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Full text of "Investigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field"



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INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 

HEARINGS 

BEFORE THE 

SELECT COMMITTEE 

ON IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 

LABOR OR MANAGEMENT EIELD 

EIGHTY-SIXTH CONGRESS 

FIRST SESSION 
PURSUANT TO SENATE RESOLUTION 44, 86TH CONGRESS 



FEBRUARY 5 AND 6, 1959 



PART 45 



Printed for the use of the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the 
Labor or Management Field 





^^IVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 



HEARINGS 

' BEFORE THE 

SELECT COMMITTEE 

ON IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 

LABOR OR J^IANAGEMENT FIELD 

EIGHTY-SIXTH CONGRESS 

FIRST SESSION 
PURSUANT TO SENATE RESOLUTION 44, 86TH CONGRESS 



FEBRUARY 5 AND 6, 1959 



PART 45 



Printed for the use of the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the 
Labor or Management Field 




UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
36751 ■ WASHINGTON : 1959 




Boston Public Library 
Superintendent of Documents 

APR 2 - 19t)9 

DEPOSITORY. 



SELECT COMMITTEE ON IMPROPER ACTIVITIES 
IN THE LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 

JOHN L. McCLELLAN. Arkansas, Chairman 
KARL E. MUNDT, South Dakota, I'ice Chairman 
JOHN F. KENNEDY, Massachusetts BARRY OOLDWATER, Ari/.ona 

SAM J. ERVIN, Jr., North Carolina CARL T. CURTIS, Nebraska 

FRANK CHURCH, Idaho HOMER E. CAPEHART, Indiana 

Robert F. Kennedy, Chief Counsel 
Ruth Young Watt, Chief Clerk 

n 



CONTENTS 



International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen & 
Helpers of America: Los Angeles Area 

Page 

Appendix 16451 

Testimony of — 

Barnes, Wendell B 16401 

Cohen, Ben H 16428 

Cohen, Sidney 1634S, 16368 

Filipoff , John W 16373, 16386, 16392, 16396 

Gnrewitz, Morris 16413 

O'Donnell, P. Kenneth 16400 

Sal.nger, Pierre E. G 16368, 16371, 

16376, 16382, 16394, 16400, 16411, 16446 

Savage, Robert B 16378, 16385, 16391 

Singer, Meyer 1 6436 



EXHIBITS 

1. Agreement dated January 23, 1959, Washington, D.C., at 

3:45 p.m. and signed by Mike Singer, Sidney Cohen, 
John Filipoff and Paul A. Collins 

2. Telegram addressed to John W. Filipoff, Teamsters Local 

208, Los Angeles, signed by James R. Hoffa, general 
president 

3. Documents pertaining to the election of Sidney Cohen for 

secretary-treasurer of local 208 Los Angeles, Calif 

4. Interview between Dr. Joseph Sternbach and Pierre 

Salinger, dated January 31, 1959 

5. Telegram dated December 30, 1958, addressed to John W. 

Filipoff from James R. Hoffa 

6. Letter dated December 17, 1958, addressed to James R. 

Hoffa, general president. International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, Chauffeurs, \\'arehousemen and Helpers, 
from John W. Filipoff, secretary-treasurer. Freight Driv- 
ers L'nion, Local 208 

7A. Letter dated April 2, 1958, addressed to Harold S. [sic] 
Gibbons, International vice president. Brotherhood of 
Teamsters, signed by John W. Filipoff, secretary-treas- 
urer. Freight Drivers L'nion, Local 208 

7B. Letter dated April 7, 1958, addressed to John W. Filipoff, 
secretary-treasurer. Freight Drivers Union, signed by 
H. J. Gibbons, executive assistant to the general presi- 
dent 

8. Telephone toll tickets showing charges for telegrams sent 

to James R. Hoffa and the board of monitors 

9. Affidavit of Leo Leibowitz 

10. Check No. 5113, dated January 30, 1959, payable to Robert 

B. Savage in the sum of $189.10, drawn by Local Freight 
Drivers Union No. 208 

11. Interview between Pierre Salinger and Harry F. Leveson, 

January 31, 1959 

12. Article, "Labor and the McClellan Committee," published 

in a magazine called "Political Affairs," July 19.58, issue.. 

13A. Memorandum prepared by William Fitzpatrick to Mr. 

Edelstein, press agent for local 208 dated September 17, 

1958 



Introduced 
on page 



Appears 
on page 



16361 (*) 



61368 


16451 


16372 


(*) 


16373 


(*) 


16376 


16452 



16377 16453 



16383 16454 



16383 16455 



1G389 
16390 




16391 


16456 


16396 


(*; 


16400 


(*; 



16401 16457 



IV 



CONTENTS 



Introduced Appears 
on page on page 
13B. Agreement between Local 208 of the International Broth- 
erhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, & Warehousemen of 
America and International Longshoremen & Warehouse- 
men's Union 16401 1C458 

14. Affidavits of Arthur H. Hansen, Roy E. King, Jr., John 

D. Chudacoff, and Louis Sandler 16406 (*; 

15. List of establishments in Hawaii under the jurisdiction of 

the NLRB, of the HERB, and the number excluded from 

either board's jurisdiction 16409 (*; 

1 6. Newspaper clippings of September 1958, from the Honolulu 

Advertiser showing the activities of Mike Singer 16411 (*; 

17. Transcript of a radio interview with Mike Singer by Aku- 

head Pupule 16411 (*; 

18. Letter dated September 19, 1958, addressed to Mr. A. J. 

Manard, secretary-treasurer. Meat & Provision Drivers 
Local Union No. 626, Los Angeles, Calif., signed by 
John M. Annand, president, Teamsters Joint Coun- 
cil 42 16412 (*) 

19A. Check No. 7425, dated November 17, 1958, payable to 
Lee Taylor, in the amount of $333, drawn by Washington 
Rendering Co., Los Angeles 16422 16459 

19B. Check No. 7426, dated November 24, 1958, payable to 
Lee Tavlor in the amount of $333, drawn by Washington 
Rendering Co., Los Angeles 1 16422 16460 

19C. Check No. 7427, dated December 1, 1958, payable to Lee 
Taylor in the amount of $334, drawn by Washington 

Rendering Co., Los Angeles 16422 16461 

20. Photograph of Al Menard, James HofFa, and Mike Singer. 16424 (*) 

21A. Check No. 1600 dated November 14, 1958, payable to Mike 
Singer testimonial, in the amount of $500, drawn by 
B. & H. Processing Co., Los Angeles 16432 16462 

21B. Check No. 1016, dated November 17, 1958, payable to 
Mike Singer testimonial, in the amount of $500, drawn 
by B. & H. Processing Co., Los Angeles 16432 16463 

22A. Check No. 4974, dated November 18, 1958, payable to 
Mike Singer testimonial in the amount of $650, drawn 
by Western Tallow Processors, Los Angeles 16435 16464 

22B. Check No. 1259, dated December 9, 1958, payable to testi- 
monial dinner in the amount of $650, drawn by Star 
Grease Co., Los Angeles 16435 16465 

23. Deposit slips and bank ledger for the account of Lee 

Taylor 16435 (*) 

24. Letter dated November 17, 1958, addressed to "Dear Fitz," 

signed by Frank Chavez, secretary-treasury, local union 

No. 901 16448 (*) 

25. Letter dated December 15, 1958, addressed to John W. 

FilipofT, secretary-treasurer. Teamsters' Local Union No. 
208, Los Angeles, Calif., and signed by John F. English, 
general secretary-treasurer, International Brotherhood 
of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen & Helpers of 

America _ 16449 16466 

Proceedings of — 

February 5, 1959. 16347 

February 6, 1959. 16399 

•May be found in the files of the select committee. 



INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1959 

U.S. Senate, Select Committee on Improper Activities 

IN the Lx\bor or ]\L\nagement Field, 

Washington^ D.O. 

The select committee met at 11 a.m., pursuant to Senate Resolution 
44, agreed to February 2, 1959, in the caucus room. Senate Office 
Building, Senator Jolin L. McClellan (chairman of the select com- 
mittee) presiding. 

Present: Senator John L. McClellan, Democrat, Arkansas; Sena- 
tor Sam J. Ervin, Jr., Democrat, North Carolina; Senator Homer E. 
Capehart, Republican, Indiana; Senator Barry Goldwater, Republi- 
can, Arizona. Also present: Robert F. Kennedy chief counsel; P. 
Kenneth O'Donnell, administrative assistant; Paul J. Tierney, as- 
sistant counsel; Pierre E. G. Salinger, investigator; Carmine S. 
Bellino, accounting consultant; Ruth Y. Watt, chief clerk. 

The Chairman. The committee will be in order. 

(Members of the select committee present at the convening of the 
session were Senators McClellan and Capehart.) 

The Chairman. We are very happy today to welcome a new mem- 
ber to the committee, the distinguished senior Senator from Indiana, 
who has been appointed by the Vice President to succeed Senator Ives, 
who served as vice chairman of this committee until he retired from 
the Senate. 

We are very glad to welcome you. 

This is a working committee. I think our record thoroughly dem- 
onstrates that, and although we have done a lot of work up to now, 
we still have lots more to do. 

The Chair earnestly solicits your help because this is a difficult, 
arduous task. Under the rules of the committee, it requires two mem- 
bers to be present for the taking of testimony under oath in a public 
hearing, and we welcome you and urge you to attend every meeting 
possible. 

You will find it intriguing, you will find it interesting, and at times 
exasperatiiig, but you will recognize there is a great job for us to do. 

Senator Capehart. Being a working man, I will thoroughly enjoy 
it. 

The Chairman. Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. Call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. We are going into a different matter today. Mr. 
Chairman, one involving a recent election of local 208 of the Teamsters 
in Los Angeles, Calif. Local 208 is the largest Teamster local in the 
city of Los Angeles. 

16347 



16348 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

They had an election in January of this year and it is a matter of 
some concern and deserves some consideration by the committee. 

The first witness, Mr. Chairman, that I would like to call is Mr. Sid 
Cohen. 

The Chairman. All right. Will you be sworn ? 

You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give before this 
Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and noth- 
ing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Cohen. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF SIDNEY COHEN 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Cohen. Sid Cohen. 

The Chairman. Is it Sid Cohen ? 

Mr. Cohen. Sid or Sidney. 1948 Isabella, Monterey Park, a little 
town right out of Los Angeles. I work for the Teamsters Union as 
a business agent for local 208. 

The Chairman. You are the business agent for local 208 of the 
Teamsters Union ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. Where is its headquarters? 

Mr. Cohen. 1616 West 9th Street, Los Angeles. ^ 

The Chairman. How long have you been a business agent for this 
local ? 

Mr. Cohen. Twelve years. 

The Chairman. Do you waive counsel, Mr. Cohen? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, I do. 

The Chairman. All right, Mr. Kennedy, you may proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Cohen, how long have you been in the Teamsters 
Union ? 

Mr. Cohen. Some twenty-odd years. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long have you been an officer of local 208, or 
when did you first become an officer of local 208, approximately? 

Mr. Cohen. 1949 or 1950. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was the local in trusteeship at that time? 

Mr. Cohen. It was. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you were appointed as an officer ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were appointed president; is that right? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. You held that position until it was taken out of 
trusteeship ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And then you ran for office and you were elected 
president ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. When was that? 

Mr. Cohen. It was 1953. 

Mr. Kennedy. And was that the last election that has been held 
up to tlie recent election in January of this year ? 

Mr. Cohen. No, we had another election after that, and I made it. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16349 

Mr. Kennedy. Yoii were reelected again ? 

Mr. Cohen. I was reelected again. 

Mr. Kennedy. What is the jurisdiction of local 208 ? 

Mr. Cohen. Local freight drivers. 

Mr. Kennedy. In the Los Angeles area ? 

Mr. CoiiEN. Yes, sir. 

Mr, IvENNEDY. And how many members does it have, approxi- 
mately ? 

Mr. Cohen. Approximately 4,900. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, Mr. Cohen, there was an election that was 
held in January of this year ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that right ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you ran for secretary-treasurer ; is that right ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Secretary-treasurer is the most important position 
in the Teamsters Union, in the local union, and it is a more important 
position than president ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you ran against the incumbent officer, John 
Filipcff? 

Mr. Cohen. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he was the gentleman who held the position of 
secretary-treasurer ? 

]Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you ran against him ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. When did j^ou first decide or make a decision that 
you would run ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, I had been contacted by quite a few of the drivers 
and they asked me if I wouldn't run for the job. 

Mr. Kennedy. \Aliat was the reason you decided to run ? 

Mr. Cohen. Several of the boys got together and talked things 
over and there were quite a few of them that were a little unhappy on 
certain things that were transpiring in the local. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you just give us that briefly, what the condi- 
tions were that you were unhappy about ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, the boys said that John promised them certain 
things that they couldn't fulfill in the contract, and they didn't think 
it was necessary to hit the bricks at the time we did back there in 
about August. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then you had that long strike for about 5 weeks ; is 
that right? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And was there a feeling that Filipoff at least was 
partially responsible for that? 

Mr, Cohen. Well, not in that many words. Of course, this wasn't 
a strike; this was strictly a lockout, an employers lockout. 

Mr. Kennedy. A strike had been taken by a local, and then the 
employers locked out the rest of the union; is that right? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 



16350 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr, Kennedy. It was a strike and a lockout. A lockout as far as 
your local was concerned ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. But there had been original offers, had there been, 
to the Teamsters Union about accepting 10, 10, and 10, for the next 
3 years. That is, a 10-cent-an-hour raise each year ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had you recommended that that offer be accepted ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. And had you urged Mr. Filipoff that that offer be 
accepted ? 

Mr. Cohen. I wouldn't know whether you would say "urge" or not. 
I talked to him about it at a dinner one night, just prior to going 
to that meeting, and I guess another fellow that was with him and 
I talked it over and they didn't see fit to take it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who was the otlier fellow ? 

Mr. Cohen. A fellow by the name of Kavner. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is Richard Kavner ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir; that is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. He is the organizer from St. Louis; is that right? 

Mr. Cohen. I think he belongs in St. Louis. 

Mr. Kennedy. So Mr. Filipoff had gone back to the membership 
and urged that this offer not be accepted ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And ultimately the agreement that was signed was 
that it would be 20 cents raise for the first year and 21/^ cents for 
the second year? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And nothing for the third year? 

Mr. Cohen. A cost of living. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was there a cost of living index for the third year? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. But on the face of it, or the surface, you did not do 
as well at the end of the strike as you would have done at the be- 
ginning, and instead of getting 30 cents, you were getting 22iA cents? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. There was some dissatisfaction as far as that was 
concerned ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. Do I understand that the employer had offered a 
10, 10, 10 increase, 10 cents for each year for 3 years; is that right? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. And you finally wound up after the strike, your 
local rejected that offer on the part of the employer and went on 
strike ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. And after the strike you finally settled for less 
than what was originally offered before the strike began? 

Mr. Cohen. For 221/2 cents. 

Tlie Chairman. And this man Filipoff — is that his name? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. He is the one who was responsible for making 
that settlement? 



IIVIPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16351 

]Mr. CoiiEX. "Well, I do not know if he was wholly responsible, but 
partly. 

The CiiAiRMAx. What was his position at the time? 

Mr. CoiiEN. Well, he was on the negotiation committee, from what 
I understand. 

The Chairman. What was his position as an officer in the union? 

Mr. Cohen. He was the secretary-treasurer. 

The Chairman. He was the secretary-treasurer, the highest office 
in the union, and he was also on the negotiating committee; is that 
right ? 

ISIr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. And he accepted, he and the negotiating commit- 
tee, accepted this otter that was less than what was originally otfered 
before tlie strike was called ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, there is an 11 Western States agreement in 
there, and I am not really too familiar with how they got about that. 

The Chairman. Is that what the dissension or dissatisfaction was 
about, that they came out with less than they were offered before 
they started ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. In other words, the union members were unhappy 
about it ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. Because their officers had finally made a settle- 
ment and bargaining agreement that actually gave them less than 
what the company offered them before they went on strike; is that 
correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is correct. 

The Chairman. All right. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you yourself had some personal grievances, 
did you not ? 

Mr. Cohen. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. In connection with Mr. Filipoff. He urged you to 
take an active role in the elections that were going on in California, 
political elections? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. In favor of a particular candidate, and when you 
failed to do it Mr, Filipoff took steps so that you would not be able, 
or you no longer collected your flat expense allowance ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

ISIr. Kennedy. And that was not only for you, but for at least one 
other of your colleagues ? 

]Mr. Cohen. One other business agent besides myself. 

The Chairman. Now, he was secretary-treasurer, and when you re- 
fused to engage in politics, as he wanted you to, then he denied you 
your expense allowance that you were entitled to under the terms of 
your employment and the office you held? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. So he didn't pay that ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. And did he have the power to withhold it ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, I guess he did have, and he did it. 



16352 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairmax. In other words, he did withhold it and you didn't 
get it for how long a period of time ? 

Mr. (^oiiEN. From about the first week in September until just 
last week. 

The Chairman. September last vear? 

Mr. Cohen. In 1958. 

The Chairman. Until last week ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. You began drawing your expense allowance again? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Kennedy, Prior to the time that you were nominated, Mr. Co- 
hen, did you have a visit by Mr. Mike Singer ? 

Mr. Cohen. I did, over at my house. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, I might say as we get into this name 
of Mr. Singer, he will play an extremely important role in the hear- 
ing that proceeds botli this morning and this afternoon. 

The Chairman. We had his name in the hearings before? 

Mr. Kennedy. We might have mentioned it, but not to the extent 
that we are going to. 

The Chairman. Identif}^ him so we may know who he is. 

Mr. Cohen. To my knowledge, Mr. Singer is a business agent for 
one of the other Teamster locals in Los Angeles, local 626. 

The Chairman. He is what? 

Mr. Cohen. He is a business agent to one of the other locals in the 
building, local 626. 

The Chairman. Is that a Teamster local ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Another local, a Teamster local that has head- 
quarters in the same building, 626 ? 

Mr. Cohen. Local 626 of the Teamsters. 

The Chairman. And "he is a business agent just the same as you 
are in the other local ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is my understanding ; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. All right. 

That is Mike Singer ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. He made a visit to you. Was this before the nomi- 
nations ? 

Mr. Cohen. I am not too sure whether that was before. No, I am 
quite sure that was before. 

Mr. Kennedy. And at that time it was rumored that you would run 
and he urged you not to run ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, he talked to me about it ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he urge you not to run ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

The Chairman. Wlien was this election or when were the nomina- 
tions ? 

Mr. Cohen. On the 21st day of December. 

The Chairman. Last December? 

Mr. Cohen. Of 1958; yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Ordinarily the nominations should have been held 
in November ; is that right ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16353 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And for some reason they were postponed until the 
21st of December? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Under your bylaws, they should be held in 
November ? 

Mr. Cohen. Under the constitution. 

Mr. Kennedy. Under the constitution they should be held in No- 
vember and the election held in January ? 

Mr. Cohen. In December. 

Mr. Kennedy. The election held in December ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. But on this, the nominations were held in Decem- 
ber and the elections were held in January ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Just going back for a moment to Mike Singer, what 
is the relationship of Mr. Singer with Mr. Iloffa, for instance? 

Mv. Cohen. Well, I understand they are very god friends. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Who would you characterize as Mr. HofFa's personal 
representative in that area of Los Angeles? Who would you say 
was his closest associa,te in that area ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, I would say probably his best friend is Mike 
Singer. 

]Mr. Kennedy. In the Los Angeles area? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

IMr. Kennedy. He is the one that came to visit you around the 
time that the nominations were made. Did he come to visit you at 
any other time and suggest that you not run for office ? 

Mr. Cohen. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have any other discussions with him in 
November or December about not iiuuiing for office? 

Mr. Cohen. No, not that I can recall. 

Mr. I^Iennedy. Did you meet him in a restaurant ? 

Mr. Cohen. That night there was a meeting set up. 

Mr. Kennedy. "WHiat night was that ? 

Mr. Cohen. The same day that he visited me. I mean that same 
night. 

Mr. Kennedy. And who was at the meeting ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, there was Mr. Filipoff, Mr. Singer, and myself. 

Mr. Kennedy. ^^Hiat conversations did you have with them at that 
time ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, just a general conversation of what we had just 
gone through, the expense account, and there was unhappiness in 
there, and one other business agent who was supposed to be appointed 
head business agent 

Mr. Kennedy. You told him that you were dissatisfied with the 
local? 

ISIr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did they urge you at that time not to run for secre- 
taiy-treasurer ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. They tried to talk me out of it, and I told them 
I wouldn't do it. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you determined to run; is that right? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 



16354 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. The nominations were held on December 21, 1958. 
Before the nominations were held, were you informed that you would 
have to resign as president in order to run as secretary-treasurer? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, I was. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who told you that? 

Mr. Cohen. Mr. Filipoff. 

Mr. Kennedy, And 

Mr. Cohen. Mr. Filipoff said he had received a telegram and it 
specifically stated that in order to nm for the job of secretary-treas- 
urer, that I should resign my present position as president. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who was the telegram from ? 

Mr. Cohen. As I understand it, it came from the general president. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Hoffa ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that what Mr. Filipoff said ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. That he had received a telegram from Mr. Hoffa 
that you would have to resign as president of the local in order to run 
as secretary-treasurer; is that right? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why was it ? Is there any provision in the constitu- 
tion that provides that you have to resign from either the general 
executive board or from the office of the president in order to run 
for secretary-treasurer ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, I looked over that constitution pretty good and 
I didn't see any in there. I questioned it at the time. I was then told 
that there was a telegram. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Filipoff say there was a provision in the 
constitution that required this ? 

Mr. Cohen. No, he did not. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he show you the telegram that he received? 

Mr. Cohen. No, he just read from a telegram, and I took his word 
that he had it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ask to see the telegram ? 

Mr. Cohen. No, I did not. 

Mr. Kennedy. He didn't offer to show it to you ? 

Mr. Cohen. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. This is the morning of December 21; is that right? 
That is, the morning of the nominations? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you resign then as president ? 

Mr. Cohen. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the nominations were held and you were nomi- 
nated ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was Mr. Hoffa in Los Angeles at that time? 

Mr. Cohen. Mr. Hoffa was in Los Angeles at that time. 

Mr. Kennedy. For what reason was he in Los Angeles? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, there was two reasons. One, mainly, to attend a 
testimonial dinner for Mike Singer. 

Mr. Kennedy. He came to attend this dinner? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. And he also came to talk to the mem- 
bership of local 208 ; that is, after the nominations. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16355 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he speak to the membership ? 

Mr. CcHEN. Yes; he did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he speak to your stewards, also? 

Mr. Cohen. They had a dinner later on that afternoon, and he did 
talk to them. But what took place there, I could not say. I didn't 
attend. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you attend the meeting of the membership at 
which Mr. Hoffa spoke? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he urge upon the membership at that time that 
they should return the incumbents to oflice? 

Mr. CoiiEN. Well, not in just that many words. I mean, he told 
them that it would be nice if they could have some experience in 
there, that they had a lot of things that they had planned, that it 
would take a man Avith a little knowledge of it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was it generally understood by the membership that 
he was urging the return of Filipoff to the position of secretary- 
treasurer ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. From what he said ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

(At this point Senator Goldwater entered the hearing room.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you understand that he also made the same kind 
of a tallc to the stewards Avhen they luid their meeting? 

Mr. Cohen. I wasn't at that meeting. 

Mr. Kennedy. I asked you if you understood that he made the 
same kind of a talk. 

Mr. Cohen. I really don't know. 

Mr. Ivennedy. The nominations were held and you were nomi- 
nated. How was the election going to be held ? 

Mr. Cohen. There was a motion put on the floor from the executive 
board of local 208 that the election should be held by referendum. 

Mr. Kennedy. And is it provided in the constitution that with the 
permission of the general president, that an election can be held by 
referendum ? 

Mr. Cohen. I don't actually think it spells it out that way. 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, it does provide in the constitution that you 
can hold the election by referendum ? 

Mr. Cohen. I am not really sure. 

Mr. Kennedy. I believe that it provides that. This is a not a vital 
point, but it also provides for contacting the general president. In 
any case, it was decided by the membership to hold it by referendimi, 
and the general president was contacted to get his acquiescence? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. The general president, Mr. Ploffa, agreed that you 
could hold the election by referendum ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the election was held by referendum ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes ; it was. 

Mr. Kennedy. Each member of the miion was polled, is that right 
the ballot was sent to them ? ' 

( At this point Senator Capehart left the hearing room.) 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 



16356 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. And the election took place over how long a period? 

Mr. CoiiEN. From the 7th to the 14th of January. 

(At this point Senator Ervin entered the hearing room.) 

Mr. Kennedy. And you brought in an outside 

Mr. Cohen. Certified public accountant. 

Mr. Kennedy. And his name? 

Mr. Cohen. Mr. Sternbach. 

(Present at this point: Senators McClellan, Goldwater, and Ervin.) 

Mr. Ivennedy. He is also the public relations man for the Magi- 
cians Association in Los Angeles ? 

Mr. Cohen. That I don't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. You didn't know that ? 

Mr. Cohen. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Anyway, he was the man who was brought in to 
supervise the election ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir; I never heard of Sternbach until the name 
was brought up. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat is Mr. Sternbach's first name? 

Mr. Cohen. Joseph. 

Mr. Kennedy. And this was a procedure that was set up by Mr. 
Filipoff and by his executive board ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. He is the one that selected Mr. Sternbach? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was to supervise the election ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. The election was held on the dates you mentioned, 
January 7 through the 14th? 

Mr. Cohen. Through the 14th. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the votes were then counted in your presence 
or in the presence of a representative of yours, as well as a repre- 
sentative of Mr. Filipoff? 

Mr. Cohen. There were two representatives of Filipoff's and two 
of my own. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the votes were counted on January 17 ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who won the election ? 

Mr. Cohen. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was the count ? 

Mr. Cohen. 1,269 to 1,149, out of 4,910. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you won by about 120 votes? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. After it was found that you won the election, you 
were not present when a telephone call was made to your home in- 
forming you of that ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you later learn that there was a Jack Estabrook 
in town who put some calls in to Portland, Oreg. ? 

Mr. Coin-iN. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who is Jack Estabrook ? 

Mr. CojnoN. Jack Eslabrook is secretary-treasurer of one of the 
Teamsters Unions out of Portland, Oreg. 

Mr. Kennedy. Secretary-treasurer of local 206 of Portland, Oreg., 
is he not? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16357 

Mr. CoiiEN". I am not quite sure of the number, but he is the secre- 
tary-treasurer of it. 

Mr. Kexnedy. Did you also know him to be one of Mr. Hoffa's chief 
lieutenants in the Oregon area ? 

Mr. Cohen. No, I don't. I can't say that for sure. 

Mr. Kennedy. Following the election — well, do you know what 
Mr. Estabrook was doing in town at that time ? What did he come 
down for? 

Mr. Cohen. He had, I understand, to be in San Francisco, and 
oddly enough came to Los Angeles to attend a victory dinner for Mr. 
Filipoii. 

Mr. Kennedy. Of course, that was not held. 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have a conversation with Filipoff then 
about turning over the job of secretary-treasurer ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, right after the meeting ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you relate what happened ? 

Mr. Cohen. He said he had to get the books audited. 

Mr. Kennedy. Before he turned it over ? 

Mr. Cohen, That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was there any provision in the constitution that 
required that? 

Air. Cohen. I am not sure of the provision of the constitution, but 
I figured it would be best for both parties concerned. 

Mr. Kennedy. So did you ask him when the auditor would arrive ? 

Mr. Cohen. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. "V\niat did he say ? 

Mr. Cohen. "How high is up ?" 

Mr. Kennedy. "How high is up ?" 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. What did you gather from that ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, it just wasn't going to be done right away quick. 

Mr. Kennedy. After you left his office and he notified you that there 
was going to be this audit, and that the auditor would arrive — and 
answered your question of when the auditor would arrive in the manner 
you described — did a period of harassment begin ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. We were being followed and license numbers 
were taken of every car that stopped in front of our house. 

Mr. Kennedy. "V\^io is "we" ? 

Mr. Cohen. There were several of us. There was one of our regu- 
lar truckdrivers who was being followed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Pie was one of your colleagues? 

Mr. Cohen. A professional truckdriver. He was followed for a 
couple of days. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you followed ? 

Mr. Cohen. I was ; every time I left the house in the evening, I had 
a car on me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you try to lose the car? 

Mr. Cohen. Several times. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you able to do that? 

Mr. Cohen. At times ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you laioAv who was in the car? 

Mr. Cohen. No, sir; I didn't. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you receive telephone calls to your home? 



16358 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Cohen. Well, we received a phone call and a guy swore at me 
one night. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you receive many telephone calls? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, not too many; just a few. 

Mr. Kennedy. What would they say in the telephone calls? 

Mr. Cohen. Just as well not mention it on the air. 

The Chairman. Said what? 

Mr. Cohen. I would rather not mention it on the air. 

Mr. Kennedy. W^as the sum and substance of it that you should 
get out as secretary-treasurer ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, they called us a few names. 

The Chairman. They evidently cursed and called you vile names 
that you don't want to repeat ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. What was the purpose of it ? What did they inti- 
mate they were undertaking to do ? 

Mr. Cohen. They just called me a sucker. 

The Chairman. Well, they called you worse than that, I assume. 
You mentioned sucker, but they called you some other things you 
don't want to mention. 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What did you understand was the purpose of these 
calls? To intimidate you? 

Mr. Cohen. Just to harass me. 

The Chairman. Well, there was some objective in it, wasn't there? 
Wliat was the objective? What was their purpose? What were 
they trying to do ? To get you not to take office, to withdraw^, or what ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. Well, say it, just whatever you have in mind. 

Mr. Cohen. To withdraw. 

The Chairman. In other words, to try to convince you that the 
best thing you could do was not to take the office that you had won in 
the election. 

Mr. Cohen. That is right ; just to quit. 

