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Full text of "James Schoolcraft Sherman (late Vice President of the United States ..."

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JAMES SCHOOLCRAFT 
SHERMAN 

( Lut Viet PRMdcDt of Ibc United StMct ) 

MEMORIAL ADDRESSES 

DELIVERED AT A JOINT SESSION OF THE SENATE 

AND THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

OF THE UNITED STATES 

FEBRUARY 15, 1913 

AMD 

AN ACCOUNT OF THE FUNERAL SERVICES 

IN UTICA, N. Y., NOVEMBER 2. 1912 



oovEumtiTT puimMo omcB 



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S. Con. Res. No. 41, 62d Gonqress. 
[Pa*Md Ibr. 1 (ralendai' day. Har. 3), 1913.] 

Rtioltitd bg tha Stnalt (lJi« Boiue of Repratittatttrtt eoneurrlna). That Iheie 
■hall bo printed and boniid, under the direction of the Joint Committee on 
Printing, fourteen tbouiand one hundred copies of the proceedings and the 
enlode* dellTered (n Congreu on lamea Schoolcraft Shennan, lata Vice Preal- 
dent of the ttnlted Statei, -with iUnstratlon, of wblch four thouaand copies shall 
be for tha naa of the Senate, eight thousand copies for the use of the House 
or RepnisentatlTes, two thoosand ooplea for the use of the Senators and Repre- 
sAitatlvcs of the State of New York, and one hundred copies, bound in full 
morocco, for the use of Mrs. James Scttootcrart Sherman: Provided, lliat there 
dull be included In such publication the proclamation of the President and 
(he proceedings In the Siyireme Court of the United States npon the death of 
Tloe President Sherman, and an account of the foneral wmce* at Utica, 
Mew Tort 

Attest: r.trtmtBf a. Bbhkbtt, 

SttTtlaiv of tht Stntttt, 



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CONTENTS 

Biography 4 

Proclamation by the President 5 

Proceedings in the Senate _ 7 

Prayer by Rev. Ulysses G. B. Pierce, D. D 7,22 

Memorial addresses by — 

Senator Root, of New York 25 

Senator Martin, of Virginia 30 

Senator Gallinger, of New Hampshire 33 

Senator Thornton, of Louisiana 35 

Senator Lodge, of Massachusetts 38 

Senator Kern, of Indiana 43 

Senator La Follette, of Wisconsin 47 

Senator 'Williams, of Mississippi 49 

Senator Curtis, of Kansas _ 64 

Senator Cummins, of Iowa 58 

Senator Oliver, of Pennsylvania 61 

Senator 0*Gorman, of New York 63 

The Speaker of the House of Representatives, 

Champ Clark 66 

The President of the United States, WilUam 

Howard Taft 70 

Proceedings in the House - 77 

Prayer by Rev. Henry N. Couden, D. D 80 

Proceedings in the Supreme Court of the United States... 83 

Proclamation by the Governor of the State of New York... 84 

Proceedings of the Utica (N. Y.) Common Council S5 

Proclamation by the Mayor of the Qty of UUca. N. Y 88 

Proceedings of the Philippine government. 89 

Funeral services in Utica, N. Y., November 2, 1012 91 

Address by Dr. M. Woolsey Stryker, President of 

Hamilton College 101 

Memorial services !n Berlin 105 

Tributes 106 

Condolences from foreign Governments 117 

[S] 



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[RdTtMd from laal blocnphlcal ikelch apprared by Hr. Shi>mui for ltu«r- 
tlon Id Ihe April, 1913, edition of the ConcreulowU Directoir, Mcond seMlon of 
tke Slxty-Mcoiid Congress.] 

Jambs Scboolcraft Shbriun, of UticB, N. Y., Vice President 
of the United States from March 4, 1909, to October 30, 1912, was 
born in the city of Utlca October 24, 1855; his father, Richard U. 
Sherman, also bom in Oneida County, N. Y., was by profession 
an editor and also prominent in public life. The son was grado^ 
ated from Hamilton College in 1S78; was a lawyer by profession, 
but retired from practice in 1906; was married in 1881 to Carrie 
Babcock, at East Orange, N. J.; ttiree sons — Sherrill, Richard U., 
and Thomas H. — are living and in business at Utica; was presi- 
dent of the Utica Trust & Deposit Co., of Utica, N. Y., and an 
officer and director of various local business enterprises; was an 
attendant of the Dutch Reformed Church and chairman of its 
board of trustees; a graduate of Hamilton College, which college, 
as well as Wesleyan University and Pittsburgh University, con- 
ferred upon him the degree of LL. D. He was a member of the 
Royal Arcanum and the Order of Elks. He was also a member 
of all the local clubs at Utica; of the Union Leagae, Republican, 
and Transportation Oubs, of New York City; of the Metropolitan, 
University, Chevy Chase, and Columbia Clubs, of Washington. 
He had been active in Republican politics since 1879; was a fre- 
quent delegate to State conventions, and presided over the New 
York SUte Republican conventions in 1895, 1900, and 1908; was 
delegate to the Republican national convention of 1892; vice 
chairman of the Republican national congressional committee for 
many years prior to 1906, in which year he was chairman of the 
committee. He appeared upon the platform in various States Id 
every campaign from 1892 down to the year of his death; was 
mayor of Utica In 1884 and a Member of Congress continuously 
from 1886 to 1908, with a two-year interim from 1890 to 1892. 
While In Congress be served on the Committees on the Judiciary, 
the Census, Industrial Arts and Expositions, Interstate and For- 
eign Commerce, Rules, and Indian Affairs, of which latter com- 
mittee he was chairman for 14 years; was elected Vice President 
upon tbe ticket with President Taft in 1908 for the term which 
ended March 4, 1913. Renominated for Vice President by tbe 
Republican convention in 1912. His last public speech (Senate 
Doc. 943, 62d Cong.) was made In Utica, August 21, 1912, when 
he again accepted a place on the Republican ticket with President 
Taft. Died in UUca, N. Y., October 30, 1912, and was buried in 
Forest Hill Cemetery, UUca, November 2, 1912. 

W 



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[DBATB OP nCB PRESIDOrr SBBKIUN.] 



3S« tbe ftteslbent of tbe Vnlteo SUtcs of Bmecfca 

B proclamation 



To tht PtopU 0/' tht United SlaUt: 

JamcH Schooloaft Shemuui, Vice Preadent of the United States, 
died at his home in Utica, N. Y., at 9^l o'clock on the evening of 
October 3ath, 1913. In his death the Nation has lost one of its most 
illtistrioiu citiiens and one of its most efficient and faithful servants. 
Elected at an early age to the' mayorship of his native city, the con- 
tinued confidence of his community was shown by his electioit for 
ten terms as a RepreaentatJTe in the National Gmgress. As a l^is- 
latof he at once took and retained high rank and displayed such 
attributes of upright and wise statesmanship as to commend him 
to the people (tf the United States for the second highest office irittain 
their gift. As presiding ofBcer of the Senate he won the respect and 
esteem of all for his fairness and impartiality. Hia private life was 
noble and good. His genial disposition and attractiveness of char- 
acter endeared him to all whose privilege it was to know him. His 
devotion to the best interests of his native land will endear his 
memory to his fellow oountiymen. 

In respect to the memory, and the eminent and variotis services 
of this high ofEctal and patriotic public servant, I direct that on the 
day of the funeral the Executive OfBces of the United States shall 
be closed and all posts and stations.of the Army and Navy shall 
display the Tiatinnnl Sag at half-mast, and that the representatives 
of the United States in foreign countries shall pay appropriate 
tribute to the illustrious dead for a period of thirty days. 

gn WtaxKi momf I have hereunto set my hand and caused 
the Seal of the United SUtes to be affixed. 

DoNB at the City of Washington this thirty-first 
day of October in the year of our Lord one thou- 
sand nine hundred and twelve and of the Inde- 
pendence of the United States the one hundred 
and thir^-seventh. 

WM H TAPT 



[8«A1,.] 



AetntSinlarTa/SUU. 

(Ho. 11 



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DEATH OF HON. JAMES SCHOOLCRAFT SHERMAN 



PROCEEDINGS IN THE SENATE 

Monday, December 2, 19i2. 

The first Monday in December being the day prescribed 
by the Constitution of the United States for the annual 
meeting of Congress, the third session of the Sixty-second 
Congress commenced on this day. 

The Senate assembled in its Chamber at the Capitol. 

Augustus O. Bacon, a Senator from the State of Georgia, 
took the chair as President pro tempore under the order 
of the Senate of August 17, 1912. 

The President pro tempore called the Senate to order 
at 12 o'clock noon. 

The Chaplain, Rev. Ulysses G. B. Pierce, D. D.. offered 
the following prayer : 

Almi^ty God, our heavenly Father, in whose presence 
we now stand, we are come together in Thy name and to 
do Thy will. At the opening of this session of Congress 
we invoke Iliy blessing. Without Thee we can do noth- 
ing. Until Thou dost bless us, our highest wisdom is but 
folly and our utmost strength but utter weakness. Be- 
stow upon us, therefore, we humbly pray Thee, wisdom 
and strength from above, that so we may glorify Thee, 
accomplishing that which Thou givest us to do. 

We come before Thee, our Father, with a deepened 
sense of our dependence upon Thee. Thou hast made us 
to know how frail we are. Thou hast showed us that the 

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Memorial Addresses: Vice PsEsiiffiNT Sherman 

way of man is not in himself alone, and that it is not in 
us who walk to direct our steps. Thou hast called from 
his earthly labors Thy servant, the Vice President of our 
Nation. While we thought it was still day Thou didst 
cause the sun of bis life to go down, bringing the night, 
when no man can work. We murmur not nor repine, 
our Father, knowing that alike the day and the night are 
Thine. Thou hast taken from our side fellow laborers 
and compaDions, leaving in this Senate empty seats and 
in our hearts loneliness and sorrow. We can not forget 
them, our Father, though in the flesh we behold their faces 
no more. Thou hast removed from his post of duty an 
officer of this body and has made us to know that in the 
midst of life we are in death. Comfort our hearts, we 
beseech Thee, for all our sorrows, and keep us evermore 
in Thy love; and though Thou feed us with the bread of 
adversity and give us to drink of the water of affliction, 
yet take not from us Thy holy spirit 

We pray Thee to bless the President of the United 
States. Uphold him by Iliy power, watch over him by 
Thy providence, guide him by Thy wisdom, and strengthen 
him with Thy heavenly grace. Bless him who shall pre- 
side over this Senate, bestowing upon him all things as 
shall seem good unto Thee. For all who are in authority 
we pray that they may serve Thee with singleness of pur- 
pose, for the good of this people and for Thy glory. 

So, our Father, may this session of Congress, begun in 
Thy name, be continued in Thy fear and ended in Thine 
honor. Grant us so to labor that by our deliberations we 
may hasten the time when Thy kingdom shall come and 
Thy will shall be done on earth as it is in heaven. 

In the name which is above every name, hear our 
prayer. Amrai. 



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Proceedings in the Senate 



DEATH OF THE VICE PRESIDENT 

Mr. Root. Mr. President, with a deep sense of public 
loss and of personal bereavement I discharge the duty 
of aDDOUDcing to the Senate that on the 30th day of Octo- 
ber last, at his home in the city of Utica, James School- 
craft Sherman, the Vice President of the United States, 
departed this life. 

His serene and cheerful temperament, inspired by love 
of country and of his kind, wiU no more diffuse through 
this body a sense of reasonableness, of friendliness, and 
of kindly consideration. His faculty of swift and just 
decision which has promoted and cleared the path of 
public business in the Senate for the three years which 
are past will no longer aid us in our deliberations. 

I have the honor to offer the resolutions which I now 
send to the desk. 

The resolutions (S. Res. 390) were read, considered by 
unanimous consent, and unanimously agreed to. as 
follows: 

Rttolvtd, That tlie Senate has heard with profound sorrow and 
regret the annonncement of the death of Jambs Scboolcbaft 
Sbbrman, late Vice President of the United States. 

Retoloed, That the Secretary communicate these resolutions to 
the House of Representattves and transmit a copy thereof to the 
family of the deceased. 

The President pro tempore. In connection with the 
announcement just made the Chair now lays before the 
Senate a cablegram received from the Brazilian Senate 
and the reply thereto, in order that the same may now 
be read and become a part of the Record, and to be on 
a later day given such disposition as the Senate may 
direct 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 



The matter entire is as follows: 

Rio db Janeiro, via Dakar, 

NoDiembre S, 1912. 
St. Prbsidbnte Sen ado. 

Senate, Washington. 
Cumpro dever commimicar V. ex., que Senado Brasil wntido 
tivamente morte eminente Sr, James Sherman, Vice Presidente 
dessa grande Republica, deliberou inserir acta seus trabalhos voto 
profundo pezar por esse doloroso acontecimento, e transmittir 
Senado Americano sinceras condoleancias, o que em seu Dome 
faco por infermedio V. ex. a quem apreseato minhas attenciosas 
saudacoes. 

Ferreira Chavbs, 
1* Secretario do Senado. 

[Tnuulatloii of cablesram.] 

Rio db Janeiro, via Dakar, 

November 6, 191i. 
Prbsidbnt of the Sbkatb, 

Wathtngton: 
I perform the duty of informing Your Excellency that the 
Senate of Brazil, keenly afflicted by the death of the eminent Mr. 
Jambs Sherman, Vice President of your great Republic, has voted 
to enter npon its journal a resolution of profound sympathy 
in that sorrowful event and to transmit to the American Senate 
sincere condolence, which I do in its name through Your Ex- 
cellency, to whom I present my respectful salutations. 

Fbrreira Chaves, 
Flrat Secretary of the Senate. 

[Cablegram,] 

Washington, November 7, 1912. 
To the President op the Braziuan Senate: 

I have received your very considerate and cordial message of 
sympathy, addressed to the American Senate, on the occasion of 
the death of the late Vice President James Sherman. 

The Senate of the United States is not now in session. So soon 
as it convenes in December I will have the honor to lay before 
that body your highly esteemed message. I beg, in the meantime, 



[10] 



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Proceedings in the Senate 



to thank yonr honorable body for its kindly consideration and 
■ympathy. 

AuoDSTus 0. Bacon, 
President of Ike Senate pro tempore. 
[Honu — The for«(alii« replr t» tlw oblegnim of the BraiUlan Senate wa«, 
upon tlie reqaeil of Senator Bacon, cabled to tlie Amerlcen ambaaiador at 
Braiil tor the Acting Seerebur of State, with dlreetloiM for Immediate dellTery.] 

Mr. CuLLOM. Mr. President, I desire as a further mark 
of respect to offer the following resolution, and I ask for 
its present consideration. 

The resolution (S. Res. S93) was read, considered by 
unanimous consent, and unanimously agreed to. as 
follows : 

Resolved, That as a further mark of respect to the memory of 
the late Vice President Jambs Schoolcbapt Sherman and the late 
Senators Weldon Brinton Heyburn and Isidor Rayner, whose 
deaths have just been announced, the Senate do now adj<nirn. 

Thereupon the Senate (at 12 o'clock and 22 minutes 
p. m.) adjourned until to-morrow, Tuesday, December 3, 
1912, at 11 o'clock a. m. 

Wednesday, December 4, 19i2. 

Mr. PoiNDEXTER. Mr. President. I present a series of 
resolutions adopted by the people of the city of Olympia, 
State of Washington, in commemoration of the late Vice 
President I ask that the resolutions may lie on the table 
and be printed in the Record. 

By tmanimous consent, the resolutions were ordered to 
lie on the table and to be printed in the Record, as follows : 

Whereas death has removed from bis earthly labors the Hon. 
Jakes Schoolcbafi Shbrhan, late Vice Presideat of the United 
States; and 

'Whereas we realize that he represented the highest type of 
American manhood, and that by his unwavering devotion to duly 
as he saw it he deserved well of his country and the world : Now 
therefore be it 

Resolved by the people of the city of Olympia, Wash., and 
vicinity, assembled without regard to political affiliations or 

[11] 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 

beliefs. That we deplore the untimely death of Hon. Jahbs 
ScHooLCBAFT SHERMAN and deeply feel the loss that our Nation 
has sustained, and that we extend to liis stricken family the 
heartfelt sympathy of this community; be it further 

Reiolved, That the chainnan of this meeting, over his signature, 
transmit a copy of these resolutions to the widow of our lamented 
Vice President, a copy to the President of the United States, and 
a copy to the Senators from the State of Washington, to be pre- 
sented to the Senate of the United States. 

The foregoing resolution was unanimously passed at an assem- 
blage of the citizens of Olympia, Wash., held in the Capital Parle 
on Saturday, November 2, 1912. 

Ghas. D. Kino, Chairman. 

Friday, December 13, 1912. 

Mr. Root submitted the following resolution (S. Res. 
408), which was read, considered by unanimous consent, 
and unanimously agreed to : 

Reaolued, That the Senate of the United States acknowledges 
with grateful appreciation the sympathy of the Senate of Brazil 
in the loss suffered by the American Government and people in 
the lamented death of Vice President Sherman; and it begs the 
Senate of Brazil to accept the assurance of its most respectful 
consideration and friendslilp. 

The Secretary is directed to transmit a copy of this resolution 
to the first secretary of the Senate of Brazil. 

Saturday, January 11, 1913. 

Mr. Root submitted the following resolution (S. Res. 
426), which was read, considered by unanimous consent, 
and agreed to : 

Resolved, That the Committee on Rules be, and it is, directed 
to report to the Senate an order for suitable ceremonies in the 
Senate in honor of the memory of the late Vice President of the 
United States, Jaubs S. Sheriun. 

Satorday, January 18, 1913. 

Mr. CuuHiNS. From the Committee on Rules, to which 
was referred Senate resolution 426, directing the Com- 
mittee on Rules to report an order for ceremonies in 

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Proceedings in the Senate 



honor of the memory of the late Vice President James S. 
Shebmam, I report a resolution which I ask to have read 
and referred to the Committee to Audit and Control the 
Contingent Expenses of the Senate. 

The resolution (S. Res. 435) was read and referred to 
the Committee to Audit and Control the Contingent Ex- 
penses of the Senate, as follows: 

Reaoloed, That Saturday, the 15th day of February> t>« set 
apart for appropriate exercises in commemoration of the life, 
cliaracter, and public service of the late Ja3ibs S. Srbrman, Vice 
President of the United States and President of the Senate of 
the United States. 

That a committee of tliree Senators, composed of Elihu Root, 
James (VGorman, and Charles Curtis, is hereby appointed with 
full power to make all arrangements and publish a suitable pro- 
gram for the aforesaid meeting of the Senate end to issue the 
invitations hereinafter mentioned. 

That invitations shall be extended to the President of the 
United States, the members of the Cabinet, the Chief Justice and 
Justices of the Supreme Court, the Speaker and Members of the 
House of Representatives, the Judges of the Commerce Court, the 
judges of the Court of Customs Appeals, the judges of the courts 
of the District of Columbia, the otBcers of the Army and Navy 
stationed in Washington, the members of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, the members of the Civil Service Commission, That 
such other invitations shall be issued as to the said committee 
shaU seem best. 

All expenses incurred by the committee in the execution of 
this order shall be paid from the contingent fund of the Senate. 

Monday, January 37, i913. 
Mr. Briggs, from the Committee to Audit and Control 
the Contingent Expenses of the Senate, to which was 
referred Senate resolution No. 435, setting apart a day for 
appropriate exercises in commemoration of the life, 
character, and public services of the late Vice President, 
submitted by Mr. Cummins on the 18th instant, reported 
it without amendment 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice Presiikent Sherman 

Tuesday, January 28. 1913. 

Mr. CnMHiNS. I ask unanimous consent for the present 
consideration of Senate resolution 435, a resolution sub- 
mitted by me and reported yesterday from the Committee 
to Audit and Control the Contingent Expenses of the 
Senate by the Senator from New Jersey [Mr. Briggs]. 

There being no objection, the resolution was considered 
and agreed to, as follows : 

Besolved, That Saturday, the 15th day of February, be set apart 
for appropriate exercises in commeiDoratioD of the life, character, 
and public service of the late Jahbs S. Shbhman, Vice President of 
the United States and President of the Senate of the United States. 

Tiiat a committee of three Senators, composed of Elihu Root, 
James A. O'Gorman, and Charles Curtis, is hereby appointed, with 
fuU power to make all arrangements and publish a suitable pro- 
gram for the aforesaid meeting of the Senate, and to issue the 
invitations hereinafter mentioned. 

That invitations shall be extended to the President of the United 
States, the members of the Cabinet, the Chief Justice and Justices 
of the Supreme Court, the Speaker and Members of the House of 
Representatives, the judges of the Commerce Court, the Judges of 
the Court of Customs Appeals, the Judges of the courts of the 
District of Columbia, the otBcers of the Army and Navy stationed 
in Washington, the members of the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion, and the members of the Civil Service Commission. That 
such other invitations shall be issued as to the said committee 
shall seem best. 

All expenses incurred by the committee in the execution of this 
order shall be paid from the contingent fund of the Senate. 

Wednesday, Februcuy 5, 1913. 

Mr. Root submitted the following resolution (S. Res. 
451), which was read, considered by unanimous consent, 
and agreed to : 

Resolved, That the Senate extend to the Speaker and the Mem- 
bers of the House of Representatives an invitation to attend the 
exercises in commemoration of the life, character, and public 
services of the late Jaubs S. Sheruan, Vice President of the 



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PROCBBDINQS IN THE SbnAIE 



United States and President of the Senate, to be held la the Senate 
Chamber on Saturday, the 15th day of Febniary next at 12 o'clock 
noon. 

Friday, February 7. 19i3. 
A message from the House of Representatives, by J. C. 
South, its Chief Clerk, auuotmced that the House accepts 
the invitation of the Senate extended to the Speaker and 
Members of the House of Representatives to attend the 
exercises in commemoration of the life, character, and 
public services of the late Jambs S. Sherman, Vice Presi- 
dent of the United States and President of the Senate, to 
be held in the Senate Chamber on Saturday, the 15th day 
of February next, at 12 o'clock noon. 



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. Memorial Addresses : Vice Presunbnt Sherman 



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on C^/&t^'€lem, ^ /^ ^ cj/elnea^, /^/<^, 


at&tfe^ clocK neon. 



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Proceedings in the Senate 




98436*— 18 2 [17] 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 



ORDER or EXERCISES 



PRESIDENT DIRECTS THE SECRH'ARY TO READ. AND THE SECRE- 
TARY READS. THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTION GOVERNING 
THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE DAY: 

■RESOLVED, THAT SATURDAY. THE 15TH DAY OF FEB- 
RUARY. BE SET APART FOR APPROPRIATE EXERCISES IN 
COMMEKORATJON OF THE LIFE. CHARACTER, AND PUBLIC 
SERVICE OF THE LATE JAMES 5. SHERMAN. VICE PRESI- 
DENT OF THE UNITED STATES AND PRESIDENT OF THE 
SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES." 



SERGEANT AT ARMS ANNOUNCES THE CHIEF JUSTICE AND ASSO- 
CIATE JUSTICES OF THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED 
STATES. 



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Proceedings in the Senate 



ALL HAVING SEEN SEATED. THE CEREMONIES OF THIS OCCA- 
SION WILL BE OPENED BY PRAYER BY THE CHAPLAIN OF 
THE SENATE. 



Mr. ROOT 
Mr. MARTIN 
MR. GALLINGER 
MR. THORNTON 
Mr. lodge 
Mr. kern 
Mr. la FOLLETTE 
Mr. WILLIAMS 
Mr. CURTIS 
Mr. cummins 
Mr. OLIVER 
MR. O'GORMAN 



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BdEMORIAL EXERCISES 



Satuhday, February i5, i9iS. 
(Legislatioe day of Tuesday, February 11, 1913.) 

The Senate reassembled at 12 o'clock meridian, on the 
expiration of the recess. 

The President pro tempore (Augustus O. Bacon) called 
the Senate to order and directed the Secretary to read the 
resolution of the Senate adopted on the 28th of January 
last 

The Secretary {Charles G. Bennett) read the resolution, 
as follows: 

Retolved, That Saturday, the 15th day of February, be set 
apart for appropriate exercises in commemoratloa of the life, 
character, and public seirice of the late Jaues S. Sheruan, Vice 
President of the United States and President of the Senate of the 
United States. 

The PiiEsniGNT pro tempore. The Senate is now in ses- 
sion for the purposes of this resolution. 

At 12 o'clock and 3 minutes p. m. the Sergeant at Arms 
(E. L. Cornelius) announced the Speaker and Memhers 
of the House of Representatives of the United States. 

The Speaker was escorted to a seat on the left of the 
President pro tempore, and the Members of the House of 
RepresentatiTes, the Clerk, Sergeant at Arms, and Chap- 
lain of the House occupied the seats assigned them. 

At 12 o'clock and 6 minutes p. m. the Sergeant at Arms 
announced the Chief Justice of the United States and the 
Associate Justices of the Supreme Court of the United 

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Memorial Addresses: Vice Presiiknt Sherman 

States, who were conducted to the seats provided for them 
in the area in front of the Secretary's desk. 

At 12 o'clock and 8 minutes p. m. the Sergeant at Arms 
announced the ambassadors and ministers plenipoten- 
tiary from foreign countries to the United States, and 
they were conducted to the seats assigned them. 

At 12 o'clock and 10 minutes p. m. the Sergeant at Arms 
announced the President of the United States and the 
members of his Cabinet, who were escorted to the seats 
provided for them in the space in front of the Secretary's 
desk. 

The other invited guests, the judges of the Commerce 
Court, the judges of the Court of Customs Appeals, the 
judges of the courts of the District of Columbia, the offi- 
cers of the Army and Navy stationed in Washington, the 
members of the Interstate Commerce Conunission, and 
the members of the Civil Service Commission, occupied 
seats on the floor of the Senate. 

The Pbesuknt pro tempore. Prayer will now be offered 
by the Chaplain of the Senate. 

The Chaplain of the Senate, Rev. Ulysses G. B. Pierce, 
D. D., offered the following prayer: 

Almighty God, our heavenly Father, Thou hast been our 
dwelling place in all generations. Before the mountains 
were brought forth, or ever Thou hadst formed the earth 
and the world, even from everlasting to everlasting. Thou 
art God. We thank Thee, O Holy One, that in a world of 
fleeting change and where naught abides we can take ref- 
uge in Thee who inbabitest eternity. Because Thou art 
so great, and for that Thy years have no end, therefore 
canst Thou stoop even to us who seem but children of a 
day. Bend over us now, we beseedi Thee, and for our 
weakness give Thou us of Thy strength, and in the dark- 
ness of our sorrow bid the light of Thy Holy Spirit to 
shine upon us. 

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Pkoceedings in the Sbhate 



Thou knowest all, our Father, and because Thou know- 
est Thou canst help. Thou knowest how weak and frail 
we are. Therefore we look unto Thee, who art Lord alike 
of life and of death. To Thine unfailing compassion we 
turn, even to Thee, who dost note Thy children's pain and 
sorrow. We bring to Thee our empfy hearts, our loneli- 
ness, our pain, and lay them at Thy feet If we drop a 
tear, it is not because we doubt Thee or because we mur- 
mur at Thy will, but because of the great love we bear to 
him whom Thou hast called from our visible presence 
and whom we this day mourn. In Thy name we conse- 
crate this day to him. 

Thou hast taken from us, our Father, the Vice President 
of this Nation and the President of this Senate. As we 
record the greatness of our loss and faintly utter our trib- 
utes of love and honor, aid Thou us. Touch Thou our 
lips, we pray Thee, that the measure of our hearts' affec- 
tion may find utterance this day. Inspire our minds, and 
by Thy Holy Spirit quicken our remembrance, that the 
life whi(^ Thou hast taken from us may live before us 
as he lives before Thee. 

Thou who art the Giver of every good and perfect 
gift, sincere and fervent thanks we render unto Thee for 
the life, the character, and the public service of Thy serv- 
ant, the Vice President of the United States. For the 
fruitage of his labors, for the blessed and unfading mem- 
ory of his life, for these, our Father, we thank Thee more 
than our lips can say. And now, that Thou hast called 
Thy servant to Thy nearer presence and to Thy higher 
service, we yield him to Thy love and keeping. May his 
soul rest in peace! 

We commend to Thee, most merciful Father, the hearts 
made desolate by this loss. Let the light of Thy counte- 
nance dispel the grief and gloom of the home where Thy 
servant was wont to dwell. Comfort, we pray Thee, the 



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MeHORUL AiHiRESSES: VicE Presuknt Sherman 

wife and lainily as we, alas, can not do. Touch their 
hearts with Thy love and heal their wounds. Though 
Thou leadest them throu^ the valley of the shadow of 
death, may they fear no evil. Let the rod of Thy faith- 
fulness and the staff of Thy loving-kindness comfort them. 
Give unto them heauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourn- 
ing, and the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness. 
Graciously grant that neither life with its hurdens nor 
death with its sorrows may he ahle to separate them from 
the love of God whidi is in Christ Jesus our Lord. 

