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c^ FREMONT HIGH SCHOOL 



ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



mim/d 1 




This being a war year every citizen, every industry, every busi- 
ness is working for the nation's war effort. Fremont too has its 
sleeves rolled up . . . "Fremont is at Work." r The cry all over 
the nation is "Buy defense stamps and bonds." Fremont has 
answered by waging a huge defense stamp campaign. < Fre- 
mont is ready to defend itself against air raids. First aid crews 
stand by to treat casualties. Corridors cushioned by walls and 
adjoining rooms, provide shelter, y An adequate food supply 
is on hand in the event of a siege, r Stretchers are produced in 
our wood shop in collaboration with and for the Red Cross. *• In 
cooperation with the Government Office for Emergency Manage- 
ment, Fremont is actively supporting the government's "Salvage 
for Victory Drive" by collecting newspapers, magazines, books, 
games, tin tubes, aluminum and brass. / Teachers are giving 
their time to air raid warden duty, auxiliary fire services, ambu- 
lance corps and others, f Teachers are also donors to the blood 
banks. / Knitting classes under the direction of the Gym Depart- 
ment have been organized and supply the Red Cross with 
afghans, sweaters and other supplies. / Through the American 
Forever Bulletins the home is acquainted with war precautions, 
helpful hints and suggestions, y Yes, Fremont is doing its 
part, doing it vigorously and wholeheartedly. 



OeMcaum 

In appreciation for the excellent service rendered to 

John C. Fremont High School and as a token of our 

regard, we, the student body, respectfully dedicate 

this, our annual, to Captain John P. Inglis. For the 

past ten years Captain Inglis has been our leader, 

and the inspiration which has inspired us and driven 

us ever onward. During these war years, his fervent 

patriotism has been an outstanding example to those 

of us who might have been faltering in our duties to 

our country. His earnest and friendly manner and 

ever-smiling greeting will be missed in Fremont's 

corridors in years to come, but the patriotic 

spirit and gentle kindliness he has left 

with us will ever be remembered. 




CAPTAIN JOHN P. INGLIS 
Principal 




MISS MARY C. MEREDITH 
Girls' Vice-Principal 



8 



DOC SKINNER 
Boys' Vice-Principal 





ELIZABETH LETENDER 
Editor-in-Chief 



FREMONTIAN 



With the uncertainties of the present war this may 
prove to be Fremont's final annual "for the dura- 
tion." Assuming this to be a fact, the staff has this 
year endeavored to produce not the usual Senior 
Yearbook, but a Fremont Yearbook, in which we 
hove faithfully reproduced the highlights of a war 
year at Fremont. Our theme "Fremont at Work" 
is especially appropriate because this year 
Fremont has been truly at work. The hearty coop- 
eration of the entire student body has made this 
book possible and our thanks are hereby ex- 
tended. Especially we wish to thank Mrs. Baldwin, 
Mr. Roberts and Mr. Earl Gray for their forebear- 
ance and understanding help in producing 
"Fremont at Work." 



10 







MR. KING 
Annual Advisor 



FREMONTIAN 
'42 





MR. WIKSTROM 
Photo Advisor 



MRS. NORDEN 
Art Advisor 



PHOTO CLASSES 




n 



FREMONTIAN STAFF 









Jean Benson 

Calendar Editor 



Marie Bollotte 

Senior Photo 



Jim Clark Gweneth Davis Phyllis Gale 

Business Manager Associate Editor, Girls' Sports Senior Photo 




Betty Goritz 

Senior Photo 



Priscilla Harris 

Associate Calendar 



Gloria Krueger 

Senior Photo 



Babe Lagna 

Senior Photo 



Helga Ledel 

Fremont at Work 




Mary Jane Loro 

Organizations Editor 



Jack Makin Pat Ollinger Frances Saunders Virginia Sponaugle 

Boys' Sports Senior Photo Editor Senior Photos Associate Organizations 




r/ /■ 



Dorothy Steffens 

Senior Photos 



Warren King Eva Furiani Marjorie Forrest Robert Drankow 

Photo Editor Calendar Organizations Art Editor 



i 



12 




13 




MISS MITCHELLL 



MRS. O'BRIEN 



W'42 SPONSORS 



^ 




Holding over three class officers from their 
Senior B term and electing two new ones, 
the Westerners of W'42 started on their long 
eventful journey over Senior A trail with 
great enthusiasm and determination. 

Although one of the smallest classes to 
graduate from Fremont they were by no 
means lacking in talent. Living up to the old 
adage that good things come in small pack- 
ages, the Westerners were the only class in 
Fremont history to win both the Senior A-B 
Brawl and the Senior A-B football game. 
They left a clearly marked trail of scholastic 
and athletic achievement. For a small class 
they possessed more than their share of out- 
standing individual personalities. They also 
had the distinction of being the largest W'42 
class in the city. 

On January 28, 1942, the Westerners of 
W'42 held their last great roundup in Inglis 
Hall, and with heads held high departed 
on their respective journeys over the long 
and arduous trail of life. 




I 



K 




BILL JAROSACK EVELYN BLAGBRO 

HARRY GARO MARIAN VILLANUA 

TOM VOURNAS 



14 



W ' 4 2 



EPHEBIANS 




EVELYN BLAGBRO 



^T'^ 





VIRGINIA BOLLETTE 



DON EDGREN 






HARRY GARO 



PHYLLIS KANAKY 



BILL SPAETER 



EPHEBIAN OATH OF ALLEGIANCE 
"We will never bring to this, our city, 
by any act of dishonesty or cowardice, 
nor ever desert our suffering comrade in 
the ranks. We will fight for the ideals 
and sacred things of the city, both 
alone and with many. We will revere 
and obey the city's laws and do our 



best to incite a like respect in those 
above us who are prone to annul or 
set them at naught. We will strive un- 
ceasingly to quicken the public sense 
of civic duty. Thus, in all these ways, 
we will transmit this city not only not 
less, but far greater and more beautiful 
than it was transmitted to us." 





DONALD TILLMAN 



MARIAN VILLANUA 



f 



15 



'i 




CHARLES BRESSOUD 
President 




The Class of Summer, Nineteen-hundred and Forty-two, setting 
the nose of their plane into the blue horizon, soared through a 
term of greater knowledge and social activities. 

Starting their senior careers, these mighty Commanders had a 
Recognition Day that John C. Fremont will long remember. Cap- 
tain Inglis and the class officers arrived in two army jeeps, onto 
a field where the Senior A's had formed into an S'42. 

The interesting events that tooi< place during the term were: 
the A and B reception, a brawl, a Sadie Hawkins dance, a 
sweater dance, the Mothers' Tea, a Senior banquet ending with 
a beautiful and impressive graduation. 



"V 
m 
m 



MARILYN WINNIE 
Girls' Vice- 
President 



JACKIE KINDIG 
Secretary 




MARION KONRAD 
Boys' Vice- 
President 



RALPH FROLEY 
Treasurer 



16 



i 



S ' 4 2 



SPONSORS 



"What a worry, such a busy semester ahead, 
more time taken up, lots of planning." These 
must have been the thoughts in the sponsors' 
minds when they first gazed upon the wonder- 
ful class of Summer '42. 

But together with the head sponsor, Mrs. Carr, 



they worked to make this term of activities one 
of the most enjoyable and interesting this class 
has ever had. And when these Seniors, with 
diploma in hand, set their courses into a new 
field, they will always remember, with gratitude, 
the work of their sponsors. 



T"^"?*-'". sa^SSSMW^ 



MR. BROWN 



MISS CAPITO 



MR. KING 



MRS. SHAW Jt 




MRS. CARR 
Chairman 



MRS. FEE 



MISS RENICK 



MR. WIKSTROM 



17 




S'42 EXECUTIVE BOARD 




18 



SENIOR As 

Don Adams 

Mary Ana Adams 
George Agajanian 
Silvio Agnifili 

John Aguirre 
Dorothy Alford 
Margaret Alley 
John Alvarez 



Cecelia Amador 
Barbara Anderson 
Gloria Arata 
Donald Arp 




Henry Bahr 

Mary Anna Baker 
Joseph Barbato 
Dorothy Barnes 

Merlene Barnes 
Billie Jean Barron 
Paul Bartley 
Shirley Basket 



June Batterton 
Velma Baugh 
Ann Becker 

Frances Belchner 



19 






Mary Bellino 
Jean Benson 

Mary Jane Berger 
Marian Binder 




Michael Brigandi 
Vyrle Brigham 
Betty Brown 
Doris Brown 






Edsell Bowman 
Jim Brady 

Dona Bremner 
Charles Bressoud 



Betty Bryant 
Lillian Bryant 
Glenna Bundy 
Mary Buono 



Manie Burg 

Mildred Burrow 
Jane Burton 

Gladys Butcher 




i! 



20 






Leo BuHer 

Lorraine Campillo 
Lois Campman 
Ethel Carpenter 



Lucille Corr 

Bertha Carrasco 
Joe Carrasco 

Thelma Carrasco 

William Casano 
Delos Champaign 
Jane Case 
Betty Cate 



Beatrice Chapman 
Anita Chester 

David Christoffenson 
Dorothy Clarke 







^^. 










