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Folio 

KPFK 90.7fmPacifica RadioLos Angeles 



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I 



January 1983 



THE ROYAL THEATRE 

11523 Santa Monica Blvd. 



SAT.&SUN.II:OOA.M. 



PUEASE POST 



West Los Anqeles. CA 9002? 

'■ > FOR INFORMATION CALL 4/8-1041 

PHYLLIS DE PICCiOTTO IN ASSOCIATION WfTH LAEMMLE THEATRES PRESENTS Honday-Friday , 9 A.M. - 5 P.M. |983 1 



liakes^peare jfilm jfesitibal 



STUDENT SHOWS* 

Rn.SERVATION.S NECE.SSARY 
(SEE INSTRUCTIONS BEtOW) 



ROYAL THEATER, 1 1523 Santi Monica Blvd. 
Wt« Lo« Ancdes (90025) ♦TZ-SSU 

STUDENT SHOWS ON FRIDAY AT 10:00 A.M. 
RESERVATIONS NECESSARY (u.se for™ below) 



ESQUIRE THEATER. 2670 E. Colocado Bird. | 
PasadnU (91107) 6(4-1774: 

sTooarr shovs qn honday at ]0:oo a.m. 

RESERVATIONS NECESSARY (use forn below) | 
NO SXr. i SMI. SHOWS Af THE ESQUIRE. 




The versatile Olivier displaved his 

talent for direction in this stlrrir 
slon of Shakespeare's historical 
ma and starred in his own film as 

the heroic klnf. We are hurled into 
he Intrigue and adventure of Kinn 

Hal as he fichts for his klnv.dor.. 



•STUDENT SHOWS-RESEBVATIONS NECESSARY 
NO STUDENT SHOW AT ROYAL THEATRE 
EStJUIRE THEATRE-M0N.JAW.I7 10:00 ■■■ 



HAMLET 



"ONE OF THE YEAR'S] 
10 BEST! 




lutionary productioi 
let" with a new and ' 
pretation of the t;t4< 



ESQUIRE THEATRE! 



A,....V 
n of ■Ham- ^ 



3 CFTHELLO 



4 AMIDf^MMFH 



p production is that of a major 
llywood studio, the underlying 
terpretation was Shakespeare's 
mantle fantasv. the nominal sub- 
ct was ancient Athenian legend. 
-ACADEMY AWARD WINNER- 



NON.FEB.T 10:00 I 



"Lear" Is a difficult work to trans 
late to the screen — it Is full of 

hidden motives and irrationality 
that challenge both actors and dir- 
ector. Scoficld gives full range to 
Lear's raging moods .md tragic life 
while Irene Worth as Gonerll docs 
ivisticp to the difficult part. 

•STUDENT SHONS- RESERVATIONS NECESSABT 



A nim (hut won five Acitdcnu Aw.irds iind hon< 
iTound Ihc vtorld. Ohvicr's Htimtfl rcm.iins (he 
dcriniuvc screen vcrM.m (il lh:il inuni.n.il Sh:ikc 
.in pLiv As dirtcliit .md Ic.idinp pi, net. Oliv 
heheiphl ..t his l.dcnl in Ihis work, he iii.in.i| 
inp ihc tl.issK dr.ini.i l.i li(c i»illiiuil prclctl 
ni.ikmg II .Ktesvihle lo ihe pcncr.il .ludicnc 
■ rem.iinine t.nlhful to Shjkcspcjrcv purp*isi 



11 fids 






1 filn 



•STUDEIfT SHOWS - 
ROYAL THEATRE-FRI.FEB.18 10:00 a.b. 
NO STtTDEKT SHOW AT ESQUIRE THEATRE 



7 MACBETH 



Th 



idelv 






imcd stage 
f "Othello" in our 
time was the presentation hv the 
National Theatre of Great Britia 
with Laurence Olivier starred in 
the title rtilc. The result is a 
film of eloquence and exciting 



STUDENT SHONS I 



VISUALLY STUNNING! 



Director 

Roman Polanski 
outdoer^ hlmseK rn 
telling (he classic 
story o( murcJef . 
ginlt and revenge'* 



8 ROMEO ANDJUUET 



'Zef tire! I i 's 'Romeo ond Jul 
wonderful, living, cxcitinri love 
story. . .Because thcjc kids am 
authentic teenaqer*-, just as f-haki 
peare had envisioned them, tticy 
take on avitality and poiria 
that no middle-aqe actor could 
project , . . r.oi.i'.tiow I think Shak' 
peare would havo prcferrnd it 



.*ny. 



•STUDtlTT SHOVS-XESeilVATIONS OTCESSASY 
aOYAL TH£ATU-ntl.lUll.4 10:00 a. a. 
ESgOTU THEATItE-ICIH.NAll.T 16:00 a. a. 



9 mills CXtSAH 



This play remains a difinitive pol 
Itlcat and psvchological study, a 

tomorrow's headlines. T 
captures the grandeur of the tl 
and the power and pomp that 



•Snraorr SHOVS-HESEItVATIOIIS wcessary 
■OYAL THEATKE-m.MAIl.tl 10:00 «.■. 
ESgOin THtATItB-ICM.m».14 10.-0» ■■■ 



»o (v^acbcth 



Orson Welles' "Macbeth 
unfornettable study in 
Made on a legendary I 
this ti Im was shot in 
at Kepubl ic Studio us i 
Western sets that Wei I 
cessfully catTou'Iaqed 
shadows. 



•STODElfT SBWfS-ttSERVATIOIIS 
ROYAL THEATRE-F»I.NAR.II H 
ESQUIRE THEATRE.M0N.MAR.21 Ij 



i^snAffi^ffir 



Lau 



ith 



BEST 

PICTURE 

OF THE 

YEAR! 



•STODENT ?W)«S RESERVATIONS 
ROYAL 
ESQUIRE 




re equalled; amongst them 
^ fellow knights: Sir John 
zud. Ralph Richardson and 
ic llardwickc. "Richard ill 

further vindication of 
ier's view that Shnkes- 



ERVATIONS MF.CESSABY 
J ESQlllBE THEATHE 



i^hatopeart jfilm jfcsJtibal 



Adrpis.sioo: $4.oo 



Discouot ticHets 
a adriTissioo^: $12.00. 



Order portp. 

ALL PROGRA.MS 
SUOJECT TO CHANCE 



TO ORDRR TICKFTS BY HAIL: SfNO YOUR RrHITTANCr TO 
LAFM"Lf; THfATRrS, H")?; SANTA MONICA BLVO. LOS 
ANGELES CA 10075. irjCLUDE 75<! OR A STAMPro SfLF- 

ADORFSSEo rnvriopr. 




OTHELLO Roni«)&.luliet 



PLEASE NOTE: SINGLE AND DISCOUNT 
TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE 
ROYAL THEATRE AT SHOW TIME. 



FOR INFORMATION TALL 478-1041 (Mon-Fr 



issions for $12) 
Tickets($4 eachl 



I 

i 

I where 
j NAME_ 
j ADDR£ 

j 

i 
i 



10 : Ot)_ A.M. Sllllll NT Slums 

iKI.Il M . 01 



KLSI.RVATiriNS ki illl 
TEACHERS :When ordering ticlcets for the 
10 a.m. show, please indicate date and 
theatre, name of your school and phone 



ached. 
SCHOOL 



CITY/ZIP_ 

THEATRE 

NO. OF TICKETS. 
(Use anothe 
for addlti 



_DATE_ 
AMT, 



Folio 



KPFK 90.7-fin 



ulation: Ahna Armour 
setta. Dir. Bookkeeper 



Burtord, 
nk Drue 



KPFK STAFF 

General Manager, acting Program Director:Jim Berland Of- 
fice Manager/Volunteer Coordinator: Akinyele Umoja. De- 
velopment Director: Miva Iwataki. Operations Director: 
Sherrv Novick. Music: Kwaku Lynn, Co-Director, Andrea 
■Enthal, Co Director, News and Public Affairs: Marc Cooper, 
Director, Tony Cavin, Cynthia Hamilton, Roberto Naduris, 
Fernando Velazquez, Exec. Prod. Traffic: Roy Turkman. 
Production: Sylvester Rivers, Manager, Lezlie Lee, Margaret 
Fowler, Raffaello Mazza. Chief Engineer: Don Wilson. Maint. 
Eng.; Bob Reite. Friends Co-ord.: Suzi Weissman. Folio: 
Susan Tewes, Sheri Weinberg. 
Dir. Community Events: Mane 
Jenny Hubbard. 

KPFK LOCAL ADVISORY BOARD 
Ruth Abraham, George Anton, Bill Bidn 
Dwight Chuman, Carol Corrigan, Maggie C 
ker. Ruth Galanter, Masamon Kojima, K. Lyie Kurisaki, 
Juanita Henderson-Kurisaki, Dr. Sergio Fuenzalida, Beverly 
Polokoff, Mel Reich. Luis J. Rodriguez, Ronald M. Sohigan, 
Larry Steinberg, Peter E. Sutheim, Delfino Varela, Maury 
Weiner. 

Station Board Meetings: 

Next Full Board Meeting: See Report to the Listener page. 
PACIFICA FOUNDATION: 5316 Venice Blvd.. Los Angeles 
90019. 213/931 -1625. KPFK: 213/877-2711. 
Pacifica Foundation National Board of Directors: 
Hon. Chair; R. Gordon Agnew; Chair: Jack O'Dell; 1st VP 
Marie Nahikian; VP's: Jeanne Palmquist, Rosemarie Reed. 
Sharon Maeda, Jim Berland, David Salnikei: Treas.: Dan 
Scharlin. Sec: Deltino Varela. Board Members: KPFA-Peter 
Franck, Ying Lee Kelley, KPFK-Julius Mel Reich, Delfino 
Varela; WBAI -Dick Asche. Marilyn Clement, David Lampel, 
Milton Zisman; KPFT-Jorge Belgrave, Joan Glantz, Margaret 
Glaser, Steve Glaser; WPFW-Ron Clark. Gabrielle Edgcomb, 
Marie Nahikian: At Large: Jack O'Dell, Dan Scharlin, Alex 
Vavoulis. 

PACIFICA NETWORK SISTER STATIONS: 
KPFA: 2207 Shattuck Ave. Berkeley, CA. 94704, 

415/848-6767 
KPFT: 419 Lovett 6lvd. Houston, TX. 77006. 

713/526-4000 
WBAI: 505 Eighth Ave, New York, NY 10018. 

212/279-0707 
WPFW: 700 H St.. NW, Washington DC. 20001. 

202/783-3100 

JANUARY 1983 NUMBER 1 VOLUME 25 

The FOLIO (ISSN 0274-4856) is the monthly publication of 
KPFK, 90.7 FM. with offices and studios at 3729 Cahuenga 
Blvd. West. North Hollywood CA 91604, Second Class Post 
age paid at Studio City CA and additional mailing offices, 
POSTMASTER: send address changes to P.O.Box 8639. 
Universal City. CA 91608, The Folio is not sold, it is sent 
free to each subscriber supporting non. profit, non commer. 
cial KPFK. and contains the most accurate possible listings 
of the programs broadcast. Subscriptions to KPFK are S30 
per year, and are transferrable to the other Pacifica stat 
Our Transmitter is on Mt. Wilson. We broadcast in stereo 
multiplex with 25 microsecond pre emphasis. Dolby calibra 
tion tones air daily before the principal evening music pro 
gram. KPFK is owned and operated by Pacifica Foundatio 
a non-profit institution. KPFK is a member of the Assoc 
tion of California Public Radio Stations and the Nation 
Federation of Community Broadcasters. 

Cover: Photograph by Ken Heyman, from the 
book, "The Color of Man. " 



Roberto Naduris is the producer oi Noticlero Pacifica and the coordinator 
for all of KPFK's Thursday night Spanish language programming. At KPFK 
almost a year and a half, Roberto comes to his present job qualified not only 
as a reporter but as an expert in Latin American politics. A professor of eco- 
nomic history at the University of Chile in Santiago until the U.S. -backed 
coup in 1973 toppled the elected government of Salvador Allende and 
brought military dictator Augusto Pinochet to power, Naduris was forced — 
along with an estimated one million other Chileans— to flee the country for 
his life. He went to Argentina where he worked in a social science institute 
there until the political climate once again forced him to seek refuge. From 
Argentina Roberto went to Glasgow Scotland. There, at the University of 
Glasgow's Institute for Latin American Studies, he became a doctoral candi- 
date and pursued his studies until, with his wife and the first of his two chil- 
dren, he moved to Southern California. 

