(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Investigation of un-American propaganda activities in the United States. Hearings before a Special Committee on Un-American Activities, House of Representatives, Seventy-fifth Congress, third session-Seventy-eighth Congress, second session, on H. Res. 282, to investigate (l) the extent, character, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, (2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propaganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitution, and (3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress in any necessary remedial legislation"

b 



INVESTIGATION OF UN-AMERICAN 

PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN THE 

UNITED STATES 

HEARINGS 

BEFORE A 

SPECIAL 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPEESENTATIVES 

SEVENTY-SEVENTH CONGRESS ^ 

FIRST SESSION ^ CI "i 5 -»- 4" " 

H. Res. 282 p x. ? 



TO INVESTIGATE (1) THE EXTENT, CHARACTER, AND 
OBJECTS OF UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN 
THE UNITED STATES, (2) THE DIFFUSION WITHIN THE 
UNITED STATES OF SUBVERSIVE AND UN-AMERICAN PROP- 
AGANDA THAT IS INSTIGATED FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES 
OR OF A DOMESTIC ORIGIN AND ATTACKS THE PRINCIPLE 
OF THE FORM OF GOVERNMENT AS GUARANTEED BY 
OUR CONSTITUTION, AND (3) ALL OTHER QUESTIONS IN 
RELATION THERETO THAT WOULD AID CONGRESS IN ANY 
NECESSARY REMEDIAL LEGISLATION 



4/H / 



APPENDIX— PART V 

TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION 



Printed for the use of the Special Committee on Un-American Activities 




INVESTIGATION OF UN-AMERICAN 

PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN THE 

UNITED STATES 

HEARINGS 

BEFORE A 

SPECIAL 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OE REPRESENT ATI YES 

SEVENTY-SEVENTH CONGRESS 

FIRST SESSION 
ON 

H. Res. 282 

TO INVESTIGATE (1) THE EXTENT, CHARACTER, AND 
OBJECTS OF UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES IN 
THE UNITED STATES, (2) THE DIFFUSION WITHIN THE 
UNITED STATES OF SUBVERSIVE AND UN-AMERICAN PROP- 
AGANDA THAT IS INSTIGATED FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES 
OR OF A DOMESTIC ORIGIN AND ATTACKS THE PRINCIPLE 
OF THE FORM OF GOVERNMENT AS GUARANTEED BY 
OUR CONSTITUTION, AND (3) ALL OTHER QUESTIONS IN 
RELATION THERETO THAT WOULD AID CONGRESS IN ANY 
NECESSARY^ REMEDIAL LEGISLATION 



APPENDIX— PART V 

TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION 



Printed for the use of the Special Committee on Un-American Activities 




UNITED STATES 
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
279895 WASHINGTON : 1941 



?i5>. v//pr 




/^■^ 




V" ^ ^ '' 






(5j62'i^i/v^<^--T 


.1 ' 


MAR 2.7 1944 


•-■■ 


U. 



SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

MARTIN DIES, Texas, Chainnan 
JOE STARNES, Alabama NOAII M. MASON, Illinois 

JERRY VOORHIS, California J. PARNELL THOMAS, New Jersey 

JOSEPH E. CASEY, Massacliusetts 
HARRY P. BEAM, Illinois 

ROBERT E. Stmpling, Secretary and Chief Investigator 
J. B. Matthews. Director of Research 

II 



-■ 



TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION 



The Transport Workers Union was first organized in New York in 
1934. Since then it has become an international nnion with locals in 
various parts of the United States, Canada, and Alaska. Its main 
strength, however, remains in New York. Its total dues-paying 
membership, according to official claims, is about 90,000. The union 
is at present affiliated with the C. I. O. 

The Transport Workers Union was in the beginning an independ- 
ent body. In 1935, its leaders sought affiliation with the Amalga- 
mated Association of Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach 
Employees of America, but the latter union suspected Quill, Hogan, 
and Santo of being Communists and their request for affiliation was 
rejected. (See Exhibit No. 1.) 

Concerning the next effort of the Transport Workers Union to 
find an affiliation, the bulletin of the Amalgamated Association of 
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees has the follow- 
ing to say : 

Next the Transport Workers commissars tried to affiliate with the New York 
lodge of the International Association of Machinists. Apparently the New 
York Machinists knew too much about the set-up, for they turned Quill down. 
(See Exhibit No. 1.) 

Later, Quill and his associates were able to obtain a charter for 
affiliation from the international headquarters of the Internationa] 
Association of Machinists in Washington and thus to enter the ranks 
of the American Federation of Labor. (See Exhibit No. 2.) 



OFFICERS OF THE TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION 

Among the principal officials of the Transport Workers Union, 
almost from the time of its formation, were Michael J. Quill, Austin 
Hogan, John Santo, and Thomas H. O'Shea. These four made the 
trip to Detroit in 1935 for the purpose of seeking affiliation with the 
Amalgamated Association of Street, Electric Railway and Motor 
Coach Employes. 

THOMAS H. o'SHEA 

The first president of the Transport Workers Union was one Thomas 
H. O'Shea. (See Exhibit No. 3.) In April 1940 O'Shea appeared 
as a witness before the Special Committee on un-American Activities. 
He testified that he had been a member of the Communist Party, 
having joined at the time the Transport Workers Union was being 
formed. According to O'Shea, he was appointed to the presidency 
of the union by the Communist Party and was not elected by the 

1621 



1622 UN-AMERICAX PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 

membership of the organization. "V^Hiien Michael J. Quill was a wit- 
ness before the Special Committee on un-American Activities he testi- 
fied that O'Shea had been his predecessor in the presidency of the 
union but that he, Quill, ^Yas the first elected president of the 
organization. 

O'Shea testified that he had been asked to step out of the presidency 
of the union by the Communist Party in order that Quill might be 
elected in his place. This was partially confirmed by Quill, who 
declared that he had been unopposed for the office at the time of his 
election in December 1935. 

The new weekly magazine, Friday, which made its first appearance 
on March 15, 1940, leans strongly toward the Communist Party "line." 
This fact is evidenced by the magazine's announcement (March 22, 
1940, p. 22) that two of its cartoonists of whom it is "pretty proud" 
are Fred Ellis and Bill Gropper. Both Ellis and Gropper have been 
well known as Communist cartoonists for many years. Their work 
has appeared regularly in the Daily Worker, the New Masses, and 
other party publications. Ruth McKenney, one of the editors of the 
New Masses, contributed a eulogistic article on Michael Quill and the 
Transport Workers Union in the March 22 issue of Friday (see 
pp. 9-11 of that issue). Among other things, Miss McKenney wrote: 
"Michael Joseph Quill, first and only president of the Transport 
Workers Union, etc., etc." The complete refutation of Miss 
McKenney's characterization of Quill as the "first and only president 
of the Transport Workers Union" is to be found not only in the fact 
that O'Shea's name appears as president of the union on the mem- 
bership books of 1935 (see Exhibit No. 3) but also in the bulletins of 
the union. In the Transport Workers Bulletin (July 1935, p. 1), a 
picture of O'Shea was puljlished with the following characterization : 
"Tom O'Shea, fighting president of the T. W. U." (See Exhibit 
No. 4.) 

In the Daily Worker for April 24, 1940, officials of the Transport 
Workers Union in New York are quoted as saying of O'Shea that 
"the company stooge was defeated when he ran for reelection" (see 
Exhibit No. 5) as president of tlie union. Quill himself has since 
stated under oath that O'Shea did not run for reelection against him 
in December 1935. Furthermore, it is clear that O'Shea was not 
re])udiated by his union at that time inasmuch as his name appears 
subsequently as one of the union's business agents in the Trans]:>ort 
Workers Bulletin. (See Exhibit No. 2.) 

In short, the record clearly establishes O'Shea's competence as a wit- 
ness concerning the Communist control of the Transport Workers 
Union. 

JOHN SANTO 

In 1936 John Santo was one of the business agents of the Transport 
Workers Union. Today he is the secretary-treasurer of the union. It 
goes without saying that this is one of the key positions in any labor 
organization. 

Santo has been identified as a member of the Communist Party by the 
following witnesses who have appeared before the Special Committee 
on Un-American Activities : John J. Murphy (hearings, p. 1044) : Ed- 
ward Maguire (hearings, p. 1069) ; William Harmon (hearings, p. 



APPENDIX PART V 1623 

1059) ; Laurence Barron (hearings, p. 1073) ; Michael J. McCarthy 
(hearings, p. 1079) ; and Thomas H. O'Shea (hearings not yet printed). 
All of these men, with the exception of McCarthy, were formerly mem- 
bers of the Communist Party, and each testified that he had sat in meet- 
ings of the party with Santo. McCarthy testified that Santo had solicit- 
ed him to join the Communist Party. 

Santo is linked, by documentary evidence, with the Communist Party. 
In the Daily Worker, May 1, 1934, Santo wrote an article on the newly 
formed union of transport employees. (See Exhibit No. 6.) Among 
other things, Santo wrote in the Daily Worker : 

The building of this new union is of the greatest importance to all oth(>r trade 
unions, as well as to the whole working class. First of all, it is a key industry, 
without which all other industries would be paralyzed. (See Exhibit No. G.) 

In the Daily Worker, June 11, 1934, Santo's name appeared as a mem- 
ber of a protest delegation from the Trade Union Unity Council to the 
German consulate iiVNew York. The Trade Union Unity Council was 
a body of local unions under the complete control of the Communist 
Party. It was a part of the movement known as the Trade Union 
Unity League, which was, in turn, affiliated with the Red International 
of Labor Unions. At the head of the international body of Communist- 
controlled unions was A, Lozovsky, with headquarters in Moscow. At 
the head of the Trade Union Unity League v^^as William Z. Foster, 
chairman of the Communist Party of the United States. Others with 
Santo in the delegation of the Trade Union Unity Council which vis- 
ited the German consulate were Sam Nesin, Communist Party func- 
tionary of New York, and Charlotte Todes, also a Communist Party 
functionary and wife of Bemhard J. Stern, who was a Columbia Uni- 
versity prcjfessor using the alias Bennett Stevens. (See hearings, p. 
4929. ) The purpose of the visit of the Trade Union Unity Council del- 
egation to the German consulate was to demand that the German Gov- 
ernment free from prison the German Communist leader, Ernst Thael- 
mann. (See Exhibit No. 7.) 

In the 1937 Yearbook of the Ohio Communist Party, the name of 
John Santo appeared on the honor roll. ( See Exhibit No. 8. ) Accord- 
ing to the testimony of Laurence Barron before the Special Committee 
on Un-American Activities, Santo came from Ohio and was a candidate 
for office in that State in 1932 on the Communist Party ticket. (See 
hearings, p. 1073.) 

The Special Committee on Un-American Activities has in its pos- 
session a docinnent entitled "District Two — Control Tasks Adopted 
at Enlarged District Meeting, March 8, 1936." "District Two*' is 
the designation given by the Communist Party to its New York 
Division. On page 7 of this document the name of Santo appeared 
as "District Rep" (meaning district representative) for section 22 
of the Communist Party, district 2. (See Exhibit No. 9.) 

AUSTIN HOGAN 

In 1936 Austin Hogan was general secretary of the Transport 
Workers Lodge, International Association of Machinists. (See Ex- 
hibit No. 2.) Today he is the president of the New York local 
of the Transport Workers LTnion, the local which comprises the 
large part of the entire membership of the union. Hogan's name 
was originally Gustav Dilloughry. 



1624 UN-AMERICAX PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 

Hogan has been identified as a member of the Communist Party 
by John J. Murphy (hearings, p. 1044) and Thomas H. O'Shea 
(hearings, not yet printed). 

In the Daily Worker for June 1, 1934, there appeared an article 
which was subcaptioned "1,000 Workers Bid Irish Communist Leader 
Adieu," (See Exhibit No, 10.) Among the participants on the 
program of this farewell meeting for the Irish Communist leader 
were Earl Browder, James AV. Ford, Charles Krumbein, Mike Gold, 
and Austin Hogan. Browder, Ford, Krumbein, and Gold are 
among the outstanding Communist leaders in the United States. 

MICHAEL JOSEPH QUILL 

Michael Quill was elected president of the Transport Workers 
Union in December 1935 after O'Shea had been instructed by the 
Communist Party leaders to withdraw in order that Quill might 
be chosen head of the union without opposition. Quill has remained 
in the presidency of the union until the present time. 

John J. Murphy testified before the Special Committee on Un- 
American Activities, as follows: 

I sat in unit 19-S meetings of the Communist Party with INIr. Michael Quill, 
and knew him for years before as station agent on the lines of the Interborough 
Rapid Transit Co. (hearings, p. 1044). 

Edward Maguire's testimony before the Special Committee on 
Un-American Activities included the following with reference to 
Michael Quill : 

Mr. Starnes. Have you collected dues from all those you have called here? 
Mr. Maguiee. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Starnes. Were they members of your unit? 
Mr. Maguire. Yes, sir ; of the unit known as 19-S. 

Mr. Thomas. Then do I understand you collected dues from Michael J. 
Quill? 
Mr. Maguiee. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Starnes. You say you were secretary-treasurer of that unit? 
Mr. Maguire. The unit known as 19-S (hearings, p. 1009). 

Michael Kelly testified that Michael Quill asked him to join the 
Communist Party and to attend the Communist Party's Workers 
school at oO East Thirteenth Street, New York, N. Y. (See hear- 
ings ( p. 1077.) 

Michael J. McCarthy also testified that Quill liad solicited him 
for membership in the Communist Party. (See hearings, p. 1079.) 

Thomas H. O'Shea likewise testified that he had personally known 
Michael Quill to be a member of the Communist Party, 

According to the official minutes of the annual meeting of the Trans- 
port Workers Union, held in October 1937, Quill had the following- 
statement to make concerning his alleged connections with the Com- 
munist Party : 

Some others say, "I saw him reading the Daily Worker. Well, I read Englisli 
very poorly, and it about the only language I read. The Daily Worker is printed 
in iilnglish. If it was printed in Gaelic I would perhaps read it also because it 
is a working man's paper. (See Exhibit No. 11.) 

Another criticism is, "I am sure he is a member of the Communist Party." 
I want to tell you that since the very day this union was started I have worked 
with Communists and Socialists and Democrats and people of other nationalities 
and political beliefs, and they have done an excellent job in building the organi- 
zation to the stage of where we were able to come to Madison Square Garden as 



APPENDIX PART V 1625 

free transit workers. And the work of all these people has been much more 
valuable than the sniping of a few narrow-minded critics. (See Exhibit No. 11.) 

Micliael Quill's connections with various Communist-controlled or- 
ganizations have been numerous. Elsewhere, the degree of Com- 
munist control in these organizations will be discussed with the sup- 
porting evidence. 

Quill contributed an article to the December 1937 issue of Cham- 
pion. (See Exhibit No. 12.) Champion was a publication of the 
Young Communist League and of the International Workers Order. 

At a mass meeting under the sponsorship of the Greater New York 
Committee for Employment, in May 193S, Quill was one of the speak- 
ers. (See Exhibit No. 13.) According to the Daily Worker's ac- 
count of this meeting, the following Connnunist-controlled organiza- 
tions were represented : American League for Peace and Democracy, 
Workers Alliance, National Negro Congress, and Harlem Division of 
the Communist Party. Exhibit No. 13 is from the Daily Worker. 
May 18, 1938, page 4. 

Li June 1939 an organization known as the Associated Blind, Inc., 
held its annual dance in the hall of the Transport Workers Union. 
(See Exhibit No. 14.) The Daily Worker listed Quill among the 
sponsors of the event, together with such well-known Communists and 
Communist fellow-travelers as Max Bedacht, Granville Hicks, Donald 
Ogden Stewart, and Jerome Davis. 

In April 1939 Quill was a speaker at a mass meeting of the Manhattan 
Citizens Committee. (See Exhibit No. 15.) A. Philip Randolph, 
president of the National Negro Congress, ancl Ben Gold, avowed Com- 
munist head of the International Fur Workers LTnion, were also among 
the speakers. The American League for Peace and Democracy, the 
National Negro Congress, and the Jewish People's Committee were 
listed in the Daily Worker as organizations supporting the meeting. 
Ben Gold and William Weiner, both nationally prominent members of 
the Commimist Party, were president and secretary, respectively, of 
the Jewish People's Committee (hearings, p. 622). 

In December 1938 Quill wrote the International Labor Defense as 
follows : 

Aware of the very necessary and able worli done by the International Labor 
Defense in behalf of organized labor throughout the past and preceding years, I 
am happy to join with you in your annual Christmas Drive for labor's Neediest 
Cases. I am urging all in our union and our affiliate organizations in the labor 
movement, and I am asking all my friends personally to support the Christmas 
Drive. I feel contident that whatever goal you have set for yourselves will be 
achieved and that funds collected will go as has always been the case in the I. L. D., 
to very worthy fighters for the workers of America. (See Exhibit No. 17.) 

In December 1938 Quill Avas a sponsor for a New Year's Eve ball of 
the Non-Sectarian Committee for Political Refugees. (See Exhibit 
No. 18.) Associated with him in the sponsorship of the ball were Marc 
Blitzstein, Millen Brand, Malcolm Cowley, Lillian Hellman, Granville 
Hicks, Genevieve Taggard, and Richard Wright. These seven persons 
were also among the signers of ])ublicly released statement "in support 
of the verdicts of the recent Moscow trials of the Trotskyite-Buk- 
harinite traitors." (See Daily Worker, April 28, 1938, p. 4.) 

In November 1938 Quill was a speaker at a mass meeting "to protest 
Nazi atrocities." The meeting was held in Pittsburgh under the aus- 
pices of the League for the Protection of Minority Rights and the 



1626 UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 

American League for Peace and Democracy (See Exhibit No. 19.) 
Ben Gold was also a speaker at the meeting. 

In June 1938 Quill was a speaker at a meeting under the auspices of 
the American Friends of the Mexican People. The principal speaker 
of the occasion was V. Lonbardo Toledano. general secretary of the 
Confederation of Mexican Workers. (See Exhibit No. 20.) 

Quill is a sponsor of the Consumer-Farmer Milk Cooperative, Inc., 
together with Max Bedacht. of the International Workers Order, and 
A. Philip Randolph, of the National Negro Congress. Rose Nelson is 
a director of the organization. (See Exhibit No. 21.) Miss Nelson 
is now an official of the International Workers Order and has been a 
section organizer of the Communist Party. ( See Exhibit No. 27. ) 

The Daily Worker for December 20, 1938, announced that Quill 
would be a speaker at a meeting under the auspices of the Progressive 
Women's Council and the American League for Peace and Democracy. 
(See Exhibit No. 16.) The Jewish People's Committee was also rep- 
resented by a speaker at the meeting. The Progressive Women's 
Council, of which Rose Nelson was once the head, has now merged with 
the International Workers Order. (See Exhibit No. 29) 

Quill is a member of the Labor Advisory Committee of Consumers 
Union of United States, Inc. (See Exhibit No. 22.) Ben Gold and 
Louis Weinstock, both well-known Connnunists, are also members of 
this committee. 

The American Labor Party, which Quill once represented on the 
Council of the City of New York, withdrew its endorsement of Quill 
on the ground that he refused to follow the policy of the American 
Labor Party in its stand on the Soviet-Nazi pact. (See Exhibit 
No. 24.) Exhibit No. 24 is from the New York Times, October 5, 
1939. 

Quill has been identified with the so-called Communist wing of the 
American Labor Party. He addressed a mass rally at which Bern- 
hard J. Stern was also a speaker. (See Exhibit No. 23.) Stern uses 
the alias of Bennett Stevens in his work for the Communist Party, 
and he is a professor at Columbia LTniversity. (See hearings, p. 4929.) 
The so-called Communist wing of the American Labor Party is known 
as the Progressive Committee to Rebuild the American Labor Party. 
Among Quill's associates on this committee are Joseph Curran, Lillian 
Hellman, Charles Hendley, Rockwell Kent, and Mervyn Rathborne. 
(See Exhibit No. 25.) 

THE LADIES AUXILIARY 

The Ladies Auxiliary of the Transport Workers Union is affiliated 
with the League of Women Shoppers. (See Exhibit No. 26.) In 
records which the Special Committee on Un-American Activities ob- 
tained at the headquarters of the Communist Party in Philadelphia, 
the League of Women Shoppers was designated as a party organization. 

The Ladies Auxiliary of the Transport Workers Union was also 
affiliated with the Progressive Women's Council prior to the time the 
latter organization was merged with the International Workers Order. 
(See Exhibit No. 26.) Exhibit No. 26 is from the Transport Workers 
Bulletin, March 1938, page 13. Rose Nelson, who was secretary of the 
Progressive Women's Council (see Exhibit No. 28, from the Daily 
Worker, July 23, 1938, p. 2), was organizer of section 15 of the Com- 



APPENDIX PART V 1627 

miiaist Party in New York in ID;]-!:. In the latter capacity. Miss Nel- 
son was active in snpport of the taxicab drivers' strike, out of which 
there was one of the begiiniings of the Transport Workers Union. 
(See Exhibit No. 27.) Exhibit No. 27 is from the Dailv Worker, 
March 30, 1934, page 3. 

When the Progressive Women's Council merged with the Interna- 
tional Workers Order in March 1939. Rose Nelson became an official 
of the latter organization as head of the International Workers Order, 
Citv Women's Department. (See Exhibit No. 29, Dailv Worker, 
March 1, 1939, p. 3.) 

The completely Communist control of the Progressive Women's 
Council is reflected not only in Miss Nelson's leadershop of the organ- 
ization but also in the fact that it merged with another Communist - 
controlled group, the International Workers Order. Elsewhere, the 
completely documented account of the Communist control of the Inter- 
national Workers Order will be presented. At this place, evidence on 
that point is confined to an article by Max Bedacht. (See Exhibit No. 
30.) Bedacht 's article, which appeared in the Daily Worker for May 
21, 1934, is headed '^Organize Workers' Children, or the Priests Will 
Get Them.*' Bedacht stated that children in the International AVork- 
ers Order who were over 9 years of age received the New Pioneer Maga- 
zine free of charge. The New Pioneer Magazine for May 1934, taken 
merely as a sample of its general propaganda, had the following to say : 

Then, one fine day, you will chase out the bosses, the cops, and the landlords. 
Like your comrades in the Soviet Union * * *. "With them you will make a 
World Soviet Republic! (New Pioneer Magazine. May 1934, p. 21.) 

One of the leaders of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Transport Workers 
Union is Isobel Walker Soiile. She Avas co-author of the Union's 
Guide for Ladies Anxiliaries. (See Exhibit No. 31.) 

Isobel Walker Soule was listed in the Daily Worker as one of the 
prominent guests present at a meeting in honor of Ella Reeve Bloor, 
The article in the Daily Worker was captioned "Women C. P. Leaders 
Honor Mother Bloor." (See Exhibit No. 32, Daily Worker, January 
6, 1938, p. 3.) 

Other connections of Isobel Walker Soule have been as follows: 
(1) Chairman, American Committee for Friendship With the Soviet 
Union (see Exhibit No. 33) ; (2) member. Citizens Defense Committee 
for the Pickets at the French Consnlate (see Exhibit No. 34) ; (3) 
speaker. League of American W^riters (see Exhibit No. 35) ; (4) 
signer, open letter for closer cooperation with the Soviet Union ( see 
Exhibit No. 36) ; (5) sponsor, Friends of the Abraham Lincoln Bri- 
gade (see Exhibit No. 37) ; (6) national committee member. Interna- 
tional Labor Defense (see Exhibit No. 38) ; (7) member editorial 
council, Soviet Russia Today (see Exhibit No. 39, Soviet Russia To- 
day, May 1940) ; and (8) member. National Committee for People's 
Rights (see Exhibit No. 40). 

TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION COUNSEL 

Harry Sacher is counsel for the Transport Workers LTnion. ^Ir. 
Sacher has been listed as a lecturer at the Communist Partv's Workers 
School in New York. (See Exhibits Nos. 41-42.) Exhibits Nos. 41 
and 42 are from the Dailv Worker, November 13. 1937, page 8, and 
March 3, 1938, page 8. 



1628 UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 

THE COMMUNIST PARTY ON CONCENTRATION 

In July 1933 the Communist Party of the Unites! States adopted 
a trade-union policy known as concentration. This policy was set 
forth in a document called an open letter to all party members. It was 
published in the Daily Worker for July 13, 1933, in a special supple- 
ment. 

The policy of concentration meant simply that the Communist 
Party decided to specialize in the larger industrial areas of the United 
States rather than to carry on work generally throughout the coun- 
try. Excerpts from the open letter will serve to elucidate the policy 
of concentration : 

The entire work of the Party and the best forces of the Party were to be 
directed first of all to building up and consolidating the Party and revolutionary 
trade union movement in the most important industrial centers of the coun- 
try * * * 

Talk about defense of the Soviet Union and struggle against imperialist war 
is nothing but empty phrases unless systematic work is carried out in the war 
industry plants and in the ports * * * 

Concentration of our work on the most important factories * * * 

But the Party cannot carry out this task successfully unless at the same time 
it establishes its base in the decisive big factories * * * 

Thomas H. O'Shea testified before the Special Committee on Un- 
American Activities that the Communist work of organizing the tran- 
sit workers in New York grew out of the policy of concentration 
enunciated in the open letter. 

F, Brown, alleged by witnesses before the committee to be an Ameri- 
can representative from the Communist International, wrote in the 
Communist for September 1933 that Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Detroit, 
Chicago, and New York were concentration points in the strategy of 
the Communist Party. (See Exhibit No. 43.) 

Also in the September 1933 issue of the Communist, J. Peters wrote 
that 

The five concentration districts, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Pittsbiu-gh, and 
New York were assigned the special task of concentrating on altogether about 
50 factories * * * (See Exhibit No. 44.) 

Writing in the Party Organizer for March 1935 Louis Sass said : 

After our Extraordinary Party Conference, we seriously undertook to carry 
through the Open Letter and its central principle: concenti-ation. One of the 
concentration points assigned to us by the District is the city traction, an industry 
where thousands of American workers, hitherto untouched by our movement, are 
organized into company unions ou the I. R. T. and B. M. T. systems. (See 
Exhibit No. 45.) 

Shortly after the publication of the open letter, Charles Krumbein, 
now State secretary of the Communist Party in New York, wrote in 
the Party Organizer, August-September 1933, as follows : 

Another point I think we should consider for concentration is city transport. 
Transport in all big cities plays a very important political role. I think it is a 
field that we must concentrate on. (See Exhibit No. 46.) 

By March 1936 the Communist Party was prepared to claim that 
a transport workers' union had been built and led by its members. (See | 

Exhibit No. 47.) * 

An anonymous "secretary of the Transport Workers Union" wrote 
in the Daily Worker that a strike of the transit workers would 
"knock a number of bricks off the capitalist structure." (See Exhibit 
No. 48.) 



APPENDIX PART V 1629 

Inasmuch as a very large number of the transit employees in New 
York City are of Irish extraction, the Communist Party, according 
to its own claims, began early to devise a special approach to these 
Irish workers. (See Exhibits Nos. 49-50.) Exhibits Nos. 49 and 50 
are from Party Organizer, August 1937, and April 1938, respectively. 

Both the Daily Worker and the Transport Workers Bulletin have 
featured the life story of the Irish revolutionist, James Connolly, 
(See Exhibits Nos. 51-'53.) Exhibit No. 53 is from the Sunday 
Worker, May 14, 1939. According to the testimony of Thomas 
H. O'Shea, this was calculated to overcome the anti-Communist 
sentiments which were prevalent among the Irish transit workers. 

MAY DAY PARADES 

The Transport Workers Union has regularly participated in the 
May Day parades under the control of the Conmiunist Party. (See 
Exhibit No. 54.) One of the tests for determining the degree of 
Communist control in the trade-unions and other organizations is 
participation in these parades which are under the direction of the 
Communist Party. 

DAILY "WORKER AND TRANSPORT W^ORKERS UNION BULLETIN 

According to the testimony of Mr. O'Shea, the Transport Workers 
Bulletin often borrowed matter from the Daily Worker. In two 
exhibits attached to this summary, a cartoon by Burck is shown in 
the Daily Worker (see Exhibit No. 56), and the identical cartoon 
with the name of Burck removed is shown in the Transport Workers 
Bulletin. (See Exhibit No. 55.) Exhibit No. 55 is from the Trans- 
port Workers Bulletin, September 1934, page 7. 

PROMPT PRESS 

Mr. O'Shea testified that the first issues of the Transport Workers 
Bulletin were paid for by the Communist Party. 

The Transport Workers Bulletin for July 1934 bears the printers' 
union label No. 209. (See Exhibit No. 59.) This label is leased 
by the Allied Printing Trades Council to the Prompt Press (see 
Exhibit No. 57), which in turn is a Communist Party institution. 
The Prompt Press holds the furniture and fixtures of the Daily 
Worker. (See Exhibit No. 58, from the New York Post, August 8, 
1939.) Almost all of the job printing of the Communist Party is done 
at the Prompt Press and bears the printers' union label No. 209, 
(See Exhibits Nos. 60-62.) 

THE TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION IN ALASKA 

According to a recent issue of the Transport Workers Bulletin, 
October 1939. page 4, the union has a "closed shoj:)" for "everything 
on wheels" in Alaska. According to O'Shea, the union has a special 
interest in Alaska because of its potential importance for air bases in 
proximity to the Soviet Union. (See Exhibit No. 63.) 



1630 UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 

Exhibit No. 1 




The 



Motorman, Conductor 



and 



MotorCoach Operator 




Volume 45 



EMETROIT. MICHIQAN. AUGUST. 1937 



Number 8 



P«&}««!3*d moMihIy fey tiij. Ai»»fgsm«t«<S AisociatioB 
of Ssre^eJ. ¥A«clti<: Ksiiwsy sad Moiw Cn»<?K Em- 
|»i«j»» ot Amfrhst. 

W Xi U»han, |V«>tsSent 

John J Wmsii*. K4>tOT 

tm E, V).r.i<» Hiffewsy. Oslrail. Mich, 



Enters.)^ «8 lfe« Pout OJH«e st DetfoiJ. Mifh., »a 
8««ceK4 S^i»«» Man*!- Accepted f«r m»ii»B« xi 
«j»e«i8S r«u»» cf p»»t«g«'. 5sro-«»d®4 for iis 5?swiJoa 
nOS. Ael of OcU>fe«r 3. S«!7. 

l»«it Anaum, *9 7S Sisgl* Copy IC rest* 



Transport Workers 



Uoion Run by Four Leading Comniunists Working 
Under Red Orders to Sovietize Transit lodostry. Plot 
Revealed in Affidavit F'rom Deposed T. W. U. President, 
a Former Communist. 



The Transport Workers Union is 
headed by four leading members of 
the Communist party who are work- 
ing under orders of the Reds to sovi- 
etue the American transit industry. 

This stateoient may appear start- 
ling in the extreme. It is no exag- 
geration, however, and is supported 
by affidavits and indisputable facts. 

In recent weeks the Transport 
Workere have gotten a stranglehold 
on New York city traction and taxi- 
cab eonipanjes. They are at ' the 
present time affiliated with the Com- 
mittee for Industrial Organization. 

Here are the four Communist ie 
heads of the Transport Workers 
Union; 

Ml€}i8«J J. Qum, president of tis© 
T. W. v.. who assumed this office at 
the dictation of the Comnumist Par- 
ty of the United States, succeeding 
Thomas O'Shea, who was ordered by 
the Communist Party late in 193^ 
to relinquish the office in favor of 
Quill. 

AiiKfin Dllloasrher}, alias Hojiran, 
secretary of the T. W. U. 

John 8iinto (an assumed name), 
general manager of the T. W. U. 



Thoraas WcMahosi, Brooklyn or- 
ganiser for the T. W. 11. 

O'Shea, the former president of 
the Transport Workers, who since 
hag renounced Communism, has 
signed an affidavit naming these men 
and their connections with the Red 
party of Russia. 

Referring to Quiil, Hogan, Santo 
and McMahon, O'Shea declares: 

■'During aJl this time I was well 
acquainted with every one of these 
men and I was a member of the 
Communist Party of the U. S. A. 
(Section of the Communist Interna- 
tionale w-ith headquarters in Mos- 
cow), District 2. Section 24, City of 
New York, State of New York, and 
each and every one of the above 
mentioned was also a member of the 
same t\)mmuni8t organization. 

"Santo at the time was the organ- 
izer of Section 15 of the Commu- 
nist Party of the New York District 
In the Mid-Bronx County." 

O'Shea In his affidavit then goes 
on to describe how the Communists 
made Quill head of the Transport 
Workers Union. 



APPENDIX PART V 



1631 



Exhibit No. 1 — Continued 



i.'' 



^>:#^*^>-- 



t«U 



tH ^ fN. 


.«• 


•s^ipr 


tlse 


p?«>«l^^tscy 






6 Vv 


tOB 


in 11*35 he. 