Mary Clevenger 
Dorothy Coates 
Dorothy Coleman 
Margaret Conklin 



Alton Connor 
Dorothy Cory 
Iris Cowie 

Clarence Cox 



Marilyn Crabbe 
Jennetta Crayk 
Jean Chenshaw 
Ruth Cribbs 



21 



I 



Rosellen Doke 
Robert Drankow 
Patricia Dunlap 
Virginia Draper 



George Dykstro 
Marie Earnshaw 

Geneva Edmondson 
Norma Elias 



Rosemary Critchfield 
Glen Crowley 
Anna Cuccia 
Bill Gulp 



Eugene Cuthbertson 
Jack Cutner 
Ann D'Aguiar 

SaJvotore D'Angelo 

Gweneth Davis 

Gertrude Darensbourg 
Jeanne Davis 
Mary Davis 




22 



Norman Elkin 
Frank Endo 



\- 




Bennie Engle 
James Enochs 



Kathernine Eymann 
Gloria Eyraud 

Christine Fanning 
Beverly Farnsworth 



. ~< Edona Ferguerson 

^ \ ^ Jack Forrar 
■^ ^^^'a-^^^ — Steve Fidchina 



<N^ 



Rose Fink 

Stanley Fischbeck 
Carlton Fisher 
Grace Fisher 
Betty Fiske 




U .Jk1k( 





i 




















•s.' *» 






Margaret Flores 
Mickey Foree 
Bette Frank 

Marjorie Fraser 

Mabel Frederickson 
Jane Freeman 
Velma Fries 
Ralph Froley 



Dorothy Fuller 
Ray Fuller 

Ruth Furgason 
Phyllis Gale 



23 



Margaret Gallagher 
Darlene Galloway 
Flora Garcia 

George Gardner 



Jean Garneau 
Virginia Garrett 
Hortense Garza 
John Gaston 



Danial Gelfer 
Enid George 
Viola Gibbs 
Dick Godfrey 




Lorraine Guilmette 
Grace Haggblom 
Virginia Hall 

Aileen Hamilton 



Jack Hancock 
Alice Hanley 
Helen Hanses 
Clyde Harmon 






24 




Anna Mae Harms 
Ella Harris 
Doris Harvey 
Victor Hasson 



Bonnie Hatch 

Norman Helmick 
Carolyn Henriques 
Robert Hernandez 



Betty Herrin 

Lorraine Hidden 
Una Holbek 

Anna Jean Hibler 



Virgil Holford 
Claire Hirsch 
John Hogan 

Marjorie Holman 



Marcheta Holt 
Phyllis Horn 

Frances Hosmer 
Henry Huber 



Betty Hutton 
Wayne Irwin 

Jacqueline Jackson 
Ida Jean Jones 



Maida Johnson 
Muriel Jones 
Shirley Jones 
Eva Jurich 



25 




Pauline Karm 
Bob Keel 
Mary Kelty 

Vivian Kennedy 



Thomas Kester 
Carl Kildoo 
Jackie Kindig 

Josephine Kinard 



Bonnie King 
Warren King 
Ken Kirby 
Ray Klein 



Elmer Koelling 
Anna Koettnetz 

Marion George Konrad 
A! Koopman 



Edna LaCosse 
Babe Lagna 

Imogene Landress 
Harry Lambert 



Jack Longdon 
Marilyn Laraby 
Sally Lazar 

Gerald Lawrence 






26 




Helga Ledel 
Mina Leech 

George Lempherc 
Ralph len 



Beverly Lenz 
Carl LendqursI 
Bill Lewis 

Elizabeth Letender 



Charles Lewis 

Rhea Lewis 

Bill Linn 

Norma Lipton 



Frank Lipus 
Fred Lloyd 

Hamilton Lloyd 
Lucy Lopez 



Peggy Mantecon 
Ann Martin 
Ann Martin 

Leila Macaulay 



Dick Marra 

Mine Marcotte 
Audrey Mainoid 
Jacic Makin 



27 



Jacquie Mestyanek 
George Meumann 
Dorothy Meyer 
Dorothy Melvin 

Virginia Michoud 
Betty Middleton 
Tom Mllett 
Bill Miller 



Dave MacLeod 
Betty MacGregor 
Winifred Maddux 
Bill Marsden 



Richard Mashburn 
Pat Mathers 

Anna Mathison 
Jack Mathison 



Norma Maxwell 
Betty Mayberry 
Rose McCarl 

Bonnie McElroy 




28 



/ 



John Miller 
Peggy Miller 
Rita Miller 
Ray Miller 



Don Mitchell 

Sadako Mitamura 
Doris Modglin 
William Mitchell 



Aslaug Moen 

Lylo Molle 

Josephine Montilepre 
June Monoghan 

Alexandria Mormanis 
Nellie Morgan 
Marian Morris 
Lila Ann Moss 









r I 




f= 



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'/^-fM 



Lisette Murin 

Frances Murray 
Lena Musella 
Richard Nagy 

Angelo Nicassio 
Jack Nemeth 
Joe Nemeth 

Marvin Newmcn 



Erwin Nickel 
Joyce Neilson 
Ed Nobbe 

Ann Nordwali 



-I.-L.-^ 



29 



Harold Norton 
Nils Oberg 
Pat Ollinger 
Joe Orlando 



Carilne Ortega 
Ralph Ortez 
Virginia Orton 
Frank Owen 



Peggy Paillet 
Paul Owen 
Bob Palmer 

Dorothy Partelow 




Anita Peterson 
Margie Phillips 
Bill Plumly 
Ruth Poppe 



Bill Powers 
Mary Post 
Don Pruns 

Kenneth Presley 



30 



f 

J 



■i' 



Imogene Pundsack 
Gene Guinn 
Milton Quinn 

Barbara Radcliff 



Helen Radick 
Mary Ramsay 
Bud Rand 

James Rankin 



Bernice Rash 
Paul Reagan 
Gene Record 
Joy Rector 



Arlene Rechter 
Helen Reeves 
Carolyn Rishel 
Dewey Robinson 





Kitty Rogers 
Arnold Roha 
Elizabeth Ross 
Gloria Ross 



Betty Rowane 
Carol Ruby 

Mildred Russell 

Charlotte Saltmarsh 



Aram Santoorjan 
Frances Saunders 
Jack Savage 
Lucille Savoca 



31 




Carlton Schleuter 
Glenn Selbert 
Helen Seim 
Art Serrano 



Charles Sherburn 
Rosalind Sherman 
Louise Shippey 
Betty Shisler 

Ruth Shopwin 
Maurine Shaw 
Richard Shaw 
Alleen Simmons 



Don Simmons 
Ruth Simpson 

Wayne Simpkins 
Louis Simon 



Betty Sine 

Genevieve Slane 
Juonita Sloan 
Paul Slocum 



'^ 



Don Landsing Smith 


Donald Smith 


Jack Smith 


Mildred Smith 


Melson Smith 


Earl Smyth 


Bill Spirito 


Virginia Sponaugle 



1^ f*l 



32 



I 



i 







Ruth Staggs 

Wilma Stallworth 
Hilbert Soderberg 
Fred Stange 



Dorothy StefFens 
Bob Stone 

Adrian Stoner 
Irene Strang 



June Stroh 
Betty Sturgill 

Louise Swortzendruber 
Delia Taylor 



Victor Taylor 
Herta Tensfeld 
Beverly Tharp 
Bill Thomas 



Jim Trudeau 
Maxine Tucker 
Anna Tuso 

Alicia Valenzuela 

Gwen Ulmer 
Lyman Vance 

Margaret VanSickle 
Barbara Underwood 



33 






Imi\«Ib iJl.U\ 





Enid Voight 

Catherine Wademan 
Bill Walker 
Frank Wall 



Maxine Wand 
Harold Watkins 
Eleanor Webster 
Geraldine Weems 



Peggy West 
Pat White 

Phiipe Wikstrom 
Ear! Wilbert 



Agnes Walker 
Robert Wilkins 
Richard Williams 
Margaret Wimsott 



Doris Wing 

Marilyn Winnie 
Ruth Wirth 
Ida Wolf 



Jack Woodruff 
Barbara Yerian 
Warren Young 
Marie Zlatich 



Bill Zsiga 

Maxine Capps 
Al Russell 

Beatrice Weldon 







34 



Ralph Barflett 



Marilyn Chittenden 



Jack Koonce 



Nadine Murrow 



Darrell PIckins 



Mary ShafFer 



Beatrice Weldon 



Regina Wojkiewicz 



Paul Wood 




35 




S'42 RECOGNITION DAY 




«l 



36 



S'42 EPHEBIANS 





MARY ANN BAKER ESTHER BRADFORD VYRLE BRIGHAM 






^'' 



y. 




ANITA CHESTER VIRGINIA DRAPER MARJORIE ERASER 





d \ T^ WkA\ 

CLYDE HARMON WAYNE IRWIN BILL LEWIS 






<f> 




ELIZABETH LETENDER MARY JANE LORO CHARLOTTE SALTMARSH VICTOR TAYLOR 



37 



W ' 4 3 



OFFICERS 



BOB ZALESKA 
President 



PHYLLIS MORRICAL 
Girls' Vice-President 



PEGGY GOETTEL 
Secretary 




I 



MALCOLM HASLAM 
Boys' Vice-President 



DOLORES MILLER 
Treasurer 



Proudly displaying the Red, White and 
Blue, symbolic of their patriotism, the 
"Midshipmen" embark on their last, but 
possibly most memorable year as Fremon- 
tians. Insignificant, perhaps so far as size 
is concerned, the class enrollment being 
only 260. But, considering the size or, 
"lack of size" we are endowed with many 
outstanding achievements. Parties, a very 
successful brawl, and a reception for the 



Sr. A's can be listed among the important 
and outstanding activities of the W. Class 
of '43. Pride of the class, in the school 
and in the country swells in the heart of 
every Midshipman with the display of his, 
our, and your colors. And the hope that 
the freedoms that these colors stand for 
in a nation, will be prevalent throughout 
our school, is the hope which is outstand- 
ing in the heart of every Midshipman. 



38 



W ' 4 3 



SPONSORS 



MR. BETTS 



MR. JOHNSON 




MISS FLACK 



MISS McADOW 



MRS. WEIDE 



The W'43 Sponsors have subdivided the 
activities of the Senior B class under the 
following chairmen: Mr. Betts, in charge 
of party, April 24, in charge of sweater 
order; Miss Flack, in charge of collections 
for sweaters, also helping with reception; 
Miss GrifFin, in charge of budget; Mr. 
Hazelwood, in charge of all printing: bal- 
lots, due cards, invitations, programs; Mr. 



Johnson, in charge of Midshipmen part 
of the Brawl between the Commanders 
and Midshipmen; helps with reception; 
Miss McAdow, in charge of Constitution 
preparation and reception favors; Mrs. 
Weide, trained leaders and class in yell; 
directed activities during dances; in 
charge of reception given for Comman- 
ders; Miss Davis, Head Sponsor. 



