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Full text of "Ivy Tech State College, 2001-2003 College Catalog"

Ivy Tech 
State College 



2001-2003 College Catalog 



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A Community College 
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Notice 

This catalog is intended to supply accurate information to the reader. From time to time, 
certain information may be changed. 

The College may revise any matter described in this catalog at any time without publishing 
a revised edition of this catalog. Courses, programs, curricula and program requirements 
may be changed or discontinued at any time. Information that appears to apply to a par- 
ticular student should be verified with the Office of Student Affairs at your local campus. 
Local campus information is found on page 6. The publication and its provisions are not 
in any way a contract between the student and Ivy Tech State College. 

Ivy Tech is an accredited, equal opportunity affirmative action state college. 

A copy of the most recent annual financial statement can be obtained upon request from the 
Office of the Treasurer. 




Message from 
the President 



On behalf of the faculty and staff, let me welcome you to Ivy Tech State College. 

The decision to continue your education is an important one that has positive implications 
for you for the rest of your life. In many ways, education is an investment. Better educated 
people earn more money, have greater job security, and better access to higher paying 
and professional jobs. We are very pleased that you have selected Ivy Tech as your 
investment vehicle. 

This is an exciting time for Ivy Tech State College. Not only are we the fastest growing 
state college system in the state of Indiana, but our affordable tuition costs and convenient 
locations make us the best value in higher education today. In addition, our new 
Community College of Indiana partnership with Vincennes University will bring more 
course offerings, more choices, and increased transferability options to thousands of 
Hoosiers. 

Todays job market is highly competitive. Only those with a solid educational background 
and finely honed skills will succeed. At Ivy Tech, we prepare you to advance in that 
environment. 

You have chosen a college known for instructional excellence. Our programs are 
challenging and keep pace with evolving technology. Our faculty and staff care about 
your success as a student. 

Whether you plan to transfer to a four-year institution, obtain employment, add to your 
training, or update your skills, Ivy Tech gives you the knowledge and the tools to meet 
the challenges of the future. 

I wish you every success on your journey of learning. 

Sincerely, 



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Gerald I. Lamkin, President 
Ivy Tech State College 



State Board of Trustees 



Joseph T. Bumblebur^ 

Chairman 

Francis H. Lueken, Jr. 

Vice Chairman 

William R. Goins 

Secretary 



Marvin E. Foote 
E. Celestine Johnson 
Paul H. Kloth 
Bill R. Liwix 
Linda B. Lorch 




Albert H. Schumaker II 
Darryl A. Smith 
Jerry D. Speidel 
Thomas E. Taylor 



College Officers 




Gerald I. Lamkin 

President 



Darnell E. Cole 

Vice President/Chancellor 



Meredith L. Carter 

Vice President/Chancellor 



Charles W. Harris 

Vice President for Development 

Robert C. Holmes 

Vice President for Finance 
and Treasurer 

William D. Kramer 

Vice President for Planning 
and Education 

William F. Morris 

Vice President for 
Administration 

M. Crocker Price 

Vice President and 
General Counsel 



Virginia B. Calvin 
Chancellor 

Jon L. Rupright 

Vice President/Chancellor 

Betty J. Doversberger 

Chancellor 

Steven J. Daily 

Chancellor 

J. Robert Jeffs 

Chancellor 

Jeff L. Pittman 

Chancellor 



James L. Steck 

Chancellor 

Douglas E. Burgham 
Chancellor 

James F. Helms 

Chancellor 

Daniel L. Schenk 
Chancellor 

Willie J. Kimmons 

Chancellor 





Table of Contents 



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Table of Contents 



General Information ■ 1 

How to Use this Catalog 2 

The Ivy Tech College Navigator 3 

College Profile 4 

College Mission 4 

College Goals 4 

Ivy Tech Foundation, Inc 5 

College Calendar 5 

Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity Policy 5 

Regional Accreditation Statement 5 

Campuses 6 

College Services 7 

Entering the College 8 

Admissions Non-Degree Objective 8 

Admissions Degree Objective 8 

Readmission 9 

Limited Admissions Enrollment 9 

Admission Procedures and Support Documents — Degree Objective 9 

Advanced Standing 10 

Secondary Initiatives 10 

Transferring to the College 10 

International Students 1 

Student Orientation 1 

Test-Out Procedures 1 

Registration 1 

Registering for Courses 1 

Open/Late Registration 12 

Course Drop and Add 12 

Student Withdrawal 12 

College Fees 12 

Additional Expenses 12 

Payment of Fees 13 

Refund Policy 13 

Financial Aid 13 

Hoosier Scholarship Program 14 

Higher Education Award Program (HEA) 14 

Ivy Tech and Foundation Scholarships 14 

21st Century Scholars Program 14 

Federal Pell Grants 14 

Indiana National Guard Supplemental Grant 14 

Indiana Part-Time Grant 14 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) 15 

Ivy Tech Grant Programs 15 

Employment and Loans 15 

Federal Work Study Program 15 

State Work Study Program 15 

Federal Stafford Loans 15 

Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) 16 

Selected Reserve Educational Assistance Program 16 

Child of Disabled Veteran (CDV) Benefits 16 



Police and Fire Fighters Orphans and Spouses Benefits 16 

Vocational Rehabilitation 16 

Workforce Investment Act 16 

Trade Readjustment Act (TRA) 16 

Employer-Funded Education 17 

Union Training Funds 17 

Veterans' Benefits 17 

Application Procedures for Financial Aid 17 

Financial Aid Appeals 17 

Student Records 18 

Dependency Provision 19 

Academic Grading 19 

Grades 19 

Status Codes 20 

Status 20 

I — Incomplete 20 

AU — Audit 20 

NW — No-Show Withdrawal 20 

W— Withdrawal 20 

S — Satisfactory 21 

U — Unsatisfactory 21 

V — Verified Competency 21 

Credit Hours 21 

Credit Hours/Load 21 

Enrollment Status 21 

Quality Points 22 

Grade Point Averages 22 

Improving a Grade 22 

Deans List 22 

Grade Reports 22 

Attendance 22 

Standards of Progress 23 

Special Problems 23 

Assessment 23 

Graduation 23 

Transferring to Another Institution 24 

Student Support Services 25 

Basic Skills Advancement Program Services 25 

Academic Advising 25 

Career and Employment Services 26 

College Bookstore 26 

Library 26 

Disability Support Services 27 

Student Organizations 27 

Organizations and Activities 27 

Student Government • 27 

Phi Theta Kappa 28 

Intramural Sports 28 

Clubs 28 

Social Activities 28 



Professional and Trade Organizations 28 

Ivy Tech State College Alumni Association 28 

Housing 28 

Student Parking 29 

Student Accident Insurance 29 

Student Health Insurance 29 

Accidents and Illnesses 29 

Registration for Elections 30 

Emergency Closing of Campuses 30 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 30 

Student Conduct 30 

College Rules 30 

Repeated Offenses of a Less Serious Nature 33 

Policy and Complaint Procedure Against Harrassment 33 

Reporting and Complaint Procedure 34 

Investigation 34 

Determination 34 

Corrective Action 35 

Violations 35 

Disciplinary Action 35 

Student Grievance Policy 36 

Informal Grievance Procedure 36 

Formal Grievance Procedure 36 

Format of the Written Grievance 36 

Timely Filing of a Formal Grievance 37 

Filing the Formal Grievance 37 

Mediation 37 

Student Status Committee 37 

Disposition of a Formal Grievance by the Student Status Committee 37 

Appeal to the Office of the President 38 

Reinstatement to the College 38 

Student Appeal of a Grade 39 

Student Right to Know 39 

Campus Security Information 39 

To Report a Crime 39 

Hours of Operation 39 

Security 39 

Prompt and Accurate Reporting 40 

Responsibility 40 

Crime Prevention Program 40 

Off-Campus Housing 40 

Alcohol Violation 40 

Drug Violation 40 

Substance Abuse Counseling 40 

Incident Reports 40 

Annual Report 40 

Instructional Programs 41 

Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree Programs 41 

Associate of Science (AS) Degree Programs 41 

Technical Certificate (TC) Programs 41 



Career Development Certificates (CDC) 41 

Business and Industry Training Programs 42 

Indiana Partnership for Statewide Education (IPSE) 42 

Statewide Program Initiatives 42 

General Technical Studies Program 42 

Apprenticeship Programs 43 

Senior Scholars 43 

Workforce Certification 43 

Business 45 

Accounting 46 

Associate of Applied Science 47 

Technical Certificate 48 

Business Administration 49 

Associate of Applied Science 50 

Casino Management Specialty 50 

eBusiness Specialty 50 

Financial Services Specialty 50 

Health Care Management Specialty 51 

Human Resources Management Specialty 51 

Logistics Management Specialty 51 

Management Specialty 51 

Marketing Specialty 51 

Operations Management Specialty 51 

Quality Management Specialty 51 

Real Estate Specialty 52 

Restaurant Management Specialty 52 

Associate of Science, Indiana State University 52 

Associate of Science, Ball State University 53 

Associate of Science, University of Southern Indiana 54 

Technical Certificate 55 

Casino Management Specialty 55 

Financial Services Specialty 55 

Health Care Management Specialty 55 

Human Resources Management Specialty 55 

Management Specialty 55 

Marketing Specialty 55 

Operations Management Specialty 55 

Quality Management Specialty 55 

Computer Information Systems 56 

Associate of Applied Science 57 

Information Technology Specialty 57 

Network/Novell Specialty 57 

Network/Windows NT Specialty 58 

Network/Multi-Vendor Specialty 58 

PC Support and Administration Specialty 58 

Programmer/Analyst Specialty 58 

Technical Certificate 59 

Office Administration 60 

Associate of Applied Science 61 

Administrative Specialty 61 



Insurance Specialty 61 

Legal Specialty 62 

Medical Specialty 62 

Software Applications Specialty 62 

Technical Certificate 63 

Health Sciences 64 

A.S. in Nursing 65 

Associate of Science 66 

Dental Assistant 67 

Technical Certificate 67 

Medical Assistant 68 

Associate of Applied Science 69 

Medical Assistant Specialty 69 

Massage Therapy Specialty 69 

Technical Certificate 70 

Administrative Specialty 70 

Clinical Specialty 70 

Generalist Specialty 70 

Massage Therapy Specialty 71 

Pharmacy Technician Specialty 71 

Medical Laboratory Technician 72 

Associate of Applied Science 73 

Occupational Therapy Assistant 74 

Associate of Science 75 

Paramedic Science 76 

Associate of Applied Science 77 

Physical Therapist Assistant 78 

Associate of Science 79 

Practical Nursing 80 

Technical Certificate 81 

Radiologic Technology 82 

Associate of Applied Science 83 

Respiratory Care 84 

Associate of Applied Science /Associate of Science 85 

Surgical Technology 86 

Associate of Applied Science 87 

Public Services 88 

Early Childhood Education 89 

Associate of Applied Science 90 

Administration Specialty 90 

Curriculum Specialty 91 

Generalist Specialty 91 

Infant/Toddler Specialty 91 

Associate of Science, Ball State University 92 

Technical Certificate 93 

Hospitality Administration 94 

Associate of Applied Science 95 

Baking & Pastry Arts Specialty 95 

Casino Management Specialty 96 

Culinary Arts Specialty 96 

Hotel & Restaurant Management Specialty 96 



Technical Certificate, Casino Management, Indiana State University 97 

Technical Certificate, Food Service, Indiana State University 98 

Human Services 99 

Associate of Applied Science 100 

Correctional Rehabilitation Services Specialty 100 

Generalist Specialty 101 

Gerontology Specialty 101 

Mental Health Specialty 101 

Substance Abuse Specialty 101 

Associate of Science, Ball State University 102 

Associate of Science, Indiana State University 103 

Technical Certificate, Mental Health 104 

Paralegal 105 

Associate of Applied Science 106 

Associate of Science, Ball State University 107 

Public Safety 108 

Associate of Applied Science 109 

Environmental Care Specialty 109 

Fire Science Specialty 110 

Hazardous Materials Specialty 110 

Public Administration Specialty 110 

Technical Certificate — Fire Science Ill 

Technology 112 

Automotive Technology 113 

Associate of Applied Science 114 

Automotive Body Repair Specialty 114 

Automotive Service Specialty 114 

Associate of Science, Indiana State University 115 

Technical Certificate 116 

Automotive Body Repair Specialty 116 

Automotive Service Specialty 116 

Aviation Technology 117 

Associate of Applied Science 118 

Aircraft Maintenance Technician Specialty 118 

Avionics Specialty 118 

Avionics 119 

Technical Certificate 119 

Construction Technology 120 

Associate of Applied Science 121 

Architectural Specialty 121 

Cabinetry Specialty 121 

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Specialty 121 

Landscape Technology Specialty 122 

Residential and Light Carpentry Specialty 122 

Surveying Specialty 122 

Technical Certificate 122 

Heating,Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Specialty 122 

Landscape Technology Specialty 122 

Residential and Light Carpentry Specialty 122 

Design Technology 123 



Table of Contents 



Associate of Applied Science 124 

Architecture Specialty 124 

Civil Specialty 125 

Computer-Aided Drafting Design and Manufacturing Specialty 125 

Computer Graphics Specialty 125 

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Design Specialty 125 

Mechanical Specialty 125 

Associate of Science, Indiana State University 126 

Architecture Specialty 126 

CADD-M Specialty 126 

Mechanical Specialty 126 

Technical Certificate 127 

Architecture Specialty 127 

Civil Specialty 127 

CADD-M Specialty 127 

HVAC Design Specialty 127 

Mechanical Specialty 127 

Electronics Technology 128 

Associate of Applied Science 129 

Automation Controls Specialty 129 

Biomedical Specialty 130 

Communications Specialty 130 

Computer Systems/Networking Specialty 130 

Electrical Maintenance Specialty 130 

Electronics Specialty 130 

Industrial Specialty 130 

Instrumentation Specialty 130 

Laser/Electro-Optics Specialty 130 

Telecommunications Specialty 130 

Associate of Science, Indiana State University 131 

Industrial Technology 132 

Associate of Applied Science 133 

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Specialty 133 

Industrial Maintenance Specialty 133 

Machine Tool Specialty 134 

Mechanical Maintenance Specialty 134 

Tool and Die Specialty 134 

Welding Specialty 134 

Technical Certificate 135 

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Specialty 135 

Industrial Maintenance Specialty 135 

Machine Tool Specialty 135 

Tool and Die Specialty 135 

Welding Specialty 135 

Machine Tool Technology 136 

Associate of Applied Science 137 

Manufacturing Technology 138 

Associate of Applied Science 139 

CAD/CAM Specialty 139 



CIM Specialty 140 

CNC Specialty 140 

Plastics Specialty 140 

Quality Assurance Specialty 140 

Tool and Die Specialty 140 

Welding Specialty 140 

Associate of Science 141 

Associate of Science 142 

Technical Certificate 143 

CAD/CAM Specialty 143 

CNC Specialty 143 

Plastics-Extrusion Molding Specialty 143 

Plastics-Injection Molding Specialty 143 

Tool and Die Specialty 143 

Quality Science 144 

Associate of Applied Science 145 

Industrial Laboratory Specialty 145 

Quality Management Specialty 145 

Recreational Vehicle Service Technology 146 

Associate of Applied Science 147 

Technical Certificate 148 

Visual Technologies 149 

Interior Design 150 

Associate of Applied Science 151 

Video Technology 152 

Associate of Applied Science 153 

Visual Communications 154 

Associate of Applied Science 155 

Graphic Design Specialty 155 

Graphic Media Production Specialty 156 

Multimedia Specialty 156 

Photography Specialty 156 

General Education and Support Services 157 

General Education Courses 158 

Communications 158 

Social Sciences 158 

Humanities 160 

Mathematics 162 

Life and Physical Sciences 164 

Basic Skills Advancement Courses 165 

English as a Second Language (ESL) Courses 165 

Language Arts 166 

Mathematics 167 

Life and Physical Sciences 167 

College Orientation 167 

Ivy Tech - Vincennes General Education Course Equivalency and Prerequisites Matrix 169 

Course Descriptions 172 

Comprehensive Technical Course Description List 173 



Program Availability 256 

Anderson Campus 257 

Bloomington Campus 257 

Columbus Campus 257 

East Chicago Campus 257 

Elkhart Campus 258 

Evansville Campus 258 

Fort Wayne Campus 258 

Gary Campus 259 

Indianapolis Campus 259 

Kokomo Campus 260 

Lafayette Campus 260 

Lawrenceburg Campus 260 

Logansport Campus 260 

Madison Campus 261 

Muncie Campus 261 

Marion Campus 261 

Michigan City Campus 261 

Richmond Campus 262 

Sellersburg Campus 262 

South Bend Campus 262 

Terre Haute Campus 263 

Valparaiso Campus 263 

Warsaw Campus 263 

Faculty & Staff 264 

Accreditations and Memberships 283 

Index 290 



Table of Content: 









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General Information 



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General Information 



How to Use this Catalog 



This catalog is easy to use. 



Just take a minute to flip through it. You'll see right away that it isn't too hard to find what you're looking 
for. When in doubt, use the table of contents in the front or the index in the back. 



It has Five Sections. 



General Information and College Services 

This section has basic information about the College and us campuses. It includes College history, 
campus addresses, and other important information such as financial aid, student rights, grading systems, 
and so on. Get to know this section well. 

Degree Programs and Requirements 

Use this section to find out which classes to take to earn the degree or certificate you want. It's organized by 
"division" (such as business or technology), then by "program" (such as business administration or industrial 
technology), and finally by "specialty" (such as marketing or machine tool). You also use this section to find 
out what degrees are offered in a certain field and how many course credits you need to complete them. It 
also tells how many credits you'll earn for each course. 

Course Descriptions 

After you look up the classes you need in section 2, you'll probably want to know what they're all about. Go 
to this easy-to-use section for that. Simply find the course number (see next page) in section 2 and then 
look it up in this section. Everything in section 3 is in alphabetical order. 

Program Availability 

Ivy Tech offers many educational programs and degrees, but not all programs and degrees are offered at 
all 23 campuses. This section is designed to help you quickly find which programs are available at the 
Ivy Tech campus that interests you. 

Faculty List and Accreditations 

This section is simply a list of full-time faculty and their educational backgrounds. It also shows which 
organizations and agencies accredit Ivy Tech State College, its campuses, and programs. 



Watch for symbols and terms. 



A degree or certificate program requires different types of courses. There are four terms that describe 
course types: "General Education," "Technical," "Specialty," and "Locally Determined." Most degrees 
or certificates require some courses of each type. Other terms you'll see are: 

Elective — The term "elective" means you can choose the class you want from those offered on your 
campus. These are marked with a "*". 

Capstone Course — This type of course includes a component that assesses certain skills that will be 
expected of you as a graduate in the workforce. The assessment typically involves a written assignment. 
These are marked with a " A ". 

Locally Determined — This means your campus decides which classes you must take to complete the 
degree. In cases where you see courses marked with the symbol "**" i it means that one of two courses 
is required and your campus decides which. In other cases, your campus determines which courses are 
required to fulfill the degree, based primarily on needs of local business and industry. Your academic 
advisor can tell you which classes are required. 



General Information 



The Ivy Tech 



Navigator 



This tells the name of the 
educational program. 



This is the type 
of degree. 



This tells 
how many 
credits you 
need to 
earn the 
degree. 



This is the 
specialty 
within the 
degree 
program. 



Visual Communications 



Associate of Applied Science 



degree. Jrou mas 

have r>6 credits t 
the following 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Choose One of 

the Following 

Specialties 



General Education Core 


18 


Technical Core 


18 


Specialty Core 


1 2 - 1 8 


Locally Determined Courses 


L2-18 



COM 101 
ENG 111 
"MAT 111 



Graphic Design 








ART 111 


Specialty 




ART 1 12 
ART 114 


(30 credits) 




ART 115 
ART 117 









Required Courses 

Fundamentals of Public Speaking 
English Composition 
Intermediate Algebra 

OR 
Functional Mathematics 
Physical Science 

Humanities/Social Sciences Course 
Humanities/Social Sciences Course 



Credit 
Hours 












VIS 101 


Fundamentals of Design 


3 


VIS 102 


Fundamentals of Imaging 


3 


VIS 115 


Computer Graphics 


3 


VIS 201 


Electronic Imaging 


3 


VIS 205 


Business Practices [or Visual Artists 


3 


VIS 207 


Portfolio Preparation 


3 









Drawing [or Visualization 
Electronic Layout 
Graphic Design 
Typography 

Advanced Graphic Design 
Locally Determined Courses 



This describes 
the course 
types and how 
many credit 
hours in each 
you need to 
earn the 
degree. 



This tells 
how many 
credits a 
course is 
worth. 



This is the 
course name. 



This is the course 
number. 



College Profile 



In just over 35 years, Ivy Tech State College — more popularly known as Ivy Tech — has 
grown from a mere idea to a thriving post-secondary institution. 

In 1963, the Indiana General Assembly established Indiana Vocational Technical College as 
Indiana's first statewide vocational technical college and appropriated $50,000 for its 
development. Following the appointment of a state board of trustees, a president was named 
and the first training program was established in 1965. The General Assembly later authorized 
Ivy Tech's present structure of 14 regions to provide accessible technical educational opportunities 
to all Indiana citizens. Between 1966 and 1969, 13 of the 14 regions were chartered and their 
boards of trustees appointed. (Region 14 was approved in 2000.) Later, Ivy Tech was given 
authority to grant diplomas and certificates, including one-year technical certificates and two- 
year associate degrees, and to offer general education courses needed for its technical education 
programs. 

Ivy Tech's growth in its relatively short history has been impressive. Enrollment reached 7 1 ,000 
in 1999-00. The College had only 3,233 students in the fall of 1968. Within the statewide Ivy 
Tech system, more than 2,600 full- and part-time faculty members teach in program areas 
offered in six instructional divisions: Business, Health Sciences, Public Services, Technology, 
Visual Technologies, and General Education and Support Services. 

The State Board of Trustees appointed Gerald I. Lamkin as the sixth president of Indiana 
Vocational Technical College in December 1982. In 1995, the Indiana General Assembly changed 
the name of the College to Ivy Tech State College. 

In 1998, the Indiana General Assembly created the Community College of Indiana (CCI). The 
Community College of Indiana is a partnership between Ivy Tech State College and Vincennes 
University (VU) that will broaden the array of course and program offerings at Ivy Tech campuses, 
enabling students to complete two-year liberal arts degree programs. Initial pilot sites for the 
2000-2001 academic year include campuses in Evansville, Gary, Lafayette, and Indianapolis. 
Expansion of the Community College of Indiana to all Ivy Tech locations will occur over the 
next six years. 



College Mission 



Ivy Tech State College is a public, statewide, open-access, community-based, technical college. 
The college's mission is to enable individuals to develop to their fullest potential and to support 
the economic development of Indiana. Ivy Tech prepares residents of Indiana with the general 
and technical education needed for successful careers or for continuation in higher education. 
The college provides courses, degree programs, counseling and related services, technical 
assistance, and community service to individuals, communities, and businesses and industries 
across the state. Ivy Tech promotes educational mobility through partnerships with local schools 
and other higher education institutions. 



College Goals 



1 . To promote and expand access to programs and services that meet students' abilities, interests 
and potential. 

2. To ensure that every graduate of an Ivy Tech program possesses the technical skills to be 
successful in the workplace. 

3. To provide a wide range of continually improving educational programs and services to 
individuals, businesses, industries and communities throughout the state. 

4 . To contribute to Indiana's economic development by providing the skilled workforce needed 
to attract and retain businesses and industries. 

5. To serve the diverse populations that reside in the state. 



GenerA £ Information 




6. To promote opportunities for individuals who have the ability, potential and desire to 
continue their education at a four-year institution. 

7. To promote mastery of the general education skills needed to be successful in higher 
education and in the workplace. 

8. To increase educational participation in Indiana. 

Ivy Tech Foundation, Inc. 

Ivy Tech Foundation, Inc. is an Indiana nonprofit corporation established in 1969 to raise funds 
to serve the needs of Ivy Tech State College and its students. 

The primary areas of the foundation's service are: 

• Scholarships and grants-in-aid that allow students to enter the college and complete their 
studies. 

• Loans for students who need temporary assistance until other sources of financial assistance 
can be obtained. 

• Equipment purchases to increase the level of instructional quality in laboratories and 
classrooms. 

• Funding for faculty enhancement opportunities and awards for excellence. 

• Seed money for innovative educational programs of exceptional merit. 

Ivy Tech Foundation, Inc. is exempt from federal income taxation under Section 501(c)(3) of the 
Internal Revenue Code. All gifts to the foundation qualify as charitable contributions for federal 
income tax purposes. In addition, these gifts qualify for a special Indiana state income tax credit. 

College Calendar 

Ivy Tech is on a semester schedule. Fall and spring semesters are 16 weeks long. The summer 
term is 1 1 weeks long. The college calendar varies by campus. Specific start and end dates can 
be obtained by calling one of the campuses listed on page 6. 

Nondiscrimination and Equal Opfortuntty Poucy 

Ivy Tech State College provides open admission, degree credit programs, courses and community 
service offerings, and student support services for all persons regardless of race, color, creed, 
national origin, religion, sex, physical or mental disability, age or veteran status. The College 
also provides opportunities to students on the same non-discriminatory opportunity basis. 
Persons who believe they may have been discriminated against should contact the campus 
affirmative action officer, Director of Human Resources, or Dean of Student Affairs. 

Ivy Tech State College is an accredited, equal opportunity/affirmative action institution. 

Regional Accreditation Statement 

Ivy Tech State College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and is a member of 
The North Central Association, 30 N. LaSalle Street, Chicago, IL 60602, (800) 621-7440. 



Genera! Information 



Campuses 



Ivy Tech serves Indiana through a network of 23 campuses. In addition, courses are offered in 
communities and workplaces across the state. 



ANDERSON (Region 6) 
104 West 53 rd Street 
Anderson, IN 46013-1502 
Phone: (765)643-7133 
1-800-644-4882 

BLOOMINGTON (Region 14) 
3116 Canterbury Court 
Bloomington, IN 47404-0393 
Phone: (812) 332-1559 

COLUMBUS (Region 10) 
4475 Central Avenue 
Columbus, IN 47203-1868 
Phone: (812)372-9925 
1-800-922-4838 

EAST CHICAGO (Region 1) 
410 E. Columbus Drive 
East Chicago, IN 46312-2714 
Phone: (219) 392-3600 
1-800-843-4882 

ELKHART (Region 2) 
2521 Industrial Parkway 
Elkhart, IN 46516-5430 
Phone: (219) 293-4657 

EVANSVILLE (Region 12) 
3501 First Avenue 
Evansville, IN 47710-3398 
Phone: (812) 426-2865 

FORT WAYNE (Region 3) 
3800 North Anthony Boulevard 
Fort Wayne, IN 46805-1489 
Phone: (219)482-9171 
1-800-859-4882 

GARY (Region 1) 
1440 East 35 th Avenue 
Gary, IN 46409-1499 
Phone: (219)981-1111 
1-800-843-4882 



INDIANAPOLIS (Region 8) 
One West 26 th Street 
Indianapolis, IN 46208-4777 
Phone: (317)921-4882 
1-800-732-1470 

KOKOMO (Region 5) 
1815 East Morgan Street 
Kokomo, IN 46903-1373 
Phone: (765)459-0561 
1-800-459-0561 

LAFAYETTE (Region 4) 
3101 South Creasy Lane 
P.O. Box 6299 
Lafayette, IN 47905-6299 
Phone: (765)772-9100 
1-800-669-4882 

LAWRENCEBURG (Region 11) 
500 Industrial Drive 
Lawrenceburg, IN 47025-2971 
Phone:(812)537-4010 

LOGANSPORT (Region 5) 
2815 East Market Street 
Logansport, IN 46947-2152 
Phone:(219)753-5101 

MADISON (Region 11) 
590 Ivy Tech Drive 
Madison, IN 47250-1881 
Phone: (812)265-2580 
1-800-403-2190 

MARION (Region 6) 
1015 East Third Street 
Marion, IN 46953-9370 
Phone: (765)662-9843 
1-800-554-1159 

MICHIGAN CITY (Region 1) 
3714 Franklin Street 
Michigan City, IN 46360-7311 
Phone: (219)879-9137 
1-800-843-4882 



MUNCIE (Region 6) 
4301 South Cowan Road 
Muncie, IN 47302-9448 
Phone: (765) 289-2291 
1-800-589-8324 

RICHMOND (Region 9) 
2325 Chester Boulevard 
Richmond, IN 47374-1298 
Phone: (765) 966-2656 
1-800-659-4562 

SELLERSBURG (Region 13) 
8204 Highway 311 
Sellersburg, IN 47172-1897 
Phone: (812)246-3301 
1-800-321-9021 

SOUTH BEND (Region 2) 
220 Dean Johnson Blvd. 
South Bend, IN 46601-3415 
Phone: (219)289-7001 
1-888-489-5463 

TERRE HAUTE (Region 7) 
7999 U.S. Highway 41 
Terre Haute, IN 47802-4898 
Phone: (812)299-1121 
1-800-377-4882 

VALPARAISO (Region 1) 
2401 Valley Dnve 
Valparaiso, IN 46383-2520 
Phone:(219)464-8514 

WARSAW (Region 2) 
850 East Smith Street 
Warsaw, IN 46580-4546 
Phone:(219)267-5428 

CENTRAL OFFICES 
One West 26th Street 
Indianapolis, IN 46208 
(317) 921-4800 



Toil-Free: 1-888-IVY-L1NE 
Web Site: www.ivy.tec.in.us 



General Information 




College Services 






f 




College See 



ENTERING THE COLLEGE 

Admissions Non-Degree Objective 



Ivy Tech offers courses in many special career areas. Admission as a non-degree student can be 
achieved simply by filing a completed registration form in the Office of Student Affairs. High 
school students (age sixteen or greater) may take Ivy Tech courses with the written approval of 
the appropriate high school official. Non-degree students enrolling in general education courses 
must take the ASSET or COMPASS assessment for course placement. Other non-degree students 
may elect to take the assessment. Non-degree students are not eligible to receive financial aid. 



Admissions Degree Objective 



Ivy Tech is an open admissions college, accessible to all Indiana citizens past high school age. 
Some degree-granting programs have limited availability and have additional requirements 
prior to acceptance to those programs. 

For admission as a student to one of Ivy Techs programs leading to an associate degree or 
technical certificate, the standard requirements are a high school diploma or General Education 
Development (GED) certificate and an application for admission. Prospective students who 
are college graduates with an associate degree or higher from a regionally accredited institution 
may submit their college transcript in lieu of the high school diploma. Prospective students 
who have some college credit may submit their college transcript if the college transcript shows 
the high school graduation date. The Office of Student Affairs will assist the student on request 
in obtaining a high school or college transcript or GED scores. 

To ensure student success, all degree-seeking students must participate in the ASSET/COMPASS 
assessment. The purposes of this assessment are to measure the student's achievement in 
mathematics, reading, writing, and to assist the student in the selection of appropriate courses. 
If the assessment reveals skill deficiencies, the student will be advised to complete appropriate 
developmental courses. Students may be eligible for financial aid during this period. 

When the assessment indicates that the student will be better served in a different setting, that 
individual may be referred to an appropriate community resource offering the needed assistance. 
The applicant may enter the admissions process at a later date, following completion of skills upgrading. 

Granting of waivers from the ASSET/COMPASS assessment is the responsibility of the academic 
officer or designee. Waivers will be granted to students who meet one or more of the following 
conditions: 

• Possess an associate degree or higher from a regionally accredited college. The number of 
years since an associate or higher degree was earned is not relevant. 

• Have completed comparable basic skills or general education courses in writing or math 
with a grade of "C" or better from a regionally accredited college. For purpose of waiving the 
reading portion, the prospective student must have completed a basic skills reading course 
or college-level general education course. 

• Have comparable assessment scores (earned within the last two years) from a regionally 
accredited institution that are deemed acceptable by an Ivy Tech campus for appropriate 
course placement. 

The College reserves the right to guide the enrollment of students in particular programs or 
courses on the basis of past academic records, academic counseling and assessment. 

Students seeking admission to certain health occupation programs may be requested to take 
part in specific pre-enrollment assessments and/or interviews to fulfill college or external agency 
requirements. Prerequisites may be required before enrolling in certain programs. 



Readmission 



Should a course of study at the College be interrupted more than two years, students must 
request readmission at a later date. This may be accomplished by contacting the Admissions 
Office. Information on eligibility for financial aid will be available to returning students. 

Limited Admissions Enrollment 

Occasionally, the number of students admitted and enrolled in programs and/or courses may 
be limited by College resources or facilities — including available lab equipment and related 
support, or the number of available clinical work stations. The Office of Student Affairs should 
be contacted regarding programs which have limited access. 

Admission Procedures and Support Documents — Degree Objective 

All prospective students pursuing an Associate of Science, an Associate of Applied Science, 
Associate of Arts or a Technical Certificate are required to: 

1 . submit an Application for Admission 

2. provide one of the following: 

A. For high school graduates: 

(1) if they are high school graduates from public schools, home schools, private schools or 
high school correspondence schools, provide an official high school transcript consisting 
of courses and grades received, graduation date, and official signature and/or seal. If the 
prospective student cannot provide an official transcript because the high school no longer 
exists and/or records are no longer available, the prospective student must provide written 
documentation to that effect. 

An Indiana certificate of completion is not the same as a high school diploma. If they only 
have a certificate of completion, they are considered non high school graduates for purposes 
of admissions, or 

(2) if they possess an associate degree or higher, they may provide an official college transcript 
from a regionally accredited college indicating date of college graduation, or 

(3) if they are less than associate degree college graduates or college transfers, they may 
provide an official college transcript from a regionally accredited college indicating date of 
high school graduation (transcripts from non-accredited colleges are unacceptable). 

B. For non high school graduates: 

(1) they may submit on official GED report of passing test scores from the American Council 
on Education (ACE). High school equivalency exams provided by other organizations are 
not acceptable, or 

(2) they may demonstrate the Ability to Benefit from postsecondary education by obtaining 
a passing grade on a test recognized for this purpose by the U. S. Department of Education. 
Students admitted to Ivy Tech under Ability to Benefit guidelines must provide an official 
GED report of passing test scores or a high school diploma within one calendar year of 
their initial date of enrollment. Students admitted under this provision who do not meet 
these requirements will be switched to courses-only status after a calendar year and are no 
longer eligible for federal, state, or institutional financial aid. A student cannot graduate 
from Ivy Tech (with the technical certificate or associate degree) without proof of high 
school graduation or passing GED scores. 

Students who do not meet Bl or B2 should be referred to the appropriate College or community 
services. 



3. submit financial aid forms (if applicable) 

4. comply with international student requirements (if applicable) 

5. submit other necessary specific data (if applicable) 

6. participate in the academic assessment. 

Applicants desiring admission to some programs may be required to meet special enrollment 
requirements including, but not limited to, pre-enrollment assessment testing, satisfactory high 
school grades, evidence of potential for success in the field, and/or an enrollment interview. 
Once a program selection is made, certain prerequisites, including, but not limited to, health 
examinations, may have to be met prior to enrollment in the particular program or course. 



Advanced Standing 



Students may be allowed to enter programs with advanced standing. Prior education and 
formal training may be considered for advanced placement. Credit may be awarded through 
transfer of credit from other postsecondary institutions, challenge examinations, the College 
Level Examination Program (CLEP), Advanced Placement (AP) tests, DANTES, or military 
experience. A score equivalent to a grade of "C" or higher on the CLEP or DANTES tests is 
required and a minimum score of 3 is required on AP tests. 



Secondary Initiatives 



Ivy Tech State College has implemented a secondary/postsecondary 2+2+2 education partnership 
with Indiana State University and high schools across Indiana. The partnership is designed to 
attract high school students into a technical education pathway that will lead to an associate 
degree, a baccalaureate degree, and even a graduate degree. The initiative has as a goal to 
change the way that younger Hoosiers, their parents, and educators view education and careers 
in technical fields. 

Articulation pathways have been established to link secondary programs in areas such as 
electronics, business administration, automotive technology, and design technology with the 
associate-baccalaureate articulations in place between Ivy Tech and ISU. High school students 
may formally enter the 2+2+2 program in their junior year. The 2+2+2 programs will provide 
students with options to learn skills to go directly to the workplace, or other opportunities to 
complete a degree program in a timely manner. 

Ivy Tech State Colleges Pathway to College program is a collaborative college preparatory project 
for secondary students in technical programs. Pathway to College coordinators offer students 
opportunities for remedial and enrichment services, dynamic educational and career planning, 
and linkages to baccalaureate programs in technical fields. The Pathway to College program 
goals address Indiana students' needs for better success in higher education. Each of the goals 
is designed to help students focus direct attention on the importance of schooling as their 
highest priority. Interested parties should contact the local Ivy Tech campus. 



Transferring to the College 



The College encourages students who previously attended other accredited colleges and 
universities or adult education programs to forward transcripts to Ivy Tech by the midpoint of 
the first semester of enrollment or re-enrollment for consideration for transfer of credit and/or 
advanced placement. Students are responsible for providing pertinent course descriptions 
and/or copies of the college catalog(s) if further documentation is needed to facilitate the review. 
The College will be glad to assist individuals with evaluation of prior educational experiences. 
The College reserves the right to refuse admission to those students who were dismissed for 
disciplinary reasons from other colleges or universities. 



International Students 



International students must meet College admission standards and certain other requirements. 
International students should apply for admission to Ivy Tech at least 90 days prior to the 
beginning of the term they wish to attend. International students must provide high school 
transcripts, which are subject to an equivalency evaluation. They must also demonstrate English 
language proficiency. The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with a minimum 
score of 550 for the written exam or 213 for the computerized version is required. 

International students must provide proof of adequate financial support for College fees and 
living expenses for each year while attending Ivy Tech. International students should submit a 
letter from an appropriate sponsor, government official or bank official stating that sufficient 
funds are available to cover the cost of the student's education and that these funds will be 
available to the student while attending college in the United States. International students 
must purchase the College's insurance coverage for medical, accident and repatriation expenses. 



Student Orientation 



All new degree students are encouraged to participate in a student success seminar/orientation 
program prior to or during the first week of classes. Orientation is designed to assist students in 
making the transition to a college environment. Topics include registration procedures, career 
and employment services, financial aid, business office services, instructional programs, tutoring 
services, college activities, and policies and procedures. 



Test-Out Procedures 



Test-out policies vary from program to program. Students wishing to test out of a course should 
contact the program advisor. A fee of $10 per credit hour (subject to change by the State Board 
of Trustees) may be charged for the tests. 

The general guidelines for test-out are: 

1. Test-out examinations should be taken before registering for the course for which the test- 
out is attempted. 

2. Test-out examinations are normally completed at one sitting (unless the test is offered in two 
parts, e.g., lab and written exams). 

3. Test-out credits are not included in credit computations for financial aid programs or student 
grade point averages. 



REGISTRATION 

Registering for Courses 



The registration process includes financial aid and program advising, selection of courses and 
payment of fees. Newly admitted students will be notified when to register for their first classes. 
Specific days are set aside for registration before the beginning of each semester. Students 
should seek assistance in course selection from faculty advisors or advisors in the Office of 
Student Affairs before registering for classes. The Office of Student Affairs can supply information 
concerning registration. 

Note: Students are registered when fees have been paid or payment arrangements have been 
made. 



Open/Late Registration 



Open registration is held before the beginning of the term. Registration after the first day of 
classes each term is considered late. Students may register after the first week of classes with 
the permission of the instructor. However, a late registration fee may be assessed any time after 
the first day of classes. For further information contact the Office of Student Affairs. 



Course Drop and Add 



A student may drop or add a course in the first week of the regular semester. Students may be 
eligible for a full or partial refund of the assessed fees for courses dropped in the first four 
weeks of the semester. Courses are not officially dropped until the necessary forms have been 
completed and returned to the Office of Student Affairs. After the first week of the semester 
students must receive the permission of the instructor to register for an added course. 



Student Withdrawal 



From the beginning of the second week to the end of the week marking the completion of 75 
percent of the course, a student may withdraw from a course by filing a change of enrollment 
form at the Registrars Office. (Students may be eligible for a full or partial refund of fees.) 
Records of students withdrawing from courses indicate a "W" status rather than a grade when 
the withdrawal process is completed. Withdrawal is complete when the necessary forms have 
been submitted to the Office of the Registrar. A student who ceases to attend class after the last 
day to withdraw will receive a grade commensurate with course requirements. 

Note: Withdrawing from class may affect or cancel financial assistance. Further information is 
available from the Financial Aid Office. 



COLLEGE FEES 



The College seeks to provide quality education at the lowest possible cost. General fees are 
based on the number of credit hours for which the student has registered. Out-of-state students 
pay an additional fee per credit hour. For a current schedule of fees and further information, 
contact the Office of Student Affairs. Students or their families maybe eligible for federal tuition 
tax credits in accordance with the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997. 



Additional Expenses 



The following additional expenses may apply, depending upon the program of study: 

Books: All students are expected to purchase the textbooks for their respective programs. The 
cost of books varies by class. 

Tools: The College furnishes major equipment items for instruction. However, in many programs 
or courses, students must furnish additional hand tools and equipment. 

Uniforms and other special equipment: Several programs require students to furnish uniforms 
and special safety clothing. 

Charges for consumable instructional materials: In some courses an additional charge for 
instructional materials may be required. 



Payment of Fees 



All enrolled students must make arrangements at the time of registration to pay all applicable 
fees. A student is officially registered and allowed to attend classes when all fees have been 
satisfied or arrangements for payment have been made. 



Refund Policy 



Students choosing to drop a course or courses must notify the College in writing using the 
drop-and-add or withdrawal form. Students choosing to withdraw from all courses may begin 
the withdrawal process in writing or by contacting the office responsible for accepting official 
oral notification. The fee refund for voluntary withdrawal from a class, when applicable, will 
be processed only after the student files a drop-and-add or withdrawal form with the Registrars 
Office. 

The College will refund student fees, with the exception of the late registration fee, on the 
following schedule for a regular semester: 

From registration to end of first week of semester . . .100% refund 

To end of second week of semester 75% refund 

To end of third week of semester 50% refund 

To end of fourth week of semester 25% refund 

After fourth week of semester No refund 

This schedule is based upon a 16-week semester calendar. Classes based on different calendars 
will have different refund schedules. The effective date for calculating the fee refund is the date 
of written notification on the drop-and-add form. Certain other fees may be refundable. Further 
details are available from the Office of Student Affairs. All refunds will be issued by check and 
mailed to the address shown on the student's registration form. Cancellation of credit courses 
by the College will result in a total refund of fees collected for those courses. 

Federal regulations mandate the treatment of refunds for financial aid recipients. Financial aid 
funds must be returned to the government when College charges were paid by financial aid 
and a refund is given a student who fully withdraws from the College. Financial aid recipients 
may request more detailed information from the Financial Aid Office. 



FINANCIAL AID 



Ivy Tech participates in various types of federal and state financial aid programs that provide 
assistance to many students. Ivy Tech also provides financial assistance to students from its 
own resources. Students are encouraged to carefully explore all financial aid options at their 
campus. 

Students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to be considered 
for any form of financial aid. Financial aid is available for both full- and part-time students 
regardless of age, race or sex. To qualify for financial aid all applicable requirements must be 
met. For federal and state financial aid programs students must: 

Be a regular student enrolled or accepted for enrollment in an eligible program; 

Not be enrolled in secondary school; 

Be a U.S. citizen or national or permanent resident; 

Maintain satisfactory academic progress in a course of study; 

Not owe a refund to a federal grant or loan program. 



Students who have completed the FAFSA and submitted all required documentation will receive 
an award letter detailing the financial aid programs offered. Any additional documentation 
required for an award or instructions for receiving payment will be mailed to the student. 
Procedures for obtaining federal loans vary by campus. Your campus financial aid office will 
instruct you on how to apply for federal Stafford loans. Detailed information on all financial 
aid programs is available at your campus financial aid office. 

The following forms of financial aid are available to Ivy Tech students: 

Hoosier Scholarship Program 

The State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana may award from one to three scholarships 
per high school, based on the size of the graduating class. Candidates are nominated by their 
high schools. The Hoosier Scholarship is a one-time, non-renewable merit award in the amount 
of $500 for one academic year. 

Higher Education Award Program (HEA) 

Residents of Indiana may apply for Higher Education Awards (formerly called State Grants). 
Applicants must file the FAFSA by March 1 preceding their enrollment for the following fall 
semester. Awards are based on demonstrated financial need. Recipients of HEA awards must 
be enrolled full-time (12 hours or more per semester) to be eligible to receive the grant. 

Ivy Tech and Foundation Scholarships 

Ivy Tech awards scholarships provided by Ivy Tech Foundation and local civic and service 
organizations. Students should contact the Financial Aid Office for details concerning availability 
of these scholarships. 

21st Century Scholars Program 

Twenty-first Century Scholars may use their tuition scholarships at Ivy Tech. Students must 
complete the award affirmation and other required forms provided by the 21st Century Scholar 
Program office to receive the award by the specified deadline. Questions regarding this program 
should be directed to the 21st Century Scholars Program or the campus financial aid office. All 
2 l sl Century Scholars are eligible for other special types of assistance as well. Please contact the 
Office of Student Affairs for additional information regarding the 2 1 SI Century Scholars Program. 

Federal Pell Grants 

The largest financial aid program at Ivy Tech is the Federal Pell Grant program. This program 
provides grant funds for tuition and books for many Ivy Tech students. Since the grant is based 
on the student's need, enrollment status, cost of education at Ivy Tech and current level of 
federal funding, the grant amount varies from semester to semester and student to student. 

Indiana National Guard Supplemental Grant 

The State of Indiana will meet 100 percent of certain tuition costs for eligible members of the 
Indiana Air and Army National Guard. The students file the Free Application for Student Aid 
between January I s ' and March l sl of the year they intend to enroll in College. 

Indiana Part-Time Grant 

Residents of Indiana may be eligible for the Indiana Part-Time Grant. Applicants must file the 
FAFSA and be enrolled in at least 6 credit hours, but less than 12 credit hours and have completed 
at least 12 semester credits toward a one or two-year degree completion. Awards are based on 
demonstrated financial need. 



Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) 

FSEOG is a federally funded student aid program which enables colleges to make grants to 
financially needy students to assist in the payment of educational costs. Awards vary each year. 

Ivy Tech Grant Programs 

Ivy Tech provides an extensive grant program. Each campus has a fee remission grant fund for 
students with special needs arising from unusual circumstances. Fee remissions are available 
under three separate programs: 

• Ivy Tech Grant — Awarded on basis of need 

• Ivy Tech Scholarship — Awarded on basis of merit 

• Part-Time Scholars Opportunity Grant — Awarded on basis of need to part-time students 



EMPLOYMENT AND LOANS 

Federal Work Study Program 

The Federal Work Study Program provides part-time employment to students who need financial 
assistance. Applicants must file the FAFSA and must be enrolled for at least six credit hours. 
Job assignments may be within the College or in public non-profit agencies in the community. 
The Financial Aid Office directs job placements after taking into consideration the amount of 
students' financial need, class schedule, and family or personal obligations. The starting hourly 
rate will be at least the federal minimum wage. Employment may consist of, but is not limited 
to, secretarial and clerical office work, maintenance or custodial work, duties in the library or 
work as lab assistants. Where possible, students are offered work study assignments in areas 
related to their career objectives. 

State Work Study Program 

Ivy Tech participates with the State Student Assistance Commission of Indiana in a state-funded 
Summer Work Study Program for financial-aid-eligible students who are residents of Indiana 
and plan to be enrolled full-time for the Fall semester. The purpose of this program is to help 
students who have received state-funded grants and scholarships to meet their remaining need. 



Federal Stafford Loans 



Low interest, federal Stafford Loans are available to eligible students who attend classes at least 
half-time (six credit hours). Funding for these loans is provided by lending institutions but the 
application process is handled completely by the Financial Aid Office. The interest rate on 
Stafford loans varies from year to year and students are notified of the applicable rate at time of 
application. Need-based, subsidized Stafford loans are interest-free during in-school and grace 
periods. Non-need based, unsubsidized Stafford loans require the student to pay the interest 
while in school or request a deferment of interest until after graduation. 

Repayment of Stafford loans begins six months after graduation, or when the students class 
load falls below six credit hours per semester. Each student borrower is required to attend 
entrance and exit loan counseling sessions. These counseling sessions are held in the financial 
aid office. Students are notified of the days and times these sessions are available. Loan 
applications will not be processed if the student has not attended the required sessions. 



Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) 

The PLUS program assists parents in financing the education of their dependent children when 
all other types of financial assistance have been denied or exhausted. Repayment begins within 
30 to 60 days after the loan is made. The federal government does not subsidize interest on 
these loans. 

Selected Reserve Educational Assistance Program 

Members of the U.S. Army Reserve, Naval Reserve, Air Force Reserve, Marine Corps Reserve, 
Army National Guard or Air National Guard may be eligible for benefits under Chapter 106 of 
the VA Regulations. Eligible students should contact the Office of Financial Aid for additional 
information and applications. 

Child of Disabled Veteran (CDV) Benefits 

Children of deceased or disabled veterans may be eligible for veterans' benefits. 

Indiana residents who are children of deceased or disabled veterans or of veterans awarded the 
Purple Heart may be eligible for a fee waiver at Ivy Tech if the parent's death, disability or 
Purple Heart award occurred as a result of military service during wartime. Inquiry concerning 
this benefit may be made at the Financial Aid Office. 

Police and Fire Fighters Orphans and Spouses Benefits 

Children and spouses of deceased, regularly paid law enforcement officers and fire fighters are 
eligible for a fee waiver if the death occurred in the line of duty. Children and spouses of 
volunteer firefighters and city or county reserve police officers who died in the line of duty also 
are eligible for a fee waiver. The fee waiver is granted only to full-time students under the age 
of 23. Certification from the appropriate agency must be presented to the College in order to 
obtain the fee waiver. 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

Students with disabilities that maybe considered barriers to employment may qualify for benefits 
through the Family Social Services Administration. The local office of the Division of Disability, 
Aging and Rehabilitative Services establishes the conditions of eligibility and awards assistance 
based on individual need. The division expects students to apply for the Pell Grant and other 
forms of financial aid through the school. However, if these resources are not sufficient to meet 
their needs the division may provide additional funding. Further information is available from 
the local office of the Division of Disability, Aging and Rehabilitative Services. 

Workforce Investment Act 

Assistance in obtaining vocational training may be available through the Workforce Investment 
Act. Contact the local Workforce/Employment and Training Center concerning eligibility 
requirements. 

Trade Readjustment Act (TRA) 

The Trade Readjustment Act provides full tuition and fees, books and supplies to eligible students. 
Students should check with their local Department of Employment and Training Office to 
determine eligibility. 



Employer-Funded Education 



Many employers pay for full or partial expenses related to courses taken at Ivy Tech when the 
training offered relates to the employee's job responsibilities. Interested students should contact 
their employers to determine if such arrangements can be made. 



Union Training Funds 



Many unions have training funds available for members. Interested students should contact 
their unions regarding availability of training funds for use at Ivy Tech. 



Veterans' Benefits 



Students who served in the armed forces may be eligible for veterans' benefits. The Veterans 
Administration and, in many instances, the Department of Defense, determines eligibility. The 
amount of monthly educational allowance will depend on enrollment status and individual 
entitlement of each veteran. 

Ivy Tech is obligated by law to evaluate past military and civilian training and education and 
award credit where appropriate. To accomplish this evaluation, veterans are obligated to provide 
the College with the necessary documentation of prior training and education. The evaluation 
must be completed within the time frame dictated by law and should be accomplished as soon 
as possible. Failure of the veteran to cooperate could result in VA benefits being terminated, 
retroactive to the first day benefits were received. The award of credit for previous training may 
allow the College to shorten the training program proportionately. The veteran should meet 
with the campus Veteran Affairs Coordinator at the earliest possible date. The veteran is 
responsible for attending classes and making reasonable progress toward an educational objective. 



APPLICATION PROCEDURES FOR 
FINANCIAL AID 

Application forms are available in the Financial Aid Office at all Ivy Tech campuses. Because 
application procedures, deadlines, eligibility regulations and refund policies vary with different 
types of student aid programs, interested students are encouraged to contact the Financial Aid 
Office at their earliest opportunity Students should allow six to eight weeks for processing 
most financial aid applications. Students are encouraged to apply for assistance at any time. In 
general the fall semester marks the beginning of the financial aid award year. 

Financial Aid Appeals 

The following steps are recommended to students who feel they have received unfair treatment 
in the financial aid process: 

1 . Schedule a personal conference with the Director of Financial Aid to discuss and resolve 
the issue. 

2. If Step 1 is unsatisfactory, schedule a consultation with the Dean of Student Affairs. 

3. If Step 2 is unsatisfactory, schedule a conference with the Student Status Committee. This 
committee will make a recommendation to the Chief Administrative Officer to resolve the 
issue. 



STUDENT RECORDS 



Ivy Tech maintains an educational record for each student who is or has been enrolled at Ivy 
Tech. In accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, 
the following student rights are covered by the act and afforded to all students at Ivy Tech: 

1 . The right to inspect and review information contained in the students educational records. 

2. The nght to challenge the contents of the student's educational records. 

3. The right to a hearing if the outcome of the challenge is unsatisfactory. 

4. The right to submit an explanatory statement for inclusion in the educational record if the 
outcome of the hearing is unsatisfactory. 

5. The right to prevent disclosure, with certain exceptions, of personally identifiable 
information. 

6. The right to secure a copy of the institutional policy. 

7. The right to file complaints with the Department of Education concerning alleged failures 
by Ivy Tech to comply with the provisions of the act. The name and address of the office 
that administers FERPA is 

Family Policy Compliance Office 
U.S. Department of Education 
400 Maryland Avenue, SW 
Washington, DC 20202-4605 

Each of these rights, with any limitations or exceptions, is explained in the Student Affairs 
Policy and Procedures Manual, a copy of which may be obtained in the Office of Student Affairs 
or the library. 

At the Colleges discretion directory information may be provided in accordance with the 
provisions of the act without the written consent of the student unless the student requests in 
writing that such information not be disclosed (see below). The items listed below are designated 
as directory information and may be released for any purpose at the discretion of Ivy Tech 
unless a request for non-disclosure is on file. 

1. Name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance. 

2. Previous institution(s) attended, major field of study, awards, honors, degree conferred. 

3. Past and present participation in officially recognized activities, date and place of birth. 

Students may request the withholding of directory information by notifying the Registrars 
Office in writing, specifying the categories to be withheld, within ten (10) calendar days from 
the first scheduled day of the term. Ivy Tech will honor the request for one term only. Therefore 
the student must file the request on a term basis. The student should carefully consider the 
consequences of any decision to withhold any category of directory information. Regardless of 
the effect upon the student Ivy Tech assumes no liability for honoring a students request that 
such information be withheld. Failure on the part of a student to request the withholding of 
specific categories of directory information indicates the students approval of disclosure. 

In addition, student records are held in security by the College. Transcripts on file with the 
College from high schools and other institutions of higher education cannot be released by Ivy 
Tech. A student needing a transcript from high school or another college should request it 
directly from that institution. The Registrar's Office will assist students wishing to see and 
review their academic records and student files. Any questions concerning the students rights 
and responsibilities under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act should be referred to 
the Office of the Registrar. 



Students enrolled in Vincennes academic programs as part of the Community College of Indiana 
will have records on file at Vincennes University as well. Please contact the Vincennes University 
Registrar at 812-888-4220 for further information. 

Dependency Provision 

Ivy Tech reserves the right, as allowed under the Federal Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 
1974, to disclose educational records or components thereof without written consent to parents 
of dependent students as defined according to the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, Section 154 
(as amended). A certified copy of the parent's most recent federal income tax form establishing 
the student's dependency status shall be required before any educational records or components 
thereof will be released to the parent of any student. 



ACADEMIC GRADING 



Grades 



The academic grading system has both grades and status codes, both of which are explained in 
greater detail later in this section. Grades reflect the quality of performance and level of 
competency achieved by students who complete a course. Formal grades are assigned at the 
end of each enrollment period. Instructors determine and assign grades and status based on 
objective appraisal and evaluation of the student's performance. Semester grade reports are 
sent to each student. The semester grade report is not sent to students who still owe fees. 

In all courses the quality of the students work determines the grade earned. For some courses 
quantity of work, speed of work, or both also are considered in determining the grade. Class 
participation also may be considered by instructors in awarding grades. In certain instances a 
status code appears on the student's record in place of a grade. Status represents a condition to 
which no letter grade can be assigned. 



The quality of student performance or competency level, as determined by the instructor at the 
completion of a course, is indicated by a letter grade of A, B, C, D or F Ivy Tech does not use 
pluses and minuses as a part of its grading system. Each designation has a numerical value per 
credit hour, referred to as "quality points." The meaning and quality point value per credit 
hour of each letter grade are shown in the table below: 



Status 




Quality 
Points Per 
Credit Hour 


A 


Excellent 


4 


B 


Good 


3 


C 


Average 


2 


D 


Below Average 


1 


F 


Failure 






Status Codes 



Status codes describe the state or condition of a course on the students record for which a 
grade has not been awarded. Status code indications carry no quality points. The types of 
status codes and the symbols used to indicate them are shown below. 

Status 

I Incomplete 

AU . . . . Audit 

S Satisfactory 

U Unsatisfactory 

V Verified Competency 

NW . . . No-Show Withdrawal 

W Withdrawal 

These status codes are used for the following reasons: 

I — Incomplete 

"I" designations are received by students who have actively pursued a course and are doing 
passing work at the end of the course but who have not completed the final examination and/ 
or other specific course assignments. 

To remove an "I" designation, a student must meet with the instructor and make arrangements 
to complete course requirements in a specified period not to exceed 30 days beyond the start of 
the following term. The instructor must submit the grade within 31 calendar days of the 
beginning of the following term in which the student received the "I" designation. 

AU— Audit 

"AU" status indicates enrollment in a course for which no grade or credit is awarded. The fees 
for audited courses are the same as those for courses taken for credit. Audit status must be 
declared no later than the end of the first week of classes with approval of the instructor or 
program chairperson. 

NW — No-Show Withdrawal 

Instructors authorize the registrar to withdraw a student from any course for which the student 
did not report for the first two weeks of the semester and failed to notify the instructor of intent 
to continue. This administrative action is reflected on the official class list. A petition for a 
refund with documentation for extenuating circumstances can be filed with the Business Office. 
Students can petition to be reinstated by receiving the approval of the instructor and completing 
the drop/add process. 

W — Withdrawal 

A "W" status code will be used for student and academic withdrawals. Student withdrawal (W) 
is a terminal status referring to voluntary student withdrawal beginning at the start of the third 
week of the course up to the end of the week marking the completion of 75 percent of the 
course. To be considered officially withdrawn from a course the student must file a withdrawal 
form with the Office of the Registrar. After 75 percent of the term has elapsed a student may 
withdraw (with the same result as indicated above) only if documented extenuating circumstances 
are submitted to and approved by the Chief Academic Officer or his/her designee. 



S — Satisfactory 

The "S" indicates satisfactory completion of course work in situations where either a status of 
satisfactory or unsatisfactory (pass/fail) has been arranged by prior agreement. Requests for 
this type of grading must be declared at time of registration. 

U — Unsatisfactory 

The "U" indicates unsatisfactory completion of course work in situations where either a status 
of satisfactory or unsatisfactory (pass/fail) has been arranged by prior agreement. Requests for 
this type of grading must be declared at time of registration. The "U" differs from an "F" in that 
quality points are not computed. 

V — Verified Competency 

The "V" indicates satisfactory completion of course work in situations such as test-out, credit 
for experience or training, College Level Examination Program (CLEP), etc. Credit gained 
through this method may be used to satisfy degree requirements. This status is approved by 
the Chief Academic Officer upon recommendation of a faculty advisor following completion of 
necessary verification and documentation of competency. 

Credit Hours 

Credit is described in semester hours (the number of credits taken per semester). The number 
of credits is determined by the demands of the course, course work and by the number of 
contact hours - the hours actually spent in the classroom or laboratory. 

Credit Hours/Load 

A credit hour represents one hour of lecture, two hours of laboratory or three hours of clinical 
instruction per week for the semester. A three-credit-hour lecture course, for example, meets 
48 hours during the semester (3 hours/week x 16 weeks). An average full-time semester class 
load in most Ivy Tech programs consists of 12-15 credit hours. A class load of more than 17 
credit hours requires approval of the Chief Academic Officer or a designee. 



Enrollment Status 



Enrollment status is determined by registered total semester credits: 

Full-time student 12 or more credits per semester 

3/4 time 9-11 credits per semester 

1/2 time 6-8 credits per semester 

Less than 1/2 time 1-5 credits per semester 

A first-year student, by definition, is one who has completed 30 or fewer semester credit hours. 
A second-year student is one who has completed 3 1 or more semester credit hours. 



Quality Points 



Quality points are numerical values indicating the quality of student performance in credit 
courses: A=4; B=3; C=2; D=l; F=0. The quality points earned for a course equal the quality 
point value times the number of credits. A student who earns an "A" in a four-credit course 
earns 16 quality points: the quality point value (4) x the number of credits (4) = the total 
quality pomts (16). 



Grade Point Averages 



The grade point average (GPA) is a numerical indication of the student's performance in all 
courses in which quality points can be earned. The GPA is calculated by dividing the number 
of quality points earned by the number of credits earned. The term and cumulative GPA, 
calculated to three decimal places, will appear on each grade report. 

Under extenuating circumstances a student may petition the Chief Academic Officer to exclude 
hours of coursework from the cumulative GPA calculation. Courses excluded from the cumulative 
GPA calculation as a result of a petition will not be counted as earned and cannot be used to 
satisfy program requirements for degree-declared students. Contact the Office of Student Affairs 
for additional information. 



Improving a Grade 



Dean's List 



Students, with the approval of faculty advisors, may attempt to improve D or F grades by 
repeating courses (allowable once in most programs). Financial aid recipients, however, should 
review their situations carefully since payment for repeated courses can be disallowed. Permanent 
student records contain complete files on all activity. The students grade point average will 
reflect the highest grade earned. 



The Dean's List, prepared and published each term, gives recognition to degree-seeking students 
who achieve a minimum 3.50 grade point average in non-basic skills courses with no Ds or Fs 
while earning six or more Ivy Tech credits during the semester and have earned at least a total 
of 12 credits during their course of study. 



Grade Reports 



Attendance 



Final grades are mailed to the address on the registration form. Grade reports are not sent if 
there are outstanding financial obligations to the College. 



Regular attendance is expected at scheduled class meetings or other activities assigned as part 
of a course of instruction. Attendance records are kept by instructors. When personal 
circumstances make it impossible to attend scheduled classes and activities the College expects 
students to confer with instructors in advance. Instructors can offer students the option of 
making up the material missed. 

Absences may be considered by instructors in awarding grades and considering involuntary 
withdrawal. Students who must interrupt their Ivy Tech education to fulfill Reserve and National 
Guard annual tour requirements should present official military orders to their instructors prior 
to departure for duty. Students are not excused from completion of the course work and should 
make arrangements with their instructors to complete all work. 



STANDARDS OF PROGRESS 



Students who have declared a certificate or degree objective and who have 15 or more cumulative 
credit hours attempted must maintain a 2.00 minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) 
to remain in satisfactory academic standing. Students receiving financial aid must demonstrate 
satisfactory progress toward completion of a program within a specified time frame based on 
their enrollment status. Students also must successfully complete the minimum number of 
credit hours required for that status each semester. All students are expected to maintain a 
cumulative 2.00 GPA to be eligible for graduation. Questions about standards of progress and 
academic standing should be addressed to the Office of Student Affairs. 



Special Problems 



The Office of Student Affairs is available to help with special problems, exceptional circumstances, 
and filing grievances (see Student Grievances). Special problems, exceptional circumstances, 
and grievances are ultimately the responsibility of the Chief Administrative Officer of the region, 
designated staff and committees. 



ASSESSMENT 



It is the mission of Ivy Tech State College to enable individuals to develop to their fullest 
potential and to support the economic development of Indiana. To this end an assessment 
program is conducted college -wide to measure student progress toward educational goals, to 
determine academic progress, to improve teaching and learning and to evaluate institutional 
effectiveness. Student assessment is part of the College's educational program. What Ivy Tech 
discovers through the assessment program is used in making decisions about everything the 
College does from curriculum planning to student activities to support services. From the time 
students apply to the College until the time they leave, students are expected to participate in 
a series of tests, surveys, and evaluative activities intended to: 

• Assess students' academic history and academic skills for accurate advisement and course 
placement at entry; 

• Obtain information on students' satisfaction with College courses, programs and services 
through such instruments as the ACT Student Opinion Survey; 

• Measure gains and competencies students have made academically while at the College 
through a variety of general education measures focused primarily on reading, writing, 
and critical thinking; and 

• Demonstrate mastery of technical skills through program outcome measures such as 
portfolio, licensure exams and other standardized exams. 

These tests, surveys and evaluative activities are used to help students achieve their individual 
goals and to improve college services and programs for all students. Students' earnest and 
sincere participation in surveys, tests, learning tasks, exit exams and portfolio development 
provides the College with accurate information to plan increasingly effective programs and 
services. In this effort students become partners in the assessment and learning process. 



GRADUATION 



The Associate of Science degree, the Associate of Applied Science degree or the Technical 
Certificate is awarded by the College to students who meet graduation requirements. Graduation 
ceremonies are held once a year. Graduating students may be charged a fee to cover the cost of 
the ceremonial cap and gown. 



A student is considered eligible for graduation when requirements for graduation have been 
fulfilled. Each student entering the final semester prior to graduation must complete an 
application for graduation. The application will be certified by the students program advisor 
and forwarded to the Registrar's Office where the appropriate diploma will be prepared. 

Graduating students will participate in outcomes assessments. To graduate with an Associate 
of Science degree, an Associate of Applied Science degree or a Technical Certificate, the student 
must: 

1. Attain a minimum grade point average of 2.00 in the required technical and general 
education courses; 

2. Earn 15 credits as a regular student of Ivy Tech rather than by test-out or other means of 
advanced placement; 

3. Successfully complete the required number of credits; 

4. Satisfy all financial obligations due the College; and 

5. Satisfy program accreditation standards that may have additional requirements. 



DEGREE 



TRANSFERRING TO ANOTHER 
INSTITUTION 

Ivy Tech has articulation agreements under which students may transfer individual courses or 
entire programs of study to a number of public and private institutions. A student, depending 
on his or her goals, may choose to transfer to another college or university and pursue a bachelors 
degree after completion of a series of courses or completion of a two-year degree program at Ivy 
Tech. Some of these agreements are collegewide and some pertain to specific campuses of Ivy 
Tech. 

The selection of an institution for transfer should be an individual decision based upon the 
extent to which credits will transfer, compatibility of degree programs, location, availability of 
programming, philosophy, and cost of attending the transfer school. Opportunities are available 
to Ivy Tech students to transfer and complete a baccalaureate program as a resident or commuting 
student. In addition opportunities are available to pursue a bachelor's degree using distance 
technologies which will allow a student to complete a degree program within the home 
community, even at an Ivy Tech campus. 

Through the DegreeLink partnership between Ivy Tech and Indiana State University (ISU), 
students may complete an articulated Associate of Science degree program and transfer to ISU 
as a junior year student. Students completing associate of science degrees in the linked programs 
may pursue bachelors degrees in Electronics Technology, Business Administration, Industrial 
Automotive Technology, Mechanical Technology, Community Health, Manufacturing Technology 
and Computer Integrated Manufacturing Technology. ISU also provides more general 
opportunities for graduates of a variety of programs for earning a Bachelor's degree in Industrial 
Supervision, General Industrial Technology, and Human Resources Development. Students 
may complete these bachelors programs on ISU's Terre Haute campus, and for certain programs 
may be able to complete the Bachelor of Science through coursework brought to Ivy Tech 
campuses using distance technologies. For students interested in exploring these options the 
Associate of Science curriculum for achieving maximum transferability is detailed in the related 
program descriptions in this catalog. Under the Bridge to ISU program, students who have not 
been accepted to the university as freshmen are referred to the local Ivy Tech where they can 
begin their education and later continue at ISU. 



Link 



CONNECTING FOR EDUCATIONAL SUCCESS 




Ball State 
University. 



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Students may pursue an articulated Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (detailed in 
the Business Administration program section), Bachelor of Science in Social Work (detailed in 
the Human Services program section), or Bachelor of Science in Family and Consumer Science 
(detailed in the Child Development program section) at Ball State University. Opportunities to 
transfer technology degree programs are also available. The Connect program provides an 
option for students who have not been accepted to Ball State as freshmen, under which they 
can enroll at Ivy Tech. Students successfully completing the Connect program are guaranteed 
admission to Ball State. 

Students may pursue an articulated Bachelor of Science in Business Administration (detailed in 
the Business Administration program section) or Bachelor of Science in Radiologic Technology 
at the University of Southern Indiana. Opportunities to transfer into the Bachelor of Science in 
Health Services are also available to graduates of the Surgical Technology, Radiologic Technology 
and Medical Assistant programs. The Health Services baccalaureate program may be completed 
via distance technology. 

Ivy Tech is also a member of the ABELINC project, a collaborative partnership involving selected 
two-year colleges across the country and Governors State University (GSU), a state university 
in Illinois. The ABELINC project, through its Board of Governors Bachelor of Arts (B. A.) degree 
program, serves adults who are mobile, work full-time, live in areas under-served by four-year 
institutions, and/or find it difficult to complete their baccalaureate programs through traditional 
campus-based programs. Students may take up to 80 credit hours at Ivy Tech that will apply 
toward the 120 credit hours required for the B.A. Students may complete the entire Bachelor 
of Arts program in their home community. 

Please consult your local Ivy Tech campus about the availability of other transfer courses and 
programs. 



STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES 

Basic Skills Advancement Program Services 

To ensure that every student has the opportunity to be successful Ivy Tech offers Basic Skills 
Advancement programs. These developmental programs are designed for students enrolled in 
regular programs or courses at the College who are encountering academic difficulty or who 
have been identified as having encountered academic difficulty in the past. Services provided 
through the Basic Skills Advancement program include diagnostic testing and assessment, course 
placement services and instruction. 

The need for these services may be identified at the time of admission. However, a student may 
use any or all services upon encountering academic difficulty during a course of study. 
Professional basic skills advancement instructors and laboratory technicians provide 
developmental instruction in the areas of math, communications, sciences, writing and study 
skills. Some campuses offer GED preparation and English as a second language (ESL). Delivery 
of instruction may be in the form of a basic skills advancement course in a classroom setting, 
one-on-one tutorial assistance, computer-based instruction or a self-paced study in the Basic 
Skills Center. For further information about the Colleges Basic Skills Advancement programs 
contact the Office of Student Affairs or the Basic Skills Center. 

Academic Advising 



Each campus provides advising to all interested students. Students may obtain individual 
advising and/or assessment to assist them in identifying their abilities or occupational interests. 
Counseling and assessments also are helpful in developing education and career plans. Students 
are encouraged to seek assistance in selecting an occupation and the necessary training from 
the Office of Career and Employment Services. 



In addition to the advising program offered by the Office of Student Affairs the College uses a 
faculty advisor system. On admission each degree student is assigned a faculty advisor whose 
purpose is to: 

1 . Assist the student in course selection and program planning. 

2 . Guide the student in meeting the requirements for graduation as prescribed by the College. 

3. Ensure that appropriate technical and general education courses are included in the chosen 
course of study. 



Career and Employment Services 



Career and Employment Services provides many types of services to all students, some of 
which are career exploration, resume writing preparation, career fair information and assistance 
in finding part-time work while in school. Candidates for graduation who desire job placement 
assistance may contact the Career and Employment Services Office, which will: 

1. Advise candidates of the Colleges career and employment services. 

2. Provide occupational information, including employment trends, and local and state 
occupational outlook data. 

3. Assist the registered candidate in preparing a packet of credentials for use in finding a job. 
The packet may include: 

a. A resume of the candidate's education and employment experience, and 

b. Personal letters of recommendation verifying the students employability 

4. Create folders containing original copies of the candidates credentials for all registered 
candidates. 

5 . Prepare copies of credentials released by the candidates for referral to prospective employers. 
Alumni may update their credentials whenever they wish to use the Career and Employment 
Services Office. 

Students or alumni registered with the Career and Employment Services Office will be informed 
of employment opportunities known to the Career and Employment Services Office. Employers 
who register with the Career and Employment Services Office are given the names of all qualified 
candidates without regard to gender, race, age, national origin or disability. Registered students 
or alumni are eligible for interviews with appropriate prospective employers. See the Office of 
Career and Employment Services for additional information. 



College Bookstore 



Library 



Each campus maintains a bookstore where students may buy textbooks and supplies. College 
sweaters, jackets, souvenirs and other items also are available for purchase. 



Libraries at each campus provide access to materials, information and services that support 
students' educational needs. In addition libraries have career exploration materials, inter-library 
loan services, general and technical periodicals, recreational reading, and audio-visual materials 
and equipment. 

In addition to print materials the College provides a variety of online databases, many of which 
are full-text, that are available to students at all campuses. 



Disability Support Services 



Reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities will be made to ensure access to 
academic programs, services, and employment in accordance with section 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. College programs 
and facilities are designed to be accessible to students with disabilities. Each campus has 
designated parking and special restroom facilities for persons with disabilities. Disability Suppon 
Services also will aid students with disabilities with career planning, financial aid and placement. 
The College staff works with the Department of Vocational Rehabilitation and other service 
agencies to assist students with disabilities through available local community resources. 

It is the students responsibility to contact the campus Disability Services representative to 
request accommodations; any information shared will be kept confidential unless the student 
authorizes release and exchange of specified information. Requests for accommodations and 
documentation of disability must be received one month prior to enrollment for the next 
academic term. Additional time may by required for some requests. Every effort will be made 
to provide reasonable accommodations in a timely manner. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Organizations and Activities 

The College recognizes the educational, recreational and social values of student organizations 
and extracurricular activities. Students are encouraged to participate in any or all phases of the 
student activities' program as long as participation does not interfere with studies. 

All student organizations operate under the policies and guidelines set for the College by the 
State Board of Trustees. Approval by the Student Government and the administration is required 
of all student organizations seeking to make use of College facilities. All approved organizations 
must be open for membership to all eligible candidates and must make available to the Student 
Government records of officers, membership and financial transactions. 

Student Government 

Students in each region are provided opportunities to participate in student organizations through 
the Student Government. Student Government is the representative governing body of the 
students. Student Government representatives are elected or selected according to the by-laws 
of each regional Student Government constitution and serve as stated in those bylaws. The 
student body membership may consist of representatives of each program area and an advisor 
as established in the by-laws. 

Student Government was established by students to encourage participation in student 
government and to promote College spirit and recognition. Student Government exercises the 
authority, unless otherwise delegated, to legislate on student matters subject to the approval of 
appropriate College administrative offices. 

The constitutions of all student organizations must be approved by a quorum of the Student 
Government, consisting of a simple majority of the total membership and one staff advisor or 
as otherwise stated in the by-laws. 

The functions of Student Government include: 

1 . Communication of bona fide concerns of the student body to appropriate College officials 
with suggestions for improvement. 

2 . Approval of student organizations beneficial to student life and worthy of being part of the 
College. 



3 . Assurance that copies of the constitution, by-laws and statement of purpose and objectives 
of each recognized student organization are on file in the Office of Student Affairs. 

4. Referral of student grievances to the appropriate College officials. 

5. Planning and conducting appropriate extracurricular student activities. 

6. Submission of student activity budgets for review and approval by regional officials. 

Phi Theta Kappa 

Phi Theta Kappa is a national honor fraternity for two-year colleges. Its purpose is to recognize 
and promote academic excellence. This is done by providing leadership development 
opportunities for service in chapter activities on campus and regional Phi Theta Kappa activities. 
Membership in Phi Theta Kappa is by invitation only and is based on a minimum grade point 
average as well as completion of a specified number of semester hours. Contact the Office of 
Student Affairs for further information. 

Intramural Sports 

College sports activities consist of intramural sports sponsored by Student Government. Leagues- 
can be formed when student interest justifies their organization. All sports activities of the 
College must be approved and sponsored by Student Government and the administration. 



Clubs 



Students wishing to organize hobby, social or special interest clubs should submit proposals to 
Student Government, which will determine whether sufficient interest exists. Student 
Government is authorized to charter the club upon approval by the administration. Each club 
must have officers and a staff advisor. 



Social Activities 



All group activities of the College must be approved and sponsored by Student Government 
and the administration. Classes, clubs and other groups should plan and conduct social activities 
pertaining specifically to their members. Student Government organizes and conducts social 
activities and gatherings in which all students and their guests may participate. 

Professional and Trade Organizations 

Student chapters of various professional and trade organizations are formed in the same manner 
as other student organizations and are subject to the same requirements. 

Ivy Tech State College Alumni Association 

Many of the regions have established chapters of the Ivy Tech Alumni Association. Membership 
in the association is open to current and former students. Contact the Office of Student Affairs 
for further information. 



HOUSING 



Ivy Tech is a commuter college and does not operate residence halls. However, the Office of 
Student Affairs may be able to respond to questions concerning housing in the community. Ivy 
Tech accepts no responsibility for locating, approving or supervising local student housing. 



STUDENT PARKING 



As part of registration some campuses require students to register their motor vehicles and 
obtain a parking sticker. A special permit is required to park in spaces for persons with 
disabilities. Stickers are to be displayed in the vehicle while parked on campus, and students 
may park only in designated student parking areas. Vehicles improperly parked in areas reserved 
for the disabled, visitors or others may be towed at the expense of their owners. 



STUDENT ACCIDENT INSURANCE 

For students registered in credit courses, the College provides accident insurance in a designated 
amount for injuries sustained while participating in College-sponsored activities. The activity 
must take place on College premises or on any premises designated by the College. Students 
are also covered while traveling to and from College-sponsored activities as a member of a 
group under College supervision. It is the students responsibility to report injuries promptly 
to the instructor or to the Oftice of Student Affairs. The insurance is for a specified minimum 
amount of coverage. It is not intended to replace insurance coverage students may already 
have. Students should review their own coverage. The master insurance policy issued to Ivy 
Tech is on file at the central administrative office. The description of the hazards insured, 
benefits and exclusions is controlled by the master policy. Students with questions may contact 
the regional Office of Student Affairs. 



STUDENT HEALTH INSURANCE 

The College has made arrangements for Ivy Tech students to obtain health insurance. Insurance 
coverage is purchased directly from the insurance company by the student. Application forms 
and brochures explaining coverage and rates are available through the Office of Student Affairs 
during registration periods. Coverages and rates are subject to change. 



ACCIDENTS AND ILLNESSES 

The College does not provide a health services center. The College supports the Drug Free 
Schools and Communities Act of 1989. Many community agencies are available to assist students 
seeking counseling or treatment. Please contact the Office of Student Affairs for a listing of 
community resources. The College conducts a biennial review of the effectivenss of its drug 
and alchohol abuse prevention programs. This review is available in the Office of Student 
Affairs. 

If a student has an accident on College property the student should report the accident to 
campus security or the Office of Student Affairs. If a student suffers an accident or illness while 
attending classes the student should notify the instructor. The College will take the necessary 
steps to intervene in a medical emergency while the student is on campus. If paramedic services 
or hospitalization is required the student is financially responsible. 

If a student is suffering from an illness that makes it impossible to attend classes the student 
should contact his/her instructors. 



REGISTRATION FOR ELECTIONS 

Students are strongly encouraged to exercise their right to vote. In order to vote in national, 
state or local elections one must be a registered voter at the persons current address. Students 
who need a voter registration form due to either not having previously registered or having 
moved can pick up a voter registration form at the Office of Student Affairs. 



EMERGENCY CLOSING OF CAMPUSES 

Severe weather conditions or other emergencies occasionally make it necessary to close a campus. 
Each campus has designated local radio stations to announce information on closings. 



STUDENT RIGHTS AND 
RESPONSIBILITIES 

Student Conduct 

The College is committed to academic integrity in all its practices. The faculty value intellectual 
integrity and a high standard of academic conduct. Activities that violate academic integrity 
undermine the quality and diminish the value of educational achievement. 

The reputation of the College and the community depends in large part upon the behavior of 
its students. Students enrolled at the College are expected to conduct themselves in a mature, 
dignified and honorable manner. Students are entitled to a learning atmosphere free from 
discrimination, harassment, sexual harassment and intimidation. This applies to the conduct 
between faculty and staff to students, student to student, and students to faculty and staff. 

Students are subject to College jurisdiction while enrolled at the College. The College reserves 
the right to take disciplinary action against any student whose conduct, in the opinion of 
College representatives, is not in the best interests of the student, other students, or the College. 
Community College of Indiana students who are disciplined should expect to find their sanctions 
enforced at other Ivy Tech and Vincennes campuses. 

All students are expected to abide by the following College rules of conduct. 

"Student" as used refers to a student, a group of students, a prospective student or a group of 
prospective students. 



College Rules 



Assembly: College policy states that assembly in a manner that obstructs the free movement 
of others about the campus, inhibits the free and normal use of the College buildings and 
facilities, or prevents or obstructs the normal operation of the College is not permitted. 
Obstruction of the free flow of pedestrian or vehicular traffic on College premises or at 
College -sponsored or supervised activities is included in the definition of obstruction. 

Cheating: Cheating on papers, tests or other academic works is a violation of College rules. 
No student shall engage in behavior that, in the judgment of the instructor of the class, 
may be construed as cheating. This may include, but is not limited to, plagiarism or other 
forms of academic dishonesty such as the acquisition without permission of tests or other 
academic materials and/or distribution of these materials and other academic work. This 
includes students who aid and abet as well as those who attempt such behavior. 



3. Children on Campus: Due to insurance and security purposes, children are not allowed to 
be on Ivy Tech property without direct supervision by parent or guardian, with the exception 
of childcare centers. Children are not allowed in classrooms unless through the expressed 
consent of the instructor. 

4. Commitment of College Funding: Committing College funding, including student clubs 
or organizations, without written approval and paperwork will result in the student being 
responsible for the money owed, the student being removed from the club or organization, 
and disciplinary action being evoked. No student shall enter into a contract with an outside 
agency using the name of the College. Contracts entered into in violation of this rule shall 
be the personal responsibility of the student. 

5 . Compliance and Identification: Students who fail to comply with direction of College officials 
or law enforcement officers in the performance of their duties and/or fail to identify 
themselves to these persons when requested to do so are subject to disciplinary sanctions. 

6 . Discrimination Activities: Any student involved in discrimination activities towards students 
or staff will face disciplinary action. 

7. Disruptive Behavior: Behaviors or actions that disrupt the Colleges processes (academic 
and/or non-academic) are in violation of College rules. No student shall behave in a manner 
that is unacceptable in a learning environment or that endangers or infringes on the rights 
and/or safety of himself or herself or other students, visitors, staff, patients in a clinical 
situation, and/or children in childcare centers at Ivy Tech. If misconduct warrants an 
immediate suspension from the institutional setting for the remainder of the instructional 
period the instructor may do so without a prior hearing. If the student does not voluntarily 
leave the institutional setting campus official(s) and/or campus security officers may remove 
the student from that setting upon oral request by the instructor. 

8. Electronic Equipment or Programs: Use of electronic equipment or programs in a manner 
that is disruptive to other students, staff, or College processes is prohibited. This includes 
electronic equipment being played loudly. Students introducing computer viruses will be 
subject to disciplinary action, including dismissal. 

9. Financial Responsibility: Students are expected to pay all fees, fines, or loans in a timely 
manner. Official transcripts and copies of records will not be given to the student and 
degrees will not be awarded until debts to the College are paid. Students will be allowed to 
inspect and view transcripts and records. Students will not be allowed to register in an 
"owe fees" status. 

10. Fundraising or Solicitation: College policy requires that individuals or organizations seeking 
the use of campus facilities or scheduling activities to solicit funds must first obtain written 
approval from the appropriate College official. College rules and regulations govern 
fundraising activities, the money collected, and the use of the money collected by the 
fundraising activities. Misrepresentation or misuse will result in the student being responsible 
for the money owed to an institution or individual, in the student being removed from the 
club or organization, and the student facing disciplinary action. The student is also 
accountable to state and federal laws and regulations. 

1 1 . Furnishing False Information With Intent to Deceive: Providing false information is against 
College rules and state laws. 

12. Harassment/Sexual Harassment/Stalking and/or Intimidation: This is defined as conduct 
causing alarm or creating a risk by threatening to commit crimes against persons or their 
property or making unwelcome sexual advances or requests for sexual favors. This also 
covers harassment or intimidation of persons involved in a disciplinary hearing and of 
persons in authority who are in the process of discharging their responsibilities. Harassment, 
stalking, and/or intimidation are not permitted. Perpetrators are also subject to Indiana 
state law. Please see the policy regarding harassment at the end of this section. 



1 3 . Hazing: Hazing, an initiation process usually into a club or organization which often involves 
humiliating or otherwise harmful tasks, performances, or behaviors is not permitted. 

14. Inappropriate Use of College Computer Resources: Theft or other abuse of computer time 
is against College rules, which include but are not limited to: 

a) unauthorized entry into a file, to use, read, or change the contents or for any 
other purpose. 

b) unauthorized transfer of a file, unauthorized use of another user's identification 
and password or use of computing facilities to interfere with the work of 
another student, faculty member or college official. 

c) use of computing facilities to send, receive, or view obscene or abusive 
messages. 

d) use of computing facilities to interfere with normal operation of the College 
computing system. 

e) use of computing facilities for students' personal benefit. 

use of College owned computer resources to prepare or print work for commercial 
purposes. 

g) Inappropriate use of printers: 

1. Printers are intended for class-related activities. Printing Internet web pages or 
other information not directly related to an authorized use is prohibited. 