\ '•' V 




■<--^ (o the 
:;i«:trSc 

;,» the 








i !^ 


■ Tranffport 
i>n of the 
',>' for pay- 
« be sft at 
15 50 minl- 


V Eh* 


A 


liVtiK 


amafeti ConstJ- 


f, Shf 


v,^ 


(lt)U 


i-rs 


iT pun M 



members, Tbey deB«ed that t&ey wmnt Red*. 
However, tSi«lr attitude and »om« r«iiR«rki 
tht'y dropped, Jofreased rather thaa SuliM 
the suspiesoa that they were tainted wUh 
tbe to&rk of Moscow. __,««,«,-« 

The Oea«ral Execotlr* Board mad* a thor- 
ough Investigation of tlie TraRaport Work- 
ers Union aad came to th« conclwsion that 
there waa no basis upon which the Amalga- 
mated Assoctatloa eottlsj acc«pt the terras 
of their offer. At a later date QuiU, Hogaa 
and Santo made farther represetitattons. 
but it was obvious that th« Aiaalgamaled 
Assoetatioa coult! not aaspend Its laws in 
favor of these men. 



RED 


DICTATORS 


OF 


TRANSPORT WORKERS 






^^ 






" ^''' ■ -"■-!<'(;-;■ di:tator<: of tht Ttnn!>ii"'t Ho \>^s Union. Reading from left to 
nyht: Austin iMUtmshrr}/, alia.? Hogan; Mickat-i J. Qitdl, president; and John Santo, 
gfnfral m^na^fn who vxn snapped in the act of Is^fttmf? a hand - made cigarette 
from a fm of non-untnn lobucfa. According -to the afftd-nvit of a former member, an 
es-Hr<J, ikfxi- thr: (' are rncmtnrg of the Communist parly of the V. 8. A., district 8. 
srrtton >'4. f'U|/ of New York, and hai^e taken conirot of the Transport Workers' Union 
undrr orrjtrs of the Communist party. International Netvs Fhoto. 



them, be returned to Qaill. Hogan and Saoto 
tor orgssotzing expeases. The wishes of the 
merahershSp — about whUh th<>y were equaiiy 
vague- apparenUy v^rr^ !;..t to be consid- 
ered. It was a.ss«med by Messrs, Quli' ^h- 
gan and SaJtto that they would c<-i' 
to run their organisation without the ■■,..,-,- 
slty for eteeUoiJs or such annoying df-rao- 
crafic expressions. Most of their memhers 
St that timt\ they said, worked in the shops 
<jf the New York subway systs^rna. 

At one of 'Jw.- :5i'ssi«,iu.-< with lij.- Transport 
Workers' rffpre.<ii ritatives. they were asked 
point-biank if they were ronsmunists, or if 
there were nny r'j.rtsmuniHts among their 



/o!» Msckimists, Then C. I. O. 

Next the Tratsaport Worhers coraraissar* 
tried to affiliate with the New Yoric lodge 
of the .International Association of Maehl- 
nists. Apparently the New York Macblnista 
knew too much about the set-up, for they 
.turned QuiU down. Later the three Reds 
were able to get a charter direct from the 
internatioaal headquarters of the Maebintsta 
in Wa,shi«gton, giving them autonomy and 
granting sperial conceasipns as to dues. etc. 
Qui!!, Hogan. Santo and their henchmen, 
aided by scores of Comrauntsts willing to 
give tiieir al! for the "cause," put on an In- 
tenisjve organizattoa campaign In the New 



1632 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 2 



t ri ifi m:j i» 'mm imm 



TRANSPORT WORKERS' 
BULLETIN 

TruiisiHfri WitrkftH ijxige 
ttft'-rntfliiUHtl Aumiation of SUifliumis 

Affiliated with tii« 
America PeieratiOM of Labor 
OFFICERS 

Presi<l«»nt 
MICHAt.t J. QL'IIJ. 

Wil»!JAM TAimVMX GL'STAVE FABEE 

..■JAMES GAHAGAN 

General Secretarv 

' AUSTrX HOGAX 

Financial Secretarv 

liOUGLAS L. MacMAHOX 

Treasurer 

MICHAEL CLUNE 

lwia« Guard 

CHAP.LES MAKTIX 

Serges nt-At- A rms 

MICHAEt. !A'XCH 

JOHX SAXTO *sJ[\J. McCARTH\> 

1HOMAS H. O-sHTnt - 



Kditor 

M. !i, FOIiGE 

A5S0i'iate Editor 
GEItALl) J. McLELLAN 

Adverli.-hvx MaimKt-r 
HEXRV HOORXWEG 



/ J 



Editorial and F^usiiie!?? Office.-: 
ir>:i West ^;ith Stre<-t 
Xf^t li'ork. \. Y, 



Kii ■.-rtiji'tiott, hy mail. One Dollar pCT Yfar 
Afhs-rti-incr Itats-.^^ on Request 
401 



APPENDIX — PART V 



1G33 



Exhibit No. 3 



TRANSPORT 

WORKERS UNION 



Niw rmK cmr 

MoniliefiiMp Book 

No. ^^^££J^^^^^^^^^^^- 

pATl '. M>i N£D _ J^^J^^ Tl^^Z.'LfZ - . 

^^i(m ...CtfM^i^I>__ 

^ojyisiON ^..., „.,„.„„. t^^ .l.*..t'f.».._ti^- — 




1634 



UN-AMERICAX PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 4 




APPENDIX — PART V 



1635 



Exhibit No. 5 



Quill Says Dies' Newest Outburst Is 
Outworn Piffle^ for War Incitement 



Tmn.sfK'irt. Workfrx Unioi-s offlfi&ls 
.<rofts>f) yftdifr<i»y »t th* st«i<»sri?T,i,s 
msuic bpforp the Dies Committ** by 
Dar;.»; H. O'Shea &n& fcfr»na«d htm 
cirKf s g fs i n "s r«>npan>'-uftlor3 

His -harfres before the war-lm-it- 
STig Dies oiitfjt «.«r? caU'd 'o-utwofn 
pi}?5#" in 8 ,\!at«rapnl iKu^fi bv 
Mirb&ei Quia, jntematSonaJ Presi- 
dent of th? unimj. 

O'Shea .was described by TWU 
officers as Ji /ormfr f>{Be#>r &! the 
linion who wm comp'infly dtscred- 
n^d and ousted from the union." 

OShea, accoyding !« TWU J^sd- 
ers tfsUflcd (:*fOTe th« Dies Com- 
niSfte<^ in i?3f? with ft number of 
m,h«>r <swipany st<x»s<»« aryJ hl« wild 
stYissfttionf! at thsrt ttaf %'<tr^ n«f«T 
«ubs!»ntjat*d 

T'Wti >«d?re ftSiid ;h»', ;hf>rf ws^ 
nothing new in ihf charges brought , 



by O Sh?a y««t«rday and Utty «t- 
tr!hiif»><1 tl-w attersison given them 
bv Di«s Sit thii time »» fe«}t»8 m 
ilne with his «tt«mpt« Us create a 
"war hy«lerJa," 

"Wtd «k« t« knew,** Mr. (^nill 
s»i«," If th« Dies C«mwiitt«e is«a 
<l«>t»Fmi»«d whs h»s ls««s 8«|>j(«ft- 
ing O'SJsea aln-c* he be<-»m« a 
<'o«spa»y «to«fe te I^S." 
O Shea, h&d stated b«Jor« the oom- 
jni?t?e that he had been president 
o! the union il» 3§3S. 

Transi?ort Union otSeials did ft«t | 
dispute lhi». They mereSy potfjt«dS j 
to the faiM that wh«n O Sheat was ' 
president oi the union at tt»t Ume , 
it c;on$«ifte4 about 803 memfeet^. 
"Today." thisy »»W. "tf»# anion 
,h«« S«,eSO s»#mb«r* in Ns-w >•<«•*. ■ 
rttf »!«>««•, «9l f« islWik o} mhtf • 
!««ais in uewral f!tie«." 
In &n eieetitKS at i,h« lane OShea l 



was president, tb«>>* showed, ;l-iP 
comsMwiv Rfcoos? wa?. defi^at^d 'Aiien 
he raK tm f*^!«etioti 

In 1938, thej- said, charges were: 
hrough'. against 0'8hes> tsy mem"- 
i>ers of the union ard he was given 
& UM. 

Charges of O'Shs* sixsut -Com- 
munista eohtroihstg the union", of- 
ficials staid, had h««n broysght by 
him and other dtecr«dited "mem-; 
bsits" at the tlm« of the hearing, 
in 18S8 and had fe^en exposed &»;; 
!.m$on-wre<;klng t^actics st (hat time.: 

"They ar«. <>( taujse " <"ifSe!al*' 
ssild "as ai>«urd no* m t.h<'y were 
tjwn ' 

O i=!h?a sfxske of fUn ciubs whlfh 
)■,>> said TWU mensijers were par-. 
!irit>anu in Thp«« st«(*men!s were; 
sJw ridtniled- l^y the TWU offtciais,: 

"Th«re *r» no gwe eloba," they- 



279895— 41— pt. 5 2 



1636 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 6 



jB.M.T. and LR,T, Subway Workers Organize New 
Union to Fight Ag€iinst the 1932 Slash in Wages 



Action >iart«! in i48th Si. Rppair Shop Si*r«ad!t "«?»!•»!! v«>mi » 
trt (klwr Serti«»* ol thr Sub'way Sj-Mcm; ism *n iTtlT fr"'"^'' 



Vtiipn Rai*p« f>p«»arirf« 



<*fp 1 mid 
! 1 < r-< 

■ ': .■ -S.:« Sn?! aV «? l-l «"W (Ml- I- 



*• :i'-:!rf-.r,c lip >''? niij 



(*<'«rt» for i^rfArkivtti^m 



.1 .(. i( bi. r .■ 

, t «i -^ ■-■< 

h'-', > 1 1 tw >7 ' .' » > ^r» int* 

' TT-i' n»» imino. S«j*H(i i«»'f fw 



APPENDIX PART V 



1637 



Exhibit No. 7 



f^ 



Trade l nioii8 

In Art ions to 

4*1 '"f I * * I 

To Msir \'Ai.i <',oii*iil 
in S. \. Tomorrow 



vi^w yoF 


%K. An inif^vs:-'.:-^ ; ,< t> • 


., ff^y> 


rnp fri-'^:n^ nf F:ri^ ; 


[ r] ^. <■''."' ' 


("<r: n\ '^v: « '-' knicr r ia -.5 


-'f.< ,, 


' ■ ' ■ ■> "! ■- is iinrhf'i'i 


hi^Tf '> ■ '■■ ~< 


mf«-i.nv: ' '"'" ."'"r<?flf 


I'nsor. T'r:r' 


. <"n'-ir '-■■'. V • -. ■ n'sh< 


tvh'^r<^ ^ p 


■f ; - - >,^ ><■ ■■'..,. '-1 ;:, ^ 


niappi^d i^>i' 


!'>r V:''^'^-'pr^-^r-)r^-)i .ihJ^'^TI*^ 


snii !ri;r!n; 


"> fwtiji'Pd tf> ^h' Tr»'^«' 


Unsriri Vmt\ 


{ <'•-!£;'!*' 


Th,- -n!-,. 


c rrp«-i^t<^rf n>r 'a;!'~>^- 


MIS' ^r* '' 1' V- 


, f'•^r M"*'"' n-«^^ »n*^ ar- 



•Nerr{,i«» Wrrk '.n ff^f^rsf Af fh? Ger- 

Will he sfrif ijp a» th*? s«m'> tlmp. 
Th«=! unii^n has pstabijshecl Thael* 
mann ronjf rs in ?ome departments. 
Two open air mfstin^s ^ilh Anna 
Schiiltj; as mam &peakf>r are piannpd 
in thp fur and drfss m3rk?!,s. Tele- 
gram.'; nrf !o be r-'^n; io the Ger- 
man Ccn'u'^t''' and Adolph HUfpr. 
Metal Ur.ion: On? !hon-and. 
"Fref> ThaPinirum.'' pc^f r«ids have 
b*''f»n purchaser!. Cp t>t"«: hsvp b^^'ti 
«f>nt to Berlin snd Wa'~hrne»!*>n, The 
rsmpalgn is twincr ras^frt af ail shf-p 
nif>efinEs, snil oiner s^f»p<; prorx^-fd 

ftH«, 

?!ll"<> Wriri-J^'-'i T'ninn , DTidf^d sf 
-h'» rounrd r^"*^':pc: th^t ptem' 
tifiKm -.h'^r» !^ <^ ?;<~nd tel^Si'">m-* t^f 

as, >h«» (■■-.!-> !;;-^>(^ T''^'' iPtl*^'"! h'^.'i 

''^^rryinsr thrnch p'^kf'IniK; '' 'h" 

r?f«i (hrnuch mas,^ pirk?t!re m 
front, nf the ronjUlate fv^r^' day 
last ti-r^rk. Cables have been sent 
'T WashHTTton and Germtnr,de- 
maiidnig th« freedom of 'EJrnst 
Thac^mnn. 

F064 Workers tJnion: Sent s 
telegram to Wa;-vhlngt-an and Ger- 
many. Committee of thn?*-^ has been 
Pifcted to m.ake further plans for 
the rampaign. 

Furnitur*" Wnr k e r ■? :ndt)<^tri8l 
Onion; l^'rirlne loeaU to n^der l«rsre 



numl>er« of ' Fr^ e Th^elmanrj" ?v>«f 
rards to h*% ,i;^^^i to fiprmanv Jtnd 
N='7i Amhft:isad«^f H^-n% Luth*"-, mi 
Wa-^hinsrton .Vnt regK^t^red lefr' 
to Adoiph Hifl*r riemRnfhne 7"t»a<'i. 
STsam* rrse?:,**, snrt s ]«>»<''■ of 
Sreetsnes to Tb^'lmsnr!. Mr>s>Ht», 
Berhn, r»T?T^an^\ 

A' f(el<sgr?t jon h'^r- hee?i elp<red in ' 
!n» T U,U c >n present Uiii> (ie- j 
m^nd to the German consulate. The! 
delegation crm:.\sts of the foUoWin.g ' 
workers: G, H^i-rrison, Rn?*- ; 
Kujit^sch. M. Perlow. J. 
Hurlmg. R/>§?. Wm. Blis.s, 
Harry Cantor. Charlotte T6dcj.. 
Fannie Golos, Sam NesSn. The dclc-i 
gatjon wsa appear before the con- < 
sulaie on Tuesday. The T.U.U.C.j 
has al.^n decided to l«ue st rail to 
ali trad* unions, independent »nd! 
A. F. of L. to undertake .■tfrnds!- ' 
arn\-i?ie<. 




1638 UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 

Exhibit No. 8 

OHIO mm T 
PEACE AND \>mm'> 





mi Yearbook 



150th Anniversary of the U. i Constitution 
13th Anniversary of the Communist Party 



„;.d 



APPENDIX PART V 



1639 



Exhibit No. S— Continncd 



GREETINGS 


^§01101 


Boll 


Chvei 


and 


cA. YAKAITIS 


V. ROMONO 


I, RjAULINAITlS 


JOS. VASILOUSKAS 


C.A. VILKELIS 


JOHN o4. VAUPSAS 


c>1. VALENTA 


B. cT^iARELD 


S. SLEKYS 


G. PALTOM 


tTWiME P. LUKAS 


tA FRIEND 


B. GAUM 


jABACKNIKOFF 


C. DARGUS 


HARRY CANEGIK 


FRANK SAUZA 


J. C. 


1 B. ICmSTUKAS 


STEVE YURINCH 


■ J, KUODIS 


BOB LEE 


(^. DROLIUS 


JOSEPH HARTMAN 


R NEMURA 


JOSEPH HARTL 


J. DELLIS 


cTVl ERDiE 


• P. BRUSCUVIENE 


R. YURIGA - 


S. KAZELEONIS 


c^NDY ZVOLENSKY 


J. £:7Vf ACHUTA 


GEO DARA80SH 


PAUL 8AIKA 


JOHN HORVATH 


Liirain 


Akron 


JOE ^lAURW 


CHAS. c^lARKS 


B. DESICH 


RoOSE MARKS 


■ THERESA CULIG 


PHILLIP DUNN 


PETER^ POPOV 
GEORGE TRAICOFF 
GUSTAV LUSTIK 
; MRS. PAUL MILICIC 


Ro- E. DUNN 

ESTHER CRITES ■^^,0>^ 
<JOHN SANTO^ «C^ 


PRODUMICH MILOS 


R^OSIE SCHUBERT 


PETER.-. SARAVANA 
H, GLADISH 
G. DUMBOFF 


FRED WILCOX 
c^i, GULIAN 


PETE TASHOFF 


W, J. MORGAN 


Toledo 


Springfield 


; SOCIAL SCIENCE SCHOOL 


SPRINGFIELD BRj C. P. 


j EUGENE STOLL 


HERBERT REED 



1640 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 9 

1 • UJi^y^^'i'**'^'^'^ msrjHsi. -TKC 



. • - MSfucT roiMTtffi iseriJi*. umm e. isse. 

; • 

Oar 1%Tt'' in ft» Fe«. Tork Cistriet oaa point to splendifi 'achieyesasr.is ir, otJx 
wsrJc durlKg th« past j^ar. Daring this |»rlo4, ovr Psrty ia&d« spier.4id 

\m6nmy ia t&» ti84« wioR fl«fM. «ith sosse «t»or «xc«|>-aoas, ewst of tfea 
tji«&« uai«R8 of t&« T.W-tJ.I., ar« afirged «ith the A.f.i. In almost all e&zm 
a-or ecsRjcst^s imsre rscsl-irsd with wpan atms b^f *he ss&sses of organized »orJ-.ers 
, ia t|j« A.F.Iw i3»ion«, At ths ^reseat tl8s«, while all &re act f-uKctionijjg ^r- 



f«c4l?» «« 2m v» !i«Terti)i«l;e»8 , 8«aj« 30O fractisse la the trasia ttaioRs, and in 

SO tm&» vsXq»» ottr P&rty cot:mde8 are either faily or partially ir, the ■ 



l«ai«»3M|5'af th.«f8« WiiORS. 



l^tsedally tod »« «Bto hsadwiy is the t»to taloa fiali of tl^e coac«r.tmtiotj 
Ir^astrles, «•«<* as SIftrise, •h®r« tfe» inflB«»«« of our Karty «»s eattcMed ooa- 
sia«i«%lf s «M tl»« mnk aM flj« ffiov^ent is .aeir«lo?ln« »>8t raplSly; ia^Trais- 
tlo3s, isfh«ire th« Tteioa, teiilt ajjS lead by oar ocwrades bsts grown to ih» streneth 
»f"5,i:i^"!wWrs, aad now being la th« k.t.U^ stands out as th« oKly %m&» 
Wiioss rseogsised %y tha wrk«rs in the entire Itsdaatsy. Th® smse tiling Jsoids , 
t?a«i in Bsilr^, Sa«r? Metal, *tc. 

Ia B&yl«, 8ur INwrty cajs record soae real adJievesBents in aev«loptag the aMtsd 
frsmt «r©wi« t!s# specific Isa'^ns of the Ss«to taasses. a»rleK &t this ti»8, 
8t«^« oat m tJ» asdel aectloa for real asas work. Ifeay aectloBS of tbe 5««*o 
9<5fttlation <»•?« wor. «T«r ^ mir Bttrty tbro'a#i Its correct sp^jllcatloc of t&e 
iiae ef ttes ^rt? for tfe« uaited front in stwggle against diacrlsii»atio8 of tM 
S«grc !S!a»96s, and aro-a»d the attack ob the Sthiopisn people. 

f« »-acc««d»d ia feuildlRg tjp the Party f roa a o^ehership of 9,100 » year a^ to . 
.a&otst 12,^ at pre&esst. 0nir ehop Tssclei gr»» from 182 to sosie 3^- 



It is ne«««8&ry, however, to point out that while we saade headway i» the treda 
•«siori field, a3sd ia ta&ss work genemliy, throii^h the correct ajwlicaticn of 
tfee line of th« Party ix tfae struggle for iasasdlate seeds of tha issssss, and 
against war and faaifisja, that dae to the press ure of aanifold tasks of the 
f&rty durla« tMs period, we neglected to a great extent our conjentr&tJoa of 
teiidiag the ?8fty in the basic Industries «!fher« these acHieTiMsents were oV 
tftlnad. 

Bxa gre^tli of the shop nt^lel are in the saaln ia %%& lis^-t industry and aason^ 
tha white collar and prcfesslooal woAers. Thi increase in nsesabership is also 



fToa ssong the light ind-astrj, !*lte collar and profossicnal worl»rs. 
teaslc iaduatries* the growth of the Party is ne^ligihle. 



In the 



With the exertion of heavy aetal iai& power, the control tasks adopted at the 
Fefcraary, 1935 Sonferencse, for the 'biiildirig of ohap nuclei, for tile inore^^e 
in the oiremlatiOB of the Daily Wor&sr, etc ., have not beer, fulfilled. 

While doing S'ach splendid worh: aaong the Keg» people ia Harles, we did not 
s-afftcier.tly Injild the Party as a result of this «oi%;. ISspecially tawst we 
stress O'lr failure to dp^elap the strog.le for Fegro ri«;hts, a^iast 4isc3rlad»- 
ation on a Blstrlct wide scale, outside of J^rleci, and hrioj^lr^g the Ke^ro 
into o'ir Party. In addition to Hsrl«B, Section X2, stands o-ot as the oialy 

section jsayiag attention to thi« woj%. In all ather aections, we cannat a»ifc 
eapccially in h'iildiai: the Part;* ataosi; the >Jegro aasees. 



APPENDIX — PART V 



1641 



Exhibit No. 9 — Continued 



- 2 



•On Youth work, we car. etate th^t while the Y. C-L. in -.ur Uistrict grew during 
the period and that we developed splendid united front noveraents aroiind specific 
youth Issues, and against war and fascisc, the efforts of our Partj- to build the 
JiCZ. does not correspond with tht, movetaent developec and with the ixjssit'ilitlee 
in existenee. 

lit is therefore necessary to iiake tha District Coimdttee, and the Party mealjer- 
;■ ship of the Ie'.T York District aware cf this alt'oatior., so that we ^dll froc now 
-on, apply most effectively the lire of the 7th 'Torld Congress on the -onited 
front against war and fasciaic, particularly in the basic ind'astries, aaonf the 
basic sections of the Acericaji t;rol»tariat in cur District, in carrying on anti- 
war, anti-fascist activities, building the trade laiions , and firmly rooting oxir 
3Party ac»ng these basic sections in otir District. 

!Hie "building of the lirmer-Labor Party in Hew York Stats will nof h© success- 
fully- sccoapllshed if the Partj- v.dll not, at the same tiise, he entrenched in the 
ahops and docks of the haslc ind^istries, and in the tradfi tmions. 

fhB District Cojamittee, at its enlarged jceeting, in reviewing the work of the 
District, and tased en the disc-iission here, as iwll as on the decisions cf the 
ConTCntioas held ia our Sections, sets itself the follo-.;i.ng control tasks aoong 
others, to he carried thfo-^sh hy the tisK of the District Convention to be held 
on Jlay n9th, 1S36. 



XeehereMp (recruiting) to he Incfeased hy 4.355, or a total of ■ 

. 16,895. 

The ioes paying m^hershlp to be 15,0(X5. 

Tae mecjbersfcip in the following categories to he Increased ^ 




Hegro 


510 


Li#it Hetal 


28 


'osien 


367 


Coacnuii lotions 


16 


Italian 


325 


Power 


22 


Geatan 


45 


Ship Ballding 


n 


Youth 


633 


Teassters 


27 


longshore 


46 


Textile 


& 


Seamen 


52 


It>od {large 


18 


TiftctiOB 


38 


plants) 




Sail road. 


42 


Meat P&cking 


5 


Heavy Mgt^tl 


9 


Geaerel Electric 


8 






Aato 


8 



(The above c«togorles are enuiB^ted Section 
ty Section on the following pages) 



1642 UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 9 — Continued 

■Knti-.l Taska oo Keaborship lncyo&8« ~ Section by Seotloa 

- 3 ~ 

ship 
Sectisa lacreasg ¥.eg.TO toaen Ifeallaa fe^gS. Tsuth Longshore Saaaga, Ti»ctioi> 

30 

SO 3 

S§ 5 

50 S 

10 IS 

15 

10 3 

10 S 

5 
10 20 

15 5 

15 

10 2 

a> 3 

25 5 

25 

20 3 

15 

S 
25 10 

3 
SO 
20 

50 10 

50 

10 5 5 

25 
10 30 SO 

4 check- 7 ladio 

ISO 35 25 25 



1 


150 


10 


25 


15 


2 


300 


25 


30 


30 


5 


sm 


5 


35 




4 


750 


300 


175 


25 


5 


ICXD 


5 


25 




6 


100 


ID 


25 


15 


7 


100 


8 


25 


10 


8 


19D 


8 


25 


10 


9 


3© 


5 


10 




10 


150 


20 


25 


10 


11 


75 


10 


20 


15 


22 


100 


25 


25 


25 


13 


40 




10 


10 


14 


• 2O0 


10 


50 


20 


15 


150 


10 


50 


20 


16 


100 


35 


25 


10 


17 


150 


10 


35 


15 ■ 


18 


13D 


20 


35 




1? 


30 


3 


8 




20 


100 




25 




21 


20 


2 


5 




22 


250 


5 


SO 


15 


£3 


100 


25 


25 


10 


24 


300 


30 


75 




?5 


200 


10 


50 




m 


50 


2 


10 


16 


27 


100 


10 


25 


25 


28 


100 


>? 


9 





fot&l 4.395 510 967 325 45 633 4€ 62 38 



APPENDIX PART \- 



1643 



Exhibit No. 9 — ContiniiPd 



Con'-pol Taai: cr> l.'^^ber-.'^l- Increase' 



,.X..i:j-... 





?> 3- 








?o 


be 


:z.S 


Efc-iii.tjd 


HeaTj Metal 


Sec. 




r-ecraited 


I 


3 




5 






3 


't 


3 




26 






, 6 


5 


3 






To 


'•,&! 


9 


10 


10 












12 


3 


Li fit !''etal 


1 






10 


IS 


2 




4 






3 


1-i 


3 




7 






5 


18 


3 




10 






' ''^ 


21 


3 






Total 


^^ 


23 


3 












:> i 


6 


Textile 


22 






6 




•'?:. -fil 42 






To 


Sal 


6 



CoasHoni r a t i ons 



1 

22 



10 
3 
3 



16 



Food 



3 


10 


10 


5 


39 


3 




Total IS 



Tcxi^: 



Teagffiters 



7 

10 
2J 



Ship Bui ldln.s; 



3 

5 

5 



7 5 

19 3 

iiS 3 

~o^sl\ il 



Heat Packin g 



10 
26 

28 



5 
3 

rotai" 2? 





S.3C. 


24 


5 


0. E. 


Sec 


13 


8 


Asto ■ 


Sfic. 


12 


3 



1644 



UN-AMERICAX PROPAGANDA ACTIMTIES 



Exhibit No. — Continued 



Coiitroi f&sks 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

9 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

33 

21 

23 
34 
25 



pally forter 

100 
1250 

500 
1250 



100 



100 
200 

ISO 
1<X) 



500 
7S0 
400 

30 
300 

35 

^)0 

ISO 

10C» 

300 



26 


100 


27 


300 


38 


SOO 


2t 


400 



fotal 



JJ666. 



1000 
3000 
1500 
3iX)C 
l^DO 
1000 
7S0 

600 
1250 
KK>0 
1000 

250 
2S0O 
2CX)0 
1500 
2»0 
1000 

zm 

KXSO 

150 
ISX) 
1000 
^300 

5CKD 

500 

8C^ 

2S0 
1000 

36000 88.100 



DiEJitroffSs 


Olgia's 


Fsffiphlet 


Why ComssuTiiso 


Mm 


4^X) 


5400 


5400 


3375 


3375 


9000 


9CCX) 


2600 


2500 


3700 


3-;^ 


4250 


4250 


4200 


4200 


700 


7m 


2»0 


2200 


3000 


SXX) 


ISOO 


ISCKS 


1250 


12^) 


4750 


47® 


4750 


4750 


2750 


27S0 


5000 


50CO 


-2900 


2900 


^K) 


«)0 


2000 


2000 


500 


500 


3750 


3750 


1500 


1500 


7000 


■POOO 


&«)0 


6400 " 


1000 


1000 


2500 


2500 


3375 


3375 


3750 


. 37S0 



89y 100 



Ly 



APPENDIX PART V 



1645 



ExiuniT X(). !) — Continued 



-6- 



Control laska 



Iv'eg nuclei to be Built in Ooncentration Industry 



Ajm - Sec. 12 - 1 in TarrytoTO 

SIJMEr. -Sec. 28 - 5 on 5 ships 

TEXTILE-SbC. 12 - 2 in Alex. Smith. 

mCTIQi:~ Sec. 2 " 1 - 42r.d St. IRT 
4 - 1 - 98th St. 
7-1 

8 - 1 - aci? 

11-1 

17 ~ I ~ mn 



Sea, 26-1 

28 « 8 (Hamb-arg-Amer. 

(Gtoard 
.(Old Doainion' 
'(Pall Kiver 
(Standard Fruit 
(Checkers Local 
(Ward line 

Total ~9 



Total 

Sac. 4 
5 
18 
21 
23 
25 

Total 



fOWS. 



1 - Park Ave. feim. 
1 - PiilLsjan Porter 
1 - 
1 - 
1 - 
1 - 



HEAT? METAI , 

Ssc. 5-1 



R. H«e 
7 - 1 - Mo r£;eri thaler 
26-1 -($11 ss . 

1 -(Amer. Machine acd 
( Foundry 



Sec. 5 - 
7 - 
10 - 
20 - 

24 - 

fotal 



See. 5 

? 

24 

28 



1 - Seligate 
1 - ffadaon Ave, 
1 - Qweens Sleo, 
1 - 
1 - Irving Place 



1 

1 - Motal Haulage 

1 - Afaer. By. Si. 

1 



Total 



Total 4 



Sac. 1-1 



4 - 1 - lashhum Wire 
10 - 1 - Ebco 



Total 



IPOO 



Sec. 3 - 1 - HBC 

10 - 1 - Sunshine 

fotal 2 



OOaJPFICATIOIlS 
Sec. 1-1 Western tMon 

22 - 1 H.Y.fel. Co. 
fotal 2 



Total IfcsBber of lies? Suclei to he Built in Concentration Industry - 48 



1646 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 9 — Continued 



- 7 > 



Ie order to assure the <«8iriylng throu^ of the Csntrol tSaska adopted, the 
following steps are to fee taken hy the Party? 

I. Sie folXowing cotaradee of the Bistflct Oocaaittee are to be respoasiMe for 
the coaceatration points during tbis periodi 

Ccffirad© Mter - Barieas &M Marina 
Steinberg -Me**^ 
Wortis ~ fiBctios 
loberta - Power 
Holmes - Bail road 
Uesla - Teasmsters 



fhe follo'sdng are the District Esps to be assigned to ea-ch s&ction to help 
igdde the srorfe oa concsatretlon and to continisaily check xs^ on th« progress 
is oariTiBig throygfe the control tasks "bj the Sections.; 



Sggtioa 



Comrade 



X 


mue 


2 


Wortis 


3 


Leeds 


4 


Jtoter 


5 


Ifgsin 


6 


Hoberts 


7 


feberts 


8 


Holmes 


9 


Be^aa 


10 


Steinberg 


11 


Utt 


12 


Steinberg 


13 


Steinberg 


14 


Mortis 


IS 


Silver 


16 


Holaea 


17 


Roberts 


18 


Sags V' 


19 


MH 


20 


Bggaa 


21 




2zy 


Santo •/ 


23 


Silver 


24 


Steinberg 


25 


Hesin 


26 


Arafcer - 


27 


Begun 


28 


toter 


2B- 


fissjUBia 



ET8ST HIP "BO mCH SBCEIOK SaOUlD ISITOTE AT LEAST "TtO BDtIRS 
A lEEK !?0 TBI SSCTIOH TO WHICH ISEY AlE AJ^ACTE^B AS H3EPS. 



APPENDIX PART ^ 1647 



p]xHiB!T Xu. — Continued 



I 



3. Sach one of the cor.centi%ticr. indMS tries, th© CG:::iades Involved in the 
\TOrk, a::d the section orssinisers in the conceKtr&ticn industries to be 
called in by the District at least or.ce "Cetwsen now and the District 
Denver. tioa,, for a check tnp and verier of progress cade. 

4. Section Cosnittees, rith the District Sep to their Section, to review 
one of the concent rat ion points of the Sectior, at least once a aonth 
d'oring this p«riod. 

5. Mesjbers of the District GoBc:ittee responsl'ble for tl-s concentration in- 
i-cstrioa to ~eet with the section crgardzsrs and the comrades involved 
in tlx© concentration industries at least once a aonth to rerlei? their 
fork. 

6. CS-.eck -op on the progress cf the Daily Worker, Simdaf Worker and the 
litcraturs sales to "be nade at the meeting of the ieaair^g coExades in 
the Sections, sonetla® in the middle cf April. 