39 



SENIOR B's 

Teofile Acosta 

Maybelle Albright 
Harold Alvarez 

Elizabeth Anderson 



Walter Anderson 
Lorraine Andrews 
Phyllis Andrus 

Doris Angermayer 



Bernard Arklin 
Betty Armstrong 
Mary Armstrong 
Bertha Arzac 







Jean Baily 

Armando Balderrama 
Herbert Ball 
Barbara Baskerville 

Bob Bates 

Peggy Bayne 

Virginia Bedrosian 
Walter Belles 



Frank Bellino 
Anna Beyerle 
Early Black 

Margie Bezanson 



40 



Jack Blasman 
Asher Blayme 
Betty Boling 
Ceclia Bowen 



Louiso Bowen 
Melva Brenick 
Pat Burns 




Claire Brodsky 



Louie Cacia 
Eleanor Cabin 
Vicenta Cano 
Rita Calvono 



Cancetta Caringello 
Ruth Carlson 
Ruth Carpenter 
Tom Carroll 



Dale Cosby 

Premple Chatenovsky 
Benny Chavez 
George Chavez 



Karim Chlarson 
Leonark Cody 
Betty Cole 

Carol Collard 



Bud Cramer 

Gene Crowther 
Pete Cuccio 

Neva Cunningham 



41 









Jim Ferguson 

Elizabeth Flartery 
Yvonne Fletcher 
Bernice Fleisher 



Margie Forrest 
Frank Fratello 
Leo Fratello 
Helen Fretch 



Eva Furiani 
Ted Gambina 
Rene Garcia 
Melba Gardner 




■^\% 




James Curry 

Katherine Dedo 
Betty DeGroff 
Jack Delano 



Dorothy Dempey 
Earl De Sues 
Betty Dillion 

Cheechina Ditamasco 



Marguerite Dring 
Lester Drummond 
Dot Dyer 

Lettie Eastman 



Edsel Eckgen 
Harold Ehrlick 
Ruth Escallier 
Bob Falvey 




^.f^ 




W^\^ 



42 




Rose Marie Gladwell 
Ralph Gaskin 
Peggy Goettel 

Henrietta Gonzales 



James Graham 
Danny Guido 

Barbara Gunyon 
Rose Haas 



Pat Hale 

Gladys Hallabaug 
Ed Hank 

Betty Jane Hansen 

Howard Hansen 
Bill Harmon 
Helen Haro 

Jack Harrington 



Charlotte Hay 

Yvonne Hedmond 
Betty Hendershot 
Jean Hermann 



Donie Hess 
Hazel Hiner 

Margaret Hoaton 
Joyce Hoffman 



43 




Virginia Kretlaro 
Wilma Kuhl 
Phyllis Larson 
Tony Laudonio 

Harry Lema 

Connie Leightner 
Irwing Lerner 
Tony Lester 



Seymore Levin 
Rose Lippert 
Ruth Lopez 
Betty Luther 



Bert Hughes 
Irma Jacobs 

Gertrude Jeneks 
June Jensen 



Claire Johnsen 

Barbara Johnson 
Donald Johnson 
Bob Kain 



Richard Kellis 
Norma Kefer 
Sadie Kissich 
Joyce Klein 

Opal Knapp 
Josephine Knill 
Betty Koelling 
John Kokalj 

4ik 




44 



Rose Lytton 
Marie Mach 

Haslam Malcolm 
Lea Mantino 



Mary Manticon 
Catherine Marrs 
Josephine Martin 
Josephine Mayer 



Eleanor McGarrety 
Norman Mayer 
Paul Mays 
Bill Merbach 

Carolyn Mesick 
George Meyers 
Joe Michelangelo 
Delia Miller 





C:\ /n 








Dolores Miller 
Dorothy Miller 
Fay Milligan 
Leon Mohler 



Aubrey Monroe 
Betty Morgan 
Phyllis Morrical 
Eileen Nelson 

Mary Joe Nickelson 
Don Nogle 

Tom Nordbak 
Morton Norris 



45 







Betty Ogden 

Albert Nusinoro 
Eleanor Olson 
Joe Parks 



Nancy Payne 
Mary Petitt 

Marilyn Pettee 
Bette Phlllys 



Eleanor Pivvala 
Lourabel Plowman 
Betty Pollard 
Gilbert Powers 

Bernard Prechtl 
Walter Rainey 
Reames Rainey 
Betty Rainwater 



Barbara Reggio 
Herb Renter 
Lucille Rizzo 
Leona Rogers 

Jack Rollins 

Grace Rosensjwig 
Clarence Roth 
Jean Round 



Hortence Sanchez 
Seymore Sataloff 
Benita Schweichir 
John Sciarra 




W -* f^ 








46 



J 



Velma Seibert 
Violet Seller 
Frances Sharp 
Eleanor Shemek 



Ruth Shepord 

Milton Sherman 
Jeannette Smith 
Beverly Smith 



Tarnold Siggia 
Beatrice Singer 
Lois Salenski 
Rubin Sonoqui 

Gene Sproul 
Helen Starr 
Devota Swain 
Robert Stagg 




fjy^'h • /Jv,^'., 




'*' - M|^ ^"^ /^^i. 

'^cS ^^ ^'^ r^' 




Glen Swain 
Junie Sugino 

Martin Tattelman 
Paul Tedman 



Mercedis Teja 

Naomi Terzenback 
Pat Thayer 

Duane Thackeray 



Cleta Tracy 
Gene Trimble 
Mary Tsarekas 
Helen Whiir 



47 




Milan Ulovich 




Catherine Vasburg 


Arthur Valenzuela 




Robert Villareal 


Marianna Varvis 




Peter Vlonders 


Dorris Wagner 




Dorothy Watry 


Mildred Wallis 




Charles Weldon 


Geraldine Ware 




Lillian Womack 


Myron 


Willmore 




Bob Zoleska 





I 



I 



I 



48 



ANCHORS ■ 
A W E I G H 




^'^ till:'?* 





* 



:i„ 



49 



ANCHORS 
A W E I G H 




ANCHORS 
A W E I G H 





MARY ANN BAKER 
Vice-President 



RUTH MEINECKE 
Treasurer 



1^ 



W'4 2 



ATHENIAN SOCIETY 

Since the founding of the Athenian Society in 1926, with 43 members, it has 
grown to be one of the most prominent clubs in Fremont today with a total 
of about nine-hundred members, consisting of the entire Senior A and B 
classes. 

The Athenian Society sponsors various events and assemblies for the student 
body as well as the club members. 

Highlights of the Society's accomplishments this year were the inspiring 
Armistice Day program, the Senior A and B football game and the brawl, and 
the Homecoming Day festivities. 

W'42 Athenian President was Harold Latham. Ben Engle headed the Society 
during S'42. 



S'42 




BENNIE ENGLE 
President 



MARGARET ALLEY 
Secretary 



MADELINE HASKIN 
Treasurer 



52 



I 



y 




" 



53 




W'42 STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT 

Fremont will forget me but I'll never forget 
Fremont. Where else could one find such a great 
school with such a friendly faculty and cooperative 
Student Body? For me these past three years will 
live forever as the most outstanding in my life. 

In holding this office and in serving this school, I 
have profited not only by the experience I have 
gained but also by the friends I have made. I hope 
it will be the pleasure of future presidents to 
receive the help and support that I have had. 

This term of W'42 has marked the beginning of 
something which you, the Pathfinders who are left 
to carry on, will have a part in finishing. The Stars 
and Stripes will always wave and the honor of our 
Cardinal and Gray will be upheld if you will do 
your part by always conducting yourself appro- 
priately and by preparing yourself to meet the 

crisis. 

Always for Fremont, 

DON TILLMAN 



54 



f 



W'42 STUDENT 
COUNCIL 

Mary ShafFer 
Girls' Vice-President 
Bill Moody 

Boys' Vice-President 

Bennle Engle 

Secretory 



Phyllis Kanaky 

Girls' League President 

Victor Taylor 

Boys' Leogue President 

Anita Decker 

Girls' Judge 



Walter Safler 

Boys' Judge 

Lorraine Moran 

Girls' Self 
Government President 

Mike Maine 

Boys' Self 
Government President 



Mary Jane Hyde 

Scholastic President 

John Agurrie 

Pathfinder Editor 

Don B. Edgren 

Head Yell Leader 



Jim Clark 

Business Manager 

Harry Gavo 

Publicity Manager 




Composed of the leading school officers, the 
Student Council meets each v/eek to discuss the 
most vital matters of the Fremont Student Body. 
Activities such as the revising and publishing 
of the school constitution, arranging athletic 
prices, administrating student body dances, ap- 
propriating money for various school needs, 
enforcing clean campus laws, supervising foot- 
ball program and hov/dy tag sales, and han- 



dling matters that are of importance and interest 
to you, the student body, are among the duties 
of the sixteen head school officers in the 
Council. With war being declared during W'42, 
the Council met with unprecedented difficulties, 
but it proved its merit, however, by carrying on 
business as usual and by bringing into opera- 
tion various defense committees to meet the 
crisis. 



. 



55 




V 



Fie 

loy 



Wi 

Bui 



, 



Jifll 
ion 



S'42 STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT 



To the Student Body: 

It is not possible for me to express in this allotted 
space all of the gratitude that I feel toward you 
students for having placed me in the high office 
of Student Body President. I can thank you how- 
ever, for the splendid support and cooperation 
that I received. It gave us of the student council, 
a real sense of satisfaction to realize that you were 
right behind us in everything that we undertook. 

I want to thank also the faculty members for their 
wise counsel and helpfulness. 

It is indeed with deep regret that I leave Fremont's 
portals for the last time as a student. With me will 
go many happy memories of time spent in the 
classroom and on the field. 

As a student, I offered you my services; as on 
alumnus, I ofFer you my best wishes for a success- 
ful future. 