2. Excessive printing is prohibited. Students must follow lab guidelines limiting 
the number of copies or pages that may be printed. 

3. Using non-approved paper in a college-owned printer is prohibited. 

15. Motor Vehicles: Students are expected to comply with parking regulations. Parking spaces 
for persons with disabilities and visitors' areas are reserved for those purposes, and vehicles 
improperly parked in those areas may be ticketed or towed at the owner's expense. 

16. Safety: No student shall engage in behavior that violates the safety rules of any institutional 
setting or other College premises, and/or College sponsored events whether such procedures 
are written or oral rules or directions. This shall include, but not be limited to, the wearing of 
any required personal protective equipment and the prescribed methods and procedures for 
handling and disposing of certain materials that may be hazardous, unstable, infectious, etc. 

1 7. Signs or Surveys: Students may erect signs, conduct surveys, or display signs or posters on 
designated bulletin boards. 

18. Use of College Name: The College name and logo are registered trademarks. The use of the 
College name or logo must be authorized by the officials in charge of College trademarks. 
Use without authorization is against College rules. 

19. Use of College Facilities: Students are permitted on campus during normal published Ivy 
Tech State College hours and at other times established in the College calendar. Students 
wishing to utilize College facilities at other times must request permission from the 
appropriate College official. Unauthorized possession, duplication, or use of keys or 
electronic locking devices to any College premise, or unauthorized entry to or use of College 
premises is against College rules. 

20. Compliance with Indiana State Laws: Violation of these laws is also against College rules 
and violators may also be prosecuted according to Indiana law. 

• Alcoholic beverages: Consuming, being under the influence of or possessing 
intoxicating beverages on College property is not permitted. 



• Arms/deadly weapons/explosives/chemicals: Possession of firearms (except those 
possessed by police or campus security officers) and other weapons, dangerous 
chemicals, or any explosive or explosive device is prohibited on College property 
or at any College sponsored activity held elsewhere. No student shall use or threaten 
to use firearms, other weapons, dangerous chemicals, or any explosive or explosive 
device on College property or at any College -sponsored activity held elsewhere. A 
harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm, explosive, or weapon that is 
used by a person to cause fear in or assault of another person is included within 
the meaning of a firearm, explosive or weapon. 

• Assault and battery, abusive actions, physical and/or verbal altercations and /or 
threatening language: Assault and battery, abusive actions, physical and/or verbal 
altercations, and/or threatening language are prohibited under College rules. 
Perpetrators are also subject to Indiana State law. No student shall threaten or 
commit a physical or sexual attack on faculty, staff or another student. No student 
shall force or threaten to force another student, faculty or staff member to have 
sexual contact against that person's will. Any student charged with an assault on 
Ivy Tech State College property or at any College sponsored activity is subject to 
prosecution and will be disciplined under the campus code of student conduct. 

• Counterfeiting and altering: Copying or altering in any manner any record, 
document, or identification form used or maintained by the College is not permitted. 

• Dumping and littering: No student shall deposit, dump, litter or otherwise dispose 
of any refuse on college property except in duly designated refuse depositories. 

• Gambling: Gambling is not allowed except where permitted by state law or within 
a sanctioned program or class. 

• Illegal use of drugs: Being under the influence of, use of, possession of, or 
distributing illegal drugs is not permitted. 

• Smoking: All Ivy Tech State College buildings are classified as "non-smoking" 
facilities. Smoking is permitted only in designated areas. 

• Theft of property: Theft of personal property, College property, or property located 
on College property is a violation of College rules. 

• Vandalism: The destruction or mutilation of Ivy Tech State College books, 
magazines, equipment, resources or buildings is a violation of College rules. 

Repeated Offenses of a Less Serious Nature 

Repeated offenses of a less serious nature are considered disruptive and will be handled under 
the College's disciplinary process. 



POLICY AND COMPLAINT PROCEDURE 
AGAINST HARASSMENT 

The College will not tolerate harassment based on sex (with or without sexual conduct), race, 
color, religion, national origin, age, disability, and/or opposition to prohibited discrimination 
or participation in this or any other complaint procedure. This prohibition covers harassment 
against any student at an Ivy Tech State College campus by anyone, including other students, 
employees or non-employees during any College activity or program. The policy prohibiting 
harassment includes adverse treatment of students because they report harassment or provide 
information related to such complaints. 



Sexual harassment is simply one form of harassment covered by this policy Sexual harassment 
encompasses unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical 
conduct of a sexual nature where: 

Submission to the conduct is an explicit or implicit term of student status (which includes 
academic and non-academic decisions). 

Submission or rejection of the conduct is the basis for any decision affecting that individual's student 
status; or such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's 
academic performance or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive academic environment. 

Sexual harassment would include, but not be limited to, actions such as: (1) sex-oriented oral 
or written "kidding" or abuse, (2) photographs, drawings or graffiti of a sexual nature, (3) 
subtle pressure for sexual activity, (4) physical conduct such as patting, pinching, or constant 
brushing against another's body, and (5) explicit demands for sexual favors, whether or not 
accompanied by implied or overt promises of preferential treatment or threats concerning an 
individual's student status. 



Reporting and Complaint Procedure 



Students are encouraged to report harassment before it becomes severe or pervasive. A student 
who thinks that he or she has been a victim of harassment and who desires to file a complaint 
to that effect should report a complaint as follows: 

If the complaint is regarding harassment by another student it may be filed with or. reported to 
the Dean of Student Affairs or an academic chairperson with the expectation that the harassing 
behavior will be a violation of the College's Code of Student Conduct, either on its own terms 
or as a violation of another College policy. 

If the complaint is regarding harassment by a College employee or non-employee it may be 
filed with or reported to the Dean of Student Affairs, any of the employee's supervisors, or with 
the Director of Human Resources or anyone else in a managerial role. All supervisors and 
members of management to whom a complaint of harassment is brought or who independently 
observe behavior prohibited by the harassment policy are to report the complaint of harassment 
or information about harassment promptly to the highest ranking official at the respective 
facility who is not the alleged harasser, to the Dean of Student Affairs or to the Director of 
Human Resources. 



Investigation 



Students filing complaints of harassment are assured that information about the allegation of 
harassment will be shared only with those who need to know about it. Records relating to 
harassment complaints will be kept confidential on the same basis. Complete confidentiality 
cannot be guaranteed since conducting an effective investigation would not be possible without 
revealing certain information to the alleged harasser and potential witnesses. Under no 
circumstances will the individual who conducts the investigation or who has any direct or 
indirect control over the investigation be subject to the supervisory authority of the alleged 
harasser. 



Determination 



After all of the evidence is in, interviews are final, and any credibility issues are resolved, a 
determination as to whether harassment occurred will be made and the parties informed of the 
determination. If no determination can be made because the evidence is inconclusive the parties 
wall be informed of this result. 



Corrective Action 



Violations 



After the determination is made the College will undertake prompt and appropriate corrective 
action including discipline up to and including termination of employment of an employee 
harasser or dismissal of a student harasser, whenever it determines that harassment has occurred 
in violation of this policy. Such corrective action will be reported to the student making the 
complaint. 



The College strives to provide an educational and professional environment that allows 
individuals to engage in their daily activities in a safe, healthy and secure manner. Local, state 
or federal law enforcement officials will be notified of anyone violating local, state or federal 
laws. Violators shall be subject to prosecution by the appropriate law enforcement officials. 

Anyone found in violation of College regulations shall be subject to disciplinary action by the 
College through due process procedures for student conduct violations. 

The regulations and procedures will be placed for reading and review in the library. Copies will 
also be available through the Office of Admissions or Student Affairs. 



Disciplinary Action 



Cases of student misconduct and/or lack of academic integrity are to be referred to the chief 
academic officer or chief student affairs officer. A student who violates the rules and regulations 
of the College may be subject to disciplinary actions, which may include, but not be limited to, 
the following: 

1. Verbal reprimand; 

2. Restitution for damages; 

3. Restriction of privileges; 

4. Failure of the assignment or course; 

5. Withdrawal from a course, program or the College for the remainder of the semester or 
term; 

6. Suspension from the College (one calendar year); 

7. Dismissal from the College (five years; student may appeal for reinstatement). 

In addition, the College representative will be responsible to review all initial disciplinary 
procedures and may suspend a student for a period of time until the Student Status Committee 
can meet. 

Students are provided an opportunity to appeal any disciplinary decision and are required to 
sign a waiver if they choose to waive the right to appeal. The basic process in discipline cases is 
as follows: notice of charges, notice of possible penalty, and opportunity to explain a defense to 
some authority. 

1. An appropriate College official shall notify the student that he or she is accused of 
violating a regulation. 

2. The student shall be notified in writing that he or she may elect one of three courses of 
action: 

A. The student may admit the alleged violation and agree with the recommended 
disciplinary action. A signed waiver which waives the right to appeal is required; 



B. The student may admit the alleged violation and request a hearing before the 
Student Status Committee. 

C. The student may deny the alleged violation, in which case the administrative 
officer shall refer him/her to the Student Status Committee. 

The Student Status Committee hears all appeals relating to disciplinary actions. 

Student Grievance Policy 

The student grievance process provides the College an appropriate mechanism to deal with 
violations of student rules of conduct and conversely allows a student with a disagreement to 
grieve against a College employee's decision affecting that student. The College encourages 
students to resolve their complaints informally. The informal grievance procedures are designed 
to accomplish a quick resolution that is most expeditious and effective. 

Whenever the informal process does not result in a satisfactory resolution the College formal 
grievance procedure is also available. 

Informal Grievance Procedure 

The student shall initiate the informal process with the student working one-on-one with 
appropriate faculty or staff and must be started within 30 calendar days of the incident. Students 
must bring to the attention of their instructor (in cases involving academic coursework) or 
relevant supervisory staff member legitimate complaints perceived by them. The student should 
first bring the complaint to the attention of his/her instructor or the person with whom the 
student has a complaint. A conference with the student will be scheduled as soon as possible 
and within five working days (Monday - Friday) of notice of the student complaint, at the 
latest. The intent of these conferences is to ensure an early discussion of the issue, that the issue 
has been raised in a timely fashion and that if possible a mutually acceptable resolution can be 
reached. 

A student who feels that the conference would be futile because of that persons involvement or 
the situation/concern cannot be resolved with the instructor or staff with whom the student has 
the complaint, he or she should bring the grievance in writing to the supervisor of that area or 
department. The conference will be held as soon as possible and at least within five working 
days of notice of the complaint. Such conferences are to be conducted in proper sequence of 
supervisors. If the grievance is not resolved with an instructor the student may elect to request 
a conference with a department head, division chair or the chief academic officer, as deemed 
appropriate. Non-instructional areas follow the same step process. Through Student Affairs, for 
example, the process would be advisors/counselors, then manager, and finally the chief student 
affairs officer. Grievances may cover matters such as the application of College policies and 
practices to the grievant but the existence or content of the policies may not be grieved. 



Formal Grievance Procedure 



If a student is not satisfied with the results of the informal process the student may proceed 
with the formal grievance as described below. 



Format of the Written Grievance 



If the complaint is not resolved to the students satisfaction through the informal procedure the 
student shall reduce the grievance to writing. The formal complaint must: 



1 . Clearly state the facts giving rise to the grievance. 

2. Describe the efforts to informally resolve the complaint. 

3. State the remedy sought by the grievant. 

4. Be signed and dated. 



Timely Filing of a Formal Grievance 



Students must file complaints within a reasonable period of time, not to exceed 30 calendar 
days, after the informal grievance process has been exhausted. Students must file a grievance 
within 30 days of the end of the term in which the incident occurred 



Filing the Formal Grievance 



Mediation 



Original copies of the formal written grievance document shall be filed with both the regional 
office of Student Affairs and the College's Executive Director for Student Support Systems (One 
West 26th Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46208). The Executive Director shall assign a College 
Grievance Coordinator who shall coordinate the handling of the grievance within the region. 



Reasonable efforts should be made by the Grievance Coordinator to mediate a mutually agreeable 
resolution of the matter with the parties. A signed document should be generated by the 
Grievance Coordinator stating the results of the mediation. 



Student Status Committee 



The Student Status Committee is a committee whose purpose is to review all formal grievances 
referred to it and recommend a resolution to the chief administrative officer. It will be composed 
of six members, including two full-time instructional staff members and two administrative 
staff persons appointed by the chief administrative officer of the region. The additional two 
members will be students designated by the Student Government Association or the chief 
student affairs officer. The Committee's review of a formal appeal will begin no later than 30 
days after fact-finding and mediation terminates. The Grievance Coordinator shall keep the 
grievance body informed of efforts related to fact-finding and mediation. Central Office support, 
as needed, will be available to the Grievance Coordinator. 



Disposition of a Formal Grievance by the Student Status Committee 

If mediation does not resolve the grievance the Student Status Committee shall, in all cases, 
conduct a hearing. Unless there is a mutual resolution of the grievance the grievance shall not 
be dismissed prior to the hearing. Written notice of the procedures, actions and meetings at all 
stages of the formal complaint procedure, including the role of advisors to each party, will be 
provided to both the student (grievant) and respondent. 

The Student Status Committee will ensure the student due process. The student has the following 
rights: 

1. Reasonable advance written notification of the time and place of the hearing; 

2. Notification in writing of the charges with sufficient particularity to enable the student to 
prepare a defense; 



3. Notification in writing of the names of the witness (es) directly responsible for reporting 
the alleged violation or, if there are no such witness (es), written notification of how the 
alleged violation was reported; 

4. Notice of actions and meetings at all stages of this appeal procedure; 

5. An opportunity to be heard; 

6. An opportunity to question witnesses at hearings; 

7. An opportunity to have a representative present when presenting facts, being questioned, 
or asking questions; 

8. An expeditious hearing of the case; 

9. An explanation of the decision rendered in the case. 

The student shall not be required to testify against him or herself. 

Once the formal grievance has been initiated and attempts by the Grievance Coordinator to 
mediate a settlement have been exhausted a hearing shall be held pursuant to the hearing 
guidelines entitled "Student Grievance Hearing Procedural Guidelines." These guidelines, which 
are occasionally updated, describe how the actual hearing will be conducted. The Grievance 
Coordinator will provide a copy to both the student (grievant) and respondent at the beginning 
of the formal process. Persons who desire to view the guidelines should contact the chief student 
affairs officer for a copy. 

The Student Status Committee will issue a recommendation(s) to the chief administrative officer 
following its deliberation. Recommendations of the Student Status Committee if approved by 
the chief administrative officer are final, unless appealed to the Office of the President (see 
Appeal to the Office of the President). The student will be informed in writing of the chief 
administrative officers decision. A copy of the letter with the chief administrative officer's decision 
will be filed in the students permanent record. 



Appeal to the Office of the President 



If the student does not accept the decision of the Student Status Committee the student may 
appeal, in writing, within 30 calendar days from the written notification by sending a written 
notice to the General Counsel, Collegewide Appeals Grievance Body, at P.O. Box 1763, 
Indianapolis, IN 46206. 

An appeal of the decision of the Student Status Committee to the Collegewide Appeals Grievance 
Body is limited to procedural errors. The Collegewide Appeals Grievance Body does not review 
or re-hear the merits of the original grievance. The Collegewide Appeals Grievance Body can 
recommend to the President that the decision should stand or to remand it back to the campus 
chief administrative officer for reconsideration. The decision of the President is final. 



Reinstatement to the College 



If a student is dismissed from any campus/region of Ivy Tech State College, that individual is 
dismissed from the College. The year starts at the time/date of official notification to the student 
by the Chief Administrative Officer. After one calendar year the individual under suspension 
may apply for reinstatement. If the student is dismissed the student may appeal for reinstatement 
after five years. The individual must begin the reinstatement appeal process by informing the 
chief student affairs officer at the campus where the dismissal took place of his/her intentions. 
The appeal for reinstatement may be applied for at any campus/region of Ivy Tech where the 
individual hopes to attend. The campus/region Student Status Committee will act on the appeal 
within 30 days of its receipt. The recommendation of the Student Status Committee will be 
forwarded to the chief administrative officer of the campus/region. That individual will render 
a judgement on the appeal. That judgement will be final. 



Student Appeal of a Grade 



When a student believes the final grade he or she received in a course is inaccurate, he or she 
should make an appointment with the instructor who issued the grade or status and explain 
the reasons for this belief. This process must be initiated within 30 calendar days of receiving 
the grade. The instructor and the student should make every effort to resolve the issue. It is 
expected that most if not all misunderstandings will be resolved at this level. 

If the grade or status issue is not resolved the student can appeal in writing to the instructor's 
supervisor. This individual may be the department chairperson or program chairperson. Once 
the student has appealed the grade or status with the chairperson, if the issue is not resolved to 
the students satisfaction the student may appeal to the department chairperson, next higher 
chairperson, or whomever is next in line. 

The student's next recourse is to appeal to the chief academic officer. If the student feels further 
appeal is necessary he or she may file a formal grievance to the Student Status Committee 
following the procedures as outlined above. 



Student Right to Know 



The 1990 federal Student Right to Know Act requires colleges and universities to report to 
prospective and current students the persistence and graduation rates of full-time technical 
certificate and degree-seeking students. The graduation rate is based upon program completion 
within 150 percent of time usually required for a full-time student. For technical certificate 
students, this is the number of full-time students graduating in three semesters. For associate 
degree students, this is the number of students graduating in six semesters. Contact the Office 
of Student Affairs for further information. 



CAMPUS SECURITY INFORMATION 

To Report a Crime 

Ivy Tech is required by federal law to report the frequency of criminal activity occurring on its 
campuses to current and prospective students, faculty, staff and parents upon request. Any 
student, prospective student, faculty or staff person who has been a victim of or a witness to a 
criminal activity which occurred on any of the facilities or grounds of any Ivy Tech campus is 
encouraged to report this act to campus security or to the Office of Student Affairs. 



Hours of Operation 



Security 



The normal hours of operation are posted at each Ivy Tech campus. 



Each Ivy Tech campus designates employees who are responsible for addressing secunty-related 
matters and to whom criminal activity should be reported. If security staff members are not available 
the activity should be reported to the Office of Student Affairs. The local police department also 
should be notified of any crime. It is College policy to assist the police in any investigation. 



Prompt and Accurate Reporting 



All criminal activity should be reported accurately to Ivy Tech personnel and local police. 
Misrepresenting criminal activity or falsely reporting an incident could result in prosecution or 
College disciplinary action. 



Responsibility 



Ivy Tech campuses have low occurrences of criminal activity. However, safety precautions 
should be observed at all times. The College encourages all students, prospective students, 
faculty and staff to take the responsibility to help each other in situations where criminal activity 
occurs. 



Crime Prevention Program 

Ivy Tech is not a residential college. Students are encouraged to follow the same safety and 
precautionary measures they follow in their homes and in the community. The Office of Student 
Affairs will assist anyone interested in attending a seminar or program on crime prevention. 

Off-Campus Housing 

There is no off-campus housing endorsed by Ivy Tech. 

Alcohol Violation 

Under Indiana law, consuming, being under the influence of, or possessing intoxicating beverages 
on College property is not permitted. Students, staff or visitors in violation of this law face 
College disciplinary action. 



Drug Violation 



Under Indiana law, being under the influence of, use of, possession of, or distribution of illegal 
drugs are not permitted. Local law enforcement authorities will be notified when instances 



Substance Abuse Counseling 



The College refers students in need of special help with substance abuse problems to appropriate 
counseling agencies in the community. 



Incident Reports 



A copy of each incident report is forwarded to the staff member designated to handle campus 
security-related issues. The Dean of Student Affairs also is supplied with a copy. 



Annual Report 



A copy of the annual report is available from the Office of Student Affairs. 



INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS 



In keeping with its mission and goals, the College serves persons with educational programs 
consistent with projected job and educational requirements and personal interests. Ivy Tech 
programs complement secondary programs, four-year programs and adult basic education 
programs. The purposes of Ivy Tech's programs are to develop competent workers for initial 
employment, upgrade the skills of those already employed and provide a foundation for further 
education at a baccalaureate institution. 

Ivy Tech programs are designed to meet the needs of students, accommodating those who wish 
to enroll in a few classes or a full degree program. A few classes in a planned sequence may 
comprise a career development certificate. Credit programs culminate in an associate of applied 
science degree, an associate of science degree, or a technical certificate. 

The College's degree programs are offered in six divisions: 

• Business Division 

• Health Sciences Division 

• Public Services Division 

• Technology Division 

• Visual Technologies Division 

• General Education and Support Services Division 

Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree Programs 

Associate of applied science degree programs prepare students for careers, career changes and 
career advancement. AAS programs may also prepare students for transfer to four-year 
institutions. These programs offer education in recognized technical areas and specialties with 
emphasis on analysis, synthesis and evaluation. The program content, which is approximately 
30 percent general education, provides depth and breadth in conceptual and technical skills. 
The general education courses equip students with the problem-solving, communications, 
scientific and mathematical skills to compete successfully in the job market. Technical courses 
equip students with the technical skills to obtain employment and to advance in the workforce. 

Associate of Science (AS) Degree Programs 

Associate of science degree programs prepare students for transfer to cooperating four-year 
institutions and for careers. AS programs contain 40 percent or more general education with 
the balance in technical courses. The general education and technical courses provide students 
with a foundation for transfer to a four-year institution and eventual completion of a baccalaureate 
degree, and equip students with skills for the job market. AS curricula can be tailored to meet 
students' specific transfer objectives. Students should contact their local Ivy Tech campus for 
information about AS transfer programs. 

Technical Certificate (TC) Programs 

Technical Certificate programs provide education in conceptual and technical skills for specific 
occupations. Each program contains a sequence of required courses in a recognized specialty 
within one of the programs at the College. The program content is designed to develop 
competency in the comprehension of general and technical skills. 

Career Development Certificates (CDC) 

Ivy Tech provides short-term programs for individuals who desire to develop competencies in 
a specific area. These programs are less than 30 semester credits in length. Instruction is 
delivered through methods that include regular courses and specifically designed courses. Many 
of these courses are based on a sequence of learning experiences determined by a certifying 



state or national association or organization. Completion of certain short-term programs qualifies 
students to sit for certification examinations. The number and type of short-term programs 
vary among the Ivy Tech campuses. 

Business and Industry Training Programs 

Ivy Tech offers specialized training services for business and industry. Directors of business 
and industry training develop custom-designed programs and services to meet the training 
needs of local businesses. Through its training offices Ivy Tech consults, designs, produces, 
conducts and evaluates training specifically designed to satisfy employer needs on a one-time 
or on-going basis. The directors work with business and industry, trade unions and community 
economic development groups to assess training needs and to deliver training when and where 
it is needed, often m-plant. 

The services provided by the business and industry training programs help ensure that the 
skills of employees of Indiana firms are current with changing technology. Instruction that 
best meets a company's specific needs is delivered through methods that might include regular 
courses, short-term courses, seminars, conferences and labs. 

With more than 30 years of experience in technical instruction Ivy Tech has been and continues 
to be a leader in promoting Indiana's economic development by providing comprehensive 
training services to Indiana businesses and industries. Detailed information is available from 
the directors of business and industry training at Ivy Tech campuses. 

Indiana Partnership for Statewide Education (IPSE) 

The Indiana Partnership for Statewide Education is a collaboration of Indiana's colleges and 
universities committed to delivering higher education courses via distance education to all 
learners throughout the state. Some IPSE courses are offered via the Indiana Higher Education 
Telecommunications System (IHETS). Classes are delivered via satellite from college and 
university campuses to learning centers located throughout Indiana, many on Ivy Tech campuses. 
Other courses are delivered directly into student homes via cable television, public broadcasting, 
video tapes or computers. Most courses offered through the partnership are transferable among 
all seven of Indiana's public colleges and universities as well as several private colleges and 
universities. Contact the campus for availability of courses. 

Statewide Program Initiatives 

General Technical Studies Program 

The General Technical Studies Program provides an option for students who may not be ready 
to enter a degree program. As such the program serves primarily as a beginning point for 
students as they define and meet their educational objectives. It is designed to meet the diverse 
needs of the students Ivy Tech serves. The program will: 

• Provide an opportunity for students to correct skill deficiencies before enrolling in a technical 
degree program. 

• Provide a program for students who have not selected a specific educational or career goal 
by the time they have entered the College. 

• Allow students who are waiting for admission into a selective program to enter the College. 

• Provide a directed program of career-oriented educational exploration to encourage an 
examination of occupational program areas. 

• Increase student retention by providing a vehicle which promotes informed choices. 

• Provide undecided students the opportunity to pursue coursework which will serve as a 
foundation for related one- or two-year programs while engaged in career exploration. 



• Provide an opportunity for a student to pursue a one -year program of general technical 
studies. 

The General Technical Studies Program is offered through the General Education and Support 
Services Division. Interested students should contact their local campus to see a description of 
the degree requirements. 

Apprenticeship Programs 

In 1993, Ivy Tech's State Board of Trustees, the Indiana Commission for Vocational and Technical 
Education, and the Commission for Higher Education approved joint educational programs 
between the College and local joint apprenticeship committees in the building trades. 

Individuals who participate in the program become Ivy Tech students and have the opportunity 
to earn credit while moving through the program. The apprentice has the opportunity to earn 
a technical certificate or associate of applied science degree. The degree depends upon the 
local Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee agreement with the College. Credit is given for 
on-the-job work experience in accordance with guidelines commonly accepted by institutions 
of higher education. Distribution of apprenticeship degree programs varies by site. 

Ivy Tech also provides a number of industrial apprenticeship curricula, some of which can 
culminate in the awarding of a certificate or degree. Contact the Apprenticeship Enrollment 
Manager for further information. 

Contact the local Ivy Tech campus for information about the availability of apprenticeship 
programs in the building and industrial trades. 

Senior Scholars 

In the spring of 2001, Ivy Tech State College launched the Senior Scholars program. Indiana 
citizens 60 years of age and older can take credit courses at Ivy Tech tuition-free. Students are 
responsible for books and any associated fees. In order to qualify for this program a person 
must meet the following requirements: 

Be an Indiana resident; 

Be 60 years of age or older at the start of a semester; 

Possess a high school diploma or GED; 

Be retired from their primary vocation (does not apply to homemakers); and 

Not be employed on a full-time basis. 

Non-credit courses are not included in the Senior Scholars program. Please contact the Office 
of Admissions for further information. 

Workforce Certification 

Several of the College's campuses provide Centers for Workforce Certification. The centers 
focus on certification activity in information technology, e.g., Novell, Microsoft and Cisco. 
They also provide certification training and testing in a wide variety of other discipline areas in 
health, business, public services and technology. The centers provide pre-assessment services, 
classroom and hands-on training, post-assessment and certification testing services in a one- 
stop setting. Courses are offered both in semester length and short-term sessions and in credit 
and not-for-credit formats. Certification testing is offered to validate the competencies achieved 
in training courses. Many certifications can be equated to college credit courses through an 
evaluation process conducted by the local faculty. 



Business 




The Business Division provides career and transfer education for 
individuals seeking employment or further education and for those 
who are currently employed in business and business-related fields. 
Programs lead to an associate of applied science degree, an associate 
of science degree or a technical certificate. Opportunities to transfer 
credits to four-year colleges are available through associate of 
science degrees or through transfer of credit for selected individual 
courses. The Business Division also offers courses to students who 
are not seeking a degree, but desire specialized post-secondary 
education. 

The programs in the Business Division — Accounting, Office 
Administration, Business Administration and Computer Information 
Systems — are accredited on a statewide basis by the Association of 
Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP). ACBSP 
accredits two- and four-year institutions offering programs in 
business which adhere to standards approved by its member 
institutions. Standards are determined with regard to a program's 
quality, rigor, transfer, faculty credentialing and other pertinent 






Y 



Career opportunities in business and office environments are 
expanding rapidly for those who have the technical skills to meet the 
demands. Programs offered through the Business Division provide 
education that meets the needs of Indiana employers. 



Accountin 



Program Description 

The Accounting program develops an understanding of accounting 
principles, business law, communications, business equipment and 
related areas of study in the field. Instruction is offered in computerized 
accounting systems. Technical skills in financial accounting, cost 
accounting and tax preparation are emphasized. 

Accounting duties typically include maintaining journals and ledgers, 
processing banking transactions, billing, preparing payroll, 
maintaining inventory records, purchasing, processing expense 
reports, preparing financial statements and analyzing managerial 
reports. Position titles may include junior or staff accountant, junior 
auditor, cost accounting clerk, bookkeeper, payroll clerk, inventory 
clerk, accounts receivable clerk and financial management trainee. 

A two-year program requiring 60 credits leads to an associate of 
applied science degree. Technical certificates and career development 
certificates also are available. An associate of science degree is available 
at selected campuses. The accounting program is available via distance 
education for interested students. Contact the nearest Ivy Tech campus 
for information and to enroll. The availability of degrees will vary 
from campus to campus. Interested students should contact local Ivy 
Tech campuses. Students graduating from the Accounting program 
participate in evaluations of proficiency in general and technical 
education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 

Science (60 Credits) 

• Technical Certificate 

(30 Credits) 

Specialties Offered: 

None 



Program 
Available at: 

Anderson 

Bloomington 

Columbus 

East Chicago 

Elkhart 

Evansville 

Fort Wayne 

Gary 

Indianapolis 

Kokomo 

Lafayette 

Lawrenceburg 

Logansport 

Madison 

Marion 

Muncie 

Richmond 

Sellersburg 

South Bend 

Terre Haute 

Valparaiso 

Warsaw 



Availability of specialties 
and degrees varies by 
campus. Contact your 
local campus for more 
information. See page 6 
for contact information. 



Accounting 



Accounting 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 


General Education Core 


18 


you must have 60 


Technical Core 


18 


credits in the 


Other Required Courses 


12 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


12 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



COM 101 


Fundamentals ol Public Speaking 


3 


*ECN XXX 


Economics Elective 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


**MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


OR 




**MAT112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


* 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 


* 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 



Technical 



ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 

3 


ACC 102 


Principles of Accounting 11 


BUS 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


BUS 102 


Business Law 


3 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 
3 


OAD218 


Spreadsheets 



Other Required Courses 


ACC 105 


Income Tax I 


3 


(24 credits) 


ACC 201 


Intermediate Accounting I 


3 




ACC 203 


Cost Accounting I 


3 




A ACC 225 


Integrated Accounting Software 


3 






Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 

'Elective ** Locally Determined * Capsione Course 



Accounting 



Accounting 



Technical Certificate 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 30 
credits in the 
following areas: 



General Education Core 6 

Technical Core 3 

Specialty Core 6 

Locally Determined Courses 1 5 



You Must Have 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



General Education 



Technical 



Other Required Courses 
(21 Credits) 



**COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 




OR 




**ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


* 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 




CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 




ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 


ACC 102 


Principles of Accounting II 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 



Key (See page 2 for definiti on s) 
■ Elective " " Locally Determined A Capstone Course 



Accounting 



Business Administration 



Program Description 

The Business Administration program gives students the broad 
background they need for general administrative positions in a variety 
of business environments. It also provides an opportunity for 
specialization in one of the following areas: casino management, 
eBusiness, financial services, health care management, human 
resources management, logistics management, management, 
marketing, operations management, quality management, real estate 
and restaurant management. 

A two-year program requiring 60-66 credits leads to an associate of 
applied science degree. Business Administration students wishing to 
pursue a bachelor's of science in Business Administration, or other 
business baccalaureate programs, at Indiana State University, Ball State 
University or the University of Southern Indiana, and enter as a junior- 
year student, may complete an associate of science degree program 
in Business Administration. Students should choose the appropriate 
associate of science curriculum for the university they plan to attend. 
Students completing the associate of science program will also be 
able to enter the workforce, as well as to transfer to ISU, Ball State or 
USI. Technical certificates and career development certificates are 
available. The Business Administration program is available via 
distance education for interested students. Contact the nearest Ivy 
Tech campus for information and to enroll. The availability of 
specialties and degrees will vary from campus to campus. Interested 
students should contact local Ivy Tech campuses. Students graduating 
from the Business Administration program participate in evaluations 
of proficiency in general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 
Science (60-66 Credits) 

• Associate oj Science 
(66 Credits, BSU; 63 
Credits, ISU; 64 
Credits, USI) 

• Technical Certificate 
(30 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

• Casino Management 

• eBusiness 

• Financial Services 

• Health Care Mgmt. 

• Human Resources Mgmt. 

• Logistics Management 

• Management 

• Marketing 

• Operations Management 

• Quality Management 

• Real Estate 

• Restaurant Management 

Program 
Available at: 

Anderson 

Bloomington 

Columbus 

Elkhart ■ 
Evansville 
Fort Wayne 

Gary 

Indianapolis 

Kokomo 

Lafayette 

Lawrenceburg 

Madison 

Marion 

Michigan City 

Muncie 

Richmond 

Sellersburg 

South Bend 

Terre Haute 

Valparaiso 

Warsaw 

Availability of specialties 

and degrees varies by 

campus. Contact your. 

local campus for more 

information. See page 6 

for contact information. 



Business Administration 



Business Administration 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 


General Education Core 
Technical Core 


18 
18 


60-66 credits in the 


Specialty Core 


12-19 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


11-13 



You Must Have 



General Education 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
Following Specialties 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 




*ECN 


Economics Elective 


3 




ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 




**MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 




OR 


**MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 




* 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 




* 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 





ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 


BUS 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


BUS 102 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 105 


Principles of Management 


3 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


MKT 101 


Principles of Marketing 


3 



Casino Management 

Specialty 

(30 Credits) 



eBusiness Specialty 
(24 Credits) 



Financial Services 

Specialty 

(24 credits) 



A BUS 204 Case Problems in Business 

HOS 132 Techniques of Casino Games: Blackjack 

HOS 141 Introduction to Casino Operations 

HOS 231 Techniques of Casino Games: Craps-Subsequent 

Locally Determined Courses 



3 
7 
11 



A BUS 204 


Case Problems in Business 


3 


BUS 209 


Introduction to eBusiness 


3 


CIS 252 


Web Site Development 


3 


MKT 240 


Internet Marketing 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



BNK215 


Principles of Banking 


3 


BNK218 


Consumer Lending 


3 


A BUS 204 


Case Problems in Business 


3 


MKT 205 


Principles of Insurance 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Specialties Continued Next Page 



Business Administration 



Business Administration 



Associate of Applied Science — Specialties 



Health Care 

Management Specialty 

(24 Credits) 



Human Resources 

Management Specialty 

(24 Credits) 



Logistics Management 

Specialty 

(24 credits) 



Management Specialty 
(24 Credits) 



Marketing Specialty 
(24 Credits) 



Operations Management 

Specialty 

(24 credits) 



Quality Management 

Specialty 

(24 Credits) 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



BUS 202 


Human Resource Management 


3 


A BUS 204 


Case Problems in Business 


3 


HLT 125 


Health Care Systems and Trends 


3 


HLT 226 


Organizational Development in Health Care 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 




BUS 202 


Human Resource Management 


3 


A BUS 204 


Case Problems in Business 


3 


BUS 220 


Conference Leadership Training 


3 


BUS 222 


Benefits Administration 


3 


BUS 223 


Occupational Safety and Health 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


9 




A BUS 204 


Case Problems in Business 


3 


LOG 201 


Transportation Systems 


3 


LOG 202 


Physical Distribution 


3 


MKT 202 


Logistics/Purchasing Control 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 




BUS 202 


Human Resource Management 


3 


BUS 203 


Business Development 


3 


A BUS 204 


Case Problems in Business 


3 


BUS 210 


Managerial Finance 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 




A BUS 204 


Case Problems in Business 


3 


MKT 104 


Promotions Management 


3 


MKT 201 


Introduction to Market Research 


3 


MKT 220 


Principles of Retailing 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 




A BUS 204 


Case Problems in Business 


3 


OPM 102 


Techniques of Supervision I 


3 


OPM 224 


Operations Management 


3 


QSC 204 


Total Quality Management 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 




A BUS 204 


Case Problems in Business 


3 


QSC 101 


Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I 


3 


QSC 102 


Statistical Process Control 


3 


QSC 202 


Quality Control Concepts and Techniques II 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Specialties Continued Next Page 



Business Administration 



Business Administration 



Associate of Applied Science — Specialties 



Real Estate Specialty 
(24 Credits) 



Restaurant Management 

Specialty 

(25 Credits) 



ADPU 109 


Real Estate Sales 


3 


ADPU110 


Real Estate Brokers 


3 


ADPU 114 


Real Estate Appraising 


6 


A BUS 204 


Case Problems in Business 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


9 




A BUS 204 


Case Problems in Business 


3 


HOS 101 


Sanitation and First Aid 


3 


HOS 108 


Table Service 


3 


HRM204 


Food and Beverage Management 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


13 



Associate of Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 
63 credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



General Education Core 36 

Technical Core 27 

Specialty Core N/A 

Locally Determined Courses N/A 




Required Courses 



Curriculum designed for transfer 
to Indiana State University's BS 
in Business Administration 
program 

Credit 
Hours 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


OR 


ENG 211 


Technical Writing 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


OR 


MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


* 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 


* 

.......... 


Life/Physical Sciences, Math Elective 


3 




Humanities Electives 


9 


* 


Social Sciences Electives 


9 



ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 


ACC 102 


Principles of Accounting II 


3 


BUS 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


BUS 102 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 110 


Business Statistics 


3 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


CIS 102 


Information Systems Fundamentals 


3 

3 


ECN 201 


Principles of Macroeconomics 


ECN 202 


Principles of Microeconomics 


3 



Business Administration 



Business Administration 



Associate of Science 





General Education Core 


36 








To earn this degree, 








you must have 


Technical Core 


30 








66 credits in the 


Specialty Core 


N/A 




following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 


Ball State 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Required Courses 



Curriculum designed for 
transfer to Ball State 
University's College of 
Business, Business Administra- 
tion program. 

Credit 
Hours 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


BIO 101 


Introductory Biology 


3 


PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


SOC111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 


PHL 101 


Introduction to Philosophy 


. 3 


POL 101 


Introduction to American Government and Politics 


3 


HSY 101 


Survey of American History I 


3 


HSY 102 


Survey of American History II 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 135 


Finite Math 


3 



Technical 



ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 


ACC 102 


Principles of Accounting II 


3 


BUS 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


BUS 102 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 110 


Business Statistics 


3 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


CIS 102 


Information Systems Fundamentals 


3 


ECN 201 


Principles of Macroeconomics 


3 


ECN 202 


Principles of Microeconomics 


3 


MAT 201 


Brief Calculus 


3 






Key 



Business Administration 



Business Administration 



Associate of Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 
64 credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



General Education Core 34 

Technical Core 30 

Specialty Core N/A 

Locally Determined Courses N/A 



III.HL'JdUUl.T] 



smms 



Required Courses 



Curriculum designed for 
transfer to the University of 
Southern Indiana's B.S. in 
Business Administration 
program. 

Credit 
Hours 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


COM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


HSY 101 


Survey of American History I 


3 


MAT 133 


College Algebra 


4 


PHL 102 


Introduction to Ethics 


3 


POL 101 


Introduction to American Government and Politics 


3 


PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


SCI 111 


Physical Science 


3 


SOC 111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 








ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 


ACC 102 


Principles of Accounting II 


3 


BUS 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


BUS 102 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 110 


Business Statistics 


3 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


ECN 201 


Principles of Macroeconomics 


3 


ECN 202 


Principles of Microeconomics 


3 


OAD 207 


Integrated Applications 


3 


OAD 216 


Business Communications 


3 



Key 



Business Administration 



Business Administration 



Technical Certificate 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 


General Education Core 
Technical Core 


6 
3 


30-33 credits in the 


Specialty Core 


6-24 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


0-18 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 

Choose One Specialty 

Casino Management Specialty 
(24 Credits) 



Financial Services Specialty 
(21 credits) 



Health Care 

Management Specialty 

(24 Credits) 

Human Resources 

Management Specialty 
(24 Credits) 



Management Specialty 
(21 credits) 

Marketing Specialty 
(21 Credits) 

Operations 

Management Specialty 

(21 Credits) 

Quauty Management Specialty 
(21 Credits) 



Credit 





Required Courses 


Hours 


**ENG111 


English Composition 


3 


**COM 101 


OR 
Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


**MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


OR 


** MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


BUS 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 



HOS 131 


Techniques of Casino Games: Craps 


9 


HOS 132 


Techniques of Casino Games: Blackjack 


6 


HOS 141 


Introduction to Casino Operations 
Locally Determined Courses 


3 
6 


ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 


BNK215 


Principles of Banking 


3 


BNK218 


Consumer Lending 


3 


Locally Determined Courses 


12 


BUS 202 


Human Resources Management 


3 


HLT 125 


Health Care Systems and Trends 


3 


Locally Determined Courses 


18 


BUS 102 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 105 


Principles of Management 


3 


BUS 202 
BUS 220 


Human Resource Management 


3 


Conference Leadership Training 


3 


BUS 221 


Principles of Employment 


3 


BUS 222 


Benefits Administration 


3 


BUS 223 


Occupational Safety and Health 


3 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


BUS 105 

CIS 101 
MKT 101 


Principles of Management 
Locally Determined Courses 


3 

15 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


Principles of Marketing 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 



CIS 101 
OPM 102 


Introduction to Microcomputers 
Techniques of Supervision I 


Locally Determined Courses 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


QSC 101 


Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I 


Locally Determined Courses 



3 
3 
15 

3 
3 

15 



Business Administration 55 



Computer Information Systems 



Program Description 

The Computer Information Systems curriculum, with 
specialties in information technology, network, PC support and 
administration, and programmer/analyst, is designed to provide 
flexible and comprehensive education. The curriculum includes 
technical courses in computer information systems and related 
areas, general education and locally determined technical 
courses in each specialty area. Instruction includes both 
theoretical concepts and practical applications needed to 
produce graduates able to function in positions of responsibility. 

Automated systems allow for the integration of several 
functionally related applications such as word processing, 
database management, spreadsheets, programming, electronic 
mail systems, graphics generation and telecommunications. 
These systems may be stand-alone, shared logic, distributed or 
integrated. Demand for employees with computer and business 
skills is particularly high in small- and medium-sized firms 
which create, transmit and control information by using 
computer technology as a management tool. 

A two-year program requiring 60 credit hours leads to an 
associate of applied science degree. Technical certificates and 
career development certificates also are available. An associate 
of science degree is available at selected campuses. The 
availability of specialties and degrees will vary from campus to 
campus. Interested students should contact local Ivy Tech 
campuses. Students graduating from the Computer Information 
Systems program participate in evaluations of proficiency in 
general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 

Science (60 Credits) 

• Technical Certificate 

(30 Credits) 

Specialties Offered: 

• Information Technology 

• Network (Novell) 

• Network (Windows NT) 

• Network (Multi-Vendor) 

• PC Support & 
Administration 

' Programmer/Analyst 

Program 
Available at: 

Anderson 
Bloomington 

Columbus 

East Chicago 

Elkhart 

Evansville 
Fort Wayne 

Gary 
Indianapolis 

Kokomo 

Lafayette 

Lawrenceburg 

Logansport 

Madison 

Marion 

Muncie 

Richmond 
Sellersburg 
South Bend 
Terre Haute 
Valparaiso 

Warsaw 

Availability of specialties and 

degrees varies by campus. 

Contact your local campus 

for more information. See ' 

page 6 for contact 

information. 



56 , Compute!* Information Systems 



Computer Information Systems 

Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 60 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
Following Specialties 

Information Technology 

Specialty 

(24 credits) 



General Education Core 


18 


Technical Core 


18 


Specialty Core 


L2 


Locally Determined Courses 


12 





Required Courses 


Credit 
Hours 


COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


*ECN 


Economics Elective 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


**MAT111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


OR 


"MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


* 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


* 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 



ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 


BUS 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


CIS 102 


Information Systems Fundamentals 


3 


CIS 106 


Microcomputer Operating Systems 


3 


A CIS 203 


Systems Analysis and Design 


3 



CIS 114 


Principles of Management Information Systems 


3 


CIS 201 


Database Design and Management 


3 


CIS 206 


Project Development with High Level Tools 


3 


CIS 227 


Topics in Information Management 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Network/Novell 

Specialty 

(24 Credits) 



CIS 202 


Data Communications 


3 


CIS 243 


Novell Network Administration I 


3 


CIS 244 


Novell Network Administration II 


3 


CIS 246 


Novell Network Hardware Service and Support 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Specialties Continued Next Page 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 



Computer Information Systems 



Computer Information Systems 



Associate of Applied Science — Specialties 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



Network/Windows NT 

Specialty 

(24 Credits) 



CIS 202 


Data Communications 


3 


CIS 263 


Windows NT Network Administration I 


3 


CIS 264 


Windows NT Network Administration II 


3 


CIS 266 


Windows NT Network Hardware Service and Support 


3 

12 




Locally Determined Courses 



Network/Multi-Vendor 
Specialty (24 Credits) 



CIS 202 


Data Communications 




3 


CIS 255 
CIS 258 


Network Operating Systems 
Network Communication and 


Connectivity 


3 
3 
3 
12 


CIS 273 


Network Administration 




Locally Determined Courses 





PC Support and 

Administration Specialty 

(24 Credits) 



CIS 202 


Data Communications 


3 


CIS 224 


Hardware and Software Troubleshooting 


3 
3 


CIS 251 


Advanced Operating Systems 


CIS 252 


Web Site Development 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Programmer/Analyst 
Specialty (24 Credits) 



CIS 113 


Logic, Design, and Programming 


3 


CIS 120 


Programming I 


3 


CIS 201 


Database Design and Management 


3 


CIS '2 17 


Programming II 

Locally Determined Courses 


3 
12 



58 ■ Computer Information Systems 



Computer Information Systems 



Technical Certificate 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 30 
credits in the 
following areas: 



General Education Core 6 

Technical Core 3 

Other Required Courses 6 

Locally Determined Courses 1 5 



You Must Have 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



General Education 



Technical 



Other Required Courses 
(21 Credits) 



**COM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


5 




OR 




**ENG111 


English Composition 


3 
3 


**MAT111 


Intermediate Algebra 


**MAT 112 


OR 
Functional Mathematics 


3 




CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 




CIS 102 


Information Systems Fundamentals 


3 


CIS 106 


Microcomputer Operating Systems 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 



Key (See p a ge 2 for definitions) 

'Elective '• Locally Determined A Capstone Course 



Computer Information Systems 



Office Administration 



Program Description 



The Office Administration program prepares students for an 
automated office environment. Students develop basic office skills 
and acquire computer skills including word processing, 
spreadsheets, databases, and microcomputer operating systems. 
Several applications (advanced word processing, desktop 
publishing and integrated packages) also can be studied in depth. 

The Office Administration program is designed to accommodate 
students with different levels of training and experience. Courses 
are offered which provide initial, advanced and refresher education 
and assist individuals in achieving professional recognition and 
career progression. The program prepares graduates as 
administrative office personnel and provides opportunities for 
specialized training in such areas as administrative, insurance, legal, 
medical, and software applications. Students who complete the 
recommended sequence of courses are eligible to take the 
Administrative/Information Processing Specialist (AIPS) or the 
Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) exams administered by the 
Institute for Certification of the International Association of 
Administrative Professionals (IAAP). 

A two-year program requiring 60 credit hours leads to an associate 
of applied science degree. Technical certificates and career 
development certificates also are available. An associate of science 
degree is available at selected campuses. The availability of degrees 
will vary from campus to campus. Interested students should 
contact local Ivy Tech campuses. Students graduating from the 
Office Administration program participate in evaluations of 
proficiency in general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 

Science (60 Credits) 

• Technical Certificate 

(30 Credits) 

Specialties Offered: 

• Administrative 

• Insurance 

• Legal 

• Medical 

• Software Applications 



Program 
Available at: 

Anderson 

Bloomington 

Columbus 

East Chicago 

Elkhart 

Evansville 

Fort Wayne 

Gary 

Indianapolis 

Kokomo 

Lafayette 

Lawrenceburg 

Logansport 

Madison 

Marion 

Muncie 

Richmond 

Sellersburg 

South Bend 

Tell City 

Terre Haute 

Valparaiso 

Warsaw 

Availability of specialties 

and degrees varies by 

campus. Contact your 

local campus for more 

information. See page 6 

for contact information. 



Office Administration 



Office Administration 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 60 
credits in the 
following areas: 



General Education Core 18 

Technical Core 18 

Specialty Core 12-15 

Locally Determined Courses 9-12 



You Must Have 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



General Education 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
Following Specialties 

Administrative Specialty 
(24 credits) 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


*ECN 


Economics Elective 


3 


ENGlll 


English Composition 


3 


**MAT111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


OR 


**MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


* 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 


* 


Social Sciences Elective 


3 



ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 


BUS 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


OAD 119 


Document Processing 


3 


OAD 216 


Business Communications 


3 


A OAD 221 


Office Administration and Supervision 


3 



OAD 103 


Word Processing Applications 


3 


OAD 114 


Desktop Publishing 


3 


OAD 121 


Office Procedures 


3 


OAD 220 


Records and Database Management 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Insurance Specialty 
(24 credits) 



INS 210 


Property and Liability Insurance Principles 


3 


INS 220 


Personal Insurance 


3 


INS 230 


Commercial Insurance 


3 


OAD 103 


Word Processing Applications 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Specialties Continued Next Page 



Office Administration 



Office Administration 



Associate of Applied Science - Specialties 




Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



Legal Specialty 
(24 credits) 



Medical Specialty 
(24 credits) 



Software Applications 

Specialty 

(24 credits) 



OAD 103 


Word Processing Applications 


3 


LEG 101 


Introduction to Paralegal Studies 


3 


LEG 102 


Legal Research and Writing 


3 


LEG 103 


Civil Procedures 


3. 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 




HHS 101 


Medical Terminology 


3 


MEA 137 


Insurance and Basic Coding with Computer Applications 


3 


OAD 121 


Office Procedures 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 




OAD 103 


Word Processing Applications 


3 


OAD 114 


Desktop Publishing 


3 


OAD 214 


Multimedia Design 


3 


OAD 217 


Problem Solving for Computer Users 


3 


OAD 218 


Spreadsheets 


3 




Locally Determined Courses HBI 


9 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 

xtive ** Locally Determined * Capstone Course 



Office Administration 



Office Administration 



Technical Certificate 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 30 
credits in the 
following areas: 



General Education Core 

Technical Core 

Specialty Core 

Locally Determined Courses 



6 

> 
9 

12 



You Must Have 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



General Education 



Technical 



Other Required Courses 
(21 Credits) 



ENGlll 


English Composition 


3 




* 


Social Sciences Elective 


3 












OAD 119 


Document Processing 


3 












CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 




OAD 103 


Word Processing Applications 


3 




OAD 121 


Office Procedures 


3 





Locally Determined Courses 



12 



Key 



■e page 2 for definitions') 
Hy Determined '• Capstone Conn 



Office Administration 




Health Sciences 



^ 
h 



Y 



The Division of Health Sciences prepares students to become technical 
members of the health care team. Classroom, laboratory and clinical 
experiences prepare students for service in hospitals, laboratories, 
nursing homes, physicians' offices and other service-related settings. 

College health sciences programs are recognized and accredited by 
appropriate external accrediting agencies. Students should contact the 
local Ivy Tech campus for information concerning programs and course 
offerings. 



Health Sciences 






A.S. in Nursin 



Program Description 

The Associate of Science in Nursing (ASN) Program is designed 
to accommodate two groups of students: those who are entering 
a nursing program for the first time and those licensed practical 
nurses seeking educational mobility to the associate-degree level. 
For first-time nursing students, the curriculum listed on the 
next page is completed. LPN's admitted to the ASN program 
who complete NUR 248 with a grade of "C" or better will receive 
advanced credit and begin the nursing sequence of courses with 
the 200 level of coursework. Completion of NUR 248 coupled 
with the LPN education and experience brings the LPN to the 
same level as the generic ASN student upon entering the second 
year of study in the program. 

Graduates of the ASN program are eligible to take the NCLEX- 
RN examination to become registered nurses. Graduates may 
seek immediate employment as nurses or choose to transfer 
their credits to a four-year institution offering a baccalaureate 
degree. 

Those interested in the program are encouraged to contact the 
nearest campus offering a program for information concerning 
course and program offerings. Students graduating from the 
ASN program participate in evaluations of proficiency in general 
and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate oj Science 
(67-68 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 



None 



Program 
Available at: 

Bloomington 
Evansville 

Gary 

Indianapolis 

Lafayette 

Madison 

Muncie 

Richmond 

Sellersburg 

South Bend 



A.S. in Nursing 



A.S. in Nursing 



Associate of Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 


General Education Core 


21 


Technical Core 


40 


67-68 credits in the 


Specialty Core 


N/A 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


6-7 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology 1 


3 


ANP 102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


BIO 211 


General Microbiology 


3 


**COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


OR 


**COM 102 


Interpersonal Communication 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 



Technical 



NUR 150 


Nursing and Universal Needs 


4 


NUR151 


Nursing and Universal Needs Practicum 


4 


NUR 152 


Nursing Related to Health Deviation I 


5 


NUR 153 


Nursing Related to Health Deviation I Practicum 


5 


NUR 154 


Pharmacotherapeutics 


2 


A NUR250 


Nursing Related to Health Deviation II 


5 


A NUR251 


Nursing Related to Health Deviation II Practicum 


5 


A NUR 252 
A NUR253 


Nursing Related to Developmental Needs 


4 


Nursing Related to Developmental Needs Practicum 


4 


NUR 254 


Professional Nursing Issues 


2 



Other Required Courses 

(6-7 Credits from these 

courses, determined 

locally) 



ANP 201 
CHM 101 


Advanced Human Physiology 


4 


Chemistry I 


3 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


PSY 201 


Lifespan Development 


3 


SOC 111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 



Ke 



y . -.■> ;yji' 2 I 



'Elective "Locally Del 



A.S. in Nursing 



Dental Assistant 



Program Description 

Students in the Dental Assistant program receive instruction in 
preparing patients for treatment and in chairside assisting as the 
dentist examines and treats patients. The dental assistant will expose 
and process X-ray films, sterilize instruments, provide oral health 
instruction, and assist with record keeping and other office 
management practices. Students gain necessary knowledge and 
skills in general education, basic science, dental anatomy and 
materials, chairside assisting, laboratory techniques, radiology and 
basic office procedure. In addition to academic and clinical course 
work on campus, students are provided with practical experience 
in dental offices under the supervision of College and dental office 
personnel. 

A one-year program requiring 39 credits leads to a technical 
certificate. Graduates are eligible to take the certification exam 
administered by the Dental Assisting National Board, Inc. Students 
graduating from the Dental Assistant program participate in 
evaluations of proficiency in general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Technical Certificate 
(39 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

None 



Program 
Available at: 

Lafayette 



Technical Certificate 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 39 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



General Education Core 6 

Technical Core 33 

Specialty Core N/A 

Locally Determined Courses N/A 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



COM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


ENG 1 1 1 


English Composition 


3 




DEN 102 


Dental Materials and Laboratory I 


3 


DEN 115 


Preclinical Practice I 


4 


DEN 116 


Dental Emergencies/Pharmacology 


2 


DEN 117 


Dental Office Management 


2 


DEN118 


Dental Radiography 


4 


DEN 122 


Clinical Practicum I 


1 


DEN 123 


Dental Anatomy 


2 


DEN 124 


Preventive Dentistry/Diet and Nutrition 


2 


DEN 125 


Preclinical Practice 11 


3 


DEN 129 


Dental Materials and Laboratory II 


3 


DEN 130 


Clinical Practicum II 


5 


DEN 131 


Basic Integrated Science 


2 



Dental Assistant 



Medical Assistant 



Program Description 

The graduate of the Medical Assistant program is a professional, 
multi-skilled person dedicated to assisting in patient care 
management, primarily in a physicians office. The practitioner 
performs administrative and clinical duties and may manage 
emergency situations, facilities and/or personnel. Competence 
in the field also requires that a medical assistant display 
professionalism, communicate effectively and provide instruction 
to patients. A required externship under the direct supervision 
of a physician provides valuable on-the-job experience. 

Graduates of the AAS (Medical Assistant Specialty) and TC 
(Generalist Specialty) in the Medical Assistant Program will be 
prepared to take the Certification Examination of the American 
Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA) and the American 
Medical Association (AMA). 

The two-year associate of applied science program requires 63 
credits for completion. Technical and career development 
certificates also are available. The availability of degrees will 
vary from campus to campus. Interested students should contact 
local Ivy Tech campuses. 

Students graduating from the Medical Assistant program 
participate in evaluations of proficiency in general and technical 
education. Associate degree graduates of the Medical Assistant 
program may seek immediate employment as medical assistants 
or, with the Medical Assistant specialty, choose to transfer to the 
University of Southern Indiana and complete a bachelor of science 
degree in Health Sendees. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 

Science (63 Credits) 

• Technical Certificate 

(30-48 Credits) 

Specialties Offered: 

• Administrative 

• Clinical 

• Generalist 

• Massage Therapy 

• Pharmacy Technician 



Program 
Available at: 

Anderson 
Columbus 
Evansville 

Elkhart 

Fort Wayne 

Indianapolis 

Kdkomo 

Lafayette 

Lawrenceburg (pending) 

Madison 

Marion 

Michigan City 

Muncie 

Richmond 

Sellersburg 

South Bend 

Terre Haute 



Availability of specialties 

and degrees varies by 

campus. Contact your 

local campus for more 

information. See page 6 

for contact information. 



Medical Assistant 



Medical Assistant 



Associate of Applied Science 



lo earn this degree, 
you must have 63-66 
credits in the 
following areas: 



General Education Core 1 8 

Technical Core 18 

Specialty Core 18-21 

Locally Determined Courses 6-12 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
Following Specialties 

Medical Assistant 

Specialty 

(27 Credits) 



Massage Therapy 

Specialty 

(30 Credits) 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



ANP 101 
ANP 102 


Anatomy and Physiology I 
Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 
3 


ENG111 


English Composition 


3 


* 


English/Communications Elective 


3 


*MAT 


Math Elective 


3 


* 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 




HHS 101 


Medical Terminology 


3 


HHS 102 


Medical Law and Ethics 


2 


HHS 104 


CPR and Basic Health Awareness 


1 


MEA113 


Pharmacology 


3 


MEA 131 


Medical Financial Management with Computer Applications 


3 


MEA136 


Office Administration with Computer Applications 


3 


A MEA 203 


Disease Conditions 


3 




MEA 114 


M.A. Lab Techniques 


3 


MEA 120 


M.A. Clinical Extern 


3 


MEA 121 


M.A. Administrative Extern 


3 


MEA 135 


Medical Word Processing/Transcription 


3 


MEA 137 


Medical Insurance and Basic Coding with Computer Applications 


3 


MEA 138 


Clinical I 


3 


MEA 139 


Clinical II 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


6 




MEA 160 


Massage Technician Training 1 


3 


MEA 161 


Massage Technician Training 2 


3 


MEA 163 


Holistic Approach to Massage Therapy 


3 


MEA 165 


Accupressure Theory and Methods 


3 


MEA 168 


Hydro/Thermodynamics 


1 


MEA 169 


Administrative Training 


2 


MEA 263 


Infant, Child and Pregnancy Massage 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Medical Assistant 



Medical Assistant 



Technical Certificate 




To earn this degree, 
you must have 
30-48 credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 

Choose One of the 
Following Specialties 



General Education Core 


6 


Technical Core 


3 


Specialty Core 


5-39 


Locally Determined Courses 


0-16 



HHS 101 



Required Courses 

English/Communications Elective 
Science/Mathematics/Humanities Elective 

Medical Terminology 



Credit 
Hours 

3 

3 



Administrative Specialty 
(21 Credits) 


HHS 102 
MEA 136 






Medical Law and Ethics 


2 


Office Administration with Computer Applications 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


16 


Clinical Specialty 




ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


(21 Credits) 


ANP 102 


AND 






Anatomy and Physiology 11 


3 






OR 


m 




PNU 126 


Integrated Life Science 
Locally Determined Courses 


5 
15-1C 


Generaltst Specialty 
(38-39 Credits) 




ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


ANP 102 


AND 






Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 




PNU 126 


OR 






Integrated Life Science 


5 




HHS 102 

' HHS 104 

MEA 113 


Medical Law and Ethics 


2 




CPR and Basic Health Awareness 


1 




Pharmacology 


3 




MEA 114 
MEA 120 


M.A. Lab Techniques 


3 




M.A. Clinical Extern 


3 




MEA 121 


M.A. Administrative Extern 


3 




MEA 131 


Medical Financial Management with Computer Applications 


3 
3 




MEA 135 


Medical Word Processing/Transcription 




MEA 136 
MEA 137 
MEA 138 
MEA 139 


Office Administration with Computer Applications 


3 




Medical Insurance and Basic Coding with Computer Applications 


3 




Clinical I 


3 




Clinical II 


3 



Specialties Continued Next Page 



Medical Assistant 



Medical Assistant 



Technical Certificate - Specialties 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



Massage Therapy 

Specialty 

(22 Credits) 



Pharmacy Technician 

Specialty 

(21-22 Credits) 



ANP 101 


Anatomy & Physiology I 


3 


ANP 102 


Anatomy & Physiology 11 


3 


MEA 102 


First Aid and CPR 


2 


MEA 160 


Massage Technician Training I 


3 


MEA 161 


Massage Technician Training 11 


3 


MEA 162 


Legal and Ethical Aspects of Massage Therapy 


1 


MEA 163 


Holistic Approach to Massage Therapy 


3 


MEA 164 


Emotional Transference 


1 


MEA 165 


Acupressure Theory and Methods 


3 








ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology 1 


3 

3 




AND 


ANP 102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


OR 


PNU 126 
CIS 101 


Integrated Life Science 


5 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 
2 


HHS 102 


Medical Law and Ethics 


MEA 113 

MEA 151 


Pharmacology 


3 


Pharmacy Technician I 


3 


MEA 152 
MEA 154 


Pharmacy Technician II 
Pharmacy Externship 


3 
2 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 

N Elective * * Locally Determined A Capstone Course 



Medical Assistant 



Medical Laboratory Technician 



Program Description 



The Medical Laboratory Technician program is designed to prepare 
graduates to work in clinics, physicians' offices, hospitals and 
research laboratories as medical laboratory technicians. Medical 
laboratory technicians perform laboratory procedures, define and 
solve associated problems, and use quality control techniques to 
aid in the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of patients. Courses 
in bacteriology, parasitology, chemistry, hematology, immunology, 
anatomy, physiology and immunohematology provide both theory 
and practical applications. 

The associate of applied science degree program requires 67 credits. 
Students graduating from the Medical Laboratory Technician 
program participate in evaluations of proficiency in general and 
technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 
Science (67 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

None 



Program 
Available at: 

South Bend 
Terre Haute 



11 Medical Laboratory Technician 



Medical Laboratory Technician 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 67 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Other Required Courses 



General Education Core 


18 


Technical Core 


31 


Other Required Courses 


18 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



#ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology' I 


3 


#ANP 102 


Anatomy and Physiology 11 


3 


#BIO 1 1 1 


General Microbiology 


3 


**COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


OR 


**COM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


**PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


OR 


**SOClll 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 



# Must take two of these three courses. Which two you must take will be determined locally 



CHM 101 


Chemistry I 


3 


HHS 102 


Medical Law and Ethics 


2 


MLT 101 


Fundamentals of Laboratory Techniques 


3 


MLT 102 


Routine Analysis Techniques 


3 


MLT 201 


Immunology Techniques 


3 


MLT 202 


Immunohematology Techniques 


3 


MLT 205 


Hematology Techniques I 


3 
3 


MLT 206 


Hematology Techniques 11 


MLT 207 


Chemistry Techniques I 


MLT 222 


Microbiology Techniques 


3 

2 


MLT 227 


Chemistry Techniques 11 



MLT 209 
MLT 210 


Routine Analysis Applications 
Hematology Applications 


1 
3 


MLT 212 


Immunology Applications 


1 

3 


MLT 213 


Immunohematology Applications 


MLT 215 
A MLT218 
MLT 221 


Parasitology and Mycology 


1 


Clinical Pathology 
Microbiology Applications 


3 
3 


MLT 224 


Chemistry Applications 


3 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 

' Elective ** Locally Determined * Capstone Course 



Medical Laboratory Technician 73 



Occupational TheraDv Assistant 



'Program Description 



Occupational therapy directs an individual's participation in 
selected tasks to restore, reinforce and enhance performance, 
facilitate learning of those skills and functions essential for 
adaptation and productivity, diminish or correct pathology, and 
promote and maintain health. An occupational therapy 
assistant provides service to individuals whose abilities to cope 
with living tasks have been threatened or impaired by 
developmental deficits, the aging process, physical injury or 
illness, or psychological disability. The profession serves a diverse 
population in a variety of settings such as hospitals and clinics, 
rehabilitation facilities, long-term care facilities, extended care 
facilities, sheltered workshops, schools and camps, private 
homes and community agencies. 

Students graduating from the Occupational Therapy Assistant 
program participate in evaluations of proficiency in general and 
technical education. Graduates of the program will be able to 
sit for the national certification examination for the Occupational 
Therapy Assistant administered by the National Board for 
Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful 
completion of this exam, the individual will be a certified 
Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). Most states, including 
Indiana, require a license to practice. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Science 
(72 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 



None 



Program 
Available at: 

Indianapolis* 



^NOTE: A new class is not being admitted in 2000-2001. 



74 Occupational Therapy Assistant 



Occupational Therapy Assistant 



Associate of Science 



degree, 
lave 72 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Other Required Courses 
(15 Credits) 



General Education Core 


31 


Technical Core 


26 


Other Required Courses 


15 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


ANP 102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


ANP 201 


Advanced Human Physiology 


4 


COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


**MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


OR 


**MAT112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


PSY 201 


Lifespan Development 


3 


PSY 205 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 


SOC111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 




OTA 101 


Foundations of Occupational Therapy 


3 


OTA 102 


Kinesiology 


2 


OTA 103 


Medical Conditions in Occupational Therapy 


3 


OTA 202 


Therapeutic Activities 


3 


OTA 203 


Therapeutic Group Activities 


3 


OTA 204 


Psychiatric Conditions in Occupational Therapy 


3 


OTA 205 


COTA in Physical Health 


3 


OTA 208 


COTA and Interactive Model 


3 


OTA 210 


COTA in Mental Health 


3 




OTA 201 


Field Work 1 - A 


1 


OTA 206 


Assistive Technology and Adaptive Equipment 


2 


OTA 207 


Daily Living Skills 


3 


OTA 209 


Field Work 1 - B 


1 


OTA 211 


Clinical Transition and Management 


4 


OTA 212 


Field Work 2 - A 


2 


OTA 213 


Field Work 2 - B 


2 



Key (See page 2 for definii 

H * Elective ** Locally Determined A Caps 



JL S»%.m_ &»% M. JL JL^^-^-ft . J L ^»^ \*J ^l^JL^v'JL JL^^^*- 



Program Description 



The Paramedic Science program prepares competent health care 
providers who possess the professional qualities required to 
function in the uncontrolled environment of emergency medicine 
in the pre-hospital setting. The program qualifies graduates for 
state certification as emergency medical technician-paramedics. 
Students will gain the knowledge and skills to manage the hostile 
environment of accidents and traumatic occurrences in the pre- 
hospital setting including disentanglement, controlling armed 
encounters, accomplishing rescue techniques and demonstrating 
patient care procedures. The curriculum includes clinical and 
practical instruction as well as a field internship in advanced 
emergency care and services. The degree requires 65.5 credit 
hours for completion. Students graduating from the Paramedic 
Science program participate in evaluations of proficiency in 
general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate oj Applied 
Science (65.5 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 



None 



Program 
Available at: 

Evansville 

Kokomo 

Terre Haute 



Paramedic Science 



Paramedic Science 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 65.5 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



General Education Core 

Technical Core 

Specialty Core 

Locally Determined Courses 



is 

47.5 
N/A 
N/A 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


ANP 102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


COM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


PHL 102 


Introduction to Ethics 


3 



Technical 



PAR 102 


Emergency Medical Technician-Basic Training 


7.5 


PAR 113 


Preparatory I 


2.5 


PAR 114 


Preparatory II 


3.5 


PAR 115 


Airway, Patient Assessment 


5 
3 


PAR 200 


Trauma 


PAR 210 


Medical I 


6 


PAR 213 


Medical II 


6.5 


PAR 215 


Special Considerations 


5 


PAR 220 


Operations 


2.5 


PAR 221 


Ambulance Internship 


6 



Paramedic Science 



Phvsical Therapist Assistant 



Program Description 



A physical therapist assistant is a health care worker who is 
educated at the associate degree level and carries out many 
patient-care functions under the supervision of the physical 
therapist. The program provides the student with the cognitive 
and affective competencies to administer therapeutic and 
psychosocial support for individuals with musculoskeletal, 
neurological, sensorimotor, cardiopulmonary, vascular or other 
physiological dysfunctions. The physical therapist assistant 
works under the supervision of a physical therapist in a variety 
of clinical settings that may include a hospital, nursing home, 
wellness center, athletic facility, private office or home. Physical 
therapist assistants (PTAs) may include in their duties application 
of hot and cold modalities, massage, therapeutic exercise, gait 
training, adjusting and fitting of braces and splints, electrical 
stimulation, biofeedback and patient and family education. 

The required course work for the A.S. in Physical Therapist 
Assistant totals 66 hours and is comprised of 42 semester hours 
of technical course work and 24 hours of general education. 
A cooperative program with community hospitals and facilities 
allows the student to gain the necessary patient contact and 
clinical experience. Students graduating from the Physical 
Therapist Assistant program participate in evaluations of 
proficiency in general and technical education. Graduates of 
the program will be able to sit for the Physical Therapist Assistant 
licensure examination, administered under the direction of the 
Indiana State Health Professions Bureau. Most states, including 
Indiana, require a license to practice. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Science 
(66 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

None 



Program 
Available at: 

Gary 
Muncie 



Physical Therapist Assistant 



Physical Therapist Assistant 



Associate of Science 



To earn this degree, 


General Education Core 


24 


you must have 66 


Technical Core 


42 


credits in the 


Specialty Core 


N/A 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



You Must Have 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



General Education 



Technical 



ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 




ANP 102 
**COM 101 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 




Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 




**COM 102 


OR 






Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 




ENG 111 
**MAT 111 


English Composition 


3 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 




OR 






**MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 




PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 




SOC 111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 




SCI 111 


Physical Science 


3 






PTA 101 


Introduction to Physical Therapist Assisting 


3 




PTA 102 


Diseases, Trauma, and Terminology 


3 




PTA 103 


Administrative Aspects of Physical Therapist Assisting 


3 




PTA 106 
PTA 107 


PTA Treatment Modalities I 


5 




Kinesiology 


5 




PTA 115 


Clinical I 


2 




PTA 205 
PTA 207 


Clinical II 


5 




PTA Treatment Modalities II 


5 


PTA 215 


Clinical III 


5 




PTA 217 


PTA Treatment Modalities III 


5 




PTA 224 


Current Issues and Review 


1 





Key 






Physical Therapist Assistant 



Practical Nursin 



Program Description 



Degrees Available: 

• Technical Certificate 
(51-52 Credits) 



The licensed practical nurse (LPN) is an integral part of the health 
care team. The Practical Nursing program is a one-year course of 
study leading to a technical certificate. This accredited program 
prepares the individual to take the state licensure exam to become 
a licensed practical nurse. The program is designed for students 
to gam knowledge and technical skills necessary to care 
appropriately for patients in a variety of health care settings such 
as hospitals, convalescent centers and physicians' offices. Students 
learn to administer medications and treatments commonly 
performed by licensed practical nurses. All courses must be 
completed with a grade of "C" or better. 

Career and educational mobility are also provided for those who 
wish to progress to the Associate of Science in Nursing level. A 
description of this transition is found in the Associate of Science 
in Nursing program description. 



Specialties Offered: 

None 



Program 
Available at: 

Anderson 
Bloomington 
Columbus 
Elkhart 
Evansville 
Fort Wayne 

Gary 

Greencastle 

Indianapolis 

Kokomo 

Lafayette 

Madison 

Muncie 

Richmond 

Sellersburg 

South Bend 

Terre Haute 

Valparaiso 



Practical Nursing 



Practical Nursing 



Technical Certificate 




iegree, 
you must have 
51-52 credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



General Education Core 


6 


Technical Core 


45-46 


Specialty Core 


N/A 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



ENGlll 


English Composition 


3 


PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 




PNU 114 


Nursing Issues and Trends 


1 


PNU 121 


Introduction to Nursing I 


4 


PNU 122 


Introduction to Nursing II 


6 


PNU 123 


Pharmacology 


3 


**PNU 126 


Integrated Life Science 


5 


OR 


**ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


AND 


**ANP 102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


PNU 127 


Care of the Adult I 


5 


PNU 128 


Care of the Adult II 


5 


PNU 129 


Care of the Adult III 


5 


PNU 130 


Nursing Care of the Older Adult 


5 


PNU 131 


Nursing Care of the Child-Bearing Family 


6 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 

' Elective " * Locally Determined * Capstone Course 



Radiologic Technolo 



3! 



Program Description 

The radiologic technologist prepares and positions patients for X- 
rays, determines the proper voltage, current, and exposure time, 
and operates the equipment. Radiologic technologists work in 
hospitals, medical laboratories, physicians' and dentists' offices 
and clinics, federal and state health agencies, and certain 
educational institutions. 

The associate of applied science program includes courses in the 
following areas: radiologic technique, exposure, positioning, 
protection, radiation physics and ethics. Clinical practice and 
supplemental instruction are provided in accredited hospitals. 
Upon completion of program requirements, graduates are eligible 
to take the National Registry Examination. 

Students graduating from the Radiologic Technology program 
participate in evaluations of proficiency in general and technical 
education. Graduates of the Radiologic Technology program may 
seek immediate employment as radiologic technologists or choose 
to transfer to the University of Southern Indiana and complete a 
baccalaureate degree in radiologic fields. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 
Science (84 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

None 



Program 
Available at: 

Columbus 
Indianapolis 

Marion 
Terre Haute 



Radiologic Technology 



Radiologic Technology 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 84 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 



General Education Core 18 

Technical Core 63 

Specialty Core N/A 

Locally Determined Courses 3 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



General Education 



Technical 



ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


ANP 102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 
3 


COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


**PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


OR 


**SOC 111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 



CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


HHS 101 


Medical Terminology 


3 


HHS 102 


Medical Law and Ethics 


2 


PNU 123 


Pharmacology 


3 


RAD 101 


Orientation/Nursing X-Ray Technology 


4 


RAD 102 


Principles of Radiographic Exposures I 


2 


RAD 103 


Radiographic Positioning I 


3 


RAD 104 


X-Ray Clinical Education I 


4 


RAD 105 


Radiographic Positioning II 


3 


RAD 106 


X-Ray Clinical Education II 


4 


RAD 107 


Radiation Physics 


3 
2 


RAD 109 


Imaging Techniques 


RAD 201 


Radiographic Positioning III 


2 


RAD 202 


X-Ray Clinical Education III 


4 


RAD 203 


X-Ray Clinical Education IV 


4 


RAD 204 


X-Ray Clinical Education V 


4 
2 

3 

2 


RAD 205 


Pathology for Radiologic Technology 


RAD 206 


Radiobiology and Radiation Protection 


RAD 208 


Principles of Radiographic Exposures 11 


RAD 209 


Radiographic Positioning IV 


3 


A RAD 299 


General Examination Review 
Locally Determined Courses 


3 
3 



> 



Key x'c page 2 



for definitions) 



Elective •" Locally Derermined A C3psione Course 



Radiologic Technology 



Respiratory Care 



Program Description 

A respiratory care practitioner is an allied health professional who 
works under the direction of physicians in the diagnosis, evaluation, 
treatment, education and care of patients with cardiopulmonary 
diseases or abnormalities. 

A graduate of the associate of applied science/associate of science 
program will be eligible to take the entry level and advanced 
practitioner exams given by the National Board for Respiratory Care 
(NBRC). Successful examination candidates will be awarded the 
Registered Respiratory Therapist credential. Graduates of the technical 
certificate program will be eligible to take the entry-level practitioner 
exam given by the NBRC. Successful exam candidates will be awarded 
the Certified Respiratory Therapy Technician credential. 

The two-year associate of applied science degree requires 79 credits 
for completion. An associate of science degree is available at selected 
campuses. The availability of degrees will vary from campus to campus. 
Interested students should contact local Ivy Tech campuses. 

Students graduating from the Respiratory Care program participate in 
evaluations of proficiency in general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: i 

• Associate of Science I 
Associate of Applied 
Science (79 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

None 

Program 
Available at: 

Fort Wayne 
Indianapolis 

Lafayette 
Michigan City 



Respiratory Care 



Respiratory Care 

Associate of Applied Science / Associate of Science 



To earn this degree, 


General Education Core 


24 


you must have 79 


Technical Core 


55 


credits in the 


Specialty Core 


N/A 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


ANP 102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


BIO 211 


General Microbiology 


3 


CHM 101 


Chemistry I 


3 
3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


ENG211 


Technical Writing 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 



Technical 



RES 121 


Introduction to Respiratory Care 


6 


RES 122 


Therapeutic Modalities 


3 


RES 123 


Cardiopulmonary Physiology 


3 


RES 124 


Clinical Practicum I 


3 
3 


RES 125 


Critical Care I 


RES 126 


Clinical Medicine I 


3 


RES 127 


Clinical Practicum II 


3 


RES 128 


Clinical Practicum III 


9 


RES 221 


Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics 


3 


RES 222 


Critical Care II 


3 


RES 223 


Respiratory Pharmacology 


3 


A RES 224 


Clinical Medicine II 


3 

2 


RES 226 


Continuing Care 


RES 227 


Clinical Practicum IV 


6 


RES 229 


Emergency Management 


2 



Key (See pa^e 2 for definitions) 



Respiratory Care 



Surgical Technolo 




Program Description 

The surgical technologist is a member of the surgical team, qualified 
by didactic and clinical education to provide safe and efficient 
care to the patient in the operating room. Instruction consists of 
courses in anatomy and physiology, microbiology, pharmacology, 
medical law and ethics, surgical techniques and surgical 
procedures. 

Closely supervised clinical education is provided in local area 
hospitals. The surgical technologist actively participates in surgery 
by performing scrub and/or circulating duties which include 
passing instruments and supplies to surgical team members, 
preparing and positioning the patient, operating equipment, 
assisting the anesthesiologist and keeping accurate records. 
Obstetrical and emergency room clinical experiences may be 
provided by specific hospitals. The two-year associate of applied 
science program requires 67 credits. 

Students graduating from the Surgical Technology program 
participate in evaluations of proficiency in general and technical 
education. Associate degree graduates of the Surgical Technology 
program may seek immediate employment as surgical technologists 
or choose to transfer to the University of Southern Indiana and 
complete a bachelor of science degree in Health Services. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate oj Applied 
Science (67 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

None 



Program 
Available at: 

Columbus 

Evansville 

Indianapolis 

Lafayette 
Michigan City 

Muncie 
Jene Haute 



Lm.uuiiiJjjiLii.ii.ua 



Surgical Technology 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 67 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 



General Education 



General Education Core 


21 


Technical Core 


46 


Other Required Courses 


N/A 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


ANP 102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


BIO 211 


General Microbiology 


3 


COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


OR 


COM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


ENG 1 1 1 


English Composition 


3 


*MAT 


Mathematics Elective 


3 


* 


Humanities/Social Science Elective 


3 



Technical 



HHS 101 


Medical Terminology 


3 


HHS 102 


Medical Law and Ethics 


2 


MEA113 


Pharmacology 


3 


SUR111 


Fundamentals of Surgical Technology 


4 


SUR112 


Application of Surgical Fundamentals 


2 


SUR113 


Surgical Procedures I 


3 


SUR114 


Clinical Applications I 


3 


SUR211 


Surgical Procedures II 


6 


SUR212 


Clinical Applications II 


9 


SUR213 


Surgical Procedures III 


3 


SUR214 


Clinical Applications 111 


8 



.ocally Determined A Capsti 



Surgical Technology 




Public Services 



The Public Services Division is made up of Ivy Tech programs in Early 
Childhood Education, Hospitality Administration, Human Services, 
Paralegal and Public Safety. 






S TA2> 

.♦ ■ e 

c 

V 

Y 



Programs in this division are characterized by heavy involvement with 
areas of the public sector. Both the educational environment and the 
employment settings for many graduates are concerned with various 
aspects of social services such as early childhood education and human 
services. Hospitality, paralegal and public safety are associated with 
providing services to diverse sectors of the community. 



Many of these programs are recognized and accredited by appropriate 
external accrediting agencies. Students should contact the local Ivy 
Tech campus for information concerning programs and course offerings. 



88 Public Services 



■^TaCTimriiroffiiyiUtA^iMM 



Program Description 



The Early Childhood Education program focuses on early childhood 
growth and development, including adult-child relationships. 
Emphasis is placed on the development of skills and techniques for 
providing appropriate environments and care for young children. 
Instruction is provided in the physical, emotional, social and cognitive 
areas of early childhood. The student develops competencies through 
classroom instruction, observation and participation in early childhood 
settings. 

Employment opportunities include day care, nursery school, Head 
Start, family day care, pediatrics setting, nanny care, school aide, 
school age care, employer-sponsored day care, infant/toddler care, 
resource and referral services, intergenerational care, respite/sick care 
and other settings. 

The two-year associate of applied science degree program requires 
63 credits. A technical certificate also is available. An associate of 
science degree transfers to Ball State University's baccalaureate program 
in Family and Consumer Sciencs. The Early Childhood Education 
program is available via distance education for interested students. 
Contact the nearest Ivy Tech campus for information and to enroll. 
The availability of degrees will vary from campus to campus. Interested 
students should contact local Ivy Tech campuses. Students graduating 
from the Early Childhood Education program participate in 
evaluations of proficiency in general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 

Science (63 Credits) 

• Technical Certificate 

(30 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

• Administration 

• Curriculum 

• Generalist 

• Infant/Toddler 

Program 
Available at: 



Columbus 
Evansville 
Fort Wayne 

Gary 

Indianapolis 

Lafayette 

Logansport 

Muncie 

Richmond 

South Bend (Pending) 

Tene Haute 



Availability of specialties 

and degrees varies by 

campus. Contact your 

local campus for more 

information. See page 6 

for contact information. 



Early Childhood Education 



Early Childhood Education 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 


General Education Core 


18 


you must have 63 


Technical Core 


2/ 


credits in the 


Specialty Core 


18 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
Following Specialties 

Administration Specialty 
(18 credits) 



Required Courses 



Must include three of the first five courses below: 



Credit 
Hours 



ENG111 


English Composition 


3 


*ENG112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


OR 


* ENG211 


Technical Writing 


3 


OR 


*COM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


*MAT 1 1 1 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


OR 


*MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


* 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 


SOC 111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 



CHD 122 


Child Growth and Development 


3 


CHD 124 


Developmental and Cultural Awareness 


3 


CHD 142 


Beginnings in Child Development 


3 


CHD 143 


Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom 


3 


CHD 144 


Reflections on Practice 


3 


CHD 202 


Family/Teacher Partnership Skills 


3 


CHD 206 


Early Childhood Administration 


3 


CHD 209 


Families in Transition 


3 


A CHD251 


Early Childhood Professionalism 


3 



*CHD 145 


CDA Process 


3 


*CHD 155 


Generalist Practicum 


3 


*CHD 165 


Infant/Toddler Practicum 


3 


*CHD 175 


Preschool Practicum 


3 


*CHD 185 


School Age Practicum 


3 


CHD 216 


The Exceptional Child 


3 


CHD 220 


Leadership and Mentoring in the Early Childhood Profession 


3 


CHD 242 


Curriculum Planning for Early Childhood Administration 


3 



Specialties Continued Next Page 



90 Early Childhood Education 






Early Childhood Education 



M 



Associate of Applied Science — Specialties 

Required Courses 



Curriculum Specialty 
(18 Credits) 



Credit 
Hours 



Must include 


two of the first five courses below: 






*CHD 145 


CDA Process 




3 


*CHD 155 


Generalist Practicum 




3 


*CHD 165 


Infant/Toddler Practicum 




3 


*CHD 175 


Preschool Practicum 




3 


*CHD 185 


School Age Practicum 




3 


Must take one 


of the two courses below: 






*CHD211 


School Age Child Care 




3 


*CHD213 


Infant/Toddler Care Programming 


3 


CHD221 


Emerging Literacy in Young Children 


3 


CHD 225 


Cognitive Curriculum 




3 


CHD 242 


Curriculum Planning for Early 


Childhood Administration 


r. 