T^.e District Ooraaittee states that in carrying thrc'a#» the decisioriS of 
the Seventh W«rid 3on(?-r«ss ar.d their aoplication to the Anerloan Party, 
and in canr^'ir^ throurh the decisions on the imitt-d front in connection 
v.lth the Labor Party, ctir basie ar^d central tasks recsaic the tasks of 
h'^iding ourPart^^- into a rsass revolutionai^? f^arty of the woiid-ng class. 



BISTBIC? (XWITTSS, District #2. 
Karch 8, 1936. 



1648 



UN-AMERICAX PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 10 



Irish' A mericfin W^prkers Shoukl Be Champkmi 

Of Negro Liberation. Says Murray at FareivelL 

1,000 WORKKRS BID IKIS» COMMtNLST LEADER ADIEU 



j Nrvv YORK - Pas-kmg Irvi'v 
! PJaiit, Tlsursday ni;.'i!, iss a f;-t, 
< weU tSPmonstration t« Stan Mvr > 
i (ieuf ra! Sern ' ; ' T 

I mu!;.^- Fan: 

p!f t«-d s>. spcn ;.,.,, .. ; . 

»T, more ; h»n i i>i!ii w- ■ ■ 

if;iftc-'i ftf '!■:? Ainpnifi!) . 

ary mcnftr'f ~it ;■!(■<•-. ■:.?■ >i,':' ■ 

of wmnir.*: Iri ,h-Afr:o- H^^r- v,,:-j-. 
; t« th«" Stmsrgif of tbC r'ti--'.;!?:-,; '■'^•■ 

in this ecunuy. 
' n. was poinlisd OTit, by Con: rati? 
; Murray Shat f>n» of EhJ> grei!t?«t; ob- 
I stacks Us tti? Aimggle of Inr.h 
i workers tit other countries «*»s i i\f 
j use of "antifjusted s'eaponx, ' rir- 

"We've Jearofd." he %&i^. "that ;i'.s 

I Hec«-ssary te «<•; rid of :hps«' bows 

land arrows which ;i:-e ojsJy hin- 

i dranws in our fight end pick up 

; the n?sl weapons of Martiist Rnri 

; l>ninlst leachtegs,** 

; Cltmg the similarity at th? strug- 

: gJ« of Ihe oppres-sed Nesro workers 

! in this country' and the tnr.ti worVt- 

I ers under ths yok? of British Sm- 

jJerSsilsm Ct>mraci« Murrav said, "I 

Seolt forward to the Irish worSwrs 

of Araerica to stand out af- '.he 



r>M:r,,,jiOi;- vf Nt 5;;-o liberation," 

fi :■ •;..: ■...-.■ ;i iceSand they v.vir 
■;. ' " ■ :■ ■ ■ ixmm ajul wf-r'- 

- U T i h'^ i^npyr- <■ ■ 

fr.'i.iitti" he -^11(4, "t Vixnl t« '-.or 
a let o( O'-s and Ma*-'* in tb<> ranks 
of ihr Afnfrican <"f>mm*?ni'*t 
Pany." 

Ear; JJro'j, lifi s<vr<'*.'»! V of ',l\c 
CovMV'Un. ■:. Panv in t!;.'; rountr*'. 
srofrf-i Coniradp Minr.iv snd 
ptc<!;:('rt schslarl'y Mii!! thf ir.v' 

■J r l!;:4i Commiini.-it Psrlr," 
Bro'.'.^i-r said, "has sshot^'!! m !;s 
xhon life ;hml it coKtRitts tiio caps- 
rity to rsx'i-h ins w-sfh fh<^ ^! ri,;rcr'.-,'s 
historic:!! f'l );'!t;ir;i;n! \V( '!'; -lavr 
U) spur 1 i:r..p.-cs a b'i 'f v,<. hr.fs- 
t<! inak<» the rrvotutton tif re b-fert" 
thf Jfisft do." he said, 

r ' >:'ri',i.'dor f..!iii xhvre has | 

I2t ; ilKr-lcnt Ri;i':;*:!)n !;iv<>n 

th«- tn\i-: fi'J' -!!or! here ;i,Ki h? Tia?! 



glad C.;!r:r.i!li; XSurrav had cotue 
i!!T>' :u 1 'liijart !j . (if Ui.f 

"Wh'ti C*or!usi<:. ytu.'^n- p-sys ix i 
3!;c;!; •:' !;• , liii, "a,- WMi:'. 'o't 

>•« St;, ' :::fe l-.uji !<> .sovcit,;' 

th<rtf^- t'oniradr,-* .Mr-ro ' 

piCcisf, tn »i>f t^c frish i'nmntti- \ 
nsM "srl.v m is* ?itrt!i5it!'-s w^*. i 
ra !■«•<!. 

J»:iv W, Ford. Comnuijii'!, ParrvJ 

■artirsn orrasrrrr i!\ Harlem, pledg;*? ; 

the softixiit ot the Negro toilers t^l 

Cofswade Mi!'r->v ^rid fx-Jinted out ' 

IhRt Ne^'ro n\?.-^.^\ i^>r> v. ere enf^nt:^*'^! ; 

In a iisht astsir.-' rh;ti?;) in-ip<Tl.'il- ' 

•'Ji^^iifetSij^^ ■ Afaca ant! Ind; i J 

„,....., 4&ip.»*^"'- '•'•■'' -i^- "'•'' J''''--' 

Worsers CTisb? of x^.y-, cv; -pok.'^ 

atisi frns old Tr;i'!:-!>-'n8! ^■>riK> of | 

Cl'ajioi Nr-Aeli ni .15 <•;-.<-;-■.':•. | 

Peariar Ktionan ?iang nn old ^ 
nafdie KvsiK, Sandv Hinna wivo f 
fniiSid a'iUi Jare,e-5 (y-env-.Jlv. srea; j: 
Jri?,!i ;ea:1p-. rtsrn; ri'ni!-->llys Rebel*' 
S'JHt' Eola Grny ^nric two N'esrrc i 
KhsrrTvop.'wr.s soosr... cird J'>e'oorsh ' 
M;srt(-n. est open .■de.<;:'r. ierj se',era! l 
ma«s sol^s, Miki* Oo'.ci a:.''o <iRiVi;, i 
The Internationa! tVorkens* Order ■; 
errhf?!t,ra plaj'ed. 



APPENDIX PART V 1649 



Exhibit No. 11 

Whether or not I c«n religious, rhether or :iOt I go t-^ ahurch, 
whether or not I tiy to aave my gotd is r&v oTfn b-asineas and none of vj-orsi And 
if soro*; of you thirik I have to go to holl 'because I don't taJcfe the advlco of soma 
critics, I don't vrant tr.esse critics to save m:>- soul. If I g^ to hell I'll raeet 
with the er.iploj'ei'B there, toot 

San.j others say, "I savr hit readin: the Bciily farkor,* 

Well, I read Sngliah very poorly, and it Is about the only 
hint'i&gc I raid, Bie Ikiily Worker is printed ir. Sr.g:li8h. If it was vsrinted hi 
Saelic I would portops re.id it also hscause it is a v/orking rain's papor. I liavo 
not hifsd the opportunity to rop.d so joany papers of this kind in this coiuitry, and 
the day th/it I don't get news of tho labor moremant I dorJt fool is a proper d-ty, 

I ac5 not trying to shovo rsy ixitloriality or sy roliijicn or rsy 
political beliefs iorir. the throat of anybody, Ttuit is »y private life and I ask, 
you to let it rcaaia r^;-' private life, 

Aaothsr criticism Is, "I an sure ho is a nem'ber of the OoaarJsA 
iat Party." 

I TKMit to toll you th.-i.t since the very day this miion mxs 
started I kivc worked Tfith cotra-onists and socialiets and d«;30crats und. people of 
other Kitiow.litiot. ;-.;.a political bsliofs, and they have done an excelltmt jobj 
biilding the oT(rii.\iz:tt%on to the at-vje of Tthersa w<j v;ere able to cme to UaalgS 
Square Stirdon au froc transit workers, lad t,:... votk of all these people h.ac 'bean " 
much saore valx-blc r'.ui the oaipi:ig of a fofr iUrro-nr-EiiudGd critics,. 





1650 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 12 




iBSrotJuftion by 



R Streciin-Lined Transport Workers Union 

By Michael 



8 M li 11 a? m 'i a -lyt ^i i u 
Will n»%!f irs ftftatt iirifjy ''r m j 

«t <i!i)!' Tnf rrlhng Is-i h br ipu<- is »<> 
Btoth s p^ft of Uus isroiii <!h><iW«'-fd 
IfSsan T1 tht i-rgbt H«<^ fy<K th« rj f i 

JM«tt<)- thp w t»ii t r ar rr ar i 

hBc-veaiirif. For thk son of a C a it 
I5:«rry farmer -"^a? bnrn nr^it >nta the 
«n<Js«. of thi. sttusvie i t tsxedara in the 
HTOB-nfv -I f ^o«f>>,rti IrcHni sirxj stti! 
Ijbsfs 'p m ^ biiltt woui i m !> ^ hip 
»affsroj %hi' fi^J-t'ng: tV< BIkV and 
t&ni \i> sfaitijisr ffr ! w 11 Jnia^d 
f& a \r u f%t 1 1 -en w}<m ht <■ !! «>x 
f»e tf t marry 

Bj' in 'bt U<.)ni a» I'i'! % t *'•!•^ 
Strtet \sw "icffc nat on il Ui't i t r? 
«J !>i frsi-rut % I,! I !)i n tUti 
Ss "> cim ti- it Qjil' \ i V( 8ll» ti ! il." 
tin-i 1* fiir > St t i| t ! m< Too 
JBK>n Bit t - >) 

S» \fX s rK > 1 p <,1 ^ )1 r* 

ef tb» hji limg .it 1 h U mi n l i i 
• lifw irion'h* af sni -^hi h r till i 



I r t s-dmi^s, whn-k >w had l»e^R rpailiJSg. 
! t 1 snore than a yo'jj.h hjmselj, this 
* 1 1 il iiS-yi-sr o^ii 'ies4er of lafeot' ia 
1 I iy inlei-fjStt-iS in Amerka'a yoath 

m J li'nt, • Hi? iK'iiK tSi^ pjifieit>sti »E>i5fiik£?ir 
at N w y<?rk'8 UriftiKi TontJi I>ay Fes- 
tive! 'a»t S|>rls!g, sintl not osiy «ndtirsiod 

ht MsdeS Yo«tb Congress at Mi!waukea 

J K i aut aJsK» aiged other tya-(?e ar>3ssns 

I iJ j.?pr8Sontetiv«s, Hs Je«ls Amer- 

■j trawl© iiriioag must take & great*? 

n t tn Mjrini? ite youRK people, swcoj;- 
t injag: tJj« JmportarvCfi of wv>rkmg' witk 
and e^i'acatmg t)i« new Cot^*^ in Am«T- 
1 a ■» rajsii35y storing labor aod pro«r««- 

^hsn Kct in tii? oSfcn «r st aiikm 

mr^i ngrs. Mike Q nil "f'trd^ '^ ■% t m** 

thc« iav* c^n r» g"ntn^ on b-*ha(if of 

hp Anit'ri ^n Lao ir Pany * tyu H for 

< in nm«r - oh arc a fam*l ar si^ht 
m *b B 'o^^h o* th« gmax \*h.<5r« h« 
w t^f HI >r pwF , oipiriati-n. an i a 

< i u*t'c if nrt tViO^ajsEjtl tjsnap«>tt 



JEff r> T> 


bi 


&-K 1 


f 


i 


r 1 






fir . 


^ 




« 


1 




»sa|> 






tern 






7h 




T! 


•mhin 


f 


.V 


"^i 


•^ 1 


f 


Wh a 


h. 


B J 


«tiN 


fi. ! 


* h 


»lUi. 


t ^ 


4. 



h 
1 J ^ 1 
Hi 1 h j4 



:i 



loj, at A 



i ! 





^ jj 


t 


«i>lv 




ial!> 


! ! i 


HUM 


r 


^< mg 


^« h, ) 


lofertsa 




Wfjrk«ts was f-i>tmv<i ia lielj* his cam- 
l^sign- Biit hf? wax bs<sit»F5t about g'iving 
Kift pttrs(?n»i story, ^-jriphasj^i^'K H WR» no 

sppt»ch th*Lt I make will «.iJvt>cst« tH5» 
eltKTtion i'C all Lsbcr Party -candstiatUa. 
I am not. askinf? th» p^oj.'jle tc support 
M<xhat>! QyiH. U b t« thdr fnteigist V^ 
vot*^ thf> -^.vhojsi Labtcif Party ti^rket. Thi* 
Ux\\ my st*>jy , if.*3 t b** sto-ry wf tht* 
transport wark*^rs R^d Uw 5>«<>pW whw 

are g^ttm^ rea«iy *-e- vwte Iftiwjf."* 
* * * ♦ ♦ 

Lt-ave it tj> the tr&^rV.oxi Kinf« of 
W&U Sfcf'^^t &■<? give pk'tity ttf work to 
th« s4o*.>: pi^rf^i'Hs and th<? ka-^-pip* 
bngf^iJi* v-^hen it ^onw? to sitf&lmsr the 
wrs.iteK ot hi>nr»t Ami-rtCiifi work*^r», Antl 
t^hpy wer<' »?l on the jfth in April, li>S4. 
So the 9ifvi-o «f ua who 4^J4>C'd to lay tJvft 
basis fi>r the Transport W'3rk<;r3 Union 
ha<j to Tti<^ct in secret. Omt fir?'t m^^etln* 
was hidd in a West-»Jd« e«ir«?e 3w>t. Aft^r 
that we trot }<'%& swanky. W^- met, ia 
hjtl-way^ iind s^i^^:><^rts. . .a^fd dark a.U«y«( 
On? fir;0 nn-^rnlft^ tiirt^ of us met und<«r « 
laroig-^ in Cenfrftt Fark. It di4n't t&Jt» 
Jong for a |soUe<?mai5 to eom^ aion« with 
his "C'rnon yr-u bum^, bnstk it up!" 
oA.n^ Tjoariy hr^jik u-i up he did. St took 
thr^e wi'*rks b^-fort- w^-- c*>uj<I grt tlh* n>.n« 
E'-jy? tog-tihsr agsm. But ws; didri't go to 
th« j>atk. W$ di-cussi.'<? org'anization &n 
r<x>ftops, and evi-n funeral j^af''«jfs. And 
furt^shftd t<yjms. When wtr h(^«^d our 
first haii for ?^5.(m w*? hjid a ^r^At^r 
thnn ar,'! s* ^?iat<?r f* fimtr of victory 
than whvJi u-^; hired Madt>^oa F-q«are 
ftS)d''rr for tht oj.x'-ntnj^ t^f our fsfsl ftS- 
SiionaS mr-v.:-':it:MTi. A«d yuu kn-.f* wh&t 
A vjcU^ry that sfcft;^. 

But we httU BOKMJtJiitti? to ilsrht for. 



'Ihe Uiampion 



I 



APPENDIX PART V 



1651 



Exhibit No. 12 — Continued 



'^XJWS''''*'^*'^^*^^S»r""-* fi ^V)f>fjfii'M;^g^*^.^ft^ f, j^~ 




^K T? Tj illIIJ* O €z 

Jk & £1. Hi ii!^ O 

is Moving "EverYthing on Wheels" 

J. Quill 



A few year? a^i 1 h»ii t>i^ misfortuB* Thr**^ wwks sfti^r «e "^rr-ricA, ciip T>t0 m«n who wsf* irettinif S3 e«nts aa 

■i-ii work, aEon^ w.tJi thausarni'^ ■){ nXhstf. M>v&n hs^ evpard^^i lo : : ther,i« ^lour f. r "3 h.^-urs a w^>ek wht^n E worit<&d 



iCifcy for ■■.■ ' ^i:.--ur. i^ Ijouroj a <i::*y, i^>■■■:u{>.■^, ■';n:; ^ 

:H4 hiiur'^ : .;. iju>-s a year ur:=i<-r '.'->< n^.---*'- -■■ 

I the masv vi.:;'_»-.)s fypc ;.f c;<rnT-ft,ny ■■.ini-r: \. ;; ,;,!. ■.. \ ,■.<-■ n.. 



C.LO, &r= 



tKf- 



was n hv;' of 



if y«'ar« 7he mtfi v.;; 
jays, sad vv*' ^•;t<.-\',- ; 



P.T.:. , ^ . ... 

PJUsTurtrk Th& *:-.,, 

theri' w.^r*' thv wor^t J hav;-- <:-vo'-' s**.>j;, 

w«> dtv:c..d !o .j,.. s-t.M'h^ng about it. 
%> kbtw fron; (n- s?Art ihst tho proper 



:atk w>th us, an4 wh^ 

: y th>^ hour--! a 

ia i.t^>, U-.i?, ■v^c -■►tvuvi iiic U.'JvO and ff^-^t t-:rv- 
;-'3 iH-rausf? we o'uid not al>ide the path into pi$?t'<>n 

cft^'-. After ■■-' ''■ ■"■- ^ " "^ ' '■'■■'' """■ - ;;.." ■■■■ ■ ' 
went out tio 
-- ^-'^rMtt^ to 
. ^ around 






W.. i,r«<. • 




^i 


Bm. r 




d 

1 • 


rni'(. 






that the : 

<mTv i'n: 




V 

1 e aii^vj 
tiat'thn 


^V' 




. Trans- 

.:;.•,■) it. 
f xmity 



:that 




ojr 'vhoivi Pi- 

rah ■■ ■ .r.,.>f3 a,4 "'ifUf 

fcnd ii; . '■rhr';". Ef w& ^ui' 
1 c!;?!;y and a better hU\ v, •■ 



:.a hour 
n the 'jsiibway, #!©-' 

- .- J < ... <^yst^;ma 

hours A 

. ay 
rfy 

•nt 



'-8,1 

iir.nt* tho3« 

■..4 



sit.. 






of fri, n.!5h:(. a 



n'-t ■;*'< "'Ur prif. 
fir" firtiy.h*')} th'-r 



'if ' ri t.-'n^d hand 
h lhoa« 

•■■1 
■<i 



abor 



!>; r-)ipry, i^^ Ai 



fh.iuM. 



279895 — 41~pl. 5- 



1652 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 13 

pm 'nrm - . — -^" i-- . - rrM ii r. ^. i - - - i rT-n- 1- - i - ^ » 

iQuill^ Isaacs Vow 
iDhcrimmation Fmht 

Promise to Aid Negro«« in Strufgk for Equal 

Rsglite t« Job* at Mmm Meetiag of Greater 

New York Employmeut Body 

Manhattan Borough President Stanky M. Isaacs and 

Jjty Counciiman Michael J. QniW pledgred their sapport 

I to the Harlem dme ajcainst Negro discrimtnation by pub- 

■ He utilities s?t a mas«. meeting Monday in St. Marks Church, 

188th St. and St. Nicholas Ave. 

by ths! OF?«ter Nftw Ycstk Oomsnit- ; 

tea ff« EmployKswt of wWch $h« 

Bev, CSsiyten Pfw«lJ, Jr., !» chsUr- 

man,, 

"The ftght ag*isssi Ne^r« discrimt- 
' r.Ktion," 4«rlare<S l«a»C8, *ig vlttti. 

It is viw3."' he «mphas5x«ia, "U we 

WBir.t dsfmocrscjr to «»ec««l," 

The Bksrtn^ts P)r«sld«S3t fwrtfe** 

urged th»S th* Kegro people ftght 

for » clause to tim »ew City Chtur- 
• tw, prwSdta* f«f * p»aalt,3r &g»JMt 

comps.K'es whicfe «m333<S <iS««te!- 

Rate «g«.lnxt jjeifswis b*es»s5«« of 

coior or r«Jis!ion, 
; Dr, P»w«U. chalrmsn ot the msim 

me^ttog. i*vl«w#4 ths smccesses «i 

»he c«m«»Jtt«« In combatting tle^ro 

(tocriwissttoa. 
Mr. S'owtss tsaaaum®^ tfe*t, the 

€5o«tt»it£«« wsi t»«ei wS«3 l»»«te »f 

the i,R.T. ms m/f*. 

ta-inslag: prftsssre »5>oo the BortSen's 
*nd )^«ateW mil* C0Bftj»al«s8. 
. Ommeliamn ^ffi. pnssSdeot dfj 
the Traasport Wm*te«f«* Ssion, suM 
that hl« uoloa Jia«J won we«kl.v 

Kerpoas «»j>l«reS fey the IJR.T. H« 
■«t)rp8»9iSi th« Ssassawaase el aaittsst 
*cticn by ths Negro p®<^5«, aatf 
whits members ©f W» union on th* 

Q«3ll! i^«4s«d tS!i« full isipsjoift el 

■fels ualran te «i« fight of th» OCKa- 

mtttee te anpkjyaarRt »«fttfi8t the 

IRT, an<l «Ah«r tostltutkm* which 

pr»cUs« SiscrteiaKtloir!,, 

'Th» Tr»a»pcrt Wortasr* tjoks*," 
Quaj ssid. "t« dsterraSaed So wJj?* 
oat »JJ «rtlfka»l (Siffi«nMS8«s aet ajp 
by tJieis* prejudleed utiSity offl«i«i»." 

Abs«^ the os5t$wh«SJng sp*a35«r« 
*»« OlMys Stoser of the Katlsass! 
KfSBTO Cengreiw *ho d«m»n*Kl tS3« 
«(U(i« e<|u*ytl«« for N^roea "to work 
«vrrywh«r«,'' 

Ot»«r pretato^ijt aqjeettwrn were 

Rev w, L. lme«. A. ^«hn«mi. W«l- 

t»r White. T. AjtooW Kia. H«taT 

, Kraft. SSasbstij Reiss a*y«e« »n«J 

ftiany others, 

'' OrtanjiBgtiPns rejjresented at ths 
»i«!t&vs were. Aa!*rtc»n league fiarj 
Bsace «n!i Pre«4»aii, aptewm •%?»««*■ 
«f the Wofkers' Affiaace. NtitKma! 
»«««> Coiypress. NAAOI", }f»tl«B«l 
•Uelxsji I^Rga*. '»ea«h«ni* Union, 

I*eW*aw CSwaMaStSsTHMiem Di- 
;iri?ten of as* Oewaanuafet rau-ty wsd 




,« 



I 



APPENDIX PART V 



1653 



Exhibit No. 14 



MmM Ammmml 
Mmmmm Tm^mwrmw 

The A»©clst«d Bllll!*^c,, will 
hold itM first &nnm.l tooca mnd 
eatertatemtnt thm Smt^j evening 
at tM Tmmpmt Kail, ISS W. um 
St.. Irrinf Sella, piml4«ai M th« 
organimtldja, sunwiwetl yesterday. 

"The Asmcisti£d MtoAr he said. 
"Is an mmnimUm of th« hilnd; 
foremi^ itiid ec«ifeolI#d dtrectly by 
Ihe fe%^ for tue ©wuomlc, wcl&l 
and cultwml toetfeerme»t of sU! tJbc^ 
Wind. 

Spoas<»» of ihe affair • Include 
Contressm&n Vito ■ Marowitonlo; 
Cottaciliimn -MkhAe! Quill, presi- 
dent Tf&tmpon Workers of Amer- 
ica, CIO: Donald C^den Stewart: 
Oraiivilie Hicte; Max Bedacht, 
president International Wtsrlters 
Or4tt: Justice Dorothy Kenyon; 
Rev. C. Everett Wagner; CouRcil- 
m«n Salvatore Nlnfo; and Jerome 
l^Rv-tg. president American Fedffa- 
^<m of Tochers, AFh. , j 



1654 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 15 



Randolph, Quill Head 
Equal Rishts Meetinsl 

Sunday M &f%-@y-#rpr4 J: "9 - -i-^&9~~ | 

Other Uuioit leaders Accept InYitetlons to Speak j 

Al Cosifere»ce Wed»€«dlay Oa Negro 

Dmcrimim&lmn 




A. Philip Sandoiglu-iltll,,. 
Qui!!. AdanrrrPowA' Rabbi I. C, 
k tie&I and reliflous leaders, we sch< 

spvas a-; a mvnster mass meeting Wed!ii«8daiy Bight, 
at the Abyssinian Baptist Church, 132 m^ lS8t]^ 

The m««tfa5g Is tetef eaSle^ ia i 
tmppori Kit thx ii»tl-4SserfaK}i»ts»a 

the Urfeaw C«teK«a Fegalstlwt »a^ 

is s^!5S.or««l fey tts« M&aSl«ti»« 

Clttejw Committee.. 
Th« ant'i-di'scrtmiostlon KBs in 
<iuestion a?« no*' before the Kew 
York State Aa&emb^y arj<J Serat«. 

At a meetUig of She MarAattan. 
CiiUfns Co!T3mUtf>e at t&a Harkm 
S'MCA l-tkJay nSght pl&tis were »m- 

k'U><i lor W«<5r««s<l*y's snsss iae«t- 
tof, B^presenWtU'es from ?&rto«s 
»a.c5e union, fraternal, rellgtous, so- 
cial asjd other org»aSzatSom votefl 
for & torchlight jmrsde t« precede 
the roeetirsg at Ule chursh. 

They voted also to sersd & ti^'e- 
gatjon to AJbsny to suppoit as- 
sea-.tslywen and senators to ths?^ 
effort' to get the snU-dis^rinv.ns- 
iliin h'T;'! on* o? eommtttee. 

'.f!»e wa.*! set for d?- 
. . ilekgatlon but H U 
ISkeiy that soa^e jsersom wHl te«^'« 
for Albany directly &tl^T to« rha^ 
meeting. 

Great «rith«si«,«H greet«d the 
comrolttee's report that It had dis- 
tributed more than imm postal 
c»r«S«, {>etitSoM and t«l8gran« 
throughout the Stats aesi^fd to 
bring- ?>f6'ss«re at Albany for pas- 
sage of the hUls. _^-~-— — ~™~ I 

, The SoUinvlng organisatloas arej 

i among those which are supporting j 
Wedue-day night's ma.« roe-etlng ; 
and whkh wUI haye large repre- j 
scntRtior^s prps<>ntr Kattona! Asso- 
ciation for the AdvftRcenwnt ol 

j Colored Pwjple. tTrban l#agM«. Mu- j 

■slrtans I'njon, I.ooaS 802, Art'.erie»n j 

|; League for Pesice and r)emocrafy, j 

i Arsierican T^egion. Vetersris erf Ft>r~ j 

I elgn Wars, Modern Tre r.d, the Salfm 

IjLjTeum. the .Coordteating ComaxH- 

[tee of Youth Action, Studsat Lite- 

Irarv SocSrty, KatSonal Negro. Con- 

Igres*. Brotherhood of Sleeping Car 

il Porters, and Jewlah People* Com 

■jtah'.efc. 



April : 



APPENDIX PART V 



1655 



Exhibit No. 16 



___ ™™™ ■• ^" ' _^„mmm , i m 

Qiilll Wil%kk®»ivj, 

At Bronx MaatliH^^ 
Dm Aiiti^Seittitisiii 

p«r«i»iittei of m«i&l mteorill^ will 
be heM.W«da«id&y M.S F. M. In 
tlit MOTitefiow bonfr^teu, Hewitt 
Fisoe »^r I^ugwood At®, 

nUtf M' iim J.wf«ai!# Wmm wll 
pr«t#« mi «h«rcl»i ®| 41ff»eal 
d»iKwtali»toM will l>t r®pr»ent#d. 
tto« ap««l:«« l»el«<Se Mlch«#l Qtifil, 
li^febl IC&t«, Mmv, W. T. Hawtliorn* 
of HttRt« Feint FimJ^t^tan 

fressl-: «ii's Ooiima; Dr. Bta*- 

b«rf. a€i?smn-#; Wiiteft* 



1656 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. IT 



iJuiU Llrge^ Labor Back 



TT n v 

4j '^ 




'NeediesflJrive 



Transport Workers Head Calls on Union and 

Affiliates to Support Fund Campaign 
for Lab«>r Prisoners and Famili^ 

Hew York City's Councilman Michael J. Quill, Interna- 
tiona! President of the Transport Workers Union, last we^k 
called upon all the members of ^ his organizati'^n and its 
affiliates to support the 1938 annual Xmas Drive for labor's 

neediest cases, it was announced by the International l^bor 

Defense. #— • — • — 

"Aware ©f iht Tety 



amd *fele work iene by the Inter - 
nati<»ial Labor Defense," Mr. 
^isill stated In a speeial meseafs 
to tfee IL©, "in behalf ef ©rfau- 
i«ed l&ltor ibro-afhoigii the i»s$i 
ani pfgee^lnf y®ai», I am feappy 
to ^n with yea in f^wt annstal 
Cliristmas Drt^e f»r laltor's Need- 
iest Cases, 

"I am arflisf all la ®«sr «ni©ts 
and ear afflllat« wgajsteatlons In 
the lalNur aso-rement, aad I ais 
aski«ir all my friends personally 
t« «apport t&e C&rfatiBaa driipif 
I fee! confldeut thai whateT** 
f©al y©a ha're set for j&ufstivm 
wll! be achieved and that fnxiAi 
collected will fo as has always 
been the case In the ILD. to very 
worthy fifhters for the w^arkera ©f 
Am«Hca." 
Mr. QuU! and his fellow offlcsrs' 
to th® Transport Workers Union of 
America have already made gen- 
erous per^nal contributions to the 
Xm$s Drive for labor's prisons^ 
and their f^aaille*. """^ 




Wear 
LISLE 

HOSE 



BILFIELII 



ifosfity-un^iui 



APPENDIX PART V 



1657 



Exhibit No. IS 



Ml 



i€«ig^ Si* 



t- 



From N^ITV 



movemmt, and llteimtiir« fe»i't 
^ftM tlwlf Imi5^ to ^pc^twjr % gmM 
New tmf& ftr« J^l, for tlie benefit 
of pt^itioa -nim^m tixm Na«l ter- 
ror, lit the M^^ iy¥«f«l4g Fi«m, 
tSri 0i. w«^i «f Bnw^wmy, it wma 

tartan C««i»lit»e f*;sr P^IHfeftl Htf- 

*aS Mrs. J. C, Oufgerihtlmer, trea«« 

Aibwrt Hi^^to, H«, Stanley 
iMftc*. CimnciliMu Ctimrte Below, 
O^iacllmaa., M^^gl ^^ Hon. 

S*m»d. H«a. tJsb«r L. BurdieK, 
Him. J0ii» F. ICy»l«, Hmi. Jerry J. 
O'CoBi^ll, M«a-« li«^y G. Telta«. 

StelM Adier, Mnw Blltet€to, Ml- 
k« Bmisd, M*l«l» Cowlty, ^fej&rles 

t«>o Hubermtn. Matthew Jmfch»n, 
Oewge ®. IC&ufnmn, Paul 3. Kern, 
Kaymond M&Mey, Q«thrie McClln- 
ti«, CIIiro«l Odels, 

KaroM J, Borne, Boaald C%de» 
Stewart, Leiand Stowr, 0«n«?vle'i'e 
■T&ggartl. Tamirte. Charles Weld- 
man. Hichard Wrifht and Im^tm 
Zwiptaiith. *- 

Georfe OiMm and his 8«;!ety Ot- 
ch«sfra will pj&y for dancing. The 
fSoor show and e»tenaiiime«t will 
oomtet of Luther AdJ«r. Morris Oar. 
»ov.?ity, I«if a-lksoB, Kathertoe 
Locke, Raymond Massey, Benno 
Schneider and other stars of radio, 
stage mad mrt^mx. 



*«- 



1658 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 10 




y 



!aaers 
To Hit Nazis 
At Pitt. 

PITTSB0RGH-, Nov. 1?, 
—A ImrsT" ■»-""-- ".--.-■*■;.■..■■ iq 

protest . . .„ m 

against th« J; ^>^ 

■ tomorrow at the Irene 

K&uf maun Sett! t 



mmv 



x.jSB,U,ili 






'tid among thr 
si&iuiing l&bor aH<l 
gre85«i¥e flg-ures m'ho -.„,, 
address the rally are Ben 
Gold, president «\f the m^ 
l^nktlonal Fur Workers 
Union ; Mii»^g l.Qgpt> prtn- 
ident oF"*^ " Transport 

f:nt of th& 
OiflceWorkera Union; Eev. 
B, Fj^ Ci?ip&:f ord, and As- 



jJect Cbar|«s 

Gold, Qui!! 

r« In Pitts- 



,K- i j[ iS.S gft 



burgh as delegates to tne 
CIO Convention, uow In mb- 
sion here. 

Rev. Crawford and 
Christter will report on 
their recent Interview with 
the State Department in 
Washington where they 
ap|>ea.red m delegates of 
the ^^nsorinir organisa- 
tions to demand severance 
of relations with the Nad 
government. 



APPENDIX PART V 



1659 



Exhibit No. 20 



What s rfappenmg 
in Mexico Today ? 

V. LOMBARDO 

^OLEDANO 



Chmrl« HEMDLEY 

M. GUAREI6A ^ General 

WerktM. A.F.L. 

Mk!ia«l QUILL 

Pr««.. Tf«B»i?«rt Woritef* 
0»io», C.J-d. 



^ 



^^«t»i^% Oonfederatloa 
MtMom Worker* 



of 






FriS< 



GORMAM 



Ttf*:, tlK«s*S T*xW« w&rktr* 
UftSOiS «rf A»«tlc».. CXO. 