Upon Roberto's arrival at KPFK Noticiero Pacifica was born. The Noticie- 
ro , a weekly Spanish language newscast heard every Thursday at 6:45 pm, 
was the first of KPFK's Spanish language programs. It is co-produced every 
week by Roberto, along with News Engineer Fernando Velazquez, and is dis- 
tributed to public radio stations across the country from Pacifica's WBAI in 
New York to a station in Alaska. "We have a serious responsibility," says Ro- 
berto in discussing the Noticiero, "many of our listeners here in Los Angeles, 
as well as in other cities, are Central American refugees, and we are virtually 
the only reliable information about their home countries available in Spanish 
in the United States." While the Noticiero has its focus on Latin America as 
well as the Latino community in the U.S., Roberto is the first to note that 
the program is by no means limited to Latin American news. "The ongoing 
fighting in Central America," he says, "is a major story virtually every week 
on any newscast. Now with growing evidence that the administration is 
pushing for a more direct role in the fighting, and with growing evidence that 
the war is being regionalized to include all of Central America, it is especially 
important for us to keep an eye on the latest developments." 

Roberto's contribution to KPFK is by no means limited to Spanish 
language programming. He is a virtual walking, or more often sitting, resource 
in the KPFK News Department, and much of the Latin American coverage on 
Ttie Evening News has the benefit of Roberto's insight, knowledge and under- 
standing. He manages to keep current on political developments in all of La- 
tin America, and off the top of his head has no trouble providing other mem- 
bers of the News Department with background information on virtually every 
aspect of Latin American politics. 

Roberto says that he is especially distressed at the right wing bias of much 
of the Spanish language news available on the commercial media. "People 
who don't speak English are forced to rely on what are simply Spanish trans- 
lations of English language news," Roberto says, "and often those who do the 
translating slant the news somewhat further to the right than it was in the ori- 
ginal English. Ironically the end result is that a reporter who speaks no Span- 
ish goes to Latin America, sends a story to New York in English, where it is 
translated into Spanish and then sent across the country and around the 
world by the North American wire services. In producing the Noticiero we are 
trying to provide poeple with an alternative. If you haven't heard the alterna- 
tive yet be sure to tune in on Thursdays after The Evening News, and if you 
don't speak Spanish, KPFK's Spanish language programming is certainly rea- 
son to learn." 

January FOLIO PAGE 3 





\The First Biennial Con fen 

On the Fate of the Earth 



EVOLUTION WAS SLOW TO PRODUCE US, 
but our extinction will be swift; it will literally be 
over before we know it. We have to match swiftness 
with swiftness. Because everything we do and every- 
thing we are is in jeopardy, and because the peril is 
immediate and unremitting, every person is the right 
person to act, and every moment is the right moment 
to begin, starting with the present moment. For no- 
thing underscores our common humanity as strongly 
as the peril of extinction does; in fact, on a practical 
and political plane it establishes that common human- 
ity. The purpose of action, though, is not to replace 
life with politics. The point is not to turn life into a 
scene of protest; life is the point. 

—Jonathan Schell 
The Fate of the Earth 



By unequivocal popular demand we will once again broadcast highlights from this impelling conference which was origi- 
nally (and exclusively) covered on KPFK last November. The programs air on Sunday, January 16 & Tuesday, January 18. 



As part of KPFK's special week 
of fundraising this month, Sunday 
January 16 and Tuesday January 
18 will include thoughtful and mo- 
ving speeches by Ron Dellums, 
George Wald, Jennifer Leaning, and 
many other charismatic activists de- 
dicated to peace, disarmament and 
the environment. Material previous- 
ly unaired (Fate of the Earth Con- 



ference, October 19-21) will be 
heard along with updates from re- 
cent world developments. 

The Fate of the Earth was re- 
markable in that it brought toge- 
ther speakers from many areas: an- 
ti-nuclear, environmental, medical, 
native American, military, policy, 
and others which encouraged un- 
precedented cross-pollination and 



forward movement of ideas and in- 
spiration. 

The two days of programming 
have been labeled Pacificathon be- 
cause they will address the most es- 
sential issues of war, peace and sur- 
vival, from which Pacifica derives 
its name. 

Produced by Raffaello Mazza 
and Dr. Bob Rufsvold. 



January FOLIO PAGE 4 



M X Protest Hans Eisler 



Folkscene 
Special 



What is pointing at Kwajalein? \ 
The first test flight of the MX mis- 
sile is scheduled to be launched 
from the Vandenberg Air Force 
Base (near Lompoc, 45 miles north 
of Santa Barbara) to the Kwajalein 
Atoll in the South Pacific within 
the next six weeks (exact date is 
"classified"). Over 8,000 Marshal- 
lese Islanders have been displaced 
by the U.S. government and re- 
moved to the Tiny Island of Ebeye 
where overcrowded and unsanitary 
conditions more dense than New 
York City exist. 

On Sunday, January 23, a legal 
rally will take place in Lompoc 
at Ryan Park at noon (rain or 
shine) to call for a nuclear-free Pa- 
cific and to protest the production, 
testing and deployment of the MX 
missile and other destabilizing first- 
strike nuclear weapons systems. 

Nuclear-free Pacifica Radio 
KPFK will provide live coverage. 



Music 
Changes 

Music change: Music in Black, nor- 
mally heard on Wednesdays at 1:30 
p.m. will now be aired on Tuesday 
mornings, 6:00 to 7:00 a.m. (dur- 
ing the Sunrise Concert spot). Bill 
Davila's Noon Concert will now be 
extended Wednesdays, from noon 
to 2:00 p.m. Enjoy these two clas- 
sical programs as KPFK continues 
to strive to improve its music pro- 
gramming variety. 



Hanns Eisler (1898-1962) is one 
of the most remarkable composers 
of the 20th century, yet he is prac- 
tically unknown in this country to- 
day. He began a traditional music 
career as one of the most celebra- 
ted students of Arnold Schoen- 
berg, but he rejected that world in 
order to write music for the Marxist 
Worker's Movement. 

In the early 1930's, Eisler was 
one of the best-known composers 
in Europe, both for his traditional 
classical music and for his revolu- 
tionary political music, much of it 
written in collaboration with his 
life-long friend, Bertolt Brecht. 

In 1938 Eisler settled in New 
York City, where he spent four 
years as a teacher and composer 
for stage and documentary films. 
During this period he also wrote a 
landmark study on composing for 
films. He lived the next six years 
in Hollywood, where he composed 
scores to eight feature films, one of 
which received an Oscar, 

In 1947 he was the first of many 
artists to testify before the House 
Committee on Un-American Activi- 
ties. The following year he was de- 
ported, accused of being "the Karl 
Marx of Communism in the music 
field." He spent his last years in 
East Germany as one of the foun- 
ding fathers of that country's cul- 
tural life. 

On Monday January 17, KPFK 
presents a special on Hanns Eisler, 
from 9:30 am to 2:00 pm. This is 
the first program on American ra- 
dio to examine Eisler's life and mu- 
sic in depth. It features recordings 
unavailable in this country and in- 
terviews with people who knew 
Eisler. Produced by Ted Cohen 
with Mordecai Bauman, the pro- 
gram is hosted by Jeannie Pool 
and Mario Casetta, with fundraising 
in and around. Don't miss it! 



Starting on Tuesday January 4 
at 9:30 am (to 11:30 am). Folk- 
scene will present eight two-hour 
programs focusing on the collective 
works of Ewan MacColl and Peggy 
Seeger. This series of programs will 
also include the "eight radio bal- 
lads" the MacColls produced for 
the BBC. Roz and Howard Larman 
will host. 

Ewan MacColl was born in Scot- 
land in 1915, but spent the bulk of 
his childhood in Salford, Lancashire 
England. After leaving school at the 
age of 14, he worked at a variety of 
jobs. In 1950, Ewan turned his at- 
tention to traditional music and 
played a key role in initiating and 
extending what is now called "the 
folksong revival" in Britain. He was 
among the first to recognize the im- 
portance of the folk club as the ba- 
sic unit in this revival, a unit with- 
out which the revival might never 
have survived. By 1956, Ewan was 
acknowledged as one of the leading 
singers and major theorists of the 
revival. 

Peggy Seeger was born in 1935 
in New York City. Her parents were 
both professional musicians. She 
came in contact with folk music in 
the mid-1 940's through her parent's 
work with the Works Progress Ad- 
ministration, with Alan and John 
Lomax, and through their work at 
the Library of Congress. It was be- 
cause of listening to recordings of 
field singers and instrumentalists 
from all over the U.S., that Peggy 
absorbed the folk idiom and devel- 
oped her singing and playing tech- 
niques while growing up in a suburb 
of Washington, D.C. 

Through her friendship with 
Alan Lomax she was brought to 
England in 1956 to take part in a 
Granada television film. Dark of the 
Moon, and through Lomax she met 
Ewan MacColl. For a year they 
worked together on various TV and 
radio programs and began to sin^ 
to-jether as a team. 

January FOLIO PAGE 5 



l\S i.,i/hrii. \iilnir Sulliiun jiij RiihdiJ D'0\ l\ C,iiiclumil\ jltn 




1 Saturday 



9:00 Gilbert & Sullivan Special. 

Trial by Jury: performed by solo- 
ists, chorus and orchestra of the 
D'Oyly Carte Opera Company. 
Fred Hyatt produced. (Note: all 
programs during this special are 
performed by soloists, chorus 
and orchestra of the D'Oyly Carte 
Opera Company). 
10:00 The Sorcerer. 
12:00 Patience. 
2:30 lolanthe. 
4:30 The Mikado. 
6:30 The Yeomen of the Guard. 
8:30 The Gondoliers. 
10:30 The Grand Duke. 

All times approximate 

^:00 12 O'clock Rock. Sessions: 

A re-broadcast of Live From Studio 

Zzzz segments. Andrea 'Enthal 

hosts. 



2 Sunday 



f^OO Gospel Caravan. Prince Dixon 
hosts. 

9:00 National Security. 
11:00 Dorothy Ray Healey. Com- 
mentary. 

^2:00 Many Worlds of Music. Mar- 



io Casetta hosts. 
j,*^00 The Sunday Opera. M 30 

p.m.: Tenor of the Times— Fred Hy- 
att casts a (not very distant) look 
backward to tenor highlights of 
1982. 1:30-5 p.m.: HerberV.Naugh- 
ty Marietta with Judith Blazer, Les- 
lie Harrington and the Milennium 
Chamber Orchestra and Choir, con- 
ducted by James R. Morris (Smith- 
sonian Collection N-026). Fred 
Hyatt hosts. 

5:00 East Wind. East Wind wel- 
comes the Year of the Boar, an ani- 
mal known as a strong and fierce 
fighter. 1983 will be a year requir- 
ing strength and endurance, espe- 
cially for the Japanese and Ameri- 
can Indians who continue to strug- 
gle for redress/reparations after 
being forcibly relocated from their 
lands and homes by the United 
States government. A discussion of 
these issues will take place between 
John Howell and Larry Sellers of 
Indians United and Miya Iwataki 
and Bert Nakano of the National 
Coalition foj; Redress/Reparations. 
6:00 The Sunday Evening News. 
6:30 The Science Connection. 
Steve and Vera Kilston host this 
program of the latest science news 
and views. 
1^:00 Preachin' the Blues. Mary Al- 
din hosts. 
8:30 Lesbian Sisters. 



1^^.30 Folkscene. A program of tra- 
ditional and contemporary folk mu- 
sic, featuring live music, interviews 
with the performers, and the finest 
in recorded folk music. Tentatively 
scheduled guests for this evening: 
Mary McCaslin and Jim Ringer. Roz 
and Howard Larman host. 

^H2:00 Smoke Rings. Six hours of 
jazz with John Breckow. 