And now may God our Father, who hast loved us with 
an everlasting love and called us into His eternal kingdom 
in Christ, comfort our hearts and stahUsh them in every 
good word and in every good work. Unto Him be glory 
and honor, dominion and power, now and forevermore. 
Amen. 

The Presiiknt pro tempore. For the purposes of this 
commemoration a certain order of exercises has been 
adopted, in pursuance of which there will be addresses 
made by Senators and some of the guests on this occasion. 
The Chair now recognizes the senior Senator from New 
Yot^ [Mr. Root]. 



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MEMORIAL ADDRESSES 



AiH>REss OP Senator Root, of New York 

Mr. Pbesosnt: Vice President Sherman was bom in the 
city of Utica, od the banks of the Mohawk, on the 24th of 
October, 1855. He came of English stock. His father, 
Richard U. Sherman, was a native of the same county 
and was one of its well-known and esteemed citizens. 
IBs grandfather, Willett Sherman, was one of the early' 
settlers upon the lands relinquished by the Oneida 
Indians toward the dose of the eighteenth century, and he 
was one of the first manufacturers of central New York. 
The grandson was graduated from Hamilton College in 
the class of 1878. He was^admitted to the bar in 1880 and 
became a successful lawyer. In 1884 he was made mayor 
of his native city. In 1886 he was chosen by the people 
of the great manufacturing region of the upper Mohawk 
to represent them in the Fiftieth Congress, and for more 
than 20 years he continued to represent them with but 
one break in his continuous service«through reelection to 
the Fifty-first, Fifty-third, Fifty-fourth. Fifty-fifth, Fifty- 
sixth, Fifty-seventh, Fifty-eighth, Fifty-ninth, and Sixtieth 
Congresses. He became a potent factor in the House of 
Representatives. He was an active member of the Com- 
mittee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce; he was 
chairman of the Committee on Indian Affairs; and he 
was long a member of the Committee on Rules, one of 
that little group of three constituting a majority of the 
committee, who, under the former rules of the House, 
guided the course of legislation and accomplished the 

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Meuorul Addresses: Vice President Sherkan 

nearest approach to responsible parliamentary govern- 
ment which this country has ever seen. Through frequent 
designation as Chairman to preside over the House sitting 
in Committee of the Whole, where so great a part of the 
business of the House is done, he gradually rose to general 
recognition as a parliamentarian of the first order and a 
presiding officer of the highest effectiveness. In his own 
city, as the years passed, evidences accumulated of the 
respect and confidence in which a communis so rarely 
cars while it renders unpremeditated judgment upon the 
character of one known through the contact and observa- 
tion of daily life. He was made treasurer of his church, 
the Dutch Reformed Church, of Utica, and chairman of 
its board of trustees. He was chosen to be president of 
the Utica Trust & Deposit Co. He was made a trustee of 
his alma mater and a member of the executive com- 
mittee of its board of trustees. Children grew up about 
him and the wife of his youth, in a home where virtue, 
family affection, cheerfulness, honor, and obedience ruled. 
It was one of those homes which, indefinitely multiplied 
among a people, are the safe foundatioiis of just and free 
self-government, and sure guaranties of the future in a 
republic From near and far throughout that region the 
unfortunate and struggling learned to come to him, their 
Representative, and ^his kindness and ready sympathy 
never failed them. No trouble of another was ever too 
great or too small to command his attention. His patience 
under such demands was never worn out His willing- 
ness to take trouble for others was never overtaxed. In 
the feelings of his people grateful appreciation of the 
poor and humble for his kindly service was minted with 
general pride in the honor of his representation and of 
his citizenship. 

The long and distinguished career as a Representative 
in Congress was brought to a close by Mr. Sherman's elec- 

[20] 



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Addbbss of Senator Root, of New Yore 

Son to the Vice President^ in November, 1908. He was 
renoDiiiiated by his party for the same high office in 1012, 
hut a fatal malady already had been established, and 
before the election, at his home in Utica, on the 30th of 
October, 1912, liis earthly course came to its end. 

Senators know, but few outside of the Senate fully 
appreciate, how great a service he rendered as presiding 
officer in this Chamber during the three and one-half 
years which followed the inauguration of March. 1900. 
Only experience can give a full understanding of the diffi- 
culties of legislation, the obstacles to progress in legisla- 
tive business presented by the persistent advocacy of a 
multitude of varying opinions, and the impossibility of 
wise and judicious consideration when feelings are exas- 
perated and personal prejudices and antipathies are ex- 
cited. Only through experience can one learn how much 
the success of legislative consideration depends upon the 
spirit which pervades the legislative chamber, and how 
much depends upon the flnn and intelligent application 
of those rules of procedure which the experience of cen- 
turies has shown to be necessaiy in the conduct of legis- 
lation. During all the years in which Vice President 
Sherman presided over the Senate we felt the calming 
and steadying effect of a serene and potent presence in 
the chair. The justice of bis rulings was the product not 
merely of intellectual integrity, but also of essential kind- 
liness of feeling and consideration. Not only the rulings 
were fair, but the man was fair. He was strong and self- 
possessed and untroubled, with a gentle and deUcate sense 
of humor subdued to the proprieties of the place, with 
swift certainty of conclusion, founded upon knowledge 
and accurate thinking, carrying conviction and making 
acquiescence natural. He expedited business by always 
doing promptly the right thing without vacillation or de- 
lay. In the rare instances when he found himself mis- 

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Meuobial Addresses: Vice Pbesident Sherman 

taken, prompt acknowledgment and reparation were ac- 
corded with such frank sincerity that the sufferer by the 
mistake felt himself the gainer. He was positive without 
dogmatism; certain without personal overconfldence. He 
controlled procedure under the rules without making 
them the instruments of irritation or oppression, and 
without sacrificing the spirit to the letter. Senators of all 
parties became his friends. All lamented his untimely 
death, and all join here in doing honor to his memory. 

All associated action among men exhibits an inevitable 
conflict between the idea of combined efiBciency and the 
idea of individual freedom. Neither can prevail without 
some sacrifice of the other. The difference is tempera- 
mental, and the two types of character are hard to recon- 
cile and are prone to misjudgment, each of the other. 

Mr. Sherman was of the type which seeks efiBciency by 
the law of its nature. His instincts were for order, disci- 
pline, intelligent direction, voluntary subordination to a 
common purpose, definite condusions, achievement So 
in politics, from first to last, he was always for party 
organization and party responsibility. In the House he 
was always for the most eff'ective rules of procedure, and 
as a parliamentary presiding officer he naturally made the 
application of parliamentary rules a means of progress 
rather than an obstacle. His character exhibited in high 
degree the virtues of his type. He had the capacity for 
sympathetic appreciation of the feelings and motives of 
others which makes associated action easy. He had a 
genius for friendship which conciliated affection and dis- 
armed enmity. He thou^t much of the common cause 
in which he was enlisted and little of his own advantage; 
much of general success and little of personal advance- 
ment He was modest and unassuming — never vaunted 
himself or pressed himself forward. He never sought the 
spotlight on the public stage. He was free from the ex- 

[2S] 



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Am)ress of Senator Root, of New York 

aggerated egoism which has wrecked so many fair causes. 
He had the unselfishness and self-control to obey where 
others rightly led, and he had the clearness of intelligence, 
the force of personality, and the decision of character to 
lead, so that others might follow. He was simple and 
direct in thought and action. He was frank and truthful 
and entirely free from that cowardice which hreeds de- 
ception. He had naturally an unconscious courage which 
needed no screwing up to the sticking point Among all 
the midtitude who have known him, ia boyhood and in 
manhood, in private and in public, not one can recall a 
mean or ignoble or cruel or deceitful word or act on his 
part He was sincere in his beliefs, he was faithful to 
his word, he was steadfast in bis friendships, he was loyal 
to every cause that he espoused. His life made men 
happier; his example is making men better. His service 
will endm*e in the fabric of our institutions. 

In this Republic unlike many nations which enjoy con- 
'stitutional government we grant no titles of nobility and 
no decorations for honor. As public servants complete 
their work and pass from the stage of action the judg- 
ment of their contemporaries finds no such definite means 
of expression, and so we have come here to-day to render 
in this ceremony the verdict of our generation upon the 
private virtues and the public service of Jahes School- 
graft Sherman. The Senate and the House of Represent- 
atives, the Chief Justice and the Associate Justices of the 
Supreme Court the ambassadors and ministers of foreign 
powers, the President and his Cabinet the civil and mili- 
tary and naval ofiBcers of the Nation, a multitude of 
friends who knew him and of countrymen who knew him 
not join here to set in the archives of our Government a 
record of honor which will remain so long as the Nation 
he served so well endures. 



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Address of Senator Martin, of Virginia 

Mr. Presiiknt: To an orator or an essayist the aspira- 
tions, achievements, and character of the late Vice Presi- 
dent Sherman would funush a theme big enough and 
broad enough to invite and justify an effort of the most 
philosophic and ambitious proportions. My time, oppor- 
tunity, and humble abilities have not tempted me to 
undertake to offer to the Senate to-day anything on that 
plane. My only desire is very briefly and in plain and 
simple words to pay some tribute to the memory of a per^ 
sonal friend, a patriotic citizen, and an able and upright 
public o£Scer. 

I knew Vice President Sherman chiefly in his relations 
to the Senate as its presiding officer and in his relations 
with Senators in his daily contact and association with 
them. He was elected Vice President of the United States 
on the 3d day of November, 1906. He took the oath of 
office and entered upon the discharge of his duties on 
the 4th day of March, 1909. On that day he first presided 
over the Senate. The last day on which he presided over 
the Senate was the 12th day of June, 1912, at which time 
a serious illness compelled him to discontinue his active 
work and go to hia home at Utica, N. Y., where on the 
30th day of October, 1912. he departed this life. 

Betweui the 4th day of March, 1909, and the 12th day 
of June, 1912, a period of three years and more than three 
months, he was rarely absent from his post of duty in the 
Senate. During that period I can say with perfect safefy 
that no one heard from him, either tivm the chair as the 
presiding officer of the Senate or in his association with 
Senators, a harsh, unkind, unjust, or unpleasant word. 



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Ai»RESs OF Sbnator Martim, op Virginia 

The Senate during my 18 years of service in the body has 
been fortunate in its presiding officers, but in no instance, 
either of a Vice President or a President pro tempore, has 
the body been honored with an abler, more courteous, or 
more impartial presiding officer than Vice President 
Sherman. He was as just and as fair to one side of the 
Chamber as to the other. He was as courteous, consider- 
ate, and as just to the Democrats as he was to the most con- 
spicuous and able Republicans in the body. He was by 
training and conviction a Republican in politics; he was 
always loyal to his party. He was by nature a partisan. 
I have no doubt I am as intense a partisan as he was, and 
I trust I am as devoted to the Democratic Party as he was 
to the Republican Party; but, Mr. President, in the Senate 
there is much less of politics than is generally supposed 
to exist 

In respect to questions essentially political in their 
nature Senators divide on political lines, but questions of 
that character constitute only a very small per cent of the 
questions which come before the Senate; and in defining 
questions essentially and properly political I would limit 
them to questions in respect to which Senators form their 
opinions in accordance with their convictions as to the 
policies in their judgment most promotive of the public 
welfare. In the Senate rarely, if ever, are questions 
treated as political questions with a view to gaining 
political advantages for the one party or the other. From 
my experience and observation in the Senate I can say I 
have found very little disposition on either side of the 
Chamber to deal with public questions with a view to 
party advantage rather than with a view to the public 
welfare. From this broad and patriotic point of view the 
late Vice President Suerham was a partisan in respect to 
questions essentially and properly of a political nature. 
So long as men adhere to this patriotic and honorable 
line of division on political questions politics does not 

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Memorial Ain»tESSEs: Vice President Sheruan 

and can not interfere with cordial personal relations or 
lead to unjust, unfair, or partial rulings from the chair. 
A partisan only in this higher and nobler sense, and 
actuated only by patriotic motives, it was inevitable that 
the official rulings of Vice President Sherman from the 
chair would always bear the impress of honest conviction 
and intelligent consideration and command the respect of 
Senators on both sides of the Chamber. 

As his rulings were impartial as between the two politi- 
cal parties in the Senate, so his personal friendships were 
not confined to the members of either one of the political 
parties. He was my personal friend. My associations 
with him constitute one of the most pleasing features of 
my public life. He enjoyed to the fullest extent the con- 
fidence and esteem of the Democrats as well as of the 
Republicans of the Senate, and with many of them he was 
on terms of the closest friendship. Democrats consulted 
and advised with him as freely as the Republicans did. 
There was no sham or hypocrisy in his character. In his 
personal association with Senators he was always frank, 
cordial, and courteous. In the conduct of the business 
of the Senate he was attentive, vigilant, just, and able. 
He was a careful student of parliamentary law, and in 
his rulings rarely, if ever, erred; but whether he erred or 
not, there was never an occasion during his official life 
in the Senate when any Senator questioned his fidelify of 
purpose or his careful consideration of any question pre- 
sented to him or his earnest desire to dispose of it cor- 
rectly and justly. 

His death brought the deepest sorrow to every Mem- 
ber of this body. In the official business of the Senate he 
has been missed more than words can reasonably express. 
The country at large has lost one of its noblest citizens 
and a public officer of the highest ideals, devoted to the 
faithful discharge of every duty devolved upon him. 



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Address of Senatob Gallinger, of New Hampshire 

Mr. President: When on a certain occasion the late 
Vice President called me to the desk, saying that he felt 
ill, and asked me to take the chair for the remainder of 
the day, he added, with pathos in his voice, " I am not at 
all sure how long I shall be able to continue to preside 
over the Senate." He then told me something of his fears, 
and as he left the Chamber my heart sank, and what fol- 
lowed a little later was not a matter of complete surprise 
to me. As was his custom in emergencies, Mr. Sherman 
made a brave fight against the disease that had fastened 
itself upon him, and only surrendered when poor, weak 
human nature succumbed to the inevitable. 

James Schoolcraft Sherman was a strong type of the 
beat in our public life. He was an intelligent legislator, 
an ideal presiding officer, a powerful debater, and an 
orator of acknowledged ability. He was a good friend, 
a charming companion, and a loving husband and father, 
whose popularity was nation-wide. His death was a 
shock not only to his countrymen, but beyond our borders 
it was felt as a calamity. He died as serenely and bravely 
as he lived. 

Mr. President, the predominant note in Mr. Sherman's 
life was geniality and good nature. From him radiated a 
sweetness and tenderness that were contagions. No one 
came in contact with him without feeling the influence of 
a pure, generous, lovable soul. He was kind to animals, 
fond of sports, and a lover of nature. In good literature 
he found great pleasure, and in the study of economic 
questions he took special delight 

»3436*— 13 S rSS] 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 

Id both Houses of Congress Mr. Sherman was univer- 
sally liked, and in every relation of life he was honored 
and respected. We sadly miss him from this Chamber, 
where he was held in highest esteem by the entire mem- 
bership. While a strong party man, he was free from 
narrow partisanship. He was in the truest sense a pa- 
triot, loving his comitry and its institutions, and devoted 
to the happiness and welfare of all classes of its people. 
He was broad-minded and large-hearted, incapable of a 
meanness, and filled with sympathy and love for his fel- 
lows. Such a life surely did not end when death came. 
Rather let us believe that it was the beginning of a higher 
and better existence, and that the earthly activities of our 
friend were but the prelude to a life of greater beauty, of 
grander aspirations, and of nobler achievements. In the 
contemplation of the great mystery that surrounds death 
and immortalit?, which no one, however wise, can fully 
interpret, we may well exclaim : 

Shall I say that what heaven gave 
Earth has takeo? 

Or that sleepers in the grave 
Reawaken? 

One sole sentence can I know. 
Can I say: 

You, my comrade, had to go, 
I to stay. 

And so, Mr. President, to this brief and inadequate trib- 
ute to a dear friend, whose memory will always be lov- 
ingly treasured in my heart of hearts, I can but add the 
simple word " adieu." 



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Address op Senator Thornton, of Louisiana 

Mr. PRESHSNT : It is to me a source of mingled sorrow 
and pleasure to have been asked to speak on this occasion. 

Of sorrow, because it brings freshly to my mind the 
thought of the loss of him whose memory we are as- 
sembled to honor, and of pleasure because of the oppor- 
tunity given me to add my short tribute of respect and 
affection to the fuller tributes placed on the altar of his 
memory this day. 

It was not my good fortune to know him as long as did 
others who have preceded or will follow me, but I shall 
ever esteem it fortunate for me that I knew him at all. 

My acquaintance with Mr. Sherman only dated from 
my entrance into the Senate in 1910, yet in the time that 
I knew him I learned to love him because of his sweet 
spirit, his gracious demeanor, his kindly consideration, 
coupled with the fine sense of humor that added to the 
charm of his personality and made his companionship so 
agreeable. 

These were the traits of character that won my heart 
soon after we met and held it to the end. 

And it is not on the statesman, the Congressman, the 
presiding officer of the Senate, or the Vice President of 
the United States that my mind lovingly dwells, but on 
the lovable man. 

And I do not know how better to illustrate these win- 
ning qualities I have mentioned and the recognition by 
others of their exercise than by relating an incident in 
which he and I were the actors and the conament of a 
third party thereon. 

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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 

He waa not preaiding over the Senate on the morning I 
waa sworn in, and I did not meet him for four days there- 
after. Then he came to my seat and, with that pleasant 
smile we all so well remember, said: "Senator, I have 
not had the opportunity of making your acquaintance, but 
I wish now to introduce myself and so say that I welcome 
you to the Senate and hope your stay with us will be 
always agreeable and pleasant to you." 

And after a moment of pleasant chat he left, taking a 
part of my heart with him. 

About a day after this little incident, one of my Demo- 
cratic friends from the House of Representatives, who 
had seen long service in that body with Mr. Sherman 
and waa on intimate personal terms with him, came over 
to the Senate and sat down by me and said : " Have you 
met my friend, Jim Sherman, yet?" Then I told him of 
the incident of the previous day and of how much I had 
appreciated the gracious action, and his comment was: 
" Now is not that exactly like Jim Sherman ! " 

This was the beginning of my acquaintance with him, 
this the first of the many acts of kindness shown me by 
him during the two years that followed until death stayed 
the hand always so ready to be uplifted for the help of 
others. 

And so it was that I learned to love him while he was 
here, and so it is that I shall love his memory since he 
has gone. 

And I am sure that my experience with him is that of 
all with whom he came in contact, for he was filled with 
the spirit of kindness toward others, and many there are 
besides myself who loved him living and mourn him 
dead. And if the beautiful dream of the poet be true, 
that on the roll of the book of gold hereafter the names 
of those who loved their fellow men shall be first in- 
scribed, then will his name be found high up on the list 

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Address op Senator Thornton, of 1.ouisiana 

We will no more see the winniDg smile, do more feel 
the cordial hand grasp, no more receive the acts of kindly 
sympathy, but the memory of it all will remain with us 
and make us feel thankful that we knew one whose im- 
pulses through life prompted his conduct toward others to 
the end that he might contribute to their happiness. 



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Address of Senator Lodge, of Massachusetts 

Mr. President: The tie which binds those who have 
been long together in the public service is apt to grow 
very close as the years glide by. Mr. Sherman and I, as 
it chanced, began our congressional life at the same time, 
in the Fiftieth Congress, 26 years ago. Except for two 
years, when he was out of the House for one term, we 
have been together ever since. He remained in the 
House, was one of its most trusted leaders and most effi- 
cient Members. During all those years I saw him con- 
stantly, and it was with peculiar pleasure that, as the 
president of the convention, I declared his nomination 
as the Republican candidate for the Vice Presidency in 
1908. His service here in the high office to which he was 
chosen is so recent that it is as fresh in our minds as the 
grief we have all felt for his untimely death. I say 
"untimely," for he was still far from the chilling pre- 
cincts of old age, and any death is premature which 
strikes a man down when he is in the prime of his 
abilities, when he is ripened by long training and wide 
experience, and when his life is still valuable to his 
country, still ample in promise for a yet larger service in 
the future. 

Of his long and successful career as a legislator I shall 
not attempt to speak. Others who saw him at work year 
after year in the House can alone do him sufficient justice 
in this respect But there is one phase of his public work 
of which I wish to say a few words, because he there 
attained to an excellence not often reached in what is 
always an exacting and sometimes an ungrateful duty. 
During his long service in the House he gradually came 

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Address of Senator Lodge, of Massachusbits 

to be recognized as the best Chairman of the Committee 
of the Whole whom that great body had known in many 
years. 

To preside not merely well but effectively in the House 
Committee of the Whole is a severe test of a man's quali- 
ties, both moral and mental. He must have strength of 
character as well as ability, quickness in decision must go 
hand in band with knowledge, and firmness must always 
be accompanied by good temper. 

Many if not most persons seem to regard parliamentary 
law as a collection of haphazard and arbitrary rules. No 
view could be more erroneous. General parliamentary 
law, like all other systems of law or jurisprudence, rests 
upon certain underlying principles, and is designed to 
carry out those principles and to effect particular pur- 
poses for which the system exists. Parliamentary law 
aims to insure the transaction of business by legislative 
bodies, to eliminate disorder and confusion from the 
process, to make impossible the occurrence of situations 
where there is no thoroughfare and no way out, and to 
preserve the proper rights of miDorities. 

For the attainment of these objects, so essential to the 
transaction of business in any legislative assembly or any 
large body which debates and votes, parliamentary law 
has been developed by practice and perfected by long ex- 
perience. A presiding officer of high and martted ability 
like Mr. Sherman must therefore possess a full knowledge 
of the principles iq)on which parliamentary law is based 
and also understand the philosophy of the system so that 
be can apply it at will to any given question. Besides this 
familiarity with general parliamentary law and in addi- 
tion to a firm grasp of its principles, a presiding officer 
must know thoroughly the rules of the particular body 
which he serves. In the case of our House of Representa- 
tives the rules are many and complicated and the litera- 
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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 

ture to which they have given rise in discussions, deci- 
sions, and precedents is voluminous in the extreme. In 
the Senate, on the other hand, the rules are simple and 
their burden is light, but they are administered in con- 
formity with habits and customs which have slowly grown 
up during a century and which, for that very reason, can 
be understood and appreciated only by the exercise of 
patient and observant care. Mr. Sherman, as Chairman 
of the Committee of the Whole in the House and as 
President of the Senate, met the exacting and very difQ- 
cult requirements of both positions with a success as com- 
plete as it is rare. He was equally master of general par- 
liamentary practice and its principles and of the various 
systems peculiar to the two branches of Congress. 
Always alert, prompt, and clear in decision, rapid in the 
conduct of business, he was courtesy and kindness itself 
to all the Members of the House and Senate. A strong 
party man, of deep convictions as to political principles, 
when in the chair he recognized no party divisions on the 
floor. To him in that high and responsible place each 
Member of this body was simply a Senator with rights and 
obligations equal to those of every other Member of the 
body. He xmderstood thoroughly also that most essential 
fact, that the first duty of a presiding o£9cer is to preside, 
and. when questions of order are raised, to dedde. He 
realized fully that it was far better to run the risk of an 
occasional error, against which his knowledge and experi- 
ence protected him, than, like Lord Eldon, to say con- 
tinually "I doubt." He knew that the presiding officer 
who hesitates is, if not always lost, quite sure to find con- 
tnd of the helm slipping from him, to see the public busi- 
ness drift oft on the baffling waves of debate, ground on 
the shoals of delay, or sink, a helpless wreck, even when 
in sight of land. Therefore he ruled, as he conducted the 
general business, clearly and without doubt or hesitation. 

[40] 



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Address of Senatoh Lodge, of Massachdsetts 

He exhibited also in a high degree, whenever occasion 
demanded, the steady courage which is at all times so 
important, but which is not always associated in the 
minds of most people with the qualifications of a presid- 
ing o£Scer. Correct rulings may readily be as unpopular 
as a righteous vote or an honest speech, and it is very easy 
to create a doubt under cover of which the unpopular 
ruling can be escaped. This Mr. Sherman never did. He 
was as incapable of making a wrong ruling through fear 
as he was of ruling wrongly to advance a personal or 
party interest. I remember well one occasion when a 
very popular and much-desired amendment was offered 
to an appropriation bill where it was plainly out of order. 
Under the Senate rules the Chair may submit a question 
of order to the Senate. It was not necessary in this in- 
stance that Mr. Sherman should rule wrongly; it was 
only necessary to stand back and allow the Senate to set 
the rule aside. Mr. Sherman was urged to submit the 
question of order to the Senate. He declined to do so. 
He refused to evade his duty. The point of order was 
made, and he sustained it It was not popular to do this, 
but it was right, and the act showed not only courage but 
a high conception of public duty. 

I have dwelt upon this single phase of Mr. Sherman's 
public service, because time forbids that I should do more, 
and because the high excellence which he actiieved as a 
presiding officer, l>oth in the House and Senate, is in 
itself at once an exhibition and a proof of his ability. 
his intellectual keenness, and his force of character. But 
I can not end these most inadequate words without 
speaking of liim for an instant as a friend and wholly 
apart from his public service. He was one of the best 
and most loyal friends. Indeed, his loyalty to a friend was 
so strong that he more than once bore troubles not his 
own and endured censure when he had no fault, rather 

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Memorial Addresses: Vice Presusnt Sherman 

than desert one to whom his friendship had been given. 
He was one of the pleasantest and most agreeable of com- 
panions, full of fim and humor, and with a sympathetic 
interest which ranged over many subjects and touched 
many men. By those who knew him well he is greatly 
missed. Not a day goes by that I do not think of him 
here and of our talks together, that I do not wish I could 
hear once again that hearty laugh and cheery voice, that 
I could see him as he was, now serious, now mirthful, but 
always strong and kind and full of sympathy with those 
for whom he cared. He died in the highest ofBce but one 
of the Republic. The ofBce will be filled, but the place 
which he had made for himself in the affection of those 
who knew him will remain vacant and unoccupied. 



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Address of Senator Kern, op Indiana 

Mr. President: It was during the presidential campaign 
of 1908, and in the city of Chicago, that I first met James S. 
Sherman. We were opposing candidates for Vice Presi- 
dent, and at that particular time and place the political 
situation was the subject of well-nigh universal discus- 
sion. Both of us were in the midst of the contest I have 
never forgotten the genial warmth of Mr. Sherman's 
greeting, and the ease with which he captured my 
friendship. 

Before that meeting I had him in mind as a fomii- 
dable political adversary — a foeman worthy the steel of 
any man, but none the less a foeman. After looking into 
his genial face, which reflected that gentle spirit, and 
hearing his words of kindly greeting which so clearly 
proceeded from a hesri full of affection for his fellow 
men I was never able to regard him otherwise than as 
my friend. 

Some weeks later as the campaign proceeded I was 
about to be introduced to a very large political assem- 
blage in his home city of Utica, when a telegram was 
handed me. It was from Mr. Sherman, who was in a 
distant pari of the country, bidding me welcome to his 
city, expressing his hearty good will, and urging me to 
call upon his family while in Utica. 

A few days later, when the word came to me that a 
member of my family had been suddenly stricken by 
disease, I had scarcely turned my face toward home, 
abandoning the campaign for a time, when from my 
opponent, this great-hearted man, came a message full 

[43] 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 

of sympathy, expressing in tenderest phrase his hopes 
that my worst fears might not be realized. 

Within a week of the election, when a foul libel assail- 
iiig my reputation had been published in a single eastern 
newspaper, the first knowledge I had of the article came 
from Mr. Sherman, deprecating the publication and re- 
assuring me of his high personal regard. 

When I came to the Senate two years ago he was so 
anxious to show his good will and emphasize his personal 
friendship that within five minutes after the oath had 
been administered to me he invited me to take the gavel 
and preside over the Senate. I protested that I wa^ a 
stranger, not only to this body but its procedure, but he 
insisted, saying, " It will be only for a few minutes and it 
is for my own pleasure and gratification that I ask you 
to do me this personal favor." 

And from that time on until the last he never lost an 
opportunity to make me feel that however wide our politi- 
cal differences — and they were irreconcilable — I had in 
him a friend on whose fidelity I might always rely. 

Such incidents may be tiresome, in so far as they refer 
to my personal connection with them, but it seemed to me 
that the recital of these bare facts would serve to illus- 
trate the kindness of heart and nobility of spirit of this 
man whose untimely death we mourn, with far greater 
force than I could possibly portray them in any combina- 
tion of words, however ingeniously arranged or elo- 
quently expressed. 

While the election of 1908 brought to me defeat, disas- 
trous as such things are counted or measured amongst 
men, the campaign brought to me in the nature of recom- 
pense the friendship of this man, which during his life I 
treasured as one of my dearest possessions, and now that 
he has " gone forever and ever by," the memory of that 
friendship will bless and inspire me to my latest day. 

t44] 



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AimBESs OF Senator Kern, of Indiana 

There are men here who knew him intimately through- 
out his long and honorable public career, covering a pe- 
riod of nearly a quarter of a century, and who, therefore, 
must have loved him well, but I doubt if any of such men 
had greater reason than I for yielding to him a full meas- 
ure of affectionate regard or who felt a deeper sense of 
personal loss when death took from me such a friend. 