The Chairman. To quit, to step out. In other words, to let Filipoff 
continue. 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. To get rid of him, and you get out, you step out ; 
is that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. Did they threaten you in any way? 

Mr. Cohen. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Just abuse ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is all. 

The Chairman. They cursed you ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And called you vile names ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. Just vilification and abuse? 

Mr. Cohen. That is all. 

The (Chairman. And you call that harassment ; is that right? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were considerably concerned, were you not, Mr. 
Cohen? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 16359 

Mr. Cohen. Well, I was being followed, and I was concerned. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were so concerned you got your gun out, didn't 
you? 

Mr. Cohen. That I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. "Well, now, what did you do? Would you describe 
some of these things so that we can develop these facts? What did 
you do, where did you get your gun, what kind of a gun and what did 
you do with it? 

Mr. Coiien. I put a shotgun in back of the door. 

INIr, Kennedy. What about at the front door ? 

Mr. Cohen. I had one there, too. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then you were considerably concerned, Mr. Cohen, 
during this period of time? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes ; I was. 

Mr. Kennedy. From these telephone calls and from the fact that 
you were being followed continuously ; is that right? 

i\Ir. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. And they were coming by and taking down the 
license plate numbers of the cars in front of your home ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mv. Kennedy. This went on for several days? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

INIr. Kennedy. And you had also known about this telephone call to 
Portland by Mr. Estabrook. Hadn't it been related to you that Esta- 
I)i'ook had requested some help from Portland to come down because 
thoy needed help ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

]SIr. Kennedy. And to bring some people down from Portland? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes ; that is right. 

Mr. Kennedy, Did you understand Mr. Estabrook was a muscleman 
for the local up there ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, no. 

Mr. Kennedy. Well along those lines, did you, Mr. Cohen ? 

Mr. (\)HEN. I can't say that I understood he is a muscleman. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you told that ? 

Mr, Cohen. Well, I have been told a lot of things by several of the 
boys. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was that one of the things you were told ? 

Mr. Cohen, That is right, 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you also told in connection with the people that 
were following you that there were some out-of-town goons in town? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr Kennedy. Did you connect the fact of the telephone calls by 
Estabrook to Portland requesting this help with these people that 
w re following you and the information that there were out-of-town 
goons ? 

Mr. Cohen. I sort of put two and two together; yes, sir. 

]\[r. Kennedy. I might say, Mr. Chairman, that we have been trying 
to find Mr. Estabrook and have been unsuccessful in locating him. 

Xow, von were so concerned that you placed these guns there. Who 
else was being harassed in the same way ? 

Mr. '^^ HEN. Well, there was one of our drivers that was being 
harassed. 

36751—59 — pt. 45 2 



16360 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. What was his name ? 

Mr. Cohen. Jake Nunez. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. What about Mr. Collins ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, Mr. Collins was quite concerned, too. He slept 
with a gun alongside his bed. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he was one of your chief supporters at that 
time? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. What about Mr. Patton ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, Mr. Patton was a supporter. 

Mr, Kennedy. Was he being harassed also? 

Mr. Cohen. That I couldn't say, but one night while Collins was 
leaving his home from what I understand a car tried to run him off the 
street. And at that time Patton said something about getting Collins 
a gun so he could protect himself. 

Mr. Kennedy. Patton wanted to get a gun also to protect himself ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Now, were you so concerned that not only did you 
have the arrangement on the guns but did you decide to come back here 
to Washington to see Mr. Hoffa? 

Mr. Cohen. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. So did you and Mr. Collins then make arrangements 
to come back to visit with Mr. Hoffa ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat day did you come back ? 

Mr. Cohen. It was on a Wednesday, I think we left there. 

Mr. Kennedy. It was January 21 ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes ; and we arrived on Thursday morning. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, by that time had any auditor arrived to audit 
the books ? 

Mr. Cohen. No, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You came to Washington and who did you visit with 
then? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, we went up to see Mr. Hoffa and we were turned 
over to Mr. Gibbons who we talked to for a short period of time. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you explain the situation to him ? 

Mr. Cohen. No, we did not. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was Mr. Richard Kavner there? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, he was. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ultimately go to see ]Mr. Hofl'a ? 

Mr. Cohen. As soon as he got through with what he was doing, 
we were showed into his office. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you explain the situation to him ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, Mr. Collins started to explain his concern in 
this, and of course I told him that I was not here to give him any 
trouble or anything, but strictly to state our position here because the 
papers in Los Angeles were giving him a lot of bad publicity at the 
time. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you want to make sure that he knew about it? 

Mr. Cohen. I wanted him to understand that we weren't against 
him in any way, shape, or form, and I so stated. 

Mr. Kennedy. AAHiat did he say lie would do Avith flie election then? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, he was coing to call in an auditoi-, and lie told 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16361 

somebody on the intercom system to see that an auditor was sent to 
Los Angeles. 

Mr. IVENNEDT. Did it also turn out that Mike Singer was in town? 

Mr. CoiiEN. Yes, Mike Singer was in town. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you contact Mr. Singer ? 

Mr. CoiiEN. Richard Kavner contacted him and I talked to him 
over the telephone and he said he would come down while we were 
having lunch. 

Mr. Kennedy. So you all had lunch together ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then was it ultimately arranged for Mr, Filipoff to 
come in ? 

Mr. Cotien. Mr. Singer called Mr. Filipoff, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. So Mr. Filipoff got on a plane that night and came 
to Washington also ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. By the 23d of January, you and Filipoff were both 
here, as well as Mike Singer and one of your chief supporters, Mr. 
Collins ; is that right ? 

Mr. Cohen. Was that on a Friday ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then did you have a meeting, the four of you ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, we did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Where did you meet ? 

Mr. Cohen. In a little room outside of Jimmy's office, Jimmy 
Hoffa's office. 

Mr. Kennedy. Over at the International Headquarters ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. At that time, was it urged upon you that you should 
resign as secretary-treasurer? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, Mike Singer thought it would be best if we kind 
of hushed up all of the trouble that was going to start this, concerning 
this election and everything. 

ISIr. Kennedy. Were you quite upset by this time ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, I was. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you agree to resign ? 

Mr. Cohen. I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you sign a paper saying you would resign? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir ; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was at this meeting that you attended at Inter- 
national Headquarters in an anteroom from Mr. Hoffa's office? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. I hand you what purports to be a photostatic copy 
of a document dated January 23, 1959, here in Washington, D.C. 
at 3 :45 p.m. of said day, and it appears to be signed by Mike Singer, 
Sidney Cohen, John Filipoff, and Paul A. Collins. 

I ask you to examine it and state if you identify it. 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

(No response.) 

The Chairman. It may be made exhibit No. 1. 

(Document referred to wjis marked "Exhibit No. V for reference 
and mav be found in the files of the select committee. ) 



16362 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. Is that tlie resignation or agreement that you 
signed here on the 23d day of January ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, it is not really a resignation. It is an agreement 
but it is not a resignation. 

The Chairman. We ^Yill determine what it is by its contents. 

You signed that document here that day ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. Was it signed by the others whose names appear 
on it? 

Mr. Cohen. It was. 

The Chairman. All right. Now we may inspect it and determine 
what it really does. 

Mr. Kennedy. We have some copies of that, Mr, Chairman. 

Could I read it into the record, Mr. Chairman ? 

The Chairman. Read pertinent parts of it. It is made an exhibit. 

Mr. Kennedy (reading) : 

Washington, D.C., January 23, 1959, 3 :45 p.m. : 

Due to misunderstandings a situation was created in local union 208 whereby 
local 208 stands to lose its effectiveness as a trade union organization by having 
its membership divided into two separate camps. 

John Filipoff and Sidney Cohen have agreed in the presence of Mike Singer 
and Paul Collins that for the beuetit of the membership of local union 208, 
the following should be done for the purpose of bringing the membership to- 
gether as one to do the work that is so necessary for the benefit of the entire 
membership. To accomplish the above it is agreed that : 

1. The original position of the officers and business agents will revert to the 
same standing and position that they had prior to the December 1958 nomi- 
nations. 

The Chairman. Let me interrupt at that point. It was not only the 
December 1958 nominations but there had been a January election, had 
there not ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

The Chairman. Pursuant to the nominations there had been an 
election ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, yes. 

The Chairman. I thought you had an election where you got 1,269 
votes. 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And the other fellow 1,149 ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. That was subsequent to the nomination. 

So this refers to nominations but there had actually been an elec- 
tion in which you had been elected ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. At the time this document was prepared? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Kennedy (reading) : 

2. That Sidney Cohen will act in the capacity as president and business 
agent of local 208, as previous to the nomination in December 195S, and shall 
receive the same basic wages as the secretary-treasurer; and his expense ar- 
rangement shall be the same as all business agents. 

3. Robert Savage will remain as business agent in the same capacity he 
had previous to the December 1958 nominations, at the same salary and expenses 
the same as all business agents. 

The following statements have been made pertaining to the two parties in- 
volved, John Filipoff and Sidney Cohen : 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16363 

That an executive board meeting shall be railed by Cam Ferrell, Monday, 
January 26, at 8 p.m., pertaining to the consummation of this situation. That 
at that time it has been agreed that Sidney Cohen will resign his position as 
secretary-treasurer to take over the post as designated above in paragraph 2; 
and that John Filipolf will take the position as secretary-treasurer of local 208; 
that Cam Ferrell will resign as president of local 208 and the executive board 
will designate Sidney Cohen as president in accordance with paragraph 2 
above. 

That the executive board has no animosity toward Sidney Cohen or Robert 
Savage for taking the position Sidney Cohen took in running for the office 
of secretary-treasurer against John Filipofl', and there shall never be any 
animosity against Sidney Cohen. 

John Filipoff agrees that Paul Collins will be hired as a business agent in 
Local Union 208 commencing Monday, January 26, 1959. 

The above agreement was entered into in the office of the International I'nion 
in Washington, D.C., January 23, 1959, as a voluntary agreement between the 
two parties with no other considerations other than that which appears here in 
writing. 

The meeting of the parties in Washington was not scheduled for this agree- 
ment. The presence of these parties in Washington, D.C., was arranged through 
the efforts of Mike Singer for the purpose of arriving at some understanding 
between the parties to accomplish what is stated above. 

The Chairman. Let me ask you this : In other words, the will of the 
union members, the dues-paying members, was actually thwarted by 
this ag-reement; was it not? 

Mr. Cohen. No, sir. 

The Chairman. Why not? If you had been elected secretary- 
treasurer, obviously they wanted you as such. 

Mr. Cohen. I objected to that statement because it was not in its 
entirety. 

The Chairman. What was not in its entirety ? 

Mr. Cohen. There were several things left out of there. 

The Chairman. Out of what? 

Mr. Cohen. I was going to take it back to our committee and our 
members, and just see what would happen on contacting our regular 
committee and Mr. Savage. From my understanding, Mike was sup- 
posed to hold that until we could get an OK from our regular 
committee. 

The Chairman. All right. In other words, you were to take this 
back now, this agreement, although it was signed and went into effect, 
on the face of it. You say it wasn't to go into effect at that time? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. But there was a further understanding that you 
were to take it back and do what? 

Mr. Cohen. See our regular committee and talk to our boys out in 
the field. 

The Chairman. Do you mean talk to those who had supported you ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. And see if thev would affree to it ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. Except for that, on the face of it, as written, if 
this was a full agreement between you, then it would amount to 
thwarting the will of the majority of the members, would it not, as 
expressed in the election? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

The Chairman. But you say there was a further understanding 
that you were to take it back and see if they would approve or some- 
thing ? 



16364 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. Before it was to go into effect ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman, But this sets a date for these things to be done, 
does it not ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, I guess there is a date on it all right. 

The Chairman. This sets a date for this agreement to go into ef- 
fect and for the things to be done that were agi^eed to in this agree- 
ment ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, there was supposed to be an executive board called 
on the following Monday and I asked them to hold the thing up and 
they wouldn't do it. 

The Chairman. Well, this document, within itself, actually thwarts 
the will of the membersliip, the majority of them, as expressed in the 
election just a few weeks before, does it not ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, it does. 

The Chairman. All right. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why did you agree to sign such an agreement? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, that is kind of a rough story. I had a — we were 
all sitting in this little back room there, and I had three fellows trying 
to talk me into something and I finally agreed, just to be able to get 
out of there. I didn't think at the time it was legal. 

(At this point Senator McClellan left the hearing room.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you scared ? 

Mr. Cohen. No, not exactly scared. 

INIr. Kennedys There must have been some reason, Mr. Cohen, to 
make you sign such an agreement as this, where you had just been 
elected within the week as secretary-treasurer; that the election had 
been run proper, that the election had been set up by your opponents, 
your opposition, and you had come to Washington to meet in the head- 
quarters of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters and resign. 

Wliat was it that made you sign such an agreement ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, probably after all of this, going through all of 
this, and the fellows following and everything, I am still a little 
nervous and shaky. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that it? You were just upset? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. And I wanted to get out of there. I 
probably would have given them everything I had if they had asked 
for it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Had Mr. Collins turned and joined the other side, 
also? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, up until that time Mr. Collins was still on my 
side. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was he at this meeting? 

INIr. Cohen. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy'. You say throe people were trying to make you sign it. 

Mr. Cohen. Well, there is Collins. 

Mr. Kennedy-. Then he had joined them. 

Mr. Cohen. Well, no; he thought it was for the best interests of 
everybody concerned that it be done. 

Mr. Kennedy'. It is certainly within his best interests, because he 
got to be made a business agent, under this agreement. 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, he was made a business agent. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 16365 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he join the others in opposition to you, then? 

Mr. Cohen. "Well, no ; not that day. 

]\Ir. Kennedy. You said there were tlnee against you, three people 
that were urf^infj. Mr. Collins was one of them, was he not? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, I wouldn't say at that time he was actually 
against me. He figured it was for the best interest of the organization 
that it be done this way, 

Mr. Kennedy. He was urging you to sign it ? 

]Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. It says here : 

Due to misunderstandings, a situation was created in local 208. 

What does that mean ? 

Mr. Cohen. AVell, I guess the little misunderstanding that they 
refer to has to do with all of our expense accounts and making one of 
the other fellows the head business agent that was riding us all the 
time. 

Mr. Kennedy. This was complaints that you had against Mr. 
Filipoff? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

]Mr. Kennedy. But they did not have nay complaints against you. 
Was this the complaints that you had against them and the fact that 
you were running for secretary-treasurer ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

(Present at this point : Senators Ervin and Goldwater.) 

Senator Goldwater. How many members do you have in this local? 

Mr. Cohen. It fluctuates a little bit there. It is about 4,900. 

Senator Goldwater. You won by 1,200 ? 

Mr. Cohen. No ; I won by 120. 

Senator Goldwater. I thought you said 1,200. 

(At this point Senator McClellan entered the hearing room.) 

Mr. Kennedy. It says here that the — 

executive board has no animosity toward Sidney Cohen or Robert Savage. 

Does that mean they were not going to be mad at 3'ou because you 
ran for secretary-treasurer? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

]Mr. Kennedy. Were you informed that the local might very well 
be placed in trusteeship if you did not sign this agreement? 

Mr. Cohen. That is one of the main concerns that we had ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mike Singer tell you that ? 

Mr. Cohen. He did. 

Mr. Kennedy. That if this agreement was not made, the local might 
be placed in trusteeship, taken over? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who dictated this? 

Mr. Cohen. INIike Singer. 

IVIr. Kennedy. Did he leave the room occasionally while this was 
being dictated? 

Mr. Cohen. No; I think he left the room once or possibly twice. 
I know once for sure he went out to get some coffee for the boys. 

]\Ir. Kennedy, ^^^lose office would he have gone into when he left 
the room? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, he would have gone directly into Hoffa's office. 



16366 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. This was an anteroom right off of Mr. Hoffa's office? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was Mi*. Hoffa in his office while this meeting was 
taking place? 

Mr. Coiien. Well, I know he was in there off and on. He had 
another meeting going on in another room there someplace. 

Mr. Kennedy. You came back and the meeting of the executive 
board was held ; is that right ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. In fact, a meeting of the executive board was called 
by the president of local 208 even prior to the time you got back to 
Los Angeles ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right ; for the following Monday. 

Mr. Kennedy. For the purpose of taking this matter up. Did you 
attend the executive board meeting ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir ; I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you inform them at that time that you did not 
intend to resign ? 

Mr. Cohen. I did. I wrote them a letter to that effect. 

The Chairman, Are you a member of the executive board ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was Mike Singer present at this meeting? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, he wasn't at the meeting until he was later called 
in. He was in one of the outer offices. 

Mr. Kennedy. Waiting for the meeting to take place ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was called in and he brought in this agreement ; 
is that right? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Prior to that time, there was supposedly only one 
copy of this agreement ; is that right ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. After this meeting took place and you told them you 
were not going to go through with it and resign, were copies of this 
agreement mimeographed ? 

Mr. CoiraN. I understand there was quite a few of them mimeo- 
graphed ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Several thousand ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. There was quite a few of the fellows that had 
them. 

Mr. Kennedy. They were distributed amongst the membership ; is 
that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. I think so; yes. 

The Chairman. Wliy did you decide not to resign, and carry out 
this agreement? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, after I got settled down, I thought it was a pretty 
lousy deal. 

The Chairman. Wlien did you get settled down ? 

Mr. Cohen. After I talked to a few of our members on Monday. 

The Chairman. They decided or they agreed with you that it was 
a lousy deal, did they ? 

Mr. CoiiEN. That is ri^ht. 

Mr. Kennedy. What is the status at the present time? Are you 
secretary-treasurer or president or what ? 



IMPROPER ACTR^ITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16367 

Mr. Cohen. No, I am still supposed to be secretary-treasurer. 

Mr. Kennedy. Does Mr. FilipotF say he is secretary-treasurer? 

Mr. Cohen. No. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Have you taken over the position of secretary- 
treasurer ? 

Mr. Cohen. AVell, we had a court appoint a court receiver in there 
to take care of all of the funds and everything that went into the 
union. I have been back and forth to the lawyer's office. I have been 
in that office quite a few times and I have taken care of several things. 
But I haven't seen John around. 

Mr. Kennedy. Filipofi' ? 

INIr. Cohen. Yes. 

The CHAmMAN. Do you mean you have been in the secretary- treas- 
urer's office taking care of things? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. In the office of the local, the secretary-treasurer's 
office of the local ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The CHAmMAN. You have been in there taking care of it ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. But you have also had a court receiver appointed? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. To do what ? 

Mr. Cohen. To take care of the funds of the local until 

The Chairman. To take over the assets of the local ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right, until we could get an auditor. 

Mr. Kennedy. The auditor still hasn't been sent out by the inter- 
national ? 

Mr. Cohen. No, not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. On the face of this, it looks to me like a case where, 
if the local members do not elect the officials wanted by the inter- 
national or some of the international henchmen, like this fellow Mike 
Singer, they undertake then to throw the election out or to intimidate 
those who are elected, or to work out some agreement like this, where 
the international selectees, or those they favor, can continue to serve 
and function as officers. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, no ; not exactly. 

The Chairman. What j^rompted all of this to be done? You won 
the election. A^Hiat is all this about ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, Mr. Filipolf just refused to give up the job and 
tell us that he was waiting at one time for an auditor, and he con- 
tinued on there. Then here just a week or so ago one of our boys 
asked him when the auditor was going to come in, and he said he just 
canceled it out, it wasn't coming. So then we decided 

The Chairman. In other words, he was undertaking to continue to 
serve notwithstanding the fact you had had an election and he had 
been defeated and vou had been elected in his place ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. When he took that position, obviously he appealed 
or had the support of — he a])pealed to and had the support of — the 
international officials, including the provisional president, Mr. Hoffa. 

Mr. Cohen. I understand that there was a telegram sent from Mr. 
Hoffa to have it audited and turn over the books. 

<goSTd^ 

P (1 R ( . I n 



16368 IM1>R0PER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIEIiD 

The Chairman, Well, here is a telegram that says — do you know 
about the telegram ? Can you identify it ? 

Mr. Cohen. No; I can't. Mr. Filiport'read ittous. 

The Chairman. He what ? 

Mr. Cohen. He read it to us at the time. 

Mr. Kennedy. What it does, in fact, is support Mr. Filipoff in his 
position of not turning the office over to you until an auditor came in. 
Is that right ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, that is not the understanding that I originally 
Jiad. 

The Chairman. Who can identify the telegram ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Salinger. 

The Chairman. Be sworn. 

You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give before this 
Senate Select Committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Salinger. I do, 

TESTIMONY OF PIERRE E. G. SALINGER 

The Chairman. State your name and your present position. 

Mr, Salinger. My name is Pierre Salinger. I reside in Wasliing- 
ton, D.C., and I am a staff investigator for this committee. 

The Chairman. In the course of performance of your duties as a 
staff investigator, did you procure a telegram or a photostatic copy of 
a telegram from James R. Hoffa, general president, to John W. Fili- 
poff, Teamsters Local Union 208, the telegram being dated January 
19, 1959? 

Mr. Salinger. I did. Senator. 

The Chairman. I hand you here what purports to be a photostatic 
copy of the telegram. Do you recognize it ? 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Salinger. This telegram came from the files of local 208, Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

The Chairman. Did you see the original ? 

Mr. Salinger. I saw the original and this photostat was made from 
the original at my direction. 

The Chairman. This photostatic copy may be made exhibit No. 2. 

(Telegram referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 2" for reference 
and will be found in the appendix on p. 16451.) 

The Chairman. Now we can read it. It is dated January 19, 1959, 
from Washington, D.C. 

John W. Filipoff, Teamster Local Union 208, 1616 West 9th Street, LOAS. 

Is that Los Angeles ? 

TESTIMONY OF SIDNEY COHEN— Resumed 

Mr. CoiiEN. Yes. 

The Chairman (reading) : 

Your action refusing to turn over oflSce to Sidney Cohen pending an opportunity 
to have the books audited has my support and approval. I am immediately dis- 
patching an international auditor to prcx'eed with the auditing of the b(K)ks of 
local 208. 

jAi[ES R. IIoFFA, General President. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16369 

That is January 19. This is now February 5, I believe, today. 

Mr. C/OHEN. Tliat is right. 

The Chairman. Has any auditor been dispatched out there to take 
over these books and audit them that you know of ? 

Mr. Cohen. Not to my knowledge. 

The Chairman. AVhen did you leave out there? 

Mr. Cohen. Tuesday night. 

The Chairman. Tuesday night of this week? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. That would be the night of the 2d ? 

Mr. Cohen. The 3d. 

The Chair3ian. From the date of this, January 19, to February 3, 
there had been no auditor sent by the provisional or general president 
in accordance with this telegi-am? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. He said, "I am immediately dispatching," but that 
"immediately" hasn't yet arrived, or the accountant hasn't yet 
arrived ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. What is all this about? Is it just a dictatorial or 
arbitral^ authority being exercised to prevent you from taking office 
to which you were elected ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is about it. That sums it up pretty good. 

The Chairman. If that is not it, what does "about" mean? How 
close did they come ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, he has an arbitrary stand all right. 

The Chairman. In other words, if he doesn't like who is elected, 
if his gang does not like who is elected at a local for secretary-treasurer, 
president, or something, this is a part of the procedure to get rid of 
them? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, they were hollering about the election not being 
straight. 

The Chairman. They said what? 

Mr. Cohen. They were hollering about the election not being con- 
ducted right. 

The Chairman. Well, it was a referendum election. 

Mr. Cohen. Yes ; it was. 

The Chairman. Who conducted it? 

Mr. Cohen. The executive board of local 208 and John Filipoff. 

The Chairman. They conducted the election ? 

Mr. Cohen. They set the thing up and Joseph Sternbach, a cer- 
tified CPA, conducted the election. 

The Chairman. Did you select the CPA ? 

Mr. Cohen. No, sir : I did not. 

The Chairman. Wlio selected him ? 

Mr. Cohen. The executive board and Filipoff. 

The Chairman. How did you happen to arrange for each of you 
to have representatives at the counting of the ballots ? 

Mr. Cohen. We were asked by the CPA to have a couple of repre- 
sentatives there. So I appointed two representatives to represent me 
at the counting of the ballots, and Mr. Filipoff had two, also. 

The Chairman. Who certified the results of that election, and to 
whom did they make the certification ? 



16370 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Cohen. Mr. Stembach certified the election. 

The Chairman. HewastheCPA? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. Whom did he certify the results of that election 
to? 

Mr. Cohen. To John Filipoff and myself. 

The Chairman. To the two candidates ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. He certified that you were elected, that you re- 
ceived tlie 1,269 votes to Filipoff 1,149 ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. That is right. 

The Chairman. Under yonr constitution, how soon are you to take 
over the office after the election is held ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, the constitution is a little vague. It doesn't 
exactly say. It says there shall be an audit and then they are sup- 
posed to turn over the books to the newly elected secretary. 

The Chairman, What is back of this thing, that you came up here 
and signed this document? What is in back of that? Wliat was the 
whole idea? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, I don't know that offhand. 

The Chairman. The biggest thing offhand and onhand, too, was 
to get rid of you from the position of secretary-treasurer, wasn't it? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes ; that is about it. 

The Chairman. That is about it? Again we are getting close. 

Mr. Cohen. Pretty close. 

The Chairman. What are you so reluctant to tell these things for ? 

Mr. Cohen. I don't know. I don't think I am really reluctant. I 
am not sure why I actually signed that thing in the first place. I 
have been kicking myself ever since. 

The Chairman. It made you look kind of silly to go down there 
and sign such a thing after you had been elected, did it not? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, it did. 

The Chairman. Thej^ put a lot of pressure on you to get you to 
doit? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, they had done a lot of talking. 

The Chairman. Threatened to put the local in receivership and 
everything else? 

Mr. Cohen. And court litigations and so on and so forth. 

Senator Goldwater. Mr. Cohen, you come in contact with a lot 
of your members out there, I presume. 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Senator Goldwater. Would you care to tell us what their general 
feeling is about Mr. Hoffa after 2 years of disclosures that have gone 
on here? 

Mr. Cohen. Our boys are really not too unhappy. 

Senator Goldwater. Do they fool it h all right for ^U\ IToffa to 
be doing what he has been doing? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, if they are thinking othei'wise, they are not 
saying. 

Senator Goldwater. After listening to you, I think I can under- 
stand. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16371 

Do you find any oeneral dissatisfaction with him not as a union 
leader, but in the role that he has been playing as disclosed before 
this committee? 

Mr. CuHEN, No, personally I don't. 

Senator Goldwater. You don't find any. 

That is all. 

The Chairman. Are there any other questions? 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Filipoff appeared as a witness in Mr. Hoffa's 
wiretap trial, did he not, for Mr. Hoffa? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, I am quite sure he did. 

INIr. Kennedy. Didn't also his son appear as a witness for Mr. 
Iloffa? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

Mr, Kennedy. And wasn't Mr. Filipoff sent by Mr. Hoffa to Am- 
sterdam in connection with a convention, sent with Mr. Harold Gib- 
bons to Amsterdam ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, I know he went to Amsterdam, yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. All right. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could I call Mr. Salinger to put in the documents ? 

The Chairman. Mr. Salhiger has been sworn. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you put in the documents, Mr. Salinger, in 
connection with the election that was held, and the affidavit we have 
from the gentleman who conducted the election ? 

Would you tell the committee briefly, Mr. Salinger? 

The Chairman. What was the question ? 

Mr. Kennedy. I want to get the documents in connection with the 
election that was held, the documents of the certified public account- 
ant who conducted the election and, Mr. Chairman, we also have an 
affidavit from him in connection with the election. 

The Chairman. Do you have a number of documents there per- 
taining to this election about which Mr. Cohen has testified ? 

TESTIMONY OF PIEKRE E. G. SALINGEIU-Resiimed 

Mr. Salinger. I do, sir. 

The Chairman. "VVliere were they procured ? 

Mr. Salinger. They were procured in Los Angeles, Calif., from 
the individuals involved. 

The Chairman. All right. You may proceed to identify the docu- 
ments. 

Mr. Salinger. First, this is the file of Dr. Joseph Sternbach, certi- 
fied public accountant, Los Angeles, Calif., who conducted the election 
at the request of the executive board of local 208. I will not go into 
great detail, but some of the precautions that he took to see that this 
election was conducted in an honest way were : 

1. He purchased a certain type of rare bond paper from a printing 
company in Los Angeles. He ascertained that this was the only 
company in Los Angeles that had such paper and he bought up their 
entire supply so that nobody else could print any ballots. 

2. The list of the eligible members was checked in the union office 
and a secret number sent to him which was the total number of 
eligible members. At the same time he also received a number from 
the people who addressed the envelopes to the eligible members. They 



16372 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 

gave liiiii the number in secret, and these two numbers checked, so he 
knew he had the right number of ballots going out to the various 
voters in the local. 

The paper was delivered, or the printed ballots were delivered, from 
the printing com])any to the mailer by Brinks, and the addressed 
envelopes were delivered from the addresser to the mailer by Brinks, 
and he supervised the stuffing of the ballots in the envelopes. They 
were sent out 

Mr. Kennedy. Didn't he cut the paper a certain way ? 

Mr. Salinger. The Teamster emblem was put on the ballots but 
was altered in a secret way. He took the nostrils off the horse. 

The Chairman. Tlie what ? 

Mr. Salinger. The nostrils. 

The Chairman. They had a horse without a nose ? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes. 

Then the ballots were sent by the members to a post office box which 
had been engaged by Dr. Steinibach. He picked theni up each day 
there and he called up representatives of each candidate each day 
saving, "We got so many votes in today," and urging them to get out 
the vote. 

Then the night they counted the ballots, the niglit of eTanuary I7th, 
there were two observers from each side. There was Mr. Farrell, who 
was the unopposed candidate for president. 

Mr. Farrell was looking over Dr. Sternbach's shoulder. Dr. Stern- 
bach was opening each ballot himself, looking at each ballot, and 
placing them in piles for Cohen and Filipoff. 