3 Monday 



^^00 Sunrise Concert. Lorin 

Sklamberg presents vocal music. 
7:00 Morning Magazine. News: the 
latest local, national and interna- 
tional events; 7:15, Commentary 
with Phyllis Bennis; 7:30, News 
Check-In: interviews, phone calls, 
features, etc.; 8:30, Newscast: an 
extended round-up of the late- 
breaking news from around the 
world; 9:00, Read All About It. 

►^'S^SO Folkdance with Mario!! 
11:30 Morning Reading. 

l^'ff-OO Noon Concert. Music of the 
Americas, with Jeannie Pool. 
2:00 The Afternoon Air. Alan 
Watts: "Pursuit of Pleasure" part 4, 
concluding (from MEA, Box 303, 
Sausalito, Ca. 94965); 3:00, News 
headlines; 3:30, Organic Gardening 



January FOLIO PAGE 6 



with Will Kinney and Barbara 
Spark; 4:00, open time; 4:30, Con- 
sider the Alternatives; 5:00, Body 
Politics with Gary Richwald; 5:55, 
Calendar. 

6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 Commentary. Charles Morgan 
7:00 Labor Scene. Sam Kushner 
hosts. 

1*^30 Chapel, Court & Countryiide. 

Joseph Spencer hosts this program 
of early classical music. 
y^QQ Johnny Otis: Blue Monday 
Edition. Traditional Rhythm & 
Blues, Jazz, Gospel with lively dis- 
cussions, live performances. 

11:00 American Mercury. Mike 
Model hosts this program with 
guests, news, interviews and fea- 
tures about the broadcast medium. 

11:30 The Late Night News. 
12:00 Something's Happening! 

Alan Watts: "Religion and Sexuali- 
ty" part 1 of 3. Krishnamurti. Open 
■til 6. 



4 Tuesday 



•6.00 Sunrise Concert. The Pacifica 
Bird presents: an assortment of in- 
teresting programs from the past. 
7:00 Morning Magazine. News: the 
latest local, national and interna 
tional events; 7:15, Commentary 
with Charles Morgan; 7:30, News 
Check-In: interviews, phone calls, 
features, etc.; 8:30, Newscast: an 
extended round-up of the late- 
breaking news from around the 
world; 9:00, Read All About It. 

^9:30 Folkscene. Folkscene pre 
sents the first of an eight-part pro- 
gram on the "World of Ewan Mac- 
Coll and Peggy Seeger." Included 
in the program will be the radio 
ballad, "The Ballad of John Axon." 
Roz and Howard Larman host. 
11:30 Morning Reading. 

^^2:00 Noon Concert. Leonid 
Hambro at the keyboard. 
2:00 The Afternoon Air. Jackie 
Apple's Audio Networks; 3:00, 



News headlines; 3:30, American 

Indian Airwaves with Liz Lloyd; 

4:00, open time; 5:55, Calendar. 

6:00 The Evening News. 

6:45 Open Journal. 

7:00 Psychology for the People. 

Steve Portugues hosts. 
p^:30 Imaginary Landscape. Carl 
Stone hosts. 

10:30 In Fidelity. Peter Sutheim 
hosts. 

11:30 The Late Night News. 
12:00 Centerstand. Motorcycle 
talk with hosts Dick, Roy, Mar- 
garet at large and engineer Diane. 
1:30 Something's Happening! 



5 Wednesday 

6:00 Sunrise Concert. Tom Nixon 
plays a mixture of musics from art 
to zydeco. 

7:00 Morning Magazine. News: the 
latest local, national and interna- 
tional events; 7:15, Jeff Horton; 
7:30, News Check-In: interviews. 




Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger-see highlights for information 



January FOLIO PAGE 7 



phone calls, features, etc.; 8:30, 
Newscast: an extended round up 
of the late-breaking news from 
around the world; 9:00, Read All 
About It; 9:25, Calendar. 

^^30 Independent Music. Mario 
Casetta hosts. 
11:30 Morning Reading. 

^»1^:00 Noon Concert. Bill Davila 
hosts. 

2:00 The Afternoon Air. Edward 
Olmos of Zoot Suit fame (El Pa- 
chuko) will talk about his latest 
film. The Ballad of Gregorio Cor- 
tez, a true story about a Mexican- 
American in the early 1900's who 
caused the biggest manhunt in 
Texas' history— interviewed by Mi- 
ya Iwataki; 3:00, News headlines; 
3:15, Senior Citizen's Report with 
James Burford of Americans for 
Democratic Action; 3:30, Feminist 
Magazine with Helene Rosenbluth: 
a 90-minute program focusing on 
feminist perspectives of controver- 
sial issues; 5:00, Movement L.A. 
5:55, Calendar. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 Commentary. Charles Morgan 
7:00 Family Tree. Left open for 
late-breaking events in the African 
community. Sylvester Rivers hosts. 

^<^:00 Spirit Flight. Black music 
from around the world, with host 
Kwaku Lynn. 

1^0:00 Ears Wide Open. Carl Stone 
hosts. 

11:30 The Late Night News. 
12:00 Something's Happening! 
Graveyard Shift with Dudley 
Knight. Open 'til 6. 



6 Thursday 



^^00 Sunrise Concert. Mary Aldin 
reveals her folk, jazz and country- 
sides too. 

7:00 Morning Magazine. News: the 
latest local, national and interna- 
tional events; 7:15, Commentary 
with Charles Morgan; 7:30, News 
Check-In: interviews, phone calls, 
and features; 8:30, Newscast: an 
extended round-up of all the late- 
breaking news from around the 
world; 9:00, Read All About It; 
9:25, Calendar. 

9:30 The Nixon Tapes. Tom Nix- 
on plays a mixture of musics, often 
based around a theme of some sort. 



11:30 Morning Reading. 
V«^:00 Noon Concert. Chapel, 
Court & Countryside. Joseph Spen- 
cer hosts this program of early clas- 
sical music. 

2:00 The Afternoon Air. Theater 
CloseUp with Ray Tatar; 2:30, 
Media Rare: Dream-doers, hum- 
dingers and hell-raisers in the arts, 
hosted by that anti-twaddle model 
of a modern media generalist, Paul 
Lion (alternate Thursdays); 3:00, 
News headlines; 3:15, Inside L.A. 
explores the public policy land- 
scape of Southern California's natu- 
ral and built environments with fre- 
quent listener call-ins, hosted by 
Bob Pugsley; 4:00, Portraits of the 
U.S.S.R. with Suzi Weissman; 5:00, 
The Wizard Show: a surprise show, 
with hosts Bob Nelson and Shel 
Plotkin; 5:55, Calendar. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 Noticiero Pacifica. 
7:15 Flor y Canto. 
8:15 Nuestra Comunidad Latina. 
9:15 Voz y Raiz de Latinoameri- 
cana. 

10:15 America Latina en Marcha. 
11.00 Janus Co. Radio Theatre. 
Jan and Mallory Geller host. 
11:30 The Late Night News. 
12:00 Something's Happening! 



7 Friday 



>*^00 Sunrise Concert. We Call It 
Music, in its new time slot: a pro- 
gram of bop jazz that oldsters could 
call nostalgia and youngsters dis- 
cover as kitsch. Jim Seely hosts. 
7:00 Morning Magazine. 
9:00 Listener Read All About It. 
9:25 Calendar. 

1^:30 Amelia Airwaves. Music for 
diverse tastes, brought to you by 
Susan Kernes. 
11:30 Morning Reading. 

^^■JTDO Noon Concert. Soundboard. 
John Schneider hosts. 
2:00 The Afternoon Air. Fast 
paced interviews with Ed di Grazia, 
author of the newly-released book. 
Banned Films, a fully documented 
chronicle of every film banned in 
America— he talks with Mike Model; 
2:30, Intergay: a weekly syndicated 
report with David Wynyard; 3:00, 
News headlines; 3:30, Newswatch; 
4:30, Just a Minute with Nancy 



Hollander and Blase Bonpane alter- 
nating weekly; 5:30, The Iron Tri- 
angle with Gordon Adams; 5:55, 
Calendar. 

6:00 The Evening News. 
7:00 The Health Department. Al 
Huebner hosts. 

l^-'fjTbO Le Jazz Hot & Cool. John 
Breckow hosts. 

10:00 Hour 25. Science Fiction. 
Mike Model and co-host Mel Gil- 
den kick off 1983's science fiction 
with a phone show asking The 
Group Mind for your ideas of the 
best and worst in the field for 
1982. Also, Terry Model's sf calen- 
dar and the traditional airing of 
"The Eye of Argon." All in 90 min- 
utes! 

11:30 FutureWatch. Monitoring 
the cutting edge of science and reli- 
gion with host Linda Strawn. 

•r$^00 Straight, No Chaser. Jazz 
with Jay Green. 

V^O Music, Inc. Pearl Shelby 



8 Saturday 



1^:00 Genesis of a Music. Music 
from the 12th to 20th centuries, 
national and international, explor- 
ing roots, influence, causes and ef- 
fect. David Porter hosts. 

w«^r30 Folk Music. John Davis 
hosts. 

10:30 Halfway Down the Stairs. 
11:30 L.A. COSH. Special rebroad 
cast: Worker's Health in the Soviet 
Union. 

12:35 The Car Show. John Retsek 
and Len Frank share their expertise 
with you . . . open phones, of 
course. 

ii,«4TD0 Carnival of Music. "African 
Roots": The moving and enjoyable 
experience of traditional and con- 
temporary African music. Sheiron 
Allen hosts. 

V«<^frb0 Sounds of Jamaica. Reggae 
music at its best-from the first an- 
noucer to play Reggae in Southern 
California, Miss Wire Waist! 
6:00 The Saturday Night News. 
6:30 On Film. Dean Cohen hosts. 
7:00 On Stage. Lawrence Christon 
hosts. 

l/«^30 Up From the Ash Grove. Ed 
Pearl presents a sampler of popular 
and ethnic musics, sometimes with 
a political direction. 



January FOLIO PAGE 8 



»»^00 Land of a Thousand Dances. 

Reggae, soul and dance musics, 
with Jimmy Hori's personal Top 10 
each week. 
yf^l.QO 12 O'clock Rock. A maga 
zine format program on post-punk 
underground rock, produced by 
Andrea 'Enthal with Liz Garo, Jeff 
Harris, Steve Barker, Lezlie Lee, 
Keith Goshorn and others. Each 
program contains a live concert & 
new post-punk underground record 
releases. At press time the possibili- 
ty of opening the program with 
Live From Studio Zzzz, rather than 
with new releases, was being deba- 
ted. (Well, subscriber-listeners— do 
ya want the concert to be first or 
in the middle?) Weekly details will 
be listed in the L.A. Reader (a free 
magazine distributed at record 
stores in Pasadena, Hollywood, 
downtown L.A., West L.A. and 
Santa Monica) under the rock con- 
certs listing. 



9 Sunday 



V'^:00 Gospel Caravan. Prince Dixon 
hosts. 

9:00 National Security. Ian Mas- 
ters hosts. 

11:00 Dorothy Ray Healey. Com- 
mentary. 

|,.^2:00 Many Worlds of Music. Mar- 
io Casetta hosts. 

yV^Q The Sunday Opera. Otello 
with Mario Del Monaco, Renata Te- 
baldi, Aldo Protti, with Orchestra 
and Chorus of L'Accademia di San- 
ta Cecilia, Rome, conducted by Al- 
berto Erede. (Richmond 63004). 
Fred Hyatt hosts. 

5:00 East Wind. Two Women: Ac- 
tress/writer Jeannie Joe, author of 
Ying-Ying: Pieces of a Childtiood, 
will talk about her career in the arts 
and discuss her new book. Akemi 
Kikumura, also a multi-talented ac- 
tress/writer, will share insights into 
her new book. Through Harsh Win- 
ters: The Life of a Japanese Immi- 
grant Woman. Both women have 
been very active in the Asian com- 
munity and cultural arena, and are 
interviewed by Miya Iwataki. 
6:00 The Sunday Evening News. 
6:30 The Science Connection. 
Steve and Vera Kilston with the 
latest science news and views. 



