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Full text of "Irish pedigrees; or, The origin and stem of the Irish nation"

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lllllllillMII 

60001 a034M 



OPINIONS 

ON THE 

FIRST SERIES OF ** IRISH PEDIGREES." 



I. — Writing to the Author, Sir T. M. Biddulph is pleased to say : 

Buckingham Palaoe, 25th Jannary, 187C. 
lienten^nt-General Sir T. M. Biddnlph is desired to acknowledge 
Mr. O'Hart's Letter to the Queen ; and the copy of his ** Irish 
Pedigrees", which Her Majesty graciously accepts. 

John O'Hart, Esq., 

Ringsend School, Dublin. 



IL — Sir J. Bernard Burke, Uister King of Arms : 

Dublin Castle, 18th January, 1S76. 
Mr Dear Mr. O'Hart, 

1 waited, until I had read your Book, to write my thanks for the 

handsome copy you have sent me. I now do so most warmly ; and I 

can, at the same time, add my high appreciation of your work. It 

is full of interest to the genealogical and historic student, and will, 

I trust, circulate largely. I am sending a copy to my friend. Garter 

King of Arms. 

Ever, my dear sir, yours sincerely, 

(Signed) 

J. Bernard Burke, Ulster, 



III,— Her Grace, The Duchess of Marlborough : 
A work of great interest and research. 



IV. — His Grace, The Duke of Leinster : 

The work appears to be most carefully compiled, and will be of 
much use in tracing the descents of Irish families. 



11, OPINIONS 

V. —The Bight Hon. Lord O'Haoan : 

Dear Mb. O'Hakt, 

I have been absent from town, or I shonld sooner bave acknow- 
ledged yonr kind note, and tbe interesting and valnable work yon 
have been so good as to send to me. I am mncb obUged for it ; and 
althoagb I have only bad time to glance through some portions of it, 
I have seen enough to recognise the great industry and yarious re- 
search which it displays ; and I trust it will prove an important con- 
tribution to the history and philology of Ireland. I very sincerely 
wish to the publication a high and deserved success. 

I am, dear Sir, faithfully yours, 

O'Haoan. 



VI.— W. H. Nkwkll, LL.D. : 

I am much obliged for your copy of " Irish Pedigrees", which is 
full of interest, and may fairly be termed a handbook to Irish Genea- 
logies. The extracts in the Appendix are most instructive. 



TIL—Tht Rev. John O'Hanlon, C.C., Dublin : 

You seem to have drawn the " Irish Pedigrees" most conscien- 
tiously and researchfully from the very best sources. Its arrangement 
is most judiciously planned, and yon have admirably contrived to 
render an abstruse subject both readable and intelligible. 



VIII.— /Vo/e««or John 8tuaat Blackie, University of Edinburgh : 

Your "Irish Pedigrees" contains excellent materials for history 
and Philology. 



IX. — Professor Geddes, University of Aberdeen: 
The work contains a large amount of information on the genealogies 
of the Gael. 



X.— The Gkafhig : '< Mr. O'Hart's * Irish Pedigrees' is written 
with much care and labour." 



• • • 



OF THE »BESS. Ul. 

XI.' -Irish Tbachsrs' Journal : ''There can be no second 
opinion am to the reaearchf industry, and ability displayed in the 
work." 



XII. — (Liverpool) XJnitjed Irishmak : " Onr generation has wit- 
nessed a great disentombment of the almost forgotten chronicles of 
onr race, and amongst the many works of the various scholars and 
antiquaries who have laboured in this direction, Mr. O'Hart's book 
is one of the most valuable.'' 



Xin.--GALWAY Vindicator : "By unveiling the Irish Genea- 
logies, Mr. O'Hart has rendered good service to his country." 



XIV. — ^Waterford News : *' The author deserves the lasting 
gratitade of the Irish Nation, for publishing, at so much expense, 
■ach a work." . 



XV. — BoacoMMON Messenger : " With the exception of the 
Jews, there was, we believe, no other race on earth who trace their 
lineage to so remote an antiquity as can the descendants of Heber, 
Ir, and Heremon. Thanks to Mr. O'ELaii;, they have now a new 
start in the pages of history, and will come down to posterity as 
fresh as those who have succeeded them by a thousand years." 



XVL — Irish Educational Journal : "The learned author ex- 
hibits in every page a knowledge of his subject not always to be met 
with in treatises on Genealogy." 



XVIL — ^Ballina Herald : " The ' Pedigrees' display an astonish- 
ing amount of research, and are concisely put and admirably arranged 
by the author." 



IV. OPINIONS 

XVin. — Irish Timbs : ** Mr. O'Hart claims for his book no more 
than that it is a carefully and honestly-made compilation from the 
works of the highest authority. The author proves incontestably 
that Queen Victoria is of Irish lineal descent, and gives the ' Stem 
of the Royal Family' at considerable length, tracing Her Majesty's 
pedigree back to the father of the human race ... As a book 
of reference Mr. O'Hart's work will be found very useful to the Irish- 
man imbued with proper affection for the history of his race." 



XIX.— Kilkenny Journal : " This work is one of surpassing in- 
terest, not only to Irishmen, but to all students of Celtic History. 
The learned author has left nothing undone to render his work 
perfect." 



XX. — Wexford People : " Mr. O'Hart's book is an admirable 
production. It would seem to us to be not only the result of a 
labour of love, but of the labour of a whole lifetime combined there- 
with. The intimate knowledge beginning with family history, and 
developing into national history, which it displays, is truly wonder- 
ful." 



XXI. — ^Northern Whig : ''The author actually traces the Grenea- 
logy of the Irish race from the creation of man— from Adam down to 
the present day." 



XXII.— Liverpool Mercury: "The volume is the result of a 
considerable amount of careful research, which has enabled the 
compiler to bring to light many hidden and curious historical 
records." 



XXIII. — Clare Advertiser : " We have now before us one of 
the most valuable and interesting Irish works perhaps ever pub- 
lished . . . There is a pleasing simpliiication of abstruse terms 
which is calculated to enhance its value manifold beyond the general 
range of historical Irish works . * . The root and stem and wide- 



OP THE PRESS. V. 

extending branches of the Irish nation are given with great succinct- 
netn and clearness, from Adam and from Noah down to the 17th 
centnry. But perhaps one of the strangest items in this most 
valoable repertoire of Irish antiquity, is that showing how her 
Majesty, the Queen, derives her lineal descent from a branch of the 
author's family ... No matter what page the book is opened at 
— ^from the Preface to the Appendix, the reader is sure to find some- 
thing interesting, attractive, and novel. The typography is faultless, 
the binding and gilding chaste, grand, firm, and substantial. . . . 
It is a volume which deserves to get wide circulation." 



XXIV. — Limerick Chronicle : ** The author has shown an un- 
flagging, and, indeed, a laudable zeal, in disinterring from half 
mouldered manuscripts an amount of information relative to the 
antecedents of the old Irish families . . . Mr. O'Hart's industry is 
most commendable. His work certainly leaves nothing to be desired. 
We would commend to the interest of our readers an admirable 
Appendix, which contains a great deal of information relative to the 
general antiquities of the country, and adds considerably to the worth 
of the volume." 



XXV.— Banbridgb Chronicle: "Altogether, Mr. O'Hart's 
volume is a notable example of research and learning on this parti- 
cular subject . . . We may express a hope that his diligence ' 
will be requited by that full measure of success which it thoroughly 
deserves." 



XXVI. — MuNSTER News: "One of the most interesting and 
reliable works on Irish Pedigrees which has appeared this century." 



XXVII.— (The English) Catholic Times: "A book that will 
delight countless thousands of Irishmen all over the world." 



XXVIII.— Limerick Reporter : "A book which is likely to be 
referred to henceforward as the standard authority on the very in- 
tereeting subject on which it so exhaustively and satisfactorily treats. 



VI. OPINIONS 



It supplies a long-felt want in Irish antiquarian literature, in which 
nothing exactly like it exists . . . Mr. O'Hart's book, to describe 
it in a few words, is the sum and substance, theflos et meduUa, the 
concentrated essence of all the best works on the subject of 
Pedigrees.'* 



XXIX.>-Belfast News Letter : " We cordially commend Mr. 
O' Hart's book, and congratulate him on the compilation of a work of 
such laborious investigation,** 



XXX.—- (The London) Daily TsLEaRAPH : '\ Appears to be care- 
fully and intelligently compiled.** 



XXXI. — Nation : *' An interesting and valuable compilation.** 



XXXII. — Dublin Freehands Journal: /'It has our warmest 
conmiendation, and deserves an extensive circulation.** 



J 

XXXIII.— Forney's Sunday Chronicle (Washington) : '' It has 

long been conceded that the chronicles of Ireland reached back into 

a past much more remote than those of any other State of Western 

Europe.** 



XXXIV.— Weekly Public Otikiov (Treston, N.J., America): 
''The bearing of the Celtic language and literature upon modem 
civilization, and its influence in moulding the character of the people 
who inhabit the British Isles and the United States, is not only 
little understood here (in America), it is scarcely dreamed of ; and 
yet the cursory reading of this erudite but popular work acquaints 
us at once with facts of the most profound interest and importance. 
In the development of the personal history of the Irish people, we 
are carried back to the origin and stem of the Irish nation, and find 
in it a past as remote and well*anthenticated as that of the 
Hebrews.** 



OF THE PBE88. TU. 

XXXV. — Clare Journal : '' Will serve as a nseful adjunct to the 
stady of the ancient history of our country, combined with a 
knowledge of families at present in existence, who are of purely 
Irish lineage and descent, as well as those who from time to time in 
the natural order of things settled in Ireland, and who cannot lay 
claim to Milesian blood. Every one anxious to trace the origin of 
his name and the family from which he sprung should procure a 
copy of this work ; as, from its excellent arrangement, with a little 
study, he will be able to trace such.'' 



XXX VI.— Dttmfrus Standard : *' What a lot of venerable tomes 
and other archasological treasures the author must have levied tribute 
upon to realize such a product of labour and research as the work 
now before us ! Many years must have been spent by him in gather- 
ing materials, and in properly assorting the same, so as to make it 
the finished article such as we see it — a learned, yet popular delinea- 
tion of the Irish race as seen through the mists of tradition away 
far back to the remotest times, and through the more reliable medium 
of the historical era." 



XXXVII.— Dublin Medical Press : " Mr. O'Hart's genealogical 
deductions are by no means mere speculations, but rather the records 
of facts, of which there exists good evidence." 



XXXVIIL— Boston Pilot : "Mr. 0*Hart has collected, systepia- 
tised, and digested the erudite dkjecta memJbra which lay scattered 
over many a volume. In <;hia we repeat he deserves the applause 
and patronage of his Celtic readers on both sides of the Atlantic . . . 
He zealized the situation with the fervour of a Celt, and the ken of a 
HnnaehU : between the covers of his book will be found more 
infoimation on Irish family names than ever was accessible to the 
ordinary English reader before." 



Viii. OPINIONS OP THE PRESS. 

XXXIX.— Inverness Highlander : " Until we recover our own 
lost MSS., there ia no doubt we shall have to depend, to a very large 
extent, upon the vast and valuable MS. materials still existing in 
Ireland, for a large portion of our history. This is made very ap- 
parent by Mr. Skene ixx his "Celtic Scotland"; and by Dr. 
Maclauchlan in his various works. The same fact is indirectly sup- 
ported by a great deal in Campbell's " West Highland Tales", as 
well as in the Leahhar na-Feinne. . . . Literature, however, is 
doing again what proximity and consanguinity did long ago, in putting 
ourselyes and the Irish on good terms. There are now few literary 
men of any weight who indulge in the rabid hatred of everything 
Irish, which still characterizes the uneducated and the selfish. 



XL.--CORK Examiner : " This admirable book of pedigrees brings 
to light the origin of many families hitherto hidden in obscurity. 
Irish names have for centuries been so distorted that without such 
a book as Mr. O'Hart's it would be quite impossible to get at the 
roots of Irish family trees. When Irishmen with fine old Irish sur- 
names go to liye in England, they generally become ashamed (Heaven 
knows why ! ) of their Celtic origin, and by twisting their surnames 
try to make people believe that they *' came over with the Con- 
querors", or some other personage of doubtful character ... In 
Mr. O'Hart's book there is a large amount of information, such as 
will be interesting to every Irishman." 



XLI.— Irish American : "iMr. O'Hart has undertaken a work that 
is really national in its scope ; and he should receive cordial aid from 
all who take pride in deriving their origin from the old land. As one 
of the oldest peoples, with a historical record, in the civilized world, 
our family pedigrees constitute an heirloom of inestimable value ; 
and we cannot afford to be indifferent to anything that tends to 
establish and strengthen the evidence of their authenticity. Mr. 
O'Hart has done much to rescue from oblivion the records of so 
many families of our old race, — all traces of whom were being lost 
in the vicissitudes to which all who remained faithful to " Faith and 
Fatherland" were exposed in Ireland*" 



IRISH PEDIGEEES; 

OR, 

THE ORIGIN AND STEM 

OF THE 

IRISH NATION. 

(second series.) 

BY 

JOHN O'HART, Q.U.I., 

FELLOW OF THE ROYAL HISTORICAL AND ARGHiBOLOOIOAL 

ASSOCIATION OF IRELAND ; 

AUTHOR OF ''THE LAST PRINCES OF TARA/' ETC. 



** Thus shall memory often, in dreams sublime, 
Catch a glimpse of the days that are over ; 

Thus, sighing, look through the waves of time, 
For the long-faded glories they coyer." 

— Moore. 



EiUered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1878, by Jtichard 
Oulahan, of Washington^ D,C., in the office of the Libraiian of 

Congress, at Washington. „ -^ --^ 

J -"I \-'' " ' - • 



DUBLIN: '. OEC ff7d 



M. H. GILL & SON, 50, UPPER SAClC¥IjLLE STRE 




JAS. DUFFY A SONS, 15, WELLINGTON QUAY, (AW^/PfflMRdSTBR 

ROW, LONDON): i— .-r^ ^ 

W. fl. SMITH A SON, 86 A 8(), MIDDLE ABBEY STREET. 
LONDON: WHITTAKER A CO.; SIMPKIN, MARSHALL A GO, 
EDINBURGH: JOHN MifiNZIES. 
NEW YORK : SOLD BY D. A J. BADLEIR, 31, BARCLAY STREET; 
P. M. HAVERTY, 27, BARCLAY ST.; and SCRIBNER, ARMSTRONG A Ca 

743 A 745, BROADWAY. 

1878. 
All Rights Reserved, 



2/r. /. f;^^ 



ENTSRED AT STATIONERS* HALL. 



DUBLIN: GEORGE HEALY, STEAM PRINTER, 20, LOWER ORMOND QUAY. 



PREFACE. 



In the first series of this Work, published in 1876, I pro- 
mised that, if God spared me, T would, so far as I could, 
complete Irish PEDiaRKEs ; this book is that promised 
Tolume. 

As my first series'^ had withstood the strictest scrutiny, 
I asked the permission of 8ir J. Bernard Burke, Ulster 
King of ^rms — himself a distinguished Genealogist, 
to compare my Notes with O'Ferrall's Linea Antiqua : to 
see if the genealogies which I had traced for my second 
series would agree with those recorded in the copy of that 
excellent work preserved in the Office of Arms. With that 
flowing courtesy for which he has ever been proverbial. 
Sir Bernard not only granted me that permission, but also 
the permission to inspect Sir William Betham's enlarged 
edition of the Linea Antlqiia, and any ancient record in 
the Office of Arms bearing on my subject. For that kind- 
ness and courtesy I desire to record my grateful acknow- 
ledgments. I think it right to observe that, in my care- 
ful inspection of those valuable records, I found that the 
genealogies which I had traced agreed more fully with 
those recorded in the splendid volumes of the '< Betham 
Collection'*, than with those in OTerrall's Linea Antiqua. 

* Series : Where reference ia made in this book to " first series", it 
meaas the first volume or series of this Work; and it ma^ be well to 
mention that the word in [bracket], in this or the first series, is meant 
to simplify the pronunciation of the word which precedes it. 



4 PREFACE. 

I have also studied with great advantage Burke's << Peerage 
and Baronetage**, and his <' Landed Gentry", which are 
full of valuable genealogical information. The knowledge 
which I thus gleaned, together with the varied informa- 
tion I obtained from the ** Annals of the Four Masters", 
Funeral Entries, Inquisitions, and other public records, 
as well as from private authentic sources — all enabled me 
to ^' complete^ this series, such as it is ; and to continue 
some of the Genealogies down to the present time. Oi", 
to use the language towards me of the friendly reviewer in 
the ** Boston Pilot*' (see ante), I have ** collected, systema- 
tized, and digested the disjecta membra which lay scattered 
over many a volume.** 

Already I have collected in this Work three hundred 
and twenty-seven Genealogies, namely : fifty-one of the 
House of Heber ; six of the House of Ith ; twenty- eight of 
the House of Ir ; two hundred and eight of the House of 
Heremon; and thirty-four of Anglo-Norman families. But 
almost every one of those Genealogies is a stem from 
which branch many other families whose pedigrees I have 
not yet traced ; but, if I am spared, I hope to throw 
more light on the subject, in a future edition. 

Of the reviews of the first series which have reached 
me, not one was adverse ; although it was thought that, 
because ** Irish Pedigrees** must necessarily bring to light 
a portion, at least, of Ireland's past sad history, some of 
the English press would review it in a hostile spirit. This 
was not the case ; for, my Work, while imveiling the 
Irish Genealogies, subserves no sect or party. 

At all times the subject of Genealogies must command 
the respect and attention of both rich and poor ; on ac- 



PBEFACE. 5 

count of tbe intimate bearing it has upon the individual, 
together with the tribes, people, nation, and family to 
ivhich he belongs. So it was in the past •; and so it ever 
shall be. The ancient Romans were fond of having the 
statues of their illustrious ancestors in prominent places, 
so as to animate themselves to deeds of virtue and valour ; 
and also that the memory of them would shed lustre on 
their descendants. Even our blessed Saviour would con- 
descend to have his genealogy, according to the flesh, 
traced up and left on record : the Evangelist St. Matthew 
traces it back to Abraham ; the Evangelist St. Luke, back 
to our First Parents. And we are told by St. Jerome that, 
in his own day, the boys in the very streets of Jerusalem 
could name their ancestors up to Adam. 

The ancient Irish were not behind other nations in this 
respect ; for, accordiag to O'Donovan, in the Miscellany of 
tJie Celtic Society (1849)— 

" Those of the lowest rank among a great tribe traced and retained 
the whole line of their descent with the same care which in other 
nations was peculiar to the rich and great ; for, it was from his own 
genealogy each man of the tribe, poor as well as rich, held the 
charter of his civil state, his right of property in the cantred in 
which he was bom, the soil of which was occupied by one family or 
clan, and in which no one lawfully possessed any portion of the sop 
if he was not of the same race as the chief." 

Up to the end of the sixteenth century — or as long as 
the '^ Tanist Law'"'' remained in force in Ireland, collec- 
tions of authentic Irish pedigrees existed ; in one or other 
of which was carefully registered the birth of every mem- 
ber of a sept, as well of the poor as of the rich, and by 

* Tanigt-Lavo : See *' The Laws of Tanistry" in the Appendix of 
the first series of this Work. 



6 PREFACE. 

which was determined the portion of land to be allotted 
for the sustenance of each head of a family and of those 
dependent on him. All those local records have disap- 
peared : when, by the conquest of Ireland, they ceased to 
be useful for their own speqial purpose, they would natur- 
ally be neglected ; and, in all probability, have most of 
them perished. But, before they disappeared, they doubt- 
less formed the basis of the genealogical collections made 
by MacFirbis, O'Clery, Keating, and in O'Ferrall's Linea 
Antiqtia. 

" A time came", writes the author of T/te Life and Letterts of 
Florence MacCarthy Mor^ ''when it was of importance for the con- 
cxuerors of Ireland to know something of the native families from 
whom they must expect irreconcileable hostility, or might hope for 
allegiance ; and ont of this necessity arose a new valne for all 
Genealogical records, present and past, which had not yet perished. 
The attention of English official personages in Ireland, towards the 
close of the sixteenth century, was, in a marked manner, directed 
towards the recovery of such documents ; and able statesmen like 
Sir George Carewe, then President of Munster ; Lord Burgley, and 
Sir Hobert Cecyll ; Irish supporters of the Government, like the 
Earl of Thomond ; official legal persons, as Kichard Hadsor ; and, as 
Dr. O'Donovan asserts, paid spies, employed by the lord deputies, 
greatly contributed to the preservation of Irish pedigrees, and, truth 
to say, greatly also to the inaccuracies and confusion in which so 
many collections abound. From wills and lawsuits — customary 
sources of genealogical evidence, little information could be expected 
amongst a people who had no power of disposing of the portion of 
sept-lands which they held during life, and whose contentions when 
not settled by the sword, were pleaded and decided orally by 
Brehons on hill-sides under the open heavens, and which were 
little likely to be placed on permanent record : hence the more 
diligence would be needed by spies or official persons for acquiring 
the information, past or present, desired by the English Govern- 
ment." 



PREFACE. 7 

As mentioned in the Preface of the first series, it was 
my happiness, when searching for my own family pedi- 
gree, to meet with ancient Irish Manuscripts (some of 
which were long considered as lost), from which, in 1878, 
I compiled my '* Last Princes of Tara"* ; and which 
form the basis of this work. In addition to the other 
authorities mentioned in that Preface which aided me in 
my research, I am since indebted to the Very Eev. Canon 
Ulick J. £ourke*s '' Aryan Origin of the Gaelic Race and 
Language" : Longmans, Green & Co., London ; the 
Lectures on Ancient Irish History, by the eminent Irish 
Scholar, the Key. David £• Mulcahy, Lisburn ; and the 
Eight Rev. Dr. O'Brien's Irish Dictionary : Paris, 1768. 

It may be asked — Why trace in this Work the genea- 
logy of the present Eoyal Family of Great Britain and 
Ireland ; since Queen Yigtobia's immediate ancestors were 
German Princes, in no way connected with Ireland. I 
would reply that, as Queen Victoria is of Irish lineal 
descent^ I have traced in Irish Pediobees Her Majesty's 
Lineage. And it is satisfactory to me to have to record 
that the Queen's Irish Hneal descent, as I trace it down 
from Heremon, son of Milesius of Spain, is the same as 
that compiled by the Eev. A. B. Grimaldi, M.A. ; and 
published! within the last month or two in London ! 

Lest the Irish genealogies might remain in the obscurity 
in which I found them, I published the first series at 
my own expense ; but, unaided, I was not prepared to 

* Last Princes of Tara : In that book I first traced the Irish lineal 
descent of Qaeen Victobia ; and my own family genealogy. 

t Published : The Leaflet in which Queen Victoria's lineal descent 
is traced by the Rev. Mr. Grimaldi, M.A., is published in London, 
by W. H. Gnest, 29, Paternoster Row. 



8 PREFACE. 

inenr the farther pecuniary responsibility of publishing 
this volume. Accordingly, I appealed to representatives 
of families whose genealogies are traced in the Work; 
soliciting subscriptions towards the printing expenses of 
the publication : in this series are inserted the names and 
addresses of those who, up to the date of going to press, 
responded to my appeal. Further subscriptions will be 
acknowledged in a future edition. 

In the ** Dedication** pages of this series I venture to 
show that the Gaels were the first inhabitants of Great 
Britain ; that there is not that difference in race between 
Gelt and Teuton which many have supposed ; and that 
the Gaelic was the primeval language of Man I The ex- 
tracts from ancient Irish history given in the ^* Appendix" 
will, I hope, also prove instructive. 

The '< Exile of Erin", wherever his lot is cast, or the 
descendant of such exile who loves the land of his fathers, 
may find in this Work not only the lineage of his family, 
but also perhaps the name of the territory once possessed 
by his ancestors in the ** Old Country.** 

In compiling the first series my object was simply to 
''unveil" the genealogies therein recorded; and to spell 
the names so that they might the more easily be pro- 
nounced by the reader unacquainted with the Irish lan- 
guage. In preparing the materials for this series, however, 
I saw the great help it would render to the Science of 
Comparative Philology, were I to give in its correct ortho- 
graphy each Irish proper name mentioned in the Work. 
With that view I revised, de novo^ all my notes ; and, 
errors excepted, have written the personal names and sir- 
names therein recorded as they were spelled in the Irish 



PBEFAGS. 9 

language. To the Philologist and Ethnologist the study of 
these Irish proper names will disclose a mine of anti- 
quarian wealth more precious, in my opinion, than any 
of the rich antiquities discovered in Assyria, Mycente, or 
the Troad. 

In the first series it is shown that, in the eleventh cen- 
tury, '< simames'* (or ^iV^-names) were first adopted in 
Ireland ;v until that time every Irish personal name was 
significant, and was sometimes rendered more so by the 
application of some surname or epithet. The English 
meaning of the Irish name, or epithet, from which each 
Irish simame is derived, is, in almost every instance, here 
given ; and, in some cases, I trace the epithet or its cog- 
nate in others of the ancient languages, to show that the 
Gaelic Irish speech is connected in sisterhood with the 
most venerated languages in the world. 

The reader who looks through the *' Index of Sir- 
names", in this and the first series, will find in the body 
of the work (where I give the derivation of the names), 
that many families are of Irish descent who have long 
been considered of foreign extraction : for, dispossessed in 
former times of their territories in Ireland, by more power- 
ful families than their own, or by the Danish, or English 
invasion, members of some Irish families settled in Great 
Britain, or on the continent ; and, from time to time after- 
wards, descendants of such persons, with their simames so 
twisted, translated, or disguised, as to appear of English 
or Anglo-Norman origin, came to Ireland in the ranks of 
its invaders — ^in the hope that, if they succeeded in its 
conquest, they would, as many of them did, receive from 
the Conquerors some of the Irish estates confiscated in 
those unhappy times in Ireland. 



10 PBEFAGK. 

It has been said that the Irish genealogies cannot be 
authentic ; because, it is alleged, that, so late as 1809, the 
Irish did — 

Plough their horses by the tail, 
And thresh their oats by fiery flail ; 

and that therefore they must have been then so ignorant 
that they were unable to preserve their genealogies. No 
doubt, compared with our present advanced civilization 
and improved agricultural machinery, those were primitive 
modes of ploughing and threshing ; but it does not follow 
that, even if, in 1809, the Irish ** ploughed their horses by 
the tail", no genealogical records then existed in Ireland. 
De Vere, in his Antar and Zara (London : Henry S. 
King & Co. 1877), says : 

" On examining the material records still existing, we find abun- 
dant proofs of the antiquity of Irish civilization. The traces of the 
husbandman's labour remain on the summit of hills which have not 
been cultivated within the records of tradition ; and the implements 
with which he toiled have been found in the depth of forest or bog." 

It has been also stated that, ''the names, dates, and 
events recorded by the old Irish annalists from the earliest 
times down to the third century were mere fiction.'* A 
great admission, however, in the statement is — that there 
were old annalists who recorded the history of the Irish 
nation, before the third century. I admit that errors and 
inaccuracies existed in some of the ancient Irish annals, 
as well as in the annals of other coimtries ; for, we are 
told that the compilers of the << Psalter of Tara", in the 
reign of the Irish Monarch King Cormac Mac Art (who 
died, A.D. 266), were strictly enjoined by him to purge 



PBEFAGE. 11 

that celebrated work of all matter which could not be well 
authenticated. Of that Monarch the Annals of the Four 
Masters say : 

** It was this Cormac, son of Art, that collected the chroniclers of 
Ireland to TeamJiatr ('^Tara"), and ordered them to write the 
chronicles of Ireland in one book, which was named the Saltair 
Teamhra^h (anglicised ** The Psalter of Tara"). In that book were 
entered the coeval exploits and synchronisms of the Kings of Ireland 
with the Kings and Emperors of the world ; and of the Kings of 
the provinces, with the Monarchs of Ireland." 

The ** Book of Ballymote", preserved in the Royal Irish 
Academy ; and the Leabhar Buidhe Leacan (or **The Yellow 
Book of Leacan"), in Trinity College, Dublin, say that a 
noble work was performed by Cormac Mac Art, at that 
time : namely, the compilation called Gormac^s Saltair. 

In Keating*s History of Ireland, by 0*Mahony, it is^ 
said : 

" This Cormac (Mac Art) was, indeed, one of the wisest Monarchs 
that ever possessed Ireland. Of this fact let his Tegasg Righ (or 
' Book of Precepts for Kings'), which was transcribed by his son, 
Carbri Lificar, bear testimony, as well as the many other praise- 
worthy institutes, named from him, that are stiJl to be found in the 
books of the Brehon Laws.'* 

Copies of the Tegasg Righ are yet extant in the ** Book 
of Leinster" and in the << Book of Ballymote" ; and trans- 
lated extracts from it are given in the first volume of the 
•* Dublin Penny Journal", by Dr. O'Donovan. Of Cormac 
Mac Art,-^' the learned OTlaherty also writes : 

* Cormac Mac Art : For a further account of King Cormac Mac 
Art see Notes under No. 82, pages 110, 111, 112, 113, first series ; and 
'* Cormac's Palace at Tara'^ m the Appendix to this volume. It may 
be permitted the humble writer of tnese pages to say that (see No. 
82, pa^e 136, first series,) he is the lineal descendant of that once 
illustrious Monarch. 



12 

** Ifuf ^am%, ^Kkyii^ tor ihe pnlilje sood, were Berer abrogated 

In ilmr wonderfdl eompilaiion« known &s the Annul a 
liuM/fuu'hta Kireann (or the Annnlfi of the Kmgdom of 
Irekfid), the ** Four MsBien" esrefallj pniged of fable 
And fiction the other Manoseript materials (written since 
the *^ Pnalter of Tara** was compiled) which, daring sixteen 
years, they had collected for the purpose of compiling 
those *^ Annals ** Besides : the brief plain style of rer 
cording individuals and events, employed in the Annals of 
Ireland compiled by the '* Four Masters/* is, in itself, a 
convincing proof of their authenticity ; for, if they were 
the inventions olfictionf they would certainly display its 
deceptive embellishments, but could never present the 
pleasing simplicity and consistent chronological order 
which distinguish them. And, as facts stated in the 
AnnaUt IU(njhachUi Elreann have been amply corroborated 
by other Manuscripts contemporary with those facts ; and 
as the early Irish chronicles are remarkably confirmed 
by scienoe, as regards eclipses, astronomical calculations, 
etc., tljo works of the " Four Masters'* have justly been 
accepted by the most cautious arch(eologists as trustworthy 
and reliable. Hence have I adopted as trustworthy, the 
genealogies compiled by Michael 0*Clery, who was the 
principal of the ** Four Masters.** 

Scholars who are best acquainted with them contend 
that the Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland, compiled by 
the ** Four Masters**, are more reliable than even those of 
Greece ; which have been accepted, because of the accident 
of the Qreek language having been studied and encouraged 
by the Homans, wlio led the mind of Europe so long 



PBEFAGE. 1^ 

before and after the Christian era. But, as the greatest 
nations have often been the most ruthless in their treatment 
of conquered races, so it was with the ancient Eomans to- 
wards the nations which they subdued ; therefore it was 
that, through 6onquest, most of the countries of Europe, 
including Britain and Gaul, were forced to receive the 
Roman civilization. But, with Pagan Eome Ireland had 
no dealings ; she was, says De Yere, '< an Eastern nation 
iu the West ; her civilization was not military, it was 
patriarchal — ^whose type was the family, and not the army; 
it was a civilization of Clans". Olaudian, speaking of the 
battles of the Soman general Stilico with the Britons and 
Picts, and the Scots of Ireland, in the latter end of the 
fourth century,, says — 

Totam cum Scotns lemem, 

Movit et infesto spumavit remige Tethys. 

Which may be translated as follows : 

When the Soot moved all Ireland against us, and the ocean foamed 
with his hostile oars. 

'' Leagued with their countrymen in Scotland, and with 
the Picts", writes DeVere, ** the ancient Irish had repea- 
tedly driven back the Eomans behind their further wall, 
till they left the land defenceless.'' Therefore it was that 
Pagan Eome hated Ireland and its belongings. As the 
Eomans never conquered or attempted to invade Ireland, 
they had no interest to serve by studying the Irish lan- 
guage ; and, following in the footsteps of their masters, the 
Eoman-conquered nations learned to frown not only on 
the language of Ireland, but, on Ireland's admirable 
Philosophy. 



14 PREFACE. 

Ignorant of its worth in the domain of a Classical edu- 
cation, pome of the Irish people of to-day have, through 
/(uthlon, unhappily learned to despise their native tongue 
—the Gaelic language of Ireland : 

Long, long neglected Gaelic tongue, 

Thou'st died upon our Irish plains, 
Save some lingering sounds that stay. 

To tell us that a wreck remains. 
Our " hundred hills'' each bears a name — 

An echo from each vale is wrung 
Upon our ears — these bring with shame 

Remembrance of our native tongue. 

As if, howevei, the Celtic were the language of Destiny, 
philology has come to its rescue. Of that science the 
Rev. Canon Bourke writes : 

** The Lectures of Max Muller and Matthew Arnold, at Oxford ; 
-of G^ddes, at Aberdeen ; Blackie, at Edinburgh ; the published 
works of Prichard and Pictet ; of Cox and Nigra ; of Sir Henry 
Sumner Maine and of Mons. Q. Gaidoz in the JReime Celtique ; the 
publication at home of O'Curry's MS. Materials of Irish History ; 
the Essays and learned works on philology by W. K. SuUivan, have 
given the science in this country a pubUc status which it had never 
before the present time enjoyed. The German host of GaeHc lovers 
4ire found in the van of this wonderful movement.'' 

As showing that there is not that chasm between Celt 
and Teuton which ignorance, prejudice, and political dif- 
ferences in the past had placed between the two races in 
Great Britain and Ireland, Arnold says, in his Essays on 
the stmly of Keltic Literature : 

" There exists in the mind of many Englishmen, yea, and of many 
Irishmen in Ireland, such a sense of mutual repulsion, such a feeling 



PBEFAGE. 15 

of incompatibility, of radical antagonism between the two races that 
the Jews seemed, at least not long ago. nearer than the Gael to 
Englishmen ... I remember when I was young I was taught 
to think of Kelt as separated by an impassable gulf from Teuton ; 
my father in particular was never weary of contrasting them ; he in- 
aisted much ctftener on the separation between us (the English) and 
them (the Irish), than on the separation between us and any other 
race in the world . . . The sense of apathy to the Irish people, of . 
radical estrangement from them, has visibly abated amongst all the 
better part of us. I am inclined to think that the march of science 
— science insisting that there is no such original chasm between ua — 
has had an appreciable share in producing this changed state of 
feeling." 

The estrangement on the part of the Irish towards 
the English people was equally intense; for, I well 
remember having in my boyhood asked my mother, why, 
as she understood the English language, she did not speak 
it. Her reply to me, interpreted, was : 

" My child, I hate the English for the cruelties they inflicted on 
our people, since first they came to Ireland ; my heart can therefore 
never warm to the language of the Sacsanach,*^* 

Beyond what is revealed in the genealogies recorded in 
this Work, it is not my province to enter into the past sad 
history t of Ireland ; but the immortal Moore has mildly 



* Saewi7Mc/i : This word Saaanach, gen. Sacsanaigh [Saxony], is 
the Irish name for ''a Saxon", and " an Englishman." 

^Sad History. To their credit be it told, there are many benevolent 
Englishmen who candidly admit that, in the past. England inflicted on 
Ireland wrongs, for which honourable amends should now be made : 
among them, Mr. William Ewart Gladstone, M.P., late First Lord of 
the Treasury in the " Gladstone" Administration ; and Lord Ran- 
dolph Churchill, M.P., son of the amiable Duke of Marlboroudi, 
Her Majesty's Viceroy in Ireland, in 1877, under the " fieaconsfield'* 
(or Disraeli) Administration. 



16 PREFACE. 

told it in the following lines, which he hopefully inscribed 
to the Hero of Waterloo, as a distinguished Irishman : 

While History's Muse the memorial was keeping 
Of all that the dark hand of Destiny weaves, 
Beside her the Genius of Erin stood weeping, 

For liers was the story that blotted the leaves ; 
But oh ! how the tear in her eyelids grew bright. 
When, after whole pages of sorrow and shame, 
She saw History write, 
With a pencil of light 
That illumin'd the volume, Wellington's name! 

Yet still the last crown of thy toils is remaining, 

The grandest, the purest, even thou hast yet known; 
Though proud was thy task, other nations unchaining, 

Far prouder to heal the deep wounds of thy own. 
At the foot of that throne for whose weal thou hast stood, 
Go, plead for the land that first cradled thy fame — 
And, bright o'er the flood 
Of her tears and her blood, 
Let the rainbow of hope be her Wellington's name! 

BiMOSEND School, Dublin. 

J. CHART. 



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* Subscribers : As the first and second volumes which compose Irish 
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CONTENTS. 



Page. 



Opinions on the First Series of this Work, 



Preface, 




... ... «•• ... ••• ... 


• •■ 


• • • 


1 


Names of Subscribers, 


• •« 


• • ■ 


17 


Dedication, 


... ... ■•• ... •■• ... 


• •• 


• « • 


33 






PART I. 












The Line or House op Hbber : 








1. The 


Stem of the Clancy (of Munster) Family 


• •• 


• • • 


53 


2. 


>» 


Coghlan „ 


• • • 


■ ■ • 


54 


3. 


}> 


CuUen ,, 


• • • 


• • ■ 


65 


4. 


9* 


Curry „ 


• •• 


• • • 


55 


5. 


>• 


Downes „ 


• • • 


• • * 


56 


6. 


if 


Durkin „ 


• ■ a 


• • • 


57 


7. 


ft 


Hamilton (Duke of Abercom) Family 


• • • 


57 


8. 


9i 


Hanraghan (of Munster) 


ti 


«•• . 


59 


9. 


it 


Heffeman 


it 


• •• 


60 


10. 


ft 


Hickey 


a 


• •• 


60 


11. 


it 


Hogan 


n 


• ■ ■ 


61 


12. 


H 


Keely 


it 


« • • 


62 


13. 


>♦ 


Kennedy (of Munster) 


ti 


• ■ • 


62 


14. 


If 


MacAuliffe 


it 


• • • 


63 


15. 


f 
ii 


MacCarthy (Glas) 


it 


• •• 


63 


16. 


ti 


MacCarthy (Lords Muscry) 


ti 


• • • 


65 


17. 


tf 


MacCarthy (of Minnesota) 


>» 


• •• 


66 


18. 


ti 


MacGraith 


a 


• •• 


68 


19. 


it 


MacMahon (of Munster) 


a 


■ •• 


69 


20. 


a 


MacMahon (of France) 


• > 


• •• 


70 


21, 


it 


MacNamara 


>» 


• •« 


71 



22 CONTENTS. 











PAGE. 


22. 


The stem oCthc Macnamara (Fionu) 


Family. 


... 7a 


23. 


>» 


Maher 




... 4 3* 


24. 


>» 


Moriarty (of Munster) 




... 74 


25. 


»• 


O'Brien (continued) 




... 75 


26. 


»> 


. O'Brien (of Dromoland) 




... 76 


27. 


»» 


O'CaUaghan 




... 76 


28- 


>» 


O'CarroU (Ely) 




... 77 


29. 


»> 


O'CarroU (of Maryland) 




... 78 


30. 


»» 


O'Connell 




... 79' 


31. 


>r 


O'Dea 




... 79- 


32. 


>» 


O'Donoghue (of Lough Lein) 




... 80 


33. 


»» 


0*Donoghue (of the Glen) 




. . . o2«- 


34, 


» 


O'Donovan 




... 82 


35. 


»» 


O'Gara 




... 87 


36. 


)» 


O'Grady 




... 87 


a7 


>» 


P'Hara Buidhe [boy] 




... 89' 


38. 


» 


O'Hara Beagh 




... 90- 


39. 


i» 


O'Hara, of the Boutc 




... 91 


40l 


r> 


O'Keeflfe 




... 92: 


41. 


n 


0*Mahony 




... 92 


42. 


9f 


O'Snllivan Mor 




... «74 


43. 


t* 


O'Sullivan Beara 




... 95 


44. 


rr 


Plunkett 




... 95' 


45. 


>» 


Quin (of Munster) 




... vO ' 


46. 


«r 


Roughan 




... 97 


47. 


»f 


Slattery 




... 97 


48. 


>r 


Stewart 




... 97 


49. 


»r 


Stewart (of Maryland) 




... 100' 


50. 


>> 


Stuart 




... 101 


51. 


>» 


Trasey (of Munster) 




... 102 



PART II. 

The Line or House op Ith : 
(I.th was the Uncle of Milesius of Spain.) 

1. The Stem of the Barry Family. 103* 



CONTENTS. 



23 









PAGX. 


2. The stem of the Clancy (of Dartry) Family. 


... 104 


9. 




Coffey „ 


... 105 


4. 




Nicolson ,» 


... 107 


5. 




Nioolson (of Portree) „ 


... 108 


6. 




Nicholson (of America) „ 


... 109 


7. 




Nicholson (of Plymouth) , > 


... 110 


8. 




Nicolson (of London) „ 


... HI 


9. 




Nicholson (of Moreton-in-Marsh) Family 11^ 


10. 




Another Nicholson (of Plymouth) ,, 


... 112 


11- 




Nicholson (of Coleford) „ 


... 113 


12. 




O'DriscoU 


... 114 


13. 




O'Leary 


... 115 



PART m. 

Thx Link or Houie o* Ir : 



1. 


Thi Stem of the Cahill (of Clare) 


Fami 


2. 


n 


Curtin 


f > 


8. 


»f 


Dugan 


99 


4. 


t» 


Duncan 


9* 


5. 


9f 


Guinness 


» 


6. 


99 


Leayy 


)» 


7. 


)» 


Leydon 


>» 


8. 


>t 


Lynch 


>» 


9. 


»r 


MacArtan 


fy 


10. 


>» 


MacCartan (or Cartan) 


99 


11. 


)t 


MacGarry 


» 


IS. 


»» 


Manning 


)> 


13. 


» 


Moledy 


» 


14. 


ft 


Moore 


» 


15. 


>» 


Moran 


>9 


16. 


U 


Mulcahy 


f» 


17. 


*P 


Mulcahy (of Ardpaddeen) 


>f 


18. 


»* 


Mulcahy (of Eilkeany) 


ff 


19. 


)f 


Mulyy 


19 


20. 


»> 


O'Connor (Coroomroe) 


n 



lis 

117 
118 
118 
119 
119 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
125 
127 
127 
129 
130 
131 
181 



u 



COMTEMTS. 







PAGB. 


21. The stem of the 


O'C/onnor (Kerry) Family. 


... 133 


22. 


OTarrell „ ... 


... 133 


23. 


O'Loghlin (of Barren) „ ... 


... 133 


24. 


Quimi (coanty Longford) ,, ... 


... 1<54 


25. 


Beynolds „ ... 


... 136 


26. 


Kuddy „ ... 


... 137 


•7. »» 


Shanly „ ... 


... 137 


28. 


Ward „ ... 

PAET IV. 


... 138 



Ths Line or House of Heremon: 



i. The 


stem of the Agnew 


Fiimily 


... 


140 


2. 


it 


Allen 


)} 


... 


141 


3, 


•1 


Barnewall 


»> 


• «• 


141 


4. 


II 


Beatty 


»» 


... 


142 


fi. 


If 


Boland (of Ulster) 


>} 


... 


143 


0. 


II 


Boyle 


II 


... 


143 


7. 


i> 


Brady 


II 


..• 


144 


8. 


II 


Breen 


i> 


•.. 


144 


i*. 


II 


Breslin 


II 


... 


145 


KX 


II 


Bums 


91 


... 


145 


11, 


II 


Cairas 


91 


... 


146 


12, 


19 


Caine 


» 


,,. 


147 


18, 


l> 


Oallan 


99 


••a 


147 


14, 


»l 


CanaTan (of Connaugbt) 


II 


... 


147 


15, 


»> 


Canning 


»• 


„• 


148 


16, 


>» 


Carbery (of Offaley) 


•» 


as. 


148 


IT, 


» 


Carbeiy (cl Orgiall) 


»» 


... 


149 


18. 


» 


Carbery (ol Ulster) 


l» 


.aa 


149 


m 


»> 


Carlton 


» 


«•• 


149 


2XK 


» 


Caniey 


n 


• •• 


150 


21, 


»♦ 


C^nlfidd 


** 


«.» 


150 


22. 


>» 


Oo]|^ 


** 


— 


151 


5>a 


»• 


Coaeannoo 


» 


•*« 


151 







OOMTKNTS. 






ZD 








* 


PAGE. 


24.' 


res stem of theCoimellan 


Family. 


• •• 


152 


25. 


»> 


Conroy 


a 


• •• 


153 


26. 


»» 


Coouan 


>» 


■ • • 


154 


27. 


»» 


Corrigan 


it 


• •• 


155 


28. 


it 


Craig 


it 


*•• 


155 


29. 


9) 


Crean 


ii 


• •• 


156 


do. 


99 


CroUy 


i9 


• • • 


157 


31. 


n 


Cuimiiigham 


it 


■ • • 


158 


32. 


»» 


Daly 


9t 


• •• 


159 


33. 


n 


Davidson 


tt 


• •• 


160 


34. 


99 


Davin 


ti 


«•• 


161 


35. 


*9 


Dempsey 


ti 


• •• 


161 


36. 


9» 


Dempsey (Lords of Clanmaliere) „ 


• • • 


162 


37. 


9f 


Dignuni 


99 


• •• 


168 


38. 


>» 


DiUon 


» 


• •• 


164 


39. 


»> 


Dogherty 


it 


• •• 


166 


40. 


>» 


Donnellan (of Connaaght) 


tt 


■ • • 


168 


41. 


*9 


Donnellan (of Ulster) 


tt 


• • • 


169 


42. 


*» 


Donnelly 


ti 


• • « 


170 


43. 


r» 


Dowling 


it 


• •• 


170 


44. 


»» 


Duncan (Line of Heremon) 


a 


• •• 


171 


45. 


>» 


Dunlevy 


9i 


• ■• 


172 


46, 


w 


Dunne 


tt 


*•• 


174 


47. 


»> 


Dnnn (of Ards) 


99 


■ • • 


175 


48. 


»> 


Dwyer (of Leinster and Monster),, 


• •• 


175 


49. 


♦» 


Edmundson 


99 


• •• 


176 


50. 


» 


Egan 


99 


• •• 


177 


51. 


99 


Fallon 


tt 


• •• 


177 


52. 


f* 


Feehan 


99 


• •• 


178 


53. 


»» 


Felan 


it 


• •• 


179 


54. 


W 


Fihilly 


99 


• • • 


179 


55. 


M 


Finaghty 


)9 


• • • 


179 


56. 


it 


Fitzpatrick 


ii 


• •• 


180 


57. 


it 


Fogarty 


ti 


«•• 


180 


58. 


** 


Fox 


99 


*•• 


181 



z<$ 




00VTEVT8. 




















FA0K. 


69. This «tomoC the Flina (of Korthem Claniboy) Fumly 


■ ■■ 


182 


60, 


w 


GflUflgher 




r» 


•■• 


183 


6L 


#f 


Ganraly 




rf 


«•• 


184 


62. 


#f 


Carrey (of Oi^U) 




n 


■ •■ 


184 


6». 


»# 


Ganrey (of Tyrone) 




19 


■ ■• 


185 


64, 


#» 


Gayaa 




If 


• •• 


186 


60. 


»f 


Gawley 




9t 


••• 


186 


66. 


ft 


Geraghty 




19 


• •• 


186 


67. 


ft 


GUkeUy 




99 


• • • 


187 


68. 


ft 


Grimley 




l» 


• •• 


187 


60. 


M 


Hanly 




•1 


• •• 


188 


70. 


»» 


Haaraghan (of Leinflier) 




II 


• •• 


189 


71. 


>f 


Hargadan 




19 


• •• 


189 


72. 


M 


Harte 




tt 


• •• 


189 


78. 


ff 


Harte (of England) 




n 


• •• 


191 


74. 


f» 


Harte (of Glare, Limerick & Kerry) , 


f 


194 


76. 


*t 


Harte (of Gastleconnell) Family 


• •• 


196 


76. 


»> 


Henry 


>f 




• •• 


196 


77. 


W 


Higgins 


»» 




• • • 


197 


78. 


»» 


Holahan 


i» 




• •• 


199 


7D. 


»f 


Hoolahan 


n 




• •• 


199 


80. 


f» 


Hughes 


It 




• •• 


201 


81. 


»» 


Hynes 


ff 




• •• 


202 


82. 


ff 


Kane 


tr 




• •• 


202 


88. 


H 


Kavanagh 


II 




»*• 


204 


84. 


>l 


Keane (of Cappoquin) 


fr 




• •• 


205 


85. 


>» 


Kecnan 


f» 




••• 


206 


86. 


«» 


Keogh 


9* 




• •• 


206 


87. 


»> 


Kieman 


9* 




— • 


207 


8a 


9» 


KUbride 


f* 




• •• 


206 


89, 


>» 


Kinaela 


*» 




m^ 


209 


00, 


»> 


Lane (of Ulster) 


>» 




••• 


309 


Oh 


»» 


Larkin (of Ulster) 


»» 




— » 


210 


osr. 


.«» 


Lavan 


>» 




••• 


210 


09L 


»> 


Lawlor (of M<iMighan) 


»* 




— • 


210 


W. 


»• 


Loftua 


» 




•• 


210 



CONTENTS. 27 



95. The Stem of the Logan 
96. 



97. 

98. 

99. 
100. 
101. 
102. 
103. 
104. 
105. 
106. 
107. 
108. 
109. 
110. 
HI. 
112. 
113. 
114. 
115. 
116. 
117. 
118. 
119. 
120. 
121. 
122. 
123. 
124. 
125. 
126. 
127. 
128. 
129. 



t» 

if 

if 

99 

99 

»> 

99 

99 

n 
»• 

if 
a 
if 

a 

ff 

J9 
f» 
if 
» 

if 
it 
If 
if 

if 
>» 

}> 
>t 







PA.OE. 


Logan Family 




211 


Longan 






211 


Macaulay 






211 


MacBrannen 






212 


MacDermott 






2ia 


MacDonnell (of Clare) 






214 


MacDonoell (Earls of Antrim) Family. 


215 


MacDonnell (of Leinster) 


fi 


• • 


216 


MacDonnell (of Mayo) Family. 


• ■• 


217 


MacDonongh 




• • • 


217 


MacDonough (of Tirerill) 




• •• 


218 


MacDowall 




• «• 


218 


MacFetridge 




• •• 


219 


MacGeoghagan 




• •• 


219 


MacGillcanny 




• • • 


i22a 


MacGillfinen 




• •• 


221 


MacHale 




• •• 


221 


MacHngh 




• •• 


222 


M«icKeogh 




• •• 


i22» 


MacKeogh (of Derrylea) 




• •• 


22* 


MacMahon (of Dartry) 




• • • 


224 


MacManns 




• •• 


225 


MacMorough 




• •• 


226 


Macnamee 




• •• 


226 


Maconky 




• •• 


227 


MacLoghlin 




• •• 


227 


MacSheehy 




• •• 


228 


MacSwiney (of the Battle Axes) Family 


229 


MacSwiney (of Banagh) 


9 




2m 


MacTieman (of Clan Ck>lla) , 




231 


MacTTais (McVeigh) 






231 


Madden (of Gonnaught) 






233 


Madden (of Ulster) 






234 


Magauran 






235 


Magellan 






236 



28 CONTENTS. 







\ 




PAGE. 


130. 


The Stem of the Magofrey Family 


• •• 


237 


131. 


$9 


Magrath (of Ulster) 


19 


• •• 


237 


132. 


19 


Maguire 


II 


• •• 


237 


133. 


it 


Mahou (of Comiaught) 


H 


• •• 


238 


134. 


it 


Malone 


ti 


• •• 


239 


135. 


it 


McCami 


19 


• •• 


2.39 


136. 


1} 


McKieman (of Maryland) 


tt 


• « • 


240 


137. 


19 


Michil 


91 


• •• 


242 


138. 


99 


Moghan 


19 


• • • 


245 


139. 


n 


Molloy 


91 


• •• 


245 


140, 


19 


Mooney (of Offaley) 


91 


• •* 


246 


141. 


11 


Mooney (of Ulster) 


11 


• •• 


247 


142. 


>) 


Morgan 


II 


• •• 


247 


143. 


11 


Moriarty (of Connaught) 


fl 


• •• 


248 


144. 


»9 


Morris 


19 


• •• 


248 


145. 


II 


Mulbrennan 


11 


• •• 


249 


146. 


II 


Muldoon (of Meath) 


II 


• •• 


251 


147. 


19 


MnUinny 


If 


• • • 


261 


148. 


11 


Mulheeran (of Offaley) 


99 


• • • 


251 


149. 


II 


Mullen 


91 


• •• 


251 


150. 


91 


Mulroy 


II 


• •• 


252 


151. 


19 


Mulvy 


II 


• • ■ 


253 


152. 


11 


Murphy 


19 


• •• 


253 


153. 


11 


Naghten 


91 


. « • 


254 


154. 


19 


Nealan 


91 


• • • 


255 


155. 


II 


Nowlan 


91 


• •• 


256 


156. 


II 


O'Beime 


II 


• •• 


256 


157. 


ft 


0*firannan 


19 


• •• 


258 


158. 


91 


O'Brassil (West) 


91 


• •• 


258 


159. 


11 


0*Byme (of Maryland) 


99 


• •• 


259 


160. 


>l 


O'Clery 


91 


• •• 


260 


161. 


l> 


0'(}onor Don 


99 


• •• 


261 


162. 


II 


O'Connor (of Moy Ith) 


19 


• •• 


262 


163. 


91 


O'Connor (SUgo) 


•9 


• •• 


262 


164. 


1* 


O'Connor (of Orgiall) 


99 


• •• 


263 



CONTENTS. 



29 



PAGE. 



166. 


The Stem of the O'Donnell (of Clankelly) 




Family 


264 


166. 


tt 


O'Donnell (of Newport-Mayo] 


) ., 




264 


167. 


it 


O'Donnell (of Leitrim) 




ft 




266 


168. 


ti 


O'Donnell (of Oldcastle and Castlebar),, 


267 


169. 


*y 


O'Donnell (of Spain) 


Family 


t.. 


268 


170. 


ft 


O'Donnell (of Austria) 


)) 




. . 


269 


171. 


»> 


O'Dowd 


ft 




... 


269 


172. 


» 


O'Dwyer (of Ulster) 


tt 




... 


270 


17a. 


>> 


O'Finan 


tt 




... 


270 


174. 


>» 


O'Flaherty 


ft 




... 


271 


175. 


a 


O'Flanagan (of Fermanagh) ,, 




• • . 


271 


176. 


f» 


O'Flanagan (of Orgiall) 


tt 




... 


272 


177. 


ft 


0*F)ynn (of Connaught) 


ti 




• . • 


273 


178. 


If 


O'Gorman 


It 




... 


274 


179. 


tf 


O'Hagan 


Family 


... 


276 


180. 


11 


O'Hanlon 




If 


t *. 


277 


181. 


>t 


O'Hart 




tt 


... 


279 


182. 


ft 


O'Kelly (Hy-Maine) 




If 


... 


284 


183. 


It 


O'Kelly (of Meath) 




11 


... 


284 


184. 


1* 


O'Malley 




11 


... 


285 


185. 


ti 


O'Mealla 




tt 


... 


285 


186. 


tf 


O'Melaghlin 




tt 


... 


286 


187. 


ft 


O'Neill (of Clanaboy) 




ft 


... 


286 


188. 


tt 


O'Neill (of Mayo and Leitrim) 


tt 


... 


286 


189. 


t* 


Ord 




*t 


... 


289 


190. 


If 


O'Regan 




tt 


. • 


291 


191. 


ft 


O'Reilly (continued) 




tt 


■ • • 


291 


192. 


It 


O'Reilly (of Scarva) 




tt 


... 


293 


193. 


ft 


O'Rourke (continued) 




11 


... 


293 


194. 


» 


O'Shaughnessy 




It 


... 


295 


195. 


>» 


O'Toole 




It 


... 


297 


196. 


19 


Payne 




11 


... 


297 


197. 


tt 


Quirk 




It 


... 


298 


198. 


l» 


Roe 




tt 


... 


299 


199. 


tt 


Rogan 




ti 


... 


299 



so 



CONTENTS. 



200. The Stem of the Kogers 



Family 



201. 
202. 
203. 
204. 
205. 



if 
tf 



Koyal Family 

Byan 

Scanlan 

Sheane 

Spillane 



9t 



PAGE. 

. 300 

. 300 

. 300 

. 301 

. 302 

. 302 



PART V. 



Anglo-Irish and Anglo-Norman Families in Ireland. 



1. The 



Family. 



2. 


>> 


3. 


ft 


4. 


ft 


5. 


it 


6. 


$t 


7. 


»i 


8. 


it 


9. 


tt 


10. 


9t 


11. 


it 


12. 


t1 


13. 


f 


14. 


tt 


15. 


ti 


16. 


tt 


17. 


ft 


18. 


ii 


19. 


it 


20. 


a 


21. 


ti 


22. 


9i 


23. 


it 


21. 


it 


25. 


9t 



tt 
ii 
ti 



Barrett 

Bermingham 

Bourke 

Bourke (Lords Marquis Mayo) 

Bourke (of Carrowkeel) ., 

Bourke (of Lough Conn and Ballina) „ 

Bourke (Lords Viscount Mayo) 

Brown and Browne 

Burke (of Clanricarde) 

Butler 

Cooke 

Costello 

Cusack 

Dalton 

D'Arcy 

Daunt 

Delmore 

Fay 

Fitzgibbon 

Fitzgerald 

Fitzmaurice 

Joyce 

Lac^ 

MacJordan 

Nangle 



tt 

it 
ti 
ti 
it 

it 
tt 
tt 
it 
it 
ti 
ti 
it 
»« 
ti 
ti 
a 
it 



if 



... 304 

... 305 

... 306 

... 310 

... 311 

... 313 

... 313 

... 315 

... 315 

... 318 

... 320 

... 323 

... 324 

... 324 

... 325 

... 326 

... 328 

... 329 

... OoJi 

... 384 

... 334 

... Ot>0 

... 342 

... 342 

... 343 









CONTENTS 


If6. Tht 


E Nugeat Family 


••• ••• 


27. „ 


Petit 


>> 


«•• •• 




28. „ 


Power 


*» 


«• • • • a 




29. „ 


PorceU 


>> 


■•«• •• 




30. ., 


Taykr 


ti 


••• ••• 




31. „ 


Tohin 


ji 


••• ••« 




32. „ 


Tuite 


)i 


■»« • • ■ 




33. ,, 


TyireU 


»» 


• 




34. „ 


Vance 


>» 


• • • • • 




35. „ 


Whyte 


t» 


• •• •• 





81 

PAGE. 

. 343 

. 345 

. 345 

. 349 

. 350 

. 350 

. 351 
352 

. 352 

. 355 



APPENDIX. 



1. Adjuration Bell 

2. A.ncient Irish Literature 

3. Anglo-Saxon Colony in Wexford 

4. Bardic Families 

5. Bog of Allen ... ... 

6. Bogs and Ancient Forests 

7. Brass Money 

8. Brehon Families 

9. Brigantes 

10. Celto- Scythians 

11. Cimbrians and Britons 

12. Gormac's Palace at Tara 

13. Gurrragh of Kildare 

14. Cyclopean Architecture 

15. Danish Remains 

16. English Pale 

x/« J; aines «.■ ... ... ... ,. •• 

18. Flight of the Earls „ 

19. Hereditary Officers 

^u. uiDemia ••• ■.. ••• ... ..* ••• 

21. Insula Sacra 

22. Meeting of Grace O'Malley and Queen Elizabeth 

23. Monasteries 

24. Picts, Caledonians, and Belgians 

25. Wardership of Sligo 

26. Witchcraft 



PA.6K 

. 357 
. 357 
. 358 

. 361 

. 362 

. 362 

. 363 

364 

365 

, 366 

, 367 

369 

. 370 

, 370 

371 

373 

374 

, 375 

376 

376 

377 

379 

381 

382 

385 



InDKX 07 SiRNAMSS 



387 
398 



DEDICATION. 



TO 

SIR J. BERNARD BURKE, C.B., LL.D., 

Ulster King of Arms, 

IRELAND. 



Sib, 

Addressing you in the first series of this Work, 
as the only person, in my opinion, competent to pro- 
nonnce on the genealogies which I trace in Irish Pedi- 
6BEES, I there quote an important passage from page 728 
of Camden's Britannia, which says — 

" From the deepest sources of antiquity the history of the Irish is 
taken ; so that, in comparison to them, that of other nations is but 
novelty and a beginning." 

If this be true of the " history" of the Irish Nation — 
and few, if any, will dispute Camden's dictum — ^it also 
follows that, compared with the Irish tongue, the language 
of any other nation is but '' novelty and a beginning." 

Eminent geologists and ethnologists maintain that the 

locality of Man's primitive origin, the seat of the Garden 

of Eden — the so-called ** Paradise" — was in the Pacific 

c 



^4 i^t^£ft^^n&s. 

Ornish fi'^ii^ ^ih^ pr^md e&otineBt id Amig westwmid to 

Afp'ki^f m^ <b^i^iir4 i^ Aunimlk* When the great Pacific 
mntiimd* ^]fmly »mkf so that the ocean commenced 
^\l\Uf^ np i\m yulley§f Han retreated to the mountains ; 
^M^Aii \fy miiiinmi Mfiking» were transformed into islands, 
miA mw Ufrm ihd mmj gronps of Polynesia. If this 
ih^Mt-y lUHild bd rdoonoilod with the narratlYe in the 
HttMff^il Volume (flrto Gonosis, ii. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14) — and 
H^^U)tlii}'f^ ('ommoiitAtorg oonfess that the sites of some 
iHHUttii^t^, p\{'k% mA places mentioned in the Bible are 
t^Vi^h yi^l lumso^f iaiucd --it would explain the origin of the 
fttk^ii^lil i<^kU|)kd aiid othor buildings found in America after 
Ub ftin^ovi^tw by ChviHtopher Columbus, a.d, 1492 ; and 



ii\\\ i\\^\ Al 'A ^s'W(}^^\i\>(\^ n^A talbd. Tb« Und oontaoung on its 
Vh*»«n>m \\y^ 0r^\ Am^'ivsan l<^^ k «k>wl>^ smking ; ^wkik Soathcn 

^t,^ <ifiNV«(%i^4-Ti>M |^H>\^ ikM tk«M f^H'mit Uk^ ^xae^t Outuio, had. 

f^rM fNMiVlf^'A ^t)>>f^x«#)is <ii ^f^MTtflK^m ^dmitot ^n«» lonMfiL &v«a Lake 
tM^^ i^^t<^ \jtkk4^ <>fitJwiAy A>wwit f^wty 1^MW«iai^ ^«e«R .^ge> ! TiM 

\>l><.y >»>^ inrnv' %hM f^mf^ )w«*i «4»iidily trax'ifiilitn^ «mithw«rd ^ jumL 

V^v ni" iH^nnlly ly^wl-nHlmHe/l. 'S^i^- «*)«w«c\' »5 tUnkmg. 'with 5 

fyV4^l\ >«<*i^ mpvi r»*p -^Mtn^ oJwtt'JHmT^ t4)«iilit]|; thtit k i^ fts am 
t;»»7»t^ ^v 'fnrt\ »«<th«5 f»i Jkh** luM Jwli Aif«l«T*y. OonUttuiii^ 

.fiv> IT^Hw] "SIM***? ^f-^»<»tm»v ♦' I'lwmTrtm."" in tht- PiMtilv: Owwu. i» 
fm«i t^mt tlK* h^i o: ivJwt <vv*h te <»vi»femtly n Mtnk«ii {immnem : 

if^>nH\ Af ihem not r^*«^i«Kt tlw mirfWii' nt tb?» (vwaii. «tMi ntii«i%. 

'wt^vh *^' ■<H%m'; tvv*v vifot^fm 'ihwit thif ^<4**bU|p H«s -wwtjwmlix 
f<eTfmK ^' f^^t ihAi k Imb -not ^immmI. 





DEDICATION. 35 

proclaim the great civilization of the inhabitants of the 
Pacific continent before its submersion. It is not how- 
ever difficult to understand that, civilized as those people 
may then have been, the insular position of the races 
thus preserved should, in the absence of intercourse with 
other civilized nations, have, in the course of ages, con- 
duced to a savage condition — savage in some instances 
even at the present day ; nor is it difficult to see that their 
insular position should also have conduced to the preserva- 
tion of their language — whatever it may have been. 

Writing of the Pyramids of Egypt — ** those stupendous 
monuments of human labour and engineering skill," 
Canon Bourke says : 

*' Sgypt stands in her Pyramids a perennial landmark in the do- 
main of the world's history, connecting the period of the deluge with 
the present. Take away the records written by the pen of Moses, 
there still remain the Pyramids, raising their heads above all passing 
mists, and proclaiming the story of the knowledge and the skill, and 
the practical power of the immediate posterity of Noah and his 
children." 

The first inhabitants of Europe after the deluge were 
the Celts ; who were descended from Japhet. But the 
Celts and the Gaels were identical in origin ; for, according 
to Liddell (in his ** History of Eome"), Celt is strictly the 
same as Gael, and the Greek Keltai and Gallatai and the 
Latin GalU are all one. Heretofore, however, the Celts 
and the Gaels were considered as two distinct nations : 
the Celts as descended from Gomer; the Gaels, from 
Magog — two of the sons of Japhet. 

According to O'Brien's ** Irish Dictionary'* (from which 
I have largely quoted in these pages), that portion of the 



86 DEDICATION. 

posterity of Japhet which peopled the south and south- 
west parts of Europe, must, after the deluge, have first pro- 
ceeded from the centre of the dispersion of mankind 
(Genesis xi. 8,) towards the straits of the Thracian Bos- 
phorus and those of the Hellespont ; which they crossed by 
means of boats, whose construction was, doubtless, 
familiar to them from the traditional knowledge they had 
of the ark. Those tribes which passed over the Helles- 
pont first inhabited the south parts of Thrace*, as also 
Macedonia or ancient Greece ; and those which crossed the 
Thracian Bosphorus (now called the straits of Constanti- 
nople) must have been the first inhabitants both of the 
northern parts of Thrace and of lower and upper Mesia, 
and also of Dacia when some of them had crossed the 
Danube.! In process of time a portion of the tribes 
which first settled in the two Mesias and the northern 
parts of Thrace proceeded towards Illyricum and Pan- 
nonia; from which regions, where they were separated 
into two different bodies, it is natural to conclude (from 
the situation of those localities) that they proceeded 
towards the west by two different courses : those of 
Pannonia going towards Noricum (now called Austria), 
Stiria, Carniola, and upper Bavaria — from which 



* Thrace: The ancient name of Adrianople, in Thrace, was, 
according; to Ammianus, Uscudama ('*uisge" : Irish, watery and 
" daimh", a house, more correctly **domh" ; Lat. "dom-us^'), mean- 
ing '* the watery residence" : showine an affinity in language be- 
tween the Thracians and the ancient Irish. 

t Danube : The name of the river '' Danube" is, in the old Celtic, 
Danou (" dana" : Irish, bold ; " obha'* or " obhuin," an old Irish 
word for river), and signifies " the bold impetuous river. " 

(See the Irish epithet Oharbh, in Note under the ** O'Mahony'^ 
peaigree, for the root of the Latin river Oarumna and the French , 
Oaronne : each of which literally nitians " the boisterous river.'* 



DEDICATION. 87 

countries it would appear that all the western parts of 
Germany were first peopled, as the east and north-east of 
that country were probably peopled from Dacia ; and those 
of Dlyricum taking their course towards Istria, from which 
point of the Adriatic coast they poured down into the 
regions of Italy, whence, in after ages, some of them pro- 
ceeded to Gaul, speaking the very same language as that 
spoken by those of their nation whom they left in Italy, 
and who, by the ancient authors, were called Indigena or 
Aborigines ; meaning that they were the original or pri- 
mitive people who first inhabited that land. Those 
people were the Siculi, the Ausones, the Umbri (and all 
their descendants of different names mentioned by Cluver 
in his Geogr.y Liber 8. c. 88. p. 882). Borne of the ancient 
authors rank the Aborigines with the Umbrians, whom 
Pliny (Lib. 8. c. 14) represents as the most ancient 
people of Italy : ** Umbrorum gens Antiquissima ItaliiB 
existimatur" ; and Florus calls them ** Antiquissimus 
Italiffi populus." But it is conceded that the Aborigines 
were a tribe of the first inhabitants of Italy, and conse- 
quently of the same stock of people, of whom the first 
planters of Gaul were only a detachment ; as the Umbri 
are acknowledged by some of the ancient authors to have 
been of the same stock as the old Gauls. The Sabini, 
who, as well as the Umbri and the Aborigines, formed a 
portion of the people afterwards called Latins, were but a 
tribe of the Umbri, and consequently of the same stock as 
the primitive Gauls. That the primitive inhabitants of the 
above-mentioned regions had originally but one and the 
same language, Cluver (in his German, Antiq, c. 6, 7, 8,) 
produces clear vestiges in Gaul, Germany, Spain, Italy, 



38 DEDICATION. 

and Illyricum ; he might have added Thrace, Macedonia, 
and Greece. 

'' I am much inclined," says Dr. O'Brien, " to believe that the near 
agreement which the ancient writers have remarked between the 
old Latin and Greek was, in greater measure, owing to this original 
identity of the European languages, than to whatever mixture 
might have been introduced into the Latin from the dialects of the 
Greek adventurers that came to Ttaly from time to time. Nor do I 
doubt but that the Gauls who repassed the Alps and settled in 
Upper Italy in the earliest times of the Komans, found the language 
of that country very nearly agreeing with their own : in the same 
manner and by the same reason that the people of Ireland and those 
of the Highlands of Scotland easily understand each other's dialects, 
though it be now near twelve hundred years since the Scots of 
Scotland parted from those of Ireland." 

That the Iberno-Celtic or Gaelic Irish language is the 
best preserved dialect of the old Celtic, and therefore the 
most useful for illustrating the antiquities of all the Celtic 
nations, was the opinion of the great Leibnitz, who (in 
his Collectan, EtymoLy vol. i. p, 168) writes : 

** Postremo, ad perficiendam, vel certe valde promoveudam 
litteraturam Celtican, diligentius Lingua Hibemicse studium ad- 
jungendum censeo, ut Lhudius egregie facere csepit. Nam, uti 
alibi jam admonni, quemadmodum Angli fuere Colonia Saxonum, 
& Brittanni emissio veterum Celtarum, Gallorum, Cimbrorum; ita 
Hibemi sunt pi*opago antiquiorum Britannise habitatomm, colonis 
Celticis, Cimbricisque nonnullis, ut sic dicam, mediis anteriorum. 
Itaque ut ex Anglicis linguse veterum Saxonum, & ex Cambricis 
veterum Gallorum ; ita ex Hibemicis vetustiorum adhuc Celtarum, 
Germanorumque, &c., ut generaliter dicam, accolarum Ocean! 
Britanniui Cismarinorum antiquitates illustrantur. Et si ultra 
Hibemiam esset aliquse insula Celtici sermonis, ejus filo in multo 
adhuc antiquiora duoeremur.*' 



DEDICATION. 89 

And t&e learned Welshman,'^ Edward Lliuyd, mentioned 
by Leibnitz in the foregoing extract, acknowledges that 
the roots of the Latin are better and more abundantly pre- 
served in the Lish than in the Welsh, which is the only 
Celtic dialect that can pretend to vie with the Gaelic Lish, 
as regards purity or perfection. Addressing the Irish 
nation, Lhuyd says : 

** Your language is better situated for being preserved than any 
other language to this day spoken throughout Europe ;" 

meaning, no doubt, that languages are best preserved in 
islands and in mountain-countries, as being the most diffi- 
cult of access for strangers, and especially because the 
Boman arms never reached Lreland, which, up to the 
Danish invasion, received no colonies but from Celtic 
countries. But, addressing the Welsh, the candid Lhuyd 
gives the preference to the Lish, not only for purity 
and perfection, as well as for priority of establishment in 
the British Isles, but also for its utility in illustrating the 
remote antiquities of Great Britain ; he says : 

" It is impossible to be a complete master of the ancient British, 
without a competent knowledge of the Irish language." 

And he fully establishes the fact that the Gaels! had 
been the primitive inhabitants of Great Britain, before 
the Cymri or ancient Britons (who were the ancestors of 

* Wel$hman : See Lhuyd's " Irish Vocabulary ;" And his 
ArcluBologia Britannka, published in £Inglish by Dr. Nicholson, in 
his "Irish labrary." 

t Gads : Baxter, in his Olossario Antiquce BritannicB, considers 
that the Brigantes (who were a part of the G-aelic colony which went 
from Spain to Ireland) were the first inhabitants of Britain ; and 
Lhuyd shows that the Brigantes were the first inhabitants of all 
that part of Great Britain which now comprehends England and 
WalM. 



40 DSDIC4T10N. 

the Welsh) axrived in that island ; and that the dialect ai 
those Gaels was then the universal language of the whole 
British Isle.* 

The Island of Great Britain was called by the Gaels 
Alban^ AJhcdn (*< aill'* : Irish, a rock or cliffy and " ban", 
white ; because of the chalky cliffs of Dover, as seen from 
the direction of Gaol), and, more lately, AUnon ('^ alb-ns^ : 
Lai, white) J signifying the white cliff; and when the Gi^els 
were driven by the Britons to the northern portion of the 
Island, that part only was called " Alba*', << Alban*', or 
" Albain'*, whUe the southern portion of the Island, now 
known as England, was called Britain or ** Albion." 

According to Usher (in his Antiquit. EccL Brit,^ page 
878), /'Albion" was the name under which Great Britain 
was known to the Greeks, not only in the time of Ptolemy, 
Marcianus Heracleota, Eustachius, etc., but also in the 
much more ancient time of Aristotle and of Theophrastus : 
a very natural name for it by a Gaul placed on the conti- 
nent at or near Calais, where the first and only knowledge 
he may have of the British Isle consists in the bare sight 
of the white cliffs of Dover ; and this Gaul having crossed 
the channel and observed the situation and shape of the 
land above Dover, naturally calls it Ceantir\ (** ceanntir*' : 
Irish, head land), which the Bomans latinized Cantium, now 



* Isle : When the Oymri (see ** Cimbrians and Britona", in Appen- 
dix), settled in Britain, they forced the Gaels to the northern part 
of the Ishmd ; and the name Alban or AJbain, which the Gaels nad 
first given to it, followed them, so as to be appropriated to whatever 
tract they inhabited. Hence it is that the term Albanach is the 
Irish for a native of Alba or Scotland, or North Britain, even at the 
present day. 

t Ceantir : This word is compounded of the Irish ceann, " the 
head", and tir, ** a land", *' a country", *< a nation" ; and this ceann 



DEDICATION. 41 

** Kent." A numerous colony of the Gaels having after- 
wards crossed over from Gaul to Britain, which by degrees 
they peopled from one end to the other, they gave names 
to all the remarkable objects of nature and art throughout 
the whole country — such as rivers, mountains, headlands, 
towns, etc, ; and, accordingly, we find these Gaelic names 
everywhere in England and Wales, from Dover to York, 
namely : from Ceantir (or " Kent") to the river Isc, now 
called the '< Ouse*', which passes through York ; and from 
the river Isca (which passes through the town of Caer 
Leoti-ar-Isc, in Monmouthshire,) to Longdion (or *< Lon- 
don"), and its river Tamk-isc or Thamisisj now the 
" Thames." 

In his Mona Antiqua^ Boland observes that the remains 
of old habitations still to be seen on the tops of high places 
in Anglesea are called to this day Ceitir Guidehdy which 
he anglicises <* the Irishmen's cottages",* but which 



cinUf in the genitive case. Hence the Anglo-Saxon word 
king ; because the " Kins:" is the head of his peo^e or subjects : the 
Irish C being equivalent to the English letter K ; and the final 
doable n, to tne English ng, — See O'Brien's Irish Dictionary, under 
the word " Cinn." 

* Cottages : The ancient Irish had four sorts of habitations, viz. — 
1. CaUhir, " a city" (the Welsh c^r) ; 2. Baile, " a town" (Latin, 
viUa), called tkLille moTy if '' a large town" ; 3. Dun, " a strong or 
fortified habitation"; 4. Bruighean^ "a palace", '* royal residence", 
"^ a grand house or building." Bruigfiean is like the Prain of the 
WfSah, which means "a king's court"; they also call it Priv-lys 
{** Primh-lios" : Irish, a clmffort\ meaning ** a principal residence." 
The Irish word " Brug" or " Brog" is the root of JSruighean, here 
mentioned ; and is the same in meaning as the German, Gaulish, and 
Spanish Brwga, Briga, and Broga. The Thracian Bria (ace. Brian) 
signified " a town" or ** habitation" ; and the Irish Bruighean is 

Enmoanced " bruian", the same as the Thracian J^rian— both words 
aving the same signification. 

Strabo observes that the *' Phryges" were formerly called Bryges, 
or, as the Greeks wrote it, Bmgea (Irish, Brugeis), and were of the 
Tbncian kind : ** Phryges antiquitus Bryges Thracum genus" ; 
which goes to prove that the Phrygians, Thracians, and ancient Irish 
dwelt in houses and in cities, and were thus distinguished from the 
Nomads. 



42 IHEOICATIOV* 

shonld moiie properly be rendered " the lialHtatioiis of the 
Gads" ; and he justly obsenres that those are vestiges of 
the first habitations that were made by the first planters 
of the island, because the vall^rs were then all eovered 
with woods, which were the haunts of wobres and otho* 
wild beasts. Two other objects, whose names are plain 
Irish, are Uving evidences that the Gaels were the ancient 
inhabitants of Anglesea before the Welsh. The landing- 
place of the ferry or passage from North Wales to Anglesea 
is, in Welsh, called Port-aeth-wy, which is a corraption of 
the Irish Port-ath-hhuidhe, meaning " the bank or landing 
place of the yellow ford" : the water of that arm of the sea 
being of a yellowish coloar, It is also remarkable that 
Tin-dath'Wy, the name of the territory adjacent to Port- 
aeth'Wtj, is pnre Irish ; for tyn, in Welsh, signifies ** a 
country or territory^, as tain does in * Irish : so that 
originally the name was Tain-ath-bhuidhe, meaning << the 
territory of the yellow ford." 

Even the name of the very capital of Britain, as used 
in the time of the Bomans (who added the termination 
'< um" to it) was mere Irish ; for loiig is still the only 
word in common use in Irish to signify ^^aship^' as din or 
dion has been used to express '' a place of safety or pro- 
tection" : so that Longdin or Longdion, which the Bomans 
changed to Londinum (now ** London''), literally means '* a 
place of safety for ships." It is also worthy of remark that 
the name of the river on which London is built was plain 
Irish. CaBsar calls it 7m, which is only latinizing the 
Irish word Mr, (<^ water"), which was the Gaelic name of 
that river before the Bomans invaded Britain ; and whether 
the word Tani was always prefixed to isc or isis^ either as 



DEDICATION. 43^ 

an epithet, or as, being the name of the river Tame, 
which joins its water, in either case, the Irish word Tamh, 
wliich signifies '^ still'* (or quiet, gentle, smooth), was a 
natural epithet for the river Thames^ as well as being a very 
significant name for the river Tamey on account of the 
stillness of its water. 

According to the ancient Irish historians and to Nenius, 
the Briton, the Gaelic colony which came to Ireland from 
Spain, and brought a mixture of the old Spanish or 
Gantabrian into the Irish language, was called the '' Mile- 
sian or Scotic Nation" ; they were also called Scots. That 
Milesian colony never inhabited Britain before their arrival 
in Ireland, but came directly by sea to this country ; 
whence, after a long process of time, they sent a colony to 
the north-west coast of Great Britain, and, in the fifth 
century, another colony under the command of Fergus 
Mor Mac Earca, the founder of the Scottish Monarchy in 
North Britain. 

The Gaelic Irish bears a striking afi&nity not only to the 
old British in its different dialects, the Welsh and Armoric, 
besides the old Spanish or Gantabrian language preserved 
in Navarre and the Basque provinces, but also to the 
Greek, the Latin, the Hebrew, Phoenician, the Chaldee, 
the Syriac, the Arabic, etc. Instances of this affinity are 
given throughout this work 1)t. O'Brien shows that the 
lingua prisca of the aborigines of Italy (from which the 
Latin of the twelve tables and afterwards the Boman lan- 
guage were derived) could be nothing else than a dialect of 
the primitive Celtic ; and I venture the opinion that, if 
Philologists investigate the matter, they will find that the 
Aborigines of America and of the Polynesian Islands 



44 DEDICATION. 

speak dialects of the ancient Celtic ! (For further valu- 
Able information on this subject see Dr. O'Brien's excellent 
** Irish Dictionary.") 

The Problem — ** What was the Language of our First 
Parents", has long been a disputed question. 

Some say it was the Pelasgian, which was another name 
for the Japhetic ; and some say that the Japhetic was the 
Scythian, which was another name for the Celtic. 

In a Scottish Gaelic poem by Allister MacDonald, in 
praise of the Gaelic language, the following passage 
occurs : 

" Si labhar Adhamh a b-pairfchas fan, 
S*ba suasmhar Gaelig a m-beul aluin Eabha" ; 

which may be thus interpreted : 

' * The expressive Gaelic language was that which Adam spoke in 
Paradise, and which flowed from the Hps of the fair £ve." 

Or, divested of its adjectives, the passage may be reduced 
to the following proposition : 

The Gaelic was the Language of Eden. 

Of the Gaelic speech the Very Rev. Canon Bourke writes : 

" In its plastic power and phonetic fecundity Irish Gaelic possesses 
like its primitive Aryan parent tongue, not only the virtual but the 
formal germinal developments of dialectic variety." 

And Ganon Bourke also says— 

"The science of Comparative Philology has, without direct 
reference to revelation, enabled men of literary research to discover 
the most convincing proofs, to show that before the dispersion of the 
human family there existed a common language, admirable in its 
raciness, in its vigour, its harmony, and the perfection of its forms".* 

• Forma : In the same strain writes Adolph^ Pictet, of Geneva, 
in bia Lea Origines Indo-Europeennes, ou les Aryan PrimUifa C Paris. 
1859). / V . 



DEDICATION. IS* 

That common primevoJ language of Man, which some 
call by the name Aryan, I prefer to call the Scythian. 

According to the ''Four Masters'*, the Scythian language 
was the Celtic ; which, after Gaodhal [gael] who <' refined 
and adorned it", was called Oaodhilg or Gaelic. 

Phoeniusa Farsaidh (or Fenius Farsa : see No. 14, Fart 
I., c. i, first series), son of Baath, son of Magog, son of 
Japhet, was the inventor of <' letters'* ; he was also the 
grandfather of Gaodhal, a quo the Gaels. This Phoeniusa 
Farsaidh was king of Scythia, and was the ancestor of the 
Phctnicians : after him the Scythian language was called 
the ** Phoenician.'* It is worthy of remark that Cadmus* 
the Phoenician (who is mentioned by 0*Flaherty in his 
Ogygia as brother of Phoeniusa Farsaidh) was, according 
to the ancient Irish annalists, contemporary with Joshua ; 
and it is a curious coincidence that the alphabet of the 
Gaels consisted o{ sixteen letters — ^the very number of letters 
as in the Phoenician alphabet, and the very number 
brought by Cadmus to Greece, from Egypt, + where the 
Gaels were first located, and whence they made their first 
migration, namely — that to the Island of Creta (now called 
Candia), in the Mediterranean Sea. 

• Cadmus : This name may be derived from the Irish Cadhmus 
[caw-mus], which means ** pride" ; some persons, however, advance 
the opinion that there was no such person as " Cadmus." 

f Egypt: This circumstance regarding the Gaelic alphabet is the 
more remarkable, as its whole natural and primitive stock of letters 
is but sixteen in number ; the same as that of the first Roman or 
Latin alphabet which, according to Tacitus (Anal, ii.) and Pliny 
(Liber. 7. c. 56), Evander, tiie Arcadian, brought from Greece to the 
Aborigines of Italy, and which was the original Phoenician set of 
letters communicated b^ Cadmus to the Greeks. And yet our six- 
teen letters of the primitive Irish alphabet were sufScient for all the 
essential purposes of language ; each preserving its own sound or 

S)wer, without usurping that of any other letter. In the primitive 
aelic alphabet ^ and P were not included.— O'Brien's Irish 
Dictionary. 



46 DEDICATION. 

The ancient alphabet of the Gaels contained sixteen 
letters ; the Phoenician, sixteen ; the modern Gaelic, 
eighteen ; the Burmese, nineteen ; the Italian, twenty ; the 
Indians of Bengal, twenty -one ; the Chaldee, Hebrew, 
Latin, Samaritan, and Syriac, twenty- two each ; French, 
twenty-three ; English, twenty-four, it has now twenty- 
six ; Greek, twenty-four ; Dutch and German, twenty-six ; 
Slavonic, and Spanish, each twenty-seven ; Arabic, twenty- 
eight; Welsh, twenty-eight ; Persian, thirty-one ; Coptic, 
thirty-two ; Turkish, thirty-three ; Georgian, thirty-six ; 
Armenian, thirty-eight ; Eussian, forty- one ; Muscovite, 
forty-three ; Sanscrit, and Japanese, fifty ; Ethiopic, and 
Tartarian, each two-hundred- and two ; the Chinese have, 
properly speaking, no alphabet, except we call their whole 
language by that name : their letters are words, or rather 
hieroglyphics, amounting to about eighty thousand. 

The letters of the Gaelic alphabet were named after 
shrubs and trees : the name of the letter in every instance, 
save that of the aspirate H, begins with the letter itself ; 
to preserve, as it were, its proper sound or power. 

The sixteen letters of the ancient Gaelic alphabet were 
arranged in the foUowing order : BLFSNDTCMG 
R, and A U E I. The H and P have since been added ; 
so that the modem Gaelic alphabet consists of eighteen 
letters, arranged as follows : ABCDEFGHILMN 
O P R S T U. 

Beginning with A, the names of the letters of the 
modern Gaelic alphabet are : Ailrrij which means the fig 
or palm tree ; Beith, the birch tree ; Coll, the hazel tree ; 
Dairy the oak tree ; Eadha, the aspen tree ; Feaiti^ an 
alder tree ; Qortf the ivy ; (H) Vath (the name of the 



DEDICATION. 47 

aspirate ^),the whitethorn ; loga, the yew tree ; Luis, the 
wild ash ; Muin, the Tine tree ; Nmn, the ash tree ; Oiry 
the broom tree ; PeUh, the dwarf elder ; RuU, the bore 
tree ; Suit, the willow tree ; Teine, the furze or whin bosh ; 
Ur, the heath shrub* 

There is no K in the Gaelic alphabet, ancient or 
modem ; nor had the ancient Latins any character like 
that letter : they gave the sound of K to C, as in the word 
sacra (pronounced ** sakra"), where the c has the sound 
of the English letter k. The latin name Casar is now in 
English pronounced '^Seasar'* (where chas the sound of s) ; 
in German, however, it is pronounced " Kaiser'* ; but in 
no case can G in Gaelic be sounded like S. Nor have the 
Greeks the letter C in their alphabet ; but K (the Greek 
letter '' kappa") corresponds to the Gaelic and Latin C, 
which has or should have the sound of the English letter 
K. 

Baath, son of Magog, son of Japhet, was contemporary 
with Nimrod; of whom, according to an ancient Lrish 
poem, it is said : 

One was at first the language of mankind, 
Till haughty Nimrod, with presumption blind, 
Proud Babel built ; then, with confusion struck, 
Seventy -two different tongues the workmen spoke. 

That one language was the language of mankind down 
from Adam to the building of the Tower of Babel, when 
(Genesis xi. 1) '' the whole earth was of one language and 
of one speech." 

Upon the division of the Earth by Noah amongst his 
sons, and by Japhet of his part thereof amongst his sons, 
&ythia came to Baath*s lot. Thus in Scythia, in Central 



4S vmsno^rto&L 



\iM>, Ur bom tJbe Mene of BabeiU the Talley of Shinar^ 
the <3/a^A Setuuxr of tbe ttaeieni Iiuih ammliBiB^SMi 
Im p^pk, w« are told, took no psrt iniih Idiase of 
iMid liiim iailie building of tbeTowfiraf Babal; md^ist 
bexM^; ib« l«#iii2g vitality of the Celtie kogiuge ! 

If Baaib aud Iuk p^ple took no part hi the lniil£i]^ of 
tijbd Tower of Vabel, it maybe affirmed th&t they did not on 
thai li^fld im^ur the displeairare of the Lord ; and thai, 
ll^rafQfe, their laaguage was not eonfoBed. But &e Ian- 
guttgij of iiaatb aiid his people was the Scythian : eryo, the 
tiayiUiMi hugnu^^ wa» not confused. J£f then, the 
fJijyUaau language wan not confused ; and that one was 
Urn language of maukindf from Adam down to the boilding 
of the Towar of Babel, when ** the whole earth was of one 
laiiguaga and of one speeoh*', it follows that the ** Scy- 
i)UH.n" wa» that mifi languags'^yraSt in fact, the language 
of lilden. Dut It has been above shown that the Scythian 
language was the Oeltio ; and that the Celtic was the 
(laeliu ; therefore, *< The Gaelic was the language of 
Mden." 

Htmiu pevHouH ooneiiler that, because the Hebrew* was 
the language of tlie Jews— the once chosen people of God, 
it the^'ofore waa the language of our First Parents ; but, 

* }hbr4w : Th^ Druidio Iriah had Hehraio ottstoms to a great ex- 
tent : iw iuatanoe— the Druidio judis^ were ol a priestly caste, and 
wur« uaoh a oollar ol gold. Buxtorf states that this collar was caDed 
loUhan Morain ; and that ** lodhan Morain'' is Chaldee for Urim 
and Thummim {m^ l&xodiAS, xxviu. 90). I cannot sav whether it 
>vaH th«> OmU wW borrewed that Mostac bad^e frem iSbub Israelites^ 
itf that it was the Israelites who bonowed it &om the GaeLs ; but 
ioUha)i Moralu is also Gaelio» and is said to be so called after 
a (HAlebrated Irish Brehon who hved in the first centnrj (see 
** Brehou ITanuUes*', in the Aweadix). 

As showing the affinity betveen the Irish and the Hebrew lan- 
guages, it in%y be remarked that the Irish proaoon «e aigittfies ^^he"*. 



DEDICATION. 49 

if the ancient Gaelic alphabet had only sixteen letters, 
while the Hebrew has twenty-two, it appears to me that, 
of the two languages, the Gaelic is the more primitive — ^is 
in fact more ancient than any of the languages above enn- 
merated ! 

After the confusion of tongues at the Tower of Babel, 
Phoeniusa Farsaidh, king of Scythia, and the inventor of 
*^ letters", as above mentioned, employed learned men to 
■go among the dispersed multitude to learn their several 
languages ; who, when those men returned well-skilled in 
what they went for, opened a " school" in the valley of 
Shinar, near the city of JEothena ; where, with his younger 
son, Niul, he remained teaching for twenty years. On 
account of Niul's great reputation for learning, Pharaoh 
invited him into Egypt ; gave him the land of Gampus- 
Oyrunt, near the Bed Sea, to inhabit ; and his daughter 
Scota in marriage. 

The ancient Irish historians tell us that the river "Nile" 
was so-called affcer this Niul ; and that Scota, his wife, 
was the daughter of Pharaoh, who (Exodus, ii., 5) rescued 
the infant Moses from drowning in the Nile : hence, it is 
said, the great interest which Niul and Scota took in the 
welfare and education of Moses ; the affection which 
Moses entertained for them and their son Gaodhal ; and 
the friendship which long afterwards existed between the 
Feine and the Israelites in the Land of Promise. Such 



'<him", and that the Hebrew pronoun se also means " he", "him" ; 
that the Trish pronoun 6o, which means '' this" or ** that", is like the 
Hebrew so, wnich has the same meaning ; and that the Irish pro- 
noun Uif always ei^ressed to signify ** a female", is analogous to 
the Hebrew isa, which means " a woman. " — See Buxtorf s Hebrew 
Lexicon, 



50 DKDicATnm. 

was the intiniacy between Moses and Niul that, we are 
told, Moses inTited him to go on board one of Pharaoh's 
ships on the Bed Sea, to witness the miracle (Exodns, 
xiv., 16, 17, 18) to be peifoimed by the Great I AM, the 
God of the Israelites, in their deliverance from Egyptian 
bondi^e ; bat, on accomit of his being the son-in-law of 
Pharaoh, Ninl, while sympathising with the Israelites in 
their great affliction, asked Moses to excuse him for decli- 
ning the invitation. Then Moses held Ninl excused. 

The Egyptians were the most learned nation on the face 
of the earth ; and the Bible tells ns that Moses was in- 
structed in all the learning of Egypt. It does not however 
appear that, before the time of Moses, the Egyptians had 
any knowledge of alphabetical writing. If, then, it was the 
Celtic alphabet which Cadmns the Phoenician bronght from 
Egypt into Greece, we may infer that the Celtic language 
and alphabet were at that time known in Egypt ; and that 
it was in the school conducted by Niul and his father in 
the Valley of Shinar, or from Niul and his colony in Egypt, 
that the Egyptians received their knowledge of <' letters", 
and probably much of the knowledge for which ancient 
Egypt was so renowned. But, wherever the Feine (or 
Phoenicians) and the Egyptians themselves received their 
education, it was they who had the honour of instructing 
civilizing, and polishing the Grecians, by the colonies they 
sent among them : the Phoenicians taught them naviga- 
tion, writing, and commerce ; the Egyptians, by the know- 
ledge of their laws and polity, gave them a taste for the 
arts and sciences, and initiated them into their mysteries. 

For three generations the descendants of the Feine, 
who, under the chieftaincy of Niul here mentioned, settled 



DEDIOATION. 51 

in Egypt, possessed and inhabited the territory near the 
Bed Sea which was granted to him and his people by 
Pharaoh. Because, however, of the sympathy which Niul 
ajid his colony had manifested for Moses and the Israel- 
ites in bondage, the Egyptians (see the first series) forced 
Srath, son of Asruth, son of Gaodhal, son of the said Niul, 
io leave Egypt, himself and his colony ; when, affcer some 
traverses at sea, Sruth and the surviving portion of his 
people (who were known as Phcene or Feine as well as 
Gaels) reached the Island of Greta, where he died. We 
learn that some of Sruth's colony remained in Greta ; some 
of them migrated to Getulia, in the North of Africa, where 
Carthage* was afterwards built ; and some of them sailed 
towards the Land of Ganaan, where, on the Island of Sor, 
off its coast, they founded the city of ** Tyre" : this colony 
of the Gaels was called Tyrians. Grateful for the sym- 
pathy which their forefathers in Egypt had experienced 
from Niul and his people, the Israelites, after they had 
been some time settled in the Land of Promise, allotted 
to the Tyrians that tract of country on the north-west of 
Palestine, which had been inhabited by the Canaanites ; 
and that territory was, from the name *' Phoene'*, called 
Phanice and, more lately, Pimnicia. 

* Carthage : This name is derived through the Latin Cartha-go 
from the Phoen. and Chald. Kartha, ** a walled city" ; which word 
'' Kartha" seems to be derived by metathesis from the genitive case 
eathrach, of the Irish caihair [cawhir], " a city." Compare caihxiir 
with the British haer ; the Scyth. car\ the ancient Sax. caerten; the 
Goth, gards ; the Cantabr. caria ; the Breton. Ker ; the Heb. 
Kariah or Kiriah and Karth ; the Syriac Kari-tUa ; and the 6r. 
Karak, Mel Kartha (meaning *' the King of the city") was the title 
of the Phoenician Hercules — the reput^ founder of Tyre ; and 
" Mel-Kartha" is evidently derived from the Trish or Celtic Maol 
CartJuuihf which means the hero or king of the city." — See Note, in 
this series, under the simame " MacCarthy.'' 



iA DKDJCAXiOil. 

As the Fhcene (or Feme) idiOe in Egypt weie fciwiliskT ' 
with ibe motfres idiidi actuated the Egyptians in building 
ibeir Pillar'Towets along tbe Hile (similar to tbose in 
Babylon and other Eastern nations), it is considered that, 
from the same motives, the Fenian leaders who settled in 
Ireland in those early times, did there erect those mys- 
terious ''Bomid Towers*, concerning the origin of which 
th^e have been so many conflicting opinions ; for, at that 
early period in the world's history, a colony of the Feine 
(who are represented as good navigators, a race of giants, 
and ^^ great builders in stone"), discovered and settled in 
Ireland. 

I have thus traced the great antiquity of the Irish 
language, the affinity in race between Gelt and Tenton, the 
origin and migrations of the GaelB,and their early settlement 
in Great Britain ; to show that there is not that difference 
in race between the English and the Irish peoples, which 
some would incline to believe. 

Under the anspices of your revered name I now commit 
my Ibish Pediobees to the care and perusal of the chil- 
dren of the Gael. 

With great respect, I am, Sir, 

Your ever faithful servant, 

JOHN O'HART. 
BmosEND School, Dublin, 

February, 1878. 



PART I. 



HOUSE OF HEBEK. 

Hbbeb (see the first series) was the eldest of the three 
sons of Milesius of Spain who left any issne ; from him the 
following families, along with others given in the first 
series, are descended : 

1. — ^The Stem of the " Clancy" (of Munstee) Family. 

NiALL or Neal, brother of Menmon who is No. 105 on the 
*' Macnamara" pedigree, was the ancestor of Mac Flancha*; 
which is anglicised Clanchy, Clancie, Clancy, MacClancy, 
and Clinch, 



105. Niall : son of Aodh 
(or Hugh) odhar ; a quo the 
Hy-Niall (or O'Neill), of 
Munster. 

106. Flancha : his son ; 
a quo MacFlancha. 

107. Donald : his son. 

108. Gilloilbhe ('* oilbhe- 
im" : Irish, a reproach) : his 
son. 

109. Flaitheamh : his son. 

110. Gilloilbhe (2) : his 
son. 

111. Flaitheamh (2) : his 
son. 

112. Flathrigh fflath : Ir- 
ish, " a chief*, and righ^ ** a 
king" ; Com. ruy ; Arm. rue ; 
Hind, raj-a; Lat. r$x; Fr. 



roi) : his son ; a qno O^Fla- 
thrigh, anglicised Flattery. 

113. Diarmaid (or Der- 
mod): his son. 

114. Eacneach : his son ; 
had two brothers — 1. Hn^, 
and 2. Donald. 

115. Hugh : son of Bac- 
neach. 

116. Donald : his son. 

117. Hugh (2) : his son. 

118. Murtach : his son. 

119. Baothach (latinized 
Boetius) : his son. 

120. Hugh (8) : his son. 

121. Baothach (2) : his 
son. 

122. Baothach (8) Clancy: 
his son. 



* MaeFlaneha : The root of this name is the Irish word ** Flann*', 
genitiTe, "flaiDn" [floin or flin], blood; and the name itself means 
"the descendants of the rei^-complexioned man." Besides Mac 
Flancha the following' simames are derived from the same prolific 



u 



ntlBH PSDIGBXX9. 



t, — Twt Stkx ow ram *'*- CoaD[.Aa" Familz. 

]>B4L]«A^ for DealLhaotli), a broths of Bladd wiio (see 
the first series) is No. 92 on tha ^^ O'Bnen" pedigree, was 
Hie Sfcneestor of MaeCo^ilain ; angiiciaed Coghlan and 

9^ Dealbha: the ninth 



son of Cass. 

^. Aedhan:hisson:had I 
ft brother named Gnobog, 
who was the ancestor of 
(fCwrry. 

94. Bile (or Beg): his 
§on, 

9$« Anbhile : his son. 

96« Sioda : his son. 

97* Trean : his son* 

98. Treachar: his son. 

99. Dathal (or Dathin) : 
bi« son. 

100. Lorcan : his son. 

101. Coehlan (''cochal" : 
Irishy a covl or hood) : his 
son ; a qno MacCochlain, 

102. Maol-Michil: his 
son. 

103. Coehlan (2) : his son. 

104. Fionn : nis son. 

105. Fnathmaran : his 
aon. 



106. Fogartatdi : his son. 

107. AnbhftTth : his son. 

108. Gormogsn : his son. 

109. ToiithgheaT : his son. 

110. Coehlan MaeCog^- 
Ian : his son ; the first who 
assomed this simame. 

111. Mnrthad : his son. 

112. Longseaeh: his son. 

113. Aodh (or Hn^) : his 
son. 

114. Ck>nehobhar (or Con- 
or) mor : his son. 

115. Conor oge : his son. 

116. Amhailgadh [Awly] : 
his son. 

117. Melachlin : his son. 

118. Donald : his son. 

119. Conor (3) : his son. 

120. Shane (or John): 
his son. 

121. Melachlin (2) : his 
son. 

122. Felim: his son. 



root: FUmagan, FUumagan, FUnn, Flyim, Glenn, Glinn, Glynn, 
Linn, Lynn, Macklin, Maglin, Macloin, McGloin, etc. 

" In the earl^ ages/' m% Dr. Joyce, "individaals received their 
names from epithets impljring some personal peculiarities, such as 
colour of hair, complexion, size, figure, certain accidents of deformity, 
mental qualities— such as bravery, fierceness, etc. ; and we have 
only to look at the old forms of the names, to remove any doubt we 
may entertain of the truth of this assertion.'' — Irish Names of Places, 

* Deatbhai From this Dealbha the territories of the "seven 
Dealhhnas'' (part of the King's County) are so called ; and now go 
by the name of Deivin : whereof his posterity were Lords, until dis- 
possessedi during the Commonwealth, by Oliver Cromwell. 



I-] 



THE OULLEN AND CUBBY FAMILIES. 



55 



128. Melachlin (3) : his 
son. 

124. Cormac : bis son. 

125. Art : his son. 



126. John (2) : his son. 

127. Johni oge MacCogh- 
lan : his son ; living in 
1667. 



8. — The Stem op the ** Oullen" Family. 

DoNN, brother of Brian who is No. 93 on the ** Keely" 
pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Coilean ; which has been 
anglicised Colin , Collin, Collins, Culhane, and Cullen. 



98. Donn : son of Caol- 
Inighe. 

94. Dnnaghach : his son. 

95. Ainnir : his son. 

96. Coilean an catha 
(" coilean*' : Irish, a young 
varrior), meaning "the 
young war dog'' : his son ; a 
quo O* Coilean, 

97. Conor : his son. 

98. Dermod : his son. 

99. Teige O'Cullen : his 
son ; who settled in Carbery 
and first assumed this sur- 
name. 



100. 
son. 

101. 

102. 

103. 

104. 
grain : 

105. 
son. 

106. 

107. 

108. 

109. 
his son. 



Coilean -caonra : his 

Donall : his son. 
Conor mor : his son. 
Conor oge : his son. 
Teige mhaighe o-na- 
his son. 
GioUalachtghi : his 

Niall : his son. 
Ranall : his son. 
Eanall (2) : his son. 
Dermod O'Cullen : 



4. — The Stem of the ** Cubby*' Family. 

Gnoboo, brother of Aedhan who is No. 93 on the ** Cogh- 
lan" pedigree, was the ancestor of O^Curaidh ; anglicised 
Corey, Cory and, more lately, Curry » 



93. Gnobog: sonof 
Dealbha. 

94. Baodan : his son. 

95. Maithan : his son. 

96. Maoltuile : his son. 

97. Saraan : his son. 



98. Aodh : his son. 

99. Dungal : his son. 

100. Dungus : his son. 

101. Innealach : his son. 
102 Luachan : his son. 
108. Lughaidh : his son. 



flU 



IMcJinT 



Ill, I^naaid (Denaod) 
O*G0t^: bMKCrn; tbeftrst 
frb^ ftfwtuned tbii tinumie. 



lliL 

Lis no 
114. 

116. 
117. 

iia 

119. 
120. 
121. 

son. 



C«Ea& j 3) : Ms kh& 

DfiduJd : kissoaa. 
Conor (2) : his son. 
Donald (2) : \a& son. 
Conor O'Canj : his 



6. — ^Tmb Stkii of the " Dowkes" Easolt. 

BitocAV^ a jounger brother of Lnghaidh who is Mo. 88 on 
tbo yO'VUxB,** pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Duana ; 
anglicised Doan^ Dawne$f Duaine^ Duane, Dwain, ondHooke. 



88. Brocan 0* brocan** : 
Irish, a little badger) : third 
son of Cormac Oaleng; a 
quo O'Brocairif anglicised 
Brogan, 

89. Talglaine : his son. 

90. Oosda : his son, 

91. Finghin: his son. 

92. Blathmac : his son. 
08. Baodan: his son. 
94. Orunmaol: his son. 
00. Maoinaob : his son. 
()(}. Oolgan : bis son. 
07. Crunmaol (2) : his 



98. Bobartach : his son. 

99. Bnadhrach : his son. 

100. Aonachan(<<aonach'*: 
Irish, a fair) : his son ; a 
quo O'h'Aonaghain^ angli- 
cised Hinnegan, Henaghaji, 
and Henehan. 

101. Airgeaid : his son. 

102. Aongns : his son. 
108. Tuileagna : his son. 

104. Tuileagna (2^: his 
son. 

105. Cormac : his son. 

106. Grunmaol (8) : his 
son. 



* ( ^m'ihih ! ThU \¥tml it deri\'ml from the Irish obsolete sabstan 
Mv«* ^^Hfi '* |«HWt«Vi" *MHMUitt«M" I and from it some genealogists xn- 



I.] 



THB DUBKIN AND HABOLTON FAMILIES. 



67 



107. 

108. 

109. 

110. 
a hall) 
Alia, 
HaU. 

111. 

112. 

113. 
[duan] 



Diognadha : his son. 

Crimthann : his son. 

Oisein : his son. 

AUa("aUa'': Irish, 
: his son ; a quo O'/t- 
anglicised Ally and 

Siodhal : his son. 
Eochagan : his son. 
Dubhan ("dubhan" 
: Irish, a dark-com- 



plexioned man; a fishing 
hook) : his son a quo- 
O'Duana, 

114. Searragh: his son. 

115. Ceallach O'Duana: 
his son ; first assumed this 
simame. 

116. GioUa-Ghriosd : his 
son. 

117. Toileagna 0*Daana: 
his son. 



6. — ^Thk Stbm of the " Dubkin" (House op Heber) Family. 



SnfEALL, brother of Carthann who is No. 98 on the '< Mao- 
namara" pedigree, was the ancestor of 0*h Dobharcon ; 
anglicised Durkin. 



93. Sineall : son of Cas- 
san. 

94. Cillin (" cillin" : Ir- 
ish, a little cell) : his son ; a 
quo O* Cillin J anglicised Kil- 
leen, 

95. Aodh : his son. 

96. Banbhan ("banbh" : 
Irish, a sucking pig) : his 
son ; a qno O'EanhUain, 
anglicised Bannin, 

97. Dubhlaoidh: his son. 

98. Dobharchu (" dob- 
harca*': Irish, an ottei-) : his 
son ; a quo O'h- Dohharchon. 



99. Luchodhar : his son. 

100. Orghus ; his son. 

101. Menmon odhar : his 
son 

102. Gathan : his son. 

103. Oormghal : his son. 

104. Ceilceann (** ceil" : 
Irish, to conceal ; Heb. 
"chele*', a prison): his son. 

105. Padraic (Patrick) : 
his son. 

106. Donald ; his son. 

107. Donoch O'h-Dobhar- 
con : his son. 



7. — ^Thb Stem of the ^* Hamilton" (Duke op Abbbcobn) 

Family. 

Waltbb (the Mor Mhaor Leamhna or " Great Steward of 
Lennox*'), lord high steward of Scotland, who is No. 115 
on the *< Stewart*' pedigree, was the remote ancestor of 



SB 



Hamilton,^ dake of Abercom. Tbis Walter, loid steward, 
married Maigeij, the only daughter of Bobert Brace (called 
V King Bob^ the VmX^^) King of Scotland ; upon whose 
issne by the said Walter the crown was entailed by the 
Scotch Parliament, in default of male issne of the said 
Bobert Brace's only son, Dayid, King of Scotland, who 
died without issue, a.i>. 1370. 



115. Walter, lord " Ste- 
ward" of Scotland : son of 
John of Bute ; ancestor of 
Stewart and Stuart. 

116. Bobert Stewart or 
Bobert the Second, King of 
Scotland : his son. 

117. Bobert the Third, 
King of Scotland , his son ; 
his first name was John. 

118. James the First, 
King of Scotland : his son. 

119. James the Second, 
King of Scotland, his son ; 
had a brother named Ninion. 

120. Princess Mary of 
Scotland : his daughter, 
who married James, the first 
lord Hamilton. 

121. James Hamilton,first 
earl of Arran : their son. 

122. James, second earl 
of Arran, his son. 

128. Claud, the first lord 
Paisley : his son. 

124. James, first earl of 
Abercom: his son. 



125. Sir George Hamilton : 
his son ; creat^ a baronet, 
A.i>. 1660. 

126. James : his son ; 
who died in his father's life- 
time. 

127. James : his son ; the 
sixth earl of Abercom. 

128. James, the seventh 
earl : his son. 

129. Hon. John Hamil- 
ton : his son. 

180. John- James, the 9th 
earl of Abercom : his son ; 
was created *' marquis of 
Abercom." 

181. James, viscount 
Hamilton : his son. 

182. James Hamilton, 
marquis of Abercom : his 
son ; created, in 1868, 
<< marquis of Hamilton and 
duke of Abercom", in the 
Peerage of Ireland; living 
in 1877 ; was Lord Lieuten- 
ant of Lreland, in 1876 ; 
had a brother named Claud. 



* Hamilton : This Bimame is derived from the Irish ** amhail" 
(Or. *' omal-os'\ Lat. *'simil-is*') /iX;e, and " thonn", a ii^at;e ; and 
implies that the ancestor of the family was as impetuous in battle 
M the bUhws are at sea. 



t] 



THE HANBAGHAN (OF MXTNSTEB) FAMILT. 



59 



188. James, marqnis of 
Hamilton : his son ; living 
in 1877. This James had 7 
sisters, named — 1. Lady 
Harriet, 2. Lady Beatrice, 
8. Lady Louisa, L Lady 
Catherine, 5« Lady Geor- 
giana, 6. Lady Alberta- 
Frances - Anne, 7. Lady 
Maud - Evelyn ; and five 



brothers, named — 1. Claud- 
John, 2. George-Francis, 
8. Eonald-Douglas, 4. Fre- 
derick - Spencer, and 5. 
Ernest-William. 

134. James-Albert-Edw- 
ard-Hamilton, lord Paisley: 
his son ; born in 1869, and 
living in 1877. 



8. — The Stem of the ^* Hanraghan*' (of Munsteb) Family. 

Aedh (or Hugh), brother of Anluan who (see the first 
series) is No. 100 on the *< 0*Brien** pedigree, was the 
ancestor of O'h-Anraghain ; anglicised Hanrdhan. 



100. Hugh: son of Nat- 
hun. 

101. Fionn : his son. 

102. Foghmail : his son. 
108. Aongus : his son. 

104. Muireaihagh : his 
son. 

105. Eoghan (owen) : his 
son. 

106« Cu-Ultagh : his son. 

107. Faolan : his son. 

108. Donghaile : his son. 

109. Seagha : his son. 

110. Maitfaan : his son. 

111. Teige na lann 
(** lann" : Irish, the blade of 
a Mword ; Lai ** lan-io**, to 
cut): his son; a quo O'Laine^ 
anglicised Lane^ and Laney. 

112. Bicard mor: his son. 
118. Bicard oge : his son. 

114. James : his son. 

115. Murtogh : his son. 



116. Donogh : his son. 

117. Brian :' his son. 

118. Shane (or John): his 
son. 

119. Donall : his son. 

120. Donall oge : his son. 

121. Thomas : his son. 

122. John (2) : his son. 
128. William mor an- 

racan {an racan : Irish, **the 
rake"), caUed William O'A- 
Anraghain (or William the 
Bake) : his son ; who lived 
in Ballyna-ccroidhe. 

124. William oge O'Han- 
raghan : his son. 

125. Teige : his son. 

126. Donall ^8) : his son. 

127. Bory: his son. 

128. Brian (2): his son. 

129. Denis O'Hanraghan : 
his son. 



eo 



IBISH PEDIGBBBS. 



[pAwr 



9.— The Sitem of the ** Heffebnan'' Family. 

AoNGus (or ^neas) Geannattin, brother of Bladd who (see 
the first series) is No. 92 on the ** O'Brien'* pedigree, was 
the ancestor of O^h-Iffernaln ; anglicised Hefferan, Heffernan 
and Heyfron, 



92. ^neas Geannattin : 
son of Cass. 

98. Gonall : his son ; 
had a brother named Baoth 
("baoth": Irish, simple) ^ a 
quo Booth, 

94. Cohnan : son of 
Gonall. 

95. Geimhdealach : his 
son. 

96. Culen (or Ulen) : his 
son. 

97. Gathbharr(orAhhar- 
tach) : his son. 

98. Gonor (also called 
Core) : his son. 

99. Iffeman (**ifeam" : 
Irish hell ; Lat. " infem- 
ns") : his son ; a quo O'A- 
Iffernain. 

100. Faolchadh : his son. 

101. Gonligan : his son. 



102. Sioda : his son. 
108. Donoch: his son. 

104. Conn: his son» 
Some annalists make this 
Conn the ancestor of Muin- 
tir Cuinn or Qidn^ of 
Munster. 

105. MeU (or Neal) : hi& 
son. 

106. Faolach : his son. 

107. Core : his son. 

108. Moroch(or Mortogh) 
his son. 

109. Donoch (2) : his son. 

110. GioUaseana: his son. 

111. Donoch (8^ : his son. 

112. Donald: nisson. 
118. Thomas : his son. 

114. Donald : his son. 

115. Donald oge: hisson* 

116. Gonor O'Heffeman r 
his son. 



10. — ^Thb Stem of the ** Hiokby** Familt. 

EiNsiODA, brother of Maolclochach who is No. 101 on the 
** MacNamara" pedigree, was the ancestor of O^h-Iocaiyhy 
and Afaclocaigh anglicised Hickey, Hicks, and Hickson. 

101. Einsioda : son of Irish, a payment) ; his son ; 
Cnilean. a quo (yh-Iocaigh and Mac- 

102. Ainiochadagh : his locaigh, 

son. J 104. Michliagh: hifl son. 

108. locaigh (" ioc " : | 105. Ere : his son. 



«•] 



THE HOOAN FAMILT. 



61 



106. Donall O'Hickey : 
his son ; first assumed this 
simame. 

107. Deaghadh : his son. 

108. Aedh : his son. 

109. Cormac: his son 

110. James: his son. 

111. Cormac (2) : his son. 

112. Teige : his son. 



118. Owen : his son. 

114. Muireadhagh : his 
son. 

115. John: his son. 

116. Aedh (or Hugh) ; his 
son. 

117. John (2) : his son. 

118. John (8) O'Hickey: 
his son. 



11. — The Stem op the "Hogan'' Familt. 

CosGBAGH, brother of Cineidh [kenneth or kenneda] wbo 
(see the first series) is No. 104 on the " O'Brien" pedigree, 
was the ancestor of Oli-Ogainj of Munster; anghcised 
Hogan, 



104. Cosgrach : son of 
Lorcan : a quo Cosgrave ;* of 
Munster. 

105. Aithcir: his son. 

106. Ogan (*• ogan": Irish, 
u youth) : his son ; a quo 
O^h'Ogain. 

107. Teige : his son. 

108. Conor : his son. 

109. Teige (2) : his son. 

110. Giolla Padraic : his 
son. 

111. Aodh : his son. 



112. Edmond : his son. 
118. Edmond f2) : his son. 

114. Edmond (8): his son. 

115. Diarmod : his son. 

116. Oonogher : his son ; 
who died, a.d. 1685. 

117. Conogher (2), alias 
Giallgarbh t [gilgariv] , 
O'Hogan, of Cranagh, 
county Tipperary : his son ; 
a quo Kilgarriff, This Giall- 
garbh had a brother named 
Dermod ; living in 1657. 



* Cosgrave : The Irish coagar, ** victory '*, is the root of the simame 
O'Cosgrighe ; aDglicised Cosgraye, MacCoscry, MacCusker, Lestrange, 
and L'Estrange. 



t Giallgarbh : This name (" giall " : Irish, a hostage^ and " garbh", 
fierce) means the ** fierce hostage." 



(^% 



luam vmniumBssi:,. 



JWMff 



M(mC/tnf/¥' : m^uiimd^ R^^iij.- R^jhj^. EleJij^. asoL fiivjfimi^. 






1}1%. SfKBBnL:: Ilifrfflzti. 
(Hk. Cairhcs ::Iiis;sniL. 
IGO;. Momii :: Iil& aom. 

Msf SOIL. 



^ )!^MhAiJ li^mwii. t}<)Xaiy wi^ f-'^T^tmlmifttgk^Jjg&ffiiiigarf^ 






107* Ma<[>IsMag6JiauaDm r 
son. 

10& Donog^ O^^csdj: his 

0O1L 



1S«— TflS Stkic of the '' EnmsiyT " (of Muhstsb) Fasoclt. 

Doicfiff tfAic, a brother of the monarch Brian Bom who (see 
ih© flfwt i©ri©H) is No. 106 on the "O'Brien" pedigree, 
WftS ill© ftfiOOStor of O'Cinnidh ; anglicised Kennedy. 



lOff. Donchuan : son of 

mU VlumWt (<«oineadh'*: 
fritthi H mfitm «r /pi«r^ ; Gr. 

iM?: AmiIIh hkiion. 



108. Donchnan : his son. 

109. Mahoun O'Kennedj: 
his son ; first assumed this 
sirname. 

110. Teige: his son. 

111. Oiollacomin(or Giol- 
laoaoimhghin) : his son. 



I.] 



THE MacAULIFFE AND MacCARTHT FAMILIES. 



G3 



112.Donall-cathaleitreach 
bis son. 

118. Teige : his son ; had 
a brother named Giollaco- 
min. 

114. Oiollacomin (2) : his 
son. 

115. GioUa Padraic : his 
son. 

116. Aodh: his son. 

117. Donald : his son. 

118. Gillcomin : bis son ; 
bad two brothers — 1. Pat- 
rick, and 2. Donall gall. 



119. Padraic (or Patrick): 
his son. 

120. Philip ; his son. 

121. Dermod : his son. 

' 122. Maithan ; his son ; 
a qno <* Clann Maithan 
Donn O'Kennedy." 

123. Teige : his son ; had 
three brothers. 

124. Rory: his son. 

125. Dermod 'Kennedy : 
his son ; had four brothers. 



14. — The Stem of the ** MacAuliffe" Family. 

Teige, brother of Cormac who (see the first series) is No. 
109 on the ** MacCarthy*' pedigree, was the ancestor of 
UlacAmhailgaidh (anglicised MacAwly, MacAvrliff, and 
MacAuliffe\ of EaUo or Duhallow, in the county Cork. 



109. Teige : son of Mure- 
dach. 

110. Donogh : his son. 

111. Amhailgadh (** am- 
baH": Irish, like, and **gad'*, 
a twisted osier) : his son ; a 
quo AfacAmhailgaidh — mean- 
ing •* the son of the withe- 
like man.'' 



112. Conor MacAwliff : 
his son. 

118. Conor oge: his son. 

114. Maolseaghlainn : his 
son. 

115. Conor (2) : his son. 

116. Conor (8) : his son. 

117. Owen MacAwliff : 
his son. 



15. — The Stem of the " MacCabthy" (glas) Family. 

Donal goth (" goth" : Irish, straight), brother of Cormac 
fionn who (see the first series) is No. 112 on the 






" UicCiith^'^ pedigree, vms the sneestcur of MacCartky,^^ 
of Glesn-na-Crmm (or the Tale of Crom). — See No. 114 on 
the " O'BonoTUi'' pedigree, for the odgin of the nam e 

lis. Bonal goth : son of - 190. Dermod na-nglao (or 
Donal Mor na-cnrra; lord Dermod of the Conflicts) : 
of Oarbeiy, A.D. 1205 to 1251. his son ; married in 1562 a 

113. Donal maol : his daughter of Tadhg, the 
son ; lord of Carbeiy, 1262 eleTenth lord of Muskerry. 
to 1310. * I 121. Tadhg an fhorsa 

114. Donal caomh : his (Teige of the forces) : his 
son ; lord of Carheiy, 1311 . son ; chieftain, 1578 to 
to 1320. I I6ia 

115. Cormac donn: his | 122. Tadhg an dnna (or 
son ; lord of Carheiy and | Te^ the Hospicioos) : his 
Ivaghe, A.D. 1366. ; son ; second in command of 

116. Felim : his son ; « the Mnnster forces in 1641 ; 
chieftain of Glean-na-croim, . chieftain, a.d. 1618 to 
aquo'^SIiochdFeidhlimidh** 1648. 
— the trihe name of the 
MacCarthy*8 of Glean-na- 
Croim. 

117. Tadhg (or Teige) : 
his son. 

118. Finin (or Florence) : 
his son. 

119. Cormac : his son ; 
(liedA.D. 1562. 



123. Dermod (called in 
English official documents 
" Jeremy Cartie, Esq.") : 
his son ; restored to the 
lands of Glean-na-Croim, 
by act of Grace of King 
Charles II. ; married Cat- 
herine, daughter of Finin, 
son of Sir Owen, the seventh 



* MacCarihy : This sinuune is derived from Carthaeh, who (see 
the first series) is No. 106 oo the '* MacCarthy" pedigree. Carthach 
implies " the founder of a city." The root of tae word is the Irish 
cathair, gen. cathrach, "a city.** Mel-KartJiawaa the title of the 
FhoBoician Herdnles, the reputed founder of Tyre ; and the Irish 
Maol'Cartha means the ** hero or king of the city.*' Ancestors of 
MacCarthaighe (or " MacCarthy") founded the city of Oashd, which 
was formerly the royal seat of the Kingdom of South Munster. 
Compare the Phoen,, Chald., and Syr. Kartha, the Punic cartha (a 
quo ** Carthage'*), the Heb. Kyria, and Pers. car, '* a walled city*' ; 
the Heb. ckader, "a city", and Kyr, "a wall.*' — See JNote 
'' Carthage'', in the Dedication pages of this series. 



!•] 



THE MacGABTHY (lOBDS OF MUSGBT) FAMILY. 



65 



MacCarthy Beagb, by a 
daughter of Edmand Fitz- 
gibbon, the ** white knight." 

124. Felim : son of said 
Dermod. 

125. Gormac glas (other- 
Dvise Charles of Lorraine) : 
bis son ; a captain in tne 
Boyal Irish Begiment of 
Foot Guards to King James 
11. 

126. Donoch (or Denis) 
glas : his son. 

127. Daniel glas : his son. 

128. Daniel glas (2) : his 
son. 



129. Daniel glas, of Glean 
na-Croim : his son ; living 
in 1877. 

180. Florence Strachan 
MacCarthy Glas, of West- 
down House, Bradworthy, 
North Devon, England : hia 
son ; living in 1877. 

181. Finin : his son ; has 
three brothers and three 
sisters : the brothers are — 1. 
Charles, 2. Donal, 8. 
Eugene ; the sisters are — 1. 
Kathleen, 2. Mary, 8. 
Aileen — all living in 1877. 



16. — ^Thb Stem op the ** MacCabthy" (lords of Musgby) 

Faboly. 