Of tier Sp€ak€r« 



M1XIC4M OAm^lili 



jr#»#rr«w Higiif 



AUSPICES: Anitricftfi Fritsds ©f tlie Mexican P#©|ilt 



1660 UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 21 




iku^^ 



C8iSi»li»Fi«Ei «iii iSi?Eiifrfi, 118. 
215 FOURTH AVfNME NEW YOt^, H. Y. 



OFHCF: D WSECTORS 



Pr«««s««* 0»»«ii;tt«®, jawNer ; Mas*? tmCmrm^'^ MBk C<mmim». 
e*. <^mir%m A. Ut^mm. &mmiml &&^m»t ; mmakim. m<i»^ e* tnt9et»n at Cotos?^", 
Ewe MAsKSi. &B««-«tJ?» Sm-im-my. l'!-r!«f«wsi|y« Wf«ss!s«« to!.s3««, 
Jksms F. S#A. IS.D^, : C&sinMin, M<i«fe®r8*^5» C£Wf«tltJ»»; M«!tj.Ur, tet«wm»<»ia»4 W«*ar« 0f«J®?-. 

FARMER OIRKTOtS 



A®, 

«r«arl«« B&ram.. WommUe €kx>mmUm AmmiMim. 
Water a?i»tte. r5y C«»fe Ymikgf <>»p«r««««. 



Cfegj»? A. »!«&«, Omim^mns GmmmU'^^ Ms.r%mnx A«s*rla««!. 
Omimssm^s Osmmmn'm MMtiuMtm ' ' " 



J«Ty W. m»^0tn, <M>Umm«^ Cimmmnm UM^mm Amt-xn'mmsm 

LIST OF SPONSORS 

Mrs. W. EsM»sil R»wl«. CfesirmAt!, C^5»»»sm*w t«ii««®. 

Eat* BrisMtos, AsiAsr, "How to Sp«?s«l Money." 

0r. Kw!fll»« IS. Bws-w, FTO!f«!«»©if ol E!»ik>«3m«s. Oste^fcS» C»l^s»*lt?. 

Ew. M»J«iato« Cl«mi**ll, P8«>i4»B«, Brosx Ck«5«miS*« BoeUsty. 

tiv. litems P«rry Clark. FTOfewso? ssf Gsv^rroment, BarMis* CfelJ^**. 

.I^n J. KI5«». Witor. Hwml N«w Terter. 

Dr. ioiiR t«««|Bf E«i««;. Eihl««S Catttjr® Sockt?- 

K«ssJ«5l ^•»«««J4, Jg&K««irw VAnetot, N«« York tisb^rvakasj* Aw*!:! 

O, t«w^J F1«W. Fr«!si*»int, Ms8Ta»tt»n Comamsm CosspsMitf** feAgmtJos;!. 

Dr. A. A»t»» FrtSKSrSefe. ^mimmr of Eeojiomk-a, K«w T»rt S»l»«r«kj. 



■ Dr. a«lB«3r K. «<»lstete4B, a«i*?. Ffw S3m«$r«3«-ii». 

lf«J«3» S»n, Vr^i^rA. Naitocsal F««te™ti«jR «f S»W«»»«nte ; nm/S-miA^r. IJ«B!t Styas^ S«tk«»!i«nt . 

Ch»rtm. J. K«»4ls!y. P««»«kS»:»t, A2a«ri«a.« r««l«w$l«»> «^ T»flfe«r». Lo««l Hfi. h. 

Albert Mefrnmnrt. awrcWtJt. 

fia™-, Jofcss Hi»yn«i ttolm««, C«BK»«inlty Cfcurrfe. 

^timm A. Hatart, 1&e«k«sIv« S«er«t«s-ir, Ne» York Wrtma t«s«a«. 

Or, .Jofea A, KSnjptary. FuMe Hsssltis AwtAority. 

r«lk« .1, I.«rt;!rtiii, ActSn^ CW«f of Kiafor««m«nt «!s4«r tfe* Mlatettss Wsi^ DStfi«So». !>«8>t- of tj&har. 

t>?. Itofeert M. M»flv«i-, Prof8ie«j.r of Boniolmy. CoSumfeis l»»J*«r»Sty, 
IC«ti!5«»ss MeS»er»ey, Ex^cuti-ys S«»rr«ta,ry, L«!««s« «f Wtmmn Sropss*?*. 

iS*«:h«w Napmr. Secretary. 0«5Mrte»ni ol SsnltotS©*. N«w Tork City. 

Fmnk Ote8»**a. Kx«e«tjv« S«5;!Wi»ry, New toA UssiwrsHjf Ohrt«ti«a AfMKK-SsiUofi, 

jr«Rft Ellis Fotettl 
~MScis««4 J. Q(if!t PrmfeJest. Tnsnaport W«r!s»« UnletB ; »««»fe«J-. N*w Tork City Cmindll. 
♦A, FhiBp E»?i4olph. F!:i8»*d»nt, BTOtWrhofxJ of Sl«epln« C*r Porturx, 

Or. EJnsraSipy Bclswsl*, C3i»irw«n, B«r«a!j of C««pe?»}J^« M««ilrf!a«. 

Ai«3e E««9e, 8t«te KsssiwiiSwe S»«r«ti9.rT, Am«rte&m Jjstisor F«rty. 

Ro3« Sdisn«l<l»rTO*ri, Fire«S<J«Bt, Wi«»en"is TrwJe UeSon I.*i9.sn!«. 

Marr X. Si5B!ti»*it«fe, Diwtor. Gr»«nwkh K»i«e ; VIss&^PrswIAsat, M«iBte4p<a Kera»l»« Aatfespltj-. 

Koms«» t%«sa»«. NfctSoma Osalymaa, Soefeii»« Fi«%, 

C. ». " 



APPENDIX PART V 



1661 



Exhibit No. 22 

CONSUMERS UNIOM of 0. S.. Inc, 

17 5JNI0N SQUARE WEST NEW YORK, N. y. 



;u 1 IA80» AOVISOSY COMM'TTfE 



O>t*T0N WaSKJS, f^fli4t*ii. WjltiAM M MAtSSorp, ]«^WPS G-.: , " y.^^fir BRAt'V. 

V'ic« Pftfsicicnt*; A&Sl,Aa'e ScfiuJ-if END. S«tr*:4f>, Br- T*^flsufe' 

A.RIMV.-'S K^Atft. O-f^./fO* 

1>. H, PAi-MER, TfiHnu-«! SiJJ>-irt'Ui"- DfXTEs M^':rr5^- Pu';,, .■■< -< .''^:--- - 



■ ■■HA 



Ser 



^, iJSy 






i'.v.'r- 



1 : n. 



(^>- .r,!;-0!;i. 



t'-3; 



; : n. , 



i r'-n von 'y'- 



:onvA u 



I^^3ia A" ■- r 



*N. 



P,", ; :-ili-:", tKc article" on Xylon, novie cen«!!-e3, girdlcr., WfOc.\; 

iijloij, ar: 1 n-.lV: — all of -.vhieh will aj.pef^r i.'i thr Octn-' 




1662 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 23 



WEVELTIiWAm 

(MiElHOMIfy 



mkitn m*m mi stay I 



TRADE ISJUES M.SO FACTO«! 

I SJ««a«!<m Wife > .^ .J 
'" *?>^ '^«^1 IV'*^ 1 






, .ir«4 ttl *• """^ 

Liter C««n«(»~ **• »»I^' '*'* 






^M4*« 



»•* 



PROTEST 

brutal nazi i 
persecutions; 

MAS8RAliy . 

AT 

MASTERS m^rrrvfE 

J03 ST AM0 RjVEHSlPE 1^1 VB 

WEDNESDAYDEDI 

I 
SPEAKERS 

Rabbf Jb$e|ih XefHin 

rewfut aw«chj6 chcsci? 

EyqeM F« Cofttfelfy 
Samyel M. &llntUii 

<:4IAi1ZM/iM^ A.i_.l>. 11 taiA.D. 

■ 

AMERiaN LABC^ PARTY I W.D 

2824 dJlOMWAYO'P ST), 



SBQMS^ORS 




Ssrvlca 


C QEBli 3 8 i on. 


DORO'^H" 


K>;:ri'os; 


JAKES 'Xt 


•rH»'«i.s t'.iSE 


Editor 


■ '.flSIOK", 


CHAmss 


3e:.ows, 


Cit'i Co; 


n'^lltaan; 


MICHJiK 


- . ^UXLX*, 


C 


-.J Ijsanj 



paoF 



•:- J. 



'Jnio:: --ical 



R*BBI ISRAEL 
(iOLPSrEIN; 



Transport «ork»r» 



Cnion. 




APPENDIX PART V 



1663 



Kxii ii;iT Xo, 24 




VES OUILL 
11 ON RED 



Party Orders Him to Back Anti- 
Communist Oeclaratton or 
Lose Counoil Nomination 

ISSUE UP TO All fiOWINtES 



Move to 'Purge* Bank and File 

Begun as Big Unions Urge 

Members to Enroll 



Michael J. Quill, li«ii4 of th« 

"", <■ ort Workers Union, must sJe- 

n«xt Tuesday wb«thsr fa« 

.9«rlbe to th« resolutions con~ 

x the Comra«.nlst« sa lh« 

Utu ifea Simtm &» be*- ■ ot labor 

or l0»«5 the Amerlc<- *? party 

'■ '■ a csntuvwiH! for re- 

;-!g«iber ol the City 
^i-uri-i! trojTi the Bronx. 

Tius was dsMiided ye^;terd»y by the 

"' i'xecutive coromnt«« os! the 

,:arty, which adopted a gsn- 

5o5ation calUnir upon »very 

.,tft of the party to uubscrifee 

.■ttitntion, platform sr-d 

inisi- resoSution. Of ths 

parij -5 ; ijirty-odrf candisJfttes, ai- 

risa<!,v ncrftinatftci or prosfwetsve, 

Mr. Quill te th» orsly candidate to 

whom tfes execaiivft committee's 

reaclutlon !s known to apply. 

Mr, Quill, who did »ol attend 
Tlsur«d&y njg'tot'* meeUng of tSele- 
gat«s from she Labor party's dis- 
trict club* unA affiliated tmloas 
vshirh adopted th« antl^CamirtuaSst 
reaclution, was on his way to San 
Fr&Bclaco yesterday to attend the 
convention of the Congr««» of In- 
d^iatr Jal OrganJssstions. 

Murray Weiast«}n, vice pre«ld«Bt 
of the Annalg&nnated Clotbins 
Workeris, a member of tha Lalior 
party executiva committee and a 
delegate to the C. I. O. convention, 
SUw to San Frmncisco la«t night 
He was delegated by tfea executiv* 
cosnmitte* to hand Mr. QuOl copies 
of tJ5« anti-Communist resoititSon 
and the exeeiitjv« commtttee'a reso- 
lution and Inform him that a reply 
from him waa expected by next 
Tuesday at the latest. 

Next Tuesday is th« Uust day on 
which nominating petitions for can- 
didates for ih? City Council xoay 
M filed with the Board of EJectloiui. 



The Party's Announcement 

The action of the State executive 
comrslitt^e was announced by Alex 
Ho«»«. S'a*-e sprretary, in the fol- 

° • . !dl m«»»ting: of the State 

1 5>-" onimittes of the Aixseri- 

' c^ K - party, held Thursday, 

Oct 5 »f State head.5V''&i^<'rs, 151 



f. 
t • 



3 P M , de- 

h candidate 

.t. Labor pa-rty 

I ub««crit-«* to ths 



1 






eonfereftce he" ; 

t«r oa Oct. 4, 

"Any party Tandiilate ■«' 
r^fiis*;* '■■ ** ■",.•,.->> ,,, ,, «i 

anc0 - 
the n 



-;05»- 

wide 
Cen« 



SF- 

d,: 
tr: -^ 

tilK 

the L> 
Cornni 



would b« made 
f metnfeersfelp ki 1 

The leaders are \ 
- ■" *'■;■■ party ol ; 



C 

Ci- 

aofh 

to SI 
State, 



Usjioriisita CJrg:*-d t« fcnroll 

""'*■"* further infiltration of 
:nto the party and 

ml of any of the 

g-anlzations, Mr. 

■■ -he Amsigamated 

t rs ncnt out Irtt^rs 

< throughout the 

'•.pfn of the psrty*8 

■ ■ ■ :.i»i,s and 

! urging 



>v.Ui Tjot A'!j! ?:,, 
pr!niary contc:^ 






ths Tnf*!rT;a- 



and the T'Hitfd Hail'Ts, 
Mi!Hr,ery Workers Uni<^^ 
OW men)hf>r». 



•(i 

ti: 


:'. 


A!n;! 




:;.,!;U< 





?he 
! t<>e. 



>i;i-(>V.-r ! 

■?oi!stion 



I he antl- 



Ci.,,'i»titUru^v if.- 



1664 UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 25 






Prngressire €'€pn§mitteJ 



To Rebuild The 



Atneriean Labor PtBrtu 




C«fl<iya*»s For S>4t« CommiMee 

To tlie BntfMsd Vatets of the American Labor Party-^ 

\royR vMe in tke S'prmg Fruu.^rjes !>« Apsil inj inr State (;<>r!aiiittecin«i, five trunt each Ajiwmbly 
* I'HstrKt, win detenatne the csmrse And program of our Party f'or tht; T>ext twc years, Thev wi!! be 
crscical ye^-s whtch wjl! clecjde whether tk' Amencan Libor Party will li\e and fltnisish or whether it v,!!l tk" 
|S*»erafe> imo a mcUtian mcffcctiw grcwp. 

We Wfove th»t thtf ALP can feecome a vital foree for jx-ace and progress in the hfe of 
Ottf S*a*« «!B*I aatioo ©oly . fey the elcctkm <rf State Committee candlstiates pledged to supj>i:!rt 
th» p«POjP'ai8 «rf the ProgresMve Commmet to Refeuild the Ameriran Labor Party. 

Ollft SASiC mO<^UAM 

W« sKSsers «> the ot^5H«I ALP principles adopted m 1 956 ,jnd brought up to date to mchide the 
p^a^ssm tw* ccmfrooting us — especially keeping otit of the Eiiropean war wb>.-h thrgateris to engulf m. 
Th» can be be*{ acaM»piy>«5 by a "Return u> the New Deal." 

Sads a pop'aB! can be made effective only by the wsdft tisa-'.'i ^t;f>;x)rt, by fn<iking the At P truly rqj- 
rescntatjw m manual md white eollar workers, orgirnsed i.-id un-iiiianccJ, fartners, sma!! busiocjc men 

Unf««t««ately. mtr Party sn the p&si has had ikj such wide appeal. It has been organacd arid con- 
mM&i from the ic^. A. F. of L. and C.l.O. mensbcrs have been cxckKJcd from the ALP !e.sder-hip. Two 
riwfe trf the ctawnt Jfete Executn^e Qsmmittee arc nsedle trades otfioals and their p ud la\>.ver'^. L,ilx-rais, 
f^prtsmt^^tjvm <?f other trade unkms and up-Staters delbcrately were dented places on that governing b^dy. 

ALP masbsTS, who showed independence of tteught or were critical of the ruling clique, were hai'- 
ra^ed. houndesi and threatctised with expulsion. C^aratfess indstfntta"- .w J n-iu'ticcH were endured in the 
b^kf drat mxh atetbods ultimately would be aband<aiied, 

W« lai^ hesitated tt> in«il«t« a prim»ry cewtest m our Party. The results of the dictatorial 
pdKde*, howtvtff have been so disastrou* that we, who represent the V3$t majority of the active 
dWb Sewien and trade untotw o( the Party, wodd hetray our trust if «c did not speak out now. 

«UrrS Ofs THE ROSE DICTATORSHIP 

Under the feadership of Messrs. Rt^, Antonint and Dubuisky, four out of the five ALP State A*- 
•emUyimn failed of election in 1938; four out of six ALP New York City Councilmen were defeated in 
I9J9. and the party voce in the State wan cut m half. 



APPENDIX PART \- 1665 






Exhibit No. 25 — Continued 



'■■' " ^;'i"t;rit; the p:trtv ni .1 S.ilsf "rs/il ;n-,ui' 1j t ' u!. Hy )'e*i 
! i";';-.-,si\c !'t:<';. Mr-«i--., K;iAi.' .'ir.d Dubimkv went .s !• 

^:., H..!l 



tlmg toi 



♦THE WEli-Mf^OWN RED HEiHING 

In tfct-nt vcarJ. t-icrv progrcssHp nw.uurc t'iom slum ck-aramre to controi of sttxk garabitag 
!ij>, lift-n c-aM<-d "Comniur.istk." Ever\ puHIa- hgssre from Pfesid^-nt Roosevelt to Mayor i~a- 
f.uarJia, ■.sh<n .uh.iyswt'mi; fe,3ture!. lh.!t Ut>uW in the slightest t"«t dofcn the profits or preroga- 
tives <■>( hl^; !iusinf><<, ha^ t>cen calkd a C^ommujiist. 

}vi • ■ ■■ ' . . . , . -i --.(-Ki-s calk'd <^in)nn!n3-;s fo«r yearS: 

■:,•,: v/lv : ^ . iifpriscd chat the vhitrgc now should-; 

i!!!-' fh>- J ■ ' - h, ihcM: M-ry >..ime >;t'iitlenwn, bccju-*; wc sn!! ad\'.v.!te the? 

I- u ■< ■ iolLir au rn WPA >>r the fio-niillioivtWkrl 

.:.i-i?*-- X', , ■. " ' , ■ u-,:~t\ .v^.iiv--. \s'l'A cuts, i ':Ki<ty he t- .k mIcut .i~ th.:- tombil 

] :! : ■ , ,,,^,f .f^-p-, \-,,Jnit! t<iv, jrJ< ^^.ir^ Mr, R(i>»: p.r, ^ l;p :-.->"\ k;o t«i peacejif 

ii • ■ .. . f,,jf, f,,,,j; ijome^^tiC prffhlemf, the (^dufFit; nf which i? th«;i 

N^> Nt: !;■.,; k!;' ■ ■ . ! I.:-:, i<i;~i a;S:lir,it!on" !s sDcrclv the .JevKc r-i :i desperate man tO| 

,.vi:i .!;■!■■. >ii'^ ^ ,il'; ,■ ; ■ 'i! ,^ ; a ..:. I He -.-k^' ^r> hmi»tf o«!v last Spring wherHK JiSStiikJ li!«i» W:5M»i 
M.:n t . Mvt, ,hu,x- Ti, \ .^ 1..;i,' Ti»i, HiPtcd Mr. RoH- on M.iv 15sh, t9?<>: J 

'I hire i-. ,! ^tr<m>; dtrn.imi fhaf ut: shoidd «>xp€l WaWman. Hs" slandered the Party aird 
dtitlHTad?', «-5 mil to hurt it hv r.itsin;-; thr iMUf of <l'ommtin««i. . . . He is animated by a 
spirit >i ittW '..■ tuit), . . . H\- a'o not knt'n of any memhir of fiitt Part-i sht, h al-.o affil^ateti | 

»iih thv ( i>m>nutu>l Pu!r!\," | 

"■■ I :-; !!i-: ;~;.!i< ^ >! 'T;. .rnn ■i^ni-.tii"' H ^itTipls' <i trick to "nik o! rujn." Ytvu h.t\t! it tin the authority«l 

i!.. ■■■ ^'.xlrnufi ni.ii;i!)£\ ■! ifu- mcniixr-hip supports the Pros;rw»!ve (ximniittee iinti it? programj 
h A •. \', rk (■'■. iio'i. \> ,„it i^t the 9J ALP ciuhs endorse the Progressive Omuiiittet, Praetjcatly evirj*! 
vi'ii- J, ' : : i.^, ],\id~\ ,.nJ the vre.it rnajontv of recent ALP ^.indidiite^ tfkewi«e support thei 

W. t> »t««if c.iSegorieaIN that ad charges ot "Conmiunism" against the«? pet-f!on.s and the Pro- 
j4rt's<,ivt Conuiiittee .jre n-i-crlv f.iisr. 

WHAT THE COURTS HAVE SAID 

Mo-^i- R:.,.-. i1f)K:n^kv .rid thei! ''i-iiten.inT, h;!rry (jrecnher;:, late chairman ■ >t the Keu' ^'f irk fkHinl 
ty ^ n;i c-i..!' I r; h.i\o Jer>fi-d '.l-r A'.,inii: f.t di. t,it'.;-; ;p. See what the Suprenie ("ourt had t<i -ac .iKnit thetii 
nietluH;-- !■! ioiinmt; iii;r p.atv | 

Fi; ! .^; .iJi, thw.irtnc 1" i;icc.ii .ittiinpt hs^ (trceni'crg and associate^! to hoki o\er m iithce ,1? C<HU!ty off 
ilciaS-. ,1-tci Fitiii^iv D.iv. t!h: Snpicnie Court, sustain \i hv the Appe'late !">t\n!on. ordered the recon^cr-iing' 
o! a X.-w i; I-,: (iDUr^ty (do- \<': ■>;■:;. uiuler an !mpa;t;ai chairmap, to v:o..i neu' utficers, j? 

I his ».!^ the firs! tnni- isi the history of any political parrv in this State that the r«ctho<Js i 

<-f !!s leaders ui-rc (•\pIl^cd a-, io hUtaniiy undemocratic, obstructive and deceitful, that the Courts 
to<ik thf matter ctf Mipt ri i<.iott of a party convtntfoti out of t!w hands of its erstwhile leaders and 
,ni! !i m the control of a court tpptiintec. 

A; ']•>■ r,- -f-rxc'^rM:- ,,i •]-„■ Ki-,v Vcirk (j-nnti r.-immittee a full slate >><. Prrii;ro--i.. • ' Laut.!*., 

y ' ' ' ''■': ' "' lariM": \i ■ >i-. Kcivfin. Scret.ir.', .«!id Herman '^humhn. Tr- i-ii'-.-r. j«aig 



1666 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



• 

than 20 menil-« • 



Exhibit No. 25— Continued 



THi "LliESAL AHB i^iOi COMMITTiE" 






(.!>. 



, i\ 1. . I, -r :-.;ir!. 



right-v, !ni< s<H-i'.!iiii;>. who h-iif c oJitriS.u!, <! ,m ji 
thi?v lia',i> K<-fn !••*-'•tr«^fiJ!■. i'l^!,--. (!>>■ .,■..-.■. 
tion or f\t(«ii.r><»n,'" 



thr (ii.ii..!-. :,; 



> i,„iuf,xi"j<t! •>! 



LET us REiyiLe THE AMERICAN LABOH P^RTY INTO A ©RiAT DIMOCSATICAILY- 
RUN LAiOH AND UBERAL PARTY FOR LIBERTY. SSCURfTY AMD PEACE 



PRIMARY DAY 

APRIL 2nd, 1940 PoHs Open from ^> h ^ 

Vote for the Progress i\*e Slates 



APPENDIX PART V 



1667 






€: 



Mi-fiit 
A- 






Exhibit No. 25 — Contiuued 

PRCX5RESSIVE . COMMIITEE 



THE CANDIDATES 

of the 

PROGRESSIVES 

for 

STATE COMMITTEE IN 

YOUR DISTRICT ARE: 



I6?h A$s«««bly Disfric* — Kings County 

* 

mViHG HERZENBERG 
MICHAEL COLMAN 
PHIUP D'AMATO 

imm JAsmt 

MANUAL KARDONSKY 



279895 — 41 — pt. 5- 



1668 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 20 



Latlie* Aiixiliiiry 



One year MO '-li'' m-jr.Ui U.f 
Cossnel! o$ Womert'5 Auxiliaiici ^ 
«»s fojinei A generai cal! «a* I?-- | 
iued to ail AaxJaarles oX Trad** 
Cnions to send aeiegtue?; to a ■ 
mmmg at the Womes's Trade : 

Jarmir.g tl.l". CouinrU at »hich ' 
amhlt-m-. ai!<3 wor^ of W!>jnj»'s 
AuxUiar.t"> c&ak! ts^ tlssfttss^d and 
*>xp<-! i» !,. f i-xchaaged. 

Rt'i«e«»ntativ«Si h<im ths PaiRt- 
«»!;s. , Bakers', MBk IMvere', Uino- 
typs» Operate**'. Machteists", Shtp 
Yar4 Worisers', feehaScSaEis', Op- 
tiO&JU', Butttirrs'. Tmnsport 
Worlters', ajMi WP^. Wottors* 
UnS©n AiiXilJB.rt«f »tt*a4e<i. 

Tft« d»S^&t« UsW how U>e!r 
AuxUiartes wwe Jorrowi aad the 
piogwas and 8c»«ttes of their 
partkular AiKat«rSe«. Froa the 
reports of the delegates, with fe* 
eiesesJttons, their orgSitiizatitms 
wptf farasetJ during a strike oi 
their bu^sacds or m&ic re&tives' 
tjniosi. 

Osir AuKiters' wa.? atie of the 
«w;es&to»« sn« our del<^»te «x- 
pi«in*(t tli» irKidersi ai a Mn ]f%l- 
jjsaro «('« rt< rljig the asrsr.tii of 
D«' ')'> Ui4 ulckH*^ the B 
•>• 1 it ^ t I »1i»f » M f ! i- 






New Board &r««ts L.A. 

Ladlf-s Auxiliary 
Dear Sisters- 

Please a£cepl the tieartfelt 
timrUiS and appreciattou* of tise 
apteodid wortts of encourafeiafct 
wid expression of good-feill teo- 
«i»!re£! by you to the rwwSy eleftied 
officers, and EissecuUve 8i»r<i of 
the Tr&»spoft WorlwTS Uj!»» of 
Q!cm,u:r Htw Vorfe. Vow stead- 
fast cooperation ana aj>S«n<}i(i 
support ha* be«a gr«saitjy tostru- 
mmiUi to taiildlag up the B»rsUe 
of ottT Uatoii memfeershii? sn<3 
Uaeir fajaUtes to many of the crl- 
tkal i^riods of oar orsattUatioa. 

Our Union feels very proud of 

the woaiea ia oar austi5S»ry &ia£ 

looks upon It as sax instnsmeat 

I which *tfi aa* <Sa5f rrow to miKb 

jjBore powerful dJasensions than 

at present. 

In the cottrse of the ttext two 
I years the TJs«o»'5 Exeeutive Board 
i will kxk forward to clo^r ctxjpe- 
j ration between the AuxiJiary aad 
I the Onion, to tl>e end tliat the 
weUare oC the tho«sa«<ls of our 
I »»eaibers a»<J ttwi.r <JepejK5ent3 
»1tS tie feest seryesi. 

Again expressing out deepest 
(nsnisLs for kjut warm etwoarage- 
tnerit, wc remain. 

Frat«rt283!y yoijrs, 

T1i<> E'jtet^tive Board of the 

'liamjport. Workers UnioTi 

f.f Cireater New Yori; 

Aufttm HjiitaB. Prpsitien' 

Jt ,1. r!t»«imi>«i. tte'c S«><. y 

I,;. J'aiser, Krtanfiai SsT y. 



«j. 

SBife the fortssatioK of this 
0e«iieil many new Atsxitories 
have sent drtesates to the C«*m- 
ctl atid tn m&nj c»es 05ir ^eie- 
ssat«s &ave he«j respsKUlhle Ser 
the f««si»Ue» «^ saeh AtaiM«*ias 
as the |>Jaml»em pft©tt>«g?»vers, 
Horn & ]^ird«n'si. sal tSje tausS- 
ts^as tmimm, .^-i^^— — -~"'~~ 

Wh«e «ll tte» t«l«f*t«s »a»t at 
the tmi asaSi&i s^fererwe wttis 
tiia^*t«8 imm meoiMXWm with 
»tsiich «e sre affil^ited, sueh m 
Wam«ti'a Itiaa* tJisJca l*««i» 

*"■ ~ '^ sn 

^„t^.Sm~SSrS^ty say ^t «« 
h»v« orjaaSse^ «sd fit'^n g«3d- 
ance to thoassnds of wosaea ia 
both AJPi. *r>& Ci.O. orfa«l«»- 
tteas. „_.—'-"•" — — — . ^0, 
Aa a jjemsaneftt ^efat* and 
EducaUotJaX I»reetm» of the 
Coim<-il of Women's Aiwlliaries i 
wo«ld Uk«> to invite more of ota 
merohers to attend this eoKfer- 
eiiee and hear of fhe gmsd work 
snivft Auxi3!jirtf<i have coBtiiijuted 
Mi furthfrii!!? the L»oor Move- 

The itr'it Annual Confer- 
ence is so be heltJ at the Wo- 
tnin't Trade Ifnion |;.e»g«es, 
Saturday, March 5th at i P-M. 

^nKt«« 1.I1-8MIY 

nsairlady 

BrAQkjjjnn t««»l — iU A. 



■ 



APPENDIX PART V 



1669 



Exhibit No. 27 






'Bronx Workers in ^ 
C. P. -Called Meet i 
Hail Taxi Strikers! 

C^omHHiii!*? Part) 



rhe N'('«>ri",f> 



P ^ 
* -n 



H.,y-- 



inhntpn 



man fiCs) wnrkr: 



i 



',Viv<; ro;>.:-ted fo 






u:.;- ''•' '!,.• S'- '■; Rn-I ^T'^.: W-rk- 
' ■ rrs liui' -■ "■ ' 

F»vp t, :n'»rf 'h«' C^'tT.- 

' n;'in;5i Par" 
:^ SfX'akr!-, ;•::(]•!; f^-: Br.xiskv, a 

;■ and Sam K<<^in, of Uip In'prrs- • 



1670 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 28 

Women Ap|Seal 
For Siipporl of 

P-eace Parade 

I Lf!a«irr» (iail for Foil 
Farlirjpalioii on ^ 







«»rtdors.?s the pc^ct parjul? - iU<(i 
by tlit ATinfrJfjn LM.ge for ffarf 
and r>f' Miss Ns^lwm df- 

rtere<$. !-. ;i! «pif»n aSI mfm- 
bP!s and friends t« pxil'yipni^ 
fully in this hu^f demanstraUrin 
for p^-aee and d e m » <■ r s «• y bv 
marrhing- in the !<pfrial wor«en"». 
cos^yngrnt or 8a nixed by iht «>r»- 
m'Mce. 

"Our hrar>fhe«i arp a»ked t« g^i 
on th«> |»l> imm«"dtaip!y in thrSr 
ronsmUir*'*; te mobiShs' the lar^fst 
tnrnoai <>t %Mimtn ihaf am TM-.tff 
drmoTists-aUon ^'•»<? *" 

>>■» Yitrk <.inc! ■■ -• imor to 



gar.:, war. 1 

?h*»v wrv 'I'if'v are oAnafd lo- 

g8>thpr ■ ...!!- plan ne4 program 

for at'i^ins i* 

'"l>*'t w^ the ninety psr rent or- 

gram f«r pf.-^rp. Wf h?-se thf 
nam?»rifal sSrpngSh, Wip arc s'ssin 



Mrs M;-tr^;:i:f 



■;s: 



.-orlng U'i':* par;i'^ 



APPENDIX PART \' 



1671 



Exhibit No. 2tt 



sssa>.->a«-««N'Ka'K^— 



Progressive Women^s 
Council Merges withlWO 

OuMamVm^ Organ bat ion for Women's Ripilits In 

Aiiierira to S|Hir Aetivitlf's in Amalgatiiatioiii 

Rose N*^l«oo to <;o?i!i,oiie Leailership 



Thp Interr 

ji • , ■ ■ t h p m 

wit n 1 n^sr »"- ■ 



Work- rity office today an- 

f the F'rr.ii;r€««jve Women's Council 

■p 4»arnpd for itself a rppii- 



n2rpf»rrw>r!f. on 

'■ ■■■■"■ ri*p'''^r^ I ?^ 



•fp by both 
hif, ■Kind ol 



."> «!nis 

progr.->= ■ : , 

rsrsani??'?! Many old and new frlenclK were 
■ " "•!--:-.■■■ on b&nd lodsy t/> gre«t Rose N?!- 
• mn whpn »h?- officially took >v,v-r 
»■*■ job In the city ottiof. of , 
v.o', m Fifth Ave,, 15tti floor. ! 
-: » letter ad- . 

^IS Coij, 

ij,- ,,;e no^^.-.ced the merger and exprer..-^ ;; 

T;. -, and th? belief that the amaigaroatior: 
f-xperienrefi .'orrrs wiii «crf;;erate , would serve better than ever to 

(.^,,,. ,,.-.,;, '. "^.'vr-.? -.-,r,-.»r-. o::" ■'■•>?- "promote the progressive tn''iiie-r.:-f' 

g;: "in the life of. American 

fc ■'■'!' Ji K-s hood." 

