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Full text of "Iris 1900"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/iris1900ward 



Ward Seminary Annual 




SENIOR CLASS, 1900 





Not far from Olympus still 
Do I, when gods declare, 

Tidings of good or ill 

To trembling mortals bear. 



Paths happier to be trod 
Now lead me from above, 

One Master onh- — God; 
One message only — Love. 



gcdiratinn 




Tn uiir m\m has brrn si)in;:atlti'tir in aur trinililrs. yind 

in mxr good fnrtxxnr, rtnd Invjing ahunvs ; 

uilin has cmmuandrd nur rrs^rrt, 

inspired our luur, and 

raised nur ideals. 

To 

lUtss ;3rnntnv|s, 

gn ine, 
the Ollass nf lOUU, 

^criitatc this book. 





MISS BELLE J. JENNINGS. 



WARD 
SEMINARY 






** 
(ft * 
* m 
may 
>ti>t> 

mm 
mm 

m m 
m m 
*« 
mm 



was organized in IHfio by Dr. A\'illiain E. Ward, who, prevented by throat 
tronlile from continuing in acti\e ministry, by the advice of his wife rented 

tlie Kirkman residence on the corner of Summer and Cedar streets, and on 

September 2 opened a school with thirty girls present. By the succeeding 
March the attendance had so increased that he purchased, from Mr. W. P. Bryan, the present site on 
Spruce street, and there for twenty-two years was President of the Seminary. His registers for that 
time show that more than three thousand girls were intrusted to his care. The life of this Christian 
gentleman and noble tvorker, whose aim was the elevation of humanity, left its mark upon every 
home thus represented and these make his most lasting monument. Dr. Ward's successors were: 
Mr. J. B, Hancock; Rev. B. H. Charles, D.D.; and the present incumbent, Mr. J. D. Blanton. 

Through Dr. Ward's administration, Mr. Hancock's, and Dr. Charles', Mrs. Mary H. Robertson 
was Principal of the School Depailment. Hundreds of girls through the South remember her with 
.Ljrateful affection and are stronger and better women for her influence. Inspired by these influences, 
and by love for their Alma Mater, the Alumnae of Ward Seminary formed their Association. All will 
concede this most suitable, for by the quality of her work the school has won the right to lie classed 
among the leading educational factors of the South . 

Durin.g the Tennessee Exposition the enthusiastic graduates succeeded in securing Wednesday, 
Octolier -2. for a reunion of the Alumnce, and at this the foundation of this Association was laid. On 
April 22 of the following year the first formal meeting was held in the chapel of the Seminary, and the 
Monday of Commencement week of every succeeding year was appointed Aluranse Day, the business 
meeting to be held in the afternoon, and the reception in honor of the graduating class in the evening. 

At the first meeting Mrs. Edward Buford was elected President ; Mrs. J. Horton Fall, Treasurer; 
Miss Lizzie Lee Bloomstein, Historian ; and Miss Mary Lucy Mitchell, Secretary; and for each State 
represented in the school a Vice President was appointed whose duty is to look after the interests of 
the Association in her State. The present officers of the Association are; Mrs. James M. Head, Presi- 
dent; Miss Lizzie Atcheson, Historian; Mrs. P. A. Shelton, Treasurer. 

One object of the Association is educational, and at the last meeting it was deciiled that a two- 
years' scholarship should be given to the daughter of a member of the Association, to be conditioned 
upon the previous record of the candidate. 

M.VDGK C. Hall, 

Rec. Sec'v Ward Seminarv Alumna; Association. 





&5^E~^ 



WARD SEMINARY. 




Board of Directors 



Gen. G. p. Thruston 
Mr. J. B. O'Bryan 

Mr. W. C. Coi^lier. 
W. G. EwiNG, M.D. 
Mr. John Hili, Eakin. 



President 
Secretary 



Mr. Henry Sperry. 
Prof. C. B. Wallace. 
J. D. Plunket, M.D. 



Mr. a. G. Adams. 



G. P. Thruston 
J. B. O'Bryan 

W. G. EWING. 



Executive Committee 



President 
Secretary 



C. B. Wallace, 




'^'^^''•^S^'Mj 




^^ 



9 




MuTTu : '■ W'liat thou lo\est, that thou livest." 
Colors : Red and Gold. Flower : American Beauty. 

Officers 

President : Katliarine Cornelia Winstead. 
Vice President: Maude Selig. 

Secretary : Mary Earle Adams. 

Treasurer : Mary Jane Blue. 





Adams, Mary Earle, B.L., Tennessee. 

Diploma Elocution, 1900; Secretary of Senior Class, 1899-1900; 
\'ice President of C. L,. C, 1900; Vice President of Kodak 
Club, 1900. 

" She towered fit person for a queen." 



Armstrong, Ellen Baxter, B.A., \'irginia. 

" Not a thouffht, a touch, 
But pure as lines of green that streak the white 
Of tlie first snowdrops' inner leaves." 



Barr, Bessie, B.A., Tennessee. 

Trea.surer of Sophomore Class, 1898; Secretary of Junior Class, 
1S99; Associate Editor of " The Iris," 1900. 

" Choice worils and measured phrase above the reach of ordinary 
men." 



Beech, Virginia, B.L., Tennessee. 

Diploma Elocution, igoo; President of C. L. C, 1900. 
" Blithe of heart from week to week," 



Blue, Mary, B.A., Tennessee. 
Treasurer of Senior Class, 1900. 

" Comfort ha\-e thou of thy merit." 



BuRKE, Mary Elizabeth, B.L., Tenne.ssee. 

" jModest, vet withal an elf.'* 






Cannon, Wii.jioth, B.L., Tennessee. 

" Majestic in her person — tall and straight. 



Damon, Myrtle, B.A., Tennessee. 

"Ala.sl Who can convense with a ilnnib show : 



Dickson, Lizzette Blanton, B.A., Tenne.ssee. 

Secretary of C. L. C. ; Secretary of Chorns Clnb; \'ice Prc^-ident 
of Kentucky Club; Secretary of S. O. 

" Mer hair was brown, her sphered eyes were brown," 



Epler, Mary Steve, B.L., Illinois. 
President of Kodak Club. 

" Heart and hand that move together.' 



Fi.sHER, Minnie, B.A., Tennessee. 

" Kindly, unassnming spirit." 



GoANS, Edna, B.A., Tennessee. 

"A gentle maid." 






Hale, Kittie, B.A., Tennessee. 
" Sweet flower." 



"\ Herman, Elizabeth Ann, B.L., Tennessee. 

Trea.surer of Kodak CI Lib. 

" The clianii that in her manner lies 
Is framed to captivate, yet not surprise. 



Jones, Rowen.'V, B.L., Tennes.see. 
President of S. O. 

" A violet by moss^- stone. 
Half hidden from the eve. 



Lacy, Sddie Parker, B.L., Tennessee. 
Special Music Certificate, 1900. 

"A imn demure of lowly part." 



Lenox, Mamie, B.L., Tennessee. 



*' But not once her mouth .she opened, 
Not a .sinsfle word she uttered." 



Mason, Effie, B.A., Louisiana. 

" She ri,seth while it is vet nitrht.' 





McCarthy, Alma, B.L., Tennessee. 

Assistant Business Manager of "The Iris," 1900. 

" For the four winds blow from everv coast renowned suitors." 



\ Monroe, Virgie, B.L., Kentucky. 



" She is more precious than rubies: 
.\nd none of the things thou canst desire are to be compared unto 
her." 



Park, Madalienk, B.A , Tennes.see. 

Pre.sident of Delta Sigma, 1S9S-1899. 
" Flower of womankind." 



Patterson, Alma, B.L,., Tennessee. 

" How wide the forehead's calm expanse ! 



Pryor, Mary Buchanan, B.A., Tennessee. 

Vice President of Junior Class, 1S98-1899; Editor in Chief of ^ 
"The Iris," igoo; President of Iris Club, 1900. 

" Of all things good, you are the Ijest alive." 



R.ATHER, Mary, B.L., Tennessee. . 

" Thine eyes are like the deep, t>oundless heaven. 






RossER, Ray, B.A., Tennessee. 

' ' A brow of pearl 
Tress'd with redolent ebony 
In many dark, delicious curl. 



Sei.ig, Maude, B.A., Louisiana. 

Vice President of Senior Class, 1899- 1900; President of Louisiana 
Club. 

" She was a woman of stirrinir life." 



Strickland, Marian, BX-, Georgia. 



" All our di,^inty lies in our thoui^lits.' 



Thompson, Conn Overton, B.L., Tennessee. 
Class Prophet, 1899- 1900. 

Business Manager of " The Iris," 1900. 

" Let me play the fool." 



Williams, Isabel, B.L , Tennessee. 

Vice President of Delta Sigma ; Treasurer of Tennessee Club. 
" Model of beaut\-, Ijotli in form and face." 



WiNSTEAD, Katharine Cornelia, B.L. , Tennessee. fj 

President of Senior Class, 1S99-1900; Treasurer of Delta Sigma; i 
President of Tennessee Club. 

" Such strent^th, a dii^nitv so fair ! " 





Old Maid's Memory Book, 1925 



TABERNACLE LYCEUM 

Friday Evening. Jan ih. 

MISS MAIMIE ADAMS 

WILL READ HAMLET 
PRICES, 50c TO $1.50. SEATS ON SALE 



THE POSTAL COMPANY'S SYSTEM REACHES ALL IMPORTANT POINTS IN THE UNITED 
f^tvPH-^X STATES AND BRITISH AMERICA, AND via COMMERCIAL CABLES, TO ALL THE WORLD. 




cPh form 



TELEGRAM 



POSTAL TELEGRAPHCABLE COMPANY. 



This Company transmits and d 
WILLIAM H. BAKER, V. P. & Gen'l Mg 



> massages subject to tlie terms and conditions printed on ttie bacl< ot ttiis blanlc. 

JOHN O. STEVENS, Sec. ALBERT B. CHANDLER, Pri 



75-BM. J. Br. 10 Paid, 



8:05 AM. 



RECBIVEO AT 

NASHVILLE. TENN. 



Murfreesboro, Tenn. , 29th. Nov. 1901. iwhere any reply should be sent.) 

liss Conn. 0. Thompson, 

Franklin Road, Nashville, Tenn. 

Jack and I will arrive on the ten-fifty train. 

KATIE NEAL DOOLITTLE. 



^-y/lt. ^M^nad j:^^^^^^ '^A(7//(t7Jj/] 







MARY J. BLUE, ^ 


.A., Pbesid 




ELLEN ARMSTRONG, Secretary. 


MARY B. PRYOR 


Vice Pres 








THE 


GIRLS' 


LATIN 


SCHOOL, 


..,:T.::::r 


z:l.. 


BOSTON, MASS. 





.i!ssioner General Luke Wright. 



.1 J. 
of 



Goodlettsville was all astir last niftht, 
the occasion being the d^bul of Miss 
Elizabeth Ann Herman, the charming 
daughter of Mrs. K. S Herman. Their 
beautiful home was artistically decorated 
with palms and cut flowers, and from be- 
hind a screen of evergreens strains of soft 
music filled the air. Miss Herman was 
gowned in a Parisian creation of while 
silk muU over taffeta, and looked the 
veritable queen of socit-ty that she i.s to 
be. Those receiving with Miss Herman 
were : Misses Burke, Lacy, Lenox, and 
Mrs. Tom Verasopht {ncr JIadeline 
Park), and with their charms lent grace 
and enjoyment to the occasion. 



^astor N. D. Hillis, of Plymouth 
h, Brooklv "im rcsi"-ne(l fro'" 



nooi 




He) 




were 




for 




selflsr 


,ng 


Eng' 


the 


in -Ta 


3is- 


tion 


[en 


semb 


T 


Rish. 


to 


Sistei 


■'p 


pcctf 


-- 


tors 




We 




a n 




she 




sufi. 





..iiu \<j [tie ..ord oi his 
comfort and consolation. 



CANNON— BYG-ACRES. 

Mr. Sam. Cannon announces the be- 
trothal of his daughter, Miss Wilmoth 
P. Cannon, to Mr. Bob Byg-Acres. 



The monthly statement of the pub- 
bt, issuer" 'in'- sin'- 



erati 

the 

theS 

T 
City 
Qur 



gust, 
island 

t Build- 
position, 
isist of 
jted by 
* Trill he 
hundred 
rs will 
square. 

is not, 
y. but 
;d for in- 
"'le. For- 
E750 or 
^d many 
f^es, with 
tn cost is 



Yokohamji, 
,jt IS now prevalent in Osaka. Tn<. 
quarantine will be reimposed. 

MISS RATHERS HOUSE PARTY. 

One of the most enjoyable affairs of the 
season is the house pariy given by Miss 
Eatlier, tlie charming and attractive 
daughter of Mr. Uatlier. It is needless 
to .say that the guests are beinj; univer- 
sally admired and entertained. Gox par- 
ties at the opera, hinchions, dances, 
drives, and ainiisenKntR of every sort are 
being enjoyed, .^niong the guests are: 
Miss Strickland, of Ciooryia ; Mii-s Kosser 
and Mrs. Kittle Hale Smith, crtTennessee. 
These beautiful women are lair samples 
of tlie daughters of tlie South, who are 
everywhere admired for their charming 
personality. 