Donald MacOaethy Mor, who (see the first series) is No. 
116 on the '< MacCarthy'' pedigree, had a brother named 
Dermod mor of Muscry (now Muskerry) who was the 
ancestor of MacCarthy^ lords of Muscry, and earls of Clan- 
cartby. 

1 16. Dermod mor : brother of Donald MacCarthy Mor ; 
was A.D. 1858, created << lord of Muscry" ; from him 
descended Felimy, who was ancestor of MacCarthy, of 
Tuonadroman, and of Donoch, who was ancestor of Garthy 
(modernized Cartie), of Cluanfada. This Dermod mor 
was slain by his mother's brother, the lord Fitzmaurice. 

117. Cormac, Lord Muscry : his son ; slain in battle 
by the Barries, in 1874. From his younger son Donald 
are descended the <' Carthies" of Sean ChoilU 

118. Teige (or Thadeus), lord Muscry : his son ; died, 
1448 ; from his yoimger son Dermod are descended the 
" Carthies" of Drishan. 

119. Cormac (2), lord Muscry : his son ; who built five 
chiirchesy and the Castles of Bhtmeyy.Kilcreay and Bally- 
maccadan ; was slain, 1494. 



68 miSH PEDIGBEES. [PABT 

120. Cormae oge, Lord Mnscry : his son ; fought the 
battle of Glnhar and Moor, where he defeated the earl of 
Desmond, in 1521 ; he died in 1686. 

121. Teige, lord Mnscry : his son ; had six sons — 1. 
Dermod ; 2. Sir Gormac Mac Teige, lord of Musory, who 
was ancestor of the families of Gourtbreack, Bealla, Gastle- 
mor, and Glochro ; 8. Owen, who was slain at Dromanee ; 
4. Donald-na-countea* (who died in 1581) ; 5. Geallachan 
(who was ancestor of the ** Oarthies" of Carricknamnck) ; 
and 6. Donoch, who was ancestor of ** Garthy" of Garrew. 

122. Dermod, lord Muscry : son of Teige. 

128. Gormac mor, lord Muscry : his son ; living in 
1608. 

124« Gormac oge, lord Muscry : his son ; died in 1640. 

126. Donoch, lord Muscry : his son ; was the first 
** earl of Glancarthy." This Donoch was twice married : 
by his first wife he had a son named Donal ; by his 
second marriage he had three sons — 1. Gormac oge ; 2. 
Ceallachan ; 8. Justin ; and one daughter named Elana, 
who was countess of Glanrickard. 

126. Gormac oge, lord Muscry: his son; was in his 
father's time slain in a sea-fight against the Dutch, in 
June 1665, leaving no male issue. His brother Geallachan 
succeeded his father in the earldom. 

127. Donoch MacGarthy, earl of Glanoarthy: son of 
the said Geallachan ; living, a*d. 16dl. 



17 — ^Tbb Stem of tsb ** MacGabtht" (op MnmsfOTA) 

Famelt. 

DoKAL, eldest son of Donoch who is No. 126 on the 
** MaoGarthy" (lords of Muscry) pedigree, was the ancestor 
of Af AcCarlA^, of St Paul, Minnesota, U.S. Amenea. 
126« Donooh, the eighteenth lord Mnsety, Baron of 



* DomM ma tiMMUmi llus «^thet na emmiem means "of the 
tomBiif.** In tlM i^lale Wptrs, leay^ '^■^K^t^, this Donald is 



1.] THE IfACCABTHT (OF MINNESOTA) FAMILY. 67 

Blarney, the first ** earl of Clancartby", Confederate Chief- 
tain and Commander of the Maaster forces, in the wars 
of 1641-62. 

126. Donal : his eldest son. 

127. Donal-Oormao : his son. 

128. Fingin (or Florence), of Coom : his son ; had 
two sons— 1. Donal (who died yoimg, without issue), and 
2. Fingin Mor ; he had four daughters.* 

129. Fingin Mor : son of Fingin ; took an active in- 
terest in the Irish Insurrection of 1798 ; died in 1818, 
aged 98 years. This Fingin Mor left issue hy his wife 
Margaret O'Connor (Leagh) five sonst and five daught-ers. 



* Daughters: Thefonrdanglitero werema]Tied~*<metoO'Mahony 
(Coin) ; another to O'Connor (Gathal), of Coom, a descendimt of 
Cathiu-craobh-dearg O'Couor, King of Connaught; another to 
O'Solliyan, of Curragh ; and another daughter to OTieary, of Ive- 
Leary, called ** Teige-na-Posf The issne of this last marriage was 
Professor Arthur O'Leary ; Jeremiah O'Leary, father of Professor 
Jeremiah O'Leary of Lindsay, Ont.^ Canada, livins in 1877j and 
father of Arthur and Hugh O'Leary of the same place, Barristers, 
etc. ; and a daughter, Nancy, who was married to tferenuah O'Brien, 
•of Dunmanway, County Cork. Of the children of this last marriage 
are the Very Kev. Canon O'Brien, P.P., of Bandon, County Cork, 
and Dr. O'Brien, late of France, but now (1877) living in Ireland. 

t Sons : The sons were— 1. Donal M<Hr ; 2. Fingin oge ; 3. John ; 
4. Cornelius ; 5. Charles ; and the daughters were — 1. Mai^^aret ; 
2. EUen ; 3. Catherine ; 4. Marv ; and 5. Johanna. Fingm oge, 
here mentioned, married Mary O'Crowley, by whom he hiul issue 
who migrated to America ; John married a MacCarthy (Tnllig), and 
liad iflsue who died in Ireland without issue ; Com^us married 
Kate Forbish, by whom he had issue who went to America and 
settled in Vermont ; and Charles married Kancr^ O'Donovaiji, and 
emigrated to Canada. Margaret married Owen O'Connor (Cathal), 
who took part in the Irish Insurrection of 1798 ; the issue of tibis 
marrutte was Ellen, married to Timothy Collins, also a " '98" man ; 
John, uther of John O'Connor, C.E., Ottawa, Canada ; Timothy, 
father of the Rev. John S. O'Connor, P.P., of Alexandria, Canada ; 
and Owen, father of Eugene and Edward O'Connor, of St. Paul, 
Minnesota. Ot the other daughters of Fingin Mor, EUen married 
Samael Beamish ; Catherine married John Callanan ; Johanna 
married John Beamish ; and Mary married Hurlihy, the chief of his 
«ept» by whom she had a son named Dennis, who removed to 
America. 



68 IRISH FEDIGBEES. [PABT 

180. Donal Mor* : son of Fingin Mor ; was a captain 
in the Insurrection of 1798, and commanded the Irish 
forces in the battle of Ballynascarthy ; left Ireland, a.d. 
1825, and died in Canada some few years after. This 
Donal Mor had issue by his wife Mary (daughter of 
Francis Bicheson, Esq., by his wife Ellen O'CaUaghan) 
four sons and three daughters. 

181. Charles : his son ; bom 2nd February 1808 ; was 
the last of the family who migrated to America, in 1828. 
This Charles married Ellen, daughter of Timothy Collins, 
by his wife Ellen O'Connor (Cathal), in Canada, and there 
settled as an Architect ; until 1868, when he and his 
family removed to St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S.A. ; living in 
1877. This Charles had i^sue four daughters, Mary and 
Johanna, living, and Ellen and Margaret, deceased ; and 
five sons, viz. — 1. Daniel-Francisf ; 2. John-Collins ; 8. 
Charles, 4. Florence- Joseph, both deceased ; and 5. 
Cornelius Mor. 

182. Cornelius Mor MacCarthy, of St. Paul, Minnesota, 
U.S.A., Counsellor and Attorney at-Law ; living in 1877. 



18. — The Stem op the ** MacCraith" Family, 

Cbaith, brother of Boger who (see the first series) is No. 
117 on the <' O'Sullivan Mor" pedigree, was the ancestor 

* Donal Mar : His soiib were — 1. John ; 2. Oomelius ; 3. Charles; 
and his danehters — 1. Mary; 2. Ellen; 3. Johanna. Mary, his 
eldest chUd, bom a.d. 1790, married Hayes, by whom she had two 
children — John and Johanna; Mary survives her children and is 
now (1677') living in Canada. John and Cornelias, sons of Donal 
mor, went to Canada, where they died withont issue ; Ellen married 
Martin Donovan, of Dunmanway ; and Johanna went to Canada, 
where she married Joseph DeFoe, by whom she had a son, surviving, 
named Daniel MacCartny DeFoe, Barrister, etc., of Toronto, and a 
daughter Eliza, married to Paul Whyte. 

t Daniel-Francis : This Daniel-Francis MacCarthy, of St. Paul, 
Minn., married Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph Allen, by whom he 
has issue — Charles- Allen, Catherine-Louise, Joseph-Pius, and Ellen- 
Frimces. His brother, John-Collins MacCarthy, of St. Paul, Minn., 
manied Anne-Eliza, daughter of John H. GrindAU, by whom he has 
issue — Charles-Grindall, Mary-A^es, Daniel- Francis, and John- 
Edward. His brother, Charles, died young, without issue ; and his 
youngest brother, Florence-Joseph, was proprietor of the We^em 
Times, St. Paul, but died without issue, 3lBt December, 1874. 



I.] 



THE ICacMAHON (OF MUNSTEb) FAMILT. 



69 



of MacCralih ; anglicised MacCraith, and modernized 
Maccrae and Macrae. 



117. Craith (" craith" : 
Irish, to weave): son of Dun- 
long; a quo MacCraith, 
implying ** the son of the 
weaver." 

118. Donall MacCraith : 
his son. 



119. Conor : his son. 

120. Owen : his son. 

121. Buadhach : his son. 

122. Dermod : his son. 
128. Conor (2) : his son. 
124. Owen MacCraith : 

his son. 



19. — The Stem of the ** MagMahon'* (of Munsteb) 

Family. 

TuBLOGH Mor, the 178th monarch of Ireland, who died 
A.D. 1086, and (see the first series) is No. 107 on the 
" 0*Brien'* pedigree, had two sons— 1. Mathghabhuin* ; 
2. Dermod: this Mathghabhuin was the ancestor of 
MacMathgharnhna, anglicised MacMahon ; and his brother 
Dermod was the ancestor of O'Brien , Kings of Thomond. 



108. Mathghabhuin 
(" magh" : Irish, a plain ; 
" gabhuin", a calf) : son of 
Turlogh Mor ; a quo Mac- 
Mathghamhna (of Munster). 

109. Morogh : his son. 

110. Dermod MacMahon: 
his son ; first of this family 
who assumed this simame. 

111. Morogh na mong- 
nach : his son. 

112. Donogh : his son. 



118. Dermod : his son. 

114. Rory buidhe [boy] : 
his son. 

115. Donogh na glaice : 
his son. 

116. Teige roe : his son ; 
had a brother named 
Donogh. 

117. Teige (2) : his son. 

118. Turlogh (or Terence) 
his son. 



* McUhgJuibhuin : This name means '' the bear of the plahi"> or 
" a wild calf' ; for a bear is strictly a kind of toild calf. From this 
word is derived the simames Mahxm, MacMahon^ Mahonyt and 
0*Mahony ; but it may be here observed that the " Mahon" and 
"MacMahon" families of Munster are ^tinct from the " Mahon'' and 
"MacMahon", of Ulster. 



70 nasH PEDiaBEBs. [pabt 



119. Teige (8) : his son. 
This Teige had two brothers 
— 1. Brian ; and 2. Donogh 
(or Donatus), who (there is 
reason to believe) was the 
ancestor of << MaoMahon" of 
France*. 

120. Morogh : son of 
Teige. 



121. Teige (4) : his son. 

122. Turlogh roe : his 
son. 

128. Sir Teige : his son. 

124. Sir Tnrlogh MacMa- 
hon, of Corca Baisgin (now 
the barony of ** Moyarta", 
in the county Clare) : his 
son. 



20. — The " MaoMahon" (op Fbance) Fkuxly. 

Tebenoe (or Tnrlogh) MacMahon, ancestor of this family, 
who died in 1472, must have been contemporary with 
Tnrlogh who (see the first series) is No. 118 on the 
" O'Brien" pedigree, and who died in 1457. This fact 
leads me to believe that this Terence Tor, Turlogh) 
MacMahon was the same person as the Turlogh (or Ter- 
ence) who is No. 118 on the (foregoing) << MacMahon" (of 
Munster) pedigree ; whose son, Donogh (latinized << Dona- 
tus") was the <<Donatus MacMahon" who is mentioned 
in the Count de Equilly's genealogy (see No. 119), in this 
pedigree. 

* MacMahon of France: Patrick MacMahon of Torrodile, in the 
county Limerick, having espoused the cause of Kinff James the 
Second, settled in France after the Treaty of Limerick, a.d. 1691. 
His son, John MacMahon of Autun, in France, was created " Count 
de EquUly** ; who, in order that his children and his posterity might 
have sufficient proof of ''the proud fact that they were of Insh 
descent", applied on the 28th September, 1749, to the Irish Govern- 
ment (accompanying his application with necessary facts, et-c , for 
the Officers of Ulster King m. Arms), to have his genealoey, together 
with the records, etc., of his family duly authenticated, colkcted, 
and recorded, with all necessary venfication. All this was accord- 
ingly done, the various requisite signatures affixed thereto, and 
countersigned by the then Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. In these 
records, preserved in the Office of Arms, Dublin Castle, Count de 
Equilly is described as of ''the noble family, patemallv, of 
' MacMahon', of Clondeas (in the county Clare), and, maternally, of 
the noble family of ' O'Sullivan Beara.*" This John MacMahon 
(Count de Eouilly) was the grandfather of Marshal Patrick 
MacMahon of France, Duke of Magenta, President of the Freneh. 
Bepublio ; bom a.d. 1808, and living in 1877. 



I.] 



THE MacNAMASA. FAMILY. 



71 



118. Terence (or Torlogh 
MacMahon, proprietor of 
Clondiralla, who died a.d. 
1472, married Helena (dau- 
ghter of Maurice Fitzgerald, 
earl of Kildare) by whom he 
had a son, named Donogh 
or Donatus. 

119. Donatus, who mar- 
ried Honora O'Brien : their 
son. 

120. Terence, married to 
Johanna, daughter of John 
Macnamara, of Dohaghtin 
— commonly called "Macna- 
mara Eeagh" : their son. 

121. Bernard, who was 
married to Margaret, daugh- 
ter of Donogh O'Brien, of 
Daugh: their son. 

122. Murtagh, whose wife 
was Elonora, daughter of 
TVilUam O'Nelan (or O'Nea- 
lan), of Emri, who was 
Colonel of a regiment of 
horse in the army of King 
Charles the First : their son. 

128. Maurice, who was 
married to Helena, daughter 
of Maurice Fitzgerald, of 
Ballince, Knight of Glyn : 
their soil 

124. Murtagh, whose wife 
was Helena, daughter of 
Emanuel MacSheehy, of 
Ballylinan : their son. 



125. Patrick, of Torro* 
dile, in the county Limerick: 
their son ; who married 
Margaret, daughter of John 
O'Sullivan of Bantry, in the 
county Cork; and who» 
after the Treaty of Limerick, 
A.D. 1691, first visited 
France la the suite of the 
exiled King James the Se- 
cond of England, and there 
settled. 

126. John MacMahon (or 
JeanBaptiste de MacMahon) 
of Autun, in France, hut 
horn in Ireland : their son ; 
who, in 1750, was ennobled 
by the French Government, 
and created ** Count de 
EquiUy." 

127. Maurice De Mac- 
Mahon : his son ; was faith- 
ful to the Bourbon cause, and 
was therefore, during the 
reign of Louis XYIII, King 
of France, created a Lieu- 
tenant-General, and Com- 
mander of the Order of St. 
Louis. 

128. Marshal Patrick Mac 
Mahon, President of the 
French Republic, Duke of 
Magenta, etc. : his son ; 
bom in 1808, and living in 
1877. 



21. — ^Thb Stem of the " Maonamara" Pedigbee. 
Casin, a younger brother of Bladd who (see the first 
series) is No. 92 on the << O'Brien" pedigree, was the an- 



72 



IBISH PEDIGREES. 



[past 



cestor of Macconmara ; anglicised Macnamaray and 
JdcNamara, 



92. Gasin : son of Cass. 

98. Carthann : his son. 
This Carthann had three 
brothers— 1. Eocha, who 
was ancestor of 0' Grady, 
etc. ; 2. Sineall, ancestor of 
Durkin, of Munster ; and 8. 
Cormac, ancestor of Clann 
Eocha, 

94. Ardgal (also called 
Fergal) : his son. 

95. Athluan : his son. 

96. Conn : his son. 

97. Eoghan ; his son. 

98. Dnngal : his son. 

99. Urthnile (** ur" : Ir- 
ish, recent ; ** tuile", a floods 
a tofrent) : his son ; a quo 
0*h' Urihuile, anglicised Har- 
ley. Burly, Herlihy, Flood smi 
Torrens. 

100. Cullin ; his son ; a 
quo the Macnamaras are 
called Clann Cvllin, 

101. Maolclochach 
(" cloch": Irish, a stone): his 
son ; a quo O'Maolcloiche, 
anglicised Stone and Stoney; 
had a brother named Einsi- 
oda, who was the ancestor of 
«« Hickey:' 

102. Siodaan-eich-bhuidhe 
(or Sioda of the jellow 
horse) : his son. This Sioda 
(<' sioda'': Irish, silk) was 
the ancestor of Sioda, 
anglicised Silke and Sheedy. 

108. Assioda : his son. 



104. Enna (or Sedna) : 
his son. 

105. Aedh odhar (« od- 
har" : Irish, palefaced) : his 
son ; a quo Siol Aedha 
(*' aedh" or ** aodh** : Irish, 
fire ; Sanscrit " edhas **, 
firewood) ; anglicised Hay 
and O'Hay, of Munster. 
This Aedh had a brother 
named Odhran ('' odhran" : 
Irish, {^« little palefaced man); 
a quo Drum and Orme. 

106. Menmon : his son ; 
had a brother named Niall, 
who was the ancestor of 
Clancy^ of Munster. 

107. Donald: son of Men- 
mon. 

108. Cu-mara ("cu", gen. 
" con", a warrior ; ** muir", 
gen. ** mara", the sea ; Lat. 
" mar-e" ; Arab. *' mara"): 
his son ; a quo Mac-con- 
mara, meaning ** the descen 
dants of the sea-protector." 

109. Donald Macnamara: 
his son ; first assumed this 
simame. 

110. Cu-mara (2) : his 
son. 

111. Neal (or NiaU) : his 
son. 

112. Cu-meadhmor: his 
son. 

118. Lochlann : his son. 
114. Maccon : his son. 



t] 



THE MacNAMASA AND MAHEB FAMILIES. 



78 



115. On-meadh (2) : his 
son. 

116. Maccou (2): his son; 
had two brothers- 1 . Donoch, 
and 3. Lochlann. 

117. John an ghahhaltnis 
(or John the conqueror) : 
Ids son ; had two brothers 
— 1. Sioda, and 2. Loch- 
lann. 

118- Donald an-marc- 
slnaigh (or ** Donald the 
horse of the army*') : his 
son. 

119. John : his son. 



120. Gnmeadh (8) mor : 
his son. 

121. Eory (or Boger) oar- 
ragh : his son. 

122. Gnmeadh (4) : his 
son. 

128. Donoch : his son. 

124. Oumeadh (6) liath : 
his son. 

125. Donald riabhach : 
his son. 

126. Donald oge ; his son. 

127. Teige Macnamara : 
his son. 



22. — The Stem of the ** Magnamaba'' (Fionn) Familt. 

SiODA, brother of John an ghabhaltuis (or John the con- 
qneror) who is No. 117 on the (foregoiag) ^* Macnamara" 
pedigree, was the ancestor of Macnamara Fionn, 



117. Sioda : son of Mac- 
-eon. 

118. Maccon : his son. 

119. John Macnamara 
Fionn ('* fionn": Irish, /air) 
Ms son. 

120. Ca-mara: his son. 



121 Gumeadh : his son. 
122. Teige : his son. 
128. Jolm: his son. 

124. Donald : his son. 

125. Donoch Macnamara 
Fionn : his son. 



28.— The Stem of the *' Maheb" Family. 

Fionnachta, a younger brother of lomchadh who (see the 
first series) is No. 88 on the '< O'Garroll" (Ely) pedigree, 
was the ancestor of O'Meachair; anglicised Maker and 
Meagher. 



74 

88. Konnadbift : fffy»^ 
son ofCcMila. 

89. Eoduudk: Ids son. 

90. Etchom : his son. 

91. Lo^ia : his son. 

92. Feaeh (or Eiacha) : 

his 80Q. 

93. Felim : his son. 

94. Donenn: his son. 

95. lio^ba (2) : his acm. 

96. Feigna: his son. 

97. Aodh^ his SOD. 

98. Meachsr: his son. 

99. Ga-coille : his aon. 

100. GeaUach : his ion. 

101. Meachsr (2) : his 

son. 

102. Dluthach : his eon. 

103. Teige mov : his son. 



D 

lOL Eigniach : his son. 

105. DcHisld : his son. 

106. Moroch : his son. 

107. Meachar: ("meach**: 
Insh, kospitaUtj/) : his son ; 
a quo O'Meaduur. 

108. Feaeh : his son. 

109. latin: ins son. 

110. Donoch : his son. 

111. Mmtach : his son. 

112. Melachlin : his son. 

113. Fionn : his son. 

114. Beimod: his son. 

115. Gilbert : his son. 

116. Piers : his son. 

117. Gflbert (2) : his son. 

118. Teige O'Meagher : 
his son. 



24.~The Stkm of thb " Mobiabtt" (of Munsteb) Family. 

Caibbbe Inachra (also called Gairbre croithneach), son of 
Gore who (see the first series) is No. 89 on " The Stem of 
the House of Heber," was the ancestor of O'Muircheirtaigh, 
anglicised Mofiarty^ Mwriarty and MurtagK 



89. Gore, King of Mnns- 

ter. 

90. Gairbre luachra : his 

son. 

91. Maine moncbaoin 
(** mun *' : Irish, urine ; 
'< caoin'^ to weep ; Heb. 
** kun*', to lament) : his son ; 
a quo 0* Munehaoinf anglici- 
sed Minchin. 

92. Daacb iarfhlaith : 
his son. 



93. Gobthach : his s<»i. 

94. Grimtbann : his son. 

95. Aedh binn : his son. 

96. Gathal : bis son. 

97. Murcba : his son. 

98. Moriartach orMuir- 
cheartaoh ('' muir": Irish, 
the sea, and " ceart", just ; 
Lat. '* cert-ns*') : his son : 
a quo O'Muircheittaigh. 

99. Fionngnala: his son. 
100. Maoldun : his son. 



I.] 



THE o'bbibn family. — Continued, 



71^ 



101. Mttredach : his son. 

102. Teige : his son. 
108. Eoghan (or Owen) : 

his son. 



104. Maoldttn(2): his son, 

105. Owen (2) : his son. 

106. Owen oge O'Muri- 
arty : his son. 



25. — Thb Stem op the " O'Beien" Family— Continued, 

In Brian catha-an-aonaigh, who (see the first series) is 
No. 117 on the ** O'Brien'* pedigree, the direct lineage of 
this family continues : 



117. Brian catha-an-aon- 
aigh (or Brian of the battle 
of Nenagh) : son of Mathun ; 
died A.D. 1899. 

118. Turlogh bog ("bog'*: 
Irish, 9oft)\ his son; d. 1459. 

119. Teige an-Chomhaid 

ior Teige of the castle of 
Jhomhad, in Barren): his 
son ; d., 1466. 

120. Tnrlogh donn: his 
son ; d., 1528. 

121. Mnrrongh : his son ; 
created " earl of Thomond*', 
in 1548; d., 1551. 

122. Dermod : his son ; 
had a younger brother named 
Donogh, who was the ances- 
tor of 0'J?n^,of Dromoland. 

128. Murrough (2) : son 
of Dermod ; d., 1578. 

124. Murrough (8) : his 
son ; d., 1 597. 

125. Dermod (2) : his 
son ; d., 1624. 

126. Murrough (4): his 
son; created "earl of In* 
ehiquin." 



127. William : his son ; 
d., 1691. 

128. WiUiam (2): his son^ 
d., 1719. 

129. William (8): his son,- 
d., 1777 ; had a brother 
named James, who died in 
1771. 

180. Murrough (5) : son 
of said James ; was the first 
"marquis'' in the family, 
the fifth <'earl", and the 
tenth " baron" ; d., 1808, 
without male issue : in de- 
fault of which the remainder 
was to the issue of his brot- 
her Edward, who died in 
1801, in the lifetime of Mur- 
rough. 

181. William (4) : son of 
said Edward ; d., 1846 ; had 
a brother named James, who 
died in 1855. This James 
O'Brien was the third mar- 
quis, the seventh earl, and 
the twelfth baron. On his 
death the titles of " earl" 
and " marquis", in the 



76 



naSH PEDIGBEES. 



[PABT 



fiamily, became extinct ; and 
the "barony** devolved on the 
Dromoland branch of the 
O'Brien family, in the per- 
son of 8ir Lucius O'Brien 



(who died in 1872), father 
of Edward-Donogh O'Brien, 
baron of Inchiquin, living in 
1877. 



26. — The Stem op ** O'Brikn" (op Dbomoland) Family. 

DoNOCH, the younger brother of Dermod who (see the first 
series) is No. 122 on the stem of the foregoing (''O'Brien") 
family, was the ancestor of O'Brien of Dromoland, county 



Glare. 

122. Donogh : son of 
Murrough, the first earl 
of Thomond ; died, 1582. 

128. Conor : his son ; d., 
1608. 

124. Donogh (2): his son; 
d., 1684. 

125. Conor (2): his son; 
^., 1661. 

126. Sir Donogh (8) : his 
son ; first <' baronet" in the 
family; d., 1717. 

127. Lucius : his son ; 
died (before his father) 
1717. 

128. Sir Edward : his 



son ; second baronet ; d., 
1765. 

129. Sir Lucius-Henry : 
his son ; third baronet ; d., 
1795. 

180. Sir Edward : his 
son; fourth baronet; d.,1887. 

181. Sir Lucius (8) : his 
son ; fifth baronet, and 
thirteenth <' baron Lichi- 
quin''; d., 1872. 

182. Edwaid-Donogh O'- 
Brien of Dromoland : his 
son ; sixth baronet, and 
the fourteenth < 'Baron Lichi- 
quin"; living in 1877. 



27. — ^The Stem op the " O'Oallaghan" Familt. 

Ceallaohan, who (see the first series) is No. 104 on the 
stem of the •* House of Heber", was the ancestor of 
O' Ceallaghain ; anglicised Callaghan and O'Callaghan. 



!•] 



THE 0*CABBOLL (eLY) FAMILY. 



77 



104. Geallachan (*'ceal- 
lach": Irish, war) : sou of 
Baochan; a quo O'Cealla- 
ghain, 

105. Doncha (or Donoch): 
hid son. 

106. Murcha (orMorogh): 
his son. 

107. Domhnall (or 
Donall) O'Callaghau : his 
son ; first assumed this sir- 
name. 

1G8. Ceallachan (2) : his 
son ; died a d. 1092. 

109. Cenede : his son. 

110. Morogh : his son. 

111. Aodh : his son. 

112. Mahoun : his son. 
118. Maccraith : his son. 

114. Lochlann : his son. 

115. Melaghlin : his son. 

1 16. Maccraith(2): his son. 



117. Cenede (2) : his son. 

118. DonoghyOfDromine, 
his son. 

119. Conor : his son. 

120. Teige ruadh : his 
second son. 

121. Donogh (2), of Bro- 
mine : his son ; died 1578. 

122. Conor (2) : his son. 
128. Ceallachan (8) : his 

son, 

124. Gathaoir modartha 
(** modartha'*: Irish, surly) : 
his son. 

125. Donogh (8): his son; 
had three brothers. 

126. Teige O'Callaghan : 
his son. This Teige had 
four brothers — 1. Donogh ; 
2. Cathaoir ; 8. Ceallachan ; 
and 4. Morogh. 



28.— The Stem op the *< O'Carroll"* (Ely) Family. 

In John O'Carroll, who (see the first series) is No. 120 on 
the ** O'Carroll'* (Ely) pedigree, the direct lineage of this 
family continues : 



120. John O'Carroll, 
prince of Ely : son of Maol- 
manaidh na feisoige. 

121. Donogh : his son ; 
had a brother named Maol- 
manaidh, who was the an- 
cestor of 0* Carroll of Mary- 
land, United States of 
America. 



122. Teige : son of Donogh* 
1 28. Cian : his son. 

124. Donogh (2): his son. 

125. John, of Beagh, co. 
Galway : his son. This John 
was transplanted to Beagh, 
by Oliver Cromwell. 

126. Bedmond,of Ardagh,. 
county Galway : his son. 



♦ (yCarroll: This simwne is derived from the Irish Cearbhallr 



'*iiiss8acre*', ''carnage." 



78 



IRISH PEDIGREES. 



[PABT 



127. Redmond (2), of 
Ardagh : his son. 

128. John, of Turlogh, 
county Galway : his son. 

129. Frederick - Francis, 
of Dublin and of Eiltevnet, 
Dunmore, county Gal- 



way : his son ; living in 
1877. 

130. Frederic-John O*- 
Carroll, A.B., Barrister-at- 
Law, 67 Lower Leeson-st., 
Dublin : his son ; living in 
1877. 



"29. — The Stem of the "O'Oarroll" (op Maryland) Familt. 

Maolruakaidh [Mulroona] , a brother of Donogh who is 
No. 121 on the (foregoing) " O'Oarroll" (Ely) pedigree, 
was the ancestor of 0* Carroll, of Maryland, United States, 
America. 



121. Mulroona : son of 
John ; died in 1582. 

122. Ferdorach : his son. 
128. Teige caoch : his 

son ; was created '* lord 
baron of Ely", in 1662 ; 
slain in 1654. 

124. Boger : his son. 

1 26. Mulroona (2): his son. 

126. Oharles O'Carroll : 
his son ; was attorney- 
general of Maryland, United 
States, America. 



127. Charles (2), of 
CarroUton, Maryland : his 
son ; was one of the 
signatories of the '* Dec- 
laration* of American In- 
dependence", in 1776. 

128. Charles, of Mary- 
land: his son. 

129. Charles O'Carroll, of 
Maryland : his son ; living 
in 1826. 



* DtdaraHonx The following were the signatories to the "Declara- 
tion of American Independence", in Congress, on the 4th July, 
1776 :-*l. John Adams, 2. Samuel Adams, 3. Jotiah Bartlet, 4. 
Carter Braxton, 5. Charles Carroll, of Carrollton Tthe Charles CarroU 
above-mentioned), 5. Samuel Chase, 6. Abra Clarke, 7. Geo. dymer, 
8. William Ellery, 9. Wm. Moyof, 10. Elbridge Gerry, 11. Button 
Owinnett, 12. Lyman Hall, 13. John Hancock, 14. Benjn. Harrison, 
15. John Hart, 16. Joseph Hewes, 17. StepheQ Hopkins, 18. Fras. 
Hopkinson, 19. Samuell Huntington, 20. Th. Jefferson, 21. Thomas 
M. Kean, 22. Francis Lishtfoot Lee, 28. Richard Henry Lee, 24. 
Faans. Lewis, 25. Phil. Livingston, 26. Thomas Lynch, jnn., 27. 
Thos. Maywitfd, jun., 28. Arthur Middleton, 29. Lewis Morris, 90. 
Bobert Morris, 31. John Morton, 32. Thos. Nelson, jun., 33, Wm., 



I-] 



THE O'COKNELL AND 0*DEA FAMILIES. 



79 



80-— The Stem of the " 0*Connell" Family.* 

Dairb cearb, brother of Lughaidh (or Lugadius) who (see 
the first series) is No. 88 on the stem of the '^ House of 
Heber", was the ancestor of O'ConaiU; anglicised 
O^ConnelL 



88. Daire cearb : son of 
Olioll flann-beag. 

89. Fiacha : his son ; 
had four brothers, one of 
whom named Fiachra was 
ancestor of O' Donovan. 

90. Brian : his son ; had 
a brother named Gairbre, 
who was the ancestor of 
Ua-C airbre (anglicised 



" O'Oarbery "), MacEmc, 
etc. 

91. Daire (or Darius) : 
son of Brian. 

92. Fionnliath : his son. 

98. Conall (" conall '* : 
Irish, friendship) : his son ; 
a quo Ua-Conaill or O'Con- 
aiU, 



81.— The Stem of the " O'Dea" Family. 

iBNEAS (or Aongus) ceannathrach, a brother of Bladd who 
(see the first series) is No. 92 on the ** O'Brien" pedigree, 
was the ancestor of O'Deadhaichd ; anglicised Day, O'Day, 
O'Dea, and Dee. 



92. ^neas ceannathrach: 
son of Cass. 

98. Bethach : his son. 

94. Seanach : his son. 

95. Diomma : his son. 

96. Dunsleibhe : his son. 



97. Cuallta (*« cuallta" : 
Irish, a wolf): his son; a quo 
0' Ciuilltaigh, anglicised Kie- 
Uy and Wolf. 

98. Fermac : his son. 

99. Fercionn (" cionn", 



Paca, 34. Robert Francis Paine, 35. Geo. Read, 36. Caaar Rodney. 
37. George Ross, 38. Benjamin Rush, 39. Edward Rutlidge, 40, 
Roger Sherman, 41. James Smith, 42. Richard Stockton, 43. Thos. 
Stone, 44. Geo. Taylor, 45. Matthew Thornton, 46. Geo. Walton, 47. 
7m. Whipple, 48. William Williams, 49. James Wilson, 50. Jns. 
Witkinpoole, 51. Oliver Woloott, and 52. George Wythe. 

* Family : According to 0*Halloran, an '< O'Conneir' family was 
descended from Heremon ; bat, if there were, I could not find the 
pedigree. 



80 



IRISH PKDIGKKES. 



[part 



It 



.»* 



gen. ** dim ' : Irish, a head, 
a cause) : his son ; a qno 
O'Fereinrif by some angli- 
eised Perkin and Perkins, 

100. Flann Bcrapnil : his 
son. 

101. Flancha : his son. 

102. Dubhsalach : his 

son. 

108. Donn ; his son. 

104. Donald : his son. 

105. Deadha (*< deadha- 
chd" : Irish, godliness): his 
son ; a quo O' Deadhaichd, 

106. Donoch: his son. 
This Donoch had an elder 
brother named Conn Mor, 
who was ancestor of Muintir 
Cuinn or Quin^ of Mnnster ; 
and Donoch's younger bro- 
ther, Flaithertach, was the 
ancestor of Roughan, 

107. Aichear : son of 
Donoch. 

108. Oiall-gaire : his son. 



109. Mnredach : his son. 

110. Flaithertach : his 
son. 

111. Lochlann : his son. 

112. Flaithertach (2) 
fionn : his son. 

118. Padraic : his son. 

114. Bory: his son. 

115. Donoch : his soQ. 

116. Lochlann (2) : his 
son. 

117. Donald: his son. 

118. Edmond: his son. 

119. Conor: his son. 

120. Lochlann (8) : his 
son. 

121. Shane (or John) : 
his son. 

122. Lochlannriabhagh : 
his son. 

123. Conor cron (or swar- 
thy Conor) : his son. 

124. Michael : his son. 

125. Michael oge O'Dea- 
dha : his son. 



82. — The Stem of the «* O'Donoghue** (of Lough Lein) 

Family. 

Cass, brother of Nathfraoch who (see the first series) is 
No. 90 on the stem of the <* House of Heber,'* was the an- 
cestor of 0*Donchada or O'Donchu ; anglicised 0*Donocho, 
and modernized O^Donoghue, 0*Donohoe and Donoughue. 

90. Cass : son of Core, had a brother named Hagh 
king of Munster. (or Aodh) gharbh : this 

91. Eoohaidh : his son. Hugh was the ancestor of 

92. Crimthann : his son. O'Mahony. 

98. Laoghaire : his son; 94. Aodhoraidh(<'oraid**: 



I.] 



THE o'dONOGHUE (oF LOUGH LEIN) FAMILY. 



81 



Irish, an oration, a prayer : 
Lat. *• oro**, to pray) : son of 
Laeghaire. 

95. Gairbre riosthran : his 
son. 

96. Oloranach : his son. 

97. Dnnlong breae (or 
brone) : his son. 

98. Eladhach : his son. 
99. Dnnlong (2) : his son. 

100. Altan : his son. 

101. Flaifchrigh : his son. 

102. ^neas : his son. 
108. Dubhd'abhoireann 

("dubh": Irish, dark, Heb. 
"dobh-i"; "d'a": Irish, of 
the; and *'boireann'*, a large 
rosU)^ signifying ''the dark 
complexioned man of the 
large rock ** : his son ; a quo 
O* Dabhaireainn [daverin] , 
anglicised Davoren.* 

104. Donald mor : his son. 

105. Donald oge : his son. 

106. Cathbha : his son, 

107. Conor : his son. 

108. Dubhd'abhoireann (2) 
[duffdayerin] : his son. 

109. Donald (8) : his son. 

110. Donoch or Donnchu 
("donn": Irish, brown, and 
•*cn", a warrior), meaning 
"the brown-haired warrior" : 
his son ; a quo O'Donchada 



or O'Donchu, This Donoch 
died A.D. 1057. 

111. Conmhighe : his son. 

112. Gathal O'Donocho : 
his son ; first assumed thi& 
simame; died, 1068. 

118. Donoch: his son. 

114. ^neas: his son. 

115. Amhailgadh mor : his 
son. 

116. Cathahhis son. This 
Gathal (who was ancestor of 
0' Donoghue, of Lough Lein), 
had a younger brothernamed 
Gonor, who was the ancestor 
of *'0*Donoghue of the Glen", 
county Kerry. 

117. Dubhd'abhoireann (8): 
his son. 

118. Amhailgadh [awly] : 
his son. 

119. Thomas: his son. 

120. Amhailgadh (8) : his 
son. 

121. Teige : his son ; d., 
1820. 

122. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

128. Shane (or John) : his 
son. 

124. Teige (2) : his son. 

125. Bory : his son. 

126. Eory (2) : his son, 

127. Bory (8) : his son. 



* Davoren : As above shown, Dubhd'abhoireann, the ancestor of 
this family, sieoifies ** the dark-featured man of the rock" : meaning, 
DO doabt, the large rock at Ballynalackin {*^ the village or district of 
the locks *'), on the sea-shore near Lisdoonvama, in the coanty Glare, 
where stand the remains of the once strong castle of the ** Davoren*' 
family. 

P 



62 



IBISH PEDIOBEE8. 



[PABT 



128. GofiErey (or Jeoffirey) : 
his son ; died, 1759. 

129. Donall (or Daniel) : 
his son ; died, a.d. 1790. 
This Donall had an elder 
brother named Timothy, who 
died, unmarried, in 1768. 



180. Cathal (or Charles) : 
son of Daniel (or Donall) ; 
died, 1808. 

131. Charles O'Donocho, of 
Lough Lein, county Kerry : 
his son ; bom, 1806 ; had a 
brother named Daniel. 



88 — ^The Stem of the '*0*Donoghub'* (of the Glen) Family. 

Conor 0*Donocho, a younger brother of Cathal who is No. 
116 on the foregoing (** G'Donoghue of Lough Lein") 
pedigree, was the ancestor of O^Donoghue of the Glen. 



116. Conor: son of Am- 
hailgadh mor. 

117. Aedh (or Hugh) na 
Midhe : his son. 

118. Jeoffreyan Tighe (or 
JeofiErey of the Mansion): his 
son. 

119. Conor (2J : his son. 

120. Donall : nis son. 

121. (TeofiErey (2 ): his son ; 
died, 1520. 



122. Donall (2) : his son. 

123. Jeofl&rey (3) : his son. 

124. Eory : his son. 

125. Donall (3) : his son. 

126. Jeoffirey (4) : his son. 

127. Teige: his son. 

128. Jeofl&rey (5) : his son. 

129. Teige (2 :) his son. 

130. Jeoffirey 0*Donocho, 
of the Glen, county Kerry : 
his son. 



34.— The Stem of the *' O'Donovan" Famh^t. 

Olioll flann-beag, who (see the first series) is No. 87 on 
the stem of the ''House of Heber", was the ancestor of 
O'Donamhain ; anglicised O^Donovan and Donovan, 



87. Olioll flann-beag : 
son of Fiacha muilleathan ; 
was King of Munster. 

88. Daire cearb : his se- 
cond son ; ancestor of 0' Con- 
nelL 

89. Fiachra finnghinte 
(or Fiacha fidhgeinte) : his 
son. 



90. Brian : his son ; was 
contemporary with Niall of 
the Nine Hostages. 

91. Cairbre adhbha : his 
son ; had a brother named 
Conn, who was the ancestor 
of Kedy. 

92. Eire : son of Cairbre 
adhbha. 



I.] 



THE O DONOVAN FAMILY. 



83 



98. OlioU ceannfhada : 
Ms son ; living, a.d. 489. 

94. Laipe : his son ; bad 
a brother named Caoineal- 
adh, who was the ancestor 
of Trasey and Tracey^oi Muns- 
ter. 

95. Aongus: son of 
Laipe. 

96. Aodh (or Hugh): his 
son. 

97. Oruinnmhaol : bis 
son. 

98. Eoghan (or Owen) : 
his son ; living, a.d. 667. 

99. Bain : his son. 

100. Hugh (2) : his son. 
101. Dubbd'abhoireann : 

his son ; a quo, according to 
some genealogists, Davoren, 

102. Oeannfaola : his son. 

103. Cathal : his son. 

104. Uambach : bis son. 

105. Gatbal (2) : his son. 

106. Amhailgadb: his son. 



107. Donamhan : his son ; 
a quo MacDonamhain and 
O* Donamhain* ; anglicised 
O^ Donovan, 

108. Cathal (or Charles) 
0* Donovan t : his son ; was 
the first who assumed this 
simame. 

109. Amhailgadb (2) : his 
son. This name has been 
rendered Auliffe and AulafiL 

110. Murcha: his son. 

111. Aneisleis (** aneis'* : 
Irish, a hide ; ** leis", with 
him) : his son; a quo Anesley, 

112. Bagbnall (Bandal, 
Banulph, or Beginald) : bis 
son. (This name ** Regi- 
nald" bespeaks a Danish al- 
liance.) 

113. Maolruanaidh : his 
son. 

114. Crom : bis son. 
Collins asserts that this 
Crom was in possession of 



* G*D<mamhain : According to some genealogists this name is 
derived from the Irish "dona", froward (Pers. "doon*', vUe); and 
**ainhain" : Irish, cUone or only. Thus derived, the name would 
imply that this Donamhan was the only one of the family who was 

+ Cathal C Donovan : In another genealogy of this family which I 
hmve seen the names, after this Cathal, are as follows : — 



109. Amhailgadb (2) : Eibn of 
Cathal. 

110. MoTogh : his son. 

111. AinieleiB; his son. 

112. Kanall (also called Maol- 
raanaidh): his son. 

11 B. Maolra: his son. 

114. Ancrom : his son. 

115. Loohlann : his son ; had 
a brother named Cathal. 



116. Donogh, of Loughcrow : 
son of Lochlann. 

117. Cathal : his son. 

118. Dermod : his son. 

119. Donogh {2) : his son. 

120. Conor: his sob. 

121. Hugh (3) : his son. 

122. Dermod (2) : his son. 

123. Donogh O'Donovan : his 
son. 



84 



naSH PEDIGBEES. 



[part 



the great castle of Groom or 
Crom, on the river Maigne, 
in the present county Lime- 
rick, and this was the tradi- 
tion in the county in 1686, 
when the Manuscript called 
CarhricR Notitia was written ; 
but the editor of that manus- 
cript did not find that fact 
recorded in any contempor- 
aneous documents, for he 
says — " Cujus rei periculum 
veri ego ad me non recipio, 
penes famam veteremque 
traditionem esto fides.'* Ac- 
cording to the Dublin copy 
of the Annals of Innisfallen, 
Crom was killed in, or im- 
mediately before, the year 
1254, at Inis-an-bheil (now 
** Pheale"), near Iniskean, 
to the west of Bandon, in the 
county Cork, by 0*Mahony's 
people. This Crom was the 
ancestor of all the septs of the 
'Donovan family in the 
baronies of Carbery, in the 
county Cork ; and of several 
others in Leinster. He gave 
name to Glean-na-Chroim, in 
the parish of Faulohus, which 
afterwards became the pro- 
perty of a branch of the 
MacCarthys, who had their 
principal seat at Dunman- 
way. 

115. Cftthal : the eldest 
son of Crom. This Cathal 
gave name to the territory 
of <*Claaoahiir', in the Co. 



Cork, which is defined by an 
Inquisition taken at Cork on 
the 6th of October, 1G07, as 
containing two manors, viz., 
** the manor of Castell 
O'Donyvane, containing 
twenty and one ploughlands; 
and the manor of Bahyne." 
The territory of Clancahill 
contained, in all, three score 
and seven ploughlands ; and 
extended ** from the sea on 
the south, to the river Mya- 
lagh, and was bounded on 
the north with the lands of 
Clandonell roe, the lands of 
Glanscrime, and with the 
lands of Clandoghlin on the 
east, and the lands of Clan- 
dermodie and Clanteige 
revoe on the west." This 
Cathal never had any pos- 
sessions in the original ter- 
ritory (see No. 89 on this 
genealogy)of Ui-Fidhgdnte or 
(seeNo.91) Ui- Cairbre adhbha, 
in the present county Lim- 
erick;but he seems to have ac- 
quired a large tract of moun- 
tain territory in Corca Luighe^ 
the original principality of 
the O'DriscoUs, etc. : to which 
newly acquired district he 
transferred the tribe-name 
of his family, viz., "Cairbre" 
— a name which, by a strange 
whim of custom, was after- 
wards applied to a vast ter- 
ritory now forming four 
baronies in the county Cork. 



I.] 



THE ODONOYAN FAMILY. 



85 



This extension of the name 
looks strange, as it was 
transferred since the year 
1200, and as the race who 
transferred it did not remain 
the dominant family in the 
district. The fact seems to 
have been that, when Mac- 
Carthy reagh got possession 
of a part of this territory, in 
the latter end of the thir- 
teenth century, the Ui- 
Cairhre mor were the most 
important tribe within it ; 
and that he and his descen- 
dants applied the name to 
iheO*Donovan territory and 
to all the minor cantreds 
annexed by him from time 
to time. 

116. Tadhg (or Teige): 
son of Gathal. 

117. Murcha (Morogh, or 
Morgan) : his son. 

118. Concobhar (Conor, 
or Cornelius) : his son. 

119. Raghnall (or Eandal): 
his son. According to Duald 
MacFirbis, this Eagbnall 
had a son named Dermod, 
who was the ancestor of all 
the subsequent chiefs of the 
O'Donovans ; and Collins 
gives him a second son, 
Tioboid (or Toby), the an- 
cestor of a sept of the 
O'Donovans, called Sliochd 



Tioboid, who possessed a 
tract of land near the town 
of Skibbereen, where they 
built the castle of Gortna- 
clogh — the ruins of which 
still remain, and are shown 
on the Ordnance Map on a 
detached portion of the 
parish of Creagh. 

120. Dermod : son of 
Baghnall. 

121. Teige: his son; chief 
of Clancahill. 

122. Donall, commonly 
called Domhnall nag -croice 
ainn (or Donall of the 
hides) : his son ; was inau- 
gurated chief of Clancahill 
by MacCarthy reagh, about 
the year 1560 ; was fostered 
by O'Leary at his castle of 
Carrignacurra (now called 
** Castle Masters"), situated 
in theparish of Inchageelagh 
or Ive-Leary ; and it would 
appear tbat it was by 
0*Leary's assistance that he 
was enabled to set aside his 
rival Diarmaid [Dermod] 
O'Bhaire. It was this Donall 
who, according to Collins, 
built Castle Donovan ; but 
others think that parts of 
this castle are much older 
than his time. He died, 
A.D. 1584, and was succeeded 
by the elder of his two legi- 



86 



nUSH PSDIOBBES. 



[PABT 



timate* sons — 1. Donall, 
2. Teige. 

128. Donall (2): son of 
Donall ; bnmed to the 
ground the bishop's house at 
Boss, which had been a 
short time before bnilt by 
William Lyon, bishop of 
Cork, Oloyne, and Bossf ; 
died in 1689. In February 
1592, his brother Teige at- 
tempted to depose this 
Donall on the score of *' il- 
legitimacy*', but failed. 

124. Donall (8) : his son ; 
was dispossessed of his 
estates by Oliver Cromwell; 
died in 1660 ; had a brother 
named Bichard^. 

125. Donall (4): son of 
Donall (8) ; petitioned King 
Charles the Second of Eng- 
land to restore to him his 
father's landed property. 



126. Captain Richard 
O'Donovan : son of Donall 
(4) ; married, in 1708, 
Elliuor Fitzgerald, daughter 
of the Enight of Kerry, by 
whom he had several child- 
ren — 1. Donall, lus succes- 
sor ; 2. Richard, who died 
unmarried ; and some 
daughters, the eldest of 
whom was Elizabeth, who 
married Sylvester O'Sullivan 
head of the sept called 
" MacFineenduff", of Der- 
reenavurrig, near Kenmare, 
in the county Kerry,by whom 
she had a numerous issue. 

127. Donall (5): son of 
Captain Richard. 

128. Richard (2): his son; 
married, in 1800, Emma 
Anne Powell, a Welsh lady, 
by whom he had no issue. 



* Legitimate : This Donall was married to Ellen, the daughter of 
0*Leary, at the church of Drumali, after havuig had by her Dcrmod 
O'Donovan and other sons, who were declared " illegitimate*' by the 
English lord chancellor, Adam Loftns, in 1592. This Dermod 
O'Donovan was slain in the year 1581, at LcUhach-na-n-damh, by 
Donall O'Sullivan, who afterwards became The C Sullivan Beare — 
as we learn from the AnnaU qf the Four MasterSf and from O'Sullivan 
Beare's Hist, CcUhol. Iber, Compend. 



fifoss: See Harris's Ware, voL I., page 565. 

t Richard : This Eichard O'Donovan married Mary, daughter of 
O'Sullivan Beare (and granddaughter, by her mother, of Lord Mns- 
kerrv, and great granddaughter of the Earl of Glanrickard), and by 
her nod two sons — 1. Donall (or Daniel) ; 2. Murrogh, who left a 
daughter named Joane. 



I.] 



THE O GABA AND GBADY FAMILIES. 



87 



36. — ^The Stem op the " 0*Gaba ' Family. 

Beige, who is No. 101 on the **0*Hara'* pedigree, had two 
sons — 1. Eadhradh, and 2. Saorgus : this Saorgus was the 
ancestor of O'Gadhra; anglicised O'Garay Geary y and Gerry^ 



102. Saorgus: son of Beice. 

103. Claonachan('<claon** 
Irish, prejudiced): his son; a 
quo MacClaonachain, angli- 
cised MacCLanaghan and Mac 
Clenaghan, 

104. Gadhar ("gadhar": 
Irish, a mastif, which means 
that in battle he was fierce 
as a mastiff ): his son; a quo 
O'Gadhra. 

105. Bore O'Gara: his son; 
first assumed this sirname. 

106. Conor: his son. 

107. Dunsleibhe: his son. 

108. Dunsleibhe oge : his 
son. 

109. Boger: his son. 

110. Dunsleibhe (3): his 
son. 

111. Gongal : his son. 



112. Bagnach : his son. 

113. Dermod(3): his son. 

114. Tumaltach (or 
Timothy): his son. 

116. Timothy oge: his son. 

116. Eoghan: his son. 

117. Dermod (2): his son» 

118. OUoU: his son. 

119. Teige: his son. 

120. Fargal O'Gara : his 
son. This is the Fargal 
0*Gara,lord of Moy— O'Gara 
and Goolavin, to whom 
Michael O'Clery, their chief 
author, dedicated the Annala 
Bioghacta Eirionn;* and who 
was one of the two knights 
elected to represent the 
county Sligo in the Parlia- 
ment held in Dublin, a.d. 
1634. 



36.— The Stem of the "O'Grady *' Family. 

EocHA (or Eochaidh), a younger brother of Carthann, 
who is No. 93 on the *'Macnamara" pedigree, was the 



* Annala RiogTuichta Eirionn : This name means " The Annals of 
the Kingdom of Ireland;" now known aa the AnnaU of the Four 
MasUra. (See the " Dedication/' in the first series.) 



D 



ancestor of O^Oradkaigke* or O'Gradka; ^wgK^^M^^ (fOrad^^ 
MmeOrade^ and O'Brad^. 



93. Eoeha, son of Caiaxn. 

94. Breannan : his son. 

95. Finan : his son. 

96. Foranan : his son. 

97. Tiobraid : his son. 

98. Dnngal : his son ; a 
quo Cineal DonghaiU, 

99. Fodalbha : his son. 

100. Bodgns : his son, 

101. Flaithreach: his son. 

102. Seachnadhseach: his 
son. 

103. Gormac : his son. 

104. Gollachtach: his son. 

105. Conn : his son. 

106. Conn oge : his son. 

107. Art: his son. 

108. Treassach : his son ; 
had a brother named Artagan 
(meaning *< little Art"), a 
qno O'/i-ilrta^ain, which has 
been anglicised Hartigan and 
Harlan, 

109. Oradhach (also called 
Bradach) : his son ; a quo 

0* Oradhaiyhe, 

110. Maolmaith: his son. 

111. Edrocht : his son. 

112. Mortach : his son. 
118. Aneisleis : his son. 



114. Moroeh : his son. 

115. Dermod : his son. 

116. Geanfaola : his son* 

117. Moroeh (2) : his son. 

118. Dermod {£) : his son. 

119. Moroeh (3): his son. 
t 120. John O'Gradj, aUas 

O'Brady : his son ; died, 
1832. 

1 121. John: his son; d., 
1372. 

1 122. John : his son ; d., 
1417. 

123. John O^Grady, alUu 
O'Brady, of Fassaghmore, 
county Clare : his son. 

124. Sir Denis, of Fas- 
saghmore : his son. 8ir 
Denis O'Grady, alias 
O'Brady, had a grant from 
£ing Henry the Eighth, by 
Patent in 1543, of Tom- 
grany, Finnagh, Eolbec- 
hullybeg, Kilbechullymor, 
Seanboy, Cronayn, Killo- 
kennedy, Clony, Killchom- 
urryn, Enochem, Tarch- 
ayne, and Killula, in the 
county Clare ; he died in 



* O^Oradhaighe : This simame was also oalled O^Bradaighe, aa- 
glioised " O'Brady.*' The two forms of sirname seem to be synouy- 
motts; for. while O'Oradhaighe ("gradh*': Irish, love; Lat. ^'grat-ia") 
the descendants of tiie love-making man," O^Bradaighe 



means 



("bradaoh" : Irish, roguish) means " the descendants of the roguish 
man*' : roguish here meaning " iovemaking.'' 

f Of the above three persons, thns (f) marked. No. 120 was arch- 
bishop of Cashel ; No. 121, archbishop of Tnam ; and No. 122, biahop 
of Blphiii. 



t] 



THE o'hASA (bUIDHE) FAHILT. 



89 



1569. This ' Sir Denis had 
fonr sons — 1. Edmond, who 
died without issue, in 1576 ; 
2. Donald, who also died 
without issue ; 8. John, who 
surrendered his estates to 
Queen Elizabeth, and had a 
zegrant by Patent, in 1582 ; 
and 4. Hugh, to whom his 
brother John conveyed Tom- 
grany and other lands. 

125. Most Bey. Hugh 
Brady, lord bishop of Meath: 



son of Sir Denis. This Hugh 
was the first of the family 
who omitted the simame of 
" O'Grady;*' his descendants 
have since called themselves 
Brady. 

126. Luke : his son; d., 
1621 ; had two brothers — 
1. Nicholas, and 2. Gerald. 

127. Luke Brady, of Tom- 
grany : son of Luke ; alien- 
ated Scariff by license, in 
1684. 



37. — The Stem of the " O'Haba" (buidhe) FAMn.T. 

CoRHAG galeng,* brother of Conla who (see the first series) 
is No. 87 on the O'CarroU (Ely) pedigree, was the ancestor 
of O'h'Eadhradh ; anglicised O'Hara and 0*Hora, 



87. Cormac galeng : son 
of Teige. 

88. Lughaidh (or Luy) : 
his son. This Lughaidh was 
the ancestor of Muintir- 
Cormac or ^^Gormack" and 
'< MacCormaok*' ; of Mmntir 
Dulchonta (*' dul " : Lish, a 
mare 9 ** canta," to speak ; 
Lat. ** cano,'* to sing), an- 
glicised "Delahunty," **Del- 
ahunt," " Hunt," and " De- 
la-fiunt." This Lughaidh 
had two brothers — 1. Gal- 
inan, who was ancestor of 



O' Casey, and of Muintir 
Owen (of the county Galway), 
anglicised Owens ; 2. Brocan, 
who was the ancestor of 
0*Duana, 

89. Niacorb (meaning 
'* the gilded chariot"): son of 
Lughaidh. 

90. Artcorb : his son. 

91. Fiochar: his son. 

92. Fidhghe : his son. 
98. Natfraoch : his son. 

94. Breannan : his son. 

95. Fiomibarr : his son. 

96. Dermod : his son. 



* Oaleng : From this Cormac Galeng the barony of " Gallen,*' in 
the oonnty Kayo, is so called. 



90 



IBI8H SEDIGBEKS. 



[PAQ,T 



97. TaithUoch (" taith- 
lioch": Irish, an excuse) : his 
son ; a quo O'Taithliocha*. 

98. Geannfaola : his son. 

99. Taithlioch (2) : his 
son. 

• 100. Flaithna : his son. 

101. Beice : his son. 

102. Eadradh (" eidir": 
Irish, between, and *^ tu ", 
you) : his son ; a quo O^h- 
Eadhradh. This Eadhradh 
had a younger brother named 
Saorgus, who was the ances- 
tor of O'Gara, 

108. Magnus : his son. 

104. Moroch : his son. 

105. Donald : his son. 

106. Murtagh : his son. 

107. TaithUooh, of Or- 
mond : his son. • 

108. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

109. Conor gud (** guda'*: 
Irish, a gudgeon): his son ; a 
quo 0*Gyda\. 

110. Hugh O'Hara : his 
son ; the f[rst who assumed 
this sirname. This 
Hugh had three sons — 1. 



Dermod, who was ancestor 
of O'Hara (buidhe) [boy] ; 
2. Axtriabhach (or Arthur 
the grey-haired), ancestor of 
O'Hara (reagh) ; and 8» 
Guconnaght, who, some 
say, was the ancestor of 
0*Hara (of the Boute). 

111. Dermod: the eldest 
son of Hugh ; had a brother 
named Art-iiabhach. 

112. Arthur : his son. 
118. Donald : his son. 
114 Fergal : his son. 

115. Teige : his son ; who 
was the ancestor of O Hara, 
of the Eoute. 

116. John buidhe : his 
son; had a brother named 

Melaghlin.l 

117. Roger: his son. 

118. (I could not make 
out this name). 

119. Olioll: son of No. 
118. 

120. Cian : his son. 

121. Gormac : his son. 

122. Teige : his son. 

128. Teige oge 0*Hara 
buidhe [boy] : his son. 



88. — ^Thb Stbu op the ** 0*Hara** (reagh) Family. 
Abthub reagh (or Art riabhach), brother of Dermod who 

* (yTaUMiocha: Thianame has been anglicised Tathw, 

t O^Ouda : This name has been anglicised Good, Dudgeon and 
Oudgeon, 

t MetagKlin i Accordinff to some genealogists, this Melaghlin was 
the anoeitor of 0*hara, of the Boute. 



L] 



THE O HABA. FAMILY. 



91 



is No. Ill on the (foregoing) **0'Hara** (boy) pedigree, 
was the ancestor of O'Hara reagh (or ** the grey-haired")* 



111. Arthur reagh 
O'Hara : second son of 
Hugh. 

112. John: his son. 
118. John oge : his son. 

114. Donoch : his son. 

115. William: his son. 

116. Arthur (2) : his son. 



117. Core caisiol* (" cais- 
eal" : Irish, a bulwark) : his 
son ; a quo O'Caiseil, angli- 
cised Cassell and Castles* 

118. Felim : his son. 

119. Dermod : his son. 

120. Dermod reagh 
O'Hara reagh : his son. 



118. Cormac : his son. 

119. Eory ballach: his 
son. 

120. John : his son. 

121. Cathal (or Charles) 
O'Hara, of the Route : his 
son. 



39. — The Stem of the " O'Haba" (of the Route) Family. 

Teige O'Haba, ^ho is No. 116 on the **0'Hara" (buidhe 
or boy) pedigree, was the ancestor of 0*Hara, of the Route« 

115. Teige : sonofFergal. 

116. Melaghlin : his son ; 
had four brothers — 1. John 
buidhe (ancestor of O'Hara 
buidhe), 2. Cormac, 8. 
Manus, and 4. Brian. 

117. Manus: son of Mela- 
ghlin. 

* Caisiol: This word is compounded of the old Irish cos, "» 
house" (Lat., ItaL, and Span, casa), and iol or aoilf Irish, '* lime " ; 
■o that caisiol signifies "a building of stone and lime mortar." 
Whence the house or court of the Kings of Cashel was called Caisiol, 
at least as early as St. Patrick's time : a fact which proves that the 
old Irish knew and practised the art of building with stone and lime 
mortar, before the introduction of CSiristianity into Ireland. 

According to OiraXdus Cambrensis, the Castle of Pembroke was, by 
Amulphus De Montgomery (son of the great earl of Shropshire, and 
son-in-law of Mortoch mor O'Brien, King of Ireland, who died a.d. 
1119), built with sods or twigs lined about with sods of earth : *' ex 
▼irgis et cespite tenuL" It would therefore appear that the English 
people at tmit time knew nothing of the art oi building with stone 
and mortar ; '* since" says Dr. O'Brien, ** so great and opulent a man 
as Amulphus did not put it in practice with regard to his Castle of 
Perabioke ; which was the more necessaiy, as he designed it for the 
preservation of the conquest he had made of the county of Pembroke. 
As to the old Britons, so far were they ignorant of the art of building 
stone work, that when Ninian, who converted the southern Picts, 
built his church of stone and lime mortar, they called it cajuiida casa 
or 'white house' ; bein^ the first structure of the kind, as Bede 
obserres, that was seen m Britain." 



D 



10.— Tub Sm or 



^szjis, xLe £zst Ckrxsdan Km^ <tf Mmista', -who (see the 
fint ien£3; : is !Sou 91 on the ttan. ci the " House of 
^htf\ had a son named Eorhaidh (or Soeha) areamh, 
ako tailed Eoeha fionn, who vaa the third Christian King 
of Minister, and the ancestov d O'Cmoimks (hy some writ- 
ten O'Cefada) ; anglicised O* Kerne and Keeffe. 

99. Gorman : his son. 
1€0. !Fionghin (2): his son* 

101. Gaomh (''caomh": 
Irish, gentle ; Arah. " kom," 
noble ; Lat. '* com-is*'): his 
son ; a qno O^Caoimke, 

102. Donogh : his son. 

103. Hugh O'Keefe: his 
son ; first assumed this sir- 
name. 

104. Donald : his son. 

105. Fionghin (8): his 
son. 

106. Manus : his son. 

107. Eoghan : his son. 

108. Conor : his son. 

109. Arthur : his son. 

110. Donald : his son. 

111. Arthur O'Keeffe: his 



91. JEnoLBz the first 
Christian king of Mnnster. 

92. Eoeha areamh : his . 
son ; the third Christian ' 

king- 

93. Crimthann sreahh : 

his son; the fourth Christian . 
king. This Crimthann had 
five sons — 1. Cairhre crom, 
who was the seventh Christ- 
ian king ; 2. Hugh cron (or 
brown Hugh), the tenth 
Christian kmg ; 3. Cormac ; 
4. Fiachra; and 5. Scannall. 

94. Hugh cron: second 
son of Chrimthann sreabh. 

05. Cathal : bis son. 

96. Fionghin : his son. 

97. Cathal (2) : his son. 

98. Arthur : his son. 



son. 



4L^Tufi Stem of thb '* 0*Mahont" Family. 

Huuu gharbh (or Hugh the Terrible), a younger brother of 
Lftoghairo who is No. 08 on the " 0*Donoghue " pedigree, 
wan the auooRtor ot O'Mathamhna; anglicised O'Mahony 
ftud ii/ffAmit/. 



X.] 



THE O MAHONT FAMILT. 



93 



98. Aedh (or Hugh) an 
gharbh * [garriv] : son of 
Grimtbann. 

94. Tigheamach : son of 
Hngh gbarbh. 

95. Felim t : bis son. 

96. Ceannfaola : bis son. 

97. Fergin : bis son. 

98. Beice (or Becc) : bis 
son ; a quo Cineal m Beice, 
anglicised Beck (** beic " : 
Irish, a shotU.) 

99. Ferdaltach : bis son. 
100. Artgail : bis son. 



101. Connall : his son. 

102. Alioll brugha 
("brugb": Irish, a large house 
his son ; a quo Burgesh, 

108. Cugeiltacb : bis son. 

104. Conor : his son. 

105. Taithneach : bis son. 

106. Spellan : his son. 

107. Cian : bis son. 

108. Braon : his son. 

109. Cian (2) : his son. 

110. Matbghabhuin('*ma. 
gbghabbuin'* : Irish, a bear, 
or, literally, *'a calf of the 



♦ Oharhh: The epithet yharbh ("gharbh"; IriBh, rough, terrible 
impetuous ; Lat. " grav-is ") is the root of the Latin river Garumna 
and the French Garonne : both of which are derived from the Irish 
Oarbh-amhuin (**amhaiii*' : Irish, a rtver ; Lat. ''amnis"), meaning 



the boisterous nver. 

t Felim: According to other 
pedigree of O^Mahony, down from 

95. Felim: son of Tighearnach. 

96. Fergus : his son. 

97. Beic: his son; a quo "Cin- 
eal mBeice." 

98. Firdaleithe : his son. 

99. Artgail : his son. 

100. Connall : his son. 

101. Olioll brughadh : his son. 

102. Cucoigilt : his son. 

103. Conor : his son : 

104. Cathniadh : his son. 

105. Cian : his son. 

106. Bran : his son. 

107. Maolmoradh : his son. 
lOB. Cian (2) : his son. 

109. Mathghabhuin: his son; a 
quo G*Mahony. 

110. Brodceann O'Mahony : his 
son ; first assumed this simame. 

111. Cumara : his son. 

112. Donoch : his son. 

113. Cian (3) : his son. 

114. Donoch na himirce tim- 
chioU : his son. 



genealo^ts, the following is the 
this Fehm — 

115. Dermod : his son ; had a 
brother named Conor. 

116. Teige : his son; had a 
brother named Maccraith. 

117. Donoch, of Rathdreon : 
his son. 

118. Dermod mor : his son ; had 
a brother named Teige an oir, 
meaning ''Teige of the Gold." This 
Teige was the ancestor of Goold. 

119. Finghin (or Florence) : his 
son ; had two brothers — 1. Donall, 
2. Dermod. 

120. Dermod ranntach : his son. 

121. Conor eabach: his son. 

122. Conor fionn na n-eich : his 
son. 

123. Conor na croise (**crois *': 
Irish, across; Lat. "crux"; Fr. 
" croix"): his son; a quo O^Croswi 
anglicised Cross and Cruise. 

124. Conor fionn : his son. 

125. Donall : his son. 

126. Conor O'Mahony: his son. 



n 



Jia/ityrm-kifm fx O' M/hjitMjkMm- 117- 

ill. hfrAtttsuai fyjUskk' 119'- 

^j^ti-j; jd,i w>ti; teat aaffumgd laOi 

11^ Cnmftia : lizs scm- 1±2. 

tlZ, l>^*a>rj>eh : Lis Km- 123L 

114. CE^m (B) ; bis son. iiis sim. 
11$. JU6&6€h (2): lus 



DkriusKcBii ((S]): Ifais 

"F^gpt^'i'TH : fhi-g son. 
JytTj^ssaM. z Im son. 
D^£iLuUiiod. z nss son. 



42.— 'Tbk 0naf or the *' O'SrujTAK't (Mok) Fakil.t. — 

CbfifiirtfA/. 

In Boger, who Tsee the first senes) is Ko. 117 on the 
^^O'^nUiyan'' pedigree, continues the lineage of O* Sullivan 

Mot*, 



\Vl. Roger O'Snlliyan : 
son of Dnnlong ; bad a bro- 
ther named Craitb, a qno 
MacCraith. 

118. Donald : son of j 
Roger. 

119. Donal na sgreadaidhe 
(or Donal of the shriek) : his 
son. 



120. Donal (2) : bis son. 

121. Owen : bis son. 

122. Donal (3) : his son. 
128. Oven (2) : his son. 

124. Donal (4) : his son. 

125. Owen (3) : his son. 

126. Donal O'Solliyan 
Mor : his son. 



* The O'Mahonv family were " nndispnted kings of Raithleftn, and 
bad a right to be kingi of Cashel whenever that kingdom happened 
to be vacant ; and from whom the kings of Cashel had no right to 
demand anvthing except a bowing of the head." — Book of Munater, 

'i'he ()'Mahon}rs were for many aees sovereign princes of the 
ooutitrioi or districts called Cineal-jEdn, CinecU-mBeice, Ibh-CorUua^ 
Attd all that part of Muscrv which lies southward of the river Lee ; 
audi ill later auos, of the large district called ScuU, together with 
that of IW'Mcmch [Iveagh.] 

(y^uUlvan t The root of this simame is the Irish suU, gen. sul. 



w (*¥«•" Aud nuUt ** the eye", va derived from the Irish mU, " the 



"til 

huh" {(Mi Ml/) ; beoAUM the '<eye" is the light of the body. The 
(ilil li-UU Pall»*d •^Hunday". Dia 5ut7 (Lat. Dies Sol-ia), before the 
CliiiMUanM MaUt4 it i><a Domhnaigk (Lat J)ie9 Dominica), "the 
I^ui'd'H Uay,*' 



1-3 



THB SULLIVAM AND PLUNSETT FAMILIES. 



95 



48. — ^The Stem op the ** O'Sullivan" (Bbaka) Family. 

GiOLLA na-bhflann, younger brother of GioUa-Mochoda 

[Gilmochud] who (see the first series) is No. Ill on the 

^'O'Solliyan*' pedigree, was the ancestor of 0' Sullivan Beara. 

111. Giolla na-bhflann : 
son of Donall Mor O'Sollivan. 

112. Philip : his son. 
118. Annaidh: his son. 

114. Awly: his son; had a 
brother named Gihnochud, 
who was the ancestor of 
O^ Sullivan Maolj and a quo 
MacOillicuddy. 

115. Teige : his son. 



116. Dermod: his son. 

117. Donall crone: his 
son. 

118. Dermod an phudar: 
his son. 

119. Donall: his son. 

120. Donall na Spaine : 
his son. 

121. Dermod O'Sullivan 
Beara : his son. 



44. — The Stem of the ** Plunkett" Family. 

DoNOGH, brother of Teige who (see the first series) is No. 
106 on the '< O'Brien" pedigree, was the ancestor of 
O'Pluingceid ; anglicised Plunkett, 



106. Donogh : son of the 
Irish monarch Brian Boru. 

107. Pluingcead ("plane": 
IriBhyto strike severely; "cead" 
Jirst ; Chald. ** chad") : his 
son ; a quo O'Pluingceid. 

108. Oliver : his son ; the 
first of the family who came 
to Bulin or Boilean. 

109. Walter Plunkett: his 



son ; first assumed this sir- 
name. 

1 10. John : his son. 

111. Alexander : his son. 

112. Thomas : his son. 
118. Bichard dubh : his 

son. 

114. Patrick : his son. 
This Patrick had four broth- 
ers — 1. Oliver*, who was the 



* ORver : This Oliver had a son named Oliver oge Plimkett, who 
the ancestor of Phmkett, lords of Loughcrew. 



The only branches of the " Plunkett " family now in existence, 
are those of the Lords of Louth, Fingall, and Dunsany; all the others 
are considered to be extinct, for many years — ^their properties were 
aD confiscated. Loughcrew is in the hands of Mr. Naper; Mr. Wade 
holds Cliuinabretney (or Glonabrany); and the Blighs have Rathmore. 



96 



IRISH PEDIGBEES. 



ancestor of Plunkettf lords 
Dunsany; 2. Edward, the 
ancestor of Plunkett, lords of 
Glannabretney ; 8. Garret, 
the ancestor of Plunkett, 
lords of Balrath; and 4. 
Thomas, the ancestor of 
Plunkett, lords of Rathmore. 
115. Thomas (2) : eldest 
son of Patrick ; had a broth- 
er named Richard, who was 
the ancestor of Flunkett, 
lords Louth. 



[PABT 

son of 



116. Bichard : 
Thomas. 

117. Patrick (2): his soiu 

118. Redmond : his son. 

119. John: his son; the 
first " lord of Killeen" (a.d. 
1436) and "earl of Fingall". 

120. James Plunkett : his 
son ; had a brother named 
Christopher. 



45. — ^The Stem op the ** Quin" (op Munsteb) Family. 
Conn Mor, the eldest son of Deadha who is No. 105 on 
the ** O'Dea" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Cuinn ; an- 
glicised Quin. 



105. Deadha: son of 
Donald. 

106. Conn mor (** conn'* : 
Irish, wisdom) : his son ; a 
quo O'Cuinn 

107. Donall : his son. 

108. Donogh O'Quin : his 
son ; first of the family who 
assumed this sirname. 

109. Morogh mor : his 
son. 



110. Morogh (2) : his son. 

111. Donall (2) : his son. 

112. John: his son. 

113. Loghlin : his son. 

114. Donall (8) : his son. 

115. John O'Quin : his 
son. 

• a • • a 

The Earl of Dunraven is 
the present representative of 
this family. 

The tomb of the Clonabrany Plunketts is in a very go5d state of 
preservation : its inscription is in Latin (with the old Roman raised 
letters); the date, 1525. The Fingall Planketts have their barial- 
place in their old fionily chapel^ in which none but members of the 
family who have a ri^ht of burial there are permitted to be interred. 
That venerable ruin is situate within a few yards of the hall-door of 
Killeen Castle, Tara, county Meath, the seat of the Earl of Fingall ; 
the tomb of his lordship's family lies immediately in front of the 
altar. At the very foot of this tomb was buried in 1824 a Mr. George 
Plunkett, who was in the sixth degree removed in relationship to the 
grandfather of the present Earl (Uving in 1877) ; twenty years later, 
that George Plunkett's son was hud in the same tomb ; and a few 
years later, a daughter of the said George. ITiat George PluAkett was, 
I find, great-grandfather of George Noble Plunkett, of Dublin, 
living in 1877. 



!•] 



THE BOUGHAN, SLATTXBT, AND STEWABT FAMILIES. 



97 



46. — The Stem of the ** Boughan" Family. 

FukHEBTAOH, the third son of Deadha who is No. 105 on 
the *' 0*Dea" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Roghain ; 
anglicised Bowhan, Boan, and Roughan. 

106. Flahertach : son of 114. Foalusa: his son. 



Deadha. 

107. Searragh roghan 
(" seairrach** : Irish, a foal^ 
and '* rogha" a cJwice) : his 
son ; a quo (fEoghain. 

108. Faolan : his son. 

109. Feigh : his son. 

110. Olioll: his son. 

111. Eanna: his son. 

112. Griomthann; his son. 
118. Feareadhach : his 

son. 



115. Donogh elaragh : his 
son. 

116. Ainhhleithe : his 
son. 

117. Ceallach : his son. 

118. Morogh : his son. 

119. Eo'ghan (or Owen) ; 
his son. 

120. Mnireadhagh: his son. 

121. Murtogh : his son. 

122. Dermod O'Boughan : 
bis son. 



47. — The stem of the " Slatteby'* Family. 

Owen (Eoghan^, brother of John who is No. 118 on the 
** Hickey** pedigree, was the ancestor of 0* Slatiairaidh ; 



anglidsed Slattery, 

118. Owen O'Hickey: son 
of John ; was called An-Slat- 
lairaidh ("Slat": Irish, a rod, 
and '* iair," to ask), as if he 
deserved the birch ; a quo 
0*Slatiairaidh. 



119. WiUiam O'Slafcfcery : 
his son ; was the first that 
assumed this simame. 

120. John O'Slattery: his 
son. 



48. — The stem of the " Stewabt" Family. 

CoBC, No. 89 on the stem of the <' House of Heber*' 
(see first series), was married to Mong-fionn, daughter of 
Feredach fionn (also called Fionn Gormac), king of the 
Picts. Maine Leamhna, one of the sons by that marriage, 
remained in Scotland with his grandfather, Feredach fionn, 
who gave him land to inhabit, called Leamhain (anglicised 



98 



imSH PEDIGBBSS. 



[PABT 



Lennox), wliioli his posterity enjoyed ever Gonce with the 
appellation or title of Mor Mhaor Leamhna, ie. '* Great 
Steward of Lennox"; and at length became kings of 
Scotland and of England. This term *< Steward" is the 
origin of the simames Stewart and Stuart. 



89. Gorc:king of Monster. 

90. Maine Leamhna : his 
son. 

91. Donald : his son. 

92. Muredach : his son. 
98. Alen (or Alan), the 

elder, first ** Great Steward 
of Lennox" : his son ; a quo 
Stewart. 



94. Alen, the younger : 
his son. 

95. Amhailgadh [awly], 
the elder : his son. 

96. Awly, the younger : 
his son. 

97. Walter: his son. 

98. Donogh (Doncan or 
Duncan): his son. 

" Here the old Irish cop^ of the Genealogy of this Royal Family is 
defective, some leaves beins either torn or worn out with time, 
wherein the pedigree (in all ukelihood) was traced down to the time 
of the writing of that book some hundreds of years past ; and no 
other copy extant to supply it. I am (therefore) necessitated to fol- 
low the Scottish writers, where they begin to take notice of this 
noble and princely family, in the person of Bianco, who was lineally 
descended from the above-named Donogh or Duncan, who was Thane 
of Lochquaber ; was one of the chief nobility of Scotland ; and near 
Kinsman to the good King Duncan, who was murdered by the 
usurper Macbeth, as were this Bianco and all his children except his 
son Fleance.'* —Four Masters, 

[As this Bianco was murdered by Macbeth, he must have been 
contemporary with his "near kinsman the good King Duncan'^ who 
(see the ^rst series) is No. 108 on the ** Stem of the Koyal Family*' ; 
we may therefore reckon Bianco as, at least. No. 107 on this family 
stem.] 

valour, for the recovery of 
Jerusalem. 

111. Alexander: his son. 

112. Walter: his son; who, 
in the great battle of Largys, 
fought against the Danes, 
A.D. 1268. 

118. Alexander (2) : his 
son. 

114. John, of Bute : his 
son ; lord high steward of 
Scotland; was one of the 



107. Bianco, lineally des- 
cended from Duncan, who 
is No. 98 on this stem. 

108. Fleance : his son. 

109. Walter : his son. 

110. Alan Stewart : his 
son. This Alan went to the 
Holy Land with Godfrey of 
Boloign (now ** Boulogne'*) 
and Eobert, duke of .Nor- 
mandy, A.D. 1099 ; where he 
behaved himself with much 



I-] 



THE STEWART FAMILY. 



99 



six governors of the Eing- 
dom during the controversy 
between Robert Bruce and 
John Balioil, for the Crown, 
A.D. 1292. 

115. Walter : his son. 
This Walter, lord high ste- 
ward of Scotland, married 
Margery*, only daughter of 
Bobert Bruce, King of Scot- 
land ; on whom the Crown 
was entailed, by Parliament, 
upon default of male issue 
of the said Bobert Bruce's 
only son, David, which hap- 
pened accordingly. 

116. Bobert Stewart : 
their son ; was a.d. 1370, 
under the name of ^' Robert 
the Second", crowned King 
of Scotland. 

117. John : his natural 
son : who changed his name, 
And was crowned King of 
Scotland, under the title of 
^* Robert the Third." 

118. James the First, 
King of Scotland : his son ; 
was, at the age of fourteen 



years, imprisoned in the 
Tower of London, and re- 
mained there a prisoner for 
nineteen years. He was 
murdered in 1437; when his 
son, James the Second, was 
only six years old. 

119. Jamcb the Second, 
King of Scotland : his son ; 
was slain by the splinter of 
a cannon, which bursted at 
the siege of Roxburgh, in 
1460. This James t had a 
brother named Ninion 
(** noinin" : Irish, a daisy), 
who was ancestor of Crauj, 
of Banbridge, and Stewart, 
of Baltimore, Maryland, 
United States, America. 

120. James the Third, 
King of Scotland : son of 
King James the Second ; 
slain in 1488. 

121. James the Fourth, 
King of Scotland : his son ; 
was slain in the battle of 
Floddenfield, fought against 
the English, a.d. 1513. 
This James was married to 



* Margery : It is recorded that King James the First of Englaud 
jocosely used to say — " It was through a lassie (meaning this Margery 
that the Stuarts obtained the crown of Scotland ; and it was through 
a lashie (meaning Queen Elizabeth) that they succeeded to the crown 
of England." 

t James : In his " History of Scotland" Sir Walter Scott states 
that James the First, King of Scotland, had two sons, one of whom 
•died in childhood without issue ; the other succeeded to the throne 
as James the Second. According to Collier's " History of the Britisii 
Empire'*, James I., of Scotlwd, hadvonly one son'; but he had also 
A BOB named Ninion. 



100 



[PABT 



Maigaret, eldest djuig^ier of ; of Frmnee ; when the sir- 
King Hemy the Serenth, of ' njune ** Stewart" first assn- 
En^and. med the form of Stuart. 

122. James the Fifth, 124. James Stuart, known 
Eingof Seotland: his son ; as James the Sixth of Scot* 
died in 1542. land : her son. This James, 

123. Mazy Stewart (or who (see the first series) is 
Stuart), " Queen of Seots" : No. 128 on the " Stem of 
bis only daughter and heir ; the Boyal Family", was 
was proclaimed Queen of King James the first of Eng- 
Scotland, a.d. 1542 ; and be- land ; where, on the death 
beaded on the 8th February, of Queen Elizabeth, who 
1587» leaving issue one son , died without issue, he be- 
by her second husband, { ganto reign on the 24th day 
Henry Stuart, lord Damley. of March, a.d. 1603: he died 
Mary, Queen of Scots, was on the 27th March, 1625. 
first married to the Dauphin I 

"On Queen Elizabeth's demise. 



The Scottish James her vacant place supplies. 

Uniting into one, both crowns he claims. 

And then conjunctively Great Britain names.*' 

EOERTON. 



49.— Tub Stem or the ** Stewabt" (or Baltimobe) Famjly. 

NiNiON, a brother of James the Second, King of Scotland, 
who is No. 119 on the foregoing (** Stewart'*) pedigree, was 
the ancestor of Stewart^ of Baltimore, Maryland, United 
States, America. 



119. Ninion Stewart: a 
son of James the First, 
King of Scotland. 

120. James : his son. 

121. Nmion (2) : his son. 

122. James (2) : his son. 
128. Christian : his son. 
124. Ninion (8) : his son. 
12l!i. William : his son. 
190. James (8): his son. 
127. JamoB (4) : his son 

born noivr Augner, comity 
Tyrono, Iroland, about 1706; 



died in Wilmington, Dela- 
ware, United States, Am- 
erica, A.D. 1788:"Will re- 
corded on 5th July of that 
year ; had a brother named 
Samuel, who was bom in 
Ireland in 1704, and died 
in Wilmington in 1778. 

128. James i^5): his son. 

129. Joseph - James, of 
Baltimore : his son ; bom in 
Delaware, in 1798 ; living 
in 1877 : had a brother 



I.] 



THE STUABT FAMILY 



101 



named William, fatiier of 
General Alexander S. Stew- 
art, oi Oxford, Mississippi, 
United States, America, 
Chancellor of the University 
of Mississippi, and living in 
1877. 

180. Joseph- James Stew- 



art, of Baltimore, Maryland, 
U.S.A. : son of Joseph- 
James ; living in 1877, 

181. George C. Stewart : 
his son ; bom in 1860 ; has 
a brother named James B. 
Stewart, born in 1862— both 
living in 1877. 



50. — The Stem of the " Stuabt" Family. 

James, who (in the first series) is No. 24 on the ''Bourke'* 
pedigree, was the son of King James the Second, of 
England. 



24. James, by some 
ealled " King James the 
Third'* ; by others, " The 
Pretender." 

25. Charles - Edward : 
his son ; commonly called 
" The Yomig Pretender" ; 
married the Princess Louisa 
Sobie&ki, and had by her a 
son whose name was also 
Charles-Edward. 

26. Charles-Edward (2) : 
his son. Tids Charles- 
Edward married Catherine 



Bnice^'S at the Peak, Derby- 
shire ; living in 1830. 

27. Charles-Edward (3) : 
his son ; who married Anna 
De La Poer Beresford. 

28. Charles-Edward (4) : 
his son ; who, on the 15th 
June, 1874, married AUce 
Hay, daughter of the late 
Earl of Erroll, at the Eoman 
Catholic Church, Spanish- 
place, London; living in 
Austria, in 1877. 



* Catherine Bruce : The Charles-Edward Stuart who married 
Catherine Brace, was, for fear of assassination, brought up under an 
alias "Hay Allen"; he was known in Scotland as lolar ('^iolar": 
Irish, an eagle). An old Highlander, one of those who saw the last 
of " lolar", in Scotland, uttered the following words : — 

** Dhia beannachd an la ! agus Blirichibh air sgiath nam Beann 
lolar oig nasal a'h-Albainn." 

And the exclamation of the Highlander, who last saw ** lolar" 
and Catherine Bruce, his wife, was : — 
" On beannachd dhuib-se uasail aillidh rothaitneach do dh'-Albainn. 



alw— Tjbb Sm or tbk -Tu^sr" (or McaBiss) 

Caookkalajm^ lirothcr <^ Laipe vlio is Na 94 on the 

pedigree, vms the ancestor of O'Treasuiigh, 



of JfaniitoT ; angfifisM Tr^^Nty and Trmegff. 

M« Caoincaladh : son of Cnteeej) : his son ; first 
OfioQ eeannlhada. . assinned this simame. 

95. Feaigaile : his son. 100. Geadaeh : his son. 

96. Treassadi ('* treas'' : . 101. Cninge : his son. 
Irish^ the third in order) : his ' 108. Conor : his son. 

son ; a qno O'Treamed^, 103. Conor Inath : his son. 

97i. Dermod : his son. 104. Edmond : his son. 

98. Ceadach na - hiighe 105. £dmond oge : his 
(*^ htig^": ^ Irish, ttrengih ; i son. 

Gr. ** bri'% very great ; Heh. | 106. James : his son. 

** bri*% fruit) : his son. 107. James oge O'Trasey: 

99. Donn O'Trasey (or I his son. 



* Brigh: This Irish word seems to be the root of the simame 
Bright, The name Ceadach (<*cead": Irish, >r«<; Chald. *<cha4") 
implies "the foremost man"; and Ceadach na brighe means 'i;he man 
who was foremost for his strength. " 



PART 11. 

HOUSE OP ITH. 

Ith (or ItLe) was (see the first series) the uncle of 
Milesins of SpaiA ; from him the following families, along 
with others given in the first series, are descended : 



1.— The Stem op the ** Babbt" Family. 

FoTUACH Canaan, the fifth son of Lughaidh Maocon who 
(see the first series) is No. 118 on the ''Boll of the Milesian 
Monorchs of Ireland", and who (see the first series) is No. 
59 on the stem of the '' House of Ith,'* was the ancestor 
of O'Baire; anglicised Barry, 



59. Lughaidh (or Luy) 
Maccon, the lldth monarch 
of Ireland. 

60. Fothach canaan: his 
son. 

61. Mac Niadh [nia] : his 
son. 

62. Breasal : his son. 

63. Eochaidh (or Eocha): 
his son. 

64. Conor : his son. 



65. Baire : his son. 

66. Garran : his son. 

67. Aodh (or Hugh) beag: 
his son. 

68. Echin : his son. 

69. Eochaidh aignigh : his 
son. 

70. Baire (** baire*': Irish, 
a hurling match) : his son ; a 
quo 0* Baire, 



William Eitzphilip Barry got a grant and confirmation 
from King John, dated 8th November, 1208, of the three 
cantreds of — 1. Olthan, 2. Muscry, 8. Dunegan and Kil- 
ledy; which Fitzstephen had given his father in the 
*' ku^dom of Cork." 



104 



UUflU FEDIOKISS. 



D 



1. William Fitzpbilip 
Barry; whose parentage is 
not mentioned* 

2. David: his son; the 
ancestor of Barry, of Barry- 
more; was lord justice of 
Ireland, a.d. 1267. 

8. Bobert : his son. 

4. Philip : his son. 

5. David (2) : his son. 



6. DaToc : his son. 

7. William maol: his son. 

8. Lawrence : his son. 

9. James : his son. 

10. Richard : his son. 

11. James (2) : his son. 

12. Bichard (2): his son. 

13. James (3) : his son. 

14. David Barry: his son. 



2. — The Stem of the **Ci*ancy'* (op Dabtby) Familt. 

LvoHACH (or Lny), brother of Each bolg who (see the 
first series) is No 54 on the stem of the '* House of Ith", 
was the ancestor of MacFlanchaidhe^ of Dartry ; angli- 
cised Clanchy, Clancie, Clancy, and Clinch, 

72. Flanchaidh (*« flan " : 



54. Lugbach: son of Daire 
diomdhacb. 

55. Eocbaidb : his son. 

56. ^neas : bis son. 

57. Olioll : his son. * 

58. Cormac : bis son. 

59. Dunlong : bis son. 

60. Gatbair : bis son. 

61. Flann : bis son. 

62. Algeal : bis son. 

68. Ambailgadb : bis son. 

64. Eocbaidb : bis son. 

65. Dunlong : bis son. 

66. Lugbach : bis son. 

67. Conall : bis son. 

68. Fiach : bis son. 

69. Conall (2) bis son. 

70. Fionn : bis son. 

71. Croniuacbra: bis son. 



Irish, red complfxioned 
** caidb'*, chaste): his son ; a 
quo MacFlanchaidhe/*, angli- 
cised Clancy, and De Clancy, 
etc. 

78. Aodh cleireach: his 
son. 

74. Catbal na caiirge 
(** cairaig'*: Irish, a rock or 
bulwark; Gr. "charax"; Wei. 
** karreg"; Com. " carrag*'): 
bis son; a quo O' Caiirge, 
anglicised Carrick, Garrick, 
MacCarrick, Craig, and Bock, 

76. GioUa (or William) : 
bis son. 

76. Teige : bis son. 

77. Catbal : bis son. 



♦ JIfttc/VaMcAaWAe [MacFlancha] : see Kote« under the "Clancy" 
(of Munater) pedigree. 



n.] 



THE COFFEY FAMILY. 



105 



78. Teige (2) : his son. 

79. Teige bsiccach: his son. 

80. William (2) : his son. 

81. Gathal dubh : his son ; 
had a brothernamed Ferach. 

82. Cathal oge : his son ; 



had a brother named Teige 
oge. 

88. Cathal dubh [Dhu] 
MacClancy, of Dartry : son 
of Cathal oge. 



8. — The Stem of the ** Coffey'* Family. 

Febous, brother of Nathi who is No. 61 on the 
" O'Driscoll" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Cohlithaigh 
(dynasts or chief lords of that portion of the ancient terri- 
tory of Corca Luighe,"^' now called Barryroe-east, and 
Barryroe-west, in the county Cork) ; anglicised Cowhig and 
Coffey. 



61. Fergus: son of ^neas. 

62. Luigheach : his son. 
68. ^neas bolg : his son. 

64. Gearan : his son ; had 
a brother named Trean. 

65. Conall claon (** claon" 
Irish, partial ; Gr. ** klin-o": 
his son. 

66. Ceann reithe (*'reithe": 
Irish, of a ram ; '* ceann** a 
head!) : his son ;» a quo 
O'ReitheA 



67. OlioU : his son ; had a 
brother named Trean, from 
whom descended St. Beoardh 
(8 March), of Ardcarn. 

68. Fergus : son of Olioll. 

69. Connacille : his son. 

70. Maccon : his son. 

71. OUoll (2) : his son. 

72. Dungal : his son. 

78. Cobthach fionn (** cob- 
thach*': Irish, victorious ; 
fionn**, /air), meaning** the • 



(< 



* Corca Luighe : This was a territory in Carbery, in the west of 
the county Cork ; and was so called because principally inhabited by 
families oi the Lugadian Race, descendants of Luigheach (or Luig- 
haidh), son of Ithe, uncle of Milesius of Spain, and the first Milesian 
discover of Ireland. Corcaluighe ( ' * corcach" : Irish, swampy ground) 
extended from Bandon to Crookhaven and to the river of Kenmare ; 
and was anciently possessed by the O^Baires [G'Barrys], O'Coffeys, 
O'Deas, O'Driscolls, OTihillys, O'Flains, O'Heas, O'Uenegans, 
0*Learys, etc. 

The city of "Cork** is by some derived from the Irish word 
eoreach, above mentioned ; because it is built on a low marshy 
i^and, formed by the branches of the river Lee. 

f O'Reitlie : By some this name has been anglicised Ram. 



:m 



7 k. ]>Mi0<k mar : his fiBu 
T^. iMmaH mar : his aasL, 

7H, ybeexaaxk : im mo. 
77* 0»u»kDimr ^Vw Conor}: 
7%. Xdgimxui ("or MaigtL- 
neoit;: hi<) 5iotu 

71^. Conoir f 2) : bia aoo* 
W. Hsuthoia dall : hia aoa. 
81. Cobthaeh r2;: his aon. 
8^. I>«»Tmod: hia son. 
8^« F^rgal : bid aonu 
84^ tkmoch : log aoo. 
8^. A6dh (or Hngb): his 

m. Vltn^mm (2) : las 
W. (Umor {ff) : hii 
88^ Nioehoil : Ins md, 
8(^, Walter : his son* 
(M). Cohihaeh (8): his Mm. 

01. Teige O'Cowhig: his 
mu ; had a brother named 
Niocboll, who was the ances- 
tor of MacNicoL 

02. OlioU (8): son of Teige. 
OH. Dermod (2) : his son. 

* 04. Donall (2) : his son. 
05. Maghnus (8) : his son. 
0(t« Oobthaoh (4) : his son. 
07. Oonor (4) : bis son. 
OH. Maolpadraio : his son. 
00. Ooannfaolla : his son. 

100. Aodli (2) : his son. 

101. Oumuinuan : his son. 

102. Muiroadaoh : his son. 
too. Cathal (or Charles) : 

btH Mon. 
104. Douall (a) : his ton. 
I OA. Hriau ; his son. 
UHU Murtoo)\; hin nun. 



his 



Ida 

Ul^ Siodisul I his 
U4. Aadb. ^' z 
ILU CssiHii. m : 

Iliw FftTim : bis 
114. T^e (±. : his 
Uiu Cathal (S) : his 

116. Donall U) : his 

117. Afldb \-k) : his 

118. Comube : his son. 
ll!». AoJh (orHD^): 

son. 

120. Cathal (4) : his son. 

121. Teige (B) : his son; 
hiing in lda7. 

122. Shane: his son; H^ing- 
in 1701 ; held the lands of 
Mndcross (at £i]]amey> 
nnder Charles MacCarthy 
Mor, from a.i>. 1693. 

128. Dermod (or Darby):, 
his son ; bnried in Mac]at>8s 
Abbey, where his tomb- 
exists. 

124. £dmond : his son ; 
living in 1807. 

125. Edmond (2) : his &on; 
died in 1841. This Edmond 
had an elder brother named 
William, and a younger 
brother named John— both 
of whom died unmarried. 

126. Edward Lees CofiEey i 
son of Edmond (2). This. 
Edward had four brothers — 
1. James-Charles, 2. John* 
William, 8. David, and 4. 
Henry. 



«.] 



THE XICOLSON FAMILT. 



107 



4. — ^TflE Stem of the *< Nioolson" Family. 

NiocHOix, brother of Teige who is No. 91 on the "Ooffey" 
pedigree, was the of ancestor MacNicaill, anglicised Mac- 
Sicholj MacNicolf'^ NioholUtf yicholaSf MctcNieholas^ 
Nicholson and Nicohon, 



91. Niocholl (" nioaiir* : 
Irish; "ni," not, and "caill," 
to lose ; Heb. '* calah*', he 
faileth) : son of Gobthach ; 
first of the family who 
settled in Scotland. 

92. Ard : his son. 
98. Asmain : his son. 

94. Arailt : his son. 

95. Tnrc athcliath {ath- 
cUath : Irish," Dablin"): his 
son. 

96. Amlaeimh : his son. 

97. Taidg [Teige] : his 
son. 

98. Carfin : his son. 

99. Aillin : his son. 

100. Poil : his son. 

101. Fogail: his son. 

102. Moireadach: his son. 

103. Arailt (2) : his son. 



, 104. Erlile : his son. 

105. Fuileadh : his son. 

106. Erbhle (or Erlerle) : 
his son. 

107. Sdacaill ("staid": 
Irish, an estate ; " caill *', to 
lose) : his son. 

108. Torstan : his son. 

109. Tortin : his son. 

110. Torcill : his son. 

111. Seaill: his son. 

112. Oillemare : his son. 
118. Gregall : his son. 

114. Nicaill : his son. 

115. Neaill : his son. 

116. Aigh : his son. 

117. Nicaill (2): his son. 

118. Eoin (or John) : his 
son. 

119. Eogan : his son. 

120. Eoin (2) :t his son. 



* MaeNicol: In a lately published work, pnrporting to give 
the "History of the Scottish Clans," it is stated that this Clan was 
of Nwweeian origin. No doubt the Clan, from time to time, may 
have made several marriage alliances with Danish and Norwegian 
families ; but the Clan MaeNicol was of Irish extraction ! Gregall 
MacNiool, who is No. 113 on the foregoing pedigree, acquired historic 
notafaUity by his opposition to and defeat of the Danes and Nor- 
wegians : a fact which, in itself, would so to prove that the Clan 
MacNiool is not of Damsh or Norwegian descent. 

f Bmh : According to some records the three names between this 
Eoin and Donald, No. 124, are as follows :— No. 121, Nicaill (3); No. 
122, .Andreas ; and No. 123, Nicaill (4). It would however appear 
that the members of this Clan had a great partiality for marrying 
into their own families ; from which cause the names of the sons-in- 
law, in those three generations, may have been inserted for those of 
the aoiis» or, vice versa : being of the same simame. 



loe 



PAHT 



1'21. Al^3»ii«U>.r : luft sozu 

12^, DoiMtld: lu8 30ZL; had 
A broths xmm^ ]!SFeiL 

12S. ]i(gilc6hu: 30a of 
I>ottftld, 

124. £><vn?Ud KaeNicol : 
hi(^ 80n ; ehi«f of the dan in 
fch4 IaI<^ of .^kyft, in the 
mgx^s of Kin^» Charied L & 
II, ^ w^ 1^n<se m^med and 
h^ tw^ity-tbree children; 
^m« of the ^v^ WM Mar- 
^rH Momsoti, of Lewii. 

12^. Mi^leolm; hid sodn; 
ebi/^ of his eliin; toftrried 
the poeie^A Maiy MacLeod, 
M«ier of ^ohn gftrbb Mae- 
L^jA, ibe iftlle«i Uigblander 
in bi« iitne. Of ibe brothers 
atid M»ter» of thi« Maleolm 
1 ha,ye ascertained tbenames 
of the following : 1. Donald, 
trbo died tinmarried; 2. 
\Villiani ; 8. Alexander, who 
twice married into the family 
of ''MaoDonald of the Isles''; 
4. iPatriok, who married 



Gnzel FnMSHT,. a neac nola- 
tive of tdie thfflL T.arrf Zjovsk;^ 
o. George ; tf . John,, who 
died nnnuHTied ; T, Jaine» ; 
^. Jane, who was marriffd ta> 
AftK^TTrnnnTT, of Corne ; ^. 
lUchely Tnarrfffd to lil m iaild 
]iCacDanaId ; 10. Kaxy^ mar. 
ried to ATfirandiffr McQiieecL; 
and II, ]!i€LU who marzsed 
Kate XaeDonaJd. 

126. John: son of ITal- 
eolm ; married Anne Mae- 



127. Maleolm. : iixs son ; 
married Je^e MacDonald. 

12B. Donald : his son ; 
married Margaret MacDon- 
ald ; died, 1797. 

129. John : his son ; mar- 
ried Marion iMvidson ; died 
1850. 

1 dO. Norman Nicolson, the 
present Chief of the Clan: 
his son; living in Camelford, 
Campbeltown, Tasmania, 
A.D., 1877. 



6..--Tai9 Stem of thb ** Nicolson" (of Pobtbee) Family. 

NntL, brother of Donald who is No. 122 on the foregoing 

i'* Nicolson") pedigree, was the ancestor of Nicolson, of 
^ortree, Isle of Skye, Scotland. 

132. Neil : son of Alex 

mApw 
IfiHi John \ son of Neil. 



Ifi4. Httmbftlrle (8orley, or 



125. Alexander : his son ; 
married a MacLean of 
Borera. 

126. Donald: his 



son 



Htttti\\?»l)t of Drumnie : his , married Mary MacQueen. 
fton t niAll-led Margaret ' 127. Alexander : his son ; 
l)1)tmhf^ii. ^^ ^^ 1722; married 



u.] 



THE NICHOLSON FAHILT. 



10» 



Catherine MacQaeen; died 
in 1809. 

128. Samnel (2): his son ; 
bom in 1767 ; married in 
1789 Betsey (or Elizabeth), 
daughter of Norman Nicol- 
son* of Peinefiler, Portree : 
this Samuel died in 1882 ; 
and Betsey, his wife, died in 
1868. 

129. Norman f: their son ; 
born in 1808 ; married 
Marion Bethone in 1887 ; 
living in 1878 in Peinefiler, 
Portree, Isle of Skye. 



180. Samuel Nicolson, of 
Greenock : his son ; bom in 
1888 ; married in June 1870 
to Jessie MoDougall ; living 
in 1877 ; has two brothers 
and two sisters: the brothers 
are — 1, Neil, 2. Norman ; 
and the sisters are — 1. Mary- 
anne, 2. Margaret. 

181. Norman Nicolson : 
son of Samuel; bom in 1878, 
and living in 1878 ; has two 
sisters — 1 . Marion, 2. Mary. 



6. — The Stem of a ** Nicholson'* Family, in America. 

William, a younger brother of Malcolm who is No. 125 on 
the ** Nicolson" No. 4 pedigree, was the ancestor of 
Nicholson, a branch of the family, in America. 

126. William : son of 
Donald ; said to have perish- 
ed at or near Sedgemoor, 
at the time or the battle of 
that name. 

126. John (commonly cal- 
led " The Sailor" ; without 
doubt the H. P. and P. of 
D. of the ** Stuart Papers*'): 
his son ; assumed the name 
Nicolson ; married Joanna 



Coke, at Dartmouth, on the 
3rd December, 1695. 

127. WilUam, of Malbor- 
ough, Devon, merchant: son 
and only child of John, 
" The Sailor", and Joanna 
Coke ; spelled his name 
Nicholson ; married Eliza- 
beth Trosse, in April, 1724. 

128. Joseph, of^ Kings- 
bridge, Devonshire : his son; 



* Nicholson : This Norman Nicolson was the son of John, son of 
Neil, son of Donald MacNicol (No. 124 on the foregoing pedin'ee), 
the Chief of the Clan in the Isle of Skye, in the reigns of Kings 
Charles I. & II. ; and this Neil with many members of the Nicolson 
family, migrated to America,at the end of the sixteenth, and beginn- 
ing of the seventeenth, century. 

t Norman : This Norman Nicholson, in a letter to the writer of 
these pages, says— *' The MacDonalds, MacLeods, Nicolsons, and 
MacQueens came from Ireland here (to Scotland) ages and ages ago " 



»f 



110 



IBI8H PEDIGREES. 



[part 



married Mary Duusford, on 
17th March, 1761 ; had a 
brother named Jonathan. 

129. WilUam, of Ply- 
mouth : son of Joseph ; mar- 
ried Sarah Hewett, on 14th 
December, 1747 ; had broth- 
ers named Joseph, Thomas, 
John^^S Benjamin, and a 
sister named Mary. 



180. Joseph (4) : son of 
William ; married Caroline 
Gregory, on 13th December 
1826. 

131. Joseph (8): his son. 

132. Walter : his son; the 
only male representative of 
this line ; living in America, 
in 1877. 



7. ^A BBANGH OF THE ** NiCHOLSON" (OF PlYMOUTH) FaMILY. 

Jonathan^ a brother of Joseph who is No. 128 on the 
** Nicholson" No. 6 pedigree, was the ancestor of Nicholson ^ 
of Plymouth. 



* John: This John was twice married — first to Mary Ball; second, 
to Elizabeth Luscombe. By the first marriage he had a son named 
John, who was married to Elizabeth Penn, a kinswoman to the 
founder of Pennsylvania, in the United States, America. The male 
line of this branch of the family has become extinct ; but there are 
daughters who have families. 

This John's sister, Mary Nicholson, was, on the 29th March 1791, 
married to Philip Gibbs, by whom ehe had twelve children, almost 
all of whom are (in 1877) in Canada, British America. Elizabeth 
Nicholson-Gibbs, one of those twelve children, was, on the 3rd June 
1830, married to James Dore-Blake, M.D. : the issue of this marriage 
were — 1. Philip- James, born in September, 1831, since deceased ; 2. 
James Gibbs -Nicholson-Blake, bom in January 1833 ; 3. Libra- 
Augusta, born in August 1838 ; 4. Joseph (deceased), bom in March 
1836 ; 5. Joseph Nicholson-Blake, bom in May 1838 ; 6. Elizabeth- 
Anne, bom in May 1841 ; 7. Edward-Thomas, bom in June 1842 ; 
8. Mary-^nne, bom in May 1844 ; 9. Sarah- Margaret, bom in July 
1847 ; 10. Samuel- Hahnemann, bom in July 1850. 

liie Philip Gibbs here mentioned was a first cousin of Samuel 
Newcomen Gibbs, who was the father of FVederick Waymouth Gibbs 
for many years tutor to H.R.H. Albert Edward, Prince of Wales 
(1877). 



n.] 



THE NICOIiSOM (OB* LONDOH) FAMILT. 



Ill 



128. Jonathan : son of 
William ; married in Febru- 
ary 1762 at Eingsbridge, 
to Amy May. 

129. Robert : his son ; 
mamed in April 1784, at 
Eingsbridge, to Elizabeth 
Poppleston. 

180. Jonathan (2) : his 
son ; in February 1820, at 
the parish church of Stoke, 
Damerel, Devon, was mar- 
ried to Jane- Anne ttemfry. 

181. Jonathan-Henry: his 
son ; married, in December 
1842, at St. George's-church 
East, Stonehouse, Devon, to 
Anne Hanibling. This Jon- 
athan-Henry had a brother 
named Robert, who, in June 
1857, at St. Andrew's 
Church, Plymouth, was 
married to Emma Philips, 



by whom he had five sons— 

1. Jonathan-Henry, born in 
1858 ; 2. Robert- Joseph, 
born in 1860 ; 8. James- 
Bemfiry, born in 1868; 4. 
Ernest - Charles • Remfry, 
bom in 1871 ; and 5. 
Arthur-Philips, bom in 1874 
— all living in 1877. 

182. John William : son 
of Jonathan-Henry ; born in 
December, 1848 ; had three 
brothers and four sisters 
the brothers — 1. Jonathan 
Henry, bom in June, 1861 

2. Henry, bom in November 
1855 ; 8. Robert -Joseph 
bom in February, 1860 
and the sisters were — 1 
Mary-Elizabeth, 2. Emma 
8. Maria-Remfry, 4. Eliza 
beth-Caroline-Popplestone 
all living in 1877. 



8. — A BBANCH OF Tms** Nicolson" (of London) FAMHiY. 

JosEpn, a brother of WiUiam who is No. 129 on the 
*^ Nicholson" No. 6 pedigree, was the ancestor of another 
branch of the Nicolson family, in London. 



129. Joseph: son of Joseph, 
of Eingsbridge ; bom in May 
1771 ; in 1798 was married 
to Fanny Sheppard. 

180. James : his son ; 
married Lydia Laurie, liv- 
ing in 1877 at 84 Wal- 
brook» Mansion House, Lon- 
don ; had a brother named 
John : this John married 



Mary Church, and had two 
sons, one of whom is dead ; 
the other is a Draper in 
London. 

181. Ebenezer : son of 
James ; married at Moor- 
fields, in December 1854, to 
Sarah Thompson ; has three 
sons and three daughters : 
the sons — 1. Arthur-Ebene- 



112 



IBI8H FEDIGEBES, 



[PABT 



zer, bom in 1855 ; 2. James- 
Alexander, bom in June 
1863 ; 3. Frank-Abemethy, 
bom in November 1864 ; the 
daughters were — 1. Ellen- 
Sarah, 2. Anne-Lydia, 3. 
Eliza-Mary— all six children 



living in 1877- This Ebe- 
nezer has a brother named 
James Nicolson, of 44 
Grove-road, Mile-end Boad, 
London, E., who is married 
to Charlotte Abemethy, and 
has children. 



9. — The " Nicholson" (of Mobeton-in-Mabsh) FAinLY. 

Thomas, a brother of William who is No. 129 on the 
** Nicholson" No. 6 pedigree, was the ancestor of another 
branch of the Nicholson family. 



129. Thomas : son of Jos- 
eph, of Kingsbridge ; bom in 
July, 1773 ; married Esther 
Birt, on 18 September 1796. 

130. Bev. Thomas, a Bap- 
tist Minister : his son ; bom, 
13th April 1805 ; married 
Mary Anne Miles ; living in 
1878 in Moreton-in-Marsh, 
near Lydney, England. 



131. Thomas (2) : his son; 
married a Miss Hutchins. 
This Thomas had three bro- 
thers — 1. Isaiah, married to 
Lizzie Henderson ; 2. John, 
married and living in Ame- 
rica ; 3. Frank, married, and 
living in 1878 at Dalston, 
near London. 



10. — Another branch op the ** Nicholson** Family. 

Benjamin, brother of "V^lliam who is No. 129 on the 
** Nicholson" No. 6 pedigree, was the ancestor of another 
branch of the Nicholson family, living at Plymouth. 



129. Benjamin : son of 
Joseph ; bom in July 1776 ; 
married Anne Von Neck, in 
April 1800. 

130. Bev. Samuel*, of 
Plymouth, Baptist Minister: 
his son ; bom in April 1801; 
married in March 1824, Jane, 



daughter of Thomas Nichol- 
son, who is No. 129 on the 
" Nicholson" No. 9 pedigree; 
d., 1856. 

131. Henry-Martyn 
Nicholson, of Windsor-place, 
Plymouth, England : son of 
Samuel. 



*** Samuel: The children of this Samuel and Jane Nicholson were 
— 1. Samuel -Pearce, bom April 1826, died in September 1849 ; 2. 
Jane Jarvis, born August 1827, died in infancy ; 3. Jane Jarvis bom 
Oct. 1828, d. February 1869 ; 4. Anna, b. December 1829, d. Sept. 
1677 } 5. Kustaoe, b. June 1831, d. June 1852 ; 6. Mary, b. Nov. 



n.] 



THE NICHOLSON (OF OOLBFOBD) FAMILY. 



118 



11. — ^Thb Stem of thb ** Nicholson'* (of Colbford) Family. 

Rev. William Nicholson, brother of Joseph who is No. 
180 on the '* Nioholson" No. 6 pedigree, was the ancestor 
of Nicholson, of the Laird's Hill, Coleford, Gloncestershire, 
England. 



180. Rev. William, a Bap- 
tist Minister : son of Wil- 
liam, of Pl3nnonth ; born in 
1805 ; married Martha, a 
daughter of Thomas Nichol- 
son (No. 129 on the "Nichol- 
son" No. 9 pedigree), on the 
8th April 1884; living in 

1877. 

131. William Nicholson 
(Nicolson, or MacNicol), of 
The Laird's Hill, Coleford : 
his son ; bom in February, 



on 16 December 1856 ; and 
living in 1878. This Wil- 
liam, who has been com- 
monly called ** Patrick", has 
a sister named Eliza*. 

182. Charles - £benezer- 
Thurston .- Grove - Cowley- 
Nicholson : his son ; born in 
February, 1867. This Char- 
les has a brother named 
Bertram- Archibald, bom in 
July, 1863 ; and two sisters 
— 1. Ellen, 2. Lilian-Maude: 



1885 ; married Ellen Cowley, all living in 1878. 

Besides the foregoing <' Nicholson" and '< Nicolson" 
^nealogies, the Author received others of that family ; but, 
they were so incomplete, he regrets to say that he could 
not insert them. 



1832, d. in infancy ; 7. Mary (2), b. Sept. 1834 d. March 1859 ; 8. 
Lydia, b. June 1836, and living in 1878 ; 9. Sarah, b. February 1838, 
^ March 1877 ; 10. PhiUp-Edward, b. June 1839, Hving in 1878 ; 
11, William-Carey, and 12. Henry-Martyn (twins), b. Sept. 1841, and 
both living in 1878 ; 13. Phebe Nicholson, b. May 1843, and living 
in 1878 : all the surviving members of this family being (in 1878) 
omnarried, save Philip-Edward, No. 10. This Philip- Eklward was, 
on the 6th August 1863, married to Emilie-Louise Thoumeysen : 
their children were — 1. Samuel-Arnold, bom in 1865, died November 
1869 ; 2. Edward-Basil, b. Sept. 1867, living in 1878 ; 3. Marguerite 
b. Angnst 1872, living in 1878 ; and 4. Waiter-Frederick, bom July 
1 876, and Uving in 1878. 

^ jB&u: This Eliza Nicholson (now of Rothesay, near Ravens- 
bourne, Dnnedin, Orago, New Zeialand,) was married to Edward 
r^vies of Caerleon, near Newport, Monmouthshire, England ; they 
have (in 1878) five children, the names of three of whom I have as- 
certained — 1. Edward Nicolson-Davies, 2. Ernest NicoUon-Davies, 
Z. Arthur Nicholson- Daviei. 



114 



naSH PEDIGREES. 



[PABT 



12. — The Stem op the " O'Dbiscoll" Familt. 

^NEAs, brother of Fothach canaan who is No. 60 on the 
"Barry" pedigree, was the ancestor of O^h-Edersceail ; 
anglicised O'Driscoll. 



60. iBneas : son of Lugh- 
ach (Lnghaidh or Lny) 
Maccon, the 113th monarch 
of Ireland. 

61. Nathi : his son ; 
whose brother Fergus was 
the ancestor of Coffey, 

62. Edersceal : his son ; 
had nine sons ; his brother 
Colman had three sons. 

68. Brandubh : his son ; 
had eight sons. 

64. Flannan : his son ; 
had a brother named Foran- 
nan, who was father of St. 
Colum (27 February), St. 
Eltin (11 December), and St. 
Mochumna (7 June). 

65. Columan : lus son. 

66. Comdhan : his son. 

67. Flannan (2) : his 
son. 

68. Folachta : his son. 

69. iBlneas : his son. 

70. Dungus : his son ; 
had a brother named Maine. 

71. Murghul : his son. 

72. Dnngal : his son. 
78. Nuadad : his son. 

74. Fionn : his son. 

75. Edersceal ('< ede- 
arbh" : Irish, fahe^ and 
" sceaF', a story) : his son ; 
a quo O^EderaceoiL 

76. Fothach : his son. 



77. Maccon : his son. 

78. Fionn : his son. 

79. Fothach (2) : his son. 

80. Donoch mor: his son; 
had a brother named Aodh 
(or Hugh), who was the an- 
cestor of " O'Driscoll 
Bearra." 

81. Amhailgadh an gas- 
goine (** gas": Irish, a stalk ; 
** goin", a stroke) : his son ; 
a quo 0'Gasgo7iie, anglicised 
Gasgoyne, and Gascoyne. 
This Amhailgadh had a 
younger brother named 
Maccraith, whose son Don- 
och was the father of Mac- 
con, father of Ainach, father 
of Fingin, father of Conor, 
father of Conor oge, father 
of Sir Fingin O'Drisooll 
mor, who was alive, a.d. 
1460 ; and who founded the 
Franciscan Abbey of Inis- 
herkin Island. 

82. Morogh : son of Am- 
hailgadh. 

88. Donogh oge : his son. 

84. Dermod : his son. 

85. Murtogh : his son. 

86. Fingin : his son. 

87. Maccon : his son. 

88. Murtogh (2) : his son. 

89. Donald O'DriscoU i 
his son. 



n.] 



THE LEABY FAMILY. 



11& 



18. — The Stem op the " O'Leaby" Family. 

FoTHACH oanaan, the fifth son of Luy Maccon, the lldth 
monarch of Ireland who (see first series) is No. 59 on th& 
stem of the " House of Ith", was the ancestor of O'Laeg- 
haire*; anglicised O'Leary and Leary, 



59. Luy Maccon. 

60. Fothach canaan : his 
son. 

61. Duach: his son. 

62. Treana : his son. 
68. Eire : his son. 

64. Ros(**ros": Irish, a 
promontory) : his son : a quo 
O'Ruis, anglicised Ross, and 
Rush. 

65. Laeghaire : his son; 
a quo 0*Leary, 

66. Fiach : his son. 
67^ Dunlaing : his son. 

68. Kos (2) : his son. 

69. Maine : his son. 

70. Aongus (or Mneas) : 
his son. 

71. Earc : his son. 

72. Conor cliodhna : his 
son. 

78. Teige : his son. 

74. Donoch na tuaima 
(" tnaim" : Irish, a dyke or 
fence) : his son ; a quo 

G*Tuaima, anglicised Toomey 
and Tuoniey, 

75. Gonamnan : his son. 

76. Dermod : his son. 

77. Gumumhan : his son. 



78. Donoch : his son. 

79. Teige (2) : his son. 

80. Maolseaghlainn : hia 
son. 

81. Teige (8) : his son. 

82. Maolseaghlainn (2) : 
his son. 

88. Tomhas mor : hi& 
son. 

84. Tomhas oge : his 
son. 

85. Athbiadh : his son. 

86. Ciimumhan (2) : hia 
son. 

87. Amhailgadh: his son. 

88. Dunlaing (2) : hia 
son. 

89. Art : his son. 

90. Teige (4) : his son ; 
had a brother named Luigh- 
dhach. 

91. Dermod t son of 
Teige. 

92. Conogher OXeary : 
his son ; first assumed thia 
sirname. 

93. Donogh : his son. 

94. Amhailgadh (or Au* 
lifi) O'Leary : his son. 



' ^ 0*Laeghaire : Some flcenealopstB derive this sirname from the 
Iriah ** laogh", a calf, and " gair's an outcry (6r. *• car-uo") ; others, 
from the Insh '' leath": a half, and ** gair", a laugh. 



PART III. 

HOUSE OF IB. 

Ib (see the first series) was the fifth son of Milesius of 
Spain, but the second of the three who left any issue ; from 
him the following families, along with others given in the 
first series, are descended : 



1. — Thb Stem of the " Oahill" (of Clabe) Family. 

Oathal, brother of Lochlannn who is No. 108 on the 
^* O'Conor" (Corcomroe) pedigree, was the ancestor of 
O'Cathail ; anglicised CahilL 



103. Cathal (" cathal" : 
Irish, valour) : son of Conor 
mear (also called Conor* na 
luinge luaithe) ; a quo 
O'Cathail. 

104. Conor : his son. 

105. Donall danat (•* da- 
na" : Irish, hold ; Pers. and 
Arab. " dana'*, a poet) : his 
son. 

106. Teige O'Cahill : his 
son ; first assumed this sir- 
name. 

107. Brian beamach : his 
son. 

108. Cathal (2) : his son. 

109. Murtogh : his son. 

110. Edmond : his son. 

* Conor na Imnge luaithe : This name, anglicised, means ''Conor of 
the swifter-sailing ship" C'luath", comp. "iuaithe'^ Irish, qukis) ; 
a quo 0*LuaUke, anglicised Qmck, and by some Lowe, 

t Dana : This Donall was the ancestor of Dawneyf and, it is said, 
of Dane and Deane, 

X Strong : While some genealogists derive this simame from 
'* StrongboV, others are of opinion that Strong and Stronge are 
Headfordshire or Border names —derived from the Anglo-Norman 
Storange, 



111. Donall dunn : his 
son. 

112. Tomhas na sealbui- 
dhe (** seal" : Irish, a seaJ)^ 
meaning <* Thomas of the 
Seals** : his son ; a quo 
O'Sealliddhe or O Seala, an- 
ghcised SJielly. 

113. John : his son. 

114. Murtogh : his son. 

115. Edmund : his son. 

116. Teige laidir(*^laidir": 
Irish, strong) : his son ; a 
quo Lauder, Strong^, and 
Stronge, 

117. Tomhas O'Cahill : 
his son ; living, a.i>. 1700. 



THE CUBTIN FAMILY. 



IIT 



2;— -Tbs Stem of the ** Oubtin** Family. 

FsAOGH, brother of Oubroc who is No. 82 on the "0*Conor'*^ 
(Goromroe) pedigree, was the ancestor of Claim Cruitin ; 
modernized MacCruitin and O^Cuarthain^ and anglicised 
Curtin, Curtain^ Jordan^ and Jourdan. 



82. Fraoch : son of Os- 
car. 

88. Carthann : his son. 

84. Lonan : his son. 

85. Seanan : his son. 

86. Labann : his son 

87. Brocan : his son. 

88. Cruitin file* (" crui- 
tin": Irish, a crooked-back 
person ; ** file", a poet, bard 
or minstrel) : his son ; a quo 
Clann Cruitin, 

89. Maolruana : his son. 

90. Fergus : his son. 

91. Saorbreitheamhf Mac- 
Gmitin : his son ; first assu- 
med this simame. 

92. Saortuile : his son. 
98. Mudhna : his son. 
94. Altan : his son. 



95. Conor : his son. 

96. Flann : his son. 

97. Aralt : his son. 

98. GioUa Ghriosd : hia 
son. 

99. Aodh (or Hugh) : hi& 
son. 

100. Conor (2) : his son. 

101. Hugh : his son. 

102. Hugh oge : his son, 

103. Solomon : his son. 

104. Conor (8) : his son. 

105. Seanchuidh ('* sean- 
chuidh*' : Irish, a chronicler)^ 
his son ; a quo O* Seanchuidh^ 
anglicised Sanchy, 

106. Firbis : his son ; a 
quo MacFirUsj anglicised 
Forbes, 

107. Eolus : his son. 



* Cruitin file : The word cruMm [crutteen] is derived from the 
Irish erwly *'alyre", "harp", or "violin" (Lat. ctfthar-a). Of the 
ancient Irish Cru\i Evans wrote : " £z sex chordis felinis constat, 
nee '^eodem modo quo violinum modulatur, quamvis a figura hand 
mnltam abludat.*' 

t SaorbreUheamk : This word is compounded of the Iiish saoTf a 
workman, a carpenter, a builder, a joiner, a mason ; and breitheamh, 
a judge. Some of the descendants of this Saorbreitheamh were, by 
way of eminence, caUed Mac-an-t Saoir (literally, **the sons or 
descendants of the workman"), which has been anglicised Maclntyrer 
Carpenter, Joiner, Judge, Mason, etc. It was my mistake in the 
first series, paoe 227, to give " Maclntyre" as synonymous with 
**<yVidByn'\ chiefs of Hy-MacCaille, now the barony of "Imokill^r" 
in the county Cork ; for, O^Mictyre (" mactire'' : Irish, a wolf) is- 
quite distinot from Mac^a/nrt Saoir, and has been anglicised Wo(f. 



