didn't have the recess. The fellows in the miion 
went outside. They had the recess. They were talking outside. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did your wife overhear a conversation they had ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes ; she did. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Who was present in the conversation ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. My wife was sitting at a table with the owner of 
the tavern where we held the meeting, and they got outside and they 
sat at a table right next to her, and they says, "You don't have to worry 
about Rombauts. He has 2 or 3 big stops. We will get him in line." 

Mr. ICennedy. Your wife overheard them in that conversation ? 

Mr. Rombauts. That is right. 

Mr. I^nnedy. Who was present? Squillante? 

Mr. Rombauts. Squillante, Parisi, I guess, Joe Parisi, and there 
was three other fellows there. I know there was five. I don't know 
them all. 

Mr. Kennedy. You joined the union at that time ; did you not ? 

Mr. Rombauts. Yes; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Squillante explain the security clause in the 
union to you ? 

Mr. Rombauts. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was there any discussion of the fact that if you 
were outside of the association you would have to put up $300 per 
employee ? 

Mr. Rombauts. Not at that time it wasn't explained to us, but I 
think it was 3 months later something like that was explained to us. 

Mr. Kennedy. If you were in the association you would only have 
to put up $25 per company ? 

Mr. Rombauts. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. But if you were outside the association, the union 
would require $300 from the employer ; is that right ? 

Mr. Rombauts. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he also say the union would assist the associa- 
tion by jumping nonassociation stops and then getting them for the 
association ? 

Mr. Rombauts. If you knew of any stop that was a union shop and 
a nonunion garbageman was picking it up, you would let him know, 
and he would take care of it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were the employers sent union books for their em- 
ployees ? 



6818 IMPROPER ACTIVITIEIS IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were there holidays specified, in certain terms of 
the contract ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. Yes, there were. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were the terms of that contract lived up to ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Not with me ; no. 

Mr. Kjinnedy. You didn't have to live up to them ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Squillante give you assurance at that time that 
you wouldn't have to live up to the terms of the contract? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. No, he did not. 

Mr. Kennedy. You just understood that you did not have to live 
up to it ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. I just didn't believe in some of the things they had 
in it, that is all. 

Mr. Kennedy. And nobody ever bothered you ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. And during the course of the time that you were a 
member of the union, you received dance tickets from Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you had to deduct $5 from the salary of each 
employee for the dance tickets ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. I paid for them myself. 

Mr. Kennedy. You took it out ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. No, I didn't take it out of their pay. I paid it 
myself. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you told to take it out of their pay ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes. I was billed for it. After they didn't pay for 
3 months, they sent me the bill. 

Mr. Kennedy. You paid it yourself ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. That is right, 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Squillante say what you should do about the 
increase in wages that you might have to j)ay ? Did he explain how 
you could handle it ? 

'Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes; he did. He says, "If you are getting $1.50 
now, you belong to the union, you can go out tomorrow and get $2." 

Mr. Kennedy. He said you would just pass it on to the customer? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. So any payments that you had to make to the union 
could be passed on to the customer ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Vincent Squillante bring in his brother to 
the association? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes. In the beginning, Jimmie Squillante took care 
of the association himself, and then something come up and he said he 
was sort of busy and he wouldn't be able to make it any longer, and 
he would send his brother Nunzio out to be labor relations man. 

Mr. Kennedy. So Nunzio came out and held that position ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Nunzio came out and held the position. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat was Nunzio's salary ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. He got $100 a week, plus expenses. It ran for about 
$125 a week. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know he had a company of his own ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. I have heard something about it ; yes. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES ENT THE LABOR FIELD 6819 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Do you know if that was union or nonunion? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS, That I did not know. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never learned ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. I learned after awhile it wasn't. 

Mr. Kennedy. It was nonunion ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Nonunion. 

Mr. Kennedy. General Sanitation Co. ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he was executive director of the association? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And Squillante explained to you that everybody had 
to be in the union if they were members of the association ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. That is right. 

Mr. Ivennedy. And Squillante's brother, the executive director of 
the association, was nonunion; is that right? He ran a nonunion 
operation ? 

INIr. RoMBAUTs. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know when Nunzio started in that position? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. No, I don't. 

Mr. Kennedy. You don't ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. No. 

Mr, Kennedy. Yvliat about the minutes? If you were discussing 
the fact that there were monopolies, property rights, no jumping, and 
that sort of thing, did those discussions appear in the minutes ? 

Mr, RoMBAUTS. No matter what was discussed, the minutes were 
taken from our place, brought into New York City, and then for the 
next meeting they brought a copy out and read the minutes off, 

Mr. Kennedy. Why did he say they had to be brought into New 
York City? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. They had to see that everything was on the up and 
up, 

Mr, Kennedy. Was it a feeling that it was necessary to make sure 
that none of these things, such as monopolies, or any of these matters 
that might be considered against the law or illegal, did not appear 
in the minutes ? 

]Mr. RoMBAUTS, That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. And to insure that that didn't happen, those min- 
utes were brought into New York City and rewritten ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. That is right, 

Mr, Ivennedy, He explained that to you ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS, Yes, 

Mr, Kennedy, Did you subsequently join with the associations in 
New York City, the other associations ? 

Mr, RoMBAUTS, Yes. I think we went into 2 meetings, 2 or 3. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had you voted to join with the other associations? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. No, we did not. 

Mr. Kennedy, You were just told 

Mr, RoMBAUTS, We were just told that all associations would meet 
together, 

Mr. Kennedy, Vincent Squillante told you that? 

Mr. RoMBATJTS. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. He operated and ran all the associations? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. That is right. 



6820 EMPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy, Did he tell you in one of these meetings that he 
would have to resign, that he was in difficulty with the law 'i 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. No ; that wasn't the reason he gave me. He told me 
that he was too busy at the time. That is why he had to resign from 
being our man. That is when we got his brother. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Did you understand subsequently that he had been 
under income-tax investigation ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that he had been convicted of income-tax viola- 
tion? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes ; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. As I understand, you wanted to get rid of Squillante 
at one period of time ; is that right ? 

Mr. RoMBATjTS. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you tell him that you were firing him ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. We didn't tell him we was firing him. We just told 
him we wasn't going to pay him. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat did he say to that ? 

Mr, RoMBAUTS. He sa3^s, "Well, if you are not going to pay me" — 
this was twice we were called into the city, and he wanted to know 
where his check was. I think he was to receive $1,300; $100 from 
each firm. He was supposed to receive $1,300, and he wanted to know 
where his money was, because it wasn't a full year that he operated. 

So we talked it over and we decided we wasn't going to pay him, so- 
we told him that we wasn't going to pay him. 

Mr. Kennedy. So what happened ? What did he do ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. So one of the fellows that went in, one of the board 
of directors that went in with us, asked him a question. I forget 
exactly what it was. He said, "Well, I will show you what a nickel 
can do." He picked up the telephone and he called somebody, and he 
says he no longer has anything to do with the Suffolk County Gar- 
bagemen's Association. 

Mr. Kennedy. This somebody, did you interpret him to be some- 
body in the union ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. It must have been. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. What happened after that ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. A week later we got a letter from the union saying^ 
they wanted more security from our association. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much did they say they wanted then ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. I think we paid $1,800 and they wanted another 
$1,800. 

Mr. Kennedy. So within a week of the time that you told Squil- 
lante that you were no longer going to pay him, and that you wanted 
to release him, within a week of that, within a week of this telephone 
conversation, you received notification from the union to post another 
$1,800 for security ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. This is local 813 of the teamsters, is that right, Mr. 
Bernie Adelstein's ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs, Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. You might be interested in this, Mr. Chairman. 
According to the information we have, it was Mr. Adelstein that 
nominated Mr. John O'Rourke for vice president of the teamsters on 
Mr. James Hoffa's slate at a recent convention. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6821 

Senator McNamara. I liave a couple of questions, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Senator McNamara. 

Senator McNamara. I don't think I quite understood how Mr. 
Squilhinte got into this situation in Suffolk County. How did he get 
in there ? By invitation ? Did he muscle in, or what ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. By invitation. 

Senator McNamara. Were you one of the parties to the invitation? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. Everyone in the association was at that time. 

Senator McNamara. Were you an officer? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. At that time ; no. 

Senator McNamara. Subsequently, were you an officer? 

JMr. RoMBAUTs. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. How do you account for this? How come you 
ask this man, who turns out to be a pretty bad character, to come out 
there and do business for you in that area ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. No one knew he was a bad character. It was the 
understanding that w^e had that he was going to do something for the 
garbage industry. That is the understanding we had. 

Senator INIcNamara. Where did you get that impression ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. Well, they claimed he was doing it in Nassau 
County, he was doing such a good job in Nassau County. 

Senator McNamara. Who do you mean by "they claim"? The 
members of your association ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. No; we had some members who belonged to the 
Nassau County in our Suifolk County Association. 

Senator McNamara. And they sold him to the Suffolk County 
Association ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. In Suffolk County, how do you go into busi- 
ness ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTs. You need a permit from the town. 

Senator McNamara. Not a county permit ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. You also need a county health permit, too. 

Senator McNamara. You have to have a county permit and also 
get a permit from the municipality where you operate ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. That is correct. 

Senator McNamara. Is the nature of your business such that you 
do garbage collecting mostly for organized communities, municipali- 
ties? 

Mr. Rombauts. No. 

Senator McNamara. On the individual basis ? 

Mr. Rombauts. On the individual basis. 

Senator McNamara. About how much does a householder pay ? 

Mr. Rombauts. Two dollars a month. 

Senator McNamara. Two dollars? 

Mr. Rombauts. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. That is for an individual house ? 

Mr. Rombauts. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. Did you ultimately get rid of the brother of 
Vincent Squillante ? 

Mr. Rombauts. At the same time we got rid of Jimmie Squillante 
we got rid of Nunzio Squillante ? 

Senator McNamara. So you don't have these people representing 
you any more ? 



6822 IMPROPER ACTI^aTIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. No. 

Senator McNamaka. Now your business with the union is more 
difficult to conduct since you got rid of these people ? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Well, actually, we only had — the Suffolk County 
Garbagemen's Association only had a meeting about 2 weeks ago, and 
we sat there and we discussed it. There is only about three fellows 
that have any commercial accounts at all. 

The rest of them, when a new contract comes up, they are not going 
to sign. There is two fellows that may switch, commercial for house 
work so they wouldn't have to sign, and let just the one man. 

Senator MgNamara. The real strength, the real hold, the miion 
has on the business in your area is through commercial? 

Mr. RoMBAUTS. Through the commercial. House stops they can't 
touch. 

Senator McNamara. Most of the business is house stops ? 

Mr. Rombauts. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. More than 80 percent ? 

Mr. Rombauts. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. You shouldn't have any trouble getting rid 
of these people at all. 

Mr. Rombauts. No; most of us wouldn't. With my business, the 
way I figure with my business, it will cut me in half if I lose my 
commercials. I happen to be one of the fortunate ones ; one that has 
some commercial stops. 

Senator McNamara. But it probably isn't worth what it is costing 
you on this additional tax they are trying to levy ? 

Mr. Rombauts. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. They have got to the point where they are 
taking too much, where you can't do business ? 

Mr. Rombauts. Well, in a way, yes. 

Senator McNamara. Well, if it was more profitable for you to 
stay with them, you would probably stay. You are in business to 
make money. 

Mr. Rombauts. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. So they got to the point where they are taking 
too much away, and you can't stand it ? 

Mr. Rombauts. That is correct. 

Senator McNamara. That is all. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you pay the second $1,800 ? I forgot to ask you. 

Mr. Rombauts. No ; we did not. They sent 2 or 3 letters after that, 
and we didn't bother to answer them. 

Senator McNamara. Plave you been cited by the New York Labor 
Mediation Commission at all ? 

Mr. Rombauts. No. 

Senator McNamara. Even though you have the same violations as 
other people who have been brought before the Commission, you have 
not been cited? 

Mr. Rombauts. No. 

Senator McNamara. That is interesting. Thank you. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6823 

Call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Tlie next witness is Mr. Strelzin. 

The Chairman. You do solemnly swear that the testimony you are 
about to give before this Senate select committee shall be the truth, 
the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

]Mr. Strelzin. I do, sir. 

TESTIMONY OF HAKVEY L. STRELZIN 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Strelzin. My name is Harvey L. Strelzin. My address is 15 
Clark Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. I am an attorney, licensed to practice 
law in the State of New York. 

The Chairman. And you waive additional counsel ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I do, sir. 

The Chairman. Thank you. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Strelzin, you have held certain positions with 
the State of New York ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I have, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you outline those ? 

Mr. Strelzin. Well, I was an assistant attorney general of the State 
of New York between the years 1933 and 1939. I was the chairman 
of the Board of Assessors of the City of New York from June 1955 to 
May of 1957. 
: Mr. Kennedy. And you are a practicing attorney? 

Mr. Strelzin. I am a practicing attorney. 

I have held other positions, but not political. 

Mr. Ivennedy. You have had an interest in a garbage concern, 
have you ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I have, sir. I have a minority interest of 25 per- 
cent in the Sanitary Haulage Corp. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. When did you begin that ? 

Mr. Strelzin. The corporation was formed in March of 1950. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you put up how much money ? 

Mr. Strelzin. $5,000. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who were your partners ? 

Mr. Strelzin. My partners at the time — rather than partners, the 
stockholders at the time — -were one Anthony Ricci, and Paul Annus. 
That is Maj. Paul Armus. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Ricci, as I believe you know, has rather a long 
criminal record, and is rather an important figure in the underworld 
in the United States. 

Mr. Strelzin. So I learned in May of 1950. 

INIr. Kennedy. You had not known it at the time you went into 
business with him ? 

Mr, Strelzin. I had not, sir. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Had you known Mr. Ricci for a very long period 
of time prior to that time ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I was introduced to him in the early part of 1949. 
I was told at the time he was a restaurateur. 



6824 IMPROPER ACMIVITIE'S IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. That he was what ? 

Mr. Strelzin. A restaurateur. In the restaurant business. 

Mr. Kennedy. Where was he in the restaurant business ? 

Mr. Strelzin. In the Borough of Brooklyn. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had you had any business dealings with him prior 
to the time that you joined in partnership ? 

Mr. Strelzin. Yes. I represented his wife as attorney in two 
minor transactions in tlie year 1949. They involved loans that I 
made in their behalf to two different concerns. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were they clients of yours that were looking for 
loans and you went to Mr. Ricci ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I went to Mr. Ricci, and Mr. Ricci arranged for his 
wife to make the loans. 

Mr. Ivennedy. That was on two different occasions? 

Mr. Strelzin. On two occasions in 1949, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And then you would handle the money and pass it 
on to the clients ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I would, sir, and get notes and security and see that 
they were paid. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why did you decide to go into business with him in 
the Sanitary Haulage? 

Mr. Strelzin. Well, I assumed he was substantial financially. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was the only reason ? 

Mr. Strelzin. And Major Armus and myself were looking for a 
third partner. I discussed it with Mr. Ricci. He seemed interested, 
and we proceeded to investigate going into the Sanitary Haulage 
Corp. business. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you went in in March of 1950 ; is that right ? 

Mr. Strelzin. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much money did he put up ? 

Mr. Strelzin. Mr. Ricci put up $5,000 and Mr. Armus put up two 
at the time and subsequently another three. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you put up how much ? 

Mr. Strelzin. $5,000. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you learn subsequently of Mr. Ricci's criminal 
record ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I did learn it, because Major Armus had called to my 
attention an article that was published in Look magazine of May 23, 
1950. 

Mr. Kennedy. Go ahead. And you learned then about Mr. Ricci's 
background ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I did, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have Mr. Ricci continue? Did you want 
him to continue ? As I understand it, you made arrangements for him 
to withdr;) w from the firm ? 

Mr. Strelzin. Not only that, but Mr. Ricci actually did withdraw 
from the firm, as evidenced by the records from the Manufacturers 
Trust Co. of June 15, 1950, wherein we filed a new certificate indicat- 
ing that Anthony Ricci was no longer an officer, director, or stock- 
holder of the corporation. We filed an amended certificate in the 
secretary of state's office dated June 15, 1950, wherein the names of 
the officers and directors and the stockholders were changed to ex- 
clude Anthony Ricci as having any interest in the corporation. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6825 

Mr. Kennedy. Who replaced Mr. Ricci ? 

Mr. Strelzin. Mr. Ricci's stock was taken over by William Hockey. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you find anything out about the background of 
Mr. Hockey ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I knew nothing about the background of Mr. Hockey. 
I drew a Dun & Bradstreet report on him, in 1950, prior to his associat- 
ing himself with Sanitary Haulage Corp. I inquired about him 
from various people. He was engaged in the television and radio 
business in the neighborhood wherein I lived, and he was prepared to 
go in to the Sanitary Haulage business with us. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long had you known Mr. Hockey ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I daresay I met Mr. Hockey in 1948. 

Mr. Kennedy. How did you happen to select him to replace Mr, 
Ricci ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I had spoken to Mr. Hockey about that prior to 
speaking to Mr. Ricci about it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know Mr. Hockey and Mr. Ricci were 
close friends ? 

Mr. Strelzin. No ; I found that out in 1950. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know it at the time you brought Mr. Hockey 
into the firm ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I did not, sir ; not at the time. But when I discussed 
it again with Mr. Hockey the second time in 1950, he told me he knew 
Mr. Ricci. 

jNIr. Kennedy. He knew Mr. Ricci ? 

Mr. Strelzin. He did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had you known they were in business together? 

Mr. Strelzin. I did not, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know anything further about the back- 
ground of Mr. Hockey, about any arrests that he might have? 

Mr. Strelzin. No, sir. To my knowledge Mr. Hockey never has 
been convicted of a crime. The people I have spoken to about Mr. 
Hockey speak well of him. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know anything of his past associations 
with certain criminal 

Mr. Strelzin. I did not. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Do you know at this time ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I can say this, that in the 7 years that I have been 
associated with Mr. Hockey in the business, he has conducted it in an 
honorable fashion, in an upright fashion, and in a proper fashion. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Hockey replace Mr. Ricci ? 

Mr. Strelzin. Mr. Hockey replaced Mr. Ricci ; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliere did he get the money to replace Mr. Ricci ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I do not know, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he buy Mr. Ricci's interest ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I subsequently found out, and this was in 1956, sir, 
that at the time INIr. Ricci first made his investment in the Sanitary 
Haulage Corp., he had received a loan from Mr. Hockey of $5,000; 
that after Mr. Ricci stepped out in June of 1950, Mr. Hockey assumed 
the stock of the corporation, and Mr. Ricci stepped out. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not realize that was going on, either? 

Mr. Strelzin. I did not, sir. 



6926 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not realize much of what was going on in 
the background of your company, did you, if you did not realize any of 
these things ? 

Mr. Strelzin. Any of what things ? 

Mr. Kennedy. As I understand your last statement, the money that 
Mr. Ricci put up, the $5,000 that Mr. Ricci put up, was actually put 
up by Mr. Hockey. 

Mr. Strelzin. I did not know that, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not learn it until when? 

Mr. Strelzin. Until 1956. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is one thing you did not know. Did Mr. 
Hockey tell you when you asked him if he would be interested in the 
company, did he tell you that he was going to buy Mr. Eicci out? 

Mr. Strelzin. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then he deceived you, did he not ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I do not believe he deceived me. 

Mr. Kennedy. It was actually his money that was put into the 
company originally. 

Mr. Strelzin. I did not know that, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. He did deceive you when he said he was going to 
buy Mr. Ricci out, when, in fact, he was not going to buy Mr. Ricci 
out, but it was his money all along. 

Mr. Strelzin. I did not know, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Strelzin, from our examination of the books of 
this company we find Mr. Ricci comes back on the payroll in, I 
believe, 1956. Could you explain that ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I will be happy to, Mr. Kennedy. In June of 
1950, when Mr. Annus and myself decided that either Mr. Ricci step 
out or we step out, he agreed to step out. The corporation had not 
yet engaged in any activities. In the latter part of 1949, when we 
had contemplated going into the sanitary haulage business, we were 
going to utilize new equipment, known as Dempster Dumpster equij)- 
ment. Mr. Ricci, Mr. Annus, and myself made some trips to Balti- 
more, Md., Philadelphia, and Washington, D. C, to see how the equip- 
ment was being utilized in the removal of waste. The moneys ad- 
vanced for these trips and various restaurant charges, and so forth, 
were advanced by Mr. Ricci. At the time he agreed to step out in June 
of 1950, he asked for the return of the $400, which we were prepared 
to give him, and then he also said that he wanted $500 for the time 
he spent. We felt we did not want to_^ive him the $900 at that time. 
We had not yet engaged in anj^ activities. Our first account was ob- 
tained in October of 1950. This was in June of 1950, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much money had he used in expenses? 

Mr. Strelzin. $400. 

Mr. Kennedy. And what was the $500 for? 

Mr. Strelzin. $500 he felt he was entitled to for the time he ex- 
pended in investigating the merits of the Demptster Dumpster system. 
So we agreed that at a later date we would pay him the $900 which we 
did pay him beginning with January 1, 1956. 

Mr. Kennedy. When Mr. Hockey, from what he told you, was buy- 
ing his interest out, I would have thought that would have all been 
straightened out in 1950. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6827 

Mr. Strelzin. No; because in 1950, the only thing Mr. Hockey did 
was take over the stock of the corporation, which was the $5,000 of 
stock. 

Mr. Kennedy. But not to pay any of these debts ? 

Mr. Strelzin. No, sir. If anybody was to pay that, that was an 
obligation for the corporation. It was an obligation of every stock- 
holder of the corporation. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. So you waited 6 years until you started to pay Mr. 
Kicci? 

]Mr. Strelzin. Well, it so happens that Mr. Eicci has been living 
in Miami Beach for many years. He came to New York City in 1955, 
the latter part of 1955. We had dinner at the Brass Eail. There 
was Mr. Ricci, Mr. Hockey, Major Annus, and myself. He said he 
would like a return of his $900. That was almost 5 years after the 
$400 was advanced. We agreed to give him $500 for his services. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you give him $500 at that time ? 

Mr. Strelzin. No; at that time we agreed to give him the $900, 
plus simple interest at 6 percent a year for 5 years. I believe that 
it totaled $1,170. I think it was $54 a year for 5 years. 

Mr. Kennedy. So did you give him the $1,170 ? 

Mr. Strelzin. We arranged to give him the $1,170 over a period of 
weeks at $30 a week. He insisted he did not want any difficulty with 
the Government. He wanted us to show it on our books. He wanted 
to pay the tax on it. So for a period of, I think it was 31 weeks, we 
gave him $30 a week, which totaled $1,170. Not since then has he 
been on the payroll of Sanitary Haulage, nor prior to that was he con- 
nected with Sanitary Haulage. I might volunteer to you, sir, that 
in 1956, Major Annus drew approximately $5,000, which represented 
a 25-percent interest in Sanitary Haulage Corp., and I drew almost 
the same, which represented a 25-percent interest in Sanitary Haul- 
age Corp. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you ever heard of the practice followed by 
some racketeers to try to get on payrolls of various companies at a 
small amount — $30, $40, or $50 a week — so that they can show some 
source of income to the income-tax people? That is a practice that 
is followed. 

Mr. Strelzin. It was not the practice by Mr. Eicci insofar as Sani- 
tary Haulage was concerned, nor would we have countenanced it at 
any time. 

Mr. Kennedy. Actually these payments stopped when the New 
York Daily News started to look into the matter and wrote some 
stories. 

Mr. Strelzin. That is not true, sir, the payments; no, sir. The 
payments stopped approximately 3 weeks before there was any noto- 
riety in the Daily News, and the record will so indicate. Each and 
every check that was given to Mr. Eicci, each and every stub had an 
endorsement thereon. No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, up until 32 or 31, until the 
full amount of the $1,170 was paid to him. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you take out social security on that ? 

Mr. Strelzin. We paid whatever was required under the law to 
give him his $30 per week to total $1,170, because he felt that the 
bulk of that was in earnine;. 



6828 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD> 

Mr. Kennedy. The bulk of it was what ? 

Mr. Strelzin. He liad earned. 

Mr. Kennedy. Earnings? 

Mr. Strelzin. Yes; only $400 represented an advance. The $500- 
represented an earning. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you take social security out on the $400 ? 

Mr. Strelzin. We did, sir, and withholding taxes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why did you do that ? 

Mr. Strelzin. That was the way Mr. Hockey arranged it, and I 
was content to go along with it. I saw nothing wrong with it. The 
money was coming to him, I wanted it returned, and I wanted him 
to get it back. 

Mr. Kennedy. He did not have to pay that, if it was $400 legiti- 
mate expenses. 

Mr. Strelzin. Yes; there are many ways it could have been given 
to him. It could liave been given to him in one lump sum. We were 
not making any money at that time in Sanitary Haulage^ and we 
were glad to pay it back over a weekly basis. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know that Mr. Ricci was keeping in rather- 
close touch with your company during 1956 ? 

Mr. Strelzin. No, sir: your committee has informed me, of recent 
date. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know that those telephone calls were col- 
lect telephone calls from Miami, Fla. ? 

Mr. Strelzin. You have informed me of that fact, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why would he be calling collect to your company 
frequently, calls of $14, $lo, or $16 apiece ? 

Mr. Strelzin. Wliat do 3'ou mean by frequently!! Over a period 
of years ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, a period of time. 

Mr. Strelzin. I do know that Mr. Hockey and Mr. Ricci are 
friends, and I do know that Mr. Ricci, on occasion, has called Mr. 
Hockey to chat with him, so I have learned since you informed me 
about it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat? 

Mr. Strelzin. So I have learned since the committee informed me 
about it. But for the record, Mr. Ricci has never called me, I have 
never called Mr. Ricci. 

Mr. Kennedy. And these collect telephone calls were all paid out 
of company funds, were they not ? 

Mr. Strelzin. So I have been advised, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And they were usually made by Mr. Ricci, using 
an alias? 

Mr. Strelzin. I would not know, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. The name of Mr, Jackson ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I would not know, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you learned of that ? 

Mr. Strelzin. You have advised me of that. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never inquired, yourself ? 

Mr. Strelzin. No ; I have not. 

Mr. Kennedy. This was your company. I would think you would 
be interested. 

Mr. Strelzin. I am interested in the company. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6829 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you be interested in having your partner 
pay for all of these collect calls from a notorious racketeer ? 

Mr. Strelzin. My partner is conducting an uprighteous, proper 
business. 

The Chairman. That really is not the question. It is a little strange 
that a company would be paying for long-distance calls, personal calls, 
I assume, from your testimony, just to have a chat. I don't quite 
understand it. I don't quite understand that to be a legitimate ex- 
pense of your company, in the first place, and, in the second place, I 
can't understand any sense in it, why it would be done that way. I don't 
know how much these amount to. How much do they amount to? 
It doesn't add up. 

Mr. Kennedy. It is about how many in 1955 or 1956 ? 

Mr. Greene. I would say about a dozen. 

Mr. Strelzin. Mr. Hockey has informed me that over a period of 
years there have been approximately 7 or 8 calls that he received from 
Miami over a period of years. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you inquire into why Mr. Ricci was using an 
alias? 

Mr. Strelzin. No. That I do not know, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would think, if you were asking him about the 
telephone calls, you would want to find out. 

Mr. Strelzin. Frankly, I have never discussed it with Mr. Hockey. 
Frankly, until your committee mentioned it to me, until the very mo- 
ment, I never thought of asking him. 

Mr. Kennedy. You see, it concerns us a little bit on the $5,000. He 
said he did not know where Mr. Ricci got the $5,000 to invest in the 
company originally. Now you tell us that Mr. Ricci got the $5,000 
from Mr. Hockey. I don't vmderstand why Mr. Hockey would not 
have told us that. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. It has been a confusing matter. 

Mr. Strelzin. I don't know, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have anything on the background of Mr. 
Ricci and Mr. Hockey ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes. He was also known as Anthony Gobel, Anthony 
Goble, Anthony Gobels, Anthony Friedman, Gatano Ricci, Tony 
Goebels, and Bobo. 

The Chairman. He was known by all those names ? 

Mr. Kelly. At various times, sir. He is known to the New York 
City Police Department under B No. 281555. He shows a record of 
5 previous arrests, 2 of which were for felonious assault, 2 for grand 
larceny, and he has 1 conviction on July 30, 1915, a suspended sentence 
for assault, third. 

Mr. Ricci's associates in the past have been Joe Adonis, Tony Schoe- 
maker, Owney Madden, Pasquale Ricci, Joseph Bernava, and this 
woman, Anna Friedman, whose last name Ricci has at times assumed 
as an alias. 

When he was questioned by Immigration and also by the FBI, he 
stated he was employed in 1944 as a chauffeur and interviewer by an 
outfit called Nathan Outfitters, located at 1150 Broadway iu Brooklyn. 

Sn?,80 — 57 — pt. 17 12 



6830 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

It is a coincidence that the owner of this business is the same Anna 
Friedman. 

Going back a little further in Mr. Kicci's past, there is an interesting 
story about Mr. Ricci. In the 1930's, when he came from Chicago, he 
had been part of the Capone syndicate. When he first arrived, his 
hobby was kidnaping bookies at Belmont racetrack, and liolding them 
for ransom, an item which caused quite a bit of consternation, not 
only by the police, but by the bookies. The bookies refused police 
protection, but hired their own bodyguards, at which time Mr. Ricci 
desisted. 

Mr. Kennedy. Has he been described as one of the leading criminals 
in the United States ? 

Mr. Kelly. In the Kefauver hearings, which began in 1950, and 
which coincided with his abrupt departure from Sanitary Haulage, 
Mr. Ricci was described by Virgil Peterson, the head of the New York 
Crime Commission, as an important mobster, and also connected with 
the Italian lottery in Brooklyn, N. Y., and with mobs in Chicago and 
on the west coast. 

In regard to Mr. Strelzin's statement, he told us on his initial inter- 
view that he did not know about this background of Ricci 's, and yet 
at the same time he had been introduced to Ricci by a person now dead, 
who was a county detective in Brooklyn, who certainly should have 
known of Mr. Ricci's past activities. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did we find on Mr. Hockey ? 

Mr. Kelly. Mr. Hockey was connected with the wire services. He 
conducted a business known as a telescope from 100 Willougliby Street, 
Brooklyn. His early experience is centered on this wire-service oper- 
ation. In 1942 or thereabouts he was arrested and charged with a 
violation of section 580 of the penal law, conspiracy to violate section 
986 of the penal law, which relates to bookmaking, bets, and wagers. 
However, while he was convicted on that charge, the conviction was 
reversed by a higher court, and Mr. Hockey was discharged from 
custody. 

It is also interesting to note that Mr. Strelzin tells us he was unaware 
of his arrest until July 1, 1956, at which time the licensing department 
of the city of New York required all persons on the carting business 
to submit to fingerprinting. At that time, he states that Mr. Hockey 
told him about this arrest. Mr. Hockey, incidentally, was also con- 
nected with a business known as the Gil-Hoc Appliances, which 
obtained its name from Mr. Gilman and Mr. Hockey, who were part- 
ners. He stated that Mr. Ricci was a visitor to the store, and also 
purchased items there. It was an appliance store, a white-goods 
store, as they call it, and that he also, as the saying goes, drummed 
up business for Mr. Hockey. Some of his business turned out to be 
Albert Anastasia, Toney Bender, Willie Moriete, Joe Adonis, Vito 
Genoves, and other important mobsters in New York and thereabouts, 
who would flock from as far away as New Jersey to buy items at this 
little store in Brooklyn. Wlien we asked Mr. Hockey why this was 
so, he spread his hands and said, "Well, maybe it was because I had 
good prices." 

It is also interesting to know as far as the backgrounds of these 
mobsters are concerned, that they habitually buy at stores who are 
friendly to that type of person. 



IMPROPER ACTIVrriES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6831 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Hockey tell you when you originally talked 
to him that he did not know where Mr. Kicci got the $5,000? 

Mr. Kelly. It was a question of the shell game, Mr. Kennedy. 
Nobody seemed to know where the original $5,000 went. Mr. Strelzin 
said it was a matter to be discussed with Mr. Hockey. Mr. Hockey 
professed ignorance of the whereabouts of the original $5,000 of Mr. 
Kicci. Now the story comes out at a later date that Mr. Hockey lent 
Mr. Ricci the money,'that Ricci originally went into it, but Mr. Hockey 
did not admit this to us when we questioned him. 

TESTIMONY OF HARVEY L. STEELZIN— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. I want to ask you now about your relationship with 
Mr. Adelstein. 

Mr. Strelzin. You may. 

Mr. Kennedy. You have been a friend of Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I met Mr. Adelstein for the first time some time in 
October 1950. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you been a member of any association ? 

Mr. Strelzin. Sanitary Haulage Corp. is not a member of any 
corporation. 

Mr. Kennedy. We have had testimony before the committee that 
where a company is not a member of an association, that they have 
to put up as seciirity $300 per man, per employee. Has that been 
required of you by Bernie Adelstein or local 813? 

Mr. Strelzin. I would not know about it at this time, sir. I do 
know at the time we first met Bernie Adelstein, there was Mr. Hockey, 
Major Armus, and myself, and Mr. Adelstein we received a contract. 
I read the contract. We signed the contract. At that time I am 
pretty certain it did not require any security. Since then I have not 
been active in Sanitary Haulage Corp., except meetings regularly with 
officers and discussing the policy. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you put up any security ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I believe we have $300 as security on our contract. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many employess do you have ? 

Mr. Strelzin. We have five. 

Mr. Kennedy. So the most you have put up, anyway, is $300, is that 
right ? 

Mr. Strelzin. That is what I have been told. 

Mr. Kennedy. $300 ? 

Mr. Strelzin. Right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know why Mr. Adelstein has seen fit to waive 
the security for the other employees in your case ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I would not know, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You say that you met Mr. Adelstein in 1950. Have 
you done any work for Mr. Adelstein as an attorney ? 

Mr. Strelzin. Not for Mr. Adelstein, but I did some work for Mr. 
Adelstein's brother and family of a civil nature. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you charged Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. Strelzin. No, I have not. George Adelstein was kind enough 
to send me a gift certificate from Selker's. I refused to charge for my 
services. 

Mr. Kennedy. I understand you also own a liquor store, is that 
right? 



6832 IMPROPER ACnVITIEB m THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Strelzin. I do not own a liquor store. I own a half interest in 
a liquor store. It is a package goods store. 

Mr. Kennedy. Bernie Adelstein owns a liquor store. Do you 
realize that ? 

Mr. Strelzin. It is not in the same neighborhood nor did he procure 
his interest at the same time, nor is there any association. 

Mr. Kennedy. I am not saying that at all. I am going to another 
question. All I ^\ant to know is if you both own liquor stores. 

Mr. Strelzin. The implication is that we have joint interest in these 
liquor stores. 

Mr. Kennedy. No, that is not it. The next question is, establishing 
that you own a liquor store and Mr. Bernie Adelstein owns a liquor 
store, have you ever gone to Mr. Bernie Adelstein's store to buy liquor? 

Mr. Strelzin. I have not. 

Mr. Kennedy. Has your concern, your company, gone to Bernie 
Adelstein's store? 

Mr. Stoelzin. Mr. Hockey has purchased liquor from both my store 
and from Mr. Adelstein's store. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wlien you talk about Mr. Hockey 

Mr. Strelzin. Sanitary Haulage Corp. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then Sanitary Haulage, in which you have a 25 per- 
cent interest, has gone to Bernie Adelstein's liquor store to buy liquor; 
is that right? 

Mr. Strelzin. To make some limited purchases totaling approxi- 
mately $200 during the Christmas holiday. 

INIr. Kennedy. Wliy did you not buy those purchases at your store? 

Mr. Strelzin. Veiy often we do things to ingratiate ourselves with 
people, particularly if they are in a union and own a liquor store. 
It is a thing we all do. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you were doing it to ingratiate yourself with 
Bennie Adelstein ? 

Mr. Strelzin. That is right. That is one of the reasons why I did 
not send his brother a bill. I felt it was important to have friendly 
relationships with union leaders, wherein our employees are union. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is George Adelstein also an officer in the imion? 

Mr. Strelzin. I don't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is he paid by the health and welfare fund of the 
union? Did you know that? 

Mr. Strelzin. I did not know that. I know he is employed by the 
welfare fund of the sanitation union. 

Mr. I&;nnedy. I understand now why you did not. I just wanted 
to get an explanation. 

The Chairman. Have you looked into the welfare fund of this par- 
ticular union ? 

Mr. Kennedy. They have been examined by the State insurance 
commission, and I don't believe they have found anything wrong. 

I believe that is all. 

The Chairman. Senator McNamara ? 

Senator MgNamara. AVlio manages your company now, that is, the- 
cartage company or sanitary company ? 

Mr. Strelzin. The active partner is William J. Hockey. 

Senator McNamara. He manages it? 

Mr. Strelzin. He does, sir. 



IMPROPE'R ACTIVITIES m THE LABOR FIELD 6833 

Senator McNAMAiiiV. Has lie managed it all the time you have been 
in partnership? 

Mr. Strelzin. No, sir. He did not manage it during the first year. 
During the first year, Major Armus and myself conducted the busi- 
ness. You ought to know, sir, tliat in 1950 we did a gross business of 
$3,000 and some odd. In 1951 we did a gross business of approxi- 
mately $25,000. In 1952, approximately $40,000. Up to the present 
time, we do a gross business of about $140,000. It is not a large cor- 
poration. It has been a small corporation. 

Senator McNamara. Do you handle the legal work for the firm? 

Mr. Strelzin. I do, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Did you say that you were a party to this busi- 
ness of paying $30 a month to the gentleman who was paid off — $30 
a week in a period of what ? 

Mr. Strelzin. A total of $1,170, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Certainly, you, as an attorney, recognize that 
this was subterfuge, paying this man off in this manner, apparently 
charging it to salary, when he was performing no service. 

Mr. Strelzin. I did not, sir, because $500 represented a sum of 
money which we felt he had earned in the formative days of the cor- 
poration. He had actually devoted considerable time, and we agreed 
to give him $500 as salary in 1950. That is the reason we deducted 
the social security, we deducted the withholding tax, even though 
$400 represented moneys advanced to the corporation. 

Senator McNamara. Well, as an attorney, I don't know how you 
could construe this payment over this period of time, as late as it was, 
in relation to the time that you recognized the indebtedness, if you 
will, in the form of salary on your books. Certainly it was a delayed 
salary. 

Mr. Strelzin. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. And expenses. 

Mr. Strelzin. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. You treated it all in your payroll checks as 
salary. 

Mr. Strelzin. Right, sir. 

Senator McNamara. That obviously was subterfuge. 

Mr. Strelzin. Well, you would impugn, sir, something to my mo- 
tive, if you say that. 

Senator McNamara. I certainly intend to, yes. 

Mr. Strelzin. I insist, sir, there was no subterfuge of the payment 
of the $900, with interest. 

Senator McNamara. The $900 with interest was made up of ap- 
proximately four-ninths 

Mr. Strelzin. Advances. 

Senator McNamara. No, expenses. 

Mr. Strelzin. The corporation, sir, should have paid that. It was 
due him from the corporation. There was no question about that, 
Senator. 

Senator McNamara. Then why wasn't it just paid him by the cor- 
poration ? 

Mr. Strelzin. Because at the time we had not yet been conducting 
any business when he disassociated himself. Through the years he 
was not in the city of New York. When he came into New York in 



6834 IMPROPER ACITIVmES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

1955 and insisted he wanted the return of his moneys, we agreed to 
pay it to him. It was coming to him, sir, just as it might be due any- 
one else. 

Senator McNamara. But he was being paid a salary for something 
he did several years prior to that. 

Mr. Strelzin. Several years back, sir. 

Senator McNamara. And it was carried on your books as the salary 
of an employee at that time. 

Mr. Strelzin. Right, sir. 

Senator McNx\mara. Thank you. 

The Chairman. Are there any other questions ? 

Mr. Strelzin. May I make a statement, Mr. Chairman? 

The Chairman. A brief one. 

Mr. Strelzin. A brief one. I should like to say, sir, that had I 
known of the background of Tony Ricci in 1940, in March, I would 
not have used his name on the original certificate of incorporation. 
At the time I filed the original certificate of incorporation, which was 
a matter of record, I used the name of Anthony Ricci, the name of 
Major Armus, and I used my name. I knew nothing of his reputation 
at the time. Had I known it, I certainly would not have used his 
name. It was not until May of 1950, when I read of an article in 
Look magazine, which was called to my attention— as a matter of 
fact, the exact date of the magazine is May 23, 1950. It was then 
for the first time that I saw Anthony Ricci's picture in the maga- 
zine and read about his reputation, sir. Until then I knew absolutely 
nothing about it. I state this, sir, without qualifi<jation. 

Immediately after I learned of his reputation, we took steps to 
exclude him from our corporation. It was either he staying in and 
Major Armus and myself stepping out, or we staying in and his step- 
ping out. Believe me, sir, that is a fact. 

I might say this, that for the last 4 years. Major Armus has been 
associated with the Government in the Inspector General's Office, on 
official duties for the Government, and neither one of us would have 
countenanced Anthony Ricci in our corporation, once we found out 
about his background. 

Ixt me go further, sir. In 1953, one of our men was threatened 
by another cartman. What did I do about it? I went to the dis- 
trict attorney's office in Queens. I lodged a complaint with the proper 
authorities. They held a hearing. I was called down at the hearing. 
The cartman who made the threats was called down to the hearing. 
He was admonished and cautioned not to make threats against our 
drivers. Surely individuals who are engaged in a racket don't go to 
the district attorney's office to make a complaint. 

The Chairman. A^^iat did you do about Mr. Hockey when you took 
him in ? 

Mr. Strelzin. I had taken a Dun & Bradstreet report on the in- 
dividual. 

The Chairman. That does not improve the situation very much. 

Mr. Strelzin. I don't have to take up the cudgels for Mr. Hockey. 
Mr. Hockey was not a bookmaker. Mr. Hockey was engaged in a 
news-service business. He was indicted under a section which asso- 
ciates bookmaking with the news services. He was convicted. The 
matter was taken up on appeal and he was acquitted. Mr. Hockey 



IMPROPER ACnvmElS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6835 

is not a criminal, I don't have to take up his reputation or uphold 
it for him. I knew nothing about it. 

The Chairman. Apparently there is no question but that there was 
some manipulation in this whole deal from the time it was organized. 

Mr. Strelzin. Sir, I say unequivocally that Anthony Ricci is not 
associated directly or indirectly, nor has he been associated, with Sani- 
tary Haulage Corp. as officer, director, stockholder, or employee since 
June 15, 1950. I have said that under oath. 

The Chairman. All right. It remains under oath. Apparently 
during that period of time, since 1950, your firm, your business, paid 
some $200 in telephone calls, when he was calling up there, collect, chat- 
ting with your partner. 

Mr. Strelzin. I have found out, sir, that they are friends, and I know 
they are friends. 

The Chairman. Let them remain friends. 

Mr. Strelzin. Before I conclude, Mr. Chairman, just one more state- 
ment. Dr. Luther Gulic, who was the city administrator of the city 
of New York, made an investigation of Sanitary Haulage Corp., an 
investigation of its activities and of all its accounts. Sir, I should like 
to quote from his report : 

Sanitary Haulage Corp. is not a member of any rackets association or any 
other cartmen's association. They do business honorably. 

There isn't a single concern that we deal with that has ever com- 
plained. He concluded his statement to me by saying that, if every 
other cartman in the city of New York was like Sanitary Haulage, New 
York would be a better city. 

The Chairman. You admit they need some cleaning up. 

Mr. Strelzin. But not Sanitary Haulage, sir. 

The Chairman. The committee stands adjourned until 2 o'clock to- 
morrow afternoon. 

(Members of the select committee present at this point were Senators 
McClellan and McNamara.) 

(Thereupon, at 4:54 p. m., a recess was taken until Thursday, 
November 14, 1957, at 2 p. m.) 



INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 



THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1957 

United States Senaite, 
Select Commiitee on Improper Activities 

IN the Labor or Management Field, 

Washington, D. C. 

The select committee met at 2 : 30 p. m., pursuant to Senate Resolu- 
tion 74, agreed to January 30, 1957, in the caucus room, of the Senate 
Office Building, Senator John L. McClellan (chairman of the select 
committee) presiding. 

Present: Senator Jolin L. McClellan, Democrat, Arkansas; Sena- 
tor Pat McNamara, Democrat, Michigan. Also present: Robert F. 
Kennedy, chief counsel; Jerome Adlerman, assistant chief counsel; 
Robert W. Greene, investigator; James P. Kelly, investigator; Ruth 
Young Watt, chief clerk. 

The Chairman. The committee will be in order. 

(Members of the committee present at the convening of the session: 
Senators McClellan and McNamara.) 

The Chairman. Mr. Counsel, call the first witness. 

Mr. Adlerman. Mr. Charles Devine. 

The Chairman. Do you solemnly swear that the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Devine. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF CHARLES DEVINE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

SIDNEY HELLER 

The Chairman. State your name and your place of residence and 
your business or occupation, please, sir. 

Mr. Devine. Charles Devine, 169-18 Pigeon Meadow Road, Flush- 
ing, N. Y. Occupation, manager. 

The Chairman. Manager of wliat ? 

Mr. Devine. Of M. H. Lamston. 

The Chairman. Do you have counsel with you ? 

Mr. Devine. Yes, I do. 

The Chairman. Counsel, you may identify yourself for the record. 

Mr. Heller. Sidney Heller, H-e-1-l-e-r, and my office is 521 Fifth 
Avenue, New York City. 

The Chairman. Mr. Counsel, proceed. 

Mr. Adlerman. Mr. Devine, what is your occupation ? 

Mr. Devine. I am a manager. 

6837 



6838 IMPROPER AcnvrriES in the labor field 

Mr. Adlerjman. Manager of what store ? 

Mr. Devine. M. H. Lamstoii. 

Mr. Adlj5rman. Lamston's Department Store ; is that right ? 

Mr. Devine, Variety store, sir. 

Mr. Adlerman. "\"\^iere is your store located ? 

Mr. Devine. 1390 North Boulevard. 

Mr. Adlerman. Manhasset? 

Mr. Devine. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Adlerman. Is that on the so-called "Miracle Mile" ? 

Mr. Devine. That is the "Miracle Mile." 

Mr. Adlerman. Is that a section where you have rather exclusive 
stores ? 

Mr. De\^ne. Well, we hope it is that way. "We like to call it the 
Fifth Avenue of Long Island. 

Mr. Adlerman. Now, bringing you down to a point in time of April 
1955, did you have any difficulties with any union ? 
•Mr, Devine. Yes; we did, 

' Mr. Adlerman. Will you explain the circumstances or the events 
that took place ? 

Mr. Devine. Well, I came to work that morning and on the front 
sidewalk there were numerous pickets walking up and down the street. 
They had a black card that said "Unfair," and to whom I don't recall. 
But they were walking up and down the sidewalk. 
• Mr. Adlerman. What other stores were there on the sidewalk? 

Mr. Devine. There were a group of about eight stores. 

Mr. Adlerman. What were they? 

Mr. Devine. You have Arnold Constable, followed by Lamston's and 
Flint-Horner, and Michel's Shoestore, Martin's Men's Shop, Slen- 
derella, and Food Fair. 

Mr. Adlerman. Were the pickets walking down the entire front 
block? 

Mr. Devine. As far as I could perceive ; yes. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did anybody come in to see you ? 

Mr. Devine. Shortly thereafter a man named Nolan came in. 

. Mr. Adlerman. Was his first name Tom ? 

Mr. Devine. I believe so. 

Mr. Adlerman. And what did he state, or who did he represent 
that he was ? 

Mr, Dea^ne. He represented himself as the business agent of a 
garbagemen's union. 

Mr, Adlerman, Is that local 813 ? 

Mr. Devine. I believe so. 

Mr, Adlerman, And what did he state to you ? 

Mr. Devine. He said to me that he knew that we were using a non- 
union garbage collector. 

The Chairman. What is that ? 

Mr. Devine. A nonunion garbage collector. 

Mr. Adlerman. What company had you been using ? 

Mr. Devine, Herbert Anderson, 

Mr. Adlerman. And they were a nonunion garbage collection 
outfit? 

Mr, Devine. That is right, 

Mr. Adlerman. Wliat did he say after that? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6839 

Mr. Devine. Well, he asked ine about changing over to a union 
collector. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did you have a chance to observe the pickets out- 
side the store ? 

Mr. Devine. Yes. 

Mr. Adlerman. Do you recall whether or not they seemed to be in 
charge of any one person ^ 

Mr. Devine. Originally, in the morning, no; tliey seemed to be 
walking up and down aimlessly. 

Mr. Adlerman. And did you notice anybody particular who seemed 
to have charge of those pickets? 

Mr. Devine. Yes ; there was one man. 

Mr. Adlerman. Who was that man '? 

Mr. Devine. A man named Sqnillante ? 

Mr. Adlerman. Was that Mr. Nunzio Squillante ? 

Mr. Devine. I believe so. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did lie seem to be in charge of those pickets walk- 
ing up in front of your store ? 

Mr. Devine. Yes ; you might say that. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did you have any conversations with Mr. Squil- 
lante outside of your store ? 

Mr. Devine. No ; it was on the inside of the store. About 1 o'clock 
in the afternoon it started raining, and we have an overhanging front 
door and the pickets had gathered under there to escape the rain. So 
when he came along with Nolan, I asked him whether or not he 
couldn't be sure that the pickets would stand away from the doorway, 
as it was very inconvenient for customers to have to fight their way 
out, and he went over to them and told them and they immediately 
gathered in front of the windows, leaving the doors free. 

Mr. Adlerman. They obeyed his instructions? 

Mr. Devine. That is right. 

Mr. Adlerman. What happened after Mr. Nolan came in to your 
store and told you that you would have to use a union company ? 

Mr. Devine. Well, it is the policy of our company in anything 
unusual that occurs and things like this, we are to immediately call the 
main office for instructions. That I immediately did, calling on Mr. 
Marks, who then advised me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did he give you a list of companies that would be 
satisfactory to the union ? 

Mr. Devine. He showed it to me but he didn't give it to me at that 
time. 

Mr. Adlerman. Is this the list of names ? 

The Chairman. You say he showed you a list of companies that 
would be satisfactory? 

Mr. Adlerman. That is right. 

The Chairman. Did he give you the list ? 

Mr. Adlerman. I don't believe he gave it to me at that time ; no. 

The Chairman. Did you ever have in your possession a list? 

Mr. Adlerman. Later in the afternoon ; yes. 

The Chairman. Sometime later he did give it to you ? 

Mr. Adlerman. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. But not that morning ? 

Mr. Adlerivian. Not at that time ; no. 



6840 EviPROPER AcnvrriES in the labor field 

The Chaibman. How did he give you the list? Was it just on a 
piece of paper or something ? 

Mr. Devine. It was on a file card, about 5 by 7, roughtly. 

The Chairman, On what ? 

Mr. Devine. On a filing card. 

The Chairman. A filing card ? 

Mr. Devine. Yes. 

The Chairman. Do you remember the names of the companies ? 

Mr. Devine. I remember a couple of them. One was General Sani- 
tation, and there was another one, Jamaica Ash or Jamaica Sani- 
tation, or something like that. 

The Chairman. Jamaica Ash or something? 

Mr. Devine. Something similar to that. 

The Chairman. I hand you what pui'ports to be a photostatic copy 
of the list he gave you and I ask you to examine it and state if you 
identify that as a list he gave you. 

(Document handed to witness.) 

Mr. Devine. That is the list. 

The Chairman. That may be made exhibit No. 13. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 13" for ref- 
erence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7034.) 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Adlerman. At the time he gave you that list, was Mr. Nunzio 
Squillante with him ? 

Mr. Devine. Yes ; he was. 

Mr. Adlerman. The two of them came into the store together to 
talk to you ? 

Mr. Devine. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did they urge you to take a company from that 
list? 

Mr. Devine. Yes. 

Mr. Adlerman. In place of the Anderson Co. ? 

Mr. Devine. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Your firm was using the Anderson Co. prior to 
this time ? 

Mr. Devine. That is right. 

The Chairman. And you got picketed ? 

Mr. Devine. That is right. 

The Chairman. And the reason, they stated, was because you 
were not using a service that was unionized ? 

Mr. Devine. That is right. 

The Chairman. Then he gave you this list and suggested you ar- 
range with some of these that the union approved? 

Mr. Devine. That is right. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Adlerman. You consulted with the officials, one of the chief 
officers of your company, and they told you to deal with them in 
some way ? 

Mr. Devine. He told me that since we Avere so closely — and by "he" 
I mean Mr. Marks — since we were so closely allied with Arnold 
Constable, he suggested that I do nothing until such time as Arnold 
Constable had made a decision. 

The Chairman. Wlio was that ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6841 

Mr, Devine. Our Mr. Marks, of our executive office, suggested I do 
nothing until Arnold Constable made a decision. 

Mr. Adlerman, As I understand it, you did not make the decision, 
and you called your office in New York City ? 

Mr. DE^^NE. That is right. 

Mr. Adlermax. The executive office? 

Mr. Devine. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Adlermax. And you spoke to Mr. Marks ? 

Mr. Devine. That is right. 

Mr. Adlerman. IVlio told you to follow the same policy that was 
going to be followed by the Arnold Constable store, that was next to 
you ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Devine. That is correct. 

Mr. Adlerman. Now, did you sign up a contract later that day? 

Mr. Devine. We agreed, and it wasn't a written contract. 

Mr. Adlerman. Who did you agree to sign with ? 

Mr. Devine. I agreed to sign with General Sanitation Co. 

Mr. Adlerman. And you accepted them as the contractor in place 
of Anderson Co. ? 

Mr. Devine. That is right. 

Mr. Adlerman. Had you noticed any pickets on a parking lot of 
the Arnold Constable store ? 

Mr. Devine. In the morning they had them on the far parking lot; 
yes, sir. 

Mr. Adlerman. Were they trying to bar the delivery of trucks to 
the Arnold Constable store? 

Mr. Devine. I believe that would be the purpose they were there. 

Mr. Adlerman. And they were trying to stop any merchandise 
going in or coming out of that store ? 

Mr. Devine. Yes ; that is the truck delivery entrance. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did they tell you that the General Sanitation Co., 
or did they lead you to believe that the General Sanitation Co., w^as 
a union company? 

Mr. Devine. Well, yes; he said he had a list of these union com- 
panies. 

Mr. Adlerman. As far as you know, they were a union company? 

Mr. Devine. Of course. 

Mr. Adlerman. I hope, Mr. Chairman, that we will be able to 
establish that the General Sanitation was not a union company. 

The Chairman. That has already been established by the evidence. 

Mr. Adlerman. I think Mr. Montesano and Mr. Parise both have 
already testified to that effect, but we will be able to secure further 
evidence. 

The Chairman. You changed from whatever company you had on 
the basis of this picketing to the General Sanitation Co.? 

Mr. Adlerman. Definitely. That is the reason we changed, was 
because of the pickets. 

The Chairman. What apparently are the facts is that you were 
picketed, and the reason given was that you were not using a com- 
pany that was unionized. 

Mr. Devine. That is right. 

The Chairman. Or using a service that was not unionized. 

Mr. Devine. That is right. 



6842 EMPROPE'E ACTTIVmES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. And on tlie basis of that, yon changed to one of the 
companies on the list that was handed you that would be satisfactory ? 

Mr. Devine. That is correct. 

The Chairman. That turned out to be the General Sanitation Co. ? 

Mr. Devine. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Wliich was not unionized. 

Mr. Devine. I wasn't aware of that. 

The Chairman. I know you were not aware of it, but if the infor- 
mation the committee has is correct, that would be a fact. 

Mr. Devine. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. But you didn't know at that time ? 

Mr. Devine. No. 

The Chairman. You were simply trying to find a way to get along 
and to have peace and I suppose you didn't care whether it was 
unionized or not, just so long as you got your rubbish removed? 

Mr. Devine. That is right. 

The Chairman. So you changed to the one they told you to change 
to or one of the ones ? 

Mr. Devine. One of the ones ; yes. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did you know at that time that Mr. Nunzio Squil- 
lante was one of the owners of the General Sanitation Co. ? 

Mr. Devine. Yes. ^Yhen Nolan was in the store and he said, "Pick 
one," not having any personal preference, I just took the first one, 
which was the General Sanitation. 

The Chairman. It was the first one on the list that he gave you ? 

Mr. Devine. That is right. 

The Chairman. Nunzio gave that to you ? 

Mr. Devine. No ; Mr. Nolan gave me the list. 

Mr. Adlerman. Now, Mr. Devine, under the contract of the town 
with Mr. Anderson, did you know whether he had a partially free col- 
lection of rubbish ? 

Mr. Devine. I don't believe there is any free collection at all. 

Mr. Adlerman. Were you entitled to deliver up to 40 pounds of 
rubbish without any charge ? 

Mr. Devine. No ; I believe we paid all of that. 

Mr. Adlerman. Well, did you know that that was one of the reasons 
why he was able to charge you only $40 instead — how much did he 
charge you ? 

Mr. Devine. $25. 

Mr. Adler3Ian. That was the reason why he was able to only charge 
you $25. 

Mr. Devine. I wasn't aware of that, because I didn't open the store 
originally. 

Mr. Adlerman. I would like to put in the record the fact that 
Anderson & Co., under their contract with the town, was given an 
allowance so that the commercial and industrial establishments could 
have a free collection of 40 pounds of rubbish, and anything over that 
they were entitled to charge the company. 

The Chairman. Well, this contract will have to be sworn to. I 
don't know how you obtained it. It shall be put in later. 

Proceed, and you can ask him questions about that. 

ISIr. Adlerman Can we put this in subject to identification ? 



IIMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6843 

The Chairman. It will be used here and it can be referred to 
subject to identification later. 

Mr. Adlerman. Now, during the time that they had this picket line, 
did any of the pickets cross the picket line or any of the union people 
cross the picket line ? 

Mr. Devine. Surely, they all came in for lunch. 

Mr. Adlerman. They all came in for lunch ? 

Mr. Devine. They would come in for lunch and coffee. 

Mr. Adlerman. While they had a picket line there ? 

Mr. Devine. Sure. It was a part of the day's business. 

Mr. Adlerman. I have no further questions. 

Senator McNamara. I would like to ask the witness to identify 
Mr. Marks. What was his title ? 

Mr. Devine. Mr. Marks is the secretary-treasurer of M. H. Lam- 
ston. 