The f^reat Paris Exposition was 
-^nened pn .\prll 14, amid much con 



TJ 
thou!-, 
subd 
at av 
lias pn 
holder 
a sm 
.with 
before 
wheat 
prodi\ 

T'nite 
Lisbon 
the P 
tupu 
ransfc. 
judpin 
noo. ir 
Ttai' 



Cl..\.ss Yf.i.i,— Rickety Rah ! Rickety Rah ! 
Century girls — Ha! Ha! Ha! 
What'U we be when two years 

have passed ? 
Dignified Seniors, excelling 

the last! 
Rickety Rah! Rickety Rah! 
Beautiful to think about, 
Ha! Ha! Ha! 



Cl.vss Yei,l- 


-Rickety 


Rah! 


Rickety 


Rah! 




Century 


girls 


we surel 


• are! 




Rickety 


Rah! 


Rickety 


Reel 




Bachelo 


-girls 


we'll never be! 



h of 
the 
all, 

has 
om 



loss oi $100,000. Sevt .hi, 

of cotton were destroyed. The losses 

are covered by insurance. 



Le.xi.n'gton, Oct IS.— The season be- 
gan here with the three-year-olds' race, 
there being nine entries. The favorite, 
" Ep," was an easy first, winning four 
out of five heats. " Ep " is owned by 
Miss M. Steve Epler, of Illinois, a well- 
known stock owner, whose horse " Pry- 
or," it will be remembered, took the 
prize at the New York Horse Show 



corre 
don 



George H. Brush, of Ridgely, Te 
iust patented a mach' b 



MATINEE 

Sat. Eve., Jan. 23 

4 L 15 


Vendome, Sat. Eve., Jan. 23 

MISS ALMA MCCARTHY 


"LA BELLE PARISIENNE" 

Prices, $1.00 to $5.00. Seats on sale 



sly. 
life, 
ires 



'her 



will aiipeai- in a short time. 



THE BEST SELLING BOOKS. 

.\ccordiug to the foregoing lists, the 
six books which have sold best in order 
of demand during tlie month are: 

1. "One Summer." Virginia Beech. 
(Scribners.) $1.50. 

2. "Bayou Ballads." Maud Selig 
(Harpers.) $1.50. 

3. ''The Snake Charmer'' Bessie 
Barr. (Appleton.) $1..50. 

4. "A Kentucky Courtahip." Lizzette 
Dixon. (I)odd, Mead &Co.) $1.2.i. 

5. "A JIanly Maiden." Myrtle Da- 
mon. (Scribners. ) SI. 50. 

G. "The Science of the Mind." Min- 
nie Fisher. (Small, Maynard & Co.) 
$:i-iO. ^ 

THE FAMINE IN INDIA 

Neai'ly ever^'body, I suppose, is 
'var of ■ "'fty mi"' ile are 



sell 
Engl 
in .7 



Bis 

Sisf, 




TAKEN ON MV FOKTIICTII BIKTHD.W. 




C I 



Flower 

Purple and White Violets. 



Colors 

Yale Blue and White. 




^ 



Officers 

President : Kate Warren Chabwell. 

Vice President : Freddie Mae Schajiberger. 

Secretar}' : Rebekah Kinnard. 

Treasurer : Mary A.nna GauT. 





Jank Berry. 

"Black are her eyei^ 
s the beriy that grow; 
n the thorn by the 
^avside." 



Kate Chadwell. 

" She that does good 
for good's sake seeks 
neither praise nor re- 



Maude Bush. 



" Dreams ill lier large 



Hattie Cunningham. 

"Silence is a true friend 



Jane BiIvES. 



"A generous soul ■ 
ushinetothemind. 



WiELiE Cowan. 



"Slow ill considering, 
but resolute in action." 



Margie Lin Caldweu 

■'Good humor is the 
clear, blue sky of the 
soul." 



" Kindnes: 
shall win m; 




Jessie Gant. 

The voice is the flow 



Georgia Hickerson. 



; to account.' 




Cei,Este Harrison. 

' ' Sweet expression is 
the highest type of fe- 
male loveliness." 



Fannie Hutcheson. 
"I know what stndy 



Mary Gaut. 



who ha.s nnich 
akesniostof her 



Edith Holland. 



Work first, and thin 



Hkrmink Havkrkamp. 



" Under a free brain gladly 
beats a free heart." 



Rkbkkah Kinnard. 

■The fairness of her 
face no tongue can tell." 




Mary Louisk Lovf-). 




■IIli- face is full of 
nil, llii: overflowing 



Lettie Owen. 

" Patience and time 
o more than strength 
r passion," 



Maggie Bki,l Morrow. 

■ In thy heart the dew 
of youth, 
On thy lips the smile 
of truth." 



Eddie Rieves. 



he unspoken word 
r does harm." 



Meta Mitchele. 



" Maiden with the 
neek brown eves." 



" I^east in size, b 
not in knowledge." 



Cl.\ire Odil. 

'.'V lovely girl is above 



Lui..\ Riezves. 




Ruth Rosser. 

" To be honest is to be oik 
picked out of ten thousand.' 



Lii.i,iAN Scott. 



''It is good to be chi 
itable." 



Martha Tappan. 

'Wlicn women wish 
to carry a point,- they 
dare anything and ev- 
erything." 



Maggie May Wii^son. 

" Individuality is 
everywliere to be 
respected." 




Freddie Schamberger. 



tnrt" in her face but : 
a copious thenie." 



Jane Watkins. 
"Tresses like the 



Mary Kkene Shacki.eford. 

" Her words are trusty 
heralds to her mind." 



Kate Wootkn. 

"The ideal of beauty 
consists in simplicity 
and repose." 



BROOKS SPIVEY.— " Her checks are like apples that the .sun has ruddied.' 



NEI^ME WKISE.— "O faithful conscience ! 




Colors — Green and Gold. Flower — Marshal Niel Rose. 

Motto — Loj'aute m'oblige. 

J' 

Class Officers 

President 

- Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Mary Cheatham 
Jane Tillman 
Nannik Overton 
Elizabeth Glenn 




Class of 1902 

Class Roll 



Emma Berry. 
Mildred Bronson. 
Martha Carrol. 
Florence Clancev. 
Mary Cheath.\m. 
Bessie Dunbar. 
Elizabeth Glenn. 

MaTTIE GoODrASTURE. 

Pearl Gunter. 
Bessie Heffley. 
Kathryn Hart. 
Hazel Hirsch. 
Annie Huey. 



Mary Hughes. 
Fedora Jonas. 
Mattie Lou Mann. 
Anna McCampkell. 
Mary Sue Meadors. 
Mabel Murray. 
Agnes O'Bryan. 
Edith O'Neil. 
Nannie Overton. 
Sadie Peck. 
Maud Ridley. 
Louise Shwab. 
Theo. Scruggs. 



Alva Scudday. 
Adine Smith. 
Maud Stebbins. 
Liza Tally. 
Lena Tamble. 
Ida Thompson. 
Jane Tillman. 
Mary Webb. 
Lillian Williams. 
Floyd Wilson. 
Maud Wilson. 
Sue Yarbrough. 



One-Minute Biographies — Sophomore Class 



..... 


NICKNAME. 


FAVORITE STUDY. 


FAVORITE OCCUPATION. 


ULTIMATUM. 


Emma Beruv. 


"Sport." 


Primping. 


Writing compositions. 


Old maid. 


MILDKED BRONSON. 


■' David." 


Human nature. 


Copying " Paradise Lost." 


Vassar professor. 


MARTHA Carrol. 


"Biddy." 


Cooking. 


Riding a white horse. 


Arkansas traveler. 


Florence Clancev. 


"Dmnpy." 


Singing. 


Going to church. 


A Sutherland sister. 


Marv Cheatham. 


"Teen." 


Thirty-nine articles. 


Riding a wheel. 


Clergyman's wife. 


Bessie Dunbar. 


"Norwegian Pine." 


Bach. 


Practicing. 


Music teacher. 


Elizabeth Glenn. 


"Jonathan.- 


Composition outlines. 


Reading Ctesar. 


Society belle. 


Mattie Goodpasture. 


"Daisy." 


Painting. 


Tending sheep. 


Milkmaid. 


Pearl Gunter. 


"Pearline." 


How to scrub. 


Has none. 


Housekeeper. 


Bessie Heffley. 


"Eovuicer." 


Latin. 


Taking gymnasium. 


Congressman's wife. 


Kathryn Hart. 


"Loviedove." 


Poetn'. 


Palpitating. 


Valentine composer. 


Hazel Hirsch. 


"Petite." 


New York styles. 


Standing on corners. 


Baroness. 


Mary Hughes. 


"Skinny." 


Algebra. 


Prescribing. 


Doctor. 


Annie Huey. 


"It." 


Gymnastics. 


Going to C. E. 


A foolish virgin. 


Fedora Jonas. 


"Frenchy." 


Fashions. 


Traveling. 


Concert player. 


Mattie I,ou Mann. 


"Pink." 


Vicar of Wakefield. 


Playing tennis. 


Florist. 


Anna McCampell. 


"Fatty." 


Elocution. 


Dancing. 


Trained nurse. 


Mary Sue Meadors. 


"Simple." 


Bible, 


Telling the truth. 


Missionan-. 


Mabel Murray. 


"Chicariiie." 


Boys. 


Grumbling. 


Fat woman in museum. 


Agnes O'Bryan. 


"Vanity." 


Curling her hair. 


Playing cards. 


New woman. 


Nannie Overton. 


"The Wicked." 


Getting out of her lessons. 


Flirting. 


Ballet dancer. 


Sadie Peck. 


"Cutie." 


Measuring. 


Parading the streets. 


French actress. 


Maud Ridley. 


" Sweetheart." 


How to ride on the train. 


Avoiding boys. 


Hairdresser. 


I^OUISE SHWAB. 


"Weesy." 


Rag time. 


Standing before a mirror. 


French countess. 


Theo. Scruggs. 


"L,illipntian." 


Arrarigement of rats. 


Reciting. 


Teacher. 


Alva Scuddy. 


"Miss Knowall." 


Evei-ything. 


Bragging. 


Knowledge box. 


Adine Smith. 


"The Great." 


Genealogy. 


Leading cotillions. 


Globe trotter. 


Maud Stebbins. 


" Freaky." 


Her costumes. 


Setting alarm at il A.I\L 


Rip Van Winkle IL 


I,izA Tally. 


"Bean Pole." 


How to grow tall. 


Riding on a tallyho. 


Typewriter. 


Lena Tamble. 


"I.ena Way Back. " 


Street car schedules. 


Being vaccinated. 


Governess. 


Ida Thombson. 


"Togologa." 


Man. 


Going to football games. 


Baltimore belle. 


Jane Tillman. 


"Curiosity." 


Learning to ride n horse. 


Asking questions. 


Circus rider. 


Mary Webb. 


"Judy." 


Driving. 


Wearing class colors. 


Preacher. 


Lillian Williams. 


" Walkingp;ncyclopedia." 


Her apiiearaiice. 


Singing. 


College girl. 


Floyd Wilson. 


"'Possum." 


D. (J. K. Regulations. 


Posing. 


Photographer. 


Maud Wilson. 


"Cassandra Slim." 


Astronomy. 


Knitting. 


Bachelor girl. 


Sue Yarbrough. 


"Dago." 


Arrangement of her hair. 


Riding on the stfeet car. 


Evangelist. 



n> n^^ry^ 




MoTTC — "To be, not to seem." 
Fi.owER— Pink Carnation. Colors— Pink and Green. 



Officers 



Maky Miller Bl.^-nton 
Sadie Linusley Warner . 
Mary Fite Turley 
Fannie May Witherspoon 



President 

J 'ice Presideii/ 

Secretary 

Treasurer 




Class of 1903 



Class Roll 




LoUie Baisden. 
Mag-g-ie May Beaty. 
Sarah Berry. 
Mary Miller Blanton. 
Alice Carroll. 
Emma Gale Craig-. 
Helen Crandall. 
Frances Harris. 
Lula May Haynes. 
Binnie Carter Hodg-e. 
Lyda Jackson. 
Laura Belle Malone. 
Theresa McGavock. 



Sarah Morg-an. 

Mary Tom Odil. 

Clara Park. 

Mamie Plicque. 

Mary Sanders. 

Ethel Smith. 

Laura Kate Thomas. 

Valery Trudeau. 

Mary Fite Turley. 

Sadie Liudsley Warner. 

Sarah Wendel. 

Gertrude Bowling; Whitworth. 

Fannie May Witherspoon. 




n'vU 






19 00 ^2^*>*5^^-^ 

7^/ 




Freshman Class Prophecy 



D 



'X5;(s^' 



N the year 1900 a member of the Freshman Class of Ward Seminary, who shall herein 
be nameless, being taken with a convenient indisposition, was sent to the infirmary for 
repairs. She had provided herself with a ball of twine in order to facilitate the trans- 
portation of a large bunch of bananas from the street below, which she considered 
necessary to one in her delicate state of health. When darkness spread her sable wings 
over the mediseval castle known as " Ward Seminary," she carefully tied her curling tongs to the 
end of the twine and lowered them until she heard their click upon the pavement. Giving them a 
slight upward jerk, she realized that her fish was firml}- hooked, and began to haul in. " The catch 
must be a large one," she thought, for 'twas very heavy. She was somewhat startled at the ap- 
pearance of a head at the end of the line; but, pulling it over the window sill, bhe discovered that 
it was a fragment of what appeared to have been an ancient piece of sculpture, made of hollow 
bronze. The face, which was sphiuxlike, had opalescent eyes of some peculiar translucent stone, 
and bore an inscription in Etruscan, which she readily translated, and which ran as follows : 

If you look me in the eye. 
You the future will descry; 
Whisper name into mine ear. 
And 'twill all to you appear. 