Yours sincerely, 

HAMILTON LLOYD 



Con 



Jeai 

Polt! 



Tlie 
it) 
disc 
slot 
ope 
9'or 
Wee 
iolei 



56 



1 



W'42 STUDENT COUNCIL 



Fred Lloyd 

Boys" Vice-President 



Marjorie Fraser 

Girls' Vice-President 



Esther Bradford 

Secretory 



Warren King 

Business Manager 



Howard Hansen 

Boys' League President 



Mary Jane Loro 

Girls' League President 



Jim Clark 
Boys' Judge 



Virginia Draper 

Girls' Judge 



Silvio Agnefile 

Boys' Self Government 



Carolyn Ortega 

Girls' Self Government 

Bennie Engle 

Athenian President 



Anita Chester 

Scholastica President 



Jean Crenshaw 

Pottifinder Editor 



Victor Taylor 

Publicity Manager 



James Trudeau 

Head Yell Leader 




The student officers of Fremont meet every Mon- 
day under the direction of Mr. Bailey. Here are 
discussed school activities and the problems of 
student body affairs. The S'42 Council has co- 
operated in the school National Defense pro- 
gram. This program included the Win-the-War- 
Wednesday paper drive, the defense stamp 
sales campaign, a magazine and game drive 



for the entertainment of the men in the service, 
and cooperation with faculty committees for 
defense. Additional council activities were the 
sponsorship of Student Body dances, assemblies 
for instruction about conduct during blackouts 
and possible future air raids and the continu- 
ance of the clean campus drive. 



^7 




W'42 GIRLS' LEAGUE 

The Girls' League of Fremont is the club of every girl, for every girl 
is automatically a member. Its purpose is to create a friendly spirit 
among us and to develop individual personality. 

This was accomplished through the many activities and affairs we 
gave. Among these were: the making of cardinal and gray yarn 
dolls; visiting Rancho Los Amigos; attending Girls' League con- 
ventions at Herbert Hoover High School in Glendale and at George 
Washington High School; and promoting better grooming through 
the Better Grooming Clinic. 

This term we have stressed "Partners in Defense," trying to find 
the place for each girl in these uncertain times. 




PHYLLIS KANAKY 
President 



MARJORIE FRASER 
Vice-President 



BETTE FRANK 
Secretary 



LILLIAN WOMACK 
Treasurer 



58 







g|[|i|«iM^Ul(»j_a#l^«#iJ||gta|^ 



I I 



S'42 GIRLS' LEAGUE 

The crowning activity of Fremont's Girls' League was realized during S'42 when the 
Ninth Regional District Conference was held at Fremont on April 30. Girls' League 
members in attendance were from Bell, South Gate, Jefferson, Jordan, Huntington 
Park and Washington High Schools. The theme beautifully and successfully carried 
out was "Paths to Victory." 

On May 1, small, gaily decorative May baskets filled with cheery spring flowers were 
delivered by the League to every room, delighting both teachers and students. 

The executive board, consisting of the officers and one girl from each grade, and the 
cabinet, composed of first period representatives and volunteers, direct activities of 
the League, of which every girl in Fremont is a member. 




MARY JANE LORO 
President 



LILLIAN WOMACK 
Vice-President 



MARIANN VARVIS 
Secretary 



RUBY ATV/OOD 
Treasurer 



59 




BOYS' LEAGUE CABINET 

W'42 BOYS' LEAGUE 

The Boys' League includes in its membership every boy in Fremont 
and sets as its purpose the promotion of school activities, clean speech, 
fellowship and athletics. It has long been sponsored by Mr. Leaver 
and functions in two coordinating parts, the cabinet and the mem- 
bership at large. During the past term the Boys' League promoted 
and sponsored a number of activities, such as the morale assembly, 
the school spirit assembly, the football rally, the collecting and ' 
framing of the pictures of our athletic teams for the Baj^'^yr 
other successful events. 




f**. ^. 0^ 



k. 





VICTOR TAYLOR 
President 



JACK MAKIN GLENN CROWLEY JOE SCIERRA 

Vice-President Secretary Treasurer 



60 



* 





S'42 BOYS' LEAGUE CABINET 

S'42 BOYS' LEAGUE 

The Boys' League of John C. Fremont was formed in 1924. Its 
purpose is to serve the boys of the school. Every boy in Fremont 
is automatically a member upon his enrollment. 

The executive duties of the Boys' League are carried out by the 
Boys' League Cabinet. The Cabinet is made up of four officers, 
four cabinet members and a sponsor. 

The S'42 Cabinet consisted of President Howard Hanson, Vice- 
President Gordon Trigg, Secretary Harold Woodring, Treasurer 
Richard Renz, Joe Parker, Joe Sciarra, Glen Crowley, Dave Mac 
Leod and sponsor Mr. Dole V. Leever. 

The Boys' League sponsors such events as the wrestling tourna- 
ment, the handball tournament, the horseshoe tournament, 
assemblies and various other activities. 



1^ 



HOWARD HANSEN, President 



61 



W'42 AL-PER-LE 

Altruism, personality and leadership are the 
key words and qualities of our organiza- 
tion. Striving constantly for the perfection 
of these qualities is the goal of every Al- 
Per-Le girl in Fremont. 

Becoming a member of this highest girls' 
organization at Fremont is in itself a great 
honor, but continuing to work in accepting 
the duties and responsibilities of this organ- 
ization is more than an honor, it is an 
obligation. The sponsor of the Al-Per-Le is 
Miss Meredith. 







y 




^ 


^l: 






LORRAINE RICHIE 
President 




Mary 


Ann Baker 










Cynth 


anna Brown 
Evelyn 


JIagbro 


Virginia 


Bollotte 










Freida 


Campbell 
Mildred 


Chandler 


Ramona 


Davies 










Anita 


Decker 

Virginia 


Draper 


Marg 


ie 


rraser 
Mary 


Jane Hyde 
Phyliss 


<anaky 


Elizabeth Letenc 


er 








Aslau 


3 Moen 

Lorraine 


Moron 


Mary 


A 


in Renz 
Mary 


Shaffer 

Marion 


Vilanua 



62 



S'42 AL-PER-LE 

Altruism, personality and leadership ore the qualities of 
an Al-Per-Le girl. Living up to their creed, "ready for 
service," "strong in character," and "never ending 
interest in those about them," the girls of the Al-Per-Le 
of John C. Fremont High School have proved themselves 
worthy of the honor bestowed upon them — member- 
ship in the highest girls' organization in the school. 

This club is known as a service club because the mem- 
bers take part in various activities in the school. 

The principal activities of this term have been the co- 
sponsorship of the Knight-AI-Per-Le Dance and Penny 
Day for defense. 




MARY ANN BAKER 
President 



Annabel Ayres 
Esther Bradford 
Anita Chester 
Jean Crenshaw 



Anita Decker 
Virginia Draper 
Edono Ferguson 
Marjorie Fraser 

Elizabeth Letender 

Mary Jane Loro 

Asloug Moan 

Carolyn Ortega 

Mary Jean Ramsay 
Charlotte Saltmarsh 
Mary Shaffer 
Marilyn Winnie 




63 




HAROLD ALLDAY DON EDGREN BENNIE ENGLE 

MARTIN JUHNKE HAMILTON LLOYD MIKE MAIN! 
DON PALMER WALTER SATLER HAROLD STEIN 



HARRY GARO RAY HOVEY 

WILBUR MANWARREN RICHARD MINER 
VICTOR TAYLOR DON TILLMAN 



BILL ) .31- •< 
BILL MOODY 
TOM /OURNAS 



i 



W'42 KNIGHTS 

KNIGHT'S OATH: I solemly swear: to follow the Ideals 
and precepts and traditions of the Knights of the John 
C. Fremont High School, to obey authority that we may 
learn how to govern, to be humble that we may be 
worthy of authority, to be industrious that we may 
expect sincere industry on the part of others, to be loyal 
to the Knights of old — "To live pure" in thought and 
deed, "To speak the truth" even though it may seem 
to injure, "To right the wrong" whenever I find it and 
to always help the other fellow, so help me God. 







BILL SPAETER 



64 




^^ ^ ^ 





Silvio Agniflle Glen Crowley Bennie Engle Jack Goreoff Warren King 

Bill Lewis Fred Lloyd Hamilton Lloyd Wilbur Monworren Bill Threadgill 



2 3' 4 



uJi /if hjC/^^ o-ytQ^ - 

KNIGHTS 



The Fremont Knights, composed of boys who have 
shown outstanding leadership and character in 
their school life, is the highest boys' honor society 
in the school. When a Fremontian has been made 
a Knight he knows that he has reached the high- 
est achievement of his high school career. 

The members are chosen by the Knights, and must 
have as qualifications character, leadership, schol- 
arship, fellowship, sportsmanship, and service to 
the school. In other words they must be "all 
around regular fellows." Weekly meetings are 
held to form plans for activities and discuss prob- 
lems confronting the school. Fremont's number 
one Knight is, of course, the society's sponsor. 
Captain Inglis. 




VICTOR TAYLOR 



65 




GIRLS' SELF-GOVERNMENT 

The Girls' Self-Government organization was cut to one-eiglith of its former size 
during the W'42 term. It was active only during the noon period and continued 
functioning in this way throughout S'42. The girls were stationed at their posts in 
the upstairs halls to maintain quiet and order. 

In cooperation with the Boys' Self-Government, a "Cotton and Cord" dance was 
sponsored by the Girls' Self-Government during April. 



Ifei'U^r 




66 




BOYS' SELF-GOVERNMENT 

Self-Government in a high school is just what the students in the school make it. 
Membership in the Boys' Self-Government is open to all students who can be 
depended upon. The halls and bounds at noon are the only remains of what was 
once the biggest organization in the school. The Morale Committee has taken over 
the hall duty at Fremont. We hope in the near future to have a real student govern- 
ment at Fremont as we had a few years back. S'42 President was Silvio Agnefili. 
Mr. Dirckx was sponsor. 