Generalist Specialty 
(18 Credits) 



Must include three of the first five courses below: 




*CHD 145 


CDA Process 


3 


*CHD 155 


Generalist Practicum 


3 


*CHD 165 


Infant/Toddler Practicum 


3 


*CHD 175 


Preschool Practicum 


3 


*CHD 185 


School Age Practicum 


3 


CHD 216 


Exceptional Child 


3 


CHD 221 


Emerging Literacy in Young Children 


3 


CHD 225 


Cognitive Curriculum 


3 



Infant/Toddler 

Specialty 

(18 Credits) 



CHD 113 


Environments for Infants and Toddlers 


3 


CHD 120 


Infant/Toddler Growth and Development 


3 


Must take two of the three courses below: 


*CHD 145 


CDA Process 


3 


*CDH 155 
*CHD 165 


Generalist Practicum 


3 


Infant/Toddler Practicum 


3 


CHD 213 


Infant Care Programming 


3 


CHD 216 


Exceptional Child 


3 




OR 


CHD 217 


Skills for Parenting 


3 



Early Childhood Education 91 



Early Childhood Education 



Associate of Science 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Required Courses 



To earn this degree, 


General Education Core 


27 








you must have 


Technical Core 


36 








63 credits in the 


Specialty Core 


N/A 




following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 


Ball State 

UNIVtRSm 



Curriculum designed for 
transfer to Ball State 
University's baccalaureate 
program in Family and 
Consumer Sciences 

Credit 
Hours 



ARH 101 


Survey of Art and Culture I 


3 


BIO 101 


Introductory Biology 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


HSY 101 


Survey of American History I 


3 


MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


PHL 101 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


SOC 111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 



Technical 



CHD 122 


Child Growth and Development 


3 


CHD 124 


Developmentally Appropriate Guidance in a Cultural Context 


3 


CHD 142 


Beginnings in Child Development 


3 


CHD 143 


Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom 


3 


CHD 144 


Reflections on Practice in Early Childhood 


3 


CHD 145 


CDA Process 


3 


OR 


CHD 155 


Generalist Practicum 


3 


CHD 206 


Early Childhood Administration 


3 


CHD 209 


Families in Transition 


3 


CHD 216 


The Exceptional Child 


3 


CHD 217 


Skills for Parenting 


3 


CHD 221 


Emerging Literacy in Young Children 


3 


CHD 251 


Early Childhood Professionalism 


3 



Key (Vcpagc 2 for definitions 



Early Childhood Edljcation 



Early Childhood Education 



Technical Certificate 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 30 
credits in the 
following areas: 



General Education Core 


6 


Technical Core 


24 


Specialty Core 


N/A 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



You Must Have 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



General Education 



Technical 



ENG 101 


English Composition 


3 


**PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


OR 


**SOClll 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 




CHD 122 


Child Growth and Development 


3 


CHD 124 


Developmentally Appropriate Guidance in a Cultural Context 


3 


CHD 142 


Beginnings in Child Development 


3 


CHD 143 


Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom 


3 


CHD 144 


Reflections on Practice in Early Childhood 


3 
3 


CHD 145 


CDA Process 


OR 


CHD 155 


Generalist Practicum 


3 


CHD 216 


The Exceptional Child 


3 


CHD 221 


Emerging Literacy in Young Children 


3 



Ke y (See page 2 for definitions) 

' Elective ** Locally Determined A Capstone Course 



Early Childhood Education 93 



Hospitality Administration 



Program Description 



The Hospitality Administration program emphasizes the 
techniques of such hospitality leaders as Ritz, Escoffier, Statler, 
Hilton and Marriott. By choosing a specialty area, students begin 
building leadership skills for the profession of welcoming and 
serving guests. The hospitality programs offered by Ivy Tech 
produce graduates who can perfonn well in the hospitality industry. 
Specialties are available in baking and pastry arts, culinary arts, 
food service (technical certificate only), hotel and restaurant 
management, and casino management. A two-year program 
requiring 64-66 credits leads to an associate of applied science 
degree. Technical certificates and career development certificates 
are also available. The availability of specialties and degrees will 
vary from campus to campus. Interested students should contact 
local Ivy Tech campuses. Students graduating from the Hospitality 
Administration program participate in evaluations of proficiency 
in general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate oj Applied 

Science (64-66 Credits) 

• Technical Certificate 

(30-33 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

• Baking & Pastry Arts 

• Casino Management i 

• Culinary Arts 

• Hotel & Restaurant 
Management 

• Food Service (TC only) 



Program 
Available at: 

East Chicago 
Fort Wayne 

Gary 

Indianapolis 

Michigan City 

South Bend 



Availability of specialtie: 

and degrees varies by 

campus. Contact your 

local campus for more 

information. See page 6 

for contact information. 






Hospitality Administration 



Hospitality Administration 

Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degri 
you must have 
64-66 credits in the 
following areas 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
ollowing Specialties 

Baking & Pastry Arts 

Specialty 

(30 credits) 



General Education Core 18 

Technical Core 18 

Specialty Core 19-30 

Locally Determined Courses 0- 1 1 



Required Courses 



Specialties Continued Next Page 



Credit 
Hours 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


*ECN 


Economics Elective 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


**MAT111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


OR 


**MAT112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


* 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


* 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 



HOS 101 


Sanitation and First Aid 


3 


HOS 102 


Basic Foods Theory and Skills 


3 


HOS 104 


Nutrition 


3 


HOS 109 


Hospitality Purchasing 


2 
3 


HOS 201 


Hospitality Organization and Human Resource Management 


HOS 203 


Menu, Design, and Layout 


2 


HOS 204 


Food and Beverage Cost Control 


2 



BKR 101 


Yeast Breads I 


3 


BKR 102 


Yeast Breads II 


3 


BKR 103 


Merchandising 


3 


BKR 104 


Baking Science 


3 
3 


BKR 201 


Cakes, Icings, and Fillings 


BKR 202 


Advanced Decorating/Candies 


3 


HOS 105 


Introduction to Baking 


3 


HOS 106 


Pantry and Breakfast 


3 


HOS 207 


Advanced Baking and Chocolates 


3 


A HOS 280 


Co-op/Internship/Externship/Practicum 


3 



Key 



Hospitality- Administration 



Hospitality Administration 



Associate of Applied Science — Specialties 



Casino Management 

Specialty 

(30 Credits) 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



A BUS 204 


Case Problems in Business 


3 


HOS 132 


Techniques of Casino Games: Blackjack 


6 


HOS 141 


Introduction to Casino Operations 


3 


HOS 231 


Techniques of Casino Games: Craps-Subsequent 


7 




Locally Determined Courses 


11 



Culinary Arts Specialty 
(30 Credits) 



CUL110 


Meat Cutting 


2 


CUL 207 


Classical Cuisine 


3 


OIL 212 


Fish and Seafood 


2 


HOS 103 


Soups, Stocks, and Sauces 


2 


HOS 105 


Introduction to Baking 


3 


HOS 106 


Pantry and Breakfast 


3 


HOS 108 


Table Sendee 


3 


HOS 202 


Garde Manger 


3 


A HOS 280 


Co-op/Internship/Externship/Practicum 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


6 



Hotel & Restaurant 

Management Specialty 

(28 Credits) 



ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


BUS 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


BUS 102 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 105 


Principles of Management 


3 


HOS 108 


Table Service 


3 


HOS 205 


Food and Beverage Cost Control Applications 


1 


A HOS 280 


Co-op/Internship/Extemship/Practicum 


3 


HRM 202 


Front Office 


3 


HRM 206 


Supervisory Housekeeping 


3 



Hospitality Adminis 



Hospitality Administration 



Technical Certificates — Casino Management 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 34 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Specialty 
(25 Credits) 



General Education Core 6 

Technical Core 3 

Specialty Core 1 6 

Locally Determined Courses 9 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



**ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


OR 


**COM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 
3 


**MAT111 


Intermediate Algebra 


OR 




**MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 




HOS 101 


Sanitation and First Aid 


3 








HOS 132 


Techniques of Casino Games: Blackjack 


6 


HOS 141 


Introduction to Casino Operations 


3 


HOS 231 


Techniques of Casino Games: Craps-Subsequent 


7 




Locally Determined Courses 


9 



Key See page 2 



Hospitality Administration 9 / 



Hospitality Administration 



Technical Certificate— Food Service 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 30 
credits in the 
following areas: 


General Education Core 


6 


Technical Core 
Specialty Core 
Locally Determined Courses 


3 
6 
15 



You Must Have 



General Education 



Technical 



Specialty 
(21 Credits) 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



**COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


OR 


**ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


SOC 111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 




HOS 101 


Sanitation and First Aid 


3 




HOS 102 


Basic Foods Theory and Skills 


3 


HOS 104 


Nutrition 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 



Key (See page 2 for definiti 

'Elective " Locally Determined A Canst 



Hospitality Administration 



Human Services 



Program Description 



The Human Services program offers students the opportunity to become 
human services generalists and/or to concentrate in the areas of 
substance abuse, gerontology, correctional rehabilitation services or 
mental health. 

Human services professionals reach out to individuals, families and 
communities. The Human Services program provides students with 
the broad understanding they need to help others meet their 
psychological, social and environmental needs. The human services 
generalist may find employment in a variety of settings such as 
community centers, group homes, substance abuse centers and nursing 
homes. 

Those who study human services with a focus on substance abuse may 
find positions in substance abuse centers (residential, detoxification 
and hospitals) as counselors or residents-in-training. Those who focus 
on gerontology may find jobs in adult day care centers, senior citizens 
centers and extended care facilities. 

Program objectives include training the entry-level worker, providing 
education and training to upgrade the skills and knowledge of those 
currently employed, and providing development and enhancement. 
Throughout the program students examine their values and attitudes 
which reflect upon their interactions with others. 

The associate of applied science degree requires 62 credits. Human 
Services students wishing to pursue a Bachelor's of Arts or Bachelor's of 
Science degree in Community Health at Indiana State University or in 
Social Work at Ball State University and enter as a junior-year student 
may complete an Associate of Science degree in Human Services. 
Students completing an associate of science program will also be able 
to enter the workforce, as well as to transfer to ISU or BSU. The 
availability of degrees and specialties will vary from campus to campus. 
Interested students should contact local Ivy Tech campuses. Students 
graduating from the Human Services program participate in evaluations 
of proficiency in general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 

Science (62 Credits) 

• Associate of Science 

(65 Credits) 

• Technical Certificate in 
Mental Health 

(30 Credits) 

Specialties Offered: 

• Correctional 
Rehabilitation Services 

• Generalist 

• Gerontology 

• Mental Health 

• Substance Abuse 

Program 
Available at: 

Fort Wayne 
Indianapolis 

Madison 

Muncie 
Sellersburg 
Terre Haute 



Availability of specialties 

and degrees varies by 

campus. Contact your 

local campus for more 

information. See page 6 

for contact information. 



Human Services 



Human Services 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 62 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



General Education Core 

Technical Core 

Specialty Core 

Locally Determined Courses 



18 
29 

\2 
3 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



**BIO 101 


Introductory Biology 


3 




OR 


**SCI 111 


Physical Science 


3 


COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 

3 
3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


**MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


OR 


**MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


POL 101 


Introduction to American Government and Politics 


3 
3 


**PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


OR 


**SOClll 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
Following Specialties 



HMS 101 


Introduction to Human Services 


3 




HMS 102 


Helping Relationship Techniques 


3 




HMS 103 


Interviewing and Assessment 


3 




HMS 201 


Internship I 


4 




A HMS 202 


Internship II 


4 




HMS 203 


Internship Seminar I 


3 




HMS 204 


Internship Seminar II 


3 




HMS 205 


Behavioral/Reality Techniques 


3 




HMS 206 


Group Process and Skills 


3 





Correctional 

Rehabilitation Services 

Specialty 

(15 credits) 



HMS 105 


Introduction to Correctional Rehabilitation Services 


3 


HMS 113 


Problems of Substance Abuse in Society 


3 


OR 


HMS 215 


Juvenile Delinquency 


3 


HMS 240 


Rehabilitation Process: Probation and Parole 


3 


PSY 201 


Lifespan Development 


3 


OR 


PSY 205 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


3 



Specialties Continued Next Page 



Human Services- 



Human Services 



Associate of Applied Science — Specialties 



Generalist Specialty 
(15 credits) 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


PSY 201 


Lifespan Development 


3 


*HMS 


Human Services Elective 


3 


*HMS 


Human Services Elective 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


3 



3erontology specialty 

(15 credits) 

(Choose 15 credits) 



CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


HMS 108 


Psychology of Aging 


3 


HMS 114 


Social Services in Long-Term Care _ 


3 


HMS. 120 


Health and Aging 


3 


HMS 124 


Activity Director Basic 


6 


HMS 130 


Social Aspects of Aging 


3 


HMS 140 


Loss and Grief 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


3 



ental Health Specialty 
(15 credits) 



HMS 104 


Crisis Intervention 


3 


HMS 113 


Problems of Substance Abuse in Society 


3 


OR 


HMS 140 


Loss and Grief 


3 


OR 


HMS 220 


Issues and Ethics in Human Services 


3 


PSY 201 


Lifespan Development 


3 


PSY 205 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


3 



Substance Abuse 

Specialty 

(15 credits) 



HMS 113 


Problems of Substance Abuse in Society 


3 


HMS 208 


Treatment Models of Substance Abuse 


3 


HMS 209 


Counseling Issues 


3 


HMS 210 


Codependency 


3 


OR 


PSY 205 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


3 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 

* Elective * • Locally Determined A Capstone Course 



Human Services 



Human Services 



Associate of Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 65 
credits in the 
following areas: 




General Education Core 

Technical Core 

Specialty Core 

Locally Determined Courses 



27 






Curriculum designed for 


38 






transfer to Ball State 


N/A 


\Im/ University's Bachelor in 


N/A 


Bau^tate Social Work 




UNIVERSITY. 



You Must Have 



Required Courses 



General Education 



BIO 101 


Introductory Biology 


3 


COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


POL 101 


Introduction to American Government and Politics 


3 


PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


SOC 111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 


PSY 201 


Lifespan Development 




PSY 205 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 



Technics 



CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


HMS 101 


Introduction to Human Services 


3 


HMS 102 


Helping Relationship Techniques 


3 


HMS 103 


Interviewing and Assessment 


3 


HMS 113 


Problems of Substance Abuse 


3 


HMS 201 


Internship I 


4 


A HMS 202 


Internship II 


4 


HMS 203 


Internship Seminar I 


3 


HMS 204 


Internship Seminar II 


3 


HMS 205 


Behavioral/Reality Techniques 


3 


HMS 206 


Group Process and Skills 


3 


HMS 220 


Issues and Ethics in Human Services 





Human Service; 



Human Services 



Associate of Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 65 


General Education Core 


27 


Technical Core 


38 


credits in the 


Specialty Core 


N/A 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



You Must Have 




Required Courses 



Curriculum designed for 
transfer to Indiana State 
University's BA or BS in 
Community Health. 



Credit 
Hours 



General Education 



Technical 



BIO 101 


Introductory Biology 


3 


COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


OR 


ENG 211 


Technical Writing 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


OR 


MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


POL 101 


Introduction to American Government and Politics 


3 


PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


SOC 111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 




CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


HMS 101 


Introduction to Human Services 


3 


HMS 102 


Helping Relationship Techniques 


3 


HMS 103 


Interviewing and Assessment 


3 


HMS 104 


Crisis Intervention 


3 


HMS 201 


Internship 1 


4 


A HMS 202 


Internship II 


4 


HMS 203 


Internship Seminar I 


3 


HMS 204 


Internship Seminar II 


3 


HMS 205 


Behavioral/Reality Techniques 


3 


HMS 206 


Group Process and Skills 


3 


HMS 207 


Program Planning/Policy Issues 


3 



Hi man Services 



Human Services 



Technical Certificate — Mental Health 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 30 
credits in the 
following areas: 



General Education Core 
Technical Core 
Other Required Courses 
Locally Determined Courses 



6 
3 

6 
15 



You Must Have 



Required Courses 



Credit 



GENERAL EDUCATION COM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology 



Technical 



HMS 101 



Introduction to Human Services 



3 



Other Required Courses 
(21 Credits) 



HMS 205 


Behavioral/Reality Techniques 


3 


PSY 205 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 



Human Services 



Program Description 

Recognizing the demand for trained paralegals, Ivy Tech has 
shaped a curriculum with input from attorneys and other 
professionals associated with the legal field. These advisors offer 
Ivy Tech the opportunity to establish the qualifications necessary 
for success in the paralegal field. 

The duties of trained paralegals can range from research and 
writing to interviewing and investigations. For example, paralegals 
can be found performing legal research, drafting legal 
correspondence and legal pleadings, interviewing clients and 
witnesses, or managing trial documents and exhibits. 

An Ivy Tech education provides students with the wide variety of 
skills necessary to succeed in this career. The curriculum 
emphasizes written and oral communication skills and provides 
in-class opportunities for technical skill development. Courses 
are taught by attorneys who are selected based upon their 
experience in the subject matter, as well as their familiarity with 
the function of paralegals as part of the legal team. 

A two-year program requiring 60 credits leads to an associate of 
applied science degree. A 63-credit Associate of Science degree 
will transfer to Ball State University. Students graduating from 
the Paralegal program participate in evaluations of proficiency in 
general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 

Science (60 Credits) 

• Associate of Science 

(63 Credits) 

Specialties Offered: 

None 



Program 
Available at: 

Fort Wayne 
Indianapolis 

Muncie 
Valparaiso 



Paralegal 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 60 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical Core 



Locally Determined 

Courses 

(21 Credits) 

Choose From This List 

of Courses 



General Education Core 
Technical Core 
Specialty Core 
Locally Determined Courses 




Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



**ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


OR 


**BIO 101 


Introductory Biology 


3 




OR 


• 


**SCI 111 


Physical Science 


3 


COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


* 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 




**ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 


OR 


**CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


LEG 101 


Introduction to Paralegal Studies 


3 


LEG 102 


Legal Research and Writing 


3 


LEG 103 


Civil Procedures 


3 


LEG 106 


Torts and Claims Investigation 


3 


LEG 202 


Advanced Trial Procedures 


3 


A LEG 204 


Advanced Legal Writing 


3 




ACC 105 


Income Tax 1 


3 


BUS 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


BUS 102 


Business Law 


3 


LEG 104 


Torts 


3 


LEG 105 


Business Associations 


3 


LEG 107 


Contracts and Commercial Law 


3 


LEG 108 


Property Law 


3 


LEG 203 


Law Office Management and Technology 


3 


LEG 209 


Family Law 


3 


LEG 210 


Wills, Trusts and Probate 


3 


LEG 211 


Criminal Law 


3 


LEG 212 


Bankruptcy Law 


3 


LEG 280 


Co-op/Internship 


3 


LEG 281-294 


Special Topics in Paralegal 


1-5 




Associate of Science 



Paralegal 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 63 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical Core 



Electwes 

(12 Credits) 

Choose From This 

List of Courses 



General Education Core 


30 






Curriculum designed tc 


Technical Core 


21 






transfer to Ball State 


Specialty Core 
Electives 


N/A 
12 


V Iffli / University's BS in Legal 
^jfr Assistance Studies. 
BAtL State 
University. 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



BIO 101 


Introductory Biology 


3 


COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


HSY 101 


Survey of American History I 


3 


OR 


HSY 102 


Survey of American History II 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


PHL 101 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


PHL 102 


Introduction to Ethics 


3 


POL 101 


Introduction to American Govt, and Politics 


3 


PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


OR 


SOC 111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 




ACC 101 


Principles of Accounting I 


3 


LEG 101 


Introduction to Paralegal Studies 


3 


LEG 102 


Legal Research and Writing 


3 


LEG 103 


Civil Procedures 


3 


LEG 106 


Torts and Claims Investigation 


3 


LEG 202 


Advanced Trial Procedures 


3 


A LEG 204 


Advanced Legal Writing 


3 




BUS 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


BUS 102 


Business Law 


3 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


LEG 104 


Torts 


3 


LEG 105 


Business Associations 


3 


LEG 107 


Contracts and Commercial Law 


3 


LEG 108 


Property Law 


3 


LEG 203 


Law Office Management and Technology 


3 


LEG 209 


Family Law 


3 


LEG 210 


Wills, Trusts and Probate 


3 


LEG 211 


Criminal Law 


3 


LEG 212 


Bankruptcy Law 


3 


LEG 280 


Co-op/Internship 


3 


LEG 281-294 


Special Topics in Paralegal 


1-5 



Public Safe 




Program Description 



The Public Safety program is designed to meet the ongoing needs 
of municipalities, students, businesses and industries. The program 
develops technical skills, general knowledge, critical thinking and 
problem solving abilities of students. Broad-based technical skills 
and critical thinking processes assist students in adapting to changes 
in the work environment and promoting successful advancement 
on the job. 

Specialty areas allow students to choose an emphasis in 
environmental care, fire science, hazardous materials or public 
administration. Associate of applied science degrees require 60-63 
credits. Technical certificates and career development certificates 
are available. The availability of associate of applied science 
specialties and technical certificates will vary from campus to 
campus. Interested students should contact local Ivy Tech campuses. 
Students graduating from the Public Safety program participate in 
evaluations of proficiency in general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 

Science (60-63 Credits) 

• Technical Certificate 

(30 Credits) 

Specialties Offered: 

• Environmental Care 

• Fire Science 

• Hazardous Materials 

• Public Administration 



Program 
Available at: 

Fort Wayne 

Gary 
Indianapolis 
Tare Haute 



Availability of specialties 
and degrees varies by I 
campus. Contact your 1 
local campus for more 1 
information. See page 6 
for contact information. 



Public Safety 



Public Safety 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 
60-63 credits in the 
following areas: 



General Education Core 

Technical Core 

Specialty Core 

Locally Determined Courses 



IS 
15 

12-15 
12-15 



You Must Have 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



General Education 



Technical 



**CHM 101 


Chemistry I 


3 


OR 


**SCI 111 


Physical Science 


3 


**COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


OR 


**COM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


ENG111 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


POL 101 


Introduction to American Government and Politics 


3 


** 


General Education Course 


3 




PST 121 


Risk Management 


3 


PST 220 


Incident Management Systems 


3 


PST 221 


Computer Design and Planning 


3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


TEC 106 


Hazardous Materials and Control 


3 



Choose One of the 
ollowing Specialties 

Environmental Care 

Specialty 

(27 Credits) 



ENV 101 


Introduction to Environmental Technology 


3 


ENV 102 


Environmental Management 


3 


ENV 103 


Environmental Chemistry 


3 


HMT 104 


Environmental Toxicology 


3 


HMT 200 


Environmental Protection Agency (EPA") Regulations 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Specialties Continued Next Page 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 

* Elective ** Locally Determined A Capstone Course 



Piblic Safety 109 




Public Safety 



Associate of Applied Science — Specialties 



Fire Science Specialty 
(30 Credits) 



Hazardous Materials 

Specialty 

(27 Credits) 



AFS 102 


Fire Apparatus and Equipment 


3 


AFS 103 


Fire fighting Strategy and Tactics 


3 


AFS 201 


Fire Protection Systems 


3 


A AFS 202 


Fire Service Management 


3 


AFS 204 


Fire Service Hydraulics 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 




HMT 100 


Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) Regulations 


3 


HMT 120 


Hazard Communication Standard 


3 


HMT 200 


Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulations 


3 


HMT 220 


Hazardous Materials Recovery, Incineration, and Disposal 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 



Public Administration 

Specialty 

(27 credits) 



BUS 105 


Principles of Management 


3 


BUS 208 


Organizational Behavior 


3 


OPM 102 


Techniques of Supervision I 


3 


OPM 224 


Operations Management 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 



110 Public Safety 



Public Safety 



Technical Certificate — Fire Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 


General Education Core 


6 


Technical Core 


3 


30 credits in the 


Specialty Core 


6 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


15 



You Must Have 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



General Education 



Technical 



)ther Required Courses 
(21 Credits) 



ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


POL 101 


Introduction to American Government and Politics 


3 




TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 




AFS 103 


Strategy and Tactics 


3 


AFS 201 


Fire Protection Systems 


3 




Regionally Determined Courses 


15 



Public Safety 111 




Technology 



k/ 



Y 



* 



The Technology Division provides broad, practical education for those 
seeking employment and advancement in craft and technical occupations 
and for those seeking further education. The programs emphasize the 
ability to think and plan in the job setting and to address technical 
problems. Initial laboratory experiences develop skills in the use of 
modern industrial equipment and measuring instruments. Later 
classroom and laboratory work provide training in industrial applications 
of theory, analysis, design and construction techniques. Each program 
provides opportunities for the student to advance from basic skills to 
proficiency on a high technological level. 

Program advisory committees, composed of experts in each area of 
industry serve the important function of keeping the content of the 
programs current with the needs of industries to assure graduates of 
employability in today's labor market. The practical value of the 
coursework is substantiated by its use in the training programs of many 
local industries. Each program is administered and taught by faculty 
who have industrial/technical/professional experience and who are 
dedicated to technical education. The student is advised to contact the 
nearest Ivy Tech center for information concerning programs and course 
offerings. 



Technology 





Automotive Techno] 


EH591 




Program Description 


Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 




The Automotive Technology Program prepares students with the 


Science 
(63-66 Credits) 




general and technical education needed for successful careers in 
automotive service, sales, technical support, management and 
customer relations, and for continuation in higher education. A 


• Associate oj Science 

(64 Credits) 
'Technical Certificate 

(39 Credits) 




student in the Automotive Technology program may specialize in 


Specialties Offered: 




automotive body repair or automotive service. 


• Automotive Body Repair 

• Automotive Service 




A two-year program requiring 63-66 credits leads to an associate 
of applied science degree. Automotive Technology students 


Program 
Available at: 




wishing to pursue a bachelor's of science in Industrial Automotive 


Columbus 




Technology at Indiana State University and enter as a junior-year 


East Chicago 
Evansville 




student may complete the associate of science degree program 
(pending authorization) in Automotive Technology. Students 


Fort Wayne 

Indianapolis 

Kokomo 




completing the associate of science program will also be able to 


Lafayette 
Muncie 




enter the workforce, as well as to transfer to ISU. 


Richmond 
Sellersburg 
South Bend 
Tene Haute 

Valparaiso 




Technical and career development certificates also are available. 




The availability of specialties and degrees will vary from campus 






to campus. Interested students should contact the local Ivy Tech 






campus. Students graduating from the Automotive Technology 






program participate in evaluations of proficiency in general and 






technical education. 


Availability of specialties 

and degrees varies by 

campus. Contact your 

local campus for more 

information. See page 6 

for contact information. 




■ Automotiv 


e Technology 113 





Automotive Technology 

Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 


General Education Core 


18 


you must have 63- 


Technical Core 


12 


66 credits in the 


Specialty Core 


33-36 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


NA 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 

Choose One of the 
Following Specialties 

Automotive Body Repair 

Specialty 

(33 credits) 



automotive service 

Specialty 

(36 Credits) 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



**COM 


Communications Elective 


3 


ENG 1 1 1 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


SCI 111 


Physical Science 


3 


* 


General Education Elective 


3 


* 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 



AMV 101 


Chassis and Suspension Principles 


3 


AMV 113 


Electricity for Transportation 


3 


AMV 202 


Computer Engine Controls 


3 


AST 201 


Heating and Air Conditioning Principles 


3 



ABR 101 


Body Repair Fundamentals 


3 


ABR 103 


Auto Paint Fundamentals 


3 


A ABR 104 


Collision Damage Analysis and Repair 


3 


ABR 105 


Conventional Frame Analysis and Diagnosis 


3 


ABR 106 


Body Repair Applications 


3 


ABR 107 


Auto Painting Technology 


3 


ABR 108 


Unibody Structural Analysis and Repair 


3 


ABR 109 


Collision Damage Appraising 


3 


ABR 120 


Fiberglass Plastic Repair 


3 


AMV 107 


Engine Principles and Design 


3 


IDS 114 


Introduction to Welding 


3 



AMV 107 


Engine Principles and Design 


3 


AST 105 


Fuel Systems 


3 


AST 108 


Electrical Accessory Systems 


3 


AST 203 


Engine Rebuild 


3 


AST 204 


Automatic Transmission/Transaxle 


3 


AST 205 


Manual Transmission/Transaxle 


3 


AST 207 


Engine Performance 


3 


AST 209 


Automotive Braking Systems 


3 


AST 220 


Transaxle and Driveline Service 


3 


AST 221 


Driveability Diagnosis 


3 


A AST 225 


Advanced Electronics 


3 


AST 280 


Co-op/Intemship 


3 



Automotive Technology 



Automotive Technology 



Associate of Science ^ 



To earn this degree, 
rou must have 64 
xedits in the 
allowing areas: 



General Education Core 


28 


Technical Core 


36 


Specialty Core 


N/A 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 




Curriculum designed for transfer 
to Indiana State University's BS in 
Automotive Technology program 



You Must Have 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



General Education 



Technical 



CHM 101 


Chemistry I 


3 


COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


OR 


ENG 211 


Technical Writing 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


OR 


MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


MAT 121 


Geometry-Trigonometry 


3 


PHY 101 


Physics I 


4 


*** 


Social Sciences Electives 


6 








AMV 101 


Chassis and Suspension Principles 


3 


AMV 107 


Engine Principles and Design 


3 


AST 105 


Fuel Systems 


3 


OR 


AMV 113 


Electricity for Transportation 


3 


AMV 202 


Computer Engine Controls 


3 


AST 104 


Start and Charge Systems 


3 


AST 106 


Electronic Ignition Systems 


3 


AST 201 


Heating and Air Conditioning Principles 


3 


OR 


AST 209 
AST 204 


Automotive Braking Systems 


3 


Auto Transmission/Transaxle 


3 


OR 


AST 208 


Differentials/Drivelines 


3 


AST 207 


Engine Performance 


3 


AST 220 


Transaxle and Driveline Service 


3 


IDS 104 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 



=f Pending authorization. 

*** Electives from courses that transfer to ISU. 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 

tciivt ** Locally Determined A Capstone Course 



Automotive Technology 



Automotive Technology 



Technical Certificate 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 39 
credits in the 
following areas: 



General Education Core 

Technical Core 

Specialty Core 

Locally Determined Courses 



6 

3 

6-30 

0-24 



You Must Have 

General Education 



COM 102 



Required Courses 



Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 
General Education Course 



Technical 



AMV 101 



Chassis and Suspension Principles 



Choose One of the 
Following Specialties 



Automotive Body Repair 

Specialty 

(30 Credits) 



Automotive Service 

Specialty 

(30 Credits) 



ABR 101 


Body Repair Fundamentals 


3 


ABR 103 


Auto Paint Fundamentals 


3 


A ABR 104 


Collision Damage Analysis and Repair 


3 


ABR 105 


Conventional Frame Analysis and Diagnosis 


3 


ABR 106 


Body Repair Applications 


3 


ABR 107 


Automotive Painting Technology 


3 


ABR 108 


Unibody Structural Analysis and Repair 


3 


ABR 109 


Collision Damage Appraising 


3 . 


ABR 120 


Fiberglass Plastic Repair 


3 


IDS 114 


Introduction to Welding 


3 




AMV 113 


Electricity for Transportation 


3 


AST 209 


Automotive Braking Systems 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


24 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 
H ' Elective ** Locally Determined * Capstone Course 



Automotive Technology 



Aviation Technolo 



Program Description 



The Aviation Technology program prepares students to become 
certified Aviation Technicians with ratings for Aircraft Maintenance 
or Avionics. The course of instruction introduces control methods, 
team building, technical writing and computer skills. Opportunities 
exist for employment with commercial air carriers and private 
maintenance operations. 

Completion of the two-year program, consisting of 61 or 96 credit 
hours, will lead to an associate degree. Students graduating from 
the Aviation Technology program participate in evaluations of 
proficiency in general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate oj Applied 
Science ( 61 or 96 
Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

• Aircraft Maintenance 
Technician 

• Avionics 



Program 
Available at: 



Teire Haute 



Aviation Technology 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 61 or 
96 credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
Following Specialties 

Aircraft Maintenance 

Technician Specialty 

(60 credits) 



Avionics Specially 
(25 credits) 




General Education Core 19 

Technical Core 1 7 

Specialty Core 25 or 60 

Locally Determined Courses N/A 



Credit 





Required Courses 


Hours 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG211 


Technical Writing 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 131 


Algebra/Trigonometry I 


3 


PHY 101 


Physics I 


4 


PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 



AVT 141 


Aviation Basics I 


3 


AVT 142 


Aviation Basics II 


3 


AVT 144 


Aircraft Electricity 


4 


AVT 145 


Aircraft Ground Servicing 


2 


AVT 146 


Aviation Regulations 


2 


AVT 148 


Aviation Materials and Processes 


3 



AVT 222 


Nonmetallic Structures 


2 


AVT 223 


Aircraft Finishes 


2 


AVT 224 


Aircraft Inspection 


4 


AVT 225 


Airframe Fluid Systems 


4 


AVT 226 


Airframe Electrical Systems 


4 


AVT 227 


Aircraft Sheetmetal 


6 


AVT 228 


Aircraft Instruments and Avionics 


3 


AVT 231 


Reciprocating Powerplants 


5 


AVT 232 


Turbine Powerplants 


5 


AVT 233 


Powerplant Fuel and Induction Systems 


5 


AVT 234 


Reciprocating Engine Ignition and Fuel Systems 


2 


AVT 235 


Powerplant Fluid and Indicating Systems 


3 


AVT 236 


Turbine Starting Systems and Auxiliary Power 


2 


AVT 237 


Propellers 


4 


AVT 238 


Turbine Systems and Components 


4 


A AVT 240 


Structural Repair and Inspection 


5 



AVT 151 


Introduction to Avionics 


3 


AVT 205 


Navigation and Communications Systems 


3 


AVT 206 


Aviation Control Circuits 


3 


AVT 257 
A AVT 260 


Aircraft Microprocessors 


2 


Avionics Installation 


5 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


OR 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


ELT 124 


Digital I 


3 


ELT 125 


Digital II 


3 



118 Aviation Technology 



Avionics 



Program Description 

The Avionics Technical Certificate program prepares graduates to 
maintain modern aircraft avionic systems. These aircraft systems fall 
under the categories of power generation, communications and radar, 
and navigation and flight control. Basic courses emphasize an under- 
standing of electrical, electronic and computer fundamentals. Ad- 
vanced courses apply these fundamentals to the operation of the 
aircraft systems. Students graduating from the Avionics Technology 
program participate in evaluations of proficiency in general and techni- 
cal education. 

Technical Certificate 



Degrees Available: 

• Technical Certificate 
(38 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 



None 



Program 
Available at: 

Terre Haute 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 38 


General Education Core 
Technical Core 


9 
29 


credits in the 


Specialty Core 


N/A 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



You Must Have 

General Education 

Technical 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



ENG 1 1 1 


English Composition 


3 


ENG211 


Technical Writing 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 




AVT 144 


Aircraft Electricity 


4 


AVT151 


Introduction to Avionics 


3 


AVT 205 


Navigation and Communications Systems 


3 


AVT 206 


Aviation Control Circuits 


3 


AVT 257 


Aircraft Microprocessors 


2 


AVT 260 


Avionics Installation 


5 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


OR 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


ELT 124 


Digital I 


3. 


XXX XXX 


Electronics Course or Computer Course Elective 


3 



Construction Technolo 



s 



Program Description 



The Construction Technology program educates technicians with 
broad-based skills in construction methods, estimation and 
specification, and blueprint interpretation. Students may choose a 
specialty area to build on the foundation skills. Specialized courses 
are offered in architectural design, residential and light carpentry, 
landscape technology, cabinetry, surveying, and heating, ventilation 
and air conditioning. The flexibility of the program allows students 
to pursue a full course of study or take courses as needed to update 
skills. 

Associate of applied science degrees require 61 to 64 credits. 
Specialties are available in architecture, cabinetry, heating, ventilation 
and air conditioning, landscape technology, residential and light 
carpentry and surveying. Technical and career development 
certificates also are available. The availability of specialties and 
degrees will vary from campus to campus. Interested students should 
contact local Ivy Tech campuses. Students graduating from the 
Construction Technology program participate in evaluations of 
proficiency in general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 1 

Science 
(61-64 Credits) 

• Technical Certificate 1 

(30-39 Credits) 

Specialties Offered: 

• Architectural 

• Cabinetry 

• Heating, Ventilation, J 
and Air Conditioning 

• Landscape Technology 

• Residential and Light 
Carpentry 

• Surveying 



Program 
Available at: 

East Chicago 

Fort Wayne 

Kokomo 

Muncie 

Richmond 



Availability of specialtie 
and degrees varies by 
campus. Contact youi 
local campus for mon 
information. See page 
for contact information 



Construction Tea inology 



Construction Technology 

Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
I you must have 
1.61-64 credits in the 
; following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
allowing Specialties 

^chitectural specialty 
(24 credits) 



Cabinetry Specialty 
(24 Credits) 



Heating, Ventilation, 

and Air Conditioning 

Specialty 

(27 Credits) 



General Education Core 


19 


Technical Core 


18 


Specialty Core 


12-15 


Locally Determined Courses 


9-15 



Required Courses 



Specialties Continued Next Page 



Credit 
Hours 



**COM 


Communications Course 


3 


ENG111 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 111 
MAT 121 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


Geometry/Trigonometry 


3 

4 


PHY 100 


Technical Physics 


* 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 




CON 101 


Introduction to Construction Technology 


3 


CON 106 


Construction Blueprint Reading 


3 


A CON 204 


Estimating and Specifications 


3 


TEC 102 


Technical Graphics 


3 
3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


TEC 113 


Basic Electricity 


3 




DCT 105 


Facilities Design and Layout 


3 


DCT 109 
DCT 204 


Construction Materials and Specifications 


3 


Architectural CAD 


3 


DCT 208 
DSN 103 


Structural Detailing 
CAD Fundamentals 


3 
3 




Locally Determined Courses 


9 




BCT 107 
BCT 108 


Furniture Design and Construction 


3 


Cabinetry Fabrication Techniques 


3 


BCT 111 


Woodworking Fundamentals 


3 


BCT 113 


Cabinetry/Furniture Door and Drawer Assembly 


3 
12 




Locally Determined Courses 




HEA 101 
HEA 103 


Heating Fundamentals 
Refrigeration I 


3 
3 


HEA 104 
HEA 106 
HEA 202 


Heating Service 


3 


Refrigeration II 


3 


Electrical Circuits and Controls 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



E 



BBBBBian 



ai;i?r«MTcvl 



Construction Technology 



Associate of Applied Science — Specialties 



Landscape Technology 

Specialty 

(27 credits) 



Residential and Light 

Carpentry Specialty 

(24 credits) 

Surveying Specialty 
(24 Credits) 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



LND 101 


Landscape Trees 


3 


LND 102 


Shrubs and Other Plants 


3 


LND 103 


Landscape Management 1 


3 


LND 104 


Turf Management I 


3 


LND 105 


Botany 


3 


LND 203 


Insects Pests of Ornamentals 


3 


LND 207 


Soils 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


6 




BCT 104 


Floor and Wall Layout and Construction 


3 


BCT 105 


Roof Construction 


3 


BCT 114 


Exterior Trim 


3 


BCT 221 


Interior Trim 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 




DCT210 


Surveying I 


3 


DCT213 


CAD Mapping 


3 


DSN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 


3 


DSN 106 


Descriptive Geometry 


3 
12 




Locally Determined Courses 



Technical Certificate 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 
30-39 credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 
Choose One Specialty 

Heating,Ventilation, 
and Air Conditioning 
Specialty (30 credits) 

Landscape Technology 
Specialty (30 credits) 



Residential and Light 

Carpentry Specialty 

(21 credits) 



General Education Core 6 

Technical Core 3 

Specialty Core 6 

Locally Determined Courses 15-24 



Construction Technology 





Required Courses 


Credit 
Hours 


**COM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


OR 


**ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


* 


Math/Social Sciences/Humanities/Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 




CON 101 


Introduction to Construction Technology 


3 




HEA 101 


Heating Fundamentals 


3 


HEA103 


Refrigeration I 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


24 




LND 101 


Landscape Trees 


3 


LND 102 


Shrubs and Other Plants 


3 


LND 103 


Landscape Management I 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


21 








BCT 104 


Floor and Wall Layout and Construction 


3 


BCT 105 


Roof Construction 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 





Design Technolo 



Program Description 

The Design Technology program is competency-based and is 
designed to be responsive to the needs of business and industry. 
The program provides an environment conducive to the 
development of general knowledge, technical skills and critical 
thinking skills, so graduates may enter their profession as entry- 
level technicians. They also are prepared to respond to future 
advances and changes in their profession. Graduates have the 
necessary skills to choose other related and challenging careers or 
continue their education at other postsecondary institutions. 

Associate of applied science degrees require 64 credits. Specialties 
include architecture, civil, computer-aided drafting design and 
manufacturing, heating, ventilation and air conditioning, mechanical 
and computer graphics. 

Design students wishing to pursue a bachelor of science degree in 
Mechanical Technology at Indiana State University and enter as a 
junior-year student may complete the associate of science degree 
program in Design Technology. Students completing the associate 
of science program will also be able to enter the workforce, as well 
as to transfer to ISU. 

Technical and career development certificates also are available. The 
Design Technology program is available via distance education for 
interested students. Contact the nearest Ivy Tech campus for 
information and to enroll. The availability of specialties and degrees 
will vary from campus to campus. Interested students should contact 
local Ivy Tech campuses. Students graduating from the Design 
Technology program participate in evaluations of proficiency in 
general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 




• Associate of Applied 




Science (64 Credits) 




• Associate of Science 




(64 Credits) 




• Technical Certificate 




(33 Credits) 




Specialties Offered: 




• Architecture 




• Civil 




• CADD-M 




• Computer Graphics 




• Heating, Ventilation, 




and Air Conditioning 




• Mechanical 




Program 




Available at: 




Bloomington 




Columbus 




East Chicago 




Elkhart 




Evansville 




Fort Wayne 




Gary 




Indianapolis 




Kokomo 




Lafayette 




Muncie 




Sellersburg 




South Bend 




Terre Haute 




Valparaiso 





Availability of specialties 
and degrees varies by 
campus. Contact your 
local campus for more 
information. See page 6 
for contact information. 



Design Technology 123 



Design Technology 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 


General Education Core 


19 


you must have 64 


Technical Core 


18 


credits in the 


Specialty Core 


12 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


15 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
Following Specialties 



COM 101 
ENG111 
*MAT 111 

MAT 121 

*MAT 131 

MAT 132 

*MAT 133 

MAT 134 
PHY 101 



DSN 103 
DSN 106 
DSN 220 
A DSN 221 
TEC 102 
TEC 104 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



Fundamentals of Publtc Speaking 3 


English Composition 


3 


1 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 




AND 




Geometry/Trigonometry 


3 




OR 






Algebra/Trigonometry I 


3 




AND 


Algebra/Trigonometry II 


3 




OR 


College Algebra 


4 




AND 






Trigonometry 


2 




Physics I 


4 




Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 





CAD Fundamentals 


3 


Descriptive Geometry 


3 


Advanced CAD 


3 


Statics 


3 


Technical Graphics 


3 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 



Architecture Specialty 
(27 credits) 



DCT 105 


Facilities Design and Layout 


DCT 109 


Construction Materials and Specifications 


DCT 204 
DCT 208 


Architectural CAD 
Structural Detailing 


Locally Determined Courses 



3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Specialties Continued Next Page 




Design Technology 



Associate of Applied Science — Specialties 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



Civil Specialty 
(27 Credits) 



Computer-Aided 

Drafting Design and 

Manufacturing 

Specialty 

(27 credits) 

Computer Graphics 

Specialty 

(27 Credits) 



Heating, Ventilation, 

and Air Conditioning 

Design Specialty 

(27 Credits) 



Mechanical Specialty 
(27 Credits) 



DCT 109 


Construction Materials and Specifications 


3 


DCT 208 


Structural Detailing 


3 


DCT 210 


Surveying I 


3 


DCT 213 


CAD Mapping 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 








MTT 208 


CNC Programming I 


3 


MTT 220 


CAD/CAM I 


3 


MTT 221 


CAD/CAM II 


3 


TEC 101 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 




ART 111 


Drawing for Visualization 


3 


ART 114 


Graphic Design 


3 


VIS 101 


Fundamentals of Design 


3 


VIS 115 


Introduction to Computer Graphics 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 




HEA 207 


HVAC Codes 


3 


HEA214 


Applied Design 


3 


HEA 220 


Air Distribution Systems 


3 
3 


HEA 222 


Environmental Control Systems 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 








DCT 104 


Product Drafting 


3 


DCT 214 


Machine Design 


3 


DCT 217 


Product Design 


3 


TEC 101 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 

* Elective '* Locally Determined A Capstone Course 



Design Technology 



Design Technology 



Associate of Science 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
Following Specialties 

Architecture Specialty 
(Choose 9 credits) 



CADD-M Specialty 
(Choose 9 credits) 



Mechanical Specialty 
(Choose 9 Credits) 




To earn this degree. 


General Education Core 


28 


you must have 64 


Technical Core 


17 


credits in the 


Specialty Core 


9 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 




COM 101 
ENG111 
ENG 112 

ENG211 
MAT 131 
MAT 132 
PHY 101 



Required Courses 



Curriculum designed for transfer 
to Indiana State University's BS ii 
Mechanical Technology program 



Credit 
Hours 



Fundamentals of Public Speaking 
English Composition 
Exposition and Persuasion 


3 
3 
3 


OR 


Technical Writing 

Algebra/Trigonometry I 

Algebra/Trigonometry II 

Physics I 

Humanities/Social Sciences Electives 


3 
3 
3 
4 
9 



DCT 202 


CAD Programming Language 


DSN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 


DSN 106 
DSN 220 


Descriptive Geometry 
Advanced CAD 


DSN 221 


Statics 


DSN 222 
IDS 104 


Strength of Materials 
Fluid Power Basics 


TEC 102 


Technical Graphics 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 



DCT 105 


Facilities Design and Layout 


3 


DCT 109 


Construction Materials and Specifications 


3 


DCT 204 


Architectural CAD 


3 


DCT 208 


Structural Detailing 


3 








MTT 208 


CNC Programming I 


3 


MTT 220 


CAD/CAM I 


3 


MTT 221 


CAD/CAM II 


3 


TEC 101 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 








DCT 104 


Product Drafting 


3 


DCT 202 


CAD Programming Language 


3 


DCT 217 


Product Design 


3 


TEC 101 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 



; Electives from courses that transfer to Indiana State. 



Design Technology 



Technical Certificate 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 33 


General Education Core 
Technical Core 


6 
9 


credits in the 


Specialty Core 


N/A 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


18 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 





Required Courses 


Credit 
Hours 


ENG111 


English Composition 


3 


** 


General Education Course 


3 




TEC 102 


Technical Graphics 


3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


DSN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 


3 



Choose One of the Following Specialties 

Courses required to fulfill specialty areas for the Technical Certificate are determined by 
the local campuses. The following specialties are available, but you should check with an 
admissions counselor to ensure that the specialty of interest to you is available at the 
campus of your choice. 



Architecture Specialty (18 credits) 
Civil Specialty (18 credits) 
CADD-M Specialty (18 credits) 
HVAC Design Specialty (18 credits) 
Mechanical Specialty (18 Credits) 



Key 



Design Technology 



Electronics Technolo 




Program Description 



The Electronics Technology program is designed to meet the 
ongoing needs of business, industry and the student. The 
Associate of Applied Science and the Associate of Science degrees 
are structured to develop the technical skills, general knowledge, 
and critical thinking and problem solving abilities of graduates. 
Broad-based technical skills and critical thinking processes assist 
the student in adapting to changes in the work environment 
and allow advancement in the field. 

Associate of applied science degrees require 65 credits. Specialties 
include automation controls, biomedical, communications, 
computer systems/networking, electrical maintenance, 
electronics, industrial, instrumentation, laser/electro-optics, and 
telecommunications. Electronics students wishing to pursue a 
bachelor of science degree in Electronics Technology at Indiana 
State University and enter as a junior-year student may complete 
the associate of science degree program in Electronics Technology. 
Students completing the associate of science program will also 
be able to enter the workforce, as well as to transfer to ISU. A 
technical certificate and career development certificates are 
available. The availability of specialties and degrees will vary from 
campus to campus. Interested students should contact local Ivy 
Tech campuses. Students graduating from the Electronics program 
participate in evaluations of proficiency in general and technical 
education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 

Sciences (65 Credits) 

• Associate of Science 

(64 Credits) 

Specialties Offered: 



Automation Controls 

Biomedical 

Communications 

Computer 

Systems/Networking 

Electrical Maintenance 

Electronics 

Industiial 

Instrumentation 

Laser/Electro-Optics 

Telecommunications 

Program 
Available at: 

Anderson 

Bloomington 

Columbus 

East Chicago 

Elkhart 

Evansville 

Fort Wayne 

Gary 

Indianapolis 

Kokomo 

Lafayette 

Madison 

Marion 

Michigan City 

Muncie 

Richmond 

Sellersburg 

South Bend 

Terre Haute 

Valparaiso 



Availability of specialties 

and degrees varies by 

campus. Contact your 

local campus for more 

information. See page 6 

for contact information. 



ISBEESHH 



Electronics Technology 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
,-ou must have 65 
Credits in the 
following areas: 

You Must Have 

General Education 

Technical 


General Education Core 19 
Technical Core 34 
Specialty Core 0-6 
Locally Determined Courses 6-12 

Required Courses 


COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


ENG111 


English Composition 


**MAT 131 


Algebra/Trigonometry 1 


AND 


MAT 132 


Algebra/Trigonometry 11 




OR 


**MAT 133 


College Algebra 


AND 


MAT 134 


Trigonometry 


PHY 101 


Physics I 


* 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 




ELT 120 


Introduction to Electronics 


ELT 121 


Circuits I 


ELT 122 


Circuits II 


ELT 124 


Digital I 


ELT 125 


Digital II 


ELT 126 


Solid State I 


ELT 221 


Solid State II 


ELT 222 


Microprocessors 




ELT 224 


Linear Integrated Circuit Applications 




A ELT 234 


Advanced Problem Solving 




TEC 103 


Collaborative Team Skills 


Choose Oue of the 
allowing Specialties 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


Automation Controls 


AMT 102 


Introduction to Robotics 


Specialty 


AMT 201 


Manufacturing Systems Control 


(12 credits) 


Locally Determined Courses 


Key (See pa 


Specialties Continued Next Page 

,e 2 for definitions) 








■■■^■^■^■^■■■^H <i^ffl9n|aa:ii?(»iMini 



Credit 
Hours 

3 
3 
3 



Electronics Technology 



Associate of Applied Science — Specialties 



Biomedical Specialty 


ELT 219 


Required Courses 

Biomedical Electronics 1 


(12 Credits) 


ELT 220 


Biomedical Electronics 11 




Locally Determined Courses 






Communications 


ELT 228 


Communications Electronics 


Specialty 


ELT 230 


Advanced Communications Electronics 


(12 Credits) 


Locally Determined Courses 




Computer Systems/ 


ELT 212 


Networking 


Networking Specialty 


ELT 226 


Computer Troubleshooting 


(12 credits) 


Locally Determined Courses 




Electrical Maintenance 


ELT 233 


Industrial Motors and Controls 


Specialty 


ELT 238 


Process Instrumentation 


(12 credits) 


Locally Determined Courses 


Electronics Specialty 
(12 Credits) 




Locally Determined Courses 


Industrial Specialty 


AMT 201 


Manufacturing Systems Control 


(12 Credits) 


ELT 223 


Electrical Machines 




Locally Determined Courses 






Instrumentation 


ELT 235 


Process Control 


Specialty' 


ELT 237 


Calibration 


(12 Credits) 
Laser/Electro-Optics 


Locally Determined Courses 


ELT 128 


Introduction to Lasers 


Specialty 


ELT 130 


Fiber Optics 


(12 credits) 


Locally Determined Courses 




Telecommunications 


ELT 130 


Fiber Optics 


Specialty 


ELT 229 


Telecommunications 


(12 credits) 


Locally Determined Courses 






130 Electronics T 





Credit 
Hours 

3 

3 
6 



12 



Electronics Technology 



Associate of Science 



! To earn this degree, 
you must have 64 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 



General Education Core 


31 


Technical Core 


33 


Specialty Core 


N/A 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



Required Courses 



Curriculum designed for transfer 
to Indiana State University's BS 
in Electronics Technology 
program 



Credit 
Hours 



General Education 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


or 


ENG 211 


Technical Writing 


3 


MAT 131 


Algebra/Trigonometry I 


3 


MAT 132 


Algebra/Trigonometry II 


3 


PHY 101 


Physics 1 


4 


*** 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


12 



Technical 



ELT 120 


Introduction to Electronics 


3 


ELT 121 


Circuits I 


3 


ELT 122 


Circuits II 


3 


ELT 124 


Digital I 


3 


ELT 125 


Digital II 


3 


ELT 126 


Solid State I 


3 


ELT 221 


Solid State II 


3 


ELT 222 


Microprocessors 


3 


IDS 104 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 


TEC 102 


Technical Graphics 


3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 

•Elective *" Locally Determined A Capstone Couree 



*Electives from courses that transfer to Indiana State. 



Electronics Technology 



Industrial Technolo 



Program Description 



The Industnal Technology program is devoted to the development 
of skills necessary for the installation, operation and maintenance 
of industrial equipment and systems. The curriculum is broad- 
based and offers a number of specialties, but focuses on the 
integration of each area as used in systemic applications. This 
requires proficiency in mathematics, communication, physics, and 
basic computer skills as well as technical subject matter. 

In laboratory applications of classroom study each student uses the 
tools and instruments associated with the practice of the industrial 
technology specialty including volt-ohm meters, leak detectors, 
sonic diagnostic tools, pressure and level testing devices, preventive 
maintenance software programs, welding and brazing equipment, 
metallurgical testing instruments, hand tools, tool making equipment 
and electronic and hand precision measuring devices. Safety 
equipment and the safe use of tools and materials are integrated 
into each course in the curriculum. 

Associate of applied science degrees require 61-68 credits. 
Specialties are available in heating, ventilation and air conditioning, 
industrial maintenance, machine tool, mechanical maintenance, tool 
and die and welding. Technical certificates and career development 
certificates are available. The availability of specialties and degrees 
will vary from campus to campus. Interested students should contact 
local Ivy Tech campuses. Students graduating from the Industrial 
Technology program participate in evaluations of proficiency in 
general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 

Science 
(61-68 Credits) 

• Technical Certificate 

(39 Credits) 

Specialties Offered: 

• Heating, Ventilation, 
and Air Conditioning I 

• Industrial Maintenance \ 

• Machine Tool 

• Mechanical Maintenance 

• Tool and Die 

• Welding 

Program 
Available at: 



Anderson 
Bloomington 

Columbus 

Connersville 

East Chicago 

Elkhart 

Evansville 
Eort Wayne 

Gary 
Indianapolis 

Kohomo 

Lafayette 

Lawrenceburg 

Logansport 

Madison 

Muncie 
Richmond 
Sellersburg 
South Bend 

Tell City 
Terre Haute 
Valparaiso 






Availability of specialties] 

and degrees varies by 1 

campus. Contact your I 

local campus for more | 

information. See page 6 

for contact information. 



WU1U1M1 



ffiMBilffiH 



Industrial Technology 

Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 
61-68 credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
Allowing Specialties 

Heating, Ventilation, 

and Air Conditioning 

Specialty 

(33 credits) 



ndustrial maintenance 

Specialty 

(33-34 credits) 



General Education Core 19 

Technical Core 12 

Specialty Core 18-21 

Locally Determined Courses 12-16 



Required Courses 



Specialties Continued Next Page 



Credit 
Hours 



**COM 


Communications Course 


3 


OR 


**ENG 


English Course 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 121 


Geometry/Trigonometry 


3 


PHY 100 


Technical Physics 


4 


**PHY 101 


OR 




Physics I 


4 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 



IDS 102 


Introduction to Print Reading 


3 


A 1DS 260 


Quality Control and Advanced Problem Solving 


3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


TEC 113 


Basic Electricity 


3 



HEA 101 


Heating Fundamentals 


3 


HEA 103 


Refrigeration I 


3 


HEA 104 


Heating Sendee 


3 


HEA 106 


Refrigeration II 


3 


HEA 202 
IDS 103 


Electrical Circuits and Controls 
Motors and Motor Controls 


3 
3 


IDS 114 


Introductory Welding 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



IDS 103 


Motors and Motor Controls 


3 


IDS 104 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 


IDS 114 


Introductory Welding 


3 


IMT 201 
IMT 203 


Fluid Power Systems (Hydraulics/Pneumatics) 


3 


Machine Maintenance/Installation 


3 
3 


IMT 205 


Programmable Controllers I 
OR 


AMT 201 


Manufacturing Systems Control (PLCs) 


3 


IMT 207 


Electrical Circuits 


3 
12-13 




Locally Determined Courses 



i \t IMlaMiigim 



Industrial Technology 



Associate of Applied Science — Specialties 




Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



Machine Tool Specialty 
(33 credits) 



DSN 227 


Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing 




3 


IDS 114 


Introductory Welding 




3 


MTT 101 


Introduction to Machining 




3 


MTT110 


Turning and Milling Processes 




3 


MTT 204 


Abrasive Processes I 




3 


TEC 101 


Manufacturing Processes 




3 


WLD 120 


Metallurgy Fundamentals 




3 




Locally Determined Courses 




12 



Mechanical 

Maintenance Specialty 

(37 credits) 



IDS 103 


Motors and Motor Controls 


3 


IDS 104 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 


IDS 114 


Introductory Welding 


3 


IMT 201 


Fluid Power Systems 


3 


IMT 203 


Machine Maintenance/Installation 


3 


IMT 211 


Advanced Industrial Mechanics I 


3 


MTT 101 


Introduction to Machining 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


16 



Tool and Die Specialty 
(33 credits) 



DSN 227 


Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing 




3 


IDS 114 


Introduction to Welding 




3 


MTT 206 


Tooling Design I 




3 


MTT 207 


Tooling Design II 




3 


MTT 225 


Mold Making 




3 


TEC 101 


Manufacturing Processes 


Sjj 


3 


WLD 120 


Metallurgy Fundamentals 




3 




Locally Determined Courses 




12 



Welding Specialty 
(30 credits) 



WLD 100 


Welding Processes 




3 


WLD 108 


Shielded Metal Arc Welding I 




3 


WLD 109 


Oxy Acetylene Gas Welding and Cutting 




3 


WLD 120 


Metallurgy Fundamentals 




3 


WLD 205 


Welding Codes and Testing 




3 


WLD 207 


Gas Metal Arc (M1G) Welding 




3 




Locally Determined Courses 




12 



Key (See page 2 for definitions"' 
B * Elective • * Locally Determined A Capstone Co 



Industrial Technology 



Industrial Technology 



Technical Certificate 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 39 
credits in the 
following areas: 



General Education Core 6 

Technical Core 3 

Specialty Core 6 

Locally Determined Courses 24 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



Technical 

Choose One of the 
Following Specialties 

JHeating, Ventilation, & 

Air Conditioning 

Specialty (30 credits) 

Industrial Maintenance 
Specialty (30 credits) 



Machine Tool Specialty 
(30 credits) 



Tool and Die Specialty 
(30 credits) 



Welding Specialty 
(30 credits) 



**COM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


OR 


**ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


* 


General Education Elective 


3 




TEC 113 


Basic Electricity 


3 




HEA 101 


Heating Fundamentals 


3 


HEA 103 


Refrigeration I 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


24 




IDS 102 


Introduction to Print Reading 


3 


IDS 104 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


24 




MTT 110 


Turning and Milling Processes 


3 


TEC 101 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


24 




MTT 110 


Turning and Milling Processes 


3 


TEC 101 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


24 




WLD 108 


Shielded Metal Arc Welding I 


3 


WLD 207 


Gas Metal Arc (MIG) Welding 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


24 



Industrial Technology 135 



Machine Tool Technolo 



Program Description 



The Machine Tool Technology program prepares students for the 
metals manufacturing industry. Graduates are employed as skilled 
machinists and tool and die makers. The curriculum was 
developed in cooperation with the National Tooling and Machining 
Association. The program meets the national skill standards for 
the industry with National Institute for Metalworking Skills 
(NIMS) certification built into the student exit evaluation. 

The associate of applied science degree requires 64 credits. 
Students graduating from the Machine Tool Technology program 
participate in evaluations of proficiency in general and technical 
education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 
Science (64 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

None 



Program 
Available at: 

Indianapolis 



136 Machine Tool Technology 



Machine Tool Technology 

Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must rurve 64 
credits in the 
following areas: 



::;?- 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



vIachine Tool Specialty 
(33 Credits) 



General Education Core 


19 


Technical Core 


\2 


Specialty Core 


33 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



Required Courses 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 

' Elective ** Locally Determined A Capstone Course 



Credit 
Hours 



COM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


ECN 101 


Economics Fundamentals 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


MAT 121 


Geometry/Trigonometry 


3 


PHY 100 


Technical Physics 


4 




IDS 102 


Introduction to Print Reading 


3 


QSC 101 


Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I 


3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


TEC 113 


Basic Electricity 


3 








DCT 227 


Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing 


3 


DSN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 


3 


IDS 114 


Introductory Welding 


3 


MTT 101 


Introduction to Machining 


3 


MTT208 


CNC Programming I 


3 


MTT 240 


Machine Operations I 


4 


MTT 241 


Machine Operations II 


4 


TEC 102 


Technical Graphics 


3 


Choose a final semester option: 


MTT 209 


CNC Programming II 


3 


AND 


MTT 242 


CNC Machining 


4 


OR 


MTT 243 


Tool and Die Making I 


3 


AND 


MTT 244 


Tool and Die Making II 


4 



Machine Tool Technology 137 




flKT*^jP l ""iBi 

K&EEuu 



Program Description 

The Manufacturing Technology program is a multi-disciplinary 
program designed to prepare students for technician-level positions. 
Specialty areas allow students to choose an emphasis in plastics, 
quality assurance, computer-integrated manufacturing, computer- 
aided design/computer aided manufacturing, computer numerical 
control or welding. Graduates are prepared to perform many facets 
of manufacturing including set-up, troubleshooting, processing and 
quality control. 

Skills are acquired through lectures, demonstrations and hands- 
on experiences. Lab activities include the use of modem equipment 
and techniques currently found in industry. This training provides 
a foundation for any graduate to enter the workforce and continue 
skill enhancement. 

Associate of applied science degrees require 61-64 credits. 
Manufacturing Technology students wishing to pursue a bachelors 
of science in Manufacturing Technology or bachelor's of science in 
Computer Integrated Manufacturing at Indiana State University 
and enter as a junior-year student may complete the associate of 
science degree program in Manufacturing Technology. Students 
should choose the appropriate associate of science curriculum for 
their baccalaureate goal in manufacturing. Students completing 
the associate of science program will also be able to enter the 
workforce, as well as to transfer to ISU. Technical certificates and 
career development certificates also are available. The availability 
of specialties and degrees will vary from campus to campus. 
Interested students should contact local Ivy Tech campuses. 
Students graduating from the Manufacturing Technology program 
participate in evaluations of proficiency in general and technical 
education. 



Associate of Applied 
Science (61-64 Credit; 

Associate of Science- 
Manufacturing 
Technology (69 Credit 

Associate of Science- 
Computer Integrated 
Manufacturing (63 
Credits) 

Technical Certificate 
(30-39 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

• Computer-Aided Desig 
& Manufacturing 

• Computer Integrated 
Manufacturing 

• Computer Numerical 
Control 

• Plastics 

• Quality Assurance 

• Tool and Die 

• Welding 



Program 
Available at: 

Evansville 
Fort Wayne 

Lafayette 

Madison 
Muncie 

Richmond 
Sellersburg 
South Bend 
Terre Haute 



Availability of specialties 

and degrees varies by 

campus. Contact your 

local campus for more 

information. See page 6 

for contact information. 



Manufacturing-Technology 



Manufacturing Technology 




You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
ollowing Specialties 

CAD/CAM Specialty 
(24 credits) 



General Education Core 1 9 

Technical Core 2 1 

Specialty Core 12-15 
Locally Determined Courses 9 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG111 


English Composition 


3 


*MAT111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


AND 


*MAT 121 


Geometry/Trigonometry 


3 


OR 


*MAT 131 


Algebra/Trigonometry I 


3 


AND 


*MAT 132 


Algebra/Trigonometry II 


3 


OR 




*MAT 133 


College Algebra 


4 


AND 


MAT 134 


Trigonometry 


2 


PHY 101 


Physics I 


4 


* 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 




IDS 104 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 


A MFG 260 


Advanced Problem Solving Techniques 


3 


QSC 101 


Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I 


3 


TEC 101 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 


TEC 102 


Technical Graphics 


3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


TEC 113 


Basic Electricity 


3 




DSN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 


-, 


DSN 227 


Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing 


3 


MTT 208 


CNC Programming I 


3 


MTT220 


CAD/CAM I 


3 


MTT 221 


CAD/CAM II 


3 




• Locally Determined Courses 


9 



Specialties Continued Next Page 



mmaiumumi 



Manufacturing Technology 




Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



CIM Specialty 
(24 credits) 



AMT 102 


Introduction to Robotics 


3 


AMT 201 


Manufacturing Systems Control 


3 


OR 




IMT 205 


Programmable Controllers I 


3 


AMT 202 


Work Cell Design and Integration 


3 


AMT 203 


Automation Electronics 


3 


AMT 205 


Automated Manufacturing Systems 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


9 



CNC Specialty 
(24 credits) 



Plastics Specialty 
(24 credits) 



Quality Assurance 

Specialty 

(21 credits) 



Tool and Die Specialty 
(24 credits) 



Welding Specialty 
(21 credits) 



DSN 227 


Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing 


3 


MTT208 


CNC Programming I 


3 


MTT209 


CNC Programming 11 


3 


MTT210 


Interactive CNC 


3 


MTT211 


Advanced Programming Techniques 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


9 



PMT 101 


Introduction to Plastics 


3 


PMT 106 


Introduction to Polymer Science 


3 


PMT 107 


Injection Molding 


3 


PMT 108 


Extrusion Processes 


3 


PMT 209 


Manufacturing of Plastic Products 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


9 



QSC 102 


Statistical Process Control 


3 


QSC 202 


Quality Control Concepts and Techniques II 


3 


QSC 203 


Metrology 


3 


QSC 204 


Total Quality Management 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


9 



DSN 227 
MTT 206 


Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing 


3 


Tooling Design I 


3 


MTT 207 


Tooling Design II 


3 


MTT 225 


Introduction to Mold Making 


3 


WLD 120 


Metallurgy Fundamentals 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


9 



WLD 100 


Welding Processes 


3 


WLD 120 


Metallurgy Fundamentals 


3 


WLD 205 


Welding Codes, Specifications, and Estimating 


3 


WLD 207 


Gas Metal Arc (MIG) Welding 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


9 



Technology 



Manufacturing Technology 

Associate of Science — Manufacturing Technology 




You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



General Education Core 


31 


Technical Core 


30 


Specialty Core 


N/A 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 




Required Courses 



Curriculum designed for transfer 
to Indiana State University's BS in 
Manufacturing Technology 
program 



Credit 
Hours 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


OR 


ENG 211 


Technical Writing 


3 


MAT 131 


Algebra/Trigonometry I 


3 


MAT 132 


Algebra/Trigonometry 11 


3 


PHY 101 


Physics I 


4 


*** 


Humanities/Social Sciences Electives 


12 




DSN 103 
ELT 121 


CAD Fundamentals 


3 


Circuits I 


3 


ELT 122 
IDS 104 


Circuits II 


3 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 


QSC 101 


Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I 


3 


TEC 101 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 


TEC 102 


Technical Graphics 


3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


Manufacturing Electives 


6 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 

' Elective ** Locally Determined A Capstone Course 



Electives from courses that transfer to ISU 



g Technology 



Manufacturing Technology 

Associate of Sciences — Computer Integrated Manufacturing 



To earn this degree, 


General Education Core 


28 


you must have 


Technical Core 


33 


61 credits in the 


Specialty Core 


N/A 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



You Must Have 



Required Courses 



Curriculum designed for 
transfer to Indiana State 
University's BS in Computer 
Integrated Manufacturing 
program 

Credit 
Hours 



General Education 



Technical 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


OR 


ENG 211 


Technical Writing 


3 


MAT 131 


Algebra/Trigonometry I 


3 


MAT 132 


Algebra/Trigonometry II 


3 


PHY 101 


Physics 1 


4 


*** 


Humanities/Social Sciences Electives 


9 








AMT 102 


Introduction to Robotics 


3 


AMT 202 
AMT 203 
AMT 205 


Work Cell Design and Integration 
Automation Electronics 


3 
3 


Automated Manufacturing Systems 


3 


ELT 121 


Circuits I 


3 


ELT 122 


Circuits II 


3 


IDS 104 
TEC 101 


Fluid Power Basics 


3 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 


QSC 101 


Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I 


3 


TEC 102 


Technical Graphics 


3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 







Key 


P^e 2 for 


definitions) 




' Elective •• Loral 


vLV,c,-„„„„ 


* Capstone Cou 


K *** Elective from those courses that transfer to ISU. 




1142 


Manufacturing Technology | 






■■■^■^■■^^■■■w^^™ 



Manufacturing Technology 



Technical Certificate 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 
30-39 credits in the 
following areas: 



General Education Core 6 

Technical Core 3 

Specialty Core 6 

Locally Determined Courses 15-24 



You Must Have 

General Education 

Technical 

Choose One of the 
"ollowing Specialties 

CAD/CAM Specialty 
(21 credits) 



CNC Specialty 
(30 credits) 



Plastics-Extrusion 

Molding Specialty 

(21 credits) 

Plastics-Injection 

Molding Specialty 

(21 credits) 

Tool and Die Specialty 
(30 credits) 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



COM 102 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


OR 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 




TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 




MTT 110 


Turning and Milling Processes 


3 


TEC 101 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 




MTT 208 


CNC Programming I 


3 


MTT 209 


CNC Programming II 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


24 




PMT 101 


Introduction to Plastics 


3 


PMT 108 


Extrusion Processes 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 




PMT 101 


Introduction to Plastics 


3 


PMT 107 


Injection Molding 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


15 




MTT 110 


Turning and Milling Processes 


3 


TEC 101 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


24 



mimuiuudjjuja 



Science 



Program Description 



The Quality Science program is competency-based and is designed 
to meet the ongoing needs of business, industry and the student. 
The program develops technical skills, general knowledge, and 
critical thinking and problem solving abilities of program graduates. 
The program is based upon the latest technology available and 
makes extensive use of the laboratory to complete the theory-to- 
practice cycle. Broad-based technical skills and critical thinking 
processes assist the student in adapting to changes in the work 
environment and allow advancement in the field. 

Associate of applied science degrees require 61 credit hours in 
Quality Science. Specialties may be pursued in industrial laboratory 
and quality management. Students graduating from the Quality 
Science program participate in evaluations of proficiency in general 
and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 
Science (61 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

• Industrial Laboratory 

• Quality Management 



Program 
Available at: 

Terre Haute 
Lafayette 




Quality Science 





General Education Core 


19 




Technical Core 


L8 


in the 


Specialty Core 


12 


mg areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


12 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Choose One of the 
ollowing Specialties 

Industrial Laboratory 

Specialty 

(24 credits) 



Quality Management 

Specialty 

(24 Credits) 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 131 


Algebra/Trigonometry I 


3 


PHY 101 


Physics I 


4 


* 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 




ILT 101 


Industrial Laboratory Techniques 


3 


QSC 101 


Quality Control Concepts and Techniques 1 


3 


QSC 102 


Statistical Process Control 


3 


A QSC 204 


Total Quality Management 


3 


TEC 101 


Manufacturing Processes 


3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 




CHM 101 


Chemistry I 


3 


CHM 102 


Chemistry II 


3 


ILT 201 


Industrial Instrumentation and Techniques I 


3 


ILT 202 


Industrial Instrumentation and Techniques II 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 




IDS 102 


Introduction to Print Reading 


3 


QSC 201 


Advanced Statistical Process Control 


3 


QSC 202 


Quality Control Concepts and Techniques II 


3 


QSC 203 


Metrology 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 
* Elective * * Locally Determined A Capstone Course 



Quality Science 



Recreational Vehicle SeniceTechnol 



Program Description 



The Recreational Vehicle Service program prepares students for 
the field of recreational vehicle repair and service. Graduates are 
employed as technicians who provide all general maintenance on 
appliances, chassis, and body; install accessories; and repair 
structural damage. Industry contact is developed and maintained 
through the required internship program. Ivy Tech/Elkhart is one 
of nine sites nationwide approved by the Recreational Vehicle 
Industry Association (RV1A) to offer the program. 

An associate of applied science degree and a technical certificate 
are offered. Students graduating from the Recreational Vehicle 
Service Technology program participate in evaluations of 
proficiency in general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 

Science (64 Credits) 

• Technical Certificate 

(46 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

None 



Program 
Available at: 

Elkhart 



Recreational Vehicle ServiceTechnology 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 64 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



ither Required Courses 



General Education Core 
Technical Core 
Other Required Courses 
Locally Determined Courses 



18 
40 

6 
N/A 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



COM 101 

COM 102 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


* 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 


* 


Social Sciences/Humanities Elective 


3 




RVT 101 


Introduction to RV Service/Customer Relations 


2 


RVT 102 


Electrical Concepts 


3 


RVT 103 


Fluid Power, Heat, and Mechanical Systems 


4 


RVT 104 


LP Gas 


2 


RVT 105 


Electrical Systems Service 


5 


RVT 106 


RV Braking, Suspension, and Towing Systems 


3 


RVT 107 


RV Air Conditioning and Absorption Refrigeration Service 


4 


RVT 108 


Heating Systems/Accessory Installation, and Service 


3 


RVT 109 


Water Systems and Water Heating 


2 


RVT 110 


Interior Coach 


3 


RVT 111 


Exterior Coach 


4 


RVT 201 


Metal Processing and Metallurgy 


2 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 




RVT 220 


Recreational Vehicle Retailing 


3 


A RVT 280 


Co-op/Internship 


3 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 
■ •Elective *• Locally Determined * Capstone Course 



RECREATIONAt VEHICLE SERVICE TECHNOLOGY 



Recreational Vehicle ServiceTechnolog^ 



Technical Certificate 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 46 
credits in the 
following areas: 



General Education Core 


6 


Technical Core 


40 


Specialty Core 


N/A 


Locally Determined Courses 


N/A 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 




RVT 101 


Introduction to RV Service/Customer Relations 


2 


RVT102 


Electrical Concepts 


3 


RVT 103 


Fluid Power, Heat, and Mechanical Systems 


4 


RVT 104 


LP Gas 


2 


RVT 105 


Electrical Systems Service 


5 


RVT 106 


RV Braking, Suspension, and Towing Systems 


3 


RVT 107 


RV Air Conditioning and Absorption Refrigeration Service 


4 


RVT 108 


Heating Systems/Accessory Installation and Service 


3 


RVT 109 


Water Systems and Water Heating 


2 


RVT 110 


Interior Coach 


3 


RVT 111 


Exterior Coach 


4 


RVT 201 


Metal Processing and Metallurgy 


2 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 




Visual Technologies 



o o 

* % I M r* 



Y 



n 



Ivy Tech State College offers associate of science and associate of 
applied science degrees in the areas of interior design, video technology 
and visual communications. Within the Visual Communications 
program, specialty areas are offered in graphic design, graphic media 
production, multimedia, and photography. 

Students entering the Visual Technologies Division are exposed to a 
broad technical core of courses which represent key topics such as 
organizing the visual field, color theory and applications, image input 
technology, the computer as a powerful design and image 
manipulation tool, the professional visual artist as a business person 
and the exit portfolio. 

Ivy Tech's Visual Technologies Division strives for a continuous 
interaction between students and industries through the jury 
evaluation system, guest speakers, field trips, advisory committees 
and field experience opportunities. 






Visual Technologies 



Interior Desi 



Program Description 



The Interior Design program prepares students for careers by 
providing the experiences and competencies in research 
techniques, problem solving and presentation skills necessary 
to meet today's professional interior design standards. 

Structured courses in spatial relationships and organization, 
environmental issues, human factors, safety and barrier-free 
guidelines, and project management are incorporated into 
competent and creative project solutions. These project solutions 
include residential and contract design case studies using state- 
of-the-art technologies. 

Connecting students to potential employers is accomplished 
through supervised design projects for community service 
organizations, related class field trips and projects juried by area 
professionals. Field study opportunities also are provided which 
allow students to experience first-hand the daily operations and 
organization of a successful interior design firm. The culmination 
of student activity is the completion of an individual exit portfolio 
and resume which demonstrate the skills and knowledge of the 
interior design graduate. This portfolio is the primary tool used 
in job-seeking efforts. 

The two-year program requiring 66 semester hours culminates 
with an associate of applied science degree. Entry portfolios 
will be reviewed for basic drafting, design and drawing skills. 
Students graduating from the Interior Design program participate 
in evaluations of proficiency in general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate oj Applied 
Science (66 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

None 



Program 
Available at: 

Evansville 
South Bend 



Interior Design 



i 



Interior Design 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 


General Education Core 


18 


you must have 66 


Technical Core 


L8 


credits in the 


Other Required Courses 


12 


following areas: 


Locally Determined Courses 


IS 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Other Required 
Courses 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



ARH 101 


Survey of Art and Culture I 


3 


ARH 102 


Survey of Art and Culture II 


3 


COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


**MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 




OR 




**MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


SCI 1 1 1 


Physical Science 


3 




VIS 101 


Fundamentals of Design 


3 


INT 102 


Residential Drafting and Construction 


3 


INT 103 


Introduction to Interior Design 


3 


INT 108 


Interior Design II 


3 


INT 200 


Commercial Interior Detailing 


3 


INT 216 


CAD for Interior Design 


3 








INT 109 


History of Interiors I 


3 


INT 201 


Interior Finishes 


3 


INT 203 


Professional Practices 


3 


INT 209 


Special Projects/Portfolio Preparation 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


18' 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 

' Elective *• Locally Determined A Capstone Course 



Interior Design 



Video Technolo 



Program Description 

The Video Technology program prepares students for professional 
careers in the visual communications field. The program reflects 
the visual communications industry needs and standards by 
providing experiences in research, problem solving and hands-on 
procedures in video and multi-media program production. 

Students learn to create scripts and storyboards, develop a budget 
and produce a project budget based on client needs. In video 
production, students learn to use professional cameras, direct the 
production and supervise production personnel. Students gain 
experience in studio and remote location techniques. Post- 
production activities include audio dubbing, voice-over narration, 
digital-imaging, editing, computer graphics, animation and special 
effects. Students learn techniques in audio recording, mixing and 
electronic audio enhancement using both analog and digital systems. 
Students also learn techniques in 35mm photography and 
presentation technology. 

The faculty bring to the classroom the knowledge and procedures 
they gain through their professional activities and industry 
associations. Students may elect to do an extemship at an area studio. 
All students produce an exit portfolio which demonstrates the quality 
and scope of their knowledge and skills. 

The associate of applied science degree in video technology requires 
66 credits for completion. Students graduating from the Video 
Technology program participate in evaluations of proficiency in 
general and technical education. 



Degrees Available: 

• Associate of Applied 
Science (66 Credits) 



Specialties Offered: 

None 



Program 
Available at: 



South Bend 



■QHBI 



Video Technology 



Associate of Applied Science 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 66 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



Other Required 
Courses 



General Education Core 


18 


Technical Core 


18 


Other Required Courses 


12 


Locally Determined Courses 


is 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 




3 


ENG111 


English Composition 




3 


**MAT111 


Intermediate Algebra 




3 




OR 






**MAT112 


Functional Mathematics 




3 


SCI 111 


Physical Science 




3 


** 


Humanities/Art History Survey I Course 




3 


** 


Humanities/Art History Survey II Course 




3 








V1D 101 


Audio/Video Systems Theory 




3 
3 


VID 104 


Studio I 


iilPM^-i' : 


VIS 101 


Fundamentals of Design 




3 


VIS 105 


Video and Sound 




3 


VIS 115 


Computer Graphics 




3 


A VIS 207 


Portfolio Preparation 




3 




VID 102 


Media Technology 




3 
3 


VID 106 


Production Planning 




VID107 


Video Production II 




3 


VID 109 


Studio II 






Locally Determined Courses 




18 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 
k Elective " * Locally Determined A Capstone Course 



Visual Communicat 


ions 


Program Description 


Degrees Available: 




• Associate oj Applied 
Science (66 Credits) 




Specialties Offered: 


Students entering the Visual Communications program are exposed 


• Graphic Design 

• Graphic Media 


to a broad technical core of courses representing key topics such as 


Production 
• Multimedia 


organizing the visual field, color theory and application, image 


• Photography 


acquisition and manipulation technology, the computer as a 
powerful tool, the professional visual artist as a business person 


Program 
Available at: 


and the exit portfolio. 


Columbus 
Evansville 
Indianapolis 
Sellersburg 


The program offers an associate of applied science degree with 


South Bend 
Terre Haute 


specialties in the areas of graphic design, graphic media production, 




multimedia, and photography. Students graduating from the Visual 




Communications program participate in evaluations of proficiency 




in general and technical education. 






Availability of specialties 
and degrees varies by 




campus. Contact youn 

local campus for morel 

information. See page 6 

for contact information. 




«mmmwmmmm 



Visual Communications 



Associate of Applied St 



To earn this degree, 
you must have 66 
credits in the 
following areas: 



You Must Have 

General Education 



Technical 



General Education Core 


18 


Technical Core 


18 


Specialty Core 


12-18 


Locally Determined Courses 


12-18 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


**MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


OR 


**MAT 112 


Functional Mathematics 


3 


SCI 111 


Physical Science 


3 


** 


Humanities/Social Sciences Course 


3 


** 


Humanities/Social Sciences Course 


3 




VIS 101 


Fundamentals of Design 


3 


VIS 102 


Fundamentals of Imaging 


3 


VIS 115 


Computer Graphics 


3 


VIS 201 


Electronic Imaging 


3 


VIS 205 


Business Practices for Visual Artists 


3 


A VIS 207 


Portfolio Preparation 


3 



Choose One of the 
Allowing Specialties 



Graphic Design Specialty 
(30 credits) 



ART 111 


Drawing for Visualization 


3 


ART 112 


Electronic Layout 


3 


ART 1 14 


Graphic Design 


3 


ART 115 


Typography 


3 


ART 117 


Production 


3 


ART 217 


Advanced Graphic Design 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Specialties Continued Next Page 



Key (See page 2 for definitions) 



* Elective * * Localty Determined A Capstone Course 



Visual Commi nic.vi ions 



Visual Communications 



Associate of Applied Science — Specialties 



Required Courses 



Credit 
Hours 



Graphic Media 

Production Specialty 

(30 Credits) 



GRA 102 


Introduction to Machine Printing 


3 


GRA106 


Introduction to Color Printing 


3 


GRA 201 


Photomechanical Reproduction 


3 


GRA 202 


Science of Color 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


18 



Multimedia Specialty 
(30 Credits) 



ART 115 


Typography 


3 


ART 116 


Electronic Illustration 


3 


PHO 106 


Studio Practices 


3 


VIS 103 


Introduction to Multimedia 


3 


VIS 105 


Video and Sound 


3 


VIS 209 


3D Rendering and Animation 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Photography Specialty 
(30 Credits) 



PHO 104 


Basic Photography 


3 


PHO 106 


Studio Practices 


3 


PHO 107 


Intermediate Photography 


3 


PHO 109 


Studio Lighting Techniques 


3 


PHO 201 


Principles of Color Photography 


3 


PHO 204 


Commercial Photography Techniques I 


3 




Locally Determined Courses 


12 



Key 



age 2 lor ddininons) 
Vicrmined A Capstone Course 



Visual Communications 



and Support Services 



The primary function of the General Education and Support Services (GESS) Division is 
to provide courses that add to the breadth of knowledge that each student should 
gain from the college experience, regardless of his or her program. General 
education courses are an integral part of the curriculum supporting students 
who pursue technical degree programs as well as those who pursue liberal arts 
degree programs at selected Ivy Tech sites that are Community College of Indiana 
campuses. The College believes that each graduate should achieve a certain 
body of knowledge, held in common with all educated people. 

General education courses cover a range of subjects including communications 
(written and oral), social sciences, humanities, mathematics, and life and physical sciences. 

Basic skills advancement coursework includes English as a second language, language 
arts (spelling, wnting, reading, vocabulary building), mathematics (mathematics and 
basic algebra), life and physical sciences (prep/science literacy courses in chemistry and 
the life sciences), and college orientation (college skills, critical thinking, computer literacy 
and basic keyboardmg). In addition to these courses campuses may provide regionally 
determined courses to meet unique local needs. Many basic skills advancement 
programs provide basic skills assessment, one-on-one tutoring, multimedia, technology- 
based and individualized instruction, special needs counseling and other services in 
addition to courseware. 

The General Technical Studies (GTS) certificate program provides opportunities for 
students who may not be ready to enter a degree program due to lack of preparation or 
other reasons. GTS helps these students define and meet their educational objectives. 
GTS serves students who may be in need of conecting deficient academic skills before 
enrolling in a technical degree program, have yet to decide upon pursuing a specific 
course of study, are seeking admission into one of the colleges selective programs, wish to 
examine an occupational program, are in need of a career-oriented educational exploration, 
or are in need of an educational foundation for a related one- or two-year program and 
wish to pursue a one-year program of general technical studies. The GTS program is 
available at all 23 campuses. Interested students should contact their local campus and 
ask for the regional specifications of the GTS curriculum. 



General Education 



General Education Courses 

Communications 

The following courses can meet specific requirements or serve as communications electives. 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrate, 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Readin! 
80-100). Introduces fundamental concepts and skills for effective public speaking, including preparation and delivery of informative and persuasi' 
presentations. Includes instruction in the use of visual aids and critical listening. 

COM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrate! 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Readin,; 
80-100). Focuses on the process of interpersonal communication as a dynamic and complex system of interactions. Stresses the importance of unde! 
standing and applying interpersonal communication theory in work, family and social relationships. Uses lecture/discussion format. 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrate 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Wnting and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading 
80-100). Provides a foundation in rhetorical principles, communication strategies and inquiry processes that can be successfully applied in personal 
academic or professional writing situations. Initiates and integrates the composing process with critical reading and thinking. 

ENG 112 Exposition and Persuasion 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 1 1 1 - English Composition. Builds on the writing skills taught in ENG 111 and emphasizes research-based analytic and persuasivi 
writing. Requires students to complete other collaborative and individual projects. 

