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Full text of "Ivy Tech State College Central Indiana Bulletin, 1995-1996"

Ivy Tech State College 
Central Indiana 
1995-1996 



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CENTRAL INDIANA BULLETIN 



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1995-1996 
V One West 26th St. 



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PO. Box 1763 

Indianapolis, Indiana 46206-1763 

Phone:(317)921-4800 
1-800-732-1470 
FAX: (317) 921-4753 

Ivy Tech State College - Central Indiana 

Ivy Tech State College offers degree credit programs, courses, career 
development and technical certificates, and community service offerings. The 
College provides open admission, counseling, and placement services for all 
persons, regardless of race, color, creed, religion, gender, limited English 
proficiency, national origin, physical or mental handicap, limited English 
comprehension, age, or veteran status. 

Disclaimer 

This catalog is intended to supply accurate information to the reader. 
From time to time, certain information may be changed. 

The College may revise any matter described in this catalog at any time 
without pubUshing a revised version of the catalog. Information which 
appears to apply to a particular student should be verified by the Registrar's 
Office. This publication and its provisions are not in any way a contract 
between the student and Ivy Tech State College. 



Fall 1995 

Regional Relations-Central Indiana 

Editor/Designer; Lisa Kitchen Butt 

Cover Design and Technical Support: Image Design 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



General Information 



1 

2 


Introduction 

Program Information • 


5 


Admissions Information 




5 


Admission 




5 


Readmission 




5 


Limited Admission Enrollment ■■ <■'" 




6 


Success Seminars 




6 


Transferring to the College v ;. :' ; 




6 


Transferring to other Colleges 




6 


Tech Prep 




7 


Special Needs 




7 


International Students 


8 


Financial Assistance , 


11 


Fee 


: Information/Refund Policy/Registration 




11 


College Fees 




11 


Additional Expenses 




11 


Payment of Fees , . 




11 


Miscellaneous Fees 




12 


Registering for Classes 




12 


Dropping and Adding 




12 


Student Withdrawal 


13 


Student Records 




'"{ 


Dependency Provision 


14 


Academic Information 




14 


Testing Out of Classes 




14 


Academic Grading 




14 


Grades 




14 


Status Codes 




16 


Academic Standards of Progress 




16 


Academic Problems 




16 


Dean's List 




17 


Commencement 




17 


Attendance 


18 


Student Development/Support Services 




18 


Computer-Assisted Instructional Lab 




18 


Testing Lab ' ' 




18 


Tutoring Lab 



18 Writing Center 

18 Career Counseling 

18 Office of Career and Employment Services 

19 Learning Resource Center/Library 
19 College Bookstore 

19 Child Development Center 

19 Student Government Association 
"- 20 Student Organizations 

20 Alumni Association as 
20 Student Right to Know 

20 Communicable Disease Policy 

21 Workplace Violence Policy 

21 Campus Crime Awareness 

22 Sexual Harassment Policy 

23 Drug Policy 

23 Student Rights/Responsibilities 

23 College Rules 

25 Violations 

26 Student Grievance Policy 

28 Student Information 

28 Accreditation/Approvals 

28 Nondiscrimination Policy 

28 Telephone 

28 Fire 

28 Tornado 

28 Lounge/Food Service 

28 Non-Smoking Policy 

28 Parking and Housing 

29 Business and Technology Dixision 

51 Health and Human Services Division 

61 General Education and Support Services 
Division 

68 Course Descriptions 

104 Ivy Tech Personnel 

104 Board of Trustees 
104 Administrative Staff 
104 Full-time Faculty 



CALENDAR 



Fan 1995 




Fan 1996-97 




August 14 - 18 


Faculty Report 


April 19-23 


Faculty Report 


August 21 


First day of classes 


August 26 


First Day of Classes 


September 4 


Labor Day Holiday 


September 2 


Labor Day Holiday 


November 21-26 


Fall Break 


November 26-27 


Fall Break 


November 27 


Classes begin after Break 


November 28-December 1 


Thanksgiving 


December 17 


Last day of classes 


December 2 


Classes Begin After Break 


December 18 -January 1 


Winter Break 


December 22 


Last Day of Classes 


Spring 1996 




December 23-January 5 


Winter Break 


January 2-5 


Faculty Report 


Spring 1997-98 




January 8 


First Day of classes 


January 6-10 


Faculty Report 


March 4-10 


Spring Break 


January 13 


First Day of Classes 


March 11 


Classes begin after Break 


March 10-16 


Spring Break 


April 26 


Commencement 


March 17 


Classes Begin After Break 


May 5 


Last day of classes 


May 2 


Commencement 


Summer 1996 




May 10 


Last Day of Classes 


May 6-17 


Summer Break 






May 23 


First Day of Classes 






May 27 


Memorial Day Holiday 






July 4 


Holiday 






August 9 


Last Day of Classes 







III 



INTRODUCTION 



In just over a quarter of a century. Ivy Tech State 
College, formerly known as Indiana Vocational Technical 
College, has grown from an idea to a thriving postsecondary 
institution. On June 1, 1995, Ivy Tech adopted the new 
name to reflect the College's 32-year evolution from a 
postsecondary vocational school originally designed to 
provide short-term, job-specific training to a college system 
with highly sophisticated offerings. 

In 1963, the Indiana General Assembly established Ivy 
Tech State College as Indiana's first statewide vocational 
technical college by appropriating $50,000 for its 
development. Following appointment of a State Board of 
Trustees, a president was named and the first training 
program was established in 1965. Later amendments to the 
enabling legislation authorized the College's present regional 
structure of 13 administrative centers to provide accessible 
technical educational opportunities to all Indiana citizens. 
Thirteen regional boards of trustees were appointed, and 13 
regions were chartered between 1966 and 1969. 

Ivy Tech State College is a public, statewide, open- 
access, community-based college. The College's mission is to 
enable individuals to develop to their fullest potential and to 
support the economic development of Indiana. Ivy Tech 
State College prepares residents of Indiana with the general 
and technical education needed for successful careers or for 
continuation in further higher education. The College 
provides courses, certificate and degree programs, counseling 
and related services, technical assistance, and community 
service to individuals, communities, and businesses and 
industries across the state. Ivy Tech State College promotes 
educational mobility through partnerships with local schools 
and other higher education institutions. 

Ivy Tech - Central Indiana offers mstruction in three 
instructional areas: Business and Technology, Health and 
Human Services, and General Education. 



The College's regional office of Business and Industry 
Training works closely with Indiana businesses to provide 
customized training and retraining in response to specific 
company needs. These training programs are available on 
campus or in the workplace. 

Regional History 

Ivy Tech State College— Central Indiana, one of the 
College's 13 regions, opened its doors in 1966 to serve 
residents of Marion, Morgan, Hancock, Johnson, Shelby, 
Boone, Hendricks, and Hamilton counties. In 1966, the 
College enrolled 367 students in three technical programs; 
in Fall 1994, the College enrolled 6,050 students in 22 areas 
of study. 

Facilities 

The Ivy Tech State College— Central Indiana campus is 
located north of downtown Indianapolis at One West 26th 
Street, comer of Fall Creek Parkway and North Meridian 
Street. The central campus is comprised of the North 
Meridian Center, Technology Center, and the Child 
Development Center In addition, the College holds selected 
classes in area high schools throughout Marion County and 
the seven surrounding counties. 



PROGRAM INFORMATION 



Ivy Tech State College programs are designed to meet 
the needs of the student population, accommodating those 
who wish to enroll in a few classes as well as those who 
prefer a full program. Credit programs normally culminate 
in the Associate in Science degree, the Associate in Applied 
Science degree or the Technical Certificate. The three 
divisions are Business and Technology, Health and Human 
Services, and General Education. 

Short-term training is available in selected credit 
courses, in sequences of credit courses, and in custom- 
designed courses for local business and industry. Also 
available are contract training programs and non-credit 
institutional activities, such as seminars, workshops, and 
conferences. 

In addition to program and custom-designed courses. 
Ivy Tech State College offers basic skills instruction for 
students who require academic support and/or study skills to 
assist them in successful completion of a regular program of 
study. Enrollment in certain basic skills courses is designed 
to prepare the student for the GED examination. 

Associate in Applied Science (AAS) Degree and 
Associate in Science (AS) Degree Programs 

Associate in Applied Science degree programs prepare 
students for career mobility within occupational clusters at 
the technician or technology level. The programs offer 
education in recognized specialities with emphasis on 
analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. The program content, 
which is approximately 75 percent technical and 25 percent 
general education, provides both depth and breadth in 
conceptual and manipuladve skills. The general education 
courses, offered in the areas of communications, humanities, 
mathematics, life and physical sciences, and social sciences, 
equip students with the life skills they need to be fully 
functioning, contributing members of society Some, but not 
all, AAS degree programs may transfer to four-year 
instituuons. Ask for details in the Admissions Office. 

Associate in Science degree programs prepare students 
for careers and also enable students who have an interest and 
ability to transfer Ivy Tech State College credits to 
cooperating four-year institutions. These programs 
emphasize cognitive skills intended as pre-baccalaureate 
study and provide courses equivalent to those prescribed in 
the lower division of the receiving four-year college or 
university. 

Technical Certificate (TC) Programs 

The Technical Certificate programs provide training in 
conceptual and manipulative skills for specific occupations. 



Each program contains a sequence of required courses in a 
recognized specialty within one of the technologies taught at 
the College. The program content is designed to develop 
competency in the comprehension of general and technical 
skills in that specialty. 

Career Development Certificates (CDC) 

Ivy Tech State College provides short-term programs for 
individuals who desire to develop competencies in a specific 
area. These programs are less than 32 semester credits in 
length. Instruction is delivered through methods that 
include regular courses and specifically-designed courses. 
Many of these courses are based on a sequence of learning 
experiences determined by a certifying state or national 
association or organization. Completion of certain short- 
term programs qualifies students to sit for certification 
examinations. The number and types of short-term 
programs vary. 

Business and Industry Training Programs 

Ivy Tech State College offers specialized training services 
for business and industry. The Office of Business and 
Industry Training develops custom-designed programs and 
services to meet the training needs of local businesses. The 
office works with business and industry, trade unions, and 
public and community economic development groups to 
assess training needs and to deliver training when and where 
it is needed, often in-plant. Call (317) 921-4775 for more 
information. 

General Technical Studies Program 

The General Technical Studies Program provides an 
option for students who may not be ready to enter a degree 
program. As such, the program serves primarily as a 
beginning point for students as they define and meet their 
educational objectives. It is designed to meet the diverse 
needs of the students Ivy Tech serves. The program will; 

• Provide an opportunity for students to correct 
skill deficiencies before enrolling in a technical 
degree program; 

• Provide a program for students who have not 
selected a specific educational or career goal by 
the time they have entered the college; 

• Allow students who are waiting for admission into 
a selective program to enter the college; 

• Provide a directed program of career-oriented 
educational exploration to encourage an 
examination of occupational program areas; 



• Increase student retention by providing a vehicle 
which promotes informed choices; 

• Provide undecided students the opportunity to 
pursue coursework which will serve as a 
foundation for related one- or two-year programs 
while engaged in career exploration; 

• Provide an opportunity for a student to pursue a 
one-year program of general technical studies. 



Approved Degree Programs 

Associate in Science Degree 

Accounting Technology 
Administrative Office Technology 
Associate Degree Nursing 
Child Development 
Occupational Therapy Assistant 

Associate in Applied Science Degree 

Accounting Technology 
Administrative Office Technology 

Legal Specialty 

Administrative Office Specialty 
Automotive Technology 

Automotive Service Specialty 

ASSET-Ford Motor Company 

ASEP-General Motors 

T-TEN-Toyota 
Business Administration 

Management Specialty 

Lotties Management Specialty 

Marketing Specialty 
Computer Information Systems 

Microcomputer Specialty 

Programming Specialty 
Design Technology 

Architecture Specialty 

Civil Specialty 

Computer Graphic Design Specialty 

Mechanical Specialty 
Electronics Technology 

Communications Specialty 

Industrial Specialty 

Microwave Systems Specialty 
Hospitality Administration 

Culinary Arts Specialty 

Hotel/Restaurant Administration Specialty 



Baking and Pastry Arts Specialty 
Human Services Technology 

Criminal Justice Specialty 

Gerontology Specialty 

Generalist Specialty 

Substance Abuse Specialty 

Mental Health Specialty 
Industrial Technology 

Heating/Ventilation/Air Conditioning Specialty 

Industrial Maintenance Specialty 
Manufacturing Technology 

Computer Aided Design CAD/CAM Specialty 

Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) Specialty 
Medical Assistant 
Paralegal 
Public Safety Technology 

Environmental Care Specialty 

Fire Science Specialty 

Hazardous Materials Specialty 

Public Administration Specialty 
Radiologic Technology 
Respiratory Care Technology 
Surgical Technology 

Technical Certificate 

Administrative Office Technology 

Medical Specialty 

Administrative Specialty 
Child Development 
Design Technology 
Industrial Technology 

Heating/Ventilation/Air Conditioning Specialty 

Welding 
Manufacturing Technology 

Computer Numerical (CMC) Specialty 
Medical Assistant 

Clinical Specialty 

Administrative Specialty 

Pharmacy Technician Specialty 
Practical Nursing 

General Technical Studies 

Business 

Technology 

Health and Human Resources 



Weekend College 



Off-Campus Classes 



Weekend College is Ivy Tech State College's way of 
providing an educational opportunity to individuals who are 
unable to attend during regular weekday or evening hours. 

Individuals interested in Weekend College include: 

1 . Individuals whose work and home schedules 
create a need to attend classes on Friday evenings, 
Saturdays, or Sunday afternoon; 

2. Individuals anticipating a career change; 

3. Current students who want to accelerate their 
academic progress; 

4. Individuals interested in enhancing their skills and 
staying abreast of advancing technology in their 
fields. 

Weekend College offers a wide selection of credit 
courses and continuing education programs to a diverse 
group of people. 

Basic Skills Advancement Program Services 

Ivy Tech State College offers a Basic Skills Advancement 
Program to help ensure the success of students in the 
completion of their educational goals. The College is 
concerned about the success of its students, and this 
program is designed to ensure that every student has the 
opportunity to be successful. 

Services provided include diagnostic assessment and 
evaluation, and career counseling. The need for these 
services may be identified at the time of admission; however, 
a student may utilize any or all services upon encountering 
academic difficulty during a course of study. Professional 
basic skills advancement instructors and laboratory 
technicians provide supplemental instruction in the areas of 
reading, writing, mathematics, science, study skills, 
computer literacy, and keyboarding. 

Special Needs Services provide supportive services to 
students vnxh special challenges to aid in their achieving 
academic and employment goals. The services include 
interpreters for the deaf, adaptations for the hearing 
impaired, taped books, tutoring services, counseling and 
liaison with other agencies. 

For further information about the College's Basic Skills 
Advancement Program, contact either the Admissions Office 
or the General Education and Support Services Division. 



Ivy Tech State College provides credit courses at a 
number of off-campus instructional sites. 

Ben Davis High School 

1200 North Girls School Road, Indianapolis 

Blue River Career Center 

789 St. Joseph Street, Shelbyville 

Carmel Junior High School 
300 S. Guilford Ave., Carmel 

Greenfield Central High School 
810 North Broadway, Greenfield 

Greenwood High School 

615 West Smith Valley Rd., Greenwood 

Lebanon High School 
510 Essex Drive, Lebanon 

Manual High School 

2405 Madison Ave., Indianapolis 

Mooresville High School 
550 N. Indiana, Mooresville 

Mt. Vernon High School 
8112 N. 200, Fortville 

Noblesville High School 

300 N. 17th Street, Noblesville 

Pike High School 

6701 Zionsville Road, Indianapolis 

Walker Career Center 

9651 East 21st Street, Indianapolis 



ADMISSIONS INFORMATION 



Students who are high school graduates, have a high 
school equivalency degree (GED), or those who demonstrate 
"ability to benefit" are ehgible for admission to Ivy Tech State 
College. 

To enroll in an Ivy Tech program/specialty: 

1. Fill out an Ivy Tech State College application for 
Admission*. Mail or hand deliver the completed 
application to the College, 

2. Have your high school and/or college transcripts 
sent directly to Ivy Tech State College, Registrar's 
Office. With a GED, the applicant should request 
an official copy be sent or bring a copy of the 
original transcript of GED scores to the Office of 
the Registrar. 

3. All appUcants are required to attend an ASSET 
Success Seminar which includes orientation, 
assessment testing, and advisement. 

Some admitted students may be required to participate 
in pre-technical/basic skills advancement courses. All 
placements are based on a review of ASSET placement test 
scores and high school (or GED) and college transcripts. 

Pre-technical courses enable the student to develop or 
strengthen important academic skills by taking prescribed 
classes. A pre-technical class is designed to enhance the 
student's academic success and is based on the student's goal, 
a review of placement test scores, high school and/or college 
transcripts and an academic advising session. 

If you wish to earn an associate degree or technical 
certificate, you must complete the entire admission process. 
Acceptance is based on the poUcy "first-come, first-qualified, 
first-served." 

"Information required on the application concerning 
race, age, color, national origin, gender, marital status, or 
physical disabilities will be used for reporting purposes only 
Information gathered on physical disabilities will provide the 
College information regarding accommodations or 
adjustments that may be required. This information will be 
kept confidential. 

If you are interested in taking a course only and you 
meet the course prerequisites (if any), you are ready to 
enroll. 

Readmission 

Should a student's course of study at Ivy Tech State 
College be interrupted during a semester, an official drop 
form must be completed or an F grade will be assigned. If a 
student is withdrawing from classes or not re-enrolling for 
classes, the student may request readmission at a later date. 



This is accomplished by contacting the Admissions and 
Counseling offices. Information on eligibility for financial 
assistance will be available to returning students from the 
Financial Assistance Office. 

Limited Admission Enrollment 

Sometimes the number of students admitted and 
enrolled in programs and/or courses is limited by College 
resources or facilities — including available lab equipment or 
the number of available health program clinical work 
settings. The Admissions Office should be contacted 
regarding the status of different programs. 

Admission Procedures and Support Documents 

For degree-seeking students: 

1. A complete student admission data form, which 
establishes records in the Registrar's Office, is 
required. 

2. Proof of high school graduation or GED 
completion is normally required for admission 
into a program leading to a certificate or a degree. 
The high school graduate or individual who has 
the GED must request the secondary school or 
testing center send an official copy of the 
transcript or GED certification to the Office of the 
Registrar. Applicants to Associate of Science 
degrees and Health and Human Services programs 
must have their high school transcript or GED 
certification scores on file in the Registrar's Office 
before the start of the first semester. Applicants 
for all other programs must have the high school 
transcript or GED certification scores submitted 
no later than the end of the first semester of 
attendance. 

3. Students whose high school transcripts are not in 
English must have their high school transcripts 
translated into English and verified by an 
appropriate outside agency All international 
students must have their transcripts evaluated and 
verified by an appropriate outside agency Please 
contact the Admissions Office for an international 
packet. 

4. "Home Schooled" students will be required to 
obtain a GED for admission. 

5. The College has counselors available to assist 
students in selecting a course of study at Ivy Tech 
State College. 



6. The College requires that program-declared 

students either provide acceptable standardized 
test scores or participate in the College academic 
diagnostic testing program. 

7. Should a student wish to transfer credits to Ivy 

Tech State College from another college, the 
student must have an official copy of the grade 
transcript forwarded from that institution to Ivy 
Tech State College. This should be done at the 
same time as application to the college. 

8. The College requires a health examination for 

certain programs. 

Success Seminar 

All applicants for admission to a program who are 
seeking a certificate or degree at Ivy Tech State College must 
attend an ASSET Success Seminar The Success Seminar 
includes an orientation to the College, an overview of 
academic skills, academic skills assessment test, and 
advisement on courses and services needed by students to 
begin their college careers successfully. Success Seminars are 
conducted at the College on an arranged basis, at no fee to 
the student. 

The Success Seminar lasts 8 hours. Survey results and 
an orientation session are given in the afternoon. A sample 
of the assessment is available from the Admissions and 
Counseling Office. 

The academic skills assessment portion of the Success 
Seminar can be waived if the applicant has earned a 
minimum of an Associate Degree at an accredited institution 
or if they have successfully completed certain college-level 
English and Math courses. Please check with your Program 
Advisor or Office of Admissions and Counseling. 

For a schedule of the times, call (317) 921-4800. 

Transferring to the College 

The College encourages students who have previously 
attended other recognized colleges and universities, adult 
education programs and high school vocational technical 
programs to forward transcripts to Ivy Tech by the midpoint 
of the first semester of enrollment or re-enrollment for 
consideration for transfer of credit and /or advanced 
placement. Students are responsible for providing pertinent 
course descriptions and/or copies of the college catalog(s) if 
further documentation is needed to facilitate the review. The 
College reserves the right to refuse admission or to accept 
conditionally those students who have been dismissed for 
disciplinary reasons from other colleges or universities. In 
respect to transfer credits from a foreign institution, Ivy Tech 
will look at an evaluation of those courses done by an 
external evaluation agency/transfer if appropriate. 



Transferring to Other Colleges 

It is the right and responsibility of the receiving 
institution to decide whether to accept credits from another 
institution. The Associate in Applied Science degree (A.A.S.) 
and the technical certificate programs offered by Ivy Tech 
State College are intended to prepare students with the 
necessary knowledge and skills to enter or advance in the 
workplace. However, the College has articulation 
agreements with many four-year institutions which enable 
students to transfer some or all of their Ivy Tech credits 
depending upon the program. 

The following colleges and universities have an 
Articulation Agreement with Ivy Tech State College: 

Alcom State University - Lorman, MS 

Bethune-Cookman College - Daytona Beach, FL 

Central State University - Wilberforce, OH 

Delta State University 

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University 

Ferris State University - Big Rapids, MI 

Indiana Institute of Technology 

Indiana State University 

Indiana University-Purdue University at IndianapoUs 

Indiana Wesleyan University 

Lane College - Jackson, TN 

Manchester College 

Martin University 

Murray State University -Murray, KY 

Northwood University 

Oakland City University 

Prairie View A&M University - Prairie View, TX 

Purdue University 

Saint Mary of the Woods College 

Tri-State University 

University of Arkansas - Pine Bluff, AR 

University of Indianapolis 

Tech Prep 

Ivy Tech developed a statewide Tech Prep associate 
degree program in 1993. The purpose of Ivy Tech's Tech 
Prep program model is to enable Indiana high school 
students to enter into and complete a postsecondary 
technical program to leam the skills necessary to succeed in 
the workforce. This purpose is achieved through three 
program objectives: 



• Provide high school students with the information 
they need to prepare for college-level technical 
education, so students can enter directly into a 
technical program after high school graduation 
and avoid the need for costly and time-consuming 
remedial coursework; 

• Provide high school students with opportunities 
for achieving advanced standing, so students who 
take advantage of this opportunity can complete a 
technical associate degree program in less than 
two years of full-time study; and 

• Provide opportunities for students to complete an 
enriched course of study, so qualified students can 
pursue an advanced technology curriculum. 

Special Needs 

College programs and facilities are designed to be 
accessible to students with a documented disability. The 
college has designated parking and special restroom facilities 
for the physically challenged. Special Needs Services assists 
students with a disability, including hearing impairments, 
physical disability, learning disabilities, and visual 
impairments. Staff members are available to work with 
students whose learning or physical disability may impede 
their progress in their studies at Ivy Tech. The types of 
services available include: academic, career, and personal 
counseling; tutorial sessions with a full-time resource 
instructor; adaptive testing; sign language interpreters for 
classes and college-sponsored events; supplementary readers 
and testing services; coordination of taped textbook services; 
adaptive equipment including telecommunication device for 
the deaf (TDD), Visual Tech, brailler, "talking" calculator, 
tape recorders, large print reference books, etc. Special 
Needs Services works with outside agencies as needed to 
provide additional resources for students. 

Any student with a documented disability is urged to 
contact the Special Needs Office at (317) 921-4983 for help 
with special challenges as a student at Ivy Tech State College. 

International Students 

International students must meet the College admission 
standards and certain other requirements. Students should 
request an international packet from the Admissions Office, 
which has all the details: Ivy Tech State College, Admissions 
Office, One West 26th Street, PO. Box 1763, Indianapolis, 
Indiana 46206-1763. ATT: International Counselor. 

Note: International students should apply for admission 
to Ivy Tech State College at least 90 days prior to the 
beginning of the term they wish to attend. 

An international student must also provide proof of 
adequate financial support for College fees and living 
expenses for each year while attending the College. Please 
refer to the international packet. 



FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 



The purpose of Ivy Tech State College's financial 
assistance program is to provide financial assistance to those 
qualified students who, without such aid, would be unable 
to attend college. Ivy Tech State College offers various types 
of financial aid to students. Students are encouraged to 
carefully survey the variety of financial aid options available. 

• Scholarships and grants are types of gift assistance 
which do not require repayment. 

• Educational student loans are low-interest loans 
that must be repaid. Interest and repayment 
generally begin six months after a student ceases 
at least half-time enrollment. 

• Part-time employment provides meaningful 
employment for the student, also allowing the 
student to earn money to help defray education 
expenses. 

Financial Assistance Programs -Pell Grant Program 

All Pell Grant recipients must meet student 
eligibility requirements. Students must apply for 
the Pell Grant before applying for any other 
financial assistance. The Pell Grant program 
makes funds available to eligible students enrolled 
in a program which leads to a certificate or degree. 
Pell Grant funds do not have to be repaid. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program 
(SEOG) 

SEOG awards do not have to be paid back and 
provide aid based on the applicant's need, other 
aid received, and availability of funds. The 
student must be Pell eligible. 

Federal Work Study Program 

The Federal Work Study Program provides jobs 
for students interested in earning part of their 
educational expenses. Students in eligible 
programs of study may apply. Limited funds are 
available. The number of work hours per week is 
determined by the student's (1) financial need; (2) 
availability for employment; and (3) class 
schedule and academic performance. 
Employment is primarily on campus. Contact the 
Financial Assistance Office at (317) 921-4777. 

Scholarships 

Scholarships, funded by private contributions. 



provide assistance to students in certain programs. 
The Financial Assistance Office considers all 
applicants for all available funds. Some 
scholarships are based on grade point average 
only. Some are based on both merit and need. 
Please ask your instructor, program chair, and/or 
the Financial Assistance Office for information on 
specific program scholarships. 

Loan Program 

Educational loans are one choice for Ivy Tech 
State College students. Before a loan is processed, 
federal law requires the student to complete an 
application for the Pell Grant. Students must 
receive Ivy Tech State College loan counseling 
before applying for a loan. All other types of 
assistance will be considered before the Financial 
Assistance Office wall process a loan application. 

Veteran's Benefits 

Students who served in the Armed Forces may be 
eligible for Veteran's benefits. Students should 
contact the Veteran's Affairs Office Counselor for 
more informarion at (317) 921-4700. 

Students' Financial Rights and Responsibilities 

Financial aid, as a general rule, can only be awarded to 
students who are accepted into degree or certain certificate- 
granting programs; however, part-time students may be 
eligible. 

Students who receive financial assistance are expected to 
keep themselves informed concerning various terms and 
conditions of receiving aid, especially those concerning 
satisfactory progress. Applications for aid in future years 
should be submitted in a timely manner, usually between 
January 1 and March 1 of each year to ensure additional aid 
for Indiana. Some aid programs are administered by the 
College Financial Aid Office under the policies and 
guidelines established by state and federal government, other 
agencies, or outside organizations. A few programs may be 
available on a regional basis only. Eligibility for most 
financial aid at Ivy Tech State College is based upon the 
student's demonstrated financial need. To qualify for any 
form of financial aid, the student must complete the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the Ivy 
Tech Financial Aid form each year He/she must also meet 
additional eligibility requirements (i.e., citizenship or 
permanent resident status, draft compliance, satisfactory 
academic progress). Students receiving financial aid may be 



eligible for Pro Rate or Title IV refunds in the event that 
he/she withdraws from all courses. 

Students who drop or withdraw from class must see the 
Financial Assistance Office. Withdrawing from all classes or 
non-attendance of the classes may have a negative impact on 
funding from the Pell Program. 

Additional information concerning federal, state, and 
college financial aid and refund rules are available in the 
financial aid check-list, in the Financial Assistance Office and 
in the Admissions and Counseling Office. 

Financial Assistance Checklist 

1) Complete the Ivy Tech State College Financial 
Assistance Information Form. It is best to do this 
as early as possible. 

2. Pick up the Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA) from your high school counselor or 
the Admissions Office. Complete the application 
and mail to the Federal Student Aid Programs by 
March 1, 1996, to be eligible for State of Indiana 
Aid, or May 2, 1996, to be eligible for Federal Pell 
grants. You vnll receive a 1996-97 Student Aid 
Report in about three weeks. 

3. If you are a new student, apply for admission 
early. For further information, contact Student 
Affairs. An appUcation for admission must be 
filled out to qualify for financial aid. 

4. Request a financial aid transcript from each 
college or university that you have attended. This 
document must be on file before any financial aid 
can be applied. We can request them for you only 
with complete addresses and attendance dates. 

1996-97 Financial Aid Follow-Up 

1. Return the 1996-97 Student Aid Report to the Ivy 
Tech Financial Assistance Office as soon as you 
receive it in the mail. Make sure you read and 
complete it carefully It may ask you to provide 
additional documents. 

2. Read carefully all instructions before completing 
and mailing your applications. 

3. Keep readily available all taxable and non-taxable 
income documents for both yourself and your 
spouse; and your parents, if you are a dependent 
student. This includes signed 1995 tax forms, 
W2's, etc. You may be asked to submit certain 
income documentation for verification purposes. 

4. Create a file folder marked "Financial Aid" so that 
you will have easy access to all forms, letters, 
award status, and related documents when you 
have questions. 



5. If you drop or add classes, your award may 
change. 

6. Finally, if you have any questions, please do not 
guess! Schedule an appointment. An advisor will 
be available to assist you in understanding the 
process. 

Remember, to receive financial aid, it is best to apply 
early Applications must be re-submitted in January of each 
year. 

Financial Aid Appeals 

The following steps are recommended to students who 
desire to appeal a financial assistance decision: 



1 . Schedule a personal conference with the Manager 
of Financial Assistance to discuss and resolve the 
issue. 

2. If Step 1 is unsatisfactory, schedule a consultation 
with the Director of Student Affairs. 

3. If Step 2 is unsatisfactory, file a financial appeal 
with the Financial Assistance Appeals Committee. 

Students who wish to appeal financial probation or 
termination should write their appeal to the Financial 
Assistance Manager. Decisions on probation/termination 
appeals will be determined by the Financial Assistance 
Appeals Committee. 

Satisfactory Progress for Financial Assistance 

In order to maintain Satisfactory Progress, a student 
must meet the following standards: 

Qualitative Standards of Progress 

A student must be in good academic standing by earning 
at least a 2.00 grade point average (GPA) after attempting 15 
or more program hours. Students on Academic Probation 
must raise their cumulative GPA to 2.00, or must receive a 
2.00 term GPA (taking six quality hours* or more), by the 
end of the probationary term, or financial assistance will be 
denied. 

* quality hours=attempted credits 
Quantitative Standards of Progress 

Quantitative Standards of Satisfactory Progress are 
measured by (A) the number of credits completed each 
term, and (B) program completion within the maximum 
time frame. 

Both requirements, as described below, must be met in 
order to meet Quantitative Standards of progress. 



By the number of credits completed 
each term . . . 

Completion of credits is defined as earning one of the 
following grades: A, B, C, or D. 

Each term, in order to maintain Satisfactory Progress, a 
student is required to complete the number of credit 
hours indicated for his/her enrollment status. 

A student who does not earn the minimum credit hours 
required for his/her enrollment status at the end of 
his/her first term or at the end of any term immediately 
following a term of Satisfactory Progress, shall be placed 
on Academic Probation for the next term. During this 
probation term, financial assistance eligibility may be 
continued. However, a student who does not remove 
his/her probation status by the end of this first 
probationary term shall be considered as failing to make 
Satisfactory Progress. Unless he/she successfully 
appeals this determination, he/she shall be ineligible 
for financial assistance for the next term of enrollment. 

Required Term Enrollment 

Enrollment Status; The following designations are used 
to determine a student's term enrollment status: 

FuU-Time: 12 + semester credit hours 

3/4 Time: 9-11 semester hours 

1/2-Time: 6-8 semester hours 

Less than 1/2 Time: 1-5 semester hours 

Required Term Enrollment Status For Financial 
Assistance: Each term, the aid recipient must complete 
at least the minimum number of credit hours 
depending on his/her enrollment status for that term. 
This includes Basic Skills Advancement courses. 
Minimum Required 
Number of Completed 
Credits per Term 
9 



Enrollment Status 
Full-Time: 
3/4 Time: 
1/2 Time: 

Less than 1/2 Time: 



All Hours Attempted 



By program completion within the maximum time 
frame allowed . . . 

A student is expected to complete all requirements for 
an Associate Degree or Technical Certificate within the 
maximum allowable time frame. Student maximum 
time is reached after he/she has attempted (enrolled) 
150% of the number of credits that the Technical 
Certificate or Associate Degree program requires. 

If a student reaches the maximum number of credit 
hours attempted, and the student has not completed 
his/her declared course of study, suspension of financial 
assistance will occur regardless of changes from one 
course of study to another Reinstatement of aid would 
take place only if the student completed a course of 
study and subsequently enrolled in a course of study 
leading to another degree or certificate. In cases where 



a student is attempting to complete a subsequent course 
of study, all hours previously earned which apply 
toward that subsequent course of study will be counted 
toward the maximum time frame for that degree or 
certificate. 

Financial Assistance for Basic Skills 
Advancement Courses 

Financial assistance may be granted for up to 30 credit 
hours of enrollment in Basic Skills Advancement courses. 
Educationally-disadvantaged students accepted in an eligible 
program will be able to enroll in Basic Skills Advancement 
courses (not counted toward the TC, AS, or AAS degree) in 
order to ensure their future academic good standing. 

Financial Assistance will be denied: 

1 . In those terms following completion of the total 

maximum time frames. Total maximum time frames 
include all terms of enrollment during which students 
are not making satisfactory progress and/or are not 
receiving financial assistance. 

2. In any term(s) within the maximum time frame following 

the first probation term in which satisfactory progress 
was not achieved. 

Regaining Eligibility for Financial 
Assistance Standards of Progress 

Students who are denied financial assistance as a result 
of failure to maintain satisfactory progress will regain their 
eligibility if any of the following conditions are met: 

1. Enroll at least half-time at their own expense and receive 

at least a 2.00 term GPA while meeting the Quantitative 
Standards of Progress. The student will regain financial 
assistance eligibility and will be on probationary status 
the following term. 

2. Enroll at their own expense and raise their cumulative 
GPA to a 2.00 or higher while meeting the Quantitative 
Standards of Progress. The student will regain financial 
assistance eligibility and will be in good standing the 
following term. 

3. Students who have been terminated from financial 
assistance, who are within their maximum time frame, 
and return to Ivy Tech State College after an absence of 
12 or more consecutive months will be on Probationary 
Status during their first term of re -enrollment but may 
receive financial assistance. 

4. Students who have been suspended from financial 
assistance more than once, who are within maximum 
time frame, and return to Ivy Tech State College after an 
absence of 60 or more consecutive months will be on 
Probationary Status during their first term of re- 
enrollment but may receive financial assistance. 

Note: Maximum Time Frame suspension cannot be reversed 
through the appeals process. 



10 



FEE INFORMATION/REFUND POLICY/REGISTRATION 



College Fees 

The College seeks to provide quality education at the 
lowest possible cost. General fees are based on the number 
of credit hours for which the student is registered. Additional 
costs include Divisional fees and special fees pertaining to 
particular courses or College activities. Out-of-state students 
pay an additional fee per credit hour. 

All student fees are to be paid at the time of registration. 
Students having fees to be paid by a third party must have 
fee payment authorization before registering. Fees may be 
paid by cash, check, money order, MasterCard or VISA. 

Late registration fees are charged to students who 
register the first day of class or after. A $25.00 fee will be 
charged for all non-sufficient funds and stopped-payment 
checks. 

Additional Expenses 

The following additional expenses may apply, depending 
upon the program of study: 

BOOKS: All students are expected to purchase the 
textbooks for their respective programs. The cost 
of books will vary according to classes taken. 

TOOLS: The College furnishes major equipment 
items for instrucdon; however, in many programs 
or courses students must furnish additional hand 
tools and equipment. 

UNIFORMS AND OTHER SPECIAL EQUIPMENT: 
Several programs require students to furnish 
uniforms and special safety equipment. 

TRAVEL: Transportation costs to and from the College 
clinical or practicum sites vary according to the 
distance and the type of transportation used. 

For a current schedule of fees and further information, 
contact the Admissions Office. 

Payment of Fees 

All enrolled students must pay all applicable fees. A 
student is officially registered and allowed to attend classes 
only when all fees have been paid. 

Instructional Fees* 

Resident of Indiana: $60.30 per credit 
Non-Resident: $109.75 per credit 



Miscellaneous Fees* 

Application fee: No charge 

Credit by examination fee (per course): $10.00 per 
credit 

Late registration (first day of classes): $10.00 

Check fee (for check returned by bank): $25.00 

Student I.D. card: No charge 

Transcript fee: No charge for first transcript 

(transcript fee after first transcript): $ 1.00 

Parking: No charge 

Deferment Charge: $15.00 

* subject to change by the State Board of Trustees 

Refund Policy 

Students choosing to drop or withdraw from a course or 
courses must notify the College in writing using the 
Drop/Add Form. The fee refund for voluntary withdrawal 
from a class, when applicable, will be processed only after 
the student files a College Drop/Add form or withdrawal 
form with the Registrar's Office. 

The College will refund students' assessed fees, with the 
exception of the late registration and deferment fee, on a 
schedule computed as follows for a (fall, spring) semester: 

From registration to end of first week of semester: 
100% refund 

From registration to end of second week of semester: 
75% refund 

From registration to end of third week of semester: 
50% refund 

From registration to end of fourth week of semester: 
25% refund 

After fourth week of semester: No refund. 

• The effective date for calculating the fee refund is 
the date of written notification. 

• Certain other fees may be refundable. Further 
details are ayailable from the Bursar's Office. 

• All refunds will be issued by check and mailed to 
the address shown on the student registration 
form. 

• Cancellation of credit courses by the College will 
result in total refund of fees collected for those 



Please allow 10 (ten) working days for refunds to 
be processed. 



11 



Registering for Courses 

The registration process includes financial aid and 
program counseling, selection of courses, and payment of 
fees. Newly-admitted students will be notified when to 
register for their first semester classes. 

Specific days are set aside for registration before the 
begirming of each semester. Students should seek assistance 
in course selection from faculty advisors or counselors 
through the Counseling Office before registering for classes. 

The CounseUng Ofhce can supply information 
concerning registration. 

NOTE: STUDENTS ARE REGISTERED ONLY WHEN 
FEES HAVE BEEN PAID. 

Open/Late Registration 

Please see class schedule for course reservation days and 
registration times. Registration on or after the first day of 
classes each term is considered late. Students may register 
after the first week of classes with the permission of the 
instructor; however, a late registration fee is assessed 
beginning the first day of classes. For further information, 
students are asked to contact the Admissions and Counseling 
offices. 

Dropping and Adding 

Courses may be dropped or added during the first two 
weeks of the regular semester. Students may be eligible for a 
full or partial refund of the assessed fees for courses dropped 
during the first four weeks of the semester. Students 
changing, adding or withdrawing from a class must notify 
the College in writing using the drop-and-add form. This 
form must be presented to the Registrar's Office. 

Student Withdrawal 

From the beginning of the second week to the end of the 
week marking the completion of 75 percent of the course, a 
student may withdraw from a course by filing a completed 
withdrawal form at the Registrar's Office and discontinuing 
class attendance. Students may be eligible for a full or partial 
refund of the assessed fees — see Refund Policy Records will 
then indicate status of "W" in place of a grade for that course. 
A student who discontinues class attendance after the last 
day to withdraw with a "W" will receive a grade 
commensurate with the course requirements. 



12 



STUDENT RECORDS 



Student Records 

An educational record is maintained for each student 
who is, or has been, enrolled at Ivy Tech State College- 
Central Indiana. In accordance with the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, the following 
student rights are covered by the Act and afforded to all 
students at Ivy Tech State College-Central Indiana: 



1 . The right to inspect and review information 

contained in the student's educational records. 

2. The right to challenge the contents of their 

educational records. 

3. The right to a hearing if the outcome of the 

challenge is unsatisfactory. 

4. The right to submit an explanatory statement for 

inclusion in the educational record if the outcome 
of the hearing is unsatisfactory. 

5. The right to prevent disclosure, with certain 

exceptions, of personally identifiable information, 

6. The right to secure a copy of the institutional 

policy. 

7. The right to file complaints with the U.S. 

Department of Education concerning alleged 
failures by Ivy Tech State College-Central Indiana 
to comply with the provisions of the Act. 



3. Past and present participation in officially 

recognized sports and activities, physical factors of 
athletes (height and weight), date and place of 
birth. 

Students may request the withholding of directory 
information by submitting their request to the Office of the 
Registrar. The request form must be completed for each 
term of enrollment. Failure on the part of a student to 
request the withholding of specific categories of directory 
information indicates the student's approval of disclosure. 

Dependency Provision 

Ivy Tech State College-Central Indiana reserves the right, 
as allowed under the Federal Educational Rights and Privacy 
Act of 1974, to disclose educational records or components 
thereof, without vmtten consent, to parents of dependent 
students as defined according to the Internal Revenue Code 
of 1954- Section 154 (as amended). 

However, all Ivy Tech State College-Central Indiana 
students will be assumed to be "independent." A certified 
copy of the parents' most recent Federal Income Tax Form 
establishing the student's dependency status shall be required 
before any educational records or components thereof will be 
released to the parent of any student. The student will be 
required to sign a Release of Information Form. 



Each of these rights, with any limitations or exceptions, 
is explained in the Institutional Policy Statement, a copy of 
which may be obtained in the Admissions Office. 

At the discretion of College officials, directory 
information may be provided in accordance with the 
provisions of the Act without the written consent of the 
student unless the student requests, in writing, that such 
information not be disclosed (see below). These items are 
designated as directory information and may be released for 
any reason at the discretion of Ivy Tech State College-Central 
Indiana unless a request for nondisclosure is on file: 

1. Name, address, telephone number, dates of 

attendance. 

2. Previous institution(s) attended, major field of 

study, awards, honors, degree conferred. 



13 



ACADEMIC INFORMATION 



Testing Out of Courses 

Policies regarding testing out of courses vary from 
program to program. A student who wishes to test out of a 
course should contact the program advisor. A $10.00-per- 
credit-hour fee will be charged for the test. The general 
guidelines for test-out are as follows: 

1. Test-out examinations should be taken before the 

student registers for the course for which the test 
out is attempted. 

2. Test-out examinations are normally completed at 

one sitting (unless the test is offered in two parts, 
i.e., lab and written exams). 

3. Test-out credits are not included in credit 

computations for financial aid programs or 
student grade point averages. 

Academic Grading 

The academic grading system has both grades and status 
codes. In certain instances, a status code will appear on the 
student's record in place of a grade. Status represents a 
condition to which no letter grade can be assigned. Grades 
reflect the quality of performance and level of competency 
achieved by students who complete a course. Instructors 
determine and assign grades and status based on objective 
appraisal and evaluation of students' performances. Semester 
grade reports are sent to each student. 

Grades 

The quality of student performance or competency level, 
as determined by the instructor at the completion of a 
course, is indicated by a letter grade of A, B, C, D, or E Each 
designation has a numerical value per credit hour, referred to 
as Quality Points/Per Credit. The meaning and quality point 
value per credit hour of each letter grade is shown in the 
table that follows: 

Grade Description Quality Points 



A 


Excellent 


4 


B 


Good 


3 


C 

D 

F 


Average 

Minimum Passing 

Failure 


2 

1 




Status Codes 

Status codes describe the state or condition of a course 
appearing on the student's record that has not received a 
grade. Status code indications carry no grade points. The 
types of status codes and the symbols used to indicate them: 

Grade Description Quality Points 



I 


Incomplete 





AU+ 


Audit 





S 


Satisfactory 





U 


Unsatisfactory 





V 


Verified Competency 





NW 


No-Show Withdrawal 





W 


Withdrawal 






While Basic Skills Advancement courses are assigned 
these grade designations, no quality points or quality hours 
are generated. 



+ Must be declared at time of registration and cannot be used 
to complete financial assistance eligibility 

These non-grades are used for the following reasons: 

I- Incomplete 

"I" designations are received by students who have 
actively pursued a course and are doing passing work at the 
end of the course, but who have not completed the final 
examination and/or other specific course assignments. To 
remove an "I" designation, a student must meet with the 
instructor to make arrangements to complete the course 
work. The instructor must submit the grade within 3 1 
calendar days after the beginning of the term following the 
term the student received the "I" designation. If an "I" status 
code is not convened within the aforementioned time, an "F" 
will be assigned. Students who have an "I" status on their 
record may not register in that specific course. However, if 
the "I" is changed to an "F," the student may then register 
only once more for that course in order to earn a passing 
grade. 

AU-Audit 

Audit (AU) status indicates enrollment in a course for no 
grade or credit. The fees for audited courses are the same as 
those for courses taken for credit. Audit status must be 
declared no later than the end of the first week of classes 
with approval of the Instructor or Program Chair. 

NW-No-Show Withdrawal 

"NW" will be used for "No-Show" Withdrawals. 

Instructors shall authorize the Registrar to withdraw a 
student from any course for which the student did not report 
to the class for the first two weeks of the term and failed to 
notify the instructor of intention to attend. This 
administrative action will be reflected on the official class list. 



14 



Refunds will not be processed. A petition for a refund, with 
documentation for extenuating circumstances, may be filed 
at the Bursar's Office. Students can petition to be reinstated 
by receiving the approval of the instructor and completing a 
course change request form to add the classes(s) in question. 

W-Withdrawal 

A "W" status code will be used for student and academic 
withdrawals. When students find it necessary to withdraw 
from a course(s), they must give formal notification to the 
Registrar by completing a drop form. Student Withdrawal 
(W) is a terminal status, referring to voluntary student 
withdrawal by a student beginning at the start of the second 
week of the course up to the end of the week marking the 
completion of 75 percent of the course. 

After 75 percent of the term has elapsed, a student may 
withdraw only if documented extenuating circumstances are 
submitted to, and approved by, the Dean of Instructional 
Affairs or his/her designee. The "W status code designation 
will be entered on the student's academic records. 

Instructors may also recommend that a student receive a 
"W" status code for student nonattendance in class or 
student disciplinary reasons, with final approval from the 
Chief Administrative Officer or his/her designee. 

S-Satisfactory 

The "S" indicates satisfactory completion of course work 
in situauons where a status of either satisfactory or 
unsatisfactory (pass/fail) has been arranged by prior 
agreement. 