4*. jork and H«»r« fiill statement follm^: 

l.WfXK! mptnnf ■ars'P D^ar Friencte: 

j p,-..-r -.-..- --i' n "■ ,, W»> rai^w thus: ?-snfV-ir*-iif?T!*« w ir--. 



i rlubs <<Kest,pt<»d to do ex»(~Uy ir.--^ 
ta-!;)^ ■,',-•«•'< that thp Women = 
:c. • tn. r 



f.i 



TO HKAI> f>Kri 






nip, wp hope 



found' 
mpn'.<; 



li Avp . jn!.h Fioof. i fi*> i>ew , 
, .'.'ine number wiil • b« Algoaauit^ ' 



head of the I.W.O. City Women's , 4-2321 



1672 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 30 



Pag» FwBHP 



wgft^ im i iim t ;m i mM -a 



Organize Worker$^ Children^ 

Or the Priests Will Get Them 

LW,0>^ With Lom-C^sl insurmtee^ Lag» BeMmd 

Meligmui Imunmce Rackets 

— — -~«™»™™_™__™.^ Bf MAX DraBACIfX 



mm Cfailcl«a-s Secyco 
* tematioqgj WorfefTs < 
PTts^s new betwem S ss 
sand m«mbers. Since 

uary ; 
age 1- 
of 5 4^1 

1 ! . 
ti . 

T 



' ■ ■■■■*■■ to Bothlng. For m\ 
isft&l W<^k8i« Order 
s fessed more nearly 

r:i< aiteiitlon 
« our mem- j 
t- *^J iratiOR of i 
<.tp to BOW tiiey ; 

>,hhdt«ii mio our Order; 




-*ro't« 
our C tVi'ta 

K Of Off anl?in« « rl. - f -"^"d »"^^K us. &t i*>asS 250 » week. 



^ ^'■an('! 



jjouid maite effort* 

nns branch*^; a>:j 

' branch shoaW r.of 

o the ch;; ., 



i.i!)s lit v.i.,.ik Ui.il < jimist fee l?ft 
Srt !'afns>aiifns; it tt aii-yesr-roaad 
isijrit, U !s fV?iry-day work, 

» « » 

rneniber of the Na- 



tlOJlii., 








tn-iU' 










!jjera»tioit:tl W 


n T 


OiiSw iM-M'pts- chiW 


r<*r. 




IS vpars 


of ag»*. Jhf 


tSis*- 




WTrfe^ra' 


tftildrea 


aff 


mi 


r> us » 


^•(^J,r^ of af 


• {ht"i' a 


t< ~ • 


■^f-<»k. an:! 








■■': w ^^'k T ; ■■ 










um 


i.f 


'. ;,,.,:. ' f 




f*v :( 





speaker on s 
rhem*?'vf- < 



j.r.!» cor: 






•f ih- 






I { = 



f i.i-. .5«r!ftM' ni.iy »t'ii i>e foJ- 
l-''.-f1 hr V,;p t innradf^ of our 



APPENDIX— PART V 



1673 



Exhibit No. 31 

THE BEGINNING OF THE LADIES AUXILIARY 
OF THE TRANSPORT WORKERS UNION 

BY 
MARY SANTO 



A GUIDE FOR LADIES AUXILIARIES 



BY 



/ ISOBEL WAii^cc SOU! P 



RULES AND BY-LAWS 
OF THE LADIES AUXILIARY OF THE T.W.U. 



UNION TRAINING PAMPHLET No. 

tducatioriai Depdrfment 



15? \\ csf «!4th Sirtf! 



Ol NMFRICA 

Ts f V, ^i or k , N . \ . 



1674 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 32 



Women C,P. Leaders 
Honor Mother Bloor 



Veteran Labor Leader Telk of Trip to titc Soviet 
Union— ^Prawf* Democratic Sticce^s 
of Land In Recent Elections 



A group of women lesders j»W 
trlbut* to Mother S3te Hetvts Bloor. 
who recently returned from the 
Soviet Union. «t « luncheon yester- 
day. «t th« New Hunkow Reatau- 
rftnt. 

Ih-imip&l among Ui€ speakers wag 
Margaret Cowi. ehalrtnan of lh« 
Women's Cmnmtmion of the Com- 
muntei Party, which sponsored the 
mnner, who presented the chssir» 
l&dy of tjhe day «ft«r laying a 
glowing tribute to the "grand fighter 
and greajr comrade-." calling Mother 
Bloor "the symbol of progr«s»lve 
womanhood of Amerlea." 

Rebecca Orecht. ehalrlady. wet- 

corned the enthualaatjc audience »nd 

called Mother Blocs: one ©f the most 

1 active fighters against reaction &nd 

I CUKE& MOTiiSII BLOOR 

j She continued by n&ying that 
; Mother Bloor for more than 8U 
years hajs been and aim Is con- 
.'siderert the epitome of ar*. ardent 
/l«rhter In th«» foreground of the 
•itruQtglT of American la>>or. Up- I 
hoMinn f.hc Amf^rJcan ri*vo!u'lon ^ 
.ind li% rirwy-Bli- fr&ditl'>n, the j 
veteran labor igmdn wtU &« th* 



\^tiSGn of protf«Milvi*m fsar our 
younf pioneers, «h« concluded. 

Mother Bieor. when introduc«d 
received an ovenrhelmiii^ ffv»tto«, 
which tndtd wil.h the Internattoml. 
Durlnt the course of her r«m«rlEs. 
*h« vivkily impreawed ' upon the 
ftudiersc« the "democratic «uoe«si" 
of the aovitt Vnimi. Il®c»lltnf the 
cifht-lwar «l«!iiion«trstlon la Red 
g«iuiur« ftftir the tnn-oun©»meat ©f 
the el«cli«m rttur»s. *h® enthuM&s- 
itc83l:r told 0l tli« ftlm^ute hApplJseM 
of the cSiiseni. 

AAiong ihB rn'mninmit $umts •who 
welcomed MotJwr Bloor were fNiui 
Croable. Jean®tl« Turner, ^J liMfr 

^Wm&W&m^Km, Orac« Kutchijia. 
cm«rl«s KrufS4b«la, AJtsn* D»m€», 
Je«il« Tmit, Louse Tlwmpsmi, nm^ 
Warto, Kelen nmmm, Benitjs Wil-- 
llams. Audley Mow* «nd nom Nai- 
»on. 



APPENDIX PART V 



1675 



Exhibit No. 33 




To Hold Rail 



MoteA *l^r»iis1&^liMie 1 

In Speakers list 

For Feb* 7 

%^si frteiiJtehlp is u gi^at a^^t Iw 
ptmB, %Ut Ammc&a Comaalttee for 









!, 



foster If lettrtsfeip b«lw»« the Aifier« ^ 

lean and Soviet- peopks. i 

Ths SO¥M Uakm has gimn mn- \ 

stant evidestc*' of its respect for &n^ I 

\tmn6Unm& toward the Amertean 
people. Tfee Anmrimn Commlitm \ 

I for Ttien6&hip with the eovfet I 
Union feels that it can serve Ifce j 
teier«£te of Amerieafs Soviet frier.d- 1 
ship best bj tetogtof clear md m- \ 

• tboritatlve inlormatlon about the ; 

I Soviet Utilon, especially when the | 

:new8 is b«clo«4ed by &nt' ™ ■ 



ng Its fixst 
night, 
About 
World 



I The committw 
.public meeting 

on the sub|«;t. " * ... 

the Soviet Umon. i 
i Crisis.'' 

I The speakers will include a former 
i Russian general under Kerensky. 
Genersi Victor A. Yakbontoff; tho 
: editor of a Finnteh newspaper. 
Tcivo Vuorf'-s^- Anna Louise Strong, 
writer an :nalist: the Rev. 

Thomas L, HarrL*;; Milton V/olff, 
commander of the Abraham Lin- 
coln Brigade and Henry Hart', the 
novelist and critic who will act as 
chairman. 

i The meeting will be held at Man- 
hattan C»nt«r, 34th Street and 8th 

Uvenue, on Wednesday, Feb. 7. 
I 11 1 I ■ .. i^ 



1676 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit Xo. 34 



O&tsp^itej 



^Ides Heads 
Group to Aid 
Jailed Pickets 

Urges Hf %rp«t«t 
Haniite Appeals for 

^ppmlMg for puMit mp^mi tm^ 
the i^tfwtt of th« ftflj-tfertf 
&M womtn itiT««l«| to &#> 
»tmmm &i tht French 
U&rth » Mii m, Bmm- StWes,! 

th^ifmm. @l the ^fgy^j^^ SsClBiri 

mmmiiim tor Use pte^eU »| «b®; 

d«y that tt« e«nmllt«« hM «>» 
mng«l fw «|^ak In tM cmm of 
lfc« defeMMils who Imvt alr«awlf 
Urn "W«i.'^ 

MmiM.^ Mr. ^eli« mM., «lliat tli«y 
ffil »l.r#afly ttest t&« am^.^ ^r« 

h*.i»itm whmm mT^nimn &i tfeg oumw 

mi w«r« fesswroOlf ami wsjwtlfte^ly 

**«t» ww»ltt«N! Im ikmii»f«i for 
»ppmM &m U r«r^te ami ll»« r«c- 
«.ri will ^^tifr mm Irl^ w« *»- 

M«mb«r$ of t lie oommlttcft te- 
clude Mwtfea Dodd, daughter of the 
tmtmr Amlmsmdor to Oen«a»y; 
Hgramis Sfeumito, theairi^ia pro- 
^^^^> l^li^ W&lkei Som e, tour. 
^t: irairWSSrSrman of 
tase Prc^essl?* Oommltt««' of th? 
Ato«rfcaa Laljor Party; »«mas 
OSfeeal, wrlt«r< Vtncetnt Sheean 
«rJt«r; Arthur Kober, j^lsywrlght.- 
»ad Davjd MciCeivy White of the 
Veter&as of the Lincoln Brigade. 



APPENDIX PART V 



1677 



Exhibit No. 35 



Jf aequa$ Roumain, Famed 'Negro Poet, Say» 
Writer's Job Today U to Figlit Af«in»t Im- 
perialists; Speaks at Reception Here 

JXilLT WOKEMt- Hff^ f "7 1AO 

Jit«Qaee Roomiun, noted Haitilnr po*t/|«^Skriter, 
speskiag' at the banquet-reception held in hi* honor Wed- 
nesday night *t the i87th St. YWCA, denounced the 
imperialist war in Europe as another attempt of Nazi, 
British and French imperialism to re-divide the world at 
: the expexsse of millioas of exploited colonials. The even* 
' wag under the auspices of the New York Chapter of the 
Leagiia, ,^ ! , Am^can Writers . 

Roum&in called iipon all writers to enlist tbemaelves 
in the cause of the persecuted Jews, Nejrroes and ail peo- 
ple who are ground down under th» heel of aaf^rialism. 
In paying tribute to the writer, who is sow exiled 
, from his native land after f>ein|f sentenced to three years 
: in prison for his struggles a^inst imperialist ex^oitatlon, 
: Max Yergan, head of the Committee on African Affairs 
; and vice-president of the National Negro Coap^ess, said: 
[ "Mr. Roumain is the symbol of the fi^rht against im- 

i perj&lism, and Haiti, his country, represents the un-ending 

— "• battle aipilnst trnpertiUst opprrs- 

of nalBions of pe^pl*.'' 
8^f>e»kins for th« counrS for Pa«- 
Amerfcsim I>em<»sr«cy, Dr. D»vid 
BSfroa, »-«rn««t that A«»rJc«'s good 
neighbor policy was disappearing In 
the reSaSioas between America «nd 
th.» Carrlfeean ration. He <J«i50iinc«d 
proposed hfMs before Confrpss and 
th« newspaper c««si»l8Ti calling for 
the seizure w jHunefuwe by Uvs 
United !a»tea of th« European 
possessioiu in the We«t«m Hemts- 
j*ere. 

After expoelBg the slwtxJweas 
speech of Charles E. Ltndberfh, 
mouthpiece of Wall Street, who 
descarJ!>ed the Western Henitsphere 
»s the natural domain of the 
United States, Dr Efron deci»r«i; 
"It S» Uimecessaxy to point out 
the thrp«tenin« tmpUc»tlonx of 
these developments. The suggested 
sefcEure or p^srchase of tlie Europeac 
posewior^ is typieaJ of the tradi- 
UonaJ Imperialistic polliry of dealing 
with people as if they w-re cattle 
or merchandise, yurthermore, these 
same prep<Mals, ta well as Lind- 
bergh's scurritouB remarks consti- 
tute an unspeakable affront to the 
Nesrro and Indian peoples of the 
Americas, wht. comprise a great 
portion of the population of the 
Western Hemisphere." 

"The ominous trend just anen- 
tloned." he continued, "In oonnee- 
ticn with the E«roi»e«ii possessions 
le. unfortunately, cn)y one of sev- 
eral recent development* that make 
'one wonder whether the Oood 
Neighbor PoUcy is atlU in practice 
I need not call your attention to 
the attetapted trmnafer t f American 
vessels to Panamanian registry, as 
a means of evadia* the recently 
NeutraUty Act. I 



1678 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 35 — Continued 



"S«cii attempt to use the sover- 
elgaty M * sasmll sSster i«tln 
Ajs»ylca« coiastry to the b«a«nt af 
certain atUgpteg c«aaj>ani^. la, la- 
d««d, hardly eomp«tibie with ase 
Good Neighbor Policy. •. 

•'T sm prcmd," !i* wc-nt on, "to 
beJoag to «6. |>eopk tor whom the 
cry 'Ub^rtf has slways fdand « 
Jty*Rg echo, lo the firsf Negro peo- 

ipjp who h»v« b'-oken theU chains 
i>iivi cnsshM slave domtaaUon after 
fen impim»,^ie w»r agatost Bon*- 

IndlvMual arjd »s sss WsM»n ciUmn 
that oae of my »n«»st*>r8, 0«nftr«.l 
Andre H^ud. fought ^ ^.v-snnah 
,Sr 1759 tm the ind- of 

Korth Aawrfas," 



Hiitef, 2^. 



s*«ie" ?©i* ft 



.0 *'U.h its r»«ie.l 

-scsersce, aa tRSult to maa's dignity'. 
We conctemn & rc^gif«e which bums 
the teooKS of K«me, r-sd«c«s Hln- 
densHh to stSe-»c«. outlaws seatheU- 
caUy Rembrandt, Cesanne, V«n ^ 
Oogh. nn& d?{ve» mto exiJ? the best I 
thinkers of ia«KJ«m Oemmny. | 

"But wi, also rr-.f adherf to i 

those %-ho hsvf . >nsd the [ 

great writer houis Aragou and who \ 
sr.&lce «sc of the s*me methods of j 
hrat&l pers^cnUon wh»# p-r«t««dins ' 
fc f%bt H tn their «a«t»y. fey j 
:;V,!ilon«; of men to th^ir | 



"We oppose a 



'.a^e I 



f«r Ml 
is }» 

oy vihen ■ dest i 

;•■.,-■,. :!inr;t of this »;.«iu • u«:i.<.^r6cy ' 
is r«>fu.%K5 to Afric* and Ir.d<;- 
'■hiaa. 

"An Ki ' UiB _h».r».et*r of 

this w».r %'h', tsns tt> craf^h 

m in Its mmv .mMntTy, sno 

It"! fffeet upoK pi«»ent a&y history 
of the American pmpli teems to 
n;e & more >i!ir«nt tMk than to stir ' 
the. dust ol &!-di!v«5 ir. a profes- 
sion »i mfttiner ot to orste upon thr- 
fijsyre of iitsmture. 

"Who k Bot KS«!ftst war i« Sot'. 
«*r, I urg«d the voices of the men ! 
of good will, from Arg jnttna to the ! 
lJniie<| States t-o urSt«, to harmon- : 
isee in « singie symphoiiy ot broth- \ 
erhood. May ?h*y rlw aca prociaim 
Ih* iiashajtabis; wii! cf ail th** 
Ampricas lo pre**r¥<' ,sie ineiUm- 
'Able treasuTTs .jf huni»nity— p?-8ee 
and iJbei 

Oth«r , -. v»-!> p WUiir.ro 

^ Ptek«-i.s. K, A, A, C, P. i<'3d«>: 

*ef« re»<S by Ov,3ndo!>Ti Bsttnelt. 
*»jJ koowii .Hesns writer. 



APPENDIX PART V 



1679 



Exhibit No. 36 



Wt^AnMiMm ^^g prngtimrm ^ MNfamm^tme ^ ^ mmdi IPmm^»m 

That text nd am Oj^rn Lenm «»Mm!^ C«r g/eamar mitv atT Am mmMmii» t«araw 



wIsimKct ihry be Isbersk, progiT«»v«r», tfatAt sss«s»«», sue 
otlsws, » Itew to unite rhtli vsrsusa itsrces w s» to mMum 
vidarjf fewr slxrir cocswboss gcatls. Tl» F»«Mts sa4 dm? 
tiivtx »tv wrii «ws,re «l»t itxxitnscy wsS w«» il its sap- 
parttn sir* um<»d. Accer^tisgK-, they msv mm&t oc de- 
srrtqtiag tsscJs amt? « «il «««». 

On the iaMfnttkiejii kkm; ti» F«tcii^ aa^ $Mr fmwb 
h«« tried to pjevost jl ymi»i tm^i^ggfmmm treat fey sssw- 
tag stiaj>id«sa betw««» the Ssw«rs UiMOS «ttd sdset ssatksas 
m«rr*tif4 m msitstsictns pcaa*. 

Ob thf (kwtKstk «cei»e the ir«<c»w»»afies «« sttcoapting: 
tss spJit tlw <l«t&ocr»oc Sposit by sis»i!ar tsctk*. Rffiioiat 
that her* in Americ* thsjr otamst ^t <«r with s i4<'fvmt«ly 
pro-imKax appeal, they strivt ttt ptnert American imtf- 
f»c»j ttmttsxxeM m thtit wrs ««4i. Wuh tiw sum ol 
turaing jtfiti-fMCBt {«e{jn,g jigiimt the Soitet Vntoti they 
h»v« enco«r»ged tile fintastk f»i«feoo4 th«t the USSR »fl<J 
the totiittansm si»t«s »re basioiJIy a^jke. By thts ssrssesy 
tbey hop^ to cre»te dissensKKt »ii»o<iif tbe progresiaje force* 
whose united itrtngth w » first ntxmrmtf fcr tise dekat oS 
ixxism. 

Some «4t^cere AaKticun !iber»Ss ha»« WSen «»«o ;h» tr»p 
astd unwKS-ingiy «Kleti * caiu« to whk& they «r« essen- 
tially opposed. Thus, « outrihef o^ thna Have carele^y 
le«t their jignatures so the retent Bianifesto <sasse4 by she 
s<f-ca!W Comroissee for CisUural Frwsloro. This maru- 
fesco denounces in vajjwe, undefined ternas all imms ai 
' DtctatofiAip" and aswrts shat the Fasiis? states «nd So- 
viet Rua&ia eqiually nvensce An>M?rica;> mslitutitfen& and the 
dentocratic way ol itfe. 

Wbtie w-e peeler to dwell on iacis rather than person 
aSitiei, w» j«l it t» tseceisarv lo point out that among the 
•>ijj:«er» of tbts manifesto are individuals who have for vear^ 
had at thetr chiel political ofcjecti^e the maligning of the 
Soviet people and then giwernmcnt, and ic iv preciseh these 
pet^ie who are she initiatcirs and cwitrolief^ of the com- 
nriittee, 

A number tjf other committee* have been formed which 
give Up iervae to democraiiv an<S peace whi!e sKtually at- 
tacking the Soviet l-'rikon and aiding reaction. Honest pet- 
sons approached bv 5u<rh committees should scrutinize their 
aim» ver) casefuHy 2nd »upi>ot( anh show groups getiuine- 
!>■ interested in pteservitvg culture and heeiiom and refiis- 
>ttg to serve as m»trutr»?nts jor attacking the ?-c>virt Union 
or aiding Fascists in any other way. 

The undemii^tied do not represent an> coinmittee of 
organiaation, nor do thr* propose to form one. Our ob 
ject i« to point out the real purpose behind all these at- 
tempts to bracket the Soviet L'nton with the Fascist statfs, 
aitd to make it ciear that So^ift and Fascist [nilicies are .ita 
reietrtcatly opposed. To this end «e thouU! Sike to stress 
tien basic points m whivh N>\ict vcKulivni dittrrv Sundamen- 
tally jlrom totalitarian lasci*ni, 

i 1. I'he Soviet Union coritmwtrs as alv^aiv to be a con- 
sistcrit t>ulvvark against nar and ag^fessum, And worits 
unceasingly tor the goal ot a peaceful international order 

fit A. 



2. It has fiinswwEPiS rscial Msd wuriooaJ |w*j»iSice witH- 
!« its botdenv, freed the mknanty jwqpJe* ettsbve^S atnittx 
tSw Titar«< sns»«Uted thm devejopcneat o< ibe c«!tt»r« and 
essMsocasc welfare ai sfeese jMwjiles, and t»«4« the estjitt*- 
8«se of 3J1S1 Seitmtisra <»r any rasiaJ taireowty a craaiftal 
ofesae. 

3. It has socialised the mewm of prti<^«i«ii30 and ii*- 
tribwtior! thi^ough she public owrxeri^tp of itidustiT^ and 
tbe coJlectiviaatk* ai agricultare, 

4. k kas Mtabiitdsed a»tio«wi4e sexaaless plsannrng. re- 
stjltiftg in incresaiagly higher living standsrd* and the aho- 
^itioo oi uneiEploytnent and 4fpmaton. 

5. It hm built tfee tnsde uniors*, in whith almost 24,000,- 
WO wwrkers »f« orgisiied, into she very iabrk of its 
society. 

6. The Soviet Unioe h*8 emsncipased wosnan «r>d she 
jatmly, and has deseit^ied an advanced system ai child care. 

7. FrofB the view-point of ctjlturaS freedom, the differ- 
ence betwe*t! she Soviet Umon and she Fascist countries is 
most stnkitsg. The Soviet Union hiss effected one of the 
most lar-reaching cuiturtii and educational advances in all 
history and among a pc^lation which at she start was 
alsnos! shree-lourtl^ iilitetste. Those writers and think- 
ers »ho« books have been butt>ed by the Naats are pub- 
lished in the Soviet Union, The besr literature frorn 
Hoiner to THomaa Mann, the best thought from ,\ri»tot!e 
to I^nm, 1$ available to the masses of the Soviet people, 
vvbo themseivei ac ivelv fatticipate m she crestion of cul- 
ture, 

8. It hav replaced the myths »nd superstitions of old 
Russia with she truths assd techniques of experimental sci- 
ence, evtendinj; scientific procedures to every held, from 
economic>i to public health. And it hsus tnade science stnd 
scsentihc -studs ai adahle to the raasa of the people, 

9. The Soviet L'nion cotisiders political dictatorship a 
transitional form and has shown a steadily expanding 
deitKicrai-'i m evetv sphere. Its epoch-making new Con- 
stitution guarantee* Soviet citizen* universal suffrage, civil 
liberties, the right to empiovment, to leisure, to tree edu- 
cation, so free medical care, to mat«rial securitv m sickness 
and old 2,ge. to esjuaiity of the se\es in all helds oS acti* it\, 
and to ecfuasitv of all racrs and nationalities. 

10. In relation to Ru.ssia's pass, the counttv Has been 
advancing raptdli along the niad of tnatrrial and cultural 
progre-v m wais that the .-^merR-an people can understand 
and appreciate. 

The Soviet Union has an economic system different from 
<>i;r osvn. Hut Soviet aims and achievements make it clear 
•hi! therr exists a V)utid and permanent basis m mutual 
iJr.iis t„! n>..peration between the U.S,.-\. and the USSR 
..in behalf of world peace and the vevurin and fteedom of 
all nations, 

.•\ccord..tgU, the signers of this ler.rr urge .Amencam of 
whatever political persuasion to stand hrtnli lot close co- 
operation in this sphere between the I'niied States and 
.SOS if I Russia, and so be on guard against am and all at- 
tempt* to present such cooper-simn to thi-* critical pernsd 
V the .iflairi of mankind, 

SOVIET RUSSIA TODAY 



1680 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 36 — Continued 



.AMHMI9 mm 40» m m ** ' * ** *•» *P*» i*««r Ji^rm 



"Tit Sr 



jftnttmat 



D«, TMoMja Aewnt, fnfttnt •/ Mri- 

trmt. LfUmd Stmnt*^ Vmnrrmt 

tiMmt txUtr HtKttmt Cfnftrtitcr 
r*a». HwrTOX Aittnw. Frtfnnr ./ £«»- 

D«. Ch«UJO S, B*eW(«, H^mtrmrt f r«»- 

^•^, /ff. 

Mao«1C* BsTKn. «r<Ujl 

L<»«» p. BauiL, EJanr. M»4rr» it* 

T. A. Bs»»w. M*i'*'ci J»*€itt, F»r~ 

Aucii St»»» BiACKi»«<.ff. tifrtftti, 
u-rttrr 

AKtT* BtocK. Tkntrt Guili fitt- 
ffsdff 

KtCHADdt BOTWl. »«•# Vflltr. 

SSfUuai Shako. Krurr 
Si«D» BanKU. triUttii 
Ro»»Y B»iy»At'fr. wrtttr 

P«0*. DWMW-HV »•»»»««. 

Pr^fttssf »/ tnfiuk, Cttl*mH* 
vrrsttf 

Pr^ffti^r «/ fm^ak, S'rtt' Ytiri Vnt- 

KATKMtKlE DlfViSllKl'.t 8!,*»i«, trttktr 

Mrr* Bisnesn, t»r«(*>r, »u<»« »/ <*» 

i y. 8*OM»4ltc, »ft»r 

Pior. R.mMT S.'«»\t««s, Hiitnrtk Pre- 
ifitar af Sfalo^r. Srti Vor* Ct*- 

R<:>»«»T .\J Co*Tif» ocifiT 

I-fSTRK (OHSS. ttrtUf 

Kvif OiCKTOS. rdnorml tlag 0,f Co/- 

I'm I ft K*Ktr. Uftirr 
Pi«t«(> f'{ i>f>.VATl\ Ufltrf 

V***) t^ntr/tturr i'^mmitfff 

i'E.ir, DiXtSTKV Doit! vs. t),f^,!mri,l 

if fr->nlKitt. Small CeUrft 
\\\*yti Dt^Plfll, uritrr 
f'«<lF. r., <.•, DCNN-, Pr,i,,,,.e .,( /:«!. 

et f'rnri, l\ttrrn!% nt I'allUrme 
l'«.1?. GfO«C« B. C»t«!f^ (;A*,r»!«, !,> 

.»Mi 5,«.«„ ;■>.„.,„„ 

r«A>, Ht\»y Pmrr K\i»>iiiiri /• 

KrN?i»Tll Ft«i><. ^er< 

f tOrrnmi, I. Br^n Mau r C^tlt^r 
\lll-r WlIUKOW KitlJ'. U'lUr 

SEPTEMBER 19J9 



<.(.)- 



Sa*a 8**» F>B». wr^rr 
WttUAM O. FiRa, !«.. C»»Kr»»«» •/ '*f 
8»»nl. Jwtrric** Smtmm l»iMmtf 

l»«Me FlKSMAM, imtri- 

A«o»s. Fia«»», wmrr. mtv 

WaUBO F»ASIt. mrittr 

Wa»BA G*C •rtM* 

Hl»«) Gbluib*, «r»MI 

J!o««rr GattNnt. Drp*rfmrni •/ if"#- 

fej^, h''**!' Ytrt Vrntrrttfty 

/»»*<* V»>rtrritt 
ModTtMW G«AV»», «; rik« Jmrriet* 

Ph. Jobs H. GtJ.\. tt*»tmttt. ftrmrr 

fFf/*iif*i */ tiff Jmftirm* E**»*m**i 

WitUAV OoM-t*. «•»«» 

MAVHJtt HAt^niw, .4><«<^o</« tdtlar. 

''B*9is .!*#■•*/" 

f:.*m, P. HaV»K. ftfitrrr, uriirr 
P*Ot. Samv«1 S. H««»«» Prtfttt»r pf 

Rmxrit*i L*»f**t* ttnd intiitmti9Kt, 

Cktfttf* V^nrrftfx 

Rtv. Thovas L- Ha««is. ,V««'/ f »<•<■•■ 
*n># St<rrtt0rf, Jmfftfmm Lt^fttr ftr 
f*f*tt tl*A J}fmt>tr*f'y 

0.MH5SU. HAMvrrr, unw^ 

CiillAKVJJtB HjCRS. uritfr 

Plioi', Nn»MAX K, HlM«5, BrUrlmem) 

CuAltLSS j. HtSt>lSS. frfstdfnt 7" <'«-*• 
cri' i'«»0« «/ ?*c <'»/i nf \'r^^ >*6*-i 
LtO Hl.»K«M*N. arUtr 
LAf*CST<»- HCOKSS, ^o*/ 
Ac.ATH* Ul-««. t4t-(*/r 

Rsv. Oti» O. !a«ksok, KnUr »f S>. 

<>A(»KK joH^!l. f^ft 

GEOUC'I? K.At FTMAX. fiUiUrtfiif 

F«or. A< FXAXDif* K*' V. .ifi^'tau 

F«K> t.' KtlU <i r!t^r 

.I^txiiiitfaltir Cuniuliatit. 11'. P, A, 
A«TH4 « KuajA fU-,\.ri<i^f 

uriur . * 

r. J, Lax*v«^, artui 
Jay I.k'vim. itocma «•*■)>(. 

JOMW HoWASJ* i.VWVVN. pUxi.'l^fi' 

Pdor. M \« l.e«MS«, Prolntor fi (;<■!■ 
Xfmr^FL LR5i tv ft ufti^f 

\Hm», Ltviv l.rilr' 

fK'il III C^''( r-^ ffW/.- nf r?v.i' }i<t!'-> ^,' 

Uu!t„,, f .,.,,..,», 

R-'wmtT %Jo»vv l-,n(rT <,/.(,". <■ ' ;^.- 

! ,.<;.» h!„«.ii „.-. ;^.f... -f (I,/ N,., 
fi/fu!.!,. 

r«n. H,1H,«I, t I, vUltk \,:;,- ( ,.. 



Kfc*w« M«i»t. /«««"»•. ««*>»«*. «« "f ^ 
Tk*m4> M—» , . '. 

ftttw F. O. MAtKt«»«». -#«•«•>«»» 
IV«/«..r .; H»«»rr •/ IMtrttmrr, 
HarttT4 VmirtTf'f _ , : 

0«. AkiTA JklAMVKi. DfHrtmtml »/ 

Dk. G«o«a« Mammau- rrt»««K»» 

Aux* $I»cMa«©>«. <w"-'" 

f«rtm*»l »f «•«•<•<«■ l.nfmmtrt, Ctt- 
Ufs »i tkf CUy »f V"* !'♦''* 

Ttow. V. J. McGiti. /•'»'«»•-■- •/ /•♦»■- 
/»»•»*!, HnMf'f Colhtt 

!»«fi». R»i«» M(<i»KA». «'<<? C^/f»< 

NtTM McKsKXlY. t.'t/<r 

Dah-stik ?. Mowtote, ttu^f 

?mr. Hentwrir A. Matt*. Cr^frsitr 

ff Ei9m9mift. B*\» ifatnr C«lh«f 
HAUvrv OX'»xxo«. «'>«« 

SKAJKCS O'SHllrt. K.r,UT, (TttK 
\!.«lV \V«rr« OrtXttTOV. «•.*#/ u*rirr 
S. J. P»»«LMA!«. »rri«rf 
r>«, JDKV P. PctHH. Dr^'tmrmt f« 

Imtrrmtl Mrivtnt, \mti V^nrrtiH 

\tU>nl Stlnt»i 
D« EMflV M. PittJON. pkftKKtm 
WaII«» N. PoiAKW. tnfitrrr 
PlKir- At *X P««T««. frolntar »l <.,tf. 

GfO«<J« D, PftATT, j».. «»i'«<(<f«f'lJ» 
.fOMS Hvt>» IHltSTON, t.'tler 

P«or. pA1-(. K^*>1N\ Ptifi^itar (*f JfHtiro~ 

■ P»or WAtri!« R*vTtvsT««vcK. P»;o 

ffStn* fit fnjKtlrial f «tf(<(/C?l«tf * "- 

-BffcSMiff J. K«is a** (>*(»*'*'»? 

BtHTft^ C. R»VSOU». mtttil UO'lr' 

Iws Rk.*^. K<*t*( »-<«*f 

Cvtf,. R*VM<''XTV RrtlliSi, ^i*^m/*■ kfad 

til Jmrritan RrJ ^r»JI Id ^wtitrt 
WtUiAVf Iti'lt-tNS. t« , t,rttrt 

H Allot r> j. RoMr tAw^nfff 

!>« Tt^sn'tt A Rn\iv. ii^rmf hfnj 

Ficrss Sc>*<^(;v, M»-^)/,,/ 

P«"l F»ff>(»t>.K J SvHtM\.V, ProUf 

... .•.. I,'..<, .,«,, ,, II il.h^ml t:stl,.-i 



-< tHHti.t Sn !>»■*■, *. 'If. > 






V)N>.f NT Sn*t iv. (. tit. • 






Vu-'t \ H«'>TMm<i. St*"i>F f. > 


n^.-).- 


. 'iW 


}if*st\\ SurrtUN f-'Ju, 






i>'>} fj«\»s.r r StNtM.'N 


^. .*- 


!<!a<it 


/'^ ,►,<,»- ^* /-.W.'* ;./, 


'^:tii'^ 


fU^ 


t,;<„' f nM^'Mft 






t(H%V SK\fti*Tl\.Jv ».n/<r 






T tft F rUftfWfcU SMftM 


<-4u..iT 




'! >« VTlPHfNW^N SMtTH 


r-f 


^a^ot 


f J', v-^t rVmmo^f, /«/M / 


j^'..fi 


'fl 


Hfsrrs tNovi>£it(;^\iu> u-f. 