It is not my purpose to speak of this man's ofBcial life, 
nor of the distinction gained by him during his years of 
service as a Representative in Congress of a rich and 
I>opulous district, or those other years of service here as 
the Vice President of the United States. 

The people of the Utica district honored and trusted 
faim, and he was altogether faithful to their interests. 
They loved him, and he gave them his personal affection 
In return. He won their continued support by his fidelity 
to duty, but he won their hearts by his unfailing kindness 
and gentle bearing to everyone. 

And so in this body. As a presiding o£Scer he was able 
and impartial, and because of the ability with which he 
discharged the duties of his high office he was honored 
by the Senators from every State. And yet when he died 
and a deep sense of personal loss and bereavement op- 
pressed us, it was not of his great ability as a presiding 
officer, or the loss that the Nation had sustained in the 
loss of its Vice President, that we thought first, but rather 
of the great heart of the man, of his genial manners, bis 
gentle ways, and his never-failing love for his fellow man. 

His public record is one of which his family and friends 
may be justly proud. He will be doubtless remembered 
as a commanding figure in the councils of the Nation in 
that period during which he served the people. But be- 
yond and above all this, the memories of his cheery smile, 
his kindly deeds, his generous conduct toward political 
friend and foe alike, which made men love faim, will find 

[45] 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice Pbesident Sherman 

their way into the history of the times in which he lived, 
and in the homes of the people at least will add luster to 
his name. 

It is better that a man should have the personal affec- 
tion of the hundreds who know him well and love him for 
the sweetness of his life and character than that he ahould 
have the applause of the millions because of great public 
achievements, while hungering for the joys of personal 
friendship of which he knows nothing. 

The Divine Master when on earth, being called upon for 
a solution of the problem as to what was necessary in the 
conduct of man to insure the inheritance of eternal life, 
declared that he who loved God and who also loved bis 
neighbor as himself should surely live, and in further ex- 
empliflcation of the law of love which glorified the new 
dispensation declared: "A new commandment I give unto 
you, that ye love one another." 

What a true disciple of this Christian doctrine, what a 
consistent follower of these divine teachings, was the late 
Vice President of the United States! 

And if we may rely upon the teachings and promises 
of the Man of Galilee, as with confidence we do, then is 
the future of our friend assured, for he has come into that 
inheritance of eternal life which has been promised to all 
who, keeping God's commands, have loved their fellow 



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Address of Senator La Follette, of Wisconsin 

Mr. President: In the brief time assigned me I can offer 
but the simplest tribute to a personal friend. 

I first met the late Vice President 25 years ago, when 
he became a Member of the Fiftieth Congress. I had en- 
tered the House of Representatives two years before. 
We were of the same age. We were both Republicans. 
We became friends. We served together four years. We 
were both retired from the public service on the 4th of 
March, 1891. We did not meet again for 15 years. 

In those intervening years he had been returned to the 
House of Representatives, where he had risen to posi- 
tion and to power. I had gone back to my State, to find 
another call to service. 

When we again met in this Chamber, a decade and a 
half had wrought great changes in political parties and 
in the country. We were both Republicans, but he was 
of one school, I of another. He believed that the inter- 
ests of business and the interests of the country were at 
all times identical. I believed otherwise. But while we 
disagreed on many if not most matters of legislation, 
our friendly personal relations remained unbroken to 
the end. 

Looking back upon the years in which he laid the foun- 
dations of his career, I can well understand its influence 
upon his conception of the obligations of public service. 
The strongest men are, in some degree at least, the prod- 
uct of their environment But whatever may have been 
the influences directing the course of Mr. Sherman's 
thinking, that course was a steadfast and consistent one 
throughout his life. His convictions were strong and 

[47] 



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Memorial Addbesses: Vice Pbesident Sherman 

were strongly maintained. He never skulked or evaded, 
but with resolution and courage fought out every issue 
openly, to victory or to defeat 

From the- House of Representatives he was chosen to 
be Vice President of the United States. But in the hour 
of his greatest triumph, when life and hope were strong- 
est within, the hand of death was laid upon him. At the 
very threshold of his new career the grim messenger met 
him. From the first its shadow went with him in and 
out of this Chamber, stood over him at his desk, fol- 
lowed him down the corridors, pursued him to his home. 
Month after month, waking or sleeping, in social cheer 
or the still hours of the night, it was his constant com- 
panion. Before all others he was the first to know what 
threatened him. His ear first caught the mandate that 
chills the heart and slows the pulse: "Be ye ready, the 
summons cometh quickly." 

He indulged in no delusions touching the final issue. 
His clear vision saw straight to the open tomb. To go 
down in defeat and to. rise again and fight on demands 
courage of a high order. To face death when it breaks 
life off in the middle and to make no sign is the supreme 
test 

He understood. But he took care that those who were 
nearest and dearest to him should not know. He bore 
an outward geniality and spirit that dispelled fear from 
all his friends, while caring for every detail, and making 
the final preparation. 

Mr. President, the longest span of life is but a day — 
a day of sunshine and shadow between the impenetrable 
darkness of two eternities. The mystery of our coming 
and going we can not solve; but — 

We believe that God is overhead; 
And as life is to the tiving. 
So death is to the dead. 



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Address of Senator Wuxums, of Mississippi 

Mr. Presidemt: Mr. James S. Sherman, Vice President 
of the United States, was cut down in the high tide of 
physical and mental virility and maturity. 

Shakespeare pictures life as a one-act play with seven 
scenes, and of the seventh he says: 

Last scene of all. 
That ends this strange eventful history. 
Is second childishness and mere oblirion, 
Sana teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything. 

The man whose personality we recall to-day least of 
all men would have desired to live that long. Rather was 
his temperament that of one who would heed the admo- 
nition: 

Gather ye rosebuds while ye may. 

Old Time is still a-flying. 
And this same flower thai smiles to-day 

To-morrovr will be dying. 

For that reason was he called " Sunny Jim." He was 
sunny in appearance, in speech, in thought, in feeling. 
But it was not the rippling sunniness of short, breaking 
wavelets on the surface of a shallow brook; the stream 
of his thought was deep and strong and steady. 

I first met him in 1893, when both of us were Members 
of the Fifty-third Congress. We were of totally opposite 
schools of political thought, opposite heredities and en- 
vironments, but we soon became warm personal friends 
of that type who are said to be " hail fellows well met," 
extending one to the other every possible personal cour- 
tesy, and in legislative work every possible favor consist- 
ent with our respective partisan obligations. He was ex- 
perienced, I not; and so it came to pass that he showed 

B343e'-I3 1 [49] 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sheruan 

me how to do things in a parliamentary way. In 20 years* 
acquaintance I never saw a frown on his face, nor did I 
ever see a shadow or a doud. He must have had his 
sorrows and troubles, as all of us have, but whatever they 
were he never afilicted others with them. He shared his 
enjoyments, not his worries, with his friends. 

He had been when I first met him already a Member of 
two Congresses — the Fiftieth and the Fifty-first — though 
defeated for the Fifty-second. He was after the Fifty- 
third a Member successively of seven more Congresses, 
and then for nearly four years Vice President of the 
United States. " He wore his honors meekly." Pride of 
ofiBce was as alien to him as taking himself too seriously 
in any other way would have been. Among his fellows he 
did his work patiently, vigilantly, intelligently, genially, 
and, above all, equably — never seeking the first place for 
glory nor the last to shirk labor or responsibility, but 
meeting with marked ability whatever fell to him as his 
share in bis country's or his party's tasks in that great 
arena of struggling and often excited gladiators — the 
House of Representatives. The favorite of three Speak- 
ers — ^Reed, Henderson, and Cannon — all of whom, when 
forced to leave the chair at critical moments demanding 
a quick, decisive, self-possessed, and able parliamen- 
tarian in their stead, delighted to call him to it. he yet 
never held a conmiittee assignment in the House higher 
than that of Judiciary at one time and Interstate and 
Foreign Commerce at another. For years he could have 
had a place on Ways and Means or Appropriations — the 
two leading committees there — for the asking. But there 
were always friends who wanted preferment, and be 
always subordinated himself to them, thereby making 
the task of the Speaker, who was in those days always 
the party leader, easier and the pathway of bis friends 
pleasanter. 

[60] 



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AiHUiEss OF Senator Williams, of Mississippi 

He proved himself easily equal, if not superior, 
wherever he was placed. He fell below the demands of 
DO responsibility or task laid upon him. His action was 
decisive; his speech facile, lucid, and terse, though unpre- 
tentious. I used to think in the House that he was the 
ablest and the readiest presiding officer we ever had after 
Reed died, and that he handled hills of which he had 
charge on the floor more rapidly, more easily, and with 
clearer explanations to Members not on the committee 
and seeking information than any other Member. 

Above all, he did all with irresistible pleasantness of 
demeanor and appealing modesty. When with a point of 
order he took a Member off his feet and the floor, he did 
it with a smile, which was itself an apology, as much as 
to say, " I hate to trouble you, old fellow, but really the 
business of the House must go on in an orderly and pre- 
scribed way"; or, " I hate to disturb you of all men, but 
this is my only way of meeting an exigency of party man- 
agement." Of nearly all men I ever met, he knew best 
that no man has a right to take himself or his share of 
human work and human honors too seriously. Men are 
too many, the earth is too small, and other planets and 
solar systems are too numerous and large and earthly 
life is too short for that 

Oh, why should the spirit of mortal be proud? 
Like a fast-flitting meteor, a fast-flying cloud, 
A flash of the lightning, a break of the wave, 
He passes from life to his rest in the grave. 

And the fever called living 
Is conquered at last. 

After his death his friends may say that he was— 
A man that Fortune's huffets and rewards 
Has ta'en with equal thanks. 
I am not an old man yet, as life is measured here in 
Washington, and yet there are perhaps more of the men 

[M] 



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Memorial Aih>res$es: Vice President Sherman 

who were in public life when Mr. Sherman and I first 
entered it who are now waiting to shake our hands on the 
other shore than there are on this. 
Friend after friend departs; 

Who hath not lost a friend? 

There is no union here of hearts 

That finds not here an end. 

Over the river they beckon to us — 

Loved ones who've crossed to the farther shore. 

Perhaps the best thing we can do here is to so deal with 
men and women, too, that we shall be neither ashamed 
nor afraid to meet them hereafter. This I believe this 
man did. I have met him by the funeral bier; in the po- 
litical struggle, where we crossed swords in earnest and 
fateful conflict; around the banquet board. He was 
always the same and always a gentleman, in manners, 
speech, and conduct He carried sunshine with him in 
this life. Why can we not hope that he carries it with 
him over there? 

Of course none of us know with certainty what death is, 
nor can we know except with the eye of faith. How can 
we, when we do not even know what life is or whence 
it is? 

Life I I know not what thou art, 

But know that thou and I must pari; 

And when or where or how we met, 

I own to me's a secret yet 

Or, as another sweet singer expresses it: 

Like to the grass that's newly sprung. 
Or, like a tale that's new begun. 
Or, like the bird that's here to-day. 
Or, like the pearl'd dew of May, 
Or, like an hour, or, like a span. 
Or, like the singing of a swan — 
E'en such is man, who lives by breath; 
Is here, now there — in life and death. 

[52] 



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AiH>itESS OF Senator Williams, of Mississippi 

But if, as I ferventiy believe, existence is one duration, 
of which what we call life is one part on this side of the 
dividing portal which we call death and of which what 
we call eternity is the part on the other side — if, as Long- 
fellow says : 

There is no death! What seems so is transition; 

This life of mortal breath 

Is but a suburb of the life elysian, 

Whose portal we call Death. 
Or if, as another sings — 

The living are the only dead; 
The dead live, never more to die — 
then, why in sweet Heaven's name can we not go through 
life as James S. Sherman did, with smiles upon our faces, 
meeting our tasks earnestly and honestly, but cheerfully, 
not sadly — doing our best and leaving the sad faults and 
sins of us, like little children, to the pity of the All Father 
whose mysteriously weak and strong and unfathomable 
creatures we are? 

The body of him has been laid away in " God's acre " — 
I like that ancient Saxon phrase which calls the burial 
ground God's acre; it is just — and though a Nation here, 
through us, its representatives, is met with fit observance 
to do him ceremonious honor — all deserved by faithful, 
long, honest, intelligent public service, deserved by cour- 
teous, kind-hearted human serviceableness and cleanness 
in private life — I do not think he wants us to be sad or 
to make others sad in his death, except in so far as we 
can not help it because of the mutual missing of him. 
It is for the living who have been left by the loving and 
beloved dead and not for the dead themselves that we 
are called to sorrow, because, as to him who has passed 
the portal where this " mortal coil," the flesh, is " shuf- 
fled off," a freer and a broader life, untrammeled by 
flesh limitations and undeflected by flesh temptations, 
begins. 

The soul, immortal as its Sire, 
Shall never di^. 



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Address op Senator Curtis, of Kansas 

Mr. President: No one outside his family circle felt 
more than did I the death of James S. Sherman, the Vice 
President of the United States. For years I was associated 
with him in the House of Representatives, and early 
learned not only to respect him but to love him. His 
qualities not alone as a man, as a legislator, as a parlia- 
mentarian, but as a friend, impressed themselves upon 
me and quickly endeared him to me in many ways, and 
that endearment deepened as time went by. Mr. Sher- 
man was more than a friendly acquaintance to those with 
whom he frequently came in contact. He was a fatherly 
man. He was at once interested in the things in which 
you were interested, and immediately took upon himself 
the cloak of helper and adviser. He was thus particularly 
useful and congenial to new MeraJ>ers, and commanded 
for himself respect and support in everything he under- 
took. In fact, I believe, and make bold at this time to 
assert, that James S. Sherman enjoyed the real loving 
friendship and affection of more men throughout the 
country than any other one American living. He had 
traveled extensively in the United States, and there was 
scarcely a town in this broad Nation in which he might 
appear, whether or not his coming had been hen^lded, 
that some man would not step to his side, and, throwing 
his arm about his neck, accost him in terms of pleasure 
and of attachment. 

Long and close association with Mr. Sherman in the 
House gave me keen appreciation of his talents as a legis- 
lator, while all of you here to-day are aware of his excep- 



[54] 



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Address of Senator Curtis, of Kansas 

tional abilities as a presiding officer and as an exponent 
of parliamentary law. While seeking no recognition as 
an orator, he was ready in debate, and, though kindly and 
considerate to his opponents on the floor, drove home 
arguments with such conciseness and good effect that 
defeat in a contest on legislative matters rarely overtook 
him. His readiness under all circumstances to gauge a 
situation in its true light, his quickness to take advantage 
of opportunities made him, to my mind, one of the most 
successful and best RepreseDtatives, and he was valued 
and complimented as such not only by the people of his 
district but of the United States. His efforts were not 
centralized or localized. As chairman of the Committee 
on Indian Affairs and as a leading member of the great 
.Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce his field 
of labor was broad and varied, and in nothing did he 
shirk his responsibilities, but was constantiy working for 
the enactment of legislation of a character which would 
inure to the benefit of the public and of those whose inter- 
ests were at stake. A large number of the most important 
statutes bom in these committees bear witness to-day to 
his ability and able judgment 

Mr. Sherman was a partisan, open and unequivocal. 
He made plain his position on public policies and pub- 
tic questions at every opportunity, and rather, I always 
thought, enjoyed such declarations. There was never 
any misunderstanding as to where he stood on any ques- 
tion, and he would lose with grace, upholding his ideals, 
rather than yield to those beneath whose veneering was 
a desire to either please or advantage his opponent 
He disliked pretense and detested dishonesty. While 
easy of approach and ready to listen to those who sought 
him, he was quick to detect and resent imposition or in- 
sincere motives. On such occasions his indignation would 



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Memorial Aih>ressbs: Vice President Sherman 

assert itself by vigorous expression and prompt refusal, 
and the discovery would rarely be forgotten. 

Some of Mr. Sherman's warmest friends were num- 
bered among those who did not always agree with him 
either in politics or in policy. He was democratic un- 
ostentatious, genial. His sympathy was deep and easily 
stirred. He saw the right in all that he did, but, finding 
himself mistaken in any situation or degree, his acknowl- 
edgment of the fact was quick, earnest, and sincere. 
In fact, in private and public life Mr. Sherman met, as 
fully as it is possible to meet, every demand upon him 
as a citizen, a neighbor, a friend, and a statesman. 

Id his family relations he was particularly blessed. 
His enjoyment and contentment reached its height when 
his family was gathered about him, and its menibers,> 
more than any others, will miss him as a devoted hus- 
band, loving, gentle father, and jealous protector. 

It is difficult, indeed, to realize that James S. Sherman 
has gone never to return. Had he been spared there were 
other heights which he might have reached, but after 
traveling well the road of service to his people, his party, 
and his Nation, he was stricken down in the prime of 
life and left us lonely and sorrowful at his demise. We 
miss his cordial greeting, his heartfelt band grasp, bis 
tender solicitude. His memory will live always and we 
are better for having known him. His career will ever 
be a shining example before the youth of our country, 
and the tributes paid him heretofore and to-day, though 
they do not add to his worth or greatness, are confes- 
sions of love, respect, and esteem on the part of those 
who not only knew him but who enjoyed in his pres- 
ence and at his side those delightful characteristics and 
that personal cbarm which endeared him to young and 
old and which remained with him to the end. 



[5«] 



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Address of Senator Curtis, of Kansas 

He has gone. He has trod the path we shall tread when 
the summons comes. Let us be as well prepared in all 
things as was he, for the good he did lives after t)im. 
Our struggle here may be longer, yet for whatever time 
it be we will go on as " weary ships to their haven under 
thehm." 

But 01 for the touch of a vanish'd band. 
And the sonod of a voice that is stilll 



[»7] 



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Address of Senator Cummins, of Iowa 

Mr. President; It seems to be the way of this turt>uleDt, 
fighting wbrld of ours that in life the people, and es- 
pecially the public people, are chiefly concerned with 
their never-ending disagreements; but in the presence of 
death, with its majestic and solemn harmonies, we no 
longer hear the noise of the conflict and we lay aside the 
weapons of our warfare. We are conscious then, as at 
no other time, of the immensity of that limitless region 
in which the peace of common purpose always reigns. 

In his lifetime there were some things upon which the 
late Vice President and myself were not in accord, but 
now that he has joined the immortals upon the other 
shore my memory refuses to perform its accustomed o£Sce» 
and just now I am wondering what these differences were. 
In the stead of a recollection of controversy there comes 
trooping into my mind the remembrance of his noble 
manhood, his lofty character, his strong, keen intellect, 
his unsurpassed candor, his perfect fairness, and his 
tender heart Into every political contest he carried not 
only the flawless courage but the sensitive honor of the 
knights in the olden time. He hit hard, but only when he 
was face to face with his adversary. The body of his 
enemy felt his blows; but the wounds he inflicted were 
always found on the breast, never on the back. The 
American people had a name for him, and they will 
cherish it so long as humanity holds the affection which 
lightens and sweetens mortal existence. 

To be loved by close associates and immediate fol- 
lowers is a joy that many men experience, but to be loved 
by the whole number of one's acquaintance is a distinc- 

£68] 



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AiwRESs OF Senator Cummins, of Iowa 

tion that but few men have attained, and our lameDted 
friend was one of these rare, choice spirits of the world. 

For nearly four years James S. Sherman, as Vice Presi- 
dent of the United States, was the presiding officer of the 
Senate. Others have spoken, and spoken well, of his 
service elsewhere. My purpose is to record my high ap- 
preciation of his service here. The qualities which fit a 
man to guide the deliberations of a body like ours, to ad- 
minister the rules which govern it, and to render quick 
justice to all its members, are rarely united in a single 
man. High above every other quality is the power to be 
fair and impartial. Most men, I think, want to be fair, 
but there are only a few men who, in the moments of 
stress and storm, have the capacity to be fair. Vice Presi- 
dent Sherman had this quality in as high degree as any 
man I ever knew. During all the time he directed our 
deliberations he was eminently jusL So successful was he 
that throughout all the days of fierce debate, days in 
which feeling ran strong, there never arose the least sus- 
picion of his perfect impartiality. 

He was a skilled parliamentarian. He was not only 
master of the general subject, but, what is more wonder- 
ful, he was master of the mysterious rules which we have 
adopted for our own government His decisions were 
quickly made and were delivered with precision and 
emphasis. The operations of his mind were not only 
accurate, but they were lightninglike in their rapidity. 
He was courteous, but his flrmness was as striking as his 
courtesy. Many illustrious men have occupied the chair 
to which he so worthily succeeded, but I venture to say 
that no one of them discharged its duties more faithfully 
or more efi&ciently than did he. 

All in all, I have never known a presiding officer who 
combined all the qualities of mind and conscience de- 
manded by such an office more completely than they were 

[59] 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 

united in him; and when the Master called him he laid 
down the authority of his commanding position among 
us with the love, the respect the confidence, and the ad- 
miration not only of every Senator but of all his fellow 
men. 

With hearts full of sorrow we say of him the best that 
can be said of any man — the world is better because he 
lived in it 



[60] 



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Address of Senator Olivek, of Pennsylvania 

Mr. Pbesidbnt: Few men have lived and died who were 
better loved thaD James Scroolouft Sherman. I leave 
it to those who knew him from his earlier years to tell 
the story of his puhlic life, and will content myself with 
sajring a veiy few words about Sherman the man— for if 
was as man to man that we knew each other best. I never 
met him mitil after he was Vice President and I was a 
Senator, not quite four years ago; but we were thrown 
into close companionship during the long extra session 
of 1909, and from that association there grew a friendship 
which, on my part, was at least as strong as I ever felt 
for any man, and I believe that on his part it was just as 
strong. No man could be with him long without becom- 
ing his friend. His very presence compelled friendship. 
The sunny smile which dominated his face, and about 
which so much has been said and written, was not the 
mere mask of the hail fellow well met, but the outward 
manifestation of an inborn and ingrained kindly nature, 
filled to the full with the joy of living and the delight of 
mingling with his fellow men. What most endeared 
him to men was his intense humanity. He was human all 
through, and he loved human kind; and those of us who 
were admitted to the inner cloisters of bis intimacy feel 
that in losing him we lost a part of our own selves, and 
that life for us will never again be as complete a thing as 
it was before he was taken away. 

Hypocrisy was a thing abhorrent to him, and political 
hypocrisy he could tolerate least of all. Not once but 
often have I heard him in imsparing terms denounce men 
in public life who, to please the passing whim of the 

[«1] 



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Memobul Addresses: Vice President Sherman 

people, advocated or supported measures or policies in 
which he knew they did not believe. 

He was first and last a partisan, and an intense one pt 
that; but his partisanship was in no way tainted with 
bitterness of spirit. It arose from the very intensity of his 
convictions. He believed from his heart that his country's 
welfare depended on the continued supremacy of his 
party, and he saw no path to progress but by way of its 
success; and with zeal unflagging and spirit undaunted, 
in and out of season he labored for that success. I know, 
for he told me more than once, that with waning health 
and growing years he longed to withdraw from the con- 
flict, and spend the days that might remain to him in the 
companionship of the wife and sons who were the objects 
of his tenderest affection; but with his rare political in- 
sight he well knew that last year's fight was to be a losing 
one; and he would not — constituted as he was, he could 
not — be recreant in its adversity to the party which had 
honored him in the days of its triumphant prosperity. 
So, like the true soldier that he was, he died with his face 
to the foe, under the standard of the party he had served 
so well, and in whose principles he so implicitly believed. 

He was a man, take Mm for all in all. 
We shall not look upon his like again. 



[ffi] 



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Address of Senator 0*Gohman, of New York 

Mr. President: I join in the estimate of the late Vice 
President, which has been so eloquently pronounced by 
my distinguished colleague, and I share in the general 
grief caused by the premature closing of a career which 
only a few months since was rich in achievement and full 
of promise for the future. It is no small achievement to 
serve as a political leader In city, county, and State; to 
represent an important constituency in the National 
House of Representatives for 18 years, and at the end of 
so long a period of exacting public service to be elevated 
to within one step of the highest office within the gift of 
a free people. In public life such was the record of 
James Schoolcraft Sherman. Its mere recital is an -elo- 
quent eulogy on the character and attainments of the 
citizen in whose memory we now pause to pay a last 
tribute of affectionate respect. It is no mere ceremonial 
that the Senate, over whose counsels he presided for four 
years, should bestow that homage which friendship and 
patriotism ever offered to the true man, the faithful pub- 
lic servant, the enlightened statesman. During his active 
and useful career Mr. Sherman witnessed the nughtiest 
strides in material development the world has ever seen. 
He saw the Republic grow from the chaos of Civil War 
to its present commanding place among the nations of the 
earth. He saw the Empire State, of which he was a native 
son, leap forward with giant bounds, valiantly maintain- 
ing her place at the head of the mighty procession of the 
States of our majestic Union. His pride in the forward 
strides of the State and Nation was jiutifled, for in the 
upbuilding of both he played the part of an active, ear- 
nest, and public-spirited citizen. 
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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 

Neither a laggard nor a drone, for more than 25 years 
he was in the thick of the conflict which accompanies and 
stimulates progress. Throughout his life Mr. Sherman 
was a popular type of the American optimist, and im- 
parted confidence and enthusiasm to all within the influ- 
ence of his delightful personality. Industrious and suc- 
cessful in private enterprise, he was alert and influential 
in public affairs, and ably contributed to that ceaseless 
mental combat and attrition of thought whose constant 
flashes light the guiding torch of civilization which illu- 
mines the pathway of liberty and law. His impulses were 
generous, his sympathies broad, bis intellect keen. He 
was a patriot. He loved his country and its institutions. 
For many years, at great personal and domestic sacrifice, 
he gave loyal, generous, and disinterested service to ad- 
vance the public weal and uphold his country's honor. 
He had unbounded faith in the Republic; he had un- 
wavering confidence in his countrymen and in their at- 
tachment to the principles of liberty and their capacity 
to right wrongs and uproot evils. In their active, watch- 
ful, and vigilant patriotism he saw the best security 
against the evils that beset all Governments. His best 
tribute was the repeated expression of confidence and 
approbation that came to him from Iiis fellow citizens in 
central New York, who knew him so well and valued his 
character and attainments so highly. 

After years of industry and earnest effort in party 
council and public arena the citizen whose deeds we now 
commemorate was raised to the exalted station of Vice 
President of the United States, from which he passed 
with honor to the grave. 

As President of the Senate he measured up to the best 
traditions of that high o£Qce. No Member of this body 
can forget the charm of his bearing or the ability, scru- 
pulous impartiality, and fine courtesy with which he 

[64] 



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Address of Senator O'Gohman, of New York 

presided over the deliberations of this Chamber. The 
promptness and fairness of his rulings were no small 
contribution to the expedition of public business, and 
the lucidity with which he revealed his exceptional knowl- 
edge of parliamentary law was a constant source of pleas- 
ure and gratification. 

Laying no claim to the gifts of genius, he won a high 
place in the Nation's councils by that persistency of effort 
and strength of character which constitute the genius of 
success. Above all, he was the true American and ideal 
citizen in his domestic life, and by his devotion to home 
and family commanded the deep respect of a moral and 
chivalrous people. As a stream can rise no higher than 
its source, so a Nation can be no better than its homes. 
In the family circle are found those spiritual agencies 
which save society from corrosion and decay. Unless a 
nation grows morally as well as materially, spiritually 
as well as intellectually, its future is dark and its days 
are numbered. For Mr. Sherman's success in life we 
commended him; for the enviable places that he won 
among his fellow men we praised him; for the public 
honors that he earned we admired him; yet in this solemn 
hour, sanctified by the liberated spirit of the comrade 
whom we mourn, I would pay tribute to those traits of 
character which made the loving husband, the devoted 
father, the faithful friend, the good citizen. These were 
the titles that he won; they were the flowers of love and 
duty and friendship that blossomed along his pathway 
through life. They constitute the fairest garland that 
can be placed upon his tomb. 

Mr. President, our departed friend gave his best to the 
service of the people. Who can do more? The State of 
New York has given many of her sons to the service of 
the Nation, and high upon her roll of fame posterity will 
inscribe the high character and unblemished record of 
James Schoolcraft Sherman. 



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Address of Speaker Clark, of the Hodse of 
Representatives 

The President pro tempore. The Chair now recognizes 
the Speaker of the House of Representatives. 

Mr. PREsmeNT: Of all the wise and salutary things done 
by the fathers of the Republic, one of the wisest and most 
salutary was dividing Congress into two bodies. 

