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Full text of "Ivy Tech Community College Course Catalog"




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IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY COLLEGE 


COURSE CATALOG 
2009-2010 


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lvyTech.edu 



Notice: 

This catalog is intended to supply accurate information to the reader. From time to time, certain information may be changed. 

The College may revise any matter described in this catalog at any time without publishing a revised edition of this catalog. Courses, 
programs, curricula and program requirements may be changed or discontinued at any time. Information that appears to apply to a 
particular student should be verified with the Office of Student Affairs at your local campus. Local campus information is found on 
page 4.The publication and its provisions are not in any way a contract between the student and Ivy Tech Community College. 

Ivy Tech is an accredited, equal opportunity, affirmative action state college. 

A copy of the most recent annual financial statement can be obtained upon request from the Office of the Treasurer. 

€> 2009 Ivy Tech Community College. 




Message from the President 



Welcome to Ivy Tech Community College, the nation's largest single accredited statewide community college system 
and Indiana's I argest college/university. We offer degrees at 29 locations and we have more than 120,000 students 
studying over 150 different programs throughout Indiana. You have made a wise choice in choosing to continue your 
education at Ivy Tech Community College. You will find faculty and staff dedicated to assisting you as you progress 
through your academic studies and complete your certificate or degree program. And whether you choose to enter 
the workforce after earning your degree/certificate or transfer your credits to another institution to pursue a bache- 
lor's degree, Ivy Tech Community College is committed to giving you the education you need to be competitive and 
successful. 



Not only will your education change your life, but it will also benefit those around you. You will directly contribute to 
your communities by providing the skills and knowledge needed in today's workplace. Community colleges are 
growing across the country because they provide education where it is needed the most - in communities that they 
serve. Ivy Tech Community College stands by its commitment to change the lives of its students and in turn change 
the state of Indiana. We are proud to have you as an Ivy Tech Community College student. 



Oi^^^K.Au-^ 



Tom Snyder, President 
Ivy Tech Community College 
president@ivytech.edu 




k%^«jj 



General Information 

College Mission 

College Core Values 

College Calendar 

Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity . 

Regional Accreditation Statement 

Academic Calendars 

How to Use This Catalog 

How to Use the Programs of Study Section . 

Campuses 

Programs of Study 



2 

3 

4 

5 

Ivy Tech Program Inventory 6 

Programs of Curriculum 9 

Accounting 10 

Advanced Manufacturing 11 

Agriculture 12 

Automotive Technology 14 

Aviation Technology 16 

Biotechnology 17 

. Building Construction Management 18 

Business Administration 19 

' Central Service Technician 20 

Chemical Technology 21 

Community Emergency Preparedness & Management 22 

Computer Information Systems 23 

Computer Information Technology 25 

Construction Technology 27 

Criminal Justice 29 

Dental Assisting 30 

Dental Hygiene 31 

Design Technology 32 

Early Childhood Education .' 34 

Education 36 

Electrical Engineering Technology 36 

Electronics & Computer Technology 37 

Fine Art 38 

General Studies 38 

Health Information Technology 39 

Hospitality Administration 40 

Human Services 41 

Industrial Technology 43 



Information Security 45 

Interior Design 46 

Kinesiology 47 

Liberal Arts 47 

Library Technical Assistant 48 

Machine Tool Technology 49 

Mechanical Engineering Technology JO 

Medical Assisting 31 

Medical Laboratory Technology 53 

Mortuary Science 54 

Nursing 54 

Office Administration 56 

Paralegal Studies 57 

Paramedic Science 59 

Physical Therapist Assistant 60 

Practical Nursing 60 

Pre-Engineering 61 

Professional Communication 62 

Public Safety 62 

Radiation Therapy 64 

Radiologic Technology 64 

Respiratory Care 65 

Surgical Technology 66 

Theraputic Massage 67 

Transportation, Distribution and Logistic 68 

Visual Communication 68 

Course Descriptions 70 

Comprehensive Course Description List 71 

Program Availibility 155 

Anderson Campus 156 

Batesville Campus 156 

Bloomington Campus 156 

Columbus Campus 157 

Connorsville Campus 157 

East Chicago Campus 157 

Elkhart Campus 158 

Evansville Campus .\ 158 

Fort Wayne Campus 159 

Gary Campus 160 

Greencastle Campus 160 

Indianapolis Campus 160 



Kokomo Campus 161 

Lafayette Campus 162 

Lawrenceburg Campus 162 

Logansport Campus 163 

Madison Campus 163 

Marion Campus ' 163 

Michigan City Campus 164 

Muncie Campus 1 64 

New Castle Campus 165 

Richmond Campus 165 

Sellersburg Campus 165 

South Bend Campus 166 

Tell City Campus 167 

Terre Haute Campus 167 

Valparasio Campus 167 

Wabash Campus 168 

Warsaw Campus 168 

Faculty and Staff 169 

Northwest 170 

North Central 172 

Northeast 174 

Lafayette 176 

Kokomo 178 

East Central 179 

Wabash Valley 181 

Central Indiana 183 

Richmond 186 

Columbus 186 

Southeast 187 

Southwest 188 

Southern Indiana 190 

Bloomington 191 

Accreditations and Membership 193 

Northwest (Gary, East Chicago, Michigan City, Valparasio) 194 

North Central (South Bend, Elkhart, Warsaw 194 

North East (Fort Wayne) 194 

Lafayette (Lafayette) 195 

Kokomo (Kokomo, Logansport) 195 

East Central (Anderson, Marion, Muncie) 195 

Wabash Valley (Terre Haute) 196 

Central Indiana (Indianapolis) 196 



Richmond (Richmond) 197 

Columbus (Columbus) ; 197 

Southeast (Lawrenceburg, Madison) 197 

Southwest (Evansville) 197 

Southern Indiana (Sellersburg) 198 

Bloomington (Bloomington) '. 198 

Contact Information for Accrediting Organizations 199 

College Services 201 

Entering the College 202 

Admissions for Non-Degree Enrollment 202 

Admissions for Degree Enrollment ■ 202 

Course Placement Assessment 202 

Readmission Following Enrollment Absence 202 

Limited Admissions Enrollment 202 

Admission Proceedures and Support Documents-Degree Objective 202 

Secondary Initiaves , 203 

Dual Credit 203 

Transferring Credit to the College 203 

Admission Proceedures and Support Documents-International Students 203 

Student Orientation 203 

Advanced Placement Credit and Credit for Prior Learning 203 

Registration 204 

Registering forCourses 204 

Open/Late Registerations 204 

Course Drop and Add 204 

Student Withdrawl 204 

College Fees 204 

Additional expenses 204 

Payment of Fees 204 

Refund Policy 205 

Financial Aid 205 

Application Proceedures for Financial Aid 205 

Student Records 205 

Dependency Provision 206 

Academic Grading 206 

Grades 206 

Status Codes 206 

Status 206 

l-lncomplete 206 

AU-Audit 206 

W-Withdrawl 207 



S-Satisfactory ; . , 207 

U-Unsatisfactory * 207 

V— Verified Compentency 207 

Credit Hours 207 

Credit Hours Load 207 

Enrollment Status 207 

Quality Points 207 

Grade Point Averages 207 

Improving a Grade . . , 207 

Dean's List 207 

Grade Reports 208 

Prior Courseworks 208 

Attendance 208 

Standards of Progress 208 

Special Problems 208 

Assessment 208 

Graduation 209 

Transferring to another Institution 209 

TrensferIN .' 209 

Student Support Services 209 

Academic Skills Advancement Program Services 210 

Academic Advising 210 

Career Services 210 

College Bookstore 210 

Library 210 

Disability Support Services 210 

Student Life : 210 

Organizations and Activities 210 

Student Government Association (SGA) 211 

PhiTheta Kappa 211 

Intramural Sports 211 

Clubs .........: 211 

Social Activities 211 

Professional Organizations 21 1 

' Leadership Development 211 

Community Service 211 

Ivy Tech Alumni Association 211 

E-Mail 211 

Campus Connect: The College Portal Website 211 

Housing 212 

Student Parking 212 

Student Accident Insurance 212 



Student Health Insurance 212 

Accidents and Illness 212 

Voter Registration 212 

Emergency Closing of Campus 212 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 212 

Student Conduct 212 

College Rules 213 

Repeated Offenses of a Less Serious Nature 215 

Policy and Complaint Proceedure Against Harassment 21S 

Reporting and Complaint Proceedure 215 

Investigation 215 

Determination 215 

Corrective Action 215 

Violations 215 

Disciplinary Actions 216 

Student Grievance Policy 216 

Informal Grievance Procedure 216 

Formal Grievance Procedure .' 216 

Format of the Written Grievance 216 

Timely Filing of a Formal Grievance 216 

Filing the Formal Grievance 216 

Mediation 217 

Student Status Committee 217 

Disposition of a Formal Grievance by the Student Status Committee 217 

Appeal to the Office of the President 217 

Reinstatement to the College 217 

Student Appeal of a Grade 217 

Student Right to Know 218 

Campus Security Information 218 

Jeanne Clery Art (Campus Crime Statistic) Information 218 

Campus Sex Crime Prevention Art 218 

Instructional Programs 218 

Associate of Arts (AA) Degree Programs 219 

Associate of Science (AS) Degree Programs 219 

Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree Programs 219 

Associate of Fine Arts (AFA) Degree Programs 219 

Technical Certeficates (TC) Programs 219 

Certificate Programs .'..-. .219 

Distance Learning 219 

Apprenticeship Programs 219 

Ivy Tech Community College General Education Courses by Catagory 220 



COLLEGE MISSION 

Ivy Tech Community College prepares Indiana residents to learn, live, and work in a diverse and 
globally competitive environment by delivery professional, technical, transfer, and lifelong educa- 
tion. Through its affordable, open-access education and training programs, the College enhances 
the development of Indiana's citizens and communities and strengthens its economy. 

COLLEGE VISION 

Indiana's residents, communities, and economy will be transformed by Ivy Tech Community 
College's leadership in higher education. 

CORE VALUES 

We value, respect, and promote: 

■ A Student-centered Environment 

■ A Faculty/staff-focused Environment 

■ Diversity 

■ Integrity 

■ Community Engagement 

■ Innovation 

■ Excellence 

NON-DISCRIMINATION AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY POLICY 

Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana provides open admission, degree credit programs, courses 
and community service offerings, and student support services for all persons regardless of race, 
color, creed, national origin, religion, gender, sexual orientation, physical or mental disability, age 
or veteran status. The College also provides opportunities to students on the same non-discrimi- 
natory opportunity basis. Persons who believe they may have been discriminated against should 
contact the campus affirmative action officer, Human Resources Administrator, or Dean of Student 
Affairs. Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana is an accredited, equal opportunity/affirmative 
action institution. 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Ivy Tech is on a semester schedule. Fall and spring semesters are 1 6 weeks long. Summer terms are 
of varying lengths. Certain dates on the college calendar may vary by campus. Specific start and 
end dates for the fall, spring and summer semesters are listed in the calendar in this publication. 

REGIONAL ACCREDITATION STATEMENT 

Ivy Tech Community College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the 
North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, http://www.ncahlc.org, (312) 263-0456. 

The Higher Learning Commission 
30 N.LaSalle Street, Suite 2400 
(800) 621-7400 or (312) 263-0456 
Fax:(312)263-7462 



UPCOMING ACADEMIC CALENDARS 




Fall 2009 




Classes begin 


August 24, 2009 


Labor Day Holiday* 


September 7 


Thanksgiving Holiday/Fall Break* 


November 26-27 


Classes end 


December 20 


Spring 2010 




Classes begin 


January 11,2010 


Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday 


January 18 


Spring Break 


March 7-13 


Classes end 


May 9 


Graduation varies; check with your campus 




Summer 2010 




Classes begin 


May 24, 2010 


Memorial Day Holiday 


May 31 


Distance Education classes begin 


June 7 


Independence Day Holiday 


July 5 


Classes end 


August 3, 2010' 


Fall 2010 




Classes begin 


August 23, 2010 


Labor Day Holiday* 


September 6 


Thanksgiving Holiday/Fall Break* 


November 25-26 


Classes end 


December 19 


Spring 2Q11 




Classes begin 


January 10,2011 


Martin Luther King, Jr. Holiday 


January 17 


Spring Break 


March 6-12 


Classes end 


May 8 


Graduation varies; check with your campus 




Summer 2011 




Classes begin 


May 23, 2011 


Memorial Day Holiday 


May 30 


Distance Education classes begin 


June 6 


Independence Day Holiday 


July 4 


Classerend 


August 2 


*Some regions/campuses may have additional vacation days; 


check with your campus for your specific calendar. 





How to Use this Catalog 

THIS CATALOG IS EASY TO USE 

Just take a minute to flip through it. You'll see right 
away that it isn't too hard to find what you're looking 
for. When in doubt, use the table of contents in the front 
or the index in the back. 

IT HAS SIX SECTIONS 

General Information and College Services - This 
section has basic information about the College and its 
campuses. It includes College history, campus addresses, 
and other important information such as financial aid, 
student rights, grading systems, and so on. Get to know 
this section well. 

Degree Programs and Requirements - Use this sec- 
tion to find out which classes to take to earn the degree 
or certificate you want. It's organized by "program" (such 
as business administration or industrial technology), 
and then by "concentration" (such as youth services). You 
also use this section to find out what degrees are 
offered in a certain field and how many course credits 
you need to complete them. It also tells how many cred- 
its you'll earn for each course. 

Course Descriptions - After you look up the classes 
you need in Section 2, you'll probably want to know 
what they're all about. 60 to this easy-to-use section for 
that. Simply find the course number (see sample page 
at right) in the Program Descriptions section ( Section 2) 
and then look it up in the Course Descriptions section 
(Section 3). Everything in Section 3 is in alphabetical 
order. 

Program Availability - Ivy Tech offers many educa- 
tional programs and degrees, but not all programs and 
degrees are offered at all 23 campuses.This section is 
designed to help you quickly find which programs are 
available at the Ivy Tech campus that interests you. 

Faculty and Staff - This section is a list of full-time 
faculty and their educational backgrounds. 






Accreditations and Memberships - This section 
shows which organizations and agencies accredit Ivy 
Tech Community College, its campuses, and programs. 

WATCH FOR SYMBOLS AND TERMS. 

A degree or certificate program requires different types 
of courses. There are fourterms that describe course 
types:"GeneralEducation,""Professional/Technical," 
"Concentration,"and "Regionally Determined." Most 
degrees or certificates require some courses of each 
type. Other terms you'll see are: 

Elective- The term "elective" means you can choose 
the class you want from those offered on your campus. 
These are marked with a"*! 
Capstone Course- This type of course includes a 
component that assesses certain skills that will be 
expected of you as a graduate in the workforce.The 
assessment typically involves a written assignment. 
These are marked with a" A " 
Regionally Determined - This means your campus 
decides which classes you must take to complete the 
degree. In cases where you see courses marked with ■ 
the symbol"**" it means that one of two courses is 
required and your campus decides which. In other 
cases, your campus determines which courses are 
required to fulfill the degree, based primarily on 
needs of local business and industry. 

Your academic advisor can tell you which classes are 
required. 




IVY TECH 



How to Use the Programs of Study 
Section 

All of the pages in the Programs of Study section follow the 
same format.The page at the right (page 3) contains a typical 
page from this section. The table below gives the description of 
each of the keyed items on the sample page. 

I This tells the name of the educational program. 

I This describes the educational program. 

I This tells you the types of careers you can have with a 
degree within this program. 

I This tells the degrees available within the educational 
program. 

I This tells you the concentrations that are available within 
this program. 

I This is the type of degree. 

I This tells how many credits you need to earn a degree. 

I This describes the course types and how many credits 
hours in each you need to earn the degree. 

m This is the course type symbol. 

Q This is the course number. 

Q This is the course name. 

I This tells how many credits a course is worth. 



COURSE TYPE KEY 

* Elective 

A Capstone Course 

** Regionally Determined 



Criminal Justice 



Program Description 

If you are looking for an opportunity for public serv ice in a 
challenging job that involves personal responsibiM"]JJ| 
may find success in the criminal justice field. Know^^M 
sociology, psychology, government and law is helptuHn 
preparing for this career. 



Sample Careers 

Corrections officer, law enforcement officer 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered 

Corrections, Law Enforcement, Youth Services 



a 



Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. I 
Contact your local campus for more information. See page 6 fof 
contact information. 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in Criminal 
Justice is available with Indiana State University, Indiana 
University and lU-South Bend. To view these Associate of 
Science transfer degree programs and to see if they are avail- 
able at your local Ivy Tech campus, students should go to 
http^/wvmjvytech.edu/. 

Students are encouraged to review these options with their 
advisors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to 
which they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to 
which they wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course 
and program transfer may also be available at your local cam- 
pus. Students should contact the transfer office of their local Ivy 
Tech for further information. 



> Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 61 -62 credits in 

following areas: 
General Education Core 19 

Professional/Technical Core 27 

Concentration Courses 12 

Regionally Determined Credits 3-4 

General Education (19 Credits) 

COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 



13 




Life Skills Elective 



MATH 1 XX Mathematics Elective 



PSYC101 Introduction to Psychology 

or 

S0CI111 Introduction to Sociology 



XXXXXXX Humanities Elective 



XXXXXXX Life/Physical Science Elective 



Professional/Technical (27 credits) 



CRIM 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems 



CRIM103 Cultural Awareness 



CRIM 105 Introduction to Criminology 



CRIM 110 


Introduction to Law Enforcement 


3 


CRIM 120 


ntrod . ' ' ". Quits 


3 


CRIM 130 


MrodudJonaConec: on: 


3 


CRIM 201 


: '- •; - '<■",->,■ ,.:■"-. 


3 


CRIM 240 


Criminal Law and Procedure 


i 


' CRVir. 


Criminal Justice Research 


3 



Associate of Applied Science - 
Concentrations 

Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Corrections Concentration (15-16 credits; 
Vigorous law enforcement and stringent sentendng rules haw 
increased the number of people being held for trial or imprisoned 
for their crimes in the last decade. Corrections officers monitor peo- 
ple being detained for trial and those who have been imprisoned. 



Regionally Determined Credits* 

CRIM 280 Internship - 

or 

CRIM XXX Criminal Justice elective i_ 

Law Enforcement Concentration (15-16 credits) 
Law enforcement officials provide assistance, respond to emergency 
calls, investigate crime scenes, and testify in courtThis concentration 
places emphasis on developing the skills needed to be a poke offi- 
cer, including law, community reiatjons^mcedural law and criminal 
investigations. 



;- '3 I-"- : " ;:::::-: 1 


; : ; : : : :;•": :.— .-- : ::: : ■ 




: _ ; . ; _ ;;- .; 1 


Rsc'"3 -.-re--;:;-::: 


CRIM 280 
or 


Internship - 



Campuses 






Ivy Tech offers degrees in 29 locations. Courses are offered in communities across the state. 


ANDERSON (East Central) 


GREENCASTLE (Wabash Valley) 


NEW CASTLE (East Central) 


104 West 53rd Street 


1 North Calbert Way 


300 Trojan Lane 


Anderson, IN 46013-1502 


Greencastle,IN46135 


New Castle, IN 47362 


Phone:(765)643-7133 


INDIANAPOLIS (Central Indiana) 


Phone:(765)521-9012 


1-800-644-4882 


50 W. Fall Creek Parkway N. Dr. 


RICHMOND (Richmond) 


BATESVILLE (Southeast) 


Indianapolis, IN 46208-5752 


2357 Chester Boulevard 


920 County Line Road 


Phone:(317)921-4800 


Richmond, IN 47374-1298 


Batesville, IN 47006 


1-800-732-1470 


Phone:(765)966-2656 


Phone:(812)934-3954 
1-888-360-0027 


KOKOMO(Kokomo) 
1815 East Morgan Street 


1-800-659-4562 
SELLERSBURG (Southern Indiana) 


BLOOMINGTON (Bloomington) 


Kokomo, IN 46901-1373 


8204 Highway 311 


200 Daniels Way 


Phone:(765)459-0561 


Sellersburg, IN 47172-1897 


Bloomington, IN 47404-9272 


1-800-459-0561 


Phone:(812)246-3301 


Phone:(812)332-1559 
1-866-447-0700 


LAFAYETTE (Lafayette) 
3101 South Creasy Lane 


1-800-321-9021 

SOUTH BEND (North Central) 


COLUMBUS (Columbus) 


Lafayette, IN 47903-6299 


220 Dean Johnson Blvd. 


4475 Central Avenue 


Phone:(765)269-5000 


South Bend, IN 46601-3415 


Columbus, IN 47203-1868 


1-800-669-4882 


Phone:(574)289-7001 


Phone:(812)372-9925 
1-800-922-4838 


LAWRENCEBURG (Southeast) 
50 Walnut Dr. 


1-888-489-5463 
TEU CITY (Southwest) 


CONNORSVILLE (Richmond) 


Lawrenceburg, IN 47025-2971 


1034 31st Street 


717W.21stSt. 


Phone (812) 537-4010 


Tell City, IN 47586 


Connorsville, IN 47331 


1-800-715-1058 


Phone:(812)547-7915 


Phone:(765)825-9394 


LOGANSPORT (Kokomo) 


TERRE HAUTE (Wabash Valley) 


EAST CHICAGO (Northwest) 


2815 East Market Street 


7999 U.S.Highway 41 South 


410 E.Columbus Drive 


Logansport, IN 46947-2152 


Terre Haute, IN 478024898 


East Chicago, IN 46312-2714 


Phone:(574)753-5101 


Phone:(812)299-1121 


Phone:(219)392-3600 
1-800-843-4882 


MADISON (Southeast) 
590 Ivy Tech Drive 


1-800-377-4882 
VALPARAISO (Northwest) 


ELKHART (North Central) 


Madison, IN 47250-1881 


3100 Ivy Tech Dr. 


2521 Industrial Parkway 


Phone:(812)265-2580 


Valparaiso, IN 46383-2520 


Elkhart.lN 46516-5430 


1-800-403-2190 


Phone:(219)464-8514 


Phone:(574)293-4657 


MARION (East Central) 


1-800-843-4882 


EVANSVILLE (Southwest) 


261 S. Commerce Drivea 


WABASH (Kokomo) 


3501 First Avenue 


Marion, IN 46953-9370 


277 N.Thorne Street 


Evansville, IN 47710-3398 


Phone:(765)662-9843 


Wasbash, IN 4xxxx 


Phone:(812)426-2865 


1-800-554-1159 


Phone:(260)563-8828 


FORT WAYNE (Northeast) 


MICHIGAN CITY (Northwest) 


WARSAW (North Central) 


3800 North Anthony Boulevard 


3714 Franklin Street 


3755 Lake City Highway 


Fort Wayne, IN 46805-1 489 


Michigan City, IN 46360-7311 


Warsaw, IN 46580-3901 


Phone:(260)482-9171 


Phone:(219)879-9137 


Phone:(574)267-5428 


1-800-859-4882 


1-800-843-4882 


OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 


GARY (Northwest) 


MUNCIE (East Central) 


OFFICE OF THE PROVOST 


1440 East 35th Avenue 


4301 South Cowan Road 


50 W. Fall Creek Parkway N. Dr. 


Gary, IN 46409-1499 


Muncie, IN 47302-9448 


Indianapolis, IN 46208 


Phone:(219)981-1111 


Phone:(765)289-2291 


' Phone:(317)921-4800 


1-800-843-4882 


1-800-589-8324 





Ivy Tech Community College regions 




Toil-Free: 1-888-IVY-LINE 
Web Site: www.ivytech.edu 



Ivy Tech Program Inventory 



SCHOOL OF APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 



Advanced Manufacturing 



AAS 



Agriculture 



AAS, AS Concentrations: 

Agriculture Business Management 
Agriculture Equipment Management 
Crop Management 
Livestock Management 



Biotechnology 


AAS, AS 




Chemical Technology 


AAS 


Concentrations: 

Chemical Lab Tech 
Forensics Lab Tech 


Electrical Engineering Technology 


AS 




Kinesiology 


AS 




Mechanical Engineering Technology 


AS 




Pre-Engineering 


AS 




SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 


Accounting 

'Available online 


TC,AAS*,AS 
Certificate 


Bookkeeper 
Fundamental Payroll 


Business Administration 

* Available online 


TC,AAS*AS 
Certificate 


Human Resources Management 



Computer Information Systems TC, AAS*, AS* 
'Available online 



Certificate 



Concentrations: 

Database Management 
Programmer/Analyst 
Student Directed Studies 
Web Management 

Database 

Java Programming 
Visual Programming 
Web Management 



Computer Information Technology TC, AAS 



Concentrations: 

Computer Security 

Network 

PC Support and Administration 



Computer Information Technology 



Student Directed Studies 

Certificate Network Administration 

PC Support and Administration 
Routing and Switching 
Systems Security 



Information Security 



AAS 



Certificate 



Concentrations: 

Network Security 
Data Security 

Network Security 
Data Security 



Office Administration 

'Available online 



TC,AAS*,AS 



Concentrations: 

Administrative 

Legal 

Medical 

Software Applications 





Certificate 


Microsoft Office Specialist 


Transportation, Distribution 
and Logistics 


AS 




SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 


Early Childhood Education 

'Available online 


TC*,AAS*,AS 




Education 


AS 




SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS AND DESIGN 


Fine Arts 


AFA 




Interior Design 


AAS 


Concentrations: 

Decorative Arts and Design 
Garden Design 
Interior Design 



Visual Communications 



AAS, AS, AFA 



Concentrations: 

Film and Video 

Graphic Design 

Graphic Media Production 

Photography 

Web Design 

Web Development 



SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES 



Central Service Technician TC 



Dental Assisting 


TC 


Dental Hygiene 


AS 


Health Information Technology 


AS 



Medical Assisting 



TC.AAS 



Concentrations: 

Administrative 

Clinical 

EKG 

Generalist 

Insurance 

Medical Assistant 

Pharmacy Technician 

Phlebotomy 

Therapeutic Massage 

Transcription 



Medical Laboratory Technology 


AAS 


Nursing 


AS . 


Paramedic Science 


AAS, AS 


Physical Therapy Assisting 


AS 


Practical Nursing 


TC 


Radiation Therapy 


AS 


Radiologic Technology 


AS 


Respiratory Care 


AS 


Surgical Technology 


AAS, AS 



Therapeutic Massage TC, AAS 



SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



General Studies 

*Available online 



Liberal Arts 



AA,AS 



Concentrations: 

English and Communication 

Foreign Language 

Humanities 

Life and Physical Sciences 

Mathematics 

Social and Behavioral Sciences 



Professional Communication 



SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AND SOCIAL SERVICES 



Community Emergency AS 

Preparedness and Management 



Criminal Justice 

* Available online 



AAS, AS* 



Concentrations: 
Corrections 
Law Enforcement 
Youth Services 



Hospitality Administration 



TC,AAS,AS 



Concentrations: 

Baking and Pastry Arts 
Culinary Arts 
Event Management 
Hotel Management 
Restaurant Management 



Human Services 

'Available online 



TC,AAS*,AS* Concentrations: 

Correctional Rehabilitation Services 

Generalist 

Gerontology 

Mental Hearth 

Substance Abuse 



Library Technical Assistant 

'Available online 


AS* 


Concentrations: 

Children's Services 
Library Technology 


Mortuary Science 


AAS 




Paralegal Studies 

'Available online 


AAS*, AS* 





Public Safety 



SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY 



Automotive Technology 



TCAAS 



TC,AAS,AS 



Concentrations: 

Environmental Health and Safety 
Rre Stience 
Hazardous Materials 
Public Administration 



Concentrations: 

Alternative Fuel Technician 

Auto Body Repair 

Auto Service 

Automotive Service Management 

Dealer Co-Op 

Heavy Trudc/Diesei 

High Performance 



Automotive Technology 



Concentrations 

Motor Sports 

Motor Sports Fabrication 

Certificate Automotive Electrical/Electronia 
Brakes and Suspension 
Engine Performance 
Power Train 



Aviation Maintenance Technology AAS 



Concentrations: 

Aircraft Maintenance Technician 



Building Construction 
Management 



AAS, AS 



Building Trades Apprenticeship TC, AAS, AS 



Construction Technology 



Concentrations: 

Boilermaker 

Bricklayer 

Carpenter 

Cement Mason 

Electrical Lineman 

Electrician 

Elevator Constructor 

Roorlayer 

Glazier 

Heat/Frost Insulator/Asbestos Worker 

Ironworker 

Millwright 

Mining Operations 

Operating Engineer 

Painter 

Plasterer 

Plumber/Pipefitter 

Roofer 

Sheet Metal Worker 

Sprinkler Fitter 

Substation Mechanic 

Telecommunications Technician 



TC, AAS Concentrations: 

Architectural 

Cabinetry 

Electrical 

HVAC 

Interior Planning and Design 

Landscape Technology 

Residential and Light Carpentry 



Construction Technology 



Certificate 



Construction Technician 



Design Technology 

* Available online 



TC,AAS*,AS 



Concentrations: 

Architecture 

CAD-CAM 

Civil 

Computer Graphics 

Mechanical 



Electronics and Computer 
Technology 



AAS, AS 



Industrial Apprenticeship 



TC, AAS Concentrations: 

Electrician 

Facilities Maintenance 

Heating Ventilating/Air Conditioning 

Industrial Mechanic 

Machine Repair 

Mechanic-Gas/Electric Vehicles 

Millwright 

Mold/Die Maker 

Pattern Repairer 

Plumber/Pipefitter 

Sheet Metal 

Stationary Power Plant 

Toolmaker 



Industrial Technology TC, AAS, AS Concentrations: 

Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning 
Machining 
Maintenance 
Power Plant 
Process Operations 
Welding 
Certificate Fluid Power 

Heating and Air Conditioning 
Industrial Electrician 
Machine Tool 
Welding 



Machine Tool Technology 



AAS 




PROGRAM CURRICULUM 

Key for Curriculum Listings 

* Student Elective 

** Regionally Determined 

A Capstone 




10 



Accounting 



Program Description 

The Accounting program develops an understanding of 
accounting principles, business law, communications, busi- 
ness equipment and related areas of study in the field. 
Instruction is offered in computerized accounting systems. 
Technical skills in financial accounting, cost accounting and 
tax preparation are emphasized. 

Sample Careers 

Bookkeeper, payroll clerk, junior or staff accountant 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science, 
Technical Certificate 

Certificates Offered 

Bookkeeper, Fundamental Payroll 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in 
Accounting is available with III Kokomo, IUPUI and lUPUC.To 
view these transfer degree programs and to see if they are 
available at your local Ivy Tech campus, students should go to 
http://www.ivytech.edu. Students are encouraged to review 
these options with their advisors, to consult the current catalog 
of the institution to which they wish to transfer, and to contact 
the institution to which they with to transfer. Additional oppor- 
tunities for course and program transfer may also be available 
at your local campus. Students should contact the transfer office 
of their local Ivy Tech for further information. 



Associate of Applied Science 




To earn this degree, you must have 61 credits in t 


le following 


areas: 




General Education Core 19 




Professional/Technical Core 30 




Regionally Determined Credits 12 





General Education (19 Credits) 



COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 



ECON XXX Economics Elective 



ENGL 111 English Composition 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



MATH XXX Intermediate Algebra or Higher 



XXXX XXX Life/Physical Sciences Elective 



XXXX XXX Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 



Professional/Technical (30 credits) 



ACQ 101 Financial Accounting 



ACCT102 Managerial Accounting 



ACQ 105 Income Tax 



ACCT 201 Intermediate Accounting I 



ACCT 203 Cost Accounting I 



ACCT 225 Integrated Accounting Systems 



BUSN 101 Introduction to Business 



BUSN102 Business Law 



CINS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 



OFAD 218 Spreadsheets 



Other Required Courses (12 credits) 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Associate of Applied Science via Distance 
Education 

To earn this degree, you must have 61 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education 19 

Professional/Technical Core 42 

General Education (19 Credits) 



COMM101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 



ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 

or 

ECON 202 .Principles of Microeconomics 



ENGL 111 English Composition 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



MATH 111 Intermediate Algebra 



XXXX XXX Life/Physical Sciences Elective 



XXXX XXX Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sci. Elective 



Professional/Technical (42 credits) 



ACCT 101 Financial Accounting 



ACCT 102 Managerial Accounting 



ACCT 105 Income Tax 



ACCT 106 Payroll Accounting 



ACCT 201 Intermediate Accounting I 



ACCT 202 Intermediate Accounting II 



ACCT 203 Cost Accounting I 



ACCT 207 Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Entities 



A ACCT 225 Integrated Accounting Systems 



BUSN 101 Introduction to Business 



BUSN 102 Business Law 



BUSN 210 Managerial Finance 

or 

CINT 106 Microcomputer Operating Systems 

or 

OFAD 216 Business Communications 



CINS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 



OFAD 218 Spreadsheets 



Technical Certificate 

To earn this degree, you must have 31 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 7 

Professional/Technical Core 9 

Regionally Determined Credits 1 5 



he following 



General Education (7 Credits) 


** C0MM101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 

or 
** ENGL 111 English Composition 


3 

3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 1 


* XXXX XXX Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


Professional/Technical (9 credits) 


ACCT 101 Financial Accounting 


3 


ACCT 102 Managerial Accounting 


3 


CINS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


Other Required Courses (15 credits) 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 




Certificate: Bookkeeper 


Professional/Technical (18 credits) 


ACCT 101 Financial Accounting 


3 


ACCT 102 Managerial Accounting 


3 


ACCT 105 Income Tax 


3 


ACCT 106 Payroll Accounting 3 


CINS 101 Introductionto Microcomputers 3 


OFAD 218 Spreadsheets 3 




Certificate: Fundamental Payroll 


Professional/Technical (18 credits) 


ACCT 101 Financial Accounting 3 


ACCT 106 Payroll Accounting 3 


ACCT 122 Accounting Systems Application 3 


BUSN 102 Business Law • 3 


CINS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 


OFAD 218 Spreadsheets 3 



Advanced Manufacturing 



Program Description 

The Advanced Manufacturing Technology program is 
designed to prepare students for the modern manufactur- 
ing environment. This program will prepare you for 
employment with companies that have implemented team 
oriented design, production, quality, and maintenance sys- 
tems within the manufacturing environment. 

American manufacturers are becoming increasingly 
dependent upon the use of high-tech equipment that 
involves multiple,integrated systems.lt is critical that these 
companies be able to recruit and employ individuals who 
know how to operate, troubleshoot, and maintain this 
high-tech equipment. 

Sample Careers 

Jobs in-the manufacturing environment 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science 

Certificates Offered 

Manufacturing Operations, Mechatronics Certification Level I 

Concentrations Offered None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 64-65 credits in the 

following areas: 
General Education Core 20-21 

Professional/Technkal Core 32 

Regionally Determined Credits 1 2 



General Education (20-21 Credits) 


C0MM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 


ENGL 111 English Composition 3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 


MATH 1 1 1 1ntermediate Algebra 3 


MATH 137 Trigonometry with Ana lytic Geometry 


PHYS101 Physics 1 4 


XXXX XXX Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sciences 3-4 
Elective 


Professional/Technical (44 credits) 


ADMF 1 01 Key Principles of Advanced Manufacturing 3 


ADMF 102 Technology in Advanced Manufacturing ■ 


ADMF 103 Graphic Communications fix Manufacturing 3 


ADMF 113 Electrical and Electronic Principles lor 

Manufacturing 


ADMF 115 Materials and Prc:e::r: ; :- '.'".souring 


ADMF ": -_::~b:':- r: : ::: z -''r.i.v: J 


ADMF 201 Lean Manufacturing 3 




ADMF : 11 :.; :, 5,;:;~; - Vr.-;:.": 


ADMF 216 Projects in Advanced Manufacturing 3 


ADMF 280 Manufacturing Co-op Internship 2 
Elective 



Regionally Determined Credits 112 credits) 



Certificate: Manufacturing Operations 

Professional/Technical (21 credits) 



AOMF 101 Key Principles of Advanced Manufacturing 


3 


ADMF 102 Technology in Advanced Manufacturing 


3 


ADMF 109 Green Manufacturing Operations 


3 ' 


ADMF 118 World Class Manufacturing 


3 


ADMF 201 Lean Manufacturing 


3 


ADMF 211 Quality Systems in Manufacturing 3 


MATH 111 Intermediate Algebra 


3 



Certificate: Mechatronics Certification Level I 

Professional/Technical (18 credits) 



ADMF 101 Key Principles of Advanced Manufacturing 3 


ADMF 102 Technology in Advanced Manufacturing 3 


ADMF 112 Mechatronics I 


3 


ADMF 122 Mechatronics II 


3 


ADMF 202 Mechatronics III 


3 


ADMF 222 Mechatronics IV 3 




IVY TECH 



Agriculture 



12 



Program Description 

Indiana's agriculture industry is high-growth and high tech. 
Changes in the business of agriculture and technologies 
used have tremendous potential for our economy, the envi- 
ronment — and your future.The agriculture AAS degree at 
Ivy Tech will immerse students in the field of agriculture by 
taking a core of 27 credit hours of agriculture courses and 
18 credit hours of agriculture courses in one of four agricul- 
ture concentrations. Students will gain hands-on experi- 
ence and knowledge through class room, laboratory and 
field trip activities in a small dass size environment with 
highly educated and experience instructors in agricultural 
disciplines. A supervised agriculture internship is also 
required in the curriculum. This internship allows students 
to apply concepts learned in the classroom, while develop- 
ing connections within the agriculture industry 

Sample Careers 

Farm management, technical representative, meat processor 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered 

Agriculture Business Management, Agriculture Equipment 
Management, Crop Management, Livestock Management 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in 
Agriculture is available with Purdue University. To view these 
Associate of Science transfer degree programs and to see if they 
are available at your local Ivy Tech campus, students should go to 
http://www.ivytech.edu/. Students are encouraged to review 
these options with their advisors, to consult the current catalog 
of the institution to which they wish to transfer, and to contact 
the institution to which they wish to transfer. Additional oppor- 
tunities for course and program transfer may also be available at 
your local campus. Students should contact the transfer office of 
their local Ivy Tech for further information. 



Associate of Applied Science 




To earn this degree, you must have 65-67 credits in the 


following areas: 




General Education Core 


19 


Professional/Technical Core 


27 


Concentration Courses 


12 


Regionally Determined Credits 


7-9 



General Education (19 Credits) 



CHEM 101 introductory Chemistry 1 3 


COMM 1 XX Communications Elective 3 


ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 1 


MATH 1XX Mathematics Elective 


3 


MATH 1XX Mathematics Elective 

or 

SON 1XX Science Elective 


3 


XXXX XXX Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sciences Elective3 


Professional/Technical (27 credits) 


AGRI100 Introduction to Agriculture 3 


AGR1 101 Agricultural Data Management 


3 


AGRI110 Introductory Agricultural Business and Economics 3 


AGR1 1 1 1 Introduction to Crop Production 


3 


AGRI113 Introduction to Animal Science 3 


AGRI114 Introduction to Agricultural Systems 


3 


AGRI117 Soil Science 


3 



AGRI 200 Precision Farming Technology 



3 



A AGRI 210 Management Methods for Agriculture Business 3 

Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Agriculture Business Management Concentration 

(19-21 credits) 

The Agricultural Business Management Concentration prepares stu- 
dents for management positions in various agriculture businesses, 
including agricultural marketing and processing firms, agricultural 
supply and service firms, and agriculture production and manage- 
ment and farming operations. Students will study sales, advertising, 
merchandising, economics, farm management, marketing, agrono- 
my and animal science. 

3 
3 



AGRI 204 Agriculture Salesmanship 



AGRI 207 Marketing Agriculture Products 



AGRI 208 Agriculture Financial Records 



AGRI 209 Agriculture Commodity Marketing 



Regionally Determined Credits 



3 
3 

7-9 



Agriculture Equipment Management Concentration 

(19-21 credits) 

Agriculture Eguipment Management prepares individuals for a 
career in agriculture the equipment industry. Students will study 
the management of agriculture businesses while learning about 
machinery principles of agriculture production. Course work taken 
for this concentration will prepare students to work as parts 
assistants, setup technicians, and office support in agriculture 
equipment businesses 



AGRI 213 Agriculture Equipment Power Systems 


3 


AGRI 219 Crop Machinery and Equipment 3 


AUTC152 Diesel Engine Theory 


3 


INDT104 Fluid Power Basics 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


7-9 



Crop Management Concentration (19-21 credits) 
Our state is well-known for its corn and soybeans, but changing 
technology is broadening the scope of crop production in Indiana. In 
this concentration, you'll study the science behind crop production, 
learning how to maximize profit and production, adapt to changing 
environmental conditions, and how to best use new technology in 
agronomic row crop management. Careers in with this concentra- 
tion include fertilizer and pesticide applicators, seed agronomist, 



precision agriculture technicians, seed research technicians and km* 

farm operators. 

AGRI 216 Disease and Insea Identification arid Control 3 

AGRI 217 Soil Fertility 3_ 

AGRI 218 Weed Identification and Control 3 



AGRI 219 Crop Machinery and Equipment 



Regionally Determined Credits 



M 



Livestock Management Concentration (19-21 credits/ 
The Livestock Management Concentration is designed to prepare 
individuals for a career in the world of animal agriculture. The grow- 
ing area of animal care requires a strong background in die sciences 
of behavior, genetics, breeding, reproduction, nutrition and health. 
Jobs students might get with this degree concentration include 
herdsman positions, A.I. technicians, livestock managers and home 
farm operatorc. 



AGRI 202 Animal Production Facilities 



AGRI 203 Livestock Selection and Evaluation 
AGRI 205 Animal Nutrition and Livestock Disease 
AGRI 206 Animal Anatomy and Physiology 



Regionally Determined Credits 



: 
: 

3 
3 




IVY TECH 



Automotive Technology 



Program Description 

The Automotive Technology program offers exciting careerc 
and unlimited opportunities. Through the use of modem 
equipment and A.S.L master certified instructors, students 
learn how to diagnose and repair the modern automobile. 
This is a "hands-on" training program that allows plenty of 
lab time to develop the skills needed to be a successful 
automotive technician. 

Sample Careers 

Body repair technician, insurance adjuster, damage appraiser, 
automotive service and sales manager 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science, 
Technical Certificate 

Certificates Offered 

Automotive Electrical/Electronics. Brakes and Suspension 
Engine Performance, PowerTrain 

Concentrations Offered 

Alternative Fuel Technician, Auto Body Repair, Auto Service, 
Automotive Service Management, Dealer Co-op, Heavy 
Truck/Diesel, Motorsports 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in 
Automotive Technology is available with Indiana State 
University. To view this Associate of Science transfer degree pro- 
gram and to see if it is available at your local Ivy Tech campus, 
students should go to http://www.ivytech. edu/. Students are 
encouraged to review this option with their advisors, to consult 
the current catalog of the institution to which they wish to 
transfer, and to contact the institution to which they wish to 
transfer. Additional opportunities for course and program trans- 
fer may also be available at your local campus. Students should 
contact the transfer office of their local Ivy Tech for further 
information. 



Associate of Applied Science 




To earn this degree, you must have 67-69 credits in the follow- 


ing areas: 




General Education Core 


19-20 


Professional/Technical Core 


24 


Concentration Courses 


12 


Regionally Determined Credits 


'12-13 



General Education (19-20 Credits) 



ENGL 111 English Composition 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



MATH 1XX Math Elective 



XXXXXXX General Education Elective 



Professional/Technical (24credits) 



AUTC 101 Steering and Suspension Systems 
AUTC 105 Powertrain Service 



AUTC 107 Engine Principles and Design 



AUTC 109 Engine Performance 



COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

or 

COMM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 



3 



3 



SON 111 Physical Science 

or 

SCIN 101 Science of Traditional and Alternative Energy 



XXXX XXX Humanities/Social and Behavoiral Sci. Elective 3 



AUTC 113 


Electrical and Electronics I 


3 


AUTC 121 


Braking Systems 


3 


AUTC 123 


Electrical and Electronics II 


3 


AUTC 201 


Climate Control Systems 


3 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Alternative Fuel Technician (24-25 credits) 
An alternative fuel technician needs an understanding of traditional 
vehicle maintenance and repair skills combined with knowledge of 
alternative fuel systems.This concentration will offer training in safe 
handling of fuel systems and problem solving techniques. 



AUTC 103 


Principles of Alternative/Renewable Energie 


3 


AUTC 106 


Compressed Natural Gas 1 


3 


AUTC 114 


Compressed Natural Gas II 


3 


a AUTC 210 


Hybrid Systems 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12-13 



Automotive Service Management Concentration 

(24-25 credits) 

Automotive shops operate at their best when they're run smoothly. 
This concentration will help you develop the necessary wide variety 
of managerial and technical skills, such as hiring, training, supervi- 
sion, inventory control, computing, and budget management. 



ACCT101 Financial Accounting 


3 


A AUTC 253 Service Organization and Parts 


3 


BUSN 101 Introduction to Business 


3 


MKTG101 Principles of Marketing 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12-13 



Auto Service Concentration (24-25 credits) 
Modern cars need trained technicians to diagnose and repair them. 
This concentration offers "hands-on" training in engine rebuilding, 
fuel injection, automatic transmission/transaxle, computer engine 
control diagnosis and more. 



AUTC 127 Engine Repair 


3 


AUTC 209 Engine Performance 1 


3 


AUTC 219 Engine Performance II 


3 


A AUTC 243 Advanced Electronics 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12-13 



14 



Auto Body Repair Concentration (24-25 credits) 
Unibody construction and synthetic materials have made 
advanced training in automotive body repair important for those 
just entering the fields as well as for those who are currently work- 
ing. This concentration is designed to teach the skills you need to 
repair today's auto body. 



AUBR101 Body Repair Fundamentals 3 


AUBR103 Auto Paint Fundamentals 3 


AUBR 125 Automotive Body Welding 


3 


A AUBR 207 Capstone Course 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12-13 



Dealer Co-Op Concentration (24-25 credits) 
This ASE/NATEF master certified training program allows you to 
choose one of the cooperative education specialties which combine 
classroom and lab training at the college with hands-on work expe- 
rience at an independent service facility or franchise dealership. 



ft. AUTC243 


Advanced Electronics 


3 


AUTC274 


Cooperative - Electrical Systems 


3 


AUTC276 


Cooperative - Engine Performance 


3 


TECH 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


Regionally 


Determined Credits 


12-13 


Heavy Truck/Diesel Concentration (24-25 credits) 


TRCK 101 


Heavy Truck Steering and Suspension 


3 


TRCK127 


Diesel Engine Repair 


3 


a TRCK 219 


Diesel Engine Performance 


3 


TRCK 224 


Heavy Truck Electrical Systems 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12-13 



Motorsports Concentration (24-25 credits) 
Do you like fast cars? Want to work with automotive, aviation, 
marine, motorcycle, motorsports and-racing industries? This train- 
ing program offers the education demanded by employers. By 
combining lessons in the classroom with practical hands-on expe- 
rience in the lab or at the track, you will set your career in gear. 



AUTC149 


Introduction to Motor Sports 


3 


AUK 250 


Motor Sports Fabrication I 


3 


AUTC 254 


High Performance Engines/Systems I 


3 


a AUTC 267 


Motorsports Project 


3 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Technical Certificate 

To earn this degree, you must have 31 credits in the following 
areas: 
General Education Core 


Professional/Technical Core 


3 


Concentration Courses 


6 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 



General Education (7 Credits) 



** COMM XXX Communications Course 


3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective . 


** XXXXXXX Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sci. Elective 


3 


Professional/Technical (3 credits) 


AUTC 101 Steering and Suspension Systems 


3 


Choose One of the Following Concentrations 
Alternative Fuel Technician Concentration (21 credits) 


AUTC 1 1 3 Electrical and Electronics 1 


3 


AUTC 121 Braking Systems ~ 3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 


Auto Body Repair Concentration (21 credits) 


AUBR 101 Body Repair Fundamentals 3 


AUBR 103 Auto Paint Fundamentals 3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 


Automotive Service Management Concentration 

(21 credits) 


AUTC 113 Electrical and Electronics I 


3 


AUTC 121 Braking Systems 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 


Heavy Truck/Diesel Concentration (21 credits) 


AUTC 1 1 3 Electrical and Electronics 1 


3 


TRCK 121 Braking Systems 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 



Motorsports Concentration 


Qlcredtej 


AUTC 107 Engine Principles and LV,ign 


3 


AUTC 1 1 3 Electrical and Electronics 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 



Certificates 



Automotive Electrical/Electronics '-. Cr« • 



AUTC 109 


Engine Performance I 3 


AUTC 113 


Electrical and Electronics I 3 


AUTC 123 


Electrical and Electronics II 3 


AUTC 201 


Climate Control Systems 3 


AUTC 209 


Engine Performance II 3 


AUTC 219 


Engine Performance III 3 


Brakes and Suspension (18 Credits) 


AUTC 101 


Steering and Suspension Systems 2 


AUTC 105 


Powertrain Service 3 


AUTC 109 


Engine Performance 3 


AUTC 113 


Elearic3 : a-.: E : i^ r :' 'J 3 


AUTC 121 


:':■ -: 5, stems 3 


AUTC 123 


Electrical and Electronic II 3 


Engine Performance (l8Credits) 


AUTC 107 


Engine Principles and Design 3 


AUTC 109 


Engine Performance I 3 


AUTC 113 


Electrical and Electronics I • 


AUTC 209 


Engine Performance II 3 


AUTC 219 


".' : : r'"':'""3nce III 3 


AUTC 229 


Driveability Diagnosis 3 



Power Train (18 Credits) 




AUTC 105 Powertrain Service • 




AUTC113 Electric 3": E ;::•;-_ 3 


AUTC 125 Vanua Dn.etrains 


3 


AUTC 127 Engine Repair 


3 


AUTC 135 Automotive Transmission 


3 



IS 



Aviation Maintenance Technology 



Program Description 

The Aviation Maintenance Technology program will prepare 
you to become a certified Aviation Technician with ratings for 
Airframe or Powerplant.The course of instruction introduces 
control methods, team building, technical writing and com- 
puter skills. 

Sample Careers 

Employment with commercial air carriers and private mainte- 
nance operations 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered 

Airframe, Powerplant 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 



16 




Associate of Applied Science 




To earn this degree, you must have 72-76 credits 


n the following 


areas: 




General Education Core 


20-21 


Professional/Technical Core 


18 


Concentration Courses 


30-37 



General Education (20-21 Credits) 



ENGL 111 English Composition 3 


ENGL 211 Technical Writing 


3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 1 


MATH 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 


MATH 131 Algebra/Trigonometry I 


3 


PHYS101 Physics 1 


4 


* XXXXXXX Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sci. Elective 


3-4 


Professional/Technical (18 Credits) 


AVTT141 Aviation Basics 1 


3 


AVIT 142 Aviation Basics II 


3 


AVIT144 Aircraft Electricity 


5 


AVIT 145 Aircraft Ground Servicing 


2 


AVIT 146 Aviation Regulations 


2 


AVIT 148 Aviation Materials and Processes 3 



Choose One Of The Following Concentrations 

Airframe Concentration (37 Credits) 
The airframe concentration prepares you for working on aircraft struc- 
tures and their associated systems. At the completion of this concentra- 
tion, you are eligible to take the Federal Aviation Administration's 
exams. Successful completion of the FAA exams will earn the student a 
FAA mechanics certificate with an airframe rating. 



AVIT 222 


Nonmetallic Structures 


6 


AVIT 226 


Airframe Electrical Systems 


3 


AVIT 227 


Aircraft Sheetmetal 


8 


AVIT 228 


Aircraft Instruments and Avionics 




AVIT 241 


Aircraft Fuel System and Welding Practices 




a AVIT 242 


Aircraft Inspection and Rigging 




AVIT 243 


Aircraft Hydraulic and Pneumatic Systems 




AVIT 244 


Aircraft Landing Gear Systems 




AVIT 245 


Aircraft System 





Powerplant Concentration (34 Credits) 
The powerplant concentration prepares you for working on aircraft 
piston and turbine engines and their associated systems. At the 
completion of this concentration, you are eligible to take the 
Federal Aviation Administration's exams. Successful completion of 
the FAA exams will earn the student a FAA mechanic certificate 
with powerplant rating. 



AVIT 231 


Reciprocatinq Powerplants 7 


AVIT 232 


Turbine Powerplants 


AVIT 233 


Powerplant Fuel and Induction Systems 3 


AVIT 235 


Powerplant Fluid and Indicating Systems 3 


AVIT 237 


Propellers 5 


AVIT 251 


Engine Cooling and Exhaust 3 


a AVIT 252 


Engine Install, Conformity, and Ignition 3 


AVIT 253 


Engine Starting System 3 




IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY 
COLLEGE 



Biotechnology 



Program Description 

Do you want a career on the cutting edge? The biotechnolo- 
gy program will prepare you to work in a variety of life sci- 
ence laboratory settings. Emphasis is placed on learning 
applications such as analysis of biological molecules, use of 
bioreactors and fermentors, recombinant DNA technology, 
generation of cell cultures and safe operation of laboratory 
equipment. 

Sample Careers 

Clinical or Laboratory Technician 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in 
Biotechnology is available with lUPUl.To view this Associate 
of Science transfer degree program and to see if it is available 
at your local Ivy Tech campus, students should go to 
http://www.ivytech.edu/. 

Students are encouraged to review this option with their 
advisors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to 
which they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to 
which they wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course 
and program transfer may also be available at your local 
campus. Students should contact the transfer office of their 
local Ivy Tech for further information. 




General Education (24-25 Credits) 



BIOL 121 General Biology 



CHEM105 General Chemistry I 



CHEM106 General Chemistry I 



ENGL 111 English Composition 



XXXX XXX Humanities/Social Science Elective 
IVYTXXX Life Skills Elective 



Professional/Technical (43 credits) 



BIOT 101 Introduction to Biotechnology 



MATH 133 College Algebra with Analytic Geometry 

or 

MATH 136 College Algebra 



COMM101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

or 

COMM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 



BIOT 103 Safety and Regulatory Compliance for 

Biotechnology 
BIOT 201 Cell Cultureand Cellular Processes 
BIOT 21 1 Analytical Methods for Biotechnology I 



BIOT 212 Analytical Methods for Biotechnology II 3 


BIOT 227 Genetic Engineering and DNA Analysis 4 


BIOT 233 Protein Analysis and Purification 4 


A BIOT 280 Internship 3 


Regionally Determined Credits 12 










-«- 






IVY TECH 

COMV : 

COLLEGE 





II 



Building Construction Management 



Program Description 

The Building Construction Management program will pre- 
pare you for work in residential, commercial and industrial 
construction and construction consulting. Emphasis is placed 
on building a foundation in materials science, concrete and 
soil technology, static and strength of materials science,sur- 
veying and building fabrication. 

Sample Careers 

Field engineer, Estimator 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




18 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in Building 
Construction Management is available with Indiana State 
University. To view this Associate of Science transfer degree pro- 
gram and to see if it is available at your local Ivy Tech campus, 
students should go to http-J/www. ivytech.edu/. 

Students are encouraged to review this option with their advi- 
sors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to which 
they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to which 
they wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course and 
program transfer may also be available at your local campus. 
Students should contact the transfer office of their local Ivy Tech 
for further information. 



Associate of Applied Science 






To earn this degree, you must have 62 credits in the 


following 


areas: 






General Education Core 


20 




Professional/Technical Core 


30 




Regionally Determined Credits 


12 





General Education (20 Credits) 



COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speakinq 


3 


ENGL 1 1 1 Enqlish Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 1 


MATH 1 1 1 Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MATH 121 Geometry -Trigonometry 


3 


PHYS101 Physics 1 


4 


XXXX XXX Humanities/Social Science Elective 


3 


Professional/Technical (42 credits) 


BCOM 1 02 Construction Graphics and Print Reading 


3 


BC0M 104 Commercial and Industrial Construction 


3 


BCOM 105 Concrete and Soils 


3 


BCOM 115 Construction Management Practices 


3 


BCOM 206 Construction Estimating 


3 


BCOM 210 Codes and Specifications 


3 


a BCOM 220 Project Planning and Control 


3 


DESN210 Surveying 


3 



DESN221 Statics 3 


DESN222 Strength of Materials 


Regionally Determined Credits 


— 12 










-^~ 






IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY 
COLLEGE 





Business Administration 



Program Description 

Whether your career goal is to start your own business, to 
advance your career in an existing business, or to continue 
your education at a four-year institution, the Business 
Administration program can be a stepping stone on your 
path to success. The program provides outstanding career 
opportunities by giving you new job skills or by improving 
the ones you already possess. 

Sample Careers 

Sales assistant, first line manager, real estate office assistant, 
restaurant assistant manager 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science, 
Technical Certificate 

Certificates Offered 

Human Resource Management 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in Business 
Administration is available with Ball State University, Indiana 
State University, IU East, IU Kokomo, IU South Bend, IUPU 
Columbus, lUPU-Fort Wayne, Indiana Wesleyan University, 
Purdue University and the University of Southern Indiana.To 
view these Associate of Science transfer degree programs and to 
see if they are available at your local Ivy Tech campus, students 
should go to http://www.ivytech.edu/. 

Students are encouraged to review these options with their 
advisors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to 
which they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to 
which they wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course 
and program transfer may also be available at your local cam- 
pus. Students should contact the transfer offi ce of their local Ivy 
Tech for further information. 



Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 61-63 credits in the 
following areas: 

General Education Core 19-21 

Professional/Technical Core 

General Education (i 9 -21 Credits) 



C0MM101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 


* ECONXXX EconomiG Elective 


3 


ENGL 111 English Composition 3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 1 


** MATH 1 XX Mathematics Elective 3 


* XXXXXXX Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sci. Elective 3-4 


* XXXXXXX Life /Physical Sciences Elective 


3-4 


Professional/Technical (44 credits) 


ACCT101 Financial Accounting 


3 


ACCT 102 Managerial Accounting 


BUSN101 Introduction to Business 


3 


BUSN 102 Business Law 


3 


BUSN105 Principles of Management 


3 


BUSN 120 Business Ethics and Social Responsibility 


3 



BUSN 202 


Human Resources Management 3 


* BUSN 204 


Case Problems in Business 3 


CINS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 3 


MKTG 101 


Principles of Marketing 3 


•"XXXXXXX 


Regionally Determined Credits 12 


• 



Associate of Applied Science via 
Distance Education 

To earn this degree, you must have 61-63 credits in the follow- 
ing areas: 
General Education Core 19-21 

Professional/Technical Core 42 



General Education (19-21Credtts) 


C0MM 101 


Fundamenca : /'-.: : l: : - -; 


3 


* ECONXXX 


EconomiG Elective 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


- 


" MATH1XX 


Mathematics Elective 


3 


* XXXXXXX 


Humanities/Social And Behavioral Sd Elective 3-4 


* XXXXXXX 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3-4 


Professional/Technical (42 credits) 


ACQ 101 


Financial Accounting 


3 


ACCT 102 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


BUSN 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


BUSN 102 


Business Law 




BUSN 105 


Prina'ples of Management 


3 


BUSN 120 


Business Ethics a r : See'; -"a::: - :: : 


3 


BUSN 202 


-.-;- : a;:_':;: 'a - ::; - ;-: 


3 


« BUSN 204 


CasePrcbleTS : " :.s "ass 


3 


CINS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


MKTG 101 


Principles of Marketinq 


3 


"XXXXXXX 


D e: ana . ?;:: — a: '.■-.: \ 


12 



*** 12 hours of School of Business program ekcoKS fprefnes 
ACG, BANK, BUSN, CINS, ONI, INSC, LOGM, MKTG. OfAD, OPMT. 
SPMT) or 12 hours of self-directed courses with advisor 



19 



20 



Business Administration continued 

approval ^^^^^^^ 

Technical Certificate 

To earn this degree, you must have 31 credits in the 
following areas: 

General Education Core 7 

Professionalfiechnical Core 9 

Regionally Determined Credits 1 5 

General Education (7 Credits) 

** ENGL111 English Composition 3 

IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 1 

XXXX XXX Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sci. Elective 3~~ 

Professional/Technical (24 credits) : 



BU5N101 Introduction to Business 



BUSN 105 Principles of Management 



CINS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 
Regionally Determined Credits 

Certificate 

Human Resources Management u\ credits) 



BUSN 101 


Introduction to Business 3 


BUSN 105 


Principles of Management 3 


BUSN 202 


Human Resource Management 3 


BUSN 221 


Principles of Employment 3 


BUSN 222 


Benefits Administration 3 


BUSN 223 


Occupational Safety and Health 3 


0PMT211 


Labor Relations 3 



Central Service Technician 



Program Description' 

Find your place in the ever-growing healthcare industry. 
Central service departments are the center of all activity 
surrounding supplies and equipment needed in surgery 
and other patient care areas.You would have a major role in 
preventing infections by cleaning, decontaminating, 
assembling, sterilizing, and packaging all instruments used 
during surgery. 

Sample Careers 

Central Service Technician 

Degrees Available 

Technical Certificate 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Technical Certificate 

To earn this degree, you must have 36 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 7 

Professional/Technical Core 29 



General Education (7 Credits) 


ENGL 111 English Composition 


3 


IVVT1XX Life Skills Elective 1 


PSYC101 Introduction to Psychology 


3 


Professional/Technical (29 credits) 


CSTC 101 Infection Control Procedures 


4 


CSTC 102 Surgical Instrumentation 


2 


CSTC 103 Fundamentals of Health Careers 3 


CSTC 104 Clinical Applications 1 


3 


CSTC 105 Fundamentals of Central Service Technician Skills 


4 


CSTC 106 Clinical Applications II 


3 


CSTC 107 Application of Central Service Technician Skills 


3 


CSTC 108 Clinical Applications III 


4 


HLHS101 Medical Terminology 3 




IVY TECH 



Chemical Technology 

Program Description 

If you're interested in science and mathematics, chemical 
technology could be for you. The focus of the program is 
using principles of science, math and technology to prepare 
and analyze samples in a variety of laboratory settings 

Sample Careers 

Laboratory Technician.Forensic Technician 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered 

Chemical Laboratory Technician, Forensics Laboratory 
Technician 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 62 credits in the 

following areas: 
General Education Core 23 

Professional/Technical Core 22 

"Concentration Courses 17 



General Education (23 Credits) 


CHEM 105 


General Chemistry 1 


5 


CHEM 106 


General Chemistry II 


5 


* COMMXXX 


Communication Elective 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


IVYTXXX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 136 


College Algebra 


3 


* XXXXXXX 


Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sci. Elective 


3 


Professional/Technical (22 credits) 


CHEM 211 


Organic Chemistry 1 


5 


CHMT101 


Industrial Laboratory Techniques 


3 


CHMT170 


Success in Science 


1 


CHMT201 


Industrial Instrumentation and Techniques 1 


3 


a CHMT202 


Industrial Instrumentation and Techniques II 


3 


CHMT270 


Professional Development 


1 


CHMT280 


Co-op/Internship 


3 


TECH 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Chemical Labratory Technician Concentration 

(17 credits) 

If you have an interest in science.mathematics, health, or technology, 
and have good communication skills, you may find success as a 
chemical lab technician.Chemical lab technicians work in laborato- 
ries and production facilities.They use state of the art technological 
equipment to gather and analyze data. 



ADMF 101 


Key Principles of Advanced Manufacturing 3 


CHEM 212 


Organic Chemistry II 5 


CHMT204 


Presentation of Technical Issues 3 


CHMT 207 


Food, Drugs, and Polymers 3 


CHMT210 


Quantitative Analysis 3 



Forensic Labratory Technician Concentration 

(17 credits) 

The forensic laboratory technician concentration wfl help you 
develop skills of quantitative and qualitative analysis to be used in 
laboratories of police departments, crime scene investigation and 

morgues. 



CHEM 212 


Organic Chemistry II 




CHMT 210 


Quantitative Analysis 




CRIM 101 


Introduction to the Criminal Justice Systems 




F0RN 101 


Introduction to Forensk Science 




FORN 203 


Crime Methods and Techniques 






IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY 

COLLEGE 



21 



Community Emergency Preparedness & Management 



Program Description 

Significant changes have occurred since September 2001. 
The Community Emergency Preparedness and Management 
program is designed to address those changes and enhance 
the ability of individuals to prevent and respond safely and 
recover from natural or man-made disasters. 

This program has been carefully designed with input from 
employers who know the demand of emergency manage- 
ment, in short, caree5 in emergency preparedness and 
response and environmental health and safety are in 
demand.Those benefiting from the associate degree are first 
responders, firefighters, military personnel, corrections and 
law enforcement professionals, emergency managers, those 
in the health care professions, as well as corporate and gov- 
ernment workers. 

Sample Careers 

Environmental science and protection technicians, firefighters, 
first line supervisors of firefighting and prevention workers 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 



22 




Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 66-68 credits in the 

following areas: 
General Education Core 24-26 

Professional/Technical Core 42 



General Education (24-26 Credits) 
'English/Communications (9 credits) Choose 3 courses: 


COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


COMM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENGL 211 


Technical Writing 


3 


Mathematics (3 credits) 


MATH 1XX 


Mathematics Elective 


3 


Humanities/Social Sciences (9 credits) Choose 3 courses: 


PHIL 102 


Introduction to Ethic 


3 


POLS 101 


Introduction to American Government and Politics 3 


POLS 112 


State and Local Government 


3 


PSYC253 


Introduction to Social Psychology 


3 


S0CI111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 


Life/Physical Sciences (3-5 credits) 


BIOL 201 


General Microbiology I 


4 


CHEM 105 


General Chemistry 


5 


CHEM111 


Chemistry I 


4 


SON 111 


Physical Science 


3 


Professional/Technical (42 credits) 


CEPM101 


Introduction to Homeland Security 


3 


CEPM 102 


Principles of Emergency Management 
and Planning 


3 


CEPM 103 


Basic Skills in Emergency Program Management 3 


CEPM 104 


Disaster and Terrorism Awareness 


3 


CEPM 105 


Introduction to Mitigation 


3 


CEPM 106 


Disaster Response and Recovery Operations 


3 


CEPM 107 


Exercise Program Design, Planning 
and Evaluation 


3 


CEPM 210 


Understanding and Combating Terrorism 


3 


CEPM 212 


Homeland Security Intelligence Ops 
and Tactical Skills 


3 



CEPM 213 


Weapons of Mass Destruction and 
Hazardous Materials 


3 


CEPM 214 


Understanding the Incident Command System 


3 


CEPM 215 


Contingency Planning and Incident Command 


3 


CEPM 216 


Public Information Officers Course 


3 


a CEPM 257 


Preparedness Practicum 


3 




rVYTECH 



Computer Information Systems 



Program Description 

Get the knowledge you need to meet today's business 
requirements in the computer world. The CIS curriculum is 
designed to provide a flexible and comprehensive education. 
You will be instructed in both theoretical concepts and prac- 
tical applications. You also will become familiar with pro- 
gramming languages, operating systems, database manage- 
ment systems, and web design, as well as application pro- 
gramming concepts and practices. 

Sample Careers 

Information Manager, Website Manager, 
Computer Programmer 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science 
Technical Certificate 

Certificates Offered 

Database, Java Programming, Visual Programming 
Web Management 

Concentrations Offered 

Database Management, Programmer/Analyst 
Student Directed Studies, Web Management 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in 
Computer Information Systems is available with Indiana State 
University, IUPUI, lUPU-Columbus, IU East and the University of 
Southern Indiana.To view these Associate of Science transfer 
degree programs and to see if they are available at your local Ivy 
Tech campus, students should go to http://www.ivytech.edu/. 

Students are encouraged to review these options with their 
advisors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to 
which they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to 
which they wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course 
and program transfer may also be available at your local cam- 
pus. Students should contact the transfer office of their local Ivy 
Tech for further information. 




General Education (19 Credits) 



COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


* ECONXXX 


Economics Elective 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective . 


1 


** MATH 1XX 


Mathematics Elective 


3 


* XXXXXXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


* XXXXXXX 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 


Professional/Technical (31 credits) 


ACQ 101 


Financial Accounting 


3 


BUSN101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


CINS101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


CINS102 


Information Systems Fundamentals 


3 


CINS113 


Logic, Design and Programming 


3 


CINS125 


Database Design and Management 


3 


CINS157 


Web Site Development 


3 


CINS203 


Systems Analysis and Design 


3 



a CINS 279 Capstone Class (new course) 


CINT 106 Microcomputer Operating Systems 


3 


CINT 1 2 1 Network Fundamentals 


3 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Database Management Concentration i 5 credits; 
The focus of the Database Management concentration is teaming to 
work with the storage and management of electronic data. 
Emphasis is placed on learning database management systems soft- 
wareand understanding and recommending user system require- 
ments and data storage methods. 



Four courses 


from list: 




CINS131 


Structured Query Language 


3 


CINS205 


Database Design Using Oracle 


3 


CINS215 


Held Study 


3 


CINS 225 


Advanced Database Management Systems 


3 


CINSXXX 


Programming Course Involving 
Database Manipulation 


3 


CINT 251 


Introduce:- :: ;.::;-: J;:.". 


3 


CINS 280 


Coop/1 ntemship 


'-: 



Programmer/Analyst Concentration "1 re: 
Interested in learning a different language? Just ice humans, com- 
puters speak their own languages. This concentration places empha- 
sis on developing advanced programming skills, mastering a variety 
of computer languages. 



Four courses 


from list: 




CINS 107 
CINS 112 


Microcomputer Programming 

Introduc: : _ :: 5 ~- ;: :-sand 


3 

3 


Game Development 


CINS 118 


- ::_;: - :: J,:3."_ : ::i : 




CINS 121 


CC— ;=--cc-3--'-: 




CINS 122 


::::.-_- ; -: - ;3 - e - :3 ; 


3 


CINS 123 


i>>; :;•.=-;. are -::-; ~: 


3 


CINS 124 


: ?;;; : ;: : : 


5 


CINS 126 


She ;:—;-:_;-:-::;■:—::-:-- 


lers 3 


CINS 131 




3 


CINS 136 






CINS 137 


Visual Basic Programming 




CINS 218 


^.r:e:.:;:_ : -::; -: 


3 


CINS 221 


Advanced CC— <i--~:i : 





13 



Computer Information Systems continued 



CINS 222 


Advanced RPG Programming 3 


. CINS 236 


Advanced JAVA Programming 3 


CINS 237 


Advanced Visual Basic Programming 3 


CINS 238 


Advanced Simulation and Game Development 3 


CINS 253 


Graphics Image Lab 3 



Student Directed Studies Concentration (12 credits) 
The student directed studies concentration allows you to select elec- 
tive courses from a wide list of options, focusing on specific areas of 
interest. 



Four courses from the list: 


ACCTXXX 


Accounting Elective 


0-12 


BUSN XXX 


Business Elective 


0-12 


CINS XXX 


Computer Information Systems Elective 


0-12 


CINTXXX 


Computer Information Technology Elective 


0-12 


CRIMXXX 


Criminal Justice Elective 


0-12 


EEC XXX 


Electronics and Computer Technology 


0-12 


ENGL 211 


Technical Writing 


0-3 


OFAD XXX 


Office Administration Elective 


0-12 


vise XXX 


Visual Communications Elective 


0-12 



Web Management Concentration (12 credits) 
Websites must be both appealing and functional.This concentration 
will help you develop the skills necessary to manage great websites. 
Those skills include graphic design, understanding of operating 
systems, principles in eBusiness and programming techniques. 



Four courses 


from the list: 


BUSN 209 


Introduction to e-Business 3 


CINS 136 


Introduction to Java Programming 3 


CINS 137 


Visual Basic Programming 3 


CINS 236 


Advanced Java Programming 3 


CINS 253 


Graphic Image Lab 3 


CINS 257 


Advanced Web Site Development (required) 3 


CINS 258 


Web Applications Programming 3 


CINS 259 


Web Administration (required) 3 


CINS XXX 


Web-based Programming Elective 3 


CINT109 


UNIX Operating System 3 


CINT 201 


Advanced Operating Systems: LINUX (required) 3 



24 



Associate of Applied Science via 
Distance Education 

To earn this degree, you must have 62 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 19 

Professional/Technical Core 31 

Regionally Determined Credits 1 2 



General Education (19 Credits) 


COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


* ECONXXX 


Economics Elective 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


** MATH1XX 


Mathematics Elective 


3 


* XXXXXXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


* XXXXXXX 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 


Professional/Technical (43 credits) 


ACQ 101 


Financial Accounting 


3 


BUSN 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


CINS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


CINS 102 


Information Systems Fundamentals 


3 


CINS 113 


Logic, Design and Programming 


3 


CINS 125 


Database Design and Management 


3 


CINS 157 


Web Site Development 


3 


CINS 203 


Systems Analysis and Design 


3 


CINS 279 


Capstone Class 


1 


CINT 106 


Microcomputer Operating Systems 


3 


CINT 121 


Network Fundamentals 


3 


Regionally 


Determined Credits 


12 




General Education (7 Credits) 



ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 


MATH 1 XX Mathematics Elective 


3 


Professional/Technical (3 credits) 


CINS 102 Information Systems Fundamentals 3 


Concentration (6 credits) 


CINS 113 Logic, Design and Programming 


3 


CINS 106 Microcomputer Operating Systems 


3 


Locally Determined Courses (15 credits) 




• CINS XXX CINS Course Elective 


12 


CINS XXX CINS Course Elective 

or 

CINTXXX CINT Course Elective 


3 

3 



Certificate 



Database (27 credits) 


CINS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 3 


CINS 102 


Information Systems Fundamentals 3 


CINS 113 


Logic, Design and Programming 3 


CINS 125 


Database Design and Management 3 


CINS 131 


Structured Query Language 3 


CINS 137 


Visual Basic Programming 3 


CINS 205 


Database Design 3 


CINS 225 


Advanced Database Management Systems 3 


CINS 237 


Advanced Visual Basic Programming 3 



Java (21 credits) 



CINS101 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

CINS102 Information Systems Fundamentals 3 

CINS113 Logic, Design and Programming 3 

CINS125 Database Design and Management 3 

CINS 136 Introduction to Java Programming 3 

CINS157 Web Site Development 3 

CINS 236 Advanced Java Programming 3 

Visual Programming (21 credits) 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



CINS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 

CINS 102 Information Systems Fundamentals 

CINS 113 Logic,Design and Programming 

CINS 121 C-C++ -C# Programming 

CINS 125 Database Design and Management 

CINS 137 Visual Basic Programming 

CINS 237 Advanced Visual Basic Programming 



Web Management (27 credits) 



CINS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

CINS 102 Information Systems Fundamentals 3_ 

CINS 125 Database Design and Management 3 

CINS 157 Web Site Development 3_ 

CINS 257 Advanced Web Site Development 3 

CINS 259 Web Administration 3_ 

CINT106 Microcomputer Operating Systems 3 

CINT121 Network Fundamentals 3 

CINT 201 Advanced Operating Systems: Linux 3 




IVY TECH 



Computer Information Technology 



Program Description 

IT careers are in abundance and the Computer Information 
Technology program will prepare you to get the career you 
want. You will develop skills in network management, net- 
work security, computer hardware support and operating 
system administration. You will be prepared to provide 
technical support to computer users, including hardware, 
network and operating system support 

Sample Careers 

Computer support specialist 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science, Technical Certificate 

Certificates Offered 

Network Administrator, PC Support and Administration 
Routing and Switching, Systems Security 

Concentrations Offered 

Computer Security, Network, PC Support and Administration 
Student Directed Studies 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 62-66 credits in the 
following areas: 

General Education Core 19 

Professional/Technical Core 

Concentration Courses 12-16 



General Education (19 Credits) 


COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ECONXXX 


Economics Elective 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 1XX 


IMathematics Elective 


3 


XXXXXXX 


Life/Physical Science Elective 


3 


XXXXXXX 


Social Science Elective 


3 


Professional/Technical (31 credits) 


CINS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 


• 


CINS 113 


.: " : : : ; : -•::■:-- -; 


3 


CINS 203 


:,;:e~: : '= .: : r: '.-.: v 


3 


CINT 106 


MicrocomputerOperatinq Systems 


3 


CINT 121 


Network Fundamentals 


3 


CINT 201 


Advanced Czi'r. ■'-: :;:;~is:UNUX 


3 


CINT 210 


PC Technology Essentials 


3 


CINT 211 


IT Technician 


3 


CINT 225 


,',-::.'.; '.;:.■.:•• !:;•;: _ : V'r - : 


3 


CINT 251 


Introducer :: :.;:;-; ."eairity 


3 


CINT 279 


Capstone Class 


1 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Computer Security Concentration (12 credits) 

This concentration focuses on developing in-depth knowledge and 

technical skills related to network and information security. 



Four courses 


from the list: 






C','2:: 


Routers and Firewalls 








V ■-.-;-- '■;- -.. ;-- 


.-:. 




CIMZf- _'--> , .e:v.y5e:_-:. 3 


CINT 271 Field Study 3 


CINT 280 Coop Internship 3 


CINT2XX 


CTEecr-.e 









Computer Information Technology continued 

Network Concentration (12-16 credits) 

This concentration focuses on developing in-depth knowledge and 

technical skills related to creating and maintaining computer network 

systems. 



Four courses 


from the list: 




CINT 125 


Windows Client Operating System 


3 


CINT135 


Novell Administration 1 


3 


CINT 136 


Novell Advanced Administration 


3 


CINT 140 


Cisco Discovery: Networking for Home 
and Small Businesses 


. 4 


CINT 141 


Cisco Discovery: Working at a 
Small-to-Medium Business of ISP 


4 


CINT 240 


Cisco Discovery: Introducing Routing and 
Switching in the Enterprise 


4 


CINT 241 


Cisco Discovery: Designing and Supporting 
Computer Networks 


4 


CINT 160 


Cisco Exploration: Network Fundamentals 


4 


CINT 161 


Cisco Exploration: Routing Protocols and 
Concepts 


4 


CINT 260 


Cisco Exploration: LAN Switching and Wireless 


4 


CINT 261 


Cisco Exploration: Accessing the WAN 


4 


CINT 226 


Implementing & Administering a Windows 
Network Infrastructure 


3 


CINT 227 


Managing a Windows Network 


3 


CINT 228 


Administering Windows Directory Services 


3 


CINT 235 


Networking Technology Concepts 


3 


CINT 236 


Novell Hardware Service and Support 


3 


CINT 237 


Novell Administration 111 


3 


CINT25X 


Security Elective (maximum 3 credit hours) 


3 



PC Support and Administration Concentration 

(12 credits) 

This concentration focuses on developing in-depth knowledge and 
technical skills related to assisting computer users with software, 
hardware and network needs. 



Four courses 


from the list: 


CINS125 


Database Design and Management 3 


CINS151 


Integrated Business Software 3 


CINS 157 


Web Site Development 3 


CINS206 


Project Development with High-Level Tools 3 


26 CINT 109 


UNIX Operating Systems 3 



CINT 120 


Data Communications 3 


CINT XXX- 


CINT Elective (maximum 3 credit hours) 3 


EECT120 


Introduction to Electronics 3 


CINT 212 


Application User Support and Troubleshooting 3 


CINT 213 


Hardware Support and Troubleshooting 3 


CINT 214 


Help Desk Tools and Technologies 3 


CINT 217 


Preventative Maintenance and Data Recovery 3 



Student Directed Studies Concentration (15 credits) 
The student directed studies concentration allows students to select 
elective courses from a wide list of options, focusing on specific areas 
of interest. 



ACQ XXX 


Accounting Elective 


0-12 


BUSN XXX 


Business Elective 


0-12 


CINS XXX 


Computer Information Systems Elective 


0-12 


CINT XXX 


Computer Information Technology Elective 


0-12 


EECTXXX 


Electronics Elective 


0-12 


ENGL 211 


Technical Writing 


0-3 


INDTXXX 


Industrial Technology Elective 


0-12 


OFADXXX 


Office Administration Elective 


0-12 


vise XXX 


Visual Communications Elective 


0-12 





Technical Certificate 

To earn this degree, you must have 31 credits in the following 

areas: 

General Education Core 7 

Professional/Technical Core 3 

Concentration Courses 6 

Regionally Determined Credits 15 



General Education (7 Credits) 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 1 


MATH 1XX 


Mathematics Elective 3 


Professional/Technical (3 credits) 


CINT 106 


Microcomputer Operating Systems 3 


Concentration (6 credits) 


CINT 121 


Network Fundamentals 3 


CINT 225 


Windows Network Operating Systems 3 



Locally Determined Courses (15 credits) 



CINS XXX 
or 
CINT XXX 


CINS Course Elective 3 
CINTCourse Elective 3 


CINT XXX 


CINT Course Electives 12 




Certificate 


Network Administration (21 credits) 


CINS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 3 


CINT 106 


Microcomputer Operating Systems 3 


CINT 121 


Network Fundamentals 3 


CINT 125 


Windows Client Operating System 3 


CINT 225 


Windows Network Operating Systems 3 


CINT 227 


Managing a Windows Network 3 


CINT 251 


Introduction to Systems Security 3 


PC Support and Administration (21 credits) 


CINS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 3 


CINT 106 


Microcomputer Operating Systems 3 


CINT 121 


Network Fundamentals 3 


CINT 125 


Windows Client Operating System 3 


CINT 201 


Advanced Operating Systems: Linux 3 


CINT 210 


PC Technology Essentials 3 


CINT211 


IT Technician 3 


Routing and Switching (16 credits) 
Four courses from the list: 


CINT 140 


Cisco Discovery: Networking for Home 4 * 
and Small Businesses 


CINT 141 


Cisco Discovery: Working at a 4 
Small-to-Medium Business of ISP 


CINT 240 


Cisco Discovery: Introducing Routing and 4 
Switching in the Enterprise 


CINT 241 


Cisco Discovery: Designing and Supporting 4 
Computer Networks 


CINT 160 


Cisco Exploration: Network Fundamentals 4 


CINT 161 


Cisco Exploration: Routing Protocols and 4 
Concepts 


CINT 260 


Cisco Exploration: LAN Switching and Wireless 4 


CINT 261 


Cisco Exploration: Accessing the WAN 4 



Sys 



ems Security (27 credits) 



CINS101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


CINT106 


Microcomputer Operating Systems 


3 


CINT121 


Network Fundamentals 


3 


CINT201 


Advanced Operating Systems: Linux 


3 


CINT 225 


Windows Network Operating Systems 


3 


CINT251 


Introduction to Systems Security 


3 


CINT 252 


Routers and Firewalls 


3 


CINT 253 


Microsoft Network Security 


3 


CINT 254 


Linux Networking Security 


3 




IVY TECH 



Construction Technology 

Program Description 

The construction industry has placed new demands on the 
building industry. There is a need for employees skilled in 
estimating, writing specifications for building plans, layout 
and assembly of residential steel framing, and building 
restoration and renovation. 

This program will give you the knowledge and skills neces- 
sary for job success either as a self-employed business per- 
son, or as an employee in home improvement centers, 
plumbing and electrical contractor, carpentry trades, or 
many other phases within the construction industry. 

Sample Careers 

HVAC Technician, carpenter, electrical installer 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science, Technical Certificate 

Certificates Offered 

Construction Technician 



Concentrations Offered 

Architectural, Cabinetry, Electrical, Heating, Ventilation, and 
Air Conditioning, Home Inspection, Landscape Technology, 
Residential and Light Carpentry 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Applied Science 




To earn this degree, you must have 62 craft 


5 in the Mowing 


areas: 




General Education Core 


20 


Professional/Technical Core 


18 


Concentration Courses 


12 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 



General Education (20 Credits) 



COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speakinq 


3 


ENGL 111 


Enqlish Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 1XX 


Mathematics Elective 


3 


MATH 121 


Geometry Trigonometry 


3 



PHYS100 Technical Physics 

or 

PHYS 101 Physics 1 

or 

Science of Traditional and Alternative Energy 



* xxxxxxx 


Humanities/Social and Behavioral So. Elective 3 


Professional/Technical (18 credits) 


C0NT101 


Introduction to Construction Technology 3 


C0NT102 


Construction Materials 3 


C0NT106 


Construction Blueprint Reading 3 


CONT127 


Electrical Basics I 


a C0NT204 


Estimating and Specifications 2 


TECH 104 


Computer Fundamentals ?c~e:--: ::. 3 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Architectural Concentration ,24 credits) 
Get prepared for a career in an architect's office. This CDursework 
includes drafting, residential construction materials, commercial con- 
struction materials, geometry, technical math, production drawing, 
light medium, and heavy construction drafting. 



Four courses from the list: 


DESN 105 Architectural Design 1 . : 


DESN 108 Residential Design 3 


DESN 204 Architectural Design II 3 


DESN 208 Structural Design and 


Detailing 3 



Regionally Determined Credits 



2" 



28 



Construction Technology continued 

Cabinetry Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration places an emphasis on woodworking, design and 
installation. Learn to build and install cabinetry and to assist clients in 
selecting and designing residential and commercial cabinetry. 



BCOT 120 Woodworking Fundamentals 



BCOT 121 Furniture Design and Construction 

BCOT 1 22 Woodworking Jig layout 

BCOT 1 26 Furniture Door and Drawer Assembly 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Electrical Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration can provide you with the knowledge and skills 
to gain employment as an electrical technician, installer or service 
provider.The focus of this program is residential and light commercial 
installation, troubleshooting and maintenance. 



BCOT 201 Residential Wiring 



BCOT 213 Motor and Motor Controls 



BCOT 220 Electrical Troubleshooting Technigues 

BCOT 222 Commercial/Industrial Wiring 

Regionally Determined Credits 



Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning 
Concentration (24 credits) 

This concentration provides theory and laboratory work in heating, 
ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC).As a technician, you'll be 
prepared for employment in a variety of areas, including: designing 
HVAC systems for residential, commercial, and industrial applications. 



HVAC101 Heating Fundamentals 


3 


HVAC 103 Refrigeration I 3 


HVAC 104 Heating Service 3 


HVAC 106 Refrigeration II 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 



Landscape Technology Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration is designed to provide understanding and skill in 
the technical reguirements for work in any of the many areas of 
employment in the "green industry." The curriculum is planned to 
prepare you for positions in landscape construction and manage- 
ment, golf course, park and cemetery maintenance. 



LAND 101 Landscape Trees 



3 



LAND 102 Shrubs and Other Plants 



LAND 103 Landscape Management I 



LAND 104 Turf Management I 



Regionally Determined Credits 



12 



Residential and Light Carpentry Concentration (24 credits) 
The Residential and Light Carpentry Specialty can provide you with 
the knowledge and skills you need for employment as a carpenter. 
You will study residential and commercial construction. 



BCOT 104 Floor and Wall Layout and Construction 


3 


BCOT 105 Roof Construction 


3 


BCOT 114 Exterior Trim 


3 


BCOT 221 Interior Trim 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 


Surveying Concentration (24 credits) 


DESN103 CAD Fundamentals 


3 


DESN 106 Descriptive Geometry 


3 


DESN210 Surveying 3 


DESN 213 CAD Mapping 3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 



Technical Certificate 




To earn this degree, you must have 31-37 credits in the 


following areas: 




General Education Cote 


7 


Professional/Technical Core 


3 


Concentration Courses 


6-9 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15-18 



General Education (7 Credits) 



COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 

or 

ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



Professional/Technical (3 credits) 



XXXX XXX Math/Social Sciences/Humanities/Life/ 
Physical Sciences Elective 



CONT 101 Introduction to Construction Technology 

Choose One of the Following Concentrations 
Architectural Concentration (24 credits) 
DESN 105 Architectural Design I 



DESN 204 Architectural Design II 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


18 


Electrical Concentration (24 credits) 


BCOT 201 Residential Wiring 


3 


CONT 127 Electrical Basics 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


18 


Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning 
Concentration (24 credits) 


HVAC 101 Heating Fundamentals 


3 


HVAC 103 Refrigeration 1 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


18 


Home Inspection Concentration (24 credits) 


BCOT 130 Home Inspection 


3 


BCOT 131 Residential Building Codes 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


18 


Landscape Technology Concentration (24 credits) 


LAND 101 Landscape Trees 


3 


LAND 102 Shrubs and Other Plants 


3 


LAND 103 Landscape Management 1 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 


Residential and Light Carpentry Concentration 

(24 credits) 


BCOT 104 Floor and Wall Layout and Construction 


3 


BCOT 105 Roof Construction 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


18 




Certificate 


Construction Technician (21 credits) 


BCOT 104 Floor and Wall Layout and Construction 3 


BCOT 105 Roof Construction 3 


BCOT 114 Exterior Trim 3 


BCOT 221 Furniture Design and Construction 3 


CONT 101 Introduction to Construction Technology 3 


CONT 106 Construction Blueprint Reading 3 


CONT 127 Electrical Basics 3 



Criminal Justice 

Program Description 

If you are looking for an opportunity for public service in a 
challenging job that involves personal responsibility, you 
may find success in the criminal justice field. Knowledge of 
sociology, psychology, government and law is helpful in 
preparing for this career. 

Sample Careers 

Corrections officer, law enforcement officer 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered 

Corrections, Law Enforcement, Youth Services 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in Criminal 
Justice is available with Indiana State University, Indiana 
University and lU-South Bend. To view these Associate of 
Science transfer degree programs and to see if they are avail- 
able at your local Ivy Tech campus, students should go to 
httpj/www.ivytedi.edu/. 

Students are encouraged to review these options with their 
advisors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to 
which they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to 
which they wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course 
and program transfer may also be available at your local am- 
pul Students should contactthe transfer offi ce of their local Ivy 
Tech for further information. 




General Education (19 Credits) 



COMM101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

or 

COMM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 

3_ 

1 



ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



MATH 1XX Mathematics Elective 



PSYC101 Introduction to Psychology 

or 

SOC1 1 1 1 Introduction to Sociology 



XXXXXXX Humanities Elective 



XXXX XXX Life/Physical Science Elective 



Professional/Technical (27 credits) 



CRIM 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems 



CRIM 103 Cultural Awareness 



CRIM 105 Introduction to Criminology 



CRIM 110 


Introduction to Law Enforcement 3 


CRIM 120 


Introduction to Courts 3 


CRIM 130 


Introduction to Corrections 3 


CRIM 201 


Ethics in Criminal Justice 3 


CRIM 240 


Criminal Law and Procedure 3 


a CRIM 260 


Criminal Justice Research 3 




Associate of Applied Science - 
Concentrations 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Corrections Concentration (15-16 credits) 
Vigorous law enforcement and stringent sentencing rules have 
increased the number of people being held for trial or imprisoned 
for their crimes in the last decade. Corrections officers monitor peo- 
ple being detained for trial and those who have been imprisoned 



CRIM 230 Community-Based Corrections 



CRIM 231 Special 



CRIM 246 Legal I 



XXXXXXX Program Elective 



Regionally Determined Credits: 

CRIM 280 Internship 

or 

CRIM XXX Criminal Justice elective 



Law Enforcement Concentration (15-16 create) 
Law enforcement officials provide assistance, respond to emergency 
alls, investigate crime scenes, and testify in courtThis concentration 
places emphasis on developing the stalls needed to be a poke offi- 
cer, including law, community relatiorcprocediBal law and criminal 
investigations. 



CRIM 113 Crimii 



3 



CRIM 210 



: 



CRIM 220 Criminal Evidence 



CRIM XXX Program Elective 



Regionally Determined Credits; 



CRIM 280 Internship 



CRIM XXX Criminal Justice elective 



29 



Criminal Justice continued 

Youth Services Concentration (15-16 credits) 
This concentration will prepare you to work with youth offenders and 
their families as they navigate the judicial and correctional system. 
Youth services professionals strive to prevent youth offenders from 
committing future crimes by helping the youth and the families 
discover the causes of illegal behavior. 



CRIM 150 Juvenile Justice Systems 


3 


CRIM 250 Juvenile Law and Procedures 3 


CRIM 251 Special Issues in Youth Services 


3 


CRIM 252 Juvenile Delinquency 3 


Regionally Determined Credits: 

CRIM 280 Internship 

or 

CRIM XXX Criminal Justice elective 


4 
3 










^<- 






IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY 
COtlEGE 





30 



Dental Assisting 

Program Description 

The dental assistant is an integral part of the dental health 
care team. Dental assistants prepare a patient for an exam; 
pass instruments to the doctor; prepare dental materials; 
expose and develop X-rays; teach preventative dental care; 
sterilize instruments; and / or perform dental receptionist 
duties. You could be instrumental in helping a patient be 
less anxious about having a dental check up. You could help 
a child understand why brushing their teeth is important. 

Sample Careers 

Dental assistant 

Degrees Available 

Technical Certificate 

Concentrations Offered 

None 




Technical Certificate 

To earn this degree, you must have 40 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 7 

Professional/Technical Core 33 

General Education (7 Credits) 



C0MM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 1 


Professional/Technical (33 credits) 


DENT 102 


Dental Materials and Laboratory I 3 


DENT 115 


Preclinical Practice 1 4 


DENT 116 


Dental Emergencies/Pharmacology 2 


DENT 117 


Dental Office Management 2 


DENT 118 


Dental Radiography 4 


DENT 122 


Clinical Practicum 1 1 


DENT 123 


Dental Anatomy 2 


DENT 124 


Preventive Dentistry/Diet and Nutrition 2 


DENT 125 


Preclinical Practice II 3 


DENT 129 


Dental Materials and Laboratory II 3 


a DENT 130 


Clinical Practicum II 5 


DENT 131 


Basic Integrated Science 2 




FVYTECH 



Dental Hygiene 

Program Description 

The IvyTecti Community College Dental Hygiene program 
educates a group of diverse dental hygiene students by 
providing a curriculum which reflects the core values of the 
profession, instills an understanding of life-long learning, 
and educates the graduate to assess, plan, implement, and 
evaluate dental hygiene care for the individual and the 
community. As a graduate of this program, you will be eli- 
gible to take national and state/regional examinations for 
licensure which are required to practice dental hygiene. 

The dental hygienist is an integral part of the dental health 
care team who specializes in preventive dental care and 
techniques in oral hygiene. Common procedures performed 
by hygienists include cleaning, scaling and root planing, 
radiography, and application of dental sealants. Local den- 
tal regulations determine the duties hygienists are able to 
perform. 

Sample Careers 

Dental Hygienist 

Degrees Available 

*Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 77 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core: 29 

Professional/Technical Core: 48 



General Education (29 Credits) 


# 


APHY101 


Anatomy and Physiology 1 


3 


# 


APHY 102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


# 


BIOL 211 


Microbiology 1 


3 


# 


CHEM111 


Chemistry 1 


4 




COMM 101 
or 
COMM 102 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 
Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 

3 


# 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 




IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


# 


MATH 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 




PSYC 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 




SOCI111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 


Professional/Technical (48 credits) 




DHYG101 


Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene 


2 




DHYG 102 


Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Lab 


2 




DHYG 103 


Dental Radiology 


2 




DHYG 104 


Dental Anatomy 


2 




DHYG 105 


Nutrition and Oral Health 


2 




DHYG 106 


Oral Histology and Embryology 


1 




DHYG 107 


Head and Neck Anatomy 


1 




DHYG 109 


Preventive Dentistry 


1 




DHYG 113 


Dental Radiography Clinic 1 


1 




DHYG 114 


Dental Hygiene Clinic 1 


5 




DHYG 120 


Pharmacology 


2 




DHYG 121 


Medical and Dental Emergencies 


1 




DHYG 122 


General Pathology 


1 




DHYG 201 


Community and Public Health Dentistry 


3 




DHYG 203 


Dental Materials 


2 




DHYG 204 


Pain Management 


2 



DHYG 208 


Periodontology 2 


DHYG 222 


Oral Pathology 2 


DHYG 224 


Dental Hygiene Clinic II 5 


DHYG 228 


Dental Hygiene Clinical Procedures 


a DHYG 230 


Clinic Seminar 2 



DHYG 234 Dental Hygiene Pink I 



# Courses must be successfully completed before admittance to the 
program. 




IVY TECH 



31 



Design Technology 

Program Description 

Look around your surroundings and consider the opportuni- 
ties. Consider your favorite hobbies, toys, and necessities. It 
all had to be designed. Do you want to know the secrets of 
good design? The Design Technology Program will show you 
how you can become a valuable member of a process engi- 
neering team. You'll learn how to design solutions for modi- 
fying new or existing buildings, developing innovative com- 
mercial products, creating compelling animations and tech- 
nical brochures, or carving complex machine parts from sim- 
ple blocks of wood. Choose from one of four specialties- 
Architectural, Mechanical, Graphics or CAD-CAM-and you'll 
be on your way to an exciting career in an in-demand field. 

Sample Careers 

Designer, drafter, graphic designer, surveyor 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science 
Technical Certificate 

Concentrations Offered 

Architecture, Civil, CAD-CAM, Computer Graphics, Mechanical 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in Design 
Technology is available with Indiana State University and 
Purdue Calumet. To view these Associate of Science transfer 
degree programs and to see if they are available at your local Ivy 
Tech campus, students should go to ftffp://ivww.ivytech.edu/. 

Students are encouraged to review these options with their 
advisors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to 
which they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to 
which they wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course 
and program transfer may also be available at your local cam- 
pus. Students should contact the transfer oftl ce of their local Ivy 
Tech for further information. 



Associate of Applied Science 




To earn this degree, you must have 62-63 credits in the 


following areas: 




General Education Core 


20-21 


Professional/Technical Core 


18 


Concentration Courses 


12 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 



General Education (20-21 Credits) 



COMM101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 


3 


IVYR1XX Life Skills Elective 1 



MATH 111 
and 


Intermediate Algebra 


MATH 121 


Geometry/Trigonometry 


MATH 131 
and 


Algebra/Trigonometry I 


MATH 132 


Algebra/Trigonometry II 


MATH 133 
and 


College Algebra 


MATH 134 


Trigonometry 


MATH 136 
and 


College Algebra 


MATH 137 


Trigonometry with Analy 



PHYS101 Physics I 



XXXX XXX Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sci. Elective 3-4 



Professional/Technical (18 credits) 


DESN 102 


Technical Graphics 3 


DESN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 3 


DESN 106 


Descriptive Geometry 3 


DESN 220 


Advanced CAD 3 


DESN 221 


Statics 3 


'■ DESN 225 


Portfolio Preparation 3 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Architecture Concentration (24 credits) 
Everyone enjoys attractively designed residential areas, public 
parks, and playgrounds, college campuses, shopping centers, golf 
courses, parkways, and industrial parks. Architects help design 
these areas so that they are not only functional but beautiful and 
compatible with the environment as well. 



DESN 105 


Architectural Design I 




DESN 109 


Construction Materials and Specifi 


cations 3 


DESN 204 


Architectural Design II 




DESN 208 


Structural Design and Detailing 




Regionally 


Determined Credits 


12 



Civil Concentration (24 credits) 
The civil concentration places emphasis on construction materials, 
structural design and surveying.You will be prepared for employ- 
ment with civil engineering firms, construction firms, surveying firms 
and highway departments. 



DESN 109 Construction Materials and Specifi cations 3 


DESN 210 Surveying 


3 


DESN 213 CAD Mapping 


3 


DESN 228 Civil 1 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 



Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing 
Concentration (24 credits) 

Manufacturing or CAD/CAM design technologists translate engi- 
neers' and designers'ideas into graphic form.This places emphasis 
on using CNC programming, and CAD/CAM technology in design and 
manufacturing applications. 



ADMF115 


Materials and Processes for Manufacturing 3 


MTTC 208 


CNC Programming I ' 3 


MTTC 220 


CAD/CAM I 3 


MTTC 221 


CAD/CAM II 3 


Regionally Determined Credits 1 2 



Computer Graphics Concentration (24 credits) 
This new concentration combines Technical Drawing and Fine Arts 
Drawing. You will be prepared to find employment as graphic illus- 
trators and commercial artists who design parts catalogs, magazine 
and newspaper advertising, as well as entry level animation used in 
movie production. 



DESN 130 Fundamentals of Computer Graphis 
DESN 1 32 Raster Imagine Fundamentals 



DESN 133 Vector Imaging Fundamentals 



DESN 230 Computer Modeling and Animation 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Mechanical Concentration (24 credits) 
.Mechanical disciplines work in many industries that vary by industry 
and function.Some specialties include applied mechanics, computer- 
aided-design and manufacturing; energy systems;material handling 
systems; pressure vessel and piping systems; heating, refrigeration 
and air condition systems. 



ADMF 1 1 5 Materials and Processes for Manufacturing 


3 


DESN 104 Mechanical Graphics 


3 


DESN 214 Kinematics of Machinery 


3 


DESN 217 Design Process and Applications 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 





Associate of Applied Science via Distance 
Education 

To earn this degree, you must have 62-63 credits in the 

following areas: 
General Education-Core 20-21 

Professional/Technical Core 42 

Architecture Concentration (62-63 Credits) 
General Education (20-21 Credits) 



COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 1 


MATH 111 


Intermediate Algebra 3 


MATH 121 


Geometry/Trigonometry 3 


PHYS 101 


Physics I 4 


XXXX XXX 


Humanities/Social & Behavioral Sci. Elective 3-4 



Professional/Technical Core (42 credits) 



DESN 102 


Technical Graphic, 


3 


DESN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 


3 


DESN 105 


Architectural Design 1 


3 


DESN 106 


Descriptive Geometry 


3 


DESN 109 


Construction Materials and Specifications 


3 


DESN 204 


Architectural Design II 


3 


DESN 220 


Advanced CAD 


3 


DESN 221 


Statics 


3 


DESN 222 


Strength of Materials 


3 


a DESN 225 


Portfolio Preparation 


3 


DESN 228 


Civil 1 


3 


Choose 3 courses from the list below: 


DESN 108 


Residential Design 


3 


DESN 113 


Intermediate CAD 


3 


DESN 206 


Mechanical and Electrical Eguipment 


3 


DESN 209 


Estimating 


3 


DESN 210 


Surveying 


3 


DESN 213 


CAD Mapping 


3 


DESN 228 


Civil 1 


3 


DESN 280 


Co-Op/Internship 


3 


INDT113 


Basic Electricity 


3 


TECH 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


Civil Concentration (62-63 Credits) 
General Education (20-21 Credits) 


COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MATH 121 


Geometry /Trigonometry 


3 


PHYS 101 


Physics 1 


4 


XXXX XXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3-4 


Professional/Technical Core (42 credits) 


DESN 102 


Technical Graphics 


3 


DESN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 


3 


DESN 106 


Descriptive Geometry 


3 


DESN 109 


Construction Materials and Specifications 


3 


DESN 208 


Structural Design and Detailing 


3 



DESN 210 


Surveying 3 


DESN 213 


CAD Mapping 3 


DESN 220 


Advanced CAD 3 


DESN 221 


Statics 3 


DESN 222 


Strength of Materials 3 


a DESN 225 


Portfolio Preparation 3 


Choose 3 courses from the list below: 


DESN 105 


Architectural Design 1 3 


DESN 108 


Residential Design 3 


DESN 110 


Architectural Rendering 3 


DESN 204 


Architectural Design II 3 


DESN 206 


Mechanical and Electrical Eguipment 3 


DESN 209 


Estimating 3 


DESN 228 


Civil 1 3 


DESN 280 


Co-Op/lntemship 3 


TECH 104 


Compute- 1 . '-.----.-'-.: : :■'-.:-■: .:• 3 



Computer-Aided Design and Manufacturing 
Concentration (62-63 Credits) 
General Education (20-21 Credits) 



COMM 101 


Fundamental; :' : _: : :5:e;'--: 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


: 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 




MATH 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MATH 121 


Geometry /Trigonometry 


3 


PHYS 101 


PhysiG 1 


4 


XXXX XXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3-4 


Professional/Technical Core (42 credits) 


DESN 102 


Technical Graphic 




DESN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 




DESN 106 


Descriptive Geometry 




DESN 220 


Advanced CAD 




DESN 221 


Statics 




DESN 222 


Strength of Materials 


3 


a DESN 225 


Portfolio Preparation 




MTTC208 


CNC Programming 1 


3 


MTTC220 


CAD CAM 1 


3 


MTTC221 


CAD/CAM II 3 





33 



Design Technology continued 



34 



TECH 101 


Processes and Materials 


3 


Choose 3 courses from the list below: 


DE5N 104 


Mechanical Graphics 


3 


DESN 202 


CAD Customization and Programming 


3 


DESN214 


Kinematics of Machinery 


3 


DESN 217 


Design Process and Applications 


3 


DESN 227 


Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing 


3 


DESN 280 


Co-Op/Internship 


3 


INDT104 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 


INDT113 


Basic Electricity . 