,, 




3v>ft*i \V».iK»f» 3>in ! F f. ■ 


-■-• >•.. 


i.'-> ^ 


I t-*\u StwtvSfc, d<^<.' 






< HftfitTJx % STy\n, t. '.■.'■• 






A V Srru-., Jtrtixt 






XirtLfo K. Srtks, 4<>i,..>«v 


M^...;(< 


-C 


H'^^Wrtawcrf •^«» /^Utfy 


:s> 





APPENDIX PART V 



1681 



Exhibit Xo. 36 — Continued 




Ifli, Jflls Tfttini tod StMtly X.«.<w.«», f»«i,»j pttrrrrt <> (k« jwftin*, llijfcj — < »r»tl i^tit 



I.KTTEW 



iC' 



'V ^»oV« ^^f" 



rKi\i.Li> (»<JOEv Sr£» uir «. fif^f 

M^fki-Jnatt, t. Matiat hKtitffi Jnttifrntf 
"f ?>-*'vi>><J 
k<iItft«T TtvKEft, It^iianB t^ritrr 

SA^'-, *tt!*/ '>/ Jutt^mofttf lahi , Man- 

j *M£i Tn: «RS» ;(*f(j/. fo^-jirr 
»!»««,* .! t\ \EY *i i\t»«!5.. j5,j,; ,. ,„i. 
rr , L, --jf. ' 

J Ri.is«>M> W<nti, «i»i«d<,i( 

D«, WHmv Hi\R> W^viH. ^intuist 

r».lF H (a«V K WUUJ. i'litlrtlfr K<i 



V 



f^fDisfnai 



> <.'> We. i^>, i 



t. rttr-r 



Birr.lcr o/ 5. i 
Sru V &c 



( HIIA Wt-*tHt»» ».v 

Max We,8j», friisi 

l)« G£»»I.O WlNDT, 

If '.tli, l.,r 

Rev- RomuT WmiHK£«, drrttm^n 

At»E«T R»m WiiiuMS !.f.(». 

}-'.lLA WlVtsl, *. rj/cf 

Riti)«n WmcHT t.mr^ 
.Ait V-,n si„ a^Juf 

28 



obwrvti! ihir same to bold tii» for pam 
ft»cjiOfi; pm!oJigf4 srn^tvon» i>E pam 
iflt bi tht ant »tK »<« oixirrvrd in 
ttit cthrr Thus ifs^xt thr f«t »hat 
the b!&xl toritfnis wrrf roromon. (hf 
crnuii nrtvous «Mfmi ««:«<! quitt 
<i(fff>m!l% ur«itr jhetr conditions, 

.\!I tht* (acts 3w wf II JB athtn whkh 
wf icafn*4 in &«r i^>«rvations oi sfwsr 
vo»lcK«it i»im do nos wfutt, o) 
cowFStf, rh<r gftwraS vtrwi hf£dl *bt>ut 
the role wHwrh &fte or anotHef coflri- 
poo^ns cicnwnt aJ tht Wood pbjs tn 
t\%t condtTtoos of tfee orjfmism. THe 
rwults ot th* invfsngitiom sbowt^ 
onljf th»t m aiE caurs mvaUtog an in- 
tricate and compWx (>n>c»» of tiw or- 
gantsm as a wJtoir, tht ctntta! nffvous 
sv««n; piaii ttw initiatint an<i oTganii 
inj suit. Evrry «atc such »s sl«!). 
pain. ap{j«i(t, Mti*t). pathoiojrcal con 
ditions etc, m»$i b« ttiuitci as a 
whoW 5\>tcm of prtK-««rs m whsch (He 
!.-!j«jd fartor* play a vtty cmpoitant 
Tolt, Tht «ntr«! nrrvoui svsKfn has 
a (lft«rminjnj infiuencr on ait th» sepa- 
Hit ntotjwnts oi thnt pfOCr»«s» on 
tlveii succession, sSwit piacttimtt «i %'mx 
inj even tht S{>t*.t^" aijfnifiomct of tach 
titattnj. !t (5 obvious ham tha that 
fhe thton of sleep which explairw ft 
as atmng from kyfnotoinroiu — the 
P":»ons o! sSeirp accortSmg to Prof. 
Pitroni — wSiKh appear in the WorxJ, 
rtiui! be rev»«i KHnewhal to corr«|>ofid 
>*ith otit findings. Str«$> and its ofis;!n 
;n particular rannot rww be txplameii 
fiy ihe accumulation of potsonous pr<wj- 
uct* m the biood. Sleep i» of course 
(■ofinecttd with sotne ki'nii of cHemicai 
t ?iangT>* in the general biood How ot the 



organswn ; but th«e dhinfe* fn«« rajhet 
he regarded as a coits«<)a»n« of «!«p 
and not as its cause. "Hm* cetittal ner- 
vous systeoa, however, <toe» deieraiine 
»ietp. In th»s r«pe<t our fact* confirm 
the nersottt tbeor> ot slevp and in p*r- 
tkuSar Acsdettucitn i. P»vlo*'« iahibt- 
five or brake theory of «l«p. 
{J tri^md artuir, tfUt»f •/ llu rfur***- 
e»M-j rtmltitf frtm tht nttafsf of lie 
*W> 0/ lit tumi tftrr tkeir tinti. 

STAJUQV Airr« nUANT 

{C»«/««»erf frtm jutfr 21 ) 

iective of 45,000 worker*,' 'the Palace 
of Colt«re' and 'tHe auto-giafit' are but 
natural expresstotks to thett*. Out yo«R|; 
people ir; aocuaicmnni to them, 

' I teraenU»t tKe [4ant as it »-«s in 
(•JIS, Ai that time there were o«i!v 
750 workers m the entire e«tabliih«»e«t. 
!i»ttad of the body department there 
stt»d a h«if-r«OTed carpentry shop and 
on the p!«c« where tsow the medwn- 
ical-aasemblinj diviwoo standv one 
could hear the rustling of the >rm in 
a large tangled thicket. 

"So for tne those exipreswora so 
which «« ha%e become »cci«tOBied do 
not uxm to be at all usual T(>ey fill 
me with great pride in our country. 
It may he uid that we have only be- 
come ac<ju»inted with the autotnohile 
after the tes-olution. We had none o* 
the necessary technique before for 
budding aotontohiles. .And now we have 
giant plants with the most modern 
technical equipitient and with a highly 
qualified personnel inti in these plants 
new people* are ettv-rginif as well as 
new machines." 



SOVIET RUSSIA TODAY 



1682 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 37 



FRIQOS OF THE ABRAHftM LJKCX3LM BlIGADE 



ABRAHAM UNCOLN BflTTAUON 



GECmSX. WASiUKSION BATTMXm 



imn a^**2**T 












Oy«S« B«al3S 
Ana »«*!>««>• 

lx>a» ri»!t>»5 
U«nry H^n 



Th® s«««e<i *p«» B«Bi)«r»hi.p SMtstlag «f tH* Fyl 

of Tha A.Jir»h««s Liiicola Brl4j*^« will ^ h«ld «« B^Si»84«^ 
STening Sept«mb«ir 14 »t 8$00 |;«». la tJs* B«tr®i* S®«m ^ 
th« Detroit -tsi&a«5 Kot«l, ll» awat rawlM y«m %h«* »a » 
iR«ab®r «f the Frlsads it Is of the «*a0«t ii^«rt«ac'8 t;tet 
ytju att«ad W(»b«r8hlp 38««rfeiag«« 

ttm pr©gr8» far th» moetiag «111 taol'odoi ttif »h«^i«g 
of the fil»5 »te«ri»ft*s l*f 8iy9tt«8 ♦ , «M«h ceriteia? 8«s»<> 
sxcelXsnt, scenes of th« Linoola BrigsA* m«a la acstiasi. 
t-ae of the Volaat«©rg wfeo r«c®atly isirri'n'sd fr-asi 3j*ii« will 
sj>«»k suRd th« Fsiii progr«® for th» Fri®a^ vlll hm dl«" 
casseA. 

&«, tW.* particular tias whso tfw m©a ta Sjwtia a®<»4 ooir 
help so ^&dly we !aw«t oa,ll upon, you tc do jfour shstra ia 
helping th«R along the road to Tiotory, Pie&ao iSasiss it & 
point to attsnd this meeting wid fcrlrig your frle»ds» 



ii0tasta*» co»o«irrBE 






VRIWDS OF TKE I^RAEM LIICOIS B81G,!U3K. 



Rofeort ?»yIor 



c 1 o 



k»«l*M«»tf Vlvttt lb)«aki<i<i«t ei 



i«« Wttk XIJL ilStK feWffW^BWMB 



APPENDIX PART V 1683 



Exhibit No. 38 



IHTERNATIOHAL LABOR DEFENSE 

H2 EAST I9tjs STREET - NEW YORK CITY 






iC*..*lji« 






t (£• 



;:-w — vh.^n d«aj-crac. is thrftat«ai»d — aor* than «Ter b»frre iw wtmi t-r- 
r«ss«sj>-^r th-ss A- are 8«rviag prisf^r. s^atPscRs teca-iec th<^ <»xer- 
cland C"r.i3tituti.fn&I rijgi'.ts — tn dsforsse ~f toaocracy. 

W<> WEiRt t" r«aea'bpr hiir.dxaAa of jTaShsrlPss childs-«r, ■rldfws wH 30 
hti3>a.-!d3 6-i.e-'l lat'-r'a martyrs, wfaern waiting f^r !T;;g>jaida tr t'C ro- 
ii-'RB<»d. "Sie tspn r.i^ed ci,gi->r?>tt0B and siiMr8p«j->ers ar;d th** kr. wJ <^<i.:r'^ 
tJ-.,-it they'rf> a t I' rlrttec 

At rhristems t l:^f- , V:i<^ I. L. 2. f<^T the last 14 yr^.'-ra has, throxi^ 
its Anr.ijuil rrr'.v<^, rtade this r<rjeabra,':re p"33itl€. y >r C5;rict;.>ra 
time 1"'3J^ wr w.xr.t t < sd.nd st*n^r*r .';rr0tlr<':3 ij;t'^ tho Strste por-S 
ttir^ti-irics -cc z'f-.f r'3;tt rie:;, tr.t- the w rV hvson ar.d c>ialR ^aai's 
■»;;^rc :,:cn ar- - :,fi:;e'J ^o^-yxac the,'* f-wf't f " r la'b'r. At Christfsrts 
tine ' :i?.?, wc '.fart t r.tj-c!\j'!rt:';e>; ^xjt nifl. w'.irh crust c :r;tla'ua erary 
R-nth thT'-u^rh'it t-.e y^nr. l^-scsc atsr:, w<-~cr. na-.d children depend .^?3 
r-r.t: :■,^;cd ho^p fr-n the r. L. V. 

^■■' C'LT. r-j t'-c tiuT.t tr.o 7*'ir l'':v? 3,-iw •n.-ir^,' r1ctcrl£»8 f r lati-r 
i-i'rr.<sf, F'-jjr TTf trr-i-n tr;;!'.o -,i- 1 nis t prlr-nerc^ — Bll; iri.':3, M'^ney, 
r^'-' .T < 1t ~-nd .•"••" .-f-r --T-ro iir:-r,- -;,.r.-s rtli/sscd thr~i.u?J*. effort;' *f 
~i'^l\ r ■- v.:-r ''. ■ f- y-'- rr. :-' 1< ;; " r.t',r,ue this Inn rt'ir.t wr'-r. 



*'^*C'\ 



^Ifc "X- 






\ 
!>. 

l! 
1 

H 
I 






279895— 41— pt. 5 5 



1684 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 39 



O M 



E M 



^ 



ISJiToRI 1IA 

s'lN- AMKRlt IS \ViiBKitt IS till S.Aitl 1 M,l\ /^ V I'l.'.llltll S 

iSOMK ()IST<>RK'%i. !'\RAtJifs C--//'-. Llim'inl 11 

Jriu: vi'Ai I'VtoN Ri I'i Ri 11. . ■ • 






;\1 Jlli KOI HiV "',H luBl" . . ^ M.^'-'"./ hllDiH I, 



4-RlMI- AMI It MR I l\ 1 til i S^J! 

THti Rill ABM'S sl,l N « BI>'.S „'(l SI Mi'. 

Tin OiRKI ^l'"MI( V IS tM\(|--S 

THl'. '.I'fl M "s 

i,>i fSlfONS ^^|| •(NsUiKS 

\!l.U.l(n ft (ti l-MKl J;- M I'RIVSl vH.il !, M 4Rl H „>"* 



/.)'. .//«/.( c,h„',ia :;i 
//. /). // : ;^ 

.>K 

in 

M 



1 ! 1 II S-; H> i m- HHiOR 



i" 



U»KA SMI ill, fJitW THt-XilKlRI-. BAVK?., ,5/,,-,...,;,,,,, /-,/,;,,, 

IKIROTHV SRJV>S1!B. RLBilST \\ . ll|-\N, 1 1 1% R -l i-mVSRl!-. '. A. H i: l.l.l;!!. 
i.ANflSTON ii! ' iii ^, ilR. JOHN KIN'OSBUKV, f..lRi 1-.^ i ■■-.;,1N 1 >-,li:oRf;!. MAR- 
SHAi-f,, ISHj^iR ,',i MNi il)H<, IWiBJ:!. WAIKFR S.)1M, ■,: \ \ A > ! i S-^IJIVART 



4'4>.>'Titini TOItM 



WllIMM 



!>;T!t ^l3i^■;l. 

viAiiv' and 

i <.■■:,. i.t«. 

■Av .,: :rU i. .!. 
... .-R t . 






|.y 1'. 
;f (. 

'1;.. r. 

\A,^ 


'•" • , 


■i'Mfli 


■ ,„.,J \ 




:,»tt^UlU'li 



1? il \>,,\i. 



i91J, X( tV,? t>,«,i 
'. SI .50 [.,« ynn 
l.-f , l:< a>»i .).> 



T/ie Kesults 
of Your Help 



I\ our i;i«t i«fi!<- HI' !i>Si! >mi 

wi> ltd- i-t-ceivirig s-v<-r>- rtiimih front 
Hiir i.<-;s<{i'r», "Irpysinj; li..- iuyvnt-y 
i.f riMK'tiimji: fi« many |»'i(jik. a« pos- 
sible uitls «>ur niajiiiziiHA i« rountfr- 
rti-.! i!u- jir!>« Mwkitiif «2.i!ti»t truth 

Uiioiif lli'' Soviet ! l>il>!l. 

U f I. ill! ii>i< .iiimi! ill! uffer frimi 
.>ii. <if oiif r<»it<i<^r?, who Im" ii«k«*<l 
11' !<i U!tii!!»i<i hi» I5»rm\ l<> (liinatf 
SJJHMI ti> liu- majiaziti.-, if felliiw 
r. .i<li.!-, \s<H tii.itrh It iviih ,1 MA-!. ml 

V.Hir r.'»j>»!n^«" m)- xuifi ,mi! }»»'Si- 
t-riHi-. f»r. A. Koltif-iiHerj; «-rif in 
SiiS, hitif for hini.<«»K. luiif in sm-iti- 
<itA of lii-i li!*<ith.'i-. Dr. \;il}i;>Il 
!i..il.. ii!.< rn. ,ut<l ri"!.r<... n- !!)ai the 
r.ii.l, .m.S !U.- r.-mS.-r- nf tlir iijagit- 
ziii>. V, ili •'m.-riakf ami -iirpa,^^" tiir 
>;.M>i!»(. J. F, ^'iiroi-r, ;i!i i.Srf man 
t,f Hi) fri.m \rs«i>iii<, m-ihI. ijj 5:i,<'K* 
.if ill- SHKKl .! iit«.nlli liUinv.mre. 
:tm! < .lil- <tt! .ili (>nr ireA.it r.* tn Ho tt» 
mueSi. V Mi-* W>ti...r i.f V<-w V.irli, 
j>iikin£ ii(> "III fii,!^-^'/iin for till- 
(H-1 turn-, '.!)! <ri,f'-'l ■"!■< jiron)o(e 
.Mir e\i .■!!<. in niAE.ii'.iii. ."' 1 li'-f .»e 
oiiiv .( f< vv nuKioin cXiUdp!)-* <>(' olm- 
Iritntlt.r^ fri.ni Hornla lo Aiit'ka 
wh-. biuc "*<•»( !;ii-2e or ^tiinU 
auiitmiN for <nir cir.'lil.uimi «iriM'. 

\ltof>i-)lt<T »•.■ hate n-rrivffl al- 
,,,..-! «].'ifn*, w'li.ii ihi- author nf 

.lo .li.it. ti.l- ..!r..:..K !!!.lt.-hiMi. TUilt 

liA. i-.i.sl.i. .1 u- !o li.^iti our »!ai!tn«> 
<:i<!ijiiil^ti, am) 11. Av •ii!.-rri|!li<mi» 
are )tourii!<» i«. Hiit I., ouiio (ilC 
I aiii|ia!!_-n ri-jiUv r!Ti>'!ii<\ ««» nnirt 
ii.iA.. !lii. ri'maininjt S2.l*tMi. That 
rii...!ii» ,1 tlioit«it™^ tuorr from ytm, 
lie. IT i^-.i'l.r.*. 

Wt' itm«t fiiibli !>|) ihf Arhe in 
Ma\. \Ve urs* i-onntitif! on ym» lo 
tiiak.. tfoo.l .»<) ihf rc^l «f ill*' 
aiiuiiiiit v»e ix'i'il thiriiiji slic n<'i(t f«'w 
week*. !•!<•»«• maii your ctmlrihti- 
lion tuilav ' 



I ir, ti)al.>.J« l>»o* Fwntt 

v^ovin- Kl ..^Si* TI>1.;>\ 

i;( Ri.l 3;oJ SI , S..« V..»fc. N V 



Vui>4. 






*ArrotMiM« rvrlY* 



APPEXDIX — PART V 



1685 



Exhibit No. 40 



aocxwsu. kjkst; «.»<»«» 



SIXA WiKTSS, ri(..CA«™NM 



// .'5 :;/ 

JOHN HOWARD I^WSC**. r»«™«. 



NEWS YOU DO>l'T GET 



J, Kd«»»^ S««iS«w« 
»«>»«« A- *.«ii 

)j sit t-iOJjacJtj 

■ . Kyi* OfeJ'WM 
H. *. t- S>w(« 

l,«««<r<i Si**** 

S»t» B»M «»irt 

Hofwre ^5ct«wj 

yj»rJ P. HWKNWO 
HwsfTf H»st 

v^<2ft««ti*« Hick* - 

.* <S)'*c« t-»«awrt» 
Ownw L. K, Mam* 

fivrttm ^MnuM 

!m>4^ Wi^i(«t S«»)> 
>>>>» J. NfHwalt 
W)Rt*w ?(«<« 
^•HI«<»h»Mi ) 9ttrn 

. ^"•^my H««t<Mi V«nM 
1 LrwJ Wwtl 

icHWj WcUnV 
l>>!l«r Wilxa 



CUFWKCS OF MATlKKa USKB WOCJUJ B8 AFP«SCUTK> 



I link 



£nfcte« SeMt Wood ' 



Pitt ilS? iSTjIKATIOl? affiESS 
?AK OF KK!!^ STILL XT' SOtrW 



HATf€H<IAL COMMITTK 
FOt l»iOI»trS ftiCHT^' 
15« Fifth Av«., N. Y. Ci 

F»rtB«ttjt }<»Maa»! rwnisiitt** for tli* 
tiisttxst vt famkxi Pri»«s«« • 



EJEANO* WKfHSTOCX 



Steji,: 



Artitistlce Dsy, "oveJEber XI, bT«u/$it, a j-aj- of bop* to the 
ss.'sry vets awaiting 'isportatloa oc Kills l8iar»d *sa Sous w** 
relaasod. Sujioi^ Franchlal, «&o bad oonae to ti-.e tjnited states 
from Itsjlj' Irs 1921 and had lost a l«s *iie helptag tlse Spanish 
pecplo diji'eiKi todriti, Aagastin flasa. ham In Ecuador, and 
Csrlos &>dI, orlslnally froffi Kaxlcc, were peisaBed os $£00. 
boad, Alois iucoi, atlir^nsllj from Switzerlasd, heard a depor- 
tation order chanrjed to an liacondltiorisl rslaee©. 

t'suB QOBt pressin;.' case, that of Peaal List, took a sli^t 
tarn fur the batter sAen It sa© anae'oncsd that his deportatioa, 
ected-Ala=.l for Ss-t'irdav, rovseiber 12, stss j^stponed for a short 
time. Hsviofo cams to this couEtry Ic 1921, Paul List rorkad as 
a aSEifcac up \iBtil 1537, vfcen ho vwnt to Fronce ic order to ra- 
©Kter on the heals of his tAfo" s Xr^n.rlCBX: citizenship to lej^^lixa 
his strsj- In this co'intr}'. FPoss there, tist -vr.t to Sp«ln eisd 
drovo ar. aabulanco for th« hoyailet Ocvernssent. Ee hss prcveB. 
hitasoll in eveiy -a}' to he a trustworthy and deslra'cle pereon. 
Tha SntloaEil Oostnittoe for Poople's HliJitB throu^^. its xoooers 
has TigDrousiy protssted stjtlast the action of the JJepartoeBt of 
Lahor in the List case, r>Bd is urging that list he relep.Bed iB>- 
aadiatel;.' end be poncitted to join his vife r.nd his child. i*>0 
is sarlouaiy iii with infooUi* paralysle in a Boehestar hospital. 



1686 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 41 



Wliat^s on 



nrAOtlKE. W#fk<»j». i$ IVaftn. Saw. 
d«t Worker. Fr!<l»T, IS Honn. fstmnit* 
inv»t *>• n»«4» l«i »tft»e«« »r »«Ut« will 



BOOK ANTJ MAOAKINR Otslld JnvUd*.-* | 
St /rtm 7?>c 



Bronx 



rx> <^-PR«aEKT8; a»!» »»nf«>' 
,t»?» B*nrt. fttrlne Q«»rt?{. Thrr* 
Rf>C!i>>« Ef*(frr»lnm<»n{. A<lm 35«'. 

s SU!N<} DANCE' B!f »pp> .flshiiWtlftjr 
; ASS 'iAf floot ihow' Adm «9<^»** t^«*r>r> 

> A^r , Brfinx Ausp H»rfy M#tf.tf «n<l 

- n«h. 8 30 P M 



HARI.F.M SWINr* CI .b T ^- « ^ «*«« 

F i«-rrL"i-; . -.n p^r»ot • T "•< ^ 

f^» twitiR tsiTix unrt ?■•»■* <■ ■<' •■'*' 
S. 5 r M 

r MON CATS • Bf ' '' 

J.,mmv mrv*". Srf^t' ^ <>,.;•' * "'j" •? 
8«lnst dn»n Rujhv YCT '.V '« I 

roME TO Ot^r-nirc •'' '"•'• '*''^ 
Bs'h B'*rh Vri. tJ.-. =- r>»nf^|- » 

IR7S7 B«v P»rktE-»y. Pif^oitHr Ay»P i«» 

!T tOOKfl M tf P'" '^•-••-M«»»|«l* 
{ ttnt fl«'«'tArf Ht» \v ■• *;:'-'7/« ^*« 

«r» c»l«hrftUntt «t « P'*' '^•'' '^^ •'*'^ 
\ i yo P M mt 3» Orshsm 
Wot 

39^8 j Cpmlng 

•^ LABOR LAW »n<*. tr t 

mc'.'Kltnjf »s rn; ^^' '.'■'' 
\ Riirt nthfrS BPS.n« i ■' 

8 <0 P M . ftt the %v,->rk> : 
, S2th St, r?-f $: m-> 



J 



Br«*».»»> 



,1 jS(^»t!«* 



Brtrnklyn 



OONCERT AND DANCE' Brnfft!. D»'!v ni'h St 



<«i thf pr'->«r»m 

Sunday 



3»! RArk««ov Avenue 



r^! I. MIUjr.R 
ni.i'x/-; Riot r»st 
I IScrt Pact !t W 

■| .\M«n«-y Br, ILD 



El^ft!on »nrt ih# Aius- ' 
18th ?< Anur Tf^rsi , 

SIX DAYS- m«n ».ikbor«. 7th rfUx risnf*' 
fw^srsm Rov»i 8«vii!ii;ah*lis Osci\t\iT» 
ftftv S--tnf!f«y Sub^ 35c«» «7 C 13th St. j 

FAMOUS .'«THTMO QUARTFT p<-i!.-.rm» 
Br- h.>\t'n, ^trnh^!«'^?^fl J*in»:?r stns<( vmr 

KA-:'TH ^nr!rNt> H€«t!liu.-^ MjIfXisn 
.:><' -'^ f »,<«i> !<,•>, n?«s A O, 

-""'■ sn F s,Ttn 8t , 

•.<■., ... (! Ill r M rsf^mrtii-, j 



WHAT PHSrK C^\ '■••■'■ 
t#!; th«» »«'!rt i^nf <!)*t!,-' 
?or;n' voii' huti'* ? •■ ' 

r ^; 

ANTt-WAR St'S'r- ^ 

!• 1' pri'p » M * ' 

n v ' '(!< hr ^ <> 1 i s 

-r .'.i (Siiii .'t :i. 
: - ■ f*« ChAt ^t . 
> sf^r! Mfiflf :i;.i', ■ 
. 'iff- Ki <>!>-if ;■ < •■ 

xov 2" K- *! <■- r " 
f^fUnn;, IS' h ,' ■ s- ' ' 

tiv ruv ni* . r. 

As;«:n^S \V»r »: 

Th!snk-<,Kl> ;r.« r\r '. 
H»:! S*!n|t batid *• 

lEKST. (UK N> V "i ■ 



*r%}i! 



««3 






"^ 







f<« 



.SANT <% 



<>■ -r-V 



APPENDIX PART V 



1687 



Exhibit No. 42 

Classes T«dii5 

The opening class in tw wr» 
on labor Law and IndiisfrSal B»- 
latlons will open today st S W ?■ 5i. 
»t the Workers Schoo!. 35 Sw^5 5Ja 
St. This wli! be thf f irsi of » »?* 
Of ten lisctureg. dPSien«l p«rli«* 
l»rly for members of tne ifga! pf* 
fes&ion, tr&de union orgain-'frs «^ 
others anfaged in labor artui'i* 
and ijlftnned to b* « romprrhpris!^ 
survey of the law as U fiftf^-^ I*' 
bor orfftnlKstlons. 

The course ft.-? r v^hoW ^ill bf »» 
analysis of thr Jrw and «i" ^'*' 
with leg»! rights of Inbor orpatUW- 
tlorwt with rpfpmifr to cni;ft-;i»* 
bargaining, strlkfs, bovcous *!5^ 
other leffRl problnns. out-'-'*"''^^"'^ 
labor a'torneys activrlv pagag<*<^' '" 
this fjpld. win rover the Ni-rris 1^' 
Quardia Act. etc. »nfi the iutynm 
I of such SKrnciirs as the Ns!!«^f« 
Labor Bf>«rd «nd thf vsMiou^ ^^^'* 
and k-K-ftI bodies. Experlrniwi w^ 
ttators will dl«fus« the problrni^ if-' 
volvf^ U\ negollations srui coP' 
trart.s. Expert'? in their n^'<^ *^ 
, tRke up sm-lal lesrisSstion Rffe<-tifil 
i labor, workmen's ronn^ii-''*'^'^'*' 
i crlnunRi proce.«ise,*, mlnoutu** und'*' 
' the law »nd Inner unlMi probSf!^ 
The lecturers for th!< M'ri("^ *^* 
(-!»rte l|£|lv_SMMr. J^^^T" ^ 
Hrort'-ky, David Srribr,«'i Abr«h*» 
Uncer. David M Frrernnn Jf*^^ 
Tauber. Edward KuniR, Ir^'^ 
Sohwub. A, W. Cohen and ^*^ 
Schlener. 



1688 UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 

ExiiiniT No. 43 



F 



u% 



THE COMMUNIST 



place, and mors jprtkularly, where we started to concentrate scant 
tlmt ago, we lacked jf5cmstency. 

WliOe leading hundreds of struggles for the daily demands of 
the working class we did not succeed (we shall deal with the reason 
later) in raising the consciousness, especially of the thousands of new 
members, to our fundamental task, the building of a ma^ prole- 
tarian Party rooted in the factories. 

Our laxity In arousing the lower units, the shop nuclei, to the 
task that they should perform, weakened the persktencc in our con- 
centration actiwties, gave to our efforts at concentration a mechan- 
ical form expressed m the phra»t **Wc tried hard but we, did not 

succeed." 

Here we must stre^ again : not that we did not know the method 
of concentration, but that the great role of concentration in the basic 
industries was not fully understood by the whole -Party. 

Certainly we don't lack experiences in cg^n^j^^^^a^jj^gjl^ They 
are here undtr our very eyes. Certainly the Party districts o f Pitt^_ 
bur ^ k Cleveland, |^,€||;<^|. Chkago, New^^^]|gffk are rich with them. 
'Wut the trouble is that they are not studied, consequently, they are not 
popularized as a means of strengthening the whole Party. -We 
learn very little from the experiences of the Bolshevik Party and 
other sections of the Communfet International; we learn very 
little from our own experiences. 

So we discover already the fundamental reasons that hindered us 
in the past from building the Party into a mass proletarian Party, 
and in doing so we indicate also the way to overcome these' hin- 
drances. 

However, the reasons pointed out ant not the only ones. There 
are still other weaknesses that must be overcome, other problems 
and tasks to be solved that will enable us to carry out the Open 
Letter in practice. 

These arc the prcAlems and tasfcs closely connected, inter-re- 
lated and rising out of the process of concentration. Upon their 
prompt solution depends the tempo In building a mass Party. 

These arc the problems of strengthening the leadership of the 
Party as a whole j of developing new cadres and correctly utilizing 
the old; of buOding sections and developing sectksn leadership, of 
developing local leaders in the industrial centers, of collective work 
from the top down and vice versa, of inner democracy, of dsciiS- 
slons which raise the consciousne^ of the Party toward its taste, of 
planned work and control, of cutting down the numerous inner, 
meetings that hinder the concrete mass work, of systematic rconait- 
ing, etc, etc. 



:vimmms:iiMymiMmmmsmi:;:::xm:i:ii\ 



APPENDIX PART V 



1689 



ExHiHiT No. 44 



9 S f ! 



'HIE voM\i\:si" 



who never hid the fact that he uj^ ,, C-nuf)unf,t, c.^ntinuouslv k<.|'t 
his eyes o|ien for possible Pans nu-nibcr^. 

Not uftderc^timating the m-'.v-^^sis of ■; ■,, ru;t;i)j .u .ill i':\nv^ and 
through all activities, the nia;n aitentuiri ->f the Part\- must be 
riveted upon recruiting fr<»ui tleci^-ive ha-sc :ru!ustries. 

At the |-'(iurtfcnth PU-ninn the Parfc ^<-t it-rlf. ,inv ru' othrrs, 
the folltswing tasks; The orjiani/ation est a firm Imm-. I^r our Partv 
am<mg the decisive strata of American wsifkcrs uj the m>:^t im- 
portant industrial centers. The Party pk'«igcd at thi> plenum, to 
"overcome the isrtlation of the Party frusn the decisive masses of 
the American wtsrkers, to come before the masses as their vanguard 
in the stnisrgle against the offcHNive of the bourgetusje and against 
the imperialist war and to tiriT^lv root itself in the dcci>ivc indu^trv 
hv means of solid jx-rsonal contact v^ith the workers." 

Use above examples shov^' that the Part\' did n!)t tullv under- 
stand this central task. Hie exi>tmg shop nuclei in tfic h.isic in- 
dustr\- dill not grow. Ninety pcTccnt of tfuwf who joined the Panv 
were unemplovcd, and a very small pTcentagc cif the empltned 
workers came through direct activsts' in and arountl the factor}'. 
An analvsis <'f the membership conifxisition shows that only 3 per- 
cent are steel workers, a little above 5 pi-rcent miners, not quite 3 
percent automtibile workers, only 1 percent marmc workers, 1.3 
percent railroad workers, .3 percent chemical workers.. 

Onlv 28 percent of the ennployed members, or 7 percent of the I 
total membership of the Party, are working in mines or factories 
employing 500 or more workers. 