Senator McNamara. Does he handle labor relations generally, or is 
he just your superior? 

Mr. Devine. No ; he handles these things generally. 

Senator McNamara. Labor relations for your company ? 

Mr. Devine. That is right. 

Senator McNamara. That is all. 

The Chairman. All right. Thank you very much. 

Call the next witness. 

Mr. Adlerman. Mrs. Patricia Kelly. 

The CnAHtMAN. You do solemnly swear the evidence you shall give 
before this Senate select committee will be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mrs. Kelly. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF MES. PATKICIA KELLY 

The Chairman. State your name, and your place of residence and 
your business or occupation. 

Mrs. Kelly. My name is Patricia Kelly. I reside at 132-48 41st 
Koad, Flushing, and I am a personnel manager for Arnold Constable, 
in Manhasset. 

The Chairman. For whom ? 

Mrs. Kelly. Arnold Constable. 

The Chairman. What business are they in? 

Mrs. Kelly. A department store. 

The Chairman. A depaiiment store. 

Mrs. Kelly. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you M^aive counsel ? 

Mrs. Kelly. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Adlerman. Mrs. Kelly, were you acting in a similar capacity 
for Arnold Constable in April of 1953? 

Mrs. Kelly. Yes, sir ; I was. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did you have occasion to speak to any delegates 
from local 813 of the Sanitation Union? 

Mrs. Kelly. I was present when Mr. Nolan came into the super- 
intendent's office, of our store. 

Mr. Adlerman. Was that Mr. Thomas F. Nolan ? 



6844 iMPEOPER AcrrviTiBS in the labor field 

Mrs. Kelly. That is right. 

Mr. Adlerman, Did he give you a card showing that he was a busi- 
ness agent of union local 813 ? 

Mrs. Kelly. Yes ; he did. 

The Chairman. Mrs. Kelly, I present to you what purports to be 
a photostatic copy of a card, personal card of Thomas F. Nolan, 
business agent, Union Local 813, IBFT, and I ask you to examine 
this photostatic copy and state if you identify it as such. 

(Document handed to witness.) 

Mrs. Kj:lly. Yes ; that is right. 

The Chairman. That may be made exhibit No. 14. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 14" for refer- 
ence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7035.) 

Mr. Adlerman. How many times did Mr. Nolan come to your 
office? 

Mrs. Kelly. Twice. 

Mr. Adlerman. Will you tell us about the first time he came to 
your place ? 

Mrs. Kelly. He came in to our office, and I would say the latter 
part of March of 1955, and he came in to see Mr. Story, our super- 
intendent, and I was in the office at this time. And he requested, I 
believe, he requested the name of our garbage collector at the time, 
who was Mr. Anderson. He told us that he would like us to take a 
union carting company and he would present us with a list of names 
we could choose from. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did he present to you with a list of names of com- 
panies who were union companies or would be acceptable to the 
union ? 

Mrs. Kelly. That is what he said ; yes. 

Mr. Adlerman. I show you exhibit No. 13, and I ask you if that is 
the list that was given to you. 

(Document handed to witness.) 

Mrs. Kelly. That is right. 

IVfr. Adlerman. Now^, what was the outcome of that first meeting ? 

Mrs. Kelly. Mr. Storey, the superintendent, told him that it was 
a matter that would have to be taken under discussion and they 
couldn't let him know that day, but that he would let him know within 
the very near future. 

Mr. Adlerman. Would you tell us what the next occasion of Mr. 
Nolan's visit was? 

Mrs. Kelly. Mr. Nolan came back, a week or 10 days later after 
that first meeting, to find out what the result of the discussion was, 
and at that time he brought the list. 

The Chairman. Did the pickets remain there during that time ? 

Mrs. Kelly. No ; there were no pickets there at that time. 

The Chairman. After he agreed to have some consultations about 
it, and let him know, the pickets were removed ? 

Mrs. Kelly. I don't remember that there were any pickets there 
before that. 

Mr. Adlerman. Neither on the first occasion, nor on the second occa- 
sion were there any pickets ? 

Mrs. Ejelly. No. 



IMPROPER ACTIVrriBS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6845 

Mr. Adlerman. But there did come a day when you did receive 
reports tliat there were pickets Avho were trying to block the cars 
driving goods to the store in your own private parking lot ? 

Mrs. Kelly. That is right. 

Mr. Adlerman. And they would have to be removed, is that right? 

Mrs. Kelly. That is right. 

Mr. Adlerman. Was that the date that you finally signed a contract 
or made an agreement with General Sanitation ? 

Mrs. Ivelly. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. The pickets were placed later after these earlier 
conversations ? 

Mrs. Kelly. That is right. 

The Chairman. You didn't move fast enough ; you got the pickets ; 
is that it ? 

Mrs. Kelly. I guess that was the general idea. 

The Chairman. When you got the pickets, you moved a little faster 
and you signed the contract ? 

Mrs. Kelly. We didn't sign any contract to my knowledge. It was 
a verbal contract, a verbal agreement. 

The Chairman, You discharged your present arrangements with 
the Anderson Co., and took over the General Sanitation Co. ? 

Mrs. Kelly. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That was all done verbally, you think ? 

Mrs. Kelly. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Adlerman. Can you tell us how you happened to pick the 
General Sanitation in preference to the other names on that list? 

Mrs. Kelly. This was the list that was given to us and General 
Sanitation was the first name on the list. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did you understand that General Sanitation was 
a union company ? 

Mrs. Kelly. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Adlerman. That was the implication that was left with you? 

Mrs. Kelly. Yes ; it was. 

Mr. Adlerman. How long did General Sanitation pick up the gar- 
bage at your store ? 

Mrs. Kelly. Well, I would say that the firm that called itself 
General Sanitation picked it up for a month or two. 

Mr. Adlerman. Then what happened ? 

Mrs. Kelly. Then the following bill that came in for the services 
was billed under Estates Carting. 

Mr. Adlerman. Estates Carting? ^ 

Mrs. Kelly. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Adlerman. You never engaged Estates Carting at any time? 

Mrs. Kelly. No. 

Mr. Adlerman. They just kept on taking the rubbish in place of 
the General Sanitation ? 

Mrs. Kelly. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Was Estate Carting Co. on the list that was given 
to you ? You have it before you, and I don't. 

Mrs. Kelly. No. 

89330— 57— pt. 17 13 



6846 IMPROPER ACTrV'ITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The CiiAiRMAX. In other words, you changed to one companyy 
that was on the list. A month or two later you got a bill from another 
company ? 

Mrs. Kelly. That is right. 

The Chairman. That was not on the list ? 

Mrs. Kelly. That is right. 

The Chairman. Estate Carting Co. 

Mrs. Kelly. That is right. 

The Chairman. I present to you here an original bill from the 
Estate Carting Co., dated July 31, 1955, and I ask you to examine 
it and state if you identify it as the bill that you referred to that you 
received from a different company. 

(Document handed to the witness.) 

Mrs. Kelly. Yes ; I believe it is the one. 

The Chairman. That will be exhibit No. 15. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 15" for ref- 
erence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7036.) 

Mr. Adlerman. Arnold Constable had no choice when the Estate 
Carting came along, and it was just that was the carting company 
that was picking up the rubbish ? 

Mrs. Kelly. That is right, we weren't informed that there was 
any change at all. 

Mr. Adlerman. As long as the union didn't bother you, that was 
all you were interested in ? 

Mrs. Kelly. That is right. 

The Chairman. Did your company or your employers make any 
arrangements with this particular company so far as you know ? 

Mi"s. Kelly. No. 

Tlie Chairman. In other words, the bill came as a surprise ? 

Mrs. Kelly. That is right. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether this company, the Estate 
Carting Co., succeeded the General Sanitation Co. that you had em- 
ployed ? 

Mrs. Kelly. Well, when we received this bill from Estate Carting, 
tlie manager of the store made a telephone call to the number that 
was on tlie list for General Sanitation, to find out why the name 
of the company was changed, and at that time they told him that Gen- 
eral Sanitation was the same as Estates Carting. 

The Chair:man. "What do our records show, our information, Mr. 
Counsel, with respect to this Estates Carting Co., whether it was 
unionized or not ? Do we have any information on that ? 

Mr. Adlerjuan. I believe, Senator, that the Estates Carting or the 
route was sold to the Estates Carting Co., although we have no par- 
ticular knowledge of the exact ownership of Estates Carting. 

Mrs. Kelly. It is now owned by George Trella, and it is a union 
firm at this time. 

The Chairman. Was it unionized at that time ? 

]\rrs. Kelly. Not directly, Senator McClellan, we do not know. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

]\Ir. Adlerman. I have no further questions. 

The Chairman. Any further questions. Senator McNamara ? 

Senator McNamara. I was wondering about the rate. Was it the 
same rate when you changed from Anderson to General Sanita- 
tion ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IK THE L.\BOR FIELD 6847 

Mrs. Kelly. No. 

Senator McNamara. No change in your rates ? 

Mrs. Kelly. Not at that time, no. 

Senator McNamara. Were there later changes ? 

Mrs. Kelly. About a year later there was. 

Senator McNamara. They were increased ? 

Mrs. Kelly. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Substantially ? 

Mrs. Kelly. No, $5 a month. 

Senator McNamara. Thank you, that is all. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 

Call the next witness. 

Mr. Adlerman. ^Ir. Costigan. 

The Chairman. You solemnly swear that the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Costigan. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF MATTHEW COSTIGAN, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, BERNAED MARGOLIS 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Costigan. Matthew Costigan, and I live at 19 Bluebell Court, 
Garden City, and I am manager for the Grand Union Co. of Man- 
hasset. 

The Chairman. You have counsel present, Mr. Costigan ? 

Mr. Costigan. He is a representative of the company. 

Mr. Margolis. My name, sir, is Bernard Margolis, 1000 Vermont 
Avenue NIV., Wasliington, D. C, and member of the District bar, 
and I am here at the request or suggestion of the Grand Union Co. 
whom I represent in Washington, on behalf of this witness. 

The Chairman. Let me say this to you, that witnesses are entitled 
to have counsel present if they desire, that is, counsel of their own 
choosing. Counsel for the company, or someone else, may sit in the 
audience and observe, and of course they are welcome. But we have 
to keep this record straight. 

Mr. Margolis. I am here as counsel for the witness. 

The Chairman. That is very good. Proceed. 

Mr. Adlerman. Mr. Costigan, what is your occupation ? 

Mr. Costigan. Store manager. 

Mr. Adlerman. Of the Grand Union Supermarket ? 

Mr. Costigan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Adlerman. Located at 82 Plandum Koad, Manhasset ? 

Mr. Costigan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Adlerman. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Costigan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Adlerman. Do you recall having some visitor from local 813 of 
the Sanitation I'nion to see some time about March or April of 1955? 

Mr. Costigan. Yes, I do. 

Mr. Adlerman. Will you relate to us what happened at that time? 

Mr. Costigan. Well, they came in on a Monday morning, two 
gentlemen and one said they represented the union and the other said 
that they represented a carting company. 



6848 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. Do you remember their names ? 

Mr, CosTiGAN. No, sir; I do not. They stated to me having union 
employees in the store, a union shop, I should have a union carting 
company, and I said I couldn't go with them until I took it up with 
my district manager. One stated, '"Well, you have a miion shop, 
you might as well have a union truck, or union carting." 

The Chairman. He said what ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. They stated that as long as I had a union shop, 
union employees, I should have a union carting corporation, or union 
trucking company, take the rubbish away. 

The Chairman. Then you took it up with your superiors? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. I did, right away, that morning. 

The Chairman. All right, proceed. 

Mr. Adlerman. Will you relate what happened then? 
■ Mr. CosTiGAN. I took it up wdth my district manager, and he told 
me to go ahead but find out how much they were going to charge me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did one of these gentlemen come back at a later 
date ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, the following day, on Tuesday. 

Mr. Adlerman. Which gentleman was that ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. That was the man, I think, that represented the 
carting company. 

Mr. Adlerman. Have you since been able to identify him? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. I have. 

Mr. Adlerman. If I show you this picture, would you be able to 
identify him? 

The Chairman. In other words, would you be able to identify the 
man if you saw a picture of him ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. I would. 

The Chairman. I present to you a picture of two men, and I ask 
you to examine it and state if you recognize either of them, and 
which one was it that talked to you. 

(A photograph was shown to the witness.) 

Mr. CosTiGAN. It is the gentleman on my left. 

The Chairman. The shorter one ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. The black-headed one ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. That is right. 

The Chairman. We have that identified. "^Ylioishe? 

Mr. Adlerman. That is Mr. Nunzio Squillante. 

Mr. CosTiGAN. That is Mr. Nunzio, w^ho was going to take care of 
removing my rubbish. 

The Chairman. You said "Mr. Nunzio." Do vou know who that 
is? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Squillante. 

The Chairman. That is the man that you had this transaction 
with ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. He is the one who was going to take care of your 
rubbish and demanded that you have a union shop ? 

Mr. Costigan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Or a union carting company ? 

Mr. Costigan. That is right. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6849 

The Chairman. That picture may be made exhibit No. 16 for refer- 
ence only. I do not think that I want it in the record as printed, but 
just so we can refer to it for further identification. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 16" for refer- 
ence and may be found in the files of the Select Labor Committee.) 

Mr. Adlerman. When you had this conversation with Mr. Nunzio 
Squillante, incidentally, is he the same man that came in with the 
union representative earlier ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir, he was. 

Mr. ADLERivrAN. Have you been able to identify the union repre- 
sentative? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. I have not been able to identify him, sir. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did he tell you whether his name was Thomas 
Nolan? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. He might have, sir, but I have an idea he did say, 
but I don't want to go on record, and I only saw the man once and I 
never saw him again. 

Mr. Adler3Ian. At the time that Mr. Nunzio Squillante 

The Chairman. Let me ask a question there. 

Is the other party in the picture the man that was there with him ? 

Mr. COSTIGAN. No. 

The Chairman. In other words, the second person on the picture, 
where you have identified the picture 

Mr. CosTiGAN. I can only identify one man in that picture. 

The Chairman. You do not know the other ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. I do not. 

Mr. Adlerman. When Mr. Nunzio Squillante came back, did you 
ask him what price he would charge ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir, I did. 

Mr. Adlerman. Wliat price had you been paying Anderson & Co. 
up to that time ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. $40 a month. 

Mr. Adlerman. Were you satisfied with the services of Anderson 
«S:Co.? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir 

Mr. Adlerman. What price did Mr. Squillante say he would charge ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. He charged me $50. 

Mr. Adlerman. Now, subsequent to that time, did you find another 
carting company picking up the rubbish in place of the General Sani- 
tation Co. ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Afterward, yes. , 

The Chairman. You dismissed the Anderson Co. ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir ; I did. 

The Chairman. And employed General Sanitation ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, they took over. 

The Chairman. On the basis of your transaction with Mr. Squil- 
lante ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Now, you say after that you found another com- 
pany taking over the work ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, I did. 

The Chairman. What company was that ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. That was the Estates Carting Co. 



6850 EVIPROPER ACrn-lTIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Adlerman. Those trucks, did tliey just have a piece of paper 
on there with the names on the truck ? 

Mr. CosTiGAx. Well, I think the first company had a piece of paper 
on the door of the truck ; the Estates has not and his name is printed 
ria^ht on the truck. 

Mr. Adlermaist. The first time, when the General Sanitation came 
around, they just had a piece of paper? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. It looked like a piece of paper. 

Mr. Adlerman. And on that was printed or written, "General San- 
itation Co. ?" 

Mr. CosTiGAX. That is right. 

Mr. Adlerman. Since that time, have there been subsequent raises 
in price? 

Mr. CosTiGAisr. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Adlerman. For the collection of rubbish ? 

Mr. CosTiGAX. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Adlermax. And you are paying- at the present time how much ? 

Mr. CosTiGAX. At the present time we are paying $25 a week. 

Mr. Adlermak. That is $110 a month ? 

Mr. CoSTiGAN. Roughly, yes. 

The Chairman. WHiat were you paying Anderson Co. ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. $40 a month. 

The Chairman. It is now how much ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. $25 a week. How it was broke up, we were paying 
him $110 a month, but the contractor of the Estates Carting Co. came 
to me and he said he had difficulty in making his payroll up every week 
when I was paying him by the month, and could I pay him by the 
week. I got my district manager to O. K. it and we pay him $25 a 
week instead of $110 a month. 
. The Chairman. When was the change made from the Anderson Co. 

Mr. CosTiGAN. I think it was in the spring of 1955. 

The Chairman. 1955, a little more than 2 years ago ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN.' That is right. 

The Chairman. Your rates have gone up from $40 a month to $25 
a week. 
: Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. In that period of time ? 
- Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir. 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Alderman. I have no further questions. 

Senator McNamara. I would like to ask the witness a couple of 
questions. 

You say that you have a union shop, the Grand Union Co. is a union 
operation ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. It is a union organized shop. 
. Senator McNamara. Is this the Grand Union, what we knew in 
the old days, as the Grand Union Tea Co. ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. It is a continuance of that company. 

Senator McNamara. Do you have the same sort of merchandise? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. A little more ; it is a supermarket. 

Senator McNamara. You ha ve a supermarket setup now ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir. 



IMPROPER ACTWITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6851 

Senator McNamara. It was all trash and garbage ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. We do have garbage, and we have vegetable w^aste 
^nd so on, and produce. 

Senator McNamara. How many employees do you have, approxi- 
mately ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. We have 14 full-time employees, and 6 part-time. 

Senator McNamara. You have someone designated as a shop 
steward ? 

jNIr. CosTiGAN. We do but at the present time we haven't got one. 

Senator McNamara. I mean at the time this was done ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir. 

Senator JMcNaini ara. Did you consult with him on this change ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. I did not. 

Senator McNamara. You do not know whether your union repre- 
sentative took any position on it ? 

Mr. OosTiGAN. They did not. 

Senator McNamara. It was all done without their knowledge ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir. You see, the only thing I brought up with 
this General Carting Co. — I took that up with my district manager. 
That is all of the authority I had and I could not go along with any- 
body until I took it uj) with him and he told me to go along with 
them. 

Senator McNamara. I am raising a question whether or not you 
consulted with the union that you were doing business with, with your 
employees at the store. But you did not. 

Mr. COSTIGAN. No. 

Senator McNamara. That is all, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Just why did you make the change from Anderson 
Co. over to General Sanitation ? Why did you make that change ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Well, the change was — I was just told that we would 
have to change over, having a union shop, and it would be better to 
have a union cartage and also there was a remark passed, "You know 
if you don't change over, you might get a picket line." 

The Chairman. It was under a threat of a picket line ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes ; there was a threat of a picket line. 

The Chairman. Did you look into the matter to ascertain whether 
General Sanitation was a unionized company ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. I took it for granted that they were. 

The Chairman. You just took it for granted? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. The implication in the conversation led you to 
believe that ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. That is right. 

The Chairman. And you were told you would do it or else you 
would have a picket line and so you took it up with your superiors and 
they said, "Well, go ahead and go along with it," 

Mr. CosTiGAN. That is right. 

The Chairman. Did you learn later that General Sanitation was not 
unionized ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. I never knew they were not unionized and I always 
thought they were. 

The Chairman. You did not know it w-as just a gang of racketeers 
running a business ? 



6852 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. CosTiGAN. Well, I read that in the paper. 

The Chairman. You have learned a little about it since ? 

Mr. CosTiGAN. That is right. 

The Chairman. You did not know it at that time ? 

Mr. COSTIGAN. No. 

The Chairman. I see. 
Is there anything further ? 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Eesumed 

Mr. Adlerman. Mr. Kelly, have you had an opportunity to examine 
the union records to determine whether or not the General Sanita- 
tion Co. is a union company ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, Mr. Adlerman ; I have. 

Mr. Adlerman. Will you tell us where you examined these records ? 

Mr. Kelly. Well, the records were examined initially at the office 
of the Manhattan district attorney some time in April or May of this 
year. They were again examined — the records were examined by the 
district attorney's office and I received a registered letter this morn- 
ing from them. 

However, back in May, when I examined the contracts that were 
on file at the district attorney's office, I looked specifically for the name 
of General Sanitation Co. as having a union contract on file. Now, 
all of these contracts have been picked up by District Attorney Hogan's 
office on their subpena for examination, and they were in their custody 
at the time. 

A check of all of those contracts revealed no contract for General 
Sanitation Co. I had a conversation with Mr. Adelstein, who was the 
secretary-treasurer and business agent of the union. 

TheCHAHiMAN. Of local 813? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes. On May 20 of this year I asked him if General 
Sanitation was a union firm. He said, "I thought they were out of 
business." And I said, "Were they a union firm, to your knowledge ?" 
And he said, "I can't say offhand. If they were a union firm, their 
contract would be on file at District Attorney Hogan's office. He has 
all of my contracts." 

The Chairman. Then you examined the contracts ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct. 

The Chairman. There was no contract on file ? 

Mr. Kelly. There was no contract on file at District Attorney 
Hogan's office. 

Now, we have here photostatic copies of the receipts that were given 
to the Private Sanitation Union, Local 813, at their request by Dis- 
trict Attorney Hogan's at the time that these contracts were delivered 
in answer to their subpena. A review of these lists revealed no name 
listed for General Sanitation Co. 

The Chairman. What about the Estates Carting Co. ; is it on there? 

Mr. Kelly. Estates Carting is listed twice on one of these lists. Sen- 
ator McClellan, and after the second listing it has in parentheses the 
name "Trella." Now, George Trella is the present owner of Estates 
Carting. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further ? 

Mr. Adlerman. Have you the letter from the district attorney's 
office? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6853 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir ; I have. 

Mr. Adlerman. Would you let us see it ? 

(A document was handed to the chairman.) 

The Chairman. This letter may be made exhibit No. 17 and not 
necessarily printed in the record. It is for reference. The district 
attorney's office, after checking the records, confirms that General San- 
itation Avas not on the list as being unionized. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 17" for refer- 
ence and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

The CiiAiRMAX. Is there anything further ? 

Mr. Adlermax. I have no other questions. 

The Chairman. Thank you. 

Call the next witness. 

Mr. Adlerman. Mr. Tom Nolan. 

The Chairman. Do you solemnly swear that the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Nolan. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF THOMAS F. NOLAN 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Nolan. Thomas F. Nolan, 95 McDougal Street, New York; 
truckdriver. 

The Chairman. What is your occupation ? 

Mr. Nolan. Truckdriver. 

The Chairman. You are a truckdriver ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Mr. Nolan, do you have counsel ? 

Mr. Nolan. I am not waiving counsel, Mr. Chairman, and I re- 
quested my testimony be postponed until tomorrow, as he is flying in 
tonight. 

The Chairman. Will you speak a little louder, please ? 

Mr. Nolan. I have a cold. 

The Chairman. You have arranged for counsel ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, I have. 

The Chairman. But he is not here ? 

Mr. Nolan. He is not available right now. 

The Chairman. When were you notified to be here ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yesterday. 

The Chairman. And you arranged with counsel ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. He cannot be here today ? 

Mr, Nolan. He cannot be here. 

The Chairman. He is not here ? 

Mr. Nolan. No. 

The Chair]vian. He can and will be here tomorrow ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

The Chairman. And you prefer to wait until your counsel can be 
present to testify ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

The Chairman. Are there any objections ? 



6854 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Under those circumstances, then you will remain over until tomor- 
row, subject to call, and get in touch with your counsel innnediately. 
If you have any doubt about him being here, let us laiow now, or as 
early as you can. I am not going to require you to proceed with your 
testimony until a reasonable opportunity is given for counsel, but in 
the event there is any other contingency that you know of or you can 
find out about, please let us know about it sometime this afternoon. 

Senator McNamara. Let me ask one question. I understand in stat- 
ing occupation you said you were a truckclriver. 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Are you not the business agent of local 813 ? 

Mr. NoLAx. I was a business agent. 

Senator JNIcXamara. You are not now ? 

Mr. XoLAX. 1 am not now. 

Senator MgXamara. That is all. 

The Chairman. All right. You will be available — I think the com- 
mittee will recess over, when we recess today, until 10 o'clock tomorrow, 
and you will be available at 10 o'clock tomorrow with your counsel 
present. 

Mr. Nolan. Thank you very much. 

The CnAiRaiAN. Call the next witness, 

Mr. Adlerman. Mr. Nunzio Squillante. 

The Chairman. Will you be sworn ? You do solemnly swear that 
the evidence you shall give before this Senate select committee shall 
be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you 
God? 

Mr. Squillante. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF NUNZIO SQUILLANTE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, PATRICK GEARY 

: . The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Squillante. Nunzio Squillante, 524 11th Avenue, Hyde Park. 

The Chairman. What is your occupation, please sir ? 

Mr. Geary. Mr. Chairman 

The Chairman. Just a amoment. 

Mr. Squtllante. I refuse to answer on i\\^ ground that it might 
incriminate me. 

The Chairman. I think that is sufficient notice to the committee. 
Do you have comisel present with you to represent you ? 

Mr, Squillante. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Mr, Counsel, identify yourself for the record. 

Mr. Geary. My name is Patrick Geary, and my office is in Jamaica, 
Long Island, and before the committee asks any questions I would 
like to ask you. Senator McClellan, whether you received a copy of 
the statement dated November 12, 1957, which I sent to you on that 
date pursuant to rule 7 of the rules of the select committee, giving 
you advance notice we intended to read such statement into the record. 

The Chairman. Just one moment. The Chair has received from 
counsel, Mr. Patrick Geary, a letter with a statement attached. The 
letter is dated November 12, and so is the statement, in which he gave 
notice in his letter that he proposed to read the attached statement 
at the time that his client was called to testify. He says he does it 



niPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 6855 

under the rules of the committee, and the Chair would remind counsel 
that rule 6 of the committee states, and I quote 

Mr, Geary. I am referring to rule 7, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. I am going to read both of them. 

Counsel retained by any witness and accompanying such witness shall be 
permitted to be present during the testimony of such witness at any public or 
executive hearing, and to advise such witness, while he is testifying, of his 
legal rights, but this shall not be construed to excuse a witness from testifying 
in the event his counsel is ejected for contumacy or disorderly conduct; nor 
shall this rule be construed as authorizing counsel to coach the witness, answer 
for the witness, or put words in the witness' mouth. The failure of any witness 
to secure counsel shall not excuse such witness from attendance in response 
to subpena. 

Rule No. 7. Any witness desiring to read a prepared or written statement in 
executive or public hearing shall file a copy of such statement with the counsel 
or chairman of the committee 24 hours in advance of the hearing at which 
the statement is to be presented. The committee shall determine wliether such 
statement may be read or placed in the record of the hearing. 

There is no rule of the committee that grants counsel the right to 
testify for his client. This committee has in the past, and will again 
at this time, permit counsel to raise any objection in any brief state- 
ment that he may desire to raise, but the committee will not in this 
instance, as it has not in the past and as I trust it will not do in the 
future, make this committee and these hearings available as a forum 
to counsel who may represent witnesses simply to try to give the com.- 
mittee a lecture upon its duties. Your statement is in that nature. 
Your statement will be filed as an exhibit for future reference. It will 
not be printed in the record. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 18" for refer- 
ence and may be found in the files of the select committee. ) 

Mr. Geary. In lieu of its being read, ^Ir. Chairman, I was going to 
request 

The Chairman. You are at liberty to make as many copies as you 
wish and hand them to the press, and you can get the full benefit of 
it from that standpoint. The committee has read your statement 
and we know what it is. We are not here just to be lectured about the 
fifth amendment and what we ought to think about it or not think 
about it. We are here to interrogate witnesses, and that is what we 
will do. 

Mr. Geary. The statement does cover other items besides the fifth 
amendment. I have particular reference to our request that Mr. Bob 
Greene be relieved of his duties as committee investigator. 

The Chairman. Mr. Bob Greene, as a member of the staff of this 
committee, happens not to be any of your business. That is the 
committee's business. 

Mr. Geary. He is employed by Newsday, and when he writes about 
people in his paper 

The Chairman. Just a moment. I said that you can give your 
statement to the press and you can get any benefit from it you can. 
Your objection to Mr. Greene or any other member of the staff of this 
committee is overruled. 

Mr. Geary. I take exception, sir. 

The Chairman. You can take all of the exceptions you like, and let 
the exceptions be noted in the record. 

Proceed with the interrogation of this witness. 



6856 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

'Mr. AdliERman. Mr. Squillante, are you related to Vincent J. 
Squillante ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incrimi- 
nate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Is he your brother ? 

Mr, Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incrimi- 
nate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Are you connected with the General Sanitation 
Co.? 

■Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incrimi- 
nate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Have you been a partner of Louis lannacine, also 
known as Lou Michaels, in the Corsair Carting Co. i 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that to do so 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Were you familiar with the criminal record of 
Mr. Louis lannacine when you were his partner ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that to do so 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Were you familiar with the fact that Louis lan- 
nacine was convicted and jailed for labor extortion in New York? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the gromid that to do so 
might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did you ever hear of the fifth amendment? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that to do so 
might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. I am going to overrule your answers unless you 
can invoke the fifth amendment. 

Mr. Adlerman. Mr. Squillante, do you want to answer that last 
question ? 

The Chairman. If you want to invoke the fifth amendment on the 
ground that any testimony you give might incriminate you, that is 
your privilege. I have no objection. But that is the only source of 
authority for your refusing to answer so far as I know. If you want 
to invoke the fifth amendment, say so. 

Mr. Geary. On behalf of my client, may I raise another objection 
to these questions? I object to these questions on the ground that 
neither House of Congress has the power to make inquiries into the 
private aif airs of its citizens. 

The Chairman. The objection is overruled. We are making in- 
quiry into improper practices and if your client is guilty of improper 
practices, we propose to interrogate him about it. 

Proceed. 

Mr, Geary. Might I cite this one Supreme Court case ? 

The Chairman. No, sir, I am familiar with it. We know what 
it is. 

Mr. Adlerman. Mr. Squillante, what has been your previous occu- 
pation ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the groimd that it might 
incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Are you invoking the fifth amendment, yes or no ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. You are ordered to answer it. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIEIS EST THE LABOR FIEIiD 6857 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. With the authority and the approval of the com- 
mittee, I will order and direct you to answer the question whether you 
are iuA'oking the fifth amendment on the ground that an answer to 
the question might tend to incriminate you. 

Mr. Geary. May I object on the ground that Mr. Squillante is npt. 
an attorney'^ 

The Chairman. You can object, but you are here to advise him and 
I am trying to get the record straight. If you do not want it straight,, 
you can let it go this way. 

Mr. Geary. I have advised him. 

The Chairman. The committee will proceed according to its judg- 
ment. , , , 

All right, proceed. 

Mr. Adlerman. Were you employed as a florist in 1953 ? 

Mr, Squillante. I beg your pardon. I didn't understand that, 
question. 

Mr. Adlerman. Were you employed as a florist or in a flower shop, 
ui 1953? ... 

Mr. Sqlhcllante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. j, ... 

Mr. Adlerman. Were you a stone mason before that time ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might tend, 
to incriminate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Had you ever had any experience in the garbage 
or refuse collection business until you became executive director of 
the Suffolk County Garbage Association ? 

Mr. Geary. I object to that question. I don't think the counsel 
intended it to read that way. It said something about a "refusal." 

Mr. Adlerman. What is that? 

Mr. Geary. You said something about a "refusal." 

Mr. Adlerman. I asked if he collected any "refuse." , . 

Mr. Geary. You said "refusal." 

Mr. Adlerman. I am sorry. 

The Chairman. We are not trying to be cute here. Did you (19I-, 
lect any garbage? Let us see if he can understand that one. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. Have you been down in the garbage somewhere? 

Mr. Squillante. I beg your pardon ? 

The Chairman. Have you been involved in garbage ? 

Mr. Geary. I object to that question because you are badgering 
the witness, obviously. , .,,■ 

The Chairman. Is it obvious? I thought I was being subtle. - 

Have you been connected with the garbage business ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. It might, I do not know. You may be correct. 
Do you belong to any union ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. I think it will come nearer incriminating the 
union. Have you been active in behalf of any union ? 



6858 UMPROPE'R ACTIVITIEiS IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Squillani"E. I beg your pardon ? 

*rhe Chairman. Have you been active in behalf of any union? 

Mr. Squillanit:. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

Tlte Chairman. HaA^e you held any official capacit}^ in a union? 
, Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. Are you now a member of a union ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. Have you ever performed any mission for the 
union ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the gromid it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you have any other questions ? 

Mr. Adlerman. Were you emploj^ed by the Suffolk County Cart- 
men's Association ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did you receive $100 a week salary and $25 a week 
expenses from the Suffolk County Cartmen's Association, as the 
executive director or labor consultant ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did you report that income in your income-tax 
return ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. Well, we have some testimony that you are a 
pretty bad character. Do you want to say it might incriminate yon 
to deny it ? 

Mr. Geary. Might I object to that question ? 

The Chairman. Overruled. 

Proceed, Mr. Witness. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. I think that you may be right about that. 

Proceed. 

Mr. Adlerman. Were you employed as an agent of your brother to 
form the "whip" company, the General Sanitation Co. ? 

Mr. Squitj-ante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did you run tlie "whip"' company known as the 
Corsair Co. in New Yoi'k ? 

Mr. Geary. I object to the use of the term "whip." It calls for a 
conclusion. 

The Chairman. Overruled. "Whip" has been testified to here 
under oath by other witnesses and it is a part of the record. 

Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Adlerman. Was the General Sanitation Co. a union company? 

]\Ir. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incrimi- 
nate me. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6859 

Mr. Adlerman. At the time that you took the business away from 
Anderson & Co., at the Miracle Mile stores, was the General Sanitation 
Co. a union company ? 

Mr. Squiixante. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incrimi- 
nate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did you use fraud to get those shops away from 
the Anderson Co. ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the gi-ound it might incrimi- 
nate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did you act in collusion with Mr. Adelstein of 813 
local of the cartmen's association to get those shops away from the 
Anderson Co. ? 

Mr. SguiLLueVNi'E. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incrimi- 
nate me. 

The Chairman. We have some testimony here that indicates at 
least, and maybe conclusively and maybe not, depending upon the 
point of view, that you are simply a racketeer and that you have been 
engaged in the business of union racketeering in the breaking up of 
contracts between business enterprises and carters, and trying to force 
them to employ another contractor or service on the basis that it was 
a union or unionized sendee when it was not, and that you were threat- 
ening to use pickets and you did use pickets in some instances in order 
simply to intimidate business and force them to give their contracts 
for this service to a company in which you and your brother were 
interested. 

Would it intimidate you to answer that truthfully ? 

Mr. Geary. I object to the form of the question. 

The Chairman. You may, to the form and substance, and both are 
noted of record and I will help you a little. They are both overiailed. 

Proceed. I asked the witness a question. 

Mr. Squill^vnte. I don't think that I remember the question. 

The Chairman. I would not expect you to, so I will repeat it. 

Mr. Geary. May we have it repeated from the record, Mr. 
McClellan? 

The Chairman. Now, if it will help the counsel, I will be glad to 
defer to that request. 

Will you read it from the record ? 

(Whereupon the pending question was read by the reporter as above 
recorded.) 

(Members of the select committee present at this point were Sena- 
tors McClellan and McNamara. ) 

The Chairman. Well, that is an admission that it might. 

Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Geary. May we except to the chairman's remark ? 

The Chairman. Yes, sir. You may except to any opinion or con- 
clusion that I make. 

Proceed. 

Mr. Adlerman. Yesterday, we heard testimony by Mr. Recchia, 
AngeloRecchia, of the Trio Carting Co. 

Mr. Squillante. P^xcuse me. Counsel; I did not hear the name of 
the company. 



6860 IMPROPER ACTIVmES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Adlerman. Trio Carting Co. — that as punishment for his first 
refusal to rig the bids at Mitchel Field, certain stops were taken away 
from him at the Sunrise Stores, 10 stops. 

Would you be willing to tell us of your side of that case ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might 
incriminate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did you take away 10 stops at the instructions of 
Vincent Squillante, your brother, of the 10 stores of Sunrise, from the 
Trio Carting Co. ? 

Mr, Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds it might in- 
criminate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Did you later sell those stops to another company ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might in- 
criminate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Mr. Chairman, I would like to put in at this point 
certain checks and certain evidence, showing that the Sunrise Store 
stops which he took away from Mr. Recchia for Mr. Recchia's refusal 
to rig bids on Mitchel Field, were sold by Mr. Vincent Squillante and 
Nun'zio Squillante. 

TESTIMONY OP JAMES P. KELLY— Eesumed 

The Chairman. Mr. Kelly, you have been previously sworn. You 
will remain under the same oath. 

Proceed to interrogate Mr. Kelly. 

Mr. Adlerman. Mr. Kelly, do you have any evidentary material 
there showing that the General Sanitation Co. sold the 10 stops of 
the Sunrise Stores to the Jamaica Ash & Rubbish Co., Nunzio Squil- 
lante? 

'Mi^. Kelly. Yes, sir; I do. 

Mr. Adlerman. Would you tell us what evidence you have there ? 

Mr. Kelly. I have a series of checks, Mr. Counsel, from the Jamaica 
Ash & Rubbish Co. drawn on the bank of Westbury Trust Co., in 
Westbury, N. Y., signed by the principals of the Westbury Paper 
Stock Co., Enrico Fazzini and Emedio Fazzini, a portion of which 
check has written "Paid for ^un Rise Market, one note." This check 
was dated April 5, 1955, made out to cash, for $500. 

The Chairman. By whom was this check endorsed ? By whom was 
the check endorsed that you just testified to ? 

Mr. Kelly. The check was endorsed with the signature of Nunzio 
Squillante. 

The Chairman. This check wil be made exhibit No. 19. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 19" for refer- 
ence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7037.) 

Mr. Geary. May I see the check before it is marked ? 

The Chairman. No, I will make it an exhibit. It has been sworn to. 

Mr. Geary. May I object to any testimony that that is Nunzio's 
signature, unless we have some testimony along those lines ? 

The Chairman. You just be patient. You will get to see all of them 
that vou want to. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6861 

TESTIMONY OF NUNZIO SQUILLANTE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, PATKICK GEAEY— Resumed 

The Cpiaikvian. I now present to the witness, Squillante, a photo- 
static copy of the check which Mr. Kelly just testified to and ask you to 
examine the check and the endorsement thereon and state if you 
recognize this as a photostatic copy of the original check and if the 
signature, endorsement, thereon is yours. 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

( The witness conferred with his counsel. ) 

The Chairmax. You can tell us whether that is your signature or 
not. Then we will have the record straight. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

Th« Chairman. I thought you would be helpful to your attorney. 
He wanted to be sure that it was your signature. 

Mr. Geary. I have other objections to it going into evidence, Mr. 
Chairman. It is a photostatic copy. We object that it is not the best 
evidence. Either produce the original or give a reason for that copy. 

The Chairman. There must be an original if it is a photostatic 
copy. 

Mr. Geary. Not necessarily. 

Tlie Chairman. Your client might help us a little if he can say he 
knows nothing about any such check. 

Are you willing to say that, that you know nothing about the original 
of that check ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

The Chairman. I think your counsel and the committee could get 
along well if we could get your cooperation. 

Mr. Geary. I have it. 

The Chairman. Sir? 

Mr. Geary. I say I have his cooperation. 

The Chairman. I am sure you do, but then the committee would like 
to have it, too. That is, if it is agreeable. If it is not, we will plod 
along. 

All right, talk about the next one. 

Mr. Geary. Has that check been marked in evidence ? 

The Chairman. Yes, sir, it has been made exhibit No. 19. 

Mr. Geary. May I have an exception, Mr. Chairman? 

The Chairman. Yes, you may have an exception. If you client is 
willing to testify about it, we maybe can remove that exception. 

Do you want to see it again ? 

Mr. Geary. I think it went in evidence before I had an opportunity 
to object or except. 

The Chairman. Hand me the other checks. 

Mr. Geary. Of course, I do not know what he is going to say, Mr. 
Chairman — my client. 

89330—57 — pt. 17 14 



6862 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman, I thought he was cooperating with you and you 
with him ? I thought you would know. I will do it your way if you 
wish. 

I hand you another photostatic copy of a check dated May 3, 1955, 
in the amount of $500, drawn on the Westbury Paper Stock Co. 
account, bearing the signature^ apparently of your client, Mr. Nunzio 
Squillante. 

Mr. Geary. Nunzio Squillante, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Did I place the wrong emphasis on it ? He can cor- 
rect it. I will be glad to have him correct the pronunciation and also 
give us some information about the che«k. 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

The Chairman. All right, Mr, Witness, have you seen the check? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the gi'ounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Place it back there right in front of him. 

Look at it. 

Let the record show lie is looking at it whether he will answer or 
not. There are witnesses here that know he is looking at it. 

Do you want to identify the check or would it incriminate you if 
you did ? 

Mr. Squillante, I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Is that your signature in the endoi"sement of tlie 
check ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

The Chairman. Let me have the same check. I will present it to 
the witness Kelly. 

The check I just showed the witness that he refused to identify is 
made exhibit No. 20. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 20" for ref- 
erence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7038. ) 

The Chairman. Exhibit No. 20 is presented to you, Mr. Kelly, for 
any statement you wish to make about it, based on your investigation. 

Mr, Geary. May I have exception and objection, Mr. Chairman ? 

The Chairman. You can have it. I wanted to give you the first 
opportunity. You objected to that a moment ago. Now, what are 
you objecting to? 

Mr. Geary. To it being marked as "Exhibit 20" because it has not 
been properly received in evidence. Nobody has identified the sig- 
nature. 

The Chairman. We are going to identify it now. I did it tliat way 
a while ago and you objected and I did it your way and you objected. 

Mr, Kelly. This clieck is dated May 3, 1955, ' It is 'drawn on a 
clieck blank of the Westbury Paper Stock Co, to the Bank of West- 
bury Trust Co. in Westbury, N, Y, It is signed In' Enrico Fazzini 
and Emedio Fazzini, A note on the left corner of tlie check indicates 
it is cash for note No, 2, Sun Rise Market, paid to Squillante. Tlie 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EN THE LABOR FIELD 6863 

^'.heck is made out to cash. It is endorsed by Niinzio Sqiiillante, 524 
Eleventh Avenue, NHP. 

Below that are the initials N. Y. S., and C. H. A. U., and a number, 
^^.872171. Below that is the date 7-26-54. 

The Chairman. That cheek will be exhibit 20, as I said. 

TESTIMONY OF NUNZIO SQUILIANTE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, PATRICK GEARY— Resumed 

The Chairman. I now present to Witness Squillante another 
photostatic copy of a check dated August 3, 195 — it seems to be blank. 
I cannot tell what year. It was paid on August 4, 1955, so I assume 
tlie date of the check is August 3, 1955. 

It is made to General Sanitation in the amount of $305. It is 
<lrawn on the Westbury Paper Stock Co., and bearing the endorse- 
ment on the reverse side of General Sanitation by N. Squillante, 

I present that to the witness Squillante and ask him to examine 
it and state if he identifies it. 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

(The witness conferred with liis counsel.) 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Well, you have seen the check. You have seen 
tJie photostatic copy before you there, have you not ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

The Chairman, I^et the record show that the witness will not even 
iadmit that he has seen the check. Show it to him again so everyone 
in the room can see it, that he is looking at it. 

He has his cliance to identif v it. 

All right, the record shows it. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

The Chairman. Present the same check to Witness Kelly. 

Mr. Kelly, testify with regard to that check, what it is. 

Mr. Kelly. This check is also made out on a Westbury Paper Stock 
Co. check. Senator McClellan, signed also by Enrico and Emedio 
Fazzini. The check is on the bank of the Westbury Trust Co., West- 
bury, X. Y, On the left corner of the check is the notation ""Sun 
Rise Store account," 

The check is payable to General Sanitation, and the amount is $305. 
The endorsement on the back of the check is "General Sanitation, N. 
Squillante." 

The CiiAiRjrAN. That check may be made exhibit No. 21. 

( Tlie document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 21" for refer- 
ence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7039.) 

Mr. Geary. May I object to it going into evidence on the ground 
that it bears no date; the year is missing. As I recall, it says xVugust 
3, 195-, with no year. 

The Chairman. Present that check to the witness again. 

Look at that check and see if it does not bear a date on when it was 
cashed at the bank. 



6864 IMPROPER ACnVITIBS EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Geary. I am making the objection to the date of the writing, 
I am making the objection, Mr. Chairman. 

The CHAiRMAisr. Will you answer that? Doesn't it show when it 
was cashed ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might 
incriminate me. 

Mr. Kelly. Mr. Kelly, I present to you 2 other checks ; 1 dated June 
7, 1955, in the amount of $500, drawn on the same account as these 
others, made payable to cash, and another one dated September 12. 
1955, in the amonut of $1,000, drawn on the same account, made pay- 
able to cash, and I ask you to make any explanation of those checks 
upon which you have information. 

(Documents handed to witness.) 

Mr. Geary. Mr. Chairman, may I object to him reading these 
checks? If they are going into evidence, the exhibit speaks for itself 
and there is no requirement nor is there any necessity for Mr. Kelly 
to read what is going into evidence. 

The Chairman. Let the record show that counsel, to save time, 
objects to everything this committee is doing, or that it may do, and 
that his objections are overruled. Let that be for the permanent 
record. 

Proceed, Mr. Kelly. 

Mr. Kelly. This check is also on a Westbury Paper Stock Co. 
check on the Bank of Westbury Trust Co. It is payable to cash in 
the sum of $500. The date of the check is June 7, 1955. It is signed 
by Enrico and Emedio Fazzini. The notation in the left corner of 
this check is "Squillante, for Sun Rise store." The endorsement, 
however, is "Santa Fazzini." I recall a conversation with this person 
at the time we obtained these checks originally. Senator. 

The Chairman. Did you see the original checks ? 

Mr. Kelley. Yes ; I did. 

The Chairman. All of these that have been made exhibits here? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes. 

The Chairman. You saw the originals ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes. 

The Chairman. These are accurate photostatic copies of them ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And you had a conversation with him at that time ? 

Mr. Kelly. Mr. Fazzini told me 

Mr. Geary. I object to any conversations on the ground that they 
are hearsay. 

The Chairman. I have already entered the objections you will 
make; this one and all others. 

Mr. Kelly. She told me the check was made out to cash at the 
insistence of Mr. Nunzio Squillante. 

The Chairman. That is the witness here ? 

Mr. Kelly. The witness who is here today. Senator. And that she 
endorsed this check and gave the cash to him. 

The Chairman. That check may be made exhibit 22. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 22" for ref- 
erence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7040.) 

Mr. Kelly. The next check is dated September 12, 1955, the West- 
bury Paper Stock Co., pay to the order of cash, in the sum of $1,000, 



IMPROPER ACrrrVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6865 

on tlie Bank of Westbury Trust Co. It is also signed by Enrico 
and Emedio Fazzini. The notation in the left corner of this check 
indicates cash for Squillante, Sun Rise Stores. The check is en- 
dorsed "Emedio Fazzini." 

In a conversation with him at the time the other check was dis- 
cussed, he told us that at the insistence of Nunzio Squillante, this 
check was also made out to cash; it was cashed by him, and the cash 
turned over to Mr. Squillante. 

Mr, Geary. The same objection, Mr. Chairman. 

Tlie CiiAiRMAx. Proceed. All objections are overruled. 

That may be made exhibit 23, that check. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 23" for ref- 
erence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7041.) 

Mr. Kelly. The cash-receipts book for General Sanitation was re- 
viewed and there was no indication that either of those checks were 
entered as cash receipts. 

Mr. Geary. May I object, unless Mr. Kelly produces the books? 

The Chairman. As I understand, you have reviewed the books of 
the General Sanitation Co. ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct, sir. 

The Chairman. And there was no entry of the money having been 
received ? 

Mr. Kelly. By General Sanitation. 

Tlie Chairman. By the company? 

]Mr. Kelly. That is correct. 

The Chairman. All right. Proceed. 

Mr. Adlerman. No further questions. 

The Chairman. Senator McNamara ? 

Senator McNamara. Do you know Tom Nolan ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might 
incriminate me. 

Senator McNamara. Are you able to order union members to picket 
business places ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might 
incriminate me. 

Senator McNamara, You previously refused to answer the question 
''Are you a member of a union ?" 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer 

Senator McNamara. I didn't ask the question yet. 

Mr, Squillante. Sorry, 

Senator McNamara. The commitee has testimony indicating that 
you are a member or an officer of an association of businessmen en- 
gage in the cartage business. Are you or have you been a member or 
an officer of such an or£:anization ? 

Mr, Squillante. Senator, I didn't hear the first part of that ques- 
tion. 

Senator McNamara. The first part of it was a statement that this 
committee has testimony indicating that you are a member or an 
officer of an association of businessmen engaged in the cartage in- 
dustry. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse 

Senator McNamara. The question is: Are you or have you been 
a member or an officer of such an organization ? 



6866 IISIPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

Senator McNamara. Thank you ; that is all, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Is there anytliing further ? 

Mr. Adlerman. Just one question. 

]Mr. Squillante, did you ever make any arrangement with Mr. Bernie 
Adelstein to have that list prepared tliat was given to the store owners 
on Miracle Mile with your name on the top ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. Mr. Chairman, we have some information which: 
indicates that Mr. Squillante was present at a luncheon with Mr. Al- 
bert Anastasia, Mr. Donno, Mr. Kosetti, and several other gentle- 
men, at a time when there was under consideration the purchase of 
Anderson & Co. by Donno Co. They were looking for additional 
capital. Mr. Anastasia was one of those that was supposed to put 
up that capital. I would like to ask Mr. Nunzio Squillante at this 
time was he present at this luncheon. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

Mr. Adlerman. No further questions, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. This committee is investigating in the field of man- 
agement-labor relations, or labor-management relations; and if man- 
agement is in a conspiracy, or engaging in extortion, it is just as 
reprehensible, if not more so, than some isolated union official doing 
it. 

Will you just be fair enough to both labor and management to state 
which side, if either, you represented in these transactions ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Or did you simply represent and belong, and were 
a part of, a gang of racketeers ? It wouldn't be proper to recognize 
them as either legitimate management or labor. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

The Chairman. All right. Stand aside. You will remain here,, 
subject to being recalled. 

The committee will take a 5-minute recess at this time. 

(Brief recess.) 

The Chairman. The committee will be in order. 

Call your witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Don Modica. 

(Members of the select committee present at this point were Senators 
McClellan and McNamara.) 

The Chairman. Stand and be sworn. 

You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give before 
this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. MoDicA. I do. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 6867 

TESTIMONY OF C. DON MODICA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

PATRICK GEARY 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. MoDiCA. C. Don Modica, 110 Brail Avenue, Asbury Heights, 
N. J. I am a teacher and writer. 

The Chairman. Teacher and writer ? 

Mr. MoDiCA. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. Do you have counsel 
present to represent you '( 

Mr. MoDiCA. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Counsel, will you identify yourself for the record ? 

Mr. Geary. My name is Patrick Geary, and my office is in Jamaica, 
Long Island. 

Mr. Chairman, I would like to call to the committee's attention 
something that I consider highly reprehensible that happened just 
a few moments ago, when Mr. Robert Kennedy, the chief counsel to 
this committee, called my client in the hall and asked him whether 
I, as attorney, advised him to take the fifth amendment. I think that 
is stooping pretty lov.'. 

The Chairman. You know, we have some opinions, too, of witnesses 
who come up here and take the fifth amendment to the questions and 
to the documents submitted. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to point out, Mr. Chairman, tlmt I 
talked to Professor Modica in New York, and at that time he did not 
have counsel or attorney with him. 

Is that correct, Mr. Modica i' Professor, isn't that correct ? 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incrimi- 
nate me. 

The Chairman. I think it is pretty obvious to everyone that we 
are laboring under the most terrific difficulties and handicaps. We 
go and try to get this information that the Congress needs and we 
should have in order to legislate justly to eliminate the improper prac- 
tices in the area of management and labor relations. 

We get cooperation at times from some sources and from other 
sources we get no cooperation. We get only obstruction, and every 
hindrance placed in the way of the committee that can be placed in it. 
So we are not always gi-eatly impressed when charges are made against 
us. 

I think the record will reflect when witnesses come in here and coop- 
erate, counsel appearing before the committee are respected. But 
notwithstanding, we sometimes have a conflict of duty and a conflict 
of interest. We try to proceed with a quorum and try to pursue the 
assignment that the committee has from the Senate of the United 
States to get along with its job and discharge its responsibilities. 

All right, Mr. Kennedy, proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Professor Modica is important to us because he was 
listed as educational director of the Greater New York Cartmen's 
Association. He also participated in meetings 



6868 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. Let it be noted that that is presumably a business 
association. That is on the side of management. 

Mr. Kennedy. ^"Vlien he started at that position, he received $90 a 
week. He then had his sahiry upped to $100 a week. It was for that 
reason, for whatever information he could give us about the Greater 
New York Cartmen's Association, that we wished to call him. 

In addition, he participated in many meetings of the Intercounty 
Cartmen's Association. We wanted any information that he might 
have on that. 

The Chairman. We had the proof, as I recall, that he was present 
at a number of meetings and at times did counsel Mr. Squillante at 
these meetings. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is correct. 

The Chairman. Other testimony from members of the association 
was that they did not know what he was there for ; that is, he had no 
official connection with the association and was not a member of it. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is correct. That is of the intercounty, but he 
was actually on the payroll of the Greater New York Cartmen's 
Association. 

The Chairman. Proceed to interrogate. 

Mr. Kennedy. We have here the original minutes of the meeting 
when he was introduced. Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Have these minutes been sworn to ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Kelly can swear to them. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

The Chairman. Mr. Kelly, I hold in my hand documents, photo- 
static copies of minutes of meetings. The title of it is, "Meeting of 
Greater New York Cartmen's Association," the first one that I shall 
refer to being dated June 3, 1953. I present to you, Mr. Kelly, and 
ask you to examine it and state if you identify that document and 
what it is and how you procured it. 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Kelly. This document. Senator McClellan, is the photostatic 
cop3'^ of the typewritten minutes of the Greater New York Cartmen's 
Association, which was held in the Yorkville Casino on June 3, 
1953. This particular copy, though unsigned, was obtained from the 
New York County district attorney's office. It had been subpenaed 
from the Greater New York Cartmen's Association by him. 

The Chairman. It was obtained originally under subpena ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct. Senator. 

The Chairman, xlnd you have it from that subpena ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct, Senator. 

The Chairman. The Chair will make this document, which you 
have identified. Exhibit No. 24. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 24" for refer- 
ence, and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

The Chairman. I will read from it, Mr. Counsel, so you may 
predicate your 

Mr. Geary. In the first place, Mr. Chairman, if I may have my 
objections, Mr. Kelly testified that the document was a photostatic 
copy, unsigned my anyone. He also testified that he procured it 
from the district attorney's office of New York County. I submit that 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6869 

the proper foundation has not been laid to offer or submit this paper 
in evidence. 

The Chairman. Yes, sir; I understand, and, if we make any errors, 
your client "will have an opportunity to correct them under oath. 
This states : 

Meeting was called to order at 8 :20 p. m. IMembers were asked by the 
president to sign the trust agreements before leaving the meeting hall. Mr. Don 
Modica was introduced to the members as our public-relations director. He 
gave us a talk as to his views. He stressed three E's — education, engineering, 
and enforcement. 

You may interrogate the witness as to whether the Don Modica 
refers to him, if he was present, if he gave such a talk, and any other 
tiling pertinent thereto. 

TESTIMONY OF C. DON MODICA, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
PATRICK GEARY— Resumed 

Mr. Kexxedy. Were you present at this meeting and did you give 
a talk on the three E's — education, engineering, and enforcement? 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might incrim- 
inate me. 

Mr. Kenxedy. Did you find that the cartmen were receptive to this 
talk that you gave them. Professor ? 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might incrim- 
inate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Our information is not only that he was put on the 
payroll 

The Chairman. Ask him if he was put on the payroll. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you put on the payroll, Professor? 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might in- 
criminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was put on the payroll and performed this 
educational function, but he also published a newspaper called the 
Hired Broom, w-hich was distributed among the cartmen. This was 
put out by Mr. Modica and has various editorial notes. For instance, 
the editorial on this particular edition we have of October 1, 1956, is 
Out of Garbage There Grows a Rose. 

Mr. Geary. Mr. Chairman, I object to the reading of anything not 
in evidence. If Mr. Kennedy wants to read it, suppose we mark it as 
exhibit 25. 

The Chairman. You know, Counsel, if j^ou could just learn to be 
a little patient, you could get all of it marked properly. I will now 
present this document to your client, the witness, and ask him to ex- 
amine it and state if he identities it. 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

The Chairman. Doctor, do you identify the document? 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incriminate 
me. 

The Chairman. Do you mean making a rose out of garbage would 
be incriminating^ 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. I don't want to read something into the record if 
it is not fair to you. If you say that you had nothing to do with it, 



(6870 IMPROPER ACTIVIT'IES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

' that is a different thing. But I do want to be fair to you and give 
you the opportunity to see it and refute it if it is not true. 

Mr. MoDicA. I respectfully decline to answer on the ground that it 
might incriminate me. 

The Chairman. You mean if you refuted it, it might tend to in- 
criminate you, or do you mean if you admitted you know about it, 
it might incriminate you ? Which do you mean ? 

Mr, MoDicA. I refuse to answer on the groiuid the answer might 
incriminate me. 

The Chaiemax. The document may be made exhibit 25, havmg 
been exhibited to the witness for his identification, and he takes the 
fifth amendment. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 25" for iden- 
tification, and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy, Mr. Chairman, I might say that the professor, when 
we talked to him in New York was very helpful, he answered all of our 
questions, and we had a long talk for over an hour, I believe. He told 
us of his background and his relationship with the cartmen's associa- 
tion. 

The Chairman. Ask him direct questions about what he told you 
at the time and see if he will deny it. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to ask him if he would just be willing 
to repeat what he told us in that office and tell us of his association 
with the cartmen's association, and about his own background. 

Would you be willing to do that. Professor ? 

Mr. MoDicA. I refuse to answer on the grounds it might incriminate 
me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, I have a memorandum on our inter- 
view with the professor. Could I go into the background ? 

The Chairman. Read from the memorandum of the notes you 
made at the time and ask hun if he said it or if he did not say it. 

Mr. Geary. Mr, Chaiman, may I object to any such reading? 
These conversations w^ere supposed to be of a confidential nature, as 
I understand it. No record was to be made. 