There is a House habit and a Senate habit, differing 
widely. This difference grows out of the difference in 
numbers, the difference in average age, and the difference 
in the length of tenure. Some Representatives never 
leam the House habit; some Senators never learn the 
Senate habit; a few observant men leam both habits. 
That Mr. Vice President Sheruan learned both habits 
thoroughly and well is su£Sciently attested by the fact 
that he presided with eminent success over the large and 
tumultuous assembly of the House of Representatives and 
over the smaller and more sedate assembly of the Senate. 

I hope that it will not be taken as an ungracious word 
for me to suggest to Senators that Jahes Schoolcraft 
Sherman was a House product We trained him; we 
gave him his promotion; we sent him to the service of 
the Nation in his capacity of Vice President 

There is no finer school under the sun than the House 
of Representatives for mental pugilistics. Personally we 
are courteous to each other, but there is no such thing as 
House courtesy that influences the course of legislation. 

It might be well to state for a moment how reputations 
are made in the House. They are made in two ways — 
one by a brilliant oratorical performance and the other 
by assiduous industry in the committees and on the floor 
of the House. I used to divide the membership with ref- 
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Address of Speaker Clark 



erence to riaing in the House into two classes — the quick 
climbers and the steady climbers. 

A few men make a national reputation in that House 
by one great oration. I saw Lafe Pence, of Colorado, in 
the Fifty-third Congress, make a national reputation the 
second day after he was sworn in, and I saw Charles E. 
Littlefield, of Maine, make a national reputation by one 
great oration within about three months of the time when 
he was sworn in; but these are exceptional cases. As a 
rule, the men who achieve high position in the House do 
so by slow and steady climbing. Vice President Sherman 
went up and up in the House gradually until he got into 
the front rank. One day, in a hot political debate there, 
I dubbed the small coterie to which he belonged as the 
" Big Five," a name which stuck. 
There is much truth in Longfellow's lines: 

The heights by great men reached and kept 
Were not attained by sudden fll^t, 

But tbey while their companions slept 
Were toiling upward in the night. 

That was the case with Mr. Sherman. He presided in 
the House and also in the Senate with grace, firmness, 
fairness, unfailing courtesy, rare good sense, and to the 
entire satisfaction of Representatives and of Senators. 
Though he was never elected Speaker, he was frequently 
assigned by three Speakers to preside temporarily over 
the House proper as well as over the Committee of the 
Whole. 

While not an orator,, he was a strong debater and 
illumined every subject which he discussed; because he 
never spoke on any subject on which he was not well in- 
formed — an example which all public speakers would do 
excellently well to follow. 

A fine stage presence, graceful gestures', most gracious 
manners, a musical, well-modulated voice of good carry- 



[67] 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 

ing power, exquisite taste in the selection and arrange- 
ment of words, enabled him to please the House of Rep- 
resentatives, the most critical and at the same time the 
fairest and justest audience in the wide, wide world. 
Though he killed the pet bills of many Members, he had 
not an enemy in the membership of the House. He 
seemed to have taken for the basis of his action the saying 
of Thackeray that " the world is like a looking-glass. 
Smile at it, and it smiles back; scowl at it, and it scowls 
back; hit at it, and it hits bade." 

He was a most successful pilot of measures through the 
House, the chief reason being that he moved on lines of 
least resistance. Adhering to his opinions with tenacity, 
fidelity, and courage, he antagonized no one unneces- 
sarily. To use a common and expressive sentence, he 
took things by the smooth handle, and thereby accom- 
plished much. 

Amiability was the chief characteristic of the man, and, 
after all, Tennyson was right when he said: 
Kind hearts are more than coronets. 
And simple faith than Norman hlood. 

Whether in committee or on the floor or in the chair, 
like charity, as described by St Paul in his splendid 
rhapsody in the thirteenth chapter of First Corinthians, 
he suffered long and was kind; envied not; vaunted not 
himself; was not puffed up; behaved himself not un- 
seemly; was not easily provoked. In fact, he had himself 
so well in hand that he could not he baited into an ex- 
hibition of bad temper. He gave sharp blows, and re- 
ceived them with perfect equanimity. In victory he was 
not offensively jubilanti in defeat he was not utterly cast 
down. He appeared equal to both extremes of fortune, 
clearly realizing, with his optimistic philosophy, the as- 
tounding svnf tness with which political situations change 
in this rapid age. 

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Address of Speaker Clark 



In the House he was a prime favorite on both sides of 
the big aisle, which constitutes the line of demarcation in 
politics, but not in personal friendships or robust Ameri- 
canism. When he was translated from that energetic and 
boisterous body to the dignity and quietude of the Vice 
Presidency his fellow members, while sincerely rejoicing 
at his promotion, just as sincerely regretted his departure 
from their midst 

The House most heartily joins the Senate and the 
President of the United States in doing honor to this 
typical American. His fitting epitaph would be: 
Mens aequa in arduis. 



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Address of President Taft - 

The PRESUSMT pro tempore. As a fitting dose to these 
ceremonies, the Chair now recognizes the President of the 
United States. 

Mr. President: After the eloquent tiibutes that have 
been paid to the memory of the late Vice President Sher- 
man by his associates, who knew him well, it is not for 
me to add anything new to that which has been said, and 
well said. 

llr. Sherman was a man with whom no one could come 
in contact without feeling better for the meeting and with 
a more kindly disposition toward his fellow men and the 
world at large. 

Life, on the whole, is made up of a series of what ap- 
pear to many to be insignificant incidents, and there are 
those who in their own thoughts, in their own affairs, 
and in what they regard as the large issues of society 
recognize no necessity for attention to the daily en- 
counters and the hourly exchanges of thought and of 
treatment between individuals. To them life is ap- 
parentiy a series of grand stage plays, which are to mark 
the character of the players pennanentiy, and that which 
intervenes between these plays is of no importance. This 
view is accentuated as men grow in self-absorption and 
lose the sense of proportion with respect to their own im- 
portance — a weakness to which most men in greater or 
less degree are prone. A character that is the antithesis 
of such tendencies makes for himself a place among all 
with whom he has personal association that is durable 
and fragrant This was one of the lovable and most 
marked traits of Mr. Sherman. Everyone, high or low, 
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AoioiBss OP President Taft 



intiinate or distant, who met him, felt the influence of his 
good will, of his earnest desire to accord to each one the 
courte^ and recognition of his right as a member of 
society to which he was entitled. Any painful feeling 
that he had to cause hy what duty required him to say 
wag as painful to him as it was to the person to whom he 
felt called upon in this way to speak. 

He never exaggerated his own importance. He depre- 
cated the personal equation. He was alws^s for helping 
a cause or some other person, and he had truly that 
charity and love of his fellow men which, as the poem 
has it, is really the love of God, and made the name of 
Abou Ben Adhem lead all the rest 

Educated at one of those truly American small colleges. 
with high patriotic ideals, derived from the history of the 
struggle for liberty regulated by law as embodied in our 
Constitution, Mr. Sherman came to manhood to the study 
and successful practice of law. but in a few years drifted, 
as so many country lawyers do, into politics. He loved 
politics; he correctly thought that he could be engaged 
in nothing more useful to his country, and he became a 
partisan on principle. As might be expected from one 
of his generous self-deprecatory attitude of mind, be 
minimized the personal and exalted his party cause. He 
came to believe thoroughly and, in my judgment, rightly 
that the only possible means of securing effective, perma- 
nent, and Just popular government, truly representative 
of the people, is through parties, and therefore he was 
willing to give up much of his personal judgment to 
reconcile the views of himself and his associates upon a 
few great principles. 

His personal popularity carried him into the mayoralty 
of the city of his birth, in which he lived his life long. 
Then he came to Congress, and for 20 years he was a 
Hember, and a prominent member of the Republican 



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Memorial Aih)iiesses: Vice E'resiiknt Sherman 

Party, in the great popular House of Representatives. 
There he exhihited great ability as a dehater and legisla- 
tor, which his fellows fully recognized. But in contempo- 
rary history Mr. Sherman suffers in comparison with 
others less deserving, because the work that he wrought, 
the influence that he exerted, the progress and reforms 
that he helped to bring about, were not recorded in the 
headlines of newspapers, or, indeed, in the news columns 
or editorials, for he was content to work quietly to achieve 
an object, and made no conditions that should attach his 
name to the success of the work in hand. 

He was an influential and leading Member of that body 
during the controversies that took place over the question 
whether the House of Representatives should be per- 
mitted to do business or should be at the mercy of the 
minority, and he stood with one of the great Speakers of 
that body for progress, and it was achieved. 

He was at the head of the Indian Committee in the 
House, and no problems in our Government are more 
difficult than those within the jurisdiction of that com- 
mittee. They involve the proper, businesslike considera- 
tion and disposition of questions of the management of 
trust property in which the discretion of the particular 
official having control can be very little restricted by law. 
Conditions in and near the Indian country are such that 
neighboring public opinion can not be trusted to do jus- 
tice to the Indians or to carry out the charitable purposes 
of the Government. The situation is prolific of schemes 
to defraud the wards of the Nation. 

No one will know, except those most intimate with the 
course of legislation and with the details of appropriation 
bills, the work James S. Sherman and a few of his asso- 
ciates did in the elimination of fraud and the maintenance 
of the honor of the Nation in preserving to the Indians 
what was theirs. And thus we may say truly that the 

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Address op Pbesident Taft 

great work that the man whose early death we deplore 
did for his fellow men was done as an adviser, as a quiet 
but active worker in the shadow of some more conspicu- 
ous person, all arising from the disinterested patriotism, 
the high-minded party spirit, and the inherent modesty 
of the man. 

I need not redte to those who had so much better oppor- 
tunity than I to observe it and feel it the clear and rapid 
thought and the equally clear and rapid expression of 
decision which in the administration of the parliamentary 
law that Mr. Sherman displayed frequently as the presid- 
ing o£Bcer of the House of Representatives and continu- 
ously during his term as Vice President as President of 
the Senate. He was a model presiding ofBcer. Preserv- 
ing his temper under all conditions, and some of them 
most difiBcult, he ruled with firmness and with a courtesy 
that disarmed the sometime heat of those whose views he 
was overruling. 

And now there is but one more word to speak, and that 
one utters in the tenderest tone and makes most brief. 
What might be expected from a man of his heart and his 
constant appreciation of the feelings of others, from one 
of nature's gentlemen, his domestic life, his love of wife 
and children and fellow townsmen, made a circle so 
sweet, a home so bright, a neighborhood so full of love for 
him that even in the few hours that we were permitted to 
spend in the city where he lived and died the overwhelm- 
ing evidences of affection for him were most impressive 
on every band; and his great qualities were revealed in 
a most remarkable tribute which his memory called out 
from his l>eIoved pastor, the president of Hamilton 
College. 

We have celebrated the memorial of a modest Ameri- 
can, a distinguished patriot, an able statesman, a noble 
man I 

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Memorial Addresses: Vice Presiisnt Sherman 

Mr. Root. I now move that, after the guests of the Sen- 
ate shall have retired, the Senate, as a further mark of 
respect to the memory of the late Vice President, stand in 
recess until 12 o'clock noon, on Monday, the 17th of 
February. 

The President pro tempore. Before submitting the mo- 
tion, the Chair wilt give opportunity, as indicated by the 
Senator from New York, for the guests of the Senate to 
retire. The Sergeant at Arms will announce the order in 
which they will retire, so that they may do so without 
confusion. 

The President of the United States and the members of 
his Cabinet, the ambassadors and ministers plenipotenti- 
ary to the United States, the Chief Justice and Associate 
Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States, the 
Speaker and Members of the House of Representatives, 
and the other guests of the Senate thereupon retired from 
the Chamber. 

The PnBsmENT pro tempore. The Senator from New 
Yori£ [Mr. Root] moves that, as a further mark of respect, 
the Senate now stand in recess until 12 o'clock on Monday. 

The motion was unanimously agreed to; and (at 2 
o'clock and 30 minutes p. m., Saturday, February 15) the 
Senate took a recess until Monday, February 17, 1913, at 
12 o'clock meridian. 

Monday, February 17. 1913. 

Mr. Smoot submitted the following concurrent resolu- 
tion (S. Con. Res. 41), which was read, considered by 
unanimous consent, and agreed to: 

Beiolved by the Senate (the House of Represeatativet concur- 
ring), That there shall be printed and bound, under the direction 
of the Joint Committee on Printing, 14,100 copies of the proceed- 
ings and the eulogies deUvered in Congress on James Schoolcraft 
Sherman, late Vice President of the United Slates, with illustra- 
tion, of which 4,000 copies shall be for the use of the Senate, 

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PnocEEDiNas m the Senate 



8,000 copies for the use of the House of Representatives, 2,000 
copies for the use of the Senators and Representatives of the State 
of New York, and 100 copies, bound in full morocco, for the use 
of Mrs. James Schoolcraft Sherman: Provided, That there shall 
be included in such publication the proclamation of the President 
and the proceedings in the Supreme Court of the United States 
upon the death of Vice President Sherman, and an account of the 
funeral services at Utica, N. Y. 



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PROCEEDINGS IN THE HOUSE 

The Speaker on October 31, 1912, appointed the fol- 
lowing committee to represent the House at the funeral 
of the late Vice President, the Hon. James Schoolcraft 
Sherman: 

Representatives Underwood, Alabama; Macon, Arkan- 
sas; Needham, California; Taylor, Colorado; Hill, Con- 
necticut; Heald. Delaware; Sparkman, Florida; Bartlett, 
Georgia; French. Idaho; Cannon, Illinois; Crumpacker, 
Indiana; Murdock, Kansas; James, Kentucky; Broussard, 
Louisiana; Guernsey, Maine; Talbott, Maryland; McCall, 
Massachusetts; Hamilton, Michigan; Stevens, Minnesota; 
Candler, Mississippi; Bartholdt, Missouri; Pray, Montana; 
Kinkaid, Nebraska; Roberts, Nevada; Sulloway, New 
Hampshire; Gardner. New Jersey; Fergusson, New Mex- 
ico; Kitchin, North Carolina; Hanna, North Dakota; Long- 
worth, Ohio; McGuire, Oklahoma; Hawtey, Oregon; Dal- 
zell, Pennsylvania; O'Shaunessy, Rhode Island; Finley, 
South Carolina; Burke, South Dakota; Moon, Tennessee; 
Henry, Texas; Howell, Utah; Plumley, Vermont; Jones, 
Virginia; Humphrey, Washington; Hughes, West Vir- 
ginia; Cooper, Wisconsin; Mondell, Wyoming; Haugen, 
Iowa; Payne, New Yoric; and Hayden, Arizona. 

Monday, December 2, 191%. 

A message from the Senate, by Mr. Crockett, one of its 
clei^ annoimced that the Senate had agreed to the fol- 
lowing resolutions: 

Resolved, That the Senate has heard with profound sorrow and 
regret the announcement of the death of Jambs Schoolcrapt 
Sherman, late Vice President of tlie United States. 

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Memorial Ai»besses: Vice Presii^nt Sherman 

Resolved, That the Secretary commonicate these resolutloDs to 
the House of Representatives and transmit a copy thereof to the 
family of the deceased. 

Also: 

Retolved, That as a further mark of respect to the memory of 
the late Vice President Jambs Schoolcraft Sheruan and the late 
Senators Weldon Brinton Heyburn and Isidor Rayner, whose 
deaths have just been announced, the Senate do now adjonm. 

Mr. Cannon. Mr. Speaker, I announce to the House that 
James Schoolcraft Sherman, Vice President of the United 
States, departed this life at his home in Utica, N. Y., on 
the 30th day of October, 1912. 

The admirable administration of the high office which 
he held, the second in the gift of the Republic, his bril- 
liant and useful career for so many years in the House of 
Representatives, his sympathetic touch with every class, 
the unsullied purity of his public and private Ufe, had 
so impressed the coimtry that his death occasioned ex- 
pression of deep-felt grief so universal as to manifest a 
general and profound sense of national bereavement 

Congress will doubtless, by concurrent action of the 
two Houses, at an early moment set apart a time for 
proper expression touching the life, character, and serv- 
ices of this eminent citizen. 

I move you, sir, that out of regard for his memory and 
the memory of the Members of this House and of the 
Senate who have departed this life since the adjournment 
of the last session of Congress this House do now adjourn. 

The motion was agreed to; and accordingly (at 1 o'clock 
and 8 minutes p. m.) the House adjourned until to- 
morrow, Tuesday, December 3, 1912, at 12 o'clock noon. 

THURsnAY, February 6, i9i3. 
Mr. Fitzgerald. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent 
that the Speaker lay before the House the invitation of 

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PnOCEEDINaS IN THE HoUSE 



the Senate to attend the memorial exemses of the late 
Vice President. 

The Speaker laid before the House the following resolu- 
tion, which the Clerk read : 

Senate resolution 451 

Resolved, That the Senate extend to the Speaker and the Mem- 
bers of the House of Representatives an invitation to attend the 
exercises in commemoration of the life, character, and public 
services of tbe late James S. Sherman, Vice President of the 
United Stales and President of the Senate, to be held in the Senate 
Chamber on Saturday, the 15th day of Febraary next, at 12 o'clocli 
noon. 

Mr. Fitzgerald, llr. Speaker, I move that the invitation 
he accepted, and that the Clerk be directed to notify the 
Senate to that effect 

The Speaker. The gentleman from New York moves 
that the invitation of the Senate be accepted, and that the 
Clerk be directed to notify the Senate to that effect 

The question was taken, and the motion was agreed to. 

The following resolution, submitted by Mr. Fitzgerald, 
was agreed to : 

House resolution 817 

Reiotved, That the House accept the invitation of the Senate ex- 
tended to the Speaker and Hembers of the House of Representa- 
tives to attend the exercises in commemoration of tlie life, char- 
acter, and public services of the late James S. Shbrhan, Vice 
President of tbe United States and President of tbe Senate, to be 
held in the Senate Chamber on Saturday, the 15th day of Feb- 
ruary next, at 12 o'clock noon. 

Mr. Fitzgerau). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent 
that when the House adjourns on February 14, 1913, it 
adjourn to meet at 11.30 a. m. on Saturday, February 15, 
1913. 

The Speaker. The gentleman from New York asks 
unanimous consent that when the House adjourns on the 

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Memorial Addresses: Vice pRESUffiNT Sherman 

14th of February, 1913, it adjourn to meet at 11^ a. m. 
on Saturday, February 15, 1913. Is there objection? 

There was no objection. 

Friday, February U. 1913. 

Mr. FiTZGERAU). Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent 
for the present consideration of the resolution which I 
send to the Clerk's desk. 

The Clerk read as follows: 

House resolution 835 

Reiolved. That on Saturday, February 15, 1913, at 10 minutes 
of 12 o'clock a. na., pursuant to the resolution heretofore adopted 
accepting the Invitation of the Senate to attend the memorial 
services to commemorate the life and character and public 
services of the Hon. Jambs S. Sbbruan, late the Vice President 
of the United States, the House shall proceed, with the Speaker, 
to the Senate Chamber, and at the conclusion of the services It 
shall return to this Chamber. 

The Speaker. Is there objection to the present con- 
sideration of the resolution? 

There was no objection. 

The resolution was agreed to. 

Saturday, February 15, 1913. 
The House met at 11.30 a. m. 

The Chaplain, Rev. Henry N. Couden, D. D.. offered the 
following prayer : 

Our Father in heaven, we thank Thee that our Republic 
is not ungrateful, but holds in sacred memory the men 
who laid her foundations deep and strong and wide; the 
brave men who have fought her battles, the statesmen 
who have breathed their spirits into her sacred institu- 
tions and kept them inviolate, as evinced by the special 
order of the day in memory of a noble son, who proved 
himself worthy of the confidence reposed in him by his 
fellow countrymen. May his life be an incentive to faith- 
ful service and nobility of soul to those who survive him. 

[M] 



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PROCEBDINOS IN THE HoUSE 



Be Thou solace to those who knew and loved him, and 
let the everlasting arms be about the bereaved wife and 
children, that they may look forward with confidence to 
the unchanging love of a heavenly Father who doeth all 
things well. Amen. 

The Journal of the proceedings of yesterday was read 
and approved. 

The SraAKER. The hour of 10 minutes of 12 having ar- 
rived, the House will proceed to the Senate Chamber. 

Thereupon the Members of the House, preceded by the 
Sergeant at Arms and the Speaker, proceeded to the 
Senate Chamber. 

At 2 o'clock and 35 minutes p. m. the Members returned, 
and the House was called to order by the Speaker. 

Mr. FrrzoERALO. Mr. Speaker, as a further mark of re- 
spect to the memory of the late Vice President Sherman, 
I move that the House do now adjourn. 

The motion was agreed to; and accordin^y <at 2 o'clock 
and 36 minutes p. m.) the House adjourned until to- 
morrow, Sunday, February 16, 1913, at 12 o'clock noon. 

Sunday, March 2. 1913. 

Mr. FiNLEY. Mr. Speaker, I move to take from the 
Speaker's table Senate concurrent resolution 41, relative 
to the eulogies on the late Vice President Sherman. 

The Speaker. The Clerk will report the resolution. 

The Clerk read as follows : 

Senate concurrent resolution 41 

Be$olved by the Senate (the Hoaae of Reptetenlative* concur- 
ring). That there shall be printed and bound, under the direction 
of the Joint Committee on Printing, 14,100 copies of the proceed- 
Ings and the eulogies delivered in Congress on Jambs ScHOOLctUFp 
Sherman, late Vice President of the United States, wtlh illustra- 
tion, of which 4,000 copies shall be for the use of the Senate, 
8,000 copies for the use of the House of Representatives, 2,000 

B34SS'— 13 S [81] 



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llEMoniAL Addresses: Vice President Sherman 

copies for the use of the Senators and RepresentatiTes of the Slate 
of New York, and 100 copies, bound in full morocco, for the use 
of Mrs. James Schoolcraft Sherman : Provided, That there shall 
be included in such publications the proclamatioa of the Presi- 
dent and the proceedings in the Supreme Court of the United 
Slates upon the death of Vice President Sheruan, and an account 
of the funeral services at Utica, N. Y. 
The resolution was agreed to. 



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PROCEEDINGS IN 
THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES 

Thubsday, October 31, iW«. 

Present: The Chief Justice, Mr. Justice McKenna, Mr. 
Justice Holmes, Mr. Justice Day, Mr. Justice Lurton, Mr. 
Justice Hughes, Mr. Justice Van Devanter, Mr. Justice 
Lamar, and Mr. Justice Pitney. 

Mr. Assistant to the Attorney General Fowler addressed 
the court as follows: 
** May it please the Honorable Court: 

" I deeply regret the necessity of performing the sor- 
rowful du^ of announcing to this honorable court the 
death of the Hon. James Schoolcraft Sherman, Vice Pres- 
ident of the United States. 

"Through many years of active and valuable public 
service, Mr. Sherman had attained, independent of the 
office which he occupied, an enviable position in the 
hearts of his countrymen. Four years ago he was chosen 
by the people of his country to the position which he held 
at the time of his death. 

" Out of respect deemed to he due so exalted a position 
in a coordinate branch of the Government, and that this 
honorable body may join with a bereaved Nation in ex- 
pressing its sorrow at his untimely death. I move that this 
court do now adjourn until after the funeral." 

The Chief Justice responded: 
" Mr. Attorney General : 

" The court hears with sorrow the announcement which 
you make of the death of the Vice President, and as a 
token of our participation in the burden of loss which the 
country has suffered, and out of sympathy with his coun- 
trymen, the motion you present is granted, and the court 
will stand adjourned until Monday next." 

Adjourned until Monday next at 12 o'clock. 

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Memomal Addresses: Vice President Sherman 



proclamatton 

jBs tbe Oovcmor of tbe State ol Hew voA 



Statb op New Yokk, 
ExBcunvs Chambbr. 
Jahbs Schooickavt Shbuian, Vice Pntident of the United 
States, and for twenty years a Member of the House oF Representa- 
tives from the State of New York, a patriot and statesman, beloved 
b7 all who knew him, and honored and esteemed by the entire 
citizenship of our country, is dead. Tbe people of tbe State of 
New York mourn the loss of one of her most illustrious sons. The 
qualities which won for Jamss Schoolcravt Shbkkan a high place 
among the Nation's statesmen and rulers endeared him to the 
citizouhip of hii native State. His untimely demise causes great 
sadness and deserves sorrowful and appropriate recognition. 

Mmo, tterxfnrr, tt ts Imntv ibexcM, That as a mark of regard 
for the distinguished dead the flags upon tbe capitol and upon all 
the public buildings of the State, including the armories and arsenals 
of tbe National Guard, be di^layed at half-mast until and including 
the day of the funeral, and the citizens of the State for a like period 
are requested to unite in appropriate tokens of respect. 

GivBN under my band and the privy seal of the 
State at tbe capitol, in the city of Albany, this 
first day of November, in the year of our hotd 
one thousand nine hundred and twelve. 

JOHN A. DIX. 



[I.. 8.] 



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PROCEEDINGS OF 
THE COMMON COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF UTICA. N. Y. 

Ik Common Council, 
ThuFidag noon, October 31. 191S. 

SPECIAL session 

Meeting called for the purpose of taking suitable action upon 
the death of James Schoolcbapt Sherman, Vice President of the 
United States, which occurred at liis home in this city at 9.42 
p. m., Wednesday, October 30, 1912. 

President Stetson presiding. 

Present, all members. 

In calling the meeting to order. President Stetson addressed the 
council as follows: 

" The occasion which calls us together at this noon hour is in- 
deed a sad one. As you know, Vice President Jambs S. Sherman 
last evening departed ttiis life. 

" While the death of our distinguished citizen, who has so effl- 
cientiy served his city and the Nation, was not unexpected, yet 
the news of his passing came as a shock to the community. 

" Genuine grief will not pause at the ttu-esbold of bis home, but 
will spread itself throughout the entire land. 

" Mr. Sherman was a genial gentleman, who had the faculty of 
making fast friends of those with whom he came in contact. 
That he had due regard for those things which are most ennobling 
in life can he best attested by tiis achievements as a servant of 
the people. He was a friend to his neighbors, thoughtful of 
others, unselfish, and courageous. 

"Here he was known and loved because he was known; and 
here his considerate, helpful, and gracious presence will be sor- 
rowfully missed. 

" He strove for advancement and attained honorable position as 
the reward of application. He had earned for himself national 
distinction and held next to the highest ofBce within the gift of 
the people of the Nation. He was our shining light. 

" While he was approaching life's period of whitened locks, be 
had reached the summit of a remarkable career, in the lenith of 
his fame, and in his departure we may find Consolation in the 
fact that he was loved and honored and will be mourned by all 
who knew him and appreciated his worth. 

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Memorial Addressbs: Vice President Sherman 



" It is most fitting that this council, in behalf of the people of 
the city, take appropriate action expressive of the sorrow which 
bis death occasions." 

Alderman Dickinson addressed the council as follows: 

" Hr. President and Gentlemen : This is an occasion when mere 
words prove hut feehle vehicles for the conveyance of the sad- 
ness which hurdens our hearts. We are mourners at the bier 
of one we loved. Our admiration for the statesmanship of the 
Vice President, who lies to-day clothed in the ineifable majesty 
of death, is shared by 90,000,000 fellow people of the great 
Republic of which he was an ornament, but our deep and abiding 
love for our neighbor and friend Is a tender and holy sentiment 
which transcends mere admiration and can be shared only by 
those nearer ones to whom he was " Jim " — Sunny Jim — personal 
friend, genial companion, intimate associate. 

" In history Jambs Schoolcraft Sherman will he given an ele- 
vated place as a constructive statesman, a bulwark of a great 
political party, a tireless and consistent advocate of certain 
national policies, and as the most gifted Presiding Officer who 
ever graced the Senate Chamber. 

" Here in Utica his memory will fill a more intimate, more per- 
sonal chamber in our hearts — a chamber redolent with the 
fragrance of the flowers of genial fellowship, helpful citizenship, 
cordial intimacy, and wholesome, tender affection. The ruddy 
countenance which bespoke the warm red blood pubating 
through his arteries, the genial smile which was but a radiation 
from a generous and humanity-loving heart, the warm handclasp 
which electrified with the knowledge that back of it was genuine 
affection, the cheery word before which the pessimism took its 
flight — these will be cherished in Utica so long as lives any of the 
thousands who knew and loved Jiu Shebman — the Jim Sherman 
whose untimely death at the very height of his splendid career 
has draped our public edifices in black and brought a sense of 
personal bereavement to our hearts." 

Alderman Miller presented the following and asked unanimous 
consent for an immediate vote thereon, which was granted: 

" The common council of the city of Utica assembles in special 
session to-day to give testiraony to its profound sorrow and the 
sorrow of all our people at the death of Jambs Schoolcraft 
Sherman. 