ENG 211 Technical Writing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 111 - English Composition. Builds on the wnting skills taught in ENG 111. Requires students to prepare technical reports foi 
various purposes using standard research techniques, documentation and formatting as appropriate. Requires students to demonstrate both written anc 
oral competencies. 

Social Sciences 

The following courses can meet specific requirements or serve as social sciences electives. 

APO 112 State and Local Government 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Wnting and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
80-100). Provides a study of the basic organization and historical developments of the states, cities, counties, townships and special districts. Special; 
emphasis is given to the federal relationships of the states with the central government and the struggle over states' rights. Also emphasized are the. 
problems facing state and local governments in the fields of urban renewal, crime, transportation, finance, education and governmental reform, t 

APO 201 Introduction to Political Science 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 1 1 1 - English Composition. Provides a study of the basic principles of government and its institutions. Also provides a back- | 
ground for other courses in government, t 

APO 220 Public Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency through appropnate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
80-100). Examines the structure and function of the bureaucratic arm of the executive branch of government. Special emphasis will be placed on the 
internal workings of government agencies of administration on the local, state and national levels. Considerable attention will be paid to the power 
exerted through these agencies, t 



f This is a Vincennes University course. More information may be found in the Vincennes University catalog. 
I 



SO 154 Cultural Anthropology 3 Credits 

Lrequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
Dmpetency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
b-100) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Surveys the variety of social and cultural developments within the human family. Various cultural types and 
tajpr societal structures such as kinship terminology, patterns of production and consumption and social institutions will be dealt with in a variety 
(f cultural settings, t 

LsO 245 Cultural Diversity 3 Credlts 

Jrerequisites: ENG 1 1 1 - English Composition and SOC 1 1 1 - Introduction to Sociology. Provides students with an opportunity to explore their own 
ithnic roots. Increases understanding of the mam ethnic groups in the United States: Appalachians, Native Americans, Afro Americans, Asian 
Americans, Pacific Islanders and Hispamcs. The social and religious impact on the cultural integration of these groups will be introduced. Discus- 
ions on how these aspects of the United States culture may affect international dialogues will also be included. t 

ISO 252 Social Problems 3 Credits 

Lrequisites: SOC 111 - Introduction to Sociology. Introduces some of the more complex and important problem areas in the American social 
ontext and includes a presentation of contemporary thinking relative to the identification, analysis and alleviation of these problems.t 

ISO 253 Introduction to Social Psychology 3 Credlts 

prerequisites: SOC 1 1 1 - Introduction to Sociology and PSY 101 - Introduction to Psychology. Studies human behavior in social situations. Processes 
)f communication, socialization, social role, social self and social groupings are emphasized, t 

^SO 261 Sociology of Relationships and Families 3 Credlts 

(Prerequisites- Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
Competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Wnting, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading 
30-100) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Examines the sociological and psychological dynamics of dating, relationships, marnage, tamily lite and 
granting. Emphasis will be placed on how our contemporary society and culture is affecting these institutions and customs. The course will also 
Ixplore the impact of divorce and stepfamilies on today's lifestyles.! 

ECN 101 Economics Fundamentals 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College : II or demonstrated 
rompetency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
80-100) and MAT 050 - Basic Algebra. Provides an introduction to the fundamentals of economics and their application to current economic problems. 

ECN 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 

■Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College : II or demonstrated 
'competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Wnting and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Wnting, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
80-100) and MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra or MAT 112 - Functional Mathematics. Develops a conceptual understanding of the forces affecting the 
llevel of national income, employment, interest rates and prices. 

ECN 202 Principles of Microeconomics 

Prereouisites- Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Wnting II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
E^l£^^ assessment (ASSET Wnting and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Wnting 70-100 and COMPASS Reading 
80-100) and MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra or MAT 112 - Functional Mathematics. Develops an understanding of the process by which the market 
Ipnce mechanism allocates resources and influences individual behavior. 

POL 101 Introduction to American Government and Politics 3 Cre lts 

I Prereouisites- Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 

i K^SSS£^-™« < asset ™^ and Reading ™ s < 41 or higher ' C0MPASS wmmg ' 7 ,°; 100 ; nd C0MPA S Re I 

80-100) Introduces the foundations, nature and dynamics of Amencan government and politics including constitutional foundations, civil liberties and 
civil nghts, federalism, political parties, public opinion, interest groups, media, nominations, campaigns, elections, the presidency, the judiciary, con- 
gress, bureaucracies and public policy. 

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology 

Prereouisites- Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Wnting II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 

C^SSSSS* assessment (ASSET Wnung and Readmg sectlons ' 41 or hlgher ' C0MPASS Wl T s v 70 ~ 100 - C ^T mg ' 

80-100) and MAT 044 Mathematics. Provides a general survey of the science of psychology. Includes the study o research methodology, emotion, 
biological foundations, learning and cognition, perception, development, personality, abnormal psychology and social psychology. 

f This is a Vincennes University course. More information may be found in the Vincennes University catalog. 



PSY 201 Lifespan Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PSY 101 - Introduction to Psychology or SOC 111 - Introduction to Sociology. Covers human development from conception to death 
Covers relevant research for each period. 

PSY 205 Abnormal Psychology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PSY 101 - Introduction to Psychology. Examines theories and research related to mental illness as well as etiology, pathology and treatmen', 
methods. Includes description of various disorders and personality problems. \ 

SES 207 World Geography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Readingl 
80-100) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Applies geographic principles to interpretation of human activities in all major world regions. Cultural 
economic and political aspects of major nations are emphasized. t 

SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstratecj 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Readingl 
80- 1 00) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Introduces students to the science of human society including fundamental concepts, descriptions and analyses o \ 
society, culture, the socialization process, social institutions and social change. 

Humanities 

The following courses can meet specific requirements or serve as humanities electives. 

AHI 235 World Civilization I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstratedj 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading,, 
80-100). Covers the development of early civilizations of the eastern hemisphere, the civilizations of Greece and Rome, the rise and growth oi; 
Christianity and Islam, early Oriental history, medieval Europe, the Renaissance and Reformation, power politics and diplomacy, the expansion of; 
Europe and its effect on various civilizations, and scientific and intellectual developments to 1650t 

AHI 236 World Civilization II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstratedi 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading,! 
80-100). Covers 17th century absolutism, science and economics, the Enlightenment and the French Revolution; Romanticism and the Industrial J 
Revolution; revolutions of the 19th century; colonialism and imperialism and their effects on underdeveloped areas; the prelude to World War I and l 
the war itself; 20th century world politics and the Cold War; independence movements in Africa and Asia; and recent social and cultural develop- 
merits, t 

ARH 101 Survey of Art and Culture I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading,. 
80-100). Surveys painting, sculpture and architectural styles of ancient Mediterranean cultures to the Renaissance period. Provides a foundation for the I 
study of art history. 

ARH 102 Survey of Art and Culture II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
80-100). Surveys painting, sculpture and architectural styles from the Renaissance through the 20th Century. Emphasizes developing analytical skills. 

HAH 110 Art Appreciation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
80-100). Explores the creative processes of humankind, its usages of specific traditional and contemporary media for communication and the study 
of penods and styles in art as they relate to the human condition. T 



tThis is a Vincennes University course. More information may be found in the Vincennes University catalog. 



iEL 220 Introduction to World Literature I 3 Credits 

'rerequisites: ENG 1 1 1 - English Composition. Surveys literary masterpieces and various literary types produced from Homer's time to Shakespeare's, 
.ncludes a study of drama, poetry (with some attention to epic form as well as shorter narrative verse) and the philosophic essay. Combines practice 
n advanced expository writing with literary study, t 

HEL 221 Introduction to World Literature II 3 Credits 

'rerequisites: ENG 1 1 1 - English Composition. Surveys selected major literary works and various literary types produced from the Jacobean period 
.o the present. The course content includes work by Eastern, Continental, British and American authors. Instruction in research techniques and 
vriting research papers is combined with literary study, t 

HEL 222 American Literature I 3 Credits 

prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
Competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
|30-100). Studies major American poets and prose writers, noting their relationship to contemporary English writers. The course emphasizes the 
;arly colonial, national and sectional periods of literature.? 

HEL 223 American Literature II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Wnting and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
30-100). Studies poets and prose writers of the so-called Second National Period of American Literature. The course also includes some present-day 
nvriters of poetry, prose and drama. t 

HEL 227 Introduction to World Fiction 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Wnting II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
.30-100). Examines fiction of various types and periods by Continental, Eastern, American and British writers, t 

HEL 240 Children's Literature 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
'80-100). Designed both for education majors who need to meet state requirements and for the general student who may wish to gain or regain 
appreciation for the best literature written for children. Classic and modern children's books, ranging from kindergarten to junior high level, will be 
read and discussed, t 

HEW 202 Creative Writing 3 Credits 

.Prerequisites: ENG 111 - English Composition. Provides opportunity for creative expression through one or more of the literary genres — short 
(fiction, novella, poetry, one-act drama and essay.t 

HLS 100 Conversational Spanish 2 Credits 

^Prerequisites: None. Introduces basic vocabulary, structures and cultural information needed for communication while traveling in Spanish-speaking 
(regions of the United States, t 

HLS 101 Spanish Level I 3 Credits 

: Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
■competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
80-100). Corequisites: HLS 102 - Spanish Vocabulary Level I. Introduces the Spanish language and culture with emphasis on listening comprehen- 
jsion. Guided communications tasks, vocabulary building and use of audio-visual aids, video, language lab and "less-stress" techniques are em- 
j ployed. T 

HLS 102 Spanish Vocabulary Level I 1 Credit 

Corequisites: HLS 101 - Spanish Level I. Builds word power for active recall and passive recognition. t 

HLS 103 Spanish Level II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HLS 101 - Spanish Level I, HLS 102 - Spanish Vocabulary Level I. Corequisites: HLS 104 - Spanish Vocabulary Level II. Provides 
structured oral communication, vocabulary building with an emphasis on speaking. Introduces reading of graded and glossed materials, basic 
grammatical structures, writing. t 

f This is a Vincennes University course. More information may be found in the Vincennes University catalog. 



1 Credit 


3 Credits 


ocabulary Level IV Continu 


1 Credit 


3 Credits 



HLS 104 Spanish Vocabulary Level II 1 Credit 

Corequisites: HLS 103 - Spanish Level II. Builds word power for active recall and passive recognition. t 

HLS 201 Spanish Level III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HLS 103 - Spanish Level II, HLS 104 - Spanish Vocabulary Level II. Corequisites: HLS 202 - Spanish Vocabulary Level III. Provides 
emphasis on reading. Conversation is coordinated with reading of cultural text, written and oral reports. Continues study of grammar structun 
vocabulary building, t 

HLS 202 Spanish Vocabulary Level HI 

Corequisites: HLS 201 - Spanish Level III. Builds vocabulary and grammar to develop reading ability, t 

HLS 203 Spanish Level IV 

Prerequisites: HLS 201 - Spanish Level III, HLS 202 - Spanish Vocabulary Level III. Corequisites: HLS 204 - Spanish Vocabulary Level IV Continui 
HLS 201 with an emphasis on writing, cultural and contemporary topics, t 

HLS 204 Spanish Vocabulary Level IV 

Corequisites: HLS 203 - Spanish Level IV Builds vocabulary, can be specialized for students in technical areas, t 

HPP 213 Logic 

Prerequisites: ENG 111 - English Composition. Examines formal logic through a study of the principles and methods employed in the appraisal ( 
arguments and methodology that will lead one's thinking to the accurate attainment of truth, t 

HPP 220 Philosophy of Religion 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 111 - English Composition. Studies the origin and nature of religion. After an initial view of recent philosophical analyses of th 
religious experience, major world religions (Hindusim, Buddhism, Taoism, Shinto, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, et al.) are examined for their specifi 
content, structure and spirit. t 

HSY 101 Survey of American History I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrate! 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Readingi 
80-100). Covers major themes and events in American history from the discovery era to the Civil War and Reconstruction. 

HSY 102 Survey of American History II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstratec 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading' 
80-100). Covers major themes and events in American history from the Civil War and Reconstruction to the present. 

PHL 101 Introduction to Philosophy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 111 - English Composition. Examines fundamental questions of philosophy such as the foundations of morality, skepticism and 
knowledge, the nature of mind, free will and determinism, and the existence of God. Emphasizes the evaluation of arguments and analysis of concepts. 

PHL 102 Introduction to Ethics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 111 - English Composition. Examines major theories of ethics, theoretical issues, moral problems and issues and our responsibility! 
to future generations. 

Mathematics 
The following courses can meet specific requirements or serve as mathematics electives. 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: A scaled score of 40 or higher on the Elementary Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or a COMPASS score of 41-65 on the Algebra ' 
section, or successful completion of MAT 050 - Basic Algebra. Reviews algebraic terminology and laws, basic operations with real numbers and polyno- 
mials, scientific notation, linear equations and graphs, and factoring algebraic expressions. Provides an in-depth study of rational expressions, systems of 
linear equations, radicals, radical equations and quadratic equations. Introduces functions and function notation. 



f This is a Vincennes University course. More information may be found in the Vincennes University catalog. 



General Education 



[AT 112 Functional Mathematics 3 Credits 

'-erequisites: A scaled score of 40 or higher on the Elementary Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or a COMPASS score of 41-65 on the Algebra 
: tction, or successful completion of MAT 050 - Basic Algebra. Through real-world approaches, presents mathematical concepts of measurement, 
Iroportion, geometry, equation solving and statistics. 

IAT 115 Statistics 3 Credits 

Irerequisites: A scaled score of 41 or higher on the Intermediate Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or a COMPASS score of 66 or higher on the 
flgebra section, or successful completion of MAT 1 12 - Functional Mathematics or MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra. Provides study in the collection, 
jiterpretation and presentation of descriptive and inferential statistics including measures of central tendency, probability, binomial and normal distribu- 
tor, hypothesis testing of one- and two-sample populations, confidence intervals, chi-square testing, correlation, data description and graphical repre- 
;ntations. 

IAT 121 Geometry-Trigonometry 3 Credits 

rerequisites: A raw score of 13 or higher on the Geometry section of the ASSET assessment, or successful completion of MAT 111 - Intermediate 
Ugebra or MAT 112 - Functional Mathematics. Provides study in geometry and trigonometry including polygons, similar figures, geometric solids, 
l-roperties of circles, constructions, nght triangles, angle measurements in radians and degrees, trigonometric functions and their application to nght 
dangles, Pythagorean theorem, laws of sine and cosine, graphing of trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, vectors and coordinate conver- 
ions. 

/[AT 131 Algebra/Trigonometry I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: A scaled score of 41 or higher on the Intermediate Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or successful completion of MAT 111 - 
'ntermediate Algebra. Provides study in algebra, including functions, exponential rules, linear equations, radicals, vectors, right triangle trigonometry, 
iblique triangles, graphs of sine and cosine functions. 

»1AT 132 Algebra/Trigonometry II 3 Credits 

j Prerequisites: Demonstrated mathematics competency through test-out or successful completion of MAT 13 1 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. Continues study 
! | algebra and trigonometry including systems of equations, graphing of trigonometric functions, trigonometric equations, rectangular and polar coordi- 
nates, complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions and conies. 

MAT 133 College Algebra 4 Credits 

{prerequisites: A scaled score of 41 or higher on the Intermediate Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or successful completion of MAT 111 - 
' intermediate Algebra. Presents an in-depth study of polynomials, radicals, rational expressions, inequalities, complex numbers, functions, matrices, 
graphs and conies. 

MAT 134 Trigonometry 2 Credits 

■Prerequisites: A scaled scored of 41 or higher on the Intermediate Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or successful completion of MAT 111 - 
I .Intermediate Algebra. Presents an in-depth study of vectors, nght triangle trigonometry, oblique triangles, graphs of trigonometric functions and an 
introduction to complex numbers. 

MAT 135 Finite Math 3 Credits 

■Prerequisites: A scaled score of 4 1 or higher on the College Algebra section of the ASSET assessment, or a COMPASS score of 46 or higher on the College 
I Algebra section, or successful completion of MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra. Surveys solving and graphing linear inequalities, elementary set theory, 
[matrices and their applications, linear programming and elementary probability. 

MAT 201 Brief Calculus 3 Credits 

■Prerequisites: A COMPASS score of 46 or higher on the Trigonometry section (ASSET cannot be used), or MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra and one of the 
|l following: MAT 121 Geometry-Trigonometry, MAT 132 - Algebra/Trigonometry II, MAT 133 - College Algebra or MAT 135 - Finite Math. Studies the 
\ fundamental concepts and operations of calculus including the study of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, points-of-inflection, first-derivative test, 

I concavity, second-derivative test, optimization, antiderivatives, integration by substitution, integration by parts, and elementary applications of a definite 

I I integral. 



Gunkrai. Education 



Life and Physical Sciences 

The following courses can meet specific requirements or serve as life and physical sciences electives. 

ANP 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated' 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading,! 
80-100) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Develops a comprehensive understanding of the close inter-relationship between anatomy and physiology as seen 
in the human organism. Introduces students to the cell, which is the basic structural and functional unit of all organisms, and covers tissues, integument, 
skeleton, muscular and nervous systems as an integrated unit. 

ANP 102 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I. Continues the study of the inter-relationships of the systems of the human body. 

ANP 201 Advanced Human Physiology 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II. Provides advanced study of human physiology Emphasizes the study of the function of the 
nervous, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, urinary, digestive and endocrine systems, and their homeostatic mechanisms and system interaction. Focuses 
laboratory exercises on clinically relevant measurement of human function. 

ANP 203 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated'! 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
80-100) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Provides a comprehensive study of the interrelationship between anatomy and physiology from chemical to> 
cellular to organ interactions. Provides an in-depth study of each system of the body from a viewpoint of structure as well as function. 

ANP 204 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 203 - Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Provides the remaining comprehensive study of the interrelationship between anatomy and 
physiology from chemical to cellular to organ interactions. Provides an in-depth study of each system of the body from a viewpoint of structure as welh 
as function. 

BIO 101 Introductory Biology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
80-100) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Introduces the basic concepts of life. Includes discussion of cellular and organismal biology, genetics, evolution, 
ecology and interaction among all living organisms. Addresses applications of biology to society. 

BIO 211 General Microbiology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
80-100) and MAT 044 - Mathematics. Presents an overview of microbiology which includes fundamentals, methods and materials. Introduces industrial 
and clinical microbiology, and special topics. 

BIO 212 General Microbiology II 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: BIO 211 - General Microbiology and ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I. Presents a secondary study of bacteria, viruses, fungi, rickettsia 
and parasites. Emphasizes the study of bacterial growth and control demonstrated by serological techniques. 

CHM 101 Chemistry I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
80-100) and MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra. Includes the science of chemistry and measurement, atomic theory and the periodic table, chemical 
bonding, stoichiometry and gases. 

CHM 102 Chemistry II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHM 101 - Chemistry I. Includes liquids and solids, solutions and solution concentrations, acids and bases, equilibrium, nuclear 
chemistry, and organic and biochemistry. 



PHY 100 Technical Physics 4 Credits 

J Prerequisites: MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra. Pre or Corequisites: MAT 121 - Geometry-Trigonometry or MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. 

Introduces the concepts and applications of physics. Leads students to develop an integrated understanding of the theory and applications of measuring 
I (or unit) systems, scalars, vectors, force, work, rates, energy, momentum, power, force transformers (simple machines), vibrations and waves, and time 

constants. Emphasizes understanding concepts, factual knowledge, computation and application. 

PHY 101 Physics I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 121 - Geometry-Trigonometry, or MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry 1, or MAT 134 - Trigonometry. Introduces the basic concepts of 
; mechanics including force and torque, linear and rotational motion, work, energy and power, simple machines, fluids, and the physics of heat. 

■ 
PHY 102 Physics II 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHY 101 - Physics I. Introduces the physics of light, periodic and wave motion, electricity and magnetism, and concepts of modern and 
current physics. 



SCI 111 Physical Science 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET Writing and Reading sections, 41 or higher, COMPASS Writing, 70-100 and COMPASS Reading, 
80-100) and MAT 050 - Basic Algebra. Introduces physical concepts and theories pertaining to current applications and trends in physics, chemistry, 
earth science and astronomy. Emphasizes concepts and factual knowledge. 

Basic Skills Advancement Courses 

English as a Second Language (ESL) Courses 

ENG 001 Elementary English as a Second Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated ability to write and understand simple statements and questions on familiar topics. The suggested range on the English 
Placement Test is 16-35. Emphasizes writing elementary statements, reading and understanding elementary materials and expanding competence in 
speaking and listening. 

ENG 002 Intermediate English as a Second Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated intermediate competency in English with ability to read, write, and speak with control of basic language structures. The 
suggested range on the English Placement Test is 36-54. Emphasizes writing, reading and speaking with increasing competence in academic and social 
situations. 



ENG 003 Pre-Academic English as a Second Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated fair control of most sentence structure, expository materials, statement and conversation in social and academic settings. 
The suggested range on the English Placement Test is 55-65. Emphasizes paragraph organization, reading and understanding expository and academic 
materials through vocabulary development. Develops comprehension of social and academic conversations and lectures. 

ENG 004 Academic English as a Second Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated ability to write with some ease, understand expository academic reading material, understand lectures and converse in 
academic and social situations. The suggested range on the English Placement Test is 66-84. Emphasizes organization of expository writing, finding 
main ideas and details in academic texts and understanding and speaking in academic settings. 

ENG 010 English As A Second Language - Reading I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CASAS/IRCA Pre-enrollment Appraisal. Develops basic reading skills in English using texts on subjects relating to American culture. 
Emphasizes vocabulary acquisition, dictionary use, reading strategies for basic comprehension and interpretation. Uses collaborative technique of 
student interaction. 

ENG 011 English As A Second Language - Reading II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Level I ESL Reading Mastery. Stresses comprehension skills using texts which focus on American cultural values. Focuses on vocabulary 
expansion, comprehension and interpretation strategies, and experience with various forms of reading material. 

ENG 012 English As A Second Language - Reading HI 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 011 - English As A Second Language - Reading II. Stresses comprehension skills and reading strategies for academic materials. 
Focuses on vocabulary expansion, transitional development, theme development and critical analysis of academic writing. Allows for practice in in- 
creased reading proficiency. 



ENG 013 English As a Second Language - Listening/Speaking I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CASAS/IRCA Pre-Enrollment Appraisal. Focuses on listening and speaking strategies for comprehensible input. Provides practice recog 
nizing and producing speech patterns of American English. Allows for conversational practice on topics of cultural values and behaviors. 

ENG 014 English As A Second Language - Listening/Speaking II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Level I ESL Listening/Speaking Mastery. Provides practice in recognizing and producing speech patterns of American English. Allows fo 
conversational practice with emphasis on cross-cultural values and behaviors and the use of idioms. 

ENG 015 English As A Second Language - Listening/Speaking HI 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 014 - English As A Second Language - Listening/Speaking II. Provides experience in recognizing and producing speech patterns o 
American English. Allows for conversational practice relating to academic and cultural subjects with an emphasis on critical thinking skills expressec' 
verbally. 

ENG 016 English As A Second Language - Grammar/Structure I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CASAS/IRCA Pre-enrollment Appraisal. Focuses on the acquisition of basic patterns of structure and syntax for controlled communica- 
tion. Emphasis is on the form, meaning and usage of basic structures in American English, providing practice through extensive and varied communi- 
cative activities. 

ENG 017 English As A Second Language - Grammar/Structure II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Level I ESL Grammar/Structure Mastery. Focuses on the study of patterns of more advanced structure and syntax. Emphasis is on the 
acquisition of sentence structure for verbal and written communication of the relationship of ideas. 

ENG 018 English As A Second Language - Grammar/Structure III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 1 7 - English As A Second Language - Grammar/Structure II. Focuses on the acquisition of more advanced patterns of structure and 
syntax. Emphasis is on the development of competent verbal and written expression in critical analysis for academic purposes. 

ENG 019 English As A Second Language - Writing I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CASAS/IRCA Pre-enrollment Appraisal. Focuses on conventions for basic written communication in English emphasizing sentence 
construction and paragraph development. Uses writing strategies to produce coherent expression in journals, free writing exercises, paragraphing and 
short essays. Student collaboration is a part of the learned writing process. 

ENG 020 English As A Second Language - Writing II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Level ESL Writing Mastery. Focuses on techniques of written communication for coherent expression of ideas through paragraph devel- | 
opment and essay writing. Emphasizes the writing process using strategies of revision and editing through peer collaboration. Stresses the structure and ] 
syntax of written expression for effective communication. 

ENG 021 English As A Second Language - Writing HI 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 020 - English As A Second Language - Writing II. Focuses on techniques of written communication for the analysis and elaboration 
of academic material through paragraph and essay writing. Emphasizes the strategies of the writing process through rhetorical modes of composition for 
varied purposes. Extensive use of structure and syntax for thoroughly coherent expression. 

Language Arts 

ENG 007 Spelling 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Improves basic spelling competencies through practice and attention to spelling rules and exceptions. 

ENG 024 Introduction to College Writing I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET 32-37, COMPASS 23-51). Enables the beginning college writer to 
develop control of the writing process through writings which are focused, organized and well developed. Requires students to demonstrate proficiency 
in basic standard writing conventions including grammar and mechanics. 

ENG 025 Introduction to College Writing II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 024 - Introduction to College Writing I or demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment 
(ASSET 38-40, COMPASS 52-69). Builds on the competencies learned in ENG 024 - Introduction to College Writing I and prepares students for entry 
into English 1 1 1 - English Composition. Enables beginning college writers to expand control of the writing process through writings which are focused, 
organized and well developed. Requires students to demonstrate increased proficiency in the use of standard writing conventions. 



ENG 028 Vocabulary Building 1 Credit 

.Prerequisites: None. Focuses on developing general English vocabulary. Includes dictionary skills, context skill and work structure analysis. 

ENG 031 Reading Strategies for College I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET 32-35, COMPASS 44-65). Increases performance in reading compre- 
hension, vocabulary and flexibility. Introduces critical reading skills and study strategies. 

ENG 032 Reading Strategies for College II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 03 1 - Reading Strategies for College I or demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (ASSET 
;37-39, COMPASS 66-79). Enhances performance in reading flexibility, vocabulary and comprehension beyond the level of ENG 03 1 - Reading Strategies 
for College I. Emphasizes critical reading and strategies for effective study. 

Mathematics 

MAT 044 Mathematics 3 Credits 

'Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency on the numerical skills section of the assessment (ASSET 32-40, COMPASS 19-43). Reviews fractions and 
decimals. Concentrates on ratio, proportion, percents, measurement, signed numbers, equations and their applications. 

MAT 050 Basic Algebra 3 Credits 

'Prerequisites: Successful completion of MAT 044 - Mathematics or demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment (numerical skills section 
U ASSET 41+, COMPASS 44-100), (pre -algebra section - ASSET 23-38, COMPASS 0-40). Reviews signed numbers and simple equation solving. Concen- 
itrates on integer exponents, scientific notation, linear and literal equations, polynomial operations, polynomial factoring, and graphing skills in prepara- 
tion for MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra or MAT 112 - Functional Mathematics. 

Life and Physical Sciences 

CHM 061 Basic Chemistry 3 Credits 

[ Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II and MAT 050 - Basic Algebra, or demonstrated competency in the 
I reading section (ASSET 41 + , COMPASS 80-100) and the algebra section (ASSET 40-55, COMPASS 41-100) of the assessment. Provides students with an 
i introduction to chemistry basics. Provides instruction for students with little or no recent chemistry background, especially those desiring to continue in 
, more advanced chemistry courses or other science courses. 

BIO 065 Basic Life Sciences 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Success completion of ENG 031 - Reading Strategies for College I, and MAT 044 - Mathematics or demonstrated competency on reading 
section (ASSET 37+, COMPASS 66+) and mathematics section (ASSET 41+, COMPASS 44-100) of the assessment. Introduces the scientific method and 
I basic concepts and terminology used in biology, microbiology, anatomy, physiology and organic chemistry which are related to life sciences. Prepares 
entering students who took no high school science or who took science several years ago for general education life sciences courses. 

College Orientation 

IVY 070 College and Life Success Skills 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Minimum entry assessment at the ENG 024 - Introduction to College Writing I (ASSET 32-37, COMPASS 23-51) and ENG 031 - Reading 
Strategies for College I level (ASSET 32-35, COMPASS 44-65). Enhances success in college by assisting students in obtaining skills necessary to reach 
their educational, career and life objectives. Topics include time management, memory techniques, reading techniques, note taking, test taking, problem 
solving and decision making, group interaction and resource utilization. 

IVY 071 Study Skills Survey 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Minimum entry assessment at the ENG 024 - Introduction to College Writing I (ASSET 32-37, COMPASS 23-51) and ENG 031 - Reading 
Strategies for College I level (ASSET 32-35, COMPASS 44-65). Increases success in college by assisting students in obtaining skills necessary to reach 
their educational objectives. Students will learn effective strategies for studying for tests, dealing with test anxiety, answering a variety of types of test 
questions (multiple choice, true/false, matching, short answer and essay) and analyzing test results. Students also will leam time management 
techniques, memory strategies, textbook reading and notetaking methods. 



General Education 



IVY 072 Research Strategies 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Minimum entry assessment at the ENG 024 - Introduction to College Writing I (ASSET 32-37, COMPASS 23-51) and ENG 031 - Readin 
Strategies for College I level (ASSET 32-35, COMPASS 44-65). Increases success in college by assisting students in obtaining skills necessary to reacl| 
their educational objectives, specifically in the area of information literacy. In this course students will learn how to use a variety of research tool I 
including CD-ROM databases, the Internet and other research tools. Students will learn how to use the MIA or APA documentation when summa! 
rizing, paraphrasing and quoting resources. Students will also be exposed to some of the basic issues concerning informational integrity. 

IVY 073 Styles of Learning 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Minimum entry assessment at the ENG 024 - Introduction to College Writing I (ASSET 32-37, COMPASS 23-51) and ENG 031 - Readin; 
Strategies for College I level (ASSET 32-35, COMPASS 44-65). Increases success in college by assisting students in obtaining skills necessary to reacrli 
their educational objectives. The course presents a holistic, integrated, principle-centered approach for solving academic challenges. This course i: 
a step-by-step learning process which provides effective tools that help students adapt to change. 



J 



PHL 071 Critical Thinking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated 
competency on the writing section (ASSET 41+, COMPASS 70-100) and the reading section (ASSET 41+, COMPASS 80-100) of the assessment. Assists 
students in developing critical thinking strategies with academic and workplace applications. 

OAD 019 Keyboarding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the fundamentals of keyboarding using the touch method. Emphasizes mastery of the keyboard, develop- 
ment of speed and accuracy. 

OAD 029 Speed and Accuracy Development 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: OAD 019 - Keyboarding. Designed to diagnose individual keyboarding speed and accuracy skills and bring those skills to an employable] ' 
level. 



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Course Descriptions 



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COLIRSE DESCRIPTIONS 




Comprehensive Technical Course Description List 

(Alphabetical Order) 

BR 101 Body Repair Fundamentals 3 Credits 

rerequisites: None. Examines the characteristics of body metals and includes the installation of moldings, ornaments, and fasteners with emphasis on 
teet metal analysis and safety. 

BR 103 Auto Paint Fundamentals 3 Credits 

-erequisites: None. Introduces auto paint considerations with emphasis on the handling of materials and equipment in modern automotive technolo- 
es. 

BR 104 Collision Damage Analysis and Repair 3 Credits 

rerequisites: None. Provides instruction in analyzing extensive body damage and determining the tools and procedures needed to replace panels. 

BR 105 Conventional Frame Diagnosis and Correction 3 Credits 

rerequisites: None. Covers the use of tools, frame machines and equipment for frame and chassis repair. Includes study of terms pertaining to front 
ispension and rear axle. Describes uses of frame gauges, tram gauges, and other measuring devices. 

BR 106 Body Repair Applications 3 Credits 

rerequisites: None. Introduces fundamentals of using hand and power tools in the repair of minor collision damage with emphasis on safety. 

BR 107 Automotive Painting Technology 3 Credits 

■ prerequisites: None. Provides instruction in the total refinishing of an automobile with emphasis on advanced and specialty painting techniques. 

lBR 108 Unibody Structural Analysis and Repair 3 Credits 

llrerequisites: None. Covers unibody repair, identification and analysis of damage, measuring and fixturing systems, straightening systems and tech- 
niques, mechanical component service, and knowledge of suspension and steering systems on front-wheel-drive unibody vehicles. 

lBR 109 Collision Damage Appraising 3 Credits 

['rerequisites: None. Covers uses of estimation guides, procedures for itemizing damage, abbreviations, numbers of parts, and uses of time and money 
. onversion tables. Emphasizes damage inspection, recording on estimate sheets, and the calculation of costs. 

LBR 110 Auto Body Power Tools 3 Credits 

rerequisites: None. Covers diagnosis of problems associated with the use of power tools in auto body work. 

LBR 111 Auto Body Hydraulic Tools 3 Credits 

rerequisites: None. Provides instruction in the selection, use and maintenance of hydraulic tools for auto body repair. 

LBR 1 12 Basic Body Lab I 1 Credit 

rerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to develop skills and knowledge in the area of basic auto body fundamentals. 

LBR 1 13 Basic Body Lab II 1 Credit 

rerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to develop skills and knowledge in the area of basic auto body application. 

LBR 114 Collision Damage Lab 1 Credit 

rerequisites: None. Provides opportunities to develop skills and knowledge in the area of collision damage analysis and repair. 

VBR 115 Auto Body Circuits 3 Credits 

rerequisites: None. Includes fundamentals of electrical theory, automotive components and circuits, and troubleshooting techniques. Emphasizes 
attery construction, function, and operation. 

U$R 116 Suspension and AUgnment for Auto Body 3 Credits 

rerequisites: None. Covers suspension and steering parts of an automobile and the theory of wheel alignment and wheel balance. Provides instruction 
n identifying wheel alignment angles, steering wheel positioning, vehicle tracking, and wheel balancing. 



Course Descriptions 



ABR 117 Auto Paint Lab 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Develops auto painting skills with emphasis on materials and equipment handling. 

ABR 118 Automotive Upholstery 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers techniques of automobile interior refinishing. Includes study of spring construction, filling, and fabrics. Develops manipi. 
lation skills through practice projects on seats, panels, and armrests. 

ABR 119 Glass Installation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines different types of automobile glass and their uses. Includes removal and installation of front and rear glass. Covei 
installing and adjusting side glass, bonding, rear-view mirror support, and use of rubber channel and synthetic rubber adhesive. 

ABR 120 Fiberglass Plastic Repair 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces types of fiberglass and plastic materials used in auto body repair. Covers both interior and exterior applications. 

ABR 121 Unibody Repair Lab 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Develops skills and knowledge in the area of unibody structural analysis and repairs. 

ABR 122 Conventional Frame and Unibody Structural Analysis, Diagnosis, and Repair 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Includes the use of tools, frame machines and equipment for frame and chassis repair. Includes study of terms pertaining to fron 
suspension and rear axle. Describes the uses of frame gauges, tram identification and other measuring devices. Unibody repair emphasizes identificatioi 
and analysis of damage, measuring and fixtunng systems, straightening systems and techniques, mechanical component service, and knowledge o 
suspension and steering systems on front wheel drive unibody vehicles. 

ACC 101 Principles of Accounting I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II, ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II, MAT 044 - Mathematics, or demonstrate; 
competencies. Introduces the fundamental principles, techniques, and tools of accounting. Presents the mechanics of the accounting cycle includinj 
collecting, recording, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting information pertaining to service and mercantile enterprises. Covers internal control 
deferred charges, notes and interest, valuation of receivables, payrolls, inventories, and plant assets. 

ACC 102 Principles of Accounting II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I. Continues the study of accounting to include partnership and corporate accounting systems 
Covers preparation and analysis of financial statements and long-term liabilities and investments. Introduces cost, managerial, branch, and nonprofi 
accounting techniques. 

ACC 105 Income Tax I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I (or) with program advisor approval. Offers an overview of federal and state income tax law fo) 
individuals including taxable income, capital gains and losses, adjustments, standard and itemized deductions, tax credits and appropriate tax forms 
Introduces tax concepts needed by a sole proprietorship. 

ACC 106 Payroll Accounting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I. Covers payroll calculating and reporting including various federal and state withholding taxeSj 
employer payroll taxes, typical insurance and other arrangements affecting the preparation of payroll registers, and employees' earnings records. Include; 
computerized payroll. 

ACC 107 Accounting for Recordkeeping 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides instruction for non-accounting majors, with special emphasis on the trade professions. Covers the cash basis of recordkeeping 
for materials, payroll, depreciation, and financial statements. Introduces the operation of petty cash funds, basic cash budgeting, and controlling cash 
through the use of a checkbook. Covers financial ratios, construction accounting methods and computing customer estimates. 

ACC 108 Career Essentials of Accounting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the basic principles of accounting as utilized in a variety of office settings. Includes the principles of debit and credit, 
double-entry bookkeeping, use of journals and analyzing transactions. Covers uses of ledgers, posting procedures, petty cash, banking procedures 
payroll, depreciation, work sheets, balance sheets and income statements. 

ACC 109 Personal Finance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the process of setting and achieving financial goals. Emphasizes managing financial resources, budgeting for current 
expenses, projecting cash flow, and managing short- and long-term credit. Includes use of insurance to reduce risks and vehicles for saving and investing. 



174 CourSe Descui 



ICC 111 Accounting Principles Lab I 1 Credit 

I Prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning 
I problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in the Principles of Accounting I course. Introduces the touch-method 
hf numeric input on a calculator and includes computerized problems. 

MX 112 Accounting Principles Lab II 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 102 - Principles of Accounting 11 (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning 
problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in the Principles of Accounting II course. Uses computerized problems. 

ICC 113 Income Tax Lab 1 Credit 

prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 105 - Income Tax 1 (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and 
l.ctivities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in the Income Tax I course. Uses computerized problems. 

MX 114 Payroll Accounting Lab 1 Credit 

[prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 106 - Payroll Accounting (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning 
Problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in the Payroll Accounting course. Uses computerized problems. 

MX 118 Financial Concepts for Accounting 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: None. Develops math skills needed in the business field and serves as a basis for course work in business. Includes the study of business 
iipplications using rational numbers, algebraic equations, time value of money concepts and basic statistics. 

MX 201 Intermediate Accounting I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 102 - Principles of Accounting II. Studies accounting principles and applications at an intermediate level pertaining to the income 
litatement and balance sheet, cash and short-term investments, receivables, inventories, plant assets and intangible assets, current and contingent liabili- 
ties, corrections of errors and statement of cash flows. Includes analysis of bad debts, inventory valuation, repairs and maintenance, depreciation of plant 
Issets, and present value applications. 

ACC 202 Intermediate Accounting II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 201 - Intermediate Accounting I. Continues studies of Intermediate Accounting I. Includes investments, long-term debt, stockhold- 
ers' equity, special accounting problems and analysis, statement of cash flows and financial statement analysis. Also includes corporate capital and 
treasury stock transactions, dividends, earnings per share, accounting for income taxes, correction of errors and creation of financial statements from 
Incomplete records. 

MX 203 Cost Accounting I 3 Credits 

prerequisites: ACC 102 - Principles of Accounting II. Examines the manufacturing process in relation to the accumulation of specific costs of manufac- 
lured products. Studies various cost accounting report forms, matenal, labor control and allocation of manufacturing costs to jobs and departments. 

MX 204 Cost Accounting II 3 Credits 

'rerequisites: ACC 203 - Cost Accounting I. Continues Cost Accounting I. Studies the master or comprehensive budget, flexible budgeting and capital 
)udgeting. Emphasizes tools for decision making and analysis. Introduces human resource accounting. 

MX 205 Seminar in Accounting 1 Credit 

'rerequisites: Program advisor approval. Allows accounting students an opportunity to pursue specific areas of interest at a more advanced level in 
iccounting. 

VCC 206 Managerial Accounting 3 Credits 

'rerequisites: ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I. Provides an understanding of accounting records and management decision making, with topics 
ncluding internal accounting records and quantitative business analysis. 

\CC 207 Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Entities 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I (or) with program Advisor approval. Emphasizes the similarities and differences between govern- 
nent, nonprofit and commercial accounting methods and procedures. Exposes students to the basic fund accounting cycle for the general fund and other 
special funds. 

IeC 208 Income Tax II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 105 - Income Tax I. Continues Income Tax I. Studies procedures and problems pertaining to federal and state income tax laws for 
Dartnerships and corporations. Includes a review and in-depth study of concepts related to proprietorships covered in Income Tax I. 



Course Descriptions 



ACC 209 Auditing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 201 - Intermediate Accounting I. Covers public accounting organization and operation including internal control, internal and 
external auditing, verification and testing of the balance sheet and operating accounts and the auditor's report of opinion of the financial statements. 

ACC 210 Money and Banking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies monetary and banking theories as they relate to present-day domestic and international problems. Topics include banking 
operations, price changes, international monetary relationships and application of monetary and fiscal policy. 

ACC 212 Business Finance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces basic tools and techniques of financial analysis and management and sources of financial and economic theory as 
applied to business finance. Includes conceptual materials related to valuation, capital structure formulation and risk-return consideration. 

ACC 217 Intermediate Accounting Lab I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 201 - Intermediate Accounting I (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning 
problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in Intermediate Accounting I. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 218 Intermediate Accounting Lab II 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 202 - Intermediate Accounting II (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning 
problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in Intermediate Accounting II. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 219 Cost Accounting Lab 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Enrollment in ACC 203 - Cost Accounting I (or) with program Advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning 
problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included in Cost Accounting I. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 220 Special Applications Lab I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and 
theories included in an accounting course. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 221 Special Applications Lab II 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and activities designed to accompany concepts and 
theories included in an accounting course. Uses computenzed problems. 

ACC 222 Accounting Software Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 102 - Principles of Accounting II. Solves accounting problems using software similar to what is currently used in business. Includes 
installation, operation and analysis of an accounting software package. 

ACC 223 Advanced Topics in Accounting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Discusses topics of current interest in accounting. Focuses on special interest projects for students in account- 
ing. Includes tnps, guest speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars. 

ACC 225 Integrated Accounting Software 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 1 1 1 - English Composition, MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra or equivalent or advisor approval, ACC 201 - Intermediate Account- 
ing I, ACC 203 - Cost Accounting, OAD 218 - Spreadsheets or corequisite with advisor approval. Integrated accounting software package(s) will be 
used to illustrate computerized accounting practices. The general ledger will be integrated with accounts receivable, accounts payable and other account- 
ing modules. 

ACC 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Departmental approval. Provides the opportunity to work at a job site specifically related to a student's career objectives. Provides on- 
the-job experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

ACC 281-294 Special Topics in Accounting 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

ACC 298 Field Study/Cooperative Education 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Must be enrolled in an Associate Degree Program. Must have permission from a Program Supervisor. The student works at a job site that 
is specifically related to his/her career objectives. The course is a field project within the framework of actual work experience in accounting. 



.176 Course Desckji i • > 



AFS 101 Fire Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the history of firefighting, identifies the types of apparatus and fire protection systems and analyzes the fire problem in 
general. Provides a basis for the chemical and hazardous properties of combustion and the related by-products. 

AFS 102 Fire Apparatus and Equipment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines in detail the types of apparatus in use today. Studies pumpers, aerials, elevating platforms and special apparatus. Utilizes 
National Fire Protection Association standards in identifying the proper responses for a given situation. Includes study of apparatus placement on an 
emergency incident, types of pumps, tests, equipment, drafting, relay, nozzles, fittings and hose lays and maintenance on various types of apparatus. 

AFS 103 Firefighting Strategy and Tactics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Prepares the student to make responsible decisions concerning fireground strategies and tactics at the company level. Uses various 
priority scenarios, including preparing for incident command and commanding the initial response. Emphasizes company operations with basic com- 
mand decisions. 

AFS 104 Building Construction Fire Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the design principles involved in the protection of a structure from fire involvement. Studies the signs, symptoms and 
indicators of partial or total building collapse during firefighting operations. Includes the study of legislative codes and laws concerning building design, 
building fire safety, classification of building construction and blueprint reading. 

AFS 105 Fire/Arson Investigation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on the responsibilities of the firefighter, the investigator and the department in fire scene investigations, fire cause and loss, 
collection and preservation of evidence and determination of fire origin. Emphasizes the application and assistance of various scientific aids that assist in 
the investigation. 

AFS 108 Fire Prevention/Inspection 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the function of the fire inspector and the organization of the fire prevention unit. Emphasizes identifying codes and 
regulations utilized by the inspector with particular use of the Indiana Fire Code. Includes the legal authority of fire prevention principles, application of 
the fire code and sound management principles as applied to a bureau. 

AFS 109 Fire Department Specifications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Surveys specifications of firefighting apparatus, equipment, protective clothing, facilities and all other sources of materials neces- 
sary to a fire department. Study includes the writing of Standard Operating Guides (SOGs) and blueprint readings. 

AFS 201 Fire Protection Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a general introduction to fire alarm monitoring devices and extinguishing systems. Develops a strong base for fire 
protection or commercial applications. Covers fire extinguishing agents, portable fire extinguishers, carbon dioxide systems, dry chemical systems, 
halogenated systems/foam systems, explosive suppression systems, thermal/smoke/flame detection systems and building monitoring systems. Covers 
standpipe and sprinkler systems. 

AFS 202 Fire Service Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the principles and functions of administrative and management personnel in the fire service. Topics discussed include 
departmental organizations, administrative and management procedures, personnel selection, line and staff functions, communications, the fire com- 
pany unit, public relations and current problems in administration. 

AFS 204 Fire Service Hydraulics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies compressible fluids including fluid properties, principles of fluid statics, flow system principles, pipe friction and head loss, 
jflow measurements, pumps and other appliances and hydraulic devices. Relates applications to fire protection, water supply and foam systems. 

AFS 205 Aircraft Firefighting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the hazards associated with aircraft firefighting. Includes lecture and practical use of airport firefighting equipment, 
extinguishing agents, strategy and tactics, rescue methods and aircraft design and construction. 

AFS 208 Industrial Fire Loss Prevention 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with a comprehensive study of industrial fire loss prevention and control management programs. Includes 
'procedures for fire risk and loss control, standards and specifications for equipment, laws, codes, regulations, organization of fire brigades and adminis- 
trative control of industrial operation. 



Coi'rsi. Descriptions 



AFS 209 Fireground Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Emphasizes the command and control of fire department major operations at an advanced level. Links operations and safety 
Studies pre-incident preparation, size-up, incident command systems and incident management with large role-playing incident scenarios for students to ' 
solve. 

AMT 102 Introduction to Robotics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 104 - Computer Fundamentals for Technology. Introduces students to robotics and automated systems and their operating charac- 
teristics. Covers robotics principles of operation and work envelopes. Teaches coordinate systems and how hydraulic, pneumatic and electromechanical • 
systems function together as a system. Covers servo and non-servo controls, system capabilities and limitations and safety. Investigates robot tooling, ! 
including welders, grippers, magnetic pickups, vacuum pickups, compliance devices, adhesive applicators and paint sprayers. 

AMT 201 Manufacturing Systems Control (PLCs) 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 104 - Computer Fundamentals for Technology and TEC 1 13 - Basic Electricity or advisor approval. Introduces the field of industrial 
controls. Teaches principles of control systems and how they are applied to a production system to achieve automation. Systems included in the course ] 
are stepper motors, programmable logic controllers, microprocessors, computers and feedback systems. Emphasizes programmable logic controllers and ■, 
the local area network. 

AMT 202 Work Cell Design and Integration 3 Credits 

Corequisites: AMT 102 - Introduction to Robotics, AMT 201 - Manufacturing Systems Control (PLCs). Studies principles pertaining to design and 
implementation of robots in industrial work cells. Emphasizes selection of the best work site and robot system, application of cell sensor, development 
of cycle times, economic analysis, safety considerations, proposal preparation and human resources development. 

AMT 203 Automation Electronics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 113 - Basic Electricity, MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra or MAT 131 - Algebra/Tngonometry I. Demonstrates the operation and 
application of electronic devices in the automation field. Includes linear integrated circuits, sensors and interfacing systems, actuators and drive controls 
and process control techniques. 

AMT 204 Automation Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Covers basic principles and applications for planning and controlling production operations and improvement pro- '•{ 
grams. Includes system characteristics and solutions for production process and service operation problems; methods analysis; cost estimating; facilities I 
planning, tooling and services acquisition and maintenance; production, project and program scheduling; materials and inventory management; safety II 
and loss prevention; decision-making tools and evaluation of alternatives. 



AMT 205 Automated Manufacturing Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMT 201 - Manufacturing Systems Control (PLCs), AMT 203 - Automation Electronics. Provides instruction in selecting equipment, 
writing specifications, designing fixtures and interconnects, integrating systems, providing interfaces and making the assigned systems operational to 
produce "marketable" products. 

AMT 206 Advanced Manufacturing Systems Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMT 201 - Manufacturing Systems Control (PLCs). Provides an in-depth study of programmable controllers. Emphasizes program 
language installation, maintenance and applications. 

AMV 101 Chassis and Suspension Principles 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Describes various frame designs and suspension systems used in modem vehicles. Includes repair and replacement of steering < 
linkages and chassis components, both front and rear. 

AMV 107 Engine Principles and Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines engine dynamics, theory of engine operation and design characteristics of all engine assemblies and subassemblies. 
Emphasizes removal, tear down, visual inspection, precision measuring inspection, clean up of components and pans and rebuilding engines according 
to industry standards. 

AMV 113 Electricity for Transportation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 050 - Basic Algebra. Introduces fundamentals of electricity and electrical behavior as applied to modem transportation. Includes 
extensive use of digital multimeters and circuit troubleshooting. Presents an intensive study of the construction, function and principles of operation of 
starting motors, charging systems and their control systems with emphasis on diagnosis and bench repair. 

AMV 202 Computer Engine Controls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AST 106 - Electronic Ignition Systems. Examines computerized ignition, carburetor, fuel injection and sensors for engine controls on late 
model passenger cars. Covers theory, diagnostic procedure and repair procedure of the CCC, MCU, EEC-IV, lean bum and other spark control systems. 

_^ m ^ mm as mtmm nwflt 



\MV 280 Co-op/Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minimum of 30 credits toward their degree with at least a 3.0 grade point average. Provides the 
ppportunity to work at a job site specifically related to a students career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit toward an 
associate degree. 

XMV 281-294 Special Topics in Automotive Technology 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
hat reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

Till Drawing for Visualization 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces students to the tools and methods of drawing. Presents drawing as a catalyst to seeing and a way of recording ideas. 
Gives students the necessary drawing preparation for the study of graphic design. 

\RT 112 Electronic Layout 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Deals with advanced issues of designing for communication. Develops creative problem solving skills. Uses the computer as a tool 
lor executing layouts for client approval. Produces practical samples for student portfolios. 

|\RT 114 Graphic Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIS 101 - Fundamentals of Design. Corequisites: ART 115 - Typography. Introduces design for communication. Teaches the steps in 
design development and the difference between message and concept. Produces samples for student portfolios. 

\KT 115 Typography 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: None. Addresses the issues pertinent to the proper and creative use of type and the enhancement of communication. Covers the history 
pf type, typographic terminology, design, copyfitting attention to aesthetics, common sense and how we read. 

:1RT 116 Electronic Illustration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides instruction in illustration techniques using computer software designed for creating illustrations, technical drawings, 
ogos, packaging, maps, charts and graphs. Emphasis is on preparing effective, creative illustrations for various media applications in an efficient, 
iDroductive manner. 

*RT 117 Production 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Focuses on the hand assembly of art and type for the printer's camera. Covers production terminology, printing process, 
iiand preparation of illustrative materials for reproduction and preparation of mechanical art using hand skills. Produces samples for student portfolios. 

\RT 202 Special Projects I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Accommodates student interest in specific areas or in areas where there is a need to strengthen skills. Requires performance and 
completed work to be portfolio quality and reflect applicability to the main areas of the program. 

J4RT 203 Independent Study I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with opportunities to design projects for specific areas of interest. Requires the project plan to be approved by 
Ihe instructor. Restricts work to student program area and requires it to be portfolio quality. 

\RT 205 Special Projects II 3 Credits 

'rerequisites: None. Provides specific experience in selected areas. Recommends completion of two projects. Requires instructor approval for addi- 
tional projects. 

JVRT 206 Independent Study II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Builds skills in specific areas of a visual communications program or a related program such as marketing, advertising, and 
bxternship or supervision. Requires instructor approval for program projects. Requires program chairpersons approval to elect non-program coursework. 

XRT 210 Illustration Techniques I 3 Credits 

3 rerequisites: None. Develops dexterity in the application of transparent and opaque media. 

MIT 217 Graphic Design II 3 Credits 

rerequisites: ART 1 12 - Electronic Layout. Provides experience with advanced design projects which communicate a common theme through several 
different media. Provides opportunity for students to work in a team environment. 



Course Descriptions 



ART 218 Digital Production 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Addresses issues of preparing camera-ready art electronically. Topics covered are preparing computer files for service bureau 
output, scanning and printing resolution, color matching and color models, trapping, and computer system operations and troubleshooting. 

AST 102 Two/Four-Wheel Alignment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 050 - Basic Algebra. Covers the pnnciples of two- and four-wheel alignment and wheel balance. Emphasizes practical work I 
experience in the lab covering all the alignment angles. 

AST 103 Automotive Electronics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduction to electrical theory and automotive circuits and components. Electron theory, electrical circuits, terms, wiring J 
diagrams and batteries are emphasized. Introduces electrical circuit and component test equipment. 

AST 104 Start and Charge Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMV 1 13 - Electricity for Transportation. Studies construction, function and principles of operation of starting motors, charging systems 
and their control systems with emphasis on diagnosis and bench repair. 

AST 105 Fuel Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMV 113 - Electricity for Transportation. Studies automotive fuel systems: single, double, and four barrel carburetors, fuel injection 
systems and emission controls as they apply to the fuel system. Focuses on shop procedures for troubleshooting, servicing, replacing or overhauling fuel 
system and emission control components. 

AST 106 Electronic Ignition Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMV 1 13 - Electricity for Transportation. Introduces basic principles of electronic ignition systems. Includes functions and testing of 
conventional breaker point ignitions. 

AST 108 Electrical Accessory Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMV 1 13 - Electricity for Transportation. Presents the functions, construction, and principles of operation and troubleshooting techniques 
for the accessories of automotive vehicles. Includes electrical accessories such as windshield wipers and washers, power seats, power windows, adjust- 
able steering wheels, power tailgates and power headlight doors. 

AST 109 Small Gas Engine Maintenance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents theory, service and repair of small gas engines and their components; emphasis is on safety, measurements, lubricants, 8 
fuels, and engine design. 

AST 110 Small Gas Engine Overhaul 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers disassembly, inspection, measuring, cleaning, machine repair, and proper assembly techniques applicable to small gas j 
engine overhaul. Includes overhaul of carburetor and ignition systems and maintenance procedures on rebuilt two-cycle and four-cycle engines. 

AST 111 Basic Auto Care 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides basic instruction in auto maintenance for the automobile owner. Covers routine maintenance, economical operation, j 
elimination of objectionable noises, care of interior and exterior appearance, warranty regulations and emergency road procedures. 

AST 113 Automotive Diesel and Engine Theory 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers operation of the diesel engine and differences between a diesel and gas engine. Includes instruction on shop equipment, 
fuels, oils, seals, bearings, lubrication and cooling systems. 

AST 114 Service Organization and Parts 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents facility and personnel requirements for efficiently-run parts and service departments. Emphasizes principles, practices 
and procedures necessary to effectively operate the departments. Includes manufacturer catalogs and component numbering systems, methods of 
scheduling time and techniques for obtaining maximum work efficiency from technicians and specialists. 

AST 201 Heating and Air Conditioning Principles 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an in-depth study of automotive air conditioning and heating. Emphasizes the operation and theory of air conditioning J 
and its components. Includes a study of vacuum and electrical control circuits. 

AST 203 Engine Rebuild 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMV 107 - Engine Principles and Design. Covers precision machines, tools and equipment needed for rebuilding today's modern engine. 
Includes repair, proper assembly and installation techniques applicable to the modem engine. 



180 Course Description:: 



AST 204 Automatic Transmission/Transaxle 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Deals with construction, functions and principles of operation. Emphasizes practical work experience in the lab where students 
overhaul automatic transmissions and transaxle assemblies. 

AST 205 Manual Transmission/Transaxle 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents theory and overhaul procedures related to the manual transmission/transaxle, including clutches and transfer cases and 
diagnosis and overhaul of the manual power train. 

|AST 206 Heating and Air Conditioning Service and Repair 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: AST 201 - Heating and Air Conditioning Principles. Covers diagnosis, service and repair procedures of the heating/air conditioning 
'system. Includes replacement and overhaul procedures for components related to heating/air conditioning systems. 

AST 207 Engine Performance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMV 202 - Computer Engine Controls and AST 105 - Fuel Systems. Includes advanced instruction in the theory, diagnosis and repair of 
computer-controlled ignition systems and fuel systems on late-model vehicles using state-of-the-art diagnostic equipment. Emphasizes recommended 
manufacturer methods for servicing the computer-controlled ignition system. 

AST 208 Differentials/Drivelines 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies differential and driveline theory and overhaul. Includes overhaul and service procedures applicable to gear sets, bearings 
and seals. Includes theory and overhaul procedures related to the driveshaft and axle assemblies for front and rear wheel drive vehicles. 

AST 209 Automotive Braking Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers theory, service and repair of automotive braking systems and their components. Emphasizes hydraulic theory and the repair 
;and service of booster units, master cylinder, wheel cylinder, caliper rebuilds and drum and rotor service. 

AST 210 Modified Automotive Engines 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AST 203 - Engine Rebuild. Provides instruction for advanced transportation students and employed technicians to familiarize them with 
higher performance engines, durability and economy. Stresses individuality in constructing performance engines. 

AST 212 Comprehensive Diagnosis I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMV 101 - Chassis and Suspension Principles, AST 201 - Heating and Air Conditioning Principles, AST 207 - Engine Performance, and 
AST 220 - Transaxle and Driveline Service. Provides students with the opportunity to diagnose and repair the complete automotive system according to 
manufacturers' recommendations and specifications. Requires students to complete repair orders assigned by the instructor. 

AST 213 Comprehensive Diagnosis II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AST 212 - Comprehensive Diagnosis I. Provides opportunity for students to complete work based on flat rate hours. Includes recordkeeping, 
parts procurement and methods for determining unpaid labor lost on flat rate. 

AST 215 ASE Certification Review 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Prepares professional automotive technicians for the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence certification 
tests. Reviews all eight areas of testing and provides sample certification tests. Lectures will stress theory of operation and diagnostic logic. Labs will 
stress professional repair and testing techniques. 

AST 220 Transaxle and Driveline Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers complete diagnostic procedures for automatic transaxles, computer shift transaxles, drive axles and shafts. Emphasizes on- 
car repair and removal procedures of transaxles and driveline components. 

AST 221 Driveability Diagnosis 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMV 113 - Electricity for Transportation, AMV 202 - Computer Engine Controls, AST 207 - Engine Performance. Develops the 
student's ability to diagnose and troubleshoot common and complex engine performance problems. Students are expected to utilize all available test 
equipment to make a complete and accurate diagnosis. Emphasis is on a systematic and logical approach to troubleshooting driveability problems. 

AST 225 Advanced Electronics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AMV 113 - Electricity for Transportation, AST 108 - Electrical Accessory Sytems, AST 201 - Heating and Air Conditioning Principles, 
AST 204 - Auto Transmission/Transaxle, AST 221 - Driveability Diagnosis. Presents advanced theory and diagnosis in automotive electronic systems. 
Examines all major vehicle computer systems with an emphasis on the diagnosis, testing and repair of these systems. 



Course Descriptions 



AVT 141 Aviation Basics 1 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra. Provides familiarization with aviation drawings and blueprint reading. The student learns the prope < 
methods to weigh various aircraft and the requirements for weight-and-balance reporting. Fabrication of fluid lines for hydraulic, oxygen and fuei| 
systems is also covered. 

AVT 142 Aviation Basics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. This is a math and physics review course with practical applications for aviation. The student reviews basic mathematical 
operations, determines areas of wing platforms and volumes of fuel tanks. Ratios and proportions are discussed as they apply to wings and aircraf j 
engines. The operation of simple machines, aircraft nomenclature and basic aerodynamics are also covered. 

AVT 144 Aircraft Electricity 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: AVT 141 - Aviation Basics 1 or instructor consent. Introduces the student to the principles of basic electricity. The student leams Ohm'. 
Law and the relationships of voltage, current, resistance and power in DC electrical circuits. The relationships between RMS values of voltage anc 
current, true and apparent power, reactance and impedance using vector algebra in AC circuits are discussed. Electrical wiring in the aircraft, prope 
test equipment, basic troubleshooting and battery servicing are also covered. 

AVT 145 Aircraft Ground Servicing 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on the proper methods and safety procedures involved in working with aircraft on the ground. The student learn: 
identification of aircraft fuels and refueling procedures and how to properly clean, inspect and treat corrosion. Standard hand signals used witl 
marshalling aircraft, engine run-up and taxiing procedures and ramp safety are also included. 

AVT 146 Aviation Regulations 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the student to the Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs) pertaining to aviation maintenance (FAR Parts 23, 43 and 65) 
the Advisory Circulars (ACs) that expand upon these regulations, and proper record keeping for maintenance tasks performed on civil aircraft 
Included are the format of technical publications and the various media (paper, microfiche and CD-ROM) on which they are published. 

AVT 148 Aviation Materials and Processes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of aviation manufacturing and inspection methods. Introduces the student to some of the processes ant 
the special tools used in aviation quality assurance. 

AVT 151 Introduction to Avionics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of the aviation electronics industry. Introduces the various job descriptions, duties, activities and pro 
cesses involved in manufacturing, repairing and maintaining aircraft avionics systems. 

AVT 205 Navigation and Communications Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Completion of Technical Core. Exposes the student to correct safety practices and develops comprehensive knowledge and technica 
skills required to repair and maintain complex aircraft navigation and communication systems. 

AVT 206 Aviation Control Circuits 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: AVT 205 - Navigation and Communications Systems. Emphasizes advanced skills on EC.C. and aircraft controls and circuitry. Stud; 
of autopilot, approach linkages, safety, position and warning systems and the glass cockpit are included in this course. 

AVT 222 Nonmetallic Structures 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the student to inspecting and evaluating honeycomb and laminated structural damage as well as damaged transpar 
ent acrylic materials structures. The student becomes familiar with the methods involved in removing and repairing damaged honeycomb anc 
laminated structural materials and repairing acrylic materials. 

AVT 223 Aircraft Finishes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Familiarizes the student with the process of selecting, applying and repairing fabric coverings; identifying wood defects anc 
making repairs to wood structures. Also covered are the application of finishing materials and identification of finish defects. 

AVT 224 Aircraft Inspection 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents the operation of these hydraulic systems: landing gear struts, aircraft brakes, steering and flaps. Students also stud] 
aircraft jacking and leveling, aircraft wheels, tires and tubes. Aircraft conformity and airworthiness inspections are also covered. 

AVT 225 Airframe Fluid Systems 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the proper handling and identification of hydraulic fluids; inspection of hydraulic lines and fittings and servicing 
troubleshooting and repairing hydraulic systems and components. Additionally, students learn about the function and operation of aircraft pressuriza- 
tion and cabin air distribution systems and aircraft fuel systems. Introduces the proper methods involved in inspecting and servicing oxygen systems j 



182 Course Descriptions 



AVT 226 Airframe Electrical Systems 4 Credits 

[Prerequisites: None. Presents the theory of operation and proper methods of inspecting, servicing, troubleshooting and repairing the various 
electrically powered aircraft systems. Included are power distribution systems for light and transport aircraft and power generation and regulation. 
|Proper wiring technique and connector repair are also covered. 

AVT 227 Aircraft Sheetmetal 6 Credits 

prerequisites: None. Introduces the basic techniques necessary to perform sheet metal repairs on aircraft structures. Students develop skills in these 
areas: using sheet metal tools, laying out parts, forming parts with bending machines and repairing various structural airframe components. 

AVT 228 Aircraft Instruments and Avionics 3 Credits 

iPrerequisites: None. Introduces the student to aircraft instruments and the various avionic systems installed in both general aviation and transport 
category aircraft. Included are basic theory of operation and the regulations pertaining to maintenance of instruments and avionics. 

AVT 231 Reciprocating Powerplants 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers inspection and repair of radial engines, and overhaul, inspection and removal of reciprocating engines. Students will 
perform a receiving inspection on an aircraft engine and perform a complete overhaul to airworthy condition. 

AVT 232 Turbine Powerplants 5 Credits 

[Prerequisites: None. Covers the overhaul of a turbine engine, and the inspection, checking, servicing, repair and removal/installation of turbine 
[engines. Students will perform a receiving inspection on an aircraft engine and perform a complete overhaul to airworthy condition. 

AVT 233 Powerplant Fuel and Induction Systems 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies fuel metering systems in reciprocating powerplants. Air flow through turbines, superchargers and carburetors is 
(discussed. Students overhaul carburetors to supplement theory discussions in this area. Engine cooling systems are also covered. 

AVT 234 Reciprocating Engine Ignition and Fuel Systems 2 Credits 

[Prerequisites: None. The student overhauls magnetos and inspects and repairs ignition systems and fuel systems. 

AVT 235 Powerplant Fluid and Indicating Systems 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: None. Covers lubricating systems in reciprocating engines. Indicating systems and engine instruments are also covered. 

AVT 236 Turbine Starting Systems and Auxiliary Power 2 Credits 

: Prerequisites: None. Introduces reciprocating and turbine engine electrical systems. Students will inspect, service, troubleshoot and repair turbine 
pneumatic starting systems and turbine ignitions. 

AVT 237 Propellers 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the inspection, repair and troubleshootng of propeller control systems. The removal, installation and balancing of 
propellers are also covered. 

AVT 238 Turbine Systems and Components 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces turbine engine electrical systems. Students inspect, check, troubleshoot and repair engine fire detection systems. 
Exhaust systems and thrust reversers are also covered. 

AVT 240 Structural Repair 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the student to welding techniques used on aircraft. Rigging of flight controls on a fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft 
are also accomplished. Repair, servicing and inspection of ice and rain control and smoke carbon monoxide detection systems are also covered. 

AVT 257 Aircraft Microprocessors 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Completion of Technical Core. A familiarization with computer applications in the aircraft. Students are introduced to microproces- 
sors, volatile and non-volatile memory, machine language and how various aircraft systems are interfaced. 

AVT 260 Avionics Installation 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Completion of Technical Core. The student utilizes knowledge and skills developed in previous classes to install and troubleshoot 
avionics systems in light aircraft. Introduces the student to bidding avionics installations and how an avionics business operates. 

BCT 102 Construction Materials 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Develops skills in identifying building materials commonly used in modem building construction. Provides experience in the 
application of locally accessible materials. 



Course Descriptions 



BCT 104 Floor and Wall Layout and Construction 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the design and construction of floor and wall systems. Develops skills needed for layout and construction of floor and 
wall systems from blueprints and professional planning documents. 

BCT 105 Roof Construction 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CON 101 - Introduction to Construction Technology. Studies the design and construction of roof systems. Emphasizes use of the framing 
square for traditional rafter and truss roofing. Instructs students in additional up-to-date techniques. 

BCT 107 Furniture Design and Construction 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Develops skills in the design, layout and construction of furniture. Introduces furniture styles, types of materials used and methods 
of construction. 

BCT 108 Cabinetry Fabrication Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Develops skills in the design, layout and construction of cabinets. Provides opportunities for students to lay out and fabricate 
faceplates and cases for cabinets. 



BCT 109 Furniture Refinishing and Repair 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Develops knowledge and skills in the technology of refinishing and repairing furniture. Introduces procedures used in stripping, 
bleaching, caning, veneering and wood fillers. 



BCT 110 Cabinetry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the basic skills and technology of cabinet making, focusing on cabinet design and layout, terminology, tools and skill 
requirements. 

BCT 111 Woodworking Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the basic skills and technology of woodworking and focusing on tool and machine operations. Introduces proper 
jointry and material selection. 

BCT 112 MiUwork 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the basic skills and technology of the production of wood products and focuses on machinery set-up and operations for 
making moldings, door frames and picture frames. 

BCT 113 Cabinetry/Furniture Door and Drawer Assembly 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Develops skills in the design, layout and construction of cabinet/furniture doors, drawers and counter tops. Introduces types of j 
hardware and installation methods. 

BCT 114 Exterior Trim 3 Credits 

Prerequisites'. None. Develops necessary skills in finishing building exteriors. Provides training in the installation of the cornice, windows, doors, and 
various types of sidings used in todays market place. 

BCT 115 Auxiliary Building Design and Construction 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CON 101 - Introduction to Construction Technology. Develops carpentry skills in construction of garages, storage buildings, wood decks, 
patios, privacy fences and gazebos. 

BCT 201 Residential Wiring 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 1 13 - Basic Electricity. Covers the practice of residential wiring, including electrical service, metering equipment, lighting, switches, 
outlets and other common components, and methods of installation and maintenance of the residential wiring system in accordance with the current 
National Electrical Code. 

BCT 202 Plumbing Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the operation and function of the home plumbing system. Introduces pipe drawings and isometric pipe layout and 
blueprint symbols. Demonstrates how to rough in plumbing and install drainage, water systems, fixtures and water heaters in compliance with the 
plumbing code. 

BCT 203 Masonry Concrete Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers materials and methods of construction with concrete block, brick and forming for poured concrete. Includes study in the j 
preparation of the building site. 



184 Course Descriptions 



BCT 205 Advanced Projects in Building Construction I 3 Credits 

| Prerequisites: CON 204 - Estimating and Specifications. Applies problem solving to common problems in construction. Emphasizes the cooperation 
between several trades in the construction industry. 

BCT 206 Advanced Projects in Building Construction II 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: BCT 205 - Advanced Projects in Building Construction I. Applies problem solving skills to common challenges in construction. Empha- 
sizes the cooperation between several trades in the construction industry allowing students to practice necessary skills to resolve the problem. Concen- 
trates on decision-making skills. 

BCT 207 Carpentry — Light Commercial 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces carpentry skills required in light commercial construction. Focuses on construction methods and materials used for 
office buildings, clinics, small churches and other non-residential structures. 

BCT 210 Vinyl and Aluminum Siding Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides in-depth examination of common and unusual problems encountered by an aluminum siding applicator on new jobs and 
existing structures. Includes sidings, soffit, fascia, rain gutter and covering of trims and windows. Emphasizes actual installation and a wide variety of 
experiences. Includes standing seam and corrugated metal roofing, metal carports, awnings, metal storage buildings, ventilators and flashings. 

BCT 211 Construction Organization and Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None: Introduces organization and management procedures focusing on subcontracting, equipment and tool inventories, job materials, 
codes, inspections and permits. 

BCT 213 Motors and Motor Controls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 113 - Basic Electricity. Studies the wiring and design of motor control circuits, including circuit and conductor calculations, motor 
circuits and controls. Includes control transformers and service, circuit layout for motor control and machine tool hook-up and control. 

BCT 214 Wall and Floor Coverings 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers modem materials and techniques of interior floor and wall coverings. Provides instruction on assessing the durability and 
maintenance of matenals and techniques in correct installation procedures. 

BCT 215 Basic Theory of Paint and Stain 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the basic skills and techniques of finishing wood products, including proper preparation, staining and finishing 
procedures. 



BCT 216 Advanced Residential Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Studies residential floor plans and elevation. Analyzes contemporary living patterns, cost, privacy, convenience and 
efficiency coordinated with needs. Compares exterior styles for cost and aesthetic values. Studies multiple housing, duplex arrangements, apartments 
and condominiums. Provides students with opportunities to do floor plans, elevations and perspective drawings to incorporate the conclusions reached 
from the above research. 

BCT 217 Plumbing Mechanical Installation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BCT 202 - Plumbing Fundamentals. Develops skills in the use of plumbing equipment. Covers residential and commercial installations, 
troubleshooting and service and repair in conformance with codes. 

BCT 218 Commercial Plumbing Installation and Estimating 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BCT 202 - Plumbing Fundamentals. Offers in-depth study of commercial plumbing with emphasis on code requirements and commercial 
blueprints. Instructs in estimating the cost of a complete plumbing system. 

BCT 219 Survey and Measurement 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents fundamentals of surveying, including use of transit, reading angles, land description, restrictions and legal problems. 
Covers topographical maps and their use. 

BCT 220 Electrical Troubleshooting Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 1 13 - Basic Electricity and BCT 201 - Residential Wiring. Presents methods and techniques for troubleshooting appliances, motors, 
motor controls, relay wiring, residential wiring, commercial wiring and industrial wiring systems. 

BCT 221 Interior Trim 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Develops basic knowledge, skills and awareness of interior trim. Provides training in installation of drywall, moldings, interior 
doors, kitchen cabinets and baseboard moldings. 



BCT 222 Estimating and Specifications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BCT 104 - Floor and Wall Layout and Construction and CON 106 - Construction Blueprint Reading I. Introduces wiring methods andi 
material selection for commercial and industrial wiring systems. Studies mechanical installation of hardware as well as electrical design, layout ands 
installation. Emphasizes tool use and material selection and installation. 

BCT 223 Plumbing Design and Installation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BCT 202 - Plumbing Fundamentals. Provides techniques for working with pipes and fittings. Studies residential and commercial! 
electrical hot water heating systems, private well water systems and electrical components of plumbing systems. 

BCT 224 Energy Conservation Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Offers an in-depth study of energy conservation techniques currently being applied and developed. Covers new materials,: 
construction concepts and alternative approaches being developed to reduce energy consumption. 

BCT 225 Fabrication 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies concepts and techniques of industrialized housing. Covers pre-fabrication, fabrication, jigs and rigging, including mobile! 
homes, sectional homes and modular homes. 

BCT 226 Construction Supervisory Training 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the duties and responsibilities of the supervisor of a construction crew. Develops leadership abilities and techniques- 
necessary to deal with special problems in daily construction work. Gives attention to adjusting to the role of supervisor and indicates what is expected 
from each member of the crew. 

BCT 227 AC/DC Circuits 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies basic electrical principles for both DC and AC circuits. Includes electron theory, Ohm's Law, Watts Law, Kirchoff s Laws, 
series circuits, parallel circuits, series-parallel circuits, electromagnetism and electromagnetic induction, inductance and inductive circuits, LR time 
constants, LR circuits, RC circuits, LRC circuits, impedance and phase angles for current voltage, resistance, reactance and power. Studies components 
including resistors, inductors, capacitors and transformers. 

BCT 231 Construction Supervision 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Develops required skills in construction supervision. 

BDC 102 Mass Communications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces mass media with emphasis on broadcast and cinema, from early development through the present. Examines the 
relationship between society and the media. 

BDC 106 Script Writing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II. Focuses on knowledge and skills needed to prepare objectives, audience analyses and 
overall planning for media productions. Examines visual flow and continuity, scripting formats and concept development. 

BDC 107 Field Production 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Emphasizes skills development in the area of on-field recording of video and audio. Provides experience in lighting, on-location 
video recording and sound gathering. 

BDC 109 Post Production 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIS 115 - Computer Graphics or equivalent experience. Provides experience in digital video, editing, computer graphics and special 
effects in video and audio. 

BDC 201 Broadcast Studio Practices 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIS 105 - Video and Sound. Covers the theory of operation and technical skills related to set up, operation and routine maintenance 
of studio equipment. 

BDC 202 Broadcast Program Production 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BDC 106 - Scnpt Writing. Develops the skills needed to produce and direct broadcast programming and electronic field productions. 
Examines legal and business issues affecting the media producer. 



186 Course Descriptions 



BDC 204 Special Projects I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Instructor approval. Accommodates student interest in specific areas. Students develop critical thinking and time management skills. 

BDC 205 Broadcast Operations 3 Credits 

.'Prerequisites: BDC 102 - Mass Communications. Examines daily operations of a broadcast facility, including promotion, management and sales. 

BDC 206 Independent Study I 3 Credits 

^Prerequisites: Instructor approval. Provides the opportunity to develop skills in a specific area of study related to the program major. Project work 
I must be of portfolio quality. 

BDC 280 Internship 3 Credits 

| Prerequisites: Minimum of a 2.0 cumulative GPA at last grading period and permission of the program chairperson. Provides interested and qualified 
students with on-the-job training in entry-level skills required for employment in the broadcast field. Minimum of 140 laboratory hours. 

BKR 101 Yeast Breads I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 105 - Introduction to Baking. Prepares students to produce a variety of yeast raised breads and rolls using both straight dough and 
I sponge dough methods. Emphasizes proper mixing, fermentation, make-up proofing and baking. 

BKR 102 Yeast Breads II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 105 - Introduction to Baking. Prepares students to produce a variety of pastries. Emphasizes proper proofing, baking and finishing. 
Focuses on sanitation, hygienic work habits and conformance with health regulations. 

BKR 103 Merchandising 3 Credits 

' Prerequisites: BKR 102 - Yeast Breads II. Requires students to produce yeast raised and plasticized/sweet dough products for limited retail sale for a 12- 
week period. Studies merchandising and marketing, planning, production, controlling scrap, cash recaps and all pertinent phases of a retail bake shop 
operation. 



BKR 104 Baking Science 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 101 - Sanitation and First Aid, HOS 102 - Basic Foods Theory and Skills, HOS 105 - Introduction to Baking. Explores the science 
of baking and the different reactions that take place based on the ingredients, temperatures and equipment in relation to the final product. 

BKR 201 Cakes, Icings, and Fillings 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 105 - Introduction to Baking. Requires students to produce and finish a variety of cakes. Emphasizes application techniques, color 
coordination, and the flavor and texture of fillings. Practices the techniques of basic cake decorating. Emphasizes sanitation, hygienic work habits and 
conformance with health regulations. 

BKR 202 Advanced Decorating/Candies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BKR 201 - Cakes, Icings, and Fillings. Presents the six different classical styles of cake decorating, the production of gum paste objects 
which accompany the styles, the use of royal icings and investigates the similarities and differences between the six styles. Students will be required to 
produce examples of each style and technique, to include two practical examinations. 

BNK 215 Principles of Banking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Discussion ranges from fundamentals of negotiable instruments to contemporary issues and developments within the industry. 

BNK 216 Analyzing Financial Statements 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a practical introduction to financial analysis from the viewpoint of the commercial loan officer and develops skills needed 
to effectively assess a borrower's ability to repay loans. 

BNK 217 Law and Banking: Applications and Principles 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces laws pertaining to secured transactions, letters of credit, and the bank collection process. Provides a bankers guide to 
law and legal issues with special emphasis on the Uniform Commercial Code. 

BNK 218 Consumer Lending 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents an insiders view of consumer lending, offering essential information about the maze of regulations that govern credit 
practices and reviews loan processing, cross-selling and collections. 



Course Descriptions 



BNK 219 Bank Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a complete introduction to the handling of day-to-day bank activities and incorporates case studies to help acquire bank i 
management skills. 

BNK 220 Trust Operations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides basic trust terminology and discusses the concepts and ideas that comprise the various trust functions. Translates themi 
into workable procedures. 

BUS 101 Introduction to Business 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the U.S. business system in relation to the nations economy. Studies business ownership, organization principles andj 
problems, management, and administration and development practices of American business enterprises. 

BUS 102 Business Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Describes the judicial system and the nature and sources of law affecting business. Studies contracts, sales and negotiable , 
instruments with emphasis on Uniform Commercial Code applications. Includes appropriate remedies for breach of contract and tort liabilities. Exam- 
ines business structures and agencies. 

BUS 103 Office Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers broad areas of administrative office services and management, including office organization, site location, layout and 
environment, records management, systems controls, and office communication services and devices. 

BUS 104 Investment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents the basis of investing, with attention to the various ways in which investment vehicles operate. 

BUS 105 Principles of Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Describes the functions of managers, including the management of activities and personnel. Focuses on application of guidance 
principles in management. 

BUS 108 Personal Finance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Emphasizes management of individual financial resources for growth and maintenance of personal wealth. Covers home buying 
and mortgage financing, installment financing, life and health insurance, securities, commodities and other investment opportunities. 

BUS 110 Business Statistics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra. Introduces students to the theory and applications of statistical inferential techniques as applied to 
business problems. The student is exposed to a software package to illustrate the extent that the computer has facilitated quantitative research. 

BUS 202 Human Resource Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BUS 105 - Principles of Management. Focuses on the activities of human resource management, with emphasis on employer-employee 
relations, job analysis and evaluation, salary administration, work measurement and standards, performance appraisal and legal compliance. 

BUS 203 Business Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: 45 credit hours and/or departmental approval. Explores business operations for the self-employed or as a manager of a small business 
enterprise. Covers the role of entrepreneur and manager; selecting the appropriate business organization; developing plans and strategies for small, 
medium, and growing firms; securing financing for start-up and growing operations; exploring growth opportunities and successfully managing human 
and material resources. 

BUS 204 Case Problems in Business 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: 45 program credit hours to include ENG 111 - English Composition and MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra or MAT 112 - Functional 
Mathematics and departmental approval. Applies business concepts and principles to specific case studies or problems. 

BUS 205 Risk Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines risks faced by business firms and considers ways of handling them. Covers property, liability and personal losses, with 
attention to insurance contracts and their uses. Studies individual life, health and pension insurance, public policy, government regulations and social 
insurance programs. 



188 CbuiisE Disc 



BUS 207 Introduction to International Business 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: BUS 101 - Introduction to Business and/or departmental approval. Provides an overview of the international environment within which 
i 'business operates today. Demonstrates the global relationships between business activities and how events in one part of the world can influence business 
I decisions and activities in other parts of the world. 

BUS 208 Organizational Behavior 3 Credits 

; Prerequisites: BUS 105 - Principles of Management. Studies human behavior in organizations at the individual and group level, including the effect of 
[■organizational structure on behavior. Focuses on using organizational behavior concepts for developing and improving interpersonal skills. 

BUS 209 Introduction to eBusiness 3 Credits 

I Prerequisites: None. Focuses on how eBusiness is being conducted and managed and its major opportunities, limitations, issues and risks. Applica- 
i tions to be discussed include those of business-to-consumers, business-to-business and intrabusiness. Because eBusiness is interdisciplinary, subject 
matter will be directed at managers, professionals and students who wish an overview of the eBusiness potential. 

' BUS 210 Managerial Finance 3 Credits 

! Prerequisites: MAT 1 12 - Functional Mathematics or MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra, and ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I. Improves decision- 
■ making skills related to the financial resources of a firm. Includes techniques of financial analysis, time value of money, capital budgeting, and risk. 

BUS 220 Conference Leadership Training 3 Credits 

r Prerequisites: None. Stresses the importance of the conference in business and industry. Emphasizes the practical application of the various 
techniques of conference leadership and an understanding of group dynamics in the conference setting. 

BUS 221 Principles of Employment 3 Credits 

| Corequisites: BUS 202 - Human Resource Management. Provides an in-depth look at the employment process. Emphasizes the role of recruiting, 
f selecting and training of employees. Studies in detail techniques in job analysis, behavioral interviewing and on-the-job training. 



BUS 222 Benefits Administration 3 Credits 

Corequisites: BUS 202 - Human Resource Management. Provides an in-depth look at benefits administration. Topics include vacations, holiday pay, 
insurance, retirement programs and other employee inducements. Emphasizes cost of benefits in relationship to the overall compensation package. 
Looks at the relevance of reward, recognition and pay structures. 

BUS 223 Occupational Safety and Health 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Emphasizes the importance of safety and health in the workplace. Examines the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 in 
depth with relationship to businesses and their employees. Places emphasis on effective practices, costs, labor and management reponsibilities, 
health hazards, alcohol and drug abuse, workers compensation, physical conditions and training. 

BUS 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Departmental approval. Gives students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides 
on-the-job experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

BUS 281-294 Special Topics in Business Administration 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

CHD 113 Environments for Infants and Toddlers 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the physical, human and time environments required for high-quality care of infants and toddlers. The parent- 
teacher partnership along with adult-adult relationships within the environment are explored. 

CHD 120 Infant/Toddler Growth and Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the physical, social, emotional, cognitive and language development of infants and toddlers from conception. Examines 
the crucial role of brain development during the first three years. 

CHD 122 Child Growth and Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children from conception to age 12, as well as quality care 
and education of young children. 



CoritsiE Descriptions 



CHD 124 Developmentally Appropriate Guidance in a Cultural Context 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a basic understanding of the anti-bias/multi-cultural emphasis in the field of early childhood. Analyzes developmentally ] 
appropriate practices, theory, and implementation for various early childhood settings. Includes lectures, field trips, review of current literature and j 
observations. 

CHD 142 Beginnings in Child Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines basic principles of child development, developmentally appropriate practice (DAP), importance of family, licensing and 
elements of quality care of young children with an emphasis on health and safety and the learning environment. Entry-level course for early care and 
education teachers. 

CHD 143 Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Entry-level course for early care and education teachers. Examines developmentally appropriate environments and activities in 
various child care settings. Explores the varying developmental levels and cultural backgrounds of children. 

CHD 144 Reflections on Practice in Early Childhood 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines child care practice, reflecting on the areas of relationship and communication within the program, curriculum 
development, program management, awareness, diversity and use of community resources. Offers resources to enhance professionalism. 

CHD 145 CDA Process 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 142 - Beginnings in Child Development, CHD 143 - Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom, CHD 144 - Reflections on 
Practice in Early Childhood or program chair approval. Prepares the student for the verification process for the Child Development Associate (CDA) 
credential. Provides opportunity for practical experience through supervised participation in early care and education settings. 