»^:00 Preachin' the Blues. Mary Al 
din hosts. 

8:30 IMRU. The IMRU Gay/Les 
bian news report, calendar, and fea- 
tures. 

^i'9:30 Folkscene. A program of tra- 
ditional and contemporary folk mu- 
sic, featuring live music, interviews 
with the performers, and the finest 
in recorded folk music. Tentatively 
scheduled guests this evening; from 
Scotland . . . Ossian. Roz and How- 
ard Larman host. 

l»i'T'2:00 Smoke Rings. Six hours of 
jazz with John Breckow. 



10 Monday 



y'^OO Sunrise Concert. Lorin 

Sklamberg presents vocal music. 
7:00 Morning Magazine. News; the 
latest local, national and interna- 
tional events; 7:15, Commentary 
with Phyllis Bennis; 7:30, News 
Check-In: interviews, phone calls, 
features, etc.; 8:30, Newscast: an 
extended round-up of all late- 
breaking news from around the 
world; 9:00, Read All About It; 
9:25, Calendar. 
V/^30 Folkdance with Mario!! 
11:30 Morning Reading. 
12:00 Noon Concert. Music of the 
Americas, with Jeannie Pool. 
2:00 The Afternoon Air. Alan 
Watts: "Psychedelic Explosion" 
part 1 of 4; 3:00, News headlines; 
3;30, open time; 4:00, Nutrition, 
Health & the Environment with Irv 
Lyon; 4:30, Consider the Alterna-' 
tives; 5:00, Consumer Awareness 
with Ida Honorof; 5:55, Calendar. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 Commentary. Charles Morgan 
7:00 Labor Scene. Sam Kushner 
hosts. 
t»»^30 Chapel, Court & Countryside. 
Joseph Spencer presents early clas- 
sical music. 
|i*^00 Johnny Otis: Blue Monday 
Edition. Rhythm & Blues, Jazz, 
Gospel— with lively dicussions and 
live performances. 
11:00 American Mercury. Guests, 
interviews, news and features about 
the broadcast medium with host 
MikeHodel. 

11.30 The Late Night News. 
12:00 Something's Happening! 
Alan Watts: "Religion and Sexu- 



ality" part 2 of 3. Krishnamurti. 
Open 'til 6. 



11 Tuesday 



^OrOb Sunrise Concert. The Pacifica 
Bird presents: an assortment of pro- 
grams from our archives. 
7:00 Morning Magazine. News: the 
latest local, national, and interna- 
tional events; 7:15, Commentary 
with Charles Morgan; 7:30, News 
Check-In: interviews, features, etc.; 
8:30, Newscast: an extended report 
with news from around the world; 
9:00, Read All About It; 9:25, Cal- 
endar. 

k^30 Folkscene. Part 2 of an eight 
part series of the "World of Ewan 
MacColl and Peggy Seeger. Included 
in the program is the radio ballad 
"The Song of a Road." Roz and 
Howard Larman host. 
11:30 Morning Reading. 

^fi^Q Noon Concert. Leonid Ham- 
bro at the keyboard. 
2:00 The Atfernoon Air. The Time 
of Man: a timeless documentary on 
overpopulation produced for you 
by KPFK's Ruth Buell (Uncle 
Ruthie) featuring Paul Eriich, the 
poetry of Robinson Jeffers, music 
and the voices of people in your 
community; 3:00, News headlines; 
3:30, open time; 5:00, Catch 222: 
Growing Up in L.A. Schools with 
Jeff Horton; 5:55, Calendar. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 Open Journal. 
7:30 Prescription for Survival. Phy- 
sicians for Social Responsibility. 
Dr. Bob Rufsvold hosts. 

»*^30 Imaginary Landscape. Carl 
Stone hosts. 

10:30 In Fidelity. Peter Sutheim 
hosts. 




January FOLIO PAGE 9 







ting in Vietnam and has recently 






completed a reading tour of the 






U.S., and is now residing in Los 






Angeles. He is interviewed by Liz 






Lloyd of KPFK's American Indian 






Airwaves; 3:00, News headlines; 






3:15, Senior Citizen's Report with 






James Burford of Americans for 






Democratic Action; 3:30, Feminist 






Magazine: a 90-minute program fo- 






cusing on feminist perspectives of 






controversial issues, with Helene 






Rosenbluth; 5:00, Movement L.A. 




^jj^^^H m^^^^^H 


with Mark and Avis Ridley-Thomas; 
5:55, Calendar. 






6:00 The Evening News. 




■ ^^^^KSji^Bm V^^^^^^^^^l 


6:45 Commentary. Charles Morgan 
7:00 Family Tree. Sylvester Rivers 






hosts. 


^^^^^^^^^^^^Hj^^^m^^^^H^^'-'" ' ' . ? 




1 


W«':00 Spirit Flight. Black music 
from around the world, with host 
Kwaku Lynn. 

^*4tJ:00 Ears Wide Open. Carl Stone 










^^^ 


hosts. 




^^^^^^B^Hk Ifl^^H 


11:30 The Late Night News. 






^^^^H 


12:00 Something's Happening! 




^^^^^^^^^^^^Hiii^''^ ^^^^^^^^^H 


Spoken arts. 

13 Thursday 

1^:00 Sunrise Concert. Mary Aldin, 
better known for her Sunday night 
program Preach in' the Blues, reveals 
her folk, jazz and country sides too. 
7:00 Morning Magazine. News: the 
latest local, national and interna- 
tional events; 7:15, Commentary 
with Charles Morgan; 7:30, New; 
Check-In: interviews, features, etc.; 
8:30, Newscast: an extended re- 
port; 9:00, Read All About It; 
9:25, Calendar. 
9:30 The Nixon Tapes. Tome Nix 


Tom LaBlanc, a Sioux/Japanese poet and A. I.M. activist will read from his works on 


Wednesday, January 12, from 2 to 3 p.m. 




on plays a mixture of musics, often 
based around a theme of some sort. 






11:30 The Late Night News. 

12:00 Centerstand. 

1:30 Something's Happening! 


terviews, phone calls, etc.; 8:30, 
Newscast: an extended report; 
9:00, Read All About It; 9:25, Cal- 


11:30 Morning Reading. 
|,,<fZ!00 Noon Concert. Chapel, 
Court & Countryside. Early classi- 
cal music with host Joseph Spencer. 


12 Wednesday 


endar. 
^<^0 Independent Music. Mario 

Casetta hosts. 

11:30 Morning Reading. 
(^4^:00 Noon Concert. Bill Davila 


2:00 The Afternoon Air. Theatre 
Close-Up with Ray Tatar; 2:30, 
Speaking of Seniors with Grace Ja- 
cobs; 3:00, News headlines; 3:15, 
Middle East in Focus with Michel 


^^■.QQ Sunrise Concert. Tom Nixon 


hosts. 


Bogopolsky and Sarah Mardell; 


plays a mixture of musics from art 


2:00 The Afternoon Air. Tom La- 


4:00, Portraits of the U.S.S.R. with 


to zydeco. 


Blanc, well-known A. I.M. poet and 


Suzi Weissman; 5:00, The Wizard 


7:00 Morning Magazine. News: the 


activist, reads his poetry and talks 


Show: "Water"-Michael Storper 


latest local, national and interna- 


about some of the current Indian 


from U.C.L.A., hosted by Shel Plot- 


tional events; 7:15, Jeff Horton; 


struggles. LaBlanc, a Sioux/Japa- 


kin and Bob Nelson; 5:55, Calen- 


7:30, News Check-in: features, in- 


nese from South Dakota, began wri- 


dar. 



January FOLIO PAGE 10 



6:00 The Evening News. 

6:45 Noticiero Pacifica. 

7:15 Flor y Canto. 

8:15 Nuestra Comunidad Latina. 

9:15 Voz y Raiz de Latinoameri- 

cana. 

10:15 America Latina en Marcha. 

11:00 Janus Co. Radio Theatre. 

Mallory and Jan Geller host. 

11:30 The Late Night News. 

12:00 Something's Happening! 

A rebroadcast of last year's 6-hour 

tribute to Martin Luther King. 



14 Friday 



^f>fS^O Sunrise Concert. We Call It 

Music: a program of bop jazz, with 

host Jim Seely. 

7:00 Morning Magazine. 

9:00 Listener Read All About It. 

9:25 Calendar. 
^o9":30 Amelia Airwaves. Music for 

diverse tastes, brought to you by 

Susan Kernes. 




ATTENTION SUBSCRIBERS 

WHO ARE MEMBERS OF THE 

CLERGY 

What greater moral concern is there 
than the safeguarding and furth- 
ance of freedom? Whose moral ob- 
ligation is it to make sure the world 
doesn't blow up? If you feel that 
KPFK's programming addresses 
these issues, and that more people 
need to know about KPFK's First 
Amendment radio programming, 
then join our new Clergy Friends 
of KPFK Chapter. For more in- 
formation, call Suzi Weissman at 
877-2711 or Rabbi Josef Rosen- 
blatt at 938-8308. Remember, 
KPFK is your resource: let's broad- 
en its impact in our community. 



11:30 Morning Reading. 
12:00 Noon Concert. Soundboard. 
John Schneider hosts. 
2:00 The Afternoon Air. Actress/ 
writer Jeannie Joe, author of Ying- 
Ying: Pieces of a Childhood, will 
talk about her multi-faceted career 
in the arts and discuss her new 
book. The long-time cultural acti- 
vist will be interviewed by Miya 
Iwataki; 2:30, Intergay: a weekly 
syndicated report with David Wyn- 
yard; 3:00, News headlines; 3:30, 
Newswatch; 4:30, Just a Minute w/ 
Blase Bonpane and Nancy Hollan- 
der alternating weekly; 5:30, 777e 
Iron Triangle with Gordon Adams; 
5:55, Calendar. 



6:00 The Evening Nevivs. 

7:00 The Health Department. Al 

Huebner hosts. 

|/»<jtOO Le Jazz Hot & Cool. John 
Breckow hosts. 

10:00 Hour 25. Science Fiction. 
Tonight, a live remote broadcast 
from Dangerous Visions bookstore 
in Sherman Oaks. Special guests, 
come down and see what the 
Group Mind looks like. Meet Mel 
Gildenl The address is 13603 Ven- 
tura Blvd., one block east of Wood- 
man. Mike Hodel is the producer. 

f<<2:00 Straight, No Chaser. Jazz 
with Jay Green. 

(X^OO Music, Inc. Pearl Shelby is 
the host. 



v^^^^^^n■.^. ^^ ^^ us ' . ■. u u v s^'.^^^^■;',^■.^ \^\^^s^^^\\^^'. ^ '.s\^ ^ s^^ ^ : ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^. '. ^^'. s^ ^ u^'. ^u^^s ^ u■.■;^^^\^■^<^ ^^ ^^^ss^^ ^^ ^^ 



^ W\x(i\ anb ^ta Cruis^e 



Ahoy there! Set sail with KPFK and the Larmans. Join us 
on an all-day cruise aboard the "Manuiwa" (Storm Bird), a 75- 
foot schooner which served as the flagship of the L.A. Yacht 
Club during the '32 Olympics and won the Trans-Pacific Yacht 
Race in 1934. 

Captain Gregory Alexander will guide twenty special KPFK 
supporters around the harbor and along the sea coast with in- 
teresting narrative of historical landmarks and points of interest. 
Music and entertainment will be provided by Louis Killen, the 
master of sea shanties and other songs sailormen sang in the 
nineteenth century. And . . . enjoy the mouth-watering hors 
d'oeuvres and a catered international buffet as the sun sets 
into the Pacific. 

RSVP now by sending a check for S75 per person to KPFK- 
CRUISE, 3729 Cahuenga Boulevard West, North Hollywood, 
CA 91604. For more information, call (213) 877-2711. 

PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT KPFK 




January FOLIO PAGE 11 



Dr. Kiiin with children in Grenada, Mi: 



y«i% 



i*"^! 



J/ 



V. 




15 Saturday 



MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. 'S 
BIRTHDAY 

W<^00 Genesis of a Music. David 
Porter hosts, with some fundraising. 

^^:30 Folk Music. John Davis plays 
and pitches. 