How this weird and occult talisman came into the po.ssession of the writer she is not permitted 
to state. The secrets of banana raising must not be given to the public. Let it be sufficient to 
say that one dark and stormy night, when the moon was full, Jupiter was eating crabs, Mars had 
a quarrel on with the twins, Neptune had accidentally stuck his trident through the tail of the bear, 
and Venus was wandering through llie asteroids, .she, the writer, ensconced in her lonely tower, 
resolved to consult the fates in regard to ihe futures of her beloved classmates. 

Hastily wliispering a name into the ear of the image, she gazed into its eyes and beheld a 
vast auditorium filled with a large and enthusia,stic crowd. At length a figure appeared upon the 
stage, a woman dressed in while. For a moment only, the crowd was strangely silent, then the 



people seemed to shake the very foundations of the building with their tumultuous applause. This 
is no small wonder; for before them stands the world-famous young violinist, Mile. Marie de 
Blantonousky ! 

Again she gazed; the scene had changed. A brilliantly illumined palace hall met her view. 
The lovely young Duchess of Wheelbarrow and her friend, the Duchess of Cannot, were being 
presented to Her Majesty, Queen Victoria. She looked more closely and was startled, for in their 
faces she found something quite familiar. All was clear. In them siie recognized Sadie Warner 
and Laura Kate Thomas, formerly of Nashville, Tenn. 

This time no concert hall nor enchanting court scene greets her gaze ; but a convent, bleak 
and drear! What would she find at this uninviting spot ? Presently, from the principal entrance 
issued, clothed in robes of black, the beloved and honored Mother Superior. ' Twas her old friend, 
Valery; but O how changed! How little did she think to find her here! Valery, so full of life, 
of unconquerable, overflowing spirits, a nun — stately, steadfast, and demure — all in a robe of dark- 
est grain ! How time can alter one ! 

Looking once more into the wonderful eyes, she saw the interior of one of Nashville's most 
magnificent churches, beautifully decorated with evergreens and the season's choicest blossoms. 
'Twas the wedding day of Sarah Morgan, one of Tennessee's fairest and most gifted daughters. 
The bridegroom was a promising young physician. Beautiful was the blushing bride, and equally 
so the maid of honor, Mamie Plicque, who is also a leader in Nashville society. 

A .scientist was Lyda Jackson, of deep and erudite mien, the possessor of much esoteric wis- 
dom, and highly respected by her fellow-scientists. 

Helen Crandall, she found to be occupied as lady principal in a celebrated .seminary for young 
ladies. She was living a successful life, and seemed contented and happy. Associated with her as 
teachers were Sarah Wendell and Lollie Baisden. 

Suddenly before her eyes there appeared a procession of kings and other royal personages 
bearing garlands and palms. On a gorgeous throne in the background sat a figure in robes of 
green. Over her head, in incandescent lights, flashed out the word "fame." The procession ap- 
proached and laid their offerings at her feet. The observer had just time to distinguish the 
cla.ssic features of Mary Fite Turley, when darkness came to her relief 

Theresa McGavock she saw as a blooming young matron occupied with sweet home duties. 




Ethel Smith's keen wit had placed her in the position of editor of "Puck," and well did she fill 
her place. 

Frances Harris had become a poet of sweet and charming personalit}', and was fast taking 
her highl)' merited stand among poets of every tongue. 

Mary Saunders had developed into a learned Latin and Greek scholar, and spent her days in 
digging up old monuments and deciphering their inscriptions. 

A great volume of smoke obscured the view. When it cleared, a battlefield, with all its horrors, 
presented itself. Soothing the groans of the dying, dressing wounds, and performing offices for 
the dead, were to be seen members of tlie Red Cross Society. Foremost among them, she dis- 
covered Mary Tom Odil, whose gentle face was loved by all with whom she came in contact. 

Bennie Hodge a brilliant journalist had become, and her name was famous throughout the 
entire world. 

Much might be said of Laura Malone's historical works, but the fact that they were to be 
found classed with Gibbon's " Rome," and Guizot's " France," speaks for itself. 

Sarah Berry was an artist of great promise and rare and singular genius, and Emma Gayle 
Craig's voice had made her a second Patti. 

Gertrude Whitworth had graduated at Vassar, and attained great honors there ; while Alice 
Carroll was spending the winter in New York, giving a series of successful musical entertainments. 

Next the eyes of the image showed her the interior of an enormous theater, upon which was 
being played, with great feeling, " Romeo and Juliet." The leading lady she recognized as Maggie 
May Beaty, an actress of great note. 

Clara Park she found as a woman's rights advocate, and her eloquent appeals were heard 
throughout all the country. 

Lula May Haynes was the wife of a well-to-do banker, and was living in great state. 

The fate of all, save herself, had now been revealed. Raising the image in her trembling fin- 
gers, she attempted to put it to her eyes ; but her hold upon it had been very slight, and in a mo- 
ment she beheld it in a thousand pieces at her feet. "Alas! Alas!" she cried. "'What have I 
done ? My fate is sealed from me forever! " And with this she sank upon the floor in a swoon. 

Fannie May Withkrspoon. 






Jo f Ae 

elight 






Ti;3USHED 3Y 






jreaencjL^la" 



To the Senior Class 1899-1900. Ward Seminary, Nashville, Tenn. 



HEAKT'S DELIGHT. 

TWO-STEP. 



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DEPARTMENT OF 



Vlymitnl dulturc 

JESSE KILGORE WARDLAW 
Instrurtai- 



MoTTo: 
Mens Sana in corpore sano. 

'fhusiral QJulturr Exlnhitiou 

WARD SEMINARY 



SATURDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 28, 1900 
From 4 to 5 o-clock 



1. May Drill. 

2. (n) Swedish Gymnastics. 
(*) Club Swinging. 

3. German Bell Drill. 

4. Fancy March. 

5. Ring Drill. 
0, Combination Wani> a 

Exercise. 
7. Advanced Cli'b Swin 



All lady friends of the school ; 
cordially invited. 




'^Uard Scminarv) Commencement 



MAY 17-30, 1900 



Thursday, May 17, 8 p.m. /iic/lal. — Pupils of Miss Mclhvaine. 

Friday, May iS, S p.:\i. Recital. — Pupils of Miss Gear3^ 

Saturday, Maj' 19, S p.m. Recital. — Pupils of Miss Cosgrove and Mr. Allen. 

Monday, May 21, 8 p.m. Recital. — Pupils of Mr. Starr and Miss Caldwell. 

Tue.sda3', May 22, S p.m. Graduate Recital. — Piano and \'oice, Miss Little. 

Thursday, May 24, 8 p.m. Annual Recital. — Elocution, " The Prince.ss." 

Friday, May 25, 8 p.m. AVr/A!/. —Pupils of Mrs. Randle. 

Saturday, May 26, 3 to 5 ; S to 10 p.,'M. — Art Reception. 

Sundaj', May 27, i i a.m. Baccalaureate Sermon, Rev. Jas. I. \'ance, D.D. 

Monday, May 28, 8 p.m. Aliinuiic Reception to Senior Class. 

Tuesday, May 29, 8 to 10 p.m. Graduate Recital. — Music and lilocutiou. 

Wedne.sday, May 30, 11 .\.m. Address to Graduates, Professor William Spencer Currell, Ph.D. 
Conferring Diplomas. 




Clang, Clang, Clang! 

( With apologies to Tennyson I 





LANG, CUiiiK, ClaiiR! 

I iR-ar thy rail, O bell, 

Anil I would that my tongue coulil utter 
The thoughts that within me dwell; 
For I know I am late tor breakfast, 
And I feel that stony stare 

That comes from the angry teacher— 
A warning, I'd best take care. 
But, still, I am always tardy, 

Though I honestly, earnestly strive 
To get up when I hear that gong ring. 
And be there at six fifty-five. 
Clang, clang, clang! 

Comes sharply again to nn- ears, 
And it always has this meaning: 
A lecture, repentance, and — tears. 

— Is.\m-.r. Wiij.i.\M.s 



The Senior^s Story 



WAS the night for our club to meet in mj- room. Mr. 
Blanton had \-er3' kindly permitted u.s to form the dub, 
with the provision that it.s meeting.s were not to interfere 
with our college duties; in fact, though no such admission 
was e\-er made in so manj- words, he permitted the club 
to exist s///> rosa in the Seminar}'. It was a story-tellers' 
club. Each member was put under solemn obligation to 
hatch up a story and tell it at some meeting. This had 
been the order pursued by the others until my turn was 
now due. I had racked my brain for the last several 
months trying to evolve .some fabrication from my un- 
imaginative mind, and I felt that I had not only failed, 
but must certainly continue to fail in the future. I had 
never been able to tell a story when it had been produced 
by some one else, and the task of making the story and 
telling it, too, seemed ridiculously far beyond me. Now 
that my fate was staring me in the face, I felt deeply conscious that I had been almost a traitor 
to permit myself to join a story-tellers' club. To tell the whole truth, I had had at each meeting 
qualms of conscience ; had felt my guilt, but not sufficiently keen to stick to my half-formed 
resolution to confess and resign. So I had not done it. I had listened to the stories told bj' the 
others in titrn with varied and conflicting sensations, first with wondering approval, and then 
with fault-finding disapproval. It was so easy, as I looked back upon it, to sit in judgment upon 
the efforts of others, and yet now I realized with a vengeance that to criticise and find fault is, 
after all, easier than to do better oneself. Therefore, I sat in my room almost prostrated with 
the overwhelming sense of inability to do as well as those I had thought in nn- ignorant pride 





were so iinperfectl_v " filling the bill " ol the club's demand. At the thought of the ordeal so rap- 
idly approaching, the cold, clammy perspiration came out on my hands and feet. If Mi.ss Carter 
had come in on me then, and, doubting my state of health, had put her educated touch upon me, 
I am sure she would have pronounced me suffering with a chill, possibly a congestive chill, or 
even approaching death. 

For the sake of the privacy we were tacitly allowed to meet late, our meetings .sometimes 
lasting for an hour or two after lights were out. I had gone up to my fourth-story room, south 
wing, at once after supper, That awful coming event had already begun to cast its baleful 
shadow over me, and I felt I must get off for a while to bring myself into some composure, if 
possible. It was all in vain. Disgrace, as I felt it, like an avenging Nemesis, was just behind 
nie. I, the vny /as/ of the ten, was about to make ihe Ji/s/ failure. I realized now that the poor- 
est effort, that one that I had thought so imperfect, was as beautiful as a dream of happiness and 
as perfect as an ideal fancy from the poet's heart on fire with his theme. My mind would not or 
could not work, and my memory, usually .so good to help me, was a perfect blank; so, like a rud- 
derless vessel, I drifted to my fate. 

Hush ! Was that the step of the first member ? No, nothing but the hungry wandering of a 
mouse. I could not repress a ghastly smile at the thought of a mouse, of all living things, wan- 
dering about in a college for young ladies. Thus, it is said, men will sometimes go to death with 
a smile on their lips. But that smile seemed to loosen something in.side of me, and, much to my 
joy, I felt a wave of blood leave my heart and run through me, carrying warmth and (what was more 
important) a feeling of renewed life. Strange to say, I felt confidence growing in me, although 
I could not tell upon what basis it developed, and was not inclined to take time to analyze it. 
I was too deeply grateful that I was to meet my fate in a better frame of mind, to say the least, 
and I just shut my eyes with those joy bells ringing in my ears and enjoyed that thrill of satis- 
faction to the fullest extent. The next moment I opened my eyes glowing with delight, for when 
my lids shut out my lamp and the fire light I .saw a vision. Never mind what it was: that will 
come later; but that glimp.se was like a peep into heaven. I wanted to sing, to shout, to dance, 
to tunable on the bed — wanted to do everything a well-ordered Senior ought not to do — and I had 
hard work to hold myself in check. The prisoner sentenced to die, standing with the yawning 
grave just behind him, momentarily expecting the flash of the rifles, ne%'er received his reprieve 
with a greater shock of joy than I did when I realized that my pride was not to tumble to the 



dnst. Now I would welcome the (irdeal and feel satisfied with any outcome. The critic in me 
was dead, and my soul leaped within me as the man whose faith had made him whole. I felt I 
had passed a crisis in my life which would exert a humanizing- influence to its latest years. What 
a respect for others had grown within me! What a charity — wide, liberal, generous! So happy 
and elated did I feel that I sat there with almost palpitating breath to enjoy the luxnr)' of a good 
" think " before the quiet assembling of the club Back and forth along my college course, now so 
soon to close, my mind flew like the bii.sy .shuttle of the weaver. The glowing radiance that the 
future had suddenl}' taken, .seemed to glow along the pathway of the years behind me also, and 
the successive gradations of my intellectual training seemed suddenly to assume definite propor- 
tions and to flame with vivid meaning. I felt as if my mind had hitherto been a.sleep and had 
just now awakened to the sunlight of a fully developed strength. I felt that the attitude that had 
formerly been mine toward classmates and teachers had somehow changed. They were, of course, 
untouched; so it must be that I had undergone this wonderful, all-pervading change. As I thrilled 
through and through with my new-found ecstasy, I felt that I resembled m^' old self less than the 
airj' butterfl)' resembles the ugly chrysalis from which it has j ust escaped. The past took on a fuller 
meaning; the future offered an illimitable opportunity. As my mental — and, I might add, my 
soul — exaltation increased, I felt I must fill my lungs with more of life's elixir, and so I threw my 
head back to get a deep breath, when I lost my balance and fell from the chair. Mj' castle in Spain 
was all a dream, and the crushing sense of my impending degradation rolled like an icy avalanche 
upon me. D. R. S. 




