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Full text of "Journal of the North Carolina Dental Society [serial]"

Ci)e Hittatp 

ottl)e 

IDmifiion of ^ealti) affatr$ 
(Unitiet^itp of H^ottt Carolina 




This Book Must Not Be Taken 
from the Division of Health 
Affairs Buildings. 

This JOURNAL may be kept out TWO DAYS, 
and is subject to a fine of FIVE CENTS a day 
thereafter. It is DUE on the DAY indicated 
below: 



Digitized by the Internet Arcliive 

in 2010 with funding from 

North Carolina History of Health Digital Collection, an LSTA-funded NC ECHO digitization grant project 



http://www.archive.org/details/jofnc491966nort 



VOLUME 49 



NUMBER 1 JANUARY 1966 



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F THE NORTH CAROLINA DENTCTj 




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THE JOURNAL 

of 
The North Carolina Dental Society 

(A Constituent of the American Dental Association) 



OFFICERS 

1965-1966 

'earce Roberts, Jr., D.D.S. 

President 

Asheville 

Homer Guion, D.D.S. 
President-Elect 
Charlotte 

AMES A. Harrell, D.D.S. 

Vice President 

Elkin 

;. W. POINDEXTER, D.D.S. 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Greensboro 

DISTRICT EDITORS 

F. A. Buchanan, D.D.S. 

First District 

Hendersonville 

William G. Ware, Jr. 
D.D.S. 

Second District 
Winston-Salem 

LicHARD M. Fields, D.D.S. 

Third District 

Pleasant Garden 

Glenn F. Bitler, D.D.S. 

Fourth District 

Raleigh 

^mes a. Privette, D.D.S. 

Fifth District 

Kinston 



VOLUME 49 



NUMBER 1 



JANUARY 1966 



Page 

Dedication Bobbitt 4 

The President's Page Roberts 5 

Editor's Comment Miller 6 

Editorials 8 

Letters to the Editor 11 

Paperwork Headache? Shanks and Thorpe 12 

Simplified Billing — A Help to Both 

Patient and Doctor Graham and Graham 22 

Emergency Call System Buchanan 27 

Removable of Bilateral Tori Clark 29 

Ask the Dentist Horton and Megginson 32 

The Formocresol Pulpotomy Baker 37 

Training Auxiliary Personnel Cunningham 43 

Book Reviews 50 

The District Meetings — 1965. ...District Editors 53 

Professions Training Seminar Spillman 62 

Workshop on Dental Prepayment Bitler 64 

General News 69 

Obituaries 75 



ditor-Publisher: Barry G. Miller, D.D.S Charlotte 

ssociate Editor-Publisher: M. Lamar Dorton, D.D.S Statesville 

hotographic Editor: Baxter B. Sapp, Jr., D.D.S Durham 

lanaging Editor: Andrew M. Cunningham, B.S Raleigh 



ai 



Publication Office: P. O. Box 11065, Raleigh, N. C, 27604 



Published four times a year, January, April, August and September by the North 
arolina Dental Society, 405 W. Peace St., Raleigh, N. C. 27603. The closing dates 
)r the Journal are February L June 1, and November 1. The subscription rate is 
Z.OO per year. Second-class postage paid at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 



54012 



[31 



In grateful appreciation 
this issue is dedicated to . . . 




ni 



Samuel L Bobbin, D.D.S. 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



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Dr. Bobbitt was reared on a farm in Warren County. He attended ele- 
mentary school in his home county, and continued his education at Buies 
Creek, Mars Hill and Cary High School. 

He graduated from Atlanta-Southern Dental School in 1919, worked 
for one year with the State Board of Health, was associated with Dr. Louis 
Pegram for two years, and entered private practice in Raleigh. In 1922 he 
married Inez Pirkie of Atlanta. 

He has been president of the Fourth District Dental Society, Chairman 
of the State Executive Committee, Dental Advisor to the State Selective 
Service Board since World War II, the dental member of the Vocational L 
Rehabilitation Advisory Committee, and is serving his third term on the 
State Board of Dental Examiners. Currently he is president of the Board, 
the second time he has held this office. 

Sam Bobbitt has not just taken from dentistry, he has added much to 
his profession. Rarely does he miss a district, state, or national meeting. 
He is a credit to his family, his community, and his profession. Truly, he 
is a man among men. 



ente 



C( 
istai 



[4] 





|A s A New Year begins I wish to extend to all of you my wishes for the 
best of New Years and to thank you for your many expressions of 
Iriendship and interest during the past months. 

I Your officers, Executive Committee, and Central Office Staff have been 
n the "go." We enjoyed the generous hospitality extended us as we visited 
vhh you during your District meetings. The chance to participate in receiv- 
ng the new members into the Society was very rewarding. 

Many of you were present at the A.D.A. meeting in Las Vegas. I regret 
Ve did not plan a meeting center for those of us who attended. These meet- 
ngs are so large and it is impossible to see those from our State unless a pre- 
arranged location is designated. In future years I hope the Executive Com- 
littee will reserve a room where we may visit during this annual meeting. 

During this meeting your Society opposed the resolution directed against 
le North Carolina Dental Society presented by the New York Dental So- 
iety. This resolution was defeated, but resolutions No. 23 1 and No. 232 that 
elate to membership were adopted. I would suggest that all members be- 
ome acquainted with these resolutions. The full text of them appeared in 
le November Newsletter. 

It was a pleasure to visit with the clinicians that represented the North 
'arohna Dental Society so well in Las Vegas. Thank you for your partici- 
ation. 

Active committees are planning an exciting annual session for you, 
lay 4-8 in Pinehurst. Other committees are working diligently formulating 
ieas to present to you for your consideration: 
Projected plans to guide and develop future dental prepayment programs 
North Carolina. 

Suggested programs for the establishment of additional schools in North 
'arolina to train dental auxiliary personnel. 

Creation of committees to further promote the objectives of dentistry 
irough North Carolina and Federal agencies to benefit the people of North 
'arolina. 

I wish all of you could have observed the participation of your repre- 
;ntatives at the recent District Officers Conference. This has developed by 
^presentation into a small House of Delegates meeting. It is stimulating to 
le this representative group plan for the future of dentistry within our State. 
Convey to me, if you will, your ideas, your suggestions, and your as- 

stance. ^ ^ 

Pearce Roberts, Jr. 

[5] 



Electronic Billing 

One of the latest computers is so 
human it blames its mistakes on 
others!! Not so — data-transmis- 
sion and data-phone electronic bill- 
ing. The systems, say the authors, 
will eliminate the negative and ac- 
centuate the positive. Are we not 
headed in this direction?? The ques- 
tion remains — is it practical? 

Simplified Billing 

The American Credit Card has 
started a new economic system bet- 
ter known as instant bankruptcy. 
The Grahams are using a system 
which will reverse this trend in your 
office. In a well-written paper a 
system of patient and office ac- 
counting is reviewed. 

Ask the Dentist 

A person who has completed his 
education is no longer educated. A 
measure of education is the aware- 



in a wide diversity and range of 
human activity. 

Our very competent and dedi- 
cated executive secretary in his re- 
port presented at the State Secre- 
taries' Management Conference, 
June, 1965, has some words of 
wisdom on the development of op- 
portunities for these our greatest re- 
sources. 

Health Careers 

Prejudice is not inherited. It is 
caught not taught — from the turn 
of a head, a few words, the comic 
on TV, the tales of ridicule by 
grandmothers, aunts and uncles, and 
from the community itself. Prejudice 
is contagious. 

Dentistry has now a public body 
to endeavor to stamp out the 
pestilence! Health Careers merit our 
support and enthusiasm. The au 
thor has given an excellent resume, 
of Health Careers. Be counted now, 



EDITOR'S COMMENT 



ness of an increasing number of 
things that lie ahead of one. Let us 
hope that we have not completed 
our education and let us be assured 
that the public is in need of addi- 
tional information. 

The authors offer an avenue and 
challenge for service. Compliments 
go to them for their efforts and to 
each member of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society, a challenge to 
support their efforts. 

Auxiliary Personnel 

The greatest resources of our 
state are the inquiring minds of 
countless people who have the po- 
tential of excellence and greatness 



Barry G. Miller 



[6] 




practitioners and auxiliaries, that 
the best available of our youth 
might find dentistry inviting and ex- 
citing. 

Removal of Bilateral Tori 

Another of Dwight Clark's ex- 
cellent case reports! A real compli- 
ment to the Editor, the Journal, 
and the Profession — the Editor 
has heard it said that all the talents 
are not at the University. Come 
fellows — let's meet Dwight's chal- 
lenge — your Journal will be 
the better for reports of like quality. 

Formocresol 

Dentists are people. Like the 
cycles of flying objects in the sky, 
formocresol of old is back on the 
scene. The author gives a review of 



current thoughts and clinical ap- 
plication. The summarizing thoughts 
are interesting. Microbiologically 
and histochemically the suggestion 
that biological responses of tissues 
in primary teeth may differ from 
those in permanent teeth certainly 
justifies the author's observation 
that further clinical studies are justi- 
fied. 

Emergency Call System 

The thoughtful work with and for 
others in this instance is the short- 
est distance between two points — 
the dental profession and the image 
of the profession perceived by the 
public. Buck has offered leadership 
to a vital community service — one 
that could and perhaps should func- 
tion in each city across the State. 



1966 Directory of Members 



Along with this issue of the Jour- 
nal you will receive a directory of 
2i|members of the Society. It includes 
a roster of members in good stand- 
ing as of January 1, 1966 listed in 
alphabetical order and also by 
towns in North Carolina. 

It also includes a list of state 
and district officers and committees. 
In addition, the officers of allied or- 
ganizations are also listed, including 
the North Carolina Dental As- 
sistants Association, the North Caro- 
lina Dental Auxiliary, the North 
Carolina Dental Hygienists Associa- 
tion and the North Carolina Dental 
(Laboratory Association. 
Members and officers of the State 
IBoard of Dental Examiners are also 
included. 



The 1966 directory is a valuable 
desk reference for all members. 
Keep it handy. 



STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP 

The Journal of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society is owned and 
published by the North Carolina 
Dental Society, P. O. Box 11065, 
Raleigh, N. C, 27604. The Society 
has no stockholders, bondholders, 
mortgagees, or other security hold- 
ers. The magazine is published 
quarterly — January, April, August, 
and September. Its circulation, to 
all members of the Society, aver- 
aged 1,460 for the four quarters 
preceding this issue. The Editor is 
Dr. Barry G. Miller, 1927 Bruns- 
wick Avenue, Charlotte, N. C, 
28207. The Managing Editor is An- 
drew M. Cunningham, P. O. Box 
11065, Raleigh, N. C, 27604. 



[7] 



Editorials 



ADA 



'X'he American public and the in- 
terest of general dentistry has 
again been complimented. The ele- 
vation of Bill Garrett to President- 
Elect of the American Dental As- 
sociation is good. 

We are all indebted to the en- 
thusiastic servants of academic hfe 
who have given generously over the 
years. These individuals, though, do 



not represent American dentistry, 
nor do the limited practitioners 
truly convey to our public that 
image which we seek. Dr. Garrett's 
election to this high office will, it is 
hoped, bring renewed interest and 
enthusiasm to the men in general 
practice across the nation to step 
up and accept opportunities and re- 
sponsibiUties. 



EVERYTHING IS IN FAVOR OF THE HOUSE 



T AS Vegas is the house! The per- 
■^centage against the players, the 
American Dental Association was 
never greater. 

During the recent meeting at Las 
Vegas four major addresses were 
heard by the editor which con- 
cerned themselves with the image of 
dentistry. To an observer, interested 
in the relationships of dentistry from 
both the point of view of the indi- 
vidual, the component, the state, 
and the American Dental Associa- 
tion, these discussions of the image 
of dentistry in the setting of the 
"strip" of Las Vegas was somewhat 
of a paradox. To conduct educa- 
tional programs, informational pro- 
grams, and the business of the den- 
tal health of the American public 
amid the echoes of slot machines, 
the strange voices of the table hawk- 
ers, the ill-reputed syndicate of the 
boxing world, and surrounded by 



and accosted by at every turn, the 
fertile field of prostitution, would 
seem hardly to be in the interest of 
dentistry. What has been accrued 
for the image of dentistry? 

From this perspective the Board 
of the Trustees of the American 
Dental Association and those of- 
ficers and committees making the 
decision for sites of convention 
cities would do well to take a sec- 
ond look! 

This atmosphere that so strongly 
prevailed at this recent meeting of 
the American Dental Association 
and the various organizations that 
meet in conjunction with the annual 
meeting of the American Dental As- 
sociation, was far from the reality of 
the heart and substance of dentist- 
ry for the American public and 
for one, a strong voice of oppo- 
sition in returning to this site would 
like to be heard. 



[8] 



DENTISTS ARE PEOPLE 



A MOST cursory review of the lead- 
"^ ership of our profession in local 
communities across the State would 
convince one that dentists are peo- 
ple. Often, however, in viewing the 
state body politic leadership of the 
dental profession one is not so con- 
vinced. 

The most stubborn obstacle to the 
progress of a growing profession is 
perhaps lack of foresight — the in- 
ability to comprehend the needs of 
the future. 

Our greatest need in the North 
Carolina Dental Society today is 
leadership without fixed policy. We 
should always be for the thing that 
is most efficient and feasible. What 
we advocated yesterday we should 
feel at perfect liberty to kick over 
today as we find that what we ad- 
vocated yesterday stands in the way 
of what we find to be a good thing 
today. 

Typical of the obvious, that den- 
tists are people, is the town of 
tw€nty-two thousand that has on its 
city council one of the members of 
the dental profession. He is Presi- 
dent of the Boy Scout Council, a 
member of the Board of Directors 
of the Chamber of Commerce, ac- 
tive in his church, active in his 
political party, a person who stands 
up with conviction, takes positions, 



and gives leadership. This same in- 
dividual, however, when caught up 
in the body politic of the state den- 
tal organization is disposed to con- 
form and speak with unison for the 
group. He becomes accustomed to 
the presence of an attorney in de- 
liberations to determine if every- 
thing that is said is legal and con- 
forms with state policy. He becomes 
accustomed to lengthy meetings that 
have agendas which are often not 
followed; meetings that consider de- 
tails of information that should have 
been accomplished by imaginative, 
forthright, dedicated, definite com- 
mittees. 

Needed and wanted are leaders 
in the state body politic that can 
stand on their own two feet, den- 
tists who are people, dentists who 
are original, dentists who are con- 
victed, dentists who do not need a 
legal interpretation for every ex- 
pression or phrase, dentists who can 
stand up and commit and convict 
themselves to a position without 
having it written and read word-for- 
word verbatim for fear of being 
quoted out of context. 

Dentists are people, and it is time 
that the state dental society favor 
the needs of the future and compre- 
hend these needs by bringing forth 
new and imaginative, convictive and 
dedicated leadership on all levels. 



[9] 



FROM THE DESK OF A DEDICATED SERVANT 



"OuLES of this office : 

1. Only complete dentistry. 

2. The patient is to be treated 
not for today but for the future. 

3. No patient under active treat- 
ment should be allowed to have 
caries lesions when he or she leaves 
the office without an appointment 
in two weeks for the removal of 
caries lesions regardless of how 
small these lesions may be. 

4. All patients in this practice 
shall be kept in optimum dental 
health. 

5. If patients (and/or parents) 



do not practice oral hygiene as 
taught by this office — they will be 
dismissed as patients of this prac- 
tice. 

6. When treating a patient keep 
in mind the thought that the next 
time this patient is seated in a den- 
tal chair — it will not be yours — 
but the existing restorations are 
ours — will they reflect the image 
that we desire for our dentistry and 
profession — for we are the dental 
profession. It can be no greater than 
the dentistry we produce. 

Complete dentistry, quality den- 
tistry, dentistry for the future is a 
policy of this office. 



[10] 



Letters to the Editor 



August 20, 1965 
My sincere congratulations on the 
excellence of the August issue of 
your Journal. 

The format and the contents are 
outstanding. All the articles are 
good, but I was particularly im- 
pressed with the ones by Pearce 
Roberts and Robert Holmes. No 
doubt you will receive some com- 
ment on Dr. Holmes's provocative 
article which is good. 

I look forward to future issues. 
Thanks and very best wishes for 
your continued success. 
William A. Garrett, D.D.S. 
Atlanta, Georgia 



June 1965 

The three recent issues of the 
Journal that you sent us contain 
improvements — and suggest fur- 
ther improvements that will keep 
your publication on the road to 
being a more useful and interesting 
organ. 

Your covers are, as before, color- 
ful and attractive. Typography is 
good, but greater variety in head- 
line style is still needed. Bigger type 
and associated art would be a good 
start. 

Use of photographs is good with 
the general news and component 
unit news, but there is little or no 
art with the main articles. We sug- 
gest that the pictures and blurbs 
from the "In This Issue" section be 
used to illustrate their associated 
articles. This would in part make 
up for the lack of pictures with 
main items. 

We like the "I See Dentistry" 
essays and the special piece on 
"What It Means to Go to the Den- 
tist" (Aug., 1964). They provide 



an interesting and worthwhile 
means of balancing technical and 
non-technical material. 

The use of numerous short edi- 
torials instead of one long one is 
good. Continue your efforts to make 
editorials more specific, hence more 
forceful. 

Some articles, including edi- 
torials, seem to "start in the middle." 
Examples in the August, 1964, is- 
sue are the Dixon editorial and the 
Health Conference report. Try to 
present material so that it can be 
understood and appreciated even by 
those who may have missed your 
last few issues. 

Another suggestion: in the Gen- 
eral News Section, try alternating 
itaUc headlines with the usual bold 
face heads. It will provide greater 
variety and typographical interest. 

Once again try for more illustra- 
tions for the technical articles. A 
photo or diagram will go a long 
way toward brightening pages. 

Thanks again for your participa- 
tion in and contribution to our 
workshop. 
Paul Barton 
F. T. Gaumer 
Todd Hunt 

For the Workshop Faculty 
Ohio State University 



September 29, 1965 
Please express my sincere thanks 
to those responsible for dedicating 
the August Journal to me. My ten 
years association with the Society 
have been happy, rewarding, and 
satisfying. I am humbly grateful 
for this honor. It is a tribute I shall 
always cherish with pride. 
Andrew M. Cunningham 
Executive Secretary 



[11] 



Electronic billing could be the answer! 



Paperwork Headache? 



Figure 1. Data Transmission Unit 




Philip G. Shanks 
North Carolina National Bank 



J. O. Thorpe 



T) ANKS have and are turning to 
^ the field of automation for a 
possible answer to the rapidly ac- 
celerating paperwork problem. Com- 
puters programmed to perform hun- 
dreds of calculations at fantastic 
speeds are "employed" to solve 
problems, are possibly the answer. 
Banks are not only being highly 
successful internally but they are 
spawning a whole new spectrum of 
automative services for others with 
computers and their programming. 

One of these innovations in auto- 
mated services is electronic bill- 
ing. Simply, electronic billing is a 
service whereby virtually all de- 
tails connected with a dentist's or 
physician's patient billing and book- 
keeping are handled automatically 
— usually at considerable savings in 
overhead expense — through a 
bank's electronic data processing fa- 
cilities. 

The office center of the new ser- 
vice is the handy desk-top data trans- 
mission unit (see figure 1). Con- 
nected to a special data-phone, the 
machine "reads" information from 
a punched card and transmits it over 
a normal telephone line to a re- 



ceiving unit at the bank. Additional 
data may be transmitted by using 
the machine keyboard. Once in- 
stalled, it is as easy to use as a 
dial phone or ten-key adding ma- 
chine. 

The Savings 

By removing time and cost-con- 
suming details from the adminis- 
tration of his practice, the service 
allows the dentist or physician to 
devote more time to professional 
activities, while permitting him to 
maintain complete income control. 
Furthermore, with records being 
processed by a bank, the service 
affords complete protection against 
the financial loss of records due to 
theft or misplacement, or to de- 
struction of bills and records by fire 
or other cause. Designed to free his 
staff from many time consuming 
chores, electronic billing also re- 
lieves his accountant of much de- 
tailed paperwork. It leaves him free 
to render the important service of 
evaluating the doctor's financial po- 
sition, preparing tax returns, profit 
and loss statements, and providing 
professional advice. Besides reliev- 



[13] 



FIGURE 2 



SAMPLE DENTAL SERVICE DESCRIPTION CHARGE SHEET 



235 Alveolectomy 

265 Biopsy 

730 Bite Splint 

400 Bridge, Cement 

405 Bridge, Fixed 

410 Bridge — Preparation for 

415 Bridge — Repair 

430 Bridge — Removable 

420 Bridge — Temporary 

425 Bridge — Try-in 

250 Cleaning 

300 Crown 

320 Crown, Cement 

310 Crown, Acrylic Veneer 

340 Crown, Porcelain Veneer 

330 Crown, Porcelain Jacket 

350 Crown, Post 

360 Crown — Preparation for 

390 Crown— Steel 

370 Crown — Temporary 

380 Crown — Try-in 

381 Crown — Re-Cement, 
Temporary 

435 Denture — Adjustment 
440 Denture — Partial Adjustment 
475 Denture — Insert — Full-Upper 
480 Denture — Insert — Partial-Up- 
per 
485 Denture — Insert — Full-Lower 
490 Denture — Insert — Partial- 
Lower 
465 Denture — Rebase 
470 Denture — Partial Rebase 
445 Denture — Repair 
450 Denture — Partial Repair 
455 Denture — Try-in 
460 Denture — Partial Try-in 
520 Densensitization Treatment 
700 Diagnostic models 

240 Electric pulp tests 
120 Examination 
161 Extractions 



290 Facing — Replace 
201 Fillings — Amalgam 
211 Fillings — Amalgam — 

Re-inforced 
221 Fillings — Porcelain 
234 Fillings — Resin 
532 Filling— Synthetic 
531 Filling — Temporary 
530 Fluoride Treatment 

257 Gingivectomy 

180 Gold Inlay Preparation 

185 Gold Inlay Cemented 

540 Gum Treatment 

277 Incision & Drainings 
710 Impression 
720 Impression — Final 
280 Irrigation 

255 Occlusal Adjustment 
100 Office Call 

270 Pap Smear— Oral 
550 Peridontal Pack Applied 
560 Peridontal Pack Removed 
510 Pericomitis Treatment 
500 Post-Operative Treatment 
245 Prophylaxis 

1 75 Root Canal Treatment 
178 Root Canal Completed 
265 Root Tip Removal 

170 Scahng, Deep 

171 Scaling, Fine 
260 Space Maintainer 

262 Space Maintainer — Adj. 

263 Space Regainer 

241 Thermal Tests 

601 X-rays 

610 X-rays— Bite Wing 

620 X-rays— Full Mouth 

750 Wax Bite 



[14] 



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nsowra caMOUMA 

mAXIGSSAL, BANK 



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SEHVICE DESCRIPTION 



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HHHitH^ 



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FIGURL 3 



igure 3. Patient Master Card. 



Ll|4MA L G AMZX 1 L L 1 JM G S ////// 



Li 11 11 I i 



III II I 



ric nt-'KC «»■> stxsacznMC shtici! 



SERVICE MASTER CARD 



PLEASK NOTE 



Z. KET » fCPU« 0« SIX oioir 

AMOUNT AFTER TR»W?MITT1««S 
TMiS CARD. 

a DtfStSS •()€;.• KEY TO CO«IH,tTt 
EACH <»«V1ENI TnAUSACTlOH. 



I I 

' FIGURE 4 
Figure 4. Service Master Card (Charges). 



ng his Staff of the billing chore, 
banks will receive patients' remit- 
tances for the doctor at a desig- 
nated post office box and credit 
these sums to his account. The con- 
siderable work involved in receiving, 
recording, and depositing payments 
pan be eliminated altogether. 



Perhaps most important of all, 
the service, by providing detailed 
facts and analyses of his profes- 
sional activities, adds an important 
new dimension of efficiency and ac- 
curacy to the financial management 
of his practice. 

Initially, it is necessary for the 



[ 15] 



dentist or physician to furnish the 
bank with certain basic data con- 
cerning each patient and open ac- 
count in his file. The data required 
by the system is recorded on source 
documents, one of which is com- 
pleted for each patient. In addition 
to the patient source documents, the 
dentist or physician furnishes the 
bank with a listing of the services 
he renders. He may list and describe 



up to 900 different types of treat- 
ment, selected by him to fit the re- 
quirements of his particular prac- 
tice. (See figure 2 for a typical 
listing.) This information is then 
punched into a series of cards. 

The dentist or physician is fur- 
nished with a file of Patient Mastet 
cards (see figure 3); one card foi 
each patient. It contains an identi-i 
fying doctor or clinic code, a re 



B-Q^. 



'•^ |l , , , I | ||3ft»vire ot3CBifi:iat< 



I I 



I II II 

kdw*H«iiioi.iyi"" 

]!lil!tlOMAXjlftAMICilll 



PLEASE NO 1 



I lojtcTiwwic aa.tu<& \ft> bookhJUjhj srA%c.t 
I I 

It t I 



SERVJCS MASTER CARD 



L 4 FilifN-f MAittR Cj 
SKOLLO 6L*»rS >>BEC< 
TR»KSM15SK» Of THIi 

2. rgv fl Ftivs <y» sj« 

AMOUtiT A( riK Tl!« 
THIS C«RO 

EACH P*TI6HT TMW 




Figure 5. Service Master Card (Credits) 



■PaTIEMT (vJWtfc 

lirii I ill I 



iijioO jC 

iili 

22222 



pai abopuy 1 i-WHRLLifln FILL! NGS 



IIIIC .00 

Mill 

22221 




3333 3(33333 



4- 41 4 

55551 

66i66 

7 ? 7 7 7 

88888 

99999 
S ( ; t s 



4 4 .; 4 4 
55555 
6 5 6-66 
77777 



99999 

iO il li !3K: 



!) 000 00 000 c 1 

» js j; 2« a * ,i -^ ts j< 

1 11 i 1 1 1 1 1 ill iiiiin 11 ijf il 



2 22221222222222222222 



2?2 



22 



Mool 
i 1 ill 

22222 



It I Tn 

00000000000000 olooooonoco 
ill iluiiii ill 1 mill 11 11 



lOOC! 



2222222222222221222222222 



3333 3 3 331 

I 4 4 4 4 4 4 < 

5 55 5 5 3l'5 

666g|66 6 

77777777 

8885888 8 88 8 8838 8 8SiS8 

9l9l999l9999l9999»t-99 

!s IE ins n 3e 21 c 23 » a X s ;i ;9 30 n ass s 



WORTH CAfeOlilfcA "3333333333333 
IVATIOMAL MillXrKP 44444444444444 



EI.ECTROXSB FIGURE 6 



S3 



99 



99199 

(3 M « N « 



55155555555555 
666S66S&666&66 
777I7777777777 
8888883888888888888883888 
998999999l99l9999999S9999 



SKKTICB 
I 



Gill 

BMBJ 
1 11 

222i 
3 3 31 
444) 
555! 
6661 
777; 
8881 
999 



Figure 6. Transaction Card. 



[16] 



sponsible party code, the patient 
code and the patient name. Addi- 
tional space is provided on the card 
for noting patient activity, etc. 

The bank will also provide two 
sets of Service Master cards (see 
figures 4 & 5 ) ; one for charges and 
the other for credits. The first card 
set is used to describe each of the 
services rendered i.e., "preparation 
for crown," "amalgam fillings," 
'bite-wing x-rays," etc. The second 
pet is used to describe the method 
[or crediting an individual account; 
I.e., "paid by cash," "paid on ac- 
count," "credit adjustment," etc. 

\ Transaction card (figure 6) is 
automatically punched at the bank 
kvith the information transmitted 
hrough the transmission unit. A 
leparate card is punched for each 
complete transaction. The data 
unched in the cards is "stored" on 
nagnetic tape and used to update 
ill account records. 

THIS IS THE WAY IT'S DONE 

Basic transmission of patient data 
o the bank is completed in four 
iteps. At the end of the day or at a 
)re-arranged time during the day, 
he aide or receptionist will dial the 
)ank. A tone signal indicates the 
)ank's receiving unit is set for trans- 
nission. She raises a special switch 
)n the Data-phone: 

Places the first patient's Master 
:ard in the card carriage; inserts 
he slide into the terminal; waits 
mtil the information punched in the 
ard is transmitted and the slide 
las returned to its normal position. 

2. Keys in six digits for the date; 
e., month, day, year (052265). 
It is not necessary to key in the 
late after the initial transmission of 
lata. The program card in the 



bank's receiving unit will automati- 
cally punch the date in all cards 
transmitted after the initial trans- 
action.) 

3. Removes the patient's Master 
card and places the proper Service 
Master card in the card carriage; 
inserts the slide into the terminal. 
Waits until the information on the 
card has been transmitted and the 
slide has returned to its normal po- 
sition. 

4. Using the keyboard, the opera- 
tor keys in the charge for the par- 
ticular service rendered and de- 
presses the Register key marked 
"REG" to complete the transmis- 
sion for each charge. (Steps 1, 3, 
and 4 are repeated for each patient. 
If an individual patient received 
more than one service, the above 
procedure must be repeated for 
each service rendered; i.e. the pa- 
tient's Master card must immedi- 
ately precede each Service Master 
card and the amount of charge 
keyed in for each individual trans- 
action. ) 

Experience has shown that an 
operator can transmit, on the aver- 
age, four complete patient entries in 
one minute. 

If the operator makes an error 
in the transmission; i.e., inserts only 
one card, or fails to key in the 
amount for service rendered and not 
realize the error before depressing 
the Register key, the transmission 
unit will emit an intermittent tone 
for 4 to 6 seconds signifying the 
error. When the tone stops, she sim- 
ply depresses the key marked 
"CHECK" and re-transmits the 
transaction beginning with the in- 
sertion of the patient's Master card. 
The error transaction will be auto- 
matically discarded by the bank. 



[ 17] 



mm 



EUECTSONIC aiLtlNt AND BOOKKEEPINC SERV 

OAJLY TRANSACTION REGISTER 



KORTH CAROLirVA 
IVATIOIVAL BAIVK 



565'* 1 MR FRANCIS X. JARRETT 

5735 2 MRS R. B. LITTLE 

5735 2 l«S R. B. LITTLE 

5735 2 MRS R. B, LITTLE 

5800 1 MR EDGAR W, MARTIN 

5800 1 MR EDGAR W, MARTIN 

6025 1 MR R. J. ROBERTSON 

6082 I MISS MARY ROBINSON 

6082 1 MISS MARY ROBINSON 

7135 3 JOHN THOMPSON 

8000 ^ SHIRLEY WILLIAMS 

8I72 3 GERALOINE WOLFE 

8659 1 ROBERT Y(XJNG ■ 

8725 1 MR JOHN ZACHERY 



PHILIP G. WILLIAMSON. 
SUITE 235 

'♦O? PROFESSIONAL LANE 
YOUR CITY, N.C. 



05/13/65 



AMALGAM FILLINGS 
PROPHYLAXIS 
SITE WfNG X-RAYS 
DEEP SCALING 
PORCELAIN FILLINGS 
AMALGAM FILLINGS 
PAYMENT ON ACCOUNT 
FULL MOUTH X-RAYS 
ELECTRIC PULP TESTS 
PAYMENT ON ACCOUNT 
CLEANING 
EXTRACT I ON 
AMALGAM FILLINGS 
AMALGAM FILLINGS 



05 12 

05 12 

05 12 

05 12 

05 12 

05 12 

05 12 

05 12 

OS 12 

05 12 

05 12 

05 12 

05 12 

05 12 



10 00 






25 00 




6 00 






6 00 




5 00 






11 00 




3 00 






\k 00 




10 00 






15 00 




10 00 






25 00 






25 


00 


10 00 




10 00 






10 00 




5 00 






15 00 






10 


00 


15 00 




10 00 






10 00 




15 00 






15 00 





6 00 
10 00 



18 00 

22 00 



FIGURE 7 



100 00 too 00 35 00 35 00 



Figure 7. Doily Transaction Register. 



THE DOCTOR RECEIVES 

Daily: 

The bank furnishes the dentist or 
physician with a Daily Transaction 
Register (figure 7) which provides 
him with a complete summary of 
services rendered to his patients 
seen the previous day. It contains 
such items as the patient's name, de- 
scription of the services rendered, 
charges and credits and current bal- 
ance on these accounts which had 
activity. In addition, it will sum- 
marize all the previous day's trans- 
actions with totals for all data trans- 
mitted from the doctor's office to the 



100 00 35 00 6 759 00 



bank. The report will also provide 
the current total of outstanding ac- 
counts receivable for all accounts. 

Monthly: ; 

An Analysis of Professional Ser- 
vices Rendered (figure 8) classifies 
the dentist's or physician's profes- 
sional activity by type of service, by 
number of patient visits and by to- 
tal accrued charges for each service 
category. The report also provides 
for the totals of accrued credits 
received, classified by type of pay- 
ment; i.e., payment on account, paid 
by cash, post office box remittance, 



[ 18] 



etc. A detailed re-cap of the patient 
file lists the number of new and 
closed accounts for the month, the 
number of accounts with a zero or 
outstanding balance, as well as the 
total number of accounts in file. 

An Aged Analysis of Accounts 
Receivable (figure 9) is prepared 
for the dentist or physician, which 
provides a detailed summary for 



the date of last patient activity and 
date of last payment are shown for 
each account. 

The bank prepares and mails a 
statement (figure 10) to each re- 
sponsible party who has an out- 
standing balance, with a copy fur- 
nished to the doctor's office. The 
statement is sent to the patient un- 
der the doctor's name; neither the 



NCNB 



ELECTRONIC eilLINC «<D BOOXK£CPtHC SERVICE 

MONTHLY ANALYSIS OF PROFESSIONAL SERViCtS 



NORTH CAROLIIVA 
IVATIOMAL BAJVK 



PHILIP G. WILLIAMSON, 
SUITE 235 

1(07 PROFESS I C»WL LANE 
YOUR CITY, N.C. 



1000 I 

05/2i*/65 



160 


EXTRACT IC»(S 




15 


150 00 




175 


ROOT CANAL TREATMENT 




7 


65 00 




200 


AMALGAM FILLINGS 




32 


190 00 




221 


PORCELAIN FILLINGS 




20 


120 00 




2'»0 


ELECTRIC PULP TESTS 




6 


30 00 




2'»5 


PROPHYLAXIS 




18 


200 00 




250 


CLEANING 




If. 


90 00 




3)0 


ACRYLIC VENEER CRCWN 




6 


250 00 




1*10 


PREPARATION FOR BRIDGE 




6 






610 


SITE WING X-RAYS 




2U 


115 00 




620 


FULL MOUTH X-RAYS 




U 


120 00 




700 


DIAGNOSTIC MODELS 




5 






900 


CASH PAYMENT 




18 




150 00 


910 


PAID ON ACCOUNT 




12 




125 00 


960 


COURTESY DISCOUNT 




5 




25 00 


990 


PAYMENT RECEIVED 


FIGURE & 


102 




865 00 



Figure 8. Monthly Analysis of Professional Servi 

2ach account which had activity 
during the month or which had an 
outstanding balance. Each balance 
s shown in one of a series of 
;olumns indicating whether it is a 
;urrent charge or 30, 60, or 90 
lays past due. Year-to-date charges 
e ind year-to-date credits, as well as 



1330 00 



1165 00 



bank's identity nor its role in the 
transaction is ever revealed. It con- 
tains, in complete detail, all ser- 
vices rendered, all payments received 
during the month and the account 
balance. The statement form is per- 
forated and the patient is requested 
to return the top portion with his re- 



[19] 



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[20] 



PHILIP G. W1LLI/>MS0N, 0.0. S. 
POST OFFICE BOX 12 31* 
YOUR CITY, N.C. 
28110 







PHILIP G. WILLIAMSON, D.D.S. 




1000 
05800 


MR. EOCAR W. MARTIN 






2635 PEACE HAVEN DRIVE 






YOUR CITY, N.C. 
28107 


f> 


05/2'./65 



MR. EOGAR W. MARTIN 
MR. EDGAR W. MARTIN 



BALANCE FORMARO 
PORCELAIN FILLINGS 
AMALGAM FILLINGS 



O't/24/65 
05/12/65 
05/12/65 



5 00 



10 00 
10 00 



FIGURt 10 



25 00 




•' 25 


00 


PHILIP G. 


WILLIAMSON, O.D.S. 







igure 10. Stotement. 



nittance in the return envelope en- 
closed for his convenience. All year- 
o-date information (charges and 
credits) is shown on that portion of 
he statement which is retained by 
he patient; it assures him of an en- 



tirely accurate and up-to-date record 
of dental or medical expenses paid 
and due — information which can be 
vitally helpful for tax and insur- 
ance purposes. 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



[21 ] 



This appears to be a good system. Would save time 
on sending statements. Would almost require a 
full time receptionist, however. 




Frank R. Graham 



James E. Graham, Jr. 



Stat 



poll 
tbet 
cept 
3rd 
in 



Simplified Billing — 
A Help to Both Patient and Doctorf: 



Ts there an accounting system that 
■'■ is easy to use, current, and in- 
formative to patient and doctor 
and still give the complete set of 
accounting records? The answer is 
yes! Not only does this improve the 
doctor-patient relationship but it has 
proven increased collections for 
services at the time of the visit, thus 
reducing statement mailings. 

Records Required 

There is general agreement as to 
the specific records needing to be 



created during the daily routine. 
They are as follows: (1) a daily 
log — the usual entries; (2) a 
permanent ledger for each patient 
or family head; (3) a monthly 
statement — showing balances for- 
ward, visits by patient, treatment 
received, charges, receipts, and bal- 
ance owed; (4) a charge slip — 
presented to patient at completion 
of visit identifying for the patient ^ 
treatment and charges. 

In reviewing the above records 



■flltOi 



[22] 



it is obvious that a number of en- 
tries are identical. A poster board 
utilizing a system for one positioning 
pf each of the forms makes it pos- 
jsible to apply the accounting en- 
ries on charge slip, monthly state- 
Tient, daily log, special ledger card 
n one effort. Therefore by this fea- 
ure alone the time to post the vari- 
)us records is reduced by approxi- 
nately seventy-five percent. 

To illustrate the effectiveness of 
he idea one perhaps could follow 
I typical visit of a patient, Mrs. 
poe, from the time she comes to 
he doctor's office until the time 
he leaves. The patient's ledger and 
!he current monthly statement are 
iled in alphabetical order in a tray. 
\.i the beginning of the day the 
ecretary removes the ledgers and 
'tatements for the patients ap- 
lointed for the day, thus making 
hem readily convenient at the re- 
eptionist desk. The patient's rec- 
rd is also pulled in advance. When 
irs. Doe arrives she is registered 
n a charge slip and the daily log 
. also posted showing she is in the 



office for treatment. A charge slip 
and medical record is placed in 
the treatment room. The doctor in- 
dicates treatment on the charge slip 
receipt simply by placing a check 
in the box opposite the appropriate 
service code. The patient is then 
requested to give this to the recep- 
tionist. Mrs. Doe can see what has 
been completed, the charge, and 
her previous balance. 

At the reception desk Mrs. Doe 
gives the slip to the receptionist who 
has an excellent opportunity to ask 
Mrs. Doe if she will make a pay- 
ment on her account while she is 
present. The receptionist places the 
ledger card, statement, charge slip 
and receipt on the poster board and 
with one writing enters the follow- 
ing information: date, patient re- 
ceipt number, service code indica- 
ting treatment performed, total fees 
charged, payment by Mrs. Doe, if 
any, and the new unpaid balance 
on the account. At the same time, 
a time and date is recorded on her 
charge slip for her next appoint- 
ment. The charge slip receipt is now 



01 U - MRS II3€ 



di~ 



.£i^__^ 



^3\i^ 



.3^r 



/)}llt> •J^Ii?7 Sm/TH 



PAID ON 
ACCOUNT 



BALANCE DUE 



J 



YOUR RECEIPT FOR THE AMOUNT SHOWN HERE- 

THis IS A STATEMENT of your account to date- 



PLEASE PRESENT THIS AT RECEPTION DESK 



N9 11346 

YOUR NEXT APPOINTMENT: 

HATF ///W^J^ TIMF ^ - ^7^5^ 



EXA 



NATION 



;-RAY 



PROPHYLACTIC CLEANING 

SCALING 

ROOT PLANING - CURRETAGE 

- PERIODONTAL SURGERY 
ADJUSTMENT 

-SILVER RESTORATION 
PLASTIC RESTORATION 
GOLD RESTORATION 
SILICATE RESTORATION 
GOLD CROWN 

- PORCELAIN JACKET CROWN 

- APPLIANCE 
ED BRIDGE 



/^ 



7/iu Ch/ci^ ^.i^</J^ 



RPD - REMOVABLE PARTIAL DENTURE 

FD - FULL DENTURE 

DR - DENTURE - REPAIR - REBUILD - ADJUST. 

RCA - EMER ROOT CANAL TREATMENT 

RCT - ROOT CANAL TREATMENT 

RCF - ROOT CANAL FILLED 

EX - REMOVAL 

EX5 - SURGICAL REMOVAL 

POT - POST OPERATIVE TREATMENT 

EV - EMERGENCY VISIT 

RX -PRESCRIPTION 

O -OTHER 

CR - CASH RECEIPT 

CK - CHECK RECEIPT 



DRS. GRAHAM AND GRAHAM 

1350 Saint Julien Street 

CHARLOTTE 5. NORTH CAROLINA 

TELEPHONE ED 4-7908 



THANK YOU 



cotd 



Patient's statement-receipt-appointment slip 



[23] 



returned to Mrs. Doe. The patient 
ledger and statement are returned 
to the ledger tray in alphabetical 
order. Thus, as Mrs. Doe leaves 
the office all accounting records per- 
taining to her account are currently 
posted and up to date. In the event 
that she does not return to the of- 
fice before the end of the month 
the statement is already completed 
awaiting to be mailed at the close 
of the month. 

Making sure all records are in 
balance is also a routine matter. 
The daily log shows all entries made 
for the date. The addition of 



charges, credits, balances, and old 
balances on the daily log makes it 
possible to prove that all entries are 
arithmetically correct. These column 
totals also are used to increase or 
decrease the control balance main- 
tained for the total charges, total 
credits, and total unpaid balances. 
Thus, one source of information 
from the daily log provides all the 
necessary totals for control figures. 
Additionally, if there is more than 
one doctor, or a hygienist a charge 
or credit column for each individual 
shows the total for each at the end 
of the day. 





■^ Hi 


■ 


1^ 






ZIP-ORITER 




no"" 




Mrs. John Smith 
1876 Anderson Drive 
Charlotte, N. C, 




M»B SIAIUS 




FAMILY MEMBERS 


DATE OF BIRTH 
























































INSURANCE 


• ° 


CCUf.IlOB CO 




?' 










^ i 


•irLOTC<S«D0>[SS 








DATE 


PATIENT 


"code" 


wiilta 


;c''cS°:t 


BAI ANCE DUE 


ii 


VaI.NCE 






1 


Iclii^oi 


■ n!i?5io>u 


c^ f5 


s..\^ 


0- 


H-^^- 




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PATIENTS LEDGER sheet no 









ll 



[24] 



On the extreme right side of the 
[daily log is provision for a deposit 
blip form on which is recorded the 
jchecks received on account and 
lamount of money involved. This 
deposit sUp is credited in duplicate. 
Therefore, the duplicate appears as 
part of the daily log and shows 
n the exact amount which should be 
e deposited in the bank. As an end 
result, all transactions regarding a 
Datient account, distribution of 
harges and credits by the doctor, 
dnd the amount deposited in the 
oank are recorded and balanced 
jn a single sheet of paper. 

At the completion of a month's 
ervice, statements are prepared to 
5e mailed. All entries with past due 
iDalance or current charges, less pay- 
nent received, are ready on the 
statement. All that remains to be 
done is to place them in a window 
nvelope and mail. 

An additional time saving ad- 
f'antage is the method of addressing. 
The patient ledger card contains 
tencil on which the patient's mail- 
ng address is typed when the patient 
irst visits the doctor. Using a hand 
ize duplicator the patient's name 
ind address can be reproduced on 
he new account in less time than it 
akes to tell this. Thus, new state- 
nents for patients with outstanding 
>alance are prepared with a mini- 
num time and effort, ready to re- 
ord any activity as it affects the 
►atient's account during the next 
nonth. 

The above advantages seem to 
avor the doctor, but let us con- 
ider the advantages to the patient 
DT a moment. On each visit he re- 
eives an itemized record of what 
reatments are performed as well 
s a receipt for any payments made 
p the doctor. Upon receipt of his 



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: 



Daily Log 



[25] 



STATEMENT 

JAMES E. GRAHAM. JR.. DOS. FRANK R. SSAHAM. DOS 

« DOCTORS GRAHAM AND GRAHAM 

1350 Saint Julien Street 

• CHARLOTTE. NORTH CAROLINA 28205 
9 Telephone 334-7908 

_ for professional services rendered: 

•r n 

* Mrs. Jobn Smith 

• 1876 And«x«on Drive 
»1_ Charlotte, ■. C. j 

PAY LAST 
AMOUNT IN 

THIS COLUMN 

# PLEASE DETACH THIS PORTION AND MAIL WITH REMITTANCE | 








DATE 


PATIENT 


"cod" 


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PLEASE MAKE 

CHECKS 

PAYABLE TO 

DRS. GRAHAM & GRAH/ 

Charlotte, n. c. 


M 



Mont-hly Statement 



monthly statement, every entry is 
detailed as to when a member of 
the family visited the doctor, treat- 
ments received, charges for these 
treatments, as well as payments 
made and the new unpaid balance. 
It is unusual for a patient to call 
the doctor's office for an explana- 
tion of an itemized statement. The 
net result of this daily procedure is 
to complete all accounting records 
in the doctor's office with a mini- 



mum effort. At the same time every} 
one has confidence in the accuracy 
of the record. Certainly the patienr 
receives a completely detailed analy 
sis of the transactions involving hi 
account. These are the reasons wh 
the doctor can be confident ths 
this billing and accounting syster 
is helpful to him as well as to hi 
patients. 

1350 St. Julien St. 
Charlotte, N. C. 



[26] 



4 service to the community — Consider the au- 
thor's suggested advantages and his disadvantages. 



h 



Emergency Call System 



tV vital part of service by our 
^^ profession is providing emer- 
ency dental treatment. As dentists 
ve are morally obligated to relieve 
)ain and suffering. Through our 
lounty hospital (Margaret Pardee 
Memorial Hospital) we have, for 
he past ten years, made use of a 
otating dental emergency call sys- 
em. 

Many people in pain through ac- 

ident or other causes will call the 

ocal hospital for relief. Since the 

bll system is through the hospital 

Emergency service, it is limited to 

wti ientists who are members of the 

thi ;taff. The qualifications of the staff 

lentists have been examined and 

h ipproved and this provides legal 

protection for the hospital when a 

[lentist is called to attend a patient. 

The purpose of this call system is 



to provide emergency dental treat- 
ment for the public when their regu- 
lar dentist is not available. This 
service includes toothaches, acci- 
dents, hemorrhage, and consulting 
services with staff physicians. 




Francis A. Buchanan 



[27] 



How It Works 

Each dentist is on call for a period 
of one week. He is to be available 
by local telephone during that week. 
However, he may arrange with an- 
other dentist to assume his duty if it 
is necessary to be out of town during 
his time on call. A roster of dental 
emergency calls is maintained by 
the hospital emergency room and 
switchboard. This list is prepared 
by the hospital business office along 
with the physician call list and is 
mailed to each staff dentist every 6 
or 7 weeks. 

Of course, most emergencies are 
of a toothache nature and in these 
instances after the dentist-on-call 
determines this by a phone call from 
the hospital, he simply arranges for 
the patient to meet him at his of- 
fice. Many situations, however, are 
seen and treated at the hospital. 
Physicians sometimes request con- 
sultations, especially in accident 
cases, and after consultation the 
patient may be seen by his or her 
regular dentist at a later date. 

The dentist-on-call is not limited 
by any method of treatment. If he 
feels that an analgesic drug pre- 
scribed by phone will suffice, then 
he may do so. Treatment may be 
administered at the hospital emer- 
gency room where a dental emer- 
gency tray is maintained. 

Some Disadvantages 

( 1 ) There is a tendency on the 
part of some individuals to delay 
treatment in the case of a tooth- 
ache until after regular working 
hours. This situation can be best 
taken care of by determining over 
the phone just how long the patient 
has been in pain and how severe 



the pain is. Then perhaps an anal- 
gesic can be prescribed, and the 
patient seen the next morning, 

(2) One must avail himself for 
one week. However, this does not 
confine the dentist-on-call to his 
home. He can attend movies, 
meetings, play golf, etc., just as long 
as he can be reached by phone in a 
short period of time. 

(3) One must secure a substi- 
tute when the call period falls dur- 
ing vacation, dental meetings, etc. 

Advantages 

( 1 ) The emergency call system 
provides effective treatment for the 
public when their regular dentist is 
not available. 

(2) It enables the hospital to 
take care of patients who require 
treatrrient that only a dentist is capa- 
ble of rendering. 

(3) It gives evening freedom to 
aU the staff dentists except the den- 
tist-on-call. If a patient calls at the 
home of a dentist and that patient 
is not seen regularly by that dentist, 
he simply instructs the patient to 
call the hospital which will provide 
the name of the dentist-on-call. 

(4) It provides effective emer- 
gency service for transients and va- 
cationers who are away from home 
and their regular dentists. 

In conclusion, it is felt that any 
city with as many as 6 or 7 dentists 
can develop an effective emer- 
gency system in connection with the 
hospital. This will provide a service 
to the public and will give the den- 
tists more evening freedom. 

Oakley Medical Building 

508 7th Avenue, 
Hendersonville, N. C. 



[28] 



Case Report Number 2 



This patient could not have full upper and lower 
dentures made because of large exostosis of the 
mandible. A case such as this is often referred to 
the oral surgeon. This case is noteworthy as an 
example of such an instance, and was concluded 
with highly satisfactory results. 



'"Phis 48 year old man came to 
the student dental clinic October 
29, 1962 to have full upper and 
lower dentures made following re- 
cent extractions. 

History 

This was a well developed, well 
nourished white male with no his- 



tory of heart trouble, allergies, or 
systemic disease. 

Clinical Examination 

Intra-oral examination revealed 
bilaterally large broad-based man- 
dibular tori which would not permit 
satisfactory construction of a lower 
denture. (Figure 2) 



Removal of 



Bilateral Tori 




DwiGHT Lanier Clark 



[29] 




FIGURE 6. The tori removed were approxi- 
FIGURE 3. One side with the flap reflected. mately 30 x 8 x 5 millimeters. 



[30] 






X-Ray Examination 

An occlusal radiograph was taken 
and demonstrated the large radio- 
paque exostosis bilaterally. (Figure 
1) 

Surgical Procedure 

Under local anesthesia, an in- 
cision was made on the crest of the 
ridge distal to the exostosis and 
continuing anteriorly to the mid- 
line. The mucoperiosteal flap was 
carefully reflected on the right side 
over the torus. Using a surgical air 
turbine handpiece with sterile iso- 
tonic sodium chloride spray the 
torus was removed in toto. The area 
was irrigated and cleaned of all 
debris. Excess tissue of the muco- 
periosteal flap was trimmed and the 



incision was closed with 0000 black 
silk. The same procedure was ac- 
complished on the other side. The 
patient tolerated the procedure well 
and left the office in good condi- 
tion. (Figures 3, 4, 5.) 

Diagnosis 

Bilateral Mandibular Tori 

Course 

Post-operative recovery was good. 
Sutures were removed on the fourth 
post-operative day and photographs 
were made. Full upper and lower 
dentures were constructed the first 
part of January, 1963 in the student 
prosthodontic clinic. 

UNC School of Dentistry 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



I 31 



An informed public is a responsible public. 



Ask the Dentist 




Charles W. Horton 




L. P. Megginson, Jr. 



r\N August 22, 1963, the first 
^^ dental health column published 
in North Carolina, on a regular 
basis, appeared in the High Point 
Enterprise. In the intervening two 
years, more than forty articles have 
appeared in the newspaper on den- 
tal subjects. Most of the articles 
were written on dental health, but 
some were concerned with career 
opportunities in dentistry, including 
dental auxilliary personnel. 

The project was first visualized 
because of concern about: 

1. The public image of dentistry 

2. The lack of appreciation off 
dental services by the public. 

3. The lack of knowledge among^ 
the populace about dental health 

An article published concerning^: 
dentistry's public image in the 
A.D.A. Journal in March, 1963, 
prompted our interest with this re- 
mark — "Dentists are dedicated toii 
the proposition of filling cavities 
and bank accounts." If this is truly 
our public image, then certainly the, 
profession's efforts must be directed' 
toward its correction. 



[32] 



The High Point Dental Society 
agreed to allow the project to be 
tried under its auspices with built 
in safeguards to prevent a breach 
of ethics. 

These safeguards are explained 
later in this article. 

A delegation from the High Point 
Dental Society approached the edi- 
tor and managing editor (Mr. Holt 
McPherson and Mr. Joe Brown) of 
the High Point Enterprise to enlist 
their support in publishing the ar- 
ticle. With some reluctance, be- 
cause nothing of this kind had ever 
been done in North Carolina, they 
agreed to a trial publication. 



The Enterprise is the predomi- 
nant daily newspaper in the city of 
High Point with a daily circulation 
of 28,300. The average number of 
readers per copy is 3.9 or 110,370 
people. Of this number, 75,000 
are adult readers. (These statistics 
compiled by newspaper.) 

After approximately one year of 
publication, a survey was taken by 
the dentists of High Point. The sur- 
vey was conducted in their private 
dental offices by dental assistants. 
Because of this relative inexperi- 
ence in conducting surveys, some 
error is inherent, but by and large^, 
the survey is relatively accurate. 



iirsi 



ulai 



Ask The Dentist 



DEAR DOCTOR: My six- this disease. If it's a quick cur 
lyearnjld son iias some new for pyorriiea you want — tiie 
permanent teeth erupting in the have your teeth removed. 
Ifront part of his mouth, and the dE.^'r DOCTOR: My hus 
teeth are coming m very band is having all of hi"s teeti 
crooked. I rushed him to our ,aken out because he has pyor 
dentist and had him examined, rhea. I don't want to lose m' 
ery concerned, but the teeth - can I catch pyorrhe: 



Ask 

The 
Dentist 



Point Enterprise, Thuridoy, Dee. 24, 1964 13 B 



"Ask 



The Dentist" «el- 
j comes comments and ques- 
tions from its readers. Ques- 
tions of widest appeal will be 
made the basis of this regu- 
lar column and may be 
mailed to Ask The Dentist, 
The High Point Enterprise. 

.^-... ^„.. • ^„.^.. yj^,,„^. Is it possible to go to 'he, pjjj^ij Mental Re- iy 

dentist just didn't have too from him? . 'hospital and be put to sleep on Multiple Sclerosis/ 

mr«)n'for'some time^^e'ven ANSWER: No. Pyorrhea is , to have my mouth fixed up? is, 'Tuberculosis, just (/ A 

took some X-Ravs - but all he '^°"<''''°" "h"^'' has been gomi i think I need some fillings a few. Why not a fu 
said was io Watch him for ""/?' .f",?' "I"^' '^■"^ i",'"*.™' and mavbe one or two teeth ?arch in oral disease^ f>, 

„ .... \ 

we see an orthodontist right 



Dear Doctor: 



sues of the teeth — not Ih hurt and I cant stand pain. ^^^ j^^j jgn^j 



away? 



, teeth Thais why the teeth arj 
loose sometimes — the bons Answer: 






.y^t 



ca^e to the pi «j,^j'^,, ^r/^, '^o„^J% 



e*"*/ : 



ANSWER: I think that 
would stick with mv dentist. ""'='= .'°,'y;™™f- '"« """' ""°r,'. , , ■ ,ic manner. It, S^' ^^•'Jlh '%-, Hi 'o 

I'm glad that you 'are con- ='™'"'' ""^ "=«"' '^ '■"'""''«': °°" ' '<=' '"■" "^ P^'" "=""ress upon Ih '" .l^o^f''^ ^ '4 ^"'lo >■ 




.%, 

^Z!^^.. ^ 



cemed 



mother should ' 



In costly delays in dental treat- .ess of the 



sti-j 



be concerned with her chil- The gums become painful ment. Fear is your enemv in 
drens teeth, boti baby teeth ^"^ swollen because this con-,,.,„ ,..„., 
and permanent teeth. You cer- ^'a"' chronic infection develops 
tainlv can prevent a lot of den- '"'" 'he acute stage. It's not the 
tal problems that develop later 'ee'h — it's the foundationment 
n in life if an ounce of pre- structures around the leeih 
enlion is used during the vears >'°" ''<' develop pyorr 
from two to twelve years of **'°"'' he caught from , 
band. It will be becai 
n °But back to your problem. It condition developing 
s not unusual to have crowd- '""^ "i yur own mo 
ng in the front part of the disease needs to be d( 
nouth when the permanent 'he early stages, bs -^^^^ Doctor 
eelh erupt. If vou will look in '""^h damage has bt 
flOnI '-our son's r outh. you will no- 0'"^e Ihe teeth become 
■e how* much larger a 
dc-r that permanent toolh is ■"^_^"'-^- _ Lloo^eu icciu: •'V'^fti 



{is 

urate, 

'O/T'^ Of 'ome a 

rf:cr,V>^<^?^V?^.^</ cental 

disease .'CO^A^f =-*'^'' "'' ' '' 



'^^. 



well, you know then a pacifier cause a child to hav 
'00 late. crooked teeth? ^^p/. 

. comparLTOn to the baby toolh DEAR DOCTOR: I Answer: ff/^^ 

hat it replaced. There should f^dh cleaned for Ihe I Generally, dentists now /'f, 

>e crowding— old mother nature '" "^y hfe the other 

ranted it that wav— this is one ' "^ ^ hltle 
Ih,. or,^ih 7;ri,,rc uh;,.>^tist rcmov 

' 7% 



i'ant€ 



sre 
:(iK 

vitie 
tnil' 



ectei 




Ask The [ 



'o 

*■'> - p * ■■ 

Will thumbsucking or sucking' /}j°' />^''^A(,/'>on'° i''''>o "'i-'fi by wasting away of the 



*b;^v,s;?- 



^Z>o 



Ask 
The 
Dentist 



[e the other .. . .u i ,„ ■ %/'^,\. }■ '''iv,°i/^ 

:le confused. '•'^' 'humbsucking won ^^y 'n „>^, a V % , 

ved ihis larl crooked teeth if the h^%/'<' ^^ fl^^, '%*',, 'o /< 



^/•f, ^Oi' s . *»vt 



^ A and fiums that anchor the 
^Vih in the moulh. A prime 



icerh and said thai before the child re if^^tijS^nr?S^ 
it on my teeth it cou Sucking is one o' 



'^.si> 



"*/p 



'%■ 



'<.. ■*; 




pyorrhea - is that tr habits a baby de' li^'^^ltT' liJ^ J'° ^"''o,., '•*,''% 
ANSWER: Yes - t related to his •So,!.''' >'. tS..!^ *>/!'' li! "'/ 

■me to have 

done on a: If the dentist treats the tooth 
mouth. 'and destroys the germs, healing 



ANSWER: Yes - t related to his .s,,'? ^11. :% '" * '''e ' „ >■ / 
your teeth is one of th food from brea p,j,;'««/ %,, -^r/ «,J ii'>Of "I, /[^ , 
of ihal complicated di chologisis tel' ■V,,""a > . *•?^„°''/■A'V'''' lo'\ done 
called pyorrhea. Ta gives a bah- % '" t„ •^V''V'?' ^''^^/-I'n my i 



calculus, or tartar as 

sometimes called. Today 

the only treatment is to remove 

alculus. How does it form- and 

low might it be prevented^ : 

Cleft palate. The dentist 

serves as part of a health learn, 

'including speech therapist, phy- 

iisician and psyrholoqist in cori 



formed from minerals and securi' 
saliva. Some people ha crease w' 
Dear Doctor: minerals in their sali bored p 

I have been reading so much It*'!"*^^.'""^: ^^^^ ^•'""c t baby's , *"*^ 
^ their teeth. Tartar on yt salisf- y^ % 



'^ ^■**/> '''«?/ (j^^^ would be best takes place. Where the jaw bone 
■^^oL dn^^^oT^^f}c ^Oi-' -* rather than tr>' has become involved, the bone 
^on o,,y A^ /j^ u!^'^ am afraid it will will grow back normally once 



,,\\i ecently about smoking and'f 'J '<^<^'V'''i^^°"'^'' ..-'*'«>'' /"« "- 
"'' ancer of the lung. I have ="<^''^°" ^"<' '7'f ''° /V *o, " I "'i 
„,,„ eard that smoking may cause,?r' "^=" .^""O"';'' '» ="' /*e ^C*'-^ V^ 



''^^^' ^oSo" e?*'o my health 



'■> y/. 



smoking may t— ^„. . .... ... 

lancer of the mouth. Is this^'l'V'.'^"^';''" '"^^"^ '» 
infection of the gums, 
allowed to orosre.ss thi" 






'e,3 






<>'t' 



'''*/». Of ^f .%^., A> 



[33] 



the infection is gone. The dentist 
11 fill the nerve canal with 
'''lei %" spend an overwhelm-ia special material to prevent 
''' /ortion of their t i m cipcnetration of bacteria and 
, to preserve teeth rather | fluids. The fibers which attach 
xtract them. By removingithe tooth continue to hold it 

th'« HicttaiuiH np iniiiroHlfirm. 



The number of adults interviewed 
over 21 was 185. 

The following questions were 
asked: 



1. Do you read the newspaper 
every day if possible? 

2. Do you read the H.P. Enterprise? 

3. Have you ever seen this column 
in the newspaper? 



Yes 



No. of 
people 

172 
163 

121 



Percent 
of 185 

93 
88 

74 



No 



No. of 
people 

13 

22 

63 



Percent 
of 185 

7 
12 

26 



The following questions were 
asked to determine how many of 
those seeing the column read it and 
found it interesting and informa- 
tive. The percentages in this series 
were tallied using those having seen 
the column in the newspaper as 100 
percent because these were the po- 
tential readers. (Question No. 3 
above) 



Yes 



No. of 
people 

1 . Do you read the column when- 
ever you see it? 104 

2. Do you find the column interesting 
and informative? (error in survey) 106 



86 



102 



No 



Percent No. of 
of 121 people 



17 



Percent 
of 121 

14 



It is encouraging to note here 
that all those reading the column 
found it interesting and informative. 

To compare the performance of 
the column with one of similar con- 
tent, the following question was 
asked of the same people concern- 
ing readership of Dr. Molner, the 
medical column which appears daily. 

Do you read Dr. Molner, the 
medical column in the Enterprise? 

45 percent read Molner regularly. 

35 percent read Molner occasion- 
ally. 



20 percent read Molner never. 

From these figures it appears that 
80 percent read the medical column 
regularly or occasionally, while 86 
percent read ASK THE DENTIST 
whenever they see it in the news- 
paper. By this comparison, it may 
be deduced that the dental column 
performs extremely well. 

By using the statistics obtained 
in the survey, it may be computed 
that the column has approximately 
42,000 adult readers. How many 
man-hours would it take for all the 



[34] 



dentists practicing in High Point to 
get the same message across to 42,- 
000 individual dental patients? 

As with all surveys, the possi- 
bihty of error exists. In this par- 
ticular instance, it is true that the 
people who visit dental offices are 
dentally oriented. They would be 
more inclined to be interested in 
dental topics than those who do not 
visit the dentist with any degree 
of regularity. Still it may be said 
that people are not always sick but 
they do read the medical columns 
because of genuine interest in their 
health. 

Also, since only .2 percent of the 
adult readers of the Enterprise were 
polled, this did not give a repre- 
sentative sampling. It has been said, 
however, that presidential elections 
are predicted with much less sam- 
pling with an alarming degree of 
accuracy. 

Conclusions 

Since the dental column has been 
in operation for some two years 
now, the authors feel the following 
things have been learned: 

1. A dental health column is a 
useful tool in our efforts to edu- 
cate the public toward a better 
understanding of dental health 
problems. 

2. People do read the column 
regularly. 

3. The general public is interested 
in dental topics if they are written 
in an interesting manner in terms 
the layman can understand. 

4. Weekly publication is best be- 
cause it offers continuity. Readers 
will look for it on a certain day, 
week after week. 

5. Support must be built slowly 
with the newspaper editors because 
it is new to this area. They are not 



anxious to publish any new column 
because they already have many 
other things competing for space. 
The best possible method to get 
their cooperation is to have a dele- 
gation of several dentists from their 
respective communities to go to 
them in person, show them ex- 
amples of the dental column, and 
ask that they be pubhshed. (The 
president and several members of 
the local society would do nicely.) 
The editor should be approached 
politely, never demanding. He may 
ask, "but what if the vets, the chiro- 
practors, the optometrist, the phy- 
sicians, etc. all come and ask for 
equal space?" Then an explanation 
should be made to him why we 
think the dental profession's mes- 
sage is an important public service 
and should reach the public. Any 
editor worth his salt as a news- 
paperman, will be responsive to a 
plea from the medical and dental 
societies, the United Fund, the Boy 
and Girl Scouts, etc., for help. If he 
is not, then, he is not a public 
spirited newspaperman, and you 
might as well give up for that area 
for the time being. 

The editor may agree to trial 
publication to see if he gets any 
response in the form of questions 
from his readers. If he does, then 
you've got the icing on the cake. 
Occasionally, it is nice, and com- 
mon courtesy, for some one in an of- 
ficial capacity in the dental society, 
to take time to write a letter thank- 
ing the newspaper for their coopera- 
tion. 

6. Most readers find a question- 
answer reader participation format 
generates more interest. 

7. Great care should be taken 
in the selection of the author or 
authors. If the column is not writ- 



[35] 



ten in terms the layman can under- 
stand; it will fail. It must be dra- 
matic and interesting. Technical 
terminology is out. The author 
should have an excellent concept 
of the ethics of the society and 
should always know the ethics 
committee is available for consul- 
tation at any time. 

A picture of the author along with 
a credit line to increase interest 
by its readers, may be requested by 
some papers. This should not be 
allowed in the beginning however, 
because it might arouse some ad- 
verse reaction among the profes- 
sion while the program is still in 
its infancy. Publication of the au- 
thor's by-line and a picture might 
be allowed at some later date, to 
make the column a more effective 
instrument. 

In the beginning, a copy of the 
column before publication should 
be sent to the ethics committee for 
clearance. If it is proper and is 
then published, a copy of the pub- 
lished article should then be sent to 
the ethics committee chairman so 
he may check to see if the two are 
the same, or substantially so. If this 
method is followed it. offers protec- 



tion for both the dental society, and 
the author. It is an unwieldy, cum- 
bersome thing to use, but it is safe. 
If after a year or so, the author 
is found to be trustworthy, and has 
a good concept of ethics, then it 
should be dispensed with. 

8. Subject matter should concern 
itself with dental topics only, no 
politics or controversial issues. The 
column should not be used in an 
editorial manner, but its main func- 
tion should be remembered — to 
educate. 

9. This author believes a dental 
column is of unlimited value in 
building good will for dentistry in 
North Carolina, and will help all 
dentists to have a happier, more use- 
ful practice. 

10. Dentistry needs friends and 
needs them bad. A dental column is 
an important public service that we 
in dentistry can render to the public 
for the mutual benefit of both. 

The authors wish to express their 
appreciation to the High Point En- 
terprise and the High Point Dental 
Society for making this experience 
possible. 
High Point 
North Carolina 



[36] 



Well prepared paper — the value of knowledge is 
that from its application direction is toward some 
worthy end — Report of Councils and Bureaus 
Vol. 56, April '58. Worthy end — the question to 
be answered, how much service and experience is 
repeated for the patient unnecessarily with this 
technique. 



The Formocresol Pulpotomy 



ONE of the most important areas 
in dentistry for children is the 
management of injured and infected 
pulps of primary and young perma- 
nent teeth. Successful pulp therapy 
is important for the dental health of 
every child patient. Conservation of 
pulpaly involved teeth whether by 
caries or by accident should be of 
major concern to every practicing 
dentist. 

It is essential to maintain pri- 
mary teeth in their proper position 
for obvious reasons. The intact pri- 
mary dentition provides optimum 
masticatory function, reserves space 




Benjamin R. Baker 



[37] 



for the developing permanent suc- 
cessors and provides a desirable cos- 
metic appearance for the child which 
is so important for many. Any 
proven clinical procedure which 
tends to reduce the needless pre- 
mature loss of teeth in children 
should be used. Various methods for 
maintaining carious and trauma- 
tized teeth in a sound condition 
have been reported. These are the 
direct pulp cap, the indirect pulp 
cap, vital pulpotomy, and the so- 
called non-vital pulpotomy. 

The formocresol pulpotomy for 
primary teeth has been one of the 
more clinically successful of the rec- 
ommended methods for treating ex- 
posed cariously involved primary 
teeth. The purpose of this paper is 
to bring the reader up to date on the 
current status of formocresol pulp- 
otomies. It is also the purpose of 
this paper to present a practical 
formocresol technique which may 
be used as a one-appointment pro- 
cedure in the dental office. It is 
felt that a one-appointment proce- 
dure is more desirable for the prac- 
ticing dentist in the interest of eco- 
nomics and time. 

Review of the Literature 

Calcium Hydroxide has been the 
preferred medicament for covering 
amputated pulp stumps. The search 
for better materials and better re- 
sults in treatment is continuous in 
dental research. Unfavorable clini- 
cal reactions of internal resorption 
in teeth treated with calcium hy- 
droxide pulpotomies have been re- 
ported. In recent years a revival of 
the formocresol technique for surgi- 
cally amputated primary pulp 
stumps has been recommended. 

Experimental Studies on Animals 

Histological studies using the for- 



mocresol technique on the teeth of 
animals have shown that three dis- 
tinct zones exist in the microscopic 
studies of the tissue sections of ani- 
mal teeth. The first zone was one of 
reaction of formocresol with the 
pulp blood clot. This was followed 
by a zone of fixation of pulp tissue. 
The third zone was interpreted as 
normal vital pulp. Buckley's for- 
mocresol (19 percent formalde- 
hyde, 35 percent cresol, glycerine 
and water) was the medicament 
used. Pulp changes varied from sur- 
face fixation to complete calcific 
degeneration. These changes were 
in direct ratio to the length of ex- 
posure time that formocresol was 
applied to the amputated pulps. Ap- 
plications varied in length from five 
minutes to seven days with some 
evidence of calcific degeneration 
beginning after three days. Teeth 
treated with formocresol revealed 
no bridging, no inflammatory re- 
sponse, and no apparent periapical 
pathology. Vital tissue was found in 
the apical third of the root canal of 
formocresol treated teeth. 

Findings in Human Teeth 

Studies by several researchers in 
which formocresol pulpotomies were 
performed clinically have reported 
outstanding clinical success. In these 
studies only vital teeth were used 
in the experiments. No premature 
exfoliation of teeth treated with for- 
mocresol was found. 

One study has been reported 
which found inflammatory cells in 
the area of the pulpotomy. Other 
studies have been reported in which 
teeth with necrotic pulps and peria- 
pical abscesses were treated with 
formocresol. Clinical success has 
been claimed for these teeth, but no 
histological support has been pub- 
lished relative to treatment of teeth 



[38] 




FIGURE 1. Demonstrafes a carious tooth with a prognosis for pulpotomy. 

FIGURE 2. Illustration of the pulp amputation and extension into the pulp canal orifice. 

FIGURE 3. Demonstration of a cotton pledget soaked in formocresol applied to the pulp stumps. 

FIGURE 4. Demonstrates the pulp stumps after formocresol application. Note the three orifices 

and the clean pulp chamber. 

FIGURE 5. Demonstrates the cavity preparation with the zinc oxide and eugenol base to 
which has been added two drops of formocresol. 

FIGURE 6. The finished restoration by the one-appointment pulpotomy procedure using 

formocresol. 



with abscesses. 

In 1961 the Department of Pe- 
dodontics at the University of North 
Carolina School of Dentistry began 
a clinical study comparing the cal- 
cium hydroxide pulpotomy with the 
formocresol pulpotomy. A one-ap- 
pointment procedure was used 
rather than the two-appointment 
procedure reported in the literature. 



The literature suggests that short 
periods of exposure of formocresol 
to the amputated pulp stumps are 
sufficient. 

The Department of Biostatistics 
of the School of Public Health at 
UNC designed file cards and placed 
them in a random selection order 
for use in the study. Calcium hy- 
droxide and formocresol were the 



[39] 



experimental treatments. Following 
the procedure, the cards were dated 
and filed in a six month recall file. 
Bite wing radiographs were taken 
at six-month intervals for eighteen 
months to gain a progress report 
on the success or failure of the 
technique. 

At the end of eighteen months, 
18 formocresol pulpotomies had 
been performed, of which 16 were 
successful and two had failed. In 
contrast, 1 7 calcium hydroxide pulp- 
otomies had been performed, of 
which only 9 were successful. This 
study is continuing and two, three, 
four, and five year recalls are pro- 
jected along with the pulpotomies 
which have been done since the 
first eighteen-month period ended. 

Technique for the One-Appointment 
Procedure 

The tooth is anesthetized and 
isolated under the rubber dam. The 
cavity preparation is done to com- 
pletion in so far as possible before 
the potential exposure is excavated. 
If the mechanical reduction is ac- 
complished prior to the exposure, 
it will minimize contamination of the 
pulp chamber with debris. 

After the preparation is com- 
pleted, the pulp chamber is entered 
from the occlusal surface with a 
large, round, sterile bur. The roof 
of the chamber is entirely removed 
including all pulp horn extensions. 
Fiee access for vision to the pulp 
stumps is necessary. The contents 
of the pulp chamber are removed 
with the round bur and air water 
spray for flushing of the chamber. 
Care should be made not to per- 
forate the chamber floor. The pulp 
stumps are amputated just at the 
level of entry of the root canal 
with the pulp chamber. Once posi- 



tive location of the canals is estab- 
Hshed, the bur is rotated in reverse. 
This cleanly amputates the stumps 
with a downward drive. Forward 
motion may be used, but this tends 
to snag and pull pulpal filaments 
from the canals which is not de- 
sirable. An alternative method of 
amputation is to use large sharp 
spoon excavators. 

When the chamber has been 
flushed and dried, a formocresol 
soaked cotton pledget is compressed 
over the pulp stumps. It is covered 
by a dry cotton pledget to catch 
excess formocresol from leaking into 
the soft tissue. The pledget soaked 
in formocresol is left in position for 
5 to 10 minutes. Upon removal, the 
pulp stumps will have a dark brown- 
black appearance and no further 
bleeding will be seen. The pulp 
stumps are then overlaid with a 
mix of zinc oxide and eugenol to 
which has been added two drops of 
formocresol. A second layer of pure 
zinc oxide and eugenol is laid over 
the first. This seals the first layer 
preventing free formocresol from 
seepage into the mouth. The final 
restoration will be either silver 
amalgam or a chrome steel crown. 
This technique allows the pulpotomy 
to be completely performed in one 
appointment. 

Formocresol pulpotomies on per- 
manent teeth are not advocated at 
North Carolina. A series of photo- 
graphs of technique models de- 
scribes the mechanical aspects of 
the treatment. 

Discussion 

Evaluation of a technique or 
medicament should not be based 
solely upon the findings in animal 
teeth. Final judgment of results lies 
with adequate studies in human 



[40] 



teeth. In human studies caries free 
teeth do not have the same tissue 
reactions as carious teeth. This must 
be considered in evaluating studies. 
Evaluation of studies must also 
be influenced by the clinical tech- 
niques of the operators. Doyle, Em- 
merson, and Law and Lewis used 
zinc oxide and eugenol seals in their 
studies and their results were similar 
showing the three zones of pulpal 
tissue and no evidence of inflam- 
matory cells. Massler and Mansuk- 
hani used a seal of gutta-percha and 
crown and bridge cement. These 
materials have poor cavity sealing 
properties and inflammatory areas 
were found in the microscopic sec- 
tions of these formocresol pulp- 
otomies. 

The literature has revealed 
studies using the formocresol tech- 
nique on animal teeth, human teeth 
which were not carious, carious hu- 
man teeth, and abscessed human 
teeth with draining fistulas. Highly 
successful clinical results have been 
reported for all of these studies. 
There are certain different findings 
in the reaction of the pulp to for- 
mocresol among some studies. It is 
the writer's opinion that the studies 
in which carious teeth were used 
should be reviewed as most ap- 
plicable for the clinical success of 
formocresol treatment. 

Evaluation of a technique re- 
quires time to determine true suc- 
cess. In the studies reported here, 
time intervals varied from 18 
months to five years. Clinical suc- 
cess of the same magnitude was 
claimed after five years as it was 
in the shorter periods. This must be 
regarded as a most encouraging 
sign, but better evidence should ac- 
cumulate as the studies continue. 

The literature has presented evi- 



dence of outstanding clinical suc- 
cess with the formocresol technique. 
The reasons postulated for success 
are varied. Some feel that the germi- 
cidal properties of formocresol are 
responsible. Others feel that it is 
the reaction of formocresol with the 
pulp that accounts for the success. 
At the present time, it is felt by 
most that the formocresol pulpotomy 
should be reserved for vital primary 
teeth. Starkey states that teeth with 
a history of spontaneous toothache, 
internal resorption, or excessive 
bleeding after pulp amputation are 
poor candidates for pulpotomy and 
should be extracted in the health 
interest of the child. Pulpotomies 
on non-vital teeth are not advo- 
cated. No histologic studies have 
been reported which support a ra- 
tionale for treating non-vital pri- 
mary teeth with formocresol. 

Conclusion and Summary 

The formocresol pulpotomy meth- 
od of treating primary teeth has 
been clinically successful for almost 
thirty years. Histologic studies re- 
cently published reveal that while 
there is surface fixation of pulp 
tissue in formocresol treated teeth, 
normal pulp tissue exists in the 
lower one-third to one-half of the 
root canal of treated vital teeth. 
The non-vital connotation of this 
technique given by some may be 
ascribed to the procedure when the 
amputated stumps are exposed to 
free formocresol over an extended 
period of time. 

In view of the microscopic find- 
ings and the clinical success of high 
percentage range up to five years, 
the formocresol technique is freely 
justified as the recommended treat- 
ment of choice for vital exposed 
pulps of primary teeth. Further 



[41] 



clinical studies to standardize the cedure is not recommended for per- 
technique should be conducted. Fur- manent teeth because of the dearth 
ther microscopic studies should be of material available relative to its 
conducted as the technique relates efficacy, 
to non-vital teeth and the treat- 
ment of exposed vital permanent UNC School of Dentistry 
teeth. At the present time this pro- Chapel Hill, N. C. 



[42] 



The battle to train enough dentists to give Ameri- 
cans the care and protection they need has already 
been lost. 



^Training Auxiliary Personnel 



V/'ou are well aware that we are 
not graduating enough dentists 
annually to maintain, over the next 
10 or 15 years, the current ratio 
of dentists to population. In addi- 
tion to a rapidly expanding popula- 
tion, there are other factors which 
further complicate the problem. 
The percentage of the population 
receiving dental care, and the per 
capita demands for dental service 
are rising steadily. It is predicted 
that with higher living standards we 
can expect the demand for dental 
care to rise from 40 to 70 per cent 
of the U. S. population within the 
next 10 years. Growth in dental pre- 




Andrevs^ M. Cunningham 



* Presented at State Secretaries Management Conference at ADA Headquarters in 
Chicago, June, 1965. 



[43 ] 



payment plans and the inevitable 
expansion of public health pro- 
grams for the aged and other groups 
will add to the demands upon the 
dentist. 

This is a crucial problem for den- 
tistry. Unless the profession can 
come up with its own answers, it 
would not be unreasonable to expect 
the government to initiate programs 
of its own to alleviate the situation 
in the public interest. Don't say "it 
can't happen here." 

Dental research, a relatively new 
field, is committed to the develop- 
ment of an adequate control pro- 
gram to prevent damage rather than 
to repair the damage already in- 
fUcted. The training of auxiliary 
personnel to whom dentists can 
delegate more of the time-consuming 
tasks that require neither their sci- 
entific knowledge nor their profes- 
sional skill, and enable the dentists 
to achieve higher levels of produc- 
tivity and to care for more patients is 
the other answer. 

Community Institutions 

Universities generally are limited 
to educational programs leading to 
undergraduate and graduate de- 
grees. Therefore, many dental 
schools are not permitted to acti- 
vate one- or two-year curriculums 
for training auxiliary personnel, al- 
though some may permit such 
courses through extension divisions. 
Thus, the public vocational educa- 
tion programs, now well established 
throughout the country on state and 
local levels, offer the best possible 
approach for the solution of the 
problem. In this effort, it is incum- 
bent upon the State Society to as- 
sume an aggressive leadership role 
if qualified auxiliary personnel are 



to be produced through this chan- 
nel. The State Society must exhaust 
every means of initiating training 
programs within the framework of 
junior colleges, community colleges, 
or technical institutes. 

One Way 

As a first step, the State Society 
should get formal approval for such 
training programs from its own 
policy-making body, and that of its 
component and local societies. Such 
statements or resolutions should in- 
clude evidence of the need for the 
programs, and the desire of the pro- 
fession to co-operate and lend its 
full support in the establishment 
and development of these programs. 

Armed with these formal state- 
ments, an authorized committee rep- 
resenting the Society should then ap- 
proach the proper school authorities 
with: (1) a curriculum approved by 
the Council on Dental Education; 
(2) a list of equipment, instru- 
ments, and materials required for 
the number of students anticipated, 
with the cost of each; (3) faculty 
and staff requirements, including 
job specifications and salary sched- 
ules; and (4) specific space require- 
ments for the number of students 
anticipated. 

All these items are readily avail- 
able from training programs already 
activated. 

In addition, formal endorsement 
by appropriate state and local aux- 
iliary organizations is desirable. 

If the school authorities are con- 
vinced that present and projected 
requirements for trained auxiliary 
personnel in the area warrant the 
establishment of training programs, 
then the state and local societies 



[44] 



are in business, and their work has 
just begun. 

An Essential 

A formal advisory committee 
should be established to assist and 
advise school authorities in planning 
the program. Because of the highly 
specialized content of the curricu- 
lums for training dental auxiliary 
personnel, the assistance of persons 
knowledgeable in the dental field is 
essential. Usually, the local director 
of vocational education will assume 
the responsibility of organizing an 
advisory committee which should 
include representatives of socie- 
ties, auxiliary organizations, dental 
schools, and pubhc health depart- 
ments. In addition, experienced 
auxiliary personnel and lay persons 
interested in the community and its 
schools are also desirable as mem- 
bers of the committee. 

This must be a working com- 
mittee and no more than 7 to 10 
members are recommended, so that 
a cross-section of the dental dis- 
ciplines are represented, and each 
has a chance to actively participate 
in its discussions, and in establish- 
ing policies and formulating recom- 
mendations. 

Surveys will have to be conducted 
to determine present and projected 
needs for auxiliary personnel in the 
area served by the school system. 
Skills and related technical material 
to be taught will have to be iden- 
tified. Program standards will have 
to be established. Clinical and 
laboratory facilities will have to be 
planned. Criteria for selection of 
students will have to be determined. 

Educators Needed 

Perhaps the major problem which 
will immediately face the advisory 



committee will be the recruitment 
of a qualified staff. A shortage of 
teachers is especially acute in den- 
tal assistant and dental laboratory 
technician programs. While experi- 
enced dental assistants and dental 
laboratory technicians may be avail- 
able, very few have had the neces- 
sary educational background for 
teaching. There are no schools in 
the country now producing teachers 
in these fields. 

An educational program can be 
no better than those who teach it. 
The knowledge and skill of a stu- 
dent cannot be expected to rise 
above the level of the instructor. 
The shortage of qualified teachers 
for auxiliary personnel programs, 
and the lack of facilities for produc- 
ing such teachers poses a real chal- 
lenge which must be met by the 
profession, if the training of aux- 
iliary personnel is to be effective. 

Resources 

Generally, the local school board 
must furnish the building and the 
land, although some Federal money 
is available for this purpose. In ad- 
dition, local funds must be appropri- 
ated for utiUties (light, heat, water, 
gas) and for janitorial service. 

A combination of State and Fed- 
eral funds pays for equipment and 
instructional costs. In some in- 
stances, salaries of instructors may 
be supplemented by local funds, 
and this may be necessary to attract 
experienced and dedicated teach- 
ers. 

In talking with school officials, 
one will find that Federal funds are 
available for public vocational edu- 
cation under: (1) the Smith-Hughes 
Act of 1917; (2) the George-Bar- 
den Act of 1946, Titles I and II; 
(3) the Manpower Development 



[45] 



and Training Act of 1962; and (4) 
the Vocational Education Act of 
1963. 

Federal funding of public voca- 
tional education has been liber- 
alized so that health occupations, 
including dental auxiliary person- 
nel, may now be supported by Fed- 
eral funds, administered by State 
boards of vocational education. 
These funds are available to the 
states on a dollar-for-dollar match- 
ing basis. Allocations to the various 
states are based on several factors, 
including rural and urban popula- 
tion and age groups. In order to be 
eligible for these Federal funds, 
however, training programs must be 
occupationally oriented. They must 
be designed specifically to train a 
person for a particular occupation. 
None of these Federal funds are 
available to support transfer or col- 
lege parallel courses which would 
lead to a baccalaureate degree. The 
acts under which Federal money is 
allocated specify that funds shall be 
provided for vocational training of 
less than college grade. 

The Vocational Education Act of 
1963 (the Perkins Bill), made 
available to the states for the first 
time possibly more money in one 
year than could previously be ob- 
tained under the old Smith-Hughes 
and George -Barden Acts. Further, 
this Act provides for the first time 
matching funds for facilities. 

Title II of the George-Barden 
Act (1956) made funds available 
for health occupations in which 
there is direct patient contact, and 
dental assisting and dental hygiene, 
of course, are included in this cate- 
gory. 

Funds for dental laboratory tech- 



nician training were available in 
some degree under Title I of the 
George-Barden Act. However, the 
Vocational Education Act of 1963 
provided more financial support for 
this training program on a matching 
basis. 

For guidance in planning train- 
ing programs which will be properly 
accredited, assistance can be ob- 
tained from: The Council on Den- 
tal Education of the American 
Dental Association; the American 
Dental Assistants' Association; and 
the American Dental Hygienists' As- 
sociation. 

The Division of Dental Public 
Health and Resources of the U. S. 
Public Health Service is prepared 
to furnish professional consultation 
and technical services in program 
planning, selection of equipment, 
and design of facilities. 

Our Program 

Currently, there are four pro- 
grams offered by the Community 
College System in North Carolina 
for the training of auxiliary per- 
sonnel — three dental assistant pro- 
grams and one program in dental 
laboratory technology. Still another 
program in dental hygiene will be- 
come operational next September, 
provided the General Assembly, 
now in session, approves the neces- 
sary funds in the "B" budget.* 

Dental Assistant Programs 

One of the dental assistant pro- 
grams is accredited, and one is pro- 
visionally accredited by the ADA 
Council on Dental Education. The 
other will be visited for accrediting 
purposes next fall. The three have 
a total enrollment capacity annually 
of approximately 55 students. Since 



* Editor's Note: Funds for a dental hygiene course at Central Piedmont Com- 
munity College were approved and it began classes in September, 1965. 



[46] 



the first program was established in 
1961, 41 dental assistants have been 
graduated. With very few excep- 
tions, follow-up reports indicate that 
all are currently employed, and that 
their employers find their work 
satisfactory. 

Space for all three programs was 
provided in buildings already in 
existence, so no local funds were 
involved in establishing them. Fed- 
eral-State money involved in pro- 
viding the equipment ranged from 
$18-50 thousand dollars for each 
of the programs. 

All three are equipped with 3 
complete operatories, a clinical 
laboratory sterilization center, dark 
room, and a teaching laboratory with 
laboratory benches and dental en- 
gines. 

The programs are of 12 months 
duration, and were established 
through the efforts and co-opera- 
tion of local dental societies, with 
the support of the State Society. 

Instructors employed in each of 
the programs include one dental as- 
sistant on a full-time basis, and two- 
three dentists on a part-time basis. 

Clinical experience is provided by 
welfare patients at the school clinic, 
and in private dental offices. One 
of the programs is located adjacent 
to Seymour Johnson AFB, and the 
I Base Dental Clinic provides addi- 
tional opportunity for practical chni- 
cal work. 

Problems common to the estab- 
lishment of the programs were: (1) 
obtaining competent instructors; (2) 
providing adequate clinical experi- 
ence; and (3) determining the scope 
'of course content. 

Dental Technician Program 

In 1959, a group of dental labo- 
ratory men requested the UNC 



School of Dentistry to consider the 
establishment of a two-year course 
in dental technology on the campus 
at Chapel Hill. Administrative of- 
ficials replied that the University 
was committed to four-year pro- 
grams leading to undergraduate, 
graduate, and professional degrees, 
and turned down the request. 

It was then that the possibility of 
establishing a dental laboratory 
technology program on a post-high 
school vocational level was ex- 
plored. Conferences with state of- 
ficials responsible for the admin- 
istration of vocational education 
centers throughout the State bore 
fruit, and it was decided that Dur- 
ham would be an ideal location be- 
cause it was within 10 miles of the 
School of Dentistry at Chapel Hill. 

With formal endorsement of the 
proposed program by the North 
Carolina Dental Society, and as- 
surance of full support by the faculty 
and staff of the UNC School of 
Dentistry, conferences were ar- 
ranged with the Durham School 
Board and the Director of the In- 
dustrial Education Center at Dur- 
ham. Subsequently, the school board 
indicated real interest in providing 
the necessary space and equipment 
for a laboratory technician's course 
in a new facility then under con- 
struction. Target date for the first 
class of trainees was set for Septem- 
ber, 1961. Then the roof fell in. 

The State Laboratory Association 
not only refused to endorse the pro- 
gram, but retained legal counsel, 
and opposed the program vigorous- 
ly. As a result, the Durham School 
Board, in April, 1961, voted to 
abandon its plans for including a cur- 
riculum for laboratory technicians 
in its new Industrial Center. Dia- 
logue between the Dental Society 



[47] 



and the State Laboratory Associa- 
tion reached an impasse. A series 
of conferences between the Labora- 
tory Association and the Dental So- 
ciety never got off the pad. The 
situation looked bleak. 