3 


TECH 104 


Computer Fundamentals forTechnology 


3 


Mechanical Concentration (62-63 Credits) 
General Education (20-21 Credits) 


COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MATH 121 


Geometry/Trigonometry 


3 


PHYS101 


Physics 1 


4 


XXXXXXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3-4 


Professional/Technical Core (42 credits) 


DESN 102 


Technical Graphic 


3 


DESN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 


3 


DESN 104 


Mechanical Graphics 


3 


DESN 106 


Descriptive Geometry 


3 


DESN 214 


Kinematics of Machinery 


3 


DESN 217 


Design Process and Applications 


3 


DESN 220 


Advanced CAD 


3 


DESN 221 


Statics 


3 


DESN 222 


Strength of Materials 


3 


a DESN 225 


Portfolio Preparation 


3 


TECH 101 


Processes and Materials 


3 


Choose 3 courses from the list below: 


DESN 113 


Intermediate CAD 


3 


DESN 202 


CAD Customization and Programming 


3 


DESN 206 


Mechanical and Electrical Equipment 


3 


DESN 210 


Surveying 


3 


DESN 227 


Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing 


3 



DESN 280 Co-Op/Internship 



INDT104 Fluid Power Basics 



INDT113 Basic Electricity 



MTTC208 CNC Programming I 



MTTC220 CAD/CAM I 



TECH 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 



Technical Certificate 




To earn this degree, you must have 31-32 credits in the 


following areas:. 




General Education Core 


7-8 - 


Professional/Technical Core 


3 


Concentration Courses 


6 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 



General Education (7-8 Credits) 



ENGL 111 English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 


** XXXX XXX General Education Elective 


3-4 


Professional/Technical (3 credits) 


DESN 102 Technical Graphics 3 


Other Required Courses (21 credits) 


DESN 103 CAD Fundamentals 3 


DESN 106 Descriptive Geometry 3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 






IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY 
COLLEGE 



Early Childhood Education 

Program Description 

The Early Childhood Education Program focuses on early 
child growth and development including adult-child rela- 
tionships. Emphasis is placed on the development of skills 
and techniques for providing appropriate environments 
and care for young children. Instruction is provided in the 
physical, emotional, social, and cognitive areas of early 
childhood. The student develops competencies through 
classroom instruction, observation, and participation in 
early education and care settings. 

Sample Careers 

Work in settings such as child care, nursery school, Head 
Start, family child care, pediatrics, nanny care, infant/toddler 
care, resource and referral services. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science 
Technical Certificate 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in Early 
Childhood Education is available with Ball State University, IU 
Kokomo, IPFW, IUPUI, Anderson University, Indiana State 
University, and the University of Southern Indiana. To view these 
Associate of Science transfer degree programs and to see if they 
are available at your local Ivy Tech campus, students should go to 
http://www.ivytech.edu/. 

Students are encouraged to review these options with their 
advisors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to 
which they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to 
which they wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course 
and program transfer may also be available at your local cam- 
pus. Students should contact the transfer offi ce of their local 
Ivy Tech for further information. 



Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 67-68 credits in the 

following areas: 
General Education Core 1 9-20 

Professional/Technical Core 39 

Regionally Determined Creditss 9 



General Education (19-20 Credits) 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 1 


ENGL 111 English Composition 


3 


* C0MM101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 
or 

* C0MM102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 
3 


* MATH1XX Intermediate Algebra or Higher 


3 


SOC1 1 1 1 Introduction to Sociology 


3 


* XXXXXXX Life/Physical Science Elective 


3 


* XXXX XXX Humanities Elective 


3-4 


Professional/Technical (48 credits) 


ECED 100 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 


3 


ECED101 Health.Safety and Nutrition 


3 


ECE0 1 03 Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom 


3 


ECED 120 Child Growth and Development 


3 


ECED 130 Developmental^ Appropriate Guidance 
in a Cultural Context 


3 



ECED 204 Families in Transition 



ECED 210 Early Childhood Administration 



ECED 230 The Exceptional Child 



ECED 233 Emerging Literacy 



ECED 243 Cognitive Curriculum 



A ECED 260 Early Childhood Professional 



Choose two of the following: 



ECED 105 CDA Process 

or 

ECED IIS Indiana Youth Development (IYD) Process 



ECED 205 Early Care Practicum 



ECED 225 Infant and Toddler Practicum 



ECED 235 Preschool Practicum 



ECED 245 School Age Practicu m 



ECED 255 Generalist Practicum 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Technical Certificate 

To earn this degree, you must have 31 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 7 

Professional/Technical Core 15 

Regionally Determined Credits 9 



General Education (7 Credits) 


ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 


"SOCim Introduction to Sociology 


3 


Professional/Technical (24 credits) 


ECED 1 00 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 


3 


ECED 1 01 Health, Safety and Nutrition 


3 


ECED 103 Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom 3 


ECED 1 20 Child Growth and Development 


3 


Choose one of the following: 


ECED 105 CDA Process 
or 

ECED 115 Indiana Youth Development (IYD) Process 


3 
3 


ECED 205 Early Care Practicum 


3 



ECED 225 


Infant and Toddler Practicum 3 


ECED 235 


Preschool Practkum 3 


ECED 245 


School Age Practicum 3 


ECED 255 


Generalist Practicum 3 


Regionally Determined Credits 




IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY 

COLLEGE 



35 



Education 



Program Description 

With an Associate of Science degree in education, you will 
acquire knowledge of the teaching profession as well as a 
strong background in general education subjects required 
of teachers. You will be well prepared if you choose to 
transfer your degree to a bachelor's degree program in 
education. 

By completing a core of educational foundation courses, 
general education requirements, and the Praxis I exam, you 
will be ready to enter baccalaureate degree programs as a 
junior ready to pursue your bachelor's degree in education. 

Articulated transfer opportunities are available with the 
public four-year universities in Indiana. Additional oppor- 
tunities for courses and program transfer may also be 
available. You should contact the transfer office of your 
local Ivy Tech for additional information. 

Sample Careers 

Substitute teacher, teacher assistant, transfer degree 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 



36 




Electrical Engineering Technology 



Program Description 

The Electrical Engineering Technology program is designed 
to prepare students for a variety of careers in electronics 
engineering technology, such as computing, communica- 
tions, process control, biomedical, energy management, 
and transportation. The program addresses needs for 
skilled technicians who can work with engineers and other 
technicians to implement electronic designs and to sup- 
port engineering processes such as collecting, analyzing, 
and interpreting data, and troubleshooting various elec- 
tronic systems. Graduates will be able to continue their 
education at Indiana University-Purdue University- 
Indianapolis (IUPUI) in a Bachelor of Science degree in 
Electrical Engineering Technology (BS-EET), and at Purdue 
North Central (PNC) in a Bachelor of Science degree in 
Engineering Technology (BS-ET). 

Sample Careers . 

Skilled Technician, Transfer Degree 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 66 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 29 

Professional/Technical Core 37 

General Education (29 Credits) 



COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 3 


ENGL 211 


Technical Writing 3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 1 


MATH 136 


College Algebra 3 


MATH 137 


Trigonometry with Analytic Geometry 3 


MATH 210 


Calculus for Technology 3 


PHYS 101 


Physic I 4 



XXXX XXX Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sci. Elective 6 



Professional/Technical Core (37 credits) 


OESN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 


3 


EECT111 


Introduction to Circuit Analysis 


4 


EECT112 


Digital Fundamentals 


3 


EECT121 


Electronics Circuit Analysis 


4 


EECT122 


Digital Applications 


4 


EECT128 


Introduction to C Programming 


3 


EECT213 


Introduction to Industrial Controls 


3 


EECT222 


Introduction to Microcontrollers 


4 


EECT223 


Electrical Machines 


3 


EECT226 


ComputerTroubleshooting 


3 


INDT205 


Programmable Controllers 1 


3 




IVY TECH 



Electronics & Computer Technology 



Program Description 

The Electronics and Computer Technology program is 
structured to prepare you with the technical skills, general 
knowledge and critical thinking and problem-solving skills 
necessary to pursue a career and adapt to changes in the 
fields of computer and electronics systems in such indus- 
tries as telecommunications, medicine, electrical service, 
industry, instrumentation and others using this type of 
technology. 

Sample Careers 

Engineering technician 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science, 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 



*%n 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in 
Electronics Technology is available with Indiana State University, 
lUPU-Fort Wayne, and the University of Southern Indiana.To 
view these Associate of Science transfer degree programs and to 
see if they are available at your local Ivy Tech campus, students 
should go to http://www.ivytech.edu. Students are encouraged 
to review these options with their advisors, to consult the cur- 
rent catalog of the institution to which they wish to transfer, 
and to contact the institution to which they wish to transfer. 
Additional opportunities for course and program transfer may 
also be available at your local campus. Students should contact 
the transfer offi ce of their local Ivy Tech for further information. 




General Education (20 Credits) 



C0MM101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 1XX 


First Course in a Series 


3 


MATH 1XX 


Second Course in a Series 


3 


PHYS 101 


Physics-I 


4 


XXXXXXX 


Humanities/Social and Behavioral Sci. Elective 


3 


Professional/Technical (43 credits) 


EECT101 


Introduction to Electronic and Projects 


3 


EECT111 


Introduction to Circuit Analysis 


4 


EECT 112 


Digital Fundamentals 


3 


EECT121 


Electronics Circuit Analysis 


4 


EECT122 


Digital Applications 


4 


EECT128 


Introduction to C Programming 


3 


EECT211 


AC Electronics Circuit Analysis 


4 



EECT 226 Computer Troubleshooting 


»3 


A EECT 279 Advanced Problem Sofving 


i 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 










-«- 






IVY TECH 

COMV. 
COLLEGE 





5" 



Fine Art 



Program Description 

The art/design/fashion industry captures the creative 
individual. Earn an associate degree in fine arts and culti- 
vate your artistic skills- whether it is in fine arts, commer- 
cial art, film, fashion, or photography. Artists make 
careers everywhere that visual expression, flexible think- 
ing and communication skills are in demand. 

Sample Careers 

Fine artists, such as painters, sculptors and illustrators 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Fine Arts 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 



38 





" 




I 


if, 


I P 








s 


3 ■ 


* 


mm 




i 



Associate of Fine Arts 

To earn this degree, you must have 61 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 28 

Concentration 33 



General Education (28 Credits) 


ARTH 101 


Survey of Art and Culture 1 


3 


ARTH 102 


Survey of Art and Culture II 


3 


COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENGL 112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 118 


Concepts in Mathematics 


3 


PSYC 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


SON 111 


Physical Science 


3 


S0CI111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 


Professional/Technical (33 credits) 


ARTS 100 


Life and Object Drawing 1 


3 


ARTS 101 


Life and Object Drawing II 


3 


ARTS 102 


Color and Design Theory 


3 


ARTS 103 


Three-Dimensional Design 


3 


ARTS 104 


Contemporary Art History 


3 


ARTS2XX 


Studio Electives 


15 


ARTS2XX 


Art History Elective 


3 




IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY 
COLLEGE 



General Studies 

Program Description 

The General Studies program focuses on students taking 
their first two years of college at Ivy Tech and then trans- 
ferring their credits to other colleges and universities 
both in state and out of state. General Studies' students 
complete a core of general education courses which 
include: Fundamentals of Public Speaking, English 
Composition, Exposition and Persuasion, Mathematics 
and Life and Physical Sciences. Also students select from 
courses which include: History, Government and Politics, 
Psychology, Sociology and Philosophy. 

Sample Careers 

The General Studies program is designed as a transfer 
opportunity to bachelor's degree-granting institutions. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Health Information Technology 



Program Description 

Healthcare professionals strive daily to provide real-time 
health cate delivery and aid in health-related decision 
making. Helping provide that commitment of quality 
healthcare are health information management profes- 
sionals who specialize in medical records management, 
privacy, risk management, medical coding, insurance 
reimbursement, corporate compliance, data analysis and 
reporting. Employment possibilities include physician 
offices, clinics, hospitals, long-term care facilities, rehabil- 
itation centers, and other healthcare facilities that main- 
tain, collect, and analyze healthcare data. 

This Ivy Tech associate of science degree program has the 
input of employers who understand the demand for 
trained professionals committed to the timely, accurate, 
and secure collection of health information. 

Sample Careers 

Documentation specialist, Coder, HIM director, 
HIM department manager or supervisor 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 69 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 25 

Professional/Technical Core 44 

General Education (25 Credits) 



# APHY101 


Anatomy and Physiology 1 3 




APHY102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 3 




# COMM101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 


-«- 


# ENGL 111 


English Composition 3 


ENGL 211 


Technical Writing 3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 1 


MATH 115 


Statistics 3 


PHIL 102 


Introduction to Ethics 3 


PSYC 101 

or 

SOCI111 


Introduction to Psychology 3 
Introduction to Sociology 3 


IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY 


Professional/Technical (44 credits) 




# CINS101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 3 




CINS102 


Information Systems Fundamentals 3 




HIMT101 


Health Information Systems 3 




HIMT102 


Health Data Content and Structure 2 




HIMT 104 


Health Information and the Law 3 




HIMT105 


Healthcare Organizations and Delivery Systems 3 




HIMT 201 


Reimbursement Systems 3 




HIMT 202 


Healthcare Data Literacy and Statistics 3 




HIMT 203 


ICD Coding 3 




HIMT 204 


Quality Assessment and Improvement 2 




a HIMT 205 


Organization and Supervision 2 




HIMT 207 


Health Information Externship 1 1 




HIMT 208 


Health Information Externship II 1 




HIMT 210 


Pathophysiology and Pharmacology 1 3 




HIMT 213 


CPT Coding 3 




HIMT 219 


Pathophysiology and Pharmacology II 3 




# HLHS101 


Medical Terminology 3 





# Courses must be successfully completed before admittance to 
the program. 



39 



Hospitality Administration 



Program Description 

Event planning careers are for people with strong organi- 
zational and inter-personal skills, and that also enjoy the 
art of creating a functional and pleasant environment for 
customers attending an event.The hospitality administra- 
tion's concentration in event management provides train- 
ing in budget management, organizational skills; man- 
agement skills, communication skills, and how to coordi- 
nate the activities of many diverse groups of people and 
suppliers. 

Sample Careers 

Event planner, meeting planner, convention center coordinator 
or director, lodging manager 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science 
Technical Certificate 

Concentrations Offered 

Baking & Pastry Arts, Culinary Arts, Event Management 
Hotel Management, Restaurant Management 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 



40 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in 
Hospitality Administration is available with Ball State 
University. To view these Associate of Science transfer degree 
programs and to see if they are available at your local Ivy Tech 
campus, students should go to http://www.ivytech.edu/. 

Students are encouraged to review these options with their 
advisors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to 
which they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to 
which they wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course 
and program transfer may also be available at your local cam- 
pus. Students should contact the transfer office of their local 
Ivy Tech for further information 




General Education (19 Credits) 



COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

or 

COMM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 



ENGL 111 English Composition 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



MATH 1 XX Mathematics Elective 



XXXX XXX Life/Physical Science Elective 



XXXX XXX Humanities Elective 



Professional/Technical (20 credits) 



HOSP101 Sanitation and First Aid 



H0SP102 Basic Food Theory and Skills 



HOSP 104 Nutrition 



XXXX XXX Social/Behavioral Science Elective 



HOSP 108 Human Relations Management 

HOSP 201 Hospitality Purchasing and Cost Control 

HOSP 203 Menu, Design, and Layout 

HOSP 280 Co-op/lntemship 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Baking and Pastry Arts Concentration (30 credit; ■ 

Restaurants, hotels, clubs, grocery stores, commercial, and independ- 
ent shops are constantly seeking bakers and pastry chefs with the 
necessary skills and experience.This concentration is tailored to will 
prepare you to satisfy industry demands and American Culinary 
Federation Standards for Baker certification. 



HOSP 105 Introduction to Baking 3 


HOSP 106 Pantry and Breakfast 3 


HOSP 111 Yeast Breads 3 


HOSP 113 Baking Science 3 


HOSP 208 Cakes, Icings, and Fillings 3 


HOSP 209 Advanced Decorating and Candies 3 


HOSP 213 Classical Pastries and Chocolates 3 


HOSP 270 Bakery Merchandising 


Regionally Determined Credits 


6 



Culinary Arts Concentration (30 credits) 

Ivy Tech's excellent educational kitchen enables us to train you for 

entry-level positions, such as first, second or saute cooks, sous 

chefs, and garde mangers.The goal is to send you into the food 

service industry equipped with manual, theoretical and technical 

competence. 



HOSP 103 


Soup, Stock, and Sauces 3 


HOSP 105 


Introduction to Baking 3 


HOSP 106 


Pantry and Breakfast 3 


HOSP 110 


Meat Fabrication 3 


HOSP 202 


Fish and Seafood 3 


HOSP 207 


Table Service 3 


HOSP 210 


Classical Cuisine 3 


HOSP 212 


Garde Manger 3 


HOSP 211 
or 
HOSP 221 


Specialized Cuisine 3 
Catering Administration 3 


HOSP 213 


Classical Pasteries and Chocolates 3 



Event Management Concentration (30 credits) 

Ivy Tech's excellent educational kitchen enables us to train you for 

entry-level positions, such as first, second or saute cooks, sous 

chefs, and garde mangers.The goal is to send you into the food 

service industry equipped with manual, theoretical and technical 

competence. 



ACCT101 Financial Accounting 



3 



8USN105 Principles of Management 



CINS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 



HOSP 1 14 Introduction to Hospitality 



H0SP144 Travel Management 



HOSP 171 Introduction to Convention & Meeting 
■■. Management 



HOSP 172 Development and Management of Attractions 



HOSP 271 Mechanics of Meeting Planning 



HOSP 272 The Tourism System 



MKTG101 Principles of Marketing 



Hotel Management Concentration (30 credits) 
Hospitality at the basic level is simply the art of making guests 
feel welcome. It is the largest service industry in the nation and 
dramatic employment growth is expected bothnationally and in 
Indiana.This concentration addresses your potential to become a 
successful manager. 



ACQ 101 


Financial Accounting 


3 


BUSN 102 


Business Law 


3 


BUSN 105 


Principles of Management 


3 


CINS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


HOSP 114 


Introduction to Hospitality 


3 


* HOSP 144 
or 

* BUSN 101 


Travel Management 
Introduction to Business 


3 
3 


HOSP 207 


Table Service 


3 


HOSP 215 


Front Offi ce 


3 


HOSP 217 


Housekeeping 


3 


MKTG101 


Principles of Marketing 


3 



Restaurant Management Concentration (30 credits) 
Restaurant management training provides you with great oppor- 
tunities to manage a complex operation and play the lead role in 
creating a great experience for your customers. This concentration 
includes courses in hotel and restaurant management, financial 
management, business, sales, food and beverage purchasing. 



ACQ 101 


Financial Accounting 


3 


BUSN 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


BUSN 102 


Business Law 


3 


BUSN 105 


Principles of Management 


3 


BUSN 208 


Organizational Behavior 


3 


CINS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


HOSP 114 


Introduction to Hospitality 


3 



HOSP 207 Table Service 



MKTG 101 Principles of Marketing 



0PMT 224 Operations Management 

or 

MKTG 204 Marketing Management 




General Education (7 Credits) 



COMM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 

or 

ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 


3 
3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 1 


MATH1XX Mathematics Elective 3 


Professional/Technical (3 Credits) 


HOSP 101 Sanitation and First Aid 


2 


Choose One of the Following Concentrations 
Baking and Pastry Arts Concentration (21 credits) 


HOSP 105 Introduction to Baking 3 


HOSP 113 Baking Science 


3 


HOSP 270 Bakery Merchandising 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 


Culinary Arts Concentration (21 credits) 


HOSP 102 Basic FoodsTheory and Skills 


3 


HOSP 104 Nutrition 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 



Human Services 

Program Description 

If you're looking for a career that will allow you to hekp 
others, you may want to check out our Human Services 
program. It's designed to provide meaningful training for 
■ students interested in working with people The program 
emphasizes the personal attitudes, technical knowledge, 
and practical skills necessary to obtain entry-level 
employment in a wide variety of social service settings. 
As human services paraprofessionais, graduates reach 
out to individuals, families and communities. 

Career opportunities exist in local community mental 
health centers, psychiatric hospitals, group homes, sub- 
stance abuse programs, government welfare agencies, 
correctional institutions, homeless shelters, and agencies 
serving the developmental^/ disabled. 

Sample Careers 

Social service worker, corrections counselor, counselor 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science 
Technical Certificate 

Concentrations Offered 

Correctional Rehabilitation Services, Generalist, Gerontology, 

Mental Health, Substance Abuse 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




42 



Human Services continued 

Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in Human 
Services is available with Ball State University, Indiana State 
University, lUPU-Fort Wayne, IUPUI and the University of 
Southern Indiana.To view these Associate of Science transfer 
degree programs, students should go to www.ivyiech.edu. 

Students are encouraged to review these options with their 
advisors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to 
which they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to 
which they wish to transfer. Opportunities for cou5e and pro- 
gram transfer may also be available at your local campus. 
Students should contact their local transfer office. 




General Education (19 Credits) 



BIOL 100 Human Biology 

or 

BIOL 101 Introductory Biology 



COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 



ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 



IVY1XX Life Skills Elective 



MATH 1XX Mathematics Elective 



PSYC101 Introduction to Psychology 



SOCI 111 Introduction to Sociology 



Professional/Technical (26 credits) 



CINS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 



HUMS 10.1 Introduction to Human Services 



HUMS 102 Helping Relationship Techniques 



HUMS 103 Interviewing and Assessment 



HUMS 201 Internship I 



A HUMS 202 Internship II 



HUMS 205 Behavior Modification/Choice Theory 



HUMS 206 Group Process and Skills 



Choose One of the following Concentrations 
Correctional Rehabilitation Services Concentration 

(18 credits) 

This concentration prepares you to work in correctional facilities, 

courts, youth rehabilitation and crime prevention. 



HUMS 105 Introduction to Correctional Rehabilitation 
Services 


3 


HUMS 1 1 3 Problems of Substance Abuse in Society 


3 


HUMS 215 Juvenile Delinquency 


3 


HUMS 240 Rehabilitation Process: Probation and Parole 3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


6 



Direct Support Professional Concentration 

(17-18 credits) 

This concentration prepares you for a career at agencies that pro- 
vide community-based services and support to individuals with 
developmental disabilities in a variety of settings including voca- 
tional, residential, and recreational. 



HUMS 116 Introduction to Disabilities 



HUMS 1 23 Health and Wellness/Disabilities 
HUMS 127 Positive Personal Support 



HUMS 128 Disability Support Teams 



Regionally Determined Credits 



5h 



Generalist Concentration (18 credits) 
This concentration prepares you to find employment in a variety of 
settings, such as community centers, group homes, substance 
abuse centers, and assisted living facilities. 



HUMS 109 Understanding Diversity 



HUMS 113 Problems of Substance Abuse in Society 
HUMS 220 Issues and Ethics in Human Services 
PSYC 201 Lifespan Development 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Mental Health Concentration (18 credits) 
With a mental health concentration, you may find jobs in commu- 
nity mental health centers, crisis centers, residential facilities for 
the developmentally delayed, and services for the mentally ill. 



HUMS 104 Crisis Intervention 


3 


HUMS 220 Issues and Ethics in Human Services 3 


PSYC 201 Lifespan Development 3 


PSYC 205 Abnormal Psychology 3 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Substance Abuse Concentration (18 credits) 
With a concentration in substance abuse, you may find a job in 
substance abuse centers (residential, detox, hospitals) as coun- 
selors or counselors-in-training. 



HUMS 113 Problems of Substance Abuse in Society 


3 


HUMS 208 Treatment Models of Substance Abuse 


3 


HUMS 209 Counseling Issues in Substance Abuse 


3 


HUMS 210 Issues of Substance Abuse in Family Systems 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


6 





Technical Certificate 

To earn this degree, you must have 31 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 7 

Professional/Technical Core 3 

Concentration Courses 21 

General Education (7 Credits) 




COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


IVYT 1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


PSYC 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


Professional/Technical (3 credits) 


HUMS 101 


Introduction to Human Services 


3 


Mental Health Concentration (21 credits) 


HUMS 205 


Behavior Modification/Choice Theory 


3 


PSYC 205 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 


Direct Support Professional Concentration (21 credits) 


HUMS 102 


Helping Relationship Techniques 


3 


HUMS 103 


Interviewing and Assessment . 


3 


HUMS 116 


Introduction to Disabilities 


3 


HUMS 123 


Health and Wellness 


3 


HUMS 126 


Community Integration 


3 


HUMS 127 


Positive Personal Support 


3 


HUMS 128 


Disability Support Teams 


3 



Industrial Technology 

Program Description 

The IndustrialTechnology programis designed to prepare 
you for the modern industrial environment. In today's 
modern factories, CNC machines and automated equip- 
ment fabricate industrial and consumer products. To 
operate in the modern manufacturing facility requires 
highly trained individuals. 

Sample Careers 

Industrial technologist, CNC technologist, machinist, 
quality manager 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science, 
Technical Certificate 

Certificates Offered 

Fluid Power, Heating and Air Conditioning, Industrial 
Electrician, Machine Tool, Welding 

Concentrations Offered 

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning, Machining, 
Maintenance, Power Plant Technology, Process Control and 
Automation, Welding 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in 
Industrial Technology is available with Purdue University. To 
view this Associate of Science transfer degree program and to 
see if it is available at your local Ivy Tech campus, go to 
http://www.ivytech.edu. 

Students are encouraged to review this option with their advi- 
sors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to which 
they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to which 
they wish to transfer. Opportunities for course and program 
transfer may be available at your local campus. Students should 
contact their local transfer office. 

Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 62-64 credits in the follow- 
ing areas: 
General Education Core 
Professional/Technical Core 
Concentration Courses 
Regionally Determined Credits 
General Education (20-22 Credits) 



COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 1XX 


Math Elective 


3 


PHYS 101 
or 
SON 101 


Physics 1 

Science of Traditional and Alternative Energy 


4 
4 


* XXXXXXX 


Humanities/Social and Behavior Sciences/ 
Mathematics Electives 


6-8 


Professional/Technical (18 credits) 


INDT102 


Introduction to Print Reading 


3 


INDT106 


Introduction to the Workplace and Safety 


3 


INDT113 


Basic Electricity 


3 


INDT114 


Introductory Welding 


3 


a INDT260 


Problem Solving and Teamwork 


3 


TECH 104 


Computer Fundamentals 


3 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Electric Line Concentration (24 credits) 

Learn how to repair and maintain electrical transmission systems. 

Common jobs include lineworker, line installer and line technician. 



ENGR102 Climbing 


3 


ENGR 1 03 Electrical Essentials for Power Line Workers 


3 


ENGR 107 Transmission and Distribution of Electric 
Power 


3 


ENGR 109 Rigging for Line Workers 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 



Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning 

Concentration (24 credits) 

This concentration will prepare you to install and repair heating, air 

conditioning, refrigeration and ventilation systems. 



HVAC 101 Heating Fundamentals 



HVAC103 Refrigeration I 



HVAC 208 Heating Service 



HVAC 211 Refrigeration I 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Machining Concentration (24 credits) 
Today's industries rely on trained and skilled machinists, machine 
operators and manufacturerc to produce precision components for 
everything from household appliances to aircraft parts. With training 
that includes CNC operation and programming, as well as robotics 
and CAD systems, you'll be ready for a machine tool-related career. 



MTTC 101 Introduction to Machining 



MTTC 104 Machining Handbook 



MTTC 105 Abrasive Processes I 



MTTC 110 Turning and Milling Processes 



Regional! 1 , D;:f'~ '-:: "-;: ' 



Maintenance Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration will provide you with a broad range of skis appf- 
cable to a variety of jobs in the industrial environment too wi be 
prepared to install, repair, maintain and troubleshoot industrial 
machinery and equipment such as pumps, motors, pneumatic and 
hydraulic systems, and production machinery. : 



INDT103 Motor a-: '.':::-::-:•: ; 



INDT104 Ruid Power Basic 



INDT203 Machine 



INDT205 Proqran 



";: ;-; ?;:;•- ';: . ;: :; 



Natural Gas Technology Concentration 24 credits 

Learn how natural gas lines are constructed and maintained 
Graduates will install new projects and maintain the pipeines. 



43 



Industrial Technology continued 



NGAS 101 


Fundamentals of Natural Gas 


3 


N6A5 102 


Natural Gas Pipe Joining 


3 


NGAS 203 


Natural Gas Regulatory and Compliance Issues 


3 


NGAS 204 


Natural Gas Construction and Technigues 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 



Power Plant Technology Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration emphasizes the operation of modem power 
plants and will provide the skills for a career in this field. You'lll learn 
technical and safety aspects of plant and facility operations. 
PPTC101 Power Plant Fundamentals 3 

PPTC121 Power Plant Steam Systems 3 

PPTC 201 Power Plant Instrumentation and Contr ol 3 

PPTC 221 Advanced Power Plant Systems 3 

Regionally Determined Credits 12 

Process Operations (24 credits) 
This concentration is designed to train you for technician work in 
refineries and energy industry. It offers study in monitoring, control- 
ling and troubleshooting equipment used in the production of gaso- 
line, airplane fuel, plastic soft drink bottles, glass jars, pharmaceutical, 
and electricity. You will learn pneumatic, electronic and microcomput- 
er instrumentation, how to use instruments that measure variables 
such as pressure, flow, temperature and chemical composition. 

3 
3 



INDT 131 Introduction to Process Technology 
INDT 132 Process Technology I (Equipment) 



INDT 133 Process Technology II (Systems) 3 

INDT 1 34 Process Technology III (Operations) 3 

Regionally Determined Credits 12 

Welding Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration is designed for you if you are interested in learn- 
ing welding or upgrading your skills in the various processes. Novices 
and advanced-level students can benefit from the individualized 
competency-based program offered. This concentration offers a vari- 
ety of skill levels in oxyacetylene, arc,MIG, TIG, and welding/cutting 
processes, using both manual and semi-automatic applications. 



WELD 108 Shielded Metal Arc Welding I 



WELD 207 Gas Metal Arc (MIG) Welding f 

WELD 208 Gas Tungsten Arc (TIG) Welding T 

WELD 210 Welding Fabrication I T 



44 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Technical Certificate 

To earn this degree, you must have 31-32 credits 

following areas: 

General Education Core 7-8 

Professional/Technical Core 3 

Concentration Courses 6 

Regionally Determined Credits 15 



General Education (7 Credits) 


COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 1 XX Mathematics Elective 


3-4 


Professional/Technical (3 credits) 


INDT 102 Introduction to Print Reading 


3 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning 
Concentration (21 credits) 



HVAC 101 Heating Fundamentals 


3 


HVAC103 Refrigeration I 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 


Machining Concentration (21 credits) 


MTTC101 Introduction to Machining 


3 


MTTC 110 Turning and Milling Processes 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 


Maintenance Concentration (21 credits) 


INDT 104 Fluid Power Basics 


3 


INDT 113 Basic Electricity 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 


Welding Concentration (21 credits) 


WELD 108 Shielded Metal Arc Welding 1 


3 


WELD 207 Gas Metal Arc (MIG) Welding 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 




Certificates 



Fluid Power (18 Credits) 



IMTC201 


Fluid Power Systems (Hvdraulics/Pneumatics) 3 


INDT 102 


Introduction to Print Readinq 3 


INDT 103 


Motors and Motor Controls 3 


INDT 104 


Fluid Power Basics 3 


INDT 106 


Introduction to the Workplace and Safety 3 


INDT 113 


Basic Electricity 3 


Heating and Air Conditioning (18 credits) 


HVAC 101 


Heatino. Fundamentals 1 


HVAC 103 


Refrigeration 1 3 


HVAC 205 


Heat Pump Systems 3 


HVAC 208 


Heating Service 3 


HVAC 211 


Refrigeration II 3 


INDT 113 


Basic Electricity 3 


Industrial Electrician (18 credits) 


EECT105 


Introduction to National Electrical Code 3 


IMTC 122 


Electrical Wiring Fundamentals/NEC Code 3 


INDT 204 


Electrical Circuits 3 


INDT 103 


Motors and Motor Controls 3 


INDT 113 


Basic Electricity 3 


TECH 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 


Machine Tool (18 credits) 


INDT 102 


Introduction to Print Readinq 3 


INDT 106 


Introduction to the Workplace and Safety 3 


MTTC101 


Introduction to Machininq 3 


MTTC 105 


Abrasive Processes 1 3 


MTTC 110 


Turninq and Milling Processes 3 


MTTC 208 


CNC Programming 1 3 


Welding (18 credits) 


INDT 114 


Introductory Welding 3 


WELD 108 


Shielded Metal Arc Welding 1 3 


WELD 206 


Shielded Metal Arc Welding II 3 


WELD 207 


Gas Metal Arc (MIG) Welding 3 


WELD 208 


Gas Tungsten Arc (TIG) Welding 3 


WELD 209 


Welding Certification 3 






Information Security 

Program Description 

The Associate of Applied Science in Information Security 
will prepare you to work in areas related to information 
assurance and computer security. The certificates are 
designed for students currently working in the computer 
industry to enhance their knowledge of information and 
network-related risks and their avoidance and resolution. 
Major employers include computer and data processing 
companies, wholesale and retail trade companies, uni- 
versities and colleges, and federal, state, and local gov- 
ernment agencies. 

Sample Careers 

Computer Security or Information Assurance technicians 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered 

Network Security, Data Security 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 





General Education (19 Credits 



COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 



ENGL 1 11 English Composition 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



MATH 111 Intermediate Algebra 



MATH 115 Statistics 



SCIN XXX Life/Physical Science Elective 



XXXX XXX Humanities/Social & Behavioral 
Science Elective 



Professional/Technical (33 credits) 


CINS113 


Logic, Design and Programming 


3 


ONS 121 


C/C++/C# Programming 


3 


CINS139 


Introduction to Computer Forensics 


3 


CINS203 


Systems Analysis and Design 


3 


CINT121 


Network Fundamentals 


3 


CINT 125 


Windows Client Operating System 


3 


CINT201 


Advanced Operating Systems: LINUX 


3 


CINT 225 


Windows Network Operating Systems 


3 


a CINT 251 


Introduction to Systems Security 


3 


CINT 253 


Microsoft Network Security 


3 


INSE101 


Introduction to Information Systems Security 


3 


Choose One of the Following Concentrations 
Network Security Concentration (12 credits) 


CINT 252 


Routers and Firewalls 


3 


CINT 254 


Linux Network Security 


3 


INSE201 


Risk Management/Cyber Terrorism 


3 


INSE202 


Advanced Routers/Firewalls 


3 


Data Security (12 credits) 


CINS 221 


Advanced C/C++/C# Programming 


3 



CINS 239 


Advanced Computer Forensics 3 


INSE210 


Secure Coding Theory and Application 3 


INSE211 


Cryptography 3 




Certificates 


Data Security (24 Credits) 


CINS 121 


C/C++/CS Programming 3 


CINT 201 


Advanced Operating Systems: LINUX 3 


CINT 225 


Windows Network Operating Systems 3 


CINT 251 


Introduction to Systems Security 3 


CINT 253 


Microsoft Network Security 3 


INSE101 


Introduction to Information Systems Security 3 


INSE210 


Secure Coding Theory and Application 3 


INSE211 


Cryptography ; 


Network Security (27 Credits) 


CINT 201 


Advanced Operating Systems: LINUX 3 


CINT 225 


Windows Network Operating Systems 3 


CINT 251 


Introduction to Systems Security 3 


CINT 253 


Microsoft Network Security 3 


CINT 252 


Routers and Firewalls 3 


CINT 254 


Linux Network Security 3 


INSE101 


Introduction to Information Systems Security 3 


INSE201 


Risk Management/Cyber Terrorism 3 


INSE202 


Advanced Routers 'Firewalls 3 




IVYTECH 

COMMl \m 
-EGE 



45 



Interior Design 

Program Description 

The Interior Design Program provides career education in 
the creation of safe, functional, productive and aestheti- 
cally pleasing interior and exterior environments for 
work, home, health and recreation. Students investigate 
many topics ranging from the interaction between 
human beings and their environments, to design concep- 
tion and problem-solving, to materials specifying, project 
management and more. Student activities culminate in 
the development of an exit portfolio and resume demon- 
strating the skills and knowledge for a professional posi- 
tion in one of many concentration areas. 

Sample Careers 

Interior designer, landscape designer, retail designer 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered 

Decorative Arts and Design, Garden Design, Interior Design 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 



46 




Associate of Applied Sciencs 




To earn this degree, you must have 67 credits in the following 


areas: 




General Education Core 


19 


Professional/Technical Core 


24 


Concentration Courses 


12 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 



General Education (19 Credits) 



ARTH101 Survey of Art and Culture I 



3 



ARTH102 Survey of Art and Culture I 



3 



COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

or 

COMM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 



ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 



3 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



MATH 1 XX Mathematics Elective 



Professional/Technical (24 credits) 



INTD101 Design Theory 



INTD102 Drafting and Construction 



INT0 103 Introduction to Interior Design 



INTD105 Design Presentations 



INTD 201 Interior Materials 



INTD 203 Professional Practices 



A INTD 209 Portfolio Preparation/Internship 



INTD 216 CAD for Environmental Designers 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Decorative Arts and Design Concentration (24 credits) 
Do you know the difference between faux finish and Venetian 
plaster? If you're interested in decorative arts, this concentration 
will prepare you with classes ranging from three-dimensional 
design to visual merchandising. 



ARTS 100 Life and Object Drawing 1 


3 


ARTS 103 Three-Dimensional Design 


3 


INTD 109 History of Interiors I 3 


INTD 217 Visual Merchandising 3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 



Garden Design Concentration (24 credits) 
Are your thumbs green? As a garden designer, you'll be able to put 
them to use.This concentration offers studies on designing and 
maintaining harmonious natural ecosystems for human enjoyment 
and use. 



GRDN 110 Fundamentals of Gardening 



GRDN114 Garden Design I 



GRDN 115 History of Garden Design 



GRDN 116 Theme Gardening 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Interior Design Concentration (24 credits) 
As an interior designer, you're responsible for the decoration, 
design and functionality of your client's space.This concentration 
prepares you for careers in the creation of safe, functional and aes- 
thetically pleasing interior and exterior environments for work, 
home, health and recreation. 



INTD 103 


Introduction to Interior Design 3 


INTD 104 


Textiles for Interiors 3 


INTD 108 


Interior Design II 3 


INTD 109 


History of Interiors 1 3 


INTD 200 


Lighting and Building Systems 3 



Regionally Determined Credits 




IVY TECH 



Kinesiology 



Program Description 

With an Associate of Science degree in Kinesiology, you 
will acquire an understanding of motion, particularly of 
the human body. The purpose of this degree program is to 
prepare you to work in entry-level positions in fitness 
leadership, sports management, wellness promotion, and 
corporate wellness. 

Articulated transfer opportunities are available with 
Indiana University Bloomington with specializations in 
Sports Marketing/Management, Fitness and Exercise 
Science. Students can transfer from the Ivy Tech 
Community College Bloomington campus to the 
Department of Kinesiology in the School of Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation at the Indiana 
. University Bloomington campus. 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 61 credits in the following 
areas: 

General Education Core 46 

Professional/Technical Core 15 



General Education (46 Credits) 


COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 


COMM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 


ECON 201 


Principles of Macroeconomics 3 


ECON 202 


Principles of Microeconomics 3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 3 


ENGL 202 


Creative Writing 3 


ENGL 211 


Technical Writing 3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 1 


MATH 135 


Finite Math 3 


PSYC101 


Introduction to Psychology 3 


soani 


Introduction to Sociology 3 


SOCI 252 


Social Problems 3 


50CI 261 


Sociology of Relationships and the Family 3 


XXXX XXX 


Humanities/Social & Behavioral Sciences Elective3 


xxxxxxx 


Life & Physical Sciences/Mathematics Electives 6 


Professional/Technical (15 credits) 


BUSN 101 


Introduction to Business 3 


BUSN102 


Business Law 3 


CINS101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 3 


HPER211 


Introduction to Sport Management 


a HPER212 


Introduction to Exercise Science 3 




IVY TECH 



Liberal Arts 



Program Description 

The Associate of Arts and Associate of Science in Liberal 
Arts are transfer programs that provide you with an 
opportunity to complete the first two years of study lead- 
ing to a bachelor's degree in liberal arts areas. 

Articulation agreements have been established with a* 
the public, four-year universities in Indiana so that if you 
complete your associate degree, you may fulfil the 
requirements for a related bachelor's degree in an addi- 
tional two years of full-time study at the university. 

Sample Careers 

Transfer degree 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Arts, Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

English and Communication, Foreign Language, Humanities 
Life and Physical Sciences, Mathematics 
Social and Behavioral Sciences 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




•i" 



Library Technical Assistant 



Program Description 

The Library Technical Assistant program will give you an 
understanding of the history of libraries and the func- 
tions and roles of the different types of libraries. You will 
have an understanding of and be functionally proficient 
in: basic library technical services including ordering, pro- 
cessing, and copy-cataloging of the variety of types and 
forms of materials found in libraries; library public sup- 
port services including circulation, interlibrary loan, and 
basic reference, and computer operations as they relate 
to library functions. 

As a library technical assistant, you might work under the 
supervision of librarians in circulation, technical process- 
ing, reference and audio-visual services. You also might 
assist librarians in the preparation and organization of 
materials and help patrons use the library. 

Sample Careers 

Staff positions in public, academic, school and special libraries 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

Children's Services, Library Technology 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 



48 




Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 61 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 25 

Professional/Technical Core 24 

Concentration Courses 12 



General Education (25 Credits) 


COMM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 1XX 


Mathematics Elective 


3 


PSYC 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


S0CI111 


Principles of Sociology 


3 


XXXXXXX 


Humanities Elective 


6 


XXXXXXX 


Life/Physical Science Elective 


3 


Professional/Technical (24 credits) 


CINS101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


LIBR101 


Introduction to Libraries and Library Services 


3 


LIBR102 


Introduction to Reference Sources and Services 


3 


LIBR 103 


Introduction to Libraries Public Services 


3 


LIBR 104 


Introduction to Technical Services 


3 


LIBR 201 


Cataloging and Classification 


3 


LIBR 202 


Electronic Resources and Online Searching 


3 


LIBR 206 


Library Assistant Practicum 


3 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Children's Services Concentration (12 credits) 

This concentration will prepare you to work under the supervision 

of a children's librarian or in the children's section of a library. 

Choose four of the following: 



ECED 103 


Curriculum in Early Childhood Classroom 


3 


ECED 120 


Child Growth and Development 


3 


ECED 130 


Developmental^ Appropriate Guidance in 
Cultural Context 


3 


ECED 223 


School Age Programming 


3 


ECED 233 


Emerging Literacy 


3 



ENGL 240 


Children's Literature - 3 


. LIBR 203 


Library Services for Children 3 


LIBR 204 


Library Media Center Operations and Services 3 


LIBR 205 


Library/Media Materials and Eguipment 3 


XXXXXXX 


Any LTA Library Technician Concentration Course 3 



Library Technician Concentration (12 credits) 
The ever changing world of technology affects libraries just as 
much as it does other businesses and facilities.This concentration 
equips you with knowledge to support a library through such areas 
as websites and information systems. 

Choose four of the following: 



CINS102 


Information Systems Fundamentals 3 


CINS157 


Web Site Development 3 


0FAD 103 


Introduction to Computers with Word Processing 3 


OFAD110 


Presentation Graphic 3 


0FAD1H 


Desktop Publishing 3 


OFAD207 


Integrated Applications 3 


OFAD214 


Multimedia Design 3 


0FAD218 


Spreadsheets 3 


XXXXXXX 


Any LTA Childrens Services Concentration Course 3 




IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY 

COLLEGE 



Machine Tool Technology 



Program Description 

Virtually all manufactured products depend on America's 
precision machining industry at some point during their 
production. The Machine Tool Technology program was 
developed from employer input — employers who know 
the demand for solid training in this specialized field of 
metal cutting operations for the creation of machined 
parts, specialized tooling molds, dies and prototypes. 

Sample Careers 

Machinists, First line supervisors/managers of production 
and operating workers, tool and die makers 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 65 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 20 

Professional/Technical Core 45. 

General Education (20 Credits) 



C0MM.101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 3 


IVYT 1XX 


Life Skills Elective 1 


MATH 111 


Intermediate Algebra 3 


MATH 121 


Geometry/Trigonometry 3 


PHYS 101 


Physics 1 4 


XXXXXXX 


Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 



Professional/Technical (45 credits) 



ADMF115 


Materials and Processes for Manufacturing 


3 


DESN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 


3 


DESN 227 


Geometric Dimensions andTolerancing 


3 


INDT 102 


Introduction to Print Reading 


3 


MTTC102 


Turning Processes 1 


3 


MTTC103 


Milling Processes 1 


• 3 


MTTC204 


Abrasive Processes 1 


3 


MTTC208 


CNC Programming 1 


3 


MTTC209 


CNC Programming II 


3 


MTTC 220 


CAD/CAM 1 


3 


MTTC240 


Machine Operations 1 


3 


MTTC 241 


Machine Operations II 


3 


a MTTC 242 


CNC Machining 


3 


TECH 102 


Technical Graphics 


3 


TECH 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 




IVY TECH 



m 



Mechanical Engineering Technology 



Program Description 

The Mechanical Engineering Technology program will 
educate skilled technicians who will work with engineers 
and other technicians to implement mechanical designs 
and to support engineering processes such as collecting, 
analyzing and interpreting data and troubleshooting 
mechanical systems. You will develop basic mechanical 
design skills and the appropriate science and math 
knowledge to enter the workforce and/or transfer to a 
four-year engineering technology program. Graduates 
can continue their education at IUPUI. 

Sample Careers 

Manufacturing, Transportation, Computer and electronics, 
Transfer degree 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 



50 



Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 64 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 30 

Professional/Technical Core 34 



General Education (30 Credits) 



COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


CHEM111 


Chemistry 1 


4 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG211 


Technical Writing 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 136 


College Algebra 


3 


MATH 137 


Trigonometry with Analytic Geometery 


3 


MATH 221 


Calculus for Technology 1 


3 


PHYS101 


Physics 1 


4 


XXXX XXX 


Humanities/Social and Behavioral Science 
Elective 


3 


Professional/Technical (34 credits) 


BUSN 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


CESN 102 


Technical Graphics 


3 


DESN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 


3 


DESN 104 


Mechanical Graphics 


3 


DESN 221 


Statistics 


3 


EECT111 


Introduction to Circuit Analysis 


4 


INDT104 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 


METC105 


Introduction to Engineering Technology 


3 


METC220 


CAD/CAM for Mechanical Design 


3 


METCXXX 


Mechanical Engineering Technical Elective 


6 




IVY TECH 



Medical Assisting 

Program Description 

A graduate of the Medical Assistant Program is a profes- 
sional, multi-skilled healthcare provider dedicated to 
assisting in patient are management in an ambulatory 
care setting. You would perform administrative and clini- 
cal duties and may manage emergency situations, facili- 
ties and/or personnel. Competence in the field requires 
professionalism and effective communication skills as 
well as technical skills. A required extemship provides 
valuable on-the-job experience. 

Sample Careers 

Certified Medical Assistant (CMA), medical assistant, 
insurance specialist, medical transcriptionist 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science, Technical Certificate 

Concentrations Offered 

Administrative, Clinical, EKG, Generalist, Insurance, 
Medical Assistant, Pharmacy Technician, Phlebotomy, 
Therapeutic Massage, Transcription 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




The Ivy Tech Community College Medical Assisting Program is 
accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied 
Health Education Programs (CAAHEP),on recommendation of 
the Curriculum Review Board of the American Association of 
Medical Assistants Endowment (CRB-AAMAE). 

Commission on Accreditation of 

Allied Health Education Programs 

1361 Park Street 

Clearwater, FL 33756 

(727) 210-2350 
Only graduates of the AAS and GENERALIST-TC are eligible to 
take the national exam to become a Certifi ed Medical 
Assistant (CMA).The American Association of Medical 
Assistants Certifying Board (AAMA CB) awards the CMA creden- 
tial after successful completion of the exam. The Commission 
on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAA- 
HEP), in collaboration with the Curriculum Review Board (CRB) 
of the AAMA Endowment (a committee on accreditation of 
CAAHEP), accredits medical assisting programs. 




General Education (19 Credits) 



APHY101 Anatomy and Physiology I 



3 



APHY 1 02' Anatomy and Physiology I 



3 



C0MM101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

or 

COMM102 Introduction Interpersonal Communication 3 

ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 3_ 

1 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



MATH1XX Math Elective 



XXXX XXX Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 



Professional/Technical (42 credits) 



HLHS101 Medical Terminology 



MEAS107 Administrative I 



MEAS108 Administrative II 



Medical Insurance and Basic Cooing with 
Computer Applications 



MEAS 207 Integrated Medical Office Systems 



MEAS218 Pharmacology 



MEAS 219 Medical Assisting Laboratory techniques 



MEAS 238 Clinical I 



MEAS 239 Clinical II 



MEAS 242 Disease Conditions 



A MEAS 258 Medical Assisting Clinical Extemship 



MEAS 259 Medial Assisting Administrative Externship 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Technical Certificate 

To earn this degree, you must have 31-46 credits in the 

following areas: 
General Education Core 
Professional/Technical Core 3 

Concentration Courses 6-36 

Regionally Determined Credits 0-15 

General Education (7 Credits) 
IVY1XX Life Skills Elective 

* XXXX XXX English Communi 

* XXXX XXX Social Science Sci 

Humanities Electf 

Professional/Technical 3 n 
HLHS101 Medial Terminoli 

Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Administrative Concentration 21 credits) 
This concentration includes classes that cover a range of adminis- 
trative-centered duties within the medical assisting fietd. 

Y.EASiC" -:--5vr.f 



IVY 1 XX Life Skills Elective 


* XXXXXXX Enaiis- I:~~ .- :;:.:-• , 


* XXXXXXX Sodal SdenceySdence/Mathematic 
Humanities Elective 


3 


Professional/Technical ,3 credits) 


HLHS101 Medial Terminology 3 



: ^':-: 



Clinical Concentration 21 credits 

This concentration indudes classes that cover a range of cinic-cen- 

tered responsibilities within the medial assisting field. 



MEAS 238 Clinical I 



51 



MEAS239 Clinical II 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Generalist Concentration (36 credits) 

The Generalist Concentration is the one concentration that will 

allow you to sit for certification. 



APHY101 Anatomy and Physiology I 



APHY 1 02 Anatomy and Physiology I 



MEAS107 Administrative I 



MEAS 137 Medical Insurance and Basic Coding 

with Computer Applications 

MEAS 207 Integrated Medical Office Systems 



MEAS 218 Pharmacology 



MEAS 219 Medical Assisting Laboratory Techniques 



MEAS 238 Clinical I 



MEAS 239 Clinical I 



MEAS 258 Medical Assisting Clinical Externship 



3 



MEAS 259 Medical Assisting Administrative Externship 3 

EKG Concentration (21 credits) 

This concentration will prepare you to administer diagnostic EKG 

testing and start you on your way to a career as an EKG Technician. 

MEAS 205 Introduction to Electrocardiography 3_ 

MEAS 206 Advanced Electrocardiography Techniques 3 



Regionally Determined Credits 



15 



Insurance Concentration (21 credits) 
Correctly coding and billing insurance claims is a vital piece of the 
medical profession and is a job which demands specialized train- 
ing. This concentration starts with basic insurance claims and cod- 
ing, and progresses to advanced duties which include hospital 
billing, coding and claims. 

MEAS 1 37 Medical Insurance and Basic Coding with 3 
Computer Applications 



MEAS 21 3 Advanced Insurance Coding 



MEAS 220 Advanced Insurance Claims Processing 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Pharmacy Technician Concentration (21 credits) 
This concentration will equip you to assist pharmacies, medical 
centers and other medical facilities. 



APHY 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 



APHY 102 Anatomy and Physiology I 



CINS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 



MEAS 151 Pharmacy Technician I 



MEAS 1 52 Pharmacy Technician I 



3 



MEAS 218 Pharmacology 



3 



MEAS 254 Pharmacy Externship 3 

or 

MEAS 255 Pharmacy Technical Experiential Seminar 3 

Phlebotomy Concentration (21 credits) 
This concentration prepares you to be a specialist in obtaining blood 
samples at hospitals, laboratories and other medical facilities. 
MEA212 Phlebotomy 3_ 



MEA 257 Phlebotomy Externship 



3 



Regionally Determined Credits 



15 



Therapeutic Massage Concentration (33 credits) 
This concentration provides you with information in anatomy and 
physiology of skeletal, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, and 
muscular systems. It includes information on different styles, tech- 
niques and viewpoints of massage.The course demonstrates the 
physiological effects of circulatory massage strokes. 



HLHS105 


Medical Law and Ethic 


3 


APHY 101 


Anatomy and Physiology 1 


3 


APHY 102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


TMAS 101 


Holistic Approach to Massage Therapy 


3 


TMAS 120 


Massage Technician Training 1 


3 


TMAS 122 


Massage Financial Management 


3 


TMAS 125 


Acupressure Theory and Methods 


3 


TMAS 140 


Massage Technician Training II 


3 


TMAS 141 


Massage Through the Life Span 


3 


TMAS 202 


Deep Tissue Muscle Release 


3 


TMAS 205 


Pathology and Massage 


.3 



Transcription Concentration (21 credits) 
This concentration prepares you to work in the field of medical 
transcription with focus on word processing software and medical 
dictation. You will learn proofreading techniques and improve 
speed and accuracy in production of medical documents. 



MEAS 1 35 Medical Word Processing and Transcription 



3 



MEAS 235 Advanced Transcription 



Regionally Determined Credits 




IVY TECH 



52 



Medical Laboratory Technology 

. Program Description 

As research continues to change the face of modern med- 
icine, more sophisticated tests allow for more accurate 
and rapid diagnosis. Medical Laboratory Technology 
(MLT) has become a technologically complex field requir- 
ing/specific knowledge and skills.The MLT program at Ivy 
Tech will train you to proficiently perform the duties 
required in a clinical laboratory. This two-year Associate 
in Applied Science Degree Program will prepare you the- 
oretically and technically for the procedures you will be 
performing. 

Sample Careers 

Medical Laboratory Technician, Clinical Laboratory Technician 

Degrees Available 

'Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 69-71 credits in the follow- 
ing areas: 
General Education Core 19-20 
Professional/Technical Core 50-51 


MEDL 215 


Parasitology and Mycology 


* MEDL 218 


Clinical Pathology 3 


MEDL 221 


Microbiology Applications 3 


MEDL 222 


IKtcroMology'fedwiqBg 3 


MEDL 224 


Chemistry Applications 3 


MEDL 227 






cation (19-20 Credits) 
Anatomy and Physiology I 
Anatomy and Physiology II 

General Microbiology 


3 
3 

4 


Chemistry Techniques II 2 


General Edu 

APHY101 
** APHY102 










or 
** BIOL 201 




-«" 




** COMM101 

or 
** COMM 102 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 
Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 
3 




ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 




IVYT 1XXX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 




IWTFfH 




MATH 1XX 

** PSYC101 

or 
** S0CI111 


Mathematics Elective 
Introduction to Psychology 

Introduction to Sociology 


3 
3 

3 


COMMI 

COLLEGE 


Professional/Technical (50-51 credits) 

** CHEM 101 Introductory Chemistry 1 

or 
** CHEM 111 Chemistry I 

HLHS105 Medical Law and Ethics 

MEDL 101 Fundamentals of Laboratory Techniques 


3 

4 
3 

3 




MEDL102 


Routine Analysis Techniques 


3 




MEDL 201 


Immunology Techniques 


3 




MEDL 202 


Immunohematology Techniques 


3 




MEDL 205 


Hematology Techniques I 


3 




MEDL 206 


Hematology Techniques II 


3 




MEDL 207 


Chemistry Techniques I 


3 




MEDL 209 


Routine Analysis Applications 


1 




MEDL 210 
MEDL 212 


Hematology Applications 
Immunology Applications 


3 

1 




MEDL 213 


Immunohematology Applications 


3 





53 



54 



Mortuary Science 

Program Description 

Program Aim: 

The central aim of the Mortuary Science program recognizes the 
importance of funeral service education personnel as: 

1 . Members of a human service profession, 

2. Members of the community in which they serve, 

3. Participants in the relationship between bereaved families and 
those engaged in the funeral service profession, 

4. Professionals knowledgeable of and compliant with federal, 
state, provincial/territorial, and local regulatory guidelines (in 
the geographic area where they practice), as well as 

5. Professionals sensitive to the responsibility for public hearth, 
safety and welfare in caring for human remains. 

Program Objectives: 

1 . To enlarge the background and knowledge of students about 
the funeral service profession; 

2. To educate students in every phase of funeral service, and to 
help enable them to develop the proficiency and skills neces- 
sary for the profession, as defined by the Preamble above. 

3. To educate students concerning the responsibilities of the 
funeral service profession to the community at large. 

4. To emphasize high standards of ethical conduct.. 

5. To provide a curriculum at the post secondary level of instruction. 

6. To encourage student and faculty research in the field of 
funeral service 

• The annual passage rate of first-time takers on the National Board 
Examination (NBE)forthe most recent three-year period for this insti- 
tution and all ABFSE accredited funeral service education programs is 
posted on the ABFSE website (www.abfse.org). 

All mortuary science students must take the National Board 
Examination (NBE) as a graduation requirement. 

The Mortuary Science Program at Ivy Tech Community College of 
Indiana-De La Garza campus is accredited by the American Board of 
Funeral Service Education, 3432 Ashland Avenue, Suite U, St. Joseph, 
MO 64506, (816) 233-3747.Web; www.abfse.org. 

The Mortuary Science Program at Ivy Tech Community College of 
Indiana-Central Indiana is accredited by the American Board of 
Funeral Service Education, 3432 Ashland Avenue, Suite U, St. Joseph, 
MO 64506, (816) 233-3747. Web: www.obfse.org. 



Sample Careers 

Embalmer, funeral director 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science 



Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 

Contact your local campus for more information. 

Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 67 credits in the following 
areas: 

General Education Core 22 

Professional/Technical Core 

General Education (19 Credits) 



# 


APHY101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


# 


APHY102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


« 


BIOL 211 


General Microbiology I 


3 




COMM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


8 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 




IVYT 1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


# 


MATH 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 




S0CI111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 


Professional/Technical (45 credits) 




ACQ 101 


Financial Accounting 


3 




BUSN 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 




CINS101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


4 


M0RT100 


Orientation to Funeral Service 


3 




M0RT101 


Grief Psychology for Funeral Service 


3 




MORT 102 


Mortuary Law 


3 




MORT103 


Embalminq Chemistry 


3 




MORT 105 


Embalminq Theory I 


3 




MORT 205 


Embalminq Theory II 


3 




MORT 207 


Embalming Practicum I 


3 




MORT 208 


Pathology for Funeral Service 


3 




MORT 209 


Restorative Art 


3 




MORT 212 


Funeral Service Manaqement 


3 




MORT 217 


Embalminq Practicum II 


3 


A 


MORT 220 


National Board Exam Review 


3 



Nursing 



Program Description 

The Associate of Science in Nursing Program is designed 
to accommodate two groups of students: those who are 
entering a nursing program for the first time and those 
licensed practical nurses or certified paramedics seeking 
educational mobility to the associate-degree level. As a 
graduate of the ASN program, you will be eligible to take 
the NCLEX-RN examination to become registered nurses. 
You may seek immediate employment as nurses or 
choose to transfer their credits to a four-year institution 
offering a baccalaureate degree. 

Sample Careers 

Registered Nurse 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 



# Courses must be successfully completed before admittance 
to the program. 




Nursing continued 



Articulated transfer opportunities are available with Ball 
State University, the IU School of Nursing, Indiana State 
University, and the University of Southern Indiana. Students 
are encouraged to review these options with their advisors, to 
consult the current catalog of the institution to which they 
wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to which they 
wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course and pro- 
gram transfer may also be available at your local campus. 
Students should contact the transfer office of their local Ivy 
Tech for further information. 



Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 45-71 credits in the 

following areas: 
General Education Core 31-33 

Professional/Technical Core 14-38 

General Education (31-33 Credits) 



i 


APHY 1 01 Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


J 


APHY102 Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


# 


ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 


# 


PSYC 1 01 Introduction to Psychology 


3 




MATH 117 The Art of Geometry 

or 

MATH 118 Concepts in Mathematics 


3 

3 



PSYC 201 Lifespan Development 3 

or 

PSYC 205 Abnormal Psychology 3 

or 

S0CI111 Introduction to Sociology 3 

or . . 

SOC1 164 Introduction to Multicultural Studies 3_ 

C0MM101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

or 

COMM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 

r 

3 



ENGL 112 Exposition and Persuasion 

or 

ENGL 211 Technical Writing 



Choose two of the following: 



APHY 201 Advanced Human Physiology 



BIOL 201 General Microbiology 



<>BI0L211 General Microbiology I 



xCHEMIOl 


Introductory Chemistry 


3 


CHEM111 


Chemistry 1 


4 


PHYS101 


Physics 1 


4 


Professional/Technical Traditional (38 credits) 


NRSG 100 


Fundamentals of Nursing 


3 


X NRSG 101 


Fundamentals of Nursing Lab 


1 


NRSG 102 


Medical-Surgical Nursing 1 


2 


NRSG 103 


Medical-Surgical Nursing 1 Lab 


2 


NRSG 105 


Medical-Surgical Nursing 1 Clinical 


2 


NRSG 106 


Pharmacology for Nursing 


3 


NRSG 110 


Medical Surgical Nursing II 


3 


NRSG 111 


Medical Surgical Nursing II Clinical 


2 


NRSG 112 


Maternal-Child Nursing 


3 


NRSG 113 


Maternal-Child Nursing Clinical 


2 


NRSG 114 


Health Care Concepts in Nursing 


1 


a NRSG 200 


Complex Medical-Surgical Nursing for the ASN 


3 


NRSG 201 


Complex Medical-Surgical Nursing for the ASN 
Clinical 


4 


NRSG 202 


Nursing Care of the Complex Family 


2 


NRSG 203 


Nursing Care of the Complex Family Clinical 


2 


NRSG 204 


Psychiatric Nursing 


2 


NRSG 205 


Psychiatric Nursing Clinical 


1 


Professional/Technical LPN Transition to Nursing 
(New Curriculum) (14 credits) 


a NRSG 200 


Complex Medical-Surgical Nursing for the ASN 


3 


NRSG 201 


Complex Medical Surgical Nursing for the ASN 
Clinical 


4 


NRSG 202 


Nursing Care for the Complex Family 


2 


NRSG 203 


Nursing Care of the Complex Family Clinical 


2 


NRSG 204 


Psychiatric Nursing 


2 


NRSG 205 


Psychiatric Nursing Clinical 


1 


Professional/Technical LPN Transition to Nursing 
(Old Curriculum) (22 credits) 


NRSG 106 


Pharmacology for Nursing 


3 


NRSG 120 


Transition to ASN for the LPN 


5 


a NRSG 200 


Complex Medical Surgical Nursing for the ASN 


3 





NRSG 201 


Complex Medical Surgical Nursing for the ASM 
Clinical 


\ 


NRSG 202 


Nursing Care of the Complex Family 


I 


NRSG 203 


Nursing Care of the Complex Family (Snicai 


i 


NRSG 204 


Psychiatric Nursing 


2 


NRSG 205 


Psychiatric Nursing Clinical 


i 


Professional/Technical Paramedic Transition to Nursing 

(30 credits) 


NRSG 106 


Pharmacology for Nursing 


I 


NRSG 108 


Transition for the Paramedic to the ASN 


5 


NRSG 109 


Transition for the Paramedic to the ASN 
Lab/Clinical 


3 


NRSG 112 


Maternal-Child Nurcing 


: 


NRSG 113 


Maternal Child Nursing Clinical 


: 


a NRSG 200 


Comply Med a -',.-. ■•■ '• - ■- •■■■- :'\ 




NRSG 201 


Complex Medial Surgical Nursing for the ASN 
Clinical 


4 


NRSG 202 


Nursing Care for the Complex Family 


2 


NRSG 203 


Nursing Care of the Complex Family Clinical 


: 


NRSG 20- 


Psychiatric Nursing 


: 


NRSG 205 


Psychiatric Nursing Clinical 


i 



Symbol Key 

a Capstone Course 

f Courses must be successfully completed before admittance 

to the program 

<> BIOL 201 will substitute for BIOL 21 1 

>< CHEM 111 will substitute for CHEM 101 

X Advanced placement may be available for Certified Nursing 
Assistant - see program chair 



55 



56 



Office Administration 

Program Description 

As the business office relies increasingly on technology, 
companies need a well-trained, take-charge person to 
ensure that daily tasks are handled quickly and efficiently. 
In Ivy Tech's Office Administration Program, you'll learn the 
technical and interpersonal skills that will make you a key 
player in day-to-day operations. Not only will you cover 
basic of word processing, spreadsheets and databases, but 
you'll also study more advanced areas such as desktop 
publishing, developing skills that will move you to the top 
of a company's must-hire list. Programs are tailored for 
beginning, intermediate and advanced skill levels. 

Sample Careers 

Administrative assistant, first line manager, legal secretary, 
software application specialist 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science, Technical Certificate 

Certificates Offered 

Microsoft Certified Application Specialist 

Concentrations Offered 

Administrative, Legal, Medical, Software Applications 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Applied Science 




To earn this degree, you must have 61 credits in the following 


areas: 




General Education Core 


19 


Professional/Technical Core 


18 


Concentration Courses 


12 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 



Gene ra I Education (19 Credits) 



COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 


* ECONXXX 


Economics Elective 3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 1 


** MATH1XX 


Mathematics Elective 3 


♦ XXXXXXX 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 3 


* XXXXXXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 3 



Professional/Technical (18 credits) 



ACCT101 Financial Accounting 



BUSN 101 Introduction to Business 



OFAD103 Introduction to Computers with Word Processing 3 



0FAD119 Document Processing 



3 



OFAD216 Business Communications 



OFAD 221 Organizational Leadership 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Administrative Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration prepares you for an automated office environ- 
ment.covering skills such as word processing and microcomputer 
operating systems.As an administrative assistant, your tasks might 
include secretarial duties, scheduling work and planning meetings, 
taking minutes and composing correspondence. 



OFAD 114 Desktop Publishing 



OFAD 121 Offi ce Procedures and Team Dynamics 

OFAD 2 1 8 _ Spreadsheets 

OFAD 220 Records and Database Management 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Legal Concentration (24 credits) 

Legal office administrators perform and coordinate a law office's 

administrative activities and disseminate information to staff and 



clients.This concentration prepares you to use computers, business 
software and different legal research tools.Legal office administra- 
tors prepare correspondence and legal documents. 



PARA 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies 



PARA 102 Legal Research 



PARA 103 Civil Procedure 



OFAD 218 Spreadsheets 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Medical Concentration (24 credits) 
Working in a medical office requires specific job skills, such as a 
knowledge of medical terminology and transcription skills.Medical 
office administrators are responsible for a variety of administrative 
and clerical duties necessary to run a medical office efficiently. 



HLHS101 Medical Terminology 



3 



MEAS137 Medical Insurance & Basic Coding with 3 

Computer Applications 
OFAD 121 Office Procedures and Team Dynamic 3 

OFAD 220 Records and Database Management 3 

1? 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Software Applications Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration prepares you for an office environment, covering 
skills such as word processing, microcomputer operating systems, 
multimedia design and desktop publishing. With a software applica- 
tions concentration, your career choice could range from software 
applications specialist to desktop publisher. 



OFAD 114 Desktop Publishing 3 


OFAD 214 Multimedia Design 


3 


OFAD 218 Spreadsheets 


3 


OFAD 222 Database Applications 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 





Associate of Applied Science via 
Distance Education 

To earn this degree, you must have 61 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 19 

Professional/Technical Core 42 

General Education (19 Credits) 

COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 



Office Administration continued 



ECON XXX Economics Elective 



ENGL 111 English Composition 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



MATH 1XX Mathematics Elective 



XXXX XXX Life/Physical Sciences Elective 



XXXX XXX Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 



Professional/Technical (42 credits) 



ACCT101 Financial Accounting 



BUSN101 Introduction to Business 



OFAD 103 Introduction to Computers with Word Processing 



0FAD110 Presentation Graphics 



OFAD 114 Desktop Publishing 



OFAD 116 Essentials of Business Correspondence 



OFAD 1 1 9 Document Processing 



OFAD 121 Office Procedures andTeam Dynamics 



OFAD 130. Quality and Customer Care 



OFAD 216 Business Communications 



OFAD 218 Spreadsheets 



OFAD 220 Records and Database Management 



a OFAD 221 Organizational Leadership 



OFAD 222 Database Applications 



Technical Certificate 

To earn this degree, you must have 31 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 7 

Professional/Technical Core 3 

Concentration Courses 9-18 

Regionally Determined Credits 3-12 

General Education (7 Credits) 



ENGL 111 English Composition 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



XXXX XXX Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 



Professional/Technical (3 credits) 



OFAD 1 1 9 Document Processing 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Administrative Concentration (21 credits) 

OFAD 103 Introduction to Computers with Word Processing 3 

OFAD 121 Office Procedures and Team Dynamics 3_ 

OFAD 218 Spreadsheets 3 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Customer Service Concentration (21 credits) 

OFAD 103 Introduction to Computers with Word Processing 3 

J_ 

3 



OFAD 216 Business Communication 



OFAD 121 Office Procedures and Team Dynamics 

OFAD 130 Quality and Customer Service 

3 
3 
3 
3 



OFAD 21 7 Problem Solving for Computer Users 



OFAD 218 Spreadsheets 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Certificate 

Microsoft Certified Application Specialist (18 Credits) 



OFAD 103 


Introduction to Computers with Word Processing 3 


OFAD 110 


Presentation Graphics 3 


OFAD 204 


Outlook 2003 3 


OFAD 218 


Spreadsheets 3 


OFAD 222 


Database Applications 3 


OFAD 226 


Advanced Electronic Spreadsheets 3 




IVY TECH 



Paralegal Studies 

Program Description 

If you like writing, research and problem-solving, youl 
love a career as a paralegal. Our Paralegal program pro- 
vides students with the wide variety of skis needed to 
handle duties such as performing legal research, drafting 
legal correspondensce, interviewing clients and managing 
trial exhibits. Courses an taught by attorneys who are 
experienced in the subject matter and famSar with the 
important role paralegals play as members of the legal 
team. 

Sample Careers 

Legal assistant, paralegal 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




5" 



Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in Paralegal 
Studies is available with Ball State University and lUPU-Fort 
Wayne. To view these Associate of Science transfer degree 
programs and to see if they are available at your local Ivy Tech 
campus, students should go to http://www.ivytech.edu/. 

Students are encouraged to review these options with their 
advisors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to 
which they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to 
which they wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course 
and program transfer may also be available at your local cam- 
pus. Students should contact the transfer office of their local Ivy 
Tech for further information. 

Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 64 credits in the following 
areas: 
, General Education Core 19 

Professional/Technical Core 33 

Regionally Determined Credits 12 



58 



General Education (19 Credits) 


COMM 101 
or 
COMM 102 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 
Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 3 


ENGL 112 
or 
ENGL 211 


Exposition and Persuasion 3 
Technical Writing 3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 1 


" MATH 1XX 


Intermediate Algebra or Higher 3 


* xxxxxxx 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 3 


* xxxxxxx 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 3 


Professional/Technical (45 credits) 


CMS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 3 


PARA 101 


Introduction to Paralegal Studies 3 


PARA 102 


Legal Research 3 


PARA 103 


Civil Procedures 3 


PARA 106 


Tort Law 3 


PARA 107 


Contracts and Commercial Law 3 



PARA 108 Property Law 


3 


PARA 200 Legal Ethics 


3 


PARA 202 Litigation 


3 


PARA 203 Law Office Technology 


3 


a PARA 204 Legal Writing 3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 




General Education (19 Credits) 



COMM 101 
or 
COMM 102 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 
Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 3 


ENGL 112 
or 
ENGL 211 


Exposition and Persuasion 3 
Technical Writing 3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 1 


** MATH1XX 


Intermediate Algebra or Higher 3 


* XXXXXXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 3 


* XXXXXXX 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 3 


Professional/Technical (33 credits) 


ONS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 3 


PARA 101 


Introduction to Paralegal Studies 3 


PARA 102 


Legal Research 3 


PARA 103 


Civil Procedures 3 


PARA 106 


Tort Law 3 


PARA 107 


Contracts and Commercial Law 3 


PARA 108 


Property Law 3 


PARA 200 


Legal Ethics 3 


PARA 202 


Litigation 3 


PARA 203 


Law Office Technology 3 


* PARA 204 


Legal Writing 3 



Electives (12 credits) 


Choose four from this list of courses 


PARA 205 


Business Associations 3 


PARA 209 


Family Law 3 


PARA 210 


Willsjrusts and Estates 3 


PARA 211 


Criminal Law and Procedure 3 


PARA 280 


Internship 3 


PARA XXX 


Paralegal Elective 3 




IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY 
COLLEGE 



Paramedic Science 

Program Description 

Does the idea of being an emergency first-responder make 
your heart beat a little faster? Are you an emergency med- 
ical technician who wants to get to the next level of emer- 
gency care and job opportunity? Then our Paramedic 
Science program may be for you.Through clinical and prac- 
tical instruction as well as a field internship, you'll be pre- 
pared to function in the uncontrolled environment of 
emergency medicine in the pre-hospital setting. Upon 
completion.you'll qualify for state certification as an emer- 
gency medical technician-paramedic. Already a certified 
paramedic?Takejust seven general education courses,and 
you'll earn an Associate of Science degree that transfers 
into four-year degree programs. 

Sample Careers 

EMT, paramedic 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your localxampus for more information. 




The Paramedic Science program is accredited by the 
Commission on Accreditation of the Allied Health Education 
Program (CAAHEP), in collaboration with the Committee on 
Accrediation of Education Programs for the Emergency 
Medical Services Professional. 

Commission on Accreditation of 

Allied Health Education Programs 

1361 Park Street 

Clearwater, FL 33756 

(727) 210-2350 

Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in 
Paramedic Science is available with the University of Southern 
Indiana.To view the Associate of Science transfer degree pro- 
gram and to see if it is available at your local Ivy Tech campus, 
students should go to http://www.ivytech.edu/. 
Students are encouraged to review these options with their 
advisors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to 
which they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to 
which they wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course 
and program transfer may also be available at your local cam- 
pus. Students should contact the transfer office of their local 
Ivy Tech for further information. 

Associate of Applied Science/Associate of 
Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 66.5 credits in the follow- 
ing areas: 
General Education Core 19 

Professional/Technical Core 47.5 



General Education (19 Credits) 


APHY101 Anatomy and Physiology 1 


APHY102 Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


* COMMXXX Communications Elective 


3 


ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 1 


* MATH 1 XX Mathematic Elective 


XXXX XXX Humanities/Social Science Elective 


3 



Professional/Technical (47.5 credits) 



PARM 102 


Emergency Medical Technician 


Bask Training 7.5 


PARM111 


Preparatory 


3 


PARM 112 


Prehospital Pharmacy 


3 


PARM 115 


Airway, Patient Assessment 


3i 


' PARM 116 


Clinical Applications 1 


L5 


PARM 200 


Trauma 


3 


PARM 210 


Medical 1 


6 


PARM 213 


Medical II 


5 


PARM 215 


Special Considerations - 


3i 


PARM 216 


Clinical Applications II 


Ij 


PARM 219 


Clinical Applications III 


1.5 


a PARM 220 


Operations 


L5 


PARM 221 


Ambulance Internship 


6 




IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY 
COUEGE 



59 



Physical Therapist Assistant 



Program Description 

If you like to help people and want to work in the medical 
field, our Physical Therapist Assistant program may be for 
you.The PTA program will prepare you to work, under the 
supervision of a physical therapist, with physically 
impaired persons to help reverse adverse effects of physi- 
cal disability. The therapist and assistant work together to 
provide appropriate therapeutic intervention and commu- 
nication within the'hearth care team. You will learn to 
administer therapeutic and psychosocial support for indi- 
viduals with musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiopul- 
monary, vascular or other physiological dysfunctions. 

Sample Careers 

Physical Therapist Assistant 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. See page 6 
for contact information. 



60 




Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 69.5 credits in the follow- 
ing areas: 
General Education Core 25 

Professional/Technical Core 44.5 

General Education (25 Credits) 
# APHY 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 



APHY 1 02 Anatomy and Physiology I 



# ENGL 111 English Composition 



IVYT1XX Life Sklls Elective 



MATH 1 1 8 Concepts in Mathematics 



PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology 



SOC1 1 1 1 Introduction to Sociology 



SON 111 Physical Science 



Professional/Technical (42.5 credits) 



PTAS106 PTA Treatment Modalities I 



PTAS 107 Kinesiology 



PTAS115 Clinical I 



PTAS 205 Clinical I 



PTAS 207 PTA Treatment Modalities I 



PTAS 215 Clinical I 



PTAS 217 PTA Treatment Modalities III 



A PTAS 224 Current Issues and Review 



3 



3 



COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

or 

COMM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 



# PTAS 101 Introdurtion to Physical Therapist Assistant 3 

PTAS 102 Diseases/Trauma, and Terminology 3 

PTAS 103 Administrative Aspects of Physical 3 
Therapist Assisting 



# Courses must be successfully completed before admittance to the 
program 



Practical Nursing 

Program Description 

The licensed practical nurse (LPN) is an integral part of the 
health care team.The Practical Nursing program leads to a 
Technical Certificate and can be completed in approxi- 
mately one year. The accredited program will prepare you 
to care for patients in a variety of health care settings, such 
as hospitals, convalescent centers, clinics, home care and 
physicians' offices. Graduates are eligible to take the state 
licensure exam to become a licensed practical nurse. 

Sample Careers 

LPN.LPVN 

Degrees Available 

Technical Certificate 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Practical Nursing continued 

Technical Certificate 

To earn this degree, you must have 43 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 13 

Professional/Technical Core 30 



General Education (13 Credits) 


# APHY101 


Anatomy and Physiology 1 


3 


# APHY102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


# ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


# PSYC101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


Professional/Technical (30 credits) 


NRSG 100 


Fundamentals of Nursing 


3 


X NRSG 101 


Fundamentals of Nursing Lab 


1 


NRSG 102 


Medical-Surgical Nursing 1 


2 


NRSG 103 


Medical-Surgical Nursing 1 Lab 


' 2 


NRSG 105 


Medical-Surgical Nursing 1 Clinical 


2 


NRSG 106 


Pharmacology for Nursing 


3 


NRSG 110 


Medical Surgical Nursing II 


3 


NRSG 111 


Medical Surgical Nursing II Clinical 


2 


NRSG 112 


Maternal-child Nursing 


3 


NRSG 113 


Maternal-child Nursing Clinical 


2 


NRSG 114 


Health Care Concepts in Nursing 


1 


a NRSG 116 


Geriatric/Complex Medical Surgical Nursing 
for the Practical Nurse III 


4 


NRSG 117 


Geriatric/Complex Medical Surgical Nursing 
for the Practical Nurse Clinical III 


2 



Symbol Key 

A Capstone Course 

X Advanced placement may be available for Certified Nursing 

Assistant - see program chair 
# Courses must be successfully completed before admittance to 

the program 



Pre-Engineering 

Program Description 

The program is designed to prepare you for transfer to bac- 
calaureate degree programs in engineering. The program 
curriculum will provide a strong foundation in science, 
math and technology. Special emphasis is placed on qual- 
itative and quantitative analytical skills necessary in engi- 
neering design and problem solving while working in a 
cooperative team environment. Skills and knowledge can 
be applied to a wide range of baccalaureate engineering 
specialties including Electrical, Mechanical, Civil, Industrial, 
and Chemical engineering. The program will also focus on 
fJie applied aspects of science and engineering. 

Sample Careers 

Transfer degree 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must hare 66-67 credits in the Mow- 
ing areas: 
General Education Core 40 

Professional/Technical Core 26-27 



General Education (40 Credits) 


CHEM 105 


General Chemistry 1 


5 


C0MM101 


Fundamentals of Publk Speaking 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 211 


Calculus 1 


4 


MATH 212 


Calculus II 


4 


MATH 261 


Multivariate Calculus 


4 


MATH 264 


Differential Equations 


3 


PHYS220 


Mechanics 


5 


PHYS221 


Heat, Electricity and Optics 


5 


XXXXXXX 


Humanities Social Sciences elective 


3 


Professional/Technical (26-27 credits) 


ENGR116 


Geometric Modeling for Visualization 


2 


ENGR140 


Introduction to Engineering 1 


3 


ENGR 160 


Introduction to Engineering II 


3 


ENGR 190 


Introduction to Engineering Design 


2 


ENGR 251 


Electrical Circuits 1 


4 


ENGR 260 


Vector Mechanics-Statics 


3 


a ENGR 261 


Dynamic 


3 


ENGR 270 


Engineering Project Management 




ENGR XXX 


Pre-engineering elective 


3-i 



Y 



IVY TECH 



61 



62 



Professional Communication 



Program Description 

The Professional Communication program provides you 
with a rich background in the arts and sciences. This 
background will equip you with problem solving skills, 
communication and writing abilities, and experience in 
communicating and designing texts using information 
technologies. 

Sample Careers 

Executive assistant, writer 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 64 credits in the following 
areas: 

General Education Core 

ProfessionalAechnical Core 

General Education (31 Credits) 



COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 



ENGL 111 English Composition 



ENGL 1 1 2 Exposition and Persuasion 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



MATH 1 1 1 Intermediate Algebra 



XXXXXXX Science Elective 



XXXXXXX Social Services Electives 



XXXXXXX Humanities Electives 



Professional/Technical (33 credits) 



BUSN101 Introduction to Business 



CINS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 



COMM 201 Introduction to Mass Communication 
COMM 202 Small Group Communication 



PSYC101 Introduction to Psychology 



VISC 101 Fundamentals of Design 




IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY 



3 



COMM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 



COMM 21 1 Fundamentals of Public Relations 

ENGL 202 Creative Writing 

ENGL 211 Technical Writing 



VISC 115 Introduction to Computer Graphics 



Public Safety 

Program Description 

The Public Safety Technology program is designed to 
meet the ongoing needs of municipalities, students, 
business, and industries. The program will develop your 
technical skills, general knowledge, critical thinking, and 
problem solving abilities. Broad-based technical skills 
and critical thinking processes will assist you in adapting 
to changes in the work environment and promoting suc- 
cessful advancement on the job 

Sample Careers 

Public safety specialist, firefighter, environmental safety 
specialist 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science, Technical Certificate 

Concentrations Offered 

Environmental Health and Safety, Fire Science, 
Hazardous Materials, Public Administration 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Public Safety continued 




General Education (19 Credits) 



BIOL 101 Introductory Biology 

or 

SON 111 Physical Science 



3 



CHEM 1 01 introductory Chemistry I 



3 



COMM101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

or 

COMM102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 



ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 



3 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



MATH 1XX Mathematics Elective 



POLS 101 Introduction to American Government and Politics 3 

or 

POLS 220 Public Administration 3 



Professional/Technical (19 credits) 



PSAF 1 1 5 Hazmat Awareness and Operations 
PSAF 120 First Responder 



PSAF 121 Risk Management 



PSAF 220 Incident Management Systems 
PSAF 222 Computer Applications in Public Safety 



A PSAF 279 Public Safety Capstone Course 

TECH 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 

Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Environmental Health and Safety Concentration 

(24credits) 

This concentration prepares you to work in state and local agencies, 
waste water facilities, private companies and labs where they often 
test samples in lab environments, monitor air and water quality and 
advise on nature conservation strategies, site management, species 
protection, urban and rural development, and pest control. 



ENVM 101 


Introduction to Environmental Technology 3 


ENVM 102 


Environmental Management 3 


ENVM 110 


Environmental Toxicology 3 


HAZM200 


Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 3 

Regulations 


Regionally 


)etermined Credits 12 



Fire Science Concentration (27-28 credits) 
This concentration prepares you to work in public and industrial fire 
departments and at airports and fire protection agencies where they 
often respond to and put out fires, operate emergency equipment 



and investigate 


fires. 




FIRE 102 


Fire Apparatus and Equipment 


3 


FIRE 103 


Firefighting Strategy and Tactics 


3 


FIRE 201 


Fire Protection Systems 


3 


FIRE 202 


Fire Service Management 


3 


FIRE 204 


Fire Service Hydraulics 


3 


Regionally 


Determined Credits 


12-13 



Hazardous Materials Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration prepares you to work in fire departments, spill 
recovery companies, environment companies or government 
agencies. 



HAZM 100 OSHA Regulations 


3 


HAZM104 HAZ-MAT Health Effects 


3 


HAZM 200 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 
Regulations 


3 


HAZM 220 Hazardous Materials Recovery, Incineration 
and Disposal 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 



Public Administration Concentration (24 credits) 
The Public Administration specialty prepares you to work in local, 
city and state government agencies where you might support city 
managers of other public administrators. 



BUSN105 Principles of Management 



busn; 



Organizational Behavior 



OPMT 224 Operations Management 



POLS 112 State and Local Government 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Technical Certificate — Fire Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 31 credits in the Mowing 

areas: 
General Education Core 
Professional/Technical Core 3 

Specialty Courses 6 

Regionally Determined Credits 15 



General Education (7 Credits) 


ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 


IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 


POLS 101 Introduction to American Government 3 

and Politics 


Professional/Technical (3 credits) 


TECH 104 Compute'?. 'Zi~-."i: ':•"-:": :: 


3 


Other Required Courses (21 credits) 


FIRE 1 03 Firefighting Strategy and Tactic 3 


FIRE 201 Fire Protection Systems 


Regionally Determined Credits 


15 




IVY TEGH 

COMM 

COLLEGE 



B 



64 



Radiation Therapy 

Program Description 

This newest degree track brings another strong addition 
to Ivy Tech's commitment to the growth our Life Science 
initiatives through education and professional develop- 
ment in our community. The Radiation Therapy program 
provides didactic and clinical education opportunities 
for individuals who enjoy significant patient interaction 
and close patient/professional relationships. Clinical 
practice occurs at our partnering medical centers and 
oncology clinics throughout Indiana. 

Sample Careers 

Radiation Therapist 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 70 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core . 26 

Professional/Technical Core 44 

General Education (26 Credits) 



APHY101 Anatomy and Physiology I 



APHY 102 Anatomy and Physiology I 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



MAT13X Mathematics Elective 



PSYC101 Introduction to Psychology 



PHYS101 Physics I 



XXXX XXX Humanities Elective 



Professional/Technical (44 credits) 



HLHS101 Medical Terminology 



RDTH145 Clinical Externship I 



RDTH155 Clinical Externship I 



RDTH 223 Radiobiology and Safety 



RDTH 225 Clinical Externship I 



RDTH 232 Radiation Therapy Physics 



RDTH 235 Clinical Externship IV 



RDTH 241 Treatment Planning 



RDTH 243 Radiation Therapy Capstone Course 



RDTH 245 Clinical Externship V 



3 



C0MM101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

or 

COMM102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 

ENGL 111 English Composition 3 



RDTH 100 Introduction to Radiation Therapy 



RDTH 150 Patient Care Radiation Oncology 



RDTH 220 Technigues and Applications in 
Radiation Therapy 



RDTH 230 Pathology and Treatment Principles I 



3 



RDTH 233 Research Methodology in Radiation Oncology 1 



5 



RDTH 240 Pathology and Treatment Principles II 



3 



RDTH 242 Quality Management in Radiation Oncology 2 



2 



Radiologic Technology 

Program Description 

A radiologic technologist is someone who specializes in 
using x-rays to create images of the body. The radi- 
ographs that are produced by the radiographer enable 
the doctor to diagnose the patient for disease, fractures, 
or any irregularities. Therefore, as a radiographer, you 
must be a professional skilled in the art and science of 
radiography and able to apply scientific knowledge, 
problem-solving technigues, and use high-tech equip- 
ment, while providing quality patient care. Technologists 
are in demand in hospitals, clinics, physicians' and den- 
tists' offices. 



Sample Careers 

Radiologic Technologist 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Radiologic Technology continued 

Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 77 credits in the following 
areas: 

General Education Core 19 

Professional/Technical Core 58 



General Education (19 Credits) 


# 


APHY101 


Anatomy and Physioloqy 1 


3 


# 


APHY102 


Anatomy and Physiology II » 


3 


# 


COMM 101 
or 
COMM 102 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 
introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 
3 


# 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


t 


IVYT1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


# 


MATH 131 
or 
MATH 136 


Algebra/Trigonometry 1 
College Algebra 


3 
3 


#* 


*PSYC101 

or 
*S0CI111 


Introduction to Psychology 
Introduction to Sociology 


3 
3 


Professional/Technical (58 credits) 


# 


CINS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


# 


HLHS101 


Medical Terminology 


3 




RADT111 


Orientation and Patient Care 


4 




RADT112 


Image Production and Evaluation 1 


3 




RADT113 


Radiographic Positioning 1 and Lab 


3 




RADT114 


Radiographic Clinical Education 1 


3 




RA0T115 


Radiographic Positioning II and Lab 


3 




RADT116 


Radiographic Clinical Education II 


4 




RADT117 


Radiation Physics and Equipment Operation 


3 




RA0T201 


Radiographic Positioning III and Lab 


3 




RADT202 


Radiographic Clinical Education III 


4 




RADT203 


Radiographic Clinical Education IV 


4 




RADT204 


Radiographic Clinical Education V 


4 




RADT206 


Radiobiology and Radiation Protection 


3 




RA0T209 


Radiographic Positioning IV and Lab 


3 




RADT218 


Image Production and Evaluation II 


2 




RADT221 


Pharmacoloqy and Advanced Procedures 


3. 


A 


RADT299 


General Examination Review 


3 



Courses must be successfully completed before admittance to the program. 



Respiratory Care 

Program Description 

Respiratory therapists are health care specialists who 
provide care for patients with breathing disorders. Care 
includes assessment, evaluation, and treatment of 
patients ranging in age from premature infants to the 
elderly. Therapists also work with adults who have 
chronic lung problems, such as asthma or emphysema. 
As a respiratory therapist, you must possess good com- 
munication skills. You will work side by side with physi- 
cians, nurses and other health care providers in caring 
for patients with lung disorders. As part of the health 
care team, you help with interviewing patients, making 
.recommendations to physicians to change therapy 
based on your assessments, and providing patient and 
family education about lung disease. 

Sample Careers 

Respiratory therapist 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 

The Respiratory Care program is accredited by the Commission on 
Accreditation of the Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), in 
collaboration with the Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care 
(CoARC), 1 361 Park Street; Clearwater, FL 33756; (727) 210-2350 




Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 71-73 credits in the I 

ing areas: 
General Education Core 25-27 

Professional/Technical Core 46 

General Education (25-27 Credits) 



APHY 1 01 Anatomy and Physiology I 



# APHY102 Anatomy and Physiology I 



" #BI0L 2XX Microbiology Elective 



M 



* COMM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 
or 

* COMM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 



** #CHEM 1 XX Chemistry Elective 



M 



# ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 



IVYT1XX Ufe Skills Elective 



MATH1XX Math Elective 



PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology 

or 

SOC1 1 1 1 Introduction to Sociology 



Professional/Technical (46 credits) 



RESP121 Introduction to Respiratory Care 



RESP122 TherapeuK '.'■::; :;: 



RESP 1 23 Cardiopulmonary Physiology 



RESP125 Critical Care I 



RESP 126 Clinical Medicine I 



RESP 129 Respiratory Care Pharmacology 



RESP 134 Clinical Applications I 



RESP 137 Clinical Applications I 1 



RESP 1 38 Clinical Applications in Adult Critical Care 



RESP221 Cardiopul^:"'. Ziz-:r. ";= 



RESP 222 Critical Care I 



RESP 224 Clinical Medicine II 



RESP 226 Continuing Care 



RESP 2Z9 Emergency Management 



RESP 237 Clinical Applications of Advanced Critical Care and 
Specialty Rotations 



I Courses must be successfully completed before admittance 
to the program 



65 






Surgical Technology 

Program Description 

A career in surgical technology is very fast-paced and 
challenging. You may be able to hold a beating heart in 
your hand. You may be part of a team in the OR that 
works on replacing a total hip or knee in the orthopedic 
rotation at your site. You will certainly hand many differ- 
ent instruments to the surgeon in the correct fashion 
and at the correct time. You will be the keeper of the 
sterile field. This is a very rewarding career in the Health 
Science Field. It is not nursing; you do a very specific 
technical job and work under the RN and Surgeon. 



Sample Careers 

Surgical Technologist 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None j 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 



66 




The Surgical Technology program is accredited by the 
Commission on Accreditation of the Allied Health Education 
Program (CAAHEP), in collaboration with the Accreditation 
Review Committee on Education in Surgical Technology 
(ARCE-ST). 

Commission on Accreditation of 
Allied Health Education Programs 

1361 Park Street 
Clearwater, FL 33756 
(727) 210-2350 



Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in Surgical 
Technology is available with lUPU-FW.To view these Associate of 
Science transfer degree programs and to see if they afe avail- 
able at your local ivy Tech campus, students should go to 
http://www.ivytecti.edu/. 

Students are encouraged to review these options with their 
advisors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to 
which they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to 
which they wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course 
and program transfer may also be available at your local cam- 
pus. Students should contact the transfer offi ce of their local Ivy 
Tech for further information 



Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 68-69 credits in the follow- 
ing areas: 

General Education Core 19 

Professional/Technical Core 49-50 

General Education (19 Credits) 

# APHY101 Anatomy and Physiology I 3_ 

I 3 



APHY 102 Anatomy and Physiology I 



COMM101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

or 

COMM102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 



ENGL m English Composition 



* PSYC101 
or 

* S0CI111 


Introduction to Psychology 
Introduction to Sociology 


3 
3 


Professional/Technical (49-50 credits) 


8I0L2XX 


General Microbiology 


3-4 


# HLHS101 


Medical Terminology 


3 


HLHS105 


Medical Law and Ethics 


3 


SURG 111 


Fundamentals of Surgical Technology 


4 


SURG 112 


Application of Surgical Fundamentals 


2 


SURG 113 


Surgical Procedures 1 


3 


SURG 114 


Clinical Applications 1 


3 


SURG 211 


Surgical Procedures II 


6 


SURG 212 


Clinical Applications II 


9 


* SURG 213 


Surgical Procedures III 


3 


SURG 214 


Clinical Applications III 


7 


XXXXXXX 


Pharmacology 


3 



# Courses must be successfully completed before admit- 
tance to the program 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



' # MATH 1XX Mathematics Elective 



3 




IVY TECH 




Therapeutic Massage 

Program Description 

The Therapeutic Massage program addresses the theory 
and hands-on techniques of therapeutic massage. 
Massage skills include, assessment, relaxation massage, 
therapeutic massage, deep tissue, sports massage, 
hyrotherapies, applications for special populations 
including pregnant women, children, geriatrics and the 
disabled. Anatomy, physiology, disease conditions, phar- 
macology and their effects on the body alone and during 
massage applications are studied thoroughly, to promote 
understanding of massage indications and contraindica- 
tions. Psychological and emotional issues, legal and eth- 
ical aspects, and business development are addressed. 
The program is designed to prepare you for beginning 
entry into the massage profession, with an emphasis on 
working within the wellness community. 

Sample Careers 

Massage therapist 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Applied Science, Technical Certificate 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 

Completion of the Technical Certificate provides the student in excess of 
700 hours of training and preparation to sit for the NCBTMB (National 
Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage-and Bodywork) National 
Certification Exam. Completion of the AAS degree provides the student 
in excess of 1000 hours of preparation to sit for the National 
Certification Exam. 



Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 67 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 19 

Professional/Technical 48 



General Education (19 Credits) 


APHY101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


APHY102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


IVYT 1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 1XX 


Mathematics Elective 


3 


XXXXXXX 


Humanities/Social Science Elective 


3 


XXXXXXX 


English/Communications Elective 


3 


Professional/Technical (48 credits) 


HLHS101 


Medical Terminology 


3 


TMAS 101 


Holistic Approach to Massage Therapy 


3 


TMAS 102 


Legal Massage Applications 


3 


TMAS 120 


Massage Technician Training I 


3 


TMAS 122 


Massage Financial Management 


3 


TMAS 125 


Acupressure Theory and Methods 


3 


TMAS 140 


Massage Technician Training II 


3 


TMAS 141 


Massage Through the Life Span 


3 


TMAS 201 


Sports, Injuries and Hydrotherapies 


3 


TMAS 202 


Deep Tissue 


3 


TMAS 203 


Herbs, Drugs and Massage 


3 


TMAS 205 


Pathology and Massage 


3 


TMAS 210 


Biomechanics 


3 


a TMAS 220 


Advanced Technigues 


3 


TMAS 221 


Business Development 


3 


TMAS XXX 


Massage Elective 


3 



Technical Certificate 

To earn this degree, you must have 49 credits in th* 

areas: 
General Education Core 10 

Professional/Technical 39 



General Education (10 Credits) 


■wn 


APHY101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 




APHY 102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 




IVYT 1XX 


Life Skills Elective 




XXXXXXX 


English/Communications Elective 




Professional/Technical (39 credits) 


HLHS101 


Medial Terminoloqy 




TMAS 101 


Holistic Approach to Massaqe Therapy 




TMAS 102 


Leqal Massaqe Applications 




TMAS 120 


Massaqe Technician Traininq I 




TMAS 122 


Massaqe Financial Management 




TMAS 125 


-:.: ;::.'; "-;:- ; : 




TMAS 140 


Massaqe Technician Traininq II 




TMAS 141 


Massaqe Throuqh the Life Span 




TMAS 201 


Sports, Injuries and Hydrotherapies 




TMAS 203 


Herbs, Druqs and Massaqe 




TMAS 205 


: 3: - :: j, and Massaqe 




TMAS 210 


Biomechanics 




TMAS XXX 


Massaqe Elective 






IVY TECH 

cow ■- 

COLLEGE 



6" 



Transportation, Distribution and Logistics 



Program Description 

Transportation and logistics is a major industry in 
Indiana. Many companies now depend on their ability to 
accurately move goods around the world. Ivy Tech 
Community College's Transportation, Distribution and 
Logistics program prepares a workforce that meets this 
demand. Indiana's central location and access to nation- 
al and world markets has attracted a large increase in the 
companies in the transportation, distribution and logis- 
tics arena. 

The logistics and transportation field uses high technolo- 
gy and information systems to track goods and increase 
efficiencies. There are many opportunities fof careers in 
transportation and logistic management using the latest 
technologies in supply management, distribution sys- 
tems, and inter-modal transportation*. 

Sample Careers 

Shipping/receiving clerk, cargo and freight agent, 
first line supervisor 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science 

Concentrations Offered 

None 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 



68 




Associate of Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 54 credits in the following 

areas: 
General Education Core 31 

Professional/Technical Core 33 



General Education (31 Credits) 



COMM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


" ECON XXX 


Economics Elective 


3 


ENGL 111 


English Composition 


3 


GEOL207 


World Geography 


3 


IVYT 1XX 


Life Skills Elective 


1 


MATH 131 


Algebra/Trigonometry t 


3 


MATH 132 


Algebra/Trigonometry II 


3 


PHIL 102 


Introduction to Ethic 


3 


PSYC 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


S0CI111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 


XXXX XXX 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


' 3 


Professional/Technical (33 credits) 


ACQ 101 


Financial Accounting 


3 


BUSN101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


BUSN 102 


Business Law 


3 


BUSN 105 


Principles of Management 


3 


BUSN 227 


Logistics/Supply Chain Management 


3 


BUSN 228 


Principles of Purchasing 


3 


BUSN 229 


Transportation Systems 


3 


BUSN 230 


Business Statistics 


3 


CINS101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


MKTG 101 


Principles of Marketing 


3 


0PMT224 


Operations Management 


3 



Visual Communication 

Program Description 

Visual Communications.students are provided with all the 
skills necessary to work in the design industry. You will 
develop advanced skills and knowledge in your particular 
field of interest. The program prepares you for the world 
of work by developing real-world internship and design 
exhibit opportunities. You will also develop a professional 
print and media portfolio that will be critiqued by local 
industry representatives. You will take part in mock inter- 
views with these representatives and get important feed- 
back on what it takes to get a job in the design field. 

Sample Careers 

Camera operator, graphic designer, production assistant, 
webmaster 

Degrees Available 

Associate of Science, Associate of Applied Science, 
Associate of Fine Arts 

Concentrations Offered 

Film and Video, Graphic Design, Multimedia Production 
Photography, Web Design, Web Development 

Availability of concentrations and degrees varies by campus. 
Contact your local campus for more information. 