"As mayor of our city for 2 years, as our Representative in 
Congress for 18 years, and as Vice President of the United States 
for 4 years, be attained an eminence in public life never before 
achieved by any other citisen of this community. The honor 
and prominence which he brought to his native city were sources 
of pride to his neighbors and friends, no less Iban a marked 
distinction to the community and a tribute to bis own remark- 



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Proceedings of the Common Council of Utica. N. Y. 



able personallly and splendid attainments. In ttiis city, wliicli 
saw the beginning of his illustrious career and was the field of 
his earliest triumphs and whose interests he always held pecul- 
iarly his own, his death is felt as a deep and lasting personal loss. 

" That he achieved by his own ability and distinguished per- 
sonality the second hi^est office in this great Nation, that he 
was a statesman among statesmen whose honor and Integrity 
were above reproach, whose purposes were ever pure and lofty, 
who impressed himself upon the history of his country — those 
things and many more are known to all men. 

" But to us, his neighbors and friends, there comes the vivid 
memory of the genial disposition and beautiful traits of character 
which endeared him to all; an appreciation of his deep convic- 
tions and intensity of purpose in all that be undertook; a knowl- 
edge of bis utter disregard for caste and bis ready recognition 
of merit and ability, whether in friend or foe, in person of high 
or low degree. He was a man of boundless energy, of loyal 
devotion to the measures of public policy wliich be believed to 
be for the best interests of the people, and of a beautiful courage, 
which he displayed at all times, even in the face of the most 
discouraging opposition. 

" With no disposition to intrude upon the grief of his devoted 
but aEOicted family in this sad hour, we feel that as the official 
representatives of the city — the home which he loved so well and 
to which he brought such merited distinction — we should tender 
to them this expression of our heartfelt sympathy and the assur- 
ance of our deep appreciation of bis splendid public career and 
his beautiful private life." 

Yeas — Aldermen Dickinson, Galligan, Geiershacb, Goldbas, Hirt, 
Hughes, Kaufer, Miller, Nicholson, Pellettieri, Pugh, Redmond, 
Ryan, Simmonds, Weikert — 15. 

Nays — None. 

Adopted. 

By Alderman Goldbas: 
Retoloed, That the City Hall be draped in mourning, the flags 
on all public buildings lowered to half-mast for a period of 30 
days, and that all public offices of the city be closed during the 
hours of the funeral of Vice President Sherhan, as an official 
tribute of respect to his memory. 

Yeas — Aldermen Dickinson, Galligan, Geiershacb, Goldbas, Hirt, 
Hughes, Kaufer, HiUer, Nicholson. Pellettieri, Pugb, Redmond, 
Ryan, Simmonds, Weikert — 15. 
Nays — None. 
Adopted. 
Adjourned. 

J. P. Bankigan, 

City Clerk. 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 



In Common Council, 
Friday eoening, November 1, 191S, 
President Stetson presiding. 

Present: All members, except Aldermen Miller, Pellettieri, and 
Ryan. 

By Alderman Hughes: 
Resolved, That as a mark of reqiect to the memory of our 
late esteemed fellow townsman, Jaubs Schoolcbaft. Sherman, 
Vice President of the United States, the common council does 
hereby request that all business of every kind and description in 
this city cease during the hours of his funeral from 2 to 4 p. m. 
to-morrow. 
Adopted. 

By Alderman Dickinson: 
Resolved, That the common council of the city of Utica hereby 
determines to attend in a body the funeral of our deceased 
esteemed fellow citizen, James Schoolcraft Sherman, Vice Presi- 
dent of the United States, meeting for this purpose at Hotel Utica 
at 1.30 p. m. to-morrow, and that out of respect to bis revered 
memory this council does now adjourn. 
Adopted. 
Adjourned. 

J. P. Banniqan, 

Ci'v Clerk. 

PROCLAMATION BY THE BdAYOR OF THE CXTi OF UTICA, N. Y. 

To the citizens of Utica: 

As a final tribute to the memory of Utica's illustrious son, Hon. 
Jambs S. Sherman, Vice President of the United States, I would 
respectfully urge that all business be suspended throughout the 
city between the hours of 1 and 4 o'clock on Saturday. 

The funeral services of the Vice President will be held at the 
First Presbyterian Church at 2 o'clock. Many business houses 
will close during the afternoon, while operations will be sus- 
pended in many manufacturing establishments. I would respect- 
fully request a complete cessation of business during the hours 
of the funeral services. 

Frank J. Baker, Mayor. 

Utica, N. Y., November l, ISU. 



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PROCEEDINGS OF THE PHILIPPINE GOVERNMENT 

I Governor General'* proclUDaUon.) 

ExEcUTiTB Order 1 
No. 76. I 

The Govbrnhbnt op the Philippine Isiands, 

Executive Bureau, 
itantta. November S, 191S. 
Tbe announcement of the death of the Hon. Jaues Schoolchapt 
Sheeiman, Vice President of the United States, has been received 
with sincere and general sorrow. Since the beginning of his 
public career be has steadily grown in tbe estimation of the 
American people, and bis distinguished ability and service have 
been universally recognized. 

It is deemed fitting that the deep grief which fills all hearts 
should And formal expression. Therefore, the President of tbe 
United States has directed that the flags on all Government build- 
ings be placed at half-staff from sunrise until sunset to-day, No- 
Tember second. It is further ordered that all public business in 
the various offices of this Government be suspended so far as prac- 
ticable during the same period. 

Mbwton W. Gilbert, 

Acting Governor General. 



PHILIPPINE LEQISLATURE EXPRESSES 80RBOW 

On tbe day of Vice President Sherman's funeral, November 2, 
1912, the third Philippine Legislature adopted the following reso- 
lution and adjourned in respect to his memory: 

•• JOINT RBSOLVnON Bipnulii« the sricf ot both faoaiei of Uie legtilBture on 
account of the death of tbe Hon. Jikb* ScHoouaun SRmiuM. Vice Prcildent 
of the United State*, and prorldlna for the adjaununent of both honiet a* a 
token of larrow. 

"Retoloed bg the Philippine Commtiiion and the Philippine 
Aiaembly, That they express, as they hereby do express, the pro- 
found sorrow with which they have received the announcement 
of the death of the Hon. Jai<bs Schoolchapt Sherman, Vice Presi- 
dent of the United SUtes; 

"Resolved further. That the session of both houses be, and 
hereby is, immediately adjourned in token of their sorrow for 
this day; 

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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 



"And retolved further. That the secretary of the Philippine 
Commission or ttie secretary of the Philippioe Assembly shall 
furnish a certified copy of this resolution to the President of the 
United States, through the chief executive of the PhiUppines, and 
to the family of the deceased." 



NARVACAN COUNCIL MANIFESTS REORBT 

The municipal council of Narvacan, Province of Ilocos Sur, 
P. I., at the suggestion of the president, Mr. Pedro Viloria Baiiez, 
and on motion of Mr. Poinciano Viloria, seconded by the vice 
president, Mr. Aniceto Corrales, adopted the following resolution 
on Novemher 27, 1912: 

"BtMolutd, To express, and it hereby does express, the fact that 
it has received with profound regret the notice regarding the 
death of the Hon. James Schoolcraft Sherman, Vice President 
of the United States. 

"Resolved, furlher. That the municipal secretary be directed 
to forward, through his excellency, the governor general of the 
Philippine Islands, certified copies hereof, not only to His Excel- 
lency, the President of the United States, but also to the family 
of the deceased." 



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FUNERAL SERVICES 

IFnm the UUca (N. Y.) Dallr PrcM, Nor. 3, 1012.] 

FBISND9 GET FINAL OLIHPSB — THOUSANDS OAZB SORROWFULLY — BOOT 
OF VICE PRESIDENT LIES AT THE COUNTY BUILDIKO, WHERE FOB 
HOURS MEMBERS OF QRIBVES COMMUNITY PASS FOR LAST LOOK ON 
HIS FACE — IHPRESSrvB AND SOLEMN EXERCISES. 

The body of Vice President Sherman was placed in state in the 
courthouse in this city yesterday afternoon and remained on 
view anlil well into the night, and during these hours was seen 
by many thousands. There were no formal exercises, hut the 
proceedings were conducted in a quiet, dignified manner befit- 
ting the solemnity of the occasion. About a thousand of Mr. 
Sherman's neighbors and friends marched in the procession 
which acted as escort. Chairman Thomas R. Proctor and mem- 
bers of the reception committee were inside the bouse. The 
veterans of the Grand Army of the Republic, led by Maj. James 
Miller and E. C Ferry, were ranged on both sides of the south 
walk. II was about 2.30 p. m. when the hearse drew up at the 
curb and the procession began forming. All heads were uncov- 
ered as the body was brought to the door. The members of the 
Boosters' committee were ranged each side of the hearse and 
the members of the reception committee, headed by Rev. Louis 
H. Holden, Ph. D., escorted the remains from the house to the 
hearse. The procession started for the courthouse in the fol- 
lowing order: 

Platoon of police headed by Officer McCarthy, who was Mr. 
Sherman's bodyguard in 1908. 

Veterans of the Civil War led by Maj. James Miller and E. C. 
Ferry, Capt. Prank S. Judson of the Cavalry troop acting as 
marshal. 

tJtlca Lodge Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, 300 men. 

Hearse. 

Business men's escort, William H. Roberts, P. X. Matt, Russell 
Wheeler, William E. Richards, Hon; Henry Martin, Oscar S. 
Foster, William E. Lewis, M. Jesse Brayton, Charles W. Wicks, 
F. M. Kendrick, D. D. Smytbe, A. H. Munson, Patrick J. McQuade, 
E. i. MiUspaugb, F. A. Bosworth, Lieut. W. G. Mayer, John L. 
Haher, George B. Allen, B. Allen Whiff en, James H.Gilmore, John 
A. Cantwell, Wilbur S. Clark, Charles Millar, Brian Qarke, Messrs. 
Jefferson, Safford, DeLong, and others. 

[«] 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 



Reception committee, Thonms R. Proctor, chairman; Robert 
Eraser, George L. Bradford, W. S. Doolittle, Frederick T. Proctor, 
Charles A. Miller, Charles B. Rogers, George E. Dunham, J. Fred 
Haynard, William T. Baker, Hon. E. M. Calder, Hon. John D. 
Kernan, Perle W. Harter, Edgar B. Odell, Otto A. Meyer, Hon. P. C 
J. DeAngelis, Hon. Charles S. Symonds. 

Automobile containing Dr. Holdeu, Sherrill Babcock, and others. 

City officials, bankers, and business men generally. 

Prof. Emidio Spina and Vincenzo Marroue, of La Luce, in which 
Mr. Sherman was a stockholder. 

UtJca Republican Club, over 100 members. 

As the procession moved slowly down Genesee Street it was 
viewed by thousands standing on the sidewalks. Nearly all the 
dwellings and places of business displayed the Stars and Stripes 
at half-mast and bound with cr^pe. While the procession was 
en route, the city hall bell was tolled. 

The courthouse was profusely draped in mourning. In the 
center of the rotunda directly opposite the entrance on the main 
floor a catafalque had been made of flags, and above this was a 
canopy formed of large flags. At the right and left were screens 
formed of palms. Near by on benches were large wreaths of 
orchids, roses, carnations, and Easter lilies. 

Capt. Peter Arheilger had charge of the police outside, and at 
the entrances and inside were about 50 members of the National 
Guard, Companies A and B, in charge of Lieut. E. K. Miller and 
Lieut. Chester W. Davis. Two soldiers stood at the head and. two 
at the foot, and they were frequently relieved. 

The body was incased in a massive casket of mahogany 
covered with black broadcloth and having massive bar extension 
handles of antique silver. On the casket was a large cross of 
white lilies fringed with maidenhair fern. Mr. Sherman's face 
was placid and serene, and his position was natural. Those who 
made up the escorting column were the first to look at the re- 
mains. As the members of the Elks passed through each took 
from his buttonhole an ivy leaf and placed it on the casket. 

There was no music, no display, no speeches, hut as a resident 
and former mayor of Utica and as Vice President of the United 
States, Mr. Sheruan belonged to the people, and their desire to 
see his face again before it should be lost to sight was natural and 
sincere. To place the body in a public building in a place easy 
of access, where people could see it conveniently, was a courtesy 
on the part of his family which was highly appreciated. The 
spectators entered by the front door, formed in two lines, and 
with uncovered heads and measured tread they proceeded to the 
bier, where they paused for an instant and took a last look and 
a mental farewell of the sleeper, and then passed on and out of 
the door Just opposite. It was done quietly and reverently and 
in less time than it takes to write it. It was silent, yet eloquent; 



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Funeral Sbrvicbs 



a simple yet beautiful demonstration dictated by a feeling of 
friendsbip for Ibe dead and sympatby for bis surviving relatives. 

Never was there a better opportunity to study the composite 
character of the population of Utica than by watching the crowd 
which passed through the courthouse in viewing the remains of 
Hr. Shgrhan. For the first hour or two women and school 
children were in the majority. Among those in ttiis period were 
clergymen, school-teachers, lawyers, and doctors. After 5 o'clock 
there were more men, and from 5.30 to 6.30 there were mostly 
men. Then there was a falling off for about an hour, but shortly 
after 7 o'clock the crowd began to increase, and soon there 
was a Jam outside the building, so that people were obliged to 
stand in Une for from 15 to 20 minutes until they could get 
inside. Once inside they made speedy progress, for the soldiers 
bad tilings well systematized and kept the line moving. From 7 
to 8 o'clock the crowd was large, and passed through at the rate 
of 5,000 an hour. The spectators were not confined to Uticans, 
but there were delegations from nearly every town in the county 
and some from Herkimer County. 

The evening crowd comprised mostly the men and women 
who were at work during the day in all sorts of occupations. 
And, though they were of all ages, colors, nationalities, and races, 
all ^owed that they felt the presence of death and knew the kin- 
ship of sorrow. A delegation of about 50 boys from St. Vincent 
Industrial School viewed the remains about 5.30. They were 
accompanied by Brother Director Gregory. 

Just before the doors were closed the members of Utica Council, 
Knights of Columbus, passed through in a body. They were led 
by Knight McCreary and numbered about 200. The Sherman 
Boosters came in just after 9 o'clock. 

At about 9.30 the remains were carried out Ibe Mary Street 
entrance to the hearse. The members of Companies A and B 
of the National Guard acted as escort, and formed on either side 
of the hearse. The Elks, Boosters, and members of the Bepub- 
lican Club also joined the column and accompanied the remains 
up Genesee Street back to the home of Mr. Srebman. When the 
body was taken to and from the city hall all street cars en route 
were stopped as a mark of respect to Mr. Sheruan, who was an 
officer in the company. 

A large wreath presented by Ibe Boosters rested at the side of 
the casket and a magnificent wreath of orchids from former Con- 
gressman Littauer was close by. 

The Elks acted as escort, at the request of the family of Mr. 
Sherman, Mr. Sherman had an Elks badge in the lapel of his 
coat. 

Rev. Louis H. Holden, Ph. D., read appropriate prayers at the 
home of Mr. Shbrhan yesterday afternoon before the remains 
were taken to the courthouse. 



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[Frgm tb« Utle* (N. T.) Daily PrcH, Nor. 4, IMX] 
MB. SHBRIUN AT R&ST — FUNERAL NOTABI^ FOR ITS PROPORTION AND 

DISTINCTION A NATIONAL AND CIVIC EVENT — D10NITABIES OF 

STATE, INCLUDING THE PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC, UNtTB WITH 
NBIOHBOBS AND FRIBNDS IN THE LAST TRIBVTB OF RESPECT. 

The funeral of Hon. James S. Shbsuan, Vice President of the 
United States and Utica's foremost citizen, was held from the 
First Presbyterian Church of this city at 2 o'clock Saturday after- 
noon. In sise and proportion it was the largest ever held in this 
city. Those who attended the services at the church, although 
they filled the edifice, were but a fragment as compared with the 
throng that filled the streets and which was none the less ardent 
in its devotion to the eminent dead, or less willing to pay formal 
tribute if given opportunity. It is estimated that there were 
25,000 persons in the streets of Utica on this sorrowful day. 

In distinction, likewise, no such funeral has ever before been 
held in Utica. The President of the United States, in the person 
of Mr. Taft, justices of the Supreme Court, United States Senators, 
Representatives In Congress, and State dignitaries from all parts 
of the country were in attendance. Men famed in various walks 
of life, friends of the departed, were also present. 

The people of Utica never paid a more universal and more 
heartfelt tribute at the bier of any of iu sons. The city paused 
in its various activities to do honor to the man who had done so 
much for it in life and brought It distinction even in death. 

The rumble of traffic was hushed as the city-hall bell tolled the 
approaching hour of the obsequies. Simultaneously flags were at 
half-mast in every State in the Union and in all the possessions 
of the Government, to the remotest and smallest island. Public 
buildings were closed and from every warship a salute of 19 
minute guns was fired, echoing around the world, while every 
officer of the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps wore an emblem of 
mourning. 

No other Utican has ever received such a testimonial of honor 
and respect. Nation and city united in the tribute. The grief of 
the many mourners, friends, and kindred will be assuaged. In a 
measure, by the thought that the character and position of the 
departed were such as to command the praise and homage of a 
whole people. 

The services at the church were simple in form, yet solemn 
and impressive. They partook somewhat of the quality of 
majesty. No services conducted in such presence could fail to 
give such an impression. There were seated many of the gov- 
erning minds of a mighty nation as well as representatives of 
the highest culture — chiefs of state, of business, and education. 

President Stryker of Hamilton College delivered a touching and 
feeling eulogy. It was the sincere tribute of a friend to a friend 
who bad gone hither. Without show or ostentation, he told of 



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the excellent qualities of the departed and the blessings and cer- 
tainly of immortality. President Taft looked directly at the 
spealier throughout Ihe discourse, and was evidently deeply 
impressed. His attitude was typical of the altitude of all. The 
speaker communicated Ills emotion to the assemblage, and there 
were many tear-stained eyes. 

Sympathy radiated to the gentle and broken widow, the 
bereaved sons, and otlier kindred. 

The perfume of the beautiful flowers, like incease, pervaded 
the atmosphere of the auditorium. The black and purple of the 
mourning emblems gave a somber touch and color wholly in 
keeping with the sorrowful occasion. The music was attuned 
with the universal feeling. 

Outside was the crowd, not sharing in the inspiration of eulogy, 
music, and incense, but none the less solemn and reverent. 

The procession was formed and slowly wended its way 
between two flies of bowed humanity to the cemetery, where the 
final rites of the funeral were performed, the last adieu said 
by the family, and the body of Jahes Schoolcraft Sherman laid 
at rest 



Gray clouds racing low across cold windswept sky, a piercing 
chili that cut to the marrow, and a few light flakes of snow drift- 
ing downward — these formed a fit setting of dreariness and 
sorrow to the final rites accorded to James Schoou:raft Shermak 
Saturday afternoon, when Uticn and the surrounding towns 
poured thousands of spectators into the center of the city and 
along the route of the funeral procession. 

It had been announced in the papers that certain portions of 
the First Presbyterian Church not occupied by those entitled to 
reserved seats would be opened to the public, and long before 
11 o'clock the crowds began to gather outside the building where 
the public funeral services were to be held. 

The distinguished visitors of national reputation headed the 
procession which was formed In the Hotel Utica lobby and the 
Italian room. Members of the Republican Qub of the city, to- 
gether with the executive officers of the city, followed next in 
line. The clergy, the common council, and the members of the 
consistory of Christ Church completed the procession to the 
church which was formed at the hotel. 

It was 2.20 o'clock when the tolhng of the city ball bell an- 
nounced that the funeral cortege had left the Sherman home, fol- 
lowing the services there. The big bell tolled solemnly on with 
momentary intervals until after the procession reached the 
church. 

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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 



When the body was placed in the hearse the carriages were 
flUed as follows: 

1. Mrs. Sherman and Sberrill Sherman. 

2. Mr. and Mrs. Richard U. Sherman, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. 
Sherman. 

3. Mrs. SherriU Sherman, Mrs. L. B. Moore, Capt. Babcock. 
Mr. UtUuer. 

4. Mrs. William B. Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Cookinham, 
Mrs. Rice. 

5. Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Sherman, Miss Bessie Sherman, 
Mrs. Dick. 

8. Mr. and Mrs. Sanford Sherman, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Hatfield. 

7. Mr. and Mrs. James De Long, the Misses De Long. 

8. Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Cookinham, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Frederick 
Cookinham. 

9. Mr. and Mrs. Edward Cookinham, Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. 
Cooper, jr. 

10. Waller Cookinham, Robert Sherman, the Misses Rice. 

11. Judge and Mrs. Alfred C Coxe, Mr. and Mrs. Julius Doolittle, 

12. Miss Isabel Doolittle, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. J. Doolittle. 

13. Mr. and Mrs. Brian Clark, Mrs. Roberts. 

14. Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Childs, Miss Nellie Barber. 

15. Thomas Baker, the Misses Baker, Miss Connelly. 

18. Hon. and Mrs. George Fairchild, Hon. L. W. Emerson. 

There were in all 42 carriages at the Sherman home, and the 
greater share of the remainder were filled without regard to 
special order. The procession then moved toward the church, 
preceded by the honorary and active bearers. 

At 2.34 the carriage containing Dr. Stryker, Dr. Holden, and 
Dr. Brokaw arrived at the entrance of the church. 

Then the bearers arrived, followed by the hearse. The heavy 
casket, covered with flowers and containing the body of Utica's 
distinguished son, was lifted reverently from the hearse and 
carried up the steps of the church. 

The arrival of Mrs. Sherman was the signal for a general silent 
manifestation of sympathy. Everywhere hats were lifted and 
quiet murmurs of sympathy came from the women. Mrs. Sher- 
man was escorted to the church by her sons, Richard and 
Sberrill. 

When the distinguished visitors and those having cards of 
admission were seated such of the public as could be seated In 
the remaining space were admitted. While the service was in 
progress the throng about the church and up Washington Street 
could easily stand an estimate of 18,000. The crowd inunediately 
about the church extended over Columbia Street and down Wash- 
ington Street to Lafayette. 

After the services, the general public was admitted through 
the chapel doors of the church to view the flowers and deco- 
rations. 



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Between the double line of Senators, Congressmen, and Justices 
of the Supreme Court the casket was borne to the hearse and 
the flowers placed upon it. The immediate family and Presi- 
dent Taft and suite followed, and the procession took up the line 
of march to the cemetery. 

Up Washington Street to Genesee the 42 carriages moved in 
slow time between thousands of spectators that lined both sides of 
the route as far as Court Street. From there on the spectators 
were oa the west side of the street and four deep as far as South 
Street. Every corner was crowded, and at Oaelda Square 
another crowd awaited the cortege. 

At 3.45 o'clock the body of the dead Vice President passed the 
Sherman borne for the last time. The house stood dark and 
grim in the failing light of the afternoon as the master of the 
house passed on forever. No crowd assembled there, but from 
the windows of the near-by homes faces looked out to see the last 
of their good friend and neighbor. The march continued past 
the House of the Good Shepherd, where the waiting lines of 
orphans bowed their heads in respect to the passing hearse. 

Following out the suggestion made by Mayor Baker in his 
proclamation Saturday morning, the business houses of the city 
closed tbeir doors from 2 o'clock until 4. The national colors, 
tied with cr&pe or black and purple bunting, appeared all along 
the line of march, and the business section of the city presented 
a Sunday afternoon appearance. 

Id compliance with orders Issued yesterday, all electric cars in 
the city stopped at 2 o'clock and remained stationary for five 
minutes. The business ofBces of the railway company were 
closed all day. It was in these ways that the local electric 
company expressed the sympathy due to a distinguished citizen 
and a stockholder in the company. 



Intimate, and because of that intimacy the more sorrowful, were 
the services conducted Saturday afternoon at the borne of Vice 
President Shbrmun. There gathered the members of his family 
and a few very close friends who were given this opportunity to 
pay their tribute of honor and affection to the man they had 
known and loved. It was for tliis reason that the services took 
on an aspect essentially private, although President Taft was 
present for part of the service. 

The casket containing the body of Vice President Shebman 
was placed in the parlor at the north side of the house. In that 



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Mbmoriai. Addbessbs: Yicb President Shebman 



room were seats for some of the family and the President's party, 
while other seats were placed in the hall and the adjoining rooms. 
The honorary hearers, who were Senator Elihu Root, Thomas R. 
Proctor, Charles S. Symonds, WiUiam S. DooUttle, J. Francis Day, 
George E. Dunham, Charles B. Rogers, William T. Baker, Henry 
H. Cooper, and Dr. Payette M. Peck, were seated in a room at the 
rear of the ball until such time as they were called to perform the 
duties of their sad ofBce. Near them also were waiting the active 
hearers from the Utica Trust ft Deposit Co., of wUch Mr. Sher- 
man was president: Graham Coventry, Charles J. Lamb, Grover 
C. Clark, George W. Williams, Floyd E. Ecker, H. R. HunUngton, 
C. R. Hicks, H. P. Thomas, J. C. Cody, R. E. Roberts. 

Everywhere were to be seen the beautiful flowers which had 
been sent to express the sympathy of friends. The parlor was 
banked on every side with these and in the other rooms, too, they 
were found in profusion. From persons high and low throughout 
the country these messengers came, bearing the sympathy of 
friends who mourned together in the loss of their common friend. 

The service had been announced for 1 o'clock, but it was 
considerably after that before Rev. Louis H. Holden, Pb. D., pastor 
of Christ Church, began the Scripture reading. This he did after 
President Taft and his party arrived. They came about 1.40, the 
President being met by Lieut. W. G. Mayer, Thomas R. Proctor, 
W. S. Dootittle, and others. All stood while the President passed 
into the parlor to take his place near the body of hfs dead asso- 
ciate. 

After the minister bad repeated the Twenty-third Psalm all 
present Joined in reciting the Apostles' Greed. Then tbey were 
seated while Dr. Holden read the Scriptures, his selections being 
taken from I Corinthians xv and John xiv. He offered a brief 
prayer, ending with the Lord's Prayer. Then followed the bene- 
diction. 

The singing, which was under the direction of Dr. F. P. CavallO) 
was beautiful and lent much to the dignity and impressiveness 
of the occasion. The Schubert quartet, composed of Mrs. Hugh 
T. Owen, soprano; Mrs. Lelia Ryan Schilz, contralto; Dr. Cavallo, 
bass; and Elliott H. Stewart, tenor, sang " Paradise, Oh Paradise " 
and " Rock of Ages." There was also a male quartet, composed 
of Mr. Stewart, first tenor; Thomas E. Ryan, second tenor; A. 
Spencer Hughes, first bass; and Dr. Cavallo, second bass. They 
sang an arrangement of " Grossing the Bar." 

While tbe singing was in progress the bearers had left tlie home 
with their sad burden, and already the hearse was moving slowly 
down Genesee Street at the head of a mournful procession. As 
fast as the carriages were filled with the members of tbe family, 
they Joined tbe slow-moving line which passed between crowds 
all the way to the church where the public service was held. 



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The church doors were not open till Just before the hour of 
the funeral, but the ushers were on hand as early as 1 o'clock. 
They were: From the CoDkUng Un conditionals, Arthur J. Lowery, 
chief; Spencer Kellogg, Frank B. Rathbun, Edward B. Ibbotson, 
Charles DeAngelis, Russell Brennan, William A. Clark, Edward 
K. MiUer, Chester W. Davis, Bradford C Divine, Frederick W. 
Kincaid, A. C. BrlnckerhofT, Fred B. Adams, Stewart Snyder, 
M. Angelo Cooper, Rex Wltberbee, George Ladue, Charles L. 
Williams; from the First Presbyterian Church, Dr. F. H. Brewer, 
Dr. £. D. Fuller, J. C Hamilton. 

The interior of the church was profusely draped with emblems 
of mourning. The base was black and the overdraplngs of 
purple. The reredos was covered with black and purple and 
at the sides were festoons of similar hnes. The gallery front 
was covered with black and overdraplngs of purple, and festoons 
of the same colors were under each window. The columns were 
wound, and the front pews, occupied by the President and by 
Mrs. Sherman, were covered with black and a large flag. 

The Qoral tributes were the most numerous and costly ever 
seen at a funeral in this city. They Slled the chancel and the 
space in front. In the center was a large flag in flowers, the 
gift of the Utica Republican Club. On one side of the pulpit 
was a large cross from the Conkling Un conditionals and on the 
other a large cross of white chrysanthemums trimmed with 
orchids from the officials at the city hall. Other pieces were 
a wreath of orctiids from the United States Senate, a wreath of 
white roses from the House of Representatives, and beautiful 
floral pieces from the Secretary of State and Mrs. Knox, the min- 
ister of Salvador, the Dominican Republic, the Guatemalan min- 
ister and Sefiora Doiia Luz M^ndez, the German ambassador and 
Countess Bernstorff, the National Republican League, the Ameri- 
can Protective Tariff League, the Republican city and county 
committee, Charles V. Schram, large cross with "Auld Lang Syne " 
in flowers from the Hebrew people of Utica, a large wreath of 
white flowers on palms by Harry Gerher and Samuel Stone. On 
this was a card inscribed, " For He will give His angels charge 
concerning thee, to guard tfaee in all thy ways." Large floral 
piece from Herkimer County friends. Other floral pieces were 
from Minard J. Fisher, Miss Florence Millar, and Charles Millar, a 
blanket of chrysanthemums from the congregation of Christ 
Church. 