The VioIin^s Story 



I lie forgotten in these walls, 

Where even sunshine nia\- not stra}-, 
So closely doth the yellow earth 

Bar out the litfht of dav. 



Across my breast the broken bow 
Rests idly — it has lain for years- 

And one by one my silver strings 
Have fallen unite as tears. 




Yet he, my master, as he played 

Across my throbbing bosom, pressed 

His slender fingers, and his curls 
I'pon my heart were wont to rest. 



He wandered 'neath the gold and Tilue 
Of Andalusia's sunny skies. 

And ever into song caressed 
The cadence of our mingling sighs. 



And I, a violin, brown with mold, 

Vet time hath sweetened by her tread, 

Within this narrow box, and by 

The side of him, my master — dead! 



They found him at the fountain's brink. 
And cold upon my arching breast 

His lips; and I, a violin, nmle, 

Upon his \oung, dead heart was pressed. 



And here within the grassy rod, 
Beyond the busy lives of men, 

Alone with Nature and with God, 
Thev l)urieil us beneath the fen. 



And with the chill of setting sun 
I hear across the fallow marsh 

The long-beaked crane her wand'ring mate 
Recall with wild notes weird and harsh. 



Here, where the blushing jasmine binds 
The willow with her twisted arms, 

I slumber in the silent clay 

Beneath the green and spreading palm. 



And here his spirit softh' comes 
To greet me with the love of years, 

And as the pale moon waxeth old, 
We meet and linger with our tears. 




Soon, soon m^' form shall crumbling die. 
And mingle with the loamy earth; 

The flowered moor, the stagnant tarn, 
Shall give a modern citv birth! 



Will Progress mark her chan.ges here 
By era of the harp and pen ? 

Will nations meet upon tlie soil 

That once has been our loneh- fen ? 



The antlienis of forgotten rears. 
In time shall live again to prove 

That still upon his heart there lies 
A dead musician's only love. 

— G.\RNET NoEi,. 



Our Pound Party 




BREATHLESS hush fell upon us all wheu Nydia Rutledge sat up straight, her 
eyes glowing like coals of fire in a face almost ashen witli emotion. We felt that 
something was coming. Somehow the silence before a storm burst was the feeling 
that had been insensibly growing in our minds, as we saw her flush and pale with 
alternate waves of suppres.sed excitement. Our gathering was rather unique 
Strictly against Seminary rules, we had conspired to give this strange, self- 
poised girl a treat, garnished with a genuine surprise. It was just at tlie close of the Christ- 
mas holiday vacation, when the boxes of good things were almost emptied of their hoarded 
goodies. It had been noticed that Nydia Rutkdge had not received any box from hiane. When 
this was seen and fully realized, we more fortunate ones felt a sympathetic tenderness come over 
us toward her; yet, however genuine the feeling, none of us could have spoken to her. She had 
held everybody at arm's reach, as we then decided, although no consciousness of any feeling of 
coldness was present to any one. It was just known to be the case when the subject was discussed, 
and that was all there was to it. Ways and means were privately discussed as to how we could 
best contribute at least the remnants of our Chri.stmas dainties to her pleasure. When the prop- 
osition was made it was adopted unanimously, and it .seemed the easiest thing in the world to do: 
but b\- the time we had rejected some half dozen schemes as not suitable, it began to dawn upon 
us that it was the liardest kind of thing to do. We had all known her and liked her in a general 
way; but upon the demand being made for volunteers to do something tangible, it developed that 
she had not been intimate with any one of us or any one of her other schoolmates. Theretore our 
good intention seemed about to die of congenital lack of vitality. At last, however, some genius — 
I believe it was Miss Peck, tliough I am not certain — suggested that we might give her a surprise 
party some night, and each one was to contribute what she had or what she thought best. I 
called it a "pound paitw" l)ul the girls laughed that out of countenance, because some of them 
did not have a pound of anything left. But, anyway, call it what you please, we decided to drop 
in on her some night and have a feast as the closing event of our holiday vacation. 



In our little world it does not take long to mature a plan, especially if it has anything to do 
with eating, and bv the following night, like a band of conspirators, we slipped along tlie corri- 
dors to her room, I think at first she was inclined to disregard our leader's knock, thinking it 
was some prank; but the certain, confident tone it next assumed opened the door at once. She 
showed surprise, if not annoyance, also, at the sight that met her gaze, Init in tlie next nioir.ent 
we were invited in. Six girls in one room, and that not the biggest, are a good many, and it 
took some diplomatic as well as unconventional managing to get us all seated. Without prelimi- 
naries our leader stated the object of the meeting, just as in one of our literary societies. I tell 
you, it took a good one to keep right on beyond the danger line, as she did, when N\dia began to 
stiffen and freeze as the full import of our call dawned upon her. But we had not reckoned with- 
out our host, and she was just compelled to understand that our hearts were right, whatever our 
methods lacked. All the " returns," as I called them, were in by the time our peace was fully estab- 
lished, and the top of her small center taljle was covered with fruit cake, sardines, raisins, marsh 
mallows, and so on, until it would have made the mouth of a cannon icatcr to have seen the 
spread. Opening our mouths seemed to open our hearts — or just the reverse, if it suits >oa better — 
and the icy atmosphere rose in temperature at a rapid rate. Conventionality Hew out of the win- 
dow, and joyous hilarity ruled in its stead. Our talk rambled as inclination or impulse, especially 
the latter, dictated; and, but for that occasional something that Nydia seemed to swell with, all 
was as serene as could be. No one seemed to notice her or to fear any accident, yet all of us were 
perfectly prepared for something, if not anj'thing, when that hush which I have mentioned fell 
upon us. Nj'dia had straightened up with talk in her manner and a strange condnnation of con- 
flicting emotions was playing changes on her face. 

" Girls," she began, " now that our feast is about over, I feel that I ought to dn more than 
thank you. I find my heart so full of varying surges of inclination that it is almost impossible 
for me to articulate at all. I may not say what I wish to; in fact, I feel that I cannot: but because 
I so full)' appreciate your kind intentions I feel that I must fail trying to do my l>est to that end. 
I realize more fully than you think how this tangible kindness is onl\- the outward manife'-tation 
of your intangible good will, and I know the sympathetic hearts that throb back of this pleasant 
little party. I feel, too, that the foolish pride which all but caused me to treat you rudely at the 
outset should be atoned for by a confidence from me to you. This confidence must take the form 
of a complete life story, which, when fully in your possession, will, I believe, explain much that 




may have niystifiecl you and others of my schoohnates. Before I can remember, my father, a well- 
to-do merchant in Charleston, S. C lost almost everything he possessed in an unfortunate trade. 
With flaming pride he collected what was left and went over the Blue Ridge and settled, with wife 
and child, on a modest farm hidden in one of the deep coves on the Tennessee side of the Great 
Smoky Mountains. Their pride of birth and educational incompatibility with their neighbors iso- 
lated them from almost all associations. There, on the bank of the Little Tennessee River, I was 
reared, with no friends but my parents and no companions but my soaring aspirations. As a child 
I pined for the opportunity of education almost without knowing its import. As far as my parents 
could teach me, I was taught; but the wings of my ambition were only strengthened by such in- 
struction, and I found myself soaring up to the sky line of the Smokies with a never-weakening 
desire for learning. It is most likely true that none of you have felt what I am trying to depict, 
and I humbly pray that it is so. 

"After years of beating fruitlessly at the bars of my cage, as it were, a chance came like a 
providential gift. One day, while aimlessly strolling along tlie valley road, I picked up a scrap of 
newspaper, and just as aimlessly commenced to read it. That was four years ago, before I com- 
menced here, and seems almost a dream of another and former existence." 

She paused for a moment, and her fine eyes were filled with a soft light of reminiscence. We 
were dumb in the presence of this noble girl thus revealing— for the first time, doubtless — the 
cherished, companion secret of her girlhood. In a moment, with a perceptible start, she returned 
to us and resumed her narrative. 

" That scrap of paper contained an account of the finding of pearls in Stone River, a tribu- 
tary of the Cumberland, that flows by this city. It was a message from the outside world, and as 
such arrested my attention, and I read with rising interest of how the people along its banks were 
.seeking pearls in the common mussels found in the shallows of that stream. Ah'eady pearls had 
l)een found worth hundreds of dollars to the dealers in the cities. Until I had quite finished its 
perusal no thought of its having a personal interest to me came into my mind, but then in a flash 
I was transfi.Ked with the idea that here my chance had come. The Little Tennessee River, a 
tributary of the Tennessee, was filled with sand bars upon which I had known for years those 
same fresh-water mussels abounded. Many a time I had waded, more like a solitary boy than a 
girl, into the water, and pulled them out of their beds for the idlest pastime. Now the very sug- 
gestion that they might contain pearls, pearls with a money value, caused me to pant with a new- 



born hope. I was impatient to be at the work of findino out, and before I went home at twilight 
I had piled up a half bushel or more along the sandy bank. Almost bursting with my .secret, I 
could hardly wait for the earl}' breakfast before returning to my search. Armed with an old 
hatchet, I hurried to my work of exploring those mussels, and the fire of my ardor refu.sed to 
be dimmed by the ccjntinued disappointments that repaid my labors. But when my fingers were 
beginning to show the effects of sharp edges and awkward blows, I came upon a pearl, a genuine 
pearl — not very large, to be sure, but as a warrant that there were others to be had sufficiently 
alluring. Days and weeks were filled with my persistent .search, and one shallow after another 
was almost depleted of its supply, and yet mj' zeal knew no abatement. The good-natured chaffing 
of my parents gradually died out before the pile of pearls that steadily grew from day to day, and 
my hopes rose as their number and fineness increased. Ever}' pearl to me was an added pillar in 
the temple of my cherished ambition, and visions of a college career began to take definite out- 
line in my daydreams. 

" When I had about exhausted the resources of the river, as far as I could conscientiously 
claim, I began to take stock of my treasures. I knew nothing of the value of pearls, and j-et, 
ignorant as I was, I knew I had enough to bring several thousand dollars at a proper valuation. 
Then I declared my ambition at home. My father wrote a description of the best and largest I 
had to Tiffany's, and received a letter giving a probable valuation at twenty-five hundred dollars. 
My heart stood still within me when he opened that communication, and as he read I almost 
fainted with the sunburst of joy that flooded my soul with its radiance. 

"As I look back upon that beautiful morning in late summer, now four short years ago, I am 
sure I felt like the Peri when the tears of repentance opened the crystal gate of paradise for her 
triumphal entrance. It .seemed to me my task was done, and yet, as I've found out since, it was 
really just beginning. Mr. Blanton kindly agreed to accept most of my hoarded treasures as pay- 
ment in full of my tuition, and I am soon to reap the harvest of a long-cheri.shed hope in my 
diploma. 

" The fear that ever hung like the sword of Damocles over my head, that after all it might 
not be real, that some day I might wake to find it all a dream too beautiful to la.st, has kept me 
from yielding to the attractions and relaxations that might have made my life here so much more 
enjoyable. This has been the cause of my seeming lack of personal interest in my classmates and 
all human surroundings. But now that you have, by a fortune happy to me, broken through my 




teserve, I feel that the few remaining months we shall be together will be the happiest of my life. 
Again I thank you from the bottom of my heart, that can feel, if it cannot express, all the 
thoughts that arise in me." 

Do you know, when she stopped talking somebody caught her and kissed her, and that 
■' pound party " of ours turned out a regular old-fashioned " love feast," and we all slipped out 
of her room too full of happiness to say a word! D. R. S. 



Teacher fto a caller) : " Mr. Dale, do you know Alice Arnett's brother, the minister: 
Mr. Dale : " Did you say he was a ' D.D.? ' " 
Teacher: " Really, I do not know his initials." 



Recipe for a Senior Essay. — Soak a small brain in a copy of the " Iliad " for two weeks; 
take it out and hurriedly stir in it a large cup of Encyclopedia Britannica; into this sprinkle a tea- 
spoonful of quotations, and one-half drop of thought; flavor this with a stub pen and a little board- 
ing school ink, not too strong; garnish this with a handful of commas and periods, and serve 
" warm." 




Serenade 




HE moon sifts down her powd'ry beam, 
In elfin dance on rippling stream; 
And gurgling waters, low and far, 
Beat time to note of light guitar; 
" Ecoute, petite ! " comes soft and sweet, 
" Je t'aime, m'amie, je t'aime. " 



' Neath lattice dark lurks shadowy cloak, 
Vines softly part at stealthy stroke. 
And swift appears, through moonlight sheen, 
A slender hand, the leaves between. 