Then representatives of State and 
local societies put on their battle 
gear and took up the fight. They 
appeared before the Durham School 
Board one month later and asked 
that the question be re-considered. 
The Board listened and acted. The 
matter was re-considered, and the 
Board unanimously voted to proceed 
with its plans to train dental labora- 
tory technicians in Durham. 

All these events delayed the time 
schedule one year, and the first 
class of 20 students was accepted 
in September, 1962. 

The total cost of establishing the 
program ran over $100,000. The 
building cost local authorities ap- 
proximately $40,000, and the State 
and Federal funds provided over 
$65,000 worth of equipment. 

Two full-time laboratory tech- 
nicians are employed as instructors. 
Guest lecturers include faculty mem- 
bers of the UNC School of Dentistry, 
and other professional personnel. 

By arrangement with the UNC 
School of Dentistry, second year stu- 
dents are given practical experience 
in preparing cases for the Senior 
dental students. 

The ADA Council on Dental 
Education gave the program full ac- 
creditation in March, 1964. 

The seven students who success- 
fully completed the two-year course 
and comprised the first graduating 
class in 1964 are now gainfully em- 
ployed. Currently, there are 27 
trainees enrolled, including 15 first 
year, and 12 second year students. 
It is interesting to note here, that 



among the dropouts there are at 
least two young men who were 
not really dropouts at all. They are 
now enrolled as dental students. 

Dental Hygiene Program 

In 1963, the President of the 
North Carolina Dental Society ap- 
pointed a special committee to study 
the availability of dental hygienists 
in the State and report its findings, 
and submit its recommendations to 
the 1964 House of Delegates. The 
committee reported an acute short- 
age of hygienists, and the 1964 
House adopted a resolution direct- 
ing the President to appoint a com- 
mittee to seek the activation of ad- 
ditional schools for dental hygienists 
"immediately." 

The committee was appointed. 

Webster defines a committee as 
"a body of persons appointed or 
elected to take action on some mat- 
ter of business." With tongue in 
cheek, perhaps born of boredom 
after serving on a succession of 
purposeless committees, someone 
paraphrased Webster's definition to 
read "a group of the unwilling, 
appointed by the unfit, to do the 
unnecessary." Not this committee. 
It accpeted Webster's definition lit- 
erally, and its assignment seriously. 
Consequently, a two-year training 
program for dental hygienists has 
opened its doors to 40 students at 
Central Piedmont Community Col- 
lege in Charlotte. 

In May the Society's House of 
Delegates adopted a resolution en- 
dorsing the establishment of another 
school for hygienists in a vocational 
center in the Eastern part of the 
state. 

A 14-member advisory commit- 
tee, appointed by the State Board 
of Education, actively assists the 



[48] 



Department of Community Colleges 
in programming, establishing, de- 
veloping, and administering train- 
ing programs in the dental auxiliary 
field. Serving on this committee are 
6 dentists, 1 hygienist, 2 dental as- 
sistants, 3 school administrators, 1 
dental laboratory owner, and the 
executive secretary of the State Den- 
tal Society. 

Programs for upgrading auxiliary 
personnel already employed are 
contemplated in the future at vo- 
cational institutions. At one voca- 
tional center a post-graduate semi- 
nar for dentists is currently in 
progress in co-operation with the 
UNC School of Dentistry, using the 
clinical facilities of the center. 

The Society conducts an active 
recruitment program for prospective 
students in the auxiliary field. A 
brochure on the training opportun- 
ities in North Carolina has been 
prepared and distributed to guid- 
ance counselors throughout the state 
public school system. An exhibit, 
"Careers in Dentistry," is available 
and has been widely used at career 
days during the last two years. 

Currently, dental hygiene classes 
at the University of North Carolina 
are limited to 15 annually. The 1965 
General Assembly approved $6 
million which will permit these 
classes to enroll 60 students an- 
nually and provide the necessary 
facilities to increase the dental stu- 
dent class from 50 to 75. 

The UNC School of Dentistry 
has been conducting a correspond- 
ence program for dental assistants 
for ten or more years. In addition. 



the School offers a 3 -month sum- 
mer residence program for dental 
assistants under a grant from 
USPHS. In November, 1964, the 
School inaugurated a new corre- 
spondence and resident program in 
dental assisting equivalent to one 
academic year of study, and in- 
cludes information on all of the 
knowledges and skills required by 
the ADA Council on Dental Edu- 
cation. 

Recently the UNC School of Den- 
tistry has developed a home-study 
program for training dental labora- 
tory technicians. Designed primarily 
for the technician who is already 
employed, and who is unable to at- 
tend a technological school full-time, 
it can be completed either by cor- 
respondence, or by a combination of 
correspondence and resident sum- 
mer courses. Technicians are per- 
mitted to register for only one or 
two courses, if they so desire, un- 
der certain conditions. 

This has been a thumb-nail 
sketch of what is being done in 
North Carolina in training dental 
auxiliary personnel on a post-high 
school vocational level and at the 
University. 

Excellent communication has 
been established between the pro- 
fession and the educators, at all 
levels. It has been a happy and 
harmonious relationship from the 
beginning, and we look forward to 
long years of productive activity, 
which we hope will help win the 
war against dental manpower short- 
age. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



[49] 



Book Reviews 



Editor: "Help is needed. Anyone wish to review some excellent new books?" 



The Dentist and the Law. By 

Charles W. Carnahan. St. Louis. 
C. V. Mosby Co., 2nd Edition, 1965. 
Pp. 226. $7.75. 

There is, of course, no such thing 
as "dentistry law." But as this 
handbook amply illustrates, dentists, 
like other identifiable groups, tend 
to meet recurring situations in which 
a legal principle, statute or code is 
pertinent. Most of the situations, 
and many of the legal precepts and 
regulations, are as familiar learning 
to the dentist as to the lawyer. 
Even the newest dentistry recruit 
knows that performance below a 
certain standard may result in lia- 
bility (hence caution and insur- 
ance); that he must be hcensed; 
that he may have some fee collect- 
ing problems; that his hygienist is 
permitted to perform only certain 
functions; that he may wish to en- 
ter into a partnership agreement. 
He may not have thought about 
what the code of ethics says about 
advertising; about the Federal Den- 
ture Act; about the reports required 
by the Gold Reserve Act; or about 
reciprocity provisions permitting a 
dentist to practice in another state 
in certain instances without requali- 
fying. 

For the new dentist, or the den- 
tist-about-to-be, the book succeeds. 



As a quickly-to-be-covered ac- 
coutrement to the dental school cur- 
riculum, the book offers a concise, 
readable and tidy survey of prob- 
lem areas which he should at least 
consider and a more than adequate 
"restatement" of the laws. After 
graduation, the book should go on 
his ready reference shelf, in spite 
of the fact that some of the rich 
tables of statutory summary will be- 
come quickly unreliable. The now 
practicing dentist should find a 
casual reading worthwhile and fairly 
interesting. The book touches, for 
example, such problems as discrimi- 
nation practices by dental associa- 
tions, and agreements with new as- 
sociate dentists that the latter will 
not compete if the arrangement 
terminates. The practitioner may, 
though hopefully not, find the book 
particularly useful as background 
reading in the event that he be- 
comes involved in a practice-re- 
lated lawsuit. In such a case, he 
should take his copy of the book 
with him to his lawyer — who will 
be grateful for the case citations it 
contains. 

Robert C. Sink 

Synopsis of Oral Pathology. S. N. 
Bhaskar, D.D.S. 

This book is an excellent classi- 
fication of diseases of the oral region 



[50] 



Dresented in brief outline citing per- 
:inent facts. It is presented frankly 
oriented to be of assistance to every- 
iay practice of dentistry. None the 
ess the pathologic principles are 
:learly and accurately handled. II- 
ustrations are excellent and nu- 
merous. 

Part one is a diagnostic classifi- 
:ation according to clinical features. 
This tabulation utilizes salient fea- 
ures of lesion, location, age dis- 
ribution, sex proclivity, clinical 
'eatures, histology, treatment, prog- 
losis and a page reference for fur- 
her information. It is especially rec- 
)mmended as a feature that should 
)e helpful to those who desire 
mough information for recognition 
vithout exhaustive detail required 
or definitive study of a subject. 

The book should meet very well 
ts objective of aiding the practi- 
ioner in diagnosis. 

John T. Cutting, M.D. 

Director of Laboratories 

Charlotte Memorial Hospital 



Vdvanced Periodontal Disease. 

ohn F. Pritchard, D.D.S. 575 pages 
vith 600 illustrations. W. B. Saun- 
ters & Co. 

This book is an excellent text on 
linical periodontics. The title might 
;ad one to believe that it discusses 
miy the advanced lesion and might, 
herefore, be of interest only to the 
pecialist. It gives, however, de- 
ailed and to-the-point discussion 
f etiology, diagnostic features, 
uidelines to prognosis, both con- 
ervative and surgical treatment, 
nd prosthetic procedures in the 
lanagement of periodontal disease. 

It is extensively illustrated. The 



reproductions of both X-rays and 
photographs are excellent. In some 
instances more drawings might well 
have been used to illustrate the 
techniques more clearly. 

Dr. Pritchard has contributed 
heavily to the new procedures in 
mucogingival and osseous surgery. 
Enough time has elapsed to permit 
evaluation of the procedures which 
will stand the test of time, and his 
appraisal is of interest. He lists the 
following indications for mucogingi- 
val surgery: 

( 1 ) To relieve tension on margin- 
al gingiva from frenulum and mus- 
cle attachments and the elastic fi- 
bers in the alveolar mucosa. 

(2) To eliminate pockets extend- 
ing apically beyond the mucogingi- 
val junction. 

(3) To eliminate pockets and 
create new attached gingiva where 
alveolar mucosa is the marginal tis- 
sue. 

(4) To eliminate pockets and in- 
crease the width of attached gingiva 
where it is inadequate. 

(5) To extend the vestibule 
where necessary to provide for an 
adequate zone of attached gingiva. 

(6) To move attached gingiva 
apically, keeping it consistent with 
the marginal bone after osseous 
resculpturing to correct marginal in- 
consistencies and furca invasions. 

Individual chapters are devoted 
to specific procedures and related 
problems, such as occlusal difficul- 
ties, and related systemic disorders 
are also discussed. 

This is a comprehensive and 
practical text. 

Thomas G. Nisbet, D.D.S. 
W. Stewart Peery, D.D.S. 



[51 ] 



Begg Orthodontic Theory and Tech- 
nique. P. R. Begg, D.D.Sc. 373 
pages. W. B. Saunders Co. 

In orthodontics as in all scientific 
subjects now, truly we are becoming 
"one world." To be sure there are 
many "schools of thought or philoso- 
phies of treatment," but science 
is an uncomprising, strict teacher, 
disciplinarian, as all in the healing 
arts and on the dental team are 
well aware. The basic dictum of 
"Doctor, do your patient no harm," 
is highly regarded and respected. 

Dr. P. R. Begg of Adelaide, 
South Australia, after completing his 
dental college, traveled to Pasadena, 
California to study for two years 
under the highly esteemed "father 
of modem orthodontics," Dr. Ed- 
ward H. Angle. It has deservedly 
been said of this insatiably, inquisi- 
tive, continuous student and scien- 
tist, "Dr. Begg is one of the world's 
great rarities — a serenely con- 
tented man who can look back from 
the age of 66 upon a life that has 
contributed much to mankind, yet 
who lives with modesty and hu- 
mihty." 

By experience and well-earned 
know how, he learned occlusion is 
never a static condition; that oc- 
clusion of the human's teeth is in 
continual change. He was among 
the very first of the edgewise-trained 
man to remove some teeth in order 
to position other teeth more suc- 
cessfully. He dared much, was origi- 
nal, courageous, possessed much of 
divine discontent, and coined mean- 
ingfully the phrases, "differential 
force," "anatomically correct occlu- 
sion," and better more dependable 
ways of serving all classes of ortho- 



dontic cases — better — and for 
more people. 

Many advantages are claimed for 
these different ways of doing things 
— no necessities for bite plates or 
extra-oral anchorage and the treat- 
ment inflicts less discomfort and 
pain. Many "musts" are insisted 
upon as the shadow of Angle be- 
comes a mantle now worn by Begg. 
One must not "mix" his treatment 
with the orthodontist's manifold 
present techniques. Success in treat- 
ment more quickly and dependably 
acquired; consultations with success- 
ful operators of the techniques bene- 
fit all orthodontists and their pa- 
tients. 

In the 373 pages from foreward 
and preamble through the challeng 
ing, exciting, and often inspiring i 
twenty chapters, profusely illus- 
trated, to the ten blank pages for 
one's questions, notations, or per-j- 
sonal jottings, this book is different, 
provocative, beneficial for it willO 
cause a conscientious orthodontistjt 
to inventory again his "this one; 
thing I know; this one thing I do," 
with beneficial end results to^ 
what, why, how, when, and where; 
he presently daily serves a trusting, 
dependable clientele according to 
the best he knows. 

Surely most of us know now more 
than any of us daily use. Are you, 
Doctor, completely satisfied with 
your end results in orthodontics — 
ten years later? A scientist is afraid: 
of nothing but the truth — and a: 
better way of doing his life's dedi 
cated health services for his pa- 
tients? 

Walter T. McFall, D.D.S. 



[52] 



THE DISTRICT MEETINGS-1965 



By the District Editors 



A Perfect Combination 



C^ ooD weather, good friends, good 
^■^ clinician — together they make 
k good meeting. Such was the case 
of the First District Meeting held 
n Asheville at Grove Park Inn Oc- 
tober 2-4. 

' The highlight of the meeting was 
he honoring of eight members with 
50 or more years of service in the 
Vorth Carolina Dental Society, 
rhey were recognized at a luncheon 
pn Monday by Pearce Roberts, Jr., 
State Society President. They are: 
,L. P. Baker, Kings Mountain, 59 
^^ears; O. C. Barker, Asheville, 53 
/ears; Daisy Z. McGuire, Sylva, 
56 years; W. P. McGuire, Sylva, 54 
/ears; George K. Patterson, Ashe- 
tville, 54 years; Isaac R. Self, Lin- 
olnton, 60 years; R. C. Weaver, 
Asheville, 51 years; and P. P. Yates, 
Lenoir, 61 years. 

Saturday night's activities in- 
cluded a dinner with entertainment 
by the Highlanders and a dance 
with music by the Kentucky Gentle- 
men. 

On Sunday golfers descended on 
the Asheville Country Club and 
hacked their way to the 19th hole. 
Prize winners were: Arthur Riddle, 



low net; Howard Rhyne, low gross; 
Joe Crowell, second low net; W. L. 
Woody, second low gross. 

A social hour and buffet dinner 
preceded the business session Sun- 
day night when fifteen members 
were elected and inducted. Fen- 
ton S. Cunningham charged the new 
members and welcomed them into 
the First District. 

Elected to membership were: 
Richard K. Bowling, Hender- 
sonville; Lyman J. Gregory, Jr., 
Asheville; William R. Henshaw, 
Shelby; James M. Herren, Hender- 
sonville; Thomas G. Johnson, Jr., 
Morganton; Charles E. Jones, 
Asheville; Gerald W. Lutz, Fall- 
ston; Alan R. Lyerly, Hildebran; 
Milton V. Massey, Brevard; Rich- 
ard F. Murphy, Shelby; Robert H. 
Owen, Jr., Asheville; William S. 
Prevost, Jr., Waynesville; Fred J. 
Smith, Morganton; Jerry W. Sow- 
ers, Conover; and John L. Thomp- 
son, Jr., Shelby. 

Officers elected and installed 
were: John W. Girard, Jr., Presi- 
dent; M. W. Carpenter, President- 
Elect; Robert B. Litton, Vice 
President; Cecil A. Pless, Jr., Sec- 



[53] 




FIRST DISTRICT OFFICERS 1965-66. (Left 
to right) Robert B. Litton, vice president; 
Cecil A. Pless, Jr., secretary-treasurer; 
John W. Girard, Jr., president; Max W. 
Carpenter, president-elect; and F. A. Bu- 
chanan, editor. 



retary-Treasurer; Francis A. Bu- 
chanan, Editor. 

D. W. Hord and C. B. Taylor 
were named delegates and John T. 
Adair was elected to membership 
on the Executive Committee. 

On Monday Dr. Francis F. E. 
Morse of New York City presented 
a program on porcelain jacket 
crowns and porcelain fused to 




FIFTY YEARS SERVICE. Eight members of 
the First District were honored for fifty orj 
more years of service. Seated: Drs. L. P. 
Baker, Kings Mountain; and Daisy Z. Mc- 
Guire, Sylva. Standing: Drs. 0. C. Barker,L 
Asheville; P. P. Yates, Lenoir; W. P. Mc- f 
Guire, Sylva; George K. Patterson, Asheville; ) 
and Isaac R. Self, Lincolnton. Not pictured:: 
Dr. R. C. Weaver, Asheville. j 

I 

metal. He showed how refinement i 
of the preparation can prevent 
failure later and pointed out how} 
we may use our information and! 
knowledge to select the proper! 
shades. 

Thirteen members presented table ' 
clinics. 

Francis A. Buchanan 
Editor 
First District: 



TABLE CLINIC. One of the thirteen table 
clinics presented at the First District meeting. 



[54] 



Tar Heel Dental Seminar 



Phis year's joint Second and 
*■ Third Districts meeting at the 
^ck Tar Hotel in Durham, Septem- 
^r 18-21 was an unqualified suc- 
iss with interesting scientific ses- 
ons coupled with many social and 
Dlitical sidelights. On Saturday the 
jembers attended a sizzler of a 
iotball game (both temperature- 
id excitement-wise) between the 
niversity of Michigan and the 
niversity of North Carolina, fol- 
iwed by a social hour and dinner 
ance. 

Sunday was devoted to commer- 
al exhibits, projected clinics, and 
lible clinics. In the evening sepa- 
ite business sessions were con- 
ucted by the two Districts. 

At the Third District meeting, 
lemorial services were held for 
/. A. Pressly, Jr., of Greensboro 
nd Jack H. Hughes of Roxboro. 

In his presidential address, T. Ed- 
ar Sikes, Jr., described the rela- 
onship of the dental profession to 
jr changing times with the influx 
»f Medicare, Blue Cross coverage 



of dental procedures, the Teamster 
Union's prepaid dental insurance 
plan and the like. 

Officers elected by the Third Dis- 
trict were: C. Robert VanderVoort, 
Aberdeen, President; Charles W. 
Horton, High Point, President-Elect; 
Robert W. Sugg, Durham, Vice 
President; L. P. Megginson, Jr., 
High Point, Secretary - Treasurer; 
Luther H. Butler (66-67) and 
Charles H. Teague, Greensboro, 
Delegates; and Richard M. Fields, 
Pleasant Garden, Editor. 

Inducted as new members of the 
Third District were: Richard P. 
Belton, Greensboro; Clell S. Cald- 
well, Durham; Jon W. Couch, Ashe- 
boro; Donald R. Goodwin, Siler 
City; C. A. Graham, Jr., Ramseur; 
Kent W. Healey, Greensboro; 
Claude H. Herndon, Jamestown; 
Leonidas C. Holt, Greensboro; 
H. W. Killian, Chapel Hill; Ken- 
neth E. Mitchum, Chapel Hill; J. U. 
Newman, III, Burlington; Joseph A. 
O'Leary, Spray; Graham A. Page, 
Yanceyville; T. Carlton Pierce, Dur- 



[55] 




ABOVE: Second District Officers 1965-66. W. Stewart Peery, secretary-treasurer; J. Harr 
Spiilmon, president-elect; Horace P. Reeves, Jr., president; J. B. Freedland, immediate pas 
president; W. Smith Kirk, vice president. 

BELOW: Third District Officers 1965-66. T. Edgar Sikes, Jr., immediate past president 
C. Robert VanderVoort, president; Charles W. Norton, president-elect; and Robert W. Suga 
vice president. 



[56] 



ham; N. J. Schneider, Chapel Hill; 

.'Thomas H. Sears, Jr., Greensboro; 

.jGary R. Smiley, Chapel Hill; Thom- 
as R. Styers, Jr., Durham; and Billy 

Joe Watson, Greensboro. 
, At the Second District meeting 
President J. B. Freedland empha- 
sized the need for continuing and 
expanding the Tar Heel Dental 
Seminar. He said, "the problem and 
issue of continuing education will 
become more pertinent each year," 
and asked, "How can this best be 
achieved? Who will give it the time, 

jjinterest, leadership, and direction 
that it will require?" 

Officers elected for 1965-66 in 
the Third District were: Horace P. 
Reeves, Jr., Charlotte, President; 
J. Harry Spillman, Winston-Salem, 
President-Elect; W. Smith Kirk, Sal- 
isbury, Vice President; W. Stewart 
Peery, Charlotte, Secretary-Trea- 
surer; M. Lamar Dorton, Statesville, 
and William H. Price, Monroe, 
Delegates; Keith L. Bendey, North 
Wilkesboro, Executive Committee; 
and William G. Ware, Jr., Winston- 
Salem, Editor. 

Memorial services were held for: 
Henry C. Parker, Charlotte; Clyde 
H. Jarrett, Jr., Charlotte; Claude U. 
Voils, Mooresville; and George K. 
Carter, Taylorsville. 

New members elected by the Sec- 
ond District included: Billy Dennis, 
Salisbury; Ralph O. Hawkins, Jr., 
Denton; Gary Heeseman, Jr., Char- 



lotte; Brian P. Hill, Charlotte; 
James B. Johnson, Charlotte; Wal- 
ter T. McFall, Charlotte; James G. 
McGhee, Thomasville; Robin O. 
Moore, Thomasville; Martin H. 
Murphy, Charlotte; Richard E. 
Nash, Winston-Salem; Eldon H. 
Parks, Elkin; Luby T. Sherrill, Jr., 
Charlotte; H. F. Wilkins, Jr., Lex- 
ington; and William F. Yost, Char- 
lotte. 

Two nationally prominent au- 
thorities from Philadelphia, D. Wal- 
ter Cohen and Morton Amsterdam, 
presented lectures on Monday and 
Tuesday designed to correlate perio- 
dontal therapeutics and advanced 
restorative procedures in the treat- 
ment of pathologic conditions of the 
teeth and their supporting struc- 
tures. 

Registration for the four-day 
meeting totalled 417. 

At the close of the Seminar, the 
Executive Committees of both Dis- 
tricts met jointly and it was decided 
that the Second District would con- 
tinue its sponsorship of the Tar Heel 
Dental Seminar next year in Char- 
lotte. The Third District elected to 
meet as a separate District in 1966. 

Richard M. Fields 

Editor 

Third District 

William G. Ware, Jr. 

Editor 

Second District 



[57] 



United We Stand 



lAT" . Reid Thompson, Vice Presi- 
dent and General Counsel of 
Carolina Power and Light Com- 
pany, was the featured speaker at 
the banquet held during the Fourth 
District's annual session at the Sir 
Walter Hotel in Raleigh October 1 1 
and 12 and he set the dentists to 
thinking seriously on doing some- 
thing about their future in a fast 
changing democracy. 

Mr. Thompson began in a hu- 
morous vein but ended with a chal- 
lenge to the dentists to do some- 
thing about their loss of freedom 
to practice as they should. He urged 
them to write their Congressmen 
both when they were in agreement 
with what the legislators were en- 
acting into law and when in dis- 
agreement. He cited Medicare as 
just an instance of what the "Great 
Society" is going to do and the 
profession's apathy in not doing 
anything constructive to change it. 
He warned that dentists must act 
now or they would have no justi- 
fication to criticize the conse- 
quences. 

J. Henry Ligon, Jr., President of 
the Fourth District, presided at the 
opening session on Tuesday morn- 
ing. In his address, Dr. Ligon sug- 
gested ways the dentists as indi- 
viduals and as a society could work 
to improve the image of dentistry. 
One of our first aims, he said, should 
be to overcome the apathy shown by 
many in not attending meetings. 
"Changes in the field of dentistry 
have become so revolutionary that 
we can safely say that any dentist 
who attempts to practice 1945 den- 



tistry in 1965, is performing a dis 
service to his patients and com- 
munity," Dr. Ligon stated. 

"Our dental societies, on all lev- 
els, provide the most effective means 
we have to help us keep our free- 
dom," he continued. When it comes; 
to the matter of protecting our pro- 
fession from encroachment of unde- 
sirable political and sociological 
changes, it is simply a matter of 
united we stand, or divided we fall, 
he concluded. 

New members inducted were: 
William R. Caviness, Durham; Karl 
F. Ehrlich, Fayetteville; Joseph S. 
Evans, Jr., Henderson; Norman B. 
Grantham, Jr., Smithfield; John B. 
Hardy, Jr., Oxford; Frank W. Mc- 
Cracken, III, Sanford; Robert M. 
Polk, Jr., Laurinburg; and Jerry F. 
Wood, Selma. 

Officers elected to lead the 
Fourth District for the next year 
were: William H. Oliver, Smithfield, 
President; Joseph M. Johnson, Lau- 
rinburg, President-Elect; Robert H. 
Gainey, Fayetteville, Vice President; 
and Penn Marshall, Jr., Raleigh, 
Secretary-Treasurer. 

J. Henry Ligon, Jr., and Thom- 
as G. Collins, both of Raleigh, were 
named to the Executive Committee. 

Delegates elected were: Har- 
old E. Maxwell of Fayetteville and 
C. P. Osborne, Jr., of Lumberton. 
E. D. Baker of Raleigh and John N. 
Denning of Smithfield were named 
Alternate Delegates. 

Glenn F. Bitler 

Editor 

Fourth District 



[58] 



The Candid Camera Goes to the Fourth District 




'T~'HE Fifth District Dental Society 
-'- held its annual meeting at 
Wrightsville Beach on September 26 
and 27, amid an atmosphere of 
"sand and sea." The Blockade 
Runner Hotel, astride of ocean and 
sound, was headquarters for the 
event. R. B. Barden headed a com- 
mittee which handled local arrange- 
ments. Although the weather was 
a bit cool for swimming, facilities 
were available for other activities 
such as boating and fishing. 

Following registration on Sunday 
afternoon, table clinics under the 
direction of R. F. Hunt Jr. were 
presented. 

A well-attended social hour and 
dinner for members, wives and 
guests was held at the hotel Sun- 
day evening. H. L. Keith was master 
of ceremonies for the banquet and 
L. T. Rogers, Mayor of Wrights- 
ville Beach, welcomed the Society. 
W. H. Gray, Jr. responded. Charles 
P. Godwin, President of the Fifth 
District Dental Society introduced 
officers of the Fifth District and 
special guests. 

The evening business session 
opened with an invocation by Dar- 
den J. Eure. Necrology reports and 
minutes of the last meeting were 
read by M. W. Aldridge, Secretary- 
Treasurer. Charles T. Barker, Vice 
President then introduced the Presi- 
dent, Charles P. Godwin, for his ad- 
dress. 

Dr. Godwin discussed some 
changes that were being made in the 
program of the annual meeting. 
Other topics he covered were the 
progress of dentistry in the last fifty 
years; the student loan fund and 
the support of the loan fund by the 
Fifth District; and the growth and 
progress of study clubs in the dis- 
trict. He particularly urged that 



the membership support a resolution 
that the North Carolina Dental So- 
ciety request and endorse the state- 
wide use of fluoridation for com- 
munal water supplies, and seek 
appropriate legislation. 

Candidates for membership were 
presented by Charles T. Barker, 
Chairman of the Membership Com- 
mittee. They included: A. J. Bul- 
lard, Jr., Mount Olive; C. Richard 
Conrad, Southport; R. Willard Hin- 
nant, Goldsboro; John T. Madison, 
Shallotte; Clayton B. Smith, Jr., 
Virginia Beach, Va.; James M. Wil- 
liamson, Greenville; and Weston A. 
WilHs, Jacksonville. 

Dr. Frank Goodwin, Professor of 
Marketing at the University of 
Florida, was essayist for the Mon- 
day's program. 

At the Monday afternoon busi- 
ness session, committee reports were 
given and officers for the coming 
year were installed. They were: 
James H. Lee, Mount OUve, Presi- 
dent; Z. L. Edwards, Jr., Washing- 
ton, President-Elect; James E. Furr, 
Wilmington, Vice President; M. W, 
Aldridge, Greenville, Secretary- 
Treasurer; and James A. Privette, 
Kinston, Editor. 

Others named were: Charles P. 
Godwin, Rocky Mount, elective 
delegate; James L. Cox, Golds- 
boro, and Walter S. Linville, Jr., 
Wilson, Executive Committee; and 
David H. Freshwater, Morehead 
City and M. M. Lilley, Scotland 
Neck, alternate delegates. 

The Blockade Runner Hotel at 
Wrightsville Beach was selected 
again as the meeting site for 1966. 
Drawing of prizes ended the session. 

William B. Gilbert, Jr. 

Editor 

Fifth District 



[60] 



''By the Sea... 




ABOVE: Fifth District Offcers 1965-66. James A. Privette, editor; James E. Furr, vice presi- 
dent; James H. Lee, president; M. W. Aldridge, secretary-treasurer; Z. L. Edwards, Jr., 
president-elect. 

BELOW: New members in Fifth District. A. J. Bullard, Jr., Mount Olive; John T. Madison, 
Shallotte; R. W. Hinnant, Goldsboro; James A. Williamson, Greenville; and Weston A. Willis, 
Jacksonville. Not pictured: C. Richard Conrad, Southport; and Clayton B. Smith, Jr., Virginia 
Beach, Va. 



[61] 



A Report 



The role of the nurse, dentist, pharmacist, and: 
veterinarian in national disaster. 



Professions Training Seminar 



Charlottesville, Virginia 
October 6-8, 1965 



A PROFESSIONS training seminar 
was held in Charlottesville, Vir- 
ginia on October 6-8, 1965 under 
the sponsorship of the U. S. De- 
partment of Health, Education, and 
Welfare-Public Health Service. 

It was attended by 91 persons of 
whom eleven were dentists. There 
were representatives from the six 
states and two territories comprising 
Region Three of HEW: Maryland, 
District of Columbia, West Virginia, 
Virginia, Kentucky, North CaroUna, 
Puerto Rico and The Virgin Islands. 

The objectives of the training 
seminar were: 

1. To identify and define the po- 
tential capabilities and functional 
roles of the health disciplines for 
the provision of health and medical 
care to the sick and injured of the 




J. Harry Spillman 



1 



surviving population in a national^ 
emergency. 

2. To develop training programs! 
that can be carried out within eaclgi 
discipline. 

3. To prepare plans for imple 
menting these programs and other i 
preparedness activities unique toji 
each discipline. 

The role of the dentist in disaster 
planning was divided into three i 
categories: civic or community, ad 
ministrative, and professional. 

Civic or community responsibility ' 
can best be accomphshed by taking 
an active role in encouraging, de- 
veloping, and instructing medical 
self-help, advanced first-aid, and^ 
other community and family ori- 
ented disaster training and shelter 
program activities. 

Administrative responsibility can 
be exercised beneficially in the two 
environments that are expected to 
characterize the post-disaster pe- 
riod, the community shelter and hos- 
pital. 

The professional responsibility re- 
lates the many activities in patient 
management that are common to 
both medicine and dentistry. In 
some of these areas additional train- 
ing is necessary in order that the 
dentist's skill be commensurate 



[62] 



with his responsibility. Some of the 
functions the dentist might be called 
upon to do are: 

1. Diagnosis, including the knowl- 
edge of intra-oral manifestations of 
systemic disorders. 

2. Triage (sorting of patients). 

3. Administration of drugs by 
mouth, intramuscularly, and intra- 
venously. 

4. Recognition and control of 
shock. 

5. Such first aid procedures as 
control of hemorrhage and provision 
of an adequate airway. 

6. Resuscitation. 

The second objective, develop- 
ment of training programs, was also 
discussed. It was decided that this 
should be considered in two parts: 
in-school programs for dental stu- 
dents, and programs designed to 
reach the practicing dentist. Ma- 
terial was presented outlining pilot 
programs now being carried out in 
two dental schools, the University 
of Alabama School of Dentistry and 
Tufts University School of Dentist- 
ry. It is generally believed that 
some modifications of these pro- 
grams for preparing students for 
their roles in disaster preparedness 
will be adopted by all of the dental 
schools, so the workshop group con- 
centrated mainly on the problem 
of reaching the practicing dentist 
with training programs. 

Many ideas were proposed and 
discussed. The consensus was that 
these programs would have to be 
carried out at the local level with 
direction and guidance given at the 
state level. Most communities have 
their own Disaster Survival Plans 
and the dentists, as well as the other 
health disciplines, would have to 
determine what their role would be 
in these plans and prepare them- 



selves accordingly. The Department 
of Health, Education and Welfare, 
through the Public Health Service 
and Division of Health Mobiliza- 
tion, has developed a number of 
training manuals and other resource 
materials and are in the process of 
developing others. 

The third objective, that of de- 
veloping plans for implementing 
these programs, proved to be the 
most challenging topic to the work- 
shops. It was recognized that, far 
and away, the most difficult of all 
problems connected with instituting 
a program of this kind is motiva- 
tion — overcoming the apathy most 
people feel toward preparing for 
something they hope will not ma- 
terialize. 

It was decided that probably the 
best approach would be to select 
some key personnel geographically 
distributed around the state, and, 
at a later date, hold another train- 
ing seminar in which these key per- 
sonnel would participate. In this 
way, it was felt that some of the 
enthusiasm that these people would 
have for such a program could be 
transferred to the local level. 

The general atmosphere of the 
meeting was summed up by a 
professor at the University of Mary- 
land in words to this effect, 'T came 
to this meeting not knowing many 
of the things we've heard discussed 
by the speakers, and now I'm scared 
to death." 

It is to be hoped that all of us 
will be "scared" enough to lend our 
leadership and use our professional 
background in joining with other 
members of the health team to make 
our Community Disaster Survival 
Plans successful. 

140 LocKLAND Ave. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 



[63] 



A Report 



Workshop on Dental Prepayment 



Montgomery, Alabama 
October 7-9, 1965 



T^R. James F. Hughey, president 
of the Alabama Dental As- 
sociation, opened the workshop and 
explained it was financed by a fed- 
eral grant through the Public Health 
Service. The purpose was to fa- 
miliarize the membership with the 
many facets of different forms of 
prepayment so that we may intelli- 
gently approach the problem and 
work out a solution to best suit the 
public whom we serve and our own 
dental profession. 

Dr. Lyall O. Bishop, who has 
served as president of the following 
three groups: California Dental As- 




Glenn F. Bitler 



sociation, California Dental Service, 
and the American Society of Oral 
Surgeons, very forcefully informed 
us that today in a changing time, 
we as a profession are faced with 
the responsibility of determining a 
way through some form of prepay- 
ment to reach more people with 
quality dentistry at a reasonable 
cost. He reminded us that the aver- 
age American family has failed by 
and large to place adequate dental 
care in its budget. 

Because of the growing trend in 
health benefits, labor and manage- 
ment are increasingly interested in 
securing this vital service as fringe 
benefits for the employee. 

The blue plans of the physicians 
and hospitals were traced from their 
inception in 1929 and 1939 respec- 
tively through trying periods to the 
present time. Today 180,000 phy- 
sicians receive a major portion of 
their remuneration for services 
through prepayment plans, a large 
part of which comes through their 
own professionally sponsored plans. 

Government control of the health 
professions is directly related to the 
ability or inability of the profession 
to develop some workable programs 



[64] 



[which will provide adequate care 
'at a reasonable cost to the public. 
We were warned that apathy and 
indifference within the profession 
are conducive to the socialization 
]{ of dentistry. 

The five methods of prepaid den- 
tistry are: 

( 1 ) Closed panels 

(2) Commercial insurance plans 

(3) Self insured trust 

(4) Dental Service Corporation 

(5) Blue Cross-Blue Shield (The 
Blue Plans) 

The California Dental Associa- 
tion chose in 1955 to follow the 
dental service corporation method. 
They have had some trying times, 
but would make the same choice 
again today. Dr. Bishop feels. 

He advised us in our deliberations 
. and actions to: 

(1) Have courage to face indif- 
ference and ridicule for the cause 
you believe in. 

(2) Be flexible. 

(3) Be unafraid of new ideas, 
theories, and philosophies. 

(4) Be cognizant of our dual re- 
sponsibihty to the members of our 
dental societies and to the poten- 
tial purchasers of dental care. 

If we will inform our member- 
hip well of the facts of prepayment 
dentistry, then pull together with 
the patient's welfare first in our 

inds, then we will accomplish suc- 
cess in our approach to prepaid den- 
tal care. 

Dr. Carl Sebelius, Secretary, 
Council on Dental Health, Ameri- 
can Dental Association, enlightened 
the group on professional and con- 
sumer interest in dental prepay- 
ment, a combination of which pre- 
cipitated dental prepayment for 
groups in 1954 on the West Coast. 
A few years later the Health In- 



surance Industry became interested. 

Interest shown so far is primarily 
on a group basis. Dr. Sebelius 
pointed out that only those indi- 
viduals with recognized great need 
for dentistry are interested in dental 
insurance. 

Today 25 insurance companies 
and 23 DSC's offer dental prepay- 
ment plans to groups. 

Labor unions have shown the 
most interest in prepaid dentistry as 
a fringe benefit, and have con- 
tributed more than any other group 
toward focusing interest of the pro- 
fession and management on dental 
prepayment. 

These facts come to the surface: 

(1) Dental coverage involving 
large groups has generally been 
through union health and welfare 
funds. 

(2) Unions take a direct interest 
in the type of coverage and how it 
is administered — many times start- 
ing their own plans if what they 
want is not available. 

(3) So far there is apparently no 
one method of prepayment which 
attracts all union components. 

(4) Labor is interested in start- 
ing off right in dental prepayment. 
This is evidenced by the principles 
worked out by the AFL-CIO and 
the American Dental Association. 

Management has been consider- 
ably more reserved in showing an 
interest in prepaid dentistry. It is 
the responsibility of the profession 
to enlighten management concern- 
ing prepayment. 

We were warned by leading em- 
ployee benefit consultants that what- 
ever role dentists play in prepay- 
ment, they will be blamed for its 
shortcomings, and admonished fur- 
ther that if consumers and profes- 
sions can't find the answers in pro- 



[65] 



viding adequate health benefits, 
government will intervene. 

The National Association of Den- 
tal Service Plans w^as incorporated 
January 7, 1965 and will be acti- 
vated in November of this year. 
This action on the part of the pro- 
fession indicates that it stands 
squarely behind dental prepayment. 
Dr. SebeUus states that "NADSP 
has the potential of becoming a 
major element in the future market 
for dental prepayment." We were 
advised that dental prepayment is 
clearly here to stay. Its growth is 
inevitable. What we do with it will 
determine in a large measure the 
future of the practice of dentistry 
and of dental health in this country. 

Dr. Sebelius also feels that pre- 
payment may intensify several fore- 
seeable problems in the future. 
Dental manpower shortage and dis- 
tribution of dental personnel may 
become problems because of in- 
creased utilization of dental service 
through prepayment. It will be our 
responsibility to solve these prob- 
lems. 

Mr. Ferris Hoggard, Chief, Den- 
tal Care Economics Section, Depart- 
ment of Health Education and 
Welfare, then parallelled the devel- 
opment of medical prepayment with 
dental prepayment and pointed out 
lessons one can learn from the for- 
mer. 

(1) A national co-ordinating 
agency should be established de- 
signed to fulfill the needs of all 
parties — avoiding in advance fre- 
quent friction that has developed 
between Blue Cross and Blue Shield 
national agencies. 

(2) Dental groups must be con- 
stantly on the alert as to protect 
and retain control of our progress, 
regardless of who administers them. 



(3) DSC's should anticipate com- 
petition advantages of the insurance 
industry in the form of ratings. 

(4) DSC's should provide for 
adequate representation of the pub- 
lic on governing boards of the cor- 
poration to avoid criticism or domi- 
nation of interest of the profession 
at the expense of the public served 
by plan. 

(5) One should refer to these 
plans as "non-governmental forms 
of social insurance" rather than 
"non profit forms of private insur- 
ance," and accept this concept. 

(6) Include in the design of pre- 
paid dental care plans adequate 
provisions for the supervision of uti- 
lization and cost experience. 

(7) Provide an adequate pro- 
gram of quality assurance. These 
last two should receive special at- 
tention. Mr. Hoggard emphasized 
the importance of all members of 
organized dentistry securing a work- 
ing knowledge of the principles of 
prepaid health plans at this time in 
order that we may contribute to the 
development of fundamental poli- 
cies concerning prepaid dental care 
programs which will serve to guide 
the profession for the coming year. 

Dr. Charles Sabel, Trustee, and 
Member of Dental Prepayment Ad- 
visory Committee of the Indiana 
Dental Association, and a delegate 
to the ADA, gave his evaluation of 
the four most common arguments 
for DSC's: 

(1) Because the DSC is non- 
profit we can provide a greater re- 
turn for the consumer's premium 
dollar. False premise. 

(2) The DSC is the only method 
of administering prepayment which 
we as dentists can control. A para- 
dox, because: (a) we relinquish 
control when we set it up as sepa- 



[66] 



rate entity from the dental associa- 
tion; (b) the insurance commis- 
sioner and state legislature have 
heavy control of a DSC. 

(3) The DSC offers an unre- 
strictive free choice of dentist and 
will discourage the establishment 
of closed panels. A paradox, be- 
cause: (a) when we use a signed 
•participating agreement we estab- 
lish a closed panel and limit the 

choice of dentists; (b) New York 
and California have had DSC's for 
some time, and yet New York is 
first in number of closed panels and 
California is second. 

(4) DSC's will help prevent 
socialized dentistry or the interven- 
tion of government in dental affairs. 
The opposite is true, because: (a) 
DSC sets up an organization which 

ould be easily taken over by the 
ureaucrats; (b) federal subsidies 
are a distinct possibility; and (c) 
recipients of DSC's may in the fu- 
ture be predominantly federally fi- 
nanced organizations. 

Dr. Sabel advised that the role of 
the profession in the field of pre- 
payment dentistry is to act in an ad- 
visory capacity to commercial insur- 
ance companies. They are better 
equipped to implement prepayment 
because they have trained person- 
nel, a sales force, insurance know- 
how, and financial reserves. 

Mr. Noel Sanborn of the Health 
Insurance Council evaluated pre- 
paid dentistry as private insurance 
companies see it. 

After stating that the need and 
demand must first become evident 
before any insurance program can 
be developed successfully, Mr. San- 
born outlined the phenomenal 
growth of health insurance in the 
post World War II era. Three out 
bf four Americans now are covered 



with some form of health insurance. 
The demand for dental insurance is 
rising and there is a good possibility 
it may parallel health insurance 
growth in the years to come. At 
the present time it is considered by 
the health insurance industry to be 
in the experimental stage, and the 
26 companies offering group dental 
insurance are in a state of flux so 
far as details of coverage are con- 
cerned. 

Some of the problems encoun- 
tered are: 

(1) Pre-existing conditions at 
time of coverage. 

(2) Lack of claims personnel. 

(3) Confusing and different pro- 
fessional terminology. 

(4) Fee violations. 

(5) Variation of fees over the na- 
tion. (California fees are 82 per- 
cent higher than Maine fees.) 

Over utilization is not a prob- 
lem. Utilization is strongly in- 
fluenced by dental education of the 
patient, especially the mother and 
wife, and by the patient's income. 
Mr. Sanborn feels that the health 
insurance industry is in a favorable 
position to implement dental pre- 
payment because it has trained per- 
sonnel and a sales force in the field. 
He feels that dental insurance could 
soon be an economic factor in pri- 
vate practice. The health insurance 
industry does not desire to monopo- 
hze prepaid dentistry but wants to 
be allowed to compete on equal 
terms. Mr. Sanborn relates that re- 
lations are good between the in- 
surance companies and the ADA 
and that they desire to work with 
dentistry to give the public a method 
to pay for dental needs. 

Mr. H. G. Pearce, Vice President, 
Blue Cross Association, began his 
remarks with the observation that 



[67] 



island status is an impossibility and 
advised us to make things work out, 
not just let them happen. He gave 
the background and development of 
the Blue Health Service plans. He 
cited some of the advantages of their 
plans to be: 

( 1 ) Subscriber can purchase 
with confidence. No buyer-seller be- 
ware aspect. 

(2) Predictability is afforded the 
subscriber. 

(3) Direct claims handhng. 

He believes that: (a) the den- 
tal service market in Alabama can 
expect slow growth in the near fu- 
ture, but that we should be geared 
for the opposite; (b) the fastest 
catapult in the business is labor 
fringe benefit; (c) the market is 
now predominandy in California but 
will spread to other states with time; 
and (d) that the profession needs 
to develop facts on risk of dental 
cost today and inform the public of 
this and its dental needs. 

Mr. Pearce pointed out that we 
have a time-tried blue print to fol- 
low if we choose, the Blues, and 
that Blue Cross and Blue Shield or- 
ganizations stand ready to help in 
our program, and would welcome 
discussions at least on the possi- 
bility of working with us in this en- 
deavor. 

Mr. Robert L. Fitzke, Executive 
Secretary, Michigan Dental Service 
Corporation, enlightened the group 
as to what a DSC is and how it 
operates. 

"A DSC is an organization, cre- 
ated and supported by a dental so- 
ciety to enable a consumer group 
to contract for all its members to re- 
ceive specified dental services in 
the office of a privately practicing 
dentist in return for payment by 
the group to the organization of a 



specified sum of money." 

DSC's are patterned to a great 
extent after Blue Shield organiza- 
tions. 

Enabling acts are legislated in or- 
der that DSC's may be formed and 
exempted from the State Insurance 
Code. This exemption is based on 
the theory that contracts between 
participating dentist and the Service 
Corporation act as reserves of the 
corporation, that is, the participating 
dentist is obligated to furnish service 
instead of the Service Corporation 
furnishing dollars for service as com- 
mercial companies do. 

Costs for establishing and operat- 
ing DSC's are twofold, administra- 
tive and underwriting. Funds may 
be obtained from: 

(1) The dental profession: (a) 
grants; (b) loans; (c) special as- 
sessments; and (d) withholding por- 
tion of payment for service rendered 
from participating dentist. 

(2) The consumer. 

(3) Tax funds — government 
programs providing dental care for 
its members. 

Characteristics of Dental Service 
Corporations are: 

( 1 ) Free choice of practitioner. 

(2) Non-profit administration. 

(3) Professional supervision and 
control programs. 

(4) Support of the profession 
and close formal relationship be- 
tween corporation and profession. 

(5) Service benefits provided to 
subscriber — fees paid to prac- 
titioner. 

A most lively question and an- 
swer panel discussion was the next 
order of business of the conference. 
Audience participation was good 
and many facts were brought out. 

800 St. Mary's Street 
Raleigh, N. C. 



i 



V 



[68] 




GeSral News 




Dean Brauer to Retire 



Dr. John C. Brauer, the first and 
only dean of the UNC School of 
Dentistry since it was established 15 
years ago, has announced plans to 
retire effective July 1, 1966. During 
35 years in dental education. Dean 
Brauer has become recognized as 
one of the most creative and in- 
fluential spokesmen. 

A native of Sterling, Nebraska 
and a dental graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska, he has served 
on dental faculties at his alma 
mater, Emory University, the Uni- 
versity of Iowa and the University 
of Washington. He was dean of the 
dental school at the University of 
Southern California in Los Angeles 
when he was tapped to establish a 
new dental school at UNC in 1950. 
Last July he was elected Vice Presi- 
dent of the American Association 
of Dental Schools. If custom is fol- 
lowed, he will become President- 
Elect of the Association next year. 

In 1964 Dr. Brauer received the 
O. Max Gardner Award, given an- 
nually to "that member of the UNC 
faculty who has contributed the 
:most to the good of the human 
jrace," and a Distinguished Service 
Award from the North Carolina 
Dental Society for his contribu- 
tions to dentistry as "an educator, 
statesman, advisor, author, orator, 
gentleman, and civic and Christian 
leader." 



A seven-man committee has been 
appointed by the University to 
search for a successor to Dean 
Brauer. Dr. R. J. Shankle of the 
School of Dentistry has been named 
chairman of the committee which 
includes: Drs. M. G. Miska and 
Robert H. Sager, School of Den- 
tistry; Dr. Erie Peacock, School of 
Medicine; Dr. John T. Fulton, 
School of Public Health; Dr. E. 
Maynard Adams, Department of 
Philosophy; and Dr. Paul Munson, 
School of Pharmacy. 

Society President Pearce Roberts 
has directed the Society's Dental 
Education Committee, headed by 
Dr. Cleon W. Sanders of Benson, 
to act in liaison capacity with the 
University committee representing 
organized dentistry. 




John C. Brauer 



[69] 



Dr. Sanders has indicated that 
the Dental Education Committee 
will welcome suggestions from So- 
ciety members and urges that their 
ideas be channelled through his 
committee. 



Garrett Elected 

Dr. William A. Garrett of At- 
lanta, who has served as Trustee 
from the Fifth District for the past 
six years, was elected President- 
Elect of the American Dental As- 
sociation at its 106th Annual Ses- 
sion in Las Vegas, November 8-11. 
Dr. Maynard K. Hine of India- 
napolis was installed as the Associa- 
tion's 102nd President. 

Dr. Arthur W. Kellner of Holly- 
wood, Florida, was named to suc- 
ceed Dr. Garrett as Trustee from the 
Fifth District. 

The House of Delegates acted on 
more than 70 reports and resolu- 
tions, including two resolutions de- 
signed to remove alleged discrimi- 
natory membership practices by 
component and constituent societies, 
in answer to a complaint filed with 
the U. S. Department of Health, 
Education, and Welfare by a Negro 
dentist in Atlanta. He charged that 
the ADA is not in compliance with 
provisions of the Civil Rights Act 
of 1964. The penalty could be with- 
drawal of Federal assistance to 
ADA programs at the National Bu- 
reau of Standards and withholding 
of grants which are made to the 
Association for research projects. 

Resolution 23 1 directs constituent 
and component societies to "elimi- 
nate all practices and procedures, 
both written and unwritten, which 
are discriminatory in fact or con- 
cept" in regard to membership re- 
quirements, and "to report periodi- 



cally to the Board of Trustees on 
the steps that have been taken to 
eliminate discriminatory practices 
and procedures." It was adopted by 
a voice vote. 

Resolution 232 directs all com- 
ponent societies "to eliminate from 
their bylaws and membership prac- 
tices . . . procedures which might 
be construed as discriminatory un- 
der the Civil Rights Act of 1964," 
including, the requirement of more 
than a majority vote for election of 
new members, the submission of a 
photograph with applications for 
membership, an unreasonable re- 
quirement for the sponsorship of 
an applicant, and an unacceptable 
period for the renewal of an appli- 
cation for membership. It was 
adopted by a standing vote of 199 
to 177. 

In other principal actions the 
House of Delegates: 

Disapproved a proposal for re- 
organization of the trustee districts 
and referred the question to a new 
special committee; 

Adopted bylaws and membership 
standards for the National Associa- 
tion of Dental Service Plans; 

Approved a resolution urging the 
development of a national dental 
care program for children, particu- 
larly the needy and underprivileged; 

Adopted a resolution urging 
states to enact mandatory fluorida- 
tion laws patterned after Connecti- 
cut; 

Approved a statement by the 
Council on Dental Health saluting 
the 20th anniversary of fluorida- 
tion; 

Requested the Board of Trustees 
to present recommendations in 1966 
on the establishment of a Bureau of 
Dental Care Programs; 

Referred back to the Board of 



[70] 



Trustees for further information a 
resolution to permit a dentist with 
25 years membership in the Na- 
tional Dental Association to become 
a life member of the ADA when he 
has had 10 additional years of ADA 
membership. 



Foundation Elects Officers 

Cleon W. Sanders of Benson was 
elected president of the Dental 
Foundation of North Carolina dur- 
ing a meeting at Chapel Hill De- 
cember 1, which preceded the 11th 
annual postgraduate dental seminar 
conducted by the UNC School of 
Dentistry. An estimated 600 dentists 
attended. 

Dr. Sanders succeeds Ralph D. 
Coffey of Morganton. 

Other new officers are: Dean 
John C. Brauer of the UNC School 
of Dentistry, assistant secretary- 
treasurer; Bennie D. Barker of the 
UNC dental faculty, secretary-trea- 
surer; and Henry S. Zaytoun of Ra- 
leigh, vice president. 

The Foundation also named 16 
members to serve 3-year terms on 
its board of directors, including: 
E. D. Baker, Raleigh; W. H. Bree- 
land, Belmont; A. S. Bumgardner, 
harlotte; H. R. Chamblee, Ra- 
eigh; J. W. Girard, Jr., Asheville; 

M. Medlin, Aberdeen; W. T. Mc- 
all, Charlotte; T. G. Nisbet, Char- 
lotte; R. M. Olive, Fayetteville; and 
Norman F. Ross, Durham (all re- 
elected ) . 

Also, Bennie D. Barker, Chapel 
Hill; William L. Hand, Jr., New 
3ern; Pearce Roberts, Jr., Ashe- 
/ille; H. O. Lineberger, Jr., Ra- 
leigh; Barry G. Miller, Charlotte; 
and Miss Margaret Woodward, 
Greensboro (all newly elected). 

The board of directors has a total 
nembership of 38. 



■^,,_Jli-^ 



/ 



J. B. FREEDLAND (right) of Charlotte re- 
ceived a plaque from the Southern Endodontic 
Study Group when it met in Asheville last 
August designating him "The Prince of Endo- 
dontists." Julian L. Kelly, Jr., of Atlanta 
(center), president of the group, made the 
presentation as Pearce Roberts, Jr., president 
of the North Carolina Dental Society looked 
on. The plaque read: "For his enduring de- 
sire to achieve for Endodontists the stature 
they deserve. His untiring forethought, en- 
thusiasm, originality and wisdom have been 
a driving force behind the advance of Endo- 
dontics." 



Groundbreaking Ceremonies 
At Chapel Hill 

Groundbreaking ceremonies were 
held Saturday, September 11, for 
a $1.3 million Dental Research 
Center building at the University 
of North Carolina School of Den- 
tistry. 

Construction of the four-story 
structure is expected to require 18 
to 20 months. 

The building will be of modern 
design and will mark the first de- 
parture in the UNC Health Center 
area from the well-known modified 
Georgian architecture. 

Research facilities will include an 
electromicroscopy suite, radioiso- 
tope laboratories, animal quarters 
and specially designed microbiology 
laboratories. 

Each of the four main floor levels 



[71] 




EDNA ZEDAKER of Charlotte was installed 
as president of the American Dental As- 
sistants Association when it met in Las Vegas 
in November. 



will contain a series of research 
suites, each with a main research 
laboratory and three or four aux- 
iliary laboratories. 

About one-third of the funds for 
the research center was provided 
by the N. C. Dental Foundation 
through contributions from dentists, 
dental manufacturing and supply 
firms and dental laboratories in 
North Carolina and adjoining states. 

Other funds came from the fed- 
eral and state governments and 
other sources. 

Much of the credit for the out- 
come of the fund-raising campaign 
in North Carolina was given to the 
late Dr. R. Fred Hunt of Rocky 
Mount. The general chairman of the 
drive was Dr. Riley E. Spoon, Jr., of 
Winston-Salem. 



Laboratories Accredited 

Five dental laboratories in North 
Carolina have been accredited by 
the Joint Commission on Accredi- 
tation of Dental Laboratories ac- 



cording to a December 6 release 
by the Commission. 

There are now a total of 136 ac- 
credited laboratories in 37 states 
and the District of Columbia. 

The omission of any dental labo- 
ratory from the list does not 
necessarily indicate that such a labo- 
ratory has failed to meet accredita- 
tion standards under the voluntary 
program, the Commission adds. 

Laboratories in North Carolina 
which are now accredited include: 
Pedodontic Service, Inc., Charlotte; 
US Army Fort Bragg Dental Labo- 
ratory, Fort Bragg; Woodward Pros- 
thetic Company, Greensboro; Pope 
Air Force Base Dental Laboratory, 
464th Tactical Hospital, Pope AFB; 
Seymour Johnson Air Force Base 
Dental Laboratory, 4th Tactical 
Hospital, Seymour Johnson AFB. 



Dental Core Endorsement 

The "Blue" agencies in North 
Carolina have notified their sub-j 
scribers that effective January l,j 
1966, payment will be made for 
certain oral surgical services wheth- 
er performed by a licensed physi- 
cian or licensed dentist. Previously 
oral surgery performed by dentists 
have not been covered. 

Hospital Care Association ofi 
Durham and Hospital Saving As-i 
sociation of Chapel Hill, in com 
pliance with legislation sponsored 
by the Society and enacted by the 
1965 General Assembly, have 
amended their Surgical Endorse- 
ments as follows: 

"The Certificate issued by this 
Association is hereby amended ef- 
fective January 1, 1966 by adding 
the following provisions which be- 
come a part thereof: 

"In the event that this endorse- 



172] 



ment includes services which are 
within the scope of practice of both 
a duly licensed physician and a 
duly licensed dentist, allowances for 
such services will be made whether 
a particular service is performed by 
either a duly Hcensed physician or 
a duly licensed dentist, who under 
such license regularly charges and 
collects fees from patients in his own 
right. 

"The services herein referred to 
shall include, but not be limited to, 
excisions of tumors and cysts, and 
surgical procedures required to cor- 
rect injuries of the jaws, cheeks, 
lips, tongue, or roof and floor of the 
mouth. 

"Allowances shall not be made 
for prostheses (crowns, bridgework, 
or dentures), orthodontia (straight- 
ening of teeth), operative restora- 
tions, fillings, dental extractions, 
treatment of dental caries or gin- 
givitis, or other general dentistry." 



Hygiene Students Awarded 

Two students of dental hygiene 
at Central Piedmont Community 
College in Charlotte have been 
awarded scholarships. 

Rebecca Sue Caldwell of Shelby 
received $200 from the Charlotte 
Dental Society and $75 from the 
Charter Chapter of the American 
Business Women's Association, re- 
newable annually. 

Mrs. Betty C. Napier of Polkton 
was named recipient of the Betty 
Hobson Scholarship Award for 
1965-67 which will provide her with 
•books, uniforms, instruments and 
tuition. 



D.O.C. Sets Record 

Eighty-five dentists and their 
wives attended the 13th Annual 
District Officers Conference in Ra- 
leigh at the Velvet Cloak Inn, Satur- 
day and Sunday, December 4 and 
5, a record in attendance for the 
Conference. 

On Saturday open house was held 
at the Central Office for Confer- 
ence participants. District Officers 
were schooled in their duties in the 
afternoon. Following a dinner 
meeting, reports on the 1965 ADA 
House of Delegates and Dental Pre- 
payment were presented. 

At Sunday morning's session 
Press Relations for Professional So- 
cieties and State Society Financial 
Policies were discussed. The Con- 
ference concluded with a Business 
Session. 

Joseph M. Johnson of Laurinburg 
was named Conference President 
for the coming year. M. W. Al- 
dridge of Greenville was elected 
Vice President and M. W. Carpen- 
ter of Asheville was elected Secre- 
tary. 




ALBERTA BEAT, assistant director of the 
curriculum for dental hygiene at the UNC 
School of Dentistry, was installed as president 
of the American Dental Hygienists Associa- 
tion at its meeting in Las Vegas in November. 



[73] 



Actions by the Conference in- 
cluded: 

A recommendation that entertain- 
ment expenses of State Officers at 
District meetings be borne by the 
State Society; 

A recommendation that the State 
Bylaws be amended to provide that 
a member be dropped from the roll 
on March 31 rather than on De- 
cember 31 for non-payment of 
dues; 

A recommendation that Districts 
include an orientation breakfast for 
new members at their annual meet- 
ings. 

The Conference voted to return 
to Raleigh and the Velvet Cloak Inn 
for its 14th annual meeting Decem- 
ber 3-4, 1966, and to hold its cus- 
tomary breakfast on May 5 during 
the 110th Annual Session in Pine- 
hurst. 

The Conference also confirmed 
dates for the 1966 and 1967 Dis- 
trict meetings. 




SALLY BUCHANAN of Raleigh, a second 
year dental hygiene student at UNC, has been 
awarded an $800 scholarship by the American 
Dental Hygienists Association. Applicants for 
the award are judged on the basis of aca- 
demic achievement, leadership, and financial 
need. 



Program Revised for 1966 

Plans for a revised format for 
the 110th Annual Session of the 
North Carolina Dental Society 
which will be held in Pinehurst, May 
4-8 were completed when the Ex- 
ecutive and Annual Session Com- 
mittees met jointly early in January, 
according to Norman F. Ross, Pro- 
gram Chairman and Baxter B. Sapp, 
Jr., Convention Co-ordinator. 

In 1966 the Society will meet on 
a Wednesday to Sunday schedule. 
For the past several years the an- 
nual meeting has been held from 
Sunday to Wednesday. 

Clinicians will include Dr. John C. 
Bartels of Portland, Oregon, Dr. 
Ralph Boos of Minneapolis, and Dr. 
Thomas K. Cureton of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois. Dr. Bartels will lec- 
ture on "Porcelain," Dr. Boos will 
discuss "Full and Partial Dentures," 
and Dr. Cureton will speak on 
"Physical Fitness for the Dentist." 

Wednesday's program will include 
a Golf Tournament, the first ses- 
sion of the House of Delegates, Pro- 
jected Clinics, and a General Ses- 
sion. 

Thursday's agenda will include 
a District Officers Conference Break- 
fast, Reference Committee meetings, 
lectures by Dr. Bartels and Dr. Boos, 
and a General Session. 

The Past Presidents' Breakfast, 
essays by Dr. Bartels and Dr. Boos, 
two sessions of the House of Dele- 
gates, and informal conferences with 
the clinicians will be scheduled on 
Friday. 

On Saturday the House of Dele- 
gates will hold its final session. Dr. 
Cureton will speak, and officers will 
be installed at the third General 
Session. Rounding out the day's ac- 
tivities will be a social hour, ban- 
quet, and dance. 



[74] 



Check-out time at The Carolina, 
the headquarters hotel, will be after 
breakfast on Sunday. 



®bttuan^0 



A New Look 

The 54th annual Thomas P. Hin- 
man Dental Meeting will empha- 
size "A New Look for Preventive 
Dentistry" when the meeting — now 
one of the largest in the dental pro- 
fession — convenes in Atlanta 
March 20-23. 

For information and reserva- 
tions, write Dr. Curtis C. Reding, 
1162 Oxford Road, NE, Atlanta, 
Georgia 30306. 



Bitler Named 

Glenn F. Bitler of Raleigh was 
named practitioner of the year when 
the North Carolina Society of Den- 
tistry for Children met in Char- 
lotte in October. 

The group elected Frank Martin 
of Asheville president. Other offi- 
cers are: Barry G. Miller, Char- 
lotte, president-elect; Richard S. 
Hunter, Raleigh, vice president; and 
T. R. Oldenburg, Chapel Hill, sec- 
retary-treasurer. 



Funderburk Elected 

Dr. Ervin M. Funderburk of 
Charlotte was elected a Fellow of 
the American Society of Clinical 
Hypnosis at its annual meeting in 
Chicago last October. He is a 1939 
graduate of Emory University 
School of Dentistry. He practiced 
in Chattanooga, Tennessee after 
graduation until 1951. Since that 
date he has been located in Char- 
lotte. 



Dr. Jack H. Hughes, 69, of Rox- 

boro, a life member of the Third 
District Dental Society, the North 
Carolina Dental Society, and the 
American Dental Association, died 
September 19, 1965. 

Dr. Edwin Gates McKaughan, 63, 
of Lumberton, a member of the 
Fourth District Dental Society, died 
January 4, 1966. 

Dr. Robert Milton Olive, Jr., 46, 
of Fayetteville, a member of the 
Fourth District Dental Society, died 
December 23, 1965. 

Dr. William A. Pressly, Jr., 65, 
of Greensboro, a member of the 
Third District Dental Society, and 
the North Carolina Dental Society 
and a life member of the American 
Dental Association, died September 
3, 1965. 

Dr. Larston L. Reitzel, 34, of 
Charlotte, a member of the Second 
District Dental Society, died Sep- 
tember 24, 1965. 

Dr. Willis A. Secrest, 62, of 
Winston-Salem, a member of the 
Second District Dental Society, died 
November 12, 1965. 

Dr. Lyda Weaver Woody, 75, of 
Spruce Pine, a member of the First 
District Dental Society, died Decem- 
ber 14, 1965. 



Clinician Announced 

Dr. Wilmer B. Fames of North- 
western University in Chicago will 
be the featured clinician when the 
Blue Ridge Dental Society meets 
in North Wilkesboro on Saturday, 
April 23, 1966. He will speak on 
"Eames Technique in Amalgam." 



[75] 



The New Enlarged Program of 

DISABILITY INSURANCE 

FOR 
MEMBERS OF THE 

NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 

PLANS UP TO 

• $250.00 WEEKLY DISABILITY INCOME BENEFITS ($1,080.00 monthly) 

• $20.00 PER DAY EXTRA HOSPITAL BENEFIT, AND UP TO $225.00 SURGICAL BENEFITS 
FOR MEMBER AND DEPENDENTS (Optional) 

PLAN L-7 (Basic) 

Lifetime Accident and 7 Years Sickness 







Principal 
Sum For 


SEMI-ANNUAL 


PREMIUMS 


Weekly 
Benefits 


Dismemberment 
Benefits 


Accidental 
Death 


Premium t 
Age 40 and over 


(educed Premium 
To Age 40 


$250.00 
$200.00 
$150.00 
$100.00 


Up to $50,000.00 
Up to $40,000.00 
Up to $30,000.00 
Up to $20,000.00 


$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 


$244.50 
$196.50 
$148.50 
$100.50 


$183.50 
$147.50 
$111.50 
$ 75.50 



PLAN L-65 (Long Term) 

Lifetime Accident and For Sickness, from Inception of Disability 

To Your Attainment of Age 65 



SEMI-ANNUAL PREMIUMS 



Weekly 
Benefits 

$250.00 
$200.00 
$150.00 
$100.00 



Dismemberment 
Benefits 

Up to $50,000.00 
Up to $40,000.00 
Up to $30,000,00 
Up to $20,000.00 



Accidental 
Death 

$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 



Premium 
Age 40 and over 

$292.00 
$234.50 
$177.00 
$119.50 



i Reduced Premium 
To Age 40 

$219.25 
$176.00 
$133,00 
$ 89,75 



The premiums for Plan L-65 will be reduced to the same premium as for Plan L-7 at age 58. 

Note: The above rates do not increase at age 50 or even at age 60! 
tOn attaining age 40, age 40 rates apply on renewal. 



J. L CRUMPTON, State Mgr. 

Professional Group Disability Division 

COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEWARK, N, J. 

Box 147, Durham, N. C. 

J. Slade Crumpton, Field Representative 

If more information is needed or help desired in completing your enrollment 
please call us collect: 

Area Code 919— Phone 682-5497 



[76] 



(laledXfJt Cental JIgMo^uUo^ 






TRUMAN G. WILLIAMS, Manager 

800 St. Mary's Street 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

Phone TEmpIe 2-7673 Box 12226 



[77] 




Dtserves Fine 
Crown & Bridge iwaieriais 



Dreaiesi nesisiaite id AMtm 



LUXENE VINYL's higher resistance to abrasion caused by normal mastication and 
regular brushings means longer life for the restoration . . . greater patient confi- [ 
dence in you. 

Lowest Rate ot water Adsorption 

LUXENE VINYL has greater dimensional stability in wet or dry conditions . . . pre* 
vents weakening of bond between veneer and casting. 

LUXENE VINYL does not absorb odor causing bacteria. No embarrassing moments 
due to unpleasant mouth odor. 

LUXENE VINYL wards off discoloration caused by attack of mouth fluids and foods. 
Greater variety of foods in diet. 

LUXENE VINYL's greater toughness permits a wider scope of applications. NOW 
you can produce thinner veneers without losing LUXENE's lifelike lustre and trans- 
lucency. Restorations carrying LUXENE VINYL on the occlusal or incisal edges are 
now possible! See opposite page for Luxene processing laboratories in this area. 

LUXENE 

ONE HUNDRED EIGHTEEN EAST TWENTY FIFTH ST., NEW YORK 10, N. 



UXENE 

IROCESSING DENTAL LABORATORIES 

ene processing dental laboratories offer the most skilled technicians and W 

)dern facilities available. These laboratories are trained in exclusive advanced S 

Ixene techniques assuring you of the finest quality products possible. We 

iggest that you patronize them. You can have complete confidence in their 

c'ility to serve your needs best. 



VROLINA DENTAL LABORATORY 

800 St. Mary's St. 
Raleigh 

lARLOTTE LABORATORY, INC. 

119 S. Torrence Street 
Charlotte 

.EMING DENTAL LABORATORY, INC. 

325 Professional Building 
Raleigh 

iNOIR DENTAL LABORATORY 

103 N. Boundary Street 
Lenoir 

BE RALEIGH DENTAL LABORATORY 

800 St. Mary's Street 
Raleigh 

JPERIOR DENTAL LABORATORY 

205 S. Washington Street 
Shelby 

WIN CITY DENTAL LABORATORIES 

222 Nissen Building 
Winston-Salem 

OODWARD PROSTHETIC COMPANY 

153 Bishop Street 
Greensboro 

JRAN DENTAL LABORATORY 

121/2 Wall Street 
Asheville 



828-0379 



EDison 4-6874 



832-6054 



PLaza 4-4601 



832-7673 



487-4611 



723-1163 



272-1108 



253-2371 



J. MINOR STURGIS 

PORCELAIN LABORATORY 

BAKED PORCELAIN TO GOLD 
VACUUM FIRED PORCELAIN 

AND 

ACRYLIC RESTORATIONS 

Cast Crowns and Gold Fixed Bridge Work 
* * * 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 

* * * 

1110 Candler BIdg. Box 1404 

Atlanta 1, Georgia 

525-6512 



[80] 



niyx-^mv ^mtal (!l0mpattg 



Raleigh, North Carolina 



Robert D. Walker J. Pullen Sizer 



[81 ] 




THE NEW SILICATE FILLING MATERIAL 

Unequalled characteristics that make possible 
restorations never before obtainable with a silicate. 



Tooth Color Stability— With MQ's 
wide spectrum of colors, you are 
assured of quick and easy tooth 
matching, unusual color stability 
and life-like translucence. 

More Natural Fluorescence — A new 

elementcauses MQ to fluoresce un- 
der ultraviolet light as do live teeth. 

High Early Strength— MQ develops 



strength rapidly. At the end of 
24 hours, its compressive strength 
is 39,000 p.s.i. (A.D.A. Span 24,200 
p.s.i. in 24 hours.) 

In A Week, Strength Approximates 
That Of Human Teeth— In seven 
days, MQ increases to 42,000 p.s.i., 
or over 70% greater than A.D.A. 
specifications. 



MQ is guaranteed to comply with A.D.A. Specification No. 9. Second Revision. 
It is a product of S. S. WHITE COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa. 19105. 



S.S.WHITE® 



[82] 



WHAT'S NEW? 



Spare-dent f Dura Bond 



A NEW DEVELOPMENT IN 
DENTAL PROSTHETICS 
ALLOWS US TO REPRODUCE 
YOUR PATIENT'S PRESENT 
DENTURE OR TO MAKE A 
DUPLICATE WHEN A NEW 
DENTURE IS BEING MADE. 

* NOMINAL COST • 
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MAGIC INVISIBLE 
TREATMENT MAKES ALL 
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DEPOSITS ON DENTURES. 
ELIMINATES PERMANENT 
STAINING AND ODORS. 
HELPS INCREASE RETENTION 
AND LESSENS IRRITATION. 



»ULLIVAN J_/AI 



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BORATORIES 



1130 - 18th Street, N.W. — Box 1823 
Washington, D. C. 

Established 1930 

[83] 




One will do— but 



Carbocaine HCl Z% 
without vasoconstrictor 



_, . , , , ,, ,. , -^ , , provides very rapid, profound anes* 

Using only one local anesthetic may be suitable ^^^^.^ ^j^^^^^^ unwarranted dura- 
if all your procedures are extensive and compli- tion-particularly desirable in 

children's dentistry and modern 
high-speed restorative procedures. 



cated 

But many modern procedures are not time con 
Burning. So, more and more dentists are taking 
advantage of the unique choice provided by the 
two formulas of Carbocaine: a choice of shorter 
or longer duration — each offering profound anes 
thesia'with rapid onset- and being well tolerated.'' 
Carbocaine 3% without vasoconstrictor is grow 
ing in popularity, in keeping with high-speed pro 
cedures and for routine extractions which do not 
require long-lasting anesthesia. Carbocaine 2% 
with Neo-Cobefrin assures unsurpassed depth of 
anesthesia for the most protracted procedures; the 
need for reinjection is rare. 

Carbocaine hci 

brand of mepivacajne hci 



Operating anesthesia averages 20 
minutes upper, 40 minutes lower. 

Carbocaine HCI 2% 
. with Neo-Cobefrin® 1:20,000 

( brand of levo-norderrin I 

offers rapid-acting, consistently 
profound anesthesia of sufficiently 
long duration that even extensive 
and complicated procedures seldom 
require reinjection. 
References: 1. Hiatt, W. Local anesthe- 
sia : history ; potential toxicity ; clinical 
investigation of mepivacaine. Dent. 
Clin. North America p. 243, July 1961. 
2. Dobbs, E.G. and Ross, N. The new 
local anesthetic Carbocaine. New York 
State D. J. 27:453, Nov. 1961. 3. Weil, 
C, Santangelo, C, Welham, F. S., and 
Yackel, R.F. Clinical evaluation of mepi- 
vacaine hydrochloride by a new method. 
J.A.D.A. 63:26, July 1961. 

FOR YOUR INFORMATION: These local anesthetic solutions are for dental block 
and infiltration injections only. There are no known contraindications in dentistry 
except for patients known to be sensitized. Inject slowly and avoid intravascular 
injection by aspirating. As with all local anesthetic solutions, adverse reactions due 
to intolerance, overdosage, or intravascular injection may occur and include hypoten- 
sion and respiratory depression. Such reactions occur infrequently and usually are 
readily controlled by supporting circulation with a vasopressor and respiration with 
oxygen. Carbocaine and Neo-Cobefrin are trademarks (Reg. U.S. Pat. Off.) of Sterling Drug Inc. 



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Expressly formulated so that exposed surfaces can compliment other 
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hardness and rigidity. With Its own special bonding agent and 1800*F. 
vacuum porcelain, MICRO-BOND restorations in gold metal framework 
ore the answer to many individual needs or even preferences of dentists 
and patients. 

TINCHER DENTAL LABORATORY 

221 Vz Hale Street 
CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

Phone 

Dl 3-7571 




VITALLIUM® 

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VITALLIUM and MICRO-BOND restoratioi 

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Austenal Company Division 



ROTHSTEIN DENTAL LABORATORIES, INC. 

^tfff^^ 1100 East-West Highway, Silver Spring, Md. 

^ I ] y |B Box 914, Silver Spring, Md. 

^J^^Jf Box 1740, Washington 13, D.C. 



^EE,| 



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NOB ILIUM ALLOY, the formula of which includes the rare element 
Gallium, achieves a finer molecular structure. This is just one of the metal- 
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During the melting process, this superior alloy is protected by the 
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Step up to Nobilium . . . 

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CHICAGO • LOS ANGELES • PHILADELPHIA • HOUSTON • TORONTO • STOCKHOLM • STUTTGART 



NOBLE DENTAL 
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—Complete Laboratory Service— 



Fred Noble Fred Noble, Jr. 

225 Professional Building ji 

ii 

Raleigh, North Carolina j 

Telephone: 832-4616 J 



[88] 



RESOLUTIONS. ... A. N.Y. 



* 



Our resolutions "after New Years,"* as well as before, are still 
the same — they are few and simple and have not changed for 
78 years. 

They are — 

1. To supply you with only the best merchandise and equip- 
ment available. 

2. At a fair price to you. 

3. In the least possible time after your needs are made 
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4. To serve you better in every way. 

5. To appreciate as well as deserve your business. 



WHY NOT SEND US YOUR NEXT ORDER? 



"Keener Service" 

KEENER DENTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

ASHEVILLE 
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KNOXVILLE HUNTSVILLE 



[89] 




TICONIUM 




Honor Roll 

of Qualified 

Laboratories 



HENDERSONVILLE DENTAL LAB 

Hunter BIdg. 

P. 0. Box 1019 

Hendersonville, No. Carolina 28739 

Phone: 3-9870 

NOBLE DENTAL LABORATORY 

225 Professional BIdg. 

P. 0. Box 825 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27602 

Phone: 832-4616 

NORMAN DENTAL LABORATORY 

612 Pasteur Drive 

P. 0. Box 10003 

Greensboro, North Carolina 27404 

Phone: 299-9128 

QUEEN CITY DENTAL LABORATORY 

306 N. Church St. 
Charlotte, No. Carolina 28201 
Phone: EDison 3-6497 

SAMPLE DENTAL LABORATORY 

633 Nissen Building 
P. 0. Box 2897 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 27102 
Phone: PArk 3-3897 

SULLIVAN DENTAL LABORATORY 

p. 0. Box 1679 

Wilmington, No. Carolina 28402 

Phone: ROger 2-9793 



Specify 



on your next case 



w 



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TICONIUM PREMIUM 100 • TILON • TICON 

Ticonium, Division of CMP Industries, Inc., Albany, N.Y. 12201 
[90] 



LUXENE 

the world's only ter polymer denture 




6fe 



FLEMING DENTAL LABORATORY 

Incorporated 

Professional Building 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Telephone TE 2-6054 Post Office Box 2086 

E. R. Schwerin Leon Chadwick, Jr. 



[91] 



Porcelain Service from Coast to Coa 





Location may vary . . . 
but our Quality 
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porcelain 

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PORCELAIN SINCE 1937 



FREE-FREE-NOT EVEN 
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FROM 
OR 



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NO POSTAGE STAMP NECESSARY IF MAILED IN THE UNITED STATES 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY 

PORCELAIN JACKETS INCORPORATED 



Jectron polystyrene 
resin is pre-cured. 
It is processed by a 
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Till 





NOBLE DENTAL LABORATORY 

225 Professional BIdg. 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Phone: 832-4616 and 832-4617 



WOODWARD PROSTHETIC CO. 

153 Bishop Street 

Greensboro, North Carolina 

Phone: 272-1108 and 272-1109 



[93] 




Attend the 
54th Annual 

THOMAS P. HINMAN 

DENTAL MEETING March 20-23, 1966 

"A New Look... for Preventive Dentistry" 

All functions presented at the NEW Atlanta Marriott Motor Hotel 
Atlanta, Georgia 
FEATURING: 

• Dr. Basil G. Bibby, Rochester, N. Y., "Interpretations on 
Cause and Control of Dental Carles;" 

• Dr. Clinton C. Emmerson, Hemet, Calif., "What Do You 
Tell Your Patients?" 

• Dr. Miles R. Markley, Denver, Colo., "Preventive 
Dentistry;" 

• Dr. Leonard Monheim, Pittsburgh, Pa., "Pain Control in 
Dental Practice;" 

• Dr. Earl Pound, Los Angeles, Calif., "A Cautious Approach 
to Full Dentures;" 

• Dr. Sigurd P. Ramfjord, Ann Arbor, Mich., "Success or 
Failure of Periodontal Therapy;" 

• Dr. Maurice J. Sakiad, New York, N. Y., "The Clinical 
Management of Maligned, MaFposed, Mutilated and 
Missing Anterior Teeth with Porcelain;" 

• Dr. Milton Siskin, Memphis, Tenn., "Endodontics in Today's 
Dental Practice;" 

• Dr. Robert V. Walker, Dallas, Texas, "Management of the 
Common Complications of Office Oral Surgery;" 

• Dr. Edward V. Zegarelli, New York, N. Y., "Oral Medicine," 
and, 

• Dr. Maynard K. Hine, Indianapolis, Ind., president of the 
American Dental Association. 

FIVE SPECIAL CLINICS— Attendance Limited to 50 Each 

Occlusion / Conservative Restorations / Correction of 
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Implants, Replants, and Transplants 

Special Program for the Ladies / Largest Array of 
Teclmical Exhibits in the South 

Make Reservations NOW— DR. CURTIS C REDING, 

Chairman, 1162 Oxford Road, NE, 

Atlanta, Georgia 30306 

Presented under the auspices of the Fifth District DentaJ 
Society, Dr. Julian L. Kelly, president. 



[94] 




GOOD NUTRITION PROMOTES DENTAL HEALTH 

Gk)od nutrition is necessary for normal growth, development, 
maintenance, and repair oiall cells of the body. Dental health, 
then, like general health, depends in part on good nutrition. 

To achieve a state of good nutrition, all essential food 
nutrients must be provided in ample amounts and in favor- 
able ratio to each other. In addition, the body must be able 
to properly digest the food, and absorb and utilize the nutri- 
ents it provides. 

Dental health, therefore, also favors good nutrition. This 
interrelationship is logical inasmuch as the first step in the 
digestion of food is its thorough chewing in the mouth. 

Better dental health is possible for most persons, if pres- 
ent knowledge of factors which influence the health of the 
entire body and which affect teeth and gums locally is applied 
to daily living habits. This means meals should contain a 
well-chosen variety of foods. These foods should provide all 
known essential nutrients in recommended amounts. Excesses 
of any single type of food should be avoided, especially those 
which are concentrated sources of food energy without being 
accompanied by essential food nutrients. 

N. C. UNITS . . . 

Free health educafional materials and services are offered to Dental 
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Durham - Burlington - Raleigh High Point - Greensboro Winston-Salem 

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[97] 



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HAVE EQUIPMENT TO SELL? 
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'OR SALE: Top-loading instrument sterilizer, hot-water type: off-on 
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Phone 299-9128 Box 10,003 

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THE 



OF THE NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 




DIRECTORY 



STATE OFFICERS 



STATE COMMITTEES 



DISTRICT OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 



OFFICERS OF ALLIED ORGANIZATIONS 



The use of this roster as a general mailing list is prohibited except 
by specific authority. 



Supplement 



January, 1966 



Vol. 49, No. 1 



Published four times a year, January, April, August and September by the North 
CaroUna Dental Society, 405 W. Peace St., Raleigh, N. C. 27603. The closmg dates for 
jibs Journal are February 1, June 1, and November 1. The subscription rate is $2.00 
per year. Second-class postage paid at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 



SUPPLEMENT 

to 

THE JOURNAL OF THE NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 

January, 1966 

CONTENTS 

Page 

State Officers 3 

)tate Committees 4 

District Officers and Committees 

First District 6 

Second District 7 

Third District 8 

Fourth District 9 

Fifth District 10 

'Roster of Members 
Alphabetical li 

By towns in North Carolina 34 

Residing out-of-state and in military service 48 

)fficers — Allied Organizations Back Cover 

North Carolina Dental Assistants Association 
North Carolina Dental Auxiliary 
North Carolina Dental Hygienists Association 
North Carolina Dental Laboratory Association 

Torth Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners Back Cover 



♦ The use of this roster as a general mailing list is prohibited except with specific 
uthority. 



I 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 

1965-66 

President: Pearce Roberts, Jr., 410 Doctors Bldg Asheville 28801 

President-Elect: J. Homer Guion, 

602 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Dr Charlotte 28207 

Vice President: James A. Harrell, Box 688 Elkin 28621 

Secretary-Treasurer: C. W. Poindexter, 
309 E. Wendover Ave Greensboro 27401 

Editor-Publisher: Barry G. Miller, 1927 Brunswick Ave Charlotte 28207 

Associate Editor-Publisher: M. Lamar Dorton, 

131 N. Mulberry St Statesville 28677 

•holographic Editor: B. B. Sapp, Jr., 
Box 3806, Duke Medical Center Durham 27706 

Jpeaker of the House: Ralph D. Coffey, Box 693 Morganton 28655 

Executive Secretary: Andrew M. Cunningham, Box 11065.— Raleigh 27604 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Chairman: S. H. Isenhower (1968), Box 307 Newton 28658 

W. L. Hand, Jr. (1967), Box 335 New Bern 28560 

Roy L. Lindahl (1966), UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Darden J. Eure (1966), 707 Bridges St Morehead City 28557 



I 



DELEGATES TO THE AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION 

hairman: Paul E. Jones (1966), Box 6 Farmville 27828 

"Frank O. Alford (1967), 1001 Liberty Life Building Charlotte 28202 

Ralph D. Coffey (1968), Box 693 Morganton 28655 

Z. L. Edwards (1966), Box 157 Washington 27889 

Erbie M. Medlin (1967), Box 176 Aberdeen 28315 

C. C. Poindexter (1968), 314 Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 27401 

ALTERNATE DELEGATES 
TO THE AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION 

J. Homer Guion, 602 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Dr Charlotte 28207 

James A. Harrell, Box 688 Elkin 28621 

3. H. Isenhower, Box 307 Newton 28658 

Barry G. Miller, 1927 Brunswick Ave Charlotte 28207 

2. W. Poindexter, 309 E. Wendover Ave Greensboro 27401 

Pearce Roberts, Jr., 410 Doctors Bldg Asheville 28801 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

Clinic: Robert B. Litton, Chairman; R. F. Hunt, Jr., Harold E. Maxwell, 
Ludwig G. Scott, M. Stevenson Thurston. 

Constitution and Bylaws: Thomas G. Nisbet (1970), Chairman; G. Shu- 
ford Abernethy (1968); D. T. Carr (1969); Z.L.Edwards (1966); Walter H. 
Finch, Jr. (1967). 

Council on Dental Health: W. L. Hand, Jr. (1966); Chairman; Frank G. 
Atwater (1967); F. A. Buchanan (1970); J. Homer Guion (1969); E. A, 
Pearson, Jr. (1968). 
Dental Education: C. W. Sanders (1969), Chairman; George S. Alex- 
ander (1968); E. D. Baker (1970); R. B. Barden (1966); F. A. Buchanan 
(1966); Ralph D. Coffey (1969); Z. L. Edwards, Jr. (1967); S. P. Gay 
(1968); Roy L. Lindahl (1967); Riley E. Spoon, Jr. (1970). 
Ethics: Thomas M. Hunter (1967), Chairman; Frank G. Atwater (1968); 
C. Z. Candler, Jr. (1969); Elliot R. Motley (1970); Horace K. Thompson 
(1966). 

Exhibit: E. A. Pearson, Jr., Chairman; A. C. Current, Jr., Norman J. 
Duncan, M. M. Forbes, M. M. Lilley, Sandy C. Marks (Scientific Ex- 
hibits). 

Insurance: John S. Dilday (1966), Chairman; C. T. Barker (1967); T. L. 
Blair (1969); W. A. Mynatt (1970); J. S. D. Nelson (1968). 
Leg-islative: Mott P. Blair (1969), Chairman; L. C. Holshouser (1968), 
Secretary; H. Royster Chamblee (1970); Dennis S. Cook (1967); Paul E.I 
Jones (1966). 

Library and History: Neal Sheffield (1968), Chairman; Frank O. Alford' 
(1969); H. Royster Chamblee (1967); M. M. Lilley (1966); S. H. Steel- 
man (1970). 

Membership: J. Homer Guion, Chairman; M. W. Aldridge, C. W. Horton, 
Penn Marshall, Jr., W. Stewart Peery; Cecil A. Pless, Jr. 
Military and Veterans Affairs: J. Harry Spillman (1967), Chairman;: 
Coyte R. Minges (1969); T. Edwin Perry (1968); H. E. Plaster (1966);l 
Baxter B. Sapp, Jr. (1970). 
Necrology: Robert T. Byrd (1970), Chairman; Robert A. George (1968);; 
C. B. Johnson, New Bern (1969); W. T. Pennell (1967); J. Ernest Roberts' 
(1966). 

Program: Norman F. Ross, Chairman; G. Shuford Abernethy, M. W. Al- 
dridge, Glenn F. Bitler, Kenneth M. Ray, Freeman C. Slaughter. 
Prosthetic Dental Service: C. P. Osborne, Jr. (1968), Chairman; C. Z. 
Candler, Jr. (1969); Thomas L. Dixon (1966); C. D. Eatman (1970);, 
James A. Harrell (1967). 
Publicity: F. A. Buchanan (1970), Chairman; C. T. Barker (1968); H. Estesi 
Butler (1969); J. Henry Ligon, Jr. (1967); W. Stewart Peery (1966). 
Relief: J. T. Lasley (1968), Chairman; S. L. Bobbitt (1970); Walter E. 
Clark (1966); J. W. Heinz (1969); J. M. Kilpatrick (1967). 
State Institutions: K. L. Johnson (1968), Chairman; Robert J. Harned 
(1970); Donald L. Henson (1967); S. H. Isenhower (1966); Thomas A. 
Smith (1969). 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

Annual Session: Baxter B. Sapp, Jr., Convention Coordinator; Norman F. 
Ross (Program); L. D. Herring (Arrangements); Robert B. Litton (Clinic); 
M. L. Cherry (Entertainment Coordinator); C. P. Osborne, Jr. (Banquet);! 
Cecil A. Pless, Jr. (Reception); A. Dwight Price (Dance); E. A. Pearson; 
Jr. (Exhibit); J. W. Girard, Jr. (Hospitality); A. P. Cline, Jr. (Monitor); 
Robert T. Byrd (Necrology); Robert W. Holmes (Projected Clinics); F. A. 
Buchanan (Publicity); Sandy C. Marks (Scientific Exhibits); W. Kimball 
Griffin (Sports); Walter T. McFall, Jr. (Visual Education). 
Arrangements: L. D. Herring, Chairman; Carnie C. Gooding, Frederick Gl 
Hasty, Gerald F. McBrayer, William A. Mynatt, J. Fred Sproul, Jack B.! 
Upchurch, William G. Ware, Jr., W. Kenneth Young. 



Banquet: Colin P. Osborne, Jr., Chairman: Henry C. Harrelson, Jr.. R. F. 
Hunt. Jr.. W. Harrell Johnson, J. Henry Ligon, Jr., Auburn L. Poovey. 
Blue Shield-Blue Cross: F. D. Bell, Chairman; Vaiden B. Kendrick, A. C. 
Riddle, Jr., Grover W. Smith. 

Cancer: Robert H. Sager, Chairman; T. L. Blair, John F. Lemler, Jere E. 
Roe, W. L. Rudder. 

Children's Dental Health: Franklin E. Martin, Chairman; John M. Archer, 
[II, Duncan M. Getsinger, Donald L. Henson, R. S. Hunter. 
Corporate Practice: Henry C. Harrelson, Jr., Chairman; W. M. Ditto, 
J. Henry Ligon, Jr., G. F. McBrayer, Penn Marshall, Jr., J. Harry Spill- 
man. 