'Wlien he got finished counting everything, he handed all the Fili- 
poff ballots to the Filipoff people and all the Cohen ballots to the 
Cohen people, so they could ascertain that all the votes were right. 

The Chairman. You have his file there. Dr. Sternbach's file? 

Mr. Salinger. This is his entire file. 

The Chairman. You say his file. You mean photostatic copies of 
the file? 

Mr. Salinger. Photostatic copies procured from him in Los An- 
geles. 

The Chairman. Of his entire file ? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes, sir. 

Tlie Chairman. That may be made, that file, exhibit No. 3. 

(Documents referred to were marked "Exhibit No. 3" for refer- 
ence, and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

Mr. Salinger. In addition. Senator, I conducted an interview with 
Dr. Sternbach in his office in Ix»s Angeles, California. This inter- 
view was reported by a stenotypist, Philip Silberman, of the Los 
Angeles Police Department, and the interview has been signed by 
Dr. Sternbach to be a true and correct statement of his. 

(At this point Senator Goldwater withdrew from the hearing 
room.) 

]Mr. Kennedy. Would you get the part in about his conversation 
with Filipoff? 

Mr. Salinger. Dr. Sternbach says in this statement that after 
counting the ballots, he went to FilipofT's office and notified him he 
had lost the election. The next morning he asked Mr. Filipoff if he 
should give a report to the membership on how the election had 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 10373 

turned out and how lie had conducted the election. Filipoff told him 
that lie did not think it was necessary. 

But Filii^oit' then stated to Dr. Stembach, according to tliis 
affidavit: 

There is no doubt in my mind or in anyone else's mind. I think, as to the fair- 
ness of the manner in which the election has been conducted. 

That was FilipofT's statement. 

IMr. Kenxkdy. Or words to that effect? 

]Mr. Salinger. Or words to that effect. 

The Chairman. Is that a transcript of your interview with Dr. 
Sternbach ? 

Mr. Salinger. With Dr. Sternbach. 

The Chairman. That transcript may be made exhibit No. 4. 

(Document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 4" for reference 
and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

The Chairman. Excerpts of it may be quoted into the record. 

Mr. Kennedy. I thoujzht, Mr. Chairman, in fairness to Mr. Fili- 
poff, we should get his side of this now. 

The Chairman. You are not excused, Mr. Cohen. You may be 
recalled. 

(Members of tjie select committee present at this point in the pro- 
ceedings were Senators INIcClellan and Ervin.) 

The Chairman. Mr. Filipoff, will you be sworn ? 

You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give before this 
Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and noth- 
ing but the truth, so help you God ? 

]\Ir. Filipoff. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN W. FILIPOFF, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, 
HARRY CLIFFORD ALLDER 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Filipoff. My name is John W. Filipoff. My address is 305 
Kingsford Street, Monterey Park, Calif. 

The Chairman. What is your present position or occupation ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Would it incriminate you to ask if you have coun- 
sel present? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

]Mr. Filipoff. No. 

The Chairman. All right. I will ask you that. Do you ? 

INIr. Filipoff. Yes. 

The Chairman. All right, Mr. Counsel, identify yourself for the 
record. 

jNIr. Allder. My name is Harry Clifford Allder, a member of the 
bar of Washington, D.C. 

The Chairman. Mr. Filipoff', do you want to take the fifth amend- 
ment on all of these questions regarding the testimony you have heard 
here : do you ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 



16374 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr, FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. I was trying to save you a little time and us, too, to 
ascertain if that is what you had in mind to do. 

All right, Mr. Kennedy^ proceed to ask him all the questions you 
can think of. Let's make the record as long as you wish to. 

Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Filipoff, you were secretary-treasurer of Local 
208 of the Teamsters, and held that position from 1949 to 1959; is 
that correct ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. You are a friend and associate of Mr. Hoffa ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know Mr. Hoffa ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. The delegates of local 208 were the first west coast 
delegates to be committed to the candidacy of Mr. Hoffa in the Team- 
ster convention in October, is that correct, October of 1957 ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. xVnd you were a witness, were you not, at Hoffa 's 
wiretap trial, and also your son was a witness at that trial? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And immediately thereafter you were sent to an 
international labor meeting in Amsterdam at the expense of the inter- 
national union, were you not, Mr. Filipoff? 

Mr. FiLiiOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you went over there and attended that meeting 
with Mr. Gibbons, did you not, Mr. Filipoff? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. There is another matter which is of some interest to 
us, and one that we have had hearings on. That is in connection with 
Mr. Allen Dorfman. 

Do you know Allen Dorfman ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Isn't it correct that after you became a close associ- 
ate of Mr. Hoffa's, that at his urging you also took Mr. Allen Dorf- 
man's insurance ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Isn't it correct that after this associaticm grew up 
between you and Mr. Hoffa, that you changed from Occidental Life 
Insurance Co. in California, to the Girardina Insurance Co. of Texas, 
at the urging and insistence of Allen Dorfman ? 

Mr. FiLipoFT. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16375 

Mr. Kennedy. And isn't Allen Dorfman the general agent for that 
company ? 

Mr. FiLiPOFT. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Isn't it correct — and we have a document to that 
effect, Mr. Chairman — that the net cost for the last year's insurance, 
under Occidental, for the same coverage, was $24,007; the net cost 
under this new arrangement with Mr. Allen Dorfman's company is 
$28 051 ? Is that not correct, Mr. Filipoff ? 

Mr. FiLiroFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. So what you have done is get a more expensive in- 
surance with no greater benefits for the membership in order to do a 
favor for Mr. Allen Dorfman and Mr. Hoffa ? 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And don't you consider that a betrayal of your union 
membership in order to perform these personal favors for Mr. Dorf- 
man and Mr. Hoffa 'i 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did your members know about this just before the 
election 'I 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you thing such actions as that may have influ- 
enced the vote against you ? 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, Mr. Chairman, the record shows that the Occi- 
dental Insurance Co. was charging 41.413 cents per $1,000 insurance, 
while Mr. Allen Dorfman's company for the same coverage, $100,000 or 
insurance, was charging 50 cents per $1,000. 

The Chairman. Was there any difference in benefits between the 
two policies? 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. It might, but if there were additional benefits, it 
wouldn't incriminate you, I don't think. I do not think that you 
would insist that it woiilcl, if there were additional benefits to make 
allowance for this extra charge which you agreed to pay in changing 
companies. That would be, I think, to serve your interests. Don't 
you think so? 

Mr. FiLipoFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Well, we are trying to give you any opportunity 
here or every opportunity if there is anything in your favor for you 
to state it. 

Is there anything you want to state in your own favor? 

IMr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I lionestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Well, I wanted you to have the opportunity, at 
least. 

36731 — ^59 — pt. 45 3 



16376 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Go ahead. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, tlie nominations were set for December 21 
rather than November. Was that for the purpose of insuring that 
Mr. Hoffa would be able to come and appear at the meeting of the 
membei-ship ? 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. According to the testimony we had by Mr. Cohen, 
you showed him a telegram on the morning of December 21 or read to 
him a telegram on the morning of December 21, saying that he would 
have to resign as president in order to run as secretary-treasurer. Did 
you have such a telegram from Mr. Hoffa at that time ? 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. I hand you here what purports to be a photostatic 
copy of a telegram from James R. Hoffa, to you, dated December 30, 
1958, and ask you to examine it and state if you identify it as a photo- 
static copy of the original. 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

The Chairman. What is your statement ? 

Mr. Allder. What is the question ? 

The Chairman. I asked him to examine and state if he identifies it 
as being a photostatitc copy of the original. 

Mr. Allder. May I suggest this, Senator: Could you make that 
question two instead of one, first ask him if he has examined it ? 

The Chairman. I did. I asked him to examine it and then asked 
him to state if he identifies it. 

Mr. FiLipoFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe that my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you refuse to identify the telegram ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you deny that it is a photostatic copy of the 
telegram that you received from Mr. Hoft'a, as of that date 5 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. The telegram as presented to the witness will be 
made exhibit No. 5. 

(Document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 5'" for reference, 
and will be found in the appendix on p. 16452- ) 

The Chairman. Proceed, and let me have the telegram a moment. 

Who procured this out of the file? 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Salinger. 

The Chairman. You have been previously sworn, Mr. Salinger. 

I present you here exhibit No. 5, a telegram from Mr. Hoffa to Mr. 
Filipoff, and ask you to examine it and state if you have seen tlie 
original and if that is a photostatic copy of the original and wliere 
you procured the original. 

TESTIMONY OF PIERRE E. G. SALINGER— Resumed 

Mr. Salinger. I have seen the original and this was obtained from 
the files of local 208 in Los Angeles, Calif. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 16377 

The Chairman. That is a photostatic copy of the ori«^inal? 
Mr. Salinger. Yes; produced by the local at my request. 
The Chairman. This telegram reads : 

Pursuant to your ooinmunication of Doooiiiber 17, tlio nilinq: of this office is 
thut no member of the executive board while holdinj; such otiice can run for 
secretary-treasurer of the local union without tirst resigning the office he pres- 
ently holds. This, of course, excludes the secretary-treasurer himself." 

It is signed : 

James R. Hoffa. 

Mr. Kennedy. There are a number of matters that are of interest 
in this telegram. In the first place, the telegram that Mr. Filipoff 
said he had gotten from Mr. Hoffa was shown Mr. Cohen on December 
21 and we have another witness who can verify it because evidently 
Mr. FilipotY mentioned this in the presence of at least one other per- 
son, and this telegram from Mr. Hoffa is dated December 30, some 9 
days later, so he could not have possiblv had the telegram on Decem- 
ber 21. 

The second point here in this letter of December 17, 1958, which 
Mr. Salinger can identify. 

The Chairman. Let me show it to Mr. Filipoff. 

We have here what purports to be a photostatic copy of a letter from 
you of December 17, to James R. Hoffa, general president. 

Will you examine that photostatic copy, and state if you identify 
it as such, as a photostatic copy of the original letter you wrote to Mr. 
Hort'a as of that date, December 17, 1958 ? 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe mj' answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. The letter will be made exhibit No. 6. 

(Letter referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 6" for reference and 
will be found in the appendix on p. 16453.) 

The Chairman. I present to you exhibit No. 6, Mr. Salinger, a pho- 
tostatic copy of a letter from Mr. Filipoff to Mr. Hoffa, dated Decem- 
ber 17, 1958. 

Do vou identify that exhibit as a photostatic copy of the original 
letter of December 17, 1958 ? 

Mr. Salinger. Senator, this is a photostatic copy of the file copy 
of this letter which was contained in the files of local 208 in Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

The Chairman. You mean a carbon copy ? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You obtained it out of the files of the local ? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. It says — 

On December 17 local 208 will make nominations — 

and he wants to ask the International President whether the president 
of the local must resign, and he states — 

A ruling from the general president is respectfully requested pursuant to section 
2(a) of article VI of the international constitution. 

Section 2(a) of the international constitution merely states that the 
international president shall interpi^t the constitution and it has noth- 



16378 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

ing in it that says that a member of the general executive board or a^ 
president must resign his position. 

The Chairman. The committee will stand in recess until 2 o'clock. 

(Members of the select committee present at time of recess: Sena- 
tors McClellan and Ervin.) 

(Whereupon, at 12:30 p.m. the select committee recessed, to recon- 
vene at 2 p.m. the same day.) 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

The Chairman. The committee will be in order. 

(Members of the select committee present at the convening of the 
afternoon session were Senators McClellan and Ervin.) 

The Chairman. Call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, before we have Mr. Filipoff return 
to the stand, I would like to call Mr. Savage as a witness. 

The Chairman. You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God? 

Mr. Savage. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF ROBERT B. SAVAGE 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and 
your business or occupation. 

Mr. Savage. Robert B. Savage. I live at 3831 Gilman Road, 
Del Monte, Calif. I am business representative for local 208, Los 
Angeles, Calif. 

The Chairman. Do you waive counsel ? 

Mr. Savage. I do. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long have you been a member of the Teamsters 
Union ? 

Mr. Savage. Since 1938. 

Mr. Kennedy. And how long have you been a business agent? 

Mr. Savage. Some 8 years. 

Mr. Kennedy. About 8 years ? 

Mr. Savage. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Savage, you have been a supporter of Mr. 
Cohen's, have you ? 

Mr. Savage. Well, in this past election I was ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you compaigned for him, did you ? 

Mr. Savage. Definitely. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Savage, we have had the testimony by Mr. Cohen 
in connection with this election. I would like to ask you about some 
events that I believe you had something to do with. 

In the first place, you were one of those who did not receive the 
flat expenses from September of 1958 until February of 1959 ? 

Mr. Savage. You are right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was for the same reason as described by Mr. 
Cohen ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Savage. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you were present, were you not, on December 
21, 1958, when Mr. Filipoff said he had received a telegram from Mr. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16379 

Hoflfa saying that Mr. Cohen would have to step down as a member 
of the general executive board and as president in order to run for 
office ? 
Mr. Savage. I was. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he have the telegram at that time ? 

Mr. Savage. He had the semblance of a telegram, which he would 
not let anyone read. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ask to see it ? 

Mr. Savage. Not me ; no. 

Mr. Kennedy. But he did not show it to anyone ? 

Mr. Savage. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is the telegram that we found this morning, 
Mr. Chairman, although this meeting took place on December 21, 
which was actually dated, I believe, December 30. 

Did you know about Mr. Cohen's visit here to "Washington ? 

Mr. Savage. The visit to Washington, I had knowledge of it; yes. 
In fact, I was invited to accompany Mr. Cohen and Mr. Collins to 
Washington, and I refused. 

The Chairman. Will you pull up the microphone a little? 

Mr. Kennedy. What was your reaction when he came back and told 
you that he had signed the statement ? 

Mr. Savage. Well, as far as the statement was concerned, I was 
very much perturbed that anyone could take such a document and 
state this to the local membership to this extent without the approval 
of anyone who was interested. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. You Were shocked at it ? 

Mr. Savage. Very much at it, and I still am. 

Mr. Ivennedy. Were you surprised at Mr. Cohen signing such a 
statement? 

Mr. Savage. Well, I was surprised to an extent, and I thought there 
must be some reason why he would sign it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever get any explanation beyond the expla- 
nation that was given this morning? 

Mr. Savage. No ; what I heard this morning was the most clarified 
explanation I have heard yet. 

Mr. Ivennedy. There is one matter that I wanted to go into with 
you. It is not directly related to the election, but it is related to a 
situation that will be of considerable interest to the committee, and I 
would like to ask you whether you as a business agent participated in 
a strike of a furniture shop in Los Angeles. 

Mr. Savage. Is there any particular furniture company you have 
in mind ? "Wliat furniture company ? 

Mr. Kennedy. The Sierra Furniture Co. 

Mr. Savage. Yes ; I was on picket duty at that for 6 weeks. 

Mr. Kennedy. When did that start ? 

Mr. Savage. Exactly I cannot account for its starting, and the insti- 
gation of it. I served picket duty on that for the months of August 
and September. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wlien were you there? 

Mr. Savage. August and September. 

The Chairman. Of last year? 

Mr. Savage. Yes. 

Mr. I^NNEDY. Was that a strike by the furniture workers ? 



16380 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Savage. I understxx)d it was an organizational picket line. 

Mr. Kennedy. They were trying to organize it ? 

Mr. Savage. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was that the International Furniture Workers of 
theAFL-CIO? 

Mr. Savage. No ; it was a local No. 123. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is an independent union ? 

Mr. Savage. Yes ; I don't know the interior of its operations. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who was the one who heads that union ? 

Mr. Savage. That was a man by the name of Gus Brown. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know anything about the background of 
Mr. Gus Brown? 

Mr. Savage. None other than what I had heard and read in the 
papers years back. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you understand that he was a most active mem- 
ber of the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Savage. I understand he was, and I believe that ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was expelled from the CIO because of his Com- 
munist activities ? 

Mr. Savage. I think that is a matter of record. 

The Chairman. Well now, let me see. This man is a Communist, 
expelled because of that, and was he the one undertaking to run this 
independent union and organize this plant ? 

Mr. Savage. Not having the information regarding this, I presumed 
that was his background. 

The Chairman. I am trying to follow this line of testimony as we 
go along. In other words, Brown was at the head of the miion that 
was trying to organize the plant ? 

Mr. Savage. Yes, one of them. 

The Chairman. Or he was leading the effort to organize it ; is that 
right? 

Mr. Savage. That is right. 

The Chairman. And it was organizational picketing. In other 
words, it was to try to induce or compel the management to sign a 
contract with that miion ? 

Mr. Savage. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Do you know whether the employees of that plant 
were organized or not ? 

Mr. Savage. I do not. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many employees did they have ? 

Mr. Savage. I was told there was some 50 or 60 employees involved. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many were potential Teamstere ? 

Mr. Savage. Well, that question I asked myself, and I was given the 
answer : A possibility of four. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was the point of having the picket line, and 
what was the point of helping tliis man ? 

Mr. Savage. That I caimot answer. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was it taken up with the membership as to whether 
you would help him? 

Mr. Savage. Not to my knowledge. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliy was the Teamsters Union actively helping a 
union that was headed by a member of the Communist Party, and who 
was a man who was expelled from the labor union movement because 
of his Communist activity ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16381 

Mr, Savage. This is beyond my reasoning, and I cannot answer that. 

Mr. Kennedy. 'Wliy did you participate in the strike? 

Mr. Savage. I was employed by local 208 and I was dii-ected to do 
it, to serve picket duty, and immediately 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you speak up a little? 

Mr. Savage. I was employed by local 208, and I was directed to go 
to this picket line and serve the picket duty, and upon arriving there 
I questioned the situation surrounding it and I was very much tempted 
to walk aAvay from the whole situation on my own. I was advised 
not to do so. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who advised you, or fii*st, who sent you there? 

Mr. Savage. Mr. Filipoff. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who advised you that you should stay there ? 

Mr. Savage. One of the business agents there on the picket line 
with me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Blackwell was one? 

Mr. Savage. Blackwell was one of them ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Blackwell works for this union ? 

Mr. Savage. He works for local 208. 

Mr. Kennedy. He is a brother-in-law of Mr. Filipoff? 

Mr. Savage. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was one of those participating in the conduct of 
this strike ? 

Mr. Savage. Yes, sir. 

Mr, Kennedy. Were your expenses paid while you were walking 
the picket line for this 6- week period, and paid by the Furniture 
Workers or by the Teamsters ? 

Mr. Savage. No. I received no remuneration from them at all. The 
Teamsters paycheck they give to me every week. I received that. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know if the expenses themselves of the 
Furniture Workers in connection with the strike was financed by the 
Teamsters Union ? 

Mr. Savage, I have found out since that time that they were; yes, 

Mr, Kennedy, The expenses of this local union, which was run and 
operated by an active member of the Communist Party, were being 
financed by the Teamsters Union ? 

Mr. Savage. Loans were made from local 208 in this respect; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, I would like to call Mr. Salinger, to 
put in some documents. 

The Chairman. "V^Tiat was it about the situation that caused you 
to consider walking off, and having nothing to do with it? 

Mr. Savage. Well, I pride myself as an American citizen. 

The Chairman. IVliat is that? 

Mr. Savage. I like to pride myself as an American citzen of the 
United States, and I don't choose to be implicated with any party 
which believes in any instigations of overthrowing the United States 
Government. 

The Chairman. So that was vei*y distasteful to you to be down 
there helping to picket and try to force an organization to come under 
the rule of a Communist ? 

Mr. Savage, Very much so, and definitely. 

The Chairman, You just don't approve of that ? 

Mr, Savage, I do not. 



16382 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. But you hesitated about walking off because it was 
suggested you had better not do it or something ? 

Mr. Savage. Yes. 

The Chairman. What did you think the consequences would be if 
you walked off? 

Mr. Savage. Ifiguredl would be without a job in minutes. 

The Chairman. You would be without a job? 

Mr. Savage. That is right. 

The Chairman. You didn't go down there in the first place of your 
own volition. You were ordered and directed to by your boss? 

Mr. Savage. That is correct. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, could I call Mr. Salinger then as to 
what we have been able to find and learn as to the figures involved in 
this? 

The Chairman. Mr. Salinger has already been sworn, and you may 
proceed to interrogate him. 

Proceed. 

TESTIMONY OF PIEHEE E. G. SAIINGER— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Salinger, do you have some of the background 
information that we have found on Mr. Gus Brown who heads this 
local ? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes, sir, I do. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you give us that in summary ? 

Mr. Salinger. Mr, Gus Brown has been cited by the House Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities as a known Communist; and we 
have the reports of a Communist Party meeting, southern section of 
the State of California, in August of 1945, at which Mr. Brown was 
elected as a delegate to the State committee of the Communist Party 
in California. 

There are a number of other indications in this file of Communist 
activity, and he was ousted from the CIO for his Communist activity. 

Mr. Kennedy. When was he ousted? 

Mr. Salinger. In 1950. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the report shows his activities in the Commu- 
nist Party for a period of approximately 20 years at least; is that 
right? 

Mr. Salinger. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And ultimately he was ousted because of these ac- 
tivities? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do we have some documents indicating or showing 
that there was an alinement, an attempted effort, to bring the Team- 
sters Union together with this local 123 ? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes, sir. The documents which we obtained from 
the files of local 208 of the Teamsters, indicate that the whole mat- 
ter of cooperation between the Teamsters and Gus Brown was ar- 
ranged in the highest levels of the Teamsters Union itself. 

For instance, we have found a letter from Mr. Filipoff to Harold 
Gibbons, in 1958, in which Mr. Filipoff asks that an appointment be 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16383 

set up between Mr. Hoffa and Mr. Brown, and a letter back from Mr. 
Gibbons on the 7th of April saying, and I will quote: 

I have your letter of April 2, on the matter of Gus Brown and the Furniture 
Workers Union, and if he can arrange his affairs to be in Washington on 
Tuesday and Wednesday, I am sure both Jim and I can talk to him. 

The Chairman. Those letters may be made exhibit Nos. 7A and 
7B. 

(Letters referred to were marked "Exhibits 7A and 7B" for refer- 
ence and will be found in the appendix on p. 16454-16455.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you read the first paragraph of the letter 
to Harold Gibbons from John Filipolt? 

Mr. Salinger. The letter from Jolm Filipoff to Harold Gibbons 
says: 

Dear Harold : Some while ago Dick Kavner advised me that he had informed 
you concerning the wish of Gus Brown of the Furniture Workers Union here 
in Los Angeles to discuss possible affiliation or merger of certain of his people 
with the Teamsters. Dick indicated that he would advise him that Bill Griflan 
would be in Los Angeles shortly and that he would discuss this matter with 
Gus Brown. 

Then it goes on to say that Brown, however, was going to Wash- 
ington, and wanted to talk to Mr. Gibbons and Mr. Hoffa about this 
subject. 

Mr. Kennedy. So here they were discussing a merger between this 
union that had been expelled for Communist activities, a merger be- 
tween that union and the Teamsters Union ? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. And it would appear from the correspondence that 
they were accepting this idea ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do we find later on that the Teamsters Union 
financed activities of Mr. Gus Brown and his local 123 ? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell the committee what we have found 
on that ? 

Mr. Salinger. In the first place. Local 208 of the Teamsters Union, 
advanced two loans to Local 123 of the Furniture Workers, one in 
the amount of $5,000 and the other in the amount of $2,000, a total of 
$7,000. 

In addition to that, the Teamsters stood the cost of a substantial 
portion of the Sierra Furniture Co. strike. The total amount of that 
was $11,166.71. 

The Chairman. The total amount of that what ? 

Mr. Salinger. Of the loans made to local 123, plus the picketing 
expenses and gas, and oil, for their cars, and pickets, and coffee, food, 
and so forth, supplies, for the Sierra Furniture Co. strike. 

The Chairman. In other words, a grand total of all of the Team- 
ster local assistance to the Furniture Union was $11,000 and what? 

Mr. Salinger. $11,166.71. 

The correspondence in the files of local 208 indicates that some kind 
of an arrangement had been made with the international union for 
the reimbursement of local 208 for these strike expenses, and, in fact, 
a letter was written to the international on November 14, asking 
them for the return of this $11,166.71, which was subsequently re- 



16384 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

turned by the international of the Teamsters Union, and deposited to 
the account of Local 208 of the Teamsters in Los Angeles, Calif. 

The Chairman. In other words, the local 208 was reimbursed for 
this $11,166.71 that it advanced in assistance to the Furniture local 
it was reimbursed from the International Teamsters Union? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

The Chairman. So that the local lost nothing ? 

Mr. Salinger. Right. 

The Chairman. Actually, the international did the financing and 
provided the assistance ? 

Mr. Salinger. Correct. Because of the lateness of the hour in 
finding this out, we have not yet determined whether local 123 made 
any reimbursement to the international for these funds. However, 
we know that the international has reunbui'sed local 208. 

Mr. Kennedy. As of now, it is money coming out of the Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Teamsters? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. Just going back a moment, you talked about Mr. 
Brown being elected as a delegate in California in 1950. You just 
brought that out as an example. 

We have him actively in Communist-front organization and Com- 
munist activities beyond 1950 ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes, sir. 

Mr. ICennedy. In fact, I notice there we have him at least up until 
1954? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. This was a year after the Korean war was over. 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. The report goes up to at least 1954 where he was an 
active member of the Communist Party. 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct, sir. There is one rather interesting 
sidelight involving Mr. Brown. We made a check of the telephone 
toll tickets of the unlisted telephone number of Local 208 of the 
Teamsters in Los Angeles, Dunkirk 7-8211. We find three calls to 
Phil Weiss, who was a witness here before the committee only 2 days 
ago. 

Mr. Kennedy. Yesterday. 

Mr. Salinger. The first call was made on July 25, 1958, to New 
York, to Phil Weiss, and indicates a call was made from local 208 
by Gus Brown. On July 28, 1958, there was a call to Washington, 
D.C., to Phil Weiss, and the ticket does not indicate who made that 
call. On July 29, 1958, a call was made to New York, to Phil Weiss, 
and the name on tlie ticket is Brown. 

So we find Mr. Brown in the offices of local 208 using their private, 
unlisted number, and calling Mr. Phil Weiss in New York City. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr, Chairman, we have had the testimony over the 
period of the past 2 years of the connection of certain high officials 
of the Teamsters Union with corrupt elements and with criminal 
elements of the country. We had some testimony last year of the tie 
with certain officials, such as Mr. Hoifa, with Communist elements in 
the Longshoremen's Union, Harry Bridges' union, on the west coast. 

This is another example of the tie of the International Brotherhood 
of Teamsters at the international level, not only with the corrupt 
elements, but with the Communist elements in the United States. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16385 

The GaATRMAN. Are there any further questions of Mr. Savage? 
Mr, Kennedy. That is all. 

Senator Ervix. Mr, Savage, did you have a family at the time you 
were assigned to walk this picket line? 

TESTIMONY OF ROBERT B. SAVAGE— Resumed 

Mr. Savaoe. Did I have a family? 

Senator Ervix. Did you have a family at the time you were told 
to walk the picket line ? 

Mr. Savage. No. No ; I had no family. 

Senator ER\aN, That is all. 

The CiiAiRiiAN, What is the present situation in that local with 
respect to officers ? Who's who ? "Who is an officer? 

Mr. Savage. To the best of my recollection, we have elected a secre- 
tary-treasurer, who is Mr. Sid Cohen, and I will respect him when he 
takes his seat. He has his seat now, and he is the secretary-treasurer 
of local 208 to my knowledge. 

The Chairman. You think he is really the secretary-treasurer of 
your local? 

Mr. Savage. He should be. He was elected. 

The Chairman. Well, I know he also resigned, or said he would 
resign. He signed a statement like that. 

Mr. Savage. Well, the facts surrounding that are beyond me. 

The Chairman. Has he repudiated that statement? 

Mr. Savage. Definitely, at our executive board meeting, and the 
document as such. 

The Chah^man. Is your local in a pretty bad situation ? 

Mr. Savage. Financially? 

The Chairman. Any way. 

Mr. Savage. No. 

The Chairman. Then it is all right? 

Mr. Savage. As far as the membership is concerned ; yes. 

The Chairman. Is there any occasion for it to be taken over now and 
to be placed in a trusteeship ? 

Mr. Savage. I see no reason for that. 

The Chairman. I understand the threat was made that if this 
agreement wasn't entered into or that action taken, that it would 
likely be taken over by the international and put into trusteeship. 
What I am trying to ascertain is if there is any reason, any ground 
for it, so far as you know, either financial or because of disorganized 
or lack of officers to run it or any other reason. 

Mr. Savage. Financially, our local is well arranged. They have 
no reasons for financial embarrassment. The elected officers should 
take their seats and start their procedures of running a local. 

The Chairman. In other words, if the international and the inter- 
ference from the outside would leave it alone and let the membership 
run it, you tliink it would do a good job ? 

Mr. Savage. I am certain. 

The Chairman. That is all you are asking ? 

Mr. Savage. That is all. 

Senator Ervin. Is there any reason in the world why the newly 
elected secretary-treasurer couldn't go on into his office and receive 



16386 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

union dues and make disbursements after he takes his office without 
waiting for an audit? 

Mr. OAVAGE. I can see no reason whatsoever that I can detect. 

Senator Ervin. I agree with you in that because if that was the 
kind of rule people had to follow to get an audit, it would be prac- 
tically impossible for any fiscal officer to ever go out of office at the 
end of his term, because all of those things have to be done after the 
end of his term. 

That is what is done with clerks of courts, county treasurers, city 
treasurers, town managers, in every area of America. It seems to 
me that the claim that they have to wait until the audit checks up on 
the prior occupant of that office is just so much hogwash to keep the 
man who has been elected by the union from taking the place to which 
he has been elected. 

Mr. Savage. I can recognize these facts myself. 

The Chairman. All right. If there is nothing further, thank you 
very much. 

Call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. I want to correct a date that I put in earlier with 
Mr. Salinger. 