Associate of Science 

Articulated transfer through an Associate of Science in Visual 
Communications is available with IUPUI and the University of 
Southern Indiana. To view this Associate of Science transfer 
degree program and to see if they are available at your local Ivy 
Tech campus, students should go to http://www.ivytech.edu/. 

Students are encouraged to review these options with their 
advisors, to consult the current catalog of the institution to 
which they wish to transfer, and to contact the institution to 
which they wish to transfer. Additional opportunities for course 
and program transfer may also be available at your local cam- 
pus. Students should contact the transfer office of their local Ivy 
Tech for further information 



Associate of Applied Science 

To earn this degree, you must have 67 credits in the following 
areas: 

General Education Core 19 

Professional/Technical Core 24 

Concentration Core 12 

Regionally Determined Credits ■ 12 

General Education (19 Credits) 

r 



ARTH 101 Survey of Art and Culture I 



ARTH102 Survey of Art and Culture I 



3 



COMM101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

or 

COMM102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 



ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition 



3 



IVYT1XX Life Skills Elective 



MATH1XX Math Elective 



XXXXXXX Life/Physical Science Elective 



Professional/Technical (24 credits) 



VISC 101 Fundamentals of Design 



VISC 102 Fundamentals of Imaging 



VISC 110 Web Design I 



VISC 115 Introduction to Computer Graphics 



VISC 201 Electronic Imaging 



VISC 205 Business Practices for Visual Artists 



VISC 207 Portfolio Preparation 



VISC 213 Advanced Electronic Imaging 



3 



Choose One of the Following Concentrations 

Film and Video Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration exposes you to a broad technical core of cours- 
es representing key topics such as organizing the visual fields, 
color theory and application, image acquisition and manipulation 
technology. You will learn to operate television, video or motion 
picture. 



VIDT110 Production Editing I 



VIDT111 Studio and Field Production I 



VIDT 202 Studio and Field Production I 



VISC 105 Video and Sound 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Graphic Design Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration involves creating 2D commercial designs for 
print. You will learn approaches for production, printing, planning, 
business issues, and web design and its relationship to print 



VISC 114 Graphic Design 1 


3 


VISC 113 Typography 


3 


VISC 116 Electronic Illustration 3 


VISC 217 Graphic Design II 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 



Photography Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration will expose you to a broad technical core of 
courses representing key topics such as: organizing the visual field, 
color theory and application, image acquisition and manipulation 
technology, the computer as a powerful tool, the professional visu- 
alartist as a business person and exit portfolio. 



PHOT 104 Basic Photography 3 


PHOT 106 Studio Practices 3 


PHOT 107 Intermediate Photography 3 


PHOT 201 Principles of Color Photography 


3 


Regionally Determined Credits 


12 



Web Design Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration provides you with approaches to developing 
interactive content for CD/DVDs and websites, addressing issues 
with production-quality digital video and sound editing. Enjoy cre- 



ative problem-solving in your own interactive 3D 



VISC 113 Typography 



VISC 114 Graphic Design I 



VISC 116 Electronic Illustration 



VISC 210 Web Design II 



Regionally Determined Credits 



Web Development Concentration (24 credits) 
This concentration will provide you with experience in both creative 
and technical areas.The latest technologies that are currently in high 
demand include website design, web development and interactive 

media. 



CINS 1 25 Database Design and Management 



VISC 103 Interactive Media I 



VISC 113 Typography 



VISC 210 Web Design I 



Regionally Determined Credits 




IVY TECH 

COMMUNITY 
COLLEGE 



69 



70 




Comprehensive Course Description List 



(Alphabetical Order) 



ACCT 090 Introduction to Accounting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites : None. Introduces the basic principles of accounting as 
utilized in a variety of office settings. Includes the principles of debit 
and credit, double-entry bookkeeping, use of journals, and analyzing 
transactions. Uses of ledgers, posting procedures, petty cash, bank- 
ing procedures, payroll, depreciation, work sheets, balance sheets, 
and income statements are covered as well. 

ACCT 101 Financial Accounting TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENG 025, ENG 032 
and MAT 044. Introduces the fundamental principles, techniques, 
and tools of financial accounting.The development and use of the 
basic financial statements pertaining to corporations both service 
and retail. 

ACCT 1 02 Managerial Accounting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACCT 101. Emphasizes managerial accounting con- 
cepts, general versus cost accounting systems, cost behavior, cost- 
volume profit analysis, budgeting, standard cost systems, responsi- 
bility accounting, incremental analysis, and capital investment 
analysis. 

ACQ 105 Income Tax 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENG 025, ENG 032 
and MAT 044. Offers an overview of federal and state income tax 
law for individuals including taxable income, capital gains and loss- 
es, adjustments, standard and itemized deductions, tax credits and 
appropriate tax forms. Introduces tax concepts needed by a sole pro- 
prietorship. 

ACCT 106 Payroll Accounting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENG 025, ENG 032 
and MAT 044. Covers payroll calculating and reporting including var- 
ious federal and state withholding taxes, employer payroll taxes, 
typical insurance and other arrangements affecting the preparation 
of payroll registers and employees' earnings records. 

ACCT 1 09 Personal Finance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENG 025, ENG 032 
and MAT 044. Examines the process of setting and achieving finan- 
cial goals. Emphasizes managing financial resources, budgeting for 
current expenses, projecting cash flow and managing short- and 
long-term credit. Includes use of insurance to reduce risks and vehi- 
cles for saving and investing. 



ACCT 112 Managerial Accounting Application 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Presents a series of 
planned accounting learning problems and activities designed to 
accompany concepts and theories included in a Managerial 
Accounting Application course. 

ACCT 118 Financial Concepts for Accounting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Surveys the applications of mathematics to vari- 
ous business and accounting activities. Includes a brief review of 
basic mathematical operations and their subsequent application to 
such commercial activities as payroll, consumer finance, business 
borrowing, inventory control, pricing, depreciation, and time value of 
money. 

ACCT 122 Accounting Systems Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACCT 101. Solves accounting problems using software 
similar to what is currently used in business. Includes installation, oper- 
ation, and analysis of an accounting software package or packages. 

ACCT 201 Intermediate Accounting I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACCT 102. Studies accounting principles and applica- 
tions at an intermediate level pertaining to the income statement 
and balance sheet, cash and cash equivalents, receivables, invento- 
ries, plant assets and intangible assets, current and contingent lia- 
bilities, corrections of errors, and statement of cash flows. Included 
are analysis of bad debts, inventory valuation, repairs and mainte- 
nance, depreciatTon of plant assets and present value applications. 

ACCT 202 Intermediate Accounting II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACCT 201 . Continues studies of Intermediate 
Accounting I and includes long-term investments, long-term debt, 
stockholders' equity, special accounting problems and analysis, and 
financial statement analysis. Also included are corporate capital and 
treasury stock transactions, dividends, earnings per share, account- 
ing for income taxes, and creation of financial statements from 
incomplete records. 

ACCT 203 Cost Accounting I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACCT 102. Examines the manufacturing process in 
relation to the accumulation of specific costs of manufactured prod- 
ucts. Studies various cost accounting report forms, material, labor 
control, and allocation of manufacturing costs to jobs and depart- 
ments. » 

ACQ 204 Cost Accounting II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACCT 203. Studies the master or comprehensive budget 
flexible budgeting and capital budgeting. Emphasizes tools for deci- 
sion- making and analysis. Introduces human resource accounting. 



ACQ 206 Advanced Managerial Accounting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACCT 102. Provides an intermediate understanding of 
accounting records and management decision making, with topics 
including internal accounting records and quantitative business 

analysis. 

ACCT 207 Accounting for Government 3 Credits 

and Nonprofit Entities 1 

Prerequisites: ACCT 101. Emphasizes the similarities and differences 
between government, nonprofit and commercial accounting meth- 
ods and procedures. Exposes students to the bask fund accounting 
cycle for the general fund and other special funds. 

ACCT 208 Advanced Income Tax 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACCT 101 and ACC 105. Studies procedures and prob- 
lems pertaining to federal and state income tax laws for partner- 
ships and corporations. Includes a review and in-depth study of con- 
cepts related to proprietorships covered in Income Tax I. 

ACCT 209 Auditing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACCT 201 . Covers public accounting organization and 
operation including internal control, internal and external auditing, 
verification and testing of the balance sheet and operating accounts, 
and the auditor's report of opinion of the financial statements. 

ACCT 212 Business Finance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACCT 101, BUS 101 and MAT 111. Introduces bask 
tools and techniques of financial analysis. Financial analysis includes 
but is not limited to the use of ratios, common size statements, and 
pro forma statements. 

ACCT 213 Advanced Spreadsheets 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OAD 218 and ACCT 102. Continues the study of elec- 
tronic spreadsheets in business. Emphasizes the advanced applica- 
tion of electronic spreadsheets. 

ACCT 217 Intermediate Accounting 1 Credit 

Applications I 

Prerequisites: ACCT 102. Presents a series of planned accounting 
learning problems and activities designed to accompany concepts 
and theories included in ACCT 201. Uses computerized problems. 

ACCT 218 Intermediate Accounting 1 Credit 

Applications II 

Prerequisites: ACCT 1 02. Presents a series of planned accounting 
learning problems and activities designed to accompany concepts 
and theories included in Intermediate Accounting IL Uses computer- 
ized problems. 



■1 



72 



ACQ 219 Cost Accounting Applications 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: ACCT 102. Presents a series of planned accounting 
learning problems and activities designed to accompany concepts 
and theories included in Cost Accounting I. Uses computerized prob- 
lems. 

ACCT 225 Integrated Accounting Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EN6 1 1 1 and MAT 11 1 or higher and ACCT 201 and 
OAD 218. Uses integrated accounting software package(s) to illus- 
trate computerized accounting practices. The general ledger will be 
integrated with accounts receivable, accounts payable, and other 
accounting modules. 

ACQ 271 Accounting Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ACCT 201 or Program Chair Approval. Provides students 
with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and other 
instructional activities on topics of interest that reinforce the con- 
cepts presented in their program area. 

ACQ 272 Business Writing for Accounting 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: BUSN 101.CINS 101, ENGL 111. Focuses on the effec- 
tive use of Standard English in written, business correspondence. 
Also addresses the psychology of effective communication. Students 
will apply the ten characteristics of effective writing and practice 
the ten guidelines for writing effective sentences and paragraphs. 
Students will practice using a reference manual for guidance in 
writing Standard English. 

ACQ 273 VITA Tax Seminar 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: ACCT 105. This volunteer program prepares students to 
process both federal and state income tax returns for eligible citi- 
zens. Students will complete an IRS-developed training program 
for two levels of service - Basic and Intermediate. This level of 
training will permit the volunteers to prepare most individual tax 
returns. Student volunteers will be required to successfully pass the 
IRS Certification Tests for two levels of tax preparation service. Once 
certified, student volunteers will conduct interviews with VITA 
clients, prepare both the federal and state tax returns using IRS eFile 
software, and undergo a Quality Review Process to ensure accurate 
and acceptable tax returns for electronic filing in addition to provid- 
ing tax information and tax law to VITA clients. 

ACQ 280 Co-op/Internship 1 -6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval. Provides students with the 
opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their 
career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning 
credit toward an associate degree. 

ACQ 298 Field Study 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair approval. Provides students with the 
opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their 



career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning 
credit toward an associate degree. 

ADMF 101 Key Principles of Advanced 3 Credits 

Manufacturing (MSSC) 

Prerequisite: None. Introduces the basic principles and practices of 
Safety and Quality used in manufacturing environments. Safety 
instruction covers topics including; Material Safety Data Sheets 
(MSDS), confined space, lock out/tag out, zero energy state, haz- 
ardous materials, storage of flammable materials, storage of fuel gas 
and high pressure gas cylinders, portable powered tool safety, hand 
tool safety, record keeping, training, employer enforcement of safety 
regulations, and right to know This course also covers current quali- 
ty control concepts and techniques in industry with emphasis on 
modern manufacturing requirements. Topics of instruction include 
basic statistical and probability theory, sampling techniques, process 
control charts, nature of variation, histograms, attributes and vari- 
able charts. This course will use lecture, lab, online simulation and 
programming to prepare students for Production Certification 
Testing through Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC). 

ADMF 1 02 Technology in Advanced 3 Credits 

Manufacturing (MSSC) 

Prerequisite: None. Introduces manufacturing processes and basic 
mechanical, electrical, and fluid power principles and practices used 
in manufacturing environments. Topics include; types of production, 
production materials, machining and tooling, manufacturing plan- 
ning, production control, and product distribution will be covered. 
Students will be expected to understand the product life cycle from 
conception through distribution. This course also focuses on tech- 
nologies used in production processes. Basic power systems, energy 
transfer systems, machine operation and control will be explored. 
This course will use lecture, lab, online simulation and programming 
to prepare students for Production Certification Testing through 
Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC). 

ADMF 103 Graphic Communications 3 Credits 

for Manufacturing 

Prerequisite: None. Introduces basic blueprint reading skills com- 
monly used in the manufacturing industry. Areas of study include: 
Interpretation of drawing dimensions and notes to ANSI standards 
for machining including; Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing 
(GDT), welding, fabrication applications and inspection techniques. 
Students will be able to use Computer Aided Design software (CAD) 
to create 3D models and working drawings. 

ADMF 1 06 Supervision and Teams at Work 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and/or ENGL 
032. Introduces basic employee development with emphasis on the 



responsibilities of a newly-appointed supervisor. Emphasizes orga- 
nizational structure, motivation, delegation of authority, interviews, 
orientation and induction of new employees, employee perform- 
ance evaluations and dealing with employee conflict. 

ADMF 109 Green Manufacturing Operations 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and/or ENGL 
032. Introduces the basic concepts of restructuring the manufactur- 
ing workplace and technological activity to incorporate environmen- 
tal concerns. This course serves as an introduction to the basic prin- 
ciples of "green" manufacturing. 

ADMF 112 Mechatronics I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C" or better in MATH 044. Introduces the 
basic principles and practices of mechanical technology used in 
advanced manufacturing and mechatronic systems. This course will 
examine the appropriate procedures for the installation, trou- 
bleshooting, and repair of mechanical machine components. Issues 
including; material properties, surface finish, lubrication, and pre- 
ventive maintenance of mechatronic systems will be discussed. 

ADMF 113 Electrical & Electronic Principles 3 Credits 
for Manufacturing 

Prerequisite: ADMF 102 Technology in Advanced Manufacturing and 
demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment or earn- 
ing a grade of "C" or better in MATH 050 Basic Algebra. Introduces 
electrical and electronics topics common to Advanced 
Manufacturing Technology. Material will concentrate on practical 
techniques for proper and safe use of basic test equipment and 
hand tools. Techniques for connecting various types of circuits and 
power distribution will be introduced. Electrical wiring, circuit theo- 
ry, soldering, testing, scheduling and calculations will be studied. An 
applied knowledge of Alternating Current (AC) and Direct Current 
(DC) voltage, resistance, and current will be presented through lec- 
ture and lab activities. Written communication skills will be used to 
document and report circuit descriptions, circuit problems, and 
repair procedures 

ADMF 1 1 5 Materials & Processes for 3 Credits 

Manufacturing 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 024 Introduction to 
College Writing I and ENGL 031 Reading Strategies for College I. 
Introduces materials and processes common to Advanced 
Manufacturing Technology. This course will emphasize a practical 
understanding of materials used in production processes. 
Techniques for proper selection, evaluation, measurement and test- 
ing of materials will be covered. Students will be required to per- 



form basic manual and machine production processes in a project 
oriented learning environment. 

A DM F 11 6 Automation & Robotics in 3 Credits 

Manufacturing I 

Prerequisite: ADMF 102 Technology in Advanced Manufacturing and 
MATH 111 Intermediate Algebra. Introduces the basic theory, opera- 
tion, and programming of automated manufacturing systems. The 
course will focus on three main types of manufacturing automation 
including; Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), Computer 
Numerically Controlled Machines (CNC).and Robotics. Students will 
be required to design, program and troubleshoot computer con- 
trolled machine logic and production processes in a project oriented 
learning environment. 

ADMF 122 Mechatronics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in MATH 050. 
Introduces the common types electrical wiring circuits used for 
power and control of electrical devices and motors used in advanced 
manufacturing. Topics covered will include electrical safety, termi- 
nology, and interpretation of electrical symbols, motor theory, motor 
wiring, control wiring, and ladder diagrams. 

ADMF 201 Lean Manufacturing 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Introduces the philosophical background, histori- 
cal development, fundamental concepts, operating fundamentals, 
and the organizational rationale for the implementation of lean dis- 
ciplines in manufacturing. The course also applies to the application 
of lean disciplines and concepts to service and support industries. 
The use and implementation of lean disciplines has generally result- 
ed in the ability of an enterprise to develop a work environment 
that promotes continuous improvement, eliminates waste, reduces 
operating cost, improves quality, and achieves measurable improve- 
ment in customer satisfaction. 

ADMF 202 Mechatronics III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ADMF 122 Mechatronics II. Introduces the common 
types of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLG) and electric motor 
drive systems used in advanced manufacturing. Topics covered will 
. include PLC theory, PLC installation, control wiring, ladder diagrams, 
AC & DC motor drive application and installation. 

ADMF 205 Sensors in Manufacturing 3" Credits 

Prerequisite: ADMF 113. Introduces the basic principles and practices 
of sensor technology used in advanced manufacturing. This course 
will prepare students to utilize commonly used sensor technology 
from simple switches to complex modern sensors. Students will be 
required to match appropriate sensor technology with specific man- 
ufacturing processes. 



ADMF 206 Automation & Robotics in 3 Credits 

Manufacturing II 

Prerequisite: ADMF 116 Automation and Robotics in Manufacturing 
I. Continues to develop the theory, operation, and programming of 
automated manufacturing systems. This course will focus on three 
main types of manufacturing automation including; Programmable 
Logic Controllers (PLC), Computer Numerically Controlled Machines 
(CNC), and Robotics. Students will be required to integrate and trou- 
bleshoot computer controlled machines in a manner that represents 
actual advanced manufacturing production processes in a project 
oriented learning environment. 

ADMF 211 Quality Systems in Manufacturing 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MATH 111 Intermediate Algebra. Covers current quality 
improvement concepts and techniques in industry with emphasis 
on modern manufacturing requirements. This course introduces the 
fundamental tools of Statistical Process Control (SPC) as they are 
used in industry to reduce costs, identify root cause, and increase 
productivity at a predictable quality level. Applied principles and 
techniques of total quality systems will be utilized to ensure correct 
definition, measurement, analysis, and improvement of common 
manufacturing problems. Areas of study include; basic statistical 
and probability theory, sampling techniques, process control charts, 
nature of variation, histograms, attributes and variable charts. 

ADMF 216 Projects in Advanced 3 Credits 

Manufacturing 

Prerequisite: ADMF 101 Key Principles of Advanced Manufacturing 
and ADMF 206 Automation and Robotic in Manufacturing II. 
Requires the student of advanced manufacturing to formally display 
their knowledge and implementation of a broad range of skills from 
the advanced manufacturing curriculum. Specifically, this course will 
require students, working in manufacturing teams, to develop a 
manufacturing line for the production of a product. Students will 
enhance manufacturing processes by implementing concepts of 
learn manufacturing and employing quality concepts to ensure high 
production rates. 

ADMF 222 Mechatronics IV 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C" or better in MATH 050. Introduces the 
basic principles and practices of fluid power technology used in 
advanced manufacturing and Mechatronic systems. This course will 
examine fluid power components and fluid power circuit design. 

ADMF 280 Manufacturing COOP/lntemship 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Program Chair Approval. Gives students the opportuni- 
ty to work in a manufacturing environment that is specifically relat- 
ed to their career objectives. Students gain on-the-job experience 
while earning credit toward an associate degree. Students already 



working may apply to use that current job experience to meet 
course requirements. Students will be required to estabfeh learning, 
outcomes and prepare job reports in conjunction with the employer. 

AGR1 1 00 Introduction to Agriculture 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Presents an overview of agriculture emphasizing 
the basic concepts of crop and animal growth and production, hi 
addition, the course provides a survey of the diversity of agricultural 
industries. 

AGR1 1 01 Agricultural Data Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Principles of collecting, managing, and retrieving 
financial, physical, and spatial data from farm operations to support 
the farm's decision-making and reporting. Emphasizes use of finan- 
cial, statistical, and logical spreadsheet functions, GIS systems, 
record-keeping for fertilizer and pestkide usage and regulation, and 
specialized software applications, including integration of informa- 
tion from various sources and packages. 

AGR1 110 Introductory Agricultural 3 Credits 

Business and Economics 

Prerequisites: ENGL 025, ENGL 032, and MATH 050. Examines the role 
and characteristics of farm and off-farm agricultural business in our 
economy; introductory economic and business principles involved in 
successful organization, operation, and management 

AGR1 1 1 1 1ntroduction to Crop Production 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: ENGL 025, ENGL 032 and MATH 050. Introduces and 
examines fundamental principles of crop production and attribu- 
tion. Emphasis is placed on applying technological advances in 
agronomy to active crop-production situations, inducing basic sois, 
agricultural meteorology, and crop physiology and breeding, 

AGR1 112 Fundamentals of Horticulture 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 025, ENGL 032 and MATH 050. Biology and tech- 
nology involved in the production, storage processing, and market- 
ing of horticultural plants and products. Laboratories indude experi- 
ments demonstrating both the theoretical and practical aspects of 
horticultural plant growth and developmenL 

AGR1 113 Introduction to Animal Science 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 025, ENGL 032 and MATH 050. Examines the 
importance of livestock in the field of agriculture, and the place of 
meats and other animal products in the human (Set 

AGR1 114 Introduction to Agricultural Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 025, ENGL 032 and. MATH 050. An "mtjoducrjon to 
the Agricultural Systems Management technical curriculum. Basic 
mathematical problem solving techniques power generation, trans- 
fer, and utilization; basic principles of agricultural operations man- 
agement soil and water management crop handing and cond- 
tioning; and heat transfer. 



74 



AGR1 117 Soil Science 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Classification and characterization of soils and 
differences between soils, including physical, chemical, and biologi- 
cal properties. Relation of soils to land use and tillage, erosion, 
drainage, moisture supply and aeration practices. Relationship of 
soil properties to plant nutrition and to fertilizer chemistry, use, and 
management. 

AGRI 200 Precision Farming Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AGR1 1 1 1 and AGR1 1 17.Technology and applications of 
electronics for precision agriculture. Characteristics of personal com- 
puter hardware, electronic sensors, monitors, machine controllers, 
environmental monitors, and global positioning systems. Production 
management information systems; processing and marketing infor- 
mation systems; and yield mapping, geographic information system 
data handling, and software options. 

AGRI 202 Animal Production Facilities 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AGRI 11 3. Principles of choosing, operating, and main- 
taining machines and equipment used in farm animal production. 
Emphasizes basics of electrical and hydraulic machines and common 
operating techniques and practices. Includes use of computer soft- 
ware and hardware to manage feed, health maintenance, and waste 
management. Special focus on operator and animal safety and 
environmental quality maintenance. 

AGRI 203 Livestock Selection and Evaluation 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AGR1 113. Principles of selection and evaluation of 
breeding and market livestock: emphasis on modern breeds and 
types of livestock. Performance programs available for producers to 
improve livestock to meet economic, market, and consumer needs. 
Students participate in field trips and may participate in intercolle- 
giate livestock judging contests to gain skill in livestock selection/ 
evaluation. 

AGRI 204 Agriculture Salesmanship 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ENGL 025 AND ENGL 032. Role, dynamics, and princi- 
ples of sales communications as related to food and agriculture; 
methods for analyzing, setting objectives, planning, conducting, and 
evaluating sales communications efforts; sales presentations 

AGRI 205 Animal Nutrition and 3 Credits 

Livestock Disease 

Prerequisite: AGR1 1 1 3. Basic principles of managing animal diets to 
maximize health and minimize or prevent disease in animals and 
humans. Includes nutrient classes and functions, digestive process- 
es, symptoms of nutrient deficiency, characterization of feed prod- 
ucts, diet formulation and management. Familiarizes students with 
disease processes and mechanisms and recognition and manage- 
ment of insects of animals. 

AGRI 206 Animal Anatomy and Physiology 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AGR1 113. Principles of organ and tissue structure, 



operation, function, regulation, and integration of domestic farm 
animals. Examines mechanisms and processes of growth and devel- 
opment, reproduction, and lactation, and effects of environmental 
conditions. Includes basic genetic principles and theory, and their 
applications to physiological development and reproduction. 

AGRI 207 Marketing Agricultural Products 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AGRI 110. Includes principles of demand, supply and 

price determination in agricultural markets. Examines effects of 
costs and margins, market structure, marketing channels and sys- 
tems, horizontal and vertical integration, government regulations, 
government programs, and cooperatives on farm marketing deci- 
sions. Also examines the difference between marketing commodi- 
ties and differentiated products. 

AGRI 208 Agriculture Financial Records 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AGR1 110. Application of principles of financial and cost 
accounting, finance, and management to recording the farm's input, 
cost, production, price, and revenue information. Use and organiza- 
tion of financial data to assist farm management and decision-mak- 
ing, such as financial analysis, budgeting, strategic decisions for eval- 
uating and improving operations, credit needs, and tax liabilities. 

AGRI 209 Agricultural Commodity Marketing 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AGRI llO.Fundamentals of the mechanics of commod- 
ity futures and options, for both grain and livestock. Examine how 
these markets connect to the cash market and influence risk man- 
agement and pricing of commodities. Fundamentals of the cash 
market pricing alternatives available and development of marketing 
plans. 

AGRI 210 Management Methods for 3 Credits 

Agricultural Business 

Prerequisites: AGR1 110, AGR1 111 and AGR1 114. Examines the man- 
agement of non-farm, agriculturally related businesses. Topics 
include tools for management decision making, legal forms of busi- 
ness organization, basics of accounting, and important financial 
management techniques. Incorporates case studies and computer 
simulation game. 

AGRI 21 1 Swine Production 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AGR1 1 1 3. The principles, skills, and practices of han- 
dling swine and managing commercial swine production and pro- 
duction of pork products. Includes breeding, selection, feeding, and 
health of swine. Provides concepts of animal and animal-human 
interactions and animal behavior and practices to ensure animal 
and human well-being. 

AGRI 212 Environmental Systems 3 Credits 

Management 

Prerequisite: AGRI 114 and AGRI 11 7. Principles of using, storing, con- 
trolling and disposing of agricultural waste, chemicals, and other haz- 



ardous materials, and using and maintaining application equipment, 
to maintain human and animal health and environmental quality. 
Includes basis for and knowledge of state and federal regulatory 
requirements. May include instruction for certification in hazardous 
materials management or private pesticide applicator licensing. 

AGRI 213 Agriculture Equipment 3 Credits 

Power Systems 

Prerequisite: AGR1 114. An introduction to power generation and 
transfer in mechanical and fluid power systems. Internal combustion 
engines, fuels, and cycles are introduced. Clutches, mechanical trans- 
missions, automatic transmissions, hydrostatic transmissions, and 
final drives are discussed. Principles of hydraulics, fluids, cylinders, 
pumps, motors, valves, hoses, filters, reservoirs, and accumulators are 
studied. 

AGRI 216 Disease and Insect Identification 3 Credits 
and Control 

Prerequisite: AGR1 1 1 1 .Identification and control of the economically ' 
important diseases and insects that impact agricultural production 
in the U.S. Emphasis is placed on disease pathogens and insects that 
affect grain and forage production in the Midwest. Current technolo- 
gies in chemical control as well as integrated pest management will 
be explored with emphasis on environmental and personal safety. 

AGRI 217 Soil Fertility 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AG Rt 11 7. Use of fertilizers for peak production at opti- 
mum cost; evaluation and comparison of different forms of macro- 
and micro-nutrients, their manufacture, handling, and application; 
plant and soil chemistry. 

AGRI 218 Weed Identification and Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AGR1 111. Identification and control of the economically 
important broadleaf and grass weeds that impact agricultural pro- 
duction in the U.S. Identification of seeds, seedlings and full-grown 
plants is addressed. Weed control programs are examined in the 
context of herbicide chemistry, timing and economics. Emphasis is 
placed on pesticide formulations, application methods, rate calibra- 
tion, environmental concerns, safety, laws and regulations. Students 
will participate in training for and receive a Certified Pesticide 
Applicators Permit as part of the course requirements. 

AGRI 219 Crop Machinery and Equipment 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AGR1 11 1 and AGR1 1 1 4. Principles of choosing, operat- 
ing, and maintaining machines and equipment used in production 
of field crops. Emphasizes basic of electrical and hydraulic 
machines and common operating techniques and practices. 
Includes use of computer software and hardware and GIS to manage 
planting, tilling, and fertilizer and pesticide applications. Special 
focus on operator safety and environmental quality maintenance. 



AGRI 280 Internship 1 - 5 Credits 

Prerequisite: AGR1 100 and AGRI 111. Placement in agricultural busi- 
ness for 80 - 400 hours of work in career exploration, developing 
skill requirements, and occupational opportunities. Dual supervision 
by college staff and cooperating businesses. 

AMSL 1 01 America n Sign La nguage I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. American Sign Language I is an introduction to 
ASL as it is used within the Deaf culture. Instruction in the basic 
structure tif the language and development of its use. Skill develop- 
ment practice. Introduction to the history of deaf culture and the 
language. Introduction to the deaf perspective on the establishment 
of deaf communities and ASL. 

AMSL 102 American Sign Language II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AMSL 101. American Sign Language II is designed to 
provide a continuation of the introductory course. Students will 
increase their knowledge of the deaf community, culture, and deaf 
education in a hearing world.The deaf perspective on traditional 
employment of deaf people in a hearing society will be explored. In 
language development, complex grammar functions, expanded 
vocabulary, and skill development are incorporated into the use of 
sign production. The course will provide an opportunity for students 
to improve and enhance their ability to communicate in American 
Sign Language. 

ANTH 154 Cultural Anthropology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032, and MATH 044. The scientific study of human culture. Variations 
in patterns of human behavior are holistically examined in their 
relationship to such factors as biological evolution, socialization, kin- 
ship, economy, religion, education, personality, art, music, dance, and 
cultural change. ■ 

ANTH 254 Introduction to Archaeology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032, and 
MATH 044. The scientific study of the material artifacts of human cul- 
tural remains. Provides insight into the earliest patterns of human 
behavior and its subsequent evolution into more complex forms. 
Acquaints the student with archaeological methods and with major 
findings of the archaeological record from selected culture areas. 

APHY 067 Introduction to Anatomy 3 Credits 

and Physiology 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 031 and 
MATH 044. Introduces basic concepts and terminology used in 
Anatomy and Physiology. Prepares entering students who took no 
high school life science or took it several years ago for APHY 101 and 



APHY 1 02 (or APHY 203 and 204). Provides a general introduction to 
chemistry, cells, tissues, body systems, and basic physiological 
processes. 

APHY 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032, and MATH 050. Develops a comprehensive understanding of 
the close inter-relationship between anatomy and physiology as 
seen in the human organism. Introduces students to the cell, which 
is the basic structural and functional unit of all organisms, and cov- 
ers tissues, integument, skeleton, muscular and nervous systems as 
an integrated unit. Includes lab. 

APHY 102 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 1 01 . Continues the study of the inter-relation- 
ships of the systems of the human body. Introduces students to the 
study of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, diges- 
tive, urinary and reproductive systems. Includes lab. 

APHY 201 Advanced Human Physiology 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of APHY 101 and APHY 102, or 
equivalent. Provides a study of human physiology for students 
entering health-oriented fields. Emphasizes the study of the func- 
tion of cells, the nervous, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, urinary, 
digestive and endocrine systems, and their homeostatic mecha- 
nisms and system interaction. Focuses laboratory exercises on clini- 
cally relevant measurement of human function. Includes lab. 

APHY 203 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044. Provides a comprehensive study of the interrelation- 
ship between anatomy and physiology from chemical to cellular to 
organ interactions. Provides an in-depth study of each system of the 
body from a viewpoint of structure as well as function. Includes lab. 

APHY 204 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 203 and demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in MATH 
050. Provides the remaining comprehensive study of the inter-rela- 
tionship between anatomy and physiology from chemical to cellular 
to organ interactions. Provides an in-depth study of each system of 
the body from a viewpoint of structure as well as function: 
endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, 
and reproductive systems. Includes lab. 

ARTH 101 Survey of Art and TransferIN 3 Credits 

Culture I 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Surveys painting, sculpture, and architectural styles from 



ancient cultures to the proto-Renaissance era. Emphasizes the his- 
torical context of art movements as well as analysis of the work of 
individual artists. 

ARTH 102 Survey of Art TransferIN 3 Credits 

and Culture II 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of 'C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Surveys painting, sculpture, and architectural styles from the 
Renaissance to the present Emphasizes the historical context of art 
movements as well as analysis of the work of individual artists. 

ARTH 110 Art Appreciation TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. An introductory course in art which explores the creative 
processes of humankind, its usage of specific traditional and con- 
temporary media for communication and the study of periods and 
styles in art as they relate to the human condition. The course wi 
explore the nature of art, the evaluation of art and the processes 
and materials of art. The students will examine the formal elements 
of design and look at a wide variety of both two and three-dfcnen- 
sional artworks and will learn about the processes and tools 
involved in their creation. 

ARTS 1 00 Life and Object Drawing I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of"C" or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. This introductory course will result in the advancement of basic 
drawing skills utilizing the human figure, natural and manufactured 
objects. Basic techniques and creative processes will be explored 
through expressive use and exploration of a variety of materials and 
techniques. Emphasis will be placed on developing a higher lew) of 
quality draftsmanship with a focus on proportion and structure. 

ARTS 101 Life and Object Drawing II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ARTS 100. Rendering abil"rties"will continue to advance 
with drawing techniques utilizing the human figure, natural and 
manufactured objects, specifically from life (not photographs). More 
advanced techniques and creative processes will be explored 
through expressive use and exploration of a variety of materials and 
techniques. Emphasis will be placed on developing a higher level of 
quality draftsmanship with a focus on proportion and structure. 

ARTS 102 Color and Design Theory 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment oreamingagrade of "C or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. A critical thinking course that delves into the thought processes 
and manual skills needed in design and its application in the realm 
of two-dimensional fine arts. Intermediate to advanced design and 
color theory will be addressed through the manipulation of imagery _- 



76 



in two-dimensional media. Critical thinking, problem-solving and 
manual techniques will be emphasized equally. 

ARTS 103 Three-Dimensional Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and 
ENGL 032. An introductory course into the thought processes and 
manual skills needed in three-dimensional design. Basic techniques 
and creative processes will be explored through expressive use and 
exploration of a variety of materials and techniques. Critical thinking, 
problem-solving and manual techniques will be emphasized equally. 

ARTS 104 Contemporary Art History 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Tor better in ENGL 025 and 
ENGL 032.This course chronologically surveys painting, sculpture, 
architectural styles and the minor arts for contemporary art. 
Emphasis is on the historical context of art movements as well as 
analysis of the work of individual artists. This course will provide the 
basic knowledge of art with grounding in technique and vocabulary 
along with dealing with current issues, multicultural dimensions of 
art and making a connection between art history and art making. 
Contemporary art has a vocabulary all of its own and this course 
provides the introductory tools to appreciate all art forms over the 
last three decades. Major movements will be introduced with char- 
acteristic works including performance, painting, sculpture, print- 
making, environmental, photography and computer graphics. 

ARTS 105 Foundation I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Tor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032.This course introduces students to the fundamentals of art and 
design through a survey ofart processes and techniques. Exposing 
students to broad subject matter and using four or five material spe- 
cific exercises to emphasize additive and subtractive processes. 

ARTS 1 06 Foundation II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ARTS 105. Continues to expose students to broad sub- 
ject matter by utilizing four or five material specific exercises to 
emphasize additive and subtractive processes at an advanced level. 
Students will also be exposed to the variety of artistic possibility 
through multiple art processes and techniques by working with the 
instructor and visiting artists. 

ARTS 200 Intermediate Drawing I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ARTS 1 01 . This intermediate course will continue the 
advancement of drawing skills utilizing the human figure, natural 
and manufactured objects. There will be a thorough investigation of 
nature and the human figure through drawing. Techniques and cre- 
ative processes will be explored through expressive use and explo- 
ration of a variety of materials and techniques. Emphasis will be 



placed on quality draftsmanship with a focus on structure, line, ges- 
ture, and movement. 

ARTS 201 Intermediate Drawing II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ARTS 200.This intermediate course will continue the 
advancement of drawing skills utilizing the human figure, natural 
and manufactured objects. There will be a thorough investigation of 
nature and the human figure through drawing. Techniques and cre- 
ative processes will be explored through expressive use and explo- 
ration of a variety of materials and techniques. Emphasis will be 
placed on quality draftsmanship with a focus on structure, line, ges- 
ture, and movement. 

ARTS 204 Women in Art 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ARTH 101 or ARTH 102 or ARTS 104. This course will 
survey painting, sculpture, and architecturally styles created by 
women from medieval cultures to the present. Contemporary 
approaches to women's art will also be explored and emphasized. 

ARTS 211 Sculpture I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ARTS 103.This is a basic course in the consideration of 
three-dimensional form in sculptural concept. Students will be 
exposed to various related materials, techniques, and processes. 
Emphasis will be on composition, positive and negative space and 
craft of material technique. 

ARTS 212 Sculpture II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ARTS 21 1. This is a continuation of Sculpture I resulting 
in intermediate use of three-dimensional design skills, applications 
and materials. Emphasis will be on intermediate techniques and 
advancing compositional skill. 

ARTS 223 Printmaking I: Intaglio 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ARTS 1 00. Beginning course in printmaking, which 
introduces students to a variety of traditional techniques. Students 
are instructed in basic printing processes and in use of the presses. 
Emphasis will be on composition, craft, technical processes and 
translation of line to print. 

ARTS 224 Printmaking II: Serigraphy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ARTS 100. Beginning course in printmaking, which 
introduces students to the traditional techniques of serigraphy or 
silkscreen printmaking. Students are instructed in basic printing 
processes and in use of the screens. Emphasis will be on composi- 
tion, craft, technical processes and translation of multiple types of 
content to print. 

ARTS 225 Printmaking III: Relief 3 Credits 

and Monotype 

Prerequisites: ARTS 100. Beginning course in printmaking, which 
introduces students to the traditional techniques of relief, collagraph 
and monotype. Students are instructed in basic printing processes 



and in use of the presses. Emphasis will be on composition, craft, 
technical processes and translation of multiple types of content to 
print 

ARTS 226 The Art of The Book 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ARTS 100. Introduces the techniques, processes and 
aesthetic concerns of book arts as a studio art medium. Students 
will complete a number of original works using folding, cutting, and 
traditional fabrication as well as adhesive and non-adhesive books 
with sewn spines. Technique, concept and aesthetics will be dis- 
cussed and used as a foundation for composition, execution and for- 
mal analysis in critiques. 

ARTS 227 Papermaking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ARTS 100. Introduces the techniques, processes and aes- 
thetic concerns of papermaking as a studio art medium. Students will 
complete a number of original works using handmade pulp as well as 
paper sheets, forms, paintings and other techniques. Technique, con- 
cept and aesthetics will be discussed and used as a foundation for 
composition, execution and formal analysis in critiques. 

ARTS 231 Painting I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ARTS 101 and ARTS 102. An introductory course aimed 
at the development of painting skills, techniques, and aesthetic sen- 
sibilities. Explores and experiments with basic painting mediums, 
which may include: watercolors, acrylics, and oils in varying degrees. 
Builds visual thinking skills and methods for channeling creative 
energies that enable a lifetime of personal artistic expression. 

ARTS 232 Painting II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ARTS 231. An extension of the skills and concepts 
introduced in Painting I. Emphasis is on individual experimentation 
and the development of more advanced critical and technical skills 
in the discipline. Course continues to build visual thinking skills and 
methods for channeling creative energies that further enable a life- 
time of personal artistic expression. 

ARTS 241 Ceramics: Handbuilding I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ARTS 103. This course is designed to introduce the 
techniques, processes and aesthetic concerns of ceramics as a studio 
art medium. Students will complete a number of original works 
using basic hand building techniques, as well as earthenware glaz- 
ing and firing processes.Technique, concept and aesthetics will be 
discussed and used as a foundation for composition, execution and 
formal analysis in critiques. 

ARTS 250 Senior Seminar 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of Program Chair. Final course of program 
before graduation that prepares the student for transfer to another 
University environment and to begin exhibiting and working profes- 
sionally. Course covers artist resume development, artist statement, 
artwork presentation: digital and in-hand, along with some of the 



business aspects of being an artist. A polished presentation with 
portfolio is the final for this course. 

ASTR 101 Solar System Astronomy TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032, and MATH 044. Survey of the history of astronomy, astronomi- 
cal cycles and phenomena, astronomical instruments, formation and 
evolution of the planets and their satellites, comparative planetol- 
ogy, asteroids, comets, meteors, the sun, origin of the solar system 
and its place in the galaxy and the universe. 

AUBR 1 01 Body Repair I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Corequisite: AUBR 1 25. Examines the character- 
istics of body metals and includes the installation of moldings, orna- 
ments, and fasteners with emphasis on sheet metal analysis and 
safety. 

AUBR 103 Automotive Paint Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces auto paint considerations with 
emphasis on the handling of materials and equipment in modern 
automotive technologies. 

AUBR 1 04 Collision Damage Analysis 3 Credits 

and Repair 

Prerequisites: None. Provides instruction in analyzing extensive body 
damage and determining the tools and procedures needed to 
replace panels. 

AUBR 1 05 Conventional Frame Diagnosis 3 Credits 
and Correction 

Prerequisites: AUBR 1 25 or Program Advisor Approval. Covers the use 
of tools, frame machines and equipment for frame and chassis 
repair. Includes study of terms pertaining to front suspension and 
rear axle. Describes uses of frame gauges and other measuring 
devices. 

AUBR 110 Auto Body Power Tools 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers diagnosis of problems associated with 
the use of power tools in auto body work. 

AUBR 1 1 1 Auto Body Hydraulic Tools 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides instruction in the selection, use and 
maintenance of hydraulic tools for auto body repair. 

AUBR 114 Collision Damage Lab 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: AUBR 104. Provides opportunities to develop skills and 
knowledge in the area of collision damage analysis and repair. 

AUBR 115 Auto Body Circuits 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Includes fundamentals of electrical theory, 
automotive components and circuits, and troubleshooting tech- 
niques. Emphasizes battery construction, function and operation. 



AUBR 1 1 7 Auto Paint Lab 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: AUBR 103 and AUBR 107. Develops auto-painting skills 
with emphasis on materials and equipment handling. 

AUBR 121 Unibody Repair Lab 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Develops skills and knowledge in the area of 
unibody structural analysis and repairs. 

AUBR 122 Conventional Frame and 3 Credits 

Unibody Structural Analysis 

Prerequisites: None. Includes the use of tools, frame machines and 
equipment for frame and chassis repair. Includes study of terms per- 
taining to front suspension and rear axle. Describes the uses of 
frame gauges, tram identification and other measuring and fixtur- 
ing systems; straightening systems and techniques; mechanical 
component service and knowledge of suspension and steering sys- 
tems on front wheel drive unibody vehicles. 

AUBR 125 Automotive Body Welding 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Provides basic skills and fundamental knowledge 
in oxy-fuel welding, cutting, brazing and plasma cutting, gas metal 
arc welding, squeeze type resistance welding, exterior panel welding 
and l-CAR welding test preparation. This course is designed for auto 
service and body technicians. Emphasizes safe practices in ox-fuel 
and specific welding processes in the automotive body repair field. 

AUBR 206 Automotive Body Welding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUBR 101 . Introduces fundamentals of using hand and 
power tools in the repair of minor collision damage, with emphasis 
on safety. 

AUBR 207 Automotive Painting Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUBR 103. Provides instruction on the total refinishing 
of an automobile with emphasis on advanced and specialty painting 
techniques. 

AUBR 208 Unibody Structural Analysis 3 Credits 

and Repair 

Prerequisites: None. Covers unibody repair, identification and analy- 
sis of damage, measuring and fixing systems, straightening systems 
and techniques, mechanical component service and knowledge of 
suspension and steering systems on front-wheel-drive unibody 
vehicles. 

AUBR 209 Collision Damage Appraising 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides instruction in analyzing extensive body 
damage and determining the fools and procedures needed to 
replace panels. 

AUBR 220 Fiberglass Plastic Repair 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces types of fiberglass and plastic mate- 
rials used in auto body repair. Covers both interior and exterior 
applications. 



AUBR 227 Custom Paint Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AUBR 103. Provides instruction and interaction on 
application of custom finishes to metal and composite materials. 

AUTC 101 Steering and Suspension 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. The objective of this course wi be to study Af- 
ferent steering and suspension systems used on vehicles. Students 
will study steering and suspension components, power steering 
units, principles of four-wheel alignment, tire repair and wheel bal- 
ancing. The course will emphasize professional methods of diagnosis 
and repair for related components. 

AUTC 102 Two and Four Wheel Alignment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the principles'of two- and four-wheel 
alignment and wheel balance. Emphasizes practical work experience 
in the lab covering all the alignment angles. 

AUTC 1 03 Principles of Alternative/ 3 Credits 

Renewable Energies 

Prerequisites: None. Covers basic principles and history of alternative 
energy sources. Industry and government status of geothermal, 
wind, solar, biomass, fuel cells and other energy sources wi be high- 
lighted. Alternative and traditional energies will be defined and 
compared in terms of today's use. The evolving energy career areas 
will be discussed. 

AUTC 1 04 Liquid Propane Gas (LPG) 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUTC 107. First in a series of two that focuses on the 
use of liquefied propane gas as an alternative fuel, and how it's used 
in material handling, automobiles and light duty trucks. 
Additionally, the theory of operation, installation, diagnosis and cur- 
rent safety regulations of the use of LPG will be covered in this dass. 

AUTC 106 Compressed Natural Gas I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUTC 107. Introduces students to the role, function and 
application of compressed natural gas (CNG) as an alternative fuel 
for today's internal combustion engine. Course prepares students to 
take the ASE F1 exam. 

AUTC 107 Engine Principles and 3 Credits 

Vehicle Service 

Prerequisites: None. This course introduces engine dynamics, theory 

of engine operation and characteristics of engine design. Studies 
will include component removal and replacement visual inspection, 
precision measuring, gaskets, lubricants, sealants, and coolants. 
Under hood maintenance and service will also be covered. 

AUTC 1 08 Biomass, Biogas, Micro-turbine 3 Credits 
Technology 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C or better in ENG 025 and EHG 



n 



032. Focuses on the release of chemical energy by accelerating the 
naturally occurring carbon dioxide cycle and the use of this energy 
to power engines and generators. Natural fuels, fuels made from 
plant materials and garbage will be discussed. Engine efficiency and 
its impact on lower emissions will be discussed. 

AUTC 109 Engine Performance I 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: None. The first in a series of three courses that covers 
the operating systems of an internal combustion engine.The basic 
theory and operation of ignition, fuel, emission, and mechanical sys- 
tems will be presented. Basic test procedures will be introduced. 
Computer engine system basics will be explained. Basic service and 
replacement procedures and technigues will also be covered. 

AUTC 1 1 1 Alternative Fuels Installation 3 Credits 

and Application 

Prereguisites: AUTC 103, AUTC 104, and AUTC 106. Focuses on shop 
safety, gaseous fuel handling, federal fuel standards and industry 
standards related to the conversion and installation processes of 
alternative fuel system components/systems to current vehicles. 

AUTC 112 Liquid Propane Gas II (LPG) 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: AUTC 104. Second course in the series covering liguid 
propane gas. LPG II continues with in-depth topics in maintenance, 
diagnosis and repair as well as conversions and installation using 
the liguid propane system. 

AUTC 113 Electrical and Electronics I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.This first of three electrical classes introduces 
the fundamentals of electricity and automotive electronics. Digital 
multi-meters and circuit troubleshooting is covered. Emphasis is 
placed on understanding and utilizing electrical diagrams. 
Batteries, starting and charging systems are covered. 

AUTC 114 Compressed Natural Gas II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUTC 106. Applies skills gained from AUTC 106 and 
expands them in theory and application.The course focuses on the 
advanced maintenance, diagnosis and repair, as well as conversion 
and installation of the compressed natural gas fuel system. 

AUTC 121 Braking Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. This introductory course teaches theory, service 
and repair of automotive braking systems and their components. 
Emphasis is given to hydraulic theory, repair, and service of system 
components, including anti-lock and traction control systems. 

AUTC 123 Electrical and Electronics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUTC 1 13 and demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in MAT 
040. This second in a series of three courses will study electrical cir- 
cuit theory and diagnostic procedures.The topics for this course 
_o include principles of operation and diagnostics for the various auto- 



motive electrical and electronic systems. This course introduces 
body controllers and multiplexing. 

AUTC 125 Manual Drivetrains 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.This courses covers theory, diagnosis, and over- 
haul procedures related to manual transmission/transaxles, clutches, 
transfer cases, and differential assemblies. 

AUTC 127 Engine Repair 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: None. A study of precision tools, equipment, and pro- 
cedures needed to repair today's automotive engines 

. Focus is placed on proper repair, assembly, and installation tech- 
niques applicable to the modern engine. 

AUTC 135 Automatic Transmission 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. A study of automatic transmission theory of 
operation, diagnosis, testing, and repair procedures.Theory and 
diagnosis of computer-controlled transmissions will also be covered. 

AUTC 145 Powertrain Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. A study of driveline theory and in-car service 
procedures.Theory and overhaul procedures related to the drive- 
shaft and axle assemblies for front and rear wheel drive vehicles are 
included. Removal and installation of transmissions and transaxles 
are covered.Transmission/driveline diagnosis and in car repair is also 
included. 

AUTC 1 49 Introduction to Motor Sports 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of the various racing/ 
motor sports venues in the U. S. Students will gain an understanding 
of various racing venues and their operations. Emphasis will be 
placed on professional level racing, although sportsman and semi- 
professional venues will also be discussed. Students will learn about 
the various careers available throughout the motor sports industry. 

AUTC 1 50 Small Engine Maintenance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers disassembly, inspection, measuring, 
cleaning, machine repair and proper assembly techniques applicable 
to small gas engine overhaul. Includes overhaul of carburetor and 
ignition systems as well as maintenance procedures on two-cycle 
and four-cycle engines. 

AUTC 1 52 Diesel Engine Theory 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Operation of the diesel engine and the differ- 
ences between a diesel and gas engine. Also includes instruction on 
shop equipment, fuels, oils, seals, bearings, lubrication and cooling 
system. 

AUTC 201 Climate Control Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUTC 1 13. This course covers air conditioning and 
heating systems used on modern vehicles. Emphasis is given to the 



operation and theory of the air conditioning and its components. 
Vacuum and electronic control circuits are included. Federal regula- 
tions for handling and recycling of all refrigerants will be stressed. 
Automatic climate control systems are also covered. 

AUTC 209 Engine Performance II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUTC 109. This second in a series of three classes cov- 
ers the diagnosis and repair of ignition, fuel, emission, and computer 
systems. Extensive coverage is given to manufacturer specific com- 
puter engine control and fuel injection systems. Topics will include 
OBD I, OBD II, and future on-board diagnostic systems. 

AUTC 210 Hybrid Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUTC 106. Teaches students the fundamentals of trou- 
bleshooting, diagnosing and repairing gas-electric hybrid vehicles. 
The student will become a multi-skilled technician in preventive 
maintenance, refueling procedures, and problem solving on a wide 
range of skills to service a hybrid vehicle. 

AUTC 219 Engine Performance III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUTC 209. This third in a series of three courses covers 
advanced concepts in the diagnosis and repair of ignition, fuel, emis- 
sion, and computer systems. Coverage of manufacturer specific 
computer engine control and fuel injection systems will be stressed. 
Federal and state emission requirements will be covered with a 
focus on 5-gas exhaust analysis. Hybrid and alternative fuel technol- 
ogy will also be covered. 

AUTC 221 Vehicle Diagnosis and Service 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: AUTC 101, AUTC 121, AUTC 123, AUTC 135,AUCT 201. 
This applied service course is designed to enhance a student's 
hands-on skills to diagnose and repair vehicle concerns across a vari- 
ety of areas. Emphasis will be placed on Braking Systems, Steering 
and Suspension Systems, Climate Control Systems, and Automatic 
Transmissions. 

AUTC 229 Driveability Diagnosis 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUTC 219.This advanced course is designed to develop 
a student's ability to diagnose and repair complex driveability con- 
cerns. Emphasis will be placed on learning and following systematic 
diagnostic procedures. Students will utilize the advanced capabilities 
of diagnostic equipment provided. 

AUTC 243 Advanced Electronics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. This course presents 
advanced theory and diagnosis of automotive electronic systems. 
Emphasis is placed on the testing and repair of these systems. This 
course uses lab scopes, scan tools, and graphing multi-meters. This 
is the capstone course for automotive technology. 

AUTC 250 Motor Sports Fabrication I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the fundamentals of motor sports 



fabrication and the required tools and equipment. Students will 
learn to cut, weld and form metal for use in race car fabrication. 
Sheet metals brakes, bead rollers, tube benders, tubing notchersand 
a variety of welding process will be covered. Students will demon- 
strate knowledge through project/task completion. 

AUTC 251 Motor Sports Fabrication II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUTC 250, WELD 207, and WELD 208. Builds on the 
fundamentals learned in AUTC 250 Motors Sports Fabrication I. 
Students will learn the basic machining process using mills, metal 
lathes and CNC processes. English wheels, planishing hammers, 
sheet metals brakes, bead rollers, tube benders, tubing notchers and 
a variety of welding process will be utilized. Students will demon- 
strate knowledge through project/task completion. 

AUTC 253 Service Organization and Parts 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Facility and personnel requirements for efficiently 
run parts and service departments. Emphasis on principles, practices 
and procedures necessary to effectively operate the departments. 
Includes manufacturer catalogs and component numbering systems, 
methods of scheduling time and techniques for obtaining maximum 
work efficiency from technicians and specialists. — 

AUTC 254 High Performance Engines/ 3 Credits 

Systems I 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the fundamentals, construction, compo- 
nents and design of high performance engines/systems for various 
racing venues.The course will also cover related systems; cooling, 
lubrication, suspension and braking. Students will study the theory, 
design and requirements of high performance engines/systems and 
then design there own modified engine which they will run and 
evaluate using the computer dyno simulation program. Emphasis in 
this course is placed on bolt on performance modifications/power 
adders. 

AUTC 255 High Performance Engines/ 3 Credits 

Systems II 

Prerequisites: AUTC 254. Covers the assembly/blueprinting of a com- 
petition engine. The course will focus on the basics of block and com- 
ponent preparation and clearancing, cylinder head porting, intake 
port matching and component balancing. Students will measure all 
critical clearances during assembly including but not limited to: deck 
heights, piston to valve clearances, chamber volumes, bearing clear- 
ances, piston to wall clearances, rod side clearances. 
AUTC 257 Composite Fabrication I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUTC 250. Introduces the fundamentals of motor 
sports fabrication utilizing composite materials and the required 
tools and equipment. Students will learn to cut, lay up, form and 
cure materials for use in race car fabrication. Emphasis will be 
placed on Carbon Fiber and Fiberglass fibers with epoxy and poly- 



ester resin materials. Students will demonstrate knowledge through 
project/task completion. 

AUTC 258 Motor Sports Kit Car Building 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the design and building of the cobra kit 
car. Emphasis will be placed on proper assembly/fabrication/ improve- 
ment of the various subassemblies required to build this vehicle. Tire 
and wheel combinations, exhaust systems and other accessory 
options will also be discussed. Students will learn to cut, weld and 
form metal as needed for use in the kit car assembly. Students will 
demonstrate knowledge through project/task completion. 

AUTC 261 Dynamometer Testing and Analysis 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Covers chassis dynamome- 
ter operation and analysis of the software generated data. Students 
should have a background in high performance vehicles.The affects 
of modifications to vehicles will be stressed. 

AUTC 263 Blueprint and CAD Basics for 3 Credits 

Motor Sports 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces basic blueprint reading skills com- 
monly used in the racing parts fabrication and customization. Areas 
of study include: Interpretation of drawings dimensioned and noted 
to ANSI standards for machining, welding, and fabrication applica- 
tions, inspection techniques, and CAD (Computer Assisted Design) 
fundamentals using AutoCAD© to create shop floor drawings.This 
course also introduces reverse engineering, automated inspection, 
and rapid prototyping techniques. 

AUTC 264 Motorsports Machining 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None.This entry level course will cover machine shop 
safety, print reading and machining processes used in the fabrica- 
tion and customization of racing parts. Machines used in this course 
are: manual with numerical control, vertical milling machines, 
engine lathes, pedestal grinders, and surface grinders. 

AUTC 267 Motorsports Project 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: AUTC 250, AUTC 251, AUTC 254.This capstone course is 
designed to provide students with an opportunity to apply their 
knowledge and skills to an actual Motorsports project in a produc- 
tion type environment. Projects will vary between work on actual 
race cars and work on supporting tools and equipment for the 
Motorsports Industry. 

AUTC 271 Cooperative - Drivelines 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides qualifying stu- 
dents an opportunity to work at a job site and complete the require- 
ments for driveline service. Provides on-the-job experience while 
earning credit toward an associate degree. 

AUTC 272 Cooperative - Suspension 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides qualifying stu- 



dents an opportunity to work at a job site and complete the require- 
ments for chassis and suspension service. Provides on-the-job expe- 
rience while earning credit toward an Associate's degree 

AUTC 273 Cooperative - Brakes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides qualifying stu- 
dents an opportunity to work at a job site and complete the require- 
ments forbraking systems. Provides on-the-job experience whie 
earning credit toward an associate degree. 

AUTC 274 Cooperative - Electrical Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides qualifying stu- 
dents an opportunity to work at a job site and complete the require- 
ments for electrical systems service. Provides on-the-job experience 
while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

AUTC 275 Cooperative - Engine Repair 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides qualifying stu- 
dents an opportunity to work at a job site and complete the require- 
ments for engine repair. Provides on-the-job experience whie earn- 
ing credit toward an Associate degree. 

AUTC 276 Cooperative -Engine Performance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides qualifying stu- 
dents an opportunity to work at a job site and complete the require- 
ments for engine performance. Provides on-the-job experience 
while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

AUTC 279 Service Shop Operations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Introduces students to the 
"Real World" atmosphere of the automotive workplace. ArtWonaly, 
the couree presents historical and future trends with emphasis in 
career/placement requirements. Safety, 0SHA, EPA, and environmen- 
tal standards are presented. Introduction to the eight areas of ASE 
Technician Certification and related tools are presented. Students 
will rotate the roles of Service Manager. Service Writer. Parts 
Manager, and Team Leader. Each student will also experience the fol- 
lowing technician roles: general technician, alignment technician, 
brake technician, and diagnostic technician. Students wB wort on 
customer vehicles and gain a more dear understanding of what the 
expectations are for today's Automotive Service Technician. 

AUTC 280 Co-Op or Internship 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides qualifying stu- 
dents an opportunity to wort at a job site that is speafkaly related 
to their career objective. This dass will provide on-the-job experi- 
ence while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

AUTC 299 ASE Certification Review 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Prepares the professional automotive tedwrian 
to attempt the National Institute for Automotive Service Excelence 
certification tests. All eight areas of testing wiB be reviewed and 



"9 



80 



sample certification tests given. Lectures will stress theory of opera- 
tion and diagnostic logic. 

AVIT 1 41 Aviation Basics I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.Provides familiarization with aviation drawings 
and blueprint reading.The student learns the proper methods to 
weigh various aircraft and the requirements for weight-and-balance 
reporting.Fabrication of fluid lines for hydraulic, oxygen, and fuel 
systems is also covered. 

AVIT 142 Aviation Basics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.A math and physics review course with practical 
applications for aviation.The student reviews basic mathematical 
operations, determines areas of wing plan forms, and volumes of 
fuel tanks.Ratios and proportions are discussed as they apply to 
wings and aircraft engines.The operation of simple machines, air- 
craft nomenclature, and basic aerodynamics are also covered. 

AVIT 144 Aircraft Electricity 5 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.lntroduces the student to the principles of basic 
electricity.The student learns Ohm's Law and the relationships of volt- 
age, current, resistance, and power in DC electrical circuits.The rela- 
tionships between RMS values of voltage and current, true and appar- 
ent power, reactance, and impedance using vector algebra in AC cir- 
cuits are discussed. Electrical wiring in the aircraft.proper test equip- 
ment, basic troubleshooting, and battery servicing are also covered. 

AVIT 145 Aircraft Ground Servicing 2 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.Focuses on the proper methods and safety pro- 
cedures involved in working with aircraft on the ground.The student 
learns identification of aircraft fuels and refueling procedures and 
how to properly clean, inspect, and treat corrosion.Standard hand 
signals used with marshalling aircraft, engine run-up and taxiing 
procedures and ramp safety are also included. 

AVIT 146 Aviation Regulations 2 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.lntroduces the student to the Federal Aviation 
Regulations (FARs) pertaining to aviation maintenance (FAR Parts 
23, 43, and 65), the Advisory Circulars (ACs) that expand upon these 
regulations, and proper record keeping for maintenance tasks per- 
formed on civil aircraft.lncluded are the format of technical publica- 
tions and the various media (paper, microfiche, and CDROM) on 
which they are published. 

AVIT 1 48 Aviation Materials and Processes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.Provides an overview of aviation manufacturing 
and inspection methods.The student is introduced to processes and 
special tools used in aviation quality assurance. 

AVIT 222 Non Metallic Structures 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the student to inspecting and evalu- 
ation honeycomb and laminated structural damage as well as dam- 
aged transparent acrylic materials structures.The student becomes 



familiar with the methods involved in removing and repairing dam- 
aged honeycomb and laminated structural materials and repairing 
acrylic materials. 

AVIT 226 Airframe Electrical Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.Presents the theory of operation and proper 
methods of inspecting, servicing, troubleshooting, and repairing the 
various electrically powered aircraft systems.lncluded are power dis- 
tribution systems for light and transport aircraft, power generation 
and regulation.Proper wiring techniques and connector repair.Speed 
and configuration warning systems areas are also covered. 

AVIT 227 Aircraft Sheetmetal 8 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.lntroducesthe basic techniques necessary to 
perform sheet metal repairs on aircraft structures.Students develop 
skills in these areas: using sheet metal tools, laying out parts, form- 
ing parts with bending machines, and repairing various structural 
airframe components. 

AVIT 228 Aircraft Instruments and Avionics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.Covers the inspection, troubleshooting, and serv- 
icing of avionics and aircraft instruments installed in both general 
aviation and transport category aircraft.lncluded are basic theory of 
operation and the regulations pertaining to maintenance of instru- 
ments and avionics. 

AVIT 231 Reciprocating Powerplants 7 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.Covers overhaul, inspection, and removal of 
reciprocating engines.Students will perform a receiving inspection 
on an aircraft engine and perform a complete overhaul to opera- 
tional condition. Students will also learn inspection and repair pro- 
cedures specific to radial engines. 

AVIT 232 Turbine Powerplants 5 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.Covers the overhaul of a turbine engine; and the 
inspection, checking, servicing, repair, and removal/installation of 
turbine engines.Students will perform a receiving inspection on an 
aircraft engine and perform a complete overhaul. 

AVIT 233 Powerplant Fuel and 3 Credits 

Induction Systems 

Prerequisites:None.Studiesfuel metering systems in reciprocating 
powerplants.Airflow through turbines, superchargers and carbure- 
tors are discussed.Students overhaul carburetors to supplement the- 
ory discussions in this area.Engine cooling systems are also covered. 

AVIT 235 Powerplant Fluid and 3 Credits 

Indicating Systems 

Prerequisite: None. Covers lubricating systems in reciprocating and 
turbine engines. Indicating systems, reciprocating and turbine- 
engine electrical systems and engine instruments are also covered. 
Students inspect, check, troubleshoot, and repair engine fire detec- 
tion systems. 



AVIT 237 Propellers 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the inspection, repair, and troubleshoot- 
ing of propeller control systems.The removal, installation, and bal- 
ancing of propellers are also covered. 

AVIT 241 Aircraft Fuel System and 3 Credits 

Welding Practices 

Prerequisite: None.lntroduces the student to aircraft welding meth- 
ods. These methods will include the welding of magnesium, titani- 
um, stainless steel, and aluminum as well as fabrication of tubular 
structures. An additional major emphasis is aircraft fuel systems. 
This will include fuel dump systems, transfer systems, pressure fuel- 
ing, and fluid quantity indicating. Transfer and troubleshooting of 
systems is also covered. 

AVIT 242 Aircraft Inspection and Rigging 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Introduces the student to aircraft assembly, rig- 
ging and airframe inspection. This will include the rigging of fixed 
wing aircraft and rotary wing aircraft. Students will be instructed in 
the alignment of structures, assembly of aircraft components includ- 
ing flight control surfaces, balance and rigging of moveable control 
surfaces. In addition they will do airframe inspection and conformity 
inspection. 

AVIT 243 Aircraft Hydraulic and 3 Credits 

Pneumatic Systems 

Prerequisite: None. Present the theory and practical application of 
aircraft hydraulic and pneumatic systems as it relates to landing 
gear. Wing de-ice, and environmental systems is also covered. 

AVIT 244 Aircraft Landing Gear Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the student to safely putting an air- 
craft on jack stands for service. Also covers the inspection, service 
and repair of landing gear and retraction systems, shocks, struts, 
brakes, wheels, tires and steering systems. In addition student 
will learn to inspect, troubleshoot and service landing gear position 
and indicating warning systems. 

AVIT 245 Aircraft System 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Introduces the student to various aircraft cabin 
atmosphere systems. Students will be introduced to instrument 
static pressure leak checks. They will also work on and be introduced 
to various warning systems, electric brake control, and anti-skid sys- 
tems. 

AVIT 251 Engine Cooling and Exhaust 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Introduces students to various methods of 
engine cooling on piston and turbine engines.This will also intro- 
duce superchargers, heat exchangers, mufflers, repairing cylinders 
on piston engines and the use of thruster reversers on turbine 
engines. 



AVIT 252 Engine Install, Conformity, 3 Credits 

and Ignition 

Prerequisite: None. Students will remove and install piston and tur- 
bine engines. They will learn how to pre oil an engine after rebuild. 
They will troubleshoot, service, turbine engine exhaust nozzles.They 
will learn ignition harnesses, turbine engine ignitions and magneto 
overhaul. 

AVIT 253 Engine Starting System 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Introduces reciprocating and turbine engine 
electrical systems. Students will inspect, service, troubleshoot, and 
repair turbine pneumatic starting systems and turbine ignitions. 

BANK 1 01 Principles of Banking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 and 
MATH 044. Discussion ranges from fundamentals of negotiable instru- 
ments to contemporary issues and developments within the industry. 

BANK 102 Law and Banking: Applications 3 Credits 
and Principles 

Prerequisites:Oemonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 044. Introduces laws pertaining to secured transac- 
tions, letters of credit and the bank collection process.Provides a 
banker's guide to law and legal issues with special emphasis on the 
Uniform Commercial Code. 

BANK 103 Consumer Lending 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 044. Presents an insider's view of consumer lending, 
offering essential information about the maze of regulations that 
govern credit practices, and reviews loan processing, cross selling 
and collections. 

BANK 216 Analyzing Financial Statements 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:ACCT 101. Provides a practical introduction to financial 
analysis from the viewpoint of the commercial loan officer and 
develops skills needed to effectively assess a borrower's ability to 
repay loans. 

BANK 219 Bank Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BANK 101. Provides a complete introduction to the 
handling of day-to-day bank activities and incorporates case studies 
to help acquire bank management skills. 

BANK 220 Trust Operations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:ACCT 101 and BANK 101. Provides a broad, information 
framework intended to introduce students to quality trust opera- 
tions workmanship in a time of accelerating change in the indus- 
try.The course presents the basics of trust operations providing an 



overview of: the Securities Industry and the reasons for its exis- 
tence; the participants and terminology in the securities 
industryjrust services, includes the types of trust accounts and the 
management and operations of trust servicesjrust accounting prin- 
cipals, concepts, functions and controls; and the relationship 
between the Bank and the trust department. 

BCOM 102 Construction Graphics and 

Print Reading 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044. An introduction to drawing skills and techniques 
necessary to produce basic construction drawings.Emphasis is 
placed on the interpretation of the requirements of contract draw- 
ings, understanding terminology, symbols, and conventions used in 
residential, commercial, and industrial drawings, including architec- 
tural, structural, mechanical, electrical plans and sections. 

BCOM 103 Green Construction 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032. 
Students gain knowledge and understanding of sustainable and 
economically justifiable construction in the new"green" environ- 
ment. The course focuses on various trends in the use of alternative 
materials and designs in both the residential and commercial/indus- 
trial markets. These are compared to traditional methods and will 
compare the impact to energy and environmental. As part of the 
energy impact both the initial and ongoing costs are reviewed. The 
various trade groups and their platforms are reviewed and discussed 
in relation to economically justifiable approaches. Finally the impact 
of new verses remodeled/renovated construction is evaluated. 

BCOM 1 04 Commercial and Industrial 3 Credits 

Construction 

Prerequisites: BCOM 102. An introduction to steel, concrete, and 
composite material buildings found in heavy construction projects. 
Students will study steel frame, concrete structures,Bent Surface 
Structures, Space Frames, and other construction types used in 
heavier commercial and industrial buildings. 

BCOM 105 Concrete and Soils 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 024, ENGL 031 
and MATH 044.An introductory study of the properties and uses of 
concrete in construction.Emphasis is placed on quality control in the 
field.Other topics include: design and methods of form work, plac- 
ing, curing, and finishing.25% of the course content will cover the 
properties and behavior of soils including compaction, permeability, 
compressibility, and shear strength.Course content is consistent with 
principles and standards as determined by the Portland Cement 
Association (PCA), the American Concrete Institute (ACI), the . 



Construction Specifi cations Institute (CSI j, and the American Society 
for Testing Materials (ASTM). 

BCOM 1 1 5 Construction Management 3 Credits 

Practices 

Prerequisites:Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Students gain knowledge and understanding of the manage- 
ment functions in the construction industry inducting the project 
cycle, company and project organization, financial and budgeting 
considerations, documentation, monitoring, cost control, 
etc.Emphasis is placed on the responsibilities of managers and their 
relationship to other agents involved in a construction project. 

BCOM 206 Construction Estimating 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BCOM 102 and demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in MATH 
050. The first in a series of two estimating coursesitudents vnH 
study fundamentals of performing construction estimates inducing 
making material quantity take-offs and labor estimates.The 
Construction Specifications Institute (material divisions) wfl be used 
to organize the estimating process.Emphasis is placed on interpret- 
ing plans and specifications to determine accurate material quanti- 
ties and labor estimates, selection of appropriate material grades 
and types, and other miscellaneous cost associated with successful 
completion of a building project 

BCOM 208 Construction Business Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032. 
Students gain knowledge and understanding' of the business man- 
agement functions in the construction industry and describes the 
functions of managers, induding the management of activities, 
finances business development and personneL The course focuses 
on application of guiding principles in construction management. It 
introduces the basic principles of accounting induding debit and 
credit, balance sheets and income statements. In addition it 
addresses marketing in relation to market analysis, plans and acqui- 
sition of work. 

BCOM 210 Codes and Specifications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032.A study of the interpretation of technical building specifications, 
codes, and contract documents as they affect the selection, and 
application of materials and equipmenUbe course wi emphasize 
understanding of local, state, and national codes, and explore con- 
tractual relationships and considerations. 

BCOM 220 Project Planning and Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Pn>gram Advisor Approval.Covers the concepts and 



II 



82 



techniques for scheduling and control systems for effectively man- 
aging a construction project.Students will obtain the skills and 
knowledge necessary to effectively plan and schedule a project, to 
monitor and control all project aspects, and to anticipate and resolve 
problems as they occur. 

BCOM 223 Advanced Estimating 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BCOM 102 and BCOM 206.The second of two estimat- 
ing courses with emphasis on using specialized software to perform 
estimating and cost control tasks.Estimating projects are focused on 
commercial and industrial construction. 

BCOM 230 Construction Equipment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or successful completion of MATH 1 1 1. Introduces princi- 
ples and techniques for selecting and managing construction equip- 
ment. Identification and evaluation of types of site equipment 
including hand tools.power equipment, earthmoving/excavation 
equipment, etc.Emphasis is placed on estimating and analysis of 
equipment productivity, ownership and operating cost. 

BCOM 235 Safety and Risk Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Emphasis is placed on identifying and reducing safety risk on 
the job site.Students will study OSHA standards, accident and fire 
prevention, protection from hazardous materials, use of protective 
equipment and clothing, construction equipment and other safety 
concerns.The role of managers, workers, sub-contractors and others 
is stressed.Students will gain an appreciation for how accidents and 
safety concerns affect morale and productivity. 

BCOM 240 Professional Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Program Advisor Approval.Major focus is to provide 
practical on-the-job experience working with a construction compa- 
ny. Student interns might work in the areas of print reading, esti- 
mating, equipment management, project supervision, or other 
management related activities and tasks. 

BCOT 104 Floor and Wall Layout and 3 Credits 

Construction 

Prerequisites:None.Examines the design and construction of floor 
and wall systems.Student develops the skill needed for layout and 
construction of floor and wall systems from blueprints and profes- 
sional planning documents. 

BCOT 1 05 Roof Construction 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.Studies the design and construction of roof sys- 
tems. Emphasizes use of the framing square for traditional rafter and 
truss roofing.lnstruct students in additional up-to-date techniques. 

BCOT 107 Electrical Blueprint Reading/NEC 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:CONT 127.An introduction to the skills in basic electri- 



cal print interpretation and understanding electrical symbols, pre- 
senting the student with the electrical design problems and related 
calculations in accordance with the most current NEC.Emphasis is 
placed on reading blueprints and specifications for a single-family 
dwelling, multi-family dwelling, commercial and industrial applica- 
tions and hazardous locations.The student will be using a new com- 
puter assisted program to assist with estimating a project.Emphasis 
will be placed on understanding residential and commercial stan- 
dards and the proper development of mechanical engineering 
drawings. 

BCOT 110 Cabinetry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Develops knowredge and skills in building of 
cabinets, including methods of construction, necessary hardware 
and installation; also use of portable power tools and stationary 
power tools. 

BCOT 1 1 3 Interior Trim 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: CONT 101. Develops basic knowledge, skills, and aware- 
ness of interior trim. Provides training in installation of drywall, 
moldings, interior doors, kitchen cabinets, and baseboard moldings. 

BCOT 1 1 4 Exterior Trim 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CONT 101.Develops necessary skills in the finishing of 
the exterior of a building.The student obtains skills in the installa- 
tion of the cornice, windows, doors and various types of sidings used 
in today's market place. 

BCOT 1 1 5 Auxiliary Building Design and 3 Credits 

Construction 

Prerequisites: CONT 101 .Develops carpentry skills in construction of 
garages, storage buildings.wood decks, patios, privacy fences and 
gazebos. 

BCOT 120 Woodworking Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.An introductory study of the basic skills in wood- 
working. Emphasis is placed on safety, tool set-up and machine oper- 
ations. Other topics include proper joinery and material selection. 

BCOT 1 21 Furniture Design and Construction 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BCOT 120.Develops skills in the design, layout, and 
construction of furniture.Students are introduced to furniture styles, 
types of materials used, and methods of construction. 

BCOT 1 22 Woodworking Jig Layout 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BCOT 120.Develops skills in the design, layout and con- 
struction of holding devices, called jigs, used for special setups on the 
table saw, joiner band saw, and other woodworking machines.Each 
jig can be a single function, or a multi-functioning jig. 

BCOT 1 23 Furniture Framework 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the basic skills and technology of fur- 



niture construction, focusing on case construction, face frames and 
furniture legs. 

BCOT 124 Mi 1 1 work 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BCOT 120.lntroduces the basic skills and technology of 
the production of wood products and focuses on machinery set-up 
and operations for making moldings, doorframes and picture frames. 

BCOT 1 25 Furniture Finishing and Repair 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.Develops knowledge and skills in the technology 
of refinishing and repairing furniture.lntroduces procedures used in 
stripping, bleaching, caning, veneering and wood fillers. 

BCOT 126 Furniture Door and 

Drawer Assembly 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BCOT 120. An advanced class that develops skills in 
the design, layout, and construction of doors, drawers, and tabletops. 
Students are introduced to various types of hardware and installa- 
tion methods. 

BCOT 1 27 Basic Theory of Paint and Stain 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.lntroduces the basic skills and techniques of fin- 
ishing wood products, including proper preparation, staining and 
finishing procedures. 

BCOT 1 28 Woodworking Hobbies and Crafts 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.lntroduces the basic skills and techniques in lay- 
out and construction of small projects such as bookcases, file cabi- 
nets, and mantels.lntroduces the skills in layout and assembly of 
small hobby projects such as kitchen accessories, and living room, 
bedroom decorations. 

BCOT 1 30 Home Inspection 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. This course is designed to review the way build- 
ings are designed and constructed, which areas of buildings should 
be inspeded, and how to inspect them. Students will learn to pre- 
pare an inspedion report; reports designed to meet the specifica- 
tions of lending institutions and other organizations requiring home 
inspection services. 

BCOT 131 Residential Building Codes 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Introduces the students to building code require- 
ments in Indiana. Students wilt become familiar with the current 
code book and how to use it. Emphasis will be placed on examining 
those provisions that apply to general contradors. 

BCOT 201 Residential Wiring 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CONT 1 27.Covers the practice of residential wiring, 
including eledrical service.metering equipment, lighting, switches, 
outlets and other common components, and methods of installation 
and maintenance of the residential wiring system in accordance 
with the current National Electrical Code. 



BCOT 202 Plumbing Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.Studies the operation and function of the home 
plumbing system.lntroduces pipe drawings and pipe layout and iso- 
metric blueprint reading symbols.Demonstrates how to rough in 
plumbing and install drainage, water systems, fixtures and water 
heaters in compliance with the plumbing code. 

BCOT 203 Masonry Concrete Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.Covers materials and methods of construction 
with concrete block, brick, and forming for poured concrete.lncludes 
study in the preparation of the building site. 

BCOT 205 Advanced Projects in 

Building Construction I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CONT 101 and CONT 106.Applies problem solving to 
common problems in construction.Emphasizes the cooperation 
between several trades in the construction industry. 

BCOT 206 Advanced Projects in 

Building Construction II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BCOT 205. Applies problem-solving skills to common 
challenges in construction. Emphasizes the cooperation between 
several trades in the construction industry allowing students to 
practice necessary skills to resolve the problem. Concentrates on 
decision-making skills. 

BCOT 207 Carpentry-Light Commercial 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.lntroduces carpentry skills required in light com- 
mercial construction.Focuses on construction methods and materi- 
als used for office buildings, clinics, small churches and other non- 
residential structures. 

BCOT 208 Electrical Estimating 3 Credits 

Perquisite: CONT 127.This course presents the student with the 
electrical estimating process for residential and light commercial 
construction. Emphasis is placed on reading blueprints and specifi- 
cations, estimating labor, materials, and associated costs. The stu- 
dent will be using a new computer assisted program to assist with 
estimating a project. 

BCOT 211 Construction Organization and 3 Credits 
Procedures 

Prerequisites:None.lntroduces organization and management pro- 
cedures focusing on subcontracting, equipment and tool inventories, 
job materials, codes, inspections and permits. 

BCOT 213 Motors and Motor Controls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CONT 1 27.Studies the wiring and design of motor con- 
trol circuits, including circuit and conductor calculations.motor cir- 
cuits and controls.lncludes control transformers and service, circuit 
layout for motor controls and machine tool hookup and control. 



BCOT 214 Wall and Floor Coverings 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.Covers modern materials and techniques of inte- 
rior floor and wall coverings.Provides instruction on assessing the 
durability and maintenance of materials and techniques in correct 
installation procedures. 

BCOT 216 Advanced Residential Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Studies residential floor 
plans and elevation. Analyzes contemporary living patterns, cost, pri- 
vacy, convenience and efficiency, coordinated with needs. Compares 
exterior styles for cost and aesthetic values. Studies multiple hous- 
ing, duplex arrangements, apartments and condominiums. Provides 
students with opportunities to do floor plans, elevations, and per- 
spective drawings to incorporate the conclusions reached from the 
above research. 

BCOT 219 Survey and Measurement 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CONT 106 and demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in MATH 
050. Presents fundamentals of surveying, including use of transit, 
reading angles, land description, restrictions and legal problems. 
Covers topographical maps and their use. 

BCOT 220 Electrical Troubleshooting 3 Credits 

Techniques 

Prerequisites: CONT 1 27.Presents methods and techniques for trou- 
bleshooting appliances,motors,motor controls, relay wiring, com- 
mercial wiring and industrial wiring systems. 

BCOT 222 Commercial/Industrial Wiring 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CONT 127.Covers wiring methods and material selec- 
tion for commercial and industrial wiring systems.Studies include 
mechanical installation of hardware as well as electrical design and 
layout.Focuses on tool use.material selection, and installation of 
machines in the industrial setting. 

BCOT 223 Plumbing Design and Installation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BCOT 202.Provides techniques for working with pipes 
and fittings.Studies residential and commercial electrical hot water 
heating systems, private well water systems and electrical compo- 
nents of plumbing systems. 



BCOT 225 Fabrication 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Program Advisor Approval.Studies concepts and tech- 
niques of industrialized housing.Covers pre-fabrication, fabrication, 
jigs and rigging, including manufactured housing, sectional homes 
and modular homes. 

BCOT 228 Advanced Woodworking 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: BCOT 120.Applies problem-solving solutions in furni- 



ture construction, as well as cabinetry construction and insulation. 

BIOL 065 Basic Life Sciences 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:None.Corequisite.Demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or earning a grade of* C'or better in ENGL 

031 and MATH O44.lntroduces the scientific method and the basic 
concepts and terminology used in biology, microbiology, anatomy, 
physiology and organic chemistry which is related to We sciences. 
Prepares entering students who took no high school science or who 
took science several years ago for general education ife sciences 
courses.lndudes lab. 

BIOL 100 Human Biology Transfer IN 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044. This course is a study of the biology of the human 
organism.lt includes an examination of organizational complexity. 
development, health, and the place of humans in the natural world. 
Includes lab. 

BIOL 1 01 Introductory Biology Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 050.lntrodur.es the basic concepts of life.lndudes discus- 
sion of cellular and organismal biology, genetxs,evolijtkin, ecology, 
and interaction among all living organisms-Addresses applications 
of biology to society. Includes lab. 

BIOL 105 Biology I Transfer IN 5 Credits 

Prerequisites:Oemonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C or better*in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 050.An in-depth overview of the principles of molecular 
andMendelian genetics, concepts of Natural Selection in relation to 
evolution, and principles of population ecology and their effects on 
organismal diversity. Includes lab. 

BIOL 107 Biology II Transfer IN 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C or better' in ENGL 025, ENGL 

032 and MATH 050,/n in-depth overview of the principles of basic 
biochemistry, concepts of cell structure, cell metabolism, and ceMar 
respiration, processes of DNA replication and gene expression, fun- 
damentals of plant structure and function, principles of animal 
reproduction and development and an overview of vertebrate 
anatomy. Includes lab. 

BIOL 110 Entomology 3 Credits 

Prerequisftes:Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of 'C'or belter in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032, and MATH 050.This course will cover bask entomological con- 
cepts, including structure and function, behavior, evolution and ecol- 



S3 



ogy.Review of insert order and look at how inserts interact with 
human societies. Includes lab. 

BIOL 121 General Biology I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites:Demonstrated competency appropriate assessment or 
earning a grade of Tor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 and MATH 
050. Also, demonstrated competency in chemistry through appropri- 
ate assessment or successful completion of CHEM 061 .An introduc- 
tion to those biological and chemical principles associated with cell 
structure and function, cell division, molecular and Mendelian 
genetics, enzyme function and energetics.An overview of natural 
selection, the structure, lifecycle and classification schemes of vascu- 
lar plants will also be presented. Includes lab. 

BIOL 122 General Biology II 4 credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Tor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032, 
and MATH 050. An introduction to those principles associated with 
evolution, form and function of plants and animals and ecology. The 
course will trace the evolution of organisms and explore plant struc- 
tures, development and interaction with their environment. Students 
will look at anatomy.physiology, development and behavior of ani- 
mals and will learn aspects of conservation biology. Includes lab. 

BIOL 201 General Microbiology 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIOL 101, BIOL 105 or APHY 101 and earning a grade 
of Tor better in MAT 050,Presents an in-depth overview of micro- 
biology, including fundamental structures of microorganisms, their 
metabolism, classification and interaction with other living things, 
and the laboratory techniques for their study.lntroduces industrial 
and clinical applications of microbiology and clinically related areas 
of bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic involvement. Includes lab. 

BIOL 202 General Microbiology II 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIOL 201 or BIOL 21 1 .A secondary study of microor- 
ganisms, including the characterization of bacterial growth and 
techniques of controlling microbial growth.Provides in-depth cover- 
age of analytical and serological techniques commonly encountered 
in the microbiology laboratory. Includes lab. 

BIOL 21 1 Microbiology I Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 or APHY 101 and earning a grade ofTor 
better in MATH 050.An overview of microbiology including funda- 
mental structures of microorganisms, their metabolism, classifica- 
tion and interaction with other living things, and the laboratory 
techniques for their study.lntroduces industrial and clinical applica- 
tions of microbiology. Includes lab. 

BIOL 212 Microbiology II 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIOL 21 1 and APHY 101. Presents a secondary study of 
bacteria, viruses, fungi, rickettsia, and parasites.Emphasizes the 
o- study of bacterial growth and control demonstrated by serological 
techniques. Includes lab. 



BIOL 220 Environmental Science 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Tor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044.Survey of the basic concepts of ecology.natural 
resources and ecosystems, relationships between humans and their 
natural environment, and the magnitude and scope of global envi- 
ronmental problems. Includes lab. 

BIOL 221 Molecular Biology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIOL 121" or BIOL 107.Corequisites:CHEM 101 or CHEM 
105. An introduction to DNA, RNA and proteins and a review of their 
structures and functions, including their physical and chemical prop- 
erties and their roles in cellular metabolism.The course will include 
an indepth look at the synthesis of these molecules, as well as DNA 
replication, transcription and translation.lncludes lab. 

BIOT 100 Survey of Biotechnology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Tor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044.Presents an in-depth overview of biotechnology 
emphasizing basic molecular techniques of manipulating DNA; 
processes involved in protein purifT cation and analysis; microbial, 
plant, aquatic, medical and animal biotechnology; regulations and 
ethics of the biotechnology industry. 

BIOT 101 Introduction to Biotechnology 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIOL 121 .Presents a basic overview of biotechnology 
emphasizing current DNA and RNA technologies and structure and 
function of biomolecules.The application of these techniques in the 
field of medicine, agriculture, forensic and environment is empha- 
sized. Scientific methods, lab safety and regulations and ethics of 
the biotechnology industry will also be covered.lncludes lab. 

BIOT 103 Safety and Regulatory 3 Credits 

Compliance for Biotechnology 

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 or BIOL 121 or CHEM 101 or CHEM 105 or 
CHEM 1 1 1 . Overview of laboratory safety procedures and precau- 
tions, biosafety, radiation safety, compliance standards of regulatory 
agencies. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the regulatory 
environment of pharmaceutical, diagnostic and agricultural research 
and manufacturing.Students will be introduced to the agencies in 
the U.S. responsible for regulatory oversight of biotechnology. 
Concepts of current good laboratory practices (cGLP), current good 
manufacturing practices (cGMP), standard operating procedures 
(SOP) and validation will be addressed as they apply to industry. 

BIOT 104 cGMP and Quality Compliance 3 credits 

Prerequisites: BIOL 121 or Program Chair Approval. Overview of cur- 
rent good manufacturing practices in the global pharmaceutical 
industry. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding of the simi- 
larities and differences between the good manufacturing practice 
requirements in the United States, Europe, Canada and Japan. 



Students will also explore the different quality systems and process- 
es needed in the pharmaceutical industry. 

BIOT 105 Survey of Regulatory Affairs 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Program Chair's Approval.This course provides an entry 
level introduction to the laws and regulations that govern the devel- 
opment, marketing and commercial distribution of drugs, biological 
and medical device products and how they relate to the pharmaceu- 
tical, biotechnology and medical device industry. This course in 
intended to provide individuals with a greater understanding of reg- 
ulatory affairs, specifically providing an understanding of how their 
actions are controlled by regulations and how to interact with FDA 
or global regulatory agencies. 

BIOT 117 Quality Control Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: BIOT 101 . Students will be introduced to those princi- 
ples associated with quality control from a life sciences perspective. 
Students will learn about common microbial contaminants and how 
to prevent them. Students will also gain experience with common 
monitoring techniques used in the biotech industry. 

BIOT 1 71 Survey of Biotechnology 3 Credits 

Manufacturing 

Prerequisite: Program Chair Approval. Students will be introduced to 
the basics of biotechnology and the biology required to understand 
biotechnology. Students will then learn about the local biotech 
industry and some of the general practices shared by all biotech 
industries. Students will spend the second half of the course focus- 
ing on the specifics of either biomanufacturing or medical device 
manufacturing, earning a certificate in the area of their focus. 

BIOT 1 72 Survey of Regulatory Affairs 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair's Approval.This course provides an 
entry level introduction to the laws and regulations that govern the 
development, marketing and commercial distribution of drugs, bio- 
logical and medical device products and how they relate to the 
pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device industry. This 
course in intended to provide individuals with a greater understand- 
ing of regulatory affairs, specifically providing an understanding of 
how their actions are controlled by regulations and how to interact 
with FDA or global regulatory agencies. 

BIOT 201 Cell Culture and Cellular Processes 4 Credits 

Prerequisites:BIOT 101 and CHEM 105 or CHEM 111. An introduction 
to major biochemical pathways, cellular structure and function at a 
molecular level.Topics to be considered include the structure and 
function of the cell membrane, cytoskeleton and various organelles. 
Cellular respiration will be discussed.Protein synthesis,processing 
and export will be examined.Those processes involved in cell divi- 
sion will also be investigated and related to cancer.The laboratory 
will center upon techniques involving animal, plant, fungi and bac- 



terial cell cultures. Students will be taught how to isolate, culture 
and preserve prokaryotic organisms.Students will be taught how to 
maintain and preserve eukaryotic cell cultures.Students will learn to 
procure cell cultures from ATCC and other repositories.lncludes lab. 

BIOT 211 Analytic Methods in Biotechnology I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIOT 101 and CHEM 105 or CHEM 111. Theory and appli- 
cation of many analytical methods currently utilized in the field of 
biotechnology.These methods will include: ELISA and immunoaffinity 
techniques; methods for determining enzymatic activity; spectropho- 
tometric methods; chromatographic methods; electrophoresis; light 
and electron microscopy.When feasible, techniques will be practiced 
in the laboratory setting.Methods utilizing radioactive isotopes will 
be discussed.Considerable emphasis will be placed on proper meth- 
ods for data recording, analysis and presentation.lncludes lab. 

BIOT 21 2 Analytic Methods in 3 Credits 

Biotechnology II 

Prerequisites: BIOT 21 1 .Theory and application of many analytical 
methods currently utilized in the field of biotechnology.These meth- 
ods will include: centrifugation, light and electron microscopy, 
restriction endonuclease digestion, agar and acrylamide elec- 
trophoresis of nucleic acids, Southern and Northern blotting, poly- 
merase chain reaction and bioassays.When feasible, techniques will 
be practiced in the laboratory setting.Methods utilizing radioactive 
isotopes will be discussed. Considerable emphasis will be placed on 
proper methods for data recording, analysis and presentation. 
Includes lab. 

BIOT 214 Food and Drug Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: BIOT 101. This course provides a basic introduction to 
the laws and regulations that govern the development, marketing 
and commercial distribution of drugs, biological and medical device 
products and how they relate to the pharmaceutical, biotechnology 
and medical devices industry. This course is designed to provide stu- 
dents with an overall landscape of U.S. and International laws regu- 
lating the drug, biotechnology and medical device industry. 

BIOT 215 Clinical Trials 3 Credits 

■ Prerequisite: BIOT 101. This course provides a basic introduction to 
clinical trials, including their design, how they are conducted, and 
concepts of current good clinical practices (cGCPs). This course is 
designed to provide students with an overall landscape of the clini- 
cal trial process, PDA regulations and ICH guidelines pertaining to 
that process. 

BIOT 216 Risk Management for Drugs and 3 Credits 
Medical Devices 

Prerequisite: BIOT lO.This course provides a basic introduction to risk 
management strategy application of best practices and risk man- 
agement for both the drug and medical device industry. This course 
is designed to provide students with an overall understanding of 



this growing discipline to improve patient safety and the regulatory 
mandates and laws. 

BIOT 21 7 Biotechnology Manufacturing 3 Credits 

Processes 

Prerequisites:Program Advisor Approval.lntroduction to the process- 
es and procedures involved in the manufacture of biological mole- 
cules on both large- and small-scales.The student will learn the 
function of commonly used manufacturing equipment associated 
with biotechnology and understand the cGMP's associated with the 
use of such equipment.The regulatory environment associated with 
most biotechnology endeavors will be reviewed including those 
mandated by FDA, USDA and OSHA. 

BIOT 218 Product Life Cycle 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: BIOT 101. This course provides a basic introduction to the 
basic life cycle of both drug and medical device life cycles, from dis- 
covery through preclinical, clinical trials, and post production concerns. 

BIOT 220 Molecular Biology Lectures 3 Credits 

PrerequisitesrBIOL 121 and CHEM 106.lntroduces DNA, RNA and pro- 
teins and review their structures and functions, including their phys- 
ical and chemical properties and their roles in cellular metabolism. 
The course will include an in-depth look at the synthesis of these 
molecules, as well as DNA replication, transcription and translation. 

BIOT 221 Microbiology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIOL 121 and CHEM 106.Corequisites:BIOT 
222. Presents an overview of microbiology including fundamental 
structures of microorganisms, their growth, metabolism, interaction 
with other living things, and classification. Emphasis placed on . 
industrial applications of microbiology. 

BIOT 222 Microbiology Laboratory 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIOL 121 and CHEM 106.Corequisites: BIOT 221.A con- 
ventional laboratory of exercises, demonstrations and discussions. 
Laboratory exercises are designed to enable students to achieve pro- 
ficiency in the principles and techniques necessary for cultivation of 
microorganisms using aseptic techniques and for performing and 
interpreting biochemical tests.The laboratory exercises will be filled 
out weekly and turned in to be graded. 

BIOT 227 Genetic Engineering and 4 Credits 

DNA Analysis 

Prerequisites: : BIOT 201 or BIOT 21 Uhe essential concepts and 
techniques in genetic engineering.Students will practice essential 
gene cloning procedures: isolation of DNA, restriction endonuclease 
digestion, agarose gel electrophoresis analysis, DNA ligation, and 
transformation into a host strain.Other essential techniques such as 
PCR, construction and screening of genomic or cDNA libraries, 
Southern and Northern blot analyses will be practiced.Students will 
understand the principles and ethical issues of animal or human 



cloning practices. Current methods for transfer and propagation of 
genes into plants and animals will be discussed. Various gene knock- 
out techniques such as homologous gene recombination, ste-d*ea- 
ed mutagenesis, and RNAi will be introduced. The topics in genomics, 

proteomics, and bioinformatics will be discussedlndudes lab. 

BIOT 231 Industrial Processes and 4 Credits 

Fermentation 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor ApprovaWn introduction to fermen- 
tation processes used for commercial purposes and the operation of 
small- and large-scale fermentors.Methods used to harvest product 
from fermentors and the regulatory requirements associated with 
commercial fermentation will also be explored.lndud« lab. 

BIOT 233 Protein Analysis and Purification 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIOT 201 or BIOT 21 1 .Students wfll review the bio- 
chemical properties of amino acids and proteins, then study tech- 
niques of cell disintegration and extraction, protein separation, and 
analysis. Students will be taught to determine which method is 
most applicable in various situations and why that method should 
be utilized. When possible, students will be given an opportunity to 
perform these techniques in the laboratory.lndudes lab. 

BIOT 235 Biotechnology Laboratory 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIOL 107 and CHEM 105.Corequisites: BIOL 221. 
Presents an in-depth overview of basic biotechnology laboratory 
skills emphasizing chromatography techniques.methods of DMA 
and protein electrophoresis, processes of immunoassays.data man- 
agement skills, recombinant DNA technology, and the polymerase 
chain reaction. 

BIOT 241 Immunology and Immunological 4 Credits 
Processes 

Prerequisites: BIOT 211. A brief survey of the components of the 
immune system and how they interactThe topics covered wl 
include.B and T cell development, activation and culture, the role of 
cytokines, their production and purification, signal transduction 
processes in B-cell activation, the role of MHC complexes, 
immunoglobulin synthesis and origins of diversity, antio^nantjbody 
interactions.practical aspects of raising and purifying polyclonal and 
monoclonal antibodies.handling and labeling of antibodies, applica- 
tions of antibodies including Western blotting, ELISA, and iwwiu 
histochemistry. Includes lab. 

BIOT 280 Co-op Internship 2-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Provides students with the 
opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their 
career objectives.Provides on-the-job experience whie earning 
credit toward an associate degree. 

BUSN 101 Introduction to Business TransferIN 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 



B 



assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044.Examines the American business system in relation to 
the economic society.Studies business ownership, organization prin- 
ciples and problems.management, control facilities, administration, 
and development practices of American business enterprises. 

BUSN 102 Business Law 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C"or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Describes the judicial system and the nature and sources of law 
affecting business.Studies contracts, sales contracts with emphasis 
on Uniform Commercial Code Applications, remedies for breach of 
contract and tort liabilities.Examines legal aspects of property own- 
ership, structures of business ownership, and agency relationships. 

BUSN 1 04 Investment 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032.An introduction to the fundamentals of investing.Presents the 
basis of investing.with attention to the various ways in which 
investment vehicles operate. 

BUSN 1 05 Principles of Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 044.Describes the functions of managers, including 
the management of activities and personnel.Focuses on application 
of guidance principles in management. 

BUSN 1 06 Customer Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032, and MATH 044.Focuses on the importance of providing superior 
customer service to the organization as well as the customer service 
representative. Fundamental customer service techniques applicable 
to a variety of situations are presented. 

BUSN 1 08 Personal Finance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032, and MATH 044. Emphasizes management of individual financial 
resources for growth and maintenance of personal wealth. Covers 
home buying and mortgage financing, installment financing, life 
and health insurance, securities, commodities and other investment 
opportunities. 

BUSN 110 Introduction to Logistics 3 Credits 

Prereguisite: None. A study of the basic concepts included in the 
field of logistics and supply chain management. Topics covered 
include: supply chain management, customer service, transporta- 
tion, purchasing and inventory and warehouse management. 



86 



BUSN 1 20 Business Ethics and Social 3 Credits 

Responsibility 

Prerequisites: BUSN 101.An examination of individual, organization- 
al and societal ethical issues and the social responsibility of business 
organizations in the resolution of these issues.Critical thinking and 
informed decision making are emphasized. 

BUSN 202 Human Resource Management 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: BUSN 1 05.Focuses on the activities of human resource 
management, with emphasis on employer-employee relations, job 
analysis and evaluation, salary administration.work measurement 
and standards, performance appraisal and legal compliance. 

BUSN 203 Business Development 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: BUSN 105, MKTG 101 and ACCT 101. Explores business 
operations for the self-employed or as a manager of a small busi- 
ness enterprise. The course includes: covering the role of entrepre- 
neur and manager; selecting the appropriate business organization; 
developing plans and strategies for small, medium, and growing 
firms; securing financing for start-up and growing operations; 
exploring growth opportunities; and successfully managing human 
and material resources. 

BUSN 204 Case Problems in Business 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval.Applies business concepts and 
principles to specific case studies or problems. 

BUSN 205 Risk Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BUSN 101, BUSN 102 and MATH 050.Examines the 
risks faced by businesses and individuals; it then considers ways of 
handling them.Topics covered include property, liability and person- 
al losses that may result due to assuming these risks.Much attention 
is paid to the use of insurance contracts in reducing the impact of 
the possible losses.Specific areas include automobile.home, life, 
health, and pension insurance as well as public policy, government 
regulations, and social insurance programs. 

BUSN 206 Crisis Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Explores how to manage business crises, how best 
to avoid them, and what managers can learn from the experience. 

BUSN 207 Introduction to International 3 Credits 

Business 

Prereguisites: BUSN 101. Provides an overview ofthe international 
environment in which business operates today.Demonstrates the 
global relationships between business activities and how events in 
one part ofthe world can influence business decisions and activities 
in other parts of the world. 

BUSN 208 Organizational Behavior 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: BUSN 105,Studies human behavior in organizations at 
the individual and group level, including the effects of organization- 



al structure on behavior.Focuses on using organizational behavior 
concepts for developing and improving interpersonal skills. 

BUSN 209 Introduction to e-Business 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: BUSN 101 and CINS 101. Focuses on how e-business is 
being conducted and managed, its major opportunities, limitations, 
issues and risks.E-business applications to be discussed include . 
those of business to consumer.business to business, and intra busi- 
ness. Because e-business is interdisciplinary, subject matter will be 
directed at managers.professionals, and students who wish an 
overview of the e-business potential. 

BUSN 210 Managerial Finance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACQ 101 and BUSN 101, and MATH 111 or higher. An 
introductory course in the principles of financial management. 
Develops decision-making skills related to the financial resources of 
a firm. Includes techniques of financial analysis, time value of . 
money, capital budgeting, risk and return. 

BUSN 212 Principles of Leadership 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: BUSN 105. Introduction and overview of fundamental 
concepts of effective leadership in formal organizations. 

BUSN 213 Management in Non-Profit 

Organization 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: BUSN 105.This course is designed to introduce the 
student to the purpose and function of non-profit organizations. 
Students will apply planning, organization, leadership and control 
techniques as they apply to the non-profit sector. 

BUSN 220 Conference Leadership Training 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Stresses the importance ofthe conference in 
business and industry.Emphasizes the practical application ofthe 
various techniques of conference leadership and an understanding 
of group dynamics in the conference setting. 

BUSN 221 Principles of Employment 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: BUSN 202.An in-depth look at the employment 
process. Emphasis will be placed on the role of recruiting, selecting 
and training of employees.Techniques in job analysis, behavioral 
interviewing and on-the-job training will be studied in much detail. 
BUSN 222 Benefits Administration 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: BUSN 202.Provides an in-depth look at benefit 
administration.Topics include vacations, holiday pay, insurance, 
retirement programs and other employee inducements.Emphasis 
will be placed on cost of benefits in relationship to the overall com- 
pensation package.The course will also look at the relevance of 
reward and recognition and pay structures. 