Dance: A. Dwight Price, Chairman; Zeno L. Edwards, Jr.. Penn Mar- 
shall, Jr., W. A. Mynatt, L. B. Peeler, R. Bruce Warlick. 
■Dental Care for the Aged: Henry O. Lineberger, Jr., Chairman; Bennie D. 
Barker, L. A. Cameron, C. Z. Candler, Jr., A. P. Cline, Charles S. Cooke, 
S. P. Gay, James E. Graham, Jr., Glenn L. Hooper, John T. Hughes, 
John R. Irwin, A. T. Lockwood, Coyte R. Minges, M. H. Truluck. 
Dental Health Insurance-Industry Liaison: James B. Howell, Chairman; 
Frank G. Atwater, Bennie D. Barker, J. B. Freedland, J. W. Girard, Jr., 
Donald L. Henson, Thomas M. Hunter, Glenn A. Lazenby, Jr. 
Dental Hygienists: J. Harry Spillman, Chairman; M. W. Carpenter, 
James H. Lee, C. W. Poindexter, Lloyd B. Stanley. 

Dental Prepayment: Glenn F. Bitler, Chairman; M. W. Aldridge, C. T. 
Barker, F. S. Cunningham, R. A. Daniel, Jr., M. Lamar Dorton, M. M. 
Forbes. W. E. Kelley, Henry O. Lineberger, Jr., E. A. Pearson, Jr., J. W. 
Sigmon, T. Edgar Sikes, Jr., Freeman C. Slaughter. 

Dental Service Corporation: Roy L. Lindahl, Chairman; Thomas G. 
Collins, William A. Current, C. P. Godwin, L. C. Holshouser, W. E. Kelley, 
Cecil A. Pless, Jr., M. B. Richardson, Neal Sheffield, Jr., Charles M. 
Westrick, J. M. Zealy. 

Entertainment: M. L. Cherry, Entertainment Coordinator; C. P. Osborne, 
Jr. (Banquet); A. Dwight Price (Dance); Cecil A. Pless, Jr. (Reception). 
Hospitality: J. W. Girard, Jr., Chairman; Frank G. Atwater, L. P. Bratton, 
James H. Lee, Henry O. Lineberger, Jr., William H. Oliver, Horace P. 
Reeves, Jr., E. Kent Rogers, III, R. W. Sugg, G. W. Yokeley. 
Industrial Commission: S. B. Towler, Chairman; E. D. Baker, James W. 
Bawden, Luther H. Butler. 

Location Site for Annual Sessions: H. W. Twisdale, Chairman; C. Fred 
Clark, Jr., James E. Furr, Frank W. Hoyle, Penn Marshall, Jr., T. Edgar 
Sikes, Jr., Egbert P. Williams. 

.Alonitor: A. P. Cline, Jr., Chairman; Clarence F. Biddix, A. Bruce Bot- 
toms, Robert E. Brooks, L. A. Cameron, Dwight L. Clark, Hugh H. Cole, 
James L. Cox, Robert D. Garren, Thomas A. Morris, S. D. Petersen, Jr., 
John A. S. Reynolds, Joe B. Roberson, Clyde L. Taylor. 
Projected Clinics: Robert W. Holmes, Chairman; Donald E. Bland, Fred- 
erick G. Hasty, L. P. Megginson, Jr., J. O. Thorpe. 

Ileception: Cecil A. Pless, Jr., Chairman; Robert H. Gainey, James E. 
Graham, Jr., L. D. Herring, C. W. Horton, Walter H. Moore, Fred N. 
Ogden, II, Marion L. Ralls, Jr., C. R. VanderVoort. 

School Health: Thomas B. Reid, Jr., Chairman; George S. Alexander, 
C. Z. Candler, Jr., Thomas G. Collins, T. Edgar Sikes, Jr. 
Sports: W. Kimball Griffin, Chairman; M. B. Corl, D. W. Seifert, Jr., 
C. B. Taylor, Dan Wright. 

State Employees: M. W. Aldridge, Chairman; C. W. Horton, William H. 
Oliver, Paul A. Stroup, Jr., C. B. Taylor. 

Study Club: M. Lamar Dorton, Chairman; Donald E. Bland, Zeno L. 
Edwards, Jr., Neal Sheffield, Jr., Raymond C. Whitehurst, Jr. 
Visual Education: Walter T. McFall, Jr.. Chairman: Carnie C. Gooding, 
Dwight B. Hord, Charles A. Jarrett, C. M. Kistler. 

SPECIAL ADVISORS TO: 

N. C. Dental Assistants' Association: William H. Oliver 
X. C. Dental Hygienists' Association: W. Stewart Peery 
N. C. Dental Auxiliary: John H. Dearman 



DISTRICT SOCIETIES 



FIRST DISTRICT DENTAL SOCIETY 1965-66 



OFFICERS 

John W. Girard, Jr., Asheville President 

M. W. Carpenter, Asheville President-Elect 

Robert B. Litton, Shelby Vice President 

Cecil A. Pless, Jr., Asheville Secretary-Treasurer 

F. A. Buchanan, Hendersonville Editor 



DELEGATES 

M. W. Carpenter, John W. Girard, Jr., D. B. Hord, Cecil A. Pless, Jr., 
C. B. Taylor. 

ALTERNATE DELEGATES 

F. A. Buchanan, M. M. Forbes, R. B. Litton, K. M. Ray, E. K. Rogers, IIL 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

J. T. Adair, F. A. Buchanan, M. W. Carpenter, John W. Girard, Jr., R. B. 
Litton, Cecil A. Pless, Jr., C. B. Taylor. 

COMMITTEES 

Audit: A. P. Cline, Jr., Chairman; R. B. Suggs, D. G. Frye, Jr. 

Clinics: G. F. McBrayer, Chairman; W. A. Davis, W. A. Current, P. E. 
Hedrick, F. D. Pattishall. 

Constitution and Bylaws: S. H. Isenhower, Chairman; M. M. Forbes, S. E. 
Moser. 

Ethics: C. Z. Candler, Jr., Chairman; F. S. Cunningham, A. L. Poovey, 
O. W. Taylor, W. J. Turbyfill. 

Golf: R. R. Hoffman, Chairman; J. G. Crowell. 

Hospitality: W. A. Mynatt, Chairman; C. M. Hatchett, Jr., H. E. Bolinger, 
Walter H. Davis. 

Local Arrangements: E. K. Rogers, III, Chairman; G. F. Daniel, D. L. 
Quails, H. H. Cole, R. D. Garren. 

Membership: R. B. Litton, Chairman; F. N. Ogden, II, D. F. Hord, C. W. 
Canrobert, Jr. 

Necrology: H. E. Plaster, Chairman; J. H. Maddox, S. F. Clayton. 

Nominating: C. B. Taylor, Chairman; C. C. Diercks, H. D. Froneberger. 

Program: M. W. Carpenter, Chairman; W. J. McDaniel, D. L. Ashworth. 

Publicity: F. A. Buchanan, General Chairman; T. A. Morris, Chairman in 
charge of promotion and attendance; R. H. Owen, L. J. Gregory, R. W. 
Holmes. 

Relief: A. P. Cline, Chairman; W. E. Clark, O. C. Barker. 



SECOND DISTRICT DENTAL SOCIETY 1965-66 

OFFICERS 

Horace P. Reeves, Jr., Charlotte President 

J. Harry Spillman, Winston-Salem President-Elect 

W. Smith Kirk, Salisbury Vice President 

W. Stewart Peery, Charlotte Secretary-Treasurer 

William G. Ware, Jr., Winston-Salem Editor 

DELEGATES 

M. Lamar Dorton, W. Stewart Peery, William H. Price, Horace P. Reeves, 
Jr., J. Harry Spillman. 

ALTERNATE DELEGATES 

J. B. Freedland, Robert A. George, James E. Graham, Jr. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Keith L. Bentley, Douglas Young. 

COMMITTEES 

Auditing: William H. Price, Chairman; Robert Long, T. F. Weant. 

Commercial Exhibits: Frank H. Walker, Chairman; Norman J. Duncan, 
John J. Jordan, Fleming H. Stone, C. V. Winter, D. Clyde Young, Jr. 

Constitution and Bylaws: William F. Yelton, Chairman; L. C. Holshouser, 
T. G. Nisbet. 

Convention: C. F. Biddix, General Chairman; J. O. Thorpe, Advisor; S. D. 
Petersen, Jr. 

Dental Health and Information: John M. Archer, HI, Chairman; Frank H. 
Daniel, F. Glen Gaither. 

Ethics: Elliot R. Motley, Chairman; Harold W. Thompson, S. C. Duncan, 
A. J. Galarde. 

Hospitality: Broadus E. Jones, Jr., Chairman; Henry C. Harrelson, Jr., 
Douglas M. Young, A. Breece Breland, Fay H. Culbreth, David L. 
Ballard. 

Insurance: T. L. Blair, Chairman; Edward U. Austin, Freeman C. Slaughter. 

Membership: W. Smith Kirk, Chairman; Richard F. Scherer, James P. 
Bingham, Jr. 

Monitors and Ushers: Marshall L. Corl, Chairman; Robert D. Carlough, 
Brian P. Hill, Martin H. Murphy, Ernest Morris, Gary Heeseman, Jr., 
Daniel B. Harrell, Jr. 

Necrology: Robert W. Clinard, Chairman; J. Sherrod Williams; Roy W. 
Wilson. 

Program: James E. Graham, Jr., Chairman; M. Stevenson Thurston, 
Keith L. Bentley, Fred C. Miller. 

Projected Clinics: Keith L. Bentley, Co-Chairman; Fred C. Miller, Co- 
Chairman; O. J. Freund, Donald W. Morris, Donald C. Evans. 

Publicity: William G. Ware, Jr., Chairman; M. Lamar Dorton, Luby T. 
Sherrill, Jr., Barry G. Miller. 

Relief: J. William Heinz, Chairman; Robert A. George, G. C. Stowe, Jr. 

Table Clinics: M. Stevenson Thurston, Chairman; David R. Hinkle, John 
A. S. Reynolds. 



THIRD DISTRICT DENTAL SOCIETY 1965-66 



OFFICERS 

C. Robert VanderVoort, Aberdeen. President 

Charles W. Horton, High Point... President-Elect 

Robert W. Sugg, Durham Vice President 

L. P. Megginson, Jr., High Point Secretary-Treasurer 

Richard M. Fields, Pleasant Garden Editor 



DELEGATES 

Luther H. Butler (1967), Charles W. Horton, L. P. Megginson, Jr., C. H. 
Teague (1966), C. Robert VanderVoort. 



ALTERNATE DELEGATES 

W. Kimball Griffin, Harry A. Karesh. - H 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Maurice B. Richardson (1968) Chairman; Charles W. Horton, James B. 
Howell (1966), L. P. Megginson, Jr., Robert W. Sugg, Marvin E. Walker 
(1967), C. Robert VanderVoort. 



COMMITTEES 

Auditing: Maurice B. Richardson. • 

Children's Dental Health: Duncan M. Getsinger, Chairman; Wilbur B. 
Bland, Claude W. Drake. 

Constitution and Bylaws: Daniel T. Carr, Chairman; J. Ernest Roberts, 
S. W. Shaffer, W. P. Hinson, Jr. 

Ethics: W. L. Saunders, Chairman; W. R. Campbell, Thomas A. Kornegay, 
J. Ernest Roberts. 

Legislative: T. Edgar Sikes, Jr., Chairman; C. W. Poindexter, B. B. Sapp, 
Jr. 

Membership: Robert W. Sugg, Chairman; Charles A. Reap, Jr., Riley S. 
Stallings, Jr., Marion L. Ralls, Jr., Walter H. Moore. 

Necrology: George D. Anderson, Robert J. Harned, David E. Van Vleet, 
John K. Campbell, Robert L. Bridger. 

Program: Charles W. Horton, Chairman; L. P. Megginson, Jr., George D. 
Anderson, E. M. Medlin, R. B. Warlick (Arrangements); W. Harrell 
Johnson (Entertainment); J. Watson Smith, Jr. (Golf); Ludwig G. Scott 
(Clinician); B. M. Brannan, Jr. (Table Clinics). 

Public Education: Carl L. Bowen, Chairman; John W. Atwater, Jr., 
Thomas R. Hinson, R. E. Richardson. 

Publicity: L. P. Megginson, Jr., Chairman; C. W. Surles, Jr., John K. 
Campbell. 

Relief: S. P. Gay, Chairman; J. T. Lasley, John S. Dilday. 



FOURTH DISTRICT DENTAL SOCIETY 1965-66 

OFFICERS 

William H. Oliver, Smithfield President 

Joseph M. Johnson, Laurinburg President-Elect 

Robert H. Gainey. Fayetteville.... Vice President 

Penn Marshall, Jr., Raleigh Secretary-Treasurer 

Glenn F. Bitler, Raleigh Editor 

DELEGATES 

Joseph M. Johnson, Penn Marshall, Jr., Harold E. Maxwell, William H. 
Oliver, C. P. Osborne, Jr. 

ALTERNATE DELEGATES 

E. D. Baker, John N. Denning, Frederick G. Hasty, Marvin T. Jones, Jr., 
Henry O. Lineberger, Jr. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

J. Henry Ligon, Jr., Chairman; William H. Oliver, Joseph M. Johnson, 
Penn Marshall, Jr., Thomas G. Collins, Robert H. Gainey. 

COMMITTEES 

Auditing: W. W. Rankin, Chairman; Clarence S. Olive, R. L. Mohn. 

Children's Dental Health: J. Fred Sproul, Chairman; R. W. Roberson, 
R. S. Hunter. 

Civil Defense: R. Edgar Brooks, Chairman; C. J. Goodwin, William R. 
Spencer. 

Clinic: Harold E. Maxwell, Chairman; P. C. Purvis, Worth M. Byrd, 
Zyba K. Massey, George W. Stephenson, Roy L. Earp. 

Constitution and Bylaws: Walter H. Finch, Jr., Chairman; E. A. Pear- 
son, Jr., J. B. Powell, C. P. Osborne, Jr., J. Henry Ligon, Jr. 
^Co-Ordinating: Frederick G. Hasty, Chairman; Harold E. Maxwell. 
I Dental Education: C. W. Sanders, Chairman; E. D. Baker, N. B. Grantham, 
Jr., H. Royster Chamblee, F. D. Bell. 

Entertainment and Banquet: E. N. Pridgen, Chairman; Mitchell W. Wal- 
lace, C. H. Beck, Robert B. Taylor. 

Ethics: Thomas M. Hunter, Chairman; C. E. Roberts, Marvin T. Jones, Jr., 
Newton Smith. 

Hospitality: Lawrence H. Paschal and Newton Smith, Co-Chairmen; R. M. 
Olive, Paul Fitzgerald, Jr. 

Insurance: J. S. D. Nelson, Chairman; J. R. Edwards, Jr., Jere E. Roe, 
L. J. Moore, Jr. 

Liaison to Women's Auxiliary: Robert H. Gainey. 

: Local Arrangements: R. R. Renfrow and Joe P. Hale, Co-Chairmen; Wil- 
liam F. Grimes. 

Membership: Robert H. Gainey, Chairman; D. W. Seifert, Jr., L. A. Cam- 
eron, Grover C. Pate, W. I. Herring. 

Necrology: Robert T. Byrd, Chairman; John N. Denning, P. E. Cotter, 
R. L. Eagles, Clemuel M. Johnson. 

Nominating: Thomas G. Collins, Chairman; C. P. Osborne, Jr., Robert T. 
Byrd. L. D. Herring, J. Henry Ligon, Jr. 

Program: Joseph M. Johnson, Chairman; Glenn F. Bitler, E. N. Pridgen, 
Charles W. Tulloch, E. Ben Ward. 

Publicity: Richard L. Holzbach and Paul Fitzgerald, Jr., Co-Chairmen; 
Mitchell W. Wallace, Charles E. Edrington, David D. King, Jr. 

Relief: S. L. Bobbitt, Chairman; L. J. Moore, Glenn L. Hooper, Lloyd B. 
Stanley, Nash H. Underwood. 

School Health: Jack B. Upchurch, Chairman; Robert B. Lessem, R. R. 
Sappington, Jr. 

Sports: William J. Wiggs and W. Robert Owen, Co-Chairmen; D. W. 
Seifert, Jr. 

State Institutions: K. L. Johnson, Chairman; E. G. Boyette, Alton L. Smith, 
Charles B. Hawkins. 



10 



FIFTH DISTRICT DENTAL SOCIETY 1965-66 

OFFICERS 

James H. Lee, Mount Olive President 

Zeno L. Edwards, Jr., Washington President-Elect 

James E. Furr, Wilmington Vice President 

M. W. Aldridge, Greenville Secretary-Treasurer 

James A. Privette, Kinston Editor 

DELEGATES 

Zeno L. Edwards, Jr., James E. Furr, Charles P. Godwin, E. Smith Jewell, 
James H. Lee. 

ALTERNATE DELEGATES 

M. W. Aldridge, James L. Cox, David H. Freshwater, M. M. Lilley, Wal- 
ter S. Linville, Jr. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

James H. Lee, Chairman; James E. Furr, M. W. Aldridge, Zeno L. Ed- 
wards, Jr., James L. Cox, Walter S. Linville, Jr. 

COMMITTEES 

Arrangements: R. B. Barden, Chairman; M. G. Delbridge, Bernard L. 

Morgan, E. Smith Jewell, C. Richard Conrad. 
Auditing: Lewis P. Bratton, Chairman; C. C. Gooding, Thomas W. Vinson, 

Jr. 
Constitution and Bylaws: Z. L. Edwards, Chairman; Samuel N. Trueblood 

C^ T? "Ppsrop Tr 
Dental Caries: 'r. A. Carnevale, Chairman; R. Willard Hinnant, Arthur 

Gollobin. 
Dental Relief: T. C. Boykin, Chairman; Thomas R. Vaughan, Jr., W. H, 

Young. 
Disaster Preparedness: Roy A. Miller, Jr., Chairman; H. F. Civils, T. B, 

Reid, Jr. 

Ethics: T. S. Fleming, Chairman; Horace K. Thompson, Ben H. Houston. 
Membership: James E. Furr, Chairman; David S. Jackson, T. C. Hesmer, 

Jr. 
Mouth Guard: Phil S. Sanders, Chairman; Garland R. Homes. 
National Children's Dental Health Week: M. G. Delbridge, Chairman; 

members of the Eastern Prosthetic Study Club — J. M. Kilpatrick, Ab- 

ner F. Riggs, W. H. Gray, Jr., Arthur Gollobin, W. Kenneth Morgan 

A. Dwight Johnson, H. L. Keith, Jr., H. W. Gooding, J. M. Zealy, W. W. 

Tucker, D. L. Wells, A. D. Johnson. 
Necrology and Estate Affairs: W. L. Hand, Jr., Chairman; David H. Fresh- 
water, A. J. Bullard, Jr. 
Nominating: C. P. Godwin, Chairman; W. L. Hand, Jr., C. B. Johnsoi 

(Jacksonville), R. E. Williams. 
Program: Zeno L. Edwards, Jr., Chairman; James M. Zealy, Britton F 

Beasley. 
Resolutions: J. M. Kilpatrick, Chairman; Coyte R. Minges, C. Bernard 

Smith, Jr. 
Seminar: C. T. Barker, Chairman; J. M. Kornegay, Thomas J. Horton. 
Study Club: W. H. Gray, Jr., Chairman; Bert B. Warren, Joseph S. Hoard 

HI. 
Table Clinics: David H. Freshwater, Chairman; Fred H. Miller, Mett B 

Ausley. 



11 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 



ALPHABETICAL ROSTER OF MEMBERS 

January 1, 1966 

(Districts are indicated by number immediately following the name.) 

Zip 
— A — Code 

Abernethy, C. E. (4) 705 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

Abernethy, Charles V. (1) Powell St Forest City 28043 

Abernethy, David (1) Abernethy Professional Bldg Hickory 28601 

Abernethy, G. Shuford (1) 407 Second St., N.W Hickory 28601 

Adair, John T. (1) 116 N. College Ave Newton 28658 

Adams, C. A., Jr. (3) Wachovia Bank Bldg Durham 27701 

Adams, C. A., Ill (3) Wachovia Bank Bldg Durham 27701 

Adams, Roy G. (3) Box 188 Hamlet 28345 

Adcock, George W., Jr. (4) N. Main St Fuquay Springs 27526 

Agress, Bernard D. (2) Blalock Bldg Pilot Mountain 27041 

Albright, L. B. (2) 311 Independence Bldg Charlotte 28202 

Aldridge, M. W. (5) 

10 Medical Pavilion, 1800 W. Fifth St Greenville 27834 

Alexander, George S. (2) 323 Professional Bldg Kannapolis 28081 

Alexander, W. E. (3) Robbins 27325 

Alford, Frank O. (2) 1001 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 28202 

Allen, Don L. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Allen, Howard L. (4) Box 503 Henderson 27536 

Allen, Sidney V. (5) 3901 Oleander Dr Wilmington 28401 

Allen, Thomas I. (2) 816 Poindexter Dr Charlotte 28209 

Almond, C. Franklin (3) 234 Settle St Reidsville 27320 

Alspaugh, Laurence S. (3) 1025 Madison Ave Greensboro 27401 

Anderson, George D. (3) Box 228 Southern Pines 28387 

Anderson, G. N. (3) 206 Church St High Point 27260 

Anderson, Wayne C. (5) Box 107 Pinetops 27864 

Andrews, James E. (2) 715 Hospital St Mocksville 27028 

Andrews, John L., Jr. (3) 608 N. Main St High Point 27260 

Andrews, Victor L., Jr. (2) 715 Hospital St Mocksville 27028 

Archer, John M. Ill (2) 126 Cottage PI Charlotte 28207 

Ashby, John L. (2) Box 728 Mount Airy 27030 

Ashworth, Derwood L. (1) 912 Second St., N.E Hickory 28601 

Attayek, Eli J. (4) Box 7588 Station B Raleigh 27602 

jj Atwater, Frank G. (3) 1202 Madison Ave Greensboro 27403 

Atwater, John W.. Jr. (3) 202 N. Cox St Asheboro 27203 

Ausband, Samuel P. (2) 3720 Reynolda Rd Winston-Salem 27106 

Ausley, Mett B. (5) Box 476 Warsaw 28398 

Austin, Edward U. (2) Suite 315, Randolph Medical Center, 

1928 Randolph Rd Charlotte 28207 

— B — 

ulBain, C. D. (4) Box 466 Dunn 28334 

"Baker, Benjamin R. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Baker, E. D. (4) 402 Ligon Bldg., 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 27605 

rt Baker, Luther P. (1) Box 827 Kings Mountain 28086 

Baker, Robert N. (1) Box 827 Kings Mountain 28086 

B Baker, Thomas P. (1) Box 827 Kings Mountain 28086 

Baldwin, Harry N. (2) P. O. Box 1006 North Wilkesboro 28659 



12 

Ballard, David L. (2) 1613 Montford Dr _ .Charlotte 28209 

Banker, L. L., Jr. (2) 524 Professional Bldg Charlotte 28202 

Barber, A. D. (4) Box 406 Sanford 27330 

Barber, L. B., Jr. (1) 

Doctors' Park, 820 Fleming St Hendersonville 28739 

Barden, R. B. (5) 916 S. 17th St Wilmington 28401 

Barker, Bennie D. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Barker, Charles T. (5) P. O. Drawer 2344, 

West New Bern Station New Bern 28560 

Barker, O. C. (1) P. O. Box 486 Asheville 28802 

Barkley, Carl A. (2) 740 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Barnes, V. M. (5) Box 1426 Wilson 27893 

Barringer, Martin D. (2) Randolph Medical Center, 

1928 Randolph Rd. ...Charlotte 28207 

Barringer, M. R. (1) P. O. Box 386... ..Newton 28658 

Bartis, Nicholas J. (3) 2309 Friendly Rd Greensboro 27403 

Barton, Roger E. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Bawden, James W. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Beam, R. S. (4) 2021 Clark Ave Raleigh 27605 

Bean, William C. (2) 2433 The Plaza Charlotte 28205 

Beasley, Britton F. (5) Kinston Clinic Kinston 28501 

Beavers, D. L. (2) 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine Winston-Salem 27103 

Beavers, Franklin C. (2) 3734 Reynolda Rd Winston-Salem 27106 

Bebber, James V. (3) 720 Morgan Rd... Spray 27352 

Beck, Charles H. (4) 1677 Owen Dr... Fayetteville 28304 

Becker, D. H. (1) 704 Flatiron Bldg... Asheville 28801 

Bell, Franklin D. (4) 600 Wade Ave... Raleigh 27605 

Bell, John T. (3) 1010 111 Corcoran St Durham 27701 

Bell, Morris L. (4) 204 Sampson St Clinton 28328 

Bell, Victor E. (4) 225 Hillcrest Rd ......Raleigh 27605 

Bellois, W. B. (5) P. O. Box 1024 Wilmington 28401 

Belton, Richard P. (3) 300 E. Northwood St...... Greensboro 27401 

Bencini, E. A. (3) 330 Locke St High Point 27260 

Benfield, Robert H. (2) 1508-09 Liberty Life Bldg ...Charlotte 28202 

Bennett, Carter T. (5) 1281/2 E. Water St Plymouth 27962 

Bennett, Jack (2) Suite 204, Professional Bldg Winston-Salem 27103 

Benson, E. S., Jr. (5) 9 N. 17th St.... Wilmington 28401 

Bentley, C W. (2) Hayes Bldg North Wilkesboro 28659 

Bentley, Keith L. (2) Box 486 North Wilkesboro 28659 

Bidden, Alex J. (4) Box 628. Laurinburg 28352 

Bidden, F. H. (4) Laurinburg 28352 

Biddix, Clarence F. (2) 225 N. Torrence St Charlotte 28204 

Bingham, J. P. (2) Bingham Clinic, E. Center St Lexington 27292 

Bingham, J. P., Jr. (2) Box 124 Lexington 27292 

Bird, Charles W. (1) 1 Maple St .....Sylva 28779 

Bishop, E. L. (2) Graham Park Professional Bldg., 

1630 Mockingbird Dr Charlotte 28209 

Bissette, M. D. (5) P. O. Box 1193 Wilson 27893 

Bitler, Glenn F. (4) 800 St. Mary's St ......Raleigh 27605 

Black, A. R. (2) 608 Independence Bldg... ...Charlotte 28202 

Blackburn, Charles A. (2) 810 O'Hanlon Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Blackman, W. W. (2) 501 Weaver Bldg., 

1917 W. Innes St Salisbury 28144 

Blackwen, Glen E. (2) Box 518 Sansbury 28144 

Blair, Mott P. (3) Box 348 Siler City 27344 

Blair, Thomas L. (2) 736 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Blalock, C. A. (4) Box 295 Wenden 27591 

Blanchard, Manfred T. (3) 

Professional Bldg., Monroe St Leaksville 27288 

Bland, A. B. (5) 111 N. College St ...Wallace 28466 

Bland, Donald E. (5) ..Wallace 28466 

Bland, Wilbur B. (3) 101 W. Chestnut St Troy 2737^ 

Blankenbeckler, James D. (2) 

Suite 152, Forsyth Medical Park Winston-Salem 27103 



K 



n 



i 



13 

Bobbitt, S. L. (4) 719 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

Bolinger, H. E. (1) Weaverville 28787 

Bonner, Allan Baker (5) Box 226— Hertford 27944 

Booe, I. A. (2).. _ ..King 27021 

Boseman, Dewey (5) Varita Court Apartments Wilson 27893 

Bost, John Dewey (1) 37 13th Ave., N.E Hickory 28601 

Bottoms, Alton B. (2) 2101 E. Independence Blvd Charlotte 28205 

Bottoms, Alton W. (1) Medical Bldg Canton 28716 

Bowden, H. B. (5).. Faison 28341 

Bowen, Carl Lee (3) Box 967 Albemarle 28001 

Bowling, Howard X. (3) 703-05 N. C. National Bank Bldg. ..Durham 27701 

Bowling, Richard K. (1) 820 Fleming St... Hendersonville 28739 

Bowman, James C. (1) 411 E. Main St... Lincolnton 28092 

Boyd, S. M. (2) 162 Renfro St Mount Airy 27030 

Boyette, Edward G. (4) John Umstead Hospital Butner 27509 

riBoykin, Thomas C. (5) 610 N. Jefferson St Goldsboro 27530 

Boyles, J. L. (1) Box 656.. Gastonia 28052 

Boyles, Robert S. (2) 204 Professional Bldg Winston-Salem 27103 

Bradsher, J. D. (3) Box 21 Roxboro 27573 

Brady, C. A., Jr. (1) 817 Eighth Avenue, N.E Hickory 28601 

Brake, E. K. (1) Black Mountain 28711 

Branch, W. Howard (4) 1015 Harvey St Raleigh 27608 

Brannan, B. M., Jr. (3) 811 N. Elm St Greensboro 27401 

Brannock, R. W. (3) P. O. Box 535 Burlington 27215 

Braswell, Jack G. (1) 108 Broad St Spruce Pine 28777 

Bratton, Lewis P. (5) 2006 Trent Blvd New Bern 28560 

Brauer, John C. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Brawley, Boyce A. (2) Box 394 Mooresville 28115 

Breeland, W. H. (1) Breeland Bldg Belmont 28012 

Breland, A. Breece (2) 1927 Brunswick Ave Charlotte 28207 

Bridger, R. L. (3) 207 B Morven Rd Wadesboro 28170 

Bridges, Worth T., Jr. (2) Box 444 Mooresville 28115 

Britt, W. F. (5) Murfreesboro 27855 

Brooks, H. L. (2) P. O. Box 304.... Monroe 28110 

Brooks, Robert Edgar (4) 1601 Ramsey St Fayetteville 28301 

, Broughton, E. H. (4) 203 Hillcrest Rd Raleigh 27605 

Broughton, J. O. (5) 104 Murchison Bldg Wilmington 28401 

Brown, C. Fred (1) P. O. Box 144 Hickory 28601 

Brown, J. B. (5) 516 N. /^.cademy St Ahoskie 27910 

Brown, James William (5) Box 36 Rich Square 27869 

Brown, Oscar Hubert (5) 1003 West Third St Ayden 28513 

Browning, Henry D., HI (5) 237 New River Drive.-.. Jacksonville 28540 

Bryan, C. H. (4) P. O. Box 8. Apex 27502 

Bryan, J. K. (4) 721 College Street Oxford 27565 

Buchanan, F. A. (1) Oakley Medical Bldg Hendersonville 28739 

I Buford, J. T. H. (2) 1917 W. Innes St Salisbury 28144 

! Bulla, Thurman C. (3) 138 Scarboro St Asheboro 27203 

! BuUard, A. J., Jr. (5) 103 Smith Chapel Road Mt. Olive 28365 

: Bumgardner, A. S. (2) 1516 Elizabeth Ave Charlotte 28204 

: Bumgardner, L. F. (2) 1516 Elizabeth Ave Charlotte 28204 

Burns, E. R. (3) 410 Airport Road. Chapel Hill 27514 

Burns, William D. (3) Suite No. 3, Medical Center, 

1311 N. Elm St Greensboro 27401 

: Burns, William T. (3) 410 Airport Road Chapel Hill 27514 

; Burroughs, Robert C. Jr. (2) 1200 The Plaza Charlotte 28205 

Burrus, Roy G., Jr. (1) Box 1252 Shelby 28150 

Butcher, Dale H. (3) Box 8175 Guilford College 27410 

Butler, H. Estes (3) 

108 Butler Bldg., 430 W. Gaston St Greensboro 27408 

Butler, Luther H. (3) 

105 Butler Bldg., 430 W. Gaston St Greensboro 27408 

Butler, Thomas E. (3) P. O. Box 37 Liberty 27298 

! Butler, Wallace B. (2) Box 338 Welcome 27374 

Byerly, Charles T., Jr. (3) 918 Broad St Durham 27705 

Byerly, Robert T. (2) 2035 Beach St Winston-Salem 27103 



14 

Byrd, Robert T. (4) 411-414 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

Byrd, Thomas H., Ill (4) 401 Ligon Bldg., 800 St. Mary's St.. .Raleigh 27605 
Byrd, Worth M. (4) Box 522 Sanford 27330 

— C— 

Caddell, F. S. (3) 312 N. C. National Bank Bldg Burlington 27215 

Caldwell, Clell S. (3) 602 N. C. National Bank Bldg Durham 27701 

Caldwell, J. B. (3) 1817 Pembroke Road Greensboro 27408 

Cameron, Lawrence A. (4) P. O. Box 338 St. Pauls 28384 

Camp, Joe H. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Campbell, John K. (3) 210 Gatewood Ave High Point 27260 

Campbell, Ralph B. (2) 739 Providence Road Charlotte 28207 

Campbell, Walter E. (5) 1027 Hammond St Rocky Mount 27801 

Campbell, William R. (3) 624 Quaker Lane_ High Point 27262 

Candler, C. Z. (1) Suite 1208, N.W. Bank Bldg Asheville 28801 

Canrobert, C. W., Jr. (1) 822 First Ave., S.. Conover 28613 

Carlough, Robert D. (2) P. O. Box 3003.. Concord 28025 

Carnevale, Reynolds A. (5) 306 N. Taylor St Goldsboro 27530 

Carpenter, Joseph P. (1) 513 Sixth Ave., W Hendersonville 28739 

Carpenter, M. W. (1) 675 Biltmore Ave Asheville 28803 

Carpenter, W. W. (1) Fourth Avenue, W Hendersonville 28739 

Carr, Daniel T. (3) 915 Lamond Ave Durham 27701 

Carr, Henry C. (3) 409 Watts St Durham 27701 

Carrell, George H. (1) 775 Haywood Road ...Asheville 28806 

Carroll, Larry W. (3) Box 475.. .- Hillsboro 27278 

Carson, J. Royal, Jr. (5) P. O. Box 91 Rocky Mount 27801 

Casey, R. P. (2) Box 829 North Wilkesboro 28659 

Cash. Allan H. (2) 1850 E. Third St __ Charlotte 28204 

Cashion, Leonard R. (3) 305 Lindsay St High Point 27260 

Caudle, James N. (3) Box 145 Greensboro 27402 

Cave, William P. (1) 1087 Hendersonville Road Asheville 28803 

Caviness, William R. (4) Box 2945, Duke Medical Center.. ..Durham 27706 

Chamberlain, Vander F. (3) 104 E. Naomi St Randleman 27317 

Chamblee, H. Royster (4) 818 Professional Bldg..... Raleigh 27601 

Chandler, F. H. (2) P. O. Box 255. _ Salisbury 28144 

Chandler, Frederick M. (3) Box 333 Roxboro 27573 

Chapin, M. E. (3) UNC School of Dentistry ...Chapel Hill 27514 

Cheek, Donald G. (2) 120 S. Tradd St ___. Statesville 28677 

Cherry, M. L. (3) 701 N. C. National Bank Bldg .....Durham 27701 

Choate, E. C. (2) 615 S. Main St Salisbury 28144 

Christian, Bill J. (2) Stratford Medical Center 

First at Stratford __ Winston-Salem 27104 

Citrini, Richard J. (3) 818 Broad St Durham 27705 

Civils, H. F. (5) Box 82 .....Kinston 28501 

Civils, Harvey W. (5) P. O. Box 518 ...New Bern 28560 

Clark, Alexander (1) Route 5 Hendersonville 28739 

Clark, Badger Gill, Jr. (5) 563 Evans St Greenville 27834 

Clark, C. F., Jr. (3) 918 Broad St .....Durham 27705 

Clark, Dwight L. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Clark, George E. (5) Box 437 Conway 27820 

Clark, Walter E. (1) 508 Flatiron Bldg..... _ Asheville 28801 

Clayton, S. Fletcher (1) 1622 N. Center St... _ Hickorv 28S01 

Clayton, W. S. (1) 224 S. Caldwell Brevard 28712 

Clinard, Robert W. (2) 

374 Forsyth Medical Park, Hawthorne Road Winston-Salem 27103 

Cline, Albert P. (1) P. O. Box 912..... Canton 28716 

Cline, Albert P., Jr. (1) Medical Bldg..... Canton 28716 

Coble, Albert V. (3) Box 1583 .Burlington 27215 

Cochran, James D., Jr. (1) Drawer 468 Newton 28658 

Coffey, Ralph D. (1) P. O. Box 693 Morganton 28655 

Cole, Hugh H. (1) P. O. Box 137 Candler 28715 

Collie, Jay Mack (5) 1413 Greenville Blvd Greenville 27834 

Collins, Thomas G. (4) 

403 Ligon Bldg., 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 27605 






15 

Collins, Thomas R. (2) 1533 West First St Winston-Salem 27104 

Coltrane, J. F. (4) Zebulon 27597 

Compton, Dudley D. (2) 7515 Valley Brook Road Charlotte 28211 

Conduff, Duke P. (2) 638 N. Main St Mount Airy 27030 

Conrad, C. Richard (5) 302 East Moore St.. Southport 28461 

Cook, Adolphus J. (2) 3004 Tuckaseegee Road Charlotte 28208 

Cook, David E. (4) Box 386 Tabor City 28463 

Cook, Dennis S. ( 1 ) 210 Norwood St .....Lenoir 28645 

Cook, Dennis S., Jr. (1) 226 E. Harper Ave Lenoir 28645 

Cooke, Charles S (5) 

Cooice Professional Bldg., 1010 W. Nash St Wilson 27893 

Cooley, Julius Richard (2) 

322 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Drive Charlotte 28207 

Corbin, Jerry L. (3) 1217 Magnolia St Greensboro 27401 

Corey, Calvin B., Jr. (3) 

Suite 400 Freeman Bldg., 612 Pasteur Dr Greensboro 27403 

Corl, Marshall B. (2) 17y2 North Union St Concord 28025 

Cotter, Paul Eric (4) 118 S. Gulf St Sanford 27330 

Couch, C. Dean, Jr. (2) 1908 E. 7th St Charlotte 28204 

Couch, Jon W. (3) Ingram-Brinson Bldg .Asheboro 27203 

Coward, W. M. (3) 904 Southeastern Bldg.. Greensboro 27401 

Cox, James L. (5) 208 West Ash St Goldsboro 27530 

Cox, Vernon H. (2) 636 Reynolds Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Craig, Joe B. (2) 4316 Park Road ......Charlotte 28209 

Crandell, C. E. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Crank, J. Cecil (3) Box 551 Wrightsville Beach 28480 

Graver, A. W. (2) Box 477 Boonville 27011 

Crawford, James A. (4) 

201 Ligon Bldg., 800 St. Mary's St ..Raleigh 27605 

Cregar, Daniel U., Jr. (3) 

1563-69 So. Atlantic, Apt. 5 Cocoa Beach, Fla. 32931 

Crotts, Hylton K. (2) Suite 107 Professional Bldg., 

2240 Cloverdale Ave ....Winston-Salem 27103 

Crow, William E. (2) 

Stratford Medical Center, 1st at Stratford Winston-Salem 27104 

Crowell, J. G. (1) Fifth Ave. Clinic. ...Hendersonville 28739 

Culbreath. James C, Jr. (2) Forsyth Medical Park..Winston-Salem 27103 

Culbreth, F. H. (2) Suite 400, 4200 Park Road Charlotte 28209 

Gulp, Donald D. (2) P. O. Box 1307 Craig Air Force Base, Ala. 

Gummings. Paul M., Jr. (2) 

Suite 366, Forsyth Medical Park Winston-Salem 27103 

Cunningham. F. S. (1) 675 Biltmore Ave Asheville 28803 

Current, A. C. (1) 224 New Hope Road Gastonia 28052 

Current, William A. (1) 224 New Hope Road Gastonia 28052 

— D— 

Daniel, Frank H. (2) Doctors Center, 301 Miller St...Winston-Salem 27103 
Daniel, Gary F. (1) 

Medical-Dental Bldg., 675 Biltmore Ave Asheville 28803 

Daniel, R. A., Jr. (5) P. O. Box 468... ..Roanoke Rapids 27870 

Daniel, Robert Lee (3) P. O. Box 1133 Reidsville 27320 

Daniels, L. M. (3) 139 E. Penn. Ave Southern Pines 28387 

Darden, T. H. (3) Box 1322..... Chapel Hill 27514 

Daughtry Curtiss W. (5) Park Ave. & E. 10th St Roanoke Rapids 27870 

Davenport, H. V. (1) 507 N. Center St Hickory 28601 

Davenport, William (1) P. O. Box 85.. SDrucp Pinp 9fi777 

Davis, Edwin B., Jr. (4) Box 386 ^ Cary 27511 

Davis, Frank W. (1 ) 503 Flatiron Bid?- Asheville 28801 

Davis, Hal A., Jr. 3 915 Trollinger Road Asheboro 27203 

Davis, Joe V., Jr. (2) 181 N. Spring St Concord 28025 

Davis, Walter H. (1) 3 Doctors Park, 417 Biltmore Ave Asheville 98Rni 

Davis, Wilburn A. (1) 204 East Main St '" Brevard 9ft7i9 

Dawson, I. G (3) 126 jr Main St :::Z::::::::High Point 2?260 

Dearman, J. H. (2) Box 448 Statesville 28677 



16 

DeHart, V. L. (2) - Walnut Cove 2705^ 

Deibler, Eugene C. (4) 411 Carthage St Sanford 2733( 

Delbridge, Matthew G. (5) 314 Nelson Drive Goldsboro 2753( 

Demary, C. J. (5) New River Clinic -- Jacksonville 2854( 

Demeritt, W. W. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 2751^ 

Denning, John N. (4) 207 S. Third St .Smithfield 2757'; 

Dennis, Bill (2) 1921 West Innes St ..Salisbury 2814'^, 

Dickens, Carl W. (4) 117 S. Brooks St Wake Forest 2758' 

Dickey, Harry ( 1 ) .....Murphy 2890( 

Dickson, B. A. (1) 26 State St.... Marion 28751 

Diercks, C. C. (1) P. O. Box 490. .....Morganton 2865! 

Diggs, Robert M. (2) 2400 Vernon Drive Charlotte 2821' 

Dilday, John S. (3) 1210 111 Corcoran St Durham 2770 

Ditto, W. M. (3) 1219 Magnolia St Greensboro 2740 

Dixon, John H. (2) 1630 Mockingbird Lane Charlotte 2820i 

Dixon, T. L. (3) Lakewood Shopping Center.. .....Durham 2770' 

Dobson, David P. (3) 1034 Highland Woods Chapel Hill 2751 

Dolbee, Earl R., Jr. (1) 312 Commercial Bldg Hendersonville 2873!i 

Dorton, John (3) 1200 Broad St... Durham 2770?: 

Dorton, M. Lamar (2) 131 N. Mulberry St Statesville 2867': 

Drake, Claude W. (3) Rt. 1, Box 490. Albemarle 2800 

Draughon, Donald R. (3) 703 Vickers Ave ...Durham 2770 

Draughon, Wallace R. (3) 703 Vickers Ave Durham 2770 

Dudley, D. W. (1) 20 Lorraine Ave Asheville 2880' 

Dudney, George G. (4) 

Div of Dental Health, N. C. State Board of Health Raleigh 2760:! 

Duke J F. (5) P. O. Box 695 Washington 2788 

Duley Lyman L. (5) 314 North 36 Street Paducah, Ky. 4200 i 

Duncan, Allie H. (2) 222 West Main St.. Elkin 28621 

Duncan, N. J. (2) 140 Lockland Ave Winston-Salem 2710' 

Duncan' S. C. (2) 701 Lancaster Ave Monroe 2811! 

Dunn, John R. (5) 823 Med. Gp., Box 306 Homestead AFB, Fla. 3303 

Dupree Lewis J. (5) Box 127, Cedar Point Swansboro 2858; 

Dupree! Louis J., Jr. (5) 902 W. Vernon Ave Kinston 2850; 

— E— ; 

I 

Eagles, R. L. (4) 108 Sunset Ave Louisburg 2754' 

Eaker Yates H. (1) 25 West Main St.... Forest City 2804 

Eakes S E. (4) Box 368... Franklinton 2752 

Earp 'Roy L. (4) 800 St. Mary's St... .....Raleigh 2760 

Easley Ernest E. (3) 111 Carolina Ave Burlington 2721 

Eatman C. D. (5) 212 Peoples Bank Bldg Rocky Mount 2780 

Eatman E. L. (5) 212 Peoples Bank Bldg Rocky Mount 2780 

Eckerd,'E. A. (2) 532 North Main St Mocksville 2702 

Edrmgton, Charles E. (4) 

420 W Main St., Jonesboro Heights... Sanford 2733: 

Edwards A. C. (1) 406 W. Warren St Shelby 28151 

Edwards, Byard F. (1) 406 W. Warren St..... Shelby 2815 

Edwards Edgar E. (3) 3412 Onslow Rd., Sedgefield.... Greensboro 2740 

Edwards! George L., Jr. (5) 2101 N. Heritage St...... ...Kinston 285C 

Edwards, Henry A. (5) -— Pink Hill 2857;j 

Edwards James H. (4) 419 Professional Bldg Raleigh 2760! 

Edwards, J. R., Jr. (4) Fuquay Springs 2752 

Edwards, Linus M., Jr. (5) P. O. Box 267... Manteo 2795 

Edwards, W. J. (3) Box 374.... ......Siler City 2734 

Edwards, Zeno L. (5) Box 157 Washington 218i 

Edwards, Zeno L., Jr. (5) Box 157 Washington 2788 

Efird, Ira P., Jr. (3) 

Medical Center, 1309-11 N. Elm St Greensboro 274C' 

Ehrlich Karl F. (4) 2516 Fordham Drive Fayettevil 

Elliott 'james J. (2) 1850 E. Third St Charlotte 282f 

Ellis William W. (3) 300 N. 3rd Ave Mayodan 2701 

Ennis Myron H. (5) 615 S. Madison Ave Goldsboro 275c 

Etheridge James E. (5) 911 Raleigh Road Wilson 278^ 



17 

Eure, Darden J. (5) 707 Bridges St Morehead City 28557 

Evans, Donald C. (2) 3896 N. Independence Blvd Charlotte 28205 

Evans, Joseph S., Jr. (4) P. O. Box 746 Henderson 27536 

Evans, Marvin R. (3) P. O. Box 267 Chapel Hill 27514 

Ezzell, J. W. (2) 205 Cabarrus Bank Bldg Concord 28025 

Ezzell, L. L. (1) Andrews 28901 

— F— 

Fair, Ronald E. (1) P. O. Box 98 Drexel 28619 

Fales, A. R. (5) 405 Murchison Bldg Wilmington 28401 

Falls, Ralph L. (1) P. O. Box 490 Morganton 28655 

Farmer, Robert L. (3) 3207 East Bessemer Ave ...Greensboro 27405 

Farthing, J. Clopton (2) 1407 Reynolds Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Faucette, John W. (1) Box 685 ...Swannanoa 28778 

Ferro, Edward R. (5) Box 49 Ahoskie 27910 

Fetzer, Thomas H. (4) 4213 Six Forks Road Raleigh 27609 

Fields, Richard M. (3) Box 336 Pleasant Garden 27313 

Finch, Robert E. (4) 

304 Ligon Bldg., 800 St. Mary's St ..Raleigh 27605 

Finch, S. J. (4) Box 311 .Oxford 27565 

Finch, Walter H., Jr. (4) Box 862 Henderson 27536 

Finn, James C. (3) 915 N. Elm St ...Greensboro 27401 

Fisher, Julian H. (5) 612 N. Grace St... Rocky Mount 27801 

Fitzgerald, Paul, Jr. (4) 336 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

Fleming, T. S. (5) P. O. Box 1234 Tarboro 27886 

Floyd, Daniel J. (4) 603 S. Main St Fairmont 28340 

Folger, J. M. (2) Dobson 27017 

Forbes, M. M. (1) 106 S. Main St Lenoir 28645 

Foushee, L. M. (3) 1104 E. Willow Brook Drive..-Burlington 27215 

Foust, James A., Jr. (3) -....Mebane 27302 

Fowler, Harold D., Jr. (2) 110-A Stockton St Statesville 28677 

Fowler, William F. (2) Box 457... King 27021 

Fox, Burke W. (2) 202 Cole Bldg., 207 Hawthorne Lane..Charlotte 28204 

Fox, N. D. (2) 1656 Reynolda Road Winston-Salem 27104 

Fox, Robert M. (3) Rt. 2 Summerfield 27358 

Franklin, A. J. (2) 3616 Michigan Ave Charlotte 28205 

Eraser, John E. (5) 507 Princess St Wilmington 28401 

Freedland, J. B. (2) 724 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Dr .Charlotte 28207 

Freshwater, David H. (5) Medical Arts Bldg Morehead City 28557 

Freund, O. J. (2) 140 Lockland Ave Winston-Salem 27103 

Fritz, C. B. (1) Bernard Bldg Hickory 28601 

Fritz, John R. (1) Bernard Bldg Hickory 28601 

Froneberger, H. D. (1) 155 S. York St .Gastonia 28052 

Frost, J. S. (3) 130 Union Ave Burlington 27215 

Frye, David G. Jr (1) 24 Second Ave., N.E ..Hickory 28601 

Fuerst, Herbert (5) Ricks Bldg Rocky Mount 27801 

Funderburk, Ervin M. (2) 1012 Kings Dr., Suite 501 Charlotte 28207 

Furr, Curtis E. (2) Kannapolis Highway, Rt. 8 Concord 28025 

Furr, James E. (5) 2138 Oleander Dr Wilmington 28401 

Furr, Walter E. (1) 59 Georgia Rd Franklin 28734 

— G— 

Gaines. Roy E. (4) 2013 Clark Ave Raleigh 27605 

Gainey, Robert H. (4) 2207 Bragg Blvd Fayetteville 28303 

Gaither, F. Glen (2) 131 N. Mulberry St Statesville 28677 

Galarde, A. J. (2) 1804 E. 4th St Charlotte 28204 

Garber, M. R. (3) Hill Bldg Albemarle 28001 

Garren, Robert D. (1) Monte Vista Terrace, Rt. 4 ...Candler 28715 

Garriott, Rosebud Morse (2) P. O. Box 68 East Bend 27018 

Garrison, N. W. (3) Box 966 Burlington 27215 

Garriss, Marcus A. (5) P. O. Box 186 Weldon 27890 

Gaskins, R. Hogan, Jr. (5) 615 College St Jacksonville 28540 

Gay, S. P. (3) 1219 Magnolia St Greensboro 27401 

George, Robert A. (2) P. O. Box 882 Mount Airy 27030 



18 

Georgiade, N. G. (3) Duke Hospital Durham 27706 

Gerdes, C. Don (1) 412 Doctors Bldg Asheville 28801 

Getsinger, Duncan M. (3) 1408 Duke Univ. Rd Durham 27701 

Gibbs, John William (2) 601 Sharon Amity Rd Charlotte 28211 

Gibson, Jesse C. (4) P. O. Box 308 Rowland 28383 

Gibson, Sam B. (3) 210 Gatewood Ave High Point 27260 

Gilbert, Robert H. (5) 2101 N. Heritage St Kinston 28501 

Gilbert, William B., Jr. (5) 700 Eighth St _ New Bern 28560 

Gilliam, F. E. (3) Box 448 Burlington 27215 

Girard, John W., Jr. (1) 

2 Doctors Park, 417 Biltmore Ave Asheville 28801 

Glenn, Edmond T. (1). Boone 28607 

Godwin, Charles P. (5) P. O. Box 294. Rocky Mount 27801 

Goldwasser, J. M. (5) H. L. Green Bldg., IO6V2 W. North....Kinston 28501 

Gollobin, Arthur (5) Box 163 Elizabeth City 27909 

Gooding, Carnie C. (5) P. O. Box 478... Havelock 28532 

Gooding, Herbert W. (5) 1001 W. Third St Ayden 28513 

Goodman, Alvin S. (2) Suite 320, Providence Medical Center, 

1850 E. Third St.... Charlotte 28204 ' 

Goodwin, C. J. (4) 320 Valley Rd Fayetteville 28305 I 

Goodwin, Donald R. (3) 115 N. Fir St Siler City 27344 

Graham, C. A. (3) Liberty St... Ramseur 27316 1 

Graham, C. A., Jr. (3) 120 Liberty St... Ramseur 27316 : 

Graham , Frank R. (2) 1350 St. Julien St Charlotte 28205 

Graham, James B. (1) 815 E. King St.. ..Boone 28607 

Graham, James E., Jr. (2) 1350 St. Julien St Charlotte 28205 I 

Graham, R. H. (1) Box 607 Lenoir 28645 ! 

Grahl, C. L., Jr. (1) P. O. Box 46 Brevard 28712 ': 

Grant, Ben P. (1) Box 437 Franklin 28734 ' 

Grant, L. C, Jr. (5) Jackson 27845 1 

Grant, Robert W. (2) P. O. Box 455 Taylorsville 28681 i 

Grantham, Norman B., Jr. (4) 508 N. 7th St..... .Smithfield 27577 ' 

Gray, Robert C. (2) P. O. Box 396 Mooresville 28115 ! 

Gray, W. H., Jr. (5) Martin General Hospital Williamston 27892 ; 

Gregory, Lyman J., Jr. (1) 1092 Hendersonville Rd Asheville 28803 I 

Griffin, Donald C. (2) Pinnix Bldg Kernersville 27284 t 

Griffin, Lloyd E. (5) P. O. Box 633... ...Elizabeth City 27909 j 

Griffin, W. Kimball (3) 209 S. Gregson St Durham 27701 

Griffin, Wallace S. (5) Citizens Bank Bldg Edenton 27932 ! 

Griffith, Charles Lee (1) P. O. Box 264 Forest City 28043 .; 

Grimes, William F. (4) Box 986 Fayetteville 28302 I 

Grimsley, W. R. (3) 200 Worth St Asheboro 27203 i 

Guion. J. Homer (2) 602 Doctors iBldg., 1012 Kings Dr Charlotte 28207 ' 

Gustafson, Bruce A. (2) 2004 Cloverdale Ave Winston-Salem 27103 i; 

I 

Haddix, Guy E. (2) 226 Brookdale Dr Statesville 28677 t' 

Hagaman, Robert P. (1) Valdese General Hospital Valdese 28690 J 

Hagerty, Edward Hope (1) P. O. Box 428 Belmont 28012;! 

Hair, J. E. (1) Hair Bldg., Park St Canton 28716 ( 

Hale, G. Fred (4) 402 Ligon Bldg., 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 27605 " 

Hale, J. P. (4) 1304 Fort Bragg Rd Fayetteville 28305 

Hall, Norman C. (4) 526 S. Morgan St ...Roxboro 27573 ; 

Hall, Thomas A., Jr. (3) 5400 Friendly Rd Greensboro 27410 1 

Haltiwanger, George A. (3) 204 E. Franklin St Rockingham 28379 ! 

Haltiwanger, William L., Jr. (3) 204 E. Franklin St. ..Rockingham 28379 1 

Ham.er, Thomas N. (2) 415 Professional Bldg Charlotte 28202 

Hamilton, A. L., Jr. (5) Box 149..... Morehead City 28557 

Hamilton. R. P. (4) Gary 27511 : 

Hammond, W. L. (5) 

330 Tryon Palace Dr.. P. O. Box 1426 New Bern 28560 ' 

Hamrick, T. Hicks, Jr. (1) Box 248 Henrietta 28076 1 

Hand, W. L., Jr. (5) Box 335 New Bern 28560 

Hardy, John B., Jr. (4) Box 1265 Oxford 27565 '. 

Hargrove, Albert W. (4) 603 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 ;! 



19 

Hargrove, W. F. (1) 815 Oakland St Hendersonville 28739 

Harned, Robert J. (3) 1302 Summit Ave Greensboro 27405 

Harrell, Daniel B., Jr. (2) 181 N. Spring St Concord 28025 

Harrell, James A. (2) Box 688.... Elkin 28621 

Harrell, R. B. (2) Box 688...... Elkin 28621 

Harrelson, Henry C, Jr. (2) 1201 E. Morehead St Charlotte 28204 

Harrill, C. H. (1) Box 566 Lincolnton 28092 

Harris, Archie L. (5) 1502 Princess St Wilmington 28401 

Harris, Edward F. (2) 4126 Park Rd Charlotte 28209 

Harris, Franklin G. (4) P. O. Box 188 Sanford 27330 

Harris, Guy V. (3) 511 Trust Bldg Durham 27701 

Harris, Thomas H. (4) Wake County Health Dept Raleigh 27602 

Hart, Samuel T. (3) Medical Center. High Point 27262 

Hart, W. I. (5) P. O. Box 126 Edenton 27932 

Hartness, John D. (5) Box 708 Rocky Mount 27801 

Hartness, J. F. (2) 454 Villa Grande Ave., So St. Petersburg, Fla. 33707 

Harwood, Brooks W. (3) P. O. Box 381 Mount Gilead 27306 

Hasty, Frederick G. (4) 1611 Owen Dr Fayetteville 28304 

Hatcher, Hubert E. (4) P. O. Box 426 Gary 27511 

Hatchett, C. Mitchell, Jr. (1) P. O. Box 5294 Asheville 28803 

Hawkins, Bruce H. (1) Box 786 Mount Holly 28120 

Hawkins, Charles B. (4) P. O. Box 29.. ..Hendersonville 28739 

Hawkins, Ralph O., Jr. (2) P. O. Box 458 ...Denton 27239 

Haynes, Frank K. (2) 509 Independence Bldg Charlotte 28202 

Healey, Kent W. (3) 430 W. Gaston St Greensboro 27401 

Heath, LeRoy K. (3) 1431 Broad St Durham 27705 

Hedrick, Paul E. (1) 202 Hibriten St Lenoir 28645 

Hedrick, Paul P. (1) Hedrick Bldg.. ...Lenoir 28645 

Heeden, W. M., Jr. (4) Box 337 ...Benson 27504 

Heeseman, Gary, Jr. (2) Suite 308, 

Randolph Medical Center, 1928 Randolph Rd Charlotte 28207 

Hefner, Allen Ray (1) P. O. Box 105 Hudson 28638 

Heinz, J. W. (2) 1401 E. Independence Blvd Charlotte 28205 

Helsabeck, C. Robert, Jr. (2) Box 38 Rural Hall 27045 

Helsabeck, W. J. (2) Box 425 King 27021 

Henshaw. William R. (1) 207 Lee St Shelby 28150 

Henson, David E. (1) 202 Nantahala Bldg Franklin 28734 

Henson, Donald L. (5) Box 1042..... ...Kinston 28501 

Henson, J. L. (3) 1029 Madison Ave... Greensboro 27401 

Herman, Ralph E. (2) Taylorsville 28681 

Herndon. Claude H. (3) 100 Main St Jamestown 27282 

Herren. James M. (1) Fifth Ave. Clinic. Hendersonville 28739 

Herring, L. D. (4) 810 Professional Bldg... Raleigh 27601 

Herring, W. I. (4) Box 626...... .....Clinton 28328 

Hesmer, T. C, Jr. (5) 1010 W. Nash St Wilson 27893 

Hester, Elliott M. (3) 624 Quaker Lane High Point 27262 

Higley, L. B. (3) 408 Estes Drive... Chapel Hill 27514 

Hill, Brian P. (2) 702 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Dr.....Charlotte 28207 

Hill, James C. (2) 2025 N. Center St Hickory 28601 

Hill, J. N., Jr. (1) 412 Hiawassee St Murphy 28906 

Hines, Richard N., Jr. (5) Edenton 27932 

Hinkle. David R. (2) 1182 W. 4th St Winston-Salem 27101 

Hinnant, R. Willard (5) 4 Colonial Square, West Ash St...Goldsboro 27530 

Hinson, Thomas R. (3) Box 1143 Burlington 27215 

Hinson, Wade A. (2) Weaver Bldg., 1917 W. Innes St. ..Salisbury 28144 
Hinson, William P.. Jr. (3) Hieh Point Medical Center. High Point 27262 

Hoard, J. S., Ill (5) 2000-A Fairview Circle Tarboro 27886 

Hodgin, O. R. (2) P. O. Box 366 Thomasville 27360 

Hoffman, Milo J. (2) 1600 E. Fifth St Charlotte 28204 

Hoffman, Robert R. ( 1 ) 808 Flatiron Bldg ..Asheville 28801 

Holden, Rothschild H. (5) Box 216 Shallotte 28459 

Holland, J. M. (2) P. O. Box 348 Statesville 28677 

Holland, Murry W. (3) Chase Ave Chapel Hill 27514 

Holliday, R. H. (2) P. O. Box 849 Thomasville 27360 

Hollis, Robert H. (5) 412 Murchison Bldg ...Wilmington 28401 



20 

Holly, Norman J. (1) 1000 Highland Ave Hendersonville 28739 

Holmes, C. Ray (3) 5400 Friendly Road Greensboro 27410 

Holmes, Robert Waide (1) 950 Tunnel Road Asheville 28805 |; 

Holshouser, L. C. (2) Box 535 Rockwell 28138 'i 

Holt, Leonidas C. (3) 616 Southeastern Bldg Greensboro 27401 

Holzbach, Richard L. (4) 2207 Bragg Blvd Fayetteville 28303 

Homes, Garland R. (5) 234 W. Main St Washington 27889 : 

Honeycutt, Wallace B. (2) P. O. Box 89 Statesville 28677 ' 

Hood, J. Sidney (2) 903 E. Center St _ Lexington 27292 [I 

Hook, Brevitt (3) S. Fifth St _ Mebane 27302 ' 

Hooks, Oscar (5) 115 Whitehead Ave Wilson 27893 

Hooper, Glenn L. (4) 212 N. Ellis Ave..... .Dunn 28334 

Hoover, Charles W. (2) 21 E. Center St.. Lexington 27292 

Hoover, Dan C. (2) 201-05 Professional Bldg Charlotte 28202 

Hoover, R. G. (2) 1529 Elizabeth Ave ...Charlotte 28204 

Hopkins, Edmund Baxter (2) 238 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Hord, D. F. (1) Box 248.. Kings Mountain 28086 

Hord, Dwight B. (1 )..... ...Lawndale 28090 

Home, George N. (2) The Knowell Bldg Winter Park, Fla. 32789 

Horton, C. W. (3) 206 Church Ave...... ...High Point 27260 

Horton, Leland Clifford (4) Box 67 ...Wendell 27591 

Horton, R. L. (4) Box 746.... Wendell 27591 

Horton, Thomas J. (5) Box 168.... Farmville 27828 , 

Houser, James B., HI (2) ! 

401 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Drive Charlotte 28207 

Houston, Ben H. (5) 117 N. James St Goldsboro 27530 

Howdy, Frederick H. (5) Corner 11th & Brown Sts Washington 27889 

Howell, Albert E. (2) Box 265 Spencer 28159 

Howell, James B. (3) 917 N. Elm St Greensboro 27401 

Howell, W. C, Jr. (3) 106 Albemarle St Durham 27701 , 

Hoyle, Frank W. (1) 675 Biltmore Ave ..Asheville 28803 ' 

Hudson, Smith R. (2) 505 E. Main St •. Wilkesboro 28697 

Hughes, Charles W. (3) P. O. Box 7 Roxboro 27573 

Hughes, John T. (3) Box 237 Pittsboro 27312 

Hulin, James F. (4) P. O. Box 405 Sanford 27330 

Hull, P. C. (2) 1000 Queens Rd... ...Charlotte 28207 

Hull, P. C, Jr. (2) 601 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Dr Charlotte 28207 

Hull, Robert H. (2) 1000 Queens Rd Charlotte 28207 

Hunsucker, Hugh (3) 100 Fisher Park Circle Greensboro 27401 

Hunt, John J. (1) Cliffside 28024 

Hunt, Joseph T. (4) 519 S. Chestnut St .....Henderson 27536 

Hunt, Richard F., Jr. (5) 420 Hickory St Rocky Mount 27801 

Hunter, Grover C, Jr. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Hunter, M. Ray (3) 1011 Madison Ave _ Greensboro 27401 

Hunter, R. S. (4) 800 St. Mary's St..... _ ...Raleigh 27605 

Hunter, Thomas M. (4) 401 Professional Bldg Henderson 27536 

Hussey, T. E. (3) Box 258 Star 27356 

— I— 

Icenhower, E. C. (1) _ Granite Falls 28630 

Inscoe, Ashby G. (5) Box 427.. Spring Hope 27882 

Irvin, Emory W. (2) 1611 W. First St Winston-Salem 27104 - 

Irvin, John L. (3) Box 21, U.S.A.F.E. Hosp., APO 220 New York, N. Y. 

Irwin, John R. (2) 403 Hawthorne Medical Center. ...Charlotte 28204 
Isenhower, Samuel H. (1) Box 307 Newton 28658 

— J— 

Jackson, David S. (5) Box 37... Nashville 27856 ■ 

Jackson, Dwight A. (2) 620 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Jackson, Don F. (4) 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 27605 i 

Jackson, Ruth T. (4) 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 27605 t 

Jackson, Wilbert (4) P. O. Box 580 Clinton 28328 

Jarrell, William A., Jr. (2) 1113 E. Morehead St Charlotte 28204 



21 

Jarrett, Charles A. (2) 

Suite 504, Hawthorne Medical Center Charlotte 28204 

Jarrett, John H. (2) 3742 Freedom Drive Charlotte 28208 

Jarvis, William C. (3) 3218 South Main St High Point 27263 

Jent, Herman C. (2) 1540 Ebert St Winston-Salem 27103 

Jernigan, J. A. (4) P. O. Box 68 Dunn 28334 

Jernigan, Jerry O'Dell (4) 210 Purdie Bldg Dunn 28334 

Jewell, Edwin Smith (5) 218 Pine Grove Drive Wilmington 28401 

Johnson, A. Dwight (5) 112 N. Pine St Wilson 27893 

Johnson, B. McK. (5) Box 94 Wallace 28466 

Johnson, C. B. (5) Jacksonville 28540 

Johnson, Carol H. (1) 

Box 168, Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Ave. Boston, Mass. 

Johnson, Charles B. (5) P. O. Box 659 New Bern 28560 

Johnson, Clemuel Mansey (4) P. O. Box 487 Elizabethtown 28337 

Johnson, G. Terry (2) Box 98 Sparta 28675 

Johnson, James B. (2) Doctors Clinic, Freedom Village. .Charlotte 28210 

Johnson, Joseph M. (4) 426 King St Laurinburg 28352 

Johnson, Kenneth L. (4) 

302 Alexander Bldg., 133 Fayetteville St Raleigh 27601 

Johnson, M. L. (4) P. O. Box 819.. Whiteville 28472 

Johnson, Numa C, Jr. (3) 624 Quaker Lane High Point 27262 

Johnson, Ronald L. (2) 6113 Montpelier Rd Charlotte 28210 

Johnson, Thomas G., Jr. (1) Western Carolina Center.. Morganton 28655 

Johnson, W. H. (5) Plymouth 27962 

Johnson, W. Harrell (3) P. O. Box 307 Southern Pines 28387 

Johnston, Ben M. (3) Box 528.. ...Graham 27253 

Johnston, Charles M. (2) 2916 Crosby St Charlotte 28211 

Jones, B. E., Jr. (2) 109 N. Church St.. Concord 28025 

Jones, Charles E. (1) 252 Charlotte St ...Asheville 28801 

Jones, E. D. (1) Jefferson Ave West Jefferson 28694 

Jones, Marvin T., Jr. (4) Apex 27502 

Jones, Paul E. (5) Box 6 Farmville 27828 

Jones, Rufus S. (4) Warrenton 27589 

Jones, William R. (5) 506 Bayshore Blvd Jacksonville 28540 

Jordan, John J. (2) 1201 E. Morehead St Charlotte 28204 

Jordan, J. F. (4) Raeford 28376 

Joyner, O. L. (2) Box 55 Kernersville 27284 

Jurney, Henry C. (2) P. O. Box 616 Huntersville 28078 

— K— 

Kanoy, B. Edmond (3) Professional Bldg., 1200 Broad St. ..Durham 27705 
Karesh, Harry A. (3) Freeman Bldg., 612 Pasteur Dr. ..Greensboro 27403 

Keels, Cameron H., Jr. (1) Box 38 Morganton 28655 

Keener, Harold (1) 474 ¥2 Haywood Rd Asheville 28806 

Keerans, James L. (2) 1929 Randolph Rd Charlotte 28207 

Keiger, Cyrus C. (2) 713 Independence Bldg.. Charlotte 28202 

Keith, H. Leonidas, Jr. (5) 3600 Oleander Dr Wilmington 28401 

Keith, William C. (4) P. O. Box 565 Elizabethtown 28337 

Kelley, Wesley E. (4) Ridgewood Shopping Center, 

Medical Bldg., 3518-A Wade Ave Raleigh 27607 

Kendall, James E. (3) 1527 Shadylawn Dr Burlington 27215 

Kendrick, Vaiden B. (2) Suite 822, 

Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Drive Charlotte 28207 

Kendrick, Z. Vance, Jr. (2) Suite 502, 

Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Drive Charlotte 28207 

Kennedy, K. Carroll (3) P. O. Box 486 Carrboro 27510 

Kennerly, Robert B. (1) 609 Public Service Bldg Asheville 28801 

Ketcham, William S. (5) Box D, 15 Ruth St Jacksonville 28540 

Ketner, Bruce A. (2) Ketner Center Salisbury 28144 

Kidd, William E. (5) Box 404 Washington 27889 

Kilkelly, T. F. (3) 303 Dixie Bldg Greensboro 27401 

Killian, H. W. (3) C-1 Oak Terrace Chapel Hill 27514 

Kilpatrick, J. M. (5) Box 187 Robersonville 27871 



22 

Kilpatrick, Ralph E. (3) 815 Worth St Asheboro 27203 

King, David D., Jr. (4) 105 West 27th St Lumberton 28358 

Kirk, Frank W. (2) 200 S. Jackson St Salisbury 28144 

Kirk, W. S. (2) Weaver Bldg., 1917 W. Innes St Salisbury 28144 

Kirkendol, E. C. (2) 1200 The Plaza Charlotte 28205 

Kirkland, George F., Jr. (3) 913 Lamond Ave Durham 27701 

Kiser, J. Donald (2) 1209 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 28202 

Kiser, Winford J. (3) 203 Boulevard High Point 27262 

Kistler, A. R. (2) P. O. Box 314 Monroe 28110 

Kistler, C. D. (3) Box 575_ Randleman 27317 

Kistler, Charles M. (4) Suite 103, 1300 St. Mary's St Raleigh 27605 

Kitts, Warren H. (1) Box 86...._ Hazelwood 28738 

Kluttz, Robert F. (2) __ Landis 28088 

Kornegay, J. M. (5) P. O. Box 155 - Warsaw 28398 

Kornegay, Thomas A. (3) Box 816.... Troy 27371 

Kriegsman, Robert M. (3) 1707 Cobb St Greensboro 27403 

Kyles, C. Paul (1) P. O. Box 126 _ .....Maiden 28650 

— L— 

Lamb, Lewis E., Jr. (2) Rt. 1 Rural Hall 27045 

Landau, Lad, II (3) Freeman Bldg., 612 Pasteur Dr Greensboro 27403 

Large, Nelson D. (2) VA Hospital ...Richmond, Va. 

Lasley, J. T. (3) 303 Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 27401 

Lauten, J. J. (3) 811 N. Elm St Greensboro 27401 

Lawrence, Eugene W., Jr. (1) 202 Nantahala Bldg Franklin 28734 

Lawrence, Jack D. (1) Appalachian Theatre Bldg Boone 28607 

Lazenby, Glenn A., Jr. (3) 1304 Broad St Durham 27705 

Leary, Thomas E. (5) 308 W. Main St Ahoskie 27910 

Ledbetter, Charles B. (4) 

217 Bryan Bldg., Cameron Village Raleigh 27605 

Lee, Douglas D. (4) 504 Scottish Bank Bldg Fayetteville 28301 

Lee, James Higley (5) 201 W. College St Mount Olive 28365 

Lee, John G. (2) P. O. Box 227 Boonville 27011 

Lee, Lewis W. (5) 511 Raleigh Rd.._ Wilson 27893 

Lee, William G. (4) 312 S. Third St Smithfield 27577 

Lee, William J. (4) Ridgewood Shopping Center .....Raleigh 27607 

Leggette, James A., Jr. (3) 1014 Lamond Ave ...Durham 27701 

Lehmann, James H. (4) P. O. Box 1008. Sanford 27330 

Lemler, John F. (1) 675 Biltmore Ave Asheville 28803 

Lentz, B. P. (2) 424 Professional Bldg Charlotte 28202 

Lessem, Robert B. (4) Box 949 .....Fayetteville 28302 

Levine, H. H. (2) 537 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Lewis, James B. (1) 111-B West Third Ave Gastonia 28052 

Lewis, O. P. (1) Box 146 Kings Mountain 28086 

Lewis, William H., Jr. (3) Box 312, Dalton St Madison 27025 

Libby, Robert H. (2) 1524 Harding Place Charlotte 28204 

Ligon, J. Henry, Jr. (4) 800 St. Mary's St _ Raleigh 27605 

Lilley, M. M. (5) P. O. Box 96 _ Scotland Neck 27874 

Lindahl, Roy L. (3) UNC School of Dentistry .....Chapel Hill 27514 

Lineberger, Henry O., Jr. (4) 600 Wade Ave Raleigh 27605 

Linville, Walter S., Jr. (5) Corner Pine & Green Sts Wilson 27893 

Lipe, E. W. (2) 301 Idlewood Drive ..Kannapolis 28081 

Little, James E. (2) 242 E. Broad St _._.._ ....Statesville 28677 

Little, T. A. (3) Rt. 2, Box 20D... Durham 27705 

Litton, Robert B. (1) Box 1346 -.._. .....Shelby 28150 

Lockwood, A. T. (1) 675 Biltmore Ave Asheville 28803 

Lomax, Bobby A. (2) 116 Statesville Blvd Salisbury 28144 

Long, Herbert S. (3) P. O. Box 246.. ___ ....Graham 27253 

Long, John S. (2) 162 Forsyth Medical Park....Winston-Salem 27103 

Long, Robert (2) 321 N. Center St Statesville 28677 

Long, Robert E. (3) Box 326 Roxboro 27573 

Lore, John R. (3) Walter Reed Dr Greensboro 27403 

Love, James H. (1) 102 V2 Broadway Black Mountain 28711 

Lowry, Tolbert W. (1) 2205 West Pamela Gastonia 28052 



23 

Lucas, Walter J. (1) 112 E. Central Ave Mount Holly 28120 

Lupton, Cecil Rhodes (3) UNC School of Dentistry.. ..Chapel Hill 27514 

Lutz, Gerald W. (1) Box 138 Fallston 28042 

Lyerly, Alan R. (1) P. O. Box 556 _ Hildebran 28637 

Lynch, William G. (2) 162 Forsyth Medical Park.. ..Winston-Salem 27103 

— Mc— 

MacKay, Noel C. (2) 2101 N. Independence Blvd., Suite E.. Charlotte 28205 

McAllister, J. Malcolm (4) 303 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

McAnally, C. W. (3) _ Madison 27025 

McBrayer, Gerald F. (1) P. O. Box 490 Morganton 28655 

McBrayer, William F. (1) 809 N. Main St Rutherfordton 28139 

McCaffity, Darwin W. (4) 3105 Glenridge Dr Raleigh 27604 

McCall, Clyde N. (1) Box 396 Stanley 28164 

McCall, C. W. (1) Box 846 Tryon 28782 

McCall, R. S. (1) Box 527 _ _._ .__ Marion 28752 

McCracken, Clayton H. (1) 807 Public Service Bldg Asheville 28801 

McCracken, F. W., Ill (4) Perry Bldg..... ..Sanford 27330 

McDaniel, W. J. (1) Rutherfordton 28139 

McDowell, William W. (1) 126 Second Ave., N.E Hickory 28601 

McDuffie, A. A. (3) P. O. Box 215 Candor 27229 

McFall, Walter T. (2) 

Central Piedmont Community College, P. O. Box 4009. .Charlotte 28204 

McFall, Walter T., Jr. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

McFarland, Wilbur G., Jr. (3) 

272 N. Graham-Hopedale Rd .Burlington 27215 

McGhee, James G. (2) 400 Randolph St Thomasville 27360 

McGowan, Donald J. (2) 201 Greenwich Rd Charlotte 28211 

McGuire, Alice Patsy (1) P. O. Box 501..- Sylva 28779 

McGuire, Daisy Z. (1) 20 Main St ...Sylva 28779 

McGuire, Harold S. (1) P. O. Box 501 Sylva 28779 

McGuire, W. P. (1) .....Sylva 28779 

Mcintosh, James A. (3) 138 Scarboro St Asheboro 27203 

McKaughan, W. R. (3) 1005 Johnson St High Point 27262 

McKay, S. R. (4) Rt. 2 Red Springs 28377 

McKee, Raymond A. (1) 107 S. Oak St Cherryville 28021 

McKenzie, Owen Ray (3) Box 1245 Burlington 27215 

McLeod, William H. (2) P. O. Box 244 Monroe 28110 

— M— 

Maddox, James H. (1) 1516 Patton Ave Asheville 28806 

Madison, John T. (5) Box 2303 Shallotte 28459 

Mainwaring, John W., Jr. (3) 

Durham Co. Health Dept., 300 East Main St Durham 27701 

Mallard, A. R. (5) 1018 East Ash St... Goldsboro 27530 

Marbry, Donald L. (2) 7500 Linda Lake Drive Charlotte 28212 

Marks, Sandy C. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Marshall, Penn, Jr. (4) 

402 Ligon Bldg., 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 27605 

Marshbanks, B. P., Jr. (4) Box 907 Lillington 27546 

Marshburn, J. A. (4) 112 Church St Black Mountain 28711 

Martin, Benny Worth (4) 600 Wade Ave Raleigh 27605 

Martin, Ernest L. (2) Box 495 Statesville 28677 

Martin, Franklin E. (1) 714 Merrimon Ave Asheville 28804 

Martin, John Wayne (4) Hancock Bldg Oxford 27565 

Martin, William T. (4) 303 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

Massey, L. M. (4) 201 W. North St Zebulon 27597 

Massey, M. B. (5) Box 428 Greenville 27834 

Massey, Milton V. (1) 204 East Main St Brevard 28712 

Massey, S. H.. Jr. (4) P. O. Box 157 Warrenton 27589 

Massey, Zyba K. (4) Box 252 Zebulon 27597 

Masten, Guy M. (2) 724 Arbor Road Winston-Salem 27104 

Masten, R. E. (2) 335 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 



24 

Masters, David B. (4) 200 St. Mary's St Raleigh 27605 

Masters, W. B. (1) Bakersville 28705 

Matheson, William M. (1) 416 East King St Boone 28607 

Matney, John L. (3) 915 Lamond Ave Durham 27701 

Mauldin, Joel Lee (3) Little Bldg Wadesboro 28170 

Maultsby, William D. (4) Box 643 ..Whiteville 28472 

Mauney, R. G. (1) 117 S. Powell St Forest City 28043 

Maus, Paul (4) Box 127 Fuquay Springs 27526 

Maxwell, H. E. (4) 201 Medical Arts Bldg Fayetteville 28305 

May, H. M. (1) 205 Flatiron Bldg _. Asheville 28801 

Mazitis, Erika K. (1) Box 70, Broughton Hospital.. ..Morganton 28655 
Meadows, Kenneth H. (2) 

Suite 203 Professional Bldg., Cloverdale Ave Winston-Salem 27103 

Meadows, Van B. (2) 317 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Medford, N. M. (1) Box 156...._. Waynesville 28786 

Medford, Phil McR. (1) Waynesville 28786 

Medlin, E. M. (3) Box 176 ...Aberdeen 28315 

Megginson, L. P., Jr. (3) 210 Gatewood Ave High Point 27260 

Melvin, R. Philip (2) 2035 Beach St Winston-Salem 27103 

Mendenhall, F. C. (2) 214 Nissen Bldg ....Winston-Salem 27101 

Menius, J. A. (4) 3312 Barker Place Raleigh 27604 

Menius, John W. (3) 155 McArthur St Asheboro 27203 

Mercer, William C, Jr. (5) P. O. Box 167. ..Farmville 27828 

Miketa, Andrew J. (3) 157 Va E. Franklin St Chapel Hill 27514 

Miller, Barry G. (2) 1927 Brunswick Ave Charlotte 28207 

Miller, Fred C. (2) Box 136 Jonesville 28642 

Miller, Fred H. (5) 4703 Trentwood Drive New Bern 28560 

Miller, George I. (1) Box 248 Clyde 28721 

Miller, Roy A., Jr. (5) 410 Middle St New Bern 28560 

Milligan, Ronnie R. (1) Box 100, Broughton Hospital.. Morganton 28655 

Milliken, J. B. (3) P. O. Box 71 ..Siler City 27344 

Minges, Clyde E. (5) Box 192 •_ Rocky Mount 27801 

Minges, Coyte R. (5) Box 192 Rocky Mount 27801 

Miska, M. G. (3) Rt. 1.... Pittsboro 27312 

Mitchell, David L. (3) Eastgate Chapel Hill 27514 

Mitchell, Patricia S. (3) Eastgate Chapel Hill 27514 

Mitchum, Kenneth E. (3) UNC School of Dentistry....Chapel Hill 27514 

Mize, John T. (1) Box 310. ..Tryon 28782 

Mohn, R. L. (4) 2506 Mirror Lake Drive .....Fayetteville 28303 

Mohorn, Harold W. (3) 705 Tinkerbell Rd Chapel Hill 27514 

Monk, Henry L., Jr. (3) 

Suite 401, N. C. National Bank Bldg... Durham 27701 

Montgomery, D. O. (2) P. O. Box 309 Statesville 28677 

Moon, Hewitt E. (2) 602 Pearl Ave Kannapolis 28081 

Moore, E. D. (2) 921 Elizabeth Ave Charlotte 28204 

Moore, H. W. (3) Box 673 Hillsboro 27278 

Moore, J. S. (3) Box 150 Reidsville 27320 

Moore, L. J. (4).... St. Pauls 28384 

Moore, L. J., Jr. (4) Box 998 Lumberton 28358 

Moore, Raymond T. (1) 

P. O. Box 825, 113 W. Central Ave..... Mount Holly 28120 

Moore, Robin O. (2) 411 National Highway Thomasville 27360 

Moore, R. W. (5) P. O. Box 721 Tarboro 27886 

Moore, Saunders W. (3) 1614 Memorial Drive Burlington 27215 

Moore, Walter H. (3) 629 S. Main St ...Reidsville 27320 

Moorefield, Paul (2) P. O. Box 311... Mount Airy 27030 

Moreland, Jessie Z. (1) P. O. Box 153 ...Highlands 28741 

Morgan, Bernard L. (5) 2102 S. College Road Wilmington 28401 

Morgan, Eugene B. (2) P. O. Box 794 Kannapolis 28081 

Morgan, Eugene B., Jr. (2) P. O. Box 794 Kannapolis 28081 

Morgan, Fabian (5) Box 667 La Grange 28551 

Morgan, W. Kenneth (5) 348 Henderson Dr Jacksonville 28540 

Morris, Donald W. (2) 1519 Elizabeth Ave Charlotte 28204 

Morris, Ernest C. (2) 1519 Elizabeth Ave Charlotte 28204 



25 

Morris, Thomas A. (1) Suite 204, 94 Westgate Parkway.-Asheville 28806 

Morrison, B. R. (5) P. O. Box 363 Wilmington 28401 

Morrison, Robert R., Jr. (4) 805 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

Morrison, Virgil McKee (4) 805 Professional Bldg Ralei.gh 27601 

Morton, Thomas L. (1) 1425 Patton Ave Asheville 28806 

Moser, Galen C. (3) Bell Bldg., 449 S. Spring St Burlington 27215 

Moser, J. E. (1) Box 1123 Gastonia 28052 

Moser, Kenneth B. (2) 301 Miller St .....Winston-Salem 27103 

Moser, S. E. (1) Box 1123 Gastonia 28052 

Moses, John E. (2) 1400 N. Independence Blvd Charlotte 28205 

Moses, Joseph M. (1) 25 Myrtle St Belmont 28012 

Motley, Elliot R. (2) 217 N. Torrence St Charlotte 28204 

Mundy, Carl R. (1) 1425 Patton Ave West Asheville 28806 

Murphrey, W. E., Jr. (5) - Roanoke Rapids 27870 

Murphy, Martin H. (2) 2511 Westerly Hills Drive Charlotte 28208 

Murphy, Richard F. (1) 700 Kingsbury St Shelby 28150 

Murray, Henry V. (3) Box 98 Burlington 27215 

Murray, Henry V., Jr. (3) 522 Caswell Rd Chapel Hill 27514 

Mustian, W. F. (5) P. O. Box 3035.. Manteo 27954 

Mynatt, William A. (1) 36 All Souls Crescent, BiItmore..Asheville 28803 

— N— 

Nantz, G. R. (4) 405 W. 27th St Lumberton 28358 

Nash, Richard E. (2) 513 Westover Ave Winston-Salem 27104 

Nelson, J. S. D. (4) 304 Ligon Bldg., 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 27605 

Nelson, R. M. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Nelson, T. E., Jr. (4) 200 St. Mary's St Raleigh 27605 

Newman, Joseph Bridger (3) P. O. Box 196 Burlington 27215 

Newman, J. U., HI (3) 308 N. C. National Bank Bldg Burlington 27215 

Newton, Maurice E. (3) Box 1308 Chapel Hill 27514 

Nicholson, J. H. (2) Box 89 Statesville 28677 

Nicholson, M. P., Jr. (4) 1321 Oberlin Rd Raleigh 27608 

Nicholson, Robert A. (3) P. O. Box 94 Rockingham 28379 

Nifong, Paul D. (2) P. O. Box 13 Clemmons 27012 

Nisbet, Thomas G. (2) 

324 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Drive Charlotte 28207 

Nissen, Eva Carter (2) 421 S. Main St Winston-Salem 27101 

Nixon, H. E. (5) 322 Carolina Bldg Elizabeth City 27909 

Noblitt, Perry M. (1) Box 307 Shelby 28150 

— O— 

Oakley, Kenneth H., Jr. (4) 

206 Bryan Bldg., 2113 Cameron St Raleigh 27605 

O'Berry, Walter S. (5) P. O. Box 166 Tarawa Terrace 28543 

Ogden, Fred N. II (1) 109 Howell St Waynesville 28786 

Oldenburg, T. R. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Oldham, Floy T., Jr. (3) 

Professional Bldg., E. Franklin St Chapel Hill 27514 

O'Leary, Joseph A. (3) Box 235 Spray 27352 

Olive, Clarence S. (4) 217 Green St Fayetteville 28301 

Olive, R. M. (4) 217 Green St Fayetteville 28301 

Oliver, John N. (1) Box 372 Columbus 28722 

Oliver, Otis (2) P. O. Box 784 Mount Airy 27030 

Oliver, William H. (4) Box 29 Smithfield 27577 

Osborn, Carl F. (1) 231 Haywood Bldg., Haywood St Asheville 28801 

Osborne, Colin P., Jr. (4) P. O. Drawer 1344 Lumberton 28358 

Outland. Robert B., Jr. (5) Rich Square 27869 

Overcash, R. F. (3) Box 867 Albemarle 28001 

Overman G. L. (5) Box 1459 Goldsboro 27530 

Owen, Kenneth D. (2) 1201 E. Morehead St Charlotte 28204 

Owen, Olin W. (2) 1201 E. Morehead St Charlotte 28204 

Owen, Robert H., Jr. (1) 2 Doctors' Park Asheville 28801 

Owens, William R. (4) 1677 Owen Drive Fayetteville 28304 



26 



-P— 



Page, Graham A. (3) Box 397.. Yanceyville 27379 

Page, L. G. (3) P. O. Box 157 Yanceyville 27379 

Paisley, R. L. (1) Box 782 Morganton 28655 

Parker, C. A. (1) Box 305 Marion 28752 

Parker, W. H. (1) Box 2 Valdese 28690 

Parks, Eldon H. (2) 112 Church St .....Elkin 28621} 

Parks, J. H. (2) 209 Professional Bldg ..Kannapolis 28081 

Paschal, Lawrence H. (4) 

805 First Citizens Bank Bldg Fayetteville 28302 

Pate, Grover C. (4) P. O. Box 907. .....Lillington 27546 

Patrick, Donald Ray (5) 602-B East 10th St Greenville 27834 

Patterson, C. E. (3) 2505 Dumfries Rd ..Greensboro 27407 

Patterson, George G. (3) 207 Maple Ave Burlington 27215 

Patterson, G. K. (1) 617 Flatiron Bldg Asheville 28801 

Patterson, Henry B. (2) 117 Seneca Place. Charlotte 28210 

Patterson, R. M. (2) P. O. Box 544 Concord 28025 

Pattishall, Franklin D. (1) Box 187 Morganton 28655 

Payne, J. M. (4) Box 65 Clayton 27520 

Peake, Dean R. (1) Oak Ave Spruce Pine 28777 

Pearce, J. A. (4) 2015 Clark Ave Raleigh 27605 

Pearce, O. R., Jr. (5) 1005 East Fourth St Greenville 27834 

Pearson, E. A., Jr. (4) 2628 Dover Rd Raleigh 27608| 

Pearson, Paul L. (4) Olive Chapel Rd.. Apex 27502 

Peck, Robert B. (5) 733 Franklin St ...Roanoke Rapids 27870 

Peeler, L. B. (2) 606 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Dr.. Charlotte 28207 
Peery, W. Stewart (2) 324 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Dr. ..Charlotte 28207 

Pegg, Fred N. (2) P. O. Box 204. Kernersville 27284 

Pennell, William T. (1) 705 Flatiron Bldg Asheville 28801 

Peppers, James F. (1) 5719-A Dalton Fort Knox, Ky. 

Perdue, H. L. (3) Box 1547..... : Burlington 27215 

Perlin, Mark N. (2) 121 Greenwich Rd Charlotte 28211 

Perry, T. Edwin (4) 1321 Oberlin Rd Raleigh 27608 

Petersen, S. D., Jr. (2) 1012 Kings Drive Charlotte 28207 

Petree, R. E. (2) 418 Professional Bldg Charlotte 28202 

Pharr, John R. (2) 824 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Drive. ..Charlotte 28207 
Phillips, Guy McDonald (2) 281 Canterbury Trail.. Winston-Salem 27104 
Phillips, Kenneth R. (2) 

Suite 170, Forsyth Medical Park Winston-Salem 27103 

Pierce, T. Carlton (3) 5004 Hampton Rd Durham 27707 

Pigford, Guy E. (5) 2906 Wayne Drive Wilmington 28401 

Plaster, Harold E. (1) Box 1051.. Shelby 28150! 