118 



IBISH PEDIOBEES 



[part 



108. Crimthaun : his son. 
' 109. Hugh na tniunidhe 
(*' na-tuinnidhe" : Irish, of 
the den) : his son ; a quo 
Tunney. 

110. Conor (4) : his son. 



111. Oonor oge : his son. 

112. Hugh bnidhe : his 
son ; author of the ^'English 
Irish Dictionary", published 
in Paris, a.d. 1782. 



8. — ^Thb Stbm op the "Dugan" Family. 

Felim, the youngest brother of lonlchadh who is No. 85 on 
ihe << Manning'' pedigree, was the ancestor of D'Afadadh- 
gain ; anglicised Madigan, and Dugan^, 



85. Felim : son of Sod- 
han. 

86. Fionchu : his son. 

87. Bos : his son. 

88. Luchta : his son. 

89. Amergin : his son. 

90. Geneidh : his son. 

91. Maoldubh : his son. 

92. Fionngal : his son. 
98. Sealbhach(**sealbh": 

Irish, possession) : his son ; a 
quo Selby. 

94. Dunechar : his son. 

95. Dobhalen : his son. 

96. Gussan : his son. 

97. Labhrast(**labhras": 
Irish, a laurel tree ; Lat. 
^'laurus'*) : his son. 



98. Sarcall : his son. 

99. Scoileach {scoileach : 
Irish, *' one who keeps a 
school"; Lat. schola ; Greek 
schole ; Fr. e-cole) : his son ; 
a quo O'Scoilaigh, anglicised 
Scally, Skellyf Scully, and 
Scallan, 

100. Madadhgan {" mad- 
adh": Irish, a dog), meaning 
** a little warrior": his son ; 
a quo O^Madadhgain. 

101. Gillcira : his son. 

102. Dunsliabh : his son. 
108. Scoileach (2) O'Dug- 

an : his son. 



4. — The Stem op the " Duncan" (Line op Ib) Familt. 

DuNCHEANN (dunceanu : Irish, ** a chief of a fort"), the 
second son of Naradh who is No. 97 on the ** Buddy'' 

* Dugan : Some genealogists derive this simame from Dubhagan, 
which means '* a snuJl dark man.'' 

t Labhras : From this name some derive the simame Lawrence, 



m.] THE GUINNESS, LEAVY, AND LEYDON FAMILIES. 119 

pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Duncinriy anglicised Ditn- 
can ; and Tormach {tormach : Irish, ** an augmentation or 
increase**), the third son of the said Naradh, was the 
ancestor of O'Jormaigh, anglicised Tormey. 



5. — The Stem of the ** Guinness'* Family. 
{See the first series,) 



6. — The Stem of the ** Leavy" Family. 

CusLiABH, brother of Giolla losa who (see the first series) 
is No. 109 on the ** O'Farrell** pedigree, was the ancestor 
of MacConsleibhe ; anglicised heavy* 



109. CushUabh (" cu" : 
Irish, a hound ; << shabh", a 
mountain) f meaning << the 
warrior of the mountain" : 
son of Braon O'Farrell ; a 
quo MacConsleibhe, 

110. Guchaille: his son. 
Hi. Eichtigheama : his 

son. 

112. Cucatha MacOonsh- 
leibhe : his son ; first assu- 
med this simame. 



118. Maolseaghlainn : his 
son. 

114. Sitric : his son. 

115. Giolla Ghriosd : his 
son. 

116. Maolseaghlainn (2) : 
his son. 

117. Giolla (or WilHam) : 
his son. 

118. Owen MacConsleibhe 
(or 0*Leavy) : his son. 



7. — The Stem of the " Leydon** Family. 

OsGAH, son of Onchu who is No. 75 on the *< O'Connor" 
(Corcomroe) pedigree, had two sons — 1. Cuerc, who was 
ancestor of Quirk ; and 2. Fraoch, who was the ancestor of 
0*Liodhain*9 anglicised Leydon, Laydon, etc. 

^ (yLiodhain : This Irish simame has been anslicised Laydeir, 
Liaydon, Leydon, Leyton, Lighton, Litton, Lydon, Lyddon, Lytton, 
etc. 



120 



IRISH PEDIGBEES. 



[PABT 



75. Osgar : son of Onchu. 

76. Fraoch ; his son. 

77. Carthann : his son. 

78. Lonan : his son. 

79. Seannagh : his son. 

80. Laphan (** lapa" : Ir- 
ish, the lap) : his son ; a qno 
O'Laphain, anglicised Laffan, 

81. Brocan : his younger 
son. 



82. Felim : his son. 

83. Maobruanaidh: his son. 

84. Fiangnsa : his son. 

85. Saertach : his son. 

86. Saorthuile : his son. 

87. Mugna : his son. 

88. Liodhan (" liodan " : 
Irish, the Litany) : his son ; 
a quo O'Liodhain, 



8.— 'The Stem of thb ** Lynch" Family. 

Caolbhadh (latinized <<Caolbadius"), the 47th King of 
Ulster, the 123rd and last ironarch of Ireland of the 
Irian race, and (see the first series) is No. 91 on the 
<< Guinness'* pedigree, had a son named Conla who was 
the ancestor of 0' Leathlabhair (of the line of Ir), which 
has been anglicised Lalor and Lawlor"^^ ; and of Muintir 
Loingsigh, anglicised Linch, Lynch, and Linskey. 



91. Caolbhadh : son of 
Crunnbhadroi. 

92. Conla : his son. 

93. Eocha : his son. 

94. Baodan : his son. 

95. Fiacha : his son. 

96. Eocha larlaith : his 
son. 

97. Inrachtach : his son. 



98. Tomaltach : his son. 

99. Longseach : his son. 

100. Leathlabhar : his 
son. 

101. Eiteach: his son. 

102. Longseach (^'longse- 
ach" : Irish, a mariner) : his 
son ; a quo Muintir Loing- 
sigh. 



According to another Genealogy, Nicholas, brother of 
James le Petito who is No. 2 on the '< Petit'' pedigree, was 
the ancestor of Lynch, of the county Galway ; but either 
that genealogy, or the pedigree of Petit (or ** Le Petit," as 



* Lawlor : For the derivation of this simame, see the ** Lawlor" 
(of Monaghan) pedigree. 



m.] 



THE MacABTAN FAMILY. 



121 



the name was first spelled) must be inacoorate : the 
" Lynch" (which is as follows j exceeding the " Petit" 
pedigree by thirteen generations, in five hundred years, 
from the common stock. 



1. William le Petito. 

2. Nicholas de Linch ; 
his son ; a quo Linch and 
Jjynch, 

8. John : his son. 

4. Maurice : his son. 

5. Hugh : his son. 

6. David : his son. 

7. Thomas : his son. 

8. James : his son. 

9. Thomas (2) : his son. 

10. David (2) : his son. 

11. Thomas (8) : his son. 



12. James (2) : his son. 
18. Thomas (4) : his son. 

14. John buidhe : his son. 

15. Thomas (5) : his son. 

16. Henry : his son. 

17. Bobuc : his son. 

18. Arthur : his son. 

19. Stephen : his son. 

20. Nicholas (2) : his son. 

21. Sir Henry : his son. 

22. Sir Bobuc Linch : his 



son. 



9.— The Stem op the " MacArtan** Family. 

PoGHARTACH, brother of Aidan whd (see the first series) 
is No. 97 on the ** Guinness" pedigree, was the ancestor 
of MacArtain ; modernized MacArtan, 



97. Foghartach : son of 
Mongan. 

98. Grontach : his son. 

99. Artan (** art" : Lish, 
a god, a stone, noble) : his 
son ; a quo MacArtain. 

100. Onchu : his son. 

101. Crumna crioch ("cri- 
och" : Irish, a country, or 
perfection) : his son ; a quo 
Cree, 

102. Conor aich (**aicid": 
Irish, sickness; Gr. **ach-os"): 
his son. 

108. Eachach : his son. 



104. Searrach : his son. 

105. Banall : his son. 

106. Geneth : his son. 

107. Gillcolum : his son. 

108. Donall : his son. 

109. Donoch : his son. 

110. Shane (or John) : his 
son. 

111. Tomhas mor: his son. 

112. Tomhas oge: his sou. 
118. Searrach mor : his 

son. 

114. Giolla Padraic : his 
son. 

115. Donall (2) : his son. 



122 



naSH PEDIOBEES. 



[PABT 



116. Gillgree fionn : . his 
son. 

117. Gillcolum (2): his 

SOD. 

118. Eachmile : his son. 

119. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 



120. Tirlach : his son. 

121. Felim : his son. 

122. Eachmile (2) : his 
son. 

128. Felim (2) : his son. 
124. Patrick MacArtan : 
his son. 



10. — The Stem op the ** MagGabtan" Family. 

FEARaAN, a brother of Gonnall who (see the first series) 
is No. 92 on the '' Guinness *' pedigree, was the ancestor 
of MacCartain ; modernized Cartan, MacCartan, and 
Macartan, 



92. Feargan: son of 
Caolbhadh. 

93. Mongan : his son. 

94. Fogartach : his son. 

95. Cruinneit : his son. 

96. Artan :^ his son ; a 
quo MacArtairif lords of 
** MacArtain*s Country ", 
called after him Kiv^alartyy 
now the name of a barony 
in the county Down. 

97. Cuoincon : his son ; 
lord of Kinealarty. 

98. Gruim na cruach 
(** cruach" : Irish, a stack) : 
his son ; a quo Croke, Crooke, 
and Stack,\ 

99. Concruach : his son. 
100. Eochaidh : his son ; 

first assumed the simame 



MacCartan; had a brother 
named Eocha oge. 

101. Searran : his son. 

102. Bugmaille : his son. 

103. Ciannait : his son. 

104. Gillcolum : his son. 

105. Donall : his son. 

106. Fionnach (or Don- 
och) : his son. 

107. Shane (or John) : his 
son. 

108. Tomhais (**tomhais": 
Iiish, to measure) : his son ; 
a quo 0' Tomhais y anglicised 
Thomas^ Thorn, Toms, Mac- 
ThxmuiSj Thomson, and 
Thompson, 

109. Tomhais oge: his 
son. 

110. Searran (2) : his son. 



* Artan : See the derivation of thid name in the foregoing (" Mac- 
Artan ") pedigree. 

t Stack I Some genealogists consider that this family is of Danish 
•extraction. 



m.] 



THS MACGABBY FAMILT. 



128 



111. Giollapadraic : his 
son. 

112. Giollapadraic oge : 
his son ; a quo Killpatrick ; 
had a brother named Don- 
ald. 

118. Giolgaginn: son of 
Giollapadraic. 

114. Giollacolum (**col- 
nm": Irish, a dove): his son ; 
^qaoO'Gilcoluimt anglicised 
Colum, 

115. Eachmile: his son. 

116. A.odh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

117. Torlogh : his son. 

118. Felim (or Phelim) : 
his son. 

119. Eachmile (2): his 
son. 

120. Felim (2) : his son ; 
had two brothers — 1. Don- 



ally and 2. Anthony; died 
in 1681. 

121. Patrick ]^acOartan, 
of Ballydromroe : son of 
Felim. 

122. John : his son ; left 
Ireland in the service of 
King James the Second; 
living in 1691. 

128. Anthony : his son ; 
followed King James the 
Second, and became a 
captain in the Irish Brigade 
in the French Service. 

124. Antonie Joseph : his 
son ; a physician. 

125. Andronicus: his son ; 
was Medical Doctor, and had 
a brother who was also an 
M.D. 

126. Felix MacGartan, of 
Lille, in Flanders ; his son. 



11. — The Stem op the " MaoGabrt" Familt. 

Anbeith, brother of Brocan who is No. 108 on the 
•• Shanly,*' pedigree, was the ancestor of MacSeairaigh ; 
anglicised MacQarry^ Magarry, and Seery. 

108. Anbeith : son of Eo- 
1ns. 

104. Mnireadach : his 
son. 

105. Eachmarc: his son. 

106. Searrach('<seairach": 
Irish, a colt) : his son ; a 
qao MacSeairaigh. 

107. Fionn : his son. 



108. Lnachcas (" luach" : 
Irish, wages ; ** cas", money): 
his son ; a quo Luachais, 
anglicised Lucas. 

109. Maothan (** maoth'' : 
Irish, tender) : his son ; a 
quo Meehan, 

110. Matha : his son. 

111. Gormgall : his son. 



1^4 



[i-^ 



n± VmekaDOct ^)z iu IfiLBonr 



IlgL Mi c oJJii h: Ids 

111. ScoaeoD : Ids bqel 
11a. DozoU : Ids Bm. 
Il«. 



Lis 

117. Avhr oge : his son. 

118. GillehnoBd : 

119. Maeoailii (2): his 
son* 

120* Tliomas not z Ids MieGanj r his son ; had a 
son* ' hrolfaer named finy. 

121. Thomfls oge : his son. * 



Tth^ 


9i«iM 


; Chald. 


^Ink 


4[^;Anli. 


'%4Mf)r 


hs so 


n; had 
JflolbeT. 


a hrother 


ISL Manns dnhh : eon of 


Banrl 


■cac 




124. Oonor : ins son. 


US. 


Bar (2): 


his son. 


U6. 


Gaiihre: 1 


lis son. 


1«7. 


Gi llg 


ro o m a 



12.— The Stkm of the ** Manning^* Familt. 



FxACHA araidhe, the 87th king of Ulster of the Irian race- 
wbo (see the first series) is No. 83 on the <* Gninness" 
pedigree, had two sons — 1. Cas, and 2. Sodhan: this- 
Sodban was the ancestor of O'Maoinein [monneen] ; angli- 
cised ManniUf Manning, Mannion, and some say Rickey. 



Fergus r bis son. 
Fingin : bis son. 
Tuatbal r bis son. 
Manus : bis son. 
Aodb (or Hugh) : his- 

Donall : bis son. 
Maotban : bis son. 
Morooh : bis son. 
Maotban (2): his son. 
Donall (2) : his son. 
Dcxiooh : his son. 
D«nnod:.hiB son. 



68, Fiaoha araidhe. 


92. 


84. Bodban : bis son. 


93. 


85. lomobadb : bis son. 


94. 


86. Degill : bis son. 


96. 


87. Oaa : bis son. 


96. 


88. Oonall : his son. 


son. 


89. Flann abrad : bis 


97. 


son. ^ 


98. 


00. Maoinin (*' maoin*' : 


99. 


Irish, ¥m^lthV meaning *< the 
wealU^y little man*'): his 


100. 


101. 


son ; a quo O'Maoinmn. 
91, Duhhagaa : his son. 


102. 


108. 



m.] 



rnas molbdt and koobb families. 



125 



104. 
105. 
106. 
107. 
108. 
109. 
110. 



OillioBa : his son. 
Donoch (2): his son. 
Hagh (2) : his fion. 
Melachlin : his son. 
David : his son. 
Donall (8) : his son. 
Melachlin (2) : his 



ison. 



111. Donall (4): his son. 

112. William : his son. 
118. Donall (5) : his son. 

114. Melachlin (8): his 
son. 

115. John : his son. 

116. John oge O'Manning: 
his son. 



13. — The Stem of the " Molbdy" Family. 

Maolaneididh, a younger hrother of Fergal who (see the 
first series) is No, 105 on the *' O'Farrell*' pedigree, was 
the ancestor of 0' Maolaneididh ; anglicised Melody ^ Melody j 
Moledyf and Moody^ 



105. Maolaneididh 
^'* eideadh" : Irish, armour) : 
son of Gongal; a quo O'Maoh 
/meididh, 

106. Donall : his son. 

107. Dermod : his son. 
106. Fingin : his son. 
109. Donall (2) : his son. 
1 lO.Eichtigheama: his son« 

111. WiUiam (or Giolla) : 
his son. 

112. Eoghan (or Owen) : 
his son. 

118. Dermod (2) : his son. 

114. Eanna : his son. 

115. Donall (8) : his son. 

116. Fingin (2) : his son. 

117. Eichtighearna (2) : 
his son. 



118. Owen (2) : his son. 

119. Eobert : his son. 

120. Philip : his son. 

121. Gormac : his son. 

122. Moroch : his son. 
128. John : his son. 

124. Eobert (2) : his son. 

125. Gormac (2) : his son. 

126. Sir Patrick Moledy: 
his son : die! without issue, 
and left his property to hii 
younger brother's four chil- 
dren,namely— one daughter, 
and three sons : 1. Sir An- 
thony Moledy, of Boberts- 
town, county Kildare ; 2. 
Bedmond, of Rathwire ; and 
8. Major Hugh Moledy. 



14. — ^The Stem of the '* Moobe " Family — Continued* 

Liosach, who (see the first series) is No. 101 on the 
^ O'Moore " pedigree: 



126 



[PABX 

iher named John, who was 
the ancestor of Mulchay, 

115. Charles O'Moore*, of 
Ballinea (now Ballyna), En- 
field : son of Boger caoch ; 
d., 1601 ; had an elder brot- 
her named Cedagh, who was 
page to Queen Elizabeth, 
who granted him Ballinea. 

116. CoL Eoger : son of 
Charles ; died, 1646 ; had a 
brother named Anthony, t 

117. Col. Charles : his son; 
governor of Athlone ; killed 
in the battle of Anghrim, 
12th July, 1691 ; his sister 
Anne was wife of Patrick 
Sarsfield of Lucan, and 
mother of Patrick, earl of 
Lucan. 

118. Lewis : his son ; d., 
1788. 

119. James 0*Moore: his 
son; whose daughter and 
^ole heir, Letitia, married 
Eichard OTarreU, of Ballin- 
ree, coxmty Longford. 

120. Ambrose O'Farrell, 
of Ballyna : their son. 

121. Eichard MooreO'Far- 
rell : his son ; bom in 1797, 
and living in 1877. 

* CharUs G* Moore : This Charles had a younser brother named 
Rory oge, who, a.d. 1587, was slain by the EngliiSi. 

t Anthony O'Moore joined CNeil, earl of lyrone ; and in a great 
battle defeated the English army, a.d. 1598. In the year 1600, he 
and Captain Tyrrell went into Munster and joined with MacCarthy 
there ; where, in a great engagement, the English army is defeated, 
and their general, the earl of Ormonde, taken prisoner. Soon after 
(in 1001), the Munster and Leinster confederates submit, except this 
O'Moore and O'Conor Faley, who are left in the lurch and slain ; 
and their estates and territories of Lease and Offaly (or O'Phaley) 
seized, ooniisoated, and disposed to English planters, and called by 
the names of the King's and Queen's Counties. — Four MoMers. 



101. liosaeh : son of Am- 
ergin, who is considered the 
ancestor of Bergin. 

102. Donall : his son. 
108. Conor cacoigcriche : 

his sofu 

104. liosach (2) : his son. 

105. Donall (or Daniel) 
O'Moore: his son ; first assu- 
med this simame. 

106. Daniel oge : his son. 

107. Liosaeh (8) : his son, 
the last '< King of Lease*' ; 
btiilt the monastery of Lease 
(called De'Lege'Dei)f a.d. 
1183. 

108. ti^iall (or Neal) : his 
son. 

109. Liosaeh (4): his son; 
had a brother named Daniel. 

110. David: son of Lio- 
saeh. 

111. Anthony : his son. 

112. Melaghlin : his son ; 
died in 1481. 

118. Connall: his son; d., 
1518. 

114. Boger caoch : his son ; 
was slain by his brother 
Philip ; had a brother named 
Gedagh, who died without 
issue; and a younger bro- 



m.] 



THE HORAN AND IfXTLOAHY FAMILIES. 



127 



16. — The Stem of the " Moban*' Family. 

MocHAN, the third son of Finghin who (see the first series) 
is No. 97 on the *< OTarrell" pedigree, was the ancestor 
of O'Jdorain ; anglicised Moran, 

97. Finghin : son of Nei- 
dhe. 

98. Mochan : his son. 

99. Moran (*' moran'* : 
Irish, a multitude) : his son ; 
a quo O'Morain. 

100. Fiachra : his son. 

101. lomchadh : his son. 

102. Ferach : his son. 
108. Tomhais : his son. 

104. Giollaiosa (latinized 
Gelasius and Gillacius) : his 
son. 

105. Molroona : his son. 

106. Padraic : his son. 

107. Moireadach : his son. 

108. Melachlin : his son. 

109. Dermod : his son. 



110. GioUa (orWiUiam): 
his son. 

111. Teige : his son. 

112. Cathal : his son. 
118. Rory : his son. 

114. Muredach : his son. 

115. Lochlann : his son. 

116. Muredach (8) : his 
son. 

117. Owen : his son. 

118. Donall: his son. 

119. Rory (2) : his son. 

120. Kory oge : his son. 

121. Conor : his son ; had 
a brother named William. 

122. Tirlach 0' Moran: son 
of Conor. 



16. — The Stem of the ** Muloahy" Family. 

John, a younger brother of Eoger caoch who (in this 
series) is No. 114 on the '*Moore*' pedigree, was the ances- 
tor of Mulcahy, or (as it has also been anglicised and 
frequently spelled) Mulchay.^ 

* Mvkhay : From a similarity in the pronunciation of the names, 
some were of opinion that Maolcaich^ who is mentioned in the Stowe 
Missal, might nave been the ancestor of this family. The original 
MS. of that Missal was written in an ancient Lombardic character 
which may well be deemed older than the sixth century. (The 
Missal is supposed to be that of St. fiuadhan, the founder of the 
Monastery of Lorha, in North Tipperary, who died a.d. 584. ) The 
learned Ih*. O'Connor says that portions of the MS. are written in a 
second and much later hand ; and, at pMe 71, at the end of the 
Canon of the Mass, the name of the second scribe is given : ** Maol' 
caieh BcripsU.^^ The Ker. Dr. Todd says that the latter writing, by 
Blaolcaich, must be referred to the eighth century; which furnishes a 
•fcrang additional evidence of the high antiquity of the original— See 
th6 ** Ecclesiastical £ecord", for September, 1870. 



128 



IRISH FE^IGBEES. 



[part 



114. John O'Moore : son 
of Gonnall. By some this 
John was sumamed Maol- 
locha (**loch", gen. "locha": 
Irish, a lake, the sea, ; Lat. 
"lac-ns"; Wels. « Ihych"), 
meaning " The Hardy 
Champion", and a quo 
O'MaoUocha ; and by others 
he was surnamed Maolsatha 
(" cath" ; gen. ** catha" : 
Irish, haule\ Lat. **cat-erva*'; 
Wels. "kad"; Heb. "chath", 
terror ; Chald. ** cath", a 
battalion), meaning ** The 
Champion of the Battle," 
and a qno O^Maolcatha. 

115. Cathal^: his son. 

116. Cbnnall : his son. 

117. Eoger : his son. 

118. Thomas, of White- 
church, coxmty Waterford: 
his son ; living in 1657 ; had 
a brother, the Eev. Nicholas 
Mulcahy.''' 



119. John,ofWhitechurch: 
his son. 

120. Thomas, of White- 
church : his son. 

121. John, of Ballymakee: 
his son. 

122. Edmund mun : his 
son ; who in 1780 married 
Barbara, daughter of South- 
well Moore, of Ashgrove, 
and of his wife Elizabeth 
Fitzgerald, daughter of the 
Knight of Gl}Ti. This Ed- 
mund had two brothers — 1. 
Johnf , 2. Thomas. 

128. Edmund Moore Mul- 
cahy, of Ballymakee, a J.P. 
for the counties of Water- 
ford and Tipperary : his son; 
married Mary Cecilia Eus- 
sell. This Edmund had two 
brothers and one sister : the 
brothers were-l. John 
Moore Mulcahy, J.P., who 
married Maria Bradshaw : 



* Bev, Nicholas Mulcahy : This clergyman was parish priest of 
Ardfinnan in the county Tipperary, at the time of the CromweUian 
invasion of Ireland ; and, during the siege of Clonmel, was seized 
upon by a reconnoitering party of Cromw^'s cavalry. Of him. Dr. 
Moran (in his Historical Sketch of the PersectUions suffered by the 
Catholics of Ireland under the Rule of Cromwell and tlie Puritans. 
Dublin : James Duffy. 1862.) says : '* Immediately on his arrest^ he 
was bound in irons, conducted to the camp of the besiegers and offered 
his pardon, should he onl^ consent to use his influence with the in- 
habitants of Clonmel, and mduce them to deliver up the town. These 
terms he rejected with scorn. He was consequently led out in sight 
of the besieged walls, and there beheaded whilst he knelt in prayer 
for his faithful people and asked forgiveness for his enemies." 

*)* John : This John lived at Ballymakee, Co. Waterford, and mar- 
ried Miss Quin, Loloher Castle ; no issue, fiis brother Thomas lived 
at Glasha, and married Miss Koberts : their issue were three sons — 
1. Frank, 2. William, 3. John ; and one dauehter, Anne— all deceased, 
and now represented by John Roberts Miuoahy, J.P. for the oonnty 
Tipperary. 



in.] 



THE MULCAHY (OF ARDPADDBN) FAHILT. 



129 



2. Southwell Moore Mulcahy, 
who married Barbara Moore; 
and the sister's name was 
Elizabeth, who married Ed- 
mnndPower, J.P.,Glashman. 
The issue of this Edmund 
M. Molcahy are, as follows : 
124. Major Edmund 
Moore Muloahy, J.P. for 



Waterford and Tipperary 
(married to Susan PurceU 
O'Gorman) ; Lieutenant- 
Colonel John Bussell Moore 
Mulcahy (married to Frances 
Mary Dwyer) , and Cecilia 
Moore Mulcahy: all living 
in 1878. 



17. — ^The " Mulcahy" (of Ardpadden) Family. 

It is believed that Thomas mantach, who is marked No. 
119 on this genealogy, was a brother of John, of White- 
church, county Waterford, who is No. 1 19 on the foregoing 
('< Mulcahy '') pedigree. Commencing with that Thomas, 
the following is the genealogy of Mulcahy ^ of Ardpaddeen, 
county Waterford : 



119. Thomas mantach*, 
who fought at the Battle of 
the Boyne, a.d. 1690, on the 
mde of King James the 
Second : son of Ttiomas. 

120. Edmund : his son ; 
had a brother named John, 
who was the ancestor of the 
Mnlcfl^ys, of Eillkeany, 
cormtj Waterford. 

121. Thomas ban [bawnl : 
his son ; or <' Thomas the 
Fair/* 



122. Edmund ban: his 
son. The issue of this 
Edmund were twenty child- 
ren — 1. Edmund, who was 
born in 1773, and died 1886; 
2. Mrs. M. Mulcahy, born in 
1784, and living 1877 ; 3. 
Mrs. Butler, born in 1801, 
died 1872 ; 4. Thomas, born 
1808, and living 1877; 6. 
Mrs. Catherine Norris, born 
1806, living 1877 ; 6. David, 
bom 1807, now dead; 7. 



* MafOach : This Thomas Mulcahy owned the following townlands 
in the parish of Kiibrien, connty Waterford : nam^y — wsart, Barra- 
<aee, and Killbrien; and lie afterwards got the townland of Killkeany, 
for his son John. 



ISO 



t 



Miebael, bom 1809, died 
185B; 8. Mrs. Bridget Slum- 
alum, bom 1812, died 1868 ; 
9. Patrick, bom 1814, died 
1841 ; 10. John, bom 1816, 
died 1868 (whose eldest son 
EdmandliyesinArdpaddeen, 
in 1877) ; 11. James, bom 
1818, died 1828; 12. Ed- 
mond, bom 1821, died 1866; 
18. Joseph, bom 1823, living 
in 1877 ; 14. Richard, bom 
1825, died 1846 ; 15. David 



[(2), vlio died jomg; 16. 
I Ber. David Power Jfulcahj, 

C.C.,St Mary's, Haddington- 

road, Doblin, bom in 1880, 

and living in 1877. 

There were four more 

ehildroi who died in their 

in&ncy. 

123. John: son of Ed- 
mnndban 

124. Edmnnd Mnlcahy, of 
Arpaddeen : his son ; living 
in 1877. 



18. — ^Ths " MuLCAHY^ (of Ehjjceart) Famelt. 

John, brother of Edmtmd who is No. 120 on the forgoing 
(<< Mnlcahy" of Ardpaddeen) pedigree, was the ancestor of 
Mulcahyf of Eillkeany, comity Waterford. 



120. John, of Eillkeany, | 
comity Waterford: son of 
Thomas mantach. 

121. James : his son. 
This James had three bro- 
thers and five sisters: the 
brothers were — 1. Patrick, 2. 
David, 8. John — ^the three of 
whom left no issue. The five 
sisters were— 1. Catherine, 
who was married to Thomas 
Halloran, of Soart ; 2. Mar- 
garet, married to Denis 
Haoket, of Glashgannee ; 8. 
Johanna, married to Patrick 
Bhoehan, of Orohardstown, 
county Tipperary, near 
Oloumol : 4. Mary, married 
to Barlholomow Mulcahy, 



Marlfield ; and 5. Ellen, 
married to James Butler, of 
EillnamacL 

122. John Mnlcahy, of 
Eillkeany :. son of said 
James ; living in 1877. The 
surviving issue of this John 
are the following children 
— 1. Rev. David Bernard 
Mulcahy, CO., Lisbum; 2. 
Nanno ; 8. Johanna ; 4. 
James ; 5. Edmond ; 6. Bev. 
Patrick, of Bradford ; 7. 
Bridget ; 8. Michael — all liv- 
ing in 1877. 

128. James Mulcahy : the 
second son of the said John; 
living in 1877. 



m.] 



THE SfULVT AND O CONNOR FAMILIES. 



181 



19. — ^Thb Stem op the ** Mulvy" Familt. 

DnoRCAN, brother of lombar, who is No. 107 on the ** Rey- 
nolds*' pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Mulmhiaigh 
[mulvee] ; anglicised Mulvy. 



107. Dnorcan: son of 
Maolnianaidh. 

108. Dabbdara : his son. 

109. Mnredach : his son. 

110. Mulmbiach (** mul": 
Irish, a conical heap, and 
*' xniach", a bag or measure) : 
bis son; a qno O'Muhihiaigh. 

111. Gillcbriosd : his son. 

112. Melachlin : his son. 
118. Molmhiach (2) : his 

8on. 

114. Fergall : his son. 

115. Teige O'Mulvy: his 



son ; first assumed this sir- 
name. 

116. Anthony buidhe mor: 
his son. 

117. Donall : his son; had 
six brothers. 

118. Anthony buidhe (2) r 
his son. 

119. Anthony (8) oge : his 
son. 

120. Tirlach : his son. 

121. Maolmuire Tirlagh 
oge O'Mulvy : his son. 



20. — The Stem of the " O'Connor*' (Goegomroe) Family* 

CoBc, the third son of Fergus Mor who (see the first series) 
is No. 64 on the '* OTarrell'* pedigree, was the ancestor 
of O' Connor f of Corcamruadh [corcomroe] , in the county 
Glare. The territories in Munster possessed by the des- 
cendants of this Corc"^ were, after him, called " Corcam- 
ruadh CorC'Oiche,'' and *' Core GalevC' ; whereof they were 
styled princes or kings until their submission to the Grown 
of England. 



64. Fergus mor (com- 
monly called " Fergus Mac- 
Boy") : son of Ros (or Eos- 
sius). 

65. Core : his son. 



66. Deadhachd : his son. 

67. OUamh (latinized 
** oUavus") : his son, 

68. Meadh ruadh Q^ me- 
adh" : Irish, a scale Jor 



* Care : From this Core were also descended O'Loghlin, of Borin 
("now ** Bnrren**, in the county Clare) ; MuintvrArglui ; O'Flaherty, 
of Thomond ; O'DahhdhUirma (or " Dermody"), lawyers and judges 
to O'Connor and O'Loghlin. 



182 



IBISH PEDIGBEES. 



[part 



weighing) : his son ; a quo 
DalMeidhe or '< The tribe of 
Meadh." 

69. Aibhilt : his son. 

70. Anbheith : his son. 

71. Aodh(orHTigh)agna: 
his son; had a brother 
named Conor, who went into 
Scotland and there settled. 
This Hugh was the ancestor 
of the Scotch families of 
Forbes and Vrguhart, 

72. Achorb : sonof Hiigh 
agna. 

78. Neachtan : his son. 

74. Mearchu : his son. 

75. Oscar : his son. 

76. Earc : his son. 

77. Enarc : his son. 

78. Earc (2) : his son. 

79. Meisinsalach: his son. 

80. Meisin-dnnn: his son. 

81. Oscar (2) : his son. 

82. Cubroc : his son ; 
whose brother Fraoch was 
the ancestor of Curtin. 

88. Broc : his son. 

84. Tal : his son ; a quo 
Carn* MacTaiL 

86. Amergin ('* aimh" : 
Irish, a negative prefix; 
** eirigh", to rise): his son ; a 
qno O^ Aimfieirighin, anglici- 
sed Bergin. (See *' Bergin," 
p. 126.) 

86. Senach : his son. 



87. Fulen : his son. 

88. Dubh : his son. 

89. Beocall : his son. 

90. Geallach : his son. 

91. Maoldubh : his son. 

92. Dubh-da-chrioch: his 
son. 

93. Miodhlaoch : his son. 

94. Eachd-gaire (literally 
a '* fit of laughter*'): his son. 

95. Dubhruadh : his son. 

96. Flathartach(*'flaith" 
Irish, a lord ; ** beartach*', 
gen. << beartaighe*', tricky j 
cunning) : his son ; a quo, 
some say, 0' Flaithbeartaighe 
(of Thomond), anglicised 
O'Flaherty. 

97. Samhradhan:hisson. 

98. Argha : his son ; a 
quo Muintir Argha, 

99. Melachlin : his son. 

100. Conchobhair (or "the 
helping warrior") : his son ; 
a quo 0' Concobharthaj which 
has been anglicised " O'Con- 
nor" (of Corcomroe). This 
Conchobhair (or Conor) had 
a younger brother named 
Lochlann, who was the an- 
cestor of O'Loghlin^ of Bur- 
ren, in the county Clare. 

101. Flann: son of Conch- 
obhair. 

102. Conor mear : his son. 
108. Lochlann O'Connor : 



Cam : This Irish word signifies " a pile of stones raised over the 



tomb of deceased heroes" : compare with the Arabic word kem, 
Uttle hilL" 



f( 



UI.] THE O'CONNOB, O'fABBEIJi, AND O'LOaHLIN FAMILIES. 13S 



his son; the first of the 
family who assumed this sir- 
name ; had a brother named 
Cathal, who was the ances- 
tor of Cahillj of the county 
Glare. 

104. Cathal (or Charles) 
mor : his son. 

105. Cathal carragh : his 
son. 

106. Cathal oge : his son. 

107. Donall mantagh : his 
son. 

108. Felim an einigh : his 
son. 



109. Conor shoipleith : hia 
son. 

110. Brian : his sou. 

111. Brian oge : his sou. 

112. Murtagh muimh* 
neach : his son. 

113. Teige:his son. 

114. Bory glas : his sou. 

115. Brian caoch : his son. 

116. Mm'tagh (2): his son. 

117. Bory (2) : his son. 

118. Hugh O'Connor, of 
Corcomroe : his son. 



21. — ^The Stem of the ** O'Connor*' (Kerry) Family. 

f8ee the first series,) 



22. — ^The Stem of the ** O'Farrell" Family. 
{'See the first series,) 



28. — ^The Stem of the ** O'Loghlin" (of Burren) Family. 

LocHLANN, the younger brother of Conor who is No. 1 00 
on the foregoing '* O'Conuor" (Corcomroe) pedigree, was 
the ancestor of O'Lochhin ; anglicised O'Loghlin, 



100. Lochlann* (" loch" : 
Irish, a sea or lake ; Latin 
•* lac-us" ; and Irish " Ion", 
powerful): son of Melachlin; a 
quo O'Lochloin, of Burrenf. 



101. Melachlin : his son. 

102. Amhailgadh [Awly] : 
his son. 

108. Melachlin O'Loghlin: 
his son ; the first of th0 



* Lochlann : The Irish lochlon is the root of locMonnach, which is 
the In^h for " a Dane'' : no doubt, because the Danes were powerful 
at sea, 

t Burren : The root of this word is the Irish boireann, which here 
means *' a rocky district" ; same as that at fiallyvaughan, county 
Clare^ where stands the ancient caatle of O^LogJUin of Barren. 



184 



IfilSH PEDIGBEES. 



[PABT 



family who assumed this 
simame. 

104. Amhailgadh : his son. 

105. Congalach : his son. 

106. Donoch : his son. 

107. Annadhcam(**cam": 
Irish, crooked; Pers. "kam"; 
Chald. ** kam-ar" ; Gr. 
** kam-pto", to bend : Lat. 
" cam-urus") : his son. 
This Annadh (**annadh** : 
Irish delay) was the ancestor 
of O'h'Annaidhj anglicised 
Hanna and Hanny, 

108. Melachlin cam 0'- 
Loghlin : his son ; had three 
brothers — 1. Brian, 2. Iriall, 
and 8. Donoch; the gener- 
ations descended from this 
Melachlin, and his brothers 
Brian and Iriall, I am un- 
able to trace, but those from 
his brother Donoch are as 
follows : 

109. Annadh : son of said 
Donoch O'Loghlin. 

110. Eory : his son. 

111. Melachlin : his son. 

112. Anthony: his son ; 
died A.D. 1617. This An- 
thony had two sons — 1. 
Uaithne (Owny or Anthony), 
who died before his father ; 
and 2. Bos. 

118. Bos : son of Anthony. 



114. Melachlin (or Mala- 
chi) : his son ; died, 1688. 

115. Anthony (2): his son. 

116. Torlogh : his son. 

117. Donogh : his son. 

118. Torlogh O'Loghlin, 
of Burren : his son ; was 
living A.i>. 1724. 



Sir Colman OXoghlin, Bart., 
Member of Parliament for 
the county Glare, who died 
unmarried in 1877, was the 
eldest son of Sir Michael 
O'Loghlin (the first baronet 
in this family), who was son 
of Colman, son of Hugh, son 
of Malachi O'Loghlm; but 
I do not know the relation- 
ship which this Malach 
O'Loghlin bore to Torlogh 
O'Loghlin, No. 118 above- 
mentioned (living in 1724), 
or to any of the names on 
this pedigree preceding the 
said Torlogh. On the death 
of the above-mentioned Sir 
Colman O'Loghlin, the se- 
cond baronet, his brother Sir 
Bryan, of Australia, succeed- 
ed to the Barone(;cy ; and 
was elected in 1877 an M.P. 
for the county Clare. — The 
Author, 



24. — ^The Stem of the *• Quinn" (of Longfoed) Family. 

OiOLLAGAM, a brother of Eimhin who (see the first series) 
is No. 101 on the '' OTarrell" pedigree, was the ancestor 



m.] 



THE BEYNOLDS FAMILY. 



185 



of MacCuinn and O^Cuinn (lords of Muintir Gillagain — a 
territory in the county Longford) ; anglicised QiUnrij 
JUacQuirij and MacQueen. 



101. Giollagan C'gioUa" : 
Irish, a minister or page): son 
of Croman ; a quo O^Oiolla- 
gain^ anglicised Gilligan and 
O'Galligan, 

102. Sgannan : his son. 
108. Gormguil : his son. 

104. Conn ("conn": Irish, 
msdom) : his son ; a quo 
MacCuinn and O'Cuinn, 

105. Searragh : son of 
Conn. 

106. Aodh (or Hugh) 0'- 
Quinn : his son ; first of the 
family who assumed this 
simame. 

107. Donogh : his son. 



108. Teige : his son. 

109. Sitric : his son. 

110. Amhailgadh [awly] : 
his son. 

111. Gormguil (2): his 
son. 

112. Dermod : his son. 
118. Giolla - na - naomh : 

his son. 

114. Gormguil (8) : his 
son. 

115. Cuchonaght : his son. 

116. Cathal : his son. 

117. Cairhre : his son. 

118. Felim O'Quinn: his 
son. 



25. — The Stem op the " Reynolds'* Family. 

EiMHiN, who (see the first series) is No. 101 on the 
" O'Farrell*' pedigree, had three brothers — I. Biobhsach, 
who was the ancestor of MacRadhnaill (anglicised MacRan- 
nall, MacRandall, Magranell, Reynell, Beynolds); 2. Gear- 
abhan ; and 8. Giollagan, who was the ancestor of Quinn (of 
Longford), as in the preceding pedigree. This £iobhsach's 
proportion of his father's inheritance was situate in Con- 
maicne Bheine, which his posterity enjoyed; and the chiefs 
of whom (who were called MacRannall) were styled *4ords." 



101. Biobhsach : son of 
Croman. 

102. Eolus : his son ; after 
whom bis part of the terri- 
iory of Conmaicne Itheine 



was called Mmntir Eoluis 
(** eolus" : Irish, knowledge), 
anglicised Wallis : which ter- 
ritory is now divided into 
the three upper baronies of 



t» 



vttK' 



VIZ. : 




Men, aammai tim 

10$. ybaXxaxoK : iiift Jon. ; tide of ^ SkSsiiuiIL 

had two boliiaa — 1« Bra- 
<MMy who W9» aneertior af 

fr^Mft wh<Mii MacG^wmj k 

IM. Maoldsn : son of 
MaohmiiT4^ 

10$. Flann r<>r Flor^iee): 

I06r« Maolmanaidh ; Hs 

lCf7# lonahar ; lus so& ; 
who ira« ealled the ^^blaek 
lord"', ftfid had a lm>ther 
nain^cl I>aoreaii, wlio was 
tb« mne^iot of Mulvy. 

1()8« Mtiredaeh: son of 
lotnhftr ^ bad ten brothers, 

100. Bfldhnall (or Ban- 
daO « bis son ; a (pio Mac- 
IM/inalU (" radh*' : Irish, a 
Mfiyhff/ ; " anall'S over to one 
fii(hi from another)^ first an- 
gliohod MaoRannalL 

110. lotnhar (2) : bis son. 

111. Forgall : bis son. 
llfl. Murodaoh (2): bis 

Moii ; bad a brother uamed 
lta(1btmll-logg«na-ooon. 

* HnffnotiU i This ThoinM Reynolds, puranant to an Act of Parlia- 
mout \v^M9{[ in Quoen KUsabeth's reign, ohan^ his name from that 
t\i MttrHiinnnlit *'foc wliioh and for his oivilizinff his family and 
brtnfiing^ii (Country to the obedience of the Crown ^ Ensland, and in- 
lni<hu*iutf th« RiV||li«K oustoms and fashions among them, he was 
\yk\\fh{ ilffh«Mfii«*rt/l Oi%iUa (or the English MaoRannall), and alio 



hadlJDQee bisicbac^ 

Il9. lombar : hm 
had. one brother. 

116. T^ge : bis acsi. 

117. Cathal (or Charles) 
madb: his sfRi; had fire 
brothos. 

118. lor : his saa ; a qno 
Sliogkt It; had fire bnthers. 

119. Wilhaoi: his son. 

120. Thomas : Ms son ; 
the fost of this fiunily who 
omitted the prefix Mac^ and, 
instead of <' Bannall", called 
himself ^^yno/dr*. 

121. HnmpbreyBejnolds: 
his son. 

122. John BeynoldSy of 
Loch scnr: his son; died, 
1682. 

128. Humphrey (2): his 
son. 

124. WiUiam (2): his son. 

125. James : his son. 

126. Henry Beynolds : his 

SOD. 



in.] 



THE BUDDY AND SHANLY FAMILIES. 



137 



26. — ^The Stem of the ** Buddy " Family. 

FicHEALLAOH, brother of Neidhe who (see the first series) 
is No. 96 on the ^'O'Farrell '' pedigree, was the ancestor 
of O'Rodaighe ; anglicised Eeddy^ Roddy ^ and Ruddy. 



96. Ficheallach : son of 
Onchu. 

97. Naradh : his son. 

98. Rodoch ("rod": 
Irish, a road) : his son ; a 
quo O^Rodoighe; had two 
brothers — 1. Dunchean, who 
was the ancestor of Duncan^ 
and 2. Tormach, who was 
the ancestor of Tormey. 

99. Maolin fionn: his 
son. 

100. Alastrum (or Alex- 
ander) : his son. 
* 101. Ardgall : his son. 

102* Gillmanchan : his 
son. 

108. Gormghall : his son. 

104. Gillchriosd : his son. 

105. Maoliosa : his son. 

106. Feichin : his son. 

107. Mulmichil : his son. 

108. Giolliosa : his sdh. 

109. Mulmtdre : his son. 

110. Mulmichil (2): his 
son. 



111. Donall : his son. 

112. Gillbair (**bar"r'= 
Irish, excellence) : his son ; 
a quo O'Oiollabair, angli- 
cised Barr mid Barre. 

118. Giollamuire (or ** the 
devoted of Mary ") : his son ; 
a quo O'Oillmuire, anglicised 
Gilmore, 

114. Eigneach : his son. 

115. Giollaiosa : his son. 

116. Eilia : his son. 

117. Luachcas: his sou. 

118. John : his son. 

119. Robert : his son. 

120. Matthew : his son. 

121. Teige : his son. 

122. William : his son. 
128. Bryan buidhe : his 

son. 

124. Teige (2) : his son. 

125. Teige oge O'Roddy: 
his son ; who was a learned 
antiquarian. 



27. — ^The Stem op the " Shanly" Family. 

Bbocak, brother of Maolmuire who is No. 108 on the 
'* Reynolds*' pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Seanlaoich ; 
anglicised MacShanly and Shanly. 



* Bar : Compare the Irish word " bar " with the Heb. **bar ", a 
son ; ** bar '*, corn ; " barh '*, above ; and ** baar **, was famous ; with 
the Syriac, Old Pers., and Chald. '< bar", ht(/h ; the Arab. '' barr", 
whetU ; and the Pers. " ber", JruiL 



isd 



103. Bi 

101. Scanlaoch ( 
Izuh, old ; Lai., ** 
^ laoch^ : Iiiah, a A<fo) : Ms 
son; a quo O^ StanUuiek. 
This Seanlaoch had a liio- 
tber named Conor, wbo was 
the ancestor of MaeCulroy 
(modernized MaeElroy and 
Macllrt/9j) ; and another bro- 
ther najned Giollchriosd 
(meaning '*the devoted ot\ 
Christ"), a quo GiUehriat 
And MaeGiUchrutt. 

105. Gillfaiighid: son of 
JSeanlaoch. 

106. Donoch : his son, 

107. Donsithe : his son. 



«* 



106u GiniMdie «'baiie 
Irish, m kmriim^ atfidb} : his 



GiDpadnufi bindhe : 

Teige: his son. 
Giiliosa : his son. 
Hugh oge : his son. 
Maothan : his son. 
Dermod dobh: his 

Seonis : his son. 
Cormac : his son. 
Jeoffi^y : his son. 
Edmond : his son. 
Edmond oge Mac- 
: his son. 



109. 

his son 

110. 

111. 

112. 

113. 

111. 
son. 

115. 

116. 

117. 

118. 

119. 
Shanly 



28. — The Stem op the " Wabd " Family. 

EocHA, brother of lomchadh who is No. 85 on the " Man- 
ning " pedigree, wad the ancestor of Mac-an-Bhaird ; angli- 
cised Ward and MacWard. 



85. Eocha : son of Sod- 
han, 

86. Nar : his son. 

87. Fionnfthadh : his son. 

88. Beachtach : his son. 
80. Nuadadearg: his son. 
\\i)» Ughaine : his son. 
Ol.Mftighlen: his son; 

had a brother named Fionn- 
agat). 



92. Gillde (" Giolla " : 
Irish, a servant ; " Dia", gen. 
"De", Qod; Heb. "Yah"; 
Lat. "De-US"; Gr. "The-os", 
Accusat. " Dia") : his son, 
a quo O^Giollade, anglicised 
Gildea. 

93. Eachtigheama : his 
son. 

94. Dermod : his son. 



m.] 



THE WARD FAMILY. 



189 



95. 

96. 

97. 

98. 

99. 
100. 
101. 
102. 
son. 
108. 
104. 



Ughra : his son. 
Marios : his son. 
Gillde (2) : his son. 
Melachlm : his son. 
Ughra (2) : his son. 
Mnrios (2) : his son. 
Oillde (8) : his son. 
MelaclUin (2) : his 

Ughra (8) : his son. 
Gillcoimdhe: his son. 



105. Dermod (2) : his son. 

106. Maccraith : his son. 

107. Conor : his son. 

108. Shane (or John) : his 
son. 

109. Owen Mac-an-Bhaird 
(<* bhard " : Irish, a hard ; 
Heb. ''baar", was famous)^ 
of Monycassan : his son ; a 
qno Mac Ward f modernized 
Ward. 



3r±s:Z 2»- 



srcaE rFHOzaBsaL 






tx— 'Tffc Sm ^v 



tf^ Uk^f wfa^ ^jNae ifae Ibst wenes) is Xo. 103 od the 
^^ HmU^tmWfUT M Antrim) pedigree, vas the aneestor of 
Hfj/$iini/fmtuU/jh4K ; epgjidiert MacGniere, G'GmUwe^ Agnue^ 



\m,%Q\n MAcDoDiiell, 
mn\%xmii (inUmhaeh C^goi- 
QmW f IrlnUt an act ; Lat* 
''tfHi4V-tt»'^ aotiv»)i son of 
4ilr»»ttfi Mor ; it quo StaoOniO' 

107. &ffioImulre i his son. 

KIH, John MaoOnieve, of 
DiUiftM) I hlH son ; first assu- 
}\m\ (his slrnan^a. 

lUU. VaMok 1 his son. 



110. Molbiadh : his son. 

111. Moibiadh oge : bis 
son. 

112. Cormac : his son. 
118. John ; his son. 

114. Ferdorach* : his son; 
a quo O'FerdoraigK 

115. Brian : his son. 

116. l?earflaith Mac- 
Onieve : his son. 



'^ #V«Hl(MH«i>A ) As s ))«rt<MuU aam^ JVrrfoitMA (** ferdorchA" : Iriah, 
\W sUvk f^luriHl in«w) \^m bm modonuMvi iVscifHe, Frederick, and 
fV^\^'4Himlui (Ml 9i «ir4)«M\« i% YTMi 0'AnlfftrAM|A, uudiciBed Ferdinands 
U l^« ' tVN«)4ir {\^i UlsWr) ftaaOy (tM^ tbe fint awMs), FeidoracK 
wKs^ U Nw \)^l v« %kk%% yiMjfjt^^ wm lb« snoMtorof uDoUier 0*Fer- 



THE ALLEN AND BABNWELL FAMILIES. 



141 



2.— The Stem op the " Allen" Faioly. 

<3oLLA meann, a brother of Golla da-chrioch who is No. 85 
on the '* O'Hart*' pedigree, was the ancestor of MacAlam^ 
anglioised AUen ; of Clann Caroill (or ** O'Carroll**), of 
Oi^all or Oriel ; of Glann Benan ; Cldnn Crwmhain ; Clann 
Imanaighy etc. 



85. Colla meann : a son 
of Eochaidh Dnbhlen. 

86. Breasal : his son; had 
a brother named Deadliach 
4orn. 

87. Duach : son of Brea- 
sal. 

88. Fergus : his son. 

89. Masin : his son. 

90. Ail : his son ; had a 
brother named Daol. 

91. Alain : his son. 

92. Maoldun : his son. 
98. Breasal (2) : his son. 

94. Ail (2) : his son. 

95. Alain (2) : his son ; 
a quo Mac Alain (** alain" : 
Irish, /a/r). 

96. Aibhsidh : his son ; a 
quo Siol AibJisidh, 

97. Olioll : his son. 



98. Artrigh : his son ; a 
quo Clann Artrigh.. 

99. Suibhneach : his 
son ; had a brother named 
Gathal, a quo Clann Cathail 
(or CaJiill), of Ulster. 

100. Aonan* (** aon" : 
Irish, the one) : son of Suib- 
hneach ; a quo D'h-Aonain^ 
anglicised Heenan. This 
Aonan had a brother named 
Lagnan, a quo O'Lagnain, 
anglicised Lannen. 

101. Solomon : son of 
Aonan. 

102. Ostan : his son. 
108. Amhailgadh: his son. 

104. Gillciaran : his sou. 

105. Maolruanaidh Mac- 
Allen (or MacAlin) : his son. 



8. — The Stem of the " Babnbwall" Family. 

Bernabd O^Beirne, brother of Oillcoman who is No. 112 
on the "O'Beirne" pedigree, was the ancestor of Bamewall, 
Bartiewell, Barnts^ and Bemes. 



* Aonan : This name signifies '* the darling of the family." 



142 



D 



112. Benuml: son oflom 
bar. 

113. Edwmid : his son. 
114.Edirmid doUi: his 



-I 

I 



son. 
115. 
116. 
117. 
118. 
119. 
120. 
121. 



Edwmid (3) : his son. 
Thomas : his son. 
Biehard : bis son. 
James : bis son. 
Walter : bis son. 
Edward (4) : bis son. 
George : bis son. 



122. Patziek : bis son. 

123. Edwaid (5) : bis son. 

124. Sir Cbri^pher : bis 
son. 

125. Sir Patrick : bis son. 
12G. Sir Nidiolas: bis son. 

127. Lord Yisoonnt Kings- 
land : bis son ; tbe first peer 
in ibis family. 

128. Lord Yisoonnt Kings- 
land : bis son ; living, a.d. 
1708. 



4.— The " Beatty"* Familt. 



AccosDDfo to Tipper's " Collection of Pedigrees ", written 
in the Irish language, a.d. 1713, Goffirey, one of the princes 
from Scotland who, siding with the Irish monarch Brian 
Bom, fought the battle of Clontarf, in 1014, was the an- 
cestor of Batagh ; modernized Beattie, Beatty, and Beyt(tgh. 



1. Go&ey (or Jeffrey). 

2. Gomhgall : his son. 

8. Maolcolum : his son ; 
bad a brother named Con- 
stantine, who was the ances- 
tor of Tobin. 

4. Alpin : son of Maolco- 
lum. 

5. Sealbhaidh : his son. 

6. Amhailgadh [awly] : 
his son. 

7. Scanlan : his son. 

8. Dolbh, of the Orkney 
Isles : his son. 

9. Dolbh, of LochBroin : 
his son. 

10. Loam : his son. 



11. Constantine : his son. 

12. John mor : his son. 
18. William : his son. 

14. Eichard : his son. 

15. Garrett : his son ; the 
first of this family who re- 
tamed to live in Ireland. 

16. John Betagh : his son; 
first assumed this sirname. 

17. Henry : his son. 

18. William an fhiona (or 
" WiUiam of the Wine") : 
his son. 

19. Edward : his son. 

20. John : his son. 

21. Garrett Beatty : his 
son. 



*B«Utyi This pedigree is here incidentally given amons the familieB 
descended from Heremon ; but, while Beatty is of Irish origin, the 
lineage of the family is not yet ascertained. The name is derived 
from the Irish biaaKtach [bee-a-ta], "a public victualler.** — For 
information in relation to the ancient biata4:?is in Ireland, see No. 
S)8 (*' Monasteries") in the Appendix. 



nr.] 



THE BOLAND AND BOYLE FAICILIES. 



148 



6. — The " Boland" (of Ulsteb) Fabqlt. 

Dttngal, brother of Fergal who is No. 101 on the " Don- 
nelly" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Beoilain (" beul': 
Irish, a mouth ; Gr. ^' bel-os*', a threshold) ; anglicised 
Beolan, Boland, Boylan, and Boy land. 



6. — ^The Stem of the " Boyle" Family. 

Maoldun, a brother of Moriartns who (see the first series) 
is No. 99 on the " O'Donel" (Tyrconnell) pedigree, was 
the ancestor of O^Baoghail ; anglicised Boghill, Boyle, 
0' Boyle, and Hill 



99. Maoldun : son of 
Ceannfaola. 

100. Amel : his son. 

101. Ceannfaola : his son. 

102. Murtagh ; his son. 
108. Bradachan : his son. 

104. Baoghal (<<baoghal": 
Irish, periC) : his son ; a qno 
0'B(wghaiL 

105. Garbhan O'Boyle : 
his son ; the first who assu- 
med this simame. 

106. Aneisleis : his son. 

107. Gilbrighid : his son. 

108. Geallach : his son. 

109. Conor : his son. 

110. Meninon : his son. 

111. Aneisleis (2): his son. 

112. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

118. Menmon (2): his son. 
114. Neal ruadh : his son. 

* Junius J, Boyle : Commodore Boyle died at the N'aval Hospital 
at Norfolk, Va., in the 63rd year of his age. He was bom in Mary- 
land ; entered the United States Navy as a Midshipman, in 1823 ; and 
de^y loved Ireland — ^the country of his fathers. A saUor by profes- 
aon. Commodore Boyle, wishins to rest when dead under the broad 
ocean that had been his home while living, requested to be buried at 
sea ; Imt from some cause or other it was not thought advisable to 
oonmly with Ida request : he was buried in the cemetery attached to- 
the Iiospital grounds. 



115. Tirlogh mor: his son. 

116. Tirlogh oge : his son* 

117. Neal (2) : his son. 

118. Tirlogh (8) : his son. 

119. Teige : his son. 

120. Teige oge : his son. 

121. Tirlogh roe : his son; 
the last chief of his name. 

122. Neal Boyle : his son; 
was the first of the direct 
line of this family that omit- 
ted the prefix 0. 

128. John Boyle of Lar- 
gey, Portgleneone, coanty 
Antrim : his son. This John 
was exiled to America in 
1801, in consequence of his 
having taken part in the 
** Irish Rebellion" of 1798 ; 
he died in 1849. 

124. Junius J. Boyle*: his 
son ; Commodore, United 



144 



imSH PEDIOBBE8. 



[ 



States Navy, America ; died 
in 1870. This Jonius had 
four brothers— 1. John- 
Franklin, 2. Engene, 8. Cor- 
nelius*, 4. Nicholas-Bourke 
Boyle ; and two sisters 
named — 1* Layinia, 2. Cat- 
herine-Anne. 

126. Juan Boyle,of Wash- 
ington, D.C., United States, 
America: son of said Junius, 
living in 1877, This Juan 



had five sisters — ^1. Oceana- 
Oecilia, married to T. Sie« 
wart Sedgwick, Civil Engin- 
eer ; 2. Emily-Beale, mar* 
ried to the Hon. Z. Potat, 
of Maryland ; 8. Esmeralda; 
4. Anna ; and 6. Bebecca — 
Clyde. 

126. Juan-Ashton Boyle : 
his son ; bom in 1876 ; liv- 
ing in 1877. 



7. — ^TflE Stem of the " Bbady '* Family. 

Neal caooh O'BEnxY, brother of Donald who is No. 114 on 
the *• O'Reilly " pedigree, was the ancestor of MacBruide 
and 0*Bruide; anglicised respectively McusBride^ and 
Brady. 

114. Neal caoch: son of I cised Zis^, Key^ Kay, Kayes, 



C'harles. 

115. Maithan : his son. 

116. Gilbruidhe("bruid';: 
Irish, a stupid person) : his 
son ; a quo MacBruidhe and 
O'Bruidke. This Gillbruidhe 
had a brother named Cathal 
caoch (** caoch": Irish, dim- 
sighted), who was the ances- 
tor of ClannCamche ; angli- 



and, some say, Cox. 

117. Tieman O'Brady: 
son of Gilbruidhe ; was the 
first of this family who assu- 
med this simame. 

118. Giollaiosa : his son. 

119. Donoch : his son. 

120. Donald : his son. 

121. Neal 0*Brady; his 
son. 



8. — The Stem op the " Bbeen" Family. 

CaiMTHANN, brother of Aodh (or Hugh) who is No. 91 on 
the *' Fox" pedigree, was the ancestor of 0*Braoin; angli- 
cised Breen, 



* Comelitui : This Cornelias Boyle, a physician in Washington ; 
living in 1877. 



w.] 



THE BRESLIN AND BUBNS FAMILIES. 



U5 



91. CrimtbQ.nn: son of 
j^reannan. 

92« Donall : his son ; had 
a brother named Maolfogar- 
tach, who was ancestor of 
Magawley ; and a brother 
named Anmire, who was the 
ancestor of Macnamee, Cor- 
gaumetfy Slaman, etc. 

98. Flanchaidh: son of 
Donall. 

94. Rorc : his son. 



95. Braon (*|braon": 
Irish, a drop): his son; a 
quo O'Braoin, lords of 
** Brawney", near Athlone. 

96. Eachtighearna : his 
son. 

97. Florence : his son. 

98. Sitrio : his son. 

99. Eachtighearna 
O'Braoin (or O'Breen) : his 
son. 



9. — The Stem of the '< Bbeslin*' FamuiY. 

CoNALL greanta, brother of Fogartach who is No. 95 on the 
"Fogarty" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Brislaine; 
anglicised Bredin and Brislane, 



95. Conall greanta (''gre- 
anta*' : Irish, neat^ handy) : 
son of Neal ; a quo Grant. 

96. Neal : his son. 

97. Fergus : liiA son. 

98. Ceamach : his son ; 
whose brother Muredach was 
the ancestor of Spillane; and 
other brother Olioll, the an- 



cestor of O'Braonan^ angli- 
cised Brenham. 

99. Muldroman : son of 
Ceamach. 

100. Bhslann (<< bris*' : 
Irish, tobreak;Heb. "peras", 
to break ; " lann'*: Insh, the 
blade of a sword) : his son ; 
a quo O'Brislaine. 



10, — The stem of the " Burns" Family. 

OuMASCACH, another brother of Fogartach who is No. 95 on 
the ** Fogaxty** pedigree, was the ancestor of OBraoin ; iu 
this ease anglicised Burn, Bourns, and Burns. 



146 



IRISH FEDI6BEES. 



D 



95. Cmnascacli : son of 
Neal ; had a brother named 
Conall greanta, a quo Grant, 

96. Fogartach : son of 
Gttiiiascach. 

97. Cairbre : hia son ; 
whose younger toother Fog- 
artach was the ancestor of 
Ma4iGillcunny. 

98. Flahertach : son of 
Cairbre. | 



99. Cormaer his son. 

100. Maohnordha, {*^jnor* 
dha" : Irish, proud)-, his son; 
a qao O' Maolmordha^ angli- 
cised Mordie. 

101. Braon (" braon" : 
Irish, a drop) : his son ; a 
qno O'Braoini 



11. — The Steic op the " Gaibns " Family. 

FiNACHTACH (fionn-sneachta : Irish, " fair as snow"), who 
(see the first series) is No. 100 on the ** O'Hart " pedigree, 
had three sons — 1. Art, 2. Gonmaol, and 8. Fogharthach : 
this Fogharthach was the ancestor of O' Cairn* ("cam ": 
Irish, a heap ; Arab. ** kern", a little hill), anglicised Cairn, 
MacCairUy Cairns, Kearin, Kearins, Keams, Kerans, Kerin, 
Kieran, etc. 

From the said Fogharthach are also descended the 
Ulster families of C9>rolan, Donnellan, and Flanagan. 

1. Dermod O^Eerin was the first of the family who 
settled in Thomond. 

2. Donald : his eldest son. 
8. Donoch : his son. 

4. Mortogh : his son. 

5. Teige : his son. 

6. Hubert : his son. 

7. Teige (2) : his son ; died in 1684 ; was buried at 
Enniifh (now "Ennis *'), in the county Clare. 

8. Hubert O'Kerin : his son ; had five brothers — 1. 
Flann, 2. Tirlogh, 8. John, 4. Murtogh, and 5. Loghlin ; 
liyiog in 1657. 



* 0^ Cairn : This simame has been incorrectly written O^Ciarain 
(" ciar" : Irish, a dark-grey colour ; "an", one who.) 



IV.] 



THE OAINE, OALLAN, AND OANAVAN FAMILIES. 



147 



12. — The Stem of the '^ Caine" Family. 

Thomas, brother of Bicbard wbo is No. 124 on the " Kane'* 
pedigree, was the ancestor of Caine, and, some say, Cane. 



18. — The Stem of the " Callan'* Family, 

AoNOUs, brother of Snibbneach who (see the first series) is 
No. 92 on the ^' O'Melaghlin" pedigree, was the ancestor 
of 0*Cathalain; anglicised CaZZan. 



92. Aongas (or ^neas) : 
son of Golman mor. 

98. Maolmnha : his son. 

94. Fablden : his son. 

95. Mniltuile : his son. 

96. Congal : his son. 

97. Fallain : his son. 

98. Fiachra : his son. 

99. ^neas : his son. 



100. Brogbad ("broghad": 
Irish, opulent) : his son ; a 
quo 0' Broghaidhy anglicised 
Brody and Brodie, 

101. Gathalan (<<cathar': 
Irish,t'aZowr), meaning "little 
Charles": a quo O'Cathalain, 
in this family anglicised 
CaUan.* 



14.— The Stem of the " Canavan** (of Gonnaught) Family. 

Cahebnach, brother of Ficheallach who is No. 99 on the 
«<Fihilly" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Canamhain; 
anglicised Canaran. 



99. Cahemach: son of 
Gonbhach. 

100. Flaitheimhan 
("flaith": Irish, a chief; 
** eimh**, active ; ** an", one 



who): his son; a quo O'Flaith- 
eirnhainj anglicised Fleming, 
and modernized De Fleming. 

101. Gormac : his son. 

102. Maolmordha: his son. 



* CaUan : See the ** Carlton'' pedigree, which is also derived from 
an O'CatheUain family. 



148 



IRISH PEDIGRE&S. 



108. Canamhan* (** can": 
Irish, to sing ; Heb. '' gan-a" 
-a reed or cane; Arab. /'gan-i'\ 
to sing ; Lat. ** can-o**; Hind. 
** gan-i'S to chant; and '* am- 
han": Irish, a river): his 
son ; a quo O'Canamhain. 

104. Aodh : his son. 



[PABT 

105. Murtach : his son. 

106. Aodh (2) : his son. 

107. Moriaoh : his aon. 

108. Teige : his aon. 

109. John : his son. 

110. Fercobhra O'Cana- 
van : his son. 



15. — ^Thb Stem op the " Cannino" FuMrvr. 

Aodh (or Hugh) mtmderg, son of Fiaithertaeh {latimzed 
*^ FlaUiertius"), the 159th monarch, and brotiier of Mor- 
och, who is No. 97 on the *' Mobroj'* pedig^ree, was the 
ancestor of O'Canadhnain ; anglicised Cananan^ and 
modernized Canning and Cannon. 



97. Hugh munderg. 

98. Donald : his son. 

99. Canadhnan (''can", 



'' canadh'* : Lrisli, to uttsTy to 
sing; <'an", one who}: his 
son ; a quo &Canadhnmin. 



16. — The Stem of the ''Gabbebt" (of Offalby) Faxilt. 

Caibbbb (" corb" : Irish, a chariot ; " righ**, a king)^ 
brother of Oumascach who is No. 100 on the *^ Crigan" 
pedigree, was the ancestor of this ClunnCairhre ; aaglicised 
MacCarbery, 

100. Gairbre : son of Flor- 108. Gorman : his sob. 
ence ; a quo ClnnnCairbre^ 104. Cairbre (2) : his son. 
of Offaley. , 105. Gathal HacCarbefy : 

101. ^neas : his son. his son. 

102. Donall : his son. 



* Canamhan : This word is compounded of the Irish can, '* to ttng," 
and anUum, ** a river" (Lat. amn-is ; Welsh, avon ; Com. avan ; and 
Arm. aun). 



IT.] 



THE CABBEBT AMB CABLTON FAMIUE8. 



149 



17.— The " Gabbkbt" (of Obgiaij.) Family. 

Gaibbbx, broifaer of Coraidh^ian who is No. 102 on the 
" Gofiigan •' pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Cairhre (of 
Orgiall) ; anglicised Carhery. 



18. — Turn Sim of the " Gabbebt " (of Ulsteb) Family. 
Caibbbe, brother of Maoldnn who is No. 99 on the 
" O'Madden" (of Ulster) pedigree, was the ancestor of 
ClannCairhre (or Carbery) of Ulster. 



99. Oairfare : son of Dun- 
gall ; a qno this ClannCair- 
hre. 

100. Cnmascach : his son. 

101. Eachdach : his son. 

102. Artiigh : his son. 



108. £achagan : his son. 

104. Mnredach : his son. 

105. Maoliosa : his son. 

106. Patrick O'Carbery : 
his son ; had a brother 
named Eandal. 



19. — ^The Stem of the " Cablton" Family. 

Gaxbham, brother of (3ormac who is No. 91 on the 
" O'Flsmgan" (of Tuath Hatha) pedigree, was the ances- 
tor of 0*Cathalain ; anglicised Cahalaji, Carlton^^ and 
CharUion. 



91. Oarbhan : son of 
Toathal maolgarbh. 

92. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

98. Snibhneach : his son. 

94. Maoldnn : his son. 

95. Fergus caoch: his son. 

96. Conall : his son. 

97. Cathal : his son. 

98. Connach : his son. 

99. Rathamhnil : his son. 

100. Dunach : his son. 

101. Cathahm (<' cathal": 



Irish, valour)^ meaning 
" Kttle Charles" : his son ; a 
quo 0"Cathalain\ 

102. Dnndeadhach : his 
son. 

108. Eighnechan : his son. 

104. Mrdanach J : his son. 

105. Ciardach : his son. 

106. Maolfabhal : his son. 

107. Maolmanaidh: his 
son. 

108. Uaillgarbh O'Cath- 
alain : his son. 



* CarUon : This name has been modernized Gartlan, which, in ita 
tam, ham baoome Ctarland and Gartiand. 

t O^Cathalain : See the *' CaUan" pedigree. 

t Muianaeh : The root of this name is the Irish mulan^ « a little 
hiU", " a heap" ; and a quo 0*Muianaigh, anglicised MuUany. 



150 



IBISH PEDIGBEES. 



[PABT 



20. — Thk Stem of thk *' Cabney** Fauilt. 

Cbabnach, brother of Cosorach who is No. 98 on the 
** O'Hanlon" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Ceamaighe ; 
anglicised Carney^ Kearney, Kemey, and Camayie, 



98. Ceamach (*' cear- 
nach*' : Irish, victorious): son 
of Suibhneach; a quo O'Cear- 
naiyhe. 

99. Cnmascach : his son. 

100. OlioU : his son. 

101. Lorcan : his son. 

102. Olioll (2) : his son. 
108. Cumascach (2) : his 

on. 
104. Eocha : his son. 



105. Ceamach O^Camey : 
his son ; the first of the 
family who assumed this 
simame. 

106. Eocha (2) : his son. 

107. Ciaran : his son. 

108. Ceamach (2) : his 
son. 

109. Cnmascach O'Camey: 
his SOD. 



21. — ^TheStem OF THE " Caulfield** Familt. 

Fabach, a brother of Mortogh Mor (latinized <' Muriartus 
Magnus") MacEarca, the 181st monarch, and who (see the 
first series) is No. 90 on the stem of the <' House of Here- 
mon", was the ancestor of MacCathmhaoill ; anglicised 
MacCawell, MacCaghwell, MacCaul, Caul, Caulfield, 
Caldwell, Campbell, Camphill, Colvill, Colwell, Colwill, 
Coghill, Coyle, Cowell, Hawell, and Hemphill. 

90. Ferach : son of Mure- 
dach. 

91. Fiachra : his son. 



92. Fiachna : his son. 

98. Suibhneach meann 
(" meann" : Irish, famous) : 
his son; a quo 0' Meannaighe, 
anglicised Meany, 

94. Edalach : his son ; 
had an elder brother named 
Cuagan (** cuagan*' : Irish, 



the hinder part of the Jiead), 
who was the ancestor of 
O'Cuagain*, anglicised Coo- 
gan, Cogan, and Coggin. 

95. Donachar : son of 
Edalach. 

96. Cugabhna : his son. 

97. Conan : his son. 

98. Donachar (2) : his 
son. 

99. CathmhaoillC'cath**: 



♦ COuagain : This simame has, by some writers, been considered 
the same as MacCayadfiain ; but <*MacCagadhain'* and "O'Cuagaiu'* 
are two distinct families. 



IV.] 



THE OOLGAN AND OONCAMNON FAMILIES. 



151 



Irish, a battle ; *' maoir*, a 
heap) : his son ; a quo Mac- 
Cathmhaoill*, 

100. Breasal : his son. 

101. Murtogh : his son. 

102. Fogortach : his son. 
108. Maolcolam(*'colnm*': 

Irish, a dave)^ meaning <* the 



devoted of St. Columkill'* : 
his son ; a quo MacMaolcol- 
uim, anglicised Malcolm and 
Malcolmson. 

104. Suibhneach : his son. 

105. Colla : his son. 

106. Banal MacCath- 
maoill : his son. 



22. — The Stem of the '< Golgan" Family. 

Ctjmascagh, brother of ^neas who (see the first series) is 
No. 100 on the ** 0*Conor** (Faley) pedigree, was the an- 
cestor of Clann Colgain ; anglicised ** Clan Golgan'', a quo 
Colgatif Ma^Calganf and Swords, 



100. Comascach : son of 
Florence. 

101. Colgan ("colg" : Ir- 
ish, a swords << colgan", a 
swordsman) : his son ; a quo 
Clann Colgain. 

102. Gnmascach (2) : his 
son. 

103. Conor MacGolgan : 



his son ; first assumed this 
simame. 

104. Cathal : his son. 

105. Fionnghon : his son. 

106. Mulcoscraoh: his son. 

107. Donall : his son. 

108. Cucogair MacGolgan 
his son. 



28. — ^The Stem of the *' Goncannon" Family. 

Debmod fionn, brother of Muirgheas (or Murias) who (see 
the first series) is No. 101 on the ''O'Gonor " (Connanght) 
pfidigree, was the ancestor of O'Conceannain; anglicised 
Concannon, 



* lificCaihmhaoUl : See at No. 99 on the *' Kieman" pedigree, for 
another MacCcUhmhtioUl family, of the Clann Colla, and ot the 
Cmeal Ftartadulg?ie. 



152 



c 



101. Dermod fionn, the 
SOih ChTJstiim king of Con- 
naught : son of Tomaltaclu 

102. Daihi : his son ; had 
a brother named Conor, who 
was the aneestor of Mtdlen, 

103. Aodh : son of Dathi. 

104. Olioll : his son. 

105. Mnrtagh : his son. 

106. Teige : his son. 

107. Conceannan {** con": 
Irish, of a hound ; *' cean " : 
a head) : his son ; a qno 0'- 
ConceannainJ''^ 

108. Aodh (or Hugh) 
O'Concannon : his son ; first 
assumed this simame. 

109. Mnirgheas : his son. 

110. Mnrtagh (2) : his son. 

111. Mnirgheas (2) : his 
son. 

112. Hugh (2) : his son. 
118. Teige (2) : his son. 

114. Murtach (8) : his son. 

115. Malachi : his son. 



116. Cathal (or Charles) : 
his son. 

117. Hngh (8) : his son. 

118. Teige (8) : his son. 

119. Ardgall : his son. 

120. Mnrtach (4) : his son; 
had a brother - named Mala- 
chi, who had two sons, 1. 
John, and 2. Mnirceartach. 
This Mnirceartach (or Mnr- 
tagh) was the ancestor of 
Slioght Muirceartaigh ; an- 
glicised Moriarty and Mur- 
taghy of Connanght. 

121. DabhachC'dabhach": 
Irish, a press or vat) : son of 
Mnrtagh; a quo O'DcUfhaighe, 
anglicised Davie A 

122. Maolseaghlainn (or 
Malachi) : his son ; had two 
brothers — 1. Hngh, and 2. 
Thomas. 

123. WilHam O'Concan- 
non : son of Malachi. 



24. — The Stem op the ** Connellan'* Family. 

Laeghaibe (latinized <' Laegrins"), the 128th monarch, 
son (some say the eldest) of Niall of the Nine Hostages, 
who (see the first series) is No. 87 on the Stem of the 
** House of Heremon *\ had three sons — 1. Eanna, 2. 
Damin, and 8. St. Colman. This Eanna was the ancestor 
of 0* Gondeilbhaiii; anglicised ConneUan^ Cimelvan, Quiniariy 
and Quinlevan. 



* O^Oonceamiain : By some genealogists this simame is derived 
fh>m the Irish Conganan (*'coim": Irish, a man's name; '*gan*' 
without i ''an'\ a lie), meaning *' Conn, the speaker of tmth." 

t Davir : This name has been modernized Dames and Davis. 



IT.] 



THE CONBOY FAMILY. 



1^ 



87. Niall of the Nine 
Hostages, the 126th mon- 
arch of Ireland. 

88. Laeghaire : his son, 
the 128th monarch. 

89. Eanna : his son. 

90. Dalian : his son. 

91. Libhor* [livor] : his 
son ; a qno 0*Libhoir, angli- 
cised Livroy, and modernized 
Lefroy. 

92. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son ; had a brother named 
Faolan, who was father of 
St. Cannir, virgin. 



98. Flannagan: son of 
Hugh. 

94. Maolmith : his son. 

95. Maoldun dergeneoh : 
his son. 

96. Ferach : his son. 

97. Aongus : his son. 

98. Curidh : his son. 

99. Cionaodh : his son. 

100. Donald : his son. 

101. Molcron : his son. 

102. Condeilbhan (" con": 
Irish, of a hound ; ** deilbh", 
a countenance;^' an**, one who): 
his son; SkqaoO'Condeilbhain, 



25. — The Stem of the ** Conroy*' Family. 

Ahmibe, brother of Donall who is No. 92 on the *' Bre0n" 
pedigree, was the ancestor of MacConaire, O'Cmiaire, or 
Ifulconaire ; anglicised MacConroi\ (modernized King)^ 
Conray, Conry, Irvine, Irving, Irwin, MacNair, MeicNeir^ 
and Mulconry. 



92. Anmiie: son of Crim- 
thann. 

98. Bonan : his ^on. 

94. Foranan : his son. 

95. Cmnmaol : his son. 

96. Maoldun : his son. 



97. Fergal : his son. 

98. Florence : his son. 

99. Neachtan : his son ; 
had a brother named Suibh- 
neach, who was the ancestor 
of Macnamee. 



*" Libhor: This name, analysed, is Le-ibh-or, which means "gold 
for yon " ; and was first anglicised Livert which became Livroy and, 
more lately, L^roy. In tracing the lineage of the " House of Heber" 
I met another name like this. 

f MacConroi : The " MacConrois " (or Kings) gave name to their 
idd home of BaUe M<icConrai or '' Ballymaconry", now nsuai^ 
readored " Kingston" — near Streamstown, Connemara ; and were 
one of the tribes who possessed Joyces' Country, in West Galway, 
before tlie Joyces settled there. — See the ** Joyce" pedigree. 



Xiy), SnhlHtaiinm: job. of aeii:* : Tttsji^ 'jaam»f« = aiK 
liil. HmemLz iussil. (if C< 



li\% Plaithi^ieaL ais soil: 'Trmtuut : had. & ftraCrtfT 
lUMk ^ )pmdvet ammed. desL- nsme^ ManrxBe. 

^ .^E^^tNMM^ of CansDg: 

10$. Omair r-" eanair'^r Ila. CaiuBzg^ teicEbe: bis 
j^nu '* ensate'* ^ iTtaiiy <k son. ; had a laacher naoBad 
MM<y, : hid >Mva^ flk ^no J^flf- Wanrfrm, 
C^)m/»re^ 6S6, (aft Moveu II& 5<^dhe : sbi of Cm- 

IM^ Paail mor : his aon. vd% hmdhe. 

1/)$. Xaoillinii : hia son. 117. P^biiiin >^±) : Ida son ; 

10^^ tvoX f)%e : hid 30q* YaA a Isocher muDeil Don- 

^ffl. CoiKMtldeh : his son. o^ 

1^1^. Tmaodhe (Tam^ or 118. Tanudhe mor : son 
K*<h«in«]) ; bi# MHi« I of Fudm. 

lOS^^ VucikfOg : fab «»« 119. MawlHim : his son ; 

li(h Vmmin : fail son. faad a Isotfaa njuooed John 

llLTuMidhe (2): faisnuidfa. 
M]rti# I 120. Tiochlann : fais son ; 

1 12/ Vnidin (Paidin : Ir- had a farother named Toran- 



Mif ft diminniiire of ^^ Pat- 
rick^') } faii» Mm ; a qno J/o^- 
Phaidiuf aiigliei«ed Mac- 
Faddmf Pmlden, Patten^ and 
Pnttlwn. Thi« Paidin 
Ipftudeotil hiid a brother 
ttM(tn«d GioUaioMa. 
1 18. Ooimng oolach (<'eol- 



aeh (tcran : Irish, " a great 
noise"), a qno O'Taranai^^ 
anglicised Tomey and 
Thunder, 

121. Paidin (2): son of 
Lochlann. 

122. Muirgheas O'Conaire 
(or Mulconaire) : his son. 



SO. Tun 8tKM or ths ** Ooonam'* Family. 

CviHtNi MtK \K\\\ on UiO « Donnelly** pedigree, was the 
M\o«MiMMvf «tt«f«'( WWh (Uid iVOontiHi anglicised Canan^ 



IV.] 



THE CORRiaAN AND GBAIG FAMIUBS. 



155 



108. Cuinin (" cuinin " : 
Irish, a rabbit) : son of Dan- 
gal ; a quo MacConeini 

101. Fergal : iiis son ; had 
« brother named Aongus. 



105. Dermod : son of Fer- 
gal. 

106. Cubnidhe O'Coonan : 
his son. 



27«*— The Stem of the '' Corbioan" Familt. 

Oathal, brother of Fergal, who is No. 101 on the " Don- 
nelly'' pedigree, was the ancestor of 0*Coraidhegain; angli- 
^sed Corrigan. 



101. Cathal : son of Cam- 
ascach. 

102. Coraidhegan (** cor- 
aidhe": Irish, a hero), mean- 
ing "the little hero*': his 



son ; a quo O' Coraidhegain ; 
had a brother named Gair- 
bre, a quo O'Carbery, of 
Orgiall. 



28. — The Stem op the ** Cbaig " Familt. 

DAvm, the youngest son of Malcolm the Third, king of 
Scotland, who (see the first series) is No. 109 on the 
** Stem of the Eoyal Family,*' was ancestor of Craigf of 
Banbridge, in the county Down. 

115. Robert Bruce : his 
son ; called '^ King Eobert 
the First," of Scotland. 

116. Margery: his daugh- 
ter; married to the Mor 
Mh(wr Leamhna or ** Great 
Steward of Lennox" — name- 
ly, Walter, the lord " stew- 
ard *' of Scotland, who was 
ancestor of Stewart and 
Stitart, 

117. Robert Stewart: their 
son. 

118. John : his son. 

119. James: his son. 
I 120; Ninion : his son. 



109. Malcolm the Third, 
Tring of Scotland; died, a.d. 
1094. 

110. David, king of Scot- 
land : his youngest son. 

111. Prmce Henry: his 
Bon. 

112. David (2) : his son. 
118. Isabel: his daughter; 

married Bobert Bruce,called 
"The Noble," who competed 
with Baliol for the crown of 
Scotland. 

114. Bobert Bruce : their 
son ; earl of Annundale, and 
of Oarrick. 



1» 



121. Jaacs (2) : Ids 

122. Nimon (2) : his 

123. Jnoes (S) : Ins son. 

124. Cfaxistuai : his 8<hi. 

125. Nim op (3) : Ins sen. | 
12C. William : his son. 

127. Maiy : Ins djuigliter. 

128. Ifaiy Didaoni het 
daughter, j 

129. MmtDdjt Boifie : Iier ^ 
daughter. 

180. Stewart Gnug: her 
son; married Mary Graham, 
and had issae seven sons 
and three daughters. The 
sons were— 1. Thomas- 
Henry ; 2. Bobert Stewart; 
8. Bev.Stewart-BailIie,yicar 
of St. Mark's, Hull, York- 
shire ; 4. John ; ^.William- 
Oraham^ 19, Waterloo-rd., 
Dnblin; 6. Bey. Graham, 
Bector of St. Catherine's, 
Tullamore; 7. Hogh-Donbar. 
The daughters were — 1. 
Sarah ; 2. Mary ; 8. Maud, 
who died, January, 1877. 

This Thomas Henry Craig 
(1) married Mary-Charlotte 
Jenkins, and died October, 
1 872, leaving issue— 1 . 
Stewart - Charles, 102nd 
Begiment, who died in 
Kaules, 1876 ; 2. Elizabeth- 
Helen, who married Captain 



Marra, Italiaa Navy, and 
has issue one ^^ghtflr 
named Yiolei. Bobert- 
Stewart (2) mamed Emily- 
Maiy N<4ile, and has issue : 
I.Edwin-Stewart, 2.Bobert- 
Annesley. Rev. Stewart- 
BttSie (3) married Mary 
Alder, aiid has issae — 1. 
John-Alder, 2. Stewart- 
Graham, 3u Graham. John 
(4) married MadeHna-Louisa 
Boys, and has issue — ^1. 
Graham - Stewart - Lowther, 
2. Dunbar, 8. John. 
William-Graham Craig (5) 
married Harriette - Ada 
Lawless; no issue. Bev. 
Graham (6) married Helen 
Noble, and has issue. — 1. 
Bobert-Stewart, 2. Heniy* 
Graham, 8. Herbert- 
Newoombe, 4. William- 
Arthur, 6. Alan. 

Sari^ Craig (1) naarried 
James Henry (deceased), and 
had issue — 1. Bobert, 2. 
Stewart : both of whom are 
also deceased. Mary (2) is 
(in 1877) unmarried. 

181. Bobert-Stewart Craig, 
of Belfast: son of Stewart 
Craig ; living in 1877. 

182. Edwin-Stewart Craig: 
his son ; living in 1877. 



20.— The Stem of thi ** Cbean*' Family. 

SoRALAOR, brother of Fionnbeartach who is No. 94 on the 
<* Miohir* pedigree, was the ancestor of 0*Creain; angli- 
oised Crf<m and Cran*. 



TV,] 



THE CROIiLY FAMILY. 



167 



94. Seralach (or Tene- 
lach) : son of Endadaig (or 
£dalach). 

95. Grean (" ere" : Irish, 
-earth ; "an", an interrogative 
particle ; and " Grean ** 
means a buying) : his son ; a 
quo O'Creain, 

96. Gairmliach : his son. 

97. Donald : his son. 

98. Grean oge : his son. 

99. Lochlann : his son. 

100. Dalbach''' : his son. 

101. Maoldun : his son. 

102. Maolmaodhog : his 
«ou. 

108. Gathmaol : his son. 

104. Gairmliach : his son ; 
a quo O' Crairmlidtcha, angli- 
cised Gormley and Grimley 
{see the "Grimley" pedigree.) 

105. Maceraith : his son. 

106. Meanmnach ("m€an- 
•ma'*, gen. " meanman'* : 



Irish, comfort) : his son ; a 
quo MacMeanman, anglicised 
MacMenamin, 

107. Conor : his son. 
This Gonor had a younger 
brother named Don^d, who 
was the ancestor of Qrindey. 

108. Dermod : son of 
Conor. 

109. Brian : his son. 

110. Feral : his son. 

111. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

112. Manus : his son. 

113. Patrick : his son. 

114. Donald : his son. 

115. Manus (2) : his son ; 
had a brother named Bich- 
ard. 

116. Owen: son of Manus. 

117. John : his son. 

118. Andrew : his son. 

119. John O'Crean: his 
son. 



80. — The Stem op the " Gbolly" Family. 

Maolbuanaidh, brother of Teige who (see the first series) 
is No. 108 on the " MacDermott" pedigree, was the ku- 
ceaior oi O'Cruaidh-locha; anglicised Crawley ^ Crolly, Crolyy 
Crole, Crowley^ Campion^ Hardy , LaJce^ Locke, and Poole. 

112. Dermod : his son ; 
who was called Cruaidh-locha 
(" cruaidh" ; Irish, hard ; 
Gr. " kru-os'* ; Lat. " crud- 
us*' ; and Irish " loch*', gen. 
" locha", a lake, a pool). 



108. Maolmarnddh : son 
4>f Murtagh. 

109. Teige : his son. 

110. Dermod (Darby, Jere- 
nay, or Jeremiah) : Ins son. 

111. Sioda: his son. 



* DaStach: Thi« name signifies "blind drank" {doll: Irish, "blind*'; 
ifoch, " drankenness '*; compare Bacchm, the god of wine). 



158 



IBISH PEDIGBEES» 



[part 



meaning <*The Hardy Cham- 
pion*' ; a quo O'Cruaidh- 
locha» 

118. Maccraith : his son. 

114. Bory mor : his son. 

115. Hugh : his son. 

116. Lochlann mor : his 
son. 



1 17. Lochlann oge: his son. 

118. Banal : his son. 

119. Conor : his son. 

120. David : his son. 

121. Donoch : his son. 

122. Dermod (8) : his son. 
128. Amhailgadh [awly] 

O'Croly : his son. 



81.— The Stem of the ** Cunningham*" Family. 

TiGEABNAOH, son of Muredach (or Muireadach), son of 
Eoghan, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages, the 126th 
monarch of Ireland, and (see the first series) No. 87 on 
the stem of the '' House of Heremon**, was the ancestor 
of 0*Connaghain ; anglicised Counihan, Cunigam, Ctinigariy 
Cunningham^ Cunnivane, and Conyngham. 



87.NiaU of the Nine 
Hostages, the 126th mon- 
arch of Ireland. 

88. Eoghan (or Owen) : 
his son. 

89. Muredach : his son ; 
had a brother named Eoch- 
aidh Binne. 

90. Tigheamach : son of 
Muireadach. 

91. Daire (or Darius) : 
his son. 

92. Cunaghan (" cu*' : 
Irish, the hound, or tcarrior ; 



** an-agha*', of the battles) : 
his son ; a quo O'Connagh- 
ain, 

98. Oonall : his son. 

94. Amhailgadh : bis 
son. 

95. Teige : his son. 

96. Aodh : his son. 

97. Owen : his son. 

98. Murtagh : his son. 

99. Owen (8) : his son. 
100. Murtagh : his son. 



I am as yet unable to trace the continuation of this genea- 
logy ; and therefore unable to supply the links between 
the foregoing Murtagh (No. 100) and the imder mentioned 
Rodger O'Cunnivane, who was born, aj>. 1680. 






".] 



THE DALT FAMILY. 



159 



1. Eodger (or Boady) 
O'Crmnivane ; bbm in 1680. 

2. Timothy : his son. 

8. Mihil (or Michael) : 
his son. 

4. Thomas : his son. 

5. Michael Gonningham, 
of Ennis, comity Clare : his 
son ; living in 1878. 

6. John Ommingham, of 
Dablin : his son ; has three 
brothers and three sisters : 



the brothers are — 1. Tho- 
mas, 2. Michael, 8. Terence; 
the sisters are — 1. Mary- 
Anne, 2. Margaret, 8. Sarah. 
This John was, in Jnly 1877, 
married in St. Mary's Catho- 
lic Church, Haddington- 
road, Dablin, to Mary-Eliza- 
beth, second daughter of 
John O'Hart, Dublin, the 
compiler of this Work ; liv- 
ing in 1878. 



82.— The Stem of the " Daly" Family. 

Adhamh [Adam] , brother of Fargal the 156th monarch of 
Ireland who (see the first series) is No. 95 on the stem of 
the " House of Heremon**, was the ancestor of O'Dcdaighe 
(of Leath Cidnn^ or Leinster, Ulster, and Connaught) ; an- 
glicised Daly, and 0'Daly\. 



95. Adhamh : son of 
Maoldun. 

96. Core : his son. 

97. Faghnach : his son. 

98. Dalach ("dall" Irish, 
blind) : his son ; a quo 
0*Dalaighe, 

99. Gillcoimdhe: his son. 

100. Teige : his son. 

101. Muredach : his son. 

102. Dalach (2) : his son. 
108. Cuconnachta na- 

Scoil O'Daly (or, "Cucon- 
nachta of the Schools*') : his 



son ; the first of the family 
that assumed this simame. 

104. Teige (2) : his son ; 
was ** Primate of Ireland.*' 

105. Aongiis : his son. 
106.Donoch mor: his son; 

had two younger brothers — 
1. — Caroll, who was the an- 
cestor of O* Daly yOi Brefney, 
Westmeath, and Connaught; 
and 2. Giollaiosa. 

107. Aongus (2) : son of 
Donooh mor. 



t O'Daly : This famUy is distinct from " O'Daly" of Munster. 



1€0 



liUSS PESXGBSES. 



[PABT 



108. Pofiioch madh : his 
son. 

109. Aongns ruadh : his 
son. 

110« Doxm : his son, 

111. Daire : bis son. 

112. Donn (2) : his son. 
118. MelachliQ : his son. 

114. John : his son. 

115. Teige (8): bis son; 
had a broti^er named John. 

116. Dermod : son of 
Teige. 



117. Teige (4) : his Qon ; 
had four brothers-^1. Der^ 
mod, 2* Donoch, S. Fefdi> 
nando, and 4. Godfry. 

118. Donoch (or Denis) : 
son of Teige ; had two bro- 
thers — 1. Permod, ai^d 2. 
John. 

119. Denaod : son of 
Donooh ; bad two brothers 
— 1. John, and 2. Hugh. 

120. Teige (5) O'Daly : 
son of Dermod. 



88. — The Stem of the ** Davidson" Fabolt. 

MoBocH na-nOaodhail (or '< Moroch of the Oael'*), brother 
of Dermod na nOaill (or *' Dermod of the English", 
meaning Dermod MacMorogh, the last king of Leinster), 
who is No. 114 on the <' Eavanagh** pedigree, was the 
ancestor of MacDaibhidh ; anglicised MacDavid (meaning 
the son of David) and modernized Davidson. 



114. Moroch na nOaod- 
hail. 

115. Murtogh: his son. 

116. Donoch reamhar* 
(" reamhar'' : Irish, fleshy) : 
his son. 

117. Murtogh : his son. 

118. Donoch : his son. 
119.Eimhin ruadh 

(** eimh*' : Irish, active ; 
"ruadh", red), ox red Ed- 
mond : his son ; a quo, some 
say, MacRedmondf-wMch has 
been modernized Eedmond, 



120. S e a n a c h (called 
Owen) : his son ; had a bro- 
ther named Maurice. 

121. Manus : son of Sea- 
nach. 

122. David mor : his son ; 
a quo MacDaibhidh. 

128. Patrick : his son. 

124. Felim : his son. 

125. David (2) : his son. 

126. Patrick MacDavid: 
his son. 



* D<moch reamhar [T»w-wor] : This Donoch had a brother named 
CoDor, who was father of Dermod, the father of Williain, the father 
of Maurice, tiie father of Murtogh, who was abbot of Ferns, in tiie 
county Wejrford. 



IT.] 



THB DAYIN AND DBMPSET FAMILIBB. 



161 



84. — ^Ths Stem of thb << Davin" Family. 

Caibbbb an-damh airgid, who (see the first series) is No. 
91 on the "O'Hart *' pedigree, was ancestor of O'DoimAtn; 
anglicised Daviuy Davine, Deviriy and Devine, 



91. Gairbre an damh 
alrgid ( ' ' airgiod*' : Irish, 
nlver ; Lat. '' arg-entum'' ; 
Gr. " arg-uros"), king of 
Orgiall. 

92. Daimhin : his son. 
This Daimhin had a brother 
named Nadsloagh, who was 
the ancestor of Ma/sMahon, 
princes of Monaghan; and 
another brother named Oor- 
mac, who was the ancestor 
of Maguire, princes of Fer- 
managh. 

98. Lochlann : his son ; 
had a brother named Tuat- 
hal maolgharbh, and another 
named Glochar. 

94. Fergus : his son. 

95. Maoldun : his son. 

96. Daimhin ("daimh" : 
Irish, a poet ; Gr. " daem- 



on," a learned many and 
" daio," to know ; Heb. 
** deah," science) : his son ; 
a quo O'Daimhin. 

97. Foghartach : his son» 

98. Eochaidh leamhradh 
O'Daimhin (<< leamhradh" : 
Irish, a foolish sayijig) : his 
son ; a quo O' Learnhraidh^ 
anglicised Laury and Laurie; 
was the first of the family 
who assumed this simame. 

99. Dubhthire : his son. 

100. Eochaidh (2) : his 
son. 

101. Gathal : his son. 

102. Muireadhach : his 
son. 

108. Gumascach : his son. 

104.Fiacha 0*Daimhin : 
his son ; the last lord of 
Fermanagh, of this family. 



85. — The Stem of the ''Dempset" Family. 

DioMASACH, who (see the first series) is No. 98 on the 
<'0'Gonnor" Faley pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Diom- 
asaighe ; anglicised Demps^ and O'Dempsey. 



son 



98. Diomasach : 
Congall. 

99; Flann : his son ; had 
an elder brother named 



of I ^neas, who was ancestor 
of O'Connor Faley. 

100. Gineth (by some cal- 
led Tumaltach) : his son. 



162 



miSH PEDIGHEES. 



[past 



101. Donald: his son; had 
a brother named Riaghan, 
-who was the ancestor of 
Dunne. This Donald had 
another brother, named 
Hugh, who was the ancestor 
of O'Dempsey, lords of Clan- 
maliere (as in the next fol- 
lowing genealogy). 

102. Hugh O'Dempsey : 
son of Donald ; was the first 
of the family that assumed 
this simame. 

108. Oonor : his son. 

104. M^oluradh ("uradh" 
lrieh,apparelf good condition): 
his son; a quo Clann Maoly^ 
raidh, anglicised '* Clanma- 
Uere." 

105. Gorcran : his son. 
106: Diomasach (<< diom- 

asach": Irish, proud, liaughty, 
arrogant) : his son ; a quo 
O* Diomasaighe, 

107. Hugh O'Dempsey : 
his son ; first assumed this 
simame. 



108. Corcran (2) : his son. 

109. Florence : his. son ; 
was the first " lord of Clan-^ 
maliere." 

110. Cubhroa : his son. 

111. Dermod: his son. 

112. Hugh : his soik. 
lis. GoUen: his son. 

114. Fionn : his son. 

115. Melachlin : his -son. 

116. Dermod (2) : his sen. 

117. Fionn (2) : his son. 

118. Melachlin (2): his 
son. 

119. Fionn (8) : his son. 

120. D^mod (8) : his son. 

121. Maolmorra : his son; 
lord of Glanmaliere. 

122. Gahir (or Cahyr), of 
BallybrittaS) in the Queen's 
Go. : his son. 

128. Hugh : his son. 

124. Dermod (4): his son. 

125. Terence (or Tirloch) 
O'Dempsey : his son ; died 

I without issue, a.d. 1678i 



86. — ^The Stem of the ''Deupset" (Lobdsof Glanmauebb) 

Family. 

HuoH, a younger brother of Donald who is No. 101 on the 
foregoing (<<0*Dempsey'*) pedigree, was the ancestor of 
Clkmpseyf lords of Glanmalier&. 



101. Hugh : son of Gineth ; 
chief of his family. 

102. Conor : his son. 
108. Maolughra : his son. 

104. Corcran : his son. 

105. Diomaflach : his son. 



106. Gorcran (2) : bis son. 

107. Flann : his son ; in 
his time the family assumed 
the simame 0*Dempsey, 

108. Hugh (2) : his bon. 

109. Gonbroga : his son. 



IV.] 



THE DIGNUM FAMILY. 



168 



110. Dermod 0*Dempsey : 
his son ; built the Abbey of 
Monastereven, a.d. 1179. 

111. Hugh: his son. 

112. Coilen : his son ; died 
without issue; had a brother 
named Fionn. 

118. Maolseachlainn : son 
of the said Fionn. 

114. Fionn (2) : his son. 

115. Dermod : his son. 

116. Maolmordha: his son. 

117. Cahir : his son. 

118. Hugh, of Loghine, 
Ballybrittas : his son ; died 
in 1563. 

119; Dermod ruadh : his 
son ; had two brothers — 1. 
Owen, 2. Terence : both of 
whom died without issue. 

120. Sir Terence : son of 
Dermod ruadh ; knighted by 
Robert, earl of Essex, lord 
lieutenant of Ireland in 
1599; created "baron of 
Philipstown" and ** viscount 
Clanmaliere" by patent 
dated 8th July, 1681. 

121. Uaithne (Oweney, 
Toneyor Anthony), ofClone- 
gauny, in the King's County: 
his son ; died (before his 
father) in 1688. This 
Uaithne had four brothers — 
1. Hugh ; 2. Right Rev. 
Edmond, Roman Catholic 
bishop of Leighlin ; 8. Rev. 



Feagh, Roman Catholie 
vicar-general of Eildare ; 4. 
James. 

122. Lewis : his son ; the 
second ''lord viscount of 
Clanmaliere*', and baron of 
Philipstown. This Lewis 
took an active part in the 
''Rebellion" of 1641, for 
which he was outlawed and 
attainted ; he died intestate, 
and administration of his 
effects was granted in May, 
1683. He had two brothers 
— 1. Sir Christopher, who 
when very young, was knigh- 
ted by lord Falkland, lord 
lieutenant of Ireland, in 
July, 1624 : this Sir Chris- 
topher died without issue ; 
2. James O'Dempsey, of 
Bishop's Court, in the Co. 
Kildare, who was a colonel 
in the Army of King James 
the Second. 

123. Maximilian O'Demp- 
sey : son of Lewis; was made 
lord lieutenant of the Queen's 
County, by King James th^ 
Second, and sat in the Par- 
liament held by him on 
7th May, 1689. This Max- 
imilian died without issue ; 
he had a younger brother 
named Terence O'Oempsey, 
who was living in 1691. 



87. — ^The Stem op the " Dignum" Family. 
DoxGHNAN, brother of Beice who is No. 98 on the " Fox'* 



164 



IBISH PEDIGBEES. 



[past 



pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Doighnain ; anglicised 
(yDugmmVj Dygenamy Duigenan, Dygenan, Dignum and Hope. 

98. Doighnan (" doigh*': 106. Dealbhbaoth : his 
Irish, hope ; Gr. ** do-keo'\ 
to think) : son of Tagan ; a 
quo O^Doighnain, 

99. Naomhach : his son. 

100. Philip : his son. 

101. Paul an fionn : his 
son. 

102. Luke : his son. 
108. Angustin : his son. 

104. Malachi ruadh : his 
son. 

105. Manus : his son. 



106. Dealbhbaoth : 
son. 

107. Manus (or Mor) : his 
son. 

108. Malachi (2): his son. 

109. Manus (8): his son. 

110. Jerome : his son. 

111. John ballach : his 
son. 

112. Francis : his son. 
118. John ballach O'Dug- 

enan : his son. 



38.— The *« Dillon** Family. 

LoGHAN dilmhain (by some called '^Lochan dilionn/' 
from the Irish dile, **aflood'*J was, according to the 
** Book of Armagh," ancestor oi Dillon, of Cuircneach or 
" Dillon's Country,** in the county Westmeath ; and was, 
according to some of the Irish genealogists, brother of 
Golman Mor (king of Meath), and of Aldus (or Hugh) 
Slaine, the 141st monarch of Ireland : all three, (those 
genealogists say,) the sons of Dermod, the 133rd mon- 
arch, who was son of Fergus Cearrbheoil, son of Gonall 
Creamthann (the first Christian king of Meath), son of 
Niall of the Nine Hostages, the 126th monarch. And it 
is stated that the said Lochan killed the said Golman- 
Mor, for refusing to let him enjoy his proportion of the 
kingdom of Meath, called Ouircneach ; and therefore fled 
into France, where he and his posterity remained until 
Bobert Le Dillon, lineally descended from the said Lochan, 
came into Ireland (with those that Dermod MacMorogh 
invited out of England to assist him in the recovery of 
his kingdom of Leinster,) and laid claim to the said terri- 
tory of Cuircneach ; which having made appear, after 



IV.] THE DILLON FAMILY. 165 

some contest and strife, O'Melaghlin, then king of Meath, 
was, by the interposition and mediation of 0*Molloy and 
MacGeoghagan, then powerful men in the country, content 
he should enjoy ; and, accordingly, he and his posterity 
possessed that territory from that time down to the Crom- 
wellian confiscations of Ireland, in the seventeenth 
century. 

That the said Lochan dilmhain"^' was the ancestor of 
DilloHf Delioriy or Dilbme, or that he fled into France 
upon the murder of his brother, is not gainsayed ; but 
that he was brother of either Aldus Slaine (the 141st 
monarch of Ireland), or of Golman Mor, king of Meath, is 
contradicted by <^ The Book of the Beigns of the Irish 
Monarchs", where, giving an account of the reign of the 
monarch Aodh Slaine, it is stated : 

" Aodh (or Aldus) Slaine (son of Dermod, son of Feraus Gearb- 
heoil), and Golman rimidh, the 142nd monarch, son of Baoilan (or 
Boetanas), the 137th monarch, son of Murchertas Mor MacEarca, 
the 131st monarch, son of Muredach, son of £oghan, son of Niall 
Mor (or Niall of the Nine Hostages), reigned jointly for six years, 
until Golman (rimidh) was slain by Lochan dilmhain, son of Baodan, 
son of Muriartus or Murchertus Mor MacEarca, son of Muredach ; 
and Aldus Slaine was killed by Conall Guthbhinn." 

According to this extract, it is evident that Lochan 
dilmhain was brother of Colman rimeach (or rimidh), the 
142nd monarch (whom he killed) and not the brother of 
Colman Mor, who was king of Meath, but never monarch 
of Ireland ; for, Lochan dilmhain was the fourth genera- 
tion after Eoghan, son of Niall Mor, and Golman Mor was 
the third generation after Conall (3reamthann, brother of 
£oghan — both sons of the said Niall Mor (or Niall of the 
Nine Hostages), above mentioned. 

No account can be given of the generations from the 
said Lochan dilmhain to the said Bobert Le Dillon, who 
was called ''Robert the SacsanacK' (or Bobert the English- 
man), because he came over with the English at the time 
of the English invasion of Lreland ; but, as Boderick 
O'Connor, brother of Oathal craobh-dearg, who (see the 
first series) is No. 112 on the '' O'Connor*' (Connaught) 

* Dilmhain : This name has been also anglicised DiUantt which 
has been modernized Delant, 



c 



pedigiee, was the insh mtmanh at the time of that inva- 
akm, we maj aiwnine that Boberl Le Bilkm was of the 
same (112th) generation as the miHiaieh Bodeiiek 
O'Connor ; and that there must hare heen twenty genera- 
tions between Tiochan dihnhain and his descendant 
Bobert Le Dillon*. 

Down from that Bobert Le Dillon, the following is the 
stem of the Dilian fiunil j : 



112. Bobert Le Dillon. 

113. Thomas : his son. 

114. William Dillon : his 
son ; the first of the family 
that assumed this simame. 

115. Bir Henry : his son ; 
bnilt the Abbey of St. Fran- 
eis, in Athlone, in the reign 
of King John. 

116. Gerald : his son. 

117. Gerald oge : his son. 

118. Edmond : his son. 

119. Gerald (3): his son; 
had three sous — 1. James, 
2. Gerald oge, and 8. Bich- 
ard. 

120. Sir James : sou of 
Gerald* 

121. Thomas maol : his 



son. This Thomas had three 
sons — ^1. Bir Theobald (or 
Toby), 2. Edmond, 8. Ger* 
aid. 

122. Sir Theobald : son of 
Thomas maol ; was the first 
"lord yisoonnt Dillon,*' of 
Costello and Gallen, in the 
connty Mayo. 

123. Sir Lake : his son. 

124. Bobert : his son. 

125. Theobald : his sou ; 
lorl Yiscount Dillon. 

126. Henry : his sou ; 
lord viscount Dillon, living 
in 1708. 

127. Bichard Dillon : his 
sou. 



89. — The Stem of the " Dohbbty" Family. 

FiABfHAN, a second brother of Muriartus (or Mairiartach) 
who (see the first series) is No. 99 on the <' O'Donel *' 
(Tiroonnel) pedigree, was the ancestor of O' Dochartaigh ; 
anglicised Doclinrty, Dogherty^ Doherty, and Dougherty, 

* Robert Le Dilhn : NisU of the Nine Hoetages (see tiie first 
■•rioi) ii No. 87 oil the '* Stem of the House of Qeremon" ; whose 
son EoghM (or Eugemus) is therefore No. 88 ; whose son Muredach 
is No. oO ; whoso son Murchertus Mor MacEarca is Na 90 ; whose 
■on Baodan is No. 01 ; whose son Lochan dilmhain must therefore be 
No. 9Si t so that there were at least twenty generations between him 
and Robwt Le Dillon, above mentioned. 



ITj 



THE DOHSBTY FAUILY. 



im 



S9« Eiamhan : third son 
of Ceannfaola. 

100. Maongal : his son. 

101. DocfacGnrtach ('' doc- 
har" : Irish, harm) : his son; 
a quo O'Dochaitaigh. 

102. Maongal (2) : his 
son. 

103. Bonoch : his son. 

104. Maongal (8) : his 
son. 

105. Donald : his son. 

106. Donogh dunn : his 
son. 

107. Donald fionn : his 
son. 

108. Conor : his son. 

109. Dermod : his son. 

110. Murtagh : his son. 

111. Aongus : his son. 



Donald xmx : ijiis 

Bory : his son. 
Donald (4) : his son. 
Conor : his son. 
Aneisleis : his son. 
Donald (5) : his son. 
John : his son. 
Conor-an-enigh : his 

Donald (6) : his son. 
Brian dubh: his son. 
Connor carrach : his 
son. 

128. Felim : his son. 

124. John mor : his son. 

125. John oge : his son. 

126. Sir Cahir O'Dog- 
herty* : his son ; lord of 
Inishowen ; living in 1608. 



.112. 

118. 
114. 
115. 
116. 
117. 
118. 
119. 
son. 
120. 
121. 
122. 



* Sir Cahvr O'Dogherty, In Connelian's "Four Masters" it is 
stated that, in May, 1608, Sir Cahir O'Dogherty, lord of Inishowen, 
a yoiiDff man of great spirit and vaionr, then only in the twenty-first 
year of iiis age, raised an insBrrection against the English in Ulster ; 
being unable to tolerate the insolence and tyranny of Sir George 
Panlctt, Governor of Derry. O'Dogherty and his forces having sur- 
prised Derry, they slew Paulett and most of the garrison, and 
Dumed the town ; he also took the fort of Culmore, near Dercy, from 
Captain Hart; and gave the command of the fortress to a valiant chief 
named Felim MacDavett. O'Dogherty ravaged the settlements of the 
English im various parts of Derry, Donegal, and Tyrone ; and 
defeated their forces m several en^gements. Marshal Wingfield and 
Sir Oliver Lambert marched agamst him with four thousand men ; 
and having advanced to Culmore, MacDavett, unable to defend the 
place against so great a force, set fire to the fortress, and sailed off 
with his men towards Derry, carrying away some of the cannon, and 
throwing the rest into the sea. Wingneld then advanced against Burt 
Castle, the chief reudenoe of O'Dogherty, near Lough Swuly. Mac- 
Geop^egan says the casUe was commanded by a monk, who, not 
having a sufficient force to defend it, and not wishing to subject, to 
the dangeraoia siege, 0'J>ogherty*s lady, who was Mary Preston, 
daughter of lord Gormonstown, surrendered the castle on condition 
■ that the garrison should be spared ; but Wingfield put most of them 



Otrmjo^ ixnther of TnrwfihiaA li&o m Sol 9S ^ &e 
** (yBmne'' pecEgsee^ was tiis aice^ar of O^j 



«ii^i<3Ml ChmUy sad 
f:k«rU». Thtf Cathal liw 
the l^h Ciaistum Cn^ of 

99, iUidgall : Ins fon ; 
^dkd * faint ai Hje, in 
Seoilaad^ a.]>. 786^ ; had a 
hreiber named Dobhumra- 
ditf who waa the 22nd king 
ct Connaagfat and the an- 
ee«ior of C Mmreadhai^ 
(*^ mrnr '' : Irish the $ea ; 
** eadbaeh*^ a praUetar or a 
gmment\ meaning *' the 
deseen^nts of the man who 
protected the sea"; or, '"who 
wore garments suited to the 
sea'^; and anglicised Bturray. 
100. Cenetb: bis son; had 
a brother named Oncbu, 
who was the ancestor of 
0* Maolmocheirghe (" moch": 
Irish, early t and ''eirigh", 



fi9 

o 



of 



sQ Wear* 



\^, 



101. 



of 



102. DanaOan (or little 

. Donall) : fats son; a quo 

, CtDonallmm^ loxds of the 

I tenitoiy of damn Caikml, 

gfConnanght; had a brother 

named FJannagan, a quo 

O'lfTanna^aiR C'one of the 

twelye great lords of Cmag- 

ban, in the oonnty Boscom- 

mon"), and anglicised 

Flanagan, 

108. Cathal (or Charles) : 
son of Donallan. 

104. Ardgal O'Donnellan : 
bis son ; first of the family 
that assumed this simame. 



to the iwordi and tent O'Dogherty 's wife to her brother. 0*Dogherty 
hod VArioui enoounten with the English forces, and maintained bis 
ground for about three months in Donegal; the lord deputy Chichester 
offered a reward of Ave hundred marks for his head ; and Sir Cahir 
ueing encamped at the Rock of Doune, near Kilmacrennan, was shot 
deadwith a musket ball, by an English soldier, who took deliberate 
aim at him { rocoaniiing the warlike chief amidst his men, from his 
waving plume aud lofty stature. The extensiye estates of O'Dogherty 
were conHsoated, and tranaferred to Chichester, ancestor to the earls 
of Donegal. 



IT. 



THE DONNELLAN (OF TTLSTEB) FAMILT. 



169 



105. Lnaghlais : bis son. 

106. Gathal : bis son. 

107. Flan n bnaidh 
(" buaidb*' : Irisb, victory ; 
Heb. '<bnagb", to exult)-, his 
son. 

108. Ambailgadb: bis son. 

109. Flann (or Florence) 
oge : bis son. 

110. Malacbi : bis son. 

111. Gormac : bis son ; 
bad a brotber named Tna- 
thai, who was the ancestor 
of Donnellan, of Bosse. 

112. Florence : son of 
Cormac. 

118. Teige : bis son. 



114. John: bis son ; had 
a brotber named Tuatbal 
mor, who was the ancestor 
oi Donnellauy of Ballydonel- 
lan, Letrim, Glogban, etc. ; 
and who, a.d. 1582, built 
the Gbapel of Eilconnell. 

115. Daniel : son of John; 
had three brothers— 1. John 
oge, 2. Padraic ruadh, 8. 
.^jnbailgadb. 

116. Daniel oge : son of 
Daniel. 

117. Teige : bis son. 

118. Malacbi 0*Donnellan: 
bis son. 



41.— The Stem of the '< Donnellan" (of Ulster) Family. 

FiNAOHTAOH, brother of Inracbtacb who is No. 97 on the 
**Flinn" (of North Clanaboy) pedigree, was the ancestor of 
O'Donnelianf of Orgiall. 



97. Finachtach : son of 
Baobtaire. 

98. Longseach : bis son. 

99. Hugh : bis son. 

100. Dnbhsineach 
("dubb": Irish, black; '<sine- 
ach", a wen) : bis son ; a 
quo &Dvbhsinigh, anglicised 
Duffany, 

101. Maolcraobb (<' era- 
obh" : Irish, a Inmqh) : bis 



I son ; a quo 0*Craoibhe, an- 
glicised Creagh*,Creaghey and 
Crabbe, 

102. Donallan : bis son ; 
a quo O^Donallain ; had a 
brotber named Muireigean. 

108. Dubbdarach : son of 
Donallan. 

104. Gaillidbf : bis son. 

105. Gonor O'Donnellau : 
bis son. 



' ^ Crtagh : Some genealogists are of opinion that the ''Greash" 
family is a branch Si the O^Neill, of Ulster (see Creagk, in first 
series). 

t CaUUdh : This name, which signifies " one who loses," is 
derived from the Irish caill, "to lose" (Qeb. col, "to fail'') ; and 
seems to be the root of the fleb. co/oA, " he faileth." 




ftfltfAB*. dift aseaai woml a£ TTrmm inm «9k t&e 
«f»rK». Jt 9b. f4 4IL liw CH: 

^•Lliassii: miL(slT:a^ sstL hsai. ^mt 
d'^, Failjitie : his son. fOD f^ 

lriM> Ika^ cme S6«». Mtdtumm^ Mdnu^ JicHw^na, 

^i^.htX^rti (or ¥&gm)z MmcRmmMi^ MitUammnf ^{mod- 

IClD. Cttmancarli : bis son. adium, a quo Gmwam, etc 
JCll« Ferjflpsil: Ids son.. 103. Cimm : bis sooii. 
TUs F^Tgail had two broUi' , 1(^ Aongus: his son; had 
mm — h Cathal^ a quo ICo^- ' a brother named FeigaL 
(T^i// and 0^7/, of Ulster ; [ 105.Oithali son of Aon- 
2. IhtsgaL f gns. 

102. Dangal (more prop- j 106. Gnbnidhe (or << the 
erljr Doogealaeh : *^ Don": > jeUow warn<» "): his son ; 
Irish^ highf noble; ''gealach'% ! a quo (yCanbkuidke^ angli- 



ihe moon : from *' gesl " : 
Iri«h, iifA/^^; Welsh, " gole", 
thfl light): 0on of Fergal; a quo 
0' Dongmlai^he. This Don- 



eised Com^y, 

107. Padraic O'Donnelly : 
his son. 



48.— Thb Stem of the " Dowlino*' Fabolt. 

Fstitif f brother of Orimthann cas who (see the first series) 
1m No. 95 on the '' MaoMorough" pedigree, was the anoes-. 

* 0*Maolfhi(ma : The onoe Btrong oastle which stood at Orogmaol' 
/HktMt now the town of *' OrotimoBna,'* on the banks of the Deel, in 
the barony of Tyrawley and oeuoty of Mayo, belonged to tius family. 
To the writer of these lines that town is endeavMl by many early 
SMUtilationt \ it WAS the home of his childhood ; and that old castle 
and its grottttds were to him in his innocent rambles the scene of 
many of his childish sports and pastimes. 

t^e of this family, named Melaghlin 0*Mnlvany, who died a^ik 
U7tk wee pi^t and Ualonan to O^JCsae (See (yOuty's *<Iieotarea:V 



IV.] 



THE DUNCAN (LINE OF HEBEMON) FAMILY. 



171 



tor of 0' Dubhlaoidh, lords of Fertulagh; anglicised Dooiey, 
Dowley, Doolan, Dulen and Dowling, 



95. Felim: son of Eanna 
cinsealach ; had a brother 
named Deadhach, who was 
the ancestor of &Dea and 
Day, of Leinster. 

96. iBneas: son of Felim. 

97. Muredach : his son ; 
had a brother named Uargus» 
who was the ancestor of 
Duncan (as in next following 
pedigree). 

98. Eochaidh, king of 
Leinster : son of Muredach ; 
fled to Scotland. He had 
two brothers — 1. AlioU, who 
was the ancestor of Maconky; 
and 2. Eoghan (Owen), who 
was the ancestor of O'Har- 
raghtan of Leinster. 

99. Brandubh : son of 
Eochaidh ; the tenth Chris- 
tian king of Leinster ; a.d. 
594. 

100. Ciueth : his son; had 
a brother named Seicne, who 
was the ancestor of Murphy. 

101. Donald : son of Gin- 
eth. 

102. AlioU : his son ; a 
quo <' Bath AlioU.'' 



103. Dubhlaodh ("dubh"r 
Lish, black; <<laodh*\ a 
calf) : his son ; a quo 
Dublaoidh (by some writ- 
ten O' Dunlaing), 

104. CucoiUe : his son. 

105. AlioU (2) : his sou. 

106. Maolsaraan : his sou* 

107. Onchu : his son. 

108. Flann : his sou. 

109. Maolwradh : his son. 

110. AlioU (8) : his son. 

111. Dubhlaodh (2) : his^ 
son. 

112. Dubh (" dubh'* : Ix- 
ish, dark-featured) : his son ; 
a quo O'Duibhe, angUcised 
O'Deevy, and modernized 
Devoy Duff, Duffe ; had a 
brother named Donogh, who 
was the ancestor of Connulay^ 

118. Solomon : son of 
Dubh. 

114. Padraic : his son. 

115. GUlchriosd : his son. 

116. Padraic (2) : his son. 

117. GUlchriosd O'Dow- 
ling : his sou. 



44. — The <* Duncan** (Line ofHebemon) Family. 

(j abgus, brother of Muredach who is No. 97 on the fore- 
going (" Dowling**) pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Dun- 
cinn (** dun'* : Lrish, aforttess ; ** ceann**, gen. ** cinn**, a 
chief; Ghald. ''knan") ;. angUcised Duncan and Dunkin, 

97. Uargus : son of 1 98. AiioU : his son. 
iSneas. I 



172 



ISIBH PEDIGREES 



[part 



46. — The Stem op the ** Dunlevy" Family. 

JBneas Tuirmeach-Teamrach, the 81st monarch of Ireland, 
and who (see the first series) is No. 66 on the '^ Stem of 
the House of Heremon**, had a son named Fiach fearmara, 
y^ was ancestor of the kings of Argyle and Dalriada ; 
in Scotland: this Fiach (latinized '* Fiachus fearmara**) 
was also the ancestor of MacDunshleibhe and 0*Dunshleibhe, 
anglicised Dunlevy, Donlevy, Levitigstone, and Livingstone. 



67. Fiach fearmara : son 
of ^neas. 

68. Olioll erann: his son. 

69. Feareadach : his 
son. 

70. Forga : his son. 

71. Maine mor : his 
son. 

72. Amdal* (*' aran** : 

Irish, bread ; Lat. ''aran-s'* ; 

Gr. "aroon", ploughing ; and 

"dar* or '*dail": Irish, a 

field) : his son. 

78, Bathrean : his son. 

74. Trean : his son. 

75. Bosin : his son. 

76. Sin : his son. 

77. Eochaidh : his son ; 
had an elder brother named 
Deadhach, who was an an- 
cestor of Loam, the last 
king of Dalriada, in Scot- 
land. 

78. Deithsin : son of 
Eo<diaidh. 

79. Dluthagh : his son. 

80. Daire : his son. 



81. Fiatach fionn : his 
son ; the lOSrd monarch of 
Ireland, a quo ** Dal 
Fiatach.^' 

82. Ogaman : his son. 
88. Fionnchada: his son. 

84. lomchaidh : his son. 

85. Fergus dubh-dhea- 
dach, the 114th monarch: 
his son. 

86. iBneas (or Aongus) 
fionn : his son ; who (see 
the first series) is No. 84 on 
the Boll of the '' Kings of 
Ulster." 

87. Luigheach : his son ; 
is No. 86 on that Boll ; was 
the last of the << Dal Fia- 
tach*' pre-Christian Kings of 
Ulster. 

88. Mianach : his son. 

89. Dubhthach : his son. 

90. Dalian : his son. 

91. Forga (2) : his son. 

92. Mnredach mundearg: 
his son ; the first Christian 
King of Ulidia.f 



* Amdal : This Celtic word is the root of the simame Arjiald, 
modernized AmM, 

t Ulidia : In page 199, first edition of first series, this Muredaoh 
is, through the aatnor*s mistake, mentioned as tiie son of Crimtfaann 
liath, who was kin^ of Oraiall (and not of Ulidia), at the time of the 
advent of St. Patrick to Ireland. 



IV.] 