10:30 Halfway Down the Stairs. 
Uncle Ruthie hosts. Fundraising & 
Funraising. 

Wn:30 Ballads, Banjoes & Blue- 
grass. Tom Sauber hosts. Plus fund- 
raising. 

12:25 Calendar. 
12:35 The Car Show. John Retsek 



and Len Frank share their expertise 
with you, and invite you to support 
KPFK. 

^^HO Martin Luther King Special. 
Material on the life and speeches of 
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., inclu- 
ding Pacifica archive material from 
the period, music of the civil rights 
movement, and music that has since 
been written in his memory. With 
fundraising in and around. 
6:00 The Evening News. 

|„^<r70 Martin Luther King Special. 
The program continues. Support 
KPFK so WE can continue. . . 

r^,J^:00 12 O'clock Rock. A maga- 
zine format program on post-punk 
underground rock, produced by 



Andrea 'Enthal with Liz Garo, Jeff 
Harris, Steve Barker, Lezlie Lee, 
Keith Gorshorn and others. Each 
program contains a live concert and 
new post-punk underground relea- 
ses. At press time the possibility of 
opening the program with Live 
From Studio Zzzz rather than the 
new releases, was being debated. 
Well, subscriber-listeners— do you 
want the concert to be first or in 
the middle? Weekly details will be 
listed in the L.A. Reader (a free ma- 
gazine distributed at record stores 
in Pasadena, Hollywood, down- 
town L.A., West L.A. and Santa 
Monica) under the rock concerts 
listing. 



January FOLIO PAGE 12 



16 Sunday 



PACIFICATHON I 

Today and Tuesday will bring 
together a wealth of special materi- 
al on what Pacifica is named for— 
the ongoing quest for peace in our 
time, so that our children's time 
can happen. Not only will we fea- 
ture many of the speakers from 
the Fate of the Earth Conference, 
first aired during our November 
Drive, but we'll also cover the first 
test launching of the MX missille, 
highlights of the Whole Earth Expo, 
held in New York in November, 
featuring Dick Gregory, Michio 
Kaku (Prof, of Physics at CUNY), 
and other material. Pitching too, of 
course. Detailed schedule unavail- 
able at Folio deadline. 



|/<00 



00 Gospel Caravan. Prince Dixon 
hosts. With fundraising. 
9:00 National Security. Special 
program related to the Pacifica- 
thon, with host Ian Masters, and 
some fundraising. 

11.00 Dorothy Ray Healey. An in 
terview with Howard Moreland, au- 
thor of the article in "The Progres- 
sive" on how to make a hydroger) 
bomb (which the government tried 
to prevent from being published); 
currently the author of The Secret 
Explosion, an analysis of Reagan's 
foreign and defense policies aimed 
First Strike rather than defense 
planning. Fundraising included. 
12:00 Paciflcathon. By popular 
demand— a rebroadcast of programs 
originally aired last November, plus 



some previously unaired/related 
material from the Fate of the Earth 
Conference. The conferees address 
three subquestions: 1) What's going 
wrong?; 2) Where do we want to 
be?; 3) How do we get there? 

Good answers to the three days' 
questions will expedite disarma- 
ment and make it stick. The scien- 
tific and technological ability to re- 
arm cannot be obliterated, but it 
can be diverted to causes that 



serve humanity instead of destroy- 
ing it. Some of the speakers: Rus- 
sell Peterson is president of the Na- 
tional Audubon Society. Before 
that he was governor of Delaware, 
chairman of the Council on Envi- 
ronmental Quality, president of 
New Directions, and Director of the 
Congressional Office of Technology 



Audiocassettes - 
* Pacifica Radio Arciiives 

^-'m lor 3 n e ty catalog send 501: in sums 10 

lilHH" • • • • 

/>«///» Htdio Archhts. Dipt A 53 f 6 Vinict BL lot Ang»l$t, CA 90019 




Assessment. He is chairman of the 
Global Tomorrow Coalition. He ob 
tained his Ph.D. in chemistry at the 
University of Wisconsin in 1942. 
Wes Jackson, with his wife Dana, 
heads the Land Institute at Salina, 
Kansas, where he has concluded 
that over the long run, the plow 
has done more damage than the 
sword, but the sword has far more 
than caught up. George Wald is 
Professor Emeritus of Biochemis- 
try, Harvard University. He received 
the Nobel Prize in physiology in 
1967. In 1969 he made an extem- 
poraneous speech at M.I.T. that was 
quoted from at length in the March 
22 New Yorker. The title was "A 
Generation in Search of a Future," 
and the magazine received more re- 
quests for reprints of it than of 
any other previous piece. Lester 
Brown is President and a Senior Re- 
searcher with WorldWatch Institute, 
a leading authority on world food 
problems, and author of many 
books relevant to the Conference. 
Rear Admiral Gene R. LaRocque is 
director of the Center for Defense 
Information and a veteran of 32 
years of active duty in the U.S. 
Navy. He served 7 years in the Pen- 
tagon and was awarded the Legion 
of Merit for his performance of 
duty as a strategic planner. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:20 Fundraising. 
6:30 The Poetry Connexion. 
Arlene Stone, author of 4 books of 
poetry, playwright, anti-nuclear ac- 
tivist, will read from her latest 
work, At the Gates of Hell. Wanda 
Coleman and Austin Strauss host, 
with breaks for fundraising. 
7:30 Pacificathon continues. 
This evening will include the con- 
cert featuring Paul Winter, Pete See- 
ger and Odetta, recorded at the 
Fate of the Earth Conference. Paul 
Winter is Musician in Residence at 
the Cathedral of St. John the Di- 
vine. His albums celebrate the mu- 
sic of the natural world. 
1^2:00 Smoke Rings. Six hours of 
jazz and pitching with John Brec- 
kow. 




January FOLIO PAGE 13 



Flujtu b<. Nina Leen. 19-t 




the 30's with Labor Scene? Sam 
Kushner came up with the perfect 
connection: A musical play about 
organizing, written in the 30's by 
Mark Blitzstein, funded by the 
WPA. The history of how this mu- 
sical was almost censored, and how 
the entire production had to be 
staged from the seats and aisles of 
the only available theater, is a fa- 
scinating interlude. Sam was there, 
and he'll relate the incident during 
a fundraising break. 
^9:00 Johnny Otis: Blue Monday 
Edition. A special edition featuring 
the music of the 30's and 40's, and 
including fundraising. 
12:00 Something's Happening! 



1 7 Monday 



MUSIC OF THE 
30's AND 40's 

V^TOO Sunrise Concert. We Call It 
Music, with Jim Seely, and some 
fundraising. 

7:00 Morning Magazine. News, 
features, etc., with fundraising in- 
terspersed. 

9:00 Read All About It. , 

9:25 Calendar. 

^^:30 Amelia Airwaves. Susan Ker- 
nes with music, and fundraising. 

^T:30 Manns Elsler Special. 
A German composer born in 1898 
who studied under Schoenberg and 
later sought to express his left poli- 
tical philosophies through his mu- 
sic, Eisler had to leave Germany in 



1933 due to political repression. 
During his stay in the U.S., which 
included time in Hollywood scoring 
films, Eisler composed incidental 
music for plays by Odets, Shaw and 
Brecht. He returned to Vienna, 
which he regarded as his true spiri- 
tual home, in 1948. This documen- 
tary on his life and works is in three 

^^'"^ Parti 11:30-12:30 
Fundraising 12:30-1:00 

Part 2 1:00-2:00 
Fundraising 2:00-2:30 

Part 3 2:30-3:30 
Fundraising 3:30-4:00 

4:00 The Afternoon Air. 

An abridged version with fundrai- 
sing interspersed. 

6:00 The Evening News. 

7:00 The Cradle Will Rock. 

How do we tie together music of 



18 Tuesday 



PACIFICATHON 2 

. . . continues, with features from 
the Fate of the Earth Conference 
and other special material, inclu- 
ding the fate of Kwajalein Island 
vs. MX, the anti-nuclear movement 
in Europe (material brought back 
by Marc Cooper) and more updates. 

^B:00 Sunrise Concert. The Pacifica 
Bird Presents: special features from 
our archives. 
7:00 Fate of the Earth Conference. 

Back in October Dr. Bob Rufsvold 
and Raffaello Mazza, the producers 
of Prescription for Survival, jour- 
neyed to New York City to tape 
the Fate of the Earth. Don't miss 
this airing of what they brought 
back! More of the featured speakers 
who will be heard throughout the 
day ('til 10:30 p.m. tonight): 

John Holdren is vice-chairman 
of the Federation of American Sci- 
entists and an award-winning pro- 
fessor of energy and resources. Uni- 
versity of California, Berkeley. 

Richard Barnet is a Senior Fel- 
low of the Institute for Policy Stu- 
dies and author of many books, all 
of them relevant to the Conference, 
especially Global Reach, The Lean 
Years, and Real Security. 

Ron Dellums has represented 
Berkeley and Oakland residents 
since the 92nd Congress, and has 
earned one of the highest environ- 
mental scores from the League of 
Conservation Voters. He is one of 



January FOLIO PAGE 14 



the most lucid Congressional advo- 
cates of arms sanity. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 Fate of the Earth. 
Continuation: Physicians for So- 
cial Responsibility have been aler- 
ting the public to the disastrous me- 
dical consequences of nuclear war, 
itself the most devastating environ- 
mental threat of all. The medical 
component of the Conference on 
the Fate of the Earth seeks to alert 
the public to the global deteriora- 
tion that threatens the health of 
peoples, and, possibly, of life on 
this planet. Physicians and nurses 
can gain and use an understanding 
of what human beings must pre- 
serve here if their ecological home, 
the biosphere, is to share its health 
with that of humanity. 
Some of the speakers: 

The Medical Consequences of 
War, H. Jack Geiger, M.D., Arthur 
C. Logan Professor of Community 
Medicine, City College of New 
York. 

Civil Defense in the Nuclear 
Age: What Survival Does It Pro- 
mise? Jennifer Leaning, M.D., Na- 
tional Executive Committee Mem- 
ber, Physicians for Social Respon 
sibility. 

Psychology in the Nuclear Age, 
Robert J. Lifton, M.D., Professor 
of Psychiatry, Yale University 
School of Medicine. 
10:30 In Fidelity. Peter Sutheim 
hosts. Fundraising. 
11:30 The Late Night News. 
12:00 Centerstand. 
Pitch and play. 

1:30 Something's Happening! 
Pitching and playing old and new 
favorites. 



19 Wednesday 



MUSIC OF 
THE 50's 

|^<<JTtJ0 Sunrise Concert. Tom Nixon 
hosts. With fundraising. 
7:00 Morning Magazine. News, fea- 
tures, etc., with fundraising inter- 
spersed. 

9:00 Read All About It. 
9:25 Calendar. 

^^30 Independent Music. Indepen- 
dent labels of the 50's with Mario 
Casetta and Tom Nixon. Make a 



pledge to keep KPFK independent 
tool 

^>^^:00 Noon Concert. Special: Bill 

Davila hosts this program on the 

acoustic steel-string guitar of the 
5P^ With fundraising breaks. 

•nToO Music of the 50's, Pitch and 



play. 
4:00 
50's 

from 



Growing Up Female in the 

and other phantasmagoria, 
Helene Rosenbluth. Fund- 
raising included. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
Fundraising where possible. 

|X7:00 Black Music of the 50's. 

Johnny Otis hosts this program fea- 
turing Black artists of the 50's 
R & B scene. 

I^;K):00 Ears Wide Open. Carl Stone 
with more 50's music, and more 
good reasons to support KPFK. 
11:30 The Late Night News. 
12:00 Something's Happening! 
"Graveyard Shift" with Dudley 
Knight. Fundraising and teasing 'til 
3 Old radio from 3 to 6 




20 Thursday 



THE REAGAN TUNNEL 
Reagan two years later— Is there 
light at the end of the tunnel, or is 
that just the headlight of an on- 
coming train? 

*^:00 Sunrise Concert. Mary Aldin 
hosts, fundraises. 
7:00 Special features. Fundraising 



breaks interspersed, with the news 
at 8:30 am. 