Although no grade is assigned, credit is earned. 
Designation of "S" will not count toward degree and 
certificate graduation requirements. 

U-Unsatisfactory 

The "U" indicates unsatisfactory completion of course 
work in situations where a status of either satisfactory or 
unsatisfactory (pass/fail) has been arranged by prior 
agreement by the Dean of Instructional Affairs or his/ her 
designee. Requests for this type of grading-U-can only be 
made for non-program related courses and must be declared 
at time of registration. The "U" differs from an "F" in that 
quality points are not computed. 

V- Verified Competency 

The "V" indicates satisfactory completion of course work 
in situations such as test-out credit for experience or 
training, or College Level Examination Program (CLEP) . 
Credit gained through this method may be used to satisfy 
degree requirements. This status is approved by the Dean of 
Instructional Affairs upon recommendation of a faculty 
advisor, following completion of necessary verification and 
documentation of competency 



Transfer Credit 

Students can receive credit for courses transferred to Ivy 
Tech State College-Central Indiana. Transfer credit is 
assigned following an evaluation of equivalence/relevance 
and is authorized providing the credits were earned with 
grades of A, B, or C, from a regionally accredited institution, 
and are not over 10 years old. These credits will be included 
in earned hours and will appear at the beginning of the 
student's transcript. Although counted toward graduation, 
these credits are not used to calculate cumulative GPA. Final 
authority for Transfer Credit is with the Dean of Instructional 
Affairs, upon recommendation of the Department/Program 
head or Registrar. 

Credit Hours 

Credit is described in semester hours (the number of 
credits taken per semester). The number of credits is 
determined by the demands of the course, course work and 
by the number of contact hours-the hours actually spent in 
the classroom or laboratory. 

Credit Hours/Load 

A credit hour represents at least one hour of lecture, 
three hours of laboratory or three hours of clinical 
instruction per week for the semester. A three-credit-hour 
lecture course, for example, meets 48 hours during the 
semester (3X16) weeks. An average full-time class load per 
semester in most programs consists of 12-15 credit hours. 
To take a class load more than 17 credit hours, a student 
must have the approval of the Dean of Instructional Affairs or 
his/her designee. 

Enrollment Status 

Enrollment status is determined by the total semester 
credits being taken: 

Full-time: 12 or more credits per semester 

3/4 time: 9-11 credits per semester 

1/2 time: 6-8 credits per semester 

Less than 1/2 time: 1-5 credits per semester 

A first-year student, by definition, is one who has 
completed fewer than 30 semester credit hours; a second- 
year student is one who has completed 30 or more semester 
credit hours. 

Quality Points 

Quality points are numerical values indicating the 
quality of student performance in credit courses: A=4; B=3; 
C=2; D=l; F=0. The quaUty points earned for a course equal 
the quality point value times the number of credits. 



15 



A student who earns an A in a 4-credit course earns 16 
quality points: the quality point value (4) X the number of 
credits (4) = total quality points (16). 

Grade Point A\erages 

The GPA is calculated by dividing quality points by 
quality hours. Quality Hours include all nonbasic skills 
advancement courses graded A-E 

Earned Hours include all credits that can be applied 
toward a degree objective. Attempted Hours include all 
formally enrolled hours. 

All courses except skills advancement courses are 
included in the GPA. 

Improxing a Grade 

Students, with the approval of faculty advisors, may 
attempt to improve D or F grades by repeating courses 
(allowable once in most programs). Financial Assistance 
recipients, however, should review their situations carefully 
since payment for repeated courses can be disallowed. 
Permanent student records contain complete files on all 
activity. The student's grade point average will reflect the 
highest grade earned. 

Petition for Course Exclusion 

Under extenuating circumstances, a student may 
petition the Academic Status Committee to exclude semester 
hours of course work statistics from the cumulative GPA 
calculation. Course statistics that are excluded from the 
cumulative GPA calculation as a result of a petition will not 
be counted as earned and cannot be used to satisfy 
requirements for degree-declared students. Petition forms 
may be obtained from the Registrar's Office. 

Academic Standards of Progress 

Note: This section applies to the College's academic 
standards of progress. Students with financial assistance 
should read the financial assistance section that explains that 
required standards of progress, along with grades, include 
term progress and maximum time frame. 

Ivy Tech State College-Central Indiana has established 
this Policy for Academic Standards and Appeal of Standards 
of Progress. 

1. A student who has declared a degree or certificate 
objective and has 15 or more cumulative quality 
hours must maintain a 2.00 minimum cumulative 
GPA to be considered in satisfactory academic 
standing. 

2. A student who fails to maintain satisfactory 
academic progress will be subject to a series of 



intervention activities and related restrictions until 
such time as he/she restores satisfactory progress 
or is dismissed as a degree/certificate seeking 
student due to repeated unsatisfactory progress. 
The intervention strategies and restrictions could 
include, but are limited to: (1) reduced 
courseload, (2) required counseling sessions, (3) 
enrollment in Basic Skills Advancement courses, 
and/or (4) disqualification for graduation. 

3. A student who is dismissed for unsatisfactory 
academic progress faces one term of non- 
enrollment as a certificate or degree/declared 
student prior to resuming progress toward that 
certificate or degree, at which time re-enrollment 
is allowed on a probationary status. 

4. A student who is dismissed twice for 
unsatisfactory academic progress will be 
terminated for up to five years as a degree or 
certificate-declared student unless he/she chooses 
to participate in an extensive Basic Skills 
Advancement program. 

5. Dismissal from one campus constitutes dismissal 
from the College. Petition for readmission must 
be initiated at the site where dismissal occurred 
via the Academic Status Committee. 

6. Satisfactory academic progress is restored when a 
student successfully earns at least six credit hours 
and re-establishes a 2.00 cumulative grade point 
average. 

Academic Problems 

If a student has a problem with a grade, he/she should 
discuss it with the instructor. If the problem cannot be 
resolved then the student must consult the Divisional Chair. 
After discussion with a Student Affairs Manager or Divisional 
Chair, if the matter is still not resolved, the student should 
contact the Dean of Instructional Affairs. The student may 
be directed to follow the academic appeals process if the 
student still does not agree with the solution. 

Dean's List 

The Dean's List, prepared and published each semester, 
gives recognition to students who achieve a minimum 3.50 
grade point average or higher with no D or F grades while 
earning 12 or more credits during the Fall and Spring 
semesters or greater than eight credit hours for the summer 
session. The Dean's List is posted on the bulletin boards in 
the North Meridian Center and the Technology Center. The 
Dean's List is released to the press after the completion of 
each semester. 



16 



Commencement 

The Associate in Science degree, the Associate in 
Applied Science degree, or the Technical Certificate is 
awarded by the College to students who meet graduation and 
certification eligibility requirements. Commencement 
ceremonies are held each spring. Graduating students are 
charged a fee to cover the cost of the ceremonial cap and 
gown. 

A student is considered eligible for graduation when the 
requirements for graduation or certification have been 
fulfilled in the selected program. Each student entering the 
final semester prior to graduation must complete an 
Application for Graduation form. The application will be 
certified by the student's program advisor and forwarded to 
the Registrar's Office, where the appropriate diploma will be 
prepared. 

To graduate with the Associate in Science Degree, 
Associate in Applied Science Degree or Technical Certificate 
students must: 

1 . Successfully complete all courses within 
certification requirements with a cumulative grade 
point index of at least 2.0. 

2. Successful completion of the required number of 
credits. 

3. Completion of at least 15 degree credits as a 
regular student of Ivy Tech, and not through test- 
out or other means of advanced placement. 

4. Satisfaction of all financial obligations due the 
College. 

5. Satisfaction of program accreditation standards 
that may have additional requirements. 

Attendance 

Regular attendance is expected at scheduled class 
meetings or other activities assigned as part of a course of 
instruction. Attendance records are kept by instructors. 



17 



STUDENT DEVELOPMENT/SUPPORT SERVICES 



Student Academic Support Services 

The Student Academic Support Services (SASS) at Ivy 
Tech State College-Central Indiana offers a variety of services 
to Ivy Tech students. Following is a brief description of 
services and operation hours during the Fall and Spring 
Semesters. Summer hours may vary. Students with 
academic needs are encouraged to call (317) 921-4319 or 
(317) 921-4972. 

Computer Assisted Instruction Lab (CAl) 

The CAI Lab offers a variety of services to Ivy Tech 
students through computer use. Students may visit the lab 
and utilize the followdng educational software: ESL, math, 
developmental science, reading, study skills, and writing. 

The CAI Lab hours are 8:00 a.m to 8:30 p.m., Monday 
through Thursday; and Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 12 noon. The 
Center is located in Rooms 252A, 252B, 248, North 
Meridian Center. 

Testing Lab 

Students who miss tests or need to retake tests may, with 
approval from the instructor, visit the Testing Lab. 

The Testing Lab hours are 9:00 a.m. to 7:30 p.m., 
Monday through Thursday; and Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 12 
noon. The Center is located in Room 255A, North Meridian 
Center 

Tutoring Lab 

Students have the opportunity to work with professional 
tutors in math, reading, chemistry, and anatomy and 
physiology. 

The Tutoring Lab hours are 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., 
Monday through Thursday; and Friday 8:00 a.m. to 
12 noon. The Center is located in Room 258, North 
Meridian Center 

Writing Center 

Students have the opportunity for one-on-one tutoring. 
The Writing Center helps students generate ideas for papers, 
helps students with their designated deficiencies and 
provides feedback and suggestions. 

The Writing Center hours are 8:00 a.m. to 12 noon and 
1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday; and 
Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 12 noon. The Center is located in Room 
258A, North Meridian Center. 



Career Counseling 

The Offices of Admissions, Counseling, and 
Employment and Career Services offer career counseling to 
all interested students. Students may obtain individual 
counseling and/or assessment to assist them in identifying 
their abilities or occupational interests. Counseling and 
assessment are also helpful in developing realistic education 
and career plans through use of occupational oudook data. 

In addition to the services offered by the Counseling 
Office, the College utilizes a faculty advisor system. On 
admission, each degree student is assigned a faculty advisor 
whose purpose is to: 

1 . Assist the student in course selection and program 

planning; 

2. Guide the student in meeting the requirements for 
graduation as prescribed by the College; 

3. Ensure that appropriate technical and general 
education electives are included in the chosen 
course of study. 

Office of Career and Employment Services 

The Office of Employment and Career Services assists 
registered graduates and enrolled students of the College in 
career development, student employment, and resume 
assistance. The Employment and Career Services staff and 
program advisors coordinate efforts to refer qualified 
candidates to appropriate employment opportunities. 

The Employment and Career Services philosophy is 
"helping students/graduates to optimize the employment 
process and assisting them in making a smooth transition 
into the world of work." 

The Office of Employment and Career Services offers a 
full range of services which includes but is not limited to the 
following: 

1 . Individual employment counseling and career 
assistance; 

2. On-campus recruitment v^rith employers from 
business and industry; 

3. Job Search/Interviewing and Resume Writing 

Workshops; 

4. Classroom presentations; 

5. Annual Job Fair; 

6. Resume referral: Over 5,000 jobs are listed 
annually; 

7. Credential files and references: Maintained on all 



IS 



registered graduates and undergraduates for job 
matching and resume referral purposes; 

8. Various computerized services offered in the Office 

of Employment and Career Services: Resumes by 
Ralph, State Employment Services (JSMS), 
KiNexus (candidate registration process), Choices 
and Passport To Your Future (career exploration 
software packages); 

9. Resource Center: Includes career information, 

company literature, annual reports, job vacancy 
notices, application forms, information on four- 
year colleges, and free job search booklets and 
handouts. 

Students are encouraged to register early in their college 
careers and take full advantage of opportunities available to 
them from the Office of Employment and Career Services. 

Learning Resource Center/Library 

The Learning Resource Center's hours are 8:00 a.m. to 
9:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday; Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m.; and Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Summer 
hours may vary. The Center is located on the fourth floor of 
the North Meridian Center. 

The Ivy Tech State College Learning Resource Center 
(LRC) houses Library Services, Audio Visual Services, and 
Distance Learning Services. The Library has a collection of 
print, non-print, and automated on-line materials suited to 
the objectives and programs of the College. Library 
resources include: the general book collection, reference 
books, periodicals, pamphlets, audiovisual materials, CD- 
ROM journal indexes and full-text databases. The Library 
offers access to other library collections through interlibrary 
loan networks. 

The Library's book collection has over 13,000 books 
arranged by the Library of Congress classification system. 
The Library subscribes to 400 periodicals and CD Rom tides. 

Books may be checked out for two weeks and renewed 
for later weeks if they are not needed by others. To check 
out books and other materials from the Library, students 
must use an Ivy Tech library card which is issued after 
verification of registration. The Library sends notices of 
overdue books and fines. The fine is five cents per day after 
the due date (Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays are 
excluded). 

The Library's Audio Visual Department contains all of 
the Library's software, listening stations, and viewing 
stations. 

Software and equipment may be scheduled for class 
presentations by students. 

College Bookstore 

The College Bookstore's hours are 8:00 a.m. to 5:30 



p.m., Monday through Thursday; and Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m. The Bookstore is located on the fourth floor of the 
North Meridian Center. Cash, personal checks with proper 
ID, Visa, and MasterCard are accepted for payment. 

Refunds on books are limited. To receive a full refund 
for textbooks, the following conditions must be met: 

1 . All textbooks must be returned in new, unmarked 

mint condition with the cash register receipt. 

2. All textbooks must be returned wdthin 3 weeks of 

the date the textbooks were purchased. 

A 75% refund will be given for textbooks purchased new 
that are not in new, resalable condition. This includes any 
markings, stains, or writing in the book (including your 
name), or any visible binding or cover damage. No refunds 
are allowed on any supplies/clothing. 

Child Development Center 

Ivy Tech State College-Central Indiana has an on- 
campus Child Development Center to meet the child care 
needs of adult students. College staff and faculty, and locally- 
employed parents and guardians. This licensed center also 
provides on-site training opportunities for practicum 
students in the Child Development and other Health and 
Human Services programs. The model facility is licensed to 
serve 60 children, ages 2 to 12, from 6:30 a.m. to 10:00 
p.m., Monday through Thursday and until 6:00 p.m. on 
Friday Note: Hours could vary, depending upon 
enrollment. The Center is open to visitors interested in 
either the Child Development Program or the Child 
Development Center services except during naptime, which 
is 12:30 to 2:30p.m. daily Visitors must register with the 
center manager upon arrival. 

Student Government Association (SGA) 

Students in each region are encouraged to participate in 
student government through membership in the Student 
Government Association. The SGA is the representative 
governing body of the students and is regulated by the 
College's rules, policies, and regulations. The SGA is 
composed of representatives and officers that oversee all 
clubs and organizations. Student senators and 
representatives are elected or selected according to the by- 
laws of each regional Student Senate constitution and serve 
as stated in those by-laws. 

The student body membership may consist of senators 
of the first-year class,. the second-year class, each program 
area, and an advisor as established in the by-laws. 

The SGA was established by students to encourage 
participation in student government and to promote College 
spirit and recognition. The SGA exercises the authority, 
unless otherwise delegated, to legislate on student matters, 
subject to the approval of appropriate College administrative 
offices. 



19 



The constitutions of all student organizations must be 
approved by a quorum of the SGA, consisting of a simple 
majority of the total membership and one staff advisor, or as 
otherwise stated in the by-law^s. The functions of the SGA 
include: 

1. Communication of bona fide concerns of the 

student body and suggestions for improvement to 
appropriate College officials. 

2. Approval of those student organizations deemed 
beneficial to student life and worthy of being a 
part of the College. 

3. Assurance that copies of the constitution, by-laws, 
and statement of purpose and objectives of each 
recognized student organization are on file in the 

'. Counseling Office. 

4. Referral of student grievances concerning 
disciplinary matters or student status to 
appropriate College officials. 

5. Plarming and conducting of all appropriate 

extracurricular student activities. 

6. Submission of student activity budgets for review 
and approval by the regional administration. 

Student Organizations 

Current clubs and organizations include: 

Administrative Office Assistants 

Alumni Association 

Amateur Radio Club 

Hospitality-Restaurant Management Student 
Development Committee 

Human Services Club 

Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) ' . " 

Multi-Cultural Society 

National Issues Forum 

Student Paralegal Association 

Student Government Association 

These clubs and organizations provide opportunities for 
leadership training and community service, promote an 
intellectual climate for an interchange of ideas and ideals, 
and foster the desire for continued education. Certain 
criteria may apply to some clubs. Phi Theta Kappa, for 
example, requires applicants for initiation to have completed 
at least 12 semester hours vnth at least a 3.5 GPA. 



Alumni Association 

Membership in the Ivy Tech State College Alumni 
Association is open to current students. Others eligible for 
membership include students who have earned a certificate 
or degree, former students, current and former faculty and 
staff, and trustees. 

For information on Alumni Association activities, call 
(317)921-4312. 

College Professional and Trade Societies 

Student chapters of various professional and trade 
societies will be formed in the same manner as other student 
organizations and are subject to the same requirements. 

Student Right-To-Know 

Ivy Tech State College-Central Indiana follows the 
Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act, Public 
Law 101-542, as amended by the Higher Education 
Technical Amendments of 1991, Public Law 102-26. 
Required information is available to prospective and current 
students through the Admissions Office. 

Communicable Disease Policy 

The Communicable Disease Policy of Ivy Tech State 
College was developed to ensure the good health and safety 
of all students and employees. 

Communicable disease shall be defined as any condition 
which is transmitted directly or indirectly to a person from 
an infected person or animal through the agency of an 
intermediate animal, host or vector, or through the inanimate 
environment. 

Communicable and infectious disease shall include, but 
is not limited to: 

Influenza 

Tuberculosis 

Conjunctivitis 

Infectious Mononucleosis 

Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and 
AIDS Related Complex (ARC) 

Positive HIV antibody status 

Hepatitis A, B, and D 

Meningitis 

Sexually Transmitted Diseases 

No student or employee who has a communicable 
disease will be required to report the condition to any 
campus official if the disease or their condition does not pose 
a medically proven threat for transmission of the disease or 



20 



condition. However, students and employees should be 
encouraged to advise local health authorities if they have a 
communicable disease. Local health authorities should offer 
counseling to these persons about measures which can be 
taken to prevent the spread of infection and about ways to 
protect their own health. 

Persons who know or who have reason to beUeve that 
they are infected with a communicable disease have an 
ethical and legal obhgation to conduct themselves in 
accordance with such knowledge in order to protect 
themselves and others. Students who have communicable 
diseases, whether symptomatic or not, will be allowed 
regular classroom and work attendance in an unrestrictive 
manner as long as they are physically able to attend classes, 
college activities and/or work, and do not pose a medically- 
proven threat for transmission of the disease or condition. 
When there is no medical justification for totally restricting 
the access of students who have communicable diseases, they 
will be allowed access to the College Campus. 

No person, group, agency, insurer, employer, or 
institution should be provided any medical information 
without the prior specific written consent of a student unless 
required by state and/or federal law. Furthermore, all medical 
information relating to the communicable diseases of 
students and employees will be kept confidential, according 
to an amendment to the Family Education Rights and 
Pnvacy Act of 1974. 

For more information regarding this poUcy, please 
contact the Student Affairs Office. 

Workplace Violence Policy 

Ivy Tech intends to provide a safe place to work for all 
students. Violent behavior, direct or indirect threats, 
harassment or intimidation will not be tolerated. 

It is the responsibility of every student to help keep the 
school safe by monitoring their own behavior and by 
reporting incidents involving other students which involve 
any form of violence or threatening behavior. 

Experience has shown that there are warning signs to 
incidents of violence. Examples are: preoccupation with 
reports of violence, discussion or suggestions about hurting 
others, continuing complaints, or any threats against other 
students or faculty/staff. 

All students can experience stressful times and they are 
encourage to seek assistance when this occurs. Counselors 
can provide information about appropriate agencies that help 
people deal with stress. 

In order to keep the workplace safe, incidents of 
violence, threats, harassment, or intimidation will be taken 
seriously. Through due process, the situation will be 
investigated and all parties involved will be heard. If verbal 
abuse, threats, harassing, intimidating, or disruptive behavior 



is determined, a student may be suspended or his/her 
enrollment terminated. 

Determination of physical assault, battery, or forcible sex 
offenses will be grounds of immediate dismissal. A student 
may appeal these sanctions through the Student Status 
Committee. 

All student actions/behaviors are also governed by local 
state and federal laws and regulations. 

Note: Security should be called when there is a violent 
incident requiring immediate attention. 

Security. . . . 921-4806 or 4806 using a campus phone 

Pager * 799-0644 (North Meridian Center) 

Pager * 799-0646 (Technology Center) 

* dial 9 first if using a campus instead of public phone. 



Campus Crime Awareness and 
Campus Security Information 

The mission of the Campus Security Department is to 
provide the safest educational environment possible for all 
faculty, staff, students, and visitors to all Ivy Tech State 
College campus locations. 

Any student, prospective student, faculty, or staff person 
who has been a victim of, or wimess of, a criminal act which 
occurred on any of the facilities or grounds of any Ivy Tech 
campus is encouraged to immediately report this act to 
Campus Security. Campus Security operational hours are 
posted on campus. 

Each Ivy Tech campus employs security staff to whom 
all criminal activity should be reported. It is College policy 
to assist the police in any investigation which they conduct. 

Known and suspected violations of Federal and Indiana 
laws and other emergencies should be reported to the 
Campus Security by calling (317) 921-4806. 

Access to Ivy Tech State College facilities is from 
7:00 a.m. -11:00 p.m. each weekday during the semester 

Faculty, staff and students must work together to take 
steps to protect themselves from becoming victims of a 
crime. 

The Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990 
requires that the following campus statistics be provided for 
your information. 

Offenses Reported for 1992, 1993 and 1994: 



Incidents: 
Murder 
Rape 
Robbery 



1992 1993 1994 




1 1 



21 



Aggravated Assault/Battery 

Burglary 

Motor Vehicle Theft 




18 
1 




36 
1 



23 

1 


Arrests: 








Liquor Law Violations 
Drug Abuse Violations 














Weapons Possessions 












Students participating in off-campus, college sponsored, 
activities need to report criminal incidents to the law 
enforcement agency having jurisdiction, and inform the 
Campus Security. 

Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault Policy 

Ivy Tech is committed to the maintenance of an 
environment which is supportive of its primary educational 
mission and free from all exploitation and intimidation. The 
College will not tolerate sexual harassment, sexual assault, 
rape, or other forms of non-consensual sexual activity. Ivy 
Tech State College supports this policy for students, faculty, 
and staff through its educational preventional programs and 
its counseling support services. 

Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual 
advances, requests to engage in sexual conduct, and other 
physical and expressive behavior of a sexual nature where: 

1 . Submission to such conduct is made either 
explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an 
education; 

2. Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an 
individual is used as the basis for academic 
probation affecting the individual; or 

3. Such conduct has the purpose or effect of 
substantially interfering with an individual's 
academic performance or creating an intimidating, 
hostile or demeaning employment or educational 
environment. 

Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination which 
is illegal under Tide IX of the Education Amendments of 
1972 for students. 

Ivy Tech will enforce this policy through internal 
disciplinary procedures, security programs, and the 
encouragement of external prosecution of alleged offenders 
through appropriate external judicial forums. Violations of 
this policy shall include, but not be limited to, the following: 

1. Persistence, unwanted attempts to change a 
professional or educational relationship to a 
personal one; unwelcome sexual flirtations and 
inappropriate put-downs of individual persons or 
classes of people to serious physical abuses such 
as sexual assault and rape; unwelcome sexual 
advances; repeated sexually oriented kidding, 
teasing, joking, or flirting; verbal abuse of a sexual 



nature; graphic commentary about an individual's 
body, sexual prowess, or sexual deficiencies; 
derogatory or demeaning comments about either 
gender in general, whether sexual or not; leering, 
whistling, touching, pinching, or brushing against 
another's body; offensive crude language; or 
displaying objects or pictures which are sexual in 
nature that would create hostile or offensive work 
or learning environments. 

2 . Any form of non-consensual sexual intercourse, 
committed by physical force, coercion, threat, or 
intimidation, actual or implied, by a person(s) 
known to the victim. 

3. Any actual or attempted non-consensual sexual 
activity including, but not limited to: sexual 
intercourse or sexual touching, committed 
without physical force, coercion, threat, or 
intimidation; exhibitionism or sexual language of 
a threatening nature by a person(s) known or 
unknown to the victim. 

Non-consensual activity shall include, but not be limited 
to, situations where the victim is unable to consent because 
he/she is physically helpless, mentally incapacitated, or is 
unconscious. The inability to consent may be due to drug or 
alcohol consumption, regardless of whether or not the 
consumption was with the victim's consent. 

Consensual sexual activity between an instructor or staff 
member and a student is discouraged. 

Victims of sexual harassment or non-consensual sexual 
activity at any official College function or course sponsored 
by the College are encouraged to file a complaint through 
College officials as soon as possible after the alleged incident. 
Students should file complaints with the Office of Student 
Affairs and Affirmative Action Office. Victims of sexual 
assault should seek medical treatment immediately If 
physically injured, victims should seek medical treatment 
immediately or as quickly as possible. Contact campus 
security or the police as soon as possible to report the 
incident. 

If the offense involves another student on College 
property or at any official College function or course 
sponsored by the College, disciplinary action may be 
initiated within the College. Sanctions may include required 
counseling, temporary suspension, or dismissal. Both the 
accuser and the accused are entitled to have others present 
during any proceeding. The outcome of the proceedings will 
be provided to both the accuser and the accused for any 
proceedings where sexual assault is alleged. The College will 
attempt to assist the victim with requested changes in 
academic situations whenever reasonably possible. 

Students who perceive that they are victims of sexual 
harassment on College property should contact the campus 
Affirmative Action Office or the Student Services Office. The 



22 



Affirmative Action Office responds to every complaint, 
providing proper remediation when harassment is 
determined. Complaints against students will be forwarded 
to the Office of Student Affairs for resolution within the 
College's due process procedures for students. 

This policy shall supplement all other College policies 
relating to sexual assault and harassment, all of which shall 
remain in effect. All policies shall be applied consistently in 
such a manner as to accomplish their collective purposes and 
may be amended from time to time as deemed necessary or 
desirable by the College. 

Drug Policy 

Definitions 

Substances referred to under this policy include all 
illegal drugs, alcoholic beverages and misused legal drugs 
(both prescription and over-the-counter). 

Illegal drugs refer to the illegal manufacture, 
distribution, dispensation, possession or use of controlled 
substances listed in the Indiana Controlled Substances Act 
(IC 35-48-1-1, etseq). 

The purpose of the Drug-Free College Policy is to 
maintain a safe and productive teaching and learning 
environment and to be in compliance with the Drug-Free 
Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and 
Communities Act. 

All employees are expected to perform their duties and 
students are expected to attend classes, labs, and College 
activities unhindered by the substances defined above. The 
College will establish a drug-free awareness program for 
employees and students, and employees and students are 
expected to work together to maintain a teaching and 
learning environment free of illegal drugs. 

The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, 
possession, and use of illegal drugs present a hazard to 
students, employees, and property and are not permitted at 
any property in use by the College, at any official function 
sponsored by the College, and at any course conducted by 
the College. Any employee or student convicted of a 
criminal drug offense in or on properties controlled by the 
College, or while conducting College business is required to 
notify his/her supervisor or the Director of Student Affairs, 
respectively, within five days of the conviction. 

Any employee who violates this policy is subject to 
disciplinary action. These actions may include, but are not 
limited to, reprimand, participation in a treatment program, 
suspension, and/or termination. Each supervisor is 
responsible for implementing the Drug-Free College Policy 
as it relates to employees. 

Any student who violates this policy is subject to 
disciplinary action. Such action may include, but is not 
limited to, dismissal from College classes, programs, and 



activities. The Director of Student Affairs is responsible for 
implementing the Drug-Free College Pohcy as it relates to 
students. As part of an effort to create a drug-free campus. 
Ivy Tech State College believes that employees and students 
should be educated about: 

1 . The physical and emotional health risks 
associated with the misuse of alcohol and drugs. 

2. Treatment programs available in Indiana. 

3. The possible legal consequences of drug and 
alcohol use. 

The College encourages employees and students who 
experience problems with drugs and/or alcohol to seek help 
before these problems interfere with their performance at Ivy 
Tech State College and endanger their health and safety 

Student Rights and Responsibilities 

Student Conduct 

The reputation of Ivy Tech State College and the 
community depends, in large part, upon the behavior of its 
students. Students enrolled at the College are expected to 
conduct themselves in a mature, dignified, and honorable 
manner. 

Students are subject to College jurisdiction while 
enrolled at Ivy Tech State College. The College reserves the 
right to take disciplinary action against any student whose 
conduct, in the opinion of Ivy Tech State College 
representatives, has not been in the best interests of the 
student, other students, or the College. 

All Ivy Tech State College students are expected to abide 
by the following College rules of conduct. 

"Student" as used refers to a student, a group of 
students, a prospective student, or a group of prospective 
students. 

Ivy Tech State College — Central Indiana complies with 
regulations governing Drug-Free Schools and Campuses (34 
CFR Part 86). Information about community drug and 
alcohol abuse programs is available in the Counseling Office 
located on the first floor of the North Meridian Center. 

College Rules 

1. Alcoholic Beverages: In comphance with Indiana 
State Law, consuming, being under the influence 
of, or possessing intoxicating beverages on College 
property is no; permitted. 

2. Illegal Use of Drugs: In compliance with Indiana 
State Law, being under the influence of, use of, 
possession of, or distributing illegal drugs is not 
permitted. 



23 



3. Smoking: In compliance with Indiana State Law, 
Ivy Tech State College buildings are classified as 
"nonsmoking" facilities. 

4. Assembly: College policy states that assembly in a 
manner that obstructs the free movement of 
others about the campus, inhibits the free and 
normal use of the College buildings and facilities, 
or prevents or obstructs the normal operation of 
the College is not permitted. 

5. Signs: Students may erect signs on campus or 
display signs or posters on designated bulletin 
boards after receiving written approval from the 
appropriate College official. 

6. Solicitation of Funds: College policy requires that 
individuals or organizations seeking the use of 
campus facilities or scheduling activities to solicit 
funds, must first obtain written approval from the 
Director of Marketing and Development. (317) 
921-4312. 

7. Arms/Deadly Weapons: In compliance with 
Indiana State Law, possession of firearms (except 
those possessed by police or security officers) and 
other weapons is prohibited on College property 
or at any College sponsored activity held 
elsewhere. 

8. Cheating: Cheating on papers or tests is a 
violation of College rules. - 

9. Counterfeiting and Altering: College policy states 
that copying or altering in any manner any record, 
document, or identification form used or 
maintained by the College is not permitted. 

10. Theft of Property: Theft of personal or College 
property is a violation of College rules. 

11. Vandalism: The destruction or mutilation of Ivy 
Tech State College books, magazines, equipment 
or buildings is a violation of College rules. 

12. Use of College Facility: Students are permitted on 
campus during normal hours published by Ivy 
Tech State College and at other times established 
in the College calendar. Students wishing to 
utilize College facilities at other times must 
request permission from the appropriate College 
official. 

13. Financial Responsibility: Students are expected to 
pay all fees, fines, or loans in a timely manner. 
Grades, records, degrees, etc., will not be awarded 
until debts to the College are paid. Students will 
not be allowed to register in an "owe fees" status. 

14. Motor Vehicles: Students are expected to comply 
with parking regulations. Handicapped parking 
spaces and visitors' areas are reserved for those 
purposes, and vehicles improperly parked in those 



areas may be ticketed or lowed at the owner's 
expense. 

15. Harassment/Stalking and Intimidation: This is 
defined as conduct causing alarm, or creating a 
risk by threatening to commit crimes against 
persons or their property or making unwelcome 
sexual advances or requests for sexual favors. 
This also covers harassment or intimidation of 
persons involved in a disciplinary hearing and of 
persons in authority who are in the process of 
discharging their responsibilities. Harassment, 
Stalking and Intimidation are not permitted. 
Perpetrators are also subject to Indiana State Laws. 

16. Electronic Equipment or Programs: Use of 
electronic equipment or programs in a manner 
that is disruptive to other students, staff, or 
College processes is prohibited. This includes 
electronic equipment being played loudly. 
Students introducing computer virus will be 
subject to disciplinary action, including dismissal. 

17. Sex Offenses- Forcible and Unforcible: Sex 
offenses are prohibited under Indiana State Laws 
and College rules. 

18. Disruptive Behavior: Behaviors or actions that 
disrupt the College's processes (academic and/or 
non-academic) are in violation. 

19. Assault/Battery/Physical and/or Verbal Abuse: 
Altercations are prohibited under College rules. 
Perpetrators are also subject to Indiana State Law. 

20. Discrimination Activities: Any student involved in 
discrimination activities towards students or staff 
will face disciplinary action. 

2 1 . Gambling: In compliance vvith Indiana State Law, 
gambling as prescribed by the law is not allowed. 

22. Hazing: Hazing is a violation of College policy. 

23. Use of indecent, abusive or threatening language: 
Use of indecent, threatening, or abusive language 
is a violation of College rules. 

24. Unauthorized use of College name: Unauthorized 
use of the College name is a violation of College 
rules. 

25. Lewd or indecent conduct: Indecent conduct is a 
violation of College rules. Students are also 
subject to all local, state, and federal laws. 

26. Violation of local ordinances or of state or federal 
laws: Students are also subject to all local, state, 
and federal laws. 

27. Furnishing of false information with intent to 
deceive: Providing false information is a violation 
of College rules. Students are also subject to all 
local, state, and federal laws. 



24 



28. Children on Campus: Because of insurance and 
security purposes, children are not allowed to be 
on Ivy Tech property without direct supervision. 
Children are not allowed in classrooms unless 
through the expressed consent of the instructor. 

Violations 

The College maintains jurisdiction over matters such as, 
but not limited to, alcoholic beverages, illegal use of drugs, 
motor vehicles, assembly, soliciting, use of College facilities, 
the posting or erection of signs, theft, arms/deadly weapons, 
vandalism, physical or verbal altercations or abuses, 
harassment, threats and/or discrimination activities. 

The College attempts to protect students from those who 
might violate laws and ordinances. Local, state, or federal 
law enforcement officials will be notified of anyone who 
violates local, state, or federal laws. Violators shall be subject 
to prosecution by the appropriate law enforcement officials. 

Anyone found in violation of College regulations shall be 
subject to disciplinary action by the College through due 
process procedures for student conduct violations. The 
regulations and due process procedures as described in the 
next two parts of the Catalog and in the Student Handbook 
are available for reading and review in the College 
Library/Learning Resource Center. Copies of the Student 
Handbook also are available through the Admissions Office. 

Disciplinary Action 

A student who violates the rules and regulations of the 
College may be subject to any of the following disciplinary 
actions: 

1 . Verbal reprimand. 

2. Restitution for damages. 

3. Restriction of privileges. 

4. Withdrawal from a course, program, or the College. 

5. Suspension from the College. 

6. Dismissal from the College. 

Due Process Procedures for 
Student Conduct Violations 

Due process provides the College an appropriate 
mechanism to deal with violation of student conduct and 
conversely allows a student with a disagreement to grieve 
against College personnel's decision affecting that student. 
The intent of due process is to provide a process or 
procedure for unbiased review of a particular case or 
situation. The intent, rather than the mechanism, is the 
focus of this process. Thus, exceptions to the specifics and 
mechanisms can and will be made. 



1. Cases or appeals of student misconduct and/or 
lack of academic integrity are to be referred to the 
appropriate designee of the Vice President/ 
Chancellor, Dean of Instructional Affairs, or 
Director of Student Affairs. This College 
representative: 

a. will be responsible to review all initial 
disciplinary procedures; 

b. may suspend a student for a period of time 
until the Student Status Committee can meet; 

c. may withdraw the student from a course or 
program or dismiss the student from the 
College for disciplinary reasons. 

2. Students recommended for suspension, 
withdrawal, or dismissal will be notified in 
writing. Students will be given an opportunity to 
appeal the decision to the Student Status 
Committee if they so choose. Student Status 
Committee Appeal forms may be obtained from 
the Dean of Instructional Affairs or the Director of 
Student Affairs Offices', second floor of the North 
Meridian Center. 

3. The Student Status Committee deals with all cases 
relating to disciplinary actions or the academic 
status of students. Each region has a Student 
Status Committee that makes recommendations to 
the Vice President/Chancellor. 

4. The Student Status Committee will be composed 
of at least six members, including two full-time 
instructional staff members and two 
administrative staff persons appointed by the Vice 
President/Chancellor of the region. The additional 
two members will be students designated by the 
Student Senate. The Committee's review and 
subsequent disposition of a formal complaint will 
begin no later than 30 days after receipt of the 
written complaint. Staff legal counsel, as needed, 
will be available to the Committee. 

5. The Student Status Committee will assure the 
student due process. A written statement will first 
be presented by the student to the chairman of the 
Student Status Committee. The student will be 
invited to speak on his or her behalf to the 
Committee. The name of anyone the student 
wishes to bring to the meeting must be submitted 
for approval, in writing, to the Student Status 
Committee Chair prior to the meeting. Only the 
student may address the committee, unless 
otherwise allowed. 

6. The Student Status Committee will issue a 
recommendation to the Vice President/Chancellor 
following its deliberation. Disciplinary probation 
or dismissal from the College will be final only 



25 



after review by the Vice President/Chancellor, who 
may approve or disapprove the recommendation 
of the Student Status Committee. Students 
dismissed for disciplinary reasons will not be 
entitled to refunds. 

7. The student will be informed in writing of the 
decision of the Student Status Committee and of 
the subsequent recommendations to the Vice 
President/Chancellor, whose decision is final. All 
of the written recommendations from the 
committee will be filed in the student's folder in 
the Registrar's Office. 

8. If the student disagrees with the Student Status 
Committee recommendation, he or she may file a 
complaint with the Vice President/Chancellor 
within 72 hours after notification of the Student 
Status Committee's decision. 

9. Exceptions to these rules may be made in 
extenuating circumstances at the discretion of the 
Vice President/Chancellor or his designee, upon 
request by those involved. 

Student Grievances 

Students may bring legitimate grievances to the attention 
of their instructors, counselors or other advisors. Students 
are asked to put their grievance and possible resolution in 
writing. Time will be provided for a grievance conference 
within two weeks of the complaint. The purpose of the 
conference is to discuss the problem and to find, if possible, 
a mutually satisfactory resolution. The conferences will be 
held within two weeks of notice of the complaint. 

The first part of the process involves the student 
working one-to-one with appropriate staff to resolve the 
situation. If the grievance concerns an instructor or faculty 
advisor, the student, through a stepladder process, should 
first request a conference with a program chair or area 
supervisor. If the situation is not resolved, the student 
should address the assistant divisional chairperson. The next 
step, if there is no resolution, is to meet with the divisional 
chair Finally through this part of the process, the student 
can petition the Dean of Instructional Affairs. 

Non-instructional areas follow the same step process. 
Through Student Affairs, for example, the process would be 
counselors, then manager, and finally Director of Student 
Affairs. 

If the grievance is against the Dean of Instructional 
Affairs or Director of Student Affairs, the case will be 
remanded to the Student Status Committee. 

The student who feels his or her grievance has not been 
resolved to his/her satisfaction through the one-to-one part 
of the process should then continue the grievance process by 
requesting a hearing of the Student Status Committee. The 



Student Status Committee is the final part of the grievance 
process and involves the Student Status Committee and the 
Vice President/Chancellor. 

Note: If the student has a discrimination complaint, it 
will be referred to the Affirmative Action Officer to be 
initially processed under the College Affirmative Action Plan. 
If a hearing is necessary, the Affirmative Action Officer may 
return the matter, with advice, to the Student Status 
Committee, for a formal hearing. 

Student Grievance Policy 

1 . Bring your complaint to the attention of your 

instructor, advisor, or counselor. 

2. Your advisor, instructor, or counselor will provide 
you with a conference within two weeks of the 
notice of your complaint. 

3. If you feel that such a conference with your 
instructor, advisor, or counselor would be futile 
because of the advisor's involvement in the 
grievance, you may elect to request a conference 
with a program chairperson or assistant divisional 
chairperson, division chair or manager as deemed 
appropriate. This conference will also be held 
within two weeks of the notice of your complaint. 

4. If the complaint is not resolved to your 
satisfaction through the informal procedure, you 
may submit the grievance in writing to the Dean 
of Instructional Affairs or Director of Student 
Affairs. Exception: If the complaint is filed 
against a Director or Dean, his/her responsibility 
in these procedures shall be assumed by another 
Director/Dean. 

5. The formal written complaint brought by a 
student must: 

a. Clearly state the facts giving rise to the grievance; 

b. Clearly state the remedy sought by the 
complaining party; 

c. Be signed and dated. 

6. If the situation is not resolved at the previous 
levels, the written complaint shall be forwarded to 
the chair of the Student Status Committee unless 
the Vice President/Chancellor decides to resolve 
the complaint in another way which will be 
explained to the grievant in writing. 

The Student Status Committee is responsible for 
review and disposition of any such complaint 
forwarded to it. 

The disposition of a formal grievance procedure 
may be one of the following: 

a. Refuse further action: If no formal case has 



26 



been made by the complainant, the matter will be 
refused in writing to said grievant with reasons for 
this action. The grievant may resubmit the 
complaint once within 30 days providing there is 
additional information to be submitted. If not, 
the decision is final. 

b. Fact-finding and mediation: The Committee 
itself can engage in investigation of the allegation 
as an attempt to mediate with parties a mutually 
agreeable resolution of the matter. A signed 
agreement should be generated summarizing the 
issue and resolution, if agreement is reached, 

c. Referral: The complaint may be referred to a 
more appropriate forum for action. 

d. If the complaint is a discrimination complaint, 
it should be referred to the Director of Affirmative 
Action Programs to be initially processed under 
the College Affirmative Action Plan. If a hearing is 
necessary, the Director of Affirmative Action 
Programs may return the matter, with advice, to 
the Student Status Committee for a formal 
hearing. 

e. If the Committee believes a policy or procedure 
of the College is being legitimately challenged, it 
will refer the grievance to the Vice President/ 
Chancellor with an explanation of its concern. 

f. Remand complaint: If it appears no legitimate 
informal attempt to resolve the matter has taken 
place and it appears such discussion might lead to 
resolution of the complaint, then referral of the 
matter to the student advisor or other appropriate 
staff person for review and discussion with the 



student would be in order. If resolved, a report to 
the Student Status Committee will be made by 
such staff person. The Student Status Committee 
will review the agreement reached with the 
student to assure that, in fact, there was mutual 
agreement and understanding. 

g. Hold formal hearing: If a grievance cannot be 
resolved utilizing the steps listed above, the 
committee may hold a formal hearing. If held, the 
Committee may call witnesses including the 
parties to the complaint. The name of anyone the 
student wishes to bring to the meeting must be 
submitted for approval, in writing. Legal counsel 
may be present, but not talk on behalf of the 
student. A recommendation will then be 
formulated and a report made to the Vice 
President/Chancellor of the suggested resolution 
of the matter. 



27 



STUDENT INFORMATION 



Accreditation 

Ivy Tech State College is an accredited member of the 
North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. 

Professional Accreditations: 

American Culinary Federation Educational Institute 

American Institure for Design and Drafting 

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health 
Education Program (CAAHEP) with selected 
professional groups including: 

Joint Reveiw Committee on Education Radiologic 
Technology 

Accrediting Review Committee for Educational 
Programs in Surgical Technology 

Joint Review Committee for Respiratory Therapy 
Education 

Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs 

Council for Standards in Human Services Education 

Federal Aviation Administrative Collegiate Training 
Initiative Electronics Program 

National Academy of Early Childhood Programs 

National Association of Industrial Technology 

National Automotive Technician Education 
Foundation, Inc. 

National League of Nursing 



Approved By: 

Chef de Cuisine Association of Indiana, Inc. 

Indiana Commission on Vocational and Technical 
Education 

Indiana State Board of Nursing 

Indiana State Board of Health (Qualified Medication 
Aide, Nurse Aide, Social Service/Long Term Care) 



Non-Discrimination Policy 

Ivy Tech State College seeks to develop degree credit 
programs, courses and community service offerings and to 
provide open admission, counseling and placement services 
for all persons, regardless of race, color, creed, religion, 
gender, national origin, physical or mental handicap, age or 
veteran status. 

Questions can be addressed to: 

Director of Employee Relations: (317) 921-4762 

Fire 

In case of fire, please remain calm and move in an 
orderly fashion to the nearest exit. After you have exited the 
building, move a safe distance away 

Tornado 

In the event of a tornado warning, it is usually wise to 
move to an inner room and lower level away from glass 
windows. 

Non-Smoking Policy 

It is the policy of this College, as mandated by state law, 
to prohibit smoking within the College buildings. Please use 
the containers located outside the exterior doors to 
extinguish your cigarettes, etc. Ivy Tech State College 
appreciates your cooperation. 

Lounge/Food Service 

Sandwich, soft drink, and candy machines are provided 
in the student lounge. Students also have access to a 
microwave oven, television and pay phone. Food items are 
not to be taken out of the lounge area. Please make use of 
trash containers to keep tables clean. There is a change 
machine located in the student lounge in both buildings. 
Vending machine refunds/problems can be taken care of 
through the Security Office. 

Parking and Housing 

Rearview mirror parking hang-tags are provided to the 
students free of charge. Since Ivy Tech State College is a 
commuter college, there are no residence halls. If a student is 
unable to commute, further information can be obtained 
from the Admissions Office. There is a $5,00 replacement 
fee for parking tags. 



28 



BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION 



Accounting Technology 

In the Accounting Program, students develop an understanding of accounting principles, business law, 
communications, business equipment and related areas of study in the field. Instruction is offered in computerized 
accounting systems. Technical skills in financial accounting, cost accounting, and tax preparation are emphasized. 

Accounting duties typically include maintaining journals and ledgers, processing banking transactions, billing, 
preparing payroll, maintaining inventory records, purchasing, processing expense reports, preparing financial statements 
and analyzing managerial reports. Position titles include junior or staff accountant, junior auditor, cost accounting clerk, 
bookkeeper, payroll clerk, inventory clerk, accounts receivable clerk, and financial management trainee. 

A two-year program requiring 60 credits leads to an Associate in Applied Science degree or an Associate in Science 
degree. Career development certificates also are available. 