' Tiens! petite " mid scurrying feet 

' Je t'aime, clieri, je t'aime!" 



The terrace spurned in agile bound, 
The balcon rail with grace is found, 
And ardent fingers eager clasp 
A snow-white rose in baffled grasp. 

"Adieu, petite ! " sly winds repeat. 

"Je t'aime, ma vie, je t'aime." 

Effie M.iSON. 





A Story of the Pink Silk 




yWAS pink, just a delicate rose tint. I was a piece of silk. I lay on a counter in a 
great store. One day the clerk took nie down to show to a fat old lady. When 
he draped me and pointed out my beautiful color and luster, I trembled; for I was 
afraid I was going to be bought, and how could I ever beautify that wrinkled old 
woman ? I was measured, folded, and sent upstairs. I was bought. I was car- 
ried a long distance, blindfolded with brown paper. After that I was cut and 
sewed and twisted ; and all the while I wept bitterly. I could have borne the pain 
if it hadn't been I knew it would all have to be done over again; for they were making me en- 
tirely too small for the fat old woman. At last I was finished, and — O, what delight! — I wasn't 
for my purchaser at all, but for the sweetest, daintiest girl I ever saw. She was going to a party, 
and I was so glad I was going, too. When she and I were at our prettiest, we went downstairs; 
and her brother — it must have been her brother — kissed her and called her " Little Rosebud." 

The party was so much fun. I coquetted all evening with the broadcloths, and so did my 
mistress. I must have been so interested in them for a while that I forgot my mistress, for some- 
thing happened that night — I never knew what. That night was the last time I ever saw her. 
There followed an age of darkness. It might have been a century, for when the light shone 
on me again, my beautiful color had faded. I felt dizzy and dazed in the brightness. I passed 
through a terrible place whose horrors I cannot bear to relate. I came forth uniform in color — a 
dark blue. I had a new mistress — not the laughing, dancing Rosebud, but a pale, sad girl. She 
prized me highly and handled me with the greatest care. Ever} Sunda}' we went to church, and 
on our return I was put away until the succeeding Sunday. We did this Sabbath after Sabbath for 
years. I grew old and very weak. At some places I could scarcely hold together. I became 
very tired and felt like giving it up altogether; then I thought of the staid, quiet girl, and won- 
dered if she didn't get very tired, too, and if she didn't want to give it up. I was very sorry for 
her. Her life was just as monotonous as mine. 

One day, very suddenly, I did give wa}' in so many places tliat I couldn't be worn any more. 
Then the silent, blonde girl made me into a sofa cushion. When she lays her colorless cheek 
against me, weaker and more tired than she, I soothe and help her all I can. 

I heard her say once that I first belonged to an aunt of hers; and then there was a story, but 
her soft voice became so very soft that I could not hear it. Sometimes, when the fire burns brightly 
and I am alone, I dream of the party, the bright lights, and my beautiful mistress. 

Bessie Barr. 



Our Annual Christmas Tree 




OR many years it has been the custom of Ward Seminary to have a Christmas tree 
during the holidays for the pupils. Last year it was suggested that the tree and 
presents be contributed by the girls to some less fortunate than themselves. The 
plan was so enthusiastically received and successfully carried out that this year it 
was adopted again. 

The names and ages of about two hundred boys and girls were sent in by the 
Nashville Relief Society, so the Purchasing Committee were not working blindly 
when they bought the toys. A very pleasant evening was spent in dressing the dolls for the chil- 
dren. It was a merry scene — a hundred or more girls, their tongues going as fast as their 
needles, dressing almost as many fiaxen-haired, blue-eyed dolls. Materials were furnished by the 
Christian Endeavor Society. Misses Epler and Smith won the prize for the best-dressed doll. 
Friday before Christmas every one was busy decorating the tree and labeling the presents. 

Eleven o'clock Saturday morning was the time for the celebration, but a great number of 
children were in the chapel even an hour before time. The tree was on the platform, but was hid- 
den by curtains. These, however, did not keep many children on the front rows from peeping 
under to see what was in store for them. 

At last ever}' one was in his place, and after a carol was sung, Dr. L,andrith read a Scripture 
lesson and was followed by Dr. Matthews in prayer. Then the curtains were drawn aside, and 
what a sight met the e\'es of the eager children! An evergreen reaching from floor to ceiling, 
decorated with pop corn, red berries, and chains of bright- colored paper — the work of the little 
folks of the Primary Department! Gay tinsel chains, vari-colored balls, and brightly burning 
candles added to the beauty of the tree. On one side was a large pyramid of dolls, especially 
attractive to the girls; on the other were wagons, tool chests, horses, balls, and other things that 
are dear to a boy's heart. In response to their names, each one came forward and received the 
gifts, fruit, and candy. 

One old lady was there who was seventy-two years old, but had never .seen a Christmas tree 
before. She received her present, also, and went home, with many others, very happy and grate- 
ful for the pleasure given her. Mary Blanton. 




A Ward GirFs Version of ^^The Psalm of Life/' 





ELL me not in accents joyous, 

Girls are put here just for fun — 

Just to lausU, anil talk, and frolic 

From earh- morn till set of sun. 



A fjirl must work, and she must study, 

With " diploma " as her ,^oal; 
' Dunce thou art, and dunce remainest," 
Was not spoken of her soul. 



Here at Ward's we think and ponder 
On our Latin, Math., and Greek, 

From September until May days, 
As some knowledge we do seek. 



Days are long, and lessons longer. 

And our hearts, though brave and strong. 
Fail us when Miss ClKi])man tells ns: 
" Write these topics well and long." 



Ill the chapel reigns Hiss Jeiiiiiiios, 

And full often does remind us: 
' Do not talk and run about, ^irls: 

Rules of thousjhtfiilness must liiiid us 



We must trust not to the future, 
For we know not when to look 

For a hard aiul liorriil test 

On some deep, absorbing bf)ok. 



Let us, then, he up and doing. 

With one happy end iu view — 
That some day we'll have it tohl us: 
" Hearken, Seniors! You are through." 

— W. B. 





Music 

' Music hath charms," some one did sing, 

' To soothe the savage breast. ' ' 
O, if he knew how these halls ring — 
Ring with a \\'ild unrest 
Of Etudes, Studies, Fugue, Sonata, 
By Mozart, Mendelssohn, aud Schiimann — 
He'd think that savage was a mart3T, 
And that his ear was scarcely human. 
If he were soothed b}' such wild sounds 
As from the practice hall resounds. 

— ViRGiE Monroe. 



'II' '"^^.-^ 

mi 



.11' '5ii«E'-^ 



* 



Music Weather Report for one Week 

■M 
SUNDAY. — Fair, but temperature falling toward ni.ght. 
MONDAY.— Zero! ! ! 

TUESDAY (Bible Day ).— Weather rather gloomy. 
WEDNESDAY (Psychology Day).— Very threatening, with 

strong east w'ind blowing. 
THURSDAY (Music Lesson Day). — Weather very uncertain. 
FRIDAY. — Fair, especially so toward noon. 
SATURDAY.— A perfect day! ! ! 



vt/ vl/ * 



What two quotations fioiii Shakespeare'.s " Julius Ctesar " do Ward girls think Mi.ss Jen- 
nings has memorized ? 

Caesar to Antony: 
' ' I shall remember. ' ' 
Caesar to Trebonius: 
" What, Trebonius ! 
When Cfesar says, 'Do this,' it is performed." 



R 



is for Art, which this book rei)resents. 
It cannot be reckoned in dolkirs and cents. 





»>C3. Ci 




is for Boys, Billiards, 
and Beer, 

\nd other bad thin<;'s that all 
lurirls should fear. 



Q 



is for Candles, which 
shcnl a u'latl liirht 



On all of the feasts that we 



have in the night. 





D 






is fur Dancing each 
(lav at recess. 



% Thouirh it isn't much 



fun without boys, 
we confess. 



is tor Essays the 

Seniors must *^"^=^- 

rr 
write, - 

Which often present a 
most pitiful sight. 





rill the teacher finds out, then 



the trouble's beu'un. 




G 



is for (lolf, and, though 
we don't play. 



We wear a golf costume on 
each rainy day. 





is for Holiday so 
rarely we get. 

The absence of which 
J is a cause for regret. 



I 



is for " Iris," the finest of 
books. 



Whose contents you'll find quite 
as good cis its looks. 





is for Jennings, the Belle of 
\\ ard's school. 



Who surely " peals forth," if we 
break any rule. 




K 



is for Kitchen, so clccin 
antl so neat, '*«l 



From which issue forth 
our bread and our meat 





is for Letters we ^vt 
at mail call. 

And if we don't ,i;'et 
them, then our 
tears fall. 




is for Music, whose 
discord and strain 



From pianos below do 
give us a pain. 




N 



is for Xashville, the city of learning; 

Toward this great center the thou- 
sands are turning. 







bW 



© 



is for Order; how often we've heard, 
"Two in a line, no room for a third!" 




P 



is for Pit-a- 
Pat, the 
cutest of creatures, 



Who's just as well known as pupils or teachers. 




is for Questions we get in the elass. 

We often don't know them, 
and so let them pass. 





R 



is for Rosa, who waits at 
the door. 



\\ ho takes up the flowers and 
candy "galore." 






is for Seniors, the 
heads of the school, 



Who are never supposed 
to break any rule. 



T 



is for Thanksgiving, the day for 
the game 



That wins for old \ anderbilt glory 
and fame. 





is for Ugliness, which none of 
us own; 



But perhaps it will visit us w^hen 
we are grown. 



Y 



is for \"an(lerbilt, 
who the cannon 
did paint; 



Their names for this act 
received not a taint. 






is for "Ward's," 
a school of re- 
nown; 



It is by far the best of our 
town. 



X 
Z 



Y 



are values unknown, 
And into the waste- 
basket will have to 
be thrown. 






^Jl^^T^i 



^:^ZL£JL ^-^^^^^Z^ _^--t_^i.-7^^^ ^i^'\y'zr-2y^^ 





-■, first^origiiial essay.) 



Le Lotus 



Dans les jours qiiand le monde ctait jeune, et I'homme avait fait peu d'impietements dans les 
forets et les retraites favorites de la Mere Nature, elle allait souvent par ici et par la parmi les 
scenes de ses cn5ations, et conferait encore plus familierementque maiutenant avec ses enfants, en 
embellissant et encourageant les fleurs a fleurir, I'herbe a pousser, et les grands arbres a repandre 
leurs branches pour proteger le voyageur. 

Une de plus jolie de ces scenes fut une grande vallee, dont la beaute fut gatee par la presence 
d'un fleuve qui prenait son cours au niillieu, et foncee et engourdie I'eau qui etait en grande 
contraste anx arbres et le feuillage qui saillent ses rives, Un jour, en passant, la Mere Nature 
voyait le fleuve noir avec sa converture d'ecunie, de limon, et de la boue au dessus. 

" C'est vraiment une contradiction du loi qu'il y a de beaute partout," disait-elle, et se met- 
tait a Tembellir. Dans la place oii I'ecunie e ait plus epais et la boue plus profonde, elle jetait 
une petite semence, satisfie qn'avant loiigtemps, une change prendrait place. 

Au primtemps on voyait une Icgere meunte sur I'eau, et apres quelques jours il y avait des 
proruesses tendres qui developpaient bientot en ferrilles qui flottaient sur la surface d'une forme dif- 
ferente qu'on n'avait jamais vu. Sur les ferrilles il y avait un bouton, qui commencait a grandir et 
sortir de sa forme conicale sous I'enfluence du soleil. Un matin les creatures dil foret furent sur- 
prises voir, parmi I'ecume, une fleur parfaite, supportee seulement par ses propres feuilles, sans 
tache sur I'eau noire du fleuve. 

Les hommes ignorants le tenaient en reverence, pensant qu'elle signifiait le monde, parce- 
qu'elle representait si bien les elements dont ils croyaient — la terre, I'eau, I'air et le feu. Mais 
nous, nous voyons une plus jolie et plus profonde signification. II semble montrer que n'importe 
quoi les environements d'un homme, il pent triompher sur eux, et devenir aussi bel et aussi piir que 
ce lis, donnant a son propre charactere plus de gloire en contracte avec ses environements; et com- 
me, quand I'hiver vient, la cosse est tenue dans son lit, attendre I'arrival du primtemps, quand 
il retourne au surface avec encore plus de beaute qu'autrefois, nous avons I'idee de reternitu. 
II y a des lepons merveilleuses que la Mere Nature apprenne ses enfants ! 

MARY CHEATHAM (age 15). 



The Exhibition 





HERE is a beating of drums; two little boj'S arrayed in 
shabby uniform march up and down before the tent. 

The crowd, but a few moments ago widely- scattered, 
gather about the door. They li,sten to the in- 
ducements of the " spieler," hut the demand for 
entrance is very small. Mothers are hurrying 
dirty children away, saying: " O, dreadful! No 
you don't want to go in there; the snakes would 
bite you!" The children, on account of their dense- 
ne.ss — the world fondly calls it " innocence" — are easily pulled 



It is a poor crowd and a poor tent in a public park. It 
must be something good, to bring the long-treasured dime 
from the almost empt}- pocket. The " spieler " cries out des- 
perately: "Wait, ladies and gentlemen; bring back the chil- 
dren. See! the queen herself appears." At this the crowd 
turns back to gaze upon the snake charmer. She stands upon 
the raised platform, decked in giudy tinsel — green, yellow, 
gi and red. Two long, slender snakes twist and wind themselves 
about her. Her face is pale, almost cadaverous; but there is 
a pose, an indescribable something — perhaps the curve of her neck or the sliglit swaj- of her 
body — that suggests the serpents. 