Did we find that Mr. Brown's activities in the Communist Party 
actually go up to 1956? Is that right, rather than 1954? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. The last report we received was as of 1956? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to call Mr. Filipoff back, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Mr. Filipoff. 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN W. FILIPOFF, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, 
HAERY CLIFFORD ALLDER— Resumed 

The Chairman. Mr. Filipoff was sworn earlier today. 

You will remain under the same oath. 

Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Filipoff, could you tell the committee who 
William Fitzpatrick is, who is associated with your local ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr, Kennedy. Is he an individual that came out of the Midwest 
and who has been associated with your local union for the last year 
and a half? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was he a lawyer at one tune, until he got into 
difficulty? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. We have been trying to find Mr. Fitzpatrick, Mr. 
Chairman, and have been unable to do so. 

The Chairman. Do you know where he is ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16387 

The Chairman, Do you know anything that you could tell without 
self-incrimination; anything at all? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. All right. Proceed. 

Senator Ervin. In other words, you come before this committee 
and you state on your oath that you do not know a single thing that 
you can reveal to this committee that would not tend to incriminate 
you in the commission of some criminal offense. Is that what you 
are telling us? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Senator Er\in. And you said that if you divulged that you knew 
anybody that you have been asked about, that that would tend to 
incriminate you. 

Can you tell us the name of any human being whom you know on 
the face of this earth whose identity could be disclosed to us by you 
without it tending to incriminate you in the commission of some 
criminal offense? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. FiLipoFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Are you willing to give an accounting of your 
stewardship to the union members who pay the dues to support you? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you believe they are entitled to an accounting 
of your stewardship, the way you spend their money and how you 
manage their affairs ? 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do ^^ou believe a man who can't answer questions 
like that is fit to serve m the position of trust and to represent honest 
working people in this country ? 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. It would if you said you believe that kind of 
people should be in positions of trust and responsibility. I think it 
would tend to incriminate you. 

Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Filipoff, in the election that was held in Janu- 
ary of this year, Mr. Cohen was elected as secretary -treasurer; he 
defeated you, and afterwards, according to the information that has 
been before this committee, you stated that this was an honest election. 
Is that correct ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And shortly afterwards, after the election returns 
were announced, a telephone call was put in by Jack Estabrook to 
Portland, Oreg., where he comes from, asking to bring some more of 



16388 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 

those people down to help out; and from then on a period of harass- 
ment began. 

Mr. Cohen was followed, his wife was telephoned, he was tele- 
phoned and continuously harassed. Did you participate in that i 

Mr. FiLipOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer mi^ht tend to incriminate, me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Isn t it correct that you ordered this to take place? 

Mr. FiLipoFF. I respectfully decline to answer Ijecause I honestly 
believe my answer mi^ht tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Isn t it correct that the day following the election 
you were in conununication Avith Mike Singer here in Washington, 
D.C., about the situation? 

Mr. FiLipOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. "We have also foimd that there was a telegram seFit 
to Hoffa- and to the monitors on the day following tlie elec^tioni bv a 
group of rank and filers, protesting against the procedures that were 
used in this election. These telegrams were signed by a dozen or so^ 
rank and file members. 

As I say, the telegrams were sent to lx)th Jinuny Hofta nnd to the 
monitors. Did you have anything to do with that ? 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Filipoff, we made an examination and traced 
those telegrams, and we find that the telegrams in both instances 
were sent from your home. Could you tell us about that ? 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer becsiuse 1 honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that the telegrams Avere chaiged to your home 
telephone number ; is that correct ? 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my ansAver might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. "We also haA^e information that you ^enr out ancl 
told 3^our supporters to get signatures on petitions that tl\e eleftion 
AA^as rigged, even though you had set the election up in tlie In'gin- 
ning. Is that correct ? 

Mr, FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answei- because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, Ave liaA'e a signed, notarized state- 
ment here by an individual Avho Avas told V)y >Ir. Filiport" to go out 
and get the signatures, and if he conldn't get the signatures himself 
he was just to sign names on the petitions. Is tliat correct ^ 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I resj)ectfully decline to answer because I lionestly 
believe my ansAver might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Going back to the situation regarding the telegrams 
that were sent, Mr. Salinger, do Ave have the records on the payment 
for the telegi'ams that Avere sent? 

Mr. Salinger. Two telegrams AA-ere sent on .la.nuary IS, at 5 p.m., 
the afternoon of the day that Mr. Cohen Avas instalhnl as secretan-- 
treasurer. They are signed by a grou]) of rn.nk and lile members of 
hwal 208, and thev Avere charged to tlui home telei)hone of Mr. John 
Filipoff, 80 Kingsford Street, :Monterey l*ark, Calif. 

The Chairman. What did those telegrams <lo^ AVho wei-e they 
sent to? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16389 

Mr. SALiN(iER. The tele<>;r!inis were sent to James II. Iloffa and to 
the chairman of tlie board of monitors. In substance, they asked that 
they look into the local 208 election to determine whether there had 
been any fraud in it. 

The Chairman. And they were sent and charged to Mr. Filipoff's 
home telephone; is that correct? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

The Chairman. Do you have the documents there before you ? 

Mr. Salinger. Kight here, sir. 

The Chairman. Those documents may be made exhibit No. 8. 

{The documents referred to were marked "Exhibit No. 8" for ref- 
-erence and may bo found in tlie files of tlie select committee.) 

The Chairman. Now you may interrogate Mr. Filipoff about them. 

Mr. Kennedy. I have already asked him about theuL 

The Chairman. Do you want to make any comments about them, 
about those telegrams, why they were charged to yoiu* home phone? 
Do you want to make any comment about it? 

Mr. Filipoff. I res})ectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. If you say "No," that wouldn't incriminate you, if 
you wanted to answer it that way. That wouldn't incriminate you. 
I asked you if you want to make any comment. 

If you say "No," it wouldn't incriminate you. If you don't want 
to comment, I just want to give you a chance. Do you want to take 
advantage of the chance to comment on it ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you regard yourself as a goon, or one who 
would use goon tactics to accomplish the end he desired? You may 
answer that or decline. 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. You may be correct. 

Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, in addition we have information in 
the form of an affidavit from a gentleman who shortly before the 
election states that he was approached and was asked whether he was 
backing Sidney Cohen. He was approached by a business agent by 
the name of Neal Evanikoff, who asked him if he acted as campaign 
manager for Sidney Cohen, who was running against John Filipoff. 

He said that he was not, but that he was supporting Cohen. I will 
read what he says in the affidavit : 

I told him I was not. I was, however, a backer of Cohen's and had been a 
friend of his for years. Later, .John Filipoff came to the dock where I worked 
and said he would see to it that I didn't vote in the election. On December 30 
a letter was disimtched to me from local 208, notifying me I had been issued an 
honorable withdrawal card in the local. 

I have not, nor have I ever, requested such a card and I continue to work as 
a Teamster. However, the net effect of this letter was that I was not allowed to 
vote in the election. There is no doubt in my mind that this action was taken 
solely because I was a friend of Sidney Cohen and it was known that I was 
going to vote for him. 

The Chairman. That affidavit is duly sworn to ? 
Mr. Kennedy. Yes, Mr. Chairman. 



16390 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

The Chairman. That may be made exhibit No. 9, and excerpts may 
be read into the record. 

(Affidavit referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 9" for reference 
and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

The Chairman. May I ask you, Mr. Filipoff, is the information 
contained in that affidavit true and correct ? 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Would you do such a stunt as that, treat a man 
that way, fellow brother of the lodge? Would you treat him that 
way? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. That is not a very nice thing to do, is it, kick a fel- 
low out just because he is going to vote his own sentiments ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. That is a pretty rough fraternity to belong to. I 
don't see how you can call each other brother and kick them around 
like that. Do you think that is an appropriate name for them, an 
appropriate greeting, Brother So-and-So, and treat them like that? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. He goes on further in the affidavit saying : 

I heard from Ted Kazarian at Western Carloading, another friend of Sid 
Cohen's, that the same thing happened to him down there. I sent the withdrawal 
card back to the local and have not heard from them since. I am continuing to 
send in my dues by registered letter to the local. 

You were here at the time the agreement was signed ? You signed 
that agreement, did you not, which we discussed this morning? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. I hand you here a copy of exhibit No. 1, which is 
dated Washington, D.C., January 23, 1959, 3 : 45 p.m. ; apparently it 
has your name on it, or your signature. 

Is your name John ? Is your name John ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Filipoff. Yes. 

The Chairman. John W.? Is "W" your middle initial? 

Mr. Filipoff. Yes. 

The Chairman. And your last name? It is what? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Filipoff. Filipoff. 

The Chairman. I hand you this document, exhibit No. 1, and ask 
you to examine it and see if your signature is on it. 

(The document was handed to the witness.) 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 
H- The Chairman. Is that your signature? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Filipoff. I res])ectfully decline to answer because I honestJy 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16391 

The Chairman. All right, Mr. Kennedy, you may question the 
witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. I wonder if you could add anything or tell us what 
the situation was as far as the signing of this agreement, Mr. Filipoff. 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. According to Mr. Cohen, he was harassed, he was 
telephoned, he was followed. He came here to Washington, D.C., 
and he was told that the local would be placed in trusteeship unless 
some agreement was made. He was taken into an anteroom off of 
Mr. Holla's office and signed the agreement at that time under these 
conditions. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. IVENNEDY. And that this agreement was dictated by Mike 
Singer. Could you tell us what Mike Singer was doing in this 
meeting ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Now, Mr. Chairman, I would like to present the 
witness another document. 

The Chairman. I hand you a check which apj^ears to be the origi- 
nal check dated January 30, 1959, on Local Freight Drivers Union, 
Local 208, payable to Mr. Kobert B. Savage, in the amount of $189.10. 
It appears to have been signed by John W. Filipoff as secretary and 
treasurer, and by Neal Evanicoff as president of that local 208. 

I ask you to examine the check and state if you identify it. 

(A document was handed to the witness.) 

The Chairman. Have you examined it? 

Mr. Filipoff. Yes. 

The Chairman. Do you identify it? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. All right, Mr. Kennedy. 

I will make that check exhibit No^lO. " 

(The check referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 10" for reference 
and will be found in the appendix on p. 16456.) 

Mr. Kennedy. The check has not been cashed. 

The Chairman, It may be cashed later. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could I call Mr. Savage, who belongs to this money ? 

The Chairman. Will you come around. 

The original check can be withdrawn and a photostatic copy of it 
substituted as an exhibit, if it is desired to be withdrawn. 

All right, come around, Mr. Savage. 

TESTIMONY OF ROBERT B. SAVAGE— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. This is a check for $189.10, and this is a check to you, 
is it not ? 

Mr. Savage. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat is this sum of money for ? 

Mr. Savage. For my wages. 

36751— 59— pt. 45 i 



16392 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, it is signed by Neal Evanikoff as president of 
the local, and John Filipoff as secretary-treasurer. Is Neal Evanikoff 
the president ? 

Mr. Savage. Not to my knowledge, and he never has been. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was it a practice that was followed that Mr. Evani- 
koff could be signing the checks of the local as president ? 

Mr. Savage. Well, he has authority to sign checks, but I don't think 
he has authority to sign checks as president. 

Mr. Kennedy. Only the president has that right ; is that not correct ? 

Mr. Savage. That is true. 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, can you explain how it was that he came to be 
signing the checks as president of the local ? 

Mr. Savage. I think it is on record at the bank where our deposits 
are, that he has a signature in there to actually sign them. In the 
absence of the president or the secretary, he could have a signature 
on a check. 

Mr. Kennedy. In the first place, Mr. Evanikoff was not president 
of the union on January 30, 1959, and Mr. Filipoff was not secretary- 
treasurer ? 

Mr. Savage. Definitely not. 

The Chairman, Would you like to get this check back and see if 
you can cash it ? 

Mr. Savage. I don't think the value is very high right now. 

The Chairman. I didn't understand it. 

Mr. Savage. I don't think the value will be very highly appraised 
right now. 

The Chairman. You don't know whether it will be cashed or not ? 

Mr. Savage. I have my doubts. 

The Chairman. Well, does the local owe you the money ? 

Mr. Savage. They do. 

The Chairman. Do you have any objection to the committee photo- 
stating this check and making a photostatic copy of the exhibit 10, 
in lieu of the original, and returning the original to you ? 

Mr, Savage. No objection. 

The Chairman. It is ordered that that be done. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. I might say that under the constitution if a business 
agent is authorized to sign checks, it is only elected business agents 
who are authorized to sign checks. 

Mr. Savage. According to the constitution. 

Mr. KENNrj)Y. He is not even an elected business agent. 

Mr. Savage. Definitely not. 

Mr. Kennedy. So under no conditions does he have a right to sign 
the check. 

Mr. Savage. Not according to the International constitution. 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN W. FILIPOFF, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, 
HARRY CLIFFORD ALLDER— Resumed 

Mr. Kennfj)y. There is one other matter that I wanted to take up 
with you. 

Mr. Rex Smith works for your local ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to- answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16393 

Mr. Kennedy. Xow, he was a business ajjent for local 479 in San 
Bernardino, Calif., and he was fired from that job for his activities, 
and he came down to work for your local 208. Didn't he spend most 
of the time not organizin<j: but tryinj^ to disrupt the situation as far 
as local 479 in San Bernardino was concerned? 

Mr. FiLii'OFF. 1 respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Savage, as a business agent, did you know of 
Kex Smith l>eing hired? 

Mr. Savage. I happened to know he was hired at an especially 
called meeting. 

Mr. Kennedy. lie had been on the payroll prior to that time? 

Mr. Savage. Apparently he has. 

Mr. Kennedy. And did you know of any work that he was doing 
organizing? 

Mr. Savage. No ; I knew of no work for 208. 

Ml'. Kennedy. Had you known of his activities in local 479 at San 
Bernardino prior to that time? 

Mr. Savage. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know what he was doing and what he was 
doing on the payroll ? 

jMr. Savage. It was stated at an especially called executive board 
meeting that he was an organizer. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know any organizing work he did? 

Mr. Savage. None whatsoever. 

Mr. Kennedy. Isn't it a fact that all he was doing was being paid 
1 ly you to disrupt the situation, for the officers at San Bernardino ? 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
l>olieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Dichi't you have "Baseball Bat" Brennan on the 
|)ayroll also? 

^Ir. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
l)elieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know "Baseball Bat" Brennan? 

Mr. Savage. I don't know "Baseball Bat" Brennan, but I know a 
man by the name of Bremier that was assigned one of my errands that 
was taken away from me at a prior date, and assigned to transact 
business there as a business agent. 

Mr. Kennedy. His name was Charles Brennan ? 

l^ir. Savage. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Isn't that "Baseball Bat" Brennan that you had on 
there? 

Mr. FiLipOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe that my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you know him ? 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
l>eliev6 my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, Mr. Filipoff, you also, as well as being a union 
official, are also in management, and rather active as a businessman ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Aren't you active in- a cartage company in the Los 
Angeles area? 



16394 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And don't you have as a partner John "Radio- 
Speaker" Stevenson? 

Mr. FiLipOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, could I call Mr. Salinger back to ga 
into Mr. Filipoff 's financial activities in the world of business ? 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Mr. Salinger, did we make an investigation to de- 
termine some of the businesses that we could find Mr. Filipoff was 
engaged in, to see if he was engaged in any outside operation ? 

TESTIMONY OF PIERRE E. G. SALINGER— Resumed 

Mr. Salinger. We did. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Would you tell us what we have found ? 

Mr. Salinger. I will give a little background at first. In September 
of 1954, September 12, 1954, Mr. Filipoff entered into an agreement 
with Peter Shubin, who was identified as his cousin, and Ward James, 
and John C. Stevenson, whom you have previously referred to, to form 
a corporation to operate a waste disposal business which had an 
original contract with the Paramount Studios in Hollywood. 

Now, this original agreement they signed on September 12, 1954, 
called for them each to have 25 percent of the outstanding stock of 
this corporation. 

On September 17 

Mr. Kennedy. Of what year? 

Mr. Salinger. 1954. Mr. Filipoff entered into a signed contract 
with one Louis Visco, who is a garbage disposal man in Los Angeles, 
and owns garbage dumps. 

Mr. Kennedy. He is also head of the association ? 

Mr. Salinger. Head of the association, yes, and shown to have been 
an associate and friend of Frank Matula. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who is head of the local ? 

Mr. Salinger. Of the garbage local, and currently convicted of 
perjury and awaiting sentence on that charge. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was in connection with his answers before a 
State body, his answers of his relationship with the cartage association 
and Mr. Visco ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he was indicted and convicted for perjury in 
connection with that ? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he was sentenced and he is now on appeal ; is 
that right? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. He still holds his union position ? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And Mr. Visco had a close relationship also with 
him? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. Kjennedy. Frank Matula? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16395 

Mr. Salinger. Yes, sir. It might be of some interest to know that 
about 2 hours after I arrived in Los Angeles, Mr. Matula left for 
Palm Springs and remained there until I leJ:t. 

Mr. Filipoff signed a contract with Mr. Visco on September 17, 
1954, in which Mr. Visco agreed to take all of the rubbish that Mr. 
Filipoff was going to pick up from Paramount Studios, and there is 
a price set in this contract. 

Now, it is interesting that soon thereafter, Mr. Filipoff contacted 
Mr. Harry F. I^vison, and Mr. I^evison is a Los Angeles businessman 
and he started the Western Carloading Co., which was a trucking com- 
pany, and he later became the president and a large stockholder in 
the Metropolitan Warehouse Co. in Los Angeles, and in connection 
with that warehouse company also operates a trucking business known 
as West Trucks, Inc. 

This West Trucks, Inc., has a contract with I^ocal 208 of the Team- 
sters Union, and Mr. Filipoff is secretary-treasurer of local 208. Mr. 
Filipoff told him that he and others had developed a new and faster 
way of disposing of garbage, and he thought that it would be a par- 
ticularly effective way of clearing garbage and refuse from movie 
studios, and he asked Mr. Levison if he would be interested in putting 
up some money toward this venture. As a result of this approach, 
the Portable Container Disposal Corp. was established with four peo- 
ple, with 25 percent interest each in this corporation. They were Mr. 
Peter Shubin, Mr. Filipoff 's cousin ; Mr. Filipoff, Mr. John C. Steven- 
son, and Mr, Harry Levison. 

Of the entire operating capital of this company, $45,000 was put up 
by Mr. I^evison. 

Mr. Kennedy. He is the truck owner ? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who has the contract with Mr. Filipoff's local? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. Shubin and Mr. Filipoff and Mr. Stevenson put up no money. 
Mr. levison put up the $45,000 at 5 percent interest, and in addition 
he asked that he get 25 percent interest in the business for putting up 
the money, and that is how he became a fourth partner. 

Mr. Kennedy. He put up all of the money and got 25 percent in- 
terest in the business ? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes ; that is correct. 

Now, the business has since operated and it has been operated 
through the Metropolitan Warehouse, and Mr. Filipoff has had noth- 
ing to do with operating the business, according to Mr. Levison, and 
he has had it operated for him. 

The company has paid back out of its operating revenues all but 
$8,000 of Mr. Levison's original loan, and in other words, thev have 
paid back approximately $37,000 of the money originally loaned to 
the corporation by Mr. Levison. 

The company currently does a gross business of around $4,500 a 
month, and owns some trucks and some of these boxes that they use 
for the picking up of garbage. 

Mr. Kennedy. Does that company have a contract with the 
Teamsters Union ? 

Mr. Salinger. No, the Portable Container Disposal Corp. has a 
contract with another Teamster local. 



16396 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that Mr. Matula's local ? 

Mr. Salinger. I believe it is. 

It is interesting also that the originator and inventor of this id&a 
that they use was Mr. Ward James, and he does not appear as a part- 
ner in the final venture, and he was one of those who signed the 
original contract to have a 25-percent interest. 

But when the corporation was finally set u]), Mr. James was not in 
it and I understand Mr. James subsequently died. I don't know 
whether he was dead at the time Portable Container was set up or 
not. 

Mr. KJENNEDY. Now, John C. Stevenson, "radio speaker,'* was a 
Teamster attorney ; was he not ? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. During this period of time ? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he had gotten into some difficulties with tlie- 
law prior to this time ? 

Mr. Salinger. As a matter of fact, according to our records, 
Stevenson is still listed as a fugitive on two counts of gi-and larceny 
in the first degree from Buffalo, N.Y., where he operated a bucket 
shop under the name of John Stockman. There have been numerous 
efforts to extradite him to New York which have failed and he has not 
returned to New York to face this charge. 

Mr. Kennedy. How did he get the name "Radio Speaker"? 

Mr. Salinger. I do not know that. We have an affidavit from Mr_ 
Levison covering the elements of this transaction, which we can make 
a part of the record if you want. 

The Chairman. The affidavit may be made exhibit No. 11. 

(Affidavit referred to was marked Exhibit No. 11, and may be found 
in the files of the select committee. ) 

The Chairman. Excerpts of it may be read into the i-ecord. 

Mr. Kennedy. Ts this recitation of the facts regarding the Portable 
Disposal Corp. and what preceded it correct, Mr. Filipoff ? 

TESTIMONY OF JOHN W. FILIPOIT, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, 
HARRY CLIFFORD ALLDER— Resumed 

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. In addition to that, Mr. Filipoff, being in this busi- 
ness with a major truck owner and being in a business that has con- 
tracts with the Teamsters Union at the same time you were a Te<amster 
official, isn't is correct that you also have a farm ? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully de^'line to answer because I honestly 
believe that my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the farm is located in Button AVillow, Calif. 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe that my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could vou t.-ll us anything about the farm? 

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe that my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all, Mr. Cliairman. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 16397 

All ri^lit, you may be excused. 

Call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, the next group of witnesses go into 
a different matter that will take us at least II/2 or 2 horn's to cov-er: 
the activities of Mr. Mike Singer, which of tliemselves are of extreme 
importance, activities not only here in the continental United States 
but in Hawaii. This will take a number of witnesses, and I don't 
think we can get through it this afternoon. 

This investigation has been conducted for the most part just in 
this past week. We went into the matter with the assistance of the 
Los Angeles Police Department which, as you know, has been most 
cooperative during the 2 years of life of this committee, and particu- 
larly Chief Parker of the Los Angeles Police Department, and 
Captain Hamilton, and Capt. Joe Stevens. Mr. Chairman, if it 
hadn't been for the help of these three gentlemen and the ones work- 
ing under them, we would not have been able to get any of the facts 
developed as of this time. The Los Angeles Police Department stays 
on top of these matters, and that is why there is so little of this labor 
racketeering and labor-management racketeering in the Los Angeles 
area, because of the activities of the police department and the three 
men that I have mentioned. 

The Chairman. All right. We can't begin work this afternoon 
that we can finish, and therefore, the committee will take a recess until 
10 o'clock in the morning. 

We will reconvene in the caucus room at that time. 

(Members of the select committee present at time of recess: Sen- 
ators McClellan and Ervin.) 

(Whereupon, at 3 :25 p.m., the select committee recessed, to recon- 
vene at 10 a.m., Friday, February 6, 1959.) 



INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE 
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1959 

United States Senate, 
Select Committee on Improper Activities 

IN the Labor or Management Field, 

Washington^ D.C. 

The select committee met at 10 a.m., pursuant to Senate Resolution 
44, agreed to February 2, 1959, in the caucus room. Senate Office 
Building, Senator John L. McClellan (chairman of the select com- 
mittee) presiding. 

Present : Senator John L. McClellan, Democrat, Arkansas ; Senator 
Frank Church, Democrat, Idaho ; Senator Karl E. Mundt, Republican, 
South Dakota. 

Also present: Robert F. Kennedy, chief counsel; P. Kenneth 
O'Donnell, administrative assistant ; Paul J. Tierney, assistant counsel ; 
Pierre E. G. Salinger, investigator; Carmine S. Bellino, accounting 
consulting ; Ruth Y. Watt, chief clerk. 

The Chairman. The committee will be in order. 

(Members of the select committee present at the convening of the 
session were Senators McClellan and Church.) 

The Chairman. Counsel, you may proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman. I have a couple of matters that I 
want to finish up from yesterday. 

At the close of yesterday's session we were talking about the rela- 
tionship between the Teamsters and Gus Brown, who headed a union 
that was expelled from the CIO ; or rather, after he was exposed as a 
member of the Communist Party, he was thrown out as head of the 
union. He brought some of his membership out with him and formed 
an independent union. 

Then we developed the facts that the Teamsters Union was consid- 
ering an alinement with him and ultimately financed a strike of his 
against a furniture company in Los Angeles, even with the information 
very well known that he was an active member of the Communist 
Party. 

Mr. Chairman, we also have here a copy of a magazine called 
"Political Affairs," which is an outlet for the Communist Party in 
this country. It has an article that was written on the McClellan 
committee which I would like to have made an exhibit, if I may. 

The Chairman. Who procured this copy ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. O'Donnell. 

The Chairman. Will you be sworn ? 

16399 



16400 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 

You do solemnly swear that tlie evidence you shall give before 
this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. O'DoNNELL. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF P. KENNETH O'DONNELL 

The Chairman. Mr. O'Donnell, you are a member of the committee 
staff, are you ? 

Mr. O'Donnell. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. I hand you here a photostatic copy of what appears 
to be a pamphlet or book or magazine, published in July of 1958. Can 
you identify it and state what publication this is and give us any other 
information that you can about it, please. 

Mr. O'Donnell. Yes, sir, Mr. Chairman. 

This is the article from the July issue, July 1958, of the Communist 
organ, "Political Affairs." It was obtained by me in the normal course 
of business, by receipt in the mail. 

The Chairman. That is a photostatic copy of it. The photostatic 
copy may be made exhibit No. 12 for reference. 

(Document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 12" for reference 
and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

The Chairman. Any excerpts from it may be quoted. 

Mr. Kennedy. I just have a couple of excerpts that I would like 
to read. 

This article is entitled "Labor and the McClellan Committee," writ- 
ten from Chicago, 111. It starts on page 54, and here on page 55 it 
talks about the efforts of the McClellan committee and describes them 
as an effort to destroy unionism in the United States. It says : 

Even class-conscious unionists fell into the trap of the committee, for the line 
of the Daily Worker itself was not clear. 

However, a few Communists working in the Teamsters tired to make clear the 
purposes of the committee. They strongly criticized the AFL-CIO leader- 
ship in the early days of the committee during the attack on Beck, Brewster, 
and Hoffa. The stand against corruption was emphasized but fellow workers 
were warned against the reliance on any outside force to solve the problem. 
And when the possibility of the candidates Haggerty and Hickey arose, this 
was used to broaden the base of the rank and file movement. 

Then it goes on, and on page 57 it says : 

It is the responsibility of class-conscious forces in the labor movement, 
especially Communists, to fight for the reinstatement of the Teamsters, for labor 
unity, and to rally the workers for a counteroffensive against the committee. 

The Chairman. All right. Thank you. 

Call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Also, I would like to place in the record the infor- 
mation tliat we have of the tie between Harry Bridges' union and 
local 208 that we mentioned yesterday, and which played a role in the 
hearings yesterday. 

The Chairman. Do you have some documentary evidence ? 

Mr. Salinger, you have been previously sworn. 

TESTIMONY OF PIERRE E. G. SALINGER— Resumed 

Mr. Salinger. Mr. Chairman, on September 17, 1958, a meeting was 
held in Ix>s Angeles attended by representatives of local 208 of the 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16401 

Teamsters, officials of tlie International Longshoremen and Ware- 
housemen's Union, and among others, Mr. Gus Brown, whose name 
was brought into the record here yesterday. 

Following that meeting a memorandum was prepared by Mr. Wil- 
liam Fitz])atrick, whose name was put in the record yesterday, who 
worked directly under Mr. John Filipoff. This memorandum was 
from Fitzpatrick to the local's press agent, Mr. Edelstein, and it says: 

Re^iresentatives of the Teamsters Local 208 and International Longshoremen 
and Warehousemen's Union locals in southern California met today and discussed 
problems of mutual interest, and saw eye to eye on all issues. 

Tliis was followed by the signing of an agreement on September 19, 
1958, between local 208 and the International Longshoremen and 
Wareliousemen's Union which stated among other things — 

Each of the unions parties to the agreement shall render mutual aid and 
assistance to each other and shall cooperate in every way possible with each 
other to the end that each may enjoy the benefits of their collective efforts in 
organizational activities, negotiations, and collective bargaining within their 
respective jurisdictions. 

I have here a copy of the agreement, and a memorandum from Mr. 
Fitzpatrick to Mr. Edelstein. 

The Chairman. Those documents may be made exhibits 13A and 
13B. 

(Documents referred to were marked "Exhibits 13A and 13B" for 
reference and will be found in the appendix on pp. 16457-16458.) 

Mr. Kennedy. That is the union of Mr. Bridges on the west coast; 
is that right? 

Mr. Salinger. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Which was expelled because of Mr. Bridges' tie with 
the Communist Party ? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. I will call Mr. Barnes. 

The Chairman. Do you solemnly swear that the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Barnes. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF WENDELL B. BARNES 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Barnes. Mr. Chairman and gentlemen of the committee, I am 
Wendell B. Barnes, and my residence is in Washington, D.C., and I 
am Administrator of the Small Business Administration of the U.S. 
Government. 

The Chairman. Thank you very much. 

Mr. Kennedy, will you proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long have you held that position ? 

Mr. Barnes. Five and a half years, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Barnes, are you familiar with the activities of 
Mr. Mike Singer in Plawaii during the last year? 

Mr. Barnes. Some of them, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Are you familiar with the various strikes that he 
called and picket lines that he placed before some business houses in 
Hawaii last 3'ear ? 



1(5402 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Barnes. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, Mr. Singer came into the hearings 
yesterday as the one who dictated this agreement for the resignation 
of Mr. Cohen as secretary-treasurer of local 208, when Mr. Singer, Mr. 
Filipoff, and Mr. Cohen, w^ere here in Washington, D.C. 