Associate in Science (AS) — 
Accounting Technology 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (24 Credits) 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Accounting Technology 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


COM 


101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


ECN 101 


Economic Fundamentals 


3 


ECN 


101 


Economic Fundamentals 


3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 


111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 112 


Exposition and Persuasion 


3 


MAT 


110 


Contemporary College Mathematics OR 




POL 101 


Introduction to American Government 




MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 




and Politics 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


see 111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 










XXX XXX 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 










ACC 


101 


Accounting Principles I 


3 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 




ACC 


102 


Accounting Principles II 


3 


ACC 101 


Accounting Principles I 


3 


BUS 


101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


ACC 102 


Accounting Principles II 


3 


BUS 


102 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


CIS 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


BUS 102 


Business Law 


3 


CIS 


115 


Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 


3 


CIS 101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 










CIS 115 


Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 


3 


SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 










ACC 


105 


Income Tax I 


3 


SPECIALTY CORE (15 Credits) 




ACC 


201 


Intermediate Accounting I 


3 


ACC 105 


Income Tax I 


3 


ACC 


202 


Intermediate Accounting II 


3 


ACC 201 


Intermediate Accounting I 


3 


ACC 


203 


Cost Accounting I 


3 


ACC 202 


Intermediate Accounting II 


3 










ACC 203 


Cost Accounting I 


3 


REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 




ACC 209 


Auditing 


3 






(12 Credits) 


REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 




ACC 
ACC 


106 
111 


Payroll Accounting 
Accounting Principles Lab I 


3 

1 




(3 Credits) 


ACC 


112 


Accounting Principles Lab 11 


1 


ACC 106 


Payroll Accounting 


3 


ACC 


206 


Managerial Accounting 


3 


ACC 1 1 1 


Accounting Principles Lab I 


1 


ACC 


208 


Income Tax II 


3 


ACC 112 


Accounting Principles Lab 11 


1 


ACC 


222 


Accounting Software Application 


3 


ACC 206 


Managerial Accounting 


3 










ACC 208 


Income Tax II 


3 


TOTAL CREDITS 




60 


ACC 222 


Accounting Software Application 


3 











TOTAL CREDITS 



29 



Adminstrative Office Technology 

The Administrative Office Technology Program prepares students for an automated office environment. Students develop 
basic office skills and acquire computer skills, including word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and microcomputer 
operating systems. Several applications (advanced word processing, desktop publishing, and integrated packages) can also be 
studied in depth. 

The Administrative Office Technology Program is designed to accommodate students with different levels of training 
experiences. Courses are offered which provide initial, advanced and refresher education and assist individuals in achieving 
professional recognition and career progression. The program prepares graduates as administrative office personnel and 
provides opportunities for specialized training in such areas as legal, medical, and office automation. Students who complete 
the recommended sequences of courses are eligible to take the Administrative/Information Processing Specialist (AIPS) or 
the Certified Professional Secretary (CPS) exams administered by the Institute for Certifying Secretaries of the Professional 
Secretaries International Association (PSI). 

A two-year program requiring 60 credits leads to an Associate in Applied Science degree and an Associate in Science 
degree. Technical certificates and career development certificates also are available. 



Associate in Science (AS) — 
Administrative Office Technology 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (24 Credits) 

3 
3 
3 
3 



COM 


101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


COM 


102 


Intro to Interpersonal Communications 


ECN 


101 


Economic Fundamentals 


ENG 


111 


English Composition 


POL 


101 


Introduction to American Government 
and Politics 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


XXX 


XXX 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


XXX 


XXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


TECHNICAL CORE (36 Credits) 


ACC 


101 


Accounting Principles I 


ACC 


102 


Accounting Principles II 


AOT 


103 


InfoAVord Processing Concepts 


AOT 


119 


Document Production 


AOT 


220 


Document Management 


AOT 


221 


Office Management Procedures 


BUS 


101 


Introduction to Business 


BUS 


102 


Business Law 


BUS 


105 


Principles of Management 


CIS 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


CIS 


115 


Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 


XXX 


XXX 


Technical Elective 


TOTAL CREDITS 





Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Administrative Office 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

ECN 101 Economic Fundamentals 3 



ENG 111 English Composition 3 

MAT 110 Contemporary College Mathematics OR 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

XXX XXX Life/Physical Sciences Elective 3 

XXX XXX Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 3 



TECHNICAL CORE 



(18 Credits) 



ACC 101 Accounting Principles I 3 

AOT 103 InformationAVord Processing Concepts 3 

AOT 119 Document Production 3 

AOT 219 Specialized Formatting/Transcription 3 

BUS 101 Introduction to Business 3 

CIS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 



SPECIALTY CORE 



(12 Credits) 



AOT 
AOT 



AOT 
AOT 



116 
202 



220 
221 



Business Communications 
Information Word 
Processing Applications 
Document Management 
Office Management/Procedures 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(6 Credits) 

AOT 212 Micro Word Processing 3 

Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 3 



CIS 



115 



ELECTIVES (6 Credits) 

AOT 108 Shorthand I 

AOT HI Shorthand II 

AOT 112 Data Entry 

AOT 113 Office Calculating Machines 

AOT 207 Office Automation Applications 

AOT 214 Desktop Publishing 

AOT 216 Practicum/lnternship 

ACC 102 Accounting Principles II 

BUS 102 Business Law 

CIS 106 Micro Operating Systems 

TOTAL CREDITS 



30 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Administrative Office Technology / 
Legal Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 

Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

Economic Fundamentals 3 

English Composition 3 

Contemporary College Mathematics 3 

Life/Physical Sciences Elective 3 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 3 

CORE (36 Credits) 

Accounting Principles I 3 

InformationAVord Processing Concepts 3 

Business Communications 3 

Document Production 3 

Legal Terminology 3 

Specialized Formatting and Transcription 3 

Office Management and Procedures 3 

Introduction to Business 3 

Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 3 

Introduction to Paralegal Studies 3 

Civil Procedures 3 



COM 


101 


ECN 


101 


ENG 


111 


MAT 


110 


XXX 


XXX 


XXX 


XXX 


TECE 

ACC 


INIC^ 

101 


AOT 


103 


AOT 


116 


AOT 


119 


AOT 


215 


AOT 


219 


AOT 


221 


BUS 


101 


CIS 


101 


CIS 


115 


LEG 


101 


LEG 


103 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 



(6 Credits) 



AOT 

AOT 

BUS 

CIS 

LEG 

LEG 

LEG 



212 
214 
102 
106 
109 
111 
202 



Microcomputer Word Processing 

Desktop Publishing 

Business Law 

Micro Operating Systems 

Family Law 

Criminal Law 

Litigation 



TOTAL CREDITS 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

60 



Technical Certificate (TC) — Secretarial 
Administrative 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (6 Credits) 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

SOC XXX Social Sciences Elective 3 

TECHNICAL CORE (24 Credits) 



AOT 

AOT 

AOT 

AOT 

AOT 

AOT 

CIS 

XXX 



103 
116 
119 
219 
220 
221 
101 



ELECTIVES 

AOT 108 



InformationAVord Processing Concepts 3 

Business Communications 3 

Document Production 3 

Specialized Formatting/Transcriptions 3 

Document Management 3 

Office Management/Procedures 3 

Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

Elective 3 

(3 Credits) 



AOT 

AOT 

AOT 

AOT 

AOT 

AOT 

ACC 

CIS 

CIS 



112 
113 
202 
207 
214 
216 
101 
106 
115 



Shorthand 1 

Data Entry 

Office Calculating Machines 

InfoAVord Processing Applications 

Office Automation Applications 

Desktop Publishing 

Practicum/lnternship 

Accounting Principles 1 

Micro Operating Systems 

Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 



TOTAL CREDITS 



3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

30 



Technical Ceritificate (TC) — Medical 
Secretary 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (6 Credits) 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

SOC XXX Social Sciences Elective 3 

TECHNICAL CORE (24 Credits) 

AOT 103 InfoAVord Processing Concepts 3 

AOT 113 Office Calculating Machines 1 

AOT 220 Document Management 3 

AOT 221 Office Management and Procedures 3 

CIS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 



HHS 101 

MEA 1 1 1 

MEA 201 



XXX 



XXX 



ELECTIVES 

ANP 101 



ANP 

AOT 

AOT 

AOT 

CIS 

MEA 



102 
202 
207 
212 
115 
115 



Medical Terminology 

Medical Typing and Transcription 

Medical Transcription and 

Word Processing 

Elective 



(3 Credits) 



Anatomy and Physiology 1 
Anatomy and Physiology II 
InfoAVord Processing Applications 
Office Automation Applications 
Microcomputer Word Processing 
Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 
Medical Insurance 



TOTAL CREDITS 



3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

30 



31 



Automotive Technology 

The Automotive Technology Program prepares students with the general and technical education needed for successful 
careers in automotive service, sales, technical support, management and customer relations, and for continuation in higher 
education. A student in the Automotive Technology Program may specialize in automotive body repair or automotive service. 

A two-year program requiring 69 credits leads to an Associate in Applied Science degree. Technical and career 
development certificates also are available. 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Automotive Technology / Automotive 
Service Specialty * 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Automotive Technology / ASSET-Ford 
Motor Co. Specialty * 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


COM 


lOI 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 


111 


English Composition 3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra i ; 


3 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 3 


SCI 111 


Physical Science 


3 


SCI 


111 


Physical Science 3 


ELECTIVE: 


Humanities/Social Sciences 


3 


ELECTIVE: 


Humanities/Social Sciences 3 


ELECTIVE; 


General Education 


3 


ELECTIVE: 


General Education 3 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 


AMV 100 


Introduction to Transportation 


3 


AMV 


100 


Ford Introduction to Transportation 3 


AMV 101 


chassis/Suspension Principles 


3 


AMV 


101 


Ford STST Suspension and Steering 3 


AMV 107 


Engine Principles & Design 


3 


AMV 


107 


Ford Engine Principles & Design 3 


AMV 113 


Electricity for Transportation 


3 


AMV 


113 


Ford STST Electrical Systems 3 


AMV 202 


Computer Engine Controls 


3 


AMV 


202 


Ford STST Electronic Engine Controls 3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


TEC 


104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 


SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 


SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 


AST 105 


Fuel Systems 


3 


AST 


105 


Ford Fuel Systems 3 


AST 201 


Heating & Air Conditioning Principles 


3 


AST 


201 


Ford STST Climate Control 3 


AST 209 


Automotive Braking Systems 


3 


AST 


209 


Ford Automotive Braking Systems 3 


AST 220 


Transmission cSr Driveline Service 


3 


AST 


220 


Ford Transmission & Driveline Service 3 


REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 




REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 




(21 Credits) 






(21 Credits) 


AST 102 


Two/Four Wheel Alignment 


3 


AST 


102 


Ford STST Steering 3 


AST 104 


Start and Charge Systems 


3 


AST 


104 


Ford Start and Charge Systems 3 


AST 203 


Engine Rebuild 


3 


AST 


203 


Ford STST Engine Repair 3 


AST 204 


Automatic Transmission/Transaxle 


3 


AST 


204 


Ford Automatic Transmission/Transaxle 3 


AST 205 


Manual Transmission/Transaxle 


3 


AST 


205 


Ford Manual Transmission/Transaxle 3 


AST 207 


Advanced Engine Performance 


3 


AST 


207 


Ford STST Advanced Engine Performance 3 


AST 288.03 


Electronic & Accessory Systems 


3 


AST 


288.02 


Ford STST Automatic Transmission 3 


TOTAL CREDITS 




69 


TOTAL CREDITS 


69 



* Accredited by the Accreditation Board of the National 
Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) and In all eight 
areas of the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) by the 
National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation 
(NATEF). 



NOTE: STST — Service Technician Specialty Training 

NOTE: ASSET - Automotive Service Educational Training 

* Accredited by the Accreditation board of the National 
Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) and in all eight 
areas of the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) by the 
National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation 
(NATEF). 



32 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Automotive Technology / ASEP-General 
Motors Specialty * 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Automotive Technology / T-TEN - Toyota 
Specialty * 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 



COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 

ENG 111 English Composition 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 

SCI 111 Physical Science 

ELECTIVE: Humanities/Social Sciences 



ELECTIVE: 



General Education 



TECHNICAL CORE 



(18 Credits) 



AMV 100 GM Introduction to Transportation 3 

AMV 101 GM STG Suspension and Steering 3 

AMV 107 GM Engine Principles & Design 3 

AMV 113 GM STG Specialized Electronics Training 3 

AMV 202 GM Computer Engine Controls 3 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 

AST 105 GM Fuel Systems 3 

AST 201 GM STG Climate Control 3 

AST 209 GM STG Braking Systems/RWA174WAL 3 

AST 220 GM STG Drive Train 3 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 



(21 Credits) 



AST 102 

AST 104 

AST 203 

AST 204 

AST 205 
AST 
AST 



GM STG Steering and Alignment 

GM Start and Charge Systems 

GM Engine Rebuild 

GM Automatic Transmission/Transaxle 

GM Manual Transmission/Transaxle 

207 GM STG Drivability 

288.01 GM Electronic & Accessory Systems 



TOTAL CREDITS 



69 



COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 

ENG 111 English Composition 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 

SCI 111 Physical Science 

ELECTIVE: Humanities/Social Sciences 



ELECTIVE: 



General Education 



TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 

AMV 100 Introduction to Transportation 3 

AMV 101 T-TEN Chassis and Suspension 3 

AMV 107 Engine Principles & Design 3 

AMV 113 Toyota Electrical Circuits 3 

AMV 202 Toyota Computer Engine Controls 3 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 

AST 105 Toyota Fuel Systems 3 

AST 201 Toyota Climate Control 3 

AST 209 T-TEN Braking Systems 3 



AST 



220 Toyota Transmission & Driveline Service 3 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(21 Credits) 

AST 288.03 Toyota Electronics & Accessory Systems 3 

AST 102 T-TEN Alignment 3 

AST 104 T-TEN Start and Charge Systems 3 

AST 203 Engine Rebuild 3 

AST 204 Automatic Transmission/Transaxle 3 

AST 205 Toyota Manual Transmission/Transaxle 3 

AST 207 Toyota Engine Performance 3 

TOT^L CREDITS 69 



NOTE: STG — Service Technology Group 



NOTE: T-TEN — Toyota Technical Education Network 

* Accredited by the Accreditation Board of the National 
Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) and in all eight 
areas of the Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) by the 
National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation 

(NATEF). 



33 



Business Administration 

The Business Administration Program gives students the broad background they need for general administrative 
positions in a variety of business environments. It also provides an opportunity for specialization. A student in the Business 
Administration Program may specialize in one of the following areas: logistics management, management, marketing, quality 
management or supervision. 

A two-year program requiring 60 credits leads to an Associate in Applied Science degree. Technical certificates and 
career development certificates also are available. 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Business Administration / Management 
Specialty 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Business Administration / Logistics 
Management Specialty 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 


GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 


COM 


101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


COM 


101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 


ECN 


XXX 


Economics Elective 


3 


ECN 


XXX 


Economics Elective 3 


ENG 


111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 


HI 


English Composition 3 


MAT 


110 


Contemporary College Mathematics OR 




MAT 


110 


Contemporary College Mathematics OR 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 3 


XXX 


XXX 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 3 


XXX 


XXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 3 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 


ACC 


101 


Accounting Principles I 


3 


ACC 


101 


Accounting Principles I 3 


BUS 


101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


BUS 


101 


Introduction to Business 3 


BUS 


102 


Business Law 


3 


BUS 


102 


Business Law 3 


BUS 


105 


Principles of Management 


3 


BUS 


105 


Principles of Management 3 


CIS 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 


CIS 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 3 


MKT 


101 


Principles of Marketing 


3 


MKT 


101 


Principles of Marketing 3 



SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 

BUS 202 Human Resource Management 3 

BUS 204 Case Problems in Management 3 

BUS 208 Organizational Behavior 3 

BUS 210 Managerial Finance 3 

REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 



BUS 203 Entrepreneurship 

LOG 101 Materials Management 

SUP 223 Total Quality Management 

SUP 224 Operations Management 

TOTAL CREDITS 



SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 

LOG 101 Introduction to Materials Management 3 

LOG 201 Transportation Systems 3 

LOG 202 Physical Distribution 3 

MKT 202 Logistics/Purchasing Control 3 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 



(12 Credits) 

3 
3 
3 
3 


BUS 204 
SUP 223 
MKT XXX 
SUP 224 


60 


TOTAL CREDITS 



(12 Credits) 



Case Problems in Management 
Total Quality Management 
Marketing Elective 
Operations Management 



34 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Business Administration / Marketing 
Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

ECN XXX Economics Elective 3 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

MAT 110 Contemporary College Mathematics OR 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

XXX XXX Life/Physical Sciences Elective 3 

XXX XXX Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 3 

TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 

ACC 101 Accounting Principles 1 3 

BUS 101 Introduction to Business 3 

BUS 102 Business Law 3 

BUS 105 Principles of Management 3 

CIS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

MKT 101 Principles of Marketing 3 

SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 

MKT 102 Principles of Selling 3 

MKT 104 Advertising 3 

MKT 202 Logistics/Purchasing Control 3 

MKT 220 Principles of Retailing 3 

REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(12 Credits) 

BUS 208 Organizational Behavior 3 

MKT 201 Introduction to Market Research 3 

MKT 204 Marketing Management 3 

SUP 224 Operations Management 3 

TOTAL CREDITS 60 



35 



Computer Information Systems 

The Computer Information Systems curriculum, with specialties in computer programming and microcomputer 
operations, is designed to provide the flexible and comprehensive training required by employers. The curriculum includes 
technical courses in computer information systems and related areas, general education, and regionally determined technical 
courses in each specialty area. 

Automated systems allow for the integration of several functionally related applications such as word processing, 
database management, spreadsheets, programming, electronic mail systems, graphics generation, and telecommunications. 
These systems may be stand-alone, shared logic, distributed, or integrated. Demand for employees with computer and 
business skills is particularly high in small and medium-size firms which create, transmit, and control information by using 
computer technology as a management tool. 

A two-year program requiring 60 credits leads to an Associate in Applied Science degree. An Associate in Science degree 
is available at selected campuses. 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Computer Information Systems / 
Microcomputer Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 



COM 


101 


ECN 


101 


ENG 


111 


MAT 


110 


MAT 


111 


XXX 


XXX 


XXX 


XXX 



Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

Economic Fundamentals 3 

English Composition 3 
Contemporary College Mathematics OR 

Intermediate Algebra 3 

Life/Physical Sciences Elective 3 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 3 



TECHNICAL CORE 



(18 Credits) 



ACC 



101 



BUS 


101 


CIS 


101 


CIS 


102 


CIS 


113 


CIS 


203 



Accounting Principles 1 3 

Introduction to Business 3 

Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

Data Processing Fundamentals 3 

Logic, Design, and Programming 3 

Systems Analysis and Design 3 



SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 

CIS 106 Microcomputer Operating Systems 3 

CIS 115 Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 3 

CIS 202 Data Communications 3 

CIS 224 Hardware and Software Troubleshooting 3 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(6 Credits) 

CIS 207 Micro Database Management Systems 3 

CIS 223 Integrated Business Software 3 



ELECTIVES 

CIS 105 

CIS 107 

CIS 109 

CIS 110 

CIS 206 



CIS 
CIS 
CIS 
CIS 
CIS 
CIS 

CIS 
CIS 
CIS 

CIS 
CIS 
CIS 
CIS 



208 
211 
213 
214 
216 
220 

221 
223 
225 

226 
232 
233 
235 



(6 Credits) 

Mini-Mainframe Operating Systems 3 

Microcomputer Programming 3 

Unix V Operating Systems 3 

Basic Programming Language 3 
Systems Development with High 

Level Tools 3 

Electronic Spreadsheets 3 

RPG Programming Fundamentals 3 

Assembler Language Programming 3 

Pascal Programming 3 
Advanced RPG Programming (AS/400) 3 
Shell Command Language for 

Programmers 3 

Advanced "C" Programming 3 

Integrated Business Software 3 
Advanced Database Management 

Systems 3 

Advanced Electronic Spreadsheets 3 

Visual Basic Programming 3 

Graphic User Interfaces: Windows 3 

Local Area Newtworks 3 



TOTAL CREDITS 



36 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Computer Information Systems / 
Programming Specialty 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(6 Credits) 

CIS 204 Advanced COBOL Programming 3 

CIS 212 "C" Programming 3 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 


ELECTIVES 


(6 Credits) 


COM 


101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


CIS 


105 


Mini-Mainframe Operating Systems 


3 


ECN 


101 


Economic Fundamentals 


3 


CIS 


107 


Microcomputer Programming 


3 


ENG 


111 


English Composition 


3 


CIS 


109 


Unix V Operating Systems 


3 


MAT 


no 


Contemporary College Mathematics OR 




CIS 


110 


Basic Programming Language 


3 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


CIS 


206 


Systems Development with High 




XXX 


XXX 


Life/Physical Sciences Elective 


3 






Level Tools 


3 


XXX 


XXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


CIS 


208 


Electronic Spreadsheets 


3 










CIS 


211 


RPG Programming Fundamentals 


3 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 


CIS 
CIS 


213 
214 


Assembler Language Programming 

Pascal Programming 

Advanced RPG Programming (AS/400) 


3 
3 


ACC 


101 


Accounting Principles I 


3 


CIS 


216 


3 


BUS 


101 


Introduction to Business 


3 


CIS 


220 


Shell Command Language 




CIS 


101 


Introduction to Microcomputers 


3 






for Programmers 


3 


CIS 


102 


Data Processing Fundamentals 


3 


CIS 


221 


Advanced "C" Programming 


3 


CIS 


113 


Logic, Design, and Programming 


3 


CIS 


223 


Integrated Business Software 


3 


CIS 


203 


Systems Analysis and Design 


3 


CIS 


225 


Advanced Database Management 
Systems 


3 


SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 


CIS 


226 


Advanced Electronic Spreadsheets 


3 


CIS 


104 


Introduction to COBOL Programming 


3 


CIS 


232 


Visual Basic Programming 


3 


CIS 


106 


Microcomputer Operating Systems 


3 


CIS 


233 


Graphic User Interfaces: Windows 


3 


CIS 


201 


Database Design and Management 


3 


CIS 


235 


Local Area Newtworks 


3 


CIS 


202 


Data Communications 


3 


















TOTAL CREDITS 




6C 



37 



Design Technology 



The Design Technology Program is competency-based and is designed to be responsive to the needs of business and 
industry The program provides an environment conducive to the development of general knowledge, technical skills and 
critical thinking skills so graduates may enter their profession as entry level technicians. They also will be prepared to 
respond to future advances and changes in their profession. Included is a blend of traditional "board" techniques with 
latest hardware and software used in industry today. This balance of skills in both areas helps provide students wath the 
diversity necessary to be competitive in the job market. Graduates wall have the necessary skills to choose related careers or 
continue their education at other post-secondary institutions. 

Associate in Applied Science degrees require 64 credits. Specialties include architecture, civil, mechanical and graphic 
design. 

Technical and career development certificates also are available. 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Design Technology / Architechural 
Specialty* 



Associate in Applied Science (AS) — 
Design Technology / Mechanical 
Specialty* 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (19 Credits) 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

MAT 121 Geometry/Trigonometry . . 3 

PHY 101 Physics I 4 

ELECTIVE: Humanities/Social Sciences 3 

TECHNICAL CORE (21 Credits) 

DSN 103 CAD Fundamentals 3 

DSN 106 Descriptive Geometry 3 

DSN 220 Advanced CAD 3 

DSN 221 Statics ' 3 

DSN 222 Strength of Materials 3 

TEC 102 Technical Graphics 3 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 

DCT 105 Facilities Design and Layout 3 

Construction Materials and Specifications 3 



DCT 
DCT 
DCT 



109 
204 
208 



Architectural CAD 
Structural Detailing 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 



DCT 113 

DCT 202 

DCT 206 

DCT 210 

TOTAL CREDITS 



(12 Credits) 

Intermediate CAD 3 

CAD Programming Language 3 

Mechanical and Electrical Equipment 3 

Surveying 1 3 



64 



* Accredited by the Accreditation Board of the National 
Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) and the American 
Design Drafting Association (ADDA). 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (19 Credits) 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

MAT 121 Geometry/Trigonometry 3 

PHY 101 Physics I 4 

ELECTIVE: Humanities/Social Sciences 3 

TECHNICAL CORE 

DSN 103 CAD Fundamentals 

DSN 106 Descriptive Geometry 

DSN 220 Advanced CAD 

DSN 221 Statics 

DSN 222 Strength of Materials 

TEC 102 Technical Graphics 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 



(21 Credits) 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 

DCT 104 Product Drafting 3 

CAD Programming Language 3 



DCT 
DCT 

TEC 



202 
217 
101 



Product Design 
Manufacturing Processes 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(12 Credits) 

DCT 105 Facilities Design and Layout 3 

DCT 113 Intermediate CAD 3 

DCT 201 Schematic Drafting 3 

DCT 216 Jig and Fixture Design 3 

TOTAL CREDITS 64 

* Accredited by the Accreditation Board of the National 
Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) and the American 
Design Drafting Association (ADDA). 



38 



COM 


101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


ENG 


111 


English Composition 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


MAT 


121 


Geometry/Trigonometry 


PHY 
ELECTl 


101 
IVE: 


Physics I 
Humanities/Social Sciences 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Design Technology / Civil Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (19 Credits) 

3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 

TECHNICAL CORE (21 Credits) 

DSN 103 CAD Fundamentals 3 

DSN 106 Descriptive Geometry 3 

DSN 220 Advanced CAD 3 

DSN 221 Statics 3 

DSN 222 Strength of Materials 3 

TEC 102 Technical Graphics 3 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 

DCT 109 Construction Materials & Specifications 3 

DCT 208 Structural Detailing 3 

DCT 210 Surveying! 3 

DCT 213 CAD Mapping 3 

REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(12 Credits) 

DCT 113 Intermediate CAD 3 

DCT 202 CAD Programming Language 3 

DCT 228 Civil 1 3 

DCT 229 Civil II 3 



TOTAL CREDITS 



64 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Design Technology / Computer Graphic 
Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (19 Credits) 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

English Composition 3 

Intermediate Algebra 3 

Geometry/Trigonometry 3 

Physics I 4 

Humanities/Social Sciences 3 



ENG 
MAT 
MAT 
PHY 



111 
111 

121 
101 



ELECTIVE; 



TECHNICAL CORE (21 Credits) 


DSN 103 


CAD Fundamentals 3 


DSN 106 


Descriptive Geometry 3 


DSN 220 


Advanced CAD 3 


DSN 221 


Statics 3 


DSN 222 


Strength of Materials 3 


TEC 102 


Technical Graphics 3 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 



SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 

ART 111 Drawing for Visualization 3 

ART 114 Graphic Design 3 

VIS 101 Fundamentals of Design 3 

VIS 115 Introduction to Computer Graphics 3 

REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(12 Credits) 

Digital Production 3 

Advanced Graphic Design 3 

Science of Color 3 

Fundamentals of Animation 3 



64 



ART 


218 


ART 


217 


GRA 


202 


DCT 


230 


TOTAL CREDITS 



Technical Certificate (TC) — Design 
Technology 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE 

ENG 1 1 1 English Composition 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 



TECHNICAL CORE (3 Credits) 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 





DCT 104 




DCT 105 


(6 Credits) 


DCT 113 


3 


DSN 106 


3 


ELECTIVE: 



SPECIALTY CORE 

DSN 103 CAD Fundamentals 

TEC 102 Technical Graphics 



(6 Credits) 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(18 Credits) 

Product Drafting 3 

Facilities Design and Layout 3 

Intermediate CAD 3 

Descriptive Geometry 3 

Humanities/Social Sciences 3 

Students should select 3 Credits from the 
following: 

DCT 109 Construction Materials and 

Specifications 3 

MAT 110 Contemporary College Mathematics 3 

TEC 101 Manufacturing Processes 3 

TOTAL CREDITS 33 



39 



Electronics Technology 

The Electronics Technology Program is competency-based and is designed to meet the on-going needs of business, 
industry, and the student. The program is structured to develop technical skills, general knowledge, and the critical thinking 
and problem solving abilities of graduates, thereby assisting the student in adapting to changes in the work environment and 
allowing advancement in the field. Additionally the program prepares the student to transfer into baccalaureate degree-granting 
institutions. 

Associate in Applied Science degrees require 66 credits. Specialties include communications, industrial electronics, and 
microwave systems. Post-curriculum specialization courses and career development certificates are available. 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Electronics Technology / 
Communications Specialty* 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) 
Electronics Technology / Industrial 
Electronics Specialty* 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (23 Credits) 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (23 Credits) 



COM 101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


COM 


101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 


ENG 111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 


111 


English Composition 3 


MAT 131 


Algebra/Trigonometry I 


3 


MAT 


131 


Algebra/Trigonometry I 3 


MAT 132 


Algebra/Trigonometry II 


3 


MAT 


132 


Algebra/Trigonometry II 3 


PHY 101 


Physics I 


4 


PHY 


101 


Physics I 4 


PHY 102 


Physics II 


4 


PHY 


102 


Physics II 4 


ELECTIVE: 


Humanities/Social Sciences 


3 


ELECTIVE: 


Humanities/Social Sciences 3 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 


ELT 100 


Circuits I 


4 


ELT 


100 


Circuits 1 4 


ELT 101 


Circuits II 


4 


ELT 


101 


Circuits II 4 


ELT 103 


Digital Principles 


3 


ELT 


103 


Digital Principles 3 


ELT 105 


Solid State I 


4 


ELT 


105 


Solid State I 4 


TEC 104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


TEC 


104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 



SPECIALTY CORE (13 Credits) 

ELT 201 Solid State II 4 

ELT 228 Communications Electronics 3 

ELT 229 Telecommunications 3 

ELT 230 Advanced Communications Electronics 3 



SPECIALTi' CORE (12 Credits) 

AMT 201 Manufacturing System Controls 3 

ELT 203 Introduction to Industrial Controls 3 

ELT 214 Industrial Instrumentation 3 

ELT 223 Electrical Machines 3 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(12 Credits) 

ELT 106 Digital Applications 4 

ELT 202 Microprocessors 4 

ELT 227 Peripherals 3 

ELT 288.01 Special Topics in Solid State 1 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 



ELT 106 Digital AppUcations 

ELT 201 Solid State II 

ELT 202 Microprocessors 

ELT 288,01 Special Topics in Solid State 



(13 Credits) 

4 
4 
4 
1 



TOTAL CREDITS 



66 



TOT^L CREDITS 



* Accredited by the Accreditation Board of the National 
Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT) and the Federal 
Aviation Administration (FAA) Airway Facilities Collegiate 
Training Initiative CAF-CTl) 



* Accredited by the Accreditation Board of the National 
Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT). 



40 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Electronics Technology / Microwave 
Systems Specialty* 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (23 Credits) 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

MAT 131 Algebra/Trigonometry I 3 

MAT 132 Algebra/Trigonometry 11 3 

PHY 101 Physics! 4 

PHY 102 Physics II 4 

ELECTIVE: Humanities/Social Sciences 3 



TECHNICAL CORE 



(18 Credits) 

4 



ELT 100 Circuits I 

ELT 101 Circuits II 4 

ELT 103 Digital Principles 3 

ELT 105 Solid State I 4 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 



SPECIALTY CORE 

ELT 201 Solid State II 

ELT 227 Peripherals 



ELT 
ELT 



229 
231 



Telecommunications 
Microwave 



(13 Credits) 

4 
3 
3 
3 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(12 Credits) 

ELT 106 Digital Applications 4 

ELT 202 Microprocessors 4 

ELT 228 Communications Electronics 3 

ELT 288.01 Special Topics in Solid State 1 

TOTAL CREDITS 66 

* Accredited by the Accreditation Board of the National 
Association of Industrial Technology (NAIT). 



41 



Hospitality Administration 

The Hospitality Administration program emphasizes the techniques of such hospitahty leaders as Ritz, Escoffer, Statler, 
Hilton, and Marriott. By choosing a specialty area, students begin building leadership skills for the profession of welcoming 
and serving guests. The hospitality programs offered by Ivy Tech produce graduates who can perform well in the hospitality 
industry 

Specialties are available in baking and pastry arts, catering, culinary arts, food service (technical certificate only), and 
hotel and restaurant administration. A two-year program requiring 60-66 credits leads to an Associate in Applied Science 
degree. Technical certificates and career development certificates are also available. 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Hospitality Administration / Baking and 
Pastry Arts Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Hospitality Administration / Culinary 
Arts Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 



COM 


101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


COM 


101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 


ECN 


101 


Economic Fundamentals 


3 


ECN 


101 


Economic Fundamentals 3 


ENG 


111 


English Composition 


3 


ENG 


111 


English Composition 3 


MAT 


110 


Contemporary College Mathematics OR 




MAT 


110 


Contemporary College Mathematics OR 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 


HI 


Intermediate Algebra 3 


PSY 


101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


PSY 


101 


Introduction to Psychology 3 


SCI 


111 


Physical Science 


3 


SCI 


HI 


Physical Science 3 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 


HOS 


101 


Sanitation and First Aid 


3 


HOS 


101 


Sanitation and First Aid 3 


HOS 


102 


Basic Foods Theory and Skills 


3 


HOS 


102 


Basic Foods Theory and Skills 3 


HOS 


104 


Nutrition 


3 


HOS 


104 


Nutrition 3 


HOS 


109 


Hospitality Purchasing 


2 


HOS 


109 


Hospitality Purchasing 2 


HOS 


201 


Hospitality Organization and Human 
Resource Management 


3 


HOS 


201 


Hospitality Organization and Human 
Resource Management 3 


HOS 


203 


Menu, Design, and Layout 


2 


HOS 


203 


Menu, Design, and Layout 2 


HOS 


204 


Food and Beverage Cost Control 


2 


HOS 


204 


Food and Beverage Cost Control 2 


SPECIALTY CORE (29 Credits) 


SPECIALTY CORE (30 Credits) 


BKR 


101 


Yeast Raised Breads 1 


3 


CUL 


110 


Meat Cutting 2 


BKR 


102 


Plasticized Sweet Dough 


3 


CUL 


204 


Classical Pastries 3 


BKR 


103 


Internship/Baking Science 


3 


CUL 


206 


Externship/Internship 3 


BKR 


201 


Cakes, Icings, and Fillings 


3 


CUL 


207 


Classical Cuisines 3 


BKR 


202 


Classical Cake Decoration 


3 


CUL 


212 


Fish and Seafood 2 


BKR 


204 


Externship 


3 


HOS 


103 


Soups, Stocks, and Sauces 2 


HOS 


103 


Soups, Stocks, and Sauces 


2 


HOS 


105 


Introduction to Baking 3 


HOS 


105 


Introduction to Baking 


3 


HOS 


106 


Pantry and Breakfast 3 


HOS 


106 


Pantry and Breakfast 


3 


HOS 


107 


Hospitality Computers OR 


HOS 


207 


Classical Pastries and Chocolates 


3 


CIS 
HOS 


101 
108 


Introduction to Microcomputers 3 
Table Service 3 


TOTAL CREDITS 




65 


HOS 


202 


Garde Manger 3 










TOTAL CREDITS 


66 



42 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Hospitality Administration / Hotel and 
Restaurant Administration Specialty 



Career Certificate — Hospitality 
Administration / Institutional Food 
Management 

CAREER CERTIFICATE CORE (24 Credits) 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 


HOS 


101 


Sanitation and First Aid 


3 


COM 


101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


3 


HOS 


102 


Basic Foods Theory and Skills 


3 


ECN 


101 


Economic Fundamentals 


3 


HOS 


104 


Nutrition 


3 


ENG 


111 


English Composition 


3 


HOS 


109 


Hospitality Purchasing 


2 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


HOS 


114 


Hospitality Organization and 




PSY 


101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 






Administration 


3 


SCI 


HI 


Physical Science 


3 


HOS 


201 


Hospitality Organization and Human 
Resource Management 


3 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 


HRM 
HRM 


203 
215 


Practicum - IFM 
Therapeutic Nutrition 


3 
3 


HOS 


101 


Sanitation and First Aid 


3 


HRM 


288 


Spreadsheets for Foodservice Operators 


1 


HOS 


102 


Basic Foods Theory and Skills 


3 










HOS 


104 


Nutrition 


3 


TOTAL CREDITS 




2' 


HOS 


109 


Hospitality Purchasing 


2 










HOS 


201 


Hospitality Organization and Human 
Resource Management 


3 










HOS 


203 


Menu, Design, and Layout 


2 










HOS 


204 


Food and Beverage Cost Control 


2 










SPECIALTY CORE (30 Credits) 










ACC 


101 


Accounting Principles I 


3 










HOS 


107 


Hospitality Computers 


3 










HOS 


108 


Table Service 


3 










HOS 


114 


Hospitality Organization and 
Administration 


3 










HOS 


205 


Food & Beverage Cost Control 
Applications 


1 










HOS 


214 


Hospitality Law & Security 


3 










HOS 


216 


Hospitality Marketing & Group Sales 


3 










HRM 


201 


Food & Beverage Management 


2 










HRM 


202 


Front office 


3 










HRM 


203 


Practicum 


3 










HRM 


206 


Housekeeping 


3 










TOTAL CREDITS 




66 











43 



Industrial Technology 

The Industrial Technology Program is a discipline devoted to the development of skills necessary for the installation, 
operation and maintenance of industrial equipment and systems. The curriculum is broad-based and offers a diversity of 
specialties, but focuses on the integration of each area as used in systemic applications. This requires proficiency in 
mathematics, communication, physics and basic computer skills, as well as the technical subject matter. 

In laboratory applications of classroom study, each student uses the tools and instruments associated with the practice 
of the industrial technology specialty including volt-ohm meters, leak detectors, sonic diagnostic tools, pressure and level 
testing devices, preventive maintenance software programs, welding and brazing equipment, metallurgical testing 
instruments, hand tools, and electronic and hand precision measuring devices. Safety equipment and the safe use of tools 
and materials are integrated into each course in the curriculum. 

Associate in Applied Science degrees require 61-64 credits in industrial technology. Specialties are available in 
heating, ventilation and air conditioning, industrial maintenance, and welding. Technical certificates and career 
development certificates are available. 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Industrial Technology / Heating, 
Ventilation and Air Conditioning 
Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (19 Credits) 

Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

English Composition 3 

Intermediate Algebra 3 

Geometry/Trigonometry 3 

Technical Physics 4 

Humanities/Social Sciences 3 



COM 


101 


ENG 


111 


MAT 


111 


MAT 


121 


PHY 


110 



(18 Credits) 



ELECTIVE: 

TECHNICAL CORE 

IDS 102 Introduction to Print Reading 3 

IDS 103 Motors and Motor Controls 3 

IDS 114 Introductory Welding 3 

QSC 101 Quality Control Concepts & Techniques I 3 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

TEC 113 Basic Electricity 3 



SPECIALTY CORE 



(15 Credits) 



HEA 
HEA 



HEA 
HEA 



101 
103 



104 
106 



Heating Fundamentals 

Air Conditioning and 

Refrigeration I 

Heating Service 

Air Conditioning and 

Refrigeration II 

Electrical Circuits and Controls 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 



(12 Credits) 



HEA 201 Cooling Service 

HEA 205 Heat Pump Service 

HEA 212 Advanced HVAC Controls 

HEA 220 Air Distribution Systems 



Technical Certificate (TC) — Industrial 
Technology / Heating, Ventilation and Air 
Conditioning Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (6 Credits) 

COM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal 

Communications 3 

ELECTIVE: Mathematics/Social Sciences/ 

Life/Physical Science 3 



(3 Credits) 



(6 Credits) 



TECHNICAL CORE 

TEC 113 Basic Electricity 

SPECIALTY CORE 

HEA 101 Heating Fundamentals 

HEA 103 Air Conditioning and 

Refrigeration I 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(24 Credits) 

HEA 104 Heating Service 3 

HEA 106 Air Conditioning & Refrigeration II 3 

HEA 107 Duct Fabrication 3 

HEA 201 Cooling Service 3 

HEA 202 Electrical Circuits and Controls 3 

HEA 205 Heat Pump Service 3 

IDS 103 Motors and Motor Controls 3 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

TOTAL CREDITS 39 



TOTAL CREDITS 



64 



44 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Industrial Technology / Industrial 
Maintenance Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (19 Credits) 



COM 


101 


ENG 


111 


MAT 


111 


MAT 


121 


PHY 


110 



ELECTIVE: 



Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

English Composition 3 

Intermediate Algebra 3 

Geometry/Trigonometry 3 

Technical Physics 4 

Humanities/Social Sciences 3 



TECHNICAL CORE 



(18 Credits) 



IDS 102 Introduction to Print Reading 3 

IDS 103 Motors and Motor Controls 3 

IDS 114 Introductory Welding 3 

QSC 101 Quality Control Concepts & Techniques I 3 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

TEC 113 Basic Electricity 3 



SPECIALTY CORE 



(15 Credits) 



AMT 201 Manufacturing Systems Control 

IDS 104 Fluid Power Basics 

IMT 201 Fluid Power Systems 

IMT 203 Machine Maintenance/ 

Installation 
IMT 207 Electrical Circuits 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(12 Credits) 

IMT 105 Heating and Air Conditioning Basics 3 

Preventative Maintenance 3 

Pumps 3 



IMT 
IMT 



107 
210 



Students should select 3 credits from the 
following courses: 



AMT 
IMT 



102 
106 



Introduction to Robotics 
Millwright 1 



TOTAL CREDITS 



64 



Technical Certificate (TC) — Industrial 
Technology / Welding Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (6 Credits) 

COM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal 

Communications 3 

ELECTIVE: Mathematics/Social Sciences/Life/ 

Physical Science 3 



TECHNICAL CORE 

TEC 113 Basic Electricity 



(3 Credits) 



SPECIALTY CORE (6 Credits) 

WLD 108 Shielded Metal Arc Welding 1 3 

WLD 207 Gas Metal Aic (MIG) Welding 3 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 



(24 Credits) 



IDS 

WLD 

WLD 

WLD 

WLD 

WLD 

WLD 

WLD 



102 
109 
110 
120 
203 
206 
208 
209 



Introduction to Print Reading 

Oxyacetylene Gas Welding and Cutting 

Welding Fabrication 

Metallurgy Fundamentals 

Pipe Welding 

Shielded Metal Arc Welding II 

Gas Tungsten Arc (TIG) Welding 

Welding Certification 



TOTAL CREDITS 



45 



Manufacturing Technology 

The Manufacturing Technology Program is a multi-disciphnary program designed to prepare students for technician- 
level positions. Specialty areas allow students to choose an emphasis in quality assurance, computer-integrated 
manufacturing, computer-aided design, or computer numerical control. Graduates are prepared to perform many facets of 
manufacturing including set-up, troubleshooting, processing and quality control. 

Skills are acquired through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on experiences. Lab activities include the use of 
modern equipment and techniques currently found in industry. This provides a foundation for any graduate to enter the 
workforce and continue skill enhancement. 

Associate in Applied Science degrees require 61-64 credits in Manufacturing Technology. 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Manufacturing Technology / Computer 
Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) 
Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (19 Credits) 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

MAT 121 Geometry/Trigonometry 3 

PHY 101 Physics I 4 

ELECTIVE: Humanities/Social Sciences 3 



TECHNICAL CORE 



(18 Credits) 



IDS 104 Fluid Power Basics 3 

QSC 101 Quality Control Concepts 

& Techniques I 3 

TEC 101 Manufacturing Processes 3 

TEC 102 Technical Graphics 3 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

TEC 113 Basic Electricity 3 



SPECIALTY CORE 



(15 Credits) 



AMT 102 Introduction to Robotics 3 

AMT 201 Manufacturing Systems Control 3 

AMT 202 Work Cell Design and Integration 3 

AMT 203 Automation Electronics 3 

AMT 205 Automated Manufacturing Systems 3 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 



AMT 288.01 Special Topics 

DSN 103 CAD Fundamentals 

ELT 103 Digital Principles 

MTT 208 CNC Programming ! 

TOTAL CREDITS 



(12 Credits) 

2 
3 
4 
3 

64 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Manufacturing Technology / Computer 
Aided Design and Manufacturing (CAD/ 
CAM) Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (19 Credits) 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

MAT 121 Geometry/Trigonometry 3 

PHY 101 Physics I 4 

ELECTIVE; Humanities/Social Sciences 3 



TECHNICAL CORE 



(18 Credits) 



IDS 104 Fluid Power Basics 3 

QSC 101 Quahty Control Concepts cSr Techniques I 3 

TEC 101 Manufacturing Processes 3 

TEC 102 Technical Graphics 3 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

TEC 113 Basic Electricity 3 



SPECIALTY CORE 



(15 Credits) 



DSN 103 CAD Fundamentals 

MTT 106 Advanced Print Interpretation 

MTT 208 CNC Programming I 

MTT 220 CAD/CAM I 

MTT 221 CAD/CAM II 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 



MTT 
MTT 
MTT 
MTT 



102 
103 
204 
209 



Turning Processes I 
Milling Processes I 
Abrasive Processes 
CNC Programming II 



TOTAL CREDITS 



(12 Credits) 

3 
3 
3 
3 

64 



46 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Manufacturing Technolgy / Quality 
Assurance Specialty 



Technical Certificate (TC) — 
Manufacturing Technology / Computer 
Numerical Control (CNC) Specialty 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (19 Credits) 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

MAT 121 Geometry/Trigonometry 3 

PHY 101 Physics 1 4 

ELECTIVE: Humanities/Social Sciences 3 



TECHNICAL CORE 



(18 Credits) 



IDS 104 Fluid Power Basics 3 

QSC 101 Quahty Control Concepts 

& Techniques I 3 

TEC 101 Manufacturing Processes 3 

TEC 102 Technical Graphics 3 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

TEC 113 Basic Electricity 3 



SPECIALTY CORE 



(12 Credits) 



QSC 102 Statistical Process Control 

QSC 201 Advanced Statistical Process Control 

QSC 202 Quality Control Concepts 

& Techniques 11 
204 Total Quality Management 



QSC 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 



(12 Credits) 



CHM 
DSN 
QSC 
PST 



101 
103 
203 
121 



Chemistry I 
CAD Fundamentals 
Metrology 
Industrial Safety 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (6 Credits) 

COM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Relations 3 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

TECHNICAL CORE (3 Credits) 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 



SPECIALTY CORE 

MTT 208 CNC Programming 1 

MTT 209 CNC Programming II 



(6 Credits) 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(24 Credits) 

MAT 121 Geometry/Trigonometry 3 

MTT 102 Turning Processes I 3 

MTT 103 Milling Processes I 3 

MTT 106 Advanced Print Interpretation 3 

MTT 204 Abrasive Processes 3 

MTT 210 Interactive CNC 3 

QSC 203 Metrology 3 

TEC 102 Technical Graphics 3 

TOTAL CREDITS 



TOTAL CREDITS 



47 



Paralegal Technology 



Recognizing the demand for trained paralegals, Ivy Tech has shaped a curriculum with input from attorneys and other 
professionals associated with the legal field. The advisors offer Ivy Tech the opportunity to establish the qualifications 
necessary for success in the paralegal field. 

Ivy Techs program provides knowledgeable paralegal professionals ready for an exciting career. The duties of trained 
paralegals can range from research and writing to interviewing and investigations. As examples, paralegals can be found 
performing legal research, drafting legal correspondence and legal pleadings, interviewing clients and witnesses, or managing 
trial documents and exhibits. 