The " spieler " continues: " This lady doesn't enslave the snakes; she has an affection for 
them. See! she kisses them. This longer one — O no; it won't let nie touch it! is named "Glider;" 



the other, a little shorter, though lar,a;er in diameter, is "Crawler." Come closer; look at them! 
They are as healthy specimens as there are in the world." 

All the time the woman coils the beautiful, glistening creatures about her arms, measures 
them out before the crowd, kisses them, and faintly smiles. 

" This lady," cries the showman, "has traveled with Barnum's circus. She has been the 
wonder of every people to whom she has shown her marvelous powers. Come in and .see the 
wonderful gentleness of the boa constrictor!" 

She, standing, with that grace so peculiar to her, listens indifferently to the words that have 
rung so many times in her ears. Slowly she coils "Glider" around her right arm, and finally 
about her neck. A sudden convulsion paralyzes her face. She tears frantically at the snake. 
There is a cry of horror from the crowd. The showman springs forward, grasps and struggles 
with the serpent. The silent, deadly creature is seen to jerk and tighten his coil. The force of 
the " spieler" dislodges it, hissing and venomous. 

Ah, but the tinsel — the green, yellow, and red — lies in one insensible mass: the face, black 
and distorted, is horrible to see. "Glider," the traitor, has played his last part; his survival is 
but a moment longer than that of the betrayed. BESSIE Barr. 



First Little Girl (carr>ing in her hand a letter in a mourning envelope): "What do you 
suppose thev put this black around the edge for ? " 

Second Little Girl (proudly): " Wliy, so it will go to the Dead Letter Office, of course." 





The Advantages of an Education 



THE 




J^T 



THE 











The Evolution of a Name at Ward^s 






•■ I do beseech vou 






(Chiefly that I may set it in my prayers), 
What is your name ? ' ' 






Shakespeare, The Tempest. 




At Home 


Jst Year at Ward's 


2d Year 


Mary 


a ( Mamie 
b ( Maymye 


a j Mae 
b 1 Marie 




Lucy 


Lucye 


LUCILE 






Sai,i,ie 


Sara 


S A IDEE 






Susie 


Sue 


Suzanne 






Lri^iviE 


LlIvY 


LitWAN 






EviE 


Eva 


Evangei,ine; 






Fannie 


Frankie 


Frances 






KiTTIE 


Kate 


Katherine 






Matt IE 


Mattye 


Martha 






Jennie 


Janettic 


Janice 






Patty 


Patty E 


Patricia 






Maggie 


Margaret 


Marguerite 




"What's ill a name?" 




Shakespeare, Romeo ami Juliet. 

-St, c. c. 











Alpha Chapter of the Delta Sigma Sorosis 



FOUNDED IN 1894. 



NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



Colors — Light Blue and Purple. Flower —Violet. 

Yell — Delta Sigma, Delta Sigma, 
Mazette, Mazette, 
Dixie, Dixie, Dixie, Dixie, 
Dura Vivimus Vivamu.s. 



Officers 



Marie Brooks Stafford 
Isabel Sevier Williams 
Katie Niel Winstead 
Rebekah McEwen Kinnard 



Grand High Mogul 
Vice Regent 
Quastor 
Chartuliaria 



Beta Chapter 



OgoutzOgoiitz, Pa, 



^ 









Roll of 1899-1900. 

Effie Barrow. Hermine Haverkamp. Rebekah Kinnard. Katie Mai Landrum. 

Mary Rodgers. Madeleine Park. Marie Stafford. 

Isabel Williainis. Katie Niel Winstead. 

Martha Tappan. 

Sorores in Urbe 

Mrs, W, F. Allen, 



Martha I^anier Scruggs. 



Mrs. John E. Garner. 






u aitnC me nocu fo tePf 
ffie f^aerei. ilitorL) true, 
a 'neafR fRe m^iitic ^pefP, 
f^ eni^i^ria'^ in ^&|^/^r)6of;S) fcoo? 
ffiat cooufi. rTjO(«)t c^eailfij 6e; 

Soon tfteuj'c^ mafte a eorp/e of me 
Jn^ioPafe muiit 6e tfieii* fro^se, 
(wfocoind out of i^acreil fie/, 
^y^ac^e in faif^ ani. Born cf fo^se; 
^fP to eaefi for a,ve aPPie<«> 




Delta Sigma Sorosis 

A CLOUD~A VISION 

A Cload — 

" Sing a song of pretty maids — maidens young 
and fair! 
Sing of our Sorosis! Sing its virtues rare! " 
Thus a bearer came to me, 

Sitting in my room ; 
Thus he said and left me then 
Wrapp'd in mental gloom. 

Then my soul within me groan'd, shriek'd, and This is why my brow is sad, overcast with care; 

tore its hair; This is why my face is pale, eyes in circles stare, 

For the man had left the word with no points to j ^^^ ^^^^ ^^ „ bricks " can make, 

spare. For they sent no "straw." 

I would sing — of course, I would, 

Ride my muse to death ; Why, to set such task for one 

I was taught to serve the fair Is against the law! 

\Vith my latest breath. 

A Vision — 

But softly, now, there comes a vision 
; Of a band of fairest maids, 

Link'd in one true round of union, 
Joiii'd in love which never fades. 

Fair they are, as maidens should be, Such a sisterhood is lovely! 

True and loyal to the core. Like a string of pearls are they 

Banded for all holy uses. On a cord of virtues thread'd. 

Friends and loved ones evermore. Join'd by love, though far away. 

Then, all hail to Delta Sigma! 

May her ranks forever grow, 
May the charms that now bedeck her 

Never loss nor fading know ! 

— D. R. S. 











Officers 






RowENA Jones, 


Preside)!/ 




LizzETTE Dickson, 


Secretary 


M 


^■RY Foster, 


Vice President 




Isabel White, 


Ti'easurer 




D. Q, R. Club 

Organi/.eil January, 1897. 

Colors — Emerald and Old Gold. 
Flower — White Carnation. 



Officers 



M.\GGiE M.^Y Wilson 
JL\Y Johnston Steed 
Cecil Sharon Tipton 
Floyd Ash Wilson 
Edith Pauline Hooper 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Sergeant-at-Arms 



Members 

Edith Pauline Hooper, Colorado. Lena Stegall, Tennessee. Mary Johnston Steed, Tennessee. 

Cecil Sharon Tipton, Tennessee. Maggie May Wilson, Mississippi. 

Freddie Mae Schamberger, Tennessee. 

Floyd Ash Wilson, Mississippi. Gladys Holmes, Texas. Mattie Sue Smith, Tennessee. 



'TL4]' 



J' — 1 




ORGANIZED OCTOBER. 1899 



Motto : " Eat, drink, and be merry." 
Favoritk Occupation: " Dissecting jokes.' 




Lyda Jackson. 
L,ENA Stegall. 



Martha Tappan. 



ZipPORAH McCoy. 




Leoi,a Millette. 



Mary Rodgers. 



Hattie Bethea. 
Effie B.\rro\v. 





To thee, O Clio, goddess fair of literature and art, 
Who long delightful sway hath held 
O'er each ambitious heart, 
We sing. 



For 'twas from thee tliat inspiration came. 
To gain a firmer hold on all you love 
And form the club which proudly bears thy na 
"The C. L. C." 



When slowly pass the hours from day to day, 
'Till Saturday once more hath made the round, 
We cast our trials to the winds awa}- 
And meet with thee. 



And while we sit within some cozy bower. 
And take the stitch that saves the other nine. 
One reads aloud the best book of the hour, 

And all is gay. 
11 



Long may you live in poetry and fame, 

O goddess born ! 
We, striving, .shall prove worth}- of the name- 
*' Qlionian." 

-J- B, 



Clionian Literary Club 



President 
I'iee President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



\'iRGiNiA D. Beech 
Mamie E Adams 
LizETTE B. Dickson 
Jane L. Biles 




Members C. L. C. 



Eefie Barrow. 

Maroie Lin Caldwell. 
WiLMOTH Cannon. 

Rebecca Carpenter. 
Daisy Faulkner. 
EIdna Frierson. 

Bessie Herm.vn. 



Rebekah Kinnard. 
Evelyn Little. 

Zipporah McCoy. 

Mary Keene Shackelford. 
Cornelia Webb. 
Floyd Wilson. 

Maggie ^L\Y Wilson. 



Katie Neil Winstead. 



Gladys Holmes. 



WARD CHORUS CLUB 




"Ah, we have sighed for rest !" 



Class Flower: Star( R) JESSAMINE. 



Class Colors : Green and White. 



President : 


Treasurer : 




Evelyn 


Isabel Honslon 




I,ittle. 


White. 


Blanche 
Stearns. 


yice Piesu/fii/ 






Margie h'.n 


Man- Steve 




Caldwen. 


Epler. 


Ilattie 


Seciflarv : 




Cnningha 


Uzzette 


Susie Elizabeth 




Dickson. 


Abney. 







Anita 
Alison. 






Floyd Ash 
Wilson. 


Freddie Mae 
Schamberger. 


Bessie Claire 
Hefley. 




Cecil Sharon 
Tipton. 




Rubye Lee 
Chamberlain. 


Goodn 


Elizabeth Ann 
Herman. 


Row-en a 
Jones. 


Mar>- Fletcher 
Rather. 


Bertha 
Haulk. 

Sadve 
Cohn. 



CH.ARLES W.\NZER ST.VRR, DIRECTOR. 





Flower — CbrysaiithL-nuun. 

Colors — Orange and Turquoise Blue 

Motto — "Ars longa, vita brevis." 



Club Day 

St. Cecilia's Day, November 22 




THE 



Maude Stebbens. Alma Patterson. Susie Abney. Margie Lin Caldwell. 

Ethel Smith. Knima Gale Craig. Lillian Williams. 

■ Eliza Tally. Ethel Wallace. Dai.sy Smith. 

Bertha Gardner. Katie 51. Landrum. Lettie Owen. Jlarion Strickla 

Maud Wilson. Miss L. C. Caldwell, President. .\nna Blanton. 

Virgie Monroe. Marie Stafford. Maggie Kennedy. LoUie Baisden. 





Potpourri 



A post/iKiiioiis work is one written by an 
author after he is dead ! 

Beethoven's infirmity was his bad temper! 

A flat lowers a note and a sharp hio/icrs a 
note ! 



St. CeciHa is i\\e patlon saint of music! 
Bach's music is really better than it sounds! 
Poco a poco means Vi poky along! 
The most noted thintr about Handel was his 



Studio Club 




...MH. 


....KNAMK. 


EAVOR,-rEKX,.RESSrON. 


OCCt.,'AX,„N. 


i...:sr..vv. 


Frith. 


"Fancy-racy." " 


['11 never paint another plate." 


Lookiii.c: for the Wilson Brothers. 


Teaching in China. 


Pi:cK. 


"Pecker-wood." ' 


Ini Mr. Lon.^'nian'.s pet.'.' 


Talking about the boys. 


An early grave (talked 
herselT to death). 


Dll-l-liNDERPFER. 


"DilT." 


I gues.s I'll paint China." 


Painting violets. 


A famous flower paint'r. 


Riiin. 


"Sue." 


Where's Mrs. Longman?" 


Giving art lessons. 


Poet of the studio. 


Camimii:i.i,. 


"Camp." ■ 


Just nnythin.sr." 


Cleaning casts. 


Sculptor. 


Wkndki.l. 


"Old Maid." 


11 niercy! Here's Mr. L." 


Erasing her drawings. 


Painting portraits. 


MlKUAV. 


"Silence." 


What period is this?" 


Arranging flower studies. 


Designer. 


Fai-i.knkr. 


"Little D. F." 


Give me lapestrN'. or .i;ive 
niede.-Lth." 


Waiting for inspiration. 


White washer. 


Ronciius. 


"lirowTiie." 


It is the CMtes' thing." 


Cutting the class. 


Signboard painter. 


TURI-EV. 


"C.ibson." 


What mu.st I do ne.xt? " 


Disparaging her work. 


Excelling Gibson. 




"Snippy." 


I .said so and so." 


JIaking book covers. 


A French teacher. 


IJRONSON. 


"Vandevbilt." 


St. Louis is the only place." 


Painting something for papa. 


A St, I^ouis society 


Morgan. 


"Rene." 


What do you think of that?" 


Designing. 


Illustrator. 


Blanton. 


"Nancy." 


I'll tell papa on you." 


Painting water colors. 


A famous artist. 


McEwi-N, 


"Mac." 


0. do you think so?" 


Sketching from life. 


An artist of the twen- 
tieth centur>-. 


HITT. 


"Dear." 


Just any old thing." 


Painting China. 


Something good. 


KERl.lCV. 


"Patsy." 


Avoid the appearance of evil. " 


Telling the story of the nen-ous 
goats. 


The world-renowned 
traveler. 