BUSN 223 Occupational Safety and Health 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: BUSN 105.A look at the importance of safety and 
health in the workplace.The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 



1970 will be examined in depth with relationship to businesses and 
their employees.Emphasis will be placed on effective practices, costs, 
labor and management responsibilities, health hazards, alcohol and 
drug abuse,worker's compensation,physical conditions and training. 

BUSN 227 Logistics/Supply Chain 3 Credits 

Management 

Prerequisites: BUSN 101. Astudyofthe strategic supply chain con- 
cepts included in the field of logistics and supply chain manage- 
ment. Topics covered include: supply chain strategy, planning and 
design, customer service, transportation, purchasing, forecasting, 
inventory and warehouse management, global supply chain man- 
agement, managing supply chain risk, and financial control of logis- 
tics performance. 

BUSN 228 Principles of Purchasing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BUSN lOI.Designed to teach the basics of purchasing 
management.Topics covered include: the challenge of purchasing and 
materials management, objectives and organization, function, specifi- 
cation, quality control and inspection, supplier evaluation, selection, 
and measurement, supplier development, strategic cost management, 
contracts and negotiation, purchasing relationships, purchasing trans- 
portation, purchasing laws and ethic, and global sourcing. 

BUSN 229 Transportation Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BUSN 1 01 . Examines the structure and importance of the 
commercial transportation industry in the logistic sector of business. 
Topics covered include an in-depth examination of the various modes of 
transportation including discussions of regulations, economics, charac- 
teristics, and development in major transportation modes. Also dis- 
cussed are costing and pricing issues in transportation and relationship 
management between buyers and sellers of transportation. 

BUSN 230 Business Statistics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BUSN 101 and MATH 1 1 1 or higher.Designed to build 
student competence in the areas of descriptive and inferential sta- 
tistics, through emphasis on the application of these statistical 
methods. Includes an examination of data, probability of occurrence, 
and basic sampling processes. Uses statistical methods to model 
results and uses these models for forecasting.Tests to examine the 
appropriateness of these techniques are introduced. 

BUSN 231 Business Statistics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BUSN 230.Corequisites:MATH 201. Focuses on Chi- 
Square applications, linear regression, multiple regression, and an 
analysis of variance.Students will be expected to apply a statistical 
package to topical applications. 

BUSN 235 SHRM Certification Preparation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Prepares students to sit for 
the Professional in Human Resources (PHR) certification exam spon- 
sored by the Society for Human Resource Management. 



BUSN 271 Lessons in Leadership 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: BUSN 105. Leadership styles and strategies of historical 
leaders and/or modern day leaders are analyzed and applied to 21st 
century business scenarios. Modern management theories are dis- 
cussed in relationship to actual events in historical events to legit- 
imize the theories in a practical application. 

BUSN 280 Co-op/Internship 1 -6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Gives students the oppor- 
tunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career 
objectives.Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit 
toward an associate degree. 

CATX 101 Physical Principles, Clinical 3 Credits 

Applications and Quality Control I 

Prerequisite: Must hold a current registered radiological technologist 
license. This class will introduce the student to the physical princi- 
ples of Computed Tomography (CT) and how it relates to the clinical 
applications for both adults and children. This class introduces the 
foundation for the practice of CT scanning. This class will also cover 
radiation dose and quality control. 

CATX 1 02 Cross Sectional Anatomy I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Must hold a current registered radiological technologist 
license.This class introduces the student to cross sectional anatomy. 
It will cover the terminology related to sectional anatomy. This class 
will discuss different planes of the body and associate therewith 
the quality of images that will be encountered in clinical practice. It 
will cover the difference between all post processing options. The 
class covers anatomy in the head, cranium, facial area and neck in 
cross sectional plane and all structures and functions pertaining to 
the related anatomy. Discusses common pathologies related to the 
anatomy presented. 

CATX 201 Physical Principles, Clinical 3 Credits 

Applications and Quality Control II 

Prerequisite: Must hold a current registered radiological technologist 
license. This class will conclude on previous class the physical princi- 
ples of Computed Tomography (CT) in regards to volume scanning 
(spiral/helical CT) and the fundamentals of volume scanning. This 
class will discuss advances in spiral CT and 3D CT and impact on 
patients. 

CATX 202 Cross Sectional Anatomy II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Must hold a current registered radiological technologist 
license.This class builds on the prior class and discusses 3D images 
in more depth. It will cover the difference between all post process- 
ing options.The class covers anatomy in the thorax, abdomen, pelvis 
and extremities as well as CT angiography in cross sectional plane 
and all structures and functions pertaining to the related anatomy. 
Discusses common pathologies related to the anatomy presented. 



CEPM 101 Introduction to Homeland Security 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: None. The course provides students and practitioners 
with a comprehensive account of past and current homeland security 
practices, policies, and programs in relation to the government 
restructure.Topics indude workplace security, weapons of mass 
destruction, domestic and international terrorism, and preparedness. 

CEPM 102 Principles of Emergency 3 Credits 

Management and Planning 
Prerequisites: None.The purpose of this course is two-fold: to intro- 
duce concepts and basic descriptive information about the pofiocal 
system within the context of disaster policy and to demonstrate 
how political factors play a role in all phases of emergency manage 
ment — regardless of the type or nature of the disaster event-To 
achieve these goals the course provides practical information drawn 
from disaster policy studies and case studies.This information is 
(wherever possible) reviewed for findings that can be generated, 
that is, for lessons that are applicable to future disasters and emer- 
gencies. 

CEPM 103 Basic Skills in Emergency 3 Credits 

Program Management 

Prerequisites: None.The purpose of this course is to teach those con- 
sidering a career in emergency management about the nature and 
reasons for the public's awareness of hazards and preparedness for 
disasters.The variety of actions taken try individuals, private and vol- 
untary organizations, and the government to both prepare the pub- 
lic for the impact of disasters and provide realistic strategies to miti- 
gate their adverse consequences. 

CEPM 104 Disaster and Terrorism Awareness 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.This course is an introduction to political terror- 
ism, ranging from low-level acts of threats and acts of violence mat 
may represent significant risk to human life and property to 
largescale acts of violence using 'weapons of mass destruction'that 
may have devastating, long-term effects.The course wffl address the 
following, the nature of terrorism and its many forms, policies and 
programs to reduce the risk that terrorism presents to society, and 
policies and programs to manage terrorist events, and how to man- 
age the consequences of terrorist violence. 

CEPM 105 Introduction to Mitigation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.The course is designed to provide an under- 
standing of the principles and practice of hazard mitigation in the 
United States at the local, state, regional, and federal levels of gover- 
nance, emphasizing the importance of avoiding or preventing future 
and recurring losses of life and damage to pubic and private proper- 
ty^ further objective is to familiarize students with the tools, tech- 
niques, resources, programs, intergovernmental relationships, and 
broader social context involved in planning for and implementing 
hazard mitigation. _ 87 



CEPM 106 Disaster Response and Recovery 3 Credits 
Operations 

Prerequisites: None.This course addresses future approaches to 
reducing damage from natural hazards, aimed at breaking the 
vicious cycle of disaster/rebuilding/disaster through pre-disaster 
hazard mitigation programs and policies.These proactive approach- 
es seek to stem the tide of losses from repetitive damage incurred 
by development within known hazard areas, such as floodplains, 
storm surge areas, and earthquake fault zones.We will also look at 
disaster policy that focus on preparing for an imminent disaster, 
through evacuation and temporary property protection; responding 
to a disaster that has occurred, through search and rescue and debris 
clearance; and recovering from a past disaster, through rebuilding 
damaged structures. 

CEPM 1 07 Exercise Program Design, 3 Credits 

Planning and Evaluation 

Prerequisites: None.This course is designed to introduce you to the 
fundamentals of exercise design and to prepare you to design and 
conduct a small functional exercise.The concept of the Exercise 
Design Course is based on one important premise:emergency exer- 
cises are worth the effort.Experience and data show that exercises 
are a practical, efficient, and cost-effective way for a community to 
prepare for disasters.lt includes: the value of conducting exercises, 
the components of a comprehensive exercise program, and the exer- 
cise development process-development tasks, organization of the 
design team, exercise documentation, and the steps in designing an 
exercise.The course will also cover the purpose, characteristics, and 
requirements of three main types of exercises, table top, functional, 
and full scale exercises and the evaluation of the exercise. 

CEPM 21 Understanding and Combating 3 Credits 
Terrorism 

Prerequisites: None.This course is designed to introduce the hazards 
of terrorism, the history and nature of terrorism.The response to ter- 
rorism and the duties and functions of the emergency manager will 
be explored.The course will also look at current U.S.efforts of home- 
land security and its impacts on the field of emergency manage- 
ment. We will discuss the basic aspects of nuclear, chemical and bio- 
logical terrorism. 

CEPM 21 2 Homeland Security Intelligence 3 Credits 
Operations and Tactical Skills 

Prerequisites: None.This course is designed to explore the role of 
intelligence and law enforcement, collection methods, cycle.man- 
agement operations, classification, production and analysis, assess- 
ment of targets and threat vulnerability, source development and 
adjudication as it relates to Homeland Security and Terrorism. 



88 



CEPM 213 Weapons of Mass Destruction 3 Credits 

and Hazardous Materials 

Prerequisites: None. Unique features of terrorist attacks include 
psychogenic casualties, significant risk to responding personnel, 
multiple jurisdictions and the criminal nature of the event.This 
course will prepare the emergency manager to better understand 
the threat created by terrorism and weapons of mass destruction. 
The successful emergency manager must recognize the threat of 
terrorism and WMD and be able to mitigate and prepare for such 
disasters to bring order to potential chaos. We will also look at vari- 
ous types of biohazards. 

CEPM 21 4 Understanding the Incident 3 Credits 

Command System 

Prerequisites: None.This class will emphasize command and control 
of major emergencies operations at an advanced level, linking oper- 
ations and safety.Areas of study include: Incident Management 
System.Pre-incident planning, Size up, command Systems, Sectoring 
Functions, Staging, Safety Officer, Command Post, Communications, 
News Media, Computer Aided Resources. We will utilize simulated 
incidents, requiring the applications of appropriate solutions to 
resolve the incident. 

CEPM 215 Contingency Planning and 3 Credits 

Incident Command 

Prerequisites: None.This course is designed to teach the students 
how to develop an emergency response contingency plan for a facil- 
ity or community. Preparedness includes analyzing the hazards, 
writing and implementing the contingency plans, training employ- 
ees for an emergency, and evaluating the effectiveness of the con- 
tingency plan. 

CEPM 216 Public Information Officer Course 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.The Public Information Officers Course is aimed 
at the new or less experienced PIO including those individuals who 
have function as a secondary responsibility. Course topics include an 
overview of the job of the PIO, understanding the media, interview 
techniques, writing a news release and conducting public awareness 
campaigns.Additional application of public information skills to a 
major emergency or disaster situation will be discussed.This is 
accomplished with a series of lecture presentations and exercises 
over the course. 

CEPM 257 Preparadness Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.This course is designed to address recently iden- 
tified current events, skills, knowledge and behaviors pertinent to 
the technology or occupation and relevant to the professional devel- 
opment of the student.The student will demonstrate an under- 
standing of the vocabulary, terminology and appropriate planning/ 
administrative controls specific to the field. 



CHEM 061 Basic Chemistry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a gradeT'or better in ENGL 032 and MATH 
050. Provides students with an introduction to chemistry basics. 
Provides instruction for students with little or no recent chemistry 
background, especially those desiring to continue in more advanced 
chemistry courses or other science courses.lncludes lab. 

CHEM 101 Introductory Chemistry I 

Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 050.An introductory course that includes the science of 
chemistry and measurement, atomic theory and the periodic table, 
chemical bonding, equation writing and balancing, stoichiometry, 
and gases. Includes lab. 

CHEM 102 Introductory Chemistry II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHEM lOl.includes liquids and solids, solutions and 

solution concentrations, acids and bases, equilibrium, nuclear chem- 
istry, and organic and biochemistry.lncludes lab. 

CHEM 105 General Chemistry I Transfer IN 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 1 11 and demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 
025 and ENGL 032.Corequisite:MATH 1 32 or MATH 1 33 or MATH 
136.The first in a series of two introductory courses designed to cover 
general chemistry including measurement, atoms, molecules and 
ions, stoichiometry, chemical reactions, solids, liquids, and gases ther- 
mochemistry, atomic structure, and molecular bonding.lncludes lab. 

CHEM 106 General Chemistry II Transfer IN 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHEM 105 and MATH 132 or MATH 133 or MATH 
1 36.The second in a series of two introductory courses designed to 
cover general chemistry including kinetics, equilibria, acid/ base 
chemistry, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, 
organic chemistry and descriptive inorganic chemistry.lncludes lab. 

CHEM 111 Chemistry I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 1 1 1 and demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 
025 and ENGL 032.An introductory course that includes the science of 
chemistry and measurement, atomic theory and the periodic table, 
chemical bonding, stoichiometry, liquids and solids, gases and the 
ideal gas law, solutions, and acids and bases. Includes lab. 

CHEM 112 Chemistry II 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHEM 111 or CHEM 101. Further explores concepts of 
equilibrium. Includes chemistry of metals and nonmetals, environ- 
mental chemistry, nuclear chemistry, organic and biochemistry. 
Includes lab. 



CHEM 113 Introductory Organic Transfer IN 3 Credits 
and Biochemistry 

Prerequisites: CHEM 101 or CHEM 111. The basic principles of organ- 
ic and biochemistry are discussed.This will include the basic con- 
cepts of nomenclature and reaction equations that are necessary for 
understanding biochemistry.The ability to name and draw chemical 
structures and to write reactions for organic equations will be evalu- 
ated. Elements of biochemistry will include the basic analysis of bio- 
chemical structures and the reactions involved in the metabolic 
processes. Includes lab. 

CHEM 204 Lectures in Organic Chemistry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHEM 106.A one-semester survey course designed to 
introduce organic chemistry including nomenclature, spectroscopy, 
stereochemistry, reactions, and mechanisms. 

CHEM 21 1 0rganic Chemistry I 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHEM 106.The first in a series of two courses 
designed to cover organic chemistry including the properties, syn- 
theses, and reactivity of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The 
course includes an introduction to organic chemistry lab techniques 
covering the synthesis, purification, and characterization of organic 
compounds. Includes lab. 

CHEM 212 Organic Chemistry II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHEM 21 1. The second in a series of two courses 
designed to cover an understanding of organic chemistry including 
the properties, syntheses, and reactivity of aliphatic and aromatic 
compounds, polyfunctional natural products such as carbohydrates, 
and peptides.The course includes various organic chemistry lab 
techniques covering the synthesis, purification, and characterization 
of organic compounds.lncludes lab. 

CHMT 101 Industrial Laboratory Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroductory course dealing with basic skills 
needed in the industrial laboratory such as basic lab safety, identifi- 
cation, care and operation of basic laboratory equipment including 
pH meters, spectrophotometers, glassware, and definition and 
preparation of reagents.lncludes laboratory exercises in the use of 
selected equipment.lncludes lab. 

CHMT 1 70 Success in Science 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: :None.lntroductory course covering the basics of the 
chemical process industry including career paths, business compo- 
nents and ethical standards.Scientific literature searches and safety 
issues are discussed. 

CHMT 201 Industrial Instrumentation 

and Techniques I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHMT 101 and CHEM lOI.Addresses theoretical 



aspects of industrial laboratory instrumentation, including gas and 
liquid chromatography (GC and LC), high performance liquid chro- 
matography (HPLC), infra-red (IR) spectrophotometry and atomic 
absorption (AA). Presents theories and laws that govern the way 
instruments operate. Includes student experimentation on various 
analytical instruments. Includes lab. 

CHMT 202 Industrial Instrumentation 3 Credits 

and Techniques II 

Prerequisites: CHMT 201 .Continues the theoretical study of CHMT 
201 by addressing industrial applications of laboratory instrumenta- 
tion, including gas and liquid chromatography (GC and LC), high 
performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), infra-red (IR) spec- 
trophotometry and atomic absorption (AA).Presents automation 
techniques, including sampling,data collection and analysis.Covers 
the laws that govern the way instruments operate.lncludes student 
experimentation on various analytical instruments.lncludes lab. 

CHMT 204 Presentation of Technical Issues 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Focuses on solving prob- 
lems in chemical technology settings including the analysis of the 
problem, generation of creative solutions and effective presentation 
of proposed solutions.lncludes lab. 

CHMT 207 Food, Drugs and Polymers 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHEM 102 and CHMT 101.A survey course designed 
for advanced students, this course covers the basics of Food Science, 
Polymer Science and Pharmaceutics. Includes lab. 

CHMT 210 Quantitative Analysis 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHEM 101 and CHEM 102.lnvestigat.es techniques for 
quantitative analysis of samples including their applications in 
industrial settings.lncludes techniques such as gravimetric analysis, 
neutralization, oxidation-reduction titrations, potentiometric meas- 
urements and complexing titrations.lncludes lab. 

CHMT 270 Professional Development 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: CHMT 101. Designed to be taken the semester before 
students begin looking for a job.lts purpose is to help students with 
the professional skills required in scientific industries. 

CHMT 280 Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor Approval.Students work at a job site that is 
specifically related to his/her career objectives.Provides extensive 
job experience while earning credit towards an associate 
degree.Students will also participate in a once a week seminar. 

CIMG 1 02 Introduction to Robotics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Corequisite:TEC 104.lntroduces students to 
robotics and automated systems and their operating characteris- 
tics.Covers robotics principles of operation and work envelopes. 



Teaches coordinate systems and how hydrauficpneumatic and 
electromechanical systems function together as a system Covers 
servo and non-servo controls, system capabilities and fenrutions 
and safety. 

CIMG 202 Work Cell Design and Integration 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: CIMG 102.An advanced course which provides instruc- 
tion in selecting equipment, writing specifications, designing fix- 
tures and interconnects, integrating systems.providing interfaces 
and making the assigned systems operational. 

CIMG 203 Automation Electronics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 205.lnterface Programmable Controlers (PLCs) 
with analog I/O devices.Tune Proportional Integral Derivative (PD) 
loops. Analyze 4 -20 mA current circuitry of a thermal process. 
Achieve process control with PLC analog input/output controls using 
a human machine interface.Program on-line and off-fine via PLC 
networking. 

CIMG 205 Automated Manufacturing Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIMG 202 and CIMG 203.Covers basic principles and 
applications for planning and controlling production operations and 
improvement programs.lncludes system characteristics and solu- 
tions for production process and service operation problems: meth- 
ods analysis: cost estimating; facilities planning, tooling and services 
acquisition and maintenance; production, project and program 
scheduling; materials and inventory management; safety and loss 
prevention; decision-making tools and evaluation of alternatives. 

CINS 074 Computer Literacy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides a general survey of computer basics. 
Includes the survey and analysis of microcomputer components, 
compares and contrasts computer applications, investigates soft- 
ware options, expose students to hardware peripherals and intro- 
duces students to Windows and office applications. 

CINS 100 Using Windows Environment 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the^basic concepts of Windows and 
Windows-based applications.The student will acquire the necessary 
concepts for accomplishing the most commonly used tasks, such as 
creating folders, copying, deleting and moving files from one folder 
to another or from a folder to an auxiliary storage merfium.The stu- 
dent will also be introduced to Windows applets/The course includes 
Internet and e-mail operations and an introduction to simple word 
processing and spreadsheet applications. 

CINS 101 Introduction to Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Microcomputers 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C or better in ENGL 031. 
Introduces the physical components and operation of microcomput- 



59 



90 



ers. Focuses on computer literacy and provides hands-on training in 
four areas of microcomputer application software:word processing, 
electronic spreadsheets, database management and presentation 
software. Use of a professional business integrated applications 
package is emphasized. 

CINS 102 Information Systems Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 031 . 
Introduces information processing and programming with emphasis 
on hands-on computer experience.Examines the role of information 
processing in an organization induding:information processing 
applications, computer hardware and software, internal data repre- 
sentation, stored program concepts, systems and programming 
design.flowcharting.and data communications.Review the history 
of computers, related computer careers, the social impact of com- 
puters, and computer security. 

CINS 107 Microcomputer Programming 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: CINS 102.Coreguisite:CINS113.lntroduces a struc- 
tured microcomputer language.Concepts in input/output com- 
mands, arithmetic expressions, conditional control, iteration tech- 
niques and subroutines will be stressed.Concepts will be incorporat- 
ed into the application of solving business problems. 

CINS 1 1 1 Computer Business Applications 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: CINS 125 and COMM 101 or CINS 125 and COMM 102. 
Coreguisites:CINS 203.Requires students to apply business, micro- 
computer and communication skills within business applications. 
Emphasizes application of several forms of computerized informa- 
tion processing including data processing.word processing, spread- 
sheets, graphics and communications.Analyzes the effects of 
automation on the office worker,management, and the work envi- 
ronment, and reguires written and oral presentations. 

CINS 112 Introduction to Simulation and 3 Credits 
Game Development 

Prerequisites: CINS 1 13. Provides a*basic understanding of the fun- 
damentals of creating simulation and game design and program- 
ming. Discussions will include use for simulations and game pro- 
gramming, using game libraries, and interfaces used in program- 
ming.This course focuses on 2D simulations and games which 
include many real-time and turn-based strategy games. 

CINS 113 Logic, Design and Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 031. 
Introduces the structured techniques necessary for efficient solution 
of business-related computer programming logic problems and cod- 
ing solutions into a high-level language. Includes program flow- 
charting, pseudocoding, and hierarchy charts as a means of solving 



these problems. The course covers creating file layouts, print charts, 
program narratives, user documentation, and system flowcharts for 
business problems. Reviews algorithm development, flowcharting, 
input/output techniques, looping, modules, selection structures, file 
handling, object-oriented programming, menu systems and graphi- 
cal user interfaces. Offers students an opportunity to apply skills in a 
laboratory environment. 

CINS 114 Principles of Management 

Information Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 102 and BUSN 101. Examines the functions and 
operations required to manage information for business decisions. 
Focuses on the use of various information technologies and tools 
that support transaction processing, decision-making and strategic 
planning.The diverse information needs of different organizations 
within a business will be used as examples of practical applications 
of MIS technology. 

CINS 118 Introduction to COBOL 

Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Provides an introduction to 
COBOL (Common Business Oriented Language) with major emphasis 
on developing structured programming skills.Develops proficiency 
in applying the programming development cycle to elementary 
business problems. 

CINS 121 C/C++/C# Programming 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: CINS 1 13. Provides a basic understanding of the fun- 
damentals of procedural program development using structured, 
modular concepts.Emphasizes logical program design involving 
userdefined functions and standard structure elements. Discussions 
will include the role of data types, variables, structures, addressable 
memory locations, arrays and pointers.Data file access methods are 
also presented. 

CINS 122 RPG Programming Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 102 and CINS 11 3. Provides a general introduc- 
tion to the RPG programming language with emphasis on hands-on 
programming experience.Presents the most important features of 
the RPG language from input/output processing to applications 
reguiring handling.lntroduces language concepts in class 
lecture.lncludes programming lab assignments. 

CINS 123 Assembler Language Programming 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: CINS 102 and CINS 1 B.Gives students a basic under- 
standing of the assembler process using IBM mainframe computers. 
Stresses the importance of byte-wise manipulation of data fields 
when using low-level languages.Emphasizes the actual workings of 
a computer during the execution of a computer program.Discusses 
the role of data types, EBCDIC format of data storage and address- 
able memory locations. 



CINS 124 Pascal Programming 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: CINS 1 1 3.Provides a basic understanding of the struc- 
tured programming process necessary for successful Pascal pro- 
gramming. Emphasizes top-down program design and modularity 
using Pascal procedures, functions and independent subprograms. 
Discuss simple and advanced data types and program control aids, 
algorithm development and program debugging.Provides students 
with a fundamental understanding of good programming technique 
and a basic knowledge of Pascal syntax and structure. 

CINS 125 Database Design and Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated computer proficiency through appropri- 
ate assessment or successful completion of CINS 101 .Introduces pro- 
gram applications in a database environment and includes discussion 
of data structures; indexed and direct file organizations; data models, 
including hierarchical, network, and relational; storage devices.data 
administration and analysis; design and implementation.Using data- 
base software, students have hands-on experience creating, modify- 
ing, retrieving and reporting from databases. Students may also 
develop a business application using a database language. 

CINS426 Shell Command Language for 3 Credits 

Programmers 

Prereguisites: CINT 109 or CINT 201 .Teaches students how to write, 
test and debug shell procedures on a computer utilizing a UNIX 
operating system. Presents the shell and how it works, shell process- 
es, variables, keyword and positional parameters, control constructs, 
special substitutions, pipelines, debugging aids, error/interrupt pro- 
cessing and shell command line.Offers students the opportunity to 
apply skills in a laboratory environment. 

CINS 127 Midrange/Mainframe Database 3 Credits 
Management Systems 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated computer proficiency through appro- 
priate assessment or successful completion of CINS 101 and CINS 
1 02. Presents an overview of relational database models with 
emphasis on midrange /mainframe management systems (DBMS). 
Using a variety of database tools, the student receives practical 
experience in creating, modifying, retrieving and reporting from 
databases. Students also develop business applications using the 
database language. 

CINS 130 Seminar I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Discusses topic of current 
interest in computerized information management with emphasis 
on applications of information management skills during lab time. 
Identifies and offers various seminar topics each term under this 
course number. 

CINS 131 Structured Query Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 125 or CINS 127.SQL is now a dominant Ian- 



guage used in mainframe, mini, and microcomputer databases 
(Access, dBASE, paradox, DB2, FoxPro.Oracle, SQL Server, and Btrieve) 
by diverse groups such as home computer owners, small businesses, 
large organizations, and programmers.lt acts as a bridge between 
the user, the database management system, the data tables and 
transactions involving all three. 

CINS 132 Graphical User Interface: Windows 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides a foundation of 
fundamental concepts in the use of GUI - type software.Explores 
the Windows operating system, accessories, and various operating 
system applications.Develops proficiency with Windows operations 
including customizing the environment, integrating operating sys- 
tems applications, and managing files. 

CINS 136 Introduction to Java Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 1 13. Provides a basic understanding of the fun- 
damental concepts involved when using a member of a Java pro- 
gramming development language.The emphasis is on logical pro- 
gram design using a modular approach involving task oriented pro- 
gram functions.Java allows the design of an Internet user inter- 
face.The application is built by selecting forms and controls, assign- 
ing properties and writing code. 

CINS 137 Visual Basic Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 113.A basic understanding of the fundamental 
concepts involved when using a member of a Windows program- 
ming development language.The emphasis is on logical program 
design using a modular approach involving task oriented program 
functions. Visual Basic applications are built by selecting forms and 
controls, assigning properties, and writing code. 

CINS 1 39 Introduction to Computer Forensics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 101 and CINT 106. Presents an overview of com- 
puter forensics used in corporate and criminal investigations. Digital 
forensics professionals work both in computer network security and 
in the investigation of crimes involving the use of computers and 
networks. This course presents methods and software used to prop- 
erly conduct a computer forensics investigation. 

CINS 1 51 Integrated Business Software 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated computer proficiency through appro- 
priate assessment or successful completion of CIS 101 .Presents 
knowledge of integrated microcomputer software concepts. 
Students design a complete business system utilizing all parts of an 
integrated microcomputer software package which can share the 
same data and manipulate it.lncludes use of word processing, elec- 
tronic spreadsheets, graphics,databases and command languages. 

CINS 1 57 Web Site Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 102.There is a combination of technical and 
non-technical skills required in those interested in Web site develop- 
ment. The range of skills includes those required for a designer, a 



developer, and an administrator. This course provides a basic under- 
standing of the essential Web development skills and business prac- 
tices that directly relate to Internet technologies used in Web site 
development.This course provides the basic knowledge required to 
sit for the CIW Site Development Foundations certification exam. 

CINS 203 Systems Analysis and Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Minimum of 21 CINS credits successfully completed.ln 
this course the student will learn methodologies pertinent to the 
assessment, design and implementation of business computer infor- 
mation systems. 

CINS 205 Database Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 125.lntroduces program applications in a data- 
base environment with emphasis on loading,modifying, querying 
the database by means of a host language.Discusses data structures; 
indexed and direct file organizations; models of data, including hier- 
archical, network and relational; storage philosophies,data adminis- 
tration and analysis; design; and implementation. 

CINS 206 Project Development with 3 Credits 

High-Level Tools 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Analyzes established and 
evolving methodologies for the development of business-oriented 
computer information systems.Develops competencies in tech- 
niques that apply modern software tools to generate applications 
directly, without requiring detailed and highly technical program 
writing efforts. 

CINS 215 Field Study 1-4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.A field study class is comparable to on-the-job 
training activities directly related to the CIS program of study. This 
must be approved by the program chair and the student must be in 
his/her last semester.A student must have a GPA of 3.0 to apply for 
this study position. 

CINS 218 Advanced COBOL Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 11 8.Continues topic introduced in CIS 104 with 
more logically complex business problems.Develops a higher level of 
COBOL proficiency as well as greater familiarity with debugging 
techniques. Uses the structured approach through class instruction 
and laboratory experience. 

CINS 221 Advanced C/C++/C# Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 212.Continues those topics introduced in C 
Language Programming with emphasis on array processing, 
advanced debugging techniques, dynamic memory allocation, and 
classes. Introduces Windows programming in C++ using MFC. 
Provides the opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environ- 
ment.Students will be introduced to Object Oriented Design and 
Programming concepts using C++ language features.Differences 
between C++ and classical C programming will be addressed. 



CINS 222 Advanced RPG Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 122.0ffers advanced study in the use of RPG 
compiler language in solving business proWems.Focuses on die Be 
processing methods and a working knowledge of advanced features 

and techniques through laboratory experience. 

CINS 225 Advanced Database Management 3 Credits 
Systems 

Prerequisites: CINS 201 or CINS 207Emphasizes the development of 
advanced applications in database management 

CINS 227 Topics in Information Management 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: CINS IRDiscusses topics of current interest in infor- 
mation management.lncludes examples from production, opera- 
tions, accounting, finance, marketing, sales and human resources. 
Focuses on special interest projects. Utilizes held trips,guest speak- 
ers, audio-visual activities and semina5. 

CINS 230 Seminar II 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor ApprovaLDiscusses topics of current 
interest in computerized information management with emphasis 
on applications of information management skills during lab time. 
Identifies and offers various seminar topic each term under this 
course number. 

CINS 236 Advanced Java Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 136.Continues those topics introduced in OS 136 
with emphasis on arrays.graphics, inheritance, the Abstract 
Windows Toolkit (AWT), using layout managers, and other various 
Java tools and concepts.Provides the opportunity to apply sHb in a 
laboratory environment. 

CINS 237 Advanced visual Basic Programming 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: CINS 137.Continues those topics introduced in OS 
232. The emphasis is on data file design, data handOnc^database 
access, ActiveX, menus, variable arrays, and Visual BasicStudenls wfl 
use advanced features to increase their level of proficiency in devel- 
oping Visual Basic applications. 

CINS 238 Advanced Simulation and Game 3 Credits 
Development 

Prerequisites: CINS 1 1 2.lndudes in-depth discussions on creating 2D 
and 3D simulations and games using game libraries, timers, inter- 
rupt handlers, and multi-threading. 

CINS 239 Advanced Computer Forensic 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 139. Presents a continuation of the concepts 
learned in CINS 139, Introduction to Computer Forensics. Incidents 
of computers being used in the commission of crimes is increasing, 
making this a particularly high-demand field. This course presents 
advanced methods to properly conduct a computer forensics insti- 
gation for both criminal and corporate cases. 



H 



CINS 253 Graphic Image Lab 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 102.A fundamental course that introduces stu- 
dents to computer design graphic software.The focus of the course 
is on understanding basic computer graphics terminology, the mas- 
tering of fundamental photo editing and basic design skills and 
development of efficient working styles. 

CINS 257 Advanced Web Site Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 157.There is a combination of technical and 
non-technical skills required for those interested in Web site devel- 
opment. The range of skills includes those required for a designer, a 
developer, and an administrator. This course provides a basic under- 
standing of the essential Web designer skills including a review of 
site development essentials, an in-depth analysis of Web design ele- 
ments, basic Web technologies, and advanced Web technologies. 
This course provides the basic knowledge required to sit for the CIW 
Site Designer certification exam. 

CINS 258 Web Applications Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: CINS 157.This course will provide a basic understand- 
ing of the fundamental concepts involved when designing applica- 
tions with a server-side programming language and an SQL data- 
base. There is an emphasis on logical program design using a modu- 
lar approach involving task oriented program functions. Students 
will receive hands-on experience creating, modifying, retrieving and 
reporting from databases. Students will also develop a business 
application using a Web-oriented programming language and SQL. 

CINS 259 Web Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 157.CINT 121.CINT 201.Gives the basics covered 
in the CIW Server Administrator Certification Exam.Students will 
learn to configure and manage corporate Internet and intranet 
infrastructure, monitor and tune Web, FTRnews and mail servers 
and configure and deploy e-business solutions servers for midsize to 
large businesses. 

CINS 279 Capstone Course 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Prepares the student for 
entry into the Information world.Reviews procedures for interview- 
ing, team participation, and ethical and productive job perform- 
ance. Provides for taking program outcomes assessments. 

CINS 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides students with 
the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to 
their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earn- 
ing credit toward an associate degree. Fourth semester standing 
and a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better is recommended for 
Internship students. 

CINT 105 Operating Systems 3 Credits 

nj Prerequisites: Demonstrated computer proficiency through appro- 



priate assessment or successful completion of CINS 101 .Studies of 
computer operating systems, purposes, structure and various func- 
tions. Provides general understanding of how comprehensive sets of 
language translators and service programs, operating under super- 
visory coordination of an integrated control program, form the total 
operating systems of a computer. 

CINT 106 Microcomputer Operating Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated computer proficiency through appropri- 
ate assessment or successful completion of ENGL 031 .Introduces the 
organization, structure, and functions of an operating system for a 
microcomputer.Presents the student with operating system con- 
cepts such as commands, error messages, interrupts, function calls, 
device drivers, structure, files and organization.lncorporates con- 
cepts into practical applications. 

CINT 109 UNIX Operating Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 106.Studies the UNIX operating System and its 
use as a time-sharing operating system.lncludes basic UNIX com- 
mands, use of the visual editor, the UNIX directory structure and file 
management with SHELL commands.Offers opportunities to apply 
skills and knowledge in a laboratory environment. 

CINT 110 Hardware and Software 

Troubleshooting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 106.Presents an in-depth analysis of the compo- 
nents of a computer system and their relationship to each other. 
Includes concepts of parallel and serial connectivity, installation and 
maintenance of software, peripheral devices, interface cards, and 
device drivers.The student will analyze realistic hardware/software 
problems encountered in the workplace and learn techniques and 
procedures to implement solutions. 

CI NT 1 20 Data Communications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 102.lntroducesthe evolution of telecommunica- 
tions and its affect on data communication systems.Topics covered 
will include the basic components of a communications system, a 
study of electrical signals used to represent data, the importance of 
error control when transmitting information, and the functions of 
network systems and their role in the communication of informa- 
tion.Students will also have an opportunity to explore data commu- 
nications topics through research. 

CINT 121 Network Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 106.A study of local area networks, their topolo- 
gies and their functions and provides a general understanding of 
the basic LAN protocols.Topics covered include:fundamental con- 
cepts and terminology, the IEEE/ISO Logical Link Control standard, 
construction of a LAN, and LAN data links for internet works. 



> CINT 125 Windows Client Operating System 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 120 or CINT 121.Provides instruction to demon- 
strate the ability to implement, administer, and troubleshoot infor- 
mation systems that incorporate Microsoft Windows.This course is 
designed to follow a preparation path towards the appropriate 
Microsoft certification series. 

CINT 135 Novell Administration I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 121.lntroduces the organization, structure, func- 
tions, and administration of a network operating system.This course is 
designed to train the student in administration of a local area net- 
work. Presents network operating system concepts such as file and 
shared printing.data protection, application installation, and electronic 
messaging.Concepts will be incorporated into practical applications. 

CINT 136 Novell Advanced Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 135.Provides students.with the knowledge and 
skills needed to design, configure, and administer a complex net- 
work. The course is designed to provide students with an advanced 
skill set. 

CINT 140 Cisco Discovery: Networking for 4 Credits 
Home and Small Businesses 

Prerequisite: CINT Program Advisor Approval.The goal of this course 
is to introduce you to fundamental networking concepts and tech- 
nologies. This course provides a hands-on introduction to network- 
ing and the Internet using tools and hardware commonly found in 
the home and small business environment. These online materials 
will assist you in developing the skills necessary to plan and imple- 
ment small networks across a range of applications. This course pre- 
pares you with the skills needed to obtain entry-level Home 
Network Installer jobs. It also prepares you for some of the skills 
needed for Network Technician, Computer Technician, Cable Installer, 
and Help Desk Technician jobs. 

CINT 141 Cisco Discovery: Working at a 4 Credits 

Small-to-Medium Business or ISP 

Prerequisite: CINT 140 or CINT Program Advisor Approval.The goal of 
this course is to assist students in developing the skills necessary to 
provide customer support to users of small-to-medium-sized net- 
works and across a range of applications. The course provides an 
introduction to routing and remote access, addressing and network 
services. It will also familiarize students with servers providing email 
services, web space, and Authenticated Access.This course prepares 
students with the skills required for entry-level Help Desk Technician 
and entry-level Network Tethnician jobs. 

CINT 160 Cisco Exploration: Network 4 Credits 

Fundamentals 

Prerequisite: CINT Program Advisor Approval.The focus of this course 
is on learning the fundamentals of networking. In this course, stu- 



dents learn both the practical and conceptual skills that build the 
foundation for understanding basic networking. Human versus net- 
work communication are compared, and the parallels between 
them are presented. Students are introduced to the two major mod- 
els used to plan and implement networks: OSI and TCP/IP. The OSI 
and TCP/IP functions and services are examined in detail. Various 
network devices, network addressing schemes and the types of 
media used to carry data across the network are also presented. 

CINT 161 Cisco Exploration: Routing 4 Credits 

Protocols and Concepts 

Prerequisite: CINT 160 or CINT Program Advisor Approval.The pri- 
mary focus of this course is on routing and routing protocols. The 
goal is to develop an understanding of how a router learns about 
remote networks and determines the best path to those networks. 
This course includes both static routing, and dynamic routing proto- 
cols. By examining multiple routing protocols, students will gain a 
better understanding of each of the individual routing protocols and 
a better perspective of routing in general. Developing an under- 
standing of routing concepts is critical for implementing, verifying, 
and troubleshooting routing operations. 

CINT 170 Seminar I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Discusses topics of current 
interest in computerized information management with emphasis 
on applications of information management skills during lab time. 
Identifies and offers various seminar topics each term under this 
course number. 

CINT 1 71 Cisco Network Security 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. The Fundamentals of Network Security course 
focuses on the overall security process based on a security policy 
with an emphasis on hands-on skills in the areas of secure perimeter, 
secure connectivity, security management, identity services, and 
intrusion detection.This course prepares students to take the Cisco 
642-502 SNRS (Securing Networks with Cisco Routers and Switches) 
and the Cisco 642-522 SNPA (Securing Networks with PIX and ASA) 
Exams. 

CINT 201 Advanced Operating Systems: LINUX 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 106,Studies advanced topics in operating sys- 
tems as they apply to networking applications.Provides data relat- 
ing to the different types of operating systems including worksta- 
tion and server. This course will provide the necessary information in 
preparation for the CompTia Linux-f- Certification Exam. . 

CINT 210 PC Technology Essentials 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 1 06. Includes identification of basic terms, con- 
cepts and functions of system modules, and basic procedures for 
adding and removing field replaceable units. Reviews of portable 
system components, identification of system resources, and other 



detailed information concerning PC architecture, hardware and 
standards. Includes identification of basic terms, concepts and func- 
tion of operating systems in microcomputers and basic procedures 
for installation, upgrade and utilization. Reviews of basic concepts 
and procedures for creating, viewing, and managing files, using utili- 
ty programs and understanding normal operation and symptoms 
relating to common problems. 

CINT 211 IT Technician 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 210. Includes the understanding of more 
advanced PC terminology, concepts, functions of system modules, 
and more complex procedures for troubleshooting issues regarding 
PCs. Includes complete analysis of portable system components, an 
indepth study of system resources, and other more detailed infor- 
mation concerning PC architecture, hardware, software, and stan- 
dards. Includes a more sophisticated study of advanced terminology, 
concepts and functions of systems software in microcomputers and 
basic procedures for installation, upgrade and utilization. Reviews of 
more complex concepts and procedures for the administration of 
files using utility programs and understanding normal operation 
and symptoms relating to common troubleshooting issues with sys- 
tems software. 

CINT 212 Application User Support and 3 Credits 

Troubleshooting 

Prerequisites: CINT210.Through lectures, discussion, demonstra- 
tions, textbook exercises, and classroom labs students will learn the 
skills and knowledge necessary to support end users with their 
operating systems and software applications. The course will con- 
tain key concepts of end user and computer management including 
configuring and troubleshooting. The student will learn techniques 
in resolving issues with usability and customization of the operating 
system and applications. 

CINT 21 3 Hardware Support and 3 Credits 

Troubleshooting 

Prerequisites: CINT 210 and CINT 21 1. The student will learn through 
lectures, discussions, demonstrations, textbook exercises, and class- 
room labs the skills and knowledge necessary to support end users 
who use microcomputers in a corporate, small business, or home 
environment. The course will focus on key concepts of computer 
management including installing and updating operating systems, 
support local users and groups, manage hardware, and configure file 
and folder access. The student will learn techniques in resolving 
issues with hardware and operating systems, printers, and network 
connectivity. 

CINT 214 Help Desk Tools and Technologies 3 Credits 

Perquisites: CINT 210. The student will study a broad range of topics 
that user support specialists need when working in the support 



industry. The student will learn troubleshooting and problem sow- 
ing in working with end users. 

CINT 217 Preventative Maintenance and 3 Credits 
Data Recovery 

Prerequisites: CINT 201 and CINT 225. Through lectures, discussion, 
demonstrations, textbook exercises, and classroom labs students wi 
learn the skills and knowledge necessary to conduct maintenance 
on personal computers. This course will contain key concepts on 
computer management of preventative maintenance and trou- 
bleshooting of hardware and software. The student wi team tech- 
niques of data recovery due to equipment failure, disaster, or end 
user mismanagement. 

CINT 220 Network Server Technologies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 120 or CINT 121.A study of network servers, par- 
ticularly the hardware and software necessary to efficiently main- 
tain a modern network.This course focuses on installation, configu- 
ration, administration, and troubleshooting of network serversJn 
addition it deals with site preparation, performance monitoring, and 
disaster recovery.The course provides support and guidance for 
preparation of the student to take the Server+ certification exam, a 
COMPTIA vendor neutral test which an apply to Microsoft's MCSA 
or stand on its own merit.This course contains elements above bask 
hardware fundamentals of a standard PC and so the certification is 
considered more advanced than the A+.ln addition this course deals 
with Industry Standard Server Architecture (I5SA) issues, such as 
RAID, SCSI, multiple CPUs, SANs and other networking server issues. 

CINT 225 Windows Network Operating 3 Credits 

Systems 

Prerequisites: CIST 120 or CINT 121. Provides instruction to demon- 
strate the ability to implement, administer, and troubteshoot infor- 
mation systems that incorporate Microsoft Windows Server.This 
course is designed to follow a preparation path towards the appro- 
priate Microsoft certification series. 

CINT 226 Implementing and Administering 3 Credits 
a Windows Network Infrastructure 
Prerequisites: CINT 125 or CINT 225.Provides instruction to demon- 
strate the ability to install.manage.monitor, configure, and tnou- 
bleshoot DNS.DHCRRemote Access, Network Protocols, IP Routing, 
andWINSina Windows network infrastnjcture.ln addition, this 
course builds the skills required to manage.monitor, and trou- 
bleshoot Network Address Translation and Certificate Servkes.This 
course is designed to follow a preparation path towards the appro- 
priate Microsoft certification series. 



B 



CINT 227 Managing a Windows Network 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 125 or CINT 225. Provides instruction to demon- 
strate the ability to administer, support, and troubleshoot informa- 
tion systems that incorporate Microsoft Windows.This course is 
designed to follow a preparation path towards the appropriate 
Microsoft certification series. 

CINT 228 Administering Windows Directory 

Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 225. Provides instruction to demonstrate the 
ability to install, configure, and troubleshoot the Windows Active 
Directory™ components, DNS for Active Directory, and Active 
Directory security solutions.ln addition, this test measures the skills 
required to manage, monitor, and optimize the desktop environ- 
ment by using Group Policy.This course is designed to follow a 
preparation path towards the Microsoft exam 70-217:lmplementing 
and Administering a Microsoft Windows 2000 Directory Services 
Infrastructure. 

CINT 235 Networking Technology Concepts 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 121. Provides students with an excellent founda- 
tion upon which to build their network training.The course covers 
the basics of computer networking, including terms and concepts. 
Networking technology — how it works, and why it works - is 
made clear in this course, where concepts like contemporary net- 
work services, transmission media, and protocols are 
explained.Students learn how protocols are used in networking 
implementations from many vendors, especially those most com- 
mon in today's LANs and WANs. 

CINT 236 Novell Hardware Service and 3 Credits 

Support 

Prerequisites: CINT 1 35. Focuses on the prevention, diagnosis, and 
resolution of hardware-related problems encountered when work- 
ing with NetWare.While the course assumes the use of NetWare, the 
skills learned will have a great deal of practical value to network 
administrators as they optimize and maintain systems while using 
many other Novell products.The course explores a number of 
research tools that will assist the network administrator in acquiring 
the information needed to solve "real-world"problems.lt includes 
extensive hands-on exercises, which make up approximately 60% of 
all class time.The course materials are designed to provide a contin- 
uing reference that will be useful back at the student's worksite. 

CINT 237 Novell Administration III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 135. How to design and implement Novell 
eDirectory trees and related components in any type of organization 
for different types of organizational goals using different types of 
network operating systems. 



94 



CINT 240 Cisco Discovery: Introducing 4 Credits 

Routing and Switching in the Enterprise 

Prerequisite: CINT 141 or CINT Program Advisor Approval.The goal of 
this course is to assist students in developing the skills necessary to 
use protocols to maximize enterprise LAN and WAN performance. The 
course provides more advanced configurations of switching and rout- 
ing protocols, configuration of access control lists, and basic imple- 
mentation of WAN links. It also provides detailed troubleshooting 
guidance for LAN, WAN, and VLAN implementations. This course pre- 
pares students with the skills required for entry-level Network 
Technician, Help Desk Technician and Computer Technician jobs. 

CINT 241 Cisco Discovery: Designing and 4 Credits 
Supporting Computer Networks 

Prerequisite: CINT 240 or CINT Program Advisor Approval.The goal of 
this course is to assist students in developing the skills necessary to 
design small Enterprise LANs and WANs.The course provides an 
introduction to collecting customer requirements, translating those 
requirements into equipment and protocol needs, and creating a 
network topology which addresses the needs of the customer. It will 
also familiarize students with how to create and implement a 
design proposal for a customer. This course prepares students with 
the skills required for entry-level Pre-Sales Support and entry-level 
Network Design jobs. 

CINT 251 Introduction to Systems Security 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 106,CINT 121 and CINT 225.Provides a fundamen- 
tal understanding of network security principles and implementation. 
The student will learn the technologies used and principles involved 
in creating a secure computer networking environment including 
authentication, the types of attacks and malicious code that may be 
used against a network, the threats and countermeasures for e-mail, 
web applications, remote access, and fi le and print services. 

CINT 252 Routers and Firewalls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 251.Provides a basic understanding of the fun- 
damental concepts involved in fi rewalls, intrusion detection and 
VPN's. This course prepares students to take the Check Point certifi- 
cation test 156-210.4 (Check Point Certified Security Administrator 
NG,Management I). 

CINT 253 Microsoft Network Security 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 125, CINT 225, and CINT 227.This course teaches 
the fundamentals of implementing and administering security on 
Windows Server 2003 networks.This course will provide instruction 
to demonstrate the ability to implement, administer, and trou- 
bleshoot information systems that incorporate Microsoft Windows 
Server.This course is designed to follow a preparation path towards 
the Microsoft exam 70-298 Designing Security for a Microsoft Server 
2003 Network 



CI NT 254 Linux/Networking Security 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 201 or Program Advisor Approval.lntroduces 
concepts of security for Linux servers for computer students to build 
a foundation of knowledge about server systems and server applica- 
tions security. 

CINT 260 Cisco Exploration: LAN Switching 4 Credits 
and Wireless 

Prerequisite: CINT 161 or CINT Program Advisor Approval.The pri- 
mary focus of this course is on LAN switching and wireless LANs.The 
goal is to develop an understanding of how a switch communicates 
with other switches and routers in a small- or medium-sized busi- 
ness network to implement VLAN segmentation.This course focuses 
on Layer 2 switching protocols and concepts used to improve redun r 
dancy, propagate VLAN information, and secure the portion of the 
network where most users access network services.This course goes 
to great lengths to explain the underlying processes of the common 
Layer 2 switching technologies. 

CINT 261 Cisco Exploration: Accessing the WAN 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: CINT 260 or CINT Program Advisor Approval.The pri- 
mary focus of this course is on accessing wide area networks (WAN). 
The goal is to develop an understanding of various WAN technolo- 
gies to connect small- to medium-sized business networks. The 
course introduces WAN converged applications and quality of service 
(QoS). It focuses on WAN technologies including PPR Frame Relay, 
and broadband links. WAN security concepts are discussed in detail, 
including types of threats, how to analyze network vulnerabilities, 
general methods for mitigating common security threats and types 
of security appliances and applications. The course then explains the 
principles of traffic control and access control lists (ACLs) and 
describes how to implement IP addressing services for an Enterprise 
network, including how to configure NAT and DHCP. IPv6 addressing 
concepts are also discussed. During the course, students will learn 
how to use Cisco Router and Security Device Manager (SDM) to 
secure a router and implement IP addressing services. Finally, stu- 
dents learn how to detect, troubleshoot and correct common 
Enterprise network implementation issues. 

CINT 270 Seminar II 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Discusses topics of current 
interest in computerized information management with emphasis 
on applications of information management skills during lab time. 
Identifies and offers various seminar topics each term under this 
course number. 

CINT 271 Field Study 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.A field study class is comparable to on-the-job 
training activities directly related to the CINS program of study.This 
must be approved by the program chair and the student must be in 
his/her last semester.A student must have a GPA of 3.0 to apply for 
this study position. 



CINT 272 Fundamentals of Wireless LANs 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: CINT 260. CISCO 3 Cisco Exploration LAN Switching. 
This introductory course to Wireless LANs focuses on the design, 
planning, implementation, operation and troubleshooting of 
Wireless LANs. It contains a comprehensive overview of technolo- 
gies, security, and design best practices with particular emphasis on 
hands on skills. 

CINT 273 PC Parts Acquisition & Assembly 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: CINT 210 or Instructor Approval. Provides a review of 
all the baic PC components including case, power supply, system 
board, CPU, RAM, video and peripheral devices. Component compati- 
bility and the dollars versus performance tradeoff are covered in the 
course. Students will gain hands-on experience building and modi- 
fying their own computer system which will be purchased through 
the class. The experience will provide instruction in handling, assem- 
bling, and making standard connections. Common pitfalls and trou- 
bleshooting will be investigated. 

CINT 274 Certified Wireless Network 3 Credits 

Administrator 

Prerequisite: CINT 121. This course includes the understanding of 
the fundamentals of RF behavior, ability to describe the features and 
functions of wireless LAN components, and knowledge of the skills 
needed to install, configure, and troubleshoot wireless LAN hard- 
ware peripherals and protocols. 

CINT 279 Capstone Course 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Prepares the student for 
entry into the Information world.Reviews procedures for interview- 
ing, team participation, and ethical and productive job perform- 
ance. Provides for taking program outcomes assessments. 

CINT 280 Co-op/Internship 1 -6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Provides students with the 
opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their 
career objectives.Provides on-the-job experience while earning cred- 
it toward an associate degree.Fourth semester standing and a cumu- 
lative GPA of 2.0 or better is recommended for Internship students. 

COMM 101 Fundamentals of TransferIN 3 Credits 

Public Speaking 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and 
ENGL 032. Introduces fundamental concepts and skills for effective 
public speaking, including audience analysis, outlining, research, 
delivery, critical listening and evaluation, presentational aids, and 
use of appropriate technology. 

COMM 102 Introduction to Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Interpersonal Communication 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 



ment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032. 
Focuses on the process of interpersonal communication as a dynamic 
and complex system of interactions.Provides theory, actual practice, 
and criticism for examining and changing human interactions in 
work, family, and social contexts.lncludes topics such as perception, 
self-concept language, message encoding and decoding, feedback, lis- 
tening skills, conflict management, and other elements affecting 
interpersonal communication. 

COMM 201 Introduction to Mass 3 Credits 

Communication 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .A survey of the print and electronic media 
that compose the mass media industry.lncluded in the survey are 
the history, technology,utilization and influence of each of the medi- 
ums as well as their symbiotic relationship to each other. 

COMM 202 Small Group Communication 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .An introduction to communication princi- 
ples and practices that enable small groups, such as committees, 
conferences and public discussions, to function effectively as well as 
the practices which limit small group effectiveness.The course is 
pragmatic in approach, and the student will learn small group 
dynamics through participation. 

COMM 203 Oral Interpretation of Literature 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .Designed to develop the student's ability to 
select, analyze, interpret and communicate various types of litera- 
ture to diverse audiences and to enhance the student's appreciation 
of literature. 

COMM 204 Voice and Articulation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: COMM 101. Designed to improve the student's vocal 
abilities by providing a body of knowledge about voice production 
and diction and enabling the student to use this knowledge for 
his/her self-improvement. 

COMM 21 1 1ntroduction to Public Relations 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .The course provides an introduction to the 
concepts, principles, and practices of public relations, from the his- 
torical to the contemporary, including public relations philosophy 
and theory.The course will focus on topics such as the origins of 
public relations, the functions and practices of public relations from 
past to present, ethics and law, message strategies, and research 
methods pertaining to public relations. 

CONT 101 Introduction to Construction 

Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Presents history of building construction to pres- 
ent-day applications emphasizing future trends and construction as 
a career.Provides practice in the operation, maintenance and safety 
of various tools including the builder's level and transit. 



CONT 102 Construction Materials 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Develops skills in identifying buldng materials 
commonly used in modem building constn»ction.Provides eiperi- 
ence in the application of locally accessible materials. 

CONT 106 Construction Blueprint Reading 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: None.Provides instruction and practice in the use of 
working drawings and applications from the print to the work. 
Includes relationship of views and details, interpretation of Dimen- 
sion, transposing scale, tolerance, electrical symbols, sectionynate- 
rials list, architectural plans, room schedules and plot plans. 

CONT 1 27 Electrical Basics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. An introductory course covering both AC and DC 
circuits. Studies include electron theory.Ohm's Law, Watt's Law, 
Kirchoff's Law, series circuits, series-parallel circuits, electromagnetic 
induction, current, voltage, resistance, power, inductance, capaci- 
tance, and transformers. Stresses the use of electrical equipment 
troubleshooting, installation of hardware, metering equipment 
lights, switches, and safety procedures and practices. 

CONT 204 Estimating and Specifications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CON 106.lnvolves the students with the estimating 
process for residential construction.Emphasizes reading blueprints 
and specifi cations, estimating labor costs.materials take-off and 
pricing. 

CONT 280 Co-op/lntemship 1 -6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Grves students the opportu- 
nity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career 
objectives.Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit 
toward an associate degree. 

CRIM 101 Introduction to Criminal TransferIN 3 Credits 
Justice Systems 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of 'Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032.An introductory and fundamental course that covers the pur- 
poses, functions, and history of the three primary parts of the crimi- 
nal justice system:law enforcement courts, and corrections-This 
course further explores the interrelationships and responsMnesof 
these three primary elements of the criminal justice system. 

CRIM 103 Cultural Awareness 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Emphasizes the study of American criminal justice problems 
and systems in historical and cultural perspectives, as wei as dc- 
cussing social and public policy factors affecting crime. 
Multidisriplinary and multicultural perspectives are emphasized. 



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CRIM 1 05 Introduction to Criminology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Critically examines the history and nature of the major theoret- 
ical perspectives in criminology, and the theories found within those 
perspectives. Analyzes the research support for such theories and 
perspectives, and the connections between theory and criminal jus- 
tice system practice within all the major components of the criminal 
justice system. Demonstrates the application of specific theories to 
explain violent and non-violent criminal behavior on both the micro 
and macro levels of analysis. 

CRIM 110 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM 101 .Introduces fundamental law enforcement 
operations and organization-Includes the evolution of law enforce- 
ment at federal, state, and local levels. 

CRIM 111 Introduction to Traffic 3 Credits 

Enforcement and Investigation 

Prerequisites: CRIM lOLExamines the role of law enforcement in 
traffic safety, traffic administration, traffic laws, accident investiga- 
tion, police safety, and patrol practices. 

CRIM 1 1 3 Criminal Investigation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM 101 .A study of the elements and techniques of 
criminal investigations.Primary aspects include crime scene exami- 
nation, collection of evidence and search for witnesses, developing 
and questioning suspects, and protecting the integrity of physical 
evidence found at the scene and while in transit to a forensic sci- 
ence laboratory. Procedures for the use and control of informants, 
inquiries keyed to basic leads, and other information-gathering 
activity and chain of custody procedures will also be reviewed. 

CRIM 1 1 7 Introduction to Forensics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Studies the organization and analysis of investigative evidence, 
basic considerations in preparing evidential documentation for pres- 
entation in court, collection and preservation of physical evidence, 
and elements of legal proof in submission of evidence. 

CRIM 120 Introduction to Courts 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM 101. Introduces topics related to the adjudica- 
tion process in criminal cases, including arraignments and prelimi- 
nary hearings, suppression hearings, trials, sentencing, juvenile 
court, and probation and parole.Reviews the role of criminal justice 
personnel in court processes. 

CRIM 130 Introduction to Corrections 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM 101. Examines the American correctional sys- 
tem; the study of administration of local, state, and federal correc- 



tional agencies. Includes the history and development of correction- 
al policies and practices, criminal sentencing, jails, prisons, alterna- 
tive sentencing, prisoner rights, rehabilitation, and community cor- 
rections including probation and parole. Current philosophies of cor- 
rections and the debates surrounding the roles and effectiveness of 
criminal sentences, institutional procedures, technological develop- 
ments, and special populations are discussed. 

CRIM 150 Juvenile Justice System 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM 101 .Examination of the philosophy and theory 
behind the juvenile justice system and its component parts or sys- 
tems. Analysis of the police response to juvenile delinquency followed 
by the role of the prosecuting attorney, the juvenile court, juvenile 
correctional facilities, and community-based programs designed for 
juvenile offenders.The primary focus of attention will be on the level 
of integration of these systems into a coherent system of justice that 
effectively and equitably responds to juvenile crime.The level of coop- 
eration and coordination existing between the various component 
parts of the juvenile justice system will be critiqued, and the effective- 
ness of the juvenile system as a whole will be evaluated.Special atten- 
tion will be given to the role of the juvenile justice system within the 
context of social, political, and economic inequality. 

CRIM 171 Drugs and Justice 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: CRIM 101 . This course introduces students to an exami- 
nation of Drugs and Justice, with special emphasis on policing inves- 
tigative and enforcement response. The course surveys issues of 
drug use, abuse, and criminal justice policy in our society. 

CRIM 201 Ethics in Criminal Justice 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM 101. A discussion of ethical theories and their 
considerations in the administration of criminal justice as well as 
the application to contemporary institutions and problems. 

CRIM 204 Interview and Interrogation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM 1 01 . Introduces students to the art of interview- 
ing and interrogation, and further introduces them to the individual 
personality of the witness and/or suspect, and the means in which to 
secure valid information, admissions, and confessions, obtained legally 
and ethically, that are corroborative in nature, and that can be used to 
solve crimes and be introduced as evidence in court proceedings. 

CRIM 205 Procedural Criminal Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM 101 .Covers the theory and practice of procedur- 
al criminal law and introduces the student to the laws of arrest, 
search and seizure, probable cause, due process, confessions, suspect 
identification and the many types of surveillances, all the while 
emphasizing Indiana Criminal Law. 

CRIM 210 Police and Community Relations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM lOl.lntroduces police-community relations, 



examines trends.practices, social and individual effects of police 
work. Emphasis on police line and support operations.Analysis of 
operations, enforcement policy, operations during civil disorders and 
disaster, as well as the role of the police officer in achieving and 
maintaining public support, human relations, and relationship with 
violators and complainants. 

CRIM 212 Use of Force 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Provides hands on training in use of various 
forms of force in the performance of police duties in the field. 
Students will receive instruction in the use of physical force, use of 
chemical agents, use of firearms, defensive tactics, and working with 
police dogs. Students will also receive live firearms operation 
instruction and live-fire qualification testing. 

CRIM 213 Field Practice 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Provides hands on training in how to handle vari- 
ous situations encountered by law enforcement agents in the field. 
The student will study the considerations and intervention tech- 
niques used by police in dealing with various types of incidents: sui- 
cide management, conflict management, elderly abuse, domestic 
violence, critical incidents, dealing with street gangs, hate crimes, 
sexual assault, and criminal profiling, etc. 

CRIM 215 Police Administration and 3 Credits 

Organization 

Prerequisites: CRIM 101. Introduction to the basic principles of law 
enforcement administration and organizational structure, their func- 
tion and activities, records, communication, public relations, person- 
nel and training, policy formation, evaluation of personnel and com- 
plaint processing and planning.The student who successfully com- 
pletes this course will have an understanding of traditional and con- 
temporary management approaches and techniques. 

CRIM 220 Criminal Evidence 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM lOLExamines the rules of evidence as applied 
in criminal investigation and criminal court with a discussion of rele- 
vant issues and legal standards. 

CRIM 230 Community-Based Corrections 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM 101. Reviews programs for convicted offenders 
that are alternatives to incarceration, including diversion, house 
arrest, restitution, community service, and other topics. Reviews 
post-incarceration situations.probation and parole. 

CRIM 231 Special Issues in Corrections 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM 101. Investigates topics of special interest relat- 
ed to corrections with an emphasis on the classification and treat- 
ment of inmates.Topics may vary to reflect contemporary correc- 
tions issues. 



CRIM 240 Criminal Law and Procedure 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA 101 or CRIM 101. A theoretical and practical 
survey of the statutory law of crimes, evidence, and criminal proce- 
dure in Indiana, including an examination of sample pleadings and 
motions.Topics include the elements of specific crimes, formal pro- 
cedures from pre-trial to post-trial, actual courtroom strategies, and 
the practical concerns involved in both the prosecution and defense 
of criminal cases. 

CRIM 246 Legal Issues in Corrections 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 105 or CRIM lOI.Examines the four historical 
stages of development of the American prison system, and the six 
major rationales for punishment associated with those stages. 
Identifies the criminological perspectives that inform the ratio- 
nales for punishment, and the correctional policy implications rel- 
ative to each rationale. Analyzes the research support for each of 
the six rationales for punishment, and the policy implications 
associated with them.Connects relevant legal issues to the correc- 
tional policy implications relative to each rationale for punish- 
ment.Locates appellate court decisions relative to correctional pol- 
icy within the context of contemporary social, economic, and polit- 
ical conditions and controversies.ldentifies the specific rights of 
prisoners and the responsibilities of the state with respect to the 
conditions of confinement. 

CRIM 250 Juvenile Law and Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM 123. Examination of the philosophy and theory 
behind the juvenile justice system and how juvenile law reflects 
that philosophy.Examination of the development of juvenile law 
and procedures, early juvenile law, landmark Supreme Court cases in 
juvenile justice, issues in juvenile law, and juvenile adjudicatory pro- 
ceedings. 

CRIM 251 Special Issues in Youth Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM 150. Examines issues commonly experienced in 
the youth care field. 

CRIM 252 Juvenile Delinquency 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRIM 150. Provides an overview of the concepts, defi- 
nitions, theories and measurements of juvenile delinquency. Looks 
at the role of environmental influences (peers, gangs, school and 
drugs). Develop a working knowledge of the concepts of delinquen- 
cy and the concern for children of our society. Discusses an overview 
of the history and philosophy of the juvenile justice systems as well 
as ways to control and treat juvenile offenders. 

CRIM 260 Research Methods in 3 Credits 

Criminal Justice 

Prerequisites: CRIM 101 and demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in MATH 
050. Familiarizes students with the basic concepts, techniques, and 
problems associated with conducting research in criminal justice. 



Provides students with the analytical and critical thinking skills 
required to understand empirical research. Students will also acquire 
the necessary tools to conceptualize and conduct a research project. 
Students will examine the advantages and limitations of decisions 
that are made in the process of conducting research. Problems spe- 
cific to research in criminal justice will be explored. 

CRIM 271 Terrorism 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Advisor Approval. This course introduces students to an 
examination of terrorism and America's criminal justice system, with 
special emphasis on policing investigative response.The course sur- 
veys the meaning and historical overview of terrorism in the United 
States, a synopsis of global terrorism, and the functional and organi- 
zational preparedness and response to this global threat by 
America's criminal justice system. 

CRIM 280 Internship 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides fieldwork experi- 
ence in an approved social, educational, law enforcement, correc- 
tions or other criminal justice organization. 

CSTC 101 Infection Control Procedures 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032, and 
MATH 050. Provides the fundamentals of central processing, supply 
and processing distribution. Designed to give instruction and practice 
in aseptic technique and infection control measures necessary for cen- 
tral service. This course includes an in-depth practice of numerous 
sterilization techniques. The student develops skills and becomes pro- 
ficient in the functions of cleaning, decontaminating, processing, and 
sterilizing of reusable patient care supplies and equipment. 

CSTC 102 Surgical Instrumentation 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: CSTC 101. Prepares the student to identify surgical 
instruments by category, type and use.Emphasis on quality assur- 
ance enables the student to inspect, assemble and prepare instru- 
mentation for packaging. 

CSTC 1 03 Fundamentals of Health Careers 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CSTC 101. Emphasizes legal and ethical considerations 
of health care delivery. The student practices workplace safety meas- 
ures including body mechanics, infection control and environmental 
safety. Employability skills to gain and keep employment are practiced 

CSTC 1 04 Clinical Applications I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CSTC 102.Provides 100 of the 400 hours necessary for 
the student to take the IAHCSMM Technical Certification Exam. 
Emphasis is placed on the basic of patient care equipment and 
general cleaning and wrapping of instruments. 



CSTC 1 05 Fundamentals of Central Service 4 Credits 
Technician Skills 

Prerequisites: CSTC 104.lntroduces the field of central service and the 
personnel within the departmentThe principles and importance of 

the flow of materials are determined.The student learns about envi- 
ronmental control factors affecting the central service department 
The student will differentiate between equipment management sys- 
tems and compare outsourcing and insourting. Various types of pur- 
chasing issues and inventory methods will be explored 

CSTC 106 Clinical Applications II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CSTC 104.Provides 160 of the 400 hours necessary for 
the student to take the IAHGMM Technical Certification Exam. 
Emphasis will be placed on the basic of linen folding, assembling 
instrument and procedure trays, and sterilization. 

GTC 107 Application of Central Service 3 Credits 

Technician Skills 

Prerequisites: CSTC 1 0AEmphasizes the practice of high and tow 
sterilization methods.Students differentiate among the various ster- 
ilization methods in theory and practice. 

GTC 108 Clinical Applications III 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: CSTC W.Provides 192 of the 400 hours necessary far 
the student to take the IAHCSMM Technical Certifiation Exam. 
Emphasis will be placed on dean and sterile storage, case carts, and 
distribution. 

DENT 102 Dental Materials and Lab I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Assistant program.The first "n 
a series of two courses that reviews in-depth the properties of den- 
tal materials.proper modes of manipulation, necessary armamentar- 
ium used, and technical duties dental assistants can perform. 
Stresses clinical behavior of materials and biological factors of 
importance to dental assistant 

DENT 115 Preclinical Practice I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Assistant program.The fist in 
a series of two courses that introduce in-depth qualification and 
legal/ethical requirements of the dental assistant Surveys history 
and professional organizations. Emphasizes clinical environment and 
responsibilities, chairside assisting, equipment and instrument iden- 
tification, tray setups, sterilization, characteristics of microorganisms 
and disease control. 

DENT 116 Dental Emergencies/Pharmacology 2 Credits 
Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Assistant prograntAn in- 
depth course that surveys the most commonly utrSzed and required 
first aid measures for emergencies.Examines proper techniques and 
procedures as well as equipment medications and positioning far 
care of the patient.Reviews anatomy physiology and cardiopul- 
monary rescue as provided by the American Heart Association. 



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DENT 1 1 7 Dental Office Management 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: DENT 123.Focus on the principles of administrative 
planning, bookkeeping, recall programs, banking, tax records, com- 
puter software, insurance, office practice and management as relat- 
ed to the dental office.Attention is given to techniques of appoint- 
ment control, record keeping and credit and payment plans. 

DENT 118 Dental Radiography 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: DENT 115 and DENT 123.An in-depth course that 
focuses on the principles, benefits, effects, and control of X-ray pro- 
duction. Covers history, radiation sources, modern dental radi- 
ographic equipment and techniques, anatomical landmarks, dental 
films and processing. Emphasizes avoidance of errors while exposing 
and processing dental radiographs. 

DENT 1 22 Clinical Practicum I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: DENT 102, DENT 1 1 5, DENT 1 16 and DENT 1 23.An in- 
depth course that focuses on the performance of chairside skills that 
are applied in a clinical office situation on live patients. 

DENT 1 23 Dental Anatomy 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Assistant program.An in- 
depth course that focuses on oral, head and neck anatomy, basic 
embryology, histology, tooth morphology and charting dental sur- 
faces related to the dental field.lncludes dental anomalies.pathologi- 
cal conditions and terminology relevant to effective communication. 

DENT 1 24 Preventive Dentistry/Diet and 2 Credits 
Nutrition 

Prerequisites: DENT 1 15 and DENT 123.An in-depth course that 
emphasizes the importance of preventive dentistry and the effects 
of diet and nutrition on dental health techniques of assisting 
patients in the maintenance of good oral hygiene. 

DENT 125 Preclinical Practice II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DENT102,DENT115,DENTl16andDENT1 23.The 
second in a series of two in-depth courses that continues Preclinical 
Practice I. Anesthesia is presented.The following dental specialties 
are presented: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.Periodontics, 
Endodontics.Pediatric Dentistry, Orthodontics.Prosthodontics, and 
Dental Public Health. 

DENT 129 Dental Materials and Lab II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DENT 102.The second in a series of two in-depth 
courses that reviews the properties of dental materials.proper 
modes of manipulation, necessary armamentarium used, and tech- 
nical duties dental assistants can perform.Stresses clinical behavior 
of materials and biological factors of importance to dental assistant. 

DENT 130 Clinical Practicum II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: All DENT Courses. An in-depth clinical learning experi- 
no ence that provides increased practical chairside dental assisting 



experience to be gained from private dental practices in general and 
specialty areas of dentistry. Opportunity for increased skill develop- 
ment in clinical support and business office procedures also provid- 
ed. Weekly seminars are included as an integral part of the learning 
experience. Simulated exams are administered to review for the 
national certification exam. 

DENT 131 Basic Integrated Science 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Assistant program.An intro- 
ductory course that examines human body as integrated unit; 
includes anatomyphysiology and medical terminology. 

DENT 132 Expanded Functions for 3 Credits 

Dental Assistants 

Prerequisite: DENT 1 29, DENT1 25, DENT 1 22, DENT 1 23. Applies theo- 
ry and techniques at the laboratory competency level of restorative 
dentistry to facilitate increased production potentials in the dental 
office. Students are instructed in the various extended functions as 
allowed by the Indiana Dental Law and the Board of Dental 
Examiners. 

DENT 171 Introduction to Dental Terminology 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Addresses basic terminology required for allied 
health professionals, with a focus on dental assisting. Provides a 
review of terms associated with anatomy and physiology, pathology, 
special procedures, laboratory procedures, and pharmacology. 
Emphasis is on forming a foundation for a dental vocabulary includ- 
ing meaning, spelling, and pronunciation. Dental abbreviations, 
signs, and symbols are integrated. 

DESN 100 Introduction to Design Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides the beginning design technology student 
with the basic tools necessary for success in their chosen program. 

DESN 102 Technical Graphics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides students with a basic understanding of 
the detailing skills commonly used by a drafting technician.Areas of 
study include: lettering, sketching.proper use of equipment, geomet- 
ric constructions with emphasis on orthographic (multi-view) draw- 
ings that are dimensioned and noted to ANSI standards. 

DESN 103 CAD Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides students with a basic understanding of 
• the features and considerations associated with the operation of a 
computer-aided design (CAD) system.Students will gain valuable 
hands-on experience using CAD software.They will be expected to 
complete several projects (increasing in difficulty) relating to com- 
mand topics covered on a weekly basis. 

DESN 1 04 Mechanical Graphics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN KB.Covers working drawings both in detailing 
and assembly.Presents fastening devices, thread symbols and 
nomenclature, surface texture symbols, classes of fi ts, and the use of 



parts lists, title blocks and revision blocks. 

DESN 1 05 Architectural Design I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 103 OR PLTW IED AND PLTW POE.Presents a histo- 
ry and survey of architecture and focuses on creative design of build- 
ings in a studio environment. Covers problems of site analysis, facilities 
programming, space planning, conceptual design, proper use of mate- 
rials, selection of structure and construction techniques. Develops 
presentation drawings, and requires oral presentations and 
critiques.Generation of form and space is addressed through basic 
architectural theory, related architectural styles, design strategies, and 
a visual representation of the student's design process. 

DESN 106 Descriptive Geometry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TECH 102.lntroduces fundamental principles in devel- 
oping graphical solutions to engineering problems.Topics covered in 
this course include true length, piercing points on a plane, line inter- 
sections, true shapes, revolutions, and developments using succes- 
sive auxiliary views. 

DESN 107 History of Architecture 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044.Studies the ingenuity and imagination of the human 
spirit in shaping the built environment related to cultural, political, 
social.and technological history.Presents a survey of architectural 
styles, architects, design philosophies, and building materials used 
by time, period, country, region and city.Requires oral presentations, 
essays, term papers, research and small projects.Reld trips to histori- 
cal architectural sites are a part of this course. 

DESN 108 Residential Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 103.Covers residential design and drafting. 
Includes interior space planning, structural design and development 
of working drawings.Provides opportunity for students to design a 
residence using accepted building standards. 

DESN 109 Construction Materials and 3 Credits 

Specifications 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces various construction materials, com- 
position and application.Studies specifications of materials, construc- 
tion contracts, and applications required in the building industry. 

DESN 1 1 Architectural Rendering 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TECH 102.Presents a survey and history of pictorial 
drawings. Studies light and color, rendering media, and application 
of different architectural rendering techniques and media through a 
series of exercises. 

DESN 1 1 3 Intermediate CAD 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 103.lmproves the student's CAD ability by pre- 
senting intermediate CAD commands, which will lead to the creation 



of advanced prototype drawings.graphic manipulation of symbol 
libraries, the utilization of advanced dimensioning techniques, and 
application of data sharing techniques.Detailed plotting instruction 
will also be covered.Students will be expected to complete several 
projects relating to command topics covered on a weekly basis. 

DESN 130 Fundamentals of Computer 3 Credits 

Graphics 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces students to raster & vector based 
applications as they relate to the CAD field.Demonstrates the knowl- 
edge of devices used in the creation and for the output of drawings. 
Understand the importance of graphics in the design process and 
how it impacts the design field.These skills are developed by pro- 
ducing work from related applications. 

DESN 131 Industrial Sketching 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Combines fundamental computer graphics 
concepts of design, visualization, communication and display 
within an industrial sketching metaphor.Exercises and projects in 
graphic theory, problem solving and sketching skill development 
provide students with activities that focus on further develop- 
ment within CADD, vector imaging, raster imaging and other 
related formats.A variety of sketching techniques are used to 
gather critical information and transform graphical data into 
effective design communication instruments. Produces samples 
for student portfolios. 

DESN 132 Raster Imagine Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides intermediate instruction in illustration 
techniques using computer software designed for creating illustra- 
tions, technical, drawing, logos, packaging.maps, charts, and graphs 
utilizing CADD data. Emphasis is on preparing effective, creative 
illustrations for various media applications in an efficient, productive 
manner.Produces samples for student portfolios. 

DESN 133 Vector Imaging Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 103. Provides fundamental instruction in work- 
ing with vector images (CAD drawings) while applying elements 
and principles of design to illustrations for various output.Combines 
color theory, creativity, type and layout design for renderings. 

DESN 1 38 2D Animation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 131 and DESN 133. Provides fundamental 
instruction how animation scripts are developed as well as how 
visual stories are told through technical elements such as composi- 
tion, lighting, framing and perspective. Exploring how to tap into 
creativity and create interesting original animations. 

DESN 201 Schematics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TECH 102 and DESN 103. Includes the layout of the var- 
ious types of schematic drawings.Students will prepare finished 



drawings for the manufacture or installation of plumbing, heating, 
electrical, electronic and fluid power drawings. 

DESN 202 CAD Customization and 3 Credits 

Programming 

Prerequisites: DESN 103. Covers customizing of a CAD system. 
Covers methods used to make CAD system more efficient for the 
individual user. 

DESN 204 Architectural Design II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 105.Presents advanced computer-aided design 
topics in architectural design. Utilizes current (UBC) information for 
project design.lncludes all necessary drawings needed for the con- 
struction process. 

DESN 206 Mechanical and Electrical 

Equipment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 103 and 100-level Mathematics course.Focuses 
on mechanical and electrical requirements for buildings.Studies 
electrical load calculations, wire sizing and circuits, plumbing 
requirements, fixture units and pipe sizing.lncludes heating systems, 
duct layout and sizing. 

DESN 207 Die Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 104 and TECH lOI.Studies the detailing and 
design of blanking, piercing, and forming dies. Covers material reac- 
tion to shear, cutting clearances and net gauging. 

DESN 208 Structural Design and Detailing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 109, DESN 103 and 100-level Mathematics 
course. Focuses on the design and detailing of commercial structural 
members, their connections,materials and methods of construction. 
Concentrates on traditional materials such as reinforced concrete, 
masonry, steel, and timber.Develops understanding of element 
behavior, its significance to detailing, and establishes the ability to 
prepare working drawings for structural projects. 

DESN 209 Estimating 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 109.This course provides students with an 
understanding of building an estimate of the probable construc- 
tion costs for any given project.To prepare an estimate of quanti- 
ties, the student estimator must become familiar with working 
drawings, specifications, and various bid documents. While com- 
puterized estimating software is commonplace in industry, it is 
also essential that the student is able to apply the math theory 
behind quantification. 

DESN 210 Surveying 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 121 or MATH 131 or MATH 134.Provides stu- 
dents with a basic understanding of surveying equipment, proce- 
dures for performing measurements, turning angles, determining 
grades and other field applications.Surveying techniques and com- 
putations using the level, chain, and transit in calculating areas, 



lines, and grades will be covered in this course. 

DESN 21 1 Commercial Structures I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 204 and 100-level Mathematics courstPresents 
the design and drawing of commercial structures utifong the 
Uniform Building Code f UBC). Focus is directed to structural systems 
and details of commercial structures including wood, steel, and con- 
crete. Provides architecture students with essential strife to perform 
structural analysis of buildings. 

DESN 212 Commercial Structures II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 21 1 .Focuses on the planning and drawing of 
commercial structures.Uses working drawings for pre-engineered 
and concrete/steel structures.Applies lessons learned from OCT 211 
to new structure(s). 

DESN 213 CAD Mapping 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 103.Covers the concepts of map-malring with 
CAD software and typical media found in the industry.Gvii applica- 
tion of mapping procedures including profiles, topography, and site 
plans will also be discussed. 

DESN 214 Kinematics of Machinery 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 104 and MATH 121 or MATH 131 or MATH 
134.This noncalculus based course studies the application of kine- 
matics theories to real world machineryitatjc and motion appfca- 
tions will be studied. 

DESN 215 Electronic Schematics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:TECH 102 and DESN 103.lntroduces students to elec- 
tronic schematics, standardized symbols, and acceptable practices in 
creating various electrical and electronic drawings.Empnasizes the 
creation and manipulation of basic symbols, connection diagrams 
block and logic diagrams, including the use of figure parts and data 
extraction. Introduction to analog and digital multimeters and other 
electronic measuring instruments. 

DESN 216 Jig and Fixture Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 1 04 and TECH 1 01 .The processes of drafting 
and design as applied to tooling.Emphasizes tooling, locators, sup- 
ports, holding devices, clearances and design as it pertains to jig 
and fixtures. 

DESN 217 Design Process and Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 104.Provides the student an opportunity to 
apply all previously acquired knowledge in the design of a new or 
existing consumer productitudents will study the design processes 
with consideration given to the function, aesthetics, cost economics 
and marketability of the productA research paper and product lus- 
tration is required in this course. 

DESN 220 Advanced CAD 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TECH 102 and DESN 103.Focuses on advanced CAD fea- go 



hires, including fundamentals of three-dimensional modeling for 
design.lncludes overview of modeling,graphical manipulation, part 
structuring, coordinate system, and developing strategy of model- 
ing. Advanced CAD will enable the student to make the transition 
from 2D drafting to 3D modeling. 

DESN 221 Statics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 121 or MATH 131 or MATH 134.Studies applied 
mechanics dealing with bodies at rest without the use of calculus. 
Covers units, vectors, forces, equilibrium.moments and couples, planar 
force systems, distributed forces, analysis of structures, and friction. 

DESN 222 Strength of Materials 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 221. Studies internal stresses and physical defor- 
mations caused by externally applied loads to structural members. 
Covers stress and strain, shear stress.properties of areas, shearing force 
and bending moment,deformation of beams, columns and combined 
stresses.Studies various materials'physical and mechanical properties. 

DESN 223 Parametric Solid Modeling 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: This course builds upon previous CAD experience and 
focuses on solid modeling techniques and design intent utilizing 
parametric solid modeling CAD software. Students will use paramet- 
ric CAD software to create solid geometry for individual parts, create 
assemblies from the individual parts and then produce engineering 
working drawings from the solid models. Topic include sketching, 
part modeling, and assemblies. 

DESN 225 Portfolio Preparation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 220.Focuses on the student's final portfolio for 
graduation and preparation for the job interview.Finalizes design 
project work demonstrating the required knowledge and skills for 
degree achievements along with resume and cover letter prepara- 
tion. A presentation for the portfolio is required in this class.Every 
student must submit a copy of the final portfolio for departmental 
archives upon graduation. 

DESN 227 Geometric Dimensioning and 3 Credits 

Tolerancing 

Prerequisites:TECH 102 or INDT 102.lntrodur.es the fundamental 
principles of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing according to 
the latest ANSI standards.Students will apply geometric dimension- 
ing and tolerancing symbols along with tolerances of form, profile, 
orientation, run-out, and location to mechanical problems. 

DESN 228 Civil I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 103 and 100-level Mathematics course.Presents 
an overview of the basics of infrastructure related design topics, 
including the study of roadway and drainage systems.Emphasizes 
the preparation of drawings pertaining to infrastructure design and 
site development.Numerical calculations related to the design topics 
Iqq will be discussed. 



DESN 229 Civil II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 228,Presents advanced infrastructure related 
design topics, including highway structures.pavement types and 
geotechnical considerations.Emphasizes the preparation of drawings 
pertaining to various types of bridges.Drawing presentation of geot- 
echnical site studies and pavement designs is also reviewed. 
Numerical calculations related to the design topics will be explained. 

DESN 230 Computer Modeling and Animation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 103.Contains an historical overview of the devel- 
opment of computer-generated imagery, including CADD, computer 
animation, computer art and visualization.This course will cover vari- 
ous aspects of 3-Dimensional modeling, lighting, and camera place- 
ment, as well as compositional and design aspects for presentation. 
Computer animation techniques such as keyframing, inverse kine- 
matics, and simulation will be introduced.The course also includes an 
overview of storyboarding, scene composition, and lighting. 

DESN 250 Vector Mechanics-Statics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 218,lncludes resolution and composition of 
forces, moments, principles of equilibrium and application to trusses 
and jointed frames, friction, center of gravity and second moments 
of areas.Uses vector analysis throughout. 

DESN 251 Dynamics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 250,Covers rectilinear and curvilinear motions, 
force, mass and acceleration, projectiles, pendulums, inertia forces in 
machines.work and energy, impulse and momentum and impact. 

DESN 252 Mechanics of Solids 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 250. Covers general principles of stress and 
strain, including elastic and inelastic behavior, shear, torsion, stresses 
in beams and deflection of beams and columns.The lab portion will 
be used to determine various materials'physical and mechanical 
properties. 

DESN 271 Introduction to Solidworks 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: DESN 103. Introduction of the fundamental features of 
Solidworks design software and its major applications in industries. 
Students will get knowledge and skill on technical drawing making, 
communication and drawing management utilizing Solidworks. 

DESN 272 Advanced Solid Modeling 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: DESN 220. This course covers the modeling of complex 
parts, complex surfaces, rapid prototyping, sheet metal parts, stress 
analysis, automatic bill of materials generation, and other advanced 
modeling techniques as time permits. 

DESN 280 Co-Op/Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Gives students the oppor- 
tunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career 



objectives.Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit 
towards an associate's degree. 

DHYG 1 01 Fundamental of Dental Hygiene 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental Hygiene Program. 
Corequisite: DHYG 102 Introduction to the dental and dental 
hygiene profession, including principles of infection control, instru- 
mentation, instrument design and fundamental dental hygiene 
skills necessary to perform in subsequent courses. This course will 
have a corresponding lab to allow for application of principles 
learned in this course. 

DHYG 102 Fundamentals of Dental 2 Credits 

Hygiene Clinic 

Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental Hygiene Program. Corequisite: 
DHYG 101. Introduction to basic procedures used in dental hygiene 
practice, with primary emphasis on the techniques of instrumentation 
used in performing diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic services. 
CREDIT HOURS: 2;C0NTACT H0URS:6; CLINICAL H0URS:6 

DHYG 103 Dental Radiography 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental Hygiene Program. 
Comprehensive study of the principles of ionizing radiation and 
application of radiographic theory in dental hygiene practice. 
Radiation safety for operator and patient is emphasized. 
DHYG 104 Dental Anatomy 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental Hygiene Program. An in- 
depth course that focuses on the morphology, structure, and func- 
tion of deciduous and permanent teeth and surrounding tissues. 

DHYG 105 Nutrition and Oral Health 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental Hygiene Program. 
Introduction of the concepts of biochemistry and nutrition and their 
relationship to concepts in dentistry, health and disease and their 
application to the practice of dental hygiene. 

DHYG 106 Oral Histology and Embryology 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental Hygiene Program.The study 
of histological and embryonic development of the head, face, and 
hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity to include developmental 
abnormalities. 

DHYG 107 Head and Neck Anatomy 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental Hygiene Program. Anatomy 
and Physiology of the head and neck are studied with special 
emphasis on nerves, muscles and their attachments, bone struc- 
tures, and functions of the oral cavity. 

DHYG 1 09 Preventive Dentistry 1 Credit 

Prerequisites:: DHYG 101,102,104,and 105. Oral diseases and pre- 
ventable conditions will be reviewed and evaluated in terms of their 
causes, assessment of individual risk factors, epidemiological distribu- 



tions in populations, clinical detection, and evidence-based approach- 
es to prevention. Preventive methods, including fluoride, sealants, 
mouth guards, and plaque control measures, will be discussed in 
terms of their utilization, effectiveness, method of delivery, and cost. 

DH YG 1 1 3 Dental Radiography Clinic I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: : OHYG 1 03, DHYG 1 04, DHYG1 07. Corequisite: DHYG 
114 Clinical applications of principles and theories learned in DHYG 
103, Dental Radiology. Exposure, processing and management of 
intra and extra-oral radiographs: 

DHYG 114 Dental Hygiene Clinic I 5 Credits 

Prerequisite: DHYG 1 01 , 1 02, 1 04. Corequisite: DHYG 1 1 3. Patient 
assessment, treatment planning, writing, and communicating of 
dental hygiene treatment plans. The implementation of various 
dental hygiene treatment modalities including information pertain- 
ing to patients with special needs. 

DHYG 1 20 Pharmacology 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental Hygiene Program. A study of 
drugs with emphasize on the classification of drugs, their uses, 
actions, interactions, side effects, contraindications and oral mani- 
festations with emphasis on dental applications. A study of dental 
anesthetics is included. 

DHYG 121 Medical and Dental Emergencies 1 Credit 
Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental Hygiene Program.The pre- 
vention, diagnosis and management of common medical emergen- 
cies in the dental setting. 

DHYG 122 General Pathology 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: Admission into the Dental Hygiene Program. Principles 
of general pathology, oral pathology and oral medicine related to 
the etiology, progression, recognition and treatment of numerous 
pathological conditions. Course content focuses oral manifestations 
of systemic diseases, and pathologic identification of infectious dis- 
eases. Emphasis is placed on-ihe importance of early recognition by 
the dental hygienist of abnormal oral conditions. 

DHYG 201 Community and Public Health 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DHYG 109.DHYG 113.DHYG 114,DHYG 120, DHYG 121, 
DHYG 122.Corequisit.es: DHYG 203, DHYG 222, DHYG 224. A study of 
the principles and methods used in assessing, planning, implement- 
ing and evaluating community dental health programs.Topics 
include epidemiology, research methodology, biostatistics, preven- 
tive dental care, dental health education, program planning, and 
financing and utilization of dental services. Upon completion, stu- 
dents should be able to assess, plan, implement and evaluate a 
community dental health program. 

DHYG 203 Dental Materials 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: DHYG 109, DHYG 113, DHYG 114, DHYG 120, DHYG 121, 



DHYG 122. Corequisites: DHYG 201, DHYG 222, DHYG 224. Study of 
physical and chemical properties, identification, characteristics and 
manipulation of dental materials. 

DHYG 204 Pain Management 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: DHYG 108, DHYG 109, DHYG 113, DHYG 114, DHYG 120, 
DHYG 121, DHYG 122. Corequisites: DHYG 201, DHYG 222, DHYG 224. 
Provides the dental hygiene student with both the theoretical 
knowledge and the practical clinical skills to successfully perform 
the appropriate pain control measures to maintain patient safety 
and comfort.This includes the prevention and management of 
emergencies. 

DHYG 208 Periodontology 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: DHYG 201, DHYG 203, DHYG 222, DHYG 224. 
Corequisites: DHYG 230, DHYG 234. A study of the normal and dis- 
eased periodontium to include the structural, systemic, functional 
and environmental factors. Emphasis on therapeutic and preventive 
periodontics, etiology, pathology, and treatment modalities. 

DHYG 222 Oral Pathology 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: DHYG 201, DHYG 203, DHYG 208, DHYG 224. 
Corequisites: DHYG 230, DHYG 234. The study of oral diseases, oral 
manifestations of systemic disease, and the processes of inflamma- 
tion, wound healing, repair and immunological responses. Emphasis 
will be placed on the recognition of oral abnormalities and differen- 
tial diagnosis of oral lesions. 

DHYG 224 Dental Hygiene Clinic II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: DHYG 109.DHYG 113.DHYG 114, DHYG 120, DHYG 121, 
and DHYG 122. Corequisites: DHYG 201, DHYG 222, and DHYG 203. 
Applies theory and techniques of oral hygiene therapy in a clinical 
environment. Advanced instrumentation skills will be introduced. 
Clinical application of principles and theories learned in previous 
Dental Radiography I. Emphasis will be placed on accuracy of plac- 
ing radiographs to meet patients needs. 

DHYG 228 Dental Hygiene Clinical Procedures 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: DHYG 113, DHYG 114, DHYG 120, DHYG 121, DHYG 122 
and DHYG 208. Corequisite: DHYG 204. This clinical course will focus 
on the continued development and refinement of dental hygiene 
skills learned in DHYG 114. Incorporation of dental radiographs into 
the dental hygiene treatment plan will be included. 

DHYG 230 Clinical Seminar 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: DHYG 204, DHYG 233, and DHYG 234. Corequisites: 
DHYG 201 , DHYG 203, DHYG 222, and DHYG 224. Provides informa- 
tion related to ethics, jurisprudence including a study of the state 
practice art. Practice management principles and employment 
opportunities for the dental hygienist, resume writing and inter- 
viewing will also be covered. 



DHYG 234 Dental Hygiene Clinic III 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: DHYG 201 , DHYG 203, DHYG 208, DHYG 222, and DHT6 
' 224. Corequisites: DHYG 204 and DHYG 230. Allows for the refit- 
ment of clinical skills and application of technology and cum* pro- 
cedural practices of the dental hygienist with emphasis on self-eval- 
uation and quality assurance. 

DMS1 101 Ultrasound Physics I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Designed to provide fundamental principles of 
ultrasound physics and instnjmentation.The essential concepts of 
how ultrasound is created and it's interaction with tissue are intro- 
duced. 

DMS1 102 Abdominal Sonography I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces and familiarizes the student with the 
basic anatomy and physiology related to abdominal sonography. The 
student will also learn to identify cross sectional and sonographic 
anatomy. ; 

DMS1 103 OB/Gyn Sonography I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces and familiarizes the student with the 
basic anatomy and physiology related to gynecologic and obstetric 
sonography. The student will also learn to identify cross sectional 
and sonographic anatomy. 

DMS1 1 04 Vascular Imaging I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: One year prior experience in the area of study. This 
course focuses on the performance and interpretation of noninva- 
sive ultrasound vascular studies. Topics of study wi include anato- 
my, physiology, hemodynamic of the vascular system, direct and 
indirect testing methods, B-Mode imaging, pulsed Doppier. spectral 
analysis, color flow Doppier, and preliminary interpretation. The 
anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the arterial and venous circu- 
lation systems and the imaging protocols and techniques for these 
systems will be covered in this course. 

DMSI 201 Ultrasound Physics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: DMS1 101. Designed to build on basic fundamentals of 
ultrasound physics. The principles of Doppier, Color flow, 3D, and 40 
ultrasound are presented. 

DMSI 202 Abdominal Sonography II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DMS1 102. Continues to build on the knowledge 
acquired in Abdominal Sonography I along with learning pathologic 

indications. 

DMSI 203 OB/Gyn Sonography II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: DMSI 1 03. Continues to build on the knowledge 
acquired in OB/Gyn Sonography I along with learning pathologic 
indications. 



101 



DMSI 204 Vascular Imaging II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: One year prior experience in the area of study. This 
course will uild upon concepts and studies of Vascular Imaging I and 
include focus on the performance and interpretation of noninvasive 
ultrasound vascular studies.Topics of study will include anatomy, 
physiology, hemodynamics of the vascular system, direct and indi- 
rect testing methods, B-Mode imaging, pulsed Doppler, spectral 
analysis, color flow Doppler, and preliminary interpretation. The 
anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the arterial and venous sys- 
tems, concentrating on upper an dlower extremity venous studies, 
and abdominal vascular studies, and the imaging protocols and 
techniques for these systems will be covered. 

ECED 1 00 Introduction to Early Childhood 3 Credits 
Education 

Prerequisites: None.Entry level course for Early Care and Education 
teachers.Provides an overview of the history, theory, and founda- 
tions of early childhood education as well as exposure to types of 
programs, curricula and services available to young children. 
Opportunities to explore a variety of opportunities in the field 
through lecture, activities, and classroom observations. 

ECED 101 Health, Safety, and Nutrition 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Examines basic principles of child development, 
Developmentally Appropriate Practices (DAP), importance of family, 
licensing, and elements of quality care of young children with an 
emphasis on the learning environment related to health, safety, and 
nutrition.Entry-level course for early care and education teachers. 

ECED 103 Curriculum in Early Childhood 3 Credits 

Classroom 

Prerequisites: None.Entry level course for Early Care and Education 
teachers.Examines developmentally appropriate environments and 
activities in various childcare settings.Explores the varying develop- 
mental levels and cultural backgrounds of children. 

ECED 105 CDA Process 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval.Prepares the student for the 
verification process for the Child Development Associate (CDA) cre- 
dential. Students are provided opportunities for practical experience 
through supervised participation in early care and education settings. 

ECED 107 Introduction to Teaching 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.An introductory course which explores philo- 
sophical and historical foundations of the American educational sys- 
tem. Examines the ecological factors that impact the classroom. 
Defines the characteristics of the competent teacher. Provides 
opportunities for observations, hands on learning experiences and 
volunteer service. 

ECED 110 Infant/Toddler Growth and 3 Credits 

102 Development 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 



assessment or earning a grade of "C"or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Studies the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and language 
development of infants and toddlers from conception through age 
three. Examines the crucial role of brain development and ecological 
systems during the first three years.Responsive care by adults is rec- 
ognized as crucial to the development of the infants and toddlers. 
Quality child care is defined. 

ECED 111 Environments for Infants and 3 Credits 

Toddlers 

Prerequisites: None. Examines physical, human and time environ- 
mental factors essential for providing quality early care and educa- 
tion. Discovers and assesses the various settings for infants and 
toddlers from the perspectives of quality and family issues.Adult- 
child relationships and adult-adult relationships within the envi- 
ronments are explored. Community resources and child advocacy 
efforts are examined. 

ECED 1 1 5 Indiana Youth Development (IYD) 3 Credits 
Process 

Prerequisites: Program Chair approval.Prepares the student for the 
verification process for the Indiana Youth Development Credential 
(lYD).Students are provided opportunities for practical experience 
through supervised participation in programs for school age and 
youth educational settings. 

ECED 120 Child Growth and Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032. 
Studies the physical, social, emotional, cognitive.and moral develop- 
ment of children from conception to age twelve.Theories of child 
development, biological and environmental foundations.prenatal 
development, the birth process, and the newborn baby are discussed. 
Influences of family, community, media, and culture are considered. 

ECED 1 30 Developmentally Appropriate 3 Credits 

Guidance in a Cultural Context 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Analyzes developmentally appropriate guidance, theory and 
implementation for various early care and education 
settings.Provide a basic understanding of the anti-bias/multicultur- 
al emphasis in the field of early childhood. 

ECED 200 Family-Teacher Partnerships 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Examines the family/teacher partnership, recognizing the need 
to work as a team to enhance the child's development.Promotes 
awareness of the family as the child's first teacher, foundation, and 
framework for culture, language, attitudes, and values.Provides the 



structure for creating practices that establish active family participa- 
tion. Explores issues and resources for families. 

ECED 201 Skills for Parenting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Focuses on skill development in parents that provides knowl- 
edge regarding healthy development in young children, building 
selfesteem, communicating with young children, setting appropriate 
boundaries and nurturing emotional and social development in chil- 
dren. Examines models of parent education, parenting styles, and 
the need for parent empowerment.Analyzes the effects of parent 
involvement in children's educational experiences. 

ECED 204 Families in Transition 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 111 andSOC1 111. Examines the stages of the 
family life cycle and interpersonal relationships among family mem- 
bers. Recognizes the impact of context and culture on the family's 
ability to function. 

ECED 205 Early Care Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval.Provides opportunity for prac- 
tical experience through observation and supervised participation in 
childcare settings.This practicum offers experiences with age's infant 
through school age and requires 144 hours of field expenence in an 
approved early care setting. 

ECED 210 Early Childhood Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ECE0 100, ECED 120, ENGL 1 11 and demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment or earning a grade of 
"Cor better in MAT OSO.Introduces principles of managing an early 
care and education program; emphasizes the role of the manager to 
include personnel and program administration and fiscal manage- 
ment. Explores client-community relations. 

ECED 213 Infant and Toddler Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ECED 110 or ECED 120,Studies the program planning 
and operation for quality infant and toddler care and education.The 
students examine the teacher's role in establishing positive and pro- 
ductive relationships with families.Exploration of essential skills and 
dispositions in managing an effective program are considered.The 
students will broaden their knowledge base of appropriate instruc- 
tional strategies to enhance infant/toddler development.Students 
will develop activities to enhance the physical, social, emotional and 
cognitive development of the child, 0-36 months.Students will com- 
plete observations and field experiences with children of this age. 

ECED 21 5 The Business of Child Care 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ECED 100, ECED 101, ECED 103, ECED 105, demonstrat- 
ed competency through appropriate assessment or earning a grade 
of "Cor better in ENGL 024 and ENGL 031. An introduction to the 
principles of child care management, emphasizing the role of the 



business manager including personnel and program administration 
and fiscal management. Explores the concept of starting your own 
child care business including determining the need, client-commu- 
nity relations and marketing strategies. 

ECED 216 Curriculum Planning For 3 Credits 

Early Childhood Administrators 

Prerequisites: ENGL 111, demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in MATH 
050 and 18 credit hours of ECED coursework.Overview of cognitive 
and creative curriculum from a developmental^ appropriate per- 
spective. Examines early childhood curriculum models with an 
emphasis on planning and evaluating curriculum to meet the com- 
prehensive needs of the.young child.Course places emphasis on 
staff and family involvement in curriculum planning, implementa- 
tion, and assessment. 

ECED 218 Leadership and Mentoring in 3 Credits 

Early Childhood 

Prerequisites: ENGL 111,9 credit hours of Early Childhood Education 
coursework and Program Chair Approval.A basic introduction to the 
concept of leadership.lncludes theories of leadership and teamwork 
and provides an opportunity for students to present a workshop to 
Early Childhood professional and to establish a relationship with a 
protege. 

ECED 220 Adolescent Growth and 3 Credits 

Development 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Examines the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and moral 
development of the child age eight through adolescence.lnfluences 
of family, school, peers, community, media, and cultures are dis- 
cussed.lssues such as health, puberty, school issues, peers and youth 
culture, and personal, including substance abuse, eating 
disorders.pregnancy, depression, and suicide is considered. 

ECED 223 School Age Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Examines environments,materials, methods and 
teaching styles for providing creative experiences for the school age 
child.Offers appropriate experiences in music,movement, art and 
drama as well as methods to assist students in identification and 
pursuit of specific personal interest areas in a school age child care 
setting. Review theories of adolescent growth and development, 
establishment of partnerships with families and positive guidance 
techniques for school age children. 

ECED 225 Infant Toddler Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval.Provides opportunity for 
practical experiences through observation, assessment and super- 
vised participation in an infant/toddler setting.Students develop, 



implement and assess appropriate environments and activities for 
children 6-36 weeks.Requires 144 hours of field experience. 