THE DUNLEVY FAMILY. 



173 



98. Cairioll coscraoh : 
his son ; the second king. 

94. Deman : his son ; the 
seventh idng. 

95. Fiachna : his son ; 
the twelfth king. 

96. Maolcobhach (or 
MalcoYus), the 144th mon- 
sreh, and the 15th king of 
Ulidia : his son. 

97. Blathmac, the 150th 
monarch, and 16th king of 
Ulidia : his son. 

98. Beag boirche, 
(**boirche": Irish, a large 
kmd)y the 19th king : his 
son ; a quo O'Boirche,^^ 

99. Aodh (or Hugh) 
Boin : his son ; the 21st 
king. 

100. Fiachna : his son ; 
the 28rd king ; living, a.d. 
748. 

101. Eochaidh : his son ; 
the 24th king. 

102. Aodh (2) : his son. 
108. Eachagan : his son. 



104. Aodh (8) : his son ; 
the 88th king. 

105. Madadhan : his son. 

106. Ardgal : his son ; the 
44th king. 

107. Eochaidh, the 46th 
king : his son. 

108. Niall, the 48th king : 
his son. 

109. Eochaidh : his son ; 
whose brother Maolruanaidh 
was the 47th king of Ulidia, 
and was slain, a.d. 1014, at 
the battle of Clontarf, fight- 
ing against the Danes. 

110. Donsleibhe [duns- 
leive] : his son ; a quo Mac- 
Dunshleibhe and O'Dunshlei- 
hike, 

111. Conor : his son ; 
whose^brother Eory was the 
54th Christian (and last) 
king of Ulidia. 

112. Cu-Uladh [ula] Mac- 
Dunshleibhef : his son ; 
living, A.D. 1177. 



* G* Boirche : By some this simame has been anglicised Birch, 

t Dunshleibhe: This epithet, anglicised Dunlevy, signifies "the 
fortress on the (sliabh or) mountain" (dun : Irish, a fortress ; Pers. 
doen, a hill ; Copt, ton, a mountain ; Turk, dun, high ; Germ. duUf a 
city ; Kng. town) ; but, anglicised Dordevy, it means " the chief on 
the mountain'* (duine : Irish, a man ; Hind, dhunee, a proprietor ; 
Arab., Span., and Irish, don, noble ; Heb., Chald., and old Persian 
dan, a chief magistrate). 

The dominant family in Ulidia, when, a.d. 1177, it was invaded by 
John De Conroey, was that of Cu-Uladh (No. 1 13, above mentioned), 
whom C<mnellan styles Cu-Uladh MacDuinsIdeibhe G'h'Eochadha, 
and who was nephew of Bory, the 54th and last kin^ of Ulidia. 
The '* Cu-Uladh" portion of this name has been latmized Canis 
UUonioe: meaning that this chief of Ulidia (which in the twelfth 



174 



IRIBH PEDIGREES. 



[PABT 



•X 



46. — The Stem of the *' Dunne*' Family. 



BiAQHAN, brother of Donald who is No. 101 oil the 
" Dempsey" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Duin ; angli- 
<;ised Doyne, Duriy Dunn^ and Dunne. 



101. Riaghan ("riagh": 
Irish, to gibbe0 : son of Gin- 
«th ; a quo O'ltliaghain, angli- 
cised 0*i2tf^an— one of ** The 
Four Tribes of Tara." 

102. Maolfiona : his son. 
108. Dnbhgall : his son. 

104. Dun («* dun " : Irish, 
a hill, or fortress) : his son ; 
a quo O'Duin ; nad a broth- 
er named Dubhrean, who 
was ancestor of ff Began. 

105. Ficheallach O'Dunn : 
son of Dun ; the first who 
assumed this simame. 

106. Amhailgadh: his son. 

107. Congalach : his son ; 
a quo O'Conyhaile or O'Con- 
galaigh, anglicised Congaly 
and Conolly. 

108. Oublasma : his son. 

109. Garoill : his son. 

110. Gonbhach : his son; 
had a brother named Bra- 
nan, a quo MacBrannen. 

111. Dunsleibhe: son of 
Gonbhach. 

112. Gonbhach (2) : hia 
son. 



118. Amhailgadh (or Aw- 
I7) : his son. 

114. Teige : his son. 

115. Awly (2): his son. 

116. Awly (8) : his son. 

117. Donoch : his son. 

118. Eoger : his son ; was 
the first who assumed the 
simame O'Voyne, 

119. Leinach : his son. 

120. Teige (Thady or 
Thadeus) : his son. 

121. Teige (2) : his son ; 
chief of his name ; maaried 
to Margaret, daughter of 
Shane (an diomuis) O'NeilL 

122. Teige (8) : his son. 
128. Teige O'Doyne*, of 

Gastlebrack, Queen's Go. : 
his son ; prince of Oregon, 
and chief of his name ; was 
living in 1598; had five sons, 
and a brother named Tir- 
logh who was the ancestor 
of Dunn of Ards (as in the 
next following pedigree). 



century constituted the " Kingdom of Ulster") was swift-footed as a 
hound. The ** Mac Dninnshleibhe" portion of the name implies that 
Cu-Uladh was son or descendant of Dunsleibhe (No. 110, from whom 
tins simame is derived) : a name which Oiraldus Cam6ref»i9 latinized 
Dunlevus ; and the " O'h-Eochadha" portion signifies that tins IXuns- 
leibhe was the son of Eoohaidh, Na 109 on the foregoing pedigree. 

* Tdge 0*Doyne : With our present knowledge of '* Land tenancy" 
in Ireland, it may interest the reader to know the duties or " chief 
rents'' for their lands which the Irish Chieftains exa<ited from their 



ttV.-l 



TBK DUMinS AND DWYEB FAMILIES. 



175^ 



47. — 1%E Stem* OF the " Dunn" (of AiIids) Family. 

Teblooh, brother of Teige 0*Doyne who is No. 128 on the 
foregoing ('< iJuime**) pedigree, was the ancestor of Dunn of 
Ards, in the Queen's County. 



128. Tirlogh: son of Teige 
<3). 

124. John, of Kilvavan : 
his son; next in remainder 
to the estate of Castlebrack, 
in case of the extinction of 
the line of his elder brother 
Teige (Deed 21 Feb. 1616). 

125. Terence (or Tirlogh), 
of Kilvavan, afterward of 
Ards, in the Queen's Co. : 
his son ; died, 1680. 

126. John, of Ards : his 
son ; died, 1726« 

127. Terence, of Ards : 
his son. 



128. Lawrence : his se- 
cond son ; whose elder bro- 
ther Terence died without 
issue. 

129. James, of Ards : son 
of Lawrence ; died in 1841 ; 
had two brothers — 1. John, 
2. Lawrence. 

180. Eev. John Dunn, of 
Ards : son of James ; living 
in 1847. 

181. Terence Dunn : his 
son. 



48. — ^The Stem of the ** Dwyer" (op Leinsteb and 

Munsteb) Family. 

Caibbke, the youngest son of Cucorb, king of Leinster, 
who (see the first series) is No. 86 on the ** O'Connor" 

foUowers : The Castlebrack tenants of this Teige O'Doyne, for in- 
stance, paid one penny, "heriot", per acre, on the death of each Ceanu' 
Jinne or *' chief head of a family". (It may be mentioned that the 
word Aerio^-means '** a fine paid to the lord' of the manor at the death 
of a landholder.") His tenants of Kemymore paid yearly — ^two 
beeves, tweaty-fonr crannochs of oats, forty cakes of bread, tiiirteen 
dishes of batter, seventeen cans of malt; eight pence, heriot, in 
money, on. the death of each Ceannfinne ; one reaping hook (service) 
on one of every twenty acres ; custom ploughs one day in winter and 
one in sommer. 

From inhabitants of Ballykeneine Quarter : Meat and drink for 
twenty-four horse boys, or four shillings for their diet. From (the 
inhabitants <^) Cap^abrogan : like duties. From Garrough : like 
duties. These ^* Cmef Renta" were, a.b. 1613, abolished in Ireland 
in the ringn of King James the First, by the Parliament then held in 
Dublin by the Lord Deputy Sir Arthur Chichester. — See Lodge 
MS& Vol L, xMge 337. 



176 



naSH FBDIGBESS. 



[PABT 



(Faley) pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Dwyer, of Leinster 
and Mnnster. This Cairbre went into Mimster, where 
his grandfather Conaire Mor, the 97th monarch of Ireland, 
gave him the territory after him called Dal Cairbre, mean- 
ing '^ The lands of Garbery." 



87. Cairbre : son of Cu- 
corb. 

88. ^rgettmar : his son. 

89. Buan : his son. 

90. Lughaidh : his son. 

91. Femiadh : his son. 

92. Inneach : his son. 

93. Ferrath : his son. 

94. Finchadh : his son ; 
whose brother Urcha was 
the ancestor of MacLonga- 
chain ("longach*: Irish, be- 
longing to a ship; **an**, 
one who),SLng]iGi8edLoyigahan, 
Lenihan and Lenehan ; and 
of Coaney^ etc. This Finch- 
adh*s younger brother Arb- 
har was the ancestor of 
Trena, Cronan, Aodhan, 
Brangal, Dunechyy and 0*- 
Corbain ; anglicised Carbine. 



95. Macrimhe : son of 
Finchadh. 

96. Lnighneach: his son. 

97. Luchair : his son. 

98. Grellan : his son. 

99. Dubhdahna: his son. 

100. Donnocha : his son. 

101. Soibhneach: his son. 
had a brother. 

102. Spellan:sonof Snibh- 
neach. 

108. Dnbhiir (" dubh:") 
Irish, black or dark ; ** iir", 
gen. ** iire", a skirt): his son. 
a quo O'Dubhiire, anglicised 
Dwyer and Diver, 

104. Gaolbadh : his son. 

105. Oathalan : his son. 

106. Nial : his son. 

107. Padraic O'Dwyer : 
his son. 



49. — ^The Stem of the '' Edmundson** Familt. 

Edmond Eellt, the third son of Bonoch O'Kelly who (see 
the first series) is No. 113 on the " O'Kelly*' (Hy-Maine) 
pedigree, was the ancestor of MacEimhain ^ eimh": Irish, 
brisk, OrCtivey quick), anglicised MacEdmond^ and modernized 
Edmundson, Edmonds and Edwards, 



114. Edmond Eelly : son 
of Donoch 0*Eelly ; a qno 
MacEimhain, 



115. Edmond oge : his 
son. 

116. Conor : his son. 



IV.] 



THE BGAN AND FALLON FAMILIBS. 



177 



117. William Kelly: his 
son ; the first who was cal- 
led MacEdmond, 

118. EdmondMaoEdmond: 
his son. 



119. Conor : his son. 

120. William : his son. 

121. Edmond ruadh Mao- 
Edmond, of Gaill : his son. 



50. — ^The Stem of the "Egan" Faiolt. 

CosoRAOH, brother of Inrachtach, who (see the first 
series) is No. 100 on the << O'Eelly** pedigree, was the 
ancestor of O^h-Aedhaghain ; anglicised Egartf and Mac- 
Egofim 



100. Gosgrach : son of 
Fichollach. 

101. Flaithgheal : his son. 

102. Anlaan : his son. 

103. Flaitheamh (also 
called Felim) : his son. 

104. Gosda : his son. 

105. Aedhaghain (<<aedh": 
Irish, the eye; '< aghain'*, to 
kindle) : his son ; a quo O'k- 
Aedhaghain, 

106. Flann : his son. 

107. Mnrtach : his son. 

108. Donoch mor: his son; 
had a brother named Saor- 
bhreathach, and another 
named Dermod. 

109. Donoch oge : son of 
Donoch mor. 



110. Simeon: his son; had 
two sons-l.Saorbhreathach 
(or Justin), and 2. Maoliosa. 

111. Justin : son of Sim- 
eon. 

112. Maoliosa : his son. 

113. Flann (or Florence) : 
his son. 

114. Finghin : his son ; 
who had two sons — 1. 
Owen, and 2. Conor ruadh. 

115. Owen : son of Fin- 
ghin. 

lie. Teige: his son. 

117. Conor: his son. 

118. Teige (2) : his son. 

119. Melachlm Egan : his 
son 



51. — The Stem op the " Fallon'* Faiolt. 

Ceannfada, the younger brother of Ubhan who is No. 101 
on the "O'Beime" pedigree, was the ancestor oiO'Fallaini 
anglicised Fallon, Fallone, and Falloone, 



M 



^78 



IRISH PEDIGREES. 



[part 



101. Geannfada: son of 
Uadach. 

102. Florence : his son. 
108. Fallain (" fallain" : 

Irish, healthy): his son; a 
quo 0' Fallain. 

104. Ferchar : his son. 

105. Florence (2): his son. 

106. Mnrtach : his son. 

107. Dermod : his son. 

108. Florence (8) : his 
son. 

109. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son ; had eight brothers. 

110. Dermod (2) : his 
son. 

111. Malachi : his son. 

112. Florence (4) : his 
son. 

118. Donoch : his son ; 
had a brother named Am- 
hailgadh [awly]. 

114. Hugh mor : son of 
Donoch. 

115. Hugh oge : his son. 

116. Teige : his son. 

117. Donoch (2) : his son. 



118. Hugh ballach : his 
son. 

119. Teige mor : his son. 

120. Teige oge : his son ; 
had a brother named Bryan. 

121. Edmond : son of 
Teige oge ; had five brothers 
— 1. Daniel, 2. Teige, 8. 
Bryan, 4. Conor, and 5. 
Tirlach. 

122. Hugh (5) : son of 
Edmond. 

128. Caoch mor : his 8on« 

124. Eedmond : his son. 

125. Redmond oge : his 
son. 

126. William : his son ; 
had three brothers — 1. 
Daniel, 2. Bryan, 8. Teige. 

127. Edmond (2) : son of 
William ; had two brothers 
— 1. Bryan, and 2. John. 

128. Bedmond (8) : son of 
Edmond ; had a brother 
named Teige. 

129. WiUiam OTallon : 
son of Bedmond. 



52. — ^The Stem of the '* Feehan" Familt. 

FiAOHAN, brother of Muireadach who is No. 100 on the 
** Lane" pedigree, was the ancestor of MacFiachain and 
O'Fiachain (<< fiach** : Irish, a raven) ; anglicised Feehauy 
FtaUf Fyans Fynes, Vaughan^ and, by some, Gannon.* 



* Oannoni Other genealogists say that Oatmon taid Cannon are 
ansliciBed forms of the Irish OVanadfuUn : See the " Canning" 
pedigree. 



17.] the felan, fihilly, and finaghty families. 179 

58. — The Stem of the '* Felam'' Family. 
{See the first Series). 



54. — The Stem of the ** Fihilly ** Family. 

MuBEDACH maoUeathan, the 16th Christian King of Con- 
naught who (see the first series) is No. 97 on the 
** O'Connor " (Connaught) pedigree, was the ancestor of 
G* Ficheallaigh ; anglicised, Fihilly^ Feely, Field, Fielden, 
Fielding, and Tooth, 



97. Muredach mulleathan. 

98. Conbhach (" con- 
bhach": Irish, hydrophobia) : 
his son; a quo ClanConbhaigh, 
anglicised Conway, 

99. Ficheallach("fiacail'*: 
Irish, a tooth ; Heb. " acal *', 
he eats) : his son ; a quo 
0' Ficheallaigh, meaning 



'^ the descendants of the 
man who had large teeth." 
This Ficheallach had a 
brother named Cahemach, 
who was the ancestor of 
Canavan, of Connaught ; and 
another brother named 
Dungar, who was the ances- 
tor of Finaghty, 



55, — The Stem of the ** Finaghty*' Fabhly. 

DuNGAB, a brother of 1^'icheallach, who is No. 99 on the 
foregoing (** Fihilly ") pedigree, was ancestor of O'Finach- 
taigh; anglicised Finaghty, and Snow, 



99. Dungar : son of Con- 
bhach. 

100. Fionnachtach 
('< fionnsneachda *' : Irish, 
snow-white) : son of Dungar ; 
a quo O* Finachtaigh, ** one 
of the twelve lords of Crua- 
ghan " (or Croghan), in the 
county Roscommon. 



101. Beannachdach (latin- 
ised Benignus and Benidict^) : 
his son. 

102. Concha : his son. 
108. Cathal : his son. 

104. Murtacii : his son. 

105. Murtach oge : his son. 

106. Teige : his son. 

107. Teige oge : his son ; 



* Benedict : From this name some derive Bennett, 



180 



IBISH PEDIGBEES. 



[PABT 



the last ^Mord of Clann- 
conon." 

108. Charles OTinaghty : 
his son ; first assumed this 
sirsame. 

109. Brian : his son ; had 
two brothers — 1. Daniel, and 
2. Donoch. 

110. Hugh : son of Brain. 

111. Rory : his son ; had 



two brothers— 1. Hugh and 
2. Manus. 

112. Donoch granna : son 
of Rory. 

118. Charles : his son. 

114. William : his son ; 
had two brothers-— 1. James, 
the priest, and 2. Redmondl 

116. Malachi O'Finaghtyr 
son of William. 



56. — The Stem of the "Fitzpatmck" Familt. 

(See the first series,) 



57. — The Stem of the ** Fogaety** Family. 



Debmod, the 183rd monarch 
Oolman Mor, (** columan" : 
Clann Columain, anglicised 
Hugh) slaine, who was the 
slaine was ^^the ancestor of 
JFogarty. 

88. Conall Creamthann : 
brother of Laeghaire, who 
is No. 88 on the ** Connel- 
lan'* pedigree. 

89. Fergus Cearbheoill : 

his son. 

90. Dermod : his son ; 
the 188rd monarch of Ire- 
land. 

91. Aodh (or Hugh) 
slaine: his son; the 141st 
monarch. 



of Ireland, had two sons — 1. 
Irish, a little dove), a quo 

Colernan; and 2. Aodh (or 
141st monarch: this Aodh 
O' Fogharthaighe, anglicised 

92! Dermod ruanach : 
his son ; had a brother 
named Congall, who was 
the ancestor of O'Kelly, of 
Meath— one of "The Four 
Tribes of Tara'';* he had. 
also another brother named 
Donoch, who was the ances- 
tor of Muhey or Mnlvy*. 
This Dermod ruanach was 
the 149th monarch of Ire*^ 
land; and reigned jointly 



♦ tara: The **Pour Tribes of Tara" were O'Bart, O^Ketty (of 

Meath), O'ConnoUy, and 0*Began. 

'' Book of Rights. 



w.] 



THE FOX FAHILT. 



181 



with his brother Bladhmic 
(or Bladhmac) : both of 
whom died a.d. 664. 

98. Ceamasotal : his son. 

94. Niall : his son. 

95. Fogharthach : his 
son; was the 157th monarch. 
He- had three brothers — 1. 
Gnmascaoh, who was ances- 
tor of Bams ; 2. Conall 
greanta, ancestor of Breslin; 
and 8. Aodh (or Hugh) 
laighen, who was the ances- 
tor of MuldooHf of Meath. 



96. Geallach : son of 
Fogbarthach. 

97. Tolarg ("tol" : Irish, 
a church-yard : ** arg*', white 
or pale): his son; a quo 
O^Tolairyj anglicised Toler, 

98. Fogharthach (2): his 
son. 

99. Niall (2) : his son. 
100. Fogharthach (< 'fogh- 
arthach" : Irish, noisy) : his 
son ; a quo 0' Foyharthaigh. 



58. — The Stem of the " Fox" Faioly. 

Madye, son of Niall of the Nine Hostages who (see the 
first series) is No. 87 on the << Stem of the House of 
Heremon", was the ancestor of MacSionnaighe ; anglicised 
Fox^ Reynard f Reynardson^ and Seeny, 



87. Niall, of the Nine Hos- 
tages, the 126th Monarch of 
Ireland. 

88. Maine : his son. 

89. Brian : his son. 

90. Brannan : his son. 

91. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son ; had a brother named 
Creamthann, who was the 
ancestor of Breen, 

92. Bladhmhach : son of 
Hugh; had a brother named 
Aongns, who was the an- 
cestor of Loughnan or Lof- 
tuSf of Meath. 



93. Gongall: son of Bladh- 
mach. 

94. CoUa : his son. 

95. Giolla Brighid : his 
son. 

96. Maolbeanachtach : his 
son. 

97. Tagan : his son ; a 
quo Muintir Tagain*, 

98. Beice : his son. This 
Beice had three brothers — 1. 
Deighnan, 2. Geamachan, 
and 8. Gabhlach : this 
Geamachan had four sons 
— 1. Gibleachan ("cib": 



* IMmiir Tagam : In page 118, first edition of first series, this 
people is by mistake mentioned as " Muintir Fagan.** 



182 



IBISH PEDIGREES. 



[PABT 



Irish, a hand ; << leaca", a 
cheek \ "an", one who), a 
quo 0*(7i6Z«ac^atn,anglicised 
Giblan ; 2. Cathalan, who 
was the ancestor of a Mac- 
Quin family ; 8. Muireagan; 
4. Ginleachan (" oeann'* : 
Irish, a head ; " leaca" a 
cheek) f a quo O^Cinleachain, 
anglicised Kinlehan and 
Kinehan. 
99. Conor : son of Beice. 

100. Breasal : his son. 

101. Cathiamach (" cath": 
Irish, a fight; Heb. "chath**, 
terror \ Ohald. '* cath", a 
battalion ; " iarann'* : Irish, 
iron) : his son ; a quo 



0*Cathiamaighe, anglicised 
Carney, 

102. Cathalan : his son. 

108. Cathiamach (2) : his 
son. 

104. Bory : his son. 
' 105.' Fogartach : his son. 

106. Bory (2) : his son. 

107. Teige an Sionnach 
(" an sionnach": Irish, the 
fox): his son; a quo Mac- 
Sionnaighe, 

108. Bory (8) : his son. 

109. Neal: his son. 

110. Malachi : his son. 

111. Conor (2) : his son. 

112. Bory Fox : his son. 



59. — ^The Stem op the •* Flinn* (op Northern Clannaboy) 

Family. 

FiACHRA toirt, the third son of the monarch Colla uais, 
who is No. 85 on the " MacUais '' pedigree, was the ances- 
tor of O'Flainny of Tuirtre ; anglicised Flinn, Linn, etc. 



85. Colla uais, the 121st 
monarch of Ireland. 

86. Fiachra toirt ("toirt": 
Irish, bulk) : his son ; a quo 
the territory of Tuirtre, after- 
wards known as " Northern 
Clannaboy", now the baron- 
ies of " Toome " and " An- 
trim." 

87. Eachin (meaning << a 
little horse ") : his son ; a 



quo Eakins ; had six broth- 
ers — 1. Muredach, 2. Cor- 
mac, 8. Maine, 4. Laeghaire, 
5. iEneas, 6. Nathi. 

88. Felim : son of Eachin; 
had five brothers. 

89. Daire (or Darius) : his 
son. 

90. Cuanach: his son; 
was king of Orgiall, as were 
also seven of his posterity. 



♦ Flmn : " FUnn" of LeiDster is a branch of this funily. In 
Connau^ht and Monster the name is spelled Flynn, which is distinct 
from this family. 



IT.] 



THE GALLAGHER FAHILT. 



183 



91. Beice : his son ; king 
of Orgiall; a quo Cineal 
Beiee* 

92. Faranan: his son; 
king of Orgiall ; ancestor of 
Siol Cahesaidk (anglicised 
Casey)f and of Siol Dubh^ 
gkala, 

93. Suibhneach : his son ; 
king of Orgiall. 

94. Foghartach : his son. 

95. Molcreabhar : his son. 

96. Eachdaire : his son. 

97. Inrachtach : his son ; 
had a brother named Fin- 
achtaoh, who was the ances- 
tor of Donnellan, 

98. Moredach : son of In- 
rachtach. 

99. Flann (** flann", gen. 
" flainn " : Irish, blood) : 
his son ; a quo 0' Flainn. 



100. Foghartach (2) : his 
son. 

101. Dunagan : his son. 

102. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

103. larann : his son. 

104. Fogladh : his son. 

105. Eachdach : his son. 

106. Bory : his son. 

107. Gumeadh : his son. 

108. Cu-uladh (cu-Uladh: 
Irish, " the Ulster warrior'*): 
his son ; a quo Cooley, Cool* 
iny, Cowley y Cully, and Colly, 

109. Murtach : his son ; had 
a brother named Gumeadh. 

110. Gu-uladh (2) : his son. 

111. Donald: his son. 

112. Eory O'Flinn, of Tuir- 
tre : his son. 



60. — ^Thb Stem op the " Gallagher " Familt. 

Anhire (latinized Anmireus), who was the 138th monarch 
of Ireland, and the brother of Fergus, who (see the first 
series) is No. 91 on the " O'Donel " (of Tirconnell) 
pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Qallchobhair ; anglicised 
Galchor and Gallagher, 



91. Anmire : son of Sead- 
naoh ; slain a.d. 566. 

92. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son ; the 140th monarch. 

98. Maolchobhach (latin- 
ised MalooYus) : his son ; 
who was the 144th monarch; 
had a brother named Donald, 



who was the 146th monarch, 
and the ancestor of Mulroy, 

94. Ceallach: son of Maol- 
chobhach. 

95. Donald : his son. 

96. Donoch : his son. 

97. Bory : his son. 

98. Borcan : his son. 



184 



IBIBH PEDmBBSS. 



[PABJV 



99. Gallchobhair ("gall": 
Irish, a foreigner) " chob- 
hair*% hslp) : his son ; a 
quo 0* Gallchobhair, 

100. Manus : his son. 

101. Donoch (2) : hid aon. 

102. Amhailgadh [awly]: 
his «on. 

108. Donald (2) : his son. 
104. Dermod : his son. 
106. Hugh (2) : his son. 
106. Maolmanaidh : his 
son. 
107* Nichol : his son. 
108. Donoch (d) : his son. 



109. Fdigall : his son« 

110. Hngh (8) : his son. 

111. Gillcoimdhe : his son. 

112. Nichol (2) : his son. 
118. Eoin (or John) : his 

son. 
114. Hugh (4) : his son. 
116. Bory (2): his son. 

116. John (2) : his son. 

117. Gormac buidho : his 
son. 

118. John (8) : his son. 

119. Owen O'Galchor : his 
son. 



61.— Tbe Stsbc op the " Gabvaly" Famect. 

Brian, a brother of Damhin who (see the first series) is 
No. 92 on the "0*Hart" pedigree, was the ancestor of 
0*Garbhgeille ; aaglicised Gartdy and Garvaly 



92. Brian : son of Cairbre 
an-daimh-airgid, king of 
Orgiall. 

98. F e r g u s garbhgeill 
(" garbh" : Irish, rorigh ; 
"geill", to yield) : his son; 
a quo G* GarhhgeiUe. 

94. Hugh : his son. 

96. Faolan : his son. 

96. Mactigh : his son. 



97. Guborin : his son. 

98. Cumagan : his son. 

99. Maolagan ('' maola- 
gan'* : Irish, the bald little 
man) : his son ; a quo 
O'Maolagaifif anglicised 
Mulligan and Molyneiix. 

100. Muireadhach 0*Gar- 
valy : his son. 



62.-r-THE Stem of the << GabyeV (op OaeiAiiL) Family. 

FuoHRA ceannfionnan, brother of Niallan who is 89 on the 
*^ 0*Hanlon" pedigree, was the aBcest<n: of ffGairihidh of 
Orgiall ; anglicised Garvey. 



17.] 



THE QABVEY FAMILT. 



185 



89. Fiachra ceannfionnan 
(«oeannfioiman** : Irish, the 
fairhaired) : son of Feig ; a 
quo O'Ceannfionnainy angli- 
cised by some, Cannon. 

90. Luachmhar: his son. 

91. Failbhe : his son ; had 
a brother named Cumann 
{*' cumann" : Irish, acquain- 
tance) ^ a quo O'Cumuinn (of 
Moyne), anglicised Cummins, 
Camming y Commins, and 
Comyn. 

92. Fohach : his son. 



98. Grunmaol : his son. 

94. Dubhthirr : his son ; 
a quo O'Dubhtkire, anglicised 
I^uffry, aud (by some) 
Dooher, 

95. Failbhe (2) : his son. 

96. Fionnan : his son. 

97. Ferach : his son. 

98. Maoleadach : his son. 

99. Gairbiadh (** gair- 
biadh'* : Irish, shouting for 
food) : his son ; a quo 
O'Gairbhidhy of Orgiall. 



63. — ^The Stem op the *• Ga»vby" (op Tibowen) Family. 

EooHAiDH binne, brother of Muireadach [muredach] who 
is No. 89 on the *< Cunningham" pedigree, was the an- 
cestor of V'Garvey of Tyrone.— See the derivation of this 
simame in the foregoing (No. 62) pedigree. 



89. Eochaidh binne 
{'* binn*' : Irish, melodious) : 
son of Eoghan ; a quo Cin- 
eal Binne in Scotland, and 
Binney in Ireland. 

90. Claireadanach(<<clair- 
eadanach *' : Irish, broad- 

Jac'A : his son. 

91. Donald: his son. 

92. Ultach ("ultach" : 
Irish, an Vhterman : his son ; 
a quo MeusAn-Ultaighf an- 
glicised JUacNulty. 



9B. Failbhe : his son. 

94. Maoldun : his son. 

95. Gonrach : his son. 

96. Elgenan : his son. 

97. Cucolann : his son. 

98. DanaiUe : his son. 

99. Mulfabhal : his son. 

100. Toiceach (<*toiceach": 
Irish, wealthy) : his son. 

101. Gairbiadh : his son ; 
a quo 0*Oairbidh (of Tir- 
owen), anglicised Garvey, 



186 



IBI8H PSDIOBEES. 



[part 



64.— The "Gavan" Family. 

Gabhadhan ("gabhadh**: Irish, danger; "an," one who), 
brother of Dongal who is No. 102 on the/' Donnelly *' 
pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Oabhadhain ; anglicised 
Oavan and Oavahan, 



65. — The Stem op the " Gawley" Family. 

LxnoHAGH, who is No. 90 on the " Quirk" pedigree, was 
ancestor of O'Gabhlaighe ("gabhlach": Irish, forked or 
longlegged) ; anglicised Gavala, QawUy^ Gowley and Qooley. 



90. Luighach : son of 
Labhrach ; had six brothers, 
but there is no account of 
their issue. 

91. Brollach : his son. 

92. Connla : his son. 
98. lomchadh : his son. 

94. Dulach : his son. 

95. Croch : his son. 

96. Maith (** Maith" 



leader) : his son ; a quo 
O' Maith, anglicised, by 
some. May and Maye ; had 
two brothers — 1. lomchadh, 
2. Fare. 

97. Geannfionnan : son of 
Maith. 

98. lomchadh (2) : his 
son. 

99. Sionamhuil O'Gabh- 



Irish, a chief, a nobleman, a \ laighe : his son. 



66. — ^TflE Stem op the ** Geraghty" Family. 

Cathal (or Charles), brother of Teige mor who (see the 
first series) is No. 102 on the << O'Conor" (Connaught) 
pedigree, was the ancestor of MacOrcachta ; anglicised 
JdacOiraghty, MacGeraghty, Geraghty, Gerty, Garrett, and 
Garratt. 



102. Cathal : son of Muirg- 
heas. 

IG8. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

104. Morogh : his son. 

105. Duncath : his son. 

106. Orcacht ("ore": Irish, 
a small warrior ; " acht**, 



gen. <^ achta'*, an act) : his 
son ; a quo MacOrcachta, 

107. Duncath mor : his 
son ; had two brothers — 1. 
Moiogh, 2. Orcacht. 

108. Duncath oge : son of 
Duncath mor. 

109. Duncath (4) : his son. 



IV.] 



THE 6ILKELLT AND aBIMLEY FAMILIES. 



187 



110. Hugh : his son. 

111. Malachi: bis son. 

112. Tumaltach (or Timo- 
thy) : his son. 

118. Morogh : his son. 
114. Donall : his son. 



116. Conor: his son. 

116. Timothy (2) : his son. 

117. Malachi (2): his son. 

118. Manas : his son. 

119. Manus MacOiraghty : 
his son. 



67. — The Stem op the " Gilkelly " Family. 

Feboal, brother of Hugh who is No. 97 on the 
'^ 0*Shanghnessy '* pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Oiolla^ 
cecdlaighe ; anglicised Gillie^ Qilly^ Gilkelly^ Kilhelly. 



97. Fergal : son of Artgal. 

98. Tiobrad : his son. 

99. Camogach : his son. 

100. Gomascrach : his son. 

101. Edalach : his son. 

102. Cleireach : his son ; a 
quo O'Clery. 

108. Eidhean : his son. 

104. Flann : his son. 

105. Maolfabhal (« fabhal*': 
Irish, a report, a fable ; Lat. 
'< fabol-a *') : his son ; a quo 
0* Maolfabhailf anglicised 
Mvlfavill and MulhalL 

106. Cngeal : his son. 

107. Oiollabeartach (or 
Gilbert) : his son. 



108. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

109. Giolla-ceallach 
(*' ceallach " : Irish, war, 
strife) : his son ; a quo 
0' Oiollacea llaighe. 

110. Moroch : his son. 

111. Giollapadraic: his son*. 

112. Gillruaidhe (** ruai- 
dhe *' : Irish, erysipelas) : his 
son ; a quo MacOillruaidhe, 
anglicised Qilroy and Kilroy. 

118. Morogh (2) : his son. 
114. Florence MacGillkellyr 
his son. 



68. — The Stem of the '< GBiBfLEY" Family. 

Donald, brother of Conor who is No. 107 on the <'Crean" 
pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Oairmliacha Cgairm*'^ 
Irish, h^nt. of << goir*' to call ; and <<liach", gen. <^liacha*V 
a spoon) ; anglicised Gormley and OrinUey. 



188 



D 



107. Donald : son of Mean- 
ninach. 

108. Conor : his son. 

109. Dalbach : his son. 

110. Donald (2) : his son. 



111. Niall : his son. 

112. Conor (2) : his son. 

113. Sithric : his son. 

114. Melachlin CyGormley: 
his son. 



69. — ^The Stem Of xhs " Hahlt*' Family. 

Abca-dbabg, brother of Conall orison who is No. 88 on 
the ** 0*MaIley'' pedigree, was the ancestor of O^h-Anle- 
4igha ; anglicised Hardy , and Henly. 



88. Arca-dearg : son of 
Brian. 

89. ^neas : his son. 

90. Dnbhthach : his son ; 
had a brother named Onach» 
who was the ancestor of a 
McLcBrannan family. 

91. Uan ("uan", gen. 
*^ nain" : Irish, a lamb) : 
his son ; a quo 0* Uairiy 
f^iglicised Lamh and Lambe, 

92. Clnthmhar : his son. 
98. Maoldun : his son. 

94. Mnrtuile : his son. 

95. Anliaigh («* an" : Ir- 
ish, the; '*liaigh", gen. 
'* leagha*', a physician) : his 
son ; a quo O'h-AnUaghay 
meaning << the descendants 
•of the physician." 

96. Mmrtagh : his son. 

97. Teige : his son: 

98. Donald : his son. 

99. Mnrtagh (2) : his son. 
100. Banald catha Brian : 

his son ; meaaing Randal 
who was slain at the battle 
•of Clontarf, a.d. 1014, fight- 
ing on the side of the Irish 
monarch Brian Boroimhe. 



101. Mnireadach : his son. 

102. Idir : his son. 

108. Anliaigh (2) : his son. 

104. Donald 0*Hanly : his 
son ; the first who assumed 
this simame. 

105. lomhar : his son. 

106. Donald (B) : his son. 

107. Conor : his sen. 

108. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

109. Gilbert : his son. 

110. Bory boidhe : his son. 

111. Donald (4) : his son. 

112. Teige (2) : his son. 

113. Gilbert (2) : his son. 

114. Neamhach (or Nehe- 
miah) : his son. 

115. Hugh (2) : his son. 

116. Tireach: his son. 

117. Hugh (8) : his son. 

118. Gilbert (8) : his son. 

119. Teige (8) : his son. 

120. Edmund dubh : his 
son. 

121. William : his son. 

122. Teige : his son. 
128. Teige oge: his son. 
124. Conor O'Hanly : his 

son. 



IV.] THE HANBA6HAN, HABGADAN, AND HABTE FAMILIES. 189 



70 — ^Thb Stem op the ''Hamraohan*' (op Leimsteb) Family. 

NocHAN, brother of Seagal who is No. 101 on the 
" Murphy" pedigree, was the ancestor of 0*h-Anracain, of 
Leinster ; anglicised Hanra^ian, and Rakes, 



101. Nochan (**nocha": 
Irish, ninety ; '' an ", one 
who) : son of Seicin. 

102. Eiach : his son. 

108. Maolleathan : his son. 

104. Snidhgobhan : his son. 

105. Tiomainach (^'tiorn- 
ain " : Irish, to fall on) : his 
son ; a quo O'Tiomainaighe 
of Leinster), anglicised 
Timony, 



106. Sliabhan (" sUabh" : 
Irish, a mountain) : his son ; 
a quo O'SUabhainf anglicised 
Slevin, 

107. Anracan (" racan " : 
Irish, mischief; **raca",a 
rake) : his son ; a quo 0*A- 
Anracain. 



71. — The Stem op the ** Haboadan '' Family. 

EoGHAN (or Owen), brother of Alioll who is No. 98 on the 
** Maconky" pedigree, was the ancestor of an O'Airach- 
dain family ; anglicised Barraghtan^ Harrington, and 
Hargadan, 



98. Eoghan (or Owen) : 
son of Muireadach. 

99. Owen (2) : his son. 

100. Beice : lus son. 

101. Lagnen : his son. 

102. Mochtigheama : his 
son. 

103. Forgalach : his son. 
son. 

104. Owen (8) : his son. 

105. Cronmaol : his son. 



106. Cosorach : his son. 

107. Snagaidhil : his son. 

108. Melachlin : his son. 

109. Airachdan ('< airaeh- 
da" : Irish, of great stature) : 
his son; a quo D'h-Airach- 
dain, 

110. Owen (4) : his son. 

111. Beice O'Harraghtan : 
his son. 



72.— The " Habte" Family. 

Abt, who (see the first series) is No. 101 on the <' O'Hart" 
pedigree, had a brother named Congeal (a quo Teallach 



190 IBISH PEDIGBE£S. [PABT 

Congeal or ** The territory of Congeal"), and two sons — !• 
Donall, Prince of Tara and ancestor of O'HaH ; 2. 
Lochlann : The descendants of this Lochlann were the 
first that employed the e final in the anglicised form of 
their sirname — as Harte. 

101. Art ; a quo MacArL 
I 



I 1 2 I 

102. Donall, 102. Lochlann. 

Ancestor of O'Hart, 

108. Teige: son of Lochlann 
104. Fearmara : his son. 
105. Teige (2) : his son. 

! 

|-1 2-| 

106. Fearleighinn."^ 106. Flannagan. 

At this stage in this family pedigree, King Henry the 
Second of England invaded Ireland, a.d. 1172; and by 
his Charter to Hugh DeLacey, granting him the kingdom 
of Meath, dispossessed the 0' Harts of their patrimony, 
as Princes of Tara, in that kingdom. Thus dispossessed, 
the family was scattered : some of them settled in England, 
some in Scotland, some in France, some in Germany, etc., 
and some of them remained in Ireland. Branches of 
them who settled in Leinster called themselves Han or 
Hort ; in England, Harte and, more lately, Hart ; in Scot- 
land, Hart ; in France, Hart, LeHarty Harts, Hardies, 
Hardis ; in Germany, Hart, Hartt, Hartz, Hardts, Herdts, 
etc. In parts of Ireland some of the family anglicised the 
name Harte, Hairt, Hairtt, Hairtte, Hartte ; and, in Scot- 
land, according to MacPherson, Artho, or Arthur. 



* Fearleighinn [farlane] : This word means ** a lecturer" ; while 
MacLeighinn means "a scholar", "a student." The name is 
derived from the Irish Jear, ** a man", and leighiann, " a lesson" 
" instruction", " erudition" ; and implies that the man who was so 
called was a portion of superior education. Some consider that this 
Fearleighinn was the ancestor of MacFarlane* 



IV.] 



THE HABTE (OF ENGLAND) FAlflLY. 



191 



78. — The «* Habte '* (op England) Family. 

Stephen Habte, of WestmiU, Hertfordshire, England, is 
the first of the name recorded as living in that Country ; 
where, possibly, his father or grandfather settled after the 
English invasion of Ireland by King Henry the Second, 
A.D. 1172. From the said Stephen down to the present 
time the Harte (pi England) pedigree, is as follows : — 



1. Stephen Harte,* of 
Westmill, Hertfordshire. 

2. Havekin, of Westmill, 
his son. 

8. William, of Westmill : 
his son ; afterwards of 
Abbotsbory and Papworth 
in Cambridgeshire. 

4. William, of Papworth: 
his son ; returned to Hert- 
fordshire. This William was 
twice married : — first, to 
Mary, daughter of John 
Humphreys, by whom he 
had a son and heir named 

John; secondly, to Alice , 

by whom he had a son 
named William. 



5. John : eldest son of the 
said William Harte, of Pap- 
worth ; living a.d. 1430 ; 
married to Joane, daughter 
of William Dayly of Lincoln- 
shire. 

6. William, of St. Dun- 
stan*s, in the west of 
London, and of Ware, in 
Hertfordshire : son of John ; 
was married to Alice, 
daughter of Bobert Sutton, 
of London ; living in 1480 ; 
had a sister named Alice, 
who was wife of William 
Callow, of Sholford, Kent, 
one of the English Judges. 

7. John Harte, of the 



* Stephen Harte : Considering that John Harte, No. 5 on this Stem 
was living, A.D. 1430, and uiat between a.d. 1172 (when King 
Henry II. invaded Ireland) and l430 there elapsed a period of 258 years, 
the ancestor of this Stephen Harte who first settled in England could 
have been his father or, at most, his grandfather ; for, taking 36 
years as the average age of each generation of the family, 258 
divided by 36 would give seven generations. But the said John was 
'Uie fifth in descent down from Stephen ; then counting back to the 
said Stephen's grandfather would make at most seven generations. 
As, therefore, it was at that period (see the foregoing " Harte*' 
pedime) that tiie e final was first added to the anglicised form of 
the Irish name 6^A-ilir<, there is reason to beUeve that the said 
Stephen Harte of WestmUl, Hertfordshire, England, was of Irish 
origin ; and was descended from the 0*Haurt family. — See the 
" O'Hart" ped^ree. 



192 



IBUH PSDieSBBS* 



[PABT 



Middle Temple, London, 
Barrister-at-Law : son of 
William ; married to Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Sir 
William Peohe, Knight, and 
sister and heir of Sir John 
Peche, Knight and ** Ban- 
neret"; died 16th July 1648; 
and was buried in St. Mary 
Cray Church, London. 

8. Sir Percival Harte, of 
Lollington (now *< Lulling- 
stone'*) in Kent, knight: son 
of John; married Frideswide 
daughter of Edward, Lord 
Bray, and sister and heir of 
John, Lord Bray ; had a 
sister who was wife of Sir 
James Stanley ; died 2l8t 
May, 16B0, aged 84 years ; 
was buried at Lullington. 
Harte (now Hart) of Done- 
gal is, I believe, descended 
from this Sir Percival ; but, 
as yet, I am unable to trace 
the descent. 

9. Henry Harte : son of 
Sir Percival ; married to 
Cecily, daughter of Sir 
Martin Bowes, Knight ; died 
without issue. This Henry 
had two younger brothers — 
1. Sir George Harte, of Lul- 
lington, also a '* Knight of 
the body to the King ", who 
was married to Elizabeth, 
daughter of John Bowes, and 
sister of Sir Hieron and Sir 
John Bowes, Knights, and 
who died on the 16th July, 



1587, and was buried at 
Lullington; 2. Francis Harte 
of Halwell, Devonshire, who 
was the ancestor of Hartey 
of the counties of Clare, 
Limerick, and Kerry, in 
Ireland. 

10. Sir Perdvall Harte, of 
Lullington, Knight : son of 
the aforesaid Sir George. 
Sir Percival was twice mar- 
ried : 1st, to Anne, daughter 
of Sir Roger Manwood, 
Knight ; by whom he had a 
son named William, who 
was married to Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir Anthony 
Weldon, of Swanscombe, 
Kent: this William died 
without issue in 1671, and 
was buried at Lullington* 
Sir PercivaPs second wife 
was Jane, daughter of Sir 
Edward Stanhope, of Grim- 
stone, knight : the issue of 
this marriage were — 1. Per- 
cival Harte, who died with- 
out issue ; 2. Jerome Harte, 
obiit, 8,p. ; 8. Sir Harry 
Harte, of Lullington, knight, 
K.B.,died (before his father) 
in 1686 ; 4. Edward ; 6. 
George. This Sir Percival 
had three brothers — 1. 
Bobert Harte, ob, 8,p. ; 2. 
George Harte, 8. Sir Peter 
Manwode Harte. 

11. Sir Percival Harte, of 
Lullington, knight : son and 
heir of the aforesaid Sir 



ivO 



THE HABTB (OF ENaLAND) FAMILY. 



19a 



Harry Harte, who died in 
1636 ; WiU proved in 1642 ; 
had a brother named George 
Harte. 

12. Percival Harte, of Lul- 
lington : son of Sir Percival; 
married to Sarah, daughter 
of Edward Dixon of Hildon; 
left an only daughter and 
heir named Anne Harte ; 
died in 1738. 

13. Anne Harte; their dau- 
ghter. This Anne was twice 
married: first, to John Blunt, 
of Holcotnbe Regis, Devon- 
shire, who died without 
issue, a.d. 1728 ; secondly, 
to Sir Thomas Dyke, of 
Horeham, Sussex, baronet, 
who died in 1756, leaving 
three sons and one daugh- 
ter, namely — 1. Thomas 
Hart-Dyke, who died with- 
out issue; 2. Sir John Dixon 
Dyke, of Horeham, baronet; 
3. Percival Dyke, who died 
without issue ; and the 
daughter (whose name was 
Philadelphia) was married 
to William Lee, and left 
four children — 1. William 
Lee, 2. Philadelphia Lee, 3. 
£b»rriet Lee, 4. Louisa Lee. 
From this marriage of Anne 
Harte and Sir Thomas 
Dyke is derived the simame 
Hart' Dyke, 

14. Sir John Dixon Dyke, 
of Horeham, baronet: son 
of Aime Harte and Sir Thos. 



Dyke ; married to Philadel- 
phia, daughter of George 
Home, of East Grinsted. 

16. Sir Thomas Dyke, of 
Horeham, baronet : their 
son ; ob., s,p. ; had one bro- 
ther — Sir Percival Hart- 
Dyke, baronet; and two 
daughters — 1. Philadelphia, 
2. Anne. This Sir Percival 
was married to Anne, eldest 
daughter of Bobert Jenner, 
of Wenvoe Castle, Glamor- 
ganshure. 

16. Sir Percyvall Hart- 
Dyke, of LuUingstone Cas- 
tle, Dartford : their son ; d. 
1875. This Sir Percyvall, 
who was bom in June 1799, 
married Elizabeth, daughter 
of John Wells, of Bickley, 
Kent ; and had five brothers 
and four sisters. The bro- 
thers were — 1. John Dixon, 
2. Francis Hart, 3. Peche 
Hart, 4. Augustus Hart, 5. 
Decimus Townshend ; and 
the sisters — 1. Harriett- 
Jenner, 2. Georgiana-Fraur 
ces, 3. Laura, 4. Philadel- 
phia. 

17. Sir William Hart-Dyke 
M.P. for Mid-Eent: eldest 
son of Sir Percyvall ; bom 
in August 1837, and living 
in 1877 ; has two brothers 
and six sisters. The broth- 
ers were — 1. George- Augus- 
tus Hart, 2. Beginald-Chas. 
Hart ; the sisters were-^1*^ . 

N 



194 



IRISH PEDiaBBES. 



[PUtT 



Frances-Julia, 2. Eleanor- 
Laura, 8. Catherine-Sybella, 
4. Sybella-Catherme, 5. 
Emily-Anne, 6. Oertrnde. 
This Sir WilHam Hart-Dyke 
was married to Lady Emily 
Caroline Montagu, eldest 
daughter of the earl of 



Sandwich ; has (in 1877) a 
son named Percyvall, bom 
in October, 1871, and a dau- 
ghter named Lina Mary. 

18. Percy vail : son of Sir 
William Hart-Dyke ; living 
in 1878. 



74. — The Habtb (of Clabb, Limerick, and Eebbt) Family. 

Fbangis Habte, of Halwell, Devonshire, youngest brother 
of Henry who is No. 9 on the foregoing genealogy, was 
the ancestor of Harte, of the counties of Glare, Limerick, 
and Kerry. 

9. Francis Harte, of Hal- 
well* : third son of Sir Perci- 
val Harte of Lullington, 
Kent. 

10. Bev. Bichard Harte: 
his son ; was vicar of Boches- 
town alias Ballywilliam, in 
the diocese of Emly, of 
Adare, in Limerick, and of 
Stradmore, in Killaloe, a.d. 
1615. This Bichard mar- 
ried a daughter of John 
Southwell of Barham, in 
Suffolk, and sister of Sir 
Richard Southwell of Single- 
land in the county Limerick, 
knight, and by her had 
three sons — 1. Bichard 
Harte, 2. Percival Harte, 8. 
Henry Harte,of Carrigdiram 
in the county Clare, who 
died intestate in March 
1665. 



11. Bichard Harte : son 
of the Bev. Bichard ; had a 
grant of the lands of Clogh- 
namanagh, Ballyboure, and 
Carriglapon, in the county 
Limerick (part of the pos- 
sessions of the Monastery of 
Nenagh, in Tipperary), by 
Patent dated 11 February 
1688 ; Will dated 24 Janu- 
ary 1661. This Bichard 
was twice married : by the 
first wife he left an only son 
— Bichard, of Grangebridge, 
county Limerick ; and by 
the second, three sons — 1. 
Francis, 2. John, 3. Perci- 
vaL 

12. Bichard Harte of 
Grangebridge : eldest son of 
the aforesaid Bichard ; in 
1667 married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Thomas Amory, 



IV.] 



THE HABTE (OF CLABE, ETC.) PAMILT. 



196 



<^ Galy, in Kerry ; left three 
sons — 1. Bichard, 2. John, 
8. Edmond. 

18. Bichard Harte, of 
Orange and of Lisofin, Co. 
Clare: eldest son of Bichard; 
was a Colonel in the Army 
of King WiUiam theThird ; 
was twice married: by the 
first wife he left an only son 
named Percival ; and by the 
second wife (who was living 
a widow, A.D. 1697) he had 
two sons — 1. Henry Harte, 
of Coolms, whose Will was 
dated 16th April 1787, and 
proved 26th June 1742; and 
2. John Harte, whose only 
daughter and heir was mar- 
ried to— Hayes, of 

Cahirgoillamore, in the 
county Limerick, who was 
the father of Jeremiah 
Hayes, the father of Honora 
Hayes who was married to 
Standish 0*Orady, the 
father of Darby (or Dermod) 
O*0rady, Cahirgoillamore. 

14. Percival Harte, of 
lisofin, in Clare, and of 
Orange, in Limerick : son of 
Bichfurd; left two sons — 1. 
Bichard, .2. Percival ; and a 
daughter named &jme, who 
was wife of William John- 
son, of Flemings town, Co. 
Cork. This Percival had a 
brother named Henry, of 
Coolrus. 

15. Bichard Harte, of 



Grange : son of Percival. 
This Bichard left two daugh- 
ters — 1. Margery, wife of 
Thomas FracJcs, of Carrig, 
in the county Cork, who in- 
herited Grange ; 2. Mar- 
garet, wife of Bobert Brad- 
shaw, of the county Tippe- 
rary — married a.d. 1758, 
but had no issue. Bichard, 
having left no male issue, 
was succeeded by his young- 
er brother Percival Harte, 
of Lisofin. 

16. Sir Bichard Harte, 
of Lisofin and Coolruss: son 
of said Percival; was 
knighted by the Duke of 
Bichmond, in 1807 ; died in 
1824. This sir Bichard 
was twice married : first to 
Anne, daughter and heir of 
William Johnson, of Flem- 
ingstown, county Cork, by 
whom he had three sons — 

1. William Johnson Harte ; 

2. Percival Harte, who 
settled in the West Indies ; 
8. Kilpatrick Harte, who 
died at school. Sir Richard's 
second wife was Margaret, 
daughter of Bichard Mere- 
dyth, and relict of James 
Mahony, of Battlefield, in 
the county Kerry. 

17. William Johnson 
Harte, of Coolruss, Croom, 
county Limerick; son of 
Sir Bichard; married in 
1796 to Marion, daughter 



196 



IBI8H PEDiaBEES. 



[PABT 



and heir of James Mahony, 
of Battlefield, in Kerry ; d. 
1814. This WiUiam left 
three sons and six daugh- 
ters : the sons were — 1. 
Richard, 2. James Mahony 
Harte, of Battlefield, county 
Kerry, 3. Bev. WilHam 
Harte. 

18. Richard Harte, of 
GoolruBS : eldest son of 
William ; married Anne, 



daughter of Andrew Vance*, 
of Butland-square, Dublin 
(who died in 1849), and 
sister of John Vance, M.P» 
who died in 1875. This 
Richard died in 1842.. 

19. Richard Harte, of 
Coolruss, Oroom, county 
Limerick : his son ; living 
in 1877; had a sister named 
Mary Harte, who died in 
1869. 



75. — ^The " Harte" (op Castleconnell) Family. 

Henbt Habte, of Coolruss, brother of Percival, of Lisofin, 
in Clare, who is No. 14 on the foregoing genealogy, was 
the ancestor of Harte and Hart, of Castleconnell. 



14. Henry: son of Bichard 
Harte; Will proved 26th 
June 1742. 

15. Bichard, of Coolruss : 
his son; had a brother 
named William. 

16. Percival, of Coolruss : 
son of Bichard ; Will proved 
in 1791 ; left Ins estates to 
William Johnstone Harte, 
who died in March 1791, 



s,p. ; had a brother named 
Bichard Harte, of Tonagh. 

17. Bichard, of Castle- 
connell : son of Bichard 
Harte, of Tonagh. 

18. Bichard Harte, of 
Gurteen, in the county 
Limerick : his son ; living 
in 1877 ; had a brother, the 
Rev. Henry Harte, Fellow 
of Trinity College, Dublin* 



76. — The Stem of the ** Henry" Family. 

Henby, brother of Aibhneach who is No. 114 on the 
<' Eane" pedigree, was the ancestor of Clan Henrys 
modernized Henry , MacHenry and Fitzhenry, 



* Andrew Vance i See the '' Vance^' genealogy, in this volume. 



IV.] 



THE H106INS FAMILY. 



197 



114. Henry* O'Eane : son 
of Dermod; a quo '< Clan 
Henry." 

115. Dermod Henry : his 
son ; first assumed this 
4simame. 

1 1 G. Conor : his son. 



117. GioUa - Padraic : his 
son. 

118. James : his son. 

119. Giolla - Padraic (2) : 
his son. 

120. GeoflErey Henry : his 
son. 



77. — The Stem op the ** Higgins" Family. 

UioiN, brother of Eochaidh who is No.89 on the <<Molloy" 
pedigree, was the ancestor of O'h- Uigin ; anglicised Higgin 
Higgins\f MacHiggin (which has been modernized Higgin- 
4(7n), and Htiggina. 



89. Uigin (" uige** : Irish, 
knowledge) : son of Fiacha. 

90. Cormac : his son. 

91. Flaithbeartach : his 
•son. 

92. Tumaltach : his son. 
98. Flannagan : his son. 

94. Ibhear : his son. 

95. Conchobhar (or Con- 
or) : his son. 

96. Uigin (2) : his son ; a 
•quo O^h'Uigin. 



97. Bo be art ac h (or 
Robert) : his son. 

98. Gofl&rey O'Higgin : 
his son ; first assumed this 
sirname. 

99. Aneisleis : his son. 

100. Lochlann : his son. 

101. Cormac : his son. 

102. Ranall : his son. 
108. Cathal : his son. 

104. Morogh : his son. 

105. Niali : his son. 



4« 



* Henry : The name Qeniy is derived from the Irish An righ, 
the king." This Henry O'Kane is considered to have been so- 
called after one of the Henrys, kinn of England. As MacHenry 
and Fitzhenr^'' signify " the sons or descendants of Henry", and that 
Harry is the common name for " Henry'*, some are of opinion that 
'"MacHenry** is another name for Harrison, which would mean "the 
«on of Harry*' ; and that Harris and Fitzharris are branches of the 
** dann Henry.*' 

t Higgins : In the first edition of the first series of this work, 
** Higgins** is, in mistake, mentioned as derived irom-MacAedhagaint 
instead -of Ch-Vigin. 



198 



IRISH PBDIGBEES. 



[part 



106. Teige mor : his son. 

107. Giollacolum (by some 
called '^Giolla na-naomh*'): 
his son. 

108. Teige (2) : his son ; 
had an elder brother named 
OioUa Chriosd. 

109. Fergal madh: his son. 

110. Teige oge: his son; 
had a brother named Brian. 

111. Giollananaomh : his 
son. 

112. Mantis : his son. 

118. Aodh (or Hugh) his 
son. 

114. Donall cam : his son. 

115. Brian : his son. 

116. Brian oge : his son. 

117. Maolmuire : his son. 

118. Teige oge : his son ; 
living in 1657 ; had three 
brothers-— 1. Maithan, 2. 
Giolla-colum, and 8. Giolla- 
losa. 

119. William Higgin'^: son 
of Teige oge ; omitted the 
prefix " 0" ; first of the 
family who, in 1677, owned 
Carropadden, county Gal- 
way ; died in 1698. 

120. Thomas, of Adder- 



goole, county Galway: his 
son ; died 1717 ; willed the 
land of Carropadden to hi& 
son Nicholas. 

121. Nicholas Higgins : his 
son ; first of the family who 
settled in Carropadden. 

122. Thomas (2) : his son ; 
died 1770. 

128. Nicholas (2) : his son; 
died 1812. 

124. Thomas (8) : his son ; 
died 1846. 

125. Thomas Higgins, of 
Carropadden, solicitor, 
Tuam, living in 1877 : his 
son ; married to Kate Mae- 
Halef, daughter of Mr. 
Patrick MacHale, of Tubber- 
navine, county Mayo, and 
sister of His Grace the 
Most Bev. John MacHale^ 
Archbishop of Tuam ; no 
children. This Thomas has 
a brother named James, 

who is married to 

Hanly, by whom he had a 
son named Thomas- William* 

126. Thomas- William Hig- 
gms : son of said James ; 
living in 1877. 



* William Higgin : In consideration of the family estates in West- 
meath, confiscated by Cromwell, this William Higgin was, in 1677, 
sranted twenty-six townlands, some in the county Galway and some 
in the county Rosconmion, forfeited in 1641 by the Bermingbam 
family ; of these lands, Carropadden, Beagh, and Keelof^e — sitnate 
in the county Galway, are (in 1877) in possession of Thonuw 
Higgins, Tuam, No. 125 on this (" Higgins") pedigree. 



t KaU MacHale : See the '' MacHale" Genealogy. 



IV.] 



THE HOLAHAN AND HOOLAHAN FAMILIES. 



199 



78. — The "Holahah* Family. 

I HAVE traced the Holaham of Kilkenny back to James 
Holahan, who was born in 1694, and died in 1759 ; from 
that James the following is the descent : 



1. James Holahan, bom 
A.D. 1694; died in 1759. 
This James had two sisters ; 
and an elder brother named 
John, who was born at 
Skoghathorash, in 1687, 
and died at Royal Oak, 
county Garlow, in May, 1779. 

2. Bichard : son of James; 
died in 1810 ; had three 
sisters — 1. Mary, 2. Sarah, 
8. Margaret. 

8. James (2) : his son ; 
died (in 1805) before his 
father. This James had one 
sister and two brothers : the 
brothers were — 1. Rev. Wal- 



ter, who died in 1828, and 
2. Patrick ; the sister's name 
was Judith. 

4. Richard (2): son of 
James. This Richard had 
three brothers — 1. Rev. 
John, 2. Walter, 8. Michael; 
and three sisters — 1. Mary, 
2. Eleanor, 8. JuditlL 

5. John Holahan : son of 
Richard. This John (living 
in 1877), has a brother, the 
Rev. James Holahan, C.C, 
of Ballvcallau, diocese of 
Ossory, living in 1877 ; and 
a sister named Bridget. 



79.— The Stem of the <<Ho3Lahan'* Family. 

Flamohadh [Flancha] , brother of Cobthach who is No. 100 
on the *' 0' Madden'* (of Connaught) pedigree, was the 
ancestor of O^h- Uallachain*; anglicised Hoolahan, -etc. 

* O^h-UcUlaehiUn : After this family was dispossessed of their 
territory in Hy- Maine, in Connanght, branches of them settled in 
Dublin, Galway, Kildare, Kilkenny, King's Ooanty, Mayo, 
Meatb, and Westmeath ; and assumed one or other of thb following 
simames : Colashan, Coolacan, Coolaglukn. Halahan, Halegan, 
Balligan, Holahan, Holhane, flolhffane, Holicban, Holland, 
Holligan,Hoolaghan, Uoolaghane, Hoolahan, Houlaghan, Houlaghane 
Houlahan, Howlegan, Huleean, Huolaghane, Olehan, Oulahan, 
Oullaghan, Oullahan, Woolahan, and Merrie, Merry, Fitz Merry, 
MacBlerry, Nolan (of Connausht), Noland (in England), Proud, 
Pionde, Soople, Suple, Supple, Vain, Vane, Whelton and Wilton. 



2G0 



IBISH PBDIGlbSES. 



[PABT 



100. FlaDchadh : son of 
Maoldun (or Maoldubhan). 

101. Flann : his son. 

102. Uallacban(<<uallach*' : 
Irish, proud, haughty , merry , 
supple^ vain) : his son; a quo 
O'h' UcUlachain. 

108. lomrosan : his son. 

104. Cartmil : his son. 

105. Laidir ara : his son. 

106. Duilleabhar : his son. 

107. Luchd : his son. 

108. Logach : his son. 

109. Lughach leathdearg : 
his son. 

110. Bromansntal - fionn : 
his son. 

111. Bmithe : his son. 

112. Brandabhach beulde- 
arg : his son. 

lis. lodnaoidhe : his son. 

114. Fearmuin : his son. 

115. Columan : his son. 

116. Umhan : his son. 

117. Fionnachtach : his 
son. 



118. Brangaile : his son. 

119. Boss : his son. 

120. Fliuchgaile : his son. 

121. Cororann : his son. 

122. Dubhuibhir : his son. 
128. William 0*Haolag- 

hane, of Eillea (or Red 
Hills)^ connty Eildare: his 
son. 

124. William Honlahan^ of 
Eillea : his son. 

125. Simon Onlahan, of 
Killea : his son ; d. in 1790. 
This Simon had a brother 
named William*, who was 
father of John Oalahan, 
known as " Little John", 
the father of John, who 
was the father of two child- 
ren, now (1877) living in 
the old homestead of £illea, 
connty Kildare. 

126. John, of Tully, near 
the town of Eildare: his 
son; died in 1881. This 
John had three brothers — 1. 



* William : In my opinion this William was the ancestor of the 
Dublin branch of this family ; from him the descent is as follows: — 

125. William Oallahan, a merchant in Dublin ; Will dated 6th 
December 1781, proved 20th April 1782. 

126. Henry : his son. This Henry had five brothers — 1. William, 
2. Daniel, 3. Eobert, 4. Thomas, 5. Joseph ; and a sister named 
Anne. 

127. Bobert : son of Henry. This Robert had six brothers.^ — 1 
John, 2. Henry, 3. William (whose son John is (in 1877) living in 
Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America), 4. La#reDce. 5. 
Richard, 6. James. 

128. Denis J. Oullahan, of the Firm of *< Oullahan and Co." 
Miners, City of Stockton, California : son of Robert. This Denis 
has three children living in 1877 ; a sister named Kate, who is » 
Nun in Canada ; and a brother named Ricbazd. 



IV.] 



THE HUGHES FAIOLT. 



201 



William, 2. Pierce, 8. 
Christopher*. 

127. John, of Dublin : his 
son; died in 1825. This 
John had an elder brother 
named Simon, who, at the 
age of 19 years, was killed 
at the ** battle of Monaster- 
even", during the ** Irish 
Bebellion'* of 1798; a sis- 
ter named Anne, who mar- 
ried a Mr. Higgins ; a bro- 
ther named Patrickf ; and a 
sister named Mary, who 
married Peter MacDaniel. 

128. Richard Oulahan, of 
Washington, United States 
of America : his son ; living 
in 1878 ; had an eider bro- 
ther named John, who died 
unmarried in Dublin in 
1856; and a sister named 
Haryanne. In 1849,this Bioh- 



ard emigrated from Dublin 
to New York, United States ; 
served as first Lieutenant 
in the 164th New York 
Volunteers (Irish Legion) 
in the late American Civil 
War; and in 1864, affcer 
muster out of the Military 
Service, he received an ap- 
pointment in the Treasury, 
at Washington, D.C. 
129. John Eenyon Oulahan, 
of Washington : his son ; 
bom in 1851, and living in 
1878. This John has two 
brothers — 1. Joseph, bom 
in 1857 ; and 2. Bichard 
oge, bom in 1867. Ho had 
also two sisters— 1. Alice, 
married to John W. San- 
derson, of Washington ; and 
2. Mary. 



80. — The Stem of the ** Hughks " Family. 

Eanna ceannsalach, king of Leinster, who (see the first 
series) is No. 94 on the '< MacMorrough" pedigree, had 
seven sons : Deadhach, the seventh of these sons, was the 
ancestor of Ch-Aodha ; anglicised Hay^ Hayes^ Haiz, 
Hughes J Hewes^ O'Hay^ and O'Hugh, 

* Chrisbopherx This Christopher Oulahan had six children — 1. 
Simon, 2. WiUiam. 3. Honora, 4. Mary, 5. Pierce, 6. Christopher ; 
and this Pierce had also six children — 1. Christopher (bom in 1854), 
2. Mary (bom in 1856), 3. Simon (b. 1858), 4. John (b. in 1860), 5. 
Elizabeth (b. in 1862), and 6. Marcella (b. in 1864). 

t Palricki This Patrick Oulahan married Anastatia Delany, by 
whom he had a danshter named Bridget, who married P. Ryan, of 
Fk«ichfurze : both living at Laasinsbargh, State of New York; had 
twenty-one ohildren->nin«teen of whom living in 1877. 



202 



IRISH VEDIOBEES. 



[pjjrr 



95. Deadhacb : son of 
Eanna ceannsalacb. 

96. ^neas : his son ; had 
a brother named Eogban, 
who WB8 the ancestor of 
St. Moling, whose feast is 
on the 17th June. 

97. Aodh : son of 2Bneas. 

98. Conmaol : his son. 

99. Dubh-dacrioch : his 
son. 

100. Eanachan : his son. 

101. Deimhin : his son. 

102. Aodh ('* aodh": Irish, 
fire^ the Vesta of the Pagan 
Irish) : his son ; a quo O'h- 
Aodha, 



108. Moroch : his eon. 

104. Donald O'Hagh : hiB 
son; first assnnied this 
flimaiiie. 

106. GioUa (or William) : 
his son. 

106. Eachtigheama : his 
son. 

107. Ginaodh (or Gineth) : 
his son. 

108. Dunlong : his son. 

109. GillmoUng : his son. 

110. Dunsliabh : his son* 

111. Hugh O'Hughes : his 
son. 



81. — The Stem op the ** Hynes " Family. 

AiDHNE, brother of Braon who is No. 107 on the 
** 0*Clery " pedigree, was the ancestor of Ch-Eidhin ; 
anglicised Heyne, Hincy Hinds, Hyndi and Hyves. 



107. Aidhne ('< aidhne : 
Irish, an advocate, a pleader); 
son of Congalach ; a quo 
O'h'Eidhin. 

108. Giolla-na-naomh : his 
son. 

109. Flann : his son. 

110. Conor : his son. 

111. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

112. GioUaceallach : his 
son. 



118. Giolla-na-naomh : his 
son. 

114. Owen : his son. 

115. Shane (or John) : his 
son. 

116. Hugh : his son. 

117. Donoch: his son. 

118. Muirceartach (or Mur- 
iartach) O'Heyne : his son ; 
had a brother named Owen. 



82.— The Stem of the << Kane " Family. 

CoNOHOBHAB [conor] , prince of Letm-an-madaidh ['' Lima* 
vady*'], in the county Londonderry, and a brother of 



IV.] 



THE K4NE FAMILT. 



20» 



Niall frasach, the 162nd monarch of Ireland who (see the 
first series) is No. 96 on the *< 0*Neill '* pedigree, was the 
ancestor of 0*Cathain ; anglicised O^Cahan, Caine^ Cane, 
Kanef Keane and Keen. 



96. Conor : son of Far- 
gal, the 156th monarch of 
Ireland; a quo 0* Conor, 
of Moyith, comity Donegal ; 
had a hrother named Hugh. 

97. Oruagan (** gruag ": 
Irish, the hair), meaning 
*< the hairy man " : his son ; 
aqno 0' Oruagain, anglicised 
Oregan and Orogan ; had a 
brother named Dermod, who 
was ancestor of 0' Conor of 
Moyith. 

98. Dmigan : son of Grua- 
agan. 

99. C a t h a n (" catb" : 
Irish, a battle, and '* an," one 
who ; Heb. ** chath," terror) : 
his son ; a quo O'Cathain, 

100. Gathusach : his son. 

101. Dermod : his son ; had 
a brother named Flaithear- 
tach. 

102. Conn cionntach* 
0*Gahan : son of Dermod ; 
first assumed this simame ; 
had a brother named Annse- 
Ian, who was the ancestor of 
0*Boeainain (" bocain " : , 
Irish, hobgoblins or fairies ; 
** an *\ one who), anglicised 
Buchanan. This Annselan 
was the first of the family 
who settled in Scotland. 



108. GioUachriosd : his son-^ 

104. lomhar : his son. 

105. Banall : his son. 

106. Eachmarcach: his son.. 

107. Donall : his son. 

108. Eory : his son. 

109. Manus catha an Duin i 
his son ; prince of Limavady; 
killed by the English in the 
" battle of Down", a.d. 1260: 
hence the epithet Catha an 
Duin. 

110. Gumagh-na-nGall (or 
'' Gumagh of the English) : 
his son. 

111. Dermod (2) : his son. 

112. Gumagh (2) : his son ; 
living, A.D. 1850. 

118. Dermod (8) : his son. 

114. Aibhneach: his son; 
had a brother named Henry, 
a quo the ** Clan Henry ", 
or Henry. 

115. John (or Shane): son of 
Aibhneach. 

116. Donoch an-einigh (or 
« Donoch the Affable ") : his 
son ; a quo Macaneinigh, 
anglicised MacAneny ; living 
in 1450; had a brother 
named Daniel, who was 
ancestor of Keane, of Cappo- 
quin, and Keane, of tUe 
county Clare, etc. 



* Cionniaeh : From this name (''cionntach *' : Irisli, gwHy) some 
derive MacCionniaigh, Ao^icised Magmty and OifUy. 



204 



IBISH PEDIGBEES. 



[past 



117. Manas: son of Donoch. 

118. Bory ruadh [roe] : his 
son. 

119. Donoch ballach (or 
'" freckled Donoch'*): his son; 
lord of the Route, in the 
county Derry; surrendered 
to the English, in 1602, the 
castle of Amough and all his 
lands between the river 
Faghan and Lough Foyle, as 
far as the Bann ; obtained 
a grant of escheated lands in 
the county Waterford. 

120. Sir Donall O'Gahan, 
of Limavady: his son; 
knighted at Drogheda in 
1607, by Sir Arthur Chich- 
ester, lord deputy of Ireland. 

1^1. Bory, lord of the 



Boute and of Limavady : his 
son. 

122. Eanagh : his son. 

128. Bichard : his son ; had 
five brothers — 1. John, 2* 
Boger, 8. Henry, 4. Eanagh, 
5. Patrick. 

124. Bichard (2): son of 
Bichard ; had a younger 
brother named Thomas, who 
was the ancestor of Caine, 
and who, in 1691, settled in 
the county Leitrim, after the 
Bevolution. 

125. Joseph : son of Bichard; 
died in 1756. 

126. Bev. Bichard 0*Cahan: 
his son ; had three brothers 
— 1. William, 2. Lewis, 8. 
John. 



88. — ^The Stem of the '< Eavanaoh*' Faxilt. 

Debmod na-nGall, who is No. 114 on the *^ MacMorough** 
pedigree, had a son named Donald Caomhanach, who was 
ths ancestor of O'Caoinhanaighe ; anglicised Kavanagh and 
Cavanagh ; and a quo Cavaignac, in France. 



114. Dermod-na-nGall, the 
last king of Leinster ; had a 
brother named Moroch-na- 
nOaodhail, who was the an- 
cestor of Davidson, 

115. Donald caomhanach 
(*< caomh" : Lrish, gentle; 
Lat. " com-is*' ; Arab. 
'* kom", noble) : son of 
Dermod ; a quo O^Caomh- 



anaighe. This Donald had 
a brother named Eanna, 
who was the ancestor of 
fCinselagh, 

116. Donald oge: son of 
Donald caomhanach; prince 
of Leinster. 

117. Murtagh : his son ; 
prince of Leinster; had a 

^ brother named ijrihur— 



I 



IV.] 



THE EEANE (OF CAPPOQUIN) FAMILY. 



205 



both of whom were behead- 
ed, A.D. 1281. 

118. Moroch (or Maurice) : 
son of Murtagh. 

119. Murtagh (2) : his son; 
lord of Leinster; had a 
brother named Arthur. 

120. Arthur mor : his son. 

121. Arthur oge : his son. 

122. Gerald : his son ; lord 
of Leinster. 

123. Donall reao : his son. 

124. Arthur buidhe : his 
son ; had a brother named 
Maurice. 



125. Murtagh : son of Ar- 
thur buidhe. 

126. Cathaoir [Cahyr] 
oarrach : his son. ^ ^ 

127. Donoch, of Clonmul- 
len, county Carlow : his son. 

128. Donall-an-Spaine (or 
*' Donall the Spaniard ") : 
his son ; died in 1681. From 
this Donall some derive the 
simame Spaine. 

129. Sir Moroch Cavanagh: 
his son. 



84. — ^The Stem of the ** Eeanb" (of Cappoquin) Family. 

Daniel (or Donall), brother of Donoch an-einigh who is 
No. 116 on the ** Kane" pedigree, was the ancestor of 
Keane, of Cappoquin, county Waterford. 



116. Daniel : son of John. 

117. Eichard : his son. 
This flichard married EUza- 
beth, daughter of Alexander 
MacDonnell, of Antrim, by 
whom he had six sons — 1. 
Conbhach ballach ; 2. John, 
ancestor of the barons 
Kingston ; 3. Daniel, ances- 
tor of Keane, of the county 
Clare ; 4. Eoger, ancestor of 
KeanCy of Cappoquin ; 5 
Magnus,ancestor of O^Cahan^ 
of the south of the county 
Derry ; 6. Conbhach, who 
died without issue. 

118. Roger : the fourth son 
of the said Eichard. 



119. Magnus : his son. 

120. Hugh : his son. 

121. Thomas : his son. 

122. Daniel (2) : his son. 

123. John : his son. 

124. George : his son; alive 
in 1716. 

125. John (2) : his son ; 
got a lease of the Cappoquin 
estate, from Eichard, earl 
of Cork and Burlington, 
dated July 1738 ; died in 
1766. 

126. Eichard: his son; died 
before his father. 

127. Sir John Keane : his 
son ; created a << baronet'* in 
1801 ; d., 1829. 



206 



IBI8H PEDIOBEE8. 



[PABT 



128. Sir Bichard, the se- 
<3ond baronet : liis son ; died 
1855. 

129. Sir John Henry Keane, 
ihe third baronet : his son ; 
bom in 1816, and living in 
1878 ; has a brother named 
Leopold-George - Frederick, 
who has a son named Fre- 
derick, living in 1877. 

180. Bichard FrancisEeane: 



son of Sir John; bom in 
1845; and living in 1878; 
married to Adelaide-Sidney^ 
daughter of the late John 
Vance*, M.P. for Armagh, 
and, formerly, of Dublin. 

181. John Keane : son of 
Bichard ; bom in 1874, and 
livingin 1878; has a younger 
brother named George 
Michael Eeane. 



85.— The '< Keenan" Family. 

MuBTAOH, the fourth son of Ceallach who (see the first 
Beries) is No. 97 on the '* 0*Hart*' pedigree, was the an- 
cestor of O'Caoinain (** caoin" : Irish, m?'/^, " an*' one who; 
Heb. ** chen'\ favour) ; anglicised Keenan, 

From the said Murtach are also descended the Ulster 
families of Dongan, Donegan, Rogan, etc. 



86.— The Stem op the " Keogh'* Family. 

Desmod Kelly, the fifth son of Daniel 0*Kelly who (see 
the ;first series) is No. Ill on the " O'Kelly" (Hy-Maine) 
X)edigree, and whose patrimony was " The forty quarters 
of Moyfin", near Elphin in the county Boscommon, was 
the ancestor of MacEochaidh ; anglicised MacKeogh, and 
modernized Keogh. 



112. Dermod Kelly : son of 
Daniel O'Kelly. 

118. Eochaidh (**each" or 
<< eoch" : Irish, a steed; 
Gr. "ikk-os'*; Lat. " eq- 
uus*'), meaning <' a horse- 
man or knight'* : his son ; a 
quo MacEochaidh. 



114. Thomas Kelly: his 
son ; ancestor of Kelly ^ of 
Moyfin, etc. 

115. Nicholas: his son ; 
was Prior of Athenry ; had 
a brother named Simeon, 
who was dean of Glonfert. 

116. Nicholas oge: son of 



Vance : See the " Vance" Genealogy. 



IV.] 



THE KIERNAN FAMILY. 



207 



Nicholas; divided his estates 
amongst his four sons ; first 
who assumed the simame 
MticKeogh. 

117. Donoch: his son ; had 
three brothers — 1. Thomas, 
2. Daniel, 8. William. 

118. Hugh : his son. 

119. Conor: his son. 

120. Teige : his son. 

121. Melaghlin an-bearla 
(or Melaghlin who spoke 
English) : his son. 



122. William Eeogh : his 
son ; the first of the family 
who omitted the prefix 
'* Mac" ; had a brother 
named CoUa. 

128. Melaghlin (2) : his 
son ; had two brothers, — 1. 
named John, 2. Daniel. 

124. Edmond Keogh : his 
son. 



87. — The Stem of the << Eiebnam *' Family. 

Caibbre an-damh-airgid, who (see the first series) is No. 
91 on the << O^flart" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Ciar- 
nainf and MacCiamain ; anglicised Kiemanj and Mac- 
Kiernan,* 



91. Cairbre an damh 
airgid, king of Orgiall. 

92. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son ; whose eldest brother 
Damhin was ancestor of 
CHart ; had two younger 
brothers — 1. Gormac, who 
was the ancestor of Maguire ; 
2. Naidsluagh [nadslo] , the 
ancestor of Mac3lahon, of 
Monaghan. 

98. Fergus : his son. 
94. Cormac : his son. 



95. Eanachan : his son. 

96. lorghuileach : his son. 

97. Lughan : his son. 

98. Gearnach : his son. 

99. Feareadhach (''fear- 
eadhach*', gen. '^fearead- 
uighe " : Irish, a diessy man)i 
his son ; a quo Cineal Fear- 
eaduighe or 0* Feareaduighe- 
anglicised Faraday, The 
family of AfacCalhmfiaoill^ 
anglicised Campbell and Mac. 
Campbell (of Tyrone), are of 



* MaeKiernan : There is a " McSaenum " family in the county 
Leitrim and in America, which 1 am as yet unable to connect with 
the f ore^ing Stem. For the present I ^ve that genealogy in ita 
alphabetical order. 



208 



IBISH PSDI6BBES. 



[pass 



this Cineal Feareadvighe, 
(See Note under the ** Gaiil- 
field*' pedigree.) 

100. Maoldnn : son of Fear- 
eaddoh. 

101. Maolraanaidh [mul- 
roona] : his son. 

102L Tigheama (" tigh- 
eama": Irish, a lord, an 
owner; Lat. ** tyraun-us" ; 
Gr. ** turann-os ") : his son ; 
a quo O'Tigheamaighe, angU- 
cised Tiemey, 

lOB. Ciaman (*< ciar**, Irish, 
dark' grey, and ** ciar", a 
comb ; ** an ", one who) : his 
son ; a quo 0*Ciamain and 
MacCiarnain» 

104. Ceamach (2) : his son. 

105. Lochlann : his son. 

106. Donoch : his son. 

107. Lochlann (2) : his son. 

108. Feargal : his son. 



109. Torloch : his son. 

110. Flaitheartach: his son. 

111. Tigbeaman : his son. 

112. Michiall [Michael] : his 
son. 

lis. Eocha: his son. 

114. Aongus: his son. 

115. Murtagh : his son. 

116. Teige: his son. 

117. Giollachriosd : his son. 

118. Concobhar [conor] : 
his son. 

119. Hugh (2): his son; had 
a brother named Conor. 

120. Melaghlin : his son. 

121. Teige : his son. 

122. Hugh MacKeirnan : 
his son ; living a.d. 17 09 ; 
first of the family who, after 
the battle of the Boyne, 
settled in the county 
Leitrim ; had a brother 
named Michael. 



88. — The Stem op the " Kilbride" Family. 

Bbadachan, who is No. 108 on the << Boyle*' pedigree, had 
a younger son named GioUa-brighid, who was the ances- 
tor of MacGiollabrighid ; anglicised Gilbride and Kilbride, 



108. Bradachan: son of 
Murtagh. 

104. GioUabrighid (mean- 
ing ** the devoted of St. 
Bridget'*) : his son ; a quo 
MacOiollahrighide. 

105; Murtagh : his son. 

106. Dermod : his son. 

107. Banall : his son. 



108. Fionngal : his son. 

109. Teige : his son. 

110. Bory : his son. 

111. GioUabrighid (2): his 
son. 

112. Fionn: his son. 
118. Aongus : his son. 
114. GioUabrighid Mao- 

Gilbride : his son. 



lY.] 



THE KIKSELA AMD LANS FAMILIES. 



209 



89.— The Stem op the " Kinsela*' Family. 

Eanna, yonnger brother of Donald caomhanach who is No. 
115 on the ^* Eavanagh** pedigree, was the ancestor of 
O' Ceannaalaighe ("ceann": Irish, the head; ** salach", 
unclean); anglicised Kinselagh, Kinsela^ iLingsley, and 
Kinsley, 



115. Eanna : son of Der- 
mod-na-nGall, king of Lein- 
ster ; first assumed the sir- 
name Kinselagh. 

116. Tirlach (**tor*', gen. 
"tuir" : Irish, a tower or 
bulwark ; Lat. ** tur-ris"; and 
** leac" : Irish, a stone) : his 
son ; a quo MacTorleice, an- 
glicised MacTirlogh, Afae- 



Terence, MacTerry^ and 
Terrie* 

117. Moroch : his son. 

118. Thomas fionn: his son. 

119. Dermod : his son. 

120. Donoch : his son. 

121. Arthur : his son. 

122. Donoch (2) : his son. 

123. Edmond Kinselagh : 
his son. 



90.-— The Stem of the ** Lane** (of Ulsteb) Family. 

Fbrach, one of the eight sons of Damhin who (see the 
first series) is No. 92 on the *' O'Hart" pedigree, was the 
ancestor of O'Lainne (** lann" : Irish, the bl-ade of a sword ; 
Lat. '^lan-io**, to cut); anglicised Lane and Laney. By 
some the Irish name is spelled O'LainidK 



93. Ferach : son of Dam- 
bin. 

94. Maoldun : his son. 

95. Fogharthach : his son. 

96. Eochaidh : his son. 

97. Dur (**dur": Irish, 
dull ; Lat. ** dur-us") : his 
son ; a quo Clann Duire 
(lords of Fermanagh), and 
glicised Dwyer, 

98. Eochaidh (2) : his 
son. 



99. Gathal : his son. 
100. Muireadach : his son. 
This Muireadach had six 
brothers,one of whom,namQd 
Congmhail, was ancestor of 
Larkin ; another named 
Eochaidh was ancestor of 
M alone; and another named 
Fiachan was the ancestor of 
Feehan, Vaughan, etc. 



210 



ntlSH PEDIGBEES. 



[part 



91. — The Stem op the " Labkin'' Family. 

CoNOMHAiL, brother of Mairedach, who is No. 100 on the 
foregoing pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Lorcan (•* lor" : 
Irish, tnoughy and *' can", to sing ; Hind. *' gan-i", to 
chant) ; anglicised Larkin. 



92. — The Stem of the ** Lavan" (op Ulster) Family. 

Oboiall, who fsee the first series) is No. 101 on the 
** Maguire" pedigree, had a brother named Dallach who 
was the ancestor of O'Lamhain ^ lamh** : Irish, a hand ; 
Gr. ** lab-o'*, I take), meaning ** the descendants of the 
man with the small or withered hand ; anglicised Lavan. 



98. — The Stem of the " Lawlor " (op Monaghan) Family. 

Don AG HAN, brother of Paul who (see the first series) is No. 
99 on the ** MacMahon" (of Ulster) pedigree, was the an- 
cestor of 0* Leathlabhair ; anglicised Lalor and Lawlor. 



99. Donachan : son of 
Foghartach. 

100. Fogharthach: his son. 

101. Lagnan : his son. 

102. Muireadach: his son. 
108. Fogharthach : his son. 
104. Leathlabhair : his son; 

a quo 0' Leathlabhair, This 
name is derived from the 
Irish, "leath" pah], a half; 
"labhair'*, to speak (old 



Irish "labh''; Lat. ** lab- 
ium", a lip), and " leabhar " 
(Lat. 'Uiber", Fr. ''livre"), 
a book. 0' Leathlabhair 

means *< the descendants of 
the man who stammered " ; 
as O'Labhaimior (anglicised 
Larmour) means those 
descended from '* the man 
who was a great speaker." 



94.— The Stem op the " Loftus" Family. 

AoNGus, brother of Bladhmhach, who is No. 92 on the 
" Fox" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Lachtnain ; angli- 
cised Loughnan and Loftm, 



IV.] THE LOOAK, LONGAN, AND MAGAULAT FAMILIES. 211 



92. Aongus : son of Hugh. 
98. Bladhmhach' : his son. 

94. Congmhail : his son. 

95. Beice : his son. 



97. Conang : his son. 

98. Maolciaran : his son. 

99. Lachtnan (^Hachtna: 
Irish, *' a course grey drfiss'% 



96, Congmhail (2) : his lan^ << one who*' ; a quo 
son. I 0^ Lachtnain, 



95.— The ** Logan" Family. 

LocHAN, a son of Daimhin who (see the first series) is No. 
92 on the << 0*Hart" pedigree, was the ancestor of 
O'Lochain Q* loohan" : Irish, chaff, a pool) ; anglicised 
Logan, Logiie and Poole, 



96. — ^The Stem op the " Longan" Family. 

Bbsasal, hrother of Beice, king of Orgiall who is No. 98 on 
the ** Magellan", pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Longain ; 
anglicised Long, Longan, Langan and Langham, 

98. Breasal : son of Gum- 1 101. Eiteach : his son. 
ascach. 102. Eachagan : his son. 

99. Fiachnach : his son. 108. Eatach : his son. 
100. Longan (" long" : Ir- 104. Giollachriosd O'Lon- 

ish, a ship ; '< an" one who) : gan : his son. 
his son ; a quo O'Longain. 1 



97. — ^The Stem of the ^'Maoaulay** Family. 

Maolfoghabthaoh, hrother of Donall, who is No. 92 on 
the '* Breen'' pedigree, was the ancestor of MacAtnhailgaidh 
anglicised Macaulay, MacAuley, MacAwley, MacGawly^ 
Magaulay, MacGawley, McGauly and Wythe. (Some gene- 
alogists would derive these fanulies from Ithe, the uncle of 
Milesius of Spain.) 



S12 



IRISH PBDIGBESS. 



[past 



92. Maolfogharthach : son 
of Creamtbann. 
. 98. Conn : his son. 

94. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son; 

95. Cathasach : his son. 

96. Conn (2) : his son. 

97. Donali : his son. 

98. Suibhneach : his son. 

99. Foranan : his son. 

100. Cucroidbe (*'croidhe": 
Irish, a heart \ Gr. **kardia*'): 
his son. 

101. Feargal : his son. 

102. Amhailgadh ('< am- 
hail": Irish, Zi^; ** gad ';, 
a withe, a willow tvrig) : his 
son ; a quo MacAmhailgaidh* 

108. Hugh (2) : his son. 

104. Florence : his son. 

105. Donali MacGawly: his 
6on ; first assumed this sir- 
name. 

106. Murtbgh : his son. 

107. Mor (or Magnus) : his 
son. 

108. Hugh (3) : his son. 

109. Murtogh (2) : his son. j 



110. Amhailgadh [awly] : 
his son. 

111. Awly oge : his son. 

112. Awly (4) : his son. 
118. Brian : his son. 

114. Awly mor : his son. 

115. Awly maol : his son. 

116. Feargal (or Farrell) 
carrach : his son. 

117. Farrell oge : his son. 

118. Awly (5) : his son. 

119. William, of WiUiamg- 
town, in Westmeath : his 
son. 

120. Murtogh, of Williams- 
town: his son; died in 1681. 

121. Awly Magawly : his 
son. This Awly had five 
brothers — 1. Owen, 2. Rob- 
ert, 8. Bichard, 4. Felim, 5. 
Gerald ; he had also two 
sisters — 1. Elizabeth, wife of 
Thomas Dillon of Lissenack, 
county Westmeath ; and 2. 
Beamone, wife of Donoch 
0*Daly, son of iBneas 
0*Daly of Clonerilliok, in 
the county Westmeath.^ 



98. — Thb Stem of the " MAcBBumBX*' Faxilt. 



Brinan, a brother of Conbhach who is No. 110 on the 
''Dunne" pedigree, was the ancestor of MaoBranfiUn; 
anglicised MacBrannen^ and Brannen. 



IT.] 



THE MacDSEMOTT FAMILT. 



2ia 



110. Branan (" bran" : Ir- 
ish, a raven*) : son of Caro- 
ill ; a quo MacBranain. 

ill. Congalach : his son. 

112. Cusliabh: his son. 

118. Caroill : his son. 

114. Oiollacumhdach : his 
son. 



115. Amhailgadh [awly] ; 
his son. 

116. Melachlin : his son. 

117. Awly (2) : his son. 

118. Murtagh : his son. 

119. Awly (8) : his son. 

120. Awly oge MacBran- 
nen : his son. 



99. — Tb£ Stem of the ''MagDebmott" Family — Continued^ 

Bbyan oge, who (see the first series) is No. 126 on the 
** MacDermott" pedigree. 



126. Bryan oge MacDer- 
mott : son of Bryan ; died 
A.D. 1636. 

127. Tirlogh (or Terence) : 
his son ; died nnmarried in 
1640 ; had a brother named 
Charles, who died in 1698. 

128. Hugh : son of said 
Charles ; d. 1707. 

129. Charles (2) : his son ; 
d. 1768. 

180. Myles : his son ; d. 
1777. 



181. Hugh (2) : his son ; 
d. 1824. 

182. Charles : his son ; d. 
1878. 

188. Hugh MacDermott, of 
Coolavin, Q.C., J.P., living 
in 1878': his son; chief of 
the Clan, and known as 
"The Hereditary Prince of 
Coolavin. 



* Baven : This Branan must liaye had hair as dark as a raven ; 
or, in battle, hate been as impetnoiis as a mountain torrent : for 
bmn, which aLso means '* chaff*', has those meanings. It may be 
here observed that hran is the root of the simames Brain, Brian, 
Brien, Bryan, Etryant, Byrne, Byron, O'Brien, 0' Byrne, and of tiM 
Latin Bren-ua. And it may be added that ** Braimea" and ** Bren- 
nan*' are distinct simames. 



214 



IRISH PEDIGREES. 



[PABT 



100. — The Stem op the ** MaoDonnell*' (of Clabs) 

Family. 

Samhaible buidbe [Sorley boy] wbo (see tbe first series) is 
No. 110 on tbe ** MacDonnell" (of Antrim) pedigree, but 
No. 115 in tbe second edition of tbat series, bad two sons 
— 1. Sir James MacDonnell, wbo was tbe ancestor of 
MacDonnell, of tbe county Glare ; and 2. Sir Banall (or 
Bandal,) wbo was tbe ancestor of MacDonnell, of Antrun. 



115. Sambairle Savarly, 
Somerled, or Sorley) buidbe 
MacDonnell, of Dunluce 
Castle, county Antrim : 
son of Alexander ; died 
A.D. 1590. 

116. Sir James, of Dun- 
luce : bis son ; knigbted in 
1597 by king James tbe 
Fourtb of Scotland; left 
bis son a ward witb bis 
younger brotber £andal,wbo 
was tbe first ** earl of 
Antrim;" died 160L 

117. Sir Alexander, of Eil- 
conway and Moye : bis son; 
created a baronet in 1627 ; 
died 1684. 

118. Sir James, of Eanagb 
and Ballybannagb*: bis son; 
second baronet; died after 
1688. 



, 119. Daniel : bis younger 
son ; deprived of bis patri- 
mony in Antrim, settled at 
Kilkee, county of Clare, 
wbere be obtained leases of 
several lands from bis kins- 
man lord Clare ; died about 
1675. 

120. James, of Eilkee : bis 
son; Captain in Lord Glare's 
Dragoons ; acquired exten- 
sive estates in Clare, Lime- 
rick, and Longford ; died 
1714. 

121. Cbarles (1), of Eilkee: 
bis son (succeeded bis elder 
brotber Eandal, who died 
unmarried in 1726) ; died 
1748. 

122. Cbarles (2), of Kilkee, 
M.P. : bis son ; died 1778. 

128. Cbarles (8), of New 



* His eldest son. Colonel Alexander^ as well as his cousin Sir 
Alexander (** Collkittagh'') were both killed in the battle of Rnock- 
naness, 18th November, 1647. Hie second son. Sir Bandal, suc- 
ceeded as third baronet, but was attainted, forfeited his estates^ 
10th July, 1691, and entered with Lord Clare into the service of the 
King of France. 



IT.] THE HacDONNELL (eABLS OF ANTRIm) FAMILY. 



215 



Hall and Kilkee, M.P. : his 
son ; died 1803. 

124. Bridget : his only 
daughter, and in her issue 
heiress ; married William 
Henry Armstrong, M.P., of 
Mount Heaton, King*s Co. ; 
she died 1860. 

125. William Edward, of 
New Hall and Eilkee, 



Colonel of the Clare Militia- 
her son; succeeded his uncle 
the late John MacDonnell 
in 1850, and assumed by 
Royal Licence the simame 
and Arms of MacDonnell ; 
living in 1878. 

126. Charles Eandal : his 
son ; bom 1862 ; living 
1878. 



101.-— The Stem of the '* MacDonnell*' (Earls of Antbdi) 

Family. 



Sib Bandal MacDonnell, younger brother of Sir James 
of Dunluce, county Antrim who is No. 116 on the (fore- 
going) ** MacDonnell'* (of Clare) pedigree, was the ances- 
tor of MacDonnell, earls of Antrim. 



116. Sir Eandal : fourth | 
son of Sorley MacDonnell ; 
created in 1618 '< viscount 
Dunluce '*, and advanced to 
the ^* earldom of Antrim" in 
1620; died in 1686. 

117. Eandal : his son ; 
created**marquisof Antrim"; 
died in 1682 ; was succeeded 
by his brother Alexander, 
the third earl of Antrim, 
who died in 1699. I 



118. Eandal: son of said 
Alexander; was the fourth 
earl of Antrim; died in 
1721. 

119. Alexander : his son; 
the fifth earl ; d. 1775. 

120. Eandal- William ; his 
son ; the sixth earl ; had no 
issue but two daughters**l. 
Anne- Catherine, 2, Char- 
lotte, to whom in 1785 new 
Patent with remainder was 



IRISH FEDIOBEE8. 



[PABT 



granted ; mih this Randal- 
William the old earldom of 
Antrim became extinct ; he 
died in 1791. 

121. Anne-Catherine Mac- 
Dounell : his daughter ; 
countess of Antrim in her 
own right; died, in 1884. 
Her sister Charlotte succeed- 
ed her as countess of Antrim, 
and married lord M. E. 
Kerr ; she died in 1885. 



122. Hugh-Seymour, earl 
of Antrim : their son ; died 
in 1856 ; had a brother 
named Mark who succeeded 
him, and was earl of 
Antrim. 

128. William-Randall Mac- 
Donnelly third earl of 
Antrim, under new Patent : 
son of the said Mark ; Uving 
in 1878. 



102. — The Stem of the *^ MacDonnell " (of Leinsteb) 

Family. 

Mabous (** marcach " : Irish, a horseman) or Mark Mac- 
Donnell, brother of Donall ballach who (see the first 
series) is No. 106 on the ** MacDonnell " (of Antrim) 
pedigree, and No. Ill in the second edition of that series, 
was the ancestor of McuiDonntU, of Leinster. 



111. Marcus : son of Eoin. 

112. Tirlogh mor : his son. 
118. Tirlogh oge : his son. 

114. Donoch : his son. 

115. Eoin carrach: his son. 

116. Tirlogh (3) : his son. 

117. Charles (also called 
Colbhach) : his son. 

118. Hugh buidhe : his 

son. 

119. Ferach, of Leinster: 

his son. 

120. James : his son ; died 
in London, a.d. 1661. 



121. Hugh (2) : his son. 

122. Dermod : his son. 
128. Dermod oge : his son. 

124. William : his son ; 
died in 1810. 

125. John, of Saggart, in 
the county Dublin : his son; 
had two sons. 

126. Joseph : his son. 

127. John Daniel Mac- 
Donnell, of Dublin : his son; 
has a brother named Joseph, 
and two sisters — all Uving 
in 1878. 



IV.] 



THE MaoDONNELL AKD MACDONOtJOH FAMILIES. 



217 



103. — The Stem of the ''MaoDonnell'* (of Mato) Family. 

Donald, brother of Eoin (or John) Mor who (see the first 
series) is No. 105 on the " MacDonnell '* (of Antrim) 
pedigree, and No. 109 in the second edition of that 
series, was the ancestor of MacDonnell, of Tyrawfey, in 
the connty Mayo. 



109. Donald : son of Eoin. 

110. Eandai : his son. 

111. Shane (or Eoin) : his 
son. 

112. Aongus : his son. 
118. Marcach (or Marcns) : 

his son. 

114. Tirlogh: his son. 

116. Feareadach mor, of 
Tyrawly : his son. 

116. Duine-eadach : his 
son ; a quo Slioght Dulnea- 
duigh (*< sliochd" : Irish, 
seed^ offspring; "dnine-ea- 
dach", a dressy person). This 



Duine-eadach had two bro- 
thers — 1. Brian buidhe; and 
2. Cathal, a quo MacCathail, 
anglicised MacCail, modern- 
ized MacHale, etc. 

117. Rory: son of Duine- 
eadach. 

118. Feareadach (2) : his 
son. 

119. Feardorcha : his son. 

120. James MacDonnell, of 
Tyrawley : his son ; had a 
brother named Aongus ; 
living in 1691. 



104. — The Stem of the ** MacDonouoh" Family. 

Maolbuanaidh [mulroona] Mor, brother of Conchobhair 
(or Conor) who (see the first series) is No. 106 on the 
** O'Conor*^ (Gonnaught) pedigree, was the ancestor of 
Clann Domhnaigh, of Connaught, anglicised MacDonoughj 
Aiacdonogh, and Donoghue. 

111. Dermod : his son. 

112. Conor : his son. 

113. Tomaltach : his son. 

114. Donoch* (** domh- 
nach** : Irish, Sunday) : his 
son; a quo Clann Domhnaigh 

115. Muirgheas : his son. 



106. Mulroona Mor : son of 
Teige. 

107. Muirceartach : his 
son. 

108. 
109. 
110. 



Teige : his son. 
Mulroona (2): his son. 
Teige (2) : his son. 



. * Donoch : This name is anglicised " Dennis" and " Denny*'; and 
thus ** MacDonoush" has been modernized Dennison, De^ny, and 
Dennis, The latimzed form of " Donoch'' (or Doncha) is Dionysius. 



*id 



117. T^f^r hia 36IL. Tbia ; II9u Tags^ :: Bis soil. 
^^i^ ImA ^ lifodKr muDed ! I^. florTimff i Ids wbl. 

OMimae df ''th« little wio^ t 122L XaoIsea^IaniiB 
ti^')^ w}fu> w^ th«r Mies^tor I lilitfagftTfn) ogss:: Ms son. 
^ ^^ Md«I>6iko«g}k'^ of JnT'l 133. Cooiar r &s aoaiL 
?>^//«/>^ (iwyv ih^ toroof Gf t 121. Jo km €»<grc M 
^' lir^li'), ill ifa^ eovDif ! DtMioa^ of Bmla-mt-Jh 
SUgo. ' his 



i^ 



iOS, — Tfl« Srex (fw TBE '^ ICacDokoitgii^ (of 

Family. 



) 



CcnuMA^; Oft'b^ftg'fefldd, brother of Teige who is Xo. 117 on 
ih^ loregoing {** MacDonongh*') pedigree, was the ancestor 
of MaaVmoughf of Tirerill, county Sligo. 



117« OomiiicnA'beag'feada: 
dofl of Toffiftliach* 
11H« Morogh : hi« non. 
119« Doiiooh: bi»»on. 



120. Owen : his son. 

121. Cathal (or Charles) 
MacDonough, of TimlUolla : 

'1 his SOD. 



100. — Tiiv Strm of the ** MacDowall" Familt. 

DuBnoHALL, brother of Samhairle (or Sorley) who (see the 
flrHi Berioo) in No. 00 on the <'MaoDonnell" (of Antrim) 
pedigroo, and No. 100 in the second edition of that series, 
wai the anoostor of MacDuUighaill; anglicised MacDougaU^ 
Mrtcth\i^nldi MftcDow^Uf and MacDowalL 



100, Dubhghall (*« dubb- 
ghair^ Irl«h, a Mn^k/omgn- 
tr) \ mn of Giollabrighid 
tf^illkHdf^] ; a quo MacDuhh- 
fhi^Hl \ wan king of the Isles; ; Antrim. 
XMwjf^ A.is 1144. i 102« Lochlann : his son. 



101. Donoch : his son; had 
a brother named John, who 
was the ancestor of Hae- 
Dowelly of Lame, county 



IV] 



THE MacFETSIDGB AND MacOEOGHAGAN FAMILIES. 



219 



108. DubbghaU (2): bis 
son. 

104. lombar ("iom-ar" : 
Irisb, much slaughter) : bis 
son ; a quo Maclomhair*, 

105. GioUacolum : bis son. 

106. lombar MacDubbgb- 
aill : bis son. Tbis lombar 
bad two brotbers — 1. Locb- 
lann; and 2. Fercar (''fear*': 



Irisb, a man, " caor", a fire- 
brand; Heb. "cbarab", it 
blazed forth; Cbald. "cbarei", 
lighted up), a quo Ferrar. 
By some genealogists 
<« Ferrar" is derived from 
tbe Irisb fear-ard (Lat. 
** ard-nus*'), meaning ** tbe 
tall or bigb man.'* 



107. — ^The Stem op the •* MacFetbidgb " Family. 

Cathagh, brotber of Criocban wbo is No. 96 on tbe 
'' MacUais " pedigree, was tbe ancestor of 0*Fiachraidh 
and AiacFiacraidh ; anglicised Fiachry, and MacFetridge. 



95. G a t b a c b : son of 
Maolfogba. 

96. Aodb (or Hugb) : bis 
son. 

97. Maolbreasal : bis son. 

98. Maolcuairt(**cuairt'*): 
Irisb, a visit; Eng. "court"): 
bis son; a quo MacCaarta, 
anglicised MacCourt, 

99. Maolruainiidb : bis 
son« 



100. Maolmuire : bis son. 

101. Hugb (or Oinaodb): 
bis son. 

102. Maolpadriac: bis son. 

103. Maolruanaidb (2) : 
bis son. 

104. Fogbartbacb : bis son. 

105. Neal OTiacbry, of 
Ardstratha (or Ardstraw), in 
tbe county Tyrone : bis son. 



108. — The Stem of the *' MaoGeoghagan ** Family. 

TuATHAL, tbe tbird son of Fiacb (or Fiacba) wbo is No. 
88 on tbe '* Molloy '* pedigree, was tbe ancestor of Mac* 
Eachagain; anglicised Ma^Oeoghagan, OeoghMgan, Mac- 
geoghagan, Oahagan, Oahan, and MacGahan. 

* MacToTohair : This sirname has been aDglicised Emerson, Tver, 
Ivir, Ivor, Howard, Maclvir, Maclvor, Mclvor, and McKeever. It 
was the Author's mistake, in Note 111, page 396 of the first series 
(published in 1876), to derive some of tnese simames from Mac- 
idhir. 



220 



mSH PEDIOBESS. 



D 



88. Fiach : son of Niall of 
the Nine Hostages, the 126th 
monarch of Ireland. 

89. Tnathal : his son ; 
whose brother Eochaidh was 
ancestor of Molloy, and 
other brother Uigin, the 
ancestor of Hlggim. 

90. Amhailgadh [awly] : 
son of Tnathal. 

91. CoBcrach : his son. 

92. Eachagan (<<each": 
Irish, a horse ; Ijat. ** eq- 
uns- "; Gr. "ikk-os**), 
meaning ** a little horse '* : 
his son; a (\jioMacEachagain. 

98. Bory : his son. 

94. Awly (2) : his son. 

95. Giollacoluni : his son. 

96. Greamhthann : his 
son. 

97. Eochaidh : his son. 

98. Florence : his son. 

99. Awly (8) : his son. 

100. Ponoch : his son. 

101. Gongal : his son. 

102. Anluan : his son. 

103. Coscrach (2) : his son; 
a quo Cnoc Ul Coscraigh, 

104. Malachi : his son. 

105. Mnrtach : his son. 

106. Congal (2) : his son. 

107. Cucogar : his son. 

108. Cncalma (<< cabna *' : 



.»» 



Irish, hrave; Hebt *'dalam* 
he prevailed) : his son; a qaa 
MacCalma^ anglieised Mae- 
Calmontf and Cubn. 

109. Mnrtach (2) : his son. 

110. Gongal (3) : his son. 

111. Gongal (4) : his son. 

112. Donoch (2): his son. 

113. Gongal (5) : his son. 

1 14. Mnrtach mor : his son. 

115. Donoch (3) : his son. 

116. Dermod : his son. 

117. Hngh buidhet his son. 

118. Gonla : his son ; had 
one brother. 

119. Leineach eairach : his 
son. 

120. Gonchobhair [conor] : 
his son. 

121. Gonla (2): his son. 

122. Bos : his son. 

123. Neal : his son ; had 
three brothers. 

124. Gonall : his son ; had 
an elder brother named Bos, 
whose only son named 
Bichard died without issue. 

125. Conla (2) : son of 
Gonall. 

126. Gharles : his son ; had 
two brothers. 

127. Conor MacOeoghagan 
of Moycassell : his son. 



109. — The Stem op thb ** MacGdclcunny" Family. 

FooHABTAOH, brother of Cairbre who is No. 97 on the^ 
** Bums ** pedigree, was the ancestor of MacGiollamoeun" 
aidh ; anglicised, MacOillcunny, 



IV.] 



THB ICACGILLFINEN AND M^cHALE FAMILIES, 



221 



97. Fogbartacb. 

98. GoDgall : bis son. 

99. Ciarnaeh : bis son. 

100. Fogbartacb (2) : bis 
son. 

101. Oiollamocanadb 



(*' mo *' : old Irisb, a man ; 
Lat. "bo-two'* and **ne-mo''; 
** CTinadb " : Irisb, a wood): 
bis son ; a quo MacGiolla- 
mocunaidh. 



110. — ^TflB Stbm of the " MacGellfinbn*' Family. 

GiOLLAFiNNEAN (** finne" : Irisb, whiteness), No. 105 on the 
*^ Mulroy*' pedigree, was tbe ancestor of MacGiollaJinneain; 
anglicised MacGillfinen. (See ** OTinan.") 



111.— The Stem of the " MagHale" Family. 

Donald Ua-Heile, brotber of Eoin Mor wbo (in tbe first 
series) is No. 105 on tbe '' MacDonnell*' (of Antrim) 
pedigree, was tbe ancestor of Hale ; from wbich simame 
it was a mistake on mj part to derive MacHale. 

Doine-eadacb, wbo is No. 116 on tbe '' MacDonnell of 
Mayo'* pedigree (a brancb of tbe " MacDonneH" of 
Antrim" family), bad two brothers — 1. Brian buidbe ; 2.) 
Catbal : tbls Oatbal (" catb'* : Irisb, a battle, << all", great 
was tbe ancestor of MacCathail ; anglicised MacCail, Mac- 
Cael, MacCale, MacKeal, and MacHale*, 



117. Seamus (or James) : 
8on of Catbal ; living a.d. 
1641. 

118. Searan : bis son. 

119. Eicard : bis son. 

120. James : bis son ; mar- 
ried to Mary MacCale. 

121. Maolmuire (or Myler): 
tbeir son; died in 1790; was 
married to Anne Moffett, 
wbo died in 1795. 



122. Patrick MacEeal (or 
MacHaie), of Tubbemavine, 
barony of Tyrawley, and 
county Mayo : tbeir son ; 
died in 1 837. Tbis Patrick 
was twice married : first to 
Mary Mulkieran (wbo died 
in 1806), by wbom be bad 
six sons and tbree daugh- 
ters ; bis second wife was 
Catherine MacGale, by 



* MacHahi John, Catholic Archbishop of Tuam, livins in 1878, 
was the first of the family that wrote the name—" MacHiue." 



222 



ntlSH PEDIGEEES* 



[part 



whom be had three daugh- 
ters and two sons. Of the 
daughters by the second 
marriage, Catherine is mar- 
ried to Thomas Higgins, of 
Oarropadden, Solicitor, 

Taam, living in 1877 (see 
the ** Higgins'* Genealogy). 
Patrick MacEeal had a sis- 
ter named Margaret* (who 
died in 1816), and who was 
married to Patrick Sheridan, 
joiner and farmer, from 
Lagan. 



128. Thomas : eldest son 
of the said Patrick Mac- 
Eeal. This Thomas had 
six brothers and three sis- 
ters — the issue of his fath- 
er's first marriage : 1. Mar- 
tin ; 2. Myler ; 8. Patrick ; 
4. His Grace, the Most Bev. 
John MacHale, Archbishop 
of Tuam, living in 1878 ; 6. 
Rev. James ; 6, Edmund ; 
the sisters — 1. Anne, 2. 
Mary, 8. another Catherine 
who died young. 



112. — The Stem of the ** MagHugh" Family. 

Amhailgadh, brother of Flaitheartach who (see the first 
series) is No. 112 on the '' Maguire" pedigree, was the 
ancestor of AiacAodhj- ; anglicised MacHugh, Hughson, 
Hewsonl, McCoy, McCue, McCuy, and McKay. 



112. Amhailgadh [awly] : 
second son of Dun oge Ma- 
guire. 

118. Philip: his son; had 
four brothers. 

114. Aodh : his son ; a quo 
MacAodh, 

115. Patrick MacHugh: his 
son. 



116. Giolladubh : his son ; 
a quo MacGiolladuibh ; an- 
glicised Gillduff and Kilh 
duff. 

117. Neal : his son, 

118. Edmond : his son. 

119. Cormac : his son. 

120. John MacHugh : his 
son. 



t Margaret : Of the daushters of Margaret and Patrick Sheridan, 
Cecilia was married to Ulick Bonrke^who is No. 34 on the "Bonrkes 
of Lough Conn, and Ballina", pedigree. 

* MacAodh : For the derivation of this simame see the"Hn|;he8'* 
pedigree. In the transition of the Irish sirnames from the Insh to 
the English language, the name Aodh was by the English sometimes 
pronounced '* Od" : hence MacAodh was anglicised OdwH, and, in 
the course of time, Hodson and Hvdson ; each meaning the 9ong or 
descendants of Aodh — No. 114 on this pedigree. 

+ Bewson : This name has been rendered Hewstan and H<nuUm. 



IV.] 



the; mackeooh family. 



22S 



118. — The Stem of the ** MacKeogh" Family. 

Mblaghlin, the second son of Donoch who (see the first 
series) is No. 118 on the ** O'Kelly" (of Hy-Maine) pedi- 
gree, was the ancestor of Clann-Eochaidh ; anglicised Mac- 
Eocha, MacKeoghy Kehoe and Keough. 



114. Melaghlin : son of 
Donoch O'Kelly. 

115. Eochaidh Kelly :* his 
son ; a quo Clann Eochaidh 
(« each " [ogh] : Irish, a 
horse), meaning <* the clan 
of the knight or horseman.'' 

116. Cairbre ruadh : his 
son. 

117. Daniel MacEochaidh : 
his son ; first assumed this 
simame ; had two brothers 
— 1. Dermod reagh, 2. 
Teige. 



118. Edmond : son of 
Daniel. 

119. Donoch : his son. 

120. Col (" cor : Irish, 
impediment) : his son. 

121. Donoch : his son. 

122. Edmond (2) : his son ; 
had a brother named Daniel 
ruadh. 

123. Eochaidh : son of 
Edmond. 

124. i^Vancis MacEochy 
(or MacKeogh) : his son. 



114. — The Stem of the ** MacKeogh ** (of Debbylea) 

Family. 

Debmod reagh, brother of Daniel who is No. 117 on the 
foregoing (** MacKeogh ") pedigree, was the ancestor of 
MacEochaidh, of Derrylea ; anglicised MacKeogh, 

117. Dermod reagh Mac- 
Eocha: son of Cairbre 
ruadh. 

118. Daniel : his son. 

119. Eochaidh : his son. 

120. Eochaidh mor: his 
son. 



121. GioUadubh : his son. 

122. Eochaidh (8): his son. 
128. John MacEochy (or 

John MacKeogh), of Derry- 
lea : his son. 



* KeUy : It was only the children of the eldest sons in a direct 
line of any Adlesian Irish family that were entitled to prefix the 
to their namea : hence this Eochaidh was KeUy and not O'Kelly, 



224 



IBISH PEDIGBBES. 



[PABT 



116. — The Stem op the ** MagMahon " (op Babtby) 

Familt. 

^Sib) Bbtan MagMahon, lord of Dartry, who died in 1620, 
and who (see the first series) is No. 122 on the ** Mao- 
Mahon ", of Monaghan, pedigree; married The Lady 
Mary, widow of his kinsman Sir Boss MacMahon, and 
daughter of Hugh O'Neill, the great Earl of Tyrone ; 
whose ** flight ", a.d. 1607 (see ** The Flight of the Earls", 
in this and the first series), afforded such facilities for the 
'* Plantation of Ulster." By this lady Sir Brian left at 
his death two sons — 1. Art, 2. Brian oge ; and daughters.''' 

of St. Peter's at Casselle, in 
Flanders. 

125. CoUa Dhu MacMahon, 
titular lord of l^artry : sou 
of Patrick. This Colla mar- 
ried Aileen, daughter of 
The O'Eeilly (who was 
styled ** earl of Cavan"), and 
niece of the illustrious 
Owen Eoe O'Neill, by whom 
he had issue — 1. Bernard, 
who married a daughter of 
Art oge, son of Art roe Mac- 
Mahon of Slack's Grove ; 2. 
Hugh, who was adminis- 
trator of Eilmore, was con- 



122. Sir Bryan MacMahon, 
lord of Dartry : son of Hugh 
oge ; died, a.d 1620. 

123. Art MacMahon, lord 
of Dartry ; his son ; married 
Evaline, daughter of Ever 
MacMahon of Lissanisky, 

the county Monaghan ; 



m 

died at Ballinure in 1634, 

leaving issue an only son. 

124. Patrick: only son of 
Art ; died at Dublin in 1635, 
leaving three sons — 1. Colla 
dubh [dhu] , 2. Constantino, 
who died «.jo., 3. the Bev. 
Arthur Augustine,! Provost 



* Daughters : Of the daughters of this Sir Bryan MacMahon, lord 
of Dartry, Una (or Agnes) married — ^first, Gerald Byrne, Esq., of 
Eoscrea, and, secondly, Charles, son of Morgan (son of Bryan) 
Karanagh, of Poloroonty, in the connty Carlow ; and Katherine was 
married to Captain Hugh Reilly, Liscannow, county Cavan. 

Writing in 1608 of this Sir Bryan MacMahon, Sir Henry Dillon 
says : " That he is the best followed of any man in the country, and 
it were well he were not discontented." 

t Augwtine: This Rev. Arthur Augustine MacMahon, by his Will, 
dated in 1710, founded many Bourses for the education of voungmen 
for the priestiiood : " The preference being given to members of the 
families of MacMahon, Maguire, O'Riellv, and O'Neil . . . and 
junongst tiie four families aforesaid shall be preferred those of the 
name and parentage of the Founder." 



IV.] 



THE MACMAHON (OF DABTBY) FAMILY. 



225 



secrated bishop of Clogher in 
1708, became primate of Ar- 
magh in 1709, and who died 
in August 1737 ; 8. Con ; 4. 
Patrick ; and two other sons 
whose names have not been 
recorded, but who are stated 
to have fought at Derry, etc, 

126. Patrick, of Corravilla: 
the fourth son of Colla Dhu; 
married a lady named Mac- 
Mahon, by whom he had 
four sons — 1. Caliagh, 2. 
Bernard* who died 27th 
May 1747, aged 69 years), 
8. Eoss (who died October 
29th, 1748, aged 49), 4. 
Soger. 

127. GuUagh MacMahon, 
of Eockfield, county Mona- 
ghan : son of Patrick ; 
nominated to the Family 
Bourses, until he ** con- 
formed *', when the privilege 



appears to have passed to 
the co-heiresses of Mr. Peter 
MacMahon of Eeki^e,! 
under a clause in the Will of 
the Eev. Arthur Augustine 
MacMahon, above mentioned. 

128. Hugh, of Eockfield : 
son of CuUagh ; married 
Miss Griffith of Laurel Hill, 
county Monaghan. 

129. Charles, of Carrick- 
macross : their son ; married 
in 1821 Eose, daughter of 
— ^ Coleman, Esq., county 
Louth, by whom he had two 
sons — 1. Charles, 2. Patrick 
(who, in 1853, died, s.p.) ; 
and one daughter, Eliza. 

130. Charles MacMahon, of 
Brookfield, Dundalk : son of 
Charles ; living in 1878 ; 
Clerk of the Crown and 
Peace, for the county Louth; 
was, when only twelve years 



* Bernard : This Bernard MacMahon was consecrated bishop of 
Clogher in 1709 (in succession to his uncle Hugh, the second son of 
Colla Dhu, abo7e mentioned), and was translated to the primatial 
•chair of Armagh, in 1738 ; and his brother Ross, was, in succession 
to him, consecrated bishop of Clogher, in 1739, and was translated 
to Armaj;h, in 1747. In tne churchyard of Edragoole (or Ematriss), 
•county Monaghan, Boger MacMahon. the younger brother of these 
two primates, erected a.d. 1750, a monument to their memory, on 
which the following is the Inscription : 

" Hie, jacent Rochus (vel Rossius) et Bemardus MacMahon, 
fratres ^rmani ; uterque successive archiepiscopus Armacanus, 
totius HibemiaQ primates, quorum nobilissimi generis memor pietas, 
atqne aemula doctrina, vitaque titulos non impar morientem patriam 
decoravere. Bemardus obiit 27 Maii 1747, setat. 69. Rochus, die 
29 Oct. 1748, aetat. 49. Ambo pares virtute, pares et honoribus 
ambo." 



t Rekane : See Note under No. 11 of the ** Fay'' pedigree. 

P 



226 



IBISH PEDIOBEES. 



[PABT 



of age, called upon to nomi- 
nate to the Family Bourses. 
He married Alice, daughter 
of James Oartlan, Esq., of 
Carrickmacross, by whom 
he had issue one son, Char- 
les, and two daughters — 1. 
Alice, married to W. Bussell, 



Esq., of Downpatrick ; 2. 
Rose, married to William 
MulhoUand, Liverpool, Bar- 
rister-at-Law. 

181. Charles MacMahon, 
A.B. : his son ; living in 
1878. 



116. — The Stem of the " MagManus*' Family. 

Manus*, brother of Giollaiosa who (see the first series) is 
No. 109 on the ** Maguire" pedigree, was the ancestor of 
MacManits. 



109. Manus : son Dun mor 
Maguire ; a quo MacManus. 

110. Rory : his son. 

111. Manus (2) : his son. 

112. Patrick : his son ; had 
two brothers. 



118. Matthew : his son. 

114. Patrick (2) : his son. 

115. Conor MacManus : his 



son. 



117. — The Stem of the **MacMobough" Family. 

("For *' MacMorough'\ ** Morrow'*, and ** MacMorrow'\ 

see the first Series), 



118. — The Stem of the << Macnamee*' Family. 

Suibhneach, brother of Neachtan who is No. 99 on the 
<' Conroy'* pedigree, was the ancestor of Jdacnamidhe ; 
anglicised Macnamee^ and Mee. 

* Manus : Some derive this name from the Irish Tnainis, " a lanoe 
or spear'' {main : Irish, ** the hand'* ; Lat. man-us) ; in which caae 
MacA/anus would mean "the descendants of the man who ooold 
wield a spear.*' 



IV.] 



THE HAOONKBT AKB Iff ACflLOUGHIilN FAMILIES. 



227 



99. Snibhii^wbdi : son of 
Florence. 

100. Dubhron ("dubhron" : 
Irish, sorrow) : his son ; a 
quo O'Dubhroin, anglicised 
Doran, 

101. Ceamach : his son. 

102. Lochan : his son. 

103. Anbeith : his son. 



104. Bore : his soli. 

105. Conn : his son. 

106. Giolla Gumidhe [oa- 
mee] : his son. 

107. Cumidhe C*cu": Irish, 
a warrior; ** midhe", Meath), 
meaning ** the warrior of 
Meath" : his son ; a quo 
Macnamidhe, 



119. — The Stem of the ** Maoonky" Family. 

Alioll, brother of Eochaidh who is No. 98 on the 
** DowJing" pedigree, was the ancestor of MacOnohuin ; 
anglicised MaoOnchon, and Maconky. 



98. Alioll : son of Muirea- 
dach ; had two brothers— 1. 
Eochaidh, 2. Eoghan. 

99. Creamhthann : son of 
Alioll. 

100. Comhan : his son. 

101. Failbhe : his son. 

102. Dicneadh('*dioneadh": 
Irish, without a wound) : his 
son ; a quo 0' Dicneidhe, an- 
glicised Dickneyy which has 
been modernized Dickens. 

103. Onnchu (** onnohu" : 
Xrish, a leopard) : his son ; a 
quo Maconchuin. 



104. Cu-cuan ('*ouan": Ir- 
ish, a little warrior): his son; 
a quo O'Ctiain, anglicised 
Quain, Quane, and Qaan, 

105. Irgus : his son. 

106. Forabuidh : his son. 

107. Maoldun : his son. 

108. Cronmaol : his son. 

109. Irgus (2) : his son. 

110. Seachuasach : his son. 

111. Guaire MacOnchon : 
his son. 



120. — The Stem of the " MaoLouohlin" Family. 