I.O.NCMAX iSIni.) 


"Legion." 


Girls, be quiet." 


Working for the girls. 


Ner\'ons prostration. 


LONGMAN (MlM 


"Jack." 


Go to work, girls." 


Advising Mrs, I,, in French. 


Reincarnation. 


I'tt-a-Pat. 


"Darlinpr." 


BOWAVOW." 


Sitting in the window. 


A little nugel. 





THE IRIS CLUB. 



^^Iris Club^^ 





r.OME writer has said, "Our most joyous moments, as well as most profitable, are 
spent in earliest childhood;" but we, the " Iris Club," have no such ideas, for we 
well know that no happier nor more profitable moments could be spent than at 
our meetings. 

At the beginning of the )'ear, the Senior Class formed themselves into a club, tak- 
ing the " Iris " editorial staff as officers. Their sole aim was to make the paths of the 
" Iris " spread as far and as wide as those of the " Comet." They met every two 
weeks and discusssed "Iris," handed in various literary matter, and, 'though always at work, 
had very pleasant times. At the first meetiug the President reminded us to label everything we 
handed in, especially the "jokes." 

A crowd of little boys, playing in the court, attracted by our witty (?) remarks, marched up 
to the window. They stood .still for a little while; but the subject under discussion being too 
deep for them, they began cake walking. Being so engro.ssed with our own work, we left them 
unnoticed for a few moments, when a shout, a crash, and then— we looked up just in time to see 
our dignified Business Manager jumping through a clo.sed window, which, in her excitement, she 
had forgotten to raise. 

All tried to talk at once, but one tap of the bell lay the " well-trained " Secretary brought 
silence. 

In the clear, sweet tones so characteristic of our President, she asked: " Miss , please 

read what )-ou have written." " I didn't write anything; but, really, I have an idea. Miss Presi- 
dent, but I can't express it." " Why don't you freight it, then ? " was the consolation received. 

For the next few minutes, profound silence ensued, broken only by the low, musical voice of 
our Treasurer, as well as treasure, reading one of her charming stories. When she had finished, 
our class poet began reading the class poem. Only a few verses had been read, when the door 



was opened and Mr. Blanton came in to inquire as to whose funeral services were being held. 
We told him not to be alarmed ; that it was onlj' the class poem. 

It seemed that our good President was unusuall_v anxious about us that day, for a little 
later when our Business Manager was indulging in a little laugh over one of the numerous jokes, 
the door was hurriedly thrown open, and again Mr. Blanton wanted to know if any one was in dis- 
tress and whether we needed assistance. We assured him that his fears were groundless and 
invited him to stay with us; perhaps we could entertain him for a few moments. He sat in a 
remote corner, and when next we noticed him he was actually reading a letter. 

The ringing of the bell announced a visitor for him, and once more we were left alone and 
ready to carry on our work; but as it is time for the " Iris" to go to press, I can tell no more of 
the achievements of this, the " Iris Club." Maude Selig. 



The Iris 

HE very name, "Iris," brings to our minds thoughts of beauty and 
gladness. Before Nature spreads her green carpet beneath the leaf- 
less trees, the little iris springs up, bringing with it beauty and 
fragrance, and announces the coming of Spring, with her sweet song 
birds and beautiful flowers. 

This little herald comes to announce to us, after months of 
wind and snow, the coming of bright, sunshiny days; but its name- 
sake, The Iris, will not be a herald; its voice will, in after years, speak to us from its 
must3' leaves and remind us of all the pleasure and happiness that we, as the class of 
nineteen hundred, enjoyed at Ward's. Minnie Fisher. 





Wheel Club 




Daisy Faulkner 
Mary Rodgers 



Officers 

President Gladys Holmes 

Vice President Maude Stebbins 



Secretary 
Treasurer 



Misses Adams. 
Alison. 
Baisden. 
Bekch. 
Biles. 

Diffenderffer. 
Faulkner. 
Haverkamp. 
Harrison. 



Colors — Black and Yellow. Flower — Black-eyed Susan. 

Motto — " United we ride, provided we do not fall." 



Members 

Misses Hefley. 
Holmes. 
Hooper. 
Jackson. 
Kinnakd. 
Rodgers, M. 
Reid. 

Schamberger. 
Shwab. 



Misses Sokoloski. 
Stebbins. 
Stegall. 
Webb, C. 
Webb, M. 
Wilson, M. M. 
Wilson, F. 

WiNSTEAD. 
WOOTEN. 





Rowena Jones. Cecil Tipton. Mamie .\(lanis. Lizzette Dick.son. Ks.sie JNlcBrule. 

Mamie Burke. Maggie May Wilson. Edna Goans. Martha Lassing. Mary Keen Shackelford. 
Leola Millette. Lollie Baisden. Sadie Cohn, Virginia Pippen. Zippotah McCoy. 

Ethel Smith. Sleta Mitchell. Ennna Gale Craig. Genevieve Goodrum. Liiln Mullens. 

Bessie Herman. Marv Epler. Katie Neil Winstead. Sudie Lacw 

Beulah Johnson. Rubye Chamberlain. Mattie Sue Smith. Floyd Wilson. 



Emma Berry. Mary Blanton. Pearl Gunter. Katie May Landrum. Martha Tappan 

Anna Blanton. Grace Diffenderffer. Lyda Jackson. Freddie Schamberger. 





Officers 



Maggie May Wiwon 
May Steed 
Mattie Sue Smith 
Katie May I^andrum 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Members 

Hkrmine Haverkajip. Celeste Harrison. Cecil Tipton. 

ZippoRAH McCoy. Marie Stafford. Isabel Williams. 

Virginia Beech Floyd Wilson. Edith Hooper. 

Mary Fo.ster Lena Stegall. Daisy Faulkner. 

Gr.'V.ce Diffenderffer. Freddie Schamberger. 




ver Blossom. Colors— Red and White. 

Officers 

KATHARINE CORNELIA WINSTEAD PRESIDENT 

CORNEUA WEBB Vice President 

MARIE STAFFORD Secretary 

ISABEI, WII,I,IAMS Treasurer 




Members 



MARY ADAMS. 
SARAH BERRY. 
JANE BILES. 
RUBY CHAMBERLAIN. 
EDNER FRIERSON. 
FLORA SMITH. 
LILLIAN SCOTT. 
MARY RODGERS. 
EVELYN LITTLE. 
ANNIE HUEY'. 
MARY G. WEBB. 



VIRGINIA BEECH. 
MATTIE MAY SUJIMERS. 
MARGIE LIN CALDWELL. 
RUBY EZELL. 
EDNA GOANS. 
MATTIE SUE SMITH. 
NELIA O'NEAL. 
REBEKAH KINNARD. 
MARY LOUISE LOVE. 
BEULAH JOHNSON. 
CORNELIA WEBB. 
FREDDIE SCHAMBERGER. 



EMMA BERRY'. 
WILMOTH CANNON. 
WILLIE COWAN. 
DAISY FAULKNER. 
MARY GILLILAND. 
LUCILE ROGERS. 
ALMA PATTERSON. 
MAY' STEED. 
BESSIE HERMAN. 
ROWENA JONES. 
LENA STEGALL. 
KATHARINE CORNELIA 



JANE BERRY. 
REBECCA CARPENTER. 
HATTIE CUNNINGHAM. 
MINNIE FISHER. 
MARIE STAFFORD. 
LOUISE SHWAB. 
MARY RATHER. 
SUDIE LACY. 
GEORGIA HICKERSON. 
CECIL TIPTON. 
ISABEL WILLIAMS. 
WINSTEAD. 





Officers 

MARY B. PROSSER President 

EDITH HOLLAND Vice President 

GRACE DIFFENDERFFER ----- Secretary 

META MITCHELL ------ Treasurer 

J* 

Honorary Members 

MRS. BLANTON. MISS CHAPMAN. MISS JENNINGS. 

MISS MARY BLANTON. MISS ANNA BLANTON. 



Louisiana 



■ Coi<ORS — Green and White. 




/Tfc 




Flower — Orange Blossom. 




t^l 




Refreshments — Yellow fever germs, 


bayou water, 


W^l 




Southern moonshine 


:, and sugar cane. 


111* 




Yell— Rah, Rah, Rah, 




UK 




Here we are, 




1 i 




Gumbo, g-umbo, 




JLr 


THI 


Mardi Gras. 






1^ 


Louisiana! 


Officers 




/ 


Maude L. Selig, President. 


Myrtle Sokolosky, Vice President. 




Maude E. Stebbins, Secretary 


and Treasurer. 






^ 








Members 







Lettie Owen. Effie Mason. Elise Chaffe. Maude Selig. 

Edna Lichtenstein. Myrtle Sokolosky. 

Maude Stebbins. 



Greeting 



We come from the land where the orange flower hlossoms; 

From the land of the citron, the lemon, the palm; 
Where the meadow lark sings like an angel in heaven 

And the air is a breath of perpetual balm. 




We come, a gay band of light-hearted maidens; 

The warmth of our climate instilled in our veins; 
The joy of the sweet, sunny South in our bosoms; 

Our minds filled with summer's soft, musical strains. 



We come to the cold, sterner North for a ! 

We come with misgiving, with shudder, with dread; 
For the blood that now throbs through our warm, sunny nature 

Runs cold, if grini'Winter but shake his gray head. 



For we love not the cold, nor the wind, nor the rain storm; 

We long for the cheer of our far Southern home; 
We droop and we pine for the sun's genial luster; 

Like exiles 'mongst strangers we hopelessly roam. 



Nay, nay; not at all ! That, indeed, was the picture 
That filled our sad hearts with forebodings so dread; 

But we learned that a wealth of warmth and of welcome 
Awaited us here, ere our greetings were said. 



And we knew that the blasts of the chillest of winters 
Would warm by the blood that a tender heart thrills, 

And felt that the breasts of our own Southern comrades 
Had withstood the fierce storms with their terrors and ills. 



O, friends, gentle friends, of our home of adoption. 
When again, with farewells, we may tearfully seek 

The soft, sunny clime we as tearfulU' quitted. 

One boon of you, comrades, we, ardent, bespeak ! 




May the thoughts that of us you will tenderly cherish 
Be as kind as the welcome received from your hands 

By the sh}- little band of timid young maidens 
Who left, to be with you, their own sunny lands. 

EFFIE MASON. 




" Lord God of hosts, be with us yet, 
Lest we forget, lest we forget." 



-Kipling. 





" More things are wrought by prayer 
Than this workl dreams of. Wherefore let thy voice 
Rise, Hke a fountain, for me night and day; 
For what are men better than sheep or goats 
Tliat nouri.sh a bUnd Hfe within the brain. 
If, knowing God, they hft not hands of prayer 
Both for themselves and these who call them friends? 
For so the whole round earth is ev'ry way 
Bound by gold chains about the feet of God." 

— Tennyson. 





Don't stop here — take a panoramic view of our friends. 



wa^. 




mere Jiwarded a %\\m medal 

at the 

national 

Pbotograpbm' 

Conocntion 

Chautauqua 

new Vork 

1899, and 

a Bronze medal 

in 1897 



230 North Cherry Street 



\\f 



^f 



RECEIVED HIGHEST AWARD 
PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY 
TENNESSEE CENTENNIAL „■« 



MANY OF THE GROIPS 
^ IN THIS BOOK WERE 
MADE BY THIS FIRM^ 



MEADORS & SON 



Up-to-date Shoes 
... at Right Prices 



...FINE SHOES... 



FOR FINE FEET 



We invite you to call 
and see us 



306 UNION STREET 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 



The Daily 
American 



Prints all 
the News 



15 Cents per week 65 Cents per month 
. . . $8.00 per year . . . 

NASHVILLE 



AMERICAN CO., 



TlOLKI'lIONE 71 



DR. D. R. STUBBLEFIELID 

...DENTIST... 



401 AND 402 WILLCOX BUILDING 



Union Bank and 
Trust Co. 



R. S. PATTERSON 



UNION WTKISISX 



308 N. COLLEGE STREET 

Receives Deposits, Makes Loans, Acts as Execu- 
tor, Administrator, Guardian, Trustee, Agent. 
Sells Exchange on all Parts of the World .*. .". 



Agents for All the Principal Ocean Steamship Lines 



Kodak Pictures 



^ 



TELEPHONE 
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COLOR WORK fe-'fe^ -^ ->' ^) 4: 

AND ■^^>*,»-Zz:i»-. //•* 

DESIGNING ^^ /^^^"^^ 



EMBOSSING PLATES, 

PHOTO LITHOGRAPHING 

TOR LETTER HEADS, 

MAP ENGRAVING. 



.r ^ 



234 N MARKET ST 



toi-^siX 



.N^ASKYlLLEs, 



We c\xe Qivinq special txlienlion lo illuslieilmg aoA 

ei^grcwioq jor Hevqev^ioes, pooKs A^d pumicgviioos 
oj evTl hiocis; ovr work is 0] ]]')e l^iqoesi qrevde. 
— Give us e^ hievl.- 



ILLUSTRATIONS IN THIS BOOK A SAMPLE OF OUR WORK 



$1 GAS AND A 

...GAS STOVE 

'Wby not be Comfortable, 
and get a GAS STOVE 7 

It is Cozy to Cook On 

Try One 





Over 3,000 



IN USE IN 
NASHVIIiliE 

Gas at $1 Per Thousand 

FOR SALE BV 

NASHVILLE GAS CO. 