67 




GIRLS' 



COURT 



The Girls' Court of John C. Fremont High School is the girls sole judiciary society, 
and maintains within its jurisdiction the infliction of demerits upon the defendants 
who are summoned there. The Court is not an institution of punishment, but on 
organization for the purpose of helping us to be better Fremontians and in turn 
better Americans. 

The S'42 Court consisted of twelve jury members, and three substitutes. The officers 
are the bailiff, prosecuting attorney, defense attorney, clerk and the judge. 

Miss Meredith is the sponsor. 




68 




BOYS 



COURT 



The Boys' Courts for the past two semesters were headed by Judges Walt Sotler 
and Jim Clark. The object of the Court is to give every person a fair trial upon 
committing an offense. 

Judge Satler started a new form of court which consisted of two full courts, alternat- 
ing each week. 

The Court is made up of one judge, two prosecuting attorneys, two defense 
attorneys, two bailiffs, two clerks and two jury members from each grade, the 
Senior A in each case acting as foreman. 




69 



SENIOR 



T R I - Y 



The Senior Tri-Y organization is afFiliated with 
the Y. W. C. A. Its slogan is "To Face Life 
Squarely." It promotes friendliness, helpfulness, 
and desirable social contacts among young 
women and has religious affiliations. Meetings 
are held both at school and at various churches 



as well as the Y.W.C.A. Sponsor of the Senior 
Tri-Y is Mrs. Lorenda Openshaw. The officers for 
S'42 were: Mary Jean Ramsey, President; Reita 
Miller, Vice-President; Rhea Lewis, Secretary; 
Betty MacGregor, Treasurer. 



MARGARET ALLEY 
MARY ANN BAKER 
JEAN BENSON 
ESTHER BRADFORD 
CLAIRE BRODSKY 
VIRGINIA DRAPER 
EDONA FERGUERSON 
ROSE FERN FINK 



ELIZABETH FLAHERTY 
BETTE FRANK 
MARJORIE FRASER 
EVA FURIANE 
PHYLLIS GALE 
LA VONE GREEN 
GERTRUDE JENCKS 
JACKIE KINDIG 



BETTY KOELLING 
ELIZABETH LETENDER 
RHEA LEWIS 
BETTY MAC GREGER 
RUTH MEINECK 
DOROTHY MEYER 
DELORES MILLER 
RITA MILLER 



SODOKO MITAMORO 
NELLIE MORGAN 
PHYLLIS MORICAL 
CAROLYN ORTEGA 
MARY JEAN RAMSEY 
BEATRICE SINGER 
MARIANNE VARNIS 
LILLIAN WOMACK 




%1M 



70 



^ 



^ 



^ 



^ 



^ 



^ 



^ 



TRI-Y 




W 44 TRI-Y 






S'44 TRJ/-Y 



JUNIOR TRI-Y 



»s'^. 



71 



S'42 H I -Y 



^ 



^ 



^ 



^ 



^ 



Living up to their motto "clean sportsmanship, 
clean scholarship, clean speech and clean 
living," the S'42 Hi-Y has, this year, won the 
respect of the entire school. Members of the 
Hi-Y are selected for their leadership, citizen- 



ship and Christian character. The Hi-Y has 
sponsored several fellows at the Orthopedic 
Hospital as well as participating in all school 
projects. 



Silvio Agnifile 
Don Arp 








t 



Vyrle Brigham 
Leo Butler 
Glen Crowley 
Jack Cutner 
Bennie Engle 



Stanley Fishbeck 
Steve Fidchina 
Ralph Froley 
George Gardner 
Jack Goroeoff 

Clyde Harmon 
Warren King 
Marion Konrad 
Bill Lewis 
Charles Lewis 

Fred Lloyd 
Hamilton Lloyd 
Jack Makin 
Wilbur Manwarren 
Dove McLeod 

James Rankin 
Victor Taylor 
Bill Threadgill 
Jim Trudeau 
Bill Walker 



72 



Hl-Y 



^ 



W ' 4 3 Hl-Y 

TEOFILO ACOSTA, President 



^ 



S ' 4 3 Hl-Y 

JACK VANCE, President 



^ 



W'44 Hl-Y 

GEORGE WILSON, President 



^ 



S ' 4 4 Hl-Y 

MR. BAILEY, Sponsor 



^ 



^ 



i^ 



^ 



^ 



^ 




73 




GIRLS' 
USHERS 



Girls' Ushers is a service organization made up of a selected group 
which has charge of maintaining order at all assemblies. The members 
are on call also when special guests are visiting the school. 

Girls obtain membership by filing their applications at the end of every 
term. Their record is investigated and the applicants are voted upon by 
the old members of the club. The ushers are known for their courtesy 
and cooperation. The sponsor of the club is Miss Meredith. The Head 
Usher is Aslaug Moen and the Secretary is Mary Shaffer. 




74 




BOYS' 
USHERS 



The Boys' Ushers is a trustworthy group of boys selected for their 
character and leadership. It is the duty of the ushers to keep order at 
all athletic events and assemblies. They must see that there are no 
gate-crashers or other avoidable mishaps. During the past term the 
boys have sponsored a school drive for waste-tin. 

Requirements for membership are to serve at least one term as on 
assistant usher, and to receive a unanimous vote of old members for 
admittance. He must in addition have a good school record. During 
S'42 Bill Jones was Head Usher; Silvio Agnefile was House Manager. 




I 



75 




?^ifya:^f4-|ii 




J- r 



^ ^. 







GERMAN 



Tir 



LATIN 



^ 



FRENCH 



^ 



SPANISH 



^ 



LOS TROBADORES 



76 



1 



GOOD SAMARITAN 

The Good Samaritan Club is composed 
of Hospital Attendants. The main ob- 
jective of the club is to lend a hand to 
all students who need First Aid. Motto 
of the club is "First Aid is the best aid," 
to all types of injury, large or small. 

1^ 



SHAKESPEARE CLUB 



LES BEAUTICIENNES 

The aim of the Les Beauticiennes is 
to improve appearance, cleanliness, 
and personality. OfFicers: Bernice Rash, 
president; Lorraine Guilmette, vice-pres- 
ident; Joanne Pavlakos, secretary; 
Lorraine Hidden, treasurer; Barbara 
Baskerville, Pathfinder editor; Jean 
Herrmann, sergeant-at-arms; Mary 

Pettit, historian. 

TEXTILE ARTS 

The Textile Arts Club is composed of 
girls from the vocational dressmaking 
and vocational power sewing classes. 
It aims to form a closer bond among 
the girls and prepare them for their 
future work. 




: ;^ jtrj»Tjr]5i i j^ifj1jfffl>g » Piii i !*.>| ^ 










■-^r^ (V-- 










ni*r 



j |~i~ » iiSi»j ' "'Hij>'"'i-!».ijii ' . "J^ 1^"- "f -jLyW 



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I 



W ' 4 2 



PATHFINDER 



"Volume 31," the W'42 edition of the Path- 
finder, went to press. 

In that eventful period it saw America de- 
clare war on Japan; it saw the first alumnus, 
Samuel Cordova, killed; a defense committee 
organized; the first air raid drills; the re- 
claiming of "trash" on "Win-the-War Wed- 
nesday"; the first "blackout" prom held 
during the afternoon; and it introduced the 
"America Forever Bulletins." 

Editor Johnny Aguirre and Managing Editor 
Virginia Bollotte headed the staff along with 
News Editor Jean Crenshaw, Anna Jean 
Hibler, Feature Editor, Anita Chester, Third 
Page Editor, and Sports Editor Don Runcie. 
Roger Bridge was elected Associate Editor. 




JOHNNY AGUIRRE 



78 




PATHFINDER STAFF 



S'42 PATHFINDER STAFF 




JEAN CRENSHAW, Editor-in-Chief 
ANITA CHESTER, Publicity Director 

EDITORS 
News Editor — Roger Bridge, Anna Jean Hibler 
Feature Editor — Christian Deming, Inez Ware 
Third Page Editor — Madeline Haskin, Betty Lemata 
Sports Editor — Don Runcie, Tom Millett 
Asst. News Editor — William Barrow, Pat Devlin 
Asst. 3rd Page Ed. — Evelyn Weibusch, Shirley Honnaway 

REPORTERS 
Mildred Adams, Pauline Brajevich, Karl Bierman, Bob 
Kain, Donna Sharp, Aileen Simmons, Joan Williamson, 
Catherine Wademan and Esther Weintraub. 

Mailing Clerks — Patricia McNeely, Betty Harderson 
Advertising Manager — Bob Finley 
Chief Proof Reader — Phyllis Horn 



JEAN CRENSHAW 
Editor-in-Chief 



J 



79 




CLAVIER 

This club was organized in February, 
1938, by the students in the piano 
classes, with Miss A. M. Aiken as spon- 
sor. "Clavier" means "keyboard," taken 
from the Latin word "clairs," meaning 
"key." 

PHILHARMONIC 

The Philharmonic Club aims to stimu- 
late interest in hearing fine music and 
in attending concerts of the Philhar- 
monic Orchestra. There are twenty-two 
similar clubs among the high schools 
of Los Angeles. 

BUSINESS OFFICE 

Mr. E. H. Williamson and Mrs. Miller 
are the motivating factors of this live 
nerve-center of our school. The Busi- 
ness Office handles all ticket sales, 
book sales and other financial transac- 
tions of the school. The cafeteria and 
candy counter all clear their transac- 
tions through this hard-working crew. 

PAN-AMERICAN CLUB 

The Pan-American Club aims to study 
and understand our social, economic, 
and political relations with other na- 
tions of the Western Hemisphere. 

SAFETY CLUB 

The Safety Club aims to promote safety 
in the home and at school. They are 
studying the safety hazards at Fremont 
and hope to get our student body 
"safety conscious." 



80 




STAGE CREW 

Sponsored by Mr. Cliff 
Elger, the Stage Crew de- 
signs, builds and places 
all stage sets used in 
school productions, and 
makes arrangements for 
assemblies. The manager 
from September to Febru- 
ary was Ray Miller; from 
February to June, Harold 
Mattox. 