MuiBCEABTAOH (or Murchcrtus), the 182nd monarch of 
Ireland, who (see the first series) is No. 109 on the <<Mac- 



228 



IRISH PEDIOBEES. 



[PABT 



Loghlin'* pedigree, had a son named Muirceartach, in 
whom the MacLoghlin* genealogy oontinnes : 



109. Muirceartach, the 
182nd monarch of Ireland. 

110. Muirceartach (2) : his 
son ; lord of Cineal Eoghain 
(or " Tirowen *') ; heir-pre- 
sumptive to the throne of 
Ireland; called "The De- 
molisher of the Castles of 
the English '' ; was slain hy 
Donoch O'Kane, a.d. 1196. 

111. Donald : his son ; 
known as ** Donald of the 
Battle of Caimirge," fought 
in 1241. This Donald in- 
vaded Tirconnell with the 
English, in 1282 ; slew 
Donall, son of Hugh O'Neill, 
in 1284, and was elected 
"lord of Cineal Eoghaiuy' 
(or Tirowen) in his stead. 
In 1288, Fitzmaurice, lord 
justice of Ireland, together 
with the earl of Ulster, 
marched iato Cineal Connaill 
(or Tirconnell) ; deposed 
this Donall, and made Brian 
O'Neill chief. In 1241, this 
Brian fought the battle of 



Oaimirge(or Oaim Eirge)with 
Donald, whom he slew, 
along with nine of his chief 
kinsmen ; after which the 
O'Neills were chiefs of Cin- 
eal Eoghain, 

112. Morogh MacLoghlin : 
son of Donald. 

118. Eoghan (or Owen) 
mor : his son. 

114. Niall : his son. 

115. Owen (2) : his son. 

116. Niall (2) : his son. 

117. Aibhn each (also 
called Forbneach) : his son ; 
living in 1441. 

lis. Hugh : his son. 

1 19. Dermod : his son. 

120. Dubhaltach : his son ; 
living in 1551 ; had two 
brothers — 1. Manus Muire, 
and 2. Hugh carragh. 

121. John MacLoghlin: 
son of Dubhaltach ; had four 
brothers — 1. Dermod, 2. 
Hugh buidhe, 8. Giolla glas, 
4. Edmond gruama. 



121. — ^The Stem of the ** MaoSheeht " Familt. 

Alastbxtm (or Alexander), brother of iBneas (or Aongas) 
Mor who (see the first series) is No. 102 on the '' Mao- 
Donnell " (of Antrim) pedigree, was the ancestor of 
O'Sithaigh ; anglicised Sheehy and MacSheehy, 



^ * MacLoghlin : For the derivation of MacLoglUin, see the *'0*Logli- 
lin " pedigree. 



IV.] 



THE MacSWIMEY (nA TUAIOHE) FAMILT. 



229 



105. Alastrum (<< ala " : 
Irish, a swan ; " astraim ", 
to carry), or Alexander : son 
of Donall ; a quo Alexander, 
Lester, Mac Allister, Macalisten 
Saunders and Saunderson, 

106. Eaohdan : his son. 

107. Sithaoh an domadoir 
(** sioth ** : Irish, an atone- 
ment ; " ach ", one who), 
meaning '^ Sithach the 
Boxer " : his son ; a quo 
O'Sithaigh ; living in 1380. 



lOS.William fionn: his son. 

109. Dnnsithaoh Mac- 
Sheehy : his son ; first assu- 
med this surname. 

110. William (2) : his son. 

111. Dermod baccach : his 
son. 

112. William (3) : his son. 

113. Dermod (2): his son. 

1 14. John : his son. 

115. Dermod MacSheehy : 
his son. 



122. — The Stem of the ** MaoSwiney" (na-Tuaiohb) 

Family. 

MAOLMxnsE, the second son of Moroch mir who (see the first 
series) is No. 113 on the ** MacSwiney** pedigree, was the 
ancbstor of MacSuibhaneaighe na-Tuaighe ; anglicised 
Sweeney*, Swiney, and MacSmney (** of the Battle Axes*'). 



113. Moroch mir: son of 
Maolmuire. 

114. Maolmuire (or Myler): 
his son ; had a brother 
named Moroch, who was 
the ancestor of MacSwiney, 
of Fanad. 

115. Donoch (also called 
Daniel) : his son ; had two 



brothers — 1. Dubhghall, 2. 
Tirloch. 

116. Tirloch : son of Don- 
och ; had a brother named 
Geoffrey. 

117. Neal na Tuaighe : son 
of Tirloch ; had a brother 
named Maolmuire Mac- 
Swiney, of Desmondf. 



* Sweeney : The Irish word euibhneach [suibhne], a quo this sir- 
name, may mean ** one who cultivates strawberries." It is derived 
from euibh: Irish, "a strawberry tree'*; and neac^, ''some one", 
" any one." Nea^ih also means " a spirit", " or apparition." 

t Desmond: Branches of the ''MacSwiney" family settled in 
Connaaght, in Clanrickard, in Thomond, in Ormond, in Desmond 
and other parts of Monster. 

Four Masters, 



280 



IBISH PEDia^EU££8. 



[PABT 



118. Daniel : son of Neal. 

119. Donoch : his son. 

120. Hugh buidhe: his son. 

121. Maolmuire : his son. 

122. Owen mor : his son. 

123. Owen oge : his son. 

124. Neal bearnach : his 
son. 

125. Morogh (2) : his son. 



126. Sir Mulmuiry (Maol- 
muire) : his son. 

127. Donoch mor : his son. 

128. Maolmuire (or Mul- 
, murry) : his son. 

129. Tirloch MacSwiney na 
Tuaighe*^ : his son ; living 
in 1768. 



128. — The Stem op the ** MacSwinet " (op Banaqh) 

Family. 

DuBHOHALL of Dun Usnaigh, brother of Donoch who is 
No. 115 on the foregoing (<< MacSwiney *' na Tuaighe) 
pedigree, was the ancestor of MacSwiney, of Tir Boghainej 
now the barony of '' Banagh '', in the county Donegal. 



* N a- Tuaighe : 1 have reason to believe that a son of this Tirlogh 
MacSwiney was Hugo Smoke MacSweeny, who afterwards omitted 
the prefix Mac ; but, as yet, 1 have not verified the Geology. 
That 

1. Hugo MaoSweeny was the father of 

2. Frederick Morgan Sweeny, who iras the father of 

3. Robert Ormsby Sweeny, of St. Paul, Minnesota, United States, 
America ; living in 1878. 

Hugo, who married Ellen Dunleavy, had four brothers and one 
sister : the brothers were — 1. Doyle, 2. Morgan, 3. John, 4. Neil; 
and the sister was Honor, who was married to John Otmsby, the 
grandfathtsr of John Ormsby, Esq., of Ballina, living in 1878. 

Hugo's son, Frederick Morgan Sweeny, was married to a danghter 
<bom in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) of George Ormsby, Ssq., of 
Sligo, son of George Ormsby, Esq., and EUinor Morgan, his wife ; 
and this last mentioned George was son of George Ormsby, Esq., 
and Liady Anne Gore, his wife— all of the county bligo. Frederick 
Morgan Sweeny had two brothers and two sisters: ttie brothers 
were — 1. Hugh MacSweeny, who died in 1846, and who was post- 
master of Sligo, for 14 years ; 2. Charles. Th/a sisten were— 1. 
Mary, 2. AUcia. 



IV.] 



THE MacTIEBNAN AND UacUAIS FAMILY. 



281 



115. Dubhgall : son of 
Maolmuire. 

116. Owen conachtach 
(" conachtach " : Irish, an 
inhabitant of Connaught) : his 
son ; a quo 0' Conachtadgh 
(anglicised Conaty), of Cabra, 
in the barony of Tireragh, 
ooonty Sligo. 

117. Owen na lathaighe (or 
Owen of the mire) : his son; 
living in 1858; a quo 0' La- 
thaighe, anglicised Lahy. 

118. Maolmuire : his son. 



119. Owen : his son. 

120. Niall (or Neal) mor: 
his son. 

121. Maolmuire (2): his 
son. 

122. Maolmuire meirgeach 
(** meirgeach" : Irish, rusty)i 
his son. 

128. Donogh : his son. 

124. Neal meirgeach Mac- 
Swiney : his son ; had four 
brothers — 1. Maolmuire, 2. 
Oliver, 8. Henry, 4. Alex- 
ander. 



124.— The ** MagTiebnan '* (of Clan Oolla) Family. 

Feabgall, brother of Odhar who (see the first series) is 
No. 100 on the ** Maguire " pedigree, was the ancestor of 
MacTigheamain (** tighearna " : Irish, a lord or master) ; 
anglicised Tieman, MacTieman, MacTeman, McTernan, 
McJdaster, Atasterson, and Lord, 

There was another family of MacTigheamain in Brefney 
and Roscommon; descended from Tiernan (or Tighearnan), 
who, in this volume, is No. 112 on the " O'Rourke " 
pedigree. 



125. — ^Thb Stem of the ** MagUais" Family. 

CoLLA uais, the 1 21 st monarch of Ireland, who (seethe 
first series) is No. 85 on the " MacDonnell" (of Antrim) 
pedigree, was the ancestor of MacUais; anglicised MaC' 
Evoy, MacVeagh, MacVeigh, Noble, and Vey, 



Bo. CoUa Uais (** uais" : 
Irish, noble) : son of Eoch- 
aidh dubhlen [Dublin] ; a 
quo MacUais. 



86. Eoghain : his son ; 
had two brothers — 1. Eoch 
aidh, 2. Fiachra toirt. 

87. Earc : his son. 



282 



IRISH PEDIGREES. 



[PABT 



88. Carihann : his son ; 
had a younger brother 
named Fiachra. 

89. Dochartach : his son. 

90. Cormac : his son. 

91. Anmire : his son ; had 
a younger brother named 
Fergus. 

92. Foranan : his son. 
98. Ouaire : his son. 

94. Maolfogha : his son. 

95. Criochan : his son ; 
had an elder brother named 
Cathach, who was the an- 
cestor of MacFetridge, 

96. Aodh (or Hugh) : son 
of Criochan. 

97; Brandubh : his son. 

98. Oaoman : his son. 

99. Coibhdheanach : his 
son. 

100. Eobeartach (** ro" : 
Irish, very^ ** beartach," 
tricky) : his son ; a quo Mac- 
Robeartaighe, anglicised 
Roberts, and Robertson, 

101. Maolbrighid : his son. 

102. Feardacrioch: his son. 



108. Flaitheartach : his 
son. 

104. Hugh (2) : his son. 

105. Muireadach : his son. 

106. Brian : his son. 

107. Muran (*^mur" : Irish, 
a fortification ; Lat. *• mur- 
us*') : his son ; a quo 
O'Murairif anglicised Murrin, 

108. Donoch : his son. 

109. Curaioach (also called 
Dubhros) : his son. 

110. Padraic'^ : his son. 

111. Dubhgall : his son. 

112. Donoch (2) : his son. 
118. Moroch: lus son. 

114. Niall : his son. 

115. Eory : his son. 

116. Tirloch : his son. 

117. Cairbre : his son. 

118. Eoghan : his son. 

119. Padraic (or Patrick) : 
his son ; living in 1691. 

120. Brian : his son. 

121. Donoch (8) : his son. 

122. James: his son; living 
in 1760. 

128. Johnf : his son ; died 



* Padraic : At this stage in this family genealogy, the O^k-Aon- 
gtua (or "O'Hennessy") mspossessed the MOcUaia family of their 
territory, called By-mac- C/aw, now the barony of " Moygoish", in 
( Westmeath ; and the "MacUais" family then branched into Mac- 
Eooy (still a highly respectable family in the county Meath), 
Mac Veagh, Ma>c Veigh, etc., as above. 

t John : This John Mac Veigh, who was bom a.d. 1765, and died 
in 1815, entered the English Army, and was engaged in the Ameri- 
can War, under Generals Sir Henry Clinton and Lord Cornwallia ; 
he afterwards served under the Duke of York, in Flanders and 
Holland, and retired from the Army in 17d4. Having acquired large 
landed property in the United States, he married a Miss Stuart, by 
whom he had five soos and one daughter : descendants of those five 
sons are (in 1H77) prominent citizens in America. Becoming a 
widower he married Margaret, daughter of H. Burns, Esq., by whom 
he had an only child — a son named Patrick. 



lY.] THE MADDEN (hT-MAINE) FAMILY. 238 



in 1815. This John was 
twice married. 

124. Patrick*: his youngest 
son ; born in 1802 ; died in 
1871. 

125. Jamesf : his son; living 
in 1878 ; had four brothers, 



of whom Henry, who died in 
1878, was created by Queen 
Isabella, of Spain, a ** Knight 
of the Golden Fleece." 

126. James D. McVeigh : 
son of the said James ; bom 
in 1848 ; living in 1878. 



126. — The Stem of the " Madden " (Hy- Maine) Family. 

Owen buac, brother of Owen fionn who (see the first 
series) is No. 96 on the ** 0*Kelly ** (Hy-Maine) pedigree, 
was the ancestor of O'Madadhairiy of Gonnaught ; anglicised 
Mctdden. 



96. Owen buac (" buac- 
ach " : Irish, beauish) : son 
of Oormac. 



97. Moroch : his son ; had 
a brother named Anmchaidh, 
a quo SiolAnmchadha. 



* Fatrick : This Patrick MacVeigh, only child of John, by his 
second marriage, married in 1823 Helen, daaehter of H. O'Hare, 
Esq., of an old Irish family ; and by her had five sons and three 
daaghters. In 1849, he finaJly left Scotland ; settled on his property 
in Kentucky, United States America ; and died in 1871, nis wife 
having died in 1868. Of the five sons by that marriage, Henry 
MacVeigh, of Madrid, married fn 1851 Jacoba, daughter of Duke 
Fernandez y-Nunez, grandee of Spain, by whom he had three sons 
— 1. Henry, 2. Alfred, 3. James : this Henry was created by Queen 
Idabella of Spain a " Knight of the Golden Fleece" ; and died in 
1878. 

t James : Of this James, under the heading *' McVeigh James, 
Esq., of Wallacetown and Castlebank, Dumfriesshire,*' Walford, in 
his bounty Families (1877), says : "Third surviving son of the late 
Patrick McVeigh, Esq., Planter of Kentucky, U.S. America, by 
Helen, daughter of John O'Heir, Esq., of BaJIyna, county Down ; 
h. 1829, m. 1847 Mary, second daughter of Captain James Dalgiel, 
of the GleniB and Camwath family ; and has issue James D., b, 1848 
(married 1874 Mina, daughter of J. Parsons, Esq., Brighton), and a 
daughter, <yaroline Cassendra. 

** Ml*. McVeigh is a merchant in London, and purchased the 
Wallacetown property from the old family of Fergusons; and Cattle- 
bank from the last of the Watson family. Residences — Wallace- 
town, Dumfriesshire ; Castlebuik House, near Dumfries ; and 10 
Maxwell Road, S.W. (London)." 



2Bi 



IBMSB. FBDIOBKB8. 



[PABT 



98. Dnngealach (or Dnu- 
gal) : son of Moroch. 
99. Maoldim : his son. 

100. Cobthach : his son. 
This Cobthach had two bro- 
thers — 1. Flanchadh, who 
was ancestor of Clancy (of 
Hv-Maine), and of Hoolahan; 
2. Dangal. 

101. Longseach : son of 
Cobthach ; had a brother 
named Droighnean, who was 
fiather of Treasach (** treas": 
Irish, a battle or skirmish), a 
quo O'Treasaigh, of Con- 
nanght ; anglicised Tracey, 
Treacy, and Treassy. (See 
" Tracey '', page 102.) 

102. Donoch : son of Long- 
seach. 

103. Oaradh : his son ; had 
a brother named Gineadh 
[Einnee], a quo Kenny, of 
Connaught. 

104. Donoch (2) : his son. 

105. OlioU : bis son. 



106. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

107. Dermod : his son. 

108. Dunoagh : his son. 

109. Garadh (2) : his son. 

110. Madadhan(<*madadh": 
Irishy a dog, a warrior^ : his 
son ; a quo O'Madadhain. 

111. Dermod (2) : his son. 

112. Madadhan mor : his 
son. 

118. Cathal (or Charles): 
his son. 

114. Moroch: his son. 

115. Owen : his son. 

116. Moroch (2) : his son. 
This Moroch had two broth- 
ers — 1. Donoch-na-heire- 
ceach ; 2. Dermod caoch. 

117. Owen (2) : his son. 

118. Morogh (8) : his son. 

119. Morogh (4) O^Madden: 
his son ; had three brothers 
— 1. Owen, 2. John, 8. 
C^thaL 



127. — The Stem op the ** Madden'* (of Ulsteb) Faiolt. 

Bbeasal,* brother of Tuathal cruinnbheul who is No. 88 
on the '< 0*Brassil West '* pedigree, was the ancestor of 
O' Madden, of Ulster. 

88. Breasal : son of Felim; | 89. Feig : son of Breasal. 
a quo O^Brassil East ; had a | 90. Conall : his son. 
brother named Feig. | 91. OlioU : his son. 



* Brexual : This BretMul wwb also the ancestor of 0*Bra8aU Mach*» 
and 0*BrauU Kaodh. 



IV.] 



TBB IfiAAAUIMlN FAVILT. 



235 



92. TaathaJ : his son. 
98. Bonan : his son. 

94. Finghin : his son. 

95. Maoldun : his son. 

96. Conor cairaoh (** oair- 
ach " : Irish, scabby ; Heb. 
**karach ") : his son ; a quo 
O'Cairaighe^ anglicised Corry 
and Carey (which has been 
modernized Carew and 
Carewe) ; had a brother 
named Aodh (or Hugh). 

97. Buachall ("buachaill": 
Irish, the boy; Arab. ** buk- 
awal"; Gr. «' boukol-os") : 
son of Conor cairach ; a quo 
O'BuachailL* Had a broth- 
er named Oamascach. 

98. Dungal: son of Buac- 
hall. 

99. Maoldubhan {maol' 
dubhan : Irish, ** the devoted 
of St. Dubhan " : Dubhan 
hero meaning '< a dark- 
complexioned man ") : son 
of Dungal ; a quo O'Maol- 
diibhain, of Ulster, anglicised 
Muldoon. This Maoldubhan 
(or Maoldun) had a brother 
named Cairbre, a quo Clann 
Cairbre or Carbery, of Ulster. 



100. Aodh (or Hugh^) : son 
of Maoldun. 

101. Gairbiadh (" gair'* : 
Irish, a shout; *< biadh*\ 
food) : his son ; a quo 0'- 

Oairbidh,B,ngliGi&ed Garvey,\ 
102; Ceallachan: his son. 

103. Treinfear (''treine" : 
Irish, strength f and " fear*', 
a man ; Heb. ** fear'* and 
"fir"; Lat. "vir"): his 
son; a quo 0*Treinfir, an- 
glicised Iraynor, 

104. Hugh : his son. 

105. Madadhgan <' ma- 
dadh" : Irish, a warrior ; 
** gann", smail), mecming 
** the little warrior*' : his 
son; a quo O'Madadhgain 
and MacMadadhgain, angli- 
cised MadagaUf Madden, and 
Maddison ; had a brother 
named Area O'Brassil, a quo 
CrBrasil East. 

106. Padraic: son of Mada- 
dhgan. 

107. Lorcan O'Madagan : 
his son. 



128. — The Stem op the **Maoauban" Family. 
Breannan, brother of Hugh fionn who (see the first series) 

* 0*Buachailli Some are of opinion that BaU, Bool, and Bole, 
are anglicised forms of this old Irish simame. 

•fOarvey : This sirname signifies "the descendants of the man who 
used to shout for food" ; and is akin to O'h-Arbhidh ('* ar" : Irish, a 
ploughing \ Lat. **ar-o" to plough; '* biadh", gen. **bidh": Irish, 
food), which means " the descendants of the man who ploughed the 
land, to produce food", and which is anglicised Harvey, modernized 
Jatrvey^ 



2B6 



IBISH PEDIOBEES. 



[psurr 



is No. 98 on the '< O'Bourke'* pedigree, was the aneestor 
of MacSamhradkain ; anglicised MacGattran, MacGoverriy 
Magauran^ Ma4jovem^ Saurin, and Somen. 



98. Breannan : son of 
Fergnatli [fergna]. 

94. Baothin : his son. 

95. Maoinach : his son. 

96. Eochaidh : ,his son ; a 
quo Teallach Eochdhaidh, 

97. Dangaile : his son. 

98. Coscrach : his son. 

99. lomhar : his son. 

100. Buarc : his son. 

101. Teige : his son. 

102. Conor : his son. 

108. Samhradhan (<' samh- 
radh'* : Irish, summer; a quo 
MacSamhradkain . 

104. Muireadach : his son. 



105. Oiollananaomh : Yub 
son. 

106. GioUaiosa : his son. 

107. Giollanamaomh (2) : 
his son. 

108. Donoeh : his son. 

109. Brian breug (** breug** 
Irish, a tie) i his son. 

1 10. Thomas : his son. 

111. Fergal : his son. 

112. Brian MacSamhradh- 
ain : his son ; had four 
brothers — 1. Thomas na- 
feasoige, 2. Danoch ballach^ 
8. Maolseaghlainn, 4. Cor- 
mac. 



129.— The Stem op the ** Magellan" Family. 

Beice (king of Orgiall), son of Cumascach, brother of 
Buachall who is No. 97 on the ** Madden" (of Ulster) 
pedigree, was the ancestor of MacGealain ; anglicised 
MacGillan^ Magellan, Magillan, Gealan, and Gillan, 



97. Cumascach: son of 
Conor cairach, 

98. Beice gealan (<' gea- 
Ian** Irish, lightning) : his 
son; a quo MacGealain. This 
Beice had two brothers — 1. 
Breasal, who was the an- 
cestor of O'Longan ; and 2. 
Maoldun. 

99. Ceamach : his son* 
100. Breasal : his son. 



101. Fochaidh : his son. 

102. Cearnach (2): his son. 
108. Tuathal : his son. 

104. Cathal : his son. 

105. Tigheamach r his son. 

106. Tuathal Magealan : 
his son ; bad a brother 
named Giollachriosd Mac- 
Gealain, who was called 
MacGillan. 



IV.] THB MAGOFBET, MAOBATH, AND HAGUIBB FAIOLIBS. 237 



180« — ^Thb Stem of the '' Maoofbet** Familt. 

GuTHBioH (anglicised Geffrey, Geofi&ey, Jeof&ey, and 
Godfrey), brother of Dan oge who (see the first series is 
No. Ill on the '< Maguire" pedigree, was the ancestor of 
MacGiUhrigh; anglicised Magofrey, Maguthrie^ and 
Chithrie, 



111. Guthrigh " guth" 
[guff] : Irish, a voice; "righ": 

4)f a khig) : son of Donald ; a 
quo MacGuthnffh, 

112. Bory : his son. 

113. Guthrigh bearnach 
("beamach": Irish, gapped): 
Ms son ; a quo MacBear- 



naighe, of Fermanagh, angli- 
cised MacBimey, 

114. Niall mor : his son. 

115. Dermod : his son. 

116. Moroch : his son. 

117. Niall (2) : his son. 

118. Tirlach Magofrey: his 
son. 



131. — ^The Stem of the <' Maobath" (of Ulsteb) Family. 

DuBHcxTLiN, brother of Gairbiadh who is No. 98 on the 
^'O'Brassil West" pedigree, was the ancestor of MacCraith, 
of Ulster ; anglicised MacCraithy Maccrae^ Magrath^ and 
Creeth. 



98. Dubhculin : son of 
■Oeamach. 

99. Giollachriosd : his 
son. 

100. Dallgan (" dall" : Ir- 
ish, blind; ** gan", little) : 
Ms son ; a quo 0*Dallgain, 



anglicised Dalgariy Dalian j 
and Dolan. 

101. MaolbrigMd : Ms son. 

102. Macraith (** craith" : 
Irish, to weave) : his son ; a 
quo MacCraith, 



132. — ^The Stem of the ''Maouibb" Family. 
(See the first Series.) 



[* 



the head of the 
" Mahon" funily of Beech- 
hilL 

127. Ross Mahon : his son; 
mairiedm 1721 J&ne Usher; 
had three sons — ^1. Boss, 2. 
John, 3. Peter: both John 
and Peter died nnmarried. 
This Ross had two brothers 
— 1. James, 2. Peter — both 



ISB^ — TwM. Snv or tbs *1Iah»'* (or Coouigst) Faiiii.t. 

(Sir) Bktjui UjkcMABom, who (see the fiist series) is No. 

122 on the ** MacMahmi" (of Mnnaghan) pedigree, had a 

son named Sir Bijan, nho was the ancestor of Mahonj of 

Oonnaogpst. 
122. (Sir) Bryan Mac- 

Hahon, lord of Dartiy : son 

of Hugh oge; died, aj>. 

1620. 
128. Sir Bryan : his son ; 

had a brother named Art, 

who died in 1684, and who 

was ancestor of MacMahon, 

of Dartry. This Sir Bryan 

was the first of the fEunily 

who, in the reign of Queen of whom also died nnmar- 

EUzabethy settled in Con-| ried. 

naught. 128. Boss Mahon : son of 

124. James : his son ; ac- Boss ; married in 1762 the 

quired by purchase the es- Hon. Lady Anne Brown 

(daughter of John, then 
lord Monteagle, but after- 
wards earl of Altamont), by 
whom he had seven sons— 
1. Ross, who, in 1818, be- 
came the first baronet; 2. 
John, who married Lady 
Charlotte Brown, daughter 
of Peter, second earl of Al- 
tamont, and died leaving no 
male issue ; 3. George, who 
died young and unmarried ; 






tate of Lisduff, in the county 
Oalway. 

125. Bryan : his son ; mar- 
ried Magdalin, daughter of 
Poer ^or Power) of Lough- 
rea; died in 1695. 

126. Bryan Mahon : his 
son ; first of the family that 
omitted the prefix Mac; 
married in 1698 Ellinor, 
daughter of Boss Gaynor of 
Wostmeafh ; had an elder 
brother named James, who | 4. Benry"" ; 5. Jamesf ; 6. 

* Henry : This Henry Mahon married Anne, daughter of Bev. 
Abraham 8ymes, D.D., and died in 1888, leaving three sons — 1. 
lioti, 2. Hoiiry, 3. George : this Ross Mahon (of Belgrave-sqnare, 
Moukstown. oonnty Dublin, living in 1877,) married, first, Jane, 
daughter ox Sir Hugh Crofton, Bart., and by her had no issue ; the 
•aid Hou married, secondly, Harriet,dauffhter of Rev. Henry King, 
of llallyUn, in King's County, and by her has four sons— 1. Henry, 2. 
Komi, vL Uoor^te, 4» Arthur* the four of whom living in 1877. 

<^ Ji%m9» \ 4 his James Mahon married Frances Ker, and by her 
haa one son John» who married Fnmcea Dillon, by whom he has two 
•oat (Uviivg in i^iu ) -U Jamea» ^. Ueorge. 



IV.] 



THE MALONE AND MCGA3VK FAMILIES. 



289 



Gharles,who died unmarried; 
7. George, who married 
Sophia £.er, and died leav- 
ing one son Charles, who 
died leaving no male issue. 

129. Sir Ross Alahon : el- 
dest son of Boss ; married 
in 1786 Lady Elizabeth 
Browne, daughter of Peter, 
second earl of Altamont, 
and by her had no male 
issue ; in 1 805 he married 
secondly Diana, daughter of 
Baber, Esq., of Park- 
street, Grosvenor-square, 
London, and by her (who 
died in 1807) he had one 
son, Ross, who died an in- 
fant ; he married, thirdly, 
Maria, daughter of the Right 
Hon. James Fitzgerald, and 
by her had five sons — 1. 
Ross, 2. James, 8. William, 
4. John, 5. Henry ; was 
created a baronet in 1818; 
and died in 1887. 

180. Rev. Sir WilHam 



Boss Mahon, the fourth 
baronet; rector of Bawmarsh> 
Rotherham, Yorkshire, 

England : third son (by the 
third marriage) of Sir Boss 
Mahon, the first baronet : 
living in 1877 ; his eldest 
brother, Sir Boss Mahon, 
the second baronet, died un- 
married, and was succeeded 
in the baronetcy by his next 
brother Sir James, who was 
the third baronet, and who 
also died unmarried. This 
Sir William (Vesey) Boss 
Mahon has two surviving 
brothers — 1. John Boss 
Mahon (J. P. county Bos- 
common), of Castlegar, 
Ahascragh, county Galway ; 
2. Henry. 

131. William-Henry : son 
of Sir William Boss Mahon; 
b. 1856, and living in 1877; 
has four surviving brothers 
— 1. John, 2. James- Vesey, 
8. Edward, 4. Gilbert. 



134. — The ** Malonb" Family. 

EocHAiDH, brother of Muireadach [muredach] who is No. 
100 on the ** Lane" pedigree, was the ancestor of M alone. 



135. — The Stem of the " McCann " Family. 

C/LNA, the third son of Maithgamhuin who (see the first 
series) is No. 102 on the **MacMahon" (of Ulster) 
pedigree, was the ancestor of MacCana (anglicised 
AlcCann)j lords of Clanbrassil, county Armagh. 



240 



IBISH PBDIGBESS. 



[PABT 



108. Gana (" can " : Irish, 
to utter; Lat. '< can-o *' ; 
Heb. "gan-a", a cane; 
Hind. '*gan-i", to chant): 
son of Maithgamhuin ; a quo 
MacCana. 

104. Cana mor : his son. 

105. Cana oge : his son. 

106. Catbal (or Charles) 
McCann : his son ; first assu- 
med this simame. 

107. Charles (2) : his son. 

108. Hugh, the Valiant: 
his son. 

109. Terence, the wine 
drinker : his son. 

110. Donal (or Daniel) : his 
son ; lord of Olanbrassil. 

111. Hugh (2): his son. 

112. Cairbre oge : his son. 
118. Neal : his son. 

114. Neal oge : his son. 



116. Cairbre mor : his son. 
IIG. Hugh mor : his son. 

117. Hugh (4) : his son. 

118. Terence, of Upper 
Clannbrassil, in Armagh : 
his son. 

119. Cairbre : his son. 

120. Brian buidhe : his son; 
lord of Upper Clanbrassil. 

121. Lochlann : his son ; 
lord of Clanbrassil. 

122. Cormac, lordof Clann- 
brassil : his son. 

128. Brian ruadh : his son. 

124. Glaisneach McCann : 
his son; had a daughter 
named Elizabeth, who was 
married to John Hamilton, 
by whom she had six sons : 
one of whom was killed at 
the battle of Aughrim, ▲.d. 
1691. 



186. — ^The '< McEiebnan'* (of Maryland) Family. 

This family derives from Michael oge McEieman, of 
Arderry, parish of Drumrielly, barony of Carrigallen, and 
county of Leitrim, Ireland ; who was bom about 1680, 
and died 1760. 



1. Michael oge McKieman. 
This Michael was twice mar- 
ried : by the first wife he 
had eighteen children ; by 
the second, six. Of the 
twenty-four children I have 
ascertained the names of 
five ; of the other nineteen, 



fourteen were sons, and five 
were daughters. The five 
whose names I have ascer- 
tained were : 1. Michael, of 
Fenagh, county Leitrim, 
born in 1716 and died in 
1800 ; 2. Farrell, of Keen- 
heen, county Leitrim, b. 



IT.] 



THE moubbnan (of mabtland) familt. 



241 



1720, marriecl Jane Webb, 
of county Longford, died in 
1820, aged 100 years; 8. 
Lawrence, of Arderry, coun- 
ty Leitrim, b. 1722, married 
in Ireland, emigrated to 
Maryland in 1773, d. 1806, 
was ancestor of Oale of 
Maryland; 4. Susan, b. 
1729, married a Mr. Plun- 
kett of Mullingar, county 
Westmeath ; 5. Brian raadh 
[roe] , of Aughalough, 
county Leitrim, b. 1788, 
was twice married — first, to 
Mary Johnston, and second- 
ly, to Jane Portis, d. 1800. 

2. Michael, of Eenagh, 
county Leitrim : son of 
Michael oge ; b. 1716 ; mar- 
ried to Frances Gonnellan, 
of County Mayo ; emigrated 
to Maryland in 1778; d. 
1800. This Michael had 
ten children: 1, Peter, born 
at Fenagh, 1747, emigrated 
to Maryland in 1778, and 
died unmarried in Virginia, 
in 1812; 2. Patrick, who 
died in infancy, in Ireland ; 
8. Susan, who also died in 
infancy, in Ireland ; 4. 
Charles, bom at Fenagh in 
1758, married Mary Duige- 
nan of Eeshcarrigan (who 
died in 1788), emigrated to 
Maryland in 1790 and mar- 
ried Jane MacDonald, of 
Yirgiria, in 1795, died in 
1797; 5. Michael, bom at 



Fenagh in 1755, emigrated 
to Maryland in 1775, and 
died unmarried in Virginia, 
in 1801 ; 6. Catherine, bom 
at Fenagh in 1757 (d. 1832), 
first niarried Patrick O'Fer- 
rail — her second husband 
was Andrew Goulding— 
both of Maryland, from her 
is descended the Bev. Bobt. 
W. Brady, 8.J.; 7. Margaret, 
born at Fenagh in 1759, 
married Patrick Tieman of 
Virginia, she died in 1814, 
from her are descended the 
Tlemans of Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania ; 8. Susannah, 
bom at Feenagh in 1761, 
was thrice married : 1. to 
Florence Mahony of Vir- 
ginia, 2. to a Mr. Quinn of 
Pennsylvania, and 3. to a 
Mr. Lewis of Louisiana, she 
died in 1827 ; 9« Lawrence, 
bom at Feenagh in 1768, 
emigrated to Maryland in 
1775, married Elizabeth 
Butler of Virginia, died in 
1846, he was ancestor of the 
McKiemans of Illinois ; 10. 
Frances, bom at Fenagh in 
1765, married Ignatius 
O'Ferrall of Virginia, from 
her are descended the 
O'Ferralls of Virginia (Ber- 
keley Springs), she died in 
1848. 

8. Charles : the third son 
of Michael ; b. 1758, d. 1797. 
This Charles had seven 



242 



IBISH FEDIGBEES. 



[ 



children — 1. Frances, b. 
1778, d. 1869, was twice 
married — first to Timothy 
Monohan, and secondly to a 
Mr. Melton, both of Mary- 
land, from her is descended 
John MacKieman Monohan, 
of Lonisyille, Kentucky, 
living in 1877 ; 2. Michael, 
b. 1776, d. 1887, married 
Mary Protzman of Pensyl- 
vania, resided at Hancock 
in Maryland and had two 
children — 1. Alice (who died 
yonng), 2. John ; 8. Ella, h. 
1778, d. 1845, was twice 
married — first, to George 
Sharkey, and secondly to 
John OTerrall, both of 
Maryland, from her are 
descended the O'Ferralls of 
Lewis county, Missouri ; 4. 
John, b. 1780, d. 1824— died 
unmarried in Tennessee ; 5. 
Peter, b. 1782, d, 1837, 
married Mary Stonebraker 
of Maryland, resided at 
Frederick in Maryland, left 
no issue ; 6. Francis, b. 1784, 
d. 1828 ; married Catherine 



Smith of Maryland, resided 
at Frederick, Md., left a son 
named George S. McEieman 
who was bom in Frederick, 
in Maryland, in 1818, and 
was mariied in 1852 to Mary 
Hull who died in 1875 : this 
George 8. McEieman (living 
in 1877) resides in New 
Albany, Indiana; 7. Bernard 
b, 1786, d. 1858, was mar- 
ried to Marianne Waters of 
Maryland, resided in Ala- 
bama and was the ancestor 
of the MacKientans of North 
Alabama. 

4. Michael: the second 
son of Charles ; b. 1776, d. 
1887. 

5. John : his son ; bom in 
Hancock in Maryland ; 
removed to Ohio ; died in 
Louisiana in 1840. 

6. Warren : his son ; bom 
in Ohio in 1881 ; resides in 
Indianopolis, li^diana, in 
1877. 

7. John : son of Wairen ; 
b. 1858, and living in 1877. 



187. — The Stem of the '' Miohil" Faiult. 

Maoih, a brother of Muirceartach (latinized ''Muriar- 
tuB**) Mor MacEarca, the 181st monarch of Ireland, and 
who (see the first series) is No. 90 on '< The stem of the 
House of Heremon*', was the ancestor of O'MaolmickeilU; 



IT.] 



THE MICHIL FAMILT. 



243 



anglicised Mickil"^, Michel, Mitchell, Mulcichill, Mulvihill, 
Melvill, aud Mulville, 



90. Maoin: son of Moirea- 
daoh. 

91. Columan("columan*': 
Irish, a little dove) : his son ; 
A quo O'Columain (of Ulster) 
iinglicised Colman). 

92. Faelan : his son. 

93. Endadaidh : his son. 

94. Fionnbeartach : his 
43on. 

95. Tnatbal : his son. 

96. Dnngal : his son. 

97. Maolmiohiall (<' mich- 
iall" : Irish, /o%) : his son ; 
a quo 0' Maolmicheille and 
O^MaolmichiL 

98. Uirniman ("uiruim" : 
Irish, obedience) : his son. 

99. Ardait : his son. 
100. Eachteoragan : his 

£on. 



101. GioUachriosd : his 
son. 

102. Murcha : his son. 

103. Duinesidhe (<* duine": 
Irish, a man ; '< sidh", gen. 
" sidhe'*, of a fairy hill): his 
son ; a quo 0* Duinesidhe, 
anglicised Dennesy, and 
Dennehy, 

104. Breannan : his son. 

105. Eaohmarcaoh: his son. 

106. Coma : his son. 

107. GioUachriosd (2) : his 
son. 

108. Mnireadach : his son. 

109. Niall : his son. 

110. Giollat blein 0'»faol- 
michil, <<of the Battle Axes'* 
("blein" : Irish, the groin) : 
his son ; a quo MacBleinne\ 
and 0*Blei7ine. 



At this stage in this genealogy the family was expelled 
tby the O'Connors, of Gonnanght, from Corca Eachllnn ; 
-when they settled in the county Clare, at Doon Maolmichiall 
which they possessed up the time of the Cromwellian 
confiscations in Ireland. In 1554 the castle of Doon Maol* 
michiall was besieged by the O'Briens ; and Owen O'Maol- 

* MkhU : Another family of this name, whose pedigree I did not 
yet meet, is descended from Giollamichiall, a descendant of Colla-da- 
•crioch, who (see the first series) is No. 85 on the ** O'Hart" pedigree; 
bnt, while, MaolrmchidUf No. 97 on the foregoing stem, literally 
means " bald Michael'', the name (?to/2amtcAta/if means '' the devotea 
of 8t. MichaeL" 

t OioUai This Giolla blein O'Maolmichil, « of the Battle Axes'* 
possessed the TwUha (or Noith Corca EachUnn) in the county Rob* 
vcommon, near the river Arigna, a branch of the Shannon. 

t MacBleinne : It is considered that Blean, Bktin, Blane, Mac* 
Blane, and MacBkUne, are Anglicised forms of this Irish simame. 



mithilr €i Doon "Ufaotrnft^MaTT and Killowen, was the 
huH of ftbe fsnaLj irho possessed thai estate — of which he 
was dcprired by Olirer CnnnwelL From this Owen 
descended Daniel O'MalTihill, of Enoekanira, county 
Clarey who died in 18S0. This Daniel had two sons — 1. 
Charies ; 2. Daniel, of Kilglaasy, coimtj Glaze ; and whose 
hrother, Henzj Molville, was a Medical Doctor in Dnblin: 
this Henzj had a son muned Urqnhart. Daniel O'MolTi- 
hill, Kilglassy, had three sons, the eldest of whom was 
Charles MnlYUle. 

It is said ihat Maolmichiall, No. 97 on the foregoing 

Cdigree, did, in his advanced age, shave his heiid, and 
come a monk, very eminent for his sanctity : hence his 
name, which signifies '* bald Michael " ; on account of the 
monks shaving their heads in the tonsure. He had been a 
chief or prince of Tuatha Corca Eachlinn (or '' the north 
swampy plain ''), on the banks of the river Arigna (a 
tributary of the river Shannon), in the county Boscommon. 
In tbe '* Monasticon " is mentioned, as an eminent eccle- 
siastic of this name, a dean of Cluan Dochrach, and 
professor of Divinity of Cluan MacNorisk. 

Tbe ** Annals of the Four Masters", O'Dugan's " Topo- 
graphy '\ Lynch, in bis Cambrensis Aversus, and tbe Books 
of Leacan and Ballymote all mention this family as lords 
of Corca Eachlinn, which they continued to hold down to 
about A. D. 1416. The '* Four Masters** state, under the 
year 1180, that on the trial, for treason, of the son of 
Boger (or Boderiok) O'Connor, king of Connaught, by the 
ehicfg and nobles of Connaught, O'Maolmichiall (or O'Maol- 
miohil) was the fourth on the list. Under the year 1210, the 
«« Four Masters** also state that the 0*Conors of Connaught 
invaded Corca Eachlinn, but were beaten out of it with 
1098 by 0*Maolmichil ; and, in 1282, a similar event took 
plAee, iu wludi O'Conor^s son, MaoDermott, and 0*Eelly 
WO)^ fUl \Am\ by O^Maolmiohil, ** of the Battle Axes '* : 
yfh\<\\ mmA U^^ b(Mro*8 fame so high, that it became an 
%An^ l<i> iti^N^— ^ '' Maolmiehil of the Battle Axes could not 
lumui))>U«Ji \is'' Th« O'Gonors, however, eventually 
<^xt><^U^l \\\^ U'M«t<>)iuidul fiunily firom Corca Eachlinn ; 
^h^ ll^^^v tk^lU^l iu lh« «ouut^ Clare, at Doon Maohnichil, 
yf\ki^\k U^^^Y It^l by <miJl«daUott in Cromwell^s time. 



IV.] 



THE MOGHAN AND MOLLOY FAMILIES. 



245 



138. — The Stem op the " Moghan" Family. 

OoNN beameachy brother of Conall who is No. 91 on the 
** O'Shaughnessy'* pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Moc- 
hain ; anglicised Moghan and Mohan. 



91. Conn beamach : son 
of Owen. 

92. Cathal : his son. 

93. Flann : his son, 

94. Conor : his son. 

95. Algan(" alga" : Irish, 
nohle^ "an", one who ; Gr. 
** agla-os*') : his son. 

96. Teige : his son. 

97. Tighearnach : his son. 

98. Tioith : his son. 

99. ^neas (Aongus) : his 
son. 

100. Mochan (" moch" : 
Irish, early y " an", one who) : 
Ms son ; a quo O'Mochain, 

101. Morogh : his son. 



102. Morogh oge : his son. 

103. Athasach : his son. 

104. Minmoin : his son. 

105. Fionn : his son. 

106. Muireadach : his son. 

107. Murtagh : his son. 

108. Donoch : his son. 

109. Donald : his son. 

110. Nicholas: his son. 

111. Simeon : his son. 

112. Gregory : his son. 

113. John : his son; had 
two sons, named — 1. Mor, 
2. Dermod. 

114. Mor (or Magnus) 0'- 
Moghan : his son. 



139. — The Stem of the " Molloy " Family. 

EocHAiDH, brother of Tuathal who is No. 89 on the <*Mac- 
Geoghagan" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Maoluaidh ; 
anglicised Molloy. 



89. Eochaidh : son of 
Fiacha ; had a brother 
named Tuathal, who was 
the ancestor of MacGeogha- 
gan, and another brother 
Uigin, who was the ancestor 
of Higgins. 
90. Duncatha : son of Eo- 
chaidh. 



91. Bran : his son. 

92. Duineocar (*'duine" : 
Irish, a person ; ** ocar", 
gen. " ocair", usury) : his 
son ; a quo 0' Dainocair^ an- 
glicised Donacar, Donagher^ 
and Dooner. 

93. Anmchadh : his son. 

94. Donnceann : his son. 



246 



IRISH FEDtGBEES. 



[PARir 



95. Maoluadh : his son. 

96. Donoch : his son. 

97. Lorcan : his son. 

98. Bogach : his son. 

99. Maoluadh (;* luadh" : 
Irish, motion) : his son ; a 
quo O'Maoluaidh, lords of 
the territory of Fercal, in 
the King's County. 

100. Duach : his son. 

101. Dubh : his son. 

102. Donoch (2) : his son. 
108. Donald O'MoUoy : his 

son ; first assumed this sir- 
name. 

104. Teige : his son. 

105. Gathal : his son. 

106. Florence : his son. 

107. Fiongan (" fion*' : Ir- 
ish, wine; Heb. **yain" ; 
Lat. **vin-um" ; Gr. ** oin- 
os" or "fion-os"; and **gan": 
Irish, without)^ meaning 
" without wine" : his son; a 
quo O'Fionagain, anglicised 
Finnegan. 

108. Fergal : his son. 

109. Murtaoh : his son. 



110. Hugh mor : his son. 

111. Hugh oge : his son. 

112. Eory : his son ; had a 
brother named Cuileann, 
who was ancestor of Molloy^ 
of Connaught. 

113. Neal : son of Bory. 

114. Hugh (3) : his son. 

115. Conn (also called 
Oonstantine, and Cos- 
namh) : his son. 

116. Cathair (or Cahyr) i 
his son. 

117. Conall : his son. 

118. Caolach : his son, 

119. Cahyr (2) : his son. 

120. Oalloideach : his son ; 
had a brother named Art 
(or Arthur). This Art had 
a son named Conall O'Mol- 
loy, lord of Fercall, who, in 
1590, surrendered his lands 
to Queen Elizabeth, and got 
a re -grant thereof. 

121. Arthur O'Molloy : son 
of Calloideach ; and lord of 
Fercall. 



140. — The Stem of the ** Mooney '* (op Opfaley) Family. 

EoGHAN (or Owen), brother of Berchan who is No. 98 on 
the "O'Gorman'* pedigree, was the ancestor of 0*Maoen- 
aigh ; anglicised Mooney, and Money, 



93. Owen : son of Feig. 

94. Alioll mor : his son. 

95. Maoinach Q^ maoin", 
gen. '^maoine*': Irish, wealth-, 



Engl. ** money") : his son ; 
a quo G* Maonaigh, and the 
territory of Feara Maoinaigh 
(anglicised <* Fermanagh *'}, 



lY.] 



THE MOONET AND MORGAN FAMILIES. 



247 



which was given to him by 
his uncle, the then Irish 
monarch. 

96. C r c r a n : son of 
Maoinach ; had two brothers 
— 1. Fiachra, ancestor of 
Mooney^ of Lochern, and 2. 
lardon, ancestor of GLann 
Rorc. 

97. Conall : son of Core- 
ran. 

98. longlan : his son. 

99. Gilearan ("gile'': 
Irish, whiteness f and '<aran**, 
brecid) : his son ; a quo O'Oil- j 



earain^ anglicised Gillard and 
Gilleran, 

100. Maoltoghadh: his son. 

101. Oonadhgan : his son. 

102. GaUan : his son. 

103. Dallgan : his son. 

104. Canamhuin (see can- 
meny old Lat. form of " car- 
men ") : his son. 

105. Coscrach: his son. 

106. Giollabrighid : his son. 

107. Ceamach : his son. 

108. Banail O'Mooney : his 
son. 



141. — ^The Stem of the " Mooney" (of Ulster) Family. 

Maignan, brother of Aongus who is No. 90 on the 
*• O'Brassil West " pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Maoin- 
aigh of Ulster ; anglicised Mooney ^ and Mon$y. 



90. Maignan : son of Col- 
can. 

91. Cumann : his son ; had 
a brother named St. Furanan 
(See Calendar, 25 June). 

92. Maoinan : son of Cu- 
mann. 

93. Cumann (2) : his son. 

94. Osbiseach (** biseaoh": 
Irish, increase \ Heb. ** biz- 
za*'): his son. 



95. Maoinach : his son ; a 
quo 0' Maoinaigh. 

96. Fear- coir ("coir": 
Irish, virtuous] Heb. ** chor", 
noble) : his son ; a quo 
O'Fearcora, anglicised Far- 
aheTf and modernized Corr. 

97. Flann : his son. 

98. Cearnach : his son. 

99. Felim 0' Mooney : his 
son. 



142.— The Stem of the ** Morgan " Family. 

Muiregan, brother of Donelan who is No. 102 on the 
** Donnellan*' (of Ulster) pedigree, was the ancestor of 
0*Muiregain ; anglicised Murigan, and Morgan. 



248 



IBISH FBDIOBEBS. 



[part 



102. Muiregan (''muire- 
gan** : Irish, a mariner)', son 
of Maolcraoibhe ; a quo O*- 
Muiregain, 

108. Flann : his son. 



104. Mnrtagh : his son. 

105. Muireadaoh : his son. 

106. Flann O^Murigan : his 
son. 



148. — Tab Stem of the << Mobiabtt" (of Connaught) 

Faiolt. 

Muiroeabtaoh (or Mnrtagh), the second son of Malachi, 
the brother of Murtogh, who is No. 120 on the *' Concan- 
non" pedigree, was the ancestor of G* Muirceartaigh 
anglicised Moriarty, and Murtogh. 

120. Malachi : son of Ard- r 122. Edmond: his son; had 
i;all. I a brother named John. 



121. Muirceartach(**muir*': 
Irish, the sea; '* ceart", just 
or upright) f meaning **a pro- 
tector at sea*', or **B,n ad- 
miral'*) : his son ; a quo 
O *M airceartaigh. 



128. Hugh : son of Ed- 
mond. 

124. Edmond (2) : his son. 

125. Hugh O'Moriartj : his 
son. 



144. — The Stem of the " Mobbis** Famh^t. 

DoNOCH, brother of Diarmod who is No. Ill on the "Mac- 
Dermott" pedigree, was the ancestor of MacMuirios^ or 
O'Muirfeasa ; anglicised Morishy, Morris, Morrisey, and 
JlfacJform— modernized Morrison* 



111. Donoch : son of Teige 
mor. 

112. Teige : his son. 

118. Muirios (** muir" : 



Irish, the sea; <<fios*' or 
** feas", gen. " feasa", 
knowledge ; Lat. " vis-us"), 
meaning << intelligence from 



* Morrison : like other Scotch familieB of the present dav, « 
member of the MacMuirios or O* Muirios family settled in Scouand 
in early times ; who was the ancestor of Morrison, 



ivj 



THB MULBBENNAN FAMILT. 



249 



the sea" :. his son ; a quo 
MaeMturioSf etc. 

114. Tomaltach (or Timo- 
thy) 0* Marios : his son ; 
first assumed this simame. 

115. Martach : his son. 

116. Donal : his son. 

117. Malachi : his son. 

118. Geallach: his son. 

119. Martach : his son. 



120. Manas : his son. 

121. Maob:aanaidh(or Mal- 
roona) : his son. 

122. Malachi (2) : his son. 
128. Manas (2) : his son. 

124. Daald (or Dudley) : 
his son. 

125. Ferdinand O^Muirios* 
his son. 



145. — The Stem of the << Mulbeennan" Family. 

MniBEADAGH maoilleathau, the 16th Christian king of 
Gonnaught who (see the first series) is No. 97 on the 
^* O'Gonor " (Gonnaught) pedigree, was the ancestor of 
OMaolbreannain ; anglicised Mulhrennan^ and Brennan, 



102. Breannan {an : Irish, 
"one who"; brean, "an 
offensive smell **) : his son ; 
a quo 0' Maoilhreannain. 

103. Buarc : his son. 

104. Culuachrach Mul- 
brennan : his son ; first 
assumed this simame. 

105. Tomaltach : his son. 
lOB. Murtogh : his son. 

107. Dermod : his so a. 

108. Giollachriosd ("giolla- 
chriodd *' : Irish, a devoted of 

* (yMuirios : Another " Morris*' ^a^jjy ^^ descended from 
Tiomain Muirios, the younger brother of llobrad who is No. 91 on 
the " O'Dowd" pedi^ce ; as follows : 

91. Tiomain Muinos : son of Maoldubh, who was son of Fiachra 
ealffach (or eallach), who was son of Dathi, the 127th monarch of 
Ireland. 

92. Aodh (or Hngh) : his son. 

93. Martagh : his son. 

94. Martagh oge : his son. 

95. Teige O'Murios : his son. 



97. Muireadach maoillea- 
than('< maoilleathan'': Irish, 
broad-faced) ; a quo O'Maoil- 
leathan, anglicised Molohan, 
and Mullehan, 

98. Gathal : his son ; the 
18th Ghristian king ; was 
the ancestor of Finaghty. 

99. Dubhinrachtach : his 
son. 

110. Oireachtach : his son. 

101. Aongus maoldun : his 

son. ^ 



250 



naSH PEDIOBBES. 



[past 



Christ) : his son; a quo 
O ' Giollachriosd, anglicised 
Oillchriest, and, in Scotland, 
Christian.* 

109. Dermod (2) : his son. 

110. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

111. Giollachriosd (2) : his 
son. 

112. Maithan: his son; 
had a brother named Aodh. 



113. Hubert : his son. 

114. Hubert oge : his son. 

115. Hugh (2) : his son. 

116. Bory granna (*' gran- 
na " : Irish, not handsome) : 
his son ; a quo MacGranna, 
anglicised MacOrane ^d 
Magrane. 

117. Edmund Mulbrennan: 
his son. 



* Christian : I have traced this family back to Gilbert Christian^ 
a native of Scotland, who settled in the North of Ireland, a.d. 1702, 
and there married Margaret Richardson, by whom he had children : 
that Gilbert was, I find, the great-great-grandfather of J. B. 
Christian, living in 1877, in Holly Springs, Miasissipi, United States, 
America; subject to "vihose correction I write this notice of his 
family. And, I find, that Duncan Campbell of Inverary, Scotland, 
whose wife was Mar^ McCoy, and who settled in Ireland at the 
time of the ** Plantation of Ulster'*, by King James II. of England, 
was one of Mr. Christian's maternal ancestors. This Duncan lived 
near Londonderry, where his son Patrick Campbell purchased some 
land. Patrick's youngest son, John, when far advanced in life, 
migrated to America, a.d. 1726 : from him and his numerous children 
and other kindred have descended a large progeny, spread over the 
Southern States of the American Union. 

In 1722, the above mentioned Gilbert Christian, accompanied by 
a large number of his countrymen, migrated to America; and, having 
some time remained in Pennsylvama, he ultimately settled in 
Virginia, whither many of his name and family had preceded him 
from Ireland. Israel Christian, a Scot, once a merchant in Dublin, 
followed him ; and among those who tlien also went to America from 
various counties in Ulster were members of the following families : 
— Allen, Brakenridge, Campbell, Christian, Cunningham, Given, 
Henry, Lewis, Lockhart, McClanahan, McCue, [MacQugh], 
McDonald, McDowell, McGavock, Montgomery, Berton (or Reieton), 
Russell, Trimble, Wilson, etc. The descendants of those familiee, 
in America have there so multiplied during a residence of a century 
and three quarters in the country, and have become so connected by 
marriage, as to constitute a relationship between a lar^e proportion 
of the population of the Southern United States : disclosing the 
importajit fact that the people of that vast region in America are 
almost entirely Celtic 



IV.] 



THE MTJLDOON, HXJLFINNY, ETC., FAMILIES. 



251 



146. — The Stem of the ** Muldoon" (of Meath) Family. 

AoDH (or Hugh) laighen, brother of Foghaxthach who 
is No. 95 on the '^ Fogarty" pedigree, was the ancestor of 
O'Maoldnbhain, of Meath ; anglicised MiUdoon, and 
Meldon, 



95. Aodh laighen : son of 
Neal (or Niall). 

96. Donald : his son. 

97. Maoldon : his son. 

98. Adhnachan : his son. 



99. Assachan : his son. 
100. Maoldun (** Maol- 
Dubhan": Irish, the devoted 
of St. Dubhan) : his son ; a 
quo 0* Maoldubhain, 



147. — ^The Stem of the ** Mulfinny" Family. 

Maolfion (** fionn" : Irish, wine), brother of Dungal who 
is No. 102 on the '< Donnelly" pedigree, was the ancestor 
of O'Maolfhwna ; anglicised Mvdfinny, Feeny, etc. — See 
the *' Donnelly'* pedigree for other anglicised forms of the 
Irish sirname O'Maolfhiona. 



148. — The Stem of the '* Mulheeran'* (ob Offaley) 

Family. 

Oballaoh, a brother of ^neas who (see the first series) is 
No. 100 on the •* O'Oonor" Faley pedigree, was the ances- 
tor of O'Maolciarain, of Offaley ; anglicised Mulkeeran, 
Mulheeran^ and Mulhem, 



100. Ceallach : son of Flor- 
ence. 

101. Dungal : his son. 

102. Ceallachan : his son. 



108. Maolciaran(<<ciaran'*: 
Irish, one who is dark grey) t 
his son ; a quo O'Maolcia- 



rian. 



149. — The Stem of the << Mullen*' Family. 

CFoMOB, brother of Dathi who is No. 102 on the '' Con- 
cannon *' pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Maolain ; angli- 
cised Malin, Malliny Mollan, Mollon, Mollin, Moytan^ 
MoleynSf DeMoleyns, MacMullan, Mullen, and Milne, 



262 



naSH PEDIGBEES. 



[PABT 



102. Conor: son of Dermod 
fionn, the 80th Christian 
king of Connanght. 

103. Donall : his son. 

104. Maolan (*' maolan " : 
Irish, a bald'pated man) : 



his son ; a quo O'Maolain ; 
had a brother named Fionn 
(" fionn" : Irish, /air, hand- 
some), a quo O^Finncj angli- 
cised Finn. 



150.— The Stem of the " Mulboy" Familt. 



Anmire, the 188th monarch, brother of Fergus who (see 
the first series) is No. 91 on the " O'Donneir* (Tirconnell) 
pedigree, was the ancestor of 0' Maoldaraighey ancient 
princes of Tirconnell; anglicised Dary^ MuMory, and 
MtUroy. 



91. Anmire (** mire" : Ir- 
ish, frolick) ; son of Sead- 
nach ; ancestor of O'Oalla- 
gher. 

92. Aodh : his son. 
98. Donall : his son, 

94. Aongns : his son. 

95. Longseach : his son ; 
was the 154th monarch. 

96. Flaithertach : his son; 
the 159th monarch. 

97. Maolbreasal : his son. 

98. Morogh : his son ; had 
a brother named Aodh mun- 
derg, who was the ancestor 
of Canning, of Tirconnell. 

99. Aongns : his son. 

100. Maoldarach(*<darach" 
Irish, an oak) : his son ; a 
quo & Maoldaraighe, 

101. Maolbreasal : his son. 



102. Aongus : his son. 
108. Murtogh : his son. 

104. Maolruanaidh O'Maol- 
daraighe: his son.; first as- 
sumed this sirname. 

105. Giollafinnean: his son; 
a quo MacGillfinen, and 
OFinan. This Giollafin- 
nean was the last prince 
of Tirconnell, of the Mul- 
dory (or Mulroy) family. 
After him the O'Donnells, 
who were of the same illus- 
trious stock, became by con- 
quest Princes of Tirconnell ; 
and remained so down to 
the beginning of the 17ih 
century. — See the ** Flight 
of the Earls*', in the Appen- 
dix. 



IV.] 



THE MULYY AND MT7BPHY FAMILIES. 



25B 



151. — The Stem op the ** Mulvy" Family. 

DoNOGH, brother of Dermod ruanach who is No. 92 on the 
" Fogarty " pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Maolmodha ; 
anglicised Mulmuog, Malmody^ Moody^ Mulmy^ and Mulvy, 



92. Donoch : son of Aidus 
(or Aodh) slaine, the 141st 
monarch of Ireland. 

98. Finachtach fleadhach: 
his son, who was the 153rd 
monarch. 

94. Gathal : his son. 

95. Tomaltaoh : his son. 



96. Camascach : his son. 

97. Cearnach : his son. 

98. Maolmodh (*» modh'*, 
gen. *• modha ** : Irish, a 
mode or manner ; Lat. '^mod- 
us*') : his son ; a quo O'MaoU 
modha. 



152. — ^Thb Stem of the ** Mubpht " Family. 



Seione (or Secin), brother of Cineth who is No. 100 on the 
<' Dowling** pedigree, was the ancestor of OMuircatha, and 
JUacMuircatha (by some written O'Afidrchu, 0' Moroyhu^ 
MacMurchaday and MacMarchadain) ; anglicised Murphy ^ 
Morphy^ and Morrin, 



100. Seicin: son of Bran- 
dubh. 

101. Seagal (<< seagal" : Ir- 
ish, rye ; ij'r. *' seigle'' ; 
Lat. << secal-e") : his son ; 
had a brother named Noc- 
han, who was ancestor of 
Hanraghan, of Leinster. 

102. Mochtigheama : his 
son. 

108. Dungal : his son. 

104. Aodh fionn : his son. 

105. AlioU : his son. 



106. Aongus (or ^neas) : 
his son. 

107. Muircath (Muirchu, or 
Morogh) : his son ; a quo 
O'Muircatha (** muircatha" : 
Irish, a sea battle) <* muir- 
chu", a hound or warrior of 
the sea), 

108. Dunsliabh : his son. 

109. Donoch : his son. 

110. Donald ruadh O'Mur- 
phy : his son. 



iS64 



IBISH PEDIGBBBS. 



[PABT 



168. — The Stem op the " Naghten"* Familt. 

FiAGHBA fionn, brother of Lughach wlio (see the first 
series) is No. 92 on the ** 0*Kelly" (Hy-Maine) pedigree, 
was the ancestor of O'Neachtain and MacNeachtain ; an- 
glicised 'biaghteriy Natten, NatightoUf MacNaughtan\f and 
Norton, 



92. Fiachra fionn : son of 
Dalian. 

93. Amhailgadh [awly] : 
his son. 

94. Congal : his son. 

95. Inleigh : his son. 

96. Tuathal : his son. 

97. OlioU : his son. 

98. i^neas : his son ; had 
a brother named Maoleala 
{"eala" : Irish, a swan), a 
quo 0' Maoleala, anglicised 
Lally, and Mullally, 

99. Maolceir : his son. 

100. Neachtan ("neach'* : 
Irish, a spirit ; " teann", 
hold, daring) : his son ; a quo 
O^Neachtain, 

101. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

102. Fiontan C* fion" : Ir- 



ish, wine ; " teann**, daring): 
his son ; a quo 0*£iontain, 
anglicised Finton. 

103. Fearballach("ballach" 
Irish, speckled), meaning the 
<< freckled man": his son; 
a quo O' Fearhallaighe, 
anglicised Farrelly, Farley, 
and Freely, 

104. Fergus fionn : his son. 

105. Conor catha Brian (or 
Conor who fought on the 
side of the Monarch Brian 
Boroimhe [Boru], at the 
battle of Clontarf (A.D. 1014): 
his son. This Conor was 
the first that assumed the 
simame O'Neacktain, 

106. Amhailgadh [awly] : 
his son. 

107. Awly oge : his son. 



* NagJUen : As showing the wealth and piety in early tunes of 
this ancient f amily, I subjoin a copy of an inscription on a tomb in 
Dram Chnrch, Athlone. — 

"ONaghten Nobilissimns Satrapes ex Stirpe Hngonii Magni 
Totius Hibemiad Monarchse Hoc Templnm Eoificavit 8anct»qne 
MarisB Dedicavit Anno Domini 550. Snb hoe Tnmnlo Sepelitor 
Tandemque llllastrissima Antiqnissimaque Ejus prosapia Keqniea- 
cant in face Amen. 

t MacNaughian : Some MacNanghtans were of opinion that they 
were of Pictieh origin ; and that the family was one of the three 
clans descended from the old Maormors of Moray — soverigns of that 
ancient Fictish race, which, from the earliest times, occupied the 
district of Moray, in Scotland. 



ly.] 



THE NEALAN FAMILT« 



255 



108. Melachlin : his son. 

109. Teige, of Lougbrea : 
his son. 

110. Hugh (2): his son. 

111. Conor (2) : his son. 

112. Melachlin (2) : his 
son. 

113. Awly (4) : his son. 

114. Donall: his son. 

115. Creachmoill : his son. 

116. Gathal (or Charles) : 
his son. 

117. A\«ily (5) : his sou. 

118. GioUachriosd: his son. 



119. Jloger: his son. 

120. Giolla (or WiUiam) : 
his son. 

121. Hugh (3) : his son. 

122. Donogh : his son. 

123. Edward : his son. 

124. Thomas Naghten, of 
Crofton House, Hants, Eng- 
land : his son. 

125. Arthur E. Naghten, 
of fiUghmont, Southampton, 
M.P. for Winchester : his 
son ; living in 1878. 



164.— The Stem op the " Nealan '* Family. 

CoLLA-DA-cBiocH, who (seo the first series) is No. 85 on the 
<* 0*Hart " pedigree, had a son named Fiachra casan, who 
was the ancestor of O'Niallain ; anglicised Nalliuy Nealan^ 
Neylan,f Neillan, Neyland, Newland^ Niland^ and NaUy. 



the 



his 



85. Colla-da-crioch, 
first king of Orgiall. 

86. Fiachra casan ; 
fion. 

87. Felim : his son. 
SS, Feich : his son. 

89. Niallan ("niall": 
Irish, a champion) : his son ; 
a quo O^Niallain, 

90. Eoghan ('* ogan" : 
Irish a youth) : his son ; a 
quo MacEoghain, of Ulster ; 
anglicised MacOwen^ Mac- 
Keown, MacKeon, Keon^ 



McGeowriy Keoum, Owens, 
Owensonj and Coyne. 

91. Muireadach : his son. 

92. Baothin (" Baoth " : 
Irish, simple ; Heb. ** baha", 
was vain) : his son ; a quo 
0' Baothin,* 

93. Ronan (** ron": Irish, 
hair)y meaning ** the man 
with a profusion of hair" : 
his son ; a quo O'Ronain^ 
anglicised Bonan and Ro- 
nayne, 

94. Snbhaneach : his son. 



* O* Baothin : Some are of opinion that BooUy Bowen, and Batten, 
are anglicised forms of this siraame. 



256 



IBI8H FBDIOBEES. 



[PABT 



95. Colga : his son. 

96. Eiginneach : his son. 

97. Subhaneach (2) : his 
son. 

98. Gosgrach : his son. 

99. Dermod : his son. 

100. Anluaneach : his son. 

101. Flann line : his son. 

102. Aiodh : his son. 
108. Dermod : his son. 

104. Flaithertach : his son. 

105. Dermod 0*Niallain : 
his son ; first assumed this 
simame ; had a brother 
named Hugh, who was the 
ancestor of Neylan, of Eng- 
land : the first of whom, 
named Edmund O'Neylan, 
went there, a.d. 1120. 

106. Teige: son of Dermod. 



107. Gathal caomh : his 
son. 

108. Thomas : his son. 

109. Dermod (Z'j : his son. 

110. Donoch: Ins son. 

111. Teige (2) : his son. 

112. David : his son : a quo 
Slioght Daibhidfi {'' sliochd'*: 
Irish, posterity)^ meaning the 
posterity of Davy : his son ; 
a quo O'Daibhidhy of Orgiall, 
anglicised Davy^ Davies^ and 
Davis, 

118. Conor : his son. 

114. Thomas (2; : his son. 

115. David (2): his son. 

116. William: his son. 

117. John : his son. 

118. Denis 0*Neylan, of 
Slioght David : his son. 



155. — The Stem op the " Nowlan" FAMn«T. 
(^See the first series,) 



156. — ^The Stem of the *< O'Beibme" Family. 

AoDH (or Hugh) balbh, brother of Murgal who (see the 
first series) is No. 99 on the << O'Conor" (Connanght) 
pedigree, was the ancestor of 0*^^mn; anglicised 0*Beime, 
BeimeSy Barnes^ Bamewall^ and BarnewelL 



99. Aodhbalbh*("balbh": 
Irish, dumb ; Lat. '* balb- 
us") : son of Inreactha, the 
28rd Christian king of Con- 



naught. Some say that this 
Aodh balbh was the 26th 
king, instead of Flaithrigh 
(2). 



* Balbh : This word is the loot of the nmame Baffe. 



17.] 



THB O BEIBNE FAMILT. 



267 



100. Uadhach : son of 
Aodh balbb; a quo Clann 
Uadhaigh,* 

101. Ubhan ('» ubh'': Irisb, 
the point of a thing): bis son; 
a quo O'h' Ubhain, anglicised 
ffoban; bad a brotber named 
Geannfada, wbo was tbe 
ancestor of Fallon, 

102. Cineadb : son of Ub- 
ban. 

108. Beirin ("beirin'* : Ir- 
isb, Jit to bear or carry ; Lat. 
" fer-o" ; Gr. ** pber-o'* ; 
Pers. ** bar") : bis son ; a 
quo 0*Beirin. 

104. Mortacb mantacb : 
bis son. 

105. Dermod: bis son. 

106. Mortacb (2) : bis son. 

107. Ouconnacbt : bis son. 

108. Giollacbriosd : bis son. 

109. Donall : bis son. 

110. Giollaiosa : bis son. 

111. lombar: bis son. 

112. GioUacoman: bis son; 
bad a brotber named Ber- 
nard, wbo was tbe ancestor 
of Bamewall, etc. 

118. Maitban : son of Giol- 
lacoman. 

114. Giollacbriosd: bis son. 

115. lombar (2) : bis son. 

116. Giollacbriosd (2) : bis 
son. 

117. Donall (2) : bis son. 



118. Donocb : bis son. 

119. Cormac : bis son; bad 
five brotbers. 

120. Cairbre ; bis son ; bad 
six brotbers. 

121. Teige : bis son. 

122. Teige oge : bis son. 

123. Donocb : bis son. 

124. Brian : bis son. 

125. Donocb (2) ; bis son. 

126. Teige (8) : bis son. 

127. Henry: bis son. 

128. Hugb : bis son ; was a 
J.P. for tbe county Boscom- 
mon : died in 1818. 

129. Francis : bis son ; 
was a J.P. and D.L. for tbe 
county Leitrim; died in 
1854. 

180. Hugb O'Beime, D.L., 
Jamestown House, Drumsna, 
county Leitrim : bis son, 
living in 1878 ; bas a young- 
er brotber, Major Francis 
O'Beime, an M.P. for tbe 
county Leitrim, and living 
in 1878. 

181. Francis O'Beirne, 
born in 1864 : son of tbe 
said Hugb. Tbis Francis 
bas tbree brotbers — 1. 
Hugb-James, bom in 1866 ; 
2. Josepb, bom in 1874; 
and 8. George- Jobn, bom in 
December 1977: all living 
in 1878. 



* Clann Uadhaigh : The simames Wood and Woods are considered 
anglicised forms of this Clan-name ; which literally means ** except 
from him*' {uadh : Irish, " from him" ; ocA, ''save or except''). 



258 



ItOtBH PetilQSEBiS. 



[PABT 



167. — Tbr Stem of" the " O'Bbannan" Family. 

OuoLL, a brother of Cearnach who is No. 98 on the 
<< Breedin ** pedigree, was the ancestor of G*Brannainr of 
Ulster ; anglicised O'Brannan and Brannan. 



98. OlioU : son of Fergus. 

99. Conor : his son. 
100. Brannan ("bran'*: 



Irish, a mountain torrent): his 
son ; a qao O'Brannaut, 



158. — The Stem op the " 0*Brassil** (West) Family. 

FiACHBAGH casan, a younger brother of Bocadh, who (see 
the first series) is No. 86 on the " O'Hart " pedigree, was 
the ancestor of Clann Brassil ; a quo O^Brassil^ in the 
county Armagh, and, some say, the name of the Empire 
of " Brazil ", in South America. 



86. Fiachra casan (** cas": 
Insh, meariB or income, and 
•* an", one who ; or " casan** 
means a pathway) : son of 
Colla-da-crioch ; a quo 
O^Casairiy anglicised Cashin, 

87. Felim : his son. 

88. Tuathal cruinnbheul 
(" cruinnbeul** : Irish, a 
gathered mouth) : his son ; 
a quo O'Beil*; had a 
brother named Breasal, and 
another named Feig: This 
Feig was the ancestor of 
O'Hanlon, 

89. Oolcan: son of Tuathal 
cruinnbheul ; had a brother 
named Sacan (** sacan **: Ir- 
ish, a short corpulent man), 
literally " a little sack.*' 



90. Aongus: son of Colcsn; 
had six brothers — 1. St. 
Baodan (5 February) ; 2. 
Saraan, whose three sons 
were, St. Eonan fionn, St. 
Beican (17 August), and St« 
Cearnach (16 May) ; 8. 
Hugh, from whom were 
descended St. Cobhthach« 
St. Libren (11 March), St. 
Tuoa (virgin), St. Maimon, 
bishop (18 Dec), a quo 
'^Kilmainham*', near Dublin; 
4» Maignan (''maignan*' : 
Irish, one with a proud gait), 
a quo 0*Mat^/mm, anglicised 
Magnan and Mangan : this 
Maignan, was ancestor of 
O'Mooney^ of Ulster; 5. Lam- 
han ; and 6. Firbis, who was 



* (ySeU : The sirnamea Bale and Bell are considered anglicised 
forms of this simame. 



IV.] 



THE 0*BTBME (OF MABYLAND) FAMILY. 



259 



the ancestor of O'Connor, of 
Ulster. 

91. Diceilidh : son of Aon* 
gas. 

92. Ultan : his son. 

98. C a a n a c h (<< cuan"; 
Irish, a coast) : his son ; a 
qno O'Cuanaigli, anglicised 
Cooney (of Clan firassU). 

94. Inreactha : his son. 

95. Donoch : his son. 

96. Dallgan : his son; had 
a brother named Maolmoch- 
eirigh ("moch": Irish, early; 
" eirigh", to rise), a qno 
0*Maolmocheirghe, of Orgiall. 
— See No. 100 on the 



<< Donnellan*' ofConnaught 
pedigree, for the derivation 
and present anglicised forms 
of this Irish simame. 

97. Ceamach : son of 
Dallgan. 

98. Oairbiadh : his son ; 
had a brother named Dnbh- 
culin, who was the ancestor 
of Magrath, of Ulster. 

99. Longseach : son of 
Gairbiadh. 

100. Conan^ihail : his son. 

101. Aodh : his son. 

102. Breasal : his son ; a 
qno O'Brassil West. 



159. — The Stem of the "O'Byrnb" (of Mabylamd) Family. 

Felim, who (see the first series) is No. 181 on the 
** 0*Byme "* pedigree, was the last recognised chief of his 
name ; living in 1657. 



182. Brian : son of Felim ; 
had a brother named Wil- 
liam, who, after the Treaty 
of Limerick, settled in Eng- 
land and assumed the sir- 
name Brain^\ 

183. Hugh : son of Brian. 

184. William: his son. 

185. John : his son. 

186. Lawrence : his son ; 
migrated to America, in 
1818. 



187. Brian (2) : his son. 

188. Lawrence Byrne, of 
Pikeville, near Baltimore, 
Maryland, United States, 
America : his son ; living 
in 1877. 

189. Eichard MacSherry 
Byrne : his son. This 
Bichard has two brothers — 
1. Charles, 2. Bernard ; and 
two sisters — 1. Anna, 2. 
Eliza : all living in 1877. 



'*' Brain : This sirname appears to be derived, by metathesis, from 
" Brian." Unhappily, at that period and long afterwards, an Irish- 
man might not, under his Irish patronymic, expect favour or 
affection from the authorities in England, or Ireland. Hence the 
changes at the time of many Irhh simames ; and hence some 
members of the ** O'fiyme" family, for instance, changed their name 
to Byron, Brain, etc. 



260 



IBISH PEDIOBEES. 



[past 



160. — The Stem of the " O'Cleby*' Family. 

Feaboall, brother of Artgall who is No. 96 on the 
*' O'Shaughnessy" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Cleirigh^ 
and MacCleirigh ; anglicised O^Clery, Cleary, Clark, Clarke, 
and Clarkson, 



96. Fergall: son of Guaire 
aidhneach [aidhne] • 

97. Toirbheartach: his son 

98. Cathmogh : his son. 

99. Cumascach : his son. 

100. Ceadach : his son. 

101. Cleireach(**cleireach": 
Irish, a clerk; Lat. ** cleric- 
us") : his son ; a quo O'Clei- 
righ. 

102. Maolfabhal : his son ; 
died A.D. 887. 

108. Maolceardachd (called 
Flann) : his son. 

104. Comhailltan (** com- 
haill'* Irish, to perform a 
duty) : his son ; a quo 0'- 
Comhailltain, anglicised 
Coulton ; died a.d; 976. 

105. Giollaceallach : his 
son ; a quo Oilkelly. 

106. Congalach O'Clery: 
his son ; first assumed this 
simame ; d. 1025. 

107. Braoin : his son ; had 
a brother named Aidhne, 
who was the ancestor of 
Hynes ; d. 1088. 

108. Eoghan (or Owen) : 
his son. 

109. Donall : his son. 

110. Giollananaomh : his 
son. 

111. Tighemach : his son. 



112. Muireadach : his son. 
118. Teige: his son. 

114. Giollaiosa : his son. 

115. Lonall (2) : his son. 

116. Shane sgiamhach (or 
John the elegant) : his soil 
This John had three brothers 
— 1. Donall, 2. Thomas, 8. 
Cormac : from Shane 
sgiamhach are descended the 
O'Clerys of Tirconnell ; from 
Donall, the 0*01erys of Tyr- 
awley, in Mayo ; from Thom- 
as, the O'Clerys of Brefney- 
O'Eielly ; and from Cormac, 
the O'Clerys of the county 
Kilkenny. 

117. Dermod: eldest son 
of Shane sgiamhach [skeev- 
agh]. 

118. Cormac : his son ; 
the first of the family who 
settled in Tirconnell. 

119. GioUabrighid : his son. 

120. Giolla riabhach : his 
son. 

121. Dermod na-ttri-sgol 
(or ** Dermod of the three 
schools'' : namely, one 
school for Beading, another 
for History and Genealogy, 
and another for Poetry): his 
son. 

122. Teige cam : his son. 



IV.] 



THE CONOB DON FAMILY. 



261 



123. Dermod (8) : his son. 

124. Cucoigcrioch [cuco- 
cry] : his son. 

125. Maccon : his son. 

126. Lughach O'Clery : his 
son : had four brothers — 1. 



GioUabrighid, 2. Maccon 
meirgeach (" meirge": Irish, 
an ensign ; meaning ** Mac- 
con, the standard bearer'*), 
8. Cucoigcrioch, and 4. 
Dubhceann. 



161. — The Stem of the " 0*Conob Don " Familt. 

TiRLOCH O'CoNOB, brother of Felim who (see the first 
series) is No. 117 on the **0*Conor'* (Connaught) pedigree, 
was the ancestor of 0' Conor Dun; modernized 0' Conor 
Don. 



117. Tirloch: sonofHugh; 
was ** lord of Connaught." 

118. Hugh: his son; lord 
of Connaught ; had a brother 
named Bory. 

119. Tirloch dun ("dun" : 
Irish, here means a darkish 
brown colour^ as distinguished 
from the 0' Conor ruadh 

[Eoe] ): son of Hugh. 

120. Felim geancach : his 
son ; ** lord O'Conor Dun "; 
who attended a Parliament 
held in his time. 

121. Owen caoch : his son ; 
lord O'Conor Dun. 

122. Gairbre : his son; lord 
O'Conor Dun. 

128. Dermod: his son; lord 
O'Conor Dun ; had a brother 
named Tuathal. 

124. Sir Hugh : his son ; 
lord O'Conor Dun ; knighted 
by Sir John Perrott, lord 
deputy of Ireland. 



125. Cathal (or Charles): 
his third son. 

126. Cathal oge : his son. 

127. Donogh (or Denis) : 
his son. 

128. Charles : his son. 

129. Denis : his son. 

130. Owen : his son ; the 
first Catholic Member of 
Parliament for the county 
Roscommon, since the Ee- 
formation. 

181. Denis : his son; M.P. 
for Boscommon. 

132.Charles-OwenO*Conor, 
known as ** The O'Conor 
Don" : his son; M.P. for the 
county Boscommon ; has a 
younger brother named 
Denis, who is M.P. for the 
county Sligo — both living in 
1878. 



262 



ISISH PEDIOBBES. 



[past 



162. — The Stem op the " 0*Connob " (op Moy 1th) 

Family. 

Debmod, brother of Omagan who is No. 97 on the '< Eane" 
pedigree, was the ancestor"^ of O'Connor^ of Moy Ith, in 
the barony of Baphoe, and county Donegal. 



97. Dermod: son of Conor. 

98. Baoghal 0*Conor : his 
son ; first of the family who 
assumed this simame. 

99. Carlan ('• an" : Irish, 
one who ; ** carla,*' a wool- 
comb) : his son ; a quo 
O^Carlairif anglicised Carliuy 
Carolariy and Kerlin. 

100. Maoldun : his son. 



101. Aongus: his son. 

102. Bory : his son. 

108. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

104. Maolruanaidh [mul- 
roona] : his son. 

105. Aodh (2) : his son. 

106. Maolruanaidh 
O'Connor, of Magh [Moy] 
Ith : his son. 



168. —The Stem op the '< O'Connob Sligo '' Familt. 

Bbian, brother of Gathal craobh-dearg, the fifty-first 
Christian king of Connaught who (see the first series) is 
No. 112 on the <* 0*Conor " (Connaught) pedigree, was the 
ancestor of O'Connor Sligo. 



112, Brian : son of Tirlogh 
Mor, the 48th Christian 
king of Connaught, and 181st 
monarch of Ireland. 

118. Andreas : his son ; 
was the first that assumed 
the simame O'Connor Sligo. 

114. Brian (2): his son. 

115. Teige: his son. 



116. Donal (or Daniel) : 
his son. 

117. Murtach: his son; 
had a brother named Gathal 
(or Charles). 

118. Daniel: his son; had 
five brothers — 1. Malachi, 
2. Manus, 8. Murtach, 4. 
Donoch, 5. Malachi oge. 



* Ancestor: Other genealogists state that the ancestor of this 
family was Moroch, son of Longseach, son of Flaitheartaoh, who was 
brother of Dermod O'Cahan, No. 101 on the " Kane ** pedigree. 



IV.] 



THE O'CONKOB (OF OSGIALL) FAMILY* 



^a 



X19. Owen : his son ; had 
fi-ye brothers — 1. Felixn, 2. 
Tirloch fionn, 8. Brian, 4. 
Tirloch cairach, 5. Murtach 
baccach. 

120. Daniel (2): son of 
Owen. 

121. Charles : his son. 

122. Teige (2) : his son. 
12B. Charles (2) : his son. 

124. Teige (8): his son. 

125. Martin : his son. 

126. Owen : his son. 

127. Daniel: his son. 

128. Dermod : his son. 

129. Charles : his son. 

180. Denis (2) : his son ; 
died in 1750. 

181. Gonnell: his son, d. 
17B2. 



182. Denis (8): his son; 
d. 1885. 

188. Peter 00 on nor, 
J.P., Cairnsfort, Sligo : his 
son ; bom in 1808, living in 
1878 ; has no son. This 
Peter had three brothers — 
1. Connell, 2. Patrick, 8. 
John : Connell (who died in 
1866), had three sons ; 
Patrick (who died in 1882) 
had three sons and four 
daughters ; John (who died 
in 1852) had one son named 
Patrick. ThisPeter O'Ceimor 
had also one sister named 
Ellen, who was married to 
Simon Cullen : the issue of 
that marriage were two sons 
and two daughters. 



164. — The Stem of the ** O'Connob'* (op Obgiall) Family. 

FiBBis, brother of Aongus (or ^neas) who is No. 90 on 
the <* 0*Brassil West '* pedigree, was the ancestor of 
O'Connor^ of Orgiall, or of Clan Colla. 



90. Firbis : son of Colcan. 

91. Tuathal: his son. 

92. Sercan: his son. 

98. Maonachan (*' maoin: 
Irish, esteem^wealth) : his son; 
a quo 0' Maoinachain of 
Ulster or Orgiall, anglicised 
Monahan and Monayhan, 
From this Maonachan the 



territory of " Monaghan ** 
was first so called. 

94. Bimhiadh : his son. 

95. Concobhar (** con " : 
Irish, of a warrior^ and 
** cobhar,*' help)-, his son; 
a quo 0' Conchobhair, an- 
glicised Connor. 

96. Maolmichil (meaning 



^64 



IBISH FEDIOBBES. 



[PABT 



the devoted of St. Michael): 
his son ; a quo Michil and 
Mitchell, of Clan Colla. 

97. Dubhdara : his son. 

98. BeB,nghBm{Seanghain: 
Irish, ''a child near its time 



of being bom") : his son ; a 
quo O'Sheanghairif* laigiieiB' 
ed Shannon. 

99. OioUa dun O'Connor 
his son. 



165.— The Stem of the ** 0*Donnell** (Glankbllt) 

Familt, 

DoNALL, who (see the first series) is No. 99 on the 
*'0'Hart'* pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Domhnaill, of 
Clankelly, in the county Fermanagh; also anglicised 
MaeDonnell, Macdonald, Daniel, and AfacDaniel, 



99. Donall ("domhan": 
Irish, the world ; and ** all," 
mighty) : son of Colga ; a 
quo O^DomhnailL 

100. Art : his son. 

101. Fionnachtach : his 
son. 

102. Lachnan ('^lachna": 
Irish, yellow) : his son ; a 



quo O^Lachnain, of Ferman- 
agh, anglicised Loughnan. 
108. Teige : his son. 

104. Fearmorradh [far- 
mor-ra] , literally ** the great 
speaking man" : his son. 

105. Teige (2) : his son. 

106. Flannagan ODonnell, 
of CJankelly : his son. 



166. — The Stem op the *« 0*Donnell" (Newpobt, Mato) 

Family. 

Oalbhagh, son of Manus 0'Donel,t the last prince of 
Tirconnell, who (see the first series) is No. 120 on the 
"O'Donel" (Tirconnell) pedigree, and who died a.d. 1555, 
had a younger brother named Sir Hugh, who was chief of 



* O^Sheanghain : This simame is quite distinct from O^Sheanchain 
("seancha*': Irish, an antiquary or genealogist; "an," one whOf) 
anglicised Shanahan, and modernized Shannon, 

t Manus O'Donel: This is the Manus O'Donel, prince of Tiroon- 
neU, who made with Teige O'Connor (Sligo) the stipulations 
mentioned in No. 25, in the Appendix, to this volume, headed — 

" Wardership of Sligo ;" 
written in the Abbey of Donegal on the 23rd day of June, 1689* 



IV.] THE 0*DONNELL (OF NEWPOBT, MATO) FAIOLY. 



265 



Tirconnell, and who died in 1592 : This Sir Hugh had 
two sons — 1. Hugh ruadh [roe] , who was chief of Tir- 
connell from 1592 to 1602, and who died in Spain in 1602; 
and 2. Bory, earl of Tirconnell, in 1603, who died in Borne 
in 1608. This Bory had a son named Hugh, who was 
Page to the Infanta of Flanders, 1618 ; and was known as 
" earl of TirconnelL'* 



121. Calhhach, chief of 
Tirconnell, from 1555 to 
1566 : son of Manus, as 
above. 

122. Conn: his son ; 
unsuccessfully contested the 
chieftainship ^ of Tirconnell 
with his uncle Sir Hugh, 
above mentioned. This 
Conn, who died in 1588, had 
three ' sons — 1. Sir Nial 
garbh [garv] , who was an- 
cestor of Donndl, of New- 
port-Mayo ; 2. Hugh buidhe, 
ancestor of O'Donnell, of 
Larkfield, county Leitrim; 
and 8. Conn oge, ancestor 
of O'Donell of Oldcastle and 
Gastlebar, in the county 
Mayo, and of O'Donnell of 
Spain and of Austria. 

128. Sir Nial garbh : eldest 
son of Conn ; contested the 
chieftainship with Hugh 
ruadh, who, as above stated, 
died in Spain in 1602 : in 
which year Sir Nial garbh 
was inaugurated '< chief of 
Tirconnell." He was after- 
wards, in 1608, im- 
prisoned in the Tower of 
London, where he died in 
1626. 



124. Manus : his son ; a 
colonel in the army of Owen 
ruadh 0*Neill ; was killed at 
the battle of Benburb, in 
1646. 

125. Bory (or Boger), of 
Lifford, in the county of 
Donegal : his son ; was 
transplanted to the county 
Mayo by Oliver Cromwell. 

126.iCol. Manus G^Donnell, 
of Newport- Mayo : his son ; 
admited to benefit of Lim- 
erick Treaty, in 1698 ; died 
in 1787. This Manus had 
two sons — 1. Charles (called 
Calhhach ruadh) ; and 2. 
Hugh, of Newport-Mayo : 
This Charles, who died in 
1770, had three sons — 1. 
Manus, a major-general in 
the Austrian service, who 
died in 1798, was buried at 
Strade, in Mayo, ohiit s, p. m. ; 
2. Conn ; and 8. Lewis, of 
Bosslands, who died in 1822 
— aged 108 years. This 
Lewis had a son named 
Lewis, who died in 1841; 
and this last mentioned 
Lewis had a son named 
Charles, who died in 1858, 
8,p. Thus the line of Charles 



266 



IBISH PXDIGBEES. 



[9^T 



(called Calbhacli ruadli) 
became eztmct. 

127. Hugh O'Donnell, of 
Newport-Mayo : second son 
of the aforesaid Col. Manus 
O'Donnell. 

128. Sir Neal O'Donnell ; 
of Newport-Mayo : his son ; 
created a ** baronet **, in 
1780 ; d., 1811. 

129. Sir Neal O'Donnell, 
the second baronet : his son. 
This Sir Neal had two 
sons — 1. Sir Hugh, who was 



the third baronet^ and wiio 
died in 1828, s. p. m. ; %. 
Sir Richard. 

180. Sir Richard O'Donnell, 
of Newport-Mayo, the fourth 
baronet : second son of Sir 
Neal ; living in 1878. This 
Richard, had two sons — 1. 
George ; 2. Richard, who 
died, 8. p, m. 

181. Sir George O'Donnell, 
of Newport-Mayo : the elder 
son of Sir Richard ; bom in 
1882, and living in 1878. 



167. — The Stem of the << O'Donnell*' (of Lbitbim) 

Family. 

Hugh buidhe [boy] O'Donnell, brother of Sir Nial garbk 
[garv] who is No. 123 on the foregoing pedigree, was the 
ancestor of 0*Donnell, oi Larkfield, in the county Leitrim* 



123. Hugh boy: second son 
of Conn ; died, 1649. 

124. John : his son ; died, 
1655. This John had two 
sons — 1. Hugh, v/ho was 
called Ball'deargO' Domhnaill 
(*< balldearg" : Irish, red 
spot), was living in 1690, and 
left no issue ; 2. Connell. 

125. Connell : son of John; 
appointed lieutenant of the 
county Donegal, by king 
James the Second, in 1689. 

126. Hugh, of Larkiield: 
his eon ; died 1754. This 
Hugh had three sons — 1. 
Connell, who was a field- 



marshal in the Austrian 
sOTvice, a " K.G.O." of the 
order of Maria Theresa, and 
who, 8, p. J died in 1771 ; 2. 
John, a general in the Aus- 
trian service ; 3. Conn, of 
Larkfield. 

127. Conn, of Larkfield i 
the third son of Hugh. This 
Conn had two sons— 1. 
Hugh, of Greyfield, who 
died in 1848, aged 84 yeans ; 
and 2. Conn, of Larkfield t 
this Hugh was the father of 
the Rev. Conn O'Donndl 
(viear of AUenheads, £xig- 
land, and living in 187^,. 



IV.] THE o'dONEL (of 0I«I>CA4T|Jfi ANI> 0ASTLEBAB) FAMILT. 2iS7 



who was the father of Conu 
O'Donnell, bom in 1851, 
and living in 1877 ; and 
this Hugh was also the 
father of Robert 0*Donnell, 
of Oreyfield, who was living 
in 1877. 

128. Conn, of Larkfield: the 
second son of Conn. 



129. John, of Larkfield : 
his son ; died in 1874. 

180. Hugh O'Donnell, of 
Larkfield : his son ; bom in 
1844; had a younger brother 
named John, bom in 1862 
—both brothers living in 
1877. 



168. — The Stem of the ** 0*Donel" (of Oldgastle and 

Castlebab) Familt. 

Conn ogte 0*Donnell, another younger brother of Sir Nial 
garbh who is No. 128 on the " O'Donnell*' (of Newport- 
Mayo) pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Donel, of Oldcastle 
and Gastlebar, in the county Mayo; and of O'Donnell, of 
Austria and Spain. 



123. Conn oge : son of 
Conn ; killed at the siege of 
Donegal Castle, in 1601. 

124. Manus : his son ; a 
colonel under Owen Roe 
O'Neill. 

125. Calbhach ruadh : his 
son ; a colonel in the 
Boyalist Army Wars of 
King Charles the Second; 
settled in the county Mayo. 

126. Hugh, of Oldcastle, in 
the county of Mayo : .his 
son. 

127. Charles (called Calb- 
hach dubh), of Oldcastle: his 
son. This Charles had 
three sons — 1. Manus, of 



Wilford Lodge, bom in 
1720 ; 2. Joseph, who was 
a lieutenant-general in the 
Spanish service ; 8. Henry, 
who was a major-general 
in the Austrian service. 

128. Manus, of Wilfoid 
Lodge : son of Charles. 
This Manus had two sons — 
1. Joseph ; 2. Charles, who 
was a general of Cavalry in 
the Austrian service, and 
who died of wounds in 1805, 

120. Joseph : son of said 
Manus ; a captain in the 
Spanish service ; died in 
Santa Cruz. 



268 



ntlSH FEDIGBEES. 



[past 



180. Joseph (2), of Castle- 
bar, in the county Mayo : 
his son ; bom in 1780, died 
in 1884. This Joseph had 
three sons — 1. Manus, who 
died in 1857, 8,p. ; 2. Char- 
les ; 8. Lewis, who died in 
1862. This Lewis had two 
sons — 1. Manus, born in 



1858 ; 2. Charles, bom in 
I860— both Hving in 1876. 

181. Charles Joseph 0'- 
Donel : second son of 
Joseph ; born in 1818, and 
living in 1878. 

182. Manus 0*Donel : his 
son ; bom in 1871, and liv- 
ing in 1878. 



169.— The Stem op the ** O'Donnell" (op Spain) Fahilt. 

Joseph, the second son of Charles, of Oldcastle in the Co. 
Mayo, who is No. 127 on the foregoing (** O'Doner*) pedi- 
gree, was the ancestor of O'Donneli, of Spain. 



127. Charles, of Oldcastle, 
near Swineford, county 
Mayo. 

128. Joseph : his second 
son ; a lieutenant-general 
in the Spanish Service ; b. 
in 1722. This Joseph had 
four sons — 1. Jose, who was 
a general in the Spanish 
Service, a captain-general 
of Castile, a K.G.C. St. Fer- 
dinand, and died in 1886, 
8,p.m, ; 2. Carlos, who was a 
lieutenant-general, a E.O.C. 
St. Ferdinand, and died in 
1880 ; 8. Alejandro, who was 
a colonel in the Spanish 
Service, and died in 1887 ; 
4. Henrique, Conde de Abis- 
bal, a lieutenant-general in 



the Spanish Service; Regent 
in 1812; died in 1888. 
This Henrique's only son 
Leopoldo, was a captain in 
the Spanish Boyal Guards, 
and was shot in 1888, s.p. ; 
and the Alejandro here 
mentioned, who died in 
1887, left a son named Jose 
who was bom in 1806, and 
living in 1876 : This Jose 
had two sons — 1. Jose 
(bom in 1846, a captain of 
Infantry ; 2. Leopoldo (born 
in 1858), also a captain of 
Infantry — both sons living 
in 1876. 

129. Carlos : second son of 
Joseph ; died in 1880 ; had 
two sons — 1. Carlos, and 2. 



lY.] 



THE O'dONNELL AND 0*DOWD FAMILIES. 



269 



Leopoldo, who was duke of 
Tetuan, and a field-marshal 
in the Spanish Service. This 
Leopoldo died in 1867, s.p, 

180. Carlos (2) : second 
son of Carlos ; was a gene- 
ral of Cavalry; killed in 
1885, aged 83 years. 

181. Carlos (8) : his son ; 
second duke of Tetuan : 



Spanish minister at Vienna; 
bom in 1884, and living in 
1876. This Carlos had three 
sons — 1. Juan ; 2. Carlos ; 
8. Leopoldo, bom in 1874 — 
all three living in 1876. 

182. Juan O'Donnell, of 
Spain : son of Carlos, duke 
of Tetuan; born in 1864, and 
living in 1876. 



170. — The Stem op the **0'Donnbll*' (of Austbia) Family. 

Hen&y, the third son of Charles (of Oldcastle in the county 
Mayo) who is No. 127 on the **0'Doner*, of Oldcastle and 
Castlebar, pedigree, was the ancestor of 0' Donnelly of 
Austria. 



128. Henry : son of Char- 
les ; a major-general in the 
Austnan Service. 

129. Joseph, Count O'Don- 
nell : his son ; was minister 
of Finance to the Emperor 
Francis the Second. 

180. Maurice,CountO*Don- 
nell : his son ; field-marshal- 
lieutenant ; died in 1848. 
This Maurice had two sons 
— 1. Maximilian, Count 
O'Donnell, who saved the 
life of the Emperor, in 1858; 



and 2. Maurice, bom in 
1816, and living in 1876. 
This last named Maurice 
had two sons — 1. Henry, 
born in 1845; and 2. Hugo, 
bom in 1858 : both living 
in 1876, together with 
Henry's son, who is named 
Bory, and was born in 1871. 
181. Maximilian, Count 
0*Donnell, a major-general: 
elder son of Maurice ; was 
born in 1812, and living in 
1876. 



171. — The Stem op the " G'Dowd " Family. 

Fiachra ealg, brother of Eocha breac who is ]So. 89 on the 
" O'Shaughnessy" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Dvhhda ; 
anglicised Doody, Dowd, Dowd^ and O'Dowda, 



270 



naSH PEDIGHBES. 



[PABT 



89. Fiachra ealg : son of 
Dathi, the 127th monarch of 
Ireland. 

90. Maoldubh : his son. 

91. Tiobrad : his son ; had 
a younger brother named 
Tiomain mnrios. 

92. Donoch : son of Tio- 
brad. 

98. Olioll : his son. 

94. Cathal : his son. 

95. Duncatha : his son. 

96. Gonmac : his son. 
This Conmac had two sons 
— 1. Dubhda; 2. Caomh, 
(" caomh " : Irish, gentle ; 
Arab. *<kom*', noble; Lat. 
" com-is "), who was the 
ancestor of O'Caomhain^ 
anglicised Kevin, Kevins, 
Cowauj and Coen, 

97. Dnbhda (" dubhda " : 
Irish, dark-complexioned): son 
of Gonmac ; a quo 0' Dubhda. 



98. Geallach : his 8<m 

99. Aodh (or Hugh) : bis 
son. 

100. Maolruanaidh [mul- 
roona] : his son. 

101. Malachi : his son; had 
a brother, named Donall. 

102. Niall (or Neal) : Mb 
son. 

108. Talach : his son, 
104- Hugh (2) : his son. 

105. Murtagh : his son. 

106. Hugh (8) : his son. 

107. Talach (2) : his son. 

108. Hugh (4) : his son. 

109. Donoch : his son. 

110. Mulroona : his son. 

111. Talach (8) : his son. 

112. Brian : his son. 
118. Donall : his son. 
114. Boger O'Dowd : his 

son. This Roger had two 
brothers — 1. Teige ruadh 
[roe] ; 2. Malachi. 



172.— The Stem of the '< O'Dwyeb'* (of Ulster) Faihlt. 

Feragh, the eighth son of Daimhin who (see the first series) 
is No. 92 on the <* 0*Hart" pedigree, was the ancestor of 
&TJubhfir ; anglicised Dwyer (<< dubhfear" : Irish the dark- 
featured man). This Ferach was also the ancestor of Cuma- 
scach, king of Orgiall ; and of O'Maoloidhe ('< oidhe** : 
Irish, a guest), anglicised Mullody, Mulloda, Melloda, and 
Melledy, 



178.— The Stem of the ** O'Finak" Family. 

Giollafinnean, who is No. 106 on the **Mulroy** pedigree, 
was the ancestor of MaeQiolla Finnein ; anglicised Mac" 
Oillfin'en, Qillfinan, and O'Finan. 



IV.] 



THE O^FLAHERTSr AND 0'Fi;ANAaAl^ FAHIUES. 



271 



105. Giollafinnean (<< fin- 
nen*' : Irish, a shield) : son 
of Maolruanaidh ; a quo 
MacGiolla Finnein. 

106. Maccraith : his son. 

107. Giollapadraic: his son 

108. Conoobhar MacGiolla 
Finnein : his son ; first as- 
fiumed this simame. 

109. Donall : his son. 

110. GioUa Midhe (or 
Giolla of Meath) : his son. 



111. Ranall: his son. 

112. Henry crosach : his 
son. 

118. Tirlogh : his son. 

114. Donoch : his son. 

115. Lochlann : his son. 

116. Lochlann oge: his son. 

117. Brian : his son. 

118. Shane MacGiolla Fin- 
nein (of John 0*Finan) : 
his son. 



174. — ^The Stem op the " O'Flahesty" (of GoMNAuaHr) 

Familt. 

(See the first Series.) 



175. — The Stem of the " OTlanagan" (of Fermanagh) 

Family. 

Oaibbbb, son of Kiall of the Nine Hostages, the 126th 
monarch of Ireland and who (see the first series) is No. 
87 on the '* Stem of the House of Heremon", was the 
ancestor of O'Flanagariy of Tuatha Hatha (now the barony 
of '' Magheraboy "), in the county Fermanagh. 



88. Cairbre : son of Niall 
of the Nine Hostages. 

89. Cormac caoch : his 
son. 

90. Tuathal maolgarbh : 
his son. Some annalists 
make this Tuathal the 182nd 
monarch of Ireland. 

91. Gormac (2) : his son ; 
had a brother named Garb- 



han, who was the ancestor 
of Carleton, 

92. Donall dunn ("dunn": 
Irish, a doctor) : his son. 

98. Flann : his son. 

94. Maolruonaidh: his son. 

95. Malachi : his son. 

96. Lochlann : his son. 

97. Ardgal : his son. 

98. Longseach : his son. 



272 



naSH PEDIGBEES. 



[PABT 



99. Flannagan (<< flann '': 
Irish, blood)y meaning the 
** red faced little man '' : his 
son ; a quo Flannagain^ of 
Ulster, anglicised 0* Flan- 
agan, 

100. Padraic : his son. 

101. Brian : his son. 

102. Donall an-fhiona (or 
Donall of the Wine) : his 
son. 

108. Hugh : his son. 

104. Dermod : his son. 

105. Cormac an-neach (or 
Cormac the apparition) : his 
son. 

106. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 



107. Dermod balbh: his 
son. 

108. Brian (2) : his son. 

109. Cormac (4) : his son ; 
had a brother named Hugh. 

110. Murtogh : son of Cor- 
mac. 

111. Giollaiosa ruadh : his 
son. 

112. Cormac (5) : his son. 
118. Giollabrighid: his son. 

114. Manus : his son. 

115. Padraic : his son. 

116. Hugh (8) : his son. 

117. Murtogh (2) : his son. 

118. Giolla (or William): 
OTlanagan, of Tuatha 
Batha : his son. 



176. — The Stem of the *« O'Flanagan*' (op Orgiall) 

Familt. 

Flannagan, brother of Donallan who is No. 102 on the 
<< Donnellan" pedigree, was the ancestor of 0' Flannagain^ 
of Clann CoUa ; anglicised 0' Flanagan. 



102. Flannagan : son of 
Moroch ; a quo O'Flanna- 
gain^, 

108. Moreach : his son. 

104. Cathal ; his son. 

105. Cugranna : his son. 

106. Moreach (2) : his son. 

107. Murtogh : his son. 

108. Donall : his son. 

109. Moreach (8) : his son. 

110. Murtogh (2) : his son. 

* G*Flanna^(un\ For the derivation of this simame see No. 9t) 
on the foregoing genealogy. 

T Clann Shane : The simames Jacks and Johns are considered to 
be derived from this ** Clann Shane." 



111. Flaitheartach: bis son. 

112. Murtogh (8) : his son. 
118. Teige : his son. 

114. Uermod : his son. 

115. Jeoffry : his son. 
This JeoErj had two broth- 
ers — 1. Shane, a quo Clann 
Shane\ ; 2. Conor. 

116. Conor : son of Jeoff- 
rey. 

117. Dermod : his son. 



IT.] 



THE 0*FLTMN (OF CONNAUGPT) FAMILY. 



2(19 



118. William : his son, 

119. William oge : his son. 
had a brother namedMalachL 

120. Edmond : son of Wil- 
liam oge ; had a brother 
named Teige. 



121. Brian : son of Ed- 
mond. 

122. Brian oge O'EU^a- 
gan : his son« 



177«^-The'Stem of the ** O'Flynn" (of Coii|tai?obv) ' 

Eahilt. 

CTJORNAN(**com'* : Irish, a horn.; Arab. **kum*', a horn; 
Lat. <'cprn-a**), brother of Uadaph the 9th Christian 
king of Gonnanght who (see the first series) is No. 94 on 
the ** 0*Gonor" (Gonnaught) pedigree, was the ancestor of 
O'Flainn ; anglicised O'Flynn, Flynn, Lynn, and Blood 
(of Gonnanght). 



94. Guoman : son of Aodh 
abraidh [abrad], the 8th 
Ghristian king of Gonnanght 

95. Maolruanaidh : his 
son; a quo Siol Maolruana, 

96. Annadh : his son. 

97. Eocha : his son. 

98. Donoch : his son. 

99. Moroch : his son. 

100. Muireadach : his son. 

101. Beolan("beor': Irish, 
the mouth) : his son ; a quo 
O'Beolain, of Gonnaught, an- 
glicised Beolan and Bolcmd, 

102. Donall : his son. 

103. Flann (" flann'* : Ir- 
ish, blood), meaning ''the 
man with the red complex- 
ion"; his son; a quo O*- 
Flainn, and the name of the 
mountain called Sliabh-iu- 
Fhloinn, 

104. Fothach O'Flynn : his 
son ; the first of the family 
that assumed this simame. 

105. Feach : his son. 



106. Eocha (2) : his son. 

107. Eachtigheamach : hjis 
son. 

108. Flann (or Florence) .: 
his son. 

109. Fiachrach : his son. 

110. Giallbeartach ("giall" 
Irish, a hostage; *<beartach'% 
tricky) : his son ; a quo the 
simame 0' GialU>eartaigh,im' 
ghcised Gilbert, 

111. David : his son. 

112. Fiachrach (2): his son. 
118. Brian : his son ; had 

a brother named Florence or 
Flann. 

114. David (2) : his son. 

115. Fiachrach (8) : Im 
son. 

116. Florence (2) ; his son. 

117. Fiachrach (4): his son 

118. Melaghlin ; ms son. 

119. Golla : his son. 

120. Edmond O'Flymi : 
his son. 

8 



274 HUSH FEDIOBBES. [lART 

178.— .The Stem op the " O'Gorman" FAMiiar. 

Daibe, brother of Bosa failge* who (see the first series) ia 
No. 91 on the << O'Connor" (Faley) pedigree, was the 
ancestor of O^Oofmain; anglioised Qorman, &aiO*Oorman, 



91. Daire : second son of 
Oathair [Gahir] Mor, king 
of Leinster and the 109th 
monarch of Ireland. 

92. Feig : his son ; had a 
brother named Breacan 
(breacan : Irish, " a party- 
coloured or striped stuff, 
anciently used by different 
people as their trowsef and 
cloaks I"), who was the 
ancestor of Mulvy; and a 
quo O^Breacain^ anglicised 
Bracken, 



98. Berchan: son of Feig 
had a brother named Owen 
(Eoghan), who was the an 
cestor of Mooneye of Ferman 
agh. 

94. Earc : son of Berchan 
had a brother named St 
Fiagg (12 October). 

95. ^neas : son of Earc 
had a brother named Dal 
Ian. 

96. Eocha : son of MmBa 

97. Dermod : his son. 

98. Cormac : his son. 



* Failge : This word is the origin of the terms Foley (as in the 
name " O'Connor Faley"), PhaUy, and Offcdy ; and Rosa fcMge 
{Rosa : Irish, " a rose" ; Lat. rosa ; faUge : Irish, *' an onche", " a 
ring", " a jewel", " a wreath",) means "Rossa of the Jewels", etc. 

t Trowse : A trotue or trotose was a tightfitting article of dressi^t 
comprised in one piece "britches, stocungs, and socks or Ba&dals.*' 
We read that Sir John Perrot, lord depnty of Ireland, would »ot 
admit members habited in the Irish mantle (or cloak) and trowae^ 
to attend the Parliament he had convoked, a.d. 1586 ; and to induce 
those members summoned to that assembly to appear in English 
attire, he bestowed both " gownes and doakes of velvet and satten on 
some of them " : a full dress, whatever it might be now, not being an 
inappropriate gift for a gentlemau, at a time when a rich robe was 
oftoi a most acceptable present to the Queen.— See Ware, 

t Cloaks : From the Irish word brea>c, which means " speckled or 
of various colours", some of the Gauls were called Oalli hraccati, and 
their country Gallia braccata. Diodorus Siculus {Lib, 6,) mentions 
that the garments of those Gauls were rough and party-coloured ; 
and calls them Braccce, Dr. O'Brien, in his Irish Dictionary, 
observes at the word ''breacan", that the Irish Scots preserved this 
kind of garment up to his time (a. D. 1768). Breac, "atront" im 
so caUed from the various colours of its ^kin. 



IT.] 



THE OOBMAN FAMILY. 



275 



99. Oormftn : his son ; had 
a brother named Gormac. 

100. Donald : son of Gor- 
man. 

101. Suibhneach : his son. 

102. Maoilmuire : his son. 

103. Oobhgan : his son. 

104. Eocha : his son. 

105. Gorman (** gorm" : 
Irish, illustrious) : his son ; a 
quo O^Gormain. 

106. Dunagan : his son. 

107. Gasan : his son. 

108. Daach dubh : his son. 

109. Treasach : his son. 

110. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

111. Donoch : his son. 

112. Murtach : his son ; the 
first of the family that set- 
tled in Munster. 

118. Gorman (8) : his son ; 

114. Scannail : his son. 

115. Eachtigheamach: his 
son; had a brother named 
Maccraith. 

116. Moroch (a corruption 
of the Irish muirchu, which 
signifies <'a sea hound or 
warrior '*) : his son. This 



name has also been written 
«' Murcha*', and *• Morogh". 

117. Cum e id ("mead", 
gen. '* meid'', Irish, bulk or 
bigness) : his son ; a quo O'- 
Meid, anglicised Mead and 
Meade, 

118. Ooncobhar : his son. 

119. Donald (2) : his son. 

120. Cumeid (2) : his son. 

121. Gonbhach : his son. 

122. David : his son. 

128. Dathi : his son. 

124. John : his son. 

125. Dermod: his son; had 
a brother named Gonbhach. 

126. Donald : son of Der- 
mod ; had a brother named 
Melaghlin. 

127. Gonbhach (2) : son of 
Donald. 

;128. Donald (8) : his son. 

129. Maolseagldainn (or 
Melaghlin) : his son. 

180. Dermod (8) : his son. 

181. Donald (4) : his son. 

182. Melaghlin : his son. 
188. Dermod (4) : his son. 
184. Nicholas O'Gorman* : 

his son. 



* Nicholas O^Oorman : This, I find, was not the Nicholap Parcell 
O'Qorman, who, in 1829, was Secretary of " The Catholic Association", 
of Ireland, who died in 1857, and whose genealogy down from ** Mal- 
lacklin (or Melaghlin) McGorman," living in 1544, is as follows: 



1. Mallacklin McGorman, who 
<m the Slst day of December. 
1544, obtained from king Henry 
y [XI. a grant of the '* Countrie 
-of ffy-Brecane", now known as 
•• Ibnckane." 

2; Donald : his son ; obtained 
from Queen Mizabeth a grant of 



the advowsons of Eilmichil and 
Eilmurry, in the county Clare, 
bearing date the 25th day of 
August, 1570 ; was sheriff of 
Thomond in 1572. 

3. Donn : his son ; was sheriff 
of Thomond in 1614 ; d. 1626. 

4. Mahon : his son ; d. 1665. 



376 



IBiaH PJU>X€mVfiS. 



[PAJ^T 



179, — The Stem of the << O'Hagan" f aiolt. 

Febovs, a son of Niall of the Nine Hosta^s, the 12$th 
monarch of Ireland, who (see the first series) is No. 87 on 
the *^ Stem of the House of Heremon," was the ancestor 
of O'h^dgain ; anglicised O'Hcufan. 



88. Fergus : son 6i Niall 
of the Nine Hostages. 

89. Caolbath : his son. 

90. Cairbre : his son. 

91. Felim : his son. 

92. Dermod : his son. 
98. Conall bracaidh : his 

son. 

94. Guanach : his son. 

95. Dongaile : his son. 

96. Cnmuscach : his son. 

97. Oilioll : his son. 

98. Maolgarbh : his son. 

99. Cionaoth : his son. 
100. Ogan (also called 

Agan) : his son ; a quo 
O'h'Ogain, of Ulster, and 
O'h'Again (** ogan" : Irish, 



a youth), anglicised respect- 
ively 0*Hogan aniO'Hagan.* 

101. Eoghan (or Owen) : 
his son. 

102. Giolla easbuig 
(**giolla" : Irish, the devoted 
of; **easbog,"gen.**easbuig," 
a bishop — Lat.*'episcop-us"): 
his son; SkqvLoO' Giollaeasbtdg, 
anglicised Oillaspy, Gillespy, 
and Gilleaby. 

103. Flann O'Hagan: his 
son ; the first that assumed 
this simame. 

104. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

105. Banall : his son. 

106. Owen (2): his son. 



5. Bfehtghlin : his son ; d. 1707. 

6. Thomas : hisfM)n ; d. 1717. 

7. Mahon (2^: his son; d. 1741. 

8. James : his son ; d. 1787. 

9. Nicholas Purcell O'Gorman : 
his son ; d. 18'57. 

10. Nicholas Smith O'Gorman, 
of Bellevue, Kilrush, county 



Clare, J. P. : his son. This 
Nicholas has a yonnger brother, 
Major Purcell O'Gorman, M.P. 
for Waterford ; and a sister, 
Susan, married to Major ISdmund 
Moore Mulcahy, No. 124 on the 
'*Mulcahy" pedigree: aU living 
in 1878. 



* O'Hagan : One of the O'Hagans of Tirowen acquired territorial 
hold and standing in Meath, by marrying into the family of 
"0'Melaghlin,"of that ancient kinsdom. Walter DeLacy haviiijz 
by charter secured to the said O'Hmm all his acquired tenitoiiu 
rights, titles, and interests in Meath, 0*Hagan changed his name -to 
Fagan; and thereafter was a devoted follower of the standard and 
fortunes of his Anelo-Norman friend and protector. Thus we see 
that " Fagan" is of Irish, and not of English, descent. 



IV.] 



THE HAKLON FABflLT. 



277 



107. Maolruaiiaidh:his son. 

108. Maolseaohlainn (or 
' Melaghlin): his son. 

109/ Amhailgadh- [awly]: 
his son. 

110. Teige: his son. 

111. Owen (B): his son. 

112. Httgh (2): his son. 
118. Giollachriosd: his son* 

114. Teige (2): his son. 

115. Roger : nis son. 

116. Donail : his son. 

117. Tirlogh: his son. 

118. Teige (8): his son. 

119. Niall: his son. 

120. Brian : his son. 

121. Tirlogh (2) : his son ; 
living in 1601. 



122. GioUaohriosd (2) : his 
son. 

128. Shane (or John) : his 
son. 

124. Hugh (8): his son; 
died in 1708. 

125. Shane han [bawn] : 
his son ; first of the family 
who, after the Revolution, 
settled in the county Derry. 

126. Frank : his son. 

127. Charles': his son. 

128. Edward : his son. 
129.Thomas,LordO'Hagan: 

his son ; created a *' Baron" 
of the United Kingdom in 
1870 ; living in 1878. 



180. — The Stem op the *' O'Hanlon" Family. 

Ffiio, brother of Breasal who is No. 88 on the ** Madden" 
(of Ulster) pedigree, was the ancestor of Ch-Anlualn; 
anglicised Hanlouy HeiUon, and O^Hanlan. 



88. Feig : son of Felim ; 
had a brother named 
Eachach,who was the ances- 
tor of Rogan, 

89. Niallan : son of Feig. 
This Niallan had a brother 
named Fiachr a ceannfinan , '^ 
who was ancestor of Duffry^ 
and Oarvey; and another 
brother Oronn, wiio was 
ancestor of Mooneye of 
OrgialL 

90. Eoghan (or Owen): son 



of Niallan ; had a brother 

named Muireadach, who was 

the ancestor of St. Golman, 

of Kill. 

' 91. Muireadach : son of 

Owen. 

92. Baodan : his son. 

98. Bonan : his son. 

94. Suibhneach : his son ; 
had a brother named 
Crunmoal. 

95. Colgan : his son. 

96. Eagnach : his son. 



* Ceannfinan, or, more properly, ceann/ionnan. xbmbs "white- 
lieaded." 



278 



IRISH PEDIGBEBS. 



[PilBT 



97. Suibneach (2): his son. 

98. Goscrach: his son; had 
a brother named Ceamach 
("ceamaoh' * :Irish,t;ictoriot«), 
a quo another O'Cearnaighe 
family, anglicised Carney, 
and Camagie, of Clan Golla. 

99. D e r m o d : son of 
Goscrach. 

100. Anluan ("an-luan" : 
Irish, the champion): his son; 
a quo O'h'Anluain. 

101. Flann : his son. 

102. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

108. Dermod : his son. 

104. Flaitheartach: his son. 

105. Gumascach : his son. 

106. Maccraith : his son. 

107. Flann (2): his son. 

108. Moroch : his son ; had 
a brother . named Giolla- . 
padraic. 

109. Ardgal: son of Moroch. 

110. Moroch ruadh: his son. 

111. Edmond : his son. 

112. Eocha: his son. 
118. John O'Hanlon: his 

son ; first assumed this sir- 
name ; had a brother named 
Patrick. 

114. Eocha (2): son of 
John. 

115. Shane oge : his son. 

116. Eocha (8) : his son. 

117. Shane (2) : his son. 

118. Giollapadraic mor: his 
son. 

119. Eocha (4) : his son. 

120. Shane (8) : his son. 



121. Shane (4) oge: his 
son. This Shane had five 
sons — 1. Eocha (called 
•*Oghy"), 2. Patrick, 8. 
Melaghlm, 4. Shane oge, 5. 
Fehm. 

122. Sir Oghy O'Hanlon, 
of Tonregee (now Tanragee)» 
knight : son of Shane oge ; 
chief of his name ; lord of 
Upper and Lower Orior, in 
Armagh ; attainted, but par- 
doned on the 12th February, 
1605. 

128. Owen Oghy oge : his 
son ; lord of Orior ; had two 
brothers — 1. Tirlogh (who 
was the eldest son), and 2. 
Edward, who was the young- 
est. 

124. Patrick mor : son of 
Owen Oghy oge. 

125. Edmond: his son ; an 
officer in the service of king 
James the Second. 

126. Felix, of Killeavy, in 
the county Armagh : his 
son. 

127. Edmond ruadh, of 
Eilleavy : his son. 

128. Hugh, of Newry : bis 
son ; died in April, 1807i 
aged 86 years. 

129. Patrick, of Newry: 
his son; had an elder brother 
named Hugh, who, in 1828, 
died without issue. This 
Patrick became a barrister- 
at-law, and was living in 
Calcutta in 1880. 



IV-J ..T 



THE HABT FAMILY.— -CONTINUED. 



279 



180. Hugh O'Hanlon : his 
son ; was Law Adviser to 
the Irish Office in London, 
in 1881 ; his brother,Pringle 
O'Hanlon, was captain in 



the First Bengal Cavalry ; 
and his other brother, 
£dward, was killed at Ban- 
goon, in the East Indies. 



181. — ^Thb Stem op the " 0*Habt*" Family — Continued. 

Fbom 8hane, who (see the first series) is No. 106 on the 
O'Hmt genealogy, this pedigree is here continued: 



106. Shane: son of Tomhas 
(or Thomas) ; living a.d. 
1172; was the last Prince 
of Tara. At that period 
took place the English in- 
vasion of Ireland, when 
King Henry II. granted to 
Hugh De Lacy the kingdom 
of Meath. It was then that, 
deprived of his ancient patri- 
mony! in that kingdom, 
this bhane (or John) first 
settled in Connaught. 

lOT. Art : his son ; chief of 
his name. 



108. Concobhair : his son ; 
chief of his name. 

109. Tirloch: his son; chief 
of his name. 

110. Giollachriosd: his son; 
chief of his name. 

111. Brian : his son; chief 
of his name. 

112. Teige : his son ; chief 
of his name. 

118. Amhailgadh [awly] : 
his son ; chief of his name. 

114. Teige : his son ; chief 
of his name. 

115. Melaghlin (or Mala- 



*G'Barti As an illustration of the transitions which many of the an- 
cient Irish simames underwent, it may be observed that, in the early 
ages, the "O'Hart" family was caUed Cin-Airt ajudi Muintir-Airt^ 
meaning respectively, the " kindred,*' and the " people of Art £an 
Fhear *' (or Art EInaar), the 112th Monarch of Ireland, and the an- 
cestor of the family ; but, after the introduction of sirnames in Ireland, 
the family name was at one time Ua-Airt, next Ua'*Airt (using the 
aspirate before the name ** Airt "), next Ua- Haiti, and lastly O'A- 
Atri, anglicised O^JIart, etc. — See the ** Harte '' pedigree, for the 
changes in the anglicised forms of this family name. 

f PcUrimony: In the " Topography " of 0*l>ugan (who died, A.D. 
1372) the O'Harts, as Princes of Tara, rank next to Murcha, Meath's 
last King ; and, according to Connellan's ** Four Masters", the Princes 
of Tara were also styled *' Princes of Magh Breagh "; Magh Breagh 
(latinized Bregia) signifying the "Magnificent Plun'': that vast 



280 IBISH FBDIGBEBS. [PA.BT 



chi) : his son ; chief of his 
name. 

116. Giollachriosd caoch : 
his JBon ; chief of his name. 

117 Aodh (or Hugh*) : his 
son ; chief of his name. 

118. Hugh oge : his son ; 
chief of his name : living in 
l682. 

119. Phelim (or Felim) 0'- 



ing in 1657. In this Phelim'a 
time some of the family 
estates in the harony of Gar- 
hery, county Sligo, were 
held by Bryan O'Habrt and 
Owen O'Hairtt ; and others 
in the barony of ** Leny*\ 
same county, by Eatherine 
Hairtt, Phelim Hart, and 
this Phelmd 0*Hart— all 



Hart, of Ardtarmon : his ( '< Papist Proprietors*' whodd 
son ; chief of his name ; liv- estatesf were confiscated' by 

plain extending between the risers Liffey and the Boyte, from the city 
of Dahlin to the- town of Drogheda, thence to EellB in the coirnty 
Meath. and containing the districts about Tara, Trim, Navan, Ath- 
b<^, Dnnboyne, Maynooth, Clane, Celbridge, Lncan, Leiidip, and all 
that part of the county Dublin north of the river Lififey . The " Mag- 
nificent Plain " here mentioned contains about half a million of acros 
of thid finest land in Ireland ; and, up to the English iniranon, fonned 
a portion of 0'Hart*s Countiy. 