Plaster, Hubert S. (1) P. O. Box 216 Shelby 28150 

Pleasants, Marvin (4) P. O. Box 276 Louisburg 27549 

Pless, C. A. (1) 120-W Doctors Bldg., Doctors Drive..Asheville 28801 
Pless, Cecil A., Jr. (1) 

120-W Doctors Bldg., Doctors Drive Asheville 28801 

Poindexter, C. C. (3) 314 Jefferson Bldg.... Greensboro 27401| 

Poindexter, C. W. (3) 309 E. Wendover Ave Greensboro 274011 

Polk, Robert M., Jr. (4) 426 King St Laurinburg 283521 

Poole, Robert H., Jr. (2) Suite 400, 4200 Park Road ...Charlotte 28209 

Poole, S. D. (5) Box 203 Goldsboro 27530 

Poovey, Auburn L. (1) 335 Fourth St., N.W..... Hickory 28601* 

Pope, E. F. (1) Box 188 Hendersonville 28739 

Port, Forest Chester (1). Fletcher 2873 

Porter, W. Joseph (2) Suite 315, 

Randolph Medical Center, 1928 Randolph Rd Charlotte 28207 

Powell, J. B. (4) P. O. Box 756... ......Clinton 28328? 

Powell, William H. (1) Hair Bldg., Park St .....Canton 28716!' 

Prevost, William S., Jr. (1) 106 Broadview Rd ..Waynesville 28786 

Price, A. Dwight (3) 206-208 Lennox Bldg .Chapel Hill 27514' 

Price, James L., Jr. (1) 270 Third Ave., N.W .....Hickory 2860i': 

Price, William H. (2) 501 N. Main St .Monroe 2811(1 

Pridgen, Edward N.(4) 115 Bow St Fayetteville 28301: 



• 



I 



27 

Privette, James A. (5) Kinston Professional Center, 

2201 North Heritage St Kinston 28501 

Pruett, J. E. (1) Bessemer City 28016 

Pruett, L. Doyle (2) P. O. Box 918 Elkin 28621 

Prugh, John L. (1) 15 E. Jordan St Brevard 28712 

Pruitt, Charles C, Jr. (4) 

Dental Dept., U. S. Naval Air Station Pensacola, Fla. 

Pruitt, James F. (4) 105 College St Oxford 27565 

Purvis, P. C. (4) 304 lona St Fairmont 28340 

— Q— 

Quails, Dixon L. (1) 62 Crowell Rd Enka 28728 

Quarles, William G. (1) Akers Center Gastonia 28052 

Quinn, Galen W. (3) Duke Medical Center Durham 27706 

— R — 

Ralls, Marion L., Jr. (3) 3200 Friendly Rd Greensboro 27408 

Ralph, W. T. (5) - Belhaven 27810 

Ramos, Frank M. (3) 509 S. Duke St Durham 27701 

Ramsey, Arthur M. ( 1 ) Box 306 Marshall 28753 

Rankin, W. W. (4) 406 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

Ransom, Robert K. (1) Burnsville 28714 

Ransom, Rollin M., Jr. (4) Box 234 Knightdale 27545 

Rasberry, William E. (5) P. O. Box 278 _ Grifton 28538 

Ratton, Thomas G. (2) 27 E. Center St Lexington 27292 

Ray, A. Graham (3) Edgeworth Bldg Greensboro 27401 

Ray, Kenneth M. (1) 569 Merrimon Ave Asheville 28804 

Raymer, J. L. (1) Box 1297. _ Shelby 28150 

Reap, Charles A., Jr. (3) Box 1307 Chapel Hill 27514 

Reece, John F. (1) P. O. Box 816 Lenoir 28645 

Reece, J. P. (2) P. O. Box 544 Concord 28025 

Reese, Gene L. (1) Box 271 Boone 28607 

Reeves, Horace P., Jr. (2) 225 N. Torrence St Charlotte 28204 

Reeves, James D. (1) 14 McGeachy Bldg Asheville 28803 

Rehm, Jerome G. (2) Suite 902, 1012 Kings Dr Cliarlotte 28207 

Reich, E. H. (2) 2100 Old Lexington Rd Winston-Salem 27107 

Reid, Curtis S. (2) 329 Grove Park Ave Winston-Salem 27103 

Reid, Thomas B., Jr. (5) 617 College St Jacksonville 28540 

Renfrow, R. R. (4) 1304 Fort Bragg Rd Fayetteville 28305 

Reynolds, J. A. S. (2) 

922 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Drive Charlotte 28207 

Rhyne, Howard S. (1) 211 W. Main Ave Gastonia 28052 

Rich, C. Frank (1) 812 Flatiron Bldg Asheville 28801 

Richardson, Maurice B. (3) 230 W. North St ...Albemarle 28001 

Richardson, R. E. (3) 403 Westwood Drive Chapel Hill 27514 

Riddle, A. C, Jr. (1) 675 Biltmore Ave Asheville 28803 

Riddle, William Frederick (2) 1415 W. First St..... Winston-Salem 27104 

Ridenhour, C. E. (2) Carolina Bldg Kannapolis 28081 

Rider, Ernest A. (2) 4575 Woodlark Lane .....Charlotte 28207 

Riggs, A. F. (5) P. O. Box 271 Elizabeth City 27909 

Roberson, Joe B. (1) 1087 Hendersonville Road Asheville 28803 

Roberson, Robert W. (4) 1715 McGougan Rd Fayetteville 28303 

Roberts, C. E. (4) Dunn 28334 

Roberts, J. Ernest (3) Medical Village Burlington 27215 

Roberts, Pearce, Jr. (1) 

Suite 410 Doctors' Bldg., Doctors' Drive Asheville 28801 

Robinson, Charles F. (2) 3901 Independence Blvd Charlotte 28205 

Robinson, Ernest L. (4) P. O. Box 1146 Lumberton 28358 

Rodgers, James F. (2) Box 182 Statesville 28677 

Roe, Jere E. (4) 404 Ligon Bldg., 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 27605 

Rogers, E. Kent, III (1) 950 Tunnel Rd Asheville 28805 

Rogers, Harding W., Jr. (2) 

Doctors Clinic Bldg., Center St Mooresville 28115 



28 

Rogers, John T. (2) Freedom Village... .Charlotte 28208 

Rogers, Julian R. (3) 1114 Grove St Greensboro 27403 

Rogers, Russell J., Jr. (2) P. O. Box 397 Matthews 28105 

Rose, Junius H., Jr. (5) 2101 N. Heritage St Kinston 28501 

Ross, Grady (2) 1908 East Seventh St Charlotte 28204 

Ross, Heywood (2) 219 Elmhurst Road Charlotte 28209 

Ross, Ledyard E. (5) 602 East 10th St... Greenville 27834 

Ross, Norman F. (3) Box 3806, Duke Medical Center .Durham 27706 

Ross, Thurman J. (3) 910 Green St Durham 27701 

Rowe, O. D. (1) Box 649 ..Marion 28752 

Rudder, William L. (5) P. O. Box 28.. Beaufort 28516 

Russ, Bobby M. (5) 413 Murchison Bldg.... Wilmington 28401 



Sill 



Sager, Robert H. (3) UNC School of Dentistry....Chapel Hill 27514 'pit 

Sain, H. T. (1) P. O. Box 736 Morganton 28655 

Sams, Roy B. (1) P. O. Box 372 Mars Hill 28754 

Sanders, Cleon W. (4) P. O. Box 368 Benson 27504 

Sanders, Phil S. (5) 2101 North Heritage St Kinston 28501 

Sapp, Baxter B., Jr. (3) Box 3806, Duke Medical Center..Durham 27706 

Sapp, Hubert B. (2) 57 East Cliff Dr Concord 28025 

Sappington, R. R., Jr. (4) 1111 Clarendon St Fayetteville 28305 

Saunders, W. L. (3) 1011 Madison Ave Greensboro 27401 

Scherer, Richard F. (2) 

Suite 187, Professional Bldg Winston-Salem 27103 

Schiebel, E. C. (2) P. O. Box 664 .....Elkin 28621 

Schmucker, Ralph (2) 801 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 28202 

Schneider, John J. (1) 

Dental Dept., Marine Corps Recruit Dept Parris Island, S. C. 

Schneider, N. J. (3) 52 Willow Terrace Chapel Hill 27514 

Schneider, William Gene (3) 

Orthodontic Dept., UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Scott, Ludwig G. (3) 713 Memorial Dr Burlington 27215 

Sears, Thomas H., Jr. (3) 1601 Cornwallis Drive Greensboro 27408 

Seifert, D. W., Jr. (4) York Bldg.. 2016 Cameron St Raleigh 27605 

Seitter, D. B., Jr. (5) 1 North 16th St Wilmington 28401 i 

Self, Fred L. (1) P. O. Box 127..... Lincolnton 28092 ; 

Self, Isaac R. (1) Box 127 Lincolnton 28092 

Self, I. R., Jr. (1) Box 321 Lincolnton 28092 

Sessoms, W. W. (3) 1011 Madison Ave Greensboro 27401 

Shaffer, S. W. (3) 421-4 Southeastern Bldg Greensboro 27401 

Shankle, Robert J. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Shapiro, Eugene N. (1) 48 Battery Park Ave... Asheville 28801 i 

Shaw, Frederick C. (1) 328 E. Harper Ave Lenoir 28645 I 

Sheffield, Neal (3) 304 Dixie Bide Greensboro 27401 

Sheffield, Neal, Jr. (3) 902 N. Elm St Greensboro 27401 IStmh 

Shell, John H. (1) 6 Powell St Chapel Hill 27514 ' 

Sherman, Clarendon F. (2) P. O. Box 325.. Granite Quarry 28072 

Sherrill, Claude A., Jr. (1) 16-W Doctors Bldg ......Asheville 28801 | 

Sherrill, Luby T., Jr. (2) Mecklenburg County Health Dept Charlotte 

Shoaf, R. R. (2) Box 542. Lexington 27292 

Sholar, Norman P. (2) Box 180 Mooresville 28115 

Short, L. H. (2) 1012 Kings Drive Charlotte 28207 

Shoulars, H. W., Jr. (3) UNC School of Dentistry.. Chapel Hill 27514 

Sigmon, James W. (3) 1601 Cornwallis Drive Greensboro 27408 

Sikes, T. E. (3) 1011 Madison Ave Greensboro 27401 

Sikes, T. Edgar, Jr. (3) 1100 Olive St Greensboro 27401 

Simendinger, William H., Jr. (2) 6939 Oakstone Place.. ..Charlotte 28210 

Simpson, David H. (1) 406 S. Chester St Gastonia 28052 

Slaughter, Freeman C. (2) 201-05 Professional Bldg Kannapolis 28081 

Sloop, W. M. (1) Box 258 Crossnore 28616 

Slott, E. F. (3) Medical Village, Vaughn Rd Burlington 27215 

Sluder, Troy B., Jr. (3) 2109 N. Lake Shore Dr Chapel Hill 27514 



iieeli 



I 



29 

Smiley, Gary R. (3) 

Dept. of Orthodontics, UNC School of Dentistry.. ..Chapel Hill 27514 

Smith, Amos H. (2) Box 242 Lexington 27292 

Smith, A. L., Jr. (4) Dorothea Dix Hospital Raleigh 27602 

Smith, Clayton B., Jr. (5) 217 76th Street Virginia Beach, Va. 

Smith, Everett L. (4) 820 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

Smith, Fred J. (1) P. O. Box 490 Morganton 28655 

Smith, Grover W. (5) Kinston Clinic Kinston 28501 

Smith, James H. (5) 703 Murchison Bldg Wilmington 28401 

Smith, James R. (2) 4885 Oglethorpe Place Charlotte 28209 

Smith, John Watson, Jr. (3) Box 647.. Pinehurst 28374 

Smith, Junius C. (5) 502 Murchison Bldg Wilmington 28401 

Smith, Marcus R. (4) Box 637 Raeford 28376 

Smith, Newton (4) 1900 Bragg Blvd Fayetteville 28303 

Smith, Ray Hoyle (1) P. O. Box 155 Cherryville 28021 

Smith, Robert L. (3) Box 287 - Albemarle 28001 

Smith, Thomas A. (2) 140 Lockland Ave Winston-Salem 27103 

Smith, Vonnie B. (4) 704 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

Smithson, T. W. (5) 205 Forest Hill Ave Rocky Mount 27801 

Sneed, Thomas Q., Jr. (4) Hancock Bldg Oxford 27565 

Snider, William H. (2) 109 Fifth St... Spencer 28159 

Snyder, Jerald M. (1) 408 East Main St.__ - Old Fort 28762 

Snyder, Kenneth Ray (2) 21 Clemmonsville Rd Winston-Salem 27107 

Sockwell, C. L. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Solomon, Marshall H. (3) 1001 N. Elm St Greensboro 27401 

Southard, F. J. (2) 101 1/2 S. Main St Kernersville 27284 

3outhworth, J. D. (3) 1219 Magnolia St Greensboro 27401 

Jowers, Jerry W. (1) Villa Park Shopping Center Conover 28613 

Sowers, Wade Andrew (2) Court Square Lexington 27292 

Sowter, John B. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Spear, Herbert (5) Box 615 ...Kinston 28501 

Spence, W. M. (5) 215 Carolina Bldg..... Elizabeth City 27909 

Spencer, John R. (2) 820 W. Henderson St Salisbury 28144 

Spencer, William R. (4) .....Wake Forest 27587 

Spillman, J. Harry (2) 140 Lockland Ave Winston-Salem 27103 

Spoon, Riley E., Jr. (2) 

Suite 203, Professional Bldg., Cloverdale Ave Winston-Salem 27103 

Sproul, J. Fred (4) 2512 Fairview Rd Raleigh 27608 

Spurlin, Max L. (1) 102 Brown Ave..... Hazelwood 28738 

Stallings, June H., Jr. (3) 

900 Broad St., Corner Green & Broad Durham 27705 

Stallings, Riley S., Jr. (3) 111 Corcoran St Durham 27701 

Stamper, Clifford M. (1) Box 85 Banner Elk 28604 

Stanford, A. R. (3) Guilford Bank Bldg Greensboro 27401 

Stanley, Lloyd B. (4) 800-A St. Mary's St .....Raleigh 27605 

5teelman, S. H. (1) P. O. Box 277 Lincolnton 28092 

Stephens, John A. (3) Box 768 ...Burlington 27215 

Stephenson, G. W. (4) P. O. Box 588 Red Springs 28377 

Stevens, C. W. (1) P. O. Box 58 ..Granite Falls 28630 

Stewart, Joseph D. (2) 2008 Cloverdale Ave Winston-Salem 27103 

Stoddard. Alan L. (5) P. O. Box 418... ...Havelock 28532 

Stokes, Thomas D., Jr. (3) 3410 Cloverdale Dr Greensboro 27408 

Stone, Fleming H. (2) 

304 Cole Bldg., 211 Hawthorne Lane Charlotte 28204 

Stone, I. F. (2) Box 307 Pilot Mountain 27041 

Stonestreet, F. M. (3) 255 N. Second St.. Albemarle 28001 

Storey, Frederick B. (2) 1530 Elizabeth Ave Charlotte 28204 

5towe, G. C, Jr. (2) 301-A Hawthorne Lane Charlotte 28204 

Strickland, W. D. (3) UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Stroup, Paul A., Jr. (2) 

621 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Drive Charlotte 28207 

;trupe, James G. (2) 317 Nissen Bldg... Winston-Salem 27101 

^tubbs, J. M. (3) Box 807 Rockingham 28379 

iturdevant, C. M. (3) UNC School of Dentistry.. ..Chapel Hill 27514 



30 



Styers, Thomas R., Jr. (3) 

West Durham Community Center. Durham 27705 

Sugg, Charles H. (3) Van Buren Road Leaksville 27288 

Sugg, R. W. (3) 209 S. Gregson St Durham 27701 

Suggs, Joseph R. (3) 

Professional Bldg., 157 McArthur St Asheboro 27203 

Suggs, Robert B. (1) Box 755 - Belmont 28012 

Summey, Brett T. (1) -- West Jefferson 28694 

Surles, C. W., Jr. (3) 1124 E. Lexington Ave High Point 27262 

Sutphin, Hugh E. (3) 158 Renfro St Mount Airy 27080 

Swain, John P., Jr. (4) Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

Swindell, James E. (4) Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

— T— 

Tally, William P. (4) Box 166_ - Garner 27529 

Tannenbaum, A. Raymond (3) 1001 N. Elm St Greensboro 27401 

Taylor, C. B. (1) 6th & Fleming Sts Hendersonville 28739 

Taylor, C. F. (2) 207 Hawthorne Lane.... Charlotte 28204 

Taylor, Clyde Leslie (3) 3200 Friendly Road .Greensboro 27408 

Taylor, Gerald T. (2) 358 Forsyth Medical Park.. ..Winston-Salem 27103 

Taylor, Kenneth, Jr. (1) 111 W. Third Ave Gastonia 28052 

Taylor, Lois E. (2) 720 East Blvd...... Charlotte 28203 

Taylor, Omer W. ( 1 ) 558 Fleming St Hendersonville 28739 

Taylor, Preston R. (1) Box 108 Belmont 28012 

Taylor, Robert B. (4) 1677 Owen Dr Fayetteville 28304 

Taylor, Robert G., Jr. (2) Drawer 1071 North Wilkesboro 28659 

Taylor, W. C. (2) P. O. Box 1429 Salisbury 28144 

Teague, Charles H. (3) 716 Southeastern Bldg Greensboro 27401 

Teague, Everett R. (3) Box 659 Reidsville 27320 

Templeton, William B. (2) 

Suite 252, 1 Charlotte Town Center Charlotte 28204 

Teofan, Ronald O. (2) 

3596-C North Patterson Ave Winston-Salem 27105 

Tew, J. J (4) Clayton 27520 

Thomas, C. A. (5) 1812 Grace St Wilmington 28401 

Thomas, Carl L. (2) P. O. Box 663 Mount Airy 27030 

Thomas, George H. (1) Box 248 Skyland 28776 

Thomas, James T., Jr. (3) 147 McArthur St Asheboro 27203 

Thomas, Robert E. (3) 3970th Hospital, APO 283. ...New York, N. Y. 10001 

Thompson, Harold W. (2) P. O. Box 156.. China Grove 28023 

Thompson, Horace K. (5) 3500 Oleander Dr Wilmington 28401 

Thompson, John L., Jr. (1) 416 W. Warren St Shelby 28150 

Thomspon, S. W., Ill (4) 719 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

Thorpe, J. O. (2) Suite 207, 

Randolph Medical Center, 1928 Randolph Rd Charlotte 28207 

Thurston, M. Stevenson (2) 316 S. Church St Salisbury 28144 

Todd, Walden R. (2) P. O. Box 487..... Yadkinville 27055 

Tomlinson, F. N. (2) 310 O'Hanlon Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Towler, S. B. (4) 801 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

Townsend, Gordon L. (4)...... - Dunn 283341 

Trail, Julian S. (3) P. O. Box 575 Norwood 28128 

Trivette, L. P. (2) Box 574 ._ Mooresville 28115 

Troutman, Dennis F. (2) 464 Eastway Dr Charlotte 28205 

Troutman, M. L. (2) P. O. Box 751..... ....Kannapolis 28081 

Trueblood, Samuel N. (5) Box 737.... Washington 27889 

Truluck, Moultrie H. (1) Suite B, Medical-Dental Bldg Asheville 28803 

Tucker, W. W. (5) Room 108, Purser Bldg Goldsboro 27530 

Tulloch, Charles W. (4) Box 38 Broadway 27505 

Turbyfill, W. J. (1) 

3 Doctors Park, Suite 1, 417 Biltmore Ave Asheville 28801 

Turlington, R. H. (4) Henry Vann Bldg Clinton 28328 

Turner, James L. (3) 4519 High Point Rd Greensboro 27407 

Turner, J. V. (5) P. O. Box 1426 Wilson 27893 

Turner, L. R. (5) P. O. Drawer D Jacksonville 28540 






*eatt 
'eavi 
ebst 



31 

Turner, Robert Lee (3) 600 Pasteur Dr Greensboro 27403 

Turner, R. S. (3) 811 N. Elm St Greensboro 27401 

Twisdale, Harold W. (2) 4421 Central Ave Charlotte 28205 

— U— 

Underwood, Alvin E. (3) Seawell Bldg ...Carthage 28327 

Underwood, J. T. (3) Clay's Apt. House Blackstone, Va. 23824 

Underwood, Nash H. (4) 814 S. Main St Wake Forest 27587 

Underwood, R. L. (3) 410 Guilford Bldg Greensboro 27401 

Upchurch, Gilbert R. (3) 216 S. Main St Reidsville 27320 

Upchurch, Jack B. (4) P. O. Box 636 Apex 27502 

— V— 

VanderVoort, C. Robert (3) U.S. 1, North Aberdeen 28315 

Van Vleet, David E. (3) 115 Arcade, Wellons Village... .Durham 27703 

Vaughan, Thomas R., Jr. (5) 413 Charlotte St Rocky Mount 27801 

Vinson, Thomas W., Jr. (5) 106 Main St Murfreesboro 27855 

'Vollmer, T. D. (3) 

Medical Village, Suite J, 1610 Vaughn Rd Burlington 27215 

— W— 

tWaddell, M. A. (4) Scottish Bank Bldg Fair Bluff 28439 

iWadsworth, Charles H. (2) 180 N. Union St Concord 28025 

■Walker, Curley G. (1) 252 Charlotte St Asheville 28801 

Walker, Frank H. (2) P. O. Box 37 Yadkinville 27055 

Walker, M. E. (3) 1431 Broad St Durham 27705 

Walker, Woodrow W. ( 1 ) 317 S. Marietta St Gastonia 28052 

Wall, Joe Thomas (5) 216 Broad St Wilson 27893 

Wall, Lester E. (2) 706 Independence Bldg Charlotte 28202 

Wallace, George M. (3) 307 Lindsay St .High Point 27260 

Wallace, Mitchell W. (4) - Spring Lake 28390 

Waller, D. T. (2) 6021 Creola Road.. Charlotte 28211 

i Walters, Percy Frank (2) P. O. Box 251 Monroe 28110 

Ward, E. Ben (4) 511 S. Franklin St Whiteville 28472 

Ward, G. Thomas (1) P. O. Box 28 Cape May, N. J. 08204 

Ward, James A. (5) 228 Vance St Roanoke Rapids 27870 

fWare, William G., Jr. (2) 

^ 174 Forsyth Medical Park Winston-Salem 27103 

iWarlick, R. B. (3) Box 331 Southern Pines 28387 

Warren, Bert B. (5) 103 E. Church St Farmville 27828 

Warren, Donald W. (3) UNC School of Dentistry.. ..Chapel Hill 27514 

Warren, E. R. (5) P. O. Box 845 Goldsboro 27530 

Warren, Ray Alexander (1) 330 S. Grove St Lincolnton 28092 

Watson, Billy Joe (3) 4916 Starmount Drive Greensboro 27410 

Watson, Robert H. (2) 4200 Park Road.... Charlotte 28209 

Waynick, George E., Jr. (2) 731 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Waynick, I. M. (2) 731 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Weant, Theodore F. (2) 529 Catawba Road Salisbury 28144 

vVeathersbee, Ramsey (5) 1806 Chestnut St Wilmington 28401 

iVeathersbee, Ramsey, Jr. (5) 918 S. 17th St Wilmington 28401 

Weaver, R. C. (1) 303 Flatiron Bldg... Asheville 28801 

vVebster, B. H. (2) 1112 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 28202 

Webster. William P. (3) Rolling Road Chapel Hill 27514 

rt'ceks, H. E. (5)...... Tarboro 27886 

v\^eeks, W. P. (2) 122 Pennsylvania Ave.... Winston-Salem 27104 

Wehunt, Lloyd D. (1) Box 25 Valdese 28690 

Wells, C. T. (1) Wells Bldg Canton 28716 

Wells, Carey T., Jr. (1) 100 Main St Canton 28716 

Wells, DeLeon, Jr. (5) Wallace 28466 

Wentz, W. Robert (3) 1304 Broad St Durham 27705 

West, James B. (2) Box 1126 North Wilkesboro 28659 

Westrick, Charles M. (2) 

164 Forsyth Medical Park Winston-Salem 27103 



32 

Wharton, Richard G. (2) Box 422 Salisbury 28144 

Wheless, J. R. (3) P. O. Box 636 Reidsville 27320 

Whicker, Thomas A. (2) 400 Randolph St Thomasville 27360 

Whisnant, C. M. (1) Burnville 28714 

Whisnant, James F. (1) Box 347. _ Spindale 28160 

White, Robert Dean (5) 900 Sunset Ave Rocky Mount 27801 

White, T. L. (2) P. O. Box 306 North Wilkesboro 28659 

White, Walter A. (4) Box 157..__ Warrenton 27589 

Whitehead, A. P. (5) P. O. Box 1303 Rocky Mount 27801 

Whitehead, J. W. (4) Box 465.. ...Smithfield 27577 

Whitehurst, Raymond C, Jr. (5) 519 Broad St.. .....Wilson 27893 

Whitehurst, R. L. (5) Box 207 Rocky Mount 27801 

Whitson, Ronald W. (4) 511 S. Franklin St Whiteville 28472 

Whittington, P. B., Jr. (3) 228 Medical Arts Bldg Greensboro 27401 

Wicker, B. K. (4) Box 188.... Maxton 28364 

Wiggs, William J. (4) 2704 Fort Bragg Rd Fayetteville 28303 

Wilkins, H. F., Jr. (2) 31 Vance Circle Lexington 27292 

Wilkins, R. A. (5) Box 227 Mount Olive 28365 

Wilkins, Ralph A. (3) Box 828 Burlington 27215 

Wilkinson, Robert M. (2) 214 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Williams, Carolyn T. (2) Box 46 North Wilkesboro 28659 

Williams, Egbert P. (2) 4200 Park Road Charlotte 28209 

Williams, Harry R. (4) Roseboro 28382 

Williams, H. T. (1) 

The Doctors Bldg., 912 Second St., N.E Hickory 28601 

Williams, Jabez H., Jr. (2) Box 866 Thomasville 27360 

Williams, James Lowell (3) Box 188 Pittsboro 27312 

Williams, Joel Sherrod (2) 120 S. Tradd St Statesville 28677 

Williams, John R. (2) 637 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Williams, R. E. (5) 210 N. Herman St Goldsboro 27530 

Williamson, B. W., Jr. (3) •- Hamlet 28345 

Williamson, J. F. (3) Wadesboro 28170 

Williamson, James M. (5) 2505 E. Fifth St., Apt. 4 Greenville 27835 

Williford, William E. (2) 2032 N. Graham St ...Charlotte 28206 

Willis, Guy R. (3) 910 Central Carolina Bank Bldg Durham 27701 

Willis, Weston A. (5) 105 Warlick St Jacksonville 28540 

Wilson, Charles R. (2) Box 147... Marshville 28103 

Wilson, F. M. (2) 101 S. Hayne St.. Monroe 28110 

Wilson, G. Curtis (5) 405 W. Nash St Wilson 27893 

Wilson, Noah Rouse, Jr. (3) P. O. Box 755. Pittsboro 27312 

Wilson, Noracella McGuire (1) 20 East Main St .Sylva 28779 

Wilson, Roy W. (2) 1402 E. Morehead St ...Charlotte 28204 i 

Wilson, William Danford (1) 

New Hope Professional Bldg., 224 New Hope Road Gastonia 28052 [ 

Winchester, P. W. (1) Box 628 Morganton 28655 

Winstead, J. L., Jr. (1) Box 709 Hendersonville 28739 

Winter, Carlton V. (2) 1613 Montford Dr Charlotte 28209 

Withers, R. M. (2) Davidson 28036 

Wolfe, Carl B. (3) 1025 Madison Ave Greensboro 27401 

Woltz, William Lee, Jr. (4) Box 257 Sanford 27330 

Wood, Jerry F. (4) Medical Center Selma 27576 ( 

Wood, Matthew T. (3) UNC School of Dentistry.. ..Chapel Hill 27514 

Woodall, D. C. (4) Box 37 ..Erwin 28339* 

Woodard, W. L. (5) Beaufort 28516 

Woodard, W. L., Jr. (4) 

Garner Professional Center, Rt. 1 Garner 27529 

Woody, F. Spencer (3) .-. Roxboro 27573 

Woody, J. L. (1) P. O. Box 338. Bryson City 28713 

Woody, L. W., Jr. (1) Box 556 Spruce Pine 28777 

Woody, M E., Jr. (1) 318 South St Gastonia 28052 

Woody, W. L. (1) 107 E. Third Ave Gastonia 28052 

Wooten, A. L. (5) 1116 W. Vance St Wilson 27893 

Wooten, George A. (5) Box 472 Snow Hill 28580 

Wright, Dan (5) 602 E. Tenth St Greenville 27834 

Wright, E. K., Jr. (5) Box 48 Williamston 27892 



\aiii 



33 



— Y— 



Yates, Robert A. (4) Box 465 Chadbourn 28431 

Yelton, John L. (1) Box 35 ...Shelby 28150 

Yelton, William D. (1) P. O. Box 795 Hickory 28601 

Yelton, W. F. (2) 531 Nissen Bldg ..Winston-Salem 27101 

Yelverton, Hugh (5) P. O. Box 984 Wilson 27893 

Yokeley, Gilbert W. (2) 412 O'Hanlon Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Yokeley, K. M. (2) 767 Oaklawn Ave Winston-Salem 27104 

Yost, William F. (2) 

Sharon Forrest Shopping Center, Independence Blvd Charlotte 28212 

Young, D. Clyde, Jr. (2) Medical Arts Bldg Salisbury 28144 

Young, Douglas M. (2) 834 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Young, H. L. (5) 119 N. Church St Rocky Mount 27801 

Young, Thurman L. (4) 920 W. Johnson St ...Raleigh 27605 

Young, W. H. (5) .....Burgaw 28425 

Young, W. Kenneth (3) 600 Pasteur Drive Greensboro 27403 

— Z— 

Zaytoun, Henry S. (4) 203 Ligon Bldg., 800 St. Marys St.. .Raleigh 27605 

Zealy, James M. (5) 610 N. Jefferson St ..Goldsboro 27530 

Zibelin, C. V. (5) Box 407 Wallace 28466 

Ziglar, James N., Jr. (2) .Rural Hall 27045 

Zimmerman, H. Stokes (2) 804 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 27101 

Zimmerman, John W., Jr. (2) 405 Wallace Bldg Salisbury 28144 

Zimmerman, L. H. (3) Security Bank Bldg High Point 27260 

Zimmerman, T. R. (3) Security Bank Bldg High Point 27260 

Zuccarella, James B. (2) 206 Lake Concord Road Concord 28025 



RETIRED MEMBERS 



Atwood, T. W. (3) 9 Carolee Apartments, Elder St Durham 27705 

Chapman, William K. (2) 2943 Temple Lane Charlotte 28205 

Derby, J. E. (1) Box 1279 Tryon 28782 

Hooper, Lyman J. (1) 

Apt. A-5, Longchamps Apartments Asheville 28804 

Nance, A. W. (4) Point Harbor 27964 

Stone, C. N. (3) 810 Holt Ave Greensboro 27405 

Sturdevant, Roger E. (3) 644 Jane St., N.E Albuquerque, N. M. 87100 

Yates, P. P. (1) 107 S. Sharon Road Lenoir 28645 



34 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 



ROSTER OF MEMBERS 

January 1, 1966 
Arranged by towns and showing district in which each town is located. 



ABERDEEN, 3rd District 

Medlin, E. M. 
VanderVoort, C. Robert 

AHOSKIE, 5th District 

Brown, J. B. 
Ferro, Edward R. 
Leary, Thomas E. 

ALBEMARLE, 3rd District 

Bowen, Carl Lee 
Drake, Claude W. 
Garber, M. R. 
Overcash, R. F. 
Richardson, Maurice B. 
Smith, Robert L. 
Stonestreet, F. M. 

ANDREWS, 1st District 

Ezzell, L. L. 

APEX, 4th District 

Bryan, C. H. 
Jones, Marvin T., Jr. 
Pearson, Paul L. 
Upchurch, Jack B. 

ASHEBORO, 3rd District 

Atwater, John W., Jr. 
Bulla, Thurman C. 
Couch, Jon W. 
Davis, Hal A., Jr. 
Grimsley, W. R. 
Kilpatrick, Ralph E. 
Mcintosh, James A. 
Menius, John W. 
Suggs, Joseph R. 
Thomas, James T., Jr. 

ASHEVILLE, 1st District 

Barker, O. C. 
Becker, D. H. 
Candler, C. Z., Jr. 
Carpenter, M. W. 
Carrell, George H. 
Cave, William P. 
Clark, Walter E. 
Cunningham, F. S. 
Daniel, Gary F. 
Davis, Frank W. 



Davis, Walter H. 
Dudley, D. W. 
Gerdes, C. Don 
Girard, John W., Jr. 
Gregory, Lyman J., Jr. 
Hatchett, C. Mitchell, Jr. 
Hoffman, Robert R. 
Holmes, Robert Waide 
Hooper, Lyman J. (Retired) 
Hoyle, Frank W. 
Jones, Charles E. 
Keener, Harold 
Kennerly, Robert B. 
Lemler, John F. 
Lockwood, A. T. 
McCracken, Clayton H. 
Martin, Franklin E. 
May, H. M. 
Morris, Thomas A. 
Morton, Thomas L. 
Mundy, Carl R. 
Mynatt, William A. 
Osborn, Carl F. 
Owen, Robert H., Jr. 
Patterson, G. K. 
Pennell, William T. 
Pless, C. A. 
Pless, Cecil A., Jr. 
Ray, Kenneth M. 
Reeves, James D. 
Rich, C. Frank 
Riddle, A. C, Jr. 
Roberson, Joe B. 
Roberts, Pearce, Jr. 
Rogers, E. Kent, IH 
Shapiro, Eugene N. 
Sherrill, Claude A., Jr. 
Truluck, Moultrie H. 
Turbyfill, W. J. 
Walker, Curley G. 
Weaver, R. C. 

AYDEN, 5th District 

Brown, Oscar Hubert 
Gooding, Herbert W. 

BAKERSVILLE, 1st District 

Masters, W. B. 

BANNER ELK, 1st District 

Stamper, Clifford M. 



35 



BEAUFORT, 5th District 

Rudder, William L. 
Woodard, W. L. 

BELHAVEN, 5th District 

Ralph, W. T. 

BELMONT, 1st District 

Breeland, Wade H. 
Hagerty, Edward Hope 
Moses, Joseph M. 
Suggs, Robert B. 
Taylor, Preston R. 

BENSON, 4th District 

Heeden, W. M., Jr. 
Sanders, Cleon W. 

BESSEMER CITY, 1st District 

Pruett, J. E. 

BLACK MOUNTAIN, 1st District 

Brake, E. K. 
Love, James H. 
Marshburn, J. A. 

BOONE, 1st District 

Glenn, Edmond T. 
Graham, James B. 
Lawrence, Jack D. 
Matheson, William M. 
Reese, Gene L. 

BOONVILLE, 2nd District 

Graver, A. W. 
Lee, John G. 

BREVARD, 1st District 

Clayton, W. S. 
Davis, Wilburn A. 
Grahl, C. L., Jr. 
Massey, Milton V. 
Prugh, John L. 

BROADWAY, 4th District 

Tulloch, Charles W. 

BRYSON CITY, 1st District 

Woody, J. L. 

BURGAW, 5th District 

Young, W. H. 

BURLINGTON, 3rd District 

Brannock, R. W. 
Caddell, F. S. 
Coble, Albert V. 
Easley, Ernest E. 
Foushee, L. M. 
Frost, J. S. 
Garrison, N. W. 
Gilliam, F. E. 
Hinson, Thomas R. 
Kendall, James E. 



McFarland, Wilbur G., Jr. 
McKenzie, Owen Ray 
Moore, Saunders W. 
Moser, Galen C. 
Murray, Henry V. 
Newman, Joseph Bridger 
Newman, J. U., IH 
Patterson, George G. 
Perdue, H. L. 
Roberts, J. Ernest 
Scott, Ludwig G. 
Slott, E. F. 
Stephens, John A. 
Vollmer, T. D. 
Wilkins, Ralph A. 

BURNSVILLE, 1st District 

Ransom, Robert K. 
Whisnant, C. M. 

BUTNER, 4th District 

Boyette, Edward G. 

CANDLER, 1st District 

Cole, Hugh H. 
Garren, Robert D. 

CANDOR, 3rd District 

McDuffie, A. A. 

CANTON, 1st District 

Bottoms, Alton W. 
Cline, Albert P. 
Cline, Albert P., Jr. 
Hair, J. E. 
Powell, William H. 
Wells, C. T. 
Wells, Carey T., Jr. 

CARRBORO, 3rd District 

Kennedy, K. Carroll 

CARTHAGE, 3rd District 

Underwood, Alvin E. 

CARY, 4th District 

Davis, Edwin B., Jr. 
Hamilton, R. P. 
Hatcher, Hubert E. 

CHADBOURN, 4th District 

Yates, Robert A. 

CHAPEL HILL, 3rd District 

Allen, Don L. 
Baker, Benjamin R. 
Barker, Bennie D. 
Barton, Roger E. 
Bawden, James W. 
Brauer, John C. 
Burns, E. R. 
Burns, William T. 
Camp, Joe H. 



36 



Chapin, M. E. 
Clark, Dwight L. 
Crandell, C. E. 
Darden, T. H. 
Demeritt, W. W. 
Dobson, David P. 
Evans, Marvin R. 
Higley, L. B. 
Holland, Murry W. 
Hunter, Grover C. 
Killian, H. W. 
Lindahl, R. L. 
Lupton, Cecil Rhodes 
McFall, Walter T., Jr. 
Marks, Sandy C. 
Miketa, Andrew J. 
Mitchell, David L. 
Mitchell, Patricia S. 
Mitchum, Kenneth E. 
Mohorn, Harold W. 
Murray, Henry V., Jr. 
Nelson, R. M. 
Newton, Maurice E. 
Oldenburg, T. R. 
Oldham, Floy T., Jr. 
Price, A. Dwight 
Reap, Charles A., Jr. 
Richardson, R. E. 
Sager, Robert H. 
Schneider, N. J. 
Schneider, William Gene 
Shankle, Robert J. 
Shell, John H. 
Shoulars, H. W., Jr. 
Sluder, Troy B., Jr. 
Smiley, Gary R. 
Sockwell, C. L. 
Sowter, John B. 
Strickland, William D. 
Sturdevant, C. M. 
Warren, Donald W. 
Webster, William P. 
Wood, Matthew T. 

CHARLOTTE, 2nd District 

Albright, L. B. 
Alford, Frank O. 
Allen, Thomas I. 
Archer, John M., IH 
Austin, Edward U. 
Ballard, David L. 
Banker, L. L., Jr. 
Earrinrer, Martin D. 
Bean, William C. 
Benfield, Robert H. 
Biddix, Clarence F. 
Bishop, E. L. 
Black, A. R. 
Bottoms, Alton B. 
Breland, A. Breece 
Bumgardner, A. S. 
Bumgardner, L. F. 
Burroughs, Robert C, Jr. 
Campbell, Ralph B. 



Cash, Allan H. 

Chapman, Wm. K. (Retired) 

Compton, Dudley D. 

Cook, Adolphus J. 

Cooley, Julius Richard 

Couch, C. Dean, Jr. 

Craig, Joe B. 

Culbreth, F. H. 

Diggs, Robert M. 

Dixon, John H. 

Elliott, James J. 

Evans, Donald C. 

Fox, Burke W. 

Franklin, A. J. 

Freedland, J. B. 

Funderburk, Ervin M. 

Galarde, A. J. 

Gibbs, John William 

Goodman, Alvin S. 

Graham, Frank R. 

Graham, James E., Jr. 

Guion, John Homer 

Hamer, Thomas N. 

Harrelson, Henry C, Jr. 

Harris, Edward F. 

Haynes, Frank K. 

Heinz, J. W. 

Heeseman, Gary, Jr. 

Hill, Brian P. 

Hoffman, Milo J. 

Hoover, Dan C. 

Hoover, R. G. 

Houser, James B., IH 

Hull, P. C. 

Hull, P. C, Jr. 

Hull, Robert H. 

Irwin, John R. 

Jarrell, William A., Jr. 

Jarrett, Charles A. 

Jarrett, John H. 

Johnson, James B. 

Johnson, Ronald L. 

Johnston, Charles M. 

Jordan, John J. 

Keerans, James L. 

Keiger, Cyrus C. 

Kendrick, Vaiden B. 

Kendrick, Z. Vance, Jr. 

Kirkendol, E. C. 

Kiser, J. Donald 

Lentz, B. P. 

Libby, Robert H. 

MacKay. Noel C. 

McFall, Walter T. 

McGowan, Donald J. 

Marbry, Don L. 

Miller, Parry G. 

Moore, E. D. 

Morris. Donald W. 

Morris, Ernest C. 

Moses, John E. 

Motley, Elliot R. 

Murphy, Martin H. 

Nisbet, Thomas G. 



37 



Owen, Kenneth D. 
Owen, Olin W. 
Patterson, Henry B. 
Peeler, L. B. 
Peery, W. Stewart 
Perlin, Mark N. 
Petersen, S. D., Jr. 
Petree, R. E. 
Pharr, John R. 
Poole, Robert H., Jr. 
Porter, W. Joseph 
Reeves, Horace P., Jr. 
Rehm, Jerome G. 
Reynolds, John A. S. 
Rider, Ernest A. 
Robinson, Charles F. 
Rogers, John T. 
Ross, Grady 
Ross, Heywood 
Schmucker, Ralph 
Sherrill, Luby T., Jr. 
Short, L. H. 

Simendinger, Wm. H., Jr. 
Smith, James R. 
Stone, Fleming H. 
Storey, Frederick B. 
Stowe, G. C, Jr. 
Stroup, Paul A., Jr. 
Taylor, C. F. 
Taylor, Lois E. 
Templeton, William B. 
Thorpe, J. O. 
Troutman, Dennis F. 
Twisdale, Harold W. 
Wall, Lester E. 
Waller, D. T. 
Watson, Robert H. 
Webster, B. H. 
Williams, Egbert P. 
Williford, William E. 
Wilson, Roy W. 
Winter, Carlton V. 
Yost, William F. 

CHERRYVILLE, 1st District 

McKee, Raymond A. 
Smith, Ray Hoyle 

CHINA GROVE, 2nd District 

Thompson, Harold W. 

CLAYTON, 4th District 

Payne, J. M. 
Tew, J. J. 

CLEMMONS, 2ntl District 

Nifong, Paul D. 

CLIFFSIDE, 1st District 

Hunt, John J. 

CLINTON, 4th District 

Bell, Morris L. 
Herring, W. I. 



Jackson, Wilbert 
Powell, J. B. 
Turlington, R. H. 

CLYDE, 1st District 

Miller, George L 

COLUMBUS, 1st District 

Oliver, John N. 

CONCORD, 2nd District 

Carlough, Robert D. 
Corl, Marshall B. 
Davis, Joe V., Jr. 
Ezzell, J. W. 
Furr, Curtis E. 
Harrell, Daniel B., Jr. 
Jones, B. E., Jr. 
Patterson, R. M. 
Reece, J. P. 
Sapp, Hubert B. 
Wadsworth, Charles H. 
Zuccarella, James B. 

CONOVER, 1st District 

Canrobert, C. W., Jr. 
Sowers, Jerry W. 

CONWAY, 5th District 

Clark, George E. 

CROSSNORE, 1st District 

Sloop, W. M. 

DAVIDSON, 2nd District 

Withers, R. M. 

DENTON, 2nd District 

Hawkins, Ralph O., Jr. 

DOBSON, 2nd District 

Folger, J. M. 

DREXEL, 1st District 

Fair, Ronald E. 

DUNN, 4th District 

Bain, C. D. 
Hooper, Glenn L. 
Jernigan, J. A. 
Jernigan, Jerry O'Dell 
Roberts, C. E. 
Townsend, Gordon L. 

DURHAM, 3rd District 

Adams, C. A., Jr. 
Adams, C. A., HI 
Atwood, T. W. (Retired) 
Bell, John T. 
Bowling, Howard X. 
Byerly, Charles T., Jr. 
Caldwell, Clell S. 
Carr, Daniel T. 
Carr, Henry C. 
Caviness, William R. 
Cherry, M. L. 



38 



Citrini, Richard J. 
Clark, C. F., Jr. 
Dilday, John S. 
Dixon, T. L. 
Dorton, John 
Draughon, Donald R. 
Draughon, Wallace R. 
Georgiade, N. G. 
Getsinger, Duncan M. 
Griffin, W. Kimball 
Harris, Guy V. 
Heath, LeRoy K. 
Howell, W. C. 
Kanoy, B. Edmond 
Kirkland, George F., Jr. 
Lazenby, Glenn A., Jr. 
Leggette, James A., Jr. 
Little, T. A. 

Mainwaring, John W., Jr. 
Matney, John L. 
Monk, Henry L., Jr. 
Pierce, T. Carlton 
Quinn, Galen W. 
Ramos, Frank M. 
Ross, Norman F. 
Ross, Thurman J. 
Sapp, Baxter B., Jr. 
Stallings, June H., Jr. 
Stallings, Riley S., Jr. 
Styers, Thomas R., Jr. 
Sugg, R. W. 
Van Vleet, David E. 
Walker, M. E. 
Wentz, W. Robert 
Willis, Guy R. 

EAST BEND, 2nd District 

Garriott, Rosebud Morse 

EDENTON, 5th District 

Griffin, Wallace S. 

Hart, W. I. 

Hines, Richard N., Jr. 

ELIZABETH CITY, 5th District 

Gollobin, Arthur 
Griffin, Lloyd E. 
Nixon, H. E. 
Riggs, A. F. 
Spence, W. M. 

ELIZABETHTOWN, 4th District 

Johnson, Clemuel Mansey 
Keith, William C. 

ELKIN, 2nd District 

Duncan, AUie H. 
Harrell, James A. 
Harrell, R. B. 
Parks, Eldon H. 
Pruett, L. Doyle 
Schiebel, E. C. 



ENKA, 1st District 

Maddox, James H. 
Quails, Dixon L. 

ERWIN, 4th District 

Woodall, D. C. 

FAIR BLUFF, 4th District 

Waddell, M. A. 

FAIRMONT, 4th District 

Floyd, Daniel J. 
Purvis, P. C. 

FAISON, 5th District 

Bowden, H. B. 

FALLSTON, 1st District 

Lutz, Gerald W. 

FARMVILLE, 5th District 

Horton, Thomas J. 
Jones, Paul E. 
Mercer, William C, Jr. 
Warren, Bert B. 

FAYETTEVILLE, 4th District 

Beck, Charles H. 
Brooks, Robert Edgar 
Ehrlich, Karl F. 
Gainey, Robert H. 
Goodwin, C. J. 
Grimes, William F. 
Hale, J. P. 
Hasty, Frederick G. 
Holzbach, Richard L. 
Lee, Douglas D. 
Lessem, Robert B. 
Maxwell, H. E. 
Mohn, R. L. 
Olive, Clarence S. 
Olive, R. M. 
Owens, William R. 
Paschal, Lawrence H. 
Pridgen, Edward N. 
Renfrow, R. R. 
Roberson, Robert W. 
Sappington, R. R., Jr. 
Smith, Newton 
Taylor, Robert B. 
Wiggs, William J. 

FLETCHER, 1st District 

Port, Forest Chester 

FOREST CITY, 1st District 

Abernethy, Charles V. 
Eaker, Yates H. 
Griffith, Charles Lee 
Mauney, R. G. 



39 



FRANKLIN, 1st District 

Furr, Walter E. 
Grant, Ben P. 
Henson, David E. 
Lawrence, Eugene W., Jr. 

FRANKLINTON, 4th District 

Eakes, S. E. 

FUQUAY SPRINGS, 4th District 

Adcock, George W., Jr. 
Edwards, J. R., Jr. 
Maus, Paul 

GARNER, 4th District 

Tally, William P. 

Woodard, Warden Lewis. Jr. 

GASTONIA, 1st District 

Boyles, J. L. 
Current, A. C, Jr. 
Current, William A. 
Froneberger, H. D. 
Lewis, James B. 
Lowry, Tolbert W. 
Moser, J. E. 
Moser, S. Everett 
Quarles, William G. 
Rhyne, Howard S. 
Sim.pson, David H. 
Taylor, Kenneth, Jr. 
Walker, Woodrow W. 
Wilson, William Danford 
Woody, M. E., Jr. 
Woody, W. L. 

GOLDSBORO, 5th District 

Boykin, Thomas C. 
Carnevale, Reynolds A. 
Cox, James L 
Delbridge, Matthew G. 
Ennis, Myron H. 
Hinnant, R. Willard 
Houston, Ben H. 
Mallard, A. R. 
Overman, G. L. 
Poole, S. D. 
Tucker, W. W. 
Warren, E. R. 
Williams, R. E. 
Zealy, James M. 

GRAHAM, 3rd District 

Johnston, Ben M. 
Long, Herbert S. 

GRANITE FALLS, 1st District 

Icenhower, E. C. 
Stevens, C. W. 

GRANITE QUARRY, 2nd District 

Sherman, Clarendon F. 



GREENSBORO, 3rd District 

Alspaugh, Laurence S. 
Atwater, Frank G. 
Bartis, Nicholas J. 
Belton, Richard P. 
Brannan, B. M., Jr. 
Burns, William D. 
Butler, H. Estes 
Butler, Luther H. 
Caldwell, J. B. 
Caudle, James N. 
Corbin, Jerry L. 
Corey, Calvin B., Jr. 
Coward, W. M. 
Ditto, W. M. 
Edwards, Edgar E. 
Efird, Ira P., Jr. 
Farmer, Robert L. 
Finn, James C. 
Gay, S. P. 

Hall, Thomas A., Jr. 
Harned, Robert J. 
Healey, Kent W. 
Henson, J. L. 
Holmes, C. Ray 
Holt, Leonidas C. 
Howell, James B. 
Hunsucker, Hugh 
Hunter, M. Ray 
Karesh, Harry A. 
Kilkelly, T. F. 
Kriegsman, Robert M. 
Landau, Lad, II 
Lasley, J. T. 
Lauten, J. J. 
Lore, John R. 
Patterson, C. E. 
Poindexter, C. C. 
Poindexter, C. W. 
Ralls, Marion L., Jr. 
Ray, A. Graham 
Rogers, Julian R. 
Saunders, W. L. 
Sears, Thomas H., Jr. 
Sessoms, W. W. 
Shaffer, S. W. 
Sheffield, Neal 
Sheffield, Neal, Jr. 
Sigmon, James W. 
Sikes, T. E. 
Sikes, T. Edgar, Jr. 
Solomon, Marshall H. 
Southworth, J. D. 
Stanford, A. R. 
Stokes, Thomas D., Jr. 
Stone, C. N. (Retired) 
Tannenbaum, A. Raymond 
Taylor, Clyde Leslie 
Teague, Charles H. 
Turner, James L. 
Turner, Robert Lee 
Turner, R. S. 
Underwood, R. L. 
Watson, Billy Joe 



40 



Whittington, P. B., Jr. 
Wolfe, Carl B. 
Young, W. Kenneth 

GREENVILLE, 5th District 

Aldridge, M. W. 
Clark, Badger G., Jr. 
Collie, Jay Mack 
Massey, M. B. 
Patrick, Donald Ray 
Ross, Ledyard E. 
Williamson, James M. 
Wright, Dan 

GRIFTON, 5th District 

Rasberry, William E. 

GUILFORD COLLEGE, 3rd District 

Butcher, Dale H. 

HAMLET, 3rd District 

Adams, Roy G. 
Williamson, B. W., Jr. 

HAVELOCK, 5th District 

Gooding, Carnie C. 
Stoddard, Alan L. 

HAZELWOOD, 1st District 

Kitts, Warren H. 
Spurlin, Max L. 

HENDERSON, 4th District 

Allen, Howard L. 
Evans, Joseph S., Jr. 
Finch, Walter H., Jr. 
Hunt, Joseph T. 
Hunter, Thomas M. 

HENDERSONVILLE, 1st District 

Barber, L. B., Jr. 
Bowling, Richard K. 
Buchanan, F. A. 
Carpenter, Joseph P. 
Carpenter, W. W. 
Clark, Alexander 
Crowell. J. G. 
Dolbee, Earl R., Jr. 
Hargrove, W. F. 
Hawkins, Charles B. 
Herren, James M. 
Holly, Norman J. 
Pope, E. F. 
Taylor, C. B. 
Taylor, Omer W. 
Winstead, J. L., Jr. 

HENRIETTA, 1st District 

Hamrick, T. Hicks, Jr. 

HERTFORD, 5th District 

Bonner, Allan Baker 



HICKORY, 1st District 

Abernethy, David 
Abernethy, G. Shuford 
Ashworth, Derwood L. 
Bost, John Dewey 
Brady, C. A. 
Brown, C. Fred 
Clayton, S. Fletcher 
Davenport, H. V. 
Fritz, C. B. 
Fritz, John R. 
Frye, David G., Jr. 
Hill, James C. 
McDowell, William W. 
Poovey, Auburn L. 
Price, James L., Jr. 
Williams, H. T. 
Yelton, William D. 

HIGHLANDS, 1st District 

Moreland, Jessie Z. 

HIGH POINT, 3rd District 

Anderson, G. N. 
Andrews, John L., Jr. 
Bencini, E. A. 
Campbell, John K. 
Campbell, William R. 
Cashion, Leonard R. 
Dawson, I. C. 
Gibson, Sam B. 
Hart, Samuel T. 
Hester, Elliott M. 
Hinson, William P., Jr. 
Horton, C. W. 
Jarvis, William C. 
Johnson, Numa C, Jr. 
Kiser, Winford J. 
McKaughan, W. R. 
Megginson, L. P., Jr. 
Surles, C. W., Jr. 
Wallace, George M. 
Zimmerman, L. H. 
Zimmerman, T. R. 

HILDEBRAN, 1st District 

Lyerly, Alan R. 

HILLSBORO, 3rd District 

Carroll, Larry W. 
Moore, H. W. 

HUDSON, 1st District 

Hefner, Allen Ray 

HUNTERSVILLE, 2nd District 

Jurney, Henry C. 

JACKSON, 5th District 

Grant, L. C. 
JACKSONVILLE, 5th District 

Browning, Henry D., IH 
Demary, C. J. 
Gaskins, R. Hogan, Jr. 



41 



Johnson, C. B. 
Jones, William R. 
Ketcham, William S. 
Morgan, W. Kenneth 
Reid, Thomas B., Jr. 
Turner, L. R. 
Willis, Weston A. 

JAMESTOWN, 3rd District 

Herndon, Claude H. 

JONESVILLE, 2nd District 

Miller, Fred C. 

[ANNAPOLIS, 2nd District 

Alexander, George S. 
Lipe, E. W. 
Moon, Hewitt E. 
Morgan, Eugene Brown 
Morgan, Eugene B., Jr. 
Parks, J. H. 
Ridenhour, C. E. 
Slaughter, Freeman C. 
Troutman, M. L. 

[ERNERSVILLE, 2nd District 

Griffin, Donald C. 
Joyner, O. L. 
Pegg, Fred N. 
Southard, F. J. 

KING, 2nd District 

Booe, I. A. 
Fowler, William F. 
Helsabeck, W. J. 

KINGS MOUNTAIN, 1st District 

Baker, Luther P. 
Baker, Robert N. 
Baker, Thomas P. 
Hord, D. F. 
Lewis, O. P. 



KINSTON, 5th District 

Beasley, Britton F. 
Civils, H. F. 
Dupree, Louis J., Jr. 
Edwards, George L., Jr. 
Gilbert, Robert H. 
Goldwasser, J. M. 
Henson, Donald L. 
Pearce, O. R., Jr. 
Privette, James A. 
Rose, Junius H., Jr. 
Sanders, Phil S. 
Smith, Grover W. 
Spear, Herbert 

KNIGHTDALE, 4th District 

Ransom, Rollin M., Jr. 

LA GRANGE, 5th District 

Morgan, Fabian 



LANDIS, 2nd District 

Kluttz, Robert F. 

LAURINBURG, 4th District 

Bidden, Alex J. 
Bidden, F. H. 
Johnson, Joseph M. 
Polk, Robert M., Jr. 

LAWNDALE, 1st District 

Hord, Dwight B. 

LEAKSVILLE, 3rd District 

Blanchard, Manfred T. 
Sugg, Charles H. 

LENOIR, 1st District 

Cook, Dennis S. 
Cook, Dennis S., Jr. 
Forbes, M. M. 
Graham, R. H. 
Hedrick, Paul E. 
Hedrick, Paul P. 
Reece, John F. 
Shaw, Frederick C. 
Yates, P. P. (Retired) 

LEXINGTON, 2nd District 

Bingham, J. P. 
Bingham, J. P., Jr. 
Hood, J. Sidney 
Hoover, Charles W. 
Ration, Thomas G. 
Shoaf, R. R. 
Smith, Amos H. 
Sowers, Wade Andrew 
Wnkins, H. F., Jr. 

LIBERTY, 3rd District 

Butler, Thomas E. 

LILLINGTON, 4th District 

Marshbanks, B. P., Jr. 
Pate, Grover C. 

LINCOLNTON, 1st District 

Bowman, James C. 
Harrill, C. H. 
Self, Fred L. 
Self, Isaac R. 
Self, I. R., Jr. 
Steelman, S. H. 
Warren, Ray Alexander 

LOUISBURG, 4th District 

Eagles, R. L. 
Pleasants, Marvin 

LUMBERTON, 4th District 

King, David D., Jr. 
Moore, L. J., Jr. 
Nantz, G. R. 



42 



Osborne, Colin P., Jr. 
Robinson, Ernest L. 

MADISON, 3rd District 

Lewis, William H., Jr. 
McAnally, C. W. 

MAIDEN, 1st District 

Kyles, C. Paul 

MANTEO, 5th District 

Edwards, Linus M., Jr. 
Mustian, W. F. 

MARION, 1st District 

Dickson, B. A. 
McCall, R. S. 
Parker, C. A. 
Rowe, O. D. 

MARSHALL, 1st District 

Ramsey, Arthur M. 

MARS HILL, 1st District 

Sams, Roy B. 

MARSHVILLE, 2nd District 

Wilson, Charles R. 

MATTHEWS, 2nd District 

Rogers, Russell J., Jr. 

MAXTON, 4th District 

Wicker, B. K. 

MAYODAN, 3rd District 

Ellis, William W. 

MEBANE, 3rd District 

Foust, James A., Jr. 
Hook, Brevitt 

MOCKSVILLE, 2nd District 

Andrews, James E. 
Andrews, Victor L., Jr. 
Eckerd, E. A. 

MONROE, 2nd District 

Brooks, H. L. 
Duncan, S. C. 
Kistler, A. R. 
McLeod, William H. 
Price, William H. 
Walters, Percy Frank 
Wilson, F. M. 

MOORESVILLE, 2nd District 

Brawley, Boyce A. 
Bridges, Worth T., Jr. 
Gray, Robert C. 
Rogers, Harding W., Jr. 
Sholar, Norman P. 
Trivette, L. P. 



MOREHEAD CITY, 5th District 

Eure, Darden J. 
Freshwater, David H. 
Hamilton, A. L., Jr. 

MORGANTON, 1st District 

Coffey, Ralph D. 
Diercks, C. C. 
Falls, Ralph L. 
Johnson, Thomas G., Jr. 
Keels, Cameron H., Jr. 
McBrayer, Gerald F. 
Mazitis, Erika K. 
Milligan, Ronnie R. 
Paisley, R. L. 
Pattishall, Franklin D. 
Sain, H. T. 
Smith, Fred J. 
Winchester, P. W. 

MOUNT AIRY, 2nd District 

Ashby, John L. 
Boyd, S. M. 
Conduff, Duke P. 
George, Robert A. 
Moorefield, Paul 
Oliver, Otis 
Sutphin, Hugh E. 
Thomas, Carl L. 

MOUNT GILEAD, 3rd District 

Harwood, Brooks W. 

MOUNT HOLLY, 1st District 

Hawkins, Bruce H. 
Lucas, Walter J. 
Moore, Raymond Tillett 

MOUNT OLIVE, 5th District 

Bullard, Amos J., Jr. 
Lee, James Higley 
Wilkins, R. A. 

MURFREESBORO, 5th District 

Britt, W. F. 

Vinson, Thomas W., Jr. 

MURPHY, 1st District 

Dickey, Harry 
Hill, J. N., Jr. 

NASHVILLE, 5th District 

Jackson, David S. 

NEW BERN, 5th District 

Barker, Charles T. 
Bratton, Lewis P. 
Civils, Harvey W. 
Gilbert, William B., Jr. 
Hammond, W. L. 
Hand, William L., Jr. 
Johnson, Charles B. 
Miller, Fred H. 
Miller, Roy A., Jr. 



43 



NEWTON, 1st District 

Adair, John T. 
Barringer, M. R. 
Cochran, James D., Jr. 
Isenhower, Samuel H. 

NORTH WILKESBORO 

2nd District 

Baldwin, Harry N. 
Bentley, C. W. 
Bentley, Keith L. 
Casey, R. P. 
Taylor, Robert G. 
West, James B. 
White, T. L. 
Williams, Carolyn T. 

NORWOOD, 3rd District 

Trail, Julian S. 

OLD FORT, 1st District 

Snyder, Jerald M. 

OXFORD, 4th District 

Bryan, J. K. 
Finch, S. J. 
Hardy, John B., Jr. 
Martin, John Wayne 
Pruitt, James F. 
Sneed, Thomas Q., Jr. 

PILOT MOUNTAIN, 2nd District 

Agress, Bernard D. 
Stone, I. F. 

PINEHURST, 3rd District 

Smith, John Watson, Jr. 

PINETOFS, 5th District 

Anderson, Wayne C. 

PINK HILL, 5th District 

Edwards, Henry A. 

PITTSBORO, 3rd District 

Hughes, John T. 
Miska, M. G. 
Williams, James Lowell 
Wilson, Noah Rouse, Jr. 

PLEASANT GARDEN 

3rd District 

Fields, Richard M. 

PLYMOUTH, 5th District 

Bennett, Carter T. 
Johnson, W. H. 

POINT HARBOR, 5th District 

Nance, A. W. (Retired) 

lAEFORD, 4th District 

Jordan, J. F. 
Smith, Marcus R. 



RALEIGH, 4th District 

Abernethy, C. E. 
Attayek, Eli J. 
Baker, E. D. 
Beam, R. S. 
Bell, Franklin D. 
Bell, Victor E. 
Bitler, Glenn F. 
Bobbitt, S. L. 
Branch, W. Howard 
Broughton, E. H. 
Byrd, Robert T. 
Byrd, Thomas H., IH 
Chamblee, H. Royster 
Collins, Thomas G. 
Crawford, James A. 
Dudney, George G. 
Earp, Roy L. 
Edwards, James H. 
Fetzer, Thomas H. 
Finch, Robert E. 
Fitzgerald, Paul, Jr. 
Gaines, Roy E. 
Hale, G. Fred 
Hargrove, Albert W. 
Harris, Thomas H. 
Herring, L. D, 
Hunter, R. S. 
Jackson, Don F. 
Jackson, Ruth T. 
Johnson, Kenneth L. 
Kelley, Wesley E. 
Kistler, Charles M. 
Ledbetter, Charles B. 
Lee, William J. 
Ligon, J. H., Jr. 
Lineberger, Henry O., Jr. 
McAllister, J. Malcolm 
McCaffity, Darwin W. 
Marshall, Penn, Jr. 
Martin, Benny Worth 
Martin, William T. 
Masters, David B. 
Menius, J. A. 
Morrison, Robert R., Jr. 
Morrison, Virgil McKee 
Nelson, J. S. D. 
Nelson, T. E., Jr. 
Nicholson, M. P., Jr. 
Oakley, Kenneth H., Jr. 
Pearce, J. A. 
Pearson, E. A., Jr. 
Perry, T. Edwin 
Rankin, W. W. 
Roe, Jere E. 
Seifert, D. W., Jr. 
Smith, A. L., Jr. 
Smith, Everett L. 
Smith, Vonnie B. 
Sproul, J. Fred 
Stanley, Lloyd B. 
Swain, John P. 
Swindell, James E. 
Thompson, S. W., Ill 



44 



Towler, S. B. 
Young, Thurman L. 
Zaytoun, Henry S. 

RAMSEUR, 3rd District 

Graham, C. A. 
Graham, C. A., Jr. 

RANDLEMAN, 3rd District 

Chamberlain, Vander F. 
Kistler, C. D. 

RED SPRINGS, 4th District 

McKay, S. R. 
Stephenson, G. W. 

REIDSVILLE, 3rd District 

Almond, C. Franklin 
Daniel, Robert Lee 
Moore, J. S. 
Moore, Walter H. 
Teague, Everette R. 
Upchurch, Gilbert R. 
Wheless, J. R. 

RICH SQUARE, 5th District 

Brown, James W. 
Outland, Robert B., Jr. 

ROANOKE RAPIDS, 5th District 

Daniel, R. A., Jr. 
Daughtry, Curtiss W. 
Murphrey, W. E., Jr. 
Peck, Robert B. 
Ward, James A. 

ROBBINS, 3rd District 

Alexander, W. E. 

ROBERSONVILLE, 5th District 

Kilpatrick, J. M. 

ROCKINGHAM, 3rd District 

Haltiwanger, George A. 
Haltiwanger, William L., Jr. 
Nicholson, Robert A. 
Stubbs, J. M. 

ROCKWELL, 2nd District 

Holshouser, L. C. 

ROCKY MOUNT, 5th District 

Campbell, Walter E. 
Carson, J. Royal, Jr. 
Eatman, C. D. 
Eatman, E. L. 
Fisher, Julian H. 
Fuerst, Herbert 
Godwin, Charles P. 
Hartness, John D. 
Hunt, Richard F., Jr. 
Minges, C. E. 



Minges, C. R. 
Smithson, T. W. 
Vaughan, Thomas R., Jr. 
White, Robert Dean 
Whitehead, A. P. 
Whitehurst, R. L. 
Young, H. L. 

ROSEBORO, 4th District 

Williams, Harry R. 

ROWLAND, 4th District 

Gibson, Jesse C. 

ROXBORO, 3rd District 

Bradsher, J. D. 
Chandler, Frederick M. 
Hall, Norman C. 
Hughes, Charles W. 
Long, Robert E. 
Woody, F. Spencer 

RURAL HALL, 2nd District 

Helsabeck, C. Robert, Jr. 
Lamb, Lewis E., Jr. 
Ziglar, James N., Jr. 

RUTHERFORDTON, 1st District 

McBrayer, William F. 
McDaniel, W. J. 

SAINT PAULS, 4th District 

Cameron, Lawrence A. 
Moore, L. J. 

SALISBURY, 2nd District 

Blackman, W. W. 
Blackwell, Glen E. 
Buford, J. T. H. 
Chandler, F. H. 
Choate, E. C. 
Dennis, Bill 
Hinson, Wade A. 
Ketner, Bruce A. 
Kirk, Frank W. 
Kirk, W. S. 
Lomax, Bobby A. 
Spencer, John R. 
Taylor, W. C. 
Thurston, M. Stevenson 
Weant, Theodore F. 
Wharton, Richard G. 
Young, D. Clyde, Jr. 
Zimmerman, John W., Jr. 

SANFORD, 4th District 

Barber, A. D. 
Byrd, Worth M. 
Cotter, Paul Eric 
Deibler, Eugene C. 
Edrington, Charles E. 
Harris, Franklin G. 



45 



Hulin, James F. 
Lehmann, James H. 
McCracken, F. W., Ill 
Woltz, William Lee, Jr. 

SCOTLAND NECK, 5th District 

Lilley, M. M. 

SELMA, 4th District 

Wood, Jerry F. 

SHALLOTTE, 5th District 

Holden, Rothschild H. 
Madison, John T. 

SHELBY, 1st District 

Burrus, Roy G., Jr. 
Edwards, A. C. 
Edwards, Byard F. 
Henshaw, William R. 
Litton, Robert B. 
Murphy, Richard F. 
Noblitt, Perry M. 
Plaster, Harold Edwin 
Plaster, Hubert S. 
Raymer, J. L. 
Thompson, John L., Jr. 
Yelton, John L. 

SILER CITY, 3rd District 

Blair, Mott P. 
Edwards, W. J. 
Godwin, Donald R. 
Milliken, J. B. 

SKYLAND, 1st District 

Thomas, George H. 

SMITHFIELD, 4th District 

Denning, John N. 
Grantham, Norman B., Jr. 
Lee, William G. 
Oliver, William H. 
Whitehead, J. W. 

SNOW HILL, 5th District 

Wooten, George A. 

SOUTHERN PINES, 3rd District 

Anderson, George D. 
Daniels, L. M. 
Johnson. W. Harrell 
Warlick, R. B. 

SOUTHPORT, 5th District 

Conrad, C. Richard 

SPARTA, 2nd District 

Johnson, G. Terry 

SPENCER, 2nd District 

Howell. Albert E. 
Snider, William H. 



SPINDALE, 1st District 

Whisnant, James F. 

SPRAY, 3rd District 

Bebber, James V. 
O'Leary, Joseph A. 

SPRING HOPE, 5th District 

Inscoe, Ashby G. 

SPRING LAKE, 4th District 

Wallace, Mitchell W. 

SPRUCE PINE, 1st District 

Braswell, Jack G. 
Davenport, William 
Peake, Dean R. 
Woody, L. W., Jr. 

STANLEY, 1st District 

McCall, Clyde N. 

STAR, 3rd District 

Hussey, T. E. 

STATESVILLE, 2nd District 

Cheek, Donald G. 
Dearman, J. H. 
Dorton, M. Lamar 
Fowler, Harold D., Jr. 
Gaither, F. Glen 
Haddix, Guy E. 
Holland, J. M. 
Honeycutt, Wallace B. 
Little, James E. 
Long, Robert 
Martin, Ernest L. 
Montgomery, D. O. 
Nicholson, J. H. 
Rodgers, James F. 
Williams, Joel Sherrod 

SUMMFRFIELD, 3rd District 

Fox, Robert M. 

SWANNANOA, 1st District 

Faucette, John W. 

SWAN3BORO, 5th District 

Dupree, Lewis J. 

SYLVA, 1st District 

Bird, Charles W. 
McGuire, Alice Patsy 
McGuire, Daisy Z. 
McGuire, Harold S. 
McGuire, W. P. 
Wilson, Noracella McGuire 

TABOR CITY, 4th District 

Cook, David E. 



46 



TARAWA TERRACE, 5th District 

O'Berry, Walter S. 

TARBORO, 5th District 

Fleming, T. S. 
Hoard, J. S., Ill 
Moore, R. W. 
Weeks, H. E. 

TAYLORSVILLE, 2nd District 

Grant, Robert W. 
Herman, Ralph E. 

THOMASVILLE, 2nd District 

Hodgin, O. R. 
Holliday, R. H. 
McGhee, James G. 
Moore, Robin O. 
Whicker, Thomas A. 
Williams, Jabez H., Jr. 

TROY, 3rd District 

Bland, Wilbur B. 
Kornegay, Thomas A. 

TRYON, 1st District 

Derby, J. E. (Retired) 
McCall, C. W. 
Mize, John T. 

VALDESE, 1st District 

Hagaman, Robert P. 
Parker, W. H. 
Wehunt, Lloyd D. 

WADESBORO, 3rd District 

Bridger, R. L. 
Mauldin, Joel Lee 
Williamson, J. F. 

WAKE FOREST, 4th District 

Dickens, Carl W. 
Spencer, William R. 
Underwood, Nash H. 

WALLACE, 5th District 

Bland, A. B. 
Bland, Donald E. 
Johnson, B. McK. 
Wells, DeLeon, Jr. 
Zibelin, C. V. 

WALNUT COVE, 2nd District 

DeHart, V. L. 

WARRENTON, 4th District 

Jones, Rufus S. 
Massey, S. H., Jr. 
White, Walter A. 

WARSAW, 5th District 

Ausley, Mett B. 
Kornegay, J. M. 



WASHINGTON, 5th District 

Duke, J. F. 
Edwards, Zeno L. 
Edwards, Zeno L., Jr. 
Homes, Garland R. 
Howdy, Frederick H. 
Kidd, William E. 
Trueblood, Samuel N. 

WAYNESVILLE, 1st District 

Medford, N. M. 
Medford, Phil McR. 
Ogden, Fred N., II 
Prevost, William S., Jr. 

WEAVERVILLE, 1st District 

Bolinger, H. E. 

WELCOME, 2nd District 

Butler, Wallace B. 

WELDON, 5th District 

Garriss, Marcus A. 

WENDELL, 4th District 

Blalock, C. A. 

Horton, Leland Clifford 

Horton, R. L. 

WEST JEFFERSON, 1st District 

Jones, E. D. 
Summey, Brett T. 

WHITEVILLE, 4th District 

Johnson, M. L. 
Maultsby, William D. 
Ward, E. Ben 
Whitson, Ronald W. 

WILKESBORO, 2nd District 

Hudson, Smith R. 

WILLIAMSTON, 5th District 

Gray, W. H., Jr. 
Wright, E. K., Jr. 

WILMINGTON, 5th District 

Allen, Sidney V. 
Barden, R. B. 
Bellois, W. B. 
Benson, E. S., Jr. 
Broughton, J. O. 
Fales, A. R. 
Eraser, John E. 
Furr, James E. 
Harris, Archie L. 
Hollis, Robert H. 
Jewell, Edwin Smith 
Keith, H. Leonidas, Jr. 
Morgan, Bernard L. 
Morrison, B. R. 
Pigford, Guy E. 
Russ, Bobby M. 
Seitter, D. B., Jr. 



47 



Smith, James H. 
Smith, Junius C. 
Thomas, C. A. 
Thompson, Horace K. 
Weathersbee, Ramsey 
Weathersbee, Ramsey, Jr. 

WILSON, 5th District 

Barnes, V. M. 
Bissette, M. D. 
Boseman, Dewey 
Cooke, Charles S. 
Etheridge, James E. 
Hesmer, T. C, Jr. 
Hooks, Oscar 
Johnson, A. Dwight 
Lee, Lewis W. 
Linville, Walter S., Jr. 
Turner, J. V. 
Wall, Joe Thomas 
Whitehurst, Raymond C, Jr. 
Wilson, G. Curtis 
Wooten, A. L. 
Yelverton, Hugh 

WINSTON-SALEM, 2nd District 

Ausband, Samuel P. 
Barkley, Carl A. 
Beavers, D. L. 
Beavers, Franklin C. 
Bennett, Jack 
Blackburn, Charles A. 
Blair, Thomas L. 
Blankenbeckler, James D. 
Boyles, Robert S. 
Byerly, Robert T. 
Christian, Bill J. 
Clinard, Robert W. 
Collins, Thomas R. 
Cox, Vernon H. 
Crotts, Hylton K. 
Crow, William E. 
Culbreath, James C, Jr. 
Cummings, Paul M., Jr. 
Daniel, Frank H. 
Duncan, N. J. 
Farthing, J. Clopton 
Fox, N. D. 
Freund, O. J. 
Gustafson, Bruce A. 
Hinkle, David R. 
Hopkins, Edmund B. 
Irvin, Emory W. 
Jackson, Dwight A. 
Jent, Herman C. 
Levine, H. H. 



Long, John S. 
Lynch, William G. 
Masten, Guy M. 
Masten, R. E. 
Meadows, Kenneth H. 
Meadows, Van B. 
Melvin, R. Philip 
Mendenhall, F. C. 
Moser, Kenneth B. 
Nash, Richard E. 
Nissen, Eva Carter 
Phillips, Guy M. 
Phillips, Kenneth R. 
Reich, E. H. 
Reid, Curtis S. 
Riddle, William F. 
Scherer, Richard F. 
Smith, Thomas A. 
Snyder, Kenneth Ray 
Spillman, J. Harry 
Spoon, Riley E., Jr. 
Stewart, Joseph D. 
Strupe, James G. 
Taylor, Gerald T. 
Teofan, Ronald O. 
Tomlinson, F. N. 
Ware, William G., Jr. 
Waynick, George E., Jr. 
Waynick, I. M. 
Weeks, W. P. 
Westrick, Charles M. 
Wilkinson, Robert M. 
Williams, John R. 
Yelton, W. F. 
Yokeley, Gilbert W. 
Yokeley, K. M. 
Young, Douglas M. 
Zimmerman, H. Stokes 

WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH, 

5th District 

Crank, J. Cecil 

YADKINVILLE, 2nd District 

Todd, Walden R. 
Walker, Frank H. 

YANCEYVILLE, 3rd District 

Page, Graham A. 
Page, L. G. 

ZEBULON, 4th District 

Coltrane, J. F. 
Massey, L. M. 
Massey, Zyba K. 



48 



MEMBERS 

Residing Out-Of-State and in Military Service. 



Cregar, Daniel U., Jr. (3) 1563-69 
So. Atlantic, Apt. 5, Cocoa Beach, 
Fla. 32931 

Gulp, Donald D. (2) P. O. Box 1307, 
Craig Air Force Base, Ala. 

Dulev, Lyman L. (5) 314 North 36 
Street, Paducah, Ky. 42001 

Dunn, John R. (5) 823 Med. Gp., 
Box 306, Homestead AFB, Fla. 
33033 

Hartness, J. F. (2) 454 Villa Grande 
Ave., South, St. Petersburg, Fla. 
33707 

Home, George N. (2) The Knowell 
Bldg., Winter Park, Fla. 32789 

Irvin, John L. (3) Box 21, 
U.S.A.F.E. Hospital, APO 220, 
New York, N. Y. 

Johnson, Carol H. (1) Box 168 
Children's Hospital, 300 Long- 
wood Ave., Boston, Mass. 



Large, Nelson D. (2) VA Hospital, 
Richmond, Va. 

Peppers, James F. (1) 5719-A Dal- 
ton, Fort Knox, Ky. 

Pruitt, Charles C, Jr. (4) Dental 
Department, U. S. Naval Air Sta- 
tion, Pensacola, Fla. 

Schneider, John J., Dental Dept., 
Marine Corps Recruit Dept., Par- 
ris Island, S. C. 

Smith, Clayton B., Jr. (5) 217 76th 
Street, Virginia Beach, Va. 

Thomas, Robert E. (3) 3970th Hos- 
pital, APO 283, New York, N. Y. 
10001 

Underwood, J. T. (3) Clay's Apart- 
ment House, Blackstone, Va. 
23824 

Ward, G. Thomas (1) P. O. Box 28, 
Cape May, New Jersey 08204 



OFFICERS 1965— ALLIED ORGANIZATIONS 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL ASSISTANTS ASSOCIATION 

President: Mrs. Reandy Clement, 800 St. Mary's Street Raleigh 

President-Elect: Miss Carey E. Sherrill, Route 1 Stanley 

Vice President: Mrs. Shelby Brown, 800 St. Mary's Street Raleigh 

Secretary: Miss Joyce Sigmon, Central Piedmont 

Commimity College, 1141 Elizabeth Avenue Charlotte 

Assistant Secretary: Miss Linda Burke, 

UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 

Treasurer: Mrs. Frances McPherson, 400 Alamance Road Burlington 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL AUXILIARY 

President: Mrs. J. H. Dearman, 333 Oakwood Drive Statesville 

President-Elect: Mrs. William A. Mynatt, 46 Hilltop Road Asheville 

Vice President: Mrs. Barry G. Miller, 6047 Brookhaven Road.... Charlotte 
Recording Secretary: Mrs. M. Lamar Dorton, 136 Park Street.... Statesville 
Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. F. Glen Gaither, 

512 Hedrick Drive Statesville 

Treasurer: Mrs. H. W. Gooding Ayden 

Historian: Mrs. Joseph Johnson, Box 645 Laurinburg 

Parliamentarian: Mrs. Ralph D. Coffey, Box 693 Morganton 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL HYGIENISTS ASSOCIATION 

President: Miss Jean Stines, W-4 Beverly Apartments Asheville 

President-Elect: Mrs. Sheila Wright, 1812 Mecklenburg A venue.. Charlotte 

Vice President: Mrs. Mary F. Starrette, P. O. Box 1204 Statesville 

Secretary: Mrs. Jackelyn K. Morris, A-6 Beverly Apartments Asheville 

Treasurer: Mrs. Gail H. McLean, 2423 Nation Avenue Durham 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL LABORATORY ASSOCIATION 

President: Mr. J. Fred Horton, Box 900 Wilson 

President-Elect: Mr. C. G. Renfroe, P. O. Box 6 Charlotte 

Secretary-Treasurer: Mr. R. L. Jones, Box 1230 Reidsville 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF DENTAL EXAMINERS 

President: S. L. Bobbitt (1966), 719 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27601 

Secretary-Treasurer: C. C. Diercks (1967), Box 490 Morganton 28655 

G. Shuford Abernethy (1966), 407 Second Street, N.W Hickory 28601 

R. B. Barden (1967), 916 S. 17th Street Wilmington 28401 

Wade H. Breeland (1968), Breeland Buildmg Belmont 28012 

Guy R. Willis (1968), 910 Central Carolina Bank Bldg Durham 27701 



VI' 



'fGRAM ISSUE 
I IL 1966 



May is American Fund 
for Dental Education 
Month 




KEEP 
DENTISTRY 



MOVING UP! 




„»80 \«B 



OF THEJVORTH CAROLINA 
L SOCIETY 




NO. 2 



ov 




0'N\^\^LV^^^.. 



^l^^ 



00<^ 





.j^ 



Dental Hygiene Clinic Layout 

Central Piedmont Community College 
Charlotte. N. C. 



IIS MEMORY OF ROBERT WOODWARD 
1898-1965 




Dentistry and the laboratory industry lost one of their most loyal friends 
with the passing of Bob Woodward, November 17, 1965. 

Mr. Woodward opened the doors of the Woodward Prosthetic Company 
in Greensboro in 1921. He was proud to work with the dental profession 
for forty-four years, and his laboratory will continue to operate with his 
same loyal employees and his daughter, Margaret. 

He very unselfishly devoted the best part of his life to elevate the 
laboratory industry and to support organized denistry in every way he 
could. His memory will be cherished for a long time by his family, his 
employees, and his many friends, not only in North Carolina, but through- 
out the United States. 



WOODWARD PROSTHETIC COMPANY 

153 Bishop Street 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 

P. O. Drawer C. Phone: 272-1108 



BEST WISHES 

FOR 

AN 

ENJOYABLE MEETING 



THOMPSON DENTAL CO. 




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your meeting. 



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[1] 










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THE JOURNAL 

of 
The North Garohna Dental Society 

(A Constituent of the American Dental Association) 



OFFICERS 
1965-1966 

Pearce Roberts, Jr., D.D.S. 
President 
Asheville 

J. Homer Guion, D.D.S. 

President-Elect 

Charlotte 

fAMES A. Harrell, D.D.S. 

Vice President 
Elkin 

W. Poindexter, D.D.S. 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Greensboro 



DISTRICT EDITORS 

F. A. Buchanan, D.D.S. 

First District 

Hendersonville 

W. G. Ware, Jr., D.D.S. 
Second District 
Winston-Salem 

liCHARD M. Fields, D.D.S. 

Third District 

Pleasant Garden 

Glenn F. Bitler, D.D.S. 

Fourth District 

Raleigh 

Fames A. Privette, D.D.S. 
Fifth District 
,,, Kinston 



VOLUME 49 NUMBER 2 

APRIL 1966 



Page 

Dedication Williams 4 

The President's Page Roberts 5 

Editor's Comment Miller 6 

Editorials 8 

Press Relations for the Professional 

Society Roseman 12 

Partsch Operation for the Treatment of a 

Dentigerous Cyst Clark 19 

What's Wrong With Us? Klein 22 

Changing Concepts in the Management of the 

Cleft Lip-Palate Patient Georgiade 25 

On Bridging a Gap McKenzie 32 

Impacted Third Molar and Dentigerous 

Cyst -. Clark 34 

A Busy Board Diercks 37 

The Effectiveness of the Electric Toothbrush 
in Reducing Oral Debris in Handicapped 

Children Oldenburg 39 

NCDHA Adopts Resolution Williams 44 

110th Annual Session — Preliminary Program.... 45 

NCDAA Program 61 

N. C. Dental Auxiliary Program 62 

NCDHA Program 64 

NCDLA Program 65 

Health Careers for North Carolina Dinguess 66 

Open Reduction and Fixation of Com- 
pound Comminuted Fracture of the 

Mandible Clark 70 

Book Reviews 73 

General News 75 

Obituaries 78 



Editor-Publisher: Barry G. Miller, D.D.S Charlotte 

Associate Editor-Publisher: M. Lamar Dorton, D.D.S Statesville 

Photographic Editor: Baxter B. Sapp, Jr., D.D.S Durham 

Managing Editor: Andrew M. Cunningham, B.S Raleigh 



Publication Office: P. O. Box 11065, Raleigh, N. C, 27604 

Published four times a year, January, April, August and September by the North 
Carolina Dental Society, 405 W. Peace St., Raleigh, N. C. 27603. The closing dates 
for the Journal are February 1, June I, and November 1. The subscription rate is 
$2.00 per year. Second-class postage paid at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 

13 ] 



In grateful appreciotion 
this issue is dedicated to 




R. E. (Bill) Williams, D.D.S. 
Goldsboro, North Carolina 



Dr. Williams was born and raised in Warren County. He attended War- 
ren High School and Trinity College. He received his D.D.S. degree from 
the University of Maryland School of Dentistry in 1925 and was a member 
of Xi Psi Phi. Since establishing his practice in Goldsboro, he has been, 
an active leader in local, state, and national dental organizations. He is a; 
life member of the North Carolina Dental Society and the American| 
Dental Association, a member of the International College of Dentists,, 
and a member of Federation Dentaire International. He is a past presi- 
dent of the Fifth District Dental Society and the Wayne County Dental 
Society. 

In addition to his many dental interests. Dr. Williams has been active in 
civic affairs. He was president of his Civitan Club in 1943 and Civitan 
International recently honored him for 25 years of service. For 30 years 
he served his county as a member of the Wayne County Board of Health. [ 

Because of his service to dentistry and his community, we dedicate this 
issue of the Journal. 

[4] 





XAT'hat does one write when he sits down to write his last message to 
the membership? Can he possibly convey in writing his true apprecia- 
tion for the sincere efforts expended by the members in behalf of their 
Society? Can he thank them for the completion of assignments that will re- 
quire years to complete? I think not, because I believe each assignment is 
a continuation, not a yearly project. 

I do say, "Thank You" for the capable handling of the arduous jobs 
you were assigned, for the many miles you have traveled in behalf of your 
Society, for the dollars expended without thought of reimbursement, for 
the many hours given to assignments which could have been devoted to 
family and friends, for your advice, your interest and understanding, and 
for your interest, attendance, and gentlemanly action during the special 
meeting of the general membership. 

Please join me at our annual meeting in greeting our American Dental 
Association President, Dr. Maynard K. Hine, and our Fifth District Trustee, 
Dr. Arthur W. Kellner. 

Participate and voice your opinions as we discuss in our House of Dele- 
gates our role in this changing world, suggested program of prepayment, 
your Society's financial future, present and future plans for the education 
of dental auxiliaries, central office relocation, redistricting, and many other 
subjects of interest. 

Attend and enjoy with me the scientific program as we welcome to our 
State Essayists Dr. John C. Bartels, Dr. Ralph H. Boos, and Dr. Thomas K. 
Cureton. 






I look forward to greeting you at Pinehurst for the best meeting ever. 

Pearce Roberts, Jr., D.D.S. 



[5] 



EDITOR'S COMMENT 




Dr. Miller 

Demont Roseman, Jr., Presented 
"Press Relations for the 
Professional Society" 

at the District Officers Confer- 
ence. Mr. Roseman is a student of 
the press and his comments are of 
more than passing significance. This 
forthright presentation should be 
appreciated by every dentist. 

Case Reports Numbers 3, 4, and 5 

Months have passed and no one 
has accepted Dwight Clark's chal- 
lenge. An exchange of this interest 
in our patients would serve to bene- 
fit the population of this State. 
Thank you, Dwight, for your sig- 
nificant contributions. 

What's Wrong With Us? 

Reprinted from the Ohio State 
Dental Journal. This was a contro- 
versial article in the Ohio State Den- 
tal Journal. The editor's personal 



Barry G. Miller 



acquaintance with the author was 
the motivation for this publica- 
tion. May you find it provocative. 

Cleft Lip Palate Patient 

N. Georgiade gives us insight into 
some of the concepts of manage- 
ment of these patients. This con- 
tribution to our repertoire of 
knowledge not only gives further 
understanding, but should also alert 
us to our responsibility for these ex- 
ceptional patients. 

Reflections 

Reprinted from the National Ob 
server, January 31, 1966. J. Nor 
man McKenzie, a layman, might 
suggest to us the image of dentistry 
The editor found this to be an in- 
teresting article. The conviction 
must necessarily be that what Mr. 




Dr. Dwight L. Clark 



[6] 



McKenzie thinks of dentistry, only 
dentists have painted the picture. 

Al Busy Board 

Dr. Dierck's article should have 
[rom you a second look! The North 
Carolina State Board of Dental Ex- 
aminers is the one body, more than 
any other, that makes us a true 
profession. By understanding their 
functions and interest our public's 
lealth will be protected. 

ige The Electric Toothbrush 

"'' As more of these aids for oral 
hygiene are approved by the Coun- 
cil on Therapeutics of the ADA, 
'" we will perhaps have greater inter- 
'^ est in the use and effectiveness of 
the electric toothbrush. Dr. Olden- 
burg gives us a clinical evaluation 
of different methods of establishing 
oral hygiene. Thorough reading of 
this article and its references will 
enable us to give more intelligent 
direction to our patients. 

Health Careers 

Prejudice is not inherited. It is 
caught not taught — from the turn 





Dr. N. G. Georgiade 

of a head, a few words, the comic 
on TV, the tales of ridicule by grand- 
mothers, aunts and uncles, and from 
the community itself. Prejudice is 
contagious. 

Dentistry is now a public body to 
endeavor to stamp out the pesti- 
lence! Health Careers merit our sup- 
port and enthusiasm. The author 
has given an excellent resume of 
Health Careers. Be counted now, 
practitioners and auxiliaries, that 
the best available of our youth might 
find dentistry inviting and exciting. 