Mr, Kennedy, It was not made. 

The Chairman, The objections are overruled. 

Mr. Geary. Exception, 

Mr, Kennedy. The professor stated that he attended Columbia 
XTniversity. 

The Chairman. Is that correct ? Did you attend Columbia Uni- 
versity ? 

Mr. MoDiCA. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. Can you think of some university that you might 
have attended, which, if you admitted it, it would not incriminate 
vou ? 

Mr, Geary. May I object to that question ? 

The Chairman. Yes; and your objection is overruled. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

The Chairman. Sir ? 

Mr. MoDiCA. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might in- 
criminate me. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6871 

The Chairman. Did you tell Mr. Kennedy you had attended Co- 
lumbia University ? 

Mr. MoDiCA. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might in- 
criminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. As I say, it was quite a long interview. He stated 
tliat he left Columbia University for several years and then restarted 
his education at St. Johns University. 

The Chairman. Did you make that statement ? 

Mr. Geary. May I object to this reading from a record that was 
supposed to have been confidential ? 

The Chairman. For the purpose of this hearing, and the inter- 
rogation of this witness, let the record show again that counsel objects 
to every question, and to evei-y ruling of the Chair, and every action 
of the committee, and that the objections are overruled. 

Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Geary. Mr. Chairman, may my client have the same privilege 
with reference to his answers? In other words, a blanket taking of 
the fifth amendment, if j^ou will? If I don't have the right to object 
to each and every question 

The Chairman. Do you want to sit here and waste your time and 
mine, too? I am perfectly willing for the record to show that you 
make objection to everything done and the objection is overruled. 
Do you want to put it on the record? Do you want to take the time? 

Mr. Geary. I don't see how you can anticipate my objection and 
your ruling before I make it, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. I was trying to be courteous to you and trjdng to 
save time. 

Proceed. 

If you make an objection, the Chair will rule on it at the time. 

Mr. Kennedy. He actually graduated from St. Johns Univereity 
in Brooklyn, N. Y. He later went back and received a master's de- 
gree at St. Johns. 

The Chairman. Is that correct ? 

Mr. MoDicA. I refuse to answer on tliB grounds it might incrimi- 
nate me. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. At a later time he was instructor in philosophy of 
education at New York University and held that position for several 
years. 

The Chairman. Is that correct, Mr. Modica ? 

Mr. MoDicA. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. He stated that he left that position to obtain a bet- 
ter position with an insurance company out in Chicago, 111. 

The Chairman. Is that correct, Mr. Modica? 

Mr. MoDiCA. I refuse to answer on the grounds it might incrimi- 
nate me. 

The Chairman. Are you a professor ? 

Mr. MoDiCA. I refuse to answer on the grounds it might incrimi- 
nate me. 

The Chairman. I noticed just inadvertently I had been calling you 
Mister. I would be very glad if you are a professor to defer to your 
title and call you professor. Would you like for me to do that ? 



6872 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. MoDicA. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might 
incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. The professor stated that he had had some difficuky 
with the law when he was a younger man, but he was one of those who 
had rehabilitated himself. His criminal record indicates that he 
served 6 months in the State of Delaware Prison for practicing medi- 
cine without a license. 

Mr. Geary. I object to this as not the best evidence. 

The Chairman. We can get the best evidence if your client will 
testify. 

Mr. Geary. I think it is incumbent upon the committee to show he 
has a record. He is not going to admit it. If Mr. Kennedy is relying 
upon the hearsay statements, I think it is highly improper. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, at the time, all he stated was that 
he had a criminal record, and that he had rehabilitated himself. We 
made a study and his background shows that he was convicted of prac- 
ticing medicine without a license in the State of Delaware, and that 
he was arrested in Atlantic City, N. J., for assault with intent to kill. 

Mr. Geary. May I object to these statements on the ground that they 
are not the best evidence ? I would like to see the certificates of con- 
viction, if the committee has them. Otherwise, I don't think Mr. 
Kennedy should be permitted to continue his testimony. 

The Chairman. Let me try to help you and help the committee. 
We have other testimony here regarding Professor Modica and some 
of his activities in connection with management and labor relations, 
in a position of that kind. For your information, and I think the 
public already knows it, this committee is interested, and I think the 
public is interested and the Congress is interested, and I am quite 
certain that decent, honest, unionism throughout the country is inter- 
ested, in trying to find out whether criminal elements have infiltrated 
this area of relationships between management and labor, or vice 
versa. Therefore, we think it is pertinent. We do think that there 
may be need for legislation in this field, to keep gangsters and rack- 
eteers from taking over in this area, either as representatives of man- 
agement or as representatives of labor. 

Therefore, when we have a witness here, where we have this infor- 
mation, we like to give him the opportunity to make any explanation, 
to refute it, or to say "Yes, but," and make his explanation. That is 
the purpose of the question. If your client, on your advice, does not 
want to answer on the grounds that it might incriminate him, that is 
his privilege. Proceed. 

Mr. Geary. Mr. Chairman, Mr. Kennedy made reference to an 
arrest, I believe it was in Atlantic City. I think he should tell the 
audience and the committee just what was the ultimate outcome of 
that arrest. Was Mr. Modica convicted or acquitted or discharged or 
what happened ? 

Mr. Kennedy. I think if you will let me finish 

The Chairman. He should, and that will be done. It is always 
done. I am perfectly willing to give the witness an opportunity to 
answer. 

Mr. Geary. He knows what happened. This audience doesn't know. 

The Chairman. I would think so, and he could be very helpful by 
telling us what happened. 



IMPROPER ACnVrriES IN THE LABOR FTELD 6873 

Mr. Geaey. But Mr. Kennedy isn't telling us. I object to all of 
this testimony. I am not encouraging Mr. Kennedy to continue, but 
I do say if he is going to say that the man was arrested, he should tell 
us what happened after that. 

The Chairman. We will proceed in our way. Mr. Kennedy, where 
a man was arrested, state whatever disposition was made. We do that 
all the time. If counsel will again have a little patience, we will get 
to it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we had hoped that the professor 
would enlighten us on this, because there is no disposition shown on 
his criminal sheet. However, he was in prison in Queens County, 
X. Y., on a charge of grand larceny, subsequently, and he served 
prison time on that count. But I do not know what the disposition 
was on the Atlantic City, N. J., charge for assault with intent to kill. 

The Chairman. Would you like to enlighten the committee. Pro- 
fessor ^ 

Mr. MoDiCA. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might incrim- 
inate me. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, part of the importance of the pro- 
fessor is his close relationship with Albert Anastasia, which culmi- 
nated in his employment with the New York Cartmen's Association. 
The "Professor" told us that he met Albert Anastasia in Brooklyn, 
X. Y., many years ago. 

The Chairman. Is that correct. Professor ? 

^Ir. MoDiCA. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might incrim- 
inate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. He stated that both he and Anastasia resided quite 
-close to one another and he belonged to an Italian social club where 
Anastasia occasionally visited ; is that right, Professor ? 

Mr. MoDiCA. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it might incrim- 
inate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. He said that Albert Anastasia asked him to tutor his 
child, Umberto Anastasia, Jr. 

The Chairman. We have had some positive proof here regarding 
that. That is under oath, and it has been testified to by other wit- 
nesses. Do you wish to make any comment on that. Professor ? 

Mr. MoDiCA. I refuse to answer on the ground it may incriminate 
me. 

!Mr. Kennedy. He stated that he carried out that tutoring for the 
period of about the past 5 years. 

The Chairman. Would you tell us whether for that service you 
were paid out of union funds or otit of some business money and not 
from Anastasia's funds ? 

Mr. Geary. In objecting to that might I cite the case of Kilbouin v. 
Thompson, which holds 

The Chairman. Just a moment, now. The case is cited and the 
■objection is overruled. I do not want a lecture on what the case said 
or did not say. 

Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. He said also, he tutored the children of William 
Moretti, who was a gambler, who was murdered in 1951, and Salvatore 
Aloretti, who was a gambler and the brother of William, and he died in 



6874 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

New Jei'sey State Prison of a cerebral hemorrhage in 1952, and' 
Joseph Adonis, who 

Mr. Geary. Is he saying my client made this statement or is Mr. 
Kennedy embellishing something that was alleged to have been told 
him by Mr. Modica ? 

Mr. Kennedy. The background on the individual I am giving, and 
the statement that he tutored the children of these individuals was 
made to me by the professor. 

Mr. Geary. That is all he told you ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

Mr. Geary. He did not tell you about all of these murders ? 

Mr. Kennedy. No. 

]Mr. Geary. Then I object to their being read into evidence. 

The Chairman. Overruled. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. He said he tutored the children of Joseph Adonis who 
is a New Jersey syndicate mobster, and deported to Italy in 1954, and 
also the children of Vito Genonese, a gambler and prominent under- 
world hoodlum residing in Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 

The Chairman. Professor, we give the background of these for 
your information, so that there will be no mistake about the identity 
of those whom we are talking about. In other words, as we give the 
background of it, that identifies not only the man, but his name and 
what he did and gives you as much information as we can so that there 
will be no mistake in identity. And then we ask you if it is true that 
you had that connection with them ? 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. I see. You see, we would not want to ask you 
about one name, and then you not be able to identify whom we are 
talking about, so in order to enlighten you before you answer or take 
the fifth amendment, you will know exactly what we are talking about. 

Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. We asked him if he got paid by the parents of these 
children for the work that he did and he stated that he did not get 
paid, that he did it out of a sense of friendship although these indi- 
viduals showed him their thanks by sending him an occasional turkey 
or ham at Christmas. 

The Chairman. Would you want to comment on that, as to whether 
that was all of the compensation that you got ? 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incrimi- 
nate me. 

The Chairman. Did you have some business connection with them 
and were you associated with them in business enterprises or rack- 
eteering i 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incrimi- 
nate me. 

The Chairman. Were you connected with them in any labor or 
management shakedowns or extortion ? 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incriminate ■ 
me. 

The Chairman. I think it would be incriminating if you did it. 
What we are trying to find out is to what extent they engaged in 
improper practices, either as businessmen, or middlemen, or laboring - 
men, or union men, or anything in between. 



IMPROPER ACrrVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6875' 

You seem to liave had a very close connection witli them, and it, 
mi^ht be helpful if you could <i;ive us that information. 

Mr. MoDiCA. J I'efuse to answer on the gjround it might incriminate 
me. 

Mr. Kexnedy. Mr. Chairman, he went on to say that he had been 
very close personally, with the family of Albert Anastasia, and that 
on the day Albert was killed in the barber shop up in Xew York City 
he was one of the first ones to arrive at Albert Anastasia's home. 

He said that Mrs. Anastasia is the godmother of his daughter. 

The Chairman. Let me see if I understand it. You are saying that 
you are not going to give us any information about Mr. Anastasia,. 
is that right ? 

Mr. ]\I()DiCA. I refuse to answer on the ground I might incriminate' 
myself. 

The Chairman. You will not tell us anything you may know about 
his connection with the i-ackets in which he may have been involved 
and been identified with labor-nuinagement relations? 

Mr. MoDicA, I refuse to answer on the ground it might incriminate 
me. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further ? 

Mr. Kennedy. "We have learned independently that when Albert 
Anastasia was imprisoned in Michigan in the Federal Penitentiary in 
Michigan, that the j^rofessor was one of the few persons listed as an 
approved visitor and correspondent of Albert Anastasia. 

I would like to also say we have some contacts ■ 

The Chairman. Any of this information that the committee has, 
Mr. Professor, that you would like to refute or deny or explain, we 
would be very glad to have you do so. 

I did not want you to think as we mention these things w^e are 
doing it for the ])urpose of putting it in the record except as we give 
you an opportunity to connnent on it. 

Mr. Kennedy. He stated. Mr. (liairman, that he was also interested 
in teaching marine safety on the docks. He said that he was looking 
for a job and he was hired as vice president of the Sancor Shipbuild- 
ing Corp. during AVorld War II. to teach marine safety. 

The CHAiR:\rAN. Were you so employed? Did you make such a 
statement i 

Mr. MoDicA. I lefuse to answer on the ground it might incriminate- 
me. 

Mr. Kennedy. We asked him at that time about the information 
that we had, that the Sancor Slnj^building Corp. gratuitously built 
a home for Albert Anastasia in Fort Lee, N. J. He said he did not 
have any information on it at that time. 

This corpoiation, Mr. Chairman, was labeled as a property of Albert 
Anastasia by Kefauver's committee. 

Mr. Geary. Might I object to that ? 

The Chairman. Do you know anything about that ? 

Mr. Geary. Might I have a ruling? 

The Chairman. Overruled. Do you know anything about that? 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the gi'ound it might incriminate 
me. 

Mr. Kennedy. He said that the president of the corporation was 
Joseph Sanders, and the secretary-treasurer of the corporation was 
Bemiidetto Macri. We spoke to him about the background of Beni- 



6876 IMPROPER ACTIVITrES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

detto Macri, the president of the corporation, and the man wlio hired 
Modica, that he acted as a bodyguard for Albert Anastasia. We 
asked him about that. 

The CHAiRMAisr. Wliat was his answer ? 

Mr. Kennedy. He said he was not familiar with that, although he 
was familiar with the details of Mr. Macri's death. Mr. Macri was 
arrested in 1949 for the murder of the International Ladies' Garment 
Workers Union organizer, William Luri. He was tried and found 
not guilty when the key witnesses reneged on their testimony. Macri's 
bloodstamed car, when pointed out to the professor, was found on the 
banks of the Passaic River, N. J., in 1954. 

The Chairman. Did the professor say he knew anything about it ? 

Mr. Kennedy. No ; he said that he knew his car had been found and 
that he is now presumed to be dead, and that his brother, Vincent, 
was found in the trunk of another car about the same time, murdered, 
but he said he did not know anything about that. 

The Chairman. Is this involved in labor-management relations? 

Mr. Kennedy. Not only were the Maoris in the Sancor Shipbuild- 
ing Corp. — and Albert Anastasia is supposed to have owned or oper- 
ated that corporation — but the professor arrives and gets a job there. 
Subsequently, the professor arrives and gets a job with the New York 
City Cartmen's Association, to do a job which is not very clear. 

Professor, did you have both jobs at the same time, working for 
this corporation and also working for this cartmen's association at the 
same time ? 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incriminate 
me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat we wanted to find out, Mr. Chairman, is 
whether he was Albert Anastasia's representative with the Sancor 
Shipbuilding Co., and then whether he was Albert Anastasia's repre- 
sentative on the New York City Cartmen's Association. We have a 
considerable number of telephone calls going from the New York 
City Cartmen's Association to Albert Anastasia's home during the 

geriod of time when Mr. Modica worked there. In addition, Jimmy 
quillante describes himself as the godson of Albert Anastasia, and 
it was of great importance to determine the tieup and the connection 
of Albert Anastasia with these various cartmen's associations. 

The Chairman. Do you have any information about his connection 
with the cartmen's association, Professor ? 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incriminate 
me. 

The Chairman. Wliat was there about those associations. Pro- 
fessor, in your wisdom and intellect that would cause you to hesitate 
to give any information you have about them ? 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairman. If there is something wrong with them, and we do 
have some testimony here that indicates some of them were just in a 
racket, if you have any information it would be helpful to the 
committee to get the record straight and to get what the facts are. 

As I understand you, you cannot give it, you say, on the ground 
that it might tend to incriminate you if you told us. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the ground it might tend to 
incriminate me. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 6877 

Mr. Kexxedy. Also re<rardin«r liis connection with tlie Aiiastiisias, 
he also was the educational director of Anthony Anastasia's lou.<>shore- 
inen irroiip on the Brooklyn docks, Mr. Chairman. 
The (^HAiRMAX. Was that a labor oroup '. 

Mr. Kenxedy. A labor orii'anization. He acted as educational 
director. 

The CiiAiKMAX. Did y<ni occupy that ])osition, Professor^ 
Mr. ]\roDirA. I refuse to answer on the iiround that it niiiiht tend to 
incriminate ine. 

Mr. Kexnedy. (lenerally we Avould like to find out what he was 
doin<j-, as the educational director of the New York City Cartnien's 
Association, and whether he was in fact a re])resentative of Albert 
Anastasia in that position. 

The CiiAiRMAX. Would you help us with that i 
Mr. MoDKW. I refuse to answer on the grounds that it inioht 
incriminate me. 

The CiiAiKMAX. Let me ask counsel, and I remember, or I recall the 
testimony, someone testified that he apparently was a watchman for 
someone, some higher up at one of the cartmen's meetings. 

Mr, Kexxedy. At the Nassau Cartmen's Association. This was 
another association where he came out with Mr. Squillante, and 
according to the testimony before the committee, Mr. Squillante did 
not like him. According to the testimony before the committee, 
there were at least some individuals who felt that Mr. Modica or 
Professor Modica had sort of the position of a watchdog, and they 
were unable to determine who he was watching. 

The CiiAiRMAX'. What was the name of that association? 
Mr. Kex^x^edy. Inter- County Cartmen's Association. 
The CHAIR3IAX^ That is the Greater New York County Cartmen's 
Association and the Inter-County Association. Did you attend the 
meetings of either of those associations, the board meetings, or mem- 
bership meetings I 

Mr. Modica. I refuse to answer on the grounds it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairmax'. Did you attend those meetings as a representative 
of a gangster oi- racketeer by the name of Albert Anastasia 'i 

Mr. ]\IoDiCA. I i-efuse to answer on the ground it might in- 
criminate me. 

The Chairmax. Is there anything further? 

Mr. Kex^xedy. Professor Modica told one of our staff members that 
he had prepared a doctoral thesie^. 

Mr. Geary. I don't like to interrupt 

Mr. Kex'xedy. Would you not interrupt, please ? 
The Chairmax. When counsel concludes, you may speak. 
Mr. Kex'xedy. He told an investigator that he has a doctoral thesis 
on the moral, sociological, and economic aspects of labor-management 
relations, and he agreed, Mr. Chairman, that he would turn that thesis 
over to the committee so we could make a study of the thesis when 
considering labor legislation. He said this thesis was based on his 
25 years of experience in the labor-management field. I had hoped we 
were going to be able to get that thesis at this hearing. 

The Ciiair:max\ Mr. Geary, you may make your objection, briefly. 

8<):{H(>_5T — ].t. IT \-i 



6878 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Geary. Senator McClellan, the objection is this : Generally it is 
considered unethical for an attorney to testify in a proceeding where he 
is appearing as counsel, and I believe that Mr. Kennedy as chief counsel 
to this committee should not be considered as an exception to this 
general rule. All he is doing here is testifying as a witness. 

I will ask you to pass on that objection. 

The Chairman. Mr. Kennedy is not testifying. He is not under 
oath. Anything Mr. Kennedy says is premise for a question. It is 
not testimony. The record will so show and as chairman of the com- 
mittee I have frequently made that very clear for the record in pre- 
vious hearings. 

But if the professor has a thesis that could be helpful to the com- 
mittee, and he voluntarily submits it for our edification, we would 
be very glad to have it. If he made that statement that he would be 
glad to turn it over to us, I would like to ask the professor now if he 
has such a thesis. Would you be willing to submit that to the committee 
for its enlightenment ? 

Mr. MoDiCA. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incriminate 
me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, I would like to point out that yester- 
day we had the testimony of Mr. Amato regarding tlie prominence that 
certain figures in the Mafia had in the carting industry in and around 
New York. There is nobody more important in the Mafia than Albert 
Anastasia. In a number of the businesses in which Albert Anastasia 
had an interest over the period of the past 10 years, the professor 
ended up in a rather peculiar position as an educational director of the 
longshoremen, educational director in the Sancor Shipbuilding Co., 
and finally he ended up in the New York City Cartmen's Association. 

The Chairman. Is that correct. Professor ? 

Mr. MoDicA. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might incrim- 
inate me. 

The Chairman. Do you know anything about the connection of 
Anastasia with the Mafia ? 

Mr. MoDiCA. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incriminate 
me. 

The Chairman. Do you have any connection with it? 

Mr. MoDicA. I refuse to answer on the ground it might incriminate 
me. 

Mr. Kennedy. We felt that possibly the professor was the link 
between Albert Anastasia and the New York City Cartmen's Asso- 
ciation, and that his testimony could be very enlightening to the 
committee if he would be willing to give us any information regarding 
Mr. Albert Anastasia's interest in those organizations. 

Professor, would you do that ? 

Mr. MoDiCA. I refuse to answer on the grounds it might incriminate 
me. 

The Chairman. Obviously, the witness has no present intent of 
enlightening the committee, and therefore the Chair has felt that 
we have pursued it far enough to give the witness every opportunity 



IMPROPER ACTIVmES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6879 

to be helpful or to make explanations of the matters that are of 
record and inider oath here before the committee. I shall not per- 
sonally pursue it any further. 

Senator McNamara ? 

Senator McNaimara. I have no questions. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all. 

The Chairman. You may stand aside. 

The committee will stand in recess until 10 o'clock in the morning. 

(Committee members present at time of recess : Senators McClellan 
and McNamara.) 

( Wliereupon, at 4 : 45 p. m. the committee was recessed, to reconvene 
at 10 a. m. Friday, November 15, 1957.) 



INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 1957 

United States Senate, 
Select Committee on Improper Activities 

IN THE Labor or Management Field, 

Washington^ D. G. 

The select committee met at 10 a. m., pursuant to Senate Resolution 
74, agreed to January 30, 1957, in the caucus room, Senate Office Build- 
ing, Senator John L. McClellan (chairman of the select committee) 
presiding. 

Present : Senator John L. McClellan, Democrat, Arkansas ; Senator 
Irving M. Ives, Republican, New York; Senator Pat McNamara, 
Democrat, Michigan. Also present : Robert F. Kennedy, chief comi- 
sel; Jerome Adlerman, assistant chief counsel; Robert W. Greene, 
investigator ; James P. Kelly, investigator ; Ruth Young Watt, chief 
clerk. 

The Chairman. The committee will be in order. 

(Members of the select committee present at the convening of the 
session were Senators McClellan, Ives, and McNamara). 

The Chairman. Mr. Tom Nolan, will you come around, please ? 

(There was no response.) 

The Chairman. Mr. Alfred C. Dutton, will you come around 
please ? 

You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give before this 
Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Dution. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF ALFRED C. DUTTON 

The Chairman. Will you state your name, your place of residence, 
and your business or occupation, Mr. Dutton ? 

Mr. Dutton. Alfred C. Dutton, 49 West Drive, Manhasset, N. Y. 
I am an employee of Universal Utilities, Inc. 

The Chairman. Do j^ou waive counsel ? 

Mr. Dutton. I do, sir. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Dutton, you were a partner of Dante Donno in 
the Donno Co. ? 

Mr. Dutton. I was a partner in the Donno Co., Inc. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that was a carting firm out in Manhasset, Long 
Island ? 

6881 



6882 IMPROPER ACTIVITTE'S IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr, DuTTON. It was. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were a partner of that company until what date ? 

Mr. Dui^TON. Until October 1956. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long were you associated with them ? 

Mr. DuTTON. I began as an employee of Donno Co., doing business 
as Donno Co., and we went into partnership and formed Donno Co., 
Inc. 

Mr. Kennedy. When did you form the partnership ? 

Mr. DuTTON. I believe in 1955, sir. 

Mr, Kennedy, You were a nonunion organization ? 

Mr. DuTTON, We were. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were there efforts on the part of the union to or- 
ganize you ? 

Mr. DuTTON, At different times there were, sir. 

Mr, Kennedy. Do you remember the strikes that the union called 
on the Miracle Mile ? 

Mr. DuTTON. I do, 

Mr. Kennedy. Had there been efforts just prior to that time to 
organize the Donno Co. or shortly prior to that time ? 

Mr. DuTTON, I would say within a few months before that. 

Mr. Kennedy. There had been efforts to organize your company ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Yes, sir, 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Donno say that you M'ould have to take some 
steps to get the union from making these efforts, to keep the union 
off your back ? 

Mr. DuTTON, Well, not at that time, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy, All right. Was there discussion at the time of the 
Miracle Mile, and was there a discussion about joining up with Nunzio 
Squillante, and General Sanitation ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Not during the Miracle Mile business, but after. 

Mr, Kennedy. Would you tell us what happened in connection with 
that? 

Mr. DuTTON. Well, as far as I can recall, Mr. Donno had a conver- 
sation with Mr. Nunzio Squillante, and the first thing I knew about it, 
I came in to work one morning and Mr. Dunno said to me, "I have 
done something and I don't know whether you are going to like it or 
not, but I think I did something smart. We are going to take in a 
partner. We are going to merge General Sanitation and Donno Co., 
Inc." 

Mr. Kennedy, Did he explain to you at that time or later the reason 
why he wanted to merge with General Sanitation ? 

Mr. DuTTON, Well, it was always m.y belief and Mr. Donno in- 
ferred to me it was for our good that we merge with General Sanitation 
and he thought Mr. Squillante could bring in a lot of new business, 
and that it might keep the union off our backs for a while and also that 
he felt that he was protecting the other collectors on the north shore. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was it understood that the General Sanitation had 
a preferred position with the union because of Nunzio Squillante? 

Mr. DuTTON. I assumed that, sir, yes, sir. That was my feeling. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you also understand that the reason — I believe 
you stated as much — that the reason or one of the main reasons that 
Donno wanted to combine with General Sanitation was to keep the 
union away from him and keep them from bargaining. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6883 

Mr. DuTToisT. I don't believe that I could say that for a fact, but I 
assumed that. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any difficulty with the union after you 
joined with General Sanitation ? 

Mr. DuTTON. None that I know of, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So that the union never bothered you after that? 

Mr. DuTTON. That is correct. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Did you have any connection with Vincent Squil- 
lante? 

Mr. DuTTON. Will you repeat that ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any connection with Mr. Vincent 
Squillante? 

Mr. Button. I met Mr. Vincent Squillante about 3 or 4 times. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have to report to him or did you report to 
him at all about the progress of your business after you combined with 
Nunzio Squillante' s company? 

Mr. DuTTON. I did not, sir, no. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Donno report to him ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Yes, sir, I think he did. 

Mr. Kennedy. How often did you have to go and report ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Every Friday from what I understand. 

Mr. Kennedy. He went in with Mr. Nunzio Squillante, did he not ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You remained nonunion, is that right? 

Mr. DuTTON. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were not bothered by the union. Was there 
another nonunion shop company operating out there in that vicinity ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Anderson Co. was nonunion. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did there come a time when you were considering 
buying out Anderson Co. ? 

Mr. DuTTON. YeSj sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Donno inform you that he was going to 
try to raise some $250,000 or $300,000? 

Mr. DuTTON. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. To buy out Anderson Co. ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he inform you that Mr. Nunzio Squillante had 
arranged for him to meet with some individuals ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he go in and meet with those people ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. He had a luncheon meeting with them ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. To try to raise the $300,000 ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he tell you after the luncheon meeting with 
whom he had met ? 

Mr. DuTTON. He did not. ^Vlien he returned from that luncheon 
engagement he did not know with whom he sat down with. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he describe those individuals at all to you, the 
type of people they were ? 

j\Ir. DuTTON. He said to me that he had met with some bigtime 
boys from the city and he patted his armpit. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did that mean ? 



6884 IMPROPER ACT'IVITTES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. DuTTox. He didn't say what it meant, but to me it meant a 
shoulder holster. 

Mr. Kennedy. They were carrying gmis? 

Mr. DuTTON. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. He said that he went and had lunch and he was 
trying to raise some $250,000 or $800,000 to buy out Anderson Co., 
which was a nonunion company, and he did not have the money and 
so Mr. Squillante arranged for him to meet with some individuals 
Avho might put up the money ; is that right ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Correct ? 

Mr. Kennj:dy. He went in and met Avith them at lunch. 

Mr. DuTTON. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. After he came back from the lunch you had a dis- 
cussion with him about with wliom he met, and he said at that time 
that there were some boys from downtown. 

^Ir. Button. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. And then he patted his armpit, indicating that they 
were gangsters who carried rods ; is that right ? 

Mr. Button. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, I understand that the money was never put 
up because of the fact that the Anderson Co. could not transfer its 
cit}^ contracts to Bonno Co. ; is that right ? 

Mr. Button. I understand that was the reason. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was the main reason for that because of the con- 
nection between the Bonno Co. and Xunzio Squillante ? 

Mr. Button. I do not know the answer to that. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you do know that the stops that Anderson had 
where they picked up from cities or had city business, that those cities 
would not transfer their business if they bought out Anderson ; is that 
right? 

Mr. Button. They were incorporated villages, sir, and not cities. 
From what I understood, the contract read that they could not be 
transferred. 

Mr. Kennedy. So Anderson could not transfer their contracts, is 
that right? 

Mr. Button. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all. 

Senator McNamara. I would like to ask the witness just a couple 
of questions, Mr. Chairman. 

This sounds like a fantastic price for the Anderson Co. How much 
of that would have been in equipment in your estimation, do you know ? 

Mr. Button. I would say well over $100,000. 

Senator McNamara. $100,000 in equipment ? 

Mr. Button. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Would the rest be goodwill, $200,000 or 
$150,000 or $200,000? 

Mr. Button. Sir, may I answer that by saying that I think Mr. 
Anderson, of Anderson Co., had one of the best garbage businesses 
on Long Island. 

Senator McXamara. If they had $100,000 worth of equipment it 
would indicate the balance was for his stops and for the goodwill 
involved. 

Mr. Button. That is correct. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6885 

Senator M('Na:mai{a. Wliich still sounds to me like a fantastic price. 

Thank yon. 

The CiiAiKMAX. J !e had a n.uniber of village contracts and nnniicipal 
contracts, did he ^ 

Mr. DuTTox. Anderson Co., yes. He had three incorporated village 
contracts that 1 know of, sir. 

The CiiAiRjiAN. "Were they pretty profitable contracts ? 

Mr. DuiTox. From what I understand ; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. So if the transaction had gone through, they would 
have acquired a number of customers. They would have acquired not 
only tlie equipment, but the contracts, and the business along with it. 

Mr. Dui^i'ON. That is correct. 

The Ciiaiioian. But the municipalities protected themselves by not 
transferring. 

Mr. DuTTON. That is correct. 

The Chairman. They reserved control over the contract they had 
made with Anderson ^ 

Mr. DurroN. That is correct. 

Senator McNamara. That brings up another question. Do the con- 
tracts ordinarily run for 1 year ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Sometimes, sir ; and also 3 years. 

Senator McNamara. One or three years ? 

Mr. DuTTON. Yes, sir; and Manhasset was a 3-year contract. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Dante Donno, please. 

The Chairman. Do you solemnly swear that the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Ml'. Donno. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF DANTE DONNO, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL 

The Chair3ian. State your name and your residence and your busi- 
ness or occupation, please, sir. 

Mr. Donno. Dante Donno, 300 East Shore Road, Great Neck, Long 
Island ; owner and partner of Donno Co. 

The Chairman. You are a part owner of Donno Co. ? 

Mr. DoNNo. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You have counsel present. Will you identify your- 
self for the record. 

Mr. Margulies. Walter Margulies, M-a-r-g-u-1-i-e-s. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Donno, you have been in the carting business 
for liow long ? 

Mr. DoNNo. About 25 years. 

Mr. Kennedy. You had your own company for how long, or been 
part owner of a company for how long ? 

Now, prior to 1955, had there been efforts made b}- the union to 
organize your company ? 

Mr. DoNNO. Several times. 

Mr. Kennedy. And those were unsuccessful ? 

Mr. Donno. Yes, sir. 



6886 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. Did yon express some concern at the time that the 
union made its efforts on the IMiracle Mile out in Long Island, and 
they began striking some of those stops there ? 

Mr. DoNxo. I don't remember expressing riij concern over that, 
at that particular time because we had already gotten rid of most 
of our commercial houses. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you concerned that the union might attempt 
to organize you ? 

Mr. DoNNO. Always, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. That Avould dig considerably into your profits ; would 
it not ? 

Mr. DoNNO, Yes . 

Mr. Kennedy. If they organized you ? 

Mr. DoNNO. Yes, sir. 

Mr, Kennedy. And you were concerned that they would make 
these attempts to organize you ; were you not ? 

Mr. DoNNO. Yes, sir, 

Mr. Kennedy. Was one of the reasons that you combined with 
Mr. Nunzio Squillante and General Sanitation, to keep the union from 
making its efforts against your shop ? 

Mr. DoNNo. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. It had nothing to do with it? 

Mr. DoNNO. No. 

Mr. I^nnedy. You did combine with Nunzio Squillante? 

Mr. DoNNO. Yes ; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any troubles or difficulties with the 
union after you joined with Nunzio Squillante? 

Mr. DoNNO. Not any real trouble; no. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Did you have any efforts to organize you after you 
joined Nunzio Squillante? 

Mr. DoNNO. No. 

Mr. I^NNEDY. The union never bothered you after you combined 
with him ? 

Mr. DoNNO. Other than the usual thing, where at the local incin- 
erator they distributed circulars to the men and whatnot. 

Mr. EJENNEDY. They did that to everybody ? 

Mr. DoNNO. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. But beyond that, they made no individual efforts to 
attempt to organize 3^ou, after you combined with Nunzio Squillante ? 

Mr. DoNNO. Not that I recall, 

Mr. I^NNEDY. And that was Nunzio Squillante, of General Sanita- 
tion ; is that correct ? 

Mr, DoNNO. That is right, 

Mr. Kennedy. Your shop remained prounion during that period of 
time ? 

Mr. DoNNO, Yes, sir, 

Mr, Margtjlies, Excuse me a moment, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. ICJENNEDY. What percentage of the business did Nunzio Squil- 
lante take at the time ? 

Mr. DoNNO. Originally, there were two companies. There was 
Donno, Inc., which was a small outfit, which was formed originally 
with my brother-in-law, Charlie Dutton, and myself as partners ; each 
one of us hold a third share. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6887 

My brother-in-law, after a short while, decided he did not like the 
business and we divided the company between Button and myself. 
Then when the merger was worked out between General Sanitation 
and Donno Co., Inc., it was split up where Squillante got 50 percent 
of the stock, and Button and I retained 25 percent apiece and, in other 
words, 50 percent between us. 

That was the Donno Co., Inc., and there are two companies involved 
here. One is Donno Co. Later on there was a merger where Donno 
Co., Inc., purchased Donno Co. I don't know whether I make myself 
clear. 

Mr. Kennedy. No; you don't. 

Mr. ]\L\.RGULiES. Could I be permitted to explain that ? 

The Chairman. As I understand it, I believe that you had two 
companies, Donno, Inc., and Donno Co. 

Mr. Donno. Yes. 

The Chairman. Maybe you had better try to explain it again. 

Mr. Margulies. If I may be permitted to explain it, Donno Co., 
Inc., was a firm formed in 1954. The assets of the firm consisted of 
just one truck, which was sold by Mr. Donno to that corporation. The 
business entailed at that time was actually just one contract, I believe 
in the Oyster Bay area. 

The purpose of forming it at the time was Mr. Donno's desire to 
give his brother-in-law something to do and to give Mr. Dutton com- 
pensation for his past services. It had nothing whatsoever to do with 
Donno Co. Donno Co. was tlie main company that did all of the real 
business. 

When his brother-in-law retired, I believe in June of 1955, Mr. 
Donno divided his stock between Mr. Dutton and himself, so that that 
business never did more, if I recall correctly, than about two and a 
lialf or three thousand dollars worth of business a month, as against 
possibly fifty or sixty thousand dollars a month that Donno Co. did. 

The agreement which was prepared when Squillante came in spe- 
cifically recited that it had nothing whatsoever to do with Donno Co., 
and so his interest, the Squillante interest, was involved only in 
Donno Co., Inc., which had assets at that time of about $1,200, repre- 
sented by tlie equity in 1 or 2 trucks and the amount of business that 
it was doing, which was roughly around $3,000 a month. 

I hope that makes it clear. 

The Chairman. Has your counsel correctly stated the situation? 

Mr. Donno. The only correction I would like to make is on the 
amount of business that Donno Co., the larger firm, did. They used 
to do a total of about $30,000, rather than fifty or sixty thousand 
dollars. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did there come a time when you were considering 
buying out Anderson Co. ? 

Mr. DoNNO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you discuss this with Mr. Nunzio Squillante? 

Mr. DoNNO. At the time, yes. I would like to say that we had been 
trying to buy Herb Anderson and we had various deals since 1937, 
and in each instance Mr. Anderson backed out on the deal, so this was 
not sometliing new. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wlien was tliis, when you discussed it with Nunzio 
Squillante? 

Mr. Donno. Wliat was that ? 



688S IMPROPER ACnVITIE'S IX THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. When was it that vou discussed it witli Nunzio 
Sqiiillante? 

Mr. DoxNo. Probably around September or October. 

Mr. Kennedy. Of 1955? 

Mr. Don NO. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you also discuss it with Vincent James Squil- 
lante? 

Mr. DoNNO. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not ? 

Mr. DoNNO. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had you been meeting with James Squilhmte dur- 
ing this period of time? 

Mr. DoNNO. I met him 4 or 5 times. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you keep him advised as to the progress your 
business w^as making ? 

Mr. DoNNO. No; I didn't keep him advised as to how the business 
was progressing. Nunzio and I had called at his office a couple of 
times because Nmizio wanted to go up and see his brother and we 
happened to be in the area a couple of times and one other time he 
went up to see his brother and I went along for the ride, but I had 
been up there on several occasions. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you discuss your business with him at that time, 
wdien you went up to see him ? 

Mr. DoNNO. Not other than "How's business out on tlie island,'' and 
the usual thing when you meet someone you know. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not discuss the Anderson purchase with 
him. 

Mr. DoNNO. No ; I did not. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Nunzio Squill ante tell you that he thought he 
knew a source where some money could be raised? 

Mr. DoNNO. I don't recall that ; no. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he make arrangements for you to meet with 
anybody ? 

Mr. DoNNO. No. 

Mr. Kennedy". To discuss that ? 

Mr. DoNNO. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you in fact have a luncheon meeting with any- 
one, with Mr Squillante, with Mr. Nunzio Squillante? 

Mr. DoNNo. The only luncheon meetino; I remember was at Long 
champs, and that, as I recall, was by accident. Mr. Squillante — we 
happened to be in his office— was going to lunch, and asked us to join 
him. We did, at Longchamps, which is 1 or 2 blocks from his office. 

After we were there we were joined by several other people, but 
there was no discussion of any business on my part at all. 

Mr. Kennedy'. Did vou discuss the raising of the $250,000 or 
$300,000. 

Mr. DoNNO. No : I did not. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Do you know Avho these other people were that you 
met with ? 

Mr. DoNNO. No ; I don't. 

Mr. Kennedy'. So Mr. Dutton's testimony that you reported to Mr. 
Vincent James Squillante approximately once every week to tell him 
about your business, No. 1, and No. 2, that you had a meeting with 



IMPEOPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6889 

certain racketeers to raise $'250,000 or $300,000 for the purchase of 
Anderson Co. is not correct ; is that right % 

Mr. DoNNO. That is riglit. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know, or were you informed, who these 
♦ranosters — were you informed avIio these other individuals were? 

Mr. DoNNo. l' believe on the way back from Longchamps that 
Nmizio and myself were riding back, and I asked him who these other 
people were. 1 believe that he said that Anastasia was there. 

Mr. Kennedy. Anastasia was there ^ 

Mr. DoxNo. That is right. And 1 didn't believe him. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you tell Mr. Dutton when you returned, or 
shortly afterwards, that you had met with some of the boys from the 
lower East Side, or downtown? 

Mr. DoNNO. Well, he asked me where I had been. I told him where 
I was. And that I had had lunch down there. He asked me who 
some of the people were there, and I said I was told that there were 
some boys from downtown, and that the name Anastasia was included, 
and I didn't think that he was there. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you mention to liim at that time also about the 
fact that you were trying to raise $250,000 

Mr. DoNNO. He Avas well aware. Yes; we were trjang to raise the 
money tlii'ough various sources, through the local banks which we have 
always done business with. I have a friend who was formerly a 
banker who arranges all my loans. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did the Anderson deal ultimately fall through be- 
cause Anderson could not transfer his city stops, his city contracts? 

Mr. DoNNO. No; it just fell through. That wasn't the reason for 
it. The contracts could have been transferred. There was various 
ways of working it out. I think there was a discussion of Mr. Ander- 
son incorporating his business and getting the contracts under the 
corporation name, and then we take over the stock in this corpora- 
tion. That way it could have been transferred. 

Mr, Kennedy. So it could have worked out, but it just never did. 

Mr. DoNNo. It just never did. 

Mr. Kennedy. So Mr. Dutton is w rong on that, too, is he ? 

Mr. Don NO. Yes ; he is. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to add that when we questioned Mr. 
Anderson about tliis matter — I didn't know you were going to take 
this position when we questioned Mr. Anderson on the matter — he 
said the reason it fell through was because he could not transfer his 
commercial stops. I would like to point out also that when we ques- 
tioned you originally j'ou never mentioned the fact, up until about a 
half hour ago, that you knew anything about Mr. Anastasia being- 
present at this hmcheon. 

Mr. Don NO. I didn't recall him being present. 

Mr. Kennedy. It was only after we told you that we had a number 
of witnesses to whom you mentioned this fact that you ultimately 
stated that it had been mentioned to you that Anastasia was there. 

Mr. DoNNO. Well, these witnesses that you have happen to be 
friends of mine, and if they say I said something like that — 1 actually, 
literally, don't recall him being there, but it is possible that Nunzio 
might have said that. 

Mr. Ivennedy. That is all, Mr. Chairman. 



6890 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. Are there any questions ? 

Senator McNamara. Yes, Mr. Chairman. I would like to ask just 
a couple of questions. 

Do I understand when you merged with this other outfit that you 
retained 25 percent of the stock and your partner retained 25 percent? 

Mr. DoxNO. That was on the original merger. 

Senator McNamara. And 50 percent 

Mr. DoNNO. There were two. Tliere was another merger after 
that. 

Senator McNamara. I am talking about the one. You mentioned 
the breakdown of 50, 25, and 25. This is the one I am talking about. 

Mr. DoNNo. Correct. 

Senator McNamara. Did you actually lose 50 percent of your busi- 
ness by this merger ? * 

Mr. DoNNO. No. 

Senator McNamara. How do you account for the breakdown ? 

Mr. DoNNO. General Sanitation had to bring in a certain portion 
of business which thej^ had. They had proportionately the same 
amount, or almost the same amount, of business as Donno Co., Inc., 
so he was entitled to 50 percent of it. 

Senator McNamara. Then, actually, in gross business you had the 
same amount ? 

Mr. DoNNO. Just about. 

Senator McNamar^v. The 25 and 25 would equal 100 percent you 
had before, because he had twice as much ? 

Mr. Donno. I believe — there was a small amount there of both 
firms, and I believe there was $1,000 difference. But there was a con- 
tract of ours that was pending, and we had reason to believe that we 
were going to lose it. If we lost it, it would have made it exactly 
the same thing. 

Senator McNamara. So, in round numbers, it was the same 
amount ? 

Mr. DoNNO. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. What induced you to go in with him? You 
say it was not so that you would have less trouble with the union. 
What induced you to go in with him ? 

Mr. DoNNO. I have other interests, and I have been trying to go 
away from the garbage business, get somebody to run it for me.i It is 
a peculiar business. You have to get somebody in there that knows it, 
and you have to teach it to them. Eventually, I had hoped I could 
leave it in someone's hands. That was the original purpose of having 
my brother-in-law come in. As a matter of fact, I have a brother- 
in-law in there, now that Nunzio left, another brother-in-law that is 
in there. 

Senator McNamara. How much of your business is commercial? 

Mr. DoNNO. Very, very little commercial. 

Senator McNamara. Generally, it is individual houses ? 

Mr. DoNNo. Household. 

Senator McNamara. How much a month do the householders pay 
now? 

Mr. DoNNO. Depending on the service, it varies anywhere from $2 
to $3.50 a month per house. That is 3 days a week — $3.50 is for back 
door, where we walk around to the back of the house for the rubbish, 
and $2 would be for a curb collection. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6891 

Senator McXamara. How much do you pay your truckdrivers ? 

Mr. DoNNO. Drivers as high as $85, helpers down to $80. 

Senator McNamara. Considerably under the union scale? 

Mr. DoNNo. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. That is all, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Is there anything- further ? 

Mr. Kennedy. No. 

The Chairman, All right. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, the two points that we are interested 
in making in this are : No. 1, that Mr. Donno had difficulty with the 
union up until the time he combined with Nunzio Squillante, and then 
he had no difficulties with the union after that time. It should be 
remembered that Nunzio Scjuillante's General Sanitation Co. was also 
a nonunion shop. The second point, of course, is that Nunzio Squil- 
lante arranged this meeting with some gangsters, included in which 
was Anastasia. I would like to call at this time Mr. Palminteri on 
just a short point. 

The Chairman. Come forward, please. 

Do you solemnly swear the evidence you shall give before this Senate 
select committee will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but 
the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Palminteri. I do. 

TESTIMONY OE ALBEET E. PALMINTERI 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation, please. 

Mr. Palminteri. My name is Albert E. Palminteri. I am in the 
real-estate insurance, and travel business, at 97 Main Street in Port 
Washington. 

The Chairman. Do you waive counsel ? 

Mr. Palminteri. I clo, sir. 

The Chairman. All right. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. You are in the real-estate business ? 

Mr. Palminteri. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have any other business ? 

Mr. Palminteri. I am in the insurance and travel business. 

Mr. Kennedy. What is the name of the travel business ? 

Mr. Palminteri. Port Washingtoai Travel Bureau. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Mr. Palminteri, you handle the insurance for Mr. 
Donno, do you ? 

Mr. Palminteri. Yes ; we have handled it. 

Mr. Kennedy. During the spring of 1956, had you made some 
arrangements with Mr. Donno in connection with his passport? 

Mr. Palminteri. Yes. I went to Mineola to secure a witness 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you drive him in to Mineola at that time? 

Mr. Palminteri. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. During that trip, did he mention to you at all about 
a luncheon meeting that he had had ? 

Mr. Palminteri. He did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell us wliat he said ? 

Mr. Palminteri. I asked how his business was, and he said fairly 
good, he had sold part of it, and that he had been to New York and 
had gone to luncheon. 



6892 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he explain to you why he had this hmcheon ? 

Mr. Palminteri. No ; he did not. 

Mr. Kennedy. Woukl you proceed ? 

Mr. Palminteri. He had a hmcheon, and as he left he asked some 
of the men who he was with — he didn't know all the people there- 
he asked who was there, and the name Anastasia was mentioned. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he mention, at all about Nunzio Squillantf ? 

Mr. Palminteri. He was with Nunzio Squillante. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was with Nunzio Squillante and also ar the 
luncheon he was told was Anastasia, is that correct ? 

Mr. Palminteri. After he left the luncheon, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. He didn't know that Anastasia would be present at 
the luncheon ? 

Mr. Palminteri. That was the conversation, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. He told you that during 1956 ? 

Mr. Palminteri. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all, Mr. Cliairman. 

The Chairman. Are there any questions ? 

If not, thank you very much. 

Call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Tom Nolan. 

The Chairman. Mr. Tom Nolan ? 

Mr. Nolan, you were sworn yesterday, I believe. 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

The Chairman. At that time you gave us your name, address, and 
also yoiir business or occupation ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You are being recalled this morning. You will 
remain under the oath administered yesterday. 

TESTIMONY OF THOMAS F. NOLAN, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 
DAVID I. SHIVITZ— Resumed 

Mr. Noi^\N. Yes. 

The Chairman. At that time you said you desired counsel, a)\d 
your counsel had not been able to arrange it in time. So you re- 
quested that we defer your testimony until today, which we did. You 
are now present. You have your counsel with you. 

Mr. (^ounsel, identify yourself for the record. 

Mr. SiiiviTZ. David I. Shivitz, 271 Madison Avenue, New York 
City. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were a business representative and recording 
secretary of local 818 of the teamsters ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. For what period of time ? 

Mr. Nolan. Well, I was voted in as recording secretary in 1953, 
and I was appointed as business agent in 1953. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any opposition when you ran in 1953? 

Mr. Nolan. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you held that position until what time ? 

Mr. Nolan. ITntil March of 1957. 

Mr. Kennedy. And then you resigned, did you ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, sir. 



i:mproper activities in the labor field 6893 

Mr. Kex xkdy. Aiul vol initarily left that position, is that right 'i 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kexxkdy. As Imsiiiess a<^eiit, Mv. Nohm, where did you operate ? 

Mr. NoLAx. AVell. 1 had no specific territory. 

Mr. Kkxx'edy. All over? 

^Ir. XoLAX'. All over. 

Mr. Kennedy. In the Greater New York area ? 

Mr. Nttr^vN. Yes. 

Ml-. Kennedy. Dnrinji; March of 1955 did you go out to the socalled 
Miracle Mile, on Long Island '''. 

Mr. XoLAN. Yes, sir. 

]\Ir. Kennedy. AVhat was your purpose in g'oing out there ? 

Mr. XoLAX'. Well, there was a lot of business and stores that were 
being serviced by nonunion firms. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you instructed to go around to those stores? 

Mr. XoLAN. I went to those stores. 

Mr. Kennedy. By whom 'i 

Mr. Nolan. By my boss, Bernard Adelstein. 

Mr. Kex-^nedy. l^ernard Adelstein instructed you to go out there ? 

Mr. Nolan. That was my job. That was my assignment. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you to go around and infoim the shops that 
they were dealing with nonunion firms? 

Mr. Nolan. That they were dealing with nonunion rubbisli firms, 
and I requested that they hire a union firm. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have a list with you at that time ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who furnished you that list ? 

Mr. Nolan. The office. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who in the office ? 

Mr, Nolan. My boss, Bernard Adelstein. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Bernard Adelstein furnished you with a list 
that you were to present to the companies ? 

Mr. NoLAx\ Not to the companies. When I went in to these busi- 
ness establishments, I gave them the list, plus my business card, and 
asked that they hire a union rubbish man. 

Mr. Kennedy. You handed them that list as being the list of union 
firms which they could hire, is that right ? 

Mr. Nolan. I told them to pick anybody on that list. 

The Chairman. The Chair presents to you a document which is 
already marked "Exhibit 13" in the record of these hearings, and I 
ask you if that is the document which gives the list of those firms 
that you were suggesting as being members of the union. 

(Document handed to witness, who conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Nolan, Yes, sir. 

The Chairman, That is correct? 

Mr. Nolan. That is the list. 

The Chairman, It is the correct list. Thank you very much. 

Mr, Kennedy. So I can understand it, you went around to these 
companies, these businesses, to inform them that they were using non- 
union cartmen, is that right ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you gave them this list as a list of union cart- 
men, any of which they could select, is that right? 

Ml:f:',0— .'57 — pt. 17 16 



6894 IMPROPER AcnvrriEiS in the labor field 

Mr. Nolan. Eight. I didn't tell them to pick any one special. I 
said, "Here is the list. Choose whoever you wish." 

Mr. Kennedy. And this list had been furnished to you by Bernard 
Adelstein ? 

Mr. Nolan. Right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you familiar with the names or with these 
companies that were on this list ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, I would say "Yes." 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you familiar with the General Sanitation Co. ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know whether General Sanitation Co. was 
union or nonunion? 

Mr. Nolan. To the best of my ability, if it was on that list, it 
should be a union firm. 

Mr. Kennedy. It should be union because it was given to you by 
Bernie Adelstein, is that right ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know who operated and ran the General 
Sanitation Co.? 

Mr. Nolan. To the best of my knowledge, Nunzio Squillante. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was Nunzio Squillante with you at the time you 
went around to these various shops, these various businesses ? 

Mr. Nolan. He was out there, yes. He was soliciting business. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. So as you went into some of these shops and told 
them that they were dealing with nonunion carting firms, Nunzio 
Squillante was with you, is tliat right ? 

Mr. Nolan. He might have been. I don't recall. It is possible. 

Mr. Kennedy. But according to the testimony we have had before 
this committee, he was with you on at least 1 or 2 occasions. 

Mr. Nolan. It is possible. 

Mr. Kennedy. That he was with you. Is that right ? 

Did you know at that time that he was operating a nonunion shop ? 

Mr. Nolan. No, I did not. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that General Sanitation was a nonunion shop ? 

Mr. Nolan. To the best of my knowledge, if his name was on that 
list, I would take it for granted that he had signed a contract with the 
union. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you end up picketing some of these stores? 

Mr. Nolan. I certainly did, 3'es. I had pickets out in front of them. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many of these stores ? 

Mr. Nolan. I don't recall offhand, but I would say about 8 or 10. 

Mr. Kennedy. That you had pickets on ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you realize the implications of putting a picket 
outside a shop because they were using a nonunion firm and you gave 
them a list, on which the company at the top of the list was also 
nonunion ? 

Mr. Nolan. Well, as I told you before, to the best of my knowledge 
it was a union firm. 

Mr. Kennedy. Just because Bernie Adelstein had given you the list ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. So it is completely his responsibility ? 

Mr. Nolan. He gave me the list. I don't know if it is his responsi- 
bility or not, but he gave me that list to hand out. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6895 

The Chairman. Did you personally know anything about this 
General Sanitation Co. ? 

Mr. Nolan. No, sir. 

The Chairman. You had no personal knowledge as to whether it 
was unionized or not ? 

Mr. Nolan. To the best of my knowledge, as I told you before, 
Senator, the name is on there and I 

The Chairman, I said you had no personal knowledge. All the 
information you had was the assumption that arose by reason of the 
name appearing on this list, which was given to you by the head of the 
union, to go around and present to the folks that were not using union 
services ? 

Mr. Nolan. Eight, sir. 

The Chairman. I wanted to find out if you had any person??^ 
knowledge yourself that it was not union. All right. 

Mr. IvENNEDT. I believe that is all. 

Senator McNamara. Mr. Chairman, I have a couple of questions. 

The Chairman. Senator McNamara. 

Senator McNamara. You indicated that you first were elected a? 
recording secretary of this local 813. 

Mr, Nolan, Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Did that automatically make you the business 
agent or was that a subsequent development ? 

Mr. Nolan. No; as I told you before, I was elected as recording 
secretary. 

Senator McNamara. Then you were acting as business agent ? 

Mr. Nolan. I was appointed as business agent. 

Senator McNamara, Who appointed you ? 

Mr, Nolan, Bernard Adelstein, 

Senator McNamara, Who ? 

Mr. Nolan. Bernard Adelstein. Well, the membership voted— I 
mean, he has the power to appoint you through the membership. 

Senator McNamara. Who was he ? ^Vhat was his title ? 

Mr. Nolan. Recording secretary and business manager. My title 
did you want? 

Senator McNamara. I wanted your title. You were recording sec- 
retary ? 

Mr. Nolan. And business agent. 

Senator McNamara, And you were elected to that job ? 

Mr, Nolan. I was elected to recording secretary, and I was ap- 
pointed as business agent. 

Senator McNamara. Who had the authority to appoint you as bus- 
iness agent ? 

Mr. Nolan. Bernard Adelstein. 

Senator McNamara, I didn't hear you, 

Mr. Nolan. Bernard Adelstein. 

Senator McNamara. What was his title in the union ? 

Mr. Nolan. He was the secretary-treasurer and business manager. 

Senator McNamara. You were recording secretary by election, and 
then he had the authority to appoint a business agent, and you were 
so appointed, all of that according to your local bylaws ? 

Mr. Nolan. That is right, sir. 

Senator McNamara, Was recording secretary a paid job? 

Mr. Nolan. Well, it was included in the salary. 



6896 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Senator McNamara. I mean in itself, before you were appointed 
business agent, the recording secretary was a nonpaid job? 

Mr. Nolan. Right. 

Senator McNamara. The job you were elected to carried no salary? 

Ml-. Nolan. Tliat carried a salary ; yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara, How many members did you have in local 
813? 

Mr. Nolan. I would say roughly fifteen or sixteen hundred. 

Senator McNamara. How many ? 

Mr. Nolan. Roughly 1,500 or 1,()(>0, to the best of my knowledge. 

Senator McNamara. Fifteen or sixteen hundred. 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

Seiiator McNamaha. 1 )id you hold reguhir meetings, regular month- 
ly meetings? 

Mr. Nolan. I would say every ;J months, and then when we needed 
a special meeting, we woidd call it. 

Senator McNamara. You would liold only about four meetings a 
^■ear of the meml)ershi}) '. 

Mr. Nolan. And there vrould be meetings in l>etween, special 
meetings. 

Senator McNamara. I^ut legular meetings weie about once every 
8 months ? 

Mr. Nolan. Every 3 months; yes. 

Senator McNamara. Not on regular schedule ? 

Mr. Nolan. Well, it would be the first Wednesday of every 3 months. 

Senator McNamara. Then it was on a regular schedule. 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. The first Wednesday of every quarter ? 

Mr. NoL\N. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. Was there designated a time and place ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. What time ? Eight o'clock ? 

Mr. Nolan. Seven o'clock. 

Senator McNamara. Seven o'clock. 

Mr. Nolan. Or 8 o'clock. It would depend on what time we could 
get the hall. 

Senator McNamara. There wasn't designated a specific time ? 

Mr, Nolan. No . 

Senator McNamara. Did you use the same hall all the time ? 

Mr. Nolan. The same hall ? 

Senator McNamara. As a meeting hall. 

Mr. Nolan. No, sir. 

Senator McNamara. So there was no set time and no set place. It 
would depend on when you could make arrangements and where? 

Mr. Nolan. Well, sir, we used to have our meetings on East 14th 
Street, I think, and then something happened there. The building 
turned into a TV studio or something like that. Then we were u}) on 
Seventh Street and Second Avenue. I don't think. I know that, 
because I attended the meeting. 

Senator McNamara. It was hard for the membership to know ? 

Mr. Nolan. Well, they would have a card mailed to them notifying 
them of the meeting. 

Senator McNamara. Every member got a card mailed to them ? 

Mr. Nolan. To the best of my knowledge ; yes. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES DC THE LABOR FIELD 6897 

Senator M(^Namaka. You were tlie recordinir secret aiT. "Would 
rliat be your resi)onsihility, to see that they are notified? 

Mr. Noi.AN. Well, if some of the workers didn't get a card, he would 
come to you and tell you to put his name on the list and check. 

Senator McNamara. We have had testimony from some of your 
members here in the last couple of days that they were notified of 4 
meetings in 5 years. That is the reason for this line of questionino:. 

Mr. Nolan." Senator, let me answer that. Sometimes people move 
and they didn't notify us. Then when the shop steAvard told them 
about a' meeting or something like that, they would come to us and 
we would make a change in the address. 