2:00 Reagan and the Arts. Paul 
Lion hosts. Fundraising included. 
3:00 News Headlines. 
3:15 More Reagan Tunnel. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 The Latino Collective Pre- 
sents. . . more features on the same 
theme. With fundraising pauses. 
12:00 Something's Happening! 
Fundraising from 12 to 1. Open 
phones. 



21 Friday 



MUSIC OF THE 60'S 

. . . with music and features from 
the period provided by Ed Pearl 
and Eric Ahlberg, as below: 

^'fTOO Sunrise Special. 

7:00 Morning Magazine. News, fea- 
tures, etc., with fundraising pauses. 
9:00 Bead All About It. 
9:25 Calendar. 

V^:30 Amelia Airwaves. A 60's-rela- 
ted program of music, brought to 
you by Susan Kernes, with time 
out for fundraising. 
12:00 Special. More 60's-related 
features of an unspecified nature 
as of Folio deadline. With fund- 
raising. 

4:00 The Afternoon Air. News, 
features, etc. with fundraising. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
7:00 More Special 60's. 

^'S!00 Le Jazz Hot & Cool. John 
Breckow on 60's jazz. Plus fund- 
raising. 

10:00 Hour 25. Science Fiction. 
Tonight, science fiction from the 
60's. Mel Gilden and Mike Hodel 
will read it and play some far-out 
music. Plus, some fund-raising. 
And, of course, Terry Hodel's sf 
calendar. 

lXl2:00 Straight, No Chaser. Jay 
Green hosts. Fundraising. 

^K^fOO Music, Inc. Pearl Shelby 
hosts. 



22 Saturday 



^^1 



00 Genesis of a Music. Music 
from the 12th to 20th centuries. 



January FOLIO PAGE 15 



national and international, explor- 
ing roots, influence, causes and ef- 
fect. David Porter hosts. 

»<^30 Folk Music. John Davis hosts. 
10.30 Halfway Down the Stairs. 
Uncle Ruthie hosts. 

1^:30 Ballads, Banjoes & Blue- 
grass. Tom Sauber hosts. 
12:25 Calendar. 

12:35 The Car Show. John Retsek 
and Len Frank host, with open 
Qi>ones. 

'^:00 Carnival of Music. 

•^00 Sounds of Jamaica. Reggae 
music at its best. Miss Wire Waist 
hosts. 

6:00 The Saturday Night News. 
6:30 On Film. Dean Cohen hosts. 
7:00 On Stage. Lawrence Christon 
hosts. 

yfisO Up From the Ash Grove. Ed 
Pearl presents a sampler of ethnic 
and popular musics, sometimes 
wjjlh a political direction. 

W^ioO Land of a Thousand Dances. 
Jimmy Hori and Reggae, Soul and 
Dance musics-plus Jimmy's per- 
sonal Top lOeach week. 

^^.QQ 12 O'clock Rock. Tentative 
ly scheduled: Live From Studio 
Zzzz, 100 Flowers (also known as 
the Urinals). See January 15 for a 
complete description of this pro- 
gram. 



23 Sunday 



^^00 Gospel Caravan. Prince Dixon 
hosts. 

9:00 National Security. Ian Mas 
ters hosts. 

11:00 Dorothy Ray Healey. Com 
mentary. 

l»45:00 Many Worlds of Music. Mar- 
io Casetta hosts. 

^/ff50 The Sunday Opera. Gior- 
dano: Andrea Chenier with Mario 
Del Monaco, Renata Tebaldi, Et- 
tore Bastianini with Orchestra and 
Chorus of L'Accademia di Santa, 
conducted by Gianandrea Gavaz- 
zeni. Fred Hyatt hosts. (London 
4332). 

5:00 East Wind. Mary Jane Tashiro 
is a leading exponent of the Spud 
Murphy composition teaching 
which focuses on efficient ways of 
handling pitch information and 
tonality. Her compositions are char-> 
acterized by originality, imagina- 



tion and vitality. She will play some 
of her compositions and talk about 
her music. Hosted by Miya Iwataki. 
6:00 The Sunday Evening News. 
6:30 The Science Connection. 
Steve and Vera Kilston with the la- 
test science news and views. 

^^:00 Preachin' the Blues. Mary Al- 
din hosts. 

8:30 IMRU. The IMRU Gay/Les- 
bian news report, features, calen- 
dar. 

^^rSo Folkscene. A program of tra- 
ditional and contemporary folk mu- 
sic, featuring live music, interviews 
with the performers, and the finest 
in recorded folk music. Tentatively 
scheduled guests this evening are 
Ric and Lorraine Lee. Roz and 
Howard Larman host. 

^«K:00 Smoke Rings. Six hours of 
jazz with John Breckow. 



24 Monday 



t^TbO Sunrise Concert. Lorin 

Sklamberg presents vocal music. 
7:00 Morning Magazine. News: the 
latest local, national and interna- 
tional events; 7:15, Commentary 
with Phyllis Bennis; 7:30, News 
Check-In: interviews, features, etc., 
8:30, Newscast: an extended re- 
port; 9:00, Read All About It; 
9:25, Calendar. 

^^30 Folkdance with Mario!! 
11:30 Morning Reading. 

^K:00 Noon Concert. Music of the 
Americas. Pianist extraordinaire, 
Dorothy Donegan, live from Studio 
A at KPFK, performing jazz, blues 
and classical music. Jeannie Pool 
hosts. 

2:00 The Afternoon Air. Alan 
Watts: "Pursuit of PLeasure" part 2 
of 4; 3:00, News headlines; 3:30, 
Organic Gardening with Will Kin- 
ney and Barbara Spark; 4:30, Con- 
sider the Alternatives; 5:00, Consu- 
mer Awareness with Ida Honorof; 
5:55, Calendar. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 Commentary. Charles Morgan 
7:00 Labor Scene. Sam Kushner. 
J/'?: 30 Chapel, Court & Countryside. 
Joseph Spencer with early classical 
music. 

1*^00 Johnny Otis: Blue Monday 
Edition. Traditional Rhythm & 
Blues, Jazz, Gospel; with lively dis- 



cussions and live performances. 
11:00 American Mercury. Guests, 
interviews, and features about the 
broadcast medium, with host Mike 
Hodel. 

11:30 The Late Night News. 
12:00 Something's Happening! 
Alan Watts speaks on "Rama- 
krishna, Ramana Maharshi & 
Krishnamurti" part 1 of 4. Krish- 
namurti speaks for himself. Open 
■til 6. 

25 Tuesday 

w^:00 Sunrise Concert. The Pacifica 
Bird presents: an assortment of in- 
teresting programs from the past. 
7:00 Morning Magazine. News: the 
latest local, national and interna- 
tional events; 7:15, Commentary 
with Charles Morgan; 7:30, News 
Check-In: interviews, phone calls 
with the newsmakers, features, etc.; 
8:30, Newscast: an extended 
roundup of all the late-breaking 
news from around the world; 9:00, 
Read All About It; 9:25, Calendar. 
IrX^T^b Folkscene. Folkscene pre- 
sents "Happy Birthday Robert 
Burns," in celebration of the 224th 
birthday of the Scottish poet, col- 
lector and songwriter. Roz and 
Howard Larman host. 
11:30 Morning Reading. 
|i*<5':00 Noon Concert. Leonid Ham- 
bro at the keyboard. 
2:00 The Afternoon Air. 77?e Long 
Black Song is one of Richard 
Wright's most powerful short sto- 
ries—a young Black woman disco- 
vers that in the racially poisoned 
atmosphere of 1920's America, a 
small indiscretion can reap mon- 
strous consequences; produced/di- 
rected by Pierre Baston, featuring 
Robin Braxton, John LeGrand, and 
David McKnight; 3:00, News head- 
lines; 3:30, open time; 5:00, Catch 
222: Crowing Up in L.A. Schools 
with Jeff Horton; 5:55, Calendar. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 Open Journal. 
7:30 Prescription for Survival. 
Physicians for Social Responsibility 
with Dr. Bob Rufsvold. 
l<«^:30 Imaginary Landscape. Carl 
Stone hosts. 

10:30 In Fidelity. Peter Sutheim 
hosts. 
1 1 :30 The Late Night News. 



January FOLIO PAGE 16 




Actress, writer, anthropologist Al<emi Kil<umura, Ph.D. will be interviewed on 
East Wind on Sunday, January 9, 5-6 pm, and rebroadcast Friday, January 28, 
2-3 pm upon publication of her book "Through Harsh Winters: The Life of a 
Japanese Immigrant Woman. " Don't miss it. 



12.00 Centerstand. 

1:30 Something's Happening! 



26 Wednesday 

l<>4rT)0 Sunrise Concert. Tom Nixon 
plays a mixture of musics, from art 
to zvdeco. 

7.00 IVIorning IVIagazine. News: the 
latest local, national and interna- 
tional events; 7:15, Jeff Norton; 
7:30, News Check-In: interviews, 
features, etc.; 8:30, Newscast: an 
extended report; 9:00, Read All A- 
bout It; 9:25, Calendar. 

1*^:30 Independent Music. Mario Ca- 
setta hosts. 



11:30 Morning Reading. 
j^>?r00 Noon Concert. A special 
program featuring steel-string acou- 
stic guitar music of the 50's. Bill 
Davila hosts. 

2:00 The Afternoon Air. Alonzo 
Davis, artist and co-founder of the 
Brocl^man Gallery, will talk about 
the Gallery, why it was founded, 
and share his thoughts about Third 
World art and culture in America- 
interviewed by Miya Iwataki; 3:00, 
News headlines; 3:15, Senior Citi- 
zen's Report with James Burford of 
Americans for Democratic Action; 
3:30, Feminist Magazine: a 90-min 
ute program focusing on femini '. 
perspectives of controversial issues. 



with Helene Rosenbluth; 5:00, 

Movement L.A. with Mark and Avis 

Ridley-Thomas; 5:55, Calendar. 

6:00 The Evening News. 

6.45 Commentary. Charles Morgan 

7:00 Family Tree. Sylvester Rivers 

hosts. 
^<'^^0 Spirit Flight. Black music 

from around the world. Kwaku 

Lynn hosts. 
MtrOO Ears Wide Open. Carl Stone 

hosts. 

11:30 The Late Night News. 

12:00 Something's Happening! 

Non-linear radio. 

27 Thursday 

^^:00 Sunrise Concert. Mary Aldin 
with folk, jazz and country. 
7:00 Morning Magazine. News: the 
latest local, national and interna- 
tional events; 7:15, Commentary 
with Charles Morgan; 7:30, News 
Check-In: interviews, features, etc.; 
8:30, Newscast: an extended re- 
port; 9:00, Read All About It; 
9^, Calendar. 

Jr<^r30 The Nixon Tapes. Tom Nixon 
plays a mixture of musics, often 
based around a theme of some sort. 
11:30 Morning Reading. 

^,»42:00 Noon Concert. Chapel, 
Court & Countryside. Joseph Spen- 
cer with early classical music. 

2:00 The Afternoon Air. Theatre 
Close-Up with Ray Tatar; 2:30, 
Speaking of Seniors with Grace Ja- 
cobs; 3:00, News headlines; 3:15, 
Middle East in Focus with Sarah 
Mardell and Michel Bogopolsky; 
4:00, Portraits of the U.S.S.R. w/ 
Suzi Weissman; 5:00, The Wizard 
Show: "Communication Funda- 
mentals and Advanced Develop- 
ment" with Larry Rouch of JPL/ 
Cal.Tech.-Shel Plotkin and Bob 
Nelson host; 5:55, Calendar. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 Noticiero Pacifica. 
7:15 Flor y Canto. 
8:15 Nuestra Comunidad Latina. 
9:15 Voz y Raiz de Latinoameri- 
cana. 

10:15 America Latina en Marcha. 
11:00 Janus Co. Radio Theatre. 
Jan and Mallory Geller host. 
11.30 The Late Night News. 
12:00 Something's Happening! 
Open phones. 



January FOLIO PAGE 17 



28 Friday 



y^.OO Sunrise Concert. We Call It 
Music: bop jazz with Jim Seely. 
7:00 Morning Magazine. 
9:00 Listener Read All About It. 
9:25 Calendar. 