HOST AND 
HOSTESSES 

As all clubs and organi- 
zations at Fremont have 
directed their activities 
toward furthering the war 
effort, so have the Host 
and Hostesses. Their main 
project this semester was 
to act as host to the Fre- 
mont uniformed alumni 
who visited the school. 



FIRE 
DEPARTMENT 

This year the Fire Depart- 
ment has benefited by 
demonstrations given by 
the Los Angeles Fire De- 
partment. During air raid 
drills the firemen act as 
stair guards and serve on 
the rescue squad. 



^ 



STOCK CLUB 

The Stock Club, under the 
sponsorship of Mr. Leever 
and Mr. Matthews, have 
been forced to abandon 
their traditional Stock 
Show "for the Duration." 
This year the Club has 
emphasized Victory 
Gardens. 





81 



i 



SOUND CREW 

The Sound Crew provides 
and operates the sound 
equipment for auditorium 
and bleacher assemblies, 
dances, games and an- 
nouncements. During W'42 
the equipment was used 
176 times. 

1^ 



GIRLS' FRIENDLY 

The Girls' Friendly club 
members strive to promote 
the general welfare of the 
school. S'42 officers were: 
Helen Gibson, President; 
Virginia Brady, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Marilyn Bauer, Secre- 
tary; Patsy Howard, Treas. 





LiBRARY HELPERS 

Students who are interested 
in libary work are allowed 
to take core of the library 
and are banded together 
into a group called "Library 
Helpers." They are taught 
the Dewey numbering sys- 
tem, how to check books in 
and out, and the general 
routine of the library. 



ir 



ELLEN H. RICHARDS 

The Ellen H. Richards Club 
is a home economics club. 
Its purpose is friendliness, 
cooperation and service. 
Each term they have ons 
outstanding social affair 
and one service project. 



82 



GLEE CLUBS 



GIRLS' GLEE 

The Girls' Glee Club is an 
organization which has for 
its purpose the studying and 
singing of music of worth 
and the stimulation of a 
spirit of friendliness and co- 
operation among its mem- 
bers. Membership require- 
ments are a voice try-out 
and a good record in citi- 
zenship and attendance. The 
Girls' Glee takes part in 
numerous musical programs 
for the student body. 

BOYS' GLEE 

The Boys' Glee Club was 
organized in 1925 for the 
purpose of bringing together 
representative boys of Fre- 
mont to promote good fel- 
lowship, enjoy group sing- 
ing of worth while music 
written for men's voices, and 
encourage boys to continue 
appreciation of one of the 
fine arts as a life interest for 
leisure time. 




if 




A CAPELLA CHOIR 

The A Capella Choir was 
started in September 1931. 
It was the first high school 
A Capella Choir on the 
Pacific Coast; and made its 
debut simultaneously with 
the All-City Orchestra at 
Polytechnic High School 
Auditorium. The choir won 
instant favor and has since 
made many subsequent ap- 
pearances in both concert 
and radio performances. 



^^:^^ 



83 







BAND 



The Band has rendered outstanding service to 
the school at the football games, sports events, 
and auditorium call making a colorful display 
in their bright new uniforms. The band has 
given full and consistent support to every school 
activity, playing with style and spirit to an 
enthusiastic student body throughout the year. 



ORCHESTRA 

The Senior Orchestra, well qualified to rank 
among the city's best has done outstanding 
work not only as a performing group playing 
brilliant programs, but as a supporting organi- 
zation in the presentation of plays for the 
Children's Theatre and for other school events. 
Many members of this group play in the All- 
City Orchestra. 







84 




85 



COMMERCE 




HOUSEHOLD ARTS 




INDUSTRIAL 




INDUSTRIAL 




IN DUSTRIAL 




MATH & MUSIC 




CHRISTMAS PROGRAM 



SENIOR PROBLEMS 
AND SOCIAL LIVING 




OUR NE!GHBORS SOUTH 
OF THE BORDER 



NG 



SCIENCE 




MODERN 
DANCING 




ACADEMIC "GEOMETRY" 



What 

Fremont's 

Doing For 

National 

Defense 

AIR RAID 




AIR RAID 



AM 



'^.-Sm MAKING OF 
^J STRETCHERS 




100% ALL AMERICAN 



AMERICA FOREVER 
BULLETIN 




ISl 



i 



I 




p 



101 



'I 



.^' 



A ^-P*- 






MARTIN JUHNKE, Co-Captain 




BILL MOODY, Co-Captain 



* 



I 



VARSITY 



-4oM 



Although Fremont's hope for another championship failed 
to materialize, it can safely be said we had a fighting 
eleven. 

With six returning lettermen and a score of prospects to 
build the team around, Coach Harry Edelson coached his 
first team at Fremont to a fairly successful season. 

In the newly-formed Southern League, Fremont met the 
toughest teams in the city. Out of this group the Path- 
finders finished third. 

Frank Wall, Danny Brown, Fred Lloyd, Martin Juhnke 
and Silvio Agnefili made All-Southern League while Danny 
Brown was the only Pathfinder on All-City. 




COACH HARRY EDELSON 



104 








HAM LLOYD RIPS THROUGH THE SPARTANS 



H. P. 


Fremont 


7 . 


. Total First Downs . 


10 


68 . 


Yards Gained Running (net) 


239 


23 . 


Yards Gained Passing (net) 


5 


91 


Total Yards Gained (net) 


244 


7 . 


Forward Passes Attempted 


5 


2 . 


Forward Passes Completed 


1 


82 . 


Yards on Punt Returns 


19 


23 . 


. Average Yards on Punts . 


27 





JACK GORREOFF, L. G. 



DON TILLMAN, C. 



HARRY GARO, R. G. 



105 




BROWN ON THE LOOSE 





San Ped 


ro F 


remont 


7 


. Total First Downs . 


7 


105 


. Yards Gained Running (net) . 


119 


85 


. Yards Gained Passing (net) . 


4 


183 


Total Yards Gained (net) 


147 


18 


Forward Passes Attempted 


14 


5 


Forward Passes Completed 


1 


11 


Forward Passes Incomplete 


10 


3 


Passes Intercepted (opponent's) 


2 


23 


Runback Intercepted Passes . 


45 


37.8 


. Average Yards on Punts . 


36.1 


6 


Total Yards Punt Returns 


115 




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^ 



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FRED LLOYD, R. E. 

ALL SOUTHERN 



SILVO AGNEFILI, R. T. 

ALL SOUTHERN 



HAROLD ALLDAY, L. T. 



106 




NEVER EVEN SLOWED HIM DOWN 



Washington 

5 



t I 



■ 



47 
35 
82 
9 
3 
5 
1 




. Total First Downs . 
. Yards Gained Running . 
. Yards Gained Passing . 

Total Yards Gained 

Forward Passes Attempted 

Forward Passes Completed 

Forward Passes Incomplete 

Passes Intercepted (opponent's) 

Runback Intercepted Passes 



Fremont 

12 

185 

54 

239 

12 

6 

5 

1 

29 



SCORE 


TINEnHiY 


SCORE 1 


18 

F 





m 




QUARTER 






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HAM LLOYD, L. H. 



BILL JAROSCAK, R. H. 



DAN BROWN, L. H. 

ALL SOUTHERN, ALL CITY 



107 




ALL-CITY BROWN ON HIS WAY 




Roosevelt 

121 

6 


121 

3 



3 

1 

6 



. Yards Gained Running . 

. Total First Downs . 
. Yards Gained Passing . 

Total Yards Gained 
Forward Passes Attempted 
Forward Passes Completed 
Forward Passes Incomplete 
Forward Passes Intercepted 
Run Back Intercepted Passes 



Fremont 

144 

7 

82 

226 

13 

6 

6 








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<»V 




FRANK WALL, Q. 

ALL SOUTHERN 



TONY LESTER, R. H. 



DON HICKMAN, Q. 



108 




FRANK WALL SCORES OUR ONLY TOUCHDOWN 



LA. 

17 

413 



413 

3 



2 

27 



. First Downs . 

. Yards Gained Running . 

. Yards Gained Passing . 

Total Yards Gained 

Forward Passes Attempted 

Forward Passes Completed 

Forward Passes Intercepted 

Yards Gained Intercepted 
Forward Passes 



F 


remont 

5 


m 


IWEnPUr 


SCORE 

8 




80 


■ ^ 


r" p 


■W 




24 
104 


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GENE ESTER, F. 



AL MITCHELL, L. T. 



ROY THURMAN, F. 



109 




LESTER ROLLS ON HIS WAY 




JefFerson 

3 
21 
10 
31 

8 

1 




32.7 



Fremont 

. First Downs 13 

. Yards Gained Running . . . 263 

. Yards Gained Passing ... 

Total Yards Gained . . . 263 

Forward Passes Attempted . . 7 

Forward Passes Completed . 

Forward Passes Intercepted . . 3 

Yards Gained on Intercepted Passes . 34 
X-Average Yards on Punts . . 39.4 




CLARENCE FRENCH, R. H. 



MALCOLM HASLEM, R. T. 



EDSEL ECKGREN, L. H. 



110 



il 




Manual 
10 

136 
71 
18 
16 

4 
10 

6 



GARO STOPS MERRILL 



. Total First Downs . 
. Yards Gained Running . 
. Yards Gained Passing . 
Total Yards Lost (run ) (pass 
Forward Passes Attempted 
Forward Passes Completed 
Forward Passes Incomplete 
Forward Passes Intercepted 
26 . Runback of Intercepted Passes 

^ *^ e « ^ 











111 



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A 





^ 



COACH CHIPS AURAND 



Under a new coach, Chips Aurand, our mighty babes 
finished with a tie for second in a tough Southern 
League. 

Starting ofF the season in fine fashion, whipping H. P. 
14-0, our boys went into a temporary slump, being 
taken into camp 13-0 by Bell. Although in our first 
league encounter Washington demolished us 48 to 0. 
Rugged playing on the part of Dugan gave us a 6-6 
tie in the Roosevelt game, but L. A., following in the 
footsteps of their big brothers, shamed us 13-7 under 
a savage running game. The next two games the 
mighty little men woke up, trimming JefFerson 21 to 
and downing our biggest rivals. Manual, 8-0. 