CHD 155 Generalist Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 144 - Reflections on Practice in Early Childhood, CHD 122 - Child Growth and Development. Corequisites: CHD 143 
Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom. Provides opportunity for practical experience through observation and supervised participation in 
child care settings. This practicum covers experiences with ages infant through school age. 

CHD 165 Infant Toddler Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 120 - Infant/Toddler Growth and Development. Corequisites: CHD 1 13 - Environments for Infants and Toddlers or CHD 213 - 
Infant/Toddler Care Programming. Provides opportunity for practical experiences through observation and supervised participation in an infant/ 
toddler setting. Students develop and implement appropriate activities for this age of children. 

CHD 175 Preschool Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 142 - Beginnings in Child Development, CHD 144 - Reflections on Practice in Early Childhood. Corequisites: CHD 143 - j 
Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom. Provides opportunity for practical experience through observation and supervised participation in | 
early child care and education setting with children ages 3-5. Students will develop and implement developmentally appropriate environments and 
activities. 

CHD 185 School Age Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 122 - Child Growth and Development, CHD 142 - Beginnings in Child Development. Corequisites: CHD 211 - School Age 
Programming. Provides opportunities for practical experience through observation and supervised participation in a school-age setting. Students 
will develop and implement appropriate environments and activities. 

CHD 186 Grandparenting/Kinship Parenting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of the traditional grandparent role and the current role of grandparenting grandchildren. Includes a study 
of the goals, concerns and issues confronted by grandparents or other kin in the parenting role. 

CHD 202 Family/Teacher Partnership Skills 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the family/teacher partnership, recognizing the need to work successfully with the child's development. Promotes 
awareness of families as the child's first teacher and the child's basis for culture, language, attitudes and values. Provides the structure for creating 
practices that establish active family participation. Explores issues and resources for families. 

CHD 206 Early Childhood Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 144 - Reflections on Practice in Early Childhood, CHD 122 - Child Growth and Development, CHD 142 Beginnings in Child 
Development or advisor approval. Introduces principles of managing an early care and education program. Emphasizes the role of the manager to 
include personnel and program administration and fiscal management. Explores client-community relations. 



190 Course Descriptions 



CHD 209 Families in Transition 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the stages of the family life cycle and interpersonal relationships among family members. Explores systems dynamics 
[within the family, the community and larger culture. Recognizes the impact of context and culture on the family's ability to function. 

CHD 211 School Age Programming 3 Credits 

i Prerequisites: None. Examines environments, materials, methods and teaching styles for providing creative experiences for the school age child. 
: Offers appropriate experiences in music, movement, art and drama as well as methods to assist students in identification and pursuit of specific 
; personal interest areas in a school age child care setting. Reviews theories of adolescent growth and development, establishment of partnerships with 
families and positive guidance techniques for school age children. 

CHD 213 Infant/Toddler Care Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 120 Infant/Toddler Growth and Development. Studies the program planning and operation for infant and toddler care and 
education. Examines the important role of the teacher in establishing positive and productive relationships with family and in managing an effective 
program. 

CHD 216 The Exceptional Child 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an introduction to caring for children with special needs. Includes theories and practices for producing optimal 
developmental growth while developing effective teaching techniques. Explores public policy, inclusion, early intervention and individual education 
programs (IEPs). Explores the many types of special needs and provides methods for helping with them. 

CHD 217 Skills for Parenting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on skill development in parents to increase their effectiveness in understanding young children, building the child's self- 
esteem, communicating with young children, setting appropriate boundaries and nurturing their emotional and social development. Examines 
models of parent education, parenting styles and the need for parent empowerment. 

CHD 218 Introduction to Care in the Home 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Offers an overview of care of children in a homelike setting. Includes providing a safe, healthy learning environment in the 
home setting, family-provider relationships and recommendations for developing a professional support system. 

CHD 220 Leadership and Mentoring in Early Childhood Education 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: At least 20 hours of early childhood coursework. Introduces the concept of leadership. Includes theories of leadership and teamwork 
and provides an opportunity for students to shadow a leader in an early childhood setting. 

CHD 221 Emerging Literacy in Young Children 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Emphasizes the development and acquisition of language in order to provide materials and activities for optimum growth. 
Students explore and evaluate literacy for young children and its role in the child's development. Students evaluate young children's literature for its 
appropriateness. Introduces audiovisual material, techniques and various types of equipment and materials used to promote literacy in young 
children. 

CHD 225 Cognitive Curriculum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Reviews cognitive theories to develop appropriate practices in activities as they relate to problem-solving skills, math, science and 
social studies in early childhood settings. Reviews multicultural education. 

CHD 242 Curriculum Planning for Early Childhood Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program chair permission. Presents an overview of cognitive and creative curriculum from a developmentally appropriate perspective. 
Examines early childhood curriculum models with an emphasis on planning and evaluating curriculum to meet the comprehensive needs of the 
young child. Emphasizes staff and family involvement in curriculum planning, implementation and assessment. 

CHD 251 Early Childhood Professionalism 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Completion of 48 program credits. Surveys and further examines early childhood philosophies, theories and theorists. Encourages 
students to form their own theories for learning, discipline, family involvement and self-concept development. Identifies preferred settings and 
environments for professional practice. Guides students in the development of a professional graduation portfolio. 

CHD 281-294 Special Topics in Early Childhood Education 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 



Course Descriptions 



CIS 100 Using Windows Environment 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the basic concepts of Windows and Windows-based applications. The student will acquire the necessary concept, 
for accomplishing the most common tasks such as creating folders, copying, deleting and moving files from one folder to another or from a folder t< 
an auxiliary storage medium. The student will also be introduced to such Windows applets as the NotePad and Accessories. Simple word processing 
database, spreadsheet and communications programs will be introduced. 

CIS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II and ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated competencies, or advisoi 
approval. Coequisites: Keyboardmg at a rate of 25 GWAM with three-minute timing and no more than three errors, or advisor approval. Introduce; 
the physical components and operations of microcomputers. Focuses on computer literacy and provides hands-on training in three areas of microcom-' : 
puter application software: word processing, electronic spreadsheets and database management. Use of a professional business integrated application^ 
package is emphasized. 

CIS 102 Information Systems Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II, ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II, or demonstrated competencies or advisoi 
approval. Introduces information processing and programming with emphasis on hands-on computer experience. Examines the role of information 
processing in an organization, including information processing applications, computer hardware and software, internal data representation, stored 
program concepts, systems and programming design, flowcharting and data communications. Reviews the history of computers, related computer 
careers, the social impact of computers and computer security. 

CIS 104 Introduction to COBOL Programming 3 Credits 

Corequisites: CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming. Provides an introduction to COBOL (Common Business Oriented Language) with major 
emphasis on developing structured programming skills. Develops proficiency in applying the programming development cycle to elementary business 
problems. 

CIS 105 Operating Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Studies computer operating systems, purposes, structure, and various functions. Provides 
general understanding of how comprehensive sets of language translators and service programs, operating under supervisory coordination of an inte- 
grated control program, form the total operating systems of a computer. 

CIS 106 Microcomputer Operating System 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals. Introduces the organization, structure and 
functions of an operating system for a microcomputer. Presents the student with operating system concepts such as commands, error messages, inter- 
rupts, function calls, device drivers, structure, files and organization. Incorporates concepts into practical applications. 

CIS 107 Microcomputer Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals and CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming. Introduces a structured microcomputer 
language. Concepts in input/output commands, arithmetic expressions, conditional control, iteration techniques and subroutines will be stressed. 
Concepts will be incorporated into the application of solving business problems. 

CIS 108 Practical Computer Operations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Demonstrates workstation and minicomputer operations including peripheral devices. Provides information on data processing 
area including job responsibilities, standards and run manuals, message control functions, documentation and back-up procedures. 

CIS 109 UNIX Operating Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction of Microcomputers or CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems or advisor approval. Studies the UNIX V 
operating system and its use as a time-sharing operating system. Includes basic UNIX commands, use of the visual editor, the UNIX directory structure 
and file management with SHELL commands. Offers opportunities to apply skills and knowledge in a laboratory environment. 

CIS 110 Basic Programming Language 3 Credits 

Corequisites: CIS 1 13 - Logic, Design and Programming. Introduces concepts of program design and programming using the BASIC programming 
language, the primary language for use with microcomputers. Includes overview of basic arithmetic operations, accumulating and printing totals, 
comparing, array processing, and interactive programming. Offers students an opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment. 

CIS 113 Logic, Design and Programming 3 Credits 

Corequisites: ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II, ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College II or demonstrated competencies, CIS 101 - 
Introduction to Microcomputers or CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals or advisor approval. Introduces the structured techniques necessary 
for efficient solution of business-related computer programming logic problems and coding solutions into a high-level language. Includes program 



192 Course Descriptions 



lowcharting, pseudocoding, and hierarchy charts as a means of solving these problems. Covers creating file layouts, print charts, program narratives, 
User documentation and system flowcharts for business problems. Reviews algorithm development, flowcharting, input/output techniques, looping, 
nodules, selection structures, file handling and control breaks. Offers students an opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment. 

CIS 1 14 Principles of Management Information Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals. Corequisites: BUS 101 - Introduction to Business. Examines the functions and operations 
:equired to manage information for business decisions. Focuses on the use of various information technologies and tools that support transaction 
processing, decision-making, and strategic planning. The diverse information needs of different organizations within a business will be used as examples 
pf practical application of MIS technology. 

CIS 116 Introduction to Java Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None, but prefer CIS 1 13 - Logic, Design, and Programming, a Windows-based class and Internet experience. This course provides a basic 
understanding of the fundamental concepts involved when using a member of a Java programming development language. The emphasis is on logical 
program design using a modular approach involving task oriented program functions. Java allows the design of an Internet user interface. The applica- 
tion is built by selecting forms and controls, assigning properties, and writing code. 

CIS 120 Programming 1 3 Credits 

[Corequisites: CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming or advisor approval. Provides an introduction to business programming with the major 
jemphasis on developing structured programming skills. Students will develop proficiency in applying the programming development cycle to elemen- 
'tary business problems. 



CIS 201 Database Design and Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals. Introduces program applications in a 
! database environment and includes discussion of data structures; indexed and direct file organizations; data models including hierarchical, network and 
, relational; storage devices, data administration and analysis; design and implementation. Allows students to use database software in creating, modifying, 
retrieving and reporting from databases. Develops business application using a database language. 

CIS 202 Data Communications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals. Introduces concepts of data communications for computer programming students to build 
a foundation of knowledge upon which to add new technologies. 

CIS 203 Systems Analysis and Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers plus a minimum of 12 CIS credits successfully completed. Provides instruction for creating or 
modifying a system by gathering details, analyzing data, designing systems to provide solutions, and implementing and maintaining the systems. 

CIS 204 Advanced COBOL Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 104 - Introduction to COBOL Programming. Continues topics introduced in CIS 104 - Introduction to COBOL Programming with 
more logically complex business problems. Develops a higher level of COBOL proficiency as well as greater familiarity with debugging techniques. Uses 
the structured approach through class instruction and laboratory experience. 

CIS 206 Project Development with High-Level Tools 3 Credits 

Corequisites: CIS 201 - Database Design and Management or CIS 203 - Systems Analysis and Design. Analyzes established and evolving methodologies 
for the development of business-oriented computer information systems. Develops competencies in techniques that apply modem software tools to 
generate applications directly, without requiring detailed and highly technical program writing efforts. 

CIS 207 Microcomputer Database Management Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Presents an overview of relational, hierarchical and network database models with emphasis 
on microcomputer relational database management systems (DBMS). Provides practical experience in using database software to create, modify, retrieve 
and report. Develops business applications using the database language. 

CIS 209 Computer Business Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 201 - Database Design and Management, COM 101 - Fundamentals of Public Speaking or COM 102 - Introduction to Interpersonal 
Communication. Corequisites: CIS 203 - Systems Analysis and Design. Requires students to apply business, microcomputer, and communication 
skills within business applications. Emphasizes application of several forms of computerized information processing including data processing, word 
processing, spreadsheets, graphics, and communications. Analyzes the effects of automation on the office worker, management, and the work environ- 
ment and requires written and oral presentations. 



Course Descriptions 



CIS 210 COBOL HI 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 204 - Advanced COBOL Programming. Emphasizes file handling techniques on tape and direct access devices and the use of libraries I 
via the COBOL, CALL and COPY verbs. Introduces variant forms of the structured approach and unstructured concepts such as the GO TO verb. Helps ( 
students develop good programming practices and an entry-level COBOL competency. 

i 
CIS 211 RPG Programming Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 102 - Information Processing Fundamentals and CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming. Provides a general introduction to the j 
RPG programming language with emphasis on hands-on programming experience. Presents the most important features of the RPG language from ( 
input/output processing to applications requinng handling. Introduces language concepts in class lecture. Includes programming lab assignments. 



CIS 212 "C'7"C++" Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming or advisor approval. Provides a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts involved 
when using a low development language. Emphasizes one logical program design using a modular approach involving task-oriented program functions. 
Discusses the role of data types, storage classes, and addressable memory locations. 

CIS 213 Assembler Language Program 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 102 - Information Processing Fundamentals and CIS 1 13 - Logic, Design, and Programming. Gives students a basic understanding of 
the assembler process using IBM mainframe computers. Stresses the importance of byte-wise manipulation of data fields when using low-level languages. 
Emphasizes the actual workings of a computer during the execution of a computer program. Discusses the role of data types, EBC1DIC format of data 
storage, and addressable memory locations. 

CIS 214 Pascal Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a basic understanding of the structured programming process necessary for successful Pascal programming. Emphasizes 
top-down program design and modulanty, using Pascal procedures, functions, and independent subprograms. Discusses simple and advanced data types 
and program control aids, algonthm development, and program debugging. Provides students with a fundamental understanding of good programming 
technique and a basic knowledge of Pascal syntax and structure. 

CIS 215 Field Study 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Completion of a mininum of 30 program credits with 15 in CIS courses. Provides opportunity for a field project or research case study 
within the computer technology field. Includes collection and analysis of data and/or actual work experience in business or industry. 

CIS 216 Advanced RPG Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 2 1 1 - RPG Programming Fundamentals. Offers advanced study in the use of the RPG compiler language in solving business problems. 
Focuses on file processing methods and a working knowledge of advanced features and techniques through laboratory experience. 

CIS 217 Programming II 3 Credits 

Corequisites: CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming or advisor approval. Provides a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts involved 
when using a development language. The emphasis is on program design using a modular approach involving risk oriented program functions. The role 
of data types, storage classes, and addressable memory locations is thoroughly discussed. 

CIS 220 Shell Command Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Teaches students how to write, test and debug shell procedures on a computer utilizing a UNIX operating system. Presents the shell 
and how it works, shell processes, variables, keyword and positional parameters, control constructs, special substitutions, pipelines, debugging aids, 
error/interrupt processing and shell command line. Offers students the opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment. 

CIS 221Advanced "C"/"C++" Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 2 12 - "CTC++" Programming. Continues those topics introduced in "C" Language Programming with emphasis on array processing, 
file processing and advanced debugging techniques. Provides the opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment. This class will also introduce 
the concept of object oriented programming using the C++ computer language. Differences between C++ and classical C programming will be addressed. 

CIS 223 Integrated Business Software 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or program advisor approval. Presents knowledge of integrated microcomputer software 
concepts. Students design a complete business system utilizing all parts of an integrated microcomputer software package which can share the same data 
and manipulate it. Includes use of word processing, electronic spreadsheets, graphics, databases and command languages. 



Course Descriptions 



MMM 



CIS 224 Hardware and Software Troubleshooting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems. Presents an in-depth analysis of the components of a computer system and their relation- 
ship to each other. Includes concepts of parallel and serial connectivity, installation and maintenance of software, peripheral devices, interface cards and 
device drivers. Analyzes realistic hardware/software problems encountered in the workplace and techniques and procedures used to implement solu- 
tions. 

CIS 225 Advanced Database Management Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 201 - Database Design and Management or CIS 207 - Microcomputer Database Management Systems. Continues CIS 207 Microcom- 
puter Database Management Systems. Emphasizes the development of advanced applications in database management. 

CIS 227 Topics in Information Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals. Discusses topics of current interest in information management. Includes examples from 
production, operations, accounting, finance, marketing, sales and human resources. Focuses on special interest projects. Utilizes field trips, guest 
speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars. 

CIS 228 Cooperative Education 1-9 Credits 

Prerequisites: Have completed 50% of required major course credits, with at least a 2.5 average in the occupational field of study, as well as a 2.5 overall 
scholastic average. Provides students with the opportunity to apply concepts learned in the classroom to actual work situations. Requires program 
Advisor approval. 

CIS 229 Seminar I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Discusses topics of current interest in computerized information management with an emphasis on the 
application of information management skills during lab time. Various seminar topics may be identified and offered each term under this course number. 

CIS 230 Seminar II 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Discusses topics of current interest in computerized information management with emphasis on application of 
information management skills during lab time. Identifies and offers various seminar topics each term under this course number. 

CIS 231 Structured Query Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 201 - Database Design and Management. SQL is now a dominant language used in mainframe, mini, and microcomputer databases 
(Access, dBASE, paradox, DB2, FoxPro, Oracle, SQL Server, and Btrieve) by diverse groups such as home computer owners, small businesses, large 

1 organizations and programmers. It acts as a bridge between the user, the database management system, the data tables and transactions invoking all 

: three. 

CIS 232 Visual Basic Programming 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 113 - Logic, Design, and Programming and previous experience with Windows-based software. Provides a basic understanding of 
fundamental concepts involved when using a member of a Windows programming development language. Emphasizes logical program design using a 
modular approach involving task-oriented program functions. Allows the design of a Windows user interface. 

CIS 233 Graphic User Interfaces: Windows 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Provides a foundation of fundamental concepts in the use of Windows-type software. 
Explores the Windows operating system, accessories and various applications. Develops a proficiency with Windows operations including customizing 
the environment, integrating applications and managing files. 

CIS 235 Network Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating System and Windows-based training is recommended. Corequisites: CIS 202 - Data Communica- 
tions. Studies local area networks, their topologies and functions. Provides a general understanding of the basic LAN protocols. Covers utilization of 
application software using a local area network to share resources among network members, transferring files between users, set-up and administration 
of a network, identification of hardware and software needs and LAN-to-mainframe connectivity. 

CIS 240 A+ Certification I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals or program chair approval. Consists of the 
first of two courses required to train for the A+ certification program. Presents microcomputer knowledge and skills in detail. Presents an in-depth 
study of the components of a computer system and their relationships to each other. Includes all the concepts required to prepare for the A+ 
certification tests. Students analyze realistic hardware/software problems and perform several lab processes to assist in learning techniques and 
procedures to implement solutions. 



Course Descriptions 



CIS 241 A+ Certification II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals or program chair approval. Consists of thej 
second of two courses required to train for the A+ Certification program. Presents microcomputer knowledge and skills in detail. Presents an in- 
depth study of the components of a computer system and their relationships to each other. Includes all the concepts required to prepare for the A+| 
certification tests. Students analyze realistic software/hardware problems and perform several lab processes to assist in learning techniques and 
procedures to implement solutions. 

CIS 243 Novell Network Administration I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems. Corequisites: CIS 202 - Data Communications or CIS 235 - Network Fundamentals. 
Introduces the organization, structure, functions, and administration of a network operating system. Trains the student in administration of a local area| 
network. Presents network operating system concepts such as file and shared printing, data protection, application installation and electronic messaging. 
Concepts will be incorporated into practical applications. 

CIS 244 Novell Network Administration II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 243 - Novell Network Administration I. Introduces file server management, maintenance, installation and configuration concepts and 
techniques. Trains the student in the tasks required for management and administration of a local area network file server. Presents information on 
various installation techniques. Concepts will be incorporated into practical applications. 

CIS 245 Networking Technologies Concepts 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 243 - Novell Network Administration I. Introduces the basic concepts of computer networking. Describes the services provided by 
a network and explains the different media used to access network services. The OSI model of computer networks is introduced and a description of each 
of its layers is provided. The OSI model is compared to several different network systems to demonstrate how the network services fit into the model. 

CIS 246 Novell Network Hardware Service and Support 3 Credits 

Corequisites: CIS 244 - Novell Network Administration II. Provides hands-on experience in troubleshooting various components of a computer system 
including memory, hard disk sub-systems, network interface cards and network cabling. Focuses on the prevention, diagnosis and resolution of hard-: 
ware-related networking problems. Several hands-on labs are used to allow the student to develop a diagnostic ability. 

CIS 247 Novell Network Administration HI 3 Credits 

Corequisites: CIS 246 - Novell Network Hardware Service and Support. Introduces the student to a mixed operating systems network. Introduces 
network directory services. Teaches the student how to inter-network two different network operating systems. Directory services troubleshooting and 
network performances issues are covered. Also covers advanced pnnting techniques and print server configuration. 

I 
CIS 251 Advanced Operating Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating System. Studies advanced topics in operating systems as they apply to Networking application. 

CIS 252 Web Site Development 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or CIS 102 - Information Systems Fundamentals or program advisor approval. Creates a: 
business or personal World Wide Web presence and uses Web technology. Creates a professional and successful World Wide Web site. 

CIS 253 Graphic Image Lab 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or program advisor approval. Introduces students to computer graphic design. The beginning 
focus of the course is on basic computer terminology and use, mastering fundamental skills, and developing efficient working styles. These skills are them 
developed by creating animation, graphics presentations, and graphics manipulations. 

CIS 254 GUI and WWW 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Previous knowledge of Windows 3.X - Office software; CIS 233 - Graphic User Interfaces: Windows and CIS 232 Visual Basic Program- 
ming helpful. Provides a foundation of fundamental concepts in the use of GUI software. Employs a document-centric approach using all the main; 
applications of Windows-Based Operating Systems and Windows-Based Applications, but integrates the use of the World Wide Web to increase the 
quality of the output. 

CIS 255 Network Operating Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems or program advisor approval. Provides access to many client computers through the 
hardware and software on each computer. Delivers a view of four primary Network Operating Systems used in the workplace today. It also provides all 
detailed study with hands-on laboratory exercises that promote an understanding and installation of Network Operating Systems. A special emphasis on| 
Novell (v3.12), (v.4.01), Microsoft NT (v.3.51 and 4.0) and Unix (Linux) are provided. Students learn how to plan and install the operating system andj 
client workstations. 



Course Descriptions 



CIS 256 LAN/Data Communications 3 Credits 

| Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems or program advisor approval, Windows-based training is recommended. Draws on practical 
I examples to explain technical concepts of data communications. Provides a practical understanding of relevant terminology, concepts, hardware, soft- 
ware, protocols, architectures and other information needed to assist the student in grasping the ever-changing world of data communications. In 
addition, it provides a look at networks (LAN) and wide area networks (WAN) and explores planning and analyzing communications systems. 

! CIS 258 Network Communication and Connectivity 3 Credits 

| Prerequisites: CIS 202 - Data Communications or CIS 235 - Network Fundamentals and program advisor approval. Although networking hardware 
! and software are constantly changing, this course presents a detailed view and analysis of the mechanics and protocols used in computer networks. TCP/ 
! IP protocols have taken over where OSI protocols have left off. This course attempts to analyze the TCP/IP model and its close association with the 
j Internet and ATM networks. 

CIS 263 Windows NT Network Administration I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems. Corequisites: CIS 202 - Data Communications or CIS 235 - Network Fundamentals. 
Introduces the organization, structure, functions, and administration of a network operating system. Trains the student in administration of a local area 
network. Presents network operating system concepts such as file and shared printing, data protection, application installation and electronic messaging. 
Concepts will be incorporated into practical application. 

CIS 264 Windows NT Network Administration II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 263 - Windows NT Network Administration I. Introduces file server management, maintenance, installation and configuration 
concepts and techniques. Trains the student in the task required for management and administration of a local area network file server. Presents 
information on various installation techniques. Concepts will be incorporated into practical applications. 

CIS 266 Windows NT Network Hardware Service and Support 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 264 - Windows NT Network Administration II. Provides hands-on experience in troubleshooting various components of a com- 
puter system including memory, hard disk subsystems, network interface cards and network cabling. Focuses on the prevention, diagnosis and 
resolution of hardware-related networking problems. Several hands-on labs are used to allow the students to develop a diagnostic ability. 

CIS 273 Network Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 106 - Microcomputer Operating Systems. Corequisites: CIS 202 - Data Communications or CIS 235 - Network Fundamentals. 
Introduces the organization, structure, functions and administration of a network operating system. Trains the student in administration of local area 
networks. Presents network operating system concepts such as file and shared printing, data protection, application installation and electronic messag- 
ing. Concepts will be incorporated into practical applications. 

CIS 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the- 
job experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

CIS 281-294 Special Topics in Computer Information Systems 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

CRJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the purposes, functions and history of law enforcement, courts and correctional systems. Explores the interrelationships 
and responsibilities of the criminal justice system. 

CRJ 103 Cultural Awareness 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies American criminal justice problems and systems in historical and cultural perspectives. Discusses social and public 
policy factors affecting crime. Emphasizes multidisciplinary and multicultural perspectives. 

CRJ 105 Introduction to Criminology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Reviews crime and delinquency, types of offenses and offenders and the basic units of the criminal justice system, and introduces 
the role of law enforcement in prevention and control of deviant behavior. 

CRJ 111 Introduction to Traffic Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the role of law enforcement in traffic safety, traffic administration, traffic laws, accident investigation, police safety and 
patrol practices. 



Course Descriptions 



CRJ 113 Criminal Investigations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the organization and functions of investigative agencies, basic considerations in criminal investigations, collection and i 
preservation of physical evidence and elements of legal proof in the submission of evidence. Introduces investigation of specific types of offenses. 

CRJ 115 Criminalistics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRJ 113 - Criminal Investigations. Introduces crime scene procedure, theory and practice in evidence collections, transportation, 
identification, processing and the chain of custody. j 

CRJ 118 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces fundamental law enforcement operations and organization. Includes the evolution of law enforcement at federal, 

state and local levels. 

I 

CRJ 121 Juvenile Law and Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Includes an overview of the juvenile justice system, treatment and prevention programs and special areas and laws unique to 
juveniles. I 



CRJ 123 Juvenile Justice Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the nature, etiology and extent of juvenile crime, functions and jurisdictions of juvenile agencies, and juvenile 
processing, detention and case disposition. 

CRJ 131 Community Based Corrections 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Reviews programs for convicted offenders that are alternatives to incarceration, including diversion, house arrest, restitution, i 
community service and other topics. Reviews post-incarceration situations, probation and parole. 

CRJ 133 Legal Issues in Corrections 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Explores sentencing and incarceration, legal issues applicable to probation and parole, objectives of correctional processes and i 
influences in correctional decision making. 

CRJ 202 Adjudication 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Includes topics related to the adjudication process in criminal cases including arraignments and preliminary hearings, suppres- j 
sion hearings, trials, sentencing, juvenile court and probation and parole. Reviews the role of criminal justice personnel in court processes. 

CRJ 203 Police and Community Relations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces police-community relations and examines trends, practices and social and individual effects of police work. Empha- 
sizes problem solving, conflict management and police-community interaction. 

i 

CRJ 205 Procedural Criminal Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 211 - Criminal Law. Covers theory and practice of procedural criminal law. Introduces law of arrest, search and seizure, I 
confessions, suspect identification and surveillance. Emphasizes Indiana criminal lav/ 



CRJ 222 Special Issues in Youth Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHD 209 - Families in Transition, HMS 215 -Juvenile Delinquency. Examines issues commonly encountered in the youth care field. 

CRJ 223 Special Issues in Corrections 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 105 - Introduction to Correctional Rehabilitation Services, HMS 204 - Human Services Internship Seminar 2, CRJ 131 - Commu- 
nity-Based Corrections. Investigates topics of special interest related to corrections with an emphasis on the classification and treatment of inmates. 
Topics may vary to reflect contemporary corrections issues. 

CRJ 280 Internship 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: CRJ 101 - Introduction to Criminal Justice Systems, CRJ 103 - Cultural Awareness, LEG 211 - Criminal Law. Provides fieldwork 
experience in an approved social, educational, law enforcement, corrections or other criminal justice organization. 

CON 101 Introduction to Construction Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents history of building construction to present-day applications emphasizing future trends and construction as a career. 
Provides practice in the operation, maintenance, and safety of various tools including the builders level and transit. 



198 Course Descriptions 



CON 106 Construction Blueprint Reading I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides instruction and practice in the use of working drawings and applications from the print to the work. Includes relationship 
of views and details, interpretation of dimension, transposing scale, tolerance, electrical symbols, sections, materials list, architectural plans, room 
schedules, and plot plans. 

CON 204 Estimating and Specifications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CON 106 - Construction Blueprint Reading I. Presents the student with the estimating process for residential construction. Emphasizes 
reading blueprints and specifications, estimating labor, materials take-off, and pricing. 

CON 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minimum of 30 credits toward their degrees with a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0. 
Gives students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning 
credit toward an associate degree. 

CON 281-294 Special Topics in Construction Technology 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

CUL 110 Meat Cutting 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces meat cutting. The student will gain knowledge in the breakdown of beef, pork, poultry, lamb, and veal. 

CUL 202 Specialized Cuisine 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: 4th semester class. Introduces students to foods from various cultures. Provides a background in the history of foods from various 
countries and develops food preparation skills. Covers table service and tableside food preparation. 

CUL 207 Classical Cuisine 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents advanced and sophisticated classical culinary methods following the principles and techniques of Escoffier. Studies 
cooking techniques, timing, presentation, history and terms pertaining to classical foods and menus with emphasis on French cuisines. Provides 
practical experience in table service operation, kitchen coordination and timing. 

CUL 212 Fish and Seafood 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 109 - Hospitality Purchasing. Discusses the importance of fish and seafood in todays market. Includes types and categories of 
American and imported fish and shellfish and proper buying, storage, preparation and merchandising of fish and seafood. Provides experience in boning, 
cutting and cooking methods appropriate for seafood. 

DCT 101 Basic Drafting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces basic mechanical drafting techniques. 

DCT 104 Mechanical Drafting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics, DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals or advisor approval. Introduces the set concept of working drawings both 
in detailing and assembly. Presents fastening devices, thread symbols and nomenclature, surface texture symbols, classes of fits and the use of parts lists, 
titles and revision blocks. Introduces the basics of product design and the design process. 

DCT 105 Facilities Design and Layout 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics. Focuses on the architectural drawings of commercial or industnal buildings. Covers problems of space 
planning, design, materials, HVAC systems and construction methods. Develops working drawings and presentation drawings. Requires oral presenta- 
tions and discussions. Requires students to complete research on a limited number of construction materials and methods. 

DCT 107 Advanced CAD 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Instructs students in fundamentals of 3-D modeling for design. Includes overview of modeling, types, 
graphic manipulation, part structuring, coordinate systems, and developing strategy of model geometry'. 

DCT 108 Residential Drafting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Covers residential planning and drafting. Includes interior planning, structural design, and development of working 
drawings. Provides opportunity for students to design a residence using accepted building standards from information given in class. 



Course Descriptions 



DCT 109 Construction Materials and Specifications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces various construction materials, composition and application. Studies specifications of materials, construction contracts j 
and applications required in the building industry. 

I 
DCT 110 Architectural Rendering 3 Credits 

i 
Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics. Presents a survey and history of pictorial drawings. Studies light and color, rendering media, ano 

application of different techniques and media through a series of exercises. 

DCT 112 CAD Applications 3 Credits 

i 
Prerequisites: DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Includes advanced dimensioning techniques using the dimension variables for GDT and ordinate 

dimensioning, grips, xrefs, aligning auxiliary views, paragraph text importing and editing and the use of system and AutoCAD variables. 

DCT 113 Intermediate CAD 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals, TEC 104 - Computer Fundamentals for Technology. Continues study of CAD fundamentals. Focuses or j 
advanced CAD features and various methods of customizing CAD systems. j 

DCT 201 Schematic Drafting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 -Technical Graphics, DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Corequisites: DCT 206 - Mechanical and Electrical Equipment. Present! 
the systematic layout of various types of schematic drawing done by a draftsperson. Requires students to prepare finished drawings for manufacture oil 
installation of plumbing, heating, electrical, electronic and fluid-power type drawing. 

DCT 202 CAD Programming Language 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Covers use of computer language to program commands for CAD. 

DCT 204 Architectural CAD 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Presents advanced computer-aided design topics including architectural design. Includes all necessary 
drawings needed for the construction process. 



DCT 205 Introduction to Plastics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics. Introduces students to the major plastic processing industries, techniques, and most widely used plasticl 
polymers, their applications and properties. 

DCT 206 Mechanical and Electrical Equipment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra or MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. Focuses on mechanical and electrical requirements for a structure.! 
Studies electrical load calculations, wire sizing and circuits. Calculates plumbing requirements, fixture units and pipe sizing. Includes heating systems, 
duct layout and sizing. 

DCT 207 Die Design Drafting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 104 - Product Drafting, TEC 101 - Manufacturing Processes. Studies the drafting, detailing and design of blanking, piercing and 
forming dies. Covers material reaction to shear, cutting clearances and nest gauging. 

DCT 208 Structural Detailing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics, DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals, DCT 109 - Construction Materials and Specifications and Advisori 
approval. Focuses on detailing commercial structural members, their connections, materials and methods of construction. Concentrates on traditional! 
materials, such as reinforced concrete, masonry, steel and timber. 

DCT 209 Estimating/CAD 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 204 - Architectural CAD, DCT 108 - Residential Drafting. Introduces estimating procedures used in the building industry. Studies j; 
material takeoffs, estimating overhead expenses, contingencies, labor and equipment. Involves the use of computers to generate takeoffs and to set j> 
pricing. 

DCT 210 Surveying I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 121 - Geometry/Trigonometry or MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. Introduces surveying equipment, procedures for performing 
measurements, turning angles, determining grades and other field applications. Covers surveying techniques and computations using the level, chain | ; 
and transit in calculating areas, lines and grades. 



DCT 211 Commercial Structures I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 204 - Architectural CAD, DCT 108 - Residential Drafting. Focuses on planning and drawing commercial structures. Uses a 
presentation drawing and working drawing for concrete structures and steel structures. 

DCT 212 Commercial Structures II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 2 1 1 - Commercial Structures I. Focuses on planning and drawing commercial structures. Uses working drawings for pre -engineered 
and concrete/steel structures. 

DCT 213 CAD Mapping 3 Credits 

(Prerequisites: DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals, DCT 210 - Surveying I. Covers the concepts of map making with computer-aided drafting and typical 
drafting media found in the industry. Studies civil engineering applications of mapping procedures including profiles, topography and site plans. 

DCT 214 Machine Design 3 Credits 

: Prerequisites: DCT 104 - Product Drafting, MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra or MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. Presents practical solutions to 
mechanical design problems. Studies the design of machine elements including shafts, bearings, keys, pins and springs. Includes the geometry and 
drafting of cams and gears and the study of linkages. 

DCT 215 Electronic Drafting/CAD 3 Credits 

: Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics and DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Introduces students to electronic schematics, drill indexing, and 
printed circuit board design. Emphasizes the creation and manipulation of basic symbols, connection diagrams, block and logic diagrams, including the 
use of figure parts and data extract. 

DCT 216 Jig and Fixture Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 104 -Product Drafting and TEC 101 - Manufacturing Processes. Introduces the processes of drafting and design as applied to tooling. 
Emphasizes tooling, locators, supports, holding devices, clearances and design as it pertains to jig and fixtures. 

DCT 217 Product Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 104 - Product Drafting and DSN 222 - Strength of Materials. Provides the student an opportunity to apply all previously acquired 
: knowledge in product drafting to the design of a new or existing consumer product. Considers the function, aesthetics, cost economics and marketability 
of the product. Requires a research paper and product illustration. 

DCT 218 CAD/CAM Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DSN 220 - Advanced CAD. Covers the development of various machine routines. Studies the control of the CNC mill and lathe. Includes 
material handling and robotics. 

DCT 227 Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics. Introduces the fundamental principles of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing according to the latest 
ANSI standards. Applies geometric dimensioning and tolerancing symbols along with tolerances of form, profile, orientation, run-out, and location. 

DCT 228 Civil I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics and DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Explores the engineering field. Presents an overview of infrastructure 
design including the study of roadways and drainage systems. Emphasizes site development and highway planning. 

DCT 229 Civil II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DCT 228 - Civil I. Presents construction management techniques, including scheduling and contracts. Studies soil properties and paving 
methods. Examines practical construction considerations. 

DCT 230 Computer Rendering and Animation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DSN 220 - Advanced CAD. Instructs students in fundamentals of computer generalized renderings and animations using 3-D Studio 
software and its components. 

DEN 102 Dental Materials and Laboratory I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to Dental Assistant Program. Reviews properties of dental materials, proper modes of manipulation, necessary armamentarium 
used and technical duties which dental assistants perform. Stresses clinical behavior of materials and biological factors of importance to dental assistants. 



Course Descriptions 



DEN 115 Preclinical Practice I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Assistant Program. Introduces qualifications and legal-ethical requirements of the dental assistant. History andj 
professional organizations are surveyed. Emphasizes clinical environment and responsibilities, chair-side assisting, equipment and instrument identifi- 
cation, tray setups, sterilization, characteristics of microorganisms and disease control. 

DEN 116 Dental Emergencies/Pharmacology 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Surveys the most commonly utilized and required first aid measures for emergencies. Examines proper techniques and procedures j 
as well as equipment, medications and position care of the patient. Reviews anatomy/physiology and cardiopulmonary rescue as provided by the; 
American Heart Association. 

DEN 117 Dental Office Management 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the Dental Assistant Program. Explores principles of administrative planning, bookkeeping, filing, recall programs, banking, i 
tax records, computer software, insurance, office practice and management as related to the dental office. Attention is given to techniques of appointment 
control, record keeping, and credit and payment plans. 

DEN 118 Dental Radiography 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: DEN 123 - Dental Anatomy and DEN 115 - Preclinical Practice I. Concentrates on pnnciples, benefits, effects and control of X-rayj 
production. Covers history, radiation sources, modern dental radiographic equipment and techniques, anatomical landmarks, dental films and process- 
ing. Emphasizes avoidance of errors while exposing and processing dental radiographs. 

DEN 122 Clinical Practicum I 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: DEN 102 - Dental Materials and Laboratory I, DEN 115 - Preclinical Practice I, DEN 1 16 - Dental Emergencies/Pharmacology, and DEN 
123 - Dental Anatomy. Chairside skills are applied in a clinical office situation on live patients. 

DEN 123 Dental Anatomy 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on oral, head and neck anatomy, basic embryology, histology, tooth morphology, and charting dental surfaces related to the! 
dental field. Includes dental anomalies, pathological conditions, and terminology relevant to effective communication. 

DEN 124 Preventive Dentistry/Diet and Nutrition 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: DEN 1 15 - Preclinical Practice 1, DEN 123 Dental Anatomy. Emphasizes the importance of preventive dentistry and effects of diet and! 
nutrition on dental health. Presents techniques of assisting patients in the maintenance of good oral hygiene. 

DEN 125 Preclinical Practice II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Continues Preclinical Practice I. Anesthesia is presented. The following dental specialties are presented: Oral and Maxillogical 
Surgery, Periodontics, Endodontics, Pediatric Dentistry, Orthodontics, Prosthodontics and Dental Public Health. 

DEN 129 Dental Materials and Laboratory II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: DEN 102 - Dental Materials and Laboratory I. Continues Dental Matenals and Laboratory I. 

DEN 130 Clinical Practicum II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: All required courses of DA program prior to summer session. A clinical learning experience that provides increased practical chairside 
dental assisting experience to be gained from private dental practices in general and specialty areas of dentistry. Opportunity for increased skill 
development in clinical support and business office procedures also provided. Weekly seminars are included as an integral part of the learning 
experience. Simulated exams are administered to review for the national certification examination. 

DEN 131 Basic Integrated Science 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the human body as an integrated unit. Includes anatomy, physiology and medical terminology. 

DSN 103 CAD Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics or advisor approval. Introduces fundamentals of CAD (Computer-Aided Design/ 
Drafting). Includes overview of CAD and systems, use of software and plotter applications. Each student will complete an individual project by the end 
of the semester. 

DSN 106 Descriptive Geometry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics. Introduces fundamental principles in developing graphical solutions to engineering problems. Covers true 
length, piercing points on a plane, line intersections, true shapes, revolutions and developments using successive auxiliary views. 



202 Course Descriptions 



DSN 220 Advanced CAD 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 102 - Technical Graphics and DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals. Focuses on advanced CAD features including fundamentals of three - 
Hfmensional modeling for design. Includes overview of modeling, graphic manipulation, part structuring, coordinate system and developing strategy of 
jnodel geometry. 

DSN 221 Statics 3 Credits 

(Prerequisites: MAT 121 - Geometry/Trigonometry or MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. Corequisites: PHY 101 - Physics I. Studies applied mechanics 
Healing with bodies at rest. Covers units, vectors, forces, equilibrium, moments and couples, planar force systems, distributed forces, analysis of 
'structures (trusses and frames) and friction. 

DSN 222 Strength of Materials 3 Credits 

prerequisites: DSN 221 - Statics. Studies internal stresses and physical deformations caused by externally applied loads to structural members. Covers 
iptress and strain, shear stress, properties of areas, shearing force and bending moment, deformation of beams, columns and combined stresses. Teaches 
various materials' physical and mechanical properties. 

DSN 225 Portfolio Preparation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: 45 credit hours in the program or advisor approval. Focuses on the student's final portfolio and preparation for the job interview. 
[Finalizes design/project work demonstrating acquired knowledge and job skills along with resume and cover letter preparation for presentation to 
prospective employers. Every student must submit a copy of final portfolio for departmental archives. 

DSN 280 Co-op/Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minimum of 30 credits toward their degree with at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. Requires 
tudents to work at a job site that is specifially related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit toward an associate 
degree. 

DSN 281-294 Special Topics in Design Technology 1-5 Credits 

'Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
ithat reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

ELT 120 Introduction to Electronics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 050 - Basic Algebra. Provides the student with limited preparatory study and entry into program level content. Topics include 
'laboratory skills, basic manipulative skills, interpretation of diagrams and hand soldering techniques. Emphasis is placed upon the use of Electronic 
Work Berich software to model and analyze electronic components and circuits. 

ELT 121 Circuits 1 3 Credits 

Corequisites: MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry or MAT 134 - Trigonometry and ELT 120 - Introduction to Electronics. Introduces the basics of 
electricity and electronics. Covers DC circuits. Uses lab work to stress the use of test equipment. Discusses resistance, magnetism, series circuits, parallel 
circuits, Ohm's Law, Kirchhoff's Laws and circuit analysis (superposition, Theveinin, etc.). 

ELT 122 Circuits II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 121 - Circuits I, MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry 1. Studies electrical principles and laws pertaining to alternating current and 
voltage. Covers AC network theorems, operator, phasors, reactances, impedances, phase relationships, power, resonance, transformers, polyphase and 
filter circuits. 

ELT 124 Digital I 3 Credits 

Corequisites: ELT 120 - Introduction to Electronics, MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra or equivalent score on the ASSET intermediate algebra test. 
Introduces digital electronics including logic gates and combinational logic circuits. Studies binary arithmetic, Boolean algebra, mapping techniques, 
digital encoders and decoders, multiplexers and demultiplexers and arithmetic circuits. Uses SSI and MSI digital integrated circuits. 

ELT 125 Digital II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 124 - Digital I. Offers advanced study of digital systems including memory and D/A conversion. Covers construction of specified 
timing circuits, design driver/display systems, selected register design, counters and arithmetic circuits and validation of operation. Studies hardware and 
general microprocessor system organization. 

ELT 126 Solid State I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry 1, or MAT 134 - Trigonometry, ELT 122 - Circuits II (may be corequisite). Studies characteristics and 
applications of semiconductor devices and circuits. Covers signal and rectifying diodes, bipolar transistors, rectification, single and multistage amplifiers, 
AC/DC load lines, biasing techniques, equivalent circuits and power amplifiers. 



Course Descriptions 



ELT 127 Industrial Electronics 3 Credits I ' 

i 

Prerequisites: ELT 126 - Solid State 1. Presents overview of electronics in the industrial setting. Instructs students in how electronics is applied to | 
industrial systems. Introduces power machines, polyphase systems, solid state controls, transducers and industrial computer systems. 

i 
ELT 128 Introduction to Lasers 3 Credits 

I 1 
Prerequisites: MAT 131 - Algebra/Tngonometry I. Introduces laser action, laser beam characteristics, types of lasers, safety considerations, general laser 

applications, laser and optical equipment. Teaches basics of laser, laser systems and prepares beginning laser students for future courses. 

ELT 130 Fiber Optics 3 Credits ! 

Coreqmsites: ELT 122 -Circuits II. Presents overview of fiber optics. Studies uses for fiber optics, advantages, cable details, connectors, splices, sources, ' i 
detectors and fiber optic systems. 

ELT 203 Introduction to Industrial Controls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELtT 221\ Solid State II, ELT 223 - Electrical Machines. Studies basics of controls related to industrial electronics. Includes basic and pilot | 
control devices sueit-as circuit layouts, industrial schematics, reduced voltage starters and multi-speed controllers. Covers transformer hook-ups and | i 
circuit protection. 

ELT 206 Analog Troubleshooting Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 228 - Communications Electronics. Studies techniques for logical troubleshooting of electronic circuits and simple systems with I ,i 
emphasis on systematic diagnostic methods, signal tracing and signal injection methods. Provides experience in use of test equipment and electronic I 
communication skills. 

I 
ELT 207 Digital Troubleshooting Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 222 - Microprocessors. Studies techniques for logical troubleshooting of microcomputers. Includes modal testers, microcomputer ' : 
controlled testers, static stimulus testers, signature analysis and logic analyzers. Emphasizes system oriented troubleshooting procedures. 

ELT 212 Networking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 222 - Microprocessors. Studies types of protocol used in data communication systems. Includes an overview of networking, 
networking control and interfacing. Emphasizes protocols, packet switching systems and local area networks. 

ELT 214 Industrial Instrumentation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 126 - Solid State I. Emphasizes precision measurement via pressure, strain, force, flow and level gauges. Covers the related probes, 
sensors, transducers, computer interfaces, computer hardware and peripherals and computer software necessary for the acquisition, summarization, 
analysis and presentation of data. 

ELT 215 Laser Systems and Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 122 - Circuits II, ELT 128 - Introduction to Lasers, ELT 240 - Optics. Provides an in-depth coverage of laser types and applications. 
Focuses on ion, molecular, liquid, solid state and semi-conductor lasers with specific attention given to Nd:YAG, Ruby, CO and gallium arsenide. 
Discusses flash lamps, power supplies (CW and pulsed) and energy transfer mechanisms for each laser type. Examines other parts of laser systems 
including electro-optic and acousto-optic modulators, Q-switching, mode locking and mechanical and bleachable dye methods. Includes a description 
of lasers in medicine, surgery, dentistry, communications, range finding, alignment tracking, welding, cutting, drilling, data recording and display. ' 
Stresses hands-on operation and troubleshooting of each laser type and small-scale examples of applications. 

ELT 216 Laser and Optical Measurements 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the instruments and methods available for evaluating laser light and supporting optical equipment (lenses, mirrors, etc.). 
Includes an introduction to radiometry/photometry and typical energy/power detectors. Photographic recording mediums and important optical mea- 
suring instruments (spectrometers, spectrophotometers, monochromators and interferometers) and methods (interference and non-interference testing) 
are also discussed. Laboratory experiments stress hands-on experience with current optical measunng equipment and methods. 

ELT 219 Biomedical Electronics I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 125 - Digital II. Offers further study of medical electronics equipment including ECG, EEG, defibrillators, heart monitors and other 
monitoring and respiratory equipment. 

ELT 220 Biomedical Electronics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 219 - Biomedical Electronics I. Studies medical support systems including x-ray equipment, respirators and analyzers, and their 
maintenance. Studies medical ultra-sound, electrosurgery units and mechanical recorders. Prepares students for licensing and certification. 



Course Descriptions 



ZLT 221 Solid State II *-~ 3 Credits 

1'rerequisites: ELT 126 - Solid State I. Studies applications of special-purpose diodes, thyristors and unipolar transistors. Discusses frequency effects and 
jesponses of amplifiers. Includes discreet SCRS, UJTs, FETs, oscillators, linear regulated power supplies, switching regulators and power amplifiers, 
ntroduces op-amps. 

iLT 222 Microprocessors 3 Credits 

j'rerequisites: TEC 104 - Computer Fundamentals for Technology, ELT 125 - Digital II. Introduces microprocessor system organization, operation, 
llesign, troubleshooting and programming. Investigates and analyzes a microprocessor instruction set for its operation. Includes programming and 
•nterfacing a microprocessor. 

ELT 223 Electrical Machines 3 Credits 

prerequisites: ELT 122 - Circuits II, MAT 131 - Algebra/Trigonometry I. Provides an overview of electrical machines and how they relate to industrial 
:lectronics. Gives industrial electronics technicians insight into electrical power generation, polyphase system, transformers, all types of electrical 
motors, power factor and power factor correction, back-up power and electrical power monitoring. 

ELT 224 Linear Integrated Circuit Application 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 221 - Solid State II. Introduces operational amplifiers (op-amps), characteristics and operations. Includes op-amp active filters, 
'amplifiers, regulators, comparators, timers, oscillators and phase-locked loops. 

ELT 225 Introduction to National Electrical Code 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: None. Introduces the role and use of the National Electrical Code Book. Provides an overview of interpretation, calculations, and revisions 
Im the code book. 

ELT 226 Computer Troubleshooting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 222 - Microprocessors. Studies techniques for logical troubleshooting of microcomputers. Emphasizes system-oriented troubleshoot- 
ing procedures. 

ELT 227 Peripherals 3 Credits 

.'Prerequisites: ELT 226 - Computer Troubleshooting. Studies peripherals commonly used with computers and microcomputers interfacing with these 
iperipherals. Includes a study of data communications hardware and techniques. Studies the design of circuits to interface microprocessors with 
industrial equipment. Includes microcomputer systems interfacing with input and output transducers for control systems. Studies techniques for logical 
troubleshooting of microcomputer systems. 

ELT 228 Communications Electronics 3 Credits 

i.Corequisites: ELT 221 - Solid State II. Analyzes communication circuits with emphasis on AM, FM, SSB, and stereo transmitter and receiver systems. 
Includes noise modulation and demodulation principles, phase-locked loop, RF amplifiers, automatic gain control, detectors, limiters and discrimina- 
tors. Offers hands-on lab exposure to analog circuits utilizing analysis and troubleshooting techniques. 

ELT 229 Telecommunications 3 Credits 

.Prerequisites: ELT 125 - Digital II, ELT 126 - Solid State I. Examines various methods in transmitting digital data from one location to another. Covers 
time and frequency division multiplexing. Includes pulse-code and delta modulation, telemetry, error detection and correction and simple networks. 
II Covers techniques for logical troubleshooting of telephonic systems. 

ELT 230 Advanced Communications Electronics 3 Credits 

■ Prerequisites: ELT 228 - Communications Electronics. Introduces antenna principles and wave propagation and an in-depth study of matching tech- 
niques for transmission lines. Includes the Smith Chart and a thorough study of television operation. Measures radiation patterns with different antenna 
{arrays. Practices digital and analog troubleshooting techniques. 

ELT 231 Microwave Communications 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: ELT 230 - Advanced Communications Electronics. Studies microwave transmission lines, waveguides, waveguide components including 
.hybrid couplers, attenuators, microwave filters, phase shifters, T-junctions, irises and microwave tubes. 

ELT 233 Industrial Motors and Controls 3 Credits 

I Prerequisites: ELT 122 - Circuits II, AMT 201 - Manufacturing Systems Control (PLCs). Provides a complete understanding of basic ladder and wiring 
diagrams used in the control of electric motors. Includes the various electrical components and their functions as applied to motor controls. Topics 
I include the various types of motors used in applying electro-mechanical power, ranging from small AC shaded-pole fan motors through larger three- 
| phase motors. Motor starting components, protective devices, heat dissipation, motor slippage and frequency and multi-speed motors are discussed. 
I Lab assignments allow the student a hands-on approach to wiring various control components in the operation of three-phase motors. 



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Course Dhscriptions 



ELT 234 Advanced Problem Solving 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 125 - Digital II. Corequisites: ELT 221 - Solid State II, ELT 224 - Linear Integrated Circuit Applications. Introduces logica 
troubleshooting of electronic circuits and systems with emphasis on systematic diagnostic methods and technical reference research. Provides furthe 1 
experience in the use of test equipment and proper repair techniques. Includes job preparedness skills and preparation for appropriate certificatior 
testing. 

ELT 235 Process Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 224 - Linear Integrated Circuit Applications. Covers theory and applications of process control including the principles of PID 
feedback, open loop and closed loop systems and typical process control applications. 

ELT 237 Calibrations 3 Credits 

Corequisites or Prerequisites: ELT 122 - Circuits II. Provides training in dismantling and calibration of instruments (electronic and pneumatic) found ir 
industry, including DP cells, pH and oxygen analyzers, valve positioners, thermocouple circuits and controllers and control valves. 

ELT 238 Process Instrumentation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 125 - Digital II, ELT 221 - Solid State II. Presents the concepts and fundamentals of measurement instrumentation and its applicatior 
to industrial process control. 

ELT 239 Troubleshooting Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ELT 125 - Digital II, ELT 221 - Solid State II, ELT 233 - Industrial Motors and Controls, and approval of program chair. Introduce: 
techniques of logical troubleshooting of electronic circuits and systems with emphasis on systematic diagnostic methods, signal tracing and signa 
injection methods. Provides further experience in the use of test equipment and proper repair techniques. Class sessions will consist of lecture 
discussion and problem recitation. Problem-solving and laboratory assignments will reinforce concepts in the reading and lecture experience. 

ELT 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-jot 
experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

ELT 281-294 Special Topics in Electronics Technology 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interesi 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

ENV 101 Introduction to Environmental Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with an overview of pollution problems involving water, air, solid waste, radiation population, and noise 
Discusses current national and international problems and concerns. 

ENV 102 Environmental Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the political process of environmental law. 

ENV 103 Environmental Chemistry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra. Provides hands-on laboratory training in the application of EPA and state-required permit parameters tc 
determine facility compliance. Reviews sampling techniques and preservation methods and basic statistical quality control analysis. 

ENV 104 Plant Operations — Sanitary 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Provides the basic principles of aerobic and anaerobic biological treatment processes including activated sludge 
trickling filters, lagoons, sludge handling and disinfection. Reviews state and federal regulations related to wastewater plants. 

ENV 105 Air Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on understanding air pollution sources, effects and treatment technologies. 

ENV 106 Water 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENV 103 - Environmental Chemistry Introduces the basic treatment processes of water supplies including coagulation, sedimentation 
filtration, chemical dosage, taste and odor control. 

ENV 107 Applied Research I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Requires completion of a special project or case study specifically related to the occupational area. Serves as a field 
project within the framework of actual working experience in business or industry or a research case study including data collection and data analysis. 



206 Course Descriptions 



ENV 204 Basic Fluid Mechanics 3 Credits 

} Prerequisites: None. Introduces the principles of flow measurement, metering in closed conduits, open channels, streams, storm run-off, pump charac- 
1 .eristics and air flow. 

ENV 208 Plant Operations — Industrial 3 Credits 

I Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Covers wastewater treatment processes including coagulation, sedimentation, activated sludge, neutralization, equaliza- 
tion and cyanide and chromate removal. Presents instrumentation, maintenance and troubleshooting. Includes operations, laboratory testing and 
[associated mathematics. 

ENV 214 Environmental Regulations 3 Credits 

i Prerequisites: None. Surveys the major current environmental regulations. 

ENV 215 Waste Disposal 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: ENV 212 - Solids Handling and Disposal. Provides students with a basic understanding of solid and hazardous waste disposal problems. 

ENV 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

iPrerequisites: Departmental approval. Provides students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. 
.Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

FST 102 Food Service Equipment Operations 3 Credits 

(Prerequisites: None. An in-depth study of food service equipment including cleaning, preventive maintenance, specifications and legal requirements 
[with an emphasis on usage. 

FST 104 Food Production, Methods, and Procedures 3 Credits 

IPrerequisites: FST 102 - Food Service Equipment and Operations. Provides study of and application of food production methods and procedures with 
ian emphasis on soups, sauces and gravies. 

FST 105 Quality Service Standards 3 Credits 

IPrerequisites: HOS 101 - Sanitation and First Aid. Provides students with techniques of serving, bussing and cashiering in dining operations. 

FST 106 - Application of Food Service Production I 3 Credits 

^Prerequisites: HOS 101 - Sanitation and First Aid, FST 102 - Food Service Equipment Operations, and FST 104 - Food Production, Methods, and 
[Procedures. Provides the knowledge and applications of the principles of pantry production, baking, vegetable and fruit preparation, pastries and 
(breakfast cookery. 

FST 108 Application of Food Service Production II 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: HOS 101 - Sanitation and First Aid, FST 102 - Food Service Equipment Operations, and FST 106 - Application of Food Service Production 
ll. Provides knowledge and application of production methods and procedures for meat, seafood, poultry, dairy products and hot hors d'oeuvres. 

GRA 102 Introduction to Machine Printing 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: None. Provides a history and overview of the interrelationships of processes, materials and techniques utilizing equipment and tools 
(necessary in platemaking, bindery/finishing and offset press. Allows students to take assigned projects from design to bindery. 

GRA 104 Art and Copy Preparation 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: None. Provides a foundation in design, typographic and communication concepts. Presents traditional techniques as well as computer- 
I aided technologies in the consideration of color, format and use of visuals in illustration. Emphasizes problem solving with assignments executed 
| through strip-up of the negative into a flat and proofing. 

GRA 106 Introduction to Color Printing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies basic color theory, materials and methods used in reproduction processes. Covers techniques and materials with assign- 
ments utilizing different processes including 4-color from pre-separated negatives, register and run. Includes inks and systems. 

GRA 107 Composition Systems I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers use, operation and application of machine principles and mechanisms related to typesetting, laboratory projects in setting 
composition photographically and utilization and examination of various input systems. 



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Course Descriptions 



GRA 201 Photomechanical Reproduction 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces image conversion in black and white and color theory. Examines photo chemistry, halftones, darkroom techniques and 
diffusion transfer. 

GRA 202 Science of Color 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents physical properties of light and color and psychological aspects of color perception and relationships through creative, 
exercises. Examines color theories of Itten, Munsell, Goethe, Chevreul and Albers. 

GRA 204 Designing with Type 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces typography, type classification, identification and selection. Includes copy fitting, mark-up systems, proofreading, and| 3 
fundamentals of layout and design for print media. 

GRA 205 Survey of Printing Processes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents topics not normally covered in other courses. Examines those types of printing businesses in local area utilizing guest! 
lecturers from these businesses. Local market is surveyed and students are responsible for a research project concerning a local business with presenta- 
tion of oral or written report. 

GRA 207 Audiovisual Presentation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Teaches the use of design principles in 35mm color transparencies and fundamentals of studio production and editing. Requires! 
each student to present a slide/tape production that conveys a concept through the effective combination of images, music and/or narration. 

GRA 213 Desktop Publishing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers computer techniques in pre-preparatory and preparatory composing procedures including typesetting and typographic 
concepts. Emphasizes computer skills and output. 

GRA 214 Screen Printing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Explores screen construction and process reproduction methods. Includes paper, tusche, knife-cut and photographic stencils andj 
printing media surfaces applications. 

GRA 215 Computer Graphics II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of computers and their creative potential m graphic design focusing on videotext graphics. Allows student! 
to create and manipulate images using a keyboard and a graphics tablet. 

HEA 101 Heating Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces fundamentals applicable to the heating phase of air conditioning. Includes types of units, parts, basic controls, functions 
and applications. Emphasizes practices, tools and meter uses, temperature measurement, heat flow and tubing installation and connecting practices. 

HEA 103 Refrigeration I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces compression systems used in mechanical refrigeration, including the refrigeration cycle. Introduces safety procedures 
and proper uses of tools used to install and service refrigeration equipment. 

HEA 104 Heating Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEA 101 - Heating Fundamentals and TEC 1 13 - Basic Electricity. Covers procedures used to analyze mechanical and electrical problems 
encountered when servicing heating systems including gas, oil, electric and hydronic heating equipment. Considers electrical schematic and diagrams, 
combustion testing, venting and combustion air requirements, installation and service procedures. 

HEA 106 Refrigeration II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEA 103 - Refrigeration I and TEC 1 13 - Basic Electricity. Continues Refrigeration I with further study of compressors, metering devices 
and an introduction to troubleshooting procedures. Includes clean-up procedures following compressor burn-out and analysis of how a single problen 
affects the rest of the system. 

HEA 107 Duct Fabrication and Installation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Emphasizes reading blueprints common to the sheet metal trade, floor plans, elevations, section, detail and mechanical 
plans. Requires students to develop a layout of an air conditioning system, layout of duct work and fittings and fabrication of these parts, including 
proper use of hand-tools, and shop equipment used to fabricate duct work and fittings. 



Course Descriptions 



JHEA 201 Cooling Service 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: TEC 113 - Basic Electricity and HEA 103 - Refrigeration I. Covers procedures used to diagnose electrical control problems found in 
(residential air conditioning and refrigeration systems including 24-volt and line voltage controls such as defrost timers, defrost heaters, relays and cold 
bontrols with emphasis on schematic and pictorial diagrams. 

HEA 202 Electrical Circuits and Controls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEA 101 - Heating Fundamentals, HEA 103 - Refrigeration I, and TEC 113 - Basic Electricity. Studies various kinds of heating, air 
conditioning and refrigeration controls. Includes gas, oil, cooling and electric heat controls, thermostats and other kinds of variable controls such as 
jhumidistats, aquastats and electronic thermostats and temperature controls. Covers operation of controls and how they are integrated into complex 
Systems by using schematic and pictorial diagrams. Presents component troubleshooting and testing. 

HEA 203 Heat Loss and Gain Calculation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Covers methods used in calculating building envelope heat loss and heat gain in sizing units for residential and light 
commercial applications. Discusses building construction techniques and energy consumption reduction methods. 

HEA 204 Commercial Refrigeration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEA 106 - Refrigeration II. Examines air conditioning and refrigeration systems for commercial use, including medium- and low- 
temperature applications. Includes refrigeration accessories, metering devices and advance control arrangements. 

HEA 205 Heat Pump Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Provides an understanding of the different types of heat pumps available for use today. Familiarizes students with the 
^refrigeration cycle as it applies to the heat pump systems. Provides students with the opportunity to draw, trace and follow an electrical schematic of a 
^heat pump with refrigerant. Includes selecting the proper heat pump, recording heat loss and gain calculations for the space available. Provides 
(instruction in mechanical components and in troubleshooting a non-functioning heat pump. 

HEA 206 Advanced Cooling Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEA 201 - Cooling Service. Considers methods of troubleshooting electrical and mechanical components of air conditioning and refrig- 
eration systems. 

HEA 207 HVAC Codes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Study of state and local codes covering installation, repair, alteration, relocation, replacement and erection of heating, ventilation, 
cooling and refrigeration systems. Includes job-related costs of material and equipment, labor, warranty, taxes, permits and sub-contracts. Students will 
estimate service and maintenance contracts. 

HEA 208 Energy Management and Balancing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Deals with reduction in energy usage in a facility, operational and maintenance improvements, new building design 
standards, shut-down and consolidation, alternate energy resources, retrofitting existing buildings and energy awareness. Includes practice in adjusting 
and setting fan speeds, dampers and other air regulating devices. 

HEA 209 Psychrometrics/Air Distribution 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Studies the properties of air during the operational variations of temperature and humidity. Discusses the atmospheric 
conditions and the impact of those conditions on the heating-cooling processes and the design of systems for residential and commercial structures. 
Includes the sizing and configurations of air delivery duct systems and system design methods. 

HEA 210 Alternative Energy Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Studies the magnitude of the energy available, the various methods used in collecting this energy, how to use it and how 
to store it for heating and cooling work. Selects components of the systems, including collector cells sizing, pump sizing, pipe, and duct sizing and 
designing distribution systems. Reviews controls for systems. Studies operating costs and savings. 

HEA 211 Absorption Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEA 206 - Advanced Cooling Service or equivalent in mechanical training and HEA 212 - Advanced HVAC Controls or equivalent in 
electrical training. Surveys special cooling systems with emphasis on the absorption cycle. Includes ammonia-water and lithium-bromide cycles, types 
I of units, arrangements, parts, function of various parts and applications of units into air conditioning systems in addition to diagnosis of service prob- 
lems. 

HEA 212 Advanced HVAC Controls 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEA 202 - Electrical Circuits and Controls. Covers control systems beyond ordinary residential and single zone commercial applications. 
Includes solid state controls, zoning controls, modulating controls, low ambient controls, heat recovery and energy management controls, economizer 
controls and pneumatic controls. 



Course Descriptions 



HEA 213 Sales and Service Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Encompasses the use of blueprints, specifications, A1A documents, application data sheets, bid forms and contracts in 
estimating materials and labor in the HVAC business. Includes advertising, direct labor, indirect labor, overhead, warranty overages, taxes, permits, 
subcontracts, margins, mark-ups and profit. Provides students with the opportunity to estimate service contracts and study service organization, service 
procedures, record keeping, parts inventory control and insurance liability 

HEA 214 Applied Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Provides students with the opportunity to design and lay out a complete HVAC system. 

HEA 220 Distribution Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Covers methods used in calculating building envelope heat loss and gain in sizing units for residential and light 
commercial applications. Studies the relationship of air properties to temperature and the design of systems for residential and light commercial 
structures. Includes the sizing and configurations of air delivery duct systems. 

HEA 221 Heat Pumps and Cooling Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HEA 106 - Refrigeration II. Covers procedures used to diagnose electrical control problems found in residential air-to-air, geothermal heat 
pump and cooling systems including 24-volt and line voltage controls. Familiarizes students with the refrigeration cycle as it applies to the heat pump. 
Covers correct charging procedures and sizing of heat pumps. Includes trouble shooting of heat pumps and cooling systems such as defrost timers, 
defrost heaters, relays and cold controls with emphasis on schematic and pictorial diagrams. 



HHS 101 Medical Terminology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Addresses basic terminology required of the allied health professional. Presents Greek and Latin prefixes, as well as suffixes, word 
roots and combining forms. Emphasizes forming a solid foundation for a medical vocabulary including meaning, spelling, and pronunciation. Includes 
medical abbreviations, signs and symbols. 

HHS 102 Medical Law and Ethics 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency in reading through appropriate assessment or successful completion of BSA reading coursework. Presents j 
ethics of medicine and medical practice as well as legal requirements and implications for allied health professions. 

HHS 103 Dosage Calculation 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competencies in mathematics and reading or ENG 031 - Reading Strategies for College I and MAT 044 - Mathematics. 
Introduces the mathematical concepts required of the allied health professional to accurately administer medications. 

HHS 104 CPR and Basic Health Awareness 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with information necessary to recognize the need for one- and two-person cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) 
as it relates to adults, children and infants. Requires students to safely perform CPR. 

HHS 106 Holistic Concepts and Skills 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency in ENG 024 - Introduction to College Wnting I, and ENG 031 - Reading Strategies for College I or through 
appropriate assessment. Introduces the student to the holistic approach in the art and science of healthful living. The course content emphasizes the 
interrelatedness of the total person — body, mind and spirit — in achieving the goals of therapeutic, rehabilitative and maintenance roles. The student will 
identify and model methods of personal holistic wellness in society. 

HHS 281-294 Special Topics in Health and Human Services 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on 
topics of interest that reinforce the concepts presented in their program areas. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

HLT 125 Health Care Systems and Trends 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the health care industry emphasizing the systems approach to health care and the current trends facing the industry. Gives : 
special attention to managed care organizations. 

HLT 225 Finance and Budgeting for Health Care 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ACC 101 - Principles of Accounting I. Importance is placed on the development and use of departmental budgets. Financial statements 
will be used to project future expenses and revenues for an organization and/or department. Emphasizes the reimbursement process for a managed care 
environment and purchasing procedures. 



210 Course Descriptions 



HLT 226 Organizational Development in Health Care 3 Credits 

• [Prerequisites: BUS 105 - Principles of Management. Examines organizational structure in health care organizations including traditional structures and 
^re-engineering of the health care industry. Covers staff development, training, job analysis and design and departmental staffing. Discusses medical 
■ethics. 

HMS 101 Introduction to Human Services 3 Credits 

1 'Prerequisites: None. Explores the history of human services, career opportunities and the role of the human service worker. Focuses on target 
populations and community agencies designed to meet the needs of various populations. 

HMS 102 Helping Relationship Techniques 3 Credits 

^Prerequisites: None. Provides opportunities to increase effectiveness in helping people. Examines the helping process in terms of skills, helping 
JiStages and issues involved in a helping relationship. Introduces major theories of helping. 

HMS 103 Interviewing and Assessment 3 Credits 

'Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationships Techniques, or permission of the program chair. Develops 
[(skills in interviewing and provides a base for students to build personal styles. Introduces a variety of assessment approaches and treatment planning. 

HMS 104 Crisis Intervention 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides beginning training for people who anticipate or are presently working in crisis situations. 

HMS 105 Introduction to Correctional Rehabilitation Services 3 Credits 

^Prerequisites: None. Introduces the study of crime and criminals and how society is affected. 

HMS 106 Physiology of Aging 3 Credits 

I Prerequisites: None. Focuses on the physical changes and common pathologies associated with the aging process. Includes the psychological and social 
I implications of changes for human behavior. Focuses on health promotion and disease prevention. 

HMS 107 Human Services Topical Seminar 3 Credits 

| Prerequisites: Approval of program chair. Discusses topics of current interest in human services. Focuses on special interest projects for students in 
human services. Utilizes field trips, guest speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars. 

HMS 108 Psychology of Aging 3 Credits 

I Prerequisites: None. Covers the major behavioral changes in adulthood and aging. Students explore their own feelings about aging as well as the 
> attitudes of society. 

HMS 112 Recreation for Special Populations 3 Credits 

i 1 Prerequisites: None. Studies the nature and etiology of impairments including developmental disabilities, mental illness, physical disabilities and 
l( geriatrics and their potential impact upon an individual's ability to participate in recreational activities. Explores techniques needed to conduct a 
:j recreation program which allows successful participation by an individual with a disability. 

HMS 113 Problems of Substance Abuse in Society 3 Credits 

I Prerequisites: None. Provides basic information about alcohol and drugs and the laws which pertain to their abuse. Explores current attitudes and 
| practices which pertain to alcohol and drug use, misuse and dependence. Class can be used toward ICAADA certification. 

HMS 1 14 Social Services in Long-Term Care 3 Credits 

|j Prerequisites: None. Provides practical and useful information about aging and institutionalization. Focuses on the role of social services within the 
| long-term care facility. Indiana State Department of Health State Certification requires 48 hours of attendance. 

HMS 116 Introduction of Mental Retardation/Developmental Disabilities 3 Credits 

It Prerequisites: None. Provides the participant with background knowledge of the field of mental retardation/developmental disabilities and issues 
I pertinent to the field. 

HMS 120 Health and Aging 3 Credits 

f Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of the physical changes and common pathologies associated with the aging process. Focuses on the 
[ psychological and social implications of such changes for human behavior. Throughout the course there is a focus on health promotion and disease 
prevention during the later years. 



Course Descriptions 



HMS 122 Introduction to Residential Treatment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces information, skills and attitudes necessary to become an effective worker in residential treatment. Explores basic ] 
developmental needs, planning and use of activities and issues related to the team approach. Discusses and demonstrates observation and recording of 
behavior. 






HMS 124 Activity Director Basic 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Explores the philosophy and investigates the development of therapeutic activity programs for older persons. Focuses on activities 
which will meet the individual's physical, social and emotional needs. 

HMS 130 Social Aspects of Aging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers major theories and patterns of aging in American society. Covers social institutions and cultural factors that affect the aging 
process. 

HMS 140 Loss and Grief 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides practical and useful information for everyone who has experienced a loss. Addresses the problems of loss and grief and 
how to develop coping skills. Students will evaluate their own experiences and attitudes toward loss and grief. 

HMS 201 Internship I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationships Techniques, and HMS 103 - Interviewing and Assessment, 
or program, advisor approval. Corequisites: HMS 203 - Internship Seminar I. A field work experience in an approved social, educational, law. 
enforcement, corrections or other community service organization. The student will be supervised by an internship site professional and a college 
faculty member. A minimum of 180 hours of work experience is required. 

HMS 202 Internship II 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 201 - Internship I, HMS 203 - Internship Seminar I, HMS 205 - Behavioral/Reality Techniques, HMS 206 - Group Process andi 
Skills or program advisor approval. Corequisites: HMS 204 - Internship Seminar II. Continues Internship I. A minimum of 180 hours of work 
experience is required. 

HMS 203 Internship Seminar I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationships Techniques, HMS 103 - Interviewing and Assessment, on 
program advisor approval. Corequisites: HMS 201 - Internship I. Permits small group discussion and analysis of the human services internship 
experience. Includes special learning objectives related to the kind of work the student does after completing the program. 

HMS 204 Internship Seminar II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationships Techniques, HMS 103 - Interviewing and Assessment, HMS j 
201 - Internship I, HMS 203 - Internship Seminar I or program advisor approval. Corequisites: HMS 202 - Internship II. Continues Internship! 
Seminar I with different learning objectives. Relates objectives to the work the student does after completing the program. 

HMS 205 Behavioral/Reality Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationships Techniques, HMS 103 - Interviewing and Assessment, j 
Focuses on theories of behavioral and reality approaches. Develops understanding of terms and practical applications of the behavioral and reality I 
approaches used in working with people. 



HMS 206 Group Process and Skills 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationship Techniques, HMS 103 - Interviewing and Assessment, or 
permission by program chairperson. Studies group dynamics, issues, and behavior. Includes group functioning and leadership, guidelines on working 
effectively with a co-leader, and practical ways of evaluating the group process. 

HMS 207 Program Planning/Policy Issues 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationship Techniques, HMS 103 - Interviewing and Assessment, or' 
program advisor approval. Concentrates on the components of administration of human service agencies. Addresses practitioner skills needed by am 
administrator or supervisor. Discusses social policy issues and their impact on human services. 

HMS 208 Treatment Models of Substance Abuse 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 113 - Problems of Substance Abuse in Society or program advisor approval. Describes the various treatment models used with 
chemically dependent clients. Discussion centers on intervention and treatment models for chemical dependency and their role in the recovery 
process. Course can be applied toward hours for ICAADA certification. 



Cot 'Rs.r. Drsc km 



IMS 209 Counseling Issues 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 113 - Problems of Substance Abuse in Society or program advisor approval. Explores practice strategies for the worker who 
founsels chemically dependent clients. Course can be applied toward hours for ICAADA certification. 

IMS 210 Co-Dependency 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 1 13 - Problems of Substance Abuse in Society or program advisor approval. Presents the definitions of codependency and the 
Issues related to it. Students learn skills and techniques to confront codependent behavior. Course can be applied toward hours for ICAADA 
Certification. 

IMS 215 Juvenile Delinquency 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of the concepts, definitions and measurements of juvenile delinquency. Explores various theories which 
.ittempt to explain the causes of delinquency. Looks at the role of environmental influences (peers, gangs, school, drugs, etc.) as they contribute to 
llelinquency Discusses an overview of the history and philosophy of the juvenile justice system as well as ways to control and treat juvenile 
jlelinquents. 

|rIMS 220 Issues and Ethics in Human Services 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationship Techniques, HMS 103 - Interviewing and Assessment. 
Provides an introductory overview of the legal and ethical aspects in the field of human services with implications for the human services worker, 
included are such topics as liability, confidentiality and privilege, records and rights of clients, due process and equal protection in terms of staff and 
[:lient, discrimination and witnessing. 

HMS 240 Rehabilitation Process: Probation and Parole 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMS 105 - Introduction to Correctional Rehabilitation Services or program advisor approval. Provides an understanding of probation 
;and parole as an integral part of the criminal justice system with special emphasis on current and future trends in this area. Explores the role of 
'community corrections and its impact on the role of probation and parole in our society in view of the increase in the number of offenders. 

HMS 281-294 Special Topics in Human Services 1-5 Credits 

iPrerequisites: HMS 101 - Introduction to Human Services, HMS 102 - Helping Relationship Techniques, and HMS 103 - Interviewing and Assessment, 
provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest that reinforce the 
concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

HMT 100 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulations 3 Credits 

iPrerequisites: None. Provides a study of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) regulations which protect workers from 
•exposure to occupational hazards. Concentrates on researching, interpreting, summarizing and applying the OSHA regulations for workers who handle 
■hazardous materials. 

HMT 104 Environmental Toxicology 3 Credits 

(Prerequisites: None. Reviews research conducted to determine the systematic health effects of exposures to chemicals. Includes determination of risk 
factors, routes of entry of hazardous materials, and their effects on target organs, acute, and chronic effects and control measures. 

HMT 120 Hazard Communication Standard 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides instruction concerning the development and implementation of a hazard communication program for employees. Pro- 
rvides experience in conducting a chemical inventory, interpreting material safety data sheets (MSDSs), developing a written hazard communication 
iprogram that complies with 29CFR 1910.1200 and conducting an effective hazard communication training program. 

HMT 200 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMT 100 - Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Regulations. Provides a detailed study of the U.S. Environmental 
(Protection Agency (EPA) regulations pertaining to hazardous waste management with an emphasis on the requirements of the Resource Conservation and 
(Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Superfund Amendments and Reau- 
thorization Act (SARA). 

HMT 201 Contingency Planning 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Teaches students to develop an emergency response contingency plan for a facility or community. Includes analyzing the hazards, 
writing and implementing the contingency plans, training employees for an emergency and evaluating the effectiveness of the contingency plan. 



Course Descriptions 



HMT 203 Sampling Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMT 100 - Occupational Safety and Health Administration, HMT 1 20 - Hazard Communication Standard, and HMT 200 - Environmental 
Protection Agency Regulations. Introduces students to a variety of sampling procedures used in industrial settings and for emergency response. Includes 
sampling and monitoring devices, industrial hygiene monitoring, water and waste stream monitoring, outside air sampling, soil sampling and radiation. - 
Emphasizes collecting and preserving representative samples, interpreting laboratory results and complying with relevant federal regulations. 

HMT 205 Department of Transportation (DOT) Regulations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HMT 100 - Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Provides a detailed study of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 
regulations. Introduces certain Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency regulations pertinent to hazardous materials 
transportation. Includes problems and case studies in which students identify and interpret applicable DOT regulations and recommend compliance 
strategies. Provides practical understanding of DOT issues through interviews with local professionals in hazardous materials handling. 

HMT 220 Hazardous Materials Recovery, Incineration and Disposal 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CHM 101 - Chemistry I. Explains methods of recovery, incineration and/or disposal of hazardous waste. Includes contracting with 
qualified disposal organizations, obtaining permits and ensuring regulatory compliance of hazardous waste. 

HOS 101 Sanitation and First Aid 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Helps students leam basic principles of sanitation and safety in order to maintain a safe and healthy food service environment. 
Presents the laws and regulations related to safety, fire and sanitation and how to adhere to them in the food service operation. 

HOS 102 Basic Foods Theory and Skills 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Students learn the fundamentals of food preparation, service procedures, and sanitation and safety practices in the food service 
business. They will use proper operation techniques for equipment. This course also provides a background and history of the hospitality industry and 
introduces the student to the broad spectrum of hospitality/food service organizations and career opportunities. Students will be familiarized with the 
organizational structure and basic functions of departments. 

HOS 103 Soups, Stocks and Sauces 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Concentrates on the four major stocks and the soups that are derived from them. Time will be given to help develop the necessary 
skills to prepare food using any one of the 14 major cooking methods. 

HOS 104 Nutrition 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the characteristics, functions and food sources of the major nutrient groups and how to maximize nutrient retention in 
food preparation and storage. Students will be made aware of nutrient needs throughout the life cycle and to apply those principles to menu planning 
and food preparation. 

HOS 105 Introduction to Baking 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents fundamentals of baking science, terminology, ingredients, weights and measures, yeast goods, pies, cakes, cookies and 
quick breads and use and care of equipment. Emphasizes sanitation, hygienic work habits and conformity with health regulations. 

HOS 106 Pantry and Breakfast 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 103 - Soups, Stocks and Sauces. Covers the techniques and skills needed in breakfast cookery, as well as insight into the pantry 
department. Various methods of preparation of eggs, pancakes, waffles and cereals will be discussed. Students will receive instruction in salad prepara- 
tion, salad dressings, hot and cold sandwich preparation, garnishes and appetizers. 

HOS 107 Hospitality Computer Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of the information needs of lodging properties and food service establishments and addresses essential aspects 
of computer systems and computer based property management systems for both front office and back functions. Focuses on computer-based restaurant 
management systems for both service-oriented and management-oriented functions. 

HOS 108 Table Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with practical knowledge and skills of various types of service operations. The student will gain knowledge and 
an appreciation of the relationship between "front" and "back" of the house. Emphasis is also placed on management skills needed for bar and dining 
room management. 

HOS 109 Hospitality Purchasing 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies in detail major groups of food purchased by quantity buyers including fresh fruits and vegetables, dairy products, meats and 
seafood, processed products, beverages and non-food items. Outlines the essentials of effective food and beverage control while establishing systems for 
sale values for food and beverages. 



214 Course Descriptions 



HOS 114 Hospitality Organization and Administration 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: None. Analyzes managements functions and responsibilities as they pertain to the hospitality industry. Appropriate styles of hospitality 
(leadership are covered. 

HOS 115 Diet Therapy 4 Credits 

[Prerequisites: None. Presents to food services employees or prospective employees of health care institutions knowledge about basic nutrition, therapeu- 
tic diets and menu planning; students use knowledge by writing menus. Practicum required as an integral part of the course. 

HOS 116 Dietary Management I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Includes specifications, storage, purchasing and storage, feeding in emergencies, sanitation, and safety in a format designed for food 
service required as an integral part of the course. 

HOS 117 Dietary Management 11 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Includes specifications, storage, purchasing and preparation of food, recipe standardization, kitchen designs and delivery systems 
in format designed for food service employees or employees of health care institutions. Practicum required as an integral part of the course. 

HOS 118 Resident Clinical Assessment Practicum 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the student to the residential care environment and provides the opportunity for the student to learn how to complete 
residential nutritional status assessments, evaluate resident nutritional needs, complete the required resident evaluation instruments and to write appro- 
priate nutrition care. 

HOS 128 Total Quality Management (TQM) In Restaurant Operations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with practical knowledge and skills of restaurant operations through TQM. Emphasis is placed on forming an 
organizational team from traditional "front and back-of-the house" roles. In addition various types of service for food and beverages are taught to 
demonstrate the versatility of the industry. 

HOS 131 Techniques of Casino Games: Craps 9 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Emphasizes fundamentals of dealing the game of Craps: chip handling and cutting, call bets, procedures, accuracy, and game 
speed. Requires the development of quick mental multiplication and game speed, and knowledge of all bets and procedures for payoffs. Special attention 
is paid to the managerial aspects of Craps. 

HOS 132 Techniques of Casino Games: Blackjack 6 Credits 

f Prerequisites: None. Emphasizes fundamentals of dealing the game of Blackjack: chip handling and cutting, shuffling, card delivery, call bets, proce- 
| dures, accuracy and game speed. Special attention is paid to the managerial aspects of Blackjack. 

HOS 141 Introduction to Casino Operations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Concentrates on the basic rules, fundamentals and procedures of all the revenue producing areas of a modem casino. Covers table 
f games, slots, race and sports betting, bingo and keno. Includes an overview of other pertinent casino areas such as casino cage and surveillance, 
r Introduces casino math, game operations and protection. 

I HOS 144 Customer Relations 3 Credits 

| Prerequisites: None. Examines the key principles of quality service by understanding the service product, the service environment, the tools of 
i; service, the service needs of the customer and the application of service principles. 

HOS 150 The Tourism System 3 Credits 

; Prerequisites: None. Studies travel trends and modes and the social, environmental and economic impacts on the destination area. Emphasis is 
placed on local, regional and national tounsm. 

HOS 151 Introduction to Convention/Meeting Management 3 Credits 

j Prerequisites: None. Provides a general overview of the convention, exposition and meeting industry, and explores the career options within the 
i; industry. Includes an essential understanding of the components involved in the operation of successful meetings and conventions. 

HOS 152 The Mechanics of Meeting Planning 3 Credits 

I Prerequisites: None. Provides an in-depth study of the meeting and convention industry. Focuses on the operational aspects of the various industry 
: segments and the intra-industry interactions of each. The text is one of the main components used to study for the Certified Meeting Professional 
(CMP) examination. 



HOS 153 The Development and Management of Attractions 3 Credits J 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the process of developing visitor attractions and discusses the issues involved in their management. Course content I 
contains information geared toward achieving certain competency objectives. 

HOS 201 Hospitality Organization and Human Resources Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Teaches the necessary skills for proper recruiting, staffing, training and managing employees at various levels in hospitality careers. 
Emphasizes the organizations evolutionary and problem solving process. I 

HOS 202 Garde Manger 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 106 - Pantry and Breakfast. Illustrates basic garde manger principles and the functions and duties of the garde manger department ' 
as they relate and integrate with other kitchen operations. Students will focus on introduction to specialty work which includes ice carving, artistic l 
centerpieces and buffet decorations. They will demonstrate equipment and garde manger area planning. 

HOS 203 Menu, Design, and Layout 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides the skills needed to apply the principles of menu planning to various types of facilities and services. This course covers i 
menu layout, selection and development and pricing structures. 

HOS 204 Food and Beverage Cost Control 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces mathematical principles applied to the food service industry and uses skills to complete food related tasks. 