At 1.30 the doors to the galleries were opened and the galleries 
were at once filled. Next the side aisles were opened and filled 
almost as quickly. At 1.50 the congressional party entered, then 
the Justices of the Supreme Court and the trustees of Hamilton 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 



College. The Gonkling Un conditionals w«re seated in the chancel. 
When President Taft, former Vice President Faiiimnlu, and the 
other officers entered, the audience rose and remained standing 
until the President was seated. 

The President occupied a seat in the center aisle of the churchi 
and with him sat Attorney General Wickersham. Secretary Nageli 
of the Department of Commerce and Labor; former Vice Presi- 
dent Fairbanks, and Chairman Hilles, of the Republican national 
committee. 

Immediately back of them were seated Justices Hu^es and 
Pitney, of the United States Supreme Court; Senators Crane, 
Curtis, Lippitt, Penrose, Oliver, Bacon, .Works, and CGorman; 
Secretary Bennett, of the Senate; and Representatives Dalzell, 
Calder, Jones, Wright, Fairchlld, Fitzgerald, Dwight, Knapp, 
Cocks, and other Members of the National House of Representa- 
tives. Senator Root was seated with the honorary pallbearers. 

Others in the assemblage included former Govs. Frank S. 
Black and Benjamin B. Odell, Jr., and members of the New York 
State Legislature. Gov. Dix was unable to be present, but sent 
Lieut. Commander Eckford G. DeKay, liis military secretary, as 
his representative. 

The casket, covered with violets and lilies of the valley, was 
borne into the church at 2.30 o'clock, and following it came Mrs. 
Sherman in heavy mourning, leaning on the arm of her son 
Sherrill. She was accompanied by other members of the Sher- 
man family. All were given seats in close proximity to the casket. 
The Mendelssohn funeral march was played as the body was 
carried in and deposited immediately in front of the altar. 

The entire audience arose in silence as the bearers made their 
way to the front First came the honorary bearers and the active 
bearers with the remains and then the members of the family and 
relatives. The Republican Club occupied the chapel in rear of 
the pulpit. 

The music was in charge of Charles W. Mowry, organist and 
choir master. While the pews were filling the organ played the 
following selections: "Adagio and Andante"; C Minor Sonata, 
Hehdelssohn; Eleg^, Halsey; Largo, Handel; iJegend, Foulkes. 

The choir was made up of the following; Sopranos, Miss 
Carmelita Wilkes, Miss Florence Lumley, Mrs. Hugh T. Owen; 
altos, Miss Calista Gardner, Miss Florence Debbold, Mrs. Leila 
Ryan Schilz; tenors, Thomas G. Jones, Alfred Jay, and Elliott 
H. Stewart; bassos, Herbert Jones, A. Spencer Hughes, Hugh T. 
Owen. 

The services opened with the choir singing " Lead, Kindly 
Light." Rev. L«uis H. Holden, Ph. D., read passages of Scripture 
which declare tlie blessed assurance of eternal life. 



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PBBSIDBNT STRTKBII'S ADDRESS 

The address by President H. Woolsey Stryker, of Hamilton Col- 
lege, was brief but full of feeling. Dr. Stryker never spoke more 
deliberately, and when he came to say the words of farewell he 
looked down from the pulpit on the form of Mr. Shbruan below 
and his voice choked with emotion. Many in the audience were 
moved to tears. Dr. Stryker spoke as foUows: 

"In solemn and united mourning, but with tearful gratitude 
and calm, reasonable hope, we are met in this house of faith to 
remember him whose form is before us in all the mysterious 
dignity and the eloquent silence of deatb. We represent, while 
we deeply share, a general public sorrow. The high representa- 
tives of State and Nation assemble with us, who are his neighbors, 
in keen human sympathy, to make a common tribute of manly 
regard and manly afTection to an exalted dignitary of the land 
and to an endeared companion. We lament the passing, not 
first of the Vice President of the United States, but of Jaues 
ScHooLCRAPT Shehman, the man. This community shares in these 
acts of devotion, aware that there is gone their preeminent — ^long- 
time such — ^preeminent fellow citizen, bnt also that one is gone 
whose cordial courtesy and whose indomitable and impartial 
kindliness made him the counselor and the helper of innumerable 

" In the name of you all, I assure this household of your 
keen and profound heed for their distress, and in their names 
I thank you for your presence and for that swift telepathy in 
which you identify yonr grief with theirs. You put out to 
them warm and firm bands and they take them ^adly, and 
unspeakably they thank you. 

" I speak for that college circle which had delight and honor 
in this elect and loyal comrade and for those, its trustees, whose 
labors he zealously shared. And I speak — alas, that words are so 
poor! — as an intimate and sorrowing friend, one of many, so 
many who grieve that we shall here not see him any more. Not 
even with the most urgent brevity may I at all recite bis con- 
sistent and influential career. No; nor his earihly honors. No; 
nor his noble traits. AH these are legible; written past recalL 
Our hearts review them. Nor will we ever forget. Least of all 
may I lead yon, with steps however soft, into the sanctities of 
that domestic love'which are bis endearing legacies. We inter- 
meddle not with that Joy. 

" Good-by, good and faithful servant, great heart, gentle friend, 
good-by. Here be it remembered that this man was one whose 
patience and whose courage drank deep of that spiritual rock. 
Never was be ashamed of his hope in the Master of Life, whom 
ever since long ago be quietly and steadfastly confessed before 
men. 

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" Yes, farewell. Let the mortal put od immortality. We, the 
pilgrims of the night who still dwell in tents, salute thee in thy 
secure abode where all shadows are swallowed up of day. 
Thanks be to God for every good fight fought through; for every 
victory won through pain; for Him, the Captain of the Gross, 
who leads steadily His own to where, beyond these voices, there 
is peace." 

At the conclusion of his address. Dr. Stryker proceeded at once 
with his prayer, in which he said: 

"Therefore, Almighty and Merciful God, we bow before Thee 
and acknowledge Thy sovereign will In us. Come death, come 
life, we lay in Thy hand the secure keeping the dear dust of 
the dead. We remember with Joy and gratitude before Thee 
aU wherein Thy life touched theirs with beauty and with power. 
We pray that we may so follow the good example of those who 
sleep in Jesus Christ that, after this painful life is ended, we 
may dwell with Thee in life everlasting. Thou Who didst with 
Thine own lips say, 'I will not leave you orphans, I will care 
for you with more than human love,' dost regard these friends of 
ours in their sorrow. Let there be light in their dwellings. Let 
the peace of God that passeth all understanding guard their 
hearts and their thoughts in Christ. Make us all, God, more 
tender and more true by this day's experience. Let our vows be 
registered with Tbee while our hearts praise Thy name. Join 
us with the blessed company of those everywhere who trust 
and serve and bow and wait. And in Thy due time, through 
Thy great mercy, through Jesus Christ, who won for all, receive 
us into everlasUng habitations. Thou who bast said, ' Because 
I live, ye shall live also,' we do not ask that the way of life may be 
made soft and easy to our feet, but we ask that it may be made 
plain. Help us to bear the day's burden, to endure the trials of the 
instant. We leave all things in Thy good bands and do commit 
ourselves and all this presence to Thy faithful care, and, when 
this Is over, open to us Thy door that at last we may know Thee 
whom we have so much forgotten, and know as we are known. 

"Thon that takest away the ^ns of the world, have mercy 
on us. Thou that takest away the sins of the world, grant ns 
Thy peace. Amen." 

Then, at the request of President Stryker, the audience rose 
and joined the choir in singing with great earnestness the well- 
known hymn, " Nearer, My God, to Thee." It was the first time 
that those In the congregation had had an opportunity to give 
expression to their feelings, and they sang the five verses of the 
hymn with an earnestness seldom beard. President Taft sang 
as fervently as any, as did President Stryker. 

The benediction was announced by the pastor of the church. 
Rev. Ralph W. Brokaw, D. D. The choir sang vrith fine expres- 

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sion the well-known prayer hymn, "Abide with Me," after which 
the remains were borne from the church, the funeral procession 
being made up of the honorary bearers, clergy, the remains, 
members of the family and mourners. President Taft, and the 
other officials in their order. For a recessional the organ played 
Hendelssolm's funeral march. 

The official posiUon of Mr. Taft, as President of the United 
States, entitled him to ride ahead of the hearse, but he preferred 
to be a mourner, and at his own request was given a place behind 
Mr. Sherman's immediate family. 

The floral tributes were so numerous that they could not all be 
brought into the church, but all were taken to the cemetery. 
Among them were wreaths and other designs from the follow- 
lag: Mr. and Mrs. S. C Neale, J. G. Small and wife. National 
Republican League, Hr. and Mrs. Albert Hatfield, Mr. and Mrs. C 
H. Poole, employees of the Utica Trust & Deposit Co., Hon. and 
Mrs. M. E. Driscoll, Beta Chapter of the Sigma Phi fraternity, Hon. 
J. W. Weeks, Republican county and city committee, Mr. and Mrs. 
O. H. Hammond, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Peckham, Mr. and Mrs. D. H. 
Hazard, Hon. Charles L. Knapp, Mr. and Mrs. George E. Dunham, 
William H. Hawk and daughter, Hr. and Mrs. R. A. C. Smith, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. C Bishop, the Northern New York Trust Co., Hon. 
L. N. Uttauer, Judge W. B. Hooker and family, the Spanish 
minister, the minister of Haiti, the Secretary of State and Mrs. 
Knox, Hon. F. M. Davenport, the United States Senate, George W. 
Hinman, Mr. and Mrs. Brian Qarke, and employees of the Utica 
post office. 

A magnificent wreath from President and Mrs. Taft did not 
arrive till late, but Mrs. Sherman, accompanied by members of 
her family, went to the cemetery and placed it in the mausoleum 
yesterday morning. 



The scene at the committal service in Forest Hill Cemetery was 
one never to be forgotten. There were gathered as closely as 
they could be grouped the high and low of the earth, for many 
of the people who are generally described as Just " plain folks " 
were almost rubbing elbows with the President of the United 
States. And all about them were the resting places of those who 
are asleep in the last long rest which obliterates all distinctions 
of place and power. 

As sharp as were the contrasts in humanity gathered there, even 
more sharp were the visible aspects of nature. Underfoot along 
the edges of the drive rustled the dead leaves which had fallen 
from the many trees. Stark and bare the limbs of the trees stood 
In naked outline against the cold November sky. And yet, grouped 



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near the place where the last words of farewell were said In honor 
of bim who is gone, appeared every sort of tribute from the art 
and skill of the florist The most beaatiful and fragrant forms in 
which nature displays its floral riches were gathered there in a 
profusion of color and design. Wonderful wreaths and designs, 
huge bouquets of liiies, orchids, roses, and violets gave mute testf- 
mony of the place in the hearts of his friends which Mr. Sherman 
held. These were the tributes of friends who chose in this 
beautiful manner to express their sympathy. And so these 
flowers became the eloquent messengers of those whose hearts 
were perbaps too full to say the things that the flowers meant. 

In front of the Babcock-Moore mausoleum a tent bad been 
erected to shelter those who were to take part in the final service. 
Against the ropes in front crowded hundreds of people, eager to 
see and yet respectful and reverent, fully appreciating the sad- 
ness of the occasion. 

About 4 o'clock came a few carriages, bearing more of the 
flowers which had been brou^t from the church. There fol- 
lowed a few busy moments arranging these, and then fell the hush 
of expectancy. Soon the Haydns, numbering about 60, arrived, 
and they were grouped against the ropes at one side of the plot, 
to take their share in the service. Then Dr. M. Woolsey Stryker, 
Dr. Ralph W. Brokaw, and Dr. Louis H. Holden arrived. They 
were followed by the honorary bearers, who were grouped about 
the place prepared for the casket before it was finally laid to rest 
in the crypt. 

When ttie hearse stopped before the approach to the mausoleum, 
the bearers stood near to receive their sad burden. Reverently 
the crowd uncovered as the men moved slowly away, bearing 
between them the heavy black symbol of grief. On top of tbe 
casket lay two crosses, one of white lilies and the other of violets, 
tributes of the family. 

The casket was placed on the rests and there was a moment's 
hush as President Taft, former Vice President Fairt>ank3, and 
several others high in the Nation's councils, gathered there 
for the last tribute of respect and affection. Meanwhile the 
Haydns bad been sln^ng "Asleep in Jesus " on the tune " Rest," 
this being at the request of Mrs. Sherman. It was the same hymn 
they had sung at the funeral of Mrs. Sherman's mother not long 
before. 

Dr. Stryker began tbe committal service, speaking in a low 
tone, yet so distinctly that his words were heard by many in 
tbe crowd. The reading occupied about three minutes and 
then the Schubert quariet sang " Good Night" There followed 
a moment's stir as President Taft and his party had to take leave. 
They stepped slowly from the shelter of the tent, to make their 
way toward the waiting automobiles. As they left, Richard U. 
Sherman foUowed them, to climb into the President's car, sbalce 



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Funeral Services 



his hand, and thank bim, apparently, for his presence at the 
funeraL , 

Reverently the honorary bearers and others who had heen a 
part of the gathering left the tent. There remained but the mem- 
bers of the family, and none wished to intrude on the sacredness 
of those last moments. To the relatives belonged the intimacy of 
the final farewell and no person would have had it otherwise. 
After the Haydns had snng " Nearer, My God, to Thee," and Dr. 
Stryker had pronounced the benediction, the service was at an 
end. Gently the casket was slid into the crypt prepared for it, 
slowly the crowd turned away to pass quietly down the winding 
paths. 

Dusk was giving way to darkness before the last persons had 
left. Lights fiashing here and there in the valley below picked 
out the busy places in the city's activity. From afar came a 
steady impersonal hum as though of many voices talking — in 
fact, it was the voice of the city. And there through the trees on 
the hillside whispered the cold November wind. But it held no 
terrors for him who was left there asleep — close to the city and 
people he loved and served so well. 



MEMORIAL SERVICES IN BERLIN 

A memorial service in honor of the late Vice President Jambs 
SCBOOLCRAPT Shehhan was held at the American church In Berlin 
on the afternoon of November 2, 1912, at 2 o'clock, the same hour 
as the funeral services in Utica. The Berlin services were at- 
tended by the respective staffs of the American Embassy end the 
consulate general, headed by the ambassador, the Hon. John G. A. 
Leisbman, at whose suggestion the memorial was held. The Ger- 
man minister of foreign affairs sent Count Montgelas, of the for- 
eign office, to attend the services as his representative. Members 
of the American colony in Berlin also attended. 



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BY PRESIDENT TAFT. 
[Prom Iha Waahlngton (D. C.) Pott.] 

New Yobk, October M. 1912. — President Taft was informed of 
the death of Vice President Sherman at 930 o'clock, as the Cliief 
Executive and liis Secretary of the Navy were seated in the 
Thirteenth Re^ment Armory, Brooklyn, as guests of honor at a 
dinner given to them by employees of the Brooklyn Navy Yard, 
in celebration of the successful launching of the battleship New 
York to-day. 

The President had just finished a plea for a greater Navy, and 
Commander Greaves of the navy yard was spealung at the time 
when the news of Mr, Sherman's death was broken to the 
President. 

Mr. Taft at first made no comment after bearing the news. He 
remained seated, concealing emotions which be might have had, 
until Commander Greaves and Congressman Calder bad finished 
their speeches. He then rose and said: 

" My Friends : Three years ago you met on an occasion like 
this to celebrate the launching of the Florida, and you were 
honored by the presence of the Vice President of the United 
States — ^Vice President Sherman. It is a very sad duty for me 
to announce that word has Just come that the Vice President is 
dead. 

" Those who knew him loved him. Those who knew the serv- 
ices he rendered to his country respected him. I venture to ask 
that this assemblage adjourn in honor of bis memory and that 
00 further proceedings be taken." 

A period of silence followed the President's unexpected words. 
The band came to the relief of the situation by playing, "My 
Country, Tis of Thee," and the naval officers and men filed out 
quickly. 

The President was escorted to bis automobile. Tears came to 
his eyes. He was lost si^t of, however, as he stepped inside of 
the car and was whisked across Brooklyn Bridge and to the 
Pennsylvania Railroad Station in New York, where be was due 
to lake his train at 12.30 o'clock for Washington. 

Immediately after arriving in New York President Taft dis- 
patched the following telegram to Mrs. Sherman at Utica: 

" Mrs. Taft and 1 extend to you our heartfelt sympathy in your 
great sorrow. Our hearts go out to you in the loss of your noble 

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and loving huAand. Vice President Shbrmak had rendered dis- 
tinguished service to his country, and his death, 10 years before 
the time allotted by the Psalmist, is a great loss. As a Member of 
Congress and a Vice President he endeared himself to all who 
knew him. His memory is full of sweetness and light. 

" William H. Taft." 

Just before boarding his train for Washington President Taft 
made the following statement: 

" News of the death of Vice President Jambs S. Sherman has 
Jost reached me, and although it was not unexpected, it has filled 
my heart with sadness. I feel a sense of personal bereavement 
in the loss of a friend, who was a conscientious worker in the 
many undertakings in which we were engaged. 

" It is an easy matter to pay tribute to his worth. He was a 
gentleman of splendid poise, of mental attainment, which were 
balanced by so fine a sense of Justice that all who knew him 
respected him and admired him. The sobriquet which he has 
properly earned, and which was a tribute to a disposition that 
radiated sunshine and good will, readily explains the warm affec- 
tion in which he was held by the many thousands who had come 
into personal contact with him. 

"As a legislator and expounder of parliamentary law and prac- 
tice he had achieved a reputation of national proportions before 
he was elevated to the high and dignified office of Vice President 
of the United States. His services as Vice President will be flt- 
tindy acknowledged by the United States Senate, over which he 
presided with marked fairness. He was a Republican of sturdy 
principles, and his counsel witliin the party, always eagerly 
sought and highly regarded, will be sadly missed in the many 
crises created by new problems arising and demanding wise con- 
sideration and practical solution." 

BY GOV. WILSON, 
[rrom tbe Utlca (N. T.) Dtllj PreM, Not. 1, 1812,] 

The family of llr. Sherman yesterday received hundreds of 
telegrams from all parts of the country expressing sympathy. 
Among them was the following: 

" In common with tbe whole country, Mrs. Wilson and I have 
been deeply shocked by the death of Vice President Sherman, 
and we wish to extend to you our heartfelt sympathy. 

"WooDRow Wilson," 

[From tbe UUca (N. Y.) Dalljr Preu, Nor. i. ISIS.] 

Rochester, November 2, 1912. — At the request of Gov. Wilson, 
the Democratic parade announced for this afternoon in New 
York City has been called off out of respect to the memory of 
Vice President Sherman, whose funeral will take place tOMlay. 

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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 



As sooD as Got. Woodrow Wilson arrived in Rocbester late ye^ 
terday afternoon he telegraphed National Chairman W. F. Hc- 
Combs to cancel the parade scheduled to be held in New York 
towlay by the College Men's Wilson and Marshall Clubs. The 
parade was to take place at the same hoar that Vice President 
Sherman's funeral is to be held. 

The governor wired as follows: 

" I hope that the arrangements for the parade will be canceled 
as an evidence of our deep sympathy for the family end friends 
of the late Vice President. I know this will be your feeling." 

BT GOV. MARSHALL. 
[From the Wa*IilD«tOn (D. C), Poit. Nor. 1, IMS.] 

Chicago, Oc(ofter 3J, 1912.— Gov. Thomas R. Marshall, at the 
end of his 7,000-mile speaking tour to the Pacific Coast States and 
' return, to-day canceled further campaign speeches because of the 
death of Vice President Shisman. Gov. Marshall had been sched- 
uled to make three speeches in Chicago and several in Indiana and 
Ohio. 

" In the presence of the dead," said Gov. MarshaU, " every self- 
respecting man stands silent 

" Mr. Shebmam is not alone the dead of one of the contesting 
political parties, but is the Nation's dead as well, and as such Is 
deserving of the honor and respect of every man who respects 
the Nation." 

Before departing from Chicago for Indianapolis this afternoon, 
Gov. Marshall sent a telegram of sympathy to Mrs. Sherman. 

BT COL. ROOSBVBLT. 

New York, October SO. 1912. — Jnst after he left the Madison 
Square Garden meeting. Col. Roosevelt was informed of the death 
of Vice President Sherman. The colonel immediately seat the 
following telegram: 
" Mrs. James S. Sherman, Vtica, N. Y.: 

" Mrs. Roosevelt and I are greatly shocked and concerned at 
the sad news of your hnsband's death. We beg you to accept our 
most sincere sympathy. 

" Theodore Roosevelt." 

New York, November 1, 1912. — The following telegram was sent 
by Chairman Prendergast, of the Progressive mass meeting in 
Madison Square Garden to-nl^t, to Mrs. Sherman in response to 
Col. Roosevelt's suggestion to the meeting; 
" Mrs. James Schoolcraft Sherman, Vtica, N. Y.: 

" At the suggestion of Theodore Roosevelt and in the name of 
15,000 citizens of this city gathered in mass meeting, I have the 



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honor to extend to you their heartfelt sympathy in your great 
sorrow. 

" William A. Prendbboast, 

" Chairman." 

OTHER EXPRESSIONS OF SYMPATHY. 
IProm th< UUo (N. Y.) Dallr Preu.] 

The universal esteem in which Hr. Sherman was held is testi- 
fied to in the following messages of respect and sympathy to Mrs. 
SbermaD. 

The following was received from Hon. Augustus O. Bacon, 
President pro tempore of the United States Senate: 

" Sbbrrill Shkhman : As President pro tempore of the Senate 1 
have directed the Sergeant at Arms of the Senate to make all ar- 
rangements and provide everything which may be desired by your 
family in connection with the funeral of your honored father, the 
late Vice President, all of which it is desired may be entirely at 
the charge of the Senate. So soon as you inforrn me of the ar- 
rangement and the dates fixed and desired by the family I will 
cause the notices to he given to the Members of the Senate to se- 
cure their personal attendance. I beg that you will give me here 
this information so soon as it may be found convenient to do so. 

Senator Bacon also telegraphed as follows: 

" 1 beg to express my profound sympathy in this hour of your 
unspeakable aflliction in the death of your universally beloved 
husband. By all the people of the United States his passing away 
will be deplored as a great national loss, and by each Senator he 
will be mourned as a personal friend." 

" You have our heartfelt sympathy in your great sorrow. May 
God bless you and yours. 

" Gbamp Clarb, 

" Speaker of the Houie of RepreMcntatiuet." 

"All the members of the court deeply sympathize with you In 
your great sorrow, and personally in the loss of so faithful a pub- 
lic servant. 

" E. D, White, 
" Chief Jiutice. Vaited Statet Supreme Court." 

" Mrs. Hughes and I extend to you our deepest sympathy in 
your great sorrow. 

"Charles E. Huobbs." 

" Mrs. Dix and I extend to you and your family our sympathy. 
The State and the Nation have lost an honored and honorable 
citixen. 

" John A. Dix, 
" Governor of New York," 

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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 



" J extend to you heart sympathy for the loss of your beloved 
husband, who was also my cherished friend. 

" Cardinal GnnoNS." 

" Mrs. Sulzer and myself are greatly shocked by the death of 
your distinguished husband, and in the hour of your sad be- 
reavement we send you our heartfelt sympathy. 

" WiLLUM Sulzer." 

"Mrs. Straus and I deeply sympathize with yon in your be- 
reavement and grief. His cheerfulness and kindliness endeared 
your husband to all who knew him. 

" OscAB S. Straus." 

" Please accept my sympathy in your bereavement, and rest as- 
sured that your loss has brought sorrow to many. Your husband's 
friends are your friends. 

"Job E. Bedobs." 

" The University of Notre Dame, Ind., mourns and prays beside 
you. May God comfort you and protect the Nation. 

" President Cavanauoh." 

"Washington, D. C. 
" Mrs. Bryce and I and all the members of this embassy desire 
to convey our deep and sincere condolence with you in your 
great bereavement. 

"British Ambassador." 

"Washinoton, D. C. 
"At the request of the Japanese minister for foreign affairs and 
Viscountess Uchilda, I beg to convey to you expression of their 
profound and sincerest condolence at the terrible bereavement of 
yourself and your family. 

"Viscount Chinda, 

" Japanese Ambaaador." 

"Pl£asanton, Cal. 
" May my wife and I offer you sincere sympathy in your great 
sorrow. Regret absence from the East will prevent my repre- 
senting the Persian legation at the funeral. 

" MizRA Ali Kvli Khan, 

" Persian Cbargi tf Affaires." 

" On behalf of the Swiss Government and the Nation I have the 
honor to express to you my profound sympathy. 

"Henri Martin, 
"Cbargi d' Affaires of Sivltzerland." 



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"Tokyo, Japan. 
" My most sincere condolence and heartfelt sympathy. 

" Prince Tokuoawa." 

"Mrs. Knox Joins me in affectionate sympathy in your great 
bereavement. 

" P. C. Knox." 

" My heartfelt sympathy goes out to yoa in this hour of grief. 
None will miss his kindly personality more than those who have 
known him so intimately during years of service in the Senate 
and House of Representatives. 

" Joseph M. Dixon." 

"I grieve over the loss of one of my oldest and most valued 
friends. Mrs. Depew and I join in deepest and tenderest sympa- 
thy for yourself and family. 

" Gbauncbt M. Depew." 

" I mourn with you and your family on the death of your dis- 
tinguished husband and my friend, the Vice President. The 
Nation has lost an honest, wise, and courageous public servant, 
and to many there will come a deep sense of personal loss. Please 
accept the assurances of my sincere sympathy. 

" J. G. Cannon." 

Congressman William B. McKinley, of Illinois, who managed the 
preconvention Taft-Sberman campaign, said: "A great man and 
a good man has gone." 

" Seattle, Wash. 
" Our deepest sympathy in your great bereavement. The Nation 
has sustained a great loss in Mr. Shqiman's death. 

"w. e. humphrky." 

" Shrbvbport, La. 
" In the death of your distinguished husband the Nation has 
lost one of its foremost citizens and faithful public servants. I 
served years in the House with Mr. Sherman. He enjoyed the 
esteem, confidence, and respect of his colleagues without regard 
to party. Mrs. Pujo Joins me in extending heartfelt sympathy. 

"A. P. Pujo." 

"Please accept my sympathy. The Nation and the State as 
well as the family have suffered a great loss. 

"Alton B. Parker." 

"Mrs. Odell and I sympathize with you in your bereavement. 
Many years of association with your husband gave me the rl{^t 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice Presidemt Sherman 



to call him Mend, and his death therefore comes home to me 
with peculiar force. In bis civic life he has ever been faithful; 
in every other wallc of life be has been equally true. This knowl- 
edge should be of comfort to you in your hour of sorrow. 

" B. B. Odell, Jr." 

" Washinoton, D. C 
" Will you allow me to convey to you my personal sympathy 
and the sympathy of the Daughters of the American Revolution in 
the crusMug sorrow which has come to you in the death of your 
distinguished husband. The flog on our Memorial Continental 
Hall floats at half-mast in token of our respect and honor for the 
great man whose loss the Nation mourns. 

" Mrs. Matthew T. Scott, 
" Praideat General, N. S. D. A. B." 

" LUOANO, SWITZBRIAND. 

" We weep with you and yours. 

" Louis LOHBABD AND FAMILY." 

" New York City. 
" Please accept the deepest sympathy of my wife and myself in 
your great bereavement. 

" John Philip Sodsa." 

" London. 
" I have lost a friend. Deepest regret 

" Habbt Lauder." 

" South Harpswell, Mb. 
" Our deepest, sincerest, and lasting sympathy to you and yours 
in your irreparable aflliction. We shall always be prond that we 
numbered in among bis friends. 

" Rear Ashiral and Mrs. Peart." 

" The Royal Arcanum of Illinois, in general meeting assembled 
in Chicago, In common with our fellow cousins throughout the 
United States, mourn the loss of our faithful brother, Jambs S. 
Sherman, and tenders to you and to his sons, our bereaved 
brothers, our profound sympathy. He has served both his coun- 
try and this order ably and nobly. 

" Georob W. Manibrrb, 

" Chairman. 
"F. T. McFaden, 

"Supreme Regeat. 
" Graeme Smh-h, 

" Grand Regent." 

" Mt Dear Madam: The members of Utica Lodge of Elks sympa- 
thise deeply with you in the loss of your huU>and. Mr. Sherman 



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had been on Elk for over s score of years, a period in whicb he 
always showed an interest in our organization. We have lost an 
honored brother and our sorrow is deep at this time. Every one 
of the 700 Elks in Utica sends yoa heartf eH sympathy. 

" LaWBBNCB J. ZOBBL, 

" Exalted Ruler." 