Dr. T. R. Oldenburg 



Lo Rayne Dinguess 



[7] 



Editorials 



LET'S KEEP DENTISTRY MOVING UP 



Tn 1964 the Trustees of the Ameri- 
can Dental Association pro- 
claimed the month of May as 
"American Fund for Dental Educa- 
tion Month." Each year since that 
time the American Fund for Den- 
tal Education has conducted an ap- 
peal for support of dental educa- 
tion among all dental personnel. The 
appeal established a new record for 
support in 1965 with a 304 per 
cent increase over all previous ef- 
forts. 

In our State, however, only 44 
dentists supported this worthy en- 
deavor. A total of $693.00 was 
given. During 1965 the American 
Fund for Dental Education granted 
a total of $2,125.00 to our dental 
school at the University of North 
Carolina. The cumulative total of 
A.F.D.E. grants to our school is 
$15,471.00. Surely the dentists of 
the State of North Carolina can do 
more in 1966 to support a program 
which has been so generous with our 
own people. 

The theme for the campaign is 
very appropriately "Keep Dentistry 
Moving Up." The growth and de- 
velopment of our profession is di- 
rectly dependent upon our dental 
schools. The program of the Ameri- 



can Fund for Dental Education is 
becoming increasingly important in 
the improvement and expansion of 
dental schools. The Fund is attract- 
ing large contributions from national 
corporations not in any way related 
to dentistry. The dental profession 
must give the Fund tangible en- 
dorsement in order that they may 
tell these prospective contributors 
"the dental profession believes in' 
and is supporting this program" — 
millions of dollars are at stake. 

You v/ill be receiving a letter froni 
Dr. Gerald D. Timmons during the* 
month of May — read it carefully pi 
and then let's do our part to help 
keep dentistry moving up. Let's 
prove that North Carolina believes 
in the future of our profession and 
that we are willing to invest of our-f 
selves and our funds to help insure! 
continuation and improvement olj 
the current high standards of dental 
care in this country. The contribu 
tion need not be large — each 
should give in accord with his owe 
means, but each should give. 

Here is our opportunity to keep 
the long arm of the Federal Gov- 
ernment in its proper perspective tc 
our profession. 



[8] 



♦CONCERNING FEES 



Professional men are asked 
■*■ many questions about fees; such 
as: 1. Why are fees different? 2. 
Why did this cost twice what my 
other treatment cost? 3. How can 
an hour's treatment cost so much? 

Likewise, many answers are 
given: 1. Fees are based upon 
overhead or cost of rendering the 
service. 2. Fees are based upon 
care, skill and judgment needed in 
the treatment of an individual's con- 
dition. 3. Fees are based upon the 
quality of the service rendered. 4. 
Fees are based upon the person's 
ability to pay. 

All professional men base their 
fees on these factors, and generally 
speaking, in the order given above, 
however, this varies with different 
offices depending upon location, 
physical set-up, caliber of the per- 
sonnel, and the type of patients that 
comprise the practice. To discuss 
briefly the four factors stated above : 

1 . Costs of rendering service 
(overhead) include salaries, rent, 
laboratory costs and gold, supplies, 
utilities (telephone, electricity, wa- 
ter, gas), laundry, multiple in- 
3i|surance, etc. 

Overhead may vary from 40 to 
60 per cent. Obviously in a volume 
practice, poor location with poor 
physical set-up, and inferior per- 
sonnel, it will be less. It is the goal 
of a good restorative dentist to have 
a realistic set-up so that he can 






operate with a 50 per cent over- 
head. This can be attained by good 
management and a reaUstic work 
load. 

2. "Care, skill and judgment" is 
a variable factor that should be con- 
sidered in examination, diagnosis, 
and treatment planning for a par- 
ticular condition. Because some 
types of treatment demand a greater 
amount of training, and skill, the 
cost is more. This is illustrated by 
the reply of an artist who charged 
$350.00 for a painting that took 
only $2.00 worth of materials and 
a short time to do: "You asked me 
why so much for so little time and 
material. I reply, a 'short time' for 
the painting now, but 20 years in 
the learning how to do it well and 
fast." 

3. The quality of the service 
rendered is also a factor. Through 
disciphned study and daily improve- 
ment some professional men are 
capable of rendering a much more 
helpful and lasting service. Post 
graduate study is a continuous fac- 
tor of cost here — added to the 
initial investment of time and money 
spent in eight or more years of 
training. 

4. Because patients have varying 
abilities to pay without economic 
hardship, fees are adjusted accord- 
ingly. There should be no second or 
third choice — only work that is 



* Reprinted by permission of L. D. Pankey, 152 Alhambra Circle, Coral Gables, Florida, "The 
Philosophy of Dental Practice." 

[9] 



one's best. We all know patients 
that are deserving, morally, spir- 
itually, and personally, and if the 
fees were not adjusted accord- 
ingly, they could not have proper 
dental attention. No one under- 
stands this better than the upper 
income patient who, in every prac- 
tice, seeks the help for members of 



his family, friends or acquaintances, 
who have to make economic sacri- 
fices to have dental care. 

The clamor for socialized medi-^ 
cine and dentistry would be less if^ 
all professional men recognized this 
and gave conscientious attention to 
all groups who seek their services. 

L.D.P. 



% 



f 



1965 



'"Phe precedence having been 
broken — automatic elevation 
of Secretary-Treasurer to Presi- 
dent after three years — the mem- 
bership of the North Carolina Den- 
tal Society should have a realistic 
look at the office of Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

Before the days of the central 
office, the continuity and manage- 
ment of dental society affairs func- 
tioned through the Secretary-Trea- 



surer. Times have changed and the 
pattern of the past should be reaUs- 
tically examined. 

Perhaps our greatest need today 
is for strong, informed leaders who 
are not afraid to move forward. Is 
this need not to be met by having 
as many members as possible in- 
formed, who will study all informa- 
tion and contribute their interests? 
Let's rotate and communicate! 



NOT-TOO-DISTANT FUTURE 



M 



WHAT? 



Dentistry related to the public ca- 
pacity to achieve complete service. 
Dental treatment achieving the state 
of excellence! 

WHEN? 

The education and training of 
auxiliary dental personnel has 
reached its full potential, then our 



mission to patients may be more 
nearly accomplished. 

\ 

HOW? 

A break-through is at hand! Com- 
munity Colleges in the State of North 
Carolina with dental programs can 
generously further the health of our 
people. By what method? Continu- 
ing educational programs made ad- 



[10] 



II 



venturous, convenient and self-sus- 
taining for dental auxiliary now 
serving the public. 

jlWHY? 

To accomplish for our public the 
full potential for dental services at 
the level of excellence. Auxiliary 
personnel must have an opportunity 



to stay abreast of current knowledge. 
It takes proficient members to make 
a winning team — . And a proficient 
dental service is not performed by 
one member alone. The shortest dis- 
tance between two points — , where 
we are now to where we want to be 
— can best be achieved through 
education. Community Colleges are 
this fountain! 



THE McFALLS ADD ANOTHER CHAPTER 
TO THEIR RICH LIVES 



"C FFECTIVE March 1, Dr. Walter T. 
McFall resigned as head of den- 
tal programs at Central Piedmont 
Community College in Charlotte. 

The McFalls leave Central Pied- 
mont Community College with an 
effective functioning curriculum and 
a unique clinical arrangement for 
the dental programs. 

Of the 35 to 40 dental hygiene 
schools in the nation, the plan at 
Central Piedmont Community Col- 
lege is one of unique design. Doctor 
McFall has combined function for 
the student, convenience and com- 
fort for the patient, and a very 
practical arrangement for instruc- 
tion in this clinical facility. To date, 
there have been 55 requests through- 
out the nation to share in these con- 
cepts. The major dental companies 
are distributing the basic arrange- 
ment to their dental dealers through- 
out the nation and world. 

As head of dental programs, Doc- 
tor McFall has created much inter- 
est in this program at Central Pied- 
mont Community College. This is 
attested to by the fact that 367 per- 
sons have applied for the program. 
Of forty students enrolled at the 
present time, 28 per cent have two 



years of college or are college gradu- 
ates. 

The dental hygiene program at 
Central Piedmont Community Col- 
lege came into being in 1965 as a 
result of the actions of the House of 
Delegates of the North Carolina 
Dental Society. The Department of 
Community Colleges of the State 
Board of Higher Education, in co- 
operation with Central Piedmont 
Community College, have de- 
veloped $168,000 capital invest- 
ment including equipment and con- 
struction. They presently staff four 
full-time persons and this staff un- 
doubtedly will be increased based 
on the curriculum that has been 
developed for this program. 

It is rather unique that Bebe and 
Doctor Walter have had the oppor- 
tunity to add this additional signifi- 
cant contribution to the people of 
North Carolina and the profession 
of dentistry. As programs for addi- 
tional auxiliaries are planned, the 
McFalls will be assured that the 
program they have developed at 
Central Piedmont Community Col- 
lege will be used as an example for 
years to come. 



[ 11 ] 



Dentistry can wear its ethics with dignity without 
having to act shy about its press relations. 





IDS 
1 

it' 



"^Press Relations for the 
Professional Society 



Demont Roseman, Jr. 



I have read again your Principles 
of Ethics and the ADA Judicial 
Council's advisory opinions. And, 
from a newspaperman's viewpoint, I 
must question whether coping with 
your ethics is worth the effort. You 
should never blame a newsman for 
going elsewhere for news which is so 
much more readily available to him. 

Some of you so much more fa- 
miliar with your profession than I 
am tell me that it's not so much 
your ethics as it is the "con- 
servative," "short-sighted," "narrow- 
minded" interpretations of these 
ethics that erects the formidable ob- 
stacles to good press relations. 

In Washington now, you don't 
make a statement until you conduct 
a poll first to be sure your statement 



is all right. If what you want to 
say doesn't jive with the results of 
your poll, you'd better change your 
statement. 

With this in mind, I've conducted; 
a small-scale poll of newspapermen 
It really wasn't so much a matteri 
of testing some statements I wanted 
to make as it was a matter of trying 
to find some statements I could 
make. 

What Newspapermen Think 

I wrote about six opinionated: 
newspapermen and asked them to 
tell me something about their ex- 
periences with dentists. This should 
give you the benefit of words of 
wisdom straight from the horses' 






• Presented at the 13th Annual District Officers Conference in Raleigh, December 4-5, 1965. Mr. 
Roseman is Public Information Officer. UNC Division of Health Affairs, Chapel Hill. 

[ 12] 






mouths. Selfishly, I hoped the opin- 
ions would be lengthy enough to 
fill a 30-minute talk. The poll 
failed to produce enough material 
for a full-fledged sermon. Never- 
theless, let me share with you the 
results of my efforts. To preserve 
the dignity of the press, I will men- 
tion names in one instance only. 

The science writer for one of the 
State's largest morning papers, the 
Winston-Salem Journal, wrote as 
follows : 

"Sorry to disappoint you, but I 
can't tell you a thing about dentists' 
press relations." 

He went on to explain that science 
writing is only a secondary part of 
his job, and that the medical sciences 
really don't appeal much to him. 
So," his letter concluded, "I've 
never dealt with dentists as news 
sources." 

A staff writer for a large after- 
noon paper, Charlotte News, who 
has dentistry on his news beat re- 
plied to my query as follows: 

"I can't give you much wisdom 
on the subject of press relations 
with the local dental society because 
there isn't much of a relationship. 
I'd say that the dental society gets 
less in the paper than any other 
comparable professional group." 

He proceeded to praise the co- 
operation of the local dental so- 
ciety's secretary, and then added: 

"To my knowledge, there have 
been only three dental stories in 
the papers here since I've been the 
medical writer, about two years: 
(1) a feature during Dental Health 
Week on the importance of care for 
children's teeth; (2) the announce- 
ment of scientific speakers for the 
coming year; and (3) a small den- 
tal scholarship to a local college," 

A managing editor of another 



large afternoon paper, the Raleigh 
Times, told me by telephone that 
he couldn't remember ever going to 
a dentist for a news article. He's been 
newspapering for 20 or 25 years. 
He said his newspaper worked with 
dentists "many years ago" on fluori- 
dation. And sporadically his staff 
has dealings with public health 
dentists "trying to get children to 
brush their teeth." 

He said a dental column, pat- 
terned after a popular and well- 
read medical column, would be wel- 
comed to fill the void. But he 
hastened to add that he has never 
had a syndicate salesman mention 
that a dental column is available to 
newspapers. 

The only other reply to my mail 
survey came from the High Point 
Enterprise. I use the name openly, 
not as an undignified advertisement, 
but because the paper has the dubi- 
ous distinction of having the only 
dental column in a North Carolina 
paper, and you would recognize the 
paper referred to anyway. 

"Ask the Dentist," as the column 
is known, started about two years 
ago on a trial basis. Despite an in- 
vitation to readers at the end of 
each column to send in questions, 
the column has generated virtually 
no mail, which is significant because 
most newspapers claim their medical 
columns consistently bring in nu- 
merous letters. 

"We are still using the column," 
the High Point editor reported, 
"though somewhat irregularly be- 
cause space is so tight. The column 
is still on my list of 'something we've 
gotta do something about'." 

As for press relations specifically, 
the High Point paper's experience 
has been that it receives "little other 
than an occasional handout about 



[ 13] 



local dentists going to a conven- 
tion." 

Genuine news material from den- 
tists is almost non-existent in High 
Point. The editor recalled that his 
paper published a picture-feature 
when local dentists outfitted the high 
school footballers with mouthguards. 

Image 

Some of you may have read the 
story about a dental society in a 
large Midwestern city which asked 
the editor of their daily paper to 
speak to them about "The Image of 
Dentistry." To prepare for the talk, 
the editor searched his paper's 
"morgue" for clippings about the 
dental society and community den- 
tists. In a decade of clippings, he 
found ten pictures of incoming so- 
ciety presidents and ten stories 
ranging from the arrest of a dental 
laboratory technician to a Christ- 
mas smorgasbord — an average of 
one picture and one story per year. 

In this editor's opinion, only one 
story in that period (it concerned 
the society's mouth-protector pro- 
gram) contributed toward a favor- 
able public image for dentistry in 
that city. 

As is painfully obvious from the 
newspaper survey, the results failed 
to produce a sermon-sized talk for 
this morning. 

Radio-TV 

What about the use of radio and 
TV, as well as the press, in telling 
the dental story? I have limited ex- 
perience with either radio or TV, but 
I believe both can be used to great 
advantage — ethics permitting. We 
find in the News Bureau at Chapel 
Hill that news departments of radio 
and TV are extremely alert to news 



and co-operative in using it. While 
they (radio and TV) concentrate on 
entertainment, they are devoting 
more time now to news, and they . 
are attuned to the "local angle." A > 
few weeks ago in Philadelphia, the 
Executive Secretary of the dental 
society there told me that dentists 
have used radio to let their patients 
know their offices will be closed 
while they attend the annual con- 
vention. It has been quite success- 
ful. 

What About Pictures for 
Newspapers? 

There's no pat answer to this 
question. You should be familiar 
with the practices of your local 
paper. The better papers rarely, if 
ever, use pictures of large groups, 
hand-shaking photos, certificate or 
award presentations and the like if 
they are taken in a routine, stand 
'em-up and shoot 'em-head-on pic- 
tures. It takes a good photographer 
with a great deal of originality to 
produce lively shots from deadly 
dull events. 

As a parting word, don't tell a 
photographer what you want in a 
picture. That's his job. 



Interviewing a Clinician 

How can you use a clinician ini 
reporting your meetings in the press? 
It depends on the clinician. If he 
is capable of talking in layman's 
language he can be used to tre-' 
mendous advantage, especially in 
North Carolina. I add "especially ina 
North Carolina" because I have 
browsed through a number of news 
clippings in your society's files and 
it's obvious that the vast majority 
of news stories with any real meat ic 
them carry out-of-state datelines. 

I define clinician as a non-com- 



1 



[ 14] 



petitive dentist, almost always from 
out of the state. His visit to your 
community may offer your patients 
their only access to any newspaper 
education about dentistry. 

I suggest that you not invite the 
press to interview your clinician un- 
til you find out from him first if he 
likes to talk to the press. If he's 
defensive, has any ethical forebod- 
ings, or talks only in dental jargon, 
you're wasting his time and a news- 
man's time. For anyone who wants 
nothing to do with the press, not 
much can be done. 

But when you do arrange an in- 
terview for a clinician, or for any 
other dentist in your community, let 
me suggest that you not have your 
society president, the chairman of 
your ethics committee and the pub- 
lic information chairman, if you 
have one, sitting in either as specta- 
tors or participants. Leave the news- 
man alone with the party he wishes 
to interview. 

Before leaving the subject of in- 
terviews, another thought occurs. 
Never invite a newspaper to talk 
with visiting or local dentists if you 
have illusions about checking (re- 
viewing or censoring) what is writ- 
ten before publication. You must 
understand clearly that it is a rare 
newsman who will allow you to see 
his copy before it is published. You 
must understand that what is written 
is clearly in the newsman's domain, 
and you receive the blessings or the 
blame accordingly. 

Ethics 

For the next few pages let me 
talk about your ethics — or more 
precisely, the interpretations given 
to your ethics — because I feel that 
this is the most disturbing problem in 
""lyour press relations. 



An editorial in the now defunct 
Dental Progress magazine noted a 
few years ago that ethics was re- 
ceiving "almost constant attention" 
from the professional societies of 
medicine, dentistry, law, business, 
clergy, and university faculties. 

Quote: "These groups represent 
for the most part those people with 
the benefits of education and whose 
understanding and appreciation of 
society's needs should be at the high- 
est level. 

"But why are they continually 
occupied with the question of 
ethics? 

"Among the professions, ethics 
signifies concern with the relation- 
ship of members with each other 
and with society. We have reason to 
hope that a third major factor of 
concern will be added soon: concern 
of the professional person with so- 
ciety as a whole." 

ADA Position 

Let me quote the scripture for 
this morning from ADA's Principles 
of Ethics with Official Opinions: 

Chapter 1, Verse 4, states that 
you, as community leaders, have the 
obligation to provide freely of your 
skills, knowledge and experience to 
society in those fields in which your 
qualifications entitle you to speak 
with professional competence. 

On the surface, this is an open 
invitation to newsmen to come to 
you for knowledgeable material 
about dentistry. No advisory opinion 
interprets this conclusion as invalid. 
But the invitation becomes less in- 
viting as you get deeper into your 
ethics. 

In Chapter 1, Verse 12, it states, 
in essence, that thou shalt not com- 
mit advertisement against thy col- 
leagues, or the plague will be uponst 



[15] 



you evermore. Thou shalt stand ac- 
cused of stealing patients from col- 
leagues if thou so much as allows 
thy name to be printed or thy pic- 
ture to be published. 

I don't argue against the merits 
of codes of ethics, but I do feel 
that your press relations are groping 
around in a fog that enshrouds the 
difference between publicity and ad- 
vertising. 

What Is the Public Interest? 

A dentist puts it this way: "The 
individual dentist, however pure his 
motives may be, who engages in 
making dental information available 
to the public, risks being subjected 
to criticism, embarrassment, and 
censure from his colleagues because 
of the subtle difference between 
publicity and advertising. 

"Unfortunately, this inhibits many 
dentists from functions and activities 
that would otherwise benefit the 
public and the profession." 

One of the leading science writ- 
ers in the United States said at 
an ADA-sponsored public relations 
conference that codes of ethics have 
taken on the character of a vigilante 
committee "run by people who are 
doggedly determined to keep box 
score on anyone who gets his name 
in the paper with the idea of con- 
ducting a hanging party as an ex- 
ample to the next transgressor." 

He was not opposed to codes of 
ethics per se, but he did urge that 
positive, permissive codes be drawn 
rather than negative codes. In his 
long career in newspaper profession- 
reporting circles, he said that a com- 
plaint on unethical publicity is rarely 
based on the contents of an article. 

"The protest comes over the use 
of the name," he said. "Com- 
plainants insist that the use of the 



dentist's name in the paper is ac- 
cording to him an economic advan- 
tage, although they say something 
about 'aggrandizement.' 

"A dentist who induces or agrees 
to the publication of an article in a 
local newspaper praising him for 
having a research finding published 
in a professional journal is engaged 
in unethical conduct. 

"A dentist who, acting in his own 
behalf, induces the publication of a 
newspaper article describing his 
activities as a leader of the local so- 
ciety's Children's Health Day ac- 
tivity is engaged in unethical con- 
duct. 

"A dentist who places notice in a 
local newspaper that he is leaving 
town to take a postgraduate course 
in dentistry is engaged in unethical 
conduct. 

"A dentist who issues a news re- 
lease linking himself to new ad- 
vances in dentistry is engaged in 
unethical conduct. News releases 
concerning achievements of dentis- 
try should come from dental so- 
cieties or other appropriate profes- 
sional sources." 

This, as you are aware, conflicts 
with the preferences and practices 
of newspapers. They want to identify 
the dentist directly involved in the 
story and quote him, not the dental 
society or its president. 

You are advertising if you lec- 
ture to lay groups or arrange to pub- 
lish a news article on a particular 
technic, such as hypnosis. The ex- 
planation for this taboo is that you 
create an impression of superiority 
over your colleagues, which over- 
rides any public good that you may 
serve. 

The sum and substance of all of 
this to me is: (1) a situation has 
developed in which the dentist wants 



[ 16] 



to hide under his laboratory cabi- 
net at the sound of a newspaper- 
man; while (2) the newspaperman 
follows paths of less resistance, lead- 
ing away from dentistry. 

Let's Be Realistic 

Fortunately for the profession, 
and for the public, there are den- 
tists who agree with newspapermen 
that your ethics are, and I quote a 
dentist, "miserable and unrealistic." 

There was a time when it was 
indiscreet for a professional man to 
be active in politics. The time has 
long since passed, leaving the hope 
that similar progress will be made 
in press relations. 

Dentistry may lack some of the 
glamour of brain surgery, kidney 
transplants and hyperbaric heart 
work, but you have glamour in your 
work which has yet to be fully capi- 
talized on. The pessimists say your 
major communications problem, 
compared to medicine, is that peo- 
ple rarely die from bad teeth. 
But a newspaperman can thumb 
through issues of your professional 
publications and dig up a multitude 
of story ideas. He wants to get his 
material from real, live dentists and 
call them by name in his articles. 

Some of you may quake at the 
thought of being interviewed, mis- 
quoted and headlined about some 
of the following, but, in my opin- 
ion, they could make good news 
stories of public benefit: 

Pregnancy and your teeth; vita- 
mins in dentistry; fluorides: pills, 
pastes, etc.; teeth and tobacco; teen- 
age false teeth, or no false teeth at 
age 65; sugar and tooth decay; soft 
drinks and cavities; teething; music 
to have teeth filled by; don't pull 
those teeth, or do pull those teeth; 
color matching artificial teeth; tooth- 



picks and toothbrushes; mouth odor 
and osmoscopes. 

Middle Ground 

There is a happy middle ground 
in which dentistry can have good 
public relations. 

To the dentist who insists that a 
colleague's name in the paper will 
lure patients away, let me quote the 
dentist who said: "If the pubhc 
really knew what we can do, all of 
us would be swamped with patients." 
He believes that any information 
which improves the image of one 
dentist will improve the image of all 
dentists. 

This Is Dentistry? 

A few years ago the ADA spon- 
sored an in-depth survey which was 
climaxed with a summary report 
which concluded: 

". . . dental health requires con- 
siderable re-definition in the public 
mind. Dental care at present is 
defined largely as a serious, demand- 
ing, uninteresting, repetitive experi- 
ence. There is little notion of re- 
ward connected with it, but much of 
punishment. These types of associa- 
tion should be altered and in their 
place emphasis must be given to 
the favorable implications of pleas- 
ant and rewarding personal and pro- 
fessional dental health practices. 

"The basic rules of good dental 
care are well understood by almost 
all people. Since this knowledge is 
better known than acted upon . . . 
the objectives are now to give more 
impetus to carrying through on these 
rules." 

In other words, dentistry is faced 
more with a problem of motivation 
than with a problem of lack of basic 
information. 



[ 17] 



News Practices 

Newspapermen are not asking for 
permission to advertise dentists. But 
they do insist on attributing 
thoughts and ideas to people by 
name and, when possible, by illu- 
stration (photos). The problem, 
then, grows out of news practices 
and ethics interpretations. 

The ADA'S public information di- 
rector expresses my sentiments in 
urging dental societies to take a 
realistic, common-sense attitude to- 
ward publicity in general and den- 
tal columns in particular. He says 
that if you ask yourselves three 
questions when ethics and publicity 
are involved, you can eliminate a 
lot of narrow interpretations and 
petty bickering. The questions are: 
Is the publicity in good taste? Does 
it advance the professions aims? Is 
it in the public's best interest? 

A brief, two-paragraph story 



probably expresses my own senti- 
ments about public relations for the 
dental profession: 

At a children's birthday party, 
the hostess was chatting with one of 
the little girls and she made the 
observation, "My, but your little 
brother is shy. He hasn't moved 
from that corner all afternoon." To 
which the little girl repHed, "Oh, 
he's not shy. He's never had a neck- 
tie on before and he thinks he's 
tied to something." 

I think dentistry can wear its eth- 
ics with dignity without having to 
act shy about its press relations. 

The dental profession of tomor- 
row (and let me add, of today) will 
be judged in large measure upon 
the manner in which the challenges 
of today are met. 

Chapel Hill 
North Carolina 



[ 18] 



This case is reported because it is 
ihought to be of interest to the oral 
surgeon in his diagnosis and treat- 
ment of a dentigerous cyst within 
tlie maxilla. The results were most 
i^ratifying. 



Case Report Number 3 



Partsch Operation for the Treatment 

of a Dentigerous Cyst 



DwiGHT Lanier Clark, D.D.S. 



This 9 year old boy was referred 
on July 29, 1959 because of swell- 
ing in the left maxilla in the area 
of the cuspid and two deciduous 
molars. 

History 

The patient had no pain or 
tenderness in the involved area. The 
other history was not remarkable. 

Clinical Examination 

Noticeable bulging of the buccal 
and palatal aspects of the alveolar 
process. This was a firm mass. The 
primary teeth were decayed. (Fig- 
ure 1 ) 

X-Ray Examination 

Periapical and occlusal radio- 
graphs showed a large radiolucent 
area which was apparently a denti- 
gerous cyst involving the permanent 
cuspid. This had caused a mal po- 
sitioning of the permanent lateral 
and the permanent bicuspids. The 
two primary mo'ars were badly de- 
cayed. (Figure 2) 




Figure 1. Pre-operative photograph. Note 
position of lateral incisor. 




Figure 1. (Printed backward). 



[ 19] 





Figure 2. Pre-operative X rays. 



Figure 3. Removal of teeth and area of cyst 
underlying. 




Procedure 

On the first visit an impression 
was taken to make an immediate 
obturator. The obturator was de- 
signed with a plug to fit through the 
sockets of the primary teeth to be 
removed and into the cyst cavity. 

The following day, July 30, 1959, 
using local anesthesia, the maxil- 
lary left first and second primary 
molars were removed along with the 
supporting bone. The cyst lining, 
being visible, was then incised and 
clamped with a hemostat. The plug 
of the cyst wall, approximately the 
area of the two teeth, was removed 
and submitted for microscopic 
study. The obturator was placed 
and the patient left the office in 
good condition. (Figures 3, 4) 

Microscopic Finding 

The majority of the specimen is i 
composed of a moderately cellular 
dense fibrous connective tissue. 
Along one edge is stratified squa- 
mous epithelium. This edge also con- 
tains a heavy infiltrate of acute and 
chronic inflammatory cells. 

Course 

Post-operative recovery was un- 
eventful. The patient came in one 
month later and the cyst cavity was 
open and clean. At this date an j 
orthodontic consultation was held, 
and on January 7, 1960 work was 
begun to straighten the mal posed | 
teeth. 

On September 9, 1960, intra-oral 
X-ray examination showed no evi- 
dence of the cyst and the patient 
was dismissed. (Figure 5) 

UNC School of Dentistry 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 



[20] 







Figure 4. Obturator. 





Figure 4. Obturator in place. 



Figure 5. Post-operotive radiograpl 
September 9, 1960. 



I 21 ] 



What's Wrong With Us? 



At one time there were inequities 
between graduates of different den- 
tal schools in the United States, and 
therefore a wide variation in the 
knowledge and skills of practicing 
dentists. However, with the more or 
less standardization of our dental 
curriculum by the Council on Den- 
tal Education of the American Den- 
tal Association, this situation has 
been changed considerably. With 
the large number of postgraduate 
courses available through different 
dental schools and the numerous 
study groups, as well as the abun- 
dant literature available today in 
dentistry, certainly any practitioner 
can easily alter any deficiency which 
he may feel exists from his original 
training. He can easily stay abreast 
of the most current advancements 
in our profession. 

With these many educational op- 
portunities enjoyed by American 
dentists, certainly the quality of den- 
tistry performed in the average den- 
tal office should be of the very high- 
est! Today, therefore, when we fail 
to render a truly professional service 
it is usually due to a lack of desire 
rather than a lack of ability. 

Ideally, then, we should practice 



Robert E. Klein, D.D.S. 



dentistry to the very best of our 
ability for every patient we serve. 

Originally our profession had its 
beginning as an off-shoot of medi- 
cine. The first doctors were usually 
well-to-do individuals dedicated to 
relieving suffering and possessing a 
sincere desire to help their fellow 
man. The thought of profit and 
monetary gain was minimal. 

We must now realize that evolu- 
tions in our profession, as well as 
changes that have occurred in our 
economy down through the ages, 
have caused the motive of profit to 
become increasingly important. Poor 
men, and men of moderate means 
have entered our profession, and to- 
day's economy demands that we not 
only make a living for ourselves, 
but for members of our family as 
well, in the practice of our chosen 
profession. This capitalistic form of 
economy has provided a more abun- 
dant life for all, and we certainly 
should not criticize this country's 
economic philosophy. 

"The Best Dentist" 

However, since we have all been m\t 
reared under this philosophy, it is ^k 
only natural that it has influenced 



* Reprinted by special permission from The Ohio Dental Journal, Volume 39, Number 3, 
May, 1965. 



[22] 



our sense of morals and our sense 
of ethics. The "best dentist" has 
come to mean the one who earns 
the most money, the one who has 
the nicest office, the one who owns 
the largest home. Our dental edu- 
cators to whom we are indebted for 
giving us the knowledge and skills 
with which to practice, and to whom 
the oath tells us we should regard 
"even as our own parents," are con- 
sidered by many as men who are 
incapable of making a living in pri- 
vate practice, are ridiculed by some, 
admired by but a few, and con- 
sidered impractical by most. 

Many dentists believe that we can 
already perform a better service 
than we can get paid for, so why 
should we try to improve the effort? 
This is an outgrowth of our eco- 
nomic philosophy. We admit that we 
do not routinely produce our best 
"products," but, rather than being 
ashamed of our below par effort, we 
blame it on our patients' unwill- 
ingness to pay us a fee which we 
feel is commensurate with our best 
efforts. This may be compatible with 
our economic philosophy, but cer- 
tainly it is not compatible with the 
philosophy of our forefathers and 
the Hippocratic oath. 

It has been argued, and my ob- 
servation leads me to believe that it 
is very sad, but true, that, "The 
best dentistry produced by the aver- 
age dentist during his entire career 
is done during his senior year in 
dental school." The reason for pre- 
paring this paper is the hope that 
there will be an improvement in 
the quality of dentistry done in the 
average American dental office, to 
the point that this statement may 
never again be made of any den- 
tist. 

Certainly, a profession of the 



healing arts cannot be compared to 
industries which are frequently com- 
pelled to produce a quality product 
which the market demands (regard- 
less of its inferiority), nor can den- 
tal education be compared to in- 
dustrial advertising of consumer 
products. We would all like to pro- 
duce the very best dental "products" 
of which we are capable, because, 
"There can be no pleasure, satis- 
faction, or pride in slipshod work — 
only in work that is one's best." 
However we also realize, because 
we were reared under a capitalistic 
philosophy, that unless we are re- 
ceiving a commensurate fee we can- 
not routinely afford to deliver our 
best services. The former idealistic 
desire and the latter economic de- 
mand frequently place a practitioner 
at odds with himself, and in many 
cases this conflict causes consider- 
able frustration. 

What Is the Problem? 

Should the economic demand out 
weigh the idealistic desire, which in 
most cases it does, we may find our- 
selves slipping into some more or 
less deep ruts of mediocrity. In or- 
der to arrive at a fee that we think 
our patients can afford, we may 
often reduce the fee, and in doing 
so (because we are human) re- 
duce the quality of the service as 
well. 

Our problem then is: How can 
our profession deliver the very best 
dentistry to our patients and receive 
a fair fee for this service most of 
the time? 

My observation leads me to be- 
lieve that the bulk of our populace 
can manage to procure, in more 
cases than not, the things they feel 
they want and need. A discussion 
with most semi-intelligent laiety will 



123] 



gain agreement that dentistry is also 
a necessity. Why is it, then, that 
the vast majority of our citizens only 
receive emergency dental care? The 
answer is quite simple. The com- 
petition that our profession enjoys 
from attractive commodities pro- 
duced by American business has 
placed a much greater desire on 
those items before the public than 
the desire for oral health. I used 
the term "enjoys" because we should 
enjoy the fruits of American busi- 
ness; without it our patients would 
be unable to afford our services. 
Our entire economy depends upon 
American business. The public 
knows which industrially-produced 
commodities they want to purchase. 
We, in Hke manner, must make our 
patients want our "products." The 
automobile manufacturer and the 
cereal manufacturer know how to 
get their messages across to the pub- 
lic, but we cannot use their methods. 
We are at a disadvantage also be- 
cause we are trained to work with 
our hands. Whenever a person is 
trained in technical procedures, to 
work with his hands, it is especially 
difficult for him to think of what he 
is doing in terms of somebody 
else and to get his message across 
to the public. 

Patients know what a so-called 
permanent wave will do for them 
— or a boat — or a necklace — a 
fishing rod — a bowling ball — or a 
tire — or a gallon of gas. The busi- 
ness community sees to it that we 
know about all of these things so 
that we learn to want them. But 
most of our patients have no con- 
cept of what we do for their health, 
their appearance, their ability to 
chew and digest food, the help they 
get from our services, with the same 
enthusiasm that they do other com- 



modities mentioned. If this is true, 
how can we expect any situation 
other than the one we now have? 

If we expect to arrive at a time 
when our patients are routinely re- 
ceiving the best services American 
dentistry has to offer, our patients 
must understand the benefits den- 
tistry has to offer to the point where 
they will want, will ask for, will de- 
mand, and will be delighted to pay 
for, the services they need. In the 
past there has been confusion in 
the minds of our people between 
wants and needs. We may ask, why 
is it that our patients don't under- 
stand the benefits we have to offer? 
Again the answer is simple. No one 
ever told them. The persons at fault 
are you and I. Each man with his 
own office communicating to his 
patients his concept ought to be: 
"That any good dental service is 
worth many times any reasonable 
fee that could be asked for it. As 
long as the fee is reasonable and 
the work is good, it is a bargain." 
The smart practitioner teaches his 
patients this concept. Furthermore, 
when a doctor recommends care of 
any kind to his patient, he should 
make absolutely clear to the patient 
the benefits to be anticipated through 
such care and the penalty to be paid 
if care is refused. If at all possible, 
the doctor should illustrate each 
point. Why? Because words without 
illustrations frequently are meaning- 
less. Recall Confucious for a mo- 
ment and realize that we learn much 
more through the eyes than the ears. 
"The eye is the highway to the 
mind." 

If each of us informs his own 
patients, perhaps they in turn will 
inform others. 

Mansfield, Ohio 



[24] 



Changing Concepts in the 

Management of the Cleft 

Lip-Palate Patient 



*N. Georgiade, D.D.S., M.D. 



TV >f ANY diverse views have evolved 
^^■*- over the past years relative to 
the initial care of the newborn in- 
fant with this type of facial de- 
formity. These facial clefts present 
not only a considerable cosmetic 
and functional problem but also one 
of extreme psychological distress 
to the parents. Although the lip de- 
formity has been repaired, the col- 
lapse of the maxillary segments, as- 
sociated many times with severe 
cleft of the lip, creates further prob- 
lems for the maturing child. For the 
past twelve years a number of Swed- 
ish and German Plastic and Maxillo- 
facial surgeons have been inter- 
ested in the prevention of further 
facial deformities in this group of 
newborn infants and the possible 
correction of the usual maxillary de- 
formities. A new approach to this 
problem has been initiated by them 
and it has been the author's good 
fortune to be able to visit these 
many excellent clinics over the past 
few years. Their concepts will be 
discussed more completely at this 
time.' These newer techniques have 



been incorporated in our overall 
management of this type patient 
which also includes initial evalua- 
tion and continued follow-up care 
by our entire cleft lip-palate team, 
including the speech pathologist, or- 
thodontist, child psychologist and 
audiologist. 

Habilitation of patients with con- 
genital deformities of the oro-facial 
area may present a number of prob- 
lems in management before any re- 
constructive surgery can be under- 
taken. It is in this phase that the 
physician taking care of this type 
of patient initially must be able to 
advise the parents as to the timing 
of the future reconstructive surgery 
as well as the initial proper feeding 
of the infant both prior to and post- 
reconstructive surgery. 

Feeding: A systematic plan for 
feeding must be considered. This 
may be a difficult problem par- 
ticularly in those infants with se- 
vere bilateral cleft of the lip and 
associated clefts of the alveolar ridge 
and palate. The most satisfactory 



* From the Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic, Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Duke 
University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. Published by special permission of The 
\orth Carolina Medical Journal. 



[25] 




FIGURE 1. (A & B) Small plastic trays with elastic impression material are used for accurate 
reduplication of the facial deformity. 

(C) Pre-operative appearance of patient. 

(D) The acrylic prosthesis is used to maintain on adequate maxillary width prior to surgery. . 

(E) Post-operative appearance of the same potient following one stage bilateral lip repoir. 
(Prosthesis is still maintained orally for 3-4 months post bone grafting of alveolar clefts.) 



method of managing this type of 
infant entails feeding in an upright 
position by cradling. This technique 
minimizes the amount of regurgita- 
tion of the liquid formula which 
will occur. An Asepto type syringe 
with a flexible rubber tubing is used 
to drop the fluid onto the posterior 
aspect of the tongue. A special type 
rubber guard cleft palate nipple 
can also be used with the large 
palatal clefts. A small plastic naso 
gastric tube can be used in extreme 
situations for feeding purposes. The 



formula used with success in the 
newborn contains 3 1 ounces of milk, 
21 ounces of water, and 4 table- 
spoons of a suitable carbohydrate. 
The use of one of the many canned 
infant's formulae can also be used. 
The infants should be fed every few 
hours in order to give them the 
maximal intake with minimal re- 
gurgitation. 

Surgery and Anesthesia: The agei 
of the patient may vary from a few! 
weeks to 3 or 4 months depending! 



[26] 




FIGURE 2. (Ai Pre-operative appearance of infant with unilateral cleft of lip and alveolus. 

(Bl Insertion of autogenous rib graft contoured to fit the alveolar defect. 

(C> Radiograph of maxillae one year following lip repair and bone grafting showing migration 
of tooth buds into bone grafted area. 

(Di Post-operative appearance of the some patient. 



'^! 



on the type of deformity and weight 
of the patient. For less complicated 
reconstructive surgery a weight of 
10 pounds is considered desirable 
for oral endotracheal anesthesia and 
for the necessary surgery to be un- 
dertaken. 

The more recent addition of au- 
togenous bone grafting to alveolar 
clefts concomitantly with lip repair 
has about doubled the operative 
time and as a result it is desirable 



that the infant be older and larger 
before the surgery is undertaken. 

The Use of Prosthetic Appliances: 

In order to prevent collapse of the 
maxillae prior to and following sur- 
gery, the cleft lip-palate infant 
should be seen as soon after birth 
as possible for proper evaluation as 
to the advisability of fitting with a 
suitable type of appliar»ce. Impres- 
sions of the infant's arches are easily 



[27] 



taken on an outpatient basis with- 
out anesthesia when seen initially as 
early as possible following birth 
(Figures lA, B). From these im- 
pressions stone study models are 
made and if necessary a suitable 
appliance is designed and con- 
structed. This appliance can be 
varied depending on the type of 
deformity present. If it is considered 



desirable to maintain the arches in 
their present position until surgery 
can be carried out, a solid type of 
acrylic prosthesis can be con- 
structed. If expansion of the arch 
is desirable because of previous col- 
lapse, an appliance can be con- 
structed with one of a number of 
expansion devices incorporated in 
the prosthesis. In this manner a suit- 




FIGURE 3. (A) A severe unilateral cleft of lip, alveolus and palote at the time of simul- 
taneous repair of lip, and palatal and alveolus area. 

(B) A sculptured solid strut of rib bone is shown prior to insertion across alveolar cleft. 

(C) Rib graft now in place and covered with a vomer flap and prior to covering with lateral 
flaps during repair of the cleft lip. 

(D) Six months following repair of lip and alveolar cleft. 

[28] 



able arch form can be obtained and 
maintained until such time as bone 
grafting of the alveolar cleft can 
be carried out.- This appliance is 
maintained in the oral cavity utiliz- 
ing some of the new softer plastics 
and adhesives for adherence to the 
undercuts above the palatal and al- 
veolar cleft. (Figure ID). The ap- 
pliance is removed and refitted once 
a month up to and following surgery 
as previously outlined. 

Repair of Unilateral Cleft of Lip: 

All of these patients must have 
available a venous cannula or "cut- 
down" for adequate fluid and blood 
replacement as indicated. The blood 
volume in small infants is estimated 
to be approximately 45 ml per 
pound of body weight and a loss of 
only 75 ml of blood in a 10 pound 
infant may therefore represent a 
loss of total blood volume of over 
15 per cent. A hemoglobin of 10 
gms. or over should be considered 
as a minimal preoperative level. 

Repair of a unilateral cleft lip in 
our hands represents a combination 
of techniques described previously 
by others and excellent cosmetic 
and functional results can usually 
be attained. •^- ^' ■'■• '' (Figures 2A, B, 
C, D) (Figures 3 A, B, C, D) 

Repair of Bilateral Cleft of the 
Lip: Repair of both clefts should be 
carried out in one stage if at 
all possible. Preoperative prolabial 
pressure intermittantly may be nec- 
essary to position the prolabium 
satisfactorily. Use of the prolabium 
as part of the central lip repair ap- 
pears to give the most satisfactory 
repair both functionally and cos- 
metically. '''^ (Figures IC, E) 

Alveolar Cleft: If an alveolar cleft 
is present either unilaterally or bi- 



laterally, closure of this cleft should 
be carried out and where practical 
autogenous bone grafting used to 
bridge the cleft for restoration of the 
continuity of the arch. In many in- 
stances particularly with a bilateral 
alveolar cleft simultaneous bone 
graft is not possible. However 
vomer flaps as well as labial flaps 
are used to prepare the alveolar 
area for bone grafting which is then 
carried out in a second stage. (Fig- 
ures 3 A, B, C, D, E) (Figures 4A, 
B, C, D, E, F) 

Post-Operative Care: Relaxation 

of the operative area is obtained 
utilizing a Logan bow or collodian 
gauze dressing immediately post- 
operatively. Elbow restraints are 
utilized for the first two weeks to 
prevent finger sucking which would 
disturb the operative area and cause 
possible wound disruption. Feeding 
utilizing a rubber tipped Asepto sy- 
ringe is carried out for three weeks 
postoperatively before attempting 
feeding with a nipple. 

Summary: 

1. Unilateral and bilateral clefts 
of the lip unassociated with alveolar 
cleft defects are usually repaired 
when the infant weighs at least ten 
pounds and has a hemoglobin of 
at least ten grams. 

2. Alveolar clefts associated with 
cleft lips should be repaired when 
practical at the same time the origi- 
nal lip repair is carried out and this 
is usually performed when patient 
is four or five months of age. Very 
wide clefts of necessity must be 
closed and autogenous bone graft- 
ing carried out in two operative pro- 
cedures." 

3. Use of plastic prosthetic ap- 
pliances before, during, and after 



[29] 








FIGURE 4. (A) Patient previously shown in Figure 2 now shows the premoxilla in position 
following bone grafting with excellent continuity of the maxillary arch. 

(B) The papatal prosthesis is shown in place stabilizing the arches post bone grafting. 

(C) Pre-operative radiograph of this patient showing bilateral clefts. 

(D) Post-operative radiograph showing filling of bilateral alveolar cleft with autogenous 
bone (two stages). 

(E) Study models are shown of this infant from the time treatment instituted to completion 
six months later. Note lack of maxillary collapse in final model. 




FIGURE 5. (A) Unilateral cleft of lip and alveolus. 

iBi Post-operative appearance of patient fourteen months post lip repair and bone grafting. 
iCl Prosthesis in place following bone grafting to maintain maxillary arch in desired position. 
' D, E, & F) Radiographs of cleft are shown pre-operatively, immediately post-operotively 
and five months following insertion of bone graft bridging alveolar cleft. 



repair of the bony maxillary defects 
appears to be important in eliminat- 
ing some of the severe maxillary col- 
lapses and deformities seen in the 
past. 

4. Repair of palatal clefts are 
carried out when patient is approxi- 
mately two years of age. 

5. The multidiscipline approach 
as described appears to offer the 
best means of treatment. 

REFERENCES 

1. Georgiade, N., et al. Varying Con- 
cepts in Bone Grafting of Alveolar 
Palatal Defects. The Cleft Palate 
Journal 1:43, 1964. 

2. Georgiade, N. Use of Self Retaining 
Palatal Prosthesis. Plastic and Recon- 
structive Surgery 34:617, Dec. ( 1964). 



3. Tennison, C. Repair of Unilateral 
Cleft Lip by Stencil Method. Plastic 
and Reconstructive Surgery 9:115, 
1952. 

4. Millard, D. R., Complete Unilateral 
Cleft of the Lip. Plastic and Recon- 
structive Surgery 25:595, 1960. 

5. Millard, D. R. Refinements in Rota- 
tion-Advancement Cleft Lip Tech- 
nique. Plastic and Reconstructive Sur- 
gery 33:26, 1964 (Jan.). 

6. Trauner, R. Correction of Nose De- 
formities During First Operation of 
Unilateral Harelips. Trans. Int. Sec. 
PI. Surg. First Congress, Page 178, 
1957. 

7. Cronin, T. Surgery of the Double Cleft 
Lip and Protruding Premaxilla. Plastic 
and Reconstructive Surgery, 19:389, 
1957. 

8. Veau, V.; Plessier, P. Treatment of 
Double Harelip. J. Chir. 40:321, 1932. 

9. Georgiade, N. The Management of 
The Cleft Lip-Cleft Palate Patient. 
Southern Medical Journal (For Pub- 
lication). 



[31 ] 



On Bridging a Gap 



Asa member in good standing of 
the group that had more 
cavities, I have been going to the 
dentist for many years, suffering the 
famihar anticipatory pangs as I 
approached the chair, tensing up as 
he reached for the drill, and relax- 
ing only when safely in my car on 
the way home. 

This is the price one pays, how- 
ever grudgingly, for what my den- 
tist is pleased to call "dental health." 
However, the state of my dental 
health took a turn for the worse re- 
cently, and things will never be the 
same again. It became necessary for 
me to have something I thought only 
other people had — bridgework. As 
a preliminary to this project, my 
dentist took an impression of my 
entire mouth. It is an experience 
that beggars description. The gag- 
ging feeling as the dentist shoved 
that pinkish cement, like a tray of 
biscuits, into my mouth was bad 
enough. But after it hardened came 
the ordeal of having it yanked out. 
Thereupon he studied it critically, 
a dubious frown on his face, sug- 
gesting that I hadn't made the grade. 

This is the continuing effect den- 
tists have on me, the feeling that 
somehow I never quite measure up. 
It's different with my family doctor; 
he may scold, frown, and cluck, 
but I never really conclude that I 
am somehow letting him down. 
Dentists, at least those I have 



known, always leave me with the im- 
pression that it is all somehow my 
fault. A new string of cavities, for 
example, is likely to elicit a low- 
keyed expression of wounded pride, 
as if I had persisted in my de- 
linquency despite his professional 
counsel. 

This time, after he had yanked 
the hardened substance from my 
mouth, he uttered a noncommital, 
"H'mm, I guess this will do," and 
sent me on my way. 

On my next visit — for what he 
chose to call a consultation — I 
was shown his handiwork from the 
biscuit-making session. The pinkish 
substance had been transformed 
into a kind of beige clay mold with 
my name penciled on the earthen 
gums. 

"See?" he declared, not without 
a sense of pride, as he traced a line 
with his dental mirror to indicate 
gum recession. 

I saw. And I was horrified. For 
there, grinning up at me from the 
palm of his hand, was myself — the 
counterfeit presentment of my 
mouth, the clay-Hke teeth in quiet 
occlusion, the gums bared in a per- 
manent snarl. 

I cringed, and the dentist smiled. 
"Everybody gets a start when they 
see it," he chuckled. (For one aw- 
ful instant I thought he had been 
displaying me to his other patients, 
but he hastened to explain that he 



* This article appeared in the January 31, 1966 issue of The National Observer 
and is reprinted by special permission of the publishers. 



[32] 



meant everybody gets a start when 
faced with his own impression.) 

"Here," he said, "take a closer 
look," and he thrust them at me. 
Without thinking, I took them in 
my hand, feeling like Hamlet in 
the gravedigger's scene. I sighed, 
and handed them back. 

After the consultation, I went 
moodily on my way, brooding on the 
sad fact that the face I shall shave 



for the rest of my days will have 
lost something of that warm intimacy 
I have been accustomed to. For I 
shall be forever aware that some- 
where across town in a httle cabi- 
net a replica of a part of me sits 
grinning from a shelf, along with 
the oral replicas of lots of people I 
have never met and, possibly, a few 
old friends I have lost touch with. 

J. Norman McKenzie 



BIBLIOGRAPHY OMITTED 



In the January 1966 issue of 
the Journal, "The Formocresol 
Pulpotomy" by Benjamin R. Baker 
was published without a bibliogra- 
phy. At the author's request it is 
furnished herewith. 

Bibliography 

1. Brauer, J. C, et. al. Dentistry for 
Chidren, 4th ed. New York, Mc- 
Graw Hill, 1959. 506 p. (p. 385-394). 

2. Berger, J. E. Pulp tissue reaction to 
formocresol and zinc oxide and 
eugenol. J. Dent. Child., 32:13-28 
1st Quar. 1965. 

3. Law, D. B., and Lewis, T. M. 
Formocresol pulpotomy in deciduous 
teeth. J.A.D.A. 69:601-607, Nov. 
1964. 

4. Shiere, F. R., Frankl, S. N., and 
Logels, H. R. Pulp therapy for pri- 
mary and immature permanent teeth. 
Dent. Clin. N. Am., 639-648, Nov. 
1961. 

5. Sweet, C. A., Jr., Treatment of vitally 
exposed primary and young perma- 
nent teeth. J. Dent. Child., 23:86-89 
2nd Quar. 1956. 

6. Sweet, C. A., Jr. Formocresol tech- 
nique. Transactions of the third in- 
ternational conference on endodon- 
tics. 1963, p. 32-46. 

7. Law, D. B. Evaluation of vital 
pulpotomy technique. J. Dent. Child., 
23:40-44 1st Quar. 1956. 

8. Via, W. F., Jr. Evaluation of decidu- 
ous molars treated by pulpotomy and 
calcium hydroxide. J.A.D.A. 50:34- 
43 Jan. 1955. 



9. James, Verda, Englander, H. R., and 
Massler, M. Histologic response of 
amputated pulps to calcium com- 
pounds and antibiotics. Oral Surg., 
Oral Med., Oral Path., 10:975-986 
Sept. 1957. 

10. Emerson, C. C, Miyamoto, O., 
Sweet, C. A., Sr., and Bhatia, H. L. 
Pulpal changes following formocresol 
applications on rat molars and human 
primary teeth. J. Calif. Dent. Assn., 
27:309-323 Sept. 1959. 

11. Doyle. W. A., McDonald, R. E., and 
Mitchell, D. F., Formocresol versus 
calcium hydroxide in pulpotomy. 
J. Dent. Child., 29:86-97 2nd Quar. 
1962. 

12. Spedding, R. H. Discussion of: the 
formocresol technique. Transactions 
of the third international conference 
in endodontics. 1963, p. 47-51. 

13. Sweet, C. A., Sr. Treatment and 
maintenance of pulpless deciduous 
teeth. J.A.D.A. 22: 1972-5 Nov. 1935. 

14. Mehlum, C. Pulpotomies in primary 
teeth, a five year study. J. Dent. 
Child., 4th Quar. 20:155+ 1953. 

15. Massler, Maury, and Mansukhani, 
Nirmalit. Effects of formocresol on 
the dental pulp. J. Dent Child., 26: 
277-97 4th Quar. 1959. 

16. Droter, J. A. Formocresol in vital 
and non-vital teeth, a clinical study. 
J. Dent. Child., 30:239-242 4th Quar. 
1963. 

17. Veiling, R. J. A study of the treat- 
ment of infected and necrotic pri- 
mary teeth. J. Dent. Child., 28:213- 
217 1961. 

18. Starkey, Paul. Methods of preserving 
primary teeth which have exposed 
pulps. J. Dent. Child., 30:219-227 
4th Quar. 1963. 



[33] 



Case Report Number 4 



In this example of a dentigerous cyst the treat- 
ment deemed most advisable was complete enucle- 
ation of the cyst and removal of the involved 
tooth. This case is illustrative of one type of treat- 
ment of dentigerous cyst. 



Impacted Third Molar and 
Dentigerous Cyst 



This 45 year old man was re- 
ferred to this office to have an 
"abscessed" third molar removed on 
August 10, 1961. 

History 

Six weeks previously the patient's 
local dentist had removed a lower 
left second molar without pre-opera- 
tive X ray. This tooth was removed 
because of intermittant swelling and 
drainage distal to the second molar, 
with slight pain. The treatment 
failed to reUeve the symptoms. An 
X ray was taken of the second 
molar area post-operatively and re- 
vealed a small portion of an im- 
pacted third molar. Past history was 
not remarkable. 

Clinical Examination 

Intra-oral examination revealed 
no bulging of the mandible in the 



area of the third molar. There was 
evidence of a draining fistula from 
the extraction site of the second 
molar. The face was symmetrical 
from all aspects. There was no 
paresthesia present. 

X-Ray Examination 

A left lateral jaw and a posteriori 
anterior view of the head revealed 
a large dentigerous cyst extending 
from the area of the second molari 
to the angle of the mandible and 
involving part of the ascending 
ramus. (Figure 1) 



Surgical Procedure 

The operation was performed on 
the day the patient was seen, Oc- 
tober 24, 1961, using local anes- 
thesia, Xylocaine 1 : 100000 epineph- 
rine. An incision was made from 
the retromolar triangle extending to nt 



tic 



] 34] 



I 



DwiGHT Lanier Clark, D.D.S. 



and including the first molar. A ver- 
tical relaxing incision was made on 
the buccal aspect of the first molar. 
The mucoperiosteal reflected over 
the crest of the ridge revealed a 
very thin layer of bone overlying 
the cystic area. The bone was easily 
removed with rongeur forceps re- 
vealing the cyst lining that was 
thickened due to infection present. 
Complete enucleation was accom- 
plished with curets and the involved 
tooth removed with lower miller ele- 
vators. The resulting cavity was well 
irrigated with sterile saline and 
cleaned. The incision was completely 
closed with 0000 black silk; no 
drains were placed. The patient 
withstood the procedure well and 
left the office in good condition. 

Microscopic Finding 

The specimen has a thick capsule 
of fibrous connective tissue on the 




Figure 1. Lateral jaw and posterior anterior 
radiographs illustrating the area of the cyst 
and the involved tooth. 



periphery. Toward the central lu- 
men there are isolated areas of 
stratified squamous epithelium. The 
connective tissue in between the 
capsule and the epithelium shows 
a diffused, perivascular infiltrate of 
chronic inflammatory cells. 




Figure 2. Post-operative X rays, one month 
post-operative. 



[35] 




Figure 3. One year post-operative. 



Diagnosis 

Dentigerous Cyst 

Course 

Post-operative recovery was good. 
The patient had his local dentist re- 
move his sutures 5 days post-op- 
eratively. 

The patient returned December 
4, 1961, for a post-operative X ray 
and intra-oral examination. The tis- 
sue in the mouth had healed well 
and there was no evidence of in- 
flammation at post-operative site. 
The patient made no complaints 
of pain. (Fig. 2) 

On December 4, 1962, over a 
year after the operation, the patient 
returned for a lateral jaw and pos- 
terior anterior radiograph of the 
head. Bone had regenerated and 
there was no evidence of the cyst. 
(Fig. 3) 

UNC School of Dentistry 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 






[36] 



A Busy Board 



*C. C. DiERCKS, D.D.S. 



As AN ex-editor of The Journal 
"^^ OF THE North Carolina Den- 
tal Society and as Secretary-Trea- 
surer of the North Carolina State 
Board of Dental Examiners, who has 
just completed his first year on the 
Board, the temptation to write again 
telling of my impressions of one 
year's work is too great to resist. 

My impressions of the Board, its 
duties, and its members, are many. 
Most of all, I am impressed by the 
amount of work involved to be a 
good Board member. Before I be- 
came a member of the Board, I 
thought that the only thing they did 
was to conduct the annual exami- 
nation. This is done, yes, but what 
all do the Board members do to 
keep themselves so busy and con- 
sume so much of their time? 

Dentistry has changed rapidly the 
past few years. New equipment has 
changed operative and crown and 
bridge considerably. Board members 
no longer can grade a preparation 




on how they were taught fifteen or 
twenty years ago. They must attend 
special classes themselves to keep 
abreast of present day concepts of 
what is being taught. With transpor- 



* Secretary, North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners. 

[37] 



tation being what it is, and people 
moving accordingly, we must know 
what is taught on the West coast, in 
the Northeast, and in the Midwest. 
This cannot be learned by isolating 
one's self in his own state. Only 
national meetings and joint confer- 
ences of dental educators and den- 
tal examiners afford this type of 
interchange of ideas. At consider- 
able sacrifice, the Board members 
feel that it is their obligation to at- 
tend as many national meetings and 
conferences as possible. As a result 
of these conferences, this Board seri- 
ously challenged the "Standards of 
Dental Education." This challenge 
was based on the various ap- 
proaches and philosophies of dental 
education as found in the various 
dental colleges. 

Another interesting phase of 
Board work has been in the field of 
the Practice Act and Rules and 
Regulations. A good, strong and 
level-headed Board should make 
changes, keeping dentistry abreast 
of the changing times. Problems in 
this field are discussed at length at 
meetings of the American Associa- 
tion of Dental Examiners, and, in 
my opinion, the Board has made 
some changes this year as a result 
of these meetings. For example, the 
sanitary code which we adopted this 
year was brought from a meeting of 
the American Association of Dental 
Examiners. You may not think this 
important, but one question which 
the investigator for the Board asked 
again and again, after investigating 
various dentists regarding certain 
complaints was, "Why don't you 
have a sanitary code? That office 
I was in was not fit to be called a 
dental office." It is our purpose to 
clean up some of the filthy dental 



offices in the State and help improve 
the lot of the patient. 

The field of investigation and 
prosecution is going to be an ever- 
increasing burden to the Board. This 
is not only true in our State, but 
all states are having similar prob- 
lems. Violations run the gamut. Some 
individuals are negligent in various 
dental procedures and do not render 
qualified services. Their modus 
operandi is now becoming quite re- 
fined. Dentists convicted of various 
acts in other states, and who then 
try to get a license or reactivate 
their license in our State must be 
checked out quite carefully. 

Yes, my overall impression of one 
year's work on the Board is that it 
is a busy Board. We are doing a 
great deal now, but much more has 
to be done in the future. In ten more 
years, the duties of a good Board 
will be twice what they are today. 
Should this be factual, and in my 
own mind I am so convinced, we 
must continue working hard for the 
common good of man and dentistry. 
To accomplish this, there is no room 
for division or foot-dragging, either 
in the Board or in the dental pro- 
fession, in support of the Board. 

It is my belief that in order to 
maintain a high caliber of dentistry 
in our State, there must be very 
active organized dental study groups 
and programs of continuing educa- 
tion, a progressive dental school with 
a good program of post-graduate 
courses, and an alert and hard- 
working Board of Dental Examiners. 

I feel safe in saying that the 
North Carolina State Board of Den- 
tal Examiners intends to remain 
alert and hard-working. 

morganton, 

North Carolina • 



[38] 



■Theodore R. Oldenburg, D.D.S. 



The Effectiveness 
Of the Electric Toothbrush 
In Reducing Oral Debris 
In Handicapped Children 




Figure I 



'T'he oral hygiene of handicapped 
children is known to be poor. 
Restrictions in movement of the 
arms and hands prohibit the handi- 
capped child from performing the 
necessary functions of mouth hy- 
giene properly. Through incorrect 
toothbrushing, the accumulation of 
debris around the teeth leads to a 
greater prevalence of decay and 
gingival disease than among nor- 
mal children. «.ii.i2 it is felt that 
any improvement in oral hygiene for 
handicapped children would im- 
prove the dental and physical well- 



being of these patients. Several in- 
vestigators have reported favorable 
improvement in the oral hygiene 
of patients using electric tooth- 
brushes. 2,4,8,9 

Purpose of Study 

Because of these reports, the pres- 
ent study was conducted to deter- 
mine whether brushing with an 
electric toothbrush resulted in an im- 
provement in oral hygiene of handi- 
capped children during a two-week 
period, in comparison to routine 



• Associate Professor, Department of Pedodontics, University of North Carolina, School of 
Dentistry. 



[39] 



brushing with a standard toothbrush. 
The rapid turnover of patients at 
the hospital hmited the amount of 
time the study could be continued. 
It was not possible to carry out 
a "double blind" study, but it was 
possible to conduct a "half blind" 
study wherein the dentist evaluat- 
ing the results of the trial was un- 
aware of the type care the child had 
received. 

Materials and Methods 

Thirty-nine children ranging in 
age from 2 to 15 years who were 
residents of the North Carolina 
Cerebral Palsy Hospital were ex- 
amined in one day. The examina- 
tion was done with a good dental 
light, a mouth mirror, and a number 
23 explorer. (Figure I) 

Six teeth of each child were ex- 
amined for oral debris. The teeth 
selected were the most posterior 
teeth in each quadrant and the 
maxillary and mandibular right cen- 
tral incisors. The buccal surfaces of 
the maxillary teeth and the lingual 
surfaces of the mandibular teeth 
were evaluated, and each individual 
tooth was assigned a debris score 
ranging from to 3. 

The scoring system used for each 
tooth was developed by Greene and 
Vermillion.'^ 

— No debris or stain present. 

1 — Soft debris covering not more 
than one-third of the tooth surface, 
or the presence of extrinsic stains 
without other debris regardless of 
surface area covered. 

2 — Soft debris covering more 
than one-third, but not more than 
two-thirds, of the exposed tooth sur- 
face. 

3 — Soft debris covering more than 
two-thirds of the exposed tooth sur- 
face. 



Scores and personal character- 
istics such as name, age, sex, and 
race were recorded on a 3" x 5" 
card (Figure II). A number was 
given to each child and recorded in 
the upper right-hand corner. The 
ability of the child to brush his own 
teeth was recorded under comments. 
The six individual scores were aver- 
aged to obtain the debris index 
which was recorded in the lower 
right hand corner. 



Figure II 

Name: Kornegay, Tinker No. 6 

Age: 8 Sex: M Race: W 
Comments: Brushes Own Teeth 

Right Ant Left Total 
Max (B) 2 3 2 7 
Mand (L) 3 2 5 
Total 5 3 4 12 

Debris Index 2 



Assignment 

Four children who were to be 
discharged the following day were 
eliminated and the remaining chil- 
dren were stratified within the male 
and female wards into two groups, 
those who brushed their own teeth, 
and those who were assisted in 
brushing their teeth by one of the 
nurses' aides. 

This resulted in four groups: 

1. Male — brushes his own teeth 

2. Male — assisted by nurses' aide 

3. Female — brushes her own 
teeth 

4. Female — assisted by nurses' ; 
aide 

Within each group, children were 
randomly assigned to one of the j 
brushing groups: 

a. Electric toothbrush 

b. Regular toothbrush 



[40] 



Restrictions in assigning the chil- 
dren in each group to one of the 
toothbrushing methods were that, 
insofar as possible, each strata be 
evenly split between the two meth- 
ods, and that the total number as- 
signed to each method be evenly 
split. 

A list of children assigned to the 
two groups was provided the head 
nurse who posted the names in each 
ward. Nurses' aides were instructed 
on the use of the electric toothbrush. 
They supervised (and assisted 
where necessary) to see that each 
child's assignment was carried out, 
without any attempt to change the 
frequency or the amount of time 
taken in toothbrushing. The assign- 
ments were not disclosed to the den- 
tist who was to re-examine the chil- 
dren. 

Follow-up Examination 

At the end of two weeks, another 
examination was made, without 
reference to scores on the original 
examination. A new card was used 
and the same procedure was fol- 
lowed as in the pre-trial examina- 
tion to determine a debris index 
for each child. The results were 
then matched with those from the 
first examination. 

Seven children were discharged 
during the trial period and were not 
available for the second examina- 
tion. Six of these were in the elec- 
tric toothbrush group. (The statis- 
tician immediately wondered if this 
was due to some effect of electric 
toothbrushing, but was reassured 
that it was just an unfortunate run 
of luck.) 

One child was switched from the 
regular to the electric toothbrush 
group by the nurses' aides, but this 



was the only departure from the 
random assignment. There were 16 
children in the regular care group 
and 12 in the electric toothbrush 
group who completed the study. 

Results 

The difference in the debris in- 
dex rating, before and after the 
trial, was calculated for each child. 
The mean debris index in the regu- 
lar group was 1.64 before the trial 
period and 1.27 after the trial period 
resulting in a mean difference of 
-0.37. The mean debris index in the 
electric toothbrush group was 1.78 
before the trial period and 1.22 
after the trial period resulting in a 
mean difference of -0.56 (Figure 
III). 

Both groups showed a significant 
lowering of the debris index during 
the trial. The electric toothbrush 
group showed a larger decline 
(-0.56) than the regular group 
(-0.37) but the difference between 
the two groups was not significant 
at the 5 per cent level of signifi- 
cance. 

The debris index differences are 
shown plotted on a graph. (Figure 
IV). 

The index before the trial is 
plotted on the horizontal axis and the 
index after is plotted on the vertical 
axis. Of the children examined before 
and after the trial, three in each 
group showed up worse than be- 
fore the trial; these appear above 
the diagonal line in the graph. 
All the children who improved their 
oral hygiene are represented below 
the diagonal line. 

Generally, the children with the 
higher debris index on the initial 
examination had a tendency to im- 
prove more. The four children who 



[41 j 



Figure III. Results of Two- Week Trial of Regular and Electric 
Toothbnishing, in Cerebral Palsy Hospital Patients: 



Regular Toothbrush 



Electric Toothbrush 



Child 


Debris Index 


Child 


Debris Index 


Number 


Before 


After 


Difference 


Number 


Before 


After 1 


Oifferencf 


2 


2.0 


1.0 


-1.0 


1 


1.0 


1.3 


+0.3 


9 


1.5 


0.8 


-0.7 


3* 


2.2 


Disch. 


— 


12 


1.0 


1.5 


+0.5 


11* 


0.8 


Disch. 


— 


16* 


1.5 


Disch. 


— 


15* 


1.3 


Disch. 


— 


18* 


0.5 


1.0 


+0.5 


22 


1.5 


1.2 


-0.3 


28 


2.5 


2.2 


-0.3 


38 


1.8 


1.5 


-0.2 


31 


2.2 


1.2 


-1.0 


25 


2.5 


1.0 


-1.5 


34 


1.7 


1.0 


-0.7 


30* 


2.3 


Disch. 


— 










21 


2.0 


0.8 


-1.2 


4 


2.5 


2.2 


-0.3 


23*** 


2.2 


0.8 


-1.4 


14 


0.7 


0.5 


-0.2 










39 


2.0 


2.0 


-0 


36 


1.7 


1.3 


-0.4 


20 


1.8 


0.8 


-1.0 


5* 


0.9 


Disch. 


— 


24 


1.8 


0.8 


-1.0 


6 


1.0 


1.3 


+0.3 


26 


1.5 


1.8 


+0.3 


7 


2.0 


1.5 


-0.5 


29 


0.7 


0.5 


—0.2 


17 


2.5 


2.0 


-0.5 










19 


2.2 


0.7 


— 1.5 


32 


1.0 


0.7 


-0.3 


10 


1.0 


1.2 


+0.2 


33 


2.8 


2.3 


-0.5 


35* 
Mean 


2.9 


Disch. 




Mean 


1.64^ 


'* 1.27 


-0.37 


1.78^ 


'* 1.22 


-0.56 



* Discharged before post-trial examination. 
*• Mean excluding those who were discharged before the post-trial examination. 
*♦* Originally assigned to regular care group-transferred by nurses to this group. 



improved most were in the electric 
toothbrush group, as seen in the 
lower right-hand corner of the 
graph. 

Improvement of oral hygiene in 
both groups may have been in- 
fluenced by the following two fac- 
tors: (1) the attitudes and actions 
of the children and nurses' aides 
could have created an atmosphere 
more conducive to improvement in 



oral hygiene; or (2) the investiga- 
tor may have changed his scoring 
technique on the second examina- 
tion hopefully looking for improve- 
ment. 

Assuming that the scoring tech- 
nique was unchanged, it would 
appear that oral hygiene can be sig- 
nificantly improved in this popula- 
tion of handicapped children sim- 
ply by stimulation of the children 



[42] 



and perhaps the nurses' aides to 
better use of regular care tech- 
niques. 

Discussion 

A major purpose of this study is 
to emphasize that evaluation of new 
treatments in comparison with ac- 
cepted procedures should be done 
through a controlled study. For ex- 
ample, both groups in this study im- 
proved significantly during the trial 
period. Although there was more 
improvement in the group using the 
electric brush, it was not sig- 
nificantly better than regular care. 

Soon after this study was com- 
pleted, several authors published re- 
sults of a different sort of carefully 
controlled trial in adults.^- ^' ^' ^*^ 
They concluded that there was a 
small but significant difference in 
favor of the electric toothbrush over 
conventional brushing. 

It should be remembered that the 
results of any single small scale ex- 
periment, especially one involving 
human subjects, seldom provides the 
complete answer. Too, factors other 
than statistical significance or in- 
significance must enter into de- 
cisions as to the type of care to be 
used. In view of the presented con- 
trolled experiment to evaluate "oral 
hygiene" under different methods 
of brushing, the conclusion which 
seems warranted at this time is that 
the case either for or against any 
method is "not proven." 

UNC School of Dentistry 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY 

1. Cohen, M. M. and Winer, R. A.: Compara- 
tive effectiveness of manually and power 
operated toothbrushing on tooth deposits. 
J. Amer. Soc. Perio. 2:122 (May-June) 1964. 

2. Cohen, M. M. and Winer, Richard A.: The 
comparative effectiveness of automatic and 



Detirls Index in Handicapped Children at the North 

Corolino Cerebrol Ftalsy Hospital, Before and After a 

Two Week Trial with Regular and Electric Toothbrush Core 




10 IS 20 25 

Debris Index (before) 



Figure IV 



hand toothbrushing in periodontal disease 
in a group of mental subnormal institution- 
alized individuals (In Press). 

3. Conroy, C. W.: Comparison of automatic 
and hand toothbrushes: cleaning effective- 
ness. J.A.D.A. 70:921 (April) 1965. 

4. Cross, W. G., Forrest. J. O. and Wade, 
A. B.: A comparative study of tooth 
cleansing using conventional and electrically 
operated toothbrushes. Brit. Dent. J. 113: 
19-22 (July) 1962. 

5. Derbyshire, J. C: Cleansing effectiveness 
of conventional and electric toothbrushes: a 
clinical comparison. J.A.D.A. 69:317 (Sep- 
tember) 1964. 

6. Eisenfield, I. and Friedman, E. U.r Obser- 
vations on the dental treatment of cerebral 
palsied children. J.A.D.A. 47:538-540 (No- 
vember) 1953. 

7. Greene, J. C. and Vermillion, J. R.: Oral 
hygiene index — a method for classifying oral 
hygiene status: J.A.D.A. 61:172-179 (Au- 
gust) 1960. 

8. Hoover, D. R. and Robinson, H. B. G.: Ef- 
fect of automatic and hand toothbrushing 
on gingivitis. J.A.D.A. 65:361-367 (Septem- 
ber) 1962. 

9. Lefkowitz, W. and Robinson, H. B. G.: 
Effectiveness of automatic and hand brushes 
in removing dental plaque and debris. 
J.A.D.A. 65:351-361 (September) 1962. 

10. Lobene, R. R.: Evaluation of altered gingival 
health from permissive powered toothbrush- 
ing. J.A.D.A. 69:585 (November) 1964. 

11. O'Leary, R. L.: Dental treatment of the 
cerebral palsied patient. N.Y.S. Dent. J. 
17:508-514 (December) 1951. 

12. Zappler, S.: Dentistry and the cerebral 
palsied child. J. Dent. Child. Second Quart, 
pp. 16-18. 1949. 



[43] 



North Carolina Dental Hygienists 
Association Adopts Resolution on 
Dental Hygiene Education 



Carolyn C. Williams 



Asa result of the dental man- 
power shortage and present day 
culture, great stress is currently 
being placed on "team practice." 
The North Carolina Dental Hygien- 
ists Association believes that suc- 
cessful team practice must include 
increased educational standards with 
resulting improved services. This is 
a matter to be considered by all 
members of the dental team. In- 
creased scientific knowledge and 
dentistry's desire to render the best 
possible service for the public made 
increased educational standards es- 
sential for the dentist. We feel that 
the same must hold true for the 
dental hygienist if she is to be ca- 
pable of rendering dental hygiene 
services worthy of adding to the 
image and statue of dentistry. 

Dental hygiene education today is 
facing a crisis that may be deeper 
and more fundamental than any 
preceding one. One need not be a 
prophet to recognize that the forces 
in education and our professional 
organizations have the markings 
either of great resurgence in edu- 
cational planning or of grand retro- 
gression. Progress depends upon the 
kind of thinking that has the most 
weight in shaping plans. 

The Executive Council and the 
Committee on Dental Hygiene Edu- 
cation of the North Carolina Den- 
tal Hygienists Association have 
expressed their willingness to co- 



operate with the North Carolina 
Dental Society in the estabhshment 
of accredited schools when and 
where they are needed. The following 
resolution has been adopted by the 
Executive Council: 

Resolution 

Whereas, there is a recognized 
need for dental hygienists in North 
Carolina, and 

Whereas, it has come to the at- 
tention of the North Carolina Den- 
tal Hygienists Association that sev- 
eral programs for the education of 
dental hygienists are being initiated 
in North Carolina, and 

Whereas, the Council on Dental 
Education of the American Dental 
Association specifies that dental hy- 
giene curriculums be offered as col- 
lege level programs, and 

Whereas, only graduates of den- 
tal hygiene schools accredited by 
the Council on Dental Education are 
considered eligible for licensure by 
the State boards of dental ex- 
aminers, therefore be it 

Resolved, that the North Caro- 
lina Dental Hygienists Association 
wishes to support only those pro- 
grams for the education of dental 
hygienists that are found in schools 
approved by the Council on Dental 
Education of the American Dental 
Association. 



[44] 



Freliminary 
Frogram 



110th 

Annual Session 

North Carolina Dental Society 



May 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 1966 

THE CAROLINA 
PINEHURST 




[45] 



I 



nOTH ANNUAL SESSION COMMITTEE 

Norman F. Ross, Program Chairman 
Baxter B. Sapp, Jr., Convention Co-ordinator 

Arrangements: L. D. Herring, Chairman; Carnie C. Gooding, Frederick G. 
Hasty, Gerald F. McBrayer, William A. Mynatt, J. Fred Sproul, Jack B. 
Upchurch, William G. Ware, Jr., W. Kenneth Young. 

Clinic: Robert B. Litton, Chairman; R. F. Hunt, Jr., Harold E. Maxwell, 
Ludwig G. Scott, M. Stevenson Thurston. 

Entertainment: M. L. Cherry, Entertainment Co-ordinator; C. P. Os- 
borne, Jr. (Banquet); A. Dwight Price (Dance); Cecil A. Pless, Jr. (Re- 
ception). 

Exhibit: E. A. Pearson, Jr., Chairman; A. C. Current, Jr., Norman J. 
Duncan, M. M. Forbes, M. M. Lilley, Sandy C. Marks (Scientific Exhibits). 

Hospitality: John W. Girard, Jr., Chairman; Frank G. Atwater, L. P. 
Bratton, James H. Lee, Henry O. Lineberger, Jr., William H. Oliver, 
Horace P. Reeves, Jr., E. Kent Rogers, III, R. W. Sugg, G. W. Yokeley. 

Monitor: A. P. Cline, Jr., Chairman; Clarence F. Biddix, A. Bruce Bot- 
toms, Robert E. Brooks, L. A. Cameron, Dwight L. Clark, Hugh H. Cole, 
James L. Cox, Robert D. Garren, Thomas A. Morris, S. D. Petersen, Jr.. 
John A. S. Reynolds, Joe B. Roberson, Clyde L. Taylor. 

Necrology: Robert T. Byrd, Chairman; Robert A. George, C. B. Johnson, 
New Bern; W. T. Pennell, J. Ernest Roberts. 

Program: Norman F. Ross, Chairman; G. Shuford Abernethy, M. W. 
Aldridge, Glenn F. Bitler, Kenneth M. Ray, Freeman C. Slaughter. 

Projected Clinics: Robert W. Holmes, Chairman; Donald E. Bland, Fred- 
erick G. Hasty, L. P. Megginson, Jr., J. O. Thorpe. 

Publicity: F. A. Buchanan, Chairman; C. T. Barker, H. Estes Butler, 
J. Henry Ligon, Jr., W. Stewart Peery. 

'It 
Sports: W. Kimball Griffin, Chairman; M. B. Corl, D. W. Seifert, Jr., C. B. 
Taylor, Dan Wright. 

Visual Education: Walter T. McFall, Jr., Chairman; Carnie C. Gooding, 
Dwight B. Hord, Charles A. Jarrett, C. M. Kistler. 

[46] 




OFFICERS 
NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 

1965-1966 

Pearce Roberts, Jr., D.D.S., Asheville President 

J. Homer Guion, D.D.S., Charlotte President-Elect 

James A. Harrell, D.D.S., Elkin Vice President 

C. W. Poindexter, D.D.S., Greensboro Secretary-Treasurer 

Barry G. Miller, D.D.S., Charlotte Editor-Publisher 

M. Lamar Dorton, D.D.S., Statesville Associate Editor-Publisher 

Baxter B. Sapp, Jr., D.D.S., Durham Photographic Editor 

Andrew M. Cunningham, B.S., Raleigh Executive Secretary 

[47] 



General Information 

Registration: The registration desk will open at 1:30 p.m., Wednesday, 
May 4, in the foyer of The Carolina. Members must present their 1966 
membership cards. Registration will continue on Thursday, Friday, and 
Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Hotel Accommodations: Rooms at The Carolina will be available for 
occupancy at noon on Wednesday, May 4. Check-out time is after break- 
fast on Sunday, May 8. 

General Sessions: Three General Sessions will be held in the Ballroom: 
Wednesday at 8:30 p.m., Thursday at 8:30 p.m., and Saturday at 4:00 p.m. 
Everyone is cordially invited to attend the General Sessions on Wednes- 
day and Saturday. Officers will be elected at the General Session Thurs- 
day night and only members will be admitted to this meeting. 

House of Delegates: Four meetings of the House of Delegates will be held 
in the Bridge Room: Wednesday at 2:00 p.m., Friday at 1:30 p.m. and 
8:30 p.m., and Saturday at 9:00 a.m. Delegates only will be admitted to 
the floor of the House, but visitors are cordially invited to sit in the gallery 
and hear the deliberations. 

Reference Committees: All members are privileged and urged to attend 
Reference Committee hearings and participate in the discussions. Ap- 
pointments to Reference Committees, and the reports and resolutions re- 
ferred to them will be announced by the Speaker at the opening session 
of the House of Delegates on Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. Reference Com- 
mittees will hold hearings on Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon. 

Commercial Exhibits: Leading dental manufacturers, dealers, and dental 
laboratories will exhibit on the West Porches of The Carolina. They will 
be represented by competent and well-qualified men and women who can 
be a very helpful source of information on the latest in dental products 
and services. The commercial exhibit area will be open on Wednesday from 
2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. and on Thursday and Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 
5:00 p.m. 

Golf: An all-day Golf Tournament will be held at the Pinehurst Country 
Club on Wednesday, May 4, beginning at 8:00 a.m. A putting contest for 
men and women will be held on the green in front of The Carolina at 
1:30 p.m. on Wednesday. 

Trap and Skeet Shooting: No formal trap or skeet shooting matches are 
planned. The Pinehurst Gun Club will be available for members to shoot 
at their leisure. 

Entertainment: Members and their guests are cordially invited to attend 
the following social events at The Carolina: 

[48] 



A lawn party and social hour at 5:00 p.m. on Thursday given by the 
North Carolina Dental AuxiUary. 

Dancing in the Pine Room Thursday at 10:00 p.m. 

A reception and social hour at 5:45 p.m. Saturday in the Bridge Room. 

The Annual Banquet at 7:00 p.m. Saturday in the Dining Room. Door 
prizes will be awarded. 

A dance and entertainment in the Ballroom at 9:00 p.m. Saturday. 

Scientific Exhibits: An array of informative and colorful scientific exhibits 
will be on display in the Cocktail Lounge and adjoining areas, beginning 
at 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday. 

District Officers Conference: District officers, delegates, alternate dele- 
gates, executive committee members, and chairmen of local arrangements 
committees will meet for breakfast in the Crystal Room on Thursday at 
7:30 a.m. 

Past Presidents Breakfast: Past Presidents of the Society are invited to meet 
for breakfast in the Crystal Room at 7:30 a.m. on Friday. Dr. Darden J. 
Eure will preside. 

For the Ladies: Several social and sporting events have been planned 
especially for the ladies by the North Carolina Dental Auxiliary. 

Door Prizes: Door prizes will be awarded to lucky winners at the Annual 
Banquet on Saturday night. Only members are eligible and ticket holders 
must be present to win. 

Information Center on Group Insurance: Representatives of insurance 
companies underwriting and administering group insurance programs for 
the North Carolina Dental Society and the American Dental Association 
will be available for consultation at an information center near the regis- 
tration area. Members are urged to take advantage of this opportunity to 
confer with these representatives about their insurance problems. 

ALLIED MEETINGS 

American College of Dentists, Carolinas Chapter, luncheon, Wednesday, 
May 4 at 12:00 noon. Crystal Room. 

International College of Dentists, luncheon, Thursday, May 5 at 12:00 
noon. Crystal Room. 

North Carolina Dental Assistants Association, Whispering Pines Motor 
Lodge, Southern Pines, May 4-7. 

North Carolina Dental Auxiliary, The Carolina, Pinehurst, May 5-7. 

North Carolina Dental Hygienists Association, Mid Pines Club, South- 
ern Pines, May 5-7. 

North Carolina Dental Laboratory Association, Holiday Inn, Southern 
Pines, May 6. 

[49] 



HOUSE OF DELEGATES 
NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 

1966 

Speaker of the House 

Ralph D. Coffey 

State Officers 

Pearce Roberts, Jr President 

J. Homer Guion President-Elect 

James A. Harrell Vice President 

C. W. Poindexter Secretary-Treasurer 

Executive Committee 

S. H. Isenhower, Chairman 
W. L. Hand, Jr. Roy L. Lindahl 

Darden J. Eure 

Ethics Committee 

Thomas M. Hunter, Chairman 
Frank G. Atwater C..Z. Candler, Jr. 

Elliot R. Motley Horace K. Thompson 



First District 

M. W. Carpenter 
John W. Girard, Jr. 
D. B. Hord 
Cecil A. Pless, Jr. 
C. B. Taylor 



Third District 

Luther H. Butler 
Charles W. Horton 
L. P. Megginson, Jr. 
C. H. Teague 
C. Robert VanderVoort 



Second District 

M. Lamar Dorton 
W. Stewart Peery 
William H. Price 
Horace P. Reeves, Jr. 
J. Harry Spillman 



Fourth District 

Joseph M. Johnson 
Penn Marshall, Jr. 
Harold E. Maxwell 
William H. Oliver 
C. P. Osborne, Jr. 



Fifth District 

Zeno L. Edwards, Jr. 
James E. Purr 
C. P. Godwin 
E. Smith Jewell 
James H. Lee 



[50] 



A. D. A. Guest Speakers 



General Session 
8:30 p.m. 



Ballroom 
Wednesday 



MAYNARD K. HINE, D.D.S. 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



President 
American Dental Association 




Dr. Hine has been dean of Indiana University School of Dentistry since 
1945. He received his D.D.S. and M.S. degrees from University of Illinois 
College of Dentistry and in 1962 his alma mater named him "Alumnus of 
the Year." He was a member of the House of Delegates from 1946-1958 
and served two terms as Seventh District Trustee, representing dentists 
from Indiana and Ohio. He is author of numerous articles and books on 
periodontics, preventive dentistry and oral pathology. 



House of Delegates Bridge Room 
2:00 p.m. Wednesday 



ARTHUR W. KELLNER, D.D.S. 

Hollywood, Florida 



Fifth District Trustee 
American Dental Association 




Dr. Kellner is serving his first term as Fifth District Trustee. He has 
held the offices of First Vice President of the American Dental Association 
and President of the American Association of Dental Examiners. Since 
1953 he has represented Florida in the ADA House of Delegates. He re- 
ceived his dental degree from Chicago College of Dental Surgery. 



[51 ] 



Program 

Wednesday, May 4 

8:00 Golf Tournament Pinehurst Country Club 

10:00 Executive Committee Whispering Pines Motor Lodge 

12:00 Luncheon, American College of Dentists Crystal Room 

1:30 Putting Contest (Men and Women) Front Lawn 

1:30 Registration Desk Opens Hotel Foyer 

2:00 Commercial & Scientific Exhibits Open 

2:00 House of Delegates, First Session Bridge Room 

2:00 Scientific Films Ballroom 

3:30 Projected Clinics Ballroom 

5:00 Board of Directors, Dental Foundation of N. C, Inc.. ...Pine Room 

8:30 First General Session Ballroom 

Necrology Service 

Recognition of Guests 

Recognition of Allied Organizations 

Address: Pearce Roberts, Jr., D.D.S., President, N.C.D.S. 

Address: Maynard K. Hine, D.D.S., President, A.D.A. 

Report: Dental Foundation of N. C, Inc. 

Thursday, May 5 

7:30 District Officers Conference Breakfast Crystal Room 

9:00 Registration Desk Opens Hotel Foyer 

9:00 Reference Committees 

9:00 Scientific Film Ballroom 

9:15 Aesthetics With Longevity in Restorative Dentistry 

John C. Bartels, D.M.D., Portland, Oregon Ballroom 

12:00 Luncheon, International College of Dentists Crystal Room 

1:30 Scientific Film Ballroom 

2:00 Preliminary Treatment of Prosthetic Patients 

Ralph H. Boos, D.D.S., Minneapolis, Minnesota Ballroom 

5:00 Lawn Party for Members and Guests 

Given by North Carolina Dental Auxiliary Front Lawn 

8:30 Second General Session Ballroom 

Election of Officers 
Selection of Site for 1968 

10:00 Dancing Pine Room 

[52] 



Fri«la\. Ma\ 6 

7:30 Past Prtsidents Krcakfast Crystal Roi>in 

^AH) S^icnlifk Kilm Ballroom 

y:I5 Consen alive Cro\*n and Bridge Construction 

John C. Bands. D.M.D., Portland. Orciion Ballroom 

1:3(> House of Delegates, Second Session Bridge Room 

1:30 Scientific Film Ballrcmni 

2:00 Principles of Advanced Ksthetics 

Ralph H. Boos. D.D.S., Minneapolis, Minnesota Ballroom 

5:00 Fratemitj Hour 

Psi Omega Pine Room 

Delta Sigma Delta Bridge Room 

«:30 Pfi>sical Fitness for the Dentist 

Thomas K. Cureton. Ph.D.. L'. of Illinois Ballroom 

H:M) House of Delej^ates, 1 hird Session Bridge Room 



.•^aliinia) . Ma\ 7 

9:00 lahie Clinics Ballroom 

9:00 liouse of Delegates, Fourth Session Bridge Room 

2:00 Physical Fitness for the Dentist 

IhoriKis K. ( iifLton. Ph.D., U. of Illinois Ballroom 

4:00 I bird (ieneral Session Ballroom 

Installation of Officers 

5:45 Social Hour for Members and (lUests Bridge Room 

7:00 Annual Banquet Dining Room 

Prcscniaiion of President's Emblem 
Awarding of Door Prizes 

9:00 Dance and Fntertainment Ballroom 



Siiinla\. Ma> }i 

7:30 Breakfast 
9:00 (heck Out 

I 5.1 1 



Essayist 




JOHN C. BARTELS, D.M.D. 

Portland, Oregon 



:l 



Dr. Bartels is a graduate oj North Pacific College of Dentistry. He is a 
Fellow of the American College of Dentists, a member of the American 
Academy of Restorative Dentistry and the American Academy of Gold 
Foil Operators, and a past president of the Oregon State Dental Associa- 
tion. For 15 years he was Clinical Associate at the University of Oregon 
Dental School and is postgraduate instructor in dental ceramics and full 
mouth reconstruction. 



Thursday, 9:15 a.m. BaDroom 

AESTHETICS WITH LONGEVITY IN RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY 
This program is planned to illustrate diagnostic procedures in de- 
termining the restorative dentistry necessary to prolong the life expentancy 
of the natural dentition. It will cover educating the patient to the necessity 
of considering the masticating organ as a complete entity when receiving 
restorative treatment. Special emphasis will be given to replacing and re- 
storing teeth in the anterior segments of the mouth. 



Friday, 9:15 a.m. Ballroom 

CONSERVATIVE CROWN AND BRIDGE CONSTRUCTION 

This presentation includes: crown and bridge construction, both fixed 
and fixed removable; splinting double abutment teeth; the most current 
progress in porcelain bonded to metal, full porcelain veneer crowns and 
combinations of gold and porcelain; and aesthetic treatment of conspicuous 
gingival areas of the teeth. 