The Opeh Letter very sharply states: ' 

"It is idle chatter to t.i!k about the revolutionizing of the work- 
ing- fbss by the P.ir{y tinlessithe Party conquers a firm base for it- 
self among the miners, metal, steel workers, auto, niarinc and tex- 
tilr workers it is nothing but phrase-mongering to talk about the 
building of the Party and the revolutionary trade unions without 
doing this among the important -bodies 'of workers, in the big fac- 
tories, in the important industrial sections," 

At the Extr.iordinary Party Conference, the task was set to , 
root the Party in the decisive elements of the working chi.'is in the 
b.asic industries. Emphasis was again placed on the necessity of •■ 
concentration and the Conference concretely laid down the plan ' 
for the next peritni. The five concentration districts, Chicago, 
Detroit, Cleveland, Pittsburgh, and New Yt>rk, were assigned the ■ 
special task of concentrating on altogcfher about 50 factories in 
the steel, mining, marine and automobile industries, besides those 
specific industries and problems which the districts have (stockyard, ^ 



1690 UK- AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 

Exhibit No. 44 — Continued 



ORC;\M7\r!t)N IN' LlCli f 0¥ Ol'i \ IJ. i l t-.v ■•'^•. 

Nt ,.:•<■ T.;:- -,, rt. K In t!u'sc ^fk'CtcJ pl.mt^ and section*;, the 
ta^k ^i ;■ '-■ - u. i}\'''' ,'■ t'u- u.'rkcEx tor the struLr;jlc on 

\s A ■ . ;;^.i ^ -i i,o;;J,t,r>{i^. untir;'-'^ '' ;'M-nt insurance, etc., 

th: : {]■:■ err. .„ • . , thorou::h w^rk of , ,., a, propaganda and 

('rLran:/at:-:i thfiuijh the utili/atmn of aU available forces and 
uoap'tprN f(a' o>n-.antratMtii 'aiu! -^v. ' . A t!cli:;ite break With 
the [xi'-c rnethridN <»t allow ;n^ nur^rUrs tu he dnvrn h\ the ^^inir^c 
of e\cr:;ts is the prcrcqiiiMte tor tlie ;is>ured carrying uui of i.in- 
vO'iitrata-n. 

tt^r h- i.l !!t '\':;\ n--t\.n ■■; w ■ ' I, ..!i! -ponf .isu'iusih sn the 

amvirx, ar-d t.-. ! ■ ul mc ii i:o\.ii ■: ' , ; \\\',-r<: *h<- ret iniHist l.'.ult-rs 
^-fasui At t\- '■■■■ . * mI a ni.niant'nt, tn ui>rk I.>r the huittiinjj (>t fiirht- 
H':;:;' (U;,'an> of ti^ a'a:->r-. inUijaa'a'tra ■.■■i r\\c Isurcaurr.it"*, in urdt/r to 
;iai the in .-(-^ a; rhr rxpo^iir!- ami r-pls, -atu.au of the a-fonnis? 
k\ulr!>. 

"5;^/' unit'ss <ve is'tuiCiQusiv concentr,U€ <?Uf ^^t.-ork on //|^ otoxI 



arJ ft-Tse.uthns h'y fh^ hour^cohu'^' — Opca Letter (Ou? ctB|>hasis_jJ 

The pritt^arv task of ttic whole Partv is the building of a strong 
proh'tarian h.ise in ttie big enterprises \n these main industrial centers 
of tfie country. In order to carry out this primary task, all'memhcrs 
est tlie Partv, every leaibaig commtttre, unit, section, district, and 
the center, nuist critiei/e in the n-n*>t anahtic.il manner its past 
activity an<i approach toward this vital pre»b!em. In the pre>cess of 
the preparation for the fullillnient of tins ba>;ic task, manv diffictiltics 
will he raised as a justihcation for our failure to buHd the Partv 
and revohstiortarv unions in the lar-je factories. We have to fifrht 
all these expressions which hinder o'ar concentratiV)n wo.rk. ^Fhe 
titninst care in the selection of fe»rces, thorough discuvsu»n of tlsc 
situations in the factories -.xml niethrnls !»f approach t(> tfie workers; 
tfie most detailed, daih attentioji ant! guiJ.ince from the higher 
committees, cootdin.ttion between union fractions, Part\ committees 
:uul shop nuclei, the fullest sitilt/ation !)f the /),r<7v W <'■{■, r and the 
language papers, xht mohili/ation of mass orijani/atiiHis, arc essen- 
tials tor -the penetration of the selected fact(*ia'vS. In connection 
wuh the selection of the leadership for the concentration paints, the 
Open Letter states: 

"FAoty Party meaiber and especL-illy every Party functionary 
must hi- A real orirani/er of mass, stru<:::f:U'S in his p.irtlcular sphere 
ot \iork, Froju this standpoint, fhf Party niusc Ju<l<je the activity 
of its luju-tsiniarics atul uui.^t chose its k-adinfr bodies.*' 



•*<*'i«(»««'»<»**«W>*:'>i 



APPENDIX PART V 



1691 



Exiiii! T No. 45 



1692 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 
Exhibit No. 45 — Continued 



COSCINTIATIOH OW TIAMSPOIT 



2? ' 



whk:h they work. If we carry on better work among the 
'backward section of the working class', (backward bt^cause 
of certain historical conditions- and there is a big section 
of working class women in the U. S.) we will be able to 
devi'lop a broader united front and help therefore to %vin the 
majority of' the working class in the U. S. A," 



lem Concentration on Transport 

*riS SASS (Harlem* 



FTEfi our 
undertook 



-duiary Party Conference, we seriously 
taity through the Open Letter and it.s 
cerslral principle; eosi«*4»id ration. One of the concentration 
poinl.'s assigned to us by the District is the city traction, an 
. intiu.^try where th'rajsands of American workers, hitherto 
untouched , by our rnr, \>ut<nl, are organizsx! into company 
urdonss on the LRT. and ' B.M.T. sy.^teni.<?. The' task of 
orgaruzlng thes.e workers requsres a great deal of mctlvity, 
skill and concentration. It is very important in organizing 
city transpoi^t in New York to select the pr*sprr f^aci's to 
give daUy guidance to the eomr;ules who undcjtakc lias task. 
j In Harif^ni .seetion wc first carefully selected seven coni- 
i rade?* all ns'w Party jnenifoefH, who are American workers, 
and : . fht'iii Hit.i a concentration unit. The conuades 

in thuH uiui. wcr«.> either uisemployed or night workers, work- 
ing snch hours a.s nsade it possible for them to devote 
\ eenV;! tirr.r to the shop.s on which we decided to 

i conceruraU.'. 

i Wf "•"! a favorabhi start, A worker in — shop of 

' the •: -ft .<3ystem called up the I>ally %Vorker and gave 

sonse ieiurmation about the con\lltl<ms in the shop. We 

] irnm«- *;'''%■ contacted tJie worker, who was somewhat sym- 

; patl:; the Party. Through him we began to build a 

;-!;:• to be the organizational eomnuttee f'*r the 

.1 a difficult job at first, for the rncn in the 

■. y .: di.sappointef! time and again by the A. F. of 

: L. Tiu-y had lh>' runif>any union, of course, and 

:' ' ' xTc detrirnVntai ralhiT than hel{>fi 

-t thing that we had to convincf 

': "ur mam ndrrt-st is to protect their y-' 



orga/ 

most 

tho.H> 



i.lUV 



boHeved 
!.' the 

: ;n of 

• 'artf id 

their 

^; ,, .,;-■ .. . ..:^ V i 'iiikl depend, 

d known for yearn, ar;.j o:>-<>>!"i them 

: fives, HO they would axoid rccruit- 

.' and thereby destroy orirMniza- 

thr mrfl The men we; "i 

itson w.us a rank-and-file ijii^aui- 



APPENDIX — PART V 1693 

ExHiRiT No. 45 — Continued 



— q 



a4 TAMJY OSGAHKES 



zation interested sincerely in l>ettering the conditions of 
the workers and In protecting their Jobs. 

At the same time the union Issued leaflets that were, 
in the main, written by the men themselves, about the 
conditions existing in the shop, and how best to remedy 
these conditions. Our forces in the concentration unit sin- 
gled out the most ciass-consdous and active workers. Thes*- 
we approached to Join the Party. In the shop we had, by this 
time, 25 to 30 workers who had signed up with the union. 
Finally we were successful in recruiting one worker into the 
Party. We explained a number of things to this worker. 
He arranged a little gathering at the home of one cf his 
friends at which two workera were present. The section 
sent a leading comrade down to this gathering, who out- 
lined to the workers the role of the Party. He was suc- 
cessful in convincing them to join the Party, so that we 
had a nucleus in the shop of three members. Fi-om then on 
we tried to place the leadership and the responsibility in the 
hands of^ the Party members on the inside, with the con- 
centration unit members helping to visit contacts, conduct 
open air meetings, distribute shop papers and Pally Workers 
at the ;^op gates. 

We have kept to the system of organization mentioned 
above, namely, the groups. The men in charge of the group.^ 
were responsible for the collection of dues, the holding of 
meetings, etc. and they constitute the leading committee of 
the shop. At all times, both the union and the section paid 
the utmost attention to the individuals that , comprised the 
leadership of the shop. We have spent hours in conversa- 
tion with the comrades and the workers who were genuinely 
Interested in building the organization. 

The bosses have done their best to raise the "red scare" 
and to brand the organization as Communist. This was met 
squarely. First the C. P. expMned what Communism stands 
for. In the meantime, the union organization pointed out 
clearly that the union is composed of all workers, among 
whom there are workers of various affiliations, that the 
union do^ not exclude anyone, but welcomes everyone, it 
was pointed out that the "red scare" is used by the bosses 
to prevent oi^ganizatlon among the men and make them 
accept the company union. The men accepted the explana 
tions of the union and the leaflets and bulletins issued by 
the Party nucleus. The union kept growing. A great num- 
ber of the workers enrolled were activlz^. Of course, al! 
sorts of schemes were Invented to dyivert the attention of 
the men from i^al orgaailzatlon and struggle. First a self- 
appointed shop-committee sprang into existence, with quite 
an Influence among tibUB men, promising things such as 
betterment of conditions, shorter hours, etc. They did not 
fulfill their promise and the union was quick In discredit- 



1694 UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 

Exhibit No. 45 — Continued 



COHCEKTRATIOII OH TRARSPORT as 

tog the group. The pension plan was next introduce*! by 
the company. Our union took up this question, analyzed it 
carefully and fouiid it to be very detrimental to the men. 
We decided to fight it. A very careful expose of this plan 
resulted In its rejection on the part of the workers. Hun- 
dreds began to write in to the company, demanding that 
their names be taken off the pension list. The authority 
and standing of the union as a result of this careful and 
correctly waged struggle increased considerably. 

However, there were still some illusions among the men 
as to the possibility of turning the company union into a 
fighting body, while the members of our union have been 
in favor of deserting the company union completely as 
wmething that cannot be utilized for strengthening organi- 
zation in the shop. Our stand on the question was that 
they should remain inside of the company union for the 
present, that they should participate in the elections, and 
that they should utilize the company union as the legal 
expression of the sentiment of the workers in the shop. 

The elections, which were not held at all but were 
merely appointments made by the company, exposed the 
character of the company union completely. This was par- 
ticularly demonstrated with the acceptance by the delegates 
of the new agreement which has failed to give back the 
promised 10 per cent wage-cut taken from the men two 
years ago. At the company union meeting the agreement 
was rejected by the men. In the meantime, this opportunity 
was seized upon to begin to bring the Transport Workers 
tXnion into the open. The first open meeting of the -anion 
was called with the most important people in the shop who 
were membera of the union. It was a highly successful 
meeting. There it was decided to call another meeting of 
aU of the union members in the shop. The organization of 
this meeting was the i^sjKJnsUblty of those present. 

In the meantime, another company union meeting was 
caMesd and the question of the Transport Workers Union was 
opeaaly raised by the workers. They voted non-confidence in 
the -delegates of the company union and told them plainly 
that if they wanted to stick with the workers they had 
better get Into title only union that really represents the 
interests of the men, and is in a position to fight the com- 
pany for better conditions. Tliey al^> succeeded in electing 
& delegate to the Washington Congr^s for Unemployment 
and Social Insurance from the company union local. The 
mc^^kig of the delegate, however, was sabotaged by the 
oentmi delegates council. AH of these things served to 
a»>aa6 the anger of the workers. i&K>n after this company 
nstai meeting, the se<K>nd meeting of the rank-and-file union 
at the sikop was called. It was a meeting of several hun^ 
dfeed 'e!«>rk«r»~-all union m^n. At this meeting a decision 



APPENDIX — PART \ 1695 

Exhibit No. 45 — Coiitiiiued 



wm mMsi to mil a general meettog- of ute shop. Duiirsg 
tt% perloci we contliiiioiisly mM t&e UaAly Worker, issut'a 
tlJdPee ui^bers of the Party shop paper and recruited fou? 
additio«al members iato the shop nucietia. Owr |>«3sit 
tMa Aep today la qirite stable. All attempts of the co 
to destroy tti€ o^amtotton, of the men have so far .: . 
Sto&l ^igmm were expired; tiie *'re4 scare" ■ m^as met, an.; 
opea union oiTgunizatloa was established. 

W© Mve a uwmber of te^it&iit shortcomings, such -s . 
the ter€gttlarfty of the shop paper, our Inability to gi-; 
very Important workers toto the unit, the failure to i- 
IMUf ia gr«at niimbera every day at the gate, ai,.. .,: 
failure 10 raise s^fmrply m>me very importaat questiona ;■ 
the' union. In this cormection we have made some 
Rings. We liave been able to raise the Negro q^!"^' 
lea-dtog committee meetings, but that is as far as 
gone. Our concentration tmit as well as the I.': 
not yet uMertaken a broad campaign for the orgaiu^..*; 
Negroes into tlie union; 8lm> the demands for Negro ; 
are yet too general. However, stei» are definitely bvu 
takea by the section and the union to overcome and cor; 
tliese weaknesses. 

During the entire process of organisation there has !>•>■■ 
careftil and planned united activity between the secti*:: 
the union. This is largely responsible for the resu!t.«5, 
this acliievement of our section, we learn the iniportar, 
(1) the proper selection of forces; (2) the very « 
projection of an organizatioBai drive; (3) the irap>;; 
of conttwious guidance and supervision by the leadinK 
mittees of the Party; and (4) most important of 
the importance of applying the guiding principle oi ;u.^ 
Open Letter, that is, ©o«eentmtl«i. 



"Tlbe dictatorship of the proletariat fs a dete? 
struggle, Moody and bloodless, violent and peaceful, niiu.a, 
and economic, pedagogical and adminiatrative, against t; 
forces and traditions of old ^Kiety. Without an iron par 
hardened In the struggle, without a party enjoying the c>>;. 
fidence of all the honest elements of the class, without 
party capable of keeping in tx>uch with the sentiments of ti;' 
masses and Influencing them, tt Is impossible succes8ft!l:\- ■ 
conduct such a struggle". Lenin 



1696 UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 

Exhibit No. 4G 
24 PARTY ORGANIZER 



HOW AND WHERE TO 
CONCENTRATE 

Ex<tTp;< from Specih of Charles Krumln'm, N. Y. District 

Ory^aru'er 

J^'^ONCr-NTRATION m connecdon with mass work is the b*:'- 
^"^ g'.nnsng oi the Milutson '.<i nur prol'lemi. Of course, wc cannot 
unucri-^nm.ite the difficulttcs. th<\t wc \vj!l have m breaking with our 
f-'.Kst metluxis. W'c can see from wljere %ve arc entrenched in New 
\ ork tliat we have never taken concentration seriously. We have 
worked hard, being everywhere and therefore generally being no- 
wSiere, We must understand that to the extent that we are sue- 
ces>ful m gaming unportant helds, we will have tremendous effect 
on uthir fields that we do not concentrate on. That is a point 
wha-h mubt he stressed. 

Now m regard to concentration on the industries that are inj- 
po:_tant; Marme f:r<t jnj jun-tnixt for New York City. New York 
Luv IS tlse higgc>t ptirt in the world. It is nut only a question hcc 
of the number of workers m the industry; the political importance 
nui^t I'c seen by us. And hghtmg the war danger docs not mean 
ior UN only mass meetings. It means work m the basic industries 
that arc so clt^sc to war, mdustnes that will be decisive in war. 

Our Approach in the Past 

\X"hat his been our approach in the past? We take a comrade, 
assign hiin t<i the wacertront and consider the problem solved. But 
ihi: real problcsn is to break down the mechanical separation of 
iKiTiv and n'j.i-s w.irk, mobilizmg the l*arty members on the watc*- 
tri>nr no rii.u we nialr-plv the efforts of anv specialist we send down. 

Next, nietaL Metal is vcrv impo.rt.int tor us. Although the com- 
lades in the Metal Workers InduNtruiI Union have dune gotxJ work, 
thev b.T.e >*i.>f vet d'HM' any important concentration. For example, 
we had a comrade in Broi4:i\n where a section of this basic industry 
Is I.H"atfd, and bec.iUNC of strikes m little shops here and there tint 
car.u- i:}' we pulled htm out, kept hitn out for four or five weeks, 
aiid bv the time he rerurned tljose we had worked %vith had no 
tuttluT conhdcnce in us. If v^e tnean concentration seriously, then 
we nuist sec t'sat our comrades stay put. 

Concent r.ite on Transportation 

N'->:t on c>^r,C€n:-.-it\on for New York: railroad. On this we have 

tb.n.- '' Oio;'. i'fh. upli the issues are there for us to 



APPENDIX — PART V 1697 

Exhibit No. 46 — Continuefl 

MARINE 25 



Another point I think we should consider for concentration is city 

transport. Transport in all big cities plays a very important 
political role. I think it is a field that we must concentrate on. We 
have nothing there yet. In addition to concentrating on transport 
we can use the election campaign that we are now entering to put 
forward the proper issues, connecting the question of low fare, as it 
aiTects the workers generally, with the conditions of the transport 
workers. 

Now! want to state that on the question of concentration the 
District leadership must set the pace. Each and every one of us 
on the staff must give his major attention to a point of concentration. 
I don't mean the whole industry;^ I mean picking out certain points 
of concentration within the industries. We must $tt the pace. 

We Must Guide the Sections 

Section leadership: we have got to give very serious consideration 
to this. What is the situation today in our district? Today we 
hnd a flow from the sections to the District — ^thc section organizers 
come in, we take up problems with them, they go back to the sec* 
tion. This is not the way to develop section leadership. Systems* 
tically, regularly, we must go down to the section committee, take 
up their problems with them, so that the ^hole section leadership 
is developed, in place of bringing one comrade into the center and 
developing only him as a result. Furthermore, we must immediately 
review our entire leadership, our entire activity in the sections; %ee 
who is engaged in mass work and bring these comrades into the 
section leadership. On the other hand, some of the comrades now 
in the leadership must get into mass work, and this must be done 
simultaneously. 

Unemployed Meitmbers Responsible for Unemployed Work 

What da we find in the unemployed situation? I venture to say 
that the percentage of unemployed in the Party is greater, becauie 
of the victimization, etc., than it is in the mass as a whole, yet not 
over 10 percent of our unemployed comrades participate in un- 
employed work. Our unemployed comrades do not consider unem- 
ployed work as their mam field of work. They are not working, they 
are off all day; the unemployed likewise are not working and are 
off all day. The opportunities are tremendous and we must see to 
it that every unemployed comrade has as his main, task the un- 
employed work. 

The same applies, of course, to other fields. We have a situation 
in the trade unions where less than ^0 percent of our comrades 
participate in the fractions and less than 10 percent arc active 
in the trade unions. 



1698 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 47 



Wilc^^ i*-*^^'^' 






the r&> Tc 



i::{J MAECH 8, 1956. 



::ifivemer,t8 tt- our 

.Traae ^^'.^v'-.a .,;; i-;;t. ,;.,•,. ^.L. are rr!eri;;ed ■^itlri th& A.F'.i. ... <»iji.,>. .,: <« ^ csaces 
5ur ccijmdes wer« received vith aseri arms by the asasses ot" orca.nized wor-crs 

ir t>f-> A.?.!,, -^ions. At •;•.© -^-ese^it time, while all »r« ftct f : /l!,„ ->er- 

:p tl;.', '.^e have :,'j\'ertat-less , sic-Ts 300 fractioiK in the t mds --- ^..d iti 

acoat l£Ci trad© ujiiciRK o-dr ?«rty ccr-radsa are eltriey fijlly or p«rt J aUy in the 
i«ad>:"rt!hi-(3 of these tjj.ionis. 



Estieciaily i31d we !a»ke headwsj' In the trade anion field of the coricentratSor. 
i:\dujtries, cueh as Marine, s'hei-e the influance of our Party was ©xteRded con-, 
sid«r»'sly, ar.<3 the mr^K and file rjsc'vejTierit is deveXotjlst!- racist rapidly; ir. ^rs<s- 



tion 



i"%^'; 






- ' ad oj our coffiradf 
Ine ,«..* .*v. , at&.oc 
. " ' -yxkers ir: the ertire indastry. 
,->•»; Mef"**-! I etc. 



■rowa to theofrwjgtfe 
:itt the only trade 
Ha© saaae thirig holds 



■vsr<3 wo: v" 
.- Part,y fcr 



■:i ;:;orr.e real achie^'ementa in developing the xmitwS 
ro r.Tasij.es. ;>^rl€ffl at this tiase, 
:_: ,•.: . ■;::.;: »?or>:. Maay sectior.o of the Segro 
■ Party throtigh rite- correct appllo&tiOK of the 
o:l froj:t ir, st.r!i^>'Xe a£;&ij:st dlscriffiln8.tion of th© 



!?6grc ;5«E5:e:!, and arc;.;;:; tbf attack on th«! Ethiopian pc-cple. 

5?« : 1 in buiidi:-!::': up the Pr-rty frorr; a aeatersfeip of 9,100 a year a^ to 

aho:,- ., , -0 tit preserit. Cur shop nuclei >xT9'i' from 1S2 tc isome 2S5. 

X* ■ ■ .co:^-oary, ho?'.'6vor, to point out that :*.ile we aa.de htmdvray in the ttade 

;, oro; in laaao work j^rnerally, tkre-.uh the ccrri;ct applieatica of 
ta>_ *- ;■-»-• '. the "^tr-^y-la for i!tE6'diate nccd:^ of the stasses , and 

, that due ";o the >)rcO'Ure of oisci fold tasks of the 

.. , -v. .- - ■ * ■" •;- " :at extfcjit our cecicentratiOR of 

:. . e these achieveme.'its were ob~ fi 



ap.; 




Party . 


.. ;U ;..' :. 


huiidis 


-■: tot ?&! 


tai ri.»; , 






th of to 




,■- 00 li;,' 



, ■' - i are ir. Ihs .-sain ir thi; ii._frt ir.dustry ar.C aiBort|r 
»or.ai T'Orhor-o. Ih^ isoreaoe ^« r,'«xi5b«rship is aleo 

t ro , r;.y, hi',^> foilor f... = urofssoicoal tsor'Mirs. In th« 

ha.-; . ,^vth of t'it Po?-fy ,■ > ;;ijf'fbie, 

e;io«ption of hea%'y r.etal ai.d power, the control taste adopted at tb»Si1 
, 19o5 Oor.f erorce, for the "o-uiiding of shop nuclei, for the ir.crees* 
irci5l3tion of the Bally Worker, ©tc ., have not hein ihtlfiiled. 

^hil- :.:.- :■■:■,, ^;f;h-::o-lid wor>: anoi.oi; the lle^^ro people in, Rai'lem, we did not 
'■'■■\€-''- id "ho party as a result of this s?ork. Especially smist «f9 

•'t'"' -e to foyelop the stro<s;, le fcr Te^ro ri#ts, against disorijBin- 

■- a hi.,l<-ict widf; scale, outside cf HRrlen, ar.d "oringiRg the "t-Kro asasses ,5 

; ;- party. Ir, .odditlon to Harler., Section 12, stands out as the ORly 

:-.ecti'..,,: ;iayln;.- ettont-oo to thin work. In all other sections,, w« camtuit nsark 
any h(.H-Jd:my, es-iooiaiiy in b-jAldin.g the Party aKsonij the Hegro aassas* 



APPENDIX — PART V 

■KxiiiRiT No. 4S 



1699 



XIm- Taxi Strike As 
§eeii By A New York^ 
Transport Worker 



5 !,:i>n-, I OM ^ 






J 






279895— 41— pt. 5 G 



1700 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 

ExiiFRiT No. 48 — Continued 



^'fii'l Spar? OTganhet* 










sn'i 



ffi' shrsn »f f«rc«si. 

jsno.n '>5th the subway 

:<• TU UC , ;o be fail-. 

»-'?d tb"? samp 

r^ sould be *."!- 

■-■fi: tshfi; ;h<->v fcxTsn^^ 

•v;;;i -hi' -"aorkfr*, thf\ 

i.'hiirsa:; anti r?!5lse«-{S 

' tiixprs. 's'hf) in d'K" tiro? 

be, «!■ htirS'STi. Or^an- 

mmf « r!4 orsa n j ? <* rs 






Ss?n 



*,{ 'im^'~ ««, «rn l« g^' lpsf1f?i$ out ; t 

O^s'n*:;-!^^ in Sfirn>; ia a hafst ' 
.ab, f^T*' jil'x -r, in i*sd weather, j I 

f 'n ,y ■ ; . ■;;:;,■ :. -.n ?.Hs transit ; 









it" (3^ 



Hit aR^ "^li-* 

. JI 11, ?^?» t5ee« % -1.' 
s'tac' and ft tso* "uf-^- 

t<tf> fisht t« ^nt I 
. <s:, ton' nuf t<-> «•* - 

>-.'«? ~ rf- to 



ir 






Rn- 



1 J ♦»*ij:'<>'- m-"5t V T». f 



f^t^f n • tor!!**!!* '-"1 ! 



^fl^»« ? trtv Cwatiwl! felly »jr««pi» 



W: 



\ ftf^ 



Of 



»e«*«!»!T t^tt^ for tJt*' IMf*'* ***' 
Smtrtct ax'A that nPt »»i' *rf«n- 

mad? fw tb** k<»$t«>ir, m a rftatalt 6f 

.,» , i^ ■>!'"■' «iX thl« 
- • .,- S. t. t. t. 



APPENDIX PART V 



1701 



s — 



w 



•A\i\ 
i ! i % 






Exhibit No. 49 



„ . our I*art\ o'nir:u.k> wlu) arc active trade uriiurr 
.s^.si tit uuiMiKCvi t!iat thc\ am i'irul the way t^, 
.,^..,J.,, ,s tnrwarJ bttUIK. Where this has been 

. hjN e hccn ij;(MKi resiilts. 
;: h.ivc tcfuienc!e> atTiong ^ome leading eomrades, 

ffu vuniradcs Nv!i»» are actiwlv building the trade 
, Ih- u>i^ hekitive HI recruiting of people into 
j fi;-. \crv eorrect idea <»! recruiting key peuplc 
^^|..ji-i/t.l, ^«' thai any ordinary worker is cun- 
s H}' nu \alue, I'hi^ question o\ beiitling o\er the 
, rsi.j-t b. correaed, so that we may really ercatc 
>. ith sub>Cjniial loundatiuns. 



Organization Brings Results 

By ROSE WORTIS 

!\(,Ki I uiih diL- tonirad^s u iio say that, the reasim 
iUir h'arf. dtics ri'ii; giow taster is not because ot the 
,i!'H •■ 1 !•* ., * ,uh!i^. luit because t»l insuHicient attention 

]i: ' : ,iri>p'. u'U ue ha\e a luiit whscli has been in existence 

|.:M .1 \i\iT jjhI h.df, but the sncinbcrship at the unit is 

-o .• .ui4r\ alihi'U^f! the I'artv nienibers in this unit are 

.: '-..'^ t!ie furifutj^t iuidders <»{ the unioii. 

in antithi r unit in a |Hn\er hiaise, which started with 

wtilv ntK tojrirade, the unit in a sfiort time grew to five. 

I he HKrnber^ In this urht helped to carry through the tirNt 

vtrskc in the i!t\. A> a result of this good work, 

i\, ■ hid,:\ liis grown (o a membership ot lourteen, afui 

.if .! iiu'cting the comrades pledged themselves tu 

■ '■■■■■■■t\ mciribers b) July M). 

, -.iJM.ar situation \n the shipvards. In one 

';. T ,1 ^tr!k^ iv njiw ]n progress, the comrades 

■ ten . , the Daily ^fofkcr. 'I he\ 



1702 UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 49 — Continued 

,i i ffiat inort' ctHiki not i)c ?»o!d because nt the "livd 
^^A':c. In :innfhcr \ariK where the baiiie wpc nt worker-. 
jre employed, comrades are selling Irum HUu to iJMifi 
^,;|ucs of the Daily Worker. This shows that \X is not the 
Jiihcultics of the "Red" «^care. but the kind or work ne 
jre doing, the kind of organization ue fia\e. that lieter- 
;jiiries the failure or success of our work. 

A word on lluctuatusn. \\*e ha\'c tins kintl 0} a situa- 
■ .-:', in the l*arlv: We folh)u u|> a svmpathi/er tor montiis. 
V -iC hull at his home, heeurne friendly, etc. Bui thi 
-huiient he is recruited, we pay n<» more atlep.tiun to him, 
and the consequence is that nianv ot the new comrades 
,irop nut. h'speciallv is that true of the new t\pe we are 
. nuting in our district. We ha\e a SiU'l 0} husniess rehi- 
•win with them, bor exan^ple, we have Irlsli workers. Thcv 
,or]ie to a meeting and alter the meeting they go hack 
{0 their Irish circles, to an atmosphere rcmo\eii from mir 
Pirty; and we remain among ourselves. Iliis is wreuig. 

\]) addition to tlie formal meetings, we shouKI begin t<» 
^.\e .utention t«» meeting tiiore frequenth with these com- 
i.hlcs, to mingle with them socially. This will help t<» st<!p 
iKutualioji. 'the assigning of our best comrades for the 
persetnai guidance of new comraties sliould be seriously 
considered in our district. B\ doing this, ue shall he able 
ti» keep those wc recruit and to increase recruiting. 



APPENDIX PART V 



1703 



Exhibit No. 50 



'The Daily Worker Gave Me 
the First Break'' 

Bv }., New York 



1 



1 



\ I R.\NSP< )R r.\rir>N wc have a dtrfuult ta^k. Ninety 

pcf cent of the workers are Irish. However in !*>34 \\c 

.! hujr inenibers in the indus!:r\. and now ue luue a unit 

k\er\ shop in trans|)orta!ion. i he hi^^cst pr'sbkni in 

,!ns|>(!rtation is Reii-haitin^. I here is th. C.itholk Chureii 

i::di s.nds its prusis mta the {>reeinets to help ui the Ked- 

: ung, :ind at the present tuTie. thc\ arv forming e\erv r\pc 

■ "rgani/atum —the I h.'h. Winne, thv' KiiiglitN of i, uharn- 

1 ■■ . e ; t . 

t'Tinnunists have been \n ihe Imnt rank^ in 'ueUhni^ the 
a-'l'" irtation unmn. But tile :ni>st s^fious shorEemninu ^ 
■ tliere dvi' tjot \et •. nnugh Coin-niunists aniong die trans- 
portation workers to light this Red-baiting the way it's got 



to he t'ought. 

I nn self recruited 20 members. 1 think the Ddily IForker 
gave me the first break, especially the Sunddx Jforki-r. i 
ga\'c them out to some of the men, and after a while i was 
asked w hy I did not bring them the Daily Jforker and Sun- 
Jay U'orki-r reguhirly. I did. -so, and I also got pamphlets 
to tliem. especially the one by our great re\-olutionarv Irish- 
Hiati, James Connolly. 

i ha\e nes tnore to say. I am not a speaker. Ihe only 
thing I du is carry on the truth. 



1704 UN-AMERICAX PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 

Exhibit 51 
[From the Transport Workers Bulletin. ^May 1938, p. 7] 

James Connolly — He Gave His Life in the Struggle for Economic and National 

Freedom 

'•Then carried him from his bed in a stretcher to the aDihulaiice aitd 
drove him. to Kilnuiinham. Jail. They carried the stretcher from the am- 
bulance to the jail yard. Then put him in a chair. . . .He was very brave 
and cool. . . . I asked him: 'Will you pray for the men who are about to 
shoot your and he aiiswered: 'I will say a prayer for all brave men who 
do their duty.' . . . and then they shot him." 

James Connolly was perhaps the greatest labor leader who ever stepped into 
the turbulent pages of Irish History. All of his busy life was devoted to the 
organization and uplifting of the industrial underdog, the exploited wage slave 
and the forgotten man of Ireland. The anniversary of his execution by the British 
crown forces after the 1'936 rising, is observed in labor circles throughout the 
world. 

Born in Clones, County Monaghan, Ireland, in 1870 of poor parents, Connolly 
spent the first ten years of his life in Ulster. From there he went to Glasgow, 
Scotland, where at the age of eleven or thereabouts, he secured a .iob in a bakery 
shop. After a ten year struggle for existence in this city, he returned to Dublin 
which was to be the main scene of activities from then on. 

immortal writHngs 

Always studiously inclined and a great lover of books, Connolly, although he 
was unable to afford a formal education, was nevertheless able to make speeches 
and write extensive articles after a few years in the schools of toil and experience. 
The fruit of his studies in his "Labor in Irish History," the classic in its field. 
Other powerful books on labor are his "Reconquest of Ireland" and "Labtn-, 
Nationality and Religion." 