The team was captained by two Seniors, George 
Gardner and Chuck Bressoud. 






112 




Wk\tjKKm 



V 




BEE 

FOOT 
BALL 



MOHLER ON THE WARPATH 




! ! TOUCHDOWN ! ! 




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113 




Captained by Wilbur Manwarren and Bill 
Spaeter, the "big boys" of basketball lost to 
Washington by a score of 20-26. In the Roose- 
velt game Bill Spaeter saved the day v/hen he 
sank a foul shot after the game. We went into 
an overtime period and nosed them out 34-30. 
Next v/eek we lost 31-43 to a strong Los 
Angeles quintet. The following game Manwar- 
ren paced his team against Jeff. The final score 
read 40-35. Against Manual, Trigg broke the 
Southern League by scoring 27 points, pacing 
our team to 42-37 victory. The second round we 
lost to Washington 19-26 and Roosevelt 29-36. 
In the Los Angeles game Gordon Trigg swished 
a timely basket to win 29-28. The two following 
games we lost 22-23 to Jefferson and 34-42 to 
Manual. 

Wilbur Manwarren and Gordon Trigg made All- 
Southern team. Trigg also made All-City, being 
the only junior on the team. 




COACH JIM HUDSON 




i^ 



BILL SPAETER, Co-Captain WILBUR MANWARREN, Co-Captain 



114 



I 



' 












GORDON TRIGG 
ALL-SOUTHERN, ALL-CITY 



' "Wl 




SATLER OUTNUMBERED BUT FIGHTING 



^ 




DON PALMER 



TIP-IN FOR GORDIE 



115 






\F'"' * 



\ 






JOHN BEBECK 



116 



Jon <^ r . 



4 M 

WALT SATLER 




JACK LIDDELL 



I: 

I 
I 




TRIGG MAKES GALLANT ATTEMPT 



SPAETER FIGHTS FOR POSSESSION 




MORTON NORRIS 



TOM VOURNAS 



GENE MAUCH 



117 



T 




FOOTBALL 



BASEBALL 



Sk- 



FREMONT'S TROPHIES 




WRESTLING 



FOOTBALL 



118 



BEE 





COACH JIM HUDSON 



f 



Coach Jim Hudson led his midget hoop-tossers 
to a fairly successful season. 

Our fighting five, led by Captain Johnny Jurich, 
was barely beat out in the last few seconds of 
the Washington game, 31-33. A spirited team 
came back and swept the Roosevelt Rough 
Riders out of their saddles by a score of 34 to 
30, and Los Angeles off the court 32-25. Next 
week we lost to JefFerson, 20-32. Our team, 



hot and bothered, shamed Manual in the follow- 
ing game to a tune of 25-16. In the second 
round, we lost to Washington 12 to 21, Roose- 
vert 25 to 28, and Los Angeles 15 to 18. Dick 
Jones saved the Jefferson game when he hooked 
a shot in the last minute of play to stop the 
Democrats 25 to 24. In the final game it would 
have been better for the Manual Arts team not 
to show up, as we walloped them unmercifully 
30-15. 





CO-CAPTAIN JOHNNY JURICH 



CO-CAPTAIN DICK KINNAMON 



119 



r 




KENNY AULT 




•^ 



BOB BASS 




BUD KOERNER 



'^f'-rrwnm. 





^ 



JOHN METKOVICH 



DICK JONES CARL REYNOLDS 





L_ 



CHUCK PATE 



MANUAL SERANA 




JACK BINGHAM 



120 



I 



VARSITY 




COACH LES HASROT 



I 



In the Dorsey Tournament, the Pathfinders rode 
over every team until they were stopped in the 
Riis game. Down but not out, the team came 
back in the semi-finals to win over the Vikings. 
In a much postponed final game, Fremont beat 
Riis to win the Dorsey Tournament. 

In the City League, Fremont knocked them down 
in rapid succession, winning over L. A. 6-2, 



JefFerson 14-2, H. P. 11-2, Washington 10-7, 
and Roosevelt 11-0. Then Bell upset the Path- 
finders 7-5, and Riis won the championship 
game 3-1 . 

Fremont placed Captain Ralph Atkins, Nippy 
Jones, and Bud Koerner on the All-City League 
team. 




121 




BUD KOERNER 



JOHN BEBECK 




1^ 



Fremont 6 — Los Angeles 2 

Fremont 14 — JefFerson 2 
Fremont 1 1 — Huntington Park 2 

Fremont 10 — Washington 7 

Fremont 1 1 — Roosevelt 

Fremont 5 — Bell 7 

Fremont 1 — Riis 3 



^ 




GENE MAUCH 



DON RUNCIE 




RALPH ATKINS 



JACK LIDDELL 



DICK KINNAMON 



122 



I 




HAROLD MOHLER, P 



BEBEK LINES TO CENTER 



123 



lOTH GRADE 



[J^(umm 





Fremont's little Yankees did not do as well this 
year. Coach "Soapy" Coffman led his team to 
three defeats and only one victory. In the first 
league game Fremont played like a championship 
team to overpower ingiewood 9 to 0. Los Angeles 
forced the Pathfinders out of a close game to a 
tune of 5 to 9. A spirited nine rose and met Dorsey 
only to be beat out 3 to 5. In the final game Venice 
beat our team 6 to 10. Jim Muele, third baseman 
led the team in batting this season. 



COACH "SOAPY" COFFMAN 



lir 



124 




i 

!l 



Coach Harry Edelson's hope for a championship 
track team may not be in vain. Although only 
four meets have been run off, the Pathfinders 
have shown up very well. Against Garfield the 
scores added up about 
even. Next week we met 
Garfield again and proved 
to be the superior team. In 
the first league meet, Fre- 
mont won over Manual. 



41 

Ik 


^ 




3f 


1 

i 


n. 



Against Los Angeles, the Pathfinders lost due 
to the absence of Bob Zaieska and Gordon 
Trigg. Roy Thurman, ace shotputter, has already 
broken the school record twice and has come 
within five inches of the 
World's record. Bob Zaie- 
ska, John Sceirra, Roy Thur- 
man and Danny Brown 
should show up well in the 
City Meet. 



COACH HARRY EDELSON 




125 



TOO MANY TOILERS 



BROWN AGAIN 



FULBRIGHT BY A CHEST 



UiOlA- 






w»i^ 




BROWN TRIUMPHS 



JOE SCIARRA BY A MILE 



I 




JOE SCIERRA 



HAM LLOYD 



JIM RANKIN 



DANNY BROWN 



ROY THURMAN 



GORDON TRIGG 



EDSEL EDGREN 



ROSS FULBRIGHT 




FROOM BY THE WIDTH 
OF A BROOM 





ANOTHER VICTORY 
FOR BROWN 




GENE NORDIKE 




DUGAN STONEBREAKER FRED PAULSEN 



ED MICHEALS 



BERNARD PRECHTL 



127 



BEE 



^ 



Tfume 



This years' Bee squad is regarded as one of the strongest 
In Fremont's history. Winning all three meets thus far by 
tremendous scores it looks as though they are heading 
toward a championship. Boys looking very good this far 
are George Chavez, Bud Koerner, Dick Moody and Dick 
Jones. The first meet was run in the mud a foot deep and 
finally being called off because of weather. 













BEE TRACK SQUAD 

The Cee's are no exception, swamping all three opponents 
by scores that would make their rivals shrink. For instance 
they whipped Manual by 90 points. Paul Brammel and 
Dewey Froom have looked particularly good so far. 



CEES 



^^l^^^^^^p^^^^^U^^^^^j^^ 









■n. « 






:^>- 






CEE TRACK SQUAD 



128 



(jUm^ lyiiw 




Fremont's muscle men 
were fairly successful this 
year, whipping Manual 
and Roosevelt by far supe- 
rior scores. In both meets 




COACH JIM HUDSON 



Fremont were Sherbourne 
and Stan Rose who placed 
1st on the rings and high 
bar respectively in both 
meets. Traveling to Wash- 
ington for the Southern 



Chuck Sherbourne, Roy 

Thurman and Frank Endo showed up well in League Finals, Fremont ended up a poor fourth. 

their events. Our defeats were at the hands of The following week the story was different as 

Washington and Los Angeles. The big guns for they finished fourth in the City. 



129 



GYM TEAM 



^ ^ ^ ^^ 




ARM LEVER 







LOUIE CACIA ED NOBBE ROY THURMAN CHUCK SHERBOURNE 




STANLEY ROSE HAROLD ERLICH MYRON WILMOR FRANK ENDO VETO BEARARDINI 



130 



I 




c 



I 



(mnu 



WELDON T. SPEARS 



The tennis team enjoyed a fairly successful sea- 
son. After winning all their practice matches in 
good shape they went on in league com- 
petition to place 3rd, winning 2 and losing 2. 
In the first league encounter they were defeated 
by Washington 5-2. Next they defeated Manual 6-1, lost to Los 
Angeles 6-1, and defeated Roosevelt 6-1. The first singles spot 
was held down by Charles Pate, followed by Tommy Scroggs, 
Lee Johnson, Ace Clark and Ralph Moe. The doubles were com- 
posed of John Miller and Larry Plotkin, 1st doubles; Bill Walker 
and Jack Vance, 2nd doubles; Bill Earnshaw and Bill Kahler 
were alternate 2nd doubles. The team was composed of all 
juniors except 3 players, who were seniors, those being Bill 
Walker, John Miller and Larry Plotkin. 




131 



CANDID CAMERA CATCHES 
COMMANDERS 









I'^/^t.,^;: 








132 



5 




133 




MRS. MILLER 






MRS. WEIDE 



No majorettes, these 144 girls actually march with military precision 
without leaders. Team members must have brains as well as charm 
to execute from memory the complicated figures of the drills. Keen 
competition for places on the team accounts for the fine esprit de 
corps. The striking mass effects achieved by the girls are greeted 
with enthusiam at football games and other special occasions where 
John C. Fremont High School is represented. 