Ivy Tech training provides students with the variety of skills necessary to succeed in this career. The curriculum 
emphasizes written and oral communication skills and provides in-class opportunities for technical skill development. 
Courses are taught by attorneys who are selected based upon their experience in the subject matter, as well as their 
familiarity with the function of paralegals as part of the legal team. 

A two-year program requiring 60 credits leads to an Associate in Applied Science degree. The complete Paralegal 
Program is offered in Indianapolis, Ft. Wayne, and Gary Other campuses may offer a limited number of paralegal courses. 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Paralegal Technology 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 



SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 

LEG 106 claims Investigation 3 

LEG 202 Litigation 3 

LEG 203 Law Office Management and Technology 3 

LEG 204 Advanced Legal Writing 3 



BIO 

COM 

ENG 


101 
101 
111 


Biology 

Fundamentals of Public Speaking 

English Composition 


3 
3 
3 


REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

Choose four (12 Credits) 


ENG 

MAT 


112 
110 


Exposition and Persuasion 
Contemporary College Mathematics OR 


3 


AOT 
AOT 


103 
116 


Word Processing Concepts 3 
Business Communications 3 


UAl 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


CIS 


207 


Database Management 3 


XXX 


XXX 


Humanities/Social Sciences Elective 


3 


CIS 
LEG 


208 
104 


Electronic Spreadsheets 3 
Torts 3 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Credits) 


LEG 


105 


Business Associations 3 


ACC 

BUS 

CIS 

LEG 

LEG 

LEG 


101 
101 
101 
101 
102 
103 


Accounting Principles I 
Introduction to Business 
Introduction to Microcomputers 
Introduction to Paralegal Studies 
Legal Research and Writing 
Civil Procedures 


3 

3 
3 
3 

3 

3 


LEG 
LEG 
LEG 
LEG 
LEG 
LEG 


107 
108 
109 
110 
III 
112 


Contracts 3 
Property Law 3 
Family Law 3 
Wills, Trusts, and Probates 3 
Criminal Law 3 
Bankruptcy Law 3 










TOTAL CREDITS 


60 



48 



Public Safety 



The Public Safety Technology Program is designed to meet the ongoing needs of municipalities, students, businesses, 
and industries. The program develops technical skills, general knowledge, critical thinking, and problem solving abilities. 
Broad-based technical skills and critical thinking processes assist students in adapting to changes in the work environment 
and promoting successful advancement on the job. Additionally, the program prepares graduates to transfer to baccalaureate 
degree-granting institutions if they wish to continue their education. 

Specialty areas allow students to choose an emphasis in environmental care, fire science, hazardous materials, and public 
administration. Associate in Applied Science degrees require 60-63 credits. 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Public Safety / Fire Science Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 

3 
3 
3 
3 



CHM 


101 


Chemistr)' 1 


COM 


101 


Fundamentals of Public Speaking 


ENG 


111 


English Composition 


MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


POL 


101 


Introduction to American 
Government and Politics 


SCI 


111 


Physical Science 


TECHNICAL CORE (18 Cred 


PST 


120 


First Responder 


PST 


121 


Industrial Safety c&r Loss Prevention 


PST 


220 


Incident Management System 


PST 


221 


Design & Planning for Prevention 
& Protection 


TEC 


104 


Computer Fundamentals for Technology 


TEC 


106 


Hazardous Materials & Control 



SPECIALTY CORE 



(15 Credits) 



AFS 102 Fire Apparatus & Equipment 

AFS 103 Strategy and Tactics 

AFS 201 Fire Protection Systems 

AFS 202 Fire Service Management 

AFS 204 Fire Service Hydraulics 

REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 



AFS 101 

AFS 105 

AFS 108 

AFS 109 

TOTAL CREDITS 



(12 Credits) 

Fire Technology 3 

Fire and Arson Investigation 3 

Fire Prevention/Inspection 3 

Fire Department Specifications 3 



63 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Public Saftey / Environmental Care 
Specialty 

GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 

CHM 101 Chemistry I 3 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

POL 101 Introduction to American 

Government and PoHtics 3 

SCI 111 Physical Science 3 



TECHNICAL CORE 



(18 Credits) 



PST 
PST 
PST 
PST 

TEC 
TEC 



120 First Responder 3 

121 Industrial Safety & Loss Prevention 3 

220 Incident Management System 3 

221 Design & Planning for Prevention 

& Protection 3 

104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

106 Hazardous Materials & Control 3 



SPECIALTY CORE 



(15 Credits) 



BIO 
HMT 



ILT 
QSC 



TEC 



111 
200 



101 
101 



113 



Microbiology 

Environmental Protection Agency 

(EPA) Regulations 

Industrial Lab Techniques 

Quality Control Concepts & 

Techniques I 

Basic Electricity 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(12 Credits) 

Plant Operations-Sanitary 3 

Plant Operations-Industrial 3 
Advanced Municipal 

Wastewater Treatment 3 

Elective course in General Education 3 



ENV 
ENV 
ILT 



104 



288.01 



TOTAL CREDITS 



63 



49 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Public Safety / Hazardous Materials 
Specialty 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Public Safety / Public Administration 
Specialty 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 

Chemistry 1 3 

Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

English Composition 3 

Intermediate Algebra 3 
Introduction to American 

Government and Politics 3 

Physical Science 3 



CHM 


101 


COM 


101 


ENG 


111 


MAT 


111 


POL 


101 



SCI 



TECHNICAL CORE 



(18 Credits) 



PST 120 First Responder 3 

PST 121 Industrial Safety & Loss Prevention 3 

PST 220 Incident Management System 3 

PST 221 Design & Planning for Prevention 

& Protection 3 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

TEC 106 Hazardous Materials & Control 3 



SPECIALTY CORE 



(12 Credits) 



HMT 100 OSHA Regulations 3 

HMT 120 Hazard Communication Standard 3 

HMT 200 Environmental Protection Agency 

(EPA) Regulations 3 
HMT 220 Hazardous Materials Recovery, 

Incineration and Disposal 3 



REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 



HMT 104 

HMT 201 

HMT 203 

HMT 205 

TOTAL CREDITS 



HAZMAT Health Effects 
Contingency Planning 
Sampling Procedures 
DOT Regulations 



(12 Credits) 

3 

3 

. ; .^ ' 3 

i' 3 

60 



GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (18 Credits) 

CHM 101 Chemistry I 3 

COM 10 1 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 
POL 101 Introduction to American 

Government and Politics 3 

SCI 111 Physical Science 3 



TECHNICAL CORE 



(18 Credits) 

3 



PST 120 First Responder 

PST 121 Industrial Safety & Loss Prevention 3 

PST 220 Incident Management System 3 

PST 221 Design & Planning for Prevention 

& Protection 3 

TEC 104 Computer Fundamentals for Technology 3 

TEC 106 Hazardous Materials & Control 3 



SPECIALTY CORE (12 Credits) 

BUS 105 Principles of Management 3 

BUS 208 Organizational Behavior 3 

SUP 102 Techniques of Supervision 3 

SUP 224 Operations Management 3 

REGIONALLY DETERMINED CORE 

(12 Credits) 

ACC 101 Accounting Principles 3 

APS 202 Fire Service Management 3 

PST 288.01 Public Adminstration 3 

PST 288.02 Internship 3 



Total credits 



60 



50 



HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES 



Associate in Science Nursing (ASN) 

Ivy Tech State College - Central Indiana is approved by the Indiana Commission for Higher Education to ofer a two-year 
generic Associate of Science (AS) nursing program. The program is also accredited by the National League of Nursing. 
Graduates are eligible to write the NCLEX-RN examination to become Registecd Nurses. This program accommodates both 
students interested in nursing as a career and Licensed Practical Nurses choosing to continue their nursing education. 

ADMISSION CRITERIA 



FOR COLLEGE ADMISSION: 



FOR ASN ADMLSSION: 



Certificate of high school graduation or GED 

SAT or ACT scores* or College Assestment* 

PSB Nursing School Aptitude "Est 

Test may be waived by college transcript with grades of "C" or 
better within the past 10 years for equired science courses. 



FOR ALL NURSING STUDENTS: 



Physical health form and immunizations completed prior to 
registration for any clinical course. 



Associate in Science / Nursing (ASN) 
General Education Courses (30 Credits) 

AN? 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 

ANP 102 Anatomy and Physiology II 

BIO 111 General Microbiology 

BIO 112 General Microbiology II 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR 

COM 102 Intro to Interpersonal Communication 

ENG 111 English Composition 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 

PSY 101 Intro to Psychology 

ANP 201 Advanced Human Physiology 

PSY 201 Lifespan Development 



Technical Core Courses (40 Credits) 

Nursing & Universal Needs 4 

Nursing & Universal Needs Practicum 4 

Nursing Related to Health Deviation 1 5 
Nursing Related to Health Deviation 

I Practicum 5 
Pharmacotherapeutics 2 
Nursing Related to Health Deviation 11 5 
Nursing Related to Health Deviation 

II Practicum 5 
Nursing Related to Developmental 
Needs 4 
Nursing Related to Developmental 
Needs Practicum 4 
Professional Nursing Issues 2 



70 





NUR 


150 




NUR 


151 


3 
3 


NUR 


152 


NUR 


153 


3 
3 


NUR 


154 


NUR 


250 


3 


NUR 


251 


3 
3 


NUR 


252 


3 

4 


NUR 


253 


3 


NUR 


254 




Total Credits 



51 



Child Development 



The Child Development Program focuses on early childhood growth and development, including adult-child 
relationships. Emphasis is placed on the development of skills and techniques for providing appropriate environments and 
care for young children. Instruction is provided in the physical, emotional, social, and cognitive areas of early childhood. 
The training is appropriate for candidates seeking the Child Development Associate (CDA) credential. The student develops 
competencies through classroom instruction, observation, and participation in early childhood settings. Employment 
opportunities include: Day Care, Nursery School, Head Start, Family Day Care, Pediatrics Setting, Nanny Care, and School 
Child Care. 

Ivy Tech State College - Central Indiana has an on-campus Child Development Center to meet the need of adult 
students, College staff and faculty, and locally employed parents and guardians. This licensed center provides on-site training 
opportunities for practicum students in the Child Development and other Health and Human Services programs. This model 
facility is licensed to serve 60 children, ages 2 to 12, from 6:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday and 6:30 to 
6 p.m. on Friday The center is open to visitors interested in either the Child Development Program or the Child 
Development Center services except during naptime, which is 1 2:30 to 2:30 p.m. daily. Visitors check with the Center 
Manager upon arrival. 



Associate in Science Degree (AS) / 
Child Development 

AS/General Education Requirements 

(24 Credits) 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

ENG 112 Exposition and Persuasion 3 

MAT 110 Contemporary College Math OR 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

POL 101 Intro to American Government 3 

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology 3 

SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology 3 

BIO 101 Introductory Biology OR 

SCI 111 Physical Science 3 

AS/Broad Technical Core Courses (18 Credits) 



CHD 



121 



CHD 


122 


CHD 


123 


CHD 


124 


CHD 


209 


CHD 


221 



Introduction to Early Childhood 

Profession 3 

Child Growth and Development 3 

Health, Safety and Nutrition 3 
Developmental and Cultural 

Awareness 3 

Families in Transition 3 

Emerging Literacy 3 



AS/Specialty Core 



(12 Credits) 



CHD 125 Curriculum in the Creative Arts 

CHD 128 Practicum 1 

CHD 129 Practicum II 

CHD 131 Seminar in Guidance Techniques 



CHD 225 Cognitive Curriculum 

AS/Regionally Core (12 Credits) 

CHD 206 Early Child Administration 

CHD 230 Practicum III 

CHD 231 Seminar II - Issues in E.C.E. 

CHD XXX Regionally Determined 

Total Credits 



Technical Certificate (TC) / 
Child Development 

TC/General Education Core Courses 

(6 Credits) 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

Intro to Sociology OR 



SOC 
PSY 



111 

101 Intro to Psychology 



TC/Broad Technical Core 



(24 Credits) 



CHD 121 Intro to the Early Childhood 

Profession 3 

CHD 122 Child Growth and Development 3 

CHD 123 Health, Safety and Nutrition 3 

CHD 124 Developmental and Cultural 

Awareness 3 

CHD 125 Curriculum in the Creative Arts 3 

CHD 128 Practicum I 2 

CHD 129 Practicum II 2 

CHD 131 Seminar in Guidance Techniques 2 

CHD 221 Emerging Literacy 3 

Total Credits 30 



52 



Human Services 



The Human Services program offers students the opportunity to become Human Services GeneraHsts or to concentrate 
in the areas of Substance Abuse, Gerontology, Mental Health, or Criminal Justice. 

As a Human Services professional, one reaches out to individuals, to families, and to communities. The Human 
Services program provides the broad understanding to help others meet their psychological, social, and environmental 
needs. The Human Services Generalist may find employment in a variety of settings. 

Those who study Human Services with a focus on Substance Abuse may find positions in substance abuse centers 
(residential, detox, and hospitals) as counselors or residents-in-training. (The program is certified by Indiana Counselors 
Association on Alcohol Abuse, ICAADA.) Those who focus on Gerontology may find jobs in adult day care centers, senior 
citizens centers and extended care facilities. Those who focus on Criminal Justice may want to work in probation or parole 
but will need to continue their education. Those who focus in the araea of Mental Health may find employment in group 
homes and community health centers. 

Program objectives include training the entry-level worker, providing education and training to upgrade the skills and 
knowledge of those currently employed, and providing development and enhancement. 

The Associate in Applied Science degree requires 62 credits. 



Criminal Justice Specialty 
Substance Abuse Specialty 



Mental Health Specialty 
Generalist Specialty 



Gerontology Specialty 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Human Services 



General Education Courses 



(18 Credits) 



BIO 101 Introductory Biology OR 

SCI 111 Physical Science 3 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

MAT 110 Contemporary College Math OR 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

POL 101 Intro to American Government/Politics 3 

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology OR 

SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology 3 



Technical Core Courses 



(18 Credits) 



HMS 101 Introduction to Human Services 3 

HMS 102 Helping Relationship Techniques 3 

HMS 103 Interviewing and Assessment 3 

HMS 205 Behavioral/Reality Techniques 3 

HMS 206 Group Process and Skills 3 

HMS 207 Program Planning/Pohcy Issues 3 



Regional Courses 
Internships and Seminars 

HMS 201 Internship I 

HMS 203 Internship Seminar I 

HMS 202 Internship II 

HMS 204 Internship Seminar II 



(14 Credits) 



Generalist Specialty (12 Credits) 

CIS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

PSY 20 1 Lifespan Development 3 



HMS 
HMS 



XXX 

XXX 



Electives 
Electives 



Gerontology Specialty (12 Credits) 

HMS 108 Psychology of Aging 3 

HMS 111 Long-Term Care Activity Director OR 

HMS 114 Social Services In Long-Term Care OR 

HMS 140 Loss and Grief OR 

CIS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

HMS 120 Social Aspects of Aging 3 

HMS 130 Health and Aging 3 



Criminal Justice Specialty 

HMS 105 Criminal Justice Systems 

HMS 215 Juvenile Delinquency 

PSY 205 Abnormal Psychology 

HMS 240 Rehab Process: Probation 

and Parole 

Mental Health Specialty 

HMS 104 Crisis Intervention 

HMS 220 Legal Aspects 

PSY 205 Abnormal Psychology 

PSY 201 Lifespan Development 



(12 Credits) 

3 
3 
3 



(12 Credits) 

3 
3 
3 
3 



Substance Abuse Specialty (12 Credits) 

HMS 113 Problems of Substance Abuse 

in Society 3 

HMS 208 Treatment Models of Substance 

Abuse 3 

HMS 209 Counsehng Issues 3 

HMS 210 Codependency 3 



Total Credits 



62 



53 



Medical Assistant 



The graduate of the Medical Assistant Program is a professional multi-skilled health care provider dedicated to 
assisting in patient care management in ambulatory care settings. The practitioner performs administrative and clinical 
duties and may manage emergency situations, facilities, and/or personnel. Competence in the field also requires that a 
Medical Assistant display professionalism, communicate effectively, and provide instruction to patients. A required 
externship provides valuable on-the-job experience. 

• The program is accredited by the American Association of Medical Assistants and the Commission on Accreditation of 
Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP). 

• Graduates of the Medical Assistant Program will be prepared to take the Certification Examination of the American 
Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA) and the American Medical Association (AMA) to obtain CMA status that is 
recognized nationally 

• The two-year Associate in Applied Science program requires 63 credits for completion. The Technical Certificate 
requires 30-48 credits. 

• Salary range for Medical Assistants is from $7.50 to $14.50 per hour depending upon education, experience, and 
specialty area. 

• The Medical Assistant Program works in cooperation with private physicians' offices, health maintenance 
organizations, and Immediate Care Centers to provide cUnical and administrative experiences for students. 

• A one-year part-time limited radiology curriculum is available to medical assistant graduates leading to an opportunity 
to sit for the IDH Limited General Certificate Examination in radiography 

• Passing this exam qualifies the Limited General Technologist to perform general radiography in non-hospital settings. 
The salary range is $9.50 to $14.50 per hour. 

• Note: Evening classes are available. All but 4-5 classes can be completed in the evening. 

• Must type 30 words per minute with fewer than 5 errors for admission to the program. 



Associate 


in Applied Science Degree 


Specialty Core Courses 


(21 Credits' 


(AAS) / Medical Assistant 


MEA 
MEA 


114 
115 


MA. Lab Techniques 
Medical Insurance 


3 
2 






MEA 


120 


M.A. CUnical Extern 


3 


General Education Requirements (18 Credits) 


MEA 


121 


MA. Administrative Extern 


3 


ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology 1 3 


MEA 


130 


M.A. Administrative 


2 


AN? 102 


Anatomy and Physiology 11 3 


MEA 


133 


Clinical Theory 


3 


COM 102 


Interpersonal Communication 3 


MEA 


134 


Clinical Skills Lab 


2 


ENG 111 


English Composition 3 


MEA 


135 


Medical Word Processing/ 




N4AT XXX 


Math Elective 3 






Transcription 


3 


XXX XXX 


Humanities/Social Elective 3 














Regional Electives 


(6 Credits) 


Broad Technical Core Courses (18 Credits) 


* XXX 


XXX 


Administrative Elective 


3 


HHS 101 


Medical Terminology 3 


* XXX 


XXX 


Clinical Elective 


3 


HHS 102 


Medical Law and Ethics 2 










MEA 102 


First Aid and CPR 2 


Total Credits 




6; 


MEA 113 


Pharmacology 3 










MEA 131 


Medical Financial Management 3 


* per approval ol 


F program chair 




MEA 132 


Computer Concepts in Medical 

Office 2 










MEA 203 


Disease Conditions > -'iS; ', 


. -; 









54 



Technical Certificate (TC) / Medical 
Assistant 

General Education Requirements (6 Credits) 

COM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal 

Communications 
XXX XXX Sci/Mat/Hum Elective 

Technical Core Courses 

HHS 101 Medical Terminology 



OPTION 1 

Administrative Specialty Core Courses 

Medical Law and Ethics 
M.A. Administrative 
Computer Concepts in the 



HHS 102 

MEA 130 

MEA 132 



Medical Office 



Regionally Determined Courses 

Total Administrative Specialty Credits (total 
includes the 6 General Education Credits and 
the 3 Technical Core Credits) 



OPTION 2 

Clinical Specialty Core Courses 

ANP 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 

ANP 102 Anatomy and Physiology II 



(6 Credits) 


ANP 


102 


3 


HHS 


102 


3 


MEA 


113 




MEA 


151 




MEA 


152 




MEA 


153 




MEA 


154 



Regionally Determined Courses (15 Credits) 

Total Clinical Specialty Credits (total includes 

the 6 General Education Credits and the 3 

Technical Core Credits) 30 

Generalist Specialty Core Courses (39 Credits) 

3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 



Total Generalist Specialty Credits (total 

includes the 6 General Education Credits 

and the 3 Technical Core Credits) 48 

Pharmacy Technician Specialty 

Core Courses (21 Credits) 

ANP 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 

Anatomy and Physiology II 3 

Medical Law and Ethics 2 

Pharmacology 3 

Pharmacy Technician 1 3 

Pharmacy Technician II 3 

Pharmacy Technician Adm. 2 

Pharmacy Extemship 2 

Total Pharmacy Technician Specialty Credits 

(total includes the 6 General Education Credits 

and the 3 Technical Core Credits) 30 



3 
3 


ANP 
ENG 
HHS 


102 
111 
102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 
English Composition 
Medical Law and Ethics 


(3 Credits) 


MEA 


102 


First Aid and CPR 


3 


MEA 
MEA 


113 
114 


Pharmacology 
MA Lab Techniques 




MEA 


115 


Medical Insurance 




MEA 


120 


M.A. Clinical Extern 




MEA 


121 


M.A. Administrative Extern 


rses 


MEA 


130 


M.A. Administrative 


(6 Credits) 

2 
2 

2 


MEA 
MEA 


131 
132 


Medical Financial Management 
Computer Concepts in the 
Medical Office 


MEA 
MEA 


133 
134 


Clinical Theory 
Clinical Skills Lab 


MEA 


135 


Medical Word Processing/ 


(15 Credits) 






Transcription 



All but three of these courses are available at the Region 8 
campus. Those are available within a one-hour commute on other 
campuses. 



55 



Occupational Therapy Assistant 

Occupational therapy directs an individual's participation in selected tasks to restore, reinforce and enchance 
performance, facilitate learning of those skills and functions essential for adaption and productivity, diminish or correct 
pathology, and promote and maintain health. An occupational therapy assistant provides service to individuals whose 
abilities to cope with living tasks have been threatened or impaired by developmental deficits, the aging process, physical 
injury or illness, or psychological disability. The profession serves a diverse population in a variety of settings such as 
hospitals and clinics, rehabilitation facilities, long-term care facilities, extended-care facilities, sheltered workshops, schools 
and camps, private homes and comunity agencies. 

A two-year program requiring 72 credits leads to an Associate in Science degree. 



Associate in Science (AS) / Occupational 
Therapy Assistant 

General Education Core Courses (31 Credits) 

ANP 101 Anatomy and Physiology 1 3 

AN? 102 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 

ANP 201 Advanced Human Physiology 4 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

ENG 111 English Composition 3 

HMS 230 Abnormal Psychology 3 

MAT 110 Contemporary College Math OR 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology 3 

PSY 201 Lifespan Development 3 

SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Technical Core Courses (26 Credits) 

OTA 101 Foundations of Occupational Therapy 3 



OTA 
OTA 

OTA 
OTA 
OTA 



102 
103 

202 
203 
204 



OTA 


205 


OTA 


208 


OTA 


210 



Kinesiology 
Medical Conditions in 
Occupational Therapy 
Therapeutic Activities 
Therapeutic Group Activities 
Psychiatric Conditions in 
Occupational Therapy 
COTA in Physical Health 
COTA and Interactive Model 
COTA in Mental Health 



Specialty Core Courses 

OTA 201 FieldWorkl-A 



(15 Credits) 

1 



OTA 206 Assistive Technology and 

Adaptive Equipment 2 

OTA 207 Daily Living Skills 3 

OTA 209 Field Work I -B 1 

OTA 211 Clinical Transition and Management 4 

OTA 212 FieldWorkll-A 2 

OTA 213 FieldWorkll-B 2 



TOTAL CREDITS 



72 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM (Not yet accredited) 

The Occupational Therapy Assistant Program has initiated accreditation proceedures with the Accrediation Council for Occupational 
Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montomery Lane, FO. Box 31220, 
Bethesda, MD 20824-1220. AOTA's phone number is (301) 652-AOTA. Once accreditation of the program has been obtained, its 
graduates will be able to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapy assistant administered by the American 
Occupational Therapy Certification Board (AOTCB). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified 
Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA). Most states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the 
results of the AOTCB Certification Examination. 



56 



Practical Nursing 



The Licensed Practical Nurse is an integral part of the health care team. The Practical Nursing program is a one-year 
course of study leading to a Technical Certificate. This accredited program prepares the individual to take the state licensure 
exam to become a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). This program is designed for students to gain knowledge and technical 
skills necessary to appropriately care for patients in a variety of health care settings, such as hospitals, convalescent centers, and 
physicians' offices. Students learn to administer medications and treatments commonly performed by Licensed Practical 
Nurses. 

The Indianapolis program is accredited by the National League of Nursing (NLN) and approved by the Indiana State 
Board of Nursing. Clinical courses begin in the fall and spring semester of this twelve-month program that requires two 
semesters and a twelve-week summer session. The PSB Aptitude Test Practical Nursing is required after Skills Advancement 
courses (reading, writing, and math) are completed or almost completed. The fee for this test is $25.00. Applicants are 
advised to apply six to nine months in advance of desired admission. 

The following facilities serve as clinical sites for practical work experiences required in the program: 



American Village, Indianapolis 

Beverly Rehab, Indianapolis 

Community South and East in Indianapolis 

Hancock Memorial Hospital, Greenfield 

Riley Hospital for Children 

Regency Place — Greenwood 

Americana Healthcare North 

Cambridge Healthcare 

Carmel Care 

Johnson Memorial Hospital, Franklin 

Lifelines of Indianapolis 

Winona MemorialHospital 

St. Vincent's Hospital and Health Care Center 



Greenwood Village South, Greenwood 
Hendricks Community Hospital, Danville 
Hoosier Village Retirement Center, Indianapolis 
Noblesville Healthcare Center, Noblesville 
Pine Tree Manor, Indianapolis 
Rehabilitation Hospital of Indiana, Indianapolis 
Robin Run Village, Indianapolis 
St. Francis Hospital Center, Beech Grove 
Westminster Village North, Indianapolis 
Westview Hospital, Indianapolis 
Methodist Hospital of Indianapolis 
Wishard Memorial Hospital 



The starting salary is $10.00 to $13.00 per hour, which can increase up to 25% because of shift differentials and fringe 
benefits. Applicants should check with local medical facilities to get current salary information. 



Technical Certificate (TC) / Practical 
Nursing 

General Education Courses (6 Credits) 

COM 102 Interpersonal Communication 3 

Intro to Psychology 3 



PSY 



101 



Technical Core Courses 


(46 credits) 


for Pi 


ograi 


ANP 101 


Anatomy and Physiology I 


3 


BSA 


007 


ANP 102 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


BSA 


065 


PNU 114 


Nursing Issues and Trends 


1 


BSA 


074 


PNU 121 


Introduction to Nursing 1 


4 


HHS 


101 


PNU 122 


Introduction to Nursing II 


6 


MEA 


212 


PNU 123 


Pharmacology 


3 


BSA 


070 


PNU 127 


Care of the Adult 


5 






PNU 128 


Care of the Adult 


5 







PNU 129 Care of the Aduk 5 

PNU 130 Nursing Care of the Older Adult 5 

PNU 131 Nursing Care of the Child-Bearing 

Family 6 

Total Technical Certificate Credits 52 

Suggested courses that help develop students 
equired Courses: 

Spelling 1 

Introduction to Life Sciences 3 

Introduction to Computer Literacy 2 

Medical Terminology 3 

Phlebotomy 3 
Success Skills for Human Services 

and Health Technologies 3 



57 



Radiologic Technology 

The radiologic technologist, specializing in the use of x-rays to create images of the body, is known as a radiographer. 
A radiologic technologist is a professional who is skilled in the art and science of radiography and patient care related to 
radiography and who applies scientific knowledge to solve practical and theoretical problems. Radiologic technologists are 
in demand in hospitals, medical laboratories, physicians' and dentists' offices and clinics, federal and state health agencies 
and certain educational institutions. 

The program includes courses in the following areas — patient care, radiologic technique, exposure, positioning, 
protection, radiation physics, radiation biology, and ethics. Clinical practice and supplemental instruction are provided in 
accredited hospitals. Upon completion of program requirements, graduates are eligible to take the American Registry 
Examination given by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. 

During the last four academic periods, 93% of the program graduates passed the American Registry of Radiologic 
Technologist Examination on their first attempt. 

Radiologic Technology is a full-time year-round, two-year program. Students, once accepted, will be at a clinical site 
three days each week and in the classroom two days each week. 

The clinical sites are Bloomington Hospital in Bloomington, Johnson Memorial in Franklin, and Winona Memorial 
Hospital in Indianapolis. 

The starting salary for a Radiologic Technologist is $11.50 to $12.50 per hour. This rate does not include the fringe 
benefits that could increase the base pay as much as 25%. 

The program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology. 

The Radiologic Technology Program faculty offers a one-year part-time series of courses called Limited General 
Radiography These courses were developed by faculty of the two-year Associate Degree program in Radiologic Technology 
at the request of the Indiana Department of Health (IDH). This series of nine courses totaling 30 credits in Limited General 
Radiography is the only group of appropriate courses approved by the IDH in Indiana for individuals who work in non- 
hospital settings. These courses are open to Registered Nurses, Licensed Practical Nurses, Certified Medical Assistants and 
Medical Assistants who were trained on the job. Qualified individuals interested in this course series must be employed at a 
facility that is operating an IDH approved X-ray machine. The starting pay for students who successfully complete the 
course series ranges from $8.50 to $12.00 per hour. 



Associate in Applied Science Degree 
(AAS) / Radiologic Technology 

General Education Requirements (21 Credits) 



Anatomy and Physiology I 3 

Anatomy and Physiology II 3 

Chemistry 3 

Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

English Composition 3 

Intermediate Algebra 3 
Introduction to Psychology OR 

Introduction to Sociology 3 



Technical Core Courses (8 Credits) 

*CIS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 3 

*HHS lOI Medical Terminology 3 

*HHS 102 Medical Law and Ethics 2 



ANP 


101 


ANP 


102 


CHM 


101 


COM 


101 


ENG 


111 


MAT 


111 


PSY 


101 


see 


101 



Specialty Core Courses 

RAD 101 Orientation/Nursing X-ray 

Technology 
RAD 102 Principles of Radiographic 

Exposures I 



(55 Credits) 



RAD 
RAD 
RAD 
RAD 
RAD 
RAD 
RAD 
RAD 
RAD 
RAD 
RAD 

RAD 
RAD 
RAD 

RAD 
RAD 



103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
109 
201 
202 
203 
204 
205 

206 
207 
208 

288 
299 



Total Credits 



Radiographical Positioning I 
X-Ray Clinical Education 1 
Radiographical Positioning II 
X-Ray Clinical Education 2 
Radiation Physics 
Imaging Techniques 
Radiographic Positioning 111 
X-Ray Clinical Education 3 
X-Ray Clinical Education 4 
X-Ray Clinical Education 5 
Pathology for Radiographic 
Technologists 
Radiobiology 

Radiographic Positioning IV 
Principles of Radiographic 
Exposures 11 
Pharmacology 
General Exam Review 



* Courses will be reviewed for GPA by the Admissions Committee 
before consideration for interview. 



58 



Respiratory Care Technology 



A respiratory care practitioner is an allied health professional who works under the direction of physicians in the 
diagnosis, evaluation, treatment, education and care of patients with cardiopulmonary diseases or abnormalities. 

A graduate of the Associate of Applied Science program will be eligible to sit for the Entry Level and Advanced 
Practitioner exams given by the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC). Successful exam candidates will be awarded 
the Registered Respiratory Therapist credential. The program's pass rates for the national exam are far above the national 
averages. 

The two-year Associate of Applied Science degree requires 79 credits for completion. 

The Associate Degree program is offered on both a full-time and part-time track. Both tracks require set courses each 
semester for the duration of the program. Students are accepted into either the full-time program or the part-time program. 
The full-time program is five semesters in length (18 credits each semester) and starts in the spring semester of each year. The 
part-time program is nine semesters in length (9 credit hours per semester) and starts in the fall semester each year. Students 
may start their General Education courses any semester. Students should contact program personnel for specific curriculum 
and admission information. 

Facilities that have collaborated with the College in this program include: Bloomington Hospital, Columbus Regional 
Hospital, Community Hospital-East, Hendricks County Hospital, Indiana University Medical Center, Methodist Hospital, 
Riley Hospital for Children, St. Francis Hospital, St. Vincent Hospital, Veteran's Administration Hospital, Winona Memorial 
Hospital and Wishard Hospital. 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Respiratory Care 



Technical Certificate (TC) — Respiratory 
Care 



Semester I (18 credits) 

ANP 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 

CHM 101 Chemistry I 3 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

BIO 111 Generel Microbiology 3 
ENG 111 English Composition: Strategies 

for Inquiry 3 

PSY 101 Introduction to Pyschology 3 

(18 credits) 

Anatomy and Physiology U 3 

Introduction to Respiratory Care 6 

Theraputic Modalities 3 

Cardiopulmonary Physiology 3 

Clinical Practicum I 3 



(10 credits) 



Semester II 

ANP 102 

RES 121 

RES 122 

RES 123 

RES 124 

Semester III 

RES 125 Critical Care I 3 

RES 126 Clinical Medicine 3 

RES 127 Clinical Practicum II 3 

RES 228 Information Systems for Health Care 1 

Semester IV (18 credits) 

RES 128 Clinical Practicum III 9 

RES 221 Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics 3 

RES 222 Critical Care II 3 

RES 223 Pharmacology 3 



Semester V 

RES 224 Clinicial Medicine II 

RES 225 Emergency Management 

RES 226 Continuing Care 

RES 227 Clinical Practicum IV 

ENG 211 Technical Writing 



(15 credits) 



Semester I (15 credits) 

ANP 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 3 

CHM 101 Chemistry 1 3 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 3 

BIO 111 Generel Microbiology 3 

ENG 111 English Composition: Strategies 

for Inquiry 3 

Semester II (18 credits) 

ANP 102 Anatomy and Physiology II 3 

RES 121 Introduction to Respiratory Care 6 

RES 122 Theraputic Modalities 3 

RES 123 Cardiopulmonary Physiology 3 

RES 124 Clinical Practicum I 3 



Semester III 

RES 125 Critical Care I 

RES 126 Clinical Medicine 

RES 127 Clinical Practicum II 

Semester IV 

RES 128 Clinical Practicum III 

TOTAL CREDITS 



(9 credits) 



(9 credits) 



TOTAL CREDITS 



79 



59 



Surgical Technology 



The surgical technologist is a highly-skilled member of the surgical team, qualified by didactic and clinical education 
to provide safe and efficient care to the patient in the operating room. The didactic education consists of courses in 
Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology, Pharmacology, Medical Law and Ethics, Surgical Techniques and Surgical 
Procedures. Closely supervised clinical education is provided in local area hospitals. 

The surgical technologist actively participates in surgery by performing scrub and/or circulating duties which include: 
passing instruments and supplies to the surgical team members, preparing and positioning the patient, operating equipment, 
assisting the anesthesiologist, and keeping accurate records. Many students complete their General Education courses prior 
to the clinical. The program is two calendar years in length, requiring 67 credits leading to an Associate in Applied Science 
Degree. 

The program is accredited by the Committee on Allied Health Education and Accreditation with the Joint Review 
Committee on Education for Surgical Technologists. The full-time program begins in the fall semester each year and 
includes the spring semester and a twelve-week summer session. The General Education courses can be started any 
semester. Graduates receive an Associate in Applied Science Degree. 

The following facilities have collaborated with the College as clinical sites for practical work experiences required in 
the program: Indiana University Hospital, Riley Hospital for Children, Community East Hospital, Wishard Memorial 
Hospital, St. Vincent's Hospital and Health Care Center. 

The starting salary is $9.00 to $10.50 per hour, which can increase up to 25% because of shift differentials. 



Associate in Applied Science (AAS) — 
Surgical Technology 

General Education Courses 

AN? 101 Anatomy & Physiology I 

ANP 102 Anatomy & Physiology II 

BIO 111 Microbiology 

COM 102 Intro to Interpersonal Coi 

ENG 111 English Composition 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra OR 

MAT 110 Contemporary College Mathematics 

PSY 101 Intro to Psychology OR 

SOC 111 Intro to Sociology 



(21 Credits) 


program. 


3 


BSA 007 


3 


BSA 065 


3 


BSA 071 


lunication 3 


BSA 074 


3 


MEA 288 



Suggested courses that help develop students 
for required courses. These courses are not 
required and they do not count toward the 

Spelling 

Introduction to Life Sciences 

Critical Thinking 

Introduction to Computer Literacy 

Success Skills for Human Services 

and Health Technologies 



Technical Core Courses 



(38 Credits) 



SUR 101 Surgical Techniques 3 

SUR 102 Surgical Procedures 1 3 

SUR 103 Fundamentals of Surgical Technology 6 

SUR 104 Surgical Procedures 2 6 

SUR 105 Clinical Applications 1 9 

SUR 105 Surgical Procedures 3 3 

SUR 107 Clinical Applications 2 8: 



Broad Core Courses 

HHS 101 Medical Terminology 

HHS 102 Medical Law/Ethics 

MEA 113 Pharmacology 



(8 Credits) 



Total Credits 



67 



60 



General Education and Support Services 

The mission of the General Education and Support Services Division, through a strong General Education Program, is 
to stimulate the full intellectual, emotional, and social development of each student. General education also undergirds, 
broadens, and augments the College's technical curriculum. Recognizing its essential value, all Associate degree programs 
require a minimum of 25% of degree credits in general education. The division also provides a comprehensive skills 
advancement program, known as ACCESS, which develops basic skills, attitudes and learning processes to assure success in 
College programs. Additionally, the division provides an integrated system of academic and counseling support services. 

General Education 

An Associate degree must prepare students to enter the work force and become full participants in the complex, rapidly 
evolving multiple environments of American society The General Education Program provides instruction in mathematics, 
physical science, communication, and social science, as well as a learning support system of counseling and tutoring, and 
additional support services. 

Mathematics and Science 

Mathematics is an essential skill in meeting the ever-changing needs of our increasingly complex society 
The study of science leads to an understanding of the basic principles of the physical and life processes in our 

natural world. 

The mathematics and sciences program provides program-level mathematics and science courses, including 

Contemporary Mathematics, Intermediate Algebra, Geometry/Trigonometry Algebra/Trigonometry, Calculus, Statistics, 

Finite Math, Physical Science, Technical Physics, Physics, Chemistry, Biology Microbiology, Anatomy and Physiology and 

Advanced Physiology. 

Communication and Social Sciences 

Recognizing that language is the foundation for all learning, the communications program encourages the use of 
language as a creative tool to develop and organize an understanding of self and others. Individuals develop proficiency in 
process-oriented English Composition, Exposition and Persuasion, Technical Writing, Fundamentals of Public Speaking, and 
Introduction to Interpersonal Communications. 

The study of social science explores the commonality and diversity of human experience in a pluralistic society. 
Courses are offered in psychology, sociology, political science, economics, and the humanities. 

Skills Advancement ACCESS Program 

Developing basic skills, attitudes and learning processes in order that students may enter and be successful in college 
programs, the ACCESS program is a comprehensive system of services including initial assessment of skills, specialized 
counseling services, ongoing course placement and classroom and lab instruction in basic reading, writing, mathematics, 
science and study skills. Additional learning assistance is provided through small-group and one-on-one tutoring and 
computer-assisted instruction. The ACCESS program also provides Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) and Interactive 
Video Disk (IVI) Lab in Room 252A and Macintosh Lab in Room 252B. These two microcomputer labs help students learn 
concepts and provide students with adequate drill and practice sessions in such areas as the following: reading, writing, 
grammar, mathematics and science skills, English as a Second Language and study skills. Also available are GED preparation 
materials, technical vocabulary for the deaf program, word processing application, and a wide range of instructional 
software. Hours are Monday through Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. .Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon, and Saturday, 
9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 

Also available is a Testing Lab that can be used by the entire College. When a student misses a test for a legitimate 
reason, the instructor can leave that test in the Testing Lab, and the student can take it when it is convenient. The student 
must have a permission slip from the instructor. 



61 



Special Services 

Testing for course placement and admission to Ivy Tech programs is provided free of charge. Included in this session 
are assessments of reading, writing, science, and mathematics ability. Students who wish to receive credit by testing out of a 
course should contact the Testing Center for procedures. 

Counseling services through the ACCESS program include academic counseUng, career assessment and counsehng, 
and personal development counseling. These services are available to students who need supplemental support in order to 
succeed in their coursework. 

The Special Needs Program at Ivy Tech is available to serve any student with a documented disability that may emerge 
as a barrier to the successful completion of coursework. Academic support and counseling services are provided specifically 
for students with special needs to enhance their independence and career preparation. 

General Technical Studies Certificate 

The General Technical Studies program provides a starting point for students who want to freshen their basic skills, are 
undecided upon what specific course of study to pursue, are seeking admission into one of the College's selective programs, 
or are needing an education foundation for a related one- or two-year program. 

A one-year program requiring 30 credits leads to a General Technical Studies Certificate in each of the College's two 
degree-seeking divisions - Business and Technology, and Health and Human Services. Students who earn the Technical 
Certificate and do not pursue further education could seek employment in areas related to specific courses taken. 

See page 67 for General Technical Studies Certificates Information. 



BASIC SKILLS ADVANCEMENT 
COURSES 

Skills Advancement 

BSA 007 Spelling 

BSA 024 Introduction to College Writing I 

BSA 025 Introduction to College Writing II 

BSA 031 Reading Strategies for College I 

BSA 032 Reading Strategies for College II 

BSA 044 Mathematics 

BSA 050 Introductory Algebra 

BSA 061 Introduction to Chemistry 

BSA 065 Introduction to Life Sciences 

BSA 070 College Study Principles 

BSA 071 Critical Thinking 

BSA 074 Introduction to Computer Literacy 

BSA 081 KeyboardingI 

BSA 082 Keyboarding II 

BSA 083 Keyboarding III , ; 

BSA 288 ESL Reading V 

BSA 288 ESL Listening and Speaking V 

BSA 288 ESL Grammar V 

BSA 288 ESL Reading VI 

BSA 288 ESL Listening and Speaking VI 

BSA 288 ESL Grammar VI 



Basic Skills Advancement 
Course Descriptions 

BSA 007 Spelling ' ' . i . ' : - 

1 Credit 

Develops spelling skills by thorough practice in spelling with 
attention to rules and exceptions. 

BSA 024 Introduction to English 1 

3 Credits 

Introduces the student to a process approach to writing with 



emphasis on student generated topics and multiple drafting. 

BSA 025 Introduction to English U 

3 Credits 

Furthers skills gained in BSA 024 with emphasis on preparing 

students for English 101 by helping students expand their 

control of the writing process. 

BSA 031 Reading I 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes comprehension, vocabulary, and word attack skills 

beginning at a basic level. 

BSA 032 Reading II 
3 Credits 

Advances (comprehension, vocabulary, and word attack) skills 
acquired in BSA 031 and further prepares students for program- 
level courses. 

BSA 044 Mathematics 

3 Credits 

Introduces the basic concepts of algebra while reveiwing 

computational skills. 

BSA 050 Introductory Algebra 

3 Credits 

Reviews basic equations and graphing, and concentrates on 

algebraic relationships in preparation for intermediate algebra. 

BSA 061 Introduction to Chemistry 

3 Credits 

Introduces basic principles of chemistry and technical 

vocabulary. 

BSA 065 Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology 

3 Credits 

Studies the basics of the human body as an integrated unit. 

BSA 070 College Study Principles 

3 Credits 

Orients and motivates students for success in college. Develops 

the skills of textbook-reading, note-taking, and test-taking. 



62 



BSA 071 Critical Thinking 

3 Credits 

Assists students in developing critical thinking strategies and 

study skills in mathematics. 

BSA 074 Introduction to Computer Literacy 

3 Credit 

Introduces basic computer literacy skills development. 

BSA 081 Introduction to Keyboarding I 

1 Credit 

Deals with basic keyboarding skills applicable to a typewriter or 

computer 

BSA 082 Introduction to Keyboarding II 

1 Credit 

Deals with keyboarding skills applicable to a typewriter or 
computer 

BSA 083 Introduction to Keyboarding III 

2 Credit 

Deals with basic keyboarding skills applicable to a typewriter or 
computer 

BSA 288 ESL Reading V 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes intensive reading analysis of prose; studies 
vocabulary in context; develops reading strategies; teaches critical 
reading skills. 

BSA 288 ESL Reading VI 

3 Credits 

Stresses advanced comprehension skills using academic subject 

areas; focuses on vocabluary expansion, reading interpretation, 

and critical thinking. 

BSA 288 ESL Listening and Speaking V 

3 Credits 

Focuses on listening strategies for understanding natural speech 

patterns; provides conversational practice with emphasis on 

American cultural values and behavior; use of idioms. 

BSA 288 ESL Listening and Speaking VI 

3 Credits 

Focuses on efficient methods of listening to lectures and 

conversation; stresses vocabulary development; emphasizes 

conversation about academic and social topics using appropriate 

idioms. 

BSA 288 ESL Grammar V 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the study of complex senence structure, 

understanding the relationship between ideas, and the expression 

of ideas in conditional sentences. 

BSA 288 ESL Grammar VI 

3 Credits 

Focuses on advanced grammatical concepts through 

contextualized dialogue; examines formal and informal 

grammatical style. 



General Education 
Course Descriptions 



Communications 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 3 

COM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal 

Communications 3 

Composition 

ENG III English Composition: 

for Inquiry 3 

ENG 112 Exposition and Persuasion 3 

ENG 211 Technical Writing 3 

Economics 

ECN 101 Economic Fundamentals 3 

ECN 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 

ECN 202 Principles of Microeconomics 3 



History 






HSY 101 


Survey of American History I 


3 


HSY 102 


Survey of American History II 


3 


Political Science 






POL 101 


Intro, to American 






Government and Politics 


3 


Psychology 






PSY 101 


Introduction to Psychology 


3 


PSY 201 


Lifespan Development 


3 


PSY 205 


Abnormal Psychology 


3 


Sociology 






SOC 111 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 


Humanities 


': 1 1 ' 




ETH 101 


Introduction to Ethics 


3 


PHL 101 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


HUM 101 


Survey of Humanities 


3 


Mathematics 






MAT 110 


Contemporary College Mathematics 


3 


MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


MAT 115 


Statistics 


3 


MAT 121 


Geometry/Trigonometry 


3 


MAT 131 


Algebra/Trigonometry 1 


3 


MAT 132 


Algebra/Trigonometry II 


3 


MAT 135 


Finite Math 


3 


MAT 201 


Brief Calculus 


3 


Life and Physical 


Sciences 




ANP 101 


Anatomy & Physiology I 


3 


ANP 102 


Anatomy & Physiology 11 


3 


ANP 201 


Advanced Physiology 


4 


BIO 101 


Biology 


3 


BIO 111 


Microbiology 


3 


CHM 101 


Chemistry I 


3 


CHM 102 


Chemistry 11 


3 


PHY 101 


Physics 1 


4 


PHY 102 


Physics II 


4 


PHY 110 


Technical Physics 


4 


SCI 111 


Physical Science 


3 



63 



COMMUNICATIONS 

COM 101 Fundamentals of Public Speaking 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 

assessment or completion of BSA coursework in reading and 

writing. 