1^^.30 Amelia Airwaves. Susan Ker- 
nes with music for diverse tastes. 
11:30 Morning Reading. 

^tZ:00 Noon Concert. Soundboard. 
John Schneider hosts. 
2:00 The Afternoon Air. Akemi 
Kikumura, a multi-talented actress/ 
author, will share insights into her 
new book, Through Harsh Winters: 
The Life of a Japanese Immigrant 
Woman, inspired by her mother's 
life— she will talk with Miya Iwata- 
ki; 2:30, Intergay: a syndicated 
weekly report with David Wynyard; 
3:00, News headlines; 3:30, News- 
watch, 4:30, Just a IVIinute with 
Nancy Hollander and Blase Bon- 
pane alternating weekly; 5:30, The 
Iron Triangle with Gordon Adams; 
5:55, Calendar. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
7:00 The Health Department. A! 
Hyebner hosts. 

00 Le Jazz Hot & Cool. John 
Breckow hosts. 

10:00 Hour 25. Science Fiction. 
Join Mike Model and Mel Gilden 
for a preview of sf media in 1983. 

y^-.QQ Straight, No Chaser. Jazz 
Vi/ith Jay Green. 

^^00 Music, Inc. Pearl Shelby 
hosts. 



29 Saturday 



^fTDO Genesis of a Music. Music 
from the 12th to 20th centuries, 
national and international, explor- 
ing roots, influence, causes and ef- 
fect. David Porter hosts. 

KST30 Folk Music. John Davis hosts. 
10:30 Halfway Down the Stairs. 
Unlce Ruthie hosts. 
Uncle Ruthie hosts. 

y^:2Q Ballads, Banjoes & Blue- 
grass. Tom Sauber hosts. 
12:25 Calendar. 

12:35 The Car Show. Len Frank 
and John Retsek host. Open 
ofeenes. 

»'^:00 Carnival of Music. 

y^OO Sounds of Jamaica. The best 



in Reggae music, with host Miss 
Wire Waist. 

6:00 The Saturday Night News. 
6:30 The Poetry Connexion. The 
guest is Terry Kennedy. Wanda 
Cole.nan and Austin Strauss host. 

l^-^rSO Up From the Ash Grove. Ed 
Pearl with a sampler of ethnic and 
popular musics, sometimes with a 
political direction. 

^ff:00 Land of a Thousand Dances. 
Jimmy Hori presents Reggae, Soul 
and Dance music— plus Jimmy's 
personal Top Ten each week. 

|>f2:00 12 O'clock Rock. A maga 
zine format program on post-punk 
underground rock, produced by 
Andrea 'Enthal with Liz Garo, Jeff 
Harris, Steve Barker, Lezlie Lee, 
Keith Goshorn and others. Each 
program contains a live concert & 
new post-punk underground record 
releases. 



30 Sunday 



^6':00 Gospel Caravan. Prince Dixon 
hosts. 

9:00 National Security. Ian Mas- 
ters hosts. 

11:00 Dorothy Ray Healey. Com 
mentary. 

I»^T5:00 Many Worlds of Music. Mari- 
o Casetta hosts. 

j^/*rDO The Sunday Opera. 1 1:30: 
Tenor of the f/mes- January's 
wonderful featured tenor, the late 
Mario Del Monaco, is celebrated in 
song and commentary by ardent ad- 
mirer Fred Hyatt. 1:30-5 pm: Cata- 
lani: La Wally with Mario Del Mon- 
aco, Renata Tebaldi with Monte 
Carlo Opera Orchestra and Chorus, 
Fausto Cleva, conductor. (London 
OSA 1392). Fred Hyatt hosts. 
5:00 East Wind. Ernesto Arellano, 
Secretary General of the KMU-Kilu- 
sang Mayo Uno (the May 1st Move- 
ment) which is the largest indepen- 
dent federation of labor unions in 
the Philippines, will talk about the 
struggle of the Filipino workers 
and how they are organizing under 
Marcos' martial law. In September 
key KMU leaders were arrested. 
Arellano was out of the country at 
the time and has not been able to 
return. He will speak with Enrique 
de la Cruz and Linda Mabalot of 
the Alliance for Social Justice in 
the Philippines. 



6:00 The Sunday Evening News. 
6:30 The Science Connection. 

Steve and Vera Kilston with the la- 
test science news and views. 

^/^OO Preachin' the Blues. Mary Al 
din hosts. 

8:30 IMRU. The IMRU Gay/Les- 
bian news report, features, calen- 
dar. 

I^,<«fr30 Folkscene. A program of tra 
ditional and contemporary folk mu- 
sic, featuring live music and inter- 
views with the performers. Tune in 
for a special live guest this evening. 
Roz and Howard Larman host. 

|,»'T2:00 Smoke Rings. Six hours of 
jazz with John Breckow. 



31 Monday 



1^:00 Sunrise Concert. Lorin 

Sklamberg presents vocal music. 
7:00 Morning Magazine. News: the 
latest events; 7:15, Commentary 
with Phyllis Bennis; 7:30, News 
Check-In: interviews, features, etc.; 
8:30, Newscast: an extended re- 
port; 9:00, Read All About It; 
9:25, Calendar. 
9:30 Folkdance with Mario!! 
11:30 Morning Reading. 

^^:00 Noon Concert. Music of 
the Americas. Focus on American 
Indian music on recording. Jeannie 
Pool hosts. 

2:00 The Afternoon Air. Alan 
Watts: "Psychedelic Explosion," 
part 3 of 4, from MEA, Box 303, 
Sausalito, Ca. 94965; 3:00, News 
headlines; 3:30, open time; 4:30, 
Consider the Alternatives; 5:00, 
Body Politics with Gary Richwald; 
5:55, Calendar. 
6:00 The Evening News. 
6:45 Commentary. Charles Morgan 

7:00 Labor Scene. Sam Kushner 
V^30 Chapel, Court & Countryside. 

Joseph Spencer presents early clas- 
sical music. 
V^OO Johnny Otis: Blue Monday 
Edition. Traditional Rhythm & 
Blues, Jazz and Gospel; with lively 
discussions and live performances. 
11:00 American Mercury. 
11:30 The Late Night News. 
12:00 Something's Happening! 
Alan Watts: "Ramakrishna, Rama- 
na Maharshi, & Krishnamurti" 
part 2. Krishnamurti speaks. Open 
'til 6. 



January FOLIO PAGE 18 



Report 

to the 
Listener 

Jim Berland, 
General Manager. 



V^ 



Jf\ 



We ended the Fall Fund Drive 
on Novennber 22 with a total of 
5134,000 pledged. So far we have 
collected $78,000 (Dec. 9). Our 
quarterly mailing returns are not in- 
cluded yet, and we hope that you 
who are current subscribers who 
did not give during the drive will 
respond to that appeal. That will 
be added into the total. If that is 
$15,000, we will have $25,000 
more to raise in January. We deci- 
ded to stop on November 22 be- 
cause of the transmitter installa- 
tion schedule. The new transmitter 
is going on this week, according to 
the latest delayed schedule, and 
thus our special Fund Drive in Jan- 
uary should be a more effective ef- 
fort than it would have been to 
continue on with the old transmit- 
ter and antenna. We were off the 
air for 12 hours and at vastly re- 
duced power for a few more days. 
Fundraising during that time was 
very low. The drive finished on a 
high note with $7,000 contributed 
on Blues Gospel and Rhythm & 
Blues Day, and more than $8,000 
on Fate of the Earth Day. 

The transmitter installation con- 
tinued to experience some delay. 
The antenna manufacturer had 
their test stand shorted out by the 
rain storms in Sacramento, and has 
been altering the design as they 
construct to provide the most ef- 
fective pattern for dissemination of 
our signal. As stated above, the an- 
tenna should be hung on December 
14, and the transmitter connected 
shortly thereafter. I'll believe it 
when I hear it. And when it does 
get up to full power, we would like 
to hear from you in writing about 
improvements or denegration of 
your reception, at home, at work, 
and in your car. Please write to me 
(Attention Transmitter) and let me 
know how you are hearing us. 

Special week of fundraising: 
January 15 to 21— As explained 
above, we need to finish off the 



Fall Fund Drive in the winter. This 
one week should do it, and we hope 
with style and content. Pacifica- 
thon will look at two years of the 
Reagan Administration, war and 
peace, and celebrate the music of 
the 30's, 40's, 50's, and 60's. See 
listings for details. 

Challenge '83 

January 1, 1983 begins a critical 
year for KPFK. With our new trans- 
mitter up to power, we will enter 
into a year-long campaign to double 
the size of our subscriber base, 
from 15,000 to 30,000. Such an 
accomplishment would solve our 
operating problems, and equip us 
to meet the many challenges of 
1984 and beyond. To accomplish 
this we will need your direct help. 

We are asking each one of you 
to get at least one other new sub- 
scriber to KPFK. During early Feb- 
ruary we will be mailing our recruit- 
ment kits to help you in your ef- 
fort. But you can begin now by 
using the subscription form on page 
23. This effort also means continu- 
ing all of you as subscribers, or re- 
placing those who leave with addi- 
tional new subscribers. Traditional- 
ly 50% of you do not renew each 
year. If that continues we would 
have to add 7500 new subscribers 
just to stay even, and 15,000 more 
to meet our goal. We are going to 
rely on you to do both, for at least 
this one year, renew yourself and 
get one more person to join. Even 
doing this for one year would al- 
low us to outreach with promotion 
money, to get new listeners. 

Growth in listeners also means 
growth in subscribers. Our compre- 
hensive campaign will be built 
around community outreach to 
work along side of your efforts. 
Beginning in February with black 
history month, KPFK will link pro- 
gramming specials to outreach to 
a part of our constituancy. This will 
continue throughout the year. In 
twelve months we will address the 



communities of women, labor, 
peace and environmental activists, 
civil libertarian and civil rights 
fighters, third world communities, 
internationalists, economic demo- 
crats, and other radicals, free think- 
ers, artists, cultural workers, drama- 
tists, writers, poets, seers and doers. 
In each month we will focus upon 
these organizations and individuals 
who can help us broaden our reach 
among people who share those con- 
cerns or conditions. It will be a one- 
time request for help from you to 
us, delivered organizationally, from 
labor, church groups, community 
organizations and progressive 
movement groups. 

We believe that this effort, com- 
bined with the energy of our sub- 
scribers, promoted on and off the 
air, linked to programming, can 
make Campaign '83 a qualitatively 
uplifting experience for Pacifica 
Radio. If you would like to help, 
or have your organization involved, 
please write KPFK, Campaign '83, 
Box 8639, Universal City, Ca. 
91608. 

-Jim Berland 
General Manager 

P. S. — There were some errors in the 
Statement of Ownership in the De- 
cember issue of the Folio. We will 
re-run the corrected form in the 
February Issue. 



January FOLIO PAGE 19 



Letters 



Dear Editor; 

Perhaps belatedly I wish to com- 
ment on the malicious attack on 
Dr. Israel Shahak of Hebrew Uni- 
versity in Jerusalem for his article 
"The Jewish Religion and its Atti- 
tude to Non-Jews." Ironically 
enough his article starts by quoting 
Spinoza: "In a free state every man 
can think what he wants and say 
what he thinks." Zionism raised its 
ugly head in the United States after 
Spinoza wrote these words. Few 
men can say what they think if 
their thought opposes the position 
and ideology of the Zionist move- 
ment. This explains why Dr. Sha- 
hak was assailed for a reasonable, 
documented point of view. 

The Zionist movement in Ameri- 
ca is blackmailing Christians and 
Jews through the incessant use of 
the label "anti-Semitic." Any and 
all criticism of the actions of the 
state of Israel ranging from its cre- 
ation in 1948 through the displace- 
ment of the indigenous Palestinian 
population to the monstrous mas- 
sacres in the Shatilla and Sabra 



TO ALL LISTENERS: KPFK is 
building a new studio upstairs and 
has run out of funds for purchasing 
material: We are looking for some- 
one who can donate carpeting. We 
need industrial carpet, 44 square 
yards of ribbed loop or looped 
{not shag), preferably a graphite 
color, with a 42 oz. jute pad. Please 
call Sherry Novick at 877-2711 
during business hours if you can 
help. THANK YOU. 