This morning we are going into the activities of Mr. Mike Singer. 
He is an important figure in the Teamsters Union, and he was described 
yesterday as the individual closest to Mr. Hoffa in Los Angeles. 
He was in Hawaii last year conducting some strikes against some 
businesses. I would like to have Mr. Barnes relate to us what in- 
formation he uncovered about the situation. 

The Chairman. As I recall, Mr. Barnes, you contacted the com- 
mittee or gave us information at the time, and I think the Chair had 
a telegram from you while you were there. We appreciate that very 
much, sir,^and now we are very glad to have you give us the information 
for the record here so that we will know just what was going on while 
you were there. 

Mr. Barnes. All right, sir. 

May I lay the background for my interest in this matter, by stating 
that the Small Business Act, Public Law 85-536, requires the Admin- 
istrator of the Small Business Administration to consult and cooper- 
ate with all Government agencies for the purpose of insuring that 
small business concerns shall receive fair and reasonable treatment 
from such agencies. That is in section 8 (a) (12) . 

And in section 10 (f) , the statute says : 

To the extent deemed necessary by the Administrator to protect and preserve 
small business interests, the Administration shall consult and cooperate with 
other dei)artments and agencies of the Federal Government in the formation by 
the agency of the policies affecting small business concerns. 

Prior to my trip to Hawaii, I had been corresponding with the 
National Labor Kelations Board concerning their announced contem- 
plated change in their jurisdictional standards. I was interested in 
seeing to it that as far as possible policies were developed that would 
assure small businesses a forum where they might thrash out problems 
that they might have in the labor-management field. 

I was invited to go to Hawaii and I did go early in September, 
arriving there on September 4, to attend a conference on technical 
and marketing research, which was cosponsored by the Small Busi- 
ness Administration and the University of Hawaii and the Chamber 
of Commerce of Hawaii and the banks there. 

At the time I arrived, the newspapers of Hawaii contained numerous 
front-page stories concerning the activities of one Mike Singer, a Los 
Angeles resident who had been apparently sent to Honolulu to conduct 
an organizing drive. 

The general tenor of these newspaper stories was that he had been 
sent without the invitation of one Mr. Eutledge, the local business 
agent. 

Of course, of this I know nothing. 

The Chairman. He had been sent on the invitation ? 

Mr. Barnes. No. 

The Chairman. Without the invitation ? 

Mr. Barnes. Without the invitation. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16403 

At this juncture, September 4, there was picketing, mass picketing, 
of 100 pickets or more, which had been used against several small 
businesses. All the businesses that were picketed were very small ; 
I mean, having less than 11 employees and some of them 3 or 4 
employees. 

The apparent technique that was used was that Singer, represent- 
ing the union, would demand in an interview with the employer that 
all of the employees be signed up by his union, and each employer, 
as far as I could see, had made some objection to this. But if they 
did not sign up the picket line was thrown up and then subsequently 
the picket line was moved to a cold storage plant where most of these — 
all of these companies, I should say, were in the wholesale meat 
business. 

They imported their meats from the States and stored them in a 
cold freezer house, except for the meats that were slaughtered locally, 
but they were also stored in the same house. The picketing at the 
time that I arrived there was at the cold storage house, in which I 
think three of them, at least, had no interest whatsoever. From the 
same cold storage house, the milk companies and dairies of Honolulu 
withdrew their milk, and when the picket line had been thrown up, 
the drivers for the milk companies refused to make deliveries which 
originated at this plant. So Honolulu at that time was without milk, 
and had been for a day, at that time, and I think altogether it was 
without milk for 2 days as a result of this picketing. 

I was scheduled to make a speech before, I think, the local Chamber 
of Commerce group that day, the 4th or 5th, and because of the state- 
ments that were in the paper by these small businessmen to the effect 
that they would be unable to continue in business if these tactics were 
used, since they were insufficiently financed to meet the tactics, I, in 
the course of my speech, said I would be glad to meet with them since 
we had a financial assistance program, and that under our rules if they 
were otherwise eligible prior to a labor dispute, the fact that they were 
currently in a labor dispute would not preclude them from obtaining 
financial assistance. 

I said also, I think, that it appeared to me that some of the tactics 
being used by the union were or might be illegal insofar as demands 
were being made on the employer without the consent of the em- 
ployees, and where the employees had not even been talked to, as the 
press reports seemed to indicate. 

But I made it clear that it was not my jurisdiction to try to settle 
any of the labor disputes or to intervene in that in any way. This 
resulted in three of the four businessmen affected calling me and ask- 
ing for an appointment. 

I met them at my hotel and talked with them for some time. 

Senator Church. Mr. Barnes, excuse my interruption, but so that 
I can be perfectly clear, what connection did the small businesses — 
you said that they were all involved in the wholesale meat business — 
just what connection did they have with the warehouse that was being 
picketed ? 

Did they have any ownership interested in this warehouse indi- 
vidually or collectively ? 



16404 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Barnes. Three of them did not. I am not certain about the 
fourth. I don't think the fourth one did, but I just can't remember 
that. It may appear in some affidavits that will be filed in evidence. 

Senator Church. Well, all of these businesses, regardless of 
whether or not they had any interest in the warehouse, were storing 
meat in the warehouse ; is that right ? - 

Mr. Barnes. Yes, sir. 

Senator Churc n. And you say three of the four, as you recall, had 
no interest in the warehouse at all ? 

Mr. Barnes. Correct ; yes, sir. 

Senator Church. And in addition to these businesses storing meat 
in the warehouse, there were dairies that were storing milk products 
in the warehouse ? 

Mr. Barnes. Yes, sir. 

Senator Church. And after this picket line was thrown up, neither 
the wholesale meat businesses nor the dairies were able to get to the 
warehouse to remove the products ? 

Mr. Barnes. Correct ; yes, sir. 

Senator Church. I see. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliile we are talking about that, could you get into 
the reaction of the people when they couldn't get milk deliveries, for 
instance ? 

Mr. Barnes. Well, it seemed to me to be a very crucial situation. 
Some milk was available at some of the stores, and since there were 
no route deliveries, the ladies and women, some of them, had to walk 
for considerable distances to obtain their milk from the stores that was 
not being delivered on routes. 

In other cases they were unable to obtain milk at all. I recall sto- 
ries and pictures in the local press of women that were down at tlie 
picket line shouting and exchanging comments with the pickets, all of 
whom, of course, were stranger pickets. None of them were employed 
by any of the companies concerned. 

Senator Church. May I ask at that point, Mr. Barnes, whetlier 
there was any complaint against the warehouse itself, or any labor 
difficulty there ? Was this picketing related at all to any demands that 
had to do with employees of the warehouse itvself ? 

Mr. Barnes. It was my understanding that there was not, that no 
demands had been made on the warehouse itself. However, as I say, 
I didn't attempt to hold n. hearing or anything of this sort. My sole 
purpose was to consult with these businessmen to see if they could stay 
in business. 

I should add this, tliaf the meat that is imported into Hawaii is 
brought usually f i-om Los Anq^eles by bout, where it is sent from larger 
wholesalers, and is brought in a frozen state or at least in cold storage, 
and then tj-ansferred to this warehouse. 

Then as these businessmen receive their orders, they place the order, 
the delivery order, with a local truck company who then delivers to the 
retail store. In only one instance did any of the three even have any 
of the drivers or truck drivers or pereons that were employed in the 
deliveries of meat. This was all done by contract by other companies 
than these wholesalers. 

Within the next couple of days, the site of the picketing was 
changed. They picketed a boat that came in at the warehouse, to keep 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIKS IN THE LABOR FIELD 16405 

them from unloading tlie meat from the boat. Other statements were 
made by Sinjrer to the eli'ect that the meat was not in good condition, 
that it was not fit to eat, things of that nature. I recall seeing those 
stories. And also answers by the Hawaiian meat examiners that this 
was not an accurate statement. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did the pickets also try to go to the hotels to get 
them not to accept this meat ? 

Mr. Barnes. I don't recall that. I do recall there was an employers 
council in the business district that was picketed. But most of the 
activity that I could see occurred right at this frozen food locker 
company. 

In meeting with these three businessmen in my hotel, the first thing 
I did was interrogate them to be certain that they were in fact small 
concerns and came within our definition, criteria; to be certain that it 
was something in which I had an interest. 

I obtained their names, their addresses, their numbers of employees, 
and, in some instances, the volume of their business. The men that I 
met with were Mr. Mortimer J. Glueck, of the Hawaiian Cold Storage 
Co., which employed four people, and which was being picketed at the 
time. This concern was also associated in some way with Hawaiian 
Wholesale Food Plan, Ltd., of 1015 Kapiolani Boulevard, which 
employed 27 people and did a gross of about $700,000 a year. 

The second man was Mr. Arthur H. Hansen, of Arthur H. Hansen 
Sales, Ltd., Post Office Box 9G1, Honolulu. He also was in the whole- 
sale meat business, had 16 employees, including the officers, and an 
annual volume of over $2 million. This man, as I recall, did employ 
two or more truckers which operated not from his place of business, 
but from the frozen food place. 

The third businessman was Mr. Lou Sandler, who was the local 
manager of a Los Angeles concern, the Virg Davidson-Chudacoff Co., 
of 1210 South Queens Street, Honolulu. This was a hotel suj^ply 
house for the meat industry. It handled frozen foods and wholesaled 
for institutions. He had six employees there in Honolulu and about 
120 in the ITnited States, but they were still a small business. 

The fourth individual, Mr. Thomas C. T. Lee, who handled Avholesale 
meats, had 11 employees. He was not present, so I asked if he could 
be reached by phone. I called him by phone and talked to him and 
his story was the same as the other three businessmen. 

Generally speaking, the pattern had been the same in connection 
with each of the four businesses. Singer, representing the union, 
had made a demand on the employer to sign a contract with him 
placing all of his employees, clerks, stenographers, bookkeepers, and 
in the case of the one firm, a foreman and a couple of truckdrivers or a 
couple more truckdrivers which he had, in the union, and when asked 
if the employees had indicated a desire to belong to a union or did 
belong, or if he won an election, in each case, according to the business- 
men's statements to me. Singer replied, "No, this is easier," and he 
indicated that they had not talked with the employees. 

The businessmen repeated to me that their employees had said if 
they were signed up without being given a chance to express their 
opinions, that they would quit their jobs. So the businessmen were 
remaining adamant. But all of the four told me they would be willing 
to have an election, but they wouldn't, in effect, sign their employees' 



16406 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

rights away without them being given a chance to express an opinion. 

They were aware that this would be a violation of the Taft-Hartley 
law if they consented to Singer's demands. In order to make certain 
that I was not receiving testimony that couldn't be substantiated, I 
asked them if they would be willing to give this information in affidavit 
form. They all replied they would. 

They said they had prepared affidavits of the story that happened 
to each one in connection with a petition which they proposed to file 
with the National Labor Relations Board. I asked if they would 
furnish me a copy of this affidavit. I did receive copies. 

In general, the affidavits, as far as I could tell, followed very care- 
fully the stories they had told me. 

The Chairman. Mr. Barnas, is one of the affidavits from Arthur 
H. Hansen? 

Mr. Barnes. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And the other from John D. Chudacoff ? 

Mr. Barnes. Yes. 

The Chairman. I hand you here photostatic copies of these affidavits 
and ask you to examine them and state if you identify them as such. 

(The documents were handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Kennedy. There are several others in there, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. I understand in the documents I have handed you 
there are several affidavits, giving testimony along the line of what 
you are relating. 

Mr. Barnes. These are copies of the documents that I received from 
these businessmen. 

The Chairman. A series of affidavits, a number of affidavits? 

Mr. Barnes. Yes, sir ; a series. 

The Chairman. Those affidavits may be marked "Exhibit No. 14." 

(Documents referred to were marked "Exhibit No. 14" and may be 
found in the files of the select committee.) 

The Chairman. Exhibit No. 14 will be a bulk exhibit. You can 
number them A, B, C, and D. 

Mr. Kennedy. There are a couple of excerpts I would like to read, 
if I may. 

The Chairman. Very well. 

Mr. Kennedy. Here is the one, Mr. Chairman, of Mr. Hansen. He 
states that : 

At about 10 a.m., September 3, I had a conversation with one Mike Singer 
at the cold storage loading dock of Hawaii Brewing Corp. He told me he was a 
representative of the Teamsters Union, and that he would like to have a meet- 
ing with me by 2 p.m. that day. In the course of this conversation, I asked 
him the purpose of the meeting and he replied "To sign a contract." I asked 
him "On what basis? Do you have my men signed up?" and he answeretl "No." 

In the course of this conversation, Mr. Singer also stated to me in substance 
the following: That the Teamsters were very unhappy about the situation in 
the Hawaiian Islands ; that he had I>een sent over to do a job ; that it costs inter- 
national about $225 a day to keep him over here; and that he didn't intend to 
stay in Hawaii very long; that if my company did not sign a contract it would 
cost us a lot of money and would probably break us : that he could and would 
stop all flow of products from our mainland suppliers, specifically naming most 
of them ; and that if our products were shipped into Hawaii he would prevent 
us getting them off the docks. 

During this conversation I told him : "If our employees want to join a union, 
it's up to them. But I won't force them to join by signing a contract," or word.s 
to that effect. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16407 

During the afternoon of September 3, 1958, I saw from six to eijrht pickets 
patrolling the front of the entire dock area of the cold storage department of 
the Hawaii Brewing Corp. Some of these pickets carried picket signs bearing 
a placard with the legend "A II. Hansen Meat Co. unfair to organized labor, 
Teamsters Local 626." And others carried picket signs bearing a placard with 
the legend "Davidson-Chudacofif Meat Co. unfair to organized labor, Teamsters 
Local 626." 

That is Mr. Singer's local in Los Angeles, 626 ? 
Mr. Barnes. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kexxedy. This is Mr. Chudacoff's affidavit. He talks about 
his meeting, and he goes on to say : 

Later on the same day I called from IjOs Angeles by telephone to Mr. Rutledge 
in Honolulu and in the course of our telephone conversation — Mr. Rutledge being 
the Teamster official in Honolulu — in the course of our telephone conversation 
he informed me in substance as follows : 

That he wanted Davidson-Chudacoff Co., Honolulu, to sign a contract govern- 
ing its employees ; that this contract would contain a clause to the effect that 
we would not use any carrier that did not have union drivers ; that if we didn't 
sign this contract, the Honolulu longshoremen would refuse to unload any prod- 
uct shipped to Davidson-Chudacoff Co., Honolulu, even though the product 
might rot on the docks ; and that they had ways and means of getting our cus- 
tomers not to buy or accept deliveries from nonunion drivers who deliver our 
merchandise. 

In Mr. Sandler's affidavit, he describes the situation in similar lan- 
guage and then goes on : 

On the afternoon of September 2, 1958, I received telephone calls from the 
chefs of the Royal Hawaiian Hotel and the Hawaiian Village Hotel, and in the 
course of my telephone conversations with them, each of them informed me in 
substance that he had received a telephone call from Arthur Rutledge and was 
informed by him that if the hotel was buying products from Davidson- 
Chudacofif and continued to receive such products, "The union may put a picket 
line around the hotel," because Davidson-Chudacoff was involved in a labor dis- 
pute and its meat was delivered by nonunion trucks. 

On the same day, I was informed that the receiving clerk, Joe Rapoza, of 
the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, had received a telephone call from Arthur Rutledge 
requesting Rapoza not to receive any meat from Davidson-Chudacoff. 

The ChairMxVX. As I understand you, there were some four of five 
small businessmen whom Singer was undertaking to compel to sign 
up their employees in the union. 

Mr. Barnes. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. In other words, he had not solicited tlie employees, 
as far as you know. They had not agreed ; they had not signed up ; 
they had not expressed themselves as desiring to be members of this 
union. 

Mr. Barnes. That is right, sir. 

The Chairman. So in order to compel the employers to place their 
employees in the union, Singer resorted to the pressure of picketing 
their places of business, picketing the warehouse or storage place 
where their products were stored, and also picketing the boats that 
brought the goods in from the mainland ? 

]Mr. Barnes. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. And that was the method he was using to try to 
compel organization of employees without their consent or ap{)roval 
or without their exprass willingness to join the union ? 

Mr. Barnes. Yes, sir. I, myself, asked each of the four if they 
were willing to have an election if there was a petition filed for an 
election, and each of the four told me, "Yes." I asked them if they 

36751 — 59 — pt. 45 5 



16408 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

had conversations with Singer to this effect, and they said yes, they 
had asked him, "Why are you doing it this way instead of having an 
election?" and the conversation reported, although hearsay, was to 
the efifect that he said, "It's easier and quicker this way." 

The Chairman. Do you know what was the final outcome whether 
the men were compelled to join the union or did the business people 
enable them to resist these tactics, resist it successfully ? 

Mr. Barnes. They were able to resist the tactics in this way. On 
September 5 they filed a petition with the Hawaiian office of the Na- 
tional Labor Relations Board, and at this time and until the 15th, of 
course, it was not known whether or not the Board had jurisdiction. 

At the time I obtained these facts, it appeared to me, and it certainly 
was, in fact, true that under the announced criteria of the National 
Labor Relations Board and the Hawaiian Labor Relations Board- 
there is an act in the islands, and there is an agency there that has 
certain jurisdiction — that none of these four firms were within the 
criteria, the announced criteria, of either the National Labor Relations 
Board or the Hawaiian Labor Relations Board. 

Since this illustrated a point that I had been contending, that there 
was an area where small firms had no resort to any kind of forum to 
stop a clearly illegal act on the part of a labor organizer, I felt it my 
duty to communicate with you, since your are studying this from a 
legislative point of view. 

At the time this was made public, my wire to you and your reply, 
my recollection is that Mr. Singer left Hawaii the next morning. This 
was the 11th, September the lltli. On September 15, the National 
Labor Relations Board announced that it would take jurisdiction in 
this case. 

On October 29, the National Labor Relations Board entered a con- 
sent decree to wliich the union consented, agreeing to cease and desist 
these illegal acts. I haven't seen the exact decree, so I do not know 
what exactly was set forth there, but in general, the acts were ad- 
mitted to be illegal and they were stopped. 

The dairies that lost two days of milk supplies sued the union for 
$31,000 in damages, according to the newspaper stories. 

The National Labor Relations Board changed its criteria on Octo- 
ber 2, but still the new criteria would not have included these firms. 

So at the time I left Hawaii, I asked our office there if they would, 
working with the Hawaiian goAernmeut, furnish me a rundown of 
the number of firms in Hawaii tliat were covered by the National 
Labor Relations Board jurisdiction at that time, as well as the Plawai- 
ian Labor Relations Board. 

They subsequently did that, and I have the figures here which I 
intended to furnish to this committee. I will offer it in evidence. 

I would like to merely state that apparently from the criteria 
that were in effect since September, on September 4, when I got 
there, and September 11, when I wired you, out of a total number of 
establishments in Hawaii, of 9,220, there were 8,368 that did not fall 
within the criteria of either the National Labor Relations Board or 
the Hawaiian Labor Relations Board insofar as jurisdiction in labor 
cases. 

As to employees, out of a total number of 124,214, there were 68,382 
which were not covered by tlie jurisdictional criteria of either of 
these labor boards. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16409 

In other words, eight-iiintlis of the employers were not covered and 
roughly half of the employees were not covered, with no forum to air 
their grievances before or to obtain protection from illegal acts of 
this kind. 

The Chairman. In other words, they had no remedy available to 
them ? 

Mr. Barnes. That is right. The figure^s I have given you have been 
changed slightly by the fact that the NLRB changed its jurisdiction 
on October 2. But it still does not extend veiy far. 

I will offer this in evidence, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. That will be made exhibit 15. 

(Document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 15" for reference 
and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

Senator Church. Mr. Barnes, will you explain to me how it was 
that the NLRB did, in fact, assume jurisdiction in this case if these 
businesses fell without the criteria that they had established for 
their jurisdiction ? 

Mr. Barnes. The NLRB has the right to establish its own juris- 
diction and, as you know, under the Supreme Court rulings, it has ex- 
clusive jurisdiction at present. 

So they had announced a general criteria as to the cases which they 
considered important enough for tliem to take jurisdiction on. 

This is an announced criteria. They can go outside of that. In this 
case, all of the meat was transported across State lines, so that there 
was no question of their power to take jurisdiction. 

Senator Church. In other words, the act of Congress, as I under- 
stand it, at the present time gives to the NLRB jurisdiction in inter- 
state commerce cases so that the NLRB has authority to exercise 
jurisdiction. But because this field is so very broad, they liave estab- 
lished criteria which, in effect, exclude a great many business estab- 
ments, smaller business establishments, that are engaged in interstate 
commerce, but which normally cannot have access to the NLRB? 

Mr. Barnes. That is correct, sir. 

As part of our function to advise and consult with other agencies 
and departments of the Government, and then to be prepared to 
testify on legislative matters affecting small business, we have main- 
tained a file of cases in which small businesses were seriously affected 
or their rights imparied in some way, and have used this not in a 
judicial manner at all, but so we would have factual information on 
which to base our opinions and our testimony. 

These cases in Hawaii are just a few of a great many that we have 
accumulated from time to time in our files. 

Senator Church. In other words, as the Small Business Adminis- 
trator you are legitimately concerned in tlie no man's land that may 
in effect exclude a great many small businesses from the protections 
that the NLRB affords? 

Mr. Barnes. That is correct, sir. 

Senator Church. Now may I ask these questions, Mr. Barnes: I 
have had an interest in this Mike Singer matter. I was in Hawaii 
just a few months ago and had occasion then to make some inquiries. 
Did all of your information come from the businessmen themselves? 
That is, did you have a chance to check their representations with the 
employees in any of these firms? 



16410 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Barnes. I did not check with their employees. This was, I 
felt, beyond my jurisdiction, my obligation. However, I certainly 
talked with enough people while I was there to feel that I had the 
accurate story. 

The press, itself, reported many conversations and interviews that 
they had had with the employees. 

Senator Church. But your information came directly from the 
employers ? 

Mr. Barnes. Yes, sir. I might add that upon my return in Los 
Angeles, there were at that time stories in the papers there of demands 
that were being made and perhaps even some picketing — I don't 
recall that there was picketing — demands were being made on the 
suppliers of meat products to these small firms in Hawaii. Of coui-se, 
this is a secondary and maybe even a tertiary boycott, as far as I can 
see, the kind that is prohibited by the Taft-Hartley law. 

Senator Church. I have one other question, Mr. Barnes: In con- 
nection with the statements made to you by the businessmen, was there 
any indication or did you endeavor to ascertain whether the question 
of wages paid or hours worked, or working conditions, came into the 
negotiations or into the conversations that occurred between these 
businessmen and Mr. Singer? 

Mr. Barnes. I recall that the businessmen themselves said that this 
was merely an organizing drive. I do recall that — I made inquiry 
about this and they said that their pay levels were equitable and on a 
basis that the employees found agreeable, that they had had no com- 
plaints, and that they handled it as other businessmen did. 

I do recall that Mr. Singer said either to a paper or on a radio pro- 
gram that he didn't care whether he organized them or not, but all he 
wanted was a living wage for them. 

However, this was not the aspect of the story that was repeated to me 
by the businessmen. 

Senator Church. So far as they told you the story, Mr. Singer was 
not concorned about the wages they were paying, but was rather con- 
cerned about organizing these employees, and making them a part of 
the Teamsters Union ? 

Mr. Barnes. Yes ; and in fact I brought back some newspaper clip- 
pings which I, of course, will turn over to the committee, in which he 
said they were going to "round up" — I think the word was — from 
20,000 to 75,000 employees as quickly as possible, and that they would 
have no problem, if they didn't belong to the Teamsters Union they 
would turn them over to the proper unions. 

Well, the thing that made most of the businessmen most indiirnant 
was that the employees in question were not truckdrivers, and the 
people were generally not thought to be within the announced juris- 
diction at least of this union. 

But they were merely stenogra]>hers, and girls, and a few ofHce 
clerks; and that was the only employees that three of these firms had, 
even. 

Senator Church. In other words, three of these firms had no truck- 
drivers at all ? 

Mr. Barnes. That was my understanding. 

Senator Church. But nonetheless, the effort was made to bring 
them within the Teamsters Union, and Mr. Smger said that after 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16411 

they had been rounded up, they might be parceled out to the right 
unions ? 

Mr. Barnes. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What was to be the initiation fees, do you know ? 

Mr. Barnes. I do not know, sir. 

The Chairman. You do not know what the dues would be, the 
monthly dues ? 

Mr. Barnes. Xo, sir ; I have no idea. 

The Chairman. All right. 

IVIr. Kennedy. 1 might say, Mr. Chairman, that in the witnesses 
tliat are to follow, we will go quite extensively into Mike Singer's 
interest or lack of interest in the employees and what he was in fact 
interested in when he made coiiti'acts with employers. 

Mr. Barnes. INIr. Chairaian, I will offer these documents. 

The Chairman. Tlie newspaper clippings may be made exhibit 
No. 16. 

(Documents referred to were marked "Exhibit No. 16"' for refer- 
ence, and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

The (Chairman. Thank you very much, Mr. Barnes. 

Mr. Ivennedy. I just want to call Mr. Salinger as a short witness, 
Mr. Chairman, to trace Mr. Singer's return to the United States after 
he left Hawaii. 

The Chairman. Mr. Salinger can testify right where he is, if it is 
brief. 

TESTIMONY OF PIEERE E. G. SALINGER— Resumed 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Salinger, Mr. Singer had announced earlier 
that he wasn't going to leave Hawaii ? 

Mr. Salinger. Mr. Singer appeared on a disc jockey program in 
Hawaii, run by a disc jockey with a rather colorful name, Akuhead 
Pupule, and among the statements he made on this show — and we 
have the full transcript of his interview — was : 

Mike Singer is not leaving this island, and the only way Mike Singer will 
leave this island is in a pine box. If I go that way, there will be hundreds that 
will follow me. 

That was one of the statements he made on this progi'am. 

The Chairman. On a television or radio program? 

Mr. Salinger. A radio program. 

The Chairman. A radio program? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. What is the date of it? 

Mr, Salinger. The date of the program is September 10, 1958. 

The Chairman. On September 10, he is saying the only way he 
would leave is in a j^ine box ; is that right ? 

Mr. Salinger. That is right ; yes, sir. 

The Chairman. All right. The transcript of that radio program 
may be made exhibit No. 17 for reference. 

(Document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 17" for reference 
and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he also give a seal of assessment of his value? 

Mr. Salinger. There was some intimation that he might be some 
kind of a thug, and he said, "Well, maybe I am rotten through and 
through — and so what?" 



16412 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

That was the answer to that question. 

The Chairman. Someone asked him that question, if he was a 
thug? 

Mr. Salinger, There had been an allegation by another disc jockey 
that he was a thug, and that was his answer to that charge. 

The Chairman. He said he may be rotten through and through — 
and so what ? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, Mr. Salinger, when he returned to the United 
States, what occurred ? 

Mr. Salinger. Having been rather unsuccessful on the island, he 
started to apply the pressure on the docks in Los Angeles and in 
Wilmington, Calif. 

Pickets appeared at the docks on September lY, 18, and 19, carrying 
placards saying they were from local 626, and among those on the 
waterfront those days were Mike Singer, Charles Kico, and Mike 
Grancisch, all business agents of local 626 in Los Angeles, and Francis 
Kichevitz, a business agent of local 208, the local we had testimony 
about yesterday. 

The picketing was directed against two rail cars of chilled beef 
which had been planned for shipment by Armour & Co., South Omaha, 
Nebr., to Armour & Co. in Honolulu, and a truckload of meat from 
Wilson & Co., Los Angeles, to Wilson & Co., Honolulu. 

As a result of the picket line by these local 626 pickets, the long- 
shore workers, members of Harry Bridges' International Longshore- 
men and Warehousemen's Union, refused to load the meat, and the 
Matson freighter, Hawaii Farmer, thereupon sailed on September 19th 
without 250 tons of meat. 

The picketing was continued to halt the shipments of meat to the 
Davidson-Chudakoff Co., and also shipments from the Harris Poultry 
Co. aboard the Lurline, which sailed on September 22, 1958, without 
the meat aboard. 

Subsequently, some of the shippers directed their meat to San 
Francisco where it was shipped out without interference, and the 
picket lines disappeared. 

The Chairman. All of this was being done to compel the employers 
in Hawaii to place their employees in the union; is that correct? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct, sir, and I might add that we have 
a letter here directed from John Annand, president of Joint Council 
42 of the Teamsters, to Mr. INIenard, secretary-treasurer of the Meat 
Provision Deliverers Local Union No. 026, dated Sp]:)tember 19, 1958, 
and this letter, I can read ])art of it into the record. 

The Chairman. The letter may be mnde exhiliit No. 18. 

(Document referred to was mnrkod "Fxhibit No. 18" for reference 
and mny bo found in the files of the select committee.') 

Mr. Salinger. This letter definitely indicates the displeasure of the 
Teamsters Joint Council with Mr. "Singer's activities in picketing 
these meat shipments on the waterfront, and I will read this : 

It has come to my attention that unfair labor in-aetice char,tces under sec- 
ondary boycott secti(ms of the Taft-Hartley law have been tiled against local 
f)2G in connection with recent activities in Hawaii and also at the Matson docks 
in San Pedro. The local newsi)apers have carried stories clainiin-j; to give 
an account of activities allegedly by agents of local 02f> to prevent the loading 
of meat aboard ship for transportation to Hawaii. Although I have no knowl- 



IMPROPER ACTR'ITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 16413 

edge as to whether the newspaper stories are in any degree accurate, I feel it is 
necessary to make clear that Joint Council of Teamsters No. 42 has not directly 
or indirectly sanctioned or api)roved, nor does it now sanction or approve, any 
activities of which local ()2(; may be carrying on in regard to the above matters. 

To my knowledge, the Joint Council has not been officially or unofficially con- 
sulted in any regard nor has it extended any approval or assistance in the 
foregoing activities. 

Under the circumstances, I am sure you can understand that the labor dispute 
on which the above matters have arisen is solely between this local and the 
oin[)l()yers, and that the joint council cannot accept the responsibility for the 
matter in which you press whatever claims you may have. 
Fraternally, 

John W. Annand, President. 