Fundamental concepts and skills for effective pubhc speaking: 

preparation and delivery of informative and persuasive 

presentations. Includes instructions in use of visual aids and 

critical listening. 

COM 102 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 

assessment or completion of BSA coursework in reading and 

vmting. 

Focuses on the process of interpersonal communications as a 

dynamic and complex system of interactions. The course will 

stress the importance of understanding and applying 

interpersonal communication theory in work, family, and social 

relationships. 

COMPOSITION 

ENG 111 English Composition: Strategies for Inquiry 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency in writing skill through 

appropriate assessment or successful completion of BSA writing 

coursework. 

Provides a foundation in rhetorical principles, communication 

strategies, and inquiry processes that can be successfully applied 

in writing situations: personal, academic, or professional. The 

composing process will be initiated by and integrated with critical 

reading and thinking. 

ENG 112 Exposition and Persuasion 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ENG 111. 

Continues the strategies taught in ENG 111 and emphasizes 

research-based analytic and persuasive writing. Students will 

complete collaborative and individual projects. 

ENG 211 Technical Writing . •. 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ENG 111 

Builds on the writing skills taught in ENG 111. Students will 
demonstrate their ability to prepare technical reports for various 
purposes using standard research techniques, documentation and 
formatting as appropriate. Also, a variety of business 
correspondence will be written. Students will demonstrate both 
viTitten and oral competencies. 

ECONOMICS 

ECN 101 Economic Fundamentals 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 

assessment or BSA coursework. 

Provides an introduction to the fundamentals of economics and 

their application to current economic problems. 



ECN 201 Principles of Macroeconomics 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 

assessment or BS coursework and MAT 1 1 1 - Intermediate 

Algebra. 

Develops a conceptual understanding of the forces affecting the 

level of national income, employment, interest rates, and prices. 

ECN 202 Principles of Microeconomics 

3 Credits 

fterequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 

assessment or BSA coursework and MAT 111. Develops an 

understanding of the process by which the market price 

mechanism allocates resources and influences individual 

behavior. 

HISTORY 

HSY 101 Survey of American History 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 

assessment or completion of BSA coursework in reading and 

writing. 

Covers major themes and events in American history from the 

discovery era to the Civil War and Reconstruction. 

HSY 102 Survey of American History II 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 

assessment or completion of BSA coursework in reading and 

writing. 

Covers major themes and events in American history from the 

Civil War and Reconstruction to the present. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

POL 101 Introduction to American Government and Politics 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 

assessment or BSA coursework. 

Introduces the foundations, nature, and dynamics of American 

government and politics including constitutional foundations, 

civil liberties and civil rights. Federalism, political parties, public 

opinion, interest groups, media, nominations, campaigns, 

elections, the Presidency, the Judiciary, Congress, bureaucracies, 

and public policy 

PSYCHOLOGY 

PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 

assessment or BSA coursework. 

Provides a general survey of the science of psychology. Includes 

the study of research methodology, emotion, biological 

foundations, learning and cognition, perception, development, 

personality, abnormal psychology, and social psychology. 

PSY 201 Lifespan Developments 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Completion and grade of C or better in PSY 101 or 

SOCHI. 

Covers human development from conception to death, focusing 

on self as well as others; discussion about time before 

adolescence and adult years. In addition, relevant research for 

each period will be covered. 



64 



PSY 205 Abnormal Psychology 

3 Credits 

Examines theories and research related to mental illness as well as 

etiology, pathology, and treatment methods. Includes descriptions 

of various disorders and personality problems. 

SOCIOLOGY 

SOC 111 Introduction to Psychology 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through appropriate 

assessment or BSA coursework. 

Introduces the students to the science of human society, including 

fundamental concepts, descriptions, and analysis of society, 

culture, the socialization process, social institutions, and social 

change. 

HUMANITIES 

ETH 101 Introduction to Ethics 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency in writing and reading 

skills through appropriate assessment or successful completion of 

BSA program coursework. 

Examines some major theories of ethics and their application to 

moral problems and issues. 

PHL 101 Introduction to Philosophy 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: ENG 111 and demonstrated competency in reading 

and writing skills through appropriate assessment or successful 

completion of BSA program coursework. 

Examines some of the fundamental questions of philosophy such 

as the foundations of morality, skepticism and knowledge, the 

nature of mind, free will and determinism, and the existence of 

God. 



MAT 115 Statistics 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAT 111 

Provides study in interpretation and presentation of descriptive 

and inferential statistics. Includes measures of central tendency, 

probability, binomial and normal distributions, hypothesis testing 

of one and two sample populations, confidence intervals, chi- 

square testing, correlation, data description and graphical 

representation. 

MAT 121 Geometry and Trigonometry 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAT 111 

Provides study in geometry and trigonometry including polygons, 

similarity, solid geometry, properties of circles, constructions, 

right triangles, angle measurements in radians and degrees, 

trigonometric functions and their applications to right triangles, 

Pythagorean Theorem, laws of sine and cosine, graphing of 

trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and coordinate 

conversions. 

MAT 131 Algebra and Trigonometry I 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAT 1 II or demonstrated competency 

Provides study in algebra including functions, exponential rules, 

linear equations, radicals, vectors, right triangle trigonometry, 

oblique triangles, graphs of sine and cosine functions and 

variation. 

MAT 132 Algebra and Trigonometry II 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAT 131 

Continues Algebra-Trigonometry I providing study of systems of 

equations, vectors, graphs of trigonometric functions, 

trigonometric equations, complex numbers, exponential and 

logarithmic functions, and conies. 



HUM 101 Survey of Humanities 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency in reading and writing 

skills through appropriate assessment or successful completion of 

BSA program coursework. 

Familiarizes students with the interrelated disciplines within the 

humanities: literature, fine arts, history, music, architecture, and 

philosophy. 

MATHEMATICS 

MAT 110 Contemporary Mathematics 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: BSA 050 or demonstrated competency 

Presents mathematical concepts of numeration, algebra, geometry, 

probability and statistics through a problem-solving and modeling 

approach. The student will recognize, validate and communicate 

these concepts. 

MAT 111 Intermediate Algebra 
3 Credits 

Prerequisite: BSA 050 or demonstrated competency. 
Presents in-depth study of the fundamental concepts and 
operations of algebra including real numbers, roots, linear 
equations and inequalities, graphing, systems of equations, 
polynomials, factoring, scientific notation, introduction of 
logarithms, rational expressions, quadratic equations, graphing, 
and English and metric conversion. 



MAT 135 Finite Math 

3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAT 1 1 1 or demonstrated competency. 

Surveys solving and graphing linear equations and inequalities, 

elementary set theory matrices and their applications, linear 

programming and elementary probability 

MAT 201 Brief Calculus 
3 Credits 

Prerequisite: MAT 132 

Provides an introductory study of the fundamental concepts and 
operations of calculus, including functions, limits, continuity, 
derivatives, point of inflection, first derivative test, concavity, 
second derivative test, optimization, antiderivatives, integration 
by substitution and parts and applications of a definite integral. 

LIFE AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES 

ANP 101 Anatomy and Physiology I 

3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab) 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through assessment or 

BSA coursework. 

Develops a comprehensive understanding of the close 

interrelationship between anatomy and physiology as seen in the 

human organism. It begins by introducing the student to the cell 

which is the basic structural and functional unit of all organisms 

and covers tissues, integument, skeleton, muscular and nervous 

systems as an integrated unit. 



65 



ANP 102 Anatomy and Physiology II 

3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab) 
Prerequisite: ANP 101 

Continues the study of the interrelationships of the systems of the 
body, covering digestion, respiratory, blood, lymphatic 
articulation, excretion, hormone secretion, and reproduction. A 
brief overview of human growth and development as well as 
heredity is presented. 

ANP 201 Advanced Physiology 

4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab) 
Prerequisite: ANP 102, CHM 101 

Studies of human physiology for students entering health 
oriented fields. Emphasis will be on the study of the function of 
the nervous, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, urinary, digestive 
and endocrine systems and their homeostatic mechanisms and 
system interaction. Laboratory exercises focus on clinically 
relevant measurement of human function. 

BIO 101 Introductory Biology 

3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab) 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through assessment or 

BSA coursework. 

Provides an introduction to the basic concepts of life. The course 

includes discussion of cellular and organismal biology, genetics, 

evolution, ecology and interaction among all living organisms. 

Applications of biology to society are addressed. 

BIO 111 Microbiology 

3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab) 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through assessment or 

BSA coursework. 

Presents an overview of microbiology which includes 

fundamentals, methods and materials, an introduction to 

industrial and clinical microbiology and special topics. 

BIO 112 Microbiology II 

2 credits (2 lecture, 1 lab) 

Prerequisite: BIO 111 

Presents a study of bacteria, viruses, yeasts and molds, rickettsia 

and parasites and their roles in diseases. 



CHM 101 Chemistry I 

3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab) 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through assessment or 

BSA coursework. 

Studies the science of chemistry and measurement, atomic theory 

and the periodic table, chemical bonding, stoichiometry and 



CHM 102 Chemistry II 

3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab) 
Prerequisite: CHM 101 

Includes liquids and solids, solutions and solution 
concentrations, acids and bases, equilibrium, nuclear chemistry, 
organic and biochemistry 

PHY 101 Physics I 

4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab) 
Prerequisite: MAT 121 or 131 

Studies the basic concepts of mechanics, including force and 
torque, linear and rotational motion, work, energy and power, 
simple machines and fluids. 

PHY 102 Physics II 

4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab) 

Prerequisite; PHY 101 

Provides the study of physics of heat, light, periodic and wave 

motion, electricity and magnetism, and concepts of motion and 

current physics. 

PHY 110 Technical Physics 

4 credits (3 lecture, 2 lab) 
Prerequisite: MAT 111 

Introduces concepts and applications of physics. The 
organization of this course is nontraditional in that it leads the 
student to develop an integrated understanding of the theory and 
application of measuring (or unit) systems, scales, vectors, force, 
work, rates, energy, momentum, power, force transformers, simple 
machines, vibrations, waves, and time constants. 

SCI 111 Physical Science 

3 credits (2 lecture, 2 lab) 

Prerequisite: Demonstrated competency through assessment or 

BSA coursework. 

Studies physical concepts and theories pertaining to current 

applications and trends in physics, chemistry, earth science, and 

astronomy Emphasis is on concept and factual knowledge. 



66 



General Technical Studies Certificate (TC) — Business 



SEMESTER 1 (15 CREDITS) 



ENG HI 


English Composition 


3 


N4AT 110 


BUS 288 


College Study Principles for 




MAT 1 1 1 




Business students 


3 


ECN 101 


POL 101 


Introduction to American Government 
and Politics OR 




** SELECT: 


SOC 101 


Introduction to Sociology 


3 


TOTAL CREDITS 


** SELECT: 


Elective 


6 





SEMESTER 2(15 CREDITS) 

Contemporary College Math 
Intermediate Algebra 
Economic Fundamentals 
Elective 



Selectives must be taken from your area of interest. 



General Technical Studies Certificate (TC) — Health and Human Services 



SEMESTER 1 


(15 CREDITS) 


ENG 


111 


English Composition 


MAT 


110 


Contemporary College Math OR 


*MAT 


111 


Intermediate Algebra 


*MEA 


101 


Medical Terminology 


AN? 


101 


Anatomy and Physiology 


HST 


101 


Intro to Human Services 


** SELECT: 


Student Elective 





SEMESTER 2 


(15 CREDITS) 




3 


COM 


101 




Fundamentals of Public Speaking OR 






ENG 


211 




Technical Writing 


3 


3 


SOC 


111 




Intro to Sociology OR 




3 


PSY 


101 




Intro to Pychology 


3 


3 


ANP 


102 




Anatomy and Physiology OR 




3 


HST 


101 




Helping Relationship Techniques 


3 




** SELECT: 




Student Elective 


3 


3 


** SELECT: 




Student Elective 


3 




TOTAL 


CREDITS 




3( 



Recommended that students take MEA 101 before ANP 101 and MAT 111 before CHM 101. 



General Technical Studies Certificate (TC) — Technology 



SEMESTER 1 


(15 CREDITS) 








MAT 111 


Intermediate Algebra 


3 


SEMESTER 2 (15 CREDITS) 


TEC 102 


Technical Graphics 


3 


ENG OR 




TEC 104 


Comp. Fundamentals for Technology 


3 


COM 


General Education 


** SELECT: 


Technical Elective 


3 


QSC 101 


Quality Control Concepts and 


** SELECT: 


Technical Elective 


3 


*TEC 113 

** SELECT: 
** SELECT: 

TOTAL CREDITS 


Techniques 
Basic Electricity 
Elective 
Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 

30 



Students should demonstrate BSA050 math skills by test, prerequisite or co-requisite 
' Selectives must be taken from your area of interest. 



67 



Course Descriptions 



ABR 101 Body Repair Fundamentals 

3 Credits 

Examines the characteristics of body metals and includes the 
installation of moldings, ornaments and fasteners with emphasis 
on sheet metal analysis and safety. 

ABR 103 Auto Paint Fundamentals 

3 Credits 

Introduces auto paint considerations with emphasis on the 

handling of materials and equipment in modern automotive 

technologies. 

ABR 104 Collision Damage Analysis and Repair . ; 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction in analyzmg extensive body damage and 
determining the tools and procedures needed to replace panels. 

ABR 105 Conventional Frame Diagnosis and Correction 
3 Credits 

Covers the use of tools, frame machines and equipment for frame 
and chassis repair Includes study of terms pertaining to front 
suspension and rear axle. Describes uses of frame gauges, tram 
gauges and other measuring devices. 

ABR 106 Body Repair Applications 

3 Credits 

Introduces fundamentals of using hand and power tools in the 

repair of minor collision damage, with emphasis on safety 

ABR 107 Automotive Painting Technology 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction in the total refinishing of an automobile with 

emphasis on advanced and specialty painting techniques. 

ABR 108 Unibody Structural Analysis and Repair 

3 Credits 

Covers unibody repair, identification and analysis of damage, 

measuring and fixturing systems, straightening systems and 

techniques, mechanical component service and knowledge of 

suspension and steering systems on front-wheel-drive unibody 

vehicles. 

ABR 120 Fiberglass Plastic Repair ; 

3 Credits 

Introduces types of fiberglass and plastic materials used in auto 
body repair. Covers both interior and exterior applications. 

ACC 101 Accounting Principles I :■.•'■ 

3 Credits 

Introduces the fundamental principles, techniques and tools of 
accounting. Presents the mechanics of the accounting cycle 
including collecting, recording, summarizing, analyzing and 
reporting information pertaining to service and mercantile 
enterprises. Covers internal control, deferred charges, notes and 
interest, valuation of receivables, payrolls, inventories and plant 
assets. 

ACC 102 Accounting Principles II 

3 Credits 

Continues the study of accounting to include partnership and 

corporate accounting systems. Covers preparation and analysis of 



financial statements including a statement of cash flow, and long- 
term liabilities and investments. Introduces cost, managerial, 
branch and departmental accounting techniques. 

ACC 105 Income Tax I 

3 Credits 

Offers an overview of federal and state income tax law for 

individuals including taxable income, capital gains and losses, 

adjustments, standard and itemized deductions, tax credits and 

appropriate tax forms. Introduces tax concepts needed by a sole 

proprietorship. 

ACC 106 Payroll Accounting 

3 Credits 

Covers payroll calculating and reporting including various federal 

and state withholding taxes, employer payroll taxes, typical 

insurance and other arrangements affecting the preparation of 

payroll registers and employees' earnings records. 

ACC 107 Accounting for Recordkeeping 
3 Credits 

Provides instruction for non-accounting majors, wath special 
emphasis on the trade professions. Covers the cash basis of 
recordkeeping for materials, payroll, depreciation and financial 
statements. Introduces the operation of petty cash funds, basic 
cash budgeting and controlling cash through the use of a 
checkbook. Covers financial ratios, construction accounting 
methods and computing customer estimates. 

ACC 108 Career Essentials of Accounting 

3 Credits 

Introduces the basic principles of accounting as utilized in a 
variety of office settings. Includes the principles of debit and 
credit, double-entry bookkeeping, use of journals and transaction 
analysis. Covers uses of ledgers, posting procedures, petty cash, 
banking procedures, payroll, depreciation, work sheets, balance 
sheets and income statements. 

ACC 109 Personal Finance 
3 Credits 

Examines the process of setting and achieving financial goals. 
Emphasizes managing financial resources, budgeting for current 
expenses, projecting cash flow and managing short- and long- 
term credit. Includes use of insurance to reduce risks and 
vehicles for saving and investing. 

ACC 111 Accounting Principles Lab I 
1 Credit 

Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and 
activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included 
in an Accounting Principles 1 course. Introduces the touch- 
method of numeric input on a calculator and includes 
computerized problems. 

ACC 1 12 Accounting Principles Lab II 

1 Credit 

Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and 

activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included 

in the Accounting Principles 2 course. Uses computerized 

problems. 



68 



ACC 113 Income Tax Lab 

1 Credit 

Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and 

activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included 

in the Income Tax 1 course. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 114 Payroll Accounting Lab 

1 Credit 

Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and 

activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included 

in the Payroll Accounting course. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 118 Financial Concepts for Accounting 

3 Credits 

Develops math skills needed in the business field and serves as a 

basis for course work in business. Includes the study of business 

applications using rational numbers, algebraic equations, time 

value of money concepts and basic statistics. 

ACC 201 Intermediate Accounting I 
3 Credits 

Studies accounting principles and applications at an intermediate 
level pertaining to the income statement and balance sheet, cash 
and short-term investments, receivables, inventories, plant assets 
and intangible assets. Includes analysis of bad debts, inventory 
valuation, repairs and maintenance, depreciation of plant assets 
and present value applications. 

ACC 202 Intermediate Accounting II 
3 Credits 

Continues studies of Intermediate Accounting 1 and includes 
long-term investments, current and contingent liabilities, long- 
term debt, stockholders' equity, special accounting problems and 
analysis, statement of cash flows and financial statement analysis. 
Includes capital and treasury stock transactions, dividends, 
earnings per share, accounting for income taxes, correction of 
errors and creation of financial statements from incomplete 
records. 

ACC 203 Cost Accounting I 

3 Credits 

Examines the manufacturing process in relation to the 

accumulation of specific costs of manufactured products. Studies 

various cost accounting report forms, material, labor control and 

allocation of manufacturing costs to jobs and departments. 

ACC 204 Cost Accounting II 
3 Credits 

Continues Cost Accounting 1. Studies the master or 
comprehensive budget, flexible budgeting and capital budgeting. 
Emphasizes tools for decision making and analysis. Introduces 
human resource accounting. 

ACC 205 Seminar in Accounting 

1 Credit 

Allows accounting students an opportunity to pursue specific 

areas of interest at a more advanced level in accounting. 

ACC 206 Managerial Accounting 

3 Credits 

Provides an understanding of accounting records and 

management decision making, with topics including internal 

accounting records and quantitative business analysis. 



ACC 207 Accounting for Government and Nonprofit 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes the similarities and differences between government, 

nonprofit and commercial accounting methods and procedures. 

Exposes students to the basic fund accounting cycle for the 

general fund and other special funds. 

ACC 208 Income Tax II 

3 Credits 

Continues Income Tax 1. Studies procedures and problems 
pertaining to federal and state income tax laws for partnerships 
and corporations. Includes a review and in-depth study of 
concepts related to proprietorships covered in Income Tax 1. 

ACC 209 Auditing 

3 Credits 

Covers public accounting organization and operation including 

internal control, internal and external auditing, verification and 

testing of the balance sheet and operating accounts, and the 

auditor's report of opinion of the financial statements. 

ACC 212 Business Finance 

3 Credits 

Introduces basic tools and techniques of financial analysis and 

management and sources of financial and economic theory as 

applied to business finance. Includes conceptual materials related 

to valuation, capital structure formulation and risk-return 

consideration. 

ACC 213 Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction in the use of all modules of a spreadsheet 

software package including spreadsheet, graphics and database 

operations and applying these modules to business problems. 

ACC 214 Consumer and Commercial Credit 
3 Credits 

Provides instruction for retail, service, wholesale, and 
manufacturing firms extending credit to clients. Explores theory, 
principles and practice of consumer and commercial credit related 
to business activity and economic impact. Examines managerial 
functions of collecting and controlling credit to consumers and 
businesses. Emphasizes credit plans, credit and sales, short-term 
and intermediate credit and legal aspects of credit. 

ACC 215 Credit Procedures and Collections 
3 Credits 

Examines credit as a means of extending purchasing power, i.e., 
increased buying power, immediate use of money, merchandise or 
services and delayed payment. Covers concepts of credit and 
principles and methods of credit administration involving 
individuals and businesses. Includes information on credit policy, 
credit control, credit decision making and legal remedies. 

ACC 216 Credit Management 

3 Credits 

Explores functions of acquiring cycle of credit and management 

function of control cycle. Combines lectures, discussions, 

individual research and projects vvith written and oral 

presentations of findings and results. 



69 



ACC217 Intermediate Accounting Lab 1 

1 Credit 

Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and 

activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included 

in Intermediate Accounting 1. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 218 Intermediate Accounting Lab II 

1 Credit 

Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and 

activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included 

in Intermediate Accounting 2. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 219 Cost Accounting Lab 

1 Credit 

Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and 

activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included 

in Cost Accounting 1. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 220 Special Applications Lab I 

1 Credit 

Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and 

activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included 

in an accounting course. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 221 Special Applications Lab II 

1 Credit 

Presents a series of planned accounting learning problems and 
activities designed to accompany concepts and theories included 
in an accounting course. Uses computerized problems. 

ACC 222 Accounting Software Applications 

3 Credits 

Solves accounting problems using software similar to what is 
currently used in business. Includes installation, operation and 
analysis of an accounting software package. 

ACC 223 Advanced Topics in Accounting 

2 Credits 

Discusses topics of current interest in accounting. Focuses on 
special interest projects for students in accounting. Includes 
trips, guest speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars. 

ACC 224 Construction Bidding 

3 Credits 

Examines bidding procedures, contract documents, contracts, 
bonds and insurance. Describes materials and installation 
procedures and how they may affect the bid. Covers the unit of 
measure of the work, estimating the quantity of materials and the 
relationship of the specifications. 

ACC 225 Integrated Accounting Software 

3 Credits 

Integrated accounting software package(s) will be used to 

illustrate computerized accounting practices. The general ledger 

will be integrated with accounts receivable, accounts payable and 

other accounting. 

ACC 281-293 Special Topics in Accounting Technology 
1-5 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, 
workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. 
Contact Accounting Program Chairperson for information. 



ADP 809 Real Estate Sales 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction in accordance with the guidelines 

established by the Indiana Real Estate Commission. Includes 

property descriptions, marketing real estate, licensing, financing, 

contract, zoning, closing procedures and property management. 

ADP 8 1 Real Estate Broker 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction in accordance with the guidelines 

established by the Indiana Real Estate Commission. Includes 

property management, appraisal, investment, closing the real 

estate transaction and other topics. 

AFS 101 Fire Technology 

3 Credits 

Examines the history of firefighting, identifies the types of 
apparatus and fire protection systems and analyzes the fire 
problem in general. Provides a basis for the chemical and 
hazardous properties of combustion and the related by-products. 

AFS 102 Fire Apparatus and Equipment 
3 Credits 

Examines in detail the types of apparatus in use today. Studies 
pumpers, aerials, elevating platforms and special apparatus. 
Utilizes National Fire Protection Association standards in 
identifying the proper responses for a given situation. Includes 
study of apparatus placement on an emergency incident, types of 
pumps, tests, equipment, drafting, relay, nozzles, fittings and 
hose lays and maintenance on various types of apparatus. 

AFS 103 Firefighting Strategy and Tactics 

3 Credits 

Prepares the student to make responsible decisions concerning 

fireground strategies and tactics at the company level. Uses 

various priority scenarios, including preparing for incident 

command and commanding the initial response. Emphasizes 

company operations with basic command decisions. 

AFS 104 Building Construction Fire Service 

3 Credits 

Examines the design principles involved in the protection of a 
structure from fire involvement. Studies the signs, symptoms 
and indicators of partial or total building collapse during 
firefighting operations. Includes the study of legislative codes 
and laws concerning building design, building fire safety, 
classification of building construction and blueprint reading. 

AFS 105 Fire/Arson Investigation 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the responsibilities of the firefighter, the investigator 

and the department in fire scene investigations, fire cause and 

loss, collection and preservation of evidence, and determination 

of fire origin. Emphasizes the application and assistance of 

various scientific aids that assist in the investigation. 

AFS 108 Fire Prevention/Inspection 

3 Credits 

Examines the function of the fire inspector and the organization 
of the fire prevention unit. Emphasizes identifying codes and 
regulations utilized by the inspector, with particular use of the 
Indiana Fire Code. Includes the legal authority of fire 
prevention principles, application of the fire code and sound 
management principles as applied to a bureau. 



70 



AFS 109 Fire Department Specifications 

3 Credits 

Surveys specifications of firefighting apparatus, equipment, 

protective clothing, facilities, and all other sources of materials 

necessary to a fire department. Study includes the writing of 

Standard Operating Guides (SOGs) and blueprint readings. 

AFS 201 Fire Protection Systems 
3 Credits 

Provides a general introduction to fire alarm monitoring devices 
and extinguishing systems. Develops a strong base for fire 
protection or commercial applications. Covers fire extinguishing 
agents, portable fire extinguishes, carbon dioxide systems, dry 
chemical systems, halogenated systems/foam systems, explosive 
suppression systems, thermal/smoke/flame detection systems and 
building monitoring systems. Covers standpipe and sprinkler 
systems. 

AFS 202 Fire Service Management 

3 Credits 

Studies the principles and functions of administrative and 

management personnel in the fire service. Topics discussed 

include departmental organizations, administrative and 

management procedures, personnel selection, line 

and staff functions, communications, the fire company unit, 

public relations and current problems in administration. 

AFS 204 Fire Service Hydraulics 

3 Credits 

Studies compressible fluids including fluid properties, principles 

of fluid statics, flow system principles, pipe friction and head loss, 

flow measurements, pumps and other appliances and hydraulic 

devices. Relates applications to fire protection, water supply and 

foam systems. 

AFS 205 Aircraft Firefighting 

3 Credits 

Examines the hazards associated with aircraft firefighting. 

Includes lecture and practical use of airport firefighting 

equipment, extinguishing agents, strategy and tactics, rescue 

methods and aircraft design and construction. 

AFS 206 Shipboard Firefighting 

3 Credits 

Focuses on firefighting strategy and tactics for land-based fire 

department personnel and equipment. Includes a survey of 

equipment, hook-ups, procedures, incident command, use of 

foam and support systems on ships. 

AFS 262 Firefighter 2nd Class 

3 Credits 

Certifies firefighters for state certification as a second class 

firefighter. 

AFS 263 Firefighter lst/2nd Class 

3 Credits 

Completes certification at the second class level and begins first 

class instruction. 

AMT 102 Introduction to Robotics 

3 Credits 

Introduces students to robotics and automated systems and their 

operating characteristics. Covers robotics principles of operation 

and work envelopes. Teaches coordinate systems and how 

hydraulic, pneumatic and electromechanical systems function 



together as a system. Covers servo and non-servo controls, 
system capabilities and limitations and safety. Investigates robot 
tooling, including welders, grippers, magnetic pickups, vacuum 
pickups, compliance devices, adhesive applicators and paint 
sprayers. 

AMT 201 Manufacturing Systems Control 
3 Credits 

Introduces the field of industrial controls. Teaches principles of 
control systems and how they are applied to a production system 
to achieve automation. Systems included in the course are 
stepper motors, programmable logic controllers, microprocessors, 
computers and feedback systems. Emphasizes programmable 
logic controllers and the local area network. 

AMT 202 Work Cell Design and Integration 

3 Credits 

Studies principles pertaining to design and implementation of 

robots in industrial work cells. Emphasizes selection of the best 

work site and robot system, application of cell sensor, 

development of cycle times, economic analysis, safety 

considerations, proposal preparation and human resources 

development. 

AMT 203 Automation Electronics 

3 Credits 

Demonstrates the operation and application of electronic devices 

in the automation field. Includes linear integrated circuits, 

sensors and interfacing systems, actuators and drive controls and 

process control techniques. 

AMT 205 Automated Manufacturing Systems 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction in selecting equipment, writing 

specifications, designing fixtures and interconnects, integrating 

systems, providing interfaces and making the assigned systems 

operational to produce -marketable+ products. 

AMT 240 Introduction to Computer Integrated 
Manufacturing 

3 Credits 

Includes the study of all major components of computer- 
integrated manufacturing (business, engineering and shop floor) 
as an integrated whole. Includes project planning which will be 
formally documented and presented by students. 

AMT 241 Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Project 
3 Credits 

Continues the study of the major components of computer- 
integrated manufacturing (business, engineering and shop floor) 
as an integrated whole. Covers advanced CIM applications and 
includes the implementation of the project planned in AMT 240 
in a realistic CIM environment. 

AMV 100 Introduction to Transportation 
3 Credits 

Introduces students to the work environment of a transportation 
repair facility. Presents historical and future trends with emphasis 
in career/placement requirements. Safety, OSHA, EPA, and 
environmental standards are presented. Introduction to the eight 
areas of ASE technician certification and related tools are 
presented. 



71 



AMV 1 00 Ford Introduction to Transportation 

3 Credits 

Introduces students to the work environment of a transportation 

repair facility Presents historical and future trends with 

emphasis in career/placement requirements. SAfety, OSHA, EPA, 

and environmental standards are presented. 

Introduction to the eight areas of ASE technician certification and 

related tools are presented. 

AMV 100 GM Introduction to Transportation 

3 Credits 

Introduces students to the work environment of a transportation 

repair facility. Presents historical and future trends with 

emphasis in career/placement requirements. Safety, OSHA, EPA, 

and environmental standards are presented. Introduction to the 

eight areas of ASE technician certification and related tools are 

presented. 

AMV 101 T-Ten Chassis and Suspension 

3 Credits 

This course is a study of various frame designs and suspension 
systems used in modern Toyota vehicles. Repair and replacement 
of steering linkages and chassis components, both front and rear 
systems are included. 

AMV 101 Ford STST Suspension and Steering 

3 Credits 

This course is a study of various frame designs and suspension 
systems used in Ford vehicles. Repair and replacement of 
steering linkages and chassis components, both front and rear are 
included. Course also includes study of Air Suspension, Active 
Suspension, Level Ride, Electronic Variable power steering 
systems and related computers. 

AMV 101 GM STG Suspension and Steering 

3 Credits 

This course is a study of various frame designs and suspension 
systems used in GM vehicles. Repair and replacement of steering 
linkages and chassis components, both front and rear are 
included. Course also includes study of Level Ride, Electronic 
Variable power steering systems and related computers. 

AMV 107 Ford Engine Principles and Design 

3 Credits 

Examines engine dynamics, theory of engine operation and 
design characteristics of all engine assemblies and subassemblies. 
Emphasizes removal, tear down, visual inspection, precision 
measuring inspection, clean up of components and parts and 
rebuilding engines according to industry standards. 

AMV 107 GM Engine Principles and Design 

3 Credits 

Examines engine dynamics, theory of engine operation and 
design characteristics of all engine assemblies and subassemblies. 
Emphasizes removal, tear down, visual inspection, precision 
measuring inspection, clean up of components and parts and 
rebuilding engines according to mdustry standards. 

AMV 113 Basic Electricity STST Certification 

3 Credits 

Introduction to electrical theory and Ford automotive circuits and 

components.. Electron theory, electrical circuits, electronic 

circuits, terms and wiring diagrams are emphasized. Students 

also will be introduced to electrical and electronic circuits and 

components testing. 



AMV 113 GM STG Specialized Electronics Training 

3 Credits 

The course is an introduction to electrical theory and General 

Motors automotive circuits and components. Electron theory, 

electrical circuits, electronic circuits, terms and wiring diagrams 

are emphasized. Students also will be introduced to 

electrical and electronic circuits and components testing. 

AMV 113 Toyota Electrical Circuits 
3 Credits 

Introduces fundamentals of electricity and electrical behavior as 
apphed to modem transportation. Includes extensive use of 
digital multimeters and circuit troubleshooting. Presents an 
intensive study of the construction, function and principles of 
operation of starting motors, charging systems and their contra 
systems with emphasis on diagnosis and bench repair. 

AMV 202 Computer Engine Controls 

3 Credits 

Examines computerized ignition, carburetor, fuel injection and 

sensors for engine controls on late model passenger cars. Covers 

theory, diagnostic procedure and repair procedure of the CCC, 

MCU, EEC-iy lean bum and other spark control systems. 

AMV 202 Ford SST Electronic Engine Controls 

3 Credits 

This course examines computerized ignition, carburetor, fuel 
injection and sensors for engine controls on late model 
passenger cars. Covers theory, diagnostic procedure and repair 
procedure of the EEC-IV systems. 

AMV 202 GM Computer Engine Controls 

3 Credits 

This course examines computerized ignition, carburetor, fuel 

injection and sensors for engine controls on late model 

passenger cars. Covers theory, diagnostic procedure and repair 

procedure of the General Motors HEI and DIS systems. 

AMV 202 Toyota Computer Control System 

3 Credits 

This course examines computerized ignition, fuel injection, and 

sensors for engine controls on late model Toyota passenger cars. 

Content includes theory, diagnostic procedures, and repair of 

EFI and TCCS. 

AOT 103 Information/Word Processing Concepts 

3 Credits 

Introduces the concept of information/word processing systems. 

Offers hands-on experience in the operation of word processing 

systems. 

AOT 105 General Office Procedures 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes procedures and the changing responsibilities for the 

entry-level secretary/receptionist in today's offices. Identifies the 

skills and attitudes needed to succeed in the business 

environment. 

AOT 106 Refresher Shorthand 

1 Credit 

Provides instmction in a lab setting to bring shorthand skills to 

an employable level. 



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AOT 107 Refresher Typewriting 

1 Credit 

Provides instruction in a lab setting to bring typing skills to an 
employable level. Concentrates on four areas of skill 
development: speed and accuracy, business letters, tables and 
tabulations, and reports. 

AOT 108 Shorthand/Notetaking I 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes basic theory, brief forms and speed in reading from 

notes and the textbook. Focuses on the correct way to write 

shorthand. Uses dictation with emphasis placed on writing and 

transcription techniques. 

AOT 109 Professional Development 

2 Credits 

Enables students to analyze and improve themselves in terms of 
posture, weight control, personal hygiene, grooming, wardrobe, 
personality, communication and job application skills for success 
in employment. Includes resume preparation and interviewing 
skills. 

AOT 110 Keyboarding Skill Development 

1 Credit 

Designed to help experienced typists gain greater speed and 

accuracy. 

AOT 111 Shorthand/Notetaking II 

3 Credits 

Develops dictation, notereading and transcription skills through 
drills and tests. Emphasizes speed, accuracy and use of correct 
English. Reinforces and builds on principles and skills learned in 
Shorthand/Notetaking 1. 

AOT 112 Data Entry 

3 Credits 

Emphasis placed on accuracy and speed. 

AOT 113 Office Calculating Machines 

1 Credit 

Teaches students to use the 10-key electronic printing/display 

calculator. Develops competence with the desk calculator and 

familiarity with the types of business problems they commonly 

solve. 

AOT 116 Business Communications 

3 Credits 

Develops communications skills for use in business and industry. 

Focuses on writing effective business letters, memos, reports, and 

reviewing grammar and punctuation rules. 

AOT 119 Document Production 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes increasing speed, improving accuracy, developing and 
applying formatting skills, applying communication and language 
arts skills, and learning document production techniques. 

AOT 202 Information/Word Processing Applications 

3 Credits 

Knowledge acquired from Information/Word Processing Concepts 

will be further enhanced as more sophisticated features of a word 

processing package are learned and applied. 

AOT 206 Shorthand/Notetaking 3 

3 Credits 

Reviews fundamentals learned in Shorthand/Notetaking 1 and 2. 



Emphasizes skill in taking new matter dictation with more 
emphasis on transcribing mailable letters. Stresses essentials 
of good English principles. 

AOT 207 Office Automation Applications 
3 Credits 

Provides instruction in the use of computers and computer 
software. Covers mastery of spreadsheet and database software 
programs. Explores the integration of these packages with a word 
processing package. Assists students in applying their 
knowledge of office automation systems to make decisions, solve 
problems, and facilitate information in an office support setting. 

AOT 212 Micro Word Processing 

3 Credits 

Deals with business applications of word processing software on 
microcomputer work stations. Includes practical applications in 
the use of a microcomputer word processing software. 

AOT 214 Desktop Publishing 

3 Credits 

Provides computer skills in the production of camera-ready 

materials through electronic publishing. 

AOT 215 Legal Term/Practice 

3 Credits 

Provides basic understanding of the secretarial duties and 
responsibilities pertinent to the legal profession. Presents ethics 
of law and professional conduct. Includes laboratory experience. 

AOT 216 Practicum/lnternship 

3 Credits 

This "hands on" field experience allows the student to put into 

practice skills and knowledge obtained in class. 

AOT 219 Specialized Formatting/Transcription 
3 Credits 

Emphasizes production techniques, which include 
correspondence, business forms, manuscripts, tabulations and 
secretarial projects. Emphasizes composition skills and the 
application of communications skills. Includes transcription from 
machine dictation and an introduction to products, services and 
terminology encountered in business organizations. 

AOT 220 Document Management 

3 Credits 

Focuses on management and control of documents from creation 

to disposition, using manual, automated and electronic media. 

Discusses records management personnel, equipment, and 

procedures. 

AOT 221 Office Management and Procedures 

3 Credits 

Provides a culminating study of the management of business 

office systems and procedures. Covers problem-solving 

techniques, selection of office structures, personal and 

organizational dynamics, cooperative and teamwork activities, 

communication abilities and job search skills. 

AOT 224 Advanced Desktop Publishing 

3 Credits 

Provides hands-on experience and familiarizes students with 

specific advanced design and layout techniques and practical 

applications of desktop publishing. 



73 



AOT 281-293 Special Topics in Administrative Office 

1-5 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, 
workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. 
Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

ART 111 Drawing for Visualization 

3 Credits 

Introduces students to the tools and methods of drawing. 
Presents drawing as a catalyst to seeing a way of recording ideas. 
Gives students the necessary drawing preparation for the study of 
graphic design. 

ART 114 Graphic Design 

3 Credits 

Analyzes and reviews basic theories of graphic layout and design 

and their underlying principles and processes. Includes alphabet 

design and design language, imposition, design steps, rough, 

thumbnail, comprehensive and final layout and preparation of 

dummy 

ART 217 Advanced Graphic Design . • 

3 Credits 

Provides experience with advanced design projects which 
communicate a common theme through several different media. 
Provides opportunity for students to work in a team environment 

ART 218 Digital Productions 

3 Credits 

This course addresses the issues of preparing camera-ready art 
electronically. Topics covered are preparing computer files for 
service bureau output, scanning and printing resolution, color 
matching and color models, trapping and computer system 
operations and troubleshooting. 

AST 102 Two-/Four- Wheel Alignment 

3 Credits 

Covers the principles of two- and four-wheel alignment and 

wheel balance. Emphasizes practical work experience in the lab 

covering all the alignment angles. 

AST 102 Ford STST Steering 

3 Credits 

Covers the principles of two-and four-wheel alignment and wheel 
balance. Emphasizes practical work experience in the lab 
covering all the alignment angles. 

AST 102 GM STG Steering and Alignment 

3 Credits 

Covers the principles of two-and four-wheel alignment and wheel 

balance. Emphasizes practical work experience in the lab 

covering all the alignment angles. 

AST 102 T-Ten Alignment 

3 Credits 

Covers the principles of two- and four-wheel alignment and 
wheel balance. Emphasized practical work experience in the lab 
covermg all the alignment angles. 

AST 104 Start and Charge Systems 

3 Credits 

Studies construction, function and principles of operation of 



starting motors, charging systems and their control systems with 
emphasis on diagnosis and bench repair. 

AST 104 Ford Start and Charge Systems 

3 Credits 

Studies construction, function and principles of operation of 
starting motors, charging systems and their control systems with 
emphasis on diagnosis and bench repair. 

AST 104 GM Start and Charge Systems 

3 Credits 

Studies construction, function and principles of operation of 

starting motors, charging systems and their control systems wdth 

emphasis on diagnosis and bench repair 

AST 104 T-Ten Start and Charge Systems 
3 Credits 

An intensive study of the Toyota construction, function, and 
principle of operation of starting motors, charging systems and 
their control systems, with emphasis on diagnosis and repair The 
Study will include basic principles and rules that govern 
the operation of electrical circuits, systems, components and 
equipment that relate to the subject. 

AST 105 Ford Fuel Systems 

3 Credits 

Studies automotive fuel systems: single, double, and four barrel 
carburetors, fuel injection systems, and emission controls as they 
apply to the fuel system. Focuses on shop procedures for 
troubleshooting, servicing, replacing or overhauling fuel 
system and emission control components. 

AST 105 GM Fuel Systems 

3 Credits 

Studies automotive fuel systems: single, double, and four barrel 

carburetors, fuel injection systems and emission controls as they 

apply to the fuel system. Focuses on shop procedures for 

troubleshooting, servicing, replacing or overhauling fuel system 

and emission control components. 

AST 105 Toyota Fuel Systems 

3 Credits 

Studies automotive fuel systems: single, double, and four barrel 

carburetors, fuel injection systems and emission controls as they 

apply to the fuel system. Focuses on shop procedures for 

troubleshooting, servicing, replacing or overhauling fuel system 

and emission control components. 

AST 105 Fuel Systems 

3 Credits 

Studies automotive fuel systems: single, double and four barrel 

carburetors, fuel injection systems and emission controls as they 

apply to the fuel system. Focuses on shop procedures for 

troubleshooting, servicing, replacing or overhauling fuel system 

and emission control components. 

AST 201 Ford STST Climate Control 

3 Credits 

Provides an in-depth study of automotive air conditioning and 
heating. Emphasizes the operation and theory of air conditioning 
and its components. Includes Electronic temperature control 
systems, related computers as well as operation of R-134a systems 
and reclaim/recovery equipment. 



74 



AST 201 GM STG Climate Control 

3 Credits 

Provides in in-depth study of automotive air conditioning and 

heating. Emphasizes the operation and theory of air conditioning 

and its components. Includes Electronic temperature control 

systems, related computers as well as operation of R-134a systems 

and reclaim/recovery equipment. 

AST 201 Toyota Climate Control 

3 Credits 

Provides an in-depth study of automotive air conditioning and 
heating. Emphasizes the operation and theory of air conditioning 
and its components. Includes a study of vacuum and electrical 
control circuits. 

AST 203 Ford STST Engine Repair 

3 Credits 

Covers precision machines, tools and equipment needed for 

rebuilding today+s modern engine. Includes repair, proper 

assembly and installation techniques applicable to the modern 

engine. 

AST 203 GM Engine Rebuild 

3 Credits 

Covers precision machines, tools and equipment needed for 

rebuilding today+s modern engine. Includes repair, proper 

assembly and installation techniques applicable to the modem 

engine. 

AST 204 Ford Automatic Transmission/Transaxle 

3 Credits 

Deals v/ith construction, and functions and principles of 

operation. Emphasizes practical work experience in the lab 

where students will overhaul automatic transmissions and 

transaxle assemblies. 

AST 204 GM Automatic Transmission/Transaxle 

3 Credits 

Deals with construction, and functions and principles of 

operation. Emphasizes practical work experience in the lab 

where students will overhaul automatic transmissions and 

transaxle assemblies. 

AST 205 Ford Manual Transmission/Transaxle 

3 Credits 

Presents theory and overhaul procedures related to the manual 

transmission/transaxle, including clutches and transfer cases and 

diagnosis and overhaul of the manual power train. 

AST 205 Toyota Manual Transmission/Transaxle 

3 Credits 

Presents theory and overhaul procedures related to the manual 

Transmission/ transaxle, including clutches and transfer cases and 

diagnosis and overhaul of the manual power train. 

AST 205 GM Manual Transmission/Transaxle 

3 Credits 

Presents theory and overhaul procedures related to the manual 

transmission/transport, including clutches and transfer cases and 

diagnosis and overhaul of the manual power train. 

AST 206 Heating and Air Conditioning Service and Repair 
3 Credits 

Covers diagnosis, service and repair procedures of the heating/air 
conditioning system. Includes replacement and overhaul 



procedures for components related to heating/air conditioning 
systems. 

AST 207 Ford STST Advanced Engine Performance 

3 Credits 

An advanced course in the theory, diagnosis, and repair of Ford 

computer controlled ignitions and fuel systems, and emission 

controls on late model vehicles, using state-of-the-art diagnostic 

equipment. Emphasis is on recommended manufacturer methods 

for servicing the computer controlled ignition, fuel, and emission 

controls. 

AST 207 GM STG Drivability 
3 Credits 

An advanced course in the theory, diagnosis, and repair of GM 
computer controlled ignitions and fuel systems, and emission 
controls on late model vehicles, using state-of-the-art diagnostic 
equipment. Emphasis is on recommended manufacturer 
methods for servicing the computer controlled ignition, fuel, and 
emission controls. 

AST 207 Toyota Engine Performance 
3 Credits 

An advanced course in the theory, diagnosis, and repair of Toyota 
computer controlled ignitions and fuel systems, and emission 
controls on late model vehicles, using state-of-the-art diagnostic 
equipment. Emphasis is on recommended manufacturer methods 
for servicing the computer controlled ignition, fuel, and emission 
controls. 

AST 209 T-Ten Braking Systems 

3 Credits 

Covers theory, service and repair of automotive braking systems 

and their components. Emphasizes hydraulic theory and the 

repair and service of booster units, master cylinder, wheel 

cylinder, caliper rebuilds and drum and rotor service. 

AST 209 Ford Automotive Braking Systems 

3 Credits 

Covers theory, service and repair of automotive braking systems 

and their components. Emphasizes hydraulic theory and the 

repair and service of booster units, master cylinder, wheel 

cylinder, caliper rebuilds and drum and rotor service. 

Course includes theory, operation and diagnosis of TEVES and 

MARK IV Anti-Lock brake systems including operation and use 

of diagnostic tools and related computer systems. 

AST 209 GM STG Braking Systems 
3 Credits 

Covers theory, service and repair of automotive braking systems 
and their components. Emphasizes hydraulic theory and the 
repair and service of booster units, master cylinder, wheel 
cylinder, caliper rebuilds and drum and rotor service. Course 
includes theory, operation and diagnosis of RWAL and 4WAL 
Anti-Lock brake systems including operation and use of 
diagnostic tools and related computer systems. 

AST 220 Ford Transaxle and Driveline Service 

3 Credits 

This course is a study of differential and driveline theory and 

overhaul. The study includes overhaul and service procedures 

applicable to gear sets, bearings and seals. Theory and overhaul. 

procedures related to the driveshaft and ale assemblies 

for front and rear wheel drive vehicles are also included. 