ECED 230 The Exceptional Child 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ECED 1 20 and ENGL 1 1 1 .Provides an introduction to car- 
ing for each exceptional child.lncludes theories and practices for pro- 
ducing optimal developmental growth.Develops teaching techniques 
and explores public policy including legislative mandates. Explores the 
types of special needs and provides methods for assistance. 

ECED 233 Emerging Literacy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ECED 103 and ENGL 111. Provides for understanding of 
the development of children's language arts behaviors, concepts, 
and skills that precede and can develop into literacy, which includes 
reading and writing skills.Provides understanding and skills on how 
the acquisition of language for young children develops into opti- 
mum literacy growth through the materials and the environments 
that are provided for the young children.Students will explore and 
evaluate literature for young children.The course introduces technol- 
ogy materials and techniques, which are utilized in early childhood 
programs.ln the course the students will research, examine and 
evaluate various screening and assessment tools related to literacy 
in the early childhood. 

ECED 235 Preschool Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval. Provides opportunity for 
practical experience through observation and supervised participa- 
tion in early care and education setting with children ages 3-5. 
Students will develop and implement developmentally appropriate 
environments and activities. 

ECED 240 Introduction to Care in the Home 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines environments.materials, methods and 
teaching styles appropriate to child care in the home. Offers appro- 
priate experiences in all curricular areas as well as suggestions for 
designing and operating a program that serves all ages. Reviews 
theories of growth and development, establishment of partnerships 
with families and positive guidance techniques for infants and chil- 
dren from birth through age twelve. Reviews Indiana family child 
care licensing regulations. 

ECED 243 Cognitive Curriculum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ECED 103, ECED 120 and demonstrated competency 
through appropriate assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better 
in MATL 050.Review cognitive theories of development in. relation to 
the domains of early learning.Analyze appropriate problem solving, 
math, science, and social studies curriculum in early childhood set- 
tings. Create and implement curriculum in the domains of early 
learning with appropriate child outcomes assessment.Reflect upon 
implementation of activities and assessment with children. 



ECED 245 School Age Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval.Provides opportunities for 
practical experience through observation and supervised participa- 
tion and assessment in a school-age settingitudents will develop 
and implement appropriate environments and acthrities.Requires 
144 hours of field experience. 

ECED 255 Generalist Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval.Provides opportunity for prac- 
tical experience through observation and supervised participation 
and assessments in an early childhood settingitudents wi develop 
and implement appropriate program plans and activitiesRequires 
144 hours of field experience. 

ECED 260 Early Childhood Professional 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair ApprovaLSurveys and further examines 
early childhood philosophies, theories and theorist-Encourages stu- 
dents to form their own theories for learning, discipline, famiy 
involvement, and self-concept developmentGuides students in the 
development of a professional graduation portfofio.This is a cap- 
stone course and requires program chair approval. 

ECH0 101 Introduction to Echocardiography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C or better in MATH 050, MATH 
070 or MATH 080. APHY 102, ENGL 111 and Advisor ApprovalThis 
course focuses on cardiac anatomy, circulatory pathway, blood flow 
diagrams, cardiac pressures, cardiac murmurs, bask ECG concepts 
and chest roentgenopgraphy. Includes discussion of essential modes 
of echocardiography such as 2D, M-mode, Doppler, color flow 
Doppler and related hemodynamic calculations. Course emphasizes 
identification and description of normal cardiac structures in select- 
ed media including graphic illustrations, anatomic models, and 
ultrasound images. 

ECH0 102 Adult Echocardiography I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C* or better in MATH 050, MATH 
070 or MATH 080. APHY 102, ENGL 1 1 1 and Advisor Approval. Course 
emphasis on techniques utilized to perform a segmental adult 
echocardiogram, including explanation and practice in standard 
imaging planes and positions. Reviews normal cardiac anatomy for 
application in interpretation and categorizing bask cardiac patho- 
physiologies. 

ECH0 103 Cardiac Physics and 3 Credits 

Instrumentation I 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of T or better in MATH 050, MATH 
070 or MATH 080. APHY 102, ENGL 1 1 1 and Advisor ApprovalThis 
course presents required Doppler principles modeled after the 



103 



104 



American Registry of Diagnostic Medical Sonographies (ARDMS) 
guidelines. Topics include history, principles, flow measurements, 
and signal processing of Doppler diagnostics. Selected topics include 
machine instrumentation, elements of a transducer, routine Doppler 
examination and sound wave properties. 

ECH0 1 04 Echocardiography Clinical I 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in MATH 050, MATH 
070 or MATH 080. APHY 102, ENGL 1 1 1 and Advisor Approval. 
Current CPR AHA Health Care Provider or equivalent; additional doc- 
umentation for clinical affiliates as required. Provides practice in a 
clinical echocardiography laboratory setting. Learning environments 
will include critical care, emergency room, surgery, and cardiac 
telemetry units. Emphasis will be performance of adult echocardio- 
grams with a trained cardiac sonographer, including essential 
patient care functions. Students will observe transesophageal, stress 
and contrast echocardiograms. Course includes required hospital ori- 
entation and 2 day electrocardiography course. Additional class fee 
for ECG course will apply. 

ECHO 201 Advanced Professional Growth 3 Credits 
and Development 

Prerequisites: ECH0 101, ECH0102, ECHO 103,and ECHO 104.This 
course presents the role of the professional sonographer, including 
typical day-to-day responsibilities.Topics include maintaining prop- 
er scanning positions, lab setup, quality assurance, charging, ethic, 
patient confidentiality, safety and the significance of the team con- 
cept in contemporary healthcare settings. Capstone project empha- 
sizes the essential role of life-long learning. 

ECHO 202 Adult Echocardiography II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ECH0 102. This course is a continuation of Adult 
Echocardiography I discussing pathophysiology commonly seen in 
the adult heart, including post operative findings such as prosthetic 
valves and heart transplantations, pacemaker wires, internal defib- 
rillator wires, and central lines. Selected topics include identification 
and significance of tumors, missiles, myxomas, masses, contrast 
agents, and adult congenital heart diseases. Advanced ultrasound 
modalities such as 3D echocardiography, cardiac resynchronization 
therapy, and atrial septal defect closure devices will be discussed. 

ECHO 203 Cardiac Physics and 3 Credits 

Instrumentation II 

Prerequisite: ECHO 103. This course is a continuation of Cardiac 
Physics and Instrumentation I, emphasizing instrumentation vari- 
ables, artifacts, and bioeffects. 

ECHO 204 Echocardiography Clinical II 5 Credits 

Prerequisite: ECH0 104. Provides additional supervised experience 
focused on development of skills to competently perform echocar- 



diography procedures in adult patients, and assist cardiologists in 
various clinical environments. Rotations through other departments 
will include ECG, Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, Cath Lab, and the 
Operating Room for observation of selected cardiac surgical proce- 
dures. Observation and interaction with cardiologists during inter- 
pretation and dictation of echocardiograms is included. Continuing 
certification in CPR is required. 

ECON 101 Economics Fundamentals 

TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 and 
MATH 050 or MATH 080,Provides a survey of microeconomics, macro- 
economics, international economic, comparative economic systems, 
historical development of economic thought, and their application to 
current economic problems.An introductory course intended primarily 
for students who need only one semester of economic 

ECON 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 

TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in MATH 
050 or MATH 080.A descriptive and analytical study of fundamental 
concepts of national economia.lt includes an analysis of the deter- 
mination and fluctuations in national income and employment, 
monetary and fiscal policy, and international trade and finance. 
Economic analysis of monetary and fiscal policies is stressed. 

ECON 202 Principles of Microeconomics 

TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in MATH 
050 or MATH 080. A descriptive and analytical study of the market 
economy and how it allocates resources. Emphasis is placed on con- 
sumer behavior, market structure, pricing, and distribution and 
determination of wealth and income. 

EDUC 101 Introduction to Teaching 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044.An introductory course which provides a general 
introduction to the field of teaching.Students will explore educa- 
tional careers, teaching preparation and professional expectations as 
well as requirements for teacher certification.Current trends and 
issues in education will be examined. A 20 hour supervised observa- 
tional experience component is required for successful completion 
of this course. 

EDUC 103 Personal Health 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Introduces prospective teachers to the health issues children 



face.This course includes approaches to health appraisal, interven- 
tion strategies, and follow-up to health care issues for children. 
Special emphasis is placed on the physiological and psychological 
issues for children's health presented by AIDS, substance abuse, child 
abuse, eating disorders, suicide, and violence in the schools. 

EDUC 1 04 Movement for Children 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces principles of developmental^ appro- 
priate movement programs for elementary students. 

EDUC 1 1 1 Spanish for Classroom Teachers I 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Develops communication skills in the Spanish 
language and prepares future teachers for Spanish-only interactions 
with Spanish-speaking ESL students and their families. Knowledge 
of the language is gained through vocabulary and grammar instruc- 
tion. Acquisition of the language takes place in meaningful contex- 
tualized classroom-oriented activities. Class time is divided between 
these two major components. 

EDUC 112 Spanish for Classroom Teachers II 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: EDUC 1 1 1 . Develops intermediate communication skills 
in the Spanish language and prepares future teachers for Spanish- 
only interactions with Spanish-speaking ESL students and their par- 
ents. Knowledge of the language is gained through continued 
vocabulary and grammar instruction. Acquisition of the language 
takes place in meaningful contextualized classroom-oriented activi- 
ties. Class time is divided equally between these two components. 

EDUC 121 Child and Adolescent Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Examines the physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and moral 
development of the childbirth through adolescence with a focus on 
the middle years through adolescence.Basic theories of child devel- 
opment, biological and environmental foundations of development, 
and the study of children through observation and interviewing 
techniques are explored.The influence of parents, peers, the school 
environment, culture and the media are discussed.llp to 10 hours of 
observation/service learning may be required. 

EDUC 130 Introduction to Multicultural 3 Credits 

Teaching 

Prerequisites: EDUC 101, ENGL 111 and demonstrated competency 
through appropriate assessment or a grade of "C" or higher in MATH 
050.This course examines social and cultural conditions that influ- 
ence education.The purpose is to assist students in understanding 
diversity and how to use this knowledge effectively within the 
schools and community.The course pursues an in-depth study of 
self, familial cultural heritage, and awareness of cultural differences. 
The course examines inclusive methods of teaching. 

EDUC 1 56 Transition to Baccalaureate 1 Credit 

Education 

Prerequisites: None.This course is designed to prepare the student to 



fulfill requirements of the education profession,working with chil- 
dren in both instructional and non-instructional settings.The 
requirements of the teaching profession will be addressed. 
Appropriate completion of such requirements will be attained as 
skill development focuses on preparation for professional entrance 
exams and for transition to a Baccalaureate Degree program. 

EDUC 200 Education and the Community 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EDUC 101 and SOC1 111. Focuses on the community, 
school, and family partnerships, including curriculum, philosophies, 
and partner's role in these areas.The course promotes awareness of 
families as the children's first teacher, as well as culture, values, lan- 
guage, and attitudes.Addresses ways to design and deliver parent 
teacher conferences, parent education, and parent involvement in 
schools and community. 

EDUC 201 Using Computers in Education 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EDUC lOl.lntroduction to instructional computing 
and educational computing literature.Provides hands-on experience 
with educational software.utility packages, and commonly used 
microcomputer hardware. 

EDUC 224 Introduction to Scientific Inquiry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EDUC 101 and ENGL 111. Provides the education 
major with background in the science process skills. Students will 
explore science through active participation and reflect on content, 
skills, and dispositions as a member of a learning community^* 
Students will learn how to ask inquiry questions related to the natu- 
ral world, plan investigations and formulate explanations. 

EDUC 230 The Exceptional Child 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: EDUC 101 or Program Chair Approval. Provides an intro- 
duction to caring for the exceptional child. Includes theories and 
practices for producing optimal developmental growth. Develops 
teaching techniques. Explores public policy, inclusion, early interven- 
tion, and lEP's (laws). Explores the types of special needs and pro- 
vides opportunities through field experience to practice methods for 
helping children within special education and gifted/talented pro- 
grams. Up to 20 hours of observation/service learning may be 
required. 

EDUC 240 Introduction to Physical and 

Health Education for Elementary Teachers 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: EDUC 101. This course provides the elementary educa- 
tion major with a foundation in physical and health education. 
Knowledge and skills for planning and implementing health and 
physical education curriculum to promote physical fitness and 
healthy living for children Pre-K through 6th grade will be covered 
in the course. An observational experience is required for successful 
completion of this course. 

EDUC 241 Math Methods for Early/Middle 

Childhood Classrooms 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Math 1 1 1 . This methods course, for early childhood 



and elementary education teachers, focuses on understanding and 
application of developmental^ appropriate math environments and 
activities for children from early childhood through elementary 
school. A thorough understanding of the developmental sequence 
of acquisition of math concepts and skills, as well as, application and 
assessment of the standards developed by both the NAEYC and 
NCTM are the foundation of this course. 

EDUC 250 Educational Psychology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EDUC 101 and PSYC 101. Focuses on the study and 
•application of psychological concepts and principles as related to the 
teaching-learning process. Topics covered include educational 
research methods, cognitive and language development, personal, 
social, and moral development, behavioral learning, motivation, 
effective teaching, and measurement and evaluation. Up to 20 hours 
of observation/service learning may be required. 

EDUC 261 Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval. Provides opportunities for 
practical experience through observation and supervised participa- 
tion and assessment in a school-age setting. Students will develop 
and implement appropriate environments and activities.Requires 
144 hours of field experience. 

EDUC 270 Contemporary Issues in Education 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval. Surveys and further exam- 
ines educational philosophies, theories and theorists.Encourages 
students to form their own theories for learning, discipline, family 
involvement and self-concept development.Guides students in the 
development of a professional graduation portfolio.This is a cap- 
stone course and requires program chair approval. 

EECT 101 Introduction to Electronics 

and Projects 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. The material will concentrate on the physical 
world of electricity and electronics.Practical techniques for proper and 
safe use of basic hand and machine tools are introduced. Techniques 
for connecting various types of circuits are also covered. The process of 
fabricating printed circuit boards is presented. Communication skills 
are utilized to report project progress and results. 

EECT 103 Soldering 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None.Students practice and develop skills soldering 
and desoldering through-hole and surface mount components. 
Students will use and maintain commercial grade solder/desolder 
stations.Also students will be introduced to basic fabrication tech- 
niques. 

EECT 105 Introduction to National 

Electrical Code 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: NoneJntroduces the role and use of the National 



Electrical Code Book. Provides an overview of interpretation, calcula- 
tions, and revisions of the codebook. 

EECT 107 - Introduction to Home 
Automation Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. An introduction to the insolation and trou- 
bleshoot of home automated systems like home security, auto/rided 
computer networks, electrical wiring, cable and satellite systems. 

EECT m Introduction to Circuits Analysis 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 1 1 1 .Voltage, current, resistance.Ohm's law, 
Kirchhoff's laws, resistance combinations, and Thevenin's .Norton s. 
and superposition theorems are studied.DC and AC drcuits are stud- 
ied and utilized with basic AC terminology describedThe perform- 
ance of ideal transformers, capacitors and inductors, and fi rst order 
RLC circuits are investigated. Fundamental analog electronic droits 
are utilized in the lecture and laboratory to enhance the under- 
standing of basic laws and theorems. 

EECT 112 Digital Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in MATH 
050.lntrodur.es basic gate and flip-flop logic devices and their appS- 
cation in combinational and sequential digital tircuits.Topics include 
decoders, displays, encoders.multiplexers, demultiplexers, registers. 
and counters. Logic circuit analysis, implementation of droits using 
standard IC chips or programmable logic devices, circuit testing and 
troubleshooting are emphasized. 

EECT 115 Home Technology Integration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 107. Provides the student with an in-depth 
understanding and knowledge required for the installation and 
troubleshooting of home integration and security systems inducing 
HVAC systems, water systems, video/audio surveillance, and comput- 
er networks to prepare for the Home Technology Integration (HTI) 
certification exam. 

EECT 119 Introduction to Lasers 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 131 or MATH 134 or MATH 137. Introduces laser 
action, laser beam characteristics, types of lasers, safety considera- 
tions, general laser applications, laser and optical equipment 
Teaches basic of laser systems and prepares beginning laser stu- 
dents for future courses. Indudes an overview of lasers, physical 
basics, how lasers work, laser characteristics, laser accessories, gas 
lasers, solid-state lasers, semiconductor lasers, and other types of 
lasers. It also indudes a brief overview of low-power laser and high- 
power applications. 

EECT 121 Electronics Grcuits Analysis 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT111.Capacftors,irKluctors,switdiingrJrcuJ«s. 
transformers, rectifiers, linear regulators, dependent sources, opera- 



105 



tional amplifiers, BJT and MOSFET based small signal 
amplifiers.waveform generation, and programmable analog devices 
are studied.Grcuit fundamentals such as Kirchhoff's laws are utilized 
in analysis and design circuits.Computer simulation is used. 

EECT 1 22 Digital Applications 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 1 1 2.This course continues the study of combina- 
tional and sequential digital applications. The input -and output 
characteristics of the various common logic families and the appro- 
priate signal conditioning techniques for on/off power interfacing 
are discussed. Also stressed are standard logic function blocks,digital 
and analog signal interfacing techniques.and memory devices. 

EECT 127 Industrial Electronics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 1 26.Presents an overview of electronics in the 
industrial setting.lnstruct students in how electronics is applied to 
industrial systems.lntroduces power machines, polyphase systems, 
solid-state controls, transducers and industrial computer systems. 

EECT 128 Introduction to C Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "Cor better in MATH 050.An introduction 
to theT'programming language. No programming experience is 
needed. After completing this course, the students will have a good 
understanding of programming concepts and terminology and should 
be able to pick up another programming language if interested. The 
course is designed to prepare students to use C to solve technical and 
engineering problems such as programming microprocessors. 

EECT 130 Fiber Optics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 122.Presents overview of fiber optics.Studies 
uses for fiber optics, advantages, cable details, connectors, splices, 
sources, detectors and fiber optic systems. 

EECT 140 Networking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C"or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032 
and MATH 050.Study of types of protocols used in data communica- 
tion systems. Includes an overview of networking,networking control, 
and interfacing.Areas of emphasis includes protocols, packet switch- 
ing systems, local area networks, and the OSI model. 

EECT 209 Industrial Computer Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: EECT 1 01 or equivalent. Corequisite: EEG 1 1 2 or equiv- 
alent. An introduction to the field of industrial controls as it relates 
to a computer control systems, process control and industrial net- 
working. Covers the principles of control systems as applied to a 
production system to achieve automation. PLC's will be covered as 
the mainstay of industrial computer control. Troubleshooting of pro- 
duction control systems are.covered. 



106 



EECT 21 1 AC Circuit Analysis 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Prerequisites: EEG 121 and MATH 131 or MATH 134 
or MATH 137. AC circuits, including the j operator, phasors, reactance, 
and impedance are studied.Circuit laws, network theorems, and the 
fundamental concepts of Fourier analysis are applied and used in 
the study of topics such as passive filters, IC filters, amplifiers, reso- 
nant circuits, single phase and three phase circuits.Computer aided 
analysis of circuits is used. 

EECT 21 3 Introduction to Industrial Controls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 221 and EECT 223.Studies basics of controls 
related to industrial electronics.lncludes basic and pilot control 
devices such as circuit layouts, industrial schematics, reduced voltage 
starters, multispeed controllers, and solid-state controls.Covers 
transformer hookups and circuit protection. 

EECT 214 Industrial Instrumentation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 126.Provides a system view of manufacturing 
and automated production emphasizing the devices used in control 
and measurements.Areas covered include pressure, strain, force, 
flow, and level considerations.Principles of process control are intro- 
duced, incorporating the usage of probes, sensors, transducers, and 
various fi nal control devices.Computer software, hardware, and 
interfacing are examined in regards to data acquisition, manufactur- 
ing control, and summarization of industrial data. 

EECT 21 9 Biomedical Electronics I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 101 or BIOL 100 and HLHS 101 and EECT 126. 
Offers study of medial electronics equipment, including ECG, EEG, 
defibrillators, heart monitors and other monitoring and respiratory 
equipment. 

EECT 220 Biomedical Electronics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 219. Studies medical support systems including 
X-ray equipment, respirators and analyzers, and their maintenance. 
Studies medical ultrasound, electro surgery units and mechanical 
recorders.Prepares students for licensing and certification. 

EECT 221 Solid State 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 121 . Continues the study of bipolar transistors 
with additional circuit configurations including the emitter follower 
and the Darlington.Studies power amplifiers, amplifier classifications, 
unipolar transistors, and thyristors.lncludes discreet FETs, SCRS, UJTs, 
oscillators, linear regulated power supplies, and switching regulators. 
Discusses frequency effects and response of amplifiers. 

EECT 222 Introduction to Microcontrollers 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 122 and EECT 128.An introduction to microcon- 
troller hardware and software, focusing on embedded control appli- 
cations. Interconnections of components, peripheral devices, bus 
timing relationships, structured C-language programming, debug- 



ging, input/output techniques, and use of PC-based software devel- 
opment tools are studied. 

EECT 223 Electrical Machines 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 111. Provides an overview of electrical machines 
and how they relate to industrial electronics.Gives industrial elec- 
tronics technicians insight into electrical power generation, 
polyphase system, transformers, all types of electrical motors, power 
factor and power factor correction, back-up power and electrical 
power monitoring. 

EECT 224 Peripherals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 112. Studies peripherals commonly used with 
computers and microcomputers and the interfacing with those 
peripherals. Includes printers, scanners.modems, NIG, video 
adapters and displays, keyboards and mouse, sound systems, and 
CD-ROM and DVDROM drives.Also includes a study of data commu- 
nications hardware and techniques.Studies techniques for logical 
troubleshooting of microcomputer systems. 

EECT 226 Computer Troubleshooting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 112. A study of techniques for logical trou- 
bleshooting of microcomputer systems.Emphasizes basic system 
components including power supplies, motherboards.memory, flop- 
py and hard disk drives, operation of video displays, and keyboard 
and mouse connections. Emphasizes system-oriented troubleshoot- 
ing procedures. 

EECT 228 Communications Electronics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 121. Analyzes communication circuits with 
emphasis on AM, FM, SSB, transmitters and receivers, transmission 
lines, antennas, and wave propagation.lncludes dB gain and attenu- 
ation, noise, modulation and demodulation principles, phase-locked 
loop.RF amplifiers, automatic gain control, detectors, limiters and 
discriminators. Offers hands-on lab exposure to analog circuits utiliz- 
ing analysis and troubleshooting techniques. 

EECT 229 Telecommunications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 112. Presents an in-depth view of the telecom- 
munication industry from the very beginning to today's cellular, 
Internet, and broadband technologies.Examines various methods in 
transmitting digital data from one location to another.Covers trans- 
mission medias.time and frequency multiplexing.modulation appli- 
cations, routing networks, communications hardware, protocols, 
telephone networks, and Internet systems.Cellular, cable broadband, 
and emerging technologies are also introduced. 

EECT 230 Advanced Communications 

Electronics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 228.The basics of antenna principles and wave 
propagation together with an in-depth study of matching tech- 
niques for transmission lines.lncludes the Smith Chart and a thor- 



ough study of television operation.Radiation patterns will be meas- 
ure with different antenna arrays.Signal tracing troubleshooting 
techniques will be practiced on a color TV set. 

EECT 233 Industrial Motors and Controls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 111. Provides a complete understanding of basic 
ladder and wiring diagrams used in the control of electric motors. 
Includes the various electrical components and their functions as 
applied to motor controls.Topics include the various types of motors 
used in applying electro-mechanical power, ranging from small AC 
shaded-pole fan motors through larger three-phase motors.Motor 
starting components.protective devices, heat dissipation.motor slip- 
page and frequency and multispeed motors are discussed.Lab 
assignments allow the student a hands-on approach to wiring vari- 
ous control components in the operation of three-phase motors. 

EECT 235 Process Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 121. Presents an in-depth view of process con- 
trol theory and applications.Topics covered are open and closed loop 
systems, feedback concepts, signal conditioning, standards and ter- 
minology, controller principles and loop characteristics.Concepts of 
thermal, mechanical; optical sensor devices are emphasized as 
measurement control.Transducers and final control actuators are 
examined. 

EECT 237 Calibration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 1 21 . Provides an introductory overview of proce- 
dural calibration for instruments (electronic and pneumatic) found 
in today's controlling environments and industry.lnstrument evalua- 
tion, installation, andcalibration are the emphasis for this course. 
Dismantling and calibration of DP cells.gauges, valve positioners, 
thermocouple circuits, control elements, and other industrial instru- 
ments are incorporated throughout the course. 

EECT 238 Process Instrumentation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 121. Presents the concepts and fundamentals of 
measurement instrumentation and its application to industrial 
process control.lntroduces basic device symbols and instrumenta- 
tion terminology.lncludes measurement principles and techniques 
involving temperature, pressure, flow, level, displacement, strain, 
load, torque, vibration, humidity, density/specific gravity, gas analy- 
sis, and conductivity.Discusses open versus closed loop control and 
the application of combinations of proportional, integral, and deriv- 
ative control methods.lncludes chart. 

EECT 279 Advanced Problem Solving 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: EECT 121 and EECT 122 . Introduces logical trou- 
bleshooting of electronic circuits and systems with emphasis on sys- 
tematic diagnostic methods and technical reference research. 
Provides further experience in the use of test equipment and proper 
repair techniques. Includes job preparedness skills and preparation 
for appropriate certification testing. 



EECT 280 Co-Op/Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Program Advisor Approval. Gives students the opportu- 
nity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career 
objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit 
towards an associate's degree. 

EETC221 Electrical Power and Controls 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: EECT 121 and PHYS 101. The introduction of magnetic 
materials is followed by analysis of transformers and power condi- 
tioning equipment. Also covered are induction motors and single 
phase and three-phase systems. Motor control devices, programma- 
ble logic controllers, PLC input and output devices, and power sys- 
tems communications and monitoring are introduced. 

EETC223 Power and RF Communications 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: EECT 121 and MATH 221. This course is a study of the 
application of circuit analysis techniques to amplifiers used in power 
and RF electronics, including bipolar junction transistors, power 
MOSFETs, thyristors, RF amplifiers, phase lock loops, switching power 
supplies, and appropriate applications. Computer-aided analysis of 
circuits is used. 

EETC 225 Electronic Prototype Development 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: EECT 101 and EECT 122. Basic concepts in the develop- 
ment of an electronic prototype are covered. The student utilizes 
electronic design automation, design for testing, surface mount 
technology, design for manufacturability, component characteristic 
selection techniques, and basic failure predictions. The final proto- 
type is presented in a written and /or oral report. 

ENGL 001 Elementary English for Speakers 

of Other Languages 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated ability to write and understand simple 
statements and questions on familiar topics.The suggested range on 
the English Placement Test is 20-35.Emphasizes writing elementary 
statements, reading and understanding elementary materials, and 
expanding competence in speaking and listening. 

ENGL 002 Intermediate English for Speakers 

of Other Languages 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated intermediate competency in English 
with ability to read, write, and speak using basic language skills.The 
suggested range on the English Placement Test is 36-52.Emphasizes 
writing, reading and speaking with increasing competence in aca- 
demic and social situations. 

ENGL 003 Pre-academic English for 

Speakers of Other Languages 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated fair control of most sentence structure, 
expository materials, statement, and conversation in social and aca- 
demic settings.The suggested range on the English Placement Test 



is 53-68. Emphasizes paragraph organization, reading and under- 
standing expository and academic materials through vocabulary 
development Develops comprehension of social and academic con- 
versations and lectures. 

ENGL 004 Academic English for Speakers of Other 
Languages 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated ability to write with some ease, under- 
stand expository and academic reading material, understand lec- 
tures, and converse in academic and social srtuations.The suggested 
range on the English Placement Test is 69-83.Emphasizes expository 
writing, finding main ideas and details in academic texts, and 
understanding and speaking in academic settings. 

ENGL 007 Spelling 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None.lmproves basic spelling competencies through 
practice and attention to spelling rules and exceptions. 

ENGL 010 English for Speakers of Other 

Languages- Reading I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CASAS/IRCA Pre-enrollmem Appraisal.Deyetops 
basic reading skills in English using texts on subjects relating to 
life skills and cultural values.Emphasizes vocabulary acquisition, 
dictionary use.and reading strategies for basic comprehension 
and interpretation. 

ENGL 01 1 English for Speakers of Other 

Languages- Reading II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Noneitresses comprehension stalls and reading strate- 
gies using materials which focus on personal and cultural values. 
Focuses on vocabulary expansion, comprehension and interpretation 
strategies, and experience with a variety of reading styteJ'rovides 
practice in increased reading profidency. 

ENGL 012 English for Speakers of Other 
Languages -Reading III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Noneitresses comprehension sUb and rearing 
strategies with academic materiab.Focuses on vocabulary expan- 
sion, transitional development and critical analysts of academic 
writing. Provides practice in increased reading proficiency. 

ENGL 01 3 English for Speakers of Other 

Languages - Listening/Speaking I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CASAS/IRCA Pre-emol 
tening and speaking strategies for co 
practice recognizing and produdng speech patterns of American 
English.Allows for conversational practice on topics of cultural val- 
ues and behaviors. 

ENGL 014 English for Speakers of Other 
Languages-Listening Speaking II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Level I ESL Listening.'Spealring Mastery.Provides prac- 



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108 



tice in recognizing and producing speech patterns of American 
English.Allows for conversational practice with emphasis on cross- 
cultural values and behaviors and the use of idioms. 

ENGL 015 English for Speakers of Other 
Languages-Listening/Speaking III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Level II ESL Listening/Speaking Mastery.Provides expe- 
rience in recognizing and producing speech patterns of American 
English.Allows for conversational practice relating to academic and 
cultural subjects.with an emphasis on critical thinking skills 
expressed verbally.Gives the student ample exposure to language 
use from sources both in and out of the classroom.Language tasks 
which require problem solving by interpersonal communications. 

ENGL 01 6 English for Speakers of Other 

Languages - Grammar/Structure I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CASAS/IRCA Pre-enrollment Appraisal.Focuses on the 
acquisition of basic patterns of structure and syntax for controlled 
communication. Emphasizes form, meaning.and usage of basic 
structures in American English. Provides practice through extensive 
and varied communicative activities. 

ENGL 01 7 English for Speakers of Other 

Languages - Grammar/Structure II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Level I ESL Grammar/Structure Mastery.Focuses on 
the study and acquisition of patterns of advanced structure and syn- 
tax. Emphasizes the acquisition of sentence structure for verbal and 
written communication of ideas and their relationship. 

ENGL 018 English for Speakers of Other 
Languages-Grammar/Structure III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 017. Focuses on the acquisition of more 
advanced patterns of structure and syntax. Emphasizes the develop- 
ment of competent verbal and written expression in critical analysis 
for academic purposes. 

ENGL 01 9 English for Speakers of Other 

Languages - Writing I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CASAS/IRCA Pre-enrollment Appraisal.Focuses on 
conventions for basic written communication in English, emphasiz- 
ing sentence construction and paragraph development.Uses writing 
strategies to produce coherent expression in journals, free writing 
exercises, paragraphing, and short essays.Student collaboration is 
part of the learned writing process. 

ENGL 020 English for Speakers of Other 

Languages - Writing II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Level I ESL Writing Mastery.Focuses on techniques of 
written communication for coherent expression of ideas, through 
paragraph development and essay writing.Emphasizes the writing 
process using strategies for pre-writing, development, and revision 



through peer collaboration.Highlights the structure and syntax of 
written expression for effective communication 

ENGL 021 English for Speakers of Other 

Languages - Writing III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Level II ESL Writing Mastery.Focuses on techniques of 
written communication for the analysis and elaboration of academic 
material through paragraph and essay writing.Emphasizes the 
strategies of the writing process through rhetorical modes of com- 
position for varied purposes.Stresses the extended use of syntax and 
structure for thoroughly coherent expression. 

ENGL 024 Introduction to College Writing I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment. Enables the beginning college writer to develop control of the 
writing process by focusing on paragraph development. Requires stu- 
dents to demonstrate proficiency in basic standard writing conven- 
tions, including grammar and mechanics.Prepares students for entry 
into ENGL 025. 

ENGL 025 Introduction to College Writing II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 024,Builds on 
the competencies learned in ENGL 024 and prepares students for 
entry into college level composition by focusing on essay develop- 
ment.Enables beginning college writers to expand control of the 
writing process. Requires students to demonstrate increased profi- 
ciency in the use of standard writing conventions.lntroduces the 
processes of research and documentation. 

ENGL 028 Vocabulary Building 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None.Focuses on developing general English vocabulary. 
Includes dictionary skills, context skill and word structure analysis. 

ENGL 031 Reading Strategies for College I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment. Increases performance in reading flexibility.vocabulary, 
and comprehension. Introduces critical reading skills and study 
strategies and their applications. 

ENGL 032 Reading Strategies for College II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 031.Advances 
performance in reading flexibility, vocabulary, and comprehension. 
Emphasizes critical reading and strategies for effective study of col- 
lege level text. 

ENGL 1 1 1 English Composition TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C"or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Designed to develop students'abilities to think, organize, and 
express their ideas clearly and effectively in writing.This course incor- 



porates reading, research, and critical thinking.Emphasis is placed on 
the various forms of expository writing such as process, description, 
narration, comparison, analysis, persuasion and argumentation. A 
research paper is required. Numerous in-class writing activities are 
required in additionto extended essays written outside of class. 

ENGL 112 Exposition and 

Persuasion TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: A grade of "C"or better in ENGL HI.Buildsonthe 
writing skills taught in ENGL 111 and emphasizes research-based 
analytic and argumentative writing. 

ENGL 202 Creative Writing TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .This course introduces students to opportu- 
nities for self-expression in one or more literary genres - fiction, 
poetry, drama, and the creative essay. 

ENGL 206 Introduction to Literature 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .Development of basic strategies for critical- 
ly reading and interpreting poetry, fittion, and drama; introduction 
to the premises and motives of literary analysis and critical methods 
associated with various literary concerns through class discussion 
and focused writing assignments. 

ENGL 21 Literature and Life: Thematic 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 111. A thematic introductory literature course. 
Students will read American and/or English literature in relation to a 
specific cultural problem or theme.Students will be introduced to 
critical/ literary approaches.draw conclusions about similarities and 
differences between texts (both in terms of content and technique), 
and practice written response to the texts. 

ENGL 211 Technical Writing TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: A grade of'C'or better in ENGL 111. Builds on the 
writing skills taught in ENGL 1 1 1 .Requires students to prepare tech- 
nical reports and correspondence for various purposes using stan- 
dard research techniques.documentation, and formatting as appro- 
priate. May require students to demonstrate both written and oral 
competencies. 

ENGL 212 Western Literature I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .Introduces Western Classical Literature from 
Antiquity to Chaucer.Presents representative texts and stresses 
reflective and intensive reading from the major historical periods. 
Emphasizes aesthetic appreciation of literature, cultural and philo- 
sophical issues of its emergence. 

ENGL 213 Western Literature II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 111. Introduces Western Classical Literature from 
Shakespeare to the Modem Era. Presents representative texts and 
stresses reflective and intensive reading from the major historical 
periods.Emphasizes aesthetic appreciation of literature, and cultural 



and philosophical issues of its emergence. , 

ENGL 214 Introduction to Poetry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 111. Provides an introduction to the art and his- 
tory of poetry. Emphasizes a greater appreciation and understand- 
ing of the genre through critical analysis of various poetic forms and 
literary devices. 

ENGL 220 Introduction to World 

Literature I TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1.A survey of literature course designed to 
acquaint the student with influential works from the ancient Greeks 
to Shakespeare.lncluded in assigned readings will be epic poetry, 
the sonnet,drama, and the philosophic essay.Combines practice in 
advanced expository writing with literary study. 

ENGL 221 Introduction to World 

Literature II TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .A survey of literature course designed to 
acquaint the student with influential works from Shakespeare to 
the present.lncluded in assigned readings will be work by the 
Eastern, Continental, British, and American authors.lnstruction in 
research techniques and writing research papers is combined with 
literary study. 

ENGL 222 American Literature I TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 111. This course is designed to survey major 
American poets and prose writers from the early Colonial period to 
the time of the Civil War.lncluded will be a discussion of the major 
historical, cultural, intellectual, and political events which influenced 
the authors. 

ENGL 223 American Literature II TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .This course is designed to survey major 
American poets and prose writers from the Civil War to the present. 
Included will be a discussion of the major historical, cultural, intel- 
lectual, and political events which influenced the authors. 

ENGL 224 Survey of English Literature I 3 Credits 

. Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .Survey of English Literature I introduces the 
student to British literature from Beowulf to the eighteenth century. 
Included will be a discussion of the major historical, cultural, intel- 
lectual, and political events which influenced the development of 
British literature. 

ENGL 225 Survey of English Literature II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 111. Survey of English Literature II introduces 
the student to British literature from the Romantic, Victorian, and 
modern periods.lncluded will be a discussion of the major historical, 
cultural, intellectual, and political events which influenced the 
development of British literature. 



ENGL 227 Introduction to World Fiction 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .This general survey course introduces the 
genre of fiction through a focus on world authors.lt examines 
themes and literary devices present in novels and short stories. 

ENGL 240 Children's Literature TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .This course provides a survey and analysis of 
classic and modern children's literature for students interested in 
understanding literature read to/by children preschool-middle school. 
The course focuses on different genres of literature and may include 
picture books, folk tales, poetry, short stories, and novels.ln addition, 
the role of art, illustrations, and media adaptations will be examined 
in conjunction with children's literature throughout the years. 

ENGL 245 Literature of the Old Testament 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .Surveys the Old Testament/Hebrew 
Scripture as a literary work.Emphasizes history, composition, struc- 
ture, cultural context, and recognizing the contribution it has made 
to human development. 

ENGL 249 Linguistics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .Designed to introduce students to the vari- 
ous disciplines which comprise the scientific study of language. These 
include a survey of applied, comparative, descriptive, and historical 
linguistics.The course will primarily focus on the English language. 

ENGL 250 English Grammar 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 11 .An in-depth study of the grammatical 
structures of American English. A course designed to acquaint stu- 
dents with descriptions of modern English syntax. 

ENGR 1 16 Geometric Modeling for 

Visualization 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 050.This is a fundamental course which intro- 
duces students to geometric modeling for visualization and commu- 
nication. Modeling construction techniques to produce computer 
models for graphic visualization and communication will be 
explained and used. 

ENGR 140 Engineering Software Tools I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 133 and MATH 134 or MATH 136 and MATH 
1 37. This course introduces the students to the engineering profes- 
sion and to computer programming.The programming techniques 
which will be introduced are applicable to all computer 
languages.The C programming language will also be introduced. 
Examples and engineering applications will be used to illustrate 
programming concepts. 

ENGR 1 60 Engineering Software Tools II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 133 and MATH 134 or MATH 136 and MATH 
137. Introducing students to object-oriented programming and 
design.Emphasis on engineering application. 

ENGR 190 Introduction to Engineering Design 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 133 and MATH 134 or MATH 136 and MATH 



137. This introductory course provides the student an opportunity to 
be introduced with fundamentals of the design process from 
mechanical and electrical aspects. 

ENGR 251 Electrical Circuits I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 211. Provides an integrated lab/lecture 
sequence in which students are introduced to the fundamentals of 
circuit analysis. Topics include resistive, capadtrve. and inductive cir- 
cuit elements, nodal and mesh analysis, transient response of RLC 
circuits, steady state sinusoidal response, operational ampifters, and 
an introduction to diodes and transistors. 

ENGR 252 Electrical Grcuits II 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGR 251.An integrated lab/lecture course which 
continues ENGR 251 This course covers sinusoidal steady state analy- 
sis, LaPlace and Fourier analysis, transistors, diodes, op-amps, and 
threephase systems.An introduction to computer aided design and 
analysis is provided. 

ENGR 260 Vector Mechanics-Statics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 212.lndudes resolution and composition of 
forces, moments, principles of equilibrium and application to trusses 
and jointed frames, friction, center of gravity and second moments 
of areas.Uses vector analysis throughout 

ENGR 261 Dynamics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGR 260.Covers rectilinear and curvilinear motions, 
force, mass and acceleration, projectiles, pendulums, inertia forces in 
machines.work and energy, impulse and momentum and impact 

ENGR 270 Engineering Project Management 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: After 45 credit hou5 in the programAi introduction 
to principles of engineering project management and techniques. 
Topics include technical feasibility studies.project specifications, 
scheduling, validation, life cycle costing, and economic analysis.The 
focus is on managing an engineering project through scheduing, 
budgeting, resource management execution and control. 
ENRG 101 Introduction to the Energy Industry 1 Credit 
Prerequisites: None. This course introduces the student to the energy 
industry. Students will visit various energy utilities, such as a power 
plant a switchyard, a substation, a natural gas regulator station, 
welding facilities, ethanol plants, biodiesel plants, and other renew- 
able energy sites. 

ENRG 102 Climbing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Corequisir.es: ENGR 109 Rigging for Line Workers. 
The student will gain the knowledge of the proper care of cfimbing 
tools, and the mastering of dimbing wood pole structures. The stu- 
dent must master dimbing wood pole structures with and without 
the use of a pole safety strap Upon completion of this course the 
student will also be able to determine the proper aspects of pole 
inspection, and be able to recognize the hazards of cfirnbing. Upon 
successful completion of this course, the student win be quafned in 



109 



110 



two methods of pole top rescue. An introduction to aerial pole 
framing is included in this discipline. 

ENRG 103 Electrical Essentials for 

Power Line Workers 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. An introduction to the electrical principles 
required for installation, maintenance and troubleshooting of power 
line.Topics include electrical units, power systems overview, ac cur- 
rent and voltage, single and three phase circuits, conductors and 
cables, transformers, grounding, protective equipment. 

ENRG 107 Transmission and Distribution of 

Electric Power 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. A study of the principles and components 
required for the transmission and distribution of electric power. To 
provide the student with an understanding of high voltage sys- 
tems, single and three phase circuits, voltage regulation, power 
grids. Overhead and underground distribution. Safety, buying and 
selling of power. 

ENRG 109 Rigging for Line Workers 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Corequisite: ENRG 102 Climbing. The student 
will gain the knowledge of rigging gear inspection, safe rigging pro- 
cedures and load control, using almost any vertical or horizontal rig- 
ging system. Students will tie knots. Splice rope, install block and 
lines or power lines for hoisting purposes, as well as calculate hook 
strain and haul line tension for safe working loads. Wire and chains 
will also be covered. 

ENRG 203 Electric Line Distribution and 

Construction Practices I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENRG 103 Electrical Essentials for Power Line Workers, 
ENRG 109 Rigging for Line Workers. This course offers an introduc- 
tion to basic field practices for electric distribution employees, such 
as managing risk in power line work, working with conductors and 
cables, and operating switchgear.The various connections of trans- 
formers, troubleshooting transformers, and maintaining voltage 
levels to the customer will be covered. 

ENRG 205 Electric Line Distribution and 

Construction Practices II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENRG 203 Electric Line Distribution and Construction 
Practices I, This course covers rigging in power line work, working 
with aerial devices and digger derricks, installing protective 
grounds, working with live electrical circuits, working with revenue 
metering, and maintaining streetlights. 

ENRG 21 1 Underground Distribution 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. This course introduces the student to under- 
ground systems including drawings, materials, and installation prac- 
tices. Installing, splicing, and terminating cables. Fusing, system 



maintenance, troubleshooting, and job site safety issues. 

ENVM 101 Introduction to Environmental 
Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Oesigned to introduce the student to environ- 
mental technology, the EPA, toxics, hazardous materials, and other 
waste topics.The course will touch on the subjects of weapons of 
mass destruction, chemistry, birth defects, and some other common 
ailments.Biological warfare topics will be discussed,protection for 
the hazardous materials situations, and protection for the fire fight- 
ing personnel in the event of an emergency. 

ENVM 102 Environmental Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Designed to introduce the student to environ- 
mental management, how the environmental regulations evolved, 
the EPA, OSHA, NIOSH, and ADA.Environmental crimes will be dis- 
cussed, how the government is enforcing the rules,weapons of mass 
destruction, biological warfare, and treatment and disposal of the 
toxic wastes. 

ENVM 104 Plant Operations - Sanitary 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides the basic princi- 
ples of aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment processes, includ- 
ing activated sludge, trickling filters, lagoons, sludge handling and 
disinfection. Reviews state and federal regulations related to waste- 
water plants. 

ENVM 105 Air Quality Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHEM 101.This course is designed to introduce the 
student to environmental air quality problems experienced, laws 
enforced and enacted by the EPA as well as others, toxicity, noise 
pollution, global air pollution, and a brief history of the EPA, and 
some of their accomplishments. 

ENVM 106 Water Quality Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHEM lOl.This course is designed to introduce the 
student to water management, how the environmental regulations 
evolved, the EPA, OSHA, NIOSH, and ADA.Environmental crimes will 
be discussed.how the government is enforcing the rules,weapons of 
mass destruction, biological warfare, and treatment and disposal of 
the toxic wastes. Water resources, contamination, and what is hap- 
pening to clean the water we drink. 

ENVM 110 Environmental Toxicology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.This course is designed to introduce the student to 
environmental toxicology.how it affects our bodies, our breathing, our 
environment we live in, the places we work, eat, and I'rve.This course 
also tries to explain some of the conditions in industries, various laws 
that have been enacted and passed to protect the general population. 

ENVM 208 Plant Operations - Industrial 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Covers wastewater treatment 



processes including coagulation, sedimentation, activated sludge, neu- 
tralization, equalizations and cyanide and chromate removal. Presents 
instrumentation, maintenance and troubleshooting.lndudes opera- 
tions, laboratory testing and associated mathematics. 

FIRE 100 Fire Suppression 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Designed for non-firefighters. An introduction 
to the fire service. Terminology, history and basic firefighting skills 
are applied. 

FIRE 101 Fire Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. A general introduction to the study of fire sci- 
ence. This course examines the history and growth of the fire service 
from its beginning to modem day firefighting. Students will cover 
the life safety code (NFPA-101),fire protection systems, firefighter 
safety and survival, along with identifying and analyzing the fire 
problems we face in the fire service today. This course will also cover 
what fire is, the chemical hazards of combustion and related by- 
products of fire. Fire department organization, administration, oper- 
ations, and basic strategies and tactics will be covered. 

FIRE 102 Fire Apparatus and Equipment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines in detail the various types of appara- 
tus on the market today. Study is made of pumpers, aerials, elevat- 
ing platforms and special apparatus.The students utilizing NFPA 
standards 1901, 1904, and 1500, will identify the proper chapters on 
a given situation.Topics will include: apparatus placement on an 
emergency incident, types of pumps, tests, equipment, drafting, 
relay, nozzles, fittings and hose lays, and maintenance on various 
types of apparatus. 

FIRE 103 Fire Fighting Strategy and Tactics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Prepares students to make responsible decisions 
concerning fire ground strategies and tactics at the company level. 
Areas covered include pre-incident planning and size up. Also, the 
student will learn basic building construction, fire -behavior, fire con- 
trol, fireground factors, fire stream management and support activi- 
ties. Responsibilities of engine and ladder companies are discussed. 
Emphasis is placed on safety in all the above areas. Command scenar- 
ios are used throughout the course. 

FIRE 104 Building Construction Fire Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the design principles involved in the 
protection of a structure from fire involvement. Additionally, the 
signs, symptoms, and indicators of partial or total building collapse 
during fire-fighting operations are studied. The course includes the 
study of legislative codes and laws concerning the following: building 
design, building fire safety, classification of building construction, 
blueprint reading, plan review and in-house fixed fire protection. 

FIRE 106 Fire/Arson Investigator 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 



assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in MATH 040 and 
ENGL 032. Focuses on the responsibility of the firefighter, the inves- 
tigator, and the department in fire scene investigations. Fire cause 
and loss, collection and preservation of evidence and determination 
of fire origin will be studied. Emphasis will be placed on the applica- 
tion of various scientific aids that assist in investigations. Hands on 
labs with property and vehicle investigations will be included. On 
completion of this course the student is eligible to take the national 
testing certification for Fire Investigator I. 

FIRE 108 Fire Inspection/Code Enforcement 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the function of the fire inspector and 
organization of the fire prevention unit. Emphasizes the identifica- 
tion of the various codes and regulations utilized by the inspector, 
with special attention given to the Indiana Fire Code and IFSTA Fire 
Inspection and Code Enforcement. Includes the legal authority gov- 
erning fire prevention, applications of the firecode, and manage- 
ment's principles as applied to a bureau. 

FIRE 109 Fire Department Specifications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Specifications for firefighting apparatus, equip- 
ment, protective clothing, facilities and other sources of materials 
necessary to a fire department. The student will have a better 
understanding of NFPA Standards 1500 and 1901. 

FIRE 116 Fire Fighter I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: FIRE 117.This course is designed to 
be an entry level training program coupled with Fire Fighter II. 
Introduces the student to the fire service, terminology, history and 
basic firefighting skills needed to complete and pass the require- 
ments as designed by the Department of Homeland Security for 
Basic, Mandatory and Fire Fighter I. 

FIRE 117 Fire Fighter II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: FIRE 1 16,This is a companion course 
to Fire Fighter I and expands upon the principles and techniques of 
fire fighting. Students will study fire protection systems, firefighter 
safety and survival. This course will also cover what fire is, the 
chemical hazards of combustion and related by-products of fire. Fire 
department organization, administration, operations, and basic 
strategies and tactics will be covered. 

FIRE 201 Fire Protection Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a general introduction into fire alarm 
monitoring devices and extinguishing systems. A strong base for 
application to either fire protection or a commercial application can 
be developed.Technical areas to be covered will be: fire extinguish- 
ing agents, portable fire extinguishers, carbon dioxide systems, dry 
chemical systems, halogenated systems/foam systems, explosive 
suppression systems, thermal/smoke/flame detection systems, and 



building monitoring systems. Standpipe and sprinkler systems will 
be covered in detail. 

FIRE 202 Fire Service Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Principles and functions of administrative and 
management personnel in the fire service. Topics discussed include: 
departmental organization, administrative and management proce- 
dures, personnel selection, line and staff functions, communications, 
the fire company unit, public relations, and current problems in 
administration. 

FIRE 204 Fire Service Hydraulics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 032 and 
MATH 050. A study of compressible fluids including: fluid properties, 
principles of fluid statics, flow system principles, pipe friction and 
head loss, flow measurements, pumps, and other appliances and 
hydraulic devices. Applications are related to fire protection systems, 
water supply systems and foam systems. 

FIRE 205 Aircraft Firefighting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the hazards associated with aircraft 
firefighting. Emphasis will be placed on lecture and practical use of 
airport firefighting equipment, extinguishing agents, strategy and 
tactics, rescue methods, and aircraft design and construction. 

FITN 100 Lifetime Fitness and Wellness 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Educates students about the importance of fit- 
ness/ wellness in their everyday lives.Students will have the oppor- 
tunity to customize their own behavioral plans for fitness/weliness. 

FORN 101 Introduction to Forensic Science 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C"or better in MATH 050, ENGL 
025 and ENGL O32.lntroductory course dealing with the basic con- 
cepts in Forensic Science. Includes lab. 

FORN 203 Crime Methods and Techniques 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: FORN 101 and CHMT lOI.Advanced course addressing 
laboratory techniques used in Forensic Science. Includes lab. 

FREN 101 French Level I Transfer IN 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. An introductory course in French. Introduces the French lan- 
guage and Francophone culture through communicative activities 
intended to develop oral communication skills and listening com- 
prehension skills. Emphasis is placed on learning basic grammar 
and vocabulary necessary for successful communication while laying 
a foundation for further study. 

FREN 102 French Level II Transfer IN 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: FREN 101 French Level I or demonstrated competency 



in French through appropriate assessment; demonstrated compe- 
tency in reading and writing through appropriate assessment or 
earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and EH6L 032. 
Continues the study of French for students who have had the equiv- 
alent of one semester of college-level French. Introduces addroonal 
grammatical structures and vocabulary to further develop Sstening, 
speaking, reading, and writing skills as well as an appreciation of the 
cultures of the Francophone world. 

FREN 201 French Level III 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: FREN 102 French Level II or demonstrated competency 
in French through appropriate assessment demonstrated compe- 
tency in reading and writing through appropriate assessment or 
earning a grade of X" or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032. French is 
the primary medium of instruction. The goal of the course is to con- 
tinue the development and reinforcement of the skills of the target 
language: listening, speaking, reading and writing at an intermedi- 
ate level.The course continues the study of grammar/syntax and 
vocabulary building and introduces French civilization through con- 
versation coordinated with the reading of cultural and literacy texts 
as well as written and oral reports. 

FREN 202 French Level IV 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: FREN 201 French Level III of demonstrated competen- 
cy in French through appropriate assessment; demonstrated compe- 
tency in reading and writing through appropriate assessment or 
earning a grade of C" or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 031 French is 
the primary medium of instruction. The goal of the course is to con- 
tinue the development and reinforcement of the skiife of the target 
language: listening, speaking, reading and writing at an advanced 
intermediate level.The course continues the study of grammar/syn- 
tax and vocabulary building and continues the study of French and 
Francophone civilizations through readings, both joumafstk and §t- 
erary, and reinforced through dass discussions as well as written 
and oral reports. 

GEOG 207 World Geography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044 .A geographical analysis of the major physical. cultur- 
al, political and economic divisions of the world along with their 
characteristic, locations, human activities, and inter-relatjonships. 

GRAM 101 Graphic Media Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Explores the fundamentals of graphic art pro- 
duction. Provides hands-on training in manual page layout and an 
introduction to electronic layout Presents the concepts and funda- 
mentals of measurement and typography. Problernsohring and lab- 
oratory assignments will reinforce concepts in the reading and lec- 
ture experience. 



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GRAM 102 Introduction to Machine Printing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: GRAM 104 and GRAM 201. Provides a history and 
overview of the interrelationship of various printing processes. 
Course offers instructions in basic press operations.Covers materials 
and techniques utilizing equipment and tools necessary to operate 
a basic offset press. 

GRAM 104 Art and Copy Preparation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Corequisites:GRAM 201 .Provides a foundation in 
design, typographic and communications concepts.Presents tradi- 
tional techniques as well as computer aided technologies in the 
consideration of color, format and use of visuals in illustration. 
Emphasizes problem solving with assignments executed through 
strip-up of the negative into a flat and proofing. 

GRAM 1 06 Introduction to Color Printing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: GRAM 104 and GRAM 201.Corequisites:GRAM 102 and 
GRAM 202.Studies basic color theory,materials and methods used in 
the reproduction of color in printed materials.Covers techniques and 
materials with assignments utilizing different processes including 
four-color as well as spot color.Pre-separated negatives, halftones, 
registration and runs are covered.lncludes in depth study of inks and 
color inking systems.Also covers digital color separations. 

GRAM 201 Photomechanical Reproduction 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Corequisites:GRAM 104.lntroduces image con- 
version in black and white and color theory.Examines photochem- 
istry, halftones, darkroom techniques and diffusion transferases 
large format stat cameras. 

GRAM 202 Science of Color 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Covers the physical properties of light and color 
and the psychological aspects of color perception and color relation- 
ships. It develops an acute awareness of the use of color and color 
theories in various visual and written terms.lt covers primary, sec- 
ondary and tertiary colors, their creation and use through a series of 
hands on projects. 

GRAM 213 Desktop Publishing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 1 15.This course covers computer techniques in 
prepreparatory and preparatory composing procedures including 
electronic layout and typographic concepts.Emphasizes computer 
skills and output. 

GRAM 214 Screen Printing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.This course introduces the students to the basics 
of the Screen Printing process.Students will learn a process for 
reproducing graphic images on a wide variety of objects, from paper 
to wooden signs and ceramic objects.This course covers inking, sub- 
strates and transfer processes. 



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GRAM 215 Computer Graphics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 1 15.This course will showcase the design tricks 
and techniques of vector graphic use.lt is assumed that students 
will already know computer basics and can take assigned projects 
from basic idea to completed artwork. 

GRDN 1 10 Fundamentals of Gardening 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Studies the horticulture principles of garden 
plant structure, growth and development and soil science.lncludes 
cultural practices.propagation techniques, plant care, nutrition, 
maintenance, and disease and insect control. 

GRDN 111 Aboriculture: Trees and Shrubs 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Studies the identification, selection criteria, 
growth habits.growing conditions, installation techniques and 
maintenance requirements for woody plantings, including ever- 
green and deciduous shade and ornamental trees, shrubs and vines. 

GRDN 112 Floriculture: Annuals and 

Perennials 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Studies the identification, selection and design 
criteria for herbaceous ornamentals found in garden beds, borders 
and containers.Students will research the growing conditions, plant- 
ing techniques and maintenance requirements for perennial and 
annual plantings. 

GRDN 113 Turf Management: Grasses and 
Groundcovers 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces the identification and selection crite- 
ria for grasses and groundcovers.lncludes the growing conditions, 
installation techniques and maintenance requirements for a healthy 
lawn and landscape. 

GRDN 114 Garden Design I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Survey of basic garden landscape design. 
Includes topics on plant types and uses, client requirements, design 
concepts, site analysis, and garden planting plans and project pres- 
entation methods.Emphasizes the principles and techniques for 
designing outdoor gathering and living places. 

GRDN 1 1 5 History of Garden Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.An overview of the history of garden design and 
landscape architecture from antiquities through the 21st century. 
Students will research influential garden designers, landscape archi- 
tects, garden restoration and current trends. 

GRDN 1 1 6 Theme Gardening 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduction to garden styles and border design. 
Students will create theme gardens with an emphasis on plant com- 
binations, color, function and aesthetics.lncludes studies in water, 
shade, wildlife.native, low-maintenance and container gardens. 



GRDN 231 Garden Design II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INTD 102 and GRDN 114. Continuation of GRDN 114.An 
advanced study of design principles, concept development, creative 
problem solving and planning skills through a master plan approach. 
Emphasizes the formation of working drawings and contract docu- 
ments, barrier-free applications,business practices.project facilitation 
and the relationship between individuals and their surroundings. 

GRDN 232 Garden and Landscape Design III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INTD 105 and INTD 216 and GRDN 231.Continuation 
of GRDN 231 .Students will define and develop a program for an 
advanced landscape design problem from concept development 
through professional presentation.Emphasis is on research method- 
ology and project comprehension and management. 

H AZM 1 00 OSH A Regulations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.This course provides a study of the U.S. 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) regulations 
that pertain to protecting workers from exposure to occupational 
hazards. Students concentrate on researching, interpreting, summa- 
rizing, and applying the OSHA regulations. 

HAZM 200 EPA Regulations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.This course provides a detailed study of the U. S. 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations pertaining to 
hazardous waste management, with an emphasis on the require- 
ments of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, the 
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
Liability Art of 1980 and the Superfund Amendments and 
Reauthorization Art of 1986. 

HAZM 201 Contingency Planning 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.How to develop an emergency response contin- 
gency plan for a facility or community.Preparedness includes ana- 
lyzing the hazards, writing and implementing the contingency 
plans, training employees for an emergency, and evaluating the 
effectiveness of the contingency plan. 

HAZM 203 Sampling Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.A variety of sampling procedures used in indus- 
trial settings for emergency response.Topics to be covered include: 
sampling and monitoring devices, industrial hygiene monitoring, 
water and waste stream monitoring, outside air sampling, soil and 
radiation sampling.Emphasis will be placed on collecting and pre- 
serving representative samples, interpreting laboratory results, and 
on complying with relevant federal regulations. 

HAZM 205 DOT Regulations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HAZM 100.A detailed study of the U.S.Department of 
Transportation (DOT) regulations.Students shall be introduced to 



certain Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental 
Protection Agency regulations pertinent to hazardous materials 
transportation. 

HAZM 220 Hazardous Materials Recovery, 
Incineration and Disposal 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HAZM lOO.The methods of recovery, incineration 
and/or disposal of hazardous waste.Topics include contracting quali- 
fied disposal organizations, obtaining permits and ensuring regula- 
tory compliance of hazardous waste.Topics include contracting qual- 
ified disposal organizations, obtaining permits and ensuring regula- 
tory compliance of hazardous waste. 
HCMG 125 Health Care Systems and Trends 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 and 
MATH 044.An introduction to the health care industry emphasizing 
the systems approach to health care and the current trends facing the 
industry. Gives special attention to managed care organizations. 

HCMG 225 Finance and Budgeting for 

Health Care 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACCT 101.lmportance is placed on the development 
and use of departmental budgets.Financial statements will be used 
to project future expenses and revenues for an organization and/or 
department.Empha'sizes the reimbursement process for a managed 
care environment and purchasing procedures. 

HCMG 226 Organizational Development In 

Health Care 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BUSN 105 and HCMG 125.Examines organizational 
structure in health care organizations, including traditional struc- 
tures and reengineering of the health care industry.Covers staff 
development, training, job analysis and design, and departmental 
staffing.Discusses medical ethics. 

HIMT 101 Health Information Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides opportunity for the 
investigation of career opportunities, ethics, history, and functions of 
a health information management profession. Presents the origina- 
tion, content, and development of patient indices and patient 
records. Overview of the design, maintenance and use of manual and 
computerized health information systems for filing, numbering, and 
storage of patient information. 

HIMT 1 02 Health Data Content and Structure 2 credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Introduction to health data 
collections methods for health information systems. Study of the 
datasets and databases used in various healthcare settings. Overview 
of the creation and maintenance of health information disease reg- 
istries and indexes. Overview of concepts influencing electronic and 
computerized patient records and automation of health information 
management functions. 



HIMT 104 Health Information and the Law 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Presents the substantial 
changes brought about by HIPAA and the growth of electronic health 
records systems and electronic data networks. Discusses the state 
laws affecting the use and disclosure of health information and the 
complex interplay of federal and state health information privacy 
laws. Addresses the challenging area of how patient information 
may be used in connection with medical research. 

HIMT 105 Healthcare Organizations and 
Delivery Systems 3 credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides an overview of the 
organization of healthcare delivery, including the various types of 
healthcare institutions, accreditation standards, licensure and regula- 
tory agencies, and payment and reimbursement systems. Emphasizes 
the maintenance of data accuracy, security, privacy, and confidentiali- 
ty in manual and computerized information systems. 

HIMT 201 Reimbursement Systems 3 credits 

Prerequisites: HIMT 101, HIMT 102 and HIMT 105. Presents data ele- 
ments that apply to prospective payment systems. Enables students 
to gain knowledge of reimbursement 
systems and to identify issues and patient characteristics 
in meeting medical necessity guidelines. 

HIMT 202 Healthcare Data Literacy and 

Statistics 3 credits 

Prerequisites: HIMT 101 , HIMT 102 and MATH 1 15. Compilation and 
usage of various types of administrative and healthcare statistics 
including vital records. Includes an overview of the health informa- 
tion research process and the use of computers for data management. 

HIMT 203 ICD Coding 3 credits 

Prerequisites: HIMT 101, HIMT 102 and HIMT 210. Includes 
International Classification of Diseases (ICD) assignment and 
sequencing of codes in accordance with approved guidelines. 

HIMT 204 Quality Assessment and 
Improvement 2 credits 

Prerequisites: HIMT 101, HIMT 102 and HIMT 105. Presents the histo- 
ry and development of quality assurance in various healthcare facili- 
ties. Includes quality assessment techniques, utilization manage- 
ment, risk management, credentialing.and medical staff services as 
related to health information management. 

HIMT 205 Organization and Supervision 2 credits 

Prerequisites: HIMT 101, HIMT 102 and HIMT 105. Includes principles 
and practices essential to the efficient supervision and management 
of health information departments including planning, organizing, 
directing, and controlling health information processes, personnel, 
finances, and space. 



HIMT 207 Health Information Extemship I 1 credit 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides the student with 
the opportunity to apply acquired health information technical 
knowledge in healthcare settings. 

HIMT 208 Health Information Extemship II 1 credit 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides the student with 
the opportunity to apply acquired health information technical 
knowledge in healthcare settings. 

HIMT 210 Pathophysiology and 
Pharmacology I 3 credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 102 and HLHS 101. Covers etiology, treatment 
pharmacology, and prognosis of diseases associated with body systems. 

HIMT 213 CPT Coding 3 credits 

Prerequisites: HIMT 101, HIMT 102, HIMT 105 and HIMT 210. 
Introduces Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) coding as applied in 
facility and physician perspectives. Indudes the general content cod- 
ing guidelines, and the role of CPT coding in healthcare reimburse- 
ment Applies codes to basic medical and surgical services induing 
the use of modifiers. Ethical coding and compliance issues are 
emphasized. 

HIMT 219 Pathophysiology and 

Pharmacology II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HIMT 210. Continuation of HIMT 210 to cover the etiol- 
ogy, treatment, pharmacology and prognosis of disease associated 
with body systems. 

HIST 101 Survey of American 

History I TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Covers major themes and events in history including explo- 
ration of the New World; the colonial period; causes and results of 
the American Revolution; the development of the federal system of 
government; the growth of democracy; early popular American cul- 
ture; territorial expansion; slavery and its effect reform movements, 
sectionalism; causes and effects of the Gvil War. 

HIST 102 Survey of American 

History II TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Covers major themes induding the post Gvil War perxxtwest- 
em expansion, industrial growth of the nation and its effects, immi- 
gration and urban discontent and attempts at reform.Worid War I, 
the Roaring Twenties, sodal and governmental changes of the thir- 
ties. World War II and its consequences, the growth of the federal 
government sodal upheaval in the sixties and seventies, and recent 



113 



114 



trends in conservatism, globalization, and cultural diversity. 

HIST 125 History of American Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C"or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Examines the technological development of the United States. 
Emphasis will be given not only to the inventions themselves but 
the reasons why such technology was needed and what influence 
the technology has had on American society. 

HIST 235 World Civilization I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032. 
Presents the key individuals, events and schools of thought, which 
have most greatly impacted societal development and world history 
up to 1650.The target civilizations of study include Oriental, the 
Middle East, Western Europe.Africa, and the Americas. Discusses the 
political, economic, social and cultural evolution of human civilization. 

HIST 236 World Civilization II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Presents the key individuals, events and schools of thought, 
which have most greatly impacted societal development and world 
history since ISOO.Key movements and events of the periods will be 
studied. Discusses the political, economic, socialand cultural evolu- 
tion of civilization. 

HLHS 100 Introduction to Health Careers 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Presents information on the health care system 
and employment opportunities at a variety of entry levels.lncludes 
an overview of health care development, how health delivery sys- 
tems are organized, legal and ethical considerations of health care 
delivery, and an overview of various health care professions. 
Students are encouraged to explore health professions through 
assignments, observations and interviews. 

HLHS 101 Medical Terminology TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropria'te 
assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Addresses basic terminology required of the allied health pro- 
fessional and provides a basic knowledge of anatomy and physiolo- 
gy.pathology, special procedures, laboratory procedures, and phar- 
macology. Greek and Latin prefixes, suffixes, word roots, and combin- 
ing forms are presented.Emphasis is on forming a foundation for a 
medical vocabulary including meaning, spelling, and pronuncia- 
tion. Medical abbreviations, signs, and symbols are included. 

HLHS 103 Dosage Calculation 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 031 and 



MATH 050. Introduces the mathematical concepts required of the 
allied health professional to accurately administer medication. 

HLHS 104 CPR/Basic Life Support 0.5 credit 

Prerequisites: None.Provides students with information necessary to 
recognize the need for one and two-person cardiopulmonary resus- 
citation (CPR) as it relates to adults, children and infants.Requires 
students to safely perform CPR and the use of Automated External 
Defibrillater(AED). 

HLHS 105 Medical Law and Ethics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Provides an overview of law and ethics for allied health profes- 
. sionals functioning in a variety of settings.Topical areas include: the 
legal system, standards and scope of care and practice.physician 
patient relationships, standards of professional conduct, public 
duties, documentation, employment laws and practices, pertinent 
federal/state statutes, ethical codes, and bioethical issues.The con- 
tent will provide an understanding of ethical and legal obligations 
to self,patients, and employer. 

HLHS 107 CNA Preparation 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Regulations per the Indiana State Department of 
Health and Program Advisor Approval.Prepares individuals desiring 
to work as nursing assistants with the knowledge, skills and atti- 
tudes essential for providing basic care in extended care facilities, 
hospitals and home health agencies under the direction of licensed 
nurses.Presents information on the health care system and employ- 
ment opportunities at a variety of entry levels.lncludes an overview 
of the health care delivery systems, health care teams and legal and 
ethical considerations. Individuals who successfully complete this 
course are eligible to apply to sit for the Indiana State Department 
of Health (ISDH) certification exam for nursing assistants.This course 
meets the minimum standards set forth by the ISDH for Certified 
Nursing Assistant training. 

HLHS 108 Advanced Cardiac Life Support 1 credit 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of American Heart Association 
Basic Life Support Course including CPR for Adult, Child, Infant and 
AED.Provides students with information necessary to provide 
advanced cardiac life support safely using case scenarios.mock codes 
and following American Heart Association protocol and algorhythms. 

HLHS 109 Pediatric Advanced Life Support 1 credit 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of American Heart Association 
Basic Life Support Course including CPR for Adult, Child, Infant and 
AED. Provides healthcare providers with sufficient knowledge to ini- 
tiate advanced life support in a pediatric emergency, either in or out 
of hospital. Enhances the students'skills in evaluation and manage- 
ment of an infant or child respiratory and cardiac emergencies 



including cardiac arrest according to the 2005-2006 standards/ 
guidelines of the American Heart Association. 

HLHS 110 Tuberculosis Training 0.5 credit 

Prerequisites: None.Provides instruction to the participant on the classi- 
fications of tuberculosis, the incidences of tuberculosis and disease, the 
common diagnostic procedures for tuberculosis, the common treatment 
regimens for tuberculosis, the correct techniques for administering a 
Mantoux skin test and the correct method of reading and recording the 
results of a Mantoux skin test. The students will be given a validation 
card from the ISBH (Indiana State Board of Health) and the ALA 
(American Lung Association) after successful completion of the course 
according to criteria set forth by both of the validating agencies. 

HLHS 1 1 1 Health and Wellness for Life 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032.This course promotes the development and maintenance of 
health and wellness throughout life. Current topics of interest such 
as stress management, nutrition, fitness, environmental health, and 
changing needs during various stages of life are explored. Students 
evaluate their own health and risk factors associated with modern 
lifestyles. 

HLHS 202 Community Resources 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Introduction to social service record keeping and community 
resources. Emphasis will be given to universal documents found in 
most agencies, as well as record content, format, sequence and 
structure; overview of common community agencies and typical 
services provided by each. Emphasis is on identifying and discussing 
the uses and applications of community resources in supporting 
patients and their families. Students will learn and simulate tech- 
niques for interacting with patients and their families, and will 
examine collaborative strategies for interdisciplinary healthcare 
team efforts. 

HLHS 211 Nutrition 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032 and HLHS 1 1 ^Introduces theprinciples of nutrition and diet 
therapy for various age groups. Considers socioeconomic, 
ethnic, and religious factors related to diet. Also focuses on nutrition- 
al issues often presented in a healthcare setting, such as weight man- 
agement, diabetes education, nutritional deficiencies and recom- 
mended treatments, nutritional assessment techniques, and the spe- 
cial nutritional needs of individuals with specific health disorders. 

HOSP 100 Introduction to Cuiinology 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: ENGL 025, ENGL 032 and MATH 044 This is the begin- 



ning course in Culinology® designed to familiarize the student with 
the breadth and scope of Culinology® as a new discipline, encom- 
passing both culinary arts and food science. Students will gain an 
overview of the role of the Culinologist®, and how the blending of 
taste and technology enhances the food product development 
process. The course will include tours, presentations, and guest 
speakers from the industry. 

HOSP 1 01 Sanitation and First Aid 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "(" or better in ENGL 025 and 
ENGL 032.Corequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropri- 
ate assessment or enrollment in MATH 044. This course will help stu- 
dents learn basic principles of sanitation and safety in order to 
maintain a safe and healthy food service environment. It presents 
' laws and regulations related to safety, fire, and sanitation and how 
to adhere to them in the food service operation. 

HOSP 1 02 Basic Food Theory and Skills 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Corequisites: HOSP 101. Fundamentals of food 
preparation, service procedures, and safety practices in the food 
service industry including proper operation techniques for equip- 
ment. This course also provides a background and history of the 
hospitality industry and introduces the student to the broad spec- 
trum of hospitality/ food service organizations and career opportu- 
nities. Students will be familiarized with the organizational struc- 
ture and basic functions of departments. 

HOSP 1 03 Soups, Stocks, and Sauces 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 101 and HOSP 102,How to prepare the four 
major stocks, the fi ve mother sauces (in addition to smaller sauces) 
and various soups.Additional emphasis is placed on the further 
development of the classical cooking methods. 

HOSP 104 Nutrition 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 044.The characteristics, functions and food sources of 
the major nutrient groups and how to maximize nutrient retention 
in food preparation and storage.Students will be made aware of 
nutrient needs throughout the life cycle and to apply those princi- 
ples to menu planning and food preparation. 

HOSP 105 Introduction to Baking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Corequisites: HOSP 101 .Fundamentals of baking 
science, terminology, ingredients, weights and measures, and proper 
use and care of equipment.Students will produce yeast goods, pies, 
cakes, cookies, and quick breads. . 

HOSP 106 Pantry and Breakfast 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 102 and HOSP 105 The techniques and skills 



needed in breakfast cookery as-well as insight into the pantry 
department. Various methods of preparation of eggs, pancakes,waf- 
fles and cereals will be discussed.Students will receive instruction in 
salad preparation, salad dressing, hot and cold sandwich prepara- 
tion, garnishes and appetizers. 

HOSP 108 Human Relations Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032, and MATH 044.The necessary skills for proper recruiting, 
staffing, training, and management of employees at various 
levels.The course will help prepare the student for the transition 
from employee to supervisor.Additionally, it will help the student 
evaluate styles of leadership, and develop skills in human relations 
and personnel management. 

HOSP 1 1 Meat Fabrication 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 101 and HOSP 102.An in-depth look at meats and 
poultry. An emphasis will be placed on recognizing and understanding 
meat types and cuts to allow them to be well and profitably pre- 
pared/cooked.The course will provide discussion of grading and inspec- 
tion, basic cuts, purchasing and receiving, aging, classification, and 
appropriate cooking and storage methods.The student will be respon- 
sible for the fabrication of meats and poultry for fi nal preparation. 

HOSP 1 1 1 Yeast Bread I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 105.The first of two courses which prepare stu- 
dents to produce a variety of yeast-raised breads and rolls using both 
straight dough and sponge dough methods.The course emphasizes 
proper mixing, fermentation,make-up proofing, and baking. 

HOSP 112 Yeast Bread II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 1 1 1 .To advance the student in proficiency in the 
production of artisan yeast-raised products from around the world. 
The ingredients, methods, and equipment utilized in the production 
of these products will be emphasized. 

HOSP 1 1 3 Baking Science 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 105.To help students understand the science of 
baking and the different reactions that take place based on the ingre- 
dients, temperatures, and equipment in relation to the final product. 

HOSP 114 Introduction to Hospitality 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 and 
MATH 044.Developing an understanding of the hospitality industry 
and career opportunities, and responsibilities in the food service and 
lodging industry.lntroduces procedures for decision making which 
affects operation management, products, labor, and revenue. 

HOSP 1 1 5 Diet Therapy 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 



ment or earning a grade of "C or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032, and 
MATH(m.ThebaskprirKipteofnutntiw;ttwrc4emm>entspiayin 
maintaining good health as well as their affect on certain deease 
states. Students will learn to modify diets to meet various nutritional 
needs and to plan menus using modified diet principles. 

HOSP 116 Dietary Management I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044.The basic principles of management and supervi- 
sion.The course is designed to teach skills necessary to goals of a 
person wishing to become a dietary manager. 

HOSP 1 1 7 Dietary Management II 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, EN6L 032 
and MATH 044.The basic principles of management and supervision 
for the dietary professionaLSkills learned through this course and 
included practice are applicable to management level positions. 

HOSP 118 Resident Clinical Assessment 
Practicum 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 117.Developing an in-depth understanding of 
the principles of diet therapyitudents will learn to assess patients' 
nutritional needs, develop are plans, and implement a deftvery sys- 
tem. Students will also learn documentation stalls required by HCFA. 

HOSP 144 Travel Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032, and MATH 044.A systematic overview of the travel industry.The 
class provides comprehensive and critical information on a broad 
range of travel services,products,and issues. 

HOSP 171 Introduction to Convention/ 

Meeting Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032, 
and MATH 044 A comprehensive understanding of the convention, 
meeting management industry including the roles of various service 
providers, space requirements, and uses of convention radioes. 

HOSP 1 72 The Development and 

Management of Attractions 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044.The process of developing visitor attractions and pro- 
vides for a discussion of the issues involved in their management 

HOSP 201 Hospitality Purchasing and Cost 

Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 111 or MATH 11 8. Presents the essentials of 



115 



effective food and beverage control while establishing systems for 
sale values of food and beverages that are outlined.This course 
addresses the application of the four-step control process to the pri- 
mary phases of foodservice operations: purchasing, receiving, stor- 
ing, issuing and production. Labor costs and sales forecasting are 
analyzed. 

HOSP 202 Fish and Seafood 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: HOSP 101, HOSP 102 and HOSP 103. Emphasizes the 
importance offish and seafood in today's market.The student will 
become familiar with the different varieties and characteristic of 
fish and seafood. Students will learn the basic principles of struc- 
ture, handling, and cooking to utilize the many varieties of seafood 
in a systematic way.The course will cover proper buying, storage, 
preparation and merchandising of fish and seafood.The course pro- 
vides hands-on experience in boning, cutting, and cooking methods 
appropriate for seafood. 

HOSP 203 Menu, Design and Layout 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 201 .Applying the principles of menu planning, 
pricing, and layout to the development of menus for a variety of 
types of facilities and service.The major project will be to develop a 
menu, design and layout of a hospitality facility. 

HOSP 207 Table Service 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: HOSP 101 and HOSP 102.Provides students with prac- 
tical knowledge and skills of restaurant operations.Knowledge and 
appreciation of the relationship between "front"and"back"of the 
house is emphasized through operation of an actual food service 
environment. Quality of service is emphasized through manage- 
ment of the guest experience.Additional course work will include 
tableside cookery and the study of beverages and wines. 

HOSP 208 Cakes, Icings, and Fillings 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 1 05.Reguires students to produce and finish a 
variety of cakes.The course emphasizes application techniques, color 
coordination, and the flavor and texture of fillings-Students will 
practice the techniques of basic cake decorating. 

HOSP 209 Advanced Decorating and Candies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 208.The second in a series in decorating tech- 
niques and candy making.Students will construct classical and con- 
temporary candy products including centerpieces and/or show- 
pieces made with selected confectionery mediums. 

HOSP 210 Classical Cuisine 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Presents advanced and 
sophisticated classical culinary methods following the principles 
and technigues of Escoffier.Students will advance cooking tech- 
niques, timing, and presentation and learn history and terms per- 
taining to classical foods and menus with emphasis on French 
116 cuisines. 



HOSP 211 Specialized Cuisine 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 106, HOSP 110, and HOSP 207.Students will be 
introduced to foods from various cultures.Students will gain a sense 
of the history of foods from various countries as well as develop 
skills in preparation of these foods.Students will advance skills in 
table service as well as tableside preparation. 
HOSP 212 Garde Manger 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 106. Helps students develop skills in producing 
a variety of hot - served cold food products as it relates to the garde 
manger area. Students will prepare items appropriate for buffet 
presentation, including decorative pieces such as tallow and ice 
sculptures. 

HOSP 213 Classical Pastries and Chocolates 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: 30 hours of program studies including HOSP 105.This 
course address classical French and European desserts, including the 
preparation of goods such as Napoleons,Gateau St.Honore, petit 
fours and petit fours sec, ganaches, pastry creams and fillings, 
sauces, flans and tarts, and European sponges.The course also 
includes instruction in tempering of chocolates, molding, and choco- 
late plastique,preparation of truffles.pastilage and.marzipan, short 
doughs, and meringues.The student will be instructed in the latest 
preparation methods, innovative ideas for impressive plate presen- 
tations, and techniques that utilize specialized equipment and tools 
to make high-tech, novelle creations. 

HOSP 21 5 Front Office 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 114 and MKTG 101.Presents a systematic 
approach to front offi ce procedures, detailing the flow of business 
through a hotel beginning with the reservation process and ending 
with billing and collection procedures within the context of the over- 
all operation of a hotel.Students will examine front office manage- 
ment, the process of handling complaints and concerns regarding 
hotel safety and security.Students will become involved in the 
processes for forecasting future business, sales, and rate structure of 
the hotel as well as methods for budgeting hotel finances for success. 

HOSP 217 Housekeeping 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 114 and MKTG 101. Introduces the fundamen- 
tals of housekeeping operations.Emphasis is placed on employee 
development, management skills, OSHA standards and property 
maintenance and up-keep.Budgeting, cost controls.proper staffing 
and planning a fiscal budget are also emphasized in this course. 

HOSP 220 Biology and Chemistry of Food 
Manufacturing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIOL 121 and CHEM 105. An introduction to basic biol- 
ogy and chemistry that contribute to the success of modern food 
production. Emphasis will be given to the science behind the manu- 
facturing of food products from basic microbiology in fermentation 



to future contributions of genetic engineering. In addition, the stu- 
dent will learn the rationale behind food spoilage, good quality con- 
trol, and sanitary methodology in food production environments. 

HOSP 221 Catering Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides instruction in the 
fundamentals of catering; including the business of supplying food, 
goods, and organized service for public and private 
functions.Subjects to be covered include staffing, equipment, trans- 
portation, contracting, special arrangements, beverage service and 
menu planning.Students will practice techniques of setting up ban- 
quets and buffets.Students are required to plan, budget, cost, test 
recipes and formats, plan decor, service and entertainment for 
catered events. 

HOSP 230 Wedding Cake Production I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: HOSP 208.This course will introduce the student to the 
fundamentals of wedding cake production. It will engage the stu- 
dent in elementary, handmade production of various styles of prod- 
ucts including stacked and separated tiered cakes. In addition, this 
course will review and expand upon decorating techniques covered 
in HOSP 208. It further engages the student in decorative techniques 
of select cakes.The student will apply the basic principles of sanita- 
tion and safety in the foodservice operation. Student will apply the 
fundamentals of baking science to the preparation of a variety of 
wedding cakes, icings, and fillings. 

HOSP 231 Wedding Cake Production II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: HOSP 208, HOSP 230.This course will build on the fun- 
damentals of wedding cake production acquired in Wedding Cake 
Production I. It will engage the student in advanced, handmade pro- 
duction of various styles of advanced decorating techniques includ- 
ing rolled fondant, gum paste decorations, and pastillage and piping 
techniques. Successful completion of this class should provide the 
student with sufficient skills to acquire and excel in a job as an 
advanced wedding cake decorator. 

HOSP 232 Plated Desserts and Pastry Salon Work 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: HOSP 209, HOSP 230.This course will build on the fun- 
damentals mastered in Classical Pastries and Advanced Decorating 
and Candies. The class will focus on developing plated desserts that 
are appropriate for restaurant and hotel menus. Themes include: bal- 
ancing a dessert menu with flavors, textures, temperatures and visu- 
al appeal, seasonality of ingredients. Emphasis will be placed on cre- 
ative plate presentation and artistry. The class will look at the pro- 
duction restrictions that may be present under different shop condi- 
tions. It will take into account challenges presented by staffing, facil- 
ity and service volume. The salon portion of the class will give an 
overview of competitive pastry work based on ACF student stan- 
dards. Final project will be an intra-class, team, salon competition. 



HOSP 270 Bakery Merchandising 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOSP 112.Education and practice in merchandising 
techniques with an emphasis on the baking and pasty field.The 
majority of a student's time will be spent in all pertinent phases of 
retail bakeshop operation or in the field observing merchandising 
in action. 

HOSP 271 The Mechanics of Meeting Planning 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: HOSP 171.An in-depth examination of the meetings 
and conventions industry, this class will focus on the operational 
aspects of the various industry segments and the intra-industry 
interactions of each.The course will provide an in-depth study and 
application of the techniques used for successful meetings, conven- 
tions and expositions. The text used is one of the main components 
used to study for the Certified Meeting Professional (CMP) examina- 
tion - the highest level of expertise in meetings management.Class 
activity will help prepare the student for the CMP examination. 

HOSP 272 The Tourism System 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Tor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 050.0esigned to develop an understanding of travel 
trends and modes and the social, environmental, and economic 
impact on destination areasJhe course explores major concepts in 
tourism,what makes tourism possible, and how tourism can become 
an important factor in the wealth of any nation. Emphasis is given to 
local, regional, and national tourism. 

HOSP 280 Co-op/Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.A practical experience in a 
commercial/non-commercial foodservice or hotel establishment in 
order to build specialized skills.This work-based experience provides 
an opportunity for students to transfer their academic preparation 
into actual work-based learning by acquiring "real world"skills and 
building ties with the business/professional community.(Students 
should have a site in mind prior to registering for this course-coor- 
dinator will assist.) 

HPER 205 Structural Kinesiology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Tor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 044. Fundamental concepts concerning the interac- 
tion of biological and mechanical aspects of the musculoskeletal 
and neuromuscular structures.Emphasis on practical application to 
study and teaching of skilled human movement. Laboratory sessions 
focus on anatomy of the musculoskeletal system with application to 
human movement in sport,physical education, and daily activities. 

HPER 211 Introduction to Sport Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of Tor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 and 



MATH 044. An examination of the broad spectrum of career opportu- 
nities available in the sport management profession. Includes career 
planning, sport management terminology, and an overview of specific 
skills and courses required for professional preparation in sport man- 
agement. Fundamental aspects of the management functions as each 
relates to sport and fitness organizations. A preliminary investigation 
of managerial roles and skills, and their effects on interpersonal, 
group, and organizational relationships. 

HPER 21 2 Introduction to Exercise Science 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C"or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044. An introduction to the science of exercise and 
human movement. Special topics in exercise physiology, sport bio- 
mechanics, sports medicine, and motor integration. 

HPER 216 Current Concepts in Physical Fitness 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 044. Introduction to physical fitness and the role of 
exercise in health and wellness. Understanding the concepts, princi- 
ples, and guidelines for fitness exercise and related activities. Use of 
physical fitness assessment data to plan and carry out a personal 
fitness program. 

HUMA 100 Theatre Appreciation TransferlN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Developing understanding, appreciation and critical percep- 
tions of the theatrical event.The course will approach theatre as an 
art form, an entertainment medium and as a vehicle for self-expres- 
sion. Emphasis will be placed on the history of theatre, acting, 
directing, playwriting, theatre technology, costume design, scenic 
design, and lighting design.Active participation in the playwriting, 
acting, directing and designing processes will be provided.The 
course will also require attendance at theatrical events to offer first- 
hand experience in theatre arts. 

HUMA 117 Introduction to Music Theory 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Emphasizes the practical learning of basic music skills and will 
cover fundamental music terminology, notation and structure.Sight 
singing and listening skills will also be developed through examples 
drawn from a wide variety of musical styles. 

HUMA 118 Music Appreciation TransferlN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade ofTor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Introduces the student to music with an emphasis on critical 
listening. Surveys a variety of genres, composers and their composi- 



tions.No previous background in musk required 

HUMA 201 Introduction to Humanities I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 11 .Introduces the student to a wide variety of 
unique creations of the individual imagination.The overall purpose 
of the course is to deepen and broaden the student's enjoyment of 
the humanistic disciplines at both the level of feeling and the level 
of understanding from pre-history to the Renaissance. 

HUMA 202 Introduction to Humanities II 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .Introduces the student to a wide variety of 
unique creations of the individual imagination.The overall purpose 
of the course is to deepen and broaden the student's enjoyment of 
the humanistic disciplines at both the level of feeling and the level 
of understanding from the Renaissance to the present 

HUMS 101 Introduction to Human Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of T or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Explores the history of human services, career opportunities, 
and the role of the human service worker. Focuses on target popula- 
tions and community agencies designed to meet the needs of vari- 
ous populations. 

HUMS 102 Helping Relationship Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Tor better in EMGI. 025 and EMGI 
032. Provides opportunities to increase effectiveness in helping peo- 
ple. Examines the helping process in terms of stalls, helping stages, 
and issues involved in a helping relafjonshipiecond in a series of 
three introductory human services courses. 

HUMS 103 Interviewing and Assessment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 101 and HUMS 102 or CRIM 101 and CRIM 103. 
Introduces and develops basic interviewing staBsJndudes assess- 
ment strategies and treatment planningJhird in a series of three 
introductory human services courses. 

HUMS 104 Crisis Intervention 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Tor better in ENGL 025 and EMGI 
032. Provides beginning training for people who anticipate or are 
presently working with people in crisis situations. 

HUMS 105 Introduction to Correctional 
Rehabilitation Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 101 or CRIM lOUndudes a study of crime and 
how society is affected 

HUMS 1 06 Physiology of Aging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Tor better in ENGL 025 and EMGL 
032. Focuses on the physical changes and common pathologies 



117 



associated with the aging process.lncludes the psychological and 
social implications of changes for human behavior.Focuses on 
health promotion and disease prevention. 

HUMS 107 Human Services Topical Seminar 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Discusses topics of current 
interest in human services.Focuses on special interest projects for 
students in human services.Utilizes field trips, guest speakers, 
audiovisual activities and seminars. 

HUMS 108 Psychology of Aging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PSYC lOl.Covers the major behavioral changes in 
adulthood and aging.Students explore their own feelings about 
aging as well as the attitudes of society. 

HUMS 109 Understanding Diversity 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and 
ENGL 032. Introductory course that encourages cultural awareness 
and appreciation of diversity. Focuses on cultural variations in atti- 
tudes, values, language, gestures, and customs. Includes informa- 
tion about major racial and ethnic groups in the United States. 

HUMS 110 Women's Issues 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Major issues and social problems related to women through an 
interdisciplinary analysis of social institutions and movements for 
social change as they affect women. Focus is on 21st century trends 
in institutions such as the family, law, medicine, education and other 
social interaction. 

HUMS 112 Recreation for Special Populations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Studies the nature and etiology of impairments including 
developmental disabilities, mental illness,physical disabilities, and 
geriatrics and their potential impact upon an individual's ability to 
participate in recreational activities.Explores techniques needed to 
conduct a recreation program that allows successful participation by 
an individual with a disability. 

HUMS113 Problems of Substance Abuse 

in Society 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Introductory course that provides basic information about the 
problems of alcohol and other drug abuse.Explores symptoms and 
effects of abuse and dependence on individuals, families, and socie- 
ty.Class can be used toward ICAADA certification. 



118 



HUMS 114 Social Services in Long-Term Care 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides practical and useful information about 
aging and institutionalization.Focuses on the role of social services 
within the long-term care facility.lndiana State Department of 
Health State Certification requires 48 hours of attendance. 

HUMS 116 Introduction to Disabilities 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides background knowledge of the field of 
mental retardation/developmental disabilities and issues pertaining 
to the field. 

HUMS 117 Foundations of Direct Support 
Professionals 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. A broad overview of the major concepts associ- 
ated with providing support to individuals with disabilities in the 
community. The curriculum meets state and federal guidelines for 
direct support staff training. Students successfully completing the 
course will receive a state sanctioned certificate. 

HUMS 120 Health and Aging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Presents an overview of the physical changes and common 
pathologies associated with the aging process.Focuses on the psy- 
chological and social implication of such changes for human behav- 
ior. Throughout the course there is a focus on health promotion and 
disease prevention during the later years. 

HUMS 122 Youth and Family Treatment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Designed to allow the student exposure to applications of theo- 
ries and practical solutions to the challenges facing residential child- 
care workers.lntroduction of the impact of cultural differences with- 
in the residential setting.lntroduction to the job performance expec- 
tations of residential childcare workers, including working with plac- 
ing agencies and families of the residents in the facility. 

HUMS 123 Health and Wellness/Disabilities 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the health and medical aspects of 
assisting people with disabilities. Upon completion, students should 
be able to identify and implement strategies to promote wellness 
and manage health conditions. 

HUMS 124 Activity Director Basic 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Explores the philosophy and investigates the 
development of therapeutic activity programs for older persons. 
Focuses on activities that will meet the individual's physical, social, 
and emotional needs. 

HUMS 126 Community Integration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces students to the knowledge, skills 
and attitudes necessary for a direct support professional to success- 



fully support persons with developmental disabilities in inclusive 
community settings 

HUMS 1 27 Positive Personal Support 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 116. Designed for Direct Service Provide to help 
those with disabilities achieve independent living behaviors. 

HUMS 128 Disability Support Teams 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 1 17 and HUMS 116. Introduces the student to 
the essential characteristics of an effective team as well as the 
strategies they can use to be an active member of the team. 

HUMS 130 Social Aspects of Aging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Covers major theories and patterns of aging in American socie- 
ty.Covers social institutions and cultural factors that affect the aging 
process. 

HUMS 135 Love, Romance and Relationships 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Examines the key elements of healthy relationships. Explores 
the main problems that damage relationships. Presents research 
findings on successful and unsuccessful relationships. Examines how 
couples can improve intimacy, romance, and emotional connection. 
Explores the impact of one's emotional and relationship history on 
current and future romantic relationships. Presents practical, scien- 
tific-based skills for improving relationships. 

HUMS 140 Loss and Grief 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Introductory course that provides practical and useful informa- 
tion for people who have experienced loss.Students have the oppor- 
tunity to evaluate their own experiences and attitudes toward loss 
and grief. 

HUMS 180 Ethics in Helping Professions 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032. 
Introductory level course provides overview of legal and ethical 
aspects in the field of workers in social service settings. Includes topics 
such as personal schema and how it influences working with others, 
confidentiality, and laws regarding reporting of neglect and abuse. 

HUMS 200 Substance Abuse Internship 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 1 13, HUMS 208, HUMS 209, and HUMS 210. 
Field work experiences in approved substance abuse services 
agency. The student will complete 160 hours under the supervision 
of an agency professional and a college faculty member.The class- 
room component will include small group discussion and analysis of 
the internship experience. 



HUMS 201 Internship I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 101, HUMS 102,and HUMS 103.The first of two 
fieldwork experiences in approved human service agencies.The stu- 
dent will complete 1 60 hours under the supervision of an agency 
professional and a college faculty member.The classroom compo- 
nent will include small group discussion and analysis of the intern- 
ship experience. 

HUMS 202 Internship II 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 201, HUMS 205 and HUMS 206.The second of 
two fieldwork experiences in approved human service agencies.The 
student will complete 160 hours under the supervision of an agency 
professional and a college faculty member.The classroom compo- 
nent will include small group discussion and analysis of the intern- 
ship experience. 

HUMS 205 Behavior Modification/ 

Choice Theory 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 103 orCRIM 255 and PSYC 101.Advanced level 
course focusing on theories of behavioral and reality approaches. 
Develops understanding of terms and practical applications of the 
behavioral and reality approaches used in working with people. 

HUMS 206 Group Process and Skills 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 101, HUMS 102 and HUMS 103.Studies group 
dynamics, issues and behavior.lncludes group functioning and lead- 
ership, guidelines on working effectively with a co-leader, and prac- 
tical ways of evaluating the group processes. 

HUMS 207 Program Planning and 

Policy Issues 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 101, HUMS 102, HUMS 103 and demonstrated 

competency through appropriate assessment or earning a grade or 
"Cor better in MATH 044.Concentrates on the components of 
administration of human service agencies.Addresses practitioner 
skills needed by an administrator or supervisor.Discusses social poli- 
cy and its impact on human services. 

HUMS 208 Treatment Models of • 

Substance Abuse 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 1 13.Describes the various treatment models 
used with chemically dependent clients. Discussion centers on inter- 
vention and treatment models for chemical dependency and their 
role in the recovery process. Course can be applied toward hours for 
ICAADA certification. 

HUMS 209 Counseling Issues in 

Substance Abuse 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 1 13.Explores practice strategies for the worker 
who counsels chemically dependent clients.Course can be applied 
toward hours for ICAADA certification. 



HUMS 210 Issues of Substance Abuse in 

Family Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 113.lntroduction to the characteristics and 
dynamics of families, couples, and significant others affected by sub- 
stance abuse.Examines models of intervention and engagement in 
the treatment and recovery process.Explores the interaction 
between the family system and substance use behaviors. 

HUMS 212 Family and Child Welfare 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 101. Examines contemporary problems facing 
families and children.Evaluates the adequacy of policies, programs, 
and services in the context of changing lifestyles and social forces 
impacting the quality of life. 

HUMS 21 5 Juvenile Delinquency 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 101 or CRIM 105.Provides an overview of the 
concepts, definitions, and measurements of juvenile delinquency. 
Explores various theories that attempt to explain the causes of 
delinquency. Looks at the role of environmental influences (peers, 
gangs, school, drugs) as they contribute to delinquency.Discusses an 
overview of the history and philosophy of the juvenile justice sys- 
tem as well as ways to control and treat juvenile delinquents. 

HUMS 220 Issues and Ethics in 

Human Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 101, HUMS 102 and HUMS 103.Advanced level 
course provides an overview of legal and ethical aspects in the field 
of human services with implications for the human service worker. 
Includes topics such as confidentiality, rights of clients, client 
records, equal protection for staff and clients, and discrimination.The 
Human Service Ethical Code and related codes are covered with an 
overview of ethical dimensions of practice. 

HUMS 240 Rehabilitation Process: Probation 

and Parole 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 105. Provides an understanding of probation 
and parole as an integral part of the criminal justice system with 
special emphasis on current and future trends in this area. Explores 
the role of community corrections and its impact on the role of pro- 
bation and parole in our society in view of the increase in the num- 
ber of offenders. 

HUMS 270 Multicultural Practice 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HUMS 101, HUMS 102, and HUMS 103.This course 
examines, from a theoretical and experiential social work perspec- 
tive, the personal behaviors and institutional factors that have led to 
oppression of ethnic minorities, persons of color or other oppressed 
populations and those practices that serve to maintain inter-group 
tensions. Attention is given to discriminatory practices as related to 
gender, age, religion, disablement, sexual orientation, culture, etc It 
will explore the strategies that the various groups have employed to 



deal with discrimination. Implications to the individual, society and 
the profession are explored. 

HUMS 279 Human Services Social Work 

Bridge Course 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: HUMS 201. Orientation to the profession of social wort 
Course addresses origins, ethics, accreditation, theoretical foundations, 
fields of social work, populations served and diversity. Course buUs on 
material already covered in HMS 101 : Introduction to Human Services. 
Course will meet both at Ivy Tech and the related campus. Course wi 
provide an orientation to the School of Social Wort 

HVAC 101 Heating Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces fundamentals applicable to the heat- 
ing phase of air conditioning.lncludes types of units, parts, basic 
controls, functions, and applications.Emphasizes practices, too) and 
meter use, temperature measurement, heat flow, the combustion 
process and piping installation practices.Covej5 the basic sequence 
of operation for gas, oil and electric furnace. 

HVAC 103 Refrigeration I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduction to compression systems used in 
mechanical refrigeration including the refrigeration cycle and sys- 
tem components.lntroduces safety procedures,proper use of tools 
used to install and service refrigeration equipment, refrigerant 
charging and recovery, system evacuation, calculating superheat and 
subcooling and using a refrigerant temperature/pressure chart 

HVAC 107 Duct Fabrication and Installation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Emphasizes reading blueprints common to the 
sheet metal trade, floor plans, elevations, section, detail and 
mechanical plans.Requires students to develop a layout of an air 
conditioning duct system and frrtincrs.Fabrication of these parts, 
including proper use of hand-tools and shop equipment used to fab- 
ricate duct systems and fittings. 

HVAC 120 Basic Carpentry and Building 

Maintenance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lndudes carpentry basks,power tool and hand 
tool safety and use, framing, hanging doors and windows, trim 
basics, drywatl basics, and painting basics. 

HVAC 122 General Maintenance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Covers required record keeping, plumbing basics 
(fixture repair and replacement piping, bask plumbing code, etc), 
major appliance installation and repair, chemical usage and storage. 
MSDS files, ADA compliance and safety and liabflity topics. 

HVAC 201 Cooling Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HVAC 103.Covers procedures used to rjagnose electri- 
cal, control, mechanical and refrigeration problems common to cool- 
ing systems-Familiarizes students with using the refrigeration cycle ..« 



and temperature/pressure charts as diagnostic tools in trou- 
bleshooting refrigeration system problems.lncludes various meth- 
ods of checking refrigerant charges, methods for charging air condi- 
tioning and refrigeration systems, electrical and refrigeration system 
components, and schematic and pictorial diagrams. 

HVAC 202 Electrical Circuits and Controls 3 Credits 

Prereguisites: INDT 1 B.Studies heating, air conditioning and refrig- 
eration controls typically found on residential and light commercial 
heating and air conditioning eguipment.lncludes gas, oil and elec- 
tric heating controls, cooling controls, thermostats, humidistats, 
aquastats.and electronic controls.Covers operation of controls, inte- 
gration of controls into controls systems, reading schematic and pic- 
torial diagrams, and component troubleshooting and testing, 

HVAC 203 Heat Loss and Gain Calculation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in MATH 044. 
Introduces the student to calculating structural and other heat losses 
for winter heating, and structural and other heat gains for summer . 
air conditioning using an industry standard method of heat loss and 
heat gain calculation. Discusses building construction techniques, 
energy consumption reduction methods and equipment selection. 

HVAC 204 Commercial Refrigeration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HVAC 221. Examines air conditioning and refrigera- 
tion systems for commercial use, including medium and low tem- 
perature applications. Includes specialized commercial refrigeration 
and A/C accessories, metering devices, setting pressure controls for 
direct temperature control, fan cycling and pump down, commercial 
ice production, methods of low ambient control, and advanced con- 
trol arrangements. 

HVAC 205 Heat Pump Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HVAC 103. Familiarizes students with the refrigeration 
cycle as it applies to the heat pump system and the different types 
of heat pump systems.Covers procedures used to diagnose electri- 
cal, control, mechanical and refrigeration problems common to heat 
pump.lncludes sizing of heat pumps, specialized heat pump refrig- 
eration components and electrical controls, the air-to-air heat pump 
defrost cycle, and schematic and pictorial diagrams. 

HVAC 206 Advanced Cooling Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HVAC 106.Studies methods of troubleshooting elec- 
trical and mechanical components of air conditioning and refrigera- 
tion systems. 