Senator McNaineara. These people were substantial jieople. Tliey 
were generally members of the firms that you were doing business 
Avith, who were also members. 

Mr. Shivitz. Mr. Chairman, may I make an observation ? 

The Chairman. You may. 

Mr. Stiivitz. The testimony on that score, I think, was a little bit 
confusing, Senator McNamara. I received the testimony of the wit- 
nesses earlier in the week, and my recollection is that they testified 
there were 4 or 5 meetings over a 5-year period of the cartmen's asso- 
ciation, not of tlie union. That is where the confusion is. 

Senator McNamara. No; you are definitely wrong. This week Ase 
questioned them specifically on union meetings and not on the associa- 
tion. 

Mr. Shivitz. I realize that that was the tenor of the questioning ; 
but, if you Avill recheck the testimony, I think it Avas the first day of the 
hearings, there Avas testimony that the association met merely 4 or 
5 times in a period. That isn't the fact from the information that 
has been made available. 

Senator McNamara. You are referring to one particular day. But 
we had it on several days, specific inquiry as to the union meetings. 
That was the thing I Avas concerned with. That is the reason for this 
line of questioning. It does appear noAv that Ave cnn only conclude 
that there Avas no specific time, there Avas no specific place, even though 
the meetings Avere only once every 8 months. And Avhich is a most 
unusual arrangement for a union, I assure you. 

The Chairman. Another thing. Senator, while you are interrogating 
liim, 5'ou might interrogate him about the right of these folks to vote. 
They had no right to A^ote. to speak, or be heard. 

Senator McNamara. Well, I don't think that is too unusual on the 
face of it. I believe that employers in many instances are forced to 
join unions by reason of the setup and are not alloAved to vote. I am 
not too much concerned Avith that point. 

The Chairman. I Avonld like some information about it. 

Senator McNamara. Well, let's go on a little bit further. Was this 
Bernard Adelstein elected to the job of — what was he ? What Avas his 
title? 

Mr. Nolan. Secretary-treasurer and business manager. 

Senator McNamara. He Avas elected to that job ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, sir. 

Senator McNamara. Was he in the cartage business? Was he in 
the business prior to the election ? 

Mr. Nolan. Not to my knoAvledge, sir. 



6898 IMPROPER ACTIVITTEiS IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Senator McNamara. You don't know anything about the bylaws? 
Do they allow the election of somebody outside of the business ? 

Mr. Nolan. Not to my knowledge, sir. 

Senator McNamara. You don't know whether the bylaws do or do 
not; is that right? 

Mr. Nolan. I don't recall anything in the bylaws about that. 

Senator McNamara. Did you have bylaws ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Nolan. Yes ; we have bylaws. 

Senator McNamara. I would like to ask the chairman : Does the staff 
have a copy of the bylaws of local 813 ? 

Mr. Kennedy. We have them downstairs. 

The Chairman. You better send someone to get them. We may 
need them. 

Senator McNamara. It is a little bit hard for me to accept the fact 
that you did not know that this company which you were recommend- 
ing to take the place of a nonunion company was nonunion. Do you 
have any explanation of that outside the fact that somebody handed 
you the list ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Nolan. Senator, can I clear up one thing? You said that I 
recommended it. I did not. 

Senator McNamara. Yes ; you did. You handed the man the list. 
You said "Pick one of these. These are companies that are satis- 
factory to us." 

Mr. Nolan. I was confused. I thought that you said I recom- 
mended General Sanitation. 

Senator McNamara. I said somebody handed you a list. You say 
that you didn't know there were nonunion people on the list. 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. And you were an officer of the union ? 

Mr. Nolan. Right. 

Senator McNamara. That is all. 

Mr. Nolan. Can I say one other thing, Senator? After being- 
questioned by Mr. Kennedy last Saturday, I find out that that firm has 
a union contract. 

Senator McNamara. Who has a union contract? 

Mr. Nolan. General Sanitation. 

Senator McNamara. Did they have it at the time that you were 
recommending them ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Senator McNamara. They had a contract with your union ? 

Mr. Nolan. They did. 

Senator McNamara. Who was authorized by your local 813 to 
negotiate contracts ? 

Mr. Nolan. Bernard Adelstein. 

Senator McNamara. Who ? 

Mr. Nolan. Bernard Adelstein. 

Senator McNamara. He alone? You didn't have anybody except 
one man ? 

Mr. Nolan. Well, when you negotiate contracts, you would have a 
committee. 

Senator McNamara, Did you have a committee ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 



IIMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6899 

Senator McNamara. Was he a member of tlie committee ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

Senator McNamara. That is all. 

Mr. Kennedy. How did you find out it had a union contract? 

Mr. Nolan. Mr. Bernard Adelstein told me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have the contract with you ? 

Mr. Shivitz. We do, Mr. Kennedy. And let the record show that 
I advised Mr. Kennedy on last Saturday that it was our opinion that 
there was such a contract in existence. When I spoke to Mr. Adler- 
man earlier in the week, I told him that we had located such a con- 
tract. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you get the contract ? 

Mr. SHm:Tz. Sure. Mr. Wolbert has it. He Avill be here later 
this morning. 

Mr. Kennedy. Where is Mr. Wolbert ? 

Mr. Shivitz. He will be here. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you seen the union contract ? 

Mr. Nolan. I have. 

Mr. Kennedy. When were you informed that there w^as a union 
contract ? 

Mr. Nolan. Just 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Kennedy. ^^Hien ? Just now, Mr. Nolan ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Nolan. I think it was Monday or Tuesday. Don't hold me 
to the exact date. 

The Chairman. Who informed you ? 

Mr. Nolan. Mr. Bernard Adelstein. 

The Chairman. Did you inform the staff that you fomid out they 
had a contract ? 

Mr. Nolan. No, sir. \ 

The Chairman. When you were first interrogated, you didn't know 
they had a contract, did you ? 

Mr. Nolan. No, sir. 

The Chairman. You didn't know until a moment ago. In fact, 
when you were first interrogated here, you didn't know they had a 
union contract ; did you ? 

Mr. Nolan. Either Monday or Tuesday, as I said before, I was 
informed. 

The Chairman. I understood you to say in the earlier interroga- 
tion, that you didn't know they had a contract. You assumed they 
did. That is what you said this mOrning on the w^itness stand. 

Mr. Nolan. When you asked me about the card. 

The Chairman. I didn't ask you about the card. About this list, 
if you call that the card, exhibit 13. 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. At that time I didn't recall. 

The Chairman. "At that time I didn't recall," but you had been 
told Monday or Tuesday that they had a contract, when I first inter- 
rogated you about it. 

(At this point Senator McNamara left the hearing room.) 

Mr. Nolan. May I make it clear? When I handed this list out, 
as I said before, I took it for granted that these were union firms. 

The Chairman. I can understand that. I can understand you to 
take it for granted that they were all union, when you handled it 



6900 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

that way. I am not qiiestionino- you about that. But what I am 
questioning you about is that rioht now it appears to me that you 
have just gotten information that they had a union contract. In 
your earlier testimony this morning, when I asked you about it, you 
said you assumed that they had a contract. 

Mr. Shivitz, Senator, if I may 

The Chairman. I want the witness to answer. That is the way 
it appears from your testimony. You say you tliink you got the 
information, now- you say Monday or Tuesday. 

Mr. Nolan. Monday or Tuesday of this week. 

Tl^e Ctl\irman. I can't understand why you didn't know about it 
when I asked you about it. 

Mr. Shi"v^tz. This witness was asked, when he handed the list out, 
was he under the impression that this was a union company. 

The Chairman. Well, I think the record will speak for itself. If 
I make an erroi', the recoi'd Avill reflect it, and if you are in error, 
likewise. 

Pioceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. If they have a contract, certainly the dues are paid 
by the members '( 

Mr. Nolan. To the best of my knowledge they would be. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is the common procedure ; is it not ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were there any dues or welfare payments made by 
General Sanitation ? 

Mr. Nolan. I called the office and they tell me 

Mr. Kennedy. Just answer the question. When you had this con- 
versation with Mr. Adelstein, did you also discuss whether any dues 
were paid or any welfare-fund payments ( 

Mr. Nolan. No; I did not. 

Mr. Kennedy. You didn't discuss that ^ You didn't talk about 
that at all ? 

Mr. Nolan. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know if that happened ? 

Mr. Nolan. I Avouldn't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. The books certainly would reflect it if it happened, 
would they not ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is a connnon procedure, is it not ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know of any cases in which a company has a 
contract Avhere no dues are paid and no pension and welfare payments 
are made? 

Mr. Nolan. W^ell. it is mostly all mailed in. Most of it is mailed in. 

Mr. Kennedy. But do you know of any company wdiich has a con- 
tract where that is not done ? 

Mr. Nolan. To the best of my knowledge, no. 

Mr. Kennedy. You don't know of any company in AA'hich that is 
done ? 

Mr. Nolan. To the best of my knowledge, no. 

Mr. Kennedy. But as far as you know, the dues are always paid by 
a company, is that right ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6901 

Mr. Nolan. They are mailed in. They are notified. 

Mr. Kennedy. If there is a contract. 

Mr. Nolan. If there is a contract; yes sir. They are mailed in and 
notified about it. 

Mr. Kennedy. So the books of the union would reflect such a pay- 
ment and the books of the company would reflect it. The books of the 
union would reflect the receipt of the payment and the books of the 
company should reflect the dues pajanent, is that correct? 

Mr. Nolan. It should, sir. 

JNIr. Kennedy. If the dues were made. And the same thing for 
welfare funds, is that right ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. What arej^oiir duties as recording secretary ? 

Mr. Nolan. To take the minutes. 

Mr. Kennedy. To take the minutes ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

The Chairman. Did you keep accurate minutes ? 

Mr. Nolan. I took notes at meetings. 

The Chairman. Did you take accurate minutes at meetings ? 

Mr. NoLx^N. To the best of my ability, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. We have another name here on the list, Merval 
Decabia. Was that a union sliop ? 

Mr. Noi^\N. To the best of my knowledge. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. DeCabia testified before this committee that none 
of his employees were members of the union. He had five employees 
and none of them were members of the vmion. There were no dues and 
no welfare payments for his employees. 

Would you explain that ? 

Mr. Nolan. I don't know anything about that. 

Mr. Kennedy. But this list was furnished by Mr. Bernard Adel- 
stein ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. You have no explanation as to why any of his em- 
ployees were members of the union, and yet you went around and gaA'e 
this as an acceptable company, a union concern, is that right ? 

Mr. Nolan. Because it was given to me. 

Mr. Kennedy. By Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. Nolan. Yes. 

The Chairman. All right. You may stand aside. 

(Jail the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we are going now into the New York 
City Cartmen's Association. We would like to call the president of 
that, Mr. James Rosetti. Mr. Rosetti was the one, according to the 
information we have, that was responsible for hiring the professor. 
I would like to determine why he was hired and the relationship 
between Mr. Rosetti and Mr. Squillante. 

Tlie Chairman. Be sworn, Mr. Rosetti. 

You do solemnly swear the evidence you shall give before this 
Senate select committee will be the truth, the whole truth, and noth- 
ing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. RosET'n. I do. 



6902 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES ROSETTI, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL, 

lEVING BUSH 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. KosETTi. My name is James Kosetti, 823 Hollywood Avenue, 
Bronx, N. Y. 

The Chairman. Wliat is your business or occupation, Mr. Rosetti? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Tlie Chairman. You have counsel present ? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Counsel, you may stand aside until your client 
acknowledges you. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Rosetti. Irving Bush. 

The Chairman. Will you identify yourself for the record, counsel. 

Mr. Bush. Irving Bush, 41 East 42d Street, New York City. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, according to the information we have, 
Mr. Rosetti is president of the Greater New York Cartmen's Asso- 
ciation, and has been president since its inception. 

Would you tell us if that is true? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr, Kennedy. Mr. Rosetti, also, according to the information we 
have, was the one who gave Vincent James Squillante his start. Mr. 
Squillante was first hired by Mr. Rosetti in the Greater New York 
Cartmen's Association. It was from there that Mr. Squillante was 
able to spread out into Nassau and Suffolk Counties. 

I would like to ask you if that is true. 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. What kind of a gang do you have up there, that you 
all can't tell about your business? "Wliat kind of a gang of hoodlums 
is it? I ask you seriously. Can you tell us that? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Kennedy. IVliat I would like to find out would be why Mr. 
Rosetti hired Mr. Squillante, what Mr. Squillante's qualifications 
were for his job, and who recommended Mr. Squillante to Mr. Rosetti 
in the New York Cartmen's Association. 

Tlie Chairman. What does this fellow do in New York ? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. What does he do ? 

Mr. Kennedy. He is president of the Cartmen's Association in 
New York City. 

Senator Ives. May I ask a question, Mr. Chairman ? 

I don't think I can get anything out of the witness, and probably 
his counsel doesn't Avant him to talk. I will ask our counsel. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6903 

Just exactly what area does this Cartmen's Association in New 
York City emtjrace '? 

The Chairman. Mr. Kelly has been sworn. 

Mr. Kelly. This Cartraen's Association embraces membership firms 
in the Bronx, the area of Manhattan and Queens. 

Senator Ives. Nothing in Kings ? 

Mr. King. Kings has its own association. 

Senator Ives. Thank you. 

Mr. Kelly. And Brooklyn, likewise. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us anything about why it was that 
you retained Mr. Squillante, Mr. Rosetti ? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. We have had testimony that Mr. Squillante was the 
prominent figure in the Mafia, that he was involved in policy, that he 
was involved in narcotics during this period of time. Did you know 
all of that? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. It is my understanding also, Mr. Rosetti, that when 
the Stork Club was having its difficulties, that you and Mr. Squil- 
lante went by there and said that you could straighten out the dif- 
ficulties, and be able to bring your cartmen through the strike. Is 
that true? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. What connections did you have that would permit 
you to be able to settle that strike and be able to bring the deliveries 
through at the Stork Club, Mr. Rosetti ? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you take your instructions on what you did 
from Mr, Squillante ? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Senator Ives. Mr. Chairman, I would like to make one more in- 
quiry. Has this witness been sentenced for any offense of any kind? 

Mr. Kennedy. Not that I know of. 

Senator Ives. Is he imder indictment ? 

]\lr. Kennedy. Not that I know of. 

Senator Ives. He has no real reason, then, that you know of, for 
refusing to answer on the grounds that the answer might tend to in- 
criminate him ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Except what we have developed so far in his rela- 
tions with Mr. Squillante and the underworld in New York City. I 
expect Mr. Rosetti has a good deal of information regarding that, and 
also the connection of Mr. Bernie Adelstein and local 813 in this 
whole operation. I think he could be very helpful to the committee. 
I don't know how far he is personally involved in it. It is possible 
that that is the reason he refuses to answer, Senator. 

Senator Ives. Can we get all of that into our record ? I would like 
to know who some of these birds are that we have. 

Mr. Kennedy. From Albert Anastasia's home. Senator Ives, there 
were 18 telephone calls to the New York City Cartmen's Association. 



6904 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IK THE LABOR FIELD 

The CiiAiKMAx. Over wliat period of time? 

Mr. Kennedy. July 1956 to Jnniiary 1957. 

The Chairman. A period of 5 or 6 liionths? 

Mr. Kennedy. Six mouths. 

The Chairman. How many calls ? 

]\Ir. Kennedy. From Anastasia to the association. 

The Chairman. That is about three a month. Go aliead. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us why it was necessary to be in 
touch with Albert Anastasia so frequently ? 

Mr. RosETTi. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Also, according to the information we have, it was 
you that hired the ])rofessor, Don Modica. Can you tell us at whose 
suggestion you hired the professor? 

Mr, RosETTi. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did the professor tutor you a little bit ? 

Mr. EosETTi. I I'efuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did he tutor your children ? 

Mr. RosETTi. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Would it tend to incriminate them to have him 
tutor them? 

Mr. RosETTi. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman, Proceed, Mr. Counsel. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know of the connection between the pro- 
fessor and Albert Anastasia when you hired him? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the professor was tutoring young Albert Anas- 
tasia in your office? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds tliat the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you understand that the professor was there 
as a watchdog for Albert Anastasia ? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us anything about the tieup between 
your association of cartmen and the underworld in Xew York City, 
particularly the Mafia ? 

Mr. Rosetti. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all, Mr. Chairman. 

Senator Ix^s. Mr. Chairman, all of this testimony we are getting 
is definitely opening a rather sinister note as we go along. The other 
day we discovered that the Mafia is involved directly in the control 
of this operation on Long Island, apparently, the greater city of 
New York — at least in these three counties where this particular asso- 
ciation is concerned. It occurs to me that it might be a good idea to 
have an investigation to find out how much the Mafia is concerned 
in the activities of the teamsters generally. You have a great deal 
of racketeering and corruption in tJie teamsters that we know of. How 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6905 

iniich is the Mafia responsible for that? Have we anv record on 
that? 

Mr. Kennedy. We have some information, Senator. 

Senator Ives. I wisli we conld devek)p it. 

Mr. Kennedy. I think in the conrse of the liearin^rs tliat we exi)ect 
to have next year there will be more information rej^ardinii' the 
Mafia. 

Senator Ives. All right. 

The Chairman. As I nnderstand, these calling- companies are 
licensed by the city, or by some governing anthority, at least, in tlie 
State of New York. Is that correct ? 

Mr. RosETTi. I refnse to answer on the gronnds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. All I can say to you, sir, is I hope, in view of your 
attitude that it might tend to incriminate you if you got a license, I 
hope the State of New York or the city of New York, or the Govern- 
ment authorities, in view of that reflection upon them, will refute 
it by revoking the license. I would have to be serving on a board 
granting licenses to people like you, and have you take the statement 
under oath, make a statement under oath, that to say you were 
licensed by that board might tend to incriminate you. I think they 
can move to incriminate you by simply canceling your license. 

Senator Ives. I would suggest, Mr, Chairman, that we send this 
information to the State of New York, the attorney general and other 
people. 

The Chairman. The transcript of this testimony may be made 
available to any of the authorities in New York. We have to get to 
a point some clay so we can determine whether this Government is 
bigger than gangsters, hoodlums, and crooks, or whether they are 
running the country. 

Senator I^^ES. I agree with you on that, Mr. Chairman. We are 
going to beat this thing, if it is the last thing we do. We can beat it. 

The Chairman. That is what I am saying. We have to beat it or 
they are going to take over. 

All right. Call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Anne Daria, Mr, Chairman, secretary for the Greater 
New York Cartmen's Association. 

The Chairman, What is the name ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Anne Daria. 

The Chairman. Will you be sworn, please ? 

You do solemnly swear the evidence you shall give before this Senate 
select committee will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the 
truth, so help you God ? 

Miss Daria. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF ANNE DAEIA, ACCOMPANIED BY HER COUNSEL, 

IRVING BUSH 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or employment, please. 

Miss Daria. My name is Anne Daria. I live at 2400 Maclay Avenue, 
Bronx, N. Y. 

The Chairman. By whom are you employed ? 



6906 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer might 
tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairmax, Do you have counsel present ? 

Miss Daria. I have. 

The Chairmax. Counsel, you may identify yourself for the record. 

Mr. Bush. Irving Bush, 41 East 'i2d Street, New York City. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, the interesting point of Anne Daria is 
the fact that she was secretary of the Greater New York Cartmen's 
Association, and that she worked for James Rosetti and Vincent J. 
Squillante. I would like to ask her about what arrangements there 
were for Vincent J. Squilhinte to be hired by the New York Cart- 
men's Association. 

Would you tell me about that ? 

Miss Daria. I beg your pardon? I wasn't listening. I am sorry. 

Mr. Kennedy. Tell me if you know Vincent J. Squillante. 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy'. Would you tell us how he happened to be hired by 
the New York Cartmen's Association? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy'. And what work he was doing for the New York 
Cartmen's Association? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman, Are you under threats if you testify here ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy'. Can you tell us about Squillante bringing in his 
nephew, Jerry Mancuso, and being put on the payroll of the New 
York Cartmen's Association? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy'. Do you know anything about the Cartmen's defense 
fund, Miss Daria ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy". Do you know anything about the Carters Investors 
Corp.? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy'. You are accounting secretary for the Carters In- 
vestors Corp. ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know Mr. Dante Gallo ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know who Dante Gallo is ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is it not true that for a period of time you lived 
at Mr. Dante Gallo's home ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6907 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we have evidence and information 
that Miss Daria lived at Dante Gallo's home for a period of time. 

Did you know about Mr. Gallo's criminal record ^ 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Eesimied 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Kelly, do you have Mr. Gallo's background ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir; I do. Dante Gallo is also known as Danny 
Lee. He is known to the New York Police Department under B No. 
145150. It shows his first arrest on April 29, 1928, as Dominick Gallo 
from the Bronx, burglary. 

On September 7, 1930, as Dante Gallo in the Bronx, robbery and 
assault. He was connnitted to Elmira Reformatory in 1930, indeter- 
minate sentence. 

Now, on October 24, 1933, as Dante Gallo of the Bronx, he applied 
for treatment of a gunshot wound at Fordham Hospital, and he told 
them there he had been shot in tlie right forearm and the right but- 
tock and claims he received these wounds Vvdiile standing on the corner 
of 225th Street and White Plains Avenue, He said he did not know 
why he had been shot. 

On May 7, 1936, as Dante Gallo, he was arrested in Manhattan 
under the Code of Criminal Procedure and discharged on the follow- 
ing day. 

On October 2, 1946, as Dante Gallo, he was arrested in Manhattan, 
criminally receiving, and this case was dismissed. 

On November 18, 1946, he was arrested in the Bronx for 986 of the 
penal law, and on the 26th of November of 1946 he received a $75 
fine in gamblers court. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know all of that about Mr. Gallo? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have something further ? 

Mr. Kelly. Investigation, Mr. Kennedy, reveals that Dante Gallo 
lived at 2305 Vance Avenue in the Bronx. This is an address that 
I believe the witness is familiar with. While Gallo was living there, 
it was also the address of the "Bum Brothers," mentioned yesterday, 
Theodore and Benjamin DeMartino, who are on the major violators 
of the Federal Narcotics Bureau. 

TESTIMONY OF ANNE DARIA— Resumed 

The Chairman. Plow long have you been in with that gang? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. I agree with you. 

Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us how the New York cartmen's 
defense fund was set up ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 



690S IMPROPER ACTrvrriES in the labor field 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, didn't 3'^ou handle the checks for the Xew York 
cartmen's defense fund ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the <i:round the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you liandled the checks and deposited them at 
the Royal State Bank in the Bronx i 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground tlie answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why did you select the Royal State Bank in the 
Bronx i* 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the around the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. When j\Ir. Anastasia called at the office or tele- 
plioned at the office, did you talk to him ( 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ii;;rou)id the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kjennedy. You answered the telephone at that office; did you 
not? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, I would like to put into the record 
the background on the cartmen's defense fund, and how it originated 
and what happened to the money. 

If Miss Daria Mill not help us or assist us, maybe one of our in- 
vestigators could testify as to what the record shows. 

The Chairman. Let him come around and we will interrogate him 
and then interrogate the witness about her knowledge regarding it. 

He might make some mistake and I suggest you listen closely and 
you might want to correct it. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Eesumed 

Mr. Kelly. The minutes of the meetings of the Greater Xew York 
Cartmen's Association, which were held June T, 1956, at the Vasa 
Temple in the Bronx, N. Y., indicate that Vincent James Squillante 
discussed the necessity of starting a defense fund for the members of 
the carting industry. 

I am reading from the minutes now and we liave tliese in our 
possession. 

Ml-. Squillante stiirted by describing what happened to the association in 
Suffolk County. He reported that he represented a group of tiO members at a 
rate of .$100 per year a fii-m. 

Mr. Squillante requested the board of directors to meet in order to submit 
his resignation. He reported that Xewsday reported tlie event .is a discharge 
of Mr. Squillante. He also represented the Intercounty Association and daring 
this time he was sub.iected to attack by newspapers as a racketeer. The news- 
paper showed his picture and others. 

This attack was started by the National Republican Party and was then taken 
up by Gulleta. He directed the president of the Intercounty Cartmen's Asso- 
ciation to discharge .limmy Squillante and .lerry Mancuse. 

He reported that GuUeta's men ran the meeting. In spite of the fact that 
.Timmy Squillante and Jerry Mancuse were placed under arrest and were unable 
to attend, the vote was favorable to Jimmy Squillante and Jerry Mancuse. 

Another me^^ting was called with secret ballot. Present were 6 detectives, 
2 attorneys, and representatives of the press. Ballot showed 27 to 4 in favor 
of Jimmy Scpiillante and Jerry Mancuse. 

Vincent Squillante revealed to the membership that due to the fact that he 
failed to file a return one year he was convicted of a misdemeanor. He was 



IMPROPER ACTIVrnES IN THE' LABOR FIELD 6909 

fined and placed on probation for 3 years. At the completion of his 3-year term, 
he was given an additional 2-year probation period because it was charged that 
he had not made an honest effort to pay his taxes. 

He also stated he was being attacked by the attorney general's office, 
to summarize this, Senator. The attorney general's office, the city 
commissioner of investigation, Tenney, and Mr. Gulotta, the D. A. in 
Nassau County, and Frank Hogan, the district attorney in Manhattan. 

He stated that the only plan of defense was to engage the best legal 
service, the biggest legal mind. "We do not stand a chance, otherwise," 
was his conclusion. He advised that the members had to be prepared 
to spend substantial sums of money in order to engage this type of 
counsel. 

He advised that there had to be collective action, all members should 
forget their own individual problems and band together to meet the 
attack. He advised that each individual should not wait until he is 
touched and then attempt to defend himself individually. He called 
for action along the line of deciding what action should be taken "to 
defend ourselves." 

The Chairman. Wlio is that doing this talking ? 

Mr. Kelly. This is Mr. Vincent Squillante, sir. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Is he your boss ? 

MissDARiA. "V^niiat is that ? 

The Chairman. Is that fellow your boss, this Squillante ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the ground the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kelly. Mr. Squillante stated the only method of fighting was 
to retain the services of a reputable, large legal firm and the only way 
to engage such a firm is with money. Mr. Squillante stated that if he 
could obtain 5 minutes' time on television, he would personally bor- 
row all of the money necessary to give his story to the public, but it 
would take large funds of which he does not possess. 

Mr. Kennedy. I might say there that Mr. Squillante will be called 
this afternoon. 

The Chairman. He will be given an opportunity then, before tele- 
vision to tell his story. 

Mr. Kennedy. And it will all be free. 

The Chairman. Yes, it will be. 

Mr. Kelly (reading) : 

Mr. Rossetti, the previous witness, then reported that he had been subjected 
to vilification just to help the industry^ He has, personally, nothing but head- 
aches as a result of all of his work for the industry and his years of painstaking 
leadership. 

Mr. Joseph Melillo advised the organization that the contribution was to be 
voluntary and was to be set up in a special defense fund. A figure of $250 per 
truck was agreed upon. A committee was appointed to administer the cartmen's 
defense fund as follows : 

Michael Fidanza, George DeLalla, Frank Sabatolli, Louis Zassarino, and Wil- 
liam Tedesee. 

The Chair reported that the body had agreed to voluntarily contribute $250 
per truck to be used as follows : 

Mr. Kennedy. This is the important part, as to how the money was 
to be used. 

89330— 57— pt. 17 17 



Mr. Kex-ly (reading) : 

1. For the defense of the association and its members. 

2. For the defense of Vincent J. Squillante (in any shape or form) . 

3. For the defense of any cartman, regardless of membership (if any), area, 
color, or creed. 

4. For publicity, investigations and research. 

5. Toward any charities, for the benefit of mankind. 

The Chairman. There is a little noble sentiment expressed there 
for a change, 

Mr. Kelly (reading) : 

The Chair asked for a standing vote of confidence for Mr. Squillante and Mr. 
Rossetti and asked that the body refuse to accept the resignations. 

The minutes are signed, "John Jay Torti," and they are approved by 
S. Theodore Feingold, who incidentally, was the accountant for the 
Greater New York Cartmen's Association. 

The Chairman. What is the date of those minutes ? 

Mr. Kelly. June 7, 1956, Senator. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could we have these made an exhibit ? 

The Chair3ian. They may be made exhibit 26. 

(Tlie document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 26" for refer- 
ence and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, I would like to point out, Mr. Chairman, that 
as Mr. Kelly read these minutes, the purpose of the fund was to 
protect tlie association and then it gives the five specific purposes. 

Now, I would like to ask you, Mr. Kelly, did you find that they did 
go ahead and raise some money ^ 

Mr. Kelly. The special meeting held of the Association of Trade 
Waste Removers of Greater New York, which is a downtown asso- 
ciation of cartmen, was held on June 12, 1956, at the Second Avenue 
Manor, New York City. 

Mr. Squillante, under the heading "New business," states : 

Mr. .Tames Squillante, our labor-relations counsel, advised us of investiga- 
tions being conducted by the attorney general's office of the State of New York, 
and the district attorney of New York County. These investigations were aimed 
to prove conspiracy, restraint of trade, and monopolistic practices on the part 
of tlie private sanitation industry. 

In view of the fact that the membership of the association was completely 
unconcerned and indifferent to the injustice of these investigations, Mr. Squil- 
lante tenders his I'esignation as labor-relations counsel to the association. 

The citation of the investigations and the act of resignation by Mr. Squillante 
caused considerable discussion among the members. As a result of this discus- 
sion upon a motion made by Joseph Prelirmo and seconded by Nick Dirago, it 
was resolved that a fund be created to defend the industry, and it was further 
established that a voluntary contribution of $250 per truck be made. 

The purpose of this fund was to retain eminent legal counsel to represent the 
industry and to retain a public-relations firm on behalf of the industry, and to 
do any and all other things requisite for the benefit of the industry. 

It states that if the fund is not entirely used, it will be reduced. The 
date is June 12, 1956. 

The Chairman. Did the rates to the customers go up along about 
that time? 

Mr. Kelly. I have no independent observation, but I would suspect 
it. 

The Chairman. I imagine that fund was all passed on to the people 
they were serving? 

Mr. Kelly. We are getting to that now. 

The Chairman. I would like to see what happened. 



La:>»j xx\ xrxih UAtiUtl I'liDIJjD byii 



Mr Kelia^ The caTtmen's defense fund opened an account in the 
Koyal State Bank of New York City on June 11, 1956. They opened 
this account with checks totaling $1,500. On the following day 
June 12, they deposited an additional $2,750 at one time and $47240 at 
another time on the same date, all in checks. 

e^lhemT'"''^^ ' ^^^^"^^^ ^"""^ '^''^^^''^ ^^^^^^ ^^'^^'"''^ ^"^ ''''' "''""^^ ^^'^® ^'^ 
Mr. Kelly. The figures for June 11, 1956, the deposit totaled $1,500 
m checks For June 12, there were 2 deposits, one of $2,750 in checks 
and another of $4,250 m checks, a grand total of $8,500. 
1 he Chairman. That was in 3 days' time ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct, sir. Actually it was 2 days, Senator. 
Ihe Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Kelly. Now, on the 14th of June, there was then $8,500 in the 
balance and uncollected checks. On the 14th of June, a deposit of 
Jl5b,^60 m checks was made. There was another deposit of $.3 000 in 
check and again these were uncollected funds. 
However, on the 14th of June, we find a check from the account 
1 !? f '\^^V"^^' ® defense fund made out to the Royal State Bank 
and dated June 14, 1956, in the amount of $14,215.99. At the slme 
time, there IS a cashier's check received from the bank made out to 
Vincent J. bquillante for the identical amount. 
The Chairman. What is the amount of that check « 
Mr. Kelly. $14,215.99. The endorsement on this check reads : 
Pay to the order of the Director of Internal Revenue, for 1948 and 1941) income 
taxes, penalties and interest in full, Vincent .J. Squillante. income 

The Chairman So. Mr. Squillante had himself a pretty nice racket 
o± taking care of his income tax. 

Mr. Kelly. The story gets more interesting as we go alono- 

Ihe Chairman. We will see if we can stand it 
1^?^"'' J^?^^^^^^: Th^ ^ijoney came out of the bank, actually, on the 
hT! 1. 1 """^.'i i?^"'/T^' aPPi'oximately over $14,000 came out of 

Mr. Kelly. Some of that I believe was uncollected funds 
Mr. Kennedy Do we have any explanation as to why this par- 
ticular bank would make such a transaction ? 

Mr. Kelly. I have my own explanation of that, Mr. Kemiedv, but 
no omcial one. " ' 

The Chairman. Let us get these checks in the record. The Chair 
^U pT^'^qq a^ P^^^^ostiitic copy of a check No. 9290 in the amount of 
$14,215.99, drawn on the Royal State Bank of New York, exhibit 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No 27" for refer- 
ence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7042.) 

The Chairman. I will make the original check drawn in thf- 
amount of $14,215.99 made payable to the^Royal B^nk of N^v Yorf 
signed by George De Lalla and Michael Fidanza, exhibit No 28 ' 

( Ihe document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 28" for refer- 
ence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7043 ) 

,^7^^^ S^^'^^"^"^-^^.- ^^I understand, this money was withdrawn from 
this cartmen s defense fund as shown by this check 
Mr. Kelly. That is correct. 



6912 IMPROPER ACnVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman", And placed in another bank or a cashier's check 
was bought from the other bank. 

Mr. Kelly. That is right, sir. 

The Chairman. And it has on it the endorsement — and let me see 
that endorsement on exhibit 27, please. 

(A document was handed to the chairman.) 

The Chairman. The endorsement on the back of the check says, 
"Pay to the order of Director of Internal Revenue for 1948 and 1949 
income taxes, penalties and interest in full, Vincent J. Squillante." 

That is the check with which his income tax was paid, and it came 
out of this defense fund. 

Mr. Kelly. That was one of the checks. 

The Chairman. We will go along. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why was it necessary for Mr. Squillante to have 
this check drawn on the 14th of June ? 

Mr. Kelly. Because there was a crash program in progress, Mr. 
Kennedy, in which the attorney had notified the Federal payroll 
agency that the taxes would be paid by the 15th. 

Mr. Kennedy. So he had to get the money by the 14th of June ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. As far as this bank making these imusual arrange- 
ments, does that bank have a large number of racketeers as its custo- 
mers? 

Mr. Kelly. It seems to be a popular watering place for them, Mr. 
Kennedy. They all seem to congregate there. 

Mr. Kennedy. At that bank ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct, sir. 

On June 15, the following day, there was another check made out 
on the checks of the cartmen's defense fund, care of M. Fidanza, 402 
West 14th Street, New York City, dated June 15, 1956, paid to the 
order of Royal State Bank of New York, $1,433.75. It is signed by 
George DeLalla, secretary, and Michael Budanz. 

The Chairman. Let that check be made exhibit No. 29. 

(Document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 29" for reference 
and will be found in the appendix on p. 7044.) 

Mr. Kelly. The Royal State Bank then gives a check on the same 
date to H. Jordan Lee, who was the attorney for Mr. Squillante in 
these tax matters, for the same amount. 

The Chairman. Let that check be made exhibit No. 30. 

(Document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 30" and will be 
found in the appendix on p. 7045.) 

Mr. Kelly. Then there is another check on the cartmen's defense 
fund, the same date, June 15, 1956, the same bank. Royal State Bank 
of New York, for $1,564.20, with the same signatures. 

The Chairman. That may be made exhibit No. 31. 

(Document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 31" and will be 
found in the appendix on p. 7046.) 

Mr. Kelly. The bank gives them a check with the same date, made 
out to H. Jordan Lee, in the same amount. 

The Chairman. That will be made exhibit No. 32. 

(Document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 32" and will be 
foimd in the appendix on p. 7047.) 

The Chairman. Does the last check show what it is in payment 
for? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6913 

Mr. KJELLT. Both of those checks to Jordan Lee are endorsed "For 
deposit only, H. Jordan Lee, special." 

The Chairman. ^Yh.o is H. Jordan Lee ? 

Mr. IvELLY. The attorney for Vmcent J. Squillante in these tax 
matters. 

The Chairman. He got two checks ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. How much do they total? In round numbers, 
$3,000? 

Mr. Kelly. A little over $3,000. 

The Chairman. A little more than $3,000. So he not only paid his 
income tax, interest and penalties thereon, but also paid his attorney 
out of this defense fund ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Kelly. He didn't pay the attorney, sir. He made the checks 
out to the attorney and the attorney paid the State tax, to New York 
State. The total, as far as taxes are concerned, is $17,213.94. There 
was additional money taken out. Senator ; $5,300 was taken out of this 
cartmen's defense fund and paid to John T. Lynch, who is a private 
investigator. I believe he is located in Detroit, Mich. 

The stubs of the checks on the defense fund indicate that this is for 
research. A check or checks totaling $2,250 are made out to Mr. 
Geary, R. J. Geary. 

The Chairman. You are testifying now from the stubs of the 
checks ? 

Mr. Kelly. From notes that were made, sir. "We have the check- 
book here, I believe. 

The Chairman. You have examined the checkbook ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes. 

The Chairman. What you are stating is accurate as reflected by 
the checkbook ? 

Mr. Kelly. The check stubs reflect that this was for legal services. 

Mr. Kennedy, Wlio was this to ? 

Mr. Kelly. To Mr. R. J. Geary. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was the attorney that appeared yesterday? 

Mr. Kelly. There was a $1,000 check to Miller, Green & Bush, also 
for legal services, and a check for $794.14 to Arnold Roseman, for the 
same purposes. That totals $26,558.08. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were those attorney fees all in connection with Mr. 
Squillante or his brother ? 

Mr. Kelly. The attorney fees were explained by Squillante him- 
self in a signed statement, when he was talking about regarding this 
as a loan. They were listed as "Expenses in connection with action 
against officials of Nassau County, on behalf of myself, Nunzio Squil- 
lante, and Gennaro Mancuso." 

Mr. Kennedy. He was upset because the district attorney out in 
Nassau County was investigating him ; is that right ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is an understatement, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So he used some of this money to hire investigators 
and hired attorneys for himself, his brother, and nephew to investi- 
gate the district attorney ? 

Mr. Kelly. And the county of Nassau. 

Mr. Kennedy. The county officials in Nassau County ? 

Mr. I^LLY. That is right, sir. 



6914 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. So the total out of the defense fund that was used 
on behalf of Vincent J. Squillante was approximately $26,000 ? 

Mr. Kelly. $26,558.08. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is to pay his taxes, both Federal and State, and 
to investigate the officials of Suffolk County ? 

Mr. Kelly. Nassau County. 

Mr. Kennedy. And to pay attorney fees? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you made a study to find out how much money 
they raised ? 

Mr. Kelly. They raised a total of $57,855; $51,855 of this money 
came from the Greater New York Cartmen's Association, and the 
balance of $6,000 came from the Association of Trade Waste Ee- 
movers of Greater New York. 

The Chairman. I wonder if there would be an income tax due on 
this money ? 

Mr. Kelly. I will explain how he gets around that. Senator. 

On October 31, 1956, after local newspapers had revealed this wind- 
fall, Mr. Squillante writes a letter to the cartmen's defense fund at 
1078 Madison Avenue, which is the address of the Greater New York 
Cartmen's Association — the address on the checks was on 14th 
Street 

The Chairman. Do you have the letter ? 

Mr. Kelly. I have a carbon copy of the letter, but it is signed by 
Vincent J. Squillante. 

The Chairman, Signed by Squillante ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct, sir. 

The Chairman. Read the letter. 

Mr. KJELLY. (reading) : 

.Cartmen's Defense Fund, 

101 Madison Avenue, Neic York, N. Y. 
I hereby agree to pay to the cartmen's defense fund the sum of $26,558.08, 
less $1,500 heretofore paid in installments of $50 weekly. 

There was another letter preceding this in July in which he agrees 
to pay them $50 weekly. 

This agreement shall supersede the previous agreement to repay the sum of 
$17,213.94— 

that was the figure just for the repayment of taxes with interest — 

loaned to me by the defense fund for the payment of Federal and State income 
taxes, including penalties and interest. 

The above amount of $26,558.08 consists of the following amounts loaned to me: 
States and Federal income taxes, including penalties and interest, $17,213.94; 
expenses in connection with actions against oflScials of the Nassau County on be- 
half of myself, Nunzio Squillante, and Gennaro Mancuso as follows: John T. 
Lynch, $5,700 ; P. J. Beary, $2.250 ; Miller, Green & Bush, $1,000 ; Arnold Rose- 
man, $794.14. A total of $26,558.08, less paid on account, $1,500 a balance of 
$25,058.08. 

It is signed "Vincent J. Squillante." 

The Chairman. Those letters may be made exhibits Nos. 33 and 34. 

(Documents referred to were marked "Exhibits Nos. 33 and 34," 
for reference and may be found in the files of the Select Committee.) 

The Chairman. So he gets around paying taxes on this money by 
treating it as a loan ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6915 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir. There are other payments made from this 
fund for leojal fees. Michael A. Castaldi got $7,500 ; Miller, Green & 
Bush, $3,650 ; Arnold Roseman, $500 ; and Joseph F. Minutolo, $800, 
a total of $12,450 for legal fees. 

For advertising and ]3ublicity, the Coordinated Advertising Corp., 
$7,718; the Brooklyn Weekly and Brooklyn Daily, Inc., $250; and 
Emanuel M. Cohen, $500, a total of $8,468. 

For office equipment, $477.45; for office expenses, $889.45; for ac- 
counting fees, $350, and bank charges, $2.25, bringing the total to 
$47,695.23, including the moneys given to Squillante. 

On October 31, 1956, the bank statement showed a balance in the 
fund of $12,734.77. 

Mr. Kennedy. The way he was getting around the loan was first 
saying he was going to repay the money at $50 a week ; is that right ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is right, Mr. Kennedy. But the second agreement 
that he makes has no date or specifies no terms of repayment. 

The Chairman. And it supersedes the first agreement. 

Mr. I^LLY. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. So the first time he said he was going to repay at 
$50 a week and in the second he said he would repay at some other 
time. 

Mr. Kelly. He would repay, period. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is all. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further ? 

TESTIMONY OF ANNE DAEIA, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, IRVING 

BUSH— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. Miss Anne Daria handled the checks, according to 
the information we have, of the cartmen's defense fund. 

Can you tell us anything about what Mr. Kelly testified about? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know all of this money was going to 
Vincent J. Squillante ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Who is the boss of the defense fund ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the grounds the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Are you the dominant power that controls this 
operation ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the grounds the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Wouldn't you like to tell us who is ? 

Miss Darl\. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy, It says here it is for the defense of Vincent J. Squil- 
lante, after it says for the defense of tlie association and its members. 
Was it understood that that meant that he could pay his taxes with 
the money ? 



6916 IMPROPER ACnVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the grounds the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. I guess you can use a typewriter ; can't you ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the grounds the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. That might tend to incriminate you, too. 

Well, would you take a look at this exhibit No. 26 and state whether 
you typed the original or not ? 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 

(The witness conferred with her counsel.) 

The Chairman. Do you recall having typed the original ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the grounds the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you see anything in there that might be incrim- 
inating ? 

Miss Daria. I refuse to answer on the grounds the answer may tend 
to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Mrs. Watt, remove it, please, if it might tend to 
incriminate her. 

Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. The committee will stand in recess until 2 : 15. 

(Members of the select committee present at time of recess: Sena- 
tors McClellan and Ives.) 

(Whereupon, at 11 : 48 a. m. the select committee recessed, to recon- 
vene at 2 : 15 p. m. the same day.) 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

The Chairman. The committee will be in order. 

(Members of the select committee present at the convening of the 
session were Senators McClellan, Ives, and McNamara.) 

The Chairman. Mr. Vincent J. Squillante, will you come forward 
please ? 

Do you solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give before this 
Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing 
but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Squillante. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF VINCENT J. SQUILLANTE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, lEVING BUSH 

The Chairman. Mr. Squillante, state your name and your place of 
residence and your business or occupation. 

Mr. Squillante. Vincent J. Squillante, 1962 Narragansett Avenue, 
in the Bronx, N. Y. 

The Chairman. Will you continue with your business or occupa- 
tion ? 

Mr, Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. May "intend" to, did you say ? 

Mr. Squillante. May tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. All right, you have counsel with you? 

Mr. Squillante. Yes, sir. 



IMPRIOPEB ACTrvrriES EST THE LABOR FIELP 6917 

The Chairman. Mr. Counsel, will you identify yourself for the 
record ? 

Mr. Bush. Irving Bush, 41 East 42d Street, New York City. 

The Chairman. Mr. Kennedy, you have another fifth amendment 
expert. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. The information that we have, Mr. Squillante, is 
that you are executive director and have been executive director of 
the New York City Cartmen's Association, is that correct ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that you have held similar positions out in 
Suffolk County with the cartmen's association. 

Mr. Squillante. May I smoke, sir ? 

The Chairman. Yes, I hope it will help you to answer questions. 

Mr. Squillante. Thank you. 

Will you repeat the question, Mr. Kennedy, please ? 

Mr. Kennedy. That you have also held a similar position out in 
Suffolk County with the cartmen's association. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. That you hold yourself up as being a labor consult- 
ant, is that correct ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that you got your training for being a labor 
consultant by selling narcotics, is that right, Mr. Squillante ? 

Mr. Squillante. By selling what, Mr. Kennedy ? 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not hear me? 

Mr. Squillante. No, I didn't ; I am sorry. 

Mr. Kennedy. By selling narcotics, did you hear that ? 

Mr. Squillante. Yes, sir. I refuse to answer on the ground that 
the answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you are also involved in policy, that prior to 
the time you became a labor consultant you were very active in the 
narcotics field and that you were also active in policy, is that right ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that you feel that the way to impress people is 
to describe yourself as the godson of Albert Anastasia, is that right ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. So your three claims to fame prior to the time that 
you became a labor consultant were the fact that you were Albert 
Anastasia's godson, that you sold narcotics, and that you were active 
in policy, is that right, Mr. Squillante ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you think that it would tend to incriminate you 
to acknowledge your godfather ? Do you want to leave the record that 
way? 

Mr. Squillante. I believe so, Senator. 

The Chairman. You believe you would ? 

Mr. Squillante. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Leave the record that way, then. 



6918 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. As far as your specific operations after you became 
a labor consultant for these various cartmen's associations, you sold 
your gangster connections or you passed off your gangster connections 
to assist cartmeii ; is that right ? 

Mr, Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. That you arranged rigging of bidding such as out 
at Mitchel Field, did you do things like that ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. That you had property rights for the various mem- 
bers, that you instituted that means of operation. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you established "whip" companies in these 
various areas, to whip other cartmen into line. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that you took retaliatory measures against 
those who did not join the association or follow your instructions ; is 
that right? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that you used to take these retaliatory measures 
and you used your gangster connections; is that right, Mr. Squillante? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the gromid that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. According to information that we received here in 
sworn testimony, you were a rather active figure in the Mafia ; is that 
right, Mr. Squillante ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that you never touched narcotics yourself, but 
you used your nephew, you brought him in on it, Jerry Mancuso, and 
used him to peddle your narcotics ; is that right ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that you were active on the docks, peddling nar- 
cotics ; is that right ? 

Mr. Squillante, I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. What is the Mafia ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you know ? 

Mr. Squillante. Are you finislied with the question, Senator ? 

The Chairman, Do you know ? 

Mr, Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the ansAver 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. If you knew, would you tell us ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know Mr. DeCabia ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6919 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. According to the information that we have, you con- 
spired with Mr. DeCabia to rig the bid at Mitchel Field ; is that right ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you punished the Cartman Eecchia through the 
"whip" company for not going along on the bid. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, you established a company as the "whip" com- 
pany, the General Sanitation Co. ; is that right ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you placed in there to operate it, your brother, 
Nunzio Squillante. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have a brother named Nunzio Squillante?' 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incrimmate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know Nunzio Squillante ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incrimmate me. 

The Chairman. What kind of a blood relationship is it, where 
knowing your brother might tend to incriminate you ? Can you give uS' 
any enlightenment on that ? 

Mr. Squillante. I I'efuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. I{JENNEDY. We also understand, Mr. Squillante, that you have 
an interest not only in general Sanitation, through your brother, Nun- 
zio Squillante, but that you also had an interest in the Corsair Cart- 
ing Co. ; is that right ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that the Corsair Carting Co. also acted as a 
"whip" company ; is that right? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that you also used as a "whip" company, the 
Jamaica Sanitation Co. ; is that right? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Can you tell us anything about the Jamaica Sanita- 
tion Co. ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. How did you get into the Jamaica Sanitation Co.? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know Mr. Algon Caf ono ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know "Pogi" Torriello ? 



6920 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Squillante. Is Mr. Greene asking me a question? I didn't 
understand. 

The Chairman. I have not asked anything. 

Mr. Squillante. I thought I heard Mr. Greene ask me a question. 

Mr. Kennedy. I thought I asked you a question. You could not 
hear that. 

Mr. Squtllante. I thought Mr. Greene asked me a question. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know Mr. Torriello ? 

Mr. Sqtjillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. • 

Mr. I^NNEDY. Do you have a nephew called Jerry Mancuso? 

Mr. Squtllante. I refuse to answer on the gromid that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. ICennedy. You do know Jerry Mancuso ? 

Mr. Squtllante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Will you tell us about any of your relatives ? 

Mr. Squtllante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is your godfather Albert Anastasia ? 

Mr. Squtllante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Coming back to Jamaica Sanitation, and Jerry Man- 
cuso, did you set Jerry Mancuso up in Jamaica Sanitation? 

Mr. Squtllante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know Joe Feola ? 

Mr. Squtllante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know about Joe Feola's criminal back- 
ground ? 

Mr. Squtllante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you mind going into business with a man with 
a criminal background, Mr. Squillante ? 

Mr. Squtllante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you been in business with Mr. Carf ano ? 

Mr. Squtllante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know him as "Little Augie" ? 

Mr. Squtllante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chatrman. Wliat do they call you ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Squtllante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. They do not call you bad names? Most people 
are afraid of you, aren't they ? 

Mr. Squtllante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. According to the records that we have, there were 
18 telephone calls from the home of Albert Anastasia to the office 
of the Greater New York Cartmen's Association. 



IMPROPER ACnVmES EST THE LABOR FIEIiD 6921 

Could you tell us anything about that ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ejennedy. Then according also to the information that we have, 
a professor, an ex-professor of New York University, came and went 
to work for the New York Cartmen's Association, Don Modico. 

Do you know Professor Don Modica ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kenistedy. Can you explain why he came to work for the New 
York Cartmen's Association ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

jMr. Kennedy. Do you know that he was a tutor for Albert Anas- 
tasia's children ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you yourself call Albert Anastasia's office? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you make two telephone calls from your own 
home to Albert Anastasia ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Ordinarily you don't use your phone at home ; isn't 
that right ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. But the end of 1954 you made one call and the be- 
ginning of 1955 you made another call to Albert Anastasia. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat were those telephone calls about ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
ma}'' tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you arrange a meeting between a Mr. Donno, 
a cartman, and Albert Anastasia, for the purpose of raising some money 
to buy out Anderson Co. ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Can you tell us about the cartmen's defense fund ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. According to information we have, you took out 
$26,000 from the cartmen's defense fund to pay your own personal 
taxes and to pay your attorney ; is that right ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chair^ian. Let me have those checks. 

(The documents were handed to the chairman.) 

The Chairman. I present to you exhibit No. 27 of this record, which 
is a photostatic copy of a check in the amount of $14,215.99, made pay- 
able to you, Vincent J. Squillante. It has an endorsement on the back 
of it, "Pay to the order of the Director of Internal Kevenue for 1948-49 



6922 IMPROPER ACnVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

income taxes, penalties, and interest in full," and it has a signature 
under that endorsement. 

I will ask you to examine that exhibit and state if you identify it. 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Look at the endorsement on the check, on the reverse 
side. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. I haven't asked you anything. I just told you to 
look at it. 

Mr. Squillante. I am sorry, sir. 

The Chairman. I will ask you now, is that your signature? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incrimiiuite me. 

The Chairman. Did you take that money out of the defense fund 
that was raised, to pay your own income taxes ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to ansv^er on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did you tell the men when you were raising the 
money, $250 a truck, when you were raising that $250 per truck from 
the cartmen^ — did you tell them you were raising that money to pay 
oft' your income taxes ? 

Mr. Squillante, Excuse me. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did they know that you were raising the money 
for that purpose ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did you perpetrate a fraud on them by telling 
them you were raising the money for another purpose and then divert 
it to your own personal use ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. I just want to ask him about his relationship with 
the local 813. 

Do you know Mr. Barnie Adelstein ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ivennedy. AVliat has been your relationship with Bernie Adel- 
stein ? 

Mr. Squillante. I ref ues to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incruninate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you arranged for local 813 to be soft in some 
contracts, and very stringent on others ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
anay tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. How much do you make out of this sort of shake- 
down ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIEIiD 6923 

The Chairman. It is nothing but a shakedown, isn't it, just a gang- 
sterism shakedown ; isn't that what it is ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground tliat the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you conspired in that shakedown witli Bernie 
Adelstein of local 813 ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who thought up the security clause for the local 
union — you or Mr. Adelstein ': 

Mr. SQI7ILL.VNTE. I rcfuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that the means that you used to force people into 
the association, so that you could control them ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know that your General Sanitation Co. was 
nonunion ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answ^er on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to ask you about the Jamaica Sanita- 
tion Co., but you won't give us any information on that % 

]\f r. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Will you tell us how it started ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Greene has made an examination on the Jamaica 
Sanitation Co., and I would like to have that put in the record. 

The Chairman. Mr. Greene, will you come around, please? 

TESTIMONY OF EOBEET W. GEEENE— Resumed 

You have been previously sworn, liave you not ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. You have made a study of the books and records of 
the Jamaica Sanitation Co. ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And with the assistance of an accountant; is that 
right ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us how the Jamaica Sanitation Co. 
began, and whose money was in it and how the money was handled? 

Mr, Greene. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Where was the Jamaica Sanitation Co. operating? 

Mr. Greene. The Jamaica Sanitation Co. operated at 107-iO 157th 
Street, Jamaica, Queens County, city of New York. It was organized 
in September of 1954 by equipment and routes then owned by the 
-lamaica Ash & Rubbish Removal Co. 

Tlie following persons are listed as stockholder-investors in the 
Jamaica Sanitation Co., Inc. : 

Gennaro Mancuso, also known as Jerry Mancuso, a nephew of Mr. 
Squillante, for an investment of $18,900, 30 shares of stock. 



6924 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Alfred Toriello, alias Pogey Toriello, $10,000 investment for num- 
ber of shares, 15. 

Lillian Carfano, the wife of Anthony "Little Augie" Carfano, 
$10,000 total investment, and 15 shares of capital stock. 

Frank Caruso, $19,900 investment, 30 shares of stock. 

Joseph Feola, alias Joey Surprise, $2,000 investment, and 10 shares 
of stock, for a total investment of $60,000 and 100 shares of stock. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us about the backgrounds of any of 
those individuals ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. The f olowing is a criminal record of Alfred 
"Pogey" Toriello. 

The Chairman. I wonder if Mr. Squillante knows this man. What 
is his name ? 

Mr. Greene. Alfred "Pogey" Toriello. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Greene. The FBI record of Alfred Toriello, No. 101761, 
Albany, N. Y., August 12, 1935, investigation, released. Miami 
Beach, Fla., November 20, 1935, vagrancy, investigation, 30 days. 

Miami Beach, Fla., Alfred Toriello, failure to register as a criminal, 
released. 

Miami Beach, Fla., Alfred Toriello, loitering in a gambling house, 
1952. No sentence is listed on that charge. 

Mr. Toriello has been listed by Daniel P. Sullivan, operating direc- 
tor of the Criminal Commission of Greater Miami, with a residence 
at 8842 Hawthorne Avenue, Surfside, Fla. Mr. Sullivan has stated 
that Alfred "Pogey" Toriello is a bookmakers' collector and strong- 
arm man for the New York mob in Rhode Island, bookmaking, gam- 
bling houses, and numbers. 

The Chairman. You don't have any interest in any business like 
that, do you, Mr. Squillante ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Greene. He is listed as a close associate of Frank Costello, 
Meyer Lansky, Joe Adonis, Frank Hiacon of Worcester, Mass., and 
Providence, R. I., and Joseph Massey, and Anthony "Little Augie" 
Carfano. 

That completes the criminal information available on Alfred 
Toriello. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was one of the investors, is that right ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir ; a $10,000 investment. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you give us the background on some of the 
other investors, with Squillante's nephew ? 

Mr. Greene. The following is the criminal record of Anthony Car- 
fano, alias Little Augie Carfano. 

The Chairman. Is that your nephew ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Wliat is the name of the nephew ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Jerry Mancuso. 

The Chairman. Would Jerry be related to you ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 



IMPROPEB ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIEI^D 6925 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Greene. Anthony Carfano resides at 83 Clayton Avenue, Long 
Beach, Long Island, N. Y., and in Miami, Fla. His criminal record 
with the New York City Police Department is as follows: 

1916, Mount Vernon, N Y., felonious assault, gun, discharged. 

1918, Brooklyn, loafer act, discharged. 

1919, New York, grand larceny, turned over to Yonkers, dismissed. 

1921, Brooklyn, grand larcency, discharged. 

1922, Brooklyn, possession of a gun, discharged. 

1925, Saratoga Springs, N. Y., suspicion, discharged. 

1926, Brooklyn, gun, discharged. 

1933, Miami, Fla., concealed weapon, found guilty, fmed $100 and 
costs or 30 days. 

1933, Brooklyn, fugitive on a murder count. Union City, N. J., 
arrested and discharged. 

1946, Manhattan, vagrancy, discharged. 

1955, New York City, conspiracy to extort. That was the welfare 
fund of the Distillery Workers Union. He was found guilty on that 
charge, but the case was later reversed by the appellate division of 
the State of New York. 

That is the criminal record of Anthony Carfano. He is an asso- 
ciate of Frank Costello, Meyer Lansky, Albert Anastasia, and has 
been named by the Kef auver committee in 1951 as one of the leading 
criminals in the American underworld. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Mancuso was one of those 3 or 4 individuals 
that invested in this fine garbage company? 

Mr. Greene. However, an examination of the records pertaining 
to Mr. Mancuso's investment leads to the following information: 
There was a loan advanced to this corporation in the amount of 
$2,493 by Olivia Hughes. Olivia Hughes is also known as Olivia 
Hughes Squillante. She is the wife of Vincent James Squillante. In 
our interview with Mr. Squillante in the committee offices in New 
York, he admitted that he and his wife file joint income tax returns. 
An examination of Mr. Mancuso's investments reveals 

Mr. Kennedy. Let's understand this. You say there is a $2,000 — 
how much? 