[At that timd Eells, in the principality of Tara, was called Ceanan- 
nas ("ceann ": Irish, a head ; '* ceannas", authority , power); where, 
according to O'Brien, ** a national councU of the clergy of IreUu^d 
was heldabout the year 1152 ; in which council. Cardinal Papyron, 
flntve the first Pallia to the four Archbishops of Ardmagh, CaiAel, 
Dublin, and Tuam."] 

Dispossessed by Kins Henry II., of their territories in the Kingdom 
of Meath« the O'Hart family settled — some of them in Leinster,' somo 
in Ulster, some in England, some in Scotland, some in France, 
some in Germany, and this the senior branch of the family settled in 
that part of Connaught, now known as the county Sligo. 

* Hugh: This Hngh had four younger brothers — 1. Erian, 2. 
Teige, 3. William, 4. Bory. Brian (1) here mentioned wta tlie 
father of Donal glas, who was the father of Teige ruadh [roe], the 
father of another Donal glass ; Teige (2) was the father of Teige 
caoch, who was the father of Conor, the father of Hugh ; William 
(3)' was the father of Conor, who was the father of Bryan ; and Koty 
(4) was the father of Neale, living in 1635. —These names are inac- 
curately placed in the first edition of the first series. 

t Eatate8 : In his description of Connausht, A.D. 1614, Sir Oliver 
St. John states that ** The O'Dowds, the MacDonoghs, the O* Hares, 
aitd the O'Harts, retained the residue of the county Sligo, besides that 
which O'Connor Sligo held." For further information in eonnectioB 
with the Harts and 0*Harttf of the county Sligo, see O'Flahertyli 
*'West Connaught," by Hardiman ; Prendergast's " Orottrweliiafi 
Settlement"; and Archdeacon O'Rorke's ** Bally sadare and Kilvar- 
net, county Sligo." 



IT.] 



THE HABT FAMILY.— -CONTINUED. 



281 



Olive* Cromwell. It is wor- 
thy ol remark that, oh the 
accession of King Charles 
II. (who, himself, had 
drunk deeply of the hitter 
cnp of adversity, duringthe 
*'*Protectorate"of Cromwell), 
not even a portion of their 
estates was restored to any 
member of this family. The 
only inheritanee that re- 
mained to this Phelim was 
his poor but proud birthright, 
as ** Hereditary Prince of 
Tara" ; but, so intense at 
that time was the hatred 
which political and religious 
differences had created be- 
tween the English and the 
Irish' peoples, and so great 
the antipathy then existing 
in England towards every- 
thing Iri^h, it is not to be 
wondered at that his <<birth- 
right'* did not serve him, 
for, unhappily, those were 
sad times in Ireland ! 



120. Donoch 



gruama'' 



(" gruama'' : Irish, sullen, 
morose) : the son of Phelim 
0*Hart ; chief of his name ; 
living in 1708. 

121.Toige: his son ; chief 
of his name. 

122. Shane (2) : his son ; 
the last recognized chief of 
his name ; married Mary, 
daughter of Manus mor 0'- 
Laydon. To hide his pover- 
ty, this Shane migrated f 
from the county Sligo to the 
neighbouring county Mayo ; 
and there, in jcomparative 
retirement, far from home 
and kindred, settled near 
his wife's friends on a 
farm' at Doonbreeda, which 
they procured for him on the 
Bourke (of Carrowkeel) pro- 
perty, in Glen Nephin. 
He was buried in the 0*Lay- 
don burial-ground in Cill 
Muire (Kill Mary), now 
called ** Kilmurry ", in the 
parish of Orossmolina, bar- 
ony of Tyrawley, and said' 



* Chruajna : In the Betham Genealogical Collections, the epithet 
Applied to this Donoch is incorrectly written granna. But the 
«pithct which is properly applied to him in other State records is 
aruania, which in his case is a very significanb one; for, he naturally 
became suilen in manner, when he found that his patrimoniid estates 
irete unjustly and hopelessly confiscated. Crushed by the Crom- 
wellian settlement in Ireland, this Donoch had not left him, of his 
own, whereon to lay his head. 

■f Migrated : After the Cromwellian confiscations in Ireland womni 
<d this family migrated to America ; and (see Na 15 iu Mote, page- 
78) John Hart, one of their descendants, was one of the Signatories 
to the " Declaration of American Independence", on^ the 4th July, 
1776. 



284 



IRISH PBDIGBEBS. 



[PABT 



182.— The Stem op the ««0*Kelly" (op Hy-Maike) Family, 

— Continued. 

DoNOOH, of Tiaqnin, who (see the first series) is No« 116 
dnthe " O'Kelly" (of Hy-Maine) pedigree. 



116. Donoch, the 24th 
" O'Kelly" : son of Melach- 
lin. 

117. Teige: his son; the 
26th ** O'KeUy" ; had a 
brother named Breasal, who 
was the 27th " O'Kelly." 



118. Melachlin: son of 
Teige ; was the 28th 
" O'Kelly.'' 

11 9. Teige dubh, of Gal- 
lach : his son. 

120. Hugh O'Kelly, lord 
abbot of Knockmoy: his son. 



188.— The Stem op the "O'Kelly" (op-Meath) Family. 

OovGALL, brother of Dermod rnanach who is No* 92 on the 
''Fogarty" pedigree, was the ancestor of 0*Ceallaigk 
(chiefs of Tuath Leighe^ parts of the present baronies of 
'< West Narragh" and '' £ilkea'\ in the/ county Eildare); 
anglicised O'Kelly*. 

92. Congall : son of Aodh 
(or Aldus) slane, the 14l8t 
monarch. 

98. Gonang curra : his son. 

94. CongaU (2) : his son. 

95. Amhailgadh [awly] : 
his son. 

96. Gonang (2) : his son. 

97. Congall (8) : his son. 

98. Geallach (<< ceallach" : 
Irish, war, strife) : his son; a 
quo O'Ceallaiyhy of Meath. 



I 99.Flannagan: his 
son. 

100. Maolmaotii : his son. 

101. Congall (4) : his son ; 
was the 172nd monarch. 

102. Donald : his 8on« 
108. Donoch : his son, 
104. Geallach O'Eelly : his 

son. 



* O'KeUy: These O'Kellya, who were one of the ''Fonr 
of Tara", poBseased the district about Naas, and had their chief re- 
sidence and castle at Rathascul (or the Moat of Asenl) near Athy. 
The territory comprising these distfiols wa« kii09iBti.as.*'O'KellyW 
Country." 



m] 



THE 0'MAI4iKT AMD O'kEALLA FAMILIES. 



2^5 



184.— The Stem of the ** 0*Mallby** Famii^y. 

Brian, the first king of Gonnaught of the ;Hy-'Niall Sflpt, 
who is No. 87 on^the ** O'Oonor '' (Oonnaught) ipe^gree, 
and Tfho was the eldest of the five sons of Eo6haidhmiiu|^h- 
tneadhoin, the 124th monarch of Ireland, had twenty^four 
sons, whereof three only left issueidiamely-^l: Duachgal- 
aoh (the first Ohristian king of Conniuight), who was the 
youngest son and the ancestor of ** O'Conor" (Gonnaught); 
2. Gonall orison ; 8. Area (or Archu) dearg : this Gonall 
orison was the ancestor of O'Maille ; anglicised O* Malty ^ 
and O'Malley and modernized Manly ^ Mallet, and Be Mallet 



87. Brian : eldest brother 
of the monarch Niall of the 
Nine Hostages. 

88. Gonall orison: his son. 

89. Armeadh : his son. 

90. Tuathal : his son. 

91. Eochaidh [Eocha] 
sinne : hia son. 

92..iEneas : his son. 

93. Gunmserach : his son. 

94. Mortach : his son. 

95. Maill(**maill": Irish, 
delay) : his aon ; a quo 0'- 
MaiUe. 

96; Beaohnasaeh : his son. 
97.'Elann abhraidh 
[abrad] : his son. 

98, JDubhdara : his son. 

99. Mortach (2) : his son. 
100. Dubhdara (2) : his 

son. 



101. Mortach (8) : his son.. 

102. Donald fionn O'Mally: 
his son ; first assumed this 
simame. 

108. Mortach (4) : his son. 

104. Brian : his son. 

105. Donald : his son. 

106. Dermod:.bis son. 

107. Owen : his son. 

108. Dermbd (2) : his son. 
109.' Dermbd (8) : his son. 

This Dermod had seven 
sons — 1. Teige, 2. Dubhdara, 
8. Owen, 4. Dermod, 5. 
Hugh, G. Brian, and 7. 
John. 

110. Teige O'Mally: nson of 
Dermod (8). 



185.*-The Stem of the **0'Mballa" Famxlt. 

GuAiSE, brother of Siolan who is No. 98 on the ^* Mac 
Morough*' pedigree, was the ancestor of V^Meala ; angli- 
cised Mealla, 0*Mealla, and Mill. 



. / 



286 



IBISH PEDIGBBES. 



[PABT 



98. Onaire : son of Eog- 
han (or owen). 

99. Maolodhar : his son. 

100. Foranan : his son. 

101. Maolfothaoh : his son. 

102. Gumeala (''mil", gen. 
*• meala" : Irish, honey ; Gr. 
" mel-i" ; Lat. ** meF*) : his 
son ; a quo O'Meala. 



103. Cu geilt* (geilt : Irish, 
** a person who inhabits 
woods") : his son. 

104. Dnngall : his son. 

105. Dnnlong : his son. 

106. Gathal : his son. 

107. Gairbre O'Mealla : 
his son. 



186. — The Stxu of the ** O'Mblaghijm'* Familt. 

{See the First Series.) 



187. — The Stem of the '^ O'Neill" (of Glanabot) Familt. 

AoDH (or Hugh) dubh O'Neill, brother of Neal madh [roe] 
who (see the first series) is No. 112 on the <<0'Neiil*' 
pedigree, was the ancestor of O^NeilHf of Clanaboy. 

112. Hugh dubh O'NeiU: 
£on of Hugh an macaomh 
toinleasc. 

118. Donall oge : his son. 

114. Aodh buidhe : his son; 
a quo Clann Aodh-buidhe, 
anglicised Clanaboy — and 
signifying the <<Clan 



descended from Yellow 
Hugh." This Hugh reeoyer- 
ed from the English Uie 
territories called the VCW- 
aboys," the '<Ards," etc.; 
and his issue kept it until 
the time of king James the 
First, of England. 



* Oeilt : This word, according to O'Brien's Dictionary, oriffinaUy 
meant " a wild man or woman", one that inhabits woods or deaerts 
(cot// and eoilUe : Irish, "woods"; Welsh, guylht, ** a Wild man**, and 
gelhtydhf " woocT), Gompare.the Irish vf orda geilt and eoillte, and the 
Latin CeAce, with the Hebrew word celat, *'refage"; for tiie Celts 
frequented woods and groves, either for their places of refuge and <e- 
aidence, or to perform their relieions rites and other cftrrmonifw 
See Tacitas, 2>e Monb, Oerm, and Caesar Commentar. 



fO*IveiU : The root of this name is the Irish niaU, gen. mill, 
champion." 



•I 



IV.] 



THE 0*NEILL (OF OLANABOY) FAMILY. 



267 



115. Brian : bis son. 

116. Henry : his son 

117. Muriertacli: his son, 
who was sirnamed '< Ceann- 
fada '* ; was lord of the 
baronies of Gastlereagb, and 
Lower Ards, in the county 
Down ; and of the baronies 
of Taam (now ** Toome"), 
Antrim, Belfast, and 
Massarene ; of the towns of 
Garrickfergus, Belfast, and 
Lisneg9.rty ; and of the 
barony of Loghinslin, in the 
county Derry. 

118. Brian Ballach: his son. 

119. Hugh buidhe: his son. 
120« Conn : his son. 

121. Neal mor: his son. 

122.Pheiim [felim] baccach: 
his son. 

128. Brian, of Edenduffe- 
Carrick, alias *< Shane's 
Castle ": his son. 

124. John : his son ; had a 
brother named Conn ; was 
twice married — the only 
issue by the first marriage 
was Sir Henry O'Neill ; this 
John died 23rd April, 1617. 

125. Sir Henry : his son ; 
had a daughter named Bose, 
who was his only heir, and 
who married Bandal Mac- 
Donnell, earl of Antrim (a 
quo '< Eandalstown"), but 
left no issue. This Sir Henry 
O'Neill, whose WiU is dated 
the 13th September, 1637, 
had four brothers — I.Arthur, 



of Shane's Castle, who was 
the heir of his brotherHenry, 
in the event of his daughter 
Bo8e( Af archioness of Antrim) 
having no issue ; 2. Phelim; 
3. Shane oge, who died with- 
out issue, A.D. 1620 ; and 4. 
Hugh, who also died, sine 
prob. Arthur O'Neill, of 
Shane'sCastle,here mention- 
ed, had two sons — 1. Charles 
(no issue recorded) ; 2. 
Captain John O'Neill. This 
Captain John O'Neill had 
two sons — 1. Arthur, who 
died unmarried, in Flanders, 
in 1702; and 2. Colonel 
Charles O'Neill, of Shane's 
Castle, who died without 
issue. After this Colonel 
Charles O'Neill's death, 
Henry O'Neill administered 
on 10th September, 1716, 
but died s,p. The estates 
then reverted to *' Shane an 
Franca" (or "French John"), 
son of Brian, son of Phelim, 
the second brother of Sir 
Henry O'NeiU, No. 125 on 
this pedigree. 

126. Brian: son of the 
said Phelim, the second 
brother of the said Sir Henry 
O'Neill; had a brother named 
Arthur, 
127. Shane Un Franca (or 
** French John") : son of 
Brian ; WUl proved 1789 ; 
had two brothers named-— 
1. Henry, and 2. Hugh. 



966 



nosB pxpiawBBs. 



D 



128. Henry O'NeiU: the 
third Bon of Sbane an Franca; 
whose two elder brothers 
were — 1. Charles, 2. Clot- 
worthy ^who left no wsue). 
This Onarles, of Shane's 
CaHtle, who died in August, 
1760, had two sons^-l. The 
Rt. Honorable John O'Neill 
of Shane's Castle ; and 2. 
St. John O'Neill. This John 
was created ^^BaronO'Neill", 
on the 26th October, 1798, 
whose two sons-^1 . Charles 
Henry St. John, and 2. John 
Bruce Biohard, eabh of 
Hhane's Castle, and each 
•^ Baron O'Neill," died with- 
out issue. And . St. John 
O'Neill, the younger brother 
of the liight Hon. John, the 
first «< Baron O'Neill" here 
mentioned, died in March, 
1700, leaving an only child, 
Mary O'Neill, of whom no 
issue is recorded. 

120, Mary: daughter and 
only heir of Henry O'Neill 
(No, 128 on this stem), the 
youngest son of Shane an 
Franca ; married the Bev. 
Arthur Chichester. 

180, Bev. Wm. Chichester, 
known as'^DoctorCbichester": 
their son. This William had 
two sons — 1. Sir Arthur 



Chichesier, to wliom Um 
ClanaboyEstatesireie wfflod, 
and who died nDmanied; 
2. Bev. Edward Chichester-i 

181. Bey. Edward: seooi^d 
son of the Bey. ¥^lliani 
Chichester. TbisEdward bad 
four sons — 1. Bev. William ; 
2. Bey. Bobert ; 3. Arthnr, 
who died young, in 1880 ; 
and 4. Bev. GeorgeYanghan 
Chichester. 

182. Bev. William Gbicbes- 
ter, of Shane's Castle.: 
eldest son of the Bev. Ed- 
ward Chichester ; created 
"Baron O'NeilV' (United 
Kingdom, 1868) ; living in 
1878. This Bev. WilHam, 
Lord O'Neill, had three sons 
— 1. The Hon. Edward 
O'Neill; 2. The Hon 
Arthur O'Neill, who died un- 
married, in 1870; 8. The 
Hon. Bobert Torrens O'Neill; 
and one da^ighter, The Hon^ 
Anne O'Neill. 

188. Hon. Edward O'Neill, 
M.P. for the county Antrim: 
son of the Rev. Wm., Baron 
O'NeiU; Uvinginl878. 

184. William T. Cochrane 
O'Neill: son of the Hon. 
Edward O'Neill ; living in 
1878. 



188. — ^Thi Stbm of thb << 0*NEn.L" (or Mayo and Leitbim) 

Family. 

HuGB 0*NBniL of the Fews, a brother of Henry who (see 



IT.] 



THE ORD FAMILY. 



289 



the first series) is No. 119 on the ** O'Neill " pedigree, was 
the ancestor of O'Neill^ of Mayo and Leitrim. 



119. Hugh O'Neill : son of 
Owen. 

120. Art : his son ; died in 
1514. 

121. Felim ruadh [roe] : 
his son ; in << reheUion", 
tempore King Edward the 
Sixth. 

122. Henry : his son. 
128. Sir Tirlogh : his son ; 

died 1689. 

124. Henry (2) : his son. 

125. Tirlogh* : his son ; 
transplanted from the Fews 
to Newcastle, in the county 
Mayo; d. 1676; had a brother 
named ^Bhanet (or John) 
O'Neill, of Dungannon, in 
the county Tyrone. This 
Shane's son, Thomas, first 
assumed the simame Mac- 
Shane; anglicised Johnson, 
which by some has been 
modernized Johnston and 
Johnstone, 

126. Conn O'Neill, of the 
Fews : son of the said Tir- 



logh ; was also transplanted 
to Newcastle, county Mayo. 

127. Henry O'Neill, of Fox- 
ford, county Mayo : his son; 
was a captain in the Army 
of King James the Second, 
A.D. 1689. 

128. Neal O'NeiU, of Cloon, 
county Leitrim: son of 
Henry ; living in 1717. 

129. Henry of Oarrowrony, 
county Mayo : his son ; went 
to France and there studied 
Law. 

180. Neal (also called Nich- 
olas) : his son ; bom in 
1784 ; went to Spain and 
there died a lieutenant- 
colonel. This Neal had a 
brother named Arthur, bom 
in 1786, who also went to 
Spain, where he was lieute- 
nant-general. 

181. Neal O'Neill : son of 
Neal; left one daughter 
named Elinor. 



189.— The Stem op the "Ord" Family. 

This simame, it may be said, is of English origin, and 
should not therefore be inserted among Irish genealogies. 

* Tirlogh : Some of the descendants of this Tirlogh O'Neill have 
changed their simame to Neale. 

t Shane: The proper Irish word for '*Shane" is Sheaghan ("seaV : 
IriiBh, esteem ; " an", one who) ; so that the simame MacShane or 
Johnson literally means "the descendants of the man who was 
esteemed." 

T 



290 



IRISH FEDIGBEES. 



[PABT 



But, accozding tc some, it is derived from the Irish oraM,, 
" excellency'* ; and to others from ord^ "order." At pre- 
sent, however, I can only trace the lineage of the following 
branch of this ancient family : Edward the First, King of 
England, who (see the first series) is No. 115 on *^ The 
Stem of the Boyal Family", was twice married : first to 
Eleanor, sister of Alphonso KI., king of Castile, in Spain; 
and, second, to Margaret, daughter of Philip III., king of 
France. Of this second marriage was born Thomas Plan- 
tagenet, at Brotherton (a small village in Yorkshire), a.d. 
1800, who, in consequence was called De Brotherton \ who 
was created earl of Norfolk, and made < 'earl-marshal" of 
England. This Thomas Plantagenet left a daughter, from 
whom came— 1. The Mowbrays and Howards*, dukes of 
Norfolk ; 2. The Earls of Suffolk ; 8. The Earls of Carlisle; 
4. The Earls of Effingham ; 5. The Lords Stanford ; 6 
The Lords Berkeley ; 7* The Marquises of Salisbury. 

Edmond, the second son by this second marriage, was 
created Earl of Kent 



115. Edward the First, 
King of England ; died 
1807. 

116. Thomas Plantagenet : 
his son. 

117. Lady Margaret: his 
daughter. 

118. Elizabeth: her daugh- 
ter ; who married John, lord 
Mowbray. 

119. Catherine: their 
daughter. 

120. Sir Thomas Grey: her 
son ; who married Alice, 
daughter of Balph Neville, 
the great earl of Westmore- 
land. 



121. Elizabeth : their 
daughter; who married Philip 
lord Darcy and Mennell. 

122. John, lord Darcy : 
their son; who married Mar- 
garet, daughter of Henry, 
lord Grey and Wilton. 

128. John, lord Darcy : 
their son ; who married 
Iran, daughter of John, lord 
Greystock. 

124. Bichard: their son; 
who married Eleanor, 
daughter of John, lord 
Scroop of Upsal. 

125. William, lord Darcy : 
their son ; who married 



* ffotoards : For the ancestor of *' Howard", see lomhar, Na 
1 04 on the " MacDowall" pedigree. 



lY.] 



THE O'rEGAN and o'BEHiLT FAMILIES. 



291 



Enphemia, daughter of Sir 
Joim Langton. 

126. Jane : their daughter; 
who married Sir Roger Grey 
of Horton. 

127. : their daughter 

(whose name I do not know); 
who married Edward Mus- 
ehamp of Barmore. 

128, — — : their daughter 
(whose name I do not know); 
who married Gawin Ord, of 
Fenwiek. 

129. Oliver: their son, 
ISO, Lionel, of Fishbum : 

his son. 
181. Ralph: his son. 



182. Lionel, of Sedgefield : 
his son. 

188. Thomas : his son. 

184. George (commonly 
called ''the Patriarch of 
the Ords of Newton-Eet- 
ton) : his son. 

135. John, of Newton-Eet- 
ton: his son. 

186, Thomas, of Newton- - 
Eetton : his son. 

187, John, of Newton-Eet- 
ton : his son. 

188, John Robert Ord, of 
Haughton Hall, Darlington, 
England : his son ; living in 
1878, 



190. — The Stem op the ** 0*Beoan" Family. 

DuBHBEAN, a younger brother of Dun who is No. 104 on 
the " O'Dunn" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Riaghain, 
(one of the ** Four Tribes of Tara") ; anglicised 0* Regan. 

104. Dubhrean : son of 
Dubhghall. 



105. Dubhda : his son. 

106. Maolcroine : his son. 

107. Giollamuire caoch 0*- 



Riaghain (** riagh'* : Ifish, 
to gibbet) : his son ; chief of 
Hy-Ricighain — ^now the bar-, 
ony of ** Tinehinch", in the . 
Queen's County. 



191.— The Stem op the " O'Reilly**' Family — Continued. 

Annadh [annay] , who (see the first series) is No. 112 on 
the "O'Reilly" pedigree, had two sons — 1. Cathal (or 

* (yReiUy: This urname (see the first series) is derived from 
Raghalach, No. 105 on the " O'Keillv" pedig^ree. Bat some writers 
consider Badheohch {" radh*' : Irish, a saying ; "eolach'*, teamed, 
ekiffvl) as the correct spelling of the name ; a quo G'BadheoUaigh, 
anglicised i?aA%, Bakigh, CTReiUy, BeyUy, O'Eielly, BieUy, BUey, 
Badky, and BidUy. 



292 



IBI8H PEDIOBEES. 



[PABT 



Charle8),and 2. Fergus : that Charles was an ancestor of 
the O'Reilly or O'Rielly. 



118. Charles, lord of 
Lower Brefney : son of An- 
nadh ; was killed at the 
battle of Moysleaghta, a.d. 
1266 ; bad a brother named 
Farrell Rielly, who was the 
ancestor of "Clann Geffrey" 

114. Donald : son of (Car- 
les ; also killed at the said 
battle of Moysleaghta, in 
1256 ; had a brother named 
Keal caoch, who was the an- 
cestor of Brady, 

115. Giollaiosa : his son ; 
lord of Lower Brefoey ; built 
the Abbey of Cavan ; had 
two brothers ; died in 1880. 

116. Philip, lord of Lower 
Brefiiey : his son ; died in 
1884. 

117. John, lord of Lower 
Brefney : his son ; died 
1402. 

118. Owen na feasog, lord 
of Lower Brefney ; his son ; 
diedl449. According to some 
genealogists this Owen na 
feasog ('< feasog", gen. 
** feasoige": Irish, a heard) 
was the ancestor of Vesey 
and Vosey, 

119. Charles, lord of Lower 
Brefney : his son ; died 
1467. 

120. John, lord of Lower 
Brefney : his son; died 1510. 

121. Myles, lord of Lower 
Brefney : his son ; died 
1565. 



122. Hugh conallach, lord 
of Lower Brefiiey : his son ; 
died 1588. 

128. John ruadh [roe] : his 
son. According to some 
records this John, in Jane 
1596, resigned the chief- 
taincy to his brother Philip, 
who died in 1601 ; but, ac- 
cording to others, that bro- 
ther's name was Edmond, 
the last " O'KeiUy" of the 
county Cavan, who was 
elected chief in 1585, and 
who was wounded in the 
wars against Queen Eliza- 
beth ; of which wounds he 
died in May 1601, and was 
buried in the Monastery of 
the Franciscan Friars at 
Cavan. This Edmond was 
the ancestor of O'Reilly, of 
Scarva, county Down. 

124. Hugh, lord of Lower 
Bre&ey: son of John ruadh. 

125. Myles : his son. 

126. Colonel Edmond bui- 
dhe [boy] : his son; resumed 
the title of ** O'Reilly"; died 
in France in 1698; had a 
brother named Hugh, who 
was a captain in France, in 
1711. 

127. Connell O'Beilly : his 
son ; had a brother named 
Owen, who was chief of his 
name; both living in France 
in 1711. 



IV.] 



THE 0*BEILLY AND o'bOUBEE FAMILIES. 



29B 



192. — The Stem of the " O'Eeilly** (of Scarva) Family. 

Edmond, brother of John ruadh who is No. 128 in the 
foregoing (<< O'Beilly *') pedigree, was the ancestor of 
O'Reilly f of Scarva, county Down. 



128. Edmondy the last 
" O'BeiUy'' ; lived at Kilna- 
crott, where he built a large 
castle ; was twice married : 
first to Mary Plunkett, 
daughter of Lord Dunsany, 
and secondly to Elizabeth 
Nugent, daughter of Thomas 
Lord Uelvin. By the first 
marriage this Edmond had 
three sons— 1. Cahir, 2. 
John, 8. Terence; by the 
second marriage, three sons 
— 1. Myles, 2. Farrell, 8. 
Charles* This Edmond died 
in 1601 ; was attainted after 
his death by an Act of Parlia- 
ment, in tiie eleventh year 
of the reign of King James 
L ; and his estates forfeited 
to the crown, 

124. Terence : third son of 
Edmond, by the first mar- 
riage ; had two sons — 1. 
Brian, 2. John. 

125. Brian : elder son of 
Terence; had two sons — 1. 
John, of Belfast, 2. Miles, 
who was a captain. 

126. John, of Belfast : son 
of Brian. 



127. Miles, of Lurgan : hia 
son. This Miles had five 
sons — 1. John, 2. James, 3. 
Charles, 4. Marlow, 5. 
another John. 

128. John : the fifth son of 
Miles; married in 1788 
Lucy Savage, by whom he 
had two sons — 1. Daniel, 
who died young, and 2. 
John. 

129. John, M.P. for Bless- 
ington : second son of John; 
married Jane Lushington, 
by whom he had three sons 
— 1. John-Lushington, 2. 
William-Edmond, 8. James- 
Myles. 

180. John-LushingtonBeil- 
ly : son of John ; married 
Louisa Temple, by whom he 
had five sons, whose names 
— except the eldest — ^I have 
not yet ascertained. 

181. John-Temple EeiUy, 
D.L., Scarva-House, Scarva, 
county Down : son of John- 
Lushington Beilly; living 
in 1878. 



I 



198. — ^Thb Stem of the " O'Boubee " Family. — Continued, 

Uailabg, who (see the first series) is No. Ill on the 
" O'Bourke" pedigree, had two sons — 1. Tieman ; and 2. 



294 



imSH FEDIGBEBS. 



[PABT 



Donald, who was the ancestor of M<icTieman* or MacTer- 
of Bre&ey : that Tieman was ancestor of the senior 



narti 



branch of the O'Rourke or O'Eorke family. 



112. Tiernan : eldest son of 
Uailarg (**uair': Irish, a 
wailing^ Lat.**ulu-latio", and 
."arg,"Irish,mi/A). This Tier- 
nan married Dearvorgalf, 
daughter of Murcha, the last 
king of Meath: that Dearvor- 
gal, whose abduction by Der- 
mod MacMurrogh, king of 
Leinster,.was the ostensible 
occasion of the invasion of 
Ireland by King Heni^ the 
Second of England. 

118. Donald : his son ; was 
the last Prince of West 
Brefney. 

. 114. Feargal : his son ; 
lord of West Brefney. 

115. Donald (2) : his son ; 
lord of West Brefney ; had 
five brothers, the fifth of 
whom, Congal, was the an- 
cestor of MacNeill and Mc- 
Neill, modernised Jseihon, 
and Nelson. 
. 116. Arthur : son of Donald; 



had two brothers — 1. Hugh, 
2. Lochlann. 

117. Amhailgadh [awly], 
lord of West Brefney: son 
of Arthur. 

118. Donald (8) : his son ; 
had three brothers-«-l. Tier- 
nan, 2. Conor, 8. Bory. 

119. Uailarg mor : son of 
Donald ; had five brothers. 

120. Tiernan mor : his son. 

121. Teige na Gcoir("goir": 
Irish, to call ; Lat. *.*gar-uo'% 
to prate or prattle; Syriac, 
"kar-o", to name; Gr. "ger- 
uo" and " gar-uo", to prate): 
his son ; lord of West Bref- 
ney; a quo O'Ooirl; had 
eight brothers. 

122. Tieman oge, lord of 
West Brefiiey : his son ; had 
two brothers. 

128. Donogh : his son* 

124. Owen, lord of West 
Brefiiey : his son. 

125. Brian ballach : his 



* MacTierfian : In IriBh this sinuune is MacTigheamain ('*t«gli- 
eama": Irish, a lord or master) ; which has been anglicised Tieman^ 
MacTieman, MacTemaUf McTeman^ McMaster, Masterson, and 
Lord. (See also the " MacTieman *', of Clan Colla, pedigree. ) 

t Dearvorgal : This is the jmhi^py lady to whom, in 
** The Song of O'Ruarc, Prince of Brefni ", 

•Moore alludes in his Irish Melodies, 

« 

t O^Ooir : It is considered that Oore, Parrot, and Pratt, ue angh'- 
•eised forms of this simame. 



w.] 



THE O SHAUaHNESST FAMILY. 



2M 



son ; lord of West Bre&ey ; 
died in 1562. 

126. Brian-na-mota : his 
son ; was beheaded in Eng- 
land ; Indentnre between 
him and Sir H. Sidney, in 
1578. 

127. Teige an fhiona : his 
son. 



128. Brian (8) : his son. 

129. Brian (4) : his son. 

180. John : his son. 

181. Thomas : his son. 

182. Edmond Boche 0'- 
Bonrke : his son ; living in 
Nancy, in France, a.d. 1777. 



194. — The Stem op the ** O'Shaughnbsst'* Family. 

FiAGHRA folt-leathan, brother of Brian who (see the first 
series) is No. 87 on the ** O'Conor" (Connaught) pedigree, 
was ^e ancestor of O'Seachnasaigh ; anglicised O'Shagh- 
nosy, O^Shannessyf and O'Shaughnessy, 

87. Piachra folt-leathan 
(" folt" : Irish, hair; "leat- 
han", broad): the second son 
of Eochaidh muigh-mead 
hoin, the 124th monarch of 
Ireland ; a quo were called 
the territories in Connanght 
known as Tir Fiachra, or 
" Fiachra's Country", and a 
quo O' FuiUleaihanfBJigliQiQed 
Fulton. This Fiachra had 
two sons — 1. Amhailgadli, 
and 2. Dathi : the former 
was the second Christian 
king of Connaught, who died 
without issue ; it was after 
him that the territory of 
Tir Amhailgaidh, now the 
barony of "Tyrawley", in 
the county Mayo, was so 
called. 

88, Dathi : second son of 



Fiachra folt-leathan; was 
the 127th monarch. This 
Dathi (in imitation of the 
heroic actions of his uncle, 
the monarch Niall of the 
Nine Hostages, and in pro- 
secution of the conquest of 
France undertaken by the 
said uncle, but prevented by 
his death,) went with a great 
army into France ; and, 
marching over the Alps, was 
there killed by a Thunder- 
bolt, which put an end to 
his conquest and life toge- 
ther, AD. 428. 

89. Eocha breac : his son. 
This Eocha had two broth- 
ers— 1. OHoll molt, the 129th 
monarch of Ireland, who, 
leaving no issue, was slain 
in the battle of Ocha, a.d. 



296 



IBISH PEDIOBEBS. 



[past 



478; and 2. Fiacbra ealg, 
who was the ancestor of 
O'Dowd. 

90. Eoghan (or Owen) : 
son of Eocha breac. This 
Owen had a daughter named 
St. Faoileann, whose feast 
is on the 18th September. 

91. Gonall : his son ; had 
a brother named Conn ber- 
neach, who was the ances- 
tor of Moqhan, 

92. Oobhneann : his son. 
98. Cobthach : his son. 
94. Columhan (<< colnm- 

ban** : Irish, a prop ; Lat. 
" columna"; Welsh, ** col- 
ovn" ; Span, "coluna'* ; Gr. 
'< kolona'*) : his son ; was 
the 10th Christian kmg of 
Oonnaught, and the ances- 



tor of Colman, of that pro- 
vince. 

95. Quaire aidhne : his 
son; the 12th Chnstian 
king; a quo O'Guaxre 
(** guaire'* : Irish, rcmgh 
hair); anglicised Gurry; had 
a brother named Hugh. 

96. Artgall : his son. 

97. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. This Hugh had two 
younger brothers — 1. Der- 
mod ruadh [roe] , who was 
the ancestor of Ruane^ mo- 
dernized Reman ; 2. Eergall, 
who was the ancestor of 0*- 
Clery^ etc. 

98. Morogh : his son. 

99. Brian leath-dearg : 
his son. 

100. Breannan* : his son. 



* Breannan : According to some genealogists, the following is the 
pedigree of 0*Shatigne9sy, down from this Breannan — 



100. Breannan : son of Brian 
leath-dearflr. 

101. Tiobrad : his son. 

102. Gabhian : his son. 
103^. Agna : his son. 

104. l^ochboaidh : his son. 

105. Siodhmhnine : his son. 

106. MaoltuUe : his son. 

107. Maolciaran : his son. 

108. Feargal : his son. 

109. Cnmaffh : his son. 

110. Donodi : his son. 

111. Seachnasach : his son ; a 
qno 0*Se(ichncL9aigh, 

112.Geall bhuidhe O'Shagh- 
nasy ("geall" or "giall'» : a hoa- 
iage; **hmdhe'\yeUow): his son; 
first assumed this simame. 

llS.Radhnall (or Bandall) : 
his son. 



114. Giolla-na-niomh [neev]: his 
son. 

115. GiaUbeartach (or Gilbert): 
his son. 

116. Owen : his son. 

117. John boidhe (or yellow 
John) : his son. 

118. William : his son. 

1 19. Dermod : his son. 

120. Gialldubh :' his aon ; died 
1569. 

121. Dermod (2) : his son ; d. 

1607. 

122. Gialldnbh, i.e. Rory : his 
son ; d. 1655. 

123. Dermod (3) : his son. 

124. Bory : his son. 

125. William D'Seachnasy : his 
son. 



THE TOOLE AND PATNE FAMILIES. 



101. Duach : his son ; had 
a brother named Taadan, 
who was the ancestor of 
Scanlan. 

102. Qabhran : son of 
Duach. 

108. Agna ('<agna*' : Irish, 
wisdom ; 6r. '^ agneia ", 
chastity — * * chastity' ' being 
the surest sign of a wise 
man) : his son. 

104. Noohbnaidh : his son. 

105. Sidhmach : his son. 

106. Maolguala : his son. 
107* Gas : his son. 

108. Maolciaran : his son. 

109. Feargal : his son. 

110. Gu-maighe : his son. 

111. Donoch. his son. 

112. Seachnasach (^< seach- 
naim" : Irish, to escape) : his 
son ; a quo O' Seachnasaigh, 

113. Giall-buidhe (*• bui- 



297 



dhe'* : Irish, yellow ; "giall**, 
a hostage) O'Shaghnasy : his 
son ; first assumed this sir- 
name ; a quo (f Giall-huidhe^ 
anglicised Galvey, Galwey, 
GUhey, and Gilboy. 

114. Randal : his son. 

115. Giall-beartach : his 
son. 

116. Roger: his son. 

117. Gilbert (2) : his son. 

118. Owen : his son. 

119. John : his son. 

120. William : his son. 

121. Dermod : his son. 

122. Giall-dubh : his son. 
128. Dermod beach'^' : his 

son. 

124. Roger (2) : his son. 

125. Dermod (2) : his son. 

126. Roger (8) O'Shagh- 
nasyf : his son. 



195. — ^The Stem of the ** 0*Toole" Family. 
(See the first series.) 



196.— The Stem of the " Payne" Family. 

Abt ooe O'Neill, who (see the first series) is No. 124 on 
the ** O'Neill** pedigree, had two sons — 1. Gonn ruadh 
[roe] ; and 2. John, who was surname! <*Shemus" : this 

* Beach : This word (" beach" : Irish, a hte) seems to be the root 
of the simame Beach, 

+ Roger O'ShaghtMsy : For farther information in relation to this 
ancient family, see BlaJce-Foster's excellent work, ** The Irish Chief- 
tains ; or» A Struggle for the Crown'* (Dublin: M. H. Gill & Son» 
1872). 



298 



ntlBH FBDIOKBB8. 



D 



John O'Neill was the ancestor 
and Payns*. 

125. John : second son of 
Art oge O'Neill. 

126. Thomas : his son. 

127. Teige : his son 

128. Henry: his son; cousin 
of Sir Neal O'Neill, who was 
killed at the Battle of the 
Boyne, in 1690 ; had three 
brothers, some of whose 
descendants reside in Brazil, 
Sonth America. This Henry, 
in 1691, changed his name 
to Pain ; entered the Army 
of King William the Third ; 
and obtained large grants of 
land in the county Cork and 
other parts of Ireland. 

129. Alt Payne : his son ; 
died in 1732. 

180. Neal : his son ; died 
1772. 

181. Bichard (or Boderick): 
his son ; d. 1817. 

132. Bobert : his son. 
This Bobert had five sons — 
1. Bichard, whose family be- 
came extinct ; 2. Bobert, 
whose lineage is here traced; 



of Pain; modemuied Prnne^ 

S.Thomas, and 4. John, both 
of whom went to reside in 
Kentucky, United States 
America ; 5. Henry, who 
was killed by American In- 
dians. 

188. Bobert (2): son of 
Bobert. 

134. Bichard W. Payne: 
his son ; born in 1842 ; liv- 
ing, in 1878, in Mossgroye, 
Bandon, county Cork, as a 
Teacher of a National 
School (see in the first series 
the second paragraph of the 
Note •* The O'Neill", under 
Niall Glundubh, No. 100 on 
the O'^ctW pedigree). This 
Richard has a brother named 
Marmaduke, who is an of- 
ficer in the British Army ; 
and has four surviving chil- 
dren, the eldest of whom is 
John. 

185. John Payne : son of 
said Bichard ; bom in 1867, 
and liviog in 1878. 



197.— *The Stem of the " Quibk" Faiolt. 

GoBMAo, the second son of Gu-corb, king of Leinster, who 
(see the first series) is No. 86 on the " G'Gonnor" (Paley) 
pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Caire ('*cuirc": Irish, a 
swathe) ; anglicised Cairk, Quirky and Quirks. 

* Payne: I have reason to believe thai tkie family is not oon- 
sected with any other of the aame naaie at present in Eng land, or 
Ireland. 



IT.} 



THE BOE AND ROGAN FAMILIES. 



299 



87. Gormac : son of Ca- 
Gorb. 
' 88. lomchadh : his son. 

89. Labhradh : his son. 



90. Lngaidh [luy] : his 
son ; had six brothers. This 
Lay (or Lnigach) was the 
ancestor of Gawley. 



19a— The Stbs of the '< Bos'* Faxily. 

Neal madh (ruadh : Irish, '' red** ; Wei. rhydh ; Lai ru- 

Jui ; Fr. roik-^e ; Gr. eruth-ros), who (see the first series) is 

No. 112 on the ** O'Neill" pedigree, was the ancestor of 

O'Ruaidhe ; anglicised BoBj and Bowe. 



199.— The Stem of the " Bogan" Familt. 

Eachach, brother of Feig who is No. 88 on the <' O'Hanlon" 
pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Ruagain; anglicised 
Itogan, 



88. Eachach (<' eachach**: 
Irish, "having many hor- 
ses") : son of Felim ; a quo 
Ua EachfUgh, and MacEach' 
aighf anglicised Mageough, 
Magoughy MagoffyGoffjOough, 
and Magahy, 

89. OHoU : his son ; lord 
of the territory of Eachach 
Mor ; had a brother, named 
Cathfoighid, who was lord of 
Eacha^ch Beag. 

90. Amhailgadh [awly] : 
son of Olioll ; a quo Cineal 
Amhailgadhy now " Clan- 
awley", in the county Down. 

91. Ferach : his son ; had 
two brothers — 1. Bory, 2. 
Fraochran. 

92. Giall-dubh: son of 
Ferach. 

93. Armeadh : his son ; a 
qao Clann Armeidh ; had a 
brother named Sineach, a 
quo Clann Sineaigh. 



94. Conmaol : son of Ar- 
meadh ; had a brother 
named Cineadh (<< cineadh", 
gen. ** cinnidh ** : Irish, a 
nation, a kind ; Lat. ** gen- 
us" ; Gr. " gen-os"), a quo 
0* Cinnidh and MacCinnvdh^ 
anglicised JTenny (of Ulster), 
and MacKenna, 

95. Buarach : son of Con- 
maol. 

96. Ceallach: his son ; had 
a brother named Allan. 

97. Buagan (** ruaig ** : 
Irish, to 'pursue ; " an **, one 
who): son of GeaJlach ; a quo 
O'Ruagain. 

98. Eochagan : his son. 

99. Gumascach : his son. 

100. Olioll : his son. 

101. Muireadach : his son. 

102. Bory : his son. 

108. Morogh fionn O'Buag- 
ain : his son. 



800 ibish pediobees. [pabt 

200.— -The Stem of the '< Bogebs" Fauilt. 

B0BY9 brother of Donald who (see the first series) is No. 
104 on the '* MacDonnell *' (of Antrim) pedigree, wa,s the 
ancestor of MacRuadhri and O^Ruadhri, of ArdstratAa (or 
** Ardstraw"), in the county Tyrone ; anglicised AfacRary 
and Rory, and modernized Rockers, Rogers, and Rogerson, 



104. Ruadhrigh (" ruadh": 
Irish, red haired ; Lat. 
«* rufas"; and " righ": Irish, 
a king) : son of Alexander ; 
a quo MacRuadhri f etc. 

105. Allan : his son. 



106. Bory MacRory : his 
son ; first of the family that 
assumed this simame. 

107. Randal MacRory*, 
of Ardstraw : his son. 



201. — The Stem (or lineal descent) of the Rotal Family. 

[See the first series.) 



202.— The Stem of the ** Ryan" Family. 

GoBMAG, brother of Eoghan (or Owen) who (see the first 
series) is No. 97 on the '* MacMorough'' pedigree, was the 
ancestor of O'Righin ; anglicised Mulrian and Ryan. 



97. Cormac : son of Nathi. 

98. Colman (also called 
Colum) : his son ; a quo 
Siol Coluim, now Colum. 

99. Ronan : his son. 



100. St. Crohnmaol (22 
June) : his son. 

101. Aodh (or Hugh) roin : 
his son. 

102. Colman (2) : his son. 



* RandaX MacRory : At present I am unable to snpply the links 
in this genealogical chain down to Thomas MacRoiy (or MacRo^eiB), 
who, A.D. 1689, was living in "The Three County March ", parish of 
Ardstraw, in the county Tyrone. This Thomas was twioe married : 
his son Danieli by the first marriaffe, had six sons, five of whom 
settled in America, and one died without issue. A lineal descendant 
of that Thomas MacKory, by the first marriage, is Philip Rogers, 
builder, living (in 1877) in or near Limerick; son of Philip, who hved 
in the county Fermanagh, who was son of the said Darnel. By tbe 
second marriage, the said Thomas had fifteen sons ; some of whoae 
descendants to this day live in and about Ardstraw, and some in 
America. 



IV.] 



THK SGANLAN FAMILY. 



801 



108. Laignen : his son. 

104. Cairbre: his son. 

105. Hugh : his son. 

106. Bruadar <" bruadar" : 
Irishy a reverie) : his son ; a 
quo O'Bruadairy anglicised 
Broder^ Broderick, and Brad- 
ner, 

107. Dubhghall : his son. 

108. Righin O'righin": 
Irish, sluggish, dilatory) : his 
son ; a quo O'Highin, 



109. 

110. 

111. 

112. 

118. 

114. 
son. 

115. 

116. 

117. 

118. 
son. 



Cairbre (2) : his son. 
Teige : his son. 
Donoch : his son. 
Melachlin : his son. 
Lucas : his son. 
Daithi (or David) : his 

Neimheach : his son. 
Jeoffry : his son. 
Henry : his son. 
Henry Mulrian : his 



203. — The Stem of the ** Scanlan" Family. 

TuADAN, brother of Duach who is No. 101 on the 
" O'Shaughnessy" pedigree, was the ancestor of O'Scannla ; 
anglicised Scanlan. 



101. Tuadan : son of Bre- 
annan. 

102. Garbhan : his son. 
108. Nathseanach : his son. 

104. Conla : his son. 

105. Nobilleud : his son. 

106. Tiomail : his son. 

107. Maoltuile : his son. 

108. Maolguala : his son. 

109. Casadhmanach : his 
son. 

110. Maolciaran : his son. 

111. Feargal : his son. 

112. Scannail (*< scannail": 
Irish, scandal ; Lat. " scan- 
dal-urn " ; Or. '< skandal- 
on'*) : his son ; a quo 
O^Seannla^ 



118. Aodh (or Hugh) : his 
son. 

114. Gileneach: his son. 

115. Concobhair (or Conor): 
his son. 

116. Hugh (2) : his son. 

117. Tirlach : his son. 

118. Hugh (8) : his son. 

119. Teige : ms son. 

120. Murios : his son. 

121. Conor (2) : his son. 

122. Murios (2): his son. 
128. Brian : his son. 

124. Art : his son. 

125. Owen O'Scanlan: his 
son. 



802 ibish p£digb££s. [paxt 

204.-^The Stem of the <<8heane*' Faiolt. 

Seaohan (Shane or John), brother of Golcan, who is No. 
89 on the ** O'Brassil " (West) pedigree, was the ancestor 
of O'Seaghain ; anglicised SheanCy and Segan, 

89. Seaghan (<* seagh" : f 98. Cubreathan : his son. 



Irish, esteem) : son of Tnat- 
hal cruinnbhenl (or <' Tual 
of the gathered mouth"). 

90. Glasceann : his son. 

91. Muirios [murrish] : 
his son. 

92. Aongus : his son. 



94. Dnnbo : his son. 

95. Dnngal : his son. 

96. Tigheamach : his son. 

97. Cananan : his son. 

98. Anbuidh O'Seagfaain 
C anabuidh" : Irish, imma- 
ture) : his son. 



205. — The Stem of the " Spillanb" Family. 

MuiBEADACH [murcdach] , brother of Ceamach who is No. 
98 on the *' Breslin ** pedigree, was the ancestor of O^Speil- 
ain ; anglicised Spellan, Spelman, SpiUa^ie, Spollen, and 
Spiller, 



98. Muireadach : son of 
Fergus. 

99. Foghartach : his son. 
100. Speilan ("speU'*: 



Irish, a herd, particularly, 
of swine ; ** an", one who): his 
son ; a quo 0*Speilain. 



'* Let ^ate do her worst there are relics of joy, 
Bright dreams of the past, which she cannot destroy ; 
Which come in the night-time of sorrow and care, 
And bring back the features that joy nsed to wear." 

— ^MOORE. 

The foregoing are the pedigrees of those Milesian Irish 
families which, as yet, I have been able io collect ; and I 
need not say the collection and compilation of those genea- 
logies were to me a *' labour of love." In respect to any 
inaccuracies or blemishes which may be found in the 
Work, I trust that the magnitude of my labour will plead 
my excuse. Any inaccuracies, however, which may be 
pointed out to me, in this or the first volume, shall be 
corrected in future editions; and the blemishes, if any, 
expunged. 

It will be observed that some of the genealogies are 
traced down to the time of the English invasion of Ireland; 



IT.] MILESIAN IBI8H FAmLIES. 303 

some, to the reign of Queen Elizabeth; some, to the 
Plantation of Ulster; some, to the Cromwellian, and 
others to the Williamite, confiscations ; and some down to 
this year of our Lord, 1878. But I am satisfied that, so 
far as my sources of information enabled me to do so, each 
generation of each pedigree is faithfully recorded. 

It will be also seen that, of those families whose pedi- 
grees are continued down to 1878, some contain more 
generations than others ; but this is easily accounted for 
by the fact, that many of the names recorded in the Irish 
Genealogies were Chiefs of Clans, and that the Chiefs of 
dominant Irish families in the past were often slain in 
early manhood: because, in war, the Chief headed his 
Clan, and, thus ux/ront of the battle, was always exposed to 
the onslaught of his foe. Hence the average age of the 
generations is low in the Pedigrees of those families which 
longest continued to be dominant ; thus accounting for the 
greater number of generations. 

To render Irish Pedigbees as interesting as possible to 
future generations of those Irish, Norman-Irish, and Anglo- 
Irish families, whose genealogies are recorded in the Work, 
I would receive reliable information from the represent- 
atives of those families, at home, or abroad, who can, from 
where I leave off in any genealogy, continue their 
pedigrees down to themselves ; with the view of having 
such information, when verified, inserted in future editions 
of this, or the first, volume. And, as this Work caters to 
the prejudices of no sect or paxty, there is, under the 
mild sway of our gentle Sovereign, no valid reason for with- 
holding such information ; on the contrary, the man who 
can assist in rescuing his family genealogy from oblivion, 
and will not do so, incurs, in my opinion, the reproach so 
justly applied by Sir Walter Scott in the following lines, 
to hun, if such there be, whose soul is dead to *' Love of 
Country" ; 

fiigli thoagh his title*, proad his name, 
Booodtess his wealth as wish can claim ; 
Despite those titles, power and pelf, 
The wretch, concentred all in self, 
Living, shall forfeit fair renown, 
And, donbly dying, shall ^ down 
To the vile dnst, from which he sptiing, 
Unwept, nnhonoured and unsung. 



PART V. 

The savage loves his native shore, 
Though rude the soil and chill the air; 

Then why shouldn't Erin's sons adore 
An Isle which nature formed so fair ? 

ANGLO-IRISH AND ANGLO-NORMAN .FAMILIES 

IN IRELAND. 

While some of the genealogies recorded under this heading 
are of Anglo-Norman origin, it will be seen that others of 
them are of Irish descent, which were heretofore considered 
as of foreign extraction. No doubt, the love of country for 
which the Celts, in whatever clime, have ever been proverb- 
ial, may have led some of those families to return to 
Ireland, as opportunities offered ; for, if Scotland's friendly 
Bard could adimre the Emerald Isle, as by him expressed 
in the stanza which heads this page, it is not difficult to 
understand, why, in weal or in woe, the Irish Celt, in exile, 
so intensely loves his native country, or the loved land of 
his faihers, that he ever feels a home sickness to visit his — 

'* First flower of the earth and first gem of the sea." 



1. — The " Barbett" Family. 

The ancestor of Barrett was Sir David, who was son of a 
(nameless) king of Britain. 

1. Sir David. 

2. William, of Kilcoman : 
his son. 

8. William of Mayne : his 
son. 



4. William, the younger : 
his son; was oalled'^Baret**,* 
B, quo Barrett. This William 
had three sons — 1. Thomas; 
2. Walter; 8. Uadfaan 



*. Baret : Some are of opinion that this epithet was equivalent to 
our present English word oarraU-or, 



v.] 



THE BERMINGHAM FAMILY. 



805 



('< uadhafan** : Irish» from 
him)t a quo Mac Uadhahi, 
anglioised Mac Waddsn^ and 
Caden. 

5. Thomas : son of said 
William. 

6. Magion : his son. 

7. William dubh : his son. 

8. Bichard : his son. 



9. Edmond : his son. 

10. William dubh (2) : his 
son. 

11. Richard (2) : his son. 

12. Edmond (2) : his son. 
18. Edmond (8) : his son. 
14. Richard (8) Barrett : 

his son. 



2. — ^The '* Bebminoham*' Family. 

William, of Birmingham, in Warwickshire, in England 
(and who was therefore called ** William de JBermingham*^, 
held from Gervas de Paganell (a quo Bagenall 2Jid Bagnalf), 
baron of Dudley, nine knights* fees de veieri feoffamento ; 
and had two sons— 1. Peter, who staid in England; and 
2. Meyler, who was the first of the family that, in 1170, 
come with Richard Strongbow into Ireland, and was the 
third in command of that expedition. 



1. Meyler DeBermingham: 
son of William ; was the an- 
cestor of all those of that 
simame in Ireland. He 
had three sons— -1. Gilbert, 
of Moigh ; 2. Piers ; 8. John, 
who was lord justice of Ire- 
land. From the first and 
third son I find no issue; 
but the second son left 
issue — 

2. Piers : second son of 
Meyler. 

8. Bickard : his son ; who 
was called Eisdsard na-gcath 
(meaning << Richard of the 
Battles *'), from the many 
battles by him fought and 



won; amongst which were 
the battle of Togher, the 
battle of Finlo, and the 
battle of Atha-na-Biogk (lit- 
erally the "Ford of the 
Kings''^, now called Athenry: 
from tne kings there slain, 
viz. — the king of Connaught; 
O'Kelly, king of Hy- Maine ; 
together with most of the 
nobility of Connaught and 
Munster, who in those days 
were called petty kings of 
the territories they possess- 
ed. According to some 
annalists this Bickard na- 
gcath left threei sons — 1^ 
Thomas, who, on the win* 



806 



IBISH PEDIGEEES. 



[PABT 



ning of that battle, was 
created "baron of Athenry", 
2. William, who was arch- 
bishop of Tuam ; 8. Richard 
ruadh, who was ancestor 
of the Berminghams of 
Leinster, and whose son, 
Sir John DeBermingham, 
was created "earl of Louth'', 
by King Edward the Second, 
A.D. 1319, for the service 
performed by him and Sir 
Bichard LeTuite in a great 
battle by them fought 
against Edward Le Bruice 
(or Edward Bruce), brother 
of Bobert Bruce, king of 
Scotland, at Faughart, near 
Dundalk, in which battle 
the said Edward Bruce was 
slain (some say by the hands 
of Sir Bichard LeTuite), and 
his army routed and most 
of them slain. 

In other copies (of the 



"Genealogies") I find the 
said RUdeard na-gcath to 
have another son named 
Piers, from whom the lords 
barons of Athenry were des- 
cended, as follows : — 

4. Piers : son of Bichard 
na gcath. 

5. Walter : his son. 

6. Thomas : his son. 

7. Bichard : his son. 

8. John : his son. 

9. Edmond : his son. 

10. Bichard (2) : his son. 

11. Edmond (2) : his son. 

12. Bichard (8) : his son. 
]8. Edmond (8) : his son. 

14. Bichard (4): his son. 

15. Edward : his son. 

16. Francis : his son. 

17. Edward, lord baron of 
Athenry : his son. 

18. Francis Bermingham, 
lord baron of Athenry : his 
son. 



8.— The "Boubkb" Family. 

AoooRDD^G to Sesmondi's lEstaire de France, this family can 
trace its descent from Pepin le vieux, duke of Anstrasia, 
maire du palais, and living a.d. 622. This Bepin had a 
daughter named Dode (or Begga), who was married to 
Amsegise (or Amolpe), son of St. Amould of Metz, also 
living in 622. From this marriage the issue were as 
follows :— 



1. Pepin le vieux, ou de 
Lauden ; a«i>. 622. 

2. Bode : his daughter ; 
married to Amsegise ; as 
above. 



8. Pepin le gros, or de 
Herifltal : their son ; duke of 
Anstrasia, and maire dn 
palais ; £ed 714 ; marded 
to three wives successively. 



v.] 



THE BOUBKB FAMILY. 



807 



4. Charles martel: his son 
by the first marriage ; died 
741. This Charles had two 
wives — 1. Botmde, 2. Soni- 
childe : the sons by the first 
wife were — 1. Carloman, 2. 
Pepin le bref ; the son by the 
second wife was Grifon. 

5. Pepin le bref: son of 
Charles martel ; d. 768. 

6. Carlovongian, king of 
France : his son ; a.d. 750. 

7. Charlemagne : his son ; 
Emperor of the West, a.d. 
800 ; d. 814. Charlemagne 
had five sons : from Louis 
the First, king of France, 
who was the eldest of those 
^ve sons, the Bourbon line 
of French kings down to 
Louis XYI. was descended ; 
the fifth son was Charles, 
duke of Ligalheim. 

8. Charles, duke of Ingal- 
heim : son of Charlemagne ; 
married to Juliana. 

9. Boland (or Bowland) : 
his son had a brother named 
Gratian. 

10. Godfrey (or Croise*), 
of Bouillon : his son ; duke 
of Lorraine; had two brothers 
named— -1. Eustace, 2. Bald- 



win. This Godfrey led the 
Crusades, a.d* 1097 ; refused 
to wear a "crown" in Jeru- 
salem, or to bear the title of 
" king"; but he adopted the 
style of ** baron of the Holy 
Sepulchre." He was called 
" defender of the Christians 
in the Holy War." 

11. Baldwin the First : his 
son ; king of Jerusalem. 

12, Baldwin II.: his son; 
count of Flanders, and king 
of Jerusalem. 

18. John : his son ; earl of 
Comyn, and baron of Tour- 
bourg in Normandy; general . 
of the king's forces, and 
governor of his chief towns — 
hence called **De Bourg,'^ 
a quo Bourkei, and Burke, 

14. Harlowen : his son ; 
married Arlott, mother of 
William the Conqueror (or 
King William the First of 
England) ; founded the 
Abbey of Grestinne, in 
Normandy. This Harlowen 
had one brother named 
Eustace, who was baron of 
Tourbourg, a quo the vis- 
count de Vissi, in France; 
and one sister named Melli- 



* Croise : After this Godfrey, the Bourkes have the Crass in their 
Armorial Bearings. 

t Bourke : The SMiior (or Mayo) branch of this family retain the o 
of the French DeBowrg, while the junior (or Clanrioarde) branch 
write the name '* Bnrke" (without the o), from the Irish spelling of 
the name — DeBarc ; as no " oa " diphthong exists in the Irish 
language. 



808 



IBISH PEDIGREES. 



[PABT 



cent, who was married to 
Talk, earl of Anjou, second 
King of Jemsalem. 

15. Bobert : son of Harl- 
owen ; bad a brotber named 
Odo— both balf brothers of 
William tbe Conqueror. 
This Bobert came with the 
said William to the invasion 
of England, a.d. 1066, who 
granted him a manor in 
1068, and created him 
" earl of Cornwall.'* King 
William granted to Odo the 
bishopric of Bayeux, in 
Normandy, and created him 
** earl of Kent." 

16. William : son of Robert. 

17. Adelm De Burgo : his 
son; was the ancestor of 
all the Bourkes of Ireland. 
This Adelm had a brother 
named John, who was father 
of Hubert De Burgo, who 
married Margaret, sister 
of JUalcolm IV., king of 
Scotland. This Hubert was 
earl of Kent, constable of 
Dover Castle, chief justiciary 



of England, guardian of 
King Henry the Third, and 
one of the most distingnished 
subjects in Europe. He is 
a prominent character in 
Shakespear*8 ** King John." 

18. William* Fitzadehn 
De Burgo (or XJilliam mor 
De Burc, sometimes called 
" Uilliam conguirt"): son 
of Adelm De Bni^ ; was 
viceroy of Ireland next after 
Strongbow, a.d. 1204. This 
William was twice married : 
first, to Isabella, daughter 
of King Bichard the First 
(Cceur De Lion), and widow of 
Llewellyn, prince of Wales ; 
second, to IJna, daughter of 
Hugh O'Conor, the last king 
of Connaught. The issue 
of this Una was Bicard oge 
(or Bichard the younger), 
also called XJilliam fionn, as 
well as <' XJilliam oge." 

19. Bickard De Burgo (or 
Bicard Mor De Burc): son 
of William Fitzadelm De 
Burgo, by the first marriage; 



* William : According to Bome Annalists, William Fitzadelm De 
Burgo was " sewer '' to Henry the Second, King of England ; who, 
A.D. 1177, made him "lord justice of Ireland/' where, by his second 
wife, Una, he had one son called by some Ricard Og [oge], or Bick- 
ard the younger (to distinguish him from his elder brother Ricard 
Mor, or Richard the Elder). These two Ricards were also each 
called '' XJilliam" : namely, XJilliam Mor, or William the Elder ; and 
XJilliam Og, or the Younger William. 

It may be here observ^ that " William" is UUliam, in Gaelic; and 
'* William the Younger'' is l/Uliam Og. As time rolled on, UiUiam 
Og was contracted to UUleog, anglicised UHck, which literally means 
"Young William." It is also risht to mention that the name 
•< XJliok" was special to the Bourke £unily. 



V-] 



THE BOUBKE FAMILT. 



809 



had three brothers — 1. Hu- 
bert, who was earl of Kent ; 
£• Thomas ; 3. Geoffrey, who 
was abbot of Ely. This 
Eickard's half brother, Bio- 
ard oge (or Rickard the 
younger), was the ancestor 
of Burke, of Glanrickard, 
who were called *' Clan- 
ricarde oge*', to distingnish 
them from the descendants 
of Bicard Mor*, lords of 
Connaught, who spelled the 
name Bourke, 

20. William mor : of Atha 
an chip (or WilUam of the 
ford of the stock or head) : 
the second son of Bicard 
mor DeBurc. This William 
had an elder brother named 
Walter, who, in right of his 
wife, the daughter and heir 
of Hugo de Lacy, earl of 
Ulster, was the first earl of 
Ulster of the Bourke family. 
This Walter was also baron 
of Connaught and Trim. 
WilHam mor De Burc, of 
Atha an chip, married Fran- 
ces Delamond, daughter of 



the Duke of Norfolk; and 
was the ancestor of << Mac- 
WilUam iachtar'* (or the 
Mayo Mac William), which 
has been anglicised Williams^ 
Williamson, and Wilson. 

21. Sir William : his son ; 
married daughter of King of 
Scotland ; was Lord Warden 
of Lreland, a.d. 1296. In 
1808 this Sur William found- 
ed the Abbey of St. Francis, 
in Oalway; and was there 
interred, a.d. 1824. 

22. Sir Edmond albanach : 
his son ; was 22 years in 
Scotland with his mother's 
relations : hence he was 
sumamed albanach (or 
''Scotch" Edmond); married 
Sadhbh, daughter of Dermod 
O'Malley, of the Owles. 
This Sir Edmond had two 
elder brothers — 1. Ulick ; 2. 
Walter, a quo MacWalteVy 
modernized - Walters, and 
Waters. And he had six 
younger brothers — 1. Sir 
Richard ; 2. Sir John ; 3. 
Sir Theobald; 4. Mayler, 



* Bicard Mor: To this Rickard De Burgo, King Henry III., of 
England, made a grant of the province of Connanght, a.d. 1225 ; in 
1227 he was appointed '* lord justice of Ireland '' and " lord of Con- 
naught.'' This last title he acquired, some say, in right of his 
mother, Una (or Agnes^, daughter of Hugh O'Couor, the last king of 
Connaught (by Ranalt, his wife, daughter of Awley O'Farrell, king 
of Conmacne). This Ricard Mor had two sonsr— 1. Walter, who 
became earl of Ulster ; 2. William, the progenitor of the Bourkes of 
Mayo, and after whom, some say, thes6 Bourkes took the name 
** Mac William ia^chiar'* ; *'iachtar" meaning loioer or northern, com- 
pared to " Mac William uacfUar^\ which meant the upper (or Galway) 
Mac William (see Hardiman*s lar ContMcJU, page 39). 



810 



IBISH PEDIGBKES. 



tPABT 



a quo MacMeyler and Meyler; 
5. Hibbtm, a quo Mac- 
ffibbun, modernized Mac- 
Gibbon, and Gibbons ; 6, 
Ifhilipin*, a qno MacPhilip- 
in, anglicised MacPhilpin, 
Philbin, and Philips ; 7. Sir 
Bedmond, a quo MacRed- 
monds, 

23. Sir Thomas DeBurc : 
son of Sir Edmond albanach; 
married a daughter of 
O'Conor (Connaught). 

24. Edmond na feasoige 
(** feasog " : Irish, a beard!) : 
his son. This Edmond had 
an elder brother named Wal- 
ter, t who was the ancestor of 
the Bourkes of Ballinrobe, 
Lough Mask, and Kin- 



lough; he also h&,d three 
younger brothers— 1. Thom- 
as, 2. John, 8. Biokard : this 
Thomas was the ancestor of 
the Bourkes of Moyne; 
this John was the ancestor 
of the Bourkes of Muintir 
Creaghan ; and this Bickard, 
who was called ** Sean'* (or 
old Bickard), was the ances- 
tor of the Bourkes of Tur- 
lough near Castlebar. Ed- 
mond na feasoige married 
Honora, daughter of Ulick 
ruadh (or red Ulick), lord 
Mac Wiliiamof Clanrickard J ; 
and possessed estates at 
Newport-Mayo and at Burr- 
ishoole. 



4.^— The Bourses, Lobds Marquis Mato. 

Sir Bickard na-cnairsgiath (or Bickard of the round or 
bent shield), son of Edmond na feasoige, who is No. 24 
on the foregoing C'Bourke") pedigree, was the ancestor 
of Bourke, of Tyrawley, lords marquis Mayo. 

* Philipin: This clan is descended from Fhilipin (or ''little 
Pbilip*') ilrho was, as some say, the fourth son of Sir Edmond alban- 
ach De Bare ^ee Bardiman's lar ConnacJU, p. 242). 

t Walter : This Walter Boarke (or Walter De Bonf^), of Cinlock 
(w Eijoloogh) was the father of three sons — 1, John ; 2. Theobald, of 
KinKotxgh and Shrule; 3. Bickard, of Ballinrobe. This Biokard had 
three sons— 1. John an Tearmuinn (the Termon of Balla); 2. Walter; 
3. Theobald. This John an Tearmninn had two sons — 1 ; Biokard 
oge; 2. David. And this David had two sons — 1. Edmond; 
2. M^ler. 

t Cfktnrtcbard : According to Ware and others, '* Clanricaide *' 
comprised the baronies of Clare, Dunkellin, Longhrea, Kiltartaa, 
Athenry ; and Leitrim, in the county Galway. 



v.] 



THE BOUBKES OF OABBOWEEEL. 



811 



25. Sir Bickard na cuairs- 
giath : son of Edmond ; bad 
two younger brothers — 1. 
UHck, wbo was ancestor of 
tbe lords visconnts Mayo, 
and of tbe Bonrkes of Par- 
try and of Ballyvecban (now 
Newport-Mayo) ; 2. Thomas 
madb [rooa]« of Newport, 
Castlebreafify, Borrisboole, 
and Mayo, who was ancestor 
of the Bonrkes of Ballinglen. 

26. John Bonrke, of Ty- 
rawley: fourth son of Sir 
Bickard nacnairsgiatb. This 
John bad three elder bro- 
thers — 1. Edmond, of Cas- 
tlebar, 2. Walter, 8. Thomas 
baccaeb (or Thomas the 
lame); and three younger 
brothers — 1. Bickard, 2. 
Dayid, 8. Uliok. 

27* Oliver, of Tyrawley : 
bis son ; married a daughter 
of Hugh dubh ODonnell. 

28. Sir John Bourke, of 
Ardnaree, of Castlebar, etc. : 
8<m^ Oliver. This Sir John 



bad seven brothers — 1. Sir 
Rickard, of Newtown, Logh 
Mask, etc.; 2. Thomas, of 
Castle Cloghens ; 8. Ed- 
mond, of Bappa ; 4. David 
an Sliochd, of Batbroe, In- 
niscoe (now ** Enniscoe"), 
and Carrowkeel ; 5. Ulick, 
of Bahens ; 6. Aiithony ; 7. 
Walter. 

29. Walter ciothach (or 
lefthanded Walter), of Bel-, 
leek: son of Sir Jolm, of 
Ardnaree. This Walter bad 
seven brothers — 1. Oliver, 
who died at Inniscoe; 2. 
Ulick, of Grossmolina; 8. 
John an t-sleibhe (or John 
of the Mountain) ; 4. Walter 
fada* (or long Walter) ; and 
three others. 

80. Theobald Bourke : son 
of Walter ciothach, of Bel- 
leek ; was the first marquis 
of Mayo. 

81. Walter ciothach 
Bourke oge : his son ; was 
the second marquis of Mayo. 



5.— Tm BouBKEs of Cabbowkxsl. 

David an-slioebd Bourg, a younger brother of Sir John 
wbo is No. 28 on tbe (foregoing) *' Bourke" (lords marquis 
Mayo) pedigree, was tbe ancestor of Bourke^ of Carrow- 
keel, Qlen Nephin, county Mayo. 



* Fada ; Compare tbe Iriafa word " fada **, Umg^ with the AralHc 
" fid ", exten«toe. 



812 



lUSH PEBIGBBSS. 



[PiOCT 



28. David an sliochd 
Bonrke, of Bathroe, Inniscoe 
(now ** Enniscoe''^ and Car- 
rowkeel : son of Oliver of 
Tyrawley. 

29, Kickard rnadh, of 
Bathroe, Inniscoe, and Car- 
rowkeel : bis son. 

80. Charles, of Bathroe, 
Inniscoe, and Carrowkeel : 
his son ; married daughter 
of Thady Fitztheobald oge 
O'Connor Shgo ; had a bro- 
ther named XJlick, and a 
sister named Mary. 

' 81. Lieutenant-Colonel 
Walter Bourke : son of Char- 
les. This Walter had two 
brothers and two sisters : 
the brothers were— 1. Bow- 
land, who held lands off the 
west of Lough Conn, 2. 
Theobald ; and the sisters 
were— 1. Bridget, 2. Mar- 
garet. 

82. Theobald : son of said 
Walter ; had two brothers — 
1. Eamon laidir (or strong 
Edmond), 2.Myles. 

88. Walter ciothach (8) : 
son of Theobald. This Wal- 
ter had two brothers and 
one sister: the brothers 
were — 1. Geoffrey, 2. Ed- 
mond : and the sister's name, 
Cecilia. 

84. Captain Joseph Bourke: 
eldest surviving son of said 
Walter. This Joseph had a 
brother named Walter ; and ' 



two sisters — 1. Mary, 2. 
Julia. This Walter had 
(besides other sons and 
daughters) two sons — 1. 
Walter J. Bourke (deceased). 
Solicitor, Westport, who left 
two daughters , and 2. Bey. 
Geoffrey Bourke, P.P., of 
Ballindine, diocese of Tuam, 
and living a.d. 1877. 

85. Walter Bourke, of Car- 
rowkeel, Q.C. : son of said 
Joseph. This Walter had 
one daughter (his only heir), 
named Cecilia, married to 
Francis Lprenzo Comyn, 
J.P., Woodstock, Galway, 
both living in 1877 ; and he 
had two brothers and three 
sisters : the brothers were — 
1. Isidore Bourke, solicitor 
(deceased) ; 2. Thomas, who 
died unmarried ; the sisters 
were — 1. Frances, 2. Anne, 
8. Mary. 

86. Major Joseph Bourke : 
son of the said Isidore, soli- 
citor; died in May 1877. 
This Joseph left six brothers 
and two sisters : the bro- 
thers were — 1. Walter who 
(in 1877) was a barrister at 
Calcutta ; 2. Thomas, a mer- 
chant in New York ; 8. Isi- 
dore, an M.D. in the Indian 
British Army ; 4. Dr. Geof- 
frey, of New York; 5. John ; 
6. Edward ; and the sisters 
— 1. Dorinda, 2. Matilda. 



y«] THE BOUBKE (LOBDS YISOOUNT BfATO) FAMILY. 818 

6.-^Th]S Bourkes of Lough Conn, and Baluna. 

Rowland, a younger brother of Lieutenant-Oolonel Walter 
Bonrke who is No. 31 on the " Bourke of Carrowkeel'* 
pedigree, was the ancestor of Bourke^ of Ballina and of the 
west of Lough Conn — ^in the county Mayo. 



81. Bowland : second son 
of Charles Bourke of Bath- 
roe, Liniscoe, and Garrow- 
keel. 

82. John (called Seoghan 
[Shane] na g-cathadhaloch): 
his son. This John was 
twice married : first to Mary 
Ball of Sligo ; next to Mary 
Maguire. By the first wife 
he had two sons — L Thomas, 
of Tubbemavine (married to 
Margaret Hellis) ancestor of 
the Bourkes of Ballina (Ty- 
rawley); 2. John, t^ho served 
in the British Army. 

88. Patrick : son of John 
and Mary Maguire ; married 
to Mary Lynott. 

84. Ulick : his son ; mar- 
ried to Cecilia, daughter of 
Patrick Sheridan*; had three 
sisters and two elder bro- 
thers. 

85. John Bourke, of Dub- 
lin, C.E«, and Valuator: 



eldest son of Ulick : mar- 
ried to Catherine Cannon, 
of Mount Charles ; died in 
1862. This John had three 
brothers and two sisters : 
the brothers — 1. Thomas, 
C.E., married to Anne 
M'Guinness ; 2. Patrick, 
who died young ; 8. the Very 
Bev. Ulick J. Canon Bourke 
(living in 1878), President 
St. Jarlath's College, Tuam, 
and author of the Aryan 
Origin of the Gaelic Race and 
Language ; and the sisters 
were — 1. Maryt (married in 
1846 to Patrick MacPhilpin, 
of Gastlebar), 2. Bridget, 
who died unmarried. 

86. Ulick Joseph Bourke, 
M.D. and Physician in the 
British Army: son of said 
John ; bom in 1854, and (in 
1877) quartered with his 
Begiment, in Fermoy, Ire- 
land. 



7. — ^The Boubkbs, Lobds Viscount Mato. 

Uliok, younger brother of Sir Bickard na cuairsgiath who 
is No. 25 on the " Bourkes, lords marquis Mayo" pedigree, 
was the ancestor of Bourke^ lords viscount Mayo. 

♦ Patrich Sheridan : See No. 122 on the " MacHale" Pedigree. 

t Mary : The children of the said Mary are : — 1. Thomas Mac- 
Philpin ; 2. Rev. Peter J. MacPhilpin, Professor (in 1877) in St. 
Jarlath's College, Tuam ; 3. John MacPhilpin, Proprietor of the 
Tufun News ; and one daughter, Bridget MacPhilpin. 



814 



IBI8H PSDI6BBXS* 



[PAET 



25. Uliok Bonrke : second 
sou of Edmond na feasoige. 

26. Ulick (2): his sou; 
had four brothers — 1. David, 
2. Theobald, 8. Meyler, 4. 
Edmond. 

27. David : son of Ulick 
(2). This David had two 
brothers — 1. William, who 
had a sou called *<Bicard 
de moin an coiran'* ; 2. 
Eickard, who had a son also 
named Bickard. 

28. Bickard an iarain : 
son of David. Bickard had 
three younger brothers — 1. 
William, called " The Blind 
Abbot '• ; 2. Walter fada, a 
quo the Bourkes of Partry ; 
and 8. Ulick an' teampul. 
This Bickard an iarain was 
married to the celebrated 



heroine Graine-Ui-M]iaille 
[Orana Wale], or Grace 
O'Malley*, daughter of 
Owen O'Malley, and widow of 
O'Flaherfcy— two Irish Chiefe 
in the county Mayo. 

29. Tioboid na Luinge 
(Toby or Theobald of the 
Ships) : son of Bickard an 
iarain ; was the first <* lord 
viscount Mayo** ; had bro- 
thers, the youngest of whom 
was Bickard oge. 

80. Meyler : son of Theo- 
bald na Luinge ; second lord 
viscount Mayo. This Mey- 
ler had two brothers — 1. 
Toby ; 2. Bickard, of Bally- 
chaddy. 

81. Theobald, third lord 
viscount Mayo : son of Mey- 
ler ; living in 1709. 



* Grace O^Malley : In 1575 lord deputy Sidney wrote to the Conn- 
cil in London, that Grace O'MaUey " was powerfol in eaUeyv and 
seamen." After having performed many remarkalMe ei^oita 
against the English, 0-race was, as a matter of state policy, invited 
as a guest by Queen Elizabeth to London ; the reception which the 
Queen accorded to her was most cracious. She wen offered, at 
purtinff, to make her a "Countess , which the proud Irishwoman 
refused, but accepted the title of *' Earl " for her infant son ; for it is 
a remarkable fact that, during the voyase from Clare Iiadand, in BCayo^ 
to Chester, where she landra, Grace O'MaUey was delivered of a 
Bon^thence named Tioboid na Luinge (meaning ** Toby er Theobald 
of the ship")> ^n>m whom descend the Viscountf Mayo. 

Dressed in the simple costume of her country — a ydlow bodioe and 
petticoat ; her hair gathered to the crown and fastened with a silver 
bodkin ; with a crimson mantle thrown over her shoulden, amA 
fastened with a golden brooch, the Irish Chieftainess approached 
Elizabeth, and addressed her as in " The Meeting of Grace O'Malley 
and Queen Elizabeth," No. 22 in the Appendix. 



▼.] 



THE BROWN AND B0RKE FAMILIES. 



SIS 



8.— The «* Bbown" Familt. 



1. Stephen Browne who 
was shenff of London, in the 
reign of King Henry the 
Second. 

2. Stephen (2) : his son ; 
was mayor of London ; 
some of whose posterity 
settled in Ireland, but when 
is uncertam. 

8. John : his son. 

4. Eustace : his son. 

5. Patrick : his son. 



6. David : his son. 

7. William : his son. 

8. Philip : his son. 

9. John : his son. 

10. Walter : his son. 

11. Thomas: his son. 

12. Ulick : his son. 

13. Walter Brown, of Can- 
nis, in the county Limerick : 
his son. This family name 
has been modernized ^rotrn^. 



The following is the genealogy of another family of the 
same name : Sir David Brown, the first of this family 
recorded as having settled in Ireland, was contemporary 
with Bickard De Burgo, the red earl of Ulster ; and died, 
A.D. 1808. This Sir David had a brother who settled in 
Eillpatrick ; whence, after a time, a branch of that house 
settled in Brownstown, near Loughrea, and thence 
branched to Athenry and, afterwards, to Galway and 
Mayo. 



1. Sir David Browne ; d. 
in 1808. 

2. Stephen : his son. 
8. Henry : his son. 

4. Thomas : his son. 

5. Aobert : his son. 

6. John : his son. 



7. Stephen (2) : his son. 

8. William : his son. 

9. Dominick : his son. 

10. JeofiErey : his son. 

11. Sir Dominick : his son. 

12. Jeoffirey (2) Brown : his 
son. 



9. — ^The Buuees of Clanbioabde. 

BioKABD oge (also called William oge, and William fionn), 
a younger briber of Bickard mor De Burc who is No. 19 
on the ** Bourke** pedigree, was the ancestor of Biarke, of 
Oalway (or Clanricarde) ; who were called ** Glaoricarde 
€fge" to distixiguish them &om the descendants of Bickard 
mor — ^the senior branch of the family — ^who spell the name 
" Bourke." 



816 



IBISH PEDIGBESa. 



[PABT 



19. Biekard oge De Bore : 
a younger son of liVilliam 
Fitzadelm De Bnrgo, whom 
King Henry the Second of 
England appointed '* lord 
justice of Ireland,*' a.d. 1177. 
From this Rickard (or, as he 
was called, William) oge, 
the chiefs of this family were 
called << Mac William uach- 
tar. " (or upper Mac William, 
meaning '* Mac William of 
the territory of Clanrickard, ' ' 
which, heing in the county 
Galway, is upper, compared 
to Mayo, where lived the 
"Mac William iachtar" (or 
lower MacWilliam). Some 
of this William oge's descen- 
dants were called Fitzwil- 
Ham* 

20. William liath [leea] : 
his son. 

21. Biekard an forhar : 
his son. This Biekard had 
five brothers — 1. William 
liath, ancestor of ^facTTa^^, 
of Macaire reagh, and of the 
Bourkes of Lianagh; 2, 
Ulick; 8. Henry; 4. Ed- 
ward; 6. Hubert, who had 



a son named Biekard le hear. 
This Ulick had four sons— 
1. William don, who was 
the ancestor of the Burkes 
of Eillias and Moyralla ; 2. 
Meyler, a quo the Burkes of 
Moylen — a sept of Oran ; 8. 
Jonach, a quo Clann Trea- 
nctch or the sept of Jong^^ 
of Meaghrhdide ; and 4. 
Biekard, of Gahirwamvass. 

22. Ulick an cheann : son 
of Biekard an Forbar ; mar- 
ried to 0*Flaherty's daugh- 
ter; had six brothers, one 
of whom was Walter oge. 

28. Rickard oge: son of 
Ulick an cheann ; had a 
brother named Edmond (or 
Bedmond). 

24. Ulick au fiona: son 
of Biekard oge. This Ulick 
had a brother named John, 
who was a burgess of the 
town of Galway, and a quo 
the Galway Burkes. 

25. Ulick ruadh bodan : 
son of Ulick an fiona ; mar- 
ried Mary, daughter of O'Con- 
nor (Faly) ; had a brother 
named Biekard. 



* FUzw'dliam: Amongst the branches of the "Bourke" and 
" Burke" families are mentioned Crickard, Daris, Jennings (from 
the Irish MctcEoi-nin, meaning ** the descendants of little John *'), 
Hobard, Bubbord, Hubbort, MacRickard, MacRichard, Bichardson, 
Dicson, Dickson, Dixon, Rickards, and Richards. But see Note f, 
page 152, and No. 112 on the "Nealan" pedigree, for Davta — as a 
family of Irish origin ; and, for Dicson, JDicibon, and Dixon, see James 
Tuite, who is No. 9 on the '' Tuite*' pedigree, and who was called 
MacRisdeard : " Die" or " Dick'* being the common name for Richard, 
which is the English for Riadeard ; and " son" being English for 
Jtfac. 

t Jong : This sirname has been modernized De Jong» 



v.] 



THE BURKB FAMILY. 



817 



26. Ulick fionn : son of 
Ulick madh bodan. This 
Ulick fionn had five bro- 
thers^!. Bickard oge; 2. 
Thomas, who was the an- 
cestor of the Burkes of Car- 
ranonin and Carrabane ; 8. 
Meyler; 4. John, ancestor 
of the Bnrkes of Benmore ; 
5. Edward, ancestor of the 
Burkes of Boseim. 

27. Bickard mor (2) : se- 
cond son of Ulick fionn ; 
married a daughter of 0' 
Madden, of Hy-Maine, by 
whom Portumna came to 
this family. From this 
Bickard it is said that Rich- 
ards is derived. The elder 
brother of this Bickard was 
Ulick, who had a son named 
Bickard baccach : this Ulick 
is entered by some genealo- 
gists as the << first earl of 
Glanrickard,'* and the son 
(instead of the brother) of 
the said Rickard mor. 

28. Sir William Burke na 
chion : son of Bickard mor ; 
was the first earl of Clan- 
nckard, 4.d. 1648. 



29. Bickard sacsanach* 
(** sacsanach" : Irish, an En- 
glishman), second earl of 
Glanrickard : his son. 

80. Ulick De Burgh, third 
earl of Glanrickard : his son ; 
had eight children. 

81. Bickard: his son; 
fourth earl of Glanrickard. 
This Bickard had three bro- 
thers — 1. Thomas ; 2. Sir 
William, who was married 
to Joan, a daughter of Der- 
mod O'Shaughnessy, and 
who died in 1686 ; 8. Johnf, 
first viscount Glaremorris, 
A.D. 1629, and married to 
Catherine, third daughter of 
Sir Anthony Browne. 

82. William, the seventh 
earl of Glanrickard : son of 
the above named Sir Wil- 
liam Burke. This William, 
the seventh earl, had a bro- 
ther named Rickard (who 
was the sixth earl of Glan- 
rickard) ; and a daughter 
named Honor, who was 
married to Patrick Sarsfield, 
earl of Lucan, by whom she 
had one son. 



* Sctcsanach : Some are of opinion that this Rickard sacsanach was 
the ancestor of English. 

f John : The son of this John Burke was Thomas, the second vis- 
count Chu'emorris. The son of this Thomas was Oliver Richard 
Burke, the third viscount Glaremorris, who, in 1657, under the Pro- 
tectorate of Oliver Cromwell, lost his title and estates ; was married 
to a daughter of Edmond Burke, of Annakeen. The son of this 
Oliver was Edmund Burke, who was a lieutenant in the Duke of 
Berwick's Regiment in the service or King James the Second. 



818 



IBI8H PEDIORBBS. 



[PABT 



88. John, lord baron of 
Bofin : son of William, the 
seventh earl ; had a brother 
named Eickard, who waa the 
eighth earl. 



84. —Burke : son of John; 
was the ninth earl of Clan- 
rickard ; living, ajd. 1710. 



10.— The "Butleb" Family. 

In Camden's Britannia, page 462, we find that the family 
of '* Fitzwalter", alias **Botelere", alias Butlery derive 
their pedigree from the dukes of Normandy ; as follows : 



1. BoUo, of Norway, 
first duke of Normandy.* 

2. William longespee : 
his son ; the second duke. 

8. Richard I., the third 
duke : his son ; died a.d. 
986. This Bichard left two 
sons — 1. Richard ; 2 God- 
frey, the consul, earl of 
Bryomy. 

4. Richard II., the fourth 
duke: his son. 

6. Robert : his son ; the 
fifth duke. 

6. William, duke of Nor- 
majidy, or ** William the 
Conqueror*' : his son ; the 
first King of England, of the 
Norman line. 

7. Henry the First: his 
son ; the second King of 
England, of this line. 

8. King Henry the Second 
of England : his son. Etc. 



Godfrey, the consul, earl of 
Bryomy, second son of Bieh- 



ard I., the third duke of 
Normandy (who is No. 8. on 
this list), was the ancestor 
of DeClare (now Clare) ; and 
of Butler, in England and 
Ireland. 

Gislebert the Norman, 
earl of Eu, came into Eng- 
land with William the Con- 
queror ; and had four bobs : 
— 1. Gilsebert de Clare, earl 
of Clare, who was the an- 
cestor of Bichard Strongbow, 
earl of Pembroke, mazried 
to Eva, daughter of Dermod 
MacMorough, king of Lein- 
ster ; 2. Boger ; 8. Walter ; 
and 4. Robert, who was an- 
cestor of Fitzwalter and 
BtUler. 

Harvey Walter, who was 
lineally descended from the 
said Robert, here last men- 
tioned, married a daughter 
of Gilbert Becket (and a 
sister of Thomas a fieeket, 
the <' Martyr'^ who was 



Ncrnumdy : See « Dakes o£ Nonoaody *', iu the fint 



▼.] 



THB BUTLEB FAMILY. 



319 



lord arclibishop of Canter- 
bury, and by her had issue 
—1. Theobald Walter, who 
with all his family was ban- 
ished out of England, on 
account of the disfavour in 
which Thomas a Becket, 
archbishop of Canterbury, 
then stood with King Henry 
the Second* But soon after 
the murder of the said 
archbishop, and the king's 
public penance for having 
been accessory to his death, 
Henry the Second recalled 
from banishment all the 
archbishop's friends and 
relatives, and promoted them 
to great offices and employ- 
ments, particularly Theo- 
bald, son of the said Harvey 
Walter, for a time called 
"Theobald Walter", until 
the king took him into 
lavour and sent him into 
Ireland with the title of 
"Chief Boteler" of that 
kingdom ; where by the 
king's royal bounty, his own 
prowess, and valiant beha- 
viour, he became very em- 
inent, and attained great 
40id large possessions. 

Some antiquaries are of 
opinion that, from his office 
of " diief boteler" or "chief 
Antler" of Irelaxid, this 
Theobald Walter's posterity 
took the flimame of BiUlet ; 
but others hold that the 



name is derived from Robert 
(supposed to be " butler" to 
King William the Con- 
queror), who, in " Dooms- 
day Book", is called Robert- 
us Pincerna. This Robert 
Pinoema, with two others of 
the same name (whether his 
brothers or sons, I know 
not), called Hugo Pincerna, 
and Richard Pincerna, held, 
each of them from the King, 
several towns in England : 
one of those three persons 
was grandfather of the a{)ove 
mentioned Walter. 

The Irish antiquaries who 
record the pedigrees of the 
old English families who 
came into Ireland with the 
" Conquest," and remained 
here ever since, give only 
the following names as im- 
mediately descending from 
father to son from the said 
Theobald Walter. 

1. Theobald Walter, alias 
*«Boteler." 

2. Edmond Boteler : his 
son. 

8. Theobald (2) : his son. 

4. Theobald (8) : his son. 

5. Theobald (4) : his son ; 
died A.D. 1249. 

6. Walter : his son. 

7. Edmond, of Roscrea : 
his son. 

8. James: his son; first 
** earl of Ormonde" ; created 
in 1828. 



820 



IBISH PEDIOBESS. 



D 



9. James Balbh (or dumb 
James) : his son. 

10 James, earl of Gowran : 
his son ; had two brothers — 
—1. Theobald, 2. Pierse, 

11. Eichard: son of James. 

12. Edmond : his son. 
18. Pierse : his son. 
14. John : his son. 

16. Thomas, of Eilcasii: 
his son. 



16. James (8) : his son. 

17. Walter (2) : his eon. 

18. Thomas (2) : his son. 

19. James (4) : his eon. 

20. Thomas (8) : his son. 

21. James (5): his son; 
was the first <'dnke of Or- 
monde" ; living in 1708 ; 
had a brother named Bichaid 
Butler, of £ileash. 



11. — ^Thb ** Cooke" opEiLTUBiuk (County Sugo,) Familt* 

O'Callaohan, in his << History of the Irish Brigades/' 
states that this family settled in Ireland in the century ' 
after the Invasion ; which inclines me to believe that the 
** Cookes" in other parts of Ireland are distinct from 
tbem, and that the ancestor of this family^ came to Ireland 
in the thirteenth century with Roger De Bigod, earl of 

* Family : This family is traced down to Jobn Orsmb^ Cooke, Ssq^ 
of Kilturra, county Shgo, and liying in 1878 ; who will pardon the 
Author for here inserting the following remarks. In 1873, a fricmd 
casually sent him a copy of the Sligo Independenit of the 2dth Maich 
of that year ; togeth(Br with a ballad, headed " The Song of 
Kilturra" : both of which he filed—the ballad, solely for its metrical 
style, some stanzas of which are here subjoined. The tracing of this 

genealogy brought the circumstance to his recollection. Under the 
eading '* Bejoicings at Kilturra", in that newspaper, a well-writtea 
article appears, from which the following is an extract : — '* A corres- 
pondent informs us that the arrival home of Mr. J. Ormsby Cooke 
from Dublin to his residence, Kilturra Abbey, after completing his 
title to his family property in Landed Estates Court, was made the 
subject of much rejoicing in the neighbourhood, Mr. Cooke reoeiyiog 
a very enthusiastic reception from nis tenants, friends, and neigh- 
bours. It would seem that rumour had it that strangers were 
likely to outbid him ; and the people awaited the result with great 
interest , . . Large bonfires were lighted on the hills snrroiind- 
ing Kilvurra ; and, along the route from Ballymote, candles were 

S laced in the windows of almost every house, and in many instanoes^ 
^ ambeaux of straw and bogwoo4 were borne by the people. In Bun- 
inadden lai^e bonfires were blazing, and the little town was brill* 
iantly illuminated. When Mr. Cooke was nearing home . . . 



T.] THE COOKE FAMILT. 821 

Norfolk, and settled in the county Carlow. To this day, 
even, the sirname Cooke is very prevalent in Norfolk- 
more so, than in any other part of England or Ireland, 

It was a member of this family who (see Dr. Moran's 
Monasticon ffibernicum) founded a Franciscan Abbey in 
their demesne, now known as '' Oak Park,*' near Carlow, 
at present the property of Mr. Bruen, M.P.^ for thai 
county. 

I have traced this genealogy back to John Cooke, of 
Carlow, who was an officer in a Hegiment of Horse, in the 
Army of King James the Second. This John Cooke and 
his brothers took up arms '< for faith and sovereign*', and 
so warmly espoused the cause of King James, that, in 
grateful recognition of their devotion to him. His Majesty 
granted to them the style and title for ever of The Cookes 
of the Cavaliers, 

the horses were unyoked, and stalwart arms drew the c/trriage to the 
avenue gate, where a happy and loving tenantry hoisted him on their 
shoulders, and, amidst the ringing cheers of those assembled, carried 
him in triumph to the very centre of the homestead halL Here an 
old tenant over seventy-five years of age got on a chair and sung a 
''song of welcome. " The following are a few stanzas of that song— 
the *' Song of Kilturra'*, above mentioned : 

** Three cheers for our Landlord and long may he reign ; 
Mr. John Ormsby Cooke, its his Honour 1 mean ; 
He is well-liked in the countiy, in every degree. 
And, for nursing his tenants, no better can be. 
• • « ..••• 

** His Honour he springs from a r.oble old race ; 
His actions all show that this is the case : 
To the poor he's a friend, so good and so kind, 
His equal in Ireland I*m sure you'll not find. 
.• ...••« 

" He's sprung from the Coopers of riches and fame. 
And the Ormsbys, too, of good race and name — 
The Phibbses, the Irwines, and the Merediths so old. 
Who were royally sprung and had silver and gold. 

. ......a. 

*' To conclude, and to finish, and I'll say no more, 
In '98 1 was bom and my age is seventy-f our ; 
My name is John Scully, these lines you'll excuse ; 
I owe nothing to learning — 1 took all from the Mute". 

The reader will see the curious coincidence which this family genea* 
logy disdoses, in the fact that, while Mr. Cooke of Kilturra u th« 



B22 



IBIBH PEDieBBBS. 



[part 



The family estates in Oarlowand elsewhere confiscated, 
because of their adherence to the cause of King James, 
this John Cooke, after the battle Of Aughrim, settled in 
Connaught ; where he and his descendants married into 
some of the most respectable families of that province. 
One bf his brothers, named Mathew, went to France as an 
officer in the Irish Boyal Begiment of Footguards ; and, 
most likely, was the person alluded to by O'Gallaghan, in 
Ms '* Irish Brigades," pages 832 and 595, as the Mathew 
Cooke who there died in 1740. 



1. John Cooke, of Carlow, 
above mentioned ; living a.d. 
1690. Seeing that after the 
battle of Aughrim the cause 
of !Eing James was lost, and 
wishing to escape the Wil- 
liamite troopers, this John 
Cooke crossed into Mayo 
tmd there met and married 
Mary Lynch, the daughter 
of Dr. Patrick Lynch, of 
Westport; by her he had 
issue three sons — 1. Charles, 
2.Thomas,8.Mathew. Thom- 



as died early in life ; and 
Mathew joined the French 
service. 

2. Charles : eldest son of 
John ; married in 1725 
SheelamorO*Dowda, daugh- 
ter of The O'Dowda, prince 
of Tirer«gh, and by her had 
issue two sos»— 1. Thomas, 
2. John. This John ent^ed 
into Holy Orders, and be- 
came Parish Priest of BcJly- 
mote, CO. Sligo. 

8. Thomas : son of Char- 



representative in the Male line of a family attainted by King 
mlliam the Third, he represents through the Kapers, one of the few 
Sligo families (outside the Coopers of Markree, and ljordO»Ilooney,) 
attainted in the Parliament of King James the Second i a carious 
disclosure, and one which shows that much ** Oranee and Green" 
are fused in some Irish families. One might well look for patriotism 
in this family; for, one of the Ormsbys was lieutenant-Colonel of the 
Sligo Volunteers in 1782, while the Right Honorable Joahua Cooper, 
of Mar^e, M.P. for the county Sligo, was one of the Delegates to 
the Irish National Convention of that memorable year ! 

The Cooke's first settled in the county Sligo, on the invitation of 
the Wingfield's of Scurmore (near EnniBcrone), who, themselves, 
were sprung from a Carlow family, and who gave tkb Coekes large 
leaseholds. These leaseholds they afterwards lost, on aoeount of 
their synqmtliy Mme yearn before with the cause el the '* Fre- 
tender,'' and of the <*old faith". When delved of tiMir home- 
■teads by the Wingfields, the Cookes got leases from the Joaeaea uf 
3anada Abbey (in the county Sligo), who were also iprang from » 
Carlow family ; and between whom and the Cookes the kindliest 
relations existed, as letters in the writer's possession testify. 



y-] 



THE C08TBLL0 FAMILY. 



828 



les ; married in 1770 Anna 
Irwin, daughter of A. Irwin 
of MuoMeta, and by her he 
had issue two sons— 1 Char- 
les, and 2. Patrick. This 
Patrick married Mary Whyte 
and died without issue. 

4. Charles : son of Thom- 
as ; married in 1798 Brid- 
get, eldest daughter and co- 
heiress of Henry Meredith 
and his wife Celia Naper, 
who was the only daughter 
of Dr. James Naper, of Tub- 
bercurry*. The issue of 
Charles and Bridget Cooke 
were— 1. John, 2. Mark, 8. 
Thomas. This John mar- 
ried Ellinor Brett and died 
without issue; and Mark 
married Bridget Henry, by 
whom he had ooly one sur- 
viving son, who is (in 1877) 
in Holy Orders. 



5. Thomas : third son of 
the said Charles ; married 
in 1843 Katherine MacGe- 
terick, and had issue, now 
(1877) surviving, six sons - 
1. John Ormsby-Cooke ; 2. 
Thomas Eing-Gooke, born in 
1846, and now (1877) a 
Lieutenant-Colonel in the 
United States Service; 8. 
Francis Meredith, born in 
1848. 4. Charles Naper- 
Cooke, born in 1860, now 
in Australia ; 5. Joseph Me- 
redith Cook, bom in 1851, 
now in America; and 6. 
Edward Ormsby-Gooke, born 
m 1862. 

6. John Ormsby- Cooke, 
of Eilturra, county Sligo, 
and of Wells, in the county 
Carlow : son of Thomas ; 
bom in 1845, and living* in 
1878. 



12. — The '* Costello" family. 

OosTELo, the second son of Gilbert De Angulo who was 
the ancestor of <' Nangle", was the ancestor of Costello. 



1. Costelo : son of Gilbert 
De Angulo. 

2. Costelo oge : his son ; 
had a brother named Meyler, 
who was the ancestor of 
MacJordaiu 



8. Philip : son of Costelo 
oge. 

4. Gilbert : his son. 

5. Jordan : his son. 

6. Philip (2) : his son. 



* Tubercurry : Tbis James Naper was the dii«ct descendant of 

James Napper of Tober-an-clunre (analicised "Tobercurry"), who was 

attainted m the Dublin Parliament ol King James the Second, A.D. 

' 1690 j Celia Naper's mother was a Cooper, of Markree Castle ; and 

Henry Meredith's mother was an Ormsby of Willowbrook. 



B24 



IRISH PEDIGBSES. 



[part 



18.— The " Cusack" Family. 

Jeoffbey Le Gusaok (who was so called from a town of 
that name in France, whence he came into Ireland at, or 
soon after, the English invasion of that country) was the 
ancestor of Cusack. His posterity became very eminent 
and powerfiU ; many of whom were knights, and some 
lords justices and governors of Ireland. 



1. Jeoffrey Le Cusack. 

2. JeoSrej Cusack : his 
son. 

3. Adam : his son ; who, 
in 1282, slew WilUam Bar- 
rett and his brothers in Con- 
naught, on account of a 
quarrel about lands. 

4. Adam (2) : his son. 

5. Adam (8) : his son. 

6. Redmond : his son. 



7. John : his son. 

8. Barwal ; his son. 

9. Jeofifrey (8) : his son. 

10. David : lus son, 

11. Walter : his son. 

12. Nicholas : his son. 
18. Christopher : his son. 

14. Thomas : his son. 

15. Patrick Cusack: his 
son. 



I 



14.— The "Dalton'' Family. 



Thebe is no certain account of the origin of this family, 
other than that which we have by tradition, namely: 
That Sir Waltero DeAliton, a Frenchman, aspiring to gain 
the affections of his king's daughter (which he obtained), 
so incurred the displeasure of her father, that, to avoid 
the fury of an incensed monarch. Sir Waltero, with his 
lady, privately retired into Ireland, which was then in- 
volved in great wars between the ancient natives and their 
invading English enemies ; where, having signalized his 
great valour and good conduct on many occasions on the 
invader's side, he was soon advanced to considerable 
offices and employments, and made governor of the boidws 
of Meath, then the limits of the English conquests. In 



vO 



THE D ABGT FAMILY. 



325 



that part of the kingdom of Meath now called " West- 
meath" Sir Waltero acquired great estates and possessions, 
whidi his posterity enjoyed until they were dispossessed 
by the Usurper Cromwell. This Sir Waltero was the 
ancestor of DaLton. 

Sir Waltero De Aliton, so far as we can find, had but 
one son, who was named Philip De Aliton, from whose 
three sons— 1. Nicholas, 2. Philip the Younger, and 8. 
John, the families of — 1. Daltorif 2. Daton and Datoon^ 
and 8. Delaton, are respectively descended. 



1. Sir Waltero de Aliton« 

2. Philip : his son. 

8. Nicholas : his son ; who 
was governor of Westmeath. 
This Nicholas had two bro- 
thers — 1 Philip, who was 
ancestor of the Daltons of 
Emper, etc.; 2. John, the 
ancestor of the Daltons of 
Nochavall, etc. 

4. Philbug : son of Nicho- 
las. 

5. Piers dubh : his son. 

6. Maurice Dalton : his 
son ; first assumed this sir- 
name ; had a brother named 
Edmond, who was the an- 
cestor of the Daltons of Bal- 
lynacarrow. 

7. Piers : son of Maurice. 
This Piers had two brothers 
—1. Maurice ; and 2. Philip, 
who was the ancestor of the 
Daltons of Dungolman. 



8. Edmond : his son ; had 
a brother named John, who 
was the ancestor of the Dal- 
tons of Dundonell, and of 
Molinmechan. 

9. Thomas ; son of Ed- 
mond. 

10. Gerrott : his son. 

11. Richard : his son ; had 
thirteen sons, who were the 
ancestors of the Daltons of 
Milltown, Eolanstown, Skea- 
begg, etc. 

12. Thomas (2) : his son. 
18. Edmond ^2) : his son. 

14. Oliver : his son. 

15. Christopher : his son. 

16. Oliver (2) : his son. 

17. Christopher (2): his 
son ; had two brothers — 1. 
Edmond, 2. Thomas. 

18. OJiver Dalton, of Mill- 
town, Westmeath : his son ; 
living in 1657. 



15.— The "D'Arcy" Family. 

This family derive their origin from the emperor Charle- 
magne (or Charles the Great), and were of great eminence 



826 



naSH PBDXOBBEft. 



[past 



in France. David De Arcie aaramed this simanie from 
''Castle De Arcie," his chief seat, situate within thirty 
miles of Paris ; and was the ancestor of De Arcie, modern- 
ized D'Arcy. The Irish O^Dorchaidhe is the origin of 
Darcy and Dorcy ; some of whom have changed the name 
to D'Arcy. 



1. David De Arcie, of 
" Castle De Arcie, ** in 
France. 

2. Christopher : his son ; 
who, with some of his vas- 
sals and tenants, went to 
the Wars of the Holy Land, 
where he ended his days ; 
leaving no more issue (that 
we can find) than one son, 
named Thomas. 

8. Thomas : son of Chris- 
topher. 

4. Sir Bichard : his son ; 
was a powerful man in 
France, and joined William, 
duke of Normandy, in his 
conquest of England, where, 
after he was settled, William 
gave large possessions to 
ibe said Sir fiichard. 

5. Oliver : his son. 

6. Thomas (2) : his son. 

7. John : his son. 

8. Bichard (2) : his son. 

9. Thomas (8) : his son. 
10. Sir John D*Arcy : his 



son. This Sir John was 
sent hy King Edward the 
Second into Ireland as lord 
justice; where, a.i>. 1884, 
he married the Lady Joan, 
daughter of Bickard De Bar- 
go, the Bed earl of Ulster. 
From this marriage descend 
all the D'Arcies of Ireland. 

11. William : his son. 

12. Sir John : his son* 

18. William (2) : his son ; 
who was at the battle of 
Knock! uagh. 

14. John (4^ : his son. 

15. John (5) : his son. 

16. Sir William : his son. 

17. George: his son; had 
four brothers — 1. Thomas, 
2. Edmond, 8. Bobert, 4. 
Walter. 

18. WiUiam (4) : son of 
George. 

19. Christopher D'Arcy: 
his son ; had a brother 
named George. 



16.— Tbk " DkjnxT'' Family. 

The various branches of the family of Daunts now existing 
in Ireland, derive their origin from an ancient race of that 
name, long seated in Gloucestershire ; where the principaL 



v.] THB IHUNT FAUIIxY. ^ij 

stem possessed the manor of Owlpen for several centiEpiieB;. 
Many miters oh heraldry identify the name of ** Daunt" 
with that of Dauntre, which occurs in the '* Roll of Battle 
Abbey." Glpver and others assign to '* DauQt," of Glou- 
cestershire, the arms which Gwillyn assigns to <' Dauntre," 
viz. — sable, three beacons with ladders, or, fired gules. In 
a very old MS. in Ulster's office, tbese arms are also 
appropriated to Daunt of Gloucestershire. 

The first settlement of the *' Daunts" in Ireland appears 
to have been in the reign of Elizabeth ; when Thomas 
Daunt (second son of lliomas Daunt of Owlpen, by his 
wife, AUee Throckmorton of Tortworth,) became the lessee 
of Tracton Abbey, near Einsale ; and, in 1595, purchased 
the estate of Gurtigrenane from Sir Warham St. Leger. 
Thi^ Thomas became lord of the manor of Owlpen, on the 
death of his elder brother Henry, without issue male, Iq 
1608. From him descended Mary Daunt, sole daughter 
and hehress of the oldest line. She married Thomas An- 
thony Stoughton, of Kerry ; and died in 1868, being suc- 
ceeded in Owlpen and Gurtygrenane by her son, Thomas 
Anthony Stoughton, of Owlpen (living in 1877), who 
served as high sheriff of Gloucestershire, in 1873. 

James Daunt, of Tracton Abbey (of which place he was 
joint-lessee with Thomas of Owlpen), was high sheriff of 
the county Cork, in 1627; Thomas Daunt, of Gurty- 
grenane, was high sheriff in 1645 ; and Samuel Daunt, of 
EnocknasiUagh, was high sheriff in 1749. 

In Sir Bernard Burke's Landed Gentry^ the genealogical 
seniority of the existing lines of ^' Daunt" is stated, as 
follows : I. The Owlpen line, now merged in the family of 
Stoughton ; IL That of Fahalea, whose proprietor, Mr. 
Henry Daunt became representative-general on the death 
of the late Mrs. Stoughton ; III. The family of Mrs. George 
Achilles Daunt, of Newborough ; lY. That of Mr. George 
Daunt, of SUeveron ; V. That of the Rev. Achilles Daunt, 
of Tracton Abbey (who, in 1877, is the Very Rev. 
Achilles Daunt, B.D., Dean of Cork) ; VL That of Mr. 
Wilb'am Joseph O'Neill Daunt, of Eilcascan Castle, Balli- 
neen, living in 1877. This Mr. Daunt id the author of 
several popular works, including '< A Catechism of the 



828 nXBH PEDIOBSEB. {\ 



History of Ireland**, ^'Ireland and Her Agitators*', **fiiigh 
Talbot", •* The Wife Hunter", " The Gentleman in Debt", 
** Saints and Sinners*', etc. 

A scion of the family, Mr. Richard Oumbleton Daont, 
has been long settled in Brazil. 



17.— The <'Dslicobx** Fauilt. 

Hebbebt Ds Laharb, or, as he was called in Iriah, 
Erebeirt an Muireadi {muireach : Irish, ** a sailor or 
mariner**), was considered to be of French extraction. 

He came into Ireland upon the first invasion thereof by 
the English, and, after a time, was made governor of the 
lower borders of Meath, now called '* Westmeath,*' then 
the limits of the English conquests in that country ; where 
he and his posterity obtained great estates and possessions. 
This Herbert De Lamare was the ancestor of Delamere^ 
anglicised Delmore ; after him the Irish called his descen* 
dants MacEreheirt (<' erebeirt'* : Irish, a load or carriage ; 
from the Gaelic **eraidh'*, apparel, and ''beirt,** a burden)^ 
anglicised MacHerbert, and Herbert. 

William De Lamare, son of Herbert, lived in the reign 
of Henry the Third, King of England ; and founded the 
Abbey or Friary of Multifarnham, upon part of his posses- 
sions. 

John De Lamare (or Delamare), son, it is supposed^ of 
the aforesaid William, built the strong castle of Street, in 
the territory of Maghbreacry, in the country of Annaly 
(now the county *' Longford*'), which he made his chi^ 
seat, A.D. 1294 ; and so continued to the chiefs of his 
posterity, until their estates were confiscated by Cromwell 
and his adherents, during the ** Commonwealth.** In the 
same year (of 1294) this John Delamare joined with 
John Fitzgerald, baron of O'Phaley (now " Ofialey**), who 
was afterwards first earl of Kildare, in a great quarrel 
between him and Bichard Bourke, the Red earl of Ulster ; 
and, by his assistance, defeated and took the said em:), 



f .] THE VAT (OP 7ATBB00K AND MDTNB HALl) FAMILY. 829 

«nd x^mmitted him prisoner in the Castle of Ley, for a 
long time. After the year 1298, the said John Delamare 
was slain in an engagement with his Irish enemies, of 
Annaly. 



18. — ^The '^Pay** (op Faybbook and Moynk Hall) Family 

• 

Faye, a Parish in Normandy, gave name to a family which 
is of frequent mention in the Norman Charters. — See Mem. 
SodeU des Antiq. de la Normandie, Vol. VII. 

A branch of the family early settled in England ; for, in 
1156, Ralph De La Faia, or De Fay, obtained a pardon in 
Surrey : implying the possession of Estates there. 

In 1178. — Ralph De Faye was one of the sureties for 
Henry II., in his Convention with . Herbert, Earl of Mau- 
viesenne, for the marriage of their children. 

In 1202.-*Ralph De La Fay (son of the preceding) 
paid scutage for one and a half fees in Surrey, while, about 
the same time, the King confirmed to Peter De Faya, Bur* 
gesB of Rochelle, lands in Bromley, which he held of the 
gift of Ralph De Fay, senior. 

In 1228. — The King received the homage of John, son 
and heir of Ralph De Fay, for one knight's fee in Brom* 
ley, Surrey. 

This John De Fay died, s.p»^ circa 1241 ; and the estate 
passed to his sister Matilda, wife of Roger De Clere, and 
to Philippa, wife of Wm. Longspie, in the possession of 
whose descendants it still remains. 

In 1219. — Sir Richard De Fay, Knight of De Lacy, 
Lord of Meath, was sent by the latter on an Embassy to 
the Kmg. 

Sis, the first individual of the family whom we meet 
land, is considered to be a younger son of Ralph De 
Fay, senior, of Surrey.) 

in 1810. — George Fay was seated in the Pale. 
In 1421.— George Fay was one of four Commissioners 
appointed to hold an enquiry concerning any Treasons, or 
Felonies, committed within the county and crosses of 
Meath. 



880 



IBiaE P1$DICtBEE9* 



[PAKT 



In 1422.-^ John and James Fay were appointed to assea^^ 
a state eubaidy on the Barpnj of Fore. 

In 1511.-^" George Fay of Demegar, Barony of Pore,'' 
appears on the Boll of the Gentry of Meath ; and witbi 
him the regular Pedigree of the family oonunences : 



1. George Fay of Deme- 
gara, in West Meal^, bom 
1485, died May 1514, leav- 
ing Gerald, Iub son, then 
aged 40; and married, as 
appears firom an Inquisition 
Post Mortem^ taken at Bat- 
oath. 

2. Gerald Fay of Deme- 
gara, who w«s engaged in 
the RfibeUion of *< Silken 
Thomas ;" and, dying in 
1548, was succeeded by his 
son. 

8. Gerald Fay of Deme- 
gara, then aged 40, and mar- 
ried to Joan Fitzgerald by 
whom he had George, James 
of ComerstQwn, and Chris- 
topher. He was Sheriff of 
West Meath in 1565, and 
died 1576. 

4. George of Demegara, 
son of Gerald, died vita 
Patrisy leaving by Mary 
Fitzgerald, his wife, four 
sons — 1. Gerald, 2. George, 
8. Bedmond (all of whom 
died s.p.)y and 4. Meyler. 

5. Meyler, of Comerstown: 
sou of George ; married Mar- 
gery Nugent, by whom he 
had an only son Edward: 
and, dying Nov. 1627, was 
buried in the Abbey of Mul- 
tifamham. 



6. Edward of Gartlands- 
town House, and Dem^ara^ 
son of Meyler; married 
Eliza, daughter of Theobald 
Nugent, Esq., of New Hag- 
gard (by Mary, daughter of 
Nugent of Garhmstown, an- 
cestor of the extinot Earte 
Nugent). By this lady, Ed- 
ward had six sons—*-!. Gar- 
ret (who left issue, Anne» 
who married Nicholas, bron 
ther of the celebrated Father 
Aloyius Stafford, who was 
killed at Aughrim ; and Gap^ 
tain George Fay, who had 
the benefit of the Articles ol 
Limerick, and thereby saved 
the Gartlandstown Estate* 
which descended to his 
daughters, and co-heiresses 
(Mrs. Kennedy and Mrs* 
Lessac); 2. Meyler, died, 
s,p, ; 8. Stephen, a Priest, 
died 1687 ; 4. Anthony, diedr 
s.jp. ; 5. Francis, d. «.p. ; and 
6. Thomas. 

Edward Fay, taking a 
very active part in the dou- 
bles of 1641, had his estate 
confiscated by Cromwell ; 
but a part thereof was re- 
stored in 1668. He died» 
March 1665 ; and the male 
line of the family was carried 
on by his youngest son. 



v.] 



TMK Fl&T FAKILSr. 



881 



7. Thomas Fay, of Der- 
negara,who married (ml660) 

Anne, sister of- Blake, 

Esq., of GastletowQ. by 
whom he had three sons — 
1. Martin, 2. John Mor, 8. 
Thomas Mor ; and a dangh* 
ter, Frances, who married 
Owen Johnson, Esq., alias 
MacShane, son of Colonel 
John O'Neill of the Fews, 
and Lettice, daughter of 
Lord Blayney. From this 
marriage descend the John- 
sons of Warrenstown, in 
Meath; and Sir W. G. 
Johnson, Baronet, of Twick- 
enham. Thomas Fay having 
been aittainted in 1691, 
settled at Samaelstown in 
Meath. 

8. Martin, of Uamaelstown 
and Corboggy : son of Thom- 
as ; married in 1709 Ka- 

therine, daughter of 

Malone, of Possextown (by 
Anne daughter of Thomas 
Plunkett, Esq., of Possex- 
town and Gibstown); and, 
dying in 1765, left issue<— 1. 
Thomas, 2. Patrick, 8. John. 
The eldest son. 

9. Thomas, of Annsbrook, \ 
and Mayo House, co. Meath, 



and of Dmmherk, oo. Gavan, 
died Jany. Slst, 1796, ag^ 
86 ; leaviiig by his wife £a- 
therine, daughter of Mr* 
Thomas Murray, two sons-— 
1. Patrick, whose issue is 
extinct in Ireland; and 2. 
John. 

10. John, of Ballyhaise, 
who married, first in 1789, 
Miss O'Dowd, by whom he 
had one son, Thomas (of 
whom hereafter) ; and se- 
condly, in 1797, Miss Brady, 
by whom he had James of 
Moyne Hall, and Patrick. 
James Fay of Moyne Hall 
died in 1868, leaving two 
son8-*-«John of Moyne Hall, 
who was High Sheriff of 
Cavan, in 1874 ; and Thomas, 
A.B., of Dublin and Heath 
Lodge. 

John of Ballyhaise died 
Jany. 81st, 1886, aged 76. 

11. Thomas Fay of Fay- 
brook county Gavan, born 
1794, and Uviug in 1878. 
married MaryHerbert'^S only 
daughter of Patrick Mao 
Gabe, Esq., of Ballybay, and 
by her has four sons. — 1. 
Patrick MacCabe Fay of the 



* Htrbert : This Mary Herbert MaoCabe became sole heir of Her 
father, whose mother was the daughter and heiress of Mr. Petep 
McMahon of Beoane, county Monaguin, by ElUnor his wife, dan^tso 
of " The 0'Da£^ of Clontibret '\ by Mary, his wife, daughter of 
<' The MaoKenna of Trough'', commonly called ''The Major", wbft 
was killed, March 1689, defending the Fort of Drumbanagher^ 
near Glasloagh, for Kins James II. Mr. MaoMahon of Bekane was 
nephew of Hugh MacManon, archbishop of Armagh (whose nephews. 



882 



IBI9H PBDiaBEBS. 



[PABI 



city of Dublin, Chevalier of 
the Legion of Honour ; 2. 
Thomas Francis, of Trim ; 
8. James-Henry Fay, J.P., 
of Faybrook; 4. Charles- 
Joseph Fay, M.P. for the 
county Cavan : all living in 
1878. Also three daughters 
— 1. Marianne Frances, 
wife of Philip Smith, J.P. 



Artina, county Gavan* and 
Colmanstown House, county 
Oalway; 2. Eleanore Ger- 
trude (died in 1875), wife of 
John MacCarrick, Esq., of 
Cloonbany House, county 
Sligo ; 8. Mai^aretta 8. 
Clare, widow of Francis 
OTarrell, Esq., of Dublin. 



19. — The <* Fitzoibbon** Family. 

Thomas, surnamed *' The Great", a younger brother of 
Gerald who (see the first series) is No. 5 on the *' Fitz- 
gerald ** pedigree, was the ancestor of Fitzgibbon. 



5. Thomas, lord of 0*Con* 
nello : son of Maurice Fitz- 
gerald. 

6. John, called <* John of 
Callan" : son of Thomas ; 
was twice married — by his 
first wife, Margaret Fitz- 
Anthony (or Mac Anthony), 
this John was ancestor of 
the Earls of Desmond ; was 
killed at Callan, near Ken- 
mare, in battle with the 
MacCarthys, a.d. 1261. 

7. Gilbert (or Gibbon) : 
his son ; a quo Fitzgihbon ; 



obtained from Thomas (an" 
Apd) Fitzgerald, Meine and 
other lands in Limerick. 

8. Maurice : son of Gil- 
bert; was called **the 
White Knight" ; fought at 
Halidon Hill, a.d. 1888; 
built the church of Eilmal- 
lock, and enlarged the Dom- 
inican Monastery there, in 
which, in 1257, he was 
buried ; his younger brother 
Gilbert was the ancestor of 
MacQibhon of Maboonagh. 

9. Maurice (2) : son of 



Betmard and Boss MacMahon, succeeded him in the primatial chair), 
and grandson of CoUa Dha MacMahon, titular lora of Dartry, by 
Aileen, daughter of **The O'Bielly "—styled Earl of Cavan, and 
niece of the great Owen Roe 0*l^eiil. Colla Dhn was great grandson 
of Sir Brian (MacHngh oge) MacMahon, Lord of D«£try, by Lady 
Mary O'Neill, daughter of Uugl^ earl of Tyrone — ^the unfortunate 
chief whose " FUght" gave facilities for the " Plantation of Ulster." 
— See No. 127 in the '* MacMahon'', of Dartry, pedigree. 



v.] 



THE. FITZOIBBON FAUILT. 



883 



Maurice ; bad a younger 
brother named David, and 
two sisters. 

10. Gibbon : son of Maur- 
ice (2) ; was called Mac-an- 
tSean Ridire or ** The son of 
the Old Knight/' 

11. Thomas (2) : his son. 

12. Maurice (8) : his son. 
18. Gibbon (8) : his son. 

14. Gerald : his son. 

15. David: his son. 

16. Maurice (8) : his son ; 
had an elder brother Gerald, 
whose son Edmund was 
killed in rebellion with Des- 
mond in 1584, and attainted. 
This Maurice died in 1601. 

17. Gibbon (4) : his son ; 
had a younger brother 
named Gerald; is mentioned 
in various Inquisitions 
between 1601 and 1641. 

18. David : second son of 
Gibbon ; his elder brother 
was Maurice. This David 
was a captain in the service 
of King Charles I. ; and was 
transplanted by Oliver 
Cromwell in 1658. 

19. Maurice (4): son of 
David, by his second wife 
Joanna Butler; had two 
brothers and three sisters : 
the brothers were — 1. John, 
who died in 1781 ; 2. Thom- 
as: the sisters were — 1. 
Ellen, married to Morgan 
Byan, of Silver Grove, 
county Clare ; 2. Catherine, 



married to Henry Power of 
Tikencor, county Waterford; 
8. Margaret, who died un- 
married. 

20. Philip.: second son of 
Maurice; Will dated 26th 
January 1784 ; had an 
elder brother named Gibbon. 

21. Gerald (2) : fourth son 
of Philip; had three elder 
brothers, and two sisters : 
the brothers were — 1. Eob- 
ert, of Castle Grace, county 
Tipperary, who died unmar- 
ried, in 1772 ; 2. Maurice, of 
Castle Grace, who died un- 
married, in 1798 ; 8. John, 
of Youghal, living in 1796 : 
the sisters were — 1. Ellen, 

married to Prender- 

gast; 2, Alice, who was 
twice married — first, to Kel- 
so, and secondly to 

Allen. 

22. Philip : second son of 
Gerald. This PhiUp had 
five brothers and one sister : 
the brothers were — 1, Eob- 
ert, who died in 1817: 2. 
Eobert, who died in 1882 ; 
8. William, who died in 
1868 ; 4. Gerald, who died 
in 1844; 5. Thomas, who 
died in 1868. The sister, 
Mary Anne, married Walter 
Paye, of Kilworth, county 
Cork. 

28. Maurice Fitzgibbon, 
of Crohana House, Kilkenny: 
son of Philip; living in 1878; 



884 



IBISH PSDXGBEES. 



[part 



was twice married — ^by the 
first wife he had four boub 
and five daughters : the 
sons were — 1. Philip- John, 
2. Maurice, 8. Arthur, 4. 
RiiQhmond ; the daughters 
weire — 1 . Elizabeth^ Anne, 
2. Blanche, 8. Edith, 4. 
Isabel-Geraldine, 5. Ellen. 



The issue by the second wife 
was John Brenton, born in 
1876. 

24. Philip.John Pitzgib- 
bon : son of Maurice ; bom 
in 1868 ; living, himself and 
brothers and sisters above 
named, iun. 1878. 



20.— The " Fitzgerald'* Family. 
(^See the first series,) 



21. — The '* Fitzmaurice" Family. 