The Chairman. What date was it that this man Singer made that 
statement about if he left Hawaii, he woiikl leave in a pine box? 

Mr. Salinger. That was September 12, 1958. 

The Chairman. What date did he leave ? 

Mr. Salinger. Excuse me, let me check that again. I will refer 
to the transcript of the radio show. The radio program was made 
on the morning of September 10, 1958, and according to testimony of 
Mr. Barnes, Mr. Singer left on September 12, two days later. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all for this witness. 

I would like to now call Mr. Morris Gurewitz. 

We are going further into the activities of Mr. Singer. 

The Chairman. You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF MORRIS GUREWITZ 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation. 

Mr. Gurewitz. My name is Morris Gurewitz, and my address is 
1395 North Doheney Drive, Los Angeles 46, and I am the owner and 
operator of the Washington Rendering Co., at 4144 Bandini Boule- 
vard, Los Angeles. 

The Chairman. TYhat is the nature of that company, and what does 
it do? 

Mr. Gurewitz. I buy kitchen greases from owner-operator peddlers, 
and also have my own trucks picking up this kitchen grease from the 
hotels and restaurants, and also in the processing of feathers and 
chicken offal which I have picked up from the poultry killing plants 
and poultry retail houses. 

And I also manufacture feather meal and meat scrap from the 
offal. Also I have the contract from Los Angeles County for the 
small dead animals. 

The Chairman. You waive counsel, do you, Mr. Gurewitz ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. I do, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long have you been in this business ? 

Mr, Gurewitz. I have been in the grease business for 23 years, but 
I have been in the manufacturing business for approximately 17 years. 

Mr. Kennedy. We will be chiefly concerned this morning in your 
testimony about your grease business, Mr. Gurewitz. 

You are here imder subpena, are you not ? 



16414 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. GuREwiTz. I am, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, where do you procure your grease and how is 
it procured ? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. Well, I have two truck drivei^ of my own who are 
members of 626, who pick up and have their routes and pick up this 
grease from the hotels and restaurants. 

I also liave peddler-owner-operators of their own trucks and these 
individuals have their own routes and they sell this material to me. 

Mr. Kennedy. What union are they members of ? 

Mr. GuREwiTz. They are the members of 626-B. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now, Mr. Singer is the business agent for local 
626-B? 

Mr. GuREwiTZ. Mr. Singer is the agent for 626-B. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many members does 626-B have altogether, 
approximately ? 

Mr. GuREwiTZ. I am not quite sure, but approximately there are 40 
members. 

Mr. Kennedy. Forty members in 626-B ? 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. Yes, sir ; these are all owner-operators of their own 
business. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he represents them, supposedly ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. He definitely represents them. 

Mr. Kennedy. When did you fii-st hear of Mr. Singer ? 

Mr. GuEREwiTz. Well, it has been about 4 or 5 years ago when he 
first went to work for 626. 

Mr. Kennedy. Where did he come from ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. I don't know where he came from. The only story 
I heard was that he was in the meat business in Las Vegas, and he 
went broke there, and originally came from New York to Las Vegas, 
and he went broke in Las Vegas and then came to Los Angeles, and 
that is the story that I have. 

Mr. Kennedy. And he became a Teamster official? 

Mr. Gurewitz. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. "Wliat was your first dealing that you had with him ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. Well, my first dealings with him were that we had 
a contract to negotiate and he came in there and the first thing he 
did was throw a picket line on the front of the place, and then he 
came upstairs to talk to me. 

The Chairman. You mean he had the picket line up before you 
met him ? 

]\Ir. Gurewitz. That is Mr. Singer's practice, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. I am just asking, and I wanted the record clear 
on it. 

IVlr. Gurewitz. That is right. 

The Chairman. You met him after you had a picket line out in 
front of you ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. That is right, sir. 

Senator Church. When did this happen; about how long ago? 

Mr. Gurewitz. This was 4 or 5 years ago. Then we negotiated a 

contract and unfortunately I am one of these ulcer babies, and I 

couldn't take it much more, and so I said, "Well, let us get this thing 

over and we will get a suit of clothes out of the deal and forget it." 

And so we finished the deal, and I bought Mr. Singer and Mr. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16415 

Grancisch a suit of clothes, wliicli cost me about $350, which I couldn't 
afford to pay for. 

Mr. Kenn?:dy. Hut you were in nej^otiations and the negotiations 
broke down? 

Mr. (TntE\\'iTz. AVell, we were argiiing back and forth, and I just 
couldn't take it any more, and they had nothino: to lose, but I did. 

Mr. Kennedy. You told them you would buy them a suit of clothes 
and they said they would settle it? 

Mr. Gttrewitz. We settled it ri^jht then and there. 

Mr. Kennedy. On your terms? 

Mr. GiREwny.. Not exactly on my terms, but they were better than 
the terms that were asked for. 

The Chairman. In other words, you got considerable concessions 
after you dressed them up a bit. 

Mr. GuREwiTz. After they were dressed up a little bit. 

Mr. Kennedy. Where did they get the suit of clothes ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. At Murrays, on Main Street, Third and Main. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did they go down and pick out the suits of clothes? 

Mr. GuREAViTZ. The only tiling I got from there was the bill, and 
they went down there and picked out their clothes, and it was made 
for them, tailormade, and the bill was sent to me, and I sent a check 
for it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was there a dispute also concerning your brother at 
that time ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. Yes; ajid I don't remember the exact date but at 
that time I was under doctor's order to only work a half a day, and 
I was at home one afternoon about 1 :30 and I received a call from 
my plant tliat there was a picket line on the place and that Mr. Singer 
had instructed all of the employees out of my plant. 

The only jurisdiction that he had was the truckdrivers, and we had 
the Butchers Union in there, and the Engineers Union, the Operating 
Engineers Union in there, and the Butchers Union walked out, the 
colored boys, and they got scared and they walked out but the Engi- 
neers stayed there. 

So I immediately called my attorney and he immediately referred 
me to a labor attorney, and I can't remember his name at this time. 

Mr. Kennedy. AVhat was the picket line placed for? 

Mr. Gurewitz. Because of the reason that I was buying grease from 
my brother. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why couldn't you buy from your brother? 

Mr. Gurewitz. I am a little ahead of myself, counselor. Wlien 
they called me from the plant I asked to talk to Mr. Singer, and he 
got on the telephone and he told me that I would have to quit buying 
this grease from my brother, and I said, ''Look, after all, it is my 
brother, and I can't turn him away," and I said, "Let us talk this 
thing over tomorrow; I am at home, and I am 17 miles away from 
there." 

I said, "Let us wait until tomorrow," and he said, "The picket line 
stays here." Then I proceeded to call my attorney and we got this 
labor attorney, and we went back to the"^ plant. At that time Mr. 
Singer would not talk to us that afternoon and we were there until 
about 6 o'clock. My attorney questioned him, and he said, "Well, 
there are labor difficulties in here, and that is all I know about it." 



16416 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

That is all the answer we could oet out of him. We went back up 
to my office and we discussed it and I asked the attorney what could 
be done, and he said, "you could fif!:ht it and you could probably win 
it, but it will take a lot of time and a lot of money. Do you have it?" 
and I said, "No, I don't." "Well, then," he said, "just try and settle 
it." 

The Chairman. How many employees did you have ? 

Mr. GuREW^Tz. At that time aproximately about 25 or 30 employees. 

Mr. Kennedy. How many employees did your brother have ? 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. None. He is an owner-operator of his own truck. 

Mr. Kennedy. They were trying to jret him to join the union? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. They were trying to get him to join the union and 
he is pretty stubborn and he wouldn't join at that time. 

Mr. Kennedy. What could the union do for him ? 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. Nothing ; absolutely nothing. 

Senator Church. Let me get this straight. At the time that this 
all occurred, you were obtaining grease from these owner-operator 
drivers, the fellows that you referred to as peddlers. 

Mr. Gttrewitz. That is right, sir. 

Senator Church. At that time, were these peddlers members of 
626-B ? 

Mr. GuRE^VITz. No, the men in my yard at that time were not mem- 
bers of 626-B, as yet. 

Senator Church. I see. Then when Singer entered the picture and 
threw up a picket line, his complaint was not that you were getting 
grease from peddlers who were not union members, but that you were 
getting grease from your brother ; is that right ? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. Definitely my brother ; that is all. 

Senator Church. Now, at that time had any of the peddlers with 
whom you were dealing, who were supplying you with grease, had 
they any complaint at all, or were they complaining as to what you 
were paying them, or was there any controversy between you and 
them at the time that Singer entered this picture? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. At no time did I have any controversy with my 
men and the owner-operators; we were always under friendly terms 
and we could work out our problem without any interference. 

Senator Church. When Singer showed up, his first complaint was 
that you were getting some of this grease from your brother? 

Mr. GuREwiTz. That is right. 

Senator Church. All right. I am up with you now. 

Mr. Kennedy. So your lawyer asked you if you had that much 
money, and when you said you did not, he told you to settle it and 
did you settle it ? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. Well, the next day I finalh^ went downstairs and I 
went to the picket line and Mr. Singer was there, and T asked him 
to come upstairs and let us talk tliis thing over. We went upstairs, 
and Ave sat down, and we talked tliis over, and the tiling that I had 
to agree to was that I would not buy any grease from my brother 
and that I would pay health and welfare for the owner-operator ped- 
dlers who are in business for themselves, and these men would have 
to become members of the union, and I was not to buy any grease 
from anybody but union members. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you agree to all of this ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16417 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. I had to agree or get out of business. 

Mr. Kennedy. You no longer bought grease from your brother? 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. No, sir, I haven't bought any grease from my 
brother for a long time after that. 

Mr. Kennedy. Now tell me this: Did Mr. Singer play an even 
more important role in the business, and did he go on to play an im- 
portant part? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. Mr. Singer at that time set the price of what we 
were to pay to the peddlers. 

Mr. Kennedy. How did he do that ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. He called me over the telephone, and he said, "We 
are going to pay so much for grease, and that is it." I said, "O.K." 

Mr. Kennedy. How much did he say you should pay ? 

M,r. Gurewitz. Well, at that time it is pretty hard to remember, 
counselor. 

Mr. Kennedy. Has that changed ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. That market changes from time to time. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would he call and tell you at various times how 
much you were to pay for grease ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. Several times ; yes. 

IMr. Kennedy. Wien was the most recent time ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. The most recent time was just here sometime in 
August of this year. There was a lull there where we didn't have 
him in our hair for awhile, in regard to the grease owner-operators. 

Mr. Kennedy. What happened in August? How much did he 
tell you you were to pay then ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. At that time we were told to pay 4i/^ cents a 
pound. 

IVIr. Kennedy. What would happen if you paid more than he 
stipulated that you were to pay ? 

Mr. GuREAviTz. All he would do was tell these owner-operator 
peddlers that I am off limits, and they wouldn't be there. 

Senator Church. How did he get these peddlers into his union ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. Well, from what I understand. Senator, one man 
who originally was a member of 626 was the goat that led these lambs 
into the deal. That is all I can tell you. But that particular day 
that the settlement was made, and I was told to pay this health and 
welfare, these men were told that they had to join the union or they 
couldn't sell grease, and some of these men that were selling to me 
didn't want to join the union, and I said, "Use your own judgment; 
I can't tell you what to do and what not to do." 

Senator Church. What was the effect of this picket line on your 
business when it was set up ? 

Mr. GuRirwiTz. It cost me several thousand dollars, a couple of days 
the material rotted away, and I couldn't pick up, and my trucks were 
sitting out on the street with rotten feathers and guts. 

Senator Church. It was a stinking mess. 

Mr. Gurewitz. It was. In ordinary times it is a stinking mess, 
but it was pretty bad at that time. 

Senator Church. These trucks would not cross over the picket line 
when it was established ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. They didn't dare ; let us put it that way. 



16418 IIVIPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Senator Church, Was there any violence of any kind, or once the 
picket line was established it was just respected and they didn't come 
in ; is that what happened ? 

Mr. GuREwiTz. There was no violence because I didn't want any 
violence and I didn't ask any of them to come in or cross the picket 
line, and I didn't want any violence and I didn't want anybody to 
get hurt, and that was it. 

The (^HAiRMAN. What benefit do you get out of the union ? 

Mr. GuREwiTZ. My benefit, I get nothing, and I paid over a year's 
liealth and welfare for the owner-operator peddlers and received a 
letter from 626 telling me it was against the Taft-Hartley law, to 
quit paying, and I was behind on my payments and business wa,s 
rough, and I went up to there to their place and asked tliem to refund 
that money to me and they told me they had already spent that money 
and tliey couldn't retime it to me. 

The Chairman. These peddlers are not your employees, are they? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. No, sir. 

The Chahiman. You have no control over them ? 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. I have absolutely no control over them whatsoever. 

The Chairman. You don't hire them and you don't pay them other 
than as you purchase their goods? 

Mr. GuREwiTZ. I pay for only what material I get from them. 

Senator Church. This union is requiring you to pay pension and 
welfare funds on them? 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. I am not paying that now, Mr. Chairman, but I 
did pay it. 

Senator Church. You did for 1 year? 

Mr. GuREwiTz. For better than a year. 

Senator Church. And you found out that you weren't required to 
pav it and you stopped? 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. I stopped immediately, and they told me not to 
])ay it, and they wrote me a letter telling me it was against Taft- 
Hartley law to pay that money. 

Senator Church. Who wrote you that letter? 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. It was signed by Mr. Menard, who is the secretary- 
treasurer of 626. 

Senator Church. After telling you it was illegal to pay the money, 
and asking you to stop paying it, they failed to refund any that you 
had paid and said that they used it all? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. That is right, sir. 

Senator Church. How much had you paid? 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. I paid approximately $1,700 and I can't say that 
is exactly. 

Senator Church. Had they used it for health and welfare pur- 
poses ? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. No, and I wasn't told what it was paid for. 

Tlie Chairman. This was just a cheap shakedown racket. 

Mr. GuRKWTTZ. Tt is a pretty good one, and it wasn't too cheap for 
mo. Your Plonor. 

The Chairman. It was expensive for you. 

Mr. GuREWiTz. That is right, sir. 

Senator Church. Is this arrangement still in effect, "^s far as the 
peddlers being a part of this union are concerned and as far as this 
union still dictating to you what contract price you will pay? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 1C419 

Mr. GuREwiTz. More so than ever. 

Mr. Kexnedy. Would you tell the committee about the meeLings 
that occurred when you were told the price that you should pay for 
the greased 

Mr. GuREwiTz. I was ordered. I was called and told that there 
would be a meeting at the union hall and f was asked to come up there 
at a meeting of the peddlers, called by Mr. Mike Singer, and when I 
got the call I said, ''What busines have I got up there? I am not a 
union member.'' 

1 was told over the telephone that it would be better for me to be 
there and it was going to pertain to my business and I had better be 
there. I was there. xVt this particidar meeting, Mr. Singer, who was 
the spokesman at this meeting and the chairman, stai-ted telling us 
what he was going to do, and he was going to straighten out this busi- 
ness, and that all the peddlei-s were to stay in the yard that they were 
in, and not to make any changes. There are several other operatore 
in this business. 

They were to stay hi their yard and they were not to pny more than 
one cent a pound on the street to the hotels or restaurants and the 
price at the i-endering plants would be straightened out at a follow- 
ing meeting, and he said that it was against the law all right, but 
'•You could go to the McClellun committee and you can go to the De- 
paitment of Justice and you can go to the Los Angeles Police Depart- 
ment, and you can go to the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department and it 
won't do you any good, and the union has plenty of money and we 
would tight it." 

With that kind of business, I went right along with the picture. 
Then we were told that we would have a meeting between the owners 
of the rendering plants and the price would be settled at that time. 
This was another meeting that was called. 

I was called to another meeting and it was before this. I wa? called 
to another meeting and a couple of peddlers who had paid more than 
a cent a pound for their grease were called on the carpet and Mr. 
Singer sentenced them to 30 days out of business, two of them, and 
one for 15 daj's. They were completely out of business for that par- 
ticular time. 

The Chairman. They operate above the law, and they are bigger 
than the law'^ 

]Mr. GuREWiTZ. So far it has been that way, ]\Ir. Chairman. 

The Chairman. So far they have been over and beyond the law 
and the law can't reach them. 

Mr. GuRSwiTz. It looks that way to me, and that is why I am here 
todav, to see if we have a law that can take care of something like 
this.^ 

Mr. Kennedy. Was one of them sentenced to 6 months out of 
business ( 

Mr. GuREAViTz. One man that was selling grease to me, a family 
man, with two children, a young fellow, who had served his tim.e in 
the Army and I had nursed him along for about 6 months, building 
him up and getting him going, and he bought some grease in one 
particular spot that was an account of one of his fair-headed boys, 
Mr. Singer's fair-lieaded boys, and he picked up this grease and paid 



16420 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

more than a cent a pound and came to me and sold it to me and that 
was another meeting that was called. 

On that particular day I was having trouble in my plant w^ith my 
sewers and it was a pretty bad situation. The meeting was called for 
7 o'clock and about 5 o'clock I called Mr. Singer and I said, "^like, 
it doesn't look like I can make this meeting, because I am having trou- 
ble here," and he said, "Well, it will only cost you $500 if you don't 
come up, I don't know how, but it will cost you $500." 

I said, "I'll be there," and I immediately dropped everything and I 
left instructions at the plant what to do, and I traveled 17 miles to 
my home because I couldn't go up there with tlie stinking clothes I 
had on. I take my clothes off in the back room when I get home, and 
my wife threw some food on the table, and I gobbled that up after I 
had showered and rushed back and got there at 7 : 15, I think, that 
evening, and this particular man w^as sentenced to 6 months. He was 
completely out of business and he is out of business to this day. 

Mr, Kennedy, What was his name ? 

Mr, GuREwiTZ, Mr, Lubansky. 

Mr, IvENNEDY. Did one of the men that was put out of business for 
30 days- 



Mr. GuREwiTz. That poor fellow dropped dead with a heart attack. 

Mr. Kennedy. Right after he was put out of business? 

Mr, GuREWiTz. I would say 30 days after that. 

Mr. I^NNEDY, Did Mr, Singer, the Teamster official, have some 
friends of his that he favored, and that you were instructed to give 
part of your business to ? 

Mr, GuREWiTZ, At this particular meeting, at this meeting Mr. 
Singer told me that this business would have to be split up and end 
up between the three houses that are buying the grease. That is the 
B&H Grease Works, and the Star Grease Company, and myself. We 
were instructed to have a complete list of all of the men bringing 
grease into my plant and the amount of grease that they are bringing 
in monthly and we would have a meeting. 

Well, I suggested we might as well have the meeting at my office, 
and I would serve lunch that particular day, and so I ordered in a 
lunch and we had a meeting there, and Mr, Cohen was there and tliT-ee 
chairmen of the 626-B, three members of 626-B were there and Mr, 
Mike Singer was there and he was representing Star Grease Works 
or Company, 

Mr, I^NNEDY. That was run by a friend of his ? 

Mr. GuREwiTz, This was run by a very good friend of his. 

Mr, Kennedy, Who was that ? 

Mr, GuREWiTZ. Sam Stone and William Saunders. 

Mr, Kennedy. Sam Stone and William Saunders? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. That is right, sir. 

Mr, Kennedy. It was a new company? 

Mr. Gurewitz. It w^as a very new company. Mr. Stone had gone 
bankrupt about a year before that in this pai'ticular business. So we 
had this meeting and they checked over our list and the weiglits of 
material that was coming. There was 140,000 pounds of material 
taken away from me, approximately about 40 percent of my business, 
and I\Ir. Cohen, the same amount was taken from him and given to 
Star Grease Company. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16421 

Mr. Cohen started squawking about it and screaming, and he felt 
very badly. I said, "Don't holler, Ben. You might as well give 
graciously because they are going to take it anyway." That is wliat 
happened. 

Mr. I>Lennedy. From then on tlie peddlers were instructed to bring 
the business to Star; is that right ? 

Mr. GuitEwiTz. Certain peddlers were taken away from me and 
were sent up to Star, and some from Mr. Cohen's place were sent to 
Star. They didn't want to leave. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much would you say that Singer's activities 
have cost you since he became active ? 

Mr. GuuEwiTZ. Between Mr. Singer and Mr. Stone at the Allied, 
and the way they have been working this grease w^orks, grease busi- 
ness, I would say it has cost me a couple hundred thousand dollars 
I should have made over a period of 4 or 5 years. 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Is that $200,000 worth of business or $200,000 worth 
of 

Mr. GuREWiTz. Worth of profit that I could have had. 

Mr. Kennedy. From his activities ? - 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy, In favor of these other companies ? 

Mr. GuREwiTz. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is, in fixing the prices ? 

Mr. GuREwiTz. Fixing the prices and telling them where they 
could go and where they couldn't go. 

(At this point Senator Mundt entered the hearing room.) 

Mr. IvENNEDY. Were you approached at all about making a gift 
to Mr. Singer during the period of the last year ? 

Mr. GuREwiTz. Just before the end of the year, Mr. Lee Taylor, 
who sells his grease to my place, came to me into the yard and said 
to me, "I don't know how to tell you this, but it is going to cost you 
$1,000 to buy a new car for Mike Singer." 

Mr. Kennedy. What did you say ? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. Well, he said, "I would like to have it in cash." 
I said, "Well, we don't run a fly-by-night business here. We have 
books that are subject to Uncle Sam." I said, "The stripes on Uncle 
Sam's flag look good, but they wouldn't look good on me." 

(At this point Senator McClellan left the hearing room.) 

Mr. GuREwiTz. I said I would discuss it with my accountant and I 
would let him know. So he said, "Well, that is all right, just take 
your time." He said, "We are going to have a testimonial dinner at 
that time and give this car to Mr. Singer." 

Mr. Kennedy. What happened ? 

Mr. Gtjrewitz. Well, about a week or 10 days later, or maybe 2 
Meeks — I don't know the exact time, but I have the dates here — no, 1 
don't have the dates. I wrote three checks because I couldn't write 
the full amount of $1,000. I had to stagger them. 

Senator Church. Mr. Gurewitz, I have here in my hand what ap- 
pears to be photostatic copies of three checks written^on checks of the 
Washington Rendering Co. One is dated December 1, 1958, paid to 
the order of Lee Taylor, in the amount of $334, and appears to bear 
your signature: one is dated November 17, 1958, also paid to the order 
of Lee Taylor in the amount of $333, and appears to bear your sig- 



16422 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

nature, and the third is under date of November 24, 1958, and again 
made payable to the order of Lee Taylor in the amount of $333 and 
appears to bear your signature. 

I wonder if you would look at these three checks and identify them 
for the record. 

(The documents were handed to the witness.) 

Mr. GuREWiTz. That is a copy of our checks for $334, of my check, 
and my signature, and this amount of $333, and it is my signature, 
and this amount of $333, and this is my signature. 

Senator Church. These checks will be made exhibits Nos. 19-A,. 
19-B, and 19-C in that they all relate to the same matter. 

(Checks referred to were marked "Exhibits 19-A, 19-B, and 19-C" 
for reference and will be found in the appendix on pp. 16459-16461.) 

(At this point Senator McClellan entered the hearing room.) 

Senator Church. Mr. Gurewitz, were these three checks, which 
in the aggregate amount to $1,000, paid out by you as your contribu- 
tion for the automobile that was to be given to Mr. Singer? 

Mr. Gurewitz, That is right, sir. 

Senator Church. Was such an automobile given to him ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. Yes, sir. 

Senator Church. Was there a testimonial dinner at which appro- 
priate tributes were made to him ? 

Mr, Gurewitz. There certainly was, and that was the highest- 
priced squab my wife and I ever ate in our life. 

Senator Church. Then the price is going up, isn't it, from clothes 
to automobiles ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. That is right, sir. 

Senator Church. It would look to me as if about everything that 
could be wrong with this is wrong with it. First of all, Mr. Singer 
appears and throws a picket line around your place, and by coercion, 
which involves a suit of clothes in addition to other things, gets an 
agreement from you. The same coercion is used to bring in inde- 
pendent peddlers and make them part of Mr. Singer's union. 

Then you are compelled to pay out $1,700 in welfare funds which 
not only ought not properly to be paid, but which were illegally paid. 

Mr. Gurewitz. Right, sir. 

Senator Church. And when advised of this, you are prevented 
from recovering the money upon the excuse that the money thus 
illegally paid has been spent. 

Mr, Gurewitz. Right. JNIay I inject this for one moment: I was 
behind $1,500 in health and welfare for 626, and they brought the 
sheriff down there with a keeper to collect that $1,500. 

The Chairman, Brought who? 

Mr. Gurewitz. A sheriff and a keeper. 

Senator Church. What do you mean "a keeper" ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. If I didn't have the money right then and there 
to pay that $1,500, they would put a keeper in my place. 

Senator Church. This was a part of the $1,700 ? 

Mr, Gurewitz. No; this was sometime in May, I think it was, of 
last year. 

The Chairman, Who was the sheriff? 

Mr, Gurewitz. The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department. 
An attachment was made by 626 against me for healtli and welfare 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16423 

that I was behind because I was under circumstances that I couldn't 
pay it right at that time. So they sent that down. Fortunately, I 
have friends. 

The Chairman. The sheriff was just there to serve some kind of 
process or writ of the court ? 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. That is right. 

The Chairman. He wasn't there to do anything improper. 

Mr. GuREwiTz. No; it was all under legal procedure. It was un- 
der legal procedure. Fortunately, I was able to call a friend and get 
the certified check and pay that off so that I wouldn't be stopped from 
doing business. 

Senator Church. I understood that the health and welfare pay- 
ments that you first referred to were illegal because these peddlers 
were independent contractors. What fund does the $1,500 refer to? 

Mr. GuREwiTZ. This is for my own employees, truckdrivei-s of 626. 

Senator Church. 1 see. As distinguisliecl from the peddler group. 
And the $1,700 related to the peddler group ; is that right? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. That is right. 

Senator Church. Finally, stacked on all of these other gi'ieA'ances, 
you are faced with a situation in which Mr. Singer has, in fact, dic- 
tated to you and to the peddlers so as to channel this grease to such 
concerns as he chooses to channel it to in such amounts as he chooses 
to prescribe. 

Mr. GuREWiTz. That is ri^ht, sir. 

Senator Church. And tins, in your estimation, has cost you not less 
than $200,000 in profits? 

Mr. GuREwiTz. That is right, sir ; over a period of 4 or 5 yeai*s, to 
such an extent that I have had to mortgage and remortgage and 
loan and borrow to keep my place going, and not only that, but he has 
tried to get into my feather and offal business, too. 

Senator Church. I would say he w^as already in it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Just going back to the car, did Mr. Mike Singer ever 
come by your place of business ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. I saw Mm riding by in that new car about 2 weeks 
before he received it. 

Mr. Kennedy. He stated at the dinner, did he not, that he knew 
nothing about the present? 

Mr. Gurewitz. He put on the biggest surprise that anybody could 
ever put on. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you see him with the car 2 weeks before that ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. That is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he, in fact, come by your place of business and 
did you mention the $1,000 to him at that time? 

Mr. Gurewitz. I mentioned the $1,000 to him. I told him at that 
time, "Mike, I can't put this $1,000 out all at one time, but I will have 
to stagger it over a period of 3 weeks." He said, "That is OK," and 
walked away from me. 

Mr. Kennedy. So he was well aware of the fact ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. I am very much assured that he was well aware of 
it. 
' Mr. Kennedy. Why did you contribute $1,000 ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. I better contribute it or be out of business. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is that why you gave it ? 

3*5751—59 — pt. 45 6 



16424 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. That is right. It is cheaper to do that than to get 
out of business. I have quite an investment there. 

Mr. Kennedy. That was the dinner at which Mr. Hoffa came from 
the East Coast and spoke? 

Mr. GuREwiTZ. Yes, Mr. Hoffa was there. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you recognize these individuals? 

The Chairman. Did Mr. Hoffa participate in this dinner? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. Mr. Hoffa made a big speech there at that time, tell- 
ing how much money the Teamsters Union had, and that things were 
going to get better, and all of his members have patience, and along 
those lines. 

The Chairman. I hand you here a photograph and ask you if you 
can identify it. 

(The photograph was handed to the witness.) 

Mr. GuREwiTz. This is Al Menard and Mr. Hoffa and Mr. Mike 
Singer. 

The Chairman. Was that taken at the meeting ? 

Mr. GuREwiTZ. Mr. Chairman, I couldn't say, but they were all 
three there. 

The Chairman. All right. The picture may be made exhibit No. 
20. 

(Photograph referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 20" for refer- 
ence and may be found in the files of tlie select committee. ) 

The Chairman. I understand Hoffa in his speech praised this fel- 
low Singer, this shakedown artist, for his great service to labor. 

Mr. GuREWiTz. He did a great service when he went over to Hono- 
lulu, that he w^as going to do a tremendous job over there with the man 
that they had over there for many, many years who didn't do a job, 
and Mr. Singer did in 3 days what this man couldn't do, I think he 
said, in 20 years. 

The Chairman. But he left there right quick, I understand. Didn't 
he? 

Mr. GuREwiTz. Yes. He came back in a hurry. 

Mr. Kennedy. I just want to clear up something about your de- 
linquency on the health and welfare payments. How many employees 
were you paying on ? 

Mr. GuREwiTZ. On my own employees ? 

Mr. Kennedy. On your own employees. 

Mr. GuREwiTz. I pay on approximately about, if my memory is 
right, approximately 10 or 12 men. 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, if you were delinquent for $1,500, it must 
have been some period of time. 

Mr. GuREwiTZ. That is right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You hadn't paid for what? 

Mr. Gurewitz. For several months. 

Mr. Kennedy. It must have been more than that. 

Mr. Gurewitz. It was at least about 8 months or so. You can't 
pay it when you don't have it. 