All of Connolly's voluminous writings emphasize the necessity and value of 
industrial unionism as the form of as.sociation to be adopted by all classes of 
workers in their battle for better conditions. In his lecturesi in Dublin, Belfast 
and Cork, and during his short visit to America in 1903, he constantly reiterated 
the advantages of all the workers in a given industry being united into one 
comprehensive union. 

In 1910 James Connolly became an early member and active organizer of the 
Irish Transport and General Workers LTnion in Dublin. He became Secretary to 
the Transport Workers and spent most of his working hours to help wield it into 
a powerful and militant body. 

LEADS TRANSPORT WORKERS 

The progress of Connolly and his co-workers in organizing the men in the 
Dublin industries, and the success of the new gospel of industrial unions began 
to alarm the Dublin emplo.vers, and in 1913 the latter combined to stage one of 
the longest and most tragic lock-outs in labor history. The attitude and inten- 
tions of the employers during this eight-month lockout can best be described by 
quoting from George Russell's famous letter to them : "You determined deliber- 
ately, and in cold anger, to starve out one third of the population of this city, to 
break the manhood of the men by the sight of the suffering of their wives and 
the hunger of their children. ... It remained for the twentieth century and 
the capital city of Ireland to see an oligarchy of four hundred masters deciding 
openly on starving one hundred thousand people, and refusing to consider any 
solution except that fixed by their pride. . . ." And, we may add. their greed. 

The immediate results of the lock-out struggle were indecisive. Connolly viewed 
it as a "drawn battle.'' While the employers did not recognize the Union, they 
were compelled to recognize the individual members who remained loyal to it, and 
the.v clung to their "right" to hire free laborers, or scabs. The most enduring 
result of the lock-out was a purifying and regeneration of the Irish labor move- 
ment, and an even more intensive organizational activit.v which in the ensuing 
years were finally to win for the Transport Union recognition from the employers 
and its permanent establishment as a powerful organization. 



APPENDIX PART Y 1705 

The outbreak of the World War found Ireland's foremost labor champion 
busily engaged organizing and rebuilding the workers' morale after the struggle 
of 1913. Leading the harassed workers, editing a labor paper, helping the 
cause of women and hungry children, engaged in building up the Citizen Army, 
fighting the obstacles constantly placed in his path by government ofiicials. 
Connolly found more than plenty of hard work to accomplish. 

DIED FOR LIBEETY 

Connolly's attitude towards the European catastrophe was epitomized in the 
big sign he had nailed up outside the historic Liberty Hall. The sign was taken 
down a few days later by British military authorities and no wonder, for it 
read, "We serve neither King nor Kaiser, but Ireland." From 1914 onward, 
Connolly was one of the prime movers in the movement which was to culminate 
in the heroic insurrection of Easter Week, in INIay, 1916. 

Connolly's task on that memorable Easter Monday was to take over and hold 
the General Post Office in Dublin, and this building, under the shadow of the 
Nelson Monument, was the scene of a gallant but hopeless fight that lasted 
from Monday until Friday. 

Connolly was under no illusions as to the success of the fight. "We are going 
out to be slaughtered," he had remarked, during the week previous to the 
rising. He did believe, however, and subsequent history proves he was right, 
that a national and labor spirit would arise in his country, and that instead of 
just a few realists like himself, and a few idealists like Patrick Pearse, there 
would be a whole people to fight the cause of economic and national freedom. 



Exhibit No. .52 

[From the Daily Worker, New York, Thiu-sday, March 17, 19.">8. p. .5] 

Mike Quill Urges Irish to Honor St. Patrick by Rallying for Anti-Fascist 

Unity in U. S. 

By Edward McSorley 

New York's Irish and Irish American's march today to honor the "glorious 
Apostle and dear Saint of our isle upon whom the poor children bestow a 
sweet smile." 

And where, asks Michael J. Quill, City Councilman and International presi- 
dent of the Transport Workers Union, will they go when they leave Fifth 
Ave. ; when they leave St. Patrick's Cathedral, where His Eminence Patrick 
Cardinal Hayes will review the thousands of marchers? 

"They go back where they came from," says Councilman Quill, "back to the 
slums of the West Side, East Side and the Bronx. They'll go back to the lines 
of the unemployed. Their brief hour on Fifth Avenue will be over for another 
year." 

Councilman Quill, Kerryman who fought in the ranks of the Irish Republican 
Army and who has been fighting the battles of the transport workers in New 
York, will be marching. He will be among the members of the City Council 
as the Board of Aldermen did before is, which turned out each year to pay 
tribute to the patron Saint of the Irish people, Irish and American-born both. 

ST. PATRICK A PEOPLE'S SAINT 

"St. Patrick," says Quill, "is a people's saint. He preached to the people of 
Ireland and it is the people of Ireland and those of Irish blood in this country 
who honor him today." 

"For many years in New York," he said, "the Iri.sh people have had their 
half-a-day on Fifth Avenue. They turned out in great force to honor St. 
Patrick. Dearer than any of the other saints to the Irish people St. Patrick 
is honored in New York as he is in probably no other city in the woi-ld. 

"It was the pennies, nickels and dimes of the Irish immigrant which went 
into the building of the cathedral on Fifth Ave. in honor of his name. They who 
had little to give are they who built the cathedral, undoubtedly one of the 
finest churches in New York. 



1706 UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 

"St. Patrick's Day this year," Quill said, "finds the Catholic people of Ger- 
many, Austria and in many parts of Spain writhing under the crushing heel 
of Fascism. 

APPEALS TO CATHOLIC YOUTH 

"It is a day on which in America we must appeal to the Catholic youth 
here to realize that it is only their unity with the working class and student 
youth that they will prevent the spread of fascism to this country. 

"It is a day on which to warn them that the democracy oa which the Catholic 
Church can live in the United States today can be preserved and extended only 
if they who form a great and important section of that democracy, are ready 
to unite with the rest of the youth of the country. 

"We have seen in Germany that the Nazis first directed their religions 
attacks against Jews. It didn't take long for them to try to crush the Protestant 
Church and the indignities to which the Catholic priesthood has been sub- 
jected under Hitler have been almost without parallel. How many hundreds 
of priests and monks have been arrested in the Nazi campaign to smash the 
church : How many nuns have been forced to flee the borders of the Saar and 
other parts of Germany. 

"Catholics the world over will never forget that it was Hitler's Nazis war- 
planes which bombed Guernica, the Holy City of that devout Catholic people, 
the Basques and blasted it off to a shambles. 

"Today the mailed fist of fascism is tightening its grip on Austria. It is 
again first the Jews who are .subjected to the lash and the concentration camp. 
But just as surely as it happened in Germany, the Catholics will not be long 
after them. Already von Shirach, the Nazi youth leader, has begun his con- 
fiscation of Catholic property, already the Catholic organizations have begun to 
be attacked." 

Quill paid tribute to the Irish-American trade union leaders of past years 
who, like Tom Mooney, fought to build a progressive trade union movement 
in the United States. 

"These men were fighting the same fight," he said, "that Irish-American 
Catholics today, like John Brophy of the CIO, Francis Gorman of the textile 
workers and my friend Joseph Curran of the National Maritime Union are 
fighting today. 

"While the Irish Catholics of New York line Fifth Ave. today to watch the 
parade of their own thousands who honor St. Patrick their own democracy is 
being threatened by the Tory Liberty League forces of reaction in this country." 

Quill bitterly assailed the Tammany politicians who gave the Irish Fifth 
Ave. for a half day on the ITth of March and forgot about them for the rest of 
the year until the time came around again to get their votes. 

NOTHING SACRED TO TAMMANY 

"Nothing is sacred to Tammany," he declared, "St. Patrick or any other saint. 
Tammany has been in the habit for many years of marching up Fifth Ave. in 
the name of the Irisli and Irish-American people of New York. 

"Fifth Ave. was Irish for an afternoon. Then back the paraders went to 
their bad housing, to the firetraps, the sunless tenements. Back they went for 
another year. And Tammany made the housing laws that kept them in the 
slums. Tammany put its silk hat and its shamrocks away for another year. 

"When election day came around, though, Tannnany was on the job again. 
Out after the votes of the Irish to whom they had given the use of Fifth Ave. 
on St. Patrick's Day. 

A MAN OF THE PEOPLE 

"The Irish proudly march up Fifth Ave. today in honor of the man of the 
people, St. Patrick, whose day they celebrate. A man of the people as was He 
in whose name he spoke. One of their own people. 

"They will proudly pass in review at the great cathedral they built in his 
name. 

"When they go back where they came from, back to the slums and the relief 
stations, and" that's where many of them will go, as they have been going year 
after long year, they will go with a new determination. 



APPENDIX— PART V 1707 

WILL FIGHT FOR UNITY 

"They won't wait for Tanunany to come arouucl on Election Day with 
promises. They will go back to wipe out those slums. They will know that to 
wipe out these slums they will have to unite. They will have to unite not 
only their own ranks, but the ranks of all the people. And the unity of the 
Catholic, the Jew and the I'rote.stant will be as close as the three leaves of the 
shamrock that St. Patrick held in his hand when he preached to the people of 
Ireland." 



James Connolly 

James Connolly, leader of the Irish Transport Workers Union and Com- 
mandant-in-chief of the Citizens' Army, gathered his forces on St. Patrick's 
Day, 1916, for the last "test mobilization" before he led them into the streets 
on Easter Monday for the first armed uprising against the imperialist war of 
1914-1918. 

The rising began on April 24 and by April 29, the gallant bands, hopelessly 
outnumbered, had been forced to surrender. On May 12 Connolly was taken 
on a stretcher to Kilmainham Prison. He had been wounded in the legs and 
was unable to walk. At dawn British soldiers carried him into the yard and 
lifted him into a chair facing the firing squad. 

Connolly, who had spent several years in America as a labor organizer, 
during which time he published a paper, "The Harp," was the author of several 
books and pamphlets on the Irish question. Among them are "Labor in Irish 
History," "The Reconquest of Ireland," "The Axe to the Root," "Erin's Hope: 
The End and The Means," and "Labor Nationality and Religion." 






1710 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



7TH DIVISION — contiuuecl 

e. Retail Stands. 

f. Retail Drug. 

g. Radio Sporting Goods. 

h. Retail Paint and Hardware, 
i. Other Clerks' Locals. 

STH DIVISION 

Assemble 2:00 P. M.— 53rd St., be- 
tween 8th and 9th Aves. 
Miscellaneous Unions. 

a. United American Artists. 

b. United Association Plumbers, Aux- 

iliary No. 463. 

c. Electrical Workers, AFL. 

d. Glass and China Decorators. 

e. United Beauty Culturists. 

f. United Cigar AVorkers. 

g. United Mine Workers, 
h. United Paper Workers, 
i. Paper Box Makers. 

j. Window Trimmers, 
k. Iron and Steel Workers. 
1. Printing Trades, 
m. Butchers, 
n. Domestic Workers, 
o. Other miscellaneous Unions and 
Trade Union Groups. 

9TH DIVISION 

Assemble 2:30 P. M.— 53rd St., be- 
tween 9th and lOth Aves. 
Political Organizations. 

a. Communist Party. 

b. Young Comnuinist League. 

lOTH DIVISION 

Assemble 2:30 P. M.— 53rd St., be- 
tween 10th and 11th Aves. 

Veterans Abraham Lincoln Brigade. 



IITH DIVISION 

Assemble 3:00 P. M.— 39th St., 
tween 9th and 11th Aves. 
Professional and Office. 

a. Teachers. 

b. Psychologists L3ague. 

c. Lawyers. 

d Architects and Engineers. 

e. Advertising Guild. 

f. Social Service Workers. 

g. Office Workers, 
h. Photographers, 
i. Newspapei'men. 

j. Cultural Workers. 

k. New Theatre League. 

1. Musicians. 

m. All other Professional Worker; 



be- 



13TH DIVISION 

Assemble 3:45 P. M.— 3Sth St., be- 
tween 8th and 9th Aves. 
Youth Organizations. 

a. American Students Union. 

b. Adult Educational Student League. 

c. Alumni Hebrew Nat'l Orphan Asy- 
lum. 

d. Vanguard Community Center. 

e. Youth Council (Bronx House). 

f. Young American Artists. 

g. Other Youth Organizations. 



3 4TH DIVISION 

Assemble 4:00 P. M.— 38th St., be- 
tween 9th and 11th Aves. 
Fraternal Organizations. 

a. International Workers Order. 

b. Italian May Day Committee. 

c. United Ukrainian Organizations. 

d. Russian May Day, Committee. 

e. American Friends of the Soviet 
Union. 

f. Workmen's Circle Branches. 

g. Jewish Lathers' Relief Society. 

h. Workmen's Sick and Death Bene- 
fit Fund, 
i. German Organizations. 

1. Federation German American 

Clubs. 

2. German American Relief Com- 

mittee. 

3. Deutscher-Arbeiter Club, Inc. 

4. Arbeiter Saengenchor. 

5. Nature Friends. 

6. Other German Organizations. 

15TH DIVISION 

Assemble 4:30 P. M.— 37th St., be- 
tween 8th and 9th Aves. 
Peace, Relief, Civil Rights. 

a. American League for Peace and 
Democracy. 

b. International Labor Defense. 

c. Polish Patronati. 

d. Icor. 

e. American Friends of the Chinese 
People. 

f. Chinese Organizations. 

g. Japanese Organizations, 
h. Korean Organizations. 

i. Friends of the Abraham Lincoln 

Brigade, 
j. Spanish Organizations. 

1. Club Obrero Espanol. 

2. Comites Femeninos Unidos. 

8. Comite Pro-Democracia Es- 
panol a. 

4. Grupo Mexico. 

5. Other Spanish Organizations. 



APPENDIX — PART V 



1711 



16TH OmSION 

Assemble 5:00 P. M— 37th St., be- 
tween 9th and 11th Aves. 
Language and Cultural Organizations. 
(With the exception of I. W. O. lan- 
guage branches marching in the 14th 
Division). 

a. Freiheit Gezangs Farein. 

b. Freiheit Mandolin Orchestra. 

c. Lithuanian Organizations. 

d. Greek Workers Club. 

e. Bulgarian Macedonian Club. 

f. Croatian-American Singing So- 
ciety. 

g. Serbian Workers Club, 
h. Finnish Organizations. 

i. Armenian Organizations. 
j. Estonian Workers Club. 



Tenants, Civic and Miscellaneous Or- 
ganizations. 



1 7TH DIVISION 

Assemble 5:30 P. M. 
tween 8th and 9th Aves. 



-36th St., be- 



Sign Writers. 

Government Employees. 

WPA Research and Clerical 

Workers. 

Amalgamated Plumbers. 

City- Wide Tenants Council. 

Yorkville Tenants League. 

Citizens Civic Affairs Committee. 

East New York Community 

Center, 
i. East Side Dramatic Group, 
j. American Artist School. 
k. Hamilton Heights Good Neigh- 
bors. 
1. Middle Bronx Workers Center, 
m. Putnam Park Colony, 
n. Workers Fellowship of Ethical 

Culture, 
o. Parent-Teacher Association, 
p. Jedevisto Singing Society, 
q. Latei Relief Society. 



a. 
b. 
c. 

d. 
e. 
f. 

g. 
h. 



1712 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 55 



THE SAME HOUSE, BUT l^^O DOOES 




APPENDIX PART V 



1713 



Exhibit No. ,j!i 




DAILY woEMs^R. NEW ^.ggf J"^^^^^;^^: ^^ 13, nn 



THE SAME HOUSE, BUT TWO mmm 




1714 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 57 



Allied Printing Trades Council 



IT! 






taiaiatsaiisiSissSftissias^tfiSa^tiiemr-f^imfSSBimiam 



Jure l."j Iv 



3163 P>;lton Street ^ 
Brooklyn, J*.T, 

Da'! r B^r » ^•'' f°^ '■ "■ " 

C'oisrl"'' 
your lettssr o'" J-an« 






THIS f.,Ai5J-.l 



ON" YOVR 
PRINTtNC. 



<i4^Ha<f4 Vmfmt 






Av«sr-i;», >« f! b-eer ihe issaee of I.!? bei SO'" sJnoe ]w3;^, 
Th® f'rintlng TToides Biu« Book ,el'«?es ths» U-'t -• f fflcers 
for 1939 S3 'follows; Prftnk Th5stieton, pr«3ld<!r-t; B^rls 
Coher. , s0cr« tery-trs", 'iurer "JrKi buyer. 

TV')® Int-- rti'> 1 1 -■nel >;OY,'spe j «r" F'-lr-'i'T "o,, 
19" b<-st F-ur?^ Str<'i;-rt, has been the I&'^'.'pp ' ' ■•! ^"^1 
^;1ric« 193;-;, D - rjct know ;-fric«rs In 1934, ■''' for 

1959 follow: Tullj? Salvo, prss1d<^nt -^Rd biiyer; v-'^^-ph 
Rlflce, serretary; J-sisa TiKetl, tressur-r. 

Owner of Waldorf Fr«SG, 30 West 15th Street, 
iftssoe cf T,8b«l 426; Paul Lerras;-, buyer, ^.nd Cecil B. 
Fishbeln, 



re :i:e'it in 



grettlnr, th-^t I cannot coisply -^Ith your 
^ X SIS 

Pr 8 ' e r r.a 1 1 y v our s , 



^:^4c^,*,^ \Sa«i.^^: 



i/. 



Pyf^s 1 .tsr.t , 



SIS AIT 
20940 



.^T 



APPENDIX PART V 



1715 



ExTiiBTr Nil. ."iS 

IHATHAWAY USES 
CAPimiSTDODGEI 



[Woman Discovers Daily] 

Worker'g.Asscts Have 

Been AsRigned 



S.'', »t iMst, it wnvM spp-fsr from I 
«n 8t1ida%!'. ft!''f^ m Broftkiyn Su- 
^~i>mt^ ("nttr* frt4»y by Mrs, Bdtth | 
t.!gg?tt, wh« h«s b#fn trying wilh- 

$2.^72 libfl jurtgmifnt frfitn the Daih-| 

Wnrk^T- 

Communijit nfW8pap«>i. and Ih*- 1 
Cnnipfndssly PubUsih;r)g Company [ 
w«*fe «l*o made Imbl? under thf 
judgm<"n!. t.mt wpfk Mrs. Liggp"] 
had Hsihaway thrown snl.T rivit }«* 
for isfvers! dsys without gettinjsj 
a«.? m!>ns>y from him. howc-vpr- anA 
n^v,'. shf «8yR, ihp Comprndnily Pwb- 
iishing Company hss <3!S8p|>e8red {i*<f J 
&U pr&rUcsil purposes. 

All its as-wlf wer? «f signed awsyl 
bPtwfpn Msy 22 and June 1. lierj 
affidavit ssid, and »ub*«»q«*>r.t1y 
5»pp«»d iip wnflfr th(» n^wly orgsn- 
(jcd Dsity PubUshing Cnmp^ny, 
s^tsifi?'. which fhp (lO-v ha.« rif>l 
rl«in!. JuisUce Brfnnun grantwjl 
p?fmfs!;!on for hf"r to suf she ni»w[ 
publishing ffitjt.v ss » "poor p*"?"-! 
I .*f~'n,'' paying rour? rotts out nf what! 
' sh? roli«r»«!. if snythtnf 

Hffip'iS hn'ff shp (ssy* it happened 
The C"mpi<MliSi;y Publishing | 
C«mpsBy as<;!gi-i«d to Ih* n^w D»!lyj 
Publi«h^i^g Company in ennsM^ra- 
ti«n of f-.tymrnt of if^ ihsn fl.Oi^f I 
!f\ hst-k wisgen. th<' niirnfs of ihP 
Buiiy Worker. Stsndsy Worker andj 
the Pmj5rf>?^!v« W«*kly 

AcrounS* and ds-bta rfcf iVsiWe of I 
the Comprndasly i:omp«ny wer(» s&-j 
isflfned 1o the f k D Ptinliiijr Com- 
pspy for deb** owesl it, sod the I 
prsnting eompsny then assigned | 
ih^m to the D»j|y Publ-'Shing Com- 
pany for »wsitning Ihe Cr>n-iprod*i!yj 
Cf>mp«fiy's debts and ohhgantsn* 

The Profript rr«>». which had 8| 
$l?KKi lisdRment Against, the Com- 
prodatly crsmparty, nbi;iin«S its 
f«rniliii(> ,»5id fix'uti ! ;if a sUrr:?!.'; 
Mip. 9nd rjow iessfs them to the| 
new Disdy PuWishinsf Company U: 
$$f) « monSh. 

Ai^d »io, Mf;>«. 14«g«>Sl contended.! 
the n«ib' PwbSishtng Company nowl 
h«5 in rffert tskers ttvfrr porsessionl 
of thf» Cowprftdaiiy Coir-pasiy, Andj 
she bss b^Pn "ratilrted" out of the| 
folJectjon of her jiidgmen' 

Mrf Lifgett. widow of W«!!erl 
Ligsr*?*. Mtnnesp^-tlis rditor killed byl 
gBngstPf* four y#»r« »ge>, Mid inl 
ber »f5idavit that sh» has less th»nl 
$S0O «rid dupports herself and two! 
rbildren on i(pprif>x!m»l»>ly $30 si 
week #»rned by wtitinjs fiction farj 
pulp p»ptr m«g*i!nes. 



279895— 41— pt. o- 



1716 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 59 



I m%km\ 



WOR 




ORT 



ETIN 



Si 






N». > 



-^^ / 




JULY, 19J4/ 



S0» 



NotUng kss than the Rdurn 



1 10% Cut 




OwJ' /i«f<r /or f^** next 12 numthf h being decided upon behind closed doorf. 
Th« aid agreement is J>out to expire baf) mt the !. R, T. m well as &n the 
B. M. T. and the "representativet" and "delegates'" are busy "negotitUin^ with 
the eampankf. 

How are '^negotiaikms" conducted? 

Well, in one case we kf^ow thai Mr. Eagan, ofiicid of the B. M. T., proposed 

,,<r grmtp of representm*es that the present agreement shdl amtinm {that is, 

contisiue the 10 per cent cut) and if SO every "representative" wUl be rewarded^ 

with the round sum of 000. Seeing scrme slight opposition he. proposed the 

return of 2 per cent out of the 10 per cent cui. 

On the 1. R. T. the expiring of the oid agreement is deeply hidden m a 
ecmipir^y of silence. 

For the transit companies and their lackeys, the company union 0§ieids, the 
less the men know the better. It would not be so easy to -put crver a new setio^ 
if the tens of thousands of transport workers would KNOW THAT THEUR 
FATE IS BEING DECIDED UP ON. The I. R. T., far instance, seherfS^t no 
doubt. So cheat the men out of the return of the 10 per cent wage cut by mam>- 
pulations with the pension fund. 

Our job, the fob of every L R. T. and B. M. T. worker is to smash this 
eattspiraey of silence, brtbery and scheming. DEMAND AND AGITATE FOR 
THE FOLLOWING DEMANDS of the Transport Workers Union: 

(a) Immediate, unconditional return of the 10 per cent cut, 

{h) Increased wages to meet the rising cost of living 

(c) Introduction of the 40-48 hour week — -without reduction in weekly 
tmnmnt of pay. 

(4) A guaranteed MINIMUM weekly pay of ^0. 

(«) AU workers shall be etigjMe for pension at half pay after 25 years 
service. PenHon fund to be fully covered by the comp^my. 

{i) No speed up, no lay-offs, safe and sanitary working conditions end abcii- 
tkm of the spy system, 

(g) Two Weeks yaealion with full pay each year. 

(e) Recognition of shop artd depot committees and the Transport Workert 
Union, 

Agitate that these demands shdl be placed before the companies. No «*- 
tlementj.no new agreement withowt comem mni direct vote of ali smpbyws*. Only 
ti«» way can we «qp « new sell out. Only by fouil^iiag- up of a powerful TRAN- 
SPORT WORKERS UNION can we gain higher wagea, thorttt hmn audi 
tfcmty (at our faroilks. TuAHi^mr Workers Unmjm (I»ulepei«J«»r]^^^ 



;$&»is-^:A»^V'X*-:'>:*vJft^ 



^ 



J 



J.^ 



APPENDIX PART V 1717 

Exhibit No. 60 
One third of the nation lives in houses that are not fit to live 

in. This is especially true in Hew York, Your vofte can help to 
tear down the slums and to build decent low cost housing Cor th^ 
thousands of Nev^? York families foued to live in unsanitary fire^ 
traps. 

V. PROTECTION FOB CHni>REN~™-We , want free clinic^ 
established to help guard the health of children m low-income 
groups. Baby clinics to help our mothers bring up healthy boys 
and girls. We want nurseries where working mothers can have 
their children cared for, and more playgrounds for the kids. We 
want more schools, more teachers, and smaller classes. ; 

VL WOUm WANT PEACE™- Think of the women in 
Spain, China and Czechoslovak^. Do you want to hear the roar 
of planes and see your baby killed by fascist bombs? Of course 
not. Yet the international gangsters, the Hitlers, Mussolmis, and 
Mikados. can be stopped only by the collective action of all peace- 
loving, democratic states and peoples. By our refusing to ship 
them the materials for murder. By our boycotting of all fascist 
goods — Made in Germany, Made in Italy, Made in Japan — includ- 
ing the important support of Japanese armies — silk stockings. 

We Communists know that it is capitahsm that breeds poverty 
and war, unemployment, depressions. We believe that under 
capitalism we can never be sure of decent living conditions and 
security for all. This is possible ONLY UNDER SOCIALISM. 
where the people own the factories, mines, land, houses and natural 
resources. I 

But until the MAJORITY of the American people are con- 
vinced that socialism is the only permanent solution, we Commu- 
nists together with the forward-looking, progressive men and 
women fight for better conditions NOW! We want a better life 
NOW! 

Issued by: State Women's Comnussion. 
New York State Committee 
Communist Party. 
35 E. rath St., New York, N. Y. 

Read the Paper Which Champions Women's Eights 

The DAILY and SUNDAY WORKER 

JOIN THE COMMUNIST PARTY 



Tune in Nightly on (Unnmiinist ilation 
Bromiiusts oi vr VV M ( A 



1718 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 



Exhibit No. 61 



n!i!U:(,;-. sc!t'8u;e tieclare"? are nn'JU-- 
■il'ilr, .'snd the like of ^vhich theref'Tc 
n-.-!. '■ i-nri^cf}?-; s^efieral «tatt vi>-oui<i at 
'■'^vA\'i It is axioniauc t-i !>0UT.treD!> 
tsM-n.-i'-. -rs'^nce that a large-^^cafc msfi- 
tar-v >>r'rtfsi\8 is imp(>ss)hle dtirinL' 
fieavv wu'itet weatlicr, even in ternprr- 
Titr c!ini€s; thr Red Army niade sucit 
an offi-Ti-5ve succf-sfnllv in the Nnrtli. 
.iti'l even in the Arctic. It was an 
tx! .Hi Niiue the World War th^qit n\o<.\- 
rrn fortifications cannot be taken I'v 
frontal as?^au!t, except possibly by pro- 
^>nc;f■',! sacrifice of immensely supertnr 
t:!U(n!.<Ms; the Red Army took the Mato 



nerhi'Sio f.uie in tluee ^^*•^■k>- -i<,;ih ;; 
■runntsuHi i° lo-if-^, Snili a :v ■ '^';i'>?« 
sn r'li'uarv >i uoo^e rrtt'U-r'^ I--'- >a-fi- i\\ 
the trxt;t<><>ks on the -ul>;ftt. It s-rni i 
.'li-trate- ."(t lli-e ■--."suir 'isn? the .■( lueve- ^ 
rnetits of the <;-^c-ali'?t fC''n'tfTi%- ^vhu't. 
e;|Ut|)pe.l and -erve;i the Red \\:'-\^ 
The -•u|,>er;«!rit s' ni sriciah-t <!ver :ij>i 
taltst econotny, the superiority ■>( th>e 
r«en tiained itndsr soctalisn^ o\ er rhe 
snen dcn^,! stall zed by capitalism, wa^:. 
detnonstratesl l>y the fall of the Man- 
nerheini Line- ^nd the peace tr. 'tv '"e- 
tween the SovietlJiuun and Ftniand. 



Soviet Peac€t Policy vs. Imp®rialkts' War Policy 



l'itia!1>, the terns-i of the |>eace ireatv 
• leiHi.nstfatc the contrast between the 
t'^reij^n |!.>hcy of tlie Soviet Union and 
•hat <)! nr.jserialist states. xVtnerican 
i'onrgeois ce>ninie!stators have ex- 
i!res-^e<} their a:-t^ jUtshtnesit that the So- 
viet Uthon, as the result oi decisive 
tnihtary success, made peace at the 
e irlie.-t pn!?>i!,)*e intJinee.t, and an terttis 
which j:(ained for the Soviet Union 
(snly thtjse measures of security against 
attack re(|uired by the world situati'in. 
No burdens %vheatever ha\'e been placed 
upon the Fitmish people by the Soviet 
Union ; on the contrary, they have been 
relieved of the millstone placed arotmd 
their necks by the Mannerheims and 
Fatsners, oS' military servitude to 
British- b'rench-Anterican imperialism. 
When the Finnish people fully free 
themselves from that domination by 
!v.re!|.,ni imperialism that is represented 
i»y th.e Mantierheims and Tanners, and 
develop friendly collaboration with the 
Soviet Union, they will more and more 
-hare in the results -of the security and 
prosperity that have been resb^ed by 
■ the Soviet Union — invincible a$ she is 
to<lay, 

British- French-American imperialists 
will no>t give tjp their efforts to extend 



the war, and to turn it asrainst the So- 
viet Union. Scandinav;.! i% tsul eiunely 
safe, as detnonstrated by the ciirrent 
talk of a Finnish-Swedish-Khorwejijian 
military alliance against the Soviet 
Uniisn, which originates in !,(.>ndon. 
llerl.H-rt Hocp, er continues to speak for 
the decisive sections of Wall Street, 
and Roosevelt still .vies with hin^ for 
reactionary su|>port. Under the blows 
that have shattered their war plans, 
and ronsed a great peace movensent 
atnong the masses, the imperialist 
I'jourgeoisie titay resort to even more 
desperate adventures. The workers and 
all the toiling people, who have noth- 
ing to gain from tld^ war, who really 
hate war, who v ;: t peace above all 
else, mnst be jnore than ever aftrt, 
must take advantage of the more fa- 
vorable conditions created by the 
achievements of the Soviet Union, in 
the neutral countries must halt and 
defeat sU moves to drag them into the 
war. and in the belligerent countries 
begin a decisive movement for an im-, 
mediate and general peace. 

These are the main lessons from the 
outstanding events on the intertiationaJi 
scene during the month of March. 



Reprinted Irotn the "Sunday Worker" 
XEW YORK STATE COU 



of March ji, 1940, and issued by the 
MITTEE, COMMUNIST PARTY 

55 East 1 2th Str«ct, New York 



He 



APPENDIX PART V 



Exhibit No. 62 



1719 



armJvmrMiMk 



0'Sh^<^ Of 




1720 



UN-AMERICAN PROPAGANDA ACTIVITIES 
Exhibit No. 62 — Continued 



QtJISTION "SOCIAL WELFARE" - This Amendment 

NUMBER 8 would make it possible for the State to take care 

Vol® YES <>f the needy, set up a State Insurance System for 

unemployiment, sickness and old age with the use 

of State inanc«i. It can open the way for a getiwine jsystem of 

State Health Insurance. Vote YES, 

OtJESTIOIf "TRANSIT'*— This Amendment will make pos- 
NUMBEB 9 sJfcJ« public ownership and operation of the 
Vote YES transit lines in Hew York City. It lifts the 
restriction on the city'* borrowing capacity and 
' enables it to buy otit the private interests by raising $315,000,000. 
Public ownership and control of transit will mean improved, 
safer service and further extension of transit lines. We will 
still have to fight to safeguard the 5 cent fare, and also for a 
popular referendara on any proposed purchase plan. But the 
city is not required to buy— the amendment mmply allows the 
city now to drive a bargain with the private interests. Vote 
YES. 

B#ad &d 
COMMUNIST EiECTION PLAfFOHM lor 1938, 

For a FREE COPY send your request to: 

NEW YORK STATE COMMITTEE COMMUNIST PARTY 

35 East 12th Street, New York, N', Y, 

Israel Amter,. Chairman Charles Krumbcin, Secretary 

Vote lof lOBS, SECOTITY, DmOCEACY, PEACE 

Support the AXP.-Progresslv© Ticket 

BEAD THE DAILY AND SUNDAY WORKER 

JOIN THE COMMUNIST PARTY 



Tuae la mghtly on 

WMCA 

(Top of the Dial) 

lor Commuafet Election Messages^ on Current 
issues in the Election Campc&gn. 



set 



APPEjiiins more than 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 05445 2170 



Exhibit No. 63 



1 4 V 






Mi. 


iMiai 




ii 











^720 UX- AMERICAN PROPAGa 

Exhibit No. 62 — Coi