" The members of Branch SI of the Association of Letter Car- 
riers of Fall River, Mass., extend to yoa their heartfelt sympathy 
in your sad bereavement. In your husband's death the Nation 
loses a faithful servant and the letter carriers a staunch friend. 
" John H. Uaythobnthwaitb, 

" Pretident." 

" The Union League of Philadelphia sympathises deeply with 
you and your family In this, your great sorrow. The Vice Presi- 
dent was well known and greatly beloved here. 

"William T. Tiu>bn, 
" President of the Vnton Leagae," 

Mrs. Jennie T. Hobart, widow of former Vice President Hobart, 
extended her sympathy as that of one " who can fully appreciate 
your great bereavement." 

Former Vice President and BIrs. Fairi>anks wired: "We loved 
him as a friend and loved him as an able and truthful public 
servant." 

There also were expressions of profound sympathy from all 
the Cabinet ministers and from many American ministers to for- 
eign countries as well as from foreign representatives in the 
United States. Whiteiaw Held spoke of the Vice President's 
death as " a great loss." 

Messages of condolence were also received by Mrs. Sherman 
from the following: Senators George T. Oliver, J. M. Gallinger, 
Newell Sanders. A. 0. Bacon, Luke Lea, Jeff Davis, C. A. Culber- 
son, T. E. Burton, D. U. Fletcher, G. P. Wetmore, Isaac Stephen- 
son, J. W. Bailey, C W. Watson, Cliarles E. Townsend, W. E. Chil- 
ton, John W. Kern, Charles Curtis, George Sutherland, W. A. 
Rldiardson, G. H. Hitchcock, W. Murray Crane, Boies Penrose, 
C. A. Swanson, Isidor Rayner, Thomas S. Martin. S. M. Cullom, 
Henry F. Lippitt, George E. Chamberlain, Jonathan Bourne, jr., 
F. M. Simmons, Henry F. Ashurst, Albert B. Cummins, Robert J. 
Gamble, and James A. O'Gorman. 

Also from the following : Hon. Charles G. Bennett, Secretary of 
the United States Senate; Hon. Frank S. Black, Attorney General 
George W. Wickersham, Rev. and Mrs. U. G. B. Pierce, Norman J. 
Gould, Hon. Dennis T. Flynn, Hon. Francis E. Hendricks, Hon. 

»34M°— la 8 [113] 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 



Samuel McKIlllan, Hon. Eugene Hale, Hon. I. F. Fischer, Mr. and 
Mrs. George Sicard, Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson. Brother 
Gregory, Henry Casson, Jr., Hon. Jacob Ruppert, Jr., Hon. W. B. 
McKinley, Walter G. Wltberbee, Sefior Don Juan Rlano, ambas- 
sador of Spain, and Madame De Rlano; George Tfaerrill, Mr. 
and Mrs. £. H. Wells, W. C. Hackett, Hon. James R. Garfield, Hon. 
Frank H. Hiscock, Judge Irving G. Vann, Hon. George B. McClel- 
lan, J. G. Scbmidtlapp, J. D. Fuller, B. S. Rodey, Judge Warren B. 
Hooker, Louis Fisher, Mr* and Mrs. Phillip Eltiog, Hon. Carmi 
A. Thompson, secretary to the President; Samuel P. Calef, George 
C PriesUey, P. B. Boden, Hon. Richard Bartholdt, Mrs. Ethel 
McCarey Sanger, Hon. Charles L. Knapp, Mr. and Mrs. Pensel, Mr. 
and Mrs. Louis J. Ehret, J. G. P. Kincaid, F. W. Buderus, Charles 
A. Hawley, F. S. Hill, Mr. and Mrs. William Roach, John W. Van 
Allen, Robert Gardiner McGregor, D. M. Johnson, J. Frank Aid- 
rich, Hon. John T. Mott, John C. Moffitt, J. C. Eversman, A. V. 
CoQover, Garry B. Adams, H, M. Daugherty, H, W, Dearborn, Mr. 
and Mrs. WiUiam Morris, Hon. John Dolzell, J. J. Gilbert, N. B. 
Yates, John E. Dowd. Col. William M. Griffith, WUUam R. P. 
Bloyer, MarUn J. Hutchins, R. A. C Smith, M. D. Crowley, C. W. 
Richardson, Ormsby McCammon, Hon. C. L. Bartlett, W. C. War- 
ren, William Clift Foole, I. P. Brown, Charles E. Fitch, Victor 
Rosewater, Wilfrid Hartley, Reuben R. Lyon, Hon. Charles R. 
Skinner, M. W. Blumenburg, George W. Waaamaker, Hon. Charles 
A. Towne, George C. Boldt, George X. McLenahan, Mr. and Mrs. 
V. M. Wilson, Jr., James Otis Woodward, J. G. Searne, H. H. 
Knowtes, F. B. Newell, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Sewall, Hr. and 
Mrs. Homer P. Snyder, Hon. Henry M. Goldfogle, Hon. D. F. La- 
fean, Hon. J. Van Vechten Olcott, Mrs. Kate I. Nixon, S. G. Malby, 
Gonsalo De Quesada, Hon. Charles H. Sherrill; Col. D. M. Ransdell, 
Sergeant at Arms United States Senate; B. N. Martin, Marcus P. 
Rice, WiUiam A. Logue, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Brooks, the German 
Ambassador and Countess Bemstorlf, Hon. George W. Aldridge, 
Hon. William Barnes, Jr., Hon. George S. Klock. Miss May Irwin, 
the French Ambassador and Mme. Jusserand, George Oryis, A. E. 
Martin, Mr. and Mrs. William H. WaUon, Fred A. Smith, Thomas E. 
Oshen, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Vrooman, Henry M. Rose, C. B. Mc- 
Cawley, Hod. George Puchta, Hon. and Mrs. Charles Dick, Mrs. 
Elizabeth H. Hemphill, James K. Apgar, Bessie Edwards, Mr. and 
Mrs. David M. Ranken, Hon. and Mrs. Richard Wayne Parker, 
Sfr. and Mrs. A. Seeley, Francis A. Willard, Howard B. French, 
George E. Hopkins, J. E. Millhollsnd, Mrs. A. S. Paddock, Hon. 
W. B. Greene, Gen. W. W. Wotherspoon, Louis V. Davison, David 
F. Wilder, Ralph A. Gamble, Justice of the Supreme Court Joseph 
HcKenna, Lloyd Paul Stryker, Hon. Nicholas Murray Butler, Hon. 
Montague Lessler, Hon. C. H. Duell, A. B. Andrews, Dr. M. O. Terry, 
S. C. Neole, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Burch, E. J. Welsh; Hon. L. P. 
Fuhrmonn, mayor of Buffalo; Mr. and Mrs. E. F. Murray, Mr. and 
Mrs. William H. HotchUss, Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Brooker, John 

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G. WllUHms. Hr. and Mrs. Frederick H. ElUott, Frederick S. 
Flower, the Daiiisli minister, Hr. and Mrs. Charles Henry Butler, 
Hon. William Richardson, Gharies F. Newsom, Mrs. George H. 
Pullman, Mayor Scanlon, Lawrence, Mass.; Sterling J. Joiner, 
Mrs. Mary Townsend, Hon. Horace White, C L. Stone, J. Herbert 
Ballantine, George H. Harris, Secretary of the Treasury Franklin 
HacVeagh, the Japanese Ambassador Viscount Ghlnda, Mr. and Mrs. 
P. W. Herrick. Mr. and Mrs. Carl Stone, H. B. Tompkins, Mr. and 
Miss Hawk, Hon. Samuel Koenig, the Minister of Norway and Mme, 
Bryn, Hon. and Mrs. Truman H. Newberry, Mrs. Caroline Caton 
Williams and daughter, H. P. Bells, the senior class, Berkeley In- 
stitute, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Hon. and Mrs. Timothy L. Woodruff, the 
Haitian minister. United States Supreme Court Justice Mahloni 
Pitney, Hon. and Mrs. James R. Mann, Mr. and Mrs. L. White 
Busbey, Mr. and Mrs. William C. Denny, the governor of New 
Hampshire, Robert P. Bass; Hon. L. B. Gleason, Mr. and Mrs. Ells- 
worth Brown, Cortland S. Wheeler, Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Coolidge, 
Mr. and Mrs. James M. E. O'Grady, Hon. and Mrs. Charles B. Law, 
John L. £. Pell, Louis Waldauer, Hon. and Mrs. J. Charles Lintb- 
icum, Mr. George G. Van Tuyl, jr., Mr. George Hinman, Mr. Jules 
Roth, Mr. Harry S. Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. Seth C. Adams, Mr. and 
Mrs. F. W. Sessions, Thora Reynolds, Miss Mabel T. Boardman, Mr. 
and Mrs. William C Sylvester, Hon. John Barrett, Mr. and Mrs. 
John Hays Hammond, Postmaster General Frank A. Hitchcock, 
the Charge d'Affaires of the Republic of Panama and Blrs. Brin, 
Epdlon Chapter of Sigma Phi, Ithaca, N. Y.; Hon. J. Hampton 
Moore, The Ohio Society of the City of New York, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frank S. Witherbee, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin S. Minor, R. F. Brush, 
J. F. McMurray, Mr. and Mrs. William LitUuer, Irving W. Day, 
John F. Fitzgerald, mayor of Boston; Hon. Newton W. Gilbert, 
Martin J. Bowe, J. A. Flannlgan, Hon. Joseph B. Foraker, Paul S. 
Pearsall, Mrs. Gharies J. Hughes, jr.. Miss Christine Hoar, Hon. and 
Mrs. J. W. Fordney, Mrs. W. B. Newman, N. Main, Commander and 
Viscountess Benoist d'Azy, United States Supreme Couri Justice 
and Mrs. Lurton, Leroy W. Baldwin, S. C. Neale, Maj. Richard 
Sylvester, Senor Antonio Martin Rivero, Cuban minister; Mr. and 
Mrs. Frederick C Stevens, the Board of Bishops of the M. E. 
Church of Toledo, Ohio, Evangeline Booth, John E. Frost, F. R. 
Bane, George E. Vankennen, Francis E. Ames, Hon. Nicholas and 
Alice Longworth, Hon. J. Sloat Fassett, Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Wilcox, 
Royal Arcanum of the State of Ohio, H. D. Oliver, Gen. Oscar F. 
* Long, Rev. Father William H. Ketcham, Mr. and Mrs. Edson Brad- 
ley, Isabella E. Mullholland, G. Gunby Jordan, Philip A. Howard, 
Florence M. Bennett, C. K. Corbin, Wilbur E. Van Auken, Curtice 
Brothers, Hon. L. W. Emerson, Walter M. Ostrander, J. Shepard, 
jr., Mr. and Mrs. George C. Wood, Raymond F. Rode, Mr. and Mrs. 
F. H. Judd, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Smith, Hon. T. Harvey Ferris, 
Hon. James K. O'Connor, Hon. Charles D. Walcott, J. J. Guernsey, 
Tafl Business Men's League of SL Paul, Minn.; Hon. and Mrs. W. A. 



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Mehorial Addresses: Vice PBEsasNT Sherman 



Massey, Mrs. William B. Heyburn, R. L. Kers, jr., W. R. Roach, 
Miles P. Oodereaux, Hon. and Mrs. W. S. Cowbridge, the Minister 
of The Netherlands and Hme. Loudon, Charles H. Wilson, Rev. 
John Arthur, William R. P. Bloyer, Ellis A. Gimel, Hon. James K. 
McGuire, Henry White Callahan, Cary F. Sinunons, Mr. and Mrs. 
William A. Shanklin. Hon. Herbert Parsons, Hon. George B. CorteN 
you, P. A. Franklin, Charles G. Wagner, Sophonisba P. Brecken- 
ridge, Hon. and Mrs. Frederick M. Davenport, Fay T.Kent, Hertiert 
W. Clark, E. C Converse, Commander Joseph W, Kay, Hon. G. 
Fred Talbott, G. W. Graham, Mayor John J. Irving, Binghamton; 
Mrs. Percy Morgan, Hon. John W. Weeks, Hon. WiUiam L. Ward, 
Pittsburgh Association of Credit Men; Supreme Court Justice Wit< 
lis Van DevaDter, the Bolivian minister and family, George Alex- 
ander, mayor of Los Angeles; George T. Stockham, Hon. James Mc- 
Kinney, Hon. Daniel A. Driscoll, J. S. Runnells, Henry H. Bender, 
Mathilda Gerry, Hon. Edward Bruce Moore, Mrs. George R. Malby, 
A. Garrison McClintock, Hon. Charles W. Fairbanks, Royal Ar- 
canum of Oregon, Judge Peter B. McLennan, Hon, J, M. Levy, Hon. 
John Stewart, Hon. Nelson W. Aldrich, James M. Belden, Hon. 
George von L. Meyer, Secretary of the Navy; Hon. Charles Burke, 
Hon. E. F. Kinkead, F. H. Murphy, WilUam B. AusUn, for Hamil- 
ton Club, Chicago; Andrew J, Lester, for Chicago Club; Mme. 
Bakhm^tefT, wife of the ambassador of Russia; Miss Mary Schluter, 
Hiss Sally H. Culberson, 5. V. Wheien, Chief Justice White, for 
the justices of the United States Supreme Court; Chief Justice 
and Mrs. Edward D. White, Hon. Charles F. Scott, Hon. WiUiam 
Lorimer, the Chinese minister, Chang Yin Tang; Greek Charge 
d'Affaires Caftanzoglu, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Harty, Margaret M. 
Rager, Frank E. Wilson, the Peruvian minister, F. A. Peiet; Mr. 
and Mrs. Caldwell Sweet, WiUiam Busby, Carl Harrer, Hon. and 
Mrs. Julius Kahn, Hon. and Mrs. S. W. McGall, Irving C. Caster, 
M. J. Sherrill, Hon, Alton B. Parker, Hon. and Mrs. George S. 
Legare, Ida H. Crany, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ramsey, for the stu- 
dents and faculty of Fairmont Seminary, Washington, D. C; H. M. 
Baker, for the Chevy Chase Seminary, Washington, D. C.; the 
Turkish ambassador, Youssouf Zla Pacha; Mrs. WllUam E. Curtis, 
C. K. MacDougall, Stewart Lowery, Hon. I. W. Wood, Hon. and 
Mrs. W. W. Cocks, Anna Ray Root, Edith Patten Corbin, Hon. 
Thomas W. Bradley, and Arnold Shanklin, United States consul 
general. City of Mexico. 



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CONDOLENCES FROM FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS 



From HaJ. H. F. Jacob, first ossistaot political resident of Aden, 
Arabia, to the American consul at Aden, November 6, 1912: 

" I have tbe honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 
the 2d November, 1912, and to convey to you the expression of 
the political resident's deepest regret at the news of the sad death 
of His Excellency Jambs Schoolcbaft Shbbiun, the Vice Presi* 
dent of the United States." 

AIUIBNTINA 

From President Boque Saenz Pena, of Argentina, to President 
Taft: 

" Buenos Aibbs, October SI, 1913. — ^Pray accept. Excellency, 
the expressions of my condolence for the regrettable death of the 
eminent citizen Mr. James Sherman, Vice President of the Re- 
public" — (Cablegram, translation.) 

From Mr. Manuel E. MalbrAn, charge d'affaires of the Argentine 
Republic, Washington, to tbe Secretary of State, October 31, 
1912: 

" I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of this dajr'a 
communication by which the Secretary of State is pleased to an- 
nounce the sad intelligence of the death of the Hon, Jambs S. 
Shbrman, Vice President of the United States of America. 

" In offering to the department, in the name of my Government 
and In my own, the most heartfelt expressions of condolence on 
the mourning which means so great a loss to the Nation, I make it 
my duty to inform you that appropriate measures have been 
taken at the legation to keep the Argentine flag at half-mast on 
the building as long as the official mourning lasts." 

Department of State, November 1, 1912, memorandum: 
" The charg£ d'affaires of the Argentine Republic called to say 
he had received a telegram from his Government directing him to 
present the sincere condolences of Argentina on the death of the 
Vice President He will address a note to the department. Mr. 
Adee told the chargi d'affaires that a copy would be sent to Mrs. 
Sherman." 

From Mr. Manuel E. MalbrAn to the Secretary, of State, Novem- 
ber 1, 1912; 

"In compliance with express instructions from my Govern- 
ment, forwarded by cable to the legation, I have the honor to 

1117] 



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Mehorial Addresses; Vice President Sherman 



present to the GoTerament of the United States the expressions 
of the Argentine Government's condolence on the lamented death 
of the Vice President of the Nation, the Hon. Jambs S. Sherman. 

" The liigh attainments and great moral gifts of the Hon. Jambs 
S. Shkrman were well known and highly appreciated in the 
Argentine Republic and my Government desires to express to 
that of the United States the sincereness of the sentiments with 
which it joins in the mouminft of this Nation for the loss of one 
of its most notable personaUties. 

"In begging the Secretary of State Undly to convey to the 
Host ExceUent the President of the United SUtes the Argentine 
Government's expressions of condolence, to which I join my own, 
I have pleasure in renewing to the Secretary of Slate the assur- 
ance of my highest and most distinguished consideration." 

AUSTRU-HVNOABT 

From Baron Erich Zwiedinek von Sadenhorst, charge d'affaires 
of Austria-Hungary, Washington, to the Secretary of State, Novem- 
ber 2, 1912: 

" I have bad the honor to receive your excellency's communica- 
tion of October 31 last, relative to the death of Mr. Jambs School- 
craft Shehhan, Vice President of the United States. 

"I have received instructions from the Imperial and Royal 
Government to express its genuine sympathy to the Government 
of the United States on the occasion of this deplorable loss. 

" Taking the hherty of having recourse to your excellency's 
good offices in carrying out my instructions, I beg your excellency 
also to accept the expression of my own sincere sympathy." 

bbloium 

Department of State, November I, 1912, memorandum: 
"The Belgian minister called upon Mr. Adee to-day to say be 
had a telegram from bis Government directing him to express 
sincere condolence on the loss of the Vice President." 

From Mr. £. Havenlth, Belgian minister, Washington, to the 
Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

"With profound regret did I bear the sad intelligence of the 
death of the Hon, Jambs Schoolcraft Sherman, Vice President 
of the United SUIes. 

" I have the honor to beg you to accept my sincere condolence 
on the occasion of the death of that statesman in whose death the 
country suffered so trying a loss. 

" I have been instructed by my Government to convey to the 
Government of the United States the expression of its deep con- 
dolence." 



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CONDCa:£NCES FHOM FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS 



From Sefior Don I. Calderon, Botivian minister, Washington, to 
the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

" I have heard with true sorrow of the death of the Vice Presi- 
dent of the United States, the Hon. Jambs Schoolcraft Sherman, 
which took place at Utica on Octoher 30 last. 

" I heg your excellency to accept my Government's and my 
own heartfelt expression of sympathy in the loss of the dis- 
tinguished citizen who so credilahly discharged his high duties." 



From Mr. D. da Gama, Brazilian ambassador, Washington, to the 
Secretary of State, October 31, 1912: 

" In the name of my President I have the honor to apply to 
your excellency with a request that you be pleased to convey to 
the President of the RepubUc the expression of sincere condo- 
lence on the part of the Government and people of Braxil on the 
national mourning brought upon the United States of America by 
the lamented death of Vice President Shbrman. To these ex- 
pressions I heg leave to add my own personal regrets to your ex- 
cellency, to whom I have the honor to r<inew the assurances of 
my highest consideration. 

CHILE 

From President Ramon Barros Luco of Chile to President 
Tafl: 

" Santiago, November 2, 1912. — ^My Government and the Chilean 
people profoundly deplore the bereavement which afOlcts the 
great American Nation In the death of its illustrious Vice Presi- 
dent Sherman." — (Cablegram, translation.) 

Department of State, October 31, 1912, memorandum: 
** The Chilean minister called to-day upon Mr. Adee to express 
to bim his sincere regret at the death of the Vice President; and 
to express sorrow on behalf of the Chilean Govemment." 

From SeSor Don Edo. Suarez Hejia, Chilean minister, Washing- 
ton, D. C, to the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

" I have the honor to receive yonr excellency's obliging note of 
yesterday's date, intended to confirm to me the sorrowful news 
of the death at Utica, at 9.42 p. m. last evening, of the most ex- 
cellent Mr. Jambs Schoolcraft Sherman, Vice President of the 
United States. 

" In discharge of a painful duty, I offer to your excellency in 
the name of the Govemment of Chile the expression of its deep 
condolence on the talcing off of the illustrious citizen who, by 
popular verdict and with the respect of the whole country, held 
the high o£Bce of Vice President of the Republic 

[IM] 



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MeMOBUL AomBSSBs: Vice pRESuffiNT Sherman 



" For my part I wish to conflnn the senUtnents I bad the honor 
personally to express to your excellency yesterday most sincerely 
showing the sorrow which aOlicts the Government and people of 
the United States." 



From Mr, Chang Yin Tang, Cbioese minister, Washington, to 
the Secretary of State, November 1. 1912: 

"I have the honor tO acknowledge the receipt of your note 
of the 31st ultimo, announcing the death at Utica, N. Y., at 9.42 
o'clock p. m,, on Wednesday, October 30, 1912, of the Hon. Jaues 
ScHooixauT Sherman, Vice President of the United States. 

"I have cabled to roy Government this sad intelligence, and I 
beg to offer to the Government and people of the United States 
the heartfelt sympathy of the Government and people of China 
In the loss of a great statesman whose nobiUty of character won 
the love and respect of all," 

From Mr. Chang Yin Tang to the Secretary of State, November 
2, 1912: 

"I have the honor to inform you that I have Just received a 
cable message addressed to the President of the United States by 
the President of the Republic of China, of which the following is 
an English translation: 

" ' Mr. PHEsn>BKT: I learn with inexpressible grief of the death 
of the Vice President of the United States. The people of China 
Join with me in mourning for the distinguished statesman. I beg 
to extend to you my personal sympathy and the sympathy of the 
people of China. 

" ' Yuan Shi-Kai, 
" ' Pre$idenl of China.' 

" I have the honor to request that you will be so kind as to con- 
vey the above message to its high destination." 

COLOMBIA 

Fl-om Sefior Don JuUo Betancourl, minister of Colombia, Wash- 
ington, to the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 
. "I have received the very obli^ng communication by which 
you announced to me the lamented death of the Hon. James 
ScBOOLGRAPr Sherman, Vice President of the United States. 

"In the name of my Government and Jn my own 1 extend, 
through you, to the Government and people of the United States 
the expression of the most profound regret at the taking off of so 
distinguished a citizen. 

" As a sign of mourning for ttiis national loss, the flag of Colom- 
bia has been displayed at half-mast at the office of the legation." 

[taw 



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CotmOLENCBS FBOM FORBION GOVEBNHBNTS 



From Sefior Don Pedro M. Garre9o, minister for foreign affairs 
of Colombia, to the American charge d'affaires at Bogota, Novem- 
ber 4, 1912: 

" By your courteous note, F. 0. No. 42, of yesterday's date, this 
office has been informed to its sincere sorrow of the death of His 
Excellency James Sherman, Vice President of the United States, 
which occurred on October 30 last. The national flag wlU there- 
fore remain at half-mast until to-day." 

COSTA RICA 

Department of State, October 31, 1913, memorandum : 
" The minister of Costa Rica called upon Mr. Adee to-day to ex- 
press on behalf of tus Government and of himself, personally, 
sorrow for the death of Vice President Sherman. He will send 
an informal note to the department to this effect." 

From Senor Don Joaquin Bernardo Calvo, minister of Costa 
Rica, Washington, to the Secretary of State, October 31, 1912: 

" Referring to my visit of to-day, and interpreting the sentiments 
of my Government, I have the honor to confirm my expressions 
of deep sorrow for the lamentable death of the Hon. James S. 
Shbbman, Vice President of the United States, and, at the same 
time, I beg leave to request of you very kindly to transmit to Mrs. 
Sherman our heartfelt sentiments of condolence on her bereave- 
ment" 

From Sefior Don Joaquin Bernardo Calvo to the Secretary of 
State, November 1, 1912: 

" With profound sorrow I have been notified by your note of 
yesterday that the Hon. Jambs Schoolcraft Sherman died at 
Utica, N. Y., and that the funeral will talie place in that city 
to-morrow at 2 p. m. 

" On tlds sad occasion, I have received from my Government 
instructions to express in its name to the Washington Govern- 
ment the most sincere condolence on the lamented loss of a citi- 
len possessed of the high merits and conspicuous civic virtues by 
which the prominent functionary the Hon. Mr. Sherman was dis- 
tinguished when alive. 

" In so carrying out the wishes of my Government, I beg your 
leave, Mr. Secretary, to join to this manifestation of mourning 
my own ei^ression of like sentiments of sorrow." 



From Setior Lcdo. Antonio Hartin-Rivero, Cuban minister, 
Washington, D. C., to the Secretary of State, October 31, 1912: 

"In the name of the Government and people of Cuba, in my 
own, and in that of all the members of the legation, 1 have the 
honor to offer to you the assurances of my deep sympathy in the 

[121] 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice Presiiknt Sherman 



grief that is now weigfaiag upon the American Nation by reason 
of the death of the Hon. James S. Shbbman, Vice President of the 
United States." 

Department of State, November 1, 1912, memorandum: 
"The Cuban minister called to express deep sympathy on the 
part of Cuba at the death of the Vice President The minister 
will address a note to the department to this effect." 

From Senor R. Gutierrez Alcaide, charge d'affaires of Cuba at 
Panama, to the American chargi d'affaires, November 1, 1912: 

" With deep sorrow I have just acquainted myself by reading 
the cable messages published to-day in the newspapers of this 
capital of the sudden death of the Hon. Mr. Sherman, Vice Presi- 
dent of the United States of America, and in offering to you as 
the worthy representative of the noble American Nation the ex- 
pression of my most heartfelt sympathy for such unfortunate 
news, I wish to assure you that I join heartily in the feeling of 
sorrow which to^lay aiBicts the American people and their 
brothers of all America." 



From Mr. C. Brun, Danish minister, Washington, to the Secre- 
tary of State, October 31. 1912: 

" In the name of my Government which I have jbe honor to 
represent, and in my own, I beg to express to you, and through 
you to the Government of the United States, my most sincere and 
deep-felt sorrow and sympathy in the great loss which the Ameri- 
can Nation has suffered by the death yesterday of the Vice Presi- 
dent of the United States, James Schoolcraft Sherman." 

DOMINICAN RKFUBLIC 

From SeiJor Dr. Don Francisco J. Peynado, Dominican minister, 
Washington, to the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

" With the most profound sorrow have I received the sad news 
of the death of the Hon. James Schoolcraft Sherman, Vice 
President of the United States, wldch occurred at Utica, N. Y., 
on Wednesday, the 30th of October, 1912, at 9.42 p. m. 

" An illustrious citizen, eminent servant of his country, is thus 
removed from the scene, and in the presence of the irreparable 
loss, the Dominican people and Government join with the people 
and Government of the United States in sharing with them the 
fitting feelings of regret occasioned by his unlooked-for removaL" 

ECUADOR 

From President Plaza, of Ecuador, to President Taft: 
"Quito, Ecuador, November 5, i912, — The GovejTimeot and 
people of Ecuador lament the regrettable death of His Excellency 

[122] 



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Condolences fboh Fobeion Govebnhents 



Vice President Shbbhan, and share the grief of Yonr Excellency 
and of the American people. — (Cablegram, translation.) 

From Sefior Dr. Don S. S. Wither S., charg* d'affaires of Ecua- 
dor, Washington, to the Secretary of State, Octoher 31, 1912: 

"With profound sorrow my Government has learned of the 
death of the Vice President of the United States, Mr. Jaues S. 
Sherman, and I have been specially directed by cable to present 
to you, in behalf of the Government and people of Ecuador, the 
heartiest manifestation of condolence for the irreparable loss 
that the American Nation has suffered. 

" In complying with the wishes of my Government, I bave the 
honor to avail myself of this opportunity to express to you the 
sincere expression of my personal sympathy.** 

BSTPT 

From Y. Wahba, ministry for foreign ofTairs, Cairo, to the 
American consul general, November 3, 1912: 

" I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your telegram of 
yesterday's date informing me of the death of Mr. J. S. Shbruan, 
Vice President of the United States. 

" The Government of His Highness the Khedive, deeply feeling 
as it does the mourning of the American Nation, charges me to 
beg you to be toward the Government of the Republic the in- 
terpreter of its most profound regret and sincere sympathy.** 



From Mr. J. J. Jusserand, French ambassador, Washington, to 
the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

" 1 have received the letter by which your excellency did me 
the honor to impari to me the sad intelUgence of the death of the 
Hon. James Schoolcraft Sherman, Vice President of the United 
SUtes. 

" I am transmitting the information to my Government, which, 
your excellency may be assured, will take a sincere part in the 
mourning of the President of the United States and the American 
Nation. 