HOS 205 Food and Beverage Cost Control Applications 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the principles and procedures involved in an effective system of room, food, beverage, labor and sales income. Emphasizes 
the development and use of standards in the calculation of cost. 

HOS 206 Fundamentals of the Catering Business 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 101 - Sanitation and First Aid and FST 102 - Food Service Equipment Operations. Introduces the fundamentals of owning and, 
operating a small catering business including personal, legal and operational requirements. 



' 



HOS 207 Advanced Baking and Chocolates 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers classical French and European desserts. Includes the preparation of goods such as Napoleons, Gateaux St. Honore, petto 
fours and petits fours sec, ganaches, pastry creams and fillings, sauces, flans and tarts and European sponges. Includes tempering of chocolates, molding 
and chocolate plastique, preparation of truffles, pastilage and marzipan, short doughs, and meringues. Requires students to submit three pieces from the] 
American Culinary Federation approved individual pastry display category to be judged as a final practical exam. 

HOS 214 Hospitality Law and Security 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an awareness of the rights and responsibilities that the law grants to or imposes upon a hotel keeper. Illustrates thej 
possible consequences of failure to satisfy legal obligations. 

HOS 216 Hospitality Marketing and Group Sales 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents a practical understanding of the operating statement and precisely where, how and why the sales effort fits into total 
earnings and profit. Teaches how to measure and gauge accurately the precise worth of every type of business in advance. 

HOS 221 Catering Administration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 101 - Sanitation and First Aid, CUL 110 - Meat Cutting, HOS 204 - Food and Beverage Cost Control, and CUL 202 - Specialized 
Cuisine. Provides instruction in the fundamentals of catering including the business of supplying food, goods and organized service for public and 
private functions. Includes staffing, equipment, transportation, contracting, special arrangements, beverage service and menu planning. Demonstrates 
techniques of setting up banquets and buffets. Requires students to plan, budget, cost, test recipes and formats, plan decor, service and entertainment for 
catered events. 

HOS 231 Techniques of Casino Games: Craps-Subsequent 7 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 131 - Techniques of Casino Games: Craps or HOS 133 - Techniques of Casino Games: Roulette. Emphasizes fundamentals of 
dealing the game of Craps: chip handling and cutting, call bets, procedures, accuracy and game speed. Requires the development of quick mental 
multiplication and game speed and knowledge of all bets and procedures for payoffs. Special attention is paid to the managenal aspects of Craps. 

HOS 232 Techniques of Casino Games: Blackjack-Subsequent 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 132 - Techniques of Casino Games: Blackjack or HOS 133 - Techniques of Casino Games: Roulette. Emphasizes fundamentals of 
dealing the game of Blackjack: chip handling and cutting, shuffling, card delivery, call bets, procedures, accuracy and game speed. Special attention is 
paid to the managerial aspects of Blackjack. 



lib Course Description? 



IOS 233 Techniques of Casino Games: Roulette-Subsequent 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: HOS 133 -Techniques of Casino Games: Roulette. Emphasizes fundamentals of dealing the game of Roulette: chip handling and cutting, 
fall bets, procedures, accuracy and game speed. Requires the development of quick mental multiplication and game speed and knowledge of all bets and 
Procedures for payoffs. Special attention is paid to the managerial aspects of Roulette. 

IOS 242 Casino Supervision 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an in-depth study of casino management techniques used in gaming both locally and nationwide. Emphasizes the duties 
imd responsibilities of the mid-level casino supervisor and the casino executive. Includes duties of floor, pit and shift managers. Stresses game protec- 
iion, credit and marker control, cash and check control and internal regulatory procedures. 

HOS 244 Slots Management 3 Credits 

prerequisites: None. Emphasizes basic slots managerial techniques including supervision of slot shift managers, mechanics, technicians, floor personnel, 
rhange persons, booth cashiers, carousel attendants, coin room operators, jackpot fills and credits. 

HOS 245 Casino Surveillance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies all aspects of modern casino surveillance including all table games, slots, cage, keno, and all areas of the casino. Increases 
|:he students' familiarity with regulations, cnminal laws, rules of evidence and game protection, fostering both knowledge and professionalism within the 
Work place. 

HOS 280 Co-op/Internship/Externship/Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Requires students to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while 
Isarning credit toward an associate degree. 

HOS 281-294 Special Topics in Hospitality Administration 1-5 Credits 

prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

HRM 202 Front Office 3 Credits 

iPrerequisites: None. Presents a systematic approach to front office procedures, detailing the flow of business through a hotel beginning with the 
[reservation process and ending with billing and collection procedures within the context of the overall operation of a hotel. Examines front office 
[management, the process of handling complaints, and concerns regarding hotel safety and security. 

HRM 206 Supervisory Housekeeping 3 Credits 

iPrerequisites: None. Introduces the fundamentals of housekeeping management. Emphasis is placed on employee training, record-keeping, health and 
safety cost control and overall responsibilities. 

IDS 102 Introduction to Print Reading 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an introduction to reading and interpreting machine shop symbols, welding blueprints and working drawings used in 
'trades and crafts. Focuses on dimension, shape, fabrication and assembly. Applies basic mathematics to the solution of print and performance problems. 

IDS 103 Motors and Motor Controls 3 Credits 

; Prerequisites: TEC 1 13 - Basic Electricity. Provides a complete understanding of all types of electric motors, extending from the small shaded pole fan 
motors to the large three-phase motors. Includes motor theory magnetism and how it affects motor rotation. Provides in-depth study of motor starting 
components and protective devices for motor circuits. Includes heat dissipation from a motor, motor slippage, how motors are wired to obtain different 
speeds, and capacitors and how they affect a motor circuit. 

IDS 104 Fluid Power Basics 3 Credits 

Corequisites: MAT 050 - Basic Algebra or advisor approval. Introduces the student to fluid power principles and components. Teaches basic circuit 
design, symbols and schematic diagrams to build a foundation for career work in fluid power technology 

IDS 114 Introductory Welding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides basic skills and fundamental knowledge in oxyacetylene and shielded metal welding for maintenance welders, auto service 
and body technicians and individuals in the mining industry. Emphasizes industry welding practices and detailed study of techniques used in all weld 
positions. Covers brazing and flame cutting and electrode selection and uses. Emphasizes safe practices in welding, cutting and shielded metal arc. 



Course Descriptions 



IDS 260 - Quality Control and Advanced Problem Solving 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Completion of 45 credit hours in the program including ENG 1 1 1 - English Composition and MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra o: 
advisor approval. Covers critical thinking skills, data collection, analyzing data, problem solving and decision analysis techniques as they apply to | 
technological environment. Includes at least one substantive problem-solving project that includes a mathematics component and requires a written 



report. 



IDS 280 Co-op/Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minimum of 30 credits toward their degrees with a least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. Gives 
students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit 
toward and associate degree. 

IDS 281-294 Special Topics in Industrial Technology 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops, and other instructional activities on topics of interestl 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

ILT 101 Industrial Laboratory Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Deals with basic skills needed in the industrial laboratory such as safety, identification, care and operation of basic laboratory 
equipment including pH meters, spectrophotometers, glassware and definition and preparation of reagents. Includes laboratory exercises in the use ol 
selected equipment. 

ILT 201 Industrial Instrumentation and Techniques I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ILT 101 - Industrial Laboratory Techniques and CHM 101 -Chemistry I. Addresses theoretical aspects of industnal laboratory instrumen-i 
tation including gas and liquid chromatography (GC and LC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), infra-red (IR) spectrophotometry and M 
atomic absorption (AA). Presents theories and laws that govern the way instruments operate. Includes student experimentation on various analytical 
instruments. 

ILT 202 Industrial Instrumentation and Techniques II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ILT 201 - Industrial Instrumentation and Techniques I. Continues the theoretical study of ILT 201 by addressing industrial applicat 
of laboratory instrumentation including gas and liquid chromatography (GC and LC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), infra-red (IR) 
spectrophotometry and atomic absorption (AA). Presents automation techniques including sampling, data collection and analysis. Covers the laws that 
govern the way instruments operate. Includes student experimentation on various analytical instruments. 



ILT 203 Environmental Monitoring 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Deals with aspects of environmental pollution, providing a realistic and objective view of pollution problems. Includes 
the role of technology in the identification of environmental pollution. 

ILT 206 Food and Drug Analysis 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Examines the food processing industry. Includes various analytical techniques and quality control standards utilized by 
the food industry. Includes classification of drugs and various methods of purification. Covers instruments and procedures used to monitor the quality 
and quantity of the composition of a product. 

ILT 217 Wastewater Analysis 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Deals with the chemical and biological analysis of wastewater. Major pollutants of water are determined and quantified. 
The wastewater treatment steps are discussed to determine ideal lab sampling locations. Various wastewater tests such as BOD's, COD's, sedimentation 
rates and biological examinations are performed. 

IMT 105 Heating and Air Conditioning Basics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents fundamentals of heating and compression systems used in mechanical refrigeration and air conditioning. Includes 
combustion process, heat flow, temperature measurement, gas laws, heating and refrigeration cycles and components used in systems. Introduces basic 
mechanical service procedures used in industry. 

IMT 106 Millwright I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Introduces the proper use of hand and power tools and measuring instruments in carpentry, blacksmithing, rigging and 
equipment, machinist and general shop. Includes structural steel and fabricating terms. 

IMT 107 Preventive Maintenance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Focuses on detecting and correcting potential trouble spots and scheduling routine inspections with checklists. Studies j 
five essential forms of preventive maintenance: equipment record, checklist, inspection schedule, inspection report and equipment cost record. 



CouRsn Descriptions 



MT 108 Measurements and Calibration 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. TEC 1 13 - Basic Electricity. Provides instruction in the purpose, function and application of oscilloscopes and related 
hstruments. 

iMT 110 Coupling and Alignment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the concepts of correct alignment of industrial process machinery. Provides instruction in troubleshooting and repair of 
:oupled machines. 

IMT 111 Rigging 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: None. Introduces the proper techniques of moving industrial machinery and equipment. Emphasis is placed on proper installation, 
nspection, safety requirements and load calculation. 

IMT 112 Sheet Metal Layout and Design 3 Credits 

(Prerequisites: None. Examines the procedures used to layout sheet metal components. Presents the proper use of hand and machine tools to fabricate 
sheet metal projects. 

IMT 120 Metallurgy Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the fundamentals of thermodynamics and reactions occurring in metals subjected to various kinds of heat treatment. 
[Includes classification and properties of metals, chemical and physical metallurgy, theory of alloys, heat treatment principles as applied to ferrous and 
non-ferrous materials, test to determine uses, heat treatment for steels, special steels, and cast iron, powder metallurgy, and use of gas and electric 
furnaces and their controls. 

)IMT 122 Electrical Wiring Fundamentals 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: None. Covers National Electrical Code and its relationship to residential and commercial wiring. Includes mechanical installation of 
hardware, metering equipment, lights, switches and design. Discusses tool use and materials selection. 

IMT 201 Fluid Power Systems (Hydraulics/Pneumatics) 3 Credits 

i. Prerequisites: IDS 104 - Fluid Power Basics. Introduces the student to more complex fluid power circuits. Requires students to design, analyze and 
troubleshoot complex circuits using schematic diagrams. Studies detailed construction of typical industrial fluid power components. Teaches students 
' to disassemble and evaluate fluid power components in the lab. 

IMT 203 Machine Maintenance/Installation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines procedures for the removal, repair and installation of machine components. Analyzes methods of installation, lubrication 
! practices and maintenance procedures for industrial machinery. Presents techniques for calibration and repair of electro-mechanical devices and practice 
in computations pertaining to industrial machinery 

IMT 205 Programmable Controllers I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Introduces the basic theory, operation and programming of programmable controllers. Includes pilot control 
devices, circuit layouts, industrial schematics, relay logic, reduced voltage starters and multi-speed controllers. Covers static control systems. Demon- 
strates with programming examples, set-up examples and troubleshooting as well as PLC timing, counting, arithmetic and logic. 

IMT 206 Programmable Controllers II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: IMT 205 - Programmable Controllers I. Provides an in-depth study of programmable controllers. Emphasizes program language 
installation, maintenance and applications. 

IMT 207 Electrical Circuits 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: IDS 103 - Motors and Motor Controls, MAT 121 - Geometry-Trigonometry or advisor approval, TEC - 113 Basic Electricity. Provides 
fundamentals of single- and three-phase alternating current including parallel circuits, resistance, inductance, capacitance, switching, fusing, current 
requirements, transformer applications, and motors and motor controls. Covers the basics of mechanical and electrical installations, emphasizes tool use 
and material selection and electrical troubleshooting diagnosis and repair. 

IMT 210 Pumps 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: IDS 104 - Fluid Power Basics. Covers the construction and operation of centrifugal, reciprocating and rotary pumps and their compo- 
nents. Includes procedures of troubleshooting, installation and maintenance. 

IMT 211 Advanced Industrial Mechanics I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: IDS 103 - Motors and Motor Controls, IMT 122 - Electrical Wiring Fundamentals, IMT 201 - Fluid Power Systems, IMT 203 - Machine 
Maintenance/Installation, and PITY 101 - Physics I. Examines the operation and design of mechanical systems including belt drives, chain drives, gear 
boxes, bearings and variable speed drives. Includes the proper use of portable power tools and the study of different materials. 



IMT 212 Advanced Industrial Mechanics II 3 Credits !• 

i . 
Prerequisites: IMT 211 - Advanced Industrial Mechanics I. Continues Advanced Industrial Mechanics I with troubleshooting of the various mechanical j ' 
drive systems. Includes the study of lubrication, seals, industrial pumps, steam distribution systems and HVAC systems. 

IMT 213 Pipe Fitting Basics 3 Credits | ' 

Prerequisites: IDS 102 - Introduction to Pnnt Reading. Acquaints the maintenance technician with a basic foundation and pipe fitting skills necessary to > 
make repairs or new pipe layout. Includes determination of the type and quantity of material needed to complete a task and joining those materials in the ! 
proper manner with a minimum of supervision. 

IMT 215 Power Plant Mechanics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: IMT 207 - Electrical Circuits, MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra. Presents the basic elements in the power plant: their function, their j'ti 
mode of operation and the mechanics, with emphasis on construction and repair. The student selects, troubleshoots and repairs power plant IIP 
mechanics. 

INS 210 Property and Liability Insurance Principles 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II, ENG 032 - Reading Strategies for College 11, MAT 044 - Mathematics or demonstrated 
competencies or advisor approval. Provides an overview of the insurance business and an understanding of the basic principles of property and j> 
liability insurance. 

INS 220 Personal Insurance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INS 210 - Property and Liability Insurance Principles or advisor approval. Analyzes personal loss exposures and insurance including 
homeowners and other dwelling coverages, personal liability, inland marine, auto, life, health insurance and financial planning. 

INS 230 Commercial Insurance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INS 220 - Personal Insurance or advisor approval. Explores commercial coverages and loss exposures including property, business 
income, marine, crime, boiler and machinery, general liability, auto, workers compensation, business owners, miscellaneous coverages and surety 
bonding. 

INT 101 Interior Design Theory 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces design theory and color dynamics as applied to interior composition. Includes exploration and application of three- 
dimensional entourage, human factors and the psychology and social influences of space. 

INT 102 Residential Drafting and Construction 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an understanding of building structures, residential construction techniques, building materials and blueprint reading. 
Includes building codes and the preparation of plans, elevations, sections and details as they relate to construction drawings. 

INT 103 Introduction to Interior Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with an overview of the field of interior design. Exercises include small-scale space analysis and functional 
planning based on user needs, application of the principles of design, furniture arrangement, finish selections and presentation techniques. 

INT 104 Textiles for Interiors 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. An intensive study of textiles from fiber identification and classification to finish. Also introduces interior textile fabrications 
including window treatments, upholstery, carpet and wallcoverings. 

INT 105 Design Presentations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Presents the elements of two-and three-dimensional design concepts as related to interior representational 
drawings. Studies include audio-visual techniques, color rendering and material boards for client presentations. 

INT 107 Color and Light 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduction of color theory, including additive and subtractive systems. Covers the effects of various types of lighting on color. 

INT 108 Interior Design II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INT 102 - Residential Drafting and Construction. Presents concept development, programming and space planning of the interior 
environment. Exercises reinforce creativity and problem solving skills. Emphasizes the relationship between individuals and their surroundings, includ- 
ing studies in human scale, proxemics and design considerations for special populations. 



220 Course Descriptions 



INT 109 History of Interiors 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Survey of the development of the interrelationship of architecture, interiors, furniture and decorative arts. Includes the designers 
who created these environments. 

INT 201 Interior Finishes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INT 102 - Residential Drafting and Construction, INT 103 - Introduction to Interior Design, INT 104 - Textiles for Interiors. Examines 
the physical properties of various finish materials and architectural detailing including floor and wall treatments. Addresses problems in specifying, 
estimating and installing these materials. 

INT 202 Contract Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Studies include commercial technological and base building requirements; barrier-free, building and life 
safety codes; analysis of existing conditions, client interview and square footage and space planning standards. Emphasis is on task analysis and 
workstation design, systems and equipment manufacturers and finish selections within the office. 

INT 203 Professional Practice 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Introduction to business pnnciples and practices as they relate to the interior design profession. Includes 
business formation and management, professional ethics and organizations, certification and licensing, design liability and project management. Special 
topics involving consumer behavior, sales techniques and fee structuring will also be addressed. 

INT 204 Interior Design III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Students select a competency project related to their individual interests with scope of project approved 
by faculty. The project design solution is expected to include professional interior design research and practices including programming, concept 
development, space planning, all necessary working drawings and specifications and appropriate presentation materials. 

INT 206 Custom Design in Interiors 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Creative development of original design for interior furnishings, textiles, window treatments and accessory 
pieces. Includes material selection, budget estimation, construction constraints, estimating and installation techniques and presentation methods. 

INT 207 Commercial Interior Detailing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: INT 102 - Residential Drafting and Construction. Presents the integration of commercial and institutional interior design and architec- 
tural detailing. Includes the impact of mechanical and electrical systems, acoustics and codes. Special emphasis will be placed on lighting technology 
and application. 

INT 208 CAD for Interior Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Investigation of the concepts, techniques and skills required for computer-aided drafting. Students will 
learn efficient productivity of visual information: set-up, drawing methods, editing, zooming, dimensioning, block drawing and print/plotting of 
graphic input. 

INT 209 Portfolio Preparation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Efforts are directed toward achieving a career in interior design. Includes a comprehensive program 
assessment exam, the development of a high-quality portfolio and resume and necessary field experience. 

INT 210 Project Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. In conference with a faculty advisor, students select an interior design project. The project should include 
all phases of project programming, analysis of existing conditions, design criteria and adjacency studies, schematic and design development, contract 
documentation and administration and the final project presentation. A signed contract must be filed with the department chairperson prior to enroll- 
ment. 

INT 211 Kitchen and Bath Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Involves the requirements and space planning for kitchens and baths, utilizing both standard and custom 
cabinetry and fixtures. Topics also include casework for media and conference centers. 

INT 212 Historic Preservation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Introduces the process of establishing historic properties. Preservation, restoration and adaptive reuse 
will be differentiated as applied to both public and private properties. Includes appropriate exterior and interior color and finish selections and 
architectural detailing. 



Course Descriptions 



INT 213 Internship I 1-3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Field placement or research project within students' occupational specialty, to include collection and analysi 
of data and work experience in business and industry. 

i 
INT 214 Hospitality Design 3 Credits | 

i 
Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Introduces the special considerations in designing for the hospitality industry. Includes the intricacies c 1 

a restaurant layout from the furniture arrangement to personnel traffic patterns in meeting, dining and guestrooms and common areas. 

INT 215 Independent Study 3 Credits 

I 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Accommodates student's interest in specific areas or where there is a need to strengthen skills. Progran 

chairperson's approval is required and a signed contract must be filed prior to enrollment. 

INT 217 Retail Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Introduces principles of display and special techniques and equipment required in display work. 

INT 218 Health Care Facilities Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Introduces the interior design of the health care environment. Includes such considerations as planning I 
health and safety codes, finishes, equipment and furnishings specific to health care facilities installations. 

INT 219 Special Projects 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Permission of program chair. Students experience special projects individually or in a team situation. A signed contract must be filed witl{ 
the program chairperson prior to enrollment. 

INT 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Students work at job sites that are specifically related to career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning coursi 
credit. 

INT 281-294 Special Topics in Interior Design 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interesj 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact the program chair for more information. 

IVY 100 Prior Learning Assessment 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students an opportunity to document and present college level learning which has resulted from work/life experience. A \ 
the conclusion of this course students will submit a complete learning portfolio which consists of a request for college credits along with a detailed 
description of college level competencies for each course and documentation to support their request. 

! 

LEG 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Must be program-ready in English (both reading and writing). Introduces the beginning student to the American legal system, substan-j 
tive and procedural law, and the role of the paralegal in the legal profession. Topics include professional ethics, legal analysis and research, trial ancli 
appelate courts, civil and criminal trial procedure and brief surveys of the substantive law of torts, contracts, property and criminal law. Project; 
include an IRAC brief, library research of a statute and related case and drafting a summons, complaint and answer. 

LEG 102 Legal Research and Writing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. Introduces the student to library research resources including case reporters, digests.; 
statutes and administrative codes, registers, law encyclopedias and other secondary authorities. Students are instructed on effective research strate- > 
gies, proper citation form and Shepard's updating service. The final research and writing project is a memorandum of law. 

LEG 103 Civil Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. The first of two semesters devoted to the study of the Indiana trial rules, small claims courtj'i 
rules and local rules. (The second semester is LEG 202 - Advanced Trial Procedures.) Topics include filing requirements, the rules regarding service] 
of process and calculation of deadlines. Projects include drafting summonses, complaints, answers and various motions. 

LEG 104 Torts 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. A survey of the common law of negligence, strict liability (including products liability),) 1 
intentional torts agains persons and property, various defenses and insurance issues in tort law. Emphasis is on tort litigation practice, especially) 
personal injury law. Projects include drafting tort complaints and discovery documents. 



LEG 105 Business Associations 3 Credits 

■Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. Introduces the student to the distinguishing characteristics of sole proprietorships, 
'general and limited partnerships, limited liabiltiy companies and corporations. Topics include the formal requirements for establishing and doing 
business in each of these types of business organizations in Indiana, respective advantages and disadvantages of each type, relevant tax law issues, a 
i brief introduction to the elements of a contract, common-law doctrines of employment law and agency law. Students will review many sample 
[documents and will draft a general partnership agreement and a certificate of assumed business name. 

LEG 106 Torts and Claims Investigation 3 Credits 

! Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. Prepares the student to investigate tort claims. Instruction includes a brief survey of tort 
[law and evidence law, proper interviewing techniques, information-gathering methods and resources and investigative file preparation. Special 
[ attention is given to the importance of knowing the elements of possible causes of action and the laws of evidence at the investigative stage of a case. 
: Students will review sample complaints and forms. Projects include some legal research, preparing a demand letter, a complaint, an interview 
questionnaire, consent forms, letters requesting records and reports and a witness statement. 

LEG 107 Contracts and Commercial Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. Examines the nature of contracts under both the common law and UCC Article 2 
including contract formation, the Statute of Frauds, remedies, warranties and assignment law. The student will also be introduced to agency law, 
! employment law, negotiable instruments law (UCC Article 3), secured transactions law (UCC Article 9) and the important differences among various 
I types of business organizations. Students will examine and critique actual contracts and will have the opportunity to review Article 3 and Article 9 
documents. Written projects include critiquing a contract, drafting a contract and drafting a complaint for breach of contract. 

LEG 108 Property Law 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies. A survey of the law of real and personal property in Indiana. Introduces the student to the 
, different types of property, how ownership is acquired, estates in land, concurrent ownership, deeds, legal descriptions, easements, taxes and other 
encumberances on title, tile examination and insurance, the BFP, real estate sales and closings, mortgages and security interests, foreclosures, land- 
[ lord-tenant law, gifts, trusts, bailments and lost property. Students will examine numerous documents and will learn to draft some, including a 
I warranty deed, a mechanics lien and a complaint for foreclosure or eviction. 

LEG 202 Advanced Trial Procedures 3 Credits 

\ Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 103 - Civil Procedures. The study of Indiana trial rules pertaining to actual trial. 
. Topics include the discovery process and discovery tools, litigation support — including organization and retrieval of trial documents — techniques in 
preparing witnesses for trial and preparing jury instructions. The main project is compiling a trial notebook. 

LEG 203 Law Office Management and Technology 3 Credits 

; Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 102 - Legal Research and Writing, CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. 
Acquaints the student with various law office-specific software packages and services and their application in the law office. Through hands-on 
computer experience students work with spreadsheets, database management, timekeeping and filing, docket control, litigation support and legal 
research on the Internet and legal research computer services such as Westlaw and Lexis. 

LEG 204 Advanced Legal Writing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Should be taken in the last semester before graduation. Develops further the legal writing skills learned in Legal Research and Writing 
and in the procedural law and substantive law courses. Gives renewed emphasis to the importance of precision and accuracy in preparing correspon- 
dence, briefs and memos, litigation documents and transactional documents. To demonstrate mastery of these skills students prepare and compile 
into a portfolio examples of their best work in each category. 

LEG 209 Family Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 108 - Property Law. An introduction to the statutory laws of marriage, dissolution, 
custody (including UCCJA), visitation, support (including URESA), adoption and guardianship of minors in Indiana. Students will review many 
pleadings and intake forms and will draft a divorce petition, a financial statement and a summary decree with child-support worksheet. 

LEG 210 Wills, Trusts, and Probate 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 108 - Property Law. An introduction to the Indiana statutory law of wills, intestate 
succession, estate administration, death taxes (state and federal), trusts, power of attorney and guardianship. Students will be able to examine many 
actual probate documents and forms and will draft a will, a petition to open an estate and an inheritance tax return. 

LEG 211 Criminal Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 103 - Civil Procedures. A theoretical and practical survey of the statutory law of 
crimes, evidence and criminal procedures in Indiana including an examination of sample pleadings and motions. Topics include the elements of 
specific crimes, formal procedures for pre-trial to post-trial, actual courtroom strategies and the practical concerns involved in both the prosecution 
and defense of criminal cases. 



Course Descriptions 



LEG 212 Bankruptcy Law 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 108 - Property Law. A survey of the Federal Bankruptcy Act, including the different I 
kinds of bankruptcy proceedings. Emphasizes how to accumulate the debtor's financial information, compile initial schedules, prepare the list of 
creditors, collect and organize data for the first meeting of creditors, complete proofs of claim and pursue certain creditors' rights. The main written I 
project is preparing the forms for a Chapter 13 bankruptcy case. 

LEG 280 Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 102 - Legal Research and Writing, LEG 103 - Civil Procedures, LEG 106 - Torts and 
Claims Investigation, CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. An opportunity for the intermediate paralegal student to acquire valuable field 
experience by working gratis 120 hours (at least eight hours per week) in a local law office under attorney supervision. The student keeps a journal 
and prepares a report of his or her experience at the end of the semester. 

LEG 281-294 Special Topics in Paralegal Studies 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: LEG 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies, LEG 102 - Legal Research and Writing, LEG 103 - Civil Procedures, LEG 106 - Torts and 
Claims Investigation, LEG 202 - Advanced Trial Procedures and at least two paralegal electives. Provides students with the opportunity to attend 
seminars, workshops and other instructional activities and/or do independent study on topics of interest that reinforce the concepts taught in or 
relevant to Paralegal Studies. Requires the supervision and approval of the Paralegal Program Chair. 

LND 101 Landscape Trees 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Identifies shade, ornamental and evergreen trees and evaluates species' quality, growth habits and site adaptability. Covers 125 
species important to landscaping, tree care and turf management. 

LND 102 Shrubs and Other Plants 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Identifies 125 shrubs, vines, ground covers and herbaceous plants important to landscaping and turf management. Includes 
evaluation of growth habitats, species quality and site adaptability. 

LND 103 Landscape Management I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the practice of landscaping, tree care and turf management through lectures, slides, videos and field trips. Studies 
weed problems and their control. A large segment of the course is devoted to the study of non-pathogenic problems of landscape plants and turf, their 
pathogenic diseases and management of these problems. 

LND 104 Turf Management I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the particular growth characteristics of the grass species used in lawn areas in the midwest and Great Lakes areas. Covers 
competitive influences and how to control these problems and promote good turf. 

LND 105 Botany 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the life of a plant and cell structure; the structure and function of roots, stems, leaves, flowers and seeds; the assimilation 
of water and nutrients in the plant's growth; the states of development; and the place and importance of soils. 

LND 106 Landscape Design I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LND 101 - Landscape Trees or LND 102 - Shrubs and Other Plants. Introduces landscape drafting techniques and basic landscape 
planning for residential and small business settings utilizing the proper selection of ornamental plants consistent with design and environmental 
requirements. Included are lectures, slide and film presentations and lab work with drafting tools and equipment. 

LND 201 Landscape Management II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LND 103 Landscape Management I. Takes advantage of growing season experiences to reinforce what is taught in the prerequisite 
course by textbook and lecture. On-site observations and hands-on experiences are provided. Includes practice in the monitoring of pest problems. 

LND 202 Landscape Design II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: LND 106 Landscape Design I. Continues Landscape Design I in more sophisticated techniques such as enhancement of drawing by 
color use. Provides guidance and practice in making elevation drawings. Introduces the use of computer-aided drawings. 

LND 203 Insect Pests of Ornamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Stresses insect identification, structure and life history, and pest management of insects important to landscaping, tree care and 
turf management. 



224 Course Descriptions 



LND 204 Herbaceous Ornamentals and Grasses 3 Credits 

prerequisites: None. Stresses the identification of 125 annuals, perennials and grasses that are important to landscape management. Slides and videos 
.ntroduce a list of non-woods plants that students may encounter in operating a landscape maintenance business. Bed principles for effective landscape 
■displays will be covered. Cultural practices, propagation techniques, foliage and flower descriptions, watering, disease and insects are discussed. 

LND 205 Tree Care Practices 3 Credits 

prerequisites: LND 101 - Landscape Trees. Conveys basic knowledge and techniques used by an arborist in the care of larger mature trees. Includes 
climbing, pruning, takedowns, removals, soil relationships and fertilization, tools and equipment and safety procedures. 

LND 206 Fundamentals of Horticulture 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on the growth habits and culture of plants not particularly ornamental or frequently used in the landscape. Knowledge 
of these plants is useful to one employed in a garden center or a service organiztion where one is frequently expected to know answers to questions 
[pertaining to gardening and horticulture. 

LND 207 Soils 3 Credits 

'Prerequisites: LND 105 - Botany. Provides an overview of soil, its relationship to plant growth and its structural components in the environment. 
[Includes discussion of the living components of the soil, its structural characteristics and water and chemical relationships to fertility. Covers erosion 
.problems and their control. Includes outdoor and classroom laboratory experiences. 

LOG 101 Introduction to Materials Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies factors influencing the flow of materials in a manufacturing enterprise. Covers basics of production planning and control, 
purchasing, forecasting, inventory and distribution issues. Concludes with an overview of just-in-time theory and practices. 

LOG 201 Transportation Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides in-depth knowledge of transportation systems and their inter-relationships with our economic, social, political and 
environmental systems. 

LOG 202 Physical Distribution 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on the major concepts and rationale for utilizing warehouse inventories to lower costs of transportation, improve customer 
service, avoid stockouts, improve purchasing economics and seasonal variability. 

MEA 102 First Aid and CPR 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with information necessary to recognize emergency situations, know the proper course of action with different 
types of emergencies, and apply appropriate first aid including CPR. 

MEA 113 Pharmacology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I. Discusses the most common medications in current use with emphasis on classifications, uses, 
routes of administration, dosages, interactions, incompatibilities and side effects. Emphasizes the 50 most commonly prescribed drugs listed in Pharmacy 
Times. Addresses special precautions, legal aspects, patient education, and preparation and administration of medications. 

MEA 114 Medical Assisting Laboratory Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I. Prepares student to perform various basic laboratory procedures including preparation of patients, 
collecting and preparing appropriate specimens and expected norms of laboratory test results. Includes current safety and quality control standards. 

MEA 115 Medical Insurance 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of medical insurance programs and skills developed in handling insurance forms, CPT and ICD-9-CM Coding 
and reports as applied to the medical office. 

MEA 120 Medical Assisting Clinical Externship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Provides opportunities to observe, perform and discuss various clinical competencies under supervision, 
with learning experiences obtained in selected physician's offices, clinics or hospitals. Reviews the following basic principles of psychology as they 
apply to the medical assistant: developmental stages of the life cycle; hereditary, cultural and environmental influences on behavior; mental health; and 
applied psychology. 

MEA 121 Medical Assisting Administrative Externship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program advisor approval. Provides opportunities to observe, perform and discuss various administrative competencies under supervi- 
sion, with learning experiences obtained in selected physicians' offices, clinics or hospitals. 



Course Descriptions 



MEA 130 Medical Office Administration 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an understanding of the administrative duties and responsibilities pertinent to medical offices. Develops communications 
skills specifically directed toward a medical office and the role of the professional medical assistant as a member of the health care team. Includes ] 
instruction in medical correspondence and records, case histories of patients, filing, telephone procedures, appointment scheduling, receptionist duties 
and processing mail. Includes development of desirable personality traits, interpersonal relationships and attitudes within the medical office. 

MEA 131 Medical Financial Management with Computer Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides instruction in medical office financial administration, bookkeeping and materials management. 

MEA 132 Computer Concepts in the Medical Office 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Keyboard 25 WPM. Familiarizes students with computer applications in the health care setting. Provides students with basics of opera- 
tions and applications of computer usages within the health care provider office. Includes simulated data entry for patient records, procedures and 
diagnostic codes, insurance processing, and electronic transmission of claims and scheduling day-sheet transactions in accordance with the AAMA 
DACUM guidelines. 

MEA 133 Clinical Theory 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents theory related to clinical aspects of the medical office. Includes theory related to vital signs, asepsis, sterilization, medica- 
tion administration, EKG's, X-ray, nutrition, physical therapy and other skills needed to assist the physician in the clinical setting. 

MEA 134 Clinical Skills Lab 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Allows students to become familiar with clinical duties and gain the skills needed to perform them. Includes vital signs, asepsis, 
sterilization, medications, EKGs, X-ray, nutrition, physical therapy and other technical skills needed to assist the physician. 

MEA 135 Medical Word Processing/Transcription 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Keyboard 25 WPM. Develops skills and knowledge of medical dictation, machine transcription and use of word processors and typewrit- 
ers. Includes typing and transcription of medical reports, terminology and correspondence. 

MEA 136 Office Administration with Computer Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstration of computer keyboard skills through test out on speed, accuracy and formatting or OAD 019 - Keyboarding. Provides 
a basic understanding of the administrative duties and responsibilities pertinent to medical offices. Includes instruction in medical correspondence 
and records, case histories of patients, filing, telephone procedures, appointment scheduling, receptionist duties and processing mail. Familiarizes 
the student with computer applications in the health care setting. Provides the student with basics of operations and application of computer usage 
within the health care provider office. Includes simulated data entry for patient records, appointment scheduling and daysheet transactions. 

MEA 137 Medical Insurance and Basic Coding with Computer Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HHS 101 - Medical Terminology and demonstration of computer keyboard skills through test out on speed, accuracy and formatting or 
OAD 019 - Keyboarding. Provides an overview of medical insurance programs and the skills needed in handling insurance forms, CPT and 1CD-9- 
CM Coding and insurance reports as applied to the medical office. Includes simulated computer data entry for patient records, procedure and 
diagnostic codes, insurance processing and electronic transmission of claims. 

MEA 138 Clinical I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites or Corequisites: HHS 101 - Medical Terminology, currently CPR trained (Health Care Provider) or HHS 104 - CPR and Basic Health 
Awareness and MEA advisor approval. Presents theory and lab related to clinical aspects of the medical office. Provides students with information 
necessary to recognize emergency situations, know the proper course of action with different types of emergencies and apply appropriate first aid. 
Allows students to become familiar with clinical duties and to gain the skills needed to perform them. Includes vital signs, asepsis, stenlization, 
nutrition and treatment room procedures. 

MEA 139 Clinical II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites or Corequisites: MEA 138 - Clinical I and MEA advisor approval. Presents a continuation of clinical skills and theory and allows the 
student to become familiar with the following clinical duties: medications, EKGs, X-ray, physical therapy, respiratory testing and other technical skills 
needed to assist the physician. 

MEA 140 Basic Home Health Aide Training 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents knowledge considered necessary for providing a general range of home health aide services. Addresses care for a variety 
of patient populations and focuses on theory behind home health skills. 



226 Course Descriptions 



MEA 141 Advanced Home Health Aide Training 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 140 - Basic Home Health Aide Training. Presents advanced topics related to care for homebound clients. Criteria for safely and 
accurately performing a variety of home health aide skills will be explored. Skills required to function as a home health aide will be taught and evaluated 
through competency check-offs. Experience at a home health agency employing home health aides is included. 

MEA 142 Body Systems and Disease 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents basic concepts of anatomy and physiology along with the study of disease. Includes signs and symptoms of diseases and 
their impact on the function of various body systems. Explores maintaining optimal health in the presence of a disease. Includes discussion of patients 
role in the management of the disease process. 

MEA 143 Home Health Care Terminology 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Explores a system of analysis for basic medical terms. Includes practice in correct spelling of medical terms along with exploration 
of various medical abbreviations. Emphasizes medical terms and abbreviations specific to the home health care forum. 

MEA 151 Pharmacy Technician I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces basic skills and information needed to qualify as a Pharmacy Technician in the state of Indiana. 

MEA 152 Pharmacy Technician II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 050 - Basic Algebra or demonstrated competency through appropriate assessment and MEA 151 - Pharmacy Technician I. Theory 
is applied through performance of competency levels of the technical pharmacy task including: properly preparing, documenting and processing 
prescriptions according to pharmacy policy and regulations; preparing intravenous and special solutions; properly preparing and maintaining records 
appropriate to the pharmacy, including quality control records, controlled substances (narcotic drug distribution), prescription data and records; apply- 
ing basic principles of microbiology, using aseptic techniques; and operating and maintaining the laminar hood. The student will employ proper 
communication skills (both written and verbal). Identification and adherence to check points will be emphasized. Current national and Indiana law and 
administrative rules as they relate to the practice of the pharmacy technician will be presented. The importance of adherence to universal precautions will 
| be discussed. 

| MEA 153 Administrative Aspects of Pharmacy Technology 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Addresses the administrative aspect of pharmacy technology including professional development, professional communication, 
time management, record keeping, computer applications, third party payment processing, operation of business machines and utilization of reference 
material. 

MEA 154 Pharmacy Externship 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 151 - Pharmacy Technician I. Provides the opportunity to discuss and perform clinical procedures under supervision, with learning 
experiences obtained in selected retail pharmacies and/or hospitals. 

MEA 160 - Massage Technician Training I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides information about the anatomy and physiology of skeletal, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory and muscular 
systems. Includes information of different styles, techniques and viewpoints of massage. Demonstrates in detail the physiological effects of circulatory 
massage strokes. Includes the proper care and use of equipment and supplies. Adequate supervision during lab practices is provided. 

MEA 161 Massage Technician Training II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 160 - Massage Technician Training 1. Continues with instruction offered in Massage Technician Training I. Addresses additional 
techniques and modalities including deep friction, joint mobilization, percussion, compression (pumping), vibration, jostling, shaking and rocking. 
Introduces corporate (chair) massage. Introduces energy systems. Discusses guidelines for setting up a practice including compliance with local and 
state regulations. 

MEA 162 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Massage Therapy 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Addresses the ethics of massage therapy along with legal requirements and implications for massage technicians and therapists. 
Includes relationships with other health care practitioners and involvement and responsibilities in community projects. 

MEA 163 Holistic Approach to Massage Therapy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Considers the holistic approach to wellness with discussion including the connection of disease, the autonomic nervous system 
and the emotions. Explores the importance of the mind-body connection. Includes hygiene for both the client and therapist. 

MEA 164 Human Energies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Discusses communication skills, including verbal and nonverbal, body language and intuition. Helps the student develop an 
understanding of body circuits and energy transference. 



Cot RSI. Descri 



MEA 165 Acupressure Theory and Methods 3 Credits 

i 
Prerequisites: None. Introduces the student to information and treatments designed around the approach of Asian medicine, including energy 

systems, meridians and the five elements theory. Includes the basics of Shiatsu. 

MEA 167 Deep Tissue/Muscle Release 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Helps practitioners apply deeper techniques in body therapy, releasing chronically held tissue from past trauma, illness or recent 
injury. Discusses the use of various treatment modalities. Deep-tissue techniques include releasing the muscles and tissues of the upper body, 
including the sternocleidomastoid muscles and the pectorals. Other techniques included are defining the clavicle and releasing the attachment to the 
scapula, "lengthening the back," defining the iliac crest and sacrum and releasing the gluteals. 

MEA 168 Hydro/Thermodynamics 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the uses of water, heat and cold therapies, liniments, ointments and oils to promote healing. 

MEA 169 Administrative Training 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a basic understanding of the administrative responsibilities pertinent to massage therapy. Addresses computer usage, 
marketing and office skills that will allow students to create, promote and maintain their own businesses. 

MEA 203 Disease Conditions 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents the basic concepts of diseases, their course, and functional disturbances as they relate to body systems. Includes the 
precipitating risk factors and appropriate methods of patient education regarding various disease processes. 

MEA 209 Electrocardiograph - Basic Technique 1 Credit 

Corequisites: MEA 210 - Introduction to EKG Interpretation. Presents the basic reasons for prescribing an electrocardiograph and the theory involved. 
The physiological principles involved are the basis for proper techniques that will be practiced by the students until they demonstrate competency with 
both the theory and required skills in doing a prescribed electrocardiograph. 

MEA 210 Introduction to EKG Interpretation 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Includes anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system and recognition of basic arrhythmias. Measurement of the EKG 
complex will be taught with the emphasis placed upon determining heart rates and rhythms. 

MEA 211 Advanced Electrocardiograph Interpretation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 210 - Introduction to EKG Interpretation. Includes anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, interpretation of rhythm 
strips and 12 lead EKGs and the cardiovascular drugs associated with arrhythmias. 

MEA 212 Phlebotomy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 114 - Medical Assisting Laboratory Techniques or program advisor approval. Presents the principles and practices of laboratory 
specimen collection and processing! Also covers medical terminology, infection control, patient identification, anatomy and physiology, anticoagulants, 
blood collection, specimen processing and interpersonal skills. 

MEA 213 Advanced Insurance Coding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 115 - Medical Insurance or program advisor approval. Introduces the medical office administrator to codes necessary to bill | 
insurance claims and provides experience in coding claim forms using the correct combination of codes to maximize reimbursement. 

MEA 214 Advanced First Aid and CPR 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with information necessary to recognize emergency situations, know the proper course of action with different 
types of emergencies and apply appropriate first aid. Handling of victims of hazardous materials accidents will be addressed. Covers CPR including one 
and two rescuer. Teaches adult, infant, and child resuscitation. 

MEA 215 Advanced Medical Terminology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: HHS 101 - Medical Terminology. Includes more detailed and advanced study of the derivatives of medical terms, symbols, and signs. 
Presents an in-depth study of the correlation between medical vocabulary and the application of those terms to the anatomy and physiology of the body, 
related diseases, conditions and treatment. 

MEA 216 Nutrition 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents the importance of a balanced diet; methods of evaluating a diet; the basic four food groups; the functions, requirements 
and food sources of fats, proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals and the deficiency diseases. Introduces meal planning, nutrition for various age 
groups, religious and nationality food habits and diet therapy. Explains special diets for diabetes, diseases of the GI tract, urinary tract, blood, cardiovas- 
cular system, obesity, cancer, allergy and pregnancy. 



228 Course Descriptions 



MEA 217 Gerontology 3 Credits 

|j Prerequisites: None. Presents a multidisciplinary study of the sociological, psychological and physiological aspects of aging. Included will be patient 
I education and the impact that all facets of aging have on the total person. 

MEA 221 Seminar 1 1 Credit 

| Prerequisites: None. Discusses topics of current interest in the medical assisting profession. Attention is given to special interest projects for students in 
I the medical assistant program. Field trips, guest speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars may be utilized. 

MEA 222 Seminar II 2 Credits 

! Prerequisites: None. Discusses topics of current interest in the medical assisting profession. Attention is given to special interest projects for students in 
the medical assistant program. Field trips, guest speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars may be utilized. 

MEA 223 Seminar III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Discusses topics of current interest in the medical assisting profession. Attention is given to special interest projects for students in 
the medical assistant program. Field trips, guest speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars may be utilized. 

MEA 224 Hospital Coding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 213 - Advanced Insurance Coding or advisor approval. Builds on the comprehensive coding skills acquired through prerequisite 
■ course MEA 213. Introduces additional instruction in diagnostic related groups (DRG's) and medical record extraction. Provides discussion, observation 
and performance opportunities in related insurance coding competencies. Both classroom and clinical sites are used to provide realistic experiences 
under supervision. External sites include physicians' offices, clinics and hospitals. 

MEA 225 Insurance Coding Externship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Provides opportunities to observe, perform, and discuss various insurance related competencies under supervision, 
with learning experience obtained in selected physicians' offices, clinics, or hospitals. 

MEA 226 Medical Assisting - Advanced Clinical Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 133 - Clinical Theory and MEA 134 - Clinical Skills Lab. Advances the knowledge and skills enabling the student to assist in clinical 
management in the medical and surgical specialties. Addresses health services in the community which are directed toward prevention of disease and 
maintenance and restoration of health. 

MEA 227 Advanced Administrative Procedures 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 130 - Medical Office Administration. Provides an in-depth study of various influences on office functions concerning organization 
and management of a physicians office. Includes government and professional sources for consultation. 

MEA 228 Ophthalmic Dispensing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Includes the study of frame types and parts, facial measurements for fitting, functional and cosmetic aspects of frame selection, and 
frame alignment, adjusting and repair. Contact lenses, types, care, insertion and removal methods, modifications, polishing, and patient evaluation and 
education also are covered. 

MEA 229 Nurse Aide Procedures and Practicum 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Prepares beginning level nurse aides with the knowledge, skills and attitudes essential for providing basic nursing care. Students 
who pass this course will receive a Nurse Aide Certificate. (Note: Contact hours are specified by the Indiana State Board of Health.) 

MEA 230 Structure and Function of the Eye 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Familiarizes the student with the structure and function of the human eye. Pathological conditions will also be covered. 

MEA 231 Basic Optics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Acquaints the student with basic optical principles. Fundamental properties of lenses and mirrors and how they relate to the 
correction of visual problems will be discussed. Types of optical defects commonly associated with vision will be covered. The student will be introduced 
to optometric instrumentation, fundamental soft lens formulas and visual field screening. 

MEA 232 Clinical Optometric/Ophthalmic Practicum 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. This "hands on" field experience allows the student to put into practice, under supervision, skills and knowledge obtained in class 
and labs. 



Course Descriptions 



MEA 233 Health Unit Coordinator 5 Credits ! SI 

I 
Prerequisites: None. Prepares students to provide reception and clerical support to the nursing unit to iacilitate the delivery of nursing care. Students | & 
will gain skills in communication methods, problem solving, transcription processes, classification of orders and appropriate documentation procedures. 1 1 

MEA 234 Phlebotomy Externship 3 Credits | N 

Prerequisites: MEA 212 - Phlebotomy. Provides the opportunity to discuss and perform phlebotomy procedures under supervision with learning I ?: 
experiences obtained in selected laboratories, physicians' offices, clinics or hospitals. 

MEA 235 Advanced Transcription 3 Credits I ! 

Prerequisites: MEA 135 - Medical Wordprocessmg/Transcription. Improves accuracy and speed of the medical transcriptionist utilizing various formats I I 
for medical transcription. 

MEA 260 Advanced Acupressure 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 165 - Acupressure Theory and Methods. Focuses on the advanced theory and practice of acupressure and Asian medicine. i . 

MEA 261 Reflexology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Teaches the different aspects and points on the foot and hand relating to other parts of the body. Can be integrated into massage I 
practice or can be an independent approach. Includes an introduction to the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and nervous systems and their 
relationship to the zones on the feet. Systems disorders including the sensory and the endocrine are also identified and discussed. Identifies the 
relationship of the five zones of the foot and the areas of the spine with spinal nerve enervation and intervention. 

MEA 262 Sports Therapy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Presents an advanced course in sports massage designed to train the therapist techniques for therapy on athletes. Includes post/ 
pre-event techniques with increased stretching and deep muscle release. 

MEA 263 Infant Massage 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Teaches the therapist massage techniques for infants. 

MEA 264 Aroma Therapy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Teaches the therapist the integration of essential oils and aroma therapy into massage techniques. 

MEA 265 Advanced Techniques and Hygiene 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MEA 160 - Massage Technician Training I, MEA 161 - Massage Technician Training II. Provides the student with advanced training 
focusing on techniques, body mechanics and client management. Addresses hygiene factors for both the therapist and the client. Includes thorough 
client assessment techniques and is designed to expand the therapist into the medical field. Discusses the relationship of various illnesses and 
conditions to massage. 

MEA 281-294 Special Topics in Medical Assistant 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics 
of interest that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

MEA 299 CMA Comprehensive Review 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: Advisor approval. Reviews the entire medical assisting program in preparation for the CMA registry examination. 
Administration, clinical and general information are covered. Testing procedures are addressed. Emphasis is placed on job readiness and placement. 
The course earns continuing education units for graduate CMAs to fulfill their certification renewal requirements. 

MFG 260 Advanced Problem Solving Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Minimum 45 credits of general education and Manufacturing coursework completed or advisor approval. This course is generally part 
of the capstone experience for students who are ready to graduate from the Manufacturing Technology program. The course should draw from a 
broad spectrum of the student's prior course work and integrate concepts of manufacturing into a project-oriented class. Concepts found in the 
SCANS 2000 report are integral to the course. Teamwork, communication skills, problem solving, fundamental concepts of complexity theory 
relating to systems operations, etc. are relevant topics. 

MFG 280 Co-op/Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minimum of 30 credits toward their degrees with at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. Gives 
students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit 
toward an associate degree. 



230 Course Descriptions 



MKT 101 Principles of Marketing 3 Credits 

.Prerequisites: None. Introduces the marketing role in society and how it affects the marketing strategy. Emphasizes the marketing mix, product 
•planning, and the effects of the demographic dimension on the consumer market. 

MKT 102 Principles of Selling 3 Credits 

^Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of the selling process. Includes the psychology of selling and develops skills through a series of selling 
situations. 

MKT 104 Promotion Management 3 Credits 

i! Prerequisites: None. Presents management planning and oversight techniques for effectively communicating the results of the marketing strategy to 
! customers. Provides a comprehensive overview of promotion methods as they interact in the marketing mix, which includes price, channel of distribu- 
i don and product. Everything the company does has potential for promotional impact for the customers, which therefore requires effective management 
to pursue its marketing objectives in the target market. 

MKT 110 Consumer Behavior 3 Credits 

i Prerequisites or Corequisites: MKT 101 - Principles of Marketing. Study of the basic principles of consumer behavior which offers insight into the 
!' buyer-seller relationship. Application of theories from psychology, social psychology, and economics are examined. Course examines concepts that have 
' implications for marketing management decisions. 

MKT 201 Introduction to Market Research 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MKT 101 - Principles of Marketing and MAT 1 12 - Functional Mathematics or MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra. Presents basic research 
methods entailing procedures, questionnaire design, data analysis, and effectively communicating research results. 

MKT 202 Logistics/Purchasing Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MKT 101 - Principles of Marketing or BUS 101 - Introduction to Business. Introduces students to the framework of logistics, the logistics 
environment, customer services and matenals management. Introduces material resources planning (MRP) and just-in-time (JIT) principles. 

MKT 204 Marketing Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Departmental approval. Focuses on the analysis, implementation and control of marketing strategy Emphasizes the major decisions 
management faces in its effort to harmonize the objectives and resources of the organization with the needs and opportunities of the marketplace. 

MKT 205 Principles of Insurance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the risks faced by business firms including property, liability and personal losses, and how they are handled. Presents 
insurance contracts and their uses. Includes an overview of life insurance, health and pension insurance, public policy, government regulations, and 
social insurance. 

MKT 207 Public Relations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides broad coverage of the public relations field and acquaints students with the role of effective internal and external public 
relations in business and industry. Examines the goals and benefits of public relations, the tools of the public relations practitioner, and the principles and 
trends of the field. 

MKT 219 Field Study/Cooperative Education 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides field experience 
within the framework of actual work experience in marketing. 

MKT 220 Principles of Retailing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MKT 101 -Principles of Marketing and MAT 112 - Functional Mathematics or MAT 111 - Intermediate Algebra. Studies retailing concepts 
and practices including retail merchandise planning, buying, pricing, promotion and control in established retail operations. Attention is given to 
managerial and operational skills. 

MKT 240 Internet Marketing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers, MKT 101 - Principles of Marketing. Provides an introduction to the Internet as a marketing 
strategy including product, pricing, communication and distribution considerations. Profiles Internet users and market segments and reviews the 
Internet as a primary and secondary marketing research tool as well as a relationship marketing tool. Incorporates marketing implementation and 
planning strategies. Discusses legal and ethical issues in Internet marketing. 

MLT 102 Routine Analysis Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Studies principles, practices and clinical laboratory techniques associated with routine analysis of urine and other body 
fluids. 



Course Descriptions 



MLT 103 Fundamentals of Laboratory Techniques 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Introduces elementary skills required in the medical laboratory. Covers laboratory math, quality control, pipetting 
skills, veinipuncture techniques and microscope skills. 

MLT 196 Introduction to Patient Care and Phlebotomy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the health care delivery system. Provides instruction in specimen collection techniques, infection control and safety, and 
teaches applications of communications concepts and stress management. 

MLT 197 Clinical Phlebotomy Experience 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the practice and demonstration of clinical applications of phlebotomy in the clinical setting. 

MLT 198 Clinical Phlebotomy Discussion 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: None. Develops the professional socialization process necessary to function in a health care setting and reviews routine and special 
phlebotomy procedures in light of phlebotomist-patient interaction. 

MLT 201 Immunology Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Student is in good standing and currently enrolled in the MLT program. Provides students with an understanding of principles of the 
human immunologic system and experience in routine testing. 

MLT 202 Immunohematology Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MLT 201 - Immunology Techniques. Instructs students in practice and procedures used in blood banking in the clinical laboratory. 

MLT 203 Instrumentation 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Student is in good standing and currently enrolled in MLT program. Includes instrumentation theory and practice as applied to electronic 
equipment and automated systems in the medical laboratory. 

MLT 205 Hematology Techniques I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Student is in good standing and currently enrolled in MLT program and MLT 101 - Fundamentals of Laboratory Techniques. Presents 
theory of blood formation and function and routine hematologic procedures with emphasis on differentiation of normal from commonly encountered 
abnormal blood cells. Includes basic theory of hemostasis and associated routine coagulation procedures. Presents clinicopathologic correlations. 

MLT 206 Hematology Techniques II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Student is in good standing and currently enrolled in MLT program and MLT 205 - Hematology Techniques I. Continues the study of 
principles and procedures in hematology and hemostasis. Introduces procedures beyond those routinely performed. Continues cell differentiation with 
emphasis on early and less commonly encountered abnormal cells and associated special stains. Includes clinicopathologic correlations. 

MLT 207 Chemistry Techniques I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Corequisite: MLT 101 - Fundamentals of Laboratory Techniques. Presents principles, procedures and clinicopathologic correla- 
tions in routine chemical analysis of the blood and other body fluids. Provides laboratory experiences in basic methods selected to develop routine 
analytical abilities and to promote the ability to recognize sources of error. 

MLT 209 Routine Analysis Applications 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: MLT 102 - Routine Analysis Techniques. Studies clinical applications of routine urine analysis in the hospital laboratory including 
physical, chemical and microscopic examination of urine. 

MLT 210 Hematology Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MLT 206 - Hematology Techniques II. Studies and practices the principles and techniques of hematology in the hospital laboratory. 

MLT 212 Immunology Applications 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: MLT 201 - Immunology Techniques. Studies and practices the clinical application of serology in the hospital laboratory. 

MLT 213 Immunohematology Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MLT 202 - Immunohematology Techniques. Studies and practices the principles and procedures used in blood banking in the hospital 
laboratory. 

MLT 215 Parasitology and Mycology 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Student must be in good standing and currently enrolled in MLT program and MLT 222 - Microbiology Techniques. Provides study in the 
isolation, identification, life cycles and disease processes of pathogenic fungi and parasites. 



232 Course Descriptions 



MLT 218 Clinical Pathology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Student must be enrolled in the MLT program and have a GPA of C or above. Examines various disease conditions, diagnosis, etiologies, 
(clinical symptoms and related laboratory findings. 

MLT 221 Microbiology Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MLT 222 - Microbiology Techniques. Studies applications and clinical practices of microbiology found in the hospital laboratory. 

MLT 222 Microbiology Techniques 3 Credits 

jPrerequisites: Student is in good standing and currently enrolled in MLT program and BIO 211 - General Microbiology or equivalent recommended. 
(Instructs students in principles of bacteriology including gram negative and positive bacilli and cocci, fastidious organisms and an overview of anaerobic 
ijand acid-fast bacteria. Includes instruction in the basic laboratory techniques in clinical bacteriology. 

MLT 224 Chemistry Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MLT 207 - Chemistry Techniques I. Corequisites: MLT 227 - Chemistry Techniques II. Studies and practices the analytical aspects of 
clinical chemistry in the hospital laboratory. 

MLT 227 Chemistry Techniques II 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: MLT 207 - Chemistry Techniques I. Continues the study of principles, procedures and clinicopathologic correlations in the chemical 
analysis of blood and other body fluids. Introduces procedures beyond those routinely performed in the clinical chemistry laboratory including clinico- 
pathologic correlations. 

MLT 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the- 
job experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

MTT 101 Introduction to Machining 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Instructs students in shop safety, industrial terminology, tools and machine tooling, measurement and layout. Includes laboratory 
exercises to begin project completion of turning, milling and grinding applications. 

MTT 102 Turning Processes I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Instructs students in shop safety and industrial terminology and provides laboratory expenence toward project completion on the 
conventional lathe. 

MTT 103 Milling Processes I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Instructs students in shop safety and industrial terminology and provides laboratory experience towards project completion on the 
vertical and/or horizontal milling machine. 

MTT 104 Machinery Handbook 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Equivalent of MTT 101 - Introduction to Machining and its prerequisites as determined by advisor. Explores the intent and use of the 
machinery handbook. Applies principles and concepts in the machinery handbook to projects in the industry. 

MTT 106 Advanced Print Interpretation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 101 - Introduction to Machining or advisor approval. Applies mathematics in solving engineering and design-related problems in the 
areas of die design, fabrication, assembly, special machinery, die casting and molds. Emphasizes GDT tolerancing. 

MTT 110 Turning and Milling Processes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 101 - Manufacturing Processes, recommend MTT 101 - Introduction to Machining. Provides shop safety, industrial terminology and 
laboratory experiences on conventional lathe and milling machines. 

MTT 202 Advanced Turning Processes II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 102 - Turning Processes I or MTT 110 - Turning and Milling Processes and its prerequisites as determined by advisor. Instructs 
students in shop safety and industrial terminology. 

MTT 203 Milling Processes II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 103 - Milling Processes I or MTT 110 - Turning and Milling Processes. Covers shop safety, industrial terminology and provides 
advanced laboratory experience towards project completion on the vertical and/or horizontal milling machine. 



Course Descriptions 



MTT 204 Abrasive Processes I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 101 - Manufacturing Processes. Provides shop safety, industrial terminology and laboratory experiences on abrasive processing 
machines. Includes superabrasives technology processes. 

MTT 205 Abrasive Processes II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 204 - Abrasive Processes I. Emphasizes shop safety, industrial terminology and provides advanced laboratory experience towards 
project completion on a variety of abrasive processing machines. 

MTT 206 Tooling Design I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 1 10 - Turning and Milling Processes. Introduces concepts of tooling design, assembly and standards of fabrication. Emphasizes jig 
and fixture design/components, application and operational characteristics. 

MTT 207 Tooling Design II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 206 - Tooling Design I. Covers concepts of tooling design, assembly and standards of fabrication. Emphasizes blanking, piercing and 
progressive type dies, design/components including application and operational charactenstics. 

MTT 208 CNC Programming I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 121 - Geometry-Trigonometry or MAT 131 - Algebra/Tngonometry I or advisor approval. Introduces two and three axis CNC 
machining. Develops the theory of programming in the classroom with application of the program accomplished on industry-type machines. Studies 
terminology of coordinates, cutter paths, angle cutting, and linear and circular interpolation. 

MTT 209 CNC Programming II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 208 - CNC Programming 1 or advisor approval. Expands on MTT 208, providing further study in computer-aided numerical control 
programming. Focuses on canned cycles, loops, macros, thread cycles, drilling and pocket milling cycles. 

MTT 210 Interactive CNC 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 106 - Advanced Print Interpretation, MTT 208 - CNC Programming I, MAT 121 - Geometry-Trigonometry, and computer competen- 
cies as determined by advisor. Continues MTT 209 - CNC Programming II. Introduces advanced applications of computer-assisted part programming 
and simulation, language codes set-up and operation, troubleshooting and problem solving in a CNC turning center and CNC matching center. Includes 
related mathematical skills. 

MTT 211 Advanced Programming Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 210 - Interactive CNC. Includes the application of advanced CNC programming techniques to industrial machining. Uses down- 
loading and uploading techniques through advanced projects. 

MTT 220 CAD/CAM I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 208 - CNC Programming I, DCT 113 - Intermediate CAD, DSN 220 - Advanced CAD, or equivalent as determined by advisor. 
Covers the development of various machine routines. Introduces computer-assisted machining as it relates to automated milling and machining centers. 
Emphasizes proper programming techniques, control familiarity file data and machining functions. 

MTT 221 CAD/CAM II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 220 - CAD/CAM I or equivalent as determined by advisor. Covers the development of 3-D shapes and the codes necessary to produce 
parts. Requires students to design a new product or modify an existing design. Includes creating surface curves. Focuses on creating toolpaths for 
complex 3D surfaces. 

MTT 225 Introduction to Mold Making 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces the apprentice mold maker to the basic fundamentals of mold construction. Discusses the fundamental processes 
and basic construction of plastic molds, molds for die casting and rubber molds. 

MTT 240 Machining Operations I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 101 - Introduction to Machining, TEC 101 - Manufacturing Processes. Continues MTT 101 - Introduction to Machining. 
Students will gain additional lab experience on the drill press, lathe, milling machine, surface grinder, o.d. grinder, tool post grinder and jig grinder. 
Measurement, layout and inspection are performed at the advanced level. Classroom activities concentrate on cutting tool terminology, screw thread 
terminology, taper calculations and the Machinery Handbook. Heat treating is also covered. 



234 Course Descriptions 



MTT 241 Machining Operations II 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 101 - Introduction to Machining and MTT 102 - Turning Processes I. Emphasizes basic tool construction and close tolerance 
machining. Using the various types of equipment found in the laboratory, students rough machine, heat treat and precision grind detailed parts to 
tolerance of within .0005" consistently. Classroom activities concentrate on precision setup, inspection work and basic tool construction. Experience 
is also gained in basic conversational CNC programming. 

MTT 242 CNC Machining 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 208 - CNC Programming I, MTT 241 - Machining Operations II, DSN 103 - CAD Fundamentals, DCT 227 - Geometric Dimen- 
sioning and Tolerancing. Introduces and instructs the student in all aspects of Computer Numeric Control (CNC) machining. The student will 
program, set up and operate CNC mills and lathes utilizing CAD/CAM for fixture and part design and verification. Students continually improve 
programming, set up and cycle time efficiency Students inspect and document the quality of production parts and compare their performance with 
an industry benchmark for each project. 

MTT 243 Tool & Die Making I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 101 - Introduction to Machining, MTT 102 - Turning Processes I, MTT 103 - Milling Processes I, MTT 208 - CNC Programming 
I. Focuses on construction of a two-state progressive die that incorporates interchangeable details. Each student manufactures a die that incorporates 
the parting principle and performs the following operations: forming, piercing and parting. In addition, lecture material covers computations on 
blank lengths and diameters, blanking and piercing operations, drawing, progression and timing. Experience is gained in CNC machining and 
progressive die troubleshooting. 

MTT 244 Tool & Die Making II 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: MTT 101 - Introduction to Machining, MTT 102 - Turning Processes I, MTT 103 - Milling Processes I, MTT 208 - CNC Programming 
I, MTT 21 1 - Advanced Programming Techniques. Requires extensive detail work in machining as well as die making. Each student constructs die 
details that perform trimming, notching, piercing, piloting, forming and parting. Machining operations of die sections involves grinding of compli- 
cated contours as well as the use of the wire e.d.m. Additional experience is gained in programming/operation of CNC milling equipment. 

NUR 150 Nursing and Universal Needs 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to program. Corequisites: NUR 151 - Nursing and Universal Needs Practicum. Provides fundamental facts, concepts, 
principles and rationales necessary to meet universal healthcare needs. Introduces the five components of the nursing process and the roles of the 
associate degree nurse. 

NUR 151 Nursing and Universal Needs Practicum 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to program. Corequisites: NUR 150 - Nursing and Universal Needs. Simulated and actual patient care situations provide an 
opportunity to develop interpersonal and psychomotor skills. Initiates a beginning level of assessing, analyzing, planning, implementing and evaluating 
therapeutic measures in meeting basic universal healthcare needs. Provides an opportunity in the laboratory and clinical setting to explore the role of the 
associate degree nurse. 

NUR 152 Nursing Related to Health Deviation I 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 150 - Nursing and Universal Needs and NUR 151 - Nursing and Universal Needs Practicum. Corequisites: NUR 153 - Nursing 
Related to Health Deviation I Practicum. Defines the role of the associate degree nurse in assisting clients experiencing health deviations related to 
nutrition/elimination, rest/activity, safety and homeostasis. The nursing process is utilized to promote, maintain and restore health or support death with 
dignity in the adult client. 

NUR 153 Nursing Related to Health Deviation I Practicum 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 150 - Nursing and Universal Needs and NUR 151 - Nursing and Universal Needs Practicum. Corequisites: NUR 152 - Nursing 
Related to Health Deviation I. Provides experience that enables the student to progress in the role of the associate degree nurse when providing care to 
adult clients experiencing health deviations. The nursing process guides the application of scientific facts, concepts, principles and rationales in the 
delivery of nursing care. Psychomotor skills and appropriate therapeutic communication are emphasized. 

NUR 154 Pharmacotherapeutics 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to program. Introduces the student to the fundamental principles of drug action, the classification of drugs and the appropriate 
nursing actions to achieve the desired outcomes of therapy. The nursing process as a framework for learning is integrated throughout the course. 

NUR 248 Transition to ASN Nursing 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to program, ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I, ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II, ENG 111 - English Composition, 
MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra, PSY 101 - Introduction to Psychology, current Indiana LPN license, and official transcript from PN program. Examines 
the role of the associate degree nurse. Identifies components of the ASN program philosophy. Reviews the facts, concepts and principles underlying the 
nursing process. Laboratory and clinical experience is provided to review basic nursing skills and assist the student in identifying appropriate nursing 
responses to health deviation needs. 



Course Diiscriptions 



NUR 250 Nursing Related to Health Deviation II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 152 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation Needs I and NUR 153 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation Needs I Practicum. 
Corequisites: NUR 25 1 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation II Practicum. Defines the role of the associate degree nurse in assisting clients experiencing 
health deviations related to oxygenation, social interaction/solitude and continued health deviations of safety and homeostasis. The nursing process with 
emphasis on planning, intervention and evaluation is utilized to promote, maintain and restore health or support death with dignity in the adult client. 
Leadership skills and advanced therapeutic communication are also emphasized. 

NUR 251 Nursing Related to Health Deviation II Practicum 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 152 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation I and NUR 153 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation I Practicum. Corequisites: NUR 
250 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation II. Provides experiences that allow the student to further refine the role of the associate degree nurse in 
providing care to clients experiencing health deviations. The nursing process guides the application of scientific facts, concepts and principles in the 
delivery of nursing care. Leadership skills and advanced therapeutic communication are also applied. 

NUR 252 Nursing Related to Developmental Needs 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 152 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation I and NUR 153 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation I Practicum. Corequisites: NUR 
253 - Nursing Related to Developmental Needs Practicum. Identifies the role of the associate degree nurse in assisting clients to meet their developmental 
needs which includes the maintenance of conditions to support life processes and maturation. Utilizes the nursing process with emphasis on planning, 
implementation and evaluation. It will be utilized to evaluate therapeutic measures that promote, maintain, and restore health or support death with 
dignity. 

NUR 253 Nursing Related to Developmental Needs Practicum 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: NUR 152 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation I and NUR 153 - Nursing Related to Health Deviation I Practicum. Corequisites: NUR 
252 - Nursing Related to Developmental Needs. Provides experiences that allow the student to further refine the role of the associate degree nurse when 
providing care to the childbearing and childbearing family experiencing developmental needs which includes the maintenance of conditions to support 
life processes and maturation. The nursing process guides the application of scientific facts, concepts, principles and rationales in the delivery of nursing 
care. Decision making and appropriate therapeutic communication are also emphasized. 

NUR 254 Professional Nursing Issues 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of previous semester. Examines issues and nursings responsibility to meet changing needs of persons in their i 
environment. Historical aspects, current developments, future trends, improvement of nursing practice, legal/ethical considerations, and personal/ 
professional growth are integrated into the examination of the role of the associate degree nurse. 

NUR 260 Understanding Pathophysiology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides basic and easy to understand information about pathophysiological mechanisms and manifestations of disease. Builds ] 
on the concepts mastered in anatomy and physiology and nursing theory courses. 

OAD 019 Keyboarding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the fundamentals of keyboarding using the touch method. Emphasizes mastery of the keyboard, develop- 
ment of formatting skills and development of speed and accuracy 

OAD 029 Speed and Accuracy Development 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: OAD 019 - Keyboarding. Designed to diagnose individual keyboarding speed and accuracy skills and bring those skills to an employable 
level. 

OAD 103 Word Processing Applications 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Typing proficiency of 30 GWAM and basic formatting, or OAD advisor approval. Introduces the concepts of word processing systems. 
Offers hands-on experience in the operation of a specific word processing software package. 

OAD 108 Shorthand/Notetaking I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. This course introduces basic principles of a note-taking system. Emphasis is placed on note-taking techniques, legibility, and 
mastery of the basic vocabulary. Dictation and transcription of material is included. 

OAD 110 Presentation Graphics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or equivalent. Provides "hands-on" expenence and familiarizes students with specific advanced 
design and layout techniques and practical applications of business presentations. 



236 Course Descriptions 



- 



OAD 1 14 Desktop Publishing 3 Credits 

rerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or equivalent. Emphasizes the production of publication-quality documents. Attention is 
;iven to design and layout principles and production techniques. Fonts, graphics and page composition are integrated into camera-ready documents 
Using computer software and hardware. 

OAD 116 Essentials of Business Correspondence 3 Credits 

{Prerequisites: ENG 025 - Introduction to College Writing II. An intensive, competency-based business correspondence course that involves grammar, 
[word usage, pronunciation, punctuation, proofreading, spelling, vocabulary building and other language skills that are essential to good workplace 
(communication. 

OAD 119 Document Processing 3 Credits 

•Prerequisites: Entry level proficiency of 35 gwpm and basic formatting. Emphasis is placed on increasing speed, improving accuracy, developing and 
^applying formatting skills, applying communication and language arts skills and developing document production techniques. 

OAD 121 Office Procedures 3 Credits 

'Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Prepares the student to understand and carry out responsibilities assigned in a business office. 
JTopics include telephone techniques, office equipment, travel and conference arrangements, professional development, research techniques, time and 
[stress management and business ethics. 

OAD 207 Integrated Applications 3 Credits 

^Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers or equivalent experience. Explores the advanced features of an integrated office software 
;package using word processing, spreadsheets, databases and presentation graphics. 

OAD 211 Medical Transcription 3 Credits 

^Prerequisites: HHS 101 - Medical Terminology and OAD 119 - Document Processing with an entry-level speed of 40 GWAM with a 5 error limit. 
Develops skills and knowledge of medical transcription utilizing medical reports, terminology and correspondence. 

OAD 214 Multimedia Design 3 Credits 

^Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Continues the production of publication-quality documents. Attention is given to design and 
(layout principles and production techniques. Color and editing graphics and photographs will be introduced. Students will also apply their design skills 
to preparing documents for electronic publishing on the World Wide Web. 

OAD 215 Legal Transcription 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OAD 1 19 - Document Processing with an entry-level speed of 40 GWAM with a 5 error limit. Provides hands-on training in formatting 
illegal correspondence and court documents in the basic areas of law. Students will leam specialized rules of punctuation, terminology and standards for 
illegal documents. In a laboratory setting students will leam how to use a transcribing machine to produce legal documents from tape dictation. 

OAD 216 Business Communications 3 Credits 

'Prerequisites: ENG 111 - English Composition, CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Emphasizes analysis of business communication environ- 
Iments — cultural, organizational, technological, international and interpersonal — and the use of communications standards to direct the choice of oral 
(and written communication methods and techniques. It includes practice in writing a variety of messages used to communicate in business and industry 
(with an emphasis on the potential impact of the message on the receiver as a basis for planning and delivenng effective business communications. 

OAD 217 Problem Solving for Computer Users 3 Credits 

iPrerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Introduces the organization, structure and functions necessary for managing and maintaining 
iiinformation systems within a business organization. Presents the student with basic computer system concepts such as file and resource management, 
tdevice drivers, file structures, hard disk organization, software installation, upgrading and maintenance and fundamental data security techniques. These 
[concepts will be incorporated into practical applications. 

OAD 218 Spreadsheets 3 Credits 

.Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Provides an in-depth understanding of worksheet design, charting, what-if analysis, worksheet 
(database creation and manipulation and OLE. Knowledge and use of a spreadsheet will be applied to various business applications. Integration of 
; spreadsheets in other applications will be addressed. 

OAD 219 Advanced Document Processing 3 Credits 

1 Prerequisites: Entry level proficiency of 45 wpm and formatting. Emphasis is on a high degree of competence in an office-like environment process- 
I ing documents on a personal computer using an up-to-date software package. 



1 



Course Descriptions 



OAD 220 Records and Database Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CIS 101 - Introduction to Microcomputers. Focuses on the management and control of documents from creation to disposition using 
manual, automated, and electronic media. Examines filing procedures, records management personnel, and equipment. Uses database software to 
create, modify, query, and report information from a database. 

OAD 221 Office Administration and Supervision 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OAD 216 - Business Communications. Completion of minimum of 45 credits toward degree. Emphasizes management of office func- 
tions. Key topics include personnel, team building, ergonomics, project management and leadership styles. Case studies and role playing projects are 
included. Students will also complete the program outcomes assessment tool. 

OAD 226 Advanced Electronic Spreadsheets 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OAD 218 - Spreadsheets. Continues the study of electronic spreadsheets in business. Emphasizes the advanced application of electronic 
spreadsheets. 

OAD 280 Co-op/Internship/Externship/Practicum 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: OAD 216 - Business Communications. Completion of minimum of 45 program credits toward degree or advisor approval. Students gain 
on-the-job experience while earning college credits towards an associate degree. 

OAD 281-294 Special Topics in Office Administration 1-3 Credits 

Prerequisites;. None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

OPM 102 Techniques of Supervision I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces basic employee development with emphasis on the responsibilities of a newly appointed supervisor. Emphasizes 
organizational structure, motivation, delegation of authority, interviews, orientation and induction of new employees, employee performance evaluations 
and dealing with employee conflict. 

OPM 103 Industrial Safety I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the day to day responsibilities of management and supervision toward attaining an accident-free organization. Emphasizes 
first aid, fire prevention and control, safety procedures in starting and stopping machines, accident investigations and other preventive measures. Covers 
methods of advertising good safety practices and rules of plant protection in relation to safety and OSHA. 

OPM 104 Techniques of Supervision II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OPM 102 - Techniques of Supervision I. Develops skills for effective supervision of employees by utilizing analysis of cases, group 
discussion, in-basket exercises and role-playing. Includes problem solving techniques, labor relations, legal guidelines, policy making, counseling 
troubled employees, effective communications and human relations skills. 

OPM 205 Techniques of Leadership 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OPM 102 - Techniques of Supervision I. Identifies approaches to effective leadership and discovers an appropriate personal leadership 
style. Explores specific qualities and skills needed for conference leadership (organizing, facilitating, controlling, summarizing, speaking, and problem 
defining and solving). 

OPM 211 Labor Relations 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines labor laws and practices pertaining to industrial relations. Covers development and application of laws, mediation 
conciliation, collective bargaining, arbitration and handling of grievances. 

OPM 224 Operations Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 1 12 - Functional Mathematics or MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra. Studies the efficient production of goods and services that will 
satisfy the wants and needs of identified customer groups. Focuses on the acquisition of the factors of production, efficient use of those factors and 
distribution of the output of the production process. Includes discussion of the need for quality and its measurement. 

OTA 101 Foundations of Occupational Therapy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the OTA program. Establishes a philosophical base for subsequent course work by introducing and examining concepts j 
basic to the study of occupational therapy assistant. 

OTA 102 Kinesiology 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: OTA 101 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy and OTA 103 - Medical Conditions in Occupational Therapy 
Examines principles of human movement including analysis of biomechanics, joint structure and function and musculoskeletal function. Manual muscle 
testing and goniometric measurement are also covered. 



238 Course Descri 



OTA 103 Medical Conditions in Occupational Therapy 3 Credits 

I Prerequisites: None. Corequisites: OTA 101 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy and OTA 102 - Kinesiology. Provides a basic understanding of 
physical conditions commonly referred to occupational therapy. Typical occupational therapy treatment plans and goals are discussed for selected 
: conditions. The concept of wellness and holistic medicine also is introduced. 

OTA 201 Field Work 1-A 1 Credit 

! Prerequisites: OTA 101 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy, OTA 102 - Kinesiology, OTA 103 - Medical Conditions in Occupational Therapy, and 
i OTA 204 - Psychiatric Conditions in Occupational Therapy. Corequisites: OTA 202 - Therapeutic Activities, OTA 203 - Therapeutic Group Activities, 
I OTA 205 - COTA in Physical Health, OTA 206 - Assistive Technology and Adaptive Equipment, and permission from program chair. Offered the first 
summer session after the general education is completed. Most of the general education has occurred and the student has a foundation for understanding 
\ normal human development. Allows the student to be in a clinical setting and to initiate observation and notewriting skills. 

OTA 202 Therapeutic Activities 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OTA 101 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy, OTA 102, Kinesiology, OTA 103 - Medical Conditions in Occupational Therapy, and 
OTA 204 - Psychiatric Conditions in Occupational Therapy. Corequisites: OTA 201 - Field work 1 - A, OTA 203 - Therapeutic Group Activities, OTA 
205 - COTA in Physical Health, and OTA 206 - Assistive Technology and Adaptive Equipment. Provides learning experiences in the following categones 
of therapeutic activities: crafts, sensory awareness, movement awareness, fine arts, construction, games, self-care, domestic, textiles, vocational, recre- 
ational and educational. Emphasizes activity analysis and the individualization of activity selection. 

OTA 203 Therapeutic Group Activities 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OTA 101 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy, OTA 102 - Kinesiology, OTA 103 - Medical Conditions in Occupational Therapy, and 
OTA 204 - Psychiatric Conditions in Occupational Therapy. Corequisites: OTA 202 - Therapeutic Activities, OTA 205 - COTA in Physical Health, and 
OTA 206 - Assistive Technology and Adaptive Equipment. Provides expenential learning in the analysis and therapeutic use of a variety of group 
activities used in occupational therapy. Analyzes selected activities in terms of occupational performance, human development and adaptation to meet 
client needs. 

OTA 204 Psychiatric Conditions in Occupational Therapy 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OTA 101 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy, OTA 102 - Kinesiology, and OTA 103 - Medical Conditions in Occupational Therapy. 
Reviews psychiatric disorders and the interdisciplinary approach to the conditions commonly referred to occupational therapy. Topics of discussion will 
include clinical team approach, legal issues, nomenclature, clinical description and etiology of psychiatric disabilities. 

OTA 205 COTA in Physical Health 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OTA 101 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy, OTA 102 - Kinesiology, OTA 103 - Medical Conditions in Occupational Therapy, and 
OTA 204 - Psychiatric Conditions in Occupational Therapy. Corequisites: OTA 201 - Fieldwork 1 - A, OTA 202 - Therapeutic Activities, OTA 203 - 
Therapeutic Group Activities, and OTA 206 - Assistive Technology and Adaptive Equipment. Presents assistant-level techniques for management of 
clinical physical dysfunction cases referred to occupational therapy Includes initial screening, evaluation, treatment planning and implementation, 
intervention and prevention techniques as utilized by occupational therapy assistants in a variety of clinical settings and specific physical dysfunction 
diagnoses treated by occupational therapy. 

OTA 206 Assistive Technology and Adaptive Equipment 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: OTA 101 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy, OTA 102 - Kinesiology, OTA 103 - Medical Conditions in Occupational Therapy, and 
OTA 204 - Psychiatric Conditions in Occupational Therapy. Corequisites: OTA 201 - Fieldwork 1 - A, OTA 202 - Therapeutic Activities, OTA 203 - 
Therapeutic Group Activities, and OTA 205 - COTA in Physical Health. Provides supervised learning experience in the application of assistive technol- 
ogy in occupational therapy. Includes experiential learning in the analysis, selection, use, adjustment, adaptation and/or fabrication of assistive techno- 
logical devices. 

OTA 207 Daily Living Skills 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OTA 101 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy, OTA 102 - Kinesiology, OTA 103 - Medical Conditions in Occupational Therapy, OTA 
201 - Fieldwork 1 - A, OTA 204 - Psychiatric Conditions in Occupational Therapy, OTA 205 - COTA in Physical Health, and OTA 206 - Assistive 
Technology and Adaptive Equipment. Corequisites: OTA 208 - COTA and Interactive Model, OTA 209 - Fieldwork I - B, OTA 210 - COTA in Mental 
Health, and OTA 21 1 - Clinic Transition and Management. Provides the occupational therapy assistant student with supervised learning experiences in 
independent living skills which emphasize patient independence in personal mobility, self-care, communication, transportation, family living, work and 
leisure skills. Addresses independent living skills in physical dysfunction, psycho-social dysfunction and pediatrics. 

OTA 208 COTA and Interactive Model 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OTA 101 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy, OTA 102 - Kinesiology, OTA 103 - Medical Conditions in Occupational Therapy, OTA 
201 - Fieldwork I - A, OTA 202 - Therapeutic Activities, OTA 203 - Therapeutic Group Activities, OTA 205 - Psychiatric Conditions in Occupational 
Therapy, and OTA 206 - Assistive Technology and Adaptive Equipment. Corequisites: OTA 207 - Daily Living Skills, OTA 209 - Fieldwork I - B, OTA 
2 1 - COTA in Mental Health, and OTA 2 1 1 - Clinical Transition and Management. Provides the occupational therapy assistant student with a basis from 
which to understand and provide therapeutic activities in a non-medical setting. Presents techniques for a variety of populations in settings such as 
schools, nursing homes, adult day care and sheltered workshops. 



Course Descriptions 



OTA 209 Field Work IB 1 Credit j 

Prerequisites: OTA 101 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy, OTA 102 - Kinesiology, OTA 103 - Medical Conditions in Occupational Therapy, OTA 1 
201 - Fieldwork I - A, OTA 202 - Therapeutic Activities, OTA 203 - Therapeutic Group Activities, OTA 205 - COTA in Physical Health, and OTA 206 - jj: 
Assistive Technology and Adaptive Equipment. Corequisites: OTA 207 - Daily Living Skills, OTA 208 - COTA and Interactive Model, OTA 210 - COTA 
in Mental Health, OTA 2 1 1 - Clinic Transition and Management, and permission from program chair. Provides for clinical observation and practice of the 
occupational therapy skills and processes presented in previous and current courses in the curriculum. Emphasizes interviewing/structured evaluation, 
treatment planning, implementation, and discharge. Requires weekly seminar attendance. 

OTA 210 COTA in Mental Health 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: OTA 101 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy, OTA 102 - Kinesiology, OTA 103 - Medication Conditions in Occupational Therapy, 
OTA 201 - Fieldwork I - A, OTA 202 - Therapeutic Activities, OTA 203 - Therapeutic Group Activities, OTA 204 - Psychiatric Conditions in Occupational 
Therapy, and OTA 205 - COTA in Physical Health. Corequisites: OTA 207 - Daily Living Skills, OTA 208 - COTA and Interactive Model, OTA 209 - 
Fieldwork I - B, and OTA 2 1 1 - Clinical Transition and Management. Presents the psychiatric occupational therapy process and the role of the COTA with 
psychiatric cases referred to occupational therapy. Includes initial screening, evaluation, treatment planning and implementation of programs for pa- 
tients/clients. 

OTA 211 Clinical Transition and Management 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: OTA 101 - Foundations of Occupational Therapy, OTA 102 - Kinesiology, OTA 103 - Medical Conditions in Occupational Therapy, OTA 
201 - Fieldwork I - A, OTA 202 - Therapeutic Activities, OTA 203 - Therapeutic Group Activities, OTA 204 - Psychiatric Conditions in Occupational 
Therapy, and OTA 205 - COTA in Physical Health. Corequisites: OTA 207 - Daily Living Skills, OTA 208 - COTA and Interactive Model, OTA 209 - 
Fieldwork I - B, and OTA 210 - COTA in Mental Health. Presents basic theory, techniques and skills necessary for the transition into the clinical setting 
and for the management of an activities program. Presents management information as it relates to the role of the COTA along with an examination of the 
qualities necessary for success in the clinical setting. 