Mr. Kennedy. I just wanted to get tlie record straight. You had 
made these checks out for the car, but since our investigation began 
was there an effort to return the money to you and get the cliecks 
back? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16425 

Mr. GuREWiTz. Yes. Sunday — I don't remember the exact date, 
but it was a week ao:o 

Mr. Kennedy. February 1 ? 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. It was February 1 ; that is right. February 1. I 
liad been in Palm Springs for 3 days, and I was away from home 
from about 12 o'clock until 3 :-10, that is when I got home, and there 
was a telephone call from Lee Taylor. When that call came through — 
my wife told me that he had called and said to be sure and tell me 
that he had called. 

So I immediately called Mr. Salinger and told him that Mr. Lee 
Taylor had called me and what shall I do ? He said, "Call him." No, 
it was Jim Ahern, of the Los Angeles Police Department that I talked 
to. He said, "Call him and find out what he wants." 

I called him. He says, "You know that matter of those three checks 
that you gave me for the $1,000? I would like to buy them back." 
I said, "Wliat's wrong?" He said, "Nothing is wrong. I just want 
to be sure that nothing goes wrong." That was the end of the con- 
versation at that time. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is as far as we will go into it now. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further ? 

Senator Church. I have no questions, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. Why can't you and these peddlers out there, the 
grease peddlers, just simply withdraw from this whole thing? What 
is compelling you to stay in it ? 

Mr. GuREwiTz. It is just a question of either doing it or getting out 
of business. 

The Chairman. How will you get out of business ? 

jNIr. Gurewitz. I can't speak for the others, Mr. Chairman, but I 
can speak for myself. I can tell you this, that if I don't go along with 
this thing, my place would be, as they say, off limits, and inasmuch 
as 

The Chairman. In other words, you would be boycotted, you could 
not buy grease, you could not sell your products, you couldn't operate ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. I can sell my products all right, because he can't 
fool with Procter & Gamble, the houses as such. He only picks on 
the small ones. He don't pick on the big ones. He picks on the small 
ones. 

The Chairman. How about the peddlers? Could he put the ped- 
-dlers out of business, too ? 

Mr. GuREAviTz. That is right. 

The Chairman. In other words, it is just a complete extortion or 
shakedown, that is all there is in it ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. That is correct, as far as I am concerned, and I have 
been with the Los Angeles Police Department — this is the first time 
that this is coming out, and I don't care if it is on the record— I have 
been working with the Los Angeles Police Department for 7 or 8 
months on this now, just keeping them fully informed of what has 
been going on, because I have been afraid that my business was going 
to go to pot anyway. I could see where my business was eventually 
being taken over and put in somebody else's yard piece by piece, to the 
favorite one. Maybe there is the payoff there that I wouldn't give. 

The CiiAiRZMAN. And this Mike Singer is the thug that is directing 
this whole racket, is he ? 



16426 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. GuREWiTz. That is right, sir. We had a good union there, and 
a good man to work with, when we were working with Al Menard, who 
IS the secretary-treasurer. We could always iron out our problems. 

The Ch AiioiAN . He wasn't trying to shake you down ? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. Al JNIenard ? No. Al Menard was a orentleman. 

The Chairman. How do you regard this gentleman Singer? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. I don't call him a gentleman myself. 

The Chairman. Has he got any principles at all ? 

Mr. GuREwiTz. If you call putting a picket line in front of your 
place and then coming up and talking to you, if you call that prin- 
ciple, then I don't know what principle is. 

Senator Mundt. By putting a picket line in front of your place, do 
you mean this was done without the request of anybody in your plant? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. That is right, sir. 

Senator Mundt. You talked to the men and they said, "We don't 
want the picket line. This is not our picket line. This is a bunch of 
men." 

Mr. GiTREWiTZ. He never talks to the men. 

Senator Mundt. No. I mean you verified the fact with the men 
that this wasn't a picket line being brought in at their request? 

Mr. GuREwiTz. I beg your pardon ? 

Senator Mundt. You talked w^ith the men in your plant and found 
out that the picket line did not come there at their request ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. That is right. Many times. Each time it happened. 

Senator Mundt. The picket line is sort of a bargaining weapon 
with you ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. It is a whip, but a good one. 

Senator Mundt. Did he tell you what you had to do before he took 
the picket line away ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. That is for sure. 

Senator Mundt. It always costs you money ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. It always costs you money. I don't even have the 
pleasure of going down and sitting down in the barber shop. I go to 
the barber shop and I get a telephone tliat "there is a picket Ime here.'^ 

On November 17, "There is a picket line." 

I asked to speak to the man, and he says, "Tell him to come down 
here," not in that kind of words, but in the real filthy language that 
he uses. 

Senator Mundt. Do you mean Singer ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. That is right. I had to go back there. They wake 
up and find out that there is some addendum or something that I 
haven't signed, and I had to travel back 17 miles, from Beverly Hills 
to my plant, sign the contract, and after talking and finally takes the 
picket line and goes away happy, he has his prey. 

Senator Mundt. Do the men in the plant get any benefits from the 
document that you signed ? 

Mr. Gurewitz. I don't know what benefit they got out of it. We are 
paying them wages right along. We pay them good wages. 

Senator MuNiyr. Who gets any benefit out of it? 

Mr. (turewi'I'z. I don't know. I guess the union is the only one 
thnt gets the benefit out of it. 

Senator Mundt. I am trying to decide 

Mr. Gurewitz. Maybe I didn't understand. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IX THE LABOR FIELD 16427 

Senator Mundt. I um ti-yin^ to find out whether the benefit accrues 
to Mr. Sin«jer, or to your men, or to Mr. Hoffa, or to whom, for 
this picket line routine that you have been talking about. What is the 
purpose of it ? Somebody has to benefit from it. 

Mr. GuREwrrz. This last particular picket line that he had on No- 
vember 17 was because of an addendum that had not been signed, 
and he wanted a signature on it. They found out they didn't have 
my signature on it. 

Senator Mundt. Couldn't he have gotten it without a picket line? 

Mr. GuREwiTZ. I would have been very happy to do that than to 
travel back. I asked to do that. I asked to talk to the man, but he 
wouldn't talk to me on the telephone that particular time. 

Senator Mundt. Thank you. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further? 

Mr. Kennedy. May I place the names of the three i)eople into the 
record who were put out of business. 

Harry Ross was one of them who was supended ? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. Harry Ross. 

Mr. Kennedy. Florian Lubansky? 

Mr. GuREwrrz. Right, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. He was the one that you talked about who was sus- 
pended for 6 months ? 

Mr. GuREWiTz. That is ri^ht. 

Mr. Kennedy. And Amelio Cademartori ? 

Mr. GuREwiTz. He was put out of business for 30 days. 

Mr. Kennedy. Which was the one that had the heart attack '^ 

Mr. GxTRF.wiTz. Harry Ross. 

Mr. Kennedy. And Lubansky is L-u-b-a-n-s-k-y ? 

Mr. GuREWTTz. That is right. 

The Chairman. I want to commend you for your testimony. I 
think you have a lot of courage. I think the American people, the 
small businessmen particularly, in this country, and the public gener- 
ally, have to wake up to this danger, to this challenge to law and order 
and decency, decent society, in this country. 

There is an element of thugs, hoodlums and crooks, mugs and 
scoundrels that are trjnng to take over the economy of this country. 
This, as you have demonstrated here this morning by your testimony, 
is characteristic of their tactics and their strategy, and their procedure, 
that disregards all respectful human relationships and simply makes 
an extortion and shakedown racket out of business relationships and 
out of what ought to be decent unionism in this country. 

Mr. GuREWiTz. I would like to say this. Senator: I hope I have 
not interrupted you. But my folks,^ of Jewish descent, run away 
from Russia with things like this, and I was luclcy enough to be born 
in the United States of America, and I am going to fight like hell 
for it. 

The Chairman. You continue to fight. I hope the police authori- 
ties out in your community will give you every protection. 

Mr. GuREWiTz. I am not conceiTied one bit. 

The Chairman. I hope you are not. 

Mr. GuREwiTz. I am not worried at all. 

The Chairman. I hope you are not concerned enough that you and 
the others can get out of this 



16428 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. GuREWiTz. If the other companies will cooperate, we can get 
out of it, and that is for sure. 

The Chairman. I think you can, to, and I think you should. 

Thank you very much. 

Mr. GuREWiTZ. Thank you. 

The Chairman. Call the next witness. 

(At this point Senator Church withdrew from the hearing room.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Cohen. Mr. Ben Cohen. 

The Chairman. Just a moment, Mr. Gurewitz. 

Mr. Gurewitz, you appeared here under supena, did you not? 

Mr. Gurewitz. I did, sir. 

The Chairman. You will remain under the same subpena, subject 
to being recalled by the committee. You will continue under the 
committee's junsdiction. If any threats, or any intimidation, or any 
effort is made to coerce, or in any way harm you by reason of your 
testimony here, I wish you would report that to the committee and 
we will undertake to take appropriate action. 

Mr. Gurewitz. Thank you vei*y much, sir. 

The Chairman. Call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Cohen. 

The Chairman. You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall 
give before this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the ti-uth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Cohen. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF BEN H. COHEN 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation, please, sir. 

Mr. Cohen. My name is Ben H. Cohen. I live at 4209 St. Clair 
Avenue, North Hollywood. I am partner of B. & H. Processing Co.. 
at 1835 North E;i stern Avenue, Los Angeles. 

Tlie Chairman. Do you waive counsel, Mr. Cohen ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long have you been in the grease business, 
Mr. Cohen, the rendering business? How do you describe it? 

Mr. Cohen. Grease processing. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long have you been in that business? 

Mr. Cohen. In processing, grease processing approximately 8 years. 

Mr. Kennedy. You are here under subpena ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You were ordered here ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. You have known Mike Singer for approximately 
how long ? 

Mr. Cohen. Approximately 4 years. 

Mr. Kennedy. We have had testimony before the committee that 
Mr. Singer fixed the ])rices on "wliat sliould be paid by the poddlcrs 
on this gi'ease. Did you attend any meetings at which the prices 
Avere fixed ? 

Mr. Cohen. I attended a meeting where the committee fixed the 
prices. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was Mr. Singer present ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16429 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. How was it arranged at that meeting? What was 
stated ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, there was a lot of pro and cons about what we 
should ])ay between the price of selling the grease and the price of 
buying it, so we can have a legitimate profit. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who called this meeting? 

Mr. Cohen. One of the committee members called me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Who was that ? 

Mr. Cohen. I can't recall. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr, Mike Singer was present ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he make any statements at the meeting ? 

Mr. Cohen, Yes; he did talk about rendering plants making a 
profit on their material as before that we were going through a fight 
where we were paying more money for material than we could re- 
ceive in profit. 

Mr. Kennedy. And the advisability of arranging the prices so that 
you could make a profit ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes ; that is right. 

Mr. Kennedy. It was agreed at that meeting that the prices would 
be fixed ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr, Kennedy, And were you present at meetings when certain in- 
dividuals who paid more than the fixed prices were suspended ? 

]Mr, Cohen, Yes, 

Mr. Kennedy. And who was that meeting called by ? 

Mr. Cohen. I really can't recall. 

Mr. Kennedy. Was Mr, Singer present? 

Mr, Cohen, Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Is he the one that suspended them ? 

Mr. Cohen. I think it was the board, 

Mr, Kennedy, Who was the board ? 

Mr. Cohen, Lee Taylor, Walter Klein, and Hubert Brandt, 

Mr. Kennedy, Where was the meeting held ? 

Mr. Cohen. They were held at different — let's see. They were 
held at the union hall, 

Mr. Kennedy. Was this an operation that was run and controlled 
by Mr. Singer ? 

Mr. Cohen. I guess so. 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, just as a practical matter, isn't this whole op- 
eration controlled by Mr. Singer ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Are you concerned about your testimony here ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Cohen, were you approached about making a 
contribution for Mr. Singer ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, 

Mr. Kennedy. First, who approached you ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, the group approached me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Well, who? 

Mr. Cohen, I really can't say because there was more or less 
three or four of them together. 



16430 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. Wlio were some of tliem ? 

Mr. Cohen. There was "Red" Kaplan. 

The Chairman. Who? 

Mr. Cohen. George Kaplan, excuse me. We use the nickname of 
"Red." ^ 

Mr. Kennedy. K-a-p-1-a-n. 

Senator Mundt. Wlio is he ? 

Mr. Cohen. One of the grease buyere, I really can't recall who 
was in there, sir. 

The Chairman. That is the only one that you can recall ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, I knew, because he was the arranger of the 
whole dinner. 

The Chairman. This wasn't so long ago. This was last November. 

Mr. Cohen, I know that. 

The Chairman. Who was arranging the dinner? 

Mr. Cohen. George Kaplan arranged. I understand that he took 
care of all the entertainment. 

The Chairman. He is not the one that the money was paid to, is 
he? 

Mr. Cohen. The money was given to one of the grease buyers and 
then given to Lee Taylor. 

The Chairman. Wlio was the grease buyer it was given to ? 

Mr. Cohen. George Kaplan. 

The Chairman. George Kaplan was the one around collecting the 
money ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, there was quite a few of the individuals that 
did it. 

The Chairman. Who collected from you ? 

Mr. Cohen. George Kaplan collected from me. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Proceed, Mr, Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much money ? 

Mr. Cohen. Two checks of $500 apiece, 

Mr. Kennedy. It was to purchase Mr. Singer an automobile ? 

Mr. Cohen. That I did not know. 

Mr. Kennedy. It was to give to Mr, Singer? 

Mr. Cohen. It was a dinner and a gift for Mr. Singer. 

Mr. Kennedy. iVnd a gift for Mr. Singer. Why did you give the 
money ? Did you give it because you like Mr. Singer ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, I was asked to give. 

Mr. Kennedy. "VVliy did you give the money ? I just want to get an 
answer to that. I am not going to pursue the matter, Mr. Cohen. I 
don't want to make it any more difficult than it is for you. 

Mr. Cohen, I had to. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat? 

Mr. Cohen. I had to. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why did you have to? 

Mr. Cohen. Just to protect my business. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Cohen, did you attend a meeting where a cer- 
tain percentage of your business was taken from you ? 

Mr. Cohen. It was given up ; yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. By whom was that taken ? 

Mr. Cohen. Wlio it went to ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16431 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. Who did it *;o to ? 

Mr. Cohen. Star Grease & Tallow. 

Mr. Kennedy. jV^d Mr. Singer was present at that meeting? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

Mr, Kennedy. Is he the one that told you you would have to give 
up a. certain percentage ? 

Mr. Cohen. Xo. It was pro and con in there about how much 
grease, and this and that. 

Mr. Kennedy. A^^ly did you give up a certain percentage of your 
business to another company? 

Mr. Cohen. The same way I give $1,000. 

The Chairman. You w^ere told to do it? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The CiiAU^MAN. Told by whom ? 

Mr. Cohen. By the board. 

The Chaikman. "\Yho is the board ? 

Mr. Cohen. The three grease buyers. 

The Chairman. "V^^lo bosses the board ? 

Mr. Cohen. Lee Taylor. 

The Chairman. Wlio bosses Lee Taylor ? 

Mr. Cohen. I guess Mike. 

Mr. Kennedy. It is not a question of guessing. This is an opera- 
tion by Mr. Singer, is it not ? 

Mr. Cohen. Eight. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did they offer to purchase these checks back ? 

The Chairman. I will present to you two checks, one dated Novem- 
ber 14, 1958 ; the other dated November 17, 1958. Each check is in the 
amount of $500. They are made payable to Mike Singer Testimonial, 
each of them. They are signed B & 11 Processing Co., by Ben H. 
Cohen. 

I will ask you to examine the photostatic copies and state if you 
identify them as such. 

(Documents were handed to the witness.) 

Mr. Cohen. One check here I wrote and one check my brother 
wrote, but I identify them. 

The Chairman. You signed both of them? 

Mr. Cohfjst. No. Just one. 

The Chairman. You signed one and your brother signed one? 

Mr. Cohen. Right. 

The Chairman. Is your brother a partner with you in the processing 
company ? 

Mr. Cohen. A full partner. 

The Chairjvian. In otlier words, you are equal partners ? 

Mr. Cohen. Right. 

The Chairman. So he signed one check and you signed the other? 

Mr. Cohen. Right. 

The Chairman. That money came out of the proceeds of your 
business, did it not? 

Mr. Cohen. Right. 

The Chairman. It is nothing in the world except a shakedown, 
isn't that all it is, payoff, for protection ? 

Mr. Cohen. Well, it has never been put to me that way. 



16432 niPROPER activities in the labor field 

The Chairman. That is the way it is, is it not? I will put it to 
you that way now. Is that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. I guess so. 

The Chairman. The checks may be made exhibits 21-A and 21-B. 

(Checks referred to were marked "Exhibits 21-A and 21-B" for 
reference and will be found in the appendix on pp. 16462-16463.) 

The Chairman. Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Cohen, have you contributed any other money 
directly or indirectly to Mr. Singer ? 

Mr. Cohen. I have never contributed any other money. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you give any money to him directly or in- 
directly ? 

Mr. Cohen. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you ever asked to ? 

Mr. Cohen. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever make a loan to him ? 

Mr. Cohen. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Directly or indirectly ? 

Mr. Cohen. Indirectly I made a loan to one of the grease buyers 
that sent him money to Las Vegas which was returned to me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Wlio was the grease buyer ? 

Mr. Cohen. Paul Kollack. 

Mr. Kennedy. Paul Kollack. Wliat was the money for ? 

Mr. Cohen. That I don't know. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he tell you it was for Mike Singer ? 

Mr. Cohen. He said he was going to give it to Mike Singer. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much money was that ? 

Mr. Cohen. $300. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did Kollack return the money to you ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. Were you ever contacted about repurchasing these 
two $500 checks? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. How long ago was that ? 

Mr. Cohen. Last Saturday. 

Mr. Kennedy. By whom ? 

Mr. Cohen. Lee Taylor. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you agree to allow him to get the checks back ? 

Mr. Cohen. W^ell, the checks weren't in my possession at the time. 
They were in my accountant's office, as we have an accountant com- 
ing in only twice a week, and he has all the records. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he get the checks? 

Mr. Cohen. Lee Taylor ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

Mr. Cohen. No. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he ever return the money ? 

Mr. Cohen. I talked to Los Angeles hist night and I understand 
there has been a refund of money. 

Mr. ICennedy. How much money ? 

Mr. Cohen. $950, 1 understand. 

Mr. Kennedy. And when was that returned ? 

Mr. Cohen. I guess yesterday. I am not sure. 

Mr. Kennedy. So we helped you $950 worth, it would appear? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIKS IN THE LABOR FIELD 16433 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy. As I stated at the beginning, Mr. Cohen is here 
under subpena, Mr. Chairman. We went in and examined the books 
and records of businessmen such as Mr. Cohen. We came up with 
these checks of tliese figures. He is here under subpena. He has 
answered questions here, but he refused to do so in Los Angeles, I 
might say. 

(At this point Senator Church entered the hearing room.) 

The Chairman. The truth is, as I perceive it, that the witness is 
imder apprehension about the future. 

Is that correct ? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. I think you have demonstrated considerable cour- 
age to come liere and testify. I think you are entitled to the grati- 
tude of the American people when you come here and stand up and 
tell the facts and help to expose these crooked thugs and racketeers that 
are undertaking to dominate the economy of this country. You are 
to be highly commended. 

You will remain under your present subpena, subject to being re- 
called by the committee at sucli time as it may desire to hear further 
testimony from you, after giving you reasonable notice of the time 
and place for your appearance. 

If anyone undertakes to molest you, to threaten you, coerce or 
intimidate you in any way, regarding your appearance here as a 
witness, you will let the committee know at once and we will under- 
take to take appropriate action, based upon whatever the circum- 
stances are. 

Senator Mundt. Mr. Chairman ? 

The Chairman. Senator Mundt. 

Senator Mundt. You have related three incidents under which 
you responded through pressure applied by Mr. Singer or the board 
or somebody representing them. One was you had to give up part 
of your business to a competitor; one was you made a loan to Mr. 
Singer, indirectly, for $300 which you collected; and one was you 
contributed $1,000 to this testimonial dinner, of which, apparently, 
$950 has been collected for you by our committee. 

Except for those three incidents, have there been any other exper- 
iences in your business career where pressures have been applied to 
you or where things have worked to your disadvantage because of the 
fact that Mr. Singer and his group were in position to control part 
of your business activities? 

Mr. Cohen. No. 

Senator Mundt. Those three are all. Very well. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further? 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all. 

The Chair^ian. Thank you very much. 

Call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. I just want to call Mr. Salinger, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Kennedy. We made an examination of the purchase of the 
automobile for Mr. ]\Iike Singer? 

Mr. Salinger. We have, sir. 

Mr, Kennedy. Would you tell the committee what the documents 
relate, what documents we have ? 



16434 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Salinger. First, in addition to the $1,000 given in three checks 
by Mr. Gurewitz and the $1,000 given in two checlcs by Mr. Cohen, 
there were other contributions made to the automobile for Mr. Singer. 

Six hundred and fifty dollars was put up by the Star Grease Co., 
384G Bandini Boulevard, Los Angeles ; a further $650 was put up by 
the Western Tallow Processoi"s, 4101 Bandini Boulevard, Los Angeles. 

All this money was deposited to a special account set up at the 
Golden State Bank in Downey, Calif., under the name of I^e Taylor, 
trustee. The checks that were put into evidence here, Mr. Gurewitz's 
checks, Mr. Cohen's checks, and these two checks that I have just 
referred to, were all deposited to this account. 

There are two principal disbursements out of this account. One 
is in the amount of $1,165, and was payable to the Bob Spreen Olds- 
mobile-Cadillac Co. in Huntington Park, Calif., for which a receipt 
was given to Mr. Taylor. 

The other major disbursement out of this Lee Taylor trustee ac- 
count was a check in the amount of $2,610, also made payable to the 
Bob Spreen Oldsmobile-Cadillac Co., and on this occasion the receipt 
was given to Mike Singer, indicating that Mr. Singer personally de- 
livered the check. 

It is interesting to note that this $2,610 receipt is dated December 8, 
1958, and that is the day that Mike Singer took delivery of the car, 
which was a 1959 Oldsmobile. 

Mr. Kennedy. What was the date when he received the automobile 
and expressed surprise and gratitude for this wonderful gift ? 

Mr. Salinger. The date, as I believe it, was December 19, or 11 days 
later. As further evidence of Mr. Singer's knowledge of this trans- 
action, it must be pointed out that Mr. Singer put his own 1955 Olds- 
mobile into the deal as a partial down payment on the car. It shows 
that $1,100 was allowed on this automobile, this Olds "98," 1955, reg- 
istered in the name of Mike Singer. 

So he had knowledge of the transaction when he put his own car 
into the deal as an $1,100 down payment. He took delivery, as I say, 
on the 8th. 

Would you like to trace further what happened to this automobile? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

Mr. Salinger. This automobile was totally wrecked in Roanoke, 
Va., on January 8, 1959. At that time, the driver of the automobile 
was identified as Mi^. Pat Harrington, who gave the address 507 
North 19th Street, Montebello, Calif., and described in the insurance 
reports as a friend of Mr. Singer's. 

She said she had been instructed by Mr. Singer to drive the Oldsmo- 
bile from California to Washington, where she was going to meet Mr. 
Singer. Mr. Singer was then in Puerto Rico, according to the infor- 
mation on this insurance investigation. 

There are two things that I think should be pointed out in the 
investigation by the insurance company, the Ijondon Assurance Co. : 
First, that Mr. Singer is described in this report as "an assistant to 
James Hofl'a of the International Teamsters ITnion and, consequently, 
travels throughout the country quite extensively. About the time of 
this accident he was in San Juan, P.R." 

Further, there is a statement made by Mr. Singer to the investigators 
for the insurance company that, "This vehicle originally cost him 
$5,600.'" 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16435 

The Chairman. Is it the car that was given to him that was in the 
accident ? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct, sir. As a result of the accident and 
the total loss thereon, the insurance company made out a check to Mr. 
Singer in the amount of $4,698, which was sent to him at the Hotel 
Woodner in Washington, D.C., where he was at that time, and, in 
fact, it was at that time that he was in Washington involved in this 
local 208 election situation that we had testimony on yesterday. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Cohen, how much of your business was taken 
from you, what percentage approximately ? 

Mr. Cohen. At what point do you mean ? 

Mr. Kennedy. When you had this meeting? 

Mr. Cohen. This meeting ? About 10 percent. 

Mr. Kennedy. How mucli business have you lost altogether, what 
percentage of your business ? Just approximately. 

Mr. Cohen. About 25 percent. 

Mr. Kennedy. There are certain favorite employers, are there, of 
Mr. Singer? 

Mr, Cohen. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. And there is a close relationship between Mr. Lee 
Taylor and some members of the association with Mr. Singer? 

Mr. Cohen. Yes. 

Mr. Kennedy. We tried to find INIr. Taylor ; is that right ? 

Mr. Salinger. I talked to Mr. Taylor in Los Angeles on Tuesday 
and at that time asked him to come in for an interview. He refused 
to do so. We never have talked to him. 

The Chairman. Mr. Salinger, you made reference to certain docu- 
ments in your testimony of a moment ago. You made reference to 
checks, I believe, from the Western Tallow Processors in the amount 
of $650, and another one from the Star Grease Co. in the amount of 
$650;isthatcoiTect? 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct, sir. 

The Chairman. These checks mav be made exhibit No. 22A and 
22B. 

(Checks referred to were marked "Exhibits Nos. 22A and 22B" for 
reference and will be found in the appendix on pp. 16464—16465.) 

The Chairman. The other documents that you referred to may be 
made exhibit No. 23, in bulk. 

(Documents referred to were marked "Exhibit No. 23" for refer- 
ence and may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

The Chairman. Senator Church ? 

Senator Church. Mr. Chairman, I just wanted to say that in the 
course of the past year, while I have been a member of this committee, 
(here has been many a sordid picture brought before it. It seems to 
me that this one we have heard this morning is as bad as any. It 
certainly is just added evidence, if any were needed, to an unfolding 
spectacle of a country that has far too many racketeers clawing at the 
vitals, and certainly it points up that if we do not begin to break this 
grip they are going to strangle us. 

I do hope that the work of the committee is going to prove produc- 
tive in this session and that appropriate reform legislation is going 
to be obtained. 

The Chahiman. Thank you very much. 



16436 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Is there anything further? If not, the committee will stand in 
recess until 2 o'clock. 

(Members of the select committee present at time of recess: Sena- 
tors McClellan, Church, and Mundt.) 

(Whereupon, at 12:10 p.m. the select committee recessed, to re- 
convene at 2 p.m. the same day.) 

AIT^RNOOK SESSION 

The Chairman. The committee will come to order. 

(Members of the select committee at time of reconvening: Sena- 
tors McClellan, Church, and Mundt.) 

The Chairman. Call the next witness, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. I would like to call, Mr. Chairman, Mr. Mike Singer. 

The Chairman. Be sworn, Mr, Singer, 

You do solemnly swear the evidence you shall give before this Sen- 
ate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing 
but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mr. Singer. I do, 

TESTIMONY OF MEYER SINGER, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, 
HARRY CIIFFORD ALLDER 

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your 
business or occupation, please, sir. 

Mr. Singer. Meyer Singer, 336 North Sycamore Avenue, Los An- 
geles, Calif. 

The Chairman. What is your given name? I didn't understand 
your given name. 

Mr. Singer. Meyer Singer. 

The Chairman. Meyer Singer. You are known as Mike, also? 

Mr. Singer. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. Did you give your occupation or your business? 
Did you give us that? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer. 

The Chairman. Well, you didn't. You say you dicbi't give it to 
us — will you give it to us ? Now you can get your fifth amendment in. 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. You have counsel. 

Mr. Counsel, identify yourself for the record. 

Mr. Allder. My name is Harry Clifford Allder, member of the bar 
of Washington, D.C. 

The Chairman, All right, Mr. Kennedy, you may interrogate the 
witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Singer, could you tell us where you were born 
and the dat^? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Singer. New York City, sir; November 19, 1921. 

Mr. Kennedy, Did you go to scliool in New York City ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Did you go to grammar school ? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16437 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I 'honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kexxedy. Even going back prior to that time, did you go to 
kindergarten or first gi-ade in New York City ? 

Mr. Allder. I object to this, Mr. Chairman. I don't think this is 
pertinent to the inquiry. 

Mr. Kennedy. It is very pertinent, Mr. Allder. I want to find out 
where he was educated, where he was brought up. It is very inter- 
esting how he finally arrived in Los Angeles. 

I would like to trace his career through. I would like to find out 
by starting out where he went to school. 

Can you answer that question, please? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us what you were doing before you 
went to the first gi-ade, Mr. Singer, after you were born and what you 
did between when you were born and when you went to the first grade? 

Mr. Singer, I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell the committee why you went from 
New York City out to Los Angeles ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. On your way to Los Angeles, did you stop in Las 
Vegas and form a company there that went bankrupt and then con- 
tinue on to Los Angeles. Mr. Singer? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honesth' be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

]Mr. Kennedy. Do you liave any brothers, Mr. Singer? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have a brother, Max Singer? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, according to the information that 
we have, Mike Singer is the brother of Max Singer, who is an official 
of local 640 of the Amalgamated JSIeat Cutters L^nion in New York 
City. He was under subpena. Max Singer was under subpena to this 
committee, and he was expected to tastify regarding, for one thing, a 
$.5,000 kickback that he made to Louis Block, who was the one to award 
the insurance for that union in New York City back in 1949 or 1950. 

According to the information we have. Max Singer got more than 
$20,000 in commissions from the insurance that was collected on be- 
half of the members of his union while he was a union official. He 
made $5,000 in kickback to Louis Block, who was at that time head 
of the union. 

The Chairman. Are Mike and Max brothers ? 

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. 

The Chairman. Mike Singer is the witness before us? 

Mr. Kennedy. Max Singer. 

Tlie Chairman. Is it Mack or Max ? 