Mr. Greene. $2,400. 

Mr. Kennedy. A $2,400 loan from an Olivia Hughes to this com- 
pany; is that right? 

Mr. Greene. To the Jamaica Sanitation. 

Mr. Kennedy. And Olivia Hughes is the maiden name of Mrs. 
Vincent James Squillante; is that right? 

Mr. Greene. That is correct, sir. An examination of the amounts 
invested in the Jamaica Sanitation Co. by Gennaro Jerry Mancuso, 
reveals the following relationship between those checks received by 
Jamaica Sanitation Co. and certain checks issued from the bank 
account of Olivia Irene Hughes. They are as follows : 

One September 14, 1954, a check was cleared — in other words, 
returned as cashed — to the amount of $2,494.34. This was returned 
as cleared to the bank account of Olivia Irene Hughes. 

On September 14, 1954, a check to the amount of $2,494.34 was 
received by the Jamaica Sanitation Co. as part of the investment of 

89330— 57— pt. 17 18 



6926 IMPROPER ACTIVITIEIS IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Gennaro Mancuso. The same situation applies to three other checks, 
$3,000 and $2,000 on the dates of September 20, 1954, September 21, 
1954, September 27, 1954, were cleared to the account of Olivia Irene 
Hughes and listed on the books of Jamaica Sanitation Co. as received 
from Gemiaro Mancuso. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much is the total of that ? 

Mr. Greene. Approximately $11,500, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you have been able to trace the money, the ap- 
proximately $11,000. $11,500, of the money that Gennaro Mancuso al- 
learedly invested in this firm, Jamaica Sanitation ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Which actually came out of the bank account of 
Mrs. James Squillante, Mrs. Vincent James Squillante; is that right? 

Mr. Greene. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the investments were also by Mrs. Carfano and 
Mrs. Toriello. 

Sir, in connection with that, Jamaica Sanitation Co. in 1956 went 
out of business. About November 1955, the Jamaica Sanitation 
started to dispose of its routes and equipment. Ultimately all of the 
routes and equipment were sold to four companies for $70,460, as 
stated in the records of the Jamaica Sanitation Co. 

The purchasers stated that the total price was $109,780. The details 
of the above, and the part in the transaction played by an attorney, 
Arnold Roseman, of New York, follows : 

Of the $70,460 which the books indicate was received for the sales 
of routes and equipment, entries were made on the books of Jamaica 
Sanitation. As payments were received checks were thereafter 
drawn — in many instances to an attorney, Arnold D. Roseman — and 
were also recorded as loans and exchanges. Certain additional sums 
of money due to the corporation in installments were paid directly to 
Roseman, so that the books of the corporation do not reflect such pay- 
ments. 

Roseman in turn placed the moneys in his personal special account, 
and after consummation of the sale, drew checks to the order of various 
stockholders. 

As such, we have here as one illustration a check, a photostatic copy 
of a check, on the Manufacturers Trust Co., 149 Broadway, Arnold D. 
Roseman, attorney, 120 Broadway. The cheek is dated January 9, 
1956. The check "is for $12,000 and it is paid to Lillian Carfano, the 
wife of "Little Augie" Carfano. 

On the back of the check the endorsement reads "Re : Jamaica Sani- 
tation Company, Inc." and the check is endorsed by Lillian Carfano. 

The Chairman. That may be made exhibit No. 35. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 35" for refer- 
ence and will be found in the appendix on p. 7048.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you trace through to find out what happened 
to the money that was to be returned to Jerry Mancuso for liis invest- 
ment? 

Mr. Greene. Sir, we traced amounts disbursed by the Jamaica Sani- 
tation Co. to Gennaro Mancuso. We were unable to trace them fur- 
ther. These amounts returned were April 9, 1956, $5,000 ; September 
24, 1956, 2 payments of $500; October 4, 1956, $500. 

We went further then, sir, into the bank accounts of Olivia Irene 
Hughes. Wlien a check was issued on Apri] 9, 1956, for $5,000 to 



IMPROPER ACTIVrriES EST THE LABOR FIEUD 6927 

Jerry Manciiso on July 11, 1956, there was a deposit for $5,000 in the 
bank statement of Olivia Irene Hughes. 

Mr. Kennedy. So when the money came out of the company and 
went to Jerry Mancuso, within a short period of time there was a 
deposit in Mrs. Squillante's bank account of the exact amount ; is that 
correct ? 

Mr. Greene. That is correct, sir. On August 24, 1956, when 2 
$500 checks were issued to Jerry Mancuso, 2 weeks later on September 
7, 1956, a deposit of $1,000 was made in the bank account of Olivia 
Irene Hughes. 

On October 4, 1956, when $500 was issued to Gennaro Mancuso, on 
October 11, 1956, $500 was deposited in the bank account of Mrs. Olivia 
Irene Hughes. 

Sir, in going further over the records of the Jamaica Sanitation 
Co., and consulting with certain other agencies we developed informa- 
tion on the operations of the Jamaica Sanitation Co. when it was in 
business, which indicates a pattern which seems to be throughout the 
industry as a result of our investigations, we have determined, when 
mobsters take over a company. This is a report dated May 18, 1955, 
in the department of investigation of the city of New York. 

]Mr. Kennedy. Who is the head of that department ? 

Mr. Greene. Commissioner Tenney, sir. 

David Sotland, partner of Hamburger Express, restaurant located at 215-16 
73d Avenue, Bayside, N. Y., personally complained to this department that Ja- 
maica Sanitation Co., 107—40 157th Street, Jamaica, N. Y., a ijrivate carting 
concern, hired by the restaurant to remove trade waste, had demanded an in- 
crease from $12 to .$60 in a monthly rate for this service, effective April 1, 1955. 

Sotland stated that other businessmen in his area had received demands for 
substantial increases from the same cartmen and it was their common feeling 
that Jamaica Sanitation Co. had a "monopoly" of the area, and was "attempting 
to shake everyone down for higher rates." Mr. Sotland concluded by stating 
that the sanitation department, of whom he had also sought assistance, had 
informed him that it was powerless to interfere or intervene in matters concern- 
ing rates between cartmen and customers. 

A summary of this report reads as follows : A survey of 15 stores in the Windsor 
area and 13 stores in the Glen Oakes area substantiated the complaint. Jamaica 
Sanitation Co. services almost 60 percent of the stores in these areas, and has 
attempted to raise the trade waste removal prices from 50 to 300 percent. Store 
owners stated that no other carting concern would service any part of the area 
in competition with the Jamaica Sanitation Co. 

Investigation of the instant complaint presented overwhelming evidence of 
the same pattern uncovered in the investigations previously reported on, and 
shows that there has not been any important change in the inherently monopolistic 
character of the methods, practices, and operation of the private carting industry. 

That is my report, sir, on the Jamaica Sanitation Co. 

Mr. Kennedy. So it would appear that at least two leading gang- 
sters were investors in this company, is that right ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that Mr. Squillante had invested money in 
there through his nephew, Jerry Mancuso ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that it operated to the detriment of the owners 
of the private shops and the private homeowners ; is that right ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. That people were threatened and shook down by 
this company ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. At the time that these payments were traced 
from the bank accounts of Mrs. Squillante through Jerry Mancuso 



6928 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

into the Jamaica Sanitation Co., sir, Mr. Sqiiillante was on Federal 
probation, and at that point had not paid his back taxes and penalties 
on the grounds that he could not afford to pay such back taxes and 
penalties. He is still, sir, on Federal probation. 

The Chairman. Who is ? 

Mr. Greene. Mr. Squillante, sir. 

The Chairman. The witness here? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. He is on probation at the present time ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he said he did not have an income that would 
allow him to pay his back taxes ? 

Mr. Greene. And yet we have found by tracing these sums of 
money through that he was investing in this firm with two well- 
known hoodlums, and that he, through his nephew, received the re- 
ceipts from the firm when it was sold, is that right, in 1956 ? 

TESTIMONY OF VINCENT J. SQUILLANTE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, IRVING BUSH— Resumed 

Mr. E^NNEDY. Do you have anything to say about that, Mr. Squil- 
lante? 

Mr. Sqijillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. The Chair presents to you exhibit 35, a photo- 
stat of a check in the amount of $12,000, drawn by Mr. Roseman, 
Arnold D. Roseman, and made payable in favor of Lillian Carfano. 
I will ask you to examine this exhibit 35, the photostatic copy of the' 
check, and state if you recognize it and can identify it. 

(Document handed to witness, who conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you know the party to whom it is made pay- 
able? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Is the party to whom that check is made payable- 
your wife ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Is that her signature on the endorsement side of 
the check ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we have developed the fact that Mr. 
Squillante was a labor-relations consultant for these three cartmen's 
associations, that he was active in the General Sanitation Co., through 
his brother, that he was active in the Jamaica Sanitation Co., through 
his nephew, and that involved in these deals, operations, were well- 
known hoodlums, gangsters, and members of the Mafia. 

I would like to ask him about two other ways in which he mad& 
money out of this operation. We have already gone into the cartmen's 
defense fund. I would like to go into two beyond that, the Cartels 
Investment Corp. 



IMPROPER ACnVnTES EST THE LABOR FIELiD 6929 

Could you tell us about the Carters Investment Corp. ? 

Mr. Sqtjillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. What about the Carters Land Fill Corp. ? 

Mr. Sqtjillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. With Mr. Squillante's refusal, Mr. Chairman, to as- 
sist us in this matter, I would like to call upon Mr. Kelly, who has 
made an examination of the books and records, so that he can enlighten 
the committee on what we have found about the Carters Investment 
Corp. and the Carters Land Fill Corp. 

The Chairman. I believe it is your position that you won't answer 
any questions about it on the grounds that it might tend to incrimi- 
nate you ? Is that correct ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the groimds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. I was trying to establish that that is what you 
meant. Is that right ? 

Mr. Squillante. Well, I gave my answer, sir. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Kennedy. I might say, Mr. Chairman, before we start, that 
these are rather complicated transactions. 

The Chairiman. Well, we have a rather complicated witness here 
to help us straighten them out. 

Senator McNamara. Do you mean that they have been simple up 
to now ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Up to now they have been simple. 

Mr. Kje,l,l,y. I will try to help you, Mr. Chairman, on the basis that 
if I can understand them, anyone can. Wliich one do you want first ? 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Carters Land Fill. 

Senator McNamara. I would like to ask a question, if I may, Mr. 
Chairman. 

The Chairman. Senator McNamara. 

Senator McNamara. Mr. Squillante, are you on Federal probation ? 

Mr. Sqtjillante. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have it, Mr. Kelly ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes. The Carters Land Fill Corp., Mr. Counsel, was 
a firm that was organized on July 5, 1956, The officers of this firm 
were James Licari, who is on the "lam" now as a result of an Internal 
Revenue investigation — I think the last they heard from him he was 
in Habana, Cuba. 

Joe Feola, who went hunting when this committee went hunting 
for him with a subpena. 

Mr. Kennedy. He is missing ? 

Mr. IvELLY. He is the one that is known as Joey Surprise. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the other gentleman ? 

Mr. Kelly. The other gentleman is the witness here, Vincent J. 
Squillante. 

Mr. Kennedy. They were the three officers ? 

Mr. Kelly. The three officers in the Carters Land Fill Corp. 

Mr. Kennedy. He is being searched for by the Internal Revenue 
Department. 

Mr. Kelly. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And they believe he is in Habana, Cuba ? 



6930 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kelly. That is the latest report. 

Mr. Kennedy, And the other one is Joey Surprise ? 

Mr. Kelly. Joey Surprise. 

Mr. Kennedy. He is 1 of our 7, or 4, missing witnesses? 

Mr. Kelly. The figure changes every day. 

Mr. Kennedy. One of the four missing witnesses ? 

Mr. Kelly. And Vincent SquiUante. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wiiat was the purpose of Carters Land Fill ? 

Mr. Kelly. The purpose was to utilize the dump at College Point, 
in Queens, for the purpose of making a profit on dumping fees from 
private cartmen. This is indicated by the fact that from July 5, from 
the date of its inception, until September 30, 1956, the total sales, or 
the amount taken in for dumping fees, amounted to $35,624.50. 

The Chairman. For what period of time ? 

Mr. Kelly, From July 5 to September 30, 1956, 

The Chairman, Two months ? 

Mr. Kelly, About 3 months, sir. 

The Chairmx\n, $35,625? 

Mr. Kelly. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much were they paying for rent ? 

Mr. Kelly. They were paying a man by the name of Katz $250 a 
month rent. So, in that period of time Katz made $750. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who dumped there at the Carters land fill ? 

Mr, Kelly, Private carting firms in New York City, the New York 
City area. 

Mr. Kennedy, Did the district attorney subpena the books of Car- 
ters Land Fill ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir ; he did. 

Mr. Kennedy. So the information that we are developing has been 
developed only through the assistance and help of the district at- 
torney's office? 

Mr. Kelly. Well, the district attorney's office and also through in- 
vestigation on our own, Mr. Kennedy, in regard to some points that 
were raised. 

Mr. Ivennedy. But the district attorney has been looking into this 
matter, has he not ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is right, sir. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Jlnd they made the books available to our com- 
mittee ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. I might say, Mr. Chairman, Mr. Logan, of the dis- 
trict attorney's office, as in the last investigation, has been most helpful. 

Mr. Kelly. During this period of time, from July 5 to September 
30, the officers who were mentioned, Licari, Squillante and Feola, drew 
salaries of $500 a week, as evidenced by the check stubs for this period. 

The salaries drawn for Vincent Squillante on the check stubs, how- 
ever, show under stub No, 5 the date of July 6, 1956, Vincent J. Squil- 
lante, and next to his name is written the word "loan," 

On the next line it has PR, for payroll account, $500 ; withholding 
tax $80,50 ; New York State disability, 30 cents. Below that is written 
Joseph Feola, salary. Extended into the figures column of the check 
stub is the figure $418.90. This continues on for about 10 checks, with 
the payroll listed as $500, the withholding tax and the New York 
State disability. 



IMPROPER ACnVirrES IN THE LABOR FIEUD 6931 

On all of these is written "loan to Squillante," and underneath it is 
Joseph Feola, salary. 

The total amount paid to Vincent J. Squillante from the first to the 
last check is $4,195.90, based on a salary figure of $5,000, with the de- 
ductions for withholding tax, disability, State disability. 

At the same time, Mr. Feola 

Mr. Kennedy. You better explain about Mr. Feola. 

Mr. Kelly. Mr. Feola was also drawing a salary of $500 a week 
and paying the same withholding tax and State disability. This ap- 
peared to be puzzling, because the check stubs listed it as salary to 
Squillante and then it appeared to be changed to a loan. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would it appear that originally Squillante was re- 
ceiving $500 a week as salary ? Is that right 'i 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you talked to the accountant who kept these 
books ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir ; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. From your conversation with him as well as your 
own investigation, it would appear that the $500 originally was meant 
as salary to Mr. Squillante, is that right ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. After a 10-week period, they would have to make 
some return, is that right ? 

Mr. Kelly. The quarterly return would have been filed around 
September 30, for that quarter. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did the accountant tell you what happened to make 
the quarterly return, as far as Mr. Squillante was concerned ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir; he did. I had a conversation with him, and 
I learned that while he was preparing the quarterly return he had 
written the name Vincent Squillante as an employee with this salary 
on the form 941, which is the employee's quarterly return. Feola told 
him that that could not go in as salary, and he would have to change 
it to read a "loan." He then instructed him to go back through the 
check stubs and the records and change all the salaries of Squillante 
to read "loan," and to put below it Joseph Feola's salary. 

This would indicate that Feola was paid the money, and then lent 
the money to Squillante, or gave it to him in the form of a loan. 

Mr. Kennedy. So the purpose was to make it appear that the $500 
was coming out every week as a loan to Squillante ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is right. The only loan in history with with- 
holding tax and State disability taken out, sir, 

Mr. Kennedy. I will get to that in a minute. The $500 would come 
out as a loan to Squillante, but it was not to come from the Carters 
Land Fill Corp., but was going to appear as salary to Feola, and 
then Feola, in turn, was loaning the money to Squillante; is that 
right? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So that from an examination of the books as they 
are set up in the second stage, it would appear that Feola was receiv- 
ing $1,000 salary every week, and loaning $500 of it to Squillante 
every week. Is that right ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. But in the meantime they had taken out withholding 
tax ; is that right ? 



6932 IMPROPER ACTIVITIE'S IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Keult. They took out withholding tax and State disability. 

Mr. Kennedy. If it was a legitimate loan to Mr. Squillante, that 
withholding tax would not have been taken out ; is that right ? 

Mr. Kelly. Not as a loan. 

Mr. Kennedy. Not as a loan ? 

Mr. Kelly. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. If it had been a legitimate loan, it would not have 
been taken out; is that right? 

The Chairman. Was it a loan, Mr. Squillante? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Was this another kind of a racket you had? 

Mr. SQrriLLANTE. I refuse to answer on the ground "that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. You see, you leave everything pretty confusing 
here. You are creating a bit of suspicion, unless you can clear it up 
for us. ^ 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. SQmLLANTE. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. You are going to let the suspicion ride ? 

All right, proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. There is one other thing that is an added problem, 
Mr. Kelly, regarding the withholding tax. Is that right ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is the withholding tax correct if Mr. Feola is in 
fact receiving $1,000 a week ? 

Mr. Kelly. It would not be correct for Feola, and he had not re- 
ported it as such. 

Mr. Kennedy. So the withholding tax actually would make it ap- 
pear that Mr. Squillante and Mr. Feola actually received $500 a week 
as salary ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. As they attempted to change the books, if that were 
true, the withholding tax would be greater than it appears on the 
books ; is that right ? 

Mr. Kelly, It should have been. 

Mr. Kennedy. So it indicates that there was an attempt, at least, 
to phoney up the books so that Mr. Squillante would not appear as 
on the payroll of Carters Land Fill ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell the committee why it was necessary 
for Mr. Squillante to not appear to be on the books as an employee 
or even investor in the Carters Land Fill ? 

Mr. Kelly. Well, as my colleague, Mr. Greene, pointed out before, 
Mr. Kennedy, Mr. Squillante was then on Federal probation for fail- 
ure to pay Federal income taxes. He had been convicted for failing 
to pay income taxes in 1947 and 1948. He had not notified his pro- 
bation or parole officer that he was receiving this money. 

Mr. Kennedy. So he was in violation of his parole; is that right? 

Mr. Kelly. I would imagine so. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he had at that time an outstanding fine, did he 
not, that he had not paid ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIBS IN THE LABOR FIELD 6933 

Mr. Kelly. There was a fine at the time of his conviction. I don't 
know the amount, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell us about Carters Investment Corp., 
another company of Mr. Squillante ? You have already put into the 
record, have you not, Joe Feola's criminal record ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes, sir ; it has been entered. 

Incidentally, Mr. Kennedy, I have 2 photostats here, 1 dated Sep- 
tember 21, 1956, Carters Land Fill, Inc., reading : 

The following letter to act as an assignment of stock, if any, issued to me as 
an officer of said corporation. I assign the stock to — 

and then it has dash, dash, dash, and is not filled in — 

respectfully, Vincent J. Squillante 

The Chairman. Who is the letter addressed to ? 

Mr. Kelly. To Carters Land Fill. 

The Chairman. This letter may be made exhibit No. 36. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 36," for ref- 
erence, and may be found in the files of the select committee. ) 

The Chairman. I believe it would be only fair to show it to you, 
Mr. Squillante. It seems to have your signature on it. Will you 
examine it, please, and state if you recognize it ? 

(Document handed to witness, who conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the gromids that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. You have examined it. If you don't want to say 
so, let the record show that in the presence of all these witnesses, this 
witness has examined it. 

Would you want to say you looked at it ? 

Mr. Squillante. I have answered it. 

The Chairman. Will you tell us if you wrote it ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Is that your handwriting ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Is that your signature ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to find out what this means, Mr. Squil- 
lante. It is addressed to Carters Land Fill. 

The following letter to act as an assignment of stock, if any, issued to me as 
an officer of said corporation. I assign the stock to — 

and then it is blank. Wouldn't you know if there was any stock 
issued to you ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then you say "I assign the stock to," and leave it 
blank. Wliat does that mean, Mr. Squillante ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. It looks rather peculiar, doesn't it ? 

Mr. Squillante. Are you asking me a question, Mr. Kennedy? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 



6934 IMPROPER ACTIVITIE'S IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kelly. The second photostat, sir, is a similar letter dated Sep- 
tember 21, 1956, to Carters Land Fill, Inc., and it reads — 

I hereby render my resignation as an officer of Carters Land Fill, Inc., effective 
immediately. Respectfully, Vincent J. Squillante. 

The Chairman. That will be made exhibit No. 37. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 37" for refer- 
ence and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you an officer of that corporation ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell us about Carters Investors? 

Mr. Kelly. Carters Investors was originally formed early in 1956 
for the purpose of lending money to business organizations and carting 
firms in New York City. 

Mr. Kennedy. So he had the carting companies, he had the carting 
associations, he had the carting dumps, and now he was loaning money 
to the carting companies, to other carting companies? 

Mr. Kelly. Well, he doesn't appear in the structure of this organi- 
zation as an officer as he did in the other one, Mr. Kennedy. However, 
the entries in the general journal indicate that the president was 
Dominick Falso, who was a cartman associate with Squillante, in New 
York. The treasurer was Michael Fidanza, who was the chairman 
of the Cartmen's Defense Fund, and the secretary is Anne Daria, who 
was a witness here today, and who was the secretary for Mr. Squillante. 

The investors in this corporation were Marie LaGreca, who has a 
carting firm. She gave $4,500 as a loan and got $500 in capital stock 
for a total of $5,000. 

Frank Fisco, a similar amount, M. J. Burns, who was not a cartman 
but was an insurance man having business with carting firms in New 
York, a similar amount, and then Franlv Scalise, who makes a loan 
of $5,000 on February 10, 1956. 

Mr. Kennedy. Frank Scalise? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. ^Vhat is Mr. Frank Scalise's background ? 

Mr. Kelly. ISIr. Frank Scalise was shot and killed on June 17, 
1956, as he stepped out of a fruit store in the Bronx — 1957, 1 am sorry. 
It was this year. His record with the New York City Police Depart- 
ment indicates that he is also known as Frank "The Barber." On 
December 12, 1919, he was arrested and charged with grand larceny 
of an auto. He was discharged on that. 

On January 17, 1920, he was arrested and charged with grand lar- 
ceny, and was discharged. 

On March 25, 1925, he was charged with selling revenue stamps. 
There is no disposition on this. 

On June 30, 1936, he was arrested for Federal conspiracy, section 
88 of the United States Code. He was convicted on this and he re- 
ceived a suspended sentence and 1 day probation. 

Mr. Scalise also had an extensive narcotics background. He was 
regarded as a major international violator by the Federal Narcotic 
Bureau, and it is believed that his death was connected with a narcotics 
transaction. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6935 

The other investors were Dominick Falso, who was the president. 
He put in $4,500 as a loan and got $500 in capital stock. 

John Garrieri, $4,500, $500 capital stock, and Michael Fidanza, the 
treasurer of this company, $4,500 with $500 in capital stock. 

With loans thev totaled $82,000, the capital stock totals $3,000, and 
the grand total is $35,000. 

There were additional investors in March of 1956. Among them : 
Kachel Crescimani, who I believe is related to the witness here, $4,500 
loan and $500 capital stock; Olivia and Donna Squillante, who we are 
lold are children of the witness, $3,000 as a loan and $500 capital stock. 

The Chairman. Are they your children ? 

Mr. Squili^ante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kelly. Barbara and Linda Barrone, who I am told are the 
neices of the witness here, $3,000 and $500 in capital stock; Joseph 
Feola, also known as Joey Surprise, $4,500 and $500 in capital stock ; 
and Peter Scarpula, $5,000, no capital stock issued. 

Peter Scarpula, incidentally, is the son of Jacamo Scarpula. This 
brings the total to $62,000. 

Vincent Squillante, himself, on July 24, invested $1,200 as a loan; 
on August 15, $1,200 as a loan; on August 22, $400; and on September 
6, $800; totaling $3,600. 

This increases the working capital to $65,600. 

On September 10, 1956, an entry in the general journal corrects this 
$1,200 to indicate that it is loans payable. The loans were made to 
firms, some of which had a close relationship with Vincent Squillante, 
for example, the Royal House Fruit Co. on June 13, 1956, got a loan 
of $5,000. The Allerton Florist got a loan of $12,500. 

Mr. Kennedy. What florist ? 

Mr. Kelly. Allerton Florist. 

Mr. Kjennedy. Where is that located ? 

Mr. Ivelly. 57th Street, near Lexington Avenue, in New York City. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is there any connection between Allerton Florist 
and local 813 of the teamsters union ? 

Mr. Kelly. Well, I recall the dance fund of local 813 showing pay- 
ments to the Allerton Florist. 

Mr. Kennedy. So the dance fund of local 813 of the teamsters 
bought their flowers at the Allerton Florist Co. where this money was 
invested from this company ; is that right ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct. If I recall correctly, sir, they bought 
them from the Spring Florist, a little shop on Spring Street in New 
York, for a certain period, and then they got the Allerton Florist on 
their list, and then they went back again to the Spring Florist. 

Mr. Kennedy. Allerton Florist is rather a well-known florist com- 
pany ; is it not ? 

Mr. Kelly. Yes. It is centrally located there. They discounted 
$1,500 from that particular loan. 

Senator Ives. May I clear something up here? Are these flowers 
you are talking about ? 

Mr. Kelly. I don't know what they bought, sir. They just show 
payments to the florists. 

Senator Ives. I just wondered if they were for a dance or a funeral. 



6936 IMPROPER ACTIVITIE'S IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kelly. I think they might have been for both, Senator. We 
have had quite a bit of funerals in connection with this case. 

On September 4, the Grand Terminal Fruit Co. got $10,000, and 
there is $1,200 discounted from this which, incidentally, was in viola- 
tion of the State banking law. The Royal House Fruit Co. gets 
$5,000. There was nothing discounted from that. I believe that 
Squillante at one time had been an officer of it. 

Then the Glo Vacuum Cleaner Co. gets $7,148, and there is nothing 
discounted from that. 

The Glo Vacuum Cleaner Co. — there we have been able to associate 
a James Ward Massi, who is an associate of Squillante, with that 
company. 

James Ward, incidentally, is also an employee or officer in Pick 
Records, which is located at 35 West 53d Street, New York City, 
in a firm that Squillante was supposed to have had a close relationship 
with. 

The Chairman. I think Mr. Squillante should be given an oppor- 
tunity to correct any error in this information that the committee 
has, some parts of it that may not be accurate. 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the grounds that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Kelly, could you tell us what happened to Car- 
ters Investment Corp. ? 

Mr. Kelly. It was dissolved by the State attorney general's office 
of New York, Mr. Lefkowitz' office, as a result of the information 
we have presented here, which showed various violations — not as a 
result of the information we presented. The information we presented 
was a result of the dissolution. 

It shows various violations of State law, including the State bank- 
ing law. There is something interesting between the relationship 
of Carters Land Fill and Carters Investment, Mr. Kennedy, and I 
would like to explain that. 

The money that Squillante took out of Carters Land Fill, the $4,195 
in alleged salary, was repaid to Carters Land Fill by Squillante with 
a $4,000 check which came from Carters Investors. In spite of the 
fact that his investment was only $3,600 in the corporation. 

An additional check for $195 was furnished by Squillante from 
his personal account. That was to repay the so-called loan that he 
got from Feola. Feola then charges this in the books of Carters 
Land Fill as a loan to himself, and he takes a $1,000 check out of 
Carters Land Fill to repay himself, and then he takes the company 
car, which was a 1956 Oldsmobile, as the balance of that figure of 
$4,195 and drives off. 

The Chairman. Would that be correct ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. We, of course, are making a record here, and if 
there is anything inaccurate, we want you to not let it tend to in- 
criminate you by its inaccuracy, if you would help us straighten 
it out. 

Mr. Squillante. I have no comment. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 
_ Mr. Kennedy. I think Mr. Kelly has something to further en- 
lighten us. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6937 

Mr. KJELLY. This is an interesting sidelight on Jerry Mancuso, the 
nephew of Vincent Squillante, and who was a former employee and 
stockholder of the Jamaica Sanitation Co. 

The records of the traffic summons bureau in New York show that 
in September 1956, while driving a blue 1956 Oldsmobile, registered 
to Carters Land Fill, Mancuso was apprehended for speeding, and 
he failed to produce the registration of this vehicle. However, he 
told the officer that the car was owned by Carters Land Fill and that 
he was an employee of such corporation. 

The records of Carters Land Fill did not indicate Gennaro Man- 
cuso had ever been employed there. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 

Are there any further questions ? 

Mr. Kennedy. I have one other matter to discuss with Mr. Squil- 
lante. 

Do you have or have you had an address book or telephone book, 
Mr. Squillante? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you keep the names of your best friends in that 
telephone book ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground the answer may 
tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Are listed in that telephone book any of the gang- 
sters or hoodlums with whom you do business ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliere did you keep that telephone book, Mr. Squil- 
lante? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, I would like to put in something 
about that telephone book. 

The Chairman. Do you have the book ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Greene first will testify as to the whereabouts of 
the book and how it was obtained. 

The Chairman. Proceed, Mr. Greene. 

TESTIMONY OF EGBERT W. GREENE— Resumed 

Mr. Greene. In the spring of 1956, Mr. Vincent J. Squillante rep- 
resented the Inter-County Cartmen's Association of Nassau County 
as a labor relations adviser. His nephew, as adduced by testimony 
of witnesses here, Gennaro Mancuso, alias Jerry Mancuso, was the 
executive director of that association. 

At that time, sir, I was employed by News Day, a newspaper on 
Ijong Island. The district attorney informed me, District Attorney 
Gullotta, that they had received information that Mancuso and Squil- 
lante were involved in narcotics traffic. Subsequently I was present 
in front of the x\merican Legion Hall, Pikesville, N. Y., when Mr. 
Squillante and Mr. Mancuso arrived in a car given to Mr. Mancuso 
by the Inter-County Cartmen's Association for official use. 

They got out of their car to go upstairs into the building. Detec- 
tives of the Nassau County Police Department, in furtherance of their 



6938 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EN THE LABOR FIELD 

investigation of reports of narcotics traffic, detained Mr. Squillante 
and Mr. Manciiso. They instituted a search of their persons, and also 
instituted a search of the car in which the two had arrived. 

In going through the car and searching the car, they arrived at the 
glove compartment of the car. They cleaned out most of the things 
in tlie glove compartment, including a large stack of traffic violation 
tickets in the city of New York, which Mr. Mancuso had piled up, 
and readied the rear of the glove compartment. A detective shoved 
his hand in further to determine if there was anything else in there, 
and then withdrew it quickly. 

Investigation of the glove compartment revealed that the whole 
back of tlie glove compartment was lined with fishhooks. A further 
check after cleaning away tlie fishhooks revealed a slight recess where 
there was an address book. The Nassau County detectives, and we 
have since confirmed with District Attorney Frank Gullotta on this 
matter, brought the book to the precinct house where they copied from 
it the numbers listed in the address book. 

This was done in their investigation of the felony, narcotics. They 
then checked out all of the numbers in the address book and checked 
the individuals on the telephone listings listed to the telephone num- 
bers found. They checked the criminal records of the names of 
those persons for possible criminal records. 

Subsequent to my coming to this committee, Mr. Kelly and I inter- 
viewed District Attorney Frank Gullotta and he kindly furnished us 
with a list of the listings that they obtained from that book, which 
he maintains is the address book, they have been able to determine, of 
Vincent J. Squillante. Mr. Kelly has this listing. 

The Chairman. They were taken out of the book ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do we have to read them ? 

Mr. Kennedy. I just wanted to give some of the examples of the 
people found. 

The Chairman. Give some examples. The list of the addresses and 
names and so forth may be made exhibit No. 38. 

(Document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 38"' for reference 
and may be found in the files of the select committee. ) 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

Mr. Kelly. In the interest of brevity, I will not read all of the 
records, but just give the highlights. 

The Chairman. We might ask the witness Squillante first this ques- 
tion : Do you either claim the fishhooks or the address book ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Squillante. What was the question. Senator? 

The Chairman. Do you make any claim to either the address book 
or the fishhooks ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Read a few of the names. 

Mr. Kelly. The list that we culled from this address book shows 
a number listed as Columbus 5-9179, which is checked out to Dell's 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6939 

Cafe, at 916 Eighth Avenue, New York City. Undisclosed princi- 
pal in this restaurant or bar was a person known as Benny Indiviglio, 
whom I arrested myself, back in 1956. My partner and I arrested 
liim for the possession of cocaine. As an outgrowth of this case, he 
was indicted on a Federal conspiracy in Houston, Tex., and the trial 
lasted 26 days. He and nine otiiers were convicted. He was sen- 
tenced to 4 years in the Federal penitentiary and is now on bail pend- 
ing his appeal. 

Another number was Woodbine 1-9423, Earle Coralluzzo, 120 Alta 
Vista Drive, and this person has a police record in New York City 
and he is presently in Montreal, Canada, and he has an address at 
tlie Mount Eoyal Hotel, and I have been told he is engaged in union 
activities up there in the waiters' or waitress' union. 

The Chairman. All right, go ahead. 

Mr. Kei.ly. There was a number listed, KI 7-8628 for Dante Gallo, 
2311 Vance Street, Bronx, N. Y This person's record was read this 
morning. Senator. He also is known as Danny Lee, and he has a 
suspected narcotics background. 

The next one was Spencer 9-2078, then listed for Joseph Feola, 2 
Massita Road, Yonkers, N. Y. He is also known as Joey Surprise, 
and his record has been read in this record. 

Oregon 4-2201, the listed for Josepli Parisi, 8 Gramercy Park, 
New York City, Parisi was then head of Local 27, Paper Box Drivers 
Union, was also the mentor of Bernard Adelstein, the head of lo- 
cal 813, private sanitation unit. At one time the Private Sanita- 
tion Union was a part of local 27, up to October of 1951. Up to his 
death, Parisi was one of the trustees of local 813 welfare fund. 

Deerfield 7-6347 checks out to Nick Ratteni, 104 Rockledge Road 
in Yonkers, N. Y. Ratteni, who is one of tlie missing witnesses in 
this case, also has a police record that has been entered in the record 
of the hearings. He is an associate of Frank Costello and also Frank 
Erickson. 

Tyrone 2-9033 is listed to Anthony Sedotta, 836 Neale Avenue, in 
the Bronx. He is known to the New York City Police Department 
and he also has an alias, "Nanny the Geep." 

Next is Lehigh 4-5622 which is listed to a Johanna Tortoricci, 285 
Paladino Avenue, New York City. This was a number for Joseph 
Tortoricci, also known as "Joe Stutz" who has a police record in New 
York City and a major figure in local rackets there. 

Tyrone 2-9892 is a public phone listed in the Bluebird Pizzeria, 
at 2890 Buhre Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. This Bhiebird is supposed to 
be owned by Squillante's brother, William Squillante, and it is a sus- 
pected narcotics hangout. 

The next one is Spencer 9-2827 listed to Ann D'Amico, 131 Alta 
Vista Drive, Yonkers, N. Y., also a listing for Toby D'Amico, her 
husband, known to the New York City Police Department and is an 
associate of Earl Corraluzzo, previously mentioned. 

The Chairman. I think we have enough of them. 

Mr. Kklly. There is one interesting one here, Senator McClellan, 
Algonquin 4-7424, listed to the United Textile Workers of America, 
AFL, local 229, and 329 Fort Avenue, which is the local run by 
Tony "Ducks" Corallo. 



6940 IMPROPER ACnVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

TESTIMONY OF VINCENT J. SQTJILIANTE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, lEVING BUSH— Eesumed 

The Chairman. You would not know Tony "Ducks" Corallo, would 
you? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you have any business transactions with him ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Were you associated with him in any business 
enterprise, legitimate or otherwise ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. I do not think there is any use to read any more of 
them. We can put them in as an exhibit. 

Mr. Kennedy. A number of those mentioned were mentioned by 
Amato of the Narcotics Bureau as being important figures in the 
Mafia. 

The Chairman. This witness would not give us any information 
about the Mafia unless he has changed his mind by any chance. 

Now, are you willing to tell us what you know about it ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. I have just a few more questions on Mr. Bernie 
Adelstein. 

Do you know the accountant for local 813, Mr. Wolbert? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Have you ever arranged to meet at a Mr. Wolbert's 
home? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you arrange to meet with Mr, Bernie Adelstein 
at Mr. Wolbert's home because as you described it, "it would be quieter 
there and nobody would know about it." 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was that in connection with some of these carting 
companies ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know Carmine Traumanti ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever discuss any business -with him, any 
carting companies with him ? 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chahiman. Are there any questions ? 

Senator Ives. It is perfectly useless, Mr. Chairman, for me to ask 
the witness this question, but I am just curious to know whether he 
knows Johnny Dio. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIEiS IN THE LABOR FIEU) 6941 

Mr. Squillante. I refuse to answer the question on the ground 
that the answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Senator I%t:s. I tliink for once you are telling the truth. 

Mr. Kennedy. I wonder if he could identify any of the names on 
our list here, Mr. Chairman, of people that had some connection with 
the carting business or individuals who were interested in the carting 
business in and around New York City. 

The Chairman. I hand you a list here of some 40 or 41 people about 
whom this committee has had testimony in the course of these 
hearings. 

Mr. Kennedy. They are witnesses that we have searched for. 

The Chairman. They are those from whom we are seeking infor- 
mation, and I will ask you to examine the list and see if you can 
identify them. Will you state which of them you know, and which 
you do not know ? Maybe you can be of some help to us. 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Squillante. I have examined the list and I refuse to answer 
on the ground that the answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. You would not want to leave the impression that 
the names you see there are names of people of such character and 
reputation that you would not want to acknowledge that you know 
them, would you ? 

Mr. Squillante. I have no comment, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is a different answer. 

Senator McNamara. I would like to ask a question. I would like 
to ask the witness, Are you a citizen of the United States ? 

( The witness conferred with his counsel. ) 

Mr. Squillante. Yes, sir. 

Senator JMcNamara. That is all. Thank you. 

The Chairman. You may stand aside. 

Call the next witness. 

Mr. Squillante. Thank you, gentlemen. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to call Mr. Squillante's nephew, Mr. 
Jerry Mancuso. 

The Chairman. I believe you had better remain here, Mr. Squil- 
lante. 

Mr. Squillante. I am available, Mr. Chairman, x Avill be here. 

The Chairman. You did not take the fifth amendment on that. 
All right. 

You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give before this 
Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and noth- 
ing but the truth, so help you God ^ . 

Mr. Mancuso. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF GENNAEO MANCUSO, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, IRVING BUSH 

The ChxYirman. State you name, and your place of residence, and 
your business or occupation. 

Mr. Mancuso. My name is Gennaro Mancuso and I live at 4184 
Tremont Avenue, Bronx, N. Y. 

The Chairman. Do yo^^ have any occupation ? 

Mr. Mancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

89330—57— pt. 17 19 



6942 niPROPER activities est the labor field 

The Chairman. Are you in any kind of business ? 

Mr. Mancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did you ever do a day's work ? 

Mr. JVIancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you have a lawyer ? 

Mr. Mancuso. Yes, sir ; I have. 

Tlie Chairman. Would it incriminate you to tell us his name ? 

Mr. Mancuso. Irving Bush. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

]\Ir. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, one of the interests that we have in 
Mr. Mancuso is the fact that he is a nephew of Vincent James Squil- 
lante ; is that correct ? 

Mr. JVIancuso. I refuse to answer on the gromid that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know Mr. Squillante ? 

Mr. JVIancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Mr. Chairman, according to the information and 
testimony that we have had before this committee, Mr. Mancuso was 
appointed by Squillante as executive director of the Inter-County 
Cartmen's Association, at $100 a week. 

Is that right? 

Mr. IVIancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell the committee why Mr. Squillante 
selected you to be the executive director of that organization? 

Mr. Mancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. "VVas it because you were active in narcotics your- 
self, with him ? 

Mr. Mancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. According to the information and testimony be- 
fore this committee, you were active in the sale of narcotics; is that 
right, Mr. Mancuso ? 

Mr. Mancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. You sold narcotics and you are a pusher of nar- 
cotics ; are you ? 

Mr. Mancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that why Mr. Squillante selected you for that 
position ? 

Mr. Mancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Are you also on a salary from the Greater New York 
Cartmen's Association ? 

Mr. Mancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And we understand that you have had an invest- 
ment in the Jamaica Sanitation Co. ; is that right? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6943 

Mr. J^Iancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kexnedy. And that you were in that company with Joe Feola, 
who is also known as Joey Surprise. 

Mr. Mancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kexxedt. Actually, you were just a front, were you not, for 
Mr. Squillante in that company ? 

jSIr. Mancuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kexnedy. And that money that you put up, the $18,900 that 
you put into that company, actually came from your uncle, James 
Squillante. 

Mr. Maxcuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kexxedt. And you made it a practice of intimidating cartmen 
that would not go along with you ; did you not, Mr. Mancuso ? 

Mr. Maxcuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kexx'edt. Do you know Mr. Bernie Adelstein ? 

]Mr. ALaxccsg, I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kexx'edt, Do you have a close personal relationship with 
Bernie Adelstein ? 

Mr. Maxcuso. I refuse to answer on the gromid that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kexxedt. That is all. 

The Chaikmax. Are there any questions ? 

Mr. Kexxedt. You won't tell us anything about the cartmen in and 
around Xew York City ? 

Mr. Maxcuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairmax'. Are you one of the hoodlums up there, or are you 
just a little stooge for them ? 

]\Ir. Max'cuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kexxedt. I just wanted to ask you about the Montesano's. 
Did you shove the ^lontesano's out of the association because they 
would not go along with Ross Anneli ? 

]SIr. Maxcuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kexxedt. Do you know if Carmine Traumanti talked to Mr. 
Bernie Adelstein about Ross Anneli ? 

Mr. Maxcuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kexxedt. Do you know Tony ''Ducks" ? 

Mr. ]Maxcuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kexxedt. Did you talk to Tony "Ducks"' about this situation ? 

Mr. ]Maxcuso. I refuse to answer on the ground that the answer 
might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairmax. All right, stand aside. 

Call the next witness. 

The committeee will take a 5-minute recess. 



6944 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

(Brief recess.) 

The Chairmax. The committee will be in order. 

(Members of the select committee present at the reconvening of the 
session were Senators McClellan and Ives.) 

The Chairman. Mr. Villano. 

You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give before this 
Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole 'truth, and noth- 
ing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Villano. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF CARMINE VILLANO, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, DAVID SHIVITZ 

The Chairman. State your name, and your place of residence, and 
you business or occupation. 

Mr. Villano. Carmine Villano, 14614 20th Road, Blackstone, Long 
Island City, president of the Private Sanitation Local 813, at 221 
JFourth Avenue, New York City. 

The Chairman. Your counsel is David Shivitz. 

Mr. Kennedy. You have been in the union for how long i 

Mr. Villano. About 17 or 18 years. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long have you been an officer? 

Mr. Villano. About 17 or 18 years. 

Mr. Kennedy. What were you doing prior to the time you came into 
the union? 

Mr. Villano. I was recording secretary. 

Mr. Kennedy. Prior to the time you came into the union. 

Mr. Villano. A truckdriver. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you came in what local ? 

Air. Villano. 813. At that time it was 27. 

Mr. Kennedy. It was local 27 ? 

Mr. Villano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Did you come in as recording secretary? 

Mr. Villano. I was at that time. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who selected you ? 

Mr. Villano. Well, at that time it was Bernie Adelstein. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have to run for office after that? 

Mr. Villano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. When did you run for office ; how frequently ? 

Mr. Villano. Well, the time I ran for office or as I got in as record- 
ing secretary, it was Samuel Ritchie, and he had died and I was 
appointed at that time. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were what ? 

Mr. Villano. I was appointed at that time. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then you ran for the office ? 

Mr. Villano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. As recording secretary ? 

Mr. Villano. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever have any opposition ? 

Mr. Villano. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never had any opposition for your position ? 

Mr. Villano. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Bernie Adelstein was the president of the local, or 
what position did he have ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6945 

]SIr. A'lLLAXO. At that time he was president. 

Mr. Kexnedy. Did he run for office also ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir, 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he ever have any opposition ? 

Mr. ViLLANo. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. What is your salary ? 

Mr.ViLLANO. $195. 

Mr. Kennedy. A week ? 

Mr.ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have any expenses ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I do. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you get that on top of the $195 ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I do. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much expenses do you have a week ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Well, it all depends. 

Mr. Kennedy. Approximately ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. $20 and over. 

Mr. Kennedy. $20 and over ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you get that as a flat sum or do you get it as you 
have expenses ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. As I have expenses. 

Mr. Ivennedy. How much is "and over" ? Could it be up to $100 or 
$200 a week i 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much would "over" be ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. As I said, about $20 and over. 

Mr. Kennedy. About $20 a week, is that what you get on the aver- 
age? 

Mr.ViLLANO. It all depends. 

Mr. Kennedy. What is the average that you get a week? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I couldn't give you that amount. It could be more 
and it can be less. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who keeps or makes the arrangements on the ex- 
penses ( Whom did you get the expense money from ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. We give it to the girl. 

Mr. Kennedy. You tell her how you are going to use the money? 

Mr. ViLLANO. We give her an expense sheet at the end of the week. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you tell her how you used the money ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And then she pays the money out to you ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you tell her whether you used it in organiza- 
tional drives or for your car or whatever it might be ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. W^ell, for cars, or for trips, and so on. 

Mr. Kennedy. You let her know ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And it is something over $20 a week ? 

Mr. A'lLLANo. That is right, about that amount. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. How many members are there in your local 813 ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I would say about 1,600 or 1,700 members. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is split between New York City and Suffolk 
County and where else ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. About the whole five boroughs. 



6946 IMPROPER ACTIVmES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. How often do you have meetings of the local ? 

Mr. ViLLANo. Four times a year and we have special meetings, also. 

Mr. Kennedy. How often do the individuals in Suffolk County, how 
often are their meetings ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Well, that depends. 

Mr. Kennedy. What does it depend on ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Whenever we are called upon to go out there, once 
every 3 months. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have a meeting in which you inform them 
that there is going to be a meeting once every 3 months ? That is your 
testimony ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Whenever there is a meeting necessary, we send out 
cards to that effect. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, how often do you send out cards to tell them 
there will be a meeting? In 1956 how many meetings did you have in 
Suffolk County ? 

Mr. Vellano. I couldn't give you the number. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any meetings ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. In 1956, yes ; we had. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many meetings did you have ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I couldn't give you the amount. 

Mr. Kennedy. You don't know that ? 

Mr. V1LL.VN0. I wouldn't know the amount, and we have meetings 
all over. 

Mr. Kennedy. Let me ask you this : How many times did you send 
out cards that you were having meetings in Suffolk County ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I couldn't give you that. 

Mr. Kennedy In 1956. 

Mr. A^iLLANO. I couldn't say. 

Mr. Kennedy. You are president of the local ; are you not ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any meetings ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I couldn't give you the amount. 

Mr, Kennedy. More than one ? 

Mv. Vti.laxo. I would say more than one meeting. 

Mr. Kennedy. What about Nassau County and how many meetings 
did you send out cards for in Nassau County in 1956 ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. It would be about the same amount in Nassau. 

Mr. Kennedy. The same amount as how many ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I couldn't give you the amount. 

Mr. Kennedy. It does not give us very much help if you say it is 
the same amount and you do not Imow what that is. 

Mr. ViLLANO. The membership attended the same meetings. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many meetings have there been ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I couldn't say. 

Mr. Shlvitz. May I say 

The Chairman. Do you keep a record of the meetings ? 

Mr. ViixANO. Yes ; we have minutes to that effect. 

The Chairman. You have minutes ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

The Chairinian. Can you not check your minutes and tell how many 
meetings you have had ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I will later on, but I couldn't give you the amount 
now. 



Senator Ives. Before you leave that subject, how many meetings 
have you had this year ? This is more recent and you might remember 
that. 

Mr. Shivitz. May I respectfully ask that the Senator's question be 
read back ? 

Senator I\'es. I will repeat it. I asked him how many meetings he 
had this year in 1957. The question was raised about 1956 and I am 
curious to know whether you have had any meetings this year or not. 

Mr. ViLLANO. Well, we had one there just recently, I would say last 
month. 

Senator Ives. Last month ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Senator Ives. Is that the only one you had this year ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Another one before that, and I don't recall. 

Senator I\'es. Where did you have them ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. We had them in Nassau. 

Senator Ives. Whereabouts did you have them in Nassau ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. If I am not mistaken, it was around in Hicksville 
somewhere. 

Senator I\tes. You are the president. Were you there ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I don't recall the street. 

Senator I\t:s. You cannot kid me about Long Island. I am from 
New York State myself and I know where Hicksville is, and I have 
been there a great many times. You would know whether you were 
at Hicksville last. 

Mr. ViLLANO. I don't memorize which place it is. 

Senator I\tes. You had a meeting last month ; did you not ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I wouldn't know the address. It is some place in 
Hicksville. 

Senator Ives. Somewhere in Hicksville ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Senator I^^s. Last month ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. That is right. 

Senator Ives. T^'liere did you have the one the month before or the 
one you had before ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. There was one before that and I don't recall where, 
but it was in Nassau. 

Senator I\^s. How many have you had in Suffolk ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. We don't have any meetings in Suffolk. They all 
come to Nassau meetings. 

Senator Ives. They all come to Nassau meetings ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Suffolk and Nassau work together. 

Senator Iat:s. And you have had 2 meetings, and the only 1 you 
remember is the 1 in Nassau County ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I don't recall how many meetings. Don't put words 
in my mouth. I told you before I don't know how many meetings. 
We had 1 last month and there was 1 before that. 

Senator I\-es. Wait a minute. You told me you do not know how 
many meetings you have had after you told me you had had two. 

Mr. ViLLANO. I told you tliat we had 2, 1 this month, and 1 before 
that, and I don't remember the date. 

Senator Ives. Have you had more than that ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I don't recall. 

Senator I^^:s. You are a hot potato. 



6948 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. I just wonder how the men ever get to the meet- 
ings or know about it if the president cannot remember whether he 
has them or not or where they were held. 

Mr. ViLLANO. We have so many meetings, we don't know. I can't 
recall every meeting we have. 

The Chairman. You had two this year and they are so many you 
just do not know. 

]Mr. Villa NO. We have so many in New York and we have so many 
meetings 



The Chairman. Does 813 have that many meetings? 

Mr. ViLLANO. We do have meetings and it all depends; special 
meetings. 

The Chairman. Do you have any regular meeting place ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Well, as I said, in New York we have. 

The Chairman. You have no regular meeting place ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. We have records of it. 

The Chairman. Where is that ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. In the minutes, as I described. 

The Chairman. I am not talking about the minutes. Where do 
you meet ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. In New York City. 

The Chairman. Where is the meeting place? 

Mr. ViLLANO. The Central Plaza. 

The Chairman. How often do you meet there ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Four times a year. 

The Chairman. Four times a year ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, and outside of special meetings. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Tell me this: You have 1,800 or 1,900 members. 

Mr. ViLLANO. Approximately 1,700 to 1,800 members. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many of those are employers or self-employed ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I couldn't say. 

Mr. Kennedy. Are they allowed to vote in an election ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Well, those that carry books, I guess so. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I guess surely they do. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do the employers or self-employed vote in an elec- 
tion? 

Mr. ViLLANO. They do. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Can they ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Ke?sNedy. They can vote in an election? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Those carrying books. 

Mr. Kennedy. They must carry books. There are self-employed 
cartmen who are members of the union, and can they vote in an 
election ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. They could ; those that carry books. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do they all carry books ? If you are in a local, if 
you are in 813, do you carry a book ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. That is right. 

]\Ir. Kennedy. Even if you are an employer ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So, then all employers who are members of the local 
can vote in an election ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EN" THE LABOR FIELD 6949 

Mr. ViLLAxo. They could. 

Mr. Kennedy. I just ^A'ant to know if they are allowed to vote in 
the election. 

Mr. ViLLANO. I say that they could. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. What do you mean, "they could" ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. They could vote. If they cany a book, they could 
vote. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. As a general proposition, are they allowed to vote 
in any election? 

Mr. ViLLANO. They are allowed to vote. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. They are? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. There is no limitation of their voting ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No ; there isn't. 

Mr. Kennedy. And they can speak and talk at meetings ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And they can vote on the union contract? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir ; not on that, not on the contract. 

Mr. Kennedy. They cannot vote on the contract ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. They are not allowed to vote on that ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. What are they allowed to vote on ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. On other different circumstances. 

Mr. Kennedy. Like what? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Anything except pertaining to the contract. 

Mr. Kennedy. What else do you vote on ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Everything; anything that comes up except the 
contract. 

Mr. Ivennedy. What have you had an election or vote on? 

Mr. ViLLANO. There was a run for office. 

Mr. Kennedy. You only have one slate, and it does not do them 
any good to vote on that, and you don't have any opposition. What 
else can they vote on ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. All of them ; there are other different things, and I 
couldn't tell you. 

Mr. Kennedy. You are president of the local. 

Mr. ViLLANO. Anything that comes up ; that is, they have the chance 
to vote on it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Like what ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Like what? It all depends, and I can't give you 
any answer on that. There is nothing there to hide. 

The Chairman. Can you remember one thing that they did vote 
on, just one? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Well, they voted on the pension and welfare. 

The Chairman. What was the vote on that, and what issue was 
involved ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Well, it involved the conditions; conditions and so 
forth. That is all I can remember. 

The Chairman. Conditions and so forth down the line ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. That is right ; pertaining to the welfare and pension ; 
on conditions, also, better conditions. 

The Chairman. Do you know anything in the world about this 
union ? 



6950 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. ViLLANO. To my knowledge, I do. 

The Chairman. To your knowledge, you do ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. To the best of my ability, yes. 

The Chairman. To the best of your ability, you know what you 
know. 

Mr. ViLLANO. That is right. 

The Chairman. It seems to me that you are not too well informed 
about it. I just wonder if you are the boss or someone else is the 
boss of that local, 

Mr. ViLLANO. I am not the boss. 

The Chairman. Who is ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Bernard Adelstein. 

The Chairman. He is the boss ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. That is right. 

Mr, Kennedy. Where a company has a contract, do you have a 
checkoff system used for the company ? 

Mr. ViLLANO, Well, let us put it this way : We have the member- 
ship, and they sign a checkoff form to that effect, 

Mr, Kennedy, Do you get dues from all of the employees of the 
company with whom you have a contract ? 

Mr, ViLLANO. Yes, sir, 

Mr. Kennedy, You do that ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Can you give us any explanation as to why Mr. 
DeCabia has not paid any dues for his five employees ? 

Mr. ViLLANO, That I wouldn't know, I am not too familiar out 
there on Long Island. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. DeCabia stated in testimony before this com- 
mittee that none of his five employees were members of the union, 
and can you explain that to us ? 

Mr, ViLLANO. I wouldn't know, I am not familiar with Long 
Island, 

Mr, Kennedy. Is that Mr. Adelstein's responsibility ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Mr, Kennedy. You don't know anything about what the situation 
is on Long Island ? 

Mr. ViLLANO, No, sir. 

Mr, Kennedy. T\Tiat about the welfare fund? Is there also gen- 
erally a checkoff for the welfare fund by the employer ? 

Mr. A^iLLANO. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know why that has not been followed for 
some companies out on Long Island ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I wouldn't know, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know Mr. Bolito ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know any name such as that, similar to that? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know of anybody that has paid any pro- 
tection money ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you had any conversations with anybody re- 
garding protection money ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6951 

Mr. EJENNEDT. Did anybody ever mention to you on the telephone 
that they were sick of paying protection money without you giving 
them the protection that they required ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Nobody had such a conversation with you ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. xVnd that they were going to make a complaint to 
one of the Government agencies i 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Nobody ever had a conversation like that with you ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. In April of 1957, nobody had such a conversation 
with you ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You do not remember, or it never happened ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. It never happened. 

The Chairman. Do you know Joe Bolito ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

The Chairman. You don't know him ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

The Chairman, Do you remember where you were in April of tliis 
year ? 

Mr. V1LL.VN0. What did you say, sir ? I didn't hear you. 

The Chairman. Do you remember where you were in April of this 
year? 

Mr. ViLLANO. That all depends on what question you are going to 
confront me with. I was in New York. 

The Chairman. I am going to confront you with a few, and we will 
see if we can locate you. 

A woman's voice says "Hello." 

Bolito. Hello. Is Carmine there? 

Is that your name ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. My name is Carmine. 

The Chairman. The woman says : 

Hold on. Carmine? 

Bolito. Hello? Cannine? 

ViLLANO. Who is this? 

Bolito. Bolito. 

ViLLANO. Yeah? 

Bolito. What did you do? 

ViLLANO. Hello? 

Bolito. What did you do? 

ViLLANO. I didn't see him yet. 

Bolito. Well, forget 

ViLLANO. Yeah, I'll see him. 

Bolito. Well, forget about it. We'll stop tomorrow. 

ViLLANO. Well 

Bolito. Yeah, we'll stop tomorrow. 

You can't recall that ? 
Mr. ViLLANO. I don't, sir. 

The Chairman. Would you recognize your voice ? 
Mr. ViLLANO. It all depends. I couldn't say I would or I wouldn't. 
I don't know. 

The Chairman. You can't tell us until you are confronted with it? 



6952 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. ViLLANO. I clon't know the gentleman. I don't know who this 
Joe Bolito is. 

The Chairman. Play the recording. 

I may state for the information of the press, this is a telephone 
conversation obtained by a court order, in New York. This court order 
will be made a part of the record at this point, authorizing the use of 
this telephone conversation. 