75 



AST 220 GM STG Transaxle and Driveline Service 

3 Credits 

A study of differential and driveline theory and overhaul. 

Includes overhaul and service procedures applicable to gear sets, 

bearings and seals. Theory and overhaul procedures related to 

the driveshaft and axle assemblies for front and rear wheel 

drive vehicles is included. 

AST 220 Toyota Transmission/Transaxle Service 
3 Credits 

A study of theory and overhaul procedures of Toyota manual and 
electronic controlled transfer case assemblies, differential and 
driveline. Includes overhaul and service procedures to gear sets, 
bearings, seal and electrical related components. Theory 
and overhaul procedures related to the driveshaft and axle 
assemblies for front and rear wheel drive vehicles is included. 

AST 220 Transaxle and Driveline Service 

3 Credits 

A study of differential and driveline theory and overhaul. 

Includes overhaul and service procedures applicable to gear sets, 

bearings, and seals. Theory and overhaul procedures related to 

the driveshaft and axle assemblies for front and rear wheel drive 

vehicles is included. 

AST 288.02 FORD STST Electronic and Accessory Systems 
3 Credits 

This course is an advanced study of on-board vehicle electronic 
systems, computers and diagnostic equipment. Serial 
communications, scanners and oscilloscopes are integrated with 
concentration on schematic reading and problem solving. Course 
includes operation and diagnosis of various vehicle accessory 
systems. 

AST 288.01 GM STG Electronic and Accessory Systems 
3 Credits 

This course is an advanced study of on-board vehicle electronic 
systems, computers and diagnostic equipment. Serial 
communications, scanners and oscilloscopes are integrated with 
concentration on schematic reading problem solving. Course 
includes operation and diagnosis of various vehicle accessory 
systems. 

AST 288.03 Toyota Electronic and Accessory Systems 
3 Credits 

This course is an advanced study of on-board vehicle electronic 
systems, computers and diagnostic equipment. Serial 
communications, scanners and oscilloscopes are integrated with 
concentration on schematic reading and problem solving. Course 
includes operation and diagnosis of various vehicle accessory 
systems. 

AST 288.04 Electronic and Accessory Systems 
3 Credits 

This course is an advanced study of on-board vehicle electronic 
systems, computers and diagnostic equipment. Serial 
ommunications, scanners and oscilloscopes are integrated with 
concentration on schematic reading and problem solving. Course 
includes operation and diagnosis of various vehicle accessory 
systems. 

BKR 101 Yeast- Raised Breads and Tools 

3 Credits 

Prepares students to produce a variety of yeast-raised breads and 

rolls using both straight dough and sponge dough methods. 

Emphasizes proper mixing, fermentation, make-up proofing and 

baking. 



BKR 102 Plasticized and Sweet Doughs 

3 Credits 

Prepares students to produce a variety of pastries. Emphasizes 

proper poofing, baking and finishing. Focuses on sanitation, 

hygienic work habits and their conformance with health 

regulations. 

BKR 103 Internship 

3 Credits 

Requires students to produce yeast raised and plasticized/sweet 
dough products for limited retail sale for a 12-week period. 
Studies merchandising and marketing, planning, production, 
controlling scrap, cash recaps and all pertinent phases of retail 
bake shop operation. 

BKR 201 Cakes, Icings, and Fillings 

3 Credits 

Requires students to produce and finish a variety of cakes. 

Emphasizes application techniques, color coordination and the 

flavor and texture of fillings. Practices the techniques of basic 

cake decorating. Emphasizes sanitation, hygienic work habits and 

their conformance with health regulations. 

BKR 202 Classical Cake Decorating 
3 Credits 

Presents the six different classical styles of cake decorating, the 
production of gum paste objects which accompany the styles, the 
use of royal icings and investigates the similarities and differences 
between the six styles. Students viall be required to produce 
examples of each style and technique, to include two practical 
examinations. 

BKR 204 Externship 

3 Credits 

Requires practical work experience in chosen area of 
specialization. Students work in an approved site for a minimum 
of 144 hours, complete and submit a detailed log book, and have 
at least two site evaluations by immediate supervisor, one 
evaluation by faculty facihtator and a final group conference. 

BUS 101 Introduction to Business 

3 Credits 

Examines the U.S. business system in relation to the nation's 
economy. Studies business ownership, organization principles and 
problems, management, control facilities, administration and 
development practices of American business enterprises. 

BUS 102 Business Uw 

3 Credits 

Describes the judicial system and the nature and sources of law 
affecting business. Studies contracts, sales and negotiable 
instruments with emphasis on Uniform Commercial Code 
applications. Includes appropriate remedies for breach of contract 
and tort liabilities. Examines business structures and agency. 

BUS 103 Office Administration 

3 Credits 

Covers broad areas of administrative office services and 
management, including office organization, site location, layout 
and environment, records management, systems controls, office 
communication services and devices. 

BUS 105 Principles of Management 

3 Credits 

Describes the functions of managers, including the management of 
activities and personnel. Focuses on application of guidance 
principles in management. 



76 



BUS 202 Human Resource Management 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the activities of human resource management, with 

emphasis on employer-employee relations, job analysis and 

evaluation, salary administration, work measurement and 

standards, performance appraisal and legal compliance. 

BUS 203 Entrepreneurship 

3 Credits 

Explores business operations for the self-employed or managers 

employed in a small business enterprise. 

BUS 204 Case Problems in Management 

3 Credits 

Applies business concepts and principles to specific case studies 

or problems. 

BUS 208 Organizational Behavior 

3 Credits 

Studies human behavior in organizations at the individual and 
group level, including the effect of organizational structure on 
behavior Focuses on using organizational behavior concepts for 
developing and improving interpersonal skills. 

BUS 210 Managerial Finance 

3 Credits 

Improves decision making skills related to the financial resources 
of a firm. Includes techniques of financial analysis, time value of 
money, capital budgeting and risk. 

BUS 280 Co-op/Internship 

1-6 Credits 

Gives students the opportunity to work at a job site that is 

specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job 

experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

CHD 121 Introduction to Early Childhood Profession 

3 Credits 

Introduces the philosophy of early childhood education. Includes 

theories of discipline, parent involvement, self-concept and an 

overview of various early childhood settings. Includes lectures, 

field trips and observations. 

CHD 122 Child Growth and Development 

3 Credits 

Studies the physical, social, emotional and cognitive development 

of children from conception to age eight, as well as their quality 

care and education. Includes lectures and observations. 

CHD 123 Health, Safety, and Nutrition 

3 Credits 

Analyzes basic safety, health, and nutrition needs. Emphasizes 

applications related to early childhood programs. 

CHD 124 Developmental and Cultural Awareness 

3 Credits 

Provides a basic understanding of the anti-bias/multi-cultural 

emphasis in the field of early childhood. Analyzes 

developmentally appropriate practices, theory and 

implementation for various early childhood settings. Includes 

lectures, field trips, review of current literature and observations. 

CHD 125 Curriculum in the Creative Arts 

3 Credits 

Examines materials, methods and teaching of creative arts to 

young children. Offers appropriate music, movement, art and 



drama experiences for use in early childhood settings. Reviews 
theories of development of the young child. 

CHD 128 Practicum I 

2 Credits 

Focuses on observation skills and an introduction to site 

practices. 

CHD 129 Practicum 11 

2 Credits 

Provides opportunity for practical experience through 
observation and supervised participation in child care settings. 
Requires successful completion of the practicum to advance to 
Practicum III. 

CHD 131 Seminar in Guidance Techniques 

2 Credits 

Surveys positive guidance techniques and skills that are effective 
with young children. Provides student with the opportunity to 
observe children and attempt to understand their needs. 

CHD 206 Early Child Administration 

3 Credits 

Introduces principles of managing a child care program. 
Emphasizes the manager's role including personnel and program 
administration and fiscal management. Explores client- 
community relations. 

CHD 209 Families in Transition 

3 Credits 

Examines the stages of the family life cycle and interpersonal 

relationships among family members. 

CHD 211 School- Age Programming 

3 Credits 

Examines materials, methods and teaching styles for creative 
experiences for school age children. Offers appropriate 
experiences in music, movement, art, and drama for use in school 
age child care settings. Reviews theories of adolescent growth 
and development. 

CHD 212 Adolescent Child Growth and Development 

3 Credits 

Studies in a lecture/laboratory setting the physical, social, 

emotional and cognitive development of children 8-15 years old. 

CHD 213 Infant/Toddler Care Programming 

3 Credits 

Studies the physical, social, emotional and cognitive development 

of children 0-36 months old in a lecture/laboratory setting. 

CHD 216 The Exceptional Child 

3 Credits 

Provides an introduction to caring for the exceptional child. 
Includes theories and practices for producing optimal 
developmental growth. Develops teaching techniques. Explores 
public policy, mainstreaming, early intervention and lEPs. 
Explores the types of exceptional children and how to help them. 

CHD 217 Skills for Parenting 

3 Credits 

Focuses on skill development to increase parental effectiveness in 

understanding young children, building their self-esteem, 

communicating with them, setting appropriate boundaries and 

nurturing children's emotional and social development. 



77 



CHD218 Introduction to In-Home Care 

3 Credits 

Reviews child care offered in a home-like setting. Includes 

providing safe, healthy learning environments in the home 

setting, parent-provider relationships and recommendations for 

developing a professional support system. 

CHD 221 Emerging Literacy in Young Children 

3 Credits 

Provides understanding of the development and acquisition of 

language. Explores and evaluates literature for young children. 

Introduces audio-visual material, methods, techniques and 

various types of equipment which are utilized in early childhood 

programs. 

CHD 225 Cognitive Curriculum 

3 Credits 

Reviews cognitive theories to develop appropriate problem 
solving, math, science and social studies skills in early childhood 
settings. Reviews multi-cultural education. 

CHD 230 Child Development Practicum III 

4 Credits 

Provides opportunity for practical experience through 
observation and supervised participation in child care settings. 

CHD 231 Seminar 11 - Issues in Early Childhood Education 

2 Credits 

Companion course to CHD 230. Focuses on the integration of 
knowledge and practices in the field of early childhood and 
explores issues in early childhood. 

CHD 240 Child Development Associate Preparation 

3 Credits 

Meets requirements of the Council for Early Childhood 
Professional Recognition for academic preparation for the Child 
Development Associate credential. Provides students with the 
theoretical knowledge to support competent performance in a 
child care setting. Provides review of CDA competencies. 

CHD 242 Curriculum Planning for Early Childhood 
Administrators 

3 Credits 

Presents an overview of cognitive and creative curriculum from a 
developmentally appropriate prospective. Emphasizes planning 
and evaluating curriculum to meet comprehensive needs of the 
young child. 

CHD 281-293 Special Topics in Child Development 

1-5 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, 
workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. 
Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

CIS 101 Introduction to Microcomputers 

3 Credits 

Introduces the physical components and operations of 

microcomputers. Focuses on computer literacy and provides 

hands-on training in three areas of microcomputer application 

software: word processing, electronic spreadsheets and database 

management. 



CIS 102 Data Processing Fundamentals 
3 Credits 

Introduces data processing and programming with emphasis on 
hands-on computer experience. Examines the role of data 
processing in an organization, including data processing 
applications, computer hardware and software, internal data 
representation, stored program concepts, systems and 
programming design, flowcharting and data communications. 
Reviews the history of computers, related computer careers, the 
social impact of computers and computer security. 

CIS 104 Introduction to COBOL Programming 

3 Credits 

Provides an introduction to COBOL (Common Business Oriented 

Language) with major emphasis on developing structured 

programming skills. Develops proficiency in applying the 

programming development cycle to elementary business 

problems. 

CIS 105 Operating Systems 
3 Credits 

Studies computer operating systems, purposes, structure and 
various functions. Provides general understanding of how 
comprehensive sets of language translators and service programs, 
operating under supervisory coordination of an integrated control 
program, form the total operating systems of a computer 

CIS 106 Microcomputer Operating System 

3 Credits 

Introduces the organization, structure and functions of an 
operating system for a microcomputer. Presents the student wdth 
operating system concepts such as commands, error messages, 
interrupts, function calls, device drivers, structure, files and 
organization. Incorporates concepts into practical apphcations. 

CIS 107 Microcomputer Programming 

3 Credits 

Introduces a structured microcomputer language. Concepts in 

input/output commands, arithmetic expressions, conditional 

control. Iteration techniques and subroutines will be stressed. 

Concepts viall be incorporated into the application of solving 

business problems. 

CIS 109 UNIX Operating System 

3 Credits 

Studies the UNIX V Operaring System and its use as a dme- 

sharing operating system. Includes basic UNIX commands, use of 

the visual editor, the UNIX directory structure and file 

management with SHELL commands. Offers opportunities to 

apply skills and knowledge in a laboratory environment. 

CIS 110 Basic Programming Language 
3 Credits 

Introduces concepts of program design and programming using 
the BASIC programming language, a popular language for use 
with microcomputers. Includes overview of basic arithmetic 
operations, accumulating and printing totals, comparing, array 
processing and interactive programming. Offers students an 
opportunity to apply skills in a laboratory environment. 



78 



CIS 113 Logic, Design and Programming 
3 Credits 

Introduces the structured techniques necessary for efficient 
solution of business-related computer programming logic and 
coding solutions into a high-level programming using a 
microcomputer Reviews algorithm development, flowcharting, 
input/output techniques, looping, modules, selection structures, 
and control breaks. Offers students an opportunity to apply 
programming skills in a laboratory environment using the QBasic 
language, a popular language for use with microcoputers. 

CIS 115 Electronic Spreadsheets in Business 

3 Credits 

Provides conceptual and hands-on instruction in the use of 

spreadsheet software including worksheet, graphics and database 

operations with applications to the solution of business problems. 

CIS 201 Database Design & Management 
3 Credits 

Introduces program applications in a database environment and 
includes discussion of data structures; indexed and direct file 
organizations; data models, including hierarchical, network, and 
relational; storage devices, data administration and analysis; 
design and implementation. Allows students to use database 
software in creating, modifying, retrieving and reporting from 
databases. Develops business application using a database 
language. 

CIS 202 Data Communications 

3 Credits 

Introduces concepts of data communications for computer 

programming students to build a foundation of knowledge upon 

which to add new technologies. 

CIS 203 Systems Analysis and Design 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction for creating or modifying a system by 

gathering details, analyzing data, designing systems to provide 

solutions and implementing and maintaining the systems. 

CIS 204 Advanced COBOL Programming 

3 Credits 

Continues topics introduced in Introduction to COBOL with 

more logically complex business problems. Develops a higher 

level of COBOL proficiency, as well as greater familiarity with 

debugging techniques. Uses the structured approach through 

class instruction and laboratory experience. 

CIS 205 Database Design 
3 Credits 

Introduces program applications in a database environment with 
emphasis on loading, modifying and querying the database by 
means of a host language (COBOL). Discusses data structures, 
indexed and direct file organizations, models of data, including 
hierarchical, network and relational, storage devices, data 
administration and analysis, design and implementation. 

CIS 206 Systems Development with High-Level Tools 

3 Credits 

Analyzes established and evolving methodologies for the 

development of business-oriented computer information systems. 

Develops competencies in techniques that apply modern software 

tools to generate applications directly, without requiring detailed 

and highly technical program writing efforts. 



CIS 207 Microcomputer Database Management Systems 
3 Credits 

Presents an overview of relational, hierarchical and network 
database models with emphasis on microcomputer relational 
database management systems (DBMS). Provides practical 
experience in using database software to create, modify, retrieve 
and report. Develops business applications using the database 
language. 

CIS 208 Electronic Spreadsheets 

3 Credits 

Presents an in-depth study of an electronic spreadsheet. Focuses 

on business applications using menu commands, formulas, 

functions, macro commands, graphs, printing, database and file 

operations. 

CIS 209 Computer Business Applications 
3 Credits 

Requires students to apply business, microcomputer and 
communication skills within business applications. Emphasizes 
application of several forms of computerized information 
processing including data processing, word processing, 
spreadsheets, graphics and communications. Analyzes the effects 
of automation on the office worker, management and the work 
environment and requires written and oral presentations. 

CIS 210 COBOL III 

3 Credits 

Emphasizes file handling techniques on tape and direct access 

devices and the use of libraries via the COBOL CALL and COPY 

verbs. Introduces variant forms of the structured approach and 

unstructured concepts such as the GO TO verb. Helps students 

develop good programming practices and an entry-level COBOL 

competency 

CIS 211 RPG Programming Fundamentals 

3 Credits 

Provides a general introduction to the RPG programming 
language with emphasis on hands-on programming experience. 
Presents the most important features of the RPG language from 
input/output processing to applications requiring handling. 
Introduces language concepts in class lecture. Includes 
programming lab assignments. 

CIS 212 "C" Programming 

3 Credits 

Provides a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts 
involved when using a low development language. Emphasizes 
one logical program design using a modular approach involving 
task-oriented program functions. Discusses the role of data types, 
storage classes and addressable memory locations. 

CIS 213 Assembler Language Program 

3 Credits 

Gives students a basic understanding of the assembler process 
using IBM mainframe computers. Stresses the importance of 
byte -wise manipulation of data fields when using low-level 
languages. Emphasizes the actual workings of a computer during 
the execution of a computer program. Discusses the role of data 
types, EBCIDIC format of data storage and addressable memory 
locations. 



79 



CIS 214 Pascal Programming .. ... 

3 Credits 

Provides a basic understanding of the structured programming 
process necessary for successful Pascal programming. 
Emphasizes top down program design and modularity, using 
Pascal procedures, functions and independent subprograms. 
Discusses simple and advanced data types and program control 
aids, algorithm development and program debugging. Provides 
students with a fundamental understanding of good programming 
technique and a basic knowledge of Pascal syntax and structure. 

CIS 215 Field Study 

4 Credits 

Provides opportunity for a field project or research case study 
within the computer technology field. Includes collection and 
analysis of data and/or actual work experience in business or 
industry. 

CIS 216 Advanced RPG Programming 

3 Credits 

Offers advanced study in the use of the RPG compiler language in 

solving business problems. Focuses on file processing methods 

and a working knowledge of advanced features and techniques 

through laboratory experience. 

CIS 220 Shell Command Language 

3 Credits 

Teaches students how to write, test and debug shell procedures on 
a computer utilizing a UNIX operating system. Presents the shell 
and how it works, shell processes, variables, keyword and 
positional parameters, control constructs, special substitutions, 
pipelines, debugging aids, error/interrupt processing and shell 
command line. Offers students the opportunity to apply skills in 
a laboratory environment. 

CIS 221 Advanced C+ Programming 

3 Credits 

Continues those topics introduced in -C+ Language Programming 

with emphasis on array processing, file processing and advanced 

debugging techniques. Provides the opportunity to apply skills in 

a laboratory environment. 

CIS 222 Office Automation 
3 Credits 

Presents a perspective on the needs, potentials and urgencies of 
systems to support modem office functions. Concentrates on 
structured analysis and design of hardware/software systems for 
creating, maintaining, printing and communicating data files 
utilizing text processing systems. Covers methodologies for 
creating procedures to produce letters and reports from data files. 
Incorporates concepts and techniques into practical applications. 

CIS 223 Integrated Business Software 
3 Credits 

Presents knowledge of integrated microcomputer software 
concepts. Students design a complete business system utilizing all 
parts of an integrated microcomputer software package which can 
share the same data and manipulate it. Includes use of word 
processing, electronic spreadsheets, graphics, databases and 
command language. 



CIS 224 Hardware and Software Troubleshooting 
3 Credits 

Presents an in-depth analysis of the components of a computer 
system and their relationship to each other. Includes concepts of 
parallel and serial connectivity, installation and maintenance of 
software, peripheral devices, interface cards and device drivers. 
Analyzes realistic hardware/software problems encountered in the 
workplace and techniques and procedures used to implement 
solutions. 

CIS 225 Advanced Database Management Systems 

3 Credits 

Continues CIS 207 Microcomputer Database Management 

Systems. Emphasizes the development of advanced applications 

in database management. 

CIS 226 Advanced Electronic Spreadsheets 

3 Credits 

Continues CIS 208 Electronic Spreadsheets. Emphasizes the 

advanced application of electronic spreadsheets. 

CIS 227 Topics in Information Management 

3 Credits 

Discusses topics of current interest in information management. 
Focuses on special interest projects. Utilizes field trips, guest 
speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars. 

CIS 228 Cooperative Education 

1-9 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to apply concepts learned 
in the classroom to actual work situations. Requires program 
advisor approval. 

CIS 229 Seminar I 

1 Credit 

Discusses topics of current interest in computerized information 
management with an emphasis on the application of information 
management skills during lab time. Various seminar topics may 
be identified and offered each term under this course number. 

CIS 230 Seminar II 

2 Credits 

Discusses topics of current interest in computerized information 
management with emphasis on application of information 
management skills during lab time. Identifies and offers various 
seminar topics each term under this course number. 

CIS 232 Visual Basic Programming 

3 Credits 

Provides a basic understanding of fundamental concepts involved 
when using a member of a Windows programming development 
language. Emphasizes logical program design using a modular 
approach involving task-oriented program functions. Allows the 
design of a Windows user interface constructed in an erector-set- 
like fashion. Builds an application by selecting forms and 
controls, assigning properties and writing code. 

CIS 233 Graphic User Interfaces: Windows 

3 Credits 

Provides a foundation of fundamental concepts in the use of 

Windows-type software. Explores the Windows operating 

system, accessories and various applications. Develops a 

proficiency with Windows operations including customizing the 

environment, integrating applications and managing files. 



80. 



CIS 234 XBase Programming Language 

3 Credits 

Provides a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts 

involved when using a high-level development database language. 

Emphasizes logical program design using a modular approach. 

Provides a sound foundation of fundamental concepts, such as 

the XBase functions. 

CIS 235 Local Area Networks 
3 Credits 

Studies local area networks, their topologies and functions. 
Provides a general understanding of the basic LAN protocols. 
Covers utilization of application software using a local area 
network to share resources among network members, transferring 
files between users, set-up and administration of a network, 
identification of hardware and software needs and LAN to 
mainframe connectivity. 

CIS 240 Introduction to Computer Integrated Manufacturing 
3 Credits 

Includes the study of all major components of computer- 
integrated manufacturing (business, engineering and shop floor) 
as an integrated whole. Includes the planning of a project which 
will be formally documented and presented by the students and 
implemented in CIS 241. 

CIS 241 Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Project 

3 Credits 

Covers the major components of computer-integrated 

manufacturing (business, engineering and shop floor) as an 

integrated whole. Covers advanced CIM applications and 

includes the implementation of a project in a realistic CIM 

environment. 

CIS 280 Co-op/Internship 

1-6 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to work at a job site that 
is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the- 
job experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

CIS 281-293 Special Topics in Computer Information 

Systems 
1-5 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, 
workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. 
Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

CTR 114 Institutional Catering 

3 Credits 

The fundamentals of catering: the business of supplying food, 

goods, and organized service for public and private functions. 

Includes staffing, equipment, transportation, contracting, special 

arrangements, beverage service, and menu planning. Also covers 

cold food preparation and presentation techniques. 

CTR 214 Catering Administration 

3 Credits 

This course teaches the correct procedures in event bookings, 

contracts, recordkeeping and event follow-up. In addition, fringe 

services, human resource issues and cost control concepts. 

CUL 105 Institutional Food Service 

2 Credits 

Introduces students to the variety of institutional food service 

facilities. Includes converting recipes for quantity food 



production, calculating per portion cost and determining 
profitable selling price. 

CUL 110 Meat Cutting 

2 Credits 

Purchasing, receiving, aging and proper storage procedures will 
be identified. Emphasis will be placed on primal cuts and sub- 
primal cuts, federal inspection, grading, yields, and the 
classifications of meats, poultry, and game. 

CUL 202 Specialized Cuisine 

3 Credits 

Introduces students to foods from various cultures. Provides a 
background in the history of foods from various countries and 
develops food preparation skills. Covers table service and table 
side food preparation. 

CUL 204 Classical Pastries 
3 Credits 

Familiarizes students with Classic French, Italian and European 
desserts. Discusses names and terminology of desserts. Includes 
the preparation of goods such as puff pastry, specialty cookies, 
ganache, parlimosa creams and fillings and specialty sauces. 
Emphasizes size, consistency, presentation, eye appeal and taste of 
pastries. 

CUL 205 Fish and Seafood 

2 Credits 

Familiarizes students with professional techniques in identifying, 
purchasing, handling, storing, marketing, and preparing fish and 
seafood. 

CUL 206 Externship 

3 Credits 

Provides students vnlh practical work experience in chosen areas 
of specialization. 

CUL 211 Classical Cuisine 
3 Credits 

Presents advanced and sophisticated classical culinary methods 
following the principles and techniques of Escoffier Studies 
cooking techniques, timing, presentation, history and terms 
pertaining to classical foods and menus, with emphasis on French 
cuisines. Provides practical experience in table service operation, 
kitchen coordination and timing. 

CUL 212 Fish and Seafood 

2 Credits 

Discusses the importance of fish and seafood in today's market. 
Includes types and categories of American and imported fish and 
shell fish, and proper buying, storage, preparation and 
merchandising of fish and seafood. Provides experience in 
boning, cutting and cooking methods appropriate for seafood. 

CUL 288 Special Topics in Culinary Arts Technology 
1-5 Credits 

OCT 104 Product Drafting 

3 Credits 

Introduces the set concept of working drawings both in detailing 
and assembly. Presents fastening devices, thread symbols and 
nomenclature, surface texture symbols, classes of fits, and the use 
of parts lists, titles and revision blocks. Introduces the basics of 
product design and the design process. 



81 



DCT 105 Facilities Design and Layout ' 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the architectural drawings of commercial or industrial 
buildings. Covers problems of space planning, design, materials, 
HVAC systems and construction methods. Develops working 
drawings and presentation drawings. Requires oral presentations 
and discussions. Requires students to complete research on a 
hmited number of construction materials and methods. 

DCT 109 Construction Materials and Specifications 

3 Credits 

introduces various construction materials, composition and 
application. Studies specifications of materials, construction 
contracts and applications required in the building industry. 

DCT 113 Intermediate CAD .■•,"> - ■ 

3 Credits 

Continues study of CAD fundamentals. Focuses on advanced 
CAD features and various methods of customizing CAD systems. 

DCT 201 Schematic Drafting 

3 Credits 

Presents the systematic layout of various types of schematic 
drawing done by a draftsperson. Requires students to prepare 
finished drawings for manufacture or installation of plumbing, 
heating, electrical, electronic and fluid-power type drawing. 

DCT 202 CAD Programming Language 

3 Credits 

Covers use of AutoLlSP programming language to customize 

Autocad programs and and menus. Students will learn to execute 

macros and simple LISP programs. 

DCT 204 Architectural CAD 

3 Credits 

Presents advanced computer-aided design topics, including 
architectural design. Includes all necessary drawings needed for 
the construction process. 

DCT 206 Mechanical and Electrical Equipment 

3 Credits 

Focuses on mechanical and electrical requirements for a , , 

structure. Studies electrical load calculations, wire sizing and 
circuits. Calculates plumbing requirements, fixture units and 
pipe sizing. Includes heating systems, duct layout and sizing. 

DCT 208 Structural Detailing 

3 Credits 

Focuses on detailing commercial structural members, their 
connections, materials and methods of construction. 
Concentrates on traditional materials, such as reinforced 
concrete, masonry, steel and timber. 

DCT 210 Surveying 1 

3 Credits 

Introduces surveying equipment, procedures for performing 

measurements, turning angles, determining grades and other field 

applications. Covers surveying techniques and computations 

using the level, chain and transit in calculating areas, lines and 

grades. 

DCT 213 CAD Mapping 

3 Credits ' ' 

Covers the concepts of map making with computer-aided drafting 
and typical drafting media found in the industry. Studies civil 
engmeermg applications of mapping procedures including 
profiles, topography and site plans. 



DCT 216 Jig and Fixture Design 

3 Credits 

Introduces the processes of drafting and design as applied to 
tooling. Emphasizes tooling, locators, supports, holding devices, 
clearances and design as it pertains to jig and fixtures. 

DCT 217 Product Design 

3 Credits 

Provides the student an opportunity to apply all previously 
acquired knowledge in product drafting to the design of a new or 
existing consumer product. Considers the function, esthetics, 
cost economics and marketability of the product. Requires a 
research paper and product illustration. 

DCT 228 Civil 1 

3 Credits 

Explores the engineering field. Presents an overview of 

infrastructure design, including the study of roadways and 

drainage systems. Emphasizes site development and highway 

planning. 

DCT 229 Civil 11 

3 Credits 

Presents construction management techniques, including 

scheduling and contracts. Studies soil properties and paving 

methods. Examines practical construction considerations. 

DCT 230 Fundamentals of Computer Animation 

3 Credits 

Covers the fundamentals involved in the creation of computer 
renderings and animation utilizing 3 dimensional software. 3D 
Studio""^" will be studied and implemented to create quality 
images and animations from 3 dimensional geometry. Topics 
covered include an introduction to the 3D Studio"^" interface and 
its 5 modules, color and motion theory, and animation concepts 
through and on exercises. 

DSN 221 Statics 

3 Credits 

Studies applied mechanics dealing with bodies at rest. Covers 

units, vectors, forces, equilibrium, moments and couples, planar 

force systems, distributed forces, analysis of structures (trusses 

and frames) and friction. 

DSN 222 Strength of Materials 

3 Credits 

Studies internal stresses and physical deformations caused by 
externally applied loads to structural members. Covers stress and 
strain, shear stress, properties of areas, shearing force and bending 
moment, deformation of beams, columns and combined stresses. 
Teaches various materials physical and mechanical properties. 

ELT 100 Circuits I 

4 Credits 

This course is the study of electrical principles and laws 
pertaining to DC circuits. The relationship of passive 
components when used in simple and complex circuits are 
analyzed. Ohm's law, Kirchhoffs laws, ammeters, voltmeters, 
ohmmeters, capacitance, and power are discussed. Magnetism, 
magnetic induction, inductance and AC principles are introduced. 
Hands-on laboratory experience in understanding understanding 
electrical principles is stressed. Soldering and fabrication 
techniques are discussed and practiced, culminating with a 
project fabricated and tested by the student. Pre-requisite MAT 
HI, pre or co-requisite MAT 131. 



82 



ELT 101 Circuits II 

4 Credits 

This course is the study of electrical principles and laws 
pertaining to alternating current and voltage. DC and AC 
network theorems, j operator, phasers, reactances, impedances, 
phase relationships, power, resonance, transformers, polyphase 
and filter circuits are studied. Pre-requisite ELT 100, pre or co- 
requisite MAT 132 is recommended, but not required. 

ELT 103 Digital Principles 

3 Credits 

Introduces digital electronics, including logic gates and 
combinational logic circuits. Studies binary arithmetic. Boolean 
algebra, mapping techniques, digital encoders and decoders, 
multiplexers and demultiplexers and arithmetic circuits. Uses SSI 
and MSI digital integrated circuits. Pre-requisite BSA 032, pre or 
co-requisite BSA 025, MAT 111. 

ELT 105 Solid State I 

4 Credits 

Studies characteristics and applications of semiconductor devices 
and circuits. Covers signal and rectifying diodes, bipolar 
transistors, rectification, single and multistage amplifiers, AC/DC 
load lines, biasing techniques, equivalent circuits and power 
amplifiers. Pre or co-requisite ELT 101. 

ELT 106 Digital Applications 
4 Credits 

Offers advanced study of digital systems, including memory and 
D/A and A/D conversion. Covers construction of specified timing 
circuits, design driver/display systems, selected register design, 
counters and arithmetic circuits and validation of operation. 
Studies hardware and general microprocessor system 
organization. Pre or co-requisite ELT 101 and ELT 105; 
Pre-reequisite ELT 103 

ELT 201 Solid State II 

4 Credits 

Studies applications of special-purpose diodes, thyristors and 
unipolar transistors. Discusses frequency effects and response of 
amplifiers. Includes discreet SCRs, UJTs, FETs, oscillators, linear 
regulated power supplies, switching regulators and power 
amplifiers. Introduces op-amps. Prerequisite ELT 105, co- 
requisite ELT 288.01. 

ELT 202 Microprocessors 

4 Credits 

Introduces microprocessor system organization, operation, 
design, troubleshooting and programming. Investigates and 
analyzes a microprocessor instruction set for its operation. 
Includes programming and interfacing a microprocessor. Pre- 
requisites ELT 105 and TEC 104. 

ELT 203 Introduction to Industrial Controls 
3 Credits 

An overview of electronics as applied in the industrial setting. 
Introduction to various applications of industrial systems and 
how electronics is applied to these systems. Introduces power 
electronics, ladder logic, digital control, DC power supplies, SCRs 
and other thyristors. Variable speed control for DC and AC 
motors will be covered. Standby power supplies will be 
introduced. Pre-requisite ELT 106 and 223, pre-or co-requisite 
ELT 201 and 288.01 

ELT 214 Industrial Instrumentation 

3 Credits 

This is a hands-on, intensive lecture/lab course which emphasizes 



precision measurement via temperature, pressure, strain, pH, 
force, flow and level gauges. Instruction will cover the related 
probes, sensors, transducers, computer interfaces, computer 
hardware and peripherals, and computer software necessary for 
the acquisition, summarization, analysis and presentation of data. 
Process control for temperature, pressure, flow and level will be 
introduced. Pre-requisite or co-requisite ELT 201 and ELT 
288.01. 

ELT 223 Electrical Machines 
3 Credits 

Provides an overview of electrical machines and how they relate 
to industrial electronics. Gives industrial electronics technicians 
insight into electrical power generation, polyphase system, 
transformers, all types of electrical motors, power factor and 
power factor correction, back-up power and electrical power 
monitoring. Pre-requisite ELT 101. 

ELT 227 Peripherals 
3 Credits 

Studies peripherals and their interfacing with computers and 
microcomputers. Includes a study of data communications 
hardware and techniques. Studies the design of circuits to 
interface microprocessors with industrial equipment. Includes 
microcomputer systems interfacing with input and output 
transducers for control systems. Studies techniques for logical 
troubleshooting of microcomputer systems. Pre-requisite TEC 
104, ELT 105 and 106, pre or co-requisite ELT 202. 

ELT 228 Communications Electronics 

3 Credits 

Analyzes communication circuits with emphasis on AM, FM, SSB 
and stereo transmitter and receiver systems. Includes noise, 
modulation and demodulation principles, phase-locked loop, RF 
amplifiers, automatic gain control, detectors, limiters and 
discriminators. Offers hands-on lab exposure to analog circuits 
utilizing analysis and troubleshooting techniques. Pre-requisite 
ELT 105, pre or co-requisite ELT 201and 288.01. 

ELT 229 Telecommunications 
3 Credits 

Examines various methods in transmitting digital data from one 
location to another. Covers time and frequency division 
multiplexing. Includes pulse-code and delta modulation, 
telemetry, error detection and correction and simple networks. 
Covers techniques for logical troubleshooting of telephonic 
systems. Pre-requisite TEC 104, ELT 105 and 106, pre or co- 
requisite ELT 202. 

ELT 230 Advanced Communications Electronics 

3 Credits 

Introduces antenna principles and wave propagation and an in- 
depth study of matching techniques for transmission lines. 
Measures radiation patterns with different antenna arrays. 
Includes the Smith Chart and a thorough study of television 
operation. Practices digital and analog troubleshooting and 
signal tracing techniques on a color TV set. Pre-requisite ELT 
228. 

ELT 231 Microwave Communications 
3 Credits 

This course will include an overview of microwave transmission 
lines, wavequide components and systems. To include satellite 
earth stations, microwave relay systems and radar. Optic fibers 
and lasers as they relate to microwave, will also be covered. Pre- 
requisite ELT 228. 



83 



ELT 280 Co-op/Internship 

1-6 Credits 

Provides students the opportunity to work at a job site that is 
specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job 
experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

ELT 281-293 Special Topics in Electronics Technology 
1-5 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, 
workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. 

ELT 288.01 Special Topics in Solid State 

1 Credit 

Introduction to Operational Amplifiers (Op Amps), 
characteristics and operations. Covers inverting and noninverting 
amplifiers, differential amplifiers, waveform generation, linear 
regulators, switching regulators and voltage comparators. 
Pre-requisite ELT 105; co-requisite ELT 201 

ENV 104 Plant Operations-Sanitary 

3 Credits 

Provides the basic principles of aerobic and anaerobic biological 

treatment processes, including activated sludge, trickling filters, 

lagoons, sludge handling and disinfection. Reviews state and 

federal regulations related to wastewater plants. 

ENV 208 Plant Operations-Industrial 

3 Credits 

Covers wastewater treatment processes including coagulation, 
sedimentation, activated sludge, neutralization, equalization, 
cyanide and chromate removal. Presents instrumentation, 
maintenance and troubleshooting. Includes operations, 
laboratory testing and associated mathematics. 

EST 104 Food Production, Methods, and Procedures 
3 Credits 

Provides study of and application of food production methods 
and procedures with an emphasis on soups, sauces and gravies. 

EST 105 Quality Service Standards 

3 Credits 

Provides students with techniques of serving, bussing and 

cashiering in dining operations. 

EST 106 Application of Eood Service Production I 

3 Credits 

Provides the knowledge and applications of the principles of 
pantry production, baking, vegetable and fruit preparation, 
pastries and breakfast cookery 

EST 108 Application of Eood Service Production II 

3 Credits 

Provides knowledge and application of production methods and 

procedures for meat, seafood, poultry, diary products and hot hors 



EST 109 Computer Eood Service Spreadsheets 

3 Credits 

Introduces microcomputers and specific food service applications. 

Covers basic procedures for food service spreadsheet applications 

involving analysis and reporting using Lotus 1-2-3 or compatible 

software. 



GRA 202 Science of Color 

3 Credits 

Presents physical properties of light, and color and psychological 
aspects of color perception and relationships through creative 
exercises. Examines color theories of Itten, Munsell, Goethe, 
Chevreul and Albers. 

HEA 101 Heating Eundamentals 

3 Credits 

Introduces fundamentals applicable to the heating phase of air 

conditioning. Includes types of units, parts, basic controls, 

functions and applications. Emphasizes practices, tools and meter 

uses, temperature measurement, heat flow, and tubing installation 

and connecting practices. 

HEA 103 Refrigeration I 

3 Credits 

Introduces compression systems used in mechanical refrigeration, 

including the refrigeration cycle. Introduces safety procedures 

and proper uses of tools used to install and service refrigeration 

equipment. 

HEA 104 Heating Service 
3 Credits 

Covers procedures used to analyze mechanical and electrical 
problems encountered when servicing heating systems, including 
gas, oil, electric and hydronic heating equipment. Considers 
electrical schematic and diagrams, combustion testing, venting 
and combustion air requirements, installation and service 
procedures. 

HEA 106 Refrigeration II 

3 Credits 

Continues Refrigeration I with further study of basic system 

components and an introduction to troubleshooting procedures. 

Includes clean-up procedures following compressor burn-out and 

analysis of how a single problem affects the rest of the system. 

HEA 107 Duct Eabrication & Installation 
3 Credits 

Emphasizes reading blueprints common to the sheet metal trade, 
floor plans, elevations, section, detail and mechanical plans. 
Requires students to develop a layout of an air conditioning 
system, layout of duct work and fittings and fabrication of these 
parts, including proper use of hand-tools and shop equipment 
used to fabricate duct work and fittings. 

HEA 201 Cooling Service 

3 Credits 

Covers procedures used to diagnose electrical control problems 

found in residential air conditioning and refrigeration systems, 

including 24-volt and line voltage controls such as defrost timers, 

defrost heaters, relays and cold controls with emphasis on 

schematic and pictorial diagrams. 

HEA 202 Electrical Circuits & Controls 

3 Credits 

Studies various kinds of heating, air conditioning and 
refrigeration controls. Includes gas, oil, cooling and electric heat 
controls, thermostats and other kinds of variable controls such as 
humidistats, aquastats and electronic thermostats and 
temperature controls. Covers operation of controls and how they 
are integrated into complex systems by using schematic and 
pictorial diagrams. Presents component troubleshooting and 
testing. 



Si 



HEA 204 Commercial Refrigeration 

3 Credits 

Examines air conditioning and refrigeration systems for 
commercial use, including medium- and low-temperature 
applications. Includes refrigeration accessories, metering devices 
and advance control arrangements. 

HEA 205 Heat Pump Systems 
3 Credits 

Provides an understanding of the different types of heat pumps 
available for use today. Familiarizes students with the 
refrigeration cycle as it applies to the heat pump systems. 
Provides students with the opportunity to draw, trace and follow 
an electrical schematic of a heat pump with refrigerant. Includes 
selecting the proper heat pump, recording heat loss and gain 
calculations for the space available. Provides instruction in 
mechanical components and in troubleshooting a non- 
functioning heat pump. 

HEA 206 Advanced Cooling Service 

3 Credits 

Considers methods of troubleshooting electrical and mechanical 

components of commercial and industrial air conditioning 

including chillers used in high and low pressure systems. 

HEA 212 Advanced HVAC Controls 

3 Credits 

Covers control systems beyond ordinary residential and single 

zone commercial applications. Includes solid state controls, 

zoning controls, modulating controls, low ambient controls, heat 

recovery and energy management controls, economizer controls 

and pneumatic controls. 

HEA 213 Sales and Service Management 
3 Credits 

Encompasses the use of blueprints, specifications, AlA 
documents, application data sheets, bid forms and contracts in 
estimating materials and labor in the HVAC business. Includes 
advertising, direct labor, indirect labor, overhead, warranty 
overages, taxes, permits, subcontracts, margins, mark-ups and 
profit. Provides students with the opportunity to estimate service 
contracts and study service organization, service procedures, 
record keeping, parts inventory control and insurance liability. 

HEA 220 Distribution Systems 
3 Credits 

Covers methods used in calculating building envelop heat loss 
and gain in sizing units for residential and light commercial 
application. Studies the relationship of air properties to 
temperature and the design of systems for residential and light 
commercial structures. Includes the sizing and configurations of 
air delivery duct systems. 

HEA 221 Heat Pumps and Cooling Service 
3 Credits 

Covers procedures used to diagnose electrical control problems 
found in residential air-to-air, geothermal heat pump and cooling 
systems, including 24 volt and line voltage controls. Familiarizes 
students with the refrigeration cycle as it applies to the heat 
pump. Covers correct charging procedures and sizing of heat 
pumps. Includes trouble-shooting of heat pumps and cooling 
systems such as defrost timers, defrost heaters, relays and cold 
controls with emphasis on schematic and pictorial diagrams. 



HHS 101 Medical Terminology 
3 Credits 

Addresses basic terminology required of the allied health 
professional. Presents Greek and Latin prefixes, as well as 
suffixes, word roots and combining forms. Emphasizes forming a 
solid foundation for a medical vocabulary including meaning, 
spelling and pronunciation. Includes medical abbreviations, signs 
and symbols. 

HHS 102 Medical Law and Ethics 

2 Credits 

Presents ethics of medicine and medical practice, as well as legal 
requirements and implications for allied health professions. 

HHS 103 Dosage Calculation 

1 Credit 

Introduces the mathematical concepts required of the allied 

health professional to accurately administer medications. 

HHS 104 CPR and Basic Health Awareness 

1 Credit 

Provides students with information necessary to recognize the 
need for one and two person cardiopulmonary resuscitation 
(CPR) as it relates to adults, children and infants. Requires 
students to safely perform CPR. 

HMS 101 Introduction to Human Services 

3 Credits 

Explores the history of human services, career opportunities and 
the role of the human service worker Focuses on target 
populations and community agencies designed to meet the need 
of various populations. 

HMS 102 Helping Relationship Techniques 

3 Credits 

Examines the helping process in terms of skills, helping stages 

and issues involved in a helping relationship. Introduces major 

theories of helping. 

HMS 103 Interviewing and Assessment 

3 Credits 

Develops skills in interviewing and provides a base for students to 
build personal styles. Introduces a variety of assessment 
approaches and treatment planning. Utilizes case studies and 
recording exercises. 

HMS 104 Crisis Intervention 

3 Credits 

Provides beginning training for individuals presently working 

with people in crisis situations or planning to do so. 

HMS 105 Criminal Justice Systems 

3 Credits 

Introduces the study of crime and criminals and how society is 

affected. 

HMS 106 Physiology of Aging 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the physical changes and common pathologies 
associated with the aging process. Includes the psychological and 
social implications of changes for human behavior. Focuses on 
health promotion and disease prevention. 



85 



HMS 107 Human Services Topical Seminar 

3 Credits 

Discusses topics of current interest in human services. Focuses 

on special interest projects for students in human services. 

Utihzes field trips, guest speakers, audio-visual activities and 

seminars. 

HMS 108 Psychology of Aging 
3 Credits 

Covers the major behavioral changes in adulthood and aging. 

HMS 109 Famihes in American Culture 
3 Credits 

Covers the impact of change on the role and function of the 
modem family, the nature of the socialization process and socio- 
economic, cultural and ethnic factors that nurture or inhibit the 
family+s capacity to function. 

HMS 1 1 1 L.T.C. Activity Director 

3 Credits 

Explores the philosophy and investigates the development of 

therapeutic activity programs for residents living in nursing 

homes. Focuses on offering activities which meet an individuals 

physical, social and emotional needs. 

HMS 112 Recreation for Special Populations 

3 Credits 

Studies the nature and etiology of impairments including 
developmental disabihties, mental illness, physical disabilities and 
geriatrics and their potential impact upon an individual+s ability 
to participate in recreational activities. Explores techniques 
needed to conduct a recreation program which allows successful 
participation by an individual with a disability. 

HMS 113 Problems of Substance Abuse in Society 

3 Credits 

Provides basic information about alcohol and drugs and the laws 

which pertain to their abuse. Explores current attitudes and 

practices which pertain to alcohol and drug use, misuses and 

dependence. 

HMS 1 14 Social Services in Long-Term Care 

3 Credits 

Provides practical and useful information about aging and 
institutionalization. Focuses on the role of social services within 
the long-term care facility. 

HMS 120 Health and Aging 

3 Credits 

Provides holistic overview of the physical, psychological and 

social needs of individuals who live in extended care facilities. 

Examines effective treatment modalities to meet the resident's 

various needs. 

HMS 122 Introduction to Residential Treatment 

3 Credits 

Introduces information, skills and attitudes necessary to become 

an effective worker in residential treatment. Explores basic 

developmental needs, planning and use of activities, and issues 

related to the team approach. Discusses and demonstrates 

observation and recording of behavior. 

HMS 130 Social Aspects of Aging 

3 Credits 

Covers major theories and patterns of aging in American society. 



Covers social institutions and cultural factors that affect the aging 
process. 

HMS 140 Loss and Grief 

3 Credits 

Provides practical and useful information for anyone who has 
experienced a loss. Addresses the problems of loss and grief and 
how to develop coping skills. 