[54] 



Essayist 



RALPH H. BOOS. D.D.S. 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 




Dr. Boos is a graduate of University oi Minnesota Dental C(>Uei>i'. a 
charter diplomat oi American Board oi Prostiunlontics. and a life fellow 
and past president of Academy of Denture Prosthetics and a bellow of 
International College of Dentists. 

Thursday, 2:00 p.m. Ballroom 

PRELIMINARY 1 RLA 1 MENT OF PROS IHEIIC PAllLMS 

Oftentimes the patient presents a history of tension, malocclusion, lower 
tissue tolerance, limited health, and mental reservations. Advance condi- 
tions invt)lve traumatogenic function, crepitus, and temporomandibular 
pain. These factors have a great influence on the prognosis of treatment. 

A conditioning or preliminary treatment of prosthetic patients is es- 
sential and is planned as a separate procedure from the biomechanical 
technique of case construction. Ihe related subjects to be discussed are 
motivation, oral mucosa and nutrition, displacement, muscle therapy, bit- 
ing habits, occlusion, and pain conditions. Various programs of condition- 
ing prcKvdures are suggested, depending on the requirements of the case. 

The subjects will be illustrated b\ colored slides. 

Frida\. 2:00 p.m Ballroom 

PRINC IPLFS OF ADVANCED PROSTHETICS 

Great progress has been made in the slud\ of the basic principles of 
esthetics. The individual tooth form, position, relation to approximating 
Iceth. anteriors and posteriors, may be arranged by fundamentals. Esthetics 
is developed according to the type of patient (male or female, age. per- 
sonality and physical structures). 

The original perception was conceived from attractive and pleasing 
natural teeth associated with types of people. There is a great amount of 
evidence to substantiate the principles and wc may need to change some of 
our original concepts. 

Soft and pleasing feminine lines are associated with the female. The hard 
and more vigorous t(H)th and arrangement is associated with the male. 

Variations from the basic guides may be applied to individualize the 
esthetics and enhance the appearance of the individual. The principles may 
be applied to all types of teeth — natural, jackets, fixed bridges, partial 
jdcntures, and complete dentures. 

I 5.S I 



Essayist 




THOMAS K. CURETON, Ph.D. 

Champaign, Illinois 



Dr. Cureton is professor of Physical Education and Director of the 
Physical Fitness Laboratory, University of Illinois. He is a member of the 
White House Committee on Physical Fitness, consultant to the Air Force 
and Navy, and a member of the Olympic Committee. He has tested and 
analyzed the physical condition of thousands of men and women and has 
found that many ailments accompanying middle age can be completely 
avoided or postponed for as much as 15 years by body conditioning. 



Friday, 8:30 p.m. 

Saturday, 2:00 p.m. Ballroom 

PHYSICAL FITNESS FOR THE DENTIST 

These lectures will cover the nature of physical fitness, its various com- 
ponents and tests of; evidence of marked deterioration in the physical fit- 
ness of American men and women after 25 years of age; results from 
various experiments over 25 years to determine how physical fitness may 
be improved. Various programs are compared which reduce fat, cholesterol 
and triglycerides; and raise strength, basal metabolic rate, respiratory and 
cardiac reserves. Tests of heart function are described to measure the 
initial impulse, velocity and acceleration of the heart stroke, circulation, 
respiration, muscular endurance and various components of motor fitness, 
i.e. balance, flexibility, agility, strength, power and endurance. The lecture 
will be illustrated with slides and a movie. 



[56] 



Table Clinics 

Satiinla>. *>:()() a.m.- 12 :(M) iuhmi Ballrooiii 

1. Simpliticd Paralkl Pin Technique, Dr. E. Kent Rogers. 111. Asheville. 

2. Frtcision Anachments, Hr. James H. Maddox. Enka. 

3 Anterior Ktsin Kest«irati«»ns, Dr. Carl R. Mundy. Asheville. 

4. Ihirt\ .Second Base Plates and Mouth (.uards. Dr. Charles V. Aber- 
iicth\, lorcst C"i(\ . 

5. Panorex \-Ra> as an Orthodontic I ool, Di. Martin 1) Barringer, 
C harlotlc. 

6. Patient Kducation. Dr. Irod C". Miller. JoiKsxille 

7. I>M) and One-Half ^ ears Kxperience with a Dental Health ( Olumn. 
Dr. I.. P. Nk>-;i:insiui. Jr.. and Dr. C. W . Hortcui. Hil-Ii Voun. 

H. Periodontal K>aluation of New Oral H>giene Concepts, Dr. Janus H. 

Hi'ucll. (irccnsbori) 
9. Clinical Kvaluation of Parallel Pins, Dr. Baxter B Sapp. Jr.. Durham. 

10. Lower Lateral Incisor, Dr. Galen W. Quinn, Durham. 

1 1. Pin lechnique C>i>wn and Bridge, Dr. Keith L. Bentley. North W ilkes- 
boro. 

12. Impression lechnique Oown and Bridge, Dr. Joe B. Craig, Charlotte. 

13. ()\erh> Dental Splint, Dr. Guy i:. Haddix. Statesville. 

14. Quick Curing Acr>lic Technique, Dr. J. Sidney Hood, Le.xington. 

15. I se uf a New .Material for Crown and Bridge Work, Dr. J. Malcolm 
McAllister. Ralei^ih. 

16. Pulpotom> lechnique in Deciduous Teeth L tilizing Formocresol, Dr. 
(i. R. .\ant/. [.umbL-rton. 

17. .\ New Investment .Material for Single L nit Casting, Dr. E. N. Pridgen. 
layetleville. 

IS. Occlusal Tracing, Dr. S. Byron lowler. Raleii^h. 

19. Diagnosis and Ireatment of the Non-Functi(»nal Prematurit>, Dr. 
1 K)>d B. Stanley. Raleigh. 

20. Morning Routine, Mrs. Ethelene Masscnjjill. Selma, North Carolina 
Dental .Assistants .Association. 

21. North Carolina Dental .Assistants Association. 

22. Nitrous Oxide \nalgesia in a Cieneral Practice, Coastal Dent.il Siiul\ 
Club. 

2.^. Iliminating Post-Operati>e Pain in Kestorati>e Dentistry, l)r Junius M. 
Rose, Jr.. Loblolly Study Club. 

24. t'sc of Pins in Periodcmtal Splinting. Dr W illiam 11. Gray. Jr.. Eastern 
Prosthetics Stud\ ( lub. 

25. I se of Pins in Crown and Bridge I)entistr>. Di W K Miml' an. i astern 
Prosthetics Study C lub. 

26. Space .Maintainers, Dr. Donald L. Henson. Demeritt Study C^lub. 

27. Block Ihat Kick, Miss Mary Ann Olscn and Mrs. Bobbie Phipps. 
(ireeiisboro. North Carolina Dental Hygienists Association. 

2K. Cni>ersit> of North Cartdina Dental Student. 
29, Cni\ersit> (»f North Carolina Dental Sliideiil. 
M). I ni\ersit> of North ( andina Dental SIikKmI. 

157 1 



4 



Scientific Exhibits 

Wednesday, 2:00 p.m. through Friday 

Cocktail Lounge 

Scientific exhibits will be displayed by the following organizations: 

1. American Cancer Society, North Carolina Division, Inc. 

2. Central Piedmont Community College. 

3. Dairy Council Units of North Carolina. 

4. Division of Dental Health, North Carolina State Board of Health. 

5. Duke University Medical Center. 

6. Durham Technical Institute. 

7. Health Careers for North Carolina. 

8. North Carolina Cerebral Palsy Hospital. 

9. North Carolina Dental Assistants Association. 

10. North Carolina Dental Hygienists Association. 

11. North Carolina Heart Association. 

12. Orthodontic Research Study Group. 

13. Raleigh Dental Study Club and The North Carolina Chapter of the 
American Society of Dentistry for Children. 

14. University of North Carolina, School of Dentistry. 

15. University of North Carolina, School of Public Health. 

16. United States Public Health Service, Dental X-Ray Program. 

17. Wayne Technical Institute. 



Visual Education 

Wednesday through Saturday Ballroom 

Wednesday, May 4 

2:00 p.m. 300,000 RPM in Oral Surgery 

Use of Hospital General Surgical Facilities by the Dental 

Service 
Earliest Clinical Signs of Intra-Oral Malignancies 

Thursday, May 5 

9:00 a.m. The Dental Assistant, Operative 

1:30 p.m. Use of the Simple Face Bow in Denture Prosthesis 

Friday, May 6 

9:00 a.m. The Comfort of the Patient in Dental Practice 
1:30 p.m. Picture Your Teeth 



Saturday, May 7 

1:30 p.m. Dentist's Daily Seven 

[58] 



I 



Projected Clinics 



V( (*(lii«-^4l;i\ . 3:.H() p.m. Ballrooiii 

1. RfsidraliM- ("onsidiTutions Dirtctl) Influencing I'rojjnosis ot .\d>unL-ed 
I'LTiodontai Cast-s. Dr. Paul \1 ( uiiiiimii:s. Jr.. \S iiiston-Salciii. 

2. The L se of Pins for the .Splintin^ of Periodontal!) hntdved Teeth, Dr. 
Douglas M. 'h'lHini:. W instini-Salcni. 

3. Crossbites in Periodontia. !^r. Jack B. L pchurch. Apex. 

4. New Concept in a Dental Office, Dr. Charles T. Barker. New Bern. 



Commercial Exhibits 

^(MiiicMJa). 2:(M) p. in. t«» (>:(M) p.m. 

Tliiir-iInN ami Friila\. *>:()() a.m. to .>:(M) p.m. 

\\ ot INnrhes 

You are urged to visit the commercial exhibits. These manufacturers, 
dealers, laboratories and other organizations will be represented by highly 
qualified people uho can give you helpful hints on economical and in- 
telligent buying. 

Firm Name Booth 

Astra Pharmaceutical Products. Inc.. Worcester. Massachusetts 17 

BItKk, Drug Company. Inc.. Jersey ( ity. New Jersey 61 

BoNworih. Harry J.. Company. C hicago. Illinois 49 

Buran Dental I.ahoralory. .AshcviJle 43 

C arolina Dental Laboratory. Raleigh 87 

Carolina Dental Siipph ( ompany. Winston-Salem _ 51 

Caulk. L. D.. Company. Milford. Delaware 14 

Charlotte Laboratory. Inc.. Charlotte 58 

C ha>es Dental Instrument ( orp.. Danhury, Connecticut 35, 36 & 37 

Coastal Dsnamics Corp.. Venice. California 31 & 32 

CooL-Waite Laboratories. Inc.. New York. New York I 

C ass. Cooper D.. Company. Winston-Salem 2h 

Davics. Rosc-Hoyt. Needham. Massachusetts ftO 

Dccsc Dental Laboratory. Charlotte 4 

I)cn-Tal-K/ Chair Manufacturing Company. Des Moines. Iowa ^A 

Dentists' Supply Company of New York. York. Pennsylvania h'* & 70 

Faton I.abtJratories. Norvsich. New York . 53 

Fncorc. Inc.. Portland. Oregon „ 25 

CJcncral Flcctric Compan>. Milwaukee. Wisconsin 48 

Gel/. William, Corporation. Chicago. Illinois 27 & 28 

Greensboro Laboratory, Cirecnsboro 15 

Hanau Fngincering Company. Inc.. Buffalo. New York 35, 36, & 37 

Hygienic Dental Mfg. (ompany, Akron. Ohio 35, 36 & 37 

I .^y I 



Firm Name Booth 

Hypo Corporation, Tucker, Georgia 47 

Jelenko, J. F., & Company, Inc., New Rochelle, New York 44 

Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, New Jersey 16 

Johnson, Mead, Laboratories, Evansville, Indiana 6 

Keener Dental Supply Company, Asheville 55 & 57 

Kerr Manufacturing Company, Detroit, Michigan 21 

Lactona Products Division, Morris Plains, New Jersey 72 

Lavoris — Vick Chemical Company, New York, New York 88 

Lippincott, J. B., Company. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 89 

Lochhead Laboratories, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio 9 

Mayrand, Inc., Greensboro 64 

Midwest American, Melrose Park, Illinois 7 & 8 

Mizzy, Inc., Clifton Forge, Virginia 12 

Ney, J. M., Company, Hartford, Connecticut 59 

Noble Dental Laboratory, Raleigh 54 

Oral B Company, Wayne, New Jersey 39 

Pedodontic Service, Inc., Charlotte 13 

Pelton & Crane Company, Charlotte 41 & 42 

Physicians Products Company, Inc., Petersburg, Virginia 29 

Powers & Anderson Dental Company, Inc., Charlotte 19, 20 & 68 

Premier Dental Products Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 5 

Procter & Gamble Distributing Company, Cincinnati, Ohio 66 

Professional Budget Plan, Madison, Wisconsin 3 

Professional Management, Asheville 40 

Raleigh Dental Laboratory, Raleigh 67 

Richmond Dental Cotton Company, Charlotte 73 

Ritter Equipment Company, Inc., Rochester, New York 22, 23 & 24 

Rocky Mountain Dental Products Company, Denver, Colorado 30 

Royal Crown Cola Bottlers Association of North Carolina 33 

Rothstein Dental Laboratories, Inc., Silver Spring. Maryland 50 

Saunders, W. B., Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 79 

Smith, Paul K., Decatur, Georgia 35, 36 & 37 

Sturgis, J. Minor, Porcelain Laboratory, Atlanta, Georgia 1 1 

Sullivan Laboratories, Washington, D. C 10 

Surgident, Ltd., Los Angeles, California 77 

Thompson Dental Company, Greensboro 80, 81. 82 & 83 

Tincher Dental Laboratory, Charleston. West Virginia 52 

Union Broach Company, Inc., Long Island City, New York 2 

Universal Dental Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 78 

Valtronic Corporation, New York, New York 35, 36 & 37 

Walker-Sizer Dental Company, Raleigh 45, 46, 74, 75 & 76 

Weber Dental Manufacturing Company, Canton, Ohio 62 & 63 

Westlund Dental Studio. Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota 71 

White, S. S., Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 84 & 85 

Whitehall Laboratories, New York, New York 38 

Wilkie's Dental Laboratories, Burlington 18 

Woodward Prosthetic Company, Greensboro 90 & 91 

X-Ray Manufacturing Corporation of America, Great Neck, New York 86 

[60] 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL ASSISTANTS ASSOCIATION 

SIX 1 1 IN I II ANM Al Ml I I INC. 

NNHISIM RIN(. I'INIS MOIOK I OIK.K, SOI IHKRN IMNKS 

MAY 4-7, 1966 

FR()(;RAM 
\\ednesda>, .Ma% 4 



1:00 Registration Lobby 

9:(K( Open Hnuse Patio 

rhur>da\. Ma> 5 



8:(M» Breaktast liunuriiig Past Presidents Main Dining Room 

9:(M> Rtj-istration Lobby 

10:()(> lirst Session Business Body Ballroom 

1:U(» Luncheon Honoring (.uests Ballroom 

Address — "Dcniislr) in Bolivia," Dr. J. Homer Guion. 
Presidcnl-Elccl, NCDS, Charlotte 

2:30 (.eneral Session Ballroom 

Address of Welcome: Dr. J. Henry Ligon. Jr.. Raleigh 

Response: Miss Sylvia Walker 

"The Future of the Dental Assistant," Miss Edna Zedaker, 

President, ADAA, Charlotte 
"The Education of the Dental Assistant," Miss Patricia 

Griffith. Goldsboro 
"It's the Little Things I hat Count," Dr. Edward U. 

Austin, Charlotte 
"The Trustee Report," Mrs. Myrl Blackwell, Fourth 

District Trustee, ADAA, Draper 
Presidents Address: Mrs. Reandy Clement 

7:(M> Si-ientific Film Ballroom 

.Moderator: Dr. B. B. Sapp, Jr., Durham 
Frida>. May 6 

9:()(» Registration Lobby 

10:1111 See<»nd Session Business Body Ballroom 

11:30 lidde Clinics Ballroom 

1 here is no business scheduled for Friday afternoon, as there 
will be scientific exhibits and educational films at the meeting of 
the North Carolina Dental Society at The Carolin;i in Pinehursi 
for those who wish to attend. 
7:30 Ban(|uct and Dance llonori^^ President Reand> 

(lenient Dining Room 

\Lister of Ceremonies: Dr. William H. Oliver, Smiihfield 
Saturda\. Ma> 7 



9:00 Rii:istr;ition Lobby 

9:30 I hird Session Business Bod> Ballroom 

11:00 I ourth Session Business Body Ballroom 

I here will be a meetmg of the Board of Directors following ad- 
journment. 

161 J 




Mrs. J. H. Deorman 
President 



NORTH CAROLINA 

DENTAL AUXILIARY 

OFFICERS 

1965-1966 




Mrs. H. W. Gooding 
Treasurer 



Mrs. Joseph M. Johnson 
Historian 



Mrs. Ralph D. Coffey 
Parliamentarian 



Mrs. William A. Mynatt 
President-Elect 




Mrs. Barry G. Miller 
Vice President 



Mrs. M. Lamar Dorton 
Recording Secretary 



Mrs. F. Glen Gaither 1^ 
Corresponding SecretarjBlDl 



[62] 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL AUXILIARY 

SIXTEENTH ANNUAL MEETING 

THE CAROLINA, PINEHURST 

MAY 4-8, 1966 

PROGRAM 

kVednesday, May 4 

1:30 Registration Desk Opens Hotel Foyer 

8:30 General Session, North Carolina Dental 

Society (Auxiliary members cordially invited).. -Ballroom 
8:30 Film: "Tryon Palace" Pine Room 

Thursday, May 5 

8:30 Golf Breakfast Dining Room 

(Foursomes for 18 hole and 9 hole 
tournament to be made up here) 

9:00 Golf Tournament Pinehurst Country Club 

9:00-12:00 Carry-all shuttle service to village 
10:00 Bridge and Canasta 

1:30-4:30 Carry-all shuttle service to village 

3:00 Executive Board Meeting Crystal Room 

4:00 Past Presidents Meeting Crystal Room 

4:00 Putting Contest Front Lawn 

5:00 Lawn Party honoring the members of the North 

Carolina Dental Society given by the North 

Carolina Dental Auxiliary Front Lawn 

Mday, May 6 

12:00 Luncheon Dining Room 

(Honoring new members, wives of senior 
dental students, special guests) 
2:00-4:00 Tour of Gulistan Carpet Mill 
4:00 New and Old Executive Board Meeting. Crystal Room 

!^aturday. May 7 



9:00-12:00 
and 

1:30-4:30 Carry-all available for short tours The Carolina 

2:00 Physical Fitness for the Dentist 

Thomas K. Cureton, Ph.D., U. of Illinois... Ballroom 

5:45 Social Hour for Members and Guests given 

by the North Carolina Dental Society Bridge Room 

7:00 Annual Banquet, North Carolina Dental 

Society Dining Room 

9:00 Dance and Entertainment Ballroom 

>unday, May 8 



7:30 Breakfast 

9:00 Check Out 



[63] 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL HYGIENISTS ASSOCIATION 

NINETEENTH ANNUAL MEETING 
MID PINES CLUB, SOUTHERN PINES 

MAY 5-7, 1966 
PROGRAM 
Thursday, May 5 

4:00 Registration Lobby 

7:30 Executive Council Meeting — open to members 

Friday, May 6 

9:00 Registration 
9:30 Opening Session 

Greetings; Dr. Pearce Roberts, Jr., President, NCDS 
Dr. W. Stewart Peery, Advisor, NCDHA 
10:00 Business Session 
12:00 Luncheon Honoring Junior Members 
2:00 Scientific Film 

2:30 Keynote Speaker: Mrs. J. B. Foster, Guidance Counselor, 
West Mecklenburg High School, Charlotte, "No Place 
for Weaklings" 
3:30 "A Brighter Future," film produced by ADHA 
5:30 Official Reception — Members and Their Guests and 

NCDS Members and Their Wives 
7:30 Banquet Honoring Miss Alberta Beat, President, ADHA 

Saturday, May 7 

8:00 Breakfast — Component Societies 

9:00 Business Session — election and installation of officers 



The North Carolina Dental 

Hygienists Association 

invites 

the members of the 

North Carolina Dental Society 

and their ivives 

to attend 

an official reception 

on Friday, May sixth 

from half past five until seven o'clock 



The Terrace 

Mid Pines Club 

Southern Pines 



[64] 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL LABORATORY ASSOCIATION 

ANNUAL BUSINESS MEETING 
HOLIDAY INN, SOUTHERN PINES 
MAY 6, 1966 
Friday, May 6 

5:00 Call to Order: J. Fred Horton, President 

Address: Dr. Colin P. Osborne, Jr., Chairman, NCDS Prosthetic 

Dental Service Committee 
Address: Mr. H. K. Collins, Durham Technical Institute 
Address: Mr. J. M. Lowder, Durham Technical Institute 
President's Report: J. Fred Horton 
Treasurer's Report: R. L. Jones 
Committee Reports 
Election of Officers 
Installation of Officers 
Business Discussion 
Adjournment 



SAVE YOUR ORDERS 



69 leading manufacturers, dealers 
and laboratories will exhibit 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 2:00 - 6:00 P.M. 
THURSDAY, MAY 5, 9:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 
FRIDAY, MAY 6, 9:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M. 

110th Annual Session 

NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 

THE CAROLINA 
PINEHURST, NORTH CAROLINA 

MAY 4-8, 1966 



[65] 



Health Careers 
For North Carolina 



*Lo Rayne Dinguess 



Advertising today is rarely the product of a single- 
winged pen. Dozens, sometimes hundreds of peo- 
ple get into the act of creating, constructing, and 
approving or disapproving an advertising cam- 
paign or even a single ad. And now dentistry is 
being presented via this highly accomplished 
American technic. 



TJ EALTH Careers recruitment in 
North Carolina began as a full- 
time activity in 1960. At that time, 
one of the six districts of the North 
Carolina Hospital Association be- 
gan a three-year pilot project in 
about 20 counties in the Western 
part of the State surrounding 
Asheville. Hospital administrators, 
primarily those running nursing 
schools, got community leaders and 
foundation people interested in 
doing something about the critical 
shortage of health personnel. 

This activity followed a survey 
made in late 1959, which showed 
that our nursing schools were gradu- 
ating only about half of the nurses 
needed to fill vacancies in our hos- 
pitals. Nursing schools and other 
health training facilities were run- 
ning far below their enrollment ca- 



pacity due to lack of a sufficient 
number of qualified applicants. 
Even though only the best quali- 
fied applicants were accepted, the 
dropout rate still was high. 

This initial three-year project, 
forerunner of present expanded pro- 
gram, was not a part of our State 
Hospital Association's activity. Hos- 
pital administrators and interested 
community leaders in that area in- 
corporated an organization called 
Health Careers for Western North 
Carolina. This was a membership 
type of organization with hospitals 
constituting active members, and 
other interested organizations and 
individuals holding associate mem- 
bership. A seven member board of 
trustees, consisting of both hospital 
administrators and lay individuals, 
managed the affairs of the organi- 



Co-ordinator, Health Careers for North Carolina, District III. 



[66] 



zation with monthly meetings. This 
corporation had no structural rela- 
tionship to the Hospital Association. 
Its purpose was a three-year pilot 
project with a full-time person 
conducting a program of health ca- 
reer recruitment in that area, fi- 
nanced by the McClure Educational 
Foundation, the Mary Reynolds 
Babcock Foundation and 21 com- 
munity hospitals. 

The success of the pilot project 
in Western North Carolina in get- 
ting more young people into health 
training facilities prompted other 
foundations to become interested in 
financially supporting health careers 
recruitment. In 1962, the Board of 
Trustees of the North Carolina Hos- 
pital Association was convinced that 
the Association should take on this 
effort and extend the program state- 
wide, after having had reasonable 
assurance from several foundations 
that they would support it. Support 
came from The Duke Endowment, 
the McClure Foundation, the Mary 
Reynolds Babcock Foundation, Lig- 
gett and Myers, the R. J. Reynolds 
Company, 128 hospitals, hospital 
auxiliaries, Medical Society, the 
N. C. League for Nurses, other 
health professions and individuals 
and industries. 

The state-wide program was set 
up to be financed and operated 
through the North Carolina Hospi- 
tal Education and Research Foun- 
dation. The Foundation was or- 
ganized in 1961 for the purpose of 
health career recruitment activity, 
research, education, dissemination 
of health information, and other 
purposes. The general form of or- 
ganization is basically that of the 
foundations, which several other 
state hospital associations have or- 
ganized. 



The Board of Trustees of the 
Foundation appointed a Health 
Careers Executive Committee to or- 
ganize and implement the state-wide 
recruitment activity based on the 
experiences of the Western North 
Carolina project. The program was 
extended into the other five of the 
six districts of the North Carolina 
Hospital Association. The Western 
North Carolina operation became 
District I of our state-wide program 
and the original corporation was dis- 
solved. Districts include as few as 
twelve counties, as many as twenty- 
seven, related to population. Each 
district has a co-ordinator to fulfill 
the program's two-fold purpose : ( 1 ) 
to increase the number of profes- 
sional and technical personnel avail- 
able to care for the ever increasing 
health needs of North Carolina citi- 
zens; (2) to enlist co-operation and 
support of interested individuals 
and groups in the development and 
dissemination of information con- 
cerning the career opportunities in 
the health field. To this end, co- 
ordinators function in high schools, 
junior high schools, colleges, and 
industrial educational centers to in- 
form students of the two hundred 
health classifications, of which four 
very important ones are in the field 
of dentistry. Programs are actively 
solicited for presentation in school 
assemblies, health career clubs, vo- 
cational classes, industrial co-op- 
erative training classes, college and 
career days, and vocational fairs. 
Dentistry is spelled out in District 
III, for example: Five hundred such 
presentations have been made in- 
volving thirty-six thousand students, 
and this is perhaps typical of our 
State. 

Health Careers has co-operated 
closely with the School of Dentistry. 



[67] 



Two visits have been made to the 
UNC School of Dentistry by the Co- 
ordinator of District III. A tour was 
made just after the program was 
opened. 

( 1 ) Central Piedmont Community 
College, Charlotte — "Essential in 
providing information on health ca- 
reers to schools. Without health ca- 
reers, little co-ordination would be 
available for schools." 

(2) Technical Institute of Ala- 
mance, Burlington — "Stimulated 
interest in each local high school. 
State-wide program helps greatly." 

(3) Wayne Technical Institute, 
Goldsboro — "Applications increased 
sixty percent in one year." 

(4) University of North Carolina, 
Chapel Hill — "Doubtful at pres- 
ent, but definitely should be con- 
tinued. Worth one hundred thou- 
sand dollars a year. Has provided 
information to prospective students 
and counselors." 

Health Careers has publicized 
dentistry in monthly newsletters by 
each district co-ordinator. These 
letters are sent to educators, guid- 
ance counselors, industrial-voca- 
tional educational programs, and 
industrial counseUng teachers, co- 
ordinators, professional persons, 
health careers clubs and lay per- 
sons. There have been special stories 
on the School of Dentistry's course 
for Dental Assistants in five news- 
letters, three on the program at Ala- 
mance and eight on Career Day at 
the UNC School of Dentistry. 

On behalf of the Central Pied- 
mont Community College, Health 
Careers was active in seeking ap- 
propriations before the proper com- 
mittees for the development of den- 
tal hygiene and nursing programs. 



and at other locations throughout 
the State. 

Secondary Schools and Colleges 

Work is progressing through the 
guidance counselors to reach indi- 
vidual students. Health Careers 
initial approach has been with mass 
audiences with the intent of getting 
to the individual. At each presen- 
tation, brochures were left and post- 
cards were given out to students 
who wished to write the Health Ca- 
reers' state office directly. Over the 
State, inquiries have been received, 
as follows, for the four phases of 
dentistry, as of May, 1965: Dental 
Assisting — 172; Dental Hygiene 
— 77; Dental Laboratory Tech- 
nician — 27; Dentistry — 90. 

When information is sent to stu- 
dents, a card is enclosed asking if 
they desire an interview with a pro- 
fessional in the field. Interviews 
have been arranged. In one district, 
two college students requested inter- 
views with dentists, one of these 
students was a Morehead Scholar 
at the University of North Caro- 
lina. 

The four phases of dentistry are 
included in the Health Careers 
guidebook — Health Careers for 
Tarheels. This guidebook is placed 
in the hands of all guidance coun- 
selors, libraries, lay persons, profes- 
sional persons and students them- 
selves. 

Health Careers is a state-wide 
program. It is young, only two terms 
of school in age. There has been a 
sense of immediacy that has 
prompted Health Careers to con- 
centrate its major energies on ju- 
niors and seniors in high school, but 
has not precluded visits when re- 
quested to colleges and junior col- 
leges. 



[68] 



An Opportunity for Dentists 

Health Careers for North Caro- 
lina has provided an opportunity 
for dentists to exhibit and recruit 
for their profession. Health Careers 
Congresses on the district and state 
level have been held. Most districts 
have held two congresses. District I 
has had six, District V, none. To 
date, seventeen district congresses 
and four state congresses have been 
held. A fifth state congress was 
held in February at Raleigh. The 
UNC School of Dentistry and local 
dental societies are asked to par- 
ticipate by bringing dentistry to the 
students who come from all over 
the district to study health voca- 
tions. 

Health Careers for North Caro- 
lina has been very active in behalf 
of dentistry. The field is mentioned 
in all schools and various programs. 
Many students have been reached. 
Each practicing dentist has a re- 
sponsibility to his profession and 



community to familiarize himself 
with this active program, to work 
with and assist the co-ordinator of 
his area personally whenever and 
wherever possible, and to contribute 
to the financial support of the pro- 
gram. 

The program is successful, but can 
be more so by co-operative indi- 
vidual efforts from persons practic- 
ing in the profession toward the 
promotion of careers in their par- 
ticular field. Surveys in 1964 re- 
veal that applications received at all 
health related schools were up 36 
per cent and that there had been a 
20 per cent increase in admissions. 
Each school stated that the quality 
of the applicant was better. 

What are you doing to help sell 
your own profession? 

1500 N. C. National Bank 

Building, 
Charlotte 
North Carolina 



[69] 



Case Report Number 5 



Fractures of the jaws are an important part of the 
oral surgeon's practice. This case report is a good 
example of an open reduction and fixation by di- 
rect wiring. 



Open Reduction and Fixation of 

Compound Comminuted Fracture 

of the Mandible 



DwiGHT Lanier Clark, D.D.S. 



r^N November 29, 1962, this 36 
^^^ year old man was admitted 
four days following an automobile 
accident. He sustained fracture of 
the mandible with multiple lacera- 
tions and contusions of the face. 
The left malar area was edematous 
with a "flap door" laceration con- 
taining sutures. 

History 

The patient was well until four 
days prior to his first admission 
after an automobile accident. The 
man never lost consciousness fol- 
lowing the accident, although de- 
tails are vague. 



Clinical Examination 

The clinical examination re- 
vealed a large "flap door" lacera- 
tion of J-shape, containing sutures 
on the left side of the face, extend- 
ing from the temporal region in- 
feriorly approximately eight inches. 
This laceration evidently caused a 
"facial droop" by injury to the 
temporal, zygomatic and buccal 
branches of the facial nerve. There 
was bilateral subconjunctinal hem- 
orrhages, greater on the left, edema 
was confined to the left side of the 
face. There was a noted deformity 
of the mandible on the left. The 
infra-orbital crest appeared intact 



[70] 






on palpation as did the area of the 
maxilla and zygoma. The pupils 
were equal and reacted. The maxil- 
lary teeth were absent and the frac- 
ture was compound on the left buc- 
cal aspect of the second bicuspid. 
There was paresthesia of the lower 
left lip. (Figure 1) 

X-Ray Examination 

Posterior Anterior head, Waters' 
view, and lateral jaw radiographs 
were taken. The Waters' view 
showed no fracture of the maxillary 
sinus or orbit. The other radiographs 
showed a comminuted fracture of 
the left body of the mandible from 
the angle extending to the mental 
tuberosity. (Figure 2) 

Diagnosis 

Compound comminuted fracture 
of the left mandible. 

Surgical Procedure 

With the patient under general 
endotracheal anesthesia, the face 
and neck were prepared with phiso- 
hex, iodine, alcohol and sterile lin- 
ens applied. An incision was made 
anterior to the ear down behind the 
angle of the mandible and to fol- 
low the shadow line of the body of 
the mandible. This was carried down 
through the platysma muscle. Bleed- 
ers were clamped and tied. The 
marginal mandibular branch of the 
facial nerve was identified and was 
elevate with the flap. The mandible 
was encountered and multiple frac- 
ture fragments were present. The 
fragments were pieced back to- 
gether and holes drilled for direct 
wiring. Five No. 26 gauge stainless 
steel wires were required for com- 
plete fixation. The wound was 
closed in layers using 00 chromic 




Figure 1. Pre-operative photograph. 




Figure 2. Pre-operotive X rays. 



[71 ] 




Figure 3. Six week post-operative photograph. 




interrupted sutures in the deep tis- 
sue and 00000 silk in the skin. A 
penrose drain was left in the wound. 
The patient withstood the proce- 
dure well and was returned to the 
recovery room in good condition. 

Course 

The patient did well post-opera- 
tively. The drain was removed on 
the second post-operative day and 
the sutures were removed on the 
fifth post-operative day. The patient 
was seen by the Department of 
Physiotherapy and instructed in fa- 
cial exercises. The patient was then 
seen by a member of the hospital 
surgical staff for exploration of the 
damaged facial nerve and some scar 
revision. The patient was discharged 
on the twenty-first hospital day, to 
return to the clinic in three weeks. 

The patient returned six weeks 
post - operatively and radiographs 
showed no complications and the 
fracture fragments in good align- 
ment. The incision healed well. 
(Figures 3, 4) 

Final Diagnosis 

Compound comminuted fracture 
of the left mandible. 

Summary 

The patient has been followed 
for two months. There has been no- 
table progress in facial expression, 
also "tinghng" in the lower lip indi- 
cating return of sensation in the in- 
ferior alveolar nerve. 

UNC School of Dentistry 
Chapel Hill, N. C, 



fci 



Atlo 



lar 



Figure 4. February 1, 1963. Post-operative 

[72] 



Book Reviews 



Editor: "Help is needed. Anyone wish to review some excellent new books?" 



Comprehensive Review for Dental 
Hygienists. By Shailer Peterson. 268 
pages. C. V. Mosby Co., St. Louis. 
Shailer Peterson's book, which is 
both concise and well-written, con- 
tains excellent reference material. 
It would prove to be a definite asset 
in preparing for an examination, or 
for use as a "refresher." The ex- 
ceptional photography also adds to 
the unlimited value of the book. It 
would be a pleasure, as well as a 
relief, to know that such compre- 
hensive material was available in 
the doctor's or hygienist's library. 

LORETTA D. GaDDY 



Cavity Preparation and Impression 
Taking (A Programmed manual in 
dentistry) by James D. Harrison and 
Arlon G. Podshadley. 92 pages, 
many line drawings and photo- 
graphs. $5.75. C. V. Mosby Co., St. 
Louis. 

This programmed text deals with 
he basic fundamentals of cavity 
Dreparation and impression taking. 
^lack's principles of cavity design 



provides the outline for one unit, 
while hydrocolloid and rubber base 
(tray and copper band technics) are 
presented in the second. 

The authors undoubtably plan fu- 
ture editions in this series. 

Due to the method and limited 
scope of the presentation, this 
manual should find its widest use 
in preclinical courses for under- 
graduate students. 

Bennie D. Barker 



Emergencies and Urgent Complica- 
tions in Dentistry by William B. 
Irby, D.D.S., and Kenneth H. Bald- 
win, D.M.D. 391 pages with 100 
illustrations. $15.00. C. V. Mosby 
Co., St. Louis. First Edition, 1965. 

This excellent book should be as 
much a part of every American 
dental office as the dental chair. 
Not only is it a good reference book 
in the practitioner's office but it is 
a fine book for the doctor who is 
preparing for a certification board 
examination. 

In the words of the authors, the 



[73] 



purpose of the book is well stated. 
"The increased individual life-span 
has produced large numbers of peo- 
ple who are receiving drug therapy, 
thus demanding more exacting 
treatment. An ever-increasing toll 
of traffic and industrial accidents, 
coupled with the necessity for the 
dentist to render treatment to facial 
and other injuries in case of na- 
tional disaster, poses a requirement 
for additional knowledge. Advances 
in anesthesia have been rapid, but 
the parallel development in many 
therapeutic drugs has created a 
problem of possible complications 
when these are used concomitantly. 
Current knowledge is also impera- 
tive in the detection of facial pain 
and of many roentgenographic and 
laboratory aids in diagnosis of dis- 
eases affecting the oral regions." 
The authors state further in the text 
that "if dentistry is to take its right- 
ful place in the health sciences, we 
must not only train ourselves in all 
phases of diagnosis and treatment 
planning, but must gain the mutual 
co-operation of our medical counter- 
parts in the successful treatment of 
the ill patient." This book certainly 
serves these purposes. 

The book is divided into sections 
ranging from systemic emergencies 
to complications associated with 
tooth removal. The contents of the 



book are very systematically ar- 
ranged and, in a majority of the 
cases, the material is arranged in 
outline form. This form makes it 
readily readable for study and fast 
reference. The authors treat a very 
complicated subject as fluid and 
electrolyte balance to make it ap- 
pear quite simple and understand- 
able. The section on the temporo- 
mandibular joint is very concise and 
very scholarly presented. In the 
opinion of the reviewer, some sec- 
tions are too detailed such as the sec- 
tions of facial trauma. This detail 
would not be of great interest to the 
general practitioner or other special- 
ists of dentistry other than the oral 
surgeon. The section on diagnosis 
and treatment of soft tissue growths 
of the oral tissues and radiographic 
diagnosis and treatment of osseous 
lesions of the jaw should be read 
by all dentists. All physicians and 
dentists should read the sections on 
infections of the jaws, head, and 
neck and facial pains. Here the au- 
thors provide the reader with thor- 
ough review of the literature and a 
concise method of diagnosis with 
suggested acceptable treatment. 

This is a book that should be in 
the library of all dentists for study 
and ready reference. 

Edward U. Austin 



Rei 



iric: 



a CO 
ffleit 



[74] 



GeSral News 





Circuit Court Reverses 
District Ruling 

The Fourth Circuit Court of Ap- 
peals in Richmond, Virginia held 
that the activities of the North Caro- 

Ilina Dental Society "have the char- 
acter of state action" and that Dr. 
r Reginald Hawkins of Charlotte had 
•' been denied membership because of 
I race, in an opinion handed down 
January 20. Thus, it reversed a Dis- 
trict Court decision and remanded 
the case to the District Court for 
further proceedings not inconsistent 
with the Circuit Court's opinion. 

In March 1960, Dr. Hawkins filed 
d complaint that he had been denied 
membership in the Society because 
of race, in violation of the Four- 
teenth Amendment. The case was 
heard in the Federal District Court 
in Charlotte in September, 1963. On 
June 19, 1964 the court dismissed 
the case. It ruled that Hawkins was 
not entitled to the relief he sought, 
because the Society was a private, 
v'oluntary, organization and was not 
nvolved in state action. Dr. Haw- 
cins appealed. 

The case was then argued before 
:he Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals 



on January 12, 1965, and one year 
and eight days later an opinion writ- 
ten by Chief Judge Clement F. 
Haynsworth overruled the decision 
of the District Court. 



House of Delegates Convenes 

The House of Delegates of the 
North Carolina Dental Society con- 
vened in special session Sunday, 
February 6, at the Sir Walter Ho- 
tel in Raleigh, and voted to refrain 
from filing a petition for certiorari 
with the Supreme Court in the case 
of Reginald Hawkins v. the North 
Carolina Dental Society. 

The special meeting of the House 
and the general membership was 
called by President Pearce Rob- 
erts, Jr., at the request of a ma- 
jority of the officers, including the 
Executive Committee and the Ethics 
Committee, to determine what ac- 
tion the Society should take in the 
litigation as a result of the unfavor- 
able decision rendered by the 
Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals on 
January 20. 

The Circuit Court reversed a rul- 
ing by the District Court upholding 



[75] 



the Society, and held that the So- 
ciety was engaged in state action, 
that Hawkins had been denied mem- 
bership because of race, and re- 
manded the case to the District Court 
for further action not inconsistent 
with the Circuit Court's opinion. 

The House, on February 6, 
adopted a resolution submitted by 
the Executive Committee recom- 
mending that the Society permit the 
Hawkins case to be remanded to 
the District Court. 

When the House adjourned, the 
Society was convened in special gen- 
eral session with President Roberts 
presiding, and considered a minority 
report from 1 1 members of the 
House in opposition to the action 
taken by the House. The minority 
report was rejected, however, and 
the action of the House was up- 
held. 

More than 180 members, includ- 
ing the House of Delegates, as- 
sembled in Raleigh for the special 
meetings which began at 10:00 a.m. 
and were concluded at 2:30 p.m. 

Following adjournment President 
Roberts released the following state- 
ment to the press: 

"The Executive Committee, the 
House of Delegates, and the Gen- 
eral Session of the North Carolina 
Dental Society, in light of circum- 
stances as they exist today, voted 
that with respect to the decision of 
the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, 
no petition for certiorari should be 
filed with the Supreme Court." 



Study Club Elects Ledbetter 

Dr. C. B. Ledbetter has been 
elected president of the Raleigh 
Practice Management Study Club. 



Dr. Kenneth H. Oakley, Jr. is secre- 
tary-treasurer of the group. 

At its March meeting the club 
viewed the film "Four-handed Den- 
tistry" and the chairside assistants 
of the members were special guests. 
At a previous meeting. Dr. Roger E. 
Barton of the UNC School of Den- 
tistry was guest lecturer. He spoke 
on "Acquiring, Training, and Ef- 
fective Use of Dental Assistants." 



Blue Ridge Seminar 

The Blue Ridge Dental Society 
will present Dr. Wilmer B. Fames 
in an all-day seminar, Saturday, 
April 23, at the Elks Club in North 
Wilkesboro. 

Dr. Fames, associate dean of 
Northwestern University Dental 
School, and noted for his research 
in the preparation and condensation 
of amalgam, will lecture on "The 
FAMES' Amalgam Technique" be- 
ginning at 9:00 a.m. 

Registration fee for dentists is 
$35. Wives of dentists and auxiliary 
personnel may register for $5 each. 
Checks should be made payable to 
Blue Ridge Dental Society, Box 
1 126, North Wilkesboro, N. C. Mo- 
tel reservations can be made by 
writing directly to Lowe's Motel in 
North Wilkesboro. 



i 



i 



Society Changes Name 

After fifty years, the Tri-County 
Dental Society now has a new name. 

At a meeting in December the 
Society voted to become the West- 
ern Piedmont Dental Society. Dr., 
F. D. Pattishall, the Society's secre- 
tary said: "Since there are more 



[76] 



than three counties in the Society, 
it was felt that another name might 
be more appropriate. The change 
came after several years of debate 
and several months of intensive 
study by a special committee. It was 
with a good deal of reluctance that 
the old name was relinquished, since 
it had been in use for over fifty 
years." 

Originally the Society included 
members from Burke, Caldwell and 
Catawba counties. But in recent 
years members from Alexander and 
Lincoln counties were accepted. 



Dental Prepayment Conference 

A Conference on Prepaid Dental 
Care will be held in Raleigh at 
College Inn April 14-16, according 
to Dr. Glenn F. Bitler, chairman of 
the Society's Dental Prepayment 
Committee. 

An invitation has been ex- 
tended to all dentists in North Caro- 
lina to participate in the three-day 
conference designed to better in- 
form the profession on all methods 
of dental prepayment. 

Nationally known authorities on 
prepaid dental care will appear on 
the program, including: Ferris Hog- 
gard, Division of Dental Public 
Health, PHS, Washington, D. C; 
Dr. Kenneth Ryan, Chairman, 
Council on Dental Health, A.D.A.; 
Jim Goodman, national office of 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield; Herbert C. 
Lassiter, Executive Director, Na- 
tional Association of Dental Service 
Plans; Robert E. Paulsen, Director, 
Washington State Dental Service 
lie. Corporation; and Dr. Robert D. 
Eilers, Professor of Insurance, 



Wharton School of Finance, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 

Also, Dr. Jacob Koomen, Jr., Act- 
ing Director, N. C. State Board of 
Health, Dr. Roy L. Lindahl, UNC 
School of Dentistry and C. D. Hard- 
ing, Health Insurance Council, New 
York. 

In announcing the conference, 
N.C.D.S. President Pearce Roberts, 
Jr. had this to say: "For more than 
five years now, dentists in North 
Carolina have raised questions about 
dental insurance. Examples of the 
questions asked are: Is dental in- 
surance feasible? Do many peo- 
ple want dental insurance? Who 
qualifies? Who pays? What treat- 
ment is provided? Is there a free 
choice of dentist? Who determines 
what treatments the patients will re- 
ceive? Who administers the pro- 
gram? What are the drawbacks? 
What are the fees and who sets the 
fees? 

"An outstanding array of experts 
in the field of dental prepayment 
has been scheduled to answer these 
and other questions during this con- 
ference. This will be your oppor- 
tunity to get first-hand information 
and a chance to ask questions. 

"The matter of dental prepay- 
ment is not something in the dis- 
tant future, but is upon us now. 
Much has been said and written 
about this subject. There are argu- 
ments on both sides of the ques- 
tion. Some have fears about den- 
tal health insurance. Some of these 
fears may be partially justified. 

'Prepayment relates to efforts by 
groups of persons to assure them- 
selves of proper dental health 
through insurance, union, and in- 
dustrial welfare plans, which spread 
the cost over a broader base than 
that of the individual. Only through 



[77] 



a united profession can we meet 
our professional responsibilities. 
Plan to attend the conference with 
an open mind. 

"If we remember that a profes- 
sional man's responsibility is first to 
guard the health and welfare of his 
patients, then attendance at this con- 
ference should be an absolute 
necessity for each member of the 
profession." 

Members planning to attend 
should get in touch with Dr. 
Glenn F. Bitler, 800 St. Mary's 
Street, Raleigh, N. C. 



Aid For Handicapped 

A proposal for a regional hospi- 
tal dental facility at Cabarrus Me- 
morial Hospital in Concord for 
treatment of handicapped patients 
under general anesthesia has been 
endorsed and supported by the North 
Carolina Council on Mental Retar- 
dation. 

Dr. Freeman C. Slaughter of Kan- 
napolis told the Council the project 
would serve many seriously retarded 
patients who cannot ordinarily get 
dental treatment in the office of a 
private practitioner. 

The Council is a State body 
whose members are appointed by 
the Governor to study and recom- 
mend new programs to serve the 
mentally retarded. State Senator 
Ralph Scott of Alamance is chair- 
man. 

Dr. Slaughter told the Council 
that the Cabarrus Memorial Hospi- 
tal includes a dental surgery suite 
and that the hospital's dental staff 
is prepared to perform dental ser- 
vices under general anesthesia for 
patients who cannot be managed in 



private offices under local anes- 
thesia. 

He said the dentists need around 
$9,000 to equip the dental unit. 

The unit would serve retarded pa- 
tients from a large area of the State 
and could serve as a training center 
for other dentists in techniques for 
working with these patients, he said. 

The possibility of obtaining a 
grant from the Mental Retardation 
Branch of USPHS for support of the 
project will be explored. 



®btt«an]^H 



Dr. Henry B. Bowden, 62, of 

Faison, a member of the Fifth Dis- 
trict Dental Society, died February 
21, 1966. 

Dr. Ernest Harris Broughton, 83, 
of Raleigh, a life member of the 
Fourth District Dental Society, the 
North Carolina Dental Society, and 
the American Dental Association, 
died February 28, 1966. 

Dr. John R. Edwards, 74, of Fu 
quay Springs, a life member of the 
Fourth District Dental Society, the 
North Carolina Dental Society, and 
the American Dental Association, 
died July 26, 1965. 

Dr. Rothschild H. Holden, 71, of 
Shallotte, a life member of the Fifth 
District Dental Society, the North 
Carolina Dental Society, and the 
American Dental Association, died 
March 4, 1966. 

Dr. Robert L. Tomlinson, 75, of 
Wilson, a life member of the Fifth 
District Dental Society, the North 
Carolina Dental Society, and the 
American Dental Association, died 
July 28, 1965. 



[78] 



The New Enlarged Program of 

DISABILITY INSURANCE 

FOR 
MEMBERS OF THE 

NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 

PLANS UP TO 

• $250.00 WEEKLY DISABILITY INCOME BENEFITS ($1,080.00 monthly) 

• $20.00 PER DAY EXTRA HOSPITAL BENEFIT, AND UP TO $225.00 SURGICAL BENEFITS 
FOR MEMBER AND DEPENDENTS (Optional) 

PLAN L-7 (Basic) 

Lifetime Accident and 7 Years Sickness 







Principal 


SEMI-ANNU 


^L PREMIUMS 






Sum For 






Weekly 


Dismemberment 


Accidental 


Premium 


tReduced Premium 


Benefits 


Benefits 


Death 


Age 40 and over 


To Age 40 


$250.00 


Up to $50,000.00 


$5,000.00 


$244.50 


$183.50 


$200.00 


Up to $40,000.00 


$5,000.00 


$196.50 


$147.50 


$150.00 


Up to $30,000.00 


$5,000.00 


$148.50 


$111.50 


$100.00 


Up to $20,000.00 


$5,000.00 


$100.50 


$ 75.50 



PLAN L-65 (Long Term) 

Lifetime Accident and For Sickness, from Inception of Disability 

To Your Attainment of Age 65 



SEMI-ANNUAL PREMIUMS 



Weekly 
Benefits 


Dismemberment 
Benefits 


Accidental 
Death 


Premium 
Age 40 and over 


tReduced Premium 
To Age 40 


$250.00 
$200.00 
$150.00 
$100.00 


Up to $50,000.00 
Up to $40,000.00 
Up to $30,000.00 
Up to $20,000.00 


$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 


$292.00 
$234.50 
$177.00 
$119.50 


$219.25 
$176.00 
$133.00 
$ 89.75 






The premiums for Plan L-65 will be reduced to the same premium as for Plan L-7 at age 58. 

Note: The above rotes do not increase at age 50 or even at age 60! 
tOn attaining age 40, age 40 rotes apply on renewal. 



J. L CRUMPTON, State Mgr. 

Professional Group Disability Division 



J. SLADE CRUMPTON, Asst. Mgr. 
Box 147, Durham, N. C. 

Representing Commercial Insurance Co. of Newark, N. J. 
Member Continental Insurance Companies (New York) 

[79] 




Deserves Fine 
Crewn & Bridge Materiais 



treaiest RHiittKe ni urasmn 



LUXENE VINYL's higher resistance to abrasion caused by normal mastication and 
regular brushings means longer life for the restoration . . . greater patient confi 
dence in you. 



Lowest Rate of water Ahsorptlon 



LUXENE VINYL has greater dimensional stability in wet or dry conditions , . . pre 
vents weakening of bond between veneer and casting. 

LUXENE VINYL does not absorb odor causing bacteria. No embarrassing moment;^ 
due to unpleasant mouth odor. ; 

LUXENE VINYL wards off discoloration caused by attack of mouth fluids and foods 
Greater variety of foods in diet. 

LUXENE VINYL's greater toughness permits a wider scope of applications. NOW^ 
you can produce thinner veneers without losing LUXENE's lifelike lustre and trans, 
lucency. Restorations carrying LUXENE VINYL on the occlusal or incisal edges art 
now possible! See opposite page for Luxene processing laboratories in this aree 

LUXEN 

ONE HUNDRED EIGHTEEN EAST TWENTY FIFTH ST., NEW YORK 10, fl 



B 



I 




ROCESStNe DENTAL LABORATORIES 

Kene processing dental laboratories offer the most skilled technicians and ^M 
»dern facilities available. These laboratories are trained in exclusive advanced ^m 
one techniques assuring you of the finest quality products possible. We '^ 
5gest that you patronize them. You can have complete confidence in their 'Tw 
lity to serve your needs best. 4^ 



JRAN DENTAL LABORATORY 

121/2 Wall Street 
Asheville 

^ROLINA DENTAL LABORATORY 

800 St. Mary's St. 
Raleigh 

lARLOTTE LABORATORY, INC. 

119 S. Torrence Street 
Charlotte 

.EMING DENTAL LABORATORY, INC. 

325 Professional Building 
Raleigh 

£NOIR DENTAL LABORATORY 

103 N. Boundary Street 
Lenoir 

te RALEIGH DENTAL LABORATORY 

800 St. Mary's Street 
Raleigh 

P'fjPERIOR DENTAL LABORATORY 

205 S. Washington Street 
Shelby 



nent 



are 



NIN CITY DENTAL LABORATORIES 

222 Nissen Building 
Winston-Salem 



OODWARD PROSTHETIC COMPANY 

153 Bishop Street 
Greensboro 




253-2371 



828-0379 



EDison 4-6874 



832-6054 



PLaza 4-4601 



832-7673 



487-4611 



723-1163 



272-1108 



"-^f 



i ^ 



7^ 



(lateix^ 2>eHicU MaMo^cdanM 



Se/uUce, 



Sii 



mce> 



f9f9 



TRUMAN G. WILLIAMS, Manager 

800 St. Mary's Street 
RALEfGH, N. C 



K[ 



Phone TEmpIe 2-7673 



Box 12226 



[82] 



Ui over tne (Jnitea estates 
i2ntists proclaim 




TSt • IIN QUALITY— VACUUM FIRED 

PORCELAIIX RESTORATIOINS 

rSt • IIV FAST 

EFFICIEIXT MAIL SERVICE 

rSt • UN SEIVSIBLE PRICES 



to 



^-^ 



PORCELAIN JACKETS INC. 

162 W. 72nd ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 10023 

Please send me Postage-Free Mailing Labels and Kit. 



DR. 



ADDRESS 
CITY 



ZONE 



STATE 



A CALL WILL DO IT 

BUT COME IN AND 

SAY "HELLO" PERSONALLY 



We pride ourselves on our telephone service — call 
us at any time and you will get what you want 
promptly. But we would like to have you come in 
and visit with us sometime. Only then can you see 
how many items we have to aid you in your prac- 
tice. We carry over 10,000 different items to meet 
your needs . . . many little things that you will be 
glad to have when you know about them. Why 
not drop in on us next time — even if it is only to 
say "Hello." 



'Keener Service^ 
Since 1888 



KEEKER DENTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

ASHEVILLE 
CHATTANOOGA BRISTOL 

KNOXVILLE HUNTSVILLE 



[84] 



J. MINOR STURGIS 

PORCELAIN LABORATORY 

BAKED PORCELAIN TO GOLD 
VACUUM FIRED PORCELAIN 

AND 

ACRYLIC RESTORATIONS 

Cast Crowns and Gold Fixed Bridge Work 
* * * 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 

* • • 

1110 Candler BIdg. Box 1404 

Atlanta 1, Georgia 

525-6512 



[ 85 ] 



WHAT'S NEW? 

Spare-dent f Dura Bond 



i 



A NEW DEVELOPMENT IN 
DENTAL PROSTHETICS 
ALLOWS US TO REPRODUCE 
YOUR PATIENT'S PRESENT 
DENTURE OR TO MAKE A 
DUPLICATE WHEN A NEW 
DENTURE IS BEING MADE. 

* NOMINAL COST * 
* NO LABOR OR CHAIR TIME • 



y 



MAGIC INVISIBLE 
TREATMENT MAKES ALL 
DENTURE SURFACES 
WETTABLE. THIS SIMPLE 
INEXPENSIVE MOLECULAR 
TREATMENT PREVENTS OIL, 
FATS AND STICKY FOOD 
DEPOSITS ON DENTURES. 
ELIMINATES PERMANENT 
STAINING AND ODORS. 
HELPS INCREASE RETENTION 
AND LESSENS IRRITATION. 



c 



i / 

ULLIVAN 3-^/^' 



BORATORIES 



1130 - 18th Street, N.W. — Box 1823 
Washington, D. C. 

Established 1930 

[86] 




NE\A/! 



DENTISTRY'S ONLY AIR-DRIVEN HANDPIECE 
WITH INSTANTANEOUS HIGH TORQUE 



KWIK-TORK 



STARTS INSTANTLY . . . STOPS INSTANTLY 

Kwik-Tork, the new precision-engineered, air-driven handpiece is unexcelled 
for all operations requiring low speed and instantaneous high torque— prophy- 
laxis, grinding and polishing, and for cavity preparation, where indicated. 

Here are some of its outstanding features: ■ Delivers maximum torque im- 
mediately. ■ Built-in brake action prevents coasting when air is cut off. ■ Swivel 
connection facilitates stress-free handling . . . enables tubing to rest on your 
hand without twisting. ■ Light weight— only 5 ounces— easy to handle as a 
pencil. ■ Takes all standard burs and angles ... no special attachment 
needed. ■ Positive reverse action. ■ Quiet, cool running for patient comfort. 
■ Air and water at the handpiece. ■ Sterilizable by autoclave. 

Order your Kwik-Tork now ... or, if you would like a demonstration, call your 
t dealer salesman. S.S. White Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 19105. 



S.S.WHITE® 



[87] 



Jectron polystyrene 
resin is pre-cured. 
It is processed by a 
modern Trans-injec- 
tion molding technic 
which eliminates 
open bites. 








5 




THE FINEST FITTING DENTURES EVER MADE 



NOBLE DENTAL LABORATORY 

225 Professional BIdg. 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Phone: 832-4616 and 832-4617 



WOODWARD PROSTHETIC CO. 

153 Bishop Street 

Greensboro, North Carolina 

Phone: 272-1108 and 272-1109 



[88] 




our purpose 



• • 



HELP MAKE YOUR DENTAL 
CREATIONS SUCCESSFUL 




by skillful nnanipulafion 
of porcelain and metal 
(Permadent) restorations 





t&tCuiut 

(crown and bridge specialists) 






DENTAL STUDIO 

6701 Penn Ave., So. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 55423 



LUXENE 

fbe world's only ter polymer denture 




FLEMING DENTAL LABORATORY 

Incorporated 

Professional Building 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Telephone TE 2-6054 Post Office Box 2086 

E. R. Schwerin Leon Chadwick, Jr. 



[90] 



THE CAROLINA 

PINEHURST, N. C 

WINTER GOLF CAPITAL 




DURING THE SOCIAL SEASON AND FOR CONVENTIONS 
TOO— YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME 



FOR TOURIST, AND TRAVELER ON 

VACATION — IT'S ALWAYS GOLF-TIME 

IN PINEHURST 



IDEALLY SITUATED IN THE PINE COUNTRY 
OF THE CAROLINA SANDHILLS 



DANIEL O. DELANY, MANAGER 
CLIFFORD F. SMITH, SALES MANAGER 



[ 91 ] 



nlktx-^iztx ^mtni OInmpang 



Raleigh, North Carolina 



Robert D. Walker 



J. Pullen Sizer fl I 



[92] 



"AN OLD PROVERB" 

IT IS BETTER TO HAVE ONE MAN WORKING 
WITH YOU THAN A DOZEN WORKING FOR YOU 



WE AT TINCHER'S HAVE DOZENS WHO 
ARE ANXIOUS TO WORK WITH YOU 



Keep Us in Mind on Your Next Special Case — 

PORCELAIN - VITALLIUM - LUXENE 
SWISSEDENT - OR WHAT HAVE YOU 



Tincher Dental Laboratory 

22IV2 Hale St. 
CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

Phone 343-7571 



[93 ] 




how can I be 
sure they're 
getting 

ENOUGH 
CALCIUM 



You can be sure children are getting enough 
calcium by making sure they drink 
enough milk ... for milk and other dairy foods 
provide % of the calcium in the national 
food supply. 

In spite of the liberal amounts of milk 
products available, surveys reveal that average 
calcium intakes of children and adolescents 
are below recommended allowances. 
Studies on large numbers of children up to 
12 years of age have shown that a satisfactory 
retention of calcium requires the 
consumption of three glasses of milk daily, 
along with adequate vitamin D. Four 
glasses enabled children to store additional 
calcium for future requirements. 

Recommended daily intakes of calcium 
increase from 1.0 gram in early childhood 
to 1.3 grams for teen-age girls and 1.4 
grams for adolescent boys. In the absence 
of milk and milk products, it is difficult . . . even 
with careful selection ... to obtain from 
other foods more than one-third of these 
daily allowances. When consumed in suggested 
amounts . . . the equivalent of three or four 




glasses daily for children and four for 
teen-agers . . . milk and other dairy foods 
contribute two-thirds of the calcium allowan' 
plus one-fourth of the protein and nearly 
half of the riboflavin. 

Although the body has an ability to adapt I 
to low calcium intakes by improved absorp^ 
and utilization of the dietary supply, 
adaptation is often accompanied by reduced 
bone mineralization and growth rate . . . 
as demonstrated by the prompt growth 
response of children in low-calcium areas 
following addition of calcium lactate to thi 
diet. For full development of the skeletonj 
development of sound teeth . . . and 
attainment of maximum height and body 
vigor . . . compliance with dietary standardi] 
for calcium is an important consideration 
in planning meals for the young. 

Milk and other dairy foods stand alone in 
their ability to provide calcium needed 
by children and adolescents in a form thalj 
highly palatable, easily digested, and 
readily absorbed . . . and they also provide! 
other nutrients that contribute to a balancf 
dietary and buoyant health. 

The nutritional statements made in this adve 
ment have been reviewed by the Council on F 
and Nutrition of the American Medical Ass 
tion and found consistent with current authorit 
medical opinion. 



NORTH CAROLINA DAIRY COUN 



2600 Hillsboro Rd. 
DURHAM 

610 Coliseum Drive 
WINSTON-SALEM 



914 N. Elm 
GREENSBORO 




PORCEL 




"Engineered for Progress" 

ROTHSTEIN DENTAL LABORATORIES, INC 

1100 Easf-West Highway, P. O. Box 914, Silver Spring, Md. 
1722 Ey« Street, N. W., P. O. Box 1740, Washington, D. C. 



iS^ 



tSBSsf 



[95] 



NOBLE DENTAL 
LABORATORY 



—Complete Laboratory Service— 



Fred Noble Fred Noble, Jr. 

225 Professional Building 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Telephone: 832-4616 



[96] 




One will do— but 



Carbocaine HCl Z% 
without vasoconstrictor 



^, . , , , ,, ,. , -ill provides very rapid, profound anes« 

Using only one local anesthetic may be suitable ^^^^j^ ^j^j^^^^ unwarranted dura- 

if all your procedures are extensive and compli- tion-particularly desirable in 



cated. 

But many modern procedures are not time con 
suming. So, more and more dentists are taking 
advantage of the unique choice provided by the 
two formulas of Carbocaine: a choice of shorter 
or longer duration — each offering profound anes 
thesia' with rapid onset" and being well tolerated.^ 

Carbocaine 3% without vasoconstrictor is grow 

ing in popularity, in keeping with high-speed pro- long duration that even extensive 

cedures and for routine extractions which do not and complicated procedures seldom 

require long-lasting anesthesia. Carbocaine 2% S^'ence'-'.^HiX W. Local anesthe. 

with Neo-Cobefrin assures unsurpassed depth of sia; history ; potential toxicity ; clinical 

anesthesia for the most protracted procedures ; the 

need for reinjection is rare. 



children's dentistry and modern 
high-speed restorative procedures. 
Operating anesthesia averages 20 
minutes upper, 40 minutes lower. 

Carbocaine HCl 2% 

with Neo-Cobefrin® 1:20,000 

(brand of levo-nordefrinl 

offers rapid-acting, consistently 
profound anesthesia of sufficiently 



Carbocaine hci 

brand of mepjvacaine hci 



investigation of mepivacaine. Dent. 
Clin. North America p. 243, July 1961. 
2. Dobbs, E.G. and Ross, N. The new 
local anesthetic Cai-bocaine. New York 
State D. J. 27:453, Nov. 1961. 3. Weil, 
C, Santangelo, C, Welham, F. S., and 
Yackel, R.F. Clinical evaluation of mepi- 
vacaine hydrochloride by a new method. 
J.A.D.A. 63:26, July 1961. 

FOR YOUR INFORMATION: These local anesthetic solutions are for dental block 
and infiltration injections only. There are no known contraindications in dentistry 
except for patients known to be sensitized. Inject slowly and avoid intravascular 
injection by aspirating. As with all local anesthetic solutions, adverse reactions due 
to intolerance, overdosage, or intravascular injection may occur and include hypoten- 
sion and respiratory depression. Such reactions occur infrequently and usually are 
readily controlled by supporting circulation with a vasopressor and respiration with 
oxygen. Carbocaine and Neo-Cobefrin are trademarks (Reg. U.S. Pat. Off.) of Sterling Drug Inc. 



Cook-Waite Laboratories, Inc. 

90 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10010 



COOK-WAITE 




Daily Interdental Care IS ESSENTIAL 
to Sound Oral Hygiene 

Routine daily use of STIM-U-DENTS Interdental 
Stimulators keeps teeth surfaces clean and free of 
injurious food particles a toothbrush can't reach. 

Ask for 
FREE SAMPLES 

StimUDents Inc., 

14035 Woodrow Wilson, 

Detroit 38, Mich. 



STIM-U-DENTS 

Interdental Stimulators 



CARTER LABORATORY 



CERAMCO, PORCELAIN JACKET AND ACRYLIC VENEER CROWNS 

FIXED AND REMOVABLE GOLD RESTORATIONS 

PARTIAL DENTURE SERVICE 



BRUCE R. CARTER 

301-338 Professional Building 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Ceramco and Nobilium Representative 
Telephone TEmple 3-2618 Box 1327 



[98] 




TICONIUM 




Honor Roll 

of Qualified 

Laboratories 



HENDERSONVILLE DENTAL LAB 

Hunter BIdg. 

P. 0. Box 1019 

Hendersonville, No. Carolina 28739 

Phone: 3-9870 

NOBLE DENTAL LABORATORY 

225 Professional BIdg. 

P. 0. Box 825 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27602 

Phone: 832-4616 

NORMAN DENTAL LABORATORY 

612 Pasteur Drive 

P. O. Box 10003 

Greensboro, North Carolina 27404 

Phone: 299-9128 

QUEEN CITY DENTAL LABORATORY 

306 N. Church St. 

Charlotte, No. Carolina 28201 

Phone: EDison 3-6497 

SAMPLE DENTAL LABORATORY 

633 Nissen Building 
P. 0. Box 2897 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 27102 
Phone: PArk 3-3897 

SULLIVAN DENTAL LABORATORY 

p. 0. Box 1679 

Wilmington, No. Carolina 28402 

Phone: ROger 2-9793 




on your next case 




TICONIUM PREMIUM 100 • TILON • TICON 

Ticonium, Division of CMP Industries, Inc., Albany, N.Y. 12201 



[99] 



These brushes are typical of many collected in a recent survey and are on file. The 
one at the right is a 2-row Pycopay hard nylon used by a "conscientious" patient. 

The Worn-Out Toothbrush 

. . . today's most neglected problem in oral hygiene 

Many a patient who is conscientious about following his 
dentist's instructions overlooks the fact that proper cleaning 
and interproximal stimulation are impossible with a worn-out 
toothbrush. 

Statistics show that less than one toothbrush is purchased 
per person per year in this country. Good brushing can't be 
done with worn-out brushes . . . and good dental health is 
rarely maintained without good brushing. 

REMIND PATIENTS that their toothbrushes should be 
regularly replaced (2 at a time preferably) for effective 
home care. 

MORE DENTISTS RECOMMEND PYCOPAY 

than any other toothbrush because it reflects the profession's 
specifications for the "ideal" toothbrush: firm, straight 
handle ...2x6 tuft design . . . small, narrow head . . . easy 
to manipulate . . . wide range of nylon and Chungking 
natural bristle textures . . . plus the soft resilient Py-co-TIP 
for interproximal massage. 

Py-co-pay Division BLOCK DRUG COMPANY, INC. 

"Quality Products for Dental Health" 



[100] 



My Sincere Best Wishes 

For A 

Successful Meeting 



A. ALBERT WRAY 



ARTCRAFT LABORATORY 

p. O. Box 1164 Greensboro, N. C. 

Phone 275-1405 

Specializing in 
Crown and Bridge Dialon Jackets 



[101] 



GREENSBORO LABORATORY 

Phone BR 2-6562 Post Office Box 2938 

205 N. Davie Street 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 27402 

WILLIE WRAY CARL DRAKE 



Dial TR 3-4671 



Box 906 



SPAKE'S DENTAL LABORATORY 

508-512 Stearns BIdg. 
STATESVILLE, N. C. 

Established 1929 
CHAS. E. SPAKE, C.D.T. 




Professional 
Appearance.. 

Unfailing Performance . . . 
Pink Capsuled Analgesic . . . 
Accepted with Confidence by Patients ... 

Leading "Non-Prescription" 
Capsulated Pain Reliever 

For regular SAL-FA YNE service of two-capsule 
Professional Dental Packets in Dispenser Cartoa 
write on your letterhead to: 

The Kenton Pharmacal Co., Inc. 

Covington, Kentucky 41012 



sal-fayne 



[ 102] 



The LOGHHEAD LABORATORIES, Inc. 

Harry Dunton, Manager 

835 Enquirer BIdg. Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 

Phone 241-6203 — 241-6204 

MICRO-BOND ® 
now 
AVAILABLE IN EITHER 
GOLD PLATINUM 



ALLOY 



SERIES ALLOY 



' VACUUM-FIRED PORCELAIN CROWNS and BRIDGEWORK 

VACALON (electro-vacuum) ACRYLIC 

CERAMCO® FIXED GOLD BRIDGEWORK 

ORTHODONTIC APPLIANCES 



GOOD DENTAL PRACTICE 



lo^v do you explain "Preventive 
Dentistry" to a tuba player? 

^murol's folder, "Enjoy Good Teeth and 
jood Times" explains benefits of healthy 
eeth during critical early-teen years. 

t stresses, without preaching, the need 
or frequent dental check-ups and seeking 
lentist's advice on diet and fluoridation. 

or a supply of these helpful 
olders write: Amurol Products 
Company, Naperville, 111. 



yimurol 





PLUS 

QUALITY 

SERVICE 

DEPENDABILTY 

+ + + 

^cfOH '8udcUH<^ ?00 St. 7fl<z^'^ St. 

P, O. ^ax t^56 ^2^-0379 ^2^-0370 

[104] 



I 



— IN THE SOUTH 



•^ J' 



OKi At '^©"^o' Company^ Inc. 




i^' 



MEANS 

COMPLETE SER VICE 



ANY ONE 
OF OUR FIVE 

Efficiently Staffed 

Completely Stocked 

Branches 




Arlington 

Richnrtond 

Roanoke 

Raleigh 

Charlotte 



WILL SERVE YOU BETTER 



CHARLOTTE 
LABORATORY 

414 North Church Street 
CHARLOTTE, N. C 

P. 0. Box 2033 Phones 4-6874—4-6875 

VITALLIUM 




MICRO- h/mKL^WKSS^ GOLD 

BOND llvlH^ WwM CERAMICS 



DENTURE 






*^j K'. '-^ '> Department Offering a Highly 

•^ %' '^\ "^ o Specialized Service . . . 



o 






^ 



. ^ .^1:^ % '^OR SUPERIOR DENTURES 

< < 'o '^^ 



•J- - ^ 
o o o^, ^. 

^ m \ < 



• V 



■cj:^ V ilong together 

BE. iJENTISTRY 



VOLUME 49 



NUMBER 3 



AUGUST, 1966 




THANK YOU, DEAN BRAVER 



IS AN IMPORTANT BUSINESS ASSET- 




Pnje4jcAlLe 



VITALLIUM 'for the fines 

COBALT CHROMIUM ALLOY PARTIAL 
RESTORATIONS 



AilcJio-nonA' 



FOR THE FINEST PORCELAIN BONDB 
TO PRECIOUS METAL CROWN AND 
BRIDGE RESTORATIONS. 



When your patients realize that their dental health 
and appearance is an important business asset, they 
will want the finest restorations you can provide. 
We craft quality materials into exceptional quality 
products with talent, skill, and artistry that is sure to 
please you and your patients. 

®Howmet Corporation — Austenal Dental Divis 



WOODWARD PROSTHETIC COMPANY 

153 Bishop Street 
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 
P. O. Drawer C. Phone: 272-1108 



RELIABLE 
SERVICE 



Our offices enable us to render 
the dental profession in North 
Carolina the best of service. 
We continue to appreciate and 
welcome your patronage. 



Thompson Dental Company 

CHARLOTTE-GREENSBORO-RALEIGH 
your Service Dealer in the Carolinas 



[1] 



TRUBYTE BIOBLEND 

product superiority 
feature: 




The only way to effectively 
simulate natural tooth color is 

^^^ g% ut g% .^ •§- g% \^ \ i ATURE builds tooth color from inside out 
l-V V'IwHI'W ll' i'J The pulp and dentine areas are usualli 
^ ♦ I ♦ darkest, and light entering the tooth is reflect© 

T |*^|Y1 \A/I til \X\ ^"^ refracted through the semi-opaque body o 

the dentine to the more translucent area of thi 
enamel. In the same way, Trubyte Bioblera 
Anteriors build color from within by blendii^ 
body materials and enamels which absorb, rd 
fract and reflect light very much like naturi 
teeth. Bioblend tooth colors are never "veneere 
or "painted on" — their natural beauty, qui] 
literally, comes from within. 



PROOF 





A natural tootli A Trubyte Bioblend Anterior 

These two illustrations show how closely the structure of a Trubyte Bioblend Anterior duplicates i' 
natural tooth. In both teeth, light passes through materials of similar optical characteristics and i; 
reflected from deep within. The stainmg at the Bioblend dentino-enamel junction reproduces exactl} 



the discoloration etfect in the abraded incisal of a natural tooth. 



rrRUBYTE 



I® 



MULTI-BLENDED VACUUM FIRED PORCELAIN ANTERIORS 

The Dentists' Supply Company of N. Y.. York, Penna. 



THE JOURNAL 

of 
The North Carolina Dental Society 

(A Constituent of the American Dental Association) 



OFFICERS 

1966-1967 

J. Homer Guion 
President 
Charlotte 

George F. Kirkland, Jr. 

President-Elect 

Durham 

Walter H. Finch, Jr. 

Vice President 

Henderson 

C. W. Poindexter 

Secretary-Treasurer 

Greensboro 



DISTRICT EDITORS 

F. A. Buchanan 

First District 

Hendersonville 

W. G. Ware, Jr. 
Second District 
Winston-Salem 

Richard M. Fields 

Third District 

Pleasant Garden 

Glenn F. Bitler 

Fourth District 

Raleigh 

James A. Privette 

Fifth District 

Kinston 



VOLUME 49 



NUMBER 3 



AUGUST, 1966 



Page 

Directory 1966-1967 4 

Dedication Brauer 5 

Thoughts of the President Guion 6 

Letters to the Editor 7 

Editor's Comment Breland 9 

Editorials 1 1 

Clipped from the North Carolina Press 13 

N. C. Dental Society Surrenders to 

Extremist Groups Edwards 14 

Clinical Management for Hemophiliacs. .Porter 18 
The Southern Conference of Dental Deans 

and Examiners Breeland 22 

National Association of Dental Service 

Plans Lindahl 25 

The 17th National Dental Health 

Conference Buchanan 28 

District Programs, Fall 1966 

First District 30 

Second District 33 

Third District 37 

Fourth District 40 

Fifth District 43 

General News 46 

Obituaries 50 

N. C. Dental Laboratories Accredited by 

JCADL 71 



ditor-Publisher: A. Breece Breland Charlotte 

issociate Editor-Publisher: Barry G. Miller Charlotte 

Managing Editor: Andrew M. Cunningham Raleigh 



Publication Office: P. O. Box 11065, Raleigh, N. C, 27604 



Published four times a year, January, April, August and September by the North 
-arolina Dental Society, 405 W. Peace St., Raleigh, N. C. 27603. The closing dates 
or the Journal are February 1, June 1, July 1, and November 1. The subscription 
ate is $2.00 per year. Second-class postage paid at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 



[3] 



DIRECTORY 1966-1967 

OFFICERS i . ! ; - I i[| I 

President: J. Homer Guion, 604 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Drive Charlotte 28207 

President-Elect: George F. Kirkland, Jr., 913 Lamond Ave., Durham 27701 

Vice President: Walter H. Finch, Jr., Box 862 Henderson 27536 

Secretary-Treasurer: C. W. Poindexter, 309 E. Wendover Ave Greensboro 27401 

Editor-Publisher: A. Breece Breland, 1927 Brunswick Ave Charlotte 28207 

Associate Editor-Publisher: Barry G. Miller, 1927 Brunswick Ave Charlotte 28207 

Speaker of the House: Ralph D. Coffey, Box 693 Morganton 28655 

Executive Secretary: Andrew M. Cunningham, Box 11065 Raleigh 27604 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Chau-man: W. L. Hand, Jr., Box 335 New Bern 28561 

S. H. Isenhower, Box 307 Newton 28658^ 

L. B. Peeler, 606 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Dr Charlotte 28207?( 

Pearce Roberts, Jr., 410 Doctors Bldg Asheville 28801 

STANDING COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

Clinic: Paul A. Stroup, Jr., 621 Doctors Bldg., 1012 Kings Dr Charlotte 28207^ 

Constitution and Bylaws: Thomas G. Nisbet, 324 Doctors Bldg., 

1012 Kings Dr Charlotte 28207 

Council on Dental Health: F. A. Buchanan, 

Oakley Medical Bldg., Hendersonville 287391 

Dental Education: C. W. Sanders, Box 368 Benson 27504 

Ethics: Elliot R. Motley, 217 N. Torrence St Charlotte 28204^1 

Exhibit: Thomas G. Collins, 403 Ligon Bldg., 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 276055; 

Insurance: J. S. D. Nelson, 304 Ligon Bldg., 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 27605:i 

Legislative: Mott P Blair, Box 348 Siler City 27344^ 

Library & History: Neal Sheffield, 304 Dixie Bldg Greensboro 27401 if 

Membership: George F. Kirkland, Jr., 913 Lamond Ave Durham 27701 

Military & Veterans Affau-s: T. Edwin Perry, 1321 Oberlin Road Raleigh 27608^ 

Necrology: Luther H. Butler, 105 Butler Bldg., 430 W. Gaston St.,..Greensboro 27401 
Program: Edward U. Austin, Suite 315 Randolph Medical Center, 

1928 Randolph Rd Charlotte 28207 

Prosthetic Dental Service: C. P. Osborne, Jr., Drawer 1344 Lumberton 28358f 

Publicity: J. Donald Kiser, 1209 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 282023 

Relief: J. W. Heinz, 1401 N. Independence Blvd Charlotte 28205< 

State Institutions: Gerald F. McBrayer, Box 490 Morganton 28655 

SPECIAL COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN * 

Annual Session: Edward U. Austin, Suite 315 Randolph Medical Center, 

1928 Randolph Road Charlotte 28207 

Cancer: Benny W. Martin, 600 Wade Ave Raleigh 27605 

Children's Dental Health: Richard S. Hunter, 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 27605; 

Dental Assistants: William H. Oliver, Box 29 Smithfield 27577' 

Dental Care for the Aged: H. O. Lineberger, Jr., 600 Wade Ave Raleigh 27605 

Dental Health Insurance-Industry Liaison: James B. Howell, 

917 N. Elm St Greensboro 27401 

Dental Hygienists: J. Harry Spillman, 140 Lockland Ave Winston-Salem 27103 

Dental Service Corporation: Roy L. Lindahl, 

UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 27514 

Industrial Commission: S. B. Towler, 801 Professional Bldg Raleigh 27605 

School Health: Glenn L. Hooper, 212 N. Ellis Ave Dunn 28334 

State Employees: William H. Oliver, Box 29 Smithfield 27577|' 

SPECIAL ADVISORS 

N. C. Dental Assistants Assoc: William H. Oliver, Box 29 Smithfield 27577 

N. C. Dental Auxiliary: William A. Mynatt, 36 All Souls Crescent, 

Biltmore Asheville 28803 

N. C. Dental Hygienists Assoc: W. Stewart Peery, 324 Doctors Bldg., 

1012 Kings Dr Charlotte 28207 

[4] 



n grateful appreciation to a dedicated life . . . 




John C. Brauer, D.D.S. 



IN LATE 1949 a group of men, possessed of a great deal of judgment 
■*- and foresight, selected and succeeded in attracting to Chapel Hill, Dr. 
John C. Brauer as the first Dean of the new School of Dentistry at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 

In the intervening sixteen and one-half years, the wisdom of this selection 
las been amply demonstrated. Dean Brauer has brought the school from its 
inception to a position of recognized excellence in a short period of time. 

Furthermore, as he retires he leaves the school in an extremely strong 
position to continue the development of its programs. 

' The importance of Dean Brauer's leadership to dentistry in North Caro- 
lina, and to dental education throughout the United States and the world, 
cannot be overstated. He is truly a giant in his profession. The many con- 
cepts and programs which he has pioneered and developed will continue 
to benefit the people long beyond his years of active service. 

His integrity and devotion stand as an example for each of us. It is only 
fitting that this issue of the Journal be dedicated to this most remarkable 
gentleman. We will miss him deeply, we wish him well, and we can only 
say, "Thank you, Dean Brauer, for sharing your life with us." 

[5] 



Thoughts 

of the President 




T N MY first message to you, I find it difficult to express adequately my 

feelings on being your president for the coming year. I am grateful foi 
the high honor you have bestowed upon me, and I humbly assume the office ii 
with the pledge to serve you to the best of my ability. 

No one man is capable of running the North Carolina Dental Society bjilue, 
himself. It is the combined effort of the membership, as well as the com 
mittees, that makes the Society function so smoothly. Times are changing 
fast in all phases of American life, and dentistry is no exception. It is up tc 
you to help lead our profession to attain greater service to mankind. 

Someone has estimated that fifty per cent of the world's knowledge hat 
been developed within the past ten years, and is doubling every ten years. 

Fifty per cent of aU drugs prescribed today were not even known ten years 
ago. Ten years from now fifty per cent of all people who work in industry; 
will be producing products that have not yet been invented or discovered 

I want to thank Pearce Roberts for his excellent service as president fo 
the past year. We should be grateful for the many painstaking hours spenijte 
on behalf of the Society. Fortunately, he will be on the Executive Commit 
tee for one more year to share with us the wealth of knowledge gained from u 
experience. Unfortunately, we are also losing some excellent members oi 
the Executive Committee. This loss will be keenly felt. 

Those of us who attended the conference on dental prepayment plans a 
Raleigh in April were treated to an excellent presentation of the differeni 
types of plans that we are faced with. The House of Delegates approved 
resolution to form a Dental Service Corporation. To me this is one of th( 
most far-reaching actions taken at our annual meeting as this will affec 
dentistry for many years to come. 

A committee is working with Dr. Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent o 
Public Instruction, on a fee schedule to provide dental care for selectee 
under-privileged children. 

Payments for these services are to be made from Federal funds appro 
priated under the Elementary and Secondary Educational Act. At the tim< 
this is written, an agreement has not been reached. 

Your Program Committee is already at work on the program for the 196' 
meeting to be held May 10-14 at Pinehurst. The theme of the meeting wil It 
be "Preventive Dentistry, a Postive Approach for Organized Dentistry." 

J. Homer Guioi 

[6] 



asi 



111 



etters to the Editor 



Any communications directed to the editor's office are 
considered of interest to all dentists and will be published 
at the discretion of the editors. 



June 2, 1966 

In response to your phone call of 
ast evening, I have enclosed a pho- 
ograph of Dean Brauer and a 
nief manuscript, as you requested. 

I hope that these materials will 
neet your needs and that they will 
irrive promptly. We are sending 
hem air mail, special delivery in 
n effort to get them into your 
lands in short order. 

My congratulations to you on 
our appointment as Editor of the 
OURNAL. I am sure that you will do 
Ji excellent job, as did Dr. Miller, 
md I know that he will be of great 
Lssistance to you in this regard. If 
ve can be of any help at all, please 
lo not hesitate to call on any of 
is at the School of Dentistry. 

Perhaps you will have an oc- 
asion to come to Chapel Hill and 
isit us in the near future. We cer- 
ainly hope so. 

AMES W. Bawden 
\.ssT. Dean and 

Coordinator of Research 
JNC School of Dentistry 



May 23, 1966 

Prof. Paul Barton mentioned that 
'ou are interested in having some- 
>ne from your editorial staff attend 
he 1966 Dental Editors Seminar 
It Ohio State University. 

If Ohio State's request for an 



NIH grant is approved, the Semi- 
nar will be held September 11-15, 
1966. We should receive word 
about the grant by July 1. 

In the meantime, tentative invi- 
tations to the Seminar are being is- 
sued. Please send me the name and 
position of the person to whom you 
wish an invitation extended. Thank 
you for your interest. 

Kind regards. 

Velma Child 
Secretary 

Council on Journalism 
American Dental 
Association 



May 10, 1966 

Dr. Cureton had a rather small, 
but interested audience at Pine- 
hurst. The thought occured that 
someone in the Society might fol- 
low up in some way that would 
benefit those of us interested. For 
instance: 

1. Obtaining an expression of in- 
terest among us by an open ques- 
tion in a Journal article in the form 
of a questionaire. 

2. Making up a list of partici- 
pants. 

3. Keeping us informed and in- 
terested from time to time with fu- 
ture Journal articles or other 
means. 

4. An eventual evaluation of re- 



[7] 



suits of the converts. I do not know 
one gentleman, but I couldn't help 
but notice Dr. Rufus Hoover of 
Charlotte was very interested. He 
or someone else might care to help 
the society and all of us with such 
a project. 

See what you think and remem- 
ber I. O. U. a Champagne toast! 

Norman Ross 
Durham 

P. S. I think the Journal is the most 
informed piece of work I've seen. 
I don't dare not read it these days. 
Keep up the wonderful work! Best 
to Lois and the new daughter and 
to you. 



(The following letter was ad- 
dressed to Mr. Andrew M. Cun- 
ningham, Managing Editor of the 
Journal.) 

April 15, 1966 

Although your letter came some 
time ago the copy of the Journal 
did not arrive until yesterday so I 
waited to let you know about it. 
You see the last few miles the mail 
comes by pony express. 

I was more than pleased with the 
job Dr. Miller had done on the 
story for the Fund. He used the in- 
formation he had to get it down to 
the local level. Most of the 
"canned" material does not get the 



information to the reader in such a 
way as to let him see that the Fund 
really does come back to help in the 
local area. I realize that, in North 
Carolina, you have your own Foun- 
dation and that many dentists con- 
tribute to it, but that still should 
not stop them from giving a little 
to the Fund. Will you please tell 
Dr. Miller that I appreciate his ef- 
forts and that he will be thanked 
for them through the Central Of- 
fice. 

Looking at the program for your 
May meeting brought back many 
memories. My first appearance on 
a North Carolina program was 
many years ago and it was at that 
time that 1 told Clyde Minges a 
story which he has never let me 
forget. It must have been at least 
two o'clock in the morning and a 
few of us were sitting in the lobby 
of the Carolina just teHing stories. 
1 miss all of that now but the other 
compensations of retirement help to 
make up for it. What I am doing 
has to be illegal, nothing could be 
this nice and be legal. 

Have a good meeting. Give my 
very best to all of my friends. Our 
best to you and Dorothy. 

G. D. Timmons, Chairman 
American Fund for 
Dental Education 
scottsdale, arizona 



[81 



EDITOR'S COMMENT 



• • • 



A. Breece Breland 



ifer 



omer Guion's Thoughts 

Words yes — but from an in- 
ividual with long years of dedi- 
ated service and the unique experi- 
nce of having viewed dentistry 
from different perspectives from 
the mountain top. Read those words 
again! This time you will find more 
^visdom. 

Isn't it provocative that "ten years 
from now, fifty per cent of all peo- 
ple who work in industry will be 
producing products that have not 
yet been invented or discovered?" 

Now Hear This! The dentistry of 
today will not satisfy tomorrow's 
public. Let us endeavor to keep 
pace with the changing times. 




The Working Board 

The North Carolina State Board 
of Dental Examiners forges new 
frontiers in objectivity of examinees 
for license requirements. Wade 
Breeland, Third Vice President of 
the American Association of Den- 
tal Examiners, skillfully presents a 
new approach between examiners 
and educators. The benefactors — 
the public of the State of North 
Carolina and her dental profession 
— are highly complemented by the 
dedication of its devoted Board 
members and educators. This makes 
dentistry a true profession — the 
unique privilege and obligation of 
being the guardian of the dental 
health of the public. 



[9] 




Wade H. Breeland 



This dialogue described by Wade 
Breelajid is significant in that goals 
and objectives can be much more 
meaningful to both the profession 
and the examinee. 

Black Sunday 

As dentists practicing in North 
Carolina do we not depend on the 
good judgment of the Board to pass 
on qualifications of character, eth- 
ics, and morality as well as profes- 
sional quahfications? And as has 
been the policy in the past, will 
not these human qualities and char- 
acteristics have been judged before 
any dentist can become and remain 
a member of the Society? 

On the basis of principle, Zeno 
Edwards raises a significant ques- 
tion. Was there not an obligation 
for the leadership of the Dental 
Society to pursue the one final step 
— the principle of self determina- 
tion — before the high court? 

Hemophiliacs 

Cellular biologists within the last 
month have offered medicine and 



Zeno L. Edwards 



dentistry a breakthrough for these 
unfortunate individuals. Until this 
breakthrough is made practical for; 
its use, Joe Porter outlines excel-' 
lent direction for the management 
of these patients. 

An understanding of the ideology 
of hemophilia, its mechanism, and 
management is concisely presented. 

We know that as Joe and other 
dedicated servants compile his- 
tories on these patients they will be 
shared for our benefit. 




Editorials 



EXTENSION SERVICE 



A MERICAN dentistry is repetitive, punishing, non-rewarding, and dis- 
comforting." Finding of depth study — 1958 — University of Chicago. 
In other words — piddle, putt, pull, and replace. 



Can we afford to take $40,000 of taxpayers' 
money, $25,000 from our family to open an office, 
plus years of personal sacrifice to piddle? Should 
we strain our physical and mental being to sub- 
tract from the three score and ten? Can we afford 
to tamper with dentistry's recognition and our ego 
by lack of confidence with ill-prepared auxiliary? 
The facts are, every time a qualitatively trained 
auxiliary is added to the team — quality goes up. 



Is not dentistry's "Acres of Diamonds" in North Carolina perhaps 
through the community college programs? Few places on the horizon of op- 
portunities for service can the dollar be made more elastic than the local 
scene. 