OLD RADIO IS ALIVE! Science 
fiction -drama-comedy -westerns- 
mystery shows, on tape. Large se- 
lection & new releases. Illustrated 
catalog $2 refundable. R. Hooper 
3074 Molokai Place, Costa Mesa, 
Ca. 92626 



camps is either stifled of dismissed 
by resorting to the label "anti-Semi- 
tism." 

What the western world seems 
to have forgotten is that Judaism is 
not Zionism and to be anti-Zionist 
is totally respectable, and not in the 
remotest way to be anti-Semitic. 
The Holocaust, anti-Semitic label- 
ing and the syndrome of anti- anti- 
Semitism have assumed the prime 
position of the United States bat- 
tiefront of the continued Middle 
East war. Until all of us are able to 
freely criticize Zionism, Israel, Ju- 
daism and Jews, we will not ad- 



vance one inch towards solving a 
conflict which could result in the 
end of western civilization. 

I scarcely agree with everything 
Dr. Shahak has written or said, but 
I must defend totally his right to 
say it without his or anyone in his 
position being exposed to an odious 
label. If the United States is really 
to consider itself a free nation, then 
everyman indeed must be allowed 
to say what he thinks (short of 
course of advocating the destruc- 
tion of the nation.) 

Very cordially, 
(Dr.) Alfred M. Lilienthal 



<^^^- 



/f'*' Aor^ rt». 



<;<;::""■" 
i\>'^ - 









Jahuary FOLIO PAGE 20 



Classified 



1983 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr./ 
Black History calendar. Send $2.50 
to K.E.C. Publications, 21203A 
Hawthorne Blvd., Suite 5212, Tor- 
rance, California 90503. 



Take steps for freedom from reli- 
gion with an active organization. 
For information write ATHEISTS 
UNITED, P.O.Box 65706, Los 
Angeles, CA., 90065, or call (213) 
254-4914. 



WRITING AND EDITING 

Pat Fitzgerald M.A. English 

790-6042 Evenings 



THIS SPACE COULD BE YOURS 

for the meager sum of $10— and 

you can reach 15,000 people for an 

entire month! Call the Folio at 

(213) 877-2711 



What exactly does 

EARWORKS 

do? 

Earworks designs and installs musi- 
cally satisfying home audio sys- 
tems, or counsels you in your own 
equipment purchase. A housecall 
diagnosis and repair service is also 
available. 




Discount stores are not good places 
to go for advice. Market pressures 
force them to recommend compo- 
nents for reasons that have nothing 
to do with how well they reproduce 
music. Earworks' principal stock-in- 
trade is information and know-how, 
wedded to a reliable sense of how 
real, live music sounds. Earworks 
isn't beholden to any manufacturer. 
We can't offer you discounts, but 
we can guide you toward the most 
musical svstem in your price range. 
If you wish, your system will be set 
up and voiced by a thoroughly ex- 
perienced audio professional. Please 
call for more information. 

Peter Sutheim's I 

earworks 

PRIVATE AUDIO PRACTICE 
(213)255-2425 




THROW YOUR 
GLASSES AWAY! 

& LEARN TO SEE withjiun 



■ complete training in a single workshop 

This IS Ihe oulslanding T.O.P. Training The Omnision Program: byjiun lor Ihe Iranstormalion ol Vision In ils Functional aspecl il is Ihe ONLY training 
which SHOWS vou on v'oursell HOW your eyes are mis-coordinating and HOW to coordinate them lor correct locus Whatever your locusing problem — near- 
sighted larsighied astigmatism a wandering eye -it is simply a matter of wrong locusing ADAPTATIONS or HABITS' All habits lor maiadaptalions) can be 
unlearned In its Psychological aspect we uproot the predispositions to creating and holding visual limitations 
IMMEDIATE IMPROVEMENT IS USUALLY NOTED 
Experience a whole new pattern m HOW TO USE YOUR EYES CORRECTLY with sell-evideni demonstrations Not eyeball exercises or the Bates Method but 
introducing a whole new scope in vision capacity And a whole new emotional liberation Irom binding conditions limiting one s vision It does not matter what 
your age how long you have worn corrective lenses, or degree of seventy ol impairment But speed of results vanes individually by degree ol application and 
emotional receptivity _ 

PROVEN. ACCLAIMED 
Called outstanding and lanlastic' m published reviews and by alternative health and growth organizations and proven by independent surveys 
conducted by research organizations, the breakthrough Program is taught by Jiun. who himself wore glasses tor 18 years He attained perfect vision in lust J 
days retained tor 19 years nowi — 

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Your satisfaction is guaranteed, or your money will be refunded 

IMMEDIATE OPPORTUNITY IN YOUR LOCALITY IF YOU ACT NOW 

Call or write tor comprehensive brochure See lor Yourself 

T.O.P. Training Irom FLOWSHIP Inc 3557A Baldwin Avenue, IVtakawao Maui, Hawaii 96768 

FOR INFORMATION ON THE PROGRAM IN L.A. & SAN DIEGO. 

CALL JIUN PERSON TO PERSON COLLECT: (808)572-0666. 

(be sure Ihe c-tli i^ person lo-person ideally call atter II 00 A M youi lime) 
■.av'ng Send T O P lo Ipnnt mailing addres?.| i 







January FOLIO PAGE 21 



I^NDO/H tElSGTHS 

"The Harbor Area's Only Indepeiidciitly 

Owned and Operated Community Newspaper." 

Random Lengths is a free speech community 
paper that presents issues from alternative 
perspectives not commonly found in the regular 
print media. We openly solicit articles from all 
people in the community. Subscriptions $3.50 
per year. 



RANDOM LENGTHS 

P.O. Box 731 
San Pedro, CA 90733 



IRISH HARPS 
Irish harps are beautiful and easy to 
play. They come in various sizes 
and styles. For free brochures 
write to: Sylvia Woods, P.O.Box 
29521, Los Angeles, CA. 90029 or 
call Sylvia at (213) 247-4177 



Your new resolutions may need 
strengthening to go from idea into 
ACTION! Brief therapy can firm 
up your decisions, give you clari- 
ty and support to do new things 
in new ways. Maria Joyouspirit 
Jimakas, Ph.D., Lie. Clin. Psycholo- 
gist WLA: 478-6668 



AVANT GARDE? 
NEW THING?? 
FREE JAZZ??? 
NEW MUSIC???? 




Or music that won't stand still long enough to be categorized? 

We think that's a better definition. And that's why we stock such labels as: 

BEAD * BLACK SAINT * BVHAAST * DELMARK * FMP * ICP 
IMPROVISING ARTISTS * INCUS * INDIA NAVIGATION * NESSA 
OGUN * SACKVILLE * EL SATURN * ENJA * MOERS MUSIC 
SPOT LIGHT * STEEPLECHASE * TRIO * DENON * WHYNOT / 
BAYSTATE * SOULNOTE * MPS * AFFINITY * UNIQUE JAZZ 

AND MANY OTHER INDEPENDENT LABELS 




1101 E. WALNUT 

PASADENA 

449-3359 



January FOLIO PAGE 22 



Your Subscription 



The Computer. 

Our computer is located in Santa 
Barbara. Your payment may not go 
into the computer as quickly as you 
might think because payments go to 
our lockbox and through the bank 
before they are fed into the compu- 
ter. This process often takes more 
than a week from the time you send 
your payment. So, if you send your 
check by the 1st of the month, you 
may receive the Folio for the fol- 
lowing month. 
Bill Payment. 

Always send a bill with your check! 
We cannot credit your account cor- 
rectly unless we know exactly what 
your check is paying for. If you send 
a check for a pledge payment with- 
out a bill, you might get credit for 
a new subscription and still be bil- 
led for your original pledge. 
First Class Folio Mailing. 
The Folio is mailed Second Class, 
and should take 2 to 5 days to get 
to most places. Unfortunately, our 
experience has not been good, esp- 
ecially with outlying areas. First 
Class mailing is available for $10 ex- 
tra per year (prorated at 85 cents 
per month for current subsrciptions). 
If you get your Folio on time but 
would like to receive it well before 
the first of the month, you may want 
to get the First Class service. 
I Didn't Get My Folio . . . 
The Folio is mailed before the 24th 
of the month. If you have not re- 
ceived your Folio by the first of the 
month: 

1) Check your subscription expira- 
tion date on the previous Folio mail- 
ing label (upper right hand corner of 
label). 

2) Make sure you haven't moved 
without notifying us. 

3) If you haven't moved and are cur- 
rently enrolled as a subscriber, con- 
tact your local postmaster about de- 
livery. 

4) Send us a previous Folio label 
with an explanatory note and request 
a new Folio be sent to you. 



Moving / Address Changes. 

If you move, your Folio will not be 
forwarded unless you have requested 
Second Class forwarding from the 
Post Office. The best way to ecpedite 
an address change and assure contin- 
ued receipt of the Folio is to contact 
us in writing 6 weeks before you 
move, giving us your name, old zip- 
code, and new address. There is an 
address form on the back page of the 
Folio that you can clip: it already 
has your current mailing label on its 
back. Always include your account 
number at the top of your Folio la- 
bel for instant handling. Address 
changes that we get back from the 
Post Office cost us 25 cents apiece. 
Changes can take 8 weeks to affect 
your account. 
Prisoner Subscriptions. 
KPFK sends a free subscription to 
any prisoner upon request. 
Cassette Folios for the Print Hand- 



icapped. The Folio is available on 
cassette (returnable) to all print 
handicapped subscribers. If you'd 
like to receive the Cassette Folio, 
please tear off the address label on 
the back of your Folio and send it 
along with a note (or you may call). 
Within 2 months, you'll be receiving 
your complete program guide on 
cassette. The cassettes are returned 
to us at the end of each month to be 
re-used. 

Exchange Mailing Lists. 
KPFK exchanges and rents its sub- 
scriber lists to other organizations of 
common interest (Channel 28, Ralph 
Nader, ACLU, etc.). If you don't 
want to be on exchange mailing lists, 
send your Folio label to the Subscri- 
ptions Department and ask for an 
"NJ" code. Your name will then be 
automatically excluded from all mail 
ings except for the Folio and other 
communications from KPFK. 



MAIL COUPONS AND CHECKS TO KPFK SUBSCRIBER SERVICES 
P.O. BOX 40490, SANTA BARBARA, CA. 93103-9990 



( ) New subscription 

( ) $30 / year regular rate. 

( ) $15 / year low income. 

( ) $75 /year Film Club 



( ) Renewal 

( ) $15/72 year. 
( ) $ 8/ Vi year. 

( ) $40 down Film Club, then bill $5 /mo. 
-I- $5 service ($80 total) 



Film Club Conversion of Your Current Subscription 

($15 credit given— new subscription for 12 months created.) 

( ) $60 Full Payment. 

Gift Subscription 

Check subscription rate above, and be sure to include BOTH the name and 

address of your gift recipient and your name, address, and current Folio 

label. 



Name 



Address 



City and Zip 



January FOLIO PAGE 23 




DEFINITELY A MAMMOTH FUNDRAISER! 

SUPPORT KPFK AND HAVE AN EXHILARATING EXPERIENCE AT SEA 

THE GREAT WHALE WATCH — SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 1983 8:45 am to Noon 

HEAR ALL ABOUT THEM FROM THE EXPERTS 

For reservalions call 877-2711 during business hours. Space is limited, so get aboard fast, at the 
Balboa Pavilion on the Balboa Peninsula, Newport Beach. Adults Si 0.00. children under 12, S7.50 

Take a day and see the sea's superstars. The Great Whale W atch, sponsored by the Orange County 
Friends of KPFK and the American Cetacean Society of Orange County. 



KPFK Folio 

(ISSN-0274-4856) 

P.O. Box 8639 

Universal City CA 91608 

Studios at 3729 Cahuenga Blvd. West 

North Hollywood CA 91604 



Second-Class Postage Paid 
at Studio City CA and at 
additional mailing offices 



TIME VALUE 
Program material 

Jan. 



Pacifica Radio -Los Angeles