HVAC 207 HVAC Codes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Study of state and local codes covering installa- 
tion, repair, alteration, relocation, replacement and erection of heat- 



120 



ing, ventilation, cooling and refrigeration systems-Includes job-relat- 
ed costs of material and equipment, labor.warranty, taxes, permits 
and subcontracts.Students will estimate service and maintenance 
contracts. 

HVAC 208 Heating Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HVAC 101 .Covers procedures used to analyze mechanical 
and electrical problems encountered when servicing heating systems. 
Covers electrical schematics and connection diagrams, combustion 
testing, venting and combustion air requirements, sequence of opera- 
tion, heating controls, troubleshooting techniques, installation prac- 
tices, basic codes applying to furnace codes, and service procedures. 

HVAC 209 Psychrometrics/Air Distribution 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in MATH 044.Studies 
the properties of air during the operational variations of tempera- 
ture and humidity.Discusses the atmospheric conditions and the 
impact of those conditions on the heating-cooling and ventilation 
processes and the design of systems for residential and commercial 
structures. Includes the sizing and confi gurations of air delivery 
duct systems and system design methods. 

HVAC 211 Refrigeration II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HVAC 103 and INDT 113.Continues the study of air 
conditioning and refrigeration with further study of compressors, 
metering devices, system charging, refrigerant recovery, equipment 
installation and an introduction to troubleshooting procedures 
[electrical, mechanical and refrigeration]. Includes clean-up proce- 
dures following compressor burnout and analysis of how a single 
problem affects the rest of the system. Introduces electrical control 
systems and electrical motor basics as they apply to air conditioning 
and refrigeration including motor types, starting components, and 
motor troubleshooting basic. 

HVAC 21 2 Advanced HVAC Controls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 113.Covers control systems beyond ordinary resi- 
dential and single zone commercial applicatibns.lncludes solid state 
controls, 0-10 volt DC and 4-20 milliamp control signals, zoning con- 
trols, modulating controls, low ambient controls, heat recovery and 
energy management controls, economizer controls, 3-phase motor 
protection modules, variable frequency drives [VFDs], remote sensing 
electronic thermostats, electronically commutated DC motor control, 
Direct Digital Control [DDC] systems, multiple-stage heating/cooling 
controls.PLC control of HVAC/R equipment and pneumatic controls. 

HVAC 213 Sales and Service Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Encompasses the use of blueprints, specif! 
cations, application data sheets, bid forms and contracts in estimat- 



ing materials and labor in the HVAC business. Includes advertising, 
direct labor, indirect labor, overhead.warranty costs, taxes, permits, 
subcontracts, margins, mark-ups and profi t. Provides students with 
the opportunity to estimate service contracts and study service 
organization, service procedures, record keeping, parts inventory 
control, and liability insurance. 

HVAC 214 Applied Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides students with the opportunity to 
design and lay out complete HVAC systems. 

HVAC 220 Distribution Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Cor better in MATH 044.Covers 
methods used in calculating building heat loss and gain plus how to 
use this data in sizing equipment and duct systems for residential 
and light commercial applications.lncludes discussion of methods to 
reduce building heating/cooling loads, air flow principles, air deliv- 
ery system design methods, and introduces using a psychrometric 
chart to solve air mixture problems. 

HVAC 271 HVAC Service Projects 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Advisor Approval. This course will focus on two projects 
(or more dependingon the time involved) directly related to the 
HVAC trades. Students will work around other tradesmen of the 
field. We will incorporate into the class the principles of Service 
Learning and Civic Responsibility. 

HVAC 272 EPA Refrigerant Certification Course 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: None. This course will prepare a student to take an EPA 
approved refrigerant certification course. 

IMTC 106 Millwright I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "Cor better in MATH 044. Introduces the 
proper use of hand and power tools and measuring instruments in 
carpentry, blacksmithing, rigging and equipment, machinist and gen- 
eral shop.lncludes structural steel and fabricating terms. 

IMTC 107 Preventative Maintenance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces the major purpose of preventive 
maintenance: to save time and to cut costs.The course will study 
goals such as, reducing losses, improving product quality, boosting 
production efficiency, and increasing profits.lncludes an introduction 
to sound planning, effective scheduling, competent inspection, con- 
trol and actions at the worksite, and follow-up reporting.Lab proj- 
ects will be designed to organize materials, tool control, transporta- 
tion of equipment, sizing up labor requirements. 

IMTC 1 08 Measure and Calibration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 1 1 3. Provides instruction in the purpose, function 
and application of oscilloscopes and related instruments. 



I MTC 110 Coupling and Alignment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of'Cor better in MATH 044. Introduces the 
concepts of correct alignment of industrial process machinery. Provides 
instruction in troubleshooting and repair of coupled machines. 

IMTC 111 Rigging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces the proper techniques of moving 
industrial machinery and equipment. Emphasis is placed on proper 
installation, inspection, safety requirements, and load calculations. 

IMTC 1 1 2 Sheet Metal Layout and Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in MATH 040. 
Examines the procedures used to layout sheet metal components. 
Presents the proper use of hand and machine tools to fabricate 
sheet metal projects. 

IMTC 121 Industrial Safety 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces occupational safety and health stan- 
dards and codes with emphasis on applications of codes to typical 
work situations and MSDS requirements.lncludes emergency first 
aid, safety protection, eye protection and chemicals handling.Covers 
employer and employeeTights as well as violations, citations, penal- 
ties, variances, appeals and record keeping. 

IMTC 122 Electrical Wiring Fund 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 1 13.lntroduces the student to the National 
Electrical Code and its application in designing and installing electri- 
cal circuits, selecting wiring materials and devices, and choosing 
wiring methods.lncludes electrical safety, terminology, interpreta- 
tion of electrical symbols used in construction blueprints,branch cir- 
cuit layout, over current protection, conductor sizing.grounding, GFCI 
& AFCI protection, tool usage, and material/device selection. 

IMTC 271 Industrial Electrical Troubleshooting 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: INDT 113. This course presents methods and tech- 
niques for troubleshooting appliances, motors, motor controls, relay 
wiring, residential wiring, commercial wiring, and industrial wiring. 

INDT 101 Shop Mathematics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides a review of basic operations with num- 
bers, fractions and decimals as a basic foundation.lt presents the 
range of practical mathematics that every machinist is expected to 
use in the classroom and later in the shop in the creation and main- 
tenance of tools, fixtures and industrial devices.The last group of 
practical topics applies math to special calculations as: taper angles, 
gearing ratios, gearing systems, and cutting speeds and feeds. 
Included are applications that three dimensional in nature such as 
angled holes and surfaces that are utilized concepts found in solid 
geometry and trigonometry. 



INDT 102 Introduction to Print Reading 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in MATH 040.Provides 
an introduction to reading and interpreting machine shop sym- 
bols.welding blueprints and working drawings used in trades and 
crafts. Focuses on dimension, shape, fabrication and assembly. 
Applies basic mathematics to the solution of print and performance 
problems. 

INDT 103 Motors and Motor Controls 

Prerequisite: INDT 113. A general understanding of common types of 
electric motors, extending from the small shaded.pole fan motors to 
the large three-phase motors. Topics covered will include motor theo- 
ry, magnetism and how it affects motor rotation, motor starting com- 
ponents and protective devices for motor circuits. Heat dissipation 
from a motor, motor slippage, how they are wired to obtain different 
speeds, and how capacitors affect a motor circuit will be included. 

INDT 104 Fluid Power Basics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'Cor better in MATH 
O40.lntroduces fluid power principles and components.Teaches basic 
circuit design through the use of symbols and schematic diagrams to 
build a foundation for career work in fluid power technology. 

INDT 105 Industrial Solid State 

Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 103 and INDT 1 13.5tudies the fundamentals of 
solid-state active devices that are used in automated systems. 
Introduces the student to the theory of basic solid-state devices 
such as diodes, transistors, and SCR's and applications such as ampli- 
fiers, op amps, and switching power supplies.Prepares students to 
diagnose, repair, verify, and install electronic circuits and systems. 

INDT 106 Introduction to the Workplace 

and Safety 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces basic safety instruction including 
OSHA requirements and other concerns (MSDS, confined space, lock 
out/tag out, zero energy state, hazardous materials, storage of flam- 
mable materials, storage of fuel gas and high pressure gas cylinders, 
portable powered tool safety, hand tool safety, record keeping, train- 
ing.employer enforcement of safety regulations, right to know, 
etc.j.lncludes an introduction to measuring instruments, hand tools, 
portable powered tools, and procedures that are pertinent to the 
mix of specialties on the campus.Lab projects will be designed to 
reinforce safety procedures and develop competency levels in using 
the measuring instruments, hand tools and portable powered tools 
introduced in the course. 



INDT 107 Heating and Air Conditioning Basics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Presents fundamentals of heating and compres- 
sion systems used in mechanical refrigeration .Includes combustion 
process, heat flow, temperature measurement gas laws, heating and 
refrigeration cycles and components used in systems. 

INDT 108 Metrology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'Cor better in MATH 050. Instructs 
a student in mechanical precision measurement techniques and 
applications. Provides instruction and laboratory experiences in sur- 
face plate inspections, optical comparators, hardness testing, and 
coordinate measuring machines (CMM). Discusses calibration and 
measurement system analysis. 

INTD 110 History of Interiors and Furniture 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 031 
Survey development of the interrelationship of architecture, interi- 
ors, furniture, and decorative arts from antiquity through the ages. 

INDT 113 Basic Electricity 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through a ppropr iate 
assessment or earning a grade of'Cor better in MATH 044.The study 
of electrical laws and principles pertaining to DC and AC droits is the 
focus of the course.This indudes current voltage, resistance, power, 
inductance, capacitance, and transformersitresses the use of stan- 
dard electrical tests, electrical equipment and troubleshooting proce- 
dures. Safety procedures and practices are emphasized. 

INDT 114 Introductory Welding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides basic skills and fundamental knowl- 
edge in oxy-fuel welding, cutting and brazing. Shield Metal Arc 
welding, Gas Metal Arc welding and Gas Tungsten Arc weidmg.This 
cou5e is designed for beginning welders, auto service and body 
technicians, and individuals in the HVAC industry.Emphasizes safe 
practices in oxy-fuel and Arc welding processes. 

INDT 120 Metallurgy Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the fundamentals of thenrodynamics 
and reactions occurring in metals subjected to various lands of heat 
treatment. Indudes dassification and properties of metals, chemical 
and physical metallurgy, theory of alloys, heat treatment principles 
as applied to ferrous and non-ferrous materials, test to determine 
uses, heat treatment for steels, special steels, and cast iron, powder 
metallurgy, and use of gas and electric furnaces and their controls. 

INDT 131 Introduction to Process Technology 3 Credits 
Prerequisite: None. Introduction to power plant systems including 
boiler, turbine, generator, condenser, pumps, and auxiliary equip- 



121 



ment. Emphasizes the use of schematics and diagrams in discussing 
plant systems. Includes plant safety training. 

INDT 1 32 Process Technology I (Equipment) 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 131. Provides an overview of the equipment and 
tools used in the process industry; including piping, tubing, hoses 
and fittings, valves, pumps, compressors, turbines, motors and 
engines, power transmission and lubrication, heat exchangers, cool- 
ing towers, furnaces and boilers, filters and dryers, vessels, and 
process diagrams. Students will be introduced to many process- 
related equipment concepts, such as purpose, components, opera- 
tion, and the process technician's role for operating and trou- 
bleshooting the equipment. 

INDT 133 Process Technology II (Systems) 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 131. Provides an overview of the equipment and 
tools used in the process industry; including piping, tubing, hoses 
and fittings, valves, pumps, compressors, turbines, motors and 
engines, filters and dryers, vessels, and process diagrams. Students 
will be introduced to many p/ocess-related equipment concepts, 
such as purpose, components, operation, and the process techni- 
cian's role for operating and troubleshooting the equipment. 

INDT 134 Process Technology III (Operations) 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 133. Provides an overview of the field of opera- 
tions within the process industry. Students will use existing knowl- 
edge of equipment, system, and instrumentation to understand the 
operation of an entire unit. Students study concepts related to com- 
missioning, normal startup, normal operations, normal shutdown, 
turnarounds, and abnormal situations as well as the process techni- 
cian's role in performing the tasks associated with these concepts 
within an operating unit. 

INDT 201 Fluid Power Systems 
(Hydraulics/Pneumatics) 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 104. Introduces the student to more complex 
fluid power circuits. Requires students to design, analyze and trou- 
bleshoot complex circuits using schematic diagrams. Studies 
detailed construction of typical industrial fluid power components. 
Teaches students to disassemble and evaluate fluid power compo- 
nents in the lab. 

INDT 203 Machine Maintenance/ Installation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in MATH 
044.Examines the procedures for the removal, repair and installation 
of machine components.The methods of installation, lubrication 
practices, and maintenance procedures for industrial machinery are 
analyzed.Also presented are the techniques involved in the calibra- 
tion and repair of mechanical devices and the practice in computa- 
tions pertaining to industrial machinery. 



122 



INDT 204 Electrical Circuits 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 113.This course is designed to provide an under- 
standing of circuits using alternating current and the motor opera- 
tion. Provides fundamentals of single- and three-phase alternating 
current. Analysis of series and parallel circuits, containing resistance, 
inductance, and capacitance will be covered.Transformer applica- 
tions both single phase and three-phase along with power distribu- 
tion will be covered.This course will give each student a general 
understanding of common types of electric motors, extending from 
the small shaded pole fan motors to the large three-phase motors. 
Direct current motors will also be covered.The student will receive 
an education in motor theory, magnetism and how it affects motor 
rotation, and how capacitors affect a motor circuit will be included. 

INDT 205 Programmable Controllers I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 113, ADMF 113, OR EECT 101. Introduces the 
basic theory, operation and programming of programmable logic 
controllers. Demonstrates programming examples, set-up examples 
and troubleshooting, as well as PLC timing, counting, arithmetic and 
logic and sequencers. 

INDT 206 Programmable Controllers II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 205.Serves as a further introduction to the field 
of industrial controls-Students will learn the principles of control 
systems and how they are applied to a production system to achieve 
automation.Systems included in the courses are stepper motors.pro- 
grammable logic controllers, microprocessors, computers and feed- 
back systems.Emphasis is placed on programmable logic controllers 
and the local area network. 

INDT 207 Process Control and Automation I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIM6102.MATH 111, INDT 102, INDT 103, INDT 203, 
INDT 207 and INDT 206.lntroduces the student to Process Control 
and Automation, combining the elements of the prerequisite classes 
into a culmination of a complete manufacturing process.Basic ele- 
ments of the automation system and programming fundamentals 
are studied and individual systems are examined. 

INDT 208 Process Control and Automation II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 207. Continues to explore the Process Control 
and Automation system combining the new elements with previous 
classes into the culmination of a more complex manufacturing 
process.The student will study hardware elements of the automa- 
tion system and intermediate programming fundamentals for indi- 
vidual systems. 

INDT 209 Process Control and Automation III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 208.Finalizes the Process Control and 
Automation system by employing new hardware and software ele- 
ments to complete process.The student will build, operate and trou- 
bleshoot the process system to stimulate manufacturing procedures. 



INDT 210 Pumps 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 104.Covers the construction and operation of 
centrifugal, reciprocating.metering, special, and rotary pumps and 
their components.lncludes procedures of troubleshooting, installa- 
tion and maintenance. 

INDT 21 1 1ndustrial Instrumentation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 113 and demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in MATH 
050. Provides instruction in the purpose, function, and application of 
process control instruments relative to manufacturing and industrial 
technology. 

INDT 212 Programmable Controllers III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 206.Serves as an introduction to advance topics 
the field of programmable controllers.Use of the latest technology 
and software will be stressed.ControlLogix, Operator Interfaces, and 
Networking will be some of the areas covered.ln addition use of spe- 
cial high level functions and I/O modules will be covered such as PID 
loops, servo control, and use of multiple processors. 

INDT 213 Pipe Fitting Basics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 102 or CONT 106.Acquaints the maintenance tech- 
nician with a basic foundation and pipe fitting skills necessary to 
make repairs or layout new pipe. Includes determination of the type 
and quantity of material needed to complete a task and joining those 
materials in the proper manner with a minimum of supervision. 

INDT 214 Advanced Industrial Mechanics I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 203. Examines the operation and design of 
mechanical systems including belt drives, chain drives, gearboxes, 
and bearings.lncludes the proper use of portable tools and the study 
of different metals. 

INDT 215 Advanced Industrial Mechanics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 203 and INDT 103.Teaches advanced mechanical 
maintenance skills which specifically include vibration analysis, laser 
shaft alignment, lubrication oil analysis.pumps, seals, gaskets, and 
couplings.Half of the semester is also devoted to teaching the basics 
of heating and air conditioning. 

INDT 216 Industrial Automation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HVAC 105, INDT 207 and TECH 104Xovers the field of 
industrial automation.lntroduces the principles of control systems 
both analog and digital based.Covers instrumentation and sensors; 
position, speed, thermal, pressure, flow, and level.Develop an under- 
standing of analog and digital signal conditioning as applied to auto- 
mated systems.Covers the principles of process controllers both ana- 
log and digital.Understand control loop characteristic and tuning. 

INDT 217 Advanced Motor Drives 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 103 and HVAC 105-Covers the field of industrial 
motor drives.dc, ac, servo and stepper motors.lntroduces students to 



variable voltage dc drives and variable frequency ac drives.Topics 
covered will include installation, setup, maintenance, and trouble- 
shooting of drive systems. 

INDT 218 Power Plant Mechanics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 207 and MATH 1 1 1.Presents the basic elements 
in the power plant, the function, their mode of operation, and the 
mechanics.with emphasis on the construction and repair of power 
plant mechanics.The student selects, troubleshoots, and repairs 
power plant mechanics. 

INDT 231 Safety, Health, and Environment I 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Provides an introduction to the field of safety, 
health, and environmental concerns within the process industry. 
Within this course, you will be introduced to various types of plant 
hazards, safety and environmental systems and equipment, and the 
regulations under which processing plants are governed. 

INDT 232 Principles of Quality 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: INDT 131 . Provides an introduction to the field of quali- 
ty within the process industry. Students will be introduced to many 
process industry-related quality concepts including operating con- 
sistency, continuous improvement, plant economics, team skills, and 
statistical process control (SPC). 

INDT 233 Process Instrumentation I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: INDT 131 . Provides an introduction to the field of 
Instrumentation and covers process variables and the various instru- 
ments used to sense, measure, transmit, and control those variables. 
This course also introduces control loops and the elements that are 
found in different types of loops, such as controllers, regulators, and 
final control elements. The course concludes with a study of instru- 
mentation drawings and diagrams and a unit on troubleshooting 
instrumentation. 

INDT 234 Process Troubleshooting 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: INDT 132. Course involves instruction in the different 
types of process technology troubleshooting techniques, procedures, 
and methods used to solve process problems.Topics include applica- 
tion of data collections and analysis, cause-effect relationships, and 
reasoning. 

INDT 260 Problem Solving and Teamwork 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and MATH 111, or MATH 118 and Program 
Advisor Approval. Covers critical thinking skills, collection and ana- 
lyzing data, and quality control overview, teamwork, problem solv- 
ing and*3ecision making techniques as they apply to a technological 
environment.As a capstone course for the Manufacturing and 
Industrial Technology program, this course is designed to reinforce 
and apply the knowledge and skills learned in previous communica- 
tion,mathematics and technical courses and foster team and indi- 
vidual skills through experiments, case studies.problem solving proj- 
ects, and a writing project. 



INDT 272 Control Logix 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. This course serves as a further introduction to 
the field of industrial controls. Students will learn the principles of 
control systems and how they are applied to a production system to 
achieve automation. Systems included in the courses are stepper 
motors, programmable logic controllers, microprocessors, computers 
and feedback systems. Emphasis is placed on programmable logic 
controllers and the local area network. 

INDT 273 Electrical Troubleshooting 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Presents methods and techniques for trou- 
bleshooting appliances, motors, motor controls, relay wiring, com- 
mercial wiring and industrial wiring systems. 

INDT 274 Flux Core Arc Welding 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: INDT 1 14 or background in GMAW or Instructor's 
Approval. Provides basic skills and fundamental knowledge in Flux 
Core Arc Welding (FCAW).Gas shielded wire as well as Innershield 
wires are utilized in the course. Safe lab practices include oxy-fuel 
cutting, plasma arc cutting (P.A.C.), and storage and handling of 
high pressure cylinders. 

INDT 280 Co-op/Internship 1 -3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Program Advisor Approval. Gives students the opportu- 
nity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career 
objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit 
toward an associate degree. 

INSC 101 Introduction to Insurance 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Presents an introduction to the profession of 
insurance. The course includes an overview of the insurance indus- 
try, types of coverage that exist, insurance processes and expected 
outcomes. 

INSC 210 Property and Liability 
Insurance Principles 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032,and 
MATH 044. Provides overview of the insurance business and an 
understanding of basic principles of property and liability insurance. 

INSC 220 Personal Insurance 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: INSC 210 or Advisor Approval. Analyzes personal loss 
exposures and insurance including homeowners and other dwelling 
coverage, personal liability, inland marine, auto, life, health insur- 
ance, and financial planning. 

INSC 230 Commercial Insurance 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: INSC 220 or Advisor Approval. Explores commercial cov- 
erage's and loss exposures including property, business income, 
marine, crime, boiler and machinery, general liability, auto, workers 
compensation, business owners, miscellaneous coverages, and sure- 
ty bonding. 



INSE 101 Introduction to Information 

Systems Security 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINT 106 and CM 121 . Students wi explore the field of 
information systems security focusing on the technical aspects of the 
discipline. Students will be introduced to the basic terms, concepts, 
and buzzwords of computer and network security and best practices. 
roles and responsibilities of management and security personnel This 
course explains the fundamentals of communication, infrastructures, 
operational security, and methods for preventing attacks, areas of risk 
management, physical security, and cryptography. 

INSE 201 Risk Management/Cyber Terrorism 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INSE 101, CINT 251, and CINT 253. Students wi team 
principles of incident response and disaster recovery. The student 
will learn to identify vulnerabilities and take appropriate counter- 
measures to prevent and mitigate risks to an organization. The stu- 
dent will learn planning, assessing the risks, incident response, con- 
tingency planning, and prioritizing systems for disaster recovery. 
The role of management and the relationships of various members 
of an organization will be discussed Students wiH learn how to cre- 
ate a hardened network by developing and implementing poSdes 
and procedures, and how to restore a network in the event of a 4s- 
aster. Topis of discussion will also include cyber terrorism and its 
prevention and countermeasures. 

INSE 202 Advanced Routers/Firewalls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INSE 101 and CINT 252. Provides an advanced under- 
standing of the fundamental concepts involved in firewalls, routers, 
intrusion detection, intrusion prevention and VPN's and where they 
fit into a network security program. Students wM learn advance 
installation techniques, discuss how to make intelligent choices in 
firewall and/or router technology, and learn advanced troubleshoot- 
ing. This course provides a comprehensive look at their use with 
other network security components and how they combine with 
DMZs, routers, and VPNs for optimal perimeter security. The student 
will study such topics as packet filtering, proxy servers, authentica- 
tion, encryption, and securing host computers. Hands-on practical 
application will also be included. 

INSE 210 Secure Coding Theory and 

Application 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: CINS 221. Presents the steps for writing, testing, and 
deploying good, robust, and security-enhanced code. Subjects cov- 
ered include:Thread modeling. Secure code Bfecyde, Buffer over- 
flows, race conditions, and format string problems. Inputs and 
clients, File systems, Cryptography applications, UMLsec Java securi- 
ty. Reverse engineering. 

INSE 211 Cryptography 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: INSE 1 01 . Students will learn about cryptography as an 
indispensable resource for implementing strong security in real- 



123 



world applications. Students will learn why conventional crypto 
schemes, protocols, and systems are vulnerable. The course will 
cover the foundations of cryptography using simple mathematical 
terms: probability, information theory, computational complexity, 
number theory, and algebraic techniques. The student will assess 
the strength of several standards and use formal methods to prove 
their security and efficiency. Students will discuss zero-knowledge 
protocols: their characteristics, development, arguments, and 
proofs, symmetrical and asymmetrical encryption, digital signatures, 
Kerberos, code signing, creation/deployment of strong keys and 
passwords, Virtual Private Networks, SET, and SSL 

INTD 101 Design Theory 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces theory and color dynamics as applied 
to compositional design. Includes exploration and application of 
three-dimensional concepts, human factors and the psychology and 
social influences of space. 

INTD 102 Drafting and Construction 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides an understanding of building struc- 
tures, residential construction techniques, building materials and 
blueprint reading.lncludes building codes and the preparation of 
plans, elevations, sections, and details as they relate to construction 
drawings. 

INTD 103 Introduction to Interior Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.An introductory course, which provides students 
with an overview of the field of interior design.Exercises include small 
sale space analysis and functional planning based on user needs, 
application of the principles of design, furniture arrangement and 
selection, interior finish considerations and presentation techniques. 

INTD 104 Textiles for Interiors 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.An intensive study of textiles from fiber identifi- 
cation and classification to finish.Also introduces the study of interi- 
or textile fabrications including window treatments, upholstery, car- 
pet and wall coverings. 

INTD 1 05 Design Presentations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INTD 102.Presents the elements of two- and threedi- 
mensional representational drawings and design concepts.Studies 
include basic drawing, drafting and perspective techniques; color 
rendering, material board preparation and client presentation. 

INTD 108 Interior Design II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INTD 102 and INTD 103 and INTD 105.Presents con- 
cept development, programming and space planning of the interior 
environment. Exercises reinforce creativity and problem solving 
skills. Emphasizes the relationship between individuals and their 
surroundings, including studies in human scale.proxemics and 
design considerations for special populations. 



124 



INTD 109 History of Interiors I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and 
ENGL 032. Survey of the development of the interrelationship of 
architecture, interiors, furniture, and decorative arts from antiquity 
through the ages. 

INTD 110 History of Interiors and Furniture 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Survey of the development of the interrelationship of architec- 
ture, interiors, furniture, and decorative arts from antiquity through 
the ages. 

INTD 1 1 5 Basic CAD for Interior Designers 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: INTD 102, demonstrated competency through appro- 
priate assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in MATH 050 or 
MATH 070. Introduces fundamentals of Computer-Aided Drafting 
(CAD) for environmental designers. Includes overview of CAD sys- 
tems, use of software, and printer/plotter applications. 

INTD 200 Lighting and Building Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INTD 102 and INTD 216.Presents the integration of 
commercial and institutional interior design and architectural 
detailing. Includes the impact of mechanical and electrical systems, 
acoustics and codes.Special emphasis will be placed on lighting 
technology and application. 

INTD 201 Interior Materials 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of a "C" or better in MATH 044. Examines the 
physical properties and characteristic of various furniture and deco- 
rative materials, finishes, and architectural detailing including floor 
and wall treatments.Addresses environmental issues and problems in 
specifying, estimating, and installing these materials. 

INTD 202 Contract Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INTD 216 and INTD 108.Studies include commercial 
technological and base building requirements, barrier-free, building 
and life safety codes, analysis of existing conditions, client interview, 
and square footage and space planning standards.Emphasis is on 
task analysis and workstation design, systems and equipment man- 
ufacturers and finish selections within the office. 

I NTD 203 Professional Practice 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INTD 103 or GRDN 114. Introduction to business prin- 
ciples and practices as they relate to the environmental design pro- 
fession. Includes business formation and management, professional 
ethics and organizations, certification and licensing, design liability 
and project management. Special topic involving consumer behav- 
ior, sales techniques and fee structuring will also be addressed. 



INTD 204 Interior Design III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Students will research and 
develop creative project solutions for commercial interiors in visual 
merchandising, hospitality, adaptive reuse and special population 
projects.Students will define, research, and develop a program for an 
advanced design problem including concept development, space 
planning, all necessary working drawings and specifications and 
appropriate presentation materials. 

INTD 209 Portfolio Preparation/Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Efforts are directed toward 
achieving a career in environmental design.lncludes a comprehen- 
sive program assessment exam, the development of a quality port- 
folio and resume, and necessary field experience. 

INTD 21 1 Kitchen and Bath Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INTD 102 and INTD 201. Involves the requirements and 
space planning for kitchens and baths, utilizing both standard and 
custom cabinetry and fixtures.Topics also include casework for 
media and conference centers. 

INTD 212 Historic Preservation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INTD 102 and INTD 109.lntroduces the process of 
establishing historic properties.Preservation, restoration and adap- 
tive reuse will be differentiated as applied to both public and private 
properties. Includes appropriate exterior and interior color and finish 
selections, and architectural detailing. 

INTD 215 Advanced CAD and Digital Rendering3 Credits 
Prerequisite: INTD 1 1 5, INTD 216. Reviews the fundamentals of 
Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD) for environmental designers. 
Includes overview of advanced architectural CAD systems and use of 
3-D and rendering software. 

INTD 216 CAD for Environmental Designers 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INTD 102. Introduces fundamentals of CAD (Computer- 
Aided Drafting) for environmental graphics.lncludes overview of CAD 
and systems.use of software and plotter applications.Each student 
will complete an individual project by the end of the semester. 

INTD 217 Visual Merchandising 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Presents students with a survey of the many ele- 
ments of visual merchandising and display currently used in retail 
design and decorative accessorization to attract customers. Students 
are introduced to the principles of retail space planning, fixture 
arrangement and the display equipment required in visual mer- 
chandising including fixtures, mannequins, signage, lightincj^and 
props. Includes research in marketing, color psych, and lighting.Field 
trips and hands-on projects are an integral part of the course. 

INTD 223 History of Interiors II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INTD 109 or ARTH 101 .An in-depth exploration of the 
movements in architecture and interior design from the late 19th 
century to the present. 



INTD 224 Travel Study 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Offers the student an 
opportunity to study the culture and history of another region, with 
an emphasis on art, architecture, interior and garden 
design. Includes pre-trip meetings and lectures, trip journals and 
summary papers. 

INTD 233 Sustainable Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: GRDN 1 14 or INTD 103. Introduces the fundamental 
principles in the ecological planning and development of the natu- 
ral and built home and work environment. Presents the concepts of 
human impact on the environment through studies involving site 
selection and analysis, soil and climate conditions, efficient space 
planning and building design, renewable and environmentally 
responsible construction methods, material selections and sustain- 
able practices. 

INTD 241 Faux Finishing: Basic Glazing 

Techniques 1 credit 

Prerequisites: None. Presents the basics in glazing techniques and 
wall finishes including traditional and contemporary single and 
multi-colored wall glazing. Pigment selection, surface preparation, 
and handling of materials will be discussed and demonstrated. 

INTD 242 Faux Finishing: Italian Plasters 1 credit 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the traditional Italian plaster finish- 
es. Learn how to replicate and incorporate the beautiful textures of 
the Old World into the modern setting. The history of lime-based 
plasters and the interior decorative arts will be discussed. 

INTD 243 Faux Finishing: Patterns 

and Stenciling 1 credit 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the use of stencils and hand painted 
patterns that will repeat and match perfectly. Learn techniques to 
cut patterns and to paint them on the wall or furniture pieces. 

INTD 244 Faux Finishing: Advanced Glazing 
Techniques 1 credit 

Prerequisites: INTD 241. Presents the latest trends in advanced glaz- 
ing techniques and wall finishes. Students will explore in-depth an 
advanced level of faux and decorative finishing while building profi- 
ciency in both techniques and product knowledge. 

INTD 245 Faux Finishing: Painted Furniture 

and Decorative Accessories 1 credit 

Prerequisites: INTD 241 . Covers the techniques of creating unique, 
oneof- a-kind painted furniture and decorative accessories pieces. 
Students will learn how to create a variety of professional finishes 
including multi-layered painted and wood-toned finishes that are 
suitable over raw wood.pre-existing finishes and painted base coats. 

INTD 246 Faux Finishing: Floors and 

Floor Coverings 1 credit 

Prerequisites: NTD 243. Building on the skills acquired in the INTD 



243 course, students will learn the processes and materials required 
to create faux floor finishes and floor coverings. Instruction will be 
given in color, design, painting and finishing techniques. Each stu- 
dent will make one 5'x 8'floor cloth. 

INTD 247 Faux Finishing: Frescoes and Murals 1 credit 

Prerequisites: ARTS 1 20 or INTD 105. Applies basic drawing and 
perspective skills to create frescoes.murals and trompe I'oeil on 
the wall palette. 

INTD 280 Co-op/lntemship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Students work at job sites 
that are specifically related to career objectives.Provides on-the-job 
experience while earning course credit. 

IVYT 070 College and Life Success 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Enhances success in college by assisting stu- 
dents in obtaining skills necessary to reach their educational, career, 
and life objectives. Topics include time management,memory tech- 
niques, textbook usage, note taking, test taking.problem solving and 
decision making, group interaction, communication skills, and 
resource and technology utilization. 

IVYT 071 Study Skills Survey 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Enhances success in college by assisting stu- 
dents in obtaining skills necessary to reach their educational, career, 
and life objectives. Topics include memory, reading, note-taking, 
test-taking techniques, strategies for scheduling time to study, and 
dealing with test anxiety. 

IVYT 072 Research Strategies 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Enhances success in college by assisting stu- 
dents in obtaining skills necessary to reach their educational, career, 
and life objectives, specifically in the area of information literacy. 
Students will learn how to use an email account and a variety of on- 
line resource information databases.Students will learn how to 
gather required information for source citation when summarizing, 
paraphrasing, and quoting resources.The course also addresses basic 
issues concerning informational integrity. 

IVYT 073 Styles of Learning 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Enhances success in college by assisting stu- 
dents in obtaining skills necessary to reach their educational, career, 
and life objectives. Students will learn a holistic, integrated, princi- 
ple-centered approach for solving academic challenges.This course 
represents a step-by-step learning process which provides effective 
tools that help students adapt to change. 

IVYT 101 First Year Seminar 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with specific skills and strate- 
gies necessary to reach their educational, career, and life objectives. 
Topic include time management, study skills, learning styles, cam- 
pus and community resources, critical thinking, utilization of tech- 



nology, career skills, and diversity in society. 

IVYT 102 Information Studies and 

Research Skills 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces students to a variety of information 
skills: understanding how information and knowledge is produced 
and organized; creating a strategy for finding information: using and 
identifying print and electronic resources; locating and evaluating 
information found; citing and documenting information appropri- 
ately; and understanding issues relating to intellectual freedom and 
copyright laws. 

IVYT 1 03 Health and Wellness 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Educates students about the importance of fit- 
ness/ wellness in their everyday lives. Students wM have the oppor- 
tunity to customize their own behavioral plans for fitness/wefciess. 

IVYT 104 Critical Thinking 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Assists students in developing critical thinking 
strategies with academic and workplace applications. 

IVYT 105 Managing Personal Finances 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. An overview of how to manage personal 
finances. The course includes information in the areas of personal 
finances, loans, credit and investing. 

IVYT 106 Career Exploration 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Enhances success in college by assisting stu- 
dents in obtaining the skiHs necessary to identify their Bre. educa- 
tional, and career goals, specifically in the area of academic and pro- 
grammatic offerings that support possible career chokes. 

IVYT 107 Professional Presence 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to 
develop a professional presence in business and social settings. 
Topics include professional communication, proper etiquette and job 
attainment skills. 

IVYT 108 Academic Portfolio and 
Project Development and Management 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. A study of the bask project and portfoio process 
and provides students with the opportunity to plan and develop a 
project or portfolio for academk or professional presentation. 

IVYT 1 09 Online Learning Technologies 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Prepares students to succeed in an onlne learn- 
ing environmenUhe course provides an opportunity to demon- 
strate intellectual, social, and technical skills through the use of 
online technologies. This course also prepares students for onfine 
learning and training opportunities in the workplace. 

IVYT 110 Transfer Success 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None.Examines the essential stifc and information 
needed for transfer to a four-year institution.EmphasEes d e v e lopi n g 



125 



126 



an individual transfer plan. 

IVYT 120 New Student Seminar 3 Credit 

Prerequisites: Minimum entry assessment.Enhances success in col- 
lege by assisting students in obtaining skills necessary to their edu- 
cational, career, and life objectives.Students will create and apply 
critical thinking strategies in areas of time management, media lit- 
eracy, learning styles, study skills, career planning.money manage- 
ment, and resource utilization. 

LAND 101 Landscape Trees 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Identification of shade, ornamental, and ever- 
green trees. Including evaluating species quality, growth habits, site 
adaptability; covers 125 species important to landscaping tree care. 

LAND 102 Shrubs and Other Plants 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. The identification of 125 shrubs, vines.ground 
covers, and herbaceous plants important to landscaping including 
evaluation of growth habits, species quality, and site adaptability. 

LAND 103 Landscape Management I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Methods in the practice of landscaping, tree 
care, and turf management are briefly introduced through lectures, 
slides, videos, and field trips. Weed problems and their control are 
studied.A large segment of the course is devoted to the study of 
non-pathogenic problems of landscape plants and turf as well as 
their pathogenic diseases,and management of these problems. 

LAND 104 Turf Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. A study of the particular growth characteristics 
of the grass species used in lawn areas in the Midwest and Great 
Lakes area.Also covers the competitive influences and how to con- 
trol these problems and promote good turf. 

LAND 105 Landscape Botany 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval.The study of the life of a 
plant; cell structure; the structure and function of roots, stems, 
leaves, flowers, and seeds; the assimilation of water and nutrients in 
the plants growth and the stages of development as well as the 
place and importance of soils.This class is important to one seeking 
qualification as a licensed pesticide applicator. 

LAND 106 Landscape Design I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LAND 101 and LAND 102. Landscape drafting tech- 
niques and basic landscape planning for residential and small busi- 
ness settings utilizing the proper selection of ornamental plants 
consistent with design and environmental requirements.lncluded 
are lectures, slide and fi Im presentations, and lab work with draft- 
ing tools and equipment. 

LAND 201 Landscape Management II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LAND 103.Takes advantage of growing season experi- 
ences to reinforce what is taught in the prerequisite course by text- 



book and lecture.Actual on-site observation, as well as hands on 
experience is planned.Actual practice in the monitoring of pest 
problems is given. 

LAND 202 Landscape Design II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LAND 106. A follow up to Landscape Design I to show 
and give practice in somewhat more sophisticated techniques such 
as enhancement of drawing by color-use.Also, guidance and practice 
in making elevation drawings is given.Some introduction to the use 
of computer-aided drawings is given to the student. 

LAND 203 Insect Pests of Ornamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval. Covers insert identification, 
structure, and life history; pest management of insects important to 
landscaping and tree care. 

LAND 204 Herbaceous Ornamentals 

and Grasses 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval.The identification of 125 
annuals, perennials, and grasses that is important to landscape 
management. Slides and videos are used to introduce a list of non- 
woody plants which students may encounter in operating a land- 
scape business. Bed principles for effective landscape displays will 
be covered. Cultural practices propagation technique, foliage, and 
flower descriptions, watering, disease and insects are discussed. 

LAND 205 Tree Care Practices 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LAND 101 . Covers the basic knowledge and techniques 
used by one employed as an arborist in the care of larger mature 
trees.lncludes dimbing.pruning, takedowns, removals, soil relation- 
ships and fertilization, tools and equipment, and safety procedures. 

LAND 206 Fundamentals of Horticulture 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval.Studies the basic horticulture 
of plant structure, growth, function, and development, including 
propagation, maintenance, and selection.Studies will include use of 
fertilization and pesticides for the control of diseases and pests. 

LAND 207 Soils 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Studies the growth habits and culture of plants 
not particularly ornamental or frequently used in the landscape. 
However, knowledge of these plants will be useful to one employed 
in a garden center or service organization where this person is fre- 
quently expected to know answers to questions pertaining to gar- 
dening and horticulture. 

DBA Liberal Arts Capstone Course 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of 40 program hours and 
Program Advisor approval. Provides a culminating experience 
designed to demonstrate the student's mastery of information liter- 
acy; ethical and responsible behavior; political, social and environ- 
mental responsibility; and diversity awareness, both in general and 
in the student's area of concentration. May require a research proj- 



ect, presentation, and/or portfolio. Requires students to complete 
two sections of a college-approved standardized assessment of pro- 
ficiency in math, writing, scientific inquiry, and/or critical thinking. 

LIBR 101 Introduction to Libraries and 

Library Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032. 
Surveys the history, organization, services, and functions of libraries. 
Provides Library Technical Assistant students with an introduction to 
and overview of the Library field and the different types of libraries. 

LIBR 102 Introduction to Reference Sources 

and Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032.This course gives an overview of the reference function with 
emphasis on the role of the LTA.Emphasis is placed on developing a 
working knowledge of basic reference tools and sources, both print 
and online. An awareness of the reference interview techniques and 
process is also gained. 

LIBR 103 Introduction to Libraries 

Public Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032.0verview of the role of the Library Technical Assistant (LTA) in 
library public service areas such as reference, circulation, interlibrary 
loan, bibliographic instruction, children and young adult services,and 
public relations and promotions, with in depth coverage of circulation 
and interlibrary loan.The course will also focus on the development 
of customer service and effective communication skills. 

LIBR 104 Introduction to Technical Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032.This course is designed to prepare Library Technical Assistants 
with the skills necessary to: assist in acquisitions and processing, 
serials control, resource preservation and maintenance.Emphasis will 
be placed on processes necessary for seamless incorporation of tech- 
nical services into library services delivered to patrons. 

LIBR 201 Cataloging and Classification 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Introduces students to the basic concepts of classification and 
cataloging within a library setting.Emphasis is placed on the devel- 
opment of a working knowledge of both descriptive and subject cat- 
aloging resources, Library of Congress and Dewey Decimal classifica- 
tion systems, copy cataloging, and MARC format. 



LIBR 202 Electronic Resources and 

Online Searching 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in EN6L 025 and ENGL 
032.This course introduces students to essential electronic informa- 
tion sources (library catalogs, digital libraries, academic or gated 
databases.government resources, and the Internet) used in a variety 
of library environments, along with the online searching skills need- 
ed to effectively use them.The course emphasizes hands-on training 
with resources available in Indiana (through INSPIRE and Ivy Tech's 
Virtual Library), Boolean logic and other search strategies, copyright 
issues regarding digital information, retrieving, evaluating and cit- 
ing information. 

LIBR 203 Library Services for Children 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032.An overview of the materials and services for children and 
young adults in a public library with emphasis on the role of the 
LTA.Emphasis is placed on developing a working knowledge of pro- 
gramming for youth ages 0-18.This course will also provide an 
overview of children's literature, both classic and contemporary, and 
reference resources that will assist the LTA in providing reader's 
advisory to youth. 

LIBR 204 Library Media Center Operations 

and Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and 
ENGL 032. An overview of the role of the Library Technical Assistant 
(LTA) in a School Library Media Center by offering an introduction to 
the purposes, functions, services, and organizational structure of 
school library media centers.Basic materials, policies, procedures, 
philosophies, terminology, and services that make up today's media 
center services will be covered. A variety of activities will be includ- 
ed, such as fi eld trips, online and written presentations, and group 
discussions and projects. 

LIBR 205 Library and Media Materials 

and Equipment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Instructor Approval.Covers the fundamentals of 
library/media center technology, including instructional technology, 
educational media, computers, and related technologies.The course 
covers basic library/media center technology concepts.media utiliza- 
tion, and the use of computers in support of teaching and learning. 

LIBR 206 Library Assistant Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Regional Library Technical Assistant Advisor Approval. 
Students will gain new and varied support staff experiences com- 
patible with their career plans, completed coursework and past 



work history. Special emphasis will be put on workplace survival 
skills and job seeking skills. 

LOGM 101 Introduction to Materials 

Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032.Studies factors influencing the flow of materials in a manufac- 
turing enterprise. Covers basics of production planning and control, 
purchasing, forecasting, inventory and distribution issues.Concludes 
with an overview of just-in time theory and practices. 

LOGM 202 Physical Distribution 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Focuses on the major concepts and rationale for utilizing ware- 
house inventories to lower costs of transportation, improve cus- 
tomer service, avoid stockouts, and improve purchasing economics 
and seasonal variability. 

MATH 040 Basic Mathematics Skills 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment. Concentrates on basic operations with whole numbers, 
fractions, decimals and their applications.lntroduces a variety of 
math learning strategies.lncludes United States Customary 
Measurement System. 

MATH 044 Mathematics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in MATH 040.Reviews 
basic operations with fractions, decimals and their applications. 
Concentrates on ratio.proportion, percents, measurement, geometric 
concepts, signed numbers, interpreting and constructing graphs, 
basic linear equations, and applications.A developmental mathe- 
matics course. 

MATH 050 Basic Algebra 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in MATH 044.Reviews 
signed numbers and basic linear equations.Concentrates on integer 
exponents, scientific notation, linear equations and inequalities, lit- 
eral equations.polynomial operations, polynomial factoring.graph- 
ing linear equations, and applications.A developmental algebra 
course. 

MATH 070 Elements of Algebra and Geometry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or a grade of "Cor better in MATH 044. Blends basic 
algebraic skills and relationships with geometric applications. 
Although the disciplines of algebra and geometry are often per- 
ceived as separate in the study of mathematics, this course utilizes 



algebraic skills in simplifying expressions, manipulating variaWes, 
solving equations, and graphing linear relationships to solve re^ 
world geometric applications of area, volume.potygons. potyhedra, 
and right triangles. Designed to prepare students for MATH 117. 

MATH 080 Mathematics Principles 

with Algebra 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competerKytt>nx»c^ appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in MATH 044. Reviews 
signed numbers and basic linear equations.Concentrates on percents, 
proportions, measurement exponents, square roots, linear equations 
and inequalities, literal equations.graphing linear equations, and 
applications. Designed to prepare for success in MATH 118. 

MATH 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or a grade of "Cor better in MATH 050Jleviews bask 
operations of polynomials, scientific notation, linear equations and 
inequalities, graphing linear equations, and factoring algebraic 
expressions. Concentrates on properties of integer and rational 
exponents, rational expressions and equations, systems of inear 
equations, radicals, radial equations, quadratic equations, functions 
and their graphs, and applications^ standard college level interme- 
diate algebra course. 

MATH 117 The Art of Geometry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or a grade of "Cor better in MATH 050 or MATH 070.This 
course emphasizes visualization and appreciation of the beauty of 
mathematics through geometry; translates between visual and sym- 
bolic representations of objects used in art and design; apples map- 
pings, symmetry, similarity, vectors, and geometric constructions of 
shapes to working with 2D and 3D figures; uses geometry software. 
hands-on techniques and models. 

MATH 118 Concepts in Mathematics TransferlN 3 Credrts 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or a grade of 'Cor better in MATH 050 or MATH 
OSO.Through real world approaches.presents mathematical concepts 
of measurement, proportion, interest, equations and inequalities. 
probability and statistics. Brief survey of college mathematics. 

MATH 121 Geometry-Trigonometry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of MATH 111 or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessmenLlndudes polygons. 
similar figures, geometric solids, properties of cirdes, constructions, 
right triangles, angle measurements in radians and degrees, 
trigonometric functions and their application to right 
triangles.Pythagorean Theorem, laws of sine and cosine,araphing of 
trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, vectors and polar 
coordinates. Introductory study of geometry and trigonometry. 



127 



MATH 127 Mathematics for Elementary 

Education I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 111 or MATH 118.The course gives a theoretical 
treatment of common topics underlying an elementary mathemat- 
ics curriculum. This course covers topic in elementary number the- 
ory. Students will be encouraged to explore, make and debate con- 
jectures, build connections among concepts, and solve problems 
from their explorations. The selection of topic presented in this 
course is based upon standards and recommendations for the math- 
ematical content knowledge essential for prospective teachers 
made by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 

MATH 128 Mathematics for Elementary 

Education II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 111 or MATH 118.This course gives a theoretical 
treatment of common topic underlying an elementary mathematic 
curriculum. This course covers algebraic equations, probability, and 
statistics. Students will be encouraged to explore, make and debate 
conjectures, build connections among concepts, and solve problems 
from their explorations. The selection of topics presented in this 
course is based upon standards and recommendations for the mathe- 
matical content knowledge essential for prospective teachers made 
by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 

MATH 129 Mathematics for Elementary 

Education III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 111 or MATH 118. The course gives a theoretical 
treatment of common topics underlying an elementary mathematics 
curriculum. This course covers plane and solid geometry, and meas- 
urement. Students will be encouraged to explore, make and debate 
conjectures, build connections among concepts, and solve problems 
from their explorations. The selection of topics presented in this 
course is based upon standards and recommendations for the math- 
ematical content knowledge essential for prospective teachers made 
by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. 

MATH 131 Algebra/Trigonometry I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of MATH 1 1 1 or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment.Presents an in-depth 
study of functions, quadratic, polynomial, radical, and rational equa- 
tions, radicals, complex numbers, right triangle trigonometry, 
oblique triangles, vectors, and graphs of sine and cosine functions. 
First in a series of two courses of College Algebra/Trigonometry. 

MATH 1 32 Algebra/Trigonometry 1 1 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 131.Continues study of algebra and trigonome- 
try including systems of equations.matrices.graphing of trigono- 
metric functions, trigonometric equations and identities, rectangu- 
lar and polar coordinates, complex numbers, exponential and loga- 
rithmic functions and conics.Second in a series of two courses of 
12J, College Algebra/Trigonometry. 



MATH 133 College Algebra with 

Analytic Geometry 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of MATH 111 or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment.Presents an indepth 
study of functions, quadratic, polynomial, radical, and rational equa- 
tions, radicals, complex numbers, systems of equations.matrices, 
exponential and logarithmic functions, and conics.A standard 
College Algebra course. 

MATH 1 34 Trigonometry 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of MATH 111 or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment.Presents an in-depth 
study of right triangle trigonometry, oblique triangles, vectors, 
graphs of trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and 
equations and complex numbers in rectangular and polar/trigono- 
metric forms, rectangular and polar coordinates. A standard college 
trigonometry course. 

MATH 135 Finite Math Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of MATH 111 or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment.Surveys solving and 
graphing linear equations and inequalities, elementary set theory, 
matrices and their applications, linear programming, and elemen- 
tary probability.A standard finite mathematics course. 

MATH 136 College Algebra Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of MATH 111 or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment.Presents an in-depth 
study of functions, quadratic, polynomial, radical, and rational equa- 
tions, radicals, complex numbers, systems of equations.matrices, 
rational functions and exponential and logarithmic functions. MATH 
136 and MATH 137 together comprise a standard two-semester col- 
lege algebra and trigonometry course. 

MATH 137 Trigonometry with Analytic 

Geometry Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of MATH 131, MATH 133 or 
MATH 136 or demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment.Presents an in-depth study of right triangle trigonometry, 
oblique triangles, vectors.graphs of trigonometric functions, trigono- 
metric identities and equations and complex numbers in rectangular 
and polar/trigonometric forms, rectangular and polar coordinates 
and conies. 

MATH 141 Mathematics for Elementary 

Teachers 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or MATH 1 1 1 or MATH 1 1 2.An in-depth treatment of common 
topic underlying an elementary mathematic cum'culum.Students in 
the course will gain an appreciation for mathematic and will add to 
their pedagogical expertise by gaining conceptual understanding of 



elementary mathematic through the use of selected modes.materi- 
als, and problem solving situations.The course is designed to connect 
knowledge of the real number system to other subjects.The selection 
of topic presented in this course is based upon standards and recom- 
mendations for the mathematical content knowledge essential for 
prospective teachers made by the National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematic, the Mathematical Association of America, and the 
Indiana Professional Standards Board. 

MATH 200 Statistics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 131 or MATH 133 or MATH 135 or MATH 136. 
Provides study in the collection, interpretation and presentation of 
descriptive and inferential statistic, including measures of central 
tendency, probability, binomial and normal distributions, hypothesis 
testing of one-and two-sample populations, confidence intervals, chi- 
square testing, correlation, data description and graphical representa- 
tions-Arvintroductory statistic course. 

MATH 201 Brief Calculus I Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 131, MATH 133 or MATH 136.An introductory 
course in calculus. Fundamental concepts and operations of calculus 
including algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions: limits, con- 
tinuity, derivatives, points-ofinflection, first-derivative test, concavity, 
second-derivative test, optimization, antiderivatives, integration by 
substitution, and elementary applications of the derivative and of the 
definite integral. 

MATH 202 Brief Calculus II Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 201 .Covers topic in elementary differential 
equations, calculus of functions of several variables and infinite series. 

MATH 21 1 Calculus I Transfer IN 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or MATH 131 and MATH 132 or MATH 133 and MATH 134 or 
MATH 136 and MATH 137. Reviews the concepts of exponential, loga- 
rithmic and inverse functions. Studies in depth the fundamental con- 
cepts and operations of calculus including limits, continuity, differenti- 
ation including implicit and logarithmic differentiation. Applies differ- 
ential calculus to solve problems in the natural and social sciences, to 
solve estimation problems and to solve optimization problems. 
Applies differential calculus to sketch curves and to identify local and 
global extrema, inflection points, increasing/decreasing behaviorjon- 
cavity, behavior at infinity, horizontal and vertical tangents and 
asymptotes, and slant asymptotes. Applies the concept of Riemann 
sums and antiderivatives to find Riemann integrals. Applies the fun- 
damental theorem of calculus to solve initial value problems, and to fi 
nd areas and volumes and the average values of a function. 

MATH 212 Calculus II Transfer IN 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 21 1 .Studies the techniques of substitution, inte- 
gration by parts, trigonometric integrals, partial fractions and 



trigonometric substitution to evaluate integrals.Applies Simpson's 
rule and other elementary numerical quadrature methods to approx- 
imate integrals.Applies the integral calculus to find arc lengths, areas 
of surfaces of revolution and to solve force and work problems. 
Applies the direction field technique to find graphical solutions of 
differential equations.Applies Euler's technique to approximate the 
solution of initial value problems.Studies techniques of solving sepa- 
rable differential equations.Studies techniques to determine conver- 
gence of sequences and series.Studies techniques to determine the 
power series representation of functions. 

MATH 218 Calculus with Analytic Geometry I 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or MATH 1 3 1 and MATH 1 32 or MATH 1 33 and MATH 
134 or MATH 136 and MATH 137.Topics from analytic geometry, con- 
cept and properties of limits, concept of mathematical continuity 
definition and procedures for differentiation, and definition and pro- 
cedures for anti-differentiation. 

MATH 219 Calculus with Analytic Geometry II 5 
Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 218.Topics from Calculus and Analytic 
Geometry I, calculus to hyperbolic and inverse trigonometric func- 
tions, first and second order differential equations, integration by 
parts and partial fractions, convergence.Taylor and Maclaurin series 
expansions, and L'Hopital's rule. 

MATH 221 Calculus for Technology I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment, or MATH 131 and MATH 132 or MATH 133 and MATH 
134 or MATH 136 and MATH 137. First course in a two-semester 
sequence in the techniques of calculus, with an emphasis on how 
they are applied to technology. Topics include limits, continuity, first 
and second derivatives, definite and indefinite integrals, and appli- 
cations of these concepts. 

MATH 222 Calculus for Technology II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 221. Second course in a two-semester 
sequence in the techniques of calculus, with an emphasis on how 
they are applied to technology. Topics include the calculus of tran- 
scendental functions, techniques of integration, differential equa- 
tions, infinite series, and applications of these concepts. 

MATH 235 Discrete Mathematics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 135. Introduction to the suite of mathematical 
and logical tools used in information sciences including automata 
and computability theory, elementary probability and statistics, and 
basics of classical information theory. 

MATH 261 Multivariate Calculus 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 212 or MATH 219.Solid analytic geometry, par- 



tial differentiation, multiple integrals. 

MATH 264 Differential Equations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 261 .A first course in ordinary differential equa- 
tions. The course will develop topics from a dynamical systems per- 
spective and use technology to treat these topics graphically, 
numerically, and analytically.ln addition to the skills of logical analy- 
sis and creative problem solving, this course will enhance the stu- 
dent's ability to analyze problems orally and in writing, in addition 
to mastering the mathematical skills used in this analysis. 

MATH 265 Linear Algebra 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 212.An introduction to linear algebra.Systems 
of linear equations,matrix algebra, vector spaces, determinants, 
eigenvalues, eigenvectors, diagonalization of matrices, applications. 

MEAS 102 First Aid and CPR 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with information to recognize 
emergency situations, know proper course of action with different 
types of emergencies, and apply appropriate first aid including CPR. 

MEAS 107 Administrative I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Provides a basic understanding of the administrative duties and 
responsibilities pertinent to medical offices-Includes instruction in 
medical correspondence and records, case histories of patients, fil- 
ing, telephone procedures, appointment scheduling, receptionist 
duties, and processing mail.lncludes simulated data entry for 
patient's record, and appointment scheduling.Written, verbal and 
nonverbal communication according to patient needs are covered as 
well as documentation and associated legal and ethical bound- 
aries.Medical law, ethics, state and federal laws are covered. 

MEAS 108 Administrative II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in MATH 044, ENGL 
025 and ENGL 032.Provides instruction in medical office financial 
administration, bookkeeping,materials management, daily financial 
transactions with patients and outside sources, banking procedures, 
billing and collection. General office policies.patient instruction 
according to needs and regarding health issues.lnventory manage- 
ment of supplies and equipment is covered.Community resources 
available to patients are also explored. 

MEAS 135 Medical Word Processing and 
Transcription 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HLHS 101 and OFAD 019.Develops skills and knowl- 
edge of medical dictation, machine transcription, and word process- 
ing software. Includes typing and transcription of medical corre- 
spondence and a variety of medical reports. 



MEAS 137 Medical Insurance and 
Basic Coding with Computer Applications 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: HLHS 101 Provides an overview of medical jmrarr 
programs and the skills needed in handling insurance forms, CRT 
and ICD 9-CM coding and insurant reports as applied to the med- 
ical office.lncludes simulated computer data entry for patient 
records, procedure and diagnostic codes, insurance processing and 
electronic transmission of daims. 

MEAS 151 Pharmacy Technician I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HLHS 101 and demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in MATH 
050. Corequisites: MEAS 1 52.lntroduces bask stifc and information 
needed for a career as a Pharmacy Technician in the state of Mana. 

MEAS 152 Pharmacy Technician II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Corequisites: MEAS 151.Theory is applied 
through performance of competency levels of the technical pharma- 
cy task including: properly preparmg,documenting and processing 
prescriptions according to pharmacy policy and regulations; prepa- 
ration of intravenous and special solutions; proper preparation and 
maintenance of records appropriate to the pharmacy, inducing 
quality control records, controlled substances (narcotic drag dctribu- 
tion), prescription data and records; application of basic principte of 
microbiology; aseptic techniques; and the operation and mainte- 
nance of the laminar hood.The student will utilize proper communi- 
cation skills (both written and vertal).ldentification and adherence 
to check points will be emphasizedCurrent national and Indiana 
Law and administrative rules as they relate to the practice of the 
pharmacy technician will be presentedThe importance of adherence 
to universal precautions will be discussed. 

MEAS 205 Introduction to 

Electrocardiography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HLLISIOI.Presents the rationale for obtaining an 
electrocardiogram as well as related theory including anatomy and 
physiology, procedural technique and equipment utifaedStudents 
will be introduced to basic rhythm analysis inducing recognizing 
standard electrical waves and accurately measuring each normal 
sinus rhythm and basic arrhythmias. 

MEAS 206 Advanced Electrocardiograph 
Technique 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 205.Discusses related anatomy and physiology 
of the cardiovascular system, identification of cardiac arrhythmias, 
their rhythm strip appearance and common treatment modaities. 
Also indudes event and Holtor monitoring. 

MEAS 207 Integrated Medical Office 

Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 107 and MEAS 108. Provides instruction in med- 



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130 



ical office procedures using integrated computer programs that 
manage appointments.jnsurance documents, file maintenance and 
creation, management of medical correspondence, licensing and 
software update processes and data back-up files. 

MEAS 208 Respiratory Therapy in 

Ambulatory Care 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 102, HLHS 101 and program chair approval. 
Prepares students who are planning to work in ambulatory care as 
medical assistants to aid patients with respiratory disease. The 
course will provide learning and instruction in the use of oxygen 
and humidity therapies; hyperinflation and positive expiratory pres- 
sure therapies; aerosolized medication therapy; respiratory system 
assessment; respiratory diseases; asthma education for patients, and 
prepare the student to coordinate care with home care providers for 
patients with respiratory disease. 

MEAS 212 Phlebotomy 3 Credits 

-Prerequisites: HLHS 101 and MEAS Program Chair Approval.Presents 
the principles and practices of laboratory specimen collection and 
processing. Also covers medical terminology, infection control, 
patient identification, anatomy and physiology, 
anticoagulants.blood collection, specimen processing and interper- 
sonal skills. 

MEAS 21 3 Advanced Insurance Coding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 137.Comprehensive coding skills and guide- 
lines for both ICO-9 and HCPCS Levels I and II coding systems neces- 
sary to ensure accurate coding and maximize reimbursement for 
medical claim processing. 

MEAS 21 5 Advanced Medical Terminology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HLHS 101 .A more detailed and advanced study of the 
derivatives of medical terms, symbols and signs.lt presents an 
indepth study of the correlation between medical vocabulary and 
the application of those terms in the anatomy and physiology of the 
body, related diseases, conditions and treatment. 

MEAS 218 Pharmacology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 101, HLHS 101 and demonstrated competency 
through appropriate assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better 
in MATH 050.Discusses the most common medications in current 
use with emphasis on classifications, uses, routes or administration, 
dosages, interactions, incompatibilities, and side effects.Emphasizes 
the current 50 most commonly prescribed drugs.Addresses special 
precautions, legal aspects, and patient education and preparation 
and administration of medications. 

MEAS 219 Medical Assisting Laboratory 

Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HLHS 101, APHY 101, and MEAS Program Chair 
Approval. Prepares students to understand and perform entry-level 



basic laboratory procedures.This includes fundamental principles of 
medical lab practice, disposal of biohazard materials, specimen col- 
lection, use of methods of quality control, urinalysis testing, chem- 
istry testing, hematology testing, immunology testing, microbiology 
testing, and discussion of follow-up testing results. 

MEAS 220 Advanced Insurance Claims 

Processing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 137.lntroduces additional instruction in medical 
record extraction and various aspects of insurance processing and fol- 
low- up.Provides discussion and additional information in the various 
insurance programs and in related insurance coding competencies. 

MEAS 221 Seminar I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None.Discusses topics of current interest in the med- 
ical assisting profession. Focuses on special interest project for stu- 
dents in the Medical Assisting Program.Uses field trips, guest speak- 
ers, audiovisual activities and seminars. 

MEAS 227 Medical Office Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 107.MEAS 108 and MEAS 137.An in-depth study 
of various influences on office functions providing a background for 
organization and management of a physician's office.lncludes gov- 
ernment and professional sources for consultation. 

MEAS 235 Advanced Transcription 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 135.lmproves accuracy and speed of the medical 
transcriptionist utilizing various formats for medical transcription. 

MEAS 238 Clinical I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HLHS 101 and MEAS Program Chair Approval.Presents 
theory and lab related to clinical aspects of the medical office. 
Provides students with information necessary to recognize emer- 
gency situations, know the proper course of action with different 
types of emergencies, and apply appropriate first aid.Allows stu- 
dents to become familiar with clinical duties and to gain the skills 
needed to perform them.lncludes vital signs, asepsis, sterilization, 
nutrition, and treatment room procedures. 

MEAS 239 Clinical II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 238.Presents a continuation of clinical skills and 
theory, and allows the student to become familiar with the follow- 
ing clinical duties: Medications, EKG's, X-ray,physical therapy, respira- 
tory testing and other technical skills needed to assist the physician. 

MEAS 240 Advanced Clinical Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 239.Advances the knowledge and skills 
enabling the student to assist in clinical management in the med- 
ical and surgical specialties.Addresses health services in the commu- 
nity which are directed toward prevention of disease and mainte- 
nance and restoration of health. 



MEAS 242 Disease Conditions 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 102 and HLHS 101 .Presents the basic concepts of 
diseases, their courses and functional disturbances as they relate to 
body systems.lncludes the precipitating risk factors and appropriate 
methods of patient education regarding various disease processes. 

MEAS 254 Pharmacy Extemship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 152,Professional CPR/AED certification and 
MEAS Program Chair Approval.Provides the opportunity to discuss 
and perform clinical procedures under supervision, with learning 
experiences obtained in selected retail pharmacies and/or hospitals. 

MEAS 255 Pharmacy Technician Experiential 
Seminar 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides the opportunity to 
observe, discuss and perform basic pharmacy related procedures 
under supervision, with learning experiences obtained in selected 
retail pharmacies and/or hospitals.Prepares student for national cer- 
tification examination. 

MEAS 256 Insurance Coding Extemship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 213, MEAS 220,Professional CPR/AED certifica- 
tion and MEAS Program Chair Approval.Provides opportunities to 
observe, perform and discuss various insurance related competencies 
under supervision in selected physician offices, clinics or hospitals. 

MEAS 257 Phlebotomy Extemship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 212,Professional CPR/AED certification and 
MEAS Program Chair Approval.Provides the opportunity to discuss 
and perform phlebotomy procedures under supervision with learn- 
ing experiences obtained in selected laboratories.physician offices, 
clinics, or hospitals. 

MEAS 258 Medical Assisting Clinical 

Extemship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 218, MEAS 219, MEAS 239, APHY 102, 
Professional CPR/AED certification, and MEAS Program Chair 
Approval. Provides opportunities to observe, perform, and discuss 
various clinical competencies under supervision, with learning expe- 
riences obtained in selected physician offices, clinics or hospitals. 
Course will also review the following basic principles of psychology 
as they apply to the medical assistant: developmental stages of the 
life cycle, hereditary, cultural and environmental influences on 
behavior.mental health and applied psychology. 

MEAS 259 Medical Assisting Administrative 
Extemship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 137,Professional CPR/AED certification and 
MEAS Program Chair Approval.Provides opportunities to observe, 
perform, and discuss various administrative competencies under 
supervision, with learning experiences obtained in selected physi- 
cian offices, clinics or hospitals. 



MEAS 271 CMA Comprehensive Review 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MEAS Program Chair Approval. This course is designed 
to review the entire medical assisting program in preparation for 
the CMA national examination. Administrative, clinical and general 
information is covered. Testing procedures are addresses. Emphasis 
will be placed on job readiness and placement. The course will give 
continuing education units for the graduate CMA in order to fulfill 
their certification renewal requirements. 

MEAS 272 Spanish for Healthcare Providers 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Provides instruction in understanding and com- 
municating, basic medical office procedures, basic medical proce- 
dures, insurance filing procedures, and basic procedures in regards 
to medical treatment, taking medications and the basic principles of 
mental health and applied psychology with patients whose primary 
language is Spanish. 

MEAS 273 Transcription Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Demonstrate competency 
of keyboarding (50 wpm corrected) or successful completion of 
course work. Provides the opportunity to discuss and perform tran- 
scription in a medical facility setting under supervision. Allows stu- 
dent the opportunity to see and perform various medical reports 
and the various functions of medical transcriptions. 

MEAS 299 CMA Comprehensive Review 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS Program Chair Approval.Designed to review the 
entire medical assisting program in preparation for the CMA nation- 
al examination.Administrative, clinical and general information is 
covered. Testing procedures are addresses.Emphasis will be placed 
on job readiness and placement.The course will give continuing 
education units for the graduate CMA in order to fulfill their certifi- 
cation renewal requirements. 

MEDL101 Fundamentals of Laboratory 

Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 050 and program chair approval. Introduces the ele- 
mentary skills required in the medical laboratory.Subjects covered 
include: Laboratory math, quality control, pipetting skills, venipunc- 
ture techniques, microscopic skills, and infection control. 

MEDL 102 Routine Analysis Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032,MATH 050 and Program Advisor Approval.This course deals with 
the principles, practices and clinical laboratory techniques associat- 
ed with the routine analysis of urine. 



MEDL 196 Introduction to Patient Care 

and Phlebotomy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032 and program advisor approval. Introduces the student to the 
health care delivery system, instruction in specimen collection tech- 
niques, infection control and safety and applications of communica- 
tion concepts and stress management. 

MEDL 197 Clinical Phlebotomy Experience 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEDL 196.Covers the practice and demonstration of 
clinical applications of phlebotomy in the clinical setting. 

MEDL 198 Clinical Phlebotomy Discussion 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Student must be in good standing and currently 
enrolled in MEDL Program.Designed for students to develop the pro- 
fessional socialization process that is necessary for functioning in a 
health care setting as well as review routine and special phlebotomy 
procedure in light of phlebotomist-patient interaction. 

MEDL 201 Immunology Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Provides the student with a 
basic understanding of the principles of the human immunologic sys- 
tem as well as an understanding of, and experience in, routine testing. 

MEDL 202 Immunohematology Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEDL 201 and Program Advisor Approval.Provides 
instruction on the principles.practice, and procedures used for blood 
banking in the clinical laboratory. 

MEDL 205 Hematology Techniques I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEDL 101, MEDL 102 and Program Advisor 
Approval.This course presents theory of blood formation and func- 
tion and routine hematologic procedures.with emphasis upon dif- 
ferentiation of normal and commonly encountered abnormal blood 
cells.Also presents clinic pathologic correlations. 

MEDL 206 Hematology Techniques II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEDL 205 and Program Advisor Approval.This course 
continues the study of principles and procedures in hematology.lt 
introduces procedures which lie outside those routinely performed. 
Continues cell differentiation, with emphasis upon early and less 
commonly encountered abnormal cells, with associated special 
stains. Includes clinic pathologic correlations. 

MEDL 207 Chemistry Techniques I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHEM 101 orCHEM 111 and Program Advisor 
Approval. Presents principles, procedures and clinicopathologic cor- 
relations in routine chemical analysis of the blood and other body 
fluids. Provides laboratory experiences in basic methods, selected to 
develop routine analytical abilities and to promote the ability to rec- 
ognize sources of error. 



MEDL 209 Routine Analysis Applications 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: MEDL 102Provides the student with study of the cfc»- 
cal applications of routine analysis in the hospital laboratory includ- 
ing physical, chemical, and microscopic examination of urine 

MEDL 210 Hematology Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEDL 206 and Program Advisor ApprovaUCnowtedge 
and skill development pertaining to the principles and techniques of 
hematology in the hospital laboratory. 

MEDL 212 Immunology Applications 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: MEDL 201 and Program Advisor Approvaljtudies and 
practices the clinical application of serology in the hospital laboratory. 

MEDL 213 Immunohematology Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEDL 202 and Program Advisor ApprovaUppkaoons 
of principles and procedures used in blood banking in the hospital 
laboratory are taught in the clinical laboratory setting. 

MEDL 215 Parasitology and Mycology 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: MEDL 222.Examines the isolation, identification. He 
cycles and disease processes of pathogenic and opportunistic fungi 
and parasites. 

MEDL 218 Clinical Pathology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.The course is a review 
course in preparation for the National Registry Examination and wfl 
include current testing procedures, disease conditions, diagnosis, eti- 
ologies, clinical symptoms and related laboratory findngs. 

MEDL 221 Clinical Microbiology Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEDL 222.Provides the student with the study of 
applications and clinical practices of microbiology found in a cSnicai 
laboratory. 

MEDL 222 Microbiology Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.This course wfl instruct the 
student in the principles of bacteriology indudng^ram-negaDw and 
gram-positive bacilli and cocci, fastidious organisms and an overview 
of anaerobic organisms and add-fast baaeria.lnstnxrjon in bask lab- 
oratory techniques in dinical bacteriology wfl also be included. 

MEDL 224 Chemistry Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEDL 227.Corequisites: MEDL 20&Study and practice of 
the analytical aspects of dinical chemistry in the hospital laboratory. 

MEDL 227 Chemistry Techniques II 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor ApcKOval.Continues the study of prin- 
dples, procedures and dinkopathologic correbtiore in the chemical 
analysis of blood and other body fluidsJntroduces procedures which 
lie outside those routinely performed in the clinical chemistry labo- 
ratory, induding dinicopathologic correlations. 



131 



MEDL 280 Co-op/Internship 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisite: Program Advisor Approval. Provides clinical laboratory 
experience in an affiliated laboratory. Gives students the opportuni- 
ty to practice and employ fundamental lab skills and learn advanced 
techniques in a supervised setting. Provides on-the-job experience 
while earning credit toward the associate degree. Also provides a 
mechanism for a skills refresher course for credentialed individuals 
who have been out of the field for a period of time. 

METC 105 Introduction to Engineering 

Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides the beginning engineering technology 
student with the basic tools necessary for success in their chosen 
field. Topics include: survey of engineering technology careers, prob- 
lem solving, introduction to engineering mathematical and statisti- 
cal concepts, technical laboratories, data presentation and report 
writing, use of scientific calculators, engineering calculations, 
metrology, use of spreadsheets for data analysis and presentation, 
and engineering ethics and responsibilities. 

METC 220 CAD for Mechanical Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DESN 102.DESN 103,METC105 An introduction and 
exploration of solid modeling using AutoCAD Inventor® software. 
Emphasis is placed on learning the basic concepts of creating parts 
using software-specific modeling and modification commands. The 
concepts of parent-child relationships as well as parametric rela- 
tions are introduced. Assemblies of components are created based 
upon student-created parts, and the generation of engineering 
drawings will be required. 

MKTG 101 Principles of Marketing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025,ENGL 
032 and MATH 044. Introduces the marketing role in society and 
how it affects the marketing strategy. Emphasizes the marketing 
mix, product planning, and the effects of the demographic dimen- 
sion on the consumer market. 

MKTG 1 02 Principles of Selling 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 044.Provides an overview of the selling process. 
Includes the psychology of selling and develops skills through a 
series of selling situations. 

MKTG 1 04 Promotion Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 044.Presents management planning and oversight 
techniques for effectively communicating the results of the market- 
ing strategy to customers.Provides a comprehensive overview of 
promotion methods as they interact in the marketing mix, which 
1 32 includes price, channel of distribution, and product. 



MKTG 110 Consumer Behavior 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MKTG 101. Study of the basic principles of consumer 
behavior which offers insight into the buyer-seller relationship. 
Application of theories from psychology, social psychology and eco- 
nomics are examined.Course examines concepts that have implica- 
tions for marketing management decisions. 

MKTG 201 Introduction to Market Research 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MKTG 1 01 and MATH 1 1 1 .Presents basic research 
methods entailing procedures, questionnaire design, data analysis, 
and effectively communicating research results. 

MKTG 204 Marketing Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACCT 101, BUSN 105 and MKTG 101 .Focuses on the 
analysis, implementation and control of marketing 
strategy.Emphasizes the major decisions management faces in its 
effort to harmonize the objectives and resources of the organization 
with the needs and opportunities of the marketplace. 

MKTG 205 Principles of Insurance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade ofT'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 050. Introduces the risks faced by business fi rms 
including property, liability and personal losses, and how they are 
handled. Presents insurance contracts and their uses. Includes an 
overview of life insurance, health and pension insurance, public poli- 
cy, government regulations and social insurance. 

MKTG 213 Marketing in Non-profit 

Organizations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MKTG 101. Introduces the use of marketing manage- 
ment to persons working in themon-proflt environment, with 
emphasis on the marketing mix and the marketing concept and 
their specifi c application to the non-profit sector.This class is also 
designed for marketing majors to understand the growing world of 
non-profit marketing. 

MKTG 220 Principles of Retailing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MKTG 101 and MATH 050.Studies retailing concepts 
and practices, including retail merchandise planning, buying, pric- 
ing.promotion, and control in established retail operations.Attention 
is given to managerial and operational skills. 

MKTG 221 Real Estate Broker 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: One-year experience as an active licensed Indiana 
Real Estate Salesperson associated with a licensed Indiana Real 
Estate Broker.Mathematical competency as stipulated in Indiana 
Administrative Code (876 IAC 2-11 through 876 IAC 2-14).To prepare 
the student for taking the State of Indiana real estate broker licens- 
ing examination. 



MKTG 222 Real Estate Sales 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.To prepare students for 
taking the State of Indiana Real Estate Salesperson licensing exam. 

MKTG 223 Residential Appraising I 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.To substantially prepare the 
student for taking the State of Indiana licensed trainee residential 
appraiser examination.After taking this 75-hour classroom course 
the student must take an additional 15 classroom hours in Uniform 
Standards (USPAP) before being eligible to sit for the State Trainee 
examination. 

MKTG 224 Uniform Standards of Professional 
Appraisal Practice (USPAP) 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.lt is not a requirement to 
hold a real estate license of any kind.A real estate broker without an 
appraiser's license must comply with Rule 6 - Standards of Practice 
to do appraising.Preparation for taking the State of Indiana licensed 
residential appraiser trainee examination.This supplements MKTG 
223, in meeting the 90-classroom hour prerequisite for being eligi- 
ble to sit for the trainee examination. 

MKTG 225 Residential Appraising II 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.To substantially prepare 
and enhance appraisal students'basic knowledge of real estate 
appraisal principals and practices.This course builds upon the basic 
appraisal coursework for in-depth discipline study and to prepare 
students for license upgrades. 

MKTG 240 Internet Marketing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 101 and MKTG 101. Provides an introduction to 
the Internet as a marketing strategy including product, pricing, 
communications, and distribution considerations. Profi les Internet 
users and market segments and reviews the Internet as a primary 
and secondary marketing research tool as well as a relationship- 
marketing tool. 

MORT 100 Orientation to Funeral Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032.An introduction to funeral service, ancient history, historical 
development, present funeral practices, values of funeral service, 
personal qualifications, and ethics.Field trips to investigate current 
problem areas in funeral service are required. 

MORT 101 Grief Psychology for Funeral 

Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and 
ENGL 032.An examination of theory and management of grief, the 
process of mourning, and the value of the funeral service in 
bereavement. Grief reactions according to age and special types of 



loss will be examined.ln addition, the course will cover the funeral 
director's professional responsibilities to the families served. 

MORT 102 Mortuary Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must be accepted into and enrolled in the 
Mortuary Science Program.Principles of mortuary law; duties, rights 
and liabilities for final disposition.Business law; public and personal 
liability; business organization; licensing and zoning regulations. 
Probate proceedings, social security, and life insurance benefits, and 
ethical standards relating to funeral service. 

MORT 103 Embalming Chemistry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must be accepted into and enrolled in the 
Mortuary Science Program.Fundamentals of inorganic, organic, and 
biochemistry.Also chemistry of the human body, chemistry changes 
following death, toxicology, disinfection, and embalming chemicals. 
Basic principles of chemistry related to funeral service. 

MORT 1 05 Embalming Theory I 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Accepted into the Mortuary Science Program. An intro- 
duction of basic vocabulary utilized by the professional embalmer. 
The purposes of embalming, as well as responsibilities, conduct and 
qualities of the professional embalmer are discussed. An inventory 
of typical preparation room instruments and supplies is examined. 
Basic embalming case analysis is investigated. Techniques for 
embalming non-complicated cases are also investigated. 

MORT 205 Embalming Theory II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MORT 1 05. This course is a continuation of MORT 1 05 
Embalming Theory I.This course investigates advanced embalming 
case analysis. Strategies and techniques for embalming complicated 
and/ or complex cases are discussed. Techniques for preparing a 
deceased human body for transportation and/ or long term storage 
are presented. Embalming theories/ techniques for handling special- 
ized diseases, body conditions and other complications are discussed. 

MORT 207 Embalming Practicum I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Corequisites:MORT 206 and MORT 209.0ne labo- 
ratory session per week for one semester in an appropriate mortuary 
setting.Practical experience in all phases of funeral service including 
embalming, funeral directing, and funeral home operation.Students 
are placed in local funeral homes to work under the direct supervi- 
sion of a qualified licensed embalmer to gain knowledge of proce- 
dures used in embalming human remains for funeral services.MORT 
206 will work in conjunction with the practical experience. 

MORT 208 Pathology for Funeral Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 102, MORT 103 and BIOL 211. Divisions and 
importance of pathology.nature and causes of disease, to include 
inflammation, repair and recuperation of tissue, tumors, disease of 
the heart, respiratory and digestive systems are covered as well as 



microscopic examination of autopsy and surgical specimens.with 
particular emphasis on those conditions which relate to or affect the 
embalming or restorative art process. 

MORT 209 Restorative Art 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Corequisites:MORT 206 and MORT 207.The study 
of facial anatomy, color relationships, and restorations.Development 
of skills in anatomical modeling and cosmetics. 

MORT 212 Funeral Service Management 4 Credits 

Prerequisite: Accepted into the Mortuary Science Program. Designed 
to give the student a working knowledge of equipment items, man- 
ufacturing and use of such items. Presents a thorough study of cas- 
kets and vaults. Uses field trips and guest lecturers as learning tools. 
The curriculum is divided into two sections. The first covers con- 
struction and features of caskets, outer burial containers, and other 
funeral related products. The second section of the curriculum 
examines current practices and procedures, funeral direction, psy- 
chological and sociological aspects of funeral service, funeral home 
operation, professional overview and image, professional regula- 
tions and effective personnel management. 

MORT 217 Embalming Practicum II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MORT 103, MORT 206, MORT 207, MORT 209, APHY 102 
and BIOL 21 1 .Students work in a local approved funeral home under 
the direct supervision of a licensed embalmer.Develops practical 
embalming skills, combining work experience in funeral home.The 
student will work (8-10 hours) per week in the funeral home. 

MORT 220 National Board Exam Review 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: Accepted into the Mortuary Science Program.This 
course is designed to prepare the student for the National Board 
Examination.This examination is a graduation requirement and stu- 
dents must successfully complete the examination in order to 
become licensed funeral directors/ embalmers in most states. MORT 
220 reviews the major learning objectives of other MORT courses as 
they relate to the National Board Examination.The course also 
examines various testing methodologies and test taking strategies. 

MRTC 107 Motorcycle Engine Principles 

and Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces engine dynamics, theory of engine 
operation and characteristics of engine design.Studies R & R, visual 
inspection, precision measuring, gaskets, lubricants, sealants, - 
coolants of modern engines, and engine service. 

MRTC 127 Motorcycle Engine Service 

and Repair 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Studies precision tools, equipment, and procedures 
needed to repair today's modem engine.Repair.proper assemble, and 
installation techniques applicable to the modem engine are included. 



MRTC 173 Motorcycle Transmission/Drive 
Service and Repair 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Studies theory and operation, diagnosis, tesung 
and repair of motorcycle transmissions and drivefines. 

MRTC 174 Motorcycle Frame and Electrical 
System 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces the fundamentals and principles of 
motorcycle electronics and diagnosis.Extensive use of Digital muni- 
meters and circuit troubleshooting is covered. Emphasis is placed on 
reading and understanding wiring diagrams and symbols. 
Diagnosing, starting, and charging systems are also covered. 

MRTC 270 Motorcycle High Performance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Covers the fundamentals, construction, compo- 
nents and design of high performance motorcycles for various racing 
venues.The course will also cover related systems; cooling, lubrication, 
suspension and brakingitudems will study the theory, design and 
requirements of high performance engines/systems. Emphasis in this 
course is placed on bolt on performance modifications. 

MTTC 101 Introduction to Machining 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lnstructs the student in shop safety, industrial 
terminology, tools and machine tooling, measurement and layout 
Includes laboratory exercises to begin project completion of turning, 
milling, and grinding applications. 

MTTC 102 Turning Processes I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lnstructs students in shop safety, industrial ter- 
minology, and provide laboratory experience toward project com- 
pletion on the conventional lathe. 

MTTC 103 Milling Processes I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lnstructs students in shop safety and industrial 
terminology and provides laboratory experience toward project 
completion on the vertical and/or horizontal milling machine. 

MTTC 104 Machinery Handbook 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a "C" or better in MATH 044.ExpJores the 
intent and use of the machinery handbootLAppftes principles and 
concepts in the machinery handbook to projects in the industry. 

MTTC 1 05 Abrasive Processes I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides shop safety, industrial terminology, and 
laboratory experiences on abrasive processing machinesJndudes 
super abrasives technology processes. 
MTTC 106 Print Interpretation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Applies mathematics in solving engineering 
and design related problems in the areas of die design, fabrication, 
assembly, special machinery, die casting and molds. Emphasizes 6DT 
tolerancing. 



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MTTC 110 Turning and Milling Processes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides shop safety, industrial terminology and 
laboratory experiences on conventional lathe and milling machines. 

MTTC 202 Advanced Turning Processes II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 102 or MTTC 110.Advanced training in shop safe- 
ty and industrial terminology utilizing the conventional engine lathe. 

MTTC 203 Milling Processes II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 103 or MTTC 11 0.Covers shop safety, industrial 
terminology, and provide advanced laboratory experience towards 
project completion on the vertical and/or horizontal milling 
machine. 

MTTC 205 Abrasive Processes II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 105.Continuing emphasis on shop safety, indus- 
trial terminology, and advanced laboratory experience towards proj- 
ect completion on a variety of abrasive processing machines. 

MTTC 206 Tooling Design I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 1 10 and MTTC 105 or MTTC 102 and MTTC 103 
and MTTC 105.lntroduces concepts of tooling design, assembly, and 
standards of fabrication.Emphasizes jig and fi xture design/compo- 
nents, application and operational characteristics. 

MTTC 207 Tooling Design II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 105 and MTTC 1 lO.Covers concepts of complex 
tooling design.Emphasizes forming, blanking, piercing and progres- 
sive type die design.lncludes die applications, components, manu- 
facture and assembly techniques. 

MTTC 208 CNC Programming I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Introduces two and three 
axis CNC machining.Develops the theory of programming in the 
classroom with applications of the program accomplished on indus- 
try- type machines.Studies terminology of coordinates, cutter paths, 
angle cutting, and linear and circular interpolation. 

MTTC 209 CNC Programming II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 208.Provides further study in computer-aided 
numerical control programming.Focuses on canned cycles, loops, 
macros, thread cycles, drilling, and pocket milling cycles. 

MTTC 210 Interactive CNC 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 208.lntroduces advanced applications of com- 
puter assisted part programming and simulation, language codes 
setup and operation, troubleshooting, and problem solving in a CNC 
turning center and CNC machining center.lncludes related mathe- 
matical sills. 

MTTC 211 Advanced Programming 

Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 210.lncludes the application of advanced CNC 



programming techniques to industrial machining.Using down load- 
ing and up loading techniques utilized through advanced projects. 

MTTC 220 CAD/CAM I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 208.Covers the development of various machine 
routines.lntroduces computer-assisted machining as it relates to 
automated milling and machining centers.Emphasizes proper pro- 
gramming techniques, control familiarity, file data and machining 
functions. 

MTTC 221 CAD/CAM II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 220.Covers the development of 3-D shapes and 
the codes necessary to produce parts.Requires student to design a 
new product or modify an existing design.lncludes creating surface 
curves. Focuses on creating tool paths for complex 3-D surfaces. 

MTTC 225 Introduction to Mold Making 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 1 1 0.lntroduces the student to the basic funda- 
mentals or mold design and construction.The processes and basic 
construction of plastic molds.molds for die-castings and rubber 
molds are discussed.Each student in the class will design, build and 
inject their mold(s). 

MTTC 240 Machine Operations I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 102 and MTTC 103.Students will gain additional 
classroom experience concerning band saws, engine lathes, vertical 
mills, surface grinders, Harig® Grinding Fixture, and jig grinder. 
Measurement and layout will be performed at an advanced level. 
Classroom activities will concentrate on heat-treatment of tool 
steels, classes of ANSI fi ts and tolerances, electrical discharge 
machining, carbide tooling and basic metal stamping die theory. 
Experience will also be gained in the calculation of labor and mate- 
rial costs.ln addition, students will also be introduced to metal 
stamping die construction and conversational programming on CNC 
vertical mills.Students will also be required to create a comprehen- 
sive notebook due at the end of the semester. 

MTTC 241 Machine Operations II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 240.Emphasizes basic tool construction and 
close tolerance machining.Using the various types of equipment 
found in the laboratory, students rough machine, heat treat and pre- 
cision grind detail parts to tolerance within 0.0005 consistently. 
Classroom activities concentrate on precision setup, inspection work 
and basic tool construction.Experience is gained in basic conversa- 
tional CNC programming. 

MTTC 242 CNC Machining 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC 208. Introduces and instructs the student in 
all aspects of Computer Numeric Control (CNC) machining.The stu- 
dent will program, set up and operate CNC mills and lathes utiliz- 
ing CAD/CAM for fixture and part design and verification. Students 
continually improve programming, set up and cycle time efficien- 



cy. Students inspect and document the quality of production parts 
and compare their performance with an industry benchmark for 
each project. < 

MTTC 243 Tool and Die Making I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTTC101 andMTTC110andMTTC208orMTTC101 
and MTTC 102 and MTTC 103 and MTTC 208.Focuses on construction 
of a two-stage progressive die that incorporates interchangeable 
details. Each student manufactures a die that incorporates the part- 
ing principle and performs the following operations: Forming, 
Piercing, and Parting.ln addition lecture material covers computa- 
tions on blank lengths, and diameters.blanking and piercing opera- 
tions,drawing, progression, and timing.Experience is gained in CNC 
machining and progressive die troubleshooting. 

NGAS 101 Fundamentals of Natural Gas 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the characteristics and hazards of 
natural gas, prevention of accidental ignition, recognizing emer- 
gency conditions, inside and outside leak investigation methods and 
detection, instrumentation, carbon monoxide, and basic external 
corrosion prevention. 

NGAS 1 02 Natural Gas Pipe Joining 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: NGAS 101 . Introduces the types of natural gas 
pipeline materials, joining techniques, coating maintenance, blow- 
ing gas scenarios, repair methods, and safety precautions. 

NGAS 203 Natural Gas Regulatory and 

Compliance Issues 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.The course covers the Department of 
Transportation regulations related to natural gas companies, includ- 
ing leak survey and patrol requirements. 

NGAS 204 Natural Gas Construction 3 Credits 

Techniques 

Prerequisites: NGAS 101. Introduces the methods used to locate and 
install natural gas lines, basic design theory, backfilling, purging, 
valve inspection and maintenance, pressure testing, customer regu- 
lations and relief design, explanation of hoop stress, shutting down 
the flow of gas, basic tapping and stopping techniques, construction 
equipment and current methods and common materials. 

NRSG 100 Fundamentals of Nursing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to a Nursing Program. Corequisites:NRSG 
101. Examines roles of the licensed practical nurse and registered 
nurse as members of the health care team. Provides an overview of 
the five components of the nursing process.Explores the nurse's role 
in providing for basic physiological, psychosocial, cultural, intellectu- 
al, and spiritual needs of patients. Introduces fundamental principles 
of therapeutic communication and teaching/learning. 



NRSG 103 Medical-Surgical Nursing I Lab 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: NRSG 100 and NRSG 101. Corequisites: NRSG 102 and 

NSG 105. Simulated patient care provides an opportunity to develop 
progressively complex nursing skills. Emphasis is placed on sterile 
technique,airway maintenance, nutritional and fluid support, elimi- 
nation devices, specimen collection, medication administration, and 
drug dosage calculations. 

NRSG 105 Medical-Surgical Nursing I Clinical 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: NRSG 100 and NRSG 101. Corequisites: NRSG 102 and 
NRSG 103. Provides the opportunity to apply nursing skills in diverse 
patient care situations. Emphasizes assessment skills in determining 
patient health status.Applies knowledge of etiology.pathophysiolo- 
gy, diagnostic tests, and assessment findings to identify patient 
needs. 

NRSG 1 06 Pharmacology for Nursing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to a Nursing Program or Program Chair 
Approval. Introduces principles of pharmacotherapeutics, pharmaco- 
dynamics, and pharmacokinetics in relation to the major drug clas- 
sifications. Utilizes the nursing process to explore pharmacologic 
aspects of patient care. 

NRSG 108 Transition for the Paramedic to 

the Associate of Science in Nursing 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Associate of Science of Nursing 
Program. Corequisites: NRSG 109.Examines the transition to the role 
of the registered nurse. Identifies components of the nursing pro- 
gram philosophy. Provides an overview of the five components of 
the nursing process, emphasizes the assessment component. 
Introduces data analysis and nursing diagnoses. Reviews etiology, 
pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and the diagnostic testing 
of common alterations in health within the context of all body sys- 
tems. Introduces mental health concepts and therapeutic communi- 
cations/milieu management. 

NRSG 109 Transition for the Paramedic to the 
Associate Science in Nursing Lab/Clinical 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to a Nursing Program. Corequisites: NRSG 
108. Provides the paramedic the opportunity to transition into the 
role of the associate degree nurse.Allows the opportunity to apply 
theoretical knowledge to provide ethical, culturally competent, and 
holistic care for adults experiencing non-complex alterations in 
health. Emphasis is placed on the prevention of illness and the main- 
tenance, promotion and restoration of health, as well as the support 
of death with dignity and implementation of the ordered treatment 
plan.The nursing process provides the framework for problem solv- 
ing and critical thinking in providing nursing care.Laboratory and 
clinical experiences are provided to assist the student in identifying 
appropriate nursing interventions for health needs. 



NRSG 110 Medical Surgical Nursing II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: NRSG 102 NRSG 103, NRSG 105,and NRSG 106. 
Corequisites: NRSG 1 1 1 . Provides an understanding of the health 
care needs of adults experiencing non-complex alterations in health 
within the context of all body systems. Examines the roles of the 
licensed practical nurse and the registered nurse in applying the 
nursing process and implementing the ordered plan of treatment. 

NRSG 1 1 1 Medical Surgical Nursing II Clinical 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: NRSG 102.NRSG 103,NRSG 105,and NRSG 106. 
Corequisites: NRSG 110. Allows the opportunity to apply theoretical 
knowledge to provide ethical, culturally competent, and holistic care 
for adults experiencing non-complex alterations in health.Emphasis 
is placed on the prevention of illness and the maintenance, promo- 
tion and restoration of health, as well as the support of death with 
dignity and implementation of the ordered treatment plan.The 
nursing process provides the framework for problem solving and 
critical thinking in providing nursing care. 

NRSG 112 Maternal-Child Nursing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: NRSG 102, NRSG 103, NRSG 105, and NRSG 106. 
Corequisites: NRSG 1 1 3. Applies knowledge of etiology and patho- 
physiology to provide an understanding of the health care needs of 
children and childbearing families. Examines the roles of the licensed 
practical nurse and the registered nurse in applying the nursing 
process and implementing the ordered plan of treatment for child- 
bearing and childrearing families. Introduces growth and develop- 
ment components and how they impact therapeutic communication, 
therapeutic interventions, and teaching-learning techniques when 
providing nursing care to children and child-rearing families. 

NRSG 113 Maternal-Child Nursing Clinical 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: NRSG 102,NRSG 103,NRSG 105,and NRSG 106. 
Corequisites: NRSG 112. Allows the opportunity to apply theoretical 
knowledge to provide ethical, culturally competent, and holistic care 
for children and childbearing families. Emphasis is placed on the 
prevention of illness and the maintenance, promotion, and restora- 
tion of health as well as the support of death with dignity and 
implementation of the ordered plan of treatment. Knowledge of 
principles of growth and development are utilized to adapt thera- 
peutic communication, therapeutic intervention, and teaching- 
learning techniques to provide nursing care to children and childrea- 
ring families. The nursing process provides the framework for prob- 
lem solving and critical thinking in providing nursing care. 

NRSG 114 Health Care Concepts in Nursing 1 credit 

Prerequisites: NRSG 102, NRSG 103,andNRSG 105. Explores strate- 
gies utilized to promote lifelong personal and professional develop- 
ment. Analyzes the roles of the licensed practical nurse and the reg- 
istered nurses within the context of the larger healthcare environ- 



ment. Examines internal and external influences on nursing practice. 
Explores basic concepts of nursing leadership and management 
Analyzes legal and ethical issues in healthcare. 

NRSG 116 Geriatric/Complex Medical Surgical 
Nursing III for the Practical Nurse 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Practical Nursing Program, NRSG 1 10, 
and NRSG 1 1 1 . Corequisites: NRSG 1 17. Applies previous knowledge 
of etiology and pathophysiology to provide an understanding of the 
health care needs of adults experiencing complex alterations in 
health within the context of all body systems.Examines the role of 
the practical nurse in the acute care and long-term care setting. 
Relates principles of growth and development to the needs of geri- 
atric patients. Examines leadership skills in the geriatric setting. 

NRSG 117 Geriatric/Complex Medical Surgical 
Nursing III for the Practical Nurse Clinical 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Practical Nursing Program, NRSG 110 
and NRSG 111. Corequisites: NGAS 116. Allows the opporruntf to 
apply theoretical knowledge to provide ethical, culturally competent . 
and holistic care for adults within the context of all body systems. 
Emphasis is placed on the prevention of illness and the maintenance. 
promotion and restoration of health.as well as the support of death 
with dignity and implementation of the ordered plan of treatment 
The nursing process provides the framework for problem solving and 
critical thinking in providing nursing are.Leadership activities for 
practical nurses in the long term care setting are explored. 

NRSG 120 Transition to Associate of Science 
N u rsing for the LPN S Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the ASN Program. Coreguisite: NRSG 106. 
Examines the role of the registered nurse. Identifies components of 
the nursing program philosophy. Reviews etiology.pathopnysiology, 
clinical manifestations, and the diagnostic testing of common alter- 
ations in health within the context of all body systems. The nursing 
process will guide the student in analyzing the care of the adult and 
maternal child patients with noncomplex health disorders. Emphasis 
will be placed on assessment stalls. Laboratory experience is provid- 
ed to perform basic nursing skills and assist the student in identify- 
ing appropriate nursing responses to hearth needs. 

NRSG 200 Complex Medical-Surgical 

Nursing for the ASN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the ASN Program. NRSG 110, NRSG 111, 
NRSG 112, and NRSG 113 or Admission to the ASN Program, NRSG 
108, NRSG 109.NRSG 112, NRSG 113 and NRSG 1(>6w Admission to 
the ASN Program, NRSG 120 and NRSG ItoCorequisrte: NRSG 201. 
Applies previous knowledge of the etiology and pathophysiology of 
complex alterations in health in understanding the patient's health 
care needs within the context of aH body systems. Examines the role 



135 



136 



of the registered nurse in applying the nursing process and imple- 
menting the ordered plan of treatment in acute care settings. 
Examines leadership skills in a variety of healthcare settings. 

NRSG 201 Complex Medical Surgical Nursing 

for the ASN Clinical 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the ASN Program, NRSG 110, NRSG 111, 
NRSG 112, and NRSG 113 or Admission to the ASN Program, NRSG 
108.NRSG 109.NRSG 112, NRSG 113 and NRSG 106 or Admission to 
the ASN Program, NRSG 120 and NRSG 106. Corequisite: NRSG 200. 
Allows the opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to provide 
ethical, culturally competent, and holistic care for adults experiencing 
complex alterations in health within the context of all body systems. 
Emphasis is placed on the prevention of illness and the maintenance, 
promotion and restoration of health, as well as the support of death 
. with dignity and implementation of the ordered plan of treatment. 
The nursing process provides the framework for problem solving and 
critical thinking in providing nursing care. Leadership concepts uti- 
lized in the management of direct patient care are explored. 

NRSG 202 Nursing Care of the Complex Family 3 
Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the ASN Program, NRSG 1 1 0, NRSG 1 1 1 , 
NRSG 112,and NRSG 113 or Admission to the ASN Program, NRSG 
108, NRSG 109, NRSG 112, NRSG 113 and NRSG 106 or Admission to 
the ASN Program, NRSG 120 and NRSG 106. Corequisite: NRSG 203. 
Explores the theoretical concepts of growth and development, family 
nursing, and health promotion across the lifespan. Examines the role 
of the registered nurse in applying the nursing process and in imple- 
menting the ordered plan of treatment for families experiencing - 
complex health problems. Identifies community health resources. 
Discusses the issues of obstetrical and high-risk neonatal emergen- 
cies, family violence, acute life threatening illnesses, and chronic 
debilitating illnesses. Analyzes the needs of the geriatric patient. 

NRSG 203 Nursing Care of the Complex 

Family Clinical 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the ASN Program, NRSG 110, NRSG 111, 
NRSG 1 1 2 and NRSG 1 1 3 or Admission to the ASN Program, NRSG 
108, NRSG 109, NRSG 112, NRSG 113 and NRSG 106 or Admission to 
the ASN Program, NRSG 120 and NRSG 106. Corequisite: NRSG 202. 
Allows the opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to provide 
ethical, culturally competent, and holistic care with the focus on 
family coping and adaptation across the lifespan. Emphasis is 
placed on the prevention of illness and the maintenance, promo- 
tion, and restoration of health as well as the support of death with 
dignity, and implementation of the ordered plan of treatment for 
families experiencing complex health problems. The nursing 
process provides the framework for problem solving and critical 
thinking in providing nursing care. 



NRSG 204 Psychiatric Nursing 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the ASN Program, NRSG 1 1 0, NRSG 1 1 1 , 
NRSG 112,and NRSG 113 or Admission to the ASN Program,NRSG 
108, NRSG 109, NRSG 1 12, NRSG 1 13 and NRSG 106 Pharmacology for 
Nursing or Admission to the ASN Program, NRSG 120 and NRSG 
106.Corequisite: NRSG 205. Builds upon previous knowledge of men- 
tal health concepts to provide an understanding of psychiatric and 
behavioral disorders. Examines the role of the registered nurse in 
applying the nursing process to the care of individuals in the psychi- 
atric setting. Explores the ordered plan of treatment for psychiatric 
and behavioral disorders. Identifies the registered nurse's accounta- 
bility for the legal and ethical issues inherent in psychiatric nursing. 

NRSG 205 Psychiatric Nursing Clinical 1 credit 

Prerequisites: Admission to the ASN Program, NRSG 1 1 0, NRSG 1 1 1, 
NRSG 112,and NRSG 113 or Admission to the ASN Program, NRSG 108, 
NRSG 1 09, NRSG 1 1 2, NRSG 1 1 3 and NRSG 1 06 or Admission to the ASN 
Program.NRSG 120 and NRSG 106. Corequisite:NRSG204.Allows the 
opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to provide ethical, cultur- 
ally competent,and holistic care for individuals experiencing psychi- 
atric and behavioral disorders. The nu5ing process provides the frame- 
work for problem solving and critical thinking in nursing care. 

OFAD 009 Introduction to Keyboarding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces the use of the keyboard.Touch-typing 
skills, manual dexterity, and speed development are cultivated using 
computers. 

OFAD 019 Keyboarding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides students with the fundamentals of key- 
boarding using the touch method.Emphasizes mastery of the key- 
board, development of formatting skills, and development of speed 
and accuracy on a personal computer using an up-to-date software 
package. 

OFAD 029 Speed and Accuracy Development 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: OFAD 019.Designed to diagnose individual keyboard- 
ing speed and accuracy skills and bring those skills to an employ- 
able level. 