These programs need dentists: 

( 1 ) To inform the public. 

(2) To motivate qualified young persons for these programs. 

(3) To make salaries of directors and faculty members more equitable. 

(4) To provide leadership and participation in the development of 
foundations for incentives for the faculty and imaginative programming. 

(5) To develop scholarship funds for needy qualified students. 

Dentists need these programs : 

As a source of qualitively trained personnel that through our 
combined efforts this undesirable image of repetition, punishing, 
non-rewarding, and discomforting service will be removed. 

The answer to the profession's basic emotional appeal may be in the 
community college dental auxiliary programs. Add adventure to your prac- 
tice — support the training of auxiliary personnel. 

[H ] 



WE ARE ALL ONE 

puBLic health, research, practi- 
■*■ tioners and educators. If we are 
dentists, do we not represent the 
profession? Basically, the activities 
of the dental profession should be 
opened to all, but controlled by 
no select group. Is not the dental 
society the body politic that the pub- 
lic can look to for pohcies and lead- 
ership in dental health? 

Are not the educational institu- 
tions thus chartered to prepare us 
for this responsibility? 

By the same token, do we not 
look to our leaders in public health 
to give us broad leadership for pre- 
vention and education to the un- 
told thousands that need this direc- 
tion? 

The optimum of dental health 
for a deserving public leaves little 
room for factions among ourselves 
— educators, researchers, practi- 
tioners, and pubHc health leaders. 

To quote our president — "Times 
are changing fast in all phases of 
American life, and dentistry is no 
exception." 



NEW MAN IN TOWN ! ! ! 

VT'esterday this young practi- 
tioner was you. Today he is one 



of us. Tomorrow he is the profes- 
sion. 

The new practitioner — particu- 
larly the young graduate — de- 
serves the tender loving care given 
to any new member of a family. 

Across this great State, should we | 
not receive and present this new 
practitioner to our public in the 
same fashion that a senior vice 
president or high echelon executive! 
would be received and presented byj 
industry and commerce? 

Don't just collect his dues and 
tell him the dates of the dental i 
meetings. 

The responsible officer of his so- 
ciety can take his curriculum vitae 
and photograph to the newspaper 
for the release by the society. 

Diplomatically furnish him with 
responsible patients. 

Create opportunities for civic and 
community participation in Kiwanis, 
Civitan, Rotary, Jaycees, Lions, etc. 

Give him responsibilities. Ask 
him to take an assignment on a 
chamber committe representing den- 
tistry. 

Share your clinical judgments and 
communicative experience with his 
youthful enthusiasm and dedication, 
thus enriching the life of the public. 



[ 





jr. 

1 


MEETINGS OF THE NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 

1967— May 10-14, Pinehurst 
1968 — May 5-8, Pinehurst 




[12] 

1 


1 



clipped from 

the north Carolina press 



DENTAL CARE PLAN 

Goldsboro News-Argus 
June 1, 1966 

Discussion is on among members 
of the North Carohna Dental As- 
sociation to favor a sort of Blue 
Cross plan for dental services. Such 
a plan is badly needed. Such a plan 
should be put into effect. 

Teeth health so often determines 
condition of the whole body. Poison 
from tooth decay or disease can 
poison the whole man. 

Thousands in this state alone, 
would support organization of such 
a dental service. 

Why would it not be logical and 
reasonable for hospital care associa- 
tions or Blue Cross plans to have a 
separate dental care program? Or 
members could add dental care pro- 
grams to their hospital care by pay- 
ment of an amount the actuaries 
and the health experts would de- 
termine as reasonable and neces- 
sary. 

Most of us have now grown ac- 



customed to the value of a com- 
plete medical check at least once 
a year. We should include exami- 
nation and correction of teeth de- 
fects as an integral part of our regu- 
lar health checks. And they should 
come at least every six months. 

A dental care association or de- 
partment of hospital care groups is 
on the way. Make certain of that. 



BYWAYS OF THE NEWS 

Raleigh News and Observer 
February 7, 1966 

Just scanning the headlines I see 
where "Dentists Renew Fight to Get 
Fluoridation." . . . That's what I 
love about the Old North State. Our 
screwballs are allowed a forum. 

Scientists have given us the 
green light on fluoridation. It's good 
for the teeth. Any kid who has to do 
without it, is getting short changed. 
But the "experts" keep the dentists 
fighting — and filling. 
Charles Craven 



[13] 



The author walks on ground where perhaps others 
fear to tread. The elaborations of a major issue be- 
fore the North Carolina Dental Society are forth- 
rightly presented with strong conviction. 



North Carolina Dental Society 

Surrenders 
To Extremist Groups 

Zeno L. Edwards 



CuNDAY, February 6, 1966 will 
^ be recorded by future historians 
as "Black Sunday" in the annals of 
the North Carolina Dental Society. 
That was the day on which the of- 
ficials of our Society let it be known 
that they preferred complete and 
abject surrender to the extremists 
views of the NAACP and CORE, 
as well as to the thinking of the 
ultra liberals and their indoctrina- 
tors within our own organization, 
rather than continue the fight for 
and in defense of the most im- 
portant issue ever to confront any 
private organization — the prin- 
ciple of self-determination — some 
vestige of states rights — in the 
election of our members. Experi- 
ence has taught us that no organi- 
zation, be it professional, fraternal. 



civic, or social, can progress and 
develop its full potential of service 
to its community, and compatibility 
among its members, unless it has 
some freedom of choice in the elec- 
tion of its members. It is regrettable 
that our immediate past administra- 
tion refused to continue the fight 
for such a privilege. The writer feels 
that every member of the North 
Carolina Dental Society should be 
informed of the circumstances, as 
well as what happened and how it 
happened. Read the record below. 
When legal counsel informed the 
officials of the North Carolina Den- 
tal Society of the adverse decision 
rendered by the Circuit Court of 
Appeals in the case of Hawkins. 
versus the North Carolina Dental 
Society, President Roberts called a 



[ 14] 



meeting of the House of Delegates 
and the general membership to meet 
in special session at Raleigh, North 
Carolina, Sunday, February 6, 
1966, to consider further action. 
Appearing in the February issue of 
the NCDS Newsletter was a brief 
report of the meeting and certain 
action taken, but neither that re- 
port nor the press release from 
President Roberts's office gave the 
rank and file membership any de- 
tailed information concerning the 
real issue involved, nor the con- 
fusion and the unfavorable light in 
which the Society was placed as a 
result of refusing to instruct our at- 
torneys to file notice of appeal for 
a hearing before the U. S. Supreme 
Court. 

The Court Directs 

When the House of Delegates 
convened in special session, legal 
counsel answered many questions 
and explained the Circuit Court's 
decision as it related to our present 
status, our rights of appeal, and the 
prospects of a favorable hearing if 
appealed to the U. S. Supreme 
Court. Our attorneys did not and 
could not give any definite assur- 
ances of a favorable decision by 
the Supreme Court. Their position 
was well taken and thoroughly un- 
derstood by all those who had not 
closed their minds before coming to 
the meeting. No ethical attorney 
will guarantee to his client a jury 
decision nor the decision of a panel 
of judges with any more grace than 
would an ethical dentist or physi- 
cian give definite assurances that a 
certain prescribed medication would 
cure his patient's ills. However, our 
attorneys did advise that if the Cir- 
cuit Court's decision was accepted 
without appeal it meant that the 



plaintiff, and those similarily situ- 
ated, could become members of the 
North Carolina Dental Society re- 
gardless of the provisions in the 
Constitution and By-laws of the Dis- 
trict and State Societies. Further- 
more, we were warned that under 
the Circuit Court's decision it might 
be ruled that license to practice den- 
tistry in North Carolina was the 
only requirement of certain appli- 
cants for membership in our Dis- 
trict and State Societies. 

In spite of the above facts and 
uncertain possibilities at the time, it 
appears that the Executive Com- 
mittee had already decided that the 
Society should hoist the white flag 
of surrender and accept the bitter 
consequences, even before coming 
to the meeting and hearing the 
warnings of legal counsel and the 
opposition by many of our mem- 
bers. A member of the Executive 
Committee introduced a pre-pre- 
pared and unanimously adopted 
resolution recommending, in effect, 
that the House of Delegates not 
authorize legal counsel to file notice 
of appeal for a hearing before the 
U. S. Supreme Court. 

The House of Delegates ap- 
proved the resolution, but the de- 
cision was appealed to the general 
session by a minority report, signed 
by eleven members of the House 
of Delegates, where it was adopted 
by a small majority vote. During 
the voting it was not difficult to 
spot the source of the balance of 
power. Unfortunately, there were 
not many of the older and more 
experienced members present. It is 
not believed that the surrender on 
"Black Sunday" represents the feel- 
ings and the thinking of the ma- 
jority of the rank and file members 
of our Society. 



[15] 



It is the view of many, that the 
recommendations of the Executive 
Committee and the action taken by 
the House of Delegates have made 
a mockery of the things our dele- 
gates to the ADA have stood for 
and worked for during the past half 
century and more. During these 
many years our delegates have 
stood shoulder to shoulder with 
delegates from every state who be- 
lieved in, and fought for, the prin- 
ciple that each component society 
should have the authority to exer- 
cise its freedom of choice in the 
election of its members regardless 
of race, nationality, or previous ser- 
vitude. As the junior member of our 
delegation to the ADA, I soon 
learned by observation and experi- 
ence, during the past three years, 
that as a result of experience, dedi- 
cation to duty, and capable leader- 
ship those who preceded me had 
built for the North Carolina Dental 
Society an image of strength and 
dependability among all of the 
states. Today, that image stands 
tottering on the brink of unpleasant 
memories of "Black Sunday," mor- 
tally wounded by action resulting 
from inexperience and leadership 
without vision. 

Surrender 

Speaking against the surrender 
included such past officials and 
dedicated leaders as Dr. Clyde E. 
Minges, past president of the Ameri- 
can Dental Association, Dr. Sam 
Shaffer, past president of the State 
Board of Dental Examiners, Dr. 
Thomas M. Hunter, present chair- 
man of the Ethics Committee, and 
others. It should be emphasized that 
neither segregation nor integration 
was the real issue before the So- 
ciety. The opposition was fully 



cognizant of the acts of Con- 
gress and the decisions of the courts. 
Therefore, the opposition felt that 
regardless of their personal opin- 
ions concerning the acts of Congress 
and the court decisions, there was 
only one issue left to fight for, and 
that was the principle that each dis- 
trict society should have the right 
to establish its standards and quali- 
fications for membership, which 
would apply to all candidates for 
membership, regardless of race or 
color. The defense was begun un- 
der a former administration and 
strongly supported by each succeed- 
ing administration, so why should 
last year's administration throw in 
the towel of surrender when we had 
only one more step to go for a final 
determination and clarification of 
the issue? We should never be too 
timid to fight for certain rights, even 
though we may be wounded in bat- 
tle. 

Double Standard 

How the U. S. Supreme Court 
would have ruled in this case will 
never be known, but it is strongly 
felt that no decision by the Supreme 
Court could possibly have been any 
more distasteful and disappointing 
than was the order issued by Judge 
Warlick. This order completely 
abrogates all rights and privileges 
of the district societies to establish 
standards and qualifications for 
membership by directing that the 
provisions in our present By-laws 
be waived in the cases of certain 
applicants for membership. It is my 
understanding that legal counsel ad- 
vised the Society at our May meet- 
ing that it would not be necessary 
to change our present By-laws deal- ■ 
ing with membership. To me, that 
means that the Society will now 



[16] 



operate under a set of by-laws that 
will apply only to white applicants 
lor membership while, on the other 
hand, requiring of Negro applicants 
for membership only a license to 
practice dentistry in North Caro- 
lina. It is noted that Judge War- 
lick's order does not mention such 
time honored qualifications as 
character, reputation, ethics and 
morality, but it has always been 
our policy to give these human 
characteristics serious consideration 
when an application for member- 
ship is presented. 

Now these standards apply only 
to white applicants for membership. 
These are some of the things the 
opposition had in mind when they 
opposed the recommendations of 
the Executive Committee. The ques- 
tion now is how long can an or- 
ganization, such as ours, continue 
to operate successfully under a 
double standard of requirements for 
membership. It can be said that ours 
is a case wherein the majority have 
fallen victims of an atrocious and 
high-handed policy of discrimina- 
tion. 

Had legal counsel been instructed 
to file an appeal for a hearing be- 
fore the U. S. Supreme Court, and 
if its decision had been adverse to 
our hopes, there would have been 
no criticism of the officials of our 
Society. On the other hand, the 
members would have accepted the 
decision in good grace, and become 
reconciled by the comforting knowl- 
edge that they had carried the torch 
that had been handed to them by 
their predecessors. If it were pos- 



sible for such former leaders of the 
North Carolina Dental Society as 
Doctors Tucker, J. Martin Fleming, 
John Wheeler, Spurgeon, F. L. 
Hunt, Gene Howell, J. N. Johnson, 
H. O. Lineberger, Paul Fitzgerald, 
Betts and many others to have been 
looking down in spirit on the scene 
of surrender in Raleigh on "Black 
Sunday," they would have immedi- 
ately felt the need of prayer and 
impulsively retired to the private 
chambers of Saint Peter and offered 
their petitions that the stigma of 
the surrender be erased from the 
record of the organization to which 
they had contributed so much to 
make it one of the best and most 
highly respected among the states. 
In bringing these things to the 
attention of the members of the 
North Carolina Dental Society it is 
my aim and desire to report only 
the facts. My comments and elabo- 
ration on certain phases of the 
issues are in keeping with my per- 
sonal convictions. They are not in- 
tended to indicate a lack of respect 
for the integrity and good inten- 
tions of the officials of our Society, 
nor of any other member who may 
disagree with my views. I ascribe 
to them the same right of dissent 
that I cherish for myself. The only 
way we can achieve any semblance 
of urity and understanding of our 
problems is to bring them out in 
the open and approach them in a 
spirit of mutual interest. Let us 
hope that the present administra- 
tion will succeed. 

Washington 
North Carolina 



[ 17] 



Clinical Management 

For 

Hemophiliacs 



W. Joseph Porter 



T^HE management of the hemo- 
•^ philiac patient is difficult for 
both the dentist and the physician. It 
requires co-operation, timing, and 
preparation in order to give thor- 
ough and proper oral surgery treat- 
ment. 

HemophiUa is a blood dyscrasia 
and is caused by congenital de- 
ficiency, of either of two blood- 
clotting factors . . . hemophilia — A, 
related to factor VIII, hemophiUa 
— B, to factor IX. This deficiency 
affects males predominantly, and is 
characterized by lifelong tendency 
to prolonged bleeding. The role of 
these two factors on clotting mecha- 
nism is seen in illustration I (clot- 
ting mechanism). The disease is 
transmitted by females as a sex- 
linked recessive Mendelian trait 
contained in the X Chromosomes. 
If a male hemophiliac has children, 
all his direct male descendants will 
be normal, unless their mothers are 
carriers, while every one of his 



daughters will be a carrier of the 
gene. The daughters born to a fe- 
male carrier and an unaffected male 
stand an even chance of being car- 
riers, and the sons of being hemo- 
philiacs. 

Deficiency of factor VIII or fac- 
tor IX has been attributed to block- 
ing of metabolic synthesis of the 
factor by the mutant gene. So far, 
it has not been possible to make 
the hemophiliac's body produce the 
deficient factor. Establishment of 
an unequivocal diagnosis of hemo- 
philia A or B is based on clinical 
history and laboratory findings. A 
family history of bleeding may not 
be conclusive of hemophiha; the ab- 
sence of such a history does not ex- 
clude it. The coagulation defect is 
congenital and permanent, but is 
usually not discovered until circum- 
cision is performed, a tooth is ex- 
tracted, or an accident occurs. 
Suspicion may be aroused when the 
baby bruises easily upon learning 
to crawl. 



I 



[18] 



Clotting Mechanism 

First Stage 

Formation of thromboplastic activity. — Factor III (thromboplastin) 
IV (calcium) 

platelets > III THROMBOPLASTIN 

thrombo— VIII (AHG) 

plastin IX (PTC) Plasma thromboplastin component 

precursors X (Stuart-Power) 

XI (PTA) Plasma thromboplastin antecedent 

Second Stage 

Conversion of prothrombin (FACTOR II) to THROMBIN 
IV (Calcium) 

III THROMBOPLASTIN + II PROTHROMBIN > THROMBIN 

Accessory V (labile factor) 
factors VII (stable factor) 

VIII (AHG) 

Third Stage 

Conversion of Fibrinogen (FACTOR I) to FIBRIN 

THROMBIN + I FIBRINOGEN > FIBRIN 

FIBRIN + RBCs + PLATELETS ^ CLOT 



Normal coagulation involves two 
other events which occur after the 
actual formation of a clot. The first 
is clot retraction (syneresis) which 
is the consolidation or tightening of 
the fibrin clot. The clear yellow 
fluid expressed during this retrac- 
tion is serum (i. e., removal of 
fibrinogen from plasma by the clot- 
ting process produces serum). The 
reason for clot retraction is not 
known. Nevertheless, the process is 
studied in the test tube as an in- 
direct measure of platelet activity, 
since platelets are necessary for 
normal retraction. 

The chief laboratory differences 
between hemophilia — A and hemo- 
philia — B are the following: 

Factor VIII in hemophilia — A is 
very labile and is present in fresh 
blood or plasma, but not in serum; 
it can be preserved by storage of 
titrated plasma at — 20c. 



Factor IX in hemophilia — B is 
very stable. It is present in plasma, 
S3rum and stored in the refrigera- 
tor, it remains potent for several 
months. 

Hospitalization is required for 
oral surgery, and deciduous teeth 
should be given the utmost care 
and attention. They should be 
maintained until they can be ex- 
foliated by natural processes. 

A careful plan of surgery should 
be determined prior to doing any 
type of surgery. 

Unique conditions exist around 
oral surgery wounds: 

1 . The wound occurs in a moving 
part that should not be immobil- 
ized. 

2. The wound and surrounding 
areas are always wet. 

3. Positive and negative pressures 
occur with movements of the man- 
dible. 



[ 19] 



4. The wound and surgery area 
are bathed with bacterial contami- 
nation. 

5. An open bone wound always 
exists and frequently the medullary 
spaces are exposed directly to the 
contaminated oral fluids and there 
is no tissue to pull across the wound 
for a primary closure. 

6. The wound is subjected to 
trauma from the tongue, chewing 
and food particles. 

ONLY one tooth should be re- 
moved at a time. The wound heal- 
ing complications are quadrupled 
when the amount of surgery or the 
number of teeth removed is 
doubled. Block anesthesia should 
be used. Atraumatic removal is in- 
valuable, and lacerating the mucous 
membrane should be avoided. The 
mucous membrane should be cut 
and not torn. Loose or compressed 
bone should not be left. A minute 
piece of bone will act as a focal 
bleeding point indefinitely. 

Consultation with the physician 
handling the case should be done 
concerning the optimum time for 
surgery, and provisions for an ade- 
quate supply of blood and plasma 
should be made. 

The surgery should be performed 
in the patient's bed, and the patient 
should receive a unit of plasma one 
hour before the oral surgery is to 
be performed. There should be pre- 
operative sedation and antibiotic 
coverage. This latter treatment 
may be questioned by some, but it 
has been established through re- 
search that approximately 90 per 
cent of tooth extractions are associ- 
ated with bacteremia. Hemophiliacs 
usually have joint pathology and an 
increased susceptibility to infection. 
Each socket should be filled with 
gelfoam soaked in powdered throm- 



bin. The gelfoam should not be 
packed tightly into the socket but 
just sufficiently to fill the socket. 
All areas should be sutured to re- 
tain the gelfoam and maintain the 
wound edges. 

Just as the deficiency of factor 
VIII or IX varies in degree from 
partial to complete, so also does 
the hemophiliac vary from subclini- 
cal to severe. In view of the clini- 
cal similarity of some hemorrhagic 
conditions laboratory determina- 
tion of the clotting defect is most 
important. Several tests are avail- 
able: Appreciable prolongation of 
WHOLE BLOOD CLOTTING 
TIME indicates a severe case. A 
less severe case may be detected 
by the more sensitive PRO- 
THROMBIN CONSUMPTION 
TEST. Mild cases are revealed by 
the THROMBOPLASTIN REGEN- 
ERATION TEST. The most reli- 
able diagnostic method is assaying 
the thromboplastinogen content of 
plasma. The plasma to be analyzed 
is added to plasma from a severe 
hemophiliac, and the prothrombin 
consumption time is determined. 

The patient bleeding into the tis- 
sues of the mouth or throat must 
be hospitalized immediately. Fresh 
plasma therapy, or fresh-frozen at 
—20c., 1 to 2 hours after donation 
is started at once and maintained 
for several days after clinical im- 
provement has occurred. A trache- 
otomy set is kept at the bedside. 
The aim of plasma therapy for 
bleeding episodes is to raise the 
level of factor VIII or IX to more 
than ten per cent of normal. The 
amount required to do this will de- 
pend on the size of the patient and 
the severity of the disease. A sim- 
ple rule, but dependent on the se- 
verity, is to give 5 to 15 ml. of 



[20] 



plasma per kilogram of body weight, 
every 12 hours. 

Do not suture the wound tightly! 
Never fit a splint over the wound 
tightly if one is used. A hemo- 
philiac's blood will clot in the mouth 
but the origin of hemorrhage will 
remain patent and bleeding will 
continue. If the wound is closed 
tightly and peripheral blood pres- 
sure is greater than resistance of 
the tissue spaces, subperiosteal at- 
tachments, or of fascial spaces, 
bleeding will continue into these 
areas and produce a large hema- 
toma that is difficult to manage. 
Such a hematoma may lyse and will 
become a new area of bleeding. 

Postoperative Oral Care Includes: 

1. No mouth wash for 48 hours. 

2. Bed rest for 48 hours. 

3. Ice packs to the face for 48 
hours. 

4. Liquid or soft diet and vitamin 
supplement. 

5. No drinking straws, no smok- 
ing, no sucking action by the mouth. 

6. Patient should not bite on the 
splint. 

7. Do not remove the splint for 
8 hours unless there is excessive 
bleeding. 

8. Use oral sedation, analgesics, 
and antibiotics. 

The dentist should remove ex- 



cessive old clots from extraction 
wounds daily because it may tend 
to act as a bleeding stimulus. Re- 
packing with gelfoam and free 
thrombin may be necessary. 

Summary 

The average bleeding time for 
extraction of one tooth is approxi- 
mately ten days. Some patients may 
bleed for sixty days. It is entirely 
possible to have some patients bleed 
continuously and die from hemor- 
rhage in some other part of the 
body. Short cuts should not be used 
in treating hemophiliacs. They 
should never be released from the 
hospital early. 

The management of the hemo- 
philiac patient is a challenging one, 
and there is no simple answer. 
Each patient must be treated with 
the utmost care, and preservation 
of the teeth is especially important. 
Strict rules of procedure should be 
closely followed and knowledge of 
the type of hemophiliac is of great 
value. The hemophiliac patient can 
be treated successfully only if care 
and co-operation is used by all 
those concerned. It is hoped that 
the information given in this paper 
will help prevent some problems 
which occur with these patients. 

Charlotte 
North Carolina 






[21 ] 



A Report on 



"^The Southern Conference of 
Dental Deans and Examiners 

Wade H. Breeland 
N. C. State Board of Dental Examiners 



COMMENTS 

ON 

DR. BREELAND'S REPORT 

The excellent and meaningful report of 
Wade H. Breeland relating to the organi- 
zation, development, function, and pro- 
grams of the Southern Conference of 
Dental Deans and Examiners, certainly 
reflects the concepts and opinions of all 
who participate in these conferences. 

All of us in dental education are en- 
thusiastic supporters of this Southern 
Conference, and those of us in dental 
education from North Carolina are proud 
indeed of the leadership and dedication 
afforded by our State Board of Dental 
Examiners. In reality, it is significant 
that all state boards in the Conference 
have demonstrated an eagerness and 
readiness to discuss and to evaluate the 
many critical issues before the profession 
today, as well as to plan for the im- 
mediate future. 

Many tangible results and values al- 
ready have emanated from the unre- 
stricted, informal, as well as formal dis- 
cussions. The favorable resolution of the 
many current and developing problems, in 
dental education and licensure, may be 
realized only through continuous study 
and evaluation by the two groups that 
have been vested with the responsibility 
by society to maintain appropriate pro- 
fessional standards. The health and the 
welfare of the people of this State, and 
other commonwealths, thus are consid- 
ered and protected. The mission of the 
Southern Conference of Dental Deans 
and Examiners is clear and timely. 

John C. Brauer, Dean 
UNC School of Dentistry 



i 



' I 'he Southern Conference is the 
only group of regional dental 
deans and dental examiners that 
has incorporated. The union of 
these two important agencies has 
provided a commonalty of purpose 
that is having an ever-increasing 
favorable impact on professional 
concepts and standards in our south- 
ern states. 

It is through this organizational 
structure that progressive planning 
and programming can be realized 5 
to accommodate the ever-changing 
professional and social needs of the 
area. 

We feel that our organization 
and its annual meetings represent 
the most effective effort being pur- 
sued in the nation which focuses 
upon the problems of mutual inter- 
est between educators and exami- 
ners. This is not an educator domi- 
nated organization; our programs 
are not over structured. The op- 
portunity which exists for social in- 
terchange and the informality of 
the annual meetings has been the 
keynote for our sessions. 

Our programs have a useful and 
practical flavor due to the fact that 
we, both educators and examiners, 
are willing to face everyday prob- 



fif 



• Reprinted from the May, 1966, issue of the 
Examiners. 



Bulletin of the American Association of Dentaif 



J 



*l 



[22] 



lems and facts squarely, especially 
subjects of tangible value to both 
agencies. These programs have 
dignity and objectivity which pro- 
vide a high level of leadership 
which we feel is so necessary in 
our expanding and changing profes- 
sional needs and standards. We 
have been able, in the Southern 
Conference, as a result of our 
mutual respect and our mutual pur- 
pose, to identify common, long- 
range goals to which both educa- 
tors and examiners are committed. 
We, in the Southern Conference, 
are looking at the broader prob- 
lems of dental educators and licen- 
~ sure in an objective manner, and 
there is no subject relative to dental 
education or dental licensure that 
we would hesitate to bring before 
the conference. In the past few 
years we have learned that honest 
disagreement can serve as the basis 
of constructive discussion. 

N. C. Leads the Way 

In 1964, Dr. Robert Thoburn, 
Florida State Board, and the first 
Examiner elected Vice President of 
the Southern Conference, requested 
the N. C. State Board of Dental 
Examiners to conduct a workshop 
for the examiners at the 1965 an- 
nual session to be held at the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky School of Den- 
tistry. As a result of Dr. Thoburn's 
request, together with North Caro- 
lina's desire to learn more about 
2valuation, to improve our exami- 
nation and grading procedures, and 
to explore fully the theme of 
evaluation in an informative dis- 
:ussion, we felt that this confer- 
.^nce would be an ideal place for 
^uch a discussion. We felt if we 
:ould determine, or find out, the 



image of dentistry and the philoso- 
phy of evaluation which the vari- 
ous Southern Schools of Dentistry 
endeavored to instill and to produce 
in their graduates, that then, and 
only then, could North Carolina or 
other Boards of Examiners improve 
their image of licensure and their 
philosophy of evaluation, as well as 
keep their examinations within the 
modern concepts of teaching and 
within modern concepts of tech- 
niques. 

The N. C. Board discussed their 
thoughts with Dean John Brauer 
requesting his opinion and judg- 
ment on the following proposal: The 
N. C. Board would offer to present 
in full, in detail, in all aspects, in 
all parts and procedures, and all 
items of consideration that went into 
our evaluation program of appli- 
cants for licensure to the N. C. 
Board of Examiners, providing the 
Deans would present an equivalent 
outline of their procedure and 
evaluation philosophy applicable to 
their graduates. 

Dean Brauer considered this a 
challenging proposal which he pre- 
sented to Dean Shailer Peterson, 
Secretary of the Conference. Dean 
Peterson was enthusiastic over the 
proposal and, in turn, called Dean 
Alvin Morris, President of the Con- 
ference. The proposal was cleared 
with and accepted by all officers 
of the conference. 

Participants 

The following Boards participated 
in this program: 

North Carolina State Board 

Florida State Board 

Kentucky State Board 

Texas State Board 

Virginia State Board 



[23] 



The following Deans appeared on 
this program: 

Dean Charles A. McCallum, Uni- 
versity of Alabama 

Dean John C. Brauer, Univer- 
sity of North Carolina 

Dean Edmund Jeansonne, Loyola 
University 

Dean George H. Moulton, Emory 
University 

Dean Alvin L. Morris, Univer- 
sity of Kentucky 

The presentation of the N. C. 
State Board was presented on closed 
circuit television. The conference 
was held at University of Kentucky, 
School of Dentistry, Lexington, 
Kentucky. 

Objectives 

This conference increasingly re- 
flected the meaningful relationship 
between members of educational in- 
stitutions and members of ex- 
amining boards. Exchange has be- 
come important and paramount. We 
have started and developed a con- 
tinuing program on evaluation phi- 
losophies. 

Our Southern Conference ses- 
sions have made it possible for the 
educators to explain their goals and 
their objectives to the examiners. 
In turn, the educators have been 
able to learn first-hand how the 
examiners from the various states 



interpret their own goals and ob- 
jectives. Each group has now 
learned through discussion the 
means by which each group has at- 
tempted and is attempting to im- 
plement its aims and objectives. 

The Southern Conference of 
Dental Deans and Examiners held 
their thirteenth session in Miami 
Beach, January 7-9, 1966, with the 
Florida State Board as host, and 
President Charles A. McCallum 
presided. Sixty persons attended 
this conference with representatives 
from eleven dental schools and 
eleven state boards of dental ex- 
aminers, as well as from the A.D.A. 
Council on Dental Education and 
the American Association of Den- 
tal Schools. 

Advisors 

We of the Southern Conference 
are especially grateful to Dean 
Shailer Peterson for his excellent 
and tireless efforts while he was 
Secretary, in compiling the fine re- 
ports of our past meetings. We are 
also grateful to Dean Alvin L. Mor- 
ris and Dean John C. Brauer, to- 
gether with Dean Peterson, for lead- 
ership in initiating these programs 
of objectivity. 

Breeland Building 
Belmont 



f 



[24] 



I 



x4 Report on 



National Association of 
Dental Service Plans 



Conference and 
First Annual Meeting 
Cliicago, June 14-16, 1966 



Roy L. Lindahl 



'"pHE first annual meeting of the 
-*- National Association of Dental 
Service Plans was held in Chicago, 
June 16, 1966, preceded by a Con- 
ference on Program and Operations 
June 14 and 15, in the American 
Dental Association Building in Chi- 
cago. 

The conference held on June 14 
and 15 was devoted to a discussion 
of the technical details associated 
with the operation of a dental ser- 
vice corporation, with papers pre- 
sented by outstanding individuals 
in the field. The topics for discus- 
sion were: Day to Day Plan Ad- 
ministration, Contract Design and 
Rate Making, Marketing Methods 
and Customer Relations, Relations 
with Government Programs, Pro- 
fessional Relations and Claims 
Review, and Relations with Regula- 
tory Agencies. Other areas of dis- 
cussion related to the method of 
operation of a national coordinat- 
ing service of the National Associa- 
tion of Dental Service Plans and 



similar patterns were described by 
representatives from Blue Cross and 
Blue Shield. 

Of particular interest was the re- 
port by George Y. Ogawa, As- 
sistant Director, Bureau of Eco- 
nomic Research and Statistics of 
the American Dental Association, 
as it related to a study by the 
American Dental Association on the 
relative value of various services. 
This study is rather comprehensive 
and is a pioneer in many respects. 
It will be particularly interesting to 
view the results of this study. 

Another highlight of the meet- 
ing was a report from James T. 
Goodman, Manager, Product and 
Program Development of the Blue 
Cross Association, who discussed 
the topic of Relations with Govern- 
ment Programs. With the develop- 
ment of recent legislation, a new 
governmental philosophy has de- 
veloped as it relates to all federal 
programs. It was Mr. Goodman's 
assignment to explain this new phi- 



[25] 




losophy and to project for the par- 
ticipants an understanding of the 
impHcations involved. One of the 
important emerging points of inter- 
est is an emphasis upon placing 
more control at the local level on 
the planning of various programs 
as they might relate to matters of 
health. 

On Thursday, June 16, during 
the First Annual Meeting of the 
National Association of Dental Ser- 
vice Plans, the delegate from the 
North Carolina Dental Society par- 
ticipated as a voting member inas- 
much as the House of Delegates 
approved constituent society mem- 
bership by the North Carolina Den- 
tal Society in the National Associa- 
tion of Dental Service Plans. 

In his President's Report, Dr. 
Fritz Pierson indicated the prog- 
ress which has been made in the 
formation of the NADSP organiza- 
tion, and was most gratified to see 
the response from the profession of 
dentistry as represented by dental 
service corporations and state den- 
tal societies. 

The report of the Secretary- 
Treasurer revealed that the Ameri- 
can Dental Association planned to 
subsidize the National Association 
of Dental Service Plans, which per- 



mits a realistic operating budget un- 
til the organization is able to begin 
functioning at a self-sufficient level. 
The report also revealed that at the 
initial meeting, thirty-three member 
organizations were represented by 
authorized delegates and/or alter- 
nate delegates. Those in attendance 
represented eleven active members, 
six associate members, and sixteen 
constituent society members. 

The House of Delegates ap- 
proved the by-laws and member- 
ship standards as developed by the 
Board of Directors of the NADSP 
and adopted the following dues 
structure : 

(A) Basic annual dues of each 
member, by membership classifica- 
tion: 

I. Active Member 

a) 1,000 plus eligible 
lives covered $500.00 

b) Less than 1,000 
ehgible lives 
covered 250.00 

II. Associate Member 200.00 

III. Constituent Society 
Member 150.00 

IV. Affiliate Member 50.00 

(B) Additional annual dues of 
active members, based on the 
volume of annual subscription in- 
come, will be calculated on the 
basis of .015 per cent of subscrip- 
tion income applied to a maximum 
of ten million dollars income. 

(C) Active members shall also 
make operating contributions to the 
Corporation in an amount equal to 
two per cent of subscription income 
paid into each plan by virtue of its 
participation in national or multi- 
state accounts. 

The delegates assembled at the 
meeting also adopted a voting 
classification based on the type of 



[26] 



I 



membership in the National As- 
sociation of Dental Service Plans. 
This voting method permits those 
active members to have three votes, 
associate members two votes, con- 
stituent society members one vote 
and affiliate members no votes. Ad- 
ditionally, a provision was adopted 
to provide additional votes based on 
the volume of business accom- 
plished by the dental service cor- 
poration. Basically, it was set up 
with the philosophy that the larger 
the volume of business the greater 
number of votes that an organiza- 
tion would have. 

It was further voted that the an- 
nual dues structure be effective 
January 1, 1967. The final business 
of the meeting was the election of 
the board of directors and officers 
of the organization. 

The following were recommended 
and nominated by the American 
Dental Association, and elected to 



the board of directors: Drs. Hu- 
bert A. McGuirl, Rhode Island; 
Rulon W. Openshaw, Southern 
California; and Kenneth J. Ryan, 
Michigan. 

In addition, the following were 
elected to the board: Drs. Har- 
vey C. Janke, Ohio; Ivan D. Wil- 
bur, New York; John Y. Kim, 
Hawaii; Doland Walder, Colorado; 
F. Gene Dixon, California; and 
Charles Newschwander, Washing- 
ton. 

Dr. Ryan was named president. 
Other officers elected were: Dr. 
Dixon, vice president and Dr. 
Newschwander, secretary-treasurer. 

The meeting was adjourned with 
a spirit of cooperativeness and an 
offer to help all organizations 
through the National Association of 
Dental Service Plans. 

Chapel Hill 
North Carolina 



[27] 



A Report on 



The 

Seventeenth 

National 

Dental 

Health 

Conference 



Chicago 

April 25-27, 1966 




Francis A. Buchanan 



'T'HE 17th National Dental Health 
-*• Conference was held April 25- 
27, 1966 in Chicago. The theme 
for the meeting this year was "Den- 
tal Care for the Community." The 
areas covered were as follows: 

(1) Community Programs: Gov- 
ernment Concept 

(2) Methods of Payment: Assorted 
Concepts 

(3) The Dental Office: Focus on 
Personnel 

(4) Older Americans and their 
Oral Health 

(5) Younger Americans and their 
Oral Health 

(6) Prevention, Dental Health 
Education 

(7) Strengthening of State Health 
Department, Dental Division 

There were 25 to 30 speakers on 
the above listed subjects. I shall 
comment on those subjects which 
will be of immediate interest to 
our Society. 

Dr. Arthur Bushel, Acting Com- 
missioner of Health of New York 
City, gave a very timely keynote ad- 
dress. He noted the increase in 
chronic and man-made diseases and 
that many elderly persons are liable 
to be subject to more than one 
chronic disease (that is a patient 
may have perhaps three or four 
chronic diseases at one time). Dr. 
Bushel indicated there will be an 
increase in salaried dentists. They 
will be employed in teaching, re- 
search, welfare, etc. 

There was considerable discus- 
sion relating to federal and state 
dental and medical programs for 
children, the dentally indigent, and 



[28] 






the aged. Dr. William M. Creason, 
past chairman of the Michigan State 
Dental Association Committee on 
Legislation presented the thought 
that the dental service corporations 
could become the vehicle through 
which these federal and state dental 
programs might be carried out. He 
feels that this will reduce the ad- 
ministration costs, the patient will 
have free choice of dentists, and 
all dentists can take part. 

The dental service corporation 
was again discussed in comparison 
to the Blue Shield concept with the 
general feeling that competition be- 
tween the two would be desirable. 
Dr. Ebert of the Chicago Dental 
Society presented a discussion on 
post payment plans. He revealed 
that there was a 1.3 per cent loss 
in the Chicago Bank Plan over the 
last ten years. 

Captain William Ludwick of the 
Navy Dental Corps gave a report 
on the controversial study done at 
Great Lakes where dental assistants 
placed the dental matrix, condensed 
the amalgam restoration, and pol- 
ished the restorations. This was the 
"irst official public presentation of 
this study. I think members of the 
Society will find it interesting to 
read when it is published. 

Dr. Kenneth Ryan, Chairman of 
:he Council on Dental Health of 
:he ADA, gave a very fine paper 
)n his idea of the requirements of a 
National Dental Care Program for 
Ilhildren. He presented 15 require- 



ments such as complete care, em- 
phasis on prevention, use of the 
service corporation, etc. 

Fluoridation was again shown to 
be a decisive answer to prevention 
of dental caries. Areas with fluori- 
dated water might expect this to 
have an effect on the cost of dental 
prepayment. 

Mr. Perry Sandell of the ADA 
staff indicated that the ADA posi- 
tion on the use of commercial edu- 
cational material in schools is 
neither to approve or disapprove 
their use. It is up to local dental 
society and the local school boards 
to come to an understanding in this 
area. 

In summary, my conclusions from 
this Dental Health Conference are: 

(1) Whether we like it or not, the 
role of federal and state govern- 
ments in community health is in- 
creasing. 

(2) The dental service corporation 
is the proper agency to administer 
prepaid dental insurance and the 
governmental dental program. 

(3) More research should be 
done on the use of auxiliary office 
personnel and equipment. 

(4) As people live longer, our 
thoughts must change in all phases 
of dentistry. 

(5) A National Dental Care Pro- 
gram for Children will be proposed 
within the next year or two. 

Oakley Medical Building 
Hendersonville 



[29] 



First District Dental Society 




John W. Girard, Jr. 
President 



Education, Fellowship, and Fun 



nPHE First District Dental Society Annual Meeting is now approaching 
its 45th year! 

October 1, 2, and 3 is the time. Grove Park Inn, Asheville, is the place. 

Dr. Max Carpenter, program chairman, has a most informative essayist j 
in Dr. Clifford Ochsenbein on the subject of peridontics. The luncheon on 
Monday, with the Ladies Auxiliary, will feature an outstanding speaker. 

Dr. Jerry McBrayer, table clinics chairman, has arranged an excellent 
variety of clinics that will be of great interest. 

Dr. Kent Rogers, local arrangements chairman, has not only arranged a 
fine meeting facility, but also entertainment which will be difficult to 
surpass! 

Dr. Bob Hoffman, chairman of the golf committee, reports all is well 
for a fine tournament on Sunday morning on the beautiful Country Club 
of Asheville course. 



i! 



All the officers and committee chairmen have put forth much effort to 
produce a meeting that encompasses education, fellowship, and fun. 

I extend a special invitation to the members of our district, the Ladies jijM 
Auxiliary, the State officers, and the members of the other districts, for an I 
enjoyable and informative meeting. 






[30] 



J'' 



FIRST DISTRICT 



Program 



GROVE PARK INN, ASHEVILLE 
OCTOBER 1-3, 1966 
Saturday, October 1 

4:00 p.m. Executive Committee Meeting Room 312 

4:00 p.m. Registration Main Lobby 

6:00 p.m. Cocktail Party Green Room 

7:30 p.m. Dinner Laurel Terrace 

9:00 p.m. Dance Laurel Terrace 

Sunday, October 2 

10:00 a.m. Golf Tournament Asheville Country Club 

4:00 p.m. Registration Main Lobby 

5:30 p.m. Official Reception Grotto Room 

6:30 p.m. Buffet Dinner Plantation Room 

8:30 p.m. Business Meeting ..Laurel Terrace 

Monday, October 3 

7:30 a.m. Breakfast for New Members Mary Frances Room 

9:00 a.m. Registration Main Lobby 

9:00 a.m. Clifford Ochsenbein Laurel Terrace 

11:00 a.m. Table Clinics Green Room 

12:30 p.m. Luncheon Plantation Room 

2:00 p.m. Clifford Ochsenbein Laurel Terrace 

3:30 p.m. Business Session and Adjournment 



Table Clinics 

Monday, October 3 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m. 

1. Variations in Pin Amalgam Techniques, Joseph L. Laton, Morganton. 

2. Operative Dentistry Under General Anesthesia, T, George Johnson, 
Western Carolina Center, Morganton. 

3. Simplified Functional Bite, Robert W. Holmes, Asheville. 

4. Some Uses of Stainless Steel Crowns, Frank D. Pattishall, Morganton. 

5. Practical Uses of the Rubber Dam, Fred J. Smith, Morganton. 

6. Some Simplified Office Procedures, Milton V. Massey, Brevard, 

7. Markley Crowns, W. D. Wilson and David H. Simpson, Gastonia. 

8. A Gold Foil Technique, Carl F. Osborn, Asheville. 

[31] 



FIRST DISTRICT 



Essayist 




Clifford Ochsenbein, D.D.S. 
Lexington, Kentucky 



Dr. Ochsenbein is currently director, graduate periodontics, University of 
Kentucky Dental School. He is a diplomate of the American Board of 
Periodontology, a member of the American Academy of Periodontology, 
and a member of the American Society of Periodontics. From 1950 to 1964 
he was in practice limited to periodontics in Austin, Texas. 



Monday, October 3 



9:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.. Laurel Terrace 



PERIODONTICS 



The primary cause of tooth decay in the adult is periodontal disease and 
if the practitioner of dentistry is current in his philosophy of practice he must 
know certain basic principles regarding this disease process. Clinical cases 
will be presented which should be within the scope of all general practi- 
tioners. Considerable time will also be devoted to the management of the 
patient with poor oral hygiene, and the relationship of the biomasses to the 
clinical problem. More advanced procedures involving osseous surgery, 
mucogingival surgery, bone grafts and various flaps will be presented. 



[32 1 



I 



Second District Dental Society 




Horace P. Reeves, Jr. 
President 



Tor Heel Dental Seminar 

'~pHIS has been a year of change for the Second District. Any change is 
-*- generally somewhat opposed by most professional men. However, Earl 
Nightingale reminds us that the one thing on which we can all count is 
change. 

The first change that comes to our minds is that which was directed in 
our membership. Let us look at this for a minute. It is my firm belief that a 
professional organization exists to enable members of that profession — be it 
any of the several professions — to increase their knowledge and skill so that 
they may be of better service to their patients. 

Legislative bodies would say, "to the public." If this be true, then we 
can make this a change for the better treatment of more patients — a more 
inclusive "public." In numbers, these new members will be a very small 
percentage of our membership. Let each of us try to act in a manner which 
will be beneficial towards our common goal — more knowledge and better 
skills to be passed on to others. 

The second change is going to be more momentous than the first if indi- 
vidual members will give it their wholehearted support. At the direction of 
your Executive Committee the Second District is to be sole sponsor of The 
Tar Heel Dental Seminar. This is postgraduate education — mark that — 
Qot just another meeting. To get a course such as you are sponsoring would 
cost you transportation, lodging, and tuition at a sizable investment. Read 
the program. The clinicians are outstanding scholars. They give a good 
presentation. We believe there is interest in Pain, Pulp, & Pathology. 

With the support of every member in the district, The Tar Heel Dental 
Seminar can well become a major event. Be sure you are there. Bring a 
liend. The small ($15.00) out-of-district registration fee is a bargain for 
5uch postgraduate education for those not members of our district. Be a 
ooster! 

[33] 



SECOND DISTRICT 



Essayists 




Edward V. Zegarelli, D.D.S. 
New York, New York 



Sunday, September 18 
Monday, September 19 



8:00 p.m. 
10:30 a.m. 



Dr. Zegarelli is professor, School of Dental Surgery, Columbia Uni- 
versity. He is one of the most knowledgeable men in the field of oral pa- 
thology in this country. 




Harry Sicher, M.D., D.Sc. 
Chicago, Illinois 



Monday, September 19 
Tuesday, September 20 



9:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. 



Dr. Sicher is professor emeritus of Anatomy and Histology and director 
of the Research Training Program at Loyola University School of Dentistry. 
He is an established authority on oral and facial pain. 

[34] 



SECOND DISTRICT 




Kaare I.angeland, D.D.S. 
Buffalo, New York 



Monday, September 19 2:00 p.m. 

Tuesday, September 20 10:00 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. 

Dr. Langeland is professor of Oral Biology, State University of New York 
at Buffalo, following a distinguished career in Norway as a dentist, a re- 
searcher, and an officer in the Norwegian Army for ten years. 



Projected Clinics 

Sunday, September 18 2:00-3:30 p.m. 

1. Consideration of Anterior Tooth Placement in Facial Soft Tissue Profile, 

David R. Hinkle, Winston-Salem. 

2. Esthetic Restoration for Fractured Incisors, Ben R. Baker, Chapel Hill. 

3. Simplified Pin Technique, Douglas M. Young, Winston-Salem. 

4. Pontostructor Technique, E. Flynn Harris, Charlotte. 

5. Conservative Methods in Operative Dentistry, C. L. Sockwell, Chapel 
Hill. 

6. Preventive Orthodontics, Frank H. Daniel, Winston-Salem. 



Table Clinics 

Sunday, September 18 3:30 p.m. 

1. Functional Denture Impressions and Technique, Robert S. Moulton, 
Salisbury. 

2. To Refer or Not to Refer, Robert H. Watson, Charlotte. 

3. The Sea of Pathology Overlooked, A. Breece Breland, Charlotte. 

4. Minor Tooth Movement in General Practice, J. O. Thorpe and S. D. 
Petersen, Jr., Charlotte. 

5. Patient Education, Fred C. Miller, Jonesville. 

[35] 



SECOND DISTRICT 



Program 



QUEEN CHARLOTTE HOTEL, CHARLOTTE 
SEPTEMBER 18-20, 1966 
"Pulp, Pathology, and Pain" 



Sunday, September 18 



12:30 p.m. 


Executive Committee, Dutch Luncheon 


1:00 p.m. 


Registration 


2:00 p.m. 


Projected CUnics 


3:30 p.m. 


Table CUnics 


6:00 p.m. 


Informal Reception and Buffet 


8:00 p.m. 


E. V. Zegarelli 


Monday, September 19 


8:30 a.m. 


Registration 


9:00 a.m. 


Harry Sicher 


10:30 a.m. 


E. V. Zegarelli 


12:30 p.m. 


Business Luncheon 


2:00 p.m. 


Kaare Langeland 


3:30 p.m. 


Panel of the Essayists 




There will be discussion periods at intervals 


8:00 p.m. 


Business Meeting 




Necrology Service 




Election of New Members 




Election of Officers 


9:00 p.m. 


Adjourn 


Tuesday, September 20 


8:00 a.m. 


Registration 


8:00 a.m. 


Breakfast for New Members 


9:00 a.m. 


Harry Sicher 


10:00 a.m. 


Kaare Langeland 


11:30 a.m. 


Questions and Answers 


12:00 noon 


Business Luncheon 


1:30 p.m. 


Harry Sicher 


2:30 p.m. 


Kaare Langeland 


3:30 p.m. 


Panel Discussion 


4:30 p.m. 


Adjournment 



A registration fee of $15 will be charged for guests who are not members 
of the Second District Dental Society. 

[36] 



Third District Dental Society 




C. R. VanderVoort 
President 



We Need You! 



17 ALL in the Sandhills is a treat in itself. Add to this a resort hotel thai 
has had years and years of experience catering to its guests' slightest 
whim and you've a combination that is difficult to match. 

Your officers of the Third District, committee members, and the local 
dentists have all joined forces to provide a stimulating and provocative 
meeting we hope you'll not miss. 

From the click of the first tee shot in Sunday's golf tournament, until the 
call of the last lucky number for the drawing of prizes on Monday after- 
noon, we have every minute planned. 

All we need is you. 



[37] 



THIRD DISTRICT 



Essayists 




Troy B. Sluder, Jr., D.D.S. 
Chapel Hill 

Dr. Sluder is associate professor, Department of Operative Dentistry, 
University of North Carolina School of Dentistry. Born in Asheville, he 
received a D.D.S. degree from the University of North Carolina School of 
Dentistry and an M.S. degree from the University of Michigan School of 
Dentistry. 

Monday, October 24 10:00 a.m. 

DENTAL MATERIALS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE 

A survey of materials used daily in the clinical practice of dentistry, recent 
advances in the field of dental materials, and potential materials for the 
future. 




James E. Somers, M.D. 
Chapel Hill 

Dr. Somers, physician and psychiatrist, is associate professor, University 
of North Carolina School of Medicine. He is a graduate of Duke University 
School of Medicine. 

Monday, October 24 2:00 p.m. 

PSYCHIATRIC SYMPTOMS IN DENTAL PATIENTS 



[38] 



THraD DISTRICT 



Program 



MID PINES CLUB, SOUTHERN PINES 
OCTOBER 23-24, 1966 



Sunday, October 23 



8:30 


a.m. 


Golf Tournament 


12:00 


noon 


Registration 


3:30 


p.m. 


First General Session 


5:30 


p.m. 


Social Hour 


7:00 


p.m. 


Banquet 


9:00 


p.m. 


Second General Session 


Monday, October 24 



7:30 a.m. New Member Breakfast 
8:30 a.m. Table Clinics 
9:00 a.m. Registration 
10:00 a.m. Dental Materials in Clinical Practice 

Troy B. Sluder, Jr. 
12:30 p.m. Luncheon 
2:00 p.m. Psychiatric Symptoms in Dental Patients 

James E. Somers 
4:00 p.m. Third General Session 



Table Clinics 



Monday, October 24 8:30 a.m. 

1. Extraction Problems, C. W. Poindexter, Greensboro. 

2. Periodontics, R. A. Carnevale, Goldsboro and H. Wilson Shoulars, Jr., 
UNC, Chapel Hill. 

3. For Your Own Health, J. Ernest Roberts, Burlington. 

4. Friction Lock Pin Technique, Jon W. Couch, Asheboro. 

5. Cleft Lip Palate Treatment, Galen W. Quinn, Duke University Medical 
Center. 

6. Miscellaneous, L. G. Page, Yanceyville. 

7. The Future Dental Hygienist, Hygienists School, Guilford Technical 
Institute. 

[39] 



Fourth District Dental Society 




William H. Oliver 
President 



An Invitation to Fayetteville 



AS PRESIDENT of the Fourth District Dental Society, and on behalf 
■^^ of the members, I extend each of you a special invitation to our annual 
meeting at the Downtowner Motel in Fayetteville, October 8-10. 

This year we have variations in arrangements and procedures which we 
believe and hope will be adopted in the future years to come and will be 
enjoyed by all. 

We look forward each year to our District Meeting as an opportunity to 
renew old and make new acquaintances. I believe that you will be able to 
share with us one of the best programs that can be offered. It is your 
attendance year in and year out that has provided the stimulus and the 
means of presenting our annual meeting of which we are so proud. 

As always, we extend a very cordial invitation to the ladies who always 
add glamour to our meetings. This year, a well-planned and an enjoyable 
time is assured you. 

I must express my thanks and appreciation to my fellow officers, com- 
mittee chairmen, and members who have worked so hard to formulate plans 
for this, our forty-sixth annual meeting. 

Let others envy us! This meeting is yours to enjoy, benefit by, and share 
in. All the district officers look forward to sharing it with you. 

[40] 



FOURTH DISTRICT 



Program 



DOWNTOWNER MOTEL, FAYETTEVILLE 
OCTOBER 8-10, 1966 



Saturday, October 8 

9:00 a.m. Optional Golf Highland Country Club 

W. J. Wiggs, Chairman 

3:00 p.m. Registration Downtowner Motel 

6:30 p.m. Social Hour Tar Heel Room 

R. L. Holzbach, Chairman 
7:30 p.m. Banquet Tar Heel Room 

E. N. Pridgen, Chairman 
9:00 p.m. Dance Downtowner Motel 

Bob Smith Orchestra 



Sunday, October 9 

9:00 a.m. Golf Tournament Highland Country Club 

11:00 a.m. The Churches of Fayetteville Welcome You to Their Services 
2:30 p.m. Table Clinics Downtowner Motel 

H. E. Maxwell, Chairman 
5:30 p.m. Reception Honoring New Members Tar Heel Room 

R. H. Gainey, Chairman 

6:30 p.m. Buffet Tar Heel Room 

7:30 p.m. Awarding of Golf Prizes by W. J. Wiggs 
8:00 p.m. Business Session 



Monday, October 10 

8:30 a.m. "Your P.R. Is Showing" 
Frank Goodwin 

9:30 a.m. Guilford-Zimmerman Temperament Survey 
10:30 a.m. Break 

10:45 a.m. Film and Discussion — "The Eye of the Beholder" 
12:00 noon Lunch 

1:00 p.m. Discuss the Guilford-Zimmerman Temperament Survey 

2:00 p.m. "Little Things Count" 
Frank Goodwin 

3:00 p.m. Adjournment 

[41 1 



FOURTH DISTRICT 



Essayist 




Frank Goodwin, Ph.D. 
Gainesville, Florida 



Dr. Goodwin is professor of marketing at the University of Florida where 
he has taught courses in sales and sales management since 1947. 

Monday, October 10 8:30 a.m. 

YOUR P.R. IS SHOWING 

Monday, October 10 2:00 p.m. 

The dentist, his personahty, his patient relation, and his public relation, 
will be discussed from a marketing standpoint. Everyone will be given an 
opportunity to participate in the Guilford-Zimmerman Temperament Sur- 
vey. A discussion of the obtained profiles will follow. 



Table Clinics 

Sunday, October 9 2:30-4:30 p.m. 

1. Emergency Drugs, W. Robert Caviness, Fayetteville. 

2. Aids to Patient Education in Oral Hygiene, Miss Judy Ellis, Fayetteville. 

3. Safety in Dental Roentgenography, P. C. Purvis, Fairmont. 

4. Optimum Post Operative Treatment, C. P. Osborne, Jr., Lumberton. 

5. Newer Technique in Dentistry, E. Ben Ward, Whiteville 

6. Crown and Bridge Impression Techniques, Eugene C. Deibler, Sanford. 

7. Orientation for Hospital Dental Service, Walter H. Finch, Jr. and 
Joseph T. Hunt, Henderson. 

[42] 



Fifth District Dental Society 



James H. Lee 
President 




Sickness or Health 



A GREAT number of hours is spent in our school years and in continu- 
ing education learning to recognize abnormal and sick tissues. Do we 
really recognize tissues in health or must all our attention be given to tissues 
in sickness? Is normal a degree of sickness or health? 

Our clinician, Dr. S. N. Bhaskar, has availed himself of the finest training 
and is well prepared to bring us an outstanding program in Oral Pathology. 
All attending will have a keener appreciation for the role of the dentist in 
optimal patient diagnosis. 

Dr. David Freshwater and his committee have selected table clinics from 
the various Study Clubs in Eastern North Carolina. Each man has spent 
many hours preparing for the few minutes allotted him for the table clinics. 
Attendance by the full membership is our only way of saying "Well Done." 

The Blockade Runner's reputation is well-known. The Fifth District 
welcomes and invites the membership of the North Carolina Dental Society 
to join us. 



[43] 



FIFTH DISTRICT 



Essayist 




S. N. Bhaskar, D.D.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Bhaskar is chief, Department of Dental and Oral Pathology, U. S. 
Army Institute of Dental Research, Walter Reed Army Medical Center. He 
is a graduate of Northwestern University School of Dentistry and received 
his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois. 

Monday, September 26 9:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. 

ORAL PATHOLOGY 

These lectures will deal with everyday problems in the general practice of 
dentistry, including: X-ray interpretation; common periodontal problems | 
and their treatment; oral problems of old age and their management. 



Table Clinics 

Sunday, September 25 3:00 p.m. 

1. Full Mouth Reconstruction Using Ceramco Gold, William W. Tucker, 
Eastern Prosthetic Study Club, 

2. Tissue Conditioning in Full Denture Construction, Walter S. Linville, 
Jr., LobloUy Study Club. 

3. Pinlays the East Way, Richard F. Hunt, Jr. and Alan L. Stoddard, Lob- 
lolly Study Club. 

4. Vacuum Spatulation of Alginate Materials, Donald E. Bland, Demeriti 
Pedodontic Study Club. 

5. A Technique for Construction of Band and Loop Space Maintainers, 
David H. Freshwater, Coastal Dental Study Club. 

[44] 



FIFTH DISTRICT 



Program 



BLOCKADE RUNNER MOTOR HOTEL, WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH 
SEPTEMBER 25-26, 1966 



Sunday, September 25 

1:00 p.m. Registration 

3:00 p.m. Table Clinics 

4:00 p.m. Executive Committee Meeting 

6:00 p.m. Social Hour 

7:00 p.m. Banquet 

Invocation 

Address of Welcome 

Response to Welcome, James A. Privette 

Introduction of Guests 
8:30 p.m. General Session 

Call to Order, James H. Lee, President 

Invocation 

Necrology Service, W. L. Hand, Jr., New Bern 

Minutes of Last Meeting and Secretary-Treasurer's Report, 
M. W. Aldridge 

President's Address, James H. Lee 

Presentation of New Members, James E. Purr 

Nominating Committee Report, C. P. Godwin 

Recognition of State Officers 

Election of Officers 



Monday, September 26 



8:00 


a.m. 


New Member Breakfast 


8:00 


a.m. 


Registration 


9:00 


a.m. 


S. N. Bhaskar 


12:00 


noon 


Lunch 


1:00 


p.m. 


S. N. Bhaskar 


3:00 


p.m. 


Final Business Session 
Committee Reports 
Report on President's Address 
New Business 
Installation of Officers 
Adjournment 



[45] 



GeSral News 





Anesthesiologists to Meet 

The North Carohna Dental So- 
ciety of Anesthesiology will hold its 
annual meeting November 12 and 
13 at the Voyager Inn in Greens- 
boro. 

Dr. M. L. Allison of Ohio State 
University School of Dentistry will 
be the featured clinician at 9:30 
a.m. Sunday, November 13. His 
topic will be "Complications, Ben 
Casey, and Your Practice." 

Saturday's program includes table 
clinics at 4:30 p.m. and a banquet. 

It was incorrectly reported in the 
June Newsletter that the meeting 
would be in Durham. 



Mohorn Awarded Fellowship 

H. Wayne Mohorn, instructor in 
operative dentistry and endodontics 
at the UNC School of Dentistry, 
has been awarded one of eight na- 
tional teacher training fellowships 
by the American Fund for Dental 
Education valued at $6,000 each. 

Mohorn will enter the University 
of Michigan School of Dentistry 
next Fall for two years of study 
leading to a master's degree in en- 
dodontics. 



AFDE has awarded more than 
$160,000 in fellowships since its 
creation in 1955. The grants are to 
encourage more dentists to go into 
teaching on a full time basis. 

A native of Enfield, Mohorn re- 
ceived his dental degree from UNC 
in 1964 and immediately joined the 
dental faculty. 



Physical Fitness Clinic 

Delmar Eggart of the Central 
Branch Y.M.C.A. in Philadelphia 
will conduct a physical fitness clinic 
for dentists at the Charlotte 
Y.M.C.A. in early October or late 
November. 

Attendance will be limited and 
the cost of enrollment will be ap- 
proximately $20. 

The physical condition of par- 
ticipants will be evaluated through 
pulse activity, respiratory reserve, 
and cardiac function. A physical 
fitness program will be prescribed 
for each individual. Evaluations will 
be made under the supervision of 
an internist. 

Eggart has given clinics with Dr. 
Thomas K. Cure ton of the Univer- 
sity of Illinois. 



[46] 



I 



Harry Welch of the Charlotte Y 
will co-ordinate the clinic. 

Dentists interested in participat- 
ing in the clinic should write: Dr. 
Rufus Hoover, 1529 Elizabeth 
Avenue, Charlotte, N. C. 28204. 






45 Awarded Degrees 

Doctor of Dental Surgery degrees 
were conferred on 45 students at 
the thirteenth honors convocation of 
the University of North Carolina 
School of Dentistry June 6. 

Four students were awarded B.S. 
degrees in dental hygiene and 13 
students received two-year certifi- 
cates in dental hygiene. 

Dr. John C. Brauer, retiring dean, 
was the convocation speaker. 

D.D.S. degrees were awarded to: 
Jerry M. Alexander, Canton; 
Wayne P. Attkisson, Kinston; 
John W. Bottoms, Canton; How- 
ard McK. Bryant, Jr., Asheboro; 
Jerry C. Burnette, Charleston, W. 
Va.; Pascal S. Camak, Wilmington; 
John L. Cloninger, Dallas; James L. 
Devereux, Charlotte; James C. 
Eagle, Jr., Spencer; Richard H. 
Evans, Jr., Greenville; James R. 
Gibson, Jr., Hayesville; Richard F. 
Gorman, Winterville; Thomas G. 
Handy, Winston-Salem; Charles J. 
Harris, Jr., Mebane; William R. 
Hartness, III, Elkin; John E. 
Haynes, Gastonia; Earl P. Hicks, 
Harriman, Tenn.; Samuel P. Hol- 
stein, Jr., Monetta, S. C; Allen L. 
Hornthal, Tarboro; Eugene F. 
Howden, Winter Park, Fla.; and 
Samuel P. Jackson, Gastonia. 

Also, Charles E. Johnson II, 
Hertford; John D. Kiser, Jr., Char- 
lotte; Chauncey M. McDonald, St. 
Pauls; Lynn S. Mann, Lillington; 
David T. Marshburn, Richlands; 
Carle W. Mason, Jr., Charlotte; 



John A. Matkins, Roanoke Rapids; 
Glenn E. Minah, Durham; Wal- 
ter S. Morris, Jr., Morehead City; 
William C. Myers, Charlotte; Jan C. 
Nibbelink, High Point; Sheldon 
Peck, Durham; Lawrence D. Riv- 
ers, Warrenton; Clavis O. Shelton, 
Walnut Cove; David M. Simpson, 
Pfafftown; Warren K. Smith, Jr., 
Springfield, S. C; Alfred P. Stepp, 
Gastonia; Charlton B. Strange, Jr., 
Danville, Va.; Jerry C. Tram- 
mell, Jr., Brown Summit; Tommy D. 
Upchurch, High Point; Durwood R. 
Williams, Chevy Chase, Md.; Larry 
A. Williams, Tabor City; Robert W. 
Wilson, Salisbury; and Jerrold B. 
Young, Washington, D. C. 

B.S. degrees in dental hygiene 
were awarded to: Katherine B. 
Duncan, Apex; Judith C. Ellis, 
Mount Olive; Barbara D. Lane, 
New Bern; and Barbara A. Taylor, 
Hendersonville. 

Two-year certificates in dental 
hygiene were awarded to: Sally A. 
Buchanan, Wendell; Beverly D. 
Craig, Stanley; Frances E. Holler, 
Goldsboro; Leah J. Ipock, New 
Bern; Mary H. Keck, Burlington; 
Elsie A. Lowe, Mount Olive; Jean- 
nette E. Papineau, Plymouth; 
Betty P. Pemberton, Greensboro; 
MeHssa C. Perry, Raleigh; Janet K. 
Richardson, Kannapolis; Susan G. 
Smith, Clayton; Patricia C. Smittle, 
Raleigh; and Karen S. Wheeler, 
Swannanoa. 



Board Members Elected 

Dr. S. L. Bobbitt of Raleigh and 
Dr. Freeman C. Slaughter of Kan- 
napolis have been elected to the 
North Carolina State Board of Den- 
tal Examiners for three-year terms. 
Announcement of their election was 



[47] 



DR. JAMES W. BAWDEN, a member of the dental faculty 
since 1961, became the second dean of the UNC School of 
Dentistry July 1. 

Dr. John C. Brauer, who came to Chapel Hill as the first 
dean when the School of Dentistry was established in 1950, 
resigned to return to teaching. He will continue as pro- 
fessor of pedodontics after a year's leave of absence. 

Dr. Bawden received his dental degree, a master of sci- 
ence degree in pedodontics and a Ph.D degree from the 
State University of Iowa. He is 35 years old and a native 
of St. Louis. In addition to his teaching and administrative 
duties since joining the UNC dental faculty, he has been 
the principal investigator for a research study of the mecha- 
nisms by which a mother transfers calcium, fluoride and 
other materials to her baby during pregnancy. 




made June 1 1 by the Board of Den- 
tal Elections. 

This will be Dr. Bobbitt's fourth 
term on the Board. He was first 
elected in 1957. He was president 
of the Board in 1960-61 and 1965- 
66. 

Dr. Slaughter will be serving his 
first term, succeeding Dr. G. Shu- 
ford Abernethy of Hickory. 

Other members of the Board are: 
Drs. R. B. Barden, Wilmington; 
Wade H. Breeland, Belmont; C. C. 
Diercks, Morganton; and Guy R. 
Willis, Durham. 



Dr. Ehrlich Joins Wayne Staff 

Karl F. Ehrlich became Chnical 
Director and Instructor of the dental 
auxiliary programs at Wayne Tech- 
nical Institute in Goldsboro June 8. 
He is a native of St. Louis, a gradu- 
ate of St. Louis University School of 
Dentistry, and recently retired after 
34 years service in the Army Dental 
Corps. 

Fifteen students are enrolled in 
the dental hygiene program at the 
Goldsboro institution which begins 
in September, 1966. School officials 
report that the number of applicants 
for this program exceeded available 
facilities and many are waiting for 



the 1967 class or are seeking enroll - 
ment in the dental assisting program. I 

Applications for training in dental 
assisting also are in excess of the 
number which can be accommodated 
for instructional purposes. 



New Editor Appointed 

A. Breece Breland of Charlotte 
is the new editor-publisher. He suc- 
ceeds Barry G. Miller who has held 
the post since January, 1964 and 
will continue on the staff as associ- 
ate editor - pubUsher. President 
Guion announced Breland's ap- 
pointment after it was confirmed 
by the Executive Committee June 
25. 



McFalls Honored 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter T. McFall 
were the honor guests at the May 
meeting of the Charlotte Dental So- 
ciety and were presented with a 
brass plaque bearing the following 
inscription: 

"To Walter and Bebe McFall in 
grateful appreciation for their con- 
tinued contributions to dentistry and 
their fellowmen and especially for , 
their service to the dental profes 
sion in this community." 



[48] 



Dr. T. G. Nisbet made the presen- 
tation on behalf of the Society. 

Dr. McFall joined the staff of 
Central Piedmont Community Col- 
lege in February, 1965 as head of 
its dental program. He developed 
a curriculum, planned a dental hy- 
giene clinic which attracted national 
attention, and recruited a teaching 
staff, before he resigned in March. 
1966 because of ill health. 

The McFalls have returned to 
Asheville and are living at their 
former home at 23 White Oak 
Road. 



Welfare I.D. Cards 

Many dentists have misunder- 
stood and misinterpreted the use of 
identification cards (Authorization 
for Medical Services) now being is- 
sued welfare recipients, according 
to Russell R. Chambers, director, 
Division of Medical Services, State 
Board of Welfare. 

He stressed that only Old Age 
Assistance (OAA) and Medical As- 
sistance for the Aged (MAA) re- 
cipients are eligible for limited den- 
tal services. Aid to Families with 
Dependent Children (AFDC) and 
Aid to the Permanently and Totally 
Disabled (APTD) recipients are 
not eligible for any dental treat- 
ment. 

Dentists should carefully check 
all I.D. cards before beginning treat- 
ment. If the program indicated on 
the card is OAA, the recipient is 
eligible for emergency, palliative 
treatment, extractions, fillings, and 
repairs to dentures. If the program 
indicated is AFDC or APTD the 
recipient is not eligible. 

The I.D. card system has not yet 
been extended to MAA recipients. 







MRS. SHEILA A. WRIGHT (above) was in- 
stalled as president of the North Carolina 
Dental Hygienists Association at its 19th an- 
nual meeting in Southern Pines May 5-8. She 
attended UNC School of Dental Hygiene, 
class of '57 and has served on the executive 
council of the Association since 1961, includ- 
ing a 2-year term as secretary. 

The Wrights and their 2 children live in 
Newton. Mr. Wright is a furniture manu- 
facturer. Mrs. Wright is consultant dental 
hygienist at Western Carolina Center in 
Morganton. 



They must still present an authori- 
zation (DPW-SS-14-D) from the 
county department of pubhc wel- 
fare. 



Fluoridation Conference 

Over 75 dentists, local public 
health directors, health educators, 
water plant superintendents and 
operators, mayors, city councilmen 
and county commissioners attended 
a conference on fluoridation in 
Greensboro June 7. The one-day 
meeting was sponsored by the Di- 
vision of Dental Health. 

Principal speakers included: 
Franz J. Maier and Emma Carr 
Bivins of the U. S. Public Health 
Service; Jacob Koomen, Jr., State 
Health Director; Roddey M. Ligon, 
Jr., attorney for Forsyth County; 



[49] 



and George G. Dudney, field super- 
visor, Division of Dental Health. 

Dr. James Bawden of the UNC 
School of Dentistry presided. 

The conference recommended 
that a full-time person be employed 
by the Division of Dental Health to 
promote a statewide program of 
fluoridation. 

The conference also asked the 
Division of Dental Health to fur- 
nish the Sanitary Engineering Divi- 
sion with a recommended amount 
of fluoride to be added to com- 
munity water supplies. Present 
USPHS standards range from 0.7 
ppm to 1.2 ppm. The conference 
concluded that this should be de- 
fined more specifically so that water 
plant operators could strive for 
more uniform concentration. 

The conference concluded that 



the State Board of Health's policies 
on fluoridation should be revised 
by a committee with representatives 
from the divisions of dental health 
and sanitary engineering. 



([^fattuart^a 



Oscar L. Joyner, 75, of Kerners- 

ville, a life member of the Second 
District Dental Society, the North 
Carolina Dental Society, and the 
American Dental Association, died 
April 5, 1966. 

Z. Vance Kendrick, Jr., 58, of 

Charlotte, a member of the Second 
District Dental Society, died June 4, 
1966. 



Classified Advertising 

RATES: $3.00 for 30 words or less; additional words 5^* each. Remittance must accompany order. 
Deadline for accepting ads is first of month preceding month of publication. Send orders to: 
The Journal of the North Carolina Dental Society, Box 11065, Raleigh, N. C. 27604. 

AWARD the children who come into your office a ring for good behavior. 
It builds good will. Send $2.00 for sample assortment of 100. B & B 
Products Co., Route 2, Mooresville, N. C. 

DROPPED OUT of Dental School. Very slightly used Page Chayes contra 
angle handpiece Model X-1 (without chuck) to sell — $125.00. Contact: 
R. E. Akers, Apt. N3B, Univ. Apts., Durham; after Aug. 15, 1 Cedar St., 
Roanoke Rapids, N. C. 



50 J 



The New Enlarged Program of 

DISABILITY INSURANCE 

FOR 
MEMBERS OF THE 

NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 

PLANS UP TO 

• $250.00 WEEKLY DISABILITY INCOME BENEFITS ($1,080.00 monthly) 

• $20.00 PER DAY EXTRA HOSPITAL BENEFIT, AND UP TO $225.00 SURGICAL BENEFITS 
FOR MEMBER AND DEPENDENTS (Optional) 

PLAN L-7 (Basic) 

Lifetime Accident and 7 Years Sickness 







Principal 
Sum For 


SEMI-ANNU> 


\L PREMIUMS 


Weekly 
Benefits 


Dismemberment 
Benefits 


Accidental 
Death 


Premium 
Age 40 and over 


tReduced Premium 
To Age 40 


$250.00 
$200.00 
$150.00 
$100.00 


Up to $50,000.00 
Up to $40,000.00 
Up to $30,000.00 
Up to $20,000.00 


$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 


$244.50 
$196.50 
$148.50 
$100.50 


$183.50 
$147.50 
$111.50 
$ 75.50 



PLAN L-65 (Long Term) 

Lifetime Accident and For Sickness, from Inception of Disability 

To Your Attainment of Age 65 



SEMI-ANNUAL PREMIUMS 



Weekly 
Benefits 

$250.00 
$200.00 
$150.00 
$100.00 



Dismemberment 
Benefits 

Up to $50,000.00 
Up to $40,000.00 
Up to $30,000.00 
Up to $20,000.00 



Accidental 
Death 

$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 



Premium 
Age 40 and over 

$292.00 
$234.50 
$177.00 
$119.50 



tReduced Premium 
To Age 40 

$219.25 
$176.00 
$133.00 
$ 89.75 



The premiums for Plan L-65 will be reduced to the same premium as for Plan L-7 at age 58. 

Note: The above rotes do not increase at age 50 or even at age 60! 
tOn attaining age 40, age 40 rates apply on renewal. 



J. L CRUMPTON, State Mgr. 

Professional Group Disability Division 

J. SLADE CRUMPTON, Asst. Mgr. 
Box 147, Durham, N. C. 

Representing Commercial Insurance Co. of Newark, N. J. 
Member Continental Insurance Companies (New York) 



[51] 




Ever get the feeling that you're 
being followed? We do. 

For some time now we've been telling you that Carbocaine can be relied upon to give 
profound anesthesia with rapid onset whether a vasoconstrictor is present or not. 
We've been telling you that Carbocaine without vasoconstrictor is ideal for procedures 
of shorter duration, and that Carbocaine was the first well tolerated local anesthetic 
agent capable of producing predictable and consistent anesthesia in dentistry without 
a vasoconstrictor. 

In short, Carbocaine represents a significant breakthrough in local anesthesia for 
dentistry. And when one product leads the way, others are bound to attempt to follow. 

Nevertheless, you will not find these unique advantages of Carbocaine duplicated, 
nor the unique choice of benefits surpassed... 

Carbocaine HCl 3% without vasoconstrictor 

provides very rapid, profound anesthesia of shorter duration for routine extractions 
and modern high-speed restorative procedures (yet not so short as to fade during such 
procedures). Operating anesthesia averages 20 minutes upper, 40 minutes lower. 

Carbocaine HCl 2% with Neo-Cobefrin® (brand of levo-nordefrin) 1:20,000 

offers rapid-acting, consistently profound anesthesia of sufficiently long duration that 
even extensive and complicated procedures seldom require reinjection. 

FOR YOUR INFORMATION: These local anesthetic solutions are for dental block 
and infiltration injections only. There are no known contraindications in dentistry 
except for patients known to be sensitized. Inject slowly and avoid intravascular in- 
jection by aspirating. As with all local anesthetic solutions, adverse reactions due to 
intolerance, overdosage, or intravascular injection may occur and include hypotension 
and respiratory depression. Such reactions occur infrequently and usually are readily 
controlled by supporting circulation with a vasopressor and respiration with oxygen. 

Carbocaine and Neo-Cobefrin are trademarks (Reg. U.S. Pat. Off.) of Sterling Drug Inc. 



Carbocaine hci 

brand of mepivacaine hci 



Cook-Waite Laboratories, Inc. 

90 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10016 



COOK-WAITE 




These brushes are typical of many collected in a recent survey and are on file. The 
one at the right is a 2-row Pycopay hard nylon used by a "conscientious" patient. 

The Worn-Out Toothbrush 

. . . today's most neglected problem in oral hygiene 

Many a patient who is conscientious about following his 
dentist's instructions overlooks the fact that proper cleaning 
and interproximal stimulation are impossible with a worn-out 
toothbrush. 

Statistics show that less than one toothbrush is purchased 
per person per year in this country. Good brushing can't be 
done with worn-out brushes . . . and good dental health is 
rarely maintained without good brushing. 

REMIND PATIENTS that their toothbrushes should be 
regularly replaced (2 at a time preferably) for effective 
home care. 

MORE DENTISTS RECOMMEND PYCOPAY 

than any other toothbrush because it reflects the profession's 
specifications for the "ideal" toothbrush: firm, straight 
handle ...2x6 tuft design . . . small, narrow head . . . easy 
to manipulate . . . wide range of nylon and Chungking 
natural bristle textures . . . plus the soft resilient Py-co-TIP 
for interproximal massage. 

Py-co-pay Division BLOCK DRUG COMPANY, INC. 

"Quality Products for Dental Health" 



[53] 




i O -^ t^' ' hT Engineered for Progress 




'Hz ~ 




I DOCTOR, what is your choice; 
parallel or non-parallel pin 
splinting?^ 

ROTHSTEIN'S extensive ex- 
perience in these fields wil 
assure you a successful res 
toration. 



Rothstein Denfal Laboratories, Inc 
1100 East West Highway 
Silver Spring, Md. 
^ j^ Box 1740, Washington 13, D. C. 




T 



IT THP 

30CTC 
WHY 



Jm m 




MORE 
NOWO 



NORTH CAROLINA DAIRY COUNCILS 



2600 Hillsboro Rd. 
DURHAM 

610 Coliseum Drive 
WINSTON-SALEM 



914 N. Elm 
GREENSBORO 




he time to prepare for the 
physiological demands of motherhood 
is in the formative adolescent years. 

Nowadays, the trend to earlier 
marriages makes it even more desirable 
that full calcification of the skeleton 
be achieved at an early age. 
Complete calcification of the bones 
by this age requires an average 
retention of about 400 mg. of calcium 
daily during most of adolescence. 
For girls 1 3 to 1 9 years old a calcium 
intake of 1.4 grams per day is 
recommended . . . along with 400 I.U. 
of vitamin D. Only with a liberal 
consumption of milk and milk 
products ... at least the equivalent 
of 4 glasses daily ... is calcium 
retention likely to reach this objective. 

The expectant mother should rece-ive 
extra calcium during the second 
half of pregnancy ... or earlier if her 
dietary history is poor. An allowance 
of 1.5 grams daily is recommended 
... to be followed by a further 
increase to 2.0 grams during lactation. 
As three-fourths of the calcium in 
the national food supply comes from 
milk and milk products . . . low 
consumption of these foods usually 
reduces the calcium below 
recommended allowances. If weight 
control is a problem and certain 
food restrictions are recommended, 
proper food selection must be 
further emphasized ... to insure 
adequate calcium intake, plus adequate 
protein, vitamin and other nutrient 
consumption. Milk products ... of a 
wide variety . . . can be utilized with 
ease in weight control programs. 

Milk and other dairy foods stand alone 
in their ability to provide the calcium 
needed by the pregnant and lactating 
mother in a form that is highly 
palatable, easily digested, and readily 
absorbed . . . and they also provide 
other nutrients which contribute to a 
balanced dietary and buoyant health. 

The nutritional statements made in this 
advertisement have been reviewed by the 
Council on Foods and Nutrition of the 
American Medical Association and found 
consistent with current authoritative med- 
ical opinion. 



J. MINOR STURGIS 

PORCELAIN LABORATORY 

BAKED PORCELAIN TO GOLD 
VACUUM FIRED PORCELAIN 

AND 

ACRYLIC RESTORATIONS 

Cast Crowns and Gold Fixed Bridge Work 
* * • 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 

* * * 

1110 Candler BIdg. Box 1404 

Atlanta 1, Georgia 

525-6512 



[56] 




NOBLE DENTAL LABORATORY 

225 Professional BIdg. 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Phone: 832-4616 and 832-4617 



WOODWARD PROSTHETIC CO. 

153 Bishop Street 

Greensboro, North Carolina 

Phone: 272-1108 and 272-1109 



[57] 



What Is 
Centrimatic? 



ITS JUST ABOUT THE GREATEST THING 
THAT'S HAPPENED TO FULL DENTURES IN 
A LONG, LONG, TIME. THAT'S WHAT IT IS! 



THE BEST WAY TO LEARN ABOUT CENTRIMATIC 
TEETH IS TO TRY THEM ON YOUR NEXT DENTURES. 



Tincher Dental Laboratories, Inc. 

2211/2 HALE ST. 
CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

Phone 
343-7571 



[58] 



For 78 Years 



KEENER DENTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

SERVICE SINCE 1888 

Has Served the Dental 
Profession 



NORTH CAROLINA 
ASHEVIUE 




NORTH CAROLINA REPRESENTATIVES 
Mr. Robert R. Hudson Mr. Robert C. Haude 

Phone 704-252-8121 
Asheville 



[59] 




TICONIUM 




Honor Roll 

of Qualified 

Laboratories 



HENDERSONVILLE DENTAL LAB 

Hunter Bldg. 

P. 0. Box 1019 

Hendersonville, No. Carolina 28739 

Phone: 3-9870 

NOBLE DENTAL LABORATORY 

225 Professional Bldg. 

P. 0. Box 825 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27602 

Phone: 832-4616 

NORMAN DENTAL LABORATORY 

612 Pasteur Drive 

P. 0. Box 10003 

Greensboro, North Carolina 27404 

Phone: 299-9128 

QUEEN CITY DENTAL LABORATORY 

306 N. Church St. 
Charlotte, No. Carolina 28201 
Phone: EDison 3-6497 

SAMPLE DENTAL LABORATORY 

633 Nissen Building 
P. 0. Box 2897 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 27102 
Phone: PArk 3-3897 

SULLIVAN DENTAL LABORATORY 

p. 0. Box 1679 

Wilmington, No. Carolina 28402 

Phone: ROger 2-9793 



Specify 



TICONl 



on your next case 



J . wi 






S^ 



'jt^mutm' 



TICONIUM PREMIUM 100 • TILON • TICON 

Ticonium, Division of CMP industries, Inc., Albany, N.Y. 12201 



[60] 



(laleicfji. denial JIgMjoaxUo^ 



1919 



TRUMAN G. WILLIAMS, Manager 

800 St. Mary's Street 
RALEIGH, N. C 

Phone TEmple 2-7673 Box 12226 



[ 61 1 



all over the United States 
dentists proclaim 




PORCELAIN SINCE 1937 



fi 



fi 



rSt • IIN QUALITY— VACUUM FIRED 

PORCELAIIV RESTORATIO 

rSt • IIV FAST 

EFFICIEIVT MAIL SERVIC 

rSt . IIV SEIVSIBLE PRICES 



CLIP AND MAIL 




PORCELAIN JACKETS INC. 

162 W. 72nd ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 10023 

Please send me Postage-Free Mailing Labels and Kit. 



DR. 



ADDRESS 
CITY 



ZONE 



STATE 



FLEMING DENTAL LABORATORY 

Incorporated 



Professional Building 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



Telephone 832-6054 Post Office Box 2086 



E. R. Schwerin Leon Chadwick, Jr. 



[63] 



Superb ''Silver Service'^ 




For the ''bread and butter'' 
of your daily practice 

Dental authorities agree that silver amalgam is the "bread and butter" of 
the average dental practice. Thousands of dentists throughout the world 
agree that New True Dentalloy provides superb "silver service." Here are a 
few of the reasons why: 

High degree of purity requires less mercury for smooth amalgamation. 
Graded particle size results in wax- like consistency for easy carving. High 
compressive strength makes normal occlusal stresses well-tolerated after 
one hour. Carefully controlled expansion assures safe, tight marginal seal. 
For superb "silver service" for you and your patients, always insist on the 
amalgam alloy from S. S. WHITE COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa. 19105. 

NEW TRUE DEN T A L L O Y* 

This product appears on the American Dental Association list of certified dental materials. 
BOTTLES TABLETS SIGRENS® 

5. 5. WHITE 



® 



[64] 



Some Old Names . . . 
DUR ALLIUM - SWISSEDENT - V AC ALON 
CERAMCO-JECTRON 



Some New Names . . 

DURABOND . . . PYROPLAST 
SPARE DENTURE 



All at an old Laboratory under New Management 

TRY 
Our New Improved Service and Quality 



( / > 

BORATORIES '^ 



ULLIVAN 3_/ AE 



Box 1823 
WASHINGTON, D. C 

Established in 1930 

[65] 



YOUR LUXENE PROCESSING 
DENTAL LABORATORY 

^ ^ i^ ir -^ presents ^ j:^ jr ir is: 

BIlillHCINe ACT IN DfHTISTBY 

iV ^ ^ with LUXENE ^ ^ it 



Im 




ALBA 







NOBLE DENTAL 
LABORATORY 



—Complete Laboratory Service— 



Fred Noble Fred Noble, Jr. 

225 Professional Building 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Telephone: 832-4616 



[67] 



^\ktx-^iztx ^mini Olompaitg 



Raleigh J North Carolina 



Robert D. Walker 



J. Pullen Sizer 



[68] 



i 

i 



CARTER LABORATORY 



CERAMCO, PORCELAIN JACKET AND ACRYLIC VENEER CROWNS 

FIXED AND REMOVABLE GOLD RESTORATIONS 

PARTIAL DENTURE SERVICE 



BRUCE R. CARTER 

301-338 Professional Building 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Ceramco and Nobilium Representative 
Telephone TEmpIe 3-2618 Box 1327 



The LOCHHEAD LABORATORIES, Inc. 

Harry Dunton, Manager 

835 Enquirer BIdg. Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 

Phone 241-6203 — 241-6204 

MICRO-BOND ® 

now 

AVAILABLE IN EITHER 

GOLD PLATINUM 

ALLOY SERIES ALLOY 

VACUUM-FIRED PORCELAIN CROWNS and BRIDGEWORK 

VACALON (electro-vacuum) ACRYLIC 

CERAMCO® FIXED GOLD BRIDGEWORK 

ORTHODONTIC APPLIANCES 



[69] 




MAGNIFIED CROSS SECTION 
OF STIM-U-DENTS 
INTERDENTAL STIMULATORS 
SHOWING POROUS 
COMPRESSIBLE STRUCTURE 






Daily Interdental Care IS ESSENTIAL 
to Sound Oral Hygiene 

Routine daily use of STIM-U-DENTS Interdental 

Stimulators keeps teeth surfaces clean and free of 

injurious food particles a toothbrusii can't reach. 

Ask for 
FREE SAMPLES 

Stim-U-Dents Inc., 

14035 Woodrow Wilson, 

Detroit 38, Mich. 



STIM-U-DENTS 

Interdental Stimulators 




''The Critical Years 
of Tooth Decay" 



Amurol's new folder helps explain 
care of teeth from childhood to youth. 

Includes an eruption chart . . . 
tells how decay may be controlled 
by oral hygiene, regular dental visits 
and reduction of cariogenic sweets. 

For folders and samples send card to 
Amurol Products Co., Naperville, 111. 60540. 



^murol 



NON-'CARIOGENIC SUGARLESS SWEETS 

*** ^ Another Amurol Product -VPOSE* Disclosing Wafers. A Guidepost to Better Brushing. 

■/> 



GREENSBORO LABORATORY 

Phone BR 2-6562 Post Office Box 2938 

205 N. Davie Street 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 27402 

WILLIE WRAY CARL DRAKE 




JOINT COMMISSION ON 



ACCREDITATION OF 



DENTAL LABORATORIES 



The North Carohna dental laboratories listed have voluntarily applied 
for, and received accreditation of their operations and facilities by the Joint 
Commission on Accreditation of Dental Laboratories. The omission of any 
dental laboratory from the list does not necessarily indicate that such a 
laboratory has failed to meet accreditation standards. 

The program was created to provide a means by which dentists may 
identify and select dental laboratories whose standards of service meet the 
requirements established for the program. 

It is the policy of the Journal to publish in each issue all accredited 
laboratories in this State. 

Classification designation for the laboratories signifies the following: (a) 
Complete Dentures; (b) Removable Partial Dentures; (c) Fixed Prosth- 
odontics; (d) Ceramics; and (e) Orthodontics. 

Base Dental Laboratory, 4th Tactical Hospital, Seymour Johnson Air 
Force Base (a) 

Pedodontic Service, Inc., Charlotte (c, e) 

Pope AFB Dental Laboratory, 464th Tactical Hospital, Pope Air Force 
Base (a, c, d, e) 

US Army Fort Bragg Dental Laboratory, Fort Bragg (a, b, c, e) 

Woodward Prosthetic Company, Greensboro (a, b, c, d, e) 

[71] 



PLUS 

QUALITY 

SERVICE 

DEPENDABILTY 

+ + + 

^c<^ ScUlduu^ SOO St. 7ft^^ St. 
P. O. S<^x f^56 ^2^-0379 S:2^-0370 

[72] 



— IN THE SOUTH — 






r .0^ 



^ iCS^ Ajf^ Dental Company, Inc. 

MEANS 

COMPLETE SER VICE 



ANY ONE 
OF OUR FIVE 

Efficiently Staffed 

Completely Stocked 

Branches 




Arlington 

Richnnond 

Roanoke 

Raleigh 

Charlotte 



WILL SERVE YOU BETTER 



CHARLOTTE * 
LABORATORY 



414 North Church Street 
CHARLOTTE, N. C 

P. 0. Box 2033 Phones 4-6874—4-6875 

VITALLIUM 



MICRO- hfm^ ^^Mm gold 



t 




BOND roVHii^ mm/i CERAMICS 



DENTURE 



Each Department Offering a Highly A 

Specialized Service ... 