Court of General Sessions, County of New York 

In the Matter of Intercepting Telephonic Communications Transmitted Over 
ALgonquin ^-8824 and SS25 

It appearing from the affidavit of Alfred J. Scotti, Chief Assistant District 
Attorney of the County of New York, sworn to on June 27, 1957, that it is in the 
public interest to furnish to the United States Senate Select Committee on Im- 
proper Activities in the Labor or Management Field, of which the Honorable 
John L. McClellan, of Arkansas, is Chairman, and Robert F. Kennedy is Chief 
Counsel, certain transcripts and information with respect to the interception of 
telephonic communications during the period April 17, 1957, to .June 21, 1957, 
which were transmitted over the telephone instruments designated as ALgonquin 
4-8824 and ALgoquin 4-8825, listed in the name of International Brotherhood 
of Teamsters and Chauffeurs, Private Sanitation Local 813, located at premises 
147 Fourth Avenue, City, County, and State of New York, it is 

Ordered, That the District Attorney of New York County be, and he hereby is, 
authorized and empowered to furnish said committee with the transcripts and 
information with respect to the interception of telephonic communications trans- 
mitted over each of the above identified telephone instruments during the period 
set for hereinabove, for the use of said committee in connection with and in the 
course of its investigation. 

Dated New York, N. Y., July 1, 1957. 

(s) John A. Mullex, J. C. G. S. 



Court of General Sessions, County of New York 

In the Matter of Intercepting Telephone Communications Transm itted Over 
ALgonqnin 4-SS24 and SS2o 

State of New York, 

County of New York, ss: 

Alfred J. Scotti, being duly sworn, deposes and says : 

I am the Chief Assistant District Attorney in and for the County of New 
York and in charge of the Rackets Bureau of the District Attorney's Office. 

This is an application for an order p&rmitting the District Attorney of New 
York County to furnish to the United States Senate Select Committee oh Im- 
proper Activities in the Labor or Management Field, of which the Honorable 
John L. McClellan of Arkansas is Chairman, and Robert F. Kennedy is Chief 
Counsel, certain transcripts and information with respect to the interception of 
telephonic communications transmitted over ALgonquin 4-8824 and 8825, listed 
in the name of International Brotherhood of Teamsters and Chauffeurs, Private 
Sanitation, Local 813, located at premises 147 Fourth Avenue, City, County and 
State of New York, during the period hereinbelow set forth. 

On January 30, 1957, the Senate of the United States duly adopted a res- 
olution by which the said committee was authorized to investigate improper 
activities in the labor or management field, with the purpose of obtaining in- 
formation upon which the United States Senate could consider the advisability 
of adopting new legislation or modifying or amending present statutes. 

The said committee thereafter conducted both public and private hearings 
with this end in view, and has subpoenaed and interrogated numerous witnesses 
from various localities and States of the United States. 

The committee is now planning to extend its investigation to the area of New 
York State and in this connection has issued, or contemplates the issuance of, 
a subpoena to Bernard Adelstein, official of Local 813, International Brother- 
hood of Teamsters, for interrogation in connection with said investigation. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6953 

In August 1956, and again subsequent to January 30, 1957, the date the said 
resolution above referred to was adopted, said Chief Counsel of said committee 
requested that this ofBce furnisli him, for the use of tlie said committee, all tran- 
scripts and information reflecting the interception of all telephonic communica- 
tions transmitted over the telephone instruments hereinal)ove described. 

The records of this office reveal that the telephonic communications trans- 
mitted over said instruments were intercepted during the period hereinbelow 
set forth. All of said interceptions were pursuant to orders issued by Judges 
of the Court of General Sessions under Section 813a of the Code of Criminal 
Procedure. 

The dates during which the said telephonic communications were intercepted 
were April 17. 1957. to June 21, 1957. 

It is respectfully submitted that the District Attorney of New York City be 
authorized, in the public interest, to furnish to the United States Senate Select 
Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field the said 
transcripts and other information for the use of said committee in connection 
with and in the course of its said investigation. 

No previous application has been made for the order herein requested. 

( Signed) Alfred J. Scotti. 

Sworn to before me this 27th day of June 1957. 

(Signed) Rubin G. Semendoff, 
Notary Public for the State of New York. Qualified in Bronx County, 
No. 03-8918275. Certificate filed with New York County Clerk. 

Commission expires March 30, 1958. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. It was obtained, Mr. Chairman, through the district 
attorney's office. It is a tap that they had under a court order on 
the headquarters of local 813. 

The Chairman. All right. It may be played. 

Telephone Conversation Between Carmine Vili.ano and Joe Bolito 
(Phonetic), 3 : 04 P. M.— April 17, 1957 

Woman. Hello? 

Bolito (phonetic). Hello. Is Carmine there? 

Woman. Hold on. 

Carmine? 

ViLLANO. Hello? 

Bolito. Hello, Carmine? 

ViLLANO. Who is this? 

Bolito. Bolito. 

ViLLANO. Yeah. 

Bolito. What did you do? 

ViLLANO. Hello? 

Bolito. What did you do? 

ViLLANO. I didn't see him yet. 

Bolito. Well, forget 

ViLLANO. Yeah : I'll see him. 

Bolito. Well, forget about it. We'll stop tomorrow. 

ViLLANO. Well 

Bolito. Yeah, we'll stop tomorrow. 

ViLLANO. O. K. 

Bolito. Wait. Are we going to pay all this big money out and we don't get 
no protection? 

ViLLANO. Well, I 

Bolito. I'm just downtown here in New York and we'll file a complaint, 

ViLLANO. Yeah ; O. K. 

Bolito. He'll be forced to come around. I don't try to get nasty like you 
guys are. 

ViLLANO. Yeah, Huh? 

Bolito. Oh, sure, if you want to get nasty, I can get nasty, too. 

ViLLANO. Yeah, well 

Bolito. Because I don't like this here stuff. My guys gave enough money 
away. I'm downtown and I'm going to do it. 

ViLLANO. Yeah. O. K., Joey. 



6954 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

BoLiTO. You're supposed to take care of us today. You're supposed to let 
me know. You never come around. 

ViLLANO. He's away. He's in Long Island somewhere. 

BoLiTO. Who? 

ViLLANO. This here party. 

BoLiTO. He's right out at that place there right now, and I know where he is. 

ViLLANO. No, that's a truck ; not him. 

BoLiTO. All right. What do you want me to do? Go down and — do you 
think you're better than I am ? 

ViLLANO. Well, I don't want to make any discussions over the phone. 

BoLiTO. No, we ain't making 

ViLLANO. You know what I mean. 

BoLiTO. All right. 

ViLLANO. You understand? 

BoLiTO. How much more time do you want? 

ViLLANO. I'll see him. When I see him, I'll let you know. 

BoLiTO. You'll let me know? 

ViLLANO. Yeah. I might see him tomorrow. 

BoLiTO. All right. 

ViLLANO. Because tomorrow ; I might see him tomorrow. 

Mr. ViLLANO. I still insist that it is not my voice. 

The Chairman. You insist that is not your voice ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. That is right. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Kennedy. This, Mr. Chairman, is a tap on local 813, accord- 
ing to the district attorney's office. They asked for Carmine. Is 
there anybody else in that office by the name of Carmine ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. I am the only one. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I am the only Carmine there. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the voice comes over and says to you, 

Are we going to pay all this big money out and we don't get no protection? 

Mr. Shivitz. ^Vliere is that, Mr. Kennedy ? 

Mr. Kennedy. At the bottom of page 1. The statement is made to 
you, "Wait. Are we going to pay all this big money out and we 
don't get no protection ?" "Wliat did he mean by that ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I told you before, I don't know the gentleman. 

Mr. Kennedy. Just tell me what this conversation means, then. 

Mr. ViLLANO. I don't know. I never had no such conversation over 
the phone, with no gentleman. This Bolito, as I explained to you 
before, I don't know the gentleman. Bolito; I never heard of the 
name Bolito. 

Mr. Kennedy. Let's assume it is not Bolito. Let's assume it is 
somebody else. Does this transcript of the conversation refresh your 
recollection as to a conversation you had in April of 1957 ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. It does not. 

Mr. Kennedy. It does not ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You deny that is your voice ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I deny that is my voice. That is not my voice. 

Mr. Kennedy. You know nothing about this at all ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I don't deal with anything like that, in the years I 
have been into this union. 

Mr. Kennedy. You what? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I don't deal in kind of things like that. 

Mr. Kennedy. You don't? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6955 

Mr. ViLLANO. No ; what you just told me, about pulling deals. 

Mr. Kennedy. You don't pull any deals ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir ; never did. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. You said, "Well, I don't want to make any discussion 
over the phone." 

Mr. ViLLANO. As I explained to you before, that is not my voice. 

Mr. Kennedy. It sounds like your voice. 

Mr. ViLLANO. It might sound it to you, but not to me. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. He says to you, or what appears to be you, "Because 
I don't like this here stuff. My guys gave enough money away. I'm 
going downtown and I'm going to do it." 

Then he says he is going to lodge a complaint about the protection 
money that he has been paying. Could you tell us anything about that ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. How could I ? I have had no such conver- 
sations over the phone. I never did. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, it is possible that we will have to 
call Mr. Villano at a later time and see if we cannot refresh his recol- 
lection. We can let him go right now for a while. 

The Chairman. All right. This witness will remain under his pres- 
ent subpena, subject to being recalled upon notice of the time and 
place, reasonable notice. 

Do you accept that recognizance ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You and your counsel ? 

Mr. Villano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. I just want to make sure so that no one misunder- 
stands. The name Bolito is phonetic. 

Mr. ViLLANO. I never heard that name. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Anything like that or similar to that? Did you 
have any conversation on or about April 17, 1957, with anyone in con- 
nection with protection money or this individual saying to you that 
he was going downtown and lodge a complaint ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any conversation like that at all ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. No conversation at all with anybody ; is that right ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir ; not protection money or anything like that. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Anything like that. You have read the transcript, 
and this conversation never took place ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. It never took place ; no, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never participated in a conversation like that ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all. 

The Chairman. The committee will stand in recess until 10 o'clock 
in the morning. 

(Members of the select committee present at time of recess : Sena- 
tors McClellan and Ives.) 

(Whereupon, at 4 : 17 p. m., the select committee recessed, to recon- 
vene at 10 a. m., Saturday, November 16, 1957.) 



INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 



SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1957 

United States Senate, 
Select Committee on Improper Activities 

IN the Labor or Management Field, 

W ashing ton^ D. C. 
The select committee met at 10 a. m., pursuant to Senate Resolution 
74, agreed to January 30, 1957, in the Caucus Room, Senate Office 
Building, Senator John L. McClellan (chairman of the select commit- 
tee) presiding. 

Present: Senator John L. McClellan, Democrat, Arkansas; Senator 
Irving M. Ives, Republican, New York. 

Also present : Robert F. Kennedy, chief counsel ; Jerome Adlerman, 
assistant chief counsel; Robert W. Greene, investigator; James P. 
Kelly, investigator ; Ruth Young Watt, chief clerk. 
The Chairman. The committee will be in order. 
(Members of the select committee present at the convening of the 
session were Senators McClellan and Ives.) 
The Chairman. Call your first witness. 
Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Villano. 

TESTIMONY OF CARMINE VILLANO, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, DAVID SHIVITZ— Resumed 

The Chairman. You are recalled, Mr. Villano, for a little further 
testimony. Yesterday we played a recording that was procured under 
order of the New York courts. After hearing it, you said you did not 
recognize your voice. We will play another one for you this morning, 
and see if you can recognize your voice on it. Let us have it. 

Mr. Shivitz. Before this is done, Mr. Chairman, may I be per- 
mitted to advise the committee that this witness is not under subpena. 
At the request of counsel for the committee, I have produced him vol- 
untarily. I should also like to state to the committee that he has not 
concluded an elementary-school education. He has been a garbage 
collector prior to the time he was elected to an office in this union. 

The Chairman. His lack of education will be considered for what- 
ever weight it may have. I do not know whether a doctor's degree in 
some institution of higher learning would enable him to better recog- 
nize his own voice. 

Mr. Shivitz. I did not mean it for that, Mr. Chairman. What I 
meant was that to some of the questions that were asked of him yester- 
day, his answers did not seem responsive to them. That is due to 
lack of comprehension on his part. 

89330— 57— pt. 17 20 6957 



6958 IMPROPER ACTIVmES IN THE lABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. We will make every allowance for that. Where is 
some witness who can testify regarding this recording ? 

Mr. Kennedy. We have some witnesses that we will put on. I 
would like to ask Mr. Villano this question : Over the past 14 hours 
have you been able to give any thought to that recording and are you 
able to further identify it ? 

Mr. Villano. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You still say it is not your voice ? 

Mr. Villano. And the party's name, Bolito, I never heard of such 
a name. 

Mr. Kennedy. How about Bolito, have you heard of that ? 

Mr. Villano. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know an Epiletto ? 

Mr. Villano. Yes, sir ; we have an Epiletto. 

Mr. Kennedy. What is his first name ? 

Mr. Villano. Joe Epiletto. 

Mr. Kennedy. What does he do ? 

Mr. Villano. He is with Michael & Co. 

Mr. Kennedy. Michael & Co. ? 

Mr. Villano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And what kind of a company is that ? 

Is that a carting firm ? 

Mr. Villano. Well, he carts paper there. 

Mr. Kennedy. He carts paper ? 

Mr. Villano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And his name is Joe Epiletto ? 

Mr. Villano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have such a conversation with Joe Epiletto ? 

Mr. Villano. Well, I don't recall. I know I had one conversation 
with him. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have that conversation that we played yes- 
terday ? 

Mr. Villano. Just a minute. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Villano. That was in reference of the pension and welfare that 
he was in delinquent. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have that conversation with him yesterday ? 

Mr. Villano. No, sir ; I didn't. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have that conversation with Joe Epiletto 
that we played yesterday ? Let me have the conversation. 

The Chairman. Let me ask you this: You heard the recording 
played yesterday of the telephone conversation, a transcript of which 
was handed to you. You had it before you and your counsel when it 
was played and then made an exhibit to the record here. Do you know 
what we are talking about ? I am sure you do. The question is. Did 
you have that conversation that you heard on the recording yesterday 
with Joe Epiletto ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Villano. Not that conversation. 

The Chairman. You did not have that conversation with him ? 

Mr. Villano. No, sir. 

The Chairman. You still maintain that you did not have that con- 
versation with anyone ? 

Mr. Villano. Only pertaining to 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6959 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

The Chairman. Wait a minute now. 

Mr. ViLLANO. If I had that conversation with that same party, Joe 
Epiletto, that conversation pertained to welfare pension ; that is what 
it was. 

The Chairman. Then it is bound to be your voice, if you had the 
conversation. 

Mr. ViLLANo. It may be ; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Now you have changed your mind. 

Mr. ViLLANO. I have not changed my mind. It may be, because 
if it is Joseph Epiletto, that is the one I spoke to. 

The Chairman, I understand, but you also were asked whether it 
was Joe Epiletto or whoever it was, your voice was on that recording 
and you denied it and you said it was not your voice. So you could 
not have had the conversation with him or anybody else except you 
were using your voice. Was it jouv voice on that recording ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. When you said Joseph Bolito, I never heard of the 
name of Bolito. 

The Chairman. You never heard of Bolito, but you heard your 
voice, and you hear it all of the time and you said that was not your 
voice. You did not have that conversation that was played yesterday, 
and now do you say you did or you did not ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Shi\t:tz. May I have the question clarified, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Yes, sir ; I will clarify it. 

On yesterday you heard a recording played of a conversation between 
two people, a telephone conversation. After hearing it played, and 
after reading a transcript of it or at least you had the opportunity to 
read it, you and your counsel, after being provided with it and hearing 
the recording played, you said that you did not have that conver- 
sation, that it was not your voice. 

Now, do you say it was your voice or not your voice ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. ViLLANO. It might have been and it may not have been. 

The Chairman. You do not swear now it was not your voice ; do you ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Well, I have so many conversations on the phone with 
employers. 

The Chairman. You were very positive about it yesterday. 

Mr. ViLLANO. Well, it could have been ; why not ? 

The Chairman. "W^iy not ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

The Chairman. Because if it was not true, you should not have been 
so positive. 

Mr. ViLLANO. Mr. Senator, j^ou asked me if I was taking protection 
money and I never did in my whole life, and how do you want me to 
exphiinthat? 

The Chairman. We are not talking about that. We are talking 
about a telephone call. 

Mr. ViLLANO. That is in reference to the telephone call that you 
put up to me like that, that I took protection money. 

The Chairman. You heard the conversation and you heard it plain- 
ly. You said it was not your voice, and you never had any such 
con,versation. 



6960 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. ViLLANo. Wlien you said "protection money," I never used that 
sort of tone with anybody over the phone. 

The Chairman. Protection money or no protection money, did you 
have the conversation that you lieard played here yesterday ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I don't recalL It might be my voice and it may 
not. 

The Chairman. Do you recognize it as your voice ? 

(The witness conferred with his counseh) 

Mr. ViLLANO. I don't recognize that voice. 

The Chairman. You do not recognize your own voice in that 
one? 

Mr. ViLLANO. That is right. 

The Chairman. You do not say, though, it is not your voice, do 
you, under oath ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I am kind of skeptical about it. 

The Chairman. You are kind of skeptical ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes. 

The Chairman. I think that we can remove that a little further. 
Where is the other recording ? Let the witness have a transcript of 
the other recording. 

The one you heard played yesterday was made on April 17, 1957, 
at 3 : 04 p. m. The one you will hear now was made at 4 : 05 p. m. 
April 24, just about 1 week later. 

All right. 

Mr. Shivitz. Excuse me, Mr. Chairman, is this telephone intercep- 
tion taken pursuant to the same order ? 

The Chairman. To the same order of court that was placed in the 
record. 

Mr. Shiwtz. May I ask the chairman's permission to examine that 
order, please ? 

The Chairman; Yes; the order may be presented to counsel. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could I ask Mr. Villano, in the meantime, where is 
Michaels Co. ? 

Mr. Villano. It is located on Bedford Avenue. 

Mr. Kennedy. Whereabouts ? Where is Bedford ? 

Mr. Villano. That is in Brooklyn. 

Mr. Kennedy. Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn ? 

Mr. Villano. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you talked to him or any representati^ve of 
yours talked to Joe Bolito within the last 24 hours ? 

Mr. Villano. No, sir, 

Mr. Kennedy. No representative of yours has talked to him or any 
representative of his ? 

]Mr. Villano. I was the only one. 

Mr. Kennedy. Within the last 24 hours? 

Mr. Villano. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You have not talked to him ? 

Mr. Villano. No. sir. 

The Chairman. We had the court order placed in the record 
yesterday. 

Proceed. 

(A copy was given to Mr. Shivitz.) 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6961 

( The telephone conversation is as follows : ) 

- BoLiTO (phonetic). Carmine. 

Carmine. Ah * * * speaking. Who's this? 

BoLiTO. This is Pop Polito (phonetic) . 

Carmine. Yeah. Joe. 

BoLiTO. Ah * * * thought you were coming down. 

Carmine. I'll be down there — let's see, maybe tomorrow or Friday — ah — (in 
Italian) I can't say anything on the 

BouTO. I understand. 

Carmine. Cabish? (understand?) 

BoLiTO. Ah. 

Carmine. No. No ; it's another thing. 

BoLiTo. I understand I just want to give you some money that's coming to you. 

Carmine. Yeah. 

BoLiTO (in Italian) . Do you understand me? 

Carmine. Yeah. Yeah — I'll see you then. We'll — we'll have a good talk. All 
right? 

BoLiTO. Yeah — it's O. K., but listen 

Carmine. What? 

BoLiTO. Don't you go doublecrossing me. 

Carmine. No. What's the matter with you? 

BoLiTO. All right. 

Carmine. Now you know me better than that. 

BoLiTO. Oh. 

Carmine. All right? So how's everything else? 

BOLITO. O.K. 

Carmine. Keeping you busy? 

The Chairman. Did you recognize your voice in that conversation? 
( The witness conferred with his counsel. ) 
Mr. ViLLANo. It could be ; yes and no. 

The Chairman. Well, it could be either way. Which is it? Do 
you recognize your voice in that conversation ? 
Mr. ViLLANO. I don't recognize it. 
The Chairman. You do not recognize it ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No. 

The Chairman. But you do not swear it is not your voice ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. It sounds different. 

The Chairman. Whether it sounds or does not sound, do you recog- 
nize your voice ? You say you do not ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I don't want to commit myself, if it was I would tell 
you it was. 

The Chairman. That is perfectly obvious. You do not want to 
commit yourself, but I am asking you the questions and you are under 
oath. 

Mr, ViLLANO. I told you I was kind of skeptical about that voice. 

The Chairman. Did you have that conversation '? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. ViLLANO. I cannot make it out on the record there. 

The Chairman. Did you have the conversation ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I had a convei'sation with Joe Epiletto. 

The Chairman. At about that time? That is this year. 

Mr. Villano. I don't recall the date, but I had a conversation. 

The Chairman. What was your problem with him about money? 

Mr. Villano. Pertaining to the welfare and pension that he is a 
delinquent. 

The Chairman. You did have that conversation with him, then, 
did you not? 



6962 IMPROPER ACnVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. ViLLANO. That is right ; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you not recognize your voice ? You had a tele- 
phone conversation with him. 

Mr. ViLLANO. I had with Joe Elitto and not Bolito. 

The Chairman. Bolito may not be the correct spelling of it, and 
you say it is Elitto? 

Mr. ViLLANO, As a name, 

Mr. Shivitz. This is still a third name, Mr. Chairman, the name 
that was suggested by counsel is Epilitto, and the name the witness 
is now using is Elitto. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is from the Michaels Co. 

Mr. ViLLANO. He works for the Michaels Co., Joe Elitto. 

Mr. Kennedy. From the Michaels Co. 

Mr. ViLLANO. That is right. 

The Chairman. This last recording, transcript of it may be printed 
in the record. 

Mr. Kennedy. You say here, in the first transcript: 

Well, I don't want to make any discussions over the phone. 

Why would you say that if it was just about the welfare fund? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. ViLLANO. I didn't have this conversation, and the only con- 
versation I had with him was on the pension and welfare. 

Mr. Kennedy. You say these conversations you never had; these 
two conversations ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never had with Elitto? Did you have these 
two conversations with Elitto ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No ; I won't say I had that conversation. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have these first two conversations with 
Elitto? 

Mr. ViLLANO. Yes; I spoke to Joe Elitto, but I don't remember 
having that kind of a conversation. 

Mr. Kennedy. Where does Elitto live ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. He used to live at Hawthorne Street and from there 
I guess he moved out on Long Island ; somewhere in Long Island. 

Mr. Kennedy. Here you have in this second conversation, "Don't 
you go doublecrossing me." Why would he say that to you ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. I never used such language. I don't speak that way 
to you. 

Mr. Kennedy. He said that to you. 

Mr. ViLLANO. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. He said he had some money for you and then he 
said, "Don't you go doublecrossing me." 

Mr. ViLLANO. No. 

Mr, Kennedy. You can tell us that. 

Mr. ViLLANO. I don't remember that conversation. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you deny that you took part in these conversa- 
tions ; that you participated in these conversations ? 

Mr. ViLLANO. No ; the only thing 

Mr. Kennedy. Just answer that question. I am asking you a 
simple question. Do you deny that you participated in these two 



i 



organized crime- 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES DT THE LABOR FIELD 6963 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further ? 

You may stand aside for the present. 

Mr. Kennedy. Detective San Pietro. 

The Chairman. Will you be sworn, please ? 

You do solmenly swear that the evidence you shall give before 
this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. San Pietro. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF JOSEPH A. SAN PIETRO 

The Chairman. State your name, and your place of residence, and 
your business or occupation. 

Mr. San Pietro. Detective Joseph A. San Pietro, New York City 
Police Department, attached to the district attorney's office squad, 
New York Comity. 

The Chairman. How long have you served in that capacity ? 

Mr. San Pietro. Six and a half years. 

The Chairman. Do you waive counsel ? 

Mr. San Pietro. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Kennedy. During the course of your duties as a detective, 
were you assigned to cover certain wiretaps ? 

Mr. San Pietro. Yes, sir ; I was. 

Mr. Kennedy. And was that under a court order from the State 
of New York ? Is that right ? 

Mr. San Pietro. It was. 

Mr. I^nnedy. Was one of the wiretaps that you sat on, a tap that 
was put on local 813 of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters? 

Mr. San Pietro. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kjennedy. Was one of the officers of that local a Mr. Carmine 
Villano? 

Mr. San Pietro. I believe it was, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, you have heard his voice a number of times on 
various taps, have you not ? 

Mr. San Pietro. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Various telephone conversations ? 

Mr. San Pietro. I have. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you have heard his voice here today ? 

Mr. San Pietro. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you talked to him prior to coming into the 
room? 

Mr. San Pietro. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You have also heard the transcript of the telephone 
conversation of April 17, did you not ? 

Mr. San Pietro. I have. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was early this morning that you heard that 
transcript of a call ? 

Mr. San Pietro. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you testify or could you identify the voice 
of the gentleman that sat here and testified as the man that participated 



6964 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. San Pietro. I would say it is one and the same individual; 
yes. 

The Chairman. Are there any other questions ? 

How many wiretaps did you take, a number in the course of your 
investigation ? 

Mr. San Pietro. How many wiretaps would I take ? 

The Chairman. I am not talking about these two. I mean you are 
experienced in this kind of work, are you ? 

Mr. San Pietro. Yes, sir ; I am, sir. 

The Chairman. And you have been given special assignments by 
the district attorney's office in New York over a period of years? 

Mr. San Pietro. That is right, sir. 

The Chairman. To do this kind of work under court orders that 
legalize and authorize the service to be performed ? 

Mr. San Pietro. That is right ; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Is there any thing further ? 

Mr. Shivitz. Wliile the witness is here, might I ask the committee's 
indulgence to ask through your counsel two questions of this witness ? 

The Chairman. Submit your questions in writing. 

Mr. Shivitz. The first question is whether in the interception of 
telephone conversations at the offices of local 813, this witness knows 
whether any other Carmine spoke on the telephone. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether any other Carmine spoke 
on the telephone? 

Mr. San Pietro. Not to my knowledge, sir. 

Mr. Shivitz. And whether or not the interruptions were mechani- 
cal or whether they were actually listened to by this witness. 

Mr. San Pietro. I didn't get that. 

The Chairman. Was the interception mechanical ? 

Mr. San Pietro. Yes ; it was. 

Mr. Shivitz. And the witness did not listen to the conversations, 
but took them from mechanical transcriptions ? 

The Chairman. I do not know. I do not know how it works. 

Mr. San Pietro. I listened to the conversation as it was taking 
place and recording at the same time. 

Mr. Kennedy. I just want to clarify the first question. You are 
not testifying that there was no Carmine that called into the office, 
are you ? 

Mr. San Pietro. No ; I am not. 

Mr. Kennedy. You are testifying regarding the Carmine that par- 
ticipated in the conversation from the headquarters of local 813. 

Mr. San Pietro. Yes, sir. I am testifying that the only Carmine 
I know associated with 813 is this Carmine Villano. That is all I 
know. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 

Call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Bernie Adelstein. 

Mr. Shivitz. The witness is deaf on his right ear and the only ear 
he can hear from is the left, if I may sit on this side. 

The ChxMRMan. That request will be granted. 

Do you solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give before this 
Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and noth- 
ing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I do. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6965 

TESTIMONY OF BEKNARD ADELSTEIN, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, DAVID SHIVITZ 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Adelstein. Bernard Adelstein; 60 Grish Mill Lane, Great 
jSTeck, Long Island, is my home ; 221 Fourth Avenue, New York City, 
is the place of business. I am a labor representative. 

The Chairman. In what capacity ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I am secretary-treasurer and business manager. 

Mr. Shivtz, Mr. Chairman, may the witness either, himself or 
through me, read a very short preliminary statement? 

The Chairman. Has it been submitted ? 

Mr. Kennedy. No ; it has not. 

The Chairman. Let us see it. In the meantime, you have an at- 
torney representing you ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I do. 

The Chairman. Let him be identified for the record. 

Mr. Shivitz. David Shivitz, 271 Madison Avenue. 

Senator Ives. Mr. Chairman, I did not notice that the witness in- 
dicated what union he was secretary-treasurer of, and business man- 
ager of. 

What union is it ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I am secretary-treasurer and business manager of 
local 813, affiliated with the International Brotherhood of Teamsters 
and the AFL-CIO. I am likewise business manager and secretary- 
treasurer of the Cooperage, Drum, and Container Workers LTnion, 
AFL, affiliated with the Coopers International of North America, 
affiliated with the AFL-CIO. 

Senator Ives. Thank you. 

(The document submitted by Mr. Shivitz was examined by the 
chairman of the committee. ) 

The Chairman. Mr. Counsel, why have you not presented this 
statement under the rules ? 

Mr. Shivitz. I was not aware of that, Mr. Chairman, that it had 
to be presented in advance. I am sorry. 

The Chairman. Do you not have a copy of the rules of the com- 
mittee ? 

Mr. Shivitz. Yes ; I do. 

The Chairman. I see nothing in the statement particularly objec- 
tionable, but we have rules here and someone else will come in and 
if we establish a precedent here, then they will say, "You let some- 
one else get by with it." I have no objection to the statement. 

Senator Ives. In that connection, I would like to point out that 
when a witness does this little trick, he subjects himself to serious 
question. I do not know whether Mr. Adelstein will get it or not, 
but he subjects himself to it, because we have not had a chance to see 
it, and I have not had a chance to see it at all. 

Mr. Shivitz. Mr. Adelstein is not taking the fifth amendment and 
he is going to be a fully cooperative witness, and he has already 
answered the questions here and he is ready to do so further. 

The Chairman. Tlie rule has not been complied with, and this 
counsel has been before the committee a number of times and he has had 
a copy of the rules, and I am not going to break the precedent in this 



6966 IMPROPER ACTivmES m the labor field 

instance. I am going to permit this to be filed as an exhibit to his 
testimony and you can hand it out to the press if you want to, so they 
will know what you might have said or wanted to say. 

You will know what the exhibit is, but we are not going to break 
the rule and establish a precedent here. That rule is important for 
the protection of the committee and for the protection of the public 
and the Congress, and it is not an unfair rule. It is very simple, and 
it is easy to comply with. 

Mr. Shivitz. Might I point out that the last time this witness was 
before the committee, I believe in the spring of the year, you permitted 
a statement to be read which was not previously handed to the com- 
mittee. That is what led me into this. 

The Chairman. That was in executive session ? 

Mr, Shivitz. No ; it was in public session. 

Mr. Kennedy. How did you know that ? 

Mr. Shivitz. I was here. 

Mr. Kennedy. There was a ruling made on it ? 

Mr. Shivitz. No; I just asked for permission to read the statement, 
and the chairman allowed me to do it. 

The Chairman. That was a statement with respect to some par- 
ticular technical questions. 

Mr. Shivitz. With respect to this witness' position before the 
committee. 

Mr. Kennedy. It was a prepared statement that you had. 

Mr. Shivitz. Yes. 

The Chairman. I do not recall it. 

Senator Ives. I know that, whenever that was done, it was always 
pointed out that the rule was being waived in that connection. 

Mr. Shivitz. I do not believe that was done. 

Senator Ives. It must have been pointed out. 

Mr. Kennedy. We have his testimony. 

The Chairman. He can have the full benefit of it with the press, 
and we can read it, so let us proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long have you been in the union, Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I have been in local 813, in the private sanitation 
union, for about 20 years. 

Mr. Kennedy. About how many years ? 

Mr. Adelstein. About 20 years. 

Mr. Kennedy. And w^hat w^as your experience prior to that time? 

Mr. Adelstein. Sir, when you say "experience," what do you mean? 

Mr. Kennedy. What position did you hold prior to that time ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I held the office of secretary-treasurer and business 
manager, I believe, since 1951 or 1952. Prior to that 

Mr. Kennedy. Let us start all over again. Prior to the time you 
became an officer of the union, what were you doing ? 

Mr. Adelstein. How far back do you want to go ? 

Mr, Kennedy. Just prior. 

Mr, Adelstein. Prior to that ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Prior to the time you came into the union. 

Mr. Adelstein. I represented merchants and employers in the food 
industry. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then you came over into the union, did you ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I was asked to come over into the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who asked you ? 



LMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6967 

Mr. Adelstein. The workers on the trucks. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who was the head of the union at that time? 

Mr. Adelstein. There wasn't an organization at that time. 

Mr. Kennedy. There was not ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. What union did you join up with or affiliate with ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I affiliated with local 27, affiliated with the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who was head of that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Joseph Parisi. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you become an officer under Joseph Parisi after 
that? 

Mr. Adelstein, I was never an officer of local 27. I had a title of 
president in the private sanitation unit, which was a unit of local 27. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you elected to that position ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I was elected to that position by the membership 
in the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you have held that position until the 813 was 
formed in 1950 or 1951 ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. What year was that formed ; 813 ? 

Mr. x\delstein. I believe that was October of 1951. 

Mr. Kennedy. And then you have held a position with 813 since 
that time ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. What position have you held with 813 ? 

Mr. Adelstein. My present position. 

Mr. Kennedy. What position since 1951, since 813 was formed? 

Mr. Adelstein. I am the secretary-treasurer and business manager. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you have held that position since 1951 ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that an elected position ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I have been elected. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you had any opposition ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I never had opposition in all of my years in labor. 

Mr. Kennedy. No opposition in all of the elections you have run ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that right ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I would like to say that I didn't run the election. 
The elections that were run, I never had any opposition. 

Mr. Kennedy. What about Joe Parisi ; did he have any opposition 
when he ran for office ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I wouldn't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. You do not know that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I wouldn't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know 

Mr. Adelstein. Joe Parisi held office prior to our affiliation with 
local 27. 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, he held office also while you were in local 27, 
did he not ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he have any opposition any time that he ever 
ran for office ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I don't believe he did. 



6968 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES INT THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. Did any of the officers that ran in locals 27 or 813 
ever have any opposition ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The officers in 27 had an election by the member- 
ship under Joseph Parisi. I never attended their elections. 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, do yon know of any time that any of them ever 
had any opposition ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I cannot recall. 

Mr. Kennedy. That they had ? 

Mr. Adelstein. They may have had. 

Mr. Kennedy. You don't know of any time ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I can't recall. 

Mr. Kennedy. You do know that to the best of your recollection, 
Joe Parisi never had any opposition ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I said I did not know. 

Mr. Kennedy. You know about yours? 

Mr. Adelstein. I do. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you never had any ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I never had any opposition. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now I would like to talk to you about this : 

You were in local 27 when they were having the opposition or hav- 
ing the dispute with local 456 in Westchester? 

Mr. Adelstein. I was. 

Mr. Kennedy. With local 4567 of the teamsters. 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Joe Parise held what position at that time ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Secretary-treasurer, I believe, of local 27. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, you were attempting to organize Yonkers, 
were you not ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I was. 

Mr. Kennedy. Local 27 was. Your branch of local 27 was attempt- 
ing to organize Yonkers. 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you opposed in that organizational drive by 
local 456 of Westchester ? 

Mr. Adelstein. We were at the time, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. When that local 436 was headed by John Acropolis? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. And another officer was Eddie Doyle, is that right? 

Mr. Adelstein. I think it was. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you organize the Westchester Carting Co. ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. In 1951 ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I organized the men in Westchester Carting Co. 

Mr. Kennedy. In 1951, was it ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I wouldn't recall whether it was 1950, 1949 or 
1951. 

JSIr. Kennedy. Approximately that time, though ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Somewhere around that period. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you attempt to organize some of the other 
carting companies in Yonkers ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you worked out there in that organizational 
drive ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I did. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6969 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know Nick Pattenni ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I met him. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was head of Westchester Carting Co. ? 

Mr. Adelstein^ I know that^ he was an officer of Westchester 
Carting Co. 

Mr. Kennedy. Dm^ing this organizational drive, you were opposed 
by local 456 ? 

Mr. Adelsit^in. When we organized Westchester Carting Co., we 
were not opposed by 456. 

Mr. Kennedy. Subsequently were you opposed by 456 ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Later. 

]Mr. Kennedy. You were opposed later? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you threaten with bodily harm either Mr. Boyle 
or ]Mr. Acropolis ? 

Mr. Shivitz. At this time, Mr. Chairman 

Mr. Kennedy. I think that he can answer the question. 

Mr. Shivitz. Would you permit me to make an objection, Mr. 
Counsel. 

Tlie Chairman. You may make an objection. 

M;-. Shivitz. Thank you, Mr. Counsel. 

I (bject to this line of questioning on the following grounds : First, 
it is not relevant to the subject matter of this hearing, and second, it 
is manifestly a most unfair line of inquiry to pursue. The very na- 
ture of the subject matter is such that regardless of this witness' com- 
plete innocence, the very subject and the very questioning attempts 
to subject him to incrimination. I respectfully urge that the Chair 
rule out this line of questioning. 

The Chairman. Well, the Chair will overrule the objection. One 
of the very substances of our assignment is to find out about improper 
practices that may prevail and may occur in management-labor re- 
lations. Threats, corecion, and violence is in this committee's judg- 
ment an improper practice. It does seem to me that if the witness v\^ants 
to be cooperative and help us discover these improper practices, he 
would be the verj^ one that would want to tell and not to object to tell- 
ing that he had been threatened and coerced and intimidated by peo- 
ple in an etl'ort to compel him to things that maybe he should not do. 

Mr. Shivitz. ]Mr. Chairman, may I point out one thing in pressing 
this objection, Tliis witness and this subject has never been the 
subject of an executive session where all of the acts could be culled 
out and where the entire matter could be quietly and carefully gone 
into and the witness' statements taken. I submit, Mr. Chairman, that 
to air an area of this sort with tlie terrible implications without of 
course any basic foundation in fact, and as I say, against the back- 
gi'ound of this witness' complete lack of guilt which I am sure we are 
all certain of 

The Chairman. He can help us to find out who is, perhaps. 

Mr. Shivitz. To question a man on this subject in an open hearing 
certainly is not a fair manner of treatment. 

The Chairman. This is public business, proceed. 

Mr. Adelstein. I would like to answer that. I think that we 
should clear this situation up. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you threaten Mr. Doyle and Mr. Acropolis ? 

]\lr. Adelstein. I never threatened either one of them. 



6970 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

]\Ir. Kennedy. In the 1952 convention did you threaten Mr. Doyle 
with bodily hann ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I never threatened either one of these men. 

Mr. Kennedy. Just prior, or 2 weeks prior to the death or the 
killing of Mr. Acropolis, did you make a statement similar to, "You 
are not that tough. Don't think that you are too tough, that we 
can't take care of you. Tougher guys than you have been taken care 
of." 

Did you ever make a statement similar to that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is untrue, and I never made that statement. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never did ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And Mr. Doyle's testimony on page 73, that you 
made that statement in his presence to Mr. Acropolis, just 2 weeks or 
2% weeks prior to Mr. Acropolis being killed, is untrue? Is that 
right? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is untrue. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. And you never threatened anybody ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I never threatened Doyle and I never threatened 
Acropolis. I would like to add that I have been in the labor move- 
ment for about 20 years. In our organization work with the em- 
ployers and during the 20 years that I have been in labor, never 
once has there been a question of violence. Never once have I been 
arrested for threatening people. And Mr. Doyle's statement is not 
true. 

Mr. Kennedy. You knew ]Mr. Nick Ratteni, is that right ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I met him. 

Mr. Kennedy. You used to have diimer with him occasionally ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I did have a meal or two with the man. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know that he was one of the most notorious 
hoodlums in the United States ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I learned that through the newspapers. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you organized his company, did you not? 

Mr. Adelstein. I tied them up, pulled a strike on them. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know — — 

]\Ir. Adelstein. I organized the men personally. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know that Westchester Carting Co. had a 
reputation, and Mr. Nick Ratteni particularly had a reputation of 
threatening people out in the Westchester area ? 

]\Ir. Adelstein. I didn't hear anything along those lines and when 
I organized Westchester Carting I didn't know who owned the firm. 
If I did, I wouldn't care who owned it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know, for instance, of the burning of the 
trucks of Mrs. Embree i 

Mr. Adelstein. I heard about that through the newspapers. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you hear about the boycott of the Safeway 
Stores ? Do you know anything about that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I think that I recall something in regard to the 
Safeway Stores. 

yir. Kennedy. Did you have some opposition from the Rex Cart- 
ing Co. while you were out there? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, he did. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6971 

Mr, Kennedy. They had associated or signed up with local 456, 
had they not 'i 

Mr, Adelstein, That is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. And did you iniderstand that the Safeway Stores 
in Yonkers had grown dissatisfied with Westchester Carting Co. ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I learned about that. 

Mr. Kennedy, You did? 

Mr. Adelstein, Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And did you know that they switched over to Rex 
Carting Co. ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I learned about that. 

Mr. Kennedy. And then there was a boycott placed on the other 
stores of Safeway in the Bronx, and the boycott was for the purpose 
of forcing Safeway in Yonkers to switch back to Westchester Cart- 
ing, which was organized by your local ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is a misstatement of fact. 

Mr. Kennedy. You say that is untrue ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is untrue. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, Mr. Wells has testified from the Safeway 
Stores, and he has testified before the committee that after they 
switched over to Rex Carting Co., they were told that their other 
stores in the Bronx and other areas of New York City were boycotted, 
and that they were informed that the boycott was for the purpose of 
having them switch back to Westcliester Carting Co., and that the 
boycott was brought about from pressure from your local, so that they 
would switch back to the Westchester Carting Co. with wliom you 
had a contract. You say that is not true ? 

Mr. Shivitz. May I state that the counsel is, I assume, erroneously 
misquoting Mr. Wells' testimony. Mr. Wells' testimony was that he 
was asked to get rid of Rex Carting, a nonunion company, and go 
back to a union company, and not to go back to Westchester Carting. 
I think if your assistant will check for you, Mr. Kennedy, you will 
find I am correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. I believe he said there was a dispute between unions, 
between 456 and 27. Rex Carting Co. had organized or was organized 
by 456 of the teamsters and Mr. Acropolis and Mr. Doyle. This was an 
interunion fight, and that the pressure was brought and boycotts were 
made of the Safeway Stores in the Bronx, and that boycott was 
brought about by the activities of local 813. 

Mr. Shivitz. The only mistake you are making, Mr. Kennedy, is 
that you stated in your original question that he was told by repre- 
sentatives of 813 that he had to go back to Westchester. Otherwise, 
your statement is correct, and he was told he had to go back to an 
813 local. 

Mr. Kennedy. I didn't say he was told by representatives of 813, 
and I did not say that. Mr. Shivitz, you must listen to the questions. 

The Chairman. Does the witness understand the question ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you read back the question that I just read 
and tell me if that statement of fact is true ? 

(The pending question was then read by the reporter.) 

Mr, Kennedy. Let me rephrase it. Did you participate in any way 
in the boycott of the Safeway Stores in the Bronx ? 

Mr, Adelstein, I believe we did. 

Mr. Kennedy. And what was the purpose of that ? 



6972 IMPROPER ACTIVITIE'S IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Adelstein. So that our men working for Westchester Cartnig 
and other firms in Westchester would not lose their jobs because an- 
other local would take the work, or a firm signed up with another local 
would take the work. 

Mr. Kennedy. Let me see if I understand the facts. Westchester 
Carting Co. had a contract with the Safeway Stores. The Safeway 
Stores were dissatisfied with the service being provided by Westches- 
ter Carting Co. They switched to Kex Carting Co. which at that 
time was a union shop ; is that right ? Kex Carting Co. had a contract 
with local 456 ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. Thereafter your local put a boycott on the Safeway 
Stores in other areas of the city to force this Safeway Stores in Yon- 
kers to switch back to Westchester Carting or to switch back to a com- 
pany with whom you had a contract. 

Mr. Adelstein. To switch back to any union company who em- 
ployed our people. 

Mr. Kennedy. And in fact they switched back or they were ulti- 
mately switched back to a company that was formed or controlled by 
Westchester Carting ; isn't that right ? 

Mr. xAldelstein. That is not right. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is not right? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is not right. 

Mr. Kennedy. We will see here. This is according to Mr. Wells : 
"So a contract was made with Mr. Adelstein, who told us that if we 
would go back to his union, union 813, that our problems would be 
over." Is that right? 

Mr. Adelstein. I would like to add to that, Mr. Kennedy, whoever 
the gentleman was that I spoke to, I asked if he would employ our 
people on their own trucks, and we would sign a contract with them. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many people were going to lose their jobs over 
this Safeway Store contract ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I wouldn't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. According to the testimony, the stop was worth 
$21.50 a week. 

Mr. Adelstein. I wouldn't know how many stores were involved 
at this time, and I can't tell you accurately how many people there 
were. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you caused a boycott 

Mr. Adelstein. But it was a matter of fact, that our men were 
servicing the establishments, and the work was given to another firm 
signed up with 456. 

Mr. Kennedy. But weren't you just happy because of the fact that 
they were unionized ? Wasn't that what was important ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir; the most important thing to me is to see 
that our people do the work. 

The Chairman. Let me see if I understand this. They went from 
one union to another. 

Mr. Adelstein. With a specific purpose, Senator. 

The Chairman. Let me ask you this, and let us get answers, and 
we will get your conclusions. First they were in your union ; is that 
correct ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6973 

The Chairman. Then they signed a contract with another union, 
or with a group that belonged to another union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Well, are you speaking of Rex Carting, sir? 

The Chairman. Which one is it ? 

Mr. Ejjnnedy. What was the question ? 

The Chairman. Am I speaking of Rex ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Westchester was in first and Rex Carting came in 
and replaced them. Westchester was organized with his local, and 
Rex Carting Co. was organized with John Acropolis. 

The Chairman. They were both teamsters unions ? 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Yes. 

The Chairman. They left one teamster union and made a contract 
for the service with another, with a company in another union ? 

Mr. I^NNEDY. That is correct. 

The Chairman. Then this boycott was pulled on a number of inno- 
cent stores simply to force them back into your union ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

The Chairman. That is what I am trying to get at. 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

The Chairman. That establishes the fact. 

Mr. Adelstein. That is right. 

The Chairman. Here is one union, and here is an employer that 
elects to do business with one union, and another union steps in and 
imposes a boycott to make him come back to the original union. 

Mr. Adelstein. That is a common practice, sir. 

The Chairman. It may be, and it may be an improper practice. In 
my judgment, it is. 

Mr. Adelstein. That is a common practice, sir. 

The Chairman. We are trying to find out what may be common and 
improper. 

Mr. Kennedy. They were using union help out there in Westchester, 
and these other stores that had nothing to do with this dispute were 
boycotted. 

The Chairman. The thing I am pointing out as improper practice 
is this : You can go out and make the innocent suffer, those who have 
no responsibility in the matter, and cause them to suffer simply to 
force someone to choose your union in preference to another union. 

Mr. Adelstein. I would like to clarify that, Senator. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Adelstein. An employer may choose to leave our union today 
with contracts that are uniform and go to another local union with 
contracts that would serve him best. Under the circumstances we have 
locals set up, where under the locals they have definite jurisdiction. 
It is spelled out. Under the private sanitation unit, our jurisdiction 
was spelled out since 1937. 

Mr, Kennedy. That didn't happen in this case. You are not recit- 
ing the facts. 

Mr. Adelstein. And 456 never in all of the years that the private 
cartmen were in business in all of Westchester County, never organized 
one firm. We had firms organized that kept their trucks in different 
bureaus, that is Bond, Yet, they serviced Westchester County. 

89330— 57— pt. 17 21 



6974 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. The Safeway Stores did not switch unions they 
switched firms. They switched companies, and they were dissatisfied 
with Westchester. 

Mr. Adelstein. That is only an opinion. 

Mr. Kennedy. They were dissatisfied with Westchester, and they 
switched over to Rex Carting Co. They stated that under oath before 
this committee. Your recitation of the fact is not correct. 

The Chairman. At any rate they had a boycott to make them come 
back into this union, and the boycott that affected people who were 
wholly innocent in the transaction. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is correct. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, I understand after 1953 the Westchester Cart- 
ing Co. for whom you performed this service, no longer had a con- 
tract with local 813; is that right? 

Mr. Adelstein. At the end of November of 1953, they refused to 
sign another contract with us. 

]\Ir. Kennedy. Now, have you boycotted a lot of stores and struck 
a lot of stores to force Westchester to come back in and sign a contract 
with you ? 

Mr. Adelstein. We did not. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And they still do not have a contract ? 

j\Ir. Adelstein. Not with local 813. 

Mr. Kennedy. So they have, as I understand it, and according to 
information we have, a company contract, a company union. Is that 
right ? They formed a company union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. We were informed as to that. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why didn't you show the same vigor and determina- 
tion after 1953, after Mr. Acropolis was murdered, and after West- 
chester Carting Co. gained complete control of this area ? Wliy didn't 
you show the same vigor to try to get them to sign up at that time ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I was reminded by our joint council and by Mr. 
Parise that our jurisdiction, in their or)inion, did not extend into West- 
chester County, and that 456 or the locals up there should organize the 
unorganized. We didn't do any organizational work up there at all. 

Mr. Kennedy. The services that you performed for a period of 3 
years was to give Westchester Carting Co., after Mr. Acropolis was 
murdered, a complete control, and Nick Rattini, a notorious hoodlum, 
gained complete control of the carting business in Yonkers, in and 
around Yonkers. 

Tlien after they gained that complete control, you dropped your or- 
ganizational drives; isn't that right? 

Mr. Adelstein. I did not drop our organizational drives. I went 
up there in 1954. I attempted on numerous occasions to meet with 
the men. I met with a few men. I didn't meet with a majority of the 
men. Continuously we have tried to organize Westchester Carting. 

Mr. Kennedy. What places did you picket, and what places did you 
boycott ? 

Mr. Adelstein. We did not do any picketing in Westchester County. 

Mr. Kennedy. It certainly is highly peculiar to me, Mr. Adelstein, 
that you showed such vigor during this period of time and that a 
murder resulted from this, and then you showed no interest after 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6975 

Westchester Carting Co., headed by Nick Kattini, gained complete 
control over the area. 

Now, as far as your saying that you have never 

The Chairman. Do we have the record of this man, Nick Rattini ? 

Mr. Kennedy. It has already been put in the record, and he is one 
of the missing witnesses, I might say, Mr. Chairman. 

You also stated, Mr. Adelstein, that you never had been arrested 
for threats. Do we have anything on that, Mr. Greene? 

Mr. Adelstein, I said violence and threats. 

Mr. Kennedy. Plave you been arrested for threatening people ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I have been arrested. 

Mr. Kennedy. For threatening people ? 

Mr. Adelstein. In my line of work. 

Mr, Kennedy. Have you been arrested for threatening people ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I have been arrested in my line of work. I can't 
recall at this time for what. I have never been convicted of any 
offense. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do 3^011 consider your line of work threatening 
people ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I would like to say 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that part of your line of work ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I would like to say this to you and I don't know 
whether you would consider it threatening or not, but, sir — ■■ — 

Mr. Kennedy. What is it ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I don't know whether you would consider it threat- 
ening or not, but when I go out to organize someone, I try to get a 
contract signed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Can you tell us now, have you been arrested for 
threatening people ? 

Mr. Adelstein. And the employers in most instances refuse to 
sign. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you threaten them then? 

Mr. Adelstein. And I may threaten them with a picket line. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you threatened people? Did you threaten 
Johnny Acropolis? 

Mr. Adelstein. I have never threatened anyone bodily. 

Mr. Kennedy. What does the record show ? 

Mr. Kelly. The record of Bernard Adelstein shows four arrests. 
On all of these charges, Mr. Adelstein was found not guilty. How- 
ever, it should be noted that his second arrest in 1938, city of New 
York, was for disorderly conduct causing a disturbance with a number 
of others, using loud and profane language to a police officer. Third 
arrest in New York City in 19-10, 4Tth precinct, arrested and charged 
with fighting in a public place and causing a disturbance. Fourth 
arrest, November 30, 1939, in New York, arrested by complaint, 
charged with using threatening and vulgar language. 

The Chairman. He was acquitted on all of these charges, but as I 
understood the witness in his voluntary statement before the com- 
mittee, he said that he had never been arrested for anything. 

Did you make tliat statement? 

]Mr. Adelstein. I did not. 

The Chairman, Did you say you never had been arrested for 
threatening anyone ? 

Mr. .'^elstein. I said "or violence." 



6976 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. I think the record will correct that. 

Mr. Kennedy. You say that you know Mr. Nick Kattini ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I do. 

Mr. Kennedy. How about Tony "Ducks"' Corallo ? Do you know 
him ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I know of him. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Do you know him ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I met him. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you got a social relationship with Tony 
"Ducks" Corallo? 

Mr. Adelstein. I have no social relationship with Tony "Ducks" 
Corallo. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you meet with him often ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I do not. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you talk with him often ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Not often; no, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. How about Carmine Tramunti ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Since our last discussion, I know Carmine Tra- 
munti. When I was asked a question whether I knew Tramunti, I 
couldn't recall the name. Now I know Carmine. 

Mr. Kennedy. You do know Carmine ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I met him and I met him over 10 or 15 years. His 
relatives are in the rubbish business. 

Mr. Kennedy. What relative of his is in the rubbish business? 

Mr. Adelstein. Fidanza, Anna Anelli. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who is that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. One is an aunt, and one is a cousin, and through 
them I met him. 

Mr. Kennedy. Has Carmine talked to you about that firm? 

Mr. Adelstein. He has. 

Mr. Kennedy. He has occasionally ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Oh, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. What kind of conversations have you had with him 
about that company ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I cannot recall the specific conversations, but I 
know he spoke to me about the firm. 

Mr. Kennedy. Has Tony "Ducks" Corallo spoken to you about any 
company ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I can't recall. 

Mr. Kennedy. You can't recall that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. "Wlien we talked to you originally you could not 
recall having talked wdth or met Carmine Tramunti; is that correct? 

Mr. Adelstein. You didn't say "Carmine," you said "Tramunti." 

Mr. Kennedy. And you couldn't remember that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. After that I went out to find out who Tramunti 
was, and I was informed that it is Carmine Tramunti. 

Mr. Kennedy. You couldn't remember him by his last name? 

Mr. Adelstein. I could not. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Tony Ducks ever intercede with you for Car- 
mine Tramunti ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I can't recall. 

Mr. Kennedy. You can't recall that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6977 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know Tony Vanelli ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You know him ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know about his criminal background ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I didn't until I read it in the papers. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know Carmine Tramunti's criminal back- 
ground ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I didn't until I read his papers. 

Mr. Kennedy. Anthony Ducks Corallo'^ 

Mr. Adelstein. I didn't until I read the papers. 

Mr. Kennedy. And Joe Parise, did you know his criminal back- 
ground ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Sir, I didn't know until I read the papers, but may 
I make a statement in regard to Joseph Parise ? 

Mr. Kennedy. I don't think it is necessary. 

]Mr. Adelstein. May I please make this statement ? 

The Chairman. A brief statement? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes ; it will be a brief statement. 

I have known the man, may his soul rest in peace, for about 18 
years. I know that he has been a fine labor leader, and he served the 
labor movement well. His contracts and his welfare plan and pension 
plan speak for themselves. 

Mr. Kennedy. I don't think we are getting anywhere here. 

Mr. Adelstein. "Whatever record there is, I didn't know until a 
long time after I became affiliated with him, but finding out the way 
he served the labor movement and helped in our organization, I dare- 
say to you that he did a fine job in the labor movement. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you laiow of his conviction for rape? 

Mr. Adelstein. I learned of that later. 

Mr. Kennedy. You know quite a few of the hoodlums and gang- 
sters in and around New York, do you, Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Kennedy, I know a lot of people, judges, poli- 
ticians, Senators, Congressmen, and people in all walks of life. In 
public life, you meet a lot of people. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had you known about Parise being tied up with 
Lucky Luciano ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Xo, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Being indicted with him ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I didn't know anything about that. 

Mr. Kennedy. And who else was on that ? Lepke Buchalter, did 
you know he was indicted with him f 

Mr. Adelstein. Xo, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You didn't know that about your friend, Joseph 
Parise ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Xo, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was just a fine fellow ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Joe Parise was a very fine labor i-epresentative. 

Mr. Kennedy. You have turned over, I believe, your address book 
to us, have you not ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Your telephone book? 

Mr. Adelstein. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did ? 



^978 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. AdelsteiN. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you made a study or an examination of that, 
Mr. Greene ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you find some names in there that would be of 
interest ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And would fill in some of the gaps in this investiga- 
tion regarding this ? We have gone into some of the connections be- 
tween Mr. Squillante, and some of the cartmen with gangsters and 
hoodlums in the New York area. Did you find any well-known gang- 
sters in Mr. Adelstein's address book ? 

Mr. Greene. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you give us some examples of what you 
found ? 

Mr. Greene. We have examined the address book of Mr. Bernard 
Adelstein. After first examining this book, by the way, when we 
went back to pick it up, Mr. Adelstein 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all right, just go ahead. 

Mr. Greene. One of the names listed in Mr. Adelstein's book, un- 
der the name John B., no last name, just a John B., the telephone 
number listed under the name John B. is Judson 6-1766. This num- 
ber is listed to the Carpet Corporation of America, 515 Madison Ave- 
nue, New York. John Biello is known to the New York City Police 
Department as B-67065. He did 714 to 15 years for armed robbery, 
in which his accomplice was Nick Rattini of the Westchester Carting 
Co. Mr. Biello is an associate of Anthony Carf ano, James O'Connell, 
and Jack Kermit. An employee at the darpet Corporation of Amer- 
ica, according to our records, was George Scalise, convicted labor ex- 
tortionist. 

Mr. Biello was also a partner in real-estate holdings and in the 
Carpet Corporation of America with Joseph Petso, who was ques- 
tioned by police in connection with the murder of Thomas Lewis. 
Mr. Petso, who lived in Atlantic Beach, N. Y., is regarded as a high 
ranking underworld figure in the New York area. We asked Mr. 
Adelstein about Mr. Petso, and Mr. Biello's name in his book, and 
his reply to Mr. Kelly and myself was "You know how it is, fellows, 
everybody in this business has got a rabbi." 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is an emphatic lie. 

Mr. KENNEDY. You didn't say anything like that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I did not. 

Mr. Kelly. I think it should be brought out in regard to Mr. 
Biello that he was listed as secretary of the Carpet Corporation of 
America, and one of his associates in this business was George Galese. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you never said anything like that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is a lie. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Kelly, were you present ? 

Mr. Kelly. I was present and I Iniow the exact words. 

Mr. Kennedy. He made the statement ? 