" I beg leave to extend to you, Mr. Secretary of State, the ex- 
pression of my personal condolence on so sad an event. I know 
it is for you the loss of a friend, and having had, for my part, 
many occasions to appreciate bis Iiigh gifts, I can not but fully 
realize the sorrow you must undergo." 

GERMANY 

Department of State, November 1, 1912, memorandum; 
"The Imperial German ambassador <^alled to express the con- 
dolence of bis <jovemment on the death of the Vice President, and 



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Meuorial Addresses: Vice President Sherman 



bis own personal sympathy at the loss of a warm friend. He will 
write a note to the department" 

From Count J. H. von Bernstorff, German ambassador. Washing- 
ton, to the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

"I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your ex- 
cellency's note of the 31st of October last by which yoa gave me 
notice of the highly to be lamented death of the Vice President of 
the United States. I beg leave to express to the Government of 
the United States my most sincere sympathy in this severe and 
distressing loss. I fdiall never forget the friendly relations that 
I maintained with the deceased. I expect to have an opportunity 
to-day to express orally to your excellency my most deeply felt 
condolence." 

OREAT BRITAIN 

From the Right Hon. James Bryce, British ambassador, Wash- 
ington, to the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

"I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your note of 
October 31 in which you convey to me the distressing news of 
the death of the Vice President of the United States. 

" I desire to convey to you an expression of the sincere regret 
and sympathy of my Government, and also of my personal soi^ 
row, at the loss suffered by the people of the United States. I 
have already personally conveyed my condolences to the Presi- 
dent" 

Department of State, November 4, 1912, memorandum: 
" The British ambassador called upon the Acting Secretary of 
State to-day to say that he was instructed to formally convey the 
deep condolences of his Government upon the death of the Vice 
President. The ambassador spoke feelingly of his personal regret 
and sympathy. He had knovm Mr. Sheruan well for many 
years, and regarded him as one of the ablest heads the Senate 
ever had. He said he had a keen appreciation of the loss the 
entire codntry would sustain without Mr. Sheruan's eminent 
services and kindly counsels. 

" Mr. Adee thanked the ambassador for his words, and spoke of 
Mr. Shbrmak as having been especially a lover of peace and be- 
loved of everyone." 



Department of State, November 4, 1912, memorandum: 
" Mr. Caftanzoglu, the charge d'affaires of Greece, called to-day 
upon the Acting Secretary of State, Mr. Adee, to say that he had 
received a cable from his Government directing him to express 
sincere condolence on the part of the Greek Government at the 
death of the Vice President, and also to extend the personal 
sympathy of the minister for foreign affairs on the lamentable 
death of this great public man." 

[124] 



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CONDOLEHCBS FROM FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS 



From President M. Estrada Cabrera, of Guatemala, to President 
Tafl: 

" GuATEHUA, November S, J9ii, — In the name of the i>eopIe 
and Government of Guatemala I basten to send to Your Excellency 
and tbe Govenunent over whlcb you preside the most sincere ex- 
pression of condolence on tbe death of the Vice President, Hr. 
Shbhiun." — (Cablegram, translation.) 

From Seflor Luis Toledo Herrarte, minister for foreign affairs 
of Guatemala, to the Secretary of SUte: 

" GuATBHAiA. — I beg your excellency to deign to convey to tbe 
Government end people of the United States tbe expression of 
heartfelt condolence of tbe Guatemalan people and Government 
on the occasion of tbe lamented demise of the Hon. Jambs S. 
Shekuan, Vice President of the United States." — (Cablegram, 
translation.) 

From Senor Luis Toledo Herrarte, ndnister of foreign affairs 
of Guatemala, to American charge d'affaires at Guatemala City, 
November 2, 1912: 

" By the esteemed note of your honor. No. 270, of even date, 
I have beard with great sorrow of the death of the Hon. Vice 
President Sherman, which took place on tbe 3(Hh of last October. 

"In the name of tbe Government of the Republic, I comply 
with the duty of expressing to your honor the most heartfelt con- 
dolence for the irreparable loss which the people and tbe Govern- 
ment of the United States have suffered by his death." 

From Seiior Don Joaquin Mendez, Guatemalan minister, Wasb- 
Ingtoq, to the Acting Secretary of State, October 31, 1912: 

*' I have tbe honor to acknowledge with the deepest sorrow 
your esteemed note of this date informing me of the sorrowful 
tidings of the death of tbe Hon. Jambs Schoolchaft Shsbman, 
Vice President of the United SUtes. 

" I wish to express to your excellency in the name of the Gov- 
ernment of Guatemala and tbe people of my country the deepest 
sympathy on tbe occasion of tbe sad death of the honorable Vice 
President of the United States. 

" The death of the honorable Vice President of tbe United 
States can not fail to bring sorrow into the hearts of all. But 
the memory of his noble deeds and heroic sacrifices will survive. 

" I beg you to accept, your excellency, my own deepest personal 
sympathy for the lamentable bereavement of the honorable Vice 
President" 

From Seiior Don Joaquin Mendes to the Secretary of Stat^ 
November 4, 1912: 

"Tbe profound sorrow and intense grief caused among the 
members of tbe Government and the people of Guatemala by the 

[120] 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice Preshknt Sbcbuan 



most lamented intelligence of the death of the Hon. Vice President 
Shebman have been reflected in two cablegrams that I have re- 
ceived, one from President M. Estrado Cabrera, the other from Min- 
ister Toledo Herrarte, both carrying the expression of the keen- 
est sympathy and most sincere regret to the Government and 
people of the United States of America and most particularly to 
His Excellency the President of the United States and the most 
excellent the Secretary of State. I therefore beg your excellency 
to deign to accept these expressions as a fresh evidence of the 
cordiality of our relations and of the community of interests 
which Guatemala always desires to maintain with her elder sister, 
the great American Republic. At the same time I shall thank your 
excellency if you will please to consider this note a continuation 
of that which I bad the honor to address to you on October 31 
last and accept the homage of my highest cont^deralioa and liigh 
esteem," 



From Mr. Solon Menos, Haitian minister, Washington, to the 
Secretary of State, November J, 1912: 

"In acknowledging the receipt of your letter announcing the 
death of the Hon. Jahes Schoolchapt Sherman, Vice President 
of the United States, 1 beg you to accept the sincere condolence 
I have it at heart to extend to you In the name of my Government 
and my own on the grievous loss your Government and country 
have sustained in the death of the illustrious decedenL" 

HONDURAS 

Department of State, October 31, 1912, memorandum: 
" The minister of Honduras called upon Mr. Adee to-day to*ex- 
press the regret of Iiis Government, and his persondl regret, at 
the loss of Vice President Sherman. He will also send an in- 
formal note to the department to this effect." 

From Dr. Albert MembreBo, minister of Honduras, Washington, 
to the Secretary of SUte, October 31, 1912: 

" Deep was my sorrow on hearing of the death of the Hon. 
Jambs Schoolcraft Sherman, Vice President of the Republic. 
The demise of that great statesman, whose life may be taken as a 
model for its eminent virtues. Is a loss to the American Nation 
and to the Latin countries which the deceased loved so well. I 
have apprized my Government of the sad event by cable; and 
faithfully voicing the sentiments of the Honduran people and 
yielding to my own, I heartily Join in the sorrow that is now bow- 
ing the American people on account of the death of one of their 
most illustrious sons." 



tl26] 



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Condolences from Foreign Governments 



From Dr. Albert Metnbreflo to tlie Secretary of State, November 
1, 1912: 

" I have had the honor to receive your excellency's obliging 
note of the 31st of October last by which you announce to me the 
death, at Utica, N. Y., at 9.42 p. m., od Wednesday, October 30, 
1912, of the Hon. James Schoolcraft Shbbman, Vice President 
of the United States, and that the funeral will take place in the 
9ame city of Ulica on Saturday, November 2, at 2 p, m. 

"The President of Honduras, to whom I cabled that very sad 
event, has just sent me a message directing me to express his 
most sincere condolence to the Host Excellent the President." 



From Mr. Giuseppe Catalan!, charge d'affaires, Italian Embassy, 
Washington, to the Secretary of SUte, November 3, 1912: 

" 1 have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the note, dated 
October 31 last, by which I am advised of the death of the Hon. 
James Scboou;baft Sherman, Vice President of the United States, 
which took place at Utica, N. Y., at 9.42 p. m. Wednesday, October 
30, 1912. 

" In expressing to your excellency my keen sympathy in the un- 
timely loss of that illustrious man, I have the honor to inform you 
that I have not failed to cable Uie mournful intelligence to my 
Government, which, I am sure, will share the sorrow and mourn- 
ing of the President and this great Nation. 

" 1 regret that, my official duties prevented my attending, as I 
most earnestly desired to do, the funeral which took place at 
Utica on the 2d instant." 



From Viscount Sutemi Chinda, Japanese ambassador, Washing- 
ton, to the Secretary of State, October 31, 1912: 

" I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your com- 
munication informing me of the death of the Hon. James School- 
craft Sherman, Vice President of the United States, and I beg to 
tender you expression of my profound sympathy and condolence 
at the painful loss befallen the Government and people of the 
United States. I have duly conveyed to my Government the sad 
intelligence communicated to me in your note under acknowledg- 
ment 

From Viscount Sutemi Chinda to the Secretary of State, Novem- 
ber 1, 1912: 

" Under telegraphic instructions just received from his Im- 
perial Majesty's Government, I have the honor to convey to you, 
and through you to your Government, the assurance of the most 
sincere sentiments of grief and sorrow with which my Govem- 



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Mehobial Addresses: Vice Pbesidbnt Sherman 



ment shares in the loss sustained by the American Government 
and people tlirough the deeply lamented death of the Hon. Jaubs 
Schoolcraft Sheruan, Vice President of the United States." 



From President Francisco I. Madero, of Mexico, to President 
Taft: 

" Hbxico Citt, Mrxico, October Si, f 9f 2.— 'Will Your Excellencjr 
please accept the sincere condolence of the Mexican people and 
Government, and my own, on the death of Vice President ShbB' 
icAN." — (Telegram, translation.) 

From the Hon. Pedro Lascurain, minister for foreign affairs 
of Mexico, to the Secretary of State, October 31, 1912: 

" Will your excellency be pleased to convey to your Govern- 
ment the Mexican Government's heartfelt condolence on the death 
of Vice President Sherman." — (Telegram, translation.) 

From Senor Don Arturo de la Cueva, the Mexican chargi 
d'affaires, Washington, to the Secretary of State, October 31, 
1912: 

" I have had the honor to receive your note of to>day by which 
your excellency informed me of the death of the Most Excellent 
Mr. Jambs Schoolcbaft Sherman, Vice President of the United 
SUtes of America, at Ulica, N. Y., on Wednesday, the 30th of 
October. 

" In expressing to your excellency the most sincere sentiments 
of condolence of the embassy's staff on the distressing loss sus- 
tained by the Government and people of the United States, I 
renew to you the assurances of my highest and most distinguished 
consideration." 

NBTHSRLANDS 

From Jonkheer J. Ix>udon, minister of The Netherlands, Wash- 
ington, to the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

" I have had the honor to receive your excellency's letter of 
yesterday's date, by which you apprise me of the sorrowful loss 
just sustained by Uie United States in the death of Mr. Jaues S. 
Sherman, Vicie President of the Republic. 

" Under the sad circumstances, I have the honor to have re- 
course to your excellency's habitual kindness and to ask that 
you may be pleased to acquaint the President of the United States 
with the share 1 take in this national mourning, and I beg leave 
also to offer to your excellency my most sincere condolences." 



From President Diaz, of Nicaragua, to President Taft: 
" Hanaoca, November i, 1912. — Nicaraguan Government and 
people Join in mourning of American Government and people 



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Condolences from Poreion Gov^inhents 



for death Hon. Vice President Sbermak." — (Telegram, trans- 
UUon.) 

" Managca, November S, 1912. — Deign to accept the condolence 
of Nicaragua and my own sentiments of sympathy In the Ameri- 
can national mourning for the grievous death of the Hon. Vice 
President Jamks Shbrman." — (Telegram, translation.) 

From Diego Manuel Chamorro, minister for foreign affairs of 
Nicaragua, to the Secretary of State : 

" Manaoqa, Nicabaqua, Nooember i, 1912. — Government deplores 
death Hon. Vice President Sherman, and for tliis grievous national 
loss offers its condolence to your excellency and your Govern- 
ment." 

From Mr. Salvador Gastrillo, minister of Nicaragua. Wastiing- 
toD, to the Secretory of State, November 1, 1912: 

" I acknowledge the receipt of your excellency's obliging and 
feeling note, dated yesterday, by which you deign to apprise me 
of the death at Utica, N. Y., on Wednesday, the 30th of October, 
at 9.42 p. m., of the Hon. James Schoolcraft Sherman, Vice 
President of the United States; and you add that the funeral will 
take place at Utica, to-morrow, Saturday, November 2, at 2 p. m. 

" I have reported to my Government the sad event which brings 
mourning to the American Nation that loses in the Vice President 
not only a very high functionary, who did it honor, but also one 
of its most illustrious public men, in whom it can take pride. 

" The Republic of Nicaragua and my Government join the 
American people and Government in lamenting his removal and 
take part in their mourning. 

" 1 t>eg your excellency to deign to convey, when convenient, to 
the Most Excellent the President the assurances of my Govern- 
ment's intense sympathy and my own, which I venture also to 
extend at this time of national grief." 

NORWAY 

Department of State, October 31, 1912, memorandum: 
" The minister of Norway called to inform Mr. Adee of his 
return to Washington and to express, on his own account and on 
behalf of his Government, great re^%t at the death of the Vice 
President." 

From Mr. H. H. Bryn, minister of Norway, Washington, to the 
Secretary of State, October 31, 1912: 

" 1 have the honor to express to the American Government my 
deepest sympathy on the occasion of the premature death of the 
Vice President of the United States, whose eminent qualities have 
won for him the love of his people. 

"1 also venture to ask your excellency to be good enough to 
convey to Mrs. Sherman my sincerest condolences." 



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Mehihual Addresses: Vice Pbesident Sheruam 



From Hr. H. H. Bryn to the Secretary of State, November I, 

1912: 

" 1 have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the Hon. Alvey 
A. Adee's note of the 31st ultimo announcing the death at Utica, 
N. Y., at 9.42 o'clock p. m., on Wednesday, October 30, 1912, of the 
Hon. Jaubs Schoolcbapt Shbbhan, Vice President of the United 
States. 

"According to instructions from my Government, I have the 
honor to express, throu^ your exceliency, to the Government of 
the United States the Norwegian Government's most sincere sym- 
pathy on the painful loss which the country has suffered by the 
deplorable decease of the Vice President." 

PANAMA 

From Belisario Porras, President of Panama, to President 
Taft: 

" Panama, November 1, 1912. — I send to Your Excellency and to 
the people of the United States sincere regrets in view of the 
death of the illustrious Mr. Sherman." — (Cablegram, translation.) 

From SeRor Ernesto T. Lefevre, minister for foreign affairs of 
Panama, to the Secretary of State : 

*' Panama, November 1, 191S. — In the name of the Government 
and people of Panama I express to the American Government and 
people profound sorrow over the death of Vice President 
Shbbman." — (Cablegram.) 

From Sefior E. T. Lefevre, minister for foreign affairs of Pan- 
ama, to the American charg£ d'affaires at Panama, November 2, 
1912: 

"Through your kind communication No. 265, of yesterday, I 
have been informed of the sad death of the honorable Vice Presi- 
dent of the United States of North America, wliich occorred on 
October 31 ultimo. 

" In the name of my Government and through your worthy con- 
duct I wish to express to that of the United Slates my deep sym- 
pathy oD this mournful incideuL 

"In view of this sad occurrence the proper authority has 
ordered that on this date the national colors be hoisted to the 
half-mast in all the public offices. 

" Renewing to you the assurances of my high esteem and dis- 
tinguished consideration, I subscribe myself your Idud and 
obedient servant." 

Department of State, October 31, 1912, memorandum: 
" The charge d'affaires of Panama called to-day upon Hr. Adee 
to express his deep regret at the death of the Vice President." 



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CONDM£NCES FROM FOREIGN GOVBRNHENTS 



From Sefior Dod Juan Brin, charge d'affaires of Panama, Wash- 
ington, to the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

" With the deepest sorrow I liave read the contents of your ex- 
cellency's obliging note of yesterday, by which you announce the 
much-lamented death of the Hon. James Schoolcrapt Shbeiman, 
Vice President of the United States, which occurred at Utica, 
N. Y., at 9.42 p. m. on Wednesday, the 30th of October last, and 
whose funeral will take place in Uie same city on Saturday, the 
2d instant, at 2 p. m. 

" In view of the singular civic virtues and bt^ personal gifts 
characteristic of the departed statesman and eminent public man, 
bis death is a world-wide, irreparable loss, which all nations must 
lament, and in the most fitting mourning that now overwhelms the 
Government and people of this great country, may I he permitted 
to extend to them, tlirou^ your excellency's worthy medium, the 
expressions of sincere sympathy of the Government and people of 
my country, to which I Join my own?" 

From Sefior Don Juan Brin to the Secretary of State, Novem- 
ber 4, 1912: 

" I have the honor to transcribe to your excellency the contents 
of the following cablegram I have just received from my Govern- 
ment, wldch reads literally as follows: 

" ' Communicate Department of State the following resolution 
passed this day by the Assembly: 

" ' " The National Assembly of Panama, voicing the sentiments 
of its constituents, sends to the Government and people of the 
United States of North America the most sincere expression of 
its condolence on the occasion of the premature death of Mr. 
Jambs S. Shbbuan, Vice President of that friendly Nation." ' " 



From Hr. Federlco Alfonso Peset, minister of Peru, Washing- 
ton, to the Secretary of State, November 12, 1912: 

"I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of yonr note, 
dated October 31, in which you announce the death, at Utica, 
N. v., on Wednesday, October 30, of the Hon. Jaues Schoolcraft 
Sherman, Vice President of the United States. 

" In reply I have the honor to tender my most sincere con- 
dolence on the occasion of a loss so great for the Government 
and people of the United States." 

PORTUQAL 

From President Hanoel D. Arriaga, of Portugal, to President 
Taft: 

" LisRON, November i, 19it. — Just now hearing the sad news of 
the death of the Vice President of the United States of America, 



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Memorial Addresses: Vice pREsmENT Sherman 



I present to Your Excellency and the friendly Nation the expres- 
sion of my most sincere condolence." — (Cablegram, translation.) 

From Viscount de Alte, minister of Portugal, Washington, to 
the Secretary of State, October 31, 1912: 

" I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note of 
this date announcing the death of the Hon, Jambs Schoolcraft 
Shebman, Vice President of the United States. 

" Painfully impressed by tliis sad event, 1 beg that you will, 
with your usual courtesy, allow me to convey, through you, to 
the President my heartfelt condolence. 

" 1 also wish to express to you, sir, and to the whole American 
Government my very great sorrow at the untimely death of 
Mr. Sherman. 

" I have been directed by the President and Government of Por- 
tugal to express to President Taft and to the American Govern- 
ment their deepest sympathy on the occasion of the great loss the 
country has sustained through the death of Vice President 
Sherman." 

RUSSIA 

Department of State, November 4, 1912, memorandum: 
" The Russian ambassador called upon the Acting Secretary of 
State to-day to say that he was instructed to formally convey the 
condolences of the Imperial Government upon the lamented 
death of the Vice President. The ambassador, Mr. Bakbmeteff, 
said that Russia bad followed Mr. Sherman's public career with 
interest and admiration and realized the great loss of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States in his death. 

" Mr. Adee said that this country and the world at large would 
mourn the loss of this man whose life had been a great example 
of kindliness, good fellowsliip, and always on the side of peace." 

SALVADOR 

From President Manuel E. Araujo, of Salvador, to President 
Taft: 

" San Salvador, Salvador, October 31, 1912. — My Government 
joins with sympathy in the mourning of the American Govern- 
ment for the death of Vice President Sherman." — (Cablegram, 
translation.) 

Department of State, October 31, 1912, memorandum: 

" The minister of Salvador called upon Mr. Adee to-day to 
express the regret of his Government and his personal sorrow at 
the death of Vice President Sherman. He will also write an 
informal note to the department to this effect" 

From SeBor E>OD Federico Mejia, minister of Salvador, Wash- 
ington, to the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

" With genuine grief I have read your excellency's valued com- 
munication, by which you inform me of the death of the Hon. 

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Condolences pbou Foreign Govebnhents 



J&HB8 ScBoOLCBAFT Shbruan, Vice President of the United States 
of America, and that the funeral will take place in tlie dty of 
UUca, N. y., to-morrow at 2 p. m. 

" The Salvadorean people profoundly regret the lad event, and 
I beg your excellency to deign to accept, in the name of my Gov- 
ernment and in my own, our most sincere condolences." 

From Seilor Don Federico Mejia to the Secretary of State, 
November 1, 1912: 

" I am in receipt of special instructions from the Most Excellent 
the President of Salvador, Dr. Manuel E. Araujo, directing me to 
express to the Most Excellent Mr. President Taft, through the 
most worthy medium of your excellency, his sentiments of regrets 
and profound sorrow for the lamented death of the Hon. Jiuies 
ScHOOLCBAPT SHERMAN, Vice President of the Republic, which 
has thrown the American people into mourning and deep con- 
sternation." 



From Nich. P. Pacfaitch, ndnistry of foreign affairs, political 
section, to the American consul at Belgrade, October 27, 1912: 

" 1 am in receipt of your letter informing me that Mr. Shbbhan, 
the Vice President of the United States, died on October 31, n. s. 

" I have the honor to beg you to kindly convey to the United 
States Government the deepest condolence of the Royal Servian 
Government." 

SIAH 

From the minister for foreign affairs, Devawongse, to the 
American charge d'alfaires at Bangkok, November 3, 1912: 

" 1 have received with sincerest regret your letter of November 
2 announcing the death of the Vice President of the United States 
of America, Mr. Jambs S. Sherman, which had taken place on 30th 
of October last. 

"I beg to ask that you will be so kind as to convey to the 
President of the United States of America the deep sympathy of 
the Siamese Government as well as that of my own." 

Department of State, November 1, 11)12, memorandwn: 

" Mr. Loftus, representing the Siamese minister, called to explain 
that the minister was en route to Europe and would not be able 
personally to write to the department to express condolence on 
the death of the Vice President for several weeks. In the mean- 
time, however, Mr. Loftus wished to unofficially transmit the deep 
sympathy of Uie Siamese Government." 

From Prince Traidos Prabandh, Siamese minister, Washington, 
to the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

" I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter 
of the 31st instant, in which you announce the death, at Utica, 

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Mehobui. Admiesses: Vice Pbesidbnt Sherman 



N. Y., on Wednesday, October 30 last, of the Hon. James School- 
craft Shkbman, Vice President of the United States. 

" In reply, permit me to assure you that His Majesty's Govem- 
ment will deeply regret to learn of the loss which has befaUen 
that of the United States in the passing of this great statesman, 
and to offer, on their behalf as well as on my own part, an expres- 
sion of sincere sympathy on this sad occasion." 

SPAIN 

From Seflor Don Juan Rlafio y Gayangos, Spanish minister, 
Washington, to the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

" I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your excellency's 
note of yesterday by which you impart to me the sad intelligence 
of the death at Utlca, N. Y., of the Hon. Jambs Schoolcraft Sher- 
man, Vice President of the United States, which occurred on the 
30tb instant st 9.42 p. m., and that the funeral service will be held 
at Utica on Saturday, the 2d of November, at 2 p. m. 

" In reply, I extend to your excellency my most heartfelt con- 
dolence and beg leave to say that I propose to go to Utica to attend 
the funeral." 



Department of State, October 31, 1912, memorandum: 

"The minister of Sweden called to-day to express his deep 

regret and that of his Government at the death of the Vice 

President" 

Prom Mr. W. A. F. Ekengren, minister of Sweden, Washington, 
to the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

" I have had the honor to receive your letter of yesterday with 
its sorrowful message of the death at Utica, N. Y., on Wednesday 
last, of the Hon. Jambs Schoolcraft Sherman, Vice President of 
the United States, and I hasten herewith to repeat the assurance 
of deep-felt sympathy, which I already have had the occasion to 
personally express to you, Hr. Secretary, on account of the great 
loss inflicted not only upon the family of the deceased Vice Presi- 
dent but also upon the whole country by the demise of a man 
so highly beloved as a husband, father, and friend, so highly 
esteemed as a statesman and legislator. 

" His memory shall live long amongst them who had the good 
fortune of his personal acquaintance." 

SWITZERLAND 

From Mr. Henri Martin, charge d'affaires of Switzerland, Wash- 
ington, to the Secretary of State, November 3, 1912: 

" I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your depart- 
ment's note of October 31 Informing me of the death of the Hon. 



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Condolences from Foreiqn Govbrnbcents 



Jambs Schoolc&aft Sherman. Vice President of the United 
States. 

"Deeply touched by the unexpected death of Mr. Sherman, I 
beg you to accept, in behalf of the Swiss Federal Council, the 
expression of my warm sympathy with the American Nation for 
the loss of this distingnished statesman." 



From Yonssouf Zia Pacha, Turkish ambassador, Washington, to 
the Secretary of SUte, November 1, 1912: 

" I have heard with great regret, by your excellency's note 
dated Oct(d>er 31 last, of the death of the Hon. James Schoolceupt 
Shbhman, Vice President of the United States of America. 

" I beg your excellency kindly to accept the expression of my 
keenest sympathy on this sorrowful occasion and to receive the 
Msurance of my very high consideration." 



From Dr. Carlos Maria de Pena, minister of Uruguay, Washing- 
ton, to the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

" With profound sorrow have 1 received your communication 
announcing the death of the Vice President of the United States 
and the holding of his obseqoies at Utica, November 2, at 2 p. m. 

"I beg your excellency to deign to accept and convey to the 
President the expressions of condolence with which I take part 
in the mourning of the Nation for the loss of the illustrious Vice 
President of the United States of America, Mr. Jambs Scbool- 
cnAFT Sherman. 

" In offering this deep sympathy I regret my inability to attend 
the funeral ceremony." 

VENEZUELA 

From the ministry of foreign affairs of Venezuela to American 
charge d'affaires at Caracas, November 7, 1912: 

" With great grief this office has learned, through your honor's 
courteous note No. 90, of yesterday, that His Excellency Mr. James 
Schoolcraft Sherman, Vice President of the United States of 
America, died October 30 last. 

" The Government of Venezuela sincerely sympathizes with the 
friendly nation in its pain over so great a loss and entreats your 
honor to convey to the Government you so worthily represent an 
expression of such sympathy." 

From SefSor Don P. Ezequiel Rojas, minister of Veneniela, 
Washington, to the Secretary of State, November 1, 1912: 

" I have had the honor to receive your obliging letter of yester- 
day announcing the mucb-lamented death of the Most Excellent 

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Memorial Addresses: Vice PRESnffiNT Sherman 



Hr. iiMES Schoolcraft Shehuan, worthy Vice President of the 
United States, and informing me that the foneral service will be 
held to-morrow in the city of Utica. 

" I deeply deplore the sad event and in the name of my Govern- 
ment tender to the Government of the United States of America, 
through the Department of State, the most sincere and heartfelt 
condolence." 

WEST INDIES 

From the American consul at Bridgetown, Barbados, West 
Indies, to the Secretary of State, November 4, 1912: 

" Oo receipt of the telegram on Friday evening (announcing the 
death of Vice President Shbrman) I inunediately called up the 
acting governor of Barbados by telephone and the flags were at 
half-mast on all Government buildings on Saturday, Uie day of 
the funeral, as well as at the various foreign consulates, and the 
acting governor, Maj. J. A. Burdon, called at the consulate to ex- 
press his sympathy." 

From Wi. Robert Johnstone, colonial secretary, Kingston, Ja- 
maica, to the American vice consul at Kingston, November 2, 1912: 

" I am directed by the governor to acknowledge the receipt of 
yoor letter of the 1st instant reporting the death of the Hon. 
Jambs S. Sherman, Vice President of the United Stales of Amer- 
ica. I am to ask you to be so good as to convey to Mr. Bergholz an 
expression of his excellency's regret on behalf of this Government 
at the intelligence. 

"The information as to the death of the Vice President has 
been immediately communicated by telephone and letter to the 
deputy assistant adjutant and quartermaster general, for the infor- 
mation of the general officer commanding, and the flags at King's 
House and Headquarter House will be flown at half-mast to-day 
as a mark of respect to the deceased." 

From the governor of Martinique to the vice consul of the 
United States at Fort de France, Martinique, November 1, 1912: 

"Deeply grieved by the news of the death of Mr. Sherman, 
Vice President of the Republic of the United States of America, 
which you have just communicated to me, I wish to express the 
large share which Martinique takes in the loss of the American 
Nation and Government of the Republic of the United Stales. 

" 1 beg you to be kind enough to transmit to the American 
Nation and Government of the Republic the expression of the 
sentiments of painful sympathy of the colony and of my sincere 
condolences." 



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