One of these special occasions was a spectacular exhibition given 
at the Defense House in Pershing Square. The show was given to 
help sell Defense Stamps and Bonds. The girls carried large Ameri- 
can Flags and during the intricate patterns of the drill the Victory 
"V" often appeared in beautiful flog pictures. 

The Armistice Day program on Richer Field was another special 
occasion. Fremont students will never forget the deep patriotic 
emotions that swept over their hearts as they stood and sang "God 
Bless America" while their Drill Team, holding waving American 
flags, formed a giant U. S. A. 




.14- 



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134 



FREMONT GIRLS' 
DRILL TEAM 









^"■-'?i»2g| 



GIRLS MARCH AT 

PERSHING SQUARE FOR 

SALE OF WAR STAMPS 

AND BONDS 



135 




LETTERGIRLS 

Shirley Ash 
Jean Bailey 

Virginia Bedrosion 
Jean Benson 

Esther Bradford 
Jean Brady 
Glenna Bundy 
Betty Gate 



Gweneth Davis 
Anita Decker 

Katherine Dedo 
Marie Earnshaw 

Lettie Eastman 
Ruth Escallier 

Katherine Eymann 
Grace Fisher 

Elizabeth Flaherty 
Marjorie Fraser 

Mable Fredrickson 
Eva Furiani 

Dora Guerrero 
Barbara Gunyon 
Rose Haas 

Marjorie Harvey 

Madeline Haskin 
Charlotte Hay 
Claire Hirsch 
Maida Johnson 






136 



I 



LETTERGIRLS 

Shirley Jones 
Pauline Karm 
Wilr.ia Kuhl 

Mary Jone Loro 

Catherine Marrs 
Pat Mathers 

Betty Mayberry 
Dorothy Meyer 



Ellen Mclver 

Barbara McNeally 
Delia Miller 

Sodako Mitamura 

Aslaug Moen 
Phyllis Morrical 
Carolyn Ortega 
Marilyn Pettee 

Betty Rainwater 

Arline Richter 
Betty Rowane 
Mary Shaffer 

Helen Starr 
Grace Trevitte 
Geraldine Ware 
Ida Wolf 

Lillian Womack 
Anita Chester 
Ethel Carpenter 
Miss Renick 




137 




138 















W'42 EXECUTIVE BOARD 

G.A.A. Executive Board is the governing body 
of the Girls' Athletic Association. The board 
of W'42 has accomplished many things. One 
of the most successful Christmas Tree Parties 
was given with over 600 girls attending. Due 
to wartime conditions our semi-annual ban- 
-kqiiet was not given. In place of this a spread 
•was held in the Girls' Gym from three to five 
in the afternoon. With stunts, songs, and 
election returns, everyone enjoyed the sub- 
stitute banquet. 



MARY ANN RENZ 
President 

MARY SHAFFER 
Vice-President 

MARILYN PETTEE 
Secretary 

MARY JANE LORO 
Historian 

GRACE TREVITTE 
Head Yell Leader 

ISABEL MUMOLO 
Assistant Yell Leader 

ANITA CHESTER 
Reporter 



CHARLOTTE SALTMARSH 
Badminton Manager 

LILLIAN WOMACK 
Basketball Manager 

MARILYN CHITTENDEN 
Speedboll Manager 

MARJORIE FRASER 
Swimming Manager 

LORRAINE RICHEY 
Tennis Manager 

TOBY KANICH 

Honorary Member 

VIRGINIA BOLLOTTE 
Honorary Member 





139 









Jf^Sur.i^ 



S'42 EXECUTIVE BOARD 

Because of the "No Travel" rule of the Board 
of Education, no play days were held at 
Fremont this semester. The Summer '42 
G.A.A. Executive Board spent most of their 
meeting time discussing innovations and im- 
provements for the G.A.A. girls. The term 
v^as highlighted by the initiation of nev/ girls 
and the spread. In charge of the Vice-Presi- 
dent, Lillian Womack, the initiation v/as 
made something that v/as enjoyed by all. 



CHARLOTTE SALTMARSH 


JEAN BAILEY 


President 


Junior Badminton 


LILLIAN V^OMACK 


Manager 


Vice-President 


GRACE TREVITTE 


ELIZABETH FLAHERTY 


Baseball Manager 


Secretary 


JOAN BRYAN 


DORA GUERRERO 


Volleyball Manager 


Reporter 


MARJORIE ERASER 


EVA FURIANI 


Swimming Manager 


Head Yell Leader 


DELLA MILLER 


SHIRLEY ASH 


Tennis Manager 


Assistant Yell Leader 


MARGIE HARVEY 


PHYLLIS MORRICAL 


Archery Manager 


Senior Bodminton 


MARY SHAFFER 


Manager 


Honorary Member 








140 



Speedball 

The speedball season 
started in a burst of 
glory. There were ap- 
proximately 200 girls 
staying out in the three 
grades. Tournaments were 
run in the senior group 
and the winning team 
was Marilyn Pette's, with 
Anna Cuccia's a close 
second. The junior group 
chose teams and played 
with the idea of learning 
the game. 




^ 




^ 



141 




BASKETBALL 



The cry at 3:1 last semester 
was "Here comes that bevy 
of beautiful girls," not the 
Earl Carroll floor show but 
the winter G.A.A. basketball 
turnout. The A1 2, B12, All, 
and Bll's stayed out on 
Mondays and Wednesdays 
and the BIO and AlO's 
stayed out on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays. Due to rainy 
weather a tournament was 
not held. However, good 
sportsmanship, typical of 
G.A.A., was seen every- 
where on the basketball 
courts. 



^ 



142 




VOLLEYBALL 



* ^ 



* 



Volleyball started out with 
over two hundred girls of 
all grades staying out. With 
Joan Bryan at their head, 
the girls had a very success- 
ful season with a good time 
had by all. In the gym 
classes a round robin tour- 
nament was held and all of 
the classes played each 
other. Margie Bigmon's first 
team, from Mrs. Weide's 
second period class, was the 
school winner and received 
ribbons. 



^ 





143 




.iil^i . _ 







iV 



VOLLEYBALL 
CARNIVAL 



"One, two and over." "Come on kids, set 'em 
up!" This is the way our volleyball carnival got 
off to a hangup start. Of course old man 
weather interceded and it had to be postponed; 
but the following day old man sun shone 
especially for us. As usual there were sixty 
captains chosen out of all classes. Those chosen 
as captains set out to look for teams. They 



would meet at noon and practice so as to be 
able to work together. 

Each year it is customary for each girl to pay 
five cents which pays for bright colored ban- 
danas. Due to the war conditions the custom 
was changed and the girls appeared in bright 
colored ribbons. The winning team was Margie 
Bigman's, chosen from Mrs. Weide's Special 
Programs Class. 



niilini 



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144 



BADMINTON 



•k 



,1 



I 





Charlotte Saltmarsh, Sr. 
Badminton Manager and 
Marian Binder, Jr. Badmin- 
ton Manager, began their 
Badminton seasons with 
their full quota of girls stay- 
ing out in each group. The 
Senior group had a round- 
robin tournament in which 
all of the girls participated. 
In the Junior group they 
learned the rules and essen- 
tials of the game. A good 
time was had by all. 



1^ 






145 




^ 



Each Monday afternoon 
at four o'clock Fremont's 
bathing beauties gather 
at the Y.W. C.A. where 
a hundred foot pool in- 
vites many for a refresh- 
ing swim. 

The girls leave the school 
and board a street car 
for the Y. Bathing suits 
are furnished but you 
must have your own 
bathing caps. Many an 
accomplished swimmer is 
turned out due to the 
excellent instruction re- 
ceived here. 



SvN^imming 




146 



I' 



BASEBALL 

The baseball season, led by 
Grace Trevitte, got off to a 
good start with sprained 
fingers and all. The Senior 
girls go whizzing around the 
diamond in eight seconds 
flat, supposedly for a 
100%, to go towards a 
health certificate. A large 
turnout for G.A.A. baseball 
made round-robin tourna- 
ments a lot of fun for all. 



■A- 





^ 



147 



TENNIS 




Not professionals but aspir- 
ing champions fill the tennis 
courts after school on Mon- 
days and Wednesdays. 
Here we have a chance to 
learn to play and partici- 
pate in Round Robin and 
Elimination tournaments. 
The prerequisite for joining 
the G.A.A. tennis squads is 
the knowledge of keeping 
score and which end of the 
racquet to hit the ball with. 




^ 







m^mrrnmiM^m 



148 




149 



SEPTEMBER 




ENTER TO LEARN 



liiiiiiiii ttii i liiiiiiiil iiiiiMiiiiiaiiiiii . 

SCRUBS MEET FREMONT 




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1 FREMONT SETTLES DOWN FREMONT AT FOOTBALL RALLY | 




PHOTOGRAPHERS AT WORK 



NO MEN? NO FUN 




TRYING TO MAKE ONE MORE YARD DID YOU HEAR THIS ONE? 




SENIORS LEARN LA CONGA 



STUDENTS GET IN THE GROOVE 




HOW ABOUT A BiTE KID? 



FREMONT'S DATE BUREAU 








LL SOON LEAVE 



AW NUTS 





DID THEY SWARM BACK CAP AND A FUTURE FREMONTIAN 



DECEMBER 





WE REMEMBERED PEARL HARBOR FREMONT GETS READY FOR WAR 




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CAREFUL THERE, NO CHEATING 



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FREMONT BEAUTIES? 



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AH! AT LAST! 



COACH CHEERS TEAM 








ALMOST DIDN'T MAKE IT 



PATRIOTIC FREMONTIAN'S 



MARCH 




READING MATERIAL FOR OUR BOYS 



-£. 




INSPECTING FREMONTIAN COPY 



LET'S PLAY TOKIO-SOAKIO 



MAY 




LOOKING FOR A MAN HUH! 



JUNE 




B 10's RUSH STUDENT PREXY 



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