OTA 212 Field Work 2-A 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all didactic portions of program and permission from program chair. Provides an in-depth experience and 
opportunity to apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes learned through the coursework of the Occupational Therapy Assistant program. Students 
deliver occupational therapy services to clients with a variety of ages and conditions and gain experience specific to the role and functions expected of an 
entry-level occupational therapy assistant. 

OTA 213 Field Work 2 - B 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of all didactic portions of program and permission from program chair. *NOTE: To ensure continuity of applica- 
tion of academic concepts, all fieldwork should be completed within 18 months following completion of academic preparation. THERE ARE NO 
EXCEPTIONS TO THIS GUIDELINE. Provides an in-depth experience and opportunity to apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes learned through the 
coursework of the Occupational Therapy Assistant program. Students deliver occupational therapy services to clients with a variety of ages and condi- 
tions and gain experiences specific to the role and functions expected of an entry-level occupational therapy assistant. 

PAR 102 Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Training 7.5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Demonstrated competency in reading, writing and mathematics through appropriate assessment or successful completion of basic 
skills courses. Requires laboratory practice and clinical observation in a hospital emergency room, nursing home and ambulance. Covers theories, 
techniques and operational aspects of prehospital emergency care within the scope and responsibility of the emergency medical technician (EMT). 
Prepares students for the state certification. 

PAR 113 Preparatory 1 2.5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Certification as an EMT; course application and physical exam on file; twenty hours verified ambulance compartment time within the 
last year; CPR Certification American Heart Type C or Red Cross - Professional Rescuer; successful completion of written and practical entrance 
exams; positive evaluation by selection committee; proof of immunity to Rubella and Hepatitis B; completion of Ivy Tech State College Asset exam. 
Introduces the legal, moral and ethical responsibilities of the health care professional. Provides an overview of the Emergency Medical Services 
System and its components and their relationships. Introduces the essential principles of the standard of care, medical liability, areas of potential 
medical liability and medical liability protection. Provides an overview to stress, reactions to stress, anxiety, paramedic job stress and dealing with 
death and dying. Presents the essentials of pathophysiology and how the understanding of disease processes will improve upon the level of care 
provided by the paramedic. 

PAR 114 Preparatory II 3.5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PAR 1 13 - Preparatory I. Introduces aspects of pharmacology including drug information, action of drugs, weights and measures and 
the administration and techniques of administering drugs. Includes the essentials of venous access, therapeutic communications and lifespan devel- 
opment. 



240 Course Descriptions 



PAR 115 Airway, Patient Assessment 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PAR 1 14 - Preparatory II. Emphasizes the fundamentals of airway management including airway anatomy and physiology, assessment, 
management, ventilation and suction. General patient assessment, initial management including scene survey, initial assessment, resuscitation, 
focused/detailed exam, history, definitive field management and reevaluation are also introduced. Provides the opportunity to practice and perform 
patient assessment, IV techniques and endotracheal intubation in emergency and operating rooms. 

PAR 200 Trauma 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PAR 115 - Airway, Patient Assessment. Overviews kinematics, primary survey, resuscitation, secondary survey and management and 
monitoring and transporting trauma victims. The pathophysiology of shock, care of shock and victim oxygenation are covered. Defines parameters 
and discusses anatomy and physiology as related to burn injury, presents pathophysiology related to a specific source of burn injury and presents 
patient-related detail assessment and specific management of burns. Basic Trauma Life Support certification is obtained. 

PAR 210 Medical 1 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: PAR 200 - Trauma. Covers in detail pulmonology, respiratory management and pharmacological interventions. Cardiology and 
dysrhythmia recognition relative to prehospital intervention are emphasized. Advanced Cardiac Life Support certification is obtained. 

PAR 213 Medical II 6.5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PAR 210 - Medical I. Reviews etiology and treatment of medical emergencies associated with the nervous, endocrine and reproductive 
systems. Includes allergies and anaphylaxis, gastroenterology, toxicology, hematology, infectious and communicable diseases, environmental condi- 
tions and behavioral and psychiatric disorders. Allows the student to perform in ER and ICU settings. 

PAR 215 Special Considerations 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PAR 213 - Medical II. Pediatrics, geriatrics and interventions for the chronic care patient and assessment based management are 
covered. Neonatology and Neonatal Advanced Life Support (NALS) certification are obtained. Skills in ER, L&D, pediatric units and psychiatric care 
facilities are fine-tuned. 

PAR 220 Operations 2.5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PAR 215 - Special Considerations. Provides for the awareness of the concepts of rescue and the preparation for a response to a scene/ 
incident. Presents the essentials of crime scene awareness, medical incident command and hazardous materials operations. 

PAR 221 Ambulance Internship 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: PAR 220 - Operations. Students participate in a field internship, which provides on the job experience in all phases of prehospital 
advanced life support. 

PHO 104 Basic Photography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers basic black and white photographic theory and technique. Includes basic black and white darkroom processes and physics 
of light and filters. Studies cameras and lenses, characteristics of films and papers, and the chemistry of emulsions, exposure and development. 

PHO 106 Studio Practices 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces studio work in black and white photography using continuous light sources. Covers basic set-up techniques and 
lighting methods for a variety of subject matter. Includes practice with photo flood lamps and quartz lamps, both floods and spot and a variety of 
equipment used to modify light. 

PHO 107 Intermediate Photography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHO 104 - Basic Photography. Develops advanced camera skills with medium and large format view cameras. Covers techniques for 
photographing in a variety of picture taking situations. Includes special darkroom techniques and processes. Emphasizes good composition and the use 
of photography as a communications tool. 

PHO 109 Studio Lighting Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHO 106 - Studio Practices. Covers techniques for multiple lighting set-ups, studio electronic flash, location lighting, special effects and 
large sets. 

PHO 110 History of Photography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Surveys technological, aesthetic, social and political changes that the medium of photography has undergone. Studies and recreates 
nineteenth century processes. Includes visits to historical archives to view prints. 

PHO 201 Principles of Color Photography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHO 104 - Basic Photography. Develops camera and laboratory skills needed for color negative and color positive processes through work 
with state-of-the-art equipment and techniques. Encompasses color psychology and aesthetics as well as the physics and chemistry of color photography. 



Course Descriptions 



PHO 202 Advanced Process and Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHO 201 - Principles of Color Photography. Covers specialized techniques used by commercial photography labs such as masking " 
intemegatives, use of pnnt film, litho film, production techniques and retouching. 

PHO 203 Professional Portraiture 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHO 107 - Intermediate Photography and PHO 201 - Principles of Color Photography. Explores approaches and methods in traditional 
and alternative portraiture in studio and on-location photography. Emphasizes creative approaches to commercial portraiture. 

PHO 204 Commercial Photography Techniques I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHO 107 - Intermediate Photography and PHO 201 - Principles of Color Photography. Introduces studio and lab techniques used in 
advertising and industrial photography. Emphasizes creative problem solving and business communications. 

PHO 205 Commercial Photography Techniques II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHO 204 - Commercial Photography Techniques I. Explores special techniques used in advertising and industrial photography such as ' 
those used in on-location product photos, products with models, food illustrations and multi-image slide presentations. , :■ 

a 
PHO 206 Special Projects I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: All courses from previous semesters' course work to semester in which special projects occur. Accommodates students' interests in specific ' 
areas of their fields or in areas where there is a need to strengthen skills. Requires performance and completed work to be portfolio quality and reflect lip 
applicability to the main areas of design, production, and/or illustration. j 

PHO 207 Special Projects II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHO 206 - Special Projects I and PHO 208 - Independent Study I. Provides specific experiences in selected areas. Requires instructor 
approval prior to project work. 

PHO 208 Independent Study I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: All second semester technical courses. Provides students with opportunities to design a project for specific areas. Requires students to : ' 
develop a plan to show what the project outcomes/results will be. Restricts work to the program area and must be portfolio quality. 

PHO 209 Independent Study II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: First three semesters. Provides students with the opportunity to develop skills in specific areas of a visual communications program or to i ' 
elect a course from the College curriculum which supports a career in their chosen program. Requires program chairperson approval to elect non- ]p 
program course work. Requires instructor approval for program projects. I , 

JE 
PHO 214 Journalistic and Editorial Photography 3 Credits j j 

Prerequisites: PHO 107 - Intermediate Photography. Gives students the opportunity to photograph events and human interest features to gain expert- i 
ence in contributions to various publications. Emphasizes establishing visual relationships in the photo essay. ' 

PHO 216 Advanced Processes and Production Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces specialized lab techniques in traditional and digital formats. Works with contemporary experimental darkroom 
techniques. Covers issues in prepress production as they relate to the photographer. Teaches halftone and color separation techniques as well as the use ( 
of typography with photographs. 



PHO 218 Fine Art Photography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines current issues in non-commercial photography. Explores attitudes of photographers and critics on a wide range of topics } P 
through directed reading, class discussion and gallery visits. 

PHO 220 Sensitometry 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PHO 104 - Basic Photography. Estimates response of photographic materials to radiant energy including methods of exposing, processing, 
measurement and data evaluation. 

PHO 222 Electronic Photography 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the area of still video photography and various electronic darkroom software packages. Includes editing processes, 
manipulating images in black-and-white and color and working with various output devices. 

PMT 101 Introduction to Plastics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces plastic processing industries, techniques and commonly used polymers. 



242 Course Descriptions 



i 



PMT 106 Introduction to Polymer Science 3 Credits 

prerequisites: PMT 101 - Introduction to Plastics. Introduces structure, properties and processing characteristics of plastic polymers and additives. 

PMT 107 Injection Molding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PMT 101 - Introduction to Plastics. Expands student knowledge of the injection molding process, components and industry. 

PMT 108 Extrusion Processes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PMT 101 - Introduction to Plastics. Introduces the extrusion process, equipment and industrial applications. 

PMT 201 Advanced Injection Molding 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: PMT 107 - Injection Molding. Covers the procedures and techniques necessary to fully utilize the capabilities of modem injection molding 
|equipment to properly process thermoplastic materials. 

PMT 202 Advanced Extrusion 3 Credits 

jPrerequisites: PMT 108 - Extrusion Processes. Covers the procedures and techniques necessary to fully utilize the capabilities of modem extrusion 
equipment to properly process thermoplastic materials. 

PMT 208 Computer Applications in Plastics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PMT 107 - Injection Molding, PMT 108 - Extrusion Processes. Introduces the computer products and services available to aid in the 
design and manufacturing of plastic products. 

PMT 209 Manufacturing of Plastics Products 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: PMT 101 - Introduction to Plastics, PMT 107 - Injection Molding, PMT 108 - Extrusion Processes. Discusses the economic, organizational 
and quality control strategies employed for efficient production of plastics. Introduces the major secondary finishing, decorating and joining techniques. 
Develops an understanding of the practical considerations of manufacturing operations. 

PNU 114 Nursing Issues and Trends 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: Admission to the PN program. Focuses on nursing history, ethical and legal issues. Examines the organizational patterns and roles of the 
[practical nurse in the health care delivery system. Emphasizes life-long learning. 

PNU 121 Introduction to Nursing I 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to the PN program. Corequisites: ANP 102 -Anatomy and Physiology II or PNU 126 - Integrated Life Science. Introduces the 
jrole of the practical nurse as a member of the health care team. The nursing process is the basis for providing care within the wellness/illness continuum. 
Focuses on the application of basic nursing skills essential in meeting biological, psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs of individuals in preventive, 
(therapeutic and rehabilitative environments. 

PNU 122 Introduction to Nursing II 6 Credits 

[Prerequisites: PNU 121 - Introduction to Nursing I. Focuses on the progression of learning nursing skills. Emphasizes application of safe nursing 
practice in the clinical setting. Introduces drug administration, dosage calculations and mental health concepts. 

PNU 123 Pharmacology 3 Credits 

i Prerequisites: Admission to the PN program; approval of program chair. Studies pharmacological agents, including classifications, actions, side effects, 
(interactions and nursing implications. 

PNU 126 Integrated Life Science 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of ASSET and/or basic skills. Approval of program chair. Examines physical/chemical factors that enable man to 
[maintain homeostasis of the internal environment. Emphasizes anatomy and physiology. Integrates concepts of chemistry, nutntion and microbiology. 

PNU 127 Care of the Adult I 3 Credits 

[Prerequisites: PNU 122 - Introduction to Nursing II and ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II or PNU 126 - Integrated Life Science. Focuses on the 
[ application of the nursing process in understanding the pathophysiology and nursing care of clients with circulatory, ventilation and immunity dysfunc- 
tions. Emphasizes meeting biological, psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs in selected environments. Theory is applied in clinical component. 

PNU 128 Care of the Adult II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PNU 122 - Introduction to Nursing II and ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II or PNU 126 - Integrated Life Science. Focuses on the 
! application of the nursing process in understanding the pathophysiology and nursing care of clients with nutrition, elimination, reproduction and 
hormone dysfunctions. Emphasis will be on meeting biological, psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs in selected environments. Theory is applied 
in clinical component. 



PNU 129 Care of the Adult III 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PNU 122 - Introduction to Nursing II and ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II or PNU 126 - Integrated Life Science. Focuses on the 
application of the nursing process in understanding the pathophysiology and nursing care of clients with mobility, neurological, sensory and dermato- 
logical dysfunctions. Emphasis will be on meeting biological, psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs in selected environments. Theory is applied in 
clinical component. 

PNU 130 Nursing Care of the Older Adult 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II or PNU 126 - Integrated Life Science, and PNU 122 - Introduction to Nursing II. Focuses on the 
application of the nursing process in meeting biological, psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs of older clients in selected environments. Preventive, 
therapeutic, rehabilitative care, and in support of death with dignity are major components. Theory is applied in the clinical setting. 

PNU 131 Nursing Care of the Childbearing Family 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II or PNU 126 - Integrated Life Science, and PNU 122 - Introduction to Nursing II. Emphasis is on 
the normal reproductive cycle and normal growth and development of the child within the wellness/illness continuum. Examines conditions and 
selected interventions based on the nursing process, in providing preventive, therapeutic and rehabilitative care for the mother and child. The role of the 
practical nurse is identified in providing holistic care to the childbearing family within the clinical setting. 

PST 120 First Responder 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with information necessary to recognize emergency situations, know the proper course of action with different 
types of emergencies and apply appropriate first aid. Addresses handling of victims of hazardous materials accidents. Covers CPR, including one and two 
rescuer, and adult, infant and child resuscitation. 

PST 121 Risk Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces occupational safety and health standards and codes with emphasis on applications of codes to typical work situations 
and MSDS requirements. Includes emergency first aid, safety protection, eye protection and chemicals handling. Covers employer and employee rights 
as well as violations, citations, penalties, variances, appeals and record keeping. 

PST 220 Incident Management Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Emphasizes the command and control of major department operations at an advanced level, linking operations and 
safety. Areas of study include incident management systems, pre-incident, size-up, command systems, sectoring functions, staging, safety officer, com- 
mand post, communications, news media and computer aided resources. Utilizes simulated incidents requiring the applications of appropriate solutions. 

PST 221 Computer Design and Planning 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: TEC 104 - Computer Fundamentals for Technology. Focuses on the needs and uses of the computer in public safety. Includes computer- 
aided dispatch, advanced levels of cameo, I-Chiefs, computer-aided design of equipment, generation of incident reports, application of computers for the 
budgetary process, computer-aided resource and materials, maintenance, test records of vehicles and the GIS program. 

PST 280 Co-op/Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minimum of 30 credits toward their degrees with at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. Gives 
students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit 
toward an associate degree. 

PST 281-294 Special Topics in Public Safety 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

PTA 101 Introduction to Physical Therapist Assisting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Explores the history and concepts of physical therapy, physical therapist assisting and rehabilitative medicine. Introduces funda- 
mentals of patient care including universal precautions; body substance isolation; OSHA guidelines; patient assessment including vital signs; emergency 
procedures including CPR; body mechanics; and patient handling with applications of physics principles. Includes preparation of patients, treatment 
areas and equipment. 

PTA 102 Diseases, Trauma, and Terminology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I and ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II. Explores diseases and trauma which necessitate physical 
therapy for the client. Medical terminology, anatomy, physiology, psychology, disabilities and physics related to these conditions are discussed along with 
instrumentation, implants and fixation devices. Provides students with the opportunity to explore their own reactions to illness and disability and to 
discuss how to recognize patients' and families' reactions to illness and disability 



CouRsr. Descriptions 



PTA 103 Administrative Aspects of Physical Therapist Assisting 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Addresses the legal and ethical aspects of physical therapist assisting and patient care along with charting, documentation, report 
writing, patient history procurement, record keeping, charges, insurance information including diagnostic and procedure coding, third party reimburse- 
ment. Medicare, Medicaid, electronic claims and patient rights including American Disabilities Act policy and architectural barriers identification. Dis- 
cusses current issues in health care provision. Explores patient, family and professional communication techniques, body language and electronic 
communication as well as techniques in patient teaching. Includes performing within the limitations of scope of skills, basic principles of levels of 
authority and responsibility, planning, time management, supervisory process, performance evaluations, policies and procedures. 

PTA 106 PTA Treatment Modalities I 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTA 101 - Introduction to Physical Therapist Assisting, PTA 102 - Diseases, Trauma, and Terminology, and PTA 103 - Administrative 
Aspects of Physical Therapist Assisting. Continues concentration on the fundamentals of patient care including universal precautions, assessment of vital 
signs, CPR, body mechanics and patient positioning. Includes lectures, demonstrations and simulated patient problems in the laboratory portion of the 
course. Studies new techniques in depth, such as gait training, gait device selection, goniometry range of motion exercises and measuring. Introduces 
various modalities including hydrotherapy, thermo-therapy, massage, traction and intermittent compression techniques. Safety factors are emphasized in 
both the lectures and the laboratories. The laboratory provides the setting for the practice and implementation of theories and techniques of PTA 106. 
Students practice assessments and treatment methods on themselves and one another under the guidance and supervision of the laboratory instructor. 

PTA 107 Kinesiology 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTA 101 - Introduction to Physical Therapist Assisting, ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology 1, ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II, and 
SCI 1 1 1 - Physical Science. Introduces the physical therapist assistant student to the science of kinesiology. By definition, kinesiology is the study of 
movement. Studies human movement and brings together the fields of anatomy, physiology, physics and geometry. Prerequisite knowledge of skeletal 
and muscular anatomy and physiology is necessary. Class will consist of equal parts of lectures, demonstration and student participation in locating, 
observing and palpating various boney prominences and musculatures. Much of kinesiology requires independent study to memorize origin, insertion, 
action and innervation of all muscles. The knowledge gained in this course is an integral part of the students' background preparation for the practice of 
physical therapy. 

PTA 115 Clinical I 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTA 101 - Introduction to Physical Therapist Assisting, PTA 102 - Diseases, Trauma, and Terminology, PTA 103 - Administrative Aspects 
of Physical Therapist Assisting, and PTA 106 - PTA Treatment Modalities I. Requires the student to perform in a clinical environment with patients, using 
applications of theory and techniques of PTA 106, under the guidance of a registered physical therapist. 

PTA 205 Clinical II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTA 1 06 - PTA Treatment Modalities 1 , PTA 1 7 - Kinesiology, and PTA 207 - PTA Treatment Modalities II . Requires the student to perform 
in a clinical environment with patients using applications of theories and techniques of PTA 207 under the guidance of a registered physical therapist. 

PTA 207 PTA Treatment Modalities II 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTA 106 - Treatment Modalities I and PTA 107 - Kinesiology. Reviews joint structure, muscle origins, insertions, innervations, actions and 
physiology. Covers normal and abnormal gait, orthotics and prostheses, arthritis and joint replacement and postural correcting exercise along with 
treatment principles and therapeutic exercises for the neck, back and peripheral joints. Discusses general exercise principles and progression of the 
orthopedic patient through an exercise program. Addresses appropriate applications of principles of physics and kinesiology 

PTA 215 Clinical HI 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Completion of PTA 207 - PTA Treatment Modalities II, and PTA 106 - PTA Treatment Modalities I. Requires the student to perform in a 
clinical environment with patients using applications of theory and techniques of PTA 217 under the guidance of a registered physical therapist. 

PTA 217 PTA Treatment Modalities III 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: PTA 106 - PTA Treatment Modalities I and PTA 207 - PTA Treatment Modalities II. Provides an in-depth approach to therapeutic exercise 
as performed by the physical therapy assistant. Covers basic anatomy and physiology of the central and peripheral nervous systems and activities of daily 
living. Includes exercise physiology and neurophysiology and advanced principles and procedures of therapeutic exercise appropriate for cardiopulmo- 
nary, cardiovascular, orthopedic and neurologic conditions, stroke, spinal cord and peripheral nerve injuries. Discusses prevention measures, specialized 
techniques and the utilization of specialized therapeutic equipment and correlates them to exercise applications. Addresses appropriate applications of 
kinesiology and principles of physics. Provides practice and implementation of theories and techniques of PTA 106 and PTA 207 in the lab setting. 

PTA 224 Current Issues and Review 1 Credit 

Prerequisites: PTA 205 - Clinical II and PTA 2 1 5 - Clinical III. Teaches the sources of physical therapy research and discusses the recognition of the roles 
and responsibilities of physical therapy assistants. Requires completion and presentation of an independent project. Includes a comprehensive review of 
the course to prepare the student for licensure exam. 



QSC 101 Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers current quality control concepts and techniques in industry with emphasis on modern manufacturing requirements. 



Course Descriptions 



QSC 102 Statistical Process Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies the fundamental tools of statistical process control which are used in industry to reduce costs and increase productivity at 
a predictable quality level. Emphasizes principles and techniques of statistical process control to ensure that prevention instead of detection of problems 
is practiced. Includes basic statistical and probability theory, sampling techniques, process control charts, the nature of variation, histograms and 
attribute and variable charts. 

QSC 201 Advanced Statistical Process Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: QSC 102 - Statistical Process Control. Builds on the basic principles of QSC 102 with advanced techniques by industry to ensure 
economic production of goods based on defect prevention rather than defect detection. Covers the various decisions to modify, change or adjust 
processes based on statistical evidence. Stresses interpretation of statistical data and distinguishing between common and special causes of problems. 
Emphasizes appropriate use of control charts, trend analysis, assessing process and machine capability, evaluating the measurement process, using 
computers and automated data collection systems and implementation techniques. 

QSC 202 Quality Control Concepts and Techniques 11 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: QSC 101 - Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I, QSC 102 - Statistical Process Control, MAT 115 - Statistics or advisor approval. 
Acquaints students, with quality control systems. Emphasizes the systems approach to quality, establishing the quality system, and applying total quality 
control in the company. 

QSC 203 Metrology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers techniques of linear and angular measurement and applications for industrial processes and quality control. 

QSC 204 Total Quality Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Teaches the philosophy of total quality management. Focuses on improving processes and reducing variation in systems. Covers 
managements role in improving aspects of manufacturing and service organizations to achieve quality improvement. 

QSC 206 ISO/QS 9000 Standards and Internal Auditing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: QSC 101 - Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I, QSC 102 - Statistical Process Control or advisor approval. Teaches the basic 
principles of ISO 9000 standards, QS 9000 standard, ISO 14000 standard. Includes instruction on internal auditing with emphasis on the role of the 
internal auditor in regard to the maintenance of the quality system. 

QSC 208 - Project Management 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: QSC 101 - Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I, QSC 102 - Statistical Process Control or advisor approval. Teaches the basic 
principles of project management, team building and facilitation. Focus is on project planning, scheduling and controlling of both projects and 
budgets through completion. Covers the process of building and facilitating effective teams m the work force. 

QSC 280 Co-op/Internship 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Students must have completed a minimum of 30 credits toward their degrees with at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. Gives 
students the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while earning credit 
towards an associate degree. 

QSC 281-294 Special Topics in Quality Science 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

RAD 101 Orientation and Nursing in X-Ray Technology 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Acceptance into the program through appropriate assessment or successful completion of college entry courses. Covers seven units. 
Introduces radiology and prepares students for entry into a clinical setting. 

RAD 102 Principles of Radiographic Exposures I 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 107 - Radiation Physics. Presents individual and group characteristics needed to produce the ideal radiograph. Includes knowledge 
of interchangeability of mAs, kVp, film/screen combinations, distance and gnds. Covers factors and considerations needed for pediatnc techniques, 
calibration, heat unit calculation and technique chart construction. 

RAD 103 Radiographic Positioning I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Acceptance into program through appropriate assessment or successful completion of pre-college courses, CIS 101 - Introduction to 
Microcomputers and any other previous radiography courses. Correlates positioning, terminology, techniques and film critique with the examinations of 
chest, abdomen, upper extremity, upper/lower GI tracts and urinary tract. 



246 Course Descriptions 



RAD 104 X-Ray Clinical Education 1 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment with RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I, completion of CIS 101 and other applicable courses. Follows category 
2 of the competency lab model, which tests proficiency of skills from categories 1 and 2. Includes supervised clinical experience. 

RAD 105 Radiographic Positioning II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I, RAD 104 - X-Ray Clinical Education 1 and any other previous radiology 
course. Correlates all previous material related to anatomy and positioning, covers the areas of lower extremities, spine and thorax and advances 
knowledge in ethics and quality assurance. 

RAD 106 X-Ray Clinical Education II 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I, RAD 104 - X-Ray Clinical Education I, Concurrent with RAD 105 - Radiographic Positioning II and 
all previous required radiology courses. Includes supervised clinical experience, utilizes Category 2 of the competency model and tests proficiency of 
skills from Categories 1 and 2. 

RAD 107 Radiation Physics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate Algebra. Introduces physics as utilized in the production of X-rays. Includes laws of physics pertaining to atomic 
structure, chemical properties and reactions and electrical circuitry. Covers equipment and methods of generation and measurement of electricity. 

RAD 109 Imaging Techniques 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of any other previous radiology courses. Covers theories, principles and demonstrations of current imaging 
modalities. 

RAD 201 Radiographic Positioning III 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I, RAD 105 - Radiographic Positioning II, and all other previous radiology courses. This course 
correlates positioning terminology and techniques, film critique, with exams of Category 2 of the competency models and testing skills from Category 1 
and 2. 

RAD 202 X-Ray Clinical Education III 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I, RAD 105 - Radiographic Positioning II, RAD 106 - X-Ray Clinical Education II, Concurrent with 
RAD 201 - Radiographic Positioning III, and all other previous program courses. Introduces Category 3 of the Competency Model, proficiency testing 
over Categories 1 and 2 and testing over Category 3. 

RAD 203 X-Ray Clinical Education IV 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 202 - X-Ray Clinical Education III, RAD 201 - Radiographic Positioning III, RAD 106 - X-Ray Clinical Education II, RAD 105 - 
Radiographic Positioning II, RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I, and concurrent with RAD 209 - Radiographic Positioning IV Introduces Category 4 
of the Competency Model in lab proficiency testing of skills from Categories 1, 2, 3 and proficiency in Category 4. 

RAD 204 X-Ray Clinical Education V 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 203 - X-Ray Clinical Education IV, RAD 201 - Radiographic Positioning III, RAD 106 - X-Ray Clinical Education II, RAD 105 - 
Radiographic Positioning II and RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning I. Includes final competency testing for students who have not completed clinicals 
1-4. Continues maintenance over all categories. Includes clinical experience. 

RAD 205 Pathology for Radiologic Technology 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of previous radiology courses. Examines basic concepts concerning disease, its causes and the resulting changes as 
viewed radiographically Emphasizes needed technical changes to produce optimal radiographs from correlations to patient symptoms. 

RAD 206 Radiobiology and Radiation Protection 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of previous radiology courses. Covers theories and principles of the effects of ionizing radiation upon living tissues. 
Includes dosages, measurements, DNA structure and function and cellular radio sensitivity. 

RAD 208 Principles of Radiographic Exposures II 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 102 - Principles of Radiographic Exposures I. Continues RAD 102 - Principles of Radiographic Exposure I. Explains photo timing 
and its relationship to manual techniques. Associates kVp and mAs with the quality and quantity of radiation. Covers standard darkroom procedure, 
automatic processing and quality assurance. 

RAD 209 Radiographic Positioning IV 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RAD 201 - Radiographic Positioning III and all other previous radiology courses. Covers all positions involving radiographic examina- 
tions. 



Course Descriptions 



RAD 299 General Examination Review 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Reviews content of program, emphasizing anatomy, physics, exposure principles, positioning and radiation safety. Simulated 
exams prepare the student for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologist Examination. 

RES 121 Introduction to Respiratory Care 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair approval; demonstrated competency in reading, writing, computation and basic science skills through appropriate assess- 
ment or successful completion of BSA program coursework. Corequisites: RES 122 - Therapeutic Modalities. Presents an introduction to respiratory 
care including a brief history of the profession; equipment cleaning and sterilization techniques; patient assessment techniques and isolation techniques. 
Includes medical records documentation, gas analyzers, introduction and application of therapeutic modalities including oxygen therapy, aerosol and 
humidity therapy, airway maintenance, hyperinflation therapy and an overview of ethical practice and safety 

RES 122 Therapeutic Modalities 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program Chair approval; demonstrated competency in reading, writing, computation and basic science skills through appropriate assess- 
ment or successful completion of BSA program coursework. Presents medicinal aerosol therapy and respiratory pharmacology; hyperinflation therapies; 
introduction to pulmonary rehabilitation and home care. Introduces basic bedside pulmonary function testing and development of respiratory care 
plans. Presents selected aspects of ethical and legal respiratory practice. 

RES 123 Cardiopulmonary Physiology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I. Corequisites: ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II. Presents the cardiopulmonary system 
including ventilation, perfusion and gas exchange; introduces interpretation and application of arterial blood gases, acid-base regulation and physiologic 
monitoring. 

RES 124 Clinical Practicum I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: CPR Certification - Course C AHA, Health Care Provider (HCP) Level. Corequisites: RES 121 - Introduction to Respiratory Care. 
Introduces the student to the hospital environment. Exposes the student to various hospitals and respiratory care departments, patient charts, patient 
identification and communication within the hospital. Provides supervised experience in oxygen therapy, hyperinflation therapy, humidity/aerosol 
therapy and charting. 

RES 125 Critical Care I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 122 - Therapeutic Modalities. Introduction to the respiratory care of the critically ill patient. Presents arterial blood gas collection; 
analysis and interpretation; and basic medical laboratory data. Introduces concepts and techniques of critical respiratory care of adults and pediatrics; 
includes establishment and maintenance of artificial airways, application of adult and pediatric mechanical ventilators and related cardio-pulmonary 
monitoring equipment. 

RES 126 Clinical Medicine 1 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 123 - Cardiopulmonary Physiology. Introduces etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, therapeutics and prognosis of selected pulmo- 
nary diseases. 

RES 127 Clinical Practicum II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 121 - Introduction to Respiratory Care, CPR - Certification Course C and RES 124 - Clinical Practicum 1. Provides supervised 
experience in selected therapeutic modalities. Includes an introduction to chest physiotherapy, medicinal aerosol therapy, intermittent positive pressure 
breathing and ultrasonic therapy. Requires continuing certification in CPR. 

RES 128 Clinical Practicum HI 9 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 125 - Critical Care I, CPR Certification - HCP Level, RES 126 - Clinical Medicine I, RES 127 - Clinical Practicum II. Provides 
additional supervised experience in selected therapeutic modalities. Includes advanced patient assessment, arterial blood gas analysis and airway care. 
Provides clinical experience in adult critical care with mechanical ventilation. Includes an introduction to basic cardiopulmonary testing. Requires 
continued Certification in CPR. 

RES 221 Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 125 - Critical Care I and RES 126 - Clinical Medicine I. Presents in-depth approaches to the respiratory care management of critically 
ill neonatal, pediatric and adult patients. Emphasizes techniques of patient evaluation, cardiopulmonary monitoring, transportation and management. 
Includes advanced techniques of patient assessment through pulmonary function testing and other selected assessment techniques. 

RES 222 Critical Care II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 125 - Critical Care I and RES 126 - Clinical Medicine I. Presents advanced techniques of mechanical ventilation of neonatal, pediatric 
and adult patients; includes fetal development and assessment; neonatal and pediatric assessment, equipment, procedures and therapeutic techniques; 
and introduces related aspects of the NICU environment. 



248 Course Descriptions 



RES 223 Respiratory Pharmacology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ANP 101 - Anatomy and Physiology I and ANP 102 - Anatomy and Physiology II. Discusses the most common pharmacological agents 
currently being administered to all body systems. Emphasizes classifications, indications, side effects, dosages and routes of administration. Discusses 
emergency drugs, antibacterial medication, antifungal medications, and the implications and complications of IV therapy. 

RES 224 Clinical Medicine II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: RES 22 1 - Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics. Presents etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, therapeutics and prognosis of disease conditions 
related to respiratory care; focuses on the interrelation of all physiologic systems. Emphasizes treatment protocols and includes preparation for clinical 
simulation component of national credentialing examination. 

RES 226 Continuing Care 2 Credits 

Corequisites: RES 227 - Clinical Practicum IV Presents a brief history of home care patients in relation to respiratory care modalities. Provides an 
overview of respiratory care roles in the alternative care sites. 

RES 227 Clinical Practicum IV 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: CPR Certification - Course C and RES 128 - Clinical Practicum III. Provides additional supervised experience in selected therapeutic 
modalities. Includes advanced cardiopulmonary diagnostic techniques, application of invasive and non-invasive monitoring of the cardiopulmonary 
system and experience in respiratory care, departmental management and quality assurance roles. Includes advanced clinical experience in adult, 
pediatric and neonatal critical care. Requires continuing certification in CPR. 

RES 229 Emergency Management 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: CPR Certification - HPC Level. Applies advanced cardiopulmonary life support efforts in an emergency setting. 

RVT 101 Introduction to RV Service/Customer Relations 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the use of basic hand tools and equipment used in the repair of recreational vehicles. Discusses service and safety practices, 
technician liability, applicable laws, service documentation and manuals. Examines RV classifications, industrial codes and standards. Covers tech- 
niques, insights and pertinent knowledge needed to foster positive relationships with customers as well as situations and remedies for dealing with 
dissatisfied customers. 

RVT 102 Electrical Concepts 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Acquaints students with fundamentals of AC/DC electricity and circuitry related to troubleshooting and repair of recreational 
vehicles. Studies the use of test equipment and identification of component symbols and applies them to actual RV systems and appliances. 

RVT 103 Fluid Power, Heat and Mechanical Systems 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of pneumatic and hydraulic power generation, controls, and actuation devices found in recreational vehicles. 
Includes an introduction of the basic principles of gears, levers, pulleys and their application to simple machines. Studies the effects and application of 
heat on solids, liquids and gases. 

RVT 104 LP Gas 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Addresses LP gas fundamentals, properties and safety as used in troubleshooting and repair of RV systems within industry and 
governmental codes and standards. Encompasses the use of test equipment and identification of component symbols and applies them to actual RV 
systems and appliances. 

RVT 105 RV Electrical Systems Service 5 Credits 

Prerequisites: RVT 102 - Electrical Concepts. Provides necessary skills and knowledge to troubleshoot, repair and/or replace AC/DC circuitry, compo- 
nents and auxiliary systems in recreational vehicles. 

RVT 106 RV Braking, Suspension, and Towing Systems 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the operation, troubleshooting, repair and/or replacement of electric brakes, suspension and towing systems in all types of 
recreational vehicles. Studies actual RV systems and appliances. Includes appropriate mathematical formulae. 

RVT 107 RV Air Conditioning and Absorption Refrigeration Service 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Acquaints students with absorption refrigeration principles, troubleshooting, and repair utilizing actual RV systems and appliances. 
Studies inspection, maintenance and replacement techniques. 

RVT 108 Heating Systems/Accessory Installation and Service 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers theory of operation, diagnosis and troubleshooting of heating systems and accessories. 



Course Descriptions 



RVT 109 Water Systems and Water Heating 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers theory of operation, diagnosis and troubleshooting of water systems and water heaters. 

RVT 1 10 Interior Coach 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Deals with installation, troubleshooting, repair and/or replacement of interior cabinetry, furniture, hardware, paneling, ceilings, 
flooring, floor coverings, upholstery, soft goods, doors and other interior components. Demonstrates and applies basic skills related to working with 
wood, plastics and fabncs. 

RVT 111 Exterior Coach 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Details structural characteristics of various types of recreational vehicles. Provides skills and knowledge necessary to repair, recover 
and reseal exterior sidewalls and roofs. Demonstrates and applies techniques for locating and repairing water and air leaks, windows, basic body repair, 
touch-up and painting. 

RVT 112 Pre- Delivery and Preventive Maintenance 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides techniques and procedures to ensure proper pre-delivery preparation for new units. Covers inspection, periodic checks 
and adjustments and fluid, filter and belt replacements. Utilizes actual vehicles and components. 

RVT 201 Metal Processing and Metallurgy 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers applications of welding and the study of metals utilized in the RV service industry. Discusses and applies the use of sheet 
metal tools, layout, cutting, forming and fastening. 

RVT 220 Recreational Vehicle Retailing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides techniques and procedures that will promote retailing experience for sales staff in the recreational vehicle dealership. 
The sales techniques will focus on the total vehicle and its systems, with promotion of each system to complete the sale. 

RVT 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: Provides the opportunity to work at a job site specifically related to a student's career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while 
earning credit toward an associate degree. 

SPC 102 Introduction to Non-Destructive Testing 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Acquaints students with the principles and various types of non-destructive examination methods, their advantages, limitations 
and applications. 

SPC 103 Employee Participation Techniques and Quality Improvements 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides an overview of the development of an employee involvement program such as quality circles, teams, groups and other 
concepts. Includes problem-solving techniques of brainstorming, cause and effect diagrams, data gathering, check sheets, Pareto analysis, central 
location, frequency distribution and histograms. Covers the role of management and employees in the process and their relationship to participative 
management. 

SPC 105 Non-Destructive Testing Applications 1 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: QSC 101 - Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I. Presents an overview of the relationship of non- destructive testing to the total 
quality function. Includes advantages and limitations of various test methods. 

SPC 106 Non-Destructive Testing Applications II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SPC 1 05 - Non-Destructive Testing Applications I. Covers theoretical and practical aspects of non-destructive testing in radiography, eddy 
current testing, acoustic emission and leak testing. 

SPC 111 Reliability Objectives 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: QSC 101 - Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I, QSC 202 - Quality Control Concepts and Techniques II. Introduces the develop- 
ment and principles of reliability engineering. Establishes the mathematical and physical bases of reliability and applies the basic elements of reliability 
data analysis. Surveys concepts basic to modern reliability requirements with emphasis on practical applications in manufacturing processes and 
production operations. 

SPC 204 Statistical Concepts and Techniques 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: MAT 115 - Statistics. Presents various topics pertaining to statistical applications of quality control including frequency distribution, 
probability theory and application, and sampling techniques. 



250 Course Descriptions 



SUR 111 Fundamentals of Surgical Technology 4 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to clinical phase of Surgical program. Corequisites: SUR 1 12 - Application of Surgical Fundamentals. Introduces principles 
of sterile techniques and the operative care of the surgical patient. Includes the roles of scrubbing and circulating duties. 

SUR 112 Application of Surgical Fundamentals 2 Credits 

Prerequisites: Admission to clinical phase of Surgical program. Corequisites: SUR 111 - Fundamentals of Surgical Technology. Demonstrates the 
application of surgical fundamentals. Correlates theory to practice by requiring students to participate as members of a surgical team in laboratory 
simulations. 

SUR 113 Surgical Procedures I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SUR 1 1 1 - Fundamentals of Surgical Technology, SUR 1 12 - Application of Surgical Fundamentals. Corequisites: SUR 1 14 - Clinical 
Applications I. Introduces general surgical procedures with review of perioperative patient care including diagnostic testing, pre-operative care and 
immediate post-operative care. 

SUR 114 Clinical Applications I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SUR 1 1 1 - Fundamentals of Surgical Technology, SUR 1 12 - Application of Surgical Fundamentals. Corequisites: SUR 1 13 - Surgical 
Procedures I. Correlates the principles and theories of basic surgical procedures to clinical performance in affiliating hospitals. Includes knowledge, 
skills and attitudes necessary for successful implementation of safe patient care in an operating room. 

SUR 211 Surgical Procedures II 6 Credits 

Prerequisites: SUR 113 - Surgical Procedures I, SUR 1 14 - Clinical Applications I. Corequisites: SUR 212 - Clinical Applications II. Studies advanced 
surgical procedures in relation to the physiological aspects of surgical intervention including those procedures related to the special senses, genitouri- 
nary, musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Includes a knowledge of the involved anatomy, existing pathology, surgical hazards encountered, the 
surgical procedure and a review of perioperative patient care. 

SUR 212 Clinical Applications II 9 Credits 

Prerequisites: SUR 113 - Surgical Procedures I, SUR 1 14 - Clinical Applications I. Corequisites: SUR 21 1 - Surgical Procedures II. Correlates the basic 
principles and theories of advanced surgical procedures to clinical performance in affiliating hospitals. Includes knowledge, skills and attitudes 
necessary for successful implementation of safe patient care in an operating room. 

SUR 213 Surgical Procedures III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: SUR 211 Surgical Procedures II, SUR 212 Clinical Applications II. Corequisites: SUR 214 - Clinical Applications III. Studies special- 
ized surgical procedures including those related to the cardiothoracic and vascular systems. Includes a knowledge of the involved anatomy, existing 
pathology, surgical hazards encountered, the surgical procedure and a review of perioperative patient care. 

SUR 214 Clinical Applications III 8 Credits 

Prerequisites: SUR 211 - Surgical Procedures II, SUR 212 - Clinical Applications II. Corequisites: SUR 213 - Surgical Procedures III. Correlates 
principles and theories of specialized surgical procedures to the clinical performance in affiliating hospitals. Includes the knowledge, skills and 
attitudes necessary for successful implementation of safe patient care in an operating room. 

TEC 102 Technical Graphics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Strengthens basic drafting skills to a proficient, technician level. Includes orthographic projections with auxiliary views, dimen- 
sioning, sectioning and introductory tolerancing. Studies isometric and oblique views of parts. 

TEC 103 Collaborative Team Skills 1 Credit 

Corequisites or Prerequisites: PSY 101 - Introduction to Psychology or SOC 1 1 1 - Introduction to Sociology or consent of instructor. Introduces students 
to effective communication skills, conflict resolution, team collaboration and decision making. 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 Credits 

Corequisites: MAT 050 - Basic Algebra. Provides an introduction to microcomputer hardware, applications, and software. Emphasizes computer 
literacy, the Windows operating system, computer programming, and industrial orientation. Surveys commonly used microcomputer applications. 

TEC 106 Hazardous Materials and Control 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces hazardous materials, managing hazardous material incidents, explosive and gas emergencies, shipping containers, 
cylinder safety devices, responding to flammable and combustible liquids, oxidizers, poisons and corrosives, and radioactive emergencies. Emphasizes 
chemical identification, marking, storage, shipping and handling hazardous substances. Uses basic monitoring instruments for hazardous areas to 
protect workers and first responders. Covers protective clothing and equipment. Emphasizes safety procedures and practices. 



Course Descriptions 



TEC 113 Basic Electricity 3 Credits 

Corequisites: MAT 050 - Basic Algebra or demonstrated competency or program advisor approval. Studies electrical laws and principles pertaining to 
DC and AC circuits. Includes current, voltage, resistance, power, inductance, capacitance and transformers. Stresses the use of standard electrical tests, 
electrical equipment and troubleshooting procedures. Safety procedures and practices are emphasized. 

V1D 101 Audio/Video Systems Theory 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines cinematic convention, visual literacy and sound aesthetics. Includes viewing of films and video, class discussion and 
field trips. 

V1D 102 Media Technology 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a skills-based introduction to broadcast production. Includes hands-on expenence in production technique. 

VID 104 Studio I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Develops the skills required to set up and operate AV studio equipment. Students select equipment for specific applications and 
make recordings using audio and video signal processing devices. Emphasis is placed on audio. 

VID 106 Production Planning 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Students plan audio and video productions which meet specific needs in a given group. Emphasizes instructional design, flow, 
continuity and application of visual design principles. Project work includes preliminary planning, scripting and storyboard production. 

VID 107 Video Production II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIS 105 - Video and Sound (or equivalent experience). Focuses on the skills needed to perform as a grip or videographer on location. 
Emphasizes lighting, audio and electronic news gathering skills. 

VID 109 Studio II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Requires project work in studio post production. Students use audio and video equipment to "sweeten" recordings, produce 
special effects and create animated or graphic segments. Emphasizes coordination of audio and visual aspects. 

VID 110 Studio HI 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Explores the disciplines and techniques of television studio production by alternately fulfilling the role of director, camera 
operator, technical director, floor director and engineer. Project work includes video system design and analysis. 

VID 202 Video Production III 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on the role of the video producer as a manager of time-based information. Students learn through experiential project 
work in client relations, budgeting, contracts, media law and scheduling. 

VID 204 Special Projects I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Accommodates student interest in specific interest areas. Requires performance and completed work to be portfolio quality and 
reflect applicability to the main areas of student program. 

VID 206 Independent Study I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides the opportunity to design a project for a specific program area. Includes development of project plan and expected 
outcomes. Restricts work to student program area and must be portfolio quality. 

VID 207 Independent Study II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: All Communications courses. Corequisites: All required program courses. Focuses on the students final preparation for the job 
interview. Finalizes project work demonstrating acquired knowledge and skills, along with resume and cover letter, for presentation to prospective 
employers. Provides students with the opportunity to use one credit for field study. 

VID 280 Co-op/Internship 1-6 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to work at a job site that is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the- 
job expenence while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

VID 281-294 Special Topics in Video Technology 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. Contact chief academic officer for more information. 



252 Course Descriptions 



VIS 101 Fundamentals of Design 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Investigates design theory and color dynamics as applied to organizing the visual field. Provides experiences in applying design 
theory. 

VIS 102 Fundamentals of Imaging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIS 115 - Computer Graphics and VIS 101 - Fundamentals of Design. Introduces students to a full range of image input technology 
including conventional 35mm photography, still video capture, video camcorder and computer scanners. 

VIS 103 Introduction to Multi-Media 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advanced standing with Advisor approval. Explores various software programs involved in creating multi-media presentations, digital 
movies, digital animation and analog video output. 

VIS 105 Video and Sound 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides a comprehensive survey course in video production including an introduction to planning, shooting and editing video 
projects. 

VIS 115 Computer Graphics 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces students to the computers use in graphic design. Focuses on basic computer terminology and use, mastering funda- 
mental skills and developing efficient working styles. Develops skills by creating publications with page layout software. 

VIS 201 Electronic Imaging 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIS 1 15 - Computer Graphics. Examines the area of still video photography and various electronic darkroom software packages. Provides 
expenence with the electronic darkroom environment including editing processes, manipulation of images in black and white and color, and working 
with various output devices. Discusses four-color separations and pre-press procedures. 

VIS 202 Color Prepress 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIS 201 - Electronic Imaging. Examines the technical specifications, translation issues, various output options and troubleshooting of 
graphic files for high end printing processes. Studies and compares the roles of electronic production artists, of service bureaus and of printing technolo- 
gies. 

VIS 205 Business Practices for Visual Artists 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: ART 217 - Advanced Graphic Design. Examines legal and business issues affecting the professional visual artist. Examines copyright and 
"work for hire", marketing and self-promotion, estimating and pricing, insurance and liability, and the computers role in managing a business. 

VIS 206 Interdisciplinary Studies 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None . Offers students opportunities to complete selected projects while working in a team environment with students of other disciplines. 
Simulates situations found in industry. 

VIS 207 Portfolio Preparation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: All Communications courses. Corequisites: All required program courses. Focuses on students final preparation for the job interview. 
Finalizes project work demonstrating acquired knowledge and skills, along with resume and cover letter, for presentation to prospective employers. 
Provides students with the opportunity to use one credit for field study. 

VIS 208 Portfolio Preparation II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: VIS 207 - Portfolio Preparation. Provides the opportunity to design a portfolio that focuses on a second specialty area (or additional or 
updated skill area). Project work is finalized for presentation to prospective employers or industry review. (Restricts work to student specialty area 
or new skill area and must be portfolio quality.) Allows student to integrate skills between specialties for a revised, extended or additional portfolio. 

VIS 209 3D Rendering and Animation 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Examines the virtual world of 3D and how it can be applied as an illustration and animation element in multimedia. Students will 
explore navigation, modeling, rendering, animation, and camera and lighting techniques. 

VIS 281-294 Special Topics in Visual Communications Technology 1-5 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area (Contact chief academic officer for more information). 



Course Descriptions 



WLD 100 Welding Processes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides general study of oxy-fuel, shielded metal arc, gas tungsten arc, gas metal arc, submerged arc, plasma arc, resistance, flash 
and upset, friction, electron beam and laser welding processes. Covers equipment, techniques, electrodes, fuel gases and/or shielding gases, weld joint 
design, advantages and limitations, process applications, process variables and operational costs. 

WLD 101 Gas Welding I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Introduces basic oxy-acetylene brazing. Involves detailed study of the techniques of making welds in flat positions. Includes gas 
brazing. Pro\ides additional background essential to a qualified welder. 

WLD 103 Arc Welding I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers the welding of ferrous metals and alloys utilizing metallic manual arc welding methods. Includes procedures in joint design 
using "T" joint, lap joint and butt joint designs. Covers single pass and multi-pass techniques. Emphasizes safety hazards and safe practices in arc 

welding. 

WLD 105 Welding Equipment and Electrical Maintenance 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Focuses on the design of oxy-fuel welding and cutting equipment and electric arc welding and cutting equipment. Enables students 
to perform troubleshooting on the equipment and apply proper maintenance. Examines relationships of voltage, current and resistance on electrical 
circuits with emphasis on the production of heat from the flow of electric current through resistance. 

WLD 107 Welding Troubleshooting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Covers evaluation of weldments, welding procedures and tolerances, and joint design and alignment. 

WLD 108 Shielded Metal Arc Welding I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides students with knowledge of shielded metal arc welding operations and equipment. Provides extensive practice time to 
produce the skills to make satisfactory welds with this process. Emphasizes safety hazards and safety practices in arc welding. 

WLD 109 Oxy-Acetylene Gas Welding and Cutting 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Offers basic instruction in oxy-acetylene welding with emphasis on welding techniques in flat, horizontal, vertical and overhead 
positions. Includes brazing and flame cutting. Focuses on safety hazards and safe practices in oxy-acetylene welding and cutting. 

WLD 110 Welding Fabrication I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 108 - Shielded Metal Arc Welding I, WLD 109 - Oxy-Acetylene Gas Welding and Cutting, WLD 207 - Gas Metal Arc (MIG) Welding. 
Provides opportunities for practice in hands-on fabrication of welded products. Includes basic equipment used in fabrication. 

WLD 115 Shop Practices I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Provides use of shop to practice various types of welding to improve operator skill. 

WLD 116 Shop Practices II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 115 - Shop Practices I. Continues open use of shop to practice various types of welding to improve operator skills. 

WLD 117 Shop Practices HI 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 116 - Shop Practices II. Continues open use of shop to practice various types of welding to improve operator skills. 

WLD 120 Metallurgy Fundamentals 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Studies properties and uses of ferrous and nonferrous metals and alloys, production of iron and steel, composition and properties 
of plain carbon steel and alloying elements, selection of tools, case hardening and destructive and nondestructive testing. Includes fundamentals of heat 
treatment and reactions occurring in metals subjected to various heat treatment methods and techniques. 

WLD 201 Special Welding Processes 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Welding practice with various welding processes and techniques using advanced welding methods, machines and 
equipment. Presents advanced arc welding with emphasis on use and orientation of submerged arc welding equipment. 

WLD 202 Arc Welding II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 103 - Arc Welding I. Offers instruction in electrode selections, weld techniques, power supplies and current characteristics in 
preparation for test. 



Course Descriptions 



WLD 203 Pipe Welding I 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 108 - Shielded Metal Arc Welding 1, WLD 206 - Shielded Metal Arc Welding II. Provides for extensive practice in the preparation and 
welding of pipe in the 2G and 5G position. Includes preparation, methods of welding, electrodes and filler wires. 

WLD 204 Pipe Welding II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 203 - Pipe Welding I. Provides extensive training in the preparation and welding of pipe in the 5G and 6G position. Includes 
information on preparation, method of welding, and electrodes and filler wires. 

WLD 205 Welding Codes, Specifications and Estimating 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Advisor approval. Provides students with different types of welding codes and testing operations. Covers procedures, specifications and 
information about filler materials, positions, post-heat and pre-heat treatment, backing strips, preparations of parent metals, cleaning and defects. 
Includes AWS and ASME code. 

WLD 206 Shielded Metal Arc Welding II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 108 - Shielded Metal Arc Welding I. Covers SMAW welding equipment and products used to produce groove type butt welds. 
Provides extensive practice to develop the skills to achieve satisfactory welds of this type. Safety hazards and safe practices in arc welding are emphasized. 

WLD 207 Gas Metal Arc (MIG) Welding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: None. Considers various gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes including microwire, flux-core, innershield and submerged arc with 
emphasis on metal inert gas welding. Includes techniques of welding in all positions on various thicknesses of metal. 

WLD 208 Gas Tungsten Arc (TIG) Welding 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 109 - Oxy-Acetylene Gas Welding and Cutting. Provides students with thorough knowledge of the gas tungsten arc welding process. 
Includes detailed study of the techniques of making welds in all positions using the GTAW applications. Lectures and discussions provide additional 
background information essential to a qualified GTAW welder. 

WLD 209 Welding Certification 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: Program chair approval. Prepares the student for certification in shielded arc, TIG and MIG welding through study of the qualifications, 
procedures and equipment standards. Includes a survey of qualifying agencies, associations and societies. 

WLD 210 Welding Fabrication II 3 Credits 

Prerequisites: WLD 1 10 - Welding Fabrication I. Provides for practice in hands-on fabrication and the use of related equipment. 



Cot RSL DlISCRimONS 







Program Availability 



Ivy Tech State College offers many educational programs. Not all 
programs are offered at all campuses, however, and the degrees 
available within a program may vary from campus to campus. 
Use this section to find out what programs and degrees are 
available at the campus that interests you. 



H§ - M 


PI 

fmfk 

mm 





Program Availability 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 
Office Administration 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Electronics Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Medical Assistant 



Anderson Campus 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Office Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

General Technical Studies 

Industrial Technology 

Medical Assistant 

Practical Nursing 



Associate of Science 

Business Administration 
Electronics Technology 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 



Bloomington Campus 

Technical Certificate 

General Technical Studies 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 



Associate of Science 

Assoc of Science in Nursing 
Business Administration 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 
Office Administration 
Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Early Childhood Education 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Manufacturing Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Radiologic Technology 
Surgical Technology 
Visual Communications 



Columbus Campus 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Early Childhood Education 
General Technical Studies 
Industrial Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 



Associate of Science 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 




Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 
Office Administration 
Automotive Technology 
Computer Information Systems 
Construction Technology 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Hospitality Administration 
Industrial Technology 



East Chicago Campus 

Technical Certificate 

Automotive Technology 
Computer Information Systems 
Construction Technology 
Design Technology 
General Technical Studies 
Hospitality Administration 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 



Associate of Science 

Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 



Program Availability 257 



Elkhart Campus 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Recreational Vehicle Repair Tech 



Technical Certificate 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
General Technical Studies 
Industrial Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 
Recreational Vehicle Repair Tech 



Associate of Science 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Early Childhood Education 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Interior Design 
Manufacturing Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Paramedic Science 
Surgical Technology 
Visual Communications 
Early Childhood Education 



Evansville Campus 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Early Childhood Education 
General Technical Studies 
Industrial Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 




Associate of Science 

Assoc of Science in Nursing 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Visual Communications 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 
Office Administration 
Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Early Childhood Education 
Computer Information Systems 
Construction Technology 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Hospitality Administration 
Human Services 
Industrial Technology 
Manufacturing Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Public Safety 
Respiratory Care 



Fort Wayne Campus 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
Early Childhood Education 
Computer Information Systems 
Construction Technology 
Design Technology 
General Technical Studies 
Hospitality Administration 
Human Services 
Industrial Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 



Associate of Science 

Business Administration 

Early Childhood Education 

Design Technology 

Electronics Technology 

Human Sendees 

Paralegal 

Physical Therapist Assistant 



Prog ram Ava i lability 



Gary Campus 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Early Childhood Education 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Hospitality Administration 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 
Public Safety 



Technical Certificate 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Early Childhood Education 
Design Technology 
General Technical Studies 
Hospitality Administration 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 



Associate of Science 

Assoc of Science in Nursing 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Office Administration 
Physical Therapist Assistant 



Indianapolis Campus 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Hospitality Administration 
Human Services 
Industrial Technology 
Machine Tool Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Paralegal 
Public Safety 
Radiologic Technology 
Respiratory Care 
Surgical Technology 
Visual Communications 



Technical Certificate 

Early Childhood Education 
Design Technology 
General Technical Studies 
Industrial Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 



Associate of Science 

Accounting 

Assoc of Science in Nursing 
Business Administration 
Early Childhood Education 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Human Services 
Occupatl. Therapy Assisting 
Office Administration 



Program Availability 



Kokomo Campus 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Paramedic Science 



Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Computer Information Systems 
Construction Technology 
Design Technology 
General Technical Studies 
Industrial Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 



Associate of Science 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 



Lafayette Campus 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Early Childhood Education 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics 
Industrial Technology 
Manufacturing 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Quality Science 
Surgical Technology 



Technical Certificate 

Automotive Technology 
Early Childhood Education 
Dental Assistant 
Design Technology 
General Technical Studies 
Industrial Technology 
Manufacturing 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 



Associate of Science 

Accounting 

Associate of Science in Nursing 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Design Technology 

Electronics 

Respiratory Care 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 



Lawrenceburg Campus 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
General Technical Studies 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 



Associate of Science 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 



Logansport Campus 



Associate of Applied Science 

Early Childhood Education 
Computer Information Systems 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 



Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Computer Information Systems 
General Technical Studies 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 



Associate of Science 

Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 



MlUJmiWIIllllffl 



Madison Campus 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Electronics Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Manufacturing Technology 
Office Administration 



Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
General Technical Studies 
Human Services 
Industrial Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 



Associate of Science 

Associate of Science in Nursing 
Business Administration 
Electronics Technology 



Marion Campus 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Business Administration 

Computer Information Systems 

Electronics Technology 

Medical Assistant 

Office Administration 

Radiologic Technology 



Technical Certificate 

Computer Information Systems 
General Technical Studies 
Medical Assistant 



Associate of Science 

Business Administration 
Electronics Technology 



Michigan City Campus 



Associate of Applied Science 

Business Administration 
Hospitality Administration 
Medical Assistant 
Respiratory Care 
Surgical Technology 



Technical Certificate 

Medical Assistant 
Respiratory Care 



Associate of Science 

Business Administration 
Electronics Technology 



Muncie Campus 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Early Childhood Education 
Computer Information Systems 
Construction Technology 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Human Services 
Industrial Technology 
Manufacturing Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Paralegal 
Surgical Technology 



Technical Certificate 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Construction Technology 
General Technical Studies 
Industrial Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 



Associate of Science 

Associate of Science in Nursing 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Human Services 
Paralegal 
Physical Therapist Assistant 



Program Availability 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Early Childhood Education 
Computer Information Systems 
Construction Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Manufacturing Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 



1 j *~ 

chmond Campus 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Computer Information Systems 
Construction Technology 
General Technical Studies 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 



Associate of Science 

Assoc of Science in Nursing 
Business Administration 
Early Childhood Education 
Computer Information Systems 
Electronics Technology 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Human Services 
Industrial Technology 
Manufacturing Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Visual Communications 



Sellersburg Campus 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
General Technical Studies 
Human Services 
Industrial Technology 
Manufacturing Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 



Associate of Science 

Assoc of Science in Nursing 
Business Administration 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Human Services 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Hospitality Administration 
Industrial Technology 
Interior Design 
Manufacturing Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Medical Lab Technician 
Office Administration 
Video Technology 
Visual Communications 



South Bend Cai 

Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
General Technical Studies 
Industrial Technology 
Manufacturing Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 



Associate of Science 

Associate of Science in Nursing 
Business Administration 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Visual Communications 



Terre Haute Campus 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Aviation Technology 
Business Administration 
Early Childhood Education 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Human Services 
Industrial Technology 
Manufacturing 
Medical Assistant 
Medical Lab Technician 
Office Administration 
Paramedic 
Public Safety 
Quality Science 
Radiologic Technology 
Surgical Technology 
Visual Communications 



Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Avionics 

Early Childhood Education 
General Technical Studies 
Industrial Technology 
Medical Assistant 
Office Administration 
Practical Nursing 
Public Safety 



Associate of Science 

Business Administration 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Human Services 
Manufacturing Technology 



Valparaiso Campus 



Associate of Applied Science 

Accounting 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Electronics Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Office Administration 
Paralegal 



Technical Certificate 

Automotive Technology 
Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Design Technology 
General Technical Studies 
Industrial Technology 



Associate of Science 

Business Administration 
Electronics Technology 
Paralegal 



Warsaw Campus 



Associate of Applied Science 

Computer Information Systems 



Technical Certificate 

Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
General Technical Studies 
Office Administration 



Associate of Science 



Program Availability 




Faculty & Staff 



t, 



Y 




BOARD OF TR 



Joseph T. Bumbleburg, Chairman, Lafayette 
Francis H. Lueken, Jr., Vice Chairman, Ferdinand 
William R. Goins, Secretary, Rushville 

Marvin E. Foote, Fort Wayne 
E. Celestine Johnson, Kokomo 
Paul H. Kloth, Merrillville 
Bill R. Liwix, Indianapolis 
Linda B. Lorch, New Albany 
Albert H. Schumaker II, Columbus 
Darryl A. Smith, Madison 
Jerry D. Speidel, Anderson 
Thomas E. Taylor, South Bend 



COLLEGE OFFICERS 



Lamkin, Gerald I., President 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 
Harris, Charles W., Vice President for Development 

BS, Ball State University; JD, Indiana University School of Law 
Holmes, Robert C, Vice President for Finance and Treasurer 

BBA, University of Iowa; MPA, Indiana University 
Kramer, William D., Vice President for Planning and Education 

BS, Slippery Rock State College; MS, PED, Indiana University 
Morris, William F., Vice President for Administration 

BS, Indiana State University 
Price, M. Crocker, Vice President and General Counsel 

BA, Occidental College; JD, University of California 



REGION 1 



OFFICERS 



Cole, Darnell, Vice President/Chancellor 

AA, BA, Ferris State University; MA, Central Michigan University; PhD, 
Michigan State University 

Comer, Norman, Executive Dean, East Chicago 

BS, Northwestern University; MS, Indiana University; EdD, Loyola 

University 
Rogers, Delores, Executive Dean, Valparaiso 

BA, Simpson College; MS, St. Francis College 
Halik, Deborah A., Dean of Academic Affairs 

BS, Calumet College of Saint Joseph; MS, Purdue University 
Huddleston, Jerry L., Campus Dean, Michigan City 

BS, MA, Ball State University 
Valtierra, J. Guadalupe, Dean of Student Affairs, Gary 

BS, Purdue University; MS, JD, Indiana University 



FACULTY 



Adams, Roger L., Associate Professor in General Education, East Chicago 
BA, MA, Western Michigan University 



Alspaugh, Deborah M., Associate Professor in Basic Skills, Gary 

BS, MPA, Indiana University 
Anthony, David, Instructor in Automotive Technology, East Chicago 

BA, MS, Chicago State University 
Banks, Mary A., Associate Professor in Office Administration, East Chicago 

BS, Alcorn A & M; MS, Indiana University 
Bell, Emilly A., Assistant Professor in Basic Skills, Valparaiso 

BS, Akron University; MS, Indiana University 
Blaszkiewicz, Holly, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, 

Gary 

AA, MS, Purdue University; BA, Calumet College of St. Joseph 
Bowman, Leroy E., Associate Professor in Accounting, Valparaiso 

AS, Valparaiso Tech; BS, Valparaiso University; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan 

University 
Bruce, Paul R, Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Michigan City 

AAS, BS, Purdue University 
Cannon, Michelle, Instructor in Accounting, Gary 

MBA, Indiana University 
Capriotti, Gary, Instructor in Industrial Technology, East Chicago 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
Charbonneau, James R., Associate Professor in Electronics, Gary 

BS, Valparaiso Tech 
Christe, Marie D., Instructor in Physical Therapist Assistant, Gary 

BS, Emilio Aguinaldo College 
Cope, Charles T, Instructor in Construction, Program Chair, Gary 

TC, Ivy Tech State College; Certified in Steel Framing, Amencan Iron and 

Steel Institute 
DeNeal Patricia D., Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Gary 

Diploma, St. Mary Mercy; BS, St. Francis; MS, University of Notre Dame 
Dickson, Joan R, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Valparaiso 

AD, BS, Purdue University 
Downs, Dale D., Assistant Professor in General Education, East Chicago 

BS, Loyola University Chicago; MS, PhD, The University of Illinois at 

Chicago 
Dye, James, Assistant Professor in Physical Therapist Assistant, Program Chair, 

Gary 

BS, University of Illinois, Chicago Circle 
Espinoza, Alfonso, Instructor in Automotive Technology, East Chicago 
Excell, Donna J., Associate Professor in Office Administration, Gary 

BA, MS, Purdue L'niversity 
Fabian, Alfred E., Professor in Business Administration, Gary 

BA, University of Georgia; MBA, Roosevelt University 
Feuerbach, Elizabeth Z., Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Gary 

BS, Calumet College of St. Joseph 
Gatewood, Eric L., Instructor in Physical Therapist Assistant, Gary 

BS, Indiana University 
Given, Joan G., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Valparaiso 

Diploma, Suburban Hospital; BS, St. Francis; MS, Valparaiso University 
Guadiana, Juan P., Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, East Chicago 

ASE; AAS, Vincennes University; BS, Indiana State University 
Harrell, Jesse W, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Gary 

ASME, AWS Welding Certification 
Harris, Danita S., Instructor in Respiratory Care, Michigan City 

BS, Cabrini College; MPA, Indiana University 



Harvey, Ethel, Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems, Gary 

BS, Purdue University; MEA, Indiana University 
Hittle, Debra J., Instructor in Surgical Technology, Michigan City 

AAS, Purdue University 
Holcey, Janice, Associate Professor in Basic Skills, Department Chair, East 

Chicago 

BS, MS, Indiana University 
Hollingsworth, Genetha S., Associate Professor in Basic Skills, Gary 

BS, Fayetteville State University 
Hominger, Linda K., Associate Professor in Nursing, Program Chair, Valparaiso 

BSN, MSN, Valparaiso University; BS, College of St. Francis; MA, Ball State 

University; RNC, National Certification Corporation 
Horne, Saundra S., Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Program Chair, Gary 

AAS, Purdue University; BS, MS, College of St. Francis 
Igboegwa, Charles, Professor in Design Technology, East Chicago 

BS, MS, Eastern Illinois University; PhD, University of Illinois 
Jeftich, Danny P., Associate Professor in Basic Skills and General Education, 

Department Chair, Valparaiso 

BA, MS, College of St. Francis 
Johnson, Ruth A., Assistant Professor in Nursing, Valparaiso 

BS, Purdue University 
Jordan, Parnell, Instructor in Industrial Technology, East Chicago 

ASME, AWS Welding Certification 
Kanolis, Chris F., Associate Professor in Business Administration, East Chicago 

BA, MBA, Indiana University 
King, Lydia M., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Gary 

AA, Indiana University; BS, College of St. Francis 
Klein, Raymond G., Associate Professor in Electronics, Valparaiso 

BS, Illinois Institute of Technology 
Klodzen, Carolyn M., Assistant Professor in General Education, Valparaiso 

BA, MA, Valparaiso University 
Kolvek, Janice A., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Gar)' 

AS, Paul D. Camp College; BS, Old Dominion University; BS, Valparaiso 

University 
Layhew, Susan J., Associate Professor in Respiratory Therapy, Program Chair, 

Michigan City 

Technical Certificate, Respiratory Therapy, National Board/Respiratory Care; 

BA, Calumet College 
Lobdell, Norma, Instructor in Hospitality, Gary 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
Love, Nancy L., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Gary 

AAS, Indiana University; BS, Purdue University 
Miller, Harry B., Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Valparaiso 

ASME, AWS Welding Certification 
Morikis, Ethel, Assistant Professor in Medical Assistant, Program Chair, 

Michigan City 

AS, BS, Indiana University 

Murrell, Jimmie L., Associate Professor in Automotive Technology, East Chicago 

BA, Chicago State University; Certified - The National Institute of 
Automotive Service Excellence 

Neary, James H., Associate Professor in General Education, Gary 

BA, University of Notre Dame; MA, Purdue University 
Obajuluwa, Victor A., Assistant Professor in Physical Therapist Assistant, Gary 

BA, MEd, PhD, University of Ibadan 



Olson, Kathy G., Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Gary 

BA, Tri-State College, MS Ed, Purdue West Lafayette 
Plank, Lora Y., Assistant Professor in Surgical Technology, Program Chair, 

Michigan City 

AAS, Purdue University; Certified Surgical Technologist 
Pollard, Louise F., Associate Professor in Basic Skills, Department Chair, Gary 

BS, Wayne State University; MRC, Arkansas State University 
Remar, John M., Associate Professor in Business Administration, East Chicago 

BGS, Roosevelt University; MS, Chicago State University 
Riddle, Jared M., Instructor in Basic Skills, East Chicago 

BA, Indiana University 
Roman, Socorro M., Professor in Nursing, Department Chair, Gary 

AAS, BS, MS, Purdue University 
Rosillo, Laura, Assistant Professor in General Education, East Chicago 

BA, Indiana University; MD, IU School of Medicine, Indianapolis 
Rue, Gina M., Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Gary 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Calumet College of St. Joseph 
Sargent, Mary K., Assistant Professor in General Education, Valparaiso 

BS, MS, University of Alabama 
Schoenfelder, John H., Professor in Business Administration, Department 

Chair, Valparaiso 

AAS, Moraine Valley College; BA, MA, Governors State University 
Scott, Sharon T., Instructor in Medical Assistant, Gary 

Certified Laboratory Assistant (ASCP) 
Siddiqui, Muhammad T., Instructor in Hospitality, Gary 

AA, San Jacinto College; BA, The University of Texas of the Permian Basin 
Siewert, John A., Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, East Chicago 

Dupont Certified 
Sikoski, Aco, Instructor in Design Technology, Department Chair, Valparaiso 

BA, "Kiril I Metodij" Skopje Macedonia 
Stalevska, Liljana S., Instructor in General Education, Valparaiso 

BS, University of Skopje 
Steele, John R., Associate Professor in General Education, Gary 

BED, MS, Chicago State University; MHA, Governors State University 
Stowers, Beverly A., Associate Professor in Office Administration, Valparaiso 

BA, Cedarville College; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Wheeler, Shari L., Instructor in Child Development, Gary 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 
Williams, Gomer, Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Valparaiso 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
Zernik, Joseph D., Associate Professor in Business Administration, Department 

Chair, Gary 

BS, Calumet College; MS, Purdue University 



REGION '2 



Calvin, Virginia, Chancellor 

BS, Alcorn State University; MA, New Mexico Highlands University; EdD, 
Texas Women's University 



Batzer, Lyn, Dean of Academic Affairs 

BS, Northern Illinois University; MS, Indiana University-South Bend; EdD. 
Western Michigan University 

Hatfield, Charlotte, Campus Dean - Elkhart Site 

BS, MA, PhD, University of Texas at Austin 
Walgamuth, Joann, Campus Dean - Warsaw Site 

BS, MA, University of Houston 
Brown, Kim, Dean of Student Affairs, South Bend 

BS, Indiana University South Bend; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 



F A C U 



Adamczyk, Richard, Assistant Professor in Manufacturing Technology, South 
Bend 

BS, University of Krakow; Technical Mechanic and Teacher Degree, 
Pedagogical Technical School, Kielce (Poland) 

Alpiner, Marvin L., Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, 
Program Chair, South Bend 

BS, University of Detroit; MS, Boston University, MBA, Indiana University; 
DDS University of Detroit 

Aslandis, George, Assistant Professor in Electronics, Program Chair, South 

Bend 

BS, DeVry Institute of Technology; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Bartels, Barbara A., Assistant Professor in Office Administration, Warsaw 

BS, Ball State University; MS, St. Francis College 
Bartram, David, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Elkhart 

BA, MA, Michigan State University 
Boembeke, Angela, Instructor in Visual Communications, South Bend 

BA, Anderson University; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Borowski, George J., Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, South Bend 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BAS, Siena Heights College 
Burtch, Gale R., Assistant Professor in Basic Skills, Elkhart 

BA, Indiana University-Bloomington; MS, Indiana University-South Bend 
Comeau, John, Associate Professor in General Education, South Bend 

BA, University of Notre Dame; MS, Indiana University 
Crenshaw, Dolly, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, South Bend 

AA, South Suburban College; BS, MA, Western Michigan University 
Conley, Ruth, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, South Bend 

Diploma, Memorial Hospital School of Nursing; BSN, Bethel College 
Con-, Mary, Assistant Professor in Associate Degree Nursing, South Bend 

BSN, Ball State University; MSN, Valparaiso University 
Curry, Deborah, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, South Bend 

BSN, Pittsburg State University 
DePaul, Louis, Assistant Professor in Accounting, Department Chair, Elkhart 

BS, Youngstown State University; MBA, Indiana University 
Freel, Linda, Assistant Professor in Visual Communications, South Bend 

BA, Bethel College; MS, Indiana University-South Bend; MFA, University of 

Notre Dame 
Freygang, Jim, Assistant Professor in Design Technology, South Bend 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BFA, St. Francis College 
Ganns, Richard, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, South 

Bend 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BA, Indiana University 
Garrells, Martha, Associate Professor in Medical Assistant, Program Chair, 

South Bend 

BS, Michigan State University; MS, University of Notre Dame 



Gerbasich, Karen, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, South Bend 

BSN, St. Mary's College 
Gerdes, Edith, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, South Bend 

ADN, Purdue University; BHCA, St. Josephs College 

Gick, Desmond, Associate Professor in Computer Information Services, South 

Bend 

BS, Purdue University 
Hackemann, Sandra, Assistant Professor in Basic Skills, Elkhart 

BA, Millsaps College; MA George Peabody College 
Harris, Imogene, Associate Professor in Business, Division Chair, South Bend 

BS, Southern University 
Henkel, Chuck, Associate Professor in Technology, Division Chair, South Bend 

BA, Bethel College; MA, EDS, Western Michigan University 
Heyde, Susan, Assistant Professor in Office Administration, Elkhart 

BS, Ferris State University; MA, Ball State University 

Hiers, Judy, Assistant Professor in Office Administration, Program Chair, South 

Bend 

AAS, Delta College; BS, Western Michigan University 
Horning, Greg, Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Program Chair, 

South Bend 

BA, Indiana University at South Bend; MA, Western Michigan University 

Huettl, Robert, Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Program Chair, 

South Bend 

AS, University of Wisconsin-Barron County Campus; BS, University of 

Wisconsin-Stout 
Kambs, Dennis, Instructor in Business Administration, Division Chair, South 

Bend 

BS, Andrews University; MA, Western Michigan University 
Kent, Katherine, Associate Professor in Interior Design, Program Chair, South 

Bend 

BS, Andrews University; MA, Western Michigan University 
Keusch, Donna, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, South Bend 

Diploma, Memorial Hospital School of Nursing; BSN, Indiana University; 

MSN, Valparaiso University 
King, David, Instructor in Industrial Technology, South Bend 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Indiana University 

Kirkner, Carol, Associate Professor in Medical Laboratory Technician, Division 

Chair, South Bend 

BS, Kent State University; MS, University of Notre Dame 
Krakowski, Beth, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Program Chair, South 

Bend 

Diploma, Memorial Hospital School of Nursing; BSN, University of 

l:vansville 

Kunter, Kay, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, South Bend 

Diploma, Union Hospital School of Nursing; BSN, Indiana State University; 

MS, Indiana University 
Lankston, Thomas, Assistant Professor in General Education, South Bend 

BS, Purdue University; MS, Michigan State University 
Ledsome, Daniel, Assistant Professor in General Education, South Bend 

BA, Muskingum College; MA, Miami University 
Lutz, Mark, Assistant Professor in General Education, South Bend 

BA, University of Southern California; MA, University of Notre Dame 
McCullough, Henry, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, 

Elkhart 

AB, Grmnell College 



Measell, Nancy, Assistant Professor in Medical Assistant, South Bend 

AAS, J. Sargent Reynolds Community College; BA, Winthrop College 
Meier, Kathleen, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Elkhart 

BA, Ball State University; BSN, Goshen College 
Powell, James, Associate Professor in General Education, Division Chair, South 

Bend 

BS, Rose-Hulman Polytechnic Institute; PhD, University of Notre Dame 

Primrose, Pamela, Assistant Professor in Medical Laboratory Technician, 
Program Chair, South Bend 

BS, Indiana University 
Qintanilla, Debra, Instructor m Medical Assisting, Elkhart 

BS, University of Texas Pan American 
Sattler, Lauran, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Warsaw 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Goshen College 
Shafer, Carole, Instructor in Associate Degree Nursing, South Bend 

Diploma, Memorial Hospital School of Nursing; BSN, Defiance College; MS, 

St. Francis College 
Simala, Arlene, Instructor in Associate Degree Nursing, South Bend 

BSN, St. Mary's College; MS, Indiana University-South Bend 
Smyers, Harry, Assistant Instructor in Automotive Services, South Bend 

TC, Ivy Tech State College 

Stephans, Michael, Instructor in Hospitality, Program Chair, South Bend 

Stevens, Julia, Assistant Professor in Nursing, South Bend 

Diploma, Lincoln General Hospital School of Nursing; BS, Nebraska 
Wesleyan University; BSN, Central Missouri State University; MS, Andrews 
University 

VanOosterum, Cynthia, Assistant Professor in Accounting, Program Chair, 
South Bend 

BS, MBA, Indiana University-South Bend 

Waltz-Freel, Kathryn, Associate Professor in Basic Skills, Program Chair, South 

Bend 

BA, Montana State University; MS, Indiana University 
Wcisel, Mary, Associate Professor in Nursing, Program Chair, South Bend 

BSN, Ball State; MSN, Indiana University 
Weis, Thomas, Instructor in Visual Communications, South Bend 

BA, Indiana University 

Wisler-Dietrich, Dorothy, Assistant Professor in Associate Degree Nursing, 
South Bend 

BSN, Indiana University at South Bend; MSN, Andrews University 

Wolfson, Colette, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Department 
Chair, South Bend 

BS, Indiana University; MS, Indiana University 

Zink, Frank, Assistant Professor in General Education, South Bend 

BA, Flint College; M. Divinity, Asbury Theological Seminary 



REGION 3 



OFFICERS 



Rupright, Jon L., Vice President/Chancellor 

BS, Huntington College; MS, Saint Francis College; MMP Studies, General 
Electric Co. 