OFAD 103 Introduction to Computers 

with Word Processing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessement or earning a grade "C" or better in ENGL 032.0ffers 
hands-on experience in the operation of a specific word processing 
software package. 

OFAD 108 Shorthand/Notetaking I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces basic principles of a note-taking sys- 
tem. Emphasis is placed on note-taking techniques, legibility, and 
mastery of the basic vocabulary.Dictation and transcription of mate- 
rial is included. 



OFAD 110 Presentation Graphics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides hands-on experience and familiarizes 
students with specific advanced design and layout techniques and 
practical applications of business presentations. 

OFAD 113 Medical Coding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HLHS lOl.Addresses basic CPT coding concept guide- 
lines including learning to use documented information and basic 
ICD-9 coding guidelines including how to extract information from 
medical charts.(For campuses that do not have an MEAS program.) 

OFAD 114 Desktop Publishing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 1 01 or OFAD 103.Emphasizes the production of 
publication quality documents.Attention is given to design and lay- 
out principles and production techniques.Fonts, graphics, and page 
composition are integrated into camera-ready documents using 
computer software and hardware. 

OFAD 115 Computer Concepts for the 

Medical Office 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Familiarizes the student 
with computer applications in the health care setting.Designed to 
provide the student with basic operations and applications of com- 
puter usage within the health care provider office.Applies the use of 
a computerized account management software. 

OFAD 116 Essentials of Business 

Correspondence 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Tor better in ENGL 024 and ENGL 
031.An intensive, competency-based business correspondence 
course that involves grammar.word usage.pronunciation, punctua- 
tion, proofreading, spelling, vocabulary building, and other language 
skills that are essential to good workplace communication. 

OFAD 1 1 9 Document Processing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Entry-level proficiency of 35 gross words per minute 
on a three-minute timed writing with three or fewer errors or OFAD 
019. Emphasis is placed on increasing speed, improving accuracy, 
developing and applying formatting skills, applying communication 
and language arts skills, and developing document production tech- 
niques on a personal computer using an up-to-date word processing 
software package. 

OFAD 121 Office Procedures and 

Team Dynamics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OFAD 019 or OFAD 119. Prepares the student to under- 
stand and carry out responsibilities assigned in a business 
office.Topics include telephone techniques, office equipment, travel 
and conference arrangements, professional development, research 
techniques, time and stress management, and business ethics. 



OFAD 1 30 Quality and Customer Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade ofT'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Examines and addresses issues of quality and customer service 
faced by erganizations.Explores evolving philosophies, definition, 
development and application.lncludes examination of current appli- 
cations in administration. 

OFAD 171 Topics in Presentation Graphics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides hands on experience and familiarizes 
students with specific advanced design and layout techniques and 
practical applications of business presentations 

OFAD 204 Microsoft Outlook 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides students with the ability to utilize 
email components.Topics include managing schedules, managing 
folders and contacts, organizing work using tasks and notes, and 
customizing and using advanced email features. 

OFAD 207 Integrated Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrates competency through appropriate 
assessment or successful completion of CINS 101. Explore the 
advanced features of an integrated office software package using 
word processing, spreadsheets.database, and 1 presentation graphics. 

OFAD 208 Shorthand/Notetaking II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OFAD 108.Develop dictation, notetaking and tran- 
scription skills through drills and tests.Emphasizes speed, accuracy 
and use of correct English. Reinforces and builds on principles and 
skills learned in Shorthand/Notetaking I. 

OFAD 211 Medical Transcription I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HLHS101 and OFAD 119 with an entry level speed of 
40 GWAM on a 5-minute timed writing with a 5 error limit.Develop 
skills and knowledge of medical transcription, utilizing medical 
reports, terminology, and correspondence. 

OFAD 212 Medical Transcription II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEAS 135 or OAFD 21 1 .Develops transcription skills 
using medical documents such as office chart notes, letters, initial 
office evaluations, history and physicals, consultations,emergency 
room reports, and discharge summaries for various medical specialties. 

OFAD 213 Professional Medical Coding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OFAD 1 13.Addresses advanced CPT coding concept 
guidelines including learning to use documented information and 
advanced ICD-9 coding guidelines including how to extract infor- 
mation from medical charts.Emphasis is given to surgical coding in 
the course. 

OFAD 21 4 Multimedia Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CINS 101 or OFAD 103. Create multimedia presenta- 



tions for primary delivery via the Internet.Attention is given to 
design and layout principles and production techniques. Color and 
editing graphics and photographs will be introduced. Students will 
also apply their design skills to preparing documents for electronic 
publishing on the World Wide Web. 

OFAD 21 5 Legal Transcription 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OFAD 1 1 9, with an entry-level speed of 40 gross words 
a minute on a 5-minute timed writing with a five-error limit.Provides 
hands-on training in formatting legal correspondence and court doc- 
uments in the basic areas of law.Students will leam specialized rules 
of punctuation, terminology, and standards for legal documents.ln a 
laboratory setting, students will learn how to use a transcribing 
machine to produce legal documents from tape dictation. 

OFAD 216 Business Communications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .Emphasizes analysis of business communi- 
cation environments-cultural, organizational, technological, interna- 
tional, and interpersonal-and the use oftommunications standards 
to direct the choice of oral and written communication methods and 
techniques.lt includes practice in writing a variety of messages used 
to communicate in business and industry with an emphasis on the 
potential impact of the message on the receiver as a basis for plan- 
ning and delivering effective business communications. 

OFAD 217 Problem Solving for Computer Users 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor Approval.lntroduces the organization, struc- 
ture, and functions necessary for managing and maintaining infor- 
mation systems within a business organization. Presents the student 
with basic computer system concepts such as file and resource man- 
agement, device drivers, file structures, hard disk organization, soft- 
ware installation, upgrading and maintenance, and fundamental 
data security techniques.These concepts will be incorporated into 
practical applications. 

OFAD 218 Spreadsheets 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in MATH 044.Provides 
an indepth understanding of worksheet design, charting,what-if 
analysis, worksheet database creation and manipulation, and 
OLE.Knowledge and use of a spreadsheet will be applied to various 
business applications. Integration of spreadsheets in other applica- 
tions will be addressed. 

OFAD 21 9 Advanced Document Processing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OFAD 119 or equivalent. Emphasis on high degree of 
competency in office-like environment processing documents on a 
personal computer using an up-to-date word processing software 
package. 



OFAD 220 Records and Database Management 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through a ppropri a te 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Focuses on the management and control of documents from 

creation to disposition using manual, automated, and electronic 
media. Examines filing procedures, records management personnel, 
and equipmentUses database software to create, modify, query, and 
report information from a database. 

OFAD 221 Organizational Leadership 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OFAD 216 and Advisor Approval.Emphasizes manage- 
ment of office functions.Key topics include personnel, team budcSng, 
ergonomics.project management, and leadership sryte.Case studies 
and role-playing projects are indudeditudents will also complete 
the program and College outcomes assessment took. 

OFAD 222 Database Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Provides "hands-on'experience and familiarizes students widi 
the creation and management of a database. 

OFAD 226 Advanced Electronic Spreadsheets 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OFAD 218.Continues the study of electronic spread- 
sheets in business.Emphasizes the advanced application of electron- 
ic spreadsheets. 

OFAD 271 Adobe Illustrator© 3 Credits 

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Advisor's Approval. Provides 
beginning/intermediate instruction in illustration techniques using 
computer software designed for creating illustrations, technical 
drawings, logos, and packaging. Emphasis is on preparing effective, 
creative illustrations for various media applications in an efficient 
productive manner. 

OFAD 272 Introduction to PhotoshopS 3 Credits 

Prerequisite/Corequisite: Advisor's Approval. The course provides an 
introductory to intermediate look at Adobe Photoshop. The features 
and commands of this software will be discussed and explored in 
the context of preparing and manipulating graphics. 

OFAD 280 Co-op Internship Ixtemship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor ApprovaL Provides students with the 
opportunity to work for an organization specifically related to career 
objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit 

OPMT 102 Techniques of Supervision 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of Tor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
O32.lntroduces basic employee development with emphasis on the 
responsibilities of a newly-appointed supervisor.Emphasizes organi- 
zational structure, motivation, delegation of authority, interviews. 



137 



138 



orientation and induction of new employees, employee perform- 
ance evaluations and dealing with employee conflict. 

OPMT 205 Techniques of Leadership 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OPMT 102.ldentifies approaches to effective leader- 
ship and discovers an appropriate personal leadership style.Explores 
specific qualities and skills needed for conference leadership (orga- 
nizing, facilitating, controlling, summarizing, speaking, and problem 
defining and solving). 

OPMT 21 1 Labor Relations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BUSN 101 and BUSN 202.This is a second-year elec- 
tive course in labor-management relations. Examines labor history, 
major labor legislation, collective bargaining, grievance procedure/ 
arbitration.wage issues and economic supplements e.g."fringe ben- 
efits." Students will obtain the knowledge and skills necessary for 
functioning effectively in an organized - particularly an industrial 
-environment. 

OPMT 224 Operations Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 111 or higher.A study of the efficient production 
of goods and services that will satisfy the wants and needs of identi- 
fied customer groups.The course begins with a more detailed descrip- 
tion of what Operations Management is, then moves to an examina- 
tion of the customer and methods for determining customer demand. 

ORTH 101 Introduction to Orthotics 

and Prosthetics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on the development of knowledge nec- 
essary to understand the rehabilitation process as it relates to the 
delivery of orthotic/prosthetic care. The prosthetic and orthotics pro- 
fessions are presented in terms of the integration of the biological, 
medical, and engineering sciences as well as the clinical and techni- 
cal components of the disciplines. Students will develop a solid 
foundation of the principles and practice of orthotics and prosthet- 
ics and the materials and technology associated with the manufac- 
ture of custom devices. 

PARA 1 01 Introduction to Paralegal Studies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and 
ENGL 032. A survey of the American legal system, the substantive 
and procedural law of Indiana, and the role of the paralegal in the 
legal profession.Topics include professional ethics, trial and appel- 
late courts, civil and criminal procedure, constitutional law, and basic 
legal analysis.This entry-level course is a prerequisite for all other 
paralegal courses in the program. 

PARA 1 02 Legal Research 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA lOUntroduces the student to legal research 
resources including cases reporters and digest indexes, statutory 



codes, constitutions, administrative codes and registers, legal ency- 
clopedias, treatises, legal periodicals, and practice manuals and form 
books.lnstruction is also delivered on proper legal citation form, 
citation services, and research strategy. Projects include a series of 
law library research projects that teaches the student the descriptive 
word method of research, basic legal analysis, and the structure of a 
legal research memorandum of law.20 hours of law library atten- 
dance required in this course. 

PARA 103 Civil Procedure 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA lOl.The first of two semesters devoted to the 
study of the Indiana Trial rules, small claims, court rules, and local 
rules. (The second course is PARA 202) Topics include filing require- 
ments, the rules regarding service of process, and calculation of 
deadlines. Projects include drafting summonses, complaints, 
answers, and various motions. 

PARA 106 Tort Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA lOl.Concerns the law of non-criminal injuries to 
persons or property. Topics include negligence, strict liability, product 
liability, intentional torts, affirmative defenses, basic evidence law, 
and pre-trial investigation techniques and resources. 

PARA 107 Contracts and Commercial Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA 101. Examines the nature of contracts and com- 
mercial law under both the common law and the Commercial Code 
of Indiana.Topics include contracts for sales of goods (UCC Article 2), 
the Statute of Frauds, performance, remedies,warranties, assign- 
ment law, negotiable instruments law (UCC Article 3), and secured 
transactions law (UCC Article 9). 

PARA 1 08 Property Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA 101. A survey of the law of real and personal 
property in Indiana.Property law concepts are analyzed.Topics 
include the different types of property generally, estates in land, 
concurrent ownership, legal descriptions and deeds, easements, 
encumbrances on title, title searches and title insurance, real estate 
purchase agreements, closings, mortgages and UCC Article 9 security 
interests, foreclosures, landlord-tenant law, and personal property 
law topics such as bailments, lost property, and intellectual proper- 
ty. This is an introductory course in real and personal property law 
for paralegal majors. 

PARA 200 Legal Ethics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA 101. Examines rules of professional conduct that 
apply to all legal professions including: the American Bar 
Association Model Rules of Professional Conduct, the Indiana Rules 
of Professional Conduct, the American Bar Association Guidelines for 
the Utilization of Legal Assistants, and various other sets of rules of 
conduct created by paralegal associations. 



PARA 202 Litigation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA 101 and PARA 103.The study of Indiana trial 
rules pertaining to actual trial.Topics include the discovery process 
and discovery tools, litigation support — including organization and 
retrieval of trial documents — techniques in preparing witnesses for 
trial, and preparing jury instructions.The main project is compiling a 
trial notebook. 

PARA 203 Law Office Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA 101.A hands-on survey of software support 
available to the law practitioner, including word processing, elec- 
tronic spreadsheets.database management, presentation software, 
docket control.litigation support, timekeeping, and billing.Also 
included is information on computer-assisted legal research servic- 
es, web based research, and electronic filing. 

PARA 204 Legal Writing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA 102 and PARA 103,Further develop the legal 
writing skills the students touched upon in Legal Research.The stu- 
dent will be exposed to various legal writing techniques that are 
used in drafting a wide variety of legal documents.Throughout the 
semester, a strong emphasis is placed on proper writing methodolo- 
gy and formatting. Projects include drafting research, correspon- 
dence, litigation and transactional documents. 

PARA 205 Business Associations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA 101 .Introduces the student to the various forms 
of business entities, including sole proprietorships, general and lim- 
ited partnerships, limited liability companies (LLC's), and business 
corporations.Topics include key concepts of law (the relationship 
between principals and agents), the scope of employment doctrine, 
and respondeat superior, the distinguishing characteristics of com- 
mon business entities, the formal requirements for establishing and 
doing business in various types of business organizations in Indiana, 
respective advantages and disadvantages of each type, and relevant 
tax issues.Students will review sample business formation docu- 
ments and will draft a general partnership agreement. 

PARA 206 Advanced Tort Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA 106.A continuation of the principles and issues 
discussed in Tort Law class, including res ipsa loquitur, attractive nui- 
sance, premises liability and wrongful death.Litigation support and 
strategy will also be discussed. 

PARA 209 Family Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA 103.An introduction to the Indiana law of mar- 
riage, dissolution, custody (including UCCJA), visitation, support 
(including URESA), adoption, and guardianship of minors.Students 
will review many pleadings and intake forms and will draft a divorce 
petition, a financial statement, a summary decree with child support 
worksheet. 



PARA 210 Wills, Trust, and Estates 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA lOI.Concerns the law of wills and trusts, the 
administration of estates, and guardianships according to Indiana 
common law and the provisions of Titles 29, 30 and Title 6 (death 
taxes) of the Indiana Code.Students study the intestate succession, 
the elements of a valid will, of a valid trust, and laws of will con- 
struction. 

PARA 21 2 Bankruptcy Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARA 101 . A survey of the Federal Bankruptcy Act, 
including the various bankruptcy proceedings.There under empha- 
sizes how to accumulate the debtor's financial information, compile 
initial schedules, prepare the list of creditors, collect and organize 
data for the first meeting of creditor's, complete proofs of claim, and 
pursue creditors' rights. Including preparation of a Chapter 1 3 bank- 
ruptcy case. 

PARA 271 Medical Malpractice 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: PARA 101 . The student shall receive instruction in the 
elements of medical malpractice and how this differs from inten- 
tional tort and negligence claims.The course also concentrates on 
instruction on ethical and criminal violations that sometimes occur 
in the medical field.The student shall also receive instruction on the 
intricacies of Indiana law, including an analysis of the Indiana 
Medical Malpractice Act. The course will also cover the defenses 
available to defendants of medical malpractice claims. 

PARA 280 Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.An opportunity for inter- 
mediate paralegal student to acquire valuable field experience by 
working under attorney supervision.The student keeps a journal 
and prepares a report of his or her experience at the end of the 
semester. - . 

PARM 102 Emergency Medical Technician - 

Basic Training 7.5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Completion of the ASSET or COMPASS, 18 years of age 
prior to course completion, copy of high school diploma or GED must 
be supplied by course completion, completion of the College Health 
Examination Form and required immunizations and testsjegionally 
determined, current Health Care Provider CPR card.Based on the 
training program developed by the Department of Transportation 
and the Emergency Medical Services Commission of Indiana.Covers 
theories, techniques and operational aspects of pre-hospital emer- 
gency care within the scope and responsibility of the basic emer- 
gency medical technician (EMT-B).Requires laboratory practice and 
clinical observation in a hospital emergency room and ambulance. 
Successful completion of the course meets Indiana requirements to 
test for certification as an EMT-B. 



PARM 1 1 1 Preparatory 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 101, certification, or pending, as an EMT - B, 
course application and physical exam on file, completion of the 
College Health Examination Form and regionally required immu- 
nizations and tests, successful completion of entrance requirements 
as determined by regional affiliates.The legal, moral and ethical 
responsibilities of the health care professional are introduced. An 
overview of the Emergency Medical Services System and its compo- 
nents and their relationships is presented.The essential principles of 
the standard of care, medical liability, areas of potential medical lia- 
bility and medical liability protection are introduced. An overview of 
stress, reactions to stress, anxiety, paramedic job stress and dealing 
with death and dying is discussed.The essentials of pathophysiology 
and how the understanding of disease processes will improve upon 
the level of care provided by the paramedic are explained. 

PARM 1 1 2 Prehospital Pharmacology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARM 111. The introduction of drug information, action 
of drugs, weights and measures and the administration and tech- 
niques of administering drugs.The essentials of venous access, thera- 
peutic communications and lifespan development are also included. 

PARM 1 1 5 Airway, Patient Assessment 3.5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARM 112.The fundamentals of airway management 
including airway anatomy and physiology, assessment, manage- 
ment, ventilation, and suction are emphasized.General patient 
assessment, initial management including scene survey, initial 
assessment, resuscitation, focused/detailed exam, history, definitive 
field management, and re-evaluation are also introduced. 

PARM 116 Clinical Application I 1.5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARM 112.Provides experiences in a hospital environ- 
ment or other medical setting under supervision.Provides the 
opportunity to practice and perform patient assessment, endotra- 
cheal intubation, intravenous access techniques, and therapeutic 
communication techniques in the emergency department, surgery, 
and other appropriate clinical areas. 

PARM 200 Trauma 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARM 1 1 5. An overview of kinematics, primary sur- 
vey, resuscitation, secondary survey and management, monitoring 
and transporting trauma victims. The pathophysiology of shock, 
care of shock and victim oxygenation are covered. It defines param- 
eters and discusses anatomy and physiology as related to bum 
injury, presents pathophysiology related to a specific source of bum 
injury and presents patient-related detail assessment and specific 
management of burns. Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS) certifica- 
tion must be earned during this course. 

PARM 210 Medical I 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARM 200.Pulmonology, respiratory management 



and pharmacological interventions are covered in detailardMiogy 
and dysrhythmia recognition relative to ore-hospital intervention 
are emphasized.Advanced Cardiac life Support (ACLS) certification 
must be earned during this course. 

PARM 213 Medical II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARM 210 and APHY 102.Etiotogy and treatment of 
medical emergencies associated with the nervous, endocrine and 
reproductive systems are reviewedThe course includes presentation 
of allergies and anaphylaxis, gastroenterology, toxicology, infectious 
and communicable diseases, environmental conditions and behav- 
ioral and psychiatric disorder. 

PARM 215 Special Considerations 3 J Credits 

Prerequisites: PARM 21 3.Pediatria, geriatric arnJirrterventions far 
the chronic care patient and assessment based management are 
covered. Neonatal Resuscitation Provider (NRP) certification and 
Pediatrics Advanced Life Support (PALS) certification must be 
earned during this class. 

PARM 216 Clinical Applications II 1.5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARM 116.Provides experiences in a hospital environ- 
ment or other medical setting under supervision-Provides the 
opportunity to practice and perform patient assessment, endotra- 
cheal intubation, suctioning of upper and lower airway, deSvery of 
aerosolized medications, administration of medications via various 
enteral and parenteral routes, intravenous access techniques, inter- 
pretation of electrocardiogram tracings, and therapeutic lomn—tf 
cation techniques in the emergency department. critical care units, 
behavioral units, and other appropriate dinical areas. 

PARM 219 Clinical Applications III 1 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARM 216.Provides experiences in a hospital environ- 
ment or other medical setting under supervision.The emphasis is on 
gaining experience in the management of neonatal, pediatric and 
obstetric patients.Provides opportunities to practice assessment 
communication and management with patients ranging from 
neonate to young adult and opportunities to observe Sve births and 
perform assessment of obstetric patients are also avafcbte. 
Assessing the critically ill patient and assisting with care in specialty 
intensive care units and the bum unit is included. 

PARM 220 Operations 2 .5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARM 213-An awareness of the concepts of rescue 
and the preparation for a response to a scene/incident is 
providedThe essentials of crime scene awareness, medkal incident 
command and hazardous materials operations are presented. This is 
the capstone course of the paramedic curriculum. 

PARM 221 Ambulance Internship 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: PARM 219itudents will participate in a field intem- 



139 



ship that provides on the job experience in all phases of prehospital 
advanced life support.AII skills tested by the National Registry Exam 
will be formally reviewed and practiced.A general review of the 
total paramedic curriculum will be presented. Student's practical 
skills experienced through Clinical I, Clinical II, Clinical III, and this 
course must demonstrate competency in the objectives listed as 
required by the National Standard Curriculum.DOT, 1998. 

PHIL 101 Introduction to Philosophy 

TransferIN 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Introduces the student to recurring ideas and thought systems 
represented in the literature and lives of great thinkers and exam- 
ines philosophical principles such as foundations of morality, skepti- 
cism, the nature of knowledge, the nature of mind, free will and 
determinism, and the existence of God. Emphasizes the evaluation 
of arguments and analysis of concepts. 

PHIL 102 Introduction to Ethics TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Introduces the student to the ethical domain as a field of phi- 
losophy by examining major concepts such as happiness, virtues 
and rules and applies them to practical moral problems. 

PHIL 21 3 Logic 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .Introduces the student to logic as a field of 
philosophy by examining the structure of argument and applying 
critical thinking skills. 

PHIL 220 Philosophy of Religion TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 1 1 1 .Analyzes issues basic to understanding reli- 
gion, including the problem of evil, free will and divine foreknowl- 
edge, arguments for the existence of God, relationship of faith and 
reason, and arguments for personal immortality. 

PHOT 100 Photography for Non-Majors 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Covers basic black and white photographic theo- 
ry and technique.lncludes basic black and white darkroom processes 
and physics of light and filters.Studies camera and lenses, character- 
istics of films and papers and the chemistry of emulsions, exposure, 
and development. 

PHOT 1 04 Basic Photography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Covers basic black and white photographic theo- 
ry and technique.lncludes basic black and white darkroom processes 
and physics of light and filters.Study of camera and lenses, charac- 
teristics of films and papers and the chemistry of emulsions, expo- 
sure, and development. 



140 



PHOT 1 06 Studio Practices 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHOT 104.lntroduction to studio work in black and 
white photography using continuous light sources.Basic setup tech- 
niques and lighting methods for a variety of subject matter.Practice 
with photoflood lamps and quartz lamps, both floods and spots, and 
a variety of equipment used to modify light. 

PHOT 107 Intermediate Photography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHOT 104.Further develops advanced camera skills 
and black and white photographic vision.Special attention is placed 
on the practice and theory of the zone system.The course introduces 
special darkroom techniques and processes and refines black and 
white printing and processing skills.lt will also emphasize good 
composition and the use of photography as a communications tool. 

PHOT 1 09 Studio Lighting Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHOT 106 and VISC 1 15.Further explores multiple 
lighting set-ups, studio electronic flash, location lighting, and special 
effects. Emphasis will be put on conceptualizing the photograph 
from start to finish. 

PHOT 122 Digital Photography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces students to digital imaging tech- 
niques in photography. Digital imaging software will be used as a 
tool to manipulate photographs and scanned imagery. Provides 
experience with digital studio setting. Provides experience with the 
digital darkroom environment including editing processes, manipu- 
lation of images and working with various output devices. 

PHOT 201 Principles of Color Photography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHOT 104 and VISC 102.Develops camera and laboratory 
skills needed for color negative and color positive processes through 
work with state-of-the-art equipment and techniques. Encompasses 
color psychology and aesthetics as well as the physics of light in color 
photography.Color photographic theory will be emphasized. 

PHOT 203 Professional Portraiture 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHOT 109, PHOT 201 and VISC 101. Explores approaches 
and methods in traditional and alternative portraiture in studio and 
on-location photography.Emphasizes creative approaches to commer- 
cial portraiture as well as lighting and posing for corrective portraiture. 

PHOT 204 Commercial Photography 

Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHOT 109.lntroduces more advanced studio and lab 
techniques used in advertising and industrial photography. 
Emphasizes creative problem solving applications toward advanced 
commercial photographic assignments. 



PHOT 208 Independent Study I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHOT 104 and PHOT 106.Provides advanced students 
with opportunities to research and design projects for specified 
areas of interest.Requires the project plan to be approved by the 
instructor. Restricts work to student program area and requires it to 
be portfolio quality. 

PHOT 214 Journalistic and Editorial 

Photography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHOT 104.Gives students the opportunity to photo- 
graph events and human interest features to gain experience in con- 
tributions to various publications.Emphasizes establishing visual 
relationships in the photo essay. 

PHOT 216 Advanced Processes and 

Production Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHOT 107, PHOT 201.VISC 101 and VISC 
201 .Introduces specialized lab/alternative process techniques in tra- 
ditional and digital formats.Works with contemporary experimental 
darkroom and digital techniques.Covers issues in prepress produc- 
tion as they relate to the photographer. 

PHOT 218 Fine Art Photography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHOT 104. Examines current issues in non-commercial 
photography. Explores attitudes of photographers and critics on a 
wide range of topics through directed reading, class discussion, and 
gallery visits. 

PHYS 100 Technical Physics 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 111. Corequisites: MATH 121 or MATH 131 or 
MATH 134 or MATH 137. Introduces the concepts and applications of 
physics. Leads students to develop an integrated understanding of 
the theory and applications of measuring (or unit) systems, scalars, 
vectors, force, work, rates, energy.momentum, power, force trans- 
formers (simple machines), vibrations and waves, and time con- 
stants. Emphasizes understanding concepts, factual knowledge, 
computation, and application. 

PHYS 101 Physics I Transfer IN 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 121 or MATH 131, or MATH 134 or MATH 137. 
Introduces the basic concepts of mechanics, including force and 
torque, linear and rotational motion.work, energy and power, fluids, 
and the physics of heat.lncludes lab. 

PHYS 102 Physics II Transfer IN 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHYS 101 .Introduces the physics of light, periodic and 
wave motion, electricity and magnetism, and concepts of modern 
and current physics.lncludes lab. 

PHYS 220 Mechanics Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 211. Corequisites:MATH 212.A calculus based 



physics course that provides a detailed analysis of uniform and accel- 
erated motion; Newton's laws; gravitation and planetary motion; 
energy;momentum; conservation principles; circular motion; angular 
momentum; dynamics of rotation; statics; hydrostatics and hydrody- 
namics; simple harmonic motion and wave motion.lncludes lab. 

PHYS 221 Heat, Electricity and Optics 

Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHYS 220 and MATH 212.A calculus based physics course 
that provides a detailed analysis of heat and energy; kinetic theory; 
elementary thermodynamics; heat transfer; electrostatics; electric cur- 
rent; AC and DC circuit analysis; electromagnetism; magnetic proper- 
ties of matter; geometrical and physical optics.lncludes lab. 

PL AS 1 01 Introduction to Plastics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduction to the main plastic processing 
industries, techniques, and commonly used polymers. 

PLAS 106 Plastic Materials and Testing 3. Credits 

Prerequisites: PLAS 101 .Introduces structure, properties, and pro- 
cessing characteristics of plastic polymers and additives. 

PLAS 1 07 Injection Molding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PLAS 101. Expands the student's knowledge of injec- 
tion molding process, components, and industry. 

PLAS 1 08 Extrusion Process 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PLAS 101. Introduces the extrusion processes, equip- 
ment and industrial applications. 

PLAS 201 Advanced Injection Molding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PLAS 107.Covers the procedures and techniques nec- 
essary to fully utilize the capabilities of modern injection molding 
equipment to properly process thermoplastic materials. 

PLAS 202 Advanced Extrusion 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PLAS 108.Expands the student's knowledge of extru- 
sion processes, equipment and industrial application. 

PLAS 208 Computer Applications in Plastics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PLAS 107 and PLAS 108.lntroduces the computer 
products and services available to aid in the design and manufac- 
turing of plastic products. 

PLAS 209 Manufacturing of Plastics Products 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PLAS 107 and PLAS 108.Covers the economic, organi- 
zational, and quality control strategies employed by production tech- 
nicians to maximize efficiency in plastics manufacturing operations. 

POLS 101 Introduction to American 

Government and Politics TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C"or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Studies federalism, theories of the origins and purposes of gov- 



ernment and other aspects of the American government including 
interest groups, political parties, and the electoral process. Emphasis 
is placed on constitutional backgrounds and the organization and 
functions of the executive, legislative, and judicial segments of the 
national government, civil liberties and civil rights, public opinion, . 
media, bureaucracies, and domestic and foreign policy. 

POLS 112 State and Local Government 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032. 
Covers the basic organization and operation of state and local govern- 
ments.Topics include federalism, state constitutions, courts, governors, 
legislatures, elections, campaign finance, interest groups, local govern- 
ments, budgets and taxes, education and law enforcement. 

POLS 201 Introduction to 

Political Science TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Introduces students to the basic principles of political science, 
government and its institutions, international relations, political phi- 
losophy, and political theory.Emphasis on the impact of economy, 
culture, history, and environment on political behavior/events. 

POLS 210 Personal Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Examines the basis and principles of our legal system, how 
legal decisions are made and how they affect citizens'lives.Topics to 
be covered include federal and stare jurisdictions, criminal and civil 
law and procedures, freedom of speech, press and religion, privacy 
rights,workplace rights.property rights, the role of juries in our legal 
system and the death penalty. 

POLS 21 1 1ntroduction to World Politics 

TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044.lnvestigatesthe interaction of modern international 
political institutions, leaders, and events.Further discussion includes 
comparative analysis from a global perspective and the impart of 
international relations on individual lives. 

POLS 220 Public Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Focuses on bureaucracy in the federal government and its rela- 
tion to local and state agencies. 

PPTC 101 Power Plant Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.An introduction to power plant systems. It 



emphasizes the use of schematics and diagrams in discussing power 
plant systems and identifying major components inducing Men, 

turbines, generators, condensers.pumps, and auxiliary equipment 
Also includes the study of pre-heaters, feed water, superheat and 
reheat systems.Plant safety training and workplace procedures wi 

also be emphasized 

PPTC 1 02 Power Plant Mechanical Equipment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the various pieces of mechanical 
equipment found in power plants including compressors, pumps, 
fans, blowers, valves, heat exchangers, power transmission equip- 
ment and turbines. Mechanical concepts of work, force, and torque 
will be used to describe equipment operation and performance- 
Studies basic types of bearings, seals, and lubrication osed in power 
plant equipment. Mechanical assembly drawings and diagrams wl 
be utilized to understand equipment operation and function. 

PPTC 103 Power Plant Electrical Equipment 3 Credits 
Prerequisite: INDT 113. Introduces the study of electrical equipment 
and systems used in power plants. Topics induce three phase power. 
generators, motors, transformers, and switching gear. NEC and NESC 
Code requirements, automatic and manual motor controls, variable 
speed drives, and drcuit protection will also be studied. 

PPTC 121 Power Plant Steam Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: PPTC 101 and demonstrated competency through 
appropriate assessment or a grade of 'C or better in MATH 044. 
Studies the use of steam as a means of transferring energy and 
doing work. It will indude prindples of boiler operation to produce 
steam and the use of thermodynamics to understand the behavior 
and properties of a steam system. Major components wi be studied 
along with how they play a role in the steam generation process. 
The class will indude steam safety with prindples of maintenance 
for use in troubleshooting and maintaining 

PPTC 201 Power Plant Instrumentation 

and Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INDT 113 and PPTC 101. Introduces the bask princi- 
ples of process instrumentation and control systems.lt includes 
measurement parameters such as flow, pressure, level, temperature. 
and pHitudies the use of programmable logic controBersjirocess 
controllers, and distributed control systems that are interfaced with 
sensors and actuators to maintain process stability. 

PPTC 210 Gas Turbines 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PPTC 101.lntroduces the student to combined- cyde 
gas and steam turbine power plants.lt includes information on sys- 
tem layout controls, operation, and maintenance. 

PPTC 221 Advanced Power Plant Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PPTC 101 and PPTC 201. Examines online boier control 



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concepts, including combustion, feed water, header pressure, oxygen 
content, power demand, and other processes as applied to industrial 
power generation and process heat supply.Studies power plant 
cycles, thermodynamic properties of water, and steam.Also examines 
pollution control systems, gas turbine, and diesel generators. 

PSAF 1 1 5 Hazmat Awareness and Operations 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Introduces hazardous materials for 1st respon- 
ded. Topics include: hazardous materials definitions, regulations, 
statistics, properties and hazards; hazardous materials identification; 
incident management priorities; strategic goals and tactical objec- 
tives; personal protective equipment; contamination and decontam- 
ination; incident-specific strategies and tactics; terrorists and other 
criminal activities. 

PSAF 1 1 7 Hazardous Materials Technician 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 032 and 
MATH 040. Introduces hazardous material, managing the hazardous 
material incident, explosive and gas emergencies, shipping contain- 
ers, cylinder safety devices, responding to flammable and com- 
bustible liquids, oxidizer, poison, and corrosive and radioactive 
emergencies. This course emphasizes chemical identification, mark- 
ing, storage, shipping and handling of hazardous substances; and 
uses basic monitoring instruments for hazardous areas to protect 
workers and first responders.Covers protective clothing and equip- 
ment. Emphasizes safety procedures and practices. Detailed labs are 
included.On completion of this course the student is eligible to take 
the national test certification for Hazardous Materials Technician. 

PSAF 1 20 First Responder 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with information necessary to 
recognize emergency situations; know the proper course of action 
with different types of emergencies and apply appropriate first aid. 
Addresses handling of victims of hazardous materials accidents. 
Covers CPR (Red Cross Professional with AED or American Heart 
Association Health Care Provider), including one andtwo rescuer, 
and adult, infant and child resuscitation. 

PSAF 1 21 Risk Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "O'or better in ENGL 032 and 
MATH 040.This course will provide the student with an introduction 
to industrial safety, 0SHA, various 0SHA standards, workplace 
inspections, citations and penalties.Employee and employer respon- 
sibilities, right-to-know laws and safety awareness programs are 
examined.Safety motivation and knowledge, creating a healthy 
work environment and health hazards and issues are also 
studied.Areas such as the role of the supervisor, employee assistance 
programs, management of stress helps students understand the role 



employers play in creating a healthy workforce. In addition, the con- 
tributions of safety committees and other governmental agencies 
responsible for safety are examined. 

PSAF 220 Incident Management System 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval.Tliis class will emphasize 
command and control of major department operations at an 
advanced level, linking operations and safety. Areas of study include: 
National Incident Management System (NIMS), Pre-lncident, Size- 
up, command systems, Division and Group Functions, Staging, Safety 
Officer, Command Post, Communications, News Media, Computer , 
Aided Resources. 

PSAF 222 Computer Applications in 

Public Safety 3 Credits 

Prerequisite:TECH 104. Focuses on the needs and uses of the com- 
puter in public safety. Includes computer-aided dispatch, computer- 
aided design of equipment, computer generation of incident reports 
fire and EMS, application of computers for administrative process, 
resource management, maintenance, test records for vehicles and 
equipment and future uses of computers in public safety. 

PSAF 271 Field Studies in Fire Science and 
Environmental Impact 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: Advisor Approval. This is an applied field studies course 
related to fire disasters, environmental impact and public adminis- 
tration and may include environmental health and safety and haz- 
ardous materials issues. Content will vary according to the current 
field study opportunity, and student must seek regional advisor 
approval to use as credits toward program completion. Student will 
travel to federally protected wilderness post-burn areas to study 
environmental impact, to utilize knowledge of federal, state, and 
local law as applied to wild land protected areas, residential and 
local municipalities (before and after fires), study the application of 
NIMS, utilize field appropriate equipment and technology in 
research and photography, and perform water and soil analysis. 
Students are required to attend two training days of wilderness 
information and skills training (relating to camping, portaging, 
canoeing, and hiking) prior to the trip. Service learning projects 
may be included during the field studies. 

PSAF 279 Public Safety Capstone Course 1 Credit 

Prerequisite: Program Advisor Approval. Prepare the student for 
entry into Public Safety careers related to academic concentrations 
of public administration, hazardous materials, environmental health 
and safety management or fire science. Reviews procedures for 
interviewing, team participation, and ethical and productive job 
performance. Provides for taking program outcomes assessments 
and portfolio development. 



PSYC 101 Introduction to 

Psychology TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032, and MATH 044.Surveys behavior and cognitive processes as 
they affect the individual.The course focuses on biological founda- 
tions, learning processes, research methodologies, personality, 
human development and abnormal and social psychology. 

PSYC 102 Advanced Introduction 

to Psychology . 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PSYC 101. Continuation of PSYC 101.Addresses 
advanced topics regarding the methods, data, and theoretical inter- 
pretations in the areas of learning, sensory psychology, and psy- 
chophysiology. Presents specific theoretical issues, research meth- 
ods, and findings in the areas of developmental, social, personality, 
and abnormal psychology. 

PSYC 201 Lifespan Development TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and ENGL m.Examines human growth and 
development through the prenatal, child, adolescent, and adult 
stages of life.Physical, emotional, psychosocial, and cognitive influ- 
ences from conception to death will be addressed. 

PSYC 205 Abnormal Psychology Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and ENGL 111. Examines theories and 
research related to abnormal behavior with primary emphasis on 
symptoms, etiology, and treatment of psychological disorders. 

PSYC 210 Drugs and Human Behavior 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and ENGL 111. Examines theories and 
research related to human drug use and abuse. Drug pharmacology; 
physiological effects of drugs on the nervous system; social and psy- 
chological issues affecting drug abuse; the treatment, effects, pre- 
vention of substance abuse; and therapeutic uses of drugs in mental 
illness will be addressed. 

PSYC 21 1 Research Methods in Psychology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and MATH 050.The course will familiarize 
students with the basic concepts, techniques, and problems associ- 
ated with conducting research in psychology. Students will be pro- 
vided with the analytical and critical thinking skills required to 
design, conduct, and interpret empirical research. Problems specific 
to research in psychology will be explored. 

PSYC 240 Human Sexuality TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 . Considers sexuality from an historic, scientif- 
ic, evolutionary and psychosocial perspective including sex research 
and methods, the biological bases of sexuality, sexual behavior, sex- 
uality and the life cycle, sexual problems, and social issues. 



PSYC 242 Educational Psychology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENGL 111 and PSYC 101 .Designed for students interest- 
ed in the educational process at all levels. Included will be topics relat- 
ed to student motivation, assessment and achievement. Successful 
students will understand the importance of the application of knowl- 
edge, as well as the acquisition of knowledge.The course provides a 
basic understanding of the psychology of teaching and education. 
Problem solving in the educational setting will be stressed. 

PSYC 253 Introduction to Social 

Psychology Transfer IN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 andSOCI 111,The study of social psychology 
as a science, and how social psychologists study the interactions 
within and between individuals, social groups and institutions.This- 
course crosslists with SOCI 253. 

PSYC 260 Health Psychology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PSYC 101. An introduction to health and emphasizing 
mind-body issues, the biopsychosocial model and cognitive behav- 
ioral theory.The course will emphasize research methods and cur- 
rent practice related to stress and pain, as well as health related 
behaviors. Within the course, treatment approaches, behavioral risk 
factors and public health issues will be addressed. 

PTAS 101 Introduction to Physical Therapist 
Assisting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 044.Explores the history and concepts of physical 
therapy, physical therapist assisting and rehabilitative medicine. 
Introduces fundamentals of patient care including universal precau- 
tions; body substance isolation; OSHA guidelines.patientassessment 
including vital signs; body mechanics; and patient handling with 
applications of physics principles. Includes preparation of patients, 
treatment areas and equipment. 

PTAS 1 02 Diseases, Trauma and Terminology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTAS 107. Explores diseases and trauma which neces- 
sitate physical therapy for the client. Medical terminology, anatomy, 
physiology, psychology, disabilities and physics related to these con- 
ditions are discussed along with instrumentation, implants and fixa- 
tion devices. Provides students with the opportunity to explore 
their own reactions to illness and disability and to discuss how to 
recognize patients' and families' reactions to illness and disability. 

PTAS 103 Administrative Aspects of 

Physical Therapist Assisting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTAS 107. Addresses the legal and ethical aspects of 
physical therapist assisting and patient care along with charting, doc- 
umentation, report writing, patient history procurement, record keep- 
ing, charges, insurance information including diagnostic and proce- 



dure coding, third party reimbursement, Medicare, Medicaid, electron- 
ic claims and patient rights including American Disabilities Act policy 
and architectural barriers identification. Discusses current issues in 
health care provision. Explores patient, family, and professional com- 
munication techniques, body language and electronic communica- 
tion as well as techniques in patient teaching. Includes performing 
within limitations of scope of skills, basic principles of levels of 
authority and responsibility, planning, time management, supervisory 
process, performance evaluations, policies and procedures. 

PTAS 106 PTA Treatment Modalities I 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTAS 101 and APHY 101.Continues concentration on 
the fundamentals of patient care including universal precautions, 
assessment of vital signs, body mechanics and patient positioning. 
Includes lectures, demonstrations and simulated patient problems 
in the laboratory portion of the course.Studies new techniques in 
depth, such as gait training, gait device selection, goniometry range 
of motion exercises and measuring.lntroduces various modalities 
including hydrotherapy, thermo-therapy, massage, traction and 
intermittent compression techniques.Safety factors are emphasized 
in both the lectures and the laboratories.The laboratory provides the 
setting for the practice and implementation of theories and tech- 
niques of PTAS 106.Students practice assessments and treatment 
methods on themselves and one another under the guidance and 
supervision of the laboratory instructor. 

PTAS 1 07 Kinesiology 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTAS101 and APHY 101 .Introduces the physical ther- 
apist assistant student to the science of kinesiology.By definition, 
kinesiology is the study of movement.Studies human movement 
and brings together the fields of anatomy,physiology,physics and 
geometry. Prerequisite knowledge of skeletal and muscular anato- 
my and physiology is necessary.Gass will consist of equal parts of 
lectures.demonstration and student participation in locating, 
observing and palpating various bony prominences and muscula- 
tures.Much of kinesiology requires independent study to memorize 
origin, insertion, action and innervation of all muscles.The knowl- 
edge gained in this course is an integral part of the students'back- 
ground preparation for the practice of physical therapy. 

PTAS 115 Clinical I 2.5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTAS 102, PTAS 103 and PTAS 106.Requires the stu- 
dent to perform in a clinical environment with patients.using appli- 
cations of theory and techniques of PTAS 106, under the guidance of 
a registered physical therapist. 

PTAS 205 Clinical II 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTAS 115, PTAS 207 and PTAS 217.Requires the stu- 
dent to perform in a clinical environment with patients using appli- 
cations of theories and techniques of PTAS 207 under the guidance 
of a registered physical therapist. 



PTAS 207 Treatment Modalities II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTAS 106 and PTAS 107.Reviews joint structure, muscle 
origins, insertions, innervations, actions and physiology.Covers normal 
and abnormal gait, orthotics and prostheses, arthritis and joint 
replacement and postural correcting exercise along with treatment 
principles and therapeutic exercises for the neck, back, and pe ri pheral 
joints.Discusses general exercise principles and progression of the 
orthopedic patient through an exercise program. Addresses appropri- 
ate applications of principles of physics and kinesiology. 

PTAS 215 Clinical III 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTAS 205. Requires the student to perform in a drical 
environment with patients using applications of theory and tech- 
niques of PTAS 217 under guidance of a registered physical therapist 

PTAS 217 Treatment Modalities III 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTAS 106.Provides an in-depth approach to therapeu- 
tic exercise as performed by the physical therapy assistant Covers 
basic anatomy and physiology of the central and peripheral nervous 
systems and activities of daily living.lndudes exercise physiology 
and neuro physiology and advanced principles and procedures of 
therapeutic exercise appropriate forardiopulmonary, canSovascu- 
lar.orthopedic and neurologic conditions, stroke, spinal cord and 
peripheral nerve injuries.Discusses prevention measures, specialized 
techniques and the utilization of specialized therapeutic equipment 
and correlates them to exercise applicatJonsAddresses appropriate 
applications of kinesiology and principles of prtysks-Provides prac- 
tice and implementation of theories and techniques of PTAS 106 
and PTAS 207 in the lab setting. 

PTAS 224 Current Issues and Review 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: PTAS 215.Teaches the sources of physical therapy 
research and discusses the recognition of the roles and responstiS- 
ties of physical therapy assistants.Requires completion and presen- 
tation of an independent projectlndudes a comprehensive review 
of the course to prepare the student for licensure exam. 

QUAL 101 Quality Control Concepts and 

Techniques I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assess- 
ment or earning a grade of 'Cor better in MATH 050.Covers current 
quality control concepts and techniques in industry with emphasis on 
modem manufacturing requirementsitudies the fundamental tools 
of statistical process control which are used in industry to reduce costs 
and increase productivity at a predictable quafty levelimphasizes 
principles and techniques of SPC to ensure prevention instead of 
detection of problems is practicedJndudes bask statistical and proba- 
bility theory, sampling techntques^rocess control charts, the nature of 
variation, histograms, attributes and variable charts. 



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144 



QUAL 1 02 Statistical Process Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Studies the fundamental tools of statistical process 
control which are used in industry to reduce costs and increase produc- 
tivity at a predictable quality level.Emphasizes principles and tech- 
niques of statistical process control to ensure that prevention instead 
of detection of problems is practiced.lndudes basic statistical and 
probability theory, sampling techniques,process control charts, the 
nature of variation, histograms, and attribute and variable charts. 

QUAL 105 Non-Destructive Testing 

Application 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Presents an overview of the relationship of non- 
destructive testing to the total quality function.lncludes advantages 
and limitations of various test methods including liquid penetrate, 
magnetic particle, ultrasound, and eddy current. 

QUAL 201 Advanced Statistical Process 

Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: QUAL lOLBuilds on the basic principles of QUAL 101 
with advanced techniques by industry to ensure economic produc- 
tion of goods based on defect prevention rather than defect detec- 
tion. Covers the various decisions, to modify, change or adjust the 
process based on statistical evidence.Stresses interpretation of statis- 
tical data and distinguishing between common and special causes of 
problems. Emphasizes appropriate use of control charts, trend analy- 
sis, assessing process and machine capability, evaluating the meas- 
urement process, using computers, and implementation techniques. 

QUAL 202 Quality Control Concepts and 

Techniques II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: QUAL lOI.Acquaints students with quality control sys- 
tems. Emphasizes the systems approach to quality, establishing the 
quality system and applying total quality control in the company. 

QUAL 204 Total Quality Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Teaches the philosophy of total quality manage- 
ment. Focuses on improving processes and reducing variation in sys- 
tems.Covers management's role in improving aspects of manufactur- 
ing and service organization to achieve quality improvement. 

QUAL 206 ISO/QS International Standards 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Teaches the basic principles of ISO 9000 stan- 
dards, QS 9000 standard, IS0 14000 standard.lncludes instruction on 
internal auditing with emphasis on the role of the internal auditor 
in regard to the maintenance of the quality systems. 

QUAL 210 Quality Management Principles 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Stresses the management concept relating to 
employee attitudes, motivation and job satisfaction, as well as 
philosophies, styles of leadership, and team building as they relate 
to quality objectives. 



RADT 1 1 1 0rientation and Patient Care 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program through appropriate 
assessment.lntroduces the profession of radiology and the practi- 
tioner's role in the health care system.lt also provides students with 
the basic concepts of patient care dealing with the emotional and 
physical needs of the patients including infection control and stan- 
dard precautions. 

RADT 112 Image Production and Evaluation I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program through appropriate 
assessment.Content is designed to establish a knowledge base in 
factors that govern and influence the production and recording of 
radiologic images.Film and electronic imaging with related acces- 
sories will be emphasized.The mathematical calculations of x-ray 
technique will be taught along with the operations of darkrooms 
and developing equipment commonly used in the field. 

RADT 1 1 3 Radiographic Positioning I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program through appropriate 
assessments introduction to and familiarize the student with the 
basic routines of radiographic positioning, shielding techniques, and 
related terminology.Actual radiographs are included for analysis of 
proper positioning and overall image quality. 

RADT 114 Radiographic Clinical Education I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program through appropriate 
assessment.Content and clinical practice experiences shall be 
designed for sequential development, application, critical analysis, 
integration, synthesis and evaluation of concepts and theories in the 
performance of radiologic procedures.Through structured sequen- 
tial, competency-based assignments in clinical setting, concepts of 
team practice, patient-centered clinical practice and professional 
development shall be discussed, examined and evaluated.Clinical 
practice experiences shall be designed to provide patient care and 
assessment, competent performance of Radiologic imaging and 
total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes 
measurement shall ensure the well being of the patient preparatory 
to, during, and following the radiologic procedure. 

RADT 115 Radiographic Positioning II and Lab 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RADT 1 13.Content is designed to provide a knowledge 
base necessary to perform standard radiographic procedures along 
with the application to special studies.Consideration will be given to 
the production of images of optimal diagnostic quality.Laboratory 
experience should be used to complement the didactic portion. 

RADT 116 Radiographic Clinical Education II 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: RADT 1 RContent and clinical practice experiences 
shall be designed for sequential development, application, critical 
analysis, integration, synthesis and evaluation of concepts and theo- 



ries in the performance of radiologic procedures.Through structured 
sequential, competency-based assignments in clinical setting, con- 
cepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice and profes- 
sional development shall be discussed, examined and evaluated. 
Clinical practice experiences shall be designed to provide patient 
care and assessment, competent performance of Radiologic imaging 
and total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes 
measurement shall ensure the well being of the patient preparatory 
to, during, and following the radiologic procedure. 

RADT 1 1 7 Radiation Physics and Equipment 
Operation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the program through appropriate 
assessment. Designed to establish a basic knowledge of atomic 
structure and terminology.Also presented are the nature and char- 
acteristics of radiation, x-ray production and the fundamentals of 
photon interactions with matter. 

RADT 201 Radiographic Positioning III 

and Lab 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RADT 115. Content is designed to provide a knowledge 
base necessary to perform standard radiographic procedures along 
with the application to special studies. Consideration will be given to 
the production of images of optimal diagnostic quality. Laboratory 
experience should be used to complement the didactic portion. 

RADT 202 Radiographic Clinical Education III 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: RADT 1 16. Content and clinical practice experiences 
shall be designed for sequential development, application, critical 
analysis, integration, synthesis and evaluation of concepts and theo- 
ries in the performance of radiologic procedures.Through structured 
sequential, competency-based assignments in clinical setting, con- 
cepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice and profes- 
sional development shall be discussed, examined and evaluated. 
Clinical practice experiences shall be designed to provide patient 
care and assessment, competent performance of Radiologic imaging 
and total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes 
measurement shall ensure the well being of the patient preparatory 
to, during and following the radiologic procedure. 

RADT 203 Radiographic Clinical Education IV 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: RADT 202. Content and clinical practice experiences 
shall be designed for sequential development, application, critical 
analysis, integration, synthesis and evaluation of concepts and theo- 
ries in the performance of radiologic procedures.Through structured 
sequential, competency-based assignments in clinical setting, con- 
cepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice and profes- 
sional development shall be discussed, examined and evaluated. 
Clinical practice experiences shall be designed to provide patient 
care and assessment, competent performance of Radiologic imaging 



and total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes 
measurement shall ensure the well being of the patient preparatory 
to, during and following the radiologic procedure. 

RADT 204 Radiographic Clinical Education V 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: RADT 203. Content and clinical practice experiences 
shall be designed for sequential development, application, critical 
analysis, integration, synthesis and evaluation of concepts and theo- 
ries in the performance of radiologic procedures.Through structured 
sequential, competency-based assignments in clinical setting, con- 
cepts of team practice, patient-centered clinical practice and profes- 
sional development shall be discussed, examined and evaluated. 
Clinical practice experiences shall be designed to provide patient 
care and assessment, competent performance of Radiologic imaging 
and total quality management. Levels of competency and outcomes 
measurement shall ensure the well being of the patient preparatory 
to, during and following the radiologic procedure. 

RADT 206 Radiobiology and Radiation 

Protection 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RADT 1 1 1 and RADT 117. Covers theories and principles 
of the effects of ionizing radiation upon living tissues. Includes 
dosages, measurements, DNA structures and functions, cellular 
radiosensitivity. Overview of principles of radiation protection covered 

RADT 209 Radiographic Positioning IV 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RADT 201.Content is designed to provide a knowledge 
base necessary to perform standard radiographic procedures along 
with the application to special studies.Consideration will be given to 
the production of images of optimal diagnostic quality. Laboratory 
experience should be used to complement the didactic portion. 

RADT 218 Image Production and Evaluation II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RADT 11 2.Explains phototiming and its relationship to 
manual techniques.Associates kVp and mAs with the quality and 
quantity of radiation.Covers standard darkroom procedure, auto- 
matic processing, fluoroscopy and quality assurance. 

RADT 221 Pharmacology and Advanced 

Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RADT 201 .Covers theories and principles of current 
imaging modalities.Content is also designed to cover contrast media 
along with the theory and basic technique of venipuncture.The role of 
the radiographer during medical emergencies is also addressed. 

RADT 299 General Exam Review 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.Reviews content of pro- 
gram, emphasizing anatomy.physics, exposure principles, position- 
ing and radiation safety.Simulated registry exams prepare the stu- 
dent for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist 
Examination. 



RDTH 100 Introduction to Radiation Therapy 2 credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Radiation Therapy program. Content 
is designed to provide the student with an overview of the founda- 
tions in radiation therapy and the practitioner's role in the health 
care delivery system.This course will provide students with a histori- 
cal overview of radiation therapy and its role in medicine. An intro- 
duction to radiation therapy treatment techniques, equipment, ter- 
minology, and professional responsibilities will be included. 

RDTH 1 45 Clinical Externship I 1 credit 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Radiation Therapy program. 
Corequisite: RDTH 100. Introduces the student to procedures per- 
formed in Radiation Therapy, and provides the student with greater 
opportunities to gain practical experience. During this first semester 
of clinical education, the student is expected to develop the compe- 
tency to perform simple clinical procedures with progressively less 
assistance. Emphasis continues to be given to the development of 
professional responsibility and the practice of total patient care and 
radiation safety practices. 

RDTH 150 Patient Care in Radiation Oncology 3 credits 

Prerequisites: None. Corequisite: RDTH 100. Provides the student 
with basic concepts of patient care specific to radiation therapy 
including consideration of physical and psychological conditions. 
Handling of patients,patient examinations, asepsis, local and sys- 
temic reactions, nutrition and medications are discussed. Factors 
influencing patient health during and following a course of radia- 
tion will be identified. 

RDTH 155 Clinical Externship II 3 credits 

Prerequisites: RDTH 145. Introduces the student to procedures per- 
formed in Radiation Therapy, and provides the student with greater 
opportunities to gain practical experience. During this second 
semester of clinical education, the student is expected to develop 
the competency to perform simple to intermediate clinical proce- 
dures with progressively less assistance. Emphasis continues to be 
given to the development of professional responsibility and the 
practice of total patient care and radiation safety practices. 

RDTH 220 Techniques and Applications 
in Radiation Therapy 3 credits 

Prerequisites: RDTH 100. Content is designed to provide the student 
with the basic concepts of dosimetry and treatment planning. 
Various external beam techniques and applications, depth dose 
data.and summation of isodose curves are discussed. Modalities of 
treatment, patient setup, dose measurement, dose calculation and 
verification are also included. 

RDTH 223 Radiobiology and Safety 2 credits 

Prerequisites: RDTH 100. Introduces the student to the fundamentals 



of radiobiology and the effects of radiation on living tissue. This 
course evaluates the effects of radiation from the ceMar level, to 
the epidemiological effects on communities and potential offspring. 
Specific topic in radiobiology include: bask radiation interactions, 
cellular biology review, short and long-term effects of radiation, 
case studies, risk factors, containment and handling of five sources, 
reduction of patient dose, radiation monitoring and applicable sate 
and federal regulations. 

RDTH 225 Clinical Externship III 4 credits 

Prerequisites: RDTH 155. Introduces the student to procedures per- 
formed in Radiation Therapy, and provides the student with greater 
opportunities to gain practical experience.During this third semester 
of clinical education, the student is expected to develop the compe- 
tency to perform simple to intermediate dinkal procedures with 
progressively less assistance. Emphasis continues to be given to the 
development of professional responsibility and the practice of total 
patient care and radiation safety practices. 

RDTH 230 Pathology and Treatment 

Principles I 2 credits 

Prerequisites: RDTH 220. Provides the student with the fundamen- 
tals of each disease process. Malignant conditions, etiology and epi- 
demiology, patient workup and methods of treatment are dis- 
cussed. Attention is given to patient prognosis, treatment results 

and the effects of combined therapies. 

RDTH 232 Radiation Therapy Physics 3 credits 

Prerequisites: RDTH 220. Establishes a bask knowledge of physics 
pertinent to developing an understanding of radiations used in the 
clinical setting. Fundamental physical units, measurements, princi- 
ples, atomic structure and types of radiation are emphasized. Abo 
presented are the fundamentals of x-ray generating equipment, x- 
ray production and its interaction with matter. 

RDTH 233 Research Methodology in 
Radiation Oncology 1 credit 

Prerequisites: RDTH 100. Introduces the student to the togicmethod. 
variation and precision of thought required in the practice and or 
consumption of research. 

RDTH 235 Clinical Externship IV 5 credits 

Prerequisites: RDTH 225. Introduces the student to procedures per- 
formed in Radiation Therapy, and provides the student with greater 
opportunities to gain practical experience.During this fourth semes- 
ter of clinical education, the student is expected to develop the 
competency to perform simple to intermediate dMcal procedures 
with progressively less assistance. Emphasis continues to be given to 
the development of professional responsibility and the practice of 
total patient care and radiation safety practices. 



145 



RDTH 240 Pathology and Treatment 

Principles II 2 credits 

Prerequisites: RDTH 230. Provides the student with the fundamen- 
tals of several more disease processes. Malignant conditions, etiolo- 
gy and epidemiology.patient workup and methods of treatment are 
discussed. Attention is given to patient prognosis, treatment results 
and the effects of combined therapies. 

RDTH 241 Treatment Planning 3 credits 

Prerequisites: RDTH 220. Provides the student with the concepts of 
dosimetry and treatment planning. Various external beam tech- 
niques and applications, depth dose data,and summation of isodose 
curves are discussed. Modalities of treatment, patient setup, dose 
measurement, dose calculation and verification are also included. 

RDTH 242 Quality Management in 

Radiation Oncology 2 credits 

Prerequisites: RDTH 232. Focuses on the evolution of quality man- 
agement (QM) programs and continuing quality improvements in 
radiation oncology. Topics will include the need for quality assurance 
(QA) checks; QA of the clinical aspects and chart checks; film checks; 
the various types of evaluations and tests performed on simulators, 
megavoltage therapy equipment and therapy planning units;the 
role of radiation therapists in quality management programs; legal 
and regulatory implications for maintaining appropriate QM guide- 
lines as well as the role computers and information systems serve 
within the radiation oncology department. 

RDTH 243 Radiation Therapy Capstone Course 2 credits 

Prerequisites: RDTH 223, RDTH 232, and RDTH 240. Integrates the 
various professional courses into a single perspective as it relates to 
radiation oncology. Professional concerns will be addressed and 
attention will be given to issues related to the workplace, continued 
professional development, and the need for lifelong learning. 
Extensive review of programmatic material will be the focus of this 
course. Extensive review of physics, protection and radiation therapy 
procedures is covered. 

RDTH 245 Clinical Externship V 3 credits 

Prerequisites: RDTH 235. Allows the student to become proficient in 
all radiation therapy clinical procedures. During this fifth semester of 
clinical education, the students are further introduced to dosimetry 
procedures and are expected to have attained competency to per- 
form all clinical procedures independently, under the direct supervi- 
sion of a qualified professional or radiation therapist. Emphasis con- 
tinues to be given to the development of professional responsibility 
and the practice of total patient care and radiation safety practices. 

RDTH 260 Principles and Practice of 

Proton Therapy 8 Credits 

Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program. Content is designed to 



146 



provide the student with the knowledge and concepts used in pro- 
ton therapy. Topics covered include practical applications of using 
protons and dosimetric concepts involved in treating patients. 
Immobilization techniques and accessory fabrication are also dis- 
cussed. This course will address quality management, physics, 
radiobiology and regulatory procedures as they pertain to the field. 
Emphasis continues to be given on the professional and social intri- 
cacies of cancer care. 

RDTH 261 Proton Therapy Lab Practicum 5 Credits 

Corequisite: RDTH 260 Principles and Practice of Proton Therapy. 
Extensive integration of proton therapy concepts and treatment pro- 
cedures is the primary emphasis of this course. The student will be 
introduced to common treatment procedures performed in a proton 
therapy department. During this lab course the student will gain 
practical experience and develop the competency necessary perform 
a variety of procedures in a controlled environment on phantom 
patients. Emphasis continues to be given to the development of pro- 
fessional responsibility and the practice of total patient care. 

RDTH 265 Proton Therapy Clinical Experience 3 Credits 

Corequisites: RDTH 260 and RDTH 261 . Purpose of course is to fur- 
ther introduce the student to procedures performed in proton thera- 
py and to provide the student with the opportunity to gain practicaf 
experience. During this period of clinical experience the student is 
expected to develop the competency to perform treatment and 
mold room procedures. Specific clinical objectives and competency 
procedures noted on the Clinical Experience Requirement Form. 

RESP 121 Introduction to Respiratory Care 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval. Presents an introduction into 
respiratory care including a brief history of the profession; equip- 
ment cleaning and sterilization techniques; patient assessment 
techniques to include assessing pain levels, evaluating levels of dys- 
pnea, advanced directives and isolation techniques. Also includes 
medical records documentation, gas analyzers, introduction and 
application of therapeutic modalities including oxygen therapy, 
aerosol and humidity therapy, environmental therapy, lung expan- 
sion therapy, airway management to include tube placement, tra- 
cheostomy care and tracheobronchial aspiration. An overview of 
ethical practice and patient safety are included. 

RESP 122 Therapeutic Modalities 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: RESP 121. Presents medicinal aerosol therapy and res- 
piratory pharmacology and applying it to the nervous system and 
its receptors. In addition, bronchial hygiene therapies, basic bedside 
pulmonary function testing, tracheostomy tube changes and 12- 
Lead EKGs will be discussed and demonstrated. 

RESP 123 Cardiopulmonary Physiology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 102. Presents the cardiopulmonary system 



including ventilation, perfusion, and gas exchange; introduces inter- 
pretation and application of arterial blood gases, acid-base regula- 
tion, and physiologic monitoring.Reviews the basic principles of 
physio as it relates to the respiratory system. 

RESP 125 Critical Care I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RESP 1 21 . Presents an introduction to the respiratory 
care of the critically ill patient.This includes arterial blood gas collec- 
tion; analysis and interpretation; and basic medical laboratory data. 
Introduces concepts and techniques of critical respiratory care of 
adults, to include establishment and maintenance of artificial air- 
ways. Includes application of adult mechanical ventilators and relat- 
ed cardio-pulmonary monitoring equipment. 

RESP 126 Clinical Medicine I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RESP 123.This particular course introduces etiology, 
symptomatology, diagnosis, therapeutics, and prognosis of selected 
pulmonary diseases. 

RESP 129 Respiratory Care Pharmacology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval.The most common pharma- 
cological agents currently being administered are discussed accord- 
ing to all body systems and in relation to the nervous system and its 
receptors. Emphasis is placed on classifications, indications, side 
effects, dosages, and routes of administration.Medication discussion 
to include, but not limited to emergency drugs, antibacterial med- 
ication and anti-fungal medications. 

RESP 1 34 Clinical Applications I 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Current CPR AHA Course C or equivalent and RESP 121. 
Introduces the student to the hospital environment. The student 
will be exposed to various hospitals and respiratory care depart- 
ments, patient charts, patient identification and communication 
within the hospital. Provides supervised experience in oxygen ther- 
apy, lung expansion therapy, humidity/aerosol therapy, inspiratory 
muscle training/cough techniques, and charting. Utilizes standard 
precautions and infections disease protocols during patient care and 
handles biohazardous materials appropriately. 

RESP 137 Clinical Applications II 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: RESP 1 34. Provides supervised experience in selected 
therapeutic modalities. Students will perform lung expansion tech- 
niques. Additionally students will be exposed to various bronchial 
therapies and cough techniques. Administration of pharmacological 
agents using various aerosol devices will be included. Students will 
participate in the development of respiratory care plans, intra hospi- 
tal patient transports, and rapid response teams to improve patient 
care. Students may have observation rotations in critical care areas. 
Continuing certification in CPR is required. 



RESP 138 Clinical Applications in Adult 

Critical Care 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: RESP 125 and RESP 137. Provides supervised experi- 
ence in selected therapeutic modalities. Also includes advanced 
patient assessment, arterial blood gas analysis, and airway care. 
Provides supervised experience in adult critical care with mechani- 
cal ventilation. Allows students to participate in intra-hospital trans- 
fers along with land/air transports. Students will participate in the 
development of respiratory care plans to improve patient outcomes 
within the critical care setting. An introduction to pulmonary func- 
tion testing is included. Continued Certification in CPR is required. 

RESP 221 Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: RESP 126. Presents in depth approaches to advanced 
diagnostic procedures. Special emphasis is placed on techniques of 
patient evaluation, selection of equipment, performing procedures, 
cardiopulmonary monitoring during the procedure, interpreting test 
results and suggesting management of the patient. Also included 
are advanced techniques of patient assessment through pulmonary 
function testing and other selected assessment techniques. 

RESP 222 Critical Care II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RESP 125.Presents advanced techniques of mechani- 
cal ventilation of neonatal, pediatric and adult patients; includes 
fetal development and assessment; neonatal and pediatric assess- 
ment, equipment, procedures and therapeutic techniques, intro- 
duces related aspects of the neonatal intensive care unit environ- 
ment.Selected neonatal and pediatric diseases will be discussed. 

RESP 224 Clinical Medicine II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: RESP 221 .Studies etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, 
therapeutics, and prognosis of disease conditions related to respira- 
tory care;focuses on thejnterrelation of all physiologic systems. 
Emphasis on treatment protocols; includes preparation for the 
national board credentialing examinations such as the CRT, RRT and 
clinical simulation. 

RESP 226 Continuing Care 2 Credits 

Prerequisite: RESP 1 25. Provides an overview of respiratory care roles 
in home care, alternative care sites and pulmonary rehabilitation 
programs. Understand the purpose and function of various respira- 
tory equipment used in home and alternative care settings. 
Emphasis is placed on the importance of assessing patients' learning 
needs and how to effectively educate a patient and/or family mem- 
ber concerning smoking cessation and health management. 
Presents an overview of emergency preparedness in relation to dis- 
aster management to include vaccination protocols. Provide 
overview of mass casualty incident response. 



RESP 229 Emergency Management 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Current CPR AHA Course C or equivalent. Application of 
various techniques in advanced cardiopulmonary support during life 
threatening events.At the end of the course, students will be expected 
to successfully apply knowledge in a mock adult patient Gre setting. 

RESP 237 Clinical Applications of Advanced 

Critical Care and Specialty Rotations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RESP 138.Provides additional supervised experience 
in selected therapeutic modalities.Also includes advanced cardiopul- 
monary diagnostic techniques, application of invasive and non-inva- 
sive monitoring of the cardiopulmonary system.and experience in 
respiratory care and quality assurance roles.Also includes advanced 
clinical experience in adult, pediatric and neonatal intensive care 
units.Exposure to home care settings, alternative care sites and pul- 
monary rehabilitation programs is expected.Students are expected 
to complete patient care plans, written case studies and all clinical 
exams. Continuing certification in CPR is required. 

RESP 250 Beginning Polysomnography 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval.An overview of the field of 
Polysomnography including history, job responsibilities, credential- 
ing, medical ethics and patient confi dentiality.Normal and abnor- 
mal sleep disorders, integrating the physiologic functions of the 
nervous, respiratory and cardiovascular systems.Emphasis on basic 
sleep sciences, physiology, monitoring, electrical safety, diagnosis 
and treatment of sleep disorders. 

RESP 251 Intermediate Polysomnography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 102 and RESP 250 or Program Advisor Approval. 
Basic discussions of recording sleep apnea montage. Emphasis on 
equipment, principles of operation, associated activity related to nor- 
mal and abnormal stages of sleep, placement and calibration of the 
following: electroencephalography (EEG),electroculography (EOG), 
electocardiograpny (ECG), electromyography (EMG), pulse oximetry 
(Sp02), inductive plethysmography and airflow thermocouple. 

RESP 252 Polysomnography Directed 

Practice I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 102 and RESP 250 or Program Advisor Approval. 
Directed practice in clinical setting in sleep laboratory or a sleep cen- 
ter. Departmental orientation, policies and procedures, individual 
body mechanics and patient transfer techniques. Emphasis in over- 
seeing periodic cessation of respiratory activity based on the place- 
ment and monitoring of the following:electroencephalography (EEG), 
electroculography (EOG), electrocardiography (ECG), electromyogra- 
phy (EMG), pulse oximetry (Sp02), inductive plethysmography and 
airflow thermocouple. 

RESP 253 Neurophysiology of Sleep 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: RESP 251 and RESP 252 or Program Advisor Approval. 
Presentation and discussion of the chemical and neural control of 



the onset of sleep and wakefulness; normal function and pathophys- 
iology; current theory and research applications. 

RESP 254 Intermediate Polysomnography II 3 Credits 
Prerequisites: RESP 251 and RESP 252 of Program Advisor Approval. 
Presentation and discussion of the psychomotor practices related to 
interpretation of the polysomnogram for aduft and pediatric 
patients. Emphasis on continuous positive airway pressure (CRAP) 
and bi-level positive airway pressures (BiPAP) equipment; artifact 
recognition and troubleshooting of sleep montage results. Includes 
digital data acquisition and parasomnias. 

RESP 255 Polysomnography Directed 

Practice II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RESP 252 or Program Advisor Approval. Directed prac- 
tice in the clinical setting in sleep laboratory or a sleep center. 
Departmental orientation, policies and procedures; assist adult and 
pediatric patient set-up and discontinuance in monitoring of the fol- 
lowing: electroencephalography (EEG), electroculography (EOG), 
electrocardiography (ECG), electromyography (EMG). pulse arifnetry 
(Sp02), inductive plethysmography and airflow thermocouple. 
Emphasis on scoring a sleep montage related to respiratory 

SCI N 1 00 Earth Science . Transf erl N 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of 'Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH O50.lntroduces physical concepts and theories per- 
taining to current applications and trends in earth soence.Bask 
concepts in geology, meteorology, oceanography, and astronomy 
will be illustrated. 

SCIN 101 Science of Traditional and 

Alternative Energy 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MATH 1 1 1 or MATH 1 18 and demonstrated competen- 
cy through appropriate assessment or earning a grade of "C or bet- 
ter in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032. Introduces the basic prrysical con- 
cepts in understanding the sdence of different forms of energy- 
mechanical, kinetic heat electrical, light Selected aspects of com- 
mon sources of sustainable energy, induding solar, wind, water, 
geothermal, and biomass will also be illustrated Consideration of 
the sdence of transportation or storage of energy using new meth- 
ods that reduce environmental impact will be discussed. 

SCIN 111 Physical Science TransferlN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 050.1 ntroduces physical concepts and theories pertaining 
to current applications and trends hi physics-Bask concepts in chem- 
istry, earth sdence and astronomy will also be illustrated. 
Emphasizes concepts and applications. 



147 



SOC1 1 1 1 1ntroduction to Sociology Transfer! N 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 032 
and MATH 044.lntroduces students to the major theoretical para- 
digms of the science of human society, including fundamental con- 
cepts, descriptions, and analyses of society, culture, socialization 
processes, social institutions, social change, social stratification and 
the application of this understanding to everyday living. 

SOC1 1 64 Multicultural Studies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. Introduces students to the historical experiences, values, cul- 
tures, and beliefs of the major racial and ethnic groups that make 
up the population of the United States.Examines central questions 
in the theoretical and empirical study of race and ethnicity.This 
course will help prepare students to understand, appreciate, and 
work effectively with people who are different from themselves. 

SOCI 245 Cultural Diversity 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SOC1 111 and ENGL 111. Surveys multiple dimensions 
of diversity and social stratification in the United States, including 
race, ethnicity, age, class, physical ability, religion, gender, and sexu- 
ality. The social impart of the cultural integration of these groups 
will be introduced. 

SOCI 252 Social Problems TransferIN 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SOC1 1 1 1 .Explores various problems in contemporary 
American society.Examines structural and cultural aspects of social 
problems with specific reference to their origin, development, and 
suggested solutions. Course utilizes a sociological framework which 
encompasses a variety of theoretical perspectives. 

SOCI 253 Introduction to Social Psychology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PSYC101 and SOC1 111. The study of social psycholo- 
gy as a science, and how social psychologists study the interactions 
within and between individuals, social groups and institutions. This 
course crosslists with PSYC 253. 

SOCI 261 Sociology of Relationships 

and the Family 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and 
ENGL 032. Examines the sociological and psychological dynamic of 
dating, relationships.marriage, family life and parenting. Introduces 
students to the major theoretical paradigms as they relate to relation- 
ships. Emphasis will be placed on how our contemporary society and 
culture is affecting these institutions and customs.The course will also 
explore the impart of divorce and stepfamilies on today's lifestyles. 

SPAN 101 Spanish Level I TransferIN 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 



148 



assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032. An introductory course in Spanish. Focuses on developing stu- 
dents' capacity to use the language and to appreciate Spanish- 
speaking cultures. Emphasis is placed on skills of listening, speaking, 
reading, writing, and grammar acquisition. 

SPAN 102 Spanish Level II TransferIN 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: SPAN 101 or demonstrated competency in Spanish 
through appropriate assessment; demonstrated competency in read- 
ing and writing through appropriate assessment or earning a grade 
of'C" or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032. Continues the study of 
Spanish for students who have had the equivalent of one semester of 
college-level Spanish. Introduces additional grammatical structures 
and vocabulary to further develop speaking, reading, writing and lis- 
tening skills as well as an appreciation of the cultures of the Spanish- 
speaking world. 

SPAN 201 Spanish Level III TransferIN 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: SPAN 102 or demonstrated competency in Spanish 
through appropriate assessment; demonstrated competency in 
reading and writing through appropriate assessment or earning a 
grade of Tor better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032.ln Spanish 201, 
Spanish is the primary medium of instruction, as well as the sub- 
jert.The goal of the course is to continue development of and rein- 
forcement of the basic skills of the target language: listening, speak- 
ing, reading, and writing. The course continues the study of gram- 
mar/syntax and vocabulary building and introduces Spanish and 
Latin American civilization through conversation coordinated with 
reading of cultural text as well as written and oral reports. 

SPAN 202 Spanish Level IV TransferIN 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: SPAN 201 or demonstrated competency in Spanish 
through appropriate assessment; demonstrated competency in 
reading and writing through appropriate assessment or earning a 
grade of'C" or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 032. Spanish is the pri- 
mary medium of instruction. The goal of the course is to continue 
the development and reinforcement of the skills of the target lan- 
guage: listening, speaking, reading and writing at an advanced inter- 
mediate level.The course continues the study of grammar/syntax 
and vocabulary building and continues the study of Spanish and 
Latin American civilizations through readings, both journalistic and 
literary, and reinforced through discussions as well as written and 
oral reports. 

SPAN 240 Introduction to the Literature 

of the Spanish-Speaking World 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SPAN 202 or demonstrated competency in Spanish 
through appropriate assessment; demonstrated competency in 
reading and writing through appropriate assessment or earning a 
grade of'C" or better in ENGL 025 Introduction to College Writing II 



and ENGL 032 Reading Strategies for College II. An introduction to 
the literary analysis of Hispanic literature. Provides a general 
overview of representative works of Hispanic literature from the 
Middle Ages through the Twentieth Century. Students will read and 
analyze works of poetry, prose, and theatre within the texts' cultural 
and historical contexts using the fundamental concepts of literary 
analysis to guide the interpretation 

SPMT 101 Introduction to Sport Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C" or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 044. Focuses on the nature and scope of sport man- 
agement. Students will examine the breadth of sport related careers 
as well as engage in critical thinking about current sport manage 
ment issues and trends. 

SPMT 201 Sport in Society 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of'C" or better in ENGL 025, ENGL 
032 and MATH 044. Introduces the socio-cultural dimensions of 
sport. Sport is sometimes trivialized as a playground off to the side 
of the real world.This course will describe to the student that sport 
is a microcosm of society as well as a site for changing society. 
Finally, the course will show that sport has a profound influence on 
the social life of large numbers of people of all ages. 

SPMT 202 Management and Leadership 

in Sport 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SPMT 101. Asurvey course designed to introduce the 
student to the management related to sport.The course will assist 
students in understanding what the role of a manager is in the vari- 
ous sport industries. 

SPMT 203 Venue and Event Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SPMT 202. A survey course designed to introduce the 
student to the management related to venues and events in sport. 
The course will assist students in understanding the role of a venue 
or event manager. 

SPMT 280 Sport Management Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair Approval. Full-time work experience in 
the sport industry (40 hours/week).The experience is work in a sport 
management setting in which management practices are applied. 

SURG 1 1 1 Fundamentals of Surgical 

Technology 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to clinical phase of Surgical Program.APHY 
101 , MATH 1 1 1 or higher, ENGL 1 1 1 and HLHS 101 .Introduces princi- 
ples of sterile techniques and the operative care of the surgical 
patient. Includes the roles of scrubbing and circulating duties. 



SURG 112 Application of Surgical 

Fundamentals 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to clinical phase of Surgical Program,APHY 
101 ,MATH 1 1 1 or higher, ENGL 1 1 1 and HLHS 101 .Corequisites: SURG 
111. Demonstrates the application of surgical fundamentals. 
Correlates theory to practice by requiring students to participate as 
members of a surgical team in laboratory simulations. 

SURG 113 Surgical Procedures I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SURG 1 1 1 , SURG 1 1 2, APHY 102, BIOL 2XX General 
Microbiology, Pharmacology, HLHS 105 and Program Advisor 
Approval. Corequisites: SURG IH.Introduces general surgical proce- 
dures with review of perioperative patient care including diagnostic 
testing.preoperative care, and immediate post-operative care. 

SURG 114 Clinical Applications I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SURG 111, SURG 112, APHY 102, BIOL 2XX General 
Microbiology, Pharmacology, HLHS 105 and Program Advisor 
Approval. Corequisites: SURG 1 13.Correlat.es the principles and theo- 
ries of basic surgical procedures to clinical performance in affiliating 
hospitals. Includes knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for suc- 
cessful implementation of safe patient care in an operating room. 

SURG 201 Pharmacology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 101 and LHHS 101 and demonstrated compe- 
tency through appropriate assessment or earning a grade of "C'or 
better in MATH 050.lntroduces the basic concepts of pharmacology. 
Emphasis is given to classification, indications, interactions and 
adverse reactions of commonly used medications. Dosage calcula- 
tion,weights and measures, terminology and abbreviations associat- 
ed with drug use are presented. Medication use in the perioperative 
patient is addressed. 

SURG 21 1 Surgical Procedures II 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: SURG 113 and SURG 114 and COMM 101 orCOMM 
102andPSYC101orS0CI111.Corequisites:SURG212.Studies 
advanced surgical procedures in relation to the physiological aspects 
of surgical intervention including those procedures related to the 
special senses, genitourinary, reproductive, musculoskeletal and 
nervous systems.lncludes knowledge of the involved anatomy, 
existing pathology, surgical hazards encountered, the surgical proce- 
dure, and a review of perioperative patient care. 

SURG 212 Clinical Applications II 9 Credits 

Prerequisites: SURG 113 and SURG 114 and COMM 101 or COMM 
1 02 and PSYC 1 01 or SOC1 1 1 1 . Corequisites: SURG 21 1 . Correlates 
the basic principles and theories of advanced surgical procedures to 
clinical performance in affiliating hospitals. Includes knowledge, 
skills and attitudes necessary for successful implementation of safe 
patient care in an operating room. 



SURG 213 Surgical Procedures III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SURG 211 and SURG 212.Corequisites:SURG 
214.Studies specialized surgical procedures including those related 
to asthetic and reconstructive surgery, the cardiothoracic and vascu- 
lar systems. Includes knowledge of the involved anatomy, existing 
pathology, surgical hazards encountered, the surgical procedure, and 
a review of perioperative patient care. 

SURG 214 Clinical Applications III 7 Credits 

Prerequisites: SURG 211 and SURG 21 2.Corequisites: SURG 213. 
Correlates principles and theories of specialized surgical procedures 
to the clinical performance in affiliating hospitals.lncludes the 
knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for successful implemen- 
tation of safe patient care in an operating room. 

TECH 101 Processes and Materials 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 024 and ENGL 
031. An introduction to the characteristics.fundamentals and prop- 
erties of material used in industry.Also introduced are the funda- 
mentals of traditional and non-traditional processes, tools and 
machines used in industry. 

TECH 103 Collaborative Team Skills 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "Cor better in ENGL 024 and ENGL 
031. Introduces students to effective communication skills, conflict 
resolution, team collaboration and decision-making. 

TECH 104 Computer Fundamentals for 

Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Designed to integrate computer technology, 
decision-making and problem-solving skills by using multimedia 
technology and peripherals. Students will explore technology and 
the various-forms it takes in the industrial world. Software and com- 
puter programs will be studied along with their computer applica- 
tions. Students will also learn basic Windows operating system con 
cepts, word processing, Excel spreadsheets, and research/communi- 
cation tools within the college. 

TMAS 101 Holistic Approach to Massage 

Therapy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Considers the holistic approach to wellness with 
discussion including the connection of disease, the autonomic nerv- 
ous system, and the emotions.Explores the importance of the mind- 
body connection. 

TMAS 1 02 Legal Massage Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Presents ethics of medicine and medical prac- 
tice, as well as legal requirements and implications for allied health 
professions. Specific emphasis will be placed on the applications of 



ethics for massage practice situations.Forms, records, and documen- 
tation considerations will be addressedForms appropriate for use in 
a massage practice will be generated. 

TMAS 103 Human Energies 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.This course helps the student develop an 
understanding of the human energy system and how this system 
impacts and reflects the physical, emotional,memal, and spiritual 
aspects of health.The techniques of several energy therapists wl 
be taught, as well as professional practitioner/dient interactions 
and the importance of self-care.These techniques are useful to aid 
relaxation, reduce pain, lessen anxiety, and accelerate wound heal- 
ing, both for oneself and others. 

TMAS 1 04 Hand and Foot Reflexes 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Teaches the different aspects and points on the 
foot and hand relating to other areas of the body. Can be WH j aled 
into massage practice or can be an independent approach. An intro- 
duction to the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and nervous systems 
and their relationship to the zones on the feet are included Systems 
disorders, including the sensory and endocrine, are also identified 
and discussed.The relationships of the five zones of the foot are 
identified as are the areas of the spine with spinal nerve innovation 
and intervention. 

TMAS 120 Massage Technician Training I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 101 .This course will explore in detail the history 
of massage.professional and legal issues of massage, sanitation, 
professional touch, and massage equipment and products. 
Coursework will indude the anatomy,physiology and psychology of 
the body.by systems, and the effects of massage on each-Disease 
conditions will be discussed in terms of indications and contramS- 
cations for massage. Medical terminology will be introduced and 
used to prepare SOAP note documentation of massages performed 
Students will perform circulatory massage techniques, body 
mechanic, and draping skills for full body relaxation massage. 

TMAS 122 Massage Financial Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides instruction in massage office financial 
administration, bookkeeping.materials management and computer 
applications-Addresses product sales and inventory and bookkeep- 
ing for tax preparation.Oient tracking methods wffl be rfiscussed 
Retirement planning and serf-employmemv'employment issues wl 
be explored. 

TMAS 1 25 Acupressure Theory and Methods 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY lOl.lntroduces the student to information and 
treatments designed around the approach of Asian medicine Mail- 
ing energy systems, meridians, and the five elements theory.The 
basics of Shiatsu are induded 



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TMAS 126 Jin Shin Do Body mind Acupressure 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.This class presents theories and techniques nec- 
essary for effective practice of Jin Shin Do Acupressure. 
Approximately half the time will be in lecture and half in practical 
hands-on skill. Students will be introduced to the basic theories of 
Traditional Chinese Medicine which is the basis of all Asian 
Bodywork.Therapy. Students will learn 57 points in relation to sur- 
rounding anatomy.After this class, students will be able to utilize 
simple acupressure techniques alone or combined with massage 
sessions.With successful completion of this class, students are eligi- 
ble to take the Intermediate Jin Shin Do class. 

TMAS 140 Massage Technician Training II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 101 and TMAS 120.Client consultations, condi- 
tions, and treatment plans are discussed.Emotional transference 
and psychological effects of massage will be addressed.Additional 
techniques and modalities addressed include deep friction, trigger 
point release, unwinding, PNF techniques, positional release, and 
intra to therapeutic exercise.Corporate (chair) massage is intro- 
duced. Guidelines for setting up a practice, including compliance 
with local state regulations, are discussed.Together these courses 
provide training for entrylevel technicians into massage therapy. 

TMAS 141 Massage Through the Lifespan 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 101 and TMAS 120.This advanced course teach- 
es the therapist to work with pregnant mothers to help ease the 
discomforts and stress that accompany pregnancy.Techniques to 
help with delivery are also addressed.lt also addresses massage of 
infants and children to enhance bonding, relaxation, and comfort of 
the infant and child.Massage aspects of geriatric and disabled 
clients are addressed. 

TMAS 142 Aromatherapy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 101 and TMAS 120.This advanced course teach- 
es the therapist the integration of essential oils and aromatherapy 
into massage techniques. 

TMAS 171 Personal Fitness Training 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. The Personal Fitness Training course presents the 
concepts behind personal fitness, health and well-being. The course 
includes basic principles of human anatomy, physiology and exer- 
cise. Professional and legal practices are presented. Implementation 
of client's goals in an exercise program is discussed. Course includes 
both lecture and lab components. This program is designed to ade- 
quately prepare the student for the accredited NFPT-CPT Personal 
Trainer Board Certification Exam. The final exam for this course 
meets strict criteria and requirements imposed by the National 
Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA) accreditation standards. 
Successful board exam completion qualifies the student as a certi- 



fied personal fitness trainer. Certification test fee will be in addition 
to tuition fees. 

TMAS 201 Sports Massage, Injuries and 
Hydrotherapies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TMAS 120 and TMAS 140.Presents a specific applica- 
tion of massage therapy designed to train the therapist in the treat- 
ment of athletes.lncludes:pre-event and post-event techniques, 
general maintenance massage, and therapeutic exercises.Rrst aid 
for sports injuries and the use of hydrotherapies will be explored. 

TMAS 202 Deep Tissue/Muscle Release 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TMAS 120 and TMAS 140.Helps practitioners apply 
deeper techniques in the body therapy releasing chronically held 
tissue from past trauma, illness, or recent injury.Disoisses the use of 
various treatment modalities.Deep tissue techniques include com- 
pression and compression with stroke. 

TMAS 203 Herbs, Drugs and Massage 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 102, HLHS 101 and TMAS 120.Covers common 
medical conditions, the most common medications and the herbal 
remedies used to supplement healthcare.The most common med- 
ications and herbal remedies will be discussed according to body 
systems with emphasis on classifications, uses, routes of administra- 
tion, calcula tions, dosages, interactions, incompatibilities, and side 
effects.The student will learn how to research medical conditions, 
medications, and herbal remedies.Also addressed are special pre- 
cautions, legal aspects, and patient education. 

TMAS 204 Herbal Remedies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 102 and HLHS 101 . Covers the common medical 
conditions, and the herbal remedies that are used to supplement 
healthcare.The most common herbal remedies will be discussed, as 
well as the traditional indications, dose ranges, side effects, and con- 
traindications. The student will gain a more in depth knowledge of 
herbal remedies being utilized in healthcare today and know how to 
research more knowledge on medical conditions and herbal remedies. 

TMAS 205 Pathology and Massage 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 101, APHY 102 and TMAS 120.Presents the 
basic concepts of diseases, their courses and functional disturbances 
as they relate to body systems.lncludes the precipitating risk factors 
and appropriate methods of patient education regarding various 
disease processes and specifications for massage treatment. 

TMAS 206 Palpation Skills 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 102 and TMAS HO.Develops the student's pal- 
pation skills in order to enhance the practitioner's ability to evaluate 
the human body and energy systems.The course teaches a deeper 
understanding of muscular anatomy which includes craniosacral 
and fascial material.A substantial portion of this course will consist 



150 



of exercises to refine palpation skills. 

TMAS 21 Biomechanics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: APHY 1 02 and TMAS 1 40. Provides a basic understand- 
ing of joint movement and body motion.Addresses muscle action, 
origin and insertion, muscle synergists, antagonists, and evaluations 
of forces on each body region. Entry-level biomechanical principles 
with the structure, function and kinesiology of each body region will 
be explored. 

TMAS 220 Advanced Techniques and Hygiene 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TMAS 120.TMAS 125JMAS 140JMAS 141, and TMAS 
201 or TMAS 202.Advanced training focusing on more techniques, 
body mechanics, and client management.lt also addresses hygiene 
factors for both the therapist and the clientJhis course includes 
thorough client assessment techniques and is designed to expand 
the therapist into the medical field.The relationship of various ill- 
nesses and conditions to massage is discussed. 

TMAS 221 Business Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TMAS 102JMAS 122 and TMAS 140.Provides a basic 
understanding of the administrative responsibilities pertinent to 
massage therapy.Addresses computer usage,marketing, and office 
skills that will allow students to create.promote, and maintain their 
own business.Students prepare a business plan and define their 
goals for massage therapy. 

TMAS 240 Advanced Sports Massage 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TMAS 201. Prepares the sports massage therapist to be 
a higher qualified, specific therapist with an understanding of pro- 
fessional ethics and a team concept of (physician, trainer, 
coach.physical therapist, and massage therapist) as one team unit. 

TRCK 1 00 Diesel Preventive Maintenance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the maintenance requirements and 
procedures of modern diesel engines and medium and heavy duty 
trucks. Proper procedures and requirements for the Federal Highway 
Safety Inspection (DOT) will be discussed and practiced. 

TRCK 101 Steering and Suspension Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies steering and suspension systems com- 
monly used on modern tractors and trailers. Study will include 
steering and suspension components, power steering units, align- 
ment theory and procedures, tire repair and service, and wheel bal- 
ancing. Diagnosis, repair, and servicing of components including 
modern air suspension systems will be emphasized. 

TRCK 105 Drive Train 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the chassis systems of trucks and 
includes clutch operation removal and adjustment, driveshaft 
removal and service, frame mounted accessories, truck bodies, and 
fifth wheel plates. 



TRCK 121 Brakes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Theory, service, and repair of medium and heavy 
truck brake systems and their components. Emphasis is given to air 
brakes and their theory of operation, repair, and service of system 
components. Spring brakes and anti-lock systems will be studied on 
tractors and trailers. 

TRCK 125 HT Manual Transmission/ 

Differential 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Theory, diagnosis, and overhaul procedures 
related to manual transmissions and differentials. Course includes 
service of twin counter-shaft, under-drive, overdrive, power- 
dividers, and air shift systems. 

TRCK 1 27 Engine Repair 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies precision tools, equipment, and proce- 
dures needed to repair modern diesel engines. Repair, proper 
assembly, and component identification are studied along with 
service of removable cylinder liners. 

TRCK 21 9 Diesel Engine Performance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TRCK 224. Covers advanced concepts in diesel opera- 
tion and computerized systems. New and future Federal emission 
standards will be covered along with the sub-systems required to 
meet these standards. Emphasis will be placed on the diagnosis and 
repair of computerized system controls, engine brakes, injection sys- 
tems, emission components, and buss communication systems. 

TRCK 224 HT Electrical Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AUTC 123.Tractor and trailer wiring systems will be 
discussed along with proper diagnosis and repair procedures. 
Lighting and warning systems along with computerized engine 
controls will be examined. Dash switches, controls, and gauges will 
be studied along with factory wiring diagrams. This is the capstone 
course for the Medium/ Heavy Duty Truck specialty. 

VIDT 106 Video Producing and Planning 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 105.An introduction to producing and planning 
techniques.Focuses on knowledge and skills necessary to plan for 
video and audio productions. Develops visual flow and continuity, 
and applies principles of visual design to video storyboards. 

VIDT 110 Production Editing I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:VTSC 105.An introduction to non-linear, computer- 
based editing techniques and post-production skills.Focuses on 
knowledge and skills necessary to edit video and audio produc- 
tions.Develops visual flow and continuity, and applies principles of 
visual design to video editing. 



VIDT 1 1 1 Studio and Field Production I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 105.Hands-on training in basic technical skills. 
Students will be provided with an overview of the video production 
process, and help the student learn the terms and concepts used in 
the industry.This understanding will serve as the foundation for 
subsequent courses in video technology. 

VIDT 113 Introduction to Film Appreciation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 
assessment or earning a grade of "C'or better in ENGL 025 and ENGL 
032.An introduction to understanding and appreciating movie and 
film. Students will analyze movies for narrative and story telling 
properties, cinematography, acting, editing and sound design. 

VIDT 202 Studio and Field Production II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIDT 1 1 and VIDT 1 1 1 .Focuses on knowledge and 
skills necessary to create and execute good video and audio produc- 
tions. This course is designed to provide the student with a more 
complete view of the process of videography techniques and the 
video production process.Student will use the terminology and con- 
cepts used in the industry. 

VIDT 203 Studio and Field Production III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: COMM 101 orCOMM 102, ENGL 111 and VIDT 
202.Advanced studio and fi eld production skills.Focuses on writ- 
ing,producing and shooting projects both in the studio and on-loca- 
tion.Projects include remote video "shoot"planning, location scout- 
ing and site preparation, and hands-on studio practicing.Focuses on 
knowledge and skills necessary to create and execute good video 
and audio productions. 

VIDT 204 Studio and Field Production IV 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:' VIDT 203.Masters studio and field production skills 
with a focus on production, programming and project management 
both in the studio and on-location. 

VIDT 21 1 Production Editing II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIDT 1 10 and VISC 105. An advanced look at non-lin- 
ear, computer-based editing techniques and post-production skills. 
Focuses on knowledge and skills necessary to edit video and audio 
productions for a variety of media outlets. Continues development 
of visual flow and continuity while applying advanced principles of 
visual design to video editing. 

VISC 1 01 Fundamentals of Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces students to fundamental design the- 
ory. Investigations into design theory and color dynamics will pro- 
vide experiences in applying design theory, ideas and creative prob- 
lem solving.Provides design experiences in applying design theories 
and concepts, and creative problem solving. 



VISC 102 Fundamentals of Imaging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces students to a full range of image 
input technology and manipulation inducting conventional photog- 
raphy, digital imaging, and computer scannersitudems wi team to 
communicate concepts and ideas through various imaging devices. 
Explores composition and fosters creativity. 

VISC 1 03 Interactive Media I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:VISC 101.VISC 102 and VISC 115.Fjcptores various soft- 
ware programs involved in creating muni-media presentationsjSgi- 
tal movies.digital animation, introductory scripting through a series 
of short projects.Explore the role of interactive in contemporary 
marketing and design. 

VISC 1 05 Video and Sound 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.An introduction to the held of video technology. 
Students will leam the basic of planning, shooting, editing and 
postproducing video and sound-Projects indude exercises in techni- 
cal and creative skills application, equipment usage and production 
techniques. 

VISC 110 Web Design I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 1 01 and VISC 1 1 5 An introductory level course. 
which focuses on the tools, strategies, and techniques for web site 
design, architecture, navigation, language and production.Explores 
the methods for creating successful web sites from concept to 
implementation. Examines the process of integrating textgraphks, 
audio, and video for effective communication of information. 

VISC 1 1 1 Drawing for Visualization 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces students to the took and methods of 
drawing.Presents drawing as a catalyst to seeing and a way of 
recording ideas.Gives students the necessary drawing preparation 
for the study of design. 

VISC 1 1 2 Electronic Layout 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 1 13 and VISC 1 15.Provides intermediate instruc- 
tion in practical and creative page layoutUses an industry standard 
desktop publishing package designed for single and multi-page 
documents as a tool for executing layouts-Produces samples for stu- 
dent portfolios, which may indude stationery, charts, forms, 
brochures, and calendars. 

VISC 113 Typography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: NoneJ\n introductory course which addresses the 
issues pertinent to the proper and creative use of type and the 
enhancement of communication-Covers the history of type, typo- 
graphic terminology, design, attention to aesthetics, common sense, 
and how we read. Projects emphasize an appreciation of and the 
practical use of type. 



151 



VISC 1 1 4 Graphic Design I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 101 and VISC 115.Provides introductory instruc- 
tion in design for communication primarily for print media.Teaches 
the steps in design development with meaningful message and 
concept.Produces samples for student portfolios, which may include 
elements or comprehensive projects in logo, stationery, newspaper, 
magazine, billboard, and interface design, etc. 

VISC 1 1 5 Introduction to Computer Graphics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.A fundamental course which introduces stu- 
dents to the computer's use in visual communication.The beginning 
focus of the course is on basic computer terminology and use, mas- 
tering fundamental skills, and developing efficient working 
styles.These skills are then developed by creating work with imag- 
ing.drawing, interactive, and page layout software. 

VISC 1 1 6 Electronic Illustration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 115.Provides intermediate instruction in illustra- 
tion techniques using computer software designed for creating 
illustrations, technical, drawing, logos, packaging.maps, charts, and 
graphs. Emphasis is on preparing effective, creative illustrations for 
various media applications in an efficient, productive 
manner.Produces samples for student portfolios. 

VISC 200 2-D Animation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 1 15. Provides students with a solid introduction 
to digital 2D Animation.Primary emphasis will be placed on the var- 
ious tools and techniques needed to create 2D movies.Strong 
emphasis will also be placed on effective information delivery as 
well as cutting edge design, both for the web and other media. 

VISC 201 Electronic Imaging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 101 and VISC 102. Examines the area of raster 
image editing and current electronic darkroom software packages. 
Experience with the digital imaging environment includes calibrat- 
ing scanning processes, digital camera input, manipulating images 
in black and white and color, working with retouching for advertis- 
ing, illustrating text, and working with various output devices. 
Digital color spaces as they relate to various output devices will be 
covered. Calibration for 4-color separations and prepress procedures 
will be discussed as well as preparing images properly for the web. 

VISC 202 Special Projects I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites:VISC 114. Provides advanced instruction in specific 
areas of student interest or in areas where there is a need to 
strengthen skills.Requires performance and completed work to be 
portfolio quality and reflect applicability to the main areas of the 
program. Suggested projects may include annual reports, catalogs,- - 
newsletters, menus, direct mail and/or other multi-piece or multi- 



152 



page communications. Also may include actual community or non- 
profit projects. 

VISC 203 Independent Study 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 114.Provides advanced students with opportuni- 
ties to design projects for specified areas of interestRequires the 
project plan to be approved by the instructor.Restricts work to stu- 
dent program area and requires it to be portfolio quality. 

VISC 205 Business Practices for Visual Artists 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 101 and VISC 115.Examines legal and business 
issues affecting the professional visual artist. 

VISC 206 Interdisciplinary Studies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 210 or VISC 217 or PHOT 109.0ffers students the 
opportunity to complete selected projects while working in a team 
environment with students of other disciplines.Simulates situations 
found in industry. 

VISC 207 Portfolio Preparation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Advisor Approval. Provides advanced facilita- 
tion focusing on the students'flnal preparation for the workforce. 
Requires an evaluation and portfolio development plan to be 
approved by the instructor.Finalizes project work demonstrating 
acquired knowledge and skills, along with resume and cover letter, 
for presentation to prospective employers.Also provides students 
with the opportunity to use one credit for field of study. 

VISC 209 3D Rendering and Animation I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 201. Examines the virtual world of 3D and how it 
can be applied as an illustration and animation element in multi- 
media. Students will explore navigation, modeling, rendering, ani- 
mation, and camera and lighting techniques. 

VISC 210 Web Design II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 1 02 and VISC 1 lO.Further focuses on the tools, 
strategies, and techniques for web site design, architecture, naviga- 
tion, language and production.Explores more in depth the methods 
for creating successful web sites from concept to implementation. 
Examines the process of integrating text.graphics, audio, and video 
for effective communication of information. 

VISC 211 Interactive Media II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 103 and VISC 201. Further explores various soft 
ware programs involved in creating; multi-media presentations.digi- 
tal movies.digital animation and scripting. 

VISC 212 3-D Rendering and Animation II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 209.Further examines the virtual world of 3D 
and how it can be applied as an illustration and animation element 



in multimedia.Students will expand on navigation, modeling, ren- 
dering, animation, and camera and lighting techniques. 

VISC 21 3 Advanced Electronic Imaging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 201 .The creation of the electronic image from 
digital imaging and scanning devices is further investigated. 
Advanced Adobe Photoshop illustration techniques are taught.Other 
software such as Adobe Dimensions and Fractal Painter are intro- 
duced. Students will work with both raster and vector software to 
create final output.An emphasis in final output is given to portfolio 
projects that are in the print,web,and film media. 

VISC 217 Graphic Design II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 102, VISC 114andVISC 116,Provides intermediate 
instruction in design for communication primarily for print media. 
Further explores design theory by applying concepts to achieve 
meaningful marketing and advertising results. Produces samples for 
student portfolios, which may include elements or comprehensive 
projects appropriate to trade/industrial advertising, brochures, fly- 
ers, pamphlets, posters, direct mail and/or consumer magazine 
advertising/ branding, etc. 

VISC 218 Digital Production 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 1 14.Addresses the issues of electronic prepress 
(preparing electronic files for digital production).Topics covered 
include the tasks of prepress, paper knowledge, the entire printing 
production process (complete with requirements of the process) and 
electronic file managements strong emphasis is placed on prepress 
terminology and jargon. 