William Fitzoerald, eldest son of Qerald De Winsor who 
is No. 8 on the '* Fitzgerald" pedigree, was the ancestor of 
Fitzmaurice, 



8. Gerald De Winsor. 

4. William Fitzgerald : his 
eldest son. This William 
had four sons — 1. William, 
ancestor of Qerrard, of 
Brinn, in Lancashire ; of the 
lords Gerrard of Brandon, 
earls of Macclesfield ; and of 
the lords Gerrard of Bromly; 
2. Otho (called " DeOurio"), 
ancestor of Carew, earls of 
Totnes, and of all the Gar- 
ews of England and Ireland; 
8. John, ancestor of iC^attn^; 
and 4. Raymond Le gros, the 
eldest, but (as some allege) 
illegitimate son. This Bay- 
mond Le gros was the first 



viceroy of Ireland, under 
King Henry the Second, a.d. 
1177; he married Basilia 
De Clare (sister of Richard 
De Clare, commonly known 
as *• Strongbow", earl of 
Chepstow and (^y), by 
whom he had two sons — 1. 
Maurice, and 2. Hamo (or 
Hamon) De la gros, who was 
the ancestor of Grace, in 
the county Kilkenny. 

5. Raymond Le gros : sou 
of William. 

6. Maurice : his son ; a 
quo Fitzmaurice \ built Ma- 
lahuffe Castle. This Maurice 
had two sons — 1. Thomas ; 



▼.] 



THE FITZMHUBIOE FAMILY. 



666 



lihd 2. William, who was the 
Ancestor of Fitusmaurice, of 
Brees, in the eounty Mayo, 
who were formerly lords 
barond there* 

7. Thomas : sou of Mau- 
rice ; was the first ** lord 
Kiery" (or lord Kerry) ; 
founded the Franciscan 
Priary of Ardtet, a.d. 1253. 
This Thomas left issue bv 
Orania (or Grace), a daugh- 
ter of MacMorogh, three 
6ons— -1. Maurice ; 2. Thom- 
as,* ancestor of Fitzmau- 
rice of Liscahan and Eilfe- 
nora ; 8. Piers, who was the 
ancestor of Filzmauri^e, of 
Ballymacquin, and of Mac 
Shaen^ of Crossmacshaen, 
the last of whom was at- 
tainted in Queen Elizabeth's 
xeign. 

8. Maurice : son of Th(mi- 
HS; was the second lord 
£[«rry. This Maurice had 
three sons^^l. Nicholas ; 2. 
Mathias, who was ancestor 
of Fitzmaurice, of Ballin- 
prior and BaUenoher; 8. 
JeofiEry. 

9. Nicholas : son of Mau- 
rice ; was third lord Fitz- 
maurice, of Kerry ; had two 
IWQ»^1. Mattrioe, 2 John. 



10. Maurice: «on of Ni- 
cholas ; was fourth lord 
Kerry; had no issue, but 
his brother John became 
fifth lord Kerry. This John 
was twice married : by his 
first wife he had three sons 
"«— 1 Maurice ; 2. Nicholas, 
who was lord bishop of 
Ardfert ; 8. John, who was 
lord abbot of Dorny, other- 
wise called ** Kyry-Eleizon" 
[Kyrie Eleison]. And by 
his second wife he had two 
sons — 1. Gerrard, who was 
ancestor of Fitzmaurice, of 
Corrsela; 2. Eobert, an- 
cestor of Fitzmaurice^ of Clu- 
ancala. 

11. Maurice : son of John ; 
was the sixth lord Kerry. 
He had three sons— 1. 
Patrick ; 2. Bichard, who 
was the ancestor of Fitz- 
maurice, of Lickbeven and 
Moybile, in Olanrickard ; 8. 
John,who died: without issue. 

12. Patrick : son of Mau- 
rice ; was the seventh lord 
(Fitzmaurice^ of Kerry. 
Thia PatriQK had a son 
named Thomas balbhan 
(** balbh" : Irish, dumb ; 
** an", one icho ; Lat. •* balb- 
us"), a quo, some «ay, Bal- 



* Thomas : T3m last lieu>general of tliis Thtoifta Fltsmaurioe was 
fills (or Elizaboth), who was graadmother of Charles, the last 



f* O'Conor Kerry." 



886 



IBI8H PBDiaREES. 



[PABf 



wm 



and Baldwin*; and a 
daughter who was wife of 
Sir William Fitzgerald, 
knight of Kerry, and the 
mother of William who was 
the ancestor of Fitzgerald of 



Oloyne, and of Maurice who 
was the ancestor of Fitz^ 
geraldy of Allen, in the 
county Kildare. 

18. Thomas halhhan : son 
of Patrick ; was the eighth 



"^ Baldwin: Other ^nealogists say that the Baldwms are de- 
scended from Baudwin — ^bras-de-fer, a nobleman attached to the 
Court of Charles the Bold, King of France, who created the said 
Baudwin (or Baldwin) " earl of Flanders". That Baudwin married 
Judith, daughter of Charles the Bold, and granddaughter of Char* 
lemagne, widow of Ethelwolf, king of England, and stepmother of 
King AJfred the Great. 

We can trace back to Henry Baldwin, a Banger of Woods and 
Forests in Shropshire, who married Elinor, daughter of Sir Edward 
Herbert, of Red Castle, who was the second son of the first Lord 
Pembroke, by Lady Anne, daughter of Lord Paer, of Kendall, and 
sister of Lady Catherine Paer, surviving queen of Henry VIIL king 
of England. That Henry Baldwin haa three sons, who settled in 
Irdand in ths time of Queen Elizabeth, the eldest of whom was 
Henry ; from this Henry, the Baldwin pedigree is as follows : 



U Henry : son of Henry. 

2. Herbeit : his son. 

?« Walter, of Granahoonick : 
his son ; mentioned in the Report 
addressed to the " Court of 
Chums''; under the Act of Settle- 
ment, he obtained part of the 
lands of Knocknough and Kilba- 
lane. 

4. Walter (2) : his son. 

5. Henry (3) : his son ; married 
Miss Field, niece of Colonel 
Beecher, of Sherkin. 

6. Henry (4) : son of Henry; 
married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Dive Downes, Protestant Bishop 
of Cork, by his third wife, Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Thomas Bee- 
cher of Sherkin, and relict of 
Captain Townsend. 

7. Henry (6) ; son of Henry ; 
had a brother named William, 
who married a daiLditer of Alder- 
man French, of Cork, and was 
the founder of the Baldwin family 
of Lisarda. This William was 
a Barrister, whose son Henry 
was High Sheriff of the county 



Cork, in 1777, and left, amongst 
other issue, William, who mar* 
ried Mary, daughter of Franklin 
Kirby, of Bamborough Grange^ 
Yorkshire, England. This WU- 
liam was High Sheriff of the 
county Cork in 1818 ; and died 
in 1838, leaving a numeroas 
issue. Henry, his elder brother, 
who is No. 7 on this stem, was 
the progenitor of the Baldwng 
of Mount Pleasant, near Baodon. 
His wife was a daughter of Sir 
Robert Warren. 

8. Walter (3) : son of Henry 
of Mount Pleasant. 

9, Henry (6) : his son* 

10. Henry (7) : his sen. 

11. Chambery: his son; died 
unmarried ; had a brother named 
James. 

12. Henry (8): son of said 
James ; has three brotliers and 
one sister: the brothers are-^L 
James, 2. Chambeiy, and S. 
Walter; the sister^ name is. 
Lizzie— all bom in Australia, 
and living in 1878. 



▼.] 



THS FrrZMAUBIGE FAMILY. 



887 



lord of Kerry ; had three 
sons and one daughter : the 
sons were — 1. Patrick, who 
died in his father's life-time; 
2. Edmond, who succeeded 
his father; 8. Bobert, who 
wa^ the ancestor of Fitz- 
maurice^ of Tubud and Ard- 
glass. The daughter was 
Joan*, who was wife of 
Tirlogh O'Brien, prince of 
Desmond : from whose sons 
descended the earls of Tho- 
mond, the barons and earls 
of ** Insiquin" (Inchiquin), 
the earls of Clanrickard 
since the second earl, the 
lords Bermingham of Athen- 
Tj, Burke of Derrymaclaghny, 
Sir Boger O'Shaughnessy, 
and other personages in 
Gonnaught. 

14. Edmond : son of Thom- 
as balbhan; was the ninth 
lord of Kerry. 

15. Edmond (2) : his son ; 
was the tenth lord Kerry ; 
married Una (of Agnes), 
daughter of Tirlogh Mac- 
Mahon, lord of both the 
(territories of) Gorcavascins, 
in the county Clare, by 



whom he had four sons, each 
of whom in his turn waa 
lord of Kerry, viz. : 1. Ed- 
mond, the eleventh lord ; 2. 
Patrick, the twelfth lord ; 8» 
Gerrald, the fifteenth lord ; 
and 4. Thomas, the six- 
teenth lord Kerry. 

16. Edmond (8): son of 
Edmond ; the eleventh lord 
Kerry; created in his fa- 
ther's life- time ** lord vis- 
count Killmaul", and got 
grants of Abbey-lands to 
maintain the honour to him 
and his heirs male — ^for 
want of which heirs all re- 
verted to the Crown. 

Patrick, second son of 
Edmond, the tenth lord 
(who is No. 15 on this pedi- 
gree), succeeded his elder 
brother Edmond (No. 16), 
and was the twelfth lord 
Fitzmaurice of Kerry. He 
had two sons — 1. Edmond, 
who succeeded his father, 
as the thirteenth lord, and 
2. Maurice, who succeeded 
Edmond as the fourteenth 
lord : both being minors in 
ward with the earl of Des- 



"^ Joan : This Joan, dauffhter of Thomfts balbhan Fitzmaurice, the 
eighth lord Kerry, was the mother of Margaret O'Brien who was 
married to O'Rourke ; of Fenola (or Penelope), married to O'Doi^f^l ; 
and of Slania, wife of " The Great O'Neill.'^ It was this Joan who 
founded the Franciscan Friary of Creeveliath, oiidLa Ballymark, dHan 
Saint Peter's Bock. It may be here observed that Joan, Johanna, 
or Jane, is in Irish Sinectd, the feminiQe of Seaghau or Shane, which 
is the Irish for John (Lat. Johannes). 

w 



888 



IRISH PEDI6HEES. 



[part 



xnond ; and dying go, with- 
out issue, the honour and 
estate fell to their uncle 
Gerrald, who became the 
fifteenth lord Kerry. This 
Gerrald possessed the estate, 
until his brother Thomas 
(the fourth son of Edmond, 
the tenth lord Fitzmaurice), 
then a soldier of fortune in 
Milan, returned home, and 
had both honours and es- 
tates surrendered to him, 
and became the sixteenth 
lord Fitzmaurice of Kerry. 
This Thomas had five sons 
—1. Patrick, 2. Edmond, 8. 
Gerrald, 4. Robert, 5. Bich- 



ard — the four last of 
whom were slain in Queen 
Elizabeth's wars in Ireland. 

17. Patrick : son of Thom- 
as ; was the seventeenth 
lord Kerry. 

18. Thomas : his son ; the 
eighteenth lord. 

19. Patrick: his son; the 
nineteenth lord. 

20. William: his son ; the 
twentieth lord. 

21. Thomas : his son ; the 
twenty-first lord Fitz- 
maurice. of Kerry and Lix- 
naw ; living in 1709. 

22. William Fitzmaurice : 
his son. 



22 — The " Joycb" family. 

A VEBY curious pedigree of this family is recorded in the 
Office of Arms, Dublin. Some genealogists assert that 
Joyce and Joy are of Irish origin, and are early branches 
of the '* Mac Sheehy'* family; while others assert that 
they are of Anglo-Norman descent, and were originally 
called De Jorse. But all admit that they were an ancient, 
honourable, and nobly descended race ; of tall and manly 
stature ; and were allied to the Welsh and British Princes. 
Thomas De Jorse, who (according to the History of 
Galway, &c.) was the first of the name that came to Ire- 
land, sailed from Wales in the reign of King Edward I., 
immediately after that monarch, a.d. 1282, had defeated 
the Welsh prince Lewyllen, and added Wales to England. 
He arrived with his fleet at Thomond, in Ireland, where 
he married Nora O'Brien, daughter of the then prince of 
that principality. He afterwards put to sea, steered for 
West Connaught, and landed in the barony of Tyrawley, 



v.] THB JOYCE FAHILT. 889 

in the coxmty of Mayo, where the sept had a temporary 
stay, and founded the Abbey of Rosserk, on the banks of 
the river Moy. Thence he re-embarked, and reached lar 
Connacht (or the north-western part of the county Gal way), 
where he established a colony and acquired extensive tracts 
of territory contiguous to Eillery Bay, adjacent to the 
county Mayo ; and extending from Gong river to the river 
Glenbrickeen, near Clifden, in the county Galway, in 
which some of his posterity now reside. While on his 
voyage to lar Gonnaught, his wife was delivered of a son, 
whom he named Mac Mara (or *' the son of the sea"), who 
was subsequently called Edmond. This Edmond (Mac 
Mara) Joyce was first married to the daughter of O'Fla- 
herty, prince of lar Gonnaught, by whom he acquired the 
territory comprising the present Parish of Ballinakill, and 
other districts ; from him are descended the Joyces of 
'' Joyces* Gountry", called after their name, now forming 
the Barony of Boss, the parish of Ballinakill, etc., in the 
county Galway. 

The Joyces were a brave and warlike race, and great 
•commanders of galloglasses. particularly Tiohoid na Cais* 
lein (Toby or Theobald of the Castles), who is No. 11 on 
the subjoined list of the chiefs of the Joyce family. This 
Theobald and the neighbouring chiefs were frequently at 
war. One of his most remarkable battles was with Tio- 
hoid na Luinge (or Toby of the Ships), who is No. 29 on 
** The Bourkes, lords viscount Mayo" pedigree, p. 818 ; 
which was fought in Partry, on the boundary of the 
Bourke*s territory and Joyce's country, in which the 
Joyce's were victorious, and Theobald Bourke made pris- 
oner. As the result of that battle, Tioboid na lAiinge gave 
the Joyces a part of his territory, extending from the 
battlefield (the original boundary ; and to this day known 
as Sraith na Luinye^ indicating where Tiohoid na Luinge 
was captured) to Owenbrin. The Joyces were frequently 
at war with the OTlahertys, who, during almost the 
whole of the sixteenth century, strenuously endeavoured 
to regain the territories which Edmond (MacM^ora) Joyce 
received with the daughter of O'Flaherty, as above men- 
tioned. In those sanguinary battles the bravest and 
Nearest kinsmen fell on both sides. 



840 IBISH PEDIGBEES. [PABT 

In 1587 the Clan Joyce, with great valour, opposed 
Bingham, governor of Connaught, and, assisted by other 
tribes of the province defeated him at Caislean na Caillighe 
(*' cailleach" : Irish, an old woman \ Heb. " chelach", old 
(tge), on Lough Mask. 

Of this family are the Joyces of Joyce Grove, county 
Galway ; of Oxford, near Doonamoona, in Mayo ; of Wood- 
quay, in the town of Galway ; and of Merview, near the 
town. Other collateral branches of the family settled in 
Leinster and Munster — a descendant of one of whom was 
the Irish Judge, Chief £aron Joy.* The Joyces of Joyces' 
Country held their possessions until the middle of the 
seventeenth century, up to the Cromwellian confiscation ; 
but some of the family are still in possession of extensive 
property. 

The O'Hallorans, MacConroys, etc., possessed, before 
the Joyces, the territory known as ** Joyces' Country", 
which was anciently called Hy-Orhsen. 



Names of the Chiefs of the Clan Joyce. 



1. Thomas De Jorse ; died, 
1317. This Thomas had a 
brother named Walter, who 



Archbishop of Armagh, from 
1306 to 1311, when he re- 
signed and was succeeded 



vas Cardinal of Sabina, and j by his brother Boland. 

* Joy : Writing to the author, a friend of this family in Pennsn^l* 
vania, United States, America, says that the late Chief Baron Soj 
was a native of Belfast ; that all the members of his family have 
held a prominent place in that town for many generations; that they 
are descendants of a French Haguenot who settled in Ireland, being 
obliged to leave France in consequence of religious intolerance ; that 
it was the "Joy " family who introduced the manufacture of paper 
in Belfast ; and that the establishment of The Belfast News Letter — 
the oldest provincial Newspaper except one in Ireland — is to be 
traced to their intelliffence and eneigy. 

Other eminent authorities say that DeJorae, Joes, Jorsey^ Jose, 
Josse, Joy, Joyes, Joyce, Yoe, Yoes are all different forms of simame 
for the one family named in Irish Seoaigh, whom MacFirbis mentions 
as of " Ihe Welshmen of Ireland" ; and others derive Joy^ Joyce, 
etc, from 0*SUhaiph, anglicised Sheehy and MacSheehy (see the 
" MacSheehy** pedigree. ) 



^0 



CHIEFS OF THE CLAN JOYCE. 



341 



2. Edmoud, called " Ed- 
xnond Mac Mara" : his son : 
died 1346. He bad four 
8ons named, 1. Walter, 2. 
Bichard, 8. Edward, and 4. 
Bickard; Bichard and Ed- 
ward settled in Leinster. 

8. Walter : his son ; died 
1873. 

4. Sir Ulick : his son ; a 
baronet ; died in 1404. 
(This name implies a mar- 
riage alliance with the 
** Bourke'* family. See the 
origin of the name of Ulick 
in note p. 808.) 

5. Thomas (2) : his son ; 
^ed 1482. 

6. Tioboid (or Theobald) : 
his son ; died 1465. 

7. Giolla (or Gill) : his son ; 
died 1490. 

8. Theobald (2) : his son ; 
aied 1424 

9. Edmond ( 2) : his son ; 
•died 1550. 

10. UUck (2): his son; 
died 1670. 

11. Theobald (calleiTioboid 
na Caislein*) : his son ; died 
1600. 



12. Edmond (8) : his son ; 
died 1620. 

13. Thomas (8) : his son ; 
died 1640. 

14. Ulick (3) : his son ; 
died 1665. 

15. Ulick (4) : his son ; died 
1687. 

16. Ulick (5) : his son ; died 
1706. 

17. Gill (2) : his son ; died 
1781. 

18. Theobald (4) : his son ; 
died 1751. 

19. Giolla dubh (or Gill 
Dubh : dubh, ** dark-fea- 
tured") : his son ; died 1774. 

20. Theobald (5) : his son ; 
died 1790. 

21. Gill (4) : his son ; died 
1812. This Gill had an 
only brother named Edward, 
who was remarkable for his 
gigantic stature and incre- 
dible strength. 

22. Patrick : only son of 
Gill ; died 1887. 

28. Shane ban (or John 
the Fair ; ban : Irish, ** fair- 
complexioned") : his only 
son : died in 1856. This 



* Tioboid na Caislein : This Theobald was so called because of all 
the castles and strongholds he had built, viz. : Doon Castle, near 
Clifden ; Benvyle Castle, which commands the entrance to Killery 
Bay (and which stronghold was once unsuccessfully attacked by the 
famous Grace 0*Malley, the mother of Tioboid na Luinge, above 
Alluded to) ; and Castle Kirk, on an island of Lough Corrib, com- 
manding the entrance to his territory io that direction. He also 
built a stronghold near Clonbur, on the eastern boundary of his 
territory, which in Irish was called Dathaigh Sheoaigh, and angli- 
cised " Joyces' Country" ; and, it is believed, the Abbey of Boss 
Hill, adjacent thereto. He ruled from 1570 to 1600. 



842 



IRISH PEDIGBE&S. 



[PABT 



John had four sons — 1. Pat- 
rick, 2. Theobald, 8, John, 
4. Thomas ; and one daugh- 
ter named Mary; the four 
sons had (in 1877) twenty- 
five male children — chiefly 
varying in stature from 5 
feet 10 inches to 6 feet 6 
inches. 
24. Patrick (2) : his son ; 
living in 1877 ; had five 



I sons living in that year, 
viz.— 1. John, 2. Peter^ 8. 
Patrick, 4. Theobald, and 5. 
Thomas E. ; and five daugh- 
ters. 

25. John (8): his eldest 
son ; living; in 1877. 

26. Patrick (8) : his son ; 
living (in 1877) in Joyces* 
Country; bom in 1858. 



23.— The "Lacy" Family. 

The ancient Irish antiquaries say that Charlemagne (or 
the Emperor Charles the Great) was the ancestor of Xac^; 
from him down to Sir Hugo (or Hugh) De Lacy (to whom * 
by charter, King Henry the Second of England granted 
the Kingdom of Meath, a.d. 1172,) the following is the 
pedigree : 

1. Charlemagne (or Caro- 
lus Magnus). 

2. Oliver : his son. 
8. Eoland : his son. 

4. Aroibel : his son. 

5. Longobert : his son. 

6. Dorobert : his son. 



7. Dermarg : his son. 

8. George : his son. 

9. Eichard : his son. 

10. Boland (2) : his son. 

11. Sir Hugo de Lacy: his 
son ; living a.d. 1172. 



24. — The << MagJobdan" Famxut. 

Meyleb the Fair, the second son of Costelo who was the 
ancestor of " Costello", was the ancestor of MucJardun. 



1. Meyler the Fair. 

2. PhUbott : his son ; a 
quo Philpott. 

8. Jordan dubh : his son ; 
a quo MacJordan dubh. 



4. Timothy. MacJordan: 
his son ; first assumed tbiS'- 
sirname. 

5. William : his son. 

6. Walter : hia son. 



T.] THE NANGLEJkND NUGENT FAMILIES. 848; 



7. JohiLbaidlia [boy] : his 
son. 

8. Walter buidhe : his son. 

9. William (2) : his son. 



10. Meyler (2) : his son. 

11. Wcdter (8) : his son. 

12. Meyler (8) MacJordaa 
dubh : his son. 



25. The "Nanole" Family. 

Gilbert De Angulo, ancestor of this family (which has 
been modernized Nagle\ came as a commander into Ire- 
land, A.i>. 1172, upon the English invasion of that idngdom 
by King Henry the Second ; and, in the year 1177, he 
and his brother Jordan De Angulo were witnesses to the 
charter given by King John, of the lands of Hovede (now 
** Howth") unto Almeric De Sartcto LaurentiOf ancestor of 
St. Lawrence*^ earls of Howth. In the year 1195, Sir Hugo 
De Lacy granted to the said Gilbert all the lands called 
'* Maghery-Gallen" ; and to Gilbert's son, Jocelin, he gave 
Navan and the lands of Ardbraccan. This Jocelin was 
the first baron of Navan ; he had a brother named Oastelo. 

Jocelin De Angulo, first baron of Navan, had two sons» 
the elder of whom was ancestor of Wangle, in Leinster and 
Munster ; the second son (who was Justiciary of Ireland, 
A.D. 1195), sumamed ** Peter Peppard*' was the ancestor 
of Peppard. It was this Peter's son, or grandson, named 
Ralph Peppard, who founded St. Mary's Abbey, in Ather- 
dee (now "Ardee"), in the reign of King Edward the 
First. 

Costelo, the second son of Gilbert De Angulo, was the 
ancestor of CosteUo : after him the barony of <* Costello", 
in the county Mayo, was so called. This Gostelo had two 
sons — I. Costelo oge ; 2. Meyler fionn (or Meyler the 
Fair), who was the ancestor of MacJordan. 



26.— The Stem op the ** Nugent" Family. 
Some say thai this family is descended from the ancient 

* St. Laaorenui Howth gives title of *' Earl" to this family ; which 
was called ** St. Lawrence/' from a victory gained bv them over the 
Irish, on 8tb LftWfeBoe^s Day, A.D. 1371. The name of the family was 
originally Trittram. 



844 IRISH PEDIGBEES. [PAST 

dukes of Lorraine ; and that Sir Gilbert De Nogent, vfith 
his brother Bichard De Capello and two other gentlemen 
df their name, came into Ireland with Sir Hugh De Lacy, 
who gave the said Gilbert one of his daughters in marriage, 
and, as a marriage portion with her, the barony of "Delvin" 
—-as in the following Deed : ** De omnes terras et tenementa 
qiuB quondam 0' Finelan hahuitjfilw et consanguineo meo Oil- 
berto De Nogent.'* The said Sir Gilbert having died without 
issue, left the estates to his brother Bichard De Capello, 
lord justice of Lreland, whose daughter and only heir 
being married to baron Jones, he became, in her right, 
baron of Delvin ; which title continued in the family for 
four generations, until by the failure of heirs male, and 
the marriage of Catherine, daughter and sole heir of the 
last haron Jones, to William Nogent, of Braclon, descended 
from the said Gilbert, or from one of his kinsmen, who 
eame with him to Lreland, the estate and honour returned 
to the Nogent family. This William Nogent was the first 
who assumed the name Nugent. 

According to O'Dugan, this William was the ancestor of 
Nugent, and fifth in descent from Conor 0*Conor, king of 
Meath, who was a brother of Cathal (or Charles) craobh- 
dearg, the fifty-first Christian king of Connaught, and (see 
the first series) No. 112 on the ** O'Conor (Conaught) " 
pedigree. This Conor O'Conor was also a younger brother 
of Boderick O'Conor, the 188rd and last monarch of Ire- 
land, who died a.d. 1198. 



112. Conor O'Conor, king 
of Meath: son of Tirlogh 
mor, who was the 48th 
Christian king of Connaught 
and the 181st monarch of 
Lreland. 

118. Gilbert : his son; 
assumed the nnjne DeNogmt; 
had a brother named Rich- 
ard na capuill (*<na capuill**: 
Lrish, of the horses). 

114. GUbert (2) : his son. 

115. Thomas: his son. 



116. Nicholas : his son. 

117. William : his son ; the 
first that assumed the name 
Nugent. This William had 
issue by his wife Catherine 
Jones, two sons — 1. Bichard, 
who was ancestor of Nugent, 
barons of Delvin and earls 
of Westmeath, and of the 
branches descended from 
them ; 2. William, who was 
the ancestor of the Nugents 
of Taghmon, Moyrath^ etc. • 



y-] 



THE PETIT AND POWEB FAMILIES. 



845 



118. Bichard Nugent : son 
of William ; was the second 
lord baron of Delvin. 

119. James, the third 
baron : his son. 

120. Christopher, the 
fourth baron : his son. 

121. Bichard (2), the fifth 
baron : his son. 



I 122. Christopher (2) : the 
sixth baron : his son. 

128. Bichard (8), the 
seventh baron : his son. 

124. Christopher Nugent : 
his son ; the eighth baron 
of Delvin ; living a.d. 1709. 



27.— The " Petit" Family. 

William Le Petito (a quo Petit) came into Ireland with 
Sir Hugh De Lacy. All that is recorded of William Le 
Petito is, that the said Sir Hugo De Lacy did, by charter, 
grant unto him Matherithirnan, etc. (now called j;he barony 
of '* Magherydernan", in the county Westmeath), except 
the Logh and town of Dysart ; and that they were an- 
oiently styled ** barons of Molingare" [MuUingar] . This 
William Le Petito, in 1185, gave a great defeat to the 
Lish of Meath ; in 1190 or 1191 he was lord justice or 
governor of Lreland. 



1, William Le Petito. 

2. James : his son ; had a 
brother named Nicholas 
who, it is said, was the 
ancestor of the Lynch family, 
of Galway. 

8. Bichard Petit : his son ; 
first assumed this simame. 



4. John : his son. 
6. Simon : his son. 

6. Oerrott : his son. 

7. Simon (2) : his son. 

8. Thomas : his son. 

9. Oerrott Petit : his son ; 
living A.D. 1657. 



28.— The "Power" Family. 

Some of the Irish genealogists derive the origin of this 
family from the O'Briens, Ungs of Thomond. Bobert Le 
Poer (**por," gen. " poir " : Irish, seed, race, a claii), whose 
ancestor it is said came into England with William the 
Conqueror, was the first of this family that, a.i>. 1172, 
oame into Ireland with King Henry the Second, who, by 






ehaiier^ HSjrmML nolo the Mid Bobert, hj flie mme of 
BoUn PmUr^ibe€itJ€4yKua§osd^whh'*^^Mb6LB^pKO- 
nMl€e ihenabofuU'* ; md made him manilMil ctf IzeUnd* 
In tb« jear 1179, Uus Bobert Le Poer vas joined in com- 
miMJon wilii Sir Hugo De Lacy, as kntds josiiees of 
Irelaod. In the jear 1177, John De Comej, with the aid 
of Roger Poer Twho was liJk^ the hiother or one of the 
thr^ ifons of the said Bobert), con^pierBd UlidiA. We zead 
that this Roger (or Sir Boger) Le Poer was the friend and 
companion in arms of Sir John De Conrey and Sir Ar- 
moric 8t« Lawrenee, and -was the standard-bearer and 
marshal of IreUnd ; of him Giraldut Cambrenns writes : 
^* It might be said, without ofiCence, there was not one man 
who did more valiant acts than Boger Le Poer, wbo, al- 
though he was a young man and beardless, yet showed 
himself a lusty, valiant, and courageous gentleman ; and 
who grew into such good credit that he had the govern- 
ment of the country about Leigblin, as also in Ossory 
where he was traitorously killed.*' And Cambrenns says 
that Sir Boger Le Poer was ** the youngest, bravest, and 
handsomest of all the Anglo-Norman kmghts. This Sir 
Boger masried a niece of Sir Armoric St. Lawrence (an- 
cestor of the earls of Howth), and by her had a son, John. 
Le Poer, living a.d. 1197 ; whose grandson, Sir Eustape, 
sat in psirliament in 1295. He was succeeded by lord 
Arnold Le Poer, who slew Sir John BonevilLe in single 
combat ; and was one of the commanders in the Army of 
King Edward the First of England, against Edward Bruce, 
in Ireland, in 1815. Lord Arnold Le Poer was succeeded 
by lord Bobert Le Poer, seneschal of the^ county Wexford, 
and treasurer of Ireland. To him succeeded Matthew ; 
after him, John ; and after him, Bichard, whose son 
Nicholas was summoned to Parliament by Writ, dated 
22nd November, 1875) and <* three times afterwards.'* Of 
those Writs, Lodge savs : ** These are the most ancient 
Writ» qf Summons to Parliament, that remain on record ' 
in the Rolls Office of Ireland. Bichard, lord Le Poer, 

Sraudson of the said Nicholas, married Catherine, second 
aughter of Pierce Butler, eighth earl of Ormond (and 
henoe, probably, the Ohristian name Pien, Pierse^ or 
PiVrty, came into the ** Power " family). 



v.] THE.POIV^ll FAMILY. 847 

In 1678, Bichard, lord Le Poer. ^wtts^^ea^ted << vkeoimt 
of Decies" (or yisoount De Decies) and " earl of Tyrone";* 
whose grandson had an only daughteif^ the lady Catherine 
Le Poer, who married Sir Marcus Beresford, haronet, and 
carried into the ''Beresford*' family (now represented by the 
marquis of Waterford) the ancient barony by " Writ of 
Bummons" of the lords Le Poer. It may be well to ob< 
serve that, among the modem nobility of Ireland, no 
*^ barony" is so much prized (because of its antiquity) as 
that of Writ of Summons to Parliament. 

So early as a.d. 1868, the Le Poers (or Powers) were 
very numerous in the county Waterford, and in possession 
of a very large portion of the county called "Powers*^ 
Country " ; and, besides the family of Curraghmore (the 
seat of the marquis of Waterford), there were those of the 
baron of Donisle, and the House of Kilmeaden — ^both of 
which were destroyed by Oliver Cromwell, during his 
" Protectorate." 

* Earl of Tyn'onei The following extract from Lodge's PeeTace 
of the '* Earldom of Tyrone" may be of interest to members of the 
Po^oer family : " John, lord Le Poer, being only eieht years and a 
half old at his grandfather's death, became the ward of King James 
the First, who, 7th December, 1606, granted his wardship to his 
mother ; but 30th March, 1629, he had a special livery of his estate 
^he became a lunatic before the rebellion of 1641), and marrying 
Ruth, dauffhter and heir of Robert Pypho, of St. Mary's Abbey^ 
Esq., had hve sons and four daughters : viz., 1. Richard, created 
earl of Tyrone ; 2. Pierse, of Kmowan, county Waterford, who 
married Honora, daughter of John, the second lord Brittas (having 
issue Richard, who died there in February, 1635, leaving by Ellen, 
daughter of William Butler, of fialliboe, county Tipperary, gent., 
1. John, his heir, which John married Ellen, daughter of Daniel 
Magrath, of Mountainoastle, in the county Waterford ; Pierce, . 
whose daughter Judith was married to Mr. Duoket ; James, Ellen, . 
and Anne, and foanded the family at Rathcormac, in the county* 
Waterford) ; 3, Robert ; 4. John, who died unmarried in Dublin ;. 
5. David, who died there, 17th Ausust, 1661, and was buried at St. 
Michan*8 ; 1. Ellen, married to Thomas Wabh, of Piltown, sen., 
Esq. ; 2. Catherine, married to John Fitzgerald, of Dromana, Esq.; 
(whose only daughter, Catherine, was mother of John, late. earl 
Grandison) ; 3. Margaret ; and 4. Mary." 

In Notes at foot of the foregoing, Lodge gives the following ref e- 
z^nces : MS. Pedig. Trin. ColL, 1676 ; and aoain MSv Pedig. .Trin. 
ColL Plea and Ans. Villiera to Poer, 14th November, 1676. 



348 



IBISH PEDiaSEES. 



[PABT 



Of the Le Poer family (i^^hich has existed in the county 
Waterford for the last seven centuries) there have been 
many branches and offshoots ; one or two of which I am 
able to trace down to the present time. I. The following 
is one of them, as far as I can trace it : 



1. John Power, of Eil- 
meaden. 

2. Nicholas : his son. 
8. Piers : his soir. 

4. Sir William : his son. 

5. John (2) : his son. 

6. David : his son ; died 
A.D. 1696. 

II. Pierce Power,* by his second wife, Grace, daughter 
of Sir T. Osborne, was the ancestor of the following 
branches of the Power family : 



7. John (8) : his son ; had 
two brothers ; died (before 
his father) in 1698. 

8. David Power : his son ; 
living in 1709 ; had one 
brother. 



1. Pierce Power ; had 
three younger brothers — 1. 
Eichard, of Garrigaline, 
county Cork ; 2. Breine ; 
8. Bobert. 

2. Pierce (2) : son of said 
Pierce ; had six younger 
brothers — 1. Milo, 2. Bich- 
ard, 8. David, 4. John, 5, 
Thomas, and 6. Anthony. 

8. Nicholas: son of Pierce; 
had a brother, the Rev. John, 
who died s.p, 

4. Pierce, of Ballyhane, 
near Whitechurch, county 
Waterford: son of Nicholas ; 
had three sisters — 1. Pen- 



elope, 2. Eliza, 8. Alicia; 
married, in 1762, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Valentine Brown- 
ing, son of Major Browning 
who came to Ireland with 
Oromwell. The male issue 
of that Major Browning hav- 
ing failed, the said Elizabeth 
Browning became the heir- 
ess of Affane, near Gappo- 
quin ; and thus the Affane 
property came into the poss- 
ession of the said Pierce 
Power, who died in 1815. 

6. Bev. William Power : 
his fifth son ; had four bro- 
thers — 1. Samuel f, 2. Nich- 



* Pierce Power : This Pierce was twice mamed : by his first mar- 
riage he had a son named Roger. 

t Samwiel : This Samuel Power was married to Amie^ daughter 
and co-heir of Sir G. Browne, by whom he had three sons and three 
daughters : the sons were — 1. George-Beresford, married to Elizabeth 
Beeres, by whom he had one son (Samuel) and one daughter (Dor- 
othea-Carttor) ; 2. Samuel ; 3. Bev. Henry. The daii|^ten were 
—1. Anna, married to D. Blake, Esq. ; 2. Elizabeth ; 3. Georgina. 



v.] 



THE PUBGELL FAMILY. 



849 



olas (who died young, s.p,), 
8. John,* 4. Pierce ; and 
three sisters — Alicia, mar- 
ried to John Drew, Esq., of 
Frogmore, county Cork, 2. 
Catherine, married to Sir 
Christopher Musgrave, bart., 
of Tourin, county Waterford, 
8. Jane, married to Eev. 
George Miles. This William 
succeeded to Affane, in 1815, 
married, in 1807, Mary Ara- 
minta, daughter of the Rev. 
Thomas Sandiford ; and died 
in 1826, leaving issue — 1. 
Samuel Browning, 2. Ed- 
ward, 8. Bev. Thomas. 

6. Samuel Browning Pow- 
er : eldest son of William ; 
succeeded to Affane in 1825; 
was a J.P. for county Wat- 



erford ; in 1881 married 
Mary, daughter of Thomas 
Woodward, Esq., of the For- 
est of Dean, Gloucestershire, 
died in 1867, leaving issue 
three sons and three daugh- 
ters : the sons were — 1. 
William, 2. Bichard-Charles, 
8. Frederick-Edward ; the 
daughters were — I.Frances- 
Susanna, 2. Mary-Ara- 
minta, 8. Susanna Louisa. 

7. Captain William Power, 
of Affanef, eldest son of 
Samuel-Browning ; in 1869 
married Catherine Mary, 
only surviving child of 
Captain Jervois, B.N., of 
Winifred Dale, Bath ; living 
in 1878. 



29. — The Pubcell Family. 

James, hrother of Bichard ruadh [roe] who is No. 2 on the 
** Tyrrell ** pedigree, was the ancestor of PurcelL 

* John : This John was twice married : first to Anna Ross, by 
whom he had three children — 1. Pierce, 2. Elizabeth, married to W. 
L. Ogilby, 3. Mary, married to J. Farrell ; his second marriage was 
to Jane Bennett, by whom he had five children — 1. Samuel, married 
to Rebecca Danver, 2. Philip, 3. John, 4. Philip, 5. Anna-Ross. 
The children of this Samuel rower and his wife Rebecca Danver, 
were — 1. John- Danver, 2. Florence-Danver, 3. Frederick-Danver, 4. 
Arthur-Danver, 5. Lilian-Danver, 6. Philip-Danver, 7. Norman- 
Danver, 8. Amold-Danver. 

i* Affane : It is recorded that the first man^uis of Waterford, in 
his frequent visits to Affane, in the time of Iherce Power, of fially- 
hane. No. 4 on this pedigree, who died in 1815, used to call him his 
kiru/man, and say — " Weu, Pierce, if the Beresfords ever fail, you and 
yours will be the next to them." 

It is most likely that his lordship had a copious pedigree of the 
** Power'* family, containing its various branches and collaterals ; 
and it may fairly be assumed that such a pedigree still exists at the 
Marquis of Waterford's seat at Curraghmore. 



350 



IRISH PEDIGBEES. 



[PABT 



2. James, sarnamed **Par- 
cel" ("pur": Irish, neat, 
and ** eel," the mouth) : 
younger son of Sir Hugh 
Tirrell ; a quo PurcelL 

3. William : his son. 

4. Piers : his son. 

5. James (2) : his son. 

6. Thomas : his son. 

7. John : his son. 

8. James (8) : his son. 



9. Thomas (2) : his son. 

10. James (4) : his son, 

11. John (2) : his son. 

12. James (5) : his son. 

13. Thomas (3) : his son. 

14. James (6) : his son. 

15. Thomas (4) : his son. 

16. James (7) : his son. 

17. Thomas Puroell : his 
son ; living a.d. 1709. 



30.— The ** Taylor " Family. 

Edward Taylor, of Beverley, in Yorkshire, England, who 
was chief "Faulkiner" to King Henry the Third, a.d. 
1273, was the ancestor of Taylor and Falkener, in Ireland. 



1. Edward Taylor, of 
Beverley. 

2. James : his son. 

8. Nicholas : his son ; set- 
tled in Ireland in the second 
year of the reign of King 
Edward the First. 

4. John Taylor, of Swords, 
in the county Dublin: son 
of Nicholas. 

5. William : his son. 

6. Alexander : his son. 



7. John (2) : his son. 

8. John (3) : his son. 

9. James : his son. 

10. Eichard : his son. 

11. Robert : his son. 

12. George : his son. 
18. Michael : his son. 

14. John (4) : his son. 

15. John (5) his son. 

16. John (6) his son. 

17. John (7) : his son. 



81.— The *« Tobin" Family. 

GoKSTANTiNB, brother of Maolcolum who is No. 8 on the 
"Beatty" pedigree, was the ancestor of Tobin. 



v.] 



THE TUITE FAMILY. 



851 



8. Constantine : son of 
Comhgall. 

4. Philip : his son. 

5. Thomas : his son. 

6. James : his son. 

7. John : his son. 

8. David : his son. 

9. Bobert : his son. 



10. Christopher : his son. 

11. John (2) : his son. 

12. JeofiErey : his son. 
18. James : his son. 
14. John (8) : his son. 
16. John (4) : his son. 

16. Pierce : his son. 

17. John Tobin : his son. 



82.— Thb "Tutte" Family. 

HicHABD Le Tuite camo into Ireland with Eing Heniy 
the Second, a«d. 1172 ; where he attained large possessions 
in that part of the country now called Westmeath, which 
after him his posterity possessed and enjoyed up to the 
Cromwellian confiscations ; but, upon the restoration of 
King Charles the Second, a portion of the confiscated 
estates was restored to the family, and possessed, at the 
time of the Williamite confiscations, by Sir Joseph Tuite, 
of Sonnagh (or Tonnagh), baronet. 

In the year 1199, Richard Le Tuite built the strong castle 
of Oranard, in ** O'Farrell's Country *', called Annaly, 
now the county Longford ; and, in 1210, built the monas- 
tery of Granard, which he endowed with large possessions. 
He soon after died at Athlone by the fall of a tower. 



1. Bichard Le Tuite, a.d. 
1172. 

2. Sir John : his son. 
8. Bickard : his son. 

4. Maurice : his son. 

5. Thomas : his son. 

6. Sir Bickard : his son ; 
called Riocard na g-Cais 
leain* (or ** Bickard of the 
Castles)*', on account of the 
many castles he built and 



John Bermingham, a.d. 
1819, defeated and slew at 
Faughart, near Dundalk, 
Edward Bruce, brother of 
the renowned Bobert Bruce, 
King of Scotland — known as 
" King Bobert the First." 

7. Rickard oge : his son. 

8. John : his son. 

9. James : his son ; was 
called '< MacRisdeard^f • 



fortified. This Bickard and 10. Bichard : his son ; had 

* Rioeard na g-Ca/isleain : Some say that this Rickard was the 
Ancestor of Oosling. 

t MacRisdeard : It is said that this James Tuite was the ancestor 
of Dicson, Dickaon, and Dixon (see Note* page 316). 



852 



IBISH FEDIGBEES. 



[PIBT 



two younger brothers — 1. 
Thomas, 2. Jeoffrey. 
11. Sir Joseph Tuite, of 



Sonnagh : son of Richard \ 
living in 1657. 



88.— The " Tybbell" Family. 

Some say that the Sir Hugh Tirrell*, who a.d. 1184, came 
into Ireland with Philip, of Worcester, lord justice, was 
the ancestor of Tyrrell, and was identical with the Sir 
Hugh Tirrell who was called the ''GrsBcian Knight.*' 
This Sir Hugh had two sons — 1. Bichardruadh [roe] , who 
was ancestor of the Tyrrell family who were hereditary 
sheriffs and sometimes governors of the lower borders of 
Meath, now callel ** Westmeath", where they acquired 
the ancient territory of Fertulagh, which they enjoyed 
until confiscated by Cromwell ; and 2. James, who was the 
ancestor of PurcelL We read that, in 1316, a lord Hugh 
Tirrell, governor of Castleknock, was taken by the 
" Scotts." 

5. Eedmond : his son. 

6. James : his son. 

7. Eichard (4) : his son. 

8. Thomas : his son. 

9. Sir John : his son. 

10. James (2) : his son. 

11. Jerratt Tyrrell; his 
son; living a.d. 1657. 



1. Sir Hugh Tirrell ; a quo 
Tyrrell. 

2. Richard ruadh : his 
son ; had a brother named 
James, who was the ancestor 
of PurcelL 

8. Richard (2) : son of 
Richard. 

4. Richard (3) : his son. 



84.— The *' Vance" Family. 
This name was at one time De Vans, was modernized 

♦ Sir Hugh Tirrell : This name " Tirrell '* seems to be derived from 
the Irish tirreil (" tir", gen. " tire" : Irish, a country ; ** reil", a htar 
and rightful)^ which may signify '* the star of the country'', or, taken 
along with " Sir Hugh", may mean " the rightful of the country.'* 
The latter meaning would imply that Sir Hugh Tirrell, like many 
others who came to Ireland with the English invaders, was of Irish 
origin. 



v.] 



THE VANCE FAMILY. 



358 



Vans*, and more lately rendered Vanoe. In Scottish 
heraldry it is recorded that few of the ancient names of 
Scotland can trace their origin to a more distinguished 
foreign source. I can trace the genealogy down from 
Joseph Vans, of Wigton, in Cumberland, England ; who 
was born about a.d. 1590. 



1. Joseph Vans,of Wigton, 
lorn about 1590. 

2. George : his son ; bap- 
tized at Wigton,! 21 June, 
1640; married his cousin 
Grace Vans, in Scotland, 
about the year 1660, and 
settled in TerryscoUip (or 
Derryscollip),near Benburb, 
<50unty Tyrone, about a.d. 
1676. This George lived to 
be 119 years old; and, 
strange to say, cut a third 
row of teeth at 90 years of 
age ; he died in 1758. He 
left two sons — 1. William 
Vancey of Terryscollip, who 
4ied in 1774, leaving no 
male issue, but had one 
daughter named Grace who 
married a Mr. Holmes, and 
whose surviving male des- 
-cendants still live (in the 
name of Holmes in the neigh- 
bourhood of Benburb ; 2. 
John Vance, of Drumhirk, 



county Tyrone, who died in 
1759. 

8. John Vance : second 
son of George Vans ; married 
Eliza, daughter of Andrew 
Oliver, of Latakeel, near 
Cookstown : she lived to be 
100 years of age ; he died 
29th October 1759, aged 82 
years ; both he and his wife 
were buried at Castlecaul- 
field. 

4. John Vance, of Drum- 
hirk : his son ; married Jane, 
daughter of John Young, 
Esq., of Annahild, county 
Tyrone ; died 29 April, 
1798, leaving eleven chil- 
dren, three of whom died 
young. This John had a 
brother named Oliver, who 
had four children, three of 
whose names are recorded — 
1. Jane, who was married to 
a Mr. Graham ; 2. Grace, to 
a Mr. Walker ; 8. Anne, to 



* Vans: Some genealogists derive this simame from the Gaelio 
Uant gen. Uain, " a lamV ; Gr. accusative oin. If this derivation 
be correct, the Irish 0*Uain would be equivalent to the English 
Lamb and the French De Vans. 

\ Wigton : In the Register of Baptisms solemnized in the parisH 
of Wi|^n, in the county of Cumberland, England, a.d. 164D, the 
following entry occurs : 

"June. George the sonne of Joseph Vans baptiz. 2lBt." 



854 



IBISH PEDIGBEES. 



[PABT 



a Mr. Barrett, all of whom 
died without issue surviving, 
except Mrs. Barrett, who 
has left issue. 

5. Andrew Vance, of Rut- 
land-square, Dublin : the 
eighth son of John ; born in 
1773 ; married Maria-Mary, 
daughter of James Falls,Esq., 
Aughnacloy ; died in 1849, 
leaving eight children. Of 
the brothers and sisters of 
this Andrew, who left issue, 
I have ascertained the names 
of only — 1. Mary ; 2. George, 
an elder brother ; 3. James, 
a younger brother, but some 
of the other children also 
have left issue. This (1) 
Mary (who was bom in 1 763, 
and died in 1847) married a 
CaptainDonaldson,by whom 
she had two sons and four 
daughters, all of whom died 
without issue, except Maria, 
who married a Mr. Dowse, 
and died in 1825, leaving 
issue the Eight Honble. 
Richard Dowse, (living in 
1878), who has four child- 
ren — 1. Mary- Catherine, 2. 
Charlotte-Anne, 8. Sophia- 
Elizabeth, 4.Rickard-Dowse 
— all living in 1877. George 
Vance (2) here mentioned, 
as an elder brother of An- 
drew, was an eminent sur- 
geon in London ; he was bom 
in 1769 ; married Elizabeth- 



Bradridge, (who died in Dec, 
1876, aged 86 years), only 
daughter of John Sheppard, 
Esq., of Coombe, Fishaere, 
Morton Abbott, Devonshire; 
and, in 1837, was killed by 
a lunatic whom he was pro- 
fessionally attending. This 
George had ten children, 
eight of whom died without 
issue : the two surviving 
children were — 1 . Lieu- 
tenant-Col. H. P.Vance, 38th 
Begiment ; Elizabeth- Louisa 
Vance, both Jiving in Lon- 
don, in 1877. James (8) a 
younger brother of the said 
Andrew Vance, was bom in 
1775 ; was an officer in the 
57th Begiment ; and, un- 
married, was, in 1811, killed 
in a duel by a brother o'fficer, 
at Newry. 

6. John Vance : son of 
Andrew ; was M.P. for 
Dublin, and, afterwards, for 
Armagh; died in 1875, leav- 
ing only two daughters — 1. 
Adelaide-Sidney Vance, 
married to Bichard Francis 
Keane,* eldest eon of Sir 
John Keane, Bart., of Cap- 
poquin House, Cappoquin, 
county Waterford; 2. Flor- 
ence, who died xmmarried^ 
in 1877. This John Vance 
had four brothers and three 
sisters : the brothers were — 
' 1. James-Falls Vance (no 



* Keane : See the ** Keane'* genealogy. 



v.] 



THE WHYTE FAMILY. 



855 



issue) ; 2. Thomas Vance, 
J.P., Blaokrock House, 
Blackrock, county Dublin, 
and living in 1878; 8. 
Andrew Vance, barrister, 
who died in 1862, leaving 
two children— Mrs. Fanny 
Twig and Mrs. Mary Stein, 
both of whom were living in 
1877 and have offsprings 4. 
William Vance, of London, 
living in 1877. The slaters 
of John Vance were — 1. 
Mary, who died of cholera 
in 1882 ; 2. Jane-Ehza ; 8. 
Anne, married to Eichard 
Harte, J.P., Coolruss, 
county Limerick,* who died 
in 1842. 

7. Eustace-John : only 
surviving son of Thomas 
Vance, J.P., Blackrock 



House, Blackrock, county 
Dublin, the third son of 
Andrew Vance, above men- 
tioned; married to Alice, 
daughter of Alfred Harding, 
Esq., of Salisbury, England, 
by whom he had (living in 
1877) two sons — 1. Alger- 
non-Eustace-Henry ; 2. 
Claude-Edward. This Eus- 
tace-John Vance had seven 
sisters — 1. Emily, married 
to Fielding Scovell, of Rye- 
croft, Bray, county Wicklow, 
by whom she had two sons 
(living in 1877)— 1. Charles- 
Thornton Scovell, 2. George- 
Vance Scovell; 2. Helena, 8. 
Kathleen, 4. Edith, 5. Jan- 
etta, 6. Georgina, 7. Flor- 
ence — ^all living in 1877. 



85.— The ** Whyte" Family. 

Eichard De Pitche, who is mentioned by Giraldus Cam- 
brensis as having come into Ireland with Strongbow a.d. 
1170, is the first member of the Whyte or White fanuly 
whose name I have seen recorded. 



1. Eichard De Pitche. 

2. Eodolph : his son ; who, 
in the charter of Mathew, 
abbot of Mellifont, in the 
county Louth, and in the 
charter of Hugh De Lacy, 



to Maurice Fitzgerald, in 
the year 1177, is styled 
** Eodolph De Pitchford". 

8. J ohn, of Pitchford : his 
son ; had a brother named 
Eichard. 



* Limerick : See the ** fiarte" (of Clare, Limerick, and Kerry) 
genealogy. 



856 



lUfiH PEDIGSEKS. 



[PABT V. 



4. Bodolph (2), of Ktch- 
ford: his son; living in 
1290. 

5. Thomas, of Pitchers- 
town : his son. 

6. James, of Trim : his 
son ; had a brother named 
John, ofPitchersto wn, 
whose only son, William, 
died without issue, in the 
year 1435. 

7. Thomas, of Haverford 
West : son of James ; had 
two elder brothers — 1. Chris- 
topher, living in 1472; 2. 
John. 

8. Sir John Whyte, " Con- 
stable of the GasUe of Dub- 
lin" : his son; living in 1540. 



9. Walter : his son ; "Es- 
cheator-Oeneralof the Pale'% 
and <' Commissioner for val- 
uing the First Fruite.*' 

10. Walter (2) : his son ; 
« Escheator of Leinster", 
in 1610 ; M.P. for Donegal, 
in 1615 ; and Deputy Vice- 
Treasurer, in 1686. 

11. James : his son ; <^ Es- 
cheator- General", in 1687. 

12. Walter (8) : his son. 
18. James (2) : his son. 

14. Henry : his son ; mar- 
ried in 1746. 

15. Henry Whyte : his son; 
died an infant ; had two sis- 
ters — 1. Anne, 2. Catherine. 



APPENDIX. 



1. ADJURATION BELL. 

In the early ages the Lish people held in great yeneration some of 
the BELLS used by the saints in ancient times ; and preserved them 
for many i^es, some of them even to the present day : amongst 
otiier purposes, for administermg solemn oaths and adjurations ; and 
to swear ndsely on them was considered the greatest crime and pro- 
fanation. 



2. ANCIENT IRISH LITERATURE. 

The chief accounts of ancient Irish literature are given in Ware's 
Works, by Walter Harris ; in bishop Nicholson's " Irish Historical 
library" ; in Doctor O'Connor's Eerum HibenUcarum Scriptares Vet., 
and in his Catalogue of the Irish Manuscripts, in the Duke of Buck- 
ingham's library at Stowe ; in O'Rielly's Irish Writers ; the Works of 
Ussher, and in Lanigan's and Brennan's Ecclesiastical Histories; 
some accounts of distinguished Irish writers are also giyen in various 
Biographical Dictionaries. There are still existing vast collections 
of ancient and Taluable Irish MSS., in various libraries in Ireland : 
as those of Trinity College, Dublin, ai^ of the Royal Irish Aca- 
demy ; also in many private Ubraries, particularly in that of the 
late Sir William Betham (Ulster King of Arms). In various libra- 
ries in England there are great collections of Irish MSS. : as in 
those of the Bodleian Library, at Oxford ; of the British Museum, 
and of Lambeth, in London ; and in the library of the Duke of 
Buckingham, at Stowe, there is an immense and most valuable col- 
lection. In the libraries on the Continent there are also collectious 
of Irish MSS. particularly at Rome, Paris, and Lou vain, and in the 
libraries of Stoam and Poringal ; and it is said that there were Irish 
MSS. in the Royal Library at Copenhagen, which were carried off 
by the Danes from Ireland, in the tenth and eleventh, centuries. A 
vast number of Irish MSS. were destroyed, particularly during the 
wars in Iieland by Queen Elizabeth and Cromwell. Webb, ia his 
AncUysis of the ATiUquities of IreXamd^ says — " It was, 'till the time 
of King James L, tiM object of Government to discover and destroy 
all remains of the literature of the Irish ; in order the more fully to 
•ladicate from their minds eveiy trace of their ancient ind^en- 
deBce.'"*" (Seepage 6, of the Preface.) 

* Init^midienw, TliiB, no doobt, is trAy some of the Irish pedlgieea aronot now 
forthcoming. 



858 APPENDIX. 

In the Pagan times, many works of note are recorded, and, 
according to Charles O'Connor, it is stated by Dnald Mac Firbis, the 
learned antiquary of Leacan, that St. Patrick burned no less than 
one hundred and eighty volumes of the Books of the Druids at Tara. 
As Tara was in the early ages the seat of the Irish monarchy, there 
were many of the chief Bards consequently connected with Meath ; 
and an account of various eminent Bards who flourished in Meath 
and Ulster in the Pasan times is given in O'Rielly's *' Irish Writers." 
The most celebrated of these were Adhna, Athaime, Forchem, 
Ferceirtne, and Neide — all of whom flourished about the beginning 
of the Christian Era, at the court of Emania, under Concobhar Mac- 
Neasa, (Conor MacNessa), the celebrated king of Ulster. Oisin (or 
Ossian), in the third century, was one of the most celebrated of tiie 
Irish Bards, and many poems attributed to him are still extant ; 
some of the Ossianic poems have been translated, but many remain 
in Irish manuscript, and it is to be observed that they are veiy 
different from Ossian's Poems published by MacPherson, who 
claimed the Irish Bard as a native of Scotland ; but MacPherson's 
OwMnic Poems, though containing much poetical beaniy. are chiefly 
fictions of his own. 



3. ANGLO-SAXON COLONY IN WEXFORD. 

The English soldiers who came over with Strongbow, Hervey De 
Monte Marisco, and others, in the reign of Henry II., as allies of 
Dermod MacMurrogh, king of Leinster, got possession of the baronies 
of Forth and Bargie, where their descendants remain to this day, 
unmixed with the natives, and speak their ancient language — m 
dialect of the Anglo-Saxon ; of which specimens are given in 
Valhmcy, and in Eraser's ** Survey of Wexford." 



4. BARDIC FAMILIES. 

Accounts of the chief bards, from the earliest ikges, are to be found 
in 0*Rielly's " Irii^ Writers" ; and throughout the " Annals of the 
Four Masters*', the names of a great number of eminent Bards, his- 
torians, and Brehons have been recorded. The following were the 
chief Bardic families in Ireland, and many of them were eminent 
historians : — ^The O'Clerys of Donegal, the principal authors of the 
" Annals of the Four Masters", were hereditary Bards and histo- 
rians to the O'Donnells. The Mac Wards were also distinguished 
Bards and historians in Donegal and Tyrone, to the O'Donnells and 
O'Neills. The MaoConmidhes and O'Onives were Bards to the 
O'Neills, princes of Tyrone and lords of Clannaboy. The O'Hoseys 
were Bards to the Maguires of Fermanagh, and the MacMahons of 



BABDIG FAMILIES. 359 

Monaghan. The O'Donnellys were poets in Tyrone and Monaghan 
The 0' Daly 8, O'Mulligans, and O'Farrellys of Cavan, were Bards 
and historians to the O'Riellys. The O'Cuirneens (or Gnrrans) were 
Bards and historiographers of Brefney, under the O'Bourkes. The 
O'Mulconrys were the hereditary Bards and historians to the 
O'Conors, kings of Connaught. The MacFirbises were famous Bards 
and historians in North Connaught. The O'Duigenans, of Kilronan, 
were Bards and historians to the MacDermotts of Roscommon, and 
MacDonoghs of Slieo. The O'Dugans were Bards and historians to 
the O'Kellys of GaTway and Roscommon. The O'Dalys were cele- 
brated Bardic families in Connaught, Meath, Leinster and Munster. 
The O'Higgins and O'CofTeys were eminent Bards in Westmeath and 
in Connaught. The 0' Dunns, O'Dalys, and MacKeoffhs, were the 
chief Bards and historians under the MacMurroghs, kings of Lein- 
ster, and to various princes and chiefs in that province. The Mac 
Craiths, O'Dalys, O'Dinneens, and O'Keeffe's were chief poets in 
Desmond, to the MacCarthys, O'Donoghoes, O'Sullivans, and other 
great fanulies ; and to the Fitzgeralds, earls of Desmond. The Mac 
Craiths, MacBruodins, MacCurtins, and MacGowans were the Bards 
and historians of Thomond, to the O'Briens, Macnamaras, Mac 
Mahons, O'Loghlins, and other great families of Clare and Limerick. 

The Irish, in former ages, were the most famous harpers in Europe ; 
and continued eminent in the art even down to modem times. Tor- 
logh O'Carolan, the last and greatest of the Irish Bards, a celebrated, 
harper and composer, died a.d. 1738, in the 68th year of his age, 
at Alderford, in the county Roscommon — the residence of his great 
patron MacDermott Roe ; and was buried in the old church of Kil- 
ronan. There were many other eminent Bards, harpers, and musical 
composers in Ireland, in the 18th century — as Cormac Comman, 
Thomas O'Connellan, and his brother William, Roger and Echlin 
O'Kane, Cahir MacCabe, Miles O'Rielly, Charles Fanning, Edward 
MacDermott Roe, Hugh Qiggin, Patrick Kerr; Patrick Moyne, Arthur 
O'Neill, and others, all in Ulster and Connaught. In Meath and 
Leinster, O'Carroll, Cruise, Murphy, and Empson were distinguished 
harpers ; and Shane clarach MacDonnell, in Munster, was an emi- 
nent Bard. Interesting accounts of the Irish minstrels and Bards 
are given in the works of Walker, Beauford, Miss Brooke, Ledwich, 
Bunting, Hardiman, etc. 

Tacitus, in his Germania, gives an interesting account of the Bards 
•of the German nations, and says that by the recital of their battle- 
aon^ (which he calls '*Baritus''; from the old German bareUf to 
•ery, ) they greatly excited the valour of their warriors — the songs 
being recitea with furious vociferation, and a wild chorus, inter- 
rupted at intervals by the application of their bucklers to their 
mouths, which made the sound ourst out with redoubled force. The 
Bards of the Scandinavians, called SkaMs, were highly celebrated 
amongst the northern nations, Danes, Swedes, and Norwegians ; 
tthey were very numerous, and many of their compositions still 
remain, such as war-songs, etc., containing bold. vivicL, and admi- 
fable descriptions of warriors and battles ; they were highly hon- 



860 APPENDIX. 

oured, and it is stated that the renowned hero, Harold Harloger, 
king of Norway, in the tenfch century, placed the Bards at the ban- 
quet above all the officers of his court. The Skalds always accom- 
panied the kings and chiefs on their expeditions, to compose and 
recite their war songs, and animate the champions in battle ; for 
the poems they composed in honour of kings and heroes they re- 
ceived rich rewards of splendid dresses, gold and silver ornaments^ 
weapons, etc. In Turner's " Anglo-Saxons", an aocoont is given of 
a famous Skald of the Danes, in England, named Qurdauger^ who 
composed a poem on King Ethelred, for which he received a present 
of a gold ring weighing seven ounces ; and the same bard having 
gone to Ireland, sang ms compositions for one of the kings there, 
who offered him a present of two ships, but his treasurer told him 
that the rewards always given to poets were gold rings, swords, 
clothes, etc., which were uien presented to him ; he next went to 
the Orkney Islands, where he got from one of the larls a pi^esent of 
a silver axe. Several of the ungs and chieftains of Denmark and 
Norway were themselves Skalds, and composed war-songs, etc. The 
Skalds were mostly natives of Iceland, and from the seventh to the 
twelfth century, not less than two hundred of them, eminent in 
their art, are recorded. These fiards were, as in other nations in 
the early ages, the annalists of these countries ; and their prose his- 
torical compositions were called Saga^ which signifies " stories." 

Amongst the Gauls the Bards were highly honoured; and acconnta 
of them are given by Diodorus Siculus, and Strabo, who designate 
them Bardoif in the Greek. The Bards were highly celebrated 
amongst the ancient Britons, particularly in Wales; and in the works 
of Warton, Gray, Jones, Pennant, Evans, Owen, Davies, etc., and 
in Turner's '* Anglo- Saxons", copious accounts are given of the ffreat 
Cambrian Bards, Aneurin, Taliessin, Myrgin, Meigant, Mooued, 
Golyzan, Llywarch, Llewellyn, Hoel, etc., who sang the praises of 
the renowned Arthur, king of Britain, and other heroes, as Ossian, 
the Irish Orpheus, did the mighty deeds and fame of the Feniaa 
warriors of Ireland, at an earlier time. The Irish Bards and Brehons 
assisted at the inauguration of kincs and princes, and had some of 
the highest seats appropriated to tnem at the banquet. The Bards 
attended on batile- fields, recited their war-songs, and animated the 
champions to the contest ; and they recorded the heroic actions 
of the warriors who fell in the conflict. In Sir John Davis's 
account of Fermanagh, in the reign of King James the First, 
he says the lands of tha,t county were made into three ereat divisions r 
one part being the Mensal land of Maguire, another &e Termons or 
church lands, and the third division belonged to the chnmiolers, 
rhymers, and ealloglasses. The O'Glerys, who were hereditary 
historians and Bards to the O'Donnells, princes of Tiroonnell, had 
extensive lands ; and the ruins of their castle still remain at Kil- 
barron, near Ballyshannon, in the county Donegal, on the skors of 
the Atlantic. 

The name Ollamh-re-Dan was applied to designate a poei or pro- 
fessor of poetry, as the word Dan signifies *' a poMa" ; the term 



BO0 OF ACLEN. 861 

OUamh-re-Seanchcu was Applied to the cluoiiiclerB, and historians — 
the word aeanchas signifying a history or genealo^. The term sean- 
ehtadhe (derived from sean, " old") was also appied to historians, 
antiqnaries, and genealogists : hence the name was anglicised " Seoa- 
chies^'; File (in the plnral FUidke), anglicised *<Filea" and 
" Fileas", was also a name applied to poets or Bards. The Bards 
became a nnmerons body in Ireland. In the latter end of the sixth 
century, a rCToarkaUe contention arose between the Bards and the 
Irish monarch Aodh (son of Ainmireach, or Amnire, the 138th 
monarch) who resolved to suppress their order, which had become 
too powerful and dangerous te the state ; and at this time, aocordinff 
to Keating, they were one thousand in -number. A great nationu 
convention was held, a.d. 590, at Dromcat, in Deny, to regulate 
the disputes between the monarch and the Bards ; to which assembly 
St. Columkille came from lona in the Hebrides, and having advo- 
cated the cause of the Bards, he adjusted the contention — ^thus pre- 
venting the order from being abolished, and advising their contin- 
uance, under proper regulations, as an important national institu- 
tion. In the be^ning of the seventeenth century, a remarkable 
literary contention arose between the Bards of Leath-Cum (or those 
of Meath, Ulster, and Connaught,) and those of Leath-Mogha (or 
those of Leinster and Munster), of which a full and very inte- 
resting account is given at the year 1600. in O'Reilly's '* Irish 
Writers." This curious collection of poems is entitled lomarhhaidh' 
na-n-Eigecu or **The Contention of tne Learned" ; there are copies 
of it in various libraries, and it would form an interesting work if 
translated and published. The Bards of Ireland were for many 
centuries proscrioed and persecuted, and great numbers of them put 
to death by the English government ; and many penalties were 
enacted asainst them by l£e parliaments, as in the ''Statute of 
Kilkenny , etc. 



5. BOG OF ALLEN. 

The Bogof Allen is chiefly situated in Kildare, but it also extends 
into the King's and Queen's counties, and partly into Westmeath ; 
and is estimated to contain about three hundred thousand acres.* It 
is, like the other bogs of Ireland, composed chiefly of the remains 
of ancient forests of oak, pine, yew, hazel, birch, alder, mountain- 
ash, and poplar ; and the vast quantity of bogs in Ireland shows the 
ereat extent of the forests in lormer times, and hence one of the 
ancient names of Ireland was Fiodh-Ims, signifying the " Woody 
Ishind." 

* Aem : We read that in thereign'of the IriBh Monarch, King Cormac MacArt, 
the site of the Bog of Allen was covered by an extensiTo forest. 



862 APSBNDIX. 

6. BOGS AND ANCIENT FORESTS. 

Oak forests particularly abounded in Ireland in ancient times, and 
the Irish oak was so very durable that it was found superior to that 
of any other country for ship-building, timber for houses, furniture, 
and various other purposes. In our old historians are accounts of 
the clearing of many great plains and cutting down forests in 
various parts of Ireland, in the earliest ages. In the clearing out of 
these great plains the forests were destroyed, and great quantities 
of trees are found deeply buried in the bogs ; and in the formation 
of the " Grand Canal," when cutting through the Bo^ of Allen, in 
Kildare, oak, fir, yew, and other trees were round buned twenty or 
thirty feet below the surface, and these trees generally lie prostrated 
in a horizontal position, and have the appearance of being burned 
at the bottom of their trunks and roots : tire having been &und far 
more powerful in prostrating those forests than cutting them down 
with the axe ; and the great depth at which those trees are found 
in bogs, shows that they must have lain there for many ages. 



7. BRASS MONEY. 

According to Cox, in his Hibernia Anglicana, *' The necessities of 
the State, a.d. 1546, obliged King Henry Yllt. to coin brass or 
mixed money, and to make it current in Ireland, by proclamation ; 
to the great dissatisfaction of all the people, especiuly the soldiers.'* 
Ware also says that about this tmie King Henry, to mMTifa tfw 
his charges in Ireland, being hard put to it for lack of monies, gave 
directions to coin brass money, and commanded it by proclamation 
to pass as current and lawful money in all parts of Ireland. Simon, 
in his Essay on Irish Coins, says : *' The money struck for Ireland 
in this reign was little better than brass". This base coin was 
made current in Ireland instead of silver, in six-pences, groats, half- 
groats, and pennies, and it was also circulated m the reign of Ed- 
ward the Sixth ; but Simon says that Queen Mary, on her accession 
to the Crown, in order that she might ingratiate herself with the 
people of England, prohibited the currency of the base money there, 
and^ordered gold and silver money to be made of a better standard ; 
but Ireland was particularly excepted in the proclamation issued 
for that purpose. According to Simon, ten thousand pounds worth 
of base momes were, a.d. 1554 (in the reign of Philip and Mary), 
coined for Ireland ; and, in the years 1556 and 1557, seven thousand 
pounds worth of the same were coined into shillinra, sixpences, and 
groats for Ireland, and five thousand five hundred pounds more of 
this base money was coined into ''Harp-groats"; so that in less 
than three years about twenty-three thousand pounds worth of this 
base monev was coined and circulated in Ireland. These coins are 
estimated by Simon not to have been worth more than about one- 
iourth of the value for which they passed ; so that one ponnd of this 
base money was worth only five shillings. 



BREHON FAMILIES. 863 

In the reign of Queen Elizabeth, according to Simon, the ounce of 
silver in England was first divided into sixty pennies, which was in 
ancient times divided into only twenty pennies ; so that one of the 
old silver pennies of the reigns of the Edwards, was equal to three 
pence of the reign of Elizabeth. *'The base money coined by 
Elizabeth being decried in England", says Simon, '' was sent over in 
great quantities into Ireland, where the BungaXsy as they were then 
called, went for six pence, and the broad pieces for twelve pence; but 
in a short time after, the former passed only for two pence, and the 
latter for a croat; and, when they were refused elsewhere, they passed 
in Oonnaught — the first for one x>enny, and the last for two pence." 
Bunn or Bonn was the Irish term applied to various coins, from a groat 
to a shilling; and geal means "white", and the huiigcda above mentioned 
signify ** shillings'* ; the broad piece mentioned was about half a 
erown, but of such base metal that its value was afterwards reduced 
to two pence, and the shilling passed for one penny. About the 
year 1600, money was coined for the service of the army in Ireland, 
so debased that it contained only between two and three ounces of 
silver to nine ounces of brass ; this base money, according to Sir 
John Davies, Fynes Morrison, Camden, and Simon, was sent pver in 
great quantities to pay the army engaged in Ireland against Hugh 
O'N'eill, earl of Tyrone, as the war drew yearly out of England 
upwards of one hundred and sixty thousand pounds sterling. This 
base money, being extensively circulated, caused goods and provisions 
of all kinds to rise double !the usual price, and impoverisnment and 
discontent, not only among the Irish, but in the English army. * 

In the reign of King James the First, proclamations were issued 
ordering the base money of the reign of Queen Elizabeth to pass at 
one fourth its former value ; that is, the shilling for three pence, 
and the six-penny piece for three halfpence ; and, in the same 
reign, it was ordereo. that money should pass current in Ireland at 
one-third more than in England : thus, an English shilling passed for 
4dxteen pence in Ireland ; five shillings, for six and ei^t pence ; 
and a pound was equal to about twen^-six shillings. 

King James the Second, to supply funds for the support of his 
army, and various expenses in Ir^imd, was under the necessity of 
subs^tuting base money for silver; and, according to Simon, set 
np two mints, one in limerick, and the other in Capel-street, 
Dublin, where a vast quantity of base money was coined, consisting 
of halfcrowns, shillings, and sixpences, made of a mixed metaJ of a 
whitish colour, consisting of copper, brass, and tin ; and also some 
pennies made of copper and lead or pewter, and circulating through- 
out the country, as a substitute for silver coin. The various base 
coinages made current in Ireland by the kings and queens of Eng- 
land, and extensively circulated instead of silver money, were, of 
course, extremely injurious to the trade and commerce of the 
country, and greatly impoverished the inhabitants. 



8. BREHON FAMILIES. 
In the " Dissertations" of Charles O'Connor, and in O'Reilly's " Irish 



864 APPENDIX. 

Writers'*, accoants are given of many famous Brehons and cMe I 
jadges who flourished from the first to the eighth eentury, as Sean, 
Moran, Modsn, Conla, Fithil, Facbtna; Sencha, the three brothers 
named Burscbans or Burechans, etc. ; these eminent men formed 
and perfected a great code of laws, which, from their spirit of equity, 
were designated Breithe Neimhidhf signifying " Celestial Judgments *. 
The most renowned of these Brehons, for the justice of his jndg* 
ments was Moran, son of Gairbre-ceann-Caitt, the 101st monarch, 
who reigned in the first century of oar Era , and (see Note, page 48) 
he is represented in his office of chief judge of the hingdnm, as 
wearing on his neck a golden ornament called lodhan Mormn or 
*'Moran's Collar*', which is described in Valiancy's CoUectamea^ 
and this collar was fancifully said to press closely on the neck of 
the wearer, and almost choke him, if he attempted to pronounce an 
unjust judgment. Amongst the chief Brebon families were the fol- 
lowing : — The MacEgans, hereditary Brehons in Connaught, in 
Leinster, and in Ormond ; the O'Dorons, Brehons to the MacMur- 
roghs, kings of Leinster; the MacClancys, of Clare, Brehons t» 
the O'Briens, kings of Thomond, to the Fitzseralds, earls of Des- 
mond, |md other great families in Munster ; the O'Hagans of Tnlla- 
hoge, in Tyrone, Brehons to the O'Neills, princes of Tyrone ; the* 
O'Breslins of Donegal, Brehons to the O'DonneUs, and to the Ma- 
guires, lords of Fermanagh. 

In the Tracts of Sir John Davis, an interesting account is given of 
O'Breslin, the Brehon to Maguire: Sir John, who was attorney- 
general to King James the First, having proceeded to various parts' 
of Ulster, about a.d. 1607, together with the judges and chdnoellor^ 
to hold assizes, on coming to Fermanagh they required to know the- 
tenure by which Maguire held his lands ; and having sent for the 
Brehon, O'Breslin, who was a very feeble old man, he came to the 
camp, and the judges having demanded his Boll, he st first refused 
to show it, but at length on the lord chancellor taking an oath that 
he would return it safe, the old Brehon drew the Roll out of hu» 
bosom, and gnive it to the chancellor. The Irish MS. was well 
written, and, naving been translated for the judges, it was found to 
contain an account of the rents and tributes paid to Maguire, which 
consisted of cattle, com, provisions, hogs, meal, butter, c^. (seet 
Note *, page 174) ; but Davis says he iMt the copy of the roU at 
Dublin. 



9. BRIOANTES. 

Ths learned Bsocter, in his " Glossary of British Antiquities", ami 
many othen are of opinion that the BriganUs were the same as the 
Brigea or Phrygea of Strabo, and other ancient geogrsphers ; and 
originally possessed the country called Phrygia, in Asia Minor, near 
the EuzineSea. These Phrygians, long before the Christian Eza, 
like the Iberians of Asia, a neighbouring nation, sent a colony 



CELTO-SGYTHIANS. 865 

throng^ Thrace to Spain, which settled near the Celtiherians ; and 
their chief city was called by Ptolemy and other Greek geographers, 
Brugantia and Phlaouin Briganiian, by the Bomans FLaoia Brigan- 
tium, and by Orosius and Ortelius Brigantia and Brigantium, which 
iff now the city of *' Corunna," in Galliciay in the north of Spain. 

The Brigantes of Spain are supposed by others to have been 
Phoenicians ; and there was a celebrated Pharos or "watch-tower" 
bmlt, it is said, by the Phoenicians at Brigantia^ or, according to 
Orosius, the tower was erected by the Tyrian Hercules*. This tower 
was called by the Irish writers Tur-Breogain or " The Tower of 
Breogan", and was said to have been built by the famous warrior 
named Breogan, who was king of North Spain, and uncle of Mile- 
sius, a quo the Milesian or Scotic Irish Nation; from this tower the 
aons of Milesius and their followers set sail for Erin. The descen- 
dants of this Breogan were called by the Irish writers Clann-na- 
Breogain — a term latinized Brigantes ; therefore, there is a remark- 
able coincidence between the Irish writers and ancient geographers, 
as to the origin of the Brigantes : the Irish making them a colony 
from Scythia, near the Euxme Sea, who settled in Spain in very 
remote times ; and various seographers considering them to have 
been Phrygians, who were Uelto-Scythians from Asia Minor, also 
near the Euxine sea. The Clann-na-Breogain came to Ireland with 
the Milesians, of whom they were a branch ; and were powerful 
and numerous tribes. 

As to the origin of the Brigantes of Britain, they are considered 
by Dr. O'Connor, and by the learned Spaniard, Florian Bel Campo 
(quoted in the Ogygia Vindicata), to have been originally some of 
the Brigantes of Spain, who fii-st came to Ireland in very remote 
times, and some of whom emigrated thence to Britain ; and Dr. 
O'Connor, in his Eerum Hib, Script, Vet., states that the Brigantes 
of Britain are mentioned by Seneca and other Boman writers, under 
the name of Scoto Brigantes, as being considered of Scotic or Irish 
ori^ : they were also designated by the epithet Ceruleos, from their 
bodies having been painted a blue colour. The Brigantes of Bri- 
tain formed a powenul i>eople in the northern parts of England, 
and possessed the territories now forming the counties of Lancaster, 
York, Cumberland, Westmoreland, and Durham ; and were cele- 
brated for their valour and Ions resistance to the Boman legions. 
The Brigantes of Spain, Irelan<^ and Britain were Celts or Celto- 
Scythians, and spoke a dialect of ihe Celtic language. 



10. CELTO-SCTTHIANS. 

Thv Romans designated as CeUo-Scythia those countries about the 
Euxine sea, including parts of Europe and Asia — ^those territories 
being inhabited by the CeUo-SqfthcRf that is a mixture of Celts and 

* Tyrian ffercuUt : For the Phoenician Heroulea, the reputed founder of Tyre, 
see Note, page 51. 



866 APPENDIX. 

Scythians; and they are mentioned by Plutarch in his life of Marias. 
TheThracaans and the PelassianB (a people of Thrace), who were the 
most ancient inhabitants of Greece, were Celto-Scythians, ; also 
the Iberians who dwelt in Iberia, between the Euxine and Caspian 
seas, were a mixture of Celts and Scythians, and from them were 
descended the Oeorgians and Circassians, and the Caucasian clans, 
who have been always famous for the valour of their men, and 
beauty of their women; and, in modem times, their bravery has been 
conspicuously displayed in their resistance to the Russians. The 
ancient'inhabitants of Italy were chiefly Celts, or a mixture of Celts 
and Scythians. The Cimbrians and Bel^ans, ancient people of 
Germany and Gaul, who sent colonies to Britain in early ages, were 
likewise Cdto-Scythians, and so were the Iberians, Celtiberians, 
and Cantabrians of Spain, and the Brigantes of Spain, Ireland, and 
Britain ; and the Milesian Irish, the Britons, the Picts, and Caledo- 
nians appear to have been all a mixture of Celts and Scythians. 



11. CIMBRIANS AND BRITONS. 

The Cimmerii of the Roman writers, called by the Greeks Kimmeroi^ 
were an ancient people who inhabited the territories near the £uxine 
sea, on the borders of Europe and Asia, about the Cimmerian Bospho- 
rus, called the Pahis Meotis, now the " Sea of Asov." The term 
Cimbriy according to Plutarch, signified " robbers", or, according to 
Mallett, the word " Cimbri ", means warriors or giants ; and 
*' Cimber", in the Gothic and German language signified a robber. 
According to some writers, the Cimbric were a Go^c or Teutonic 
race, but others consider they were originally Celts, and descended 
from the Cimmerians above mentioned ; but becoming mixed with 
the Teutonic tribes of Germany, were afterwards a mixed race of 
Celts and Germans or Celto- Scythians, and their language was a 
compound of the Celtic and Teutonic. 

In very remote ages, according to the " Welsh Triads", in the 
Celtic BesearcJies of Davies, and other ancient records, the " Cymry ", 
who were ^id to have been the first inhabitants of Britain, are 
stated to have come from the east, near Def robani, now Constanti- 
nople, under a chief called Hu Gadaran ; and other colonies of the 
Cymry are stated to have come from Gaul under a chief named 
Prydau, who was the son of Aed Mawr (which is the same as the 
Irish Aodh Mor), or ** Hugh the Great", and from this Prydan the 
country was called Inish Prydain, or ** The Island of Prydan", froni 
whom, it is said, came the name of " Britain" ; but, according to 
Camden, the name was derived from BrU, which in the Celtic and 
Irish signifies "painted", or "vari^ted", as the ancient Britona 

Sainted their bodies ; according to O'Brien, the name was derived 
■om Brit, "painted", and tan, "a territory", signifying "the country 



COBMAC'S PALACE AT TAKA. 367 

of the painted people " ; and according to others, the name was 
derived from Briotan Moot. The Cymri or ancient Britons, who 
were settled in the north of England, were called Oumhrif and gave 
its name to Cumbria or "Cumberland". From these accounts it 
therefore appears that the ancient Britons were diiefly Celts, but 
mixed with the Germans or Teutonic race. 



12. COBMAC'S PALACE AT TARA. 

An account of the palace of the celebrated Cormac Mac Art, mon- 
arch of Ireland in tne third century, is ^ven by various historians. 
It was called Teach Miodhchuarta, signifying either the " House of 
Banquets", or the '* House of Conventions" ; also Teach-na-Laech, 
or the '* House of the Heroes" ; and it was the place in which were 
held the great Fein Teamhrachf or the " Conventions of Tara". In 
its halls tne monarchs ^ave their creat banquets ; and entertained 
the provincial kings, prmces, and chiefs. It is stated that the length 
of tne structure was three hundred feet ; the breadth, fifty cubits 
or about eighty feet ; and the height, tlurty cubits or nearly fifty 
feet. It contained numerous apartments besides the royal bed- 
chamber, and had on it fourteen doors ; and it is stated that there 
were seven other great habitations adjoining the palace. Cormac* 
was the .son of Art, the son of Conn of the Hundred Battles, mon- 
archs of Ireland, of the race of Heremon ; he was one of the most 
celebrated of the Irish kings, for munificence, learning, wisdom, and 
valour ; and the glories of his palace at Tara were, for many ages, 
the theme of the Irish bards. Amongst other splendid articles it 
is mentioned that he had at the royal banquets one hundred and 
fifty massive goblets of pure gold. Cormac's palace was situated 
on the Hill of Tara, and a great part of the circular earthen ram- 
parts, together with a large mound in the centre, still remain. 
The palace is considered to have been built chiefly of wood, from 
the oak forests in ancient times so abundant in Ireland ; and was 
probably in part formed of stone-workt, or a fortress of Cyclo- 
pean architecture, composed of great stones without cement : and 
though few of those stones now remain, they may have been re- 
moved in the course of ages, and placed in other buildings, par- 
ticularly as the hill of Tara was easily accessible. Though this 
royal residence could not be compared with the elesant stone-buil- 
dings of more modem times, yet it was distinguished for all the 
rude magnificence peculiar to those early ages. On the hill of Tara 
were also erected several other raths or fortresses and mounds, as 

* Cormac : As Conn of the Hundred Battles vma the gfrandfather of Cormac, he 
was sometimes called Cormac ** MacCuinn", as well as Cormac MacArt. 

t Statie work : See Note, page 91, as to the art of building with stone and lime 
mortar, at an early period in Ireland. 



868 APPENDIX. 

mentioned by various ancient historians ; amongst those fortresses 
were CatJiair Crqfinn, or ** Grofinn's fortress" —so called from Cro- 
finn, one of the Tuath De Danan queens, and this building was also 
called Tur-Treari'Teamhrach, signifying the "Strong Tower of 
Tara." As the term Cathair was applied only to stone buildings, 
this was probably a fortress of Cyclopean architecture, the stones 
of which may have been removed in the course of time ; and the 
Danans are stated by the old writers to have built fortresses in 
other parts of Ireland, particularly that called AUeach Neid, in 
Tirconnell, situated on a creat hill near Lough Swilly, in the 
county Donegal— and of wis Cyclopean fortress some ruins still 
remain. 

At Tara was also the building called Mur-Ollamhan or the 
" House of the Learned", in which resided the bards, brehons, and 
other learned men ; and likewise Bath-na-Seanadh, which signifies 
either the ** Fort of the Conventions" or of the ** Synods", and 
said to be so called from great meetings held there at different 
times by St. Patrick, St. Adamnan, St. Brendan, and St. Ruad- 
han ; also Hath-na-Iiiogh, or the ** Fortress of the Kings" ; Dwmha- 
na-nOiaU, or the ** Mound of the Hostages", where there was a 
fortress in which the hostages were kept ; and Dumha-na-mHan' 
amuSf signifying the "Mound of the Warlike Women," which was 
probably either a habitation or burial place of those ancient hero- 
mes ; there was likewise a habitation called Cluan-Feart, or the 
" Sacred Retreat", which was the residence of the Vestal Virgins 
or Druidesses. 

There were also habitations at Tara, for the warriors, Druids, 
Brehons, and bards, and also for the provincial kings, princes, and 
chiefs who attended at the great national conventions; and,therefore, 
the place was considered as a city in those times. There are many 
remains of the mounds, raths, and other antiquities still remaining at 
Tara; but many of those mounds and ramparts have been levelled in 
the course of ages. According to the ancient historians, many of the 
kings, queens, and warriors of the early ages were buried at Tara, 
and several sepulchral mounds were tiiere raised to their memory. 
In one of the earthen ramparts at Tara were discovered, A.i>. 1810, 
two of the ornaments called torques ; a sort of golden collar of 
spiral or twisted workmanship, and of a circular form, open at one 
side, worn on the necks of ancient kings and chiefs, and similar to 
those which were worn by the ancient kings and chiefs of Gaul, and 
were called tore in the Celtic languaffe. One of the torques discovered 
at Tara is five feet seven inches in length, and something more than 
twenty-seven ounces in weight, and aU formed of the purest gold ; 
the other torque is beyond twelve ounces in weight, and they form 
some of the most interesting remains of ancient Insh art. 

In the celebrated work cfdled DinaeanchuSt which gives an accoant 
of the origin of the names of remarkable places in ancient Irdand, 
and was composed by Amergin, chief bard to Dermod, monarch of 
Ireland in the sixth century, the origin of the name Teamur is thus 
given : Teph or Tephi, a daughter of Bachtir, king of Brigantia in 



CURBAGH OF KILDABE. 869 

Spain hAving been married to Canthon, king of Britain, died there, 
bat her body was brought back to Spain, and a mur or " mound*' was 
erected to her memory, and called Tepki-mur or the ** Mound of 
Tephi" Tek, daughter of Lughaidh, son of Ith, and queen of Here- 
mon, the first Milesian monarch of Ireland, having seen the mound 
of Tephi, while in Spain, caused a similar mound to be constructed 
when she came to Ireland, as a sepulchral monument for herself; and, 
being buried there, it was called Tea-Mur, signifying ''Tea's Mound", 
and nencewas derived "Tara" or **Temor", latinized "Temora" 
or " Temoria". In after times it was called TeamJiair'na-Biogh, or 
" Tara of the Kings'' ; and Bath Cormaic, or tbe " Fortress of 
Ck>imac". It is also mentioned by old writers under the names of 
Druim AiobJUn and Tulach Aoibhin, signifying the *' Beautiful or 
Delighful, Hill". Kineth O'Hartigan, a <^ebrated bard of the tenth 
century, wrote a poem un Tara, contained in the " Book of Bally- 
mote,*' from which have been translated the following among other 
passages : — 

" It was a famous fortress of wisdom ; 

It was ennobled with warlike chiefs ; 

To be viewed it was a splendid hill. 

During the time of Cormac O'Cuinn (Cormac Mac Art). 

• • • , • • 
" When Cormac was in his grandeur. 

Brilliant and conspicuous was his course ; 
No fortress was found equal to Temor, 
It was the secret of the rodd of life. 

• • • • • . 
"Enlightened was his train of bards, 

Who kept their records in careful order, 
And what they said was respected by the 
Professors in each art. 

• ••••• 
" When Cormac resided at Temor, 

His fame was heard by all the exalted ; 
And a king like the son of Art-Ean-Fhear 
There came not of the men of the world".* 



13. CURRAGH OF KILDARE. 

The Cnrragh of Kildare, celebrated as a race-course, is an extensive 
tract about six miles in length, and two in breadth, containing about 

• World : Bee Note, page 11— 

" Thus shall memory often, in dreama sublime. 

Catch a glimpse of the days that are over ; 
Thus, sigmng, look through the waves of time, 
For the loug-faded glories they coTer," 

—itoore. 



870 APPENDIX. 

five thousand acres ; it is a level or gently undulating plain of sur- 
passing beauty, covered with the most exquisite verdure, and forms 
a more delightful lawn than the hand of art has ever made. 



14. CYCLOPEAN ARCHITECTURE. 

Of that massive rude architecture composed of large stones without 
cement and forming walls and fortresses of immense strength, there 
are many remains in Ireland, resembling the Cyclopean architecture 
of ancient Greece and Etruria : such as the fortresses of AUeadk, in 
Doneeal;and of Dun Aonguis, on one of the Arran Isles, off the coast 
of Galway. At Knockfennell, in Limerick, and Cahir Concree, in 
Kerry, are the remains of Cyclopean fortresses ; similar remains are 
at Cahirdonnell, in the parish of Kilcrohane, county Kerry ; but the 
most remarkable specimen of Cyclopean architecture in Ireland is 
that callad Staigue Fort, situate also in the parish of Kilcrohane, on 
a hiU near the ba^ of Kenmare. It is Duilt of stones, without 
cement, but of admirable architecture, of a circular form ; and the 
internal area about ninety feet in diameter, the walls eighteen feet 
high and thirteen feet thick, a doorway opening to the interior ; on 
the outside a broad and deep fosse surrounds the entire building. 
A full account of ** Staigue Fort", given by Mr. Bland in the year 
1821, may be seen in the 14th volume of the *' Transactions of the 
Royal Irish Academy" ; and there is a model of the fort in the Royal 
Dublin Society House. 

That Ireland has beeti peopled from the most remote ages, there 
exists abundant evidence over the entire country. '^ In every county, 
and almost in every parish are found some memorials, such as 
remains of Cromleacs, Druidical temples, round towers, cairns, 
sepulchral mounds, Cyclopean fortresses, raths, and other antiquities, 
the histories of wluch, and even their traditions, are long lost in the 
night of time. 



15. DANISH REMAINS. 

Thb Northmen erected many fortresses and strongholds for their 
defence in Ireland, one of which of stone, namely " Reginald's 
Tower", still remains at Waterford; and they are considered to 
have constructed many of those circular earthen ramparts com- 
monly called Forts or Danish Raths ; but though they may have 
constructed many of those raths, most of them throughout Ireland 
were erected by the ancient Irish themselves, as fortresses and habi- 
tations, many centuries before the Danes came to Ireland. The 
sepulchral mounds, commonly called ifoofo, have been attribated 

* Country : "The traces of the huslMndnuui's labour," says De Vere, "remain 
on the summit of hills which have not been cultivated within the records d 
t ndition; and the implements with which he toiled have bem found in Uie 
depth of forest or l^g.^^-fiee page 10. 



ENGLISH PALE. 871 

to the Bones ; but these earth works were chiefly constructed by 
the Irish as sepulchres for kin^s and warriors in the Pagan times . 
Ledwich and some other antiquarians have absurdly attributed 
the erection of almost all the ancient stone buildings in Ireland, 
before tiie English invasion, to the Danes, and amonsst other struc- 
tures, they have maintained the al>surd theory, that the Danes 
built the Round Towers and many of the old stone churches ; but, 
instead of building, the Danes more probably destroyed many of the 
Towers, and they demolished many hundreds of the churches. But, 
after their conversion to Christianity, the Danes built a few churches, 
amonjgst others Christ Church and Sfc. Miohan*s, in the city of 
DubUn ; and some in Waterford, Limerick, and Cork. Some of the 
ancient weapons of bronze and iron, bronze pots, and other culinary 
utensils, war trumpets, etc., found in bogs, lakes, and other places, 
are supposed by some to be Danish remains ; but it is much more 
probable that they were mostly Irish. Some of them, no doubt, 
may have been Danish ; but it is very difficult now to determine 
whether those remains are Danish or Irish antiquities. The Danes, 
are traditionally said to have brewed a kind of strong beer ; and to 
have used the tops of the heath as one of the ingredients, probably 
as a substitute for hops. 



16. ENGLISH PALE. 

The term PcUe, signifying a fence or enclosure, was applied to those 
English settlements in Ireland, within which their laws and autho- 
rity prevailed; and the designation ''Pale" appears to have been 
first applied to the English territory about the beginning of the 
fourteenth century. Spencer, in his " View of Ireland *' (written in 
the reign of Queen Elizabeth), speaking of the invasion of Edward 
Bruce, a.d. 1316, says — " he burned and spoiled all the old English 
Pale." The extent of the Pale varied much at different periods, and 
Spencer says again of Bruoe's forces — " they marched forth into the 
Imglidi Psde, which then was chiefly in the north, from the point of 
Dunluce (in the county Antrim), and beyond into Dublin, having in 
the midst ELnockfergus (now ' Carrickfergus'), Belfast, Armagh, and 
Carlin^^ord, which are now the most out-bounds and abandoned 

f laces in the English Pale, and indeed not counted of the English 
'ale at all, for it stretched now no further than Dundalk towards 
the North.** According as the English power extended, so did the 
Pale, and it was considered to comprise at some periods the counties 
of Antrim, Down, part of Armagh, Louth, Meath, Westmeath, 
Dublin, Kildare, King's and Queen's Counties, Carlow, Kilkenny, 
Tipperary, Waterford, Wexford, and part of Wicklow; but in seneral 
the name "Pale" was confined to the counties of Dublm, Louth, 
Meath, and Kildare. 

Campion, in his Chromcle says : " An old distinction there is of 
Ireland into Irish and English Pales, for when the Irish had raised 
continual tumults against the English planted here with the con- 
quest, at last they coursed them into a narrow circuit of certain 



872 APPENDIX. 

shires in Leinster, which the English did choose as the fattest soil, 
most defensible, their proper right, and most open to receive help from 
England ; hereupon it was termed their Pale, ms whereont they- durst 
not peep ; hut now, both within this Pale uncivil Trish and some 
rebels do dwell, and without it countries and cities English are well 
governed.'* It appears that the Ir^h who dwelt 'W ithin the Pale, 
and acknowledged English authority, were considered as subjects, 
had to a certain extent the protection of English laws ; but ail the 
Irish outside the Pale were styled Irish enemieSf not being recog- 
nised as subjects ; while the Anglo-Irish, or Irish of English de- 
scent, who resisted the Government, were termed English rebels, 
being accounted as subjects. 

The native Irish, according to Sir John Davies, being reputed as 
aUens, or rather enemies, it was adjudged no felony to kill a mere 
Irishman in time of peace ; and it appears that if an Englishman 
killed one of the mere Irish, he was only fined a mark. Various 
penal laws against the native Irish were passed in the parliaments 
of the Pale, particularly the " Statute of Kilkenny*', a.d. 1367, in 
the reign of King Edward the Third, which prohibited, under the 
penalty of high treason, any intermarriages, fosterage, or similar 
connexions, between the families of English descent and the native 
Irish ; and imprisonment, fines, and forfeiture of lands and goods 
were inflicted on such English as permitted the Irish to pasture or 
graze their cattle on their lands ; and similar penalties, prohibiting 
the appoiutment or promotion of any of the native Irish to bishops^ 
sees, abbacies, church livingo, or any ecclesiastical preferments ; 
and that any person of the English race speaking the Irish lan- 
guage, or adopting Irish names, dress, customs, or manners, should 
foHeit all their gooids, lands, and tenements ! 

In the reigns of the Henrys and the Edwards, kings of England, 
various other penal laws were passed against the native Irish, to 
compel them to change their names and take English surnames ; to 
give up the use of the Irish language, and speak only English ; to 
adopt the English dress, manners, and customs ; to cut off their 
glibs or flowing locks*, and shave their upper lips at least once a 

* Flowing lockg : Up to the 28th year of the reiffn of Henry VIII., the Irishmen 
in Ireland proudly wore long locks of hair, which was called Coulin [coolin], and 
meant " long fair hair*' ; but an act was then passed restraining the Irish from 
wearing long locks on their beads, or bair on their upper lii)s. That stringent Law 
inspired the composition of the exquiedte Irish song called the Coulin ("cuiifhion": 
Irish, a /air-haired or handwme person)^ which is rendered in Moore's IriA 
Melodiet—** Though the last glimpse of Erin with sorrow I see"; and, for pathos, 
its music is amongst the choicest of all the Irish melodies : 

" To the gloom of some desert or cold rocky shore, 
Where the eye of the stranger can haunt us no more, 
, I will fly wit^ my Coulin^ and think the rough wind 
Less rude than the foes we leare frowning behind. 

*' And rU gase on thy gold hair, 

As graoMul it wreathes, 
And bang o'er thy soft harp. 

As wildly it breathes ; 
Nor dread that the cold-hearted Saxon will tear 
One chord from that harp, or one lock from that hair.** 

— MOOBB. 



FAIRIES. 878 

fortnight— otherwise to be punished as Trish enemies. The Trish 
resisted the relinquishment of their ancient customsi as they were 
extremely partial to wearing long flowing hair and beards on their 
upper lips ; and, notwithstanding these penal enactments, the Irish 
continued for centuries to use only their own language, manners, 
and customs. 



17.— FAIRIES. 

The idea prevalent among the peasantry of Ireland, Great Britain, 
and most of the northern nations of Europe, relative to preternatural 
beings inhabiting woods, mountains and wastes, and denominated 
in the English language FatrieSt originated in the tenets of Poly- 
theism, or the sect of paganism professed by all the ancient inhabi- 
tants of Europe, before the light of the Gospel shone among them. 

Our ancestors, not content with deriving the origin of nature from 
an eternal almighty P»ein^, delegated the works and operations of 
nature to subordinate divinities of different orders and degrees : 
some having immediate intercourse, and ultimately connected, with 
the Divine Being, from whom they thought they originated ; whilst 
others, though far superior to mankind, were only ministering 
spirits to those of higher dignity, In every order and degree, my- 
riads of these spiritual existences were sup{)osed to inhabit all parts 
of the universe ; some, they said, dwelt in the sun, some in the 
moon, and others in the planets and stars ; whilst others again 
were stationed on earth, superintending not only the affairs of man- 
kind, but every animal and vegetable production ; nay. rivers, lakes, 
plains, valleys, rocks and mountains, were under their protection, 
and even the elements were said to have their guardian genii. The 
descriptions given of these aerial beings, in the tracQtions and 
superstitions of the people, are elegant and pleasing. They are 
generally defined blooming in full perfection of youth and beauty, 
enjoying the most elegant and tinished forms, and clothed in loose 
and flowing garments of azure, bins or purple, skirted with sold and 
silver, whSst chaplets of the most beautiful and odoriferous flowers of 
the different seasons, adorn their heads, necks and arms ; and gems, 
which exceeded in brilliance the pellucid drops of early dew, ^ve 
a lustre to their elegant golden tresses. Of these fanciful bSngs 
some were said to sport in living crystal waters, rivers and foun- 
tains ; others presidme over groves, forests and plains, reposed on 
carpets of violets and primroses, in bowers of jessamines, wood- 
bines and roses ; whilst others, furnished with sold plumed wings, 
rode through the regions of the air in cloudy chariots of the most 
splendid hues, where they directed the winds, rain, storms and 
tempests. 

Tnose which were supposed to preside over the forests and vege- 
table productions of the earth, tne Irish and Britons denominated 
Feadh'Jiigh [Fairy], or <' Woodland Divinities." The FairUs were 



874 APPENDIX. 

supposed to hold their habitations under the ground and in the 
booies of trees : to them appertained the care of com, fruit and 
cattle. They were g[enerally favourable to the human race, though 
when, through the ingratitude of mankind, they were injured m 
any of their charges, they frequently notified their resentment on 
several subjects committed to their charge: the springs became 
turbid, the com and fruit blasted, and the cattle sickened and died. 
On which account great care and attention were employed to merit 
the favour of these guardian spirits; and no small degree of hom* 
a^e was paid to them. The ancient Irish generally sacrificed to 
them by pouring a part of what they drank upon the earth ; and 
so firmly did they believe in their existence, that there were persona 
in rural districts called Fairy Doctors, who were supposed to hold 
immediate intercourse with them, and prevented tnem from not 
only injuring the cattle, com and trees, but cured them of such 
diseases as tney were supposed to have inflicted on them. 

These imaginary beings among different nations have various 
names and employments, according to their situation and mode of 
life. Among the northern nations they were called Aafe, Fairies 
and Elves ; with the Greeks, Nomes ; with the Romans, Naiads^ 
Nymphs, SUvanSf Satyrs, etc. ; and in the Hebrew theoloffy they 
make a .considerable department. Whence it is evident that the 
opinion respecting Genii, Fairies, Spectre, and Apparitions, so pre- 
valent amongst most nations, arose from this ancient doctrine.--4Saa« 
kin*s Irish Varieties. 



18. FLIGHT OF THE EARLS. 
{Continued from the first series,) 

After the " flight" and attainder of the Earls of Tyrone and Tir- 
connell, their extensive possessions became forfeited to the Crown ; 
and not only the lands oi the Earls, but those of all the Irish chie& 
and i>roprietors in Ulster were confiscated. The tenants, and people 
of Irish descent were depiived of their lands ; and, according to 
Pynnar, the Swordsmen " were transported into the waste lands d 
Connaughtand Mnnster, where they were dispersed, and not planted 
together in one place"; some of the Irish chiefs got re-grant« from ths 
Crown of small portions of their own hereditary lands. 

Fynes Morrison, who was in Ireland in the tune of the lord deputy 
Mountjoy, having visited the country, a.d. 1618, says: "At this 
time I found the state of Ireland much changed; for, by the fli^tof 
the earls of Tyrone and Tirconnell, with some chiefs of conntnes in 
the North, and the suppression and death of Sir Cahir O'Dogfaerty,* 
their confederate in making new troubles, all the North was 

(yDogherty : See Note, page 167 : where some Incidents In relation to this Sir 
Cahir O'Dogherty art related. 



HESEDITABT OFFICSBS. 875 

poneaaod by new oolonieB of English, but especially of Scots. The 
mere Iriah in the North, and over all Irbland , oontinaed still in 
absolute subjection, being powerful in no part of the kingdom, 
exceptinff only in Gonnaught, where their chief strength was yet 
little to be feiured, if the English Irish had sound hearts to the state.'* 
Thus after a continued contest and fierce wars for four hundred 
and thirty years — ^from the time of Strongbow, comprising the period 
from, A.j>. 1170 to 1600— the reduction of Ireland was ultimately 
effected by England ; and with the heroic struggles of Hu^h O'l^eill, 
and Bed Hugh (VDonnell, terminated the power of tiie Irish princea 
and chiefs, not only in Ulster, but in all . the other provinces, for, 
afterwards, with the exception of the great confederacy of a.d. 1641, 
and the insurrection of 1798, the Sulesian Irish neople made no 
national movement to recover their independence. — Connellan's Four 
MasterSm 



19.— HEREDITARY OFFICERS. 

It has been shown that the office of Bards and Brehons was hered- 
itary in certain families, and so were various other offices, as those 
of j^hysidauB, militaiy commanders, standard-bearers, etc. : thus, 
for mstance, the O'Hickeys and O'CuUenans were hereditary physi- 
cians in Munster ; the O'Cassidys were the physicians of the Ma- 
guire, lords of Fermanagh ; the O'Dunlevys were physicians in 
Donegal ; and the O'Sheils in Westmeath. The O'Hanlons, chiefs 
in Armagh, were hereditary standard-bearers to the kinss of 
Ulster, The AiacSwineys, oi Donegal, the MacDonnells and Mao 
Sheehys, of Antrim, and the MacCaoes, of Cavan, were all famous 
commanders of galloglasses in Ulster, under the O'Neills, O'Don- 
nells, O'Reillys, Magmres, etc. All these fighting tribes were men 
of great strength smd valour, and were also often employed asgallo- 
^asses under the Bourkes of Connaught ; the Fitzgeralds, earls of 
Kildare and Desmond, in Leinster and Munster; and under the 
O'Briens, MacCarthys, and other great families in Munster. The 
MacDermotts, lords of Moyluig, in Roscommon, were hereditary 
marshaiR of Connaught ; and the Macnamaras of Clare were mar- 
shals of Thomond. The O'Malleys, of Mayo, and the O'Flaherty's, 
of Oalway, were admirals of Connaught ; tiie O'Briens, of Amui, in 
Galway, were admirals on that coast ; and the O'Falveys and 
O'DriacoUs were admirals of Desmond. The O'Keeffes, O'Riordans*, 
O'Sullivans, and O'Mahonys of Cork and Kerry, were also military 
commanders of note in Munster. The O'Moores, lords of Leix, were 
in ancient times the marshals and chief military commanders of 
Tteinstw ; the O'MoUoys. of King's county, were standard-bearen 
of LeinBter ; and the MacGreoghagans were marshaU of Meath. 

* (yRiordans : In modem times the simame " Riordan " has been rendoed 
Bitherdan, 



876 APPENDIX. 

The aooonnt of " Brehonism" and *' Timistxy*, gmn in this and 
the first series, has been collected from the " Essay on the Brahon 
Laws'*, by Edward O'Bielly; the '< Annals of tiie Four Maater8*\ 
the works of Ware and Vallanoey, Cox's Hibemia Anglicana, the 
Tracts of Sir John Davis, Spenser's ** View of Ireland", O'Flaherty's 
Ogygiaf the ^'Dissertations" of Charles O'Connor, and other sources. 
It may be mentioned that there are still preserved in the libraiy 
of Trinity College, Dublin, lar^ collections of Irish manuscripts on 
the Brehon Laws ; and there is a valuable glossary on these laws 
contained in the ancient work called the *' Book of Ballymote." 



20. HIBERNIA. 

Julius Caesar, in his account of Britain, thus mentions Ireland : 
"Qua ex parte est Hibemia dimidio minor ut existimatur quam 
Britannia" ; which may be translated thus : — ** On which side (the 
west) lies Ireland, less by half, it is supposed, than Britun." 
Tacitus, in the first century, in his ** Life of Agricola," mentions 
Ireland under the name of Hibemia, and says — "Melius aditus por- 
tusque per commercia et negociatores cocniti " : thus stating that 
its approaches and harbours were better known to commerce and to 
manners than those of Britain. Bv Dioscorides, in the first century 
(as q[noted by O'Flaherty), Ireland was called Htberi ; and in the 
** Itinerary" of Antoninus, quoted in O'Brien's Irish Dictionary, aft 
the word " Eirin," Ireland is called Iberione ; and by St. Patridc, 
in the Latin work called his " Confession" (which is given in vx>L L 
of O'Connor's {Rerum Hibemicarum Scriptores Veteres), Ireland is 
called Hiberione and Htberia, and the people Htberiones and Htberi- 
onacea. We have seen (in the fir^t series) that, in the century 
before the Christian era, Ireland, was first called Hibenua, by 
Julius Caesar ; and the people, Hibemi, By various other Latin 
writers the Irish are called Hiberni and Hibemenses. 



21. INSULA SACRA. 

Ikbland was called bjr several Roman writen^ Iruula Sacra or '*The 
Sacred Island", from its being a celebrated seat of Dmidimi ; and 
this name is considered to have the same signification as the Greek 
term /erne, derived from the Greek Iero8, ** sacred", and Ne8o$^ *' an 
island." Hanno and fiimilco, celebrated Carthaginiaa commanden^ 
made voyages to various countries of Europe some oenturiea bcfare 
the Christian era ; and the record ot their voyages, termed Per^us, 
was deposited by Hanno in the temple of Cronus, at Carthage ; and 
from the Annals of Carthage, in the Punic Language, BofiiB fMus 
Avienus, a Roman poet and geographer, in the fourth 



MEETING OF GRACE O'mALLET AND QUEEN ELIZABETH. S77 

^ extracted an accoant of varions conntries from the ** Periplus " of 

^ Hanno, in which work Britain and IreUmd are mentioned. The 

passage referring to Irebmd is as follows : 

t **Ast hioc duobus in «acram, sic insulctm 

t IHxere prisci, solibna cursus rati est ; 

f Hsec inter undas mnltam cespitem jacit, 

f: Eam^ue late gens Hibemicomm colit, 

] Propmqua versus insala A Ibionom patet. " 

Translated : 

*' But from this place (the SdUy Islands, off the coast of England), 
to the island which the ancients called sacred, is a distance of two 
days* sail ; its land extends widely amidst the waters, and the 
nation of Hibernians extensively inhabit it, and near it lies the 
island of the Albiones (that is Albion or England;." 



22. MEETING OF GRACE O'MALLEY AND QUEEN 

ELIZABETH. 

The meeting of Orcune- Ui-MhaiUe [Grana Wale) or " Grace 
O'Malley" and Elizabeth is a circumstance as singular as it is well 
authenticated, Dressed in the simple costume of her country, with 
her crimson mantle flung across her shoulders, the Irish chieftainess 
approached the stately Tudor, seated on her Throne, surrounded by 
her glittering court ; and, undazzled by the splendour of the scene, 
addressed the Queen of England, lesv as a mistress, than as a sister 
sovereign: 

(F&OM THE Irish.) 

There stands a tower by the Atlantic side— 

A grey old tower, by storm and sea- waves beat — 
Perch'd on a cliff beneath it, yawneth wide 

A loft^ cavern — of yore a fit retreat 

For pirates' galleys ; altho' now, you'll meet 
Noueht but the seal and wild gull ; from that cave 

A liundred steps do upwards lead your feet 
Unto a lonely chamber ! — Bold and brave 
Is he who dunbs that stair, all slippery from the wave. 

I sat there on an evening. In the west, 

Amid the waters, sank the setting sun ; 
While clouds, like parting friends, atx}ut him pre&t. 

Glad in their fleecy garbs, of gold and dun ; 

And silence was around me — save the hum 
Of the lone wild bee, or the curlew's cry. 

And lo ! upon me did a vision come. 
Of her who built that tower, iu days gone by ; 
And in that dream, behold ! I saw a building high. 



878 APPENDIX. 

A stately hall — ^lofty and carved the roof — 

Was deck*d with silken banners fair to see. 
The hangings velvet, from Genoa's woof, 

And wrought with Tudor roses curiously ; 

At its far end did stand a canopy, 
Shading a chair of state, on whicn was seen 
A ladye fair, whose look of majesty, 

Amid a throng, 'yclad in costlv sheen — 
Nobles and gallant knights proclaim her England's Queen. 

The sage Elizabeth ! and by her side 

Were group'd her counsellors, with calm, erave air, 
Burleigh and Walsingham, with others, tried 

In wisdom and in war, and sparkling there. 

Like Summer butterflies, were damsels fair, 
Beautiful and young : behind, a trusty band 

Of stalwart yeomanry, with watchful care, 
The portal guurd, while nigher to it stand 
Usher and page, ready to ape with wiUing hand. 

A Tucket sounds, and lo ! there enters now 
A stranger group, in saffix)n tunics drest : 

A female at their head, whose step and brow 
Herald her rank, and, calm and self possest, 
Onward she came, alone, through England's best. 

With careless look, and bearing free, yet high, 
Tho* Kentle dames their titterings scarce represt. 

Noting her garments as she passed them by ; 

None laughed again who met that stem and flashing eye. 

Restless and dark, its sharp and rapid look 

Show'd a fierce spirit, prone a wrong to feel. 
And quicker to revenge it. As a look. 

That sun-burnt brow did fearless thouffhts reveal ; 

And in her girdle was a skeyne of steel; 
Her crimson mantle, a gold brooch did bind ; 

Her flowing garments reached unto her heel ; 
Her hair — ^part fell in tresses unconfln'ed, 
And part, a silver bodkin did fasten up behind. 

Twas not her garb that caught the gazer's e^e — 
Tho' strange, 'twas rich, and, after its fasmon, ffood — 

But the wild grandeur of her mien — erect and high. 
B^ore the Ibiglish Queen she dauntless stood. 
And none her hearing there could scorn as rude ; 

She seemed as one well used to power — one that hath 
Dominion over man of savage mood. 

And dared the tempest in its midnight wrath, 

And thro' opposing oillows cleft her fearless path. 



MONASTBBIES. d79i 

And courteous greeting Elizabeth then pays, 

And bids her welcome to her English land 
And humble halL Each looked with curious gaze 

Upon the other's face, and felt they stand 

Before a spirit like tiieir own. Her hand 
The stranser raised — and pointing where all pale, 

Thro' the high casement, came the sunlight bland, 
Oilding the scene and group with rich avau ; 
Thus, to the English Sovereign, spoke proud " Grana Wale'* : 

" Queen of the Saxons ! from the distant west 

I come ; from Achill steep and Island Clare*, 
Where the wild eagle builds, 'mid clouds, his nest. 

And ocean flings its billows in the air. 

I oome to greet you in your dwelling fair. 
Led by your fame — lone sitting in my cave, 

In sea-beat Doona — it hath reached me there. 
Theme of the minstrers song ; and then I pave 
My galley to the wind, and crossed the dark green wave. 

" Health to thee, ladye !— let your answer be 

Health to our Irish land ; for evil men 
Do vex her sorely, and have bncklar'd thee 

Abettor of their deeds ; a lyeing train. 

That cheat their mistress for the love of gain, 
And wrong their trust —aught else I little reck. 

Alike to me, the mountam and the glen — 
The castle's rampart or the galley's deck ; 
But thou my country spare — your foot U on Tier neck." 

Thus brief and bold, outspake that lad ve stern, 

And aU stood silent thro' that crowded hall ; 
While proudly glared each proud and manly kern 

Attendant on their mistress. Then courtly all 

EUzabeth replies, and soothing fall 
Her words, and pleasing to the Irish ear — 

Fair promises — ^that sne would soon recall 
Her evu servants. Were these words sincere ? 
That promise kept ? Let Erin answer with a tear I 



23. MONASTERIES. 

In the years 1537, 1538, and 1541, various Acts of Parliament were 
passed for the suppression of religious houses in Ireland, and during 

* Clare : "Clare Itland" and "Achill Island" are off the western coast of the 
county Mayo. Clare Island is stiU in the possession of Sir Samuel O'Malley, 
who Claims to be the lineal descendant of the " O'MaUey" family. At Carrig- 
hooUjf (" tiie castle in the nook or secret place") the tourist is shown an aper^ 
ture nuuie in the sei^wall uf the chamber of Grace O'MaUev, through whicn a 
cable was passed, fastening her galley at one end. And coiled round her bed-post 
at the other ; by this means our Illustrious heroine, who was sometimes called 
the "Dark Lady of Doona", was always ready for any alarm. 



880 APPENDIX. 

the reigns of Henry VIII., Edward VI., and Elizabeth, all the abbeys, 
monasteries, priones, convents, etc., were abolished ; their extensive 
lands and endowments were confiscated and seized by the Crown, 
and the abbey and church lands, and Erenach lands (all of which 
were denominated Termon lands,) were conferred in large grants on 
laymen, chiefly the nobility and gentry of the country. Numerous 
colleges, seminaries, and schools attached to the abbeys, were also 
suppressed, and likewise the hospitals and B'tatachs, The " Biatachs" 
were charitable institutions or houses of hospitality, and are frequently 
mentioned in the course of the Annals of the Four Masters ; the 
name in the Irish is BiadlUach (derived from '* biadh " : Irish, yo(x2, 
and '* teach," a Jiouae, and hence), signifying '* houses of entertain- 
ment" ; and the lands appropriated for i^eir maintenance were 
termed Baile BicLdhtaigh (ansUcised " Ballybetagh"), that is the 
towrUand of the Biatach ; and the name Biatach or Betach*, was 
likewise applied to the keepers of those houses, who were sometimes 
laymen, and sometimes ecclesiastics — ^many of whom are recorded by 
the "Four Masters". These Biatachs were amply endowed with 
crants of lands, cattle, sheep, etc., by the Irish princes and chiefs, 
for the public entertainment of all travellers and strangers; the sick, 
the poor, and indigent. These houses of hospitality were extremely 
numerous in all parts of the country in ancient times ; and it is es- 
timated that there were at least two thousand of them throughout 
Ireland— one or more generaDy in every parish. These houses were 
generally erected at cross-roads, always well supplied with pro- 
visions and meat boiled in large cauldrons ; and supplies of vanons 
kinds were always kept ready cooked for all comers. 

At the Reformation, according to Ware's works, and Archdall's 
Moncuticon, there were in Ireland &ve hundred and sixty-three monas- 
teries of the various orders ; the respective numbers of which are 
separately given by Archdall and Ware. 

The abbots of the following monasteries were mitred abbots, who, 
together with the priors here mentioned (making in all twenty-four) 
sat amonffst the lords, barons, and bishops, as spiritual peers in the 
Irish Paniament, according to Ware and others : The abbot of 
the Cistercian monastery of MeUifont, in the county Louth, the first 
of that order founded in Ireland, in the twelfth century. The abbot 
of the Cistercians of Bective, in Meath. The abbot of tne Cistercians 
of Baltinglass, in Wicklow. The abbot of the Cistercians of Dun- 
brody, in Wexford. The abbot of the Cistercians of Tintem, in 
Wexford. The abbot of the Cistercians of Jerpoint, in Kilkenny. 
The abbot of the Cistercians of Douske, in Kilkenny. The abbot of 
the Cistercians of Tracton, in Cork. The abbot of the Cistercians of 
Monaster-Nenay, in Limerick. The abbot of the Cistercians at Ab- 
ington or Wotheney, in Limerick. The abbot of the Cistercians of 
Holy-Cross, in Tipperary. The abbot of the Cistercians of Monaster- 
£vin, in Kildare. The abbot of the Cistercians of Mary's- Abbey, ia 

*Betagh: This Irish word is the origin of the simames BeaUy, Btattu, and 
Begtagh.'^Bee the "Beatty" pedigree. 



PICTS, CALEDONIANS, AND BELGIANS. 881 

the city of Dublin. The abbot of the Angustinians of St. Thomas 
the Martyr, in Dablin. The prior of the Knights of St. John of 
Jemsaleni, at Kihnainham, in Dublin. The prior of the Augustinians 
of the Holy Trinity or Christ Church, Dublin. The prior of the 
Augustinians of All Saints, in Dublin — ^now Trinity College. The 
prior of the Augustinians of SS. Peter and Paul, of Newtown, near 
Trim, in Meath. The prior of the Augustinan Monastery of the 
Vir^ Mary, at Louth. The prior of the Benedictines of Down- 
patnck, in Down. The prior of the Au^stinians of Great Connall, 
in Kildare. The prior of the Augustimans of Kells, in Kilkenny. 
The prior of the Augustinians of Athassel, in Tipperary. The prior 
of the Augustinians of Rattoo, in Kerry. 



24. PICTS, CALEDONIANS, AND BELGIANS. 

The Picts were caHed by the Irish writers, CruUhnidh, which O'Brien 
considers to be the same as Britneigh or " Britons"; others derive the 
name from Cruit, "a harp" : hence CruUneach the Irish for " Pict", 
also signifies " a harper'*, as they are said to have been celebrated 
harpers. The ancient Britons Are mentioned by Cassar, and other 
Boman writers, as having painted their bodies a blue colour, with 
the juice of a plant callea woad : hence the painted Britons were by 
the Romans called Picti. The Picts or Cruithneans, according to the 
'* Psalter of Cashel", and other ancient annals, came from Thrace, in 
the reign of the Milesian monarch Heremon, and landed at Inver 
Slainge, now the Bay of Wexford, under two chief commanders 
named Gud and Cathluan ; but not being permitted to settle in 
Ireland, they sailed to Albain, or that part of North Britain now 
called "Scotland", their chiefs having been supplied by Heremon with 
wives from among the widows of the Tuath De Danans slain by the 
Milesians in their conquest of Ireland. The Cruithneans became 
possessed t>f North Britain, and founded there the kingdom 
of the Picts, which continued for many centuries, until they were 
conquered, in the ninth century, by Kinneth Mac Alpin, king of the 
Dalriadic Scots or Irish colony iu North Britain; and from that time 
the Scottish kings, of Milesian race, ruled over Scotland. According 
to the Irish writers the Picts, in their first progress to Ireland from 
Thrace, settled a colony in Gaul, and the tribes called Pictones and 
Pictavij in that country, were descended from them ; and they 
gave name to Pictavia or the city of " Poictiers", and the pro\^ince 
of " Poitou" ; and froin these Picts were descended the Vend cans of 
France. The venerable Bede states that the Picts came to Ireland 
from Scythia, or borders of Europe and Asia, and afterwards passed 
into Nortii Britain. It appears that the Picts were Celto-Scythians 
(or a mixture of Celts and other branches of the Scythian family) ; 
and spoke a dialect of the Celtic language. 

The Caledonians^ or first inhabitants of Scotland, are considered 
to have been the same as the Picts, and mixed with Cimbrians (or 



882 APPEKDIX. 

Britons) and some of the Milesian Scots from Ireland. The conntry 
was called hy the Irish Alba or AUtain, and by the Bomans Caii- 
donia. There are various opinions as to the origin of the name 
** Caledonia" : some say it was derived from " Cathluan", the first 
commander of the Ficts ; others consider that the inhabitants were 
called Coilldaoinef from ^^Coill," the Irish for loood, and "daoine^" 
people, as they lived chiefly in the woods — most of the country, in 
those early a^es, being covered with the great Caledonian forest ; 
and from "Coilldaoine the Romans made the Latin name CcUedorua, 
Others consider the name "* Coilldaoine" to be derived from coiU, 
''a wood", and duna, ''fortresses", as the chief habitations and 
strongholds of the people were in the forests. 

The Belgians were called in the Gaulish or Celtic language Bolg, 
and Bolgach, a quo Firbolgs and Fiivolgians ; and by the Roman 
writers Bolgce, Beigce, Belgii. O'Brien, in his Dictionary, considers 
the name to be derived from the Celtic holg, '* a quiver for arrows", 
as they were great archers. The word Bolgach also signifies " cor- 
pulent" : hence others are of opinion that &ey might have derived 
their designation from being stout men of large size ; they were 
celebrated for their bravery, fought with great valour against the 
Romans, and were called by Caesar Fortissirrd Oallorum, or ''the 
most valiant of the Gauls". The Belgians possessed an extensive 
territory, called by the Romans OaMa Belgica ; which comprised 
the northern parts of Gaul or France, and tne country now called 
" Belgium" ; they were divided into many nations or 'bibes, as the 
Farisu, Rheni, Bellovaci, Atrebates, Kervii, Morini, Menapii, etc. 
The Belgians, according to Appian, were a mixed race of Cinune- 
rians and Germans ; owers consider they were a mixture of Gauls 
and Germans, and partly of the same origin as the Cimbrians, of 
whom an account has already been given. The Belgians of Gaol, 
being intermixed with the adjoining Germans, partly adopted their 
language, and hence some have considered they were a Gothic or 
Teutonic race ; but they were chiefly^ Celts or Gaels, and spoke a 
dialect of the Celtic language, but mixed with the German or Tea- 
tonic tongue. The Belgians of Gaul, many centuries before tiie 
Christian era, sent colonies to Britain ; and when Csesar invaded 
Britain they were a powerful people, and possessed the southern 
parts of England, from Suffolk to Devonshire. The following were 
the Chief Belgic tribes in Britain : — ^the CantU, in Kent ; the Tri- 
nobanteSf in Essex and Middlesex ; the Begird and AtrelxUea^ in 
Surrey, Sussex, Hampshire, Berkshire, Wiltshire, and Somerset; 
the Jjurotriges, in Dorsetshire ; and the Damnonii, in Devonshire 
and Cornwall. The capital city of the British Belgians was Venta 
Belgarum, now " Winchester." Colonies of Belgians from Gaol also 
came to Ireland in the early ages. 