16438 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. M-a-x. And the father, Hyman Singer, was also at 
one time connected with the operations of local 640 of the Butchers 
Union, which we went into extensively last year. 

The Chairman. What was the last question to the witness? 

Mr. Kennedy. I asked if this was his brother, and if the informa- 
tion we have regarding him is correct. 

First, if this is your brother, Max Singer? 

The Chairman. Is Max Singer your brother? 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Is Hyman Singer your father! 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. You don't honestly believe that, do you, just to tell 
the truth about it ? 

(The witness conferred with his comisel.) 

The Chairman. Do you? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we have further information that 
this Mr. Singer, Mike Singer, himself, worked as a strongarm man for 
local 6-iO of the Butchers in New York City, at least up mitil 1952. 

Is that correct ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then in 1953 he worked for local 627 of the Butchers 
Union, the Meat Cutters Union. 

Is that correct ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Then, according to the information we have, in 1953 
you left New York City for Las Vegas, where you were associated 
with a meat company in that city. 

He appeared in Los Angeles in 1955. Is that right ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Senator Mundt. Mr. Chairman 

The Chairman. Senator Mundt ? 

Senator Mundt. I have an appointment in my office at 2 :15 and I 
am particularly interested in one phase of Mr. Singer's career, if I 
could ask one or two questions at this time. 

The Chairman. All right, sir. 

Senator Mundt. Mr. Singer, the committee Imows that you were in 
Honolulu, Hawaii, last year in connection with your work as an official 
of the Teamsters Union. 

When you were in that country, did you have any conferences 
with Harry Bridges of the Longshoremen's Union? 

Mr. Singer. I res]iect fully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Senator Mundt. It is true, is it not, that you and Mr. Bridges were 
working in collusion in connection with a union operation over there? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16439 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer mignt tend to incriminate me. 

Senator Mundt. It could not incriminate you, Mr. Singer, if you 
could honestly answer that question in the negative. I want to ask 
you again : 

Is it true that you were working in collusion with Harry Bridges 
and the Longshoremen over there in connection with a union activity? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Senator Mundt. xhat is all, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Kennedy. I do not know if you were here, Senator, but we also 
put in an agreement that was made with the local union in Los 
Angeles with Harry Bridges' union on the west coast, and the local 
union which Mike Singer played such a prominent role in, as well as 
his activities boycotting the meat supplies to Hawaii for a period of 
some days. 

Senator Mundt. It is my understanding that the operation also ex- 
tended to Iowa. I was just trying to determine, by giving the witness 
an opportunity to deny it, if the information was possibly inaccurate. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Singer, the information that we have is that the 
local Teamster officials in Los Angeles were ordered by higher-ups to 
put you on the payroll as a business agent. Is that correct? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Senator Mundt. May I ask one more question? I have to leave 
quickly. 

Because of the information we have, and because of your answer 
to my previous question, I think I should ask you this question, Mr. 
Singer : Are you now or have you ever been a member of the Com- 
munist Party f 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully (Recline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Senator Mundt. And in your work in the islands, were you in any 
way advancing the interests of international communism? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Senator Mundt. It certainly would, if you answered it in the 
affirmative, because this is a very incriminating situation. 

That is all, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. All right. 

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell us about your activities in Hawaii, 
whether you placed picket lines in front of these small meat businesses 
without consulting the employees ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

(At this point Senator Mundt left the hearing room.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Who paid for your transportation out to Hawaii? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Isn't it correct that the Teamsters paid for your 
transportation out there, paid your hotel bill and expenses while you 
were there, and paid for your transportation back ? 

36751 O — 59 — pt. 45 — — 7 



16440 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Singer, I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

(Members of the select committee present at this point in the pro- 
ceedings were Senators McClellan and Church.) 

Mr. Kennedy. And is it not correct that on that trip you brought 
a friend of yours with you to Hawaii and kept the friend there and 
then returned with the friend, all at union expense ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we Jiave the information regarding 
that and the fact that this trip was made, that Mr. Singer brought a 
personal friend with him, and that the friend and he were kept at 
union expense. 

I don't know whether we want to go into the details of it, but we can 
have the cost to the union for that excursion in the record. 

The Chairman. Do you want to tell us anything about this? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. You had a traveling companion when you went 
down there, didn't you ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Didn't the union pay her expenses and back ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did she perform any services whatsoever for the 
labor union ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Was she in your employ ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did she perform any business services for you ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. All right, Mr. Counsel, you may proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, may I place in the record the fact 
that the total expenses for Mr. Singer and his friend was $1,357.28. 

The Chairman. According to the information we have, Mr. Singer, 
the total expenses for you and your companion on that trip down to 
Hawaii was $1,357.28, which was paid by the Teamsters Union. Is 
that figure correct ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Is it substantially correct? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you state it as incorrect? Will you state that? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chair^ian. According to this, you were down there in Septem- 
ber of last year. September of last year is the date of this trip you 
made down there. I believe that is correct, is it not ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16441 

Mr. Singer, I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer nii^ht tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did you ^o down there on union business? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer mig^ht tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did you hear the testimony this morning of Mr. 
Barnes? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer mig^lit tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. He listed, I believe, four people in business down 
there — small businesses — that were picketed. I understand the pick- 
ets were thrown up by you or under your direction, and they were 
picketed in an effort to force them or compel them tx) put their em- 
ployees in your union. Did you do that ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer mi^ht tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did you picket the warehouse down there where 
they store meat and milk i 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chair^ian. Did you picket the boats when they arrived, that 
carried the meat on them ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you earn any legitimate money whatsoever? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you have any idea how much your illegitimate 
income is annually ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Do you get a salary from any union ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. So you get more income from a salary from a union 
than you do from the shakedown rackets in which you engage ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. All right. Mr. Kennedy, ask him about something 
else. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Singer, when you came back from Hawaii the 
arrangements were made with Mr. Harry Bridges' union for picketing 
the ships that were carrying meat to Hawaii ; is that correct ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And you were able to prevent at least two ships from 
leaving Los Angeles to carry meat to Hawaii ; is that correct, through 
your activities? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And isn't it correct that you tried to set up the same 
kind of arrangement in Puerto Rico ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 



16442 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Kennedy. As you were sent to Hawaii by Mr. Hoffa you were 
sent down to Puerto Kico by Mr. Hoffa; is that not correct? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And is it not correct that the same business agent 
that accompanied you to Hawaii accompanied you to Puerto Rico and 
you tried to make the same arrangements down there as far as organ- 
izing work is concerned ? 

Mr. Singer,. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Isn't it correct that a business agent by the name of 
Frankie Chavez of local 208 in Los Angeles has been down in Puerto 
Rico doing organizational work down there? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. After you returned from Hawaii, Mr. Hoffa was a 
guest speaker with you at a testimonial dinner for you in Los Angeles, 
was he not? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. I present to you exhibit 20, a photograph, and ask 
you to examine it and state if you recognize it. 

('A document was handed to the witness.) 

(The witness conferred with his counsel.) 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Who is the man standing next to you in that pic- 
ture ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. You know he is known as Jimmy Hoffa, do you 
not? Everybody' Itnows who it is. Don't you know, too? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Who is the man on the other side of Jimmy Hoffa 
in the picture? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. When was that picture made? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Was it made on the occasion of the big testimonial 
dinner for you ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer mav tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Did Jimmy Hoft'a attend that dinner and pay you 
big tribute? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer nuiy tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. How many people did you have contribute to the 
dinner? 

Mr. Singer. T respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16443 

Tlie Chairman*. You acted like you were surprised, didn't you, 
when they guve you this dinner and gave you a car ? 

Mr. SixoER. 1 respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The CiiAiRMAx. Didn't you put on an act like that knowing that 
you had already traded in your own car as a part of the purchase 
price of this one that tliey had presumably given to you ? 

Mr. SixoER. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The CiiAiRMAx. How much above the price of the car did you get 
from these contributions, these shakedowns? 

Mr. SixGER. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairmax. Whose money is it that is going around now trying 
to buy up these checks ? Youre ? 

Mr. SixoKR. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairmax. Are those who are going around trying to buy up 
the checks now doing it with your knowledge and consent and under 
your orders and directions ? 

Mr. SiXGER. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairmax. "Wny did you decide to go try to buy up the can- 
celed checks? 

Mr. SixGER. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairmax. "\'V^re these folks whom you solicited these checks 
from, in danger, their business in danger, if they did not contribute? 

Mr. Six'GER. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairmax. ^^^at is ^oing to happen to these witnesses who 
testified here by reason of their testimony ? 

Mr. SiXGER. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairmax. Will you state they are under any danger? 

Mr. SixGER. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairmax. Is that the way you operate, by threats and 
intimidation? 

Mr. SiXGER. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairmax. You mean you can't answer any of these questions 
that would indicate that possibly your conduct and your actions are 
wrong, that you can't answer any of them, can't even deny them- 
You can't make any comment on them without the possibility of self- 
incrimination. Is that what you are saying ? 

Mr. SixGER. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairmax. If you honestly believe it, and you so state under 
oath, I don't know anyone that is going to deny it. If you want to 
leave the record that way, that is your privilege. 

All right, Mr. Kennedy, proceed. 

Mr. Kexxedy. As far as the car is concerned, you knew that the 
car was going to be given to you. In fact, you got a personal receipt 



16444 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

for $2,610 which was one of the payments on the car, did you not, Mr. 
Singer ? 

Mr. Singer, I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. In addition, you turned in your own car as a doAvn- 
payment for which you received credit of $1,100; is that not right? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Out of the total cost of the car of $4,988 ; isn't that 
correct ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And that is how much the car cost, despite what you 
told the insurance company, about paying $5,500 for the car? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. You had personal knowledge and information that 
the money was being raised from these employei-s to make this gift to 
you ; is that not right ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Isn't it correct that there were some 400 people at 
the dinner, that each person had to pay approximately $25, while the 
dinner actually cost each person $8? So there was about $8,000 or 
$9,000 in addition to the car that is unaccounted for. 

Could you tell us what happened to the $8,000 or $9,000? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. We tried to find some books and records on that and 
we cannot get any information. Can you give us any facts or figures 
as to what happened to this money after the dinner ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. As far as the rendering business in Los Angeles, did 
you instruct certain of the companies, either directly or through this 
association, that they should give up some of their business and give 
it to the Star Grease Co., as has been testified here before the com- 
mittee? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And didn't you also suspend at least three different 
grease buyers from the union when they were caught buying grease 
for more than 1 cent a pound ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr, Kennedy. And didn't you in one case suspend Florian Lu- 
bansky, which put Lubansky out of business completely, when you sus- 
pended him for 6 months ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. And didn't you on another occasion agree to sign a 
contract that you had been arguing about with the employer, with the 
understanding that he would buy you and your assistant business agent 
a suit of clothes? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16445 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. In connection with the election here, did you dictate 
the statement whereby Mr. Cohen resigned as secretary-treasurer of 
the union and Mr. Filipoff was to be placed back in as secretary- 
treasurer? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Isn't it correct that during this period of time you 
were keeping Mr. Hoffa closely advised as to the steps that you were 
taking? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Are you sort of his personal ambassador around the 
country, Mr. Singer ? Are you his personal ambassador and his chief 
representative in Los Angeles, but you travel around spreading good 
will ? Is that part of your task ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. As you spread good will, Mr. Singer, you do it at 
union expense and you usually bring somebody with you, do you not ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. It is correct that not only did you take a traveling 
companion out to Hawaii, but you bring traveling companions when- 
ever you come east, too, don't you, at union expense ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. For instance, when you were here at the Woodner 
Hotel, at the time that this local 208 election was being considered, 
and the statement was being signed, from January 15, 1959, through 
January 24, 1959, which cost the union $368.30, isn't it correct that 
you had a companion with you at that time, a friend, and that that 
friend's bills were also paid out of the union funds? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Or is it correct that you, yourself, went to the 
beauty salon, which cost the union $7.04 ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Was that for you or for your companion, that 
ex|)ense ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer mav tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman 

The Chairman. Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Again, when you were at the Waldorf-Astoria 
Hotel in New York, didn't you have a traveling companion at that 
time? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Haven't you arranged for a telephone to be placed 
in tlie home of a friend of yours in Los Angeles, and that all the tele- 



16446 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

phone bills are to be charged from that friend's home to the Team- 
sters Union ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Isn't it correct that the telephone at the home of 
your friend is actually in your name, and is a telephone in your 
friend's home and is paid for by the union ? Is that correct? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, could I put in the moneys that Mr. 
Singer gets out of this local alone, as well as the other moneys that we 
have had testified to ? 

The Chairman. Let me ask Mr. Singer one question. 

Do the union members that pay the dues know that your extra- 
curricular activities, such as you have been interrogated about here, 
are paid out of their monev ? Do they know that ? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly 
believe my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Proceed, Mr. Kennedy. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Salinger. 

TESTIMONY OF PIERRE E. G. SAUNGEIU-Resumed 

The Chairman. Mr. Salinger, you have been previously sworn. 

Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. The union, Mr. Salinger, it was testified to this 
morning that this local 626-B has approximately 40 members. Do 
we have information that would indicate that it was somewhat 
larger ? 

Mr. Salinger. A study of their books would indicate their mem- 
bership was around 250 members. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much money does Mr. Singer draw from this 
union ? 

Mr. Salinger. I will give you the total amount first and then we 
will talk about specifics. 

In the period from August 16, 1966, to February 2, 1959, a period 
of a little over 2 years, Mr. Singer has drawn a total of $39,244 from 
this local of 250 members. 

The Chairman. What was that ? 

Mr. Salinger. $39,244. 

The Chairman. For what period of time ? 

Mr. Salinger. From August 16, 1956, to February 2, 1959. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is just under 2i/^ years; is that correct? 

Mr. Salinger.' Yes. That does not include the money, for example- 
paid by the local in Hawaii, for Mr. Singer's trip to Hawaii, nor did 
we find any expenses for his trip to Puerto Rico, paid by the 
international. 

Mr. Kennedy. These are just expenses 

Mr. Salinger. Of this local. 

Mr. Kennedy. And we know that he receives money from other 
sources, not only from other Teamster sources, but from employers, 
as we had this morning? 

Mr. Salinger. Correct. 

The Chairman. Does this include any shakedown money he may 
have gotten ? 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16447 

Mr. Salinger. No, this is just union money. 

The Chairman. That doesn't include any money he may have 
shaken down out of business people, and so forth ? 
Mr. Salinger. Xo, sir. 

Mr. Kennedy, Would you ^ive us what the salary is and then 
what he gets as expenses? It is of some interest, Mr. Chairman. 

Mr. Salinger. Mr. Singers salary has changed from time to time, 
as he was with the local for a period of time. His latest salary was 
$235 a week. In addition to that, however, he receives a monthly 
car allowance of $100, and for a substantial period of this time covered 
by this report, he also received $100 for what they call promotional 
allowance. 

There are no supporting vouchers for any expenditures in con- 
nection with the promotional allowance. 

In addition to the car allowance, the union pays his gas bills, and 
some of them are rather monumental. In fact, we have one here in 
October of 1957, a total bill for that period coming to $826.43. 
The Chairman. Gas bill for what period ? 

Mr. Salinger. It is a 1 -month period. There is some repair work 
on his car included in that. He apparently had some trouble with his 
car either coming or going to tne international convention of the 
Teamsters in Florida in October of 1957. 

Mr. Kennedy. How much did that cost the Teamsters, to send Mr. 
Singer to the international convention? 

Mr. Salinger. Mr. Singer first of all drew $1,000 by check to go 
to the convention. Then the union paid a bill at the Fountainebleau 
Hotel for Mr. Singer and a friend in the amount of $292 — excuse me — 
$387.81. In addition to that, we have this gas mileage, plus the repair 
of his auto in Pima, Ariz., which came to $423.80. The total amounts 
that we could trace as being directly connected with his trip to Miami 
to be a delegate to the convention was $2,216.24. 

The money he received also contains some other interesting items. 
For instance, in November of 1955 there is an entry on the books 
showing, "Mike Singer, traveling checks to interior of Mexico, $350." 
That is the only explanation of that item. 

Then we have an item here of $235, "Gift," with no bill attached, 
no indication of w'hat the ^ft wa.s. 

As I say, throughout this thing they pay not only his salary, but his 
car allowance, a promotion allowance, his gas bills and all of his 
telephone bills. In the later months, they have been paying telephone 
bills on several numbers, one of which is the number at the home 
of his friend. 

Mr. Kennedy. They pay his regular telephone bills as well as the 
telephone bills at the home of the friend ? 

Mr. Salinger. Yes. We managed to trace some of these gas bills, 
not only on this occasion when he went to the international convention, 
but on other occasions, and we find gas charged to the union in out-of- 
the-way places like Mobile, Ala., and Beaumont, Tex. Anyway, it 
appears that Mr. Singer does an extensive amount of traveling with 
a credit card for gas in his pocket, charged to 626. 

Mr. Kennedy. Again, the emphasis is on this local, Mr. Chairman, 
on a local that has a maximum number of 250. This is without the 
money that he gets from the international or from other expenses. 



16448 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. 

(Members of the select committee present at this point in the pro- 
ceedings were Senators McClellan and Church.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we have here a letter from Mr. 
Chavez, who was active down in Puerto Rico, which gives a slight in- 
dication as to their activities in that area. It is sent to this Fitz that 
we talked about earlier, and it is from Chavez. 

This witness probably could not identify it. Mr. Salinger could 
identify it. 

The Chairman. Mr. Salinger, I hand you a photostatic copy of a 
letter, ask you to examine it and state if you identify it, and if so, 
where you procured it or the original of it. 

Mr. Salinger. The original of this letter is contained in the files 
of local 208 in Los Angeles in a folder marked "Frank Chavez, Local 
Union 901," and it is a letter to Fitz, who is a man who worked for 
local 208 for Frank Chavez, secretary-treasurer local 901, 800 Figaro 
Street, Santucci, P.R. 

The Chairman. The letter may be made exhibit No. 24. 

(Document referred to marked "Exhibit No. 24" for reference and 
may be found in the files of the select committee.) 

The Chairman. You may read excerpts from it. 

Mr. Kennedy. Do you want to read a couple of those excerpts ? 

Mr. Salinger (reading) : 

Now to get down to the question 

The Chairman. You are reading from the letter ? 
Mr. Salinger. This is the letter. 

Now to get down to the question of organizing the unorganized in Puerto 
Rico. Very simple thing. All I have to contend with is the employers, gov- 
ernment, AFL-CIO, goon squads, police, one faction of the longshoremen. I 
don't know but somehow I get the feeling that the Teamsters aren't wanted in 
Puerto Rico. The Internal Security Division of Puerto Rico has paid me three 
visits after I respectfully refused a written invitation to appear at their oflSces. 
It is brutal, some of the questions they asked. For example, among others : 

(a ) What are my intentions in Puerto Rico? 

( & ) What are my political aflfliliations ? 

These fellows don't have a sense of humor. They reacted very violently when 
I answered in this way : 

(a) That my intentions were to give them a hosing. 

(6) That Stalin was my deceased grandfather. 

Then he goes on to say the trouble he had with the rival union, and 
he completes that by saying : 

After the second attack on me, I looked up the head of the Longshore ( UTM- 
AFL-CIO). We had a complete physical understanding with promises of much 
more to come if all that crap didn't cease. The fellow that I had the under- 
standing with, was in the hospital 6 days. Needless to say, all physical violence 
stopped. 

And so on. 

Mr. Kennedy. May we place this letter in also. 

The Chairman. All right. 

You are presented with another letter. Do you identify it? 

Mr. Salinger. This letter came from the same file. 

The Chairman. Identify it. 

Mr. Salinger. This is a letter to Filipoff, from Jolin F. English, 
secretary -treasurer of International Teamsters, and requests the fact 
that at the request of Mr. Gibbons the International Teamsters have 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN TUE LABOR FIELD 16449 

reimbursed local 208 in the amount of $7,491.33 for the Puerto Rico 
expenses of Mr. Frank Chavez. 

The Chairman. That letter may be made exhibit No. 25. 

(Document referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 25'' for reference 
and will be found in the appendix on p. 16466.) 

Mr. Kennedy. Of course, this is the local union in Tx)s Angeles, 
Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. We have some other evidence that the Chair is 
withholding from the record at this time. It may later be desirable 
or advisable for it to be placed in the public record. 

We can always determine about that and so order when the oc- 
casion arises. 

Proceed. 

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Singer, maybe you cannot explain it, but what 
was it about you particularly that Mr. Hoffa seemed to like? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Why did he select you, Mr. Singer, to perform 
these services for him ? What is it that you had done that attracted 
you to him? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

Mr. Kennedy. Did he feel that you had some of the same character- 
istics of some other companion, such as Herman Kierdorf or Barney 
Baker, or Bill Presser, or some of those people ? What was it ? Can 
you tell us? 

Mr. Singer. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be- 
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me. 

The Chairman. Is there anything further? Is there anything, 
Senator? 

Senator Church. I have lots of things, Mr. Chairman, but ques- 
tions seem futile. 

The Chairman. Mr. Singer, you will remain under your present 
subpena. You are under subpena, are you ? 

Mr. Singer. Yes, sir. 

The Chairman. You appeared in response to a subpena. You 
will remain under your present subpena subject to being recalled at 
such time as the committee may desire to hear further testimony from 
you. Reasonable notice wnll be given to you or your counsel of the 
time and place that your presence is desired. 

Do you accept that recognizance? 

Mr. Singer. I do, sir. 

The Chairman. With that underetanding, you may be excused 
temporarily. 

Call the next witness. 

Mr. Kennedy. That is all, Mr. Chairman. 

The Chairman. The committee will stand in recess until next Tues- 
day morning at 10 :30 a.m. 

('\Miereupon, at 2 :55 p.m., the committee recessed, to reconvene 
at 10 :30 a.m., Tuesday, February 10, 1959.) 

(Members of the select committee present at the taking of the re- 
cess were Senators McClellan and Church.) 



A p p p: N D I X 



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16452 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

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IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16453 

Exhibit No. 6 



0«c«iiib«r 17. 195A 



Mr. J«M« K. rtofft, 6«n«r«l fr«ftl<iartt 
|r>t«rnatioM«l BrotH«rHoo<l of T««nater«, 
Chauff«4irt, tfar«howft«MaA and H«lM'*t 
2$ LottlMiM Av«., N.W. 
WatKlngtoft I, B. C. 

f^—r Sir «nd en>tH«r: 

Local 206 «*l 1 1 makm novinatlooi for th« Office of S«crei«ry- 
rr««t!jr*r of tlM Local at ic> Canaral HaMbcrthlp Haattng to 
ba hald Bacaibar 21, 1958. 

Quattion hat arltan at to Mhatoar ar. Incusbant wa wb ar of tha 
ixacutiy« Board of the Local < other than Its Sccrctary-Traasurar, 
can within tNa purvlat*' an4 Intandnxmt of th« Conitlcutlon &f tbe 
tntarna:lo»a1 Brothe*'tM>o4 accept noatnatlon and stand for alvctlon 
at Sacratary-Trcaturar of the Local Union without ratttinlnc his 
incunboncy. 

A ruling from the CaiMral Prasl«Unt It rcsrect fully r«q<,*atta^ in 
pursuanca of Scctl<M ^ (a) of Article VI of the International 
Con«(.i lutloA. 

rraterr.elly ^urt, 

FRCI&HT DRIYIXS JNIOM 
LOCAL UhiOf: 208 



Johm W. f!llpeff 
Sccretary-Traaturar 

Jwr:WCf:[C 



16454 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 7A 



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2? U«1«1«M AVMM I.V. 
UMIda«t«a X, X>. C. 

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vbll* SCO Dick Karxwr ■dviwd m that b« haA lafamaHl ym 

eoDCvnlac th# viah of Oh* Brawa 0/ th« famltvor* ^torleera Uaiaa 
tutra la LoaAotfalaa t« iiacuaa poaaiblt afflllatloo or aorfar 
of cortaln of hla pao^La vlth ^* ItaMat^ra. Dick laAlootoA 
that ha vould advlaa bis that BlU Crlffla vouIA ba la Loa 
Asfalaa shortly aad thot ha vould dlacuaa thla aattar vith Oaa 
Iroan. 

It la ay vad*rat«odin« that Or'^ 

aftar, .'.oaavar, Caa ftrowa or *• 

apparaotly did not coo tact li*°#->'r', 

to procaod. Brovn haa ladicataA 

aaat vith you at Uaahlaftoc<i>at hla own aicfaaaa^for tn« purpoaa 

of axF^orlnc <uiA poaalhly aattlliic U:la m-obla*. 

If you daalra to handia tiila aattar tiila wa;^ asd toatra tla», 
va auf^cat that you advlaa via ¥ltan yau caa « > : - -^ nd wa 
tflil p»ca th« verd on to uLa. 

Prat«rs«lly yowra, 



Jonn W. Fillpcfr 

8oc ratary-Tr« •< '-.urar 



Dlek Kavaar 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 
Exhibit No. 7B 



16455 



--INTERNATIONAL B ROT H fT R V-iOOD Of" TEAN'.STF.RS 
CMA'jrfC 'H S V/A PC MO l^SfMKN £V H :- L P € M C 



onici o» 
• JAMES « MOFfA • 

CtN(Ul PICSIOtXI 
S9 tOUIilAMA AVI . N>^. 



WASHINGTON 1, D.C. 

April 7, 1H58 




Mr. John W. Flllpoff 
Secretary-Traasurer 
Freigbt DrlTere Union 
1616 West 9th St.,R«.101 
Lo«> Angeles, California 

Dear John : 

I have your letter of April 2 on the Matter of_Gus Brown and 
the Furniture Workers Union, and if he can arrange his affairs 
to be in Washington on Tuesday or Wednesday, I am sure both Jira 
and I can talk to bin. 

I will also try to arrange to have Griffin at the conference. 

Fraternally , 




u- 



)ons 
Ive Assistant to the 
5ral President 



HJG Js 

cc : Ulll Griffin 



36751 O— 59— pt. 4c 



16456 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 10 




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IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 
Exhibit No. 13A 



16457 




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16458 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit Xo. 13B 



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AtRCEHtNT 



TMIS AMIEMUT. by an4 batwMm U»c«i ZOC of th« li«t«ni«tl»iMl •r»cKorhop« •# 

rMMt«r«. OtMiffMtri an^ WtnlMM— w of Aatrica anrf tM lnt*m*clMMl UwgiApraMN 

«*4 W»r«iio«MMR*« UnlMi Is •ntaforf Into f»r tH* MprM» ^rr«M •# kriMglnt abMt 

•Ad Mlnulnlnt • Keraontotn MW< T imidlf>g bvtwMn ttMM rM^ctlv* Unions to tKo 

1 
whI that by cooyaratlng tmA asalstlas ••di othar. t>attar Morklas eaadltloMS aay ka 

Mjoywl by tha awabars of bath ergianlzations. 

AKTiac i 
each of tha Unions, partlas ta this Atriaai n t shall r«n4«r Mitwai a!4 an4 asslst- 
anca to aadi othar an^ shall eoo^rata in avary May posslbia with aaa» othar to tha 
and that aach My anjoy tha banaflts of thair collactlva afforts In arfanluttonal 
actlvltlas, nagotUtlons, mk* collactlva bargainlns within that r rasjpactlva Jurisdictions. 

AKTICtE II 
Uch Local Union shall astabllsh a CoMnlttaa of ^ m ibirs aach lAIck shall ba 
a standing Joint Ca«altta« «^|ch CoMilttaa shall hava tha awtherlty miA rasponslbl llty 
to affoctuatt mA l«pla«ant all of thosa Mttars sat forth abova an4 such othar aottars 

that my arlsa fra* tlaw to tiaa batwoan tha raspaetlva ^rtlas. In tha evant tha 

1 
Standing CoMil ttaa fal 1 1 to Mstcably ra««lv« any aattars r^imrtwA to than, than swch A 

aattars shall ba fi^rrmi to aach of ch* ratpactlva aKacutlva haa4s of aach Local who a 

togathar shall by mutual datarvlnatlon. If posslbia, raselva tha owtstanAInt Issuas. ^ 

\ 

All 4aclslons shall ba mm4» by mitual agrs—snt of both partlas to this AgraaMnt. « 

ARTICLE HI 
This Agraaaant shall contlnua In full forca an<i effact until cancel lad by atthar 
party, llthcr party 4aslrlng cancatlatlon shall kIv* tha othar party 60 days notica 
In «»rltlng of tha datira for cancatlatton and upon tha slxtlath day following tha 
giving of such notice In writing this Agraaaant shall ba considarad cancallad. 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 



Exhibit No. 19A 



16459 




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16460 



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 



Exhibit No. 19B 



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Exhibit No. 19C 



16461 









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16462 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES EST THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 21A 



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16463 



Exhibit No. 21B 



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16464 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 22A 



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Exhibit No. 22B 







16466 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 

Exhibit No. 25 



INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD OF TEAMSTERS 
CKA.urF€URS • NV^ARE-HOUS^CN^EN etHCLPeRS 
0~ A. MGR iC A 



OffKf Of 
JOHN F. ENGllSH 



WASKINGTON 1. D.C. 



December 15, 1958 




Mr. J»hn W, Fillp^If. Sec'y-Tre**. 
Te»in*ter>' L«cjd Ual*a N*. 208 
1616 West Ninth Street 
L«s Angelea 15, Califarnia 

Oea.r Sir and Br ether: 

Yeur letter ef December 4, 1958 te Mr. HAreld Gibbons rel»- 
tive te »n ameunt m i $749 1. 33 •( Puert* Rican expense items 
has beea referred t* this cffice f«r disp«sit{*i>. 

Eaclesed yeu vrlll find the lnternatl»o*l's check in th*t ameunt 
payable t* Lecal Unien 208 which it is asked that yeu credit to- 
ward this accaunt. 

frateriuJlv vsjrs. 



JOHN F. ENGLISH 
GENERAL SECRETARY-TREASURER 

JFE/s 
Enc. 



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