HMS 150 Special Population Needs and Activities 

3 Credits 

Recognizes and utilizes social activities and recreation as a viable 
form of therapeutic intervention based on the client's limitations 
or special needs. 

HMS 201 Internship I 

4 Credits 

Provides field work experience in an approved social, 
educational, law enforcement, corrections or other community 
service organization. Requires 12 to 14 hours of work experience 
each week. 

HMS 202 Internship II 

4 Credits 

Continues Internship 1. Requires 12 to 14 hours of work 

experience each week. 

HMS 203 Internship Seminar I 

3 Credits 

Permits small group discussion and analysis of the human 
services practicum experience. Includes special learning 
objectives related to the kind of work students do after 
completing the program. 

HMS 204 Internship Seminar II 

3 Credits 

Continues Internship Seminar 1 with different learning 

objectives. Relates objectives to the work the student will do after 

completion of the program. 

HMS 205 Behavioral/Reality Techniques 

3 Credits 

Focuses on theories of behavioral and reality approaches. 

Develops understanding of terms and practical applications of the 

behavioral and reality approaches used in working with people. 

HMS 206 Group Process and Skills 

3 Credits 

Studies group dynamics, issues and behavior. Includes group 

functioning and leadership, guidelines on working effectively 

with a co-leader and practical ways of evaluating the group 

process. 

HMS 207 Program Planning/Policy 

3 Credits 

Deals with the components of administration of human service 

agencies. Addresses practitioner skills needed by administrators 

or supervisors. Discusses social policy issues and impact on 

human services. 

HMS 208 Treatment Models of Substance Abuse 

3 Credits 

Describes the various treatment models used with chemically 

dependent clients. Discusses intervention and treatment models 

for chemical dependency and their role in the recovery process. 



86 



HMS 209 Counseling Issues 

3 Credits 

Explores practice strategies for counselors of chemically 

dependent clients. 

HMS 210 Co-dependency 

3 Credits 

Presents definitions of co-dependency and issues related to it. 

Teaches skills and techniques to confront co-dependent behavior 

HMS 215 Juvenile Delinquency 
3 Credits 

Provides an overview of the concepts, definitions and 
measurements of juvenile delinquency. Explores various theories 
which attempt to explain causes of delinquency. Looks at the role 
of environmental influences (peers, gangs, school, drugs, etc.) 
contributing to delinquency. Discusses history and philosophy of 
the juvenile justice system as well as ways to control and treat 
juvenile delinquents. 

HMS 220 Legal Aspects 

3 Credits 

Provides an overview of the legal and ethical aspects in the field 

of human services with implications for the human services 

worker. Includes liability, confidentiality and privilege, records 

and rights of clients, due process and equal protection in terms of 

staff and client, discrimination and witnessing. 

HMS 240 Rehabilitation Process: Probation and Parole 
3 Credits 

Provides an understanding of probation and parole as an integral 
part of the criminal justice system with special emphasis on 
current and future trends in this area. Explores the role of 
community corrections and its impact on the role of probation 
and parole in our society in view of the increase in the number of 
offenders. 

HMS 281-293 Special Topics in Human Services 

1-5 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, 

workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 

that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. 

Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

HMT 100 Occupational Safety and Health Administration 

(OSHA) Regulations 
3 Credits 

Provides a study of the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration+s (OSHA) regulations which protect workers 
from exposure to occupational hazards. Concentrates on 
researching, interpreting, summarizing and applying the OSHA 
regulations for workers who handle hazardous materials. 

HMT 104 Hazardous Materials Health Effects 

3 Credits 

Reviews research conducted to determine the systematic health 

effects of exposures to chemicals. Includes determination of risk 

factors, routes of entry of hazardous materials and their effects on 

target organs, acute and chronic effects and control measures. 

HMT 120 Hazard Communication Standard 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction concerning the development and 

implementation of a hazard communication program for 

employees. Provides experience in conducting a chemical 



inventory, interpreting Material Safety Data Sheets 
(MSDSs), developing a written hazard communication program 
that complies with 29CFR 1910.1200 and conducting an effective 
hazard communication training program. 

HMT 200 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulations 
3 Credits 

Provides a detailed study of the U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA) regulations pertaining to hazardous waste 
management, with an emphasis on the requirements of the 
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the 
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, 
Liability Act (CERCLA) and the Superfund Amendments and 
Reauthorization Act (SARA). 

HMT 201 Contingency Planning 

3 Credits 

Teaches students to develop an emergency response contingency 

plan for a facility or community. Includes analyzing the hazards, 

writing and implementing the contingency plans, training 

employees for an emergency and evaluating the effectiveness of 

the contingency plan. 

HMT 203 Sampling Procedures 

3 Credits 

Introduces students to a variety of sampling procedures used in 
industrial settings and for emergency response. Includes 
sampling and monitoring devices, industrial hygiene monitoring, 
water and waste stream monitoring, outside air sampling, soil 
sampling and radiation. Emphasizes collecting and preserving 
representative samples, interpreting laboratory results and 
complying with relevant federal regulations. 

HMT 205 Department of Transportation (DOT) Regulations 

3 Credits 

Provides a detailed study of the U.S. Department of 
Transportation (DOT) regulations. Introduces certain Nuclear 
Regulatory Commission and Environmental Protection Agency 
regulations pertinent to hazardous materials transportation. 
Includes problems and case studies in which students identify 
and interpret applicable DOT regulations and recommend 
compliance strategies. Provides practical understanding of DOT 
issues through intei-views vsdth local professionals in hazardous 
materials handling. 

HMT 220 Hazardous Materials Recovery, Incineration 
and Disposal 

3 Credits 

Explains methods of recovery, incineration and/or disposal of 
hazardous waste. Includes contracting with qualified disposal 
organizations, obtaining permits and ensuring regulatory 
compliance of hazardous waste. 

HOS 101 Sanitation and First Aid 

3 Credits 

Students develop an understanding of the basic principles of 
sanitation, safety and first aid (CPR) and are able to apply them in 
the hospitality operation. This course will also reinforce personal 
hygiene habits and food handling practices that protect the health 
of the consumer 

HOS 102 Basic Foods Theory and Skills 

3 Credits 

To develop skills in knife, tool and equipment handling and apply 

principles of food preparation to produce a variety of food 

products. To apply knowledge of laws and regulations relating to 

safety and sanitation in the kitchen. 



87 



HOS 103 Soups, Stocks, and Sauces 

3 Credits 

This course will enable the student to identify and prepare soups, 

stocks, sauces and thickening agents. 

HOS 104 Nutrition 

3 Credits 

Introduces the characteristics, functions, and food sources of the 

major nutrient groups and how to maximize nutrient retention in 

food preparation and storage. Students will apply the principles 

of nutrient needs throughout the life cycle and to apply those 

principles to menu planning and food preparation. 

HOS 105 Introduction to Baking 

3 Credits 

Presents fundamentals of baking science, terminology, 

ingredients, weights and measures, yeast goods, pies, cakes, 

cookies and quick breads and use and care of equipment. 

Emphasizes sanitation, hygienic work habits and conformity with 

health regulations. 

HOS 106 Pantry and Breakfast 

3 Credits 

Covers the techniques and skills needed in breakfast cookery, as 

well as insight to the pantry department. Various methods of 

preparation of eggs, pancakes, waffles and cereals will be 

discussed. Students will receive instruction in salad preparation, 

salad dressings, hot and cold sandwich preparation, garnishes and 

appetizers. 

HOS 107 Hospitality Computer Systems 

3 Credits 

Provides an overview of the information needs of lodging 
properties and food service establishments; addresses essential 
aspects of computer systems and computer-based property 
management systems for both front office and back functions. 
Focuses on computer-based restaurant management systems for 
both service-oriented and management-oriented functions. 

HOS 108 Table Service 
3 Credits 

Provides students with practical knowledge and skills of 
restaurant operations. Knowledge and appreciation of the 
relationship between "front" and "back" of the house is 
emphasized through operation of an actual food service 
environment. Quality of service is emphasized through 
management of the guest experience. Additional course work in 
tableside cookery, the study of beverages and wines is also taught. 

HOS 109 Hospitality Purchasing 

2 Credits 

Studies the overall concept of purchasing and receiving practices 
in quality hospitality operations, knowledge of quality standards 
and regulations governing food products to the purchasing 
function, and proper storage of non-food items. 

HOS 114 Hospitality Organization & Administration 

3 Credits 

Analyzes managements functions and responsibilities in such 
areas as administration, organization, communications, 
accounting, marketing, and human relations. 



HOS 201 Hospitality Organization and Human 

Resources Management 
3 Credits 

Teaches the necessary skills for proper recruiting, staffing, 
training and managing employees at various levels in hospitality 
careers. Emphasizes the organizations evolutionary and problem 
solving process. 

HOS 202 Garde Manger 

3 Credits 

Develop skills in producing a variety of cold food products and 

helps develop skills to prepare items appropriate for buffet 

presentations, including decorative pieces. 

HOS 203 Menu, Design and Layout 

2 Credits 

Provides the skills needed to apply the principles of menu 

planning to various types of facilities and services. This course 

covers menu layout, selection and development and pricing 

structures. The student will understand and design a restaurant, 

back and front, using established rules of leading designers and 

restauranteurs. 

HOS 204 Food and Beverage Cost Control 

2 Credits 

Introduces mathematical principles applied to the food service 

industry and uses skills to complete food related tasks. 

HOS 205 Food and Beverage Cost Controls 

2 Credits 

Covers the principles and procedures involved in an effective 
system of room, food, beverage, labor and sales income. 
Emphasizes the development and use of standards in the 
calculation of cost. 

HOS 206 Fundamentals of the Catering Business 

3 Credits 

Introduces the fundamentals of owning and operating a small 
catering business including personal, legal and operational 
requirements. 

HOS 207 Classical Pastries and Chocolates 

3 Credits 

Covers classical French and European desserts. Includes the 
preparation of goods such as Napoleons, Gateaux St. Honore, 
petits fours and petits fours sec, ganaches, pastry creams and 
fillings, sauces, flans and tarts and European sponges. Includes 
tempering of chocolates, molding and chocolate plastique, 
preparation of truffles, pastilage and marzipan, short doughs and 
meringues. Requires students to submit three pieces from the 
American Culinary Federation approved individual pastry display 
category to be judged as a final practical exam. 

HOS 214 Hospitality Law and Security 

3 Credits 

Provides an awareness of the rights and responsibilities that the 

law grants to or imposes upon a hotel keeper Illustrates the 

possible consequences of failure to satisfy legal obligations. 

HOS 216 Hospitahty Marketing and Sales 

3 Credits 

Presents a practical understanding of the operating statement and 

precisely where, how and why the sales effort fits into total 

earnings and profit. Teaches how to measure and gauge 

accurately the precise worth of every type of business in advance. 



HOS 221 Catering 
3 Credits 

Provides instruction in the fundamentals of catering, including 
the business of supplying food, goods and organized service for 
pubhc and private functions. Includes staffing, equipment, 
transportation, contracting, special arrangements, beverage 
service and menu planning. Demonstrates techniques of setting 
up banquets and buffets. Requires students to plan, budget, cost, 
test recipes and formats, plan decor, service and entertainment for 
catered events. 

HOS 280 Co-op/Internship 

1-6 Credits 

Requires students to work at a job site that is specifically related 

to their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while 

earning credit toward an associate degree. 

HOS 281-293 Special Topics in Hospitality Administration 
1-5 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, 
workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. 
Contact chief academic officer for more information. 



Includes business principles pertaining to food and lodging, 
methods of recordkeeping for creditors, owners, and government 
and payroll control. Emphasizes tax laws specific to the industry, 
expense control and techniques of profitable management. 

IDS 102 Introduction to Print Reading 

3 Credits 

Provides an introduction to reading and interpreting machine 
shop symbols, welding blueprints and working dravidngs used in 
trades and crafts. Focuses on dimension, shape, fabrication and 
assembly. Applies basic mathematics to the solution of print and 
performance problems. 

IDS 103 Motors and Motor Controls 
3 Credits 

Provides a complete understanding of all types of electric motors, 
extending from the small shaded pole fan motors to the large 
three-phase motors. Includes motor theory magnetism and how it 
affects motor rotation. Provides in-depth study of motor starting 
components and protective devices for motor circuits. Includes 
heat dissipation from a motor, motor slippage, how motors are 
wired to obtain different speeds, and capacitors and how they 
affect a motor circuit. 



HRM 107 Organization and Human Resources Development 
3 Credits 

This course presents the student with opportunities to 
demonstrate problem solving abilities and techniques in common 
business and industry settings. Case histories and in-basket 
situations are used to train, demonstrate, and evaluate decisions 
common to management positions. 

HRM 203 Practicum 
3 Credits 

Offers practical work experience in a commercial food service or 
hotel establishment in order to build specialized skills. Practicum 
vfiW look at technical and management skills. An agreement must 
be completed by the student, the establishment and the practice 
coordinator prior to the start of the course. Students should have 
a site in mind prior to registering for this course (coordinator will 
assist). 

HRM 204 Food and Beverage Management 

3 Credits 

Presents principles and practices of food and beverage production 

and service. Discusses management philosophies regarding 

sanitation, menu planning, cost and labor control, employee 

training, purchasing and merchandising of food and beverage. 

HRM 205 Front Office 
3 Credits 

A systematic approach to front office procedures, detailing the 
flow of business through a hotel beginning with the reservation 
process and ending with billing and collection procedures within 
the context of the overall operation of a hotel. Examines front 
office management, the process of handling complaints, and 
concerns regarding hotel safety and security. 

HRM 206 Supervisory Housekeeping 

3 Credits 

Introduces the fundamentals of housekeeping management. 

Emphasis is placed on employee training, record-keeping, health 

and safety cost control, and overall responsibilities. 

HRM 211 Financial Management 
3 Credits 

Applies accounting principles to the hospitality industry. 



IDS 104 Fluid Power Basics 

3 Credits 

Introduces the student to fluid power principles and components. 
Teaches basic circuit design, symbols and schematic diagrams to 
build a foundation for career work in fluid power technology. 

IDS 114 Introductory Welding 
3 Credits 

Provides basic skills and fundamental knowledge in oxyacetylene 
and shielded metal welding for maintenance welders, auto service 
and body technicians, and individuals in the mining industry. 
Emphasizes industry welding practices and detailed study of 
techniques used in all weld positions. Covers brazing and flame 
cutting and electrode selection and uses. Emphasizes safe 
practices in welding, cutting and shielded metal arc. 

IDS 281-293 Special Topics in Industrial Technology 

1-5 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, 

workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 

that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. 

Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

ILT 101 Industrial Laboratory Techniques 

3 Credits 

Deals with basic skills needed in the industrial laboratory such as 

safety, identification, care and operation of basic laboratory 

equipment including pH meters, spectrophotometers, glassware 

and definition and preparation of reagents. Includes laboratory 

exercises in the use of selected equipment. 

ILT 288.01 Advanced Municipal Wastewater Treatment 
3 Credits 

The basics of municipal wastewater treatment are briefly reviewed 
and then study continues on the special processes of advanced 
wastewater treatment. Emphasis is placed on ammonia and 
phosphorus removal, process control, filtration, disinfection, and 
coagulation. This course is excellent preparation for any student 
desiring to take Indiana's wastewater treatment certification test at 
the 2, 3, or 4 level. The state usually offers the test in May and 
November of each year 



IMT 105 Heating and Air Conditioning Basics 

3 Credits 

Presents fundamentals of heating and compression systems used 

in mechanical refrigeration and air conditioning. Includes 

combustion process, heat flow, temperature measurement, gas 

laws, heating and refrigeration cycles and components used in 

systems. Introduces basic mechanical service procedures used in 

industry. 

IMT 106 Millwright I 

3 Credits 

Introduces the proper use of hand and power tools and measuring 

instruments in carpentry, blacksmithing, rigging and equipment, 

machinist and general shop. Includes structural steel and 

fabricating terms. 

IMT 107 Preventive Maintenance 
3 Credits 

Focuses on detecting and correcting potential trouble spots and 
scheduling routine inspections with check lists. Studies five 
essential forms of preventive maintenance: equipment record, 
checklist, inspection schedule, inspection report and equipment 
cost record. 

IMT 108 Measurements and Calibration 

3 Credits 

An introduction to the field on industrial motor controls. 
Develops knowledge of the symbols and diagrams used in various 
methods of control. Emphasizes line diagrams, ladder logic, and 
development of troubleshooting skills. 

IMT 122 Electrical Wiring Fundamentals 

3 Credits 

Covers National Electrical Code and its relationship to residential 

and commercial wiring. Includes mechanical installation of 

hardware, metering equipment, lights, switches and design. 

Discusses tool use and materials selection. 

IMT 201 Fluid Power Systems u j .■■ 

3 Credits 

Introduces the student to more complex fluid power circuits. 
Requires students to design, analyze and troubleshoot complex 
circuits using schematic diagrams. Studies detailed construction 
of typical industrial fluid power components. Teaches students to 
disassemble and evaluate fluid power components in the lab. 

IMT 203 Machine Maintenance/Installation 
3 Credits 

Examines procedures for the removal, repair and installation of 
machine components. Analyzes methods of installation, 
lubrication practices and maintenance procedures for industrial 
machinery. Presents techniques for calibration and repair of 
electro-mechanical devices and practice in computations 
pertaining to industrial machinery. 

IMT 206 Programmable Controllers II . r , 

3 Credits 

Provides an in-depth study of programmable controllers. 

Emphasizes program language installation, maintenance and 

applications. 

IMT 207 Electrical Circuits 

3 Credits 

Provides fundamentals of single- and three-phase alternating 
current, including parallel circuits, resistance, inductance, 
capacitance, switching, fusing, current requirements, transformer 



applications and motors and motor controls. Covers the basics of 
mechanical and electrical installations, emphasizes tool use and 
material selection, and electrical troubleshooting diagnosis and 
repair 

IMT 210 Pumps 

3 Credits 

Covers the construction and operation of centrifugal, 
reciprocating and rotary pumps and compressors and their 
components. Includes procedures of troubleshooting, installation 
and maintenance. 

LEG 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies 
3 Credits 

Introduces the beginning student to the general concepts of the 
legal and paralegal fields. Topics include the American legal 
system, legal analysis and research, legal ethics and professional 
responsibility, and a survey of the major procedural and 
substantive areas of the law such as trial process, appellate courts, 
crimes, torts, contracts, and property law. 

LEG 102 Research and Writing 

3 Credits 

The study and use of legal research tools such as digests, loose 

leaf services, reporters, statutory compilations and form books. 

Legal writing format and methodology are presented through 

practical application in drafting memoranda and correspondence. 

Shepardizing and proper case citation skills are included. 

LEG 103 Civil Procedures 

3 Credits 

A study of Indiana Trial Rules and miscellaneous local rules. 

Filing requirements, computation of time and form drafting are 

emphasized. 

LEG 104 Torts 

3 Credits 

A survey of intentional torts, negligence and strict liability. 

Emphasizes the elements of tort causes of action and the rules of 

damages. 

LEG 105 Business Associations 

3 Credits 

The study of various business structures and the rights, duties, 

liabilities and formalities attendant to such structures. A survey of 

partnership, agency and corporation law is included. 

LEG 106 Claims Investigation 

3 Credits 

The study of witness interview techniques, preservation of 
evidence, organizational skills and alternative methods of 
gathering facts. Client intake procedure and communication skills 
are emphasized. 

LEG 107 Contracts and Commercial Law 

3 Credits 

A survey of contract law and the Uniform Commercial Code. 

Special statutes regarding state unfair practices, consumer 

deception and consumer rights are also presented. 

LEG 108 Property Uw 

3 Credits 

A survey of the law of real estate and personal property Provides 

practical exposure to title searches, loan documentation, zoning 

requirements, financing statements, leases and deeds. 



90 



LEG 109 Family Law 

3 Credits 

A survey of the law of marriage, dissolution of marriage, custody, 

child support and visitation, and adoption. Financial declaration 

forms, client intake skills. Child Support Guidelines and available 

social services are presented. 

LEG 110 Wills, Trusts, and Probate 

3 Credits 

Survey of the law of estates, wills, probate and guardianship, as 

well as intestate succession. Preparation of probate and 

administration forms, asset inventories and valuation, certain tax 

forms and accounting are included. 

LEG 111 Criminal Law and Procedures 

3 Credits 

Survey of Indiana criminal statutes and selected federal criminal 

laws. Investigative and administrative skills are emphasized. 

LEG 112 Bankruptcy Law 

3 Credits 

Bankruptcy Law includes a survey of the Federal Bankruptcy Act. 
Emphasizes skills needed to accumulate person financial 
information, compile initial schedules, collect and organize data 
for first meeting of creditors, complete proofs of claim and pursue 
creditor's rights. 



LOG 101 Introduction to Materials Management 

3 Credits 

Studies factors influencing the flow of materials in a 

manufacturing enterprise. Covers basics of production planning 

and control, purchasing, forecasting, inventory and distribution 

issues. Concludes with an overview of just-in-time theory and 

practices. 

LOG 102 Manufacturing 

3 Credits 

Introductory manufacturing course. Focuses on basic principles, 

practices and functions of manufacturing management. Includes 

applications in the service industries, such as utilities, hospitals 

and government. 

LOG 103 Marketing 

3 Credits 

Introductory marketing course. Focus is on basic marketing 

strategy for targeting markets and developing a marketing mix of 

product, price, distribution and promotion. 

LOG 201 Transportation Systems 

3 Credits 

Provides in-depth knowledge of transportation systems and their 

inter-relationships with our economic, social, political and 

environmental systems. 



LEG 202 Litigation 
3 Credits 

Litigation includes the study of the Indiana Rules pertaining to 
actual trial. The discovery process and its tools are reviewed. 
Skills such as document organization and retrieval, witness 
statement and deposition summarizing, indexing and scheduling 
are presented. Trial notebook preparation is utilized for practical 
experience. 

LEG 203 Law Office Management and Technology 
3 Credits 

Designed to acquaint the student with various law office 
management applications used in the practice of law, including 
word processing, spreadsheets, database management, 
timekeeping and billing, docket control, litigation support and a 
computer-assisted legal research service. Hands-on training is 
included using Westlaw on-line, computer-assisted legal research 



LEG 204 Advanced Legal Writing 

3 Credits 

Develops and enhances legal writing abilities with a focus on the 

relationship of legal writing to the legal process and the basics of 

technical writing with emphasis on the theoretical and practical 

applications of legal communications. 

LEG 280 Co-op/Internship 

1-6 Credits 

Allows students to work at a job site that is specifically related to 
their career objectives. Provides on-the-job experience while 
earning credit toward an associate degree. 



LOG 202 Physical Distribution 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the major concepts and rationale for utilizing 

warehouse inventories to lower costs of transportation, improve 

customer service, avoid stockouts, improve purchasing economics 

and seasonal variability. 

LOG 203 Sales Service 

3 Credits 

Designed to develop the art of selling. Sales knowledge and sales 
skills are applied to choices of products. Selling principles and 
the order processing cycle are emphasized. 

LOG 204 Case Studies 

3 Credits 

Uses the case study method to apply the knowledge, principles 

and skills acquired in student programs. 

LOG 208 Distribution Center Management 

3 Credits 

Studies warehousing from a depositor and operator viewpoint. 
Includes warehousing functions, location and specific site criteria, 
labor productivity, cost controls, equipment and packaging and 
customer service. 

LOG 209 Export/Import 1 

3 Credits 

Studies the practical application of export and import techniques 
and concepts, government regulations, documentation, and 
financial and transportation considerations of the movement of 
commerce from and to the United States. 



LEG 281-293 Special Topics in Paralegal Studies 
1-5 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, 
workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. 
Contact chief academic officer for more information. 
Note: All LEG courses have prerequisites. Please consult the 
program chair for class scheduling. 



LOG 210 Export/Import II 

3 Credits 

Familiarizes students with import practices, governmental 

regulations and carrier rate-making practices. Requires students 

to complete practical exercises, solve importing problems and 

work with the tariff schedule of the United States. 



91 



LOG 211 Transportation Pricing 

3 Credits 

Provides students with skills and techniques related to 

transportation pricing. Includes introduction, training and 

practice in freight management, freight classification, tariff 

interpretation and selection, zip code pricing and contract and 

negotiations. 

LOG 212 Freight Loss and Damage Claims 

3 Credits 

Covers appropriate methods for claims management, damage 
claims prevention, legal remedies for disputed claims and 
transportation regulations. 

MEA 102 First Aid and CPR 

2 Credits 

Provides students with information necessary to recognize 
emergency situations, know the proper course of action with 
different types of emergencies and apply appropriate first aid, 
including CPR. 

MEA 113 Pharmacology 

3 Credits 

Discusses the most common medications in current use wath 
emphasis on classifications, uses, routes of administration, 
dosages, interactions, incompatibilities and side effects. 
Emphasizes the 50 most commonly prescribed drugs listed in 
Pharmacy Times. Addresses special precautions, legal aspects, 
patient education and preparation and administration of 
medications. 

MEA 114 Medical Assisting Laboratory Techniques 

3 Credits 

Prepares student to perform various basic laboratory procedures, 
including preparation of patients, collecting and preparing 
appropriate specimens and expected norms of laboratory test 
results. Includes current safety and quality control standards. 

MEA 115 Medical Insurance .»;>/, i>, . . , 

2 Credits 

Provides an overview of medical insurance programs and skills 
developed in handling insurance forms, CPT and ICD-9-CM 
Coding and reports as applied to the medical office. 

MEA 120 Medical Assisting Clinical Externship 

3 Credits 

Provides the opportunity to discuss and perform clinical 
procedures under supervision, with learning experiences obtained 
in selected physicians' offices, clinics or hospitals. 

MEA 121 Medical Assisting Administrative Externship 

3 Credits 

Provides opportunities to observe, perform and discuss various 

administrative competencies under supervision, with learning 

experiences obtained in selected physicians' offices, clinics or 

hospitals. 

MEA 130 Medical Office Administration 

2 Credits 

Provides an understanding of the administrative duties and 
responsibilities pertinent to medical offices. Develops 
communications skills specifically directed toward a medical 
office and the role of the professional medical assistant as a 
member of the health care team. Includes instruction in medical 
correspondence and records, case histories of patients, filing, 



telephone procedures, appointment scheduling, receptionist 
duties and processing mail. Includes development of desirable 
personality traits, inter-personal relationships and attitudes within 
the medical office. 

MEA 131 Medical Financial Management 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction in medical office financial administration, 

bookkeeping and materials management. 

MEA 132 Computer Concepts in Medical Office 

2 Credits 

Familiarizes students with computer applications in the health 
care setting. Provides students with basics of operations and 
applications of computer usages within the health care provider 
office. Includes simulated data entry for patient records, 
procedures and diagnostic codes, insurance processing and 
electronic transmission of claims and scheduling day-sheet 
transactions in accordance with the AAMA DACUM guidelines. 

MEA 133 Medical Assisting Clinical Theory 

3 Credits 

Presents theory related to clinical aspects of the medical office. 
Includes theory related to vital signs, asepsis, sterilization, 
medication administration, EKG's, X-ray, nutrition, physical 
therapy sterile technique phlebotomy and other skills needed to 
assist the physician in the clinical setting. 

MEA 134 Medical Assisting - Clinical Skills Lab 

2 Credits 

Allows students to become familiar with clinical duties and gain 
he skills needed to perform them. Includes vital signs, asepsis, 
sterilization, medications, EKGs, X-ray, nutrition, physical 
therapy, phlebotomy, sterile technique and other technical skills 
needed to assist the physician. 

MEA 135 Medical Typing and Transcription 

3 Credits 

Develops skills and knowledge of medical dictation, machine 
transcription, and use of word processors and typewriters. 
Includes typing and transcription of medical reports, terminology 
and correspondence. 

MEA 151 Pharmacy Technician 1 

3 Credits 

Introduces basic skills and information needed to qualify as a 

Pharmacy Technician. 

MEA 152 Pharmacy Technician II 

3 Credits 

Theory is applied through performance of competency levels of 
the technical pharmacy task including: properly preparing, 
documenting and processing prescriptions according to pharmacy 
policy and regulations; preparing intravenous and special 
solutions; properly preparing and maintaining records appropriate 
to the pharmacy, including quality control records, controlled 
substances (narcotic drug distribution), prescription data and 
records; applying basic principles of microbiology, using aseptic 
techniques and operating and maintaining the laminar hood. The 
student will employ proper communication skills (both written 
and verbal). Identification and adherence to check points wall be 
emphasized. Current national and Indiana Law and 
administrative rules as they relate to the practice of the pharmacy 
technician will be presented. The importance of adherence to 
universal precautions will be discussed. 



■m 



MEA 153 Administrative Aspects of Pharmacy Technology 
2 Credits 

Addresses the administrative aspect of pharmacy technology, 
including professional development, professional communication, 
time management, record keeping, computer appUcations, third 
party payment processing, operation of business machines and 
utilization of reference material. 

MEA 154 Pharmacy Externship 

2 Credits 

Provides the opportunity to discuss and perform clinical 
procedures under supervision, with unpaid clinical experiences 
obtained in selected retail pharmacies and/or hospitals. 

MEA 203 Disease Conditions 

3 Credits 

Presents the basic concepts of diseases, their courses and 
functional disturbances as they relate to body systems. Includes 
the precipitating risk factors and appropriate methods of patient 
education regarding various disease processes. 

MEA 209 Electrocardiograph - Basic Technique 

1 Credit 

Presents the basic reasons for prescribing an electrocardiograph 
and the theory involved. The physiological principles involved 
are the basis for proper techniques that will be practiced by the 
students until they demonstrate competency with both the theory 
and required skills in doing a prescribed electrocardiograph. 

MEA 210 Introduction to EKG Interpretation 

2 Credits 

Includes anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system 
and recognition of basic arrhythmias. Measurement of the EKG 
complex will be taught with the emphasis placed upon 
determining heart rates and rhythms. 

MEA 211 Advanced Electrocardiograph Interpretation 

3 Credits 

Includes anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, 
interpretation of rhythm strips and 12 lead EKG's and the 
cardiovascular drugs associated with arrhythmias. 

MEA 212 Phlebotomy 

3 Credits 

Presents the principles and practices of laboratory specimen 

collection and processing. Also covers medical terminology, 

infection control, patient identification, anatomy and physiology, 

anticoagulants, blood collection, specimen processing and 

interpersonal skills. 



MEA 216 Nutrition 

2 Credits 

Presents the importance of a balanced diet; methods of evaluating 
a diet; the basic four food groups; the functions, requirements and 
food sources of fats, proteins, carbohydrates, vitamins, and 
minerals, and the deficiency diseases. Introduces meal planning, 
nutrition for various age groups, religious and nationality food 
habits, and diet therapy. Explains special diets for diabetes, 
diseases of the GI tract, urinary tract, blood, cardiovascular 
system, obesity, cancer, allergy and pregnancy. 

MEA 217 Gerontology 

3 Credits 

Presents a multidisciplinary study of the sociological, 
psychological and physiological aspects of aging. Included will 
be patient education and the impact that all facets of aging have 
on the total person. 

MEA 221 Seminar I 

1 Credit 

Discusses topics of current interest in the medical assisting 
profession. Attention is given to special interest projects for 
students in the Medical Assistant program. Field trips, guest 
speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars may be utilized. 

MEA 222 Seminar II 

2 Credits 

Discusses topics of current interest in the medical assisting 
profession. Attention is given to special interest projects for 
students in the Medical Assistant program. Field trips, guest 
speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars may be utilized. 

MEA 223 Seminar III 

3 Credits 

Discusses topics of current interest in the medical assisting 
profession. Attention is given to special interest projects for 
students in the Medical Assistant program. Field trips, guest 
speakers, audio-visual activities and seminars may be utilized. 

MEA 224 Hospital Coding 

3 Credits 

Designed to build on the comprehensive coding skills acquired 
through prerequisite course MEA 213. Introduces additional 
instruction in diagnostic related groups (DRG's) and medical 
record extraction. Provides discussion, observation and 
performance opportunities in related insurance coding 
competencies. Both classroom and clinical sites are utilized to 
provide realistic experiences under supervision. External sites 
include physicians' offices, clinics and hospitals. 



MEA 213 Advanced Insurance Coding 

3 Credits 

Expands on basic insurance knowledge providing in-depth 

information on coding techniques necessary to bill insurance 

claims and provides experience in coding claim forms using the 

correct combination of codes to maximize reimbursement by 

linking of codes. 

MEA 214 Advanced First Aid and CPR (First Responder) 
3 Credits 

Provides students vidth information necessary to recognize 
emergency situations, know the proper course of action with 
different types of emergencies and apply appropriate first aid. 
Handling of victims of hazardous materials accidents will be 
addressed. Covers CPR, including one and two rescuer Teaches 
adult, infant, and child resuscitation. 



MEA 225 Insurance Coding Externship 

3 Credits 

Provides opportunities to observe, perform and discuss various 

insurance related competencies under supervision, with learning 

experience obtained in selected physicians-f offices, clinics or 

hospitals. 

MEA 234 Phlebotomy Externship 

3 Credits 

Provides the opportunity to discuss and perform phlebotomy 

procedures under supervision wdth learning experiences obtained 

in selected laboratories, physicians' offices, clinics or hospitals. 



93 



MEA 281-293 Special Topics in Medical Assistant 

1-5 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, 
workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 
that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. 
Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

MEA 299 CMA Comprehensive Review 

3 Credits 

Reviews the entire medical assisting program in preparation for 
the CMA registry examination. Administration, clinical and 
general information is covered. Testing procedures are addressed. 
Emphasis will be placed on job readiness and placement. The 
course will give continuing education units for graduate CMAs in 
order to fulfill their certification renewal requirements. 

MKT 101 Principles of Marketing 

3 Credits 

Introduces the marketing role in society and how it affects the 

marketing strategy. Emphasizes the marketing mix, product 

planning and the effects of the demographic dimension on the 

consumer market. 

MKT 102 Principles of Selling 

3 Credits 

Provides an overview of the selling process. Includes the 
psychology of selling and develops skills through a series of 
selhng situations. 

MKT 104 Advertising 

3 Credits 

Focuses on advertising as the key element in the promotion of 
goods and services in the marketplace. Includes advertising 
media and media selection, advertising copy strategy, advertising 
regulations and organization of advertising functions. 

MKT 201 Introduction to Market Research 

3 Credits 

Presents basic research methods entaihng procedures, 

questionnaire design, data analysis and effectively communicating 

research results. 

MKT 202 Logistics/Purchasing Control 

3 Credits 

Introduces students to the framework of logistics, the logistics 

environment, customer services and materials management. 

Introduces material resources planning (MRP) and just-in-time 

OIT) principles. 

MKT 204 Marketing Management 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the analysis, implementation and control of marketing 

strategy. Emphasizes the major decisions management faces in its 

effort to harmonize the objectives and resources of the 

organization with the needs and opportunities of the marketplace. 

MKT 205 Principles of Insurance 

3 Credits • ■ ■'^- ' ■•' ' '' - - - >• i>' 

Introduces the risks faced by business firms, including property, 
liability and personal losses, and how they are handled. Presents 
insurance contracts and their uses. Includes an overview of life 
insurance, health and pension insurance, public policy, 
government regulations and social insurance. 

MKT 219 Field Study/Cooperative Education 

3 Credits 

Provides students the opportunity to work at a job site that is 



specifically related to their career objectives. Provides field 
experience within the framework of actual work experience in 
marketing. 

MLT 101 Fundamentals of Laboratory Technician 

3 Credits 

Introduces elementary skills required in the medical laboratory. 

Covers laboratory math, quality control, pipetting skills, 

veinipuncture techniques and microscope skills. 

MLT 102 Routine Analysis Techniques 

3 Credits 

Studies principles, practices and clinical laboratory techniques 

associated with routine analysis of urine and other body fluids. 

MLT 196 Introduction to Patient Care and Phlebotomy 

3 Credits 

Introduces the health care delivery system. Provides instruction 

in specimen collection techniques, infection control and safety, 

and teaches applications of communications concepts and stress 

management. 

MLT 197 Clinical Phlebotomy Experience 

3 Credits 

Covers the practice and demonstration of clinical applications of 

phlebotomy in the clinical setting. 

MLT 198 Clinical Phlebotomy Discussion 

1 Credit 

Develops the professional socialization process necessary to 
function in a health care setting and reviews routine and special 
phlebotomy procedures in light of phlebotomist-patient 
interaction, 

MLT 201 Immunology Techniques 

3 Credits 

Provides students with an understanding of principles of the 

human immunologic system and experience in routine testing. 

MLT 202 Immunohematology Techniques 

3 Credits 

Instructs students in practice and procedures used in blood 
banking in the clinical laboratory. 

MLT 203 Instrumentation 

2 Credits 

Includes instrumentation theory and practice as applied to 
electronic equipment and automated systems in the medical 
laboratory. 

MLT 204 Microbiology Techniques 

4 Credits 

Instructs students in principles of bacteriology, including gram 
negative and positive bacilli and cocci, fastidious organisms and 
an overview of anaerobic and acid-fast bacteria. Includes 
instruction in the basic laboratory techniques in clinical 
bacteriology. 

MLT 205 Hematology Techniques I 

3 Credits 

Presents theory of blood formation and function and routine 
hematologic procedures with emphasis on differentiation of 
normal from commonly encountered abnormal blood cells. 
Includes basic theory of hemostasis and associated routine 
coagulation procedures. Presents clinicopathologic correlations. 



94 



MLT 206 Hematology Techniques II 

3 Credits 

Continues the study of principles and procedures in hematology 

and hemostasis. Introduces procedures beyond those routinely 

performed. Continues cell differentiation with emphasis on early 

and less commonly encountered abnormal cells and associated 

special stains. Includes clinicopathologic correlations. 

MLT 207 Chemistry Techniques I 

3 Credits 

Presents principles, procedures and clinicopathologic correlations 

in routine chemical analysis of the blood and other body fluids. 

Provides laboratory experiences in basic methods selected to 

develop routine analytical abilities and to promote the ability to 

recognize sources of error. 

MLT 208 Chemistry Techniques II 

3 Credits 

Continues the study of principles, procedures and 
clinicopathologic correlations in the chemical analysis of blood 
and other body fluids. Introduces procedures beyond those 
routinely performed in the clinical chemistry laboratory, including 
clinicopathologic correlations. 

MLT 209 Routine Analysis Applications 

1 Credit 

Studies clinical applications of routine urine analysis in the 

hospital laboratory including physical, chemical and microscopic 

examination of urine. 

MLT 210 Hematology Application 

1 Credit 

Studies and practices the principles and techniques of hematology 

in the hospital laboratory. 

MLT 211 Microbiology Applications 

4 Credits 

Studies applications and clinical practices of microbiology found 
in the hospital laboratory. 

MLT 212 Immunology Applications 

1 Credit 

Studies and practices the clinical application of serology in the 

hospital laboratory. 

MLT 213 Immunohematology Applications 

3 Credits 

Studies and practices the principles and procedures used in blood 
banking in the hospital laboratory. 

MLT 214 Chemistry Application 

4 Credits 

Studies and practices the analytical aspects of clinical chemistry 
in the hospital laboratory. 

MLT 215 Parasitology and Mycology 

1 Credit 

Provides study in the isolation, identification, life cycles and 

disease processes of pathogenic fungi and parasites. 

MLT 216 Elementary Organic and Biochemistry 

3 Credits 

Studies the chemistry of carbon-containing compounds and the 

biochemistry of lipids, carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic and 

enzymes. Includes related laboratory procedures. 



MLT 217 Advanced Chemistry Technology 

1 Credit 

Presents principles and techniques of chemistry procedures 

beyond routine clinical chemistry testing, such as toxicology, 

endocrinology and inborn errors of metabolism. 

MLT 218 Clinical Pathology 

3 Credits 

Examines various disease conditions, diagnosis, etiologies, 

clinical symptoms and related laboratory findings. 

MLT 280 Co-op/Internship 

1-6 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to work at a job site that 
is specifically related to their career objectives. Provides on-the- 
job experience while earning credit toward an associate degree. 

MTT 102 Turning Processes I 

3 Credits 

Instructs students in shop safety and industrial terminology and 

provides laboratory experience toward project completion on the 

conventional lathe. 

MTT 103 Milling Processes I 

3 Credits 

Instructs students in shop safety and industrial terminology and 

provides laboratory experience towards project completion on the 

vertical and/or horizontal milling machine. 

MTT 104 Machinery Handbook 

3 Credits 

Explores the intent and use of the machinery handbook. Applies 

principles and concepts in the machinery handbook to projects in 

the industry. 

MTT 106 Advanced Print Interpretation 

3 Credits 

Applies mathematics in solving engineering and design-related 
problems in the areas of die design, fabrication, assembly, special 
machinery, die casting and molds. Emphasizes GDT tolerancing. 

MTT 204 Abrasive Processes I 

3 Credits 

Provides shop safety, industrial terminology and laboratory 

experiences on abrasive processing machines. Includes 

superabrasives technology processes. 

MTT 208 CNC Programming 1 

3 Credits 

Introduces two and three axis CNC machining. Develops the 
theory of programming in the classroom with application of the 
program accomplished on industry type machines. Studies 
terminology of coordinates, cutter paths, angle cutting, and linear 
and circular interpolation. 

MTT 209 CNC Programming II 

3 Credits 

Expands on MTT 208, providing further study in computer-aided 
numerical control programming. Focuses on canned cycles, 
loops, macros, thread cycles, drilling and pocket milling cycles. 



95 



MTT210 Interactive CNC 

3 Credits 

Continues CNC Programming II. Introduces advanced 
applications of computer-assisted part programming and 
simulation, language codes set-up and operation, troubleshooting 
and problem solving in a CNC turning center and CNC matching 
center Includes related mathematical skills. 

MTT 220 CAD/CAM I 

3 Credits 

Covers the development of various machine routines. Introduces 

computer-assisted machining as it relates to automated milling 

and machining centers. Emphasizes proper programming 

techniques, control familiarity, file data and machining functions. 

NUR 107 Transition to Associate Degree Nursing Practicum 

3 Credits 

Provides campus and clinical laboratory experience to function as 
associate degree nursing students in providing care to clients from 
the child-bearing process through adolescence. Uses the nursing 
process to provide quality nursing care. 

NUR 150 Nursing and Universal Needs 

4 Credits 

Identifies the components of the ASN program philosophy. 
Introduces the role of the Associate Degree Nurse and the facts, 
concepts, and principles underlying the nursing process. Assists 
the student in identification of universal needs and appropriate 
nursing responses to meet those needs. 

NUR 151 Nursing and Universal Needs Practicum 

4 Credits 

Provides an opportunity in the practice laboratory and clinical 
setting to utilize the role of the Associate Degree Nurse in 
employing the nursing process. Simulated and actual patient care 
will provide an opportunity to develop assessment skills and to 
initiate a beginning level of analyzing, planning, implementing, 
and evaluating therapeutic measures in meeting universal needs. 

NUR 152 Nursing Related to Health Deviation I 

5 Credits 

Examines the role of the Associate Degree Nurse in assisting 
clients experiencing health deviations related to nutrition/ 
elimination, rest/activity, safety, and requlation. The nursing 
process is utilized for assessment, analysis, planning, 
implementation, and evaluation of therapeutic measures that 
promote, maintain, and/or restore health or support death with 
dignity in the adult client. 

NUR 153 Nursing Related to Health Deviation 1 Pract. 

5 Credits 

Provides clinical experiences that allows the student to implement 
the role of the Associate Degree Nurse in providing care to clients 
experiencing health deviations related to nutrition/elimination, 
rest/activity, safety and regulation. The nursing process guides the 
application of scientific facts, concepts and principles in the 
delivery of nursing care. Decision making and appropriate 
therapeutic communication are emphasized. 

NUR 154 Pharmacotherapeutics 

2 Credits 

Introduces the student to the fundamental principles of drug 

action, the classification of drugs and the appropriate nursing 

actions to achieve the desired outcomes of therapy. The nursing 



process as a framework for learning is integrated throughout the 
course. Major drugs are classified either by clinical use of body 
system affected. 

NUR 249 Transition to ASN Nursing 

3 Credits 

Examines the role of the Associate Degree Nurse. Identifies 
components of the ASN program philosophy. Reviews the facts, 
concepts, and principles underlying the nursing process in 
meeting universal needs. Campus laboratory experience is 
provided to review basic nursing skills. Assists the student to 
indentify appropriate nursing responses to meet universal health 
deviation needs. 

EFFECTIVE 1996/1997 SCHOLASTIC YEAR: 

NUR 250 Nursing Related to Health Deviation H 

5 Credits 

Examines the role of the Associate Degree Nurse in assisting 
clients experiencing health deviations related to safety, 
oxygenation, regulation and social interaction/solitude. The 
nursing process with emphasis on planning, implementation and 
evaluation if utilized to promote, maintain, and/or restore health 
or support death with dignity in the adult client. 

NUR 251 Nursing Related to Health Deviation II Pract. 
5 Credits 

Provides clinical experiences that allows the student to implement 
the role of the Associate Degree Nurse in providing care to clients 
experiencing health deviations related to safety, oxygenation, 
regulation and social interaction/solitude. The nursing process 
guides the application of scientific facts, concepts, and principles 
in the delivery of nursing care. Decision making and appropriate 
therapeutic communication are emphasized. 

NUR 252 Nursing Related to Developmental Needs 

4 Credits 

Identifies the role of the Associate Degree Nurse in assisting 
clients to meet their developmental needs which includes 
maintenance of conditions to support life processes and 
maturation. Utilizes the nursing process with emphasis on 
planning, implementation and evaluation to evaluate therapeutic 
measures that promote, maintain or restore health and support 
death with dignity. 

NUR 253 Nursing Related to Developmental Needs Pract. 

4 Credits 

Provides clinical experiences that allows the student to implement 
the role of the Associate Degree Nurse in providing care to clients 
to meet their developmental needs which includes the 
maintenance of conditions to support life processes and 
maturation. The nursing process guides the application of the 
scientific facts, concepts and principles in the delivery of nursing 
care. Decision making and appropriate therapeutic 
communication are emphasized. 

NUR 254 Professional Nursing Issues 
2 Credits 

Examines issues and nursing's responsibility to meet changing 
needs of persons in their environment. Historical aspects, 
current developments, future trends, improvement of nursing 
practice, legal/ethical considerations, and personal/professional 
growth are integrated into the examination of the role of the 
Associate Degree Nurse. 



m 



OTA 101 Foundations of Occupational Therapy 

3 Credits 

Establishes a philosophical base for subsequent course work by 

introducing and examining concepts basic to the study of 

Occupational Therapy Assistant. 

OTA 102 Kinesiology 

2 Credits 

Analyzes human motion with emphasis on the range of motion 
and muscle strength related to occupational performance. 

OTA 103 Medical Conditions in Occuaptional Therapy 

3 Credit 

Provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of physical 
conditions commonly seen by Occupational Therapists. Includes 
a survey of the medical or surgical management of these 
conditions. 