25. WARDERSHIF OF SLIGO. 

Thx O'Connors Sligo had extensive possessions in the county Sligo ; 
their influence and authority extended, according to the "Four 



WABDEBSmP OF SLIGO* 883 

Masters,*' from Magh CMne to Ceis Corran, and from the river Moy 
to the bonndary of Brefney. " Moy Ceidne " was the ancient name 
of the plain extending near the Atlantic, from Ballyshannon, in 
Donegal, to Bundrowes, in Leitrim, and, according to Charles 
O'Connor, contained part of Carbury, in Sligo ; and *'Ceis [Keash] 
Corran" is a mountain near Louffh Anrow, in Sliflo, towards the Cur- 
lew mountains, on the borders of Roscommon. The O'Connors for a 
long period held the castle of Slieo, but, generally, in subjection to the 
O'Donnells, princes of Tirconnefl, to whom that castle and the terri- 
tory of Carbury, in Sligo, originallv belonged. The following docu- 
ment, which has been translated from an intercepted Irish MS. on 
vellum, lately in the tower of London, mvea a very curious and 
interesting account of the condition on which the O'Connor Sligo held 
the castle of that town under O'Donnell ; and it illustrates the mode 
of military tenure under the ancient Irish chiefs. This document is 
dated in the year 1539, and runs as follows : — 

** These are the conditions and the agreement on which O'Donnell 
gives the Bardctch, that is, the Wardenship of Slijgo, to Teiffe, son of 
Oathal Oge O'Connor, and on which he accepted it ; viz., that Teige 
should be a trusty and faithful officer to O'Donnell on all occasions, 
against both the English and Irish of the country, and of distant 
parts, and to be counselled by him in every cause, great aud smidl, 
Doth at home and abroad in church and country (or lay and ecclesi- 
astical), and particularly every time that O'Donnell demands Sligo 
from the son of Cathal Oge, he is obli^»d to deliver it to him ; that 
every time O'Donnell proceeds into North Connau^ht, the son of 
Cathal Oge is bound to deliver to him the keys of Sligo, and to give 
him up the town itself (or castle), for the purpose of transacting his 
affairs in North Connaught, every time he demands it ; that should 
O'Donnell be under apprehension that the Enslish or Saxons mi^ht 
take Sligo, he shall receive it from the son of (Jathal Oge, to demolish 
it (the castle), lest it should be taken possession of by the EngUsh, 
or by any others in opposition to O'Donnell, or the son of Cathal 
Ose ; that Teige is bound to go along with the officers and marshals 
of O'Donnell, to every part orNorth Connaught, to enforce the lord- 
ship of O'Donnell; that every time O'Donnell sends Buannaighe (I. e. 
retained soldiers) into North Connaught, Tei^ is bound to support 
them, and not that alone, but to enforce their billeting (or quartenng), 
for the soldiers in every other part of North Connaught, and tluit 
Teige shaU have no other soldiers than those sent to him by O'Donnell 
and such as he will permit him to retain ; that Teige is bound to 
send O'Donnell every provincial king who may oome to Sligo, and 
also every chief of a town throughout Sligo to be sent to O'Donnell, 
and do nothinx^ else but that to which O'Donnell himself shall consent; 
that Teige shall make neither peace nor war with any person far or 
near, in church or country, but with O'Donnell's permission, and to 
be at war with every person whom O'Donnell desires him to be at 
war with ; that O'Donnell shall have the small Tower of Sligo, to 
give it to whomsoever he himself may please of his own peopk, for 
the purpose of transacting in it all his private affairs in North 
Connaught. 



884 APPENDIX. 

Teige gave the Almighty God, in His Divinity and Humanity, as 
an oath and secnrity for the fulfihnent of every thin^ in this engage- 
ment, and pledged himself that God might visit his body with all 
evils in this world, and to have no mercy on his sool at the point of 
death, if he did not fulfil this matter to O'Donnell, and to his hsSam 
after him. 

The security for this covenant on the part of the church is the 
archbishop of Tuam, who is not to allow the benefit of mass, of com* 
munion, of confession, of baptism, of burial in any consecrated grave- 
yard, or the protection (sanctuary) of church or monastery to be given 
to Teige, or any person who would join him should he violate any 
part of this engagement ; and the archbishop is bound, and also every 
ecclesiastic under his jurisdiction, to extinguish the candles of the 
cross (that is, to pronounce excommunication) against Teige and 
every one who joms him, as often as O'Donnell requires them ta 
do so. , 

The sureties in these conditions on behalf of the professional men 
of Ireland, are Connor- Roe Mac Ward, O'Clery, andFergal, the son o£ 
DonaU Roe Mac Ward ; and they themselves, and the professional 
men of Ireland, are bound to satirize Teige, as O'Donnell may re- 
quire it. 

The witnesses to this compact are the guardian (i.e the abbot) of 
Donegal: viz., Roderick MacCormac and the entire of his confra- 
ternity, namely, Torlogh O'Connor, John O'Donnell, Bryan Magrath,. 
and William O'Dwyer ; also, the archbishop of Tuam (Christopher 
Bodekine), the bishop of Raphoe (Edmond O'Gallagher), the abbot., 
of Derry (Cuchonacht O'Firgil or O'Freel), and the dean of Derry. 

The year of our Lord when this indenture was written, in the* 
Monastery of Donegal, was 1539, on the 23rd day of the month of 
June, on the Vigil of St. John the Baptist." 

The following are the signatures of the ecclesiastics who witnessed 
this document, as written in Latin : ** Nos Edmundus, Episcopua 
Bapotensis interfui tempore premissorum ; Ego Abbas Derensis,. 
testis sum omnium prexmssorum ; Ego Frater Rogerus MacCormac^ 
Guardianus de Donegal, cum meo conventu fuimus testes premis- 
sorum omnium ; Ego Shane O'Donnell sum testium premissorum 
nnns ; Ego Frater Terrentius O'Connor, testis interfui premiss. ;. 
I^Decanus Derensis interfui tempore premis." 

The professional men signed as follows, in Irish : " I, Connor Boe^ 
mn in these sureties ; I, O'Clery, am in these sureties ; I, Fergal 
MacWard, am in these sureties." 

In Cox's Hibemia Anglicana it is stated that— " In the year 1585, 
in the government of the lord deputy Sir John Perrott, O'Connor 
Sligo, who had formerly taken a latent for the county of Sligo, at 
the yearly rent of one hundred pounds sterling, did covenant that in 
lien of tlus cess he would pay per annum a fine horse, and one hun- 
dred large fat beeves for three years, and afterwards one hundred 
and thirty beeves annually at Michaelmas, at the castle of Athlone ;, 
and also that he would at all Hostings brinff twenty horse and sixty 
f ooty and maintain them forty days, and woiud pay m money twenty- 



WITCHCRAFT. 885 

five pounda per annum, and that in cases of necessity he should assist 
the queen with all his forces, and that he should make legal estates 
to the freeholders— they paying their proportion of the aforesaid 
contribution ; and the queen granted O'Connor all forfeitures for 
felony or by outlawry, or reco^rnizance, and all waifs, strays, and 
penalties for bloodshed. '* Thus it appears that, at that period, in the 
reign of Queen Elizabeth, the O'Connor SUgo had the cnief authority 
in Sligo ; possessed under the crown the lands of Sligo ; and was 
equal m power to an earl over that county. 



26. WITCHCKAFT. 

The Scandinavians worshipped goddesses called Nomas or I^omies, 
and the FoUes or fatal sisters ; and the doctrine of " witchcraft" 
extensively prevailed amongst them — hence Milton alludes to 
to this subject in his Paradise Lost, when describing Sin and her 
attendant demons : 

'* Nor uglier follow the night-hag when called, 
In secret riding through the air she comes, 
Lured by the smell of infant blood to dance 
With Lapland witches, while the labouring moon 
Eclipses at their charms." 

In the ArUhologia Hibernica for June, 1794, is given a very 
curious account of " Witchcraft*', in Denmark, in the Pagan times, 
taken from the Icelandic Saga, The term applied to witches by 
Danish writers was Stryga^ and it appears that cats were particu- 
larly connected with witchcraft amongst the northern nations : that 
sagacious animal being considered capable of seeing into futurity, 
and hence the skins of cats were worn by witches, and cats and 
witches were always represented as companions. Witches were also 
considered fre<]|uently to change themselves into hares, and thus run 
with ereat rapidity on their mischievous errands ; and there pre- 
vailed a belief amongst the common people in Ireland, that they 
were invulnerable by leaden bullets, and could be shot only by a 
aixpence or other piece of silver, or by a silver ball. The wizards or 
male conjurors were also held in high esteem, particularly in 
Scotland. 

The doctrines of vntchcrafi, sorcery and necromancy, were'probably 
derived from Druidism ; the witches being nearly the same as the 
Druidesses of more ancient days, and hence Bean-draoi, or a " drui- 
dical woman", was also applied to a witch. The other terms applied 
by the Irish were Piseog (commonly pronounced "Pistreoge") 
.signifying witchcraft ; and Easarluigheackt, which also meant witch- 
craft or witchery. Hence Bean-Sa^a/rlutglte, or CaMleach Hasar- 
iuighe, signified " a woman or hag of sorcery" ; magic, sorcery, and 
necromancy were also termed Deamknoireacht, which means ** demon- 
ism." In the Erse or Scottish Gaelic, witchcraft was termed Buid- 
^eacht, Buidsea>chaSf and also Druideacht — ^the latter word signifying 
'* Druidism" ; a witch was also termed Bean-Buidseach, and a 



886 APPENDIX. 

wizard, Draoidh (that is a ** Druid"), and sometimeB Fiosaiche, 
which, meant a ''fortune-teller.*' 

The doctrines of witchcraft, wizards, warlocks, and weiid sisters, 
were very prevalent in former times in Scotland, of which copious 
and very curious accounts are given in Sir Walter Scott's " Letters 
on Witchcraft and Demonology" ; and still more admirable and 
vivid descriptions of witches and their incantations are given in 
Shakspeare's ** Macbeth." 

In Ireland, particularly in Ulster, the belief in witchcraft [exten- 
sively prevailed in former times, and, as stated in the Annals of the 
Four iMasters, an Act against witchcraft was passed in the Irish 
Parliament held at Dublui, a.d. 1585, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. 
The EvU'Eyet called by the Irish Beim-ml (signifying " a stroke of 
the eye"), a belief connected with witchcraft, was in former times 
very prevalent in Ireland^ as well as in Scotland and England ; and 
it was believed that certain wizards, witches, and other evil-minded 
persons had the power of injuring, or even causing the death of 
cattle, horses, and even human beings, especially chUdren, by their 
malignant looks. This belief also extensively prevails amonest tiie 
Turks and Arabs and in various countries of Europe ; in Italy it is 
called Med OccJdo. It was also a superstition amongst the Greeks 
and Romans : by the Greeks it was termed Baskania, and by the 
Romans Fascinatio ; and thus Virgil alludes to it in a passage 
where the shepherd laments that his tender lambs were bewitched : 

" Nescio quis teneros occulus mihi fascinat agnos," 

The doctrines of witchcraft were very prevalent among the Rom* 
ans ; and a famous witch, named Canidia, is celebrated by Borace. 
The term Saga, signifying " a wise woman, or sorceress", was applied 
to a witch in the Latin language ; and in the English the word 
" witch" is derived from the Saxon Wice, which also signifies "wise.'* 

Fairyiam has been much connected with the Danes in Ireland, in 
the traditions of the people ; who consider the Danes to have erected 
the circular earthen ramparts or raths, called /orfo, and that the 
fairies were left there by the Danes to guard their treasures until 
their return to Irehmd, which is expected to take place at some 
future time. The opinion that the Danes erected all the raths it 
erroneous ; for, though they may have built many of them, yet most 
of these ramparts were constructed by the ancient Irish, centuries 
before the Danes came to Ireland. In the traditions of ^e people, 
the Tuath De Danans and Fairyism were connected; ana it is 
probable that, from the similarity of the names, the Danes and 
Danans may have been confounded with each other, and some 
of the raths may have been constructed by the Danans in the early 
ages. The terms SigJie, Sigheog, and Siabhra, were applied by the 
Irish to Fairies : hence came the names Siabhrog, ** a fairy habit* 
ation'* ; Sltutgh-SigJie, " the Fairy host " ; and Bean-Sighe, " a Fairy 
woman." The Fairies were also called by the Iruih Dearnham-AeeUUr, 
signi^ing " Demons of the Air " ; and fre(^uently Daoine-Maithe, 
meanmff " the Good People" — being so denommated for fear of giving 
them offence, and dreadmg their power. 



INDEX. 



PAGE. ] 




PAOB. 


jaAJ'X *• ... ... 


374 




4. Benealese 
6. Chaldee 




Abbey of Caran 


292 






,, Donegal ... 


264 




6. Coptic 




, , Monaatereven . . . 


163 




7. Ghmese 




„ Multifamham ... 


325 




8. Dutch 




„ Bosserk 


339 




9. English 




„ Boss HiU 


341 




10. Ethiopio 

11. French 




„ St. Francis, Ath- 








lone ... 


166 




12. Gaelic (Ancient) 




„ St, Francis, Gal- 






13. GaeUc (Modem) 




way 


309 




14. Greek 




Abbot of Mellif ont 


355 




1$. German 




Aborigines of America ... 


43 




16. Georgian 




Italy 37, 45 




17. Hebrew 




,, Polynesian 






18. Italian 




Islands 


43 




19. Japanese 




Achill Island 


379 




20. lAtin 




Adjuration Bell 


357 




21. Muscovite 




Admirals of Connanght ... 
,, Desmond 


375 




22. Persian 




376 




23. Phoenician 




Adyowsons of Kilmichil ... 


275 




24. Bussian 




AfEimty between the He- 






25. Samaritan 




brew and Irish Languages 


48 




26. Sanscrit. 




Aileach ... ... 


370 




27. Slavonic 




AileachXeid 


368 




28. Spanish 




^vLtMk •.• ... •• 


382 




29. Svriac 

30. Tartarian 




Albain 40, 381 


,382 






Alban ... ••• 


40 




31. Turkish 




Albion ... ... >•• 


40 




32. Welsh 




Albiones 


377 


Alps 


• •• ••• ••• 


295 


Alfred the Great ... 


326 


Ancient Irish Genealogies 


5 


Aliens ... *•• ... 


372 


i» 


Irish Literature 


357 


AUister MacDonald 


44 


»» 




5 


Almerio De Sancto Lau- 




Anglesea 


41 


rentio ... ... ... 


343 


Anglo 


•Irish 


372 


Alphabetical Writing 


50 


Andla 
Wei 


•Saxon Colony in 




Alphabets : 


46 


Eford ... 


358 


No. of Letters in the— 




Annals of ancient Greece 


12 


1. Arabic 




>$ 


Carthage 


376 


2. Armenian 




It 


the Four Masters, 


12, 


3. Burmese 






87,380, 


386 



888 



IND£X. 



PAGE. 

Annaly ... ... ... 351 

Anthologia Hibemica ... 385 

Antoninus ... ... ... 376 

Apparitions 874 

Archbishop Bodekine ... 384 

Archdall's Monasticon 380 

Ardtarmon 280 

Arigna, The River ... 244 

Amulphus De Montgomery 91 

Aryan Parent Tongue ... 44 

Athenry 805 

Baath, contemporary with 

Nimrod 47 

Bacchus 157 

Baile-an-Duin 218 

BaUe-Biadhtaigh 380 

Baile-MacCk>nroi 153 

Balldearg O'Domhnaill ... 266 

Ballybetagh 880 

Bidlynalackin 81 

Bannaffh 230 

Bardach 383 

Bardic Families 358 

Bardoi 360 

Bards 375 

Baritus 359 

Barrator 804 

Baron Jones 844 

Baron of Athenry ... 305 

Connaught ... 309 

Delvin 844 

Navan 843 

Philipstown ... 163 
The Holy Sepul- 
chre 307 

Barons and Earls of '* Insi- 

quin** ... ... 337 

Barons of " Molingare " 

[MuUingar] ... 345 

Barony of Costello ... 343 

„ Gallon 89 

Base Money 363 

Baskaia 386 

Battle of Aughrim 240, 322 

Benburb ... 265 
Boyne ... 129, 298 

Camirge ... 228 

Down 203 



»» 
» 






i> 



» 



if 






PAQK. 

Battle of Finlo 305 

„ Knocktnagh ... 826 

„ Larghys ... 98 

Monastereyen ... 201 

Moysleaghta .*• 292 

Ocha 295 

Togher 305 

Bean-Buidseach 385 

Bean-Draoi 885 

Bean-Easarluighe ... 885 

Bean-Sighe [Benshee] ... 386 

Beautiful Hill 869 

Jseer ... ... ... oil 

Belfast News Letter ... 340 

Belgse 382 

Beiges . 366, 381, 882 

Bel^ 382 

Belgium 382 

Benburb 363 

Benedict 179 

Benevolent Englishmen ... 15 
Betham 6enei3ogioal Col- 
lection ... 3, 281 

Biadtach 142 

Biatachs 880 

Bishop's Court 163 

Blarney Castle 65 

Bog of Allen 361 

Bogs and ancient Forests 862 

Bolgae 382 

Bonn 863 

Book of Ballymote 11, 869, 376 

„ Leacan ... ... 11 

Books of Precepts for Eangs 1 1 

the Druids ... 358 

Bourses 224 

Braccffi 274 

Brass Money 362 

Brawney 145 

Brazil, The Empire of ... 258 

Breacan 274 

Brefhey 383 

Bregia 279 

Brehon Families 363 

Brehonism 376 

Brehon Laws 376 

Brehons 6, 375 

Brenus 213 

Brigantes ... 39, 364^ 865 



INDEX. 



889 



PAOK. 



Brigantia ... 


• •• 


365 


Castle of Street ... 


Brigantiani... ••• 


• •• 


365 


Catherine Bruce ... 


Briges 


• •• 


364 


Catholic Association 


Britain 


366 


,376 


Caucasian Clans ... 


Britain, first inliabitants of 


8 




Britons ... 


366 


,381 


Ceannfinne 


Bronze Pots 


... 


371 


Ceis Corran 


Bnigantia 


... 


365 


Celestial Judgments 


Bungals 


«• . 


363 


Celt and Teuton ... 


Bunn ... ... 


... 


363 


Celtiberians 


Burke's " Landed Gentry '* 


327 


Celtic Language ... 
Celto-Scyth» 


Burt Castle 


... 


167 








Celto-Scythia 


Cadmus, the Phoenician 


• a* 


45 


Celto-Scythians ... 
Celts and Gaels ... 


Cairbre 


... 


84 


Caislean-na-Caillighe 


... 


340 


Ceruleos 


Caisiol 


... 


91 


Chapel of Kilconnell 


Caledonia 


... 


882 


Charlemaone 30^ 
Chailes Martel 


Caledonians 


366, 


381 


Cambrensis Aversus 


... 


244 


Chief Baron Joy ... 


Camden's Britannia 


33, 


,318 


Chief " Boteler" ... 


Campus Cyrunt ... 
Candida Casa 


«•• 


49 


Chief Bufcler 


• •• 


91 


Chief " Paulkiner" 


Canidia 


• • • 


386 


Christ Church, Dublin 


Canis (Jitoniad 


• •• 


173 


Church of Kilmallock 


Cantabrians 


• •• 


866 


Cill-Muire 


Carbria) Notitia ... 


• •• 


84 


Cimbri 


Cam ... ... 


• •* 


132 


Cimbrians ... 


Cam Mac Tail 


• •• 


132 


Cimmerian Bosphoras 


Carrickfergus 


• •• 


371 


Cimmerii ... ... 


Carrighooley 


• ■ • 


379 


Cin-Airt 


Carrighnacurra 


• •• 


85 


Cineal Amhailgaidh 


Carthage 51 


,64, 


376 


„ ^dh 


Cashel 


64,91 


„ Beice ... 


Castle of Athlone ... 


••• 


384 


„ Binne 


,, Blarney ... 


• •• 


65 


„ Counaill ... 


„ Burt 


• • • 


167 


„ Donghaile ... 


„ Crossmolina 


• •• 


170 


„ Eoghain ... 


„ DeArcie ... 


••• 


326 


„ Feareaduighe 


„ Donegal ... 


«•• 


267 


„ mBeice 


,, Donovan... 


••• 


85 




„ Doon 


• • • 


341 


dare Island 


„ Kilbarron 


• •• 


360 


Clanaboy 


„ Kirk 


• •• 


341 


Clanawley 

ClancahiU 


., Ley 


• •• 


329 


„ Malahuffe 


• •• 


334 


Clanmaliere 


„ Pembroke 


• •• 


91 


Clann Armeidh ... 


„ Renyyle ... 


• •• 


341 


„ Artrigh 


„ (Shane's) 


• •• 


287 


,, Benan ... 



PAOK. 

... 328 

... 101 

.. 275 

... 366 

... 280 

... 175 

... 364 

8, 14 

366 

365, 381 

... 365 

... 365 

365,381 

... «$9 

... 365 

... 169 

r, 325, 342 

... 307 

... o4l/ 

... 319 
... 319 

... ddil 

371, 381 
... oS£ 
... 281 

366 

366,381 

. . 366 

366 
... 279 
... 299 

... v4 

... 183 
... 185 

... oo 

... 228 

151, 207 

93,94 

... 366 

... 379 

... 286 

... 299 

84,85 

... 162 

... £tfv 

... 141 
... 141 



890 



INDEX. 



Clann BrMsil 

Cairbre 

Caoiche 

Caroill 

Cathail 

Coleain 

Collft 

Columaiii ... 

Criomhain ... 

Domhnaigh 

Duire 

Eochaidh ... 

Goflfrey 

HcDry 

Imanaigh ... 

Joyce 

na-Breogain 

Rorc 

Shane 

Sineaigh 

Treanaigh ... 
,, TJadhaigh ... 
Clanricarde 
Clanricarde Oge ... 

Olaudian 

Cloaks 

Clonbur 

Cnoc-Ui- Coscraigh 



f9 
t» 
t9 
99 

99 
99 

»> 
»» 



• ■■ 



PAGE. 
... 258 
... 235 
... 144 
... 141 
141, 168 
... 151 
... 151 
180 
141 
217 
209 
223 
292 
196 
141 
340 
365 
247 
272 
299 
316 
257 
310 
309 
13 
274 
341 
220 



... 



••■ 



Commissioners for valuing 

the First Fruits 356 

Commonwealth 328 

Comparative Philology ... 44 

Conmaicne Bheine ... 135 
Constable of the Castle of 

Dublin 356 

Constantinople 366 

Convention of Tara ... 367 

« Cookes of the Cavaliers*' 321 

Coral Bocks 34 

Corca Eachlin 243 

Corca Galen 131 

Corca Luighe ... 84, 105 

Corcamruadh Corc-Oiche 131 

Cork 105 

Connac " Mac Cuinn" ... 367 

Corunna 365 

Coulin 372 

Count De Equilly ... 71 

Countess of Antrim ... 216 



PAGE. 

" Conntrie of Hy-Brecane** 275 
County and Crosses of 

Meath 329 

Cox's Hibeniia Anglkana 384 

Creta 511, 151 

Crofinn's Fortress ... ' ... 368 

Cromwellian Confiscations 351 

Cromwellian Settlement ... 280 

Croom ... ... ... 84 

Crossmolina 170 

Cuircneach 164 

Cumberland 367 

Cumbria ... ... ... 367 

Curragh of Kildare .. 369 

Cyclopean Architecture ... 370 

Cymn 39 



Dal Cairbre 
Dal Fiatach 
Dal Meidhe 
Dalriadic Scots 
Dane 
Danes 

Danish Baths 
Danish Remains 
Danube 
Darby 



... 176 

... 172 

... 132 

>. ... Zol 

■• ... l«fo 

357, 371, 386 

... 370 

... 370 



Dark Lady of Doona 
Dauphin of France 
Dearvox);^ 
De Brotherton 

De Burc 

De Capello ... 



379 
100 
294 
290 
808 
344 



Declaration of American 
Independence ... 78, 281 

De Courcy 173 

De Curio 334 

Defrobani 366 

DeLacy 276,279 

De La Gros 334 

**De-Lege-Dei" 126 

Delvin ... 54 

Demonism 885 

Demons of the Air ... 386 

Dia- Domhnaigh 94 

Dia-Suil .. 94 

Dillon's CouDtry 164 

Dinseanchus 368 

Dionysius 217 



INDEX. 



891 



PAGE. 

Dioscorides 376 

Dispersion of Mankind ... 36 

Disraeli Administration ... 15 

Doomsday Book 319 

Doona 379 

Doonbreeda 281 

Doon Castle 341 

Doon Maolmichiall 243 

Dr. O'Brien, The Right Eev. 7 

Dr. O'Donovan 11 

Dromcat 361 

Druid ... ... ... 386 

Dmidic Judges 48 

Druidism ... 385 

Drum Church, Athlone ... 254 

Duald MacFirbis 358 

Duhallow 63 

Duke of Berwick 317 

Lorraine 344 

Marlborough ... 15 

Normandy ... 318 

Ormonde 320 

Tetuan 268 

Wellington ... 16 

Dun Aonguis 370 

Duthaigh Sheoaigh ... 341 



»» 



It 



tt 



19 



9» 



Eachach Beao 299 

Eachach Mor 299 

Earl of Altamont 238 

Cavan ... 224, 331 

Clancarthy ... 66 
Clanrickard 317, 337 

Desmond 332 

Flanders 336 

Oowran 320 

Grandiaon ... 347 

Howth 343 

Rildare 328 

Louth ... .. 306 

Lucan 317 

Ormonde ... 319, 346 

Thomond 337 

TirconneU ... 265 

Tyrone 347 

Ulster 326 

Westmeath ... 344 
EutU of Tyrone and Tir- 

oonnell 374 



9* 
99 
99 
>> 

>> 
>) 
9» 
9» 



Edenduff Carrick ... 

l^dragoole 

Edward Bruce 371 
Edward O'Bielly ... 
Egyptian Bondaee 
Egyptians ... ° ... 
Eirin 

Elves 

Emerald Isle 

English 

English Invasion ... 
English-Irish 

Language 
Pale 
,, Rebels 
Escheator-General 
Escheator-General of 
X flde ... ... 

Escheator of Leinster 
Evander, the Arcadian 
" Evil Eye*' 



rt 



it 



FAOE. 

.. 287 

.. 225 

, 346, 351 

... 376 

60 

... 51 

... 376 

... 374 

... 304 

... 376 

9,343 

... 374 

... 15 

... 371 

... 372 

366 



the 



356 

356 

45 

386 



Fairies 
Fairy Doctors 
Fairyism ... 
Faley 

Far^ O'Gara 
Fascinatio ... 
Faughart ... 
Feadh-Rigb 
Feine 



373, 374, 386 

.. ... OOO 

•• ... ^f4: 

•. ... 87 

•• ... UOO 

306, 351 

.. ... ojo 

49, 51, 52 



Fenian Warriors of Ireland 360 

Ferdinando 140 

Fergus Mor Mac Earca ... 43 

Fermanagh 346 

Fiachra's Country ... 295 

Fil^ ... ... ... ... 361 

Filea ... ... ... 361 

Fileas 361 

Pilidhe 361 

Firbolgs 382 

Firvolgians ... 382 

" Flight of the Earls" 224, 374 

Floddenfield 372 

Flowin^^ Locks 372 

Fortissimi Gallorum ... 382 

Fort of the Conventions ... 368 

Fortress of Cormac ... 369 

„ of the Kings ... 368 



892 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Forts i 370, 386 

Fortune-teller 386 

Founder of Tyre 366 

Four Masters, The 12, 380, 383 

Four Tribes of Tara ... 180 

Franciscan Friary of Ardfert 335 

„ of Creeveliath 337 

Frederic 140 

Frederick 140 

French Huguenot 340 

Gaels 39, 51 

Gaelic Irish Language 9, 38, 39 
Gaelic Letters, their Names 46 
Gaelic Names in England 

and Wales ... 41, 42 

Gaelic, the Language of 

Eden ... ... ... 44 

G^en 89 

Gallia Belgica 382 

„ Braccata 274 

Gftili Braccati 274 

Galloglasses ... 339, 375 

Gaodhal [Gael] 49 

Garden of Eden 33 

Garonne, The River 36, 93, 

Garumna, The River 36, 93 

Gaul 40, 381 

Gaul, its First Planters ... 37 

Genii 374 

G^orsians 376 

Getima 51 

Giraldus Cambrensis 346, 355 
Gladstone Administration 15 

Glean-ne-Croim 64, 84 

Glen-Nephin 281 

Gortnaclogh 85 

Grace O'Malley 314, 341, 379 

Grsecian Knight 352 

"GranaWale" ... ... 379 

Grand Canal 362 

Great Britain 100 

Great Steward of Lennox 57, 98, 

155 

Grecians. 50 

Guardian of Donegal ... 383 

Habitations, Ancient Irish 41 
Hanno and Himilco ... 376 



it 



9t 






PAGE. 

Harold Harloger 360 

Harp-Groats ^. ... 362 

"Hay- Allen" 101 

Hellespont 36 

Hereditary Lands 374 

Marshals of Con- 
naught ... 375 
Officers ... 375 
Prince of Cool- 

avin 213 

Prince of Tara 281 

Sheriffs ... 352 

Heriot 175 

Hero of Waterloo .. 16 

Hervey De Monte Marisoo 358 

Hiberi 376 

Hiberia 376 

Hiberionaces 376 

Hiberione 376 

Hiberiones 376 

Hibemenses 376 

Hibemi 376 

Hibemia 376 

Hihtrma Anglicana 362, 376, 383 

Hibernians 377 

Holy Land 9S 

Horace ... ... ... 386 

House of Banquets ... 367 

„ Kilmeaden ... 347 

„ the Learned ... 366 

Houses of Entertainment 380 

Hugh De Lacy 190 

Hugh O'NeiU ... 363, 374 

Hy-Mac-Uais 232 

Hy-Orbsen 340 

Iab-Connacht 33S 

larls 360 

Iberians 376 

Iberione ... 376 

Ibh [Iv] Conlua 94 

Ibh Eachach [Iveagh] ... 94 

Ibrickane 275 

leme 376 

Immortal Moore 15 

Inis-an-Bheil 84 

Insula Sacra 376 

Inventor of Letters 45, 49* 

Inver Slainge 381 



INDEX. 



89B 



ft 



rt 



Jt 



i» 



PAGE. 

"lolar" 101 

Ireland 376 

Irish Brigades 322 

Civilization 10 

Enemies ... 372, 373 

Language 372 

Manuscripts.. 376 

„ Orpheus 360 

,, Parliament ... 380, 386 
Iriiahmen in Ireland ... 372 
Israelites ... 51 

tlANE ... ... 

Jeremiah ... ... 

Jewish Genealogies 

fie^vs ... • . 

Joan .•• ... 

Johanna ... ... 

John Baliol 

John De Courcy ... 
John of Bute 
John of Callan 

Joyce's Country 153, 

Julius Csesar 
Justiciary of Ireland 
Justin 

xLBLLS .«• .•• 

Kent ... 

Kilbarron Castle ... 

Killery Bay 

Kilmalnham 

KilmiJlock Dominican 
Monastery 

Kilturra Abbey 

Kimmeroi ... ... 

Kinealarty ... ... 

King Charles the Bold ... 
Connor MacNessa ... 
Conor 0*Conor 
Cormac MacArt II, 



... 337 
... 157 
5 
... 15 
... 337 
... 337 

... vv 

... 346 

... "o 

... 332 

339, 340, 

341, 342 

... 376 

... 343 

.. 177 

..: 80 

40, 41 

... 360 

381, 341 

258, 381 



9> 



»» 



ii 



332 

320 
366 
123 
336 
358 
344 
367, 
369 



Cormac*s Palace at 
Tara ... ... 367 

Dermod MacMurrough 358 

Duncan 98 

Edward III 372 

Edward VI. 362, 380 



PAGE. 

King Henry IL ... 279, 342 
Henry VIII. 362,372,380 
James I. ... ... 363 

James II. ... 317, 363 

of the Isles 218 

Robert Bruce ... 99 

Eoderick O'Conor ... 344 

Kingdom of Cork 103 

Meath 279, 342 

Ulster ... 174 

King's County 126 
Kinneth MacAlpin ... 381 

Knight of the Golden 

Fleece 233 

" Kyry Eleizon" 335 



fi 



Land of Canaan ... 51 

Land Tenan^ 174 

Language of Destiny ... 14 
of our First Parents 44,48 



it 



Lassie 
Latins 
Xjcase ... ... 

Leath Cuinn 
Leath Mogha 

Leibnitz 

Lennox 
Leny 

Lewyllen 

Lhuyd 

limavady 

Linea Antiqua 

Lingua Prisca 

Loam 

Lodge Manuscripts 

Lodse's Peerage ... 

London 

Lord Abbot of Domey 

Baron of Bofin 

Bermingham 

Blayney 

Bnttas 

Collooney 

Darnley 

Delvin 

Deputy Mountjoy 

Firtzmaurice 

Kerry ... 

Monteagle ... 



it 



>» 



• •■ 


99 


• •• 


37 


• •• 


126 


159, 


161 


• •• 


361 


■ • • 


38 


■ ft* 


98 


• •• 


280 


• •« 


338 


«•• 


39 


• • * 


202 


• • a 


3 


• • • 


43 


■ •• 


172 


«•• 


175 


• •• 


347 


• •• 


42 


• • 


335 


• •• 


318 


• •• 


337 


«•• 


331 


• •• 


347 


• • • 


322 


«•• 


100 


• •• 


292 


• •• 


374 


• • • 


335 


• •• 


335 


*•• 


238 



894 



INDEX. 



FAOB. 

Lord O'Conor '» Dun" ... 261 

of Clanbraasil ... 24C 

of Connaoght ... 309 

of Ck>rcavaBcin .. 337 

ofFercall 246 

of Fertnlagh 171 

of laifihowen ... 167 

of Lixnaw ... ... 338 

of Lower Brefney ... 292 

of Mnscry 65 

of O'Connello ... 332 

of Orior 278 

of West Brefney ... 294 

Randolph Churchill 15 

Tirrell 362 

Vifloount Killmaul ... 337 

Visoonnt Mayo ... 311 

Warden of Ireland ... 309 

Lords JustioeB of Ireland 346 

of Leix 375 

of Moylurg 375 



»» 
it 
)) 
>> 
it 
tt 
)> 

99 
tt 
99 
>> 
») 

tt 



tt 



99 



Mac-an-tSban-Ridire ... 
MacArtain's Country 

Macbeth 98, 

MacFinneenduff 

MacKenna of Trough, The 

Mac Mara 

MacPherson's Ossianic 

Poems 
MacRannall Gallda 
MacWilliam lachtar 

„ Uachtar 

Magh-Ceidne 

Magherydeman 

Maghery-Gallen 

Magic ..« ... 

Makhuffe Castle 

Mal-Oeohio 

Manor of Owlpen 

Maolcakh 

Maormorsof Moray 
Marchioness of Antrim ... 
Marquis of Mayo ... 

,, of Waterford ... 
Marshal of Ireland 

,, of Leinster 
Marshals of Meath 
of Thomond 



»» 



333 
122 
386 
86 
331 
339 

358 
136 
309 
309 
383 
345 
343 
385 
334 
386 
327 
127 
254 

287 
311 
347 
346 
375 
375 
375 



FAOK. 

Mathew Arnold 14 

Maurice 205 

Meeting of Grace O'Malley 

and Queen Elizabeth ... 337 
Mel-Kartha ... 51, 64 

Mere Irish 371, 375 

Michael O'CIery 12 

Migrations of the Gaels ... 36 
Milesian or Scotio Nation 43, 365 

Milesian Scots 382 

Milesian Scottish Monarchy 43 

Milesius of Spain 7 

Military Commanders ... 375 

Military Tenure 383 

Mint, in Dublin 363 

„ in Limerick 363 

Mitred Abbots 380 

Moats 370 

Monaghan, The Territory of 263 
Monasteries ... 142, 379 

Monastery of Granard ... 351 

„ of Doneffal ... 383 

„ ofKilmiOlock... 382 

Monasticon Jlibemicum ... 331 

MonasUcon, The 244 

"Moran*s Collar" 364 

Mor Mhaor Leamhna ... 5 

Morogh 275 

Moses 49 

Mound of the Hostages ... 368 

ofTephi 369 

of the Warlike Wo- 
men ... 
Muintir Airt 

Argha 

Creaghain 

Eoluis 

Gillagain ... 

Loin^gh ... 

Tagam 



»> 



It 



)» 



tt 



9t 
»> 
» 



>> 



Muircha 
Muirchu 
Mur 

Naiads 
Nathaniel ... 
Necromancy 
Neheniiah 
NUe, The River 



... 368 

... 279 
131, 132 

... 310 

... 135 

... 136 

... 120 

... 181 

... 276 

... 275 

... 369 



374 
154 
386 
188 
49 



INDEX. 



895 



FACE. 

"Nuiian, Apostle of the Sou- 
thern Picts 91 

l^omads ... ... ... ^1 

Nomes 374 

North Britain 881 

Northern Glanaboy ... 182 

Nymphs ... ... ... 374 



Oak Park 
O'Dnffy of Clontibret, 
O'FarreU'B Country 
Offaly ... 

Office of Arms, The 

Ogygia 

Ogygia Vindioata ... 

O'Hart's Country ... 

O'KeUy's Country 

Oliamh-re-Dan 

Ollamh-re- Seanchas 

Ori^ of the GaelB 

Ossian 



^ * Pacific Continent" 

Pagan JRome 

Pale, The 

Pallia 

Palus Meotis 

** Papist Proprietors'* 

Paradise Lost 

Parliaments of the Pale 

Patent for the County 

Sligo 

Pelasgian 

Pelasgiana 

Pembroke Castle ... 
Penal Enactments 
Penal Laws 
Pepin-le-Bref 

„ le-Gros 

„ le-Vieux 

Periplns 

Periplusof Hanno... 
Phaley 

Pharaoh 

Pharoa 

£heale 

Philip and Mary ... 

PhiIolo|{y 

Phlaonin Brigantion 



The 



321 

331 
... 361 
126, 274 

... u 

... 376 

... 365 

... 280 

... 284 

... 360 

... 361 

... 46 
368 

... 34 

... 13 

371, 372 

... 280 

366 
... 280 
... 380 

372 

384 
44 

366 
91 

373 

372 

307 
306 
306 
376 
377 
274 

49 
365 

84 
362 

14 
365 



of 



FAOE 

Phoene 51 

Phoenice ... ... ... 51 

Phoenicia 61 

Phoenician Hercules, 51, 64, 365 



Phoenicians 

Phry^es 

Physicians ... 

Pictavi 

Pictavia 

Picti 

Pictones 

Picts 

Pillar Towers 

Piseog 



45 

... 9d4 

... 376 
... 381 
... 381 
... 381 
... 381 
366,381 
52 
385 



'* Phintation of Ulster" 224, 331 
Ploughing and Threshing. . . 10 

Poicuers 381 

Poitou 381 

Polynesia 34 

Polytheism 373 

Portumna 3*17 

Power's Country 347 

Pretender, The ... 101, 322 
Ptetender, The Youne ... 101 
Primeval Lanffuage of Man 8 
Prince of Bremi 

of Oregon 

of Tara ... ... 

of Tiroonnell 

„ of Tireragh 

Protectorate of Cromwell 

Psalter of Caahel 

,, of Tara 

Punic Language 

Pyramids of Egypt 



9> 
if 



tt 



294 
174 
279 
383 
322 
281 
381 

11 
377 

35 



QxTXEN Elizabeth 311, 337, 363, 

380, 386 
Queen Elizabeth's Wars in 
Ireland ... ... ... 338 

Mary 362 

of Heremon 369 

of Scots 100 

Victoria 7 

Queen's County 126 

Randalstown 287 

Ranulph ... ... ... 83 

RathAlioU 171 



ft 



tf 



ft 

ft 



896 



INDEX. 



Bath Comuuc 

Bed Hugh O'Donn^U 

Befonnation, The 

Beginald 

Beginald*8 Tower ... 
Benyyle Castle 



PAGK. 

, 369 
. 374 
. 380 
83 
. 370 
, 841 



Bev. Canon U. J. Bourke... 14 

Bichard De Burgo 315 

Bi7er Moy 383 

Bobert Le Dillon 166 

Bobert the Sacaanach ... 165 

BogerDeBigod 820 

BoU of Battle Abbey ... 827 

Bosa Failge 274 

Bound Towers ... 52,371 

Boyal Family, The ... 800 

Bums Festus Avienus ... 877 



Sabini 


*•* ... o/ 


Sacred Island 


•■• ... 376 


Sacred Betreat 


... ... 368 


Sacsanach 


16, 817 


Saga ... 


360, 885, 386 


Samuel 


... ... lUo 


Satyrs 


374 


Saviour's Genealogy, The 5 


Saxon 


••• ••• o72 


Scilly Isles 


••• ••• 377 


Scota 


••• ••• Tt%/ 


Scotland ... 


• • • • • • OO X 



Scoto-Brigantes 365 

Soots 43, 875 

OCUXl '... ... ... vx 

Scythia 381 

Scythian, the Celtic Lan- 
guage ... ... ... 45 

Seanchas 361 

Sea of Asov 366 

Senachies 361 

Seneca ... ... ... 365 

Seneschal of the County 

Wexford 346 

Shane's Castle 287 

Siabhra ... ... ... 386 

Siabhrog 386 

Siege of Clonmel 128 

„ of Donegal Castle ... 267 

„ ofBoxburgh 99 

Sighe ... ... ... 386 

Siffheoff ... ... «.. 386 

SiRrer Pennies 363 






»» 



it 

,, John Davies 
„ John Davis 

tf 



Walter Scott 
„ William Betham 



>» 



99 



PAGE. 

Siol Anmchaidh 233 

Cahesaidh 138 

Dubhghala 183 

Maolniana 273 

Sir Armoric St. Law- 
rence 346 

J. Bernard Burke ... 3 
Cahir O'Dogherty 167, 374 

^ ■ ~ ... 372 

... 376 

„ Boger O'Shaughnessy 337 

Samuel O'Malley ... 379 

... 386 

Simames 9 

Skalds 357 

Sliabh-Ui-Fhloinn... ^. 273 

Slioght Daibhidh .,. .„ 25^ 

Duineaduigh ... 217 

AJT ... ..^ ... X«Sv 

Muirceartaigh ... 152 

Tioboid 85 

Song of Kiltnrra 320 

Sorcery 385 

Spectre 374 

Sraith-na-Luinge 339 

StaigueFort 370 

Standard Bearers ... 375 

„ of Leinster ... 375 

„ of Ulster ... 375 

Statute of Kilkenny 361, 372 

St. Columkille ^ ... 361 

St. Jerome ... ... ... 5 

St. Mary's Abbey, Ardee 343 
St. Michan's Church, 

Dublin ... ... ... 371 

Stone Churches 371 

Stonework 367 

Stowe Missal 127 

St. Patrick 358 

St. Patrick's " Confession" 376 

Strongbow 318, 334, 358, 874 

Strong Tower of Tara ... 368 

Stryga ... ... ... 385 

Surname ... ... ... 9 

Swordsmen 374 

Sylvans 874 



Tacitus 
Tanist Law 
Tanistry 



859, 376 
... 5 
... 376 



INDEX. 



897 



PAGE. 

Tarft ... ... ... 369 

Tara, an ancient City ... 368 

Tara of the Kings 369 

Tea 369 

Teallach Ck)ngeal 190 

Teallach Eoc&udh ... 236 

Tea-Mur 369 

Teamur .... 368 

Tea's Mound 369 

Tegasg High 11 

Temor .. 369 

Temora 369 

Teinoria 369 

Temple of Cronus 376 

Tephi 368 

Tephi-Mur 369 

Termon Lands ... — 380 

Thane of Lochquaber ... 98 

The " Good People" ... 386 

The Great O'Nefll 337 

Theobald " Bottler'' .. 319 

Theobald Walter 319 

Thomas-a-Becket ... 318, 319 

Thomas-an-Apa 332 

Thrace 36, 381 

Three County March ... 300 

Threshing . 10 

Timothy 187 

Tinehinch 281 

Tioboid-na-Caislein ... 339 
Tioboid-na-Luinge 311, 314, 339 

Tir Amhailgaidh 295 

TirFiachra 296 

Tirlogh 0*Carohui 359 

"Tonregee" 278 

Tore 368 

Torques 368 

Tower of Babel ... 48, 49 

„ of Breogan 365 

„ ofSligo 383 

Transactions of the Royal . 

Irish Academy 370 

Treasurer of Ireland ... 346 
Treaty of Limerick 71. 265 

Trinity College 381 

Trouse 274 

Trowse 274 

Tuatha Corca Eachlinn ... 244 

TuathaBatha 271 

Tuath De Danans... 381, 386 



PAGE. 

Tuath Leighe 284 

Tubbercurry 323 

Tuirtre 182 

Turner's " Anglo-Saxons" 360 

"Tuscarora" 34 

Tyrawley 281, 295, 338 

Tyre ... ... ... 61 

Tyrian Hercules 366 

Tyrians 61 



Ui-Cairbre-Adhbha 


... 84 


Ui-Cairbre-Mor ... 


86 


Ui-Fidhgeinte 


... 84 


Ulidia ... 


172, 346 


XJmbri 


... 37 


Urim and Thummim 


... 48 



Valley of Shinar 48, 49 

Yendeans of France ... 381 

Venerable Bede 381 

Vestal Virgins 368 

Vesta of the Pagan Irish 202 

Victoria, Queen 7 

Virgil* ,386 

Viscount Claremorris ... 317 
„ Dunluce ... 216 
„ of Decies ... 347 
Vitality of the Celtic Lan- 
guage 48 

Wardershif op Slioo 264, 382 

Warlocks 386 

Wars of the Holy Land ... 326 

War Trumpets 371 

Watch Tower 366 

Weird Sisters 386 

Welsh Language 39 

Welshmen of Ireland ... 340 

Welsh Triads 366 

White Knight, The ... 332 

Wice 386 

Wiiliamite Confiscations ... 361 
William the Conqueror 308, 318, 

346 

Winchester 382 

Witch 386 

Witchcraft 336 

Witches 386 

Wizards 386 

Woodland Divinities ... 373 

Woody Island 861 

Writ of Sunmions 346 



* Virgil : See Note under O'Fii-gil in the " Index of Simaraes." 



INDEX OF SIRNAMES. 



Aberketht 

Adams 

Agnew 

Asnue 

Alder 

Alexander ... 

Allen 

Ally ... 

Amory 

Anesley 

Aodhan 

Appian 

Archdall 

Amald ... 

Arnold 

Arthur 

Anlaff 

Auliffe 

Barea 

Bagenal 

Bagnall 

Baldwin 

Bale 

Balfe 

Ball ... ..< 

Balwin 

Bannin 

Barnes 

Bamwall ... 

Bamewell ... 

Barre * 

Barrett 

Barry 

Baruet 

Batten 

Beach 

Beamish 



PAGE. 
••• ••• IlZ 

••• ••• iO 

140 

140 

156 
... ... ^^\j 

68, 141, 260, 333 

... ... w4 

... ... ^ «7X 

... ... OO 

176 

... ... UOa 

... ... ooO 

... . ... 172 

14, 172 
... ... i-tHJ 

• •• ... 00 

... • ■ . 00 

... ■«. ^oy 

... 305 

... ... 305 

... ... 26o 

... ... Xott 

110, 235, 313 
... ■•• 336 

... .^ PI 

141, 256 

141, 256, 257 

141, 256 

... ■■■ l-v/ 

137 

303, 354 

103, 104, 105, 114 

••• 255 

... ... £v I 

... ... w § 









PAGE. 


Beattie 


••■V 


• V* 


142, 


380 


Beatty 


• •• 


- ••• 


* 142, 380 


Beauford 


• •• 


«•• 


• •« 


359 


Beck 


• »« 


WW 


••• 


93 


Becket 


••• 


•■•• 


318, 


319 


Bede 


• •• 


• •• 


• »• 


381 


Beecher 


• • • 


• •• 


• •• 


336 


Beimes 


• *-• 


•«• 


• •• 


256 


Bell ... 


«»•- 


v-*» 


••• 


258 


Bennett 


• •• 


• •• 


179, 349 


Beolan 


• •• 


• •• 


143, 


273 


Beresford 


■ • 


• •■• 


«•• 


347 


Bergin 


• •» 


«•• 


126, 


,132 


Bermingham 


• •• 


198, 


305 


Bemes 


•■••■ 


• » • 


• •• 


141 


Berry 


• • • 


•«• 


• •• 


282 


Beta^gh 


• •• 


••• 


••• 


142 


Betham 


• •• 


wmm 


• •• 


3 


Bethune 


• w 


• •• 


• •* 


109 


Beytagh 


»•• 


• •• 


142, 380 


Bingham 


• •• 


• •• 


• •• 


340 


Binney 


• •• 


• •• 


• •• 


185 


Birch 


• •• 


W9 


• •• 


173 


Birtj ... 


• •• 


• •» 


• •• 


112 


Blackie 


• •• 


*«• 


• •* 


14 


Blain 


• *• 


• •• 


• •• 


243 


BUke 


• •• 


• •* 


• •• 


331 


Blake-Foster 


• •• 


• • • 


297 


Blane 




• *• 


• •• 


243 


Blean 




»*• 


• •• 


243 


Blood 




• •• 


• «• 


273 


Blunt 




• *« 


• •• 


193 


Boal 




• »» 


• •« 


235 


Bodekine 




• •• 


• •• 


384 


Boggin 
Boehill 
Bofand 




• •• 


• •• 


282 
148 




• r» 


• •• 


143 


Bole 




• •• 


• •• 


235 


Boneville 




• •• 


• • • 


346 



INDEX OF SIBNAMES. 



899 









PAGE. 






PAGE. 


Boon 


• *■ 


■ • • 


... 265 


Burleigh 


• •• 


.*• ... dfO 


Booth 


• •• 


• •■ 


... 60 


Bum 


• •• 


• •. ... 145 


Bourke 7, 281, 


306, 309, 


311, 316, 


Burnett 


• •• 


. • • ... ^Ov 








341, 375 


Bums 


• •• 


146, 181, 232 


Bourne (see "Burn") 


• v« 


Butler 


129, 


130, 241, 318, 319, 


Bowen 




• •• 


... 266 






346,347 


Bowes 




*•• 


... 192 


Byrne 


*•• 


218, 224 


Boylan 




• •■ 


... 143 


Byron 


• •• 


213, 259 


Boyland 




• •• 


... 143 








Boyle 




• •* 


... 143 


Gahalan 


• •• 


... ... x4i7 


Boys 




• •• 


... 156 


Cahill 


• •• 


116, 133, 141, 170 


Bracken 




• • ■ 


... 274 


Gaine 


• •• 


147, 203 


Brackenridge 


• •• 


... 250 


Cairn 


• •• 


146 


Bradner 


• •• 


• ft* 


... 301 


Cairns 


• •• 


... ... 146 


Bradshaw 


• • • 


• •• 


128, 195 


Caldwell 


• •■ 


150 


Brady 


89, 


144, 241, 


292, 331 


Callaghan 


• • • 


.■• ... /o 


Brain 


••• 


«•• 


213, 259 


Callan 


• •• 


147, 149 


Brangal 


••• 


• •• 


... 176 


Callanan 


• •• 


• •• ••• v/ 


Brannen 


• •• 


• •• 


212, 213 


Callow 


• • • 


1^1 

• •• ••• AvJU 


Brassil 


••• 


• • • 


234, 258 


Camden 


• • • 


... 33, 303, 366 


Braxton 


• • • 


• • • 


... 78 


Campbell 


• •• 


150, 207, 260 


Brazil (see 


1 '^BrassU) 


• •• 


Camphill 


• •• 


150 


Breen 


• •« 


••• 


144, 181 


Campion 


• •• 


157, 371 


Brenham 


• •• 


• •• 


... 145 


Cananan 


« • • 


... ... 14o 


Brennan 


••• 


••• 


213, 249 


Canavan 


• *• 


147 

*• • • *• A^ § 


Breslin 


• •• 


«•• 


145, 181 


Cane 


• •• 


147, 203 


Brett 


• •• 


• • • 


.. 323 


Canning 


■ •• 


148, 178, 185, 813 


Brian 


• •• 


• •• 


... 213 


Cannon 


• •• 


148, 178, 185, 313 


Brien 


• •• 


• •• 


... 213 


Carbery 


• •• 


148, 149, 155, 235 


Bright 


• • * 


■ • ■ 


... 102 


Carbine 


• •■ 


... ... l7o 


Brislane 


• ■ • 


• • • 


... 145 


Carew 


«•• 


... 6,236,334 


Broder 


• •• 


■•• 


... 301 


Carey 


• • • 


235 


Broderick 


• •• 


• •• 


... 301 


Carleton 


*•• 


... ... £ t L. 


Brodie 


• •• 


*• • 


... 147 


Carlin 


• • • 


262 


Brody 


• •• 


• •• 


... 147 


Carlton 


• •• 


147, 149 


Brogan 


■ •• 


• •• 


56 


Camagie 


• •• 


150, 278 


Brooke 


••• 


• •• 


... 359 


Camey 


• *• 


150, 182, 278 


Brown 


• •• 


• •• 


... 238 


Carolan 


• •■ 


146, 262 


Browne 


«•• 


239, 


316, 317 


Carpenter 


• •• 


... ... xl-i 


Browning 


••• 


• ■ • 


... 359 


Carrick 


• • * 


.a. ... XU4r 


Bruce 


• •• 


346, 


351, 371 


Carroll 


• • • 


... ... 1 o 


Bmen 


••• 


• a* 


... 321 


CarroU, of 


Maryland 77, 78 


Bryan 


• •• 


• ■ • 


... 213 


Cartan 


• • • 


... ... 1^« 


Bryant 


••• 


» • • 


... 213 


Carthy 


■ »• 


...65, oo 


Buchanan 


••• 


• •• 


... 203 


Cartie 


• •• 


...64, 65 


Bunting 


• •• 


• •• 


... 359 


Casey 


• «■ 


... ... loo 


Burgess 


• •• 


• •• 


... 93 


Casmn 


• •• 


258 


Burgley 
Burke 


• • 


• • • 


6 


Cassell 


• • « 


• •■ ••• vJL 


3, 307, 309, 316, 337 


Castles 


• •• 


• •• «•• «/<L 



400 



Da>KX OF 



Caolfidd 



CmmUj 

Cayley 

Cecyl 

Cbarkf 

Charleton 

ChjHiey 

Cluwe 

doclieiter 

Chriitiiii 

Church 

Churchill 

CUmchj 

CUmde 

Clancy 

Chure 

CUrfc 

Ckrke 

Cleary 

deary 

Clinch 

Clinton 

Cljrmer 

Coen 

Coffey 

Cogan 

Cogffin 

Coi^ill 

CoghUn 

Coke 

CoUghan 

Colgan 

Coleman 

Colin 

Collin 

Collins 

Colly 

Colman 

Colum 

Colvill 

Colwell 

ColwiU 

Comman 



150 
150,807 i 

••« «•« ••« ZVk 

«## •«• ••• A'^^* 

«•« ••• •»• m0^£0 

♦»» •«« •«« V^ 

«#« »•• ««• ^^ 

149 

«•• ««• mmm m%9^ 

••« ••« «•• # V 

... 168, 175. 204, 287 

m^m ««« «•« AXX 

«•« •«« ••« m^ 

«•• ••• o3f Ivx 

63, 72, 104^ 234 

• •• ••• ••• mn3'%M 

m0» ••# 7o^ ZoO 

«•• ••# ••• ^Ov 

260 
••• «•• 0«5, 104 

.*• «•■ **. JbO£ 

• •• .•• ... .^ 

• •• ••* •«. ^/v 

106, 106, 114 

• •• ••• ••• X v\r 

• •• ••« «•• xOv 

• »* •*• ••• Xt/v 

109 
••■ ••> 14o, lol 

... ••• •• civ 

■•• ••• .•• 04/ 

... ••• ••• hJ%M 

.». 66, 67; 68 
• •• ••• loo 

248, 296 
••• .*• 128 
... ... 160 

• •• ... xOv 
((. ... loU 

• •• ••• O0| 



... 
••* 
*•* 









PA6SL 


^p^ • 


„, 


«•• 


185,282 


Comyn 


... 


• •• 


... 185 


CONB 


... 


•«• 


... 154 


Cooa^ 


mm» 


• •• 


... 231 


Caacamioii 


• •• 


• •• 


... 151 


Congily 


• «• 


• •• 


... 174 


Comicllaii 


• •• 


• •• 


152,241 


Connor 


• •« 


••• 


... 263 


Commlay 


• •• 


• •• 


... 171 


ConoUy 


• •• 


• ■• 


... 174 


Conroy 


• •• 


• •• 


153 


Coniy 


• •• 


• ■• 


... 153 


Convy 


• • • 


• •• 


... 170 


Conway 


• •• 


• •• 


... 179 


Conyngfaam 


• •• 


... 158 


Coqgan 
Cooke 


• •• 


• «• 
• •• 


... 150 
320, 321 


Coolacan 


«•« 


• •• 


llfsl 


Coolagfian 


• •• 


m— 


••• 199 


Cooley 


• •« 


• •• 


... 183 


Cooling 


• •• 


• •• 


... 183 


Coonan 


• •• 


«•• 


... J.«Hk 


Cooney 


• •• 


••• 


156, 259 


Cooper 


• •• 


••« 


321,322 


Corey 


••« 


• •• 


55 


Corgawney ... 


• •• 


... 145 


Cormaok 


• •9 


••• 


89, 282 


Cory... 


• •• 


• •• 


... 55 


Corr ••• 


• •• 


• •• 


... 247 


Corrigan 


• •• 


• •• 


... 1« 


Cony 


• •• 


• •• 


... 235 


CoBgrave 


• •• 


• •• 


... 61 


Costello 


• •• 


• •• 


323,343 


Conlton 


• •• 


••« 


... 260 


Connihan 


• •• 


• •• 


... 158 


Cowan 


• •• 


• •■ 


... 270 


Cowell 


• •• 


••• 


... 150 


Cowhig 


«•• 


••• 


... 105 


Cowley 


• •• 


• •• 


113, 188 


Cox ... 


14. 


144, 362, 376, 384 


Coyle* 


• »• 


... 


... 150 


Coyne 


• •• 


... 


266, 282 


Crabbe 


• •• 


*• . 


... 169 


Craig 


• •• 


•.. 


99, 104, 155 


Crane 


• •• 


... 


... 156 


Crawley 


• t« 


•.. 


... 167 


Creagh 


• •• 


... 


... 169 



* Coyii : Thia name has be«n modemlMd KyU. 



INDEX OF SIBNAMES. 



401 



PAGE. 



Creaghe 


... 


... 


... 169 


Crean 


... 


.•• 


aa. 156 


Cree... 


.•• 


»m9 


aaa 121 


Creeth 


•■• 


aaa 


aa. 237 


Crickard 


•• * 


• a. 


aaa 316 


Crofton 


... 


... 


aaa 238 


Croke 


... 


a.a 


aaa 122 


Crole 


... 


.•• 


... 157 


CroUy 


... 


... 


... 157 


Croly 


... 


• •• 


.aa 157 


Cromwell 


••• 


..a 


348, 352 


Cronan 


.. 


... 


... 176 


Cross 


... 


... 


... 93 


Crowley 


••• 


... 


... 157 


Cruise 


... 


... 


... 93 


Cnirk 


... 


..a 


... 298 


Culhane 


• • • 


.a. 


aaa 55 


Collen 


... 


aaa 


55, 62, 263 


Cully 


... 


a.. 


aaa 183 


Culm 


* .. 


aaa 


... 220 


Camming 


... 


a.. 


aaa 185 


Cummins 


... 


a . . 


... 185 


Cunelvan 


•• 


• m» 


..a 152 


Cunigam 


1 • • 


• •• 


... 158 


Cunigan 


•*. 


• •m 


.. 158 


Cunningham 


...158,260,283 


Cunnivane 


... 


... 


..a 158 


Curry 


• •a 


..a 


55 


Curtain 


... 


a. . 


..a 117 


Curtin 


... 


... 


117, 132 


Cusack 


... 


... 


... 324 


Baloan 


... 


• . 


... 237 


Dalgiel 
Dalian 


... 


• •• 


... 233 


... 


• a. 


... 237 


Dalton 


... 


«•• 


... 325 


Daly... 


... 


... 


... 169 


Dane 


••• 


• •a 


... 116 


Daniel 


. . 


• •• 


... 264 


Danver 


... 


... 


... v4al 


^^^ 


... 


• a* 


290, 326 


D'Arcy 


... 


m»» 


326,326 


Davy 


... 


aaa 


... 252 


Daton 


... 


••• 


... 325 


Datoon 


... 


aaa 


... 325 


Daunt 


... 


aaa 


aa. 326 


Dauntre 


... 


a. • 


... 327 


Davidson 


... 


108, 160, 204 


Davie 


• a. 


••• 


... 256 



Davies 

Davin 

Davine 

Davis 

Davoren 

Dawney 

Day 

Dayly 

De Aliton .aa 

Deane 

De Arcie ... 

De Bourg ... 

De Burgo ... 

De Clancy aaa 

De Clare 

De Courcy aaa 

L^ee aa. .a. 

Deering 
Deevy 
De Fay 
DeFaya ... 
DeFaye ... 
De Fleming... 
De Foe 
De Jong 
De Jorse ... 
De Lacy ..a 
De La Faia..a 
DeLaFay ... 
De La Hunt 
Delahunt .a. 
Delahunty ... 
De Lamare ... 
Delanuire .aa 
Delamore ... 
Delane 
Delaton 
Delion 
Delmore 
De Moleyns 
Dempsey ..a 
Dennehy ... 
Dennesy 
Dennis 
Dennison ... 
Denny 

De Nogent ... 
Dermcdy ... 
Deny 



PAOK. 

113, 152, 256, 360, 363 

... ... ... AOX 

152, 266,"316, 364^ 376 

... ... ol, o3 

aaa ... ... XXO 

••. ... '«'> 171 

aaa ... ..a L^J L 



... 



276, 344, 



... 



• •• 


324 


• •• 


116 


• ■• 


326 


• •• 


307 


«•• 


308 


• • • 


104 


318 


,329 


• •• 


346 


• • • 


79 


«■• 


62 


• •• 


171 


• •• 


329 


-•• 


329 


• •• 


329 


•«• 


147 


• • 


68 


• • • 


316 


338, 


340 


345, 


346 


... 


329 


.8. 


329 


... 


89 


... 


89 


... 


89 


... 


328 


... 


328 


aa. 


328 


a»» 


165 


... 


325 


.aa 


165 


• a. 


328 


... 


251 


.a. 


161 


• .. 


243 


aaa 


243 


... 


217 


... 


217 


aaa 


217 


... 


344 


... 


131 


... 


62 



AA 



402 



INDEX OF 8IBMAMES. 



••• 



••• 



••• 



•■• 



••• 



••• 



De Vsas 

De Vere 

De^in 

Devine 

Devoy 

Dickens 

"Dickney 

Dickson 

Dicson 

Digniun 

DiQane 

Dillon 

Dillune 

Disraeli 

Diver 

Dixon 

Doan 

Docharty 

Dogherty 

Donerty 

Dolan 

Donacar 

Donaghdr ... 

Donaldson ... 

Donegan 

DoDgan 

Donlan 

Donlevy 

Donneltan .. 

Donnelly 

Donoghue .. 

Donovan 

Doody 

Dooher 

Doolan 

Dooley 

Dooner 

Doran 

Dorcy 

Dore-Blake ... 

Dougherty ... 

Dowd 

Dowley 

Downes 

Downing (see " 

Dowse 

Doyne 

Drew 

Dnaine 



•*. 



•*• 



PAGE. 

«•• ... ooz 

18, 370 

... ... 161 

161, 283 
171 

... ... ^JsTl 

a ■ • ... Jt£ § 

316, 361 

316, 351 

163, 164 

... ... Xoo 

164, 165, 166, 224 
... ... 165 

15 

... 176, 283 

193, 316 351 

... ... 56 

... ... 166 

... ... 166 

... ... xOO 

... ... JdO § 

... ... Z40 

245 

... ... O04 

... ... 206 

... ... ^Uo 

... ... 168 

146*,"l68, 169, 183 

143, 154, 156, 170 

80, 217 

68, 82 

... ... zo«l 

••• ... 185 

... ... JL f X 

171 

... ... i^4D 

... ... ZIiJ 

... ... O^O 

110 

... ... 166 

... ... ^o«f 

171 
669 336 
O'Dmneen'*) 

... ... So4 

... ... A / % 

... ... o4«l 

• •• ... 00 



Duana 

Duane 

Ducket 

Dudgeon 

DuflF ... 

Duffany 

DuflFe 

Dufl&y 

Dugan 

Duigenan 

Dulen 

Dun ... 

Duncan 

Dunechy 

Dunkin 

Dunleavy 

Dunlevy 

Dunn 

Dunne 

Dunsford 

Durkin 

Dwain 

Dwyer 

Dygenam 

Dygenan 

Dyke 



129, 



FAOK. 

I . . ... o«f 

56 

... ... O^J 

.•* •*• «f\J 

... ... 'X / X 

••• .*• xO«f 

171 

185, 277 
... ... llo 

164, 241 

... ... JL / X 

••. ... X I % 

118, 119, 137, 171 

... ... l«u 

171 

... ... JL § Am 

... ... £o\j 

... ... 17« 

174. 176 
162, 174 

110 

57, 72 

... 56 

175, 176, 209, 270 

164 

164 

... ... 183 



Earc (see "MacEarc'') 

Eardley 

Early 

Edmonds ... 
Eklmundson 

Edwards 

Egan 

EUery 

Emerson 
Empson ... 

English 

Evans 



PAaAN 

Fallrener 

Fallon 

Fallone 

Falloone 

FaUs... 

Fanning 

Faraday 

Faraher 



••• 
... 
... 



••• 



... 168 

... 168 

.. 176 

... 176 

.. 176 

... 177 

.. 78 

... 219 

>.. 0O9 

... 317 

.. 360 

.. 276 

.. 350 

.. 177 

.. 177 

.. 177 

.. 859 

.. 207 

.. 247 



INDEX OF 8IBNAMES. 



403 



PAOB. 

Farrell ' 349 

Farrelly 254 

Farley 254 

Faulkner (see " Falkener'') 

Fay 225, 329 

Feehan 178, 209 

Feely 179 

Feeny ... .« ... 261 

Felan, 179 

Fenton (see " Finton*') 



Ferdinand 


••• 


• •• 


... 140 


Ferguson 


... 


• •• 


... 233 


Ferrar 


... 


• •• 


... 219 


Fiachry 


... 


• •• 


... 219 


Fian... 


... 


• •• 


,.a 178 


Field 


.». 


• •• 


179, 336 


Fielden 


■•• 


• •• 


... 179 


Fielding 


... 


• •• 


... 179 


Fihilly 


•.. 


105, 


147, 179 


Finaghty 


... 


• • • 


179, 249 


Finn... 


a*. 


• •• 


... 252 


Finnegan 


... 


• •• 


... 246 


Finton 


... 


• •• 


... 254 


FitzAnthony 


«• • 


.. 332 


Fitzgerald 


71 


. 86, 128, 239, 334 


Fitzgibbon 


... 


... 


... 332 


Fitzharris 


• •• 


... 


... 197 


Fitzhenry 


... 


... 


... 196 


Fitzmaurice 


••• 


... oiyt 


Fitz Merry 


■■• 


••• 


... 199 


Fitzpatrick 


... 


•.• 


... 180 


Fitzwalter 


... 


••• 


... 318 


FitzwiUian 


L... 


••• 


... 316 


Flattery 


... 53 


Flanagan 


• •« 


... 54> 146, 168 


Flannagan 


• • 


... 


... 54 


Fleming 


• •• 


... 


... 147 


Flinn 


• •• 


•• 


54, 182 


Flood 


• • • 


... 


... 72 


Floyof 


• • 


.*• 


... 78 


Flynn 


• •• 


•»• Oy, 


182, 273 


Fogarty 


• •• 


... 


146, 180 


Forbes 


• •• 


••• 


... 117 


1 Forristal 


• •• 


• •a 


... 282 


Fox ... 

1 "r^i 1 


• •• 


144,163 


, 181, 283 

4 ^VA* 


' Franks 


• •• 


..a 


... 196 



PAGE. 

Frazer 108 

Freely 254 

Freeman* (see " Maclntyre") 

French 336 

Fulton 295 

Fyans 178 

Fynes 178 



Gagahan ... 

Gahan ... 

Gaidoz 

Galchor 

v^aie... •■• 

Gallagher ... 

Galvy 

Galwey 

Gannon 

Garland 

Garratt ... 

Garrett •• • 

Garrick 

Gartlan 

Gartland ... 

Garuly 

Garviiy 

Gaskin 

Garvey 

Gavaluui ... 

Gavala 

Gavan 

Gawley 

Gaynor 

Gealan 

Geary 

Geddes 

Geoghagan .«. 

Ger^ghty ... 

Gerrard 

Gerry 

Gerty 

Gibbons 

Gibbs 

Giblan 

Gilbert 

Gilbey 

Gilboy 

Gilbride 



• •• 


a.. 


219 


• • 


... 


219 


• • • 


... 


14 


• »• 


... 


183 


• •• 


... 


241 


• »« 


... 


183 


•'•• 


«... 


297 


• •« 


... 


297 


• ■ • 


178, 


282 


• •« 


... 


149 


• •• 


... 


186 


• •• 


... 


186 


• ■ • 


... 


104 


• •• 


... 


149 


• •• 


... 


149 


• •• 


.. . 


184 


• •• 


• • » 


184 


• •• 


... 


374 


184, 185, 


235, 277 


. • 


••• 


186 


... 


• ■• 


186 


... 


170, 186 


... 


186, 


299 


... 


... 


238 


... 


... 


236 


... 


... 


87 


... 


... 


14 


... 


... 


219 


.a 


186, 282 


a. a 


... 


334 


... 


...78, 87 


••• 


... 


186 


www 


... 


316 


m»a 


aa. 


110 


... 


... 


182 


••• 


... 


273 


... 


... 


297 


■ . . 


... 


297 


a.a 


... 


208 



* Freeman.- Thia is another anglicised form of the Irish Mac-€tn-tSaoir. 



404 



INDEX OF SIBNAIIES. 









PAOE. 




Gilchriest 


«•• 


• • • 


138, 250 


Guthrie 


Gildea 


• •• 


• •• 


... 138 


Gwinnett ... 


Gilduff 


• • • 


••• 


... 222 




Gilfinan 


• • • 


• •• 


... 270 


Hackkit ... 


Gilkelly 


• •• 


• • • 


187, 260 


Hadsor 


GUI ... 


••• 


• • • 


... 297 


Hairt ... 


CiUan 


••• 


••• 


... 236 


Hairtt 


GiUard 


••• 


• •• 


... 247 


Hairtte 


Gmaspy 


• •• 


••• 


... 276 


Haiz... 


GiUeran 


• •• 


• •« 


... 247 


Halahan 


Gillesby 


• •• 


• •• 


... 276 


Hale ... 


Gillespy 


••• 


••- 


... 276 


Halegan 


GiUic 


••• 


• •• 


... 187 


Hall ... 


Gilligan 


••• 


• •• 


... 135 


Halligan 


GiUy 


• •• 


••• 


... 187 


Halloran ... 


Gilmore 


• •• 


• •• 


... 137 


Hamilton ... 


Gilroy 


«•• 


• • • 


... 187 


Hampson (See 


Ginty 


• •• 


••• 


... 203 


Hanibling ... 


Given 


• •• 


••• 


... 250 


Hanlon 


Gladstone 


• •• 


••• 


... 16 


Hanly 


Glenn 


• • 


• •• 


... 64 


Hanna 


Glynn 


• •• 


• •• 


... 64 


Hanny 


Goff ... 


• •• 


• •• 


... 299 


Hanraghan... 


Good 


• •• 


• •• 


... 90 


Hardies 


Goold 


■ •• 


••• 


... "o 


Hardiman ... 


Gooley 


• •• 


• •• 


... 186 


Harding 


Gore... 


••• 


• •• 


230, 294 


Hardis 


Gorman 


• •• 


• •• 


129, 274 


Hardts 


Gormley 


• •• 


••• 


167, 187 


Hardy 


Gosling 


• •• 


••• 


... 351 


Haivadan ... 
Harley 


Gouffh 
Goulding 


• • • 


• • • 


... 299 


• •• 


••• 


... 241 


Harraghtan... 


Gowley 


• •• 


• • • 


... 186 


Harrington ... 


Grace 


• •• 


••• 


... 334 


Hams ... 


Graham 


• •• 


••• 


156, 353 


Harrison 


Grant 


••• 


••• 


146,146 


Hart 78, 167, 


Cray 


«•• 


• •• 


... 360 




Gregan 


• •• 


• •« 


... 203 


Hartan 


Gregory 


• • • 


••• 


... 110 


Hart-Dyke ... 


Grey... 
Griffith 


• •• 


••• 


... 291 


Harte 


• •• 


••• 


... 225 


Hartigan ... 


Grimaldi 


• • • 


••• 


7 


Hartt 


Grimley 


••• 


• •• 


157, 187 


Hartte 


Grogan 
Guc^eon 


• ■• 


••• 


... 203 


Harts ... 


• •• 


••• 


... vU 


Hartz 


Guest 


••• 


••« 


... 7 


Harvey 


Guinness 


• •• 


119, 121 


, 122, 124 


Hawell 


Gunning 


••• 


•• • 


... 154 


jiiay ... ..• 


Gurry 


• •■ 


• •• 


••• •^Wi 


Hayes 



PAGE. 

... ... i>v/ 

... ... |0 

• .. ... Xdv 

... ... D 

... ... JL vv 

190, 280 

... ... J.9v 

201 

... ... JLW 

... ... m£l. 

... ... l.t/v 

... 67, 58 

... ... Xo«f 

... ... XiJM 

57, 240 
" Empson ") 

258, 277 
... loo, i9o 

... ... XOs 

... ... Xty% 

69, 189 

... ... X«Rf 

280, 309, 359 
355 

... ... X«rU 

... ... XtTvf 

... ... 'vi 

... ... -lOvf 

72 
171, 189 

... ... XOv 

... ... Xtf/ 

78, 197 

190, 192, 196, 279 

280, 282 

... ... oo 

... ... Xvv 

190, 191, 196, 365 

... ... oo 

... ... Xf^M 

... ... XSfv 

... ... X^fv 

... ... A,\J\3 

... ... Mfd 

... ... XOv 

72, 201 
... 68, 195, 201 



INDEX OF SIBNAMES. 



405 







PAGE. 








PAGE. 


Heenan 


• •• 




14 £ 


Hope 




• •• 


... 164 


Hefferan 


• •• 




60 


Hopkins 




• •• 


... 78 


Heffeman ... 


*•• 




60 


Hopkinson 




• •• 


... 78 


Hellis 


• •• 




318 


Home 




• •• 


... 193 


Hemphill ... 


• •• 




150 


Hort... 




• •• 


... 190 


Henaghan ... 


• •• 




56 


Houlaghan 




• •• 


... 199 


Henderson ... 


• •• 




112 


Hoiila^hane 


• •• 


... 199 


Henenan ... 


• •• 




105 


Houlahan 


••• 


••« 


... 199 


• •* 




56 


Houston 


••• 


• •• 


... 222 


Henlon 


• •• 




277 


Howard 


••• 


••• 


219,290 


Henly 


• •• 




188 


Howlegan 


• •• 


• •• 


... 199 


Henry 166, 


196, 197, 


203, 


250, 


Hubbord 


• •• 


• •• 


... 316 


w ' 






323 


Hubbort 


• •• 


• •• 


... 316 


Herbert 


...328, 331 


,336 


Hudson 


••• 


•.«» 


... 222 


Herdts 


• •• 


• •■ 


190 


Hughes 


••• 


a«« 


201, 222 


Herlihy 


• •• 


• •• 


72 


Huffhson 
Halegan 


• •• 


••• 


... 222 


Hervey 


• •• 


*• • 


235 


• •• 


• •• 


... 199 


Hewes 


• •• 


78, 


,201 


Hull... 


• •• 


• •• 


... 242 


Hewett 


• •• 


• •• 


110 


Humphrey 


• •• 


••• 


... ISl 


HewBon 


• •• 


••• 


222 


Hunt 


••• 


••• 


... o«f 


Hewston 


• •• 


• •• 


222 


Huntingdon 
Huolaghane 


••• 


... 78 


Heyfron 


••• 


• •* 


60 


• •• 


... 199 


Heyne 


••• 


• •• 


202 


Hurlihy 


• •• 


• • • 


... 67 


Hickey 


• •• 


60,7 


2,97 


Hurly 


• •• 


••• 


... 72 


Hicks 


• •• 


• •• 


60 


Hutchins 


• •• 


• •• 


... 112 


Hickaon 


• •• 


• •• 


60 


Hynds 


• •• 


• •• 


... 202 


Higgin 


*•• 


• •• 


197 


Hynes 


• •• 


• •• 


202,260 


Higgins 197, 


198, 201, 


220, 


222, 
















245 


Irvine 


• •• 


• •• 


... 163 


Higginson ... 
HiB 


••• 


• •• 


197 


Irving 


• •• 


• •• 


... 153 


«•• 


• •• 


U3 


Irwin 


• •• 


• •• 


153, 328 


Hinds 


• •• 


• •• 


202 


Irwine 


• •• 


• •• 


... 321 


Hine... 


• •• 


• •• 


202 


Iver ... 


• •• 


• •• 


... 219 


Hinnegan ... 


• •■ 


• •• 


56 


Ivir ... 


• •• 


• •• 


... 219 


Hoban 


«•• 


• •• 


257 


Ivor ... 


• •■ 


• •• 


... 219 


Hobard ... 


• •• 


• •• 


:{16 










Hoffan 
Holahan ... 


• •• 


• •• 


61 


Jacks 


• •• 


• •• 


... 272 


••• 


• •• 


199 


Jefferson 


• •• 


• •• 


... 78 


Holdson 


• •• 


• •• 


222 


Jenkins 


• •• 


••■ 


... 156 


Holghane ... 
Holhane 


• •• 


• •• 


199 


Jenner 


• •« 


• •• 


... 193 


• •• 


• *• 


199 


Jennings 


• •• 


• •• 


... 316 


Holighan ... 


• •• 


«»• 


199 


Jervois 


• •• 


• •• 


... 349 


Holland ... 


• •• 


• •• 


199 


Joes ... 


• •• 


• •• 


... 340 


Holligan ... 


• •• 


• •• 


199 


Johns 


• •• 


• •• 


... 272 


Holmes 


• •• 


• •■ 


353 


Johnson 


• •• 


195, 


289, 381 


Hooke 


••• 


• •• 


56 


Johnston 


• •• 


• •• 


241, 289 


Hoolaghan ... 


• •• 


■ •• 


199 


Johntsone 


«•• 


• •• 


... 289 


Hoolaghane 
Hoolahan ... 


• •• 


• •• 


199 


Joiner 


• •• 


• •• 


... 117 


• •• 


199 


,234 


Jones 


• •• 


322. 

• 


334, 360 



406 



.IXDEX OF SIRXAXE8. 









PAGE. 


r 






PACK. 


Jonff... 
Joraiui 


•«• 


«•• 


... 316 


Kilbride 


••• 


••• 


... 2K 


••• 


«»« 


a.. 117 


Kfldnff 


••• 


«•« 


... 222 


Joney 


•«« 


••• 


..a 340 


Kilganiff 
Kilkdly 


••« 


••• 


... 61 


Joae... 


— * 


«»• 


... VXV 


••• 


*«« 


... 187 


JoMe 


»•* 


M* 


... 340 


Kflleen 


••• 


•«« 


... 54 


Joardjui 


«*« 


««« 


... 117 


KiUpatrick.^ 


• • « 


... 123 


Joy ... 


«•« 


• •• 


338,340 


KQioy 


••• 


• «« 


187, 282 


Joyce 


••« 


»«• 


338.340 


yinfthmn 


• 


«* « 


... 182 


Joyes 


«•• 


• •• 


... 940 


King... 


««* 


«•• 


153,238 


Judge 


••• 


• •* 


... 117 


Kinidey 
KinlfOiiyi 


••• 
••* 




... 209 

aa. 182 


Kane 


«•* 


147, 903, 262 


Kinaela 


««• 


••• 


... 209 


jgimvaoBgfi 


• ■V 


160, 


,204,224 


Kinsley 


•«• 


••« 


... 209 


K»ye 


••• 


... 


... 144 


Kirby 


*«• 


•*« 


... 336 


Kftyes 


«•• 


••« 


... 144 


Kyle (see 


"Coyle") 




Kean 


«■• 


•a. 


... 78 










Keane 


■ •• 


203, 205. 283, 354 


Lact 


mmm 


,,, 


... 342 


Kearin 


••• 


a*. 


... 146 


Lafiaa 


• •• 


•*• 


... 120 


Kearins 


««« 


... 


... 146 


Lahy 


••• 


«•• 


... 231 


Kearney 


• •« 


... 


150, 282 


Lake... 


••« 


«•• 


... 157 


Kearna 


• *v 


••* 


... 146 


LaUy 


«•• 


••• 


... 254 


Keating 


••• 


... 6j 


334, 362 


Lalor 


• •• 


• •• 


120, 210 


A.ee ... 


••• 


.•■ 


... 144 


Lamb 


••• 


•«• 


188,353 


Keeffe 


• •• 


«•• 


... 92 


Lambe 


••• 


««• 


... 188 


Keely 


••• 


.•• 


...62, 82 


Lambert 


••• 


*•• 


... 167 


Keen 


••• 


.». 


... 203 


Lane... 


••« 


•«» 


59,209 


Keenan 


• •• 


... 


... 206 


Laney 


•*• 


mmm 


59,209 


Kehoe 


»0m 


•*• 


... 223 


T/ftngi^-n 


••• 


••• 


... 211 


Keily 


• •• 


... 


... 62 


fiangham 


• •« 


«•• 


... 211 


KeUy 


• •« 


... 


206,223 


Langton 


••« 


■•• 


... 291 


Kelso 


• •• 


... 


... ooo 


Lannen 


»•• 


• •• 


... 141 


Kennedy 


• •• 


... 


62.330 


Larkin 


••• 


• •• 


209,210 


Kenny 
Keogh 


«•• 


... 


234,299 


Larmonr 


• •• 


• •• 


..a 210 


• •• 


... 


... 206 


Lander 


• •• 


• •• 


... 116 


Keon 


• •• 


•*. 


... 256 


Lanrie 


«•• 


• •• 


111, 161 


Keongh 


• •• 


... 


... 223 


Lavan 


• •• 


• •• 


.. 210 


Keown 


• •• 


... 


... 255 


Lawless 


• •• 


«•« 


... 156 


Ker ... 


• •• 


... 


238, 239 


Lawlor 


••• 


• •• 


120, 210 


Kerans 


• •• 


... 


... 146 


Lawrence 


• •• 


• •• 


... 118 


Kerin 


• •* 


... 


... 146 


Laydon 


• •• 


• »• 


... 119 


Kerlin 


• •• 


... 


... 262 


Leary 


• •• 


115, 


, 119, 161 


Kerr... 


• •• 


... 


216, 3^9 


Leavy 


• •• 


a.a 


a.. 119 


Kevin 


«•• 


... 


... 270 


LeBmice 


••• 


..a 


aa. oOO 


Kevinn 


• •• 


*•* 


... 270 


Ledwich 


• •• 


... 


359, 371 


Key ... 


• •• 


.*. 


... 144 


&j6e ... 


• •• 


..a 


78, 193 


Kiely 


• •• 


... 


... 62 


Lefroy 


• •• 


m»» 


... 153 


Kielty 


• •• 


.•• 


... 79 


LeHart 


• •• 


.•a 


aa. 190 


Kieran 


• •• 


a*. 


... 146 


Leneban 


• •* 


• a. 


..a 176 


Kieman 


• •• 


... 


151, 207 


Lenihan 


• •• 


..a 


... 176 



INDEX OF SIBNAMES. 



407 







PAGE. 






PAGE. 


Le Petit 


••• 


... 120 


MacAneny ... 


• •» 


... 203 


Le Petito ... 


120, 


121,345 


Mac Anthony 


• •• 


... 332 


Le Poer ... 


346, 347, 348 


MacArt 


*• • 


... 190 


Lessac 


»•• 


... 330 


MacArtan ... 


• «• 


... 121 


Lester 


... 


... 229 


Macartan ... 


• •• 


... 122 


Lestrange ... 


... 


... 61 


Macaulay ... 


• •« 


... 211 


L'Estrange ... 


... 


... 61 


MacAuley ... 


• •■ 


... 211 


Le Tuite ... 


•,•• 


... 306 


MacAuliffe ... 


• •• 


... 63 


Leyingstone 


■ •a 


... 172 


MacAwley ... 


••• 


... 211 


Lewis 


78, 241, 250 1 


MacAwliffe 


• •• 


... 63 


Leydon 


• •• 


... 119 


MacAwly ... 


• •• 


63 


Leyton 


• •• 


... 119 


MacBimey ... 


• •« 


... 237 


Lightfoot ... 


• •• 


... 78 


MacBlaine ... 


• •• 


... 24a 


Lighton 


• •• 


... 119 


MacBlane ... 


••* 


... 243 


Linch 


• •• 


120, 121 


MacBrannen 


174 212. 288 


Linn 


• •• 


54, 182 


MacBride ... 


• •* 


... 144 


Linskey 


• •• 


... 120 


MacBruodin 


• •• 


.... 359 


Litton 


• • • 


... 119 


MacCabe ... 


• •• 


331, 375 


Liver 


• »• 


... 163 


MacCael 


•^» 


... 221 


Livingston ... 


• •• 


... 78 


MacCaghweU 


• •• 


... 150 


Livingstone 


• •• 


.. 172 


MacOahill ... 


• •• 


... 170 


Livroy 


■ •• 


... 153 


MacCail 


• •• 


217, 221 


Locke 


■ •• 


... 167 


MacCaim ... 


• •• 


... 146 


Lockhart ... 


••• 


... 250 


MacCale 


• •• 


... 221 


Lodge 


• •• 


... 846 


MacGahnont 


*■• 


... 220 


Loftus 


• •* 


181, 210 


MacCampbell 


• ■• 


... 207 


Logan 


• •• 


... 211 


MacCarbery 


••• 


... 14a 


Logue 


• « • 


... 211 


MacCarrick 


• ■• 


104, 332 


Long 


• • • 


... 211 


MacCartan ... 


• •• 


... 122 


Jjongahan ... 


••• 


... 176 


MacCarthy ... 


...67j 


126, 375 


Lonffan 
liOrd... 


••• 


... 211 


MacCarthy Glas 


••• 


.•• 63 


• •• 


281, 294 


MacCarthy Mor 


••• 


6 


Loiighnan ... 


181, 


210, 264 


MacCarthy of Minnesota... 66 


Lowe 


• ■• 


... 116 


MacCarthy Keagh... 


85 


Lucas 


• •• 


... 123 


MacCaiil ..« 


••• 


... 160 


Luscombe ... 


• ■• 


... 110 


MacCawell .. 


••• 


... 160 


Lushington... 


• • • 


... 293 


MacClanaghan 


••• 


... 87 


Lyddon 


• •• 


... 119 


MacClancy ... 


••• 


53, 106 


Lydon 


• •• 


... 119 


MacClenaghan 


••■ 


87 


Lynch 


78, 120, 


121, 322 


MacCosTilan 
MacColgan 


••• 


... 54 


Lynn 


• ■• 


54, 273 


•■ • 


... 161 


Lynott 


• •* 


... 313 


MacConmidhe 


••• 


... 358 


Lyons 


• •• 


... 86 


MacConroi ... 


••* 


... 153 


Lytton 


• •• 


... 119 


MacConroy... 


••• 


... 340 








MacCormac 


••• 


... 384 


MacAlin ... 


• •• 


... 141 


MacCormack 


••• 


... 0«7 


Macalister ... 




... 229 


MacCoscry ... 
MacCourt ... 




61 


Mac Allen ... 


• •• 


... 141 


••• 


• • • ^^ ^ 

... 219 


MacAllister 


• •• 


... 229 


Maccrae 


••• 


69, 237 



408 



INDEX OF SIBNAMES. 



MacCraith ... 
MacCulroy ... 
MacCurtin ... 
MacDamel ... 
MacDavett ... 
MacDavid ... 
MacDermott 



PAGE. 

... 68, 94, 237 
I.. ... loo 

■ . . ... oOSf 

201, 264 
167 
160 
...157, 218, 375 



MacDonald 108, 109, 241, 264 
MacDonald of the Isles ... 108 
MacDonnell 140, 214, 215, 216 

217, 264, 375 

Macdonogh 217 

MacDonogb 280 

MacDonough ... 217, 218 

MacDougaM 218 

MacDougall 218 

MacDowall 218 

MacDowell 218 

MacEarc 79 

MacEdmond ... 176, 177 

MacEgan 177 

MacElroy 138 

MacEocha 223 

MacEvoy 231, 232 

MacFadden 154 

MacFarlaue 190 

MacFetndge ... 219, 232 

MacFirbis 6, 117, 340 

MacGahan 219 

MaeGarry 123, 136 

MacGauran.k 236 

MacGawley 211 

MacGawly 211 

MacGeoghagan 165, 219, 245, 

376 

Macgeoghagan 219 

MacGeraghty 186 

MacGeterick 323 

MacGibboD 310, 332 

MacGilfinen ...221, 252, 270 

MacGillan 236 

MacGilchriest 138 

MacGillicuddy 95 

MacGillicunny ... 146, 220 

MacGnieve 140 

MacGovem 236 

MacGowan 359 

MacGrade 88 

MacGrane 250 



PAGE. 

MacGreevy 282 

MacGuthrie 239 

MacHale ... ' 198, 217, 22 1 , 282 

MacHenry 186 

MacHerbert 328 

MacHibbon 310 

MacBiggin 197 

MacHi^ 222, 250 

Macllroy 138 

Macllwane 170 

Maclntyre 117 

Maclvir ... •«. ... 219 

Maclvor 219 

MacJordan 323,342, 343 

MacJordan Dubh 842 

MacKeal 221 

MacKenna 299, 331 

MacKeogh ... 206, 207, 228 

MacKeon 255 

MacKeown *.. 255 

MacKiernan 207 

MacKinnon 108 

Macklin 54 

MacLean ' ... 108 

MacLeod 108, 109 

MacLoghlin 228 

MacLaughlin 227 

MacMahon ... 161, 207, 224, 225, 

238, 337 
MacMahon, of Franoe ... 70 
MacMahon, of Mnnster ... 69 

MacManamnin 282 

MacManus 226 

MacMerry 199 

MacMeyler 310 

MacMorough ... 170, 226 

MacMorris 248 

MacMorrow 226 

MacMullan... * 251 

MacNair 153 

MacNamara .'.. 71. 87, 375 

MacNamara Fionn ... 78 

MacNamara Beagh ... 71 

MacNamee ... 145, 153, 226 

MacNaughtan 254 

MacNeill 294 

MacNeir 153 

MacNichol 107 

MacNicholas 107 



INDEX OF SIBNAMES. 



409 







PAGE. 








MacNicol ... 


...106 


, 107, 108 


MagUn 




• •• 


MacNolty ... 


• •• 


... 185 


Magloin 




• •• 


MacOinghty 


• •• 


... 186 


Magnan 




• •• 


MacOnchon... 


• •• 


... 227 


Magoff 




• •• 


Maconkey ... 


••• 


... 227 


Magough 




• •• 


Maoonky ... 


••• 


171, 227 


Magovem 




• •• 


MacOwen ... 


• •• 


... 255 


Mi^rane 




• •• 


MacPhilij^in 


• •• 


... 310 


Magrannell... 


• •0 


MacPhilpin... 


*•• 


310, 313 


Magrath 


• •• 


237, 259, 


MacQaeen ... 


108, 


109, 135 


Maguire 161, 


207, 224, 


MacQuinn ... 


• •• 


135, 182 








Macrae 


• •• 


... 69 


Maher 


• •• 


• •• 


MacRandall 


• •• 


... 135 


Mahon 


• •• 


... 69, 


MacRannall 


••• 


... 136 


Mahony 


69, 92, 195, 


MacBedmonds 


• •• 


... 310 


Maine 


• •• 


• •• 


MacKichard 


• •• 


... 316 


Malcolm 


• •• 


• •• 


MacRickard 


• •• 


... 316 


Malcolmaon 


• •• 


liiacBogen ... 


• •• 


... 300 


Malin 


• •• 


• •• 


MacRory ... 


• ■• 


... 300 


Mallet 


• •• 


• •• 


MacShaen ... 


••• 


... 335 


Mallin 


• •• 


• •* 


MacShane ... 


• •• 


289, 331 


M alone 


• •• 


209, 


MacShanly ... 


• •• 


... 187 


Malony 


• •• 


... 


MacSheehy 71| 


228, 338, 340, 375 


Mangan 
Maxdy 


••• 


.•• 


MacSweeny 


• •• 


... 230 


• •• 


... 


MacSwiney ... 


229, 


230, 375 


MftT^fiin 


• •• 


... 


MacTerence 


• •• 


... 209 


Manning 


••• 


... 


MacTernan... 


• •* 


231, 294 


Mannion 


• •• 


>•• 


MacTerry ... 


• •• 


... 209 


Manwood 


• •• 


... 


MacThomas 


• •• 


... 122 


Marra 


••• 


■•• 


MacTieman 


• •• 


231,294 


Martin 


• •• 


... 


MaoTirlogh 


• •• 


... 209 


Mason 


• mm 


*•• 


MacUais ... 


• •• 


... 231 


Masteraon 


• mm 


.*• 


MacVeagh ... 


• •* 


231, 232 


May... 


• •• 


... 


MacVeurh ... 
MacWidter... 


• ■• 


231. 232 


Maye 


• •• 


*•• 


■ •• 


309, 316 


Mayward 


• •• 


... 


MacWaid ... 


• •• 


138, 875 


McOann 


• •• 


..a 


Madagan ... 


• •• 


... 236 


McGlanaghan 


... 


Madden 


283, 


234, 236 


McCoy 


• «• 


■ •• 


Maddison ... 


• •• 


... 235 


McCue 


• •• 


... 


Madi^an 
Magi^y 


• •• 

• •• 


... 118 
... 299 


McCuy 
McDonald 


• •• 

• •• 


... 
... 


Magarry ... 


• •• 


... 123 


McDougall 


• •• 




Magaoley ... 


• •• 


... 211 


McDowell 


• •• 


... 


Maganran ... 


• •• 


235,236 


McGaoly 


• •• 


... 


Magawley ... 


■•• 


... 145 


McGavock 


• •• 


... 


Magellan ... 


• •• 


... 236 


McGeown 


• •• 


... 


Mageongh ... 


• •• 


... 299 


McGloin 


• •• 


... 


Magillan 


• •■ 


... 236 


McGorman 


• •• 


... 


Maginty ... 


• •» 


... 203 


McGuinness 


... 



FAOB. 
... 54 
... «^4 

... 258 

... 299 

... 299 

... 236 

... 250 

... 135 

347,384 

237, 313, 

375 

... 73 

238, 239 
196, 241 
... 14 
... 151 
... 151 
... 251 
... 286 
... 251 

239. 331 
... 170 
... 268 
... 286 
... 124 
118, 124 
104^283 
... 192 
... 156 
... 282 
... 117 
231, 294 
111, 186 
... 186 
... 78 
... 239 
... 250 
222,260 
222, 250 
... 222 
... 250 
... 109 
... 250 
... 211 
... 250 
... 255 
... 64 
... 276 
... dl8 



410 



IKDBX OF SIBNAHES. 









PAOE. 






PAGE. 


Mcllvena 


••. 


*•• 


... 170 


Molloy 


220, 


245,24^ 


Mclvor 


... 


... 


... 219 


Molohan ... 


«^« 


... 249 


McKay 


... 


... 


... 222 


Molyneux ... 


»•• 


... 10% 


McReeyer 


... 


... 


... 219 


Monahan ... 


'••• 


242,263 


McKieman ... 


207, 240, 241, 242 


Monaghan ^^ 


«»• 


... 263- 


McMahon 


... 


«■» 


... 331 


Money 


«•• 


246,247 


McMaster 


• ■ • 


• •• 


231, 294 


Montagu .,. 


•*• 


... X8f4 


McNamara 


••• 


• 9* 


... 72 


Montgomery 


«•• 


... 250 


McNeill 


• • • 


• ■• 


... ^\n 


Moody 


••« 


125.26a 


McQaeen 


..• 


• •• 


... 108 


Mooney 


246, 247, 274, 277 


McTeman 


... 


• •• 


231, 294 


Moore 15, 


125, 127, 


128, 372 


Mead 


•». 


• •• 


... 275 


Moran 


... 


127, 282 


Meade 


... 


• •• 


... 275 


Mordie 


... 


... 14fi 


Meiu^her 
MeaDa 


... 


■ •• 


... 73 


Mor^ 


... 


230, 247 


••. 


• ■• 


... 285 


Monarty 


... 74, 162, 248 


Meany 


•*• 


• •• 


... 150 


Morishy 


• •• 


... 24S 


Mee ... 


•• • 


«■ • 


... 226 


Morphy 


• •• 


... 253 


Meehan 


... 


• •• 


... 128 


Morrin 


•»• 


... 253 


MelaHy 


.*• 


• •• 


... 125 


Morris 


•«• 


78,248 


Meldon 


.■ * 


*•• 


... 251 


Morrisey ... 


• •• 


... 248 


Melledy 


.*. 


• •• 


... 270 


MornaoB ... 


108,248, 


363, 374 


Melloda 


... 


• •• 


... 270 


Morrow 


••« 


... 22ft 


Melody 


... 


• •■ 


... 125 


Moreton ... 


• •• 


... 78 


Melton 


... 


• •• 


... 242 


Mowbray ... 


• •• 


... 290 


Melveny 


*■■ 


• •• 


... 170 


Moylan 


• •« 


... 251 


MelviU 


... 


• •• 


... 243 


Moyne ... 
Mulbrennan 


••• 


... 369^ 


Melrin 


«•» 


• ■• 


... 170 


• •* 


... 24^ 


Meredith 


••• 


• •• 


321, 323 


Mulcahy 7, 12^ 


',128, 129, 130, 27& 


Meredyth 


••• 


• ■• 


... 195 


Mulchay ... 


• •• 


126, 127 


Merrie 


••• 


• •• 


... 199 


Mulconry ... 


••• 


... 16a 


Merry 


••• 


• •• 


... 199 


Mnldoon 


• • 


181, 251 


Meyler 


.•• 


*•• 


... 310 


Muldor^ „. 


••• 


... 252 


Michel 


••. 


• •• 


... 243 


Mulfavill ... 


• •« 


.. 187 


Michil 


... 


156, 243 


, 243, 264 


Mulfinny ... 


••• 


... 251 


Middleton 


... 


... 


... 78 


MnlhaU _ 


• •• 


... 187 


MUea 


... 


... 


112, 349 


' Mulheeraa ... 


••• 


... 251 


Mill ... 


... 


a*. 


... 285 


Mulhem 


• • • 


... 251 


Milne 


.•• 


... 


... 251 


MulhoUand... 


• •• 


••• 22ft 


MUton 


••• 


... 


385 


Mulkeeran ... 


••• 


... 251 


Minohin 


••• 


... 


... 74 


Mulkieran ... 


• •• 


... 221 


Mitchell 


••• 


... 


243,264 


Mnllally 


••• 


... 264 


Moffett 


••• 


... 


... 221 


MuUany 


•w 


... 14^ 


Moghan 


••« 


• •a 


245»296 


Mullen 


••• 


152, 251 


Mohan 


••• 


• a* 


... 245 


Muller ... 


• •• 


... 14 


Moledy 


•»• 


• a. 


... 125 


Mulligan ... 


••• 


... lov 


Moleyns 


••• 


• a. 


aaa 251 


MullMla 


••• 


... 270 


MoUan 


«•• 


• a. 


... 251 


Mullody 


•• 


... 270 


Mollin 


■•• 


aaa 


... 251 


Mnllowney 


• •• 


... 170 


MoUon 


•»• 


a.* 


... 251 


Molmochery 


• •• 


... 168 



INDEX OF SIBNAMES. 



4U 



Molmody ... 
Mnlmuog ... 
MiiMan 
Mulroy 
Mulvany ... 
Mulvena 
Mulvey 
Mulvichill ... 
Mulyihill ... 
Mulville 
Mulyy 131, 
Mariarty ... 
Muriffan ... 
JMurphy 
Murray 
Murrin 
Murtagh 
Musclutmp ... 
Masgraye ... 



PAGE. 

... *•■ £00 
... ... £00 

••• ... oOO 

183, 252, 28-2 

^ ... 170 

170 

••• ... loU 

... ... A^O 

... ... Jim 

136, 180, 263, 274 

74 

••• ••• £^i 

171, 263 
168, 331 

• •• ... ^ij£ 

... 74^ 162, 248 

... ... £ak 

... .•• 04«7 



Naghten 

Nagle 

Nallin 

Nally 

Nangle 

Naper 

Napper 

Natten 

Naughton 

I^ealan 

Neale 

Neeny 

Neillan 

Neilson 

Nelson 

Neville 

Newland 

Ifeylan 

Neyland 

l^icholas 

Nicholls 

Nicholson 

Nicolson 

Nigra 

Niiand 

Noble 

Nosent 

NoLin 

Noland 



... 



• •• 
... 



... Xd4 

... 343 

... 255 

... 255 

... 343 

322, 323 

... 323 

... 254 

... ... ... 2«/T 

256, 316 

... a*. ... ZiOv 

... *•• ... Vr*tf 

... ... *•• £itO 

••• ... ... ^t/% 

... ... 78, ^94 

... ... ... JUtfV 

«•• ... ... £00 

255, 266 

... ... ... iuOO 

107 

107 

107,109,110,112,113 

... 106, 108, 109, 111 

... 14 

... 255 

156, 231 

... Ofl.^ 

... 199 
... 199 



••• 



Norris 
Norton 
Nowlan 
Nugent 

O'Beuine ... 
O'Boyle 
O'Brady ... 
O'Brannan ... 
O'Braasil ... 
O'BrassU West 
0*Breslin ... 



PAGE. 
• . .•• x£if 

.. ... ^04 

.. ... 256 
293, 343, 344 

741, 256 

>. ... i.4d 

.. ... 00 

.. ... «Do 
234, 235, 257 
.. ... ^o\§ 
364 



O'Brien 67, 69, 71, 75, 76, 96, 
213, 337, 338, 376, 383 
O'Brien, of Dromoland 76, 76 



O'Byme 

O'Cahan 

O'Callaghan... 

O'Carbery ... 

O'Carroll ... 

O'CarroU Ely 

0*Cardlan ... 

O'Casey ... 

O'Cassidy 

O'Clery 

0*Coffey 

O'Oonnell 

O'Connolly 

O'Connor 



210, 259 

203, 205,''262 

68, 76 

1. ... i 9 

141 

. 73, 77, 89 

• • ... vOV 

•■ ... 01 



I*. ... ... ofO 

6, 187, 260, 296, 384 

... ... ... 00 V 

•*• ... '•'y ^*' 

• *. ... ... XO" 

67, 166, 384 

O'Connor Corcomroe 116, 117, 

119, 131, 132 
O'Connor Faley 126, 151, 161 
O'Connor Kerry ... 133, 335 
O'Connor, of Moy Ith ... 262 
O'Connor, of Orgiall ... 263 
O'Connor, of Ulster ... 259 
O'Connor Sligo 



O'Conor 
O'Conor Don 
O'Crowley ... 
O'Cuimeen ... 
O'Cullenan ... 
O'Curry ... 
O'Daly 
O'Day 
O'Dea 
O'Deadha 



262, 264, 230, 

382, 383, 384 

203,344 

... 261 

. ... 67 

. ... 009 

... ... ... Qf O 

_,_ f V » 

•■• ••• ••• XOv 

"."79, 96," 97, 165, 171 



O'Dempsey ... 



161, 162 



4 



412 



INDEX OF SIRNAMES. 



PAGE. 

O'Dinneen 359 

O^Dozherty 167, 374 

O'Donel 143, 166, 264, 267, 337 
O'DonneU 108, 264, 266, 267, 376 

383, 384 
O'Donnell, of Austria ... 369 
O'DonneU, of Spain ... 268 

O'Donocho 80, 82 

O'Donohue 92 

O'Donoghue, of Lough Lein 80, 

81,82 

O'Donohoe 80 

O'Donoughue, of the Glen 81, 82 
O'Donovan, 6, 11, 67, 79, 82, 83 

86, 102 

. 269, 280, 296, 331 
269, 322 
174 
...105, 114, 375 
O'DriscoU Beara ... * ... 114 



O'Doran 

O'Dowd 

O'Dowda 

O'Doyne 

O'DmcoU 



Odson 

O'Duflfey 

O'Dagan 

0*Dagenan 

O'Dunlevy 

O'Dwyer 

O'Falvey 

O'FirgU* 



... ... zzz 

... ... ool 

279, 344 
164 

375 

...176, 270, 384 
... ... o/o 



O'FarreU 119, 125, 127, 131, 133 

134, 135, 137. 332 

OTerraU 3, 6, 241. 242 

O'Finan 221, 252, 270 

O'Flaherty 11, 131, 132, 271, 339 

375, 376 
O'Flainn [O'Flinn] ... 105 



O'Flanagan 
O'Flynn ... 
O'Preel 
O'Gallagher 
O'Galligan ... 
OGara ... 
OgUb^ (or O'Gilby) 
O'Gmeve 
O'Gorman ... 



O'Grady 



...149, 271, 272 
... 273 
... 384 
252, 384 
... 135 
87,90 
... 349 
... 140 
129. 274, 275 



72, 87, 88, 195 



O'Hagan 

O'Haurtt 

O'Halloran 

O'Hanlon 

O'Hara 



PAGE. 

276, 364 

... ... ^a\) 

79. 340 
150, 257. 277, 375 
87,89 



O'Hara Buidhe [Boy] 89, 90, 91 
O'Hara, of the Route 90, 91 

O'Hara Reagh [Rea] 90, 91 

O'Hare 233, 280 

O'Harraghtan 171 

O'Hart 146, 170, 180, 190, 191 

207, 279, 280 



O'Hay 

O'Hea 

O'Heir 

O'Hennessy 

O'Hickey . 

O'Eogan 

O'Hora 

O'Hosey . 

O'Hugh 

O'Kane 

OKeeffe 

O'KeUy 

O'Laydon . 

0*Leary 

Olehan 

Oliver 

O'LoghUn , 

O'Longan 

0*Madden . 



72, 201 
105 

t. ... .2«K> 

t. ... 232 

375 

... 276 

>. ... 0«7 

358 

... 201 

170, 197, 228 

92, 376 

180, 223, 284 



281 

67, 86, 86, 105, 116 

• ••• ••• i.«7ftf 

• • • • • • • Oi/O 

131, 132, 133 
. ... ... ^oo 

149 234 317 
O'Mahony 67, 69, 80, 92, 93, 94 
O'Malley ... 285, 314, 375, 379 

O'Mally 285 

O'Manning 125 

O'Meagher 74 

0*MeaUa 285 

O'Melaghlin 276 

O'Melyena 170 

O'Melveny 170 

0*Mictyre (See « Wolfe ") 

O'MoUoy 165, 376 

O'Moonev 257 

O'Moore' ... 125, 126, 128, 375 

O'Mulvany 170 

0*Mulvena 170 



• (yPirgil : This word and Virgil are derived from the Irish PeargaoH C'fcar," 
a. "flr**: Irish, o nian, Lat, "vir"; "gaol," gen. "gaoil": Irish, familif, kin, or 



jjen 
tindrtd)^ 



r 



INDEX OF SIBNAMES. 



418 



j 






PAGE. 






PAGE. 


Omulvena 


• ■* 


• •• 


... 170 


Penn . 


• •• 


110 


O'NeiJaii 


• • • # 


• • • 


... 71 


Pennant 


••• 


• • • • • • o w 


O'NeiU 126, 140, 169, 224. 228,298 


Peppard 
Perkin 


• •• 


••• • • • O^sO 








331, 375 


• •• 


•mm • • • Ov 


O'Noill, of Clanaboy 


... 28(5 


Perkins 


• • • 


•#• ••• oU 


O'NeiU, of Mayo and Leitrim288 


Perrott 


• •• 


261, 274, 384 


O'NeiU, of MuTiBter 


... 58 


Petit ... 


••• 


120, 121, 345 


O'Nelan 


• •• 


• •« 


... 71 


Pictet 


••• 


.•« ... XTC 


Ord ... 


•«• 


• •• 


... 289 


Phibbs 


••• 


... ... «li21 


O'Kegan 
O'ReSly 


• •• 


174, 


180, 291 


Philbin 


••• 


... ... oiu 


••• 


• •• 


291, 376 


PhiUps 


• •• 


111, 310 


O'Reilly, of Scarva 


••• /!\jo 


Plilpott 


• ■ • 


... ... «$4ia 


O'RieUy 


• •* 


144, 


224, 291 


Plunkett 


95, 


, 96, 241, 293, 331 


O'Riordan 


• •• 


• ■• 


... 375 


Poer... 


• •• 


...238, 346, 347 


Orme 


••• 


• •• 


... 72 


Poole 


• •• 


157 


Ormsby 


«•• 


• •• 


230,321 


Popplestoi: 


L ... 


• •• ••• XXXi 


(yRorke 


• •• 


• •• 


280, 294 


Portis 


*■ • 


••• ••• ^41 


O'Rourke 


... 231,293, 


294,337 


Poteet 


• •• 


144 


Oram 


• •• 


• • • 


... 72 


Powell 


• •• 


••• ••• Oo 


Osborne 


• •* 


• ■ • 


... 348 


Power 


129, 


238, 333, 845, 346 


O'Shagbnasy 


•*• 


... 295 






347, 348, 849 


O'Shannaasy 


• •• 


... 296 


Pratt 


••• 


... ... £a^ 


O'Shaughnessy 


295, 


317, 337 


Prendergast 


280, 833 


O'SheU 


• •• 


••• 


... 375 


Preston 


• •• 


••• ...' 167 


O'Snllivan 


• •• 


67,71 


L. 86, 375 


Prichard 


• •* 


14 


O'Sullivan Beara 


••• 


... "o 


Protzman 


• •• 


... ... */^A 


0*Sullivan Beare 


••■ 


... oO 


Proud 


• •• 


... ... J.t/«f 


O'Sullivan Maol 


■ •• 


... 95 


Pronde 


■ •• 


... ... A«/«/ 


O'SuUivan Mor 


• •• 


...68, 94 


Pnber 


• • * 


• a. ... tnO 


OToole 




• •■ 


... 297 


Pnrcell 


••• 


349, 350, 362 


Onlahan 




• •• 


... 199 


Purcell-O'Gorman 276 


Oollaghaa 
OulliSan 




••• 

• •• 


... 199 
... 199 


Pynnar 
Pypho 


• •• 

••• 


... ... d74 

... ... 047 


Owen 




• •• 


266, 360 








Owens 




• •• 


99, 256 


QUAIN 


« • • 


... ••• ££i 


Owenson 




• •* 


... 255 


Qnan 
Qoane . 


••• 
• *• 


... ... ££§ 

... ... ^£t 


Paca 




• •* 


... 78 


Quick 


••• 


... ... 116 


Padden 




• •• 


... 164 


Quin .... 


• • • 


... 80, 96, 128 


Pain... 




••• 


... 298 


Quinan 


• ■• 


154 


Paine 


• •• 


• • • 


78, 298 


Qninlan 


• •• 


152 


Parrot 




• • • 


... iS«l4 


Quinlivau 


• *• 


162 


Parsons 




••• 


... 233 


Quinn 


• •^ 


134, 136, 241 


Patten 




• • • 


... 164 


Quirk 


• « • 


119, 298 


Pattison 




• •• 


... lo4 


Quirke 


• •• 


... ... ^9o 


Paulett 




• •• 


... 167 








Paye 




• •• 


... 333 


Rabbit 


••• 


... ... Id4 


Payne 
Peche 




••• 

• •• 


... 297 
... 192 


Radley 
Rahilfy 


• •• 

• •• 


... ... ^ak 

... ... ^Rf J. 



414 



imOKX OFSISHAJfBS. 



Bakes 

IfaJeigh 

Bmd 

Bead 

Beddy 

Bedmond ... 

Began 

Beflly 

Bemiry 

Bereton 

Berton 

Beyley 

Beynard 

Beynardaon 

Beynell 

Beynolda ... 

Bicharda ... 

Bichardaon ... 

Bicbeson ... 

Bichey 

Bickarda ... 

Bidley 

Biolly 

Riley 

Biordan 

Bitherdan ... 

lioan 

Boberta 

Bobertson ... 

Bock 

Boddy 

Bodgera 

Borlney 

Boe ... ••• 

Bogan 

liogers 

Bogeraon ... 

Bonan ••• 

Bonayne ... 

liory 

Boss 

Boughan ... 

Bowan 

liowe 

liowban 

Kuane 

Buddy 

Bush 

Bussell 



PACK. 

... lov 

... ... AvX 

105 

... ... /v 

•** ... 137 
... ... 160 

... 174, 282 
... 224 

«•• ••• M. M M- 

250 

250 

• *• ... ^CSfX 

... ... Xol 

••• ... AOl 

... ... 135 

131, 135, 136, 137 
... ... 316 

250, 316 

... ... DO 

••• ... L^ft 

316, 317 

.•• ... iScrl 

• •a «.« Kirl 
... ... £01. 

... ... 375 

••• ... 375 

... ... v/ 

128, 282 
18,232 

••V ... X \yx 
••• ... lo7 
... ... ouu 

... *•• f V 

... ... At/«7 

206, 277, 299 
••• ••• SOU 

... ... vOU 

••• 255 
... ... 255 

800 

... 79, 115, 849 
*•• ...Ov, Mi 

... ... «47D 

... . • . £99 

... ••• at 

• •• ••* «(JD 

■»87 

79, 115 

128, 22G, 250 









PAGE. 


Batlidge 


... 


... 


... 1% 


Byan 


... 


301, 


300, 33g 


Saxcht 


... 


9mm 


... 117 


Saadenon 


... 


*«• 


201,229 


Sandifoid 


.•* 


• «• 


... OV3V 


Sanfield 


... 


■ •• 


... 317 


SamideBi 


••• 


•mm 


... 229 


fi * 


... 


• *• 


... 236 


Sayage 


. «• 


••• 


... 293 


Scallaa 


• • 


• •• 


... 118 


ScaUv 
Scaiuaa 


... 
... 


••• 


... 118 
297,301 


Sootfc 


... 


«• 


... 386 


ScoTeU 


... 


• «• 


... 355 


Scnily 


.». 


• •« 


118,321 


Sedgwick 


. . • 


••« 


... 144 


Seeny 


••• 


••• 


... 181 


Seery 


... 


••• 


... 123 


Segaa 
Sdby 


... 


««« 


... 302 


. •« 


mmm 


... 118 


Sexton 


... 


• •• 


... 283 


Shakespeare 


• •• 


... 386 


Shanahan 


... 


• •• 


130, 264 


Shanly 


••• 


123 


,136*137 


Shannon 


••• 


•*. 


... 264 


Sharkey 


... 


... 


... 242 


Sheane 


. •* 


... 


... 302 


Sheedy. 


••• 


... 72, 228, 340 


Sheehan 


... 


... 


... 130 


SheUy 


... 


... 


... 116 


Sheppard 


... 


... 


111,354 


Sheridan 


... 


••• 


222, 313 


Sherman 


• • 


... 


... 79 


Sidney 


... 


... 


295, 314 


Silke 


... 


... 


... 72 


Simon 


••« 


■•• 


362,363 


Skelly 


... 


•.. 


... 118 


Slaman 


... 


• . . 


145, 154 


Skittery 


... 


... 


... 97 


SleAon 


••• 


... 


... 189 


Smith 


... 


... 79, 242, 332 


Snow 


... 


• •• 


... 179 


Soople 


«•* 


• •• 


... 199 


Southwell 


••• 


• •• 


... 194 


Spaine 


... 


«•• 


... 205 


Spellan 


... 


• •• 


... 302 


Spelman 


••. 


• •• 


... 302 


Spenser 


... 


• •• 


371, 876 



IND£X OF SIBNAMES. 



415 









PAGE. 








PAGE. 


Spillane 


• ■• 




145, 802 


Tooth 


• •• 


••• 


... 179 


Spiller 


• « • 




... 302 


Toomey 


••• 


• •• 


.. 115 


SpoUen 


••• 




... 302 


Tormey 


• • • 


••* 


119, 137 


Stack 


• • • 




... 122 


Tomey 


• •• 


• • • 


... 154 


Stanley 


••• 




... 191 


Torrens 


• •• 


• •• 


... 72 


Stanhope 


• •• 




... 191 


Towusend 


•«• 


• •• 


... 336 


Stein 


• •• 




... 365 


Tracey 


• •• 


• •• 


102, 234 


Stewart 


...58, 97, 98, 


100, 156 


Tracey, of Munster 


... o«5 


St. John 


• •• 


• •• 


... 280 


Trasey 


• •• 


■ « • 


... 102 


St. Lawrence 


••• 


348, 346 


Trasey, of Munster 


oO 


St. Leger 


*•« 


• •• 


... 327 


Trayiior 


• •• 


• •• 


... 235 


Stockton 


• •« 


•«« 


... 79 


Treacy 


• •• 


• •• 


... 234 


Stone 


• •• 


• •• 


72.79 


Treassy 


• •• 


• •• 


... 234 


Stonebraker 


• •• 


... 242 


Trena 


• •• 


■ • • 


... 176 


Stoney 


••• 


*«• 


... 72 


Trimble 


• •• 


• •« 


... 250 


Stoughton 


• •• 


••• 


... 327 


Tristram 


• •• 


• •• 


... 343 


Storange 


••• 


• •• 


116, 117 


Tuite 


• •• 


• •• 


316, 351 


Strong 


• •• 


• •* 


... 116 


Tunney 


••• 


• •• 


,.. 118 


Stronge 


• •• 


• •« 


... 116 


Tuomey 


• •* 


• •• 


... 115 


Stuart 58, 


98, 


100, 101, 


, 156, 232 


Twigg 


••« 


• • « 


... 355 


Snllivan 


• •• 


••• 


... 14 


Tyrrell 


• •• 


• • • 


... 352 


Supple 


• •* 


• •• 


... 199 










Sutton 


• «• 


• •• 


... J 91 


Urquhar^ 


• • • 


• •• 


... 132 


Sweeny 


• •• 


• •• 


229, 230 


Usher 


• •• 


• •• 


... 238 


Swiney 


• • • 


• • 


... 229 










Swords 


••* 


• • 


... 151 


Vain 


• •• 


• •• 


... 199 


Symes 


• •• 


• •« 


... 238 


Valiancy 


• •• 


• •• 


... 376 










Vance 


• • • 


196, 


352, 353 


Tatlow 


• •• 


• • • 


... yo 


Vane 


• •• 


• •• 


199, 206 


Taylor 


• • • 


• •• 


79, 350 


Vans 


• •• 


• •• 


353 


Temple 


••• 


• • • 


... 293 


Vaughan 


• •• 


• •• 


178, 209 


Terrie 


••• 


• • • 


... 209 


Vesey 


• •• 


• • • 


239, 292 


Thorn 


• •• 


• •• 


... 122 


Vey ... 


• •• 


••• 


... 231 


Thomas 


• •• 


• •• 


... 122 


VilHers 


• •• 


■ • • 


... 347 


Thomson 


• • ■ 


• •« 


... 122 


Von- Neck 


• •• 


• •• 


... 112 


Thompson 


••• 


••• 


111, 122 


Vosey 


• •• 


• ■• 


... 292 


Thornton* 


• •• 


• •• 


... 79 










Thoumeysen 


• •• 


... 113 


Walford 


• •• 


»•« 


... 233 


Thunder 


••• 


• •• 


... 154 


Walker 


• •• 


• •• 


363, 359 


Throckmorton 


*•« 


... 327 


WaUis 


• •• 


• • • 


... 135 


Tieman 


• •• 


...231, 


241, 294 


Walsh 


• •• 


• • • 


... 347 


Tiemey 


••• 


• •• 


.. 208 


Walsingha 


m 


«•• 


... 378 


Timony 


*•• 


• •• 


... 189 


Walters 


• • • 


• ■ 


... 309 


Tobin 


••• 


«*• 


... 350 


Walton 


• • • 


• • • 


... 79 


Toler 


• • • 


• • • 


... 181 


Ward 


• •• 


• •• 


... 138 


Toms 


••• 


• •• 


... 122 


Ware 


• •• 


274, 302, 


376, 380 


Tootal (see 


"OToole'') 




Warren 


• •• 


... 


... 336 



* Thornton : This Ib the modern form of MaeSktnaghan ; derived from the Irish 
JIacSeeinaghain (**Seian," gen. "sceine": IrlBh, a knife J 



416 



INDEX OF SIRNAMES. 









PAGE. 






PAGE. 


Warton 


• •• 


• •* 


... 360 


Winjjrfield ... 


••• 


167, 322 


Waters 


• •• 


• • • 


242, 309 


Withinpoole 


... 


... 79 


Watson 


• •• 


• •• 


... 233 


Woloott 


... 


... 79 


Webb 


• •• 


• •• 


241, 357 


Wolf 


... 


79, 117 


Weldon 


• •« 


«•• 


.. 192 


Wolohan ... 


... 


... 199 


WeUs 


• « • 


• •• 


... "^93 


Wood 


•^ 


... 257 


Whelton 


••• 


• •• 


... 199 


Woods 


••• 


... 267 


Whipple 


••• 


• •• 


... 79 


Woodward ... 


• • 


... 347 


White 


• •• 


• •• 


... 355 


Wythe 


••• 


79, 211 


Whyte 
Williams 


••• 


••• 


68, 355 








••• 


• •• 


79, 309 


Y-NUNEZ ,.i 


• « • 


... 238 


Williamson 


••• 


... 309 


Yoe 


»•• 


... 340 


Wilson 


••• 


• ■• l«/9 


250, 309 


Yoes 


•• 


... 34tt 


Wilton 

1 


• •• 


• m • 


... 199 


Young 


• ♦ • 


353 



THE END. 



George Healt, Steam Printex*, 80, Lower Ormond Quay, Dublin. 



22^ 






^ 



t 






i 



f