THE LEADING BOOKSTORE 

OF THE STATE 



School and College Text-books, 
Latest Fiction, Fine Fashionable 
Stationery, Engraved Cards. .'. 



Call on us for anything in the 

Book or Stationery 

Line. 



Hunter & Welburn 

BOOKSELLERS AND 
STATIONERS 



306 N. Market 
Street... 



NASHVILLE, 
TENN. 



A. BOOTH & CO. 

Successors to CHASE & CO. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 
DEALERS IN AND SHIPPERS OF 

Ti$l>, Ov$t(r$, ami 
Poultry ..g 



221 Norlh Cherry Street 



NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



CHARLES PLICQUE 



■ DEALKR IN. 



FRESH AND SALT MEATS 

COUNTRY PRODUCE, ETC. 
Our Meat is tlie Higliest Grade and First-class 

TELEPHONE 3127—3 RINGS 

504 Broad Street NASHVILLE, TENN. 



TABLE LUXURIES 



...SPECIALTY.. 



ORR, JACKSON & CO. 



176 North Market Street, 



Nashville, Tenn. 



JOBBERS 

OF 

FANCY GROCERIES 












liMibAArfi^MifeMdiAdisliMisfeA 



CALVERT BROS. 



AND 



TAYLOR... 



if 



PHOTOS IN 

Carbon 
Platinum 
Aristo Platino 

PORTRAITS IN 

Oil, Pastel 
Crayon 
Water Colors 
India Ink, etc. 



Pbotoarapkrs 



Ivory Miniatures a specialty. All the 
latest styles in mounting to l)e found 
at our house '.' .'. '.' .'. '.' .■- 



CALVERT BROS. & TAYLOR 

CHERRY AND UNION STS, 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 






S1^Mf54C5HC'l4C|t|€34C|tff|»ffy 















if^-^^ 






STUDENTS 



You will do well to buy your Shoes at 
our Emporium. You can always find 
the Newest Styles at the Lowrest 
Prices. 



^ 



SPECIAL DISCOUNT ALLOWED TO ALL STUDENTS 



CUNE & GORDON 

..QUEEN.. 
SHOE HOUSE 

J' 

406 UNION STREET 



JOHN D. ANDERSON & CO. 



MINERS AND SHIPPERS 



... Hi^h Grade Coal .. 

OliR SPKCI.M.TV 

THE PEERLESS EMPIRE 



OFFICE 409 UNION STREET 



TELEPHONE 306 



THE HOWE ICE CO, 



TV. H. HOWE, President 
J H. HOTVE, Manager 

MANUFACTURERS .AND DEAT.ERS IN 



Pure Distilled 
Water Ice^ 



Main Office, Cor. Cherry and Union Streets, 
Telephone 43 
Factory, Cor. North Cherry and Jackson Streets, 
Telephone 178 



Ward 
Seminary 

buys of 



Telephone 102 



M. E. Derryberry & Co. 



ALL KINDS OF 

GROCERIES 



221=223 Broad Street 
corner College 



CHEEK & NORTON 

210-212 N. Market Street 

NASHVILLE, - - TENNESSEE 



Importers, Roasters, and 
Blenders 

High Grade Coffees 



I pKprk RmC Fii'st-class Dry Goods and Millinery jf 

L^L'^^^iV Lrl Vf3* Stylish Goods at Lowest Prices ^ Summer Street, Nashville 



JOHN BRANHAJI 



L. W. HAH, JR. 



BRANHAM & HALL 



HIGH-GRADE 



Shoes, Suit Cases, Bags 

AND UMBRELLAS AT LOWEST PRICES 

235 N. SUMMER STREET 
Telephone 67 NASHVILLE 



CLASS PINS AND MEDALS 

Geo. R. Calhoun & Co. 

LEADING 

Jewelers f^^y Opticians 

FINE REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 




iUbCtl VOU ^'^'^ ^^^^ ^"^ '" another 

ilftt^tti ^^^" ^^ ^'^y "^ remember 

HA\^ yfy^m ^1^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^^1^ him".' 

Business the quickest by Telephone 



CUMBERLAND 

TELEPHONE 

AND TELEGRAPH 

COMPANY 



r. W. W. BERRV, Vice president. 

NASHVILLE TRUST CO. 

CAPITAL, $350,000 

Acts as Administrator, Executor, Trustee, Assignee, Receiver, Agent, 
and in an)' fiduciary capacity. 

"Wills receipted for and kept safely ^^■itl^out charge. 
Boxes for rent in our giant fire and burglar-proof vaults. 

"SAVINGS DEPARTMENT." 

As a proper and legitimate function of our business, deposits will be 
received and interest allowed thereon, subject to the rules, regulations and 
conditions governing this department. 

When desired, TIME DEPOSIT CERTIFICATES may be issued, ma- 
turing at a fixed date, at such rate of interest, and in such sums, as mav be 
agreed upon. NO DEPOSITS RECEIVED SUBJECT TO CHECK.' 



311 North Cherry Street 



Vanderbilt Building 



PAPPAS' PLACE 



LUNCH ROOM (). G. PAPPAS 



PROPRIETOR 

711 CHURCH ST. 



W. C. COLLIER 
GROCERY CO.-. 



GROCERIES 



Wliiik-.-ialL- iiiiil Kilciil 

Dfaki-s in 
Imported ,Sc Daillc^lic 

601=503 Church St., Nashville, Tenn. 



Doridcr ^ 
Sidebottom 



CAKES AND CANDIES 
ICE CREAM . . . 

r~ant""''^ 513 CHURCH ST, 



THE B. H. STIEF JEWELRY COMPANY'S 



404 UNION STREET. 



JAS. B. CARR, Manager 



LARGEST STOCK IN THE SOUTH OF 

Diamonds, ^ Watches, ^ Fine Jewelry, ^ Fancy Goods 



EXCLUSIVE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED 

LIBBY CUT GLASS 



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During Vacation 

You will no doubt want to do some sort of read- 
ing. We should be glad to have you call and 
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cellaneous books. 

If You Don't Have Time 

Before you return home, an order or inquiry by 
mail will have prompt attention. Write us. 

C. p. Publishing House 

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO. 

S. "W. Cor. Broad and. Race Sts. Philadelpliia, Pa. 

COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 
AND CLASS DAY PROGRAMS 



CLASS AND FRATERNITY STATIONERY 
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ALL THE TIME 



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Grind their Own Spices. Make their Own Bak- 
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n 




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NASHVILLE. -^ TENNESSEE 



Starr Pianos 



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The StaiT represents absolute perfec- 
tion as a production of the Piano 
maker's art in its highest development 



JESSE FRENCH 
PIANO & ORGAN CO. 



PIANOS 240-24-2 N. SUMMER ST. 

FOB RENT 

NASHVILLE, TENN. 



Can 



Publishing House s„ppiy 
M. E. Lhurch °"7"t 

no matter 
where ".• 
ptiblished 



South . . . 



Books of Theology, Biography, History 
Poetry, Miscellany, Classics 



BARBEE & SMITH, 



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NASHVILLE 



LONE STAR MARKET 



•PHONE 

1677 



M. ADLEN, Proprietor 

ONLY Native and Western 

FIRST- 

CLASS Refrigerated Meats 

All kinds Imported and Domestic Sausages 
VEGETABLES AND Alt KIKDS OF DEUCACIES 214 N. SIMMER ST. 



GOOD 



GOODS! 



Nothing else 
Is what you will find at 



Dry Goods. Draperies, 
Women's Ready-made 
Garments . . . 



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J. W. McCLELLAN 



Hollbrook ^^ 
McClcllan 
& Jones... 

FRESH BUTTER, COUNTRY PRODUCE 

Boiled Boneless Hams. Eggs, 
Poultry, Sliced Hams, etc.' 



STORE 
'PHONE 

746 



DEALERS IN 



STALL 64, MARKET HOUSE 

'PHONE 24-7 



NASHVILLE 



JUNGERMAN Q ROGERS ^^03- 

ANdRUoI ^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ PUBLIC SQUARE 



Pianos ^ Organs 



SHEET MUSIC 
SMALL . . . ' 
INSTRUMENTS 



531-533 
CHURCH STREET 



Frank G. Fite 



NASHVILLE, TENN. 



We engrave plate and print Hmi Visiting Cards 
for ?-_',(H). 

PAYNE STATIONERY CO. 

STATIONERS . . 
AND ENGRAVERS 

Always consult us for l.-itust slyk-s 

217 N. SUMMER ST., NASHVILLE, TENN. 



DeMatteo 
&Bro. 

^^Fruits and 
Candies 

157 N. Spruce St., cor. Church 



A BRIGHT SPOT 

THE tedium of daily routine and rigid 
discipline is a penalty of school life 
doubly wearing on "the boarders," 
who cannot enjoy those pri\'ileges and in- 
dulgences of hon'ie which are afforded the 
local student. But there are oases where 
all restraint is laid aside and one is al- 
lowed the pleasure of her own inclina- 
tions. It is on "shopping day " the college 
maid asserts her feminine characteristics, 
with the liberty of indulging to the extent 
of her purse. As the cultivation of art 
and love for the beautiful is part of the 
course at Ward's, a shopping tour always 
liLL^ins nt the handsome retail department 
■ t ilK PHILLIPS & BinORFF MFG. CO. All 
llial i^ l)L-autiful and comfortable for the 
hfime, including the choicest art impor- 
tations from the best-known European 
manufacturers, may be found in this ideal 
stcjre, and the reasonable prices named, 
the solicitous attention accorded, together 
with the lavish splendor of the entire 
building, render the visit a profitable and 
pleasurable experience, dear to the heart 
of ever\- girl destined for the successive 
planes of sweetheart, wife, and mother. 
Meiiiiiries of Cut Glass, Toilet Ware, and 
i;iic-:i l.i.ic of love's early days will min- 
l;U w iUi thoughts of Stoves and Ranges. 
Dinner Sets, and outfits for dining rooms, 
kitchens, laundries, and dairies, and in- 
clijie her thoughts to this establishment, 
no matter where her path may lead. 



CAMERAS ^ PHOTO SUPPLIES 

Finishing a Specialty 

DUNCAN R. DORRIS 

Bicycles ^ Sundries 

153 NORTH SPRUCE ST. 



l'l>to-date Soda Fountain Servii 



Robt. L. Eves, M. D. 



PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 



OPPOSITE TULANE HOTFL 



T. J. MOONEY & CO. 
..Plumbing 

617 CHURCH ST. 



JOY & SON 

Florists 

604 CHIRCH ST. 



HERBRICK & LAWRENCE 

%^ Heating and 
k^ Electrical 
Engineers 

FINE PLUMBING 

607 CHURCH ST. 



thelemgDRY goods house of the south 



NEWEST GOODS ,jy<- -*».v SQUARE DEALING 

-^=^ \f^ A beautiful >J^^ ^^^ 

<fr vancu-ofwinscne ^, 



TRUNKS I™ -I VALISES 



^■^^m^i^ 



LARGEST VARIETY ^rt-i'V-W^ LOWEST PRICES 



MATTINGS 



THE GASTNER-KNOTT DRY GOODS GO. carpets 



SUMMER STREET, NASHVILLE 



RAILROADS ^^ trunk line connections RAILROADS 

-- NASHVILLE -- 

THE GREAT SCHOOL CENTER 

IS EASILY ACCESSIBLE FROM AF.L POINTS OF THE COMPASS 

W^ARD SEMINARY FOR YOIINO LADIES 

THE GREAT CENTRAL SCHOOL FOR YOUNG WOMEN 

HAS Pri'IV.S 'I'lIIS YKAR I-'KOII POINTS ON THE FOI,I.O\\'IX( ', WHIJ.-KXOWN RAILROADS 

NASHVILLE, CHATTANOOGA & ST. LOUIS ILLINOIS CENTRAL TEXAS & PACIFIC 

LOUISVILLE & NASHVILLE COTTON BELT HOUSTON & TEX. CENT. 

SOUTHERN RAILWAY IRON MOUNTAIN MISSOURI PACIFIC 

QUEEN & CRESCENT CHOCTAW & MEMPHIS M., K. &T. ("KATY") SANTA FE 
MOBILE & OHIO INTERNATIONAL & GREAT NORTHERN FRISCO 

NORFOLK & WESTERN CENTRAL OF GEORGIA PLANT SYSTEM SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

WARD SEMINARY PUTItS arc assured every COMFORT and COURTESY froui all I.ocal and General Agents of these LINES 



ii 



He the -Class cf 1^00 
XOard ^eminari( 

Perhaps no mercantile establishment in the world conies in 
such close relations of friendliness and acquaintanceship with 
young ladies of any institution of learning as we have with 
"Ward's Girls" during the past year. It has always been 
our aim to extend a welcome to the faculty and students of 
this great and deservedly recognized institution that would 
make them feel when in our store that ' ' this is a tempo- 
rary home." We believe we have succeeded. Each young 
lady, by her sweet ways and ladylike demeanor, has en- 
deared herself to us. May all of them find naught but 
happiness through life, and remember that letters from 
each when they reach home will be held in high esteem 

by 

Their friends, 

L. JONAS & Co. 

THE PALACE NASHVILLE, TENN.