OTA 201 Field Work 1-A 

1 Credit 

Provides clinical observation and practice of the occupational 
skills and processes presented in previous and current courses in 
the curriculum. Attendance at weekly seminar is required. 

OTA 202 Therapeutic Activities 

3 Credits 

Provides supervised learning experiences in fiber crafts, ceramics, 

woodworking, art, design and minor crafts as therapeutic 

modalities. 

OTA 203 Therapeutic Group Activities 

3 Credits 

Provides experimental learning in the analysis and therapeutic 

use of a variety of group activies used in Occupational Therapy. 

OTA 204 Psychiatric Conditions in Occupational Therapy 
3 Credits 

Reviews psychiatric disorders including medical management and 
treatment, clinical team approach, legal issues, nomenclature, 
clinical descriptions, and etiology. 

OTA 205 COTA in Physical Health 

3 Credits 

Presents assistant -level techniques for management of clinical 

physical dysfunction cases referred to occupational therapy. 

Includes initial screening, evaluation, treatment planning and 

implementation of program for patients /clients. 

OTA 206 Assistive Technology and Adaptive Equipment 

2 Credits 

Provides supervised learning experience in the application of 
technology in Occupational Therapy including orthotics, 
prosthetics, and assistive/adaptive equipment. 

OTA 207 Daily Living Skills 

3 Credit 

Provides supervised learning experiences in maximizing 
occupational performance that includes independent living skills, 
work, and plan/leisure skills. 

OTA 208 COTA and Interactive Model 

3 Credits 

Presents the COTA's role in directing activities in a non-medical 
setting. Includes appropriate techniques for a variety of 
populations in settings such as schools, nursing homes, and 
sheltered workshops. 



OTA 209 Field Work 1-B 

1 Credit 

Provides for clinical observation and practice of the occupational 
skills and processes presented in previous and current courses in 
the curriculum. 

OTA 210 COTA in Mental Health 

3 Credits 

Presents the psychiatric Occupational Therapy process and the 
role of the Occupational Therapy Assistant in appropriate 
methods and techniques. 

OTA 211 Clinical Transition and Management 

4 Credits 

Presents basic theory, techniques and skills necessary for the 
transition into the clinical setting and for the management of an 
activities program. Management information as it relates to the 
role of the COTA is provided along with examining the qualities 
necessary for success in the clinical setting. 

OTA 212 Field Work II-A 

2 Credits 

Provides supervised clinical experience. All field work must be 
completed within 18 months of completion of academics. 

OTA 213 Fieldwork Level II-B 

2 Credits 

Provides supervised clinical experience. All field work must be 
completed within 18 months of completion of academics. 

PNU 101 Foundations of Nursing 

4 Credits 

Presents the goals and the role of the licensed practical nurse on 
the health care team. Covers concept of the nursing process as 
practiced within the wellness/illness continuum. Includes basic 
nursing care, and data collection and recording. 

PNU 102 Therapeutic Measures 

3 Credits 

Focuses on preventive, therapeutic and rehabilitative nursing 
interventions requiring advanced skills and knowledge. 
Integrates the nursing process and the role of the practical nurse. 

PNU 103 Hohstic Approach to Health 

2 Credits 

Introduces the holistic approach to practical nursing. Includes 
holistic aspects of care, the wellness/illness continuum and 
therapeutic relationships. 

PNU 104 Nutrition 

2 Credits 

Covers basic principles of nutrition and diet therapy in wellness 
and illness for various age groups. Considers socio-economic, 
ethnic and religious factors related to diet. Emphasizes the role of 
the practical nurse in assisting patients in meeting nutrition 
needs. 

PNU 105 Introduction to Clinical Nursing 

3 Credits 

Provides students with opportunities to implement basic nursing 
skills in the clinical setting. Emphasizes the hygienic and comfort 
needs of the adult patient and focuses on developing basic 
assessment skills utilizing the nursing process. Stresses concise, 
accurate documentation of assessment and care. 



97 



PNU 107 Cardiopulmonary Nursing 

3 Credits 

Utilizes the nursing process in understanding the 

pathophysiology and nursing care of patients with cardiovascular/ 

ventilation needs. Emphasizes developing the nurse as a 

communicator and care giver v^^th a holistic approach. 

PNU 108 Endocrine/Genitourinary Nursing 

3 Credits 

Utilizes the nursing process in understanding the 
pathophysiology of hormonal imbalances and urinary elimination 
needs. Emphasizes developing the nurse as a communicator and 
care giver with a holistic approach, identifying community 
supports for patients and developing patient awareness of 
healthful lifestyles. 

PNU 109 Gastrointestinal/Sensorimotor Nursing 
3 Credits 

Utilizes the nursing process in understanding the 
pathophysiology of digestion, elimination, mobility and 
sensorimotor needs. Develops the nurse as a communicator and 
care giver with a holistic approach. Covers patient psychosocial 
needs and opportunities for support through community 
agencies. 

PNU 110 Introduction to Pharmacology for Practical Nursing 

2 Credits 

Introduces the concept of meeting biopsychosocial needs through 
drug administration within the preventive, therapeutic and 
rehabilitative environment. Defines practical nurse 
responsibilities in medication administration. Assesses patient 
wellness/illness status. 

PNU 111 Pharmacology for Practical Nurses 

2 Credits 

Surveys common pharmacologic agents. Develops drug therapy 
as one aspect of preventive, therapeutic and rehabilitative care of 
patients. 

PNU 112 Medical/Surgical Clinical Nursing 1 

3 Credits 

Correlates medical surgical content and nursing practice. 
Includes decision making within the practical nurse role. 
Emphasizes the holistic aspects of individuals along the wellness/ 
illness continuum. 



PNU 115 Gerontology 

3 Credits 

Focuses on the normal aging process along the wellness/illness 

continuum in later life. Surveys trends in preventive, 

rehabihtative and therapeutic care. 

PNU 116 Geriatric Clinical Nursing 

3 Credits 

Correlates gerontologic content with holistic care of the older 

adult. Implements nursing process within the role of the practical 

nurse to prevent illness or to maintain, promote and restore 

health. 

PNU 117 Maternal/Child Nursing 

3 Credits 

Examines conditions and selected interventions based on the 

nursing process in providing preventive, rehabilitative and 

therapeutic care for the mother and child. Identifies the role of 

the licensed practical nurse in providing holistic care within a 

dynamic environment 

PNU 118 Maternal/Child Clinical Nursing 

3 Credits 

Correlates maternal/child content with holistic care of the mother 
and child. Emphasizes the normal maternity cycle and normal 
growth and development of the child within the wellness/illness 
continuum. 

PST 120 First Responder 

4 Credits 

Provides students with information necessary to recognize 
emergency situations, know the proper course of action with 
different types of emergencies and apply appropriate first aid. 
Addresses handling of victims of hazardous materials accidents. 
Covers CFR, including one and two rescuer, and adult, infant and 
child resuscitation. 

PST 121 Industrial Safety and Loss Prevention 

3 Credits 

Introduces occupational safety and health standards and codes 
with emphasis on applications of codes to typical work situations 
and MSDS requirements. Includes emergency first aid, safety 
protection, eye protection and chemicals handling. Covers 
employer and employee rights as well as violations, citations, 
penalties, variances, appeals and record keeping. 



PNU 113 Medical Surgical Clinical Nursing II 

2 Credits 

Correlated theory to the hohstic care of the adult. Implements 
the nursing process in preventative, rehabilitative and therapeutic 
care. Identifies the role of the Practical Nurse providing care 
within the environment at an advanced level. 

PNU 114 Nursing Issues & Trends 

1 Credit 

Covers organizational patterns and the role of the licensed 
practical nurse in the health care delivery system. Emphasizes 
continuing education as a means for maintaining competencies. 
Includes ethical, legal and historical aspects to develop awareness 
of privileges, obligations and responsibilities of the practical 



PST 220 Incident Management Systems 
3 Credits 

Emphasizes the command and control of major department 
operations at an advanced level, linking operations and safety. 
Areas of study include incident management systems, pre- 
incident, size-up, command systems, sectoring functions, staging, 
safety officer, command post, communications, news media, and 
computer -aided resources. Utilizes simulated incidents requiring 
the applications of appropriate solutions. 

PST 221 Design and Planning for Prevention and Protection 
3 Credits 

Focuses on the needs and uses of the computer in public safety. 
Includes computer-aided dispatch, advanced levels of cameo, I- 
Chiefs, computer-aided design of equipment, generation of 
incident reports, application of computers for the budgetary 
process, computer-aided resource and materials, maintenance, test 
records of vehicles and the GIS program. 



98 



PST 281-293 Special Topics in Public Safety 

1-5 Credits 

Provides students with the opportunity to experience seminars, 

workshops and other instructional activities on topics of interest 

that reinforce the concepts presented in their program area. 

Contact chief academic officer for more information. 

PSY 205 Abnormal Psychology 

3 Credits 

Introduces abnormal psychology to acquire skill in understanding 

personality, attitude and emotional disorders which require 

intervention. 

QSC 101 Quality Control Concepts and Techniques I 

3 Credits 

Quality is the single most important force leading to 
organizational success and company growth in national and 
international markets in both the service and manufacturing 
industries. A company with a strong total quality control 
program has the opportunity to increase market penetration, 
improve productivity, lower the cost of quality, and strengthen 
leadership. This course demonstrates the development and 
implementation of a total quality control program. 

QSC 102 Statistical Process Control 
3 Credits 

Studies the fundamental tools of statistical process control which 
are used in industry to reduce costs and increase productivity at a 
predictable quality level. Emphasizes principles and techniques of 
statistical process control to ensure that prevention instead of 
detection of problems is practiced. Includes basic statistical and 
probability theory, sampling techniques, process control charts, 
the nature of variation, histograms and attribute and variable 
charts. 

QSC 201 Advanced Statistical P*rocess Control 
3 Credits 

Builds on the basic principles of QSC 102 with advanced 
techniques by industry to ensure economic production of goods 
based on defect prevention rather than defect detection. Covers 
the various decisions to modify, change or adjust processes based 
on statistical evidence. Stresses interpretation of statistical data 
and distinguishing between common and special causes of 
problems. Emphasizes appropriate use of control charts, trend 
analysis, assessing process and machine capability, evaluating the 
measurement process, using computers, and automated data 
collection systems and implementation techniques. 

QSC 202 Quality Control Concepts and Techniques II 
3 Credits 

Continues QSC 101. Acquaints students with quality control 
systems. Emphasizes the systems approach to quality, 
establishing the quality system and applying total quality control 
in the company. 

QSC 203 Metrology 

3 Credits 

Covers techniques of linear and angular measurement and 

applications for industrial processes and quality control. 

QSC 204 Total Quality Management 

3 Credits 

Teaches the philosophy of total quality management. Focuses on 

improving processes and reducing variation in systems. Covers 

managements role in improving aspects of manufacturing and 

service organizations to achieve quality improvement. 



RAD 101 Orientation and Nursing in Radiologic Technology 
4 Credits 

Covers seven units. Introduces radiology and prepares students 
for entry into a clinical setting. 

RAD 102 Principles of Radiographic Exposure 

2 Credits 

Presents individual and group characteristics needed to produce 
the ideal radiograph. Includes knowledge of interchangeability of 
mAs, kVp, film/screen combinations, distance and grids. Covers 
factors and considerations needed for pediatric techniques, 
calibration, heat unit calculation and technique chart 
construction. 

RAD 103 Radiographic Positioning I 

3 Credits 

Correlates positioning, terminology, techniques and film critique 
with the examinations of chest, abdomen, upper extremity, upper/ 
lower Gl tracts and urinary tract. 

RAD 104 X-Ray Clinical Education I 

4 Credits 

Follows category 2 of the competency lab model, which tests 
proficiency of skills from categories 1 and 2. Includes supervised 
clinical experience. 

RAD 105 Radiographic Positioning II 

3 Credits 

Correlates all previous material related to anatomy and 
positioning, covers the areas of lower extremities, spine and 
thorax, and advances knowledge in ethics and quality assurance. 

RAD 106 X-Ray Clinical Education II 

4 Credits 

Includes supervised clinical experience, utilizes category 2 of the 
competency model, tests proficiency of skills from categories 1 
and 2. 

RAD 107 Radiation Physics 

3 Credits 

Introduces physics as utilized in the production of X-rays. 
Includes laws of physics pertaining to atomic structure, chemical 
properties and reactions and electrical circuitry. Covers 
equipment and methods of generation and measurement of 
electricity 

RAD 109 Imaging Techniques 

2 Credits 

Covers theories, principles and demonstrations of current 

imaging modalities. 

RAD 201 Radiographic Positioning III 

2 Credits 

This course correlates positioning terminology and techniques, 
film critique, with exams of Category 2 of the competency model, 
testing skills from Category I and II. 

RAD 202 X-Ray Clinical Education III 

4 Credits 

Introduces Category 3 of the Competency Model, proficiency 
testing over Categories 1 and 2 and testing over Category 3. 



99 



RAD 203 X-Ray Clinical Education IV 

4 Credits 

Introduces Category 4 of the Competency Model in lab 
proficiency testing of skills from Categories 1, 2, 3 and 
proficiency in Category 4. 

RAD 204 X-Ray Clinical Education V 

4 Credits 

Includes final competency testing for students who have not 
completed clinicals 1-4. Continues maintenance over all 
categories. Includes experienced clinical. 

RAD 205 Pathology for Radiologic Technology 

2 Credits 

Examines basic concepts concerning disease, its causes and the 
resulting changes as viewed radiographically. Emphasizes needed 
technical changes to produce optimal radiographs from 
correlations to patient symptoms. 

RAD 206 Radiobiology and Radiation Protection 

3 Credits 

Covers theories and principles of the effects of ionizing radiation 
upon living tissues. Includes dosages, measurements, DNA 
structure and function and cellular radio sensitivity. 

RAD 207 Radiographic Positioning IV 

3 Credits 

Covers all positions involving radiographic examinations. 

RAD 208 Principles of Radiographic Exposure II and Quality 
Assurance 

2 Credits 

Continues Principles of Radiographic Exposure I. Explains photo 
timing and its relationship to manual techniques. Associates kVp 
and mAs with the quality and quantity of radiation. Covers 
standard darkroom procedure, automatic processing and quality 
assurance. 

RAD 209 Radiographic Positioning V 

3 Credits 

Covers all positions involving radiographic examinations. 

RAD 288 Pharmacology and Routes of Administration 

for Radiologic Technologists 
3 Credits 

Surveys common pharmacologic agents, including emergency 
drugs, contrast media, measurements, dosages, actions, contra- 
indications, allergic reactions and routes of administration. 

RAD 299 General Exam Review i 

3 Credits 

Reviews content of program, emphasizing anatomy, physics, 
exposure principles, positioning and radiation safety. Simulated 
Registry exams prepare the student for the American Registry of 
Radiologic Technologist Examination. 

RES 121 Introduction to Respiratory Care 

6 Credits '■ 

Presents an introduction into Respiratory Care including a brief 
history of the profession; equipment cleaning and sterilization 
techniques; patient assessment techniques; isolation techniques. 
Also includes medical records documentation, gas analyzers, 
introduction and application of therapeutic modahties including 
oxygen therapy, aerosol and humidity therapy, airway 
maintenance and hyperinflation therapy, and an overview of 
ethical practice and safety. 



RES 122 Therapeutic Modalities 

3 Credits 

Presents medicinal aerosol therapy and respiratory pharmacology; 

hyperinflation therapies; introduction to pulmonary rehabilitation 

and home care. Introduces basic bedside pulmonary function 

testing and development of respiratory care plans. Selected 

aspects of ethical and legal respiratory practice are presented. 

RES 123 Cardiopulmonary Physiology 

3 Credits 

Presents the cardiopulmonary system including ventilation, 

perfusion, and gas exchange; introduces interpretation and 

application of arterial blood gases, acid-base regulation, and 

physiologic monitoring. 

RES 124 Clinical Practicum 1 
3 Credits 

Introduces the student to the hospital environment. The student 
will be exposed to various hospitals and respiratory care 
departments, patient charts, patient identification and 
communication within the hospital. Provides supervised 
experience in oxygen therapy, hyperinflation therapy, humidity/ 
aerosol therapy and charting. 

RES 125 Critical Care I 
3 Credits 

Introduction to the respiratory care of the critically ill patient. 
Presents anerial blood gas collection; analysis and interpretation; 
and basic medical laboratory data. Introduces concepts and 
techniques of critical respiratory care of adults and pediatrics; to 
include establishment and maintenance of artificial airways. 
Application of adult and pediatric mechanical ventilators and 
related cardiopulmonary monitoring equipment. 

RES 126 Clinical Medicine 1 

3 Credits 

Introduces etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, therapeutics, and 

prognosis of selected pulmonary diseases. 

RES 127 Clinical Practicum 11 

3 Credits 

Provides supervised experience in selected therapeutic modalities. 
An introduction to chest physiotherapy, medicinal aerosol therapy, 
intermittent positive pressure breathing, and ultrasonic therapy 
will be included. Continuing certification in CPR is required. 

RES 128 Clinical Practicum III 

9 Credits 

Provides additional supervised experience in selected therapeutic 
modalities. Also includes advanced patient assessment, arterial 
blood gas analysis, and airway care. Clinical experience in adult 
critical care with mechanical ventilation. An introduction to basic 
cardiopulmonary testing is included. Continued certification in 
CPR is required. 

RES 221 Cardiopulmonary Diagnostics 
3 Credits 

Presents in-depth approaches to the respiratory care management 
of critically ill neonatal, pediatric, and adult patients. Special 
emphasis is placed on techniques of patient evaluation, 
cardiopulmonary monitoring, transportation, and management. 
Also included are advanced techniques of patient assessment 
through pulmonary function testing and other selected 
assessment techniques. 



100 



RES 222 Critical Care II 

3 Credits 

Presents advanced techniques of mechanical ventilation of 
neonatal, pediatric and adult patients; includes fetal development 
and assessment; neonatal and pediatric assessment, equipment, 
procedures and therapeutic techniques; introduces related aspects 
of the NICU environment. 

RES 224 Clinical Medicine 11 

3 Credits 

Presents etiology, symptomatology, diagnosis, therapeutics and 

prognosis of disease conditions related to respiratory care; focuses 

on the interrelation of all physiologic systems. Emphasis on 

treatment protocols; includes preparation for clinical simulation 

component of national credentialing examination. 

RES 225 Emergency Management 

1 Credit 

Application of advanced cardiopulmonary life support efforts in 
an emergency setting. 

RES 226 Continuing Care 

2 Credits 

Presents a brief history of home care patients in relation to 
respiratory care modalities. Provides an overview of respiratory 
care roles in the alternative care sites. 

RES 227 Chnical Practicum IV 

6 Credits 

Provides additional supervised experience in selected therapeutic 
modalities. Also includes advanced cardiopulmonary diagnostic 
techniques, application of invasive and non-invasive monitoring 
of the cardiopulmonary system, and experience in respiratory care 
departmental management and quality assurance roles. Also 
includes advanced clinical experience in adult, pediatric and 
neonatal critical care. Exposure to home care settings, alternative 
care sites and pulmonary rehabilitation programs is expected. 
Continuing certification in CPR is required. 

RES 228 Information Systems for Health Care 

1 Credit 

Presents an introduction to computer technology and its uses in 

the health care setting. 



SPC 106 Non-Destructive Testing Applications 11 

2 Credits 

Covers theoretical and practical aspects of non-destructive testing 
in radiography, eddy current testing, acoustic emission and leak 
testing. 

SPC 108 Quality Control Engineering Principles 
and Technologies 

3 Credits 

Presents principles and techniques of modern quality control 
engineering with attention to management, engineering, 
economic and production factors. Emphasizes the assurance of 
quality at the hardware, processing and system levels. 

SPC 109 Engineering Materials 

2 Credits 

Includes the basic principles of metallurgy and the properties of 
materials in the section of parts and manufacturing processes. 
Explores the ways in which the strength and hardness of metals 
can be altered by heating and cooling. Examines ceramics, 
composites, polymers and other exotic metals. 

SPC 110 Quality Control Engineering Theory and Application 

3 Credits 

Presents current theory and applications of quality engineering 
for assurance and verification of product quality at the hardware, 
processing and system levels. Emphasizes statistical analysis, 
laboratory experiments, and tests and case problem-solving 
applications. 

SPC 111 Reliability Objectives 
3 Credits 

Introduces the development and principles of reliability 
engineering. Establishes the mathematical and physical bases of 
reliability and applies the basic elements of reliability data 
analysis. Surveys concepts basic to modem reliability 
requirements with emphasis on practical applications in 
manufacturing processes and production operations. 

SPC 1 12 Reliability Techniques 

3 Credits 

Studies reliabiUty techniques and applications designed to obtain 

or improve reliability analysis. 



SPC 103 Employee Participation Techniques & 

Quality Improvements 
3 Credits 

Provides an overview of the development of an employee 
involvement program such as circle, team, group and other 
concepts. Includes problem-solving techniques of brainstorming, 
cause and effect diagrams, data gathering, check sheets, Pareto 
analysis, central location, frequency distribution and histograms. 
Covers the role of management and employees in the process and 
their relationship to participative management. 

SPC 104 Introduction to Non-Destructive Testing 
2 Credits 

Acquaints students with the principles and various types of non- 
destructive examination methods, their advantages, limitations 
and applications. 

SPC 105 Non-Destructive Testing Applications I 

2 Credits 

Presents an overview of the relationship of non-destructive testing 
to the total quality function. Includes advantages and limitations 
of various test methods. 



SPC 201 Analysis of Metallurgical Failure 

3 Credits 

Study of the factors responsible for the failure of components or 
structures, which may be motivated by either sound engineering 
practice or by legal considerations. Covers the proper application 
of failure analysis techniques to provide valuable feedback to 
design problems and materials limitations. 

SPC 202 Process Control Gauging and Measurements 

3 Credits 

Deals with the science of measurement for obtaining accurate and 
reliable data using computerized statistical process control and 
mechanical metrology. Includes selection of various instruments 
for specific applications. 

SPC 203 Codes, Specifications and Procedures Interpretations 
3 Credits 

Explores the different types of codes, specifications and 
procedures used in modem industry and provides opportunity for 
use and interpretation. Blueprint reading is included. 



101 



SPC 205 Nondestructive Testing '•Z.iy^'.-t. o. v'j I .'■.'.•: 
3 Credits 

Presents an overview of the relationship of nondestructive testing 
to the total quality function. Attention is given to the advanuges 
and limitations of various test methods. 

SPC 206 Mechanical Metrology 

3 Credits 

Provides instruction and laboratory experiments in the use of 

mechanical testing and measurement equipment for quality 

control. 

SPC 207 Electrical Metrology 

3 Credits 

Offers instruction and laboratory experiment in the use of • . . 

electrical testing and measurement equipment for quality control. 

SUP 104 Techniques of Supervision II 
3 Credits 

Develops skills for effective supervision of employees by utilizing 
analysis of cases, group discussion, in-basket exercises and role- 
playing. 

SUP 203 Reliability Objectives 
3 Credits 

Introduces development and principles of reliability engineering. 
Establishes mathematical and physical bases of reliability and 
applies basic elements of reliability data analysis. Surveys 
concepts basic to modern reliability requirements with emphasis 
on practical applications in manufacturing processes and 
production operations. 

SUP 204 Mechanical Metrology n- i ■ ..i >: .• , '■ 
3 Credits 

Provides instruction and laboratory experiments in the use of 
mechanical equipment for quality control 

SUP 224 Operations Management 
3 Credits 

Studies the efficient production of goods and services that will 
satisfy the wants and needs of identified customer groups. 
Focuses on the acquisition of the factors of production, efficient 
use of those factors and distribution of the output of the 
production process. Includes discussion of the need for quality 
and its measurement. 

SUR 101 Surgical Techniques 

3 Credits 

Introduces principles of sterile techniques and the operative care 

of the surgical patient. Includes the roles of scrubbing and 

circulating duties. 

SUR 102 Surgical Procedures I 

3 Credits 

Provides orientation to the role of a surgical technologist. 
Introduces the surgical facility, aseptic technique and basic 
surgical procedures with review of total patient care, including 
preoperative care, diagnostic test and immediate post-operative 



SUR 104 Surgical Procedures II 

6 Credits 

Studies advanced surgical procedures in relation to the total 
physiological aspects of surgical intervention. Includes a 
knowledge of the involved anatomy, existing pathology, surgical 
hazards encountered, the surgical procedure and a review of total 
patient care. 

SUR 105 Clinical Applications I 

9 Credits 

Correlates basic principles and theories of advanced surgical 
procedures to clinical performance in affiliating hospitals. 
Includes knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for successful 
implementation of safe patient care in an operating room. 

SUR 106 Surgical Procedures III 

3 Credits 

Studies specialized surgical procedures. Includes a knowledge of 
the involved anatomy, existing pathology, surgical hazards 
encountered, the surgical procedure and a review of total patient 



SUR 107 Clinical Applications 11 

8 Credits 

Correlates principles and theories of specialized surgical 

procedures to the clinical performance in affiliating hospitals. 

Includes the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for 

successful implementation of safe patient care in an operating 

room. 

TEC 101 Manufacturing Processes 

3 Credits 

Provides a basic survey of manufacturing processes, tools and 
equipment used by modern industry to convert bars, forgings, 
castings, plates and sheet materials into finished products. 
Includes basic mechanics of materials removal and forming, 
metrology, quality control and safety of operations. Introduces 
non-traditional manufacturing techniques. 

TEC 106 Hazardous Materials and Control 
3 Credits 

Introduces hazardous materials, managing hazardous material 
incidents, explosive and gas emergencies, shipping containers, 
cylinder safety devices, responding to flammable and combustible 
liquids, oxidizers, poisons and corrosive and radioactive 
emergencies. Emphasizes chemical identification, marking, 
storage, shipping and handling hazardous substances. Uses basic 
monitoring instruments for hazardous areas to protect workers 
and first responders. Covers protective clothing and equipment. 
Emphasizes safety. 

TEC 113 Basic Electricity 
3 Credits 

Studies electrical laws and principles pertaining to DC and AC 
circuits. Includes current, voltage, resistance, power, inductance, 
capacitance and transformers. Stresses the use of standard 
electrical tests, electrical equipment and troubleshooting 
procedures. Emphasizes safety procedures and practices. Pre- 
requisite or co-requisite BSA 050. 



SUR 103 Fundamentals of Surgical Technology 

6 Credits 

Demonstrates and supervises practice of general surgical 
procedures. Correlates theory to clinical by requiring students to 
actively participate as members of the surgical team. Includes 
laboratory and clinical experiences. 



VIS 101 Fundamentals of Design 

3 Credits 

This course investigates design theory and color dynamics as 

applied to organizing the field. Products provide experiences in 

analyzing design theory. 



102 



VIS 115 Computer Graphics 

3 Credits 

Introduces students to the computers used in graphic design. 

Focus on basic computer terminology and use, mastering 

fundamental skills and developing efficient working styles. 

Develops skills by creating publications with page layout 

software. 

WLD 108 Shielded Metal Arc Welding I 
3 Credits 

The student is provided viith a thorough technical understanding 
of arc welding fundamentals, welding safety, electric power 
sources, electrode classifications and selection. The course abo 
includes training to develop the manual skill necessary to make 
high quality shielded metal-arc welds in three positions on mild 
steel. 

WLD 109 Oxy-Acetylene Gas Welding and Cutting 

3 Credits 

In this course the student is provided with a thorough technical 

understanding of oxy-acetylene welding, flame cutting, brazing 

fundamental, and welding safety. Training to develop the manual 

skills necessary to produce high quality welding and cutting 

techniques is included. 

WLD 1 1 Welding Fabrication 

3 Credits 

Basic fabrication covers interpretating blueprints and welding 

symbols, principles of layout and measurement used in 

fabrication of metal products including tolerances, fits, and 

allowances. 

WLD 120 Metallurgy Fundamentals 

3 Credits 

Intrduced are properties and uses of ferrous and nonferrous 
metals and alloys; the production of iron and steel; composition 
and properties of plain carbon steel and alloying elements; 
selection of tool and case hardening steels; and destructive and 
nondestructive testing. Also included are the fundamentals of 
heat treatment and reactions that occur in metals subjected to 
various heat treatment methods and techniques. 

WLD 201 Special Welding Processes 

3 Credits 

Welding practice with various welding processes and techniques 

using advanced welding methods, machines and equipment. 

Presents advanced arc welding with emphasis on use and 

orientation of submerged arc welding equipment. 



WLD 203 Pipe Welding I 

3 Credits 

This course extends the student's welding skills as necessary to 

make high quality welds on open root mild steel pipe in 50, 2G 

and 6G positions using the SMAW process. 

WLD 206 Shielded Metal Arc Welding II 

3 Credits 

Training to develop the manual skills necessary to produce quality 

multipass fillett and groove welds with the backing in all 

positions is provided. Thiscourse is designed to use the E6010 

and 7018 electrodes on thick carbon steel plate similar to many 

structural applications. 

WLD 207 Gas Metal Arc (MIG) Welding 

3 Credits 

This course is designed to provide the students vvqth a thorough 
technical understanding of welding safety, gas metal arc 
fundamentals, gas metal arc equipment adjustment, metal transfer 
and shielding gases. It also provides training to develop the 
manual skill necessary to make quality gas metal arc welds in all 
positions on mild steel. 

WLD 208 Gas Tungsten Arc (TIG) Welding 

3 Credits 

The student is provided with thorough technical understanding of 
the gas tungsten arc welding fundamentals, arc characteristics, 
and welding safety. Training to develop the manual skill 
necessary to make quality gas tungsten arc welds in all positions 
on mild steel, stainless steel, and aluminun is included. 

WLD 209 Welding Certification 

3 Credits 

This course is designed for the student who has advanced 
shielded metal-arc welding skills. The course will concentrate on 
preparing the student for A.W.S. Certification Test. The lecture 
will cover certification procedures and qualification, destructive 
and nondestructive testing methods. 

WLD 210 Welding Fabrication II 

3 Credits 

This course provides for practice in hands-on fabrication and the 

use of related equipment will be taught. 



103 



IVY TECH PERSONNEL 



Board of Trustees , , , , , ^ , ,-. i.; 

William A. Sigman, Chairman 
Clara Thompson, Vice Chairman 
Moses W Gray, Secreury 
Michael Barth, Jr. 
Harry P Gowan 
Curtis Miller 
Joseph B. Sheets 

Administration 

Dr. Meredith L. Carter, Vice President/Chancellor 

Dr. Thomas Cooke, Dean of Instructional Affairs 

Darrell Cousert, Director of Student Affairs 

Dee HoUowell, CPA, Director of Administration & Finance 

Jane Howard, CFRE, Director of Marketing 

and Development . ,,,j,,,. 

Joan Roe , Director of Employee Relations 

Rex Ward, Director of Business and Industrial Training 



Full-Time Faculty 



Division of Business and Technolog y 

Duane Aljrey 

Senior Instructor (Welding Technology). Certification: 
American Welding Society, Certified Senior Industrial 
Technologist - NAIT. 

Susan Parker-Altman 

Instructor (Chairperson, Paralegal Technology). J.D., 
University of Louisville School of Law; M.A., Eastern 
Kentucky University; B.A., Eastern Kentucky University 

Margaret Baumer 

Instructor (Administrative Office Technology). M.S., Indiana 

University; B.S., University of Cincinnati. 

Jimmie Beeler 

Master Instructor (BusinessA4anagement). M.S., Butler 

University; A.B., Indiana University. 

Gregory A. Bemhard 

Instructor (Automotive Service Technology). B.S., Purdue 

University; NOCTI, A.S.E., Certification. 

Tom Bolinger 

Instructor (Business Management and Economics). M.B.A., 

Indiana University; B.A., Butler University 

Huey Calvain 

Senior Instructor (Welding Technology). Cerufication 
NOTCl (National Occupational Testing Competency 
Institute), American Welding Society and Certified Senior 
Industrial Technologist - NAIT. 

Bemadette Cinkoske 

Senior Instructor (Computer Information Systems 

Technologies). B.A., Indiana University. 

Conrad Cortellini 

Instructor (Design Technology). B.EA., Herron School of 

Art; License in Architecture. 

Michael DeBourbon 

Master Instructor (Assistant Division Chairperson, Business 
and Technology Division). M.S., Indiana University; B.S., 
Southern Illinois University 

Marvin Daugherty 

Master Instructor (Chairperson Computer Information 

Sytems Technology). M.S., Indiana State University; B.S., 

Martin University; A.A.S., Ivy Tech State College; NOCIT 

Certification. 



104 



Ronald Finney 

Instructor (Chairperson, Transportation Service Technology). 
B.S., Indiana University; ASE - Master Certified Technician; 
and Certified Senior Industrial Technologist - NAIT. 

William T. Flanigan 

Instructor (Chairperson, Industrial Technologies). M.S., 
Indiana Wesleyan University; B.S., Tri-State University, and 
Certified Senior Industrial Technologist - NAIT. 

Harry E. Gray 

Instructor (Accounting Technology). B.S., Buder University; 

Indiana CPA License. 

William L Greathouse 

Senior Instructor (Chairperson, Hospitality Administration- 
Hotel/Restaurant Management). M.S.M., Indiana Wesleyan 
University; B.S., Purdue University; A.A.S., Purdue 
University; Certification Rooms Division Executive, Food 
and Beverage Executive, and Hotel Administration. 

Michael Hall 

Instructor (Chairperson, Automated Manufacturing 
Technology). M.S., Purdue University; B.S., Purdue 
University; Licensed Professional Engineer; Certified 
Netware Instructor. 

Joanna Head 

Senior Instructor (Administrative Office Technology). M.S., 

Buder University; B.S., Butler University 

Krista Hollenberg 

Instructor (Paralegal Technology). J. D., Indiana University; 

M.A., Indiana University; B.A., Manchester College. 

Larry E. Hoskins 

Instructor (Chairperson, Public Safety). B.S., Southern 
Illinois University; A.A.S., Indiana Vocational Technical 
College; Master Firefigher in Tactics, Management Arson 
Investigations, Fire Prevention, Aircraft Rescue, and Fire 
Protection Engineering and Driver/Operator. 

James W. Irwin 

Instructor (Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration 

Technology). A.A.S., Indiana Vocational Technical College. 

Vincent Kinkade 

Instructor (Chairperson, Culinary Arts). B.A., Hanover 
College; A.A.S., Indiana Vocational Technical College; A.O.S., 
New England Culinary Institute. 

Stephen Kuchler 

Senior Instructor (Electronics Technology). M.S., Indiana 
University; B.S., Purdue University; A.A.S., Purdue 
University; Certified Senior Industrial Technologist (NAIT). 

Gregory Leigh 

Instructor (Computer Information Systems Technology). 

M.S., Indiana University; B.S., Indiana University 



Dehra Leverette 

Instructor (Chairperson, Administrative Ofiice Technology). 

M.S., Indiana University; B.S., Ball State University. 

Ray Nealon 

Instructor (Assistant Chairperson, Business and Technology 
Division). M.M.S., Indiana Wesleyan University; B.S., St. 
Lawrence University. 

Dan Niebauer 

Instructor (Automotive Service Technology -GM ASEP). 

A.S.E., Certified Technician. 

Michael P. O'Haver 

Instructor (Automotive Service Technology -GM ASEP). 

A.S.E., Certified Technician. 

James Pettit 

Instructor (Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration 

Technology); B.S., Martin University. 

Jereld Reeder 

Instructor (Chairperson, Electronics Technology). M.S.E.E., 

Purdue University; B.S.E.E., University of Iowa. 

Alan Rowland 

Senior Instructor (Computer Information Systems 
Technology). M.S., Ball State University; B.S., Ball State 
University; Certified Novell Instructor, NEAP Manager. 

Linda L Scott 

Master Instructor (Accounting Technology Chairperson). 
M.A., Ball State University; B.S., Ball State University; A.A.S., 
Ball State University 

Owen Lee Sensenbrenner 

Instructor (Industrial Maintenance Specialty). M.S., Indiana 
State University; B.S, Indiana State University; Accredited 
Fluid Power Instructor - EPS; Certified Senior Industrial 
Technologist - NAIT. 

Stephen Sharon 

Instructor (Industrial Maintenance). M.S., Industrial 
Engineering, Iowa State University; B.S., Purdue University; 
Accredited Fluid Power Instructor - FPS; Certified Senior 
Industrial Technologist - NAIT. 

Leslie Philip Simpson 

Instructor (Electronics Technology). J.D.; Indiana 
University; B.A. - BOG., Eastern Illinois University; Certified 
Senior Industrial Technologist (NAIT). 

Barrel S. Sparzo 

Instructor (Computer Information Systems Technology). 

M.A., Ball State University, B.A., Ball State University. 

Dr. Eugene Spiess 

Master Instructor (Computer Information Systems 
Technology). Ed.D., Nova University; M.A., East Tennessee 
State University; B.S., Tiffin University 



105 



Deanna S. Timmons 

Master Instructor (Divisional Chairperson, Business and 
Technology Division). M.S., Butler University; B.S., 
University of Indianapolis . 

Tom Trusty 

Instructor (Design Technology). B.S., Purdue University; 

AutoDesk Certified Instructor. 

David Woolums 

Instructor (Culinary Arts). A.S., Vincennes university; 
A.O.S., Culinary Institure of American; Certified Co-Chair of 
Jr Chapter of American Culinary Federation. 

Michael Wallace 

Instructor (Heating, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration 

Technology). B.A., Marian College. 

Kenton D. Wright 

Instructor (Program Coordinator, Graphics Training Center). 

B.S.M.E., Purdue University 

Robert Wurtz 

Instructor (Design Technology). B.S., Purdue University 

Division of Health and Human Services 

Diana Bennett 

Senior Instructor (Assistant Division Chair, Health and 
Human Services Technology). M.A., DePauw University; 
B.S.N. , DePauw University 

Carol Bodie 

Instructor (Practical Nursing). B.S., St. Mary - of - the - 

Woods; Diploma in Nursing from St. Anthony's School of 

Nursing. 

Kandie Belote 

Instructor (Practical Nursing). BSN, Grand Valley State 

College. 

Denise Busch 

Instructor (Associate of Science in Nursing). M.S.N. , Indiana 
University; B.S.N., University of Louisville; A.D.N. , 
Moorehead State University; LPN, Jefferson County School of 
Practical Nursing. 

Cheryl Clarkson 

Instructor (Practical Nursing). M.S.N. , Ball State Univesity, 

B.S.N., Indiana University 

Margaret Darnell 

Senior Instructor (Human Services). Doctoral Candidate, 
Ball State University; M.S., Indiana University - Indianapolis; 
B. A., Marian College. , ; , ,, ;., ,, 



Barbara Deady 

Master Instructor (Program Chairperson, Practical Nursing). 

M.S.Ed., Indiana University; B.S., Indiana State University. 

DebraJ. Drake 

Senior Instructor (Associate of Science in Nursing). M.S.N. , 

Bradley University; B.S.N., Olivet Nazarene University 

Margaret Drown 

Instructor and Clinical Coordinator (Radiologic Technology). 
M.S., Purdue University; B.S., Indiana University, A.S., 
Indiana University; R.T., R, ARRT. 

Maureen Gohde 

Instructor (Practical Nursing). B.S.N., Michigan State 

University. 

Wanda Haver 

Instructor (Chairperson, Surgical Technology); B.S., Martin 

University; CST. 

Ann Hill 

Instructor (Practical Nursing). M.S.Ed., Indiana University; 

B.S.N., St. Louis University 

Teresa ]ablonski-Polk 

Senior Instructor (Chairperson, Human Services). M.S.W, 

Washington University; B.A., University of Kentucky. 

Martha Judson 

Instructor (Practical Nursing). B.S.N. , Indiana State 

University; A.D.N. , Indiana State University. 

Kay Kavanagh 

Master Instructor (Radiologic Technology). M.S., Indiana 

University; B.A., Marian College; R.T., R, ARRT. 

Janet Kramer 

Senior Instructor (Chairperson , Associate Degree Nursing). 

M.S.N., University of Akron; B.S.N. , Ursuline College. 

Geneva Lamm 

Instructor (Practical Nursing). B.S.N., Indiana University; 
A.S.N. , Indiana University; L.RN., Indianapolis School of 
Practical Nursing. 

Kathleen Lee 

Senior Instructor (Chairperson, Respiratory Care). M.S., 
Indiana University; B.S., Muskingun College; A.S., Indiana 
University; RRT, RCR 

Ann Loureiro 

Instructor (Associate Science in Nursing). M.A.N., Ball State 

University; B.S.N. , Indiana University. 



106 



Dr. Peter Magnant 

Master Instructor (Divisional Chairperson, Health and 
Human Services Technologies). Ed.D., Indiana University; 
M.S., Indiana University; B.A., St. Mary's College; B.S., 
Indiana University; A. A., Nursing, Indiana University 

Mary Meeker 

Instructor (Associate Degree Nursing) M.S., Ball State 
University; B.S.N., Ball State University; A.S.N., University of 
Indianapolis,; LPN, Indianapolis PUblic Schools, School of 
Practiccal Nursing. 

Beverly Parham 

Master Instructor (Practical Nursing). M.S., Indiana 
University; B.S., Oklahoma State University; A.S.N. , 
University of Indianapolis. 

Anne Realey 

Instructor (Practical Nursing). R.N., - Diploma; B.S.N. , 

Indiana University. 

Linda Reed 

Senior Instructor (Chairperson, Medical Assistant). C.M.A., 
M.S., Indiana University; B.S. and B.A., Indiana University; 
Diploma, Marion County General Hospital School of 
Nursing. 

Mary Ann Reklau 

Instructor (Associate of Science in Nursing). M.S.N. , Indiana 
University; B.S.N. , Indiana University; A.S.N. , Staten Island 
Community College. 

Marcus Stowe 

Instructor (Respiratory Care). B.S., St. Francis University; 

A.S., Indiana University; RRT, RCP 

Sharon Sullivan 

Senior Instructor (Chairperson, Child Development). M.A., 

Ball State University; B.S., Western College. 

H. Jeffrey Turner 

Instructor (Medical Assisting). M.S., Indiana Wesleyan 
University; B.S., Western Michigan University; National 
Registered Emergency Medical Technician - Paramedic Level. 

Christy Troxell 

Instructor (Program Chairperson, Occupational Therapy 
Assisting). M.A., Rhode Island College; B.S., University 
of Illinois. 

Karen Tyler 

Instructor (Associate of Science in Nursing). M.S.N., 

Indiana University; B.S.N. , Indiana University. 

Willie Whitfield 

Instructor (Human Services). M.S. , Alabama A & M 

University; B.A., Alabama A & M University 

Miles Wyatt 

Instructor (Chairperson, Radiologic Technology). B.S., 

Indiana University; A.S., Indiana University R.T., R, ARRT. 



DMsion of General Education and Support Services 

Dr. Moges Bizuneh 

Instructor (Anatomy/Physiology). Ph.D., Anatomy Indiana 
University; M.S., Biology, Cornell University; B.S. Public 
Health, Haile Sallassie University 

Connie Bolinger 

Senior Instructor (Coordinator, Mathematics/Science). 

M.A.T., Mathematics, Purdue University; B.A., DePauw 

University. 

W. Michael Qippinger 

Master Instructor (Division Chairperson, General Education 
and Support Services). M.A., Indiana University; Certified 
Specialist in Developmental Education, Appalachian State 
University; B.A., Indiana University 

Jane Dalzell 

Instructor (Communications). M.S., Butler University; B.A., 

Uruversity of Indianapolis (formerly Indiana Central 

University). 

Dr Robert Dunkle 

Instructor (Social Sciences). Ph.D., Anthropology, Purdue 
University; MS., Sociology, Purdue University; B.A., 
Psychology, Parsons College. 

Michael Gorsline 

Senior Instructor (Mathematics). M.A., Ball State University; 

B.A., Indiana University -South Bend. 

Marilyn Hamilton 

Instructor (Mathematics). M.S., Butler University; B.S., 

Purdue University. 

Derrick Harding 

Instructor (ESLTDevelopment/English). M.A., Indiana 
University; B.A., College of Wooster, CESOL Certification, 
Indiana University. 

Rebecca Hiday 

Instructor (Resource Center). M.S., Indiana University- 
Indianapolis; B.S., Ball State University. 

Dr. Ronald Hollowell 

Instructor (Coordinator, Communications/Social Science). 

Ed.D,, Indiana University; M.A., Indiana University; B.S., 

University of Indianapolis (formerly Indiana Central 

College). 

Robert Keck 

Senior Instructor (Anatomy/Physiology/Chemistry). M.S., 
Indiana State (Science Ed.); M.S., College of St. Francis 
Health Service Adm.; B.S., Southern Indiana. 



107 



Kenneth King 

Master Instructor (Coordinator, Tech Prep; Faculty, 
Math/Science). M.S., Indiana University; A.B., Indiana 
University; Certificate in Meteorology, St. Louis University . 

Ali Lotfi 

Instructor (Coordinator, Student Academic Support 

Services). M.S., Indiana University; B.A., Tehran University 

David E. Miller 

Master Instructor (Mathematics and Electronics Technology). 

M.S., Indiana State University; B.S., Purdue University 

Susan Miller 

Instructor (Developmental Reading). M.S., Indiana 

University; B.S., Indiana University 

Todd Murphy 

Instructor (Developmental Sciences). M.S., Vetemiary 
Science, University of Kentucky; B.S., Microbiology, 
University of Kentucky. 

J. Stephen Noe 

Instructor (Science). M.S.., Zoology, Illinois State University; 

B.S., Biological Sciences, University of Nortre Dame. 

Susan Pearson 

Instructor/Counselor (Developmental Reading). M.A., 

University of Michigan; B.A., Indiana University. 

Kathleen Rice 

Instructor (Developmental Writing). M.S., Indiana 
University - Purdue University at Indianapolis; B.A.,Indiana 
University - Purdue University at Indianapolis 

Lucia Rusu 

Instructor (Mathematics/Physics). M.S., Purdue University; 

B.S., University Babes - Bolyai, Romania. 

Simin Shirzadi 

Instructor (Social Science). Ed.S., Western Michigan 
University; M.A., Western Michigan University; B.A., ■ •' 

Western Michigan University. 



Leroy Snare 

Instructor (Mathematics/Physics). M.S., Massachusetts 

Institute Technology, Cambridge, M.S., University of 

Missouri, Columbia, B.A., University of Missouri, Kansas 

City 

Janet Strandjord 

Instructor (Developmental Science/Mathematics). M.S., 

Indiana University; B.A., University of Illinois. 

Margaret Thomas 

Instructor (Developmental Reading/Mathematics). B.S., 

Winthrop College. 

Christopher Wood 

Master Instructor (Assistant Division Chair, General 
Education and Support Services). M.A., Indiana University; 
B.A., Indiana University. 



108 



One West 26th Street 

P.O. Box 1763 

Indianapolis, Indiana 46206-1763