Keen, Mark A., Dean of Academic Affairs, Fort Wayne 

AAS, BS, ITT Technical Institute, MS, Indiana Wesleyan University 



Lewton, J. Charles, Dean of Student Affairs, Fort Wayne 
BS, Indiana State University; MS, Purdue University 



FACULTY 



Bickley, Myron H, Assistant Professor in Electronics Technology, Program Chair, 
Fort Wayne 

AAS, Central Technical Institute, Missouri, BS, Purdue University; MS, 
Indiana University 

Bissell, Theresa, Assistant Professor in General Education, Department Chair, 
Fort Wayne 

BA, DePauw University; MS, Purdue University 

Boneff, Rose L., Instructor in Respiratory Care, Fort Wayne 

AS, BS, Indiana University 

Bowers, Elwood, Associate Professor in General Education and Instructional 
Support Services, Division Chair, Fort Wayne 

AS, Kellogg Community College; BS, MA, EdD, Western Michigan University 
Brink, Jennifer, Instructor in Respiratory Care, Program Chair, Fort Wayne 

RRT, AS, Butler University 
Burch, Jeffrey B., Instructor in Manufactunng Technology, Fort Wayne 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
Carothers, Rebecca S., Instructor in Child Development, Program Chair, Fort 

Wayne 

BS, MAE, Ball State University 
Crowder, Kay M., Instructor in Child Development, Fort Wayne 

AS, Indiana University; BS, Indiana Institute of Technology; MS, Indiana 

Wesleyan 
Dever, JoAnn, Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Program Chair, Fort 

Wayne 

RN, BSN, University of Evansviile; MSN Ed, Indiana University 
Diller, Jewel K., Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Fort Wayne 

RN, BS, Fort Wayne Bible College; MSEd., Indiana University 

Ditton, Donna S., Assistant Professor in General Education, Program Chair, 

Fort Wayne 

BA, Purdue University, MA, Ball State University 
Eads, Patricia E., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Fort Wayne 

AS, Purdue University; BSN, Ball Sate University; MSEd, Indiana University, 

RN 
Enea, Charles, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Program Chair, Fort Wayne 

BS, Tri-State University 
Eyler, George Alan, Associate Professor in Hospitality Administration, Program 

Chair, Fort Wayne 

BGS, Indiana University 
Falk, John E., Instructor in Construction Technology, Program Chair, Fort 

Wayne 

Licensed Journeyman Plumber; Licensed Plumbing Contractor 
Gallo, Edward A., Associate Professor m General Education, Program Chair, 

Fort Wayne 

BS, Worcester Polytechnic Institute; MS University of Texas at El Paso 
Geib, Janet L., Associate Professor in Office Administration, Fort Wayne 

AA, International Junior College; BS, MA, Ball State University 
Wiegand-Green, Tova, Assistant Professor in Medical Assistant, Fort Wayne 

BS, Purdue University, CMA 
Heise, Joan M., Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems, Program 

Chair, Fort Wayne 

BS, MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 



II 



Hensel, Dennis, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Fort Wayne 

CWE, American Welding Society, AAS, Ivy Tech State College 

Hess, James P, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Program Chair, 
Fort Wayne 

BA, Manchester College; MBA, Indiana University 

Hess, John W., Associate Professor in Construction Technology, Fort Wayne 

BA, Tri-State University 

Hill, Alicia, Assistant Professor in Medical Assistant, Program Chair, Fort 
Wayne 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Indiana Wesleyan University, CMA 

Hultquist, Sharon S., Librarian, Fort Wayne 

AA, Stephens College, BS Ed, Indiana University; MLS, Indiana University 
Jordan, Denise M., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Fort Wayne 

RN, BSN, Indiana University; MA, Ball State University, 

Kauffman, Kent D., Assistant Professor in Paralegal, Program Chair, Fort Wayne 

BA, Temple University; JD, The Dickinson School of Law 

Keathley, Michael W, Assistant Professor in General Education, Program Chair, 
Fort Wayne 

BA, Michigan State University; MA, Wayne State University 

Kelder, Michael O., Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Fort Wayne 

AAS, ITT Technical Institute; BA, Tri-State University 

Kelsey, Ralph L,, Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Program Chair, 
Fort Wayne 

AAS, Purdue University 
Kelty, Robert, Assistant Professor in Hospitality Administration, Division Chair, 
Fort Wayne 

AB, St. Francis College, MS, Indiana University 

Kemerer, Patricia, Instructor in General Education, Program Chair, Fort Wayne 

BA, Youngstown State University; MS, University of Saint Francis 
Khouli, Vicki L., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Fort Wayne 

BSN, MA, Ball State University; RN 
Knight, John, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Fort 

Wayne 

BS, Ball State University 
Leckrone, Jeannine, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Fort Wayne 

BS, Youngstown State 
Leigh, Ronald W., Associate Professor in Design Technology, Fort Wayne 

AB, MA, Wheaton College; PhD, New York University 
Lengerich, Donald D., Associate Professor in Accounting, Fort Wayne 

BS, Indiana University; MSE, MBA, St. Francis College, CPA 
Lenhart, Suzanne, Instructor in Human Services, Fort Wayne 

BA, Defiance College; MA, Antioch University 
Lynch, John D., Assistant Professor in Accounting, Program Chair, Fort Wayne 

BS, Purdue University 
Martin, Richard, Instructor in Manufacturing Technology, Fort Wayne 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; U.S. Dept. of Labor Certified Tool and Die 

Maker 
Metzger, Rebecca, Assistant Professor in Baste Skills, Fort Wayne 

BS, Ball State University; MA, Regent University 
McCormick, Patrick, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Fort 

Wayne 

AAS, IPFW; BS, Purdue University 
Nagel, Diane E., Assistant Professor in Basic Skills, Fort Wayne 

BA, Saint Francis College 



Negahban, Rahim, Associate Professor in Electronics Technology, Fort Wayne 
AS, Calhoun State Community College; BSEE, University of Alabama; 
MSEE., Tuskegee Institute 

Robinson, Andrea, Instructor in Office Administration, Program Chair, Fort 
Wayne 

AS, BS, Purdue 
Romines, Linda, Assistant Professor in Medical Assistant, Fort Wayne 

BSN, Purdue University; CMA, RN 
Rothgeb, Marcia, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Fort Wayne 

AAS, Purdue University; BA, Saint Francis College; RN 
Royse, Brian L., Assistant Professor in General Education, Fort Wayne 

BA, MA, Indiana University 
Scheer, Steve, Assistant Professor, Basic Skills, Fort Wayne 

BS, Indiana University; MBA, St. Francis College 
Schladenhauffen, Candace S., Assistant Professor in Respiratory Care, Division 

Chair, Fort Wayne 

BS, Indiana University; RRT, RPFT 
Shattuck, Carol, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Fort Wayne 

BS, University of St. Francis; MS, Indiana University; MSN, Indiana Wesleyan 
Shearer, James C, Instructor in Construction Technology, Fort Wayne 
Steele, Laura, Instructor in General Education, Fort Wayne 

BS, MS, Purdue University 
Stonebraker, Ben A., Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Fort Wayne 

AAS, Indiana Vocational Technical College; BS, Purdue University 
Stroup, Donald L., Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Fort 

Wayne 

BS, Purdue University; MBA, Michigan State University 
■Surface, Michael O., Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Fort Wayne 

BS, Purdue University 
Thierer, Nina L., Associate Professor in Medical Assistant, Fort Wayne 

AAS, Indiana Vocational Technical College, BS, Indiana Institute of 

Technology, CMA 
Treff, Conrad C, Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Fort Wayne 

BS, Fairleigh Dickinson University 
Tumbleson, Steven L., Assistant Professor in Manufacturing Technology, 

Program Chair, Fort Wayne 

BS; MA, Ball State University 
Van Valkfnburg, Maria, Associate Professor in Basic Skills, Fort Wayne 

BA, Nazareth College of Rochester; MA, University of Notre Dame 
Vick, Jan S., Assistant Professor in Human Services, Fort Wayne 

BS, Ball State University, MS, Saint Francis College 
Walsh, John D., Assistant Professor in General Education, Fort Wayne 

BS, University of Notre Dame; MS, Wesleyan University 
Walter, John L., Associate Professor in Manufacturing Technology, Division 

Chair, Fort Wayne 

AAS, Indiana Vocational Technical College; BS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Weiss, Anna C, Assistant Professor in Accounting, Fort Wayne 

BA, Middlebury University; MSEd, Indiana University, CPA 
Wesner, Joyce A., Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Program Chair, 

Fort Wayne 

AAS, Indiana Vocational Technical College; BS, Ball State University; MS Ed, 

Indiana Wesleyan University 
Wilson, Jerry, Instructor in Hospitality Administration, Fort Wayne 






REGION 



OFFICERS 



Doversberger, Elizabeth J., Chancellor 

BS, Purdue University; MA, Bradley University; PhD, Illinois State University 
Bathe, David, Dean of Instruction 

AS, Vincennes University; BS, Greenville College; MS, PhD, Illinois State 

University 
Laws, John, Dean of Student Affairs, Lafayette 

BS, MS, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale; EdD, Indiana University 



Abel, Cindy A., Assistant Professor in Medical Assistant, Program Chair, 

Lafayette 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Addison, Paul, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Lafayette 

BA, Indiana University; M.S., Xavier University 
Bavva, Satish, Instructor in Business Administration, Lafayette 

BA, Dehli University; MBA, Xavier University 
Benkert, Rebecca J., Instructor in Nursing, Lafayette 

BSN, MSN, Old Dominion University 
Bricker, Ken, Instructor in Industrial Maintenance, Program Chair, Lafayette 

A.S., Laramie College; BS, Purdue University 
Buckles, Judith A., Associate Professor in Dental Assistant, Program Chair, 

Lafayette 

AAS, BS, Purdue University 
Deadman, Robert, Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Lafayette 

AAS, BS, Purdue University 
Dolk, Karen L., Associate Professor in Nursing, Program Chair, Lafayette 

BSN, University of Pittsburgh; MSN, Case Western Reserve University 
Dougherty, Kathi K, Associate Professor in Dental Assistant, Lafayette 

BS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Duda, Marsha K, Professor in Practical Nursing, Program Chair, Lafayette 

AS, Purdue University; BSN, Michigan State University; MSN, Indiana 

University 
Faust, Judith, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Lafayette 

BSN, Ball State University 
Franchville, Elizabeth A., Instructor in Practical Nursing, Lafayette 

Diploma in Nursing, Deaconess Hospital School of Nursing; BSN, Purdue 

University 
Graham, Lisa L., Assistant Instructor in Surgical Technology, Lafayette 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
Hall, Dorothy S., Associate Professor in Surgical Technology, Program Chair, 

Lafayette 

AAS, Purdue University; BSN, Graceland College 
Hearn, David H., Assistant Professor m Basic Skills, Lafayette 

BS, MS, University of Delaware; PhD, Purdue University 
Helvie, Brenda A., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Lafayette 

BSN, Indiana University 
James, Peggy S., Professor in Respiratory Care, Program Chair, Lafayette 

AAS, Lansing Community College; BS, MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 



Jones, Elizabeth A., Assistant Professor in Nursing, Lafayette 

AAS, BSN, MS, Purdue University 
Karwisch, Eric, Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Program Chair, Lafayette 

BS, Purdue University; MS, Indiana University 
Lana, Elizabeth A., Instructor in Practical Nursing, Lafayette 

AAS, BS, Purdue University 
Lichti, Janet J., Instructor in General Education, Program Chair, Lafayette 

BA, Clark University; MA Purdue University 
Lindberg, Amanda Barche, Instructor in Child Development, Program Chair, 

Lafayette 

BA, North Central College; MA, Eastern Illinois University 

Mack, Rosemary J., Instructor in Basic Skills Advancement, Program Chair, 
Lafayette 

BA, University College of North Wales; MA, University of Manchester 

Maniak, Lynn M., Associate Professor in Nursing, Lafayette 

Diploma in Nursing, St. Mary's Mercy Hospital; BSN, Valparaiso University; 
BS, College of St. Francis; MSN, Purdue University-Calumet 

Manian, Vyju V, Instructor in General Education, Lafayette 

BS, MS, University of Bombay; MS, University of Pittsburgh; MS, Columbia 
University 

Mercier, William C, Assistant Professor in General Education, Lafayette 

BA, University of Colorado; MS, University of Cincinnati 
Miller, Cynthia J., Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Lafayette 

AS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Miller, Jolene K, Professor and Division Chair in Health and Human Services, 

Lafayette 

AS, University of Southern Indiana; BS, College of St. Francis; MS, Purdue 

University 
Nance, Dennis A., Associate Professor in Industrial Technology, Program Chair, 

Lafayette 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BA, Southwestern University 
Nees, Vicki L., Instructor in Practical Nursing, Lafayette 

AAS, Purdue University; BSN, Purdue University 
Paepke, Fred G., Assistant Professor in Industnal Technology, Program Chair, 

Lafayette 

AAS, BS, Ferris State University; MA, Central Michigan University 

Prater, Barbara G., Associate Professor in Chemistry, General Education and 
Support Services, Division Chair, Lafayette 

BA, University of Kansas; PhD, University of Texas at Austin 
Roberson, Glen D., Instructor in Automotive Technology, Technology Division 

Chair, Lafayette 

AAS, Purdue University; AAS, Ball State University; BS, Purdue University 
Robinson, L. Diann, Associate Professor in Basic Skills Advancement, Lafayette 

BA, MS, Purdue University 
Royal, Polly, Assistant Instructor in Nursing, Lafayette 

ASN, BSN, Purdue University 
Smith, James G., Professor in Electronics Technology, Lafayette 

AAS, BS, University of Toledo; MS, Western Michigan University 
Smock, Warren W., Associate Professor in Accounting, Program Chair, Lafayette 

BS, University of Indianapolis; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Snyders, Sharon M., Assistant Professor in Basic Skills Advancement, Lafayette 

BS, Purdue University; MS Indiana Wesleyan 
Swope, Stephen E., Assistant Professor in Respiratory Care, Director of Clinical 

Education, Lafayette 

AS, Vincennes University; BA, Ottawa University 



Wealing, Joan, Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Lafayette 

BS, Taylor University 
Whitesel, Joel A., Associate Professor in Office Administration, Program Chair, 

Lafayette 

BS, MBA, Ball State University 
Wiese, Mary B., Assistant Professor in Nursing, Lafayette 

BSN, Ball State University; MS, Purdue University 

Wilson, Linda J., Associate Professor in Business Administration, Program 
Chair, Lafayette 

BS, Miami University; MS, University of Cincinnati 



REG 


I 





N 


5 




OFF 


I 


c 


E R 


S 



Daily, Steven J., Chancellor 

BS, MS Indiana University-Kokomo 
Hockney, Daniel W, Campus Dean, Logansport 

BS, MA, Ball State University 
Lewis, Pamela J., Dean of Academic Affairs 

BS, Indiana University; MA, Ball State University 
Bailey, Janice L. , Dean of Student Affairs 

BS, Indiana University; MA, Ball State University 



U L T Y 



Anderson, Donald, Assistant Professor in General Education, Kokomo 

BS, Wisconsin State College; BS, PhD, Purdue University 
Baty, David E., Associate Professor in Accounting, Program Chair, Kokomo 

BS, MA, Ball State University 
Brehmer, Denise M., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Kokomo 

AS, Indiana University - Kokomo; BS, MSN, Ball State University; RN 
Caldwell, Kim, Instructor in General Education, Kokomo 

BS, Purdue University; MS, Indiana University 
Fry, Linda, Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Kokomo 

BS, MS, Purdue University 
Gardner, Randall, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Kokomo 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
Groves, Rhonda K., Professor in Office Administration, Division Chair, Kokomo 

BS, MA, Ball State University 
Hall, Jay, Instructor, Industrial Technology, Program Chair, Industrial 

Apprentice Technology, Kokomo 

BS, Rose Hulman Institute 
Hall, Larry R., Instructor in Automotive Technology, Program Chair, Kokomo 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
Harris, Phylliss, Associate Professor in Office Administration, Program Chair, 

Kokomo 

BS, Ball State University 
Hayes, David, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Program 

Chair, Kokomo 

BS, MS, Ball State University 
Hildenbrand, Jane, Instructor in Child Development, Program Chair, 

Logansport 

AS, Vincennes University, BS, MS, Indiana State University 



Hughes, Montevan, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, 
Logansport 

BS, MS, Ball State University 
Jackson, Rita, Assistant Professor in General Education, Division Chair, Kokomo 

BS, MA, Purdue University 
Johnson, Christopher L., Program Chair in Business Administration, Kokomo 

BS, Cedarville College; JD, University of San Diego 
Johnson, Nelda Sue, Assistant Professor in General Education, Logansport 

BSE, Midwestern State; MA, Butler University 
Jun, Benjamin, Assistant Professor in Electronics Technology, Program Chair, 

Kokomo 

BS, Seattle University; MS, PhD, Purdue University 
King, Kim, Assistant Professor in General Education, Kokomo 

BS, University of Indianapolis; MS, Ball State University 
Klakamp, Gary, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Kokomo 

BS, Indiana State University 
Koch, Jean, Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems, Kokomo 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, MS Ball State University 
LaGrave, Steve E., Associate Professor in Business Administration, Kokomo 

BS, Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis; MA, Ball State 

University 
Perkins, Jerry, Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Kokomo 

BS, Indiana University; MS, Webster University 
Peters, Laurie F., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Program Chair, 

Kokomo 

BSN, Indiana University-Kokomo; MSN, Ball State University; RN, CNP 
Pierce, Tonya, Assistant Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Kokomo 

BS, Ball State University 
Lauderbaugh, Linda, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Kokomo 

BS, Indiana University 

McClain, Nathan, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Program Chair, 
Logansport 

BS, Purdue University 
Mooney, Gerry, Assistant Professor, Medical Assistant, Kokomo 

BSN, Indiana University; MA, Ball State University; RN 
Morgan, Connie, Associate Professor in Medical Assistant, Division Chair, 

Kokomo 

BSN, MA, Indiana Wesleyan University; RN; CMA 
Pritchett, John E., Assistant Professor in Construction Technology, Program 

Chair, Kokomo 

AS, Linn Technical College 
Shively, Marsha L., Assistant Professor in General Education, Kokomo 

BS, MA, PhD, EdD, Ball State University 
Slusher, Patricia, Instructor in Medical Assistant, Program Chair, Kokomo 

AS, Purdue University; BS, Indiana University-Kokomo 
Thurmond, Bradley H, Assistant Professor in General Education, Program 

Chair, Kokomo 

BS, MS, Purdue University 
Turnpaugh, Vearl D., Associate Professor in Industrial Technology, Division 

Chair, Kokomo 

BS, MS, Purdue University; CMT, SME 
Ward, Dan, Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Program Chair, Kokomo 

BS, Purdue University 
Wiley, Kyxe, Instructor in Design Technology, Kokomo 

BS, Purdue University 



Wilson, Jane, Associate Professor in General Education, Program Chair, 
Kokomo 
BS, MA, Ball State University 



REGION 



OFFICERS 



Jeffs, Robert, Chancellor 

BA, Oliver Nazarene College; MA, Ball State University; PhD, Indiana State 
University 

Hogan, John, Executive Dean, Anderson 

BS, Western Kentucky University; Ph.D, Indiana State University 

Eberle, Carol, Dean of Academic Affairs 

BS, Oklahoma State University; MS, Southern Illinois University, 
Edwardsville ; Ph..D, University of Nebraska-Lincoln 

Hochstetler, Jay, Campus Dean, Marion 

BS, Goshen College; MBA, Indiana University; Ed.D, Ball State University 
Chesterfield, Gail, Dean of Student Affairs, Muncie 

BS, Indiana University; MA, Ball State University 



Anthony, Neil, Assistant Professor in General Education, Muncie 

BS, MA, Ball State University 
Bardonner, Steve, Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Program Chair, 

Muncie 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Ball State University; MA, IUPUI 

Bishop, Danna, Assistant Professor in Office Administration, Program Chair, 

Marion 

BS, Indiana State University; MAE, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Bow, Curtis, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Muncie 

AS, Vincennes University; BS, Ball State University 
Brinkley, Harold, Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Program Chair, 

Anderson 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Bruce, Rebecca, Instructor in Paralegal, Program Chair, Muncie 

BS, Ball State University; JD, Indiana University 
Bryan, Cathy, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Muncie 

BS, Ball State University 
Busha, Kristen, Assistant Professor in Physical Therapist Assistant, Program 

Chair, Muncie 

BS, Wayne State University; BA, Purdue; MA, Ball State University 
Clamme, Robin G., Associate Professor in General Education, Muncie 

BA, Arizona State University; MA, Ball State University 
Dietzen, Carrie, Instructor in Nursing, Muncie 

AD, Anderson University; BS, Indiana Wesleyan 

Dillman, Debra, Assistant Professor in Radiologic Technology, Program Chair, 
Marion 

BS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Gaddis, Dennis L., Associate Professor, Technology, Division Chair, Muncie 
Certificate, Lincoln Technical Institute; BS, Purdue University; MA, Ball State 
University 



Gaskill, Fred, Instructor in Human Services, Program Chair, Muncie 

BS, MA, Ball State University 
Gilbert, Larry, Associate Professor in General Education, Marion 

AB, Anderson University; MA, Ball State University 
Gosset, Kris, Instructor in Business Administration, Muncie 

BS, Otterbein College; MBA, Morehead State University 
Gould, Suzanne, Instructor in General Education, Muncie 

BA, University of Illinois-Urbana; MS, University of Illinois-Chicago 
Greenan, Mary, Associate Professor in Basic Skills, Anderson 

BS, University of Maine; MS, Butler University 
Griffin, Obrin, Assistant Professor in Electronics, Program Chair, Anderson 

BS, University of Sierra Leone; MSEE, University of Evansville 
Hamilton, Betty, Associate Professor in Physical Therapist Assistant, Muncie 

BS, Washington University; PhD, University of Nebraska 

Hartig, David A., Associate Professor in Construction Technology, Program 

Chair, Muncie 

AAS, Western Wisconsin Technical Institute; BS, University of Wisconsin- 
Stout 
Hayes, David, Assistant Professor in Electronics, Muncie 

BS, MS, Ball State University 
Helm, Jeffrey, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Program 

Chair, Anderson 

BS, MS, Ball State University 
Hiday, Mary, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Program Chair, Muncie 

AD, Anderson College; BSN, Anderson University; MA, Ball State University 
Hobbs, Lori K., Instructor in Physical Therapist Assistant, Muncie 

AS, Oklahoma City Community College; BS, Indiana University 
Hoffman, Nancy J., Associate Professor in Child Development, Program Chair, 

Muncie 

BS, Penn State University; MA, Ed.D, Ball State University 
Johnson, Karen, Associate Professor in Accounting, Program Chair, Muncie 

BS, Ferris State University; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Jones, Patrick M., Associate Professor in Industrial Technology, Department 

Chair, Muncie 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Taylor University; MA, Ball State University 
Keller, Teresa G., Associate Professor in Office Administration, Anderson 

BS, MAE, Ball State University 
Kerr, Marilyn K., Associate Professor in Business Administration, Program 

Chair, Anderson 

BS, MBA, Ball State University 
Kleeberg, Michael, Assistant Professor in General Education, Muncie 

BA, Kean College of New Jersey; MA, Ball State University 
Mann, Sam, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Muncie 

BS, Ball State University 
Masterman, Julayne, Instructor in Medical Assistant, Program Chair, Muncie 

BS, Indiana Wesleyan 
Mays, Mark D., Assistant Professor in Basic Skills, Muncie 

BA, Ball State University 
McDaniel, Kathleen, Instructor in Medical Assistant, Anderson 

BA, Loyola University; MA, Ball State University 
Moorhead, Phil, Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Marion 

BS, Bowling Green University; MS, University of Dayton 
Outland, Dan K, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Marion 

BBA, Memphis State University; MBA, Ball State University 



Pippin, Donald L., Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, 

Muncie 

BS, MA, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Pruitt, Linda, Instructor in Medical Assistant, Program Chair, Marion 

BS, MBA, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Roberts, Barbara, Assistant Professor in Medical Assistant, Muncie 

BA, Anderson University; MS, St. Francis College 
Schulz, Neilsen, Instructor in Medical Assistant, Program Chair, Anderson 

BS, MA, Ball State University 
Sexton, Steve, Instructor in Automotive Technology, Program Chair, Muncie 

BS, Indiana University 
Shafer, Pam, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Anderson 

AD, BA, Anderson University 
Sipe, Betty, Associate Professor in General Education, Program Chair, Anderson 

BS, Lenoir Rhyne College; MA, Ed.D, Ball State University 

Stoops, Sharon, Associate Professor in General Education and Support Services, 
Division Chair, Muncie 

BS, MAE, Ball State University 
Swain, Richard, Assistant Professor in General Education, Anderson 

BS, Ball State University; MS, Miami University 
Sylverson, Julia, Instructor in Surgical Technology, Program Chair, Muncie 

AD, Anderson University; BSN, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Torres, Louise, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Muncie 

BSN, Rush University College 
Vesperry, Paul, Instructor in Manufacturing Technology, Program Chair, Muncie 

AA, Clark State University, BS, Ohio State University 
Warren, John, Associate Professor in Health and Human Sendees, Division 

Chair, Muncie 

BA, Southern Illinois University; MA, Northeast Missouri State University; 

Ph.D. Indiana University 
Wedgeworth, Michael, Instructor in General Education, Muncie 

BS, MS, Ball State University 
Whisler, Vesta, Associate Professor in Accelerated Degree Program, Program 

Chair, Muncie 

BS, MAE, Ball State University 
White, Nancy, Assistant Professor in Nursing, ProgTam Chair, Muncie 

BSN, MSN, Ball State University 
Woodward, Catherine, Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Program Chair, 

Anderson 

BSN, Ball State University; MSN, Indiana Wesleyan 



REGION 



O F F I 



Pittman,Jeff, Chancellor 

BS, Western Kentucky University; BS, Indiana University; MS, Indiana State 

University 
Cottrell, Norma, Dean of Academic Affairs, Terre Haute 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 
Leah Bell, Dean of Student Affairs, Terre Haute 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 



F A C U 



Alsman, Cathy, Instructor in Human Services, Program Chair, Terre Haute 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 
Arney, Don, Professor, Division Chair, Terre Haute 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 
Barcus, Becky, Assistant Professor in Medical Assistant, Terre Haute 

BS, Indiana State University; BS, University of Evansville 
Behringer, Debra, Assistant Professor in Nursing, TerTe Haute 

BSN, University of Michigan 
Berrisford, Rick, Instructor in Welding, Terre Haute 
Boesen, Melanie, Associate Professor in Office Administration, Terre Haute 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 
Bolinger, Bonnie, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Terre Haute 

BS, MBA, Indiana State University 
Brown, Mary, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Terre Haute 

AS, BSN, Indiana State University 
Byers, John, Associate Professor in Visual Communications, Program Chair, 

Terre Haute 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BA, Wabash College 
Cantrell, LaDeena, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Terre Haute 

AS, BSN, Indiana State University 
Caton, Janet, Assistant Professor in Quality Science, Program Chair, Terre 

Haute 

BS, Indiana State University 
Chaney, Mary, Associate Professor in Visual Communications, Program Chair, 

Terre Haute 

BA, St. Mary of the Woods; MS, Indiana State University 
Clem, Lora, Instructor in Medical Laboratory Technician, Terre Haute 

BS, St. Mary of the Woods 
Kim Cooper, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Program Chair, Terre Haute 

BS, AS, Indiana State University 
Crist, Donald, Instructor in Barbenng, Terre Haute 
Gambill, Janee, Assistant Professor in Medical Laboratory Technician, Program 

Chair, Terre Haute 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 
Garner, John, Assistant Professor in Radiology, Program Chair, Terre Haute 

BS, Indiana State University 
Good, Anson, Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Terre Haute 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 
Goode, Rena, Assistant Professor in Medical Laboratory Technician, Terre Haute 

BA, Greenville College 
Gosnell, Kelly, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Terre Haute 

AS, BSN, Indiana State University 
Graham, Jeanne, Associate Professor in General Education, Terre Haute 

BS, Indiana University; MA, Indiana State University 
Greenwell, William, Assistant Professor in Human Services, Terre Haute 

BA, MA, University of Mississippi 
Harmless, Malcolm, Assistant Professor in Electronics, Program Chair, Terre 

Haute 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS.MS, Indiana State University 
Hart, Glenda, Associate Professor in Office Administration, Division Chair, 

Terre Haute 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 



Henson, Joseph, Instructor in Aviation Technology, Terre Haute 

BA, Indiana University; MA, Indiana State University 
Hofmann, Beulah, Associate Professor in Medical Assistant, Program Chair, 

Terre Haute 

BSN, MS, Indiana State University 
Jones, Charles, Assistant Instructor in Industrial Technology, Terre Haute 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
Jones, Robert, Assistant Professor in General Education, Terre Haute 

BS, Purdue University 
Kincaid, Lisa, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Terre Haute 

BSN, University of Indianapolis 
King, Deanna, Assistant Professor in Accounting, Division Chair, Terre Haute 

BS, Indiana University; MBA, Indiana State University 
Kirby, Bryan, Assistant Professor in General Education, Terre Haute 

BA, Olivet Nazarene University; MA, Indiana State University 
Kreicker, Cynthia, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Terre Haute 

BS, Indiana Wesleyan 
Laffery, Christina, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Terre Haute 

AS, Vincennes University; BS, Indiana Wesleyan 
Lawson, James, Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Terre Haute 

BS, Indiana State University 
Linneweber, James, Instructor in Accounting, Terre Haute 

BS, Indiana State University 
Lumsdon, Donald R., Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Program 

Chair, Terre Haute 

BS, Indiana State University 
McKirahan, James, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Terre Haute 

BS, MS, Eastern Illinois University 
Moore, Thomas, Instructor in Automotive Technology, Terre Haute 
Murray, Robert, Associate Professor in Computer Information Services, Program 

Chair, Terre Haute 

BA, MS, Butler University 
Page-Black, Karen, Instructor in Visual Communications, Terre Haute 

BS, Hardin-Simmons University; MS, Indiana State University 
Radtke, James, Assistant Professor in Aviation Technology Program Chair, Terre 

Haute 

BS, Ball State University 
Rasley, James, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Services, Terre 

Haute 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Pacific Western University 
Reed, Regina, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Greencastle 

BSN, St. Louis University 
Schroeder, Kenneth, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Services, 

Terre Haute 

BS, Indiana State University; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan 
Shotwell, Robert, Associate Professor in General Education, Terre Haute 

BS, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology; MS, Indiana State University 
Slyh, Kathleen, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Terre Haute 

BSN, University of Cincinnati 
Smith, Margie, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Greeencastle 

BSN, Evansville College 
Strole, Karen, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Terre Haute 
BS, Indiana State University 



Stultz, Leslie, Associate Professor in General Education, Program Chair, Terre 

Haute 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 
Summers, Pat, Assistant Professor in General Education, Terre Haute 

BS, Southern Illinois University 
Swank, Denise, Assistant Professor in Radiology, Terre Haute 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, St. Mary of the Woods 

Trout, Janet, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Program Chair, 

Terre Haute 

BS, Indiana State University; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan 
Waltermire, Pat, Assistant Professor in General Education, Terre Haute 

MLS, Indiana State University 
Webster, Janice, Associate Professor in Quality Science, Terre Haute 

BS, MA, Indiana State University 
White, Lucy, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Program Chair, 

Greencastle 

BSN, MS, Indiana State University 
Williams, Chad, Instructor in Aviation Technology, Terre Haute 
AS, Ivy Tech State College 



REGION 8 



OFFICERS 



Carter, Meredith L., Vice President/Chancellor 

BS, MS, PhD, Ball State University 
Hine, Rosalie, Dean of Academic Affairs, Indianapolis 

BS, MS, EdD, Ball State University 
Cousert, Darrell, Dean of Student Affairs, Indianapolis 

BS, Indiana University; MS, Indiana State University; PhD, Purdue University 



F A C U 



Alfrey, Duane C, Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Indianapolis 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
Altman, Susan, Assistant Professor in Paralegal, Indianapolis 

BA, MA, Eastern Kentucky University; JD, University of Louisville 
Anderson, Lana, Assistant Professor in Medical Assistant, Indianapolis 

BA, University of Massachusetts; MA Ball State University 
Andrews, Lori, Assistant Professor in Medical Assistant, Program Chair, 

Indianapolis 

AS, BS, Indiana University 
Aull, Ann G., Assistant Professor in Child Development, Indianapolis 

BS, Indiana University; MS, Indiana State University 
Baumer, Margaret A., Assistant Professor in Office Administration, 

Indianapolis 

AS, Miami Jacobs College of Business; BS, University of Cincinnati; MS, 

Indiana University 
Bernhard, Gregory A., Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, 

Indianapolis 

BS, Purdue University 
Bizuneh, Moges, Associate Professor in General Education, Indianapolis 

BS, Haile Sallassie University; MS, Cornell University; PhD, Indiana 

University 



Bodie, Carol June, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Indianapolis 

BS, St. Mary of the Woods 
Bolinger, Thomas, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Indianapolis 

BA, Butler University; MBA, Indiana University 

Cinkoske, Bernadette, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, 
Indianapolis 

BA, Indiana University 

Clarkson, Cheryl, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Indianapolis 

BSN, Indiana University; MSN, Ball State University 

Clippinger, W. Michael, Associate Professor in General Education, Division 
Chair, Indianapolis 

BA, MA, Indiana University 

Collins, Edith, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Indianapolis 

BS, MS, PhD, Indiana University; MS, Radford University 

Dalzell, Jane, Assistant Professor in General Technical Studies, Program Chair, 
Indianapolis 

BA, University of Indianapolis; MS, Butler University 

Daugherty, Marvin L., Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems, 
Program Chair, Indianapolis 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Martin University, MS, Indiana State 
University 

Deady, Barbara L., Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Program Chair, 
Indianapolis 

BSN, Indiana State University, MSEd, Indiana University 

DeBourbon, Michael W, Associate Professor in Design Technology, Program 
Chair-Assistant Division Chair, Business/Technology Division, Indianapolis 

BS, Southern Illinois University; MS, Indiana University 
Dickmann, Patricia, Assistant Professor in Child Development, Indianapolis 

BS, Purdue University; MS, Nova University 
Dragoo, Lowell, Instructor in Machine Tool Technology, Indianapolis 
Faulk, Timothy E., Instructor in Public Safety, Indianapolis 

AS, Indiana University; BS, University of New York 
Ferguson, Christopher, Instructor in Automotive Technology, Indianapolis 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 

Finney, Ronald Dean, Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Program 
Chair, Indianapolis 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Indiana University 
Flanigan, William T., Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Program 
Chair, Indianapolis 

BS, Tri-State University; MS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Flick, Daniel, Instructor in Machine Tool Technology, Indianapolis 

BA, Indiana University 
Fluharty, Linda Kay, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Indianapolis 

BSN, University of Evansville; MSN, Indiana University-Purdue University at 
Indianapolis 
Fox, Alisa, Instructor in Visual Communications, Indianapolis 
BA, Nebraska Wesleyan University 

Fox, Melinda, Associate Professor in General Education, Chair m Mathematics, 

Indianapolis 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 
Gorsline, Michael D., Associate Professor in General Education, Indianapolis 

BA, Indiana University; MA, Ball State University 
Gray, Harry E., Assistant Professor in Accounting, Indianapolis 

BS, Butler University; CPA 



Griffin, Laurene, Instructor in Hospitality Administration, Indianapolis 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
Hall, Michael C, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, 

Indianapolis 

BS, MS, Purdue University 
Hamilton, Marilyn S., Associate Professor in General Education, Indianapolis 

BS, Purdue University; MS, Butler University 
Harding, Derrick W., Assistant Professor in Basic Skills, Indianapolis 

BA, College of Wooster; MA, Indiana University 

Haver, Wanda L., Assistant Professor in Surgical Technology, Program Chair, 

Indianapolis 

BS, Martin University 
Hawkins, Steve, Instructor in Machine Tool Technology, Indianapolis 

AS, Vincennes University; BS, Purdue University 
Hayes, Amy Sorrell, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Indianapolis 

ASN, BSN, Indiana University 
Head, Joanna Mae, Associate Professor in Office Administration, Indianapolis 

BS, MS, Butler University 
Hiday, Rebecca Lynn, Assistant Professor in General Education, Indianapolis 

BS, Ball State University; MS, Indiana University 
Hill, Ann C, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Indianapolis 

BSN, St. Louis University, MSEd, Indiana University 

Hollenberg, Krista, Assistant Professor in Paralegal, Program Chair, 
Indianapolis 
BA, Manchester College; MA, JD, Indiana University 

Hollowell, Ronald L., Associate Professor in General Education, Chair of 
English, Indianapolis 

BS, University of Indianapolis; MA, Ed.D, Indiana University 

Hoskins, Larry E., Assistant Professor in Public Safety, Program Chair, 
Indianapolis 
AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Southern Illinois University 

Imel, Janet E., Associate Professor in Child Development, Program Chair, 
Indianapolis 

BS, MS, Ball State University 

Irwin, James W, Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Martin University, MS Oakland University 

Jablonski-Polk, Teresa, Associate Professor in Human Services, Program Chair, 
Indianapolis 

BA, University of Kentucky; MSW, Washington University 
Kavanagh, L. Kay, Associate Professor in Radiologic Technology, Indianapolis 

BA, Marian College; MS, Indiana University 

Keck, Robert Joe, Professor m General Education, Indianapolis 

BS, University of Southern Indiana; MS, Indiana State University; MS, 
College of St. Francis 

Kinkade, Vincent D., Associate Professor in Hospitality Administration, 
Program Chair, Indianapolis 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; AOS, New England Culinary Institute; BA, 
Hanover College, MBA, University of Indianapolis 

Koller, Angela M., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Indianapolis 

BSN, Purdue University 
Kramer, Janet A., Associate Professor in Nursing, Program Chair, Indianapolis 

BSN, Ursuline College; MSN, University of Akron 
Kuchler, Stephen, Assistant Professor in Electronics, Indianapolis 

BS, Purdue University; MS, Indiana University 



Land, Chris, Assistant Professor in General Education, Indianapolis 

BS, MAT, Purdue University 
Lee, Kathleen, Professor in Respiratory Care, Program Chair, Indianapolis 

AS, Indiana University; BS, Muskingun College; MS, Indiana University 

Leigh, Gregory, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, 

Indianapolis 

BS, MS, Indiana University 
Leverette, Debra, Assistant Professor in Office Administrative, Program Chair, 

Indianapolis 

BS, Ball State University; MS, Indiana University 
Lotfi, Ali, Assistant Professor in General Education, Indianapolis 

BA, Tehran University; MS, Indiana University 
Loureiro, Ann, Assistant Professor in Nursing, Indianapolis 

BSN, Indiana University; MAN, Ball State University 
Magnant, Peter T., Associate Professor in Health and Human Services, Division 

Chair, Indianapolis 

AA, BS, Indiana University; BA, St. Mary's College; MS, EdD, Indiana 

University 
Massey, Conchita, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Indianapolis 

BSN, Indiana University; MAEd, Ball State University 
Meek, Mary E., Assistant Professor in Nursing, Indianapolis 

ASN, University of Indianapolis; BSN, MS, Ball State University 
Miller, David E., Associate Professor in Electronics Technology, Program Chair, 

Indianapolis 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Purdue University; MS, Indiana State 
University 

Miller, Susan B., Assistant Professor in Basic Skills, Indianapolis 

BS, MS, Indiana University 
Milliner, Sean, Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Indianapolis 

BA, Glenville State College 

Moman, Frankie L., Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, 
Indianapolis 

BS, Murray State University; MS, Oakland City University 

Nealon, Raymond F, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Program 
Chair- Assistant Division Chair, Business/Technology Division, Indianapolis 

BS, St. Lawrence University; MS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Niebauer, Daniel J., Instructor in Automotive Technology, Indianapolis 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
Noe, J. Stephen, Instructor in General Education, Indianapolis 

BS, University of Notre Dame; MS, Illinois State University 
O'Haver, Michael Patrick, Instructor in Automotive Technology, Indianapolis 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 

Parham, Beverly K., Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Indianapolis 

ASN, University of Indianapolis; BS, Oklahoma State University; MSEd, 
Indiana University 

Perez, John, Instructor in Visual Communications, Indianapolis 

BA, Ball State University 
Pettit, James E., Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Indianapolis 

BS, Martin University 
Realey, Minerva Anne, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Indianapolis 

BSN, MSN, Indiana University 
Reklau, Maryann A., Assistant Professor in Nursing, Indianapolis 

ASN, Staten Island Community College; BSN, MSN, Indiana University 
Rice, Mary Kathleen, Assistant Professor in Basic Skills, Indianapolis 

BA, MS, Indiana University Purdue University at Indianapolis 



Scott, Linda L., Associate Professor in Accounting, Program Chair, Indianapolis 

AS, BS, MA, Ball State University 
Sensenbrenner, Owen L., Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, 

Indianapolis 

BS, MS, Indiana State University 
Sharon, Stephen, Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Indianapolis 

BS, Purdue University; MS, Iowa State University 
Sisel, Ann, Assistant Professor in Radiologic Technology, Indianapolis 

BS, Marian College-Fond du Lac, Wisconsin 
Stone, Diane, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Indianapolis 

BS, Indiana Wesleyan 
Stowe, Marcus D., Assistant Professor in Respiratory Care, Indianapolis 

AS, Indiana University; BS, St. Francis University; MS, Indiana University 
Tarricone, Bonnie, Assistant Professor in General Education, Indianapolis 

BA, Wheaton College; MA, The William Paterson College of New Jersey; 

PhD, Indiana University 
Teeguarden, Janet, Assistant Professor in General Education, Indianapolis 

BA, DePauw University; MS, Indiana State University 
Thomas, Margaret S., Assistant Professor in General Education, Indianapolis 

BS, Winthrop University; MA, Indiana State University 
Trusty II, Richard T., Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Indianapolis 

BS, Purdue University 
Wallace, Michael Lee, Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, 

Indianapolis 

BA, Marian College 
Ward, Denise, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Indianapolis 

ASN, Indiana University; BSN, Indiana University-Purdue University at 

Indianapolis 
Whiteneck, Thomas, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, 

Indianapolis 

BS, MS, Purdue University; MBA, San Diego State College 
Whitfield, Willie, Assistant Professor in Human Services, Indianapolis 

BA, MS, Alabama A & M University 
Wood, Christopher, Professor in General Education, Indianapolis 

BA, MA, Indiana University 
Wood, Robert, Assistant Professor in Visual Communications, Program Chair, 

Indianapolis 

BS, Pittsburg State University; MA, Ball State University 
Wright, Kenton D., Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Indianapolis 

BS, Purdue University 
Wurtz, Robert L., Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Indianapolis 

AS, BS, Purdue University; MS, Indiana State University 



REGION 



OFFICERS 



Steck, James, Chancellor, Richmond 

BS, MS, Ohio State University 
Tincher, Steven, Dean of Academic Affairs, Richmond 

BS, MA, Ball State University 
Pennington, Sabrina, Dean of Student Affairs, Richmond 

MS, Ball State University 



Anderson, Jillene K., Associate Professor in Nursing, Program Chair, Richmond 

BS, Indiana Wesleyan University; MS, Ball State University, RN 

Ayton, Eugene G., Instructor in Business Administration, Program Chair, 
Richmond 

BS, Morgan State University; MA, Ball State University 
Bechtel, Barbara E., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Richmond 

BSN, Indiana University; RN 

Berrier, Peggy A., Professor in Accounting, Program Chair, Richmond 

TC, Sumter Technical College; AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, MS, Ball 
State University; CPA 

Blakely, Curtis, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Program 
Chair, Richmond 

AS, BS, Indiana University 

Bond, Idris, Associate Professor in Medical Assistant, Division Chair, Richmond 

BS, MS, Indiana University; RN 

Brustkern, Maureen E., Associate Professor in Child Development, Program 
Chair, Richmond 

BS, Ohio State University; MS, Wright State University 

Cline, Glenda, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Richmond 

BS, Indiana University East 

Davidson, James E., Assistant Professor in General Education, Program Chair in 
Language Arts and Humanities, Richmond 

BA, Hillsdale College; MA, New York Institute of Technology 

Frantz, Robert M„ Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Program 
Chair, Richmond 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; ASE Master Mechanic; Master Machinist 

Friend, Ken S., Associate Professor in Industrial and Manufacturing Technology, 
Department Chair, Richmond 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, MS, Indiana State University 

Gabbard, Billie Jo, Instructor in Practical Nursing and Associate of Science in 
Nursing, Richmond 

TC, AS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Indiana University East; RN 

Graesser, William M., Associate Professor in General Education, Division 
Chair, Richmond 

BA, Otterbein College; MAT, Webster University 
Lucas, Karen, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Richmond 

BS, Ball State University 
Martin, David, Instructor in Construction Technology, Program Chair, Richmond 

AS, Cincinnati State Community and Technical College; BS, University of 
Cincinnati; MA, Regent University 
Oler, Ronald, Instructor in Office Administration and Electronics Technology, 
Program Chair, Richmond 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Rice, Stephanie L., Instructor in Medical Assistant, Richmond 

AS, BS, Ball State University 
Roettger, Randall, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Richmond 

AS, Vincennes University; BS, Indiana State University 
Terrell, Peggy J., Professor, Division Chair for Business and Technology 

Divisions, Richmond 

BS, Indiana State University; MA, Ball State University 
Thurston, Sheryl L., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Richmond 

BSN, MA, Ball State University; MSN, University of Phoenix; RN 



Ward, Barbara, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Richmond 

AS, BS, Indiana University East 
White, Judith A., Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Richmond 

Diploma, Bethesda Hospital School of Nursing; BS, Earlham College; RN 
Williamson, Ruth A., Assistant Professor in Child Development, Richmond 

BS, Eastern Michigan University; MA, Ball State University 
Wilson, Marc L., Associate Professor in General Education, Richmond 

BA, MA, Ball State University 



REGION 



OFFICERS 



Burgham, Douglas, Chancellor, Columbus 

BA, Youngstown State University; MA, EdD, University of Illinois 
Gaudin, Anthony J., Dean of Academic Affairs, Columbus 

BA, MS, PhD, University of Southern California 
Casey, Lucinda, Dean of Student Affairs 

BA, Muskingum College; MS, Indiana University 



Adktns, Maxine, Associate Professor in General Education and Basic Skills 
Advancement, Columbus 

BA, Indiana Central College; MA, University of Indianapolis 
Amstutz, Matthew, Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Columbus 

BA, Muskingum College 
Atkinson, Michael, Associate Professor in General Education, Columbus 

BS, Indiana University; MA, EdD, Ball State University 

Barnes, Rosalie, Professor in Office and Information Systems, Department 
Chair, Columbus 

BS, Eastern Illinois University; MS, Indiana University 
Canine, Jill, Professor in Computer Information Systems, Columbus 

BA, Hanover College; MA Ball State University 

Carpenter, Lorene, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Columbus 

ASN, Youngstown State University; BSN, University of North Carolina- 
Charlotte 

Dougherty-, Ronald, Professor in Business Administration and Accounting, 
Department Chair, Columbus 

BS, Indiana University; MS, Indiana Wesleyan University 
Duan, Xin-Ran, Associate Professor in Design Technology, Program Chair, 
Columbus 

BS, Xi'an Jiao-tong University; MS, University of Oklahoma 

Fallon, James, Instructor in Medical Assistant, Columbus 

BA, University of Cincinnati; MHA, Xavier University-Cincinnati 

Giles, Carolyn, Associate Professor in General Education and Basic Skills 
Advancement, Columbus 

BS, MS, Indiana University 
Graue, Gregory, Associate Professor in General Education, Columbus 

BS, MS, Indiana University 
Heiwig, Doug, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, Columbus 

BA, DePauw University; MBA, Butler University 
Jackson, Robert, Assistant Professor in Accounting, Columbus 

BS, MA, Bowling Green State University 



Lamm, Geneva, Associate Professor in Health Sciences, Department Chair, 

Columbus 

AAN, BSN, MSN, Indiana University 
Lewis-Kiilu, Eloise, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Columbus 

BSN, Adelphi University 
Miller-Seller, M, Assistant Professor in Design Technology, Columbus 

BS, Purdue University; MS, Indiana State University 
Nissen, Don. E., Associate Professor in Visual Communications, Columbus 

BA, Buena Vista College; MA, University of Kansas 
Nolting, Bonnie, Professor in Office Administration, Columbus 

BS, MS, Indiana University 
Norrell, Mary Patricia, Professor in Practical Nursing, Columbus 

BSN, Ball State University; MS, Indiana University 
Simmons, Susan, Assistant Professor in General Education, Columbus 

BS, Western Michigan University; MS, Indiana University 
Stidham, Dana, Assistant Professor in Medical Assistant, Program Chair, 

Columbus 

BS, Ball State University; MS, Medical University of South Carolina 
Taylor, June, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Columbus 

BSN, Ohio State University 
Waltz, Susan, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Columbus 

BSN, Indiana University 
Wang, Pei Wei, Associate Professor in Industrial Technology, Program Chair, 

Columbus 

BS, Shanghai Institute of Mechanical Engineering; MS, University of Missouri 
Wilson, Jonathan, Professor in Visual Communications, Department Chair, 

Columbus 

BFA, San Francisco Art Institute; MFA, Indiana University 
Winslow, Maribeth, Assistant Professor in General Education, Department 

Chair, Columbus 

BA, Indiana University; MA, Butler University 



REGION 11 



OFFICERS 



Helms, Jim, Chancellor 

BS, Hanover College; MS, Xavier University 
Heiderman, Don, Campus Dean/Dean of Student Affairs, Madison 

BA, Indiana State University 
McClure, Bill, Campus Dean/Dean of Academic Affairs, Madison 

AB, Franklin College; MS, University of Cincinnati 
Moore, L. Joe, Dean of Academic Affairs 

AB, PhD, Indiana University 



FACULTY 



Adams, Cora, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Madison 

BS, Indiana University 

Althoff, Dorothea, Instructor in General Education and Support Services, 
Madison 

BS, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; MS, Indiana State University 

Dadosky, Paul, Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Lawrenceburg 

BS University of Kentucky; MS, Xavier University 



Disch, Theresa, Instructor in Office Administration, Madison 

AS, Vincennes University 
Dorsey, Laurie E., Instructor in Associate of Nursing Program, Madison 

BS, Ball State University 
Erickson, John L., Department Chair, General Education and Support Services, 

Madison 

BA, Indiana State University; MS University of Kentucky 

Facemire, Charles E, Instructor in General Education and Support Services, 
Madison 

BS, New Mexico State University; MS, University of Illinois; PhD Miami 
University of Ohio 

Fitzpatrick, Stacey, Instructor in General Education and Support Services, 
Madison 

BS, MS, Indiana University, MS, Ball State University 

Garner, Annabet, Program Chair, Medical Assistant, Madison 

AS, Ivy Tech State College 

Geglein, Richard E., Department Chair, Accounting and Business 
Administration, Madison 

BA, Hanover College; MBA, Indiana Wesleyan 
Graver, Mark E., Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Lawrenceburg 

BS, Indiana University; MS, Central Michigan University 
Greer, Ruth A., Instructor in General Education and Support Services, Madison 

BA, University of Florida; MS, Indiana State University 
Hall, Tamara L., Instructor in Associate of Nursing Program, Madison 

BS, University of Evansville 
Helms, Rebecca, Instructor of Accounting and Business Administration, 

Lawrenceburg 

BS, University of Evansville; MS, Indiana State University 
Lauber, Cynthia, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Madison 

BSN, Indiana Wesleyan 

Marple, Donna, Program Chair, General Education and Support Services, 
Lawrenceburg 

BA, Marian College 
Profant, Sally, Instructor in Office Administration, Lawrenceburg 

BS, Miami University of Ohio 
Rahe, Pat A., Instructor in General Education and Support Services, 

Lawrenceburg 

BS, Indiana University; MS, Ball State University 
Sanchez, Elizabeth, Instructor in General Education and Support Services, 

Madison 

BS, DePauw University; MA, Central Michigan University 
Shapinsky, Gene A., Department Chair, Nursing, Madison 

BS, University of the State of New York; MS, Bellarmine College 
Sharp, Karen, Instructor in General Education and Support Services, 

Lawrenceburg 

AA, Concordia Lutheran College; AAB, BS, M.Ed, Miami University of Ohio 
Stephens, Emily A., Department Chair, Computer Information Systems and 

Office Administration, Madison 

BS, California State University; MS, Indiana State University 
Thurnall, Clara J., Instructor in Associate of Nursing, Madison 

BS, Indiana University; MS, Indiana University - Purdue University of 

Indianapolis 
Tackett, George, Program Chair, Electronics, Madison 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Rose Hulman 
Willis, Charmane G., Instructor in Practical Nursing, Madison 

BS, Ball State University 



Yowler, Hollace, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Madison 
BS, University of Kentucky 



REGION 12 



OFFICERS 



Schenk, Dan, Chancellor 

BS, University of Southern Indiana; MBA, University of Evansville 
Naas, James, Dean of Academic Affairs 

BS, MS, PhD, Southern Illinois University 
Bear, Tom, Dean of Student Affairs, Evansville 

BS, MS, Indiana State University; EdD, Indiana University 



FACULTY 



Amsler, Jeanne, Assistant Professor in Visual Communications, Program Chair, 
Evansville 

MS, MFA, Indiana State University 

Bailey, Sandra C, Program Chair, Associate Professor in Business 
Administration, Evansville 

BS, University of Southern Indiana, MBA, University of Evansville 

Bunner, Lana L., Program Chair, Professor in Office Administration, Evansville 

BS, MS, University of Southern Indiana 

Clifton, Lonnie, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, 

Evansville 

AS, BS, MS, Southern Illinois University; MS, University of Evansville 
Combs, Steven B., Associate Professor in Design Technology, Evansville 

BS, MS, Murray State University 
Crawford, Sherry, Community College Site Coordinator, Evansville 

BS, University of Evansville; MA, University of Southern Indiana 
Dennis, Linda, Assistant Professor in Associate Degree Nursing, Evansville 

BS, MS, University of Evansville 
Dentino, Mary Jo, Division Chair, Professor in Business, Evansville 

BS, MS, University of Southern Indiana 
Diemer, Jeanie L., Associate Professor in Business Administration, Evansville 

BS, Eastern Illinois University; MBA, University of Southern Indiana 
Dillman, Matthew A., Division Chair, Associate Professor in Technology, 

Evansville 

BS, University of Southern Indiana; MS, Murray State University, MENG, 
University of Louisville 

Duncan, Sharon A., Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Evansville 

BS, Evansville College School of Nursing; MSAC, Indiana State University; 
MS, University of Evansville 

Durbin, John, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Evansville 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College 
Dye, Susan E., Associate Professor in Associate Degree Nursing, Evansville 

BS, MS, University of Evansville 
Ehlen, Margaret K., Professor in Basic Skills, Evansville 

BA, University of Illinois-Urbana; MA, Northeastern Illinois University 

Flynn, Sherri, Instructor in Business and Office Administration, Evansville 

BA, Texas A & M at Corpus Christi; MBA, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical 
University 



Gibson, Patricia G., Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Evansville 
BS, University of Evansville, MS, Indiana State University 

Gore, Karen W, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Evansville 
BA, MBA, University of Evansville 

Grammer, Nancy, Assistant Professor in English, Vincennes 

MA, University of Evansville 

Greeson, Cynthia B., Program Chair, Associate Professor in Accounting , 
Evansville 

BS, Central Michigan University, MBA, University of Southern Indiana 
Hartgrove, Earl, Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Evansville 

BS, North Carolina State University 
Heim, Barbara H., Associate Professor in Basic Skills, Evansville 

BA, University of Evansville, MS, University of Southern Indiana 

Heller, William C, Program Chair, Associate Professor in Computer 
Information Systems, Evansville 

BA, Defiance College, MS, St. Francis College 
Hinkle, Julia, Assistant Professor in Surgical Technology, Evansville 

BS, Indiana Wesleyan University, MS, University of Evansville 
Howard, Michael A., Associate Professor in Electronics Technology , Evansville 

BS, Murray State University, MEP, University of Virginia 
Jennings, Edwin H., Assistant Professor in Manufacturing Technology. Evansville 

BS, Murray State University 
Jobe, Nancy, Assistant Professor in Office Administration, Evansville 

BS, Wayne State University, MBE, Eastern Michigan University 
Karzay, Nazar M., Associate Professor in Electronics Technology, Evansville 

BS, Kabul University, MS, Indiana State University 

Katowitz, Carol, Assistant Professor in Child Development, Program Chair, 
Evansville 

BS, Purdue University; BS, University of Southern Indiana; MA, University of 
Evansville 

Lammers, Mark P., Program Chair, Professor in Automotive Technology, 
Evansville 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College, BS, Eastern Illinois University, MS, Indiana State 
University 

Lewis, Ann E., Associate Professor in Office Administration, Evansville 
AS, Wabash Valley College, BS, MS, Southern Illinois University 

Linn, Jimmy B., Instructor in Electronics, Evansville 
BS, Rose Hulman Institute of Technology 

Lutz, Kitty-, Assistant Professor in Medical Assisting, Evansville 
BS, MS, University of Southern Indiana 

McBride, Oren, Program Chair, Assistant Professor in General Education, 

Evansville 

BS, MS, University of Illinois 

McCutchan, Judith A., Program Chair, Professor in Associate Degree Nursing, 
Evansville 

AS, BS, MS, University of Evansville 
Merkley, Patricia A., Instructor in General Education, Evansville 

BS, Ball State University, MS, Indiana University 
Merle, Don, Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Evansville 

BS, Purdue University 
Moore, William E., Instructor in Computer Information Systems, Evansville 

BS, University of Southern Indiana 
Motycka, Ann, Assistant Professor in Associate Degree Nursing, Evansville 

AD, Sinclair Community College; BS, MS, University of Evansville 



Niehaus, Michael A., Program Chair, Assistant Professor in Electronics 

Technology, Evansville 

BS, University of Southern Indiana 
Oatis, Carolyn S., Program Chair, Associate Professor in Medical Assistant, 

Evansville 

BS, St. Louis University, MS, University of Southern Indiana 
Offerman, J. Stephen, Associate Professor in Business Administration, 

Evansville 

BS, MBA, University of Evansville 
Ostrye, Mary E., Division Chair, Professor in Health and Human Services, 

Evansville 

BS, West Virginia University, MS, Marshall University, PhD, Indiana State 

University 
Otterson, Gail, Program Chair, Assistant Professor in Interior Design, 

Evansville 

BS, Southeast Missouri State University; BA, MS, Southern Illinois University 
Petty, Michael E., Division Chair, Professor in General Education , Evansville 

BA, Indiana State University, MA, University of Evansville, PhD, Indiana 

State University 
Potter, Kathleen M., Associate Professor in General Education, Evansville 

BA, Dominican College, MS, University of Southern Indiana 
Rendleman, Barbara, Assistant Professor in General Education, Evansville 

BS, University of Illinois, MS, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 
Robb, Tracy, Instructor in Visual Communications, Evansville 

BS, University of Southern Indiana, MFA, Savannah College of Arts and 

Design 
Satterfield, Michael A., Program Chair, Assistant Professor in Design 

Technology, Evansville 

BS, Ball State University 
Schmidt, Alice E., Program Chair, Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, 

Evansville 

BS, Evansville College School of Nursing, MS, University of Evansville 
Shull, Donald, Program Chair in General Education, Evansville 

MS, University of Evansville 
Silliman, Jeanne C, Professor in Basic Skills , Evansville 

BA, Saint Benedict College, MA, University of Evansville 
Smith, Jeffrey, Instructor in Industrial Technology, Evansville 

BS, University of Evansville, MBA, University of Southern Indiana 
Swain, Camilla, Instructor in Basic Skills, Evansville 

BA, Certificate in Youth Ministry, Taylor University 
Swartz, M.Jane, Professor in Associate Degree Nursing, Evansville 

AD, BS, MS, University of Evansville 
Thomas, Neil K., Program Chair, Assistant Professor in Manufacturing 

Technology, Evansville 

BS, University of Wisconsin, BS, Michigan Technological University, MS, 

University of Southern Indiana 

Tichenor, Jane, Program Chair, Professor in Basic Skills, Evansville 

BS, Oakland City College, MS, Indiana University 
Uhde, Karla G., Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Evansville 

BS, Indiana University, MS, University of Pennsylvania 
Warren, Gregory A., Assistant Professor in Automotive Technology, Evansville 

AA, Parkland College, BA, Southern Illinois University 
Whipple, Rebecca L., Associate Professor in Associate Degree Nursing, 

Evansville 

BS, MS, University of Evansville 



White, Victoria R., Instructor in Accounting, Evansville 
BS, MBA, University of Southern Indiana 

Wiltsie, Lisa, Assistant Professor in Basic Skills, Evansville 
MS, Oakland City University 



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Bennett, David, Executive Dean 

BS, MS, Indiana State University; MS, University of Delaware; PhD, 
University of South Carolina 

Clifton, David, Director of Instruction 

BS, University of Louisville; MBA, University of Kentucky 
Jackson, Sue, Dean of Student Affairs, Sellersburg 

BS, Ohio University; MS, Indiana University Southeast 



Broughton, Tonya, Instructor in Associate of Science in Nursing, Sellersburg 

LPN, ASN, Ivy Tech State College, BSN, Indiana University Southeast 
Burton, Pamela, Instructor in Medical Assistant, Sellersburg 

CMA, Jefferson State Vocational School 
Caldwell, June, Instructor in Practical Nursing, Sellersburg 

LPN, ASN, Ivy Tech State College; BSN, Indiana University Southeast 
Cartwright, Susan, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, 

Program Chair, Sellersburg 

AAS, Ivy Tech State College; BS, Indiana Wesleyan; MS, Indiana State 

University 
Crowe, Edward, Associate Professor, Industrial Technology, Department Chair, 

Sellersburg 

CBS, Indiana State University 
Dilbeck, Jack, Associate Professor in Business, Department Chair, Sellersburg 

BBA, McKendree College, MBA, Webster University 
Duffy-, Judith, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Sellersburg 

BSN, Spalding University 
Fitzner, Beverly, Associate Professor in Office Administration, Sellersburg 

BS, Indiana University; MS, State University of New York 
Freeman, Barbara, Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Sellersburg 

BSN, Midwestern State University; MS, Indiana State University 
Gregory, Michael, Associate Professor in General Education, Sellersburg 

BS, MS, Eastern Kentucky University; MS, University of Louisville 
Hoisch, Michael, Assistant Professor in Business, Sellersburg 

AAS, City College of New York; BAA, Bernard Baruch College; MA, Bellevue 

University; EdD, University of Louisville 
Hornung, Brian, Assistant Professor in Industrial Technology, Sellersburg 

AAS, Community College of the Air Force; BS, Wayland Baptist 
Jewell, Susan, Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Program Chair, 

Sellersburg 

LPN, New Albany School of Nursing; BSN Spalding University; MEd, 

Indiana University 
Johnson, Sandra, Instructor in Medical Assistant, Sellersburg 

TC, Spencenan College 



Lambert, Steve, Assistant Professor in Visual Communications, Sellersburg 

AAS, BA, American University 
Martin, Kathy, Associate Professor in General Education, Department Chair, 

Sellersburg 

AAS, JCC, BS, MS, Indiana State University 

McClure, Nancy, Associate Professor in Administrative Office Technology, 
Sellersburg 

BS, University of Indianapolis; MS, Indiana University 
Miller, Nancy, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Sellersburg 

ASN, BSN, Indiana University 
Newman, Susan, Professor/Program Chair in Basic Skills, Sellersburg 

BA, University of Montana; MS, Indiana University Southeast 

Noe, Keith, Professor/Program Chair in Electronics, Sellersburg 

AS, Cincinnati Technical College; BS, University of Cincinnati; MS, Indiana 
University Southeast 

Pickerill, Ken, Instructor in Automotive Technology, Sellersburg 

Certified-ASE 

Quinlan, Terrance, Professor in Industrial Technology, Sellersburg 

AAS, Kentucky College of Technology; BA, Morehead State University; MS, 
Indiana State University 

Randelia, Gool, Professor/Program Chair, General Education, Sellersburg 

BA, MA, University of Bombay; MLS, Indiana University; MS, Indiana 
University Southeast 

Rawles, Deborah, Associate Professor/Program Chair in Medical Assisting, 
Sellersburg 

AS, Mount Ida Junior College; BA, Purdue University 
Roberts, Andrew J., Associate Professor in Basic Skills, Sellersburg 

BS, Austin Peay University; MS, Indiana University Southeast 
Scott, Jerry, Assistant Professor in Accounting, Sellersburg 

BS, Indiana University Southeast 

Shelton, James, Assistant Professor/Computer Certification Coordinator, 
Sellersburg 

BS, Murray State University; MBA University of South Carolina 

Sprigler, Gail, Associate Professor/Program Chair in Associate of Science in 
Nursing, Sellersburg 

LPN, New Albany School of Nursing; BSN, Indiana University Southeast; 
MSN, Bellarmine College 

Stockdell, Elizabeth, Instructor in Associate of Science in Nursing, Sellersburg 

BSN, MA, Spalding University 
Talbert, Michael, Associate Professor in Basic Skills, Sellersburg 

BA, Central Bible College; M.Div, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 

Von K^nel, Robert, Associate Professor in Associate of Science in Nursing, 
Sellersburg 

AAS, Indiana University Southeast; BSN, Spalding College; MSN Bellarmine 
College 
Wang, Xuejun, Instructor in General Education, Sellersburg 

BS, Nanjing Institute of Technology; MA, Indiana State University; PhD, 
Purdue University 

White, Jonna, Associate Professor in Associate of Science in Nursing, 
Sellersburg 

SBSN, University of Tennessee; MSN, Texas Women's University 

Williamson, Robert, Assistant Professor in Computer Information Systems, 
Sellersburg 

BA, Texas Western College; MS, Eastern Kentucky University 

Zimmer, Debra, Instructor in Associate of Science in Nursing, Sellersburg 

LPN, Ivy Tech State College; ASN, ECC North; BSN, McKendree College 



REG 



OFFICERS 



Kimmons, Willie J., Chancellor 

BS, Lincoln University; MS, EdD, Northern Illinois University 
Dolly, Patricia A., Dean of Academic Affairs 

BS, Aquinas College; MS, EdD, Western Michigan University 
Jacobs, Diana, Dean of Student Affairs 

BS, MEd, State University of New York, Brockport 



Arnold, Linda C, Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Bloomington 

BS, University of Evansville 

Barnes, Kirk, Associate Professor in Design Technology, Program Chair, 
Bloomington 

BS, MA, Ball State University 

Cline, Vera E., Assistant Professor in Associate of Science in Nursing, Program 
Chair, Bloomington 

BS, MSN, Indiana State University 

Cochran, David M., Instructor in General Education, Bloomington 

BA, Oklahoma Baptist University; MA, Southwestern Baptist Theological 
Seminary 

Craig, Carolyn J., Associate Professor in Accounting, Program Chair, 
Bloomington 

AB, MBA, Indiana University 

Dawson, Ronald A., Associate Professor in Industrial Technology, Program 
Chair, Bloomington 

BS, University of Illinois; MA, Eastern Illinois University 

Friedman, Susan K., Instructor in Business Administration, Bloomington 

BA, Wellesley College; MA, Western Michigan University; MBA, Arizona 
State University 

Gates, Sharon, Assistant Professor in Associate of Science in Nursing, 
Bloomington 

BS, Purdue University; MSN, Indiana University 
Gersch, Carolyn, Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Bloomington 

BSN, Indiana University 
Hessert, Paul A., Instructor in General Education, Bloomington 

BS, MA, Indiana University 
Jillot-Elick, Karen, Assistant Professor in Practical Nursing, Bloomington 

BSN, Marian College of Fond du Lac 
Karic, Lori R., Instructor, Associate of Scinece in Nursing, Bloomington 

BSN , Valparaiso University 

Leach, Celinda K, Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Program Chair, 
Bloomington 

BS, MPH, Indiana University 
Lema, Karen, Instructor in Computer Informtion Systems, Bloomington 

BS, MIS, Indiana University 
Lessig, Alan, Associate Professor in Office Administration, Bloomington 

BBA, University of Kentucky; MAT, University of Louisville 
Melton, Nona L., Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Bloomington 

BS, University of Evansville 



Nedel, John S., Assistant Professor in General Education, Program Chair, 

Bloomington 

EMT, Maplewood Vocational School; BS, Mount Union College; MA, Indiana 

University 
Nelson, Peggy L., Associate Professor in Academic Skills Advancement, 

Program Chair, Bloomington 

BS, MS, Indiana University 
Overton, Bonita S., Instructor in General Education, Bloomington 

BS, University of Southern Indiana 
Pierro, Lou, Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems, Program 

Chair, Bloomington 

BS, MA, California State University; EdD, Indiana University 
Reading, Thomas C, Assistant Professor in Business Administration, Program 

Chair, Bloomington 

BS, Indiana University; MBA, Harvard University 
Rutherford, Janet L., Associate Professor in Office Administration, Program 

Chair, Bloomington 

BS, MS, EdS, Indiana University 
Simmons, Carol A., Instructor in Academic Skills Advancement, Bloomington 

BA, James Madison University; MA, Indiana University 
Smith Jr., Larry E., Assistant Professor in Electronics, Program Chair, 

Bloomington 

AS, Vincennes University; BS, Southern Illinois University; MS, North 

Carolina State University 
Strain, Larry G., Associate Professor in Computer Information Systems, 

Bloomington 

BS, Indiana University 
Thompson, Pam, Associate Professor in Practical Nursing, Bloomington 

BSN, Morningside College 
Wyer, Thomas A., Instructor in Design Technology, Bloomington 

BS, Purdue University 







Accreditations and 
Memberships 






Y 



(*> 



Ivy Tech State College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission 
and is a member of The North Central Association. Other accrediting 
agencies and affiliates are listed below by regions. The college is a 
member of the American Association of Collegiate Registrars and 
Admissions Officers, the American Association of Community Colleges, 
the Association of Community College Trustees, CAUSE, the National 
Association of College and University Business Officers, the National 
Association of Colleges and Employers, the National Association of 
Financial Aid Administrators, the National Council for Research and 
Planning, the National Council on Student Development, and the Society 
for College and University Planning.. 



Accreditations 



Region 1 (Gary, East Chicago, Michigan City, Valparaiso) 

Agency Program Area 

The American Culinary Federation Hospitality Administration Culinary Arts 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment Medical Assistant 

Joint Review Committee for Respiratory Therapy Education Respiratory Care 

Accreditation Review Committee on Education in Surgical Technology Surgical Technology 

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission Practical Nursing 

Indiana State Board of Nursing Associate of Science in Nursing 

Practical Nursing 

Indiana State Board of Health Nurse Aide 

National Restaurant Association Hospitality Administration 

Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education Physical Therapist Assistant 

Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 
Region 2 (South Bend, Elkhart, Warsaw) 

Agency Program Area 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment Medical Assistant 

National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Services Medical Laboratory Technician 

Phlebotomy 

Indiana State Board of Health Nurse Aide 

Qualified Medication Aide 

Indiana State Board of Nursing , Associate of Science in Nursing 

Practical Nursing 

Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 

Dietary Managers Association Dietary Manager 

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission Associate of Science in Nursing 

Indiana State Emergency Management Agency Emergency Medical Technician, Ambulance 

National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence/ 

National Automotive Technicians' Education Foundation Automotive Technology 

Recreational Vehicle Industry Association Recreational Vehicle Service Technology 

Region 3 (Fort Wayne) 

Agency Program Area 

American Association for Medical Transcnption Medical Assistant 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment Medical Assistant 

Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care Respiratory Care 

Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 

Dietary Managers Association Dietary Manager 

National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences Phlebotomy 

National Automotive Technicians' Education Foundation, Inc Automotive Technology 

Council on Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Education Hospitality Administration 

American Culinary Federation Hospitality Administration 

National Organization for Human Service Education Human Services 

Council for Standards in Human Services Education Human Services 

Indiana Association for Home Care, Inc Medical Assistant - Home Health Care 

Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA) Massage Therapy 



Accreditations 



Region 4 (Lafayette) 

Agency Program Area 

Indiana State Board of Nursing Associate of Science in Nursing 

Practical Nursing 

Indiana State Board of Health Qualified Medication Aide 

Certified Nursing Assistant 

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission Associate of Science in Nursing 

American Dental Association, Commission on Dental Accreditation Dental Assistant 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment Medical Assistant 

Accrediting Review Committee on Education in Surgical Technology Surgical Technology 

Joint Review Committee for Respiratory Therapy Education Respiratory Care 

Dietary Managers' Association ......Dietary Manager 

Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 

National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence/ 

National Automotive Technicians' Education Foundation Automotive Technology 



Region 5 (Kokomo, Logansport) 

Agency Program Area 

Association for Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment Medical Assistant 

Indiana State Board of Health Qualified Medication Aide 

Certified Nurse Assistant 

Indiana State Board of Nursing Practical Nursing 

American Design Drafting Association Design Technology 

National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence/ 

National Automotive Technicians' Education Foundation Automotive Technology 



Region 6 (Anderson, Marion, Muncie) 

Agency Program Area 

Association for Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 

Association for Gerontology in Higher Education Human Services 

Indiana State Emergency Management Agency Emergency Medical Technician Ambulance/Advance 

Indiana State Board of Health Nurse Aide 

Qualified Medication Aide 

Indiana State Board of Nursing Practical Nursing 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment Medical Assistant 

Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education Physical Therapist Assistant 

National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence/ 

National Automotive Technicians' Education Foundation Automotive Technology 



Accreditations 



Region 7 (Terre Haute) 

Agency Program Area 

Association for Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 

Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Technology 

Indiana State Board of Health Nurse Aide 

Social Services/Long-Term Care 
Activity Director/Long-Term Care 
Qualified Medication Aide 

Indiana State Emergency Management Agency Emergency Medical Technician 

Indiana State Board of Nursing Practical Nursing 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment Medical Assistant 

National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences Medical Laboratory Technician 

Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology Radiologic Technology 

National Association of Industrial Technology Automotive Technology 

Manufacturing Technology 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Industrial Technology 
Quality Science 

National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence/ 

National Automotive Technicians' Education Foundation Automotive Technology 

Region 8 (Indianapolis) 
Agency Program Area 

The American Culinary Federation Educational Institute Hospitality Administration; Culinary Arts 

American Design Drafting Association Design Technology 

Greater Indianapolis Chapter of the American Culinary Federation Hospitality Administration; Culinary Arts 

Restaurant and Hospitality Association of Indiana Hospitality Administration 

International Association of Administrative Professionals Office Administration 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment Medical Assistant 

Accreditation Review Committee on Education in Surgical Technology Surgical Technology 

Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology Radiologic Technology 

Joint Review Committee for Respiratory Therapy Education Respiratory Care 

The Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education 

of the American Occupational Therapy Association Occupational Therapy Assistant 

Association for Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 

Council for Standards in Human Services Education Human Services 

National Association of Industrial Technology Automotive Technology 

Manufacturing Technology 
Design Technology 
Electronics Technology 
Industrial Technology 
National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence/ 

National Automotive Technicians' Education Foundation Automotive Technology 

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission Associate of Science in Nursing 

Practical Nursing 

Indiana State Board of Nursing Associate of Science in Nursing 

Practical Nursing 

Indiana State Board of Health Certified Nurse Aide 

Qualified Medication Aide 
Nursing Home Activities Director 
Nursing Home Social Services Designee 



Accreditations 






Region 9 (Richmond) 

Agency Program Area 

Indiana State Board of Nursing Associate of Science in Nursing 

Practical Nursing 

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission Associate of Science in Nursing 

Indiana State Board of Health Nurse Aide 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment Medical Assistant 

Dietary Managers Association Dietary Manager 

Indiana State Emergency Management Agency Emergency Medical Technician, 

Ambulance Advanced EMT 
National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence/ 

National Automotive Technicians' Education Foundation Automotive Technology 

Association for Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 



Region 10 (Columbus) 

Agency Program Area 

Indiana State Board of Nursing Practical Nursing 

Association for Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment Medical Assistant 

Indiana State Board of Health Qualified Medication Aide 

Certified Nursing Assistant 
Home Health Aide 



Region 11 (Lawrenceburg, Madison) 

Agency Program Area 

Indiana State Board of Nursing , Associate of Science in Nursing 

Practical Nursing 
Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment Medical Assistant 

Indiana State Emergency Management Agency Emergency Medical Technician, Basic and Advanced 



Accreditations 



Region 12 (Evansville) 

Agency Program Area 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment Medical Assistant 

Accreditation Review Committee on Education in Surgical Technology Surgical Technology 

Association for Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 

National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence/ 

National Automotive Technicians' Education Foundation Automotive Technology 

National Association of Industrial Technology Electronics Technology 

Design Technology 
Manufacturing Technology 

Joint Review Committee for Educational Programs for the EMT-Paramedics .... Paramedic 

Indiana State Board of Nursing Associate of Science in Nursing 

Practical Nursing 

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission Associate of Science in Nursing 

Practical Nursing 



Region 13 (Sellersburg) 



Agency Program Area 

Indiana State Board of Nursing Associate of Science in Nursing 

Practical Nursing 

Indiana State Board of Health Nurse Aide 

Qualified Medication Aide 

Indiana State Emergency Management Agency Emergency Medical Technician, Ambulance 

National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence/ 

National Automotive Technicians' Education Foundation Automotive Technology 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs: 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment Medical Assistant 

Association for Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 



Region 14 (Bloomington) 

Agency Program Area 

Indiana State Board of Nursing Associate of Science in Nursing 

Practical Nursing 

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission Practical Nursing 

Association for Collegiate Business Schools and Programs Accounting 

Business Administration 
Computer Information Systems 
Office Administration 



Accreditations 



Contact Information for Accrediting Organizations 



The Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education 
of the American Occupational Therapy Association 
4720 Montgomery Lane PO. Box 31220 
Bethesda, MD 20824-1220 
(301) 652-2682 

Accreditation Review Committee on Education in Surgical Technology 
7108-C South Alton Way 
Englewood, CO 80112 
(303) 694-9262 

American Association for Paralegal Education 
P.O. Box 40244 
Overland Park, KS 66204 

American Association of Medical Assistants' Endowment 
20 North Wacker Drive, Suite 1575 
Chicago. 1L 60606 
(312) 899-1500 

American Culinary Federation Educational Institute 
10 San Bartola Drive 
Saint Augustine, FL 32086 
1-800-624-9458 

American Dental Association, Commission on Dental Accreditation 
211 East Chicago Avenue 
Chicago IL 
(312)440-2915 

American Design Drafting Association 

P.O. Box 799 

Rockville, MD 20848-0799 

(301) 460-6875 

Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs 
7007 College Boulevard, Suite 420 
Overland Park, KS 66211 
(913) 339-9356 

Association for Gerontology in Higher Education 
1001 Connecticut Avenue N.W. - Suite 410 
Washington, DC 20036-5504 
(202) 429-9277 

International Association of Administrative Professionals 

10502 NW Ambassador Drive 

P.O. Box 20404 

Kansas City, MO 64195-0404 

(816) 891-6600 

Business Professionals of America 
5454 Cleveland Avenue 
Columbus, OH 43231 

Commission for Hotel Restaurant Institutional Education (CHRIE) 
1200 1 T h Street NW 
Washington, DC 20363 

Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education 
1111 N. Fairfax Street 
Alexandna, VA 22314 
(703) 706-3245 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs 
35 East Wacker Drive, Suite 1970 
Chicago, IL 60601-2208 
(312) 535-9355 

Council for Standards in Human Services Education 

Attn: Naydean Blair 

Houston Community College System 

5514 Claire Road 

Houston, TX 77041 

(713) 718-5539 

Dietary Managers Association 
One Pierce Place, Suite 1220 N 
Itasca, IL 60143-3111 
(708) 775-9250 

Federal Aviation Administration 
Airman Certification Branch 
P.O. Box 25082 
Oklahoma City, OK 73125-4940 



Greater Indianapolis Chapter of the 
American Culinary Federation, Inc. 
1800 E. King Street 
Franklin, IN 46131 
(317) 736-7284 

Indiana State Board of Health 
1330 West Michigan Street 
P.O. Box 1964 

Indianapolis, IN 46206-1964 
(317) 633-0100 

Indiana State Board of Nursing 

Health Professions Bureau 

402 West Washington Street, Room 041 

Indianapolis, IN 46204 

(317)232-2960 

Indiana State Emergency Management Agency 
302 West Washington Street, Room E-208 
Indianapolis, IN 46204 
(317) 233-6545 

Joint Review Committee for Respiratory Therapy Education 
1701 West Euless Boulevard, Suite 300 
Euless, TX 76040-6823 
(817) 283-2835 

Joint Review Committee for Educational Programs for the EMT-Paramedic 
7108-C South Alton Way, Suite 150 
Englewood, CO 801 12 
(303)694-6191 

Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology 
20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 900 
Chicago, IL 60606-2901 

(312) 704-5300 

National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences 
8410 West Bryn Mawr Avenue, Suite 670 
Chicago, IL 60631 
(312)714-8880 

National Association of Industrial Technology 
3300 Washtenaw Avenue, Suite 220 
Ann Arbor, Ml 48104-4200 

(313) 677-0720 

National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission 
350 Hudson Street 
New York, NY 10014 
(212) 645-9685 

National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence/ 
National Automotive Technicians' Education Foundation 
13505 Dulles Technology Drive 
Hemdon.VA 22071-3415 
(703)713-0100 

National Organization for Human Services Education 
Dr. Marianne R. Wcodside 
University of Tennessee, Knoxville 
533 Andy Holt Tower 
Knoxville, TN 37996-0150 

National Restaurant Association 
250 S. Wacker Drive, Suite 1400 
Chicago, IL 60606 

North Central Association of Colleges and Schools 
30 North La Salle Street 
Chicago, IL 606012-2504 
(312) 263-0456 

Recreational Vehicle Industry Association 
PO Box 2999 
Reston.VA 20195-0999 
(703) 620-6003 

Restaurant and Hospitality Association of Indiana 
115 W Washington Street, Suite 1165-S 
Indianapolis, IN 46204 
(317)673-4211 



Accreditations 



2+2+2 10 

21st Century Scholars Program 14 



AS. in Nursing 65 

ABELINC 25 

Academic Grading 19 

Accidents 29 

Accounting 46 

Accreditations and Memberships 5, 284 

Administration Specialty 91 

Administrative Specialty 61, 69, 70 

Admission Procedures and Support Docu- 
ments-Degree 9 

Admissions-Degree Objective 8 

Admissions-Non-Degree Objective 8 

Advanced Standing 10 

Advising 25 

Aircraft Maintenance Technician Specialty 
117 

Alcohol Violation 40 

Alumni Association 28 

Appeals 17, 38, 39 

Application Procedures for Financial Aid 1 7 

Apprenticeship Technology 43 

Architectural Specialty 121,124 

Assessment 2, 8, 23 

ASSET 8, 

Associate of Applied Science 24,41 

Associate of Science 24, 41 

Attendance 22 

Audit 20 

Automation Controls Specialty 129 

Automotive Body Repair Specialty 114, 116 

Automotive Service Specialty 114, 116 

Automotive Technology 113 

Availability of Programs 257 

Avionics Specialty 119 

Avionics Technical Certificate 119 



B 



Baking & Pastry Arts Specialty 95 

Ball State University 25, 53, 89, 92, 99, 102, 

107 
Basic Skills 25 

Basic Skills Advancement Courses 165 
Biomedical Specialty 131 
Bookstore 26 

Business Administration 49 
Business and Industry Training Programs 42 
Business Division 41,45 



Cabinetry Specialty 121 

CAD/CAM Specialty 139, 143 

CADD-M Specialty 126 

Calendar 5 

Campuses 6 

Capstone Courses 2 

Career 8, 15, 25, 26, 27, 41, 42 



Index 



Career Development Certificates (CDC) 41 

Casino Management Specialty 50, 55, 96 

Catalog Navigator 3 

Child of Disabled Veteran (CDV) Benefits 16 

CIM Specialty 140 

Civil Specialty 124 

Clinical Specialty 70 

Closing 30 

Clubs 28 

CNC Specialty 141, 143 

College Officers 2,265 

College Profile 4 

College Services 7 

Communications Specialty 131 

Community College of Indiana 4 

COMPASS 8 

Computer Information Systems 56 

Computer Graphics Specialty 125 

Computer Integrated Manufacturing 142 

Computer-Aided Drafting Design 125 

Computer Systems/Networking Specialty 131 

Conduct 30 

Construction Technology 120 

Correctional Rehabilitation Services Specialty 

100 
Course Descriptions 158,171 
Course Equivalency Matrix 170 
Credit 

8, 10, 11, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 29, 41 
Credit Hours 2 1 
Crime Prevention Program 40 
Crime, Reporting 39, 40 
Culinary Arts Specialty 96 
Curriculum Specialty 86 

D 

Dean's List 22 
DegreeLink 24 
Dental Assistant 67 
Dependency Provision 19 
Design Technology 123 
Disabled Veteran 16 
Disability Support Services 27 
Drop and Add 12 
Drug Violation 40 



Early Childhood Education 88, 89 
eBusiness Specialty 50 
Elective 2 

Electrical Maintenance Specialty 131 
Electronics Specialty 131 
Electronics Technology 128 
Emergency Closing 30 
Employer-Funded Education 17 
Employment 15, 16, 26, 27, 41 
English as a Second Language 165 
Enrollment 8, 13, 23, 27 
Enrollment Status 21 
Entering the College 8 
Environmental Care Specialty 109 



Faculty & Staff List 264 

FAFSA 13, 15 

Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate 
Students (PLUS) 16 

Federal Pell Grants 14 

Federal Stafford Loans 15 

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportu- 
nity Grant 15 

Federal Work Study Program 15 

Fees 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 19, 20, 23 

FERPA 18 

Financial Aid 8, 11, 12, 13, 14, 
15, 16, 17, 22,23, 27 

Financial Aid Appeals 17 

Financial Services Specialty 50 

Fire Science Specialty 110 

Food Service, Technical Certificate 98 

Foundation 5, 14 



GED 8, 25 

General Education and Support Services 

Division 41, 157 
General Information 1 
General Technical Studies Degree 42 
Generalist Specialty 70, 100 
Gerontology Specialty 100, 104 
Goals 4 

Grade Point Average 22, 23, 24, 28 
Grade Reports 22 
Grades 19,22 
Grading 19, 22 
Graduation 23, 24 
Grants 13, 15 

Graphic Design Specialty 156 
Graphic Media Production Specialty 156 
Grievances 36 



H 



Harassment 33 

Hazardous Materials Specialty 96, 110 

Health Sciences Division 64, 88 

Health Care Management Specialty 51, 55 

Health Insurance 29 

Heating, Ventilation, & Air Conditioning 

Specialty 121, 135 
Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning 

Special 125, 132 
Higher Education Award Program (HEA) 14 
Hoosier Scholarship Program 14 
Hospitality Administration 94 
Hotel & Restaurant Management Specialty 96 
Hours of Operation 39 
Housing 28,40 
How to Use this Catalog 2 
Human Resources Management Specialty 51 
Human Services 99 



Illnesses 29 

Improving a Grade 22 

Incident Reports 40 

Incomplete 20 

Indiana Part-Time Grant 14 

Indiana Partnership for Statewide 

Education (IPSE) 42 
Indiana State University 10, 24, 52, 99, 103 

115, 126, 131, 141, 142 
Industrial Laboratory Specialty 145 
Industrial Maintenance Specialty 132, 135 
Industrial Specialty 131 
Industrial Technology 132 
Infant/Toddler Specialty 90 
Information Technology Specialty 56 
Instructional Programs 41 
Instrumentation Specialty 131 
Insurance 29 
Insurance Specialty 61 
Interior Design 150 
International Students 1 1 
Intramural Sports 28 
Ivy Tech and Foundation Scholarships 14 
Ivy Tech Grant Programs 1 5 



Landscape Technology Specialty 122 

Laser/Electro-Optics Specialty 131 

Legal Specialty 62 

Library 26 

Limited Admissions Enrollment 9 

Loans 15 

Locally Determined Course 2 

Logistics Management Specialty 5 1 

M 

Machine Tool Specialty 135 

Machine Tool Technology 136 

Management Specialty 51, 55 

Manufacturing Technology 138 

Marketing Specialty 51, 55 

Massage Therapy Specialty 69 

Mechanical Maintenance Specialty 135 

Mechanical Specialty 125 

Medical Assistant 68 

Medical Laboratory Technician 72 

Medical Specialty 62 

Mental Health Specialty 100 

Mission 4 

Multimedia Specialty 156 

N 

Network/Multi-Vendor Specialty 59 
Network/Novell Specialty 56 
Network/Windows NT Specialty 59 
No-Show 20 
Nursing AS 65 

o 

Occupational Therapy Assistant 74 



Off-Campus Housing 40 

Office Administration 60 

Computer Information Systems 56 

Open/Late Registration 12 

Operations Management Specialty 51, 55 

Organizations 27 

Orientation 11 



Paralegal 105 

Paramedic Science 76 

Parking 29, 32 

Part-Time Grant 14 

Pathway to College 10 

Payment of Fees 13 

PC Support and Administration Specialty 59 

Pell Grants 14 

Pharmacy Technician Specialty 71 

Phi Theta Kappa 28 

Photography Specialty 156 

Physical Therapist Assistant 78 

Plastics Specialty 141 

PLUS Loans 16 

Police and Fire Fighters Orphans and Spouses 

Benefit 16 
Policies 11, 27 

Policy and Procedures Manual 18 
Practical Nursing 80 
Professional and Trade Organizations 28 
Programmer/Analyst Specialty 59 
Public Administration Specialty 110 
Public Safety Technology 108, 140 
Public Services Division 41,88 



Quality Assurance Specialty 141 
Quality Management Specialty 51, 55, 145 
Quality Points 22 
Quality Science 144 



R 



Radiologic Technology 82 

Readmission 9 

Real Estate Specialty 53 

Records 18 

Recreational Vehicle Service Technology 146 

Refund Policy 13 

Registering for Courses 1 1 

Registrar 12, 18, 20 

Registration 11 

Reinstatement 38 

Reporting, Security 39 

Residential & Light Carpentry Specialty 121 

Respiratory Care 84 

Responsibilities 30, 40 

Restaurant Management Specialty 53 

Right to Know 39 

Rights 18, 30 

Rules 30 



Satisfactory 21 
Scholarship 14, 



15 



Secondary Initiatives 10 

security 39, 40 

Selected Reserve Educational Assistance 

Program 16 
Senior Scholars Program 43 
Services 23, 25, 26, 27, 42 
Social Activities 28 
Software Applications Specialty 62 
Special Problems 23 
Stafford Loans 14, 15 
Standards of Progress 23 
State Board of Trustees 27, 265 
State Work Study Program 1 5 
Statewide Program Initiatives 42 
Status Codes 20 
Student Activities 27 
Student Government 27 
Student Organizations 27 
Student Orientation 1 1 
Student Records 18 

Student Responsibility, Crime Prevention 40 
Student Rights 30 
Student Support Services 25 
Student Withdrawal 12 
Substance Abuse Counseling 40 
Substance Abuse Specialty 100 
Surgical Technology 86 
Surveying Specialty 121 



Technical Certificate 41 

Technical Illustration Specialty 125 

Technology Division 112 

Telecommunications Specialty 131 

Test-Out Procedures 1 1 

Tool and Die Specialty (Industrial) 135 

Tool and Die Specialty (Manufacturing) 143 

Trade Readjustment Act (TRA) 16 

Transfer 10, 24, 41, 42 

Transferring to the College 10 

Trustees 27, 43 

u 

Union Training Funds 17 

University of Southern Indiana 25, 54, 68 

Unsatisfactory 21 



Verified Competency 2 1 
Veterans' Benefits 17 
Video Technology 152 
Vincennes University 4, 19, 168 
Visual Communications 156 
Visual Technologies Division 41, 149 
Vocational Rehabilitation 16 
Voter Registration 30 

w 

Welding Specialty 135, 141 
Withdraw 12, 13, 20, 22 
Work Study 15 
Workforce Certification 43 



Notes 




Ivy Tech is an accredited, equal opportunity, 
affirmative action state college.