Mr. Kelly. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Greene. This is a photostatic copy of a page from Mr. Adel- 
stein's address book, that has the listing for the name "John B." In 
fact, sir, when we asked him about the name "John B" in the address 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES m THE LABOR FIELD 6979 

book, he said he didn't know who it was, and we asked him why he 
only listed it as "John B," instead of putting in the last name, and he 
said he did not recall. When we reminded him the number was listed 
in the ('arpet Corporation of America, he said that he still did not 
know" who it was. When we reminded him of the name "John Biello," 
alias Johnny Futto, he said "Oh, yes, I remember." 

Mr. Kenxedy. Is that true, Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. Adelsteix. That is true. 

Mr. Kelly. The date we had that discussion was March 11 "when 
we served the first subpena. 

Mr. Greexe. 1057. 

Mr. Kexxedy. Can you give us some other names with a summary ? 

Mr. Greexe. Another name listed in Mr. Adelstein's address book 
is "T. V." "T. V." is identical with Tony Vanelli. 

Mr. Kexxedy. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Adelsteix. That is true. 

Mr. Greene. Also known as Antonio Santini. When we questioned 
Mr. Adelstein on the identification of "T. V." in his book, he said "I 
cannot remember who that is." When we asked him why would he list 
names in his book with such brief initials, he said he just didn't re- 
member. When we reminded him that that number was listed to a 
firm in which Tony Vanelli had an interest, he said that he recalled 
it but that Tony Vanelli had something to do with the trade waste 
business. 

The criminal record of Antonio Santini in the New York City 
Police Department, lists that in 1914 he was sentenced to 5 years and 
6 months to 7 years in Sing Sing Prison for robbery, first degree. 

In 1921 he was sentenced to Sing Sing Prison for robbery, as a 
second offender, 40 years in Sing Sing Prison. 

In 1940 he was paroled from Sing Sing Prison, with the separa- 
tion date of his parole January 26, 1964. We understand he has 
been returned to Sing Sing since. 

The photostatic copy of the page from Mr. Adelstein's address book 
listing Tony V. that is the actual name on here, is produced there. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. He is a friend of yours ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Greene. He also has a listing in his address book for Tony D. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Who is he ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Tony D. I think may be Tony Ducks. 

Mr. Kennedy. Tony Corallo ? - 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You listed him as Tony D. 

Mr. Adelstein. That is right, and I didn't know the second name, 
and I couldn't recall it. 

Mr. Greene. Tony D.'s number is listed as Algonquin 7424, and Mr. 
Kelly and I asked him, Mr. Adelstein, who Tony D. was, and he said 
he couldn't remember. When we reminded him that it was Tony 
Ducks Corallo, he said he did recall. The criminal record of Tony 
Ducks Corallo lists 12 arrests to Tony Corallo, with convictions for 
consorting with known criminals and narcotics. The address page on 
Mr. Adelstein's address book with the listing of Tony D. is enclosed. 

Mr. Kennedy. All right. 



6980 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kelly. In regard to Mr, Corallo, incidentally, Mr. Kennedy, 
his record indicates that between 1929 when he left school, and 1940 
when he registered for the draft, he had gainful employment for 2 
weeks. He was deferred from the draft and the reason was given 
because he was the sole support of his parents. 

Mr. Greene. He also had a listing in his book under the title "Nun- 
zio," and this number was checked out to the Empire Metal Lathe 
Co., listed to Nunzio Camilla. A check of him relates obtained in- 
formation to the effect that he headed Camilla Motors, and that he 
is a close associate and friend of Augie Carfano and to Thomas Lo- 
casey. Furthermore, two of his employees were Salvatore Santora, 
alias Tom Mix, and one of his partners was James Vintlerro, alias 
Jimmy Sniff, both prominent operators in the narcotics business in 
New York. 

He also had listings in his book for Nunzio, which checked out to 
be the listing for the home number of Nunzio Squillante, and he had 
listings for Jimmy S., which turned out to be the listing for James 
Squillante, and he had a listing for Joseph Petso, who was questioned 
in connection with the Lewis murder, and he is an associate of 
Biello. 

He has the name of Dante Gollo, whose arrest record was intro- 
duced into this committee hearing yesterday, and who Anne Daria, 
the Secretary of the Greater New York Cartmen's Association used 
to reside with in the Bronx. 

He had several listings for the name of Joseph Feola, alias Joey 
Surprise. He had a listing for "J. W.," and that is an alias of James 
Massey, or Jimmy Ward. James Massey was an associate of Mr. 
Squillante in the Pic Records Co., and also was in the Glow Vaccum 
Cleaner Co., which is what that listing checked out to. Mr. Massey 
has a criminal record, and the Glow Vacuum Cleaner Co. was one 
of the investors in the Carters Investors Corp. 

The Chairman. Is there anj- of that that you want to deny, Mr. 
Adelstein ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Greene. He also had several listings for Nathan Shefferman. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know him ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Oh, sure. 

Mr. Kennedy. You have known him for a long time ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Five or six years. 

Mr. Kennedy. What connection have you had with him ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I can't recall any, outside of meeting him. 

Mr. Kennedy. Where would you meet him ? 

Mr. Adelstein. At Washington or Chicago, or somewhere. Or in 
New York. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he make any purchases for you ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he have any contacts with any of the companies 
witli whom you had contracts ? 

Mr. Adelman. The cartmen, no, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Or anybody else ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Has he suggested any business to you ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Business to me ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Any business deals of any kind. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6981 

Mr. Adelstein. Not to me, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Just a social relationship ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is all. 

Mr. Kennedy. Nothing further than that? 

Mr. Greene. At the listing of the Chicago office and the New York 
office in his phone listing book he also had a listing for DeSalvo, just 
DeSalvo, and that number checked out to local 32 in the Bronx. It 
should be in Mount Vernon, N. Y. It may be remembered from the 
committee testimony of Mr. Doyle that Thomas DeSalvo of local 32-E 
"svas the man who carried to Mr. Acropolis threats that four men would 
be killed because they said Acropolis was playing around with a rough 
mob. 

I also had the listing of Daniel Tonas, a member of the International 
Jewelry Workers Union, who was a partner with the notorious gam- 
bler, Larry Snofsky, and others in an interracial gambling casino in 
Las Vegas 2 years ago. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all of that. 

Did any of these people with these records ask you to intercede or 
any companies, cartmen's companies ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Some did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you perform any favors for them ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I never performed a favor. 

Air. Kennedy, Never, for anybody ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That would affect our people. Our members of 
our union. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever tell anyone that you would call an 
organizer off so it wouldn't bother a cartmen ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I can't recall that I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you wouldn't do anything like that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I can't recall doing anything like that. In instances 
where an organizer was handling a situation, that I would handle it. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you would say you would handle it ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. If some of these people requested personal attention, 
you would say that you would handle it yourself? 

Mr. Adelstein. I would look into the matter and find out what it 
was all about. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that you would handle it yourself ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is right, with the organizer present. And the 
men, if there were men involved. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Tony Ducks make such a request of you ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I can't recall. 

Mr. Kennedy, Did Tramunti ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, he did. 

Mr, Kennedy. He made a request ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you agree to handle it personally ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you do it ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. According to the information, was that Rose Anelli ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you then handled that matter personally ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I did. 



6982 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. You called off the man that was handling it per- 
sonally ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I didn't call him off, I called him in and took the 
question up with him. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was the question ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The question pertained to whether we should leave 
Hose Anelli alone. 

Mr. Kennedy. What do you mean ? 

Mr. Adelstein. And don't organize the people. 

Mr. Kennedy. What do you mean, leave her alone ? 

Mr. Adelstein. With a union contract. 

Mr. Kennedy. Instead of what ? 

Mr. Adelstein, Nothing, just leave her alone and not have a union 
contract there, and not organize the people. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was the only question ? 

Mr. Adelstein. There probably was a question in regard to work- 
ing conditions, where complaints were made, and I asked that they 
be adjusted, so that the men would be given their proper consideration. 

Mr. Kennedy. According to the testimony we have had before this 
committee from several witnesses, the terms of the contract for Rose 
Anelli had not been enforced, and that the employees get below union 
scale as far as their wages are concerned. 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Kennedy 

Mr. Kennedy. That is $66, 1 believe. 

Mr. Adelstein. I would have to explain that, too. If you will just 
bear with me, I think that we can clear all of that up. 

We have over 500 employers, and we have a small staff of men on 
the field. We send notifications out to all of the members reminding 
them of their conditions, and if they are not receiving their conditions 
under the terms of the contract, to call the union and make a com- 
plaint. The people employed by Rose Anelli, if they had complained, 
that matter would have been adjusted for the benefit of the workers. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you were going to handle this matter 2:)ersonally ? 

Mr. Adelstein. And the question tliat came up before me was that 
she had some nonunion people working for her, and the business agent 
requested that they be members of the union. I was asked to leave 
these people alone, and I refused, and as a result thej^ joined the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wasn't it a fact at the time you had the conversation 
with Tramunti, these people were already in the union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Let me say this to you, by a firm having a contract 
with the union does not necessarily say that all of the people working 
for them are in the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. We found that out. 

Mr. Adelstein. And it has been borne out, and I would like to 
clear that up. 

Mr. Kennedy. At the time that you intervened or interceded in 
Rose Anelli's case, she already had a contract with the union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That may be true. 

Mr. I^NNEDY, You said that you were going in to make a deter- 
mination as to whether the company should be union or not. 

Mr. Adelstein. I said whether the men, the new men that were 
newly hired that we weren't familiar with them, and didn't know 
whether they were working there, that they weren't in the union. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6983 

Mr. IvENNEDY. How could you sign a contract without even know- 
ing whether the employees wanted it or not? 

Mr. Adelstein. Let me say this to you, that is what I wanted to 
clear up. When we sign a contract with management, whoever we 
find there at the time are signed up into the union. Employers, and it is 
a common practice, hire more men after the contracts are signed, 
and we are not notified to the extent and they keep them out of the 
union as long as they can. But when we get around to the fact 
and we are informed or learn that there are nonunion people working 
for any employer, we insist that the contract be complied with. 

You will find that Montesano and other firms stated here, they have 
contracts with the union, and if it weren't for the testimony here I 
wouldn't know that they are employing nonunion people, and I can 
assure you that that will be corrected. 

Mr. Kennedy. It wasn't Mr. Montesano who was employing non- 
union help, it was Mr. DeCabia who was employing nonunion help. 
Now let us get back to this case of Rose Anelli. 

"Wliat were you going to do, and what did Mr. Tramunti request 
that you do? 

Mr. Adelstein. Leave the people alone, that they should not join 
the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. I should think you would just tell him right off, that 
you weren't going to do that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I told him it couldn't be done. 

Mr. Kennedy. You told him that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Positively. 

Mr. I^NNEDY. You said "It can't be done" ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why were you going to handle the matter personally ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I felt he could expedite it and see the men joined 
the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were going against, actually you were not doing 
Tramunti a favor, he had drawn this to your attention, and you were 
going to move in and make sure that these people were members of the 
union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. In a common practice that I have done that, Mr. 
Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that right ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I want to add to you my record stands. 

Mr. Ivennedy. It doesn't look too good this week, Mr. Adelstein. 

Mr. Adelstein. I wovild like to say this to you, that you cannot poll 
my membership and find out the action I take when and if a complaint 
comes into our office. You have our records with the Mediation 
Board and the State labor board and you will find that as a result of 
that whether we tolerate or stand for any violation of contract where 
we know about it. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to play a couple of wire taps, Mr. Chair- 
man, and see if it appears that what Mr. Adelstein was doing in this 
case was going out and trying to organize Rose Anelli's shop, as he 
has testified before this committee. 

The Chairman. Are these same taps taken under the same court 
order ? 

Mr. Kennt:dy. Yes. 



6984 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. All right. Provide the witness with a copy. 

Mr. Kennedy. There is another court order on this one. 

The Chairman. Let us have the court order. 

Mr. Kennedy. This is a tap on local 229 of the Textile Workers 
Union. 

The Chairman, This order may be printed in the record at this 
point. 

(Application for court order and the court order issued referred to 
above follow:) 

Court of General Sessions, County of New York 

In the Matter of Intercepting Telephonk- Communications transmitted over 
ALgonquin 4-7424, 7J,25, 7426, 7^7, a7id 7428 

It appearing from the affidavit of Alfred J. Scotti, chief assistant district attor- 
ney of the county of New York, sworn to on July 1, that it is in the public interest 
to furnish to the United States Senate Select Committee on Improper Activities in 
the Labor or Management Field, of which the Honorable John L. McClellan of 
Arkansas is chairman, and Robert F. Kennedy is chief counsel, certain transcripts 
and information with respect to the interception of telephonic communications 
during the periods September 21, 1945, to March 21, 1955 ; March 21, 1955, to 
September 15, 1955, and September 20, 1955, to March 20, 1956, which were 
transmitted over the telephone instruments designated as ALgonquin 4—7424, 
7425, 7426, 7427, and 7428, listed in the name of United Textile Workers of 
America, American Federation of Labor, Local 229, located at premises 325 
Fourth Avenue, county of New York, city and State of New York, it is 

Ordered, that the district attorney of New York County be, and he hereby is, 
authorized and empowered to furnish said committee with the transcripts and 
information with respect to the interception of telephonic communications trans- 
mitted over each of the above identified telephone instruments during the periods 
set forth hereinabove, for the use of said committee in connection with and in 
the course of its said investigations. 

Dated, New York, N. Y., July 1, 1957. 

( S ) John A. Miller, J. C. G. S. 



Court of General Sessions, County of New York 

In the Matter of Intercepting Telephonic Communications Transmitted over 
ALgonquin 4-71t2k, 7425, 742Q, 7i27, and 7^28 

State of New York, 

County of New York, ss: 

Alfred J. Scotti, being duly sworn, deposes and says : 

I am the Chief Assistant District Attorney in and for the County of New 
York and in charge of the Rackets Bureau of the District Attorney's Office. 

This is an application for an order permitting the District Attorney of New 
York County to furnish the United States Select Committee on Improper Activ- 
ities in the Labor or Management Field, of which the Honorable John L. Mc- 
Clellan, of Arkansas, is Chairman, and Robert F. Kennedy is Chief Counsel, 
certain transcripts and information with respect to the interception of tele- 
phonic communications transmitted over ALgonquin 4—7424, 7425, 7426, 7427, 
and 7428, listed in the name of United Textile Workers of America, American 
Federation of Labor, Local 229, located at premises 325 Fourth Avenue, County 
of New York, City and State of New York, during the periods hereinbelow set 
forth. 

On January .30, 1957, the Senate of the United States duly adopted a resolu- 
tion by which the said Committee was authorized to investigate improper activ- 
ities in the labor or management field, with the purpose of obtaining information 
upon which the United States Senate could consider the advisability of adopting 
new legislation or modifying or amending present statutes. 

The said Committee thereafter conducted both public and private hearings 
with this end in view, and has subpoenaed and interrogated numerous witnesses 
from various localities and States of the United States. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6985 

The Committee is now planning to extend its investigations to the area of 
New York State and in this connection has issued, or contemplates the issuance 
of, a subpoena to persons who used the telephones of said local, for interroga- 
tion in connection with said investigation. 

In August 1956, and again subsequent to January 30, 1957, the date the said 
resolution above referred to was adopted, said Chief Counsel of said Committee 
requested that this office furnish him, for the use of the said Committee, all 
transcripts and information reflecting the interception of all telephonic commu- 
nications transmitted over the telephone instruments hereinabove described. 

The records of this office reveal that the telephonic communications transmit- 
ted over said instruments were intercepted during the periods hereinbelow set 
forth. All of the said interceptions were pursuant to orders issued by Judges 
of the Court of General Sessions under Section 813a of the Code of Criminal 
Procedure. 

The dates during which the said telephonic communications were intercepted 
were September 21, 1954, to March 21, 1955, March 21, 1955, to September 15, 
1955, and September 20, 1955, to March 20, 1956. 

It is respectfully submitted that the District Attorney of New York County 
be authorized, in the public interest, to furnish to the United States Senate 
Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field the 
said transcripts and other information for the use of said Committee in con- 
nection with and in the course of its said investigation. 

No previous application has been made for the order herein requested. 

(s) Alfred J. Scotti. 

Sworn to before me this 1st day of July 1957. 

(s) Robert F. Ward, 
Notary Public, State of New York. Certificate filed in Neiv York, 
County. 

Commission expires March 30, 1959. 

The Chairman. We will proceed with the conversation. The con- 
versation you are about to hear is a recording of a conversation which 
was had at 12 : 30 p. m., February 21, 1955. 

All right, proceed. 

(The conversation above referred to follows :) 

Mr. Tramunti. Carmine. 

Female. Carmine? 

Mr. Tramunti. Yes. 

Operator. What is the last name, please? 

Mr. Tramunti. Gribbs. 

Operator. Just a minute, please. 

Mr. Tramunti. Bernie? 

Mr. Adelstein. How are you? 

Mr. Tramunti. All right. 

Mr. Adelstein. What's doin'? 

Mr. Tramunti. Nothing. 

Mr. Adelstein. Uh-huh. 

Mr. Tramunti. Listen 

Mr. Adelstein. What? 

Mr. Tramunti. Are you always busy? 

Mr. Adelstein. Well, not always busy. Why? 

Mr. Tramunti. Well, maybe someday I want to come down and talk with you. 

Mr. Adelstein. O. K. 

Ml-, Tramunti. Listen 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah? 

Mr. Tramunti. Just so you'll know it now, you know? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah. 

Mr. Tramunti. You know Sunset? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes. 

Mr. Tramunti. That's me. 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah ; yeah. 

Mr. Tramunti. No ; I'm in it ; it's mine. 

Mr. Adelstein. Oh, Sunset? 

Mr. Tramunti. Yeah. 

Mr. Adelstein. I didn't know that. 

Mr. Tramt:nti. Yes ; it's been going on 3 weeks now. 



6986 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Adelstein. Good luck. 

Mr. Tkamunti. You hear? 

Mr. Adelstein. Uh-hiih. 

Mr. Tramunti. Just so you'll know. 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah. 

Mr. Tramunti. Because she was telling me something about you, you know. 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah? 

Mr. Tramunti. And I said, "Now, we'll take care of that. You do it. Don't 
worry about that." 

Mr. Adelstein. Uh-huh. 

Mr. TR^iMUXTi. So this way 

Mr. Adelstein. "Wait a minute. Wait a minute. Sunset. Sunset. I got you 
mixed up with a different Sunset. Sunset? 

Mr. Tramunti. Yeah. My Aunt Anelli — Rosie — Fidenza — Anelli. 

Mr. Adelstein. Oh, my God. No kidding? 

Mr. Tramunti. Yeah. 

Mr. Adelstein. I didn't know that. 

Mr. Tramunti. Yeah. 

Mr. Adelstein. Uh-huh. Sunset. 

Mr. Tramunti. Sunshine. 

Mr. Adelstein. Sunshine? 

Mr. Tramunti. You know why I'm saying sunset? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. 

Mr. Tramunti. I am just calling Philadelphia here, and I got Sunset in front 
of me. 

Mr. Adelstein. Uh-huh. 

Mr. Tramunti. Yeah. 

Mr. Adelstein. It is Sunshine? 

Mr. Tramunti. Sunshine, and I'm saying Sunset. 

Mr. Adelstein. Sunshine. U-huh. O. K. So when will you be in? 

Mr. Tramunti. Well, I'm in all the time here in the office here, you know, 
with Tony. 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah, I know. 

Mr. Tramunti. You know what I mean? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah, so when you come in, give me a ring. 

Mr. Tramunti. I will call you and we'll get together. 

Mr. Adelstein. We will get together. How is my friend ? 

]\Ir. Tramunti. All right. Just a minute. He wants to talk to you. 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah. 

Mr. CoRALLO. Hello, Bernie ; how are you? 

Mr. Adelstein. How are you, kid? 

jNIr. CoRALLO. All right. 

Mr. Adelstein. How's tricks? 

Mr. CoRALLO. Fine, Bernie. 

Mr. Adelstein. What's doing? 

Mr. CoRALLO. Listen, Bernie 

Mr. Adelstein. What? 

Mr. CoRALLO. (Inaudible) in the partnership there in Sunrise. 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah. Sunrise, Tony. 

Mr. CoRALLO. Is it Sunshine or Sunrise? 

Mr. Adelstein. Sunrise. 

Mr. Corallo. It's Sunshine. 

Mr. Adelstein. I think it's Sunrise. 

Mr. Corallo. All right. So Sunrise. So you'll know ; you know what I mean, 
Bernie? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah. Yeah. 

Mr. Corallo. So when the time comes — you want to get together, you just 
say so. 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah. Well, I didn't know who was taking care of that. I 
will have to reach out and see which fellow is taking care of that and I will 
tell him. I'll take care of it. How is my friend? 

Mr. Corallo. Good. 

Mr. Adelstein. All right. Will you tell him that I want to get together with 

him? 

Mr. Corallo. I don't know if you could. 

Mr. Adelstein. All right. 

Mr. Corallo. I'll make the arrangements (inaudible) you hear, Bernie? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6987 



Mr. CoRALLO. All right. I' 11 make it. Listen, Bernie 

Mr. Adelstein. What? 

Mr. CoRALLO. That's the fellow up in the office who is a friend of mine. 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah, I know who it is. 

Mr. CoRALLO. Yon know who it is. 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah ; sure. 

Mr. CoRALLO. All right? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah ; sure. 

Mr. CoRALLO. All right. So you know, anyway. 

Mr. Adelstein. Yeah, Tony ; I'll take care of it. 

Mr. CoRALLO. O. K., Bernie. 

Mr. Adelstein. All right. 

Mr. CoRALLO. Look 

Mr. Adelstein. What? 

Mr. CoRALLO. Listen, is Joe back? 

Mr. Adelstein. He's supposed to be back today, Tony. 

Mr. CoRALLO. Would you let him call me as soon as he gets in? 

Mr. Adelstein. I'll tell him. Tony 

Mr. CoRALLO. What? 

Mr. Adelstein. If — tell him that if any of the delegates do go there before I 
grab them 

Mr. CoRALLO. Yeah 

Mr. Adelstein. To tell the party in the place to get in touch with me. 

Mr. CoRALLO. O. K. 

Mr. AdeLvStein. Understand? 

Mr. CoRALLo. Yeah. 

Mr. Adelstein. And I will take care of it. 

Mr. CoRALLO. O. K., boy. 

Mr. Ajjelstein. You know how some of these fellows are on the road some- 
times. They forget. So, tell them to get in touch with me, O. K.? O. K., 
Tony? 

Mr. CoRALLO. O. K. So long. 

Mr. Adelstein. So long. 

j\Ir. Kennedy. Now, was that your way of telling him that you 
were going out to get those employees organized ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That was my way of telling him I would sit down 
with him, and the record speaks for itself in regard to Sun Rise 
Cartage. 

Mr, Kennedy. What the record shows is that the company was 
organized and that none of the terms of the contract were enforced, 
that the employees received about $65 a week, instead of $85 to $90 a 
Aveek. Tliat is what the record shows, Mr. Adelstein. 

Mr. Adelstein. If that is true, I can assure you when I get back 
that will be corrected. 

Mr. Kennedy. I am glad we are helping you. 

Mr. Adelstein. The members of the union did not complain about 
that to me. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Here you had two notorious criminals calling you 
up and telling you of their relationship and their interest in a firm. 
The record then shows that the firm was unionized, and the record 
then shows that tlie terms of the contract were not enforced. 

That is what it shows, Mr. Adelstein. Now, I would like to play 
another tape, Mr. Chairman, which will show what Mr. Tramunti 
thought of this conversation. 

The Chairman. This transcript of the recording may be printed 
in the record. 

Mr. Kennedy. On top of page 5, where it says : 

How is my friend? 

Who are you referring to there ? 
Mr. Adelstein. I can't recall. 



6988 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. You can't recall that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No ; this goes back quite a little while. Mr. Ken- 
nedy, if I \Yere to ask you who you saw a month ago, you could not 
recall all of the people. 

Mr. Kennedy (reading) : 

Will you tell him that I want to get together with him? 

You can't recall who that was? 

Mr. Adelstein. I can't recall. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you said, 

I will make the arrangements. 
Who was it that you did not know whether you could get together 
with? 

Mr. Adelstein. I said I can't recall that. 

Mr. Kennedy. Even if you think real hard, you can't recall? 

Mr. Adelstein. Being over here, I don't mind telling you, I have 
to think pretty hard. 

The Chairman. Do you have another recording ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

The Chairman. This was taken under the same order ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

The Chairman. This recording was taken under the same order? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

The Chairman. Proceed and play it, and see that the witness and 
his counsel have a copy. 

(Transcript of a recording of February 21, 1955, 12:40 p. m., be- 
tween Rose Anneli and Carmine Tramunti is as follows:) 

Mr. Tramunti. EN 9-5853. O.K.? 

Woman. Yes. 

Mr. Tramunti. Hello? 

Rose Anelli. Hello. 

Mr. Tramunti. Hey — Rosie? 

Rose Anelli. Yes. 

Mr. Tramunti. Carmine. 

Rose Anelli. I just walked in. I thought I heard the telephone. I am break- 
ing my neck. 

Mr. Tramunti. Listen 

Rose Anelli. What? 

Mr. Tramunti. I called up that guy — Bernie. 

Rose Anelli. Yes? 

Mr. Tramunti. I spoke to Bernie. Now, here's what you do. Is the delegate 
out there? 

Rose Anelli. Yeah. 

Mr. Tramunti. You know that he approaches Anthony or you. No matter 
Wiho comes to you, you tell them that you are doing everything with Bernie 
Adelstein. 

Rose Anelli. I'm doing direct with Bernie Adelstein. 

Mr. Tramunti. If they don't believe you, tell them to call up Bernie Adelstein. 
That's all. You hear? 

Rose Anelli. Yeah. 

Mr. Tramunti. That's all until I see him. 
Rose Anelli. You didn't see him? 

Mr. Tramunti. No. I called him and I told him. You know what I mean? 

IlOoE AxiJ.Li. Yeah. 

Mr. TRA^trNTI. He said, "Good ; I'm glad. I wish you luck," and all that. He 
said, "All right, then, if anybody he comes up there to bother them" 

Rose Anelli. No ; this is Chester. 

Mr. Tramunti. That's right. Well, tell Chester to get in touch with Bernie. 
That's all. ;; 

Rose Anelli. Well, then, nothing untill hear from you? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6989 

Mr. Tramunti. No. Don't do nothing. 

Rose Anelli. All right. 

Mr. Tramunti. Don't do nothing no more. 

Rose Anelli. O. K. 

Mr. Tramunti. You understand? 

Rose Anelli. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Tramunti. Thats' all. I'll see you then, Rosie. 

Rose Anexli. O. K. 

Mr. Tramunti. So long. 

Rose Anexli. Bye. 

The Chairman. Wlio is Tramunti ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Carmine Tramunti is a nephew, I think, of Kose 
Anelli, the owner of Sun Rise Carting. 

The Chairman. He is the one that Corallo talked to you about? 
He is the one that had this part of the conversation with you on Feb- 
ruary 21, 1955 ; is that right? 

Mr. Adelstein. What is that question again, Senator ? 

The Chairman. He is the one that had this couA'ersation with you, 
the first recording, Tramunti ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is right. 

The Chairman. The same Tramunti ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is right. 

The Chairman, According to the record here, this first telephone 
call, that was played, was had at 12 : 30 p. m., February 21, 1955 ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is what this record says. 

The Chairman. The second one that was played was at 12 : 40 p. m., 
February 21, 1955. Obviously, Tramunti hung up the receiver in 
his conversation with you and called Rose Anelli. 

Mr. Adelstein. That is what this says. 

The Chairman. Thank you. 

The Chairman. It does not sound like you were fighting for the 
men much at that time, does it ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Senator, it is the results that count. The record 
will speak for itself. 

The Chairman. The record does speak, that she was paying only 
$66 a week for her help, whereas the union rates required eighty-some- 
odd dollars. 

Mr. Kennedy. And it was a 6-day week instead of a 5-day week. 

Mr. Adelstein. That is the employers testifying ? 

The Chairman. Do you deny it ? 

Mr. Adelstein. At this point I would not know. The men did not 
complain to me. 

The Chairman. Well, the men^did not, but Tramunti did. 

Mr. Adelstein. Tramunti did not speak to me about the wages. 

The Chairman. I know, but he spoke to you in terms that you under- 
stood, that he wanted a favor. 

Mr. Adelstein. Let me say this to you, now ; you want information 
to help. 

The Chairman. Yes. 

Mr. Adelstein, To help, and I think I am trying to cooperate and 
I Avill cooperate and please, so that we can expedite this, I would like 
to give you all of the facts as I know them. 

The Chairman. What were you talking about in these conversa- 
tions? 

89330— 57— pt. 17 22 



6990 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Adelstehst. We were talking about the men that they did not 
want to sign into the union. 

The Chairman. They were akeady in the union. 

Mr, Adelstein. They were not in the union. 

The Chairman. At that time ? 

Mr. Adelstein. At that time there were some newly hired men that 
they wanted left alone. 

The CHAHiMAN. Some newly hired ones ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Newly hired men. 

The Chairman. But the firm was in the union. 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why didn't you tell them that the men will have to 
go in the union. 

Mr. Adelstein. Wlien I found out the fact, I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. I thought you said that was what the conversation 
was about. 

Mr. Adelstein. The record will speak for itself. I had to find 
out first from Chester. 

Mr. Kennedy, What did he want when he called you. "Wliat did 
you understand he wanted ? 

Mr, Adelstein. I didn't know. I said I would look into it. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did he want? He wanted you to lay off. 

Mr. Adelstein, To lay off ? 

Mr, Kennedy. You did lay off because they are not getting union 
wages and they are working 6 days a week; of course, you laid off. 

Mr. Adelstein. You are only saying that but that isn't a matter of 
fact. 

Mr. Kennedy. It is a matter of fact. 

]Mr. Adelstein. It is not a matter of fact. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is it untrue ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I say at this time, the men did not complain to 
me, and had they, I would have corrected the situation. 

The Chairman. That is not the question. Is it true or not true 
that they only got the $66 a week ^ 

JNIr. Adelstein, Why don't we check the record. 

The Chahiman, Why do you say it is not a fact. 

jNIr. Adelstein. I did not say it wasn't a fact. 

The Chairman. A7hat was it you were saying was not a fact? 
Yon just said it is not a fact. 

Mr. Adelstein. Senator, I would like to say this to you. You have 
heard from disgruntled employers who try to engage representatives 
to get to m.e and try to do business with me. Sure, they are dis- 
gruntled, and sliow me an employer that has to improve the condi- 
tions of his people that is a happy man. 

The Chairman. You show me a man. 

Mr. Adelstein. I have gone out, Mr. Senator 

The Chairman. Now wait a minute. 

Mr. Adelstein. Why don't you hear the truth ? 

The Chairman. Do you want this committee to treat you cour- 
teously ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I would like to be treated courteously. I would 
like to be treated the way I will treat you. 

The Chair31an. Well, you reciprocate. 



IMPROPER ACTWITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6991; 

Mr. Adelstein. I %Yill. ! 

The Chairman. I mean that. You have just stated that it was not^ 
a fact, and the record will so show it was not a fact that they were] 
only getting $66 a week. I 

Now, I ask you to state whether it is true or not. I 

Mr. Adelstein. It is not a fact that any complaints w^ere brought! 
to me. 1 

The Chairman. I did not ask you about that. I have never asked 
you about a complaint. I am asking you if it is a fact or not a fact 
that they continue to operate at $66 a week, w^hereas, your union con- 
tract called for $80 a week. | 

jMr. Adelstein. I would have to look to find out. 

The Chairman. Well, you do not know then, that it is not a fact.i 

Mr. Adelstein. I wouldn't know at this time. 

The Chairman. All right. Do not say it is not a fact then, if you! 
now say you do not know whether it is a fact. i 

Proceed. j 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we have subpenaed Kose Annellii 
and she has stated that she has been given a doctor's certificate fromJ 
lier cousin that she is too sick to come, but we did interview her, andj 
Mr. Kelly can testify as to what she said as to what wages were being! 
paid by her firm. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

TESTIMONY OF JAMES P. KELLY— Resumed 

Mr. Kelly. We had a conversation with Rose Annelli in our office! 
in New York City and she stated that she did not always observe! 
the union contract, that she worked her employees 6 days a week and 
she was never troubled by the union, and was never bothered by union! 
representatives. I 

Mr. Kennedy. I want to ask you about some other matters in con- 
nection with some of these companies; namely, the security clause 
within the contract. When was that security clause put into ef-! 
feet? 

Mr. Adelstein. I think in 1951. 

Mr. Kennedy. In 1951? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. What is the provision or what does that state, tnej 
security clause ? I 

Mr. Adelstein. That if one employs members of the union and doesj 
not belong to any group or association, that they put up $300 ori 
equivalent to 4 weeks' pay, rather. Instead of $300 it is equivalent; 
to 4 weeks' pay. 

Mr. I^nnedy. Per employee ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Per employee ; yes. 

]\Ir. Kennedy. What is the purpose of that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The purpose of that has been that we have a wel- 
fare and pension plan and in order for us to cover our members, we 
iiave to pay the carriers whom we had at that time an advance. 

In many instances, or in most instances, the employer did not pay 
on time and sometimes was delinquent 2 or 3 months. We had toj 
pay the insurance carriers to see that our members were covered.! 



6992 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

On many occasions we had to take the employers to the Labor Board so 
that they would comply with that provision. 

Mr. Kennedy. You mean the security provision ? 

Mr, Adelstein. Comply with the payments under the pension and 
welfare plan, and we finally resolved that with our membership ask- 
ing that the employers put up a security so that we could continue 
to pay the carriers whether it was for a month, 2 or 3. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you make everybody put this provision up ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You don't? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You select who should put it up and who should 
not? 

Mr. Adelstein. We decide it. 

Mr. Kennedy. You and Mr. Villano ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The executive board in instances, and sometimes 
myself, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. You decide? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, surely. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you can make the decision and you personally 
can make the decision as to whether a man or a cartman would have 
to put up $300 per employee or not, is that right ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I have made the decision. 

Mr. Kennedy. Or $400 and depending upon whether you approve 
of the cartman or not, you can make it on that basis, and you can 
make the decision on that basis, is that right ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Depending upon our experience. 

Mr. K!ennedy. For instance. Van Ness testified before this com- 
mittee that within a week or so of the time he was out of the asso- 
ciation, he had to put up $300 per employee and he had to put up 
$1,200 and they were all self-employed. He had to put up $1,200 for 
4 individuals who ran the company. Excuse me, Lent rather than 
Van Ness — they were all self-employed — $1,200 for Mr. Lent. 

Mr. Adelstein. Whether they own the truck or not, if they were 
members of the union, we were still liable to the carriers. When we 
were informed that they were no longer members of groups, we asked 
that they put up their security with the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. He had to put up $1,200 for his own family, is that 
right? 

Mr. Adelstein. I assume that is so. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat about Mr. Strelzin, Harvey Strelzin, who 
operated in New York City ? 

Mr. Adelstein. What about him ? 

]Mr. Kennedy. He only had to put up $300 and he had 4 or 5 
employees. 

Mr. Adelstein. Our experience with Sanitary Haulage in regard 
to payment on pension and welfare was good. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he had a partner who was prominent in the 
underworld, isn't that true? 

Mr. Adelstein. I never met him and I don't know of him. 

]Mr. Kennedy. What about jMr. Montesano? He had to put up 
$1,800. Why did you make Mr. Montesano put up Sf?l,800? 

Mr. Adelstein, It was part of our contract and I asked him to 
comply. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 6993 

Mr. I^NNEDY. Had he been delinquent in his payment to the pen- 
sion and welfare fund ? 

Mr. Adelstein. He had been short. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had he been prior to that time ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I wouldn't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you made him put up $1,800. 

Mr. Adelstein. Over the period since he 

Mr. Ivennedy. You made him put up $1,800 and according to your 
testimony it was because these people were delinquent in their pay- 
ments ; had he been delinquent ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes ; he had been. 

Mr. Kennedy. Prior to the time you made him put up the $1,800? 

Mr. Adelstein. He has been. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is not answering the question. Prior to the 
time he put up the $1,800 had he been delinquent in his payments ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Adelstein. Prior to that, he has been. 

Mr. Kennedy. He had been prior to that time ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. What about Mr. Lent ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I think we signed him up. He was not in the union 
too long, and since we had no experience with him, he was asked to 
put up security. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you are the one who makes the decisions ? 

Mr. Adelstein. More or less, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you keep any records on who is delinquent and 
who is not? Do you keep a list as to those firms that are not satis- 
factory to you ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The firms that are delinquent, we have a list of. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have a list of those ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Do you have files and records on that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kj:nnedy. We have asked you for those records and you never 
furnished them to us. 

Mr. Adelstein. We have lists in our office as to who is delinquent 
and who is not. 

( The witness conferred with his counsel. ) 

Mr. Adelstein. And Mr. Wolbert now informs me that they looked 
at those records. 

Mr. Greene. When we first visited the office of the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters on March 11, 1957, we asked both Mr. 
Wolbert and Mr. Adelstein — this was Mr. Kelly and myself — as to 
how they determined which firm they needed to get security from. 
Mr. Wolbert explained to us that it depended upon their experience 
with the firm. 

We then asked Mr. Wolbert if they kept individual case files on 
each of the firms under contract and their experience with respect to 
working conditions and everything else, as to whetlier those firms 
would be required to post security. Mr. Wolbert said that he did 
not keep individual case files, and we asked him how he remembered 
it, and they pointed to a cardboard box on the floor that was filled 
with a number of papers, some of them rather dusty, and said, "Well, 



6994 IMPROPER ACTrvrriES in the labor field 

our experience with the State Libor-relations board or the State 
mediation board shows us, and the rest of it I remember." 

The Chairman. I want to ask you about Mr. Parisi. Is that the 
man, Mr. Parisi, P-a-r-i-s-i, who testified here that you tried to 
assess him twenty-some-odd-thousand dollars? He refused to pay 
it. ^Vliat did you do about that ? 

Mr. i\j)ELSTEi]sr. We referred the matter to the labor board. 

The Chairman. The labor board ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The labor board did not render a decision, because 
Mr, Parisi came to my office and spoke to me, and told me that, in- 
stead of paying 3 months in advance on the welfare, which was a lot 
of money, he would abide by the contract and make monthly pay- 
ments. We agreed, then, to find out how his experience would be with 
us in regard to the monthly payments. He has since complied, and 
we have had no trouble with him. 

The Chairman. He was pretty emphatic and he was not going to 
pay and he was going to operate the business. 

Mr. Adelstein. He didn't say it to us. 

The Chairman. He said it here. 

Mr. Adelstein. Well, he didn't say it to us. He asked that he be 
given consideration. 

Mr. Kennedy. Doesn't every union in the country have this dif- 
ficulty of making sure that the welfare and pension payments are 
met? 

Mr. Adelstein. I wouldn't know the problems of the other unions. 

Mr. Kennedy. You have a provision clause in your contract which 
gives you a terrific or tremendous economic control over many of these 
small cartmen, Mr. Adelstein. 

Mr. Adelstein. It is necessary for the welfare of our members. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you have not strict rules as to how it is going to 
be enforced, and it is just an arbitrary decision by Bernie Adelstein, to 
make a decision as to whether someone is going to pay $28,300 or it is 
going to be waived. Isn't that correct ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Kennedy, isn't this based more or less on tlie 
experience you have with people ? 

Mr. Kennedy. It is Bernie Adelstein [who has a background which 
is very questionable and] ^ has (got) associations with many of the 
leading hoodlums and gangsters. He is the one who is making this 
decision. 

Mr. Shr^tz. May I ask that tliat statement by counsel be stricken 
from the record ? I don't think it is a proper one. 

The Chairman. The part of his statement regarding the back- 
ground will be stricken, and his association with hoodlums, insofar 
as that is a part of his background, will remain in the record. 

Mr. Shrttz. I would like the chairman and the committee to keep 
in mind that in the garbage industry we don't get Harvard alumni 
and Yale undergraduates, and people who are in that industry are in 
it, and that is the situation, and that is who the man has to associate 
with. 

The Chairman. We are not talking about the men doing the work. 
We are talking about the racketeers. 



^ (Matter stricken from the record.) 



IMPROPER ACTWITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6995 

Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Adelstein, you have this power, and the power 
rests with you to make a decision as to whether a person is going to 
have to pay the money or not ; isn't that right ? 

(The witness conferred with his counseL) 

Mr. Snivrrz. Eead it again. 

(Whereupon, the pending question was read by the reporter as 
above recorded. ) 

Mr. Kennedy. Strike the question. The provision in the contract, 
I believe, says that the security clause is made, including wages, vaca- 
tion pay, holiday pay, and insurance. That is section 23 ; is that the 
security clause ? 

Mr. Shivitz. Section 23 does relate to security, and so does sec- 
tion 24. 

Mr. Kennedy. In the middle of paragraph 23. I don't think it is 
restricted to pension and welfare, is it ? 

Mr. Shivitz. No ; it is not. 

Mr. Kennedy. It is wages, vacation pay, holida}^ pay, insurance, 
or pension and welfare payments ; isn't that right ? 

Mr. Adelstein,. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. To insure that those payments are made. 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. Here you have a requirement of $1,200 from a firm 
which is completely self-employed, 4 individuals who own and oper- 
ate their own company. 

Mr. Adelstein. They are covered under our welfare plan, Mr. Ken- 
nedy, and they receive benefits. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many employers do you have in your union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Approximately one-third who own trucks and 
work in the industry. 

Mr. Kennedy. They must pay union dues ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. Can they vote in an election ? 

Mr. Adelstein. They cannot. 

Mr. Kennedy. They cannot vote in the election ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us; can they vote in any election of 
any kind? 

Mr. Adelstein. They cannot vote on an election of officers. 

Mr. Kennedy. Or any other election ? 

Mr. Adelstein. They cannot vote on the question of the contracts. 

Mr. Ivennedy. They cannot ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Ivennedy. They cannot vote in those, and yet they have to be 
members of the union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

Mr. Shivitz. Would you like an explanation for the reason for that, 
Mr. Kennedy ? 

The Chairman. There is no explanation that would satisfy me, 
where a person has to pay dues and be subjected to all of these other 
penalties and then have no voice in them. That would not make much 
sense to me. 



6996 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Adelsteix. I think this would be helpful, if you "would permit 
me. 

The Chairmax. I will hear you briefly. 

Mr. Adelstein. When I started in this business 20 years ago, tne 
people worked 7 days a week from dark until dark. I know of an 
instance where the employer passed away and they had to pass the hat 
around so that he could have a funeral. Our men received, as chauf- 
feurs and helpers, as low as $1 a day. That was 7 days a week and 
when they took a day off because they were sick, they were docked for 
it. There was no question of a vacation. They had none. And they 
had no hours. 

When I looked around, I found that many of these firms were 
operated by relatives and employers. I m_ade a suggestion that every 
truck shall have either a chauffeur or a helper, and I asked that every 
truck be manned by 2 men, but the employers requested at that time 
that 1, or they could join the union. 

After taking their request into consideration, a provision was made 
under the terms of the contract, that one employer, partner, or stock- 
holder be permitted to work on the truck with a chauffeur or helper, 
and perform the work and the servicing of the establishments. 

They performed the work just as a chauffeur or helper who would 
have been employed. Had we not done that, we could not have helped 
the people who were working men on trucks and provided the condi- 
tions for them. 

The Chairman. Just a moment now. I told you I would hear you 
briefly and you are not talking to the point at all. You are talking 
about the benefits that have accrued to people by reasons of unions. 
That is not the issue. 

The question here, my interpretation of it, is a question of taxation 
without representation and it is just that simple. 

Mr. Adelstein. They have representation, Senator. 

The Chairman. They cannot represent themselves and vote. 

Will you proceed ? 

Mr. Kennedy. "Wliat about the Suffolk County Cartmen's Associa- 
tion ? According to the testimony which we have received, they were 
required to put up $1,800 from that association for all of the members 
of the association. 

Mr. Adelstein. I have to refer to the records. 

Mr. Kennedy. Further, after they dismissed Mr. Squillante as 
their representative, they were then notified that they would have 
to put up another further $1,800. Do you have any explanation 
of that? 

Mr. Adelstein. I would have to refer to the record. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why was that done ? 

Mr. Adelsit^in. In the first place, I never recommended Squillante 
to the — or anyone else. So that would not make any difference. 

Mr. Kennedy. It seemed to make a difference. The record shows 
that it did. 

Mr. Adelstein. We asked them for more money, Mr. Kennedy, but 
we never got it. 

Mr. Kennedy. I know, but why did you ask for it ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Well, the fact remains under the terms of our con- 
tract, the contracts are reviewed periodically. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 6997 

Mr. Kennedy. But this is more than a coincidence, that they dis- 
missed Mr. Squillante and he said he is going to make a call to the 
union. They dismiss him and within a few weeks or a short period 
of time the association receives another request of $1,800 from you. 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Kennedy, I have been making these requests 
right along. 

Mr. Kennedy. This is a second one. Once again, the point is to 
show the arbitrary control that you have over these cartmen and to 
treat or mistreat as you see fit. 

Mr. Shr^tz. With the chairman's permission, Mr. Kennedy, if I 
understand tlie question and the answer, I don't think any conclusion 
can be drawn or any adverse conclusion to this witness can be drawn 
if he makes a demand while Mr. Squillante is there and makes the 
same demand after he leaves. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is not the point. The $1,800 was requested 
while Mr. Squillante was there and the $1,800 was paid. That was 
for the period of time. 

Mr. Shivitz. It was not paid. 

Mr. Kennedy. The $1,800 was requested again. 

Mr. Shivitz. But it was not paid while Mr. Squillante was there. 

Mr. Kennedy. No money has ever been paid ? 

Mr. Shivitz. The $700 was paid and they asked for the balance 
while Squillante was there. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have the letters there ? 

Even if this $1,800 was not paid, why was it not collected while 
Squillante was with the association ? 

Mr. Adelstein. We still did not collect it and he is not there. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had you written and contracted them frequently 
while he was there ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I can't recall how often, but we did contact them. 
After Squillante left, we did not do anything about it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have the correspondence there ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I think so. No, we haven't anything here. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know they never paid any money ? 

Mr. Adelstein. They paid $700. 

Mr. Kennedy. And then did you make a request for $1,800 ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Continuously we asked them for more money. 

Mr. Kennedy. For another $1,800 ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I can't recall the amount. 

Mr. Kennedy. After Squillante left, didn't you ask them for 
another $1,800? 

Mr. Adelstein. We made continuous requests or demands for more 
security. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you get a call from Squillante in which he told 
you that he did not represent this association any further? 

Mi\ Adelstein. I can't recall. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel. ) 

Mr. Adelstein. I may have a letter in the tiles, but I can't recall. 

Mr. Kennedy. Plow much salary do you receive from the union? 

Mr. Adelstein. $400 a week. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much does that amount to in a year, approxi- 
mately ? 

Mr." Adelstein. Roughly $20,000 or $21,000. 



6998 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. Tliat you receive in salary ? 

Mr. Adelstein. From the Private Sanitation Union. 

Mr. Kennedy, Do you have any other relatives on the payroll of 
the union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I do. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who else do you have ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Who work there '? 

Mr. Kennedy. Who else do you have ? 

Mr. Adelstein. My sister, ]Mrs. Herman, works in the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much salary does she receive ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Adelstein. About $100 a week. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that all ? Is there anybody else ? 

Mr. Adelstein. In the union ; no, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wlio works for the union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is there anybody working for the welfare fund of 
the union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. My brother. 

Mr. Kennedy. Your brother ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat is his name ? 

Mr. Adelstein. George Adelstein. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is he an accountant ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is he a lawyer ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Hdw long has he been with the union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. He has never been with the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long has he worked for the welfare fund of the 
imion ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Since it was created. 

Mr. Kennedy. What had he been doing prior to that time ? 

Mr. Adelstein. He has been in the garment business. 

Mr. Kennedy. In the garment line ? 

Mr. Adelstein. In the garment line. 

Mr. Kennedy. Doing what ? 

Mr. Adelstein. As an employee. 

Mr. Kennedy. IVhat does he do ? 

Mr. Adelstein. A cutter. 

Mr. Kennedy. What does he do for the pension and welfare fund of 
local 813 ? 

Mr. Adelstein. He manages the funds. 

Mr. Kennedy. You took a cutter out of the garment trade and made 
him manager of the welfare and pension fund, is that right ? 

Mr. Adelstein. He came in when the fund was first started and he 
was one of the only employees there and he did all of the work 
necessary. 

Mr. Kennedy. You brought him in ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. You brought him in, a cutter from the garment in- 
dustry. 

Mr. Adelstein. It is unethical to have a relative work, providing 
they can perform the duties ? 



LVIPROPER ACrrV'ITIES Es THE LABOR FIELD 1^999 

Mr. Kennedy. How much does he receive ? 

Mr. Adelstein. How much does George receive ? Offhand I would 
have to ask to refresh my memory. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Adelstein. About $200 a week for approximately a 6-day week 
job, from 8 o'clock in the morning until late at night, and he is there 
after everybody leaves. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have anybody else Avho does any work or any 
other relatives of yours or your wife that worlds in connection with 
the union ^ 

Mr. Adelstein. Xone in the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, anything connected with the union, the pen- 
sion or welfare fund ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The accountant. 

Mr. Kennedy. You have your brother, and so far we have your 
brother, yourself, your sister, is that right, and now the accountant? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. What is his name ? 

Mr. Adelstein. He is a certified public accountant and his name is 
Melvin B. Wolpert, W-o-l-p-e-r-t. 

Mr. Kennedy. What does he do ? 

Mr. Adelstein. He audits the funds and prepares all of the neces- 
sary records. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. What is his salary ? 

Mr. ADELSiTiiN. He does not receive any salary. 

Mr. Kennedy. What is his fee ? 

Mr. Adelstein. He receives a fee of $300 a month. 

Mr. Kennedy. $300 a month ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes ; for 2 full days a week on the fund. 

Mr. Kennedy. Does he receive anything else, does he receive any 
other compensation from the union ? Doesn't he get the benefit of the 
insurance trust fund ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Sir ? 

]Mr. Kennedy. He gets the benefits of the insurance and trust fund. 

Mr. Adelstein. The trustees of both the union and the employers. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat is the answer ? 

Mr. Adelstein. They voted that all connected with the fund would 
have it under the plan. 

Mr. Kennedy. He gets benefits there, also? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir ; since he does work there, yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Because he is the accountant and handles the books, 
he also gets the benefits of the insurance and trust fund. 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

]SIr. Kennedy. Is he a member of the union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. What about Michael Wolpert, is he also working 
there ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Does he work there ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Does he have anything to do with the union? 

Mr. Adelstein. He has. 

Mr. Kennedy. AVhat does he have to do with it? 

Mr. Adelstein. He acts in a legal capacity. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is he related in any way to you or your wife ? 

Mr. Adelstein. He is not related to me nor to my wife. 



7000 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. In no way ? 
Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 
Mr. Kennedy. He has no connection at all ? 
Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is he related to Melvin Wolpert ? 
Mr. Adelstein. He is either a second or third cousin of ]Melvin 
Wolpert. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who is the nephew of your wife, isn't tliat right ( 
Mr. Adelstein. No, sir ; let me clear this up, please. 
Mr. Kennedy. Please do. 

Mr. Adelstein. When we started the union 20 years ago 

]Mr. Kennedy. Just clear up about the Melvin. 

Mr. Adelstein. I would like to, but Mr. Kennedy, please- 



Mr. Kennedy. Don't get into that. We want to try to finish today. 

Mr. Adelstein. This is important. Melvin Wolpert's father used 
to be the accountant for the union and he started with us 20 years 
ago, without a fee. 

Mr. Kennedy. What relation is he to your wife? 

Mr. Adelstein. He is married to my sister. He was, may his soul 
rest in peace. 

Mr. Kennedy. All right. So you had anotlier relation working for 
the union, but he does not work there any more. 

Mr. Adelstein. Prior to Melvin B. Wolpert. 

Mr. Shi\\[tz. Is there any improper activity in what this man is 
doing ? 

Mr. Kennedy. He does not have to go into this detail. We just 
want the facts. 

The Chairman. Let us get the record now. 

Mr. Kennedy. So that I can understand it, you have your brotlier 
working there, George Adelstein, and your sister, Sophie, Melvin 
Wolpert, who is the nephew of your wife, and Michael Wolpert, who 
is tlie second cousin of Melvin Wolpert ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is not right. 

Mr. Kennedy. You tell me how he is related. 

Mr. Adelstein. Melvin B. Wolpert is my sister's son. 

Mr. Kennedy. Your sister's son ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is correct. 

]Mr. Kennedy. That is your nephew ? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then how is Michael Wolpert related to him ? 

Mr. Adelstein. He may be either a second cousin or a third 
cousin 

Mr. Kennedy. So he is related too, I would think. 

Mr. Adelstein. He is not related to me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then he is related to the accountant. 

Mr. Adelstein. He is. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wlio is related to you ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much money does Michael Wolpert receive 
from the union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Just 1 minute, please. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 7001 

Mr. Adelstein. The union does not pay Michael Wolpert any sal- 
ary. The only salary he receives is from the pension and welfare 
fund. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much does he receive from them ? 

Mr. Adelstein. He received last year $9,800. 

Mr. Kennedy. He gets $9,800 ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, all of these individuals, do they get expenses 
above and beyond that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. AVhen you say "expenses" they are reimbursements 
for what they spend. We have no flat expense accounts. 
Mr. Kennedy. How much expenses do you have ? 

Mr. Adelstein. It depends upon whether we have conventions, and 
whether it is just routine and it varies. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much, approximate expenses do you get a 
week ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I don't get a flat amount. It depends upon 

Mr. Kennedy. How much do you get on the average? 

Mr. Adelstein. On the average I would say $15 or $10 or $25 and 
it depends upon the conditions. 

Mr. Kennedy. I understand that, on the average how much do you 
get? 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Kennedy, I never averaged it. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much did you get, for instance, for 1956, for 
expenses ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The investigators had our records and I am sure 
if you refer to that you would know. I could not tell you, honestly. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to put in what records we have through 
our investigator, to show this, in this investigation. 

The Chairman. All right, proceed. 

Do you solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give before this 
Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and noth- 
ing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Frame. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF MAUHICE FRAME 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and 
your business or occupation. 

Mr. Frame. My name is Maurice Frame; residence, 118-11 84th 
Avenue, Kew Gardens, N. Y. I am an investigator for the General 
Accounting Office, loaned to this committee. 

The Chairman. How long have you been with the General Ac- 
counting Office of the Federal Government ? 

Mr, Frame. Twenty years with the General Accounting Office and 
•24 years with the Federal Government. 

The Chairman. Have you been an accountant during that time? 

Mr. Frame. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Have you made a study of the books of local 813? 

Mr. Frame. Yes, sir. 

Mr. ICennedy. And have you made a study of the total dues col- 
lected by the union ? 



7002 LMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Frame. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And have you made a study of the disbursements 
to Mr. Bernie Adelstein as far as salary is concerned, and to relatives 
of Bernie Adelstein ? 

Mr. Frame. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell us what the records show ? 

Mr. Frame. The records of Local 813 and Local 34, company un- 
ion, show 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Local 34 is what kind of a union ? 

Mr. Frame. That is a coopers international union, and also in the 
same office with local 813. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Adelstein holds what position on that local I 

Mr. Frame. He is an officer of that local, also. 

Mr. Kennedy. How large is that local, Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. Adelstein. About 800 members. 

Mr. Frame. In 1952, the total dues collected from the membership 
exclusive of initiation fees, applications, and reinstatements, totaled 
$120,926.45. In the same year the total salaries paid to Mr. Adel- 
stein and the relatives you mentioned, sir, totaled $38,570. If I may 
say so, the ratio between the total salaries paid to the total dues col- 
lected are 32 percent. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Could you move it along a little quicker? 

The Chair3Ian. What about expenses'? Are you going to cover 
tliose ? 

Mr. Frame. This schedule, sir, pertains to salaries, and a com- 
parison with the total dues collected. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Frame. In 1953, the total dues collected of the two unions 
totaled $144,402.75. The total salaries and payments to the same 
people totaled $53,070. The ratio, sir, is 37 percent for that year. 

In 1954, the total dues collected, $148,092.63. The total salaries and 
other payments to jMr. Adelstein and kin total $66,785. 

JSIr. Shivitz. Did you say total expenditures to Mr. Adelstein? 

Mr. Kennedy. And relatives. 

Mr. Frame. And relatives. This is for the year 1954, sir, and the 
ratio shows 45 percent. 

For the year 1955, the total dues collected is $166,343.25 and the 
total salaries and payments, to Adelstein and kin, $68,880. The ratio 
for this year is 40 percent. 

For the year 1956, the total dues collections, $167,184.75. The 
total salaries and other payments to Mr. Adelstein and his kin total 
$75,360. The ratio, sir, in that 3'ear, is 45 percent. 

Mr. Kennedy. You have not included expenses; is that right? 

Mr. Frame. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, what did you find as far as the expenses were 
concerned for that 6-year period? What were the expenses for that 
period ? Do you have that ? 

Mr. Frame. Not in this schedule and not with these papers. 

]Mr. Kennedy. Does an}- one have it ? 

Mr. Shivitz. Before this witness leaves, Mr. Kennedy, and Mr. 
Chairman, may I point out while he is still on the stand that he is 
talking about income into one fund and payments of the fund of 
which he is speaking do not include all of the payments into that 
fund. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 7003 

He talks about income into the union from dues, and excludes initi- 
ation fees for no reason at all and makes no reason for it, and he talks 
about payments \Yhich are not out of the local moneys at all. 

I assume Mr. Frame is including in those disbursements of kin, Mr. 
Wolpert, who, it has just been stated to the committee, is no kin what- 
soever of Mr. Adelslein. 

The Ciiairjman. Proceed, Mr. Witness. 

Mr, Kennedy. I think your statement speaks for itself, that these 
are payments out of the locals that you mentioned ; isn't that right ? 

Mr. FrxVme. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have the records on the expenses ? 

Mr. SiiiviTz. I don't know whether Mr. Frame heard your question 
because his answer is clearly erroneous. The payments that you have 
referred to, ISIr. Frame, are out of the local funds or out of the pension 
and welfare funds. 

Mr. Frame. The payments to these persons are from the payrolls 
of local 813, local 34, local 818 health-and-welfare funds, and local 34 
health-and-welfare funds, as well as the pension funds of the two. 
That is the salaries paid and fees paid and remuneration to the per- 
sons we are speaking of from these various sources. 