VISC 219 Graphic Design III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VISC 201 and VISC 217.Provides advanced instruction 
and experience with design projects/branding identity, which com- 
municate a common theme or campaign through several different 
media - magazine, billboard, radio, television, direct mail, 
brochures, point of purchase, sales promotions and/or package 
design, etcProduces samples for student portfolios. 

VISC 280 Co-op/Internship 1 -6 Credits 

Prerequisite: Advisor's Approval. Students work at job sites that are 
specifically related to career objectives. Provides on-the-job experi- 
ence while earning course credit. 

WELD 1 00 Welding Processes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides general study of oxy-fuel, shielded metal 
arc, gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc, submerged arc, plasma arc, resist- 
ance, flash and upset, friction, electron bean, and laser welding 
processes.Covers equipment, techniques, electrodes, fuel gases and/or 
shielding gases.weld joint design, advantages and limitations.process 
applications.process variables and operational costs. 



WELD 101 Gas Welding I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.lntroduces basic oxy-fuel brazing, soldering and 
braze welding.lnvolves detailed study of the techniques of making a 
strong braze or solder joint.Demonstrate proper technique for mak- 
ing a good braze weld joint on mild steel and cast iron. Provides 
additional background essential to performing maintenance and 
repair welds in industry. 

WELD 103 ARC Welding I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Covers the welding of ferrous metals and alloys 
utilizing metallic manual arc welding methods. Includes procedures 
in joint design using T'joint, lap joint, and butt joint 
designs.Coverssingle pass and multi-pass techniques.Emphasizes 
safety hazards and safe practices in arc welding. 

WELD 105 Welding Equipment and Electrical 
Maintenance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Focuses on the design of oxy-fuel welding and 
cutting equipment and electric arc welding and cutting equipment. 
Enables students to perform troubleshooting on the equipment and 
apply proper maintenance.Examines relationships of voltage, cur- 
rent, and resistance on electrical circuits with emphasis on the pro- 
duction of heat from the flow of electric current through resistance. 

WELD 1 07 Welding Troubleshooting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WELD 101 or WELD 109.Covers evaluation of weld- 
ments, welding procedures and tolerances, joint design and align- 
ment.Also covers weld defects caused by improper equipment set- 
tings, equipment failure, base metal, improper filler metal, and 
improper shielding of welds. Emphasis will be placed on wettability 
of metals. 

WELD 108 Shielded Metal Arc Welding I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with knowledge of shielded 
metal arc welding operations and equipment. Provides extensive 
practice time to produce the skills to make satisfactory welds with 
this process. Emphasizes safety hazards and safety practices in arc 
welding. 

WELD 1 09 Oxy-Fuel Gas Welding and Cutting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Offers basic instruction in oxy-fuel welding with 
emphasis on welding techniques in flat, horizontal, vertical, and 
overhead positions.lncludes brazing, soldering and flame 
cutting.Focuses on safety hazards and safe practices in oxy-fuel 
welding and cutting. 

WELD 1 1 5 Shop Practices I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None.Provides use of a shop to obtain basic welding 
skills using various types of welding processes. 



WELD 116 Shop Practices II 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: WELD 1 15.Continues open use of shop to practice vari- 
ous types of welding to improve operator skills to a higher level. 

WELD 117 Shop Practices III 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: WELD 11 6.Continues open use of shop to practice vari- 
ous types of welding to improve operator skills to an advanced level. 

WiLD 201 Special Welding Processes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor Approval.This is an advanced welding course 
that involves theory and hands-on practice with various welding 
processes such as FCAW,PAW, SAW,GTA and other welding processes. 
Presents welding processes with emphasis on use and orientation of 
the equipment. 

WELD 202 ARC Welding II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WELD 103, WELD 108, and WELD 109.Covers the weld- 
ing of ferrous metals and alloys utilizing electric welding methods 
and techniques. Safety hazards and safe practices in arc welding are 
covered. Extensive practice in the vee groove butt welds in all posi- 
tions, using a back-up strip, and low hydrogen electrodes in all posi- 
tions are covered. 

WELD 203 Pipe Welding I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WELD 206,This course provides extensive practice in 
the preparation and welding of pipe in the 2G and 5G position, and 
information of preparation, methods of welding, and electrode and 
filler wires used. 

WELD 204 Pipe Welding II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WELD 108, WELD 206, WELD 207 and WELD 208. 
Provides extensive training in the preparation and welding of pipe 
in the 5G and 6G position.lncludes information on preparation, 
method of welding, and electrodes and filler rods used. 

WELD 205 Welding Codes, Specifications 

and Estimating 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor Approval. Provides students with different 
types of welding codes and testing operations.Covers procedures, 
specifications and information about filler materials, positions, post- 
heat and preheat treatment, backing strips.preparations of parent 
metals, cleaning and defects.lntroduces students to various welding 
processes used in the welding industry.Prepares students with a 
background in which will assist them in taking the American 
Welding Society Certified Welding Inspector examine AWS.ASME 
and other codes are discussed. 

WELD 206 Shielded Metal Arc Welding II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WELD 108. Covers SMAW welding equipment and 
products used to produce groove type butt and fillet welds. Provides 



extensive practice to develop the skills to achieve satisfactory welds 
of this type. Safety hazards and safe practices in arc welding are 
emphasized. 

WELD 207 Gas Metal Arc (MIG) Welding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Considers various gas metal welding (GMAW) 
processes including microwire, flux-core, inner shield, and sub- 
merged arc with emphasis on metal inert gas wetdingJechniques of 
welding in all positions on various thicknesses metal. 

WELD 208 Gas Tungsten Arc (TIG) Welding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None.Provides students with through knowledge of 
the gas tungsten arc welding process.lndudes detailed study of the 
techniques of making welds in all positions using the GTAW appica- 
tions. Lectures and discussion provide additional background infor- 
mation essential to a qualified GTAW welder. 

WELD 209 Welding Certification 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor Approval.Prepares the student for certification 
in shielded metal arc, GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Wekfmgl.GMAW (Gas 
Metal ArfWelding) and other welding processes through study of 
the welding procedures and standards established by agencies such 
as the American Welding Society and the American Society of 
Mechanical Engineers. 

WELD 210 Welding Fabrication I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WELD 108, WELD 207 and INDT 102.Provides for con- 
tinued practice in hands-on fabrication of welded productsJndude 
basic equipment used in fabrication. 

WELD 211 Welding Fabrication II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WELD 108, WELD 207 and INDT lOlProvides opportu- 
nities for practice in hands-on fabrication of welded products. 
Include basic equipment used in fabrication. 

WELD 271 Blueprint Reading for Welders 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Provides the basic concept of reding a fabrica- 
tion blueprint and covers the different parts of the print It also pro- 
vides an understanding of welding symbols used in blueprint read- 
ing. Computations of basic measurements including fraction and 
metric along with conversion from one to the other are also cov- 
ered. This cou5e is designed for beginning welders and fabricators, 
and anyone needing to understand basic fabrication and assembly 
blueprints 

WELD 272 Gas Metal (MIG) Welding II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. This course is an extension of the processes 
learned in WELD 207 consisting of various gas metal wetfng 
(GMAW ) processes including microwire, flux-core, inner shield, and 



153 



submerged arc with emphasis on metal inert gas welding. 
Techniques of welding in all positions on various thicknesses of 
metal. 

WELD 273 Gas Tungsten Arc Welding II 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Provides advanced skills and knowledge in Gas 
Tungsten Arc Welding. This course is designed for intermediate 
welders, auto service and body technicians, and individuals in the 
HVAC industry. Emphasizes safe practices in advanced Gas Tungsten 
Arc Welding. 

WELD 274 Flux Fore Arc Welding 3 Credits 

Prerequisite: None. Covers Flux Core Arc Welding (FCAW) equipment 
and products used to produce groove and fillet welds. Provides 
extensive practice to develop the skills to achieve satisfactory welds 
in all positions, using self shielding and gas shielded wires. Provides 
the opportunity to achieve AWS qualification or certification. Safety 
hazards and safe practices in FCAW are emphasized. 



154 



Course Description Notes 



Course Description Notes 




155 



156 



ANDERSON CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Electronics and Computer Technology 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Dental Assisting 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 



Computer Information Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 

Design Technology 

Electronics and Computer Technology 

General Studies 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Visual Communications 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



BATESVILLE CAMPUS 



Associate of Science 

Business Administration 



BLOOMINGTON CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Advanced Manufacturing 

Biotechnology 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via Distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Criminal Justice 

Design Technology 



Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Electronics and Computer Technology 

Hospitality Administration 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Public Service 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Hospitality Administration 

Human Services 

Industrial Technology 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Associate of Science 

Biotechnology 

Business Administration 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Education 

Electronics and Computer Technology 

General Studies 

Health Information Technology 

Hospitality Administration 



Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Kinesiology 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Paramedic Science 

Radiation Therapy 

Respiratory Care 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



COLUMBUS CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Advanced Manufacturing 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Criminal Justice . . 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Interior Design 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Paramedic Science 

Surgical Technology 



Visual Communications 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Central Services Technician 

Dental Assisting 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 

Certificate 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Information Security 

Associate of Science 

Accounting 

Agriculture 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Education 

General Studies 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Mechanical Engineering Technology 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Paramedic Science 

Visual Communications 



Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



CONNERSVILLE CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Advanced Manufacturing 
Industrial Technology 

Certificate 

Advanced Manufacturing 
Industrial Technology 

Associate of Science 

Industrial Technology 



EAST CHICAGO CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Automotive Technology 

Building Construction Management 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Construction Technology 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Hospitality Administration 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Mortuary Science 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 
Automotive Technology 



157 



Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Construction Technology 
Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 
Hospitality Administration 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Construction Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Building Construction Management 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

General Studies 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



ELKHART CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 
Business Administration 



158 



Business Administration (via distance) 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Systems (via distance) 
Computer Information Technology 
Design Technology 
Design Technology (via distance) 
Early Childhood Education (via distance) 
Electronics and Computer Technology 
Human Services (via distance) 
Medical Assisting 

Office Administration (via distance) 
"Paralegal Studies (via distance) 
Recreational Vehicle Service Technology 

Technical Certificate 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Medical Assisting 

Practical Nursing 

Recreational Vehicle Service Technology 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Electronics and Computer Technology 



General Studies 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



EVANSVILLE CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Advanced Manufacturing 

Automotive Technology 

Building Construction Management 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Construction Technology 

Criminal Justice 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Electronics and Computer Technology 

Hospitality Administration 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Interior Design 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Paramedic Science 

Public Safety 



Surgical Technology 
Visual Communications 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 

Business Administration 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Hospitality Administration 

Manufacturing & Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 

Public Safety 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Construction Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Biotechnology 

Building Construction Management 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Education 

Electronics and Computer Technology 

General Studies (via distance) 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 



Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Pre-Engineering 

Visual Communications 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



FORT WAYNE CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Advanced Manufacturing 

Automotive Technology 

Aviation Technology 

Building Construction Management 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Construction Technology 

Criminal Justice 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Hospitality Administration 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Public Safety 

Therapeutic Massage 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 
Automotive Technology 



Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Construction Technology 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Hospitality Administration 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 

Public Safety 

Therapeutic Massage 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Construction Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Building Construction Management 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Education 

General Studies 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Office Administration 

Paralegal Studies 



159 



Paralegal Studies (via distance) 
Paramedic Science 
Respiratory Care 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



GARY CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

ElectroniG and Computer Technology 

Hospitality Administration 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Public Safety 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Hospitality Administration 

Industrial Technology 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 



160 



Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Construction Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

General Studies 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Paramedic Science 

Physical Therapist Assistant 

Respiratory Care 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



GREENCASTLE CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Business Administration 
Electronics and Computer Technology 

Technical Certificate 

Practical Nursing 

Associate of Science 

Business Administration 
Electronics and Computer Technology 
Nursing 



INDIANAPOLIS CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Advanced Manufacturing 

Automotive Technology 

Biotechnology 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Criminal Justice 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Electronics & Computer Technology 

Hospitality Administration 

Human Services (via distance) 

Machine Tool Technology 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Mortuary Science 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Public Safety 

Surgical Technology 

Visual Communications 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 



Medical Assisting 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 

Associate of Fine Arts 

Fine Arts 

Visual Communications 

Associate of Science 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 

Biotechnology 

Business Administration 

Community Emergency Preparedness & 

Management 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Education 

Electrical Engineering Technology 

Electronics and Computer Technology 

General Studies 

Health Information Technology 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Office Administration 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Paramedic Science 

Radiologic Technology 

Respiratory Care 



Surgical Technology 

Transportation, Distribution and Logistic 

Visual Communications 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



KOKOMO CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Advanced Manufacturing 

Agriculture 

Automotive Technology 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Construction Technology 

Criminal Justice 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Public Safety 

Visual Communications 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 



Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Construction Technology 

Dental Assisting 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 

Public Safety 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Construction Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Accounting 

Agriculture 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Education 

General Studies 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 



161 



Paramedic Science 
Professional Communication 
Surgical Technology 
Visual Communications 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



LAWRENCEBURG CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services (via distance) 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Medical Assisting 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Industrial Technology 



162 



Associate of Science 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Education 

General Studies 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



LAFAYETTE CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Advanced Manufacturing 

Agriculture 

Automotive Technology 

Biotechnology 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Chemical Technology 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Criminal Justice 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies 



Paralegal Studies (via distance) 
Surgical Technology 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Dental Assisting 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Accounting 

Agriculture 

Automotive Technology 

Biotechnology 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Education 

General Studies 

Health Information Technology 



Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Mechanical Engineering Technology 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Respiratory Care 

Visual Communications 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



LOGANSPORT CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting (via distance) 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Criminal Justice 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Technical Certificate 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 



Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

General Studies 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Office Administration 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



MADISON CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 



Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Practical Nursing 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Technology 
Industrial Technology 

Associate of Science 

Business Administration 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

General Studies 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



MARION CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Criminal Justice 

Design Technology 



163 



Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Industrial Technology 

Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

General Studies 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

164 Nursin 9 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 



Radiologic Technology 
Visual Communications 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



MICHIGAN CITY CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting (via distance) 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Hospitality Administration 

Human Services (via distance) 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Hospitality Administration 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Construction Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Business Administration 



Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Education 

General Studies 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Paramedic Science 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



MUNCIE CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Automotive Technology 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Construction Technology 

Criminal Justice 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Electronics & Computer Technology 

Hospitality Administration 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Public Safety 

Surgical Technology 



Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Construction Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Hospitality Administration 

Human Services 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 

Public Safety 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Construction Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Agriculture 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Education 

Electronics and Computer Technology 

General Studies 

Hospitality Administration 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 



Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Physical Therapist Assistant 

Visual Communications 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



NEW CASTLE CAMPUS 



Associate of Science 

Nursing 



RICHMOND CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Advanced Manufacturing 

Agriculture 

Automotive Technology 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Construction Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 
Automotive Technology 



Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Construction Technology 
Early Childhood Education 
Medical Assisting 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Construction Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Agriculture 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

Education 

General Studies 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Radiologic Technology 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



SELLERSBURG CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 
Accounting (via distance) 



165 



Advanced Manufacturing 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Criminal Justice 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

General Studies 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Medical Laboratory Technology 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Visual Communications 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Technology 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Technology 

Industrial Technology 

Office Administration 



166 



Associate of Science 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Education 

General Studies 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Respiratory Care 

Visual Communications 



SOUTH BEND CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Automotive Technology 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (distance) 

Electronics and Computer Technology 

Hospitality Administration 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Interior Design 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Medical Laboratory Technology 



Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Public Safety 

Visual Communications 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 

Public Safety 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Fine Arts 

Visual Communications 

Associate of Science 

Biotechnology 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Dental Hygiene 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Education 



Electrical Engineering Technology 

Electronics and Computer Technology 

General Studies 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Interior Design 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Office Administration 

Paralegal Studies 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Paramedic Science 

Respiratory Care 

Visual Communications 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



TELL CITY CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 
Office Administration 

Technical Certificate 

Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 



TERRE HAUTE CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Advanced Manufacturing 

Agriculture 

Automotive Technology 

Biotechnology 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 



Computer Information Technology 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Electronics and Computer Technology 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Medical Laboratory Technology 

Office Administration 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Paramedic Science 

Surgical Technology 

Visual Communications 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Advanced Manufacturing 
Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Computer Information Technology 
Construction Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Agriculture 

Automotive Technology 
Biotechnology 



Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Education 

Electronics and Computer Technology 

General Studies 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Radiologic Technology 

Respiratory Care 

Visual Communications 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



VALPARAISO CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Accounting (via distance) 

Advanced Manufacturing 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Criminal Justice 

Design Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services (via distance) 

Industrial Technology 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies 



167 



Paralegal Studies (via distance) 
Surgical Technology 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Design Technology 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services 

Industrial Technology 

Office Administration 

Practical Nursing 

Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Industrial Technology 

Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Criminal Justice 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

Design Technology 

General Studies 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (via distance) 

Nursing 

Paralegal Studies 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Pre-Engineering 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 



168 



WABASH CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Technology 
Industrial Technology 

Technical Certificate 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Technology 
Practical Nursing 

Associated of Science 

Business Administration 
Industrial Technology 



WARSAW CAMPUS 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting (via distance) 

Agriculture 

Business Administration 

Business Administration (via distance) 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Computer Information Technology 

Design Technology (via distance) 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Human Services (via distance) 

Medical Assisting 

Office Administration (via distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Childhood Education (via distance) 

Medical Assisting 

Certificate 



Accounting 

Automotive Technology 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Technology 

Industrial Technology 

Office Administration 

Associate of Science 

Agriculture 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Computer Information Systems (via distance) 

Criminal Justice (via distance) 

General Studies 

Human Services 

Human Services (via distance) 

Liberal Arts 

Library Technical Assistant (distance) 

Paralegal Studies (via distance) 

Associate of Arts 

Liberal Arts 




169 



170 



NORTHWEST REGION 

VALTIERRA, JOSE GUADALUPE, Chancellor; BA, Purdue University; MS, JD, Indiana University 

THOSTESEN, DAWN, Executive Director of Finance; BS, MS, College of New Jersey 

GONZALEZ, R. LOUIE, Vice Chancellor/Dean, East Chicago; BS, Calumet College of Saint Joseph; MPA, Indiana 

University 
HAKLIN, DELORES.Vice Chancellor/Dean, Valparaiso; BA, Simpson College; MS, St. Francis College; PhD, 

Indiana State University 
HUDDLESTON, JERRY L, Vice Chancellor/Dean, Michigan City; BS, MA, Ball State University 
HALIK, DEBORAH A., Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs; BS, Calumet College of Saint Joseph; MS, Purdue 

University; PhD, Indiana State University 
HOWARD, R. KEITH.Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs; BA, DePauw University; MPA, ABD, Indiana University 
POLLARD, LOUISE F, Assistant Vice-Chancellor of Academic Affairs and ASA Division Chair, Gary; BS, Wayne 

State University; MRC, Arkansas State University 
ROSENBLUM, KENNETH, Assistant Vice-Chancellor of Academic Affairs-Valparaiso; BS, University of 

Wisconsin; JD, DePaul University 
WOROSZ, MICHAEL, Assistant Vice-Chancellor of Academic Affairs; MS, Indiana State University 

FACULTY 

ABEYTA, ELIDA, Instructor in Hospitality, Assistant Program Chair, East Chicago; AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
ADAMSKI, JOHN, Assistant Professor in General Education, Gary; BS, Indiana State; MS, Purdue University 
ALSPAUGH, DE80RAH M„ Associate Professor in Academic Skills Advancement, Program Chair, Gary; BS, 

MPA, Indiana University 
APPLEHANS, MICHAEL, Instructor in Mathematics and Sciences, Gary; BSCE, MSCE, Purdue University West 

Lafayette 
BANKS.MARY A., Associate Professor in Office Administration, East Chicago; BS, Alcom A & M; MS, Indiana 

University 
BANCSI, DAWN, Assistant Professor in Physical Therapy Assistant, Program Chair, Gary; BS, University of 

Illinois, M.P.T., Governors State University 
BERG, CYNTHIA, Instructor in Nursing, Valparaiso; BSN, Indiana Wesleyan 
BOXJOM, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Program Chair, Gary; BA, St. Leo University 
BREEN, BARBARA, Instructor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Michigan City; BA, Indiana University, MS, 

University of Georgia 
BREEN, JANET, Associate Professor in Accounting, Program Chair, Valparaiso; MS, DePaul University 
BUTTERFIELD, BRYON, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Assistant Program Chair, East Chicago; AAS, Ivy 

Tech Community College 
CATSADIMAS, NICHOLAS C, Instructor in Paralegal Studies, Program Chair, Valparaiso; BS, Valparaiso 

University; JD, Valparaiso University School of Law 
CLARK, HEATHER, Assistant Professor in English, East Chicago; BA & MA, Purdue University 
COPE, CHARLES T, Instructor in Construction Technology, East Chicago; AAS, Ivy Tech State College; Certified 

in Steel Framing, American Iron and Steel Institute 
CORNELIOUS-ELLIS, SHARON, Instructor in Nursing, Gary; AA, San Joaguin Delta College, BS, Southern Illinois 

University. 
COURTNEY, MATTHEW N; Instructor in Biological Sciences; Assistant Program Chair Valparaiso Campus, BA, 



Southern Illinois University, MS, Purdue University 
DAVIES, SUSAN, Associate Professor in Early Childhood Education, Program Chair, Gary; BA & MS, Purdue 

University 
DELBY, RICHARD, Instructor in Hospitality, Assistant Program Chair, Gary; BS, Governors State University 
DENEAL PATRICIA D., Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Gary; Diploma, St. Mary Mercy; BS, St. Francis; MS, 

University of Notre Dame 
DEVANEY, CATHERINE, Instructor in Nursing, Valparaiso; BSN, Valparaiso University 
DOWNS, DALE C, Associate Professor in Mathematics and Science, Dean of Liberal Arts & Sciences and 

Education, Michigan City; BS, Loyola University Chicago; MS, PhD, The University of Illinois at Chicago 
DUNBAR, KAREN KAREIVA, Assistant Professor of Biology, Assistant Program Chair of Science, Valparaiso; BS 

Biology, University of Kentucky; MS Molecular Biology, Purdue University Calumet 
DULIN, DARLENE, Instructor in Nursing, Valparaiso; BS, Goshen College 
ERIKS, MARSHA, Instructor in Surgical Technology, Valparaiso; AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
FABIAN, ALFRED E., Professor in Business Administration, Program Chair, Gary; BA, University of Georgia; MBA, 

Roosevelt University 
FICKEN, JOANN, Education Program Chair, Assistant Professor, Education, Michigan City; BS, MS, Valparaiso 

University, Post-Graduate, Indiana Wesleyan 
FORSYTHE, SYBIL, Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Valparaiso; ASN, Purdue University; BS, MSN,MPA, 

Indiana University; EdD, Nova Southern University 
GROSS, LEE, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Valparaiso; MSN, Valparaiso University 
GUADIANA, JUAN P., Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Program Chair, East Chicago; ASE; AAS, 

Vincennes University; BS, Indiana State University 
GUFFEY, SCOTT C; Instructor in English, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences; Valparaiso Campus, BA, MA, Purdue 

University Calumet 
GUTIERREZ, LARRY, Instructor in Construction Technology, Program Chair, East Chicago 
HARDER, DIANE, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Valparaiso; MS, Indiana University; EdD, Nova Southern 

University 
HARRIS, DANITA S., Associate Professor in Respiratory Care, Gary; BS, Cabrini College; MPA, Indiana University 
HARVEY, ETHEL, Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems, Computer Information Technology, Gary; 

BS, Purdue University; PBC, MBA, Indiana University 
HENDERSON, CREOLA, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Gary; BSN.MPA, Indiana University 
HERNANDEZ, CARLOS, Assistant Professor in Science, Assistant Program Chair, Liberal Arts and Sciences, East 

Chicago; MD, Industrial University of Santander 
HORNE, SAUNDRA S„Professor in Practical Nursing, Program Chair, Gary; AAS, Purdue University; BS, MS, College 

of St. Francis 
HORTON, RAMONA, Instructor in Nursing, Gary; AS, BS, Indiana University. 
HOWARD, KAREN, Instructor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, East Chicago; BS, MS, DePauw University 
HOWE, AMY, Instructor in Nursing, Gary; BSN, Ball State University 
IDOWUJOLULOPE, Assistant Professor Liberal Arts and ASA, Assistant Program Chair; Valparaiso; MA, University 

of lbadan;M.A.L.S. Valparaiso University 
IGBOEGWUA, EJIKE, Professor in Design Technology, East Chicago, Assistant Program Chair; BS, MS, Eastern 

Illinois University; PhD, University of Illinois 
JAKICH-ORTIZ, JERRI, Instructor in Nursing, Valparaiso; BSN, Purdue University 
JEFTICH, DANNY P., Professor in Academic Skills Advancement and General Education, Valparaiso; BA, MS, 

College of St. Francis 



JENKINS, STEPHEN, Instructor in Criminal Justice, Program Chair, Valparaiso; MA, Valparaiso University; BA, 

Valparaiso University 
JOHNSON, SHEILA, Associate Professor, Gary; BA, Central Michigan University; MEd, Indiana Wesleyan 

University 
JONIEC, JOSEPH, Assistant Professor in Accounting, Program Chair - Business; BA, MEd, Loyola University, 

MBA, ABD, Liberty University 
JOSESKI.TONI, Assistant Professor in Mathematics, Valparaiso; AAS Ivy Tech Community College, BSEE, MSEE, 

Purdue University Calumet 
JORDAN, PARNELL, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Assistant Program Chair, East Chicago; ASME, AWS 

Welding Certification 
KANOLIS, CHRIS F., Associate Professor in Business Administration, Valparaiso; BA, MBA, Indiana University 
LAYHEW, SUSAN J., Associate Professor in Respiratory Therapy, Program Chair, Gary; BS, Calumet College of 

St. Joseph; MA, National-Louis University 
LOVE, NANCY L, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Gary; AAS, Indiana University; BS, MSN, Purdue 

University 
LYNCH-JACKSON.TRINA, Assistant Professor in Business, Gary; BS, Saint Joseph College; MPA, Indiana 

University 
MACKOVYAK, ROBERT, Instructor in Construction Technology, Gary 
MARINARO-KROUSH, RANDEE, Instructor in Nursing, Valparaiso; BS, Purdue University 
MAS, JOSE, Instructor of Anatomy & Physiology, and Advanced Human Physiology, Gary; DVM,(Doctor of 

Veterinary Medicine), UNNE, (National University of the Northeast, Corrientes, Argentina) 
MATAVUU, OLGICA, Assistant Program Chair-Language Arts, Valparaiso; BA-English Language and 

Literature, Indiana University; BA- Modern English Language and Literature, Belgrade, University, Serbia, 

MALS, English Language and Literature, Valparaiso University 
MCDONALD, DEANNA, Assistant Professor of Sociology, BA Purdue University, MSW Loyola University, 

Chicago. 
MCKIDDY, JAMES, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Assistant Program Chair, Valparaiso; Apprenticeship 

Certified, American School 
MERRILL, DAVID, Associate Professor in General Education, Assistant Program Chair in Science, Michigan 

City; BS, Ramapo College of New Jersey; DC, Palmer College of Chiropractic 
MEYER, SCOTT, Fellow in Industrial Technology, Assistant Program Chair, Valparaiso 
MOEL, APRIL, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Assistant Program Chair; East Chicago; AAS, Ivy Tech 

Community College 
MOORE, SANDRA, Associate Professor in Business Administration, Valparaiso; BA, Calumet College of St. 

Joseph; MA, Purdue University 
MULLINS, LANNETTE G, Assistant Professor in Humanities, History, Art History, Political Science; Chair of 

Humanities, Valparaiso Campus; BA, Valparaiso University, MALS, Valparaiso University. 
MURRELL, JIMMIE L, Associate Professor in Automotive Technology, East Chicago; BA, Chicago State 

University; Certified - The National Institute of Automotive Service Excellence 
NEWCOMB, SHARON, Instructor in Nursing, Valparaiso; BSN, Valparaiso University 
NICHOLSON, DOROTHY, Instrurtor in Surgical Technology; AAS, Ivy Tech Community College 
NICKLA, MICHELLE, Assistant Professor in Accounting, Gary; MBA, Indiana University 
NIEMAN, AMY, Instrurtor in Human Services, Assistant Program Chair, East Chicago; BLS Purdue University; 

MSW, Indiana University 
OBAJULUWA,VICTOR A., Professor in Physical Therapist Assistant, Gary; BA, MEd, PhD, University of Ibadan 



O'DROBINAK, REGINA, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Gary; MSN, Indiana University 

OLSON, KATHY G., Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems, Computer Information 

Technology, Valparaiso; BA, Tri-State College, MS Educational Computing, Purdue University 
OSBORNE, MICHAEL, Instructor in Public Safety and Fire Science, Program Chair, Gary; BA, Southern ■nets 

University, AAS, Ivy Tech Community College 
PAVLAKOVIC.VIKI, Instructor in Medical Assisting, Program Chair, Michigan Gty; AAS. (vy Tech Community 

College, BS, Calumet College of St. Joseph; Certified Medical Assistant 
PEREZ, NORMA, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Valparaiso; BS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
PERRY, SUZAN, Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Program Chair, Valparaiso 
PETRESKA.VALENTINA, Instrurtor in Advanced Manufacturing, Program Chair, Valparaiso; 
PLANK, LORA Y, Assistant Professor in Surgical Technology, Dean School of Health Sciences, Valparaiso; 

AAS, Purdue University; BS, Indiana University 
PRIMUS, SALLY, Instructor in Human Services, Program Chair, Valparaiso; BS, Ramapo College of New 

Jersey; MSW, Indiana University 
RIDDELL, DARRELL, Assistant Professor, Assistant Program Chair, Computer Information Technology, 

Computer Information Systems, Gary; BS, Indiana State University, MBAS, Keller Graduate School of 

Business 
RIDDLE, JARED M., Associate Professor in English & Communications, Regional Chair of English & 

Communications and Assistant Program Chair of Academic Skills Advancement East Chicago; BA, 

Indiana University, MA Purdue University 
RIECKEN, NANCY, Instructor in English, Assistant Program Chair Gary; BA, University of Wisconsin, MA, 

Purdue University 
ROSILLO, LAURA, Associate Professor in Science, Regional Program Chair of Science, East Chicago; 8A 

Indiana University; MD, IU School of Medicine, Indianapolis 
RUE, GINA M., Dean, School of Business, Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems. Regional 

Program Chair, Computer Information Systems, Computer Information Technology, Valparaiso; AAS, hry 

Tech State College; BS, Calumet College of St. Joseph, MS, Purdue University 
SAARY, ALLYSON, Instructor in Nursing, Valparaiso; BSN, Florida State University 
SCHOENFELDERJOHN H., Professor in Business Administration, Michigan Gty; AAS, Moraine Vafcy 

College; BA, MA, Governors State University 
SCOTT, SHARON T„ Instrurtor in Medical Assisting, Michigan Gty; Certified Laboratory Assistant (ASCP), 

Indiana University 
SIEWERT, JOHN A., Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, East Chicago; Dupont Certified 
SIKOSKI, ACO, Professor in Design Technology, Professor in Pre-Engineering: Dean- Technology; Dean- 
School of Applied Science and Engineering; BS.'IQril I Metodij" Skopje Macedonia; MS, Purdue 

University 
SMITH-ESTES, GAIL, Professor in Nursing, Program Chair, Gary; BS, MS, Purdue University 
SORIA, RICHARD, Assistant Professor in Mortuary Science, Dean - Public & Social Services: Diploma. 

Worsham College of Mortuary Science; BS, Calumet College of St Joseph; JD, Valparaiso Unrversity 

School of Law 
STALEVSKA, LIUANA, Associate Professor in Mathematics, Regional Chair LA Mathematics, Valparaiso; 

BSEE, Univeristy "Kirl and Metodij" Macedonia; MS, Purdue University 
STIPP-EVANS, DEBORAH L; Associate Professor of Psychology, Regional Program Chair of Social Sciences; 

Gary Campus, BA Purdue University; MAABS Valparaiso University 
TANASKOSKI.VESNA, Liberal Arts and English , ASA Co-Chair and English Instructor , Michigan Gty; BA. 

MA, Purdue University 



171 



172 



WHEELER-ANDREWS, SHARI L, Assistant Professor in Early Childhood Education, Gary; BS, Theater, minors in 

Psychology and Radio TV Film, MS, Family and Consumer Sciences, Child Development and Family Life 

specialization, Indiana State University 
WILLIAMS, GOMER, Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Program Chair, Valparaiso; AAS, Ivy Tech 

State College; BS California Coast University 
WILSON, FRENCEY, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Gary; AS, BS, Indiana University 
WORDEN_MCGUINESS, MARY, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Assistant Program Chair, Social Sciences; 

East Chicago Campus: BASW, Ball State University, PsyD, Chicago School of Professional Psychology. 
ZYCHJERRENCE, Instructor in Hospitality, Regional Program Chair, Michigan City; AS, Ivy Tech Community 

College 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION 

CALVIN.VIRGINIA, Chancellor; BS, Alcorn State University; MA, New Mexico Highlands University; EdD, Texas 

Woman's University 
SHAFFERJERESA, Vice Chancellor/Dean, Elkhart; BS, Indiana University; MEd, Kent State University 
MAXSON, RANDY, Vice Chancellor/Dean, Warsaw; BS, Grace College; MEd, Millersville University 
PHILIP CHUCK, Vice Chancellor of Academic Affair; EdD.Vanderbilt University; MS, George Peabody College; 

BS, California State University 
BRANHAM, KEITH. Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs; EdD, University of Central Florida, MDiv, Nazarene 

Theological Seminary, BS.Mid-America Nazarene University 

FACULTY 

ADAMCZYK, RICHARD, Assistant Professor in Manufacturing & Industrial Technology, Program Chair, South 

Bend; BS, University of Krakow.Technical Mechanic and Teacher Degree, Pedagogical Technical School, 

Kielce (Poland) 
ANDREJEVICH, MILAN, Associate Professor in Liberal Arts, South Bend; BA, Indiana University; MA, University 

of Chicago 
BELL, ANDREW, Instructor in Visual Communications, South Bend; BGS, Ball State University 
BOEMBEKE, ANGELA, Associate Professor in Visual Communications, Program Chair, South Bend; BA, 

Anderson University; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 
BRINKRUFF, DAVID, Associate Professor in Electronics & Computer Technology, Dean, School of Technology, 

South Bend; BS, Purdue University, MS, Purdue University 
BRITT, IRENE, Assistant Professor in Criminal Justice, Program Chair, South Bend; AS, Ivy Tech Community 

College; BS, Martin University; MPA, Indiana University 
BROWN, NANCY, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Warsaw; BA, Purdue University; MBA, St. 

Francis College 
BURTCH, GALE R., Assistant Professor in Academic Skills Advancement, Elkhart; BA, Indiana University- 

Bloomington; MS, Indiana University-South Bend 
BUTLER, CARRIE, Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Elkhart; BS, University of Tennessee/Argosy 

University, MBA, Argosy University 
CAMPBELL, MELODY, Associate Professor in Associate Degree Nursing; BSN, Bethel College; MSN, Ball State 

University 
COMEAU, JOHN, Professor in Liberal Arts, South Bend; BA, University of Notre Dame; MS, Indiana University 
CORY, KATRINA, Instructor in Nursing, Elkhart; ADN, Indiana University-Purdue University; BSN, Indiana 



Wesleyan University; MSN, Ball State University 
COTY.MARY, Assistant Professor in Nursing, South Bend; BSN, Ball State University; MSN, Valparaiso 

University 
CURRY, DEBORAH, Assistant Professor in Nursing, South Bend; BSN, Pittsburg State University; MSN, Ball 

State University 
. DENBY, CATHY, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts, South Bend; BA, St. Mary's College; MA, University of 

Notre Dame 
DOLPH, JOSEPH, Assistant Professor in Technology, Elkhart; BS, University of Notre Dame 
EGGLESTON, MARGARET, Assistant Professor in Visual Communications, South Bend; BS, Indiana University, 

Bloomington 
ELLINGHOUSE, COLETTE, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts, Warsaw; BA, Goshen College; MA, Ball State 

University 
FIORELLA-TEVES, SHARON, Instructor in Nursing, South Bend; BSN, Marycrest College; MS, University of 

Louisville 
FREYGANG, JIM, Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Program Chair, South Bend; AAS, Ivy Tech State 

College; BFA, St. Francis College 
GERBASICH, KAREN, Associate Professor in Nursing, South Bend; BSN, St. Mary's College; MSN, Ball State 

University 
GERDES, EDITH, Associate Professor in Nursing, South Bend; ADN, Purdue University; BHCA, St. Joseph's 

College; MSN, Ball State University 
GICK, DESMOND, Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems, South Bend; BS, Purdue University 
GRAY, DAVID, Associate Professor in Math and Sciences, Program Chair, South Bend; AB, Indiana University; 

MD, Indiana University 
GRUBER, ELLEN, Associate Professor in Academic Skills Advancement, South Bend; BS, Eastern Illinois 

University; MS, Northern Illinois University 
GUTHRIE, LOUISE, Assistant Professor in Business, Elkhart; BS, Indiana University; MBA, University of 

Nebraska 
HACKEMANN, SANDRA, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts, Elkhart; BA, Millsaps College; MA, George 

Peabody College 
HALL, CHARLES, Assistant Professor in Math and Sciences, South Bend; BS, MS, PhD, University of Notre 

Dame 
HAMMONDS, BONNIE, Instructor in Nursing, South Bend; BSN, Indiana University 
HARPER, NORA, Instructor in Nursing, South Bend; LPN, Utah Technical College; ADN, Weber State College; 

BSN, Weber State College 
HAWKINS.VIOLET, Instructor in Paralegal, Dean, School of Public and Social Services, South Bend; BA, 

Howard University; JD, Howard University 
HEETER, CAROL, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Elkhart; BS, MBA, Indiana University 
HELLYERJIM, Instructor in Paramedic, Program Chair, South Bend; BA, National-Lewis University; MA, 

Aurora University 
HIERS, JUDY, Associate Professor in Office Administration, Program Chair, South Bend; AAS, Delta College; 

BS, Western Michigan University; MS, Indiana State University 
HOCHSCHILD, ROBERT, Assistant Instructor in Accounting, Program Chair, South Bend; AAS, Ivy Tech 

Community College; BS, Bethel College; MS, Indiana University South Bend 
HORNER.MARY ANN, Instructor in Nursing, South Bend; BSW, St. Mary of the Woods College; BSN, Bethel 

College 



HOUCK, SHARON, Assistant Instructor in Academic Skills Advancement, South Bend; BA, Bethel College; MA, 

Indiana University at South Bend 
HUDERWITZ, PATRICIA, Instructor in Nursing, South Bend; BSN and MSN,Seton Hall University 
HUETTL, ROBERT, Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Program Chair, South Bend; AS, University of 

Wisconsin-Barron County Campus; BS, University of Wisconsin-Stout 
JOJO, JAMILLE, Assistant Instructor in Math and Sciences, South Bend; BA, Indiana University South Bend; 

MS, University of Notre Dame; Doctor of Optometry, Indiana University 
JOHNSJERRY, Assistant Professor in Math and Sciences, Elkhart; BS, MA, Indiana University 
KENT, KATHERINE, Professor in Interior Design, Dean, School of Fine Arts & Design, South Bend; BS, Andrews 

University; MA, Western Michigan University 
KEUSCH, DONNA, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Assistant Program Chair, South Bend; Diploma, Memorial 

Hospital School of Nursing; BSN, Indiana University; MSN, Valparaiso University 
KING, CHERYL, Assistant Professor in Environmental Design, Program Chair, South Bend; BS, Western 

Michigan University 
KIRKNER, CAROL, Professor in Medical Laboratory Technician, Dean, School of Health Sciences, South Bend; 

BS, Kent State University; MS, University of Notre Dame; EdD, California Coast University 
KOSANOVICH, RENEE, Assistant Professor in Dental Hygiene, South Bend; BS, Indiana University-Purdue 

University Ft. Wayne 
LAGADON, P. BEN, Assistant Professor in Manufacturing and Industrial Technology, Program Chair, South 

Bend; BA, Indiana University 
LANKSTONJHOMAS, Assistant Professor in Academic Skills Advancement, South Bend; BS, Purdue 

University; MS, Michigan State University 
LEDSOME, DANIEL, Assistant Professor in Math and Sciences, Program Chair, South Bend; BA, Muskingum 

College; MA, Miami University 
LUTZ, MARK, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts, South Bend; BA, University of Southern California; MA, 

University of Notre Dame 
MACMILLAN, BARBARA, Assistant Professor, Dental Hygiene, Program Chair, South Bend; BS, Loyola 

University; MS, Columbia University 
MARSH, ROBERT, Instrurtor in Industrial Technology, Warsaw; Journeyman - Machine Repairman, US 

Department of Labor 
MEASELL, NANCY, Assistant Professor in Medical Assisting, South Bend; AAS, J. Sargent Reynolds Community 

College; BA, Winthrop College 
NEGAHBAN.RAHIM, Associate Professor in Electronics and Computer Technology, Program Chair, South 

Bend; AS, J. C. Calhoun State Community College; BS, University of Alabama; MSEEJuskegee Institute 
NICHOLSON, DEBRA, Instructor in Respiratory Care, Director of Clinical Education, South Bend; AS, California 

College for Health Sciences; BS, Indiana University 
NSEULA, MICHAEL, Instrurtor in Computer Information Systems, Program Chair, South Bend; BA, Indiana 

University 
OSIRO, MESHACK, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, South Bend; BA, Bluffton College; 

MA, Ohio University 
PARMLEY, CRAIG, Associate Professor in Liberal Arts, Program Chair, South Bend; BS, Indiana State 

University; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan 
PAUL, DEBRA, Assistant Professor in Medical Assisting, Warsaw; TC, AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BA, Tri State 

University 
PAVEL, CYNTHIA, Assistant Professor in Medical Assistant, Program Chair, South Bend; AAS, Davenport 



University; BS, Central Washington University; BA, Eastern Washington University; MPA, Indiana 

University South Bend 
PEARSON, SUSAN, Assistant Professor in Respiratory Care, Program Chair, South Bend; AS, Indiana 

University; BA, DePaul University; PA, Indiana University 
PENROSE, DEBRA, Assistant Professor in Medical Assisting, Elkhart; BS, University of Texas Pan American 
PHILLIPS, JOANNE, Instrurtor in Human Services, Program Chair, South Bend; AA, Late Michigan Cofcge; BA. 

Sienna Heights University; MS and MSW, Indiana University South Bend 
POWELL, JAMES, Professor in Math and Sciences, Dean, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, South Bend; BS, 

Rose-Hulman Polytechnic Institute; PhD, University of Notre Dame 
PRIMROSE, PAMELA, Associate Professor in Medical Laboratory Technician, Program Chair, South Bend; BS, 

Indiana University; MS, University of Maryland 
RIVERA, MICHAEL, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Dean, School of Business, South 

Bend; BS, MBA, Taylor University ROE, LORI, Assistant Professor in Communication, FJkhart; BA. Morehead 

State University, MA, Morehead State University 
RUFUKU, CHARLES, Assistant Professor in Math and Sciences, Elkhart; BA, College Du Saint Esprit MO, 

Moscow Medical 
SATTLER, LAURAN, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Warsaw; AAS, Ivy Tech Sole 

College; BS, Goshen College, MA, George Washington University 
SHEAKS, CRAIG, Instrurtor in Visual Communications, South Bend; BFA, Indiana University 
SMYERS, HARRY, Instrurtor in Automotive Services, South Bend TC, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Indiana Stale 

University 
SPRING, BRENT, Assistant Professor in Hospitality, Program Chair, South Bend; BA, Indiana University 

Bloomington 
STRATTON, SANDRA, Assistant Professor in Paralegal, Program Chair, South Bend; BA. Albion Cofcge; JJO and 

MBA, Washington University 
SYERS, PHYLLIS, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Department Chair, South Bend; BSN, Prairie View ASM 

University; MSN.Texas Woman's University 
TAYLOR, LINDA, Assistant Professor in Early Childhood Education/Education, Program Chair, South Bend;BS, 

Taylor University Fort Wayne; MS Andrews University 
TIMM, MONTY, Instrurtor in Industrial Technology, Program Chair, South Bend.TChry Tech Community 

College 
TORMA, JAN, Instrurtor in Nursing, South Bend; BSN, Ball State University 
TWADDLE, GEORGE, Assistant Professor in Biotechnology, Program Chair, South Bend; BS, Purdue Urwersitji 

MS, Indiana University 
VOLHEIM, LORI, Assistant Professor in Communications, South Bend; BA. Indiana University South Bend. MA 

Ball State University 
WALTZ-FREEL, KATHRYN, Professor in Academic Skills Advancement Department Chair, South Bend; BA, 

Montana State University; MS, Indiana University 
WOLFSON, COLETTE, Associate Professor in Business Administration, Program Chair, South Bend; BS, tnclana 

University; MS, Indiana University 
WYMAN.PATSY, Assistant Professor in Hospitality, South Bend;BS, University of Michigan; MA. University of 

North Carolina 
YOUNG, ROGER, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, South Bend; BA. Columbia Cofcge; 

MS, Ferris State University 



173 



174 



NORTHEAST REGION 

KEEN, MARK A., CHANCELLOR, FORT WAYNE; AAS, BS, ITTTechnical Institute, MS, Indiana Wesleyan University; 

PhD, Indiana State University 
BAKER, RUSSELL D„ Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs, Fort Wayne; BA, Huntington University; MA, Kent 

State University; EdD, Ball State University 
LEWTON, J. CHARLES, Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs, Fort Wayne; BS, Indiana State University; MS, Purdue 

University 

FACULTY 

BARLOW, CHRISTINE E., Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts & Sciences, Fort Wayne; BS, MS, Purdue University 
BARNES, BRIAN, Assistant Instructor in Industrial Technology, Fort Wayne; CWE, CWI, American Welding 

Society 
BARNETT-JOHNSON, KIM R„ Assistant Professor, Dean, School of Liberal Arts & Sciences, Fort Wayne; BS, 

Taylor University; MLS, Indiana University 
BERINGER, LISA, Instructor in Liberal Arts & Sciences, Program Chair, Fort Wayne, BA, St. Norbert College, 

MA, Penn State University 
BICKNASE, BERNICE L, Assistant Professor in Therapeutic Massage, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; AAS, Ivy Tech 

State College; BS, Indiana Institute of Technology 
BISHOR REBECCA, Instructor in Liberal Arts & Science, Department Chair, Fort Wayne, BA, Manchester 

College, MA, Indiana University 
BISSELL.THERESA, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Department Chair, Fort Wayne; BA, 

DePauw University; MS, Purdue University 
BONEFF, ROSE L, Assistant Professor in Respiratory Care, Director of Clinical Education, Fort Wayne; RRT-NPS, 

AS, BS, Indiana University 
BRADSHAW, MARY ANNA, Assistant Professor in Human Services, Fort Wayne; AB, Indiana University; MS, St. 

Francis College; EdD., Indiana Wesleyan University 
8RINK, JENNIFER K., Assistant Professor in Respiratory Care, Department Chair, Fort Wayne; RRT-NPS, AS, 

Butler University; BS, University of St. Francis 
BUNTING, JEFF G., Assistant Instructor in Hospitality Administration, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; AAS, Ivy 

Tech Community College 
CAROTHERS, REBECCA S„ Assistant Professor in Early Childhood Education, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; BS, 

MAE, Ball State University 
CHRISTMAN, JOHN, Assistant Instructor in Industrial Technology, Fort Wayne; TC, Indiana Vocational 

Technical College; CWE, CWI, American Welding Society 
CIESLIK, CHRISTINA L, Instructor in Nursing, Fort Wayne; ASH, Lansing Community College; BSN, Michigan 

State University 
DANTZER, BRANDY, Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Fort Wayne; BSN, MSN, Indiana Wesleyan University 
DILLER, JEWEL K, Professor in Nursing, Fort Wayne; RN, BS, Fort Wayne Bible College; MSEd, Indiana 

University; MSN, Concordia University 
DITTON, DONNA S., Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts, , Fort Wayne; BA, Purdue University; MA, Ball State 

University 
DUNLAVY, SHERI A., Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Fort Wayne; AAS, BA, Purdue University; 

MSEd, Indiana University 



FAGAS, DEBORAH L, Assistant Professor in Academic Skills Advancement; BA, Indiana University; MA, Ball 

State University 
FALK, JOHN E., Assistant Professor in Construction Technology, Department Chair, Fort Wayne; Licensed 

Journeyman Plumber; Licensed Plumbing Contractor; BAMJri State University 
FIELDHOUSE, NANCY J., Assistant Professor in Nursing, Fort Wayne; RN, BSN, Goshen College; MSN, Purdue 

University 
GRANNAN, JOHN A., Instructor in Criminal Justice, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; AB, Indiana University; MS, 

Indiana Wesleyan University 
GRIESER, GAIL, Instructor in Liberal Arts & Sciences, Fort Wayne, BA, Ithaca College, MEd, Indiana University- 
Purdue University, Fort Wayne 
HAGEN-SHORT, MICHELLE L, Assistant Professor in Office Administration, Fort Wayne; BS, Purdue University 
HALL, DANIEL, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Fort Wayne; BS, Ball State University; MS, 

Indiana University 
HART, SHERRI, Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Fort Wayne; ASN, Valencia Community College, BSN, Indiana 

Wesleyan University 
HAZAIMEH, ABDALLA, Associate Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; BS, 

Yarmouk University; MS, Wichita State University; Ph.D., North Dakota State University 
HEISE, JOAN M., Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems and Computer Information 

Technology, Department Chair, Fort Wayne; BS, MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 
HENRY, STEVEN L, Assistant Instructor in Aviation Technology, Fort Wayne; TC, Columbus Technical Institute 
HESS, JOHN W„ Associate Professor in Construction Technology, Fort Wayne; BA.Tri-State University 
HESS, MICHAEL P., Instructor in Criminal Justice, Fort Wayne, BA, Indiana University-Purdue University - Fort 

Wayne, J. D.Indiana University School of Law, Indianapolis 
HINES, MARIA, Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Fort Wayne; BSN, Fairfield University 
HITZEMANN, CHERYL A., Assistant Instructor in Culinary Arts, Fort Wayne, Certified Executive Pastry Chef, 

American Culinary Federation 
HUFFMAN, ROBERT, Assistant Instructor in Automotive Technology, Fort Wayne; ASA Certification 
INGALLS, JAMES G., Assistant Professor in Academic Skills Advancement, Fort Wayne; BS, Austin Peay State 

University 
JOHNSON, LAURIE, Instructor in Elementary Education, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; BS, Purdue University; 

MEd, University of Wisconsin LaCrosse 
JONES, KAREN E., Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Fort Wayne; BA, Indiana University; MS, 

Purdue University 
KASHNER, CASEY, Instructor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Fort Wayne, BS, Eastern Michigan University, MS, 

University of Cincinnati 
KAUFFMAN, KENT D., Associate Professor in Paralegal Studies, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; BA, Temple 

University; JD, The Dickinson School of Law 
KEATHLEY, MICHAEL W., Associate Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; BA, 

Michigan State University; MA, Wayne State University 
KELDER, MICHAEL 0., Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Fort Wayne; AAS, ITT Technical Institute; 

BA.Tri-State University 
KELSEY, RALPH L, Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Department Chair, Fort Wayne; AAS, 

Purdue University; AAS, Purdue University; BS, Indiana State University 
KELTY, ROBERT, Assistant Professor in Hospitality Administration, Dean, School of Public Services and School 

of Education, Fort Wayne; BA, St. Francis College; MS, Indiana University 



KEMERER, PATRICIA, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Fort Wayne; BA, Youngstown State 

University; MS, University of Saint Francis 
KHOULI.VICKI L, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; RN-C; BSN, MA, Ball State 

University 
KNEUBUHLER, DENISE, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Fort Wayne; RN, BSN, MSN, FNP, Indiana Wesleyan 

University 
KNIGHT, JOHN H., Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Fort Wayne; AAS, Ivy Tech State . 

Collegers, Ball State University 
KNOX, DEEANN K., Assistant Professor in Medical Assisting, Fort Wayne; RN, BSN, Ball State University 
KUMFER, CYNTHIA J., Assistant Professor in Early Childhood Education, Fort Wayne; BA, MS, Indiana 

University 
LANGE, M. PAMELA, Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Fort Wayne; BSN, College of St. Teresa; NNR University of 

Colorado 
LEIGH, RONALD W., Associate Professor in Design Technology, Fort Wayne; AB, MA, Wheaton College; PhD, 

New York University 
LENGERICH, DONALD D„ Associate Professor in Accounting, Fort Wayne; BS, Indiana University; MSE, MBA, St. 

Francis College, CPA 
LONG, JOSHUA, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Fort Wayne; BA,Wadhams Hall Seminary 

College; MA, Walsh College; PhD, Capella University 
LYNCH, JOHN D., Assistant Professor in Accounting, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; BS, Purdue University; MS, 

Indiana University 
MANTOCK, CHARLENE M., Associate Professor in Health Aide, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; BSN, Olivet 

Nazarene University; MA, Ball State University 
MASON, JOHN, Assistant Instructor in Industrial Technology, Fort Wayne; AAS, Kentucky College of 

Technology; AAS, Ivy Tech Community College 
MCCORMICK, PATRICK, Associate Professor Business Administration, Fort Wayne; AAS, Indiana University 

Purdue University Fort Wayne; BS, Purdue University; MBA, Indiana Tech 
MEYER, BRENDA, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Fort Wayne; BSN, Indiana University Purdue University Fort 

Wayne; MSN, Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis 
MILLER, DODIE, Instructor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Fort Wayne; BA, Indiana-Purdue University Fort 

Wayne; MFA, Minnesota State 
MORGAN, PHIL, Assistant Instructor in Automotive Services, Fort Wayne; TC, Minnesota State University; TC, 

Ivy Tech Community College 
MOSCHEL-FOSTER, ANGEL, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Fort Wayne; BA, MA, Purdue 

University 
MOUGHLERJONI, Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Fort Wayne, ASN, Lutheran College of Health Professions, 

BSN, Indiana Wesleyan University 
MUSSON, MARY, Assistant Instructor in Early Childhood Education, Fort Wayne; BA, University of Denver; MA, 

Pacific Lutheran University; MS, Troy State University 
MYERS, MARSHA, Instructor in Therapeutic Massage, Fort Wayne, AAS, Ivy Tech Community College, BS, 

Indiana State University 
NAGEL, DIANE E., Assistant Professor in Academic Skills Advancement, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; BA, Saint 

Francis College 
NEWMAN, LINDA, Instructor in Nursing, Fort Wayne; RN, BSN, Purdue University; MSN, Ball State University; 

FNP, Indiana Wesleyan University 
PARRA, MICHELLE, Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Fort Wayne; ASN, BSN, Purdue University 



PITZER, DEBORAH K., Instructor in Manufacturing Technology, Department Chair, Fort Wayne; BS, Punk* 

University; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 
POWERS, JEAN E., Associate Professor in Business Administration, Fort Wayne; AAS, Ivy Teth State Cotege 

BSJri-State University; MS, University of Saint Francis 
PRICE, DEANNA, Instructor, Academic Skills Advancement, Writing, Fort Wayne, BfA, MMon Univenity 
PULLING, RICHARD, Instructor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Fort Wayne; BA, Tufts University; MOW, Chicago 

Theological Seminary; DMin, Bangor Theological Seminary 
QUICKEL, CARLA, Instructor, Business Administration, Fort Wayne, BA, Millersville University, MBA. 

Benedictine University 
REEVE, REBECCA, Associate Professor Liberal Arts and Sdences, Fort Wayne; BS, Ball State University; MA, 

Regent University 
REILLY, KAREN L, Dean, Academic Skills Advancement, Fort Wayne; BA, MPA, Indiana University 
RICHARD, SAJEH, Instructor in Academic Skills Advancement, Fort Wayne; BS, MBA. Indiana Institute of 

Technology 
ROBERTS, KRISTIN, Assistant Professor in Academic Skills Advancement, Department Chair, Fort Wayne; BS, 

Indiana University 
ROBINSON HINSEY, ANDREA, Assistant Professor in Office Administration; Department Chair, Fort Wayne: 

AAS, BS, Purdue University; MBA, Indiana Institute of Technology 
ROMINES, LINDA, Associate Professor in Medical Assisting, Fort Wayne; AAS, CMA, RN, BSN, Purdue 

University; MSN, Concordia University 
ROTHGEB, MARCIA, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Fort Wayne; RN, AAS, Purdue University; BA, Coiege of 

Saint Francis; MSN, University of Saint Francis 
ROYSE, BRIAN L, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Fort Wayne; BA, MA, Indiana University 
RUYLE, REBECCA, Instructor in Health Aide, Fort Wayne; AS, Purdue University; BS, Baptist Hole Coiege; MS, 

Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne; MSN, University of Saint Frands 
RYBOLT, RUSSELL H., Assistant Professor in Paralegal, Fort Wayne; BA, Indiana University; JD, Valparaiso 

University 
SCHLADENHAUFFEN, CANDACE S., Assistant Professor in Respiratory Care, Dean, Health Sdences, Fort 

Wayne; RRT-NPS, RPFT, BS, Indiana University; MS, Purdue University 
SCHROEDER, BETTY, Assistant Instructor in Paramedic Sdence, AAS, BS, Indiana Business Coiege 
SHADY, MATT, Instructor in Paramedic Science, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; BA, Goshen Coiege 
SHEARER, JAMES C, Assistant Professor in Construction Technology, Fort Wayne BA.Ti-State University 
SHERMAN, DENNIS R„ Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Fort Wayne: TC GE. Tool & Die 
SIMMONS, JEFFREY L, Assistant Professor in Academic Skills Advancement, Department Chair, 

Mathematics; Fort Wayne; BA, Taylor University; BS, Ball State University; MDiv, Anderson School of 

Theology 
SLATER, JAMES M., Assistant Professor in General Education, Fort Wayne; BS, Purdue University; MS, Eastern 

Michigan University; DO, Kirksville College of Medidne and Surgery 
SMITH, STEPHEN D., Assistant Instructor in Building Construction Management Technology, Program Chair. 

Fort Wayne; BA, Purdue University 
SPRADLIN, CHRISTOPHER D„ Assistant Professor in Academic Skills Advancement Department Chair. Fort 

Wayne; BA, Cedarville University; MA, Concordia Theological Seminary 
STEELE, LAURA, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sdences, Fort Wayne; BS, MS, Purdue University 
STONEBRAKER, BEN A., Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Fort Wayne; AAS, liiiwi 

Vocational Technical College; BS, Purdue University 



175 



STROUR DONALD L, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Fort Wayne; BS, Purdue 

University; MBA, Michigan State University 
SUDDITH, ROBERTA, Assistant Professor in Health Aide, Fort Wayne; BA, St. Francis College; MS, Walden 

University 
SULLENS, BARRY J., Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Fort Wayne; AA, Anderson 

College; BS, Lander University; MEd, Capella University 
TERHUNE, WILLIAM R., Instructor in Aviation Technology, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; AAS, Spartan School of 

Aeronautics; BS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
THIERER, NINA L., Associate Professor in Medical Assisting, Fort Wayne; AAS, Indiana Vocational Technical 

College, BS, Indiana Institute of Technology, CMA 
TOLBERT, JAMES, Instructor in Business Administration, Program Chair; BS, Central Bible College, MBA, Taylor 

University 
TOWNSEND, ROBERT, Instructor in Design Technology, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; BS, Northeastern 

University 
TREFF, CONRAD C, Assistant Professor in Manufacturing and Industrial Technology, Fort Wayne; BS, Fairleigh 

Dickinson University 
TRUMBULL, HEIDI, Instructor, ASA Math, Fort Wayne, BS, Indiana University 
TSAKOVA, MARIA, Assistant Professor in Academic Skills Advancement, Fort Wayne; BA, Saints Cyril and 

Methodius University; MLS, Indiana University 
VARGA, ANDREW, Assistant Instructor in Industrial Technology, Fort Wayne; BS, Indiana Wesleyan University; 

MS, Capella University 
VAZQUEZ, TERESA, Instructor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; BA, Oberlin College; 

MFA.The School of the Art Institute of Chicago 
VICK, JAN S., Assistant Professor in Human Services, Program Chair, Fort Wayne; BS, Ball State University, MS, 

Saint Francis College 
WALSH, JOHN D., Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Fort Wayne; BS, University of Notre Dame; 

MS, Wesleyan University 
WALTER, JOHN L, Associate Professor in Industrial Technology, Dean, Schools of Business, Technology and 

Applied Science and Engineering Technology, Fort Wayne; AAS, Indiana Vocational Technical College; BS, 

Indiana Wesleyan University; MA, Ball State University 
WEISS, ANNA C, Assistant Professor in Accounting, Fort Wayne; BA, Middlebury University; MSEd, Indiana 

University, CPA 
WIEGAND-GREEN.TOVA, Assistant Professor in Medical Assisting, Department Chair, Fort Wayne; BS, Purdue 

University, CMA 
WYNEKEN, MESHELE G., Assistant Professor in Hospitality Administration, Fort Wayne; RD, Saint Francis 

Medical Center; AA, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Illinois State University 

LAFAYETTE REGION 

BATHE, DAVID, Chancellor; AS, Vincennes University; BS, Greenville College; MS, PhD, Illinois State University 
OSTRYE.MARY E.,Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs and Professor; BS, MS, West Virginia University; PhD, 

Indiana State University 
ROSWARSKIJODD E„ Assistant Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs and Assistant Professor; BA, MS, PhD, 

Purdue University 
LAWS, JOHN, Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs, Lafayette; BS, MS, Southern Illinois University; EdD, Indiana 
176 University 



FACULTY 

ABEL, CINDY A., Assistant Professor in Medical Assisting, Lafayette; AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Indiana 

Wesleyan University 
ADDISON, PAUL, Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems, Computer Information Systems and 

Computer Information Technology Program Chair, Lafayette; BA, Indiana University; MS, Purdue 

University 
ALEXANDER, STANLEY W., Associate Professor in Psychology, Lafayette; BA, Cornell University; MEd, Boston 

College; PhD, University of Michigan 
BALACHANDER, MALATHIS, Associate Professor in Chemistry, Department Chair, Math and Sciences, 

Lafayette; BS, MS, PhD, University of Delhi, Delhi, India. 
BAUTE, AARON, Instructor in Business Administration, Program Chair, Lafayette; BS, Indiana Wesleyan 

University; MBA, Purdue University 
BAWA, SATISH, Associate Professor in Business Administration, Lafayette; BA, Dehli University; M.BA, Xavier 

University 
BERRY, DAVID C, Associate Professor in History, Dean, School of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Lafayette; BS, 

Mercer University; MA, Georgia State University 
BLACK, AMY L, Assistant Professor in Academic Skills Advancement, Lafayette; BS, St. Joseph College; MA, 

University of Phoenix 
BOLINGER, CINDY A., Assistant Instructor in Medical Assisting, Lafayette; AAS, Ivy Tech Community College 
BREWER, JOSHUA A., English Faculty Fellow, Lafayette; BA, Lipscomb University; MA, University of Miami, 

Coral Gables 
BRODSKY, JANET J„ Assistant Professor in Life Sciences, Program Chair, Lafayette; BA, Clark University; MS, 

Purdue University 
BUNNING, ALAN R., Assistant Professor in Computer Information Technology, Lafayette; BS, Purdue 

University 
BUTLER, KELLEY M., Instructor in Accounting, Lafayette; BS Oral Roberts University; MS Indiana University 
COGHILL.WILLIAM M., Schools of Education and Public and Social Services, Dean and Assistant Professor, 

Lafayette; BA, MS, Purdue University 
COMBS, JONATHAN D., Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Lafayette; BS, Purdue University 
COOPER, REED J., Instructor in Automotive Technology, Lafayette; BS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
CREE, CHAD V, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Technology, Lafayette; BS, MS, MA, Ball State 

University 
DEADMAN, ROBERT, Assistant Professor in Business, Dean, Lafayette; AAS, BS, Purdue University; MSM-IT, 

Colorado Technical University 
DELAPLANE, BRUCE L, Instructor in Elementary Education, Program Chair, Lafayette; BS, Ball State 

University; MS, Purdue University 
DOLK, KAREN L, Professor in Nursing, Department Chair, Lafayette; BSN, University of Pittsburgh; MSN, Case 

Western Reserve University 
DYE, DEBORAH K., Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Lafayette; AS, Ivy Tech State College; BSN, Indiana 

Wesleyan University 
EATON, BRYCE, Assistant Instructor in Welding, Lafayette; AS, Ivy Tech Community College 
ELY, SUSAN, Instructor in Advanced Manufacturing, Program Chair, Lafayette; BS, Rutgers University 
ERSKIN, ERIC L., Associate Professor in Automotive Technology, Program Chair, Lafayette; AAS, Montcalm 

Community College; BS, Ferris State University; MA, Northern Michigan University 



FAUST, JUDITH I., Associate Professor in Nursing, Lafayette; BSN, MSN, Ball State University 

FREEMAN, NOAH D., Assistant Professor in Agriculture, Program Chair, Lafayette; BS, MS, University of Illinois 

GIORGI N I, MASSIMILIANO, Spanish Faculty Fellow, Lafayette; BA, MA Purdue University 

GORDON, JAMES A., Instructor in Business Administration, Program Chair, Lafayette; BS, Purdue University; 

MBA, Finance University of Houston 
GUERRETTAZ, SARAH E., Associate Professor in English, Lafayette; BS, Indiana State University; MEd, Bowling 

Green State University 
GUSTUS, LISA A., Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Lafayette; TC and AS, Ivy Tech Community College; BNS, 

Indiana Wesleyan University 
GUTHRIE, AMANDA J.., Instructor in Surgical Technology, Lafayette; AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BA, Purdue 

University 
HAMMER,WENDY K., Assistant Professor in English, Lafayette; BA, University of Wisconsin; MA, Ball State 

University 
HEARN, DAVID H., Assistant Professor in Academic Skills Advancement, Lafayette; BS, MS, University of 

Delaware; PhD, Purdue University 
HERRON-JOHNSON, HEIDI L.., Assistant Professor in Spanish, Program Chair, Lafayette; BA, Drew University; 

MA and PhD, Purdue University 
INGRAM, MIKE A., Assistant Instructor in HVAC, Program Chair, Lafayette; AAS, Ivy Tech Community College 
ISAAG, JACOB P., Associate Professor in Communication, Lafayette; BA, Wabash University; MA, Ball State 

University; MS, Indiana University 
JAMES, PEGGY S., Professor in Respiratory Care, Program Chair, Lafayette; AAS, Lansing Community College; 

BS, MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 
JONES, ELIZABETH A., Associate Professor in Nursing, Lafayette; AAS, BSN, MS, Purdue University; MSN, 

Indiana University 
LINDBERG, AMANDA BARCHE, Assistant Professor in Early Childhood Education, Program Chair, Lafayette; 

BA, North Central College; MA, Eastern Illinois University 
LITTLE, STACEY E., Instructor in Business Administration, Lafayette; AS, Ivy Tech Community College; BA, St. 

Mary of the Woods; MA, Indiana University 
LOGAN, LYNDA S., Assistant Instructor in Practical Nursing, Lafayette; TC, AS Ivy Tech Community College; BS, 

Indiana Wesleyan University 
LUCAS, DONALD A., Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Program Chair, Lafayette; BS, MS, Purdue 

University 
MANIAN,VYJU V., Assistant Professor in Mathematics, Lafayette; BS, MS, University of Bombay; MS, 

University of Pittsburgh; MS, Columbia University 
MARION,WESLEY S., Instructor in Paralegal Studies, Program Chair, Lafayette; BA, Purdue University; JD, 

Indiana University 
MCCLANNEN, DOROTHY S., Professor in Surgical Technology, Program Chair, Lafayette; AAS, Purdue 

University; BSN, Graceland College; MSN, Purdue University 
MCDANEL, RODNEY A., Assistant Professor in Sociology, Program Chair, Lafayette; BS, Northern State 

University; MA, University of Houston; PhD, University of North Texas 
MERCIER, WILLIAM C, Assistant Professor in Mathematics, Program Chair, Lafayette; BA, University of 

Colorado; MS, University of Cincinnati 
MICON, JOYCE L, Assistant Professor in Human Services, Program Chair, Lafayette; BA, Doane College; MS, 

Case Western Reserve University 
MILLER, JOLENE K., Professor, Dean, School of Health Sciences, Lafayette; AS, University of Southern Indiana; 



BS, College of St. Francis; MEd, Purdue University 
MINK, JULIA A., Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Lafayette; AS, Ivy Tech Community College; BSN. Indiana 

Wesleyan University 
MISHLER, JOHN E., Instructor in Criminal Justice, Lafayette BS, Indiana State University 
MOOREJERESA G., Associate Professor in English, Program Chair, Lafayette; BA, MA, Western Kentucky 

University 
MUELLER, KEN S., Associate Professor in History, Program Chair, Lafayette; BA, MA, Southern Minois 

University; PhD, Saint Louis University 
MUGHMAW, KATHY D., Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Lafayette; ASN, BSN, Indiana University - Kokomo 
NAGLE, AMY M„ Instructor in Nursing, Lafayette; BSN, MSN, Ball State University 
NEES.VICKI L, Professor in Nursing, Lafayette; AAS, Purdue University; BSN, Purdue University; MSN, Purdue 

University 
NIELSON, KAREN E., Assistant Professor in Criminal Justice, Program Chair, Lafayette; BA, Eastern Nazarene 

College; MS, JD, University of Connecticut 
PETERSON, SHELLEY S., Instructor of Health Information Technology, Lafayette; BS, Purdue University; BS, 

Indiana University 
PHILLIPS, GEORGE J., Instructor of Respiratory Care, Lafayette, AAS, Kalamazoo Valley Community College; 

BHS Medical University of South Carolina; MSA, Central Michigan University 
PLEASANTS, STACIA L, Instructor in Early Childhood Education, Lafayette"BA, MS, Purdue University 
PRATER, BARBARA G., Special Projects to the Office of the Chancellor, and Associate Professor in Chemistry, 

Lafayette; BA, University of Kansas; PhD, University of Texas at Austin 
PRIEST, ROGER D., Assistant Professor in Communication, Program Chair, Lafayette; BA, MA, Purdue 

University 
RADZEKOWSKI, MCKENZIE, JANICE, Instructor in Biotechnology, Program Chair, Lafayette; BS, Montana 

University, PhD, Purdue University 
RATCLIFF, JOY D., Instructor in Dental Assisting, Lafayette; TC, Ivy Tech Community College; BS, Indiana 

Wesleyan University 
RATCLIFFE, DON, Assistant Professor in Microbiology, Lafayette; BA, Greenville College; MS, PhD. Purdue 

University 
RAYMANJEANA M., Mathematics Faculty Fellow, Lafayette; BS, Purdue University 
RISK, KATHLEEN M, Instructor in Academic Skills Advancement, Program Chair. Lafayette; BA. MA. ftwhe 

University 
ROBERSON, GLEN D., Associate Professor, Dean, Schools of Applied Science, Engineering and Technology, 

Lafayette; BS.MS, Purdue University 
ROBINSON, L DIANN, Professor in Academic Skills Advancement, Department Chair, Program Chair. 

Lafayette; BA, MS, Purdue University 
SCHAUER, DOUGLAS J., Instructor in Chemical Technology, Program Chair, Lafayette; BS, Drexel University; 

PhD, University of Notre Dame 
SCHUSTER STAIR, DIANNA R„ Professor in Office Administration, Program Chair, Lafayette; BS. MS, Purdue 

University 
SLAVEN, ISAAC, Instructor in Sustainable Energy, Program Chair, Lafayette; BS, MS, Purdue University 
SMOCK, WARREN W., Associate Professor in Accounting, Program Chair, Lafayette; BS, University of 

Indianapolis; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 
SNYDERS, SHARON M., Professor in Academic Skills Advancement Program Chair, Lafayette; BS, Purdue 

University; MS, Indiana Wesleyan; PhD, Purdue University 



177 



TRANA, GREG, Instructor in Business Administration; B5, BC, University of Ottawa; MBA, University of 

Saskatchewan 
TICEN, MELISSA K., Assistant Instructor in Dental Assisting, Program Chair, Lafayette; TC, Ivy Tech Community 

College 
TREES, SUSAN A., Instructor in Academic Skills Advancement, Lafayette; BA, Butler University; MS, Indiana 

University 
ULMER, MICHAEL, Instructor in Indusrial Technology, Program Chair, Lafayette; AS, Vincennes University, BS 

Purdue University 
UMBECK, J.RYAN, Instructor in Economics, Lafayette; BS, MS, Purdue University 
URAZAEV, ALBERT K., Assistant Professor in Life Sciences, Lafayette; M.D., PhD, Sci.D. Kazan Medical Institute, 

Russia. 
WEALING, JOAN, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Lafayette; BS.Taylor University; 

MSM-IT, Colorado Technical University 
WENDALL, ROBERT K., Assistant Professor in Mathematics, Lafayette; BS, MS, Purdue University 
WILLIAM, COLIN T., Associate Professor in Psychology, Program Chair, Lafayette; BA, Berry College; MA, PhD, 

Emory University 
WOODY, ROBERT T, Associate Professor in Industrial Technology, Lafayette; AS, Vincennes University, BS, 
- Indiana State University 
WULF, REBECCA K., Instructor in Academic Skills Advancement, Lafayette; AS, Vincennes University; BS, MS, 

Purdue University 
YETMAN, CHRISTINA, Assistant Instructor in Medical Assisting, Lafayette; AAS, Ivy Tech Community College 

KOKOMO REGION 

DAILY, STEPHEN J., Chancellor; BS, MS Indiana University-Kokomo 

LEWIS, PAMELA J., Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs; BS, Indiana University; MA, Ball State University; PhD, 

Indiana State University 
GUTHRIE, PAM.Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs; BA, University of Massachusetts; MS, Purdue University 
WILSON, JANE, Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs; BS, MA, Ball State University 
THURMOND, BRADLEY H., Executive Director of Instructional Sites; BA, MS, Purdue University 
HOCKNEY, DANIEL, Vice Chancellor, Logansport; BS, MA, Ball State University 

FACULTY 

ANDERSON, DONALD, Assistant Professor in Physics, Kokomo; BS, Wisconsin State College; BS, PhD, Purdue 

University 
BETZNER, DAVID, Instructor in Public Safety Technology, Program Chair, Kokomo; BS, MA, Columbia Pacific 

University 
BUNKER, KATHY, Instructor in Medical Assisting, Logansport; AAS, Harper College 
BYRD, JULIE, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Program Chair, Logansport; BS, Indiana 

Wesleyan University; MS, Ball State University 
CALDWELL, KIM, Assistant Professor in Mathematics, Kokomo; BS, Purdue University; MS, Indiana University 
CARDEN, DORIS M., Instructor in Nursing, Kokomo; ASN, BSN, Indiana University 
CHALf IN, JOHN, Assistant Professor in Paramedic Science, Program Chair, Kokomo; BS, Indiana University 
DAHLHAUSER, JOYCE, Instructor in Mathematics, Wabash; BS, DeVry University 
178 EHLER, KATHY M.Jnstructor in Nursing,Wabash;ASN,BSN,lndiana University 



ELDRIDGE, GWENN A., Instructor in English, Kokomo; BA, Indiana University; MA, Butler University 
ERNY.MICHAEL, Instructor in Automotive Technology, Program Chair, Kokomo; AAS, Ivy Tech Community College 
FERRIES, KENNETH, Assistant Professor in Political Science, Program Chair, Kokomo; BA, JD, Indiana University 
FITZGERALD, JAMES, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Program Chair, Kokomo; BA, McKendree 

College; MA, Xavier University 
GARDNER, RANDALL, Associate Professor in HVAC, Program Chair, Kokomo; AAS, Ivy Tech State College; AS, BS, 

Indiana State University; MSM, Ball State University 
GHERINGJHOMAS, Assistant Professor in English, Program Chair, Kokomo AS, San Diego Mesa College; BA, San 

Diego State University; MA, Purdue University 
GORDON, DENNIS, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Technology, Program Chair, Kokomo; AS, 

Phillips Junior College; BS, Southern Illinois University; MSJouro University International 
GROVES, RHONDA K., Professor in Office Administration, Dean of the School of Technology and the School of 

Applied Science and Engineering, , Kokomo; BS, MA, Ball State University 
GROVES, STEVE, Assistant Professor in Accounting and Business Administration, Program Chair, Kokomo; BS, 

Indiana State University; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 
HALL, JAY, Assistant Professor in Mathematics, Department Chair, Kokomo; BS, Rose Hulman Institute; MS, 

Indiana University 
HARDIMON-EDDINGTON, JIA S., Instructor in Surgical Technology, Program Chair, Kokomo; AS, Ivy Tech 

Community College 
HARDIN, FRANCES B., Instructor in Biology, Anatomy and Physiology, Kokomo; BA, Marian College; MA, Ball 

State University 
HARRIS, PHYLLISS, Associate Professor in Office Administration, Program Chair, Kokomo; BS, Ball State 

University 
HARTZOG, RICHARD, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Kokomo; BSN, Indiana Wesleyan University 
HENRY, MARIAN, Instructor in Nursing, Logansport; BS, Indiana University 
HILDENBRAND, JANE, Associate Professor in Early Childhood Education, Program Chair, Kokomo; AS, Vincennes 

University; BS, MS, Indiana State University 
HOLSAPPLE, MICHAEL, Assistant Professor in Criminal Justice, Program Chair, Logansport; BA, Indiana 

University; MS, Indiana State University 
HORNER, JANE, Assistant Professor in Early Childhood Education, Logansport; BS, Purdue University; MS, 

Indiana University 
JOHNSON, CHRISTOPHER L, Assistant Professor in Criminal Justice, , Kokomo; BS, Cedarville College; JD, 

University of San Diego 
JORDAN, GRETCHEN, Assistant Professor in Mathematics, Logansport; BS, MS, Purdue University 
KING, KIM, Associate Professor in Communication, Dean of the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the 

School of Fine Arts and Design, , Kokomo; BS, University of Indianapolis; MA, Ball State University 
KOCH, JEAN, Professor in Computer Information Systems, Dean of the School of Business, Kokomo; AAS, Ivy 

Tech State College; BS, MS Ball State University 
KOZIENSKI, RUTH, Assistant Professor in Human Services, Program Chair, Kokomo; BA, MS, Purdue University 
KUNKLE, ALAN, Assistant Professor in Mathematics, Program Chair, Kokomo; BS, MS, Purdue University 
LAUDERBAUGH, LINDA, Associate Professor in Nursing, Kokomo; BS, Indiana University; MSN, University of 

Southern Indiana 
LEDBETTERJAMERA L, Instructor in Nursing, Kokomo; BSN, Indiana University; MSN, Indiana Wesleyan 

University 
LONG, LAURA, Instructor in Nursing, Logansport; BSN, Valparaiso University; MSN, University of Phoenix 
MAPLE, CHERYL, Instructor in Nursing, Kokomo; BSM, Indiana University 



MARCUM, HEATHER, Instructor in Nursing, Kokomo; BSN, Indiana University 

MCCLAIN, NATHAN, Assistant Professor in Advanced Manufacturing, Program Chair, Kokomo; BS, Purdue 

University 
MCCAULEY.AMY, Assistant Professor in English, Kokomo; BA, Butler University; MA, Ball State University 
MCFARLAND, BARBARA, Assistant Professor in Office Administration, Logansport; BS, Ball State University; 

MS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
MCNALLY, DALENE S., Instructor in Nursing, Logansport; ASN, BSN, Indiana University 
MILLER, JERRY, Instructor in Education, Program Chair, Kokomo; BS, MS, Ball State University 
MOORMAN, THOMAS, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Wabash; BA, Wabash College; MBA, 

University of Phoenix 
MORGAN, CONNIE, Professor in Medical Assisting, Dean of the School of Public and Social Services and the 

School of Education, , Kokomo; BS, MEd, Indiana Wesleyan University 
MYERS, ROBERT, Instructor in Advanced Manufacturing, Kokomo; BS, General Motors Institute; MS, Purdue 

University 
PERKINS, JERRY, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Technology, Wabash; BS, Indiana University; 

MS, Webster University; MBA Troy State University 
PETERS, LAURIE F., Professor in Nursing, Dean of the School of Health Sciences, Kokomo; BSN, Indiana 

Universfty-Kokomo; MSN, Ball State University 
PETERSON, DANEL, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Kokomo; AS, BS, MSN, Indiana University 
PIERCEJONYA, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Kokomo; BS, MS, Ball State University 
PRICE, LISA, Instructor in Nursing, Kokomo; BSN, Indiana University; MSN, Indiana University - Purdue 

University 
PRITCHETT, JOHN E., Assistant Professor in Construction Technology, Program Chair, Kokomo; AS, Linn 

Technical College; BS, Indiana State University 
RIDDICK, KRISTY, Instructor in Dental Assisting, Program Chair, Kokomo; BA, Graceland University 
ROCKEY, JOSHUA, Assistant Professor in Communication, Program Chair, Kokomo; BA, MA, Ball State 

University 
SIEMENS, ELIZABETH, Assistant Professor in English, Logansport; BS, Indiana State University; MS, Purdue 

University 
SLUSHER, PATRICIA, Assistant Professor in Medical Assisting, Program Chair, Kokomo; BS, Indiana University 
SPENCE, GREGORY D., Instructor in Advanced Manufacturing, Logansport; AAS, Ivy Tech Community College; 

BA, Indiana University 
SROTYR, EDITH, Instructor in Medical Assisting, Kokomo; AAS, Ivy Tech Community College 
STEELE, KENNETH, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Logansport; Kokomo; BS, MBA, Fontbonne 

University 
THIBOS, RONALD, Assistant Professor in Industrial and Manufacturing Technology, Program Chair, Kokomo; 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 
VYAIN, SALLY, Assistant Professor in Psychology, Program Chair, Kokomo; BS, MA, Ball State University 
VANDEBURG, JENNIFER M., Instructor in Agriculture, Program Chair, Kokomo; BS, University of Illinois; MS, 

Purdue University 
WARD, DAN, Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Program Chair, Kokomo; BS, Purdue University 
WARD, LUKE, Assistant Professor in Visual Communications, Kokomo; BS, Purdue University 
WILEY, KYLE, Assistant Professor in Visual Communications, Program Chair, Kokomo; BS, Purdue University 
WILSON, MARIANNE, Instructor in Paralegal Studies, Program Chair, Kokomo; BA, University of Rochester; JD, 

Indiana University 
WILLIAMS, KELLY, Associate Professor in Nursing, , Department Chair, Kokomo; MSN, Indiana Wesleyan 

University 



EAST CENTRAL REGION 

CHESTERFIELD, GAIL, Chancellor; BS, Indiana University, MA, Ball State University, ABO, Indiana University 

LIGHTLE, JOHN, Vice Chancellor/Dean, Marion; BS, MA, EdO. Ball State University 

SLOAN, RONALD, Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs; DMA, University of Arizona 

STOOPS, SHARON, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Muncie; BS.MAE. Ball State University, ABO, Indiana 

State University 
LEWELLEN.MARY, Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs, Muncie; BS, MA, Ball State University University 
WILLEY, JAMES, Vice Chancellor/Dean; BS, Marian College; MEA.EdS, EdO, Ball State Unviversity 

FACULTY 

ADAMS, SHARON, Instructor in Nursing, Muncie; ASN, Floyd College; BSN Indiana Wesleyan University 
ANTHONY.NEIL, Associate Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Dean of Liberal Arts and Sciences; BS.MA. 

Ball State University 
AVERITTE, DARLISHA, Assistant Professor in Respiratory Care, Program Cnair, New Castle, MBA Anderson 

University 
BISHOP, DANNA, Associate Professor in Office Administration, Program Chair, Marion; BS, Indiana State 

University; MAE, Indiana Wesleyan University 
BRICE, JON, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Assistant Chair for Mattiematks and Physical 

Sciences, Marion 
BROOKBANK, KATHLEEN, Instructor in Nursing, New Castle; BSN, MSN, Ball State University 
CAIN, ROBERT, Instructor in Surgical Technology, Program Chair, Muncie; AAS, Ivy Tedi Community Cotege: 

BA, Indiana University 
CONWELLJAMRE, Assistant Professor in Early Childhood Education, Muncie; BA, MA, Ball State University 
CULP, SID, Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Anderson/Marion; BS, Ball State University 
DANA, KRISTEN, Assistant Professor in Academic Skills, English, Muncie; BS, MA, Bail State University 
DIETZEN, KARRIE, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Muncie; AD, Anderson University; BS, Indiana Wesleyan 

University; MSN, University of Phoenix 
DILLMAN, DEBRA, Assistant Professor in Radiologic Technology, Program Chair, Marion; BS, Indiana 

Wesleyan University; MS, Midwestern State University 
EVERETT, ARNOLD, Assistant Professor in Academic Skills, Academic Skills Mathematics Chair, Marion; 

BS.MAE, Ball State University 
FRY, J.OWEN, Assistant Professor in Academic Skills, Dean of the Department of Academic SHs. Muncie: 

BS.MAE, Ball State University 
GILBERT, LARRY, Associate Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Assistant Chair for English. CommaMOta 

and Languages, Anderson; AB, Anderson University; MA, Ball State University 
GOODMAN, STEPHANIE, Assistant Professor in Medical Assisting, Program Chair, Marion; BS, Bal State 

University; MSN, CMA(AAMA) 
GOSSETT, KRIS, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Muncie; BS, Otterbein Colege; MBA. 

Morehead State University 
GOULD, SUZANNE, Associate Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences; Chair for Biological and Chemical 

Sciences, Anderson; BFA, University of Illinois-Urbana; MAMS, University of Chkago-Mnois 
GOURLEY, DEBBIE, Assistant Professor in Hospitality Administration, Program Chair, Muncie; BS, MA. Bal 

State University 179 



GRAY, ROBERT, Instructor in Academic Skills Mathemathics, Anderson; BS, MAE, Ball State University 
GREENAN.MARY, Associate Professor in Academic Skills, Anderson; BS, University of Maine; MS, Butler 

University 
GRIFFIN, OBRIN, Assistant Professor in Electronics, Program Chair, Anderson; BS, University of Sierra Leone; 

MSEE, University of Evansville 
GROGG, ELKE, Assistant Professor in the School of Liberal Arts and Sciences; Co-Chair for Social 

Sciences/Humanities, Muncie; BS, MA, Ball State University 
GROSE, LESA, Nursing Instructor, Muncie, BSN, Indiana Wesleyan University. 
HANSON, GREG, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems/Technology, Anderson; AAS, Ivy Tech 

State College; BS, Free Will Baptist College; MS, Ball State University 
HARDMAN, TERESA, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Muncie; BSN, MSN, Ball State University 
' HAWES, MAUREEN, Instructor in Nursing, Anderson; BSN, Ball State University 
HAYES, DAVID, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems/Technology, Program Chair, Muncie; BS, 

MS, Ball State University 
HELLER, MONICA, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Assistant Chair for Social 

Sciences/Humanities, Marion. 
HICKS, MICHELLE, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Muncie; BSN, MSN, Ball State University 
HIDAY, MARY, Associate Professor in Nursing, Program Chair, Muncie; AD, Anderson College; BSN, Anderson 

University; MA, Ball State University 
HOBBS, LORI, Assistant Professor in Physical Therapist Assistant, Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education, 

Muncie; AS, Oklahoma City Community College; BS, Indiana University; MA, Ball State University 
HOFFMAN, NANCY J., Professor in Early Childhood Education, Program Chair, Muncie; BS, Penn State 

University, MA, Ed.D, Ball State University; PhD, Ball State University 
HORRELL, LATISHIA, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Assistant Chair for Social 

Sciences/Humanities and Physical Sciences, Anderson; BA, Anderson University; MS, Ball State University 
HOUSHOLDER, DONALD, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Chair for Mathematics and Physical 

Sciences, Anderson; BA, Anderson University; MA, Ball State University 
HUDSON, JOYCE, Assistant Professor, Dental Hygiene Program Chair, RDH, Medical University of South 

Carolina, MS, University of Missouri-Kansas City 
HUFF, NEIL, Instructor in Public Safety, Program Chair, Muncie; AS, Indiana University; BSA, Purdue University; 

MPA, Indiana University 
HUNT, JILL, Instructor in Nursing, New Castle; BSN, Indiana University Northwest 
HYATT, ANDREA, Assistant Professor in Academic Skills, Marion; BS, MA, Ball State University 
JEFFS, JOHN ROBERT, Associate Professor in Academic Skills, Muncie; BA, Olivet Nazarene University; MA, Ball 

State University; PhD, Indiana State University. 
JOHNSON, ROSE, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Program Chair, Marion; BS, Indiana Wesleyan; MS, Ball State 

University 
JOHNSONJONIA, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Anderson; ASN, BSN, Indiana University East 
JONES, PATRICK, Professor in Manufacturing and Industrial Technology, Program Chair, Muncie; AAS, Ivy Tech 

State College; BSJaylor University; MS, Ball State University; PhD, Cappella University 
KELLERJERESA G., Associate Professor in Office Administration, Anderson; BS.MAE, Ball State University 
KERR, MARILYN K., Associate Professor in Business Administration, Program Chair, Anderson; BS, MBA, Ball 

State University 
KLEEBERG, MICHAEL, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Assistant Chair for English, 

Communications and Languages, Muncie; BA, Kean College of New Jersey; MA, Ball State University 
180 LANG, KAREN, Associate Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Co-Chair for Social Sciences/Humanities, 



Muncie; BA, JD, University of Cincinnati; M.Div, Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
MACAULEYJERESA, Assistant Professor in Dental Assisting, Program Chair, Anderson; CDA, BS, Indiana 

University; EFDA; MS, Indiana University 
MASTERS, AMY, Nursing Instructor, Muncie, BSN, Ball State University 
MAYS, MARK, Assistant Professor in Academic Skills, Muncie; BA, Ball State University 
MCDANIEL, KATHLEEN, Assistant Professor in Medical Assisting, Anderson; BA, Loyola University; MA, Ball 

State University; CMA (AAMA).AHIMA 
MELHAM, LYNNEA, Instructor in Medical Assisting, Muncie; AS, BS, MS, Ball State University; CD, RD 
MOORE, MICHELE, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Assistant Chair for Biological and . 

Chemical Sciences, Anderson; BS, MS, Indiana University 
MOORHEAD, PHIL, Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems/Technology, Marion; BS, Bowling 

Green University; MS, University of Dayton 
MUNSELL, SUSANNA, Instructor in Medical Assisting, Marion; BA, Indiana Wesleyan University; MT (ASCP) 
NELSON, SUSAN, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Department Chair, Anderson; BSN, Anderson University; 

MSN, Ball State University 
OUTLAND, DAN K., Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Marion; BBA, Memphis State University; 

MBA, Ball State University 
PRUITT, LINDA, Associate Professor in Medical Assisting, Program Chair, Muncie; BS, MBA, Indiana Wesleyan 

University; CMA (AAMA) 
REEDER, EMILY, Assistant Professor in Human Services, Program Chair, Muncie; BA, Anderson University; 

MSW, Indiana University 
REESE, LORRAINE, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Biological and Chemical Sciences, 

Muncie; BS, MA, Ball State University 
RICHARDS, DIANE, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Marion, BSN, Indiana Wesleyan Uriiversity, MSN, Ball State 

University 
RICHWINE, LISA, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Program Chair, New Castle; BSN, MSN, NP, Ball State 

University, CLNC.Vikki Milazzo Institute 
ROBBINS, MARK, Instructor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Assistant Chair for Biological and Chemcial 

Sciences, Marion; BS, MA, Ball State University 
ROBERTS, BARBARA, Assistant Professor in Medical Assisting, Muncie; BA, Anderson University; MS, St. 

Francis College; CMA (AAMA) 
ROSALES, KAREN, Assistant Professor in Early Childhood Education, Anderson/Marion; BS, University of 

North Texas; ME, Texas Tech University 
SANDERS, SUSAN, Associate Professor in Nursing, Anderson, RN, MSN, Ball State University. 
SAXON, HERBERT, Instructor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Assistnat Chair for Biological and Chemical 

Sciences, Anderson; BS, MS, EdD, Ball State University 
SCHULZ, NEILSEN, Associate Professor in Medical Assisting, Program Chair, Anderson; BS, MA, Ball State 

University; CMA (AAMA), RRT 
SCOTT, JEFFREY, Assistant Professor in Public and Social Services, Acting Chair of the School of Public and 

Social Services and School of Education, Muncie; BS, Ball State University; MSW, Indiana University 
SEXTON, STEVE, Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Program Chair, Muncie; BS, Indiana 

University 
SHEPHERD, TAMARA, Assistant Professor in Radiologic Technology, Marion; AAS, BS, Ball State University; 

MS, Midwestern State University 
SHONK, CORA, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Muncie; BSN, MSN, Indiana Wesleyan, MA, Ball State 

University 



SKINNER, SUZANNE, Instructor in Human Services, Anderson/Marion; BSW, MS, Ball State University 
SMEDINGHOFF, JOHN, Assistant Professor in Academic Skills, Mathematics, Muncie; BEE, University of 

Dayton; MSJIIinois Institute of Technology, Armour College of Engineering 
SMITH, SEAN C, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Chair for English, Communications and 

Languages, Muncie; BA, MA, Ball State University 
STRYFFELER, RYAN, Instructor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Assistant Chair for English, Communications and 

Languages, English, Marion; BA, Hillsdale College; MA, Northern Arizona University 
SYVERSON, JULIA, Associate Professor in Nursing, Program Chair, Anderson; AD, Anderson University; BSN 

Indiana Wesleyan University; MSN, University of Phoenix 
SZAKALY, MICHAEL, Associate Professor in School of Business, Chair, Muncie; BS, MA, EdD, Ball State 

University 
THORNBURG, NANCY, Instructor in Surgical Technology, Muncie; Diploma, BMH School of Surgical 

Technology; AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
VENESKEY, KEVIN, Instructor in Accounting, Program Chair, Muncie; BA, Anderson University; MPA, Indiana 

University 
VESPERRY, PAUL, Assistant Professor in Manufacturing Technology, Program Chair, Muncie; AA, Clark State 

University; BS, Ohio State University; MAE, Ball State University 
WECHSLER, LEA ANNA, Instructor in Nursing, Muncie; ASN, Palm Beach Community College, BSN, MSN, 

Indiana Wesleyan University 
WEDGEWORTH, MICHAEL, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Assistant Chair for Mathematics 

and Physical Sciences, Muncie; BS, MA, Ball State University 
WILLY, BONNIE, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems/Technology, Muncie; BS.MAE, Ball 

State University, Master of Science in Education, Northern Illinois University 
WILKERSON, JOYCE, Associate Professor in Technology, Chair of the School of Technology and School of 

Applied Sciences, Muncie; BS, Martin University; AS, Ivy Tech Community College; MS, Indiana State 

University; PhD, Tennessee State University 
WISE, MARK, Assistant Professor in Physical Therapy Assistant, Program Chair, Muncie; BS, Bowling Green 

University; MA, Ball State University 
WOLFE, DUANE, Instructor in Liberal Arts and Sciences, Assistant Chair for Mathematics and Physical 

Sciences, Anderson, 
WOODWARD, CATHERINE, Associate Professor in Health Sciences, Chair, Muncie; BSN, Ball State University, 

MSN, Indiana Wesleyan University 

WABASH VALLEY REGION 

PITTMAN, JEFF, Chancellor; BS, Western Kentucky University; BS, Indiana University; MS, Indiana State 

University; PhD, Indiana University 
KING, DEANNA L.Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs; BS, Indiana University; MBA, PhD, Indiana State 

University 
ALLMAN, LEAH, Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs, Terre Haute; BS, MS, Indiana State University 

FACULTY 

ABBITT, JERRY, Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems, Terre Haute; BS, MS, Indiana University 
ALSMAN, CATHY, Associate Professor in Human Services, Program Chair, Terre Haute; BS, MS, Indiana State 
University 



ARCHER, JAMES, Assistant Professor in Criminal Justice, Terre Haute; BS, MS, Indiana State Unwrnity 
ARNEY, DON, Professor, Dean, School of Technology, Co-Dean, School of Applied Science and Engineering 

Technology, Terre Haute; BS, MS, Indiana State University 
BAUGHMAN.TERRA, Instructor in Nursing, Greencastle; AS, BS, Indiana State University; MS, Indiana 

Wesleyan University 
BEAR, LORI, Faculty Fellow in Medical Assisting, Terre Haute; CMA, CPHT, Professional Careen Institute 
BERRISFORD, RICK, Assistant Professor in Welding, Terre Haute; BS, Indiana State University 
BLANC, TRACY, Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Terre Haute; AS, BS, Indiana State University 
BOESEN, MELANIE, Associate Professor in Office Administration, Program Oiair, Terre Haute; AAS, hy lech 

State College; BS, MS, Indiana State University 
BOLINGER, BONNIE, Professor in Business Administration, Program Chair, Terre Haute; BS. MBA, Indiana 

State University; PhD, Indiana State University 
BOYER, BRENDA, Instructor in Nursing, Terre Haute; AS, BS, Indiana State University 
BRINSON, JAMES, Assistant Professor in Science, Terre Haute; BA. MS, Indiana State University 
BROUGHTON, BARBARA, Assistant Professor in Mathematics, Terre Haute; BS, MS, Queens University 
BROWNING.AMY, Assistant Professor in Accounting, Program Chair, Terre Haute; BS, Indiana State University; 

MBA, Ball State University 
BURKE, ROBIN, Instructor in General Education, Terre Haute; BA Indiana State University; MA, Bal State 

University 
CANNON, EMILY, Instructor in Nursing, Terre Haute; AS, Vlncennes University; BS, MS, Indiana Wesleyan 

University 
CHANEY.MARY, Associate Professor in Visual Communications, Program Chair, Terre Haute: BA. SL Mary-of- 

the-Woods College; MS, Indiana State University 
COFFEY, LYNETTE, Instructor in Nursing, Terre Haute; ASN.Vincennes University; BS, Indiana Wesleyan 

University 
COLE, CATHY, Assistant Professor in Elementary Education.Terre Haute; BA, Muskingum College; MS. 

Marygrove College 
COOPER, KIM, Assistant Professor in Practical and Associate of Nursing, Department Chair. Terre Haute; BS. 

AS, Indiana State University; MS, Indiana State University 
COX, PHYLLIS, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and English, Terre Haute; BS, MA, Indiana State University 
CREED, SHERRA, Instructor in Surgical Technology, Ten? Haute; AS, BS, Indiana State University 
DAHLIN, BROCK, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Internship Coordinator. Terre Haute: BS. 

Eastern Illinois University; MPA, Indiana State University 
DAVIS, MICHAEL, Instructor in Automotive Services, Program Chair, Terre Haute; AAS, Ivy Tech State Colege 
DIEL, MARY, Assistant Instructor in Radiology, Terre Haute; AS, Ivy Tech Community College 
OINKEL, KYNON, Assistant Instructor in Automotive Technology, Terre Haute; AAS Vmcennes University 
EICHHORST, BARBARA, Assistant Professor in Medical Laboratory Technology, Terre Haute; BS, MS, Indiana 

State University 
FIELDS.VICTOR, Assistant Professor, Site Manager, Terre Haute; BS, Indiana State University: MS. Indana 

University 
GAMBILL, JANEE, Associate Professor in Medical Laboratory Technology, Program Chair, Terre Haute; BS, MS, 

Indiana State University 
GOOD, ANSON, Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Terre Haute; BS, MS, Indiana State University 
GOODE, RENA, Associate Professor in Medical Laboratory Technology. Terre Haute; BA.Greenv*e Colege; MS 

Indiana State University 
GOSNELL, KELLY, Associate Professor in Practical and Associate of Nursing, Terre Haute; AS, BSN, Indiana 181 



State University; MS, University of Southern Indiana 
GRAHAM, JEANNE ANN, Professor in Liberal Arts, Program Chair, Terre Haute; BS, Indiana University; MA, 

Indiana State University 
GRASFEDER, JENNAFER, Assistant Instructor in Radiology, Terre Haute; RT, RDMS, RVT, Western Kentucky 

Community and Technical College 
GREENWELL, WILLIAM, Assistant Professor in Human Services, Terre Haute; BA, MA, University of Mississippi 
HARMLESS, MALCOLM, Assistant Professor in Electronics, Program Chair, Terre Haute; AAS, Ivy Tech State 

College; BS.MS, Indiana State University 
HART, MYRA, Instructor in Nursing, Terre Haute; BS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
HELDERMAN, MICHELLE, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Terre Haute; BS, University of Evansville; MS, Indiana 

Wesleyan University 
HENSON, JOSEPH, Assistant Professor in Mathematics, AS, Lake Land College; AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, 

Purdue University 
HOFMANN, BEULAH, Associate Professor in Practical and Associate of Nursing, Department Chair, 

Greencastle; BSN, MS, Indiana State University 
JONES, CHARLES, Assistant Professor in Manufacturing and Industrial Technology, Terre Haute; AAS, Ivy Tech 

State College; BS, Indiana State University 
JONES, CHERYL, Assistant Professor in Early Childhood Education, Program Chair, Terre Haute; AAS, BS, MS, 

Indiana State University 
KIRBY, BRYAN, Assistant Professor in General Education, Terre Haute; BA, Olivet Nazarene University; MS, 

Indiana State University 
LAWSON, JAMES, Assistant Professor in Manufacturing and Industrial Technology, Terre Haute; BS, Indiana 

State University 
LIECHTY, SARAH, Assistant Professor in Science, Terre Haute; BS, MS, Indiana State University 
LIGGETT, LUCINDA, Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and English, Terre Haute; AS, Vincennes University; BS, 

MA, Indiana State University 
LONG, JOE, Assistant Instructor in HVAC, Terre Haute; TC, AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
MAHER, ELIZABETH, Assistant Professor in Life Sciences, Terre Haute; BS, St. Mary-of-the-Woods College; MS, 

Indiana State University 
MASSA, LILA, Instructor in Mathematics, Terre Haute; BS, MS, Indiana State University 
MCCAMMON, CARRIE, Associate Professor in Mathematics, Program Chair, Terre Haute; BS, MS, Indiana State 

University 
MCCOY, MELYSSA, Assistant Instructors Practical and Associate of Nursing, Terre Haute; ASN, BSN, Indiana 

State University 
MCNEIL.TRACI, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Terre Haute; BS.Southern Illinois University Edwardsville; 

MSN, Barnes-Jewish College of Nursing and Allied Health 
MOORE, JEFFREY, Instructor in Electronics and Computer Technology, Terre Haute; BS, Indiana University 

Purdue University Indianapolis; MS, Indiana Central University; MS