Mr. SiimTz. But the income you have referred to, Mr. Frame, is 
only to the union and it does not include the income into these other 
funds which the disbursements were made. If those were included, 
of course, the percentage would drop appreciably. Isn't that correct, 
Mr. Frame ? 

The Chairman. Let us get this record straight now. If you desire 
tlie Chair to ask the witness a question, we will be glad to do that. 
YVe do have rules tliat we have to observe. 

Mr. SiiiviTz. I apologize, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. We cannot establish such a precedent. Let me 
ask you, Mr. Frame, as I understood your statement, you included only 
dues collected. 

Mr. Frame. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You are relatine: these expenditures to dues col- 
lected ? 

Mr. Frame. To dues collected, sir. 

The Chairman. And you are not relating these expenditures or the 
percentages to the total income of the union, but just as to dues 
collected. 

Mr. Frame. That is correct. 

The Chairman. The welfare and the pension funds are separate 
from the dues. 

Mr, Fr.vme. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And they are not included in the figures that you 
have giA^en? 

Mr. Frame. That is correct. 

The Chairman. That clears it. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the dues are the moneys that are used to operate 
and run the union, are they not ? 

Mr. Frame. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, as far as the expenses are concerned, do vou 
have that? 

JNIr. Fraime. We have that information. 



7004 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. Someone else has the other funds? That is, the 
expense account? 

Have you been sworn ? 

Do 3^ou solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give before this 
Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing 
but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. MoRViTZ. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF MILTON MORVITZ 

The Chairman. State your name and place of residence and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. MoRviTz. My name is Milton Morvitz; my address is 67-30 
164th Street, Flushing, K Y. I am employed by the United States 
General Accounting Office as an investigator and I am on loan to this 
committee as an accountant. 

The Chairman. How long have you been in the employ of the 
Government ? 

Mr. Morvitz. I have been an employee of the Government 16 years. 

The Chairman. How long have you been an investigator in the 
GAO? 

Mr. Morvitz. I have been an investigator with the GAO since Jan- 
uary 1, 1953. 

The Chairman. All right. 

TESTIMONY OF BERNARD ADELSTEIN, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, DAVID SHIVITZ— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Adelstein, so we get the record straight, do you 
also receive a salary from local 34 ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I do. 

Mr. Kennedy. On top of the approximately $20,000 ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much do you receive from local 34 ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I receive $250 a week, and $35 a week expenses. 

Mr, Kennedy. So you receive $685 a week from this union, made up 
of about 2,700 members. 

Mr. Adelstein. About that. 

Mr. Kennedy. Of which a third are employers ; is that right ? 

Mr. Adelstein. In local 34, you mean ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Combined. 

Mr. Adelstein. They are not a third employers combined. There 
are a third employers approximately, in 813, and in 34 the entire mem- 
bership almost consists of employees. There, likewise, we have a uni- 
form contract. 

TESTIMONY OF MILTON MORVITZ— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, you made a study of the expenses, Mr. Mor- 
vitz? 

Mr. Morvitz. I have a summary here of expenses. 

Mr. Keenedy. Is there any breakdown as to how the expenses were 
paid or to whom the expenses went ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 7005 

Mr. MoRviTz, Only to the extent listed in summary form, and I 
can list this pretty quickly, and we might be able to elaborate from 
Mr. Melville Wolpert's sheets which are appended over here. 

Mr. Kennedy. Can you give me the expenses, just the overall pic- 
ture of the expenses and then we can perhaps put your worksheets in 
the record. 

Mr. MoRviTz, Yes, I can. Do you want me to give you the dues ap- 
plications, which are summarized first, as against the expenses in the 
union itself ? 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Well, I want to get the expenses for the period of 
time and then I want to find out what the books reflect. 

Mr. jSIor\t:tz. The total disbursements for 1952 was $105,793, 

Mr. Kennedy. The expenses you camiot break down, Mr. Morvitz. 
I know there are expenses for running the union, for the office and 
the expenses in which there are no vouchers. Do you have that 
figure ? 

Mr. Mor\t:tz. Mr. Conley developed that entire picture with respect 
to cash expenses for which there are unsupported vouchers. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. How mucli does that amount to for this period of 
time ; could you give us that figure ? 

Mr. CoNLEY. Fifty-six thousand dollars. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is in excess of $46,000 for which there are no 
supports. 

Mr. SnmTz. Wliat period is this? 

Mr. Kennedy. What period of time. Can we swear this gentle- 
man? 

The Chairman. You solemnly swear that the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole 
trath, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Conley. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF STEPHEN A. CONLEY 

Tlie Chairman. State your name, your residence, and your business 
or occupation. 

Mr. CoNLEY. Stephen A. Conley, Burgundy, N. Y., and I have been 
employed by the Government over 39 years, with the General Ac- 
counting Office since the inception in 1921 and I have been on loan to 
this committee as an accountant employed as an investigator. I have 
been on loan to this committee since March 1, of this year. 

Mr. Kennedy. You made a study of the books and records of 813, 
to determine the expenses as far us the individual officers are con- 
cerned ? 

Mr. CoNLEY. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you find any vouchers for the expenses that 
were made ? 

Mr. Conley. There were no vouchers prior to March 11, 1957. 
March 11, 1957, was the date that Mr. Greene and Mr. Kelly of this 
committee subpenaed the records of this union. 

After that date there were some recoi'ds kept, and not fully, but 
they were partially covered by receipts. 

89330— 57— pt. 17 — —23 



7006 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. Since that time there have been some records, but 
prior to that time there were no vouchers kept ; is that right ? 

Mr. CoNLEY. The cash expenditures from October 1, 1951, to May 
1957 amounted to $56,418 and $1,579, made from March 11 to May, is 
partially covered by records. 

TESTIMONY OF BERNARD ADELSTEIN, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS 
COUNSEL, DAVID SHIVITZ— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. Can you tell us how that money was spent, Mr. 
Adelstein ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I will try. For cash disbursements, postcards, 
stamps, we have people come into our office where we send out for 
food ; strikes, where we feed people on the picket line. 

Mr. Kennedy. I am sure you have all of those expenses. Can you 
tell us or give us any kind of a breakdown as to how you spent this 
$56,000? 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Kennedy, it would be like me asking you to 
give a breakdown here how you spent all of your money in the last 
year. I can't remember. 

Mr. Kennedy. I can assure you we could give it to you. 

Mr. Adelstein. I would refer to my records and try to cooperate, if 
you will give me the time. I can assure you that you will be well 
satisfied. 

Mr. Kennedy. We have examined your records, and there are no 
vouchers for some $56,000. 

Mr. Adelstein. There are notations made in the checkbook of 
what the money was spent for, and the accountants and the investi- 
gators found all of the stubs in the books with these notations, when- 
ever a check was drawn. 

Mr. Kennedy. There are no vouchers for it, and you could put any- 
thing on a check stub. 

Mr. Adelstein. Here is an analysis of some cash disbursements 
such as taxes. 

Mr. Kennedy. We are not talking about that, and we are only 
talking about the unsupported expenses. 

Mr. SmviTz. Would you like to look at this ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Could I ? 

Mr. Shivitz. Surely. 

(Document handed to Mr. Kennedy.) 

The Chairman. Is this document for inspection or for our 
attention ? 

Mr. Shivitz. If you wish to retain it, you may. 

The Chairman. What is this document, Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. Shivitz. Covering the period October 1951 to March 1957, cash 
disbursements, and it is broken down into various categories. 

The Chairman. Is this accurate according to your best judgment, 
Mr. Adelstein? 

Mr. Shivitz. The accountant has stricken this off, a certified pub- 
lic accountant. 

The Chairman. This is the record of your certified public account- 
ant, Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Stienberg did that, and he is a certified public 
accountant. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 7007 

The Chairman. If the answer is "Yes," I am trying to get it in the 
record. 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. This may be made exhibit No. 39. 

(The document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 39" for ref- 
erence and my be found in the files of the select committee.) 

Mr. Kennedy. This doesn't answer the question at all. 

Mr. Adelstein. There is one correction. On this sheet, instead of 
taxes, it is taxis, t-a-x-i-s. Will you please correct that. 

Mr. Kennedy. Anything can be put on a check stub. Do you have 
any vouchers for any of this $56,000 that was charged to cash. 

Mr. Adelstein. "\^'hatever we had, we showed the investigators. 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, there are no vouchers prior to the day of our 
subpena. Now, I want to ask you about another matter, Mr. Adel- 
stein, and that is your dance fund. Have you operated a dance fund ? 

Mr. Adelstein, Oh, surely. 

Mr. Kennedy. You have a dance every year ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Mostly ; yes sir ; every year. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you keep books and records on that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. We have no books. 

Mr. Kennedy. You don't have any books ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No ; we keep a checkbook. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who keeps that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The girl in the office. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you have no books or records as to how the money 
M-as spent ; is that right 'I 

Mr. Adelstein. Other than the checkbook ; no. 

Mr. Kennedy. How about the income from it, do you have any 
books or records on tliat ? 

]\Ir. Adelstein. What was tl >at question ? 

Mr. Kennedy. On the income, the cash receipts, do you have any 
records on that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. We keep these records from year to year. 

Mr. Kennedy. You keep them from year to year? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You do keep books and records on that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The only records we keep is the list of the members 
who pay, and the people that gave us ads to the journal. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliere are those books and records ? 

JNIr. Adelstein. From year to year. 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

INIr. Adelstein. We don't keep them more than a year. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much money do you raise in each one of those 
dances? 

Mr. Adelstein. $15,000 to $18,000 or $20,000. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have the checkbooks ? 

Mr. Adelstein. We do. 
Mr. Kennedy. You have those checkbooks ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The committee looked at them and you hav^ them. 
And you have the disbursements, showing how the money went from 
what was deposited. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many tickets were sold for those dances, Mr. 
Adelstein ? 



7008 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Adelstein. I would say approximately 80 percent of the mem- 
bership would pay for the tickets. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many ? 

Mr. Adei-stein. Onr membership increased. 

Mr. Kennedy. Approximately how many tickets would you sell? 

Mr. Adelstein. What year are you speakinc: of ? 

Mr. Kennedy. 1955, if we had approximately 1,500 members, there 
would be about 1,200 or 1,100 that would pay for the tickets. 

Were the employers required to take out $5 or a particular amount 
for the tickets ? 

Mr. Adelstein. For their employees. We have a checkoff, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. So that everybody was required to participate; is 
that rio-ht i 

Mr. Adelstein. That would be ratified by the membership. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you get anything personally out of these dance 
funds ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Personally ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

Mr. Adelstein. I never received anything, outside of a reimburse- 
ment for some of the expenses. 

Mr. Kennedy. But beyond that you didn't receive anything? 

Mr. Adelstein. Beyond that, no. I made a loan and I never took 
any money from any of them tliat wasn't rightfully mine. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you receive any automobiles purchased out of 
the dance-fund money ? 

Mr. Adelstein. There were automobiles purchased. 

Mr. Kennedy. For whom ? 

Mr. Adelstein. For the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. For whom ? 

Mr. Adelstein. For any of the business agents, fully employed 
by the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you get an automobile ? 

Mr. Adelstein. An automobile was bought for the union, under 
my name, wdiich was since turned back to the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. In whose name was the automobile registered? 

Mr. Adelstein. Today in the union. We rent cars today. 

Mr. Kennedy. In whose name was that automobile registered that 
was purchased ? 

Mr. Adelstein. At the time they were bought, well, when we started 
the union we all had our own cars, and we came in with our own 
automobiles. 

Mr. Kennedy. All I want to find out is the dance fund. 

Mr. Adelstein. From the dance fund, they would buy cars for the 
full-time delegates of the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was there an automobile purchased for you ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Tliere was. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all. You didn't have to go through all of 
the rest. 

Mr. Adelstein. There was. It was under my name, but it belonged 
totheiniion. 

Mr. Kennedy. It was purchased in your name ? 

Mr, Adelstein. Yes, sir; and the car was sold and the money was 
turned back in to the union. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 7009 

Mr. Kennedy, All of the members of the union were required to 
participate in the dance. You kept no books or records on what hap- 
pened to the dance money, but you do admit that there was an auto- 
mobile that was purchased in your name ; is that right ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Whatever happened to the money, the investigators 
saw the checkbooks and they have a complete record of it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who controlled the receipts when they came in ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I was chairman of the funds. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who put the money in the bank ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Our girls in the office. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who is the girl in your office ? 

Mr. Adelstein. It could be Frances Massielle, and it could have 
been Mrs. Herman. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was your sister ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes ; that is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. So the money came in to you and it was your sister 
who deposited the money in the bank account ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The money didn't come in to me. It came in under 
the name of the Private Sanitation Union. All of the money that 
ever came in was deposited in banks. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have the checks for any of these years, for 
1953, for instance ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The committee has whatever checks we have. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know where the checks for 1953 are ? 

Mr. Adelstein. At this point I wouldn't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. We don't have those. 

Mr. Adelstein. If you don't have them, I don't know where they are. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Morvitz, you made a study of the dance situa- 
tion ? Will you tell us what happened ? 

TESTIMONY OF MILTON MORVITZ— Resumed 

Mr. MoR\^Tz. Yes; I will. 

This account was opened and designated as "Charity and Emer- 
gency Fund, Local 813, IBT, AFL." It was opened at the First 
National City Bank, at that time the National City Bank, on December 
30, 1952, with a deposit of $3,639. And an analysis of this account 
revealed that there were no set of books maintained for this account. 
Financial data for this account could only be obtained from the check- 
stub book, canceled checks, and bank statements. The receipts and 
disbursements of this account were not incorporated in the receipt 
of books of local 813. Melville Wolbert, the accountant for the union, 
indicated to us that no financial statements were ever prepared of this 
dance account. There were no bank reconciliations available of this 
account, so there was no way of reconciling any given month with the 
book balance, as it would reflect itself in the limited records we did 
have and the bank balance. 

There were no reports of receipts and disbursements from the dance 
fund on form 990, an internal-revenue form which under the Internal 
Revenue Code requires unions to report their financial data. 

]SIr. Kennedy. They never made a report to the Government on this 
fund, is that right ? 

Mr. IVIoRviTz. They did not. In addition, there were no reports of 
receipts and disbursements from the dance fund to the Bureau of 



7010 IMPROPER ACTIVrTIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Labor Standards, another form which is reqnired under the labor 
statutes, to be submitted to the Labor Department, United States 
Department of Labor. There were no canceled checks available from 
the date of the inception of the account which I mentioned was De- 
cember 30, 1952, through December 1953. The union was asked many 
times to account for its disappearance, and could not give us any in- 
telligent answer. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us about for instance the tickets, how 
many tickets were purchased? 

Mr. MoRviTZ. Well, in one instance, and this refers to the dance 
held on February 26, 1957, the records of Eeo Press 

Mr. Kennedt. Was this 1956 ? 

Mr. MoRViTz. It was held in 1957, but these tickets would have been 
printed in 1956. The records of Reo Press, a printing firm, show that 
a total of 10,000 tickets were printed for the union dance to be held on 
February 26, 1957; Webster Hall, the place where this affair was 
held, has a capacity of only 1,750 persons. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did you find as to the purchases that were 
made from the funds of the dance fund account ? 

Mr. MoRviTz. Well, I have a long schedule here and I also have a 
memorandum which highlights some of the expenses. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you give us that, some of the highlights? 

Mr. IMoRviTz. I just want to get that memorandum here. The Pier- 
pont Wine & Liquor Store, this store I should say by way of introduc- 
tion is owned by Bernard Adelstein and his wife, Elsie Adelstein. 
This store is located in Brooklyn, N. Y,, and sold to this account, to 
this dance account, to the union, approximately $1,500 worth of liquor 
and this covered a period of about 3 years of purchases. 

i\Ir. Kennedy. What else did you find that they purchased? 

Mr. MoRviTz. We found in one instance a listing on May 18, 1956, 
check No. 578, INIichael Wolbert, organizing expense, $550. We also 
find a check on March 21, 1956, check No. 535, a check made payable 
to Jimmie Hoffa, dinner committee, $1,000, 

We also have a check here dated July 23, 1956, check No. 597, 
made payable to Brenner, Hanna & Murphy for an attorney fee in the 
amount of $2,000. 

The Chairman. Out of this dance fund ? 

]Mr. MoRviTz. Out of this dance fund, yes. 

The Chairman. What about the automobiles? Did you find any- 
thing about that ? 

I didn't know you had to pay lawyers to dance, I am getting a 
source of new clients here. 

Mr. MoR^^Tz. With respect to the car, check No. 493 — I would 
like to change that. Check No. 496 dated February 2, 1956, made 
payable to the Cadillac motor car division, the amount of this check 
is $5,889.30 for a Cadillac. 

Mr. Kennedy. An air-conditioned Cadillac? 

Mr. MoRviTz. Yes, sir ; to Bernard Adelstein. 

Mr, Kennedy. I would like to point out again, Mr. Chairman, that 
all members of the union were assessed for this dance fund, and this 
was not a voluntary dance that one could go to if one wished, but every- 
body was assessed according to Mr, Adelstein's own testimony, for the 
tickets, I believe, at $5 per head. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EN THE LABOR FIELD 7011 

Mr. MoR^^Tz. There is another item of significance, and this refers 
to the insurance question here. These payments at least to a great 
degree were also made out of the dance fund and these payments were 
made to the Union Labor Life Insurance Co., and these policies refer 
to annuities, and the premiums were to be paid out of the dance fund 
for Mr. Bernard Adelstein and others. 

The Chairmax. Who are some of the others ? 

Mr. MoR^^:Tz. Well, we have a listing of those, Senator. 

The Chairman. All right, proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you explain that again? There was an 
annuity policy that had been purchased and the premiums were paid 
out of the dance fund for Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. j\IoR^^Tz. That is right, and I can specifically list the policy 
with respect to jNIr. Bernard Adelstein. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much is that worth ? 

Mr. Mor\t:tz. The amount of insurance would be $10,000. That is 
the amount of coverage. 

The premiums, the annual premium is $766.70. These annuity pay- 
ments would commence at the age of 60, and in this case Mr. Bernard 
Adelstein had a right to designate his own beneficiary. Under decided 
cases, I would like to j ust read 

Mr. Kennedy. Just summarize, under the decisions of the court, 
what is it ? 

Mr. ]M( )Rvi Tz. Tlie courts have held that premiums paid by a corpora- 
tion and here we Avill substitute a union for the corporation, by a 
corporation on the life of oflicers, and particularly with respect to 
annuity policies, these premiums should be included in income of the 
policyholder for tax computations in the year in which the premiums 
are paid. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you include those premiums in your tax return, 
Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I have this year. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Surely. 

Mr. Kennedy. This year ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you prior to that time ? 

Mr. Adelstein. The insurance is for all of tlie paid personnel of 
local 818, and not for me alone. I was informed at one time, or advised 
that I didn't have to. 

Mr. Kennedy. But did you ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Since I was, I have included it. 

Mr. Kennedy. You had not up to this time, or up to this year? 

Mr. Adelstein. Up to this time, this year I have included it. 

Mr. Morvitz. On this particular policy there is another point : On 
December 6, 1956, Bernard Adelstein applied for and obtained a loan 
in the amount of $6,583.94 with interest at 5 percent. Now, this policy 
actually was taken out back in February 18, 1947, so tliat in effect this 
represents substantially the entire amount of cash surrender value that 
he would be entitled to at the time. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is fine. 

I want to ask you just a few last questions. 



7012 IMPROPER ACTIVITIEiS UN THE LABOR FIELD 

On General Sanitation, Mr. Adelstein, did you know at tlie time of 
the establishment of General Sanitation ; were you informed of that by 
Mr. Squillante? 

Mr. Adelstein. What is that ? 

Mr. Kennedy. That General Sanitation Co. was being formed, or 
established. Were you informed of that fact by jMr. Squillante, James 
Squillante ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I knew of General Sanitation after it was formed. 

iSIr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Wolpert of your office have anything to do 
with General Sanitation Co. ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Which Wolpert? 

Mr. Kennedy. Melville Wolpert. 

]Mr. Adelstein. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is he here, Melville Wolpert? 

Mr. Adelstein. Surely. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you step forward, please. 

The Chairman. You solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give 
before this Senate select committee will be the truth, the whole truth, 
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Wolpert. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF MELVILLE B. WOLPEET 

The Chairman. Mr. Wolpert, state your name and your place of 
residence and your business or occupation. 

Mr. Wolpert. J^Ielville B. Wolpert, 2789 Third Place, Baldwin, 
N. Y., certified public accountant. 

The Chairman. You work for the union, do you ? 

]Mr, Wolpert. I do not presently work for the union. 

The Chairman. You do not work directly for the union ? 

]SIr' Wolpert. No. 

The Chairman. On a fee basis, is that right ? 

Mr. Wolpert. No, sir. 

The Chairman. What arrangements do you have with the union ? 

Mr. Wolpert. I am auditor of the insurance and pension funds of 
the union. 

The Chairman. And you are paid by that organization ? 

Mr. Wolpert. By the insurance and pension funds. 

The Chairman. On a fee basis or salary ? 

Mr. Wolpert. On a monthly fee basis. 

The Chairman. And you have other outside accounts ? 

Mr. Wolpert. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Have you had anything to do with General Sani- 
tation ? 

Mr. Wolpert. Not to my knowledge, sir. 

The Chairman. You have not ? 

Mr. Wolpert. No, sir. 

The Chairjuan. You would know, would you not ? 

Mr. Wolpert. I believe I would, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have anything to do, or did Mr. Squillante 
speak to you about the books of General Sanitation ? 

Mr. Wolpert. Mr. Squillante contacted me in 1955, and he asked me 
if I would like to handle the accounting for a firm. I met Mr. Squil- 
lante and when I understood that it was a carting firm, I refused the 
assignment. I don't recall the name of the firm. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 7013 

Mr. Kennedy. You never had aiij'thing to do with it after that ? 

Mr. WoLPERT. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever on the books of General Sanitation 
with Mr. Squilhinte ? 

Mr. Wolpert. No, sir. Perliaps at the outset there may have been 
something mentioned to me at the time, but not after I refused to 
handle the account. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never had anything to do with it after that 
time ? 

Mr, WoLPERT. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you discuss that with Mr. Adelstein ? 

Mr. Wolpert. I may have mentioned it to him. 

Mr. Kennedy. That you had been approached by Mr. Squillante ? 

Mr. Wolpert. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. But you decided not to have anything to do with it ? 

Mr. Wolpert. I did not feel that it would be ethical or practicable to 
handle a carting firm's business. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you keep any of the books or records for that 
firm? 

Mr. Wolpert. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not ? 

Mr. Wolpert. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you make any accounting or do any accounting 
work for Mr. Squillante ? 

Mr. Wolpert. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you do any accounting work for General Sani- 
tation at all? 

Mr. Wolpert. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you do any work for any other carting firm ? 

Mr. Wolpert. Never. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never have ? 

Mr. Wolpert. No, sir. 

The Chairman. I hand you here two sheets, documents, and ask you 
to examine them and state if you identify it. 

(Document handed to witness.) 

The Chairman. It is a handwritten document, I believe. 

Mr. Wolpert. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What is it, please ? 

Mr. Wolpert. These are worksheets which I drew up at that meet- 
ing with Mr. Squillante. 

The Chairman. All right, they may be made exhibit No. 40. 

(The documents referred to were marked "Exhibit No. 40" for 
reference and may be found in the files of the Select Committee.) 

The Chairman. What kind of worksheets are they, Mr. Witness? 

Mr, Wolpert. They list certain of the assets of the General Sani- 
tation Corp., and certain principals who w^ere involved. May I add 
this was the last contact that I had. It was merely this one sitting. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that is the end of it ? 

Mr. Wolpert. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. You never had anything to do with it after that? 

Mr. Wolpert. No, sir. 

Mr, Kennedy, You did prepare that set of sheets ? 

Mr. Wolpert. Yes. 



7014 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES m THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. And you never had any contact or discussions about 
it after that ? 

Mr. WoLPERT. I was out of the account, and I didn't wish — — 

Mr. Kennedy. You never had any conversations or discussions 
after that '? 

Mr. WoLPERT. I do not recall any. 

Mr. Kennedy. You would remember if you had, would you not? 

Mr. Wolpert. I believe that I would. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any conversations or discussions after 
that date on this matter ? 

Mr. Wolpert. No, sir ; I do not recall any. 

Mr. Kennedy. This was what date ? 

Mr. Wolpert. I don't remember. 

Mr. Kennedy. 1955, 1 believe it was. 

Mr. Wolpert. Probably. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could I caall another witness, a short witness ? 

Mr. Goldf arb. 

The Chairman. Do you solemnly swear that the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF HAEEY B. GOLDFAEB 

The Chairman. State your name and your place of residence and 
your business or occupation. 

]\Ir. Goldfarb. My name is Harrj^ B. Goldfarb. I live at 1429 Mil- 
wood Lane, Merritt, N. Y., and I am a certified public accountant in 
the State of New York. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long have you been a certified public ac- 
countant ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Since 1952, 1 believe, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. V^ere you approached during 1955 to perform some 
work on the General Sanitation Co. ? 

Mr, Goldfarb. Yes ; I was. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell us what happened ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. In what respect ? 

Mr. Kennedy. First, by whom you were approached and what 
occurred after that. 

Mr. Goldfarb. I was called by a friend of mine, Dave Wolpert. 

Mr. Kennedy. No relation to this Mr. Wolpert ; is that right ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Not that I know of. He asked me would I be will- 
ing to handle an account on a sort of a fee basis, or share a fee basis, 
and he in turn told me to call Mel Wolpert, which I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you get in touch with Mel Wolpert ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Yes. 

]\Ir. Kennedy. What conversations did you have with him ? 

The Chairman. Is that the other witness on the stand ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. What conversations did you have with him ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. He simply gave me a rundown on the situation, and 
he told me that he felt that he couldn't handle this particular account 
because it wouldn't be ethical, since he had some connection with the 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 7015 

union Avhicli I didn't understand, and he asked me if I could handle 
it, and I said I would, and I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he give you this sheet ? 
( Document handed witness. ) 

Mr. GoLDFARB. Yes ; he did. 

The Chairman. Let the record show that is exhibit No. 40. Exhibit 
40 has been presented to the witness. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. So he did give you that sheet of paper, did he not ? 

Mr. GoLDFARB. Yes ; lie did. 

Mr. Kennedy. So he did have that activity after he drew up this 
memorandum or these worksheets; he did have that activity in con- 
nection with General Sanitation. Did you agree, then, to take this 
assignment ? 

Mr. GoLDFARB. Yes ; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. You took the account ? 

Mr. GoLDFARB. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you work on the books and records ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Yes ; I did. 

INIr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Wolpert make any statement to you about 
the fee that was to be paid ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. No ; he didn't. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was any statement made at a later time ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. About the fee ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

Mr. Goldfarb. I determined the fee. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat did you decide to charge ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. $60 a month. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you keep all of the money ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. No ; I didn't. 

Mr. Kennedy. ^\niat arrangements were made about that ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. I paid Mr. Wolpert one-third. 

Mr. Kennedy. You gave Mr. Wolpert one-third of the fee ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. $20? 

Mr. Goldfarb. $20. 

Mr. Kennedy. Over what period of time was that ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. It would have been over a period of time that I 
handled the account. However, I don't believe I gave him $20 from 
the very first time, because we hadn't made any definite arrangements 
as to the distribution of the fee. 

Mr. Kennedy. How did you make a determination as to how much 
Mr. Wolpert was to receive ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Well, there was no formal method of making a 
determination. I simply asked him if it would be all right if I gave 
him one-third and I kept two-thirds. 

]Mr. Kennedy. He understood this connection with General Sani- 
tation ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Well, that I couldn't testify to, except of course 
judging by the exhibit 

Mr. Kennedy. I mean, he had given you this account, had he not? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Well, he gave me the account. I don't know whether 
Mr. Wolpert knew that this was General Sanitation. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he ever introduce you or talk to Mr. Squillante 
in your presence ? 



7016 IMPROPER ACT'IVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. GoLDFARB. To which Mr. Squillante ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Either Mr. Squillante. Vincent Squillante. 

Mr. GoLDFARB. Vincent Squillante, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. How did you meet Mr. Vincent Squillante ? 

Mr. GoLDFARB. He brought me up to the Madison Avenue address. 
I think that is the cartmen's association, and I met Mr. Squillante 
there. 

Mr. Kennedy. So Mr. Wolpert brought you to Mr. Squillante's 
office, is that right ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Yes, he did. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the purpose of bringing you there was to make 
arrangements on this account ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Apparently it was to get the O. K. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Squillante give the O. K. at that time ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. When you say, "did he give the O. K. ?" there was no 
formal action there, either. As a matter of fact, as I remember the 
conversation, Mel Wolpert said "This is the fellow who is going to 
handle that account.'' 

That is about all there was to it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who did you make the arrangements with in connec- 
tion w^ith receiving the pay ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Mr. Donno. 

Mr. Kennedy. And those arrangements were O. K.'d ; is that right? 

Mr. Goldfarb. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then you had a further conversation with Mr. Wol- 
pert about giving him the third ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. That was quite a bit later. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wlien was that ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. I would say 2 or 3 months later. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you write out checks to Mr. Wolpert ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Yes, I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Are these the checks ? 

The Chairman. Let me have them. 

I hand you here 4 checks, original checks, 3 of them in the amount 
of $20 each, 1 in the amount of $40. 

I ask you to examine these checks and state if you identify them, and 
state for what purpose they were issued. 

( Documents handed to witness. ) 

The Chairman. Have you identified the checks ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Those are checks that you made to Mr. Mel Wolpert? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. As a third of the fee ; is that right ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any discussions with him after this 
regai'ding this account ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. Not regarding this account, no. 

Mr. Kennedy. Kegarding the reports? Did you send him any 
reports ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. I sent him reports from the very beginning. 

Mr. Kennedy. You sent him reports ? 

Mr. Goldfarb. I sent him a copy. Either it would have been a pen- 
ciled copy of my report, or a typewritten copy of the report. 

Mr. Kennedy. How often did you send him a copy of the report? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 7017 

Mr. GoLDFARB. I believe every month during tlie time that I did 
the accounting. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you ever told to send a copy of the report to 
Jimmie Squillante ? 

Mr. GoLDFARB. I believe there was one time, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. A^lio told you that ? 

Mr. GoLDFARB. ]\Iel Wolpert. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Wolpert told you at least on one occasion to 
send a copy of the report directly to Jimmie Squillante? Is that 
right ? 

Mr. GoLDFARB, Yes. I believe it was his home address. 

JNIr. Kennedy. I believe that is all. 

The Chairman. The checks will be made exhibit 41-A, B, C, and D. 

(The documents referred to were marked "Exhibits 41-A,''' "-ll-B," 
"41-C,'* and '•41-D'' respectively, for reference and will be found in 
the Appendix on pp. 7049-7052.) 

Mr. Kennedy. While you kept the books and records, were there 
any payments made to the union on a checkoff system that you re- 
member ? 

Mr. GoLDFARB. I wouldn't know about that. 

]Mr. Kennedy. You do not know ? 

Mr. GoLDFARB, No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would your reports show it if there had been any 
checkoffs made for the employees ? 

Mr. GoLDFARB. Not the reports, no, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever see any checkoffs ? 

Mr. GoLDFARB. I wouldn't recognize them. I would, perhaps, if it 
were noted as such. I mean, if there were checkoff's coming off' the 
rolls, then as such it would have been indicated in the books. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you see any payments to any welfare fund ? 

Mr. GoLDFARB. Not that I recall. 

Mr. Kennedy. You do not ? 

Mr. GoLDFARB. I do uot. 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, did you see any payments to the union of any 
kind 'i 

Mr. GoLDFARB. Not that I recall. 

The Chairman. Mr. Wolpert. according to your testimony, it would 
have been somewhat misleading, if the last witness has given us the 
facts. Are his statements correct? 

Mr, Wolpert. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further ? 

TESTIMONY OF BEENARD ADELSTEIN, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, 
DAVID SHIVITZ— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to ask Mr. Adelstein regarding General 
Sanitation, and the so-called Miracle Mile incident. Did General 
Sanitation make any payments to the union for their employees ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I can't recollect. 

Mr. Kennedy. We asked you to check it. Have you checked it in 
your books and records ? 

Mr. A DEi-'^TEiN. You asked me for the contract. 

Mr. Shi'sttz. JNlr. Kennedy, at the request of Mr. Adlerman yester- 
day, I caused a telephone call to be made to the New York office to 



7018 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

determine whether any moneys had been paid from General Sanitation 
to the union or its pension or welfare funds. So far as they could 
determine on the telephone yesterday, no such payments were made. 

Mr, Kennedy, Thank you. As I understand it, the books and rec- 
ords and all the contracts of local 813 were subpenaed by the district 
attorney in New York ; is that right ? 

Mr, Adelstein. Yes, 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you get a receipt from them on the contracts 
that you had turned over ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Kennedy, I don't think they subpenaed us for 
the contracts. They asked for all the books and records. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did they also get the contracts ? 

Mr, Adelstein, They got the contracts. 

Mr, Kennedy. Do you have the receipt ? 

Mr. Shivitz. In the interest of time, could I make a statement cover- 
ing this point, with the chairman's permission ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

Mr. Shivitz. May I? 

Mr, Kennedy, AVill it expedite ? 

Mr, Shivitz. I believe so. I will give you all the facts with respect 
to the contracts as I have been able to ascertain, if you wish me to. 

Mr. Kennedy. The attorney general, the district attorney, was to 
receive all the contracts that you had in your possession, was he ? 

Mr. Adelstein. What we could find at that time. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he gave you a receipt for those contracts ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I believe he did. 

Mr. Kennedy. And on that list of contracts that he received from 
you there is no notation of General Sanitation, is there ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I wouldn't know unless I looked at it. 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Adelstein. Mr. Shivitz, my attorney, said he looked at it, and 
there isn't. 

Mr. Kennedy. Or Corsair Carting is also not listed ; is that right ? 

Mr. Adelstein. We have a contract, or had 

(The witness conferred wdth his counsel. ) 

Mr, xVdelstein. It isn't on that list, I am told. 

Mr. Kennedy. These were both firms in which Mr. Squillante or his 
relatives were interested ; is that right ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I wouldn't know if any of the relatives of Squillante 
were interested in Corsair Carting. 

Mr. Kennedy. You did not ? 

Mr, Adelstein. I wouldn't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. The district attorney at that time was making an 
investigation of Mr. Vincent Squillante ; is that right ? That is why 
he wanted these books and records ? It was not an investigation of 813. 

Mr, Adelstein, It was a John Doe subpena. 

Mr, Kennedy. But did you understand he was investigating 

Mr. Adelstein. I didn't know why lie wanted our books and records. 

Mr. Kennedy. But, anyway, you did not turn over the contracts of 
General Sanitation or Corsair; is that right? 

Mr. Adelstein. We found them in our office at a later date, with 
other contracts, 

Mr. Kennedy, When did you find them ? 

Mr, Adelstein. With other contracts. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 7019 

Mr. Kennedy. When did you find them ? 

Mr. Adelstein. What ''. 

]Mr. Kennedy. Wlien did you find them ? 

(Tlie witness conferred witli his counsel.) 

Mr. Adelstein. After our meeting Saturday, and we moved to new 
quarters, we looked through records and files — we were cleaning up 
the ])lace. We met with you last Saturday, I believe, and you raised 
the question and we started to look again, and there we found these 
contracts. 

Mr. Kennedy. So it has been since Saturday that you found these 
contracts? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. You say that according to your attorney, that there 
have been no payments made by General Sanitation to the union? 

Mr. Adelstein. That is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. Can you give any explanation of that ? 

Mr. Adelstein. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Can you give any explanation as to why you would 
furnish a list to Mr. Nolan of union concerns to distribute at the 
Miracle Mile of acceptable union concerns, when this company was not 
making any payments for their employees? 

Mr. Adelstein. When the delegates check trucks, they are supposed 
to let me know whether there are union men on these trucks or not. I 
don't check the trucks on the field, Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Nolan worked 
in that area. Mr. Nolan is not with us since. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who was it that was handling it out of your office ? 
TNHio was the accountant that was handling it and could keep you ad- 
vised ? 

Mr. Adelstein. It depended upon what collections were involved. 
If it was dues, it would be in the union office. 

Mr. IVENNEDY. "W'liose responsibility was it that this list was fur- 
nished to Mr. Nolan, giving a list of acceptable firms, when this com- 
pany in fact was not making any payments for its employees ? 

Mr. Adelstein. We have a bookkeeper, all book 

Mr. Kennedy. Who is that ? 

]\Ir. Adelstein. Lang. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you go to Lang to find out whether the pay- 
ments were being made on behalf of this company ? 

Mr. Adelstein. Now, when you ask me did I go, for what period 
do you mean ? Since you and I met ? 

Mr. Kennedy. When the Miracle Mile incident took place and you 
furnished this list to Mr. Nolan. 

Mr. ADELsn:iN. I don't believe I went to Mr. Lang. I don't believe 
I went to our bookkeeper in the union office. 

Mr. Kennedy. We also had testimony that Donno Co. was having 
difficulty with the union until they combined with General Sanitation, 
Mr. Nunzio Squillante, and thereafter had no trouble with the union, 

Mr. Adelstein. That is not true. Donno still is having trouble 
with the union. 

]\Ir. Kennedy. During the j^eriod of time in wliich tliey were affili- 
ated or associated in General Sanitation, they have had no difficulty 
with the union ? 

Mr. Adelstein. We have tried to organize the unorganized any- 
where under our jurisdiction. 



7020 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. You were picking and choosing, it would appear, 
because you were not doing very much work on General Sanitation, 
and you were not doing very much work with those companies asso- 
ciated with James Squillante. 

Mr. Adelstein. We had a contract with General Sanitation. 

Mr. Kennedy. You might have had a contract, but there was no 
enforcement on the contract, and there was no dues paid and no welfare 
or pension funds paid. 

Mr. Adelstein. Anyone in violation of contract brought to my 
attention, I can assure you will be taken care of as soon as I get back 
to the city. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were being paid $20,000. 

The Chairman. Let us see if we can bring this to a conclusion now. 

This General Sanitation Co. paid no dues, paid no welfare funds, 
paid nothing else, to the union ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Kennedy. That is correct, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. And during the time it was on the approved list 
of those that they might use ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Also, Mr. Chairman, Miravel and DeCabia, none of 
their employees at that time were making payments as members of 
the union. 

Mr. Shivitz. Mr. Chairman and Mr. Kennedy, may I state when 
I checked on this yesterday, I also checked on JMiravel and DeCabia, 
and they did make payments for their employees. They do have a 
contract. 

The Chairman. The question is were they making payments at that 
time. It is all related to that time. 

Mr. Adelstein. Miravel and DeCabia 

The Chairman. They were going out picketing people and forcing 
them to get into the union. Then we hand them a list and the first 
name on the list is somebody who has a contract, but they are not 
enforcing it. 

Mr. Kennedy. And Westbury Paper Stock. 

Mr. Adelstein. That is a subsidiary of Jamaica Ash which has a 
contract with the union. 

Mr. Kennedy. Their employees have no contract. 

Mr. Adelstein. Their employees who drive trucks have contracts 
with our union. Westbury is owned by Jamaica Ash, who has a 
contract with the union. 

The Ctlmrman. Are there any questions, Senator Ives ? 

Senator Ives. No. I think we have had enough. 

Tlie Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Adelstein. Can I answer one question ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Adelstein. They got me owning a liquor store. I don't own 
a liauor store. 

Tlie Chairtnian. Does your wife own one ? 

Mr. Adelstein. My wife owns the store. I don't own it. 

The Chairman. We just made a half a mistake. We said you and 
your v-ifeown it. 

Mr. Adelstein. There were many mistakes made by the Senate. 

Mr. Kennedy. "Wl^o put the money up for your wife ? 

Mr. Adelstein. I gave my wife that as an outright gift. Is that 
unethical ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 7021 

The Chairman. Well, you have the record straight on it. 

You may stand aside. 

Does that conclude your witnesses for the day ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

The Chairman. The Chair has prepared and will place in the 
record at this point, a summation of these hearin<>:s. Copies of it 
may now be handed to the press and also to any of the witnesses who 
desire it. I am just doing that in the interest of brevity. The press 
may have it. It is a part of the record. 

1 call attention to one point at the conclusion of this prepared state- 
ment. I said the committee therefore recommends to the appropriate 
New York State and Federal agencies that an investigation of these 
allegations be pursued with the utmost vigor. Senator Ives thinks 
that the New York authorities are ready to proceed. 

Senator Ives. Both the district attorney in the city of New York 
and the attorney general, Louis I^fkow^itz, of the State of New York. 
They are all set to go. 

The Chairman. We are very happy to know that. 

Senator Ives. As a matter of fact, I think the attorney general held 
up temporarily while this hearing was going on. 

The Chairman. We hope this record will be helpful to him. 

(The closing statement of the chairman is as follows:) 

Two weeks ago this committee presented the picture of large com- 
panies acting in collusion with a labor relations man to prevent union- 
ization of their business firms. 

Through the past week we have also dealt with a labor relations 
man. Here, however, we have dealt with a different type of situation 
and collusion betw^een a labor relations man and a union together 
with captive associations of businessmen. 

Not only does Vincent J. Squillante, a hoodlum labor relations man, 
play a part, but we find that garbage collection industry men banded 
together in associations which eventually, under Squillante, invoked 
monopoly and restraint of trade arrangements with a system of pun- 
ishments for nonconforming members through the use of whip com- 
panies. 

One of the strangest phases is the part the union, local 813, Private 
Sanitation Workers, under its secretary-treasurer Bernard Adelstein, 
played in coercing the association cartmen by invoking security clauses 
devised to compel them to join and stay in the association. 

Adelstein's collusion with Squillante is obviously payment for 
Squillante's part in inducing the cartmen of the Intercounty Cart- 
men's Association of Nassau and the Suffolk County Cartmen 's Asso- 
ciation to join the union, thus increasing the income and power of 
Bernie Adelstein. Testimony showed that approximately 45 percent 
of the total union income was paid out to Adelstein and his relatives. 

In Vincent Squillante we have presented the picture of a man who 
traded on his association Avith key underworld characters and his 
ability to "handle'' Local 813, International Brotherhood of Team- 
sters, to parlay himself into a position where he was the absolute czar 
of the private sanitation industry in Greater New York. 

Tli« committee record is rife with examples of underworld connec- 
tions with both Squillante and local 813. In all, the names of more 

89.330 O— 57— pt. 17 24 



7022 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN TEIE LABOR FIELD 

than 46 hoodlums have shown to have been connected in one way or 
another with the carting industry during the course of this week. 

The record has shown that SquiHante. the self-styled godson of 
gangland executioner Albert Anastasia, entered the private sanitation 
industry without previous experience in the industry or experience as 
a labor-relations man. He rose overnight to a position where he was 
able to rule without challenge over an industry of vital importance 
to the public health and welfare. Squillante's only previous qualifi- 
cations were experience in the New York policy rackets and as a 
pusher of narcotics. 

Starting from a base in the Greater New York Cartmen's Associa- 
tion, and operating through his brother, Nunzio Squillante, and his 
nephew, Gennaro Mancuso, Squillante quickly established control over 
the private sanitation industry in seven of the most populous counties 
of the United States. "Witnesses have testified to their belief that 
Squillante represented the highest echelon of the organized Italian 
underworld. 

This is substantiated by the introduction of evidence indicating 
Squillante's business relationship with such well-known hoodlums 
as Albert Anastasia, Joseph Feola, Anthony Carfano, Alfred (Pogi) 
Toriello, Frank Scalise, and many others. 

The testimony before this committee has indicated that Squillante 
traded on his associations with the underworld and the union to — 

(a) Establish himself as the executive director of three separate 
employer associations. 

(h) Force individual carters into the various associations and into 
I^cal 813, IBT. 

(c) Create a monopoly with respect to the collection of garbage 
and refuse in the Greater New York area. 

(d) Uphold and enforce the principal of territorial rights. 

(e) Trick the members of these associations into paying his back 
income taxes. 

These devices were used by Squillante to set up a monopoly situa- 
tion throughout the entire Greater New York area in the private 
sanitation industry. 

Squillante, a Federal probationer and convicted tax evader, used 
these contacts not only to establish control of the industry, but to 
milk money from organizations peripheral to the cartmens" industry. 

Among the devices used by Squillante were the Empire Manage- 
ment Corp., Long Island City; the Carters Defense Fund; and the 
Caters Landfill, Inc. 

Local 813, International Brotherhood of Teamsters, assumed a posi- 
tion somewhat akin to that of whip firms set up by Squillante to 
enforce decisions in each of the associations he and his mentors con- 
trolled. 

Testimony and evidence have further shown that the key to success 
with Local 813, International Brotherhood of Teamsters, was the 
magic name of any prominent underworld figure associated with a 
firm. This is particularly illustrated in the favorable treatment 
extended to companies such as Sanitary Haulage Corp. (Anthony 
Ricci), Sunrise Sanitation (Carmine Tramunti and Anthony '*Tony 
Ducks" Corallo) , General Sanitation Co. (Nunzio Squillante and Vin- 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 7023 

cent Squillaiite), Corsair Cartiiio: Co. (Nunzio Squillante and Vincent 
Sqiiillante), and Westchester Carting; Co. (Nicholas Ratteni). 

Each of these firms, and other firms controlled by persons who were 
either mobsters or friends of mobsters, were able to operate with an 
advantage over their competitors by virtne of either no union contract 
or a union contract in name only, which allowed noncompliance with 
union-contract conditions. 

The extent to which the union prostrated itself to aid the underworld 
cause was best illustrated in the Miracle Mile incident. Here local 
813 allowed Nunzio Squillante, who was operating a nonunion coni- 
pany, to use a union picket line to obtain profitable Ix>ng Island busi- 
ness which he promptly sold for a sum in excess of $8,000. 

The committee has uncovered Avhat it believes to be evidence of 
violation of State and Federal statutes in connection with this investi- 
gation. There is evidence on the hearing record to indicate that there 
may have been such crimes as income-tax evasion, monopoly, restraint 
of trade, fraud against the Federal Government, extortion, coercion, 
perjury, and violation of Federal probation. The committee there- 
fore recommends to the appropriate New York State and Federal 
agencies that an investigation of these allegations be pursued with the 
utmost vigor. 

In conclusion, then, the Chair wishes to express the thanks of the 
committee to certain staff and others w^ho have cooperated with us, 
and especially make reference to Newsday, a publication of Long 
Island, for furnishing us valuable leads and information that it has, 
and for loaning to us Mr. Robert Greene, one of its staff members, 
and who has been working on the staff as an employee, as an investi- 
gator. 

This publicaiton, as I understand, has at times initiated quite exten- 
sive investigations of its own there in New York from time to time, 
trying to help clean up this condition up there. 

Then I wish to express our thanks to Mr. James Kelly and Mr. 
Walter May, regular members of the staff, and to those from the 
General Accounting Office who have been on loan to us, who have 
worked on this very complicated and difficult ramification that is ob- 
viously operating in New York, Mr. Morris Frame, Mr. Stephen 
Conley, Mr. Milton Morvitz, and to the officials of New York, par- 
ticularly New York district attorney's office, Mr. Frank Hogan, his 
chief assistant, Mr. Scotti, and the detectives of his office who have 
worked with the committee. 

Our thanks also go to the New York State attorney general, Louis 
Lefkowitz; New York State commissioner of investigations, Arthur 
Renter; New^ York City Department of Investigations, Charles 
Tenny ; New York City Department of Licenses, Mr. Bernard O'Con- 
nell; and the Nassau County district attorney's office, Mr. Frank 
Gulotta. 

I wish also to thank Miss Florence Barkley, of the General Services 
Administration, who has also participated in this investigation. 

To all of those, the committee expresses its thanks. We have to 
have the cooperation of others if the committee is to accomplish its 
mission and carry out its function with fruitful results. We would 



7024 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

like for all citizens to cooperate with us, and certainly all of those in 
official positions. It is difficult, even when we have all of that co- 
operation, when we go into a matter so entangled as is the garbage 
situation in New York. It is difficult even with all of that coopera- 
tion and expert help to untangle it to where it doesn't stink. We 
have not been successful in doing that even now. 

The committee stands adjourned. 

(Members of the select committee present at time of adjournment: 
Senators McClellan and Ives.) , . ,. 

(Thereupon, at 1: 17 p., m., the committee was adjourned, subject 
to the call of the Chair. ) 



APPENDIX 



Exhibit No. 1 



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7025 



7026 IMPROPER AcnvmEs m the labor field 

EXHIUIT No. ") 



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IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 7027 

Exhibit No. 6 



Inter-County Cartmen s Association. Inc. 

Rov Bnown PntaiocNT 



JACH MoNT««*MO. 1»T VlC« PMIIIXN 
Gu» Anton»cci 2no VICI P«t«10IN 
Santo Ricc» T««*«u««« 



Andmkw LATTtam Sbcrctawv 
Prank Salcmi a»« t RtconoiNo Sec 
ALrnKO Fabula schqeant at amm* 



J SOUILl^N 



, 




ROVAL STREET. BELLMORE. L 1. 
LE S 29101.2 


N. V. 


UOAKU or DIRtCl'JKi 








Cahmin DkCabia 








Waltw Oynia 








PSTCII PaMISC 








Alfrco Fasula 








Roy Brown 








Jack Montksano 








Prank RuoaitRO 








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FVBUC KELATIOSS 








PRANK SAI.CHI 


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7028 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 7 



ALoONOum i fK 



Private Sanitation Union Local 813 

APPILIATCO WITH: iNTtRNATIONAL DROTHCMHOOO Or TCAMSTtltS. CHAUFrcURI. WARIMOUSItMIN AND HtLPdtS Of AmcRICA 




147 FOURTH AVENUE ROOM 113 NEW YORK 3. N. Y. 

BERNARD ADEL8TEIN -Sec ret nry-TT'eas UTOP 



May ?>, iv55 



-'nlondsle jnrb'!.-e ft 

■\ ■)-- 1- 1 :-.T^a 
-'n '. ~^. -i- '-•■ , i-o-^,' Ifl'i-.j 

Dear Enployer: 

You hive failed to dscosit security ana are 
otherwise in vlJlntlon of contract with the Union. 



You a'xj hereby directed to appear at the 
Union office, lLi7 Po'orth Avenue, Ilew York 3, N.Y. 
on Tuesdsy . M<?y 31 » ^'^^t; at P P.M. 

Upon your failure to appear nnd comply with 
our 8,'5reeinent, the matter will be referred to the 
New York State Department of Labor for pctlon as 
provided in the contract. 



Very truly yours. 



^V^^J^«^^' uiii^iEM 



BER»IARD ADELSTEIN 
Secretary-Treasurer 






IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 
Exhibit No. 8 



7029 



■ «Ti 1 1 uA^XWSSt^SA^TfTS^^ ^f^^tS^^^ 











^l^ien&jfm^^Mk 



7030 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 9 



r 



"Established by o Neighbor for his Neighbors" 

UNIONDALE GARBAGE & DISPOSAL CO. 

707 COLONIAL STREET 
UNIONDALE, L. I. 

TELEPHONE 

!▼ 3-7233 



OMMWr 17. 19^ 

IU7 fourth Miftoam 
I«^ Tortc 3. ». ^. 

Atti Mr. 1. M«l«««lml 

Bmt Sin 

Dm to th« t—% that th« p«opl« r«ipOMihl« f«r tb* 
••tturity •!■«•• la o«r Mmtraot ara at laagar la asltt 
w voaia Uka ta hava oar aaaarltjr aaaar ( #»900 ^ plat 
lataraot. rafaadoA. ta wvalA ayprtalata yaar lanodlata 
attaatlna racMNIlac thlt aattar a« «a#MB It 
far haolaaao aspaatloa. 



Toaro tvaljr* 



ftioHMa Yaa laao 

llR&oirfalo tai^aca * Dl^pcnial Oo, 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 7031 

Exhibit No. 10 

NASSAU SAN/TAT/ON CO., IN'C. 






TO * -.OM IT MAY COlCg lli 

fi-^E"" be «dvl;- that V_- . V : ». •- »ni 

K' , n^uin«nt« of th« Of «1 Sju." t 

•■'.■7WT\ t< •nd ere k' 'jw- b to 

b. ■^xcsller sanll* 

We ••rur» you ' .>«t they «r« w#«ll qualified 
by jf" >xp«rlonoe «• 1 present o; - * ' '•. to 

aenrlce ••7 »»x^r<" or bu' - '. »>/ unit »!th -.ne full 
qU»'-«;.t,« -■ I he* *'.« worV i 1 be dcnn sa*l8''sr* vrlly. 

^ry i,ruly y xirs, 
3s»u iaxiltation Co. Inc. 



■ 3s»u ::,a^ 1 1 a 1. 1 on Co. Inc. 



/ 



FaP/*HX 



7032 IMPROPER ACPivrriES in the labor field 

Exhibit Xo. 11 



ALoONQum ««BI4 



Private Sanitation Union Local 813 

APriLIATSD with: iNTIUNA-nON*!. BlIOTHCRHOOO Of TCAMmR*, CHAUPTtURS. W*RlHO0»t»««M AND HCLrKR* OT AMCRICA 



AMCRICAN FIOKIIATION OP UASOR 




CCNTRAU TRAOKS AND LABOR COUMCtt. 



•TAT. F.DCRATION OP UA.OR QeOSn ■"«-'>"'0 '''»> CONSTRUCTION T«AOI« COUNCIU 



147 FOURTH AVENUE room its S^J.^^ ^^mm.iy^-m 

BERNARD ADELSTE.N -Secretary-Tr©a8uper 



J?»bruapy 1U»1956 



Igassau Sanitation Co* 
1010 Park Boulevard, 
Massapaqua Park, L.I. 



Defer Employer: 



Vie have been notified that you are no longer 
a member of Inter-Coimty Cartman's Association. 



Demand Is hereby made that within 1*8 hours you 
deposit with this Union the security provided for in oup 
contract. Your failure to do so makes you In violation 
of contract. 



This matter should be taken care of by you 
imnedlatcly. Your failure to comply will result In the 
matter being turned over to the New York State Department 
of Lftbor for action as provided in our ag^eroent. 



Very truly yours* 



BERNARD ADELRTEIN 
B/:HL Secrfitary-Treasuror 



nEiISIERED 
RETURN RECF.IPT 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 
Exhibit No. 12 



7033 



(jlc^JJ 1/l^/^t 



•TMACUSC 



■urr*kO \ 



NEW YORK STATE BOARD OF MEDIATION 



MeRLYN ■ PITZCLC. Chairm 

RT ncv JOHN P BOLANO 

HARRY J CARMAN 

JACOa ORUMCT 

RALPH C KHARAS 

MASCL LCSLIC 

aURTON ■ TURKU* 

ARTHUR STARK 




JULIUS J MANSON Oil 
Nlw YO»i> C<Tt Oi>TI 

BAMCLAT 7<teiA 



270 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 7, N. Y. 



March 12, i 956 



lU«nu Sanitation C** 
1010 Park BIirI. 
Maasap*<iaa Park, N.T. 

Local 813, FlrlTata Sanltatioa Onion 
lii? Fourth kyKxam 
New York, N.T. 



Isauat 



PaTMBnta to Inauranea Fond, Saenrl^ Oopoait 
UnlcD Help, Non-coqpll«nee with contract. 



OentXeaant 

Ve have been aaked to name an arbitrator In the dispute stated 
abore. It is our underetandlng that this request Is nade pursuant to the 
taraa of an aodstlag eoUeotlve bargaining agreeaent. We hare accordingly 
designated a nssiber of our staff who will eondnct a hearing at the office 
of the Board, 270 Broadway, on Frldagr, Mareh 23, 1956 at 2 P.M. 



Please be present at that tiaa and rea47 ^ proceed. Bring the 
Oaion a g re e ne n t with yon and any recorda idiloh aigr be pertinent. Any 
question ceneeming this designation or Board procedure should be directed 
to ae. 

Tory truly yoare. 



fixil\xȣ, Hansen 
Distrifct Direetcr 



HB-5 (5-55) 



7034 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit Xo. 13 




IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EN THE LABOR FIELD 7035 

Exhibit No. 14 



ALooNUi'iN 4 B»J4 amyi 



THOMAS F. NOLAN 



UNION LOCAL Sll I H <>»' T 



7036 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 15 



r<-l. PRiinroM- S4)070 



Prompt Service 



hor Hrmotiiii 



Estate Carting Co. 

p. <). BOX 27-t - NEW HYDE PARK, I- I. 

RKMOVERS OF ASHi:S A.M> Rl BBISH, fm: 



UIMP THirKS TO HIKK 







l>in anrl Kuhbi>h fur M.inlh uf 

( jioii f>f \»hni at 

l^uad of Rubbi.h »nJi rW. M^^^ 



imnt uf Kuhbi.h ■! 



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IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 7037 

Exhibit No. 19 




'yt^^^l-^^^-^tJ^>CtIJ 




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7038 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 20 




m^..\ f i. 







/^f>y-/<»j 




IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 7039 

Exhibit No. 21 




- 7 



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I- .o . 






-J - ?{ 



7040 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 22 




IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 
Exhibit Xo. 23 



7041 




7042 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 27 







/ 









^^r\ 







VllitI; 11 ^ 




IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 
Exhibit No. 28 



7043 






\ i i > K 





=4 






i i 




7044 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit Xo. 29 




or<r 




IMPROPER ACmvITIES EN THE LABOR FIELD 7045 

Exhibit Xo. 30 





-<*- 



^ 



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1 




7046 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 31 







IM'^ " 




\ 



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.«^ 



n 



4 



1 



! 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES 

Ex HI HI 



m THE LABOR FIELD 
r No. 32 



7047 




7048 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 35 



92 



^. 







IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 7049 

Exhibit No. 41A 



FOR DEPOSIT ONLY IN THE 

etiemicai Corn Exctiange Bank Trust Co. 
MELVILLE B. WOLPERT 




7050 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 41B 



FOR DEf^OSlT ONLY IN THE 

tkM tm Exchange UvX Trast U. 
MELVILLE B. WOLPERX 




IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EN THE LABOR FIELD 7051 

Exhibit No. 41C 




7052 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 41D 



4^ '^'s^.v,^- 




MnHM|^mMg^gggfl|j|g|||^g^t |M>twnwttKH£iKiyi««a-tf 




P>.»v.>o,f;S*k\\ft 




022 3 



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