LUXENE 44 FOR SUPERIOR DENTURES 

Marching along together 
for 

BETTER DENTISTRY 



VOLUME 49 



NUMBER 4 



SEPTEMBER, 1966 



Ithe 




DF THE NORTH CAROL 




(M/ 






L SOCIETY 



^» ?•. *v '« 



'-^ <i 









TRANSACTI 

SPECIAL SESSION 
February 6, 1966 






|j-> 



>SEP 14 1966 



DIVISION OF 
HEALTH AFFAIRS LIBRARY 



llOTH ANNUAL SESSION 
May 4-8, 1966 



^' 



1966-1967 COMMITTEES 



1 



IS AN IMPORTANT BUSINESS ASSET- 




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THE JOURNAL 

of the 
North Carohna Dental Society 

A Constituent of the American Dental Association 
Containing the 

TRANSACTIONS 

of the 

SPECIAL SESSION 

SIR WALTER HOTEL — RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 
FEBRUARY 6, 1966 

and the 

110th ANNUAL SESSION 

The Carolina — Pinehurst, North Carolina 
May 4-8, 1966 

Volume 49 September, 1966 Number 4 



Editor-Publisher: A. Breece Breland, D.D.S Charlotte 

Associate Editor-Publisher: Barry G. Miller, D.D.S Charlotte 

Managing Editor: Andrew M. Cunningham, B.S Raleigh 

Publication Office: P. O. Box 11065, Raleigh, N. C. 27604 

Published four times a year, January, April, August and September by the North 
.Carolina Dental Society, 405 W. Peace St., Raleigh. N. C. 27603. The closing dates 
for the Journal are February 1. June 1, July 1, and November 1. The subscription 
rate is $2.00 per year. Second-class postage paid at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 



OFFICERS 1965-66 

Pearce Roberts, Jr., D.D.S., President Asheville 

J. Homer Guion, D.D.S., President-Elect Charlotte 

James A. Harrell, D.D.S., Vice President Elkin 

C. W. Poindexter, D.D.S., Secretary-Treasurer Greensboro 



SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE 
Ralph D. Coffey, D.D.S Morganton 



fl 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

S. H. Isenhower, D.D.S. (1968), Chairman Newton 

W. L. Hand, Jr., D.D.S. (1967) New Bern 

Roy L. Lindahl, D.D.S. (1966) Chapel Hill 

Darden J. EuRE, D.D.S. (1966) Morehead City 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

Andrew M. Cunningham, B.S Raleigh 

4 



Table of Contents 



Page 
SPECIAL SESSION, FEBRUARY 6, 1966 8 

110th ANNUAL SESSION, MAY 4-8, 1966 

Report of the President 12 

Report of the Secretary-Treasurer 16 

Report of the Executive Secretary 24 

Minutes of Executive Committee 27 

Committee Reports 

Annual Session 53 

Association of Professions - 56 

Blue Shield-Blue Cross 56 

Cancer 57 

Children's Dental Health 57 

Constitution and Bylaws 58 

Corporate Practice 59 

Dental Assistants 59 

Dental Care for the Aged 60 

Supplemental Report Number 1 60 

Dental Education 61 

Dental Health, Council on 62 

Dental Health Insurance-Industry Liaison 63 

Dental Hygienists 64 

Supplemental Report Number 1 65 

Dental Prepayment 66 

Supplemental Report Number 1 68 

Dental Service Corporation 71 

Supplemental Report Number 1 72 

District Apportionment 72 

Ethics 74 

Executive 76 

Supplemental Report Number 1 76 

Industrial Commission 78 

Insurance 78 

5 



Page 

Legislative 79 

Library and History 80 

Membership 81 

Military and Veterans Affairs 82 

President's Address 83 

Prosthetic Dental Service 83 

Publicity 84 

Relief 85 

Rules and Order 86 

School Health 88 

Site Location for Annual Sessions 89 

State Employees 90 

State Institutions 90 

Study Club 91 

Resolutions 92 

Report of Delegation to A. D, A 95 

Scientific Sessions 97 

House of Delegates — Attendance Record 98 

General Sessions 100 

DIRECTORY 1966-1967 

North Carolina Dental Society 

Officers, Delegates and Alternates 105 

Standing Committees 106 

Special Committees 107 

Officers of Allied Organizations 

North Carolina Dental Assistants Association 109 

North Carolina Dental Auxiliary.....:.. .1 109 

North Carolina Dental Hygienists Association 109 

North Carolina Dental Laboratory Association 109 

PICTURE CREDITS 

Page 7, Smith Studio, Raleigh; pages 26, 52, 76, and 83, Baxter B. Sapp, 
Jr.; page 67, E. Kent Rogers, III; page 104, John Hemmer, Pinehurst. 



i 



In grateful appreciation 

this issue is dedicated to , . . 




S. Everett Moser 
Gastonia, North Carolina 



Dr. Moser was born in Union County, the son of a Methodist minister. 
He received his elementary education in the schools of Forest City and 
Fallston. He continued his education at Rutherford College and Atlanta- 
Southern Dental College, where he graduated in 1921. In 1922 he began 
his practice in Gastonia where he is still going strong. 

Over the years, Everett Moser has been keenly interested and active in 
church, civic, and professional activities. He served many years on the 
official board of his church. In 1934 he was president of the Gastonia 
Civitan Club. He has served for many years on the board of directors of 
the Gaston Country Club and was president of that organization for two 
years. 

Professionally he has held all the offices of the Gaston County Dental 
Society, he is a past president of the First District Dental Society and the 
North Carolina Dental Society. Dr. Moser is a life member of both the 
N. C. D. S. and the A.D.A. Since 1951 he has served as a member of the 
Gaston County Board of Health, and for the past three years as chairman. 
He is a member of the staff of Gaston Memorial Hospital and the Garrison 
General Hospital. 



Special 
Session 



Raleigh, North Carolina 
February 6, 1966 



FIRST GENERAL SESSION 

Sunday, February 6, 1966 

Call to Order: The membership of the North Carolina Dental Society 
was convened in special general session at the Sir Walter Hotel, Raleigh, 
North Carolina, Sunday, February 6, 1966. The meeting was called to 
order by President Pearce Roberts, Jr. at 10:15 a.m. The invocation was 
offered by James A. Harrell. 

Secretary-Treasurer C. W. Poindexter declared a quorum present. 

Reading of the Call: President Roberts read the call for the special 
meeting of the membership and the House of Delegates transmitted to 
the members over his signature on January 26, 1966. The text follows: 

"Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with the provisions of 
Article HI, Section 10, and Article VIH, Section 2 of the Bylaws of the 
North Carolina Dental Society, and at the request of a majority of the 
officers, including the Executive Committee and the Ethics Committee, 
I am calling a special meeting of the House of Delegates and the entire 
membership (General Session) to be held at the Sir Walter Hotel in 
Raleigh, North Carolina, Sunday, February 6, 1966 at 10:00 a.m., for 
the purpose of determining what action the Society shall take in the 
case of Reginald A. Hawkins v. the North Carolina Dental Society and 
the Second District Dental Society, as a result of the decision rendered 
by the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia, on Jan- 
uary 20, 1966, which decision is unfavorable to the Society." 

Order of Business: President Roberts announced that following the 
close of the first general session, the House of Delegates would convene in 
special session to hear a report by legal counsel and act upon a resolution 
to be submitted by the Executive Committee. He advised the members 
that they were invited to attend the special meeting of the House, and 
would be given the privilege of the floor. He asked that members refrain 
from asking questions until the convening of the House. 

President Roberts stated that a second general session would convene 
following adjournment of the House of Delegates to give the membership 
an opportunity to act upon any action taken by the House. 

Adjournment: The meeting was adjourned at 10:25 a.m. on motion 
by E. D. Baker, seconded by Ralph D. Coffey, and duly carried. 



SPECIAL SESSION 9 

HOUSE OF DELEGATES 

Sunday, February 6, 1966 

Call to Order: The House of Delegates convened in special session, 
Sunday, February 6, 1966, at the Sir Walter Hotel, Raleigh, North 
Carolina. Speaker Ralph D. Coffey called the session to order at 10:30 
a.m. The invocation was offered by Luther H. Butler. 

Roll Call: Secretary-Treasurer C. W. Poindexter called the roll and 
determined the following were present and that they constituted a 
quorum. 

Speaker of the House — Ralph D. Coffey 

Officers — Pearce Roberts, Jr., James A. Harrell, C. W. Poindexter 

Executive Committee — S. H. Isenhower, W. L. Hand, Jr., Roy L. 
Lindahl, Darden J. Eure 

Ethics Committee — Thomas M. Hunter, Frank G. Atwater, C. Z. Cand- 
ler, Jr., Elliot R. Motley, Horace K. Thompson 

First District — M. W. Carpenter, John W. Girard, Jr., D. B. Hord, 
Cecil A. Pless, Jr., C. B. Taylor 

Second District — M. Lamar Dorton, W. Stewart Peery, Horace P. 
Reeves, Jr., James E. Graham, Jr., William H. Price 

Third District — Luther H. Butler, Charles W. Horton, L. P. Meggin- 
son, Jr., C. H. Teague, C. Robert VanderVoort 

Fourth District — Joseph M. Johnson, Penn Marshall, Jr., Harold E. 
Maxwell, William H. Oliver, C. P. Osborne, Jr. 

Fifth District — Zeno L. Edwards, Jr., James E. Furr, C. P. Godwin, 
E. Smith Jewell, James H. Lee 

Reading of the Call: Speaker Coffey read the call issued by President 
Roberts, January 26, 1966, convening the House of Delegates in special 
session on Sunday, February 6, 1966, for the purpose of determining what 
action the Society should take in the case of Reginald A. Hawkins v. 
the North Carolina Dental Society and the Second District Dental Society 
as a result of the decision rendered by the Fourth Circuit Court of Ap- 
peals in Richmond, Virginia, January 20, 1966, which decision is un- 
favorable to the Society. 

Report of the Rules and Order Committee: The report of the Rules 
and Order Committee was presented by Joseph M. Johnson, Chairman. 
Other members of the committee were: Penn Marshall, Jr., and William H. 
Oliver. 

Dr. Johnson moved that the agenda presented by the Rules and Order 
Committee be adopted as the official order of business for this special 
session. Seconded by Dr. Osborne. Motion carried. 

Dr. Johnson moved that the report of the Rules and Order Committee 
be adopted and that it constitute the rules for the proper conduct of 
business at this special session. Seconded by Dr. Graham. Motion carried. 

Report of Legal Counsel: Mr. R. C. Howison, Jr., legal counsel, reported 
that the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals on January 20, 1966 handed 
down a decision adverse to the position taken by the Society in the 
complaint by Reginald A. Hawkins. He noted that the Court ruled that the 
Society was engaged in state action and therefore was not free to choose 
members as it saw fit, and that Hawkins had been denied membership 
because of race. 

He advised that under the court rules the case would be remanded 
to the District Court for further action not inconsistent with the opinion 
of the Circuit Court, unless some appropriate action is taken by the 
Society within 30 days. 

He pointed out that the Society has three courses of action: 

1. Petition the Circuit Court to rehear the case. 

2. Petition the U. S. Supreme Court for a writ of certiorari. 

3. Do nothing until the case is remanded to the District Court and 
request a hearing on the matter. 



10 SPECIAL SESSION 

Mr. Howison explained the probable results of all three courses. 

Resolution by Executive Committee: Secretary-Treasurer C. W. Poin- 
dexter advised the House that the Executive Committee adopted the fol- 
lowing resolution and recommended that it be adopted by the House: 

Resolved, that the Society allow the case of Hawkins v. the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society to be remanded to the District Court as ordered by 
the Circuit Court. 

Dr. Poindexter moved the adoption of the resolution. The motion was 
seconded by Dr. Lindahl. 

Debate on the resolution followed. 

Recess: The House of Delegates recessed at 12:30 p.m. 

Call to Order: Speaker Coffey called the House of Delegates to order 
at 1:00 p.m. Debate on the resolution by the Executive Committee con- 
tinued. 

Resolution Adopted: A standing vote on the resolution by the Ex- 
ecutive Committee that the Society allow the Hawkins case to be re- 
manded to the District Court was taken. Speaker Coffey announced that 
the resolution was adopted by a vote of 20 in favor and 13 against. 

Use of Reserve Funds: Secretary-Treasurer C. W. Poindexter presented 
the following resolution approved by the Executive Committee, and 
moved that it be adopted: 

Resolved, that the Executive Committee be authorized to use reserve 
funds to pay the cost of this special session of the House of Delegates. 
Dr. Johnson seconded the motion and it was carried. 
Secretary-Treasurer C. W. Poindexter presented the following resolu- 
tion approved by the Executive Committee, and moved that it be adopted: 

Resolved, that the Executive Committee be authorized to use reserve 
funds to pay for legal counsel fees and any court costs involved, in 
excess of thirty-five hundred dollars. Dr. VanderVoort seconded the 
motion and it was carried. 

Adjournment: The House of Delegates adjourned at 1:45 p.m. on motion 
by Dr. Poindexter, seconded by Dr. Eure and duly carried. 



SECOND GENERAL SESSION 

Sunday, February 6, 1966 

Call to Order: The membership of the North Carolina Dental Society 
was convened in second special general session at the Sir Walter Hotel, 
Raleigh, North Carolina, Sunday, February 6, 1966. The meeting was 
called to order at 2:00 p.m. by President Pearce Roberts, Jr. The invo- 
cation was offered by James A. Harrell. 

Secretary-Treasurer C. W. Poindexter declared a quorum present. 

Minority Report: A minority report signed by eleven members of the 
House of Delegates was submitted. The report dissented with the resolu- 
tion adopted by the House of Delegates which would allow the case of 
Hawkins v. the North Carolina Dental Society to be remanded to the 



II 



SPECIAL SESSION 11 

District Court. The report, as subsequently amended, read as follows: 

"Recognizing that the membership would not vote on this resolution 
without this minority report, we the undersigned, do not approve of 
this resolution." 

It was signed by the following: Zeno Edwards, Jr., Thomas M. Hunter, 
Penn Marshall, Jr., Harold E. Maxwell, Horace K. Thompson, James H. 
Lee, E. Smith Jewell, James E. Furr, Jr., M. W. Aldridge, C. H. Teague, 
and C. W. Poindexter. 

Parliamentarian R. C. Howison, Jr. explained that the minority report 
disapproved of the resolution adopted by the House of Delegates and 
appealed to the General Session to reverse the action of the House of 
Delegates. If the vote on the report is "yes," it would constitute a vote 
against the action of the House of Delegates and a motion from the floor 
as to what action should be taken would be in order. If the vote 
on the report is "no," it would constitute a vote in favor of the 
action of the House of Delegates, the matter is ended, and the action of the 
House of Delegates stands. 

Following debate, a rising vote was taken on the minority report. 
President Roberts announced that the vote was 65 for the report and 75 
against it. He declared that the action of the House of Delegates had been 
upheld as a result of this vote. 

Adjournment: On motion by Dr. Pless, seconded by Dr. Hunter, and 
duly carried, the Second Special General Session was adjourned at 2:30 
p.m. 



Report of 
the President 



Pearce Roberts, Jr. 
Asheville 



Dr. Harrell, Dr. Hine, Dr. Kellner, Fifth District Trustee, fellow officers, 
members of the North Carolina Dental Society, distinguished guests, and 
members of our allied organizations. 

It is my distinct pleasure to welcome you to the 110th Annual Session of 
the North Carolina Dental Society. A warm welcome and deep apprecia- 
tion is extended to you. Dr. Hine, our ADA President; to you. Dr. Kellner, 
our Fifth District Trustee; and to our guest clinicians who by their par- 
ticipation will assure the success of this Annual Session. 

The excellence of this Annual Session will be attributed to the capable 
and untiring efforts of those who have worked with great devotion dur- 
ing the past year. To these participants (over one hundred in number) 
through Norman Ross, Program Chairman, and Baxter Sapp, Convention 
Co-ordinator, I express my sincere appreciation. 

To our Executive Secretary, our North Carolina Dental Society Co- 
ordinator, and his able aides, I humbly say "Thank you" for the many 
things you do for us collectively and individually. 

My sincere appreciation to Col. Joyner and Mr. Bob Howison for their 
guidance, words of wisdom, and capable counseling. 

It is my hope that at the conclusion of these four days together you will 
have been refreshed physically, spiritually, intellectually, and emotion- 
ally for this meeting has been planned to accomplish this purpose. 

Less than one year ago I stood before this Society and said "With the 

12 



PRESIDENT 13 

help of God, my fellow members, with the aid and understanding of my 
family, I will uphold to the best of my ability the position and responsi- 
bilities that have been entrusted to me." This has been my endeavor, but 
no credit is due me if accomplishments have been made, because if some 
seeds were planted we are fortunate. One year is not unto itself but is 
only an addition. I have accomplished nothing alone. 

"If we could just know where we are and whether we are tending, we 
could better judge what to do and how to do it." I quote from Abe Lin- 
coln. This so appropriately applies to us today in the North Carolina 
Dental Society because this year has been a monumental year. Perhaps 
the monument we desired was not the one erected for us. Perhaps the 
ideas of which we dreamed and sought were not the ideas or ideals ac- 
complished. It is our duty however, regardless of our reticence to con- 
form, as a profession to face the growing complexities in our socio- 
economic world and assume our place of service and leadership which 
is a legal privilege, and a moral obligation. 

The past year certainly has presented us with problems directly as- 
sociated with changes in our socio-economic world. I would like to call 
your attention to some of these and also aquaint you with other activi- 
ties within your Society. 

Following the mandate of the United States Court of Appeals for the 
4th Circuit, and pursuant to an order by Wilson Warlick, United States 
District Judge for the Western District of North Carolina, dated March 29, 
1966, the Second District Dental Society voted into its membership during 
a special call meeting April 13, 1966, Dr. Reginald Hawkins; thereby 
automatically making him a member of the North Carolina Dental So- 
ciety. This Court directed action terminates the six years your Society has 
been under duress by the actions of plaintiff Hawkins vs. the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society. The order further directed the Society to pay all 
Court costs. The statement of costs has not yet been received. 

We have had evidence that the government is all-powerful and our pro- 
fessional life is dependent upon the forces of government. Past ex- 
perience in other countries may provide us with some guides for action. 
In countries where the profession took the lead in developing programs 
of health care, evidence of socialistic health trends are negligible com- 
pared to those countries where professions were poorly organized and re- 
fused to accept their responsibility. These countries have developed their 
own plans without regard for the professions' point of view. 

Applying this to our State and Society, many dental care programs are 
now being planned within our State by agencies, without seeking pro- 
fessional advice or consultation. 

Our need for representation once again through legislative direction 
to various State boards and councils is imperative if the profession is to 
assume its rightful place in formulating programs and policies of dental 
health care for the people of North Carolina. This goal may not be ac- 
complished during one session of North Carolina General Assembly, but 
a plan of direction to the Legislative Committee should be begun with 
unanimous enthusiastic support of the entire membership. 

Had we representation on these boards, we should not be confronted 
with the problems that have arisen recently within these departments 
and throughout the State regarding dental care programs, fees, and pro- 
fessional participation. From these representatives an active, pleasant 
liaison should be established between the agencies and the Society which 
would be reflected in more satisfactory harmonious programs of care 
acceptable to all parties. 

Until such representation can be accomplished, we have, and are, en- 



14 PRESIDENT 

deavoring to "keep a foot in the door" where and when the profession] 
should be consulted in planning care programs. 

Under the direction of Glenn Bitler, his Committee on Prepayment, and 
Alex Pearson, our Dental Health Division head, a most comprehensive 
training and information workshop on prepaid dental care was held re- 
cently. This was planned to acquaint all members of the profession in 
North Carolina with this vital subject. It is hoped that our House of Dele- 
gates will recognize the need of establishing and endorsing voluntary 
programs of prepayment that can provide dental care for the people of 
North Carolina. It is our responsibility to step out of our busy offices and 
show the public and the government that we are willing to assume our 
responsibilities in providing this care. Let us not be long on policy and 
short on action. 

Through your Journal, Newsletter, and other media, we have en- 
deavored to keep you informed of activities during the year. I would like 
to elaborate on a few. 

Your Society actively opposed the resolution of the New York, Michigan 
and Minnesota Societies alleging Restrictive Practices by Constituent and 
Component Societies relating to Entrance to Membership, at the ADA 
meeting in Las Vegas. 

This opposition condemned the allowance of an unjustified attack of 
one State against another based upon suppositions — not truths. 

It is the responsibility of each member to be aware of his privileges and 
those of his Society, and to vigorously uphold democratic freedom if it 
is to exist. 

The President of the Fourth District was requested to actively partici- 
pate in the Executive Committee sessions this year because there was 
not a District representative on this committee. This representation was of 
valuable service in maintaining continuity of Districts and aiding in de- 
liberations. 

You should know that $1,889.19 was transmitted in June to the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina School of Dentistry for the establishment of a 
NCDS Dental Student Loan Fund; and that $100 was contributed to the 
North Carolina Health Council to support their project, Health Careers of 
North Carolina. Another token contribution and enthusiastic endorse- 
ment was made to the American Fund for Dental Education. 

Your District Officers Conference continues to grow and from this 
group are emerging men with tremendous ability that are becoming your 
Society leaders. May I encourage your interest and participation in this 
annual conference. 

A special committee was appointed and is now actively participating 
with health insurance companies in evaluating policies and claims ar- 
riving from either group. This committee is the Dental Health Insurance- 
Industry Liaison Committee and is chaired by Dr. James Howell. This 
committee has solved a need that has long existed. It is hopeful that the 
insurance companies will understand our desire for co-operation. 

I would like to acquaint you with another committee that was ap- 
pointed during the year that was requested to work with our State edu- 
cational agencies and to make known to them the Society's policies on 
education of auxiliary personnel. Their report to the House of Delegates 
will summarize the need within our State for auxiliary personnel (hy- 
gienists, laboratory technicians and assistants), the number of graduates 
desired yearly, the schools required for their training and the suggested 
location of these schools. 



PRESIDENT 15 

At present time we have operating within the Department of Com- 
munity Colleges, one School of Dental Laboratory Technology, Durham, 
and three dental assistant education programs that are located in Bur- 
lington, Goldsboro, and Charlotte. You will be very pleased to know 
that dental hygiene education programs are now in operation at Central 
Piedmont Community College, Charlotte; Wayne Technical Institute, 
Goldsboro; and Guilford Technical Institute, Jamestown. It is anticipated 
that these three schools and the school at the University of North Caro- 
lina that annually admits fifteen students, will graduate approximately 
80-100 hygienists yearly. 

It was with deep regret that we received the information of John 
Brauer's retirement as Dean of the UNC Dental School. I am pleased that 
we had the foresight to honor him two years ago for his great achieve- 
ments and contributions rather than at a time of his departure. We all 
appreciate his contributions to dentistry and to us in North Carolina as 
we see the school grow at Chapel Hill. To you, John, as I have said be- 
fore, "Thank you for all you have done for us." 

Yet a word of encouragement, a handshake of friendship and loyalty 
should be extended his successor who will be presented to you later. 

We were all pleased to receive the information that the Dental Re- 
search Center is under construction and will soon be a reality. I was 
privileged to be a part in the ground-breaking ceremony, and I have 
been justly proud to receive for you letters and words of congratulations 
from friends throughout these United States. 

During the year, A. P. Cline, Sr., was appointed by Governor Moore 
to the State Board of Health; T. E. Perry to the Health Task Group; So- 
ciety representatives have participated in the Rural Health Conference, 
Implementation of Medical Care Conference, a Professional Training 
Seminar for Civil Defense leaders. Conference on Prepaid Dental Care, 
ADA Conference on Dental Health Care, Management Conference for 
State Secretaries; and I have been pleased to speak for dentistry with 
Governor Moore, Dr. Ready, head of the Department of Community 
Colleges, and many other State and government officials and to repre- 
sent you at the dedication of the new ADA Headquarters, Chicago. 

I could not finish this report without telling you of the fruitful rewards 
we are receiving from the efforts expanded to co-ordinate, understand 
and encourage harmonious relations with our auxiliary organizations. 
They are a grand group sincerely dedicated to dentistry and to them I 
am grateful. 

As I draw to the close of five years of Society service as an executive 
committeeman and officer, I cannot truthfully say that I do so regret- 
fully. Conscientious representation demands much of an individual. I can 
truthfully say that there have been bountiful rewards that are too great 
to enumerate. I thank you for this high honor, for confidence, support 
and unseen aids that have given me the strength to serve. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 



Report of the 
Secretary- 
Treasurer 



I 



C. W. POINDEXTER 

Greensboro 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 

Audit for Fiscal Year Ended May 31, 1966 



The Officers and Directors 
North Carolina Dental Society 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

I have examined the balance sheets and related statements of receipts 
and disbursements for the General Fund, Relief Fund and Development 
Fund, together with supporting schedules, of the North Carolina Dental 
Society for the year ended May 31, 1966. My examination was made in 
accordance with generally accepted auditing standards applicable to ac- 
counts maintained on the cash basis and accordingly included such tests 
of the accounting records and such other auditing procedures as I con- 
sidered necessary in the circumstances. 

Inasmuch as the records are maintained on the cash basis of account- 
ing, income earned but not received and liabilities incurred but not paid, 
if any, are not reflected in the accompanying financial statements. 

In my opinion, the accompanying financial statements present fairly the 
financial position of the North Carolina Dental Society at May 31, 1966, 
and the results of its cash transactions for the year then ended, on a basis 
consistent with that of the preceding year. 

W. Kenneth Lynch, C.P.A. 



General Fund: 
Exhibit A 
Exhibit B 
Exhibit C 

Relief Fund: 
Exhibit D 
Exhibit E 

Development Fund: 
Exhibit F 

Capital Fund: 
Exhibit G 

General: 
Exhibit H 
Schedule 1 
Schedule 2 



INDEX 

Balance Sheet 

Analysis of Changes in Surplus 

Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements 

Balance Sheet 

Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements 

Balance Sheet 



Balance Sheet 

Combined Balance Sheet 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 

1966 Annual Session Expenses 



16 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 17 

EXHIBIT A 
GENERAL FUND 

BALANCE SHEET— MAY 31, 1966 

ASSETS 
Cash: 

Checking account — First Citizens Bank & 

Trust Co., Raleigh, N. C. — Exhibit C $ 14,090.78 

Savings accounts: 

North Carolina National Bank, 

Raleigh, N. C 5,623.99 

First Citizens Bank & Trust Company, 

Raleigh, N. C 6,700.21 

First Federal Savings & Loan Association, 

Durham, North Carolina 9,792.98 

Raleigh Savings & Loan Association, 

Raleigh, North Carolina 9,949.53 $ 46,157.49 

U. S. Treasury bonds at cost (maturity 

value $2,000.00) — Schedule 1 1,440.00 



ts Total $ 47,597.49 

It 



SURPLUS 

Appropriated: 

Reserve for Library and History Committee. .$ 1,600.00 
University of North Carolina Dental 

Student Loan Fund 32.28 

Dental Service Corporation 5,000.00 $ 6,632.28 

Unappropriated : 

Balance — May 31, 1965 $ 47,430.91 

Add revenue receipts in excess of expense 

disbursements — Exhibit B 64.56 

Total $ 47,495.47 

Less — Reserve expenditures 
authorized by resolutions: 
Special Session — House of 

Delegates $ 715.53 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 

Committee 782.45 

Appropriations : 

University of North 

Carolina Dental Student 

Loan Fund 32.28 

Dental Service 

Corporation 5,000.00 6,530.26 40,965.21 



Total $ 47,597.49 



18 SECRETARY-TREASURER 

EXHIBIT B| 

GENERAL FUND 

ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN SURPLUS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 

MAY 31, 1966 
Revenue Receipts: 

Total receipts — Exhibit C $103,003.30 

Less cost of matured bonds 222.00 



Net revenue receipts $102,781.30 



Expense Disbursements: 






Total disbursements — Exhibit C. 




..$107,682.76 


Less — Non-expense 






disbursements: 






Transfer of funds $ 


300.00 




Re-invested interest and 






dividends 


1,278.85 




Reserve fund disbursements: 






University of North 






Carolina Dental Student 






Loan Fund 


1,889.19 




Special Session — House 






of Delegates 


715.53 




Blue Cross-Blue 






Shield Committee 


782.45 


4,966.02 



Net expenditure disbursements 102,716.74 



Revenue Receipts in Excess of Expense Disbursements — 

Exhibit A $ 64.56 



EXHIBIT C 
GENERAL FUND 

STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE 
YEAR ENDED MAY 31, 1966 

Receipts: 

Dues and penalties $ 89,890.50 

Annual Session 7,875.00 

Journal 3,406.90 

Expense reimbursements 241.20 

Savings account interest and dividends 1,278.85 

Insurance dividend 7.85 

Sales — Formularies and Histories 3.00 

Matured bonds 300.00 



Total receipts $103,003.30 

Disbursements: 

Dues remitted: 

American Dental Association..$ 43,734.50 

A.D.A. Relief Fund 1,284.00 

First District 1,391.00 

Second District 1,505.00 

Third District 1,365.00 

Fourth District 885.00 

Fifth District 931.00 

Refunds 15.00 $ 51,110.50 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 



19 



Administrative expenses: 

Salaries and payroll taxes $ 17,134.29 

Office rent 1,500.00 

Utilities 495.33 

Office supplies 1,172.97 

Office machine maintenance.. 301.57 

Telephone 934.21 

Postage 849.85 

Travel — Executive Secretary.. 1,592.71 

Insurance 214.05 

Newspaper Clipping Service.. 120.00 

Miscellaneous 13.47 

Publications: 

Journal $ 5,303.03 

Transactions 1,414.40 

Directory 604.35 

Newsletter 411.78 

Committees: 

Children's Dental Health $ 244.30 

Council on Dental Health 212.12 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield 782.45 

Dental Prepayment 396.24 



$ 24,328.45 



7,733.56 



1,635.11 



Other: 






Annual Session — Schedule 2..$ 


8,716.64 




Reimbursement of officers 






and delegates 


3,619.32 




Legal Counsel 


3,603.01 




N.C.D.S. Dental Student 






Loan Fund 


1,889.19 




Reinvested interest 






and dividends 


1,278.85 




Furniture and equipment 


353.01 




Dental Foundation of 






N. C, Inc 


140.00 




Audit 


225.00 




District Officers' Conference- 


117.26 




Memberships 


335.00 




City and county taxes 


92.83 




House of Delegates — 






special session 


715.53 




Court costs 


991.00 




American Fund for 




Dental Education 


100.00 




A.D.A. — Fine Arts 


300.00 
300.00 




Transfer to savings account.... 




Miscellaneous 


98.50 22,875.14 


Total disbursements 




$107,682.76 









Excess of Disbursements Over Receipts ($ 4,679.46) 

Bank Balance — May 31, 1965 18,770.24 



Bank Balance — May 31, 1966 — Exhibit A $ 14,090.78 



to SECRETARY-TREASURER 

EXHIBIT D I 
RELIEF FUND 

BALANCE SHEET— MAY 31, 1966 

ASSETS 

Cash: 

Checking account — North Carolina National 

Bank, Raleigh, N. C. — Exhibit E $ 4,792.58 i 

Savings accounts: 

First Federal Savings & Loan Association, 

Durham, N. C 9,442.11 

First Citizens Bank & Trust Company, 

Raleigh, North Carolina 6,252.26 

First Union National Bank, 

Raleigh, N. C 5,600.00 $ 26,086.95 

U. S. Treasury Bonds at Cost (Maturity value — 

$4,275.00) — ^Schedule 1 3,078.00 

Total $ 29,164.95 

SURPLUS 

Balance — May 31, 1965 $ 27,421.44 

Add Excess of Revenue Receipts Over Expense Disbursements: 

Excess of disbursements over receipts — 

Exhibit E ($ 378.77) 

Add: 

Transfers to savings account 5,600.00 

Reinvested interest and dividends 629.28 

Total - $ 5,850.51 

Less cost of matured bonds 4,107.00 1,743.51 

Total $ 29,164.95 



EXHIBIT E 
RELIEF FUND 

STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE 
YEAR ENDED MAY 31, 1966 

Receipts: 

A. D. A. Relief Fund $ 1,560.75 

Matured bonds 5,550.00 

Savings account interest and dividends 697.26 

Reinstatement penalties 15.00 

Total receipts $ 7,823.01 

Disbursements: 

A. D. A. Relief Grants $ 1,972.50 

Transfer to savings account 5,600.00 

Reinvested interest and dividends 629.28 

Total disbursements 8,201.78 

Excess of Disbursements Over Receipts — Exhibit D ($ 378.77) 

Bank Balance — May 31, 1965 5,171.35 

Bank Balance — May 31,1966 — Exhibit D $ 4,792.58 



511 D 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 



21 



DEVELOPMENT FUND 

BALANCE SHEET— MAY 31, 1966 

ASSETS 
Cash in Savings Account — 
First Federal Savings & Loan Association, 

Durham, N. C 



EXHIBIT F 



.$ 4,547.65 



SURPLUS 

Reserve for Permanent Improvements: 

Balance— May 31, 1965 $ 4,362.10 

Add excess of receipts over disbursements: 

Receipts — interest on savings account 185.55 

Disbursements None 



Total $ 4,547.65 



CAPITAL FUND 
BALANCE SHEET— MAY 31, 1966 

ASSETS 
Furniture and Equipment at Cost 



EXHIBIT G 



.$ 9,937.82 



SURPLUS 

Invested in Fixed Assets: 

Balance — May 31, 1965 

Add purchases during year by General Fund: 

Electric heater 

Copy paper dispenser 

Electric stapler 

Collator 



$ 9,584.81 

24.46 

35.00 

36.05 

257.50 



Total $ 9,937.82 



EXHIBIT H 

COMBINED BALANCE SHEET— ALL FUNDS— MAY 31, 1966 

ASSETS 
Cash: 

Checking accounts $ 18,883.36 

Savings accounts 57,908.73 $ 76,792.09 



U. S. Treasury Bonds at Cost (Maturity value $6,275.00) 
Office Furniture and Equipment at Cost 



4,518.00 
9,937.82 



Total $ 91,247.91 



SURPLUS 

Appropriated: 

General Fund 

Invested in Fixed Assets: 

Capital Fund 

Unappropriated: 

General Fund $ 40,965.21 

Relief Fund 29,164.95 

Development Fund 4,547.65 



.$ 6,632.28 
9,937.82 

74,677.81 



Total $ 91,247.91 



22 SECRETARY-TREASURER | 

SCHEDULE 2 

GENERAL FUND 

SCHEDULE OF 1966 ANNUAL SESSION EXPENSES 

Arrangements Committee: 

Stenotypist $ 991.98 

Housing 112.16 

January meeting 92.95 

Registration 353.59 

Presentations 33.74 

Transportation of equipment 116.94 

Hand programs 489.85 

Amplifying system 124.00 

Signs 306.94 

Projection equipment rental 129.78 

Staff lodging and meals 291.62 

Coffee breaks 133.15 

Special services 89.60 $ 3,266.30 



Exhibits Committee: 

Door prizes $ 279.37 

Refunds 110.00 

Printing 19.71 

Social hour 233.06 

Exhibit space 500.00 

Decorator 733.36 

Scientific exhibits - 21.00 

Special services 26.21 1,922.71 



Entertainment Committee: 

Banquet $ 88.03 

Reception 570.31 

Dance 225.00 

Cabaret 135.00 

Entertainment 75.00 1,093.34 



Necrology Committee 31.18 

Program Committee 1,897.01 

Hospitality Committee 47.16 

Publicity Committee 219.87 

Clinic Committee 13.18 

Sports Committee 50.00 

Visual Education 6.00 

House of Delegates 169.89 

Total— Exhibit C $ 8,716.64 



SECRETARY-TREASURER 23 
SCHEDULE 1 



SCHEDULE OF U. S. TREASURY BONDS— MAY 31, 
GENERAL FUND 



1966 



Serial 
Number 


Date 
Acquired 


Cost 


Maturity 
Date 


Maturity 
Value 


Q22367J 


Jan., 


1956 


$ 18.00 


Jan., 


1968 


$ 25.00 


C168915J 


Jan., 


1956 


72.00 


Jan., 


1968 


100.00 


C168916J 


Jan., 


1956 


72.00 


Jan., 


1968 


100.00 


C168917J 


Jan., 


1956 


72.00 


Jan., 


1968 


100.00 


Q60612J 


Nov., 


1956 


18.00 


Nov., 


1968 


25.00 


Q60613J 


Nov., 


1956 


18.00 


Nov., 


1968 


25.00 


Q60614J 


Nov., 


1956 


18.00 


Nov., 


1968 


25.00 


C169985J 


Nov., 


1956 


72.00 


Nov., 


1968 


100.00 


D22068J 


Nov., 


1956 


360.00 


Nov., 


1968 


500.00 


M178508J 


Nov., 1956 
—Exhibit A 


720.00 


Nov., 


1968 


1,000.00 


Total- 


$1,440.00 


$2,000.00 



RELIEF FUND 



Serial 
Number 


Date 
Acquired 


Cost 


Maturity 
Date 


Maturity 
Value 


M173548J 


May, 


1955 


$ 720.00 


May, 


1967 


$1,000.00 


C153116J 


May, 


1955 


72.00 


May, 


1967 


100.00 


C153117J 


May, 


1955 


72.00 


May, 


1967 


100.00 


C153118J 


May, 


1955 


72.00 


May, 


1967 


100.00 


C153119J 


May, 


1955 


72.00 


May, 


1967 


100.00 


M198562J 


Dec, 


1955 


720.00 


Dec, 


1967 


1,000.00 


C206330J 


Dec, 


1955 


72.00 


Dec, 


1967 


100.00 


C206331J 


Dec, 


1955 


72.00 


Dec, 


1967 


100.00 


C206332J 


Dec, 


1955 


72.00 


Dec, 


1967 


100.00 


Q73231J 


Dec, 


1955 


18.00 


Dec, 


1967 


25.00 


Q73232J 


Dec, 


1955 


18.00 


Dec, 


1967 


25.00 


Q73233J 


Dec, 


1955 


18.00 


Dec, 


1967 


25.00 


D22067J 


Nov., 


1956 


360.00 


Nov., 


1968 


500.00 


M178507J 


Nov., 1956 
—Exhibit D 


720.00 


Nov., 


1968 


1,000.00 


Total- 


$3,078.00 


$4,275.00 



Report 

of the 

Executive 

Secretary 



Andrew M. Cunningham, B.S. 
Raleigh 



This is my eleventh annual report to the Society as required by Sec- 
tion 8, Article XV of the Bylaws. It is an account of my efforts in your be- 
half to administer the affairs of the Society under the supervision of the 
Secretary-Treasurer and the Executive Committee. 

A cursory review of the committee reports submitted to the House of 
Delegates will indicate that this year has been one of productive activity. 
It has been a demanding year on the Central Office. We have endeavored 
to render maximum service to the Society and the profession. However, 
for the past several years it has been apparent that lack of office space 
and limited staff has become a serious handicap. While we attempt to 
operate at maximum efficiency, many of the things that should have been 
done have been left undone, simply because we lacked the manpower 
and the time to do them. The Executive Committee is aware of this situa- 
tion and a committee has been appointed to study all aspects of the 
problem. 

Central Office: Your Central Office is the nerve center of the Society. 
A recent study by the telephone company indicates that we receive an 
average of 29 telephone calls per day, and that 2 out of every 5 calls 
placed to the Central Office receive a "busy" signal. 

In the calendar year 1965 we received 5,136 pieces of mail and dis- 
patched 10,914, not including Journal and Newsletter mailings. 

Four issues of the Journal were mailed, totalling 5,941 copies, and 
eight issues of the Newsletter were mailed, totalling 10,552 copies. 

This makes a grand total of more than 27,000 pieces of outgoing mail. 

These are but two indications that your Central Office is "where the 
action is," to borrow a phrase from Madison Avenue. 

Conferences and Papers: In the performance of my official duties I 
attended over 100 conferences, meetings, and legislative hearings during 
1965, including: 

3 Out-of-State meetings 

7 State and District meetings 

4 Local Society meetings 
11 Committee meetings 



24 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 25 

35 Conferences with officers and committee chairmen 

34 Conferences with other organizations 

8 Legislative hearings 

7 Legislative sessions 

It was my privilege to appear on the program of the 16th Secretaries 
Management Conference at the ADA Headquarters in Chicago last June. 
I presented a paper on training programs for dental auxiliary personnel. 
A summary of the paper was published in the January, 1966, issue of 
the Journal. 

In December I spoke to the students in the dental laboratory technology 
training program at Durham Technical Institute. 

Last Fall I attended the ADA meeting in Las Vegas where I sat with 
the North Carolina delegates at all sessions of the House, caucus meet- 
ings and Reference Committee hearings. 

Annual Session: Unless one has participated in the planning and exe- 
cution of an annual session, one has no conception of the amount of de- 
tailed work required. Each year I am amazed at the efforts exerted by 
those responsible for producing your Annual Session. 

This year has been no exception. All committee chairmen and commit- 
tee members have co-operated to the fullest. The result should be the 
finest Annual Session ever and I am proud to have had a part in pre- 
paring for it. 

Exhibit space was entirely sold out by early December, and a sub- 
stantial waiting list insured us against any loss of revenue by cancella- 
tion. This is a happy situation and a real tribute to the high caliber of our 
Annual Sessions. 

District Officers Conference: Eighty-five dentists and their wives at- 
tended the 13th Annual District Officers Conference last December in 
Raleigh, a record attendance for the Conference. This speaks well for the 
high degree of dedication on the part of District officials who are re- 
sponsible for the administration of their Societies. The Conference con- 
tinues to be an effective training ground for component officers and a 
valuable means of communication between them. During the Conference 
an Open House and Coffee Hour were held at the Central Office. This 
permitted the Conference participants to visit with us and we enjoyed 
having them. The Central Office, as in the past, worked with the com- 
ponent officers in developing the program for the Conference. 

Committee Work: One of the duties of the Executive Secretary is "to 
coordinate the activities of the several committees." It is in this area we 
spend a good part of our time and we feel it is time well spent. 

The Bylaws provide for 17 standing committees. In addition there were 
more than 25 special committees this year. This is far too many for ef- 
ficient administration. Special committees are necessary at times, but 
usually they are symptomatic of an inadequate system or function. When 
the duties of standing committees are well defined in the Bylaws, very 
few, if any, special committees become necessary. When the responsi- 
bilities of standing committees are not spelled out clearly, then every 
new problem requires a new committee. 

I feel compelled to observe that an objective study c. Cur committee 
system should be made. 

Financial: At the end of the fiscal year 1964-65 the unappropriated 
reserve in the General Fund totalled $47,430.91. This is the minimum re- 
serve dictated by accepted financial standards for a professional organiza- 
tion such as ours. 

Our operating expense for the fiscal year 1964-65 was $46,591.00. A 
reserve equal to operating expense for one year is considered essential. 
A reserve equal to operating expense for two years is considered highly 
desirable. 



26 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 



Incidentally, these reserve funds are invested conservatively in sav- 
ings accounts, government bonds, certificates of deposit and savings and 
loan companies. The return on invested reserve funds in 1964-65 was 
4.4 percent. 

Publications: The Central Office assisted the Editor-Publisher and the 
District Editors in the editing, publishing and business management of 
the Journal. 

This is a tedious and demanding task. We have deadlines to meet with 
the printer and the post office. Unfortunately, authors and writers are 
prone to ignore deadlines and this interrupts our routine and makes for 
unusual work loads at critical times. 

In addition, the Central Office published and circulated 8 issues of 
the Newsletter, and compiled a directory of officers, committees and 
members. 

Thanks: To Dr. Roberts, the officers and members, I am grateful for 
your support and confidence. I have tried to the best of my ability to ful- 
fill my obligations to you. I hope I have not failed you in any way. It was 
a privilege to work with you and serve you during the past year. 

To those who labored with me in the Central Office — Miss Riddle and 
Mrs. Cunningham — my apologies if I have been a hard taskmaster, and 
my grateful appreciation to you both for your capable assistance. 

Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May, 6, 1966. 
The following resolutions were submitted by Reference Committee A 
and adopted May 6, 1966: 

1. Resolved, that the Executive Committee be directed to study the 
function of the standing and special committees with the objective of 
eliminating such committees that no longer have a useful function or 
whose duties can be absorbed by other committees. 

2. Resolved, that the House of Delegates give a vote of thanks and ap- 
preciation to the Executive Secretary and his staff for another year of 
excellent and dedicated service to the North Carolina Dental Society. 




SHUTTLE SERVICE to the village by horse and carriage, courtesy of the Auxiliary, was 

enjoyed by ail. 



Minutes 

of 

Executive 

Committee 



S. H. ISENHOWER 

Chairman 
Newton 



May 19, 1965 
July 10, 1965 
September 19, 1965 
October 10, 1965 
January 8, 1966 
January 9, 1966 
February 6, 1966 
May 4, 1966 



PINEHURST, NORTH CAROLINA 

May 19, 1965 

Call to Order: The Executive Committee convened in the Crystal Room 
of The Carolina, Pinehurst, North Carolina, Wednesday, May 19, 1965, 
following the adjournment of the 109th Annual Session. President Pearce 
Roberts, Jr., called the meeting to order at 1:15 p.m. and led in prayer. 

Roll Call: Members of the Executive Committee present were: Drs. 
Pearce Roberts, Jr., J. Homer Guion, James A. Harrell, C. W. Poindexter, 
S. H. Isenhower, Darden J. Eure, W. L. Hand, Jr., and Roy L. Lindahl. 

Others present were: Dr. E. D. Baker, Past President; Mr. Andrew M. 
Cunningham, Executive Secretary; and Miss Mira Riddle, Central Office 
Secretary. 

Introduction of New Members: Dr. Roberts welcomed and presented 
the new members of the Committee, including: Dr. J. Homer Guion, 
President-Elect; Dr. S. H. Isenhower, Chairman; and Dr. Roy L. Lindahl, 
new member. 

He noted with pleasure that Dr. James A. Harrell had been re-elected 
Vice President and that Dr. C. W. Poindexter had been elected Secretary- 
Treasurer and that both men would continue to serve on the Committee. 

Dr. Roberts thanked Dr. Eure for sharing his plans with him during the 
past administration so that he might be better prepared as he assumed 
the presidency and expressed his desire and intent to keep Dr. Guion as 
well informed in preparation for his administration. 

Dr. Roberts expressed his appreciation to Dr. E. D. Baker, a past presi- 
dent, for his many years of devoted service to the Society, and for his 
personal assistance, advice, and counsel. 

Dr. Isenhower assumed the chair and presided for the rest of the 
meeting. 

Appointments: Mr. Cunningham and Miss Riddle were excused and 
the committee went into executive session. 

Dr. Baker presented a report of the special committee to evaluate 
salary considerations for the Executive Secretary. 



27 



28 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Dr. Roberts moved that the accumulated file on compensation and 
job requirements for the Executive Secretary be placed with the Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, and that he shall keep the information current for the in- 
formation of the Executive Committee in determining the salary of the 
Executive Secretary in the future. The motion was seconded by Dr. Hand 
and it was carried. 

Dr. Roberts moved that Mr. Andrew M. Cunningham be re-appointed I 
Executive Secretary for the year 1965-66 at a salary of $10,000. Dr. 
Hand seconded the motion and it was carried. 

The executive session was ended and Mr. Cunningham and Miss Riddle 
re-entered the room. 

Dr. Isenhower informed Mr. Cunningham that the committee in execu- 
tive session had voted to re-appoint him as Executive Secretary for the 
coming year. Mr. Cunningham expressed his appreciation to the Commit- 
tee and accepted the re-appointment with thanks. 

Dr. Roberts moved that Dr. Barry G. Miller be re-appointed Editor- 
Publisher for the year 1965-66. Dr. Eure seconded the motion and it was 
carried. Dr. Roberts informed the committee that Dr. Miller had agreed 
to serve another year if re-appointed and had sent his regrets that he 
could not be present for this meeting. 

It was agreed that Dr. Miller be requested to submit his nominees for 
Associate and Photo Editors to the Committee at its next meeting. 

State Secretaries' Management Conference: Dr. Harrell moved that 
the Executive Secretary be authorized to attend the 16th Annual Secre- 
taries' Management Conference in Chicago, June 7-9, 1965, and that his 
expenses be reimbursed by the Society. Dr. Lindahl seconded the motion 
and it was carried. 

It was noted that Mr. Cunningham would present a paper at the Con- 
ference on "State Society Leadership in the Development of New Train- 
ing Facilities for Dental Auxiliary Personnel." 

Dr. Roberts moved that Dr. Poindexter be requested to attend the 
Secretaries' Management Conference in Chicago, June 7-9, 1965, and 
that he be reimbursed as provided in Article XII, Section 1 of the Bylaws. 
Dr. Harrell seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Regional Conference on Hospital Dental Service: An invitation from 
the ADA Council on Hospital Dental Service for a representative of the 
Society to participate in the Regional Conference on Hospital Dental 
Service in St. Louis, June 21-23, 1965, was considered. 

Dr. Roberts moved that the invitation be declined this year and that 
the Conference be called to the attention of the Society of Oral Surgeons. 
Dr. Harrell seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Appointment of Budget Committee: Dr. Roberts announced the ap- 
pointment of the following to the Budget Committee: Dr. Poindexter, 
Chairman; Dr. Hand and Dr. Harrell. Dr. Roberts moved that the Budget 
Committee submit its report at the next meeting of the Executive Com- 
mittee. Dr. Eure seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Legal Counsel: Dr. Roberts moved that the firm of Joyner & Howison 
of Raleigh be retained as legal counsel for the year 1965-66 and that the 
firm be commended for its excellent services during the past several 
years. 

Dates for 1967 Annual Session: It was noted that the General Session 
on May 17 voted to hold the 11th Annual Session in Pinehurst in 1967. 
The dates offered by The Carolina were May 10-14 (Wednesday to Sun- 
day) and May 14-17 (Sunday to Wednesday). Dr. Roberts moved that 
the 111th Annual Session be held at The Carolina in Pinehurst, May 10-14, 
1967. Dr. Eure seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Signatures on Checks Authorized: Dr. Eure moved that in addition 
to Secretary-Treasurer C. W. Poindexter, that President Roberts be au- 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 29 

thorized to sign checks and drafts drawn on the Society's accounts. Dr. 
Hand seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Next Meeting: Dr. Roberts extended an invitation to the Executive 
Committee to hold its next meeting at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, July 10, 
1965, at his office in Asheville. Following the meeting Dr. and Mrs. Rob- 
erts will entertain the committee in their home. 

Dr. Harrell moved that the gracious invitation of Dr. and Mrs. Rob- 
erts be accepted with thanks. Dr. Poindexter seconded the motion and 
it was carried. 

Adjournment: On motion by Dr. Eure, seconded by Dr. Poindexter, 
and duly carried, the meeting was adjourned at 2:35 p.m. 

C. W. Poindexter, D.D.S. 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Read and approved July 10, 1965 



ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 

July 10, 1965 

Call to Order: The Executive Committee convened at the office of 
President Pearce Roberts, Jr., Asheville, North Carolina, Saturday, 
July 10, 1965. Dr. S. H. Isenhower called the meeting to order at 2:15 p.m. 
and led in prayer. 

Roll Call: Members of the Committee present were: Drs. S. H. Isen- 
hower, Chairman; Pearce Roberts, Jr., James A. Harrell, J. Homer Guion, 
C. W. Poindexter, W. L. Hand, Jr., Darden J. Eure and Roy L. Lindahl. 

Others present were: Dr. Barry G. Miller, Editor; Dr. Ralph D. Coffey, 
Speaker of the House; Dr. J. Henry Ligon, Jr., President, Fourth District; 
Mr. R. C. Howison, Jr., legal counsel; Mr. Andrew M. Cunningham, Ex- 
ecutive Secretary; and Miss Mira Riddle, Central Office Secretary. 

Comments of President: Dr. Roberts welcomed the Committee to his 
office and to Asheville 

He noted that the Fourth District was not represented on the Com- 
mittee this year and that he was extending to Dr. J. Henry Ligon, Jr., 
President of the Fourth District, the privilege of meeting with the Com- 
mittee. He indicated that he would extend the same privilege to Dr. Wil- 
liam H. Oliver when he succeeded Dr. Ligon as the District President. 

Approval of Minutes: The minutes of May 15, 1965, and May 19, 1965, 
were approved as previously distributed to Committee members on mo- 
tion by Dr. Lindahl, seconded by Dr. Eure, and duly carried. 

Report of Secretary-Treasurer: Dr. Poindexter presented the audit of 
the accounts of the Secretary-Treasurer for the fiscal year 1964-65. 
It was noted that the report showed a surplus in the General Fund of 
$3,778.38 and that 50 percent of that amount ($1,889.19) had been trans- 
mitted to the UNC School of Dentistry for the establishment of a North 
Carolina Dental Society Dental Student Loan Fund by direction of the 
1965 House of Delegates. 

On motion by Dr. Poindexter, seconded by Dr. Lindahl and duly car- 
ried, the audit was received for information. 

Dr. Poindexter presented the financial report of June 30, 1965. It was 
accepted for information on motion by Dr. Poindexter, seconded by Dr. 
Lindahl and duly carried. 

Dr. Roberts moved that the Budget Committee study the present policy 
of investing reserve funds and submit its recommendations at the Janu- 
ary meeting of the Committee. Dr. Lindahl seconded the motion and it 
was carried. 

Dr. Poindexter called attention to the present policy of charging Dis- 
trict Societies and allied organizations for addressing, mimeograph and 



30 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

other clerical services on a cost plus basis. It was suggested that this 
matter be placed on the agenda of the District Officers' Conference for 
explanation, review, and discussion. 

Dr. Harrell moved that authority be granted the Executive Secretary 
or an officer to have access to the safety deposit box of the Society at 
First-Citizens Bank & Trust Company in Raleigh, North Carolina. Dr. 
Lindahl seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Report of Legal Counsel: President Roberts explained that he planned 
to invite legal counsel to attend all meetings of the Executive Committee 
when feasible so that legal counsel could be informed on the actions taken 
and would be available for guidance in making decisions and policies. 

Mr. Howison reported that there had been no change in the litigation 
now pending before the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals since his report 
to the Committee May 15. No decision had been rendered by the Court. 

He noted that Dental Management in its July 1965 issue had published 
an article on the suit of Dr. Hawkins against the Society, contrary to the 
position of the Society that it is improper to comment in public about a 
case still pending in the courts. He stated that he had not had an oppor- 
tunity to study the article for further comment at this time. 

Mr. Howison reported that legislation supported by the Society had 
been passed by the 1965 General Assembly, including: 

S.B. 17 and 18, eliminating the requirement that the Governor request 
recommendations of the President of the Society before appointing dental 
members of the Mental Health Council and the Medical Care Commission. 

S.B. 397, providing for payments to dentists for services performed un- 
der contracts of medical service corporations and commercial insurance 
carriers. He pointed out that the bill becomes effective January 1, 1966, 
and that members should be alerted for cases arising after this date of 
companies refusing to make payments to dentists for oral procedures 
listed in their contracts. He suggested the possibility that at the appro- 
priate time insurance companies may elect to litigate and test in court the 
validity and constitutionality of the law, and that the Society would 
have to decide to what extent, if any, it would participate in such 
litigation. 

H.B. 1087, restoring an appropriation to the State Board of Education 
for the establishment of training programs for nurses and dental hy- 
gienists in the Community College system. 

Mr. Howison offered two suggestions for the consideration of the Com- 
mittee : 

(1) That in the interest of future legislative activity of the Society, 
letters of appreciation be sent by the President to those legislators who 
had supported Society legislation during the 1965 General Assembly, 
and that copies be sent to presidents of district and local societies for 
their information, so that they in turn might personally thank the legis- 
lators from their area. 

(2) That a more effective liaison system be established for contacting 
legislators in future sessions of the General Assembly to include : 

(a) A chairman of liaison dentists in each district. 

(b) A sub-chairman of liaison dentists for at least each 5 counties 
in each district. 

(c) A liaison dentist in each county. 

Dr. Lindahl moved that the two suggestions of legal counsel be adopted. 
Dr. Roberts seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Annual Session: President Roberts stated that Dr. Norman F. Ross, 
Program Chairman, and Dr. Baxter B. Sapp, Jr., Convention Co-ordinator, 
were not able to be present for the meeting and that he would outline 
preliminary plans for the 1966 Annual Session in their absence. 

Clinicians for the meeting will be: Dr. John C. Bartels of Portland, 
Oregon, and Dr. Ralph H. Boos of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Dr. Bartels 
will speak on operative dentistry, and Dr. Boos will speak on full dentures. 

In addition, the Program Committee is considering scheduling either 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 31 

a panel discussion or a speaker on the personal health of individual 
dentists. 

Dr. Roberts pointed out that since the 1966 annual session will be on a 
Wednesday to Sunday schedule it would be necessary to revise the cus- 
tomary format of the program. With this in mind, he indicated that the 
Program Committee was considering the following changes and would 
like direction from the Executive Committee before proceeding with its 
plans : 

(1) Extending an invitation to the Dental Auxiliary to sponsor a lawn 
party on Wednesday, the opening day of the convention. 

(2) Designating a "legislative night" during the annual session when 
the Governor and state and national legislators would be invited to be 
present. 

(3) Scheduling the banquet, entertainment and dance on Saturday 
night, the final night of the convention. 

Dr. Eure moved that the matter of inviting the Auxiliary to sponsor a 
lawn party during the 1966 annual session be left to the discretion of the 
Program Committee. Dr. Harrell seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Committee members indicated general agreement with the idea of a 
"legislative night" as outlined by Dr. Roberts. 

Budget 1965-66: Dr. Poindexter, Chairman, Budget Committee, pre- 
sented a proposed budget for 1965-66. He pointed out that it represented 
the askings of the various committees and that although it was balanced, 
it did not include a contingency fund. 

Dr. Lindahl moved that the proposed budget be adopted with the ex- 
ception of the amount allocated to the Annual Session. Dr. Guion seconded 
the motion and it was carried. 

Following discussion, Dr. Lindahl moved that $8,000 be allocated to 
the Annual Session and $1,500 be allocated to a Contingency Fund. Dr. 
Harrell seconded the motion and it was carried. A copy of the adopted 
budget reflecting these allocations is attached to these minutes. 

Dr. Poindexter suggested that consideration should be given to reduc- 
ing the dues of new members for the first calendar year following gradua- 
tion. He stated that 32 of the 54 constituent societies either waived dues 
for new members the first year, or reduced them substantially. 

Clinic: Mr. Cunningham advised the Committee that of the six table 
clinics recommended by the Clinic Committee for presentation at the 
ADA meeting in Las Vegas, November 8-11, 1965, five had made appli- 
cation and all had been accepted by the ADA Council on Scientific Ses- 
sion. The sixth clinician had indicated he would not be able to present his 
table clinic in Las Vegas. 

Dental Service Corporation: Dr. Lindahl reported that because of a 
turnover in the membership of his committee no progress had been made 
since the Pinehurst meeting. He stated that at his request the U. S. Public 
Health Service had provided material on dental service corporations and 
that after they had sufficient time to study this literature, he would call 
a meeeting of the committee. He indicated that Dr. Glenn Bitler, Chair- 
man of the Dental Prepayment Committee, would be invited to attend 
meetings of the Dental Service Corporation Committee. 

Exhibit Committee: Dr. E. A. Pearson, Jr., Chairman, Exhibit Com- 
mittee, submitted a report suggesting the following policies relating to 
rental of exhibit space be considered: 

(1) That only those dental technicians representing laboratories which 
have purchased exhibit space at the annual session be permitted to 
register. 

(2) That only those persons representing manufacturing companies 
which have purchased space at the annual session be permitted to register. 

(3) That sale of exhibit space be limited to those companies which 
offer services or products directly related to the dental profession. 

(4) That if it is desirable to provide free soft drinks to those attending 
the convention, then space should be offered gratis to soft drink companies. 



32 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

(5) That the Chairman or a member of the Exhibit Committee be au- 
thorized to certify those persons who seek admission to the annual ses- 
sion and who represent commercial interests which are not represented 
on our exhibits floor. 

Dr. Pearson suggested also that if it is desirable to increase the revenue 
from exhibit space, then it would be possible to charge more for the 
20 booths which are located in an air conditioned area. 

Dr. Eure moved that the Exhibit Committee rent exhibit space only 
to companies which offer services or products directly related to the 
dental profession. Dr. Roberts seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Dr. Harrell moved that if space is available, the Exhibit Committee be 
authorized to offer free space to soft drink companies as a service to 
the guests attending the convention. Dr. Guion seconded the motion and 
it was carried. 

By common consent, the Exhibit and Prosthetic Dental Service Com- 
mittees are to be requested to confer on the policy of admitting dental 
technicians to annual sessions. 

Dr. Lindahl moved that the Executive Committee agree in principle 
with the suggestion of the Exhibit Committee that an additional charge 
be made for exhibit space located in the air conditioned area. Dr. Harrell 
seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Legislative Committee: A report summarizing the activities of the 
Legislative Committee during the 1965 General Assembly was received 
from Dr. H. Royster Chamblee. Dr. Roberts moved that copies of the 
report be forwarded to Committee members for their information. Dr. 
Harrell seconded the motion and it was carried. 

N. C. Association of Professions: Dr. Roberts stated that he was aware 
of the action of the Executive Committee on Mav 15 instructing the in- 
coming president to appoint a committee to consider the invitation to the 
Society to join the N. C. Association of Professions as a participating or- 
ganization and submit its recommendations to the Executive Committee 
at its mid-summer meeting. However, he stated that it was his judgment 
that the House of Delegates should decide this issue. Dr. Roberts moved 
that the president proceed to appoint a committee to consider the matter 
and that its recommendations be submitted to the House of Delegates next 
May. Dr. Harrell seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Prosthetic Dental Service Committee: Reports by Dr. Colin P. Os- 
borne, Jr., Chairman, and Dr. James A. Harrell, member of the Prosthetic 
Dental Service Committee were read. They indicated that although there 
were problem areas yet to be resolved in relations with the dental labora- 
tories in the State, the Prosthetic Dental Service Committee still main- 
tained harmonious contact with the laboratories, especially the N. C. 
Dental Laboratory Association. 

It was agreed that requests from the Joint Commission on Accredita- 
tion of Dental Laboratories for surveyors should be honored and that in 
keeping with the intent of the resolution adopted by the 1965 House 
of Delegates, the President would submit a list of proposed surveyors to 
the Prosthetic Dental Service Committee for approval. 

It was noted that the technicians would like to be invited to scientific 
sessions at district meetings. It was agreed that this was a matter for in- 
dividual districts to decide and that districts should be encouraged to 
adopt this policy. 

Secretaries' Management Conference: Dr. Poindexter reported that 
he and the Executive Secretary had attended the Secretaries' Manage- 
ment Conference in the ADA Headquarters in Chicago June 7-9, 1965, and 
that his written report on the deliberations at the Conference would be 
published in the August issue of the Journal. The complete manuscripts 
presented are to be kept on file in the Central Office and will be avail- 
able on request. 



Appointments to Journal Staff: Editor-Publisher Barry G. Miller rec- 
ommended that Dr. M. Lamar Dorton be reappointed Associate Editor 
and Dr. Baxter B. Sapp, Jr., be appointed Photo Editor. 



k 

111 
k 
lis 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 33 

Dr. Eure moved that Dr. Dorton be appointed Associate Editor of the 
Journal for 1965-66. Dr. Roberts seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Dr. Roberts moved that Dr. Baxter B. Sapp, Jr., be appointed Photo 
Editor of the Journal for 1965-66. Dr. Eure seconded the motion and it 
was carried. 

Communications: Dr. Poindexter reported that in response to a request 
of the ADA Council on Legislation letters had been written to both Sena- 
tors from North Carolina urging their support of amendments 189 and 
190 to H.R. 6675, the "Social Security Amendments of 1965." 

Dr. Roberts reported that he had received a letter from Dr. Maynard K. 
Hine, President-Elect of the ADA advising that even though he had com- 
mitted himself to attend the 1966 Annual Session, that he be permitted 
to come at another date because of conflicts with meetings of other con- 
stituents. Dr. Roberts stated he had replied to Dr. Mine's letter suggesting 
that if possible he attend at least a portion of our meeting in 1966. 

Dr. Roberts summarized letters from Dr. Neal Sheffield, Jr., and Dr. 
James B. Howell emphasizing the need for better communication with 
the insurance industry. He reported that he had created a special com- 
mittee in the mutual interest of the dental profession and the insurance 
industry. 

Mr. Cunningham read a resolution to be introduced in the ADA House 
of Delegates in Las Vegas by the Dental Society of the State of New York 
which requests that resolute action be taken to: enforce the resolution 
adopted in 1961 to prevent discrimination in membership requirements; 
encourage members of the National Dental Association to apply for ADA 
membership; and eliminate any subterfuge by components which allows 
discrimination in membership requirements. 

Dr. Eure moved that the delegates to the ADA from North Carolina be 
encouraged to oppose this resolution. Dr. Lindahl seconded the motion 
and it was carried. 

Dr. Lindahl moved that legal counsel be instructed to prepare com- 
ments and arguments in opposition to the New York resolution, and that 
copies be furnished delegates, alternate delegates, officers, committee 
members and other interested parties for use in the House of Delegates 
and Reference Committee hearings. Dr. Hand seconded the motion and 
it was carried. 

Mr. Cunningham read a resolution also from the Dental Society of the 
State of New York opposing the re-districting plan proposed by the 
Special Committee on Trustee Districts. 

A request was received from the North Carolina Health Council for a 
contribution to support a campaign for $400,000 to continue Health Ca- 
reers for North Carolina, a project of the Council, through 1968. Dr. 
Poindexter moved that the Society donate $100 to the campaign of Health 
Careers for North Carolina, Inc., and that members be urged to support 
the campaign by making individual contributions. Dr. Hand seconded 
the motion and it was carried. It was noted that the North Carolina 
Health Council would hold its annual meeting in Durham, December 7 
and that President Roberts would appoint two voting representatives to 
attend. 

A letter was received from the ADA Council on Dental Health urging 
state societies to actively participate in the observance of Community 
Health Week, November 7-13, 1965. Dr. Hand moved that the local 
dental societies be urged to co-operate with local medical groups in pro- 
moting Community Health Week throughout the State. Dr. Poindexter 
seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Relief Fund: It was noted that the recent changes in the Rules of the 
ADA Relief Fund provided that after July 1, 1965, refunds and bonuses 
would be made only to constituent societies which qualified their relief 
funds as charitable trusts exempt from taxation under Section 501 (c) (3) 
of the Internal Revenue Code. Mr. Cunningham informed the Committee 
that an administrative ruling by the Council on Relief had interpreted 
this to apply to fiscal years beginning after July 1, 1965. Thus, the North 



34 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Carolina Dental Society Relief Fund would qualify for a refund and bonus 
for the fiscal year 1964-65. 

He pointed out that the 1965 House of Delegates had amended the By- 
laws to provide for the establishment of the Relief Fund as a charitable 
trust and that legal counsel was preparing a trust agreement for submis- 
sion to the Internal Revenue Service for approval. 



Comments by the President: In outlining his plans in brief for the 
coming year, President Roberts stressed the need for adequate communi- 
cations so that Committee members might keep well-informed. He urged 
Committee members to: 

( 1 ) Attend all district meetings this Fall. 

(2) Attend the ADA meeting in Las Vegas and be present for caucuses 
and reference committee hearings. 

(3) Attend the District Officers' Conference at the Velvet Cloak Inn in 
Raleigh, December 4-5, 1965. 

He requested the Secretary-Treasurer to make proper arrangements |E 
so that a called meeting of the Executive Committee could be held at 
any of the district meetings if necessary. 

He asked that agendas for all committee meetings be distributed two 
(2) weeks prior to the meeting. 

He suggested that the Chairman of the Committee consider arranging 
a monthly telephone conference to include the Executive Secretary and 
those directly related to any problems which might arise from time to time. 

He asked that the Annual Program in the April Journal include con- 
solidated programs of the Dental Assistants, Dental Hygienists, Dental 
Auxiliary, and Dental Laboratory Association. 

He requested that he be informed of significant events in the lives of 
members, including deaths, so that representatives of the Society could 
be designated to attend the services honoring or memorializing members 

He asked that consideration be given to providing large replicas of the 
Society seal for use at the Annual Session. 

He indicated a need for clarification of the administration and policies 
of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, including the appointment 
of its Professional Advisory Committee and determination of the fee 
schedule. 

He requested the Committee members to furnish him with two recom 
mendations for appointments by the Governor to the following agencies 
Board of Public Welfare, Board of Mental Health, Medical Advisory 
Council to the Board of Mental Health, Medical Care Commission and the' 
School Health Committee. 

He reported he had letters of appreciation from Dr. Richard Hagemeyer! 
and Dr. Walter T. McFall, thanking the Society for its support of H.B. 1087 
appropriating money for the training of dental hygienists and nurses 

He stated that he would be available at all times and that he would 
welcome suggestions and ideas from Committee members. 

Dr. Isenhower requested the President to furnish him in detail his plans, 
for tlae year so that copies could be distributed to Committee members 

Dedication of ADA Building: It was noted that ceremonies dedicating 
the new ADA building in Chicago would be held February 27, 1966. Dr 
Lindahl moved that President Roberts be designated as the Society's of- 
ficial representative for this occasion. Dr. Harrell seconded the motioijL 
and it was carried. 

Announcements: Mr. Cunningham announced that the Medical Societj 
was sponsoring a Rural Health Conference October 9, 1965, in Durham. 

President Roberts is to appoint a Society representative to attend thii 
meeting. 

Next Meeting: Dr. Harrell moved that the next meeting of the Execu 
tive Committee be held at 2:00 p.m., Sunday, September 19, 1965, at th( 
Jack Tar Hotel in Durham during the Tar Heel Dental Seminar spon 
sored by the Second and Third District Dental Societies. Dr. Guion sec 
onded the motion and it was carried. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 35 

Invitation from the President: President Roberts extended an invita- 
tion to the Committee members and their wives to join him and Mrs. 
Roberts for a social hour and dinner at their home at 7 Lone Pine Road 
immediately following adjournment. The gracious invitation was ac- 
cepted with thanks. 

Adjournment: On motion by Dr. Eure, seconded by Dr. Lindahl, and 
duly carried, the meeting was adjourned at 6:35 p.m. 

C. W. POINDEXTER, D.D.S. 



Read and approved September 19, 1965 



Secretary-Treasurer 



BUDGET 1965-66 
Adopted, July 10, 1965 
Amended, October 10, 1965 
ESTIMATED INCOME 

Dues $38,220.00 

Annual Session 7,765.00 

Journal 3,800.00 

Miscellaneous 200.00 

Dividends and Interest 1,415.00 

$51,400.00 



BUDGETED EXPENSE 

Administrative Expense 

1. Salaries & S.S $17,065.00 

2. Rent 1,500.00 

3. Utilities 575.00 

4. Office Supplies 1,000.00 

5. Maintenance — office machines 300.00 

6. Telephone 700.00 

7. Postage 800.00 

8. Travel 1,600.00 

9. Insurance 220.00 

0. Miscellaneous 175.00 $23,935.00 

Annual Session 8,200.00 

Publications 

1. Journal $ 4,500.00 

2. Transactions 1,400.00 

3. Directory 625.00 

4. Newsletter 300.00 6,825.00 



Committees 

Children's Dental Health $ 350.00 

Council on Dental Health 250.00 

Blue Shield-Blue Cross 500.00 

Dental Service Corporation 1,000.00 

Other 100.00 2,200.00 



Furniture and Equipment 100.00 

Legal Counsel 3,500.00 

Reimbursement — Officers, Delegates & Representatives 4,000.00 

Other 

Dental Foundation $ 150.00 

Bank & Audit 230.00 

District Officers' Conference 150.00 

Memberships 335.00 

City and County Taxes 100.00 

Miscellaneous 175.00 1,140.00 






Contingency 1,500.00 

$51,400.00 



36 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA 

September 19, 1965 

Call to Order: The Executive Committee convened at the Jack Tar 
Hotel in Durham, Sunday, September 19, 1965. Dr. S. H. Isenhower called 
the meeting to order at 2:05 p.m. Dr. James A. Harrell led in prayer. 

Roll Call: Members of the Committee present were: Drs. S. H. Isen- 
hower, Pearce Roberts, Jr., J. Homer Guion, James A. Harrell, C. W. 
Poindexter, W. L. Hand, Jr., Roy L. Lindahl and Darden J. Eure. 

Others present were: Dr. Barry G. Miller, Editor; Dr. Glenn F. Bitler, 
Chairman, Dental Prepayment Committee; Dr. E. A. Pearson, Jr., Chair- 
man, Exhibit Committee; Dr. C. P. Osborne, Jr., Chairman, Prosthetic 
Dental Service Committee and Committee members Dr. C. Z. Candler, Jr., 
Dr. C. D. Eatman, and Dr. T. L. Dixon; Dr. Charles H. Teague; Mr. A. M. 
Cunningham, Executive Secretary; Miss Mira Riddle, Central Office 
Secretary. 

Approval of Minutes: The Minutes of July 10, 1965, as previously dis- 
tributed to committee members were approved with corrections on mo- 
tion by Dr. Lindahl, seconded by Dr. Harrell and duly carried. 

Report of Secretary-Treasurer: The financial report of the Secretary- 
Treasurer, dated August 31, 1965, was received for information on motion 
by Dr. Poindexter, seconded by Dr. Lindahl and duly carried. 

Dr. Poindexter reported that very probably in the immediate future 
it would be necessary for the Society to negotiate a new lease on the space 
now occupied by the Central Office. Dr. Harrell moved that the Chair- 
man of the Executive Committee appoint a committee to study the 
situation and submit its recommendations to the Executive Committee at 
a future meeting. Dr. Lindahl seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Dr. Poindexter pointed out that on July 10 the Executive Committee 
approved a contribution of $100 to Health Careers of North Carolina, Inc., 
but that at the request of Dr. Roberts he had not forwarded the check, 
pending receipt of more information on the purposes and programs of 
Health Careers. 

Dr. Roberts reported that he had investigated the matter and had found 
that Health Careers gave minimal attention to dentistry in its recruit- 
ment programs which were mainly hospital oriented. However, he felt 
that a token contribution was in order. Dr. Hand stated that the Society 
in the past had been invited to participate in career programs sponsored 
by Health Careers and that financial support by the Society would indi- 
cate real interest in the program and be a means of gaining more recog- 
nition for dentistry in its student recruitment efforts in the future. Dr. 
Eure moved that these comments be received for information and that 
the $100 contribution be forwarded to Health Careers. Dr. Lindahl sec- 
onded the motion and it was carried. 

Dental Prepayment: Dr. Glenn F. Bitler, Chairman, Dental Prepay- 
ment Committee, explained that his committee had been requested to de- i 
velop principles and standards by which all types of dental prepayment 
plans could be approved and endorsed by the Society. He indicated that 
the full committee would meet in December to draft recommendations 
to be submitted to the House of Delegates in May 1966. The report was re- 
ceived for information. 

Commercial Exhibits: Dr. E. A. Pearson, Jr., Chairman, Exhibits Com- 
mittee, reported that sale of exhibit space at the 1966 Annual Session was 
progressing satisfactorily and that to date 65 of the 89 booths had been 
sold. 

He stated that the rental charge for 20 booths had been increased ap- 
proximately 10 percent and that this would bring in an additional $200 
and increase the total potential revenue from $7,565 to $7,765. This in- 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 37 

crease in rental charge was authorized by the Executive Committee 
July 10. 

Dr. Pearson reported that the Exhibit Committee and the Prosthetic 
Dental Service Committee at the request of the Executive Committee 
had conferred on the matter of attendance of dental laboratory technicians 
at annual sessions but had been unable to agree on a policy acceptable 
to both committees. 

On motion by Dr. Lindahl, seconded by Dr. Harrell, and duly carried, 
the following policies were adopted: 

( 1 ) Only representatives of manufacturing companies and dental sup- 
ply houses that have purchased exhibit space at an annual session shall 
be permitted to register, except by invitation of the President or the 
Chairman of the Executive Committee. 

(2) Soft drink companies shall be permitted to exhibit at all annual 
sessions, provided they advertise and dispense only soft drinks of the 
sugar-free, low-calorie type. 

Dental Laboratory Relations: Dr. Colin P. Osborne, Jr., Chairman, 
Prosthetic Dental Service Committee, reported his committee continues 
to work closely with the North Carolina Dental Laboratory Association 
in fostering better understanding of problems mutually affecting the 
dental profession and the laboratory industry and that real progress has 
been made. In order to bring about better understanding between the 
two groups, he requested the Executive Committee to consider: 

( 1 ) Inviting members of the Laboratory Association to annual sessions, 
and (2) urging the Laboratory Association to hold its annual session in 
conjunction with the annual session of the Society. 

Dr. Lindahl moved that members of the North Carolina Dental Labora- 
tory Association and all ethical dental laboratories and technicians be in- 
vited to attend annual sessions of the North Carolina Dental Society and 
that the Laboratory Association be requested to suggest ethical dental 
laboratories to whom invitations shall be extended by the Prosthetic 
Dental Service Committee. Dr. Poindexter seconded the motion and it 
was carried. 

Dr. Lindahl moved that the North Carolina Dental Laboratory Asso- 
ciation be encouraged to hold its annual session in conjunction with the 
annual session of the Society. Dr. Harrell seconded the motion and it was 
carried. 

Dr. Harrell moved that the program of the annual session of the North 
Carolina Dental Laboratory Association be included in the April issue 
of the Journal and in newspaper releases from the Central Office. Dr. 
Guion seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Dr. Osborne read a resolution adopted by the North Carolina Dental 
Laboratory Association requesting the co-operation of the Society in im- 
proving educational standards in the laboratory industry and seeking 
legislation which would provide more severe punishment for persons 
convicted of the illegal practice of dentistry. 

Dr. Lindahl moved that the resolution be received for information and 
that the Secretary be instructed to advise the North Carolina Dental 
Laboratory Association that when appropriate action is taken on the reso- 
lution, the Laboratory Association will be notified. Dr. Harrell seconded 
the motion and it was carried. 

Meeting of Auxiliary Organizations: Dr. Roberts read a communica- 
tion from Dr. William H. Oliver, Special Advisor to N. C. Dental Assistants 
Association, proposing that a conference of representatives from all 
auxiliary organizations be sponsored by the Society to discuss mutual 
problems and co-ordinate annual session activities. Dr. Roberts moved 
that such a conference be planned. Dr. Harrell seconded the motion and 
it was carried. 

Education of Auxiliary Personnel: Dr. Colin P. Osborne, Jr., Chairman, 
Advisory Committee to Department of Community Colleges on Education 
of Dental Auxiliary Personnel, reported that a lack of qualified instructors 



38 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

was a serious problem in the development of training programs for as- 
sistants, hygienists, and laboratory technicians. He cautioned that federal 
funds may be available to support these programs before the Society has 
adopted a firm policy on the use of federal money for this purpose. He 
stressed that communities interested in establishing dental auxiliary train- 
ing programs should follow the proper channels and work closely with 
the Advisory Committee. It was noted that Dr. Walter T. McFall resigned 
as Chairman of the committee July 21, 1965, and that Dr. Osborne was 
elected to succeed him. The report was received for information. 

Blue Shield-Blue Cross: Mr. Cunningham reported that Dr. F. D. Bell, 
Chairman, Blue Shield-Blue Cross Committee had received an inquiry 
from the Hospital Saving Association requesting suggestions on the 
schedule of fees for oral surgical procedures. Dr. Poindexter moved that 
this be received for information and referred to the Dental Health In- 
surance-Industry Liaison Committee and that Dr. Bell be advised to 
consult and work with the Dental Health Insurance-Industry Liaison 
Committee on the matter. Dr. Roberts seconded the motion and it was 
carried. 

Dental Hygienist Education: Dr. J. Harry Spillman, Chairman, Dental 
Hygienists Committee, reported that the dental hygiene training program 
at Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte opened this month 
with an enrollment of 40. He also reported that Wayne Technical Insti- 
tute at Goldsboro is expected to accept its first class of dental hygiene 
students in the Spring of 1966, and that still another dental hygiene pro- 
gram and a dental assistant program is being planned at Guilford Tech- 
nical Institute at Jamestown. The latter may be supported entirely by 
federal funds under the Manpower Development and Training Act. He 
stated that the Advisory Committee for the Education of Dental Aux- 
iliary Personnel has been requested to draft guidelines for the establish- 
ment of dental auxiliary training programs. 

The report was received for information with special commendation to 
the committee for its work during the past two years. 

Discussion of the use of federal (MDTA) funds in support of training 
programs for auxiliary personnel followed. It was pointed out that Dr. I. E. 
Ready, Director, Department of Community Colleges, had indicated that 
an application for federal funds for training programs requires endorse- 
ment by the Society. 

Dr. Lindahl moved that the President be directed to confer with the 
Director of the Department of Community Colleges and advise him that 
the Society is anxious to work in liaison capacity with the Department in 
the development of training programs consistent with the best principles 
of educational practice and in the interest of better dental health for the 
citizens of the State. Dr. Poindexter seconded the motion and it was 
carried. 

Dental Education: Dr. Cleon W. Sanders, Chairman, Dental Education 
Committee, reported that ground has been broken for construction of the 
Dental Research Center at Chapel Hill. He noted with regret the resigna- 
tion of Dr. John C. Brauer as Dean of the UNC School of Dentistry and 
recommended that an appropriate resolution be adopted by the Executive 
Committee recognizing Dr. Brauer's outstanding contributions to dental 
education in North Carolina. 

The report was received for information and the following resolution 
was adopted on motion by Dr. Eure, seconded by Dr. Roberts and duly 
carried : 

Resolved, that we, the members of the Executive Committee, note 
with regret that Dr. John C. Brauer, the first and only dean of the 
University of North Carolina School of Dentistry since it was estab- 
lished in 1950, will retire July 1, 1966, and express to Dr. Brauer our 
deep appreciation for his 15 years of service to dental education 
which has brought national recognition and acclaim to our School 
of Dentistry. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 39 

Reimbursement of ADA Delegates: It was noted that a caucus of the 
North Carolina delegation to the ADA has been called by Dr. Paul E. 
Jones, Chairman, on Sunday, November 7, in Las Vegas, one day prior 
to the opening of the ADA Annual Session. Dr. Hand moved that dele- 
gates to the ADA be reimbursed per diem of $25 a day for a maximum of 
five days. Dr. Lindahl seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Representatives to Conferences: Dr. Eure moved that the President 
appoint at his discretion official representatives to the following con- 
ferences : 

Professions Training Seminar, Charlottesville, Va., Oct. 6-8 
15th Institute on Hospital Dental Service, Chicago, Nov. 29-Dec. 1 
Workshop on Dental Prepayment, Montgomery, Ala., Oct. 7-9 
Regional Conference on Legislation, Chicago, Oct. 10 
Dr. Hand seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Communications: The following communications were received for in- 
formation on motion by Dr. Poindexter, seconded by Dr. Eure and duly 
carried: 

A letter from Dr. James B. Howell, Chairman, Dental Health Insurance 
Liaison Committee, dated August 24. 

A letter from Dr. Z. L. Edwards to Dr. John F. Folley, Jr., President, 
Dental Society of the State of New York, dated July 20. 

A letter from Dr. Z. L. Edwards to Dr. Gerald D. Timmons, dated Au- 
gust 25. 

A letter from Dr. Gerald D. Timmons to Dr. Z. L. Edwards, dated Sep- 
tember 9. 

A letter from Dr. Pearce Roberts, Jr., to the Joint Commission on Ac- 
creditation of Dental Laboratories, dated August 31. 

Next Meeting: On motion by Dr. Lindahl, seconded by Dr. Eure and 
duly carried, the Executive Committee will meet on Sunday, October 10 
at the Central Office. ADA Delegates will be invited to attend. Legal 
counsel will be requested to present comments and arguments against 
the New York-Michigan-Minnesota resolution to be considered by the 
ADA House of Delegates in Las Vegas. 

Adjournment: The meeting was adjourned at 5:45 p.m. on motion by 
Dr. Lindahl, seconded by Dr. Roberts, and duly carried. 

C. W. Poindexter, D.D.S. 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Read and approved October 10, 1965 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

October 10, 1965 

Call to Order: The Executive Committee convened at the Central Office 
in Raleigh, Sunday, October 10, 1965. Dr. S. H. Isenhower called the 
meeting to order at 2:13 p.m. and led in prayer. 

Roll Call: Members present were: Drs. S. H. Isenhower, Chairman; 
Pearce Roberts, Jr., J. Homer Guion, C. W. Poindexter, W. L. Hand, Jr., 
Roy L. Lindahl, Darden J. Eure, James A. Harrell. 

Delegates to the ADA present were: Drs. Paul E. Jones, Chairman; 
E. M. Medlin, Ralph D. Coffey, C. C. Poindexter, Frank O. Alford, Z. L. 
Edwards. 

Others present were: Drs. Clyde E. Minges, Past President of the 
ADA; Dr. Barry G. Miller, Editor; Dr. J. Henry Ligon, Jr., President, 
.Fourth District; Col. W. T. Joyner, legal counsel; Mr. Andrew M. Cun- 
ningham, Executive Secretary; and Miss Mira Riddle, Central Office 
Secretary. 



40 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Remarks by Chairman: Dr. Isenhower thanked the Committee mem- 
bers and delegates to the ADA for their presence at the meeting. 

Report of Legal Counsel: Colonel W. T. Joyner, legal counsel, reported 
that there had been no change in the litigation involving the Society and 
Dr. R. A. Hawkins and that the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals had not 
handed down a decision. 

He presented a preliminary draft of a memorandum on the position of 
the North Carolina Dental Society on the resolution to be presented to 
the 1965 ADA House of Delegates in Las Vegas by the Dental Society of 
the State of New York and the Michigan State Dental Association. 

It was noted that on July 10, 1965, the Executive Committee adopted 
a resolution encouraging the Delegates from North Carolina to the ADA 
to oppose the New York resolution. 

Copies of the final draft of the memorandum on the matter by legal 
counsel and copies of the memorandum decision by Judge Warlick are 
to be distributed to the Delegates from North Carolina and Society 
officers. 

Approval of Minutes: The minutes of September 19, 1965, were ap- 
proved as previously distributed to Committee members on motion by 
Dr. Lindahl, seconded by Dr. Eure, and duly carried. 

Report of Secretary-Treasurer: The financial report of the Secretary- 
Treasurer, dated September 30, 1965, was received as information on 
motion by Dr. Poindexter, seconded by Dr. Lindahl and duly carried. 

Out-of -State Travel for Executive Secretary: Dr. Eure moved that the 
Executive Secretary be authorized to attend the 106th Annual Session 
of the ADA in Las Vegas, November 8-11, 1965, and that his expenses 
be reimbursed by the Society. Dr. Lindahl seconded the motion and it 
was carried. Mr. Cunningham explained that because of difficulties ex- 
perienced in securing air transportation to Las Vegas and professional 
meetings prior to the ADA Annual Session which he was expected to 
attend, it would be necessary for him to leave Raleigh November 3 and 
return November 12. 

Budget 1965-66: Dr. Poindexter noted that subsequent to the adoption 
of the 1965-66 Budget on July 10, 1965, the Exhibit Committee had in- 
dicated that an increase in the rental charge of 20 booths would bring in 
an additional $200. 

Dr. Poindexter moved that the 1965-66 Budget adopted July 10, 1965, 
be revised to reflect this $200 increase in income, and that the alloca- 
tion of $8,000 to the Annual Session Committee be increased to $8,200. 
Dr. Hand seconded the motion and it was duly carried. 

Dental Care for the Aged: A report from Dr. Henry O. Lineberger, Jr., 
Chairman of the Dental Care for the Aged Committee, dated Septem- 
ber 11, 1965, was received for information, on motion by Dr. Roberts, 
seconded by Dr. Harrell and duly carried. 

Proposal from Encyclopaedia Britannica: A group plan proposal for 
the sale of the Encyclopaedia Britannica to Society members at a reduced 
price was considered. On motion by Dr. Hand the proposal was refused 
to avoid setting a precedent. Dr. Harrell seconded the motion and it was 
carried. 

American Field Service Program: A communication was received from 
Dr. Fritz A. Pierson, President, ADA urging state dental societies to par- 
ticipate in a program of emergency dental care for the interchange teen- 
agers placed in this country through the American Field Service. Dr. 
Harrell moved that the Society endorse the program and that members 
be encouraged to co-operate and support it through the Newsletter. Dr. 
Hand seconded the motion and it was carried. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 41 

Civil Defense: A memorandum from Mr. R. C. Howison, Jr., legal 
counsel, on the appointment of Civil Defense Area Chiefs in North Caro- 
lina v^as received as information on motion by Dr. Eure, seconded by Dr. 
Guion and duly carried. 

Health Task Group: Dr. Roberts announced that at the request of the 
Department of Administration, Office of Emergency Planning, the State 
of North Carolina, he had submitted the name of Dr. T. Edwin Perry of 
Raleigh as a nominee for the Governor to appoint to the Health Task 
Group. Dr. Lindahl moved that the announcement be received for infor- 
mation. Dr. Eure seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Comments by the President: Dr. Roberts urged Executive Committee 
members to attend the 13th Annual District Officers' Conference to be 
held at the Velvet Cloak Inn in Raleigh, December 4-5, 1965. 

He advised that he and other representatives of the Society would con- 
fer with officials of the Department of Community Colleges on October 11 
to more definitely establish the role of the Advisory Committee on Dental 
Auxiliary Education and determine more effective liaison between the 
Advisory Committe and the Society. 

He reported that the contribution of $100 to Health Careers of North 
Carolina, Inc., as authorized by the Executive Committee July 10, 1965, 
had been made. 

He reported that a copy of the resolution adopted September 19, 1965, 
recognizing Dr. John C. Brauer for his many accomplishments in the 
field of dental education, and noting his plans for retirement, had been 
forwarded to Dr. Brauer. 

He announced that Dr. J. Harry Spillman officially represented the 
Society at the Professions Training Seminar in Charlottesville, Virginia, 
October 6-8, and that Dr. Glenn F. Bitler officially represented the So- 
ciety at the Workshop on Dental Prepayment in Montgomery, Alabama, 
October 7-9. 

He urged Executive Committee members to co-operate in opposing the 
New York resolution at the ADA meeting in Las Vegas. 

He requested that information on the caucuses of North Carolina and 
the Fifth District in Las Vegas be sent to Executive Committee members 
and that they plan to attend them. 

He also urged Executive Committee mem^bers to attend the Reference 
Committee hearings in Las Vegas and particularly the hearing at which 
the New York resolution will be discussed. 

He noted that Health Careers for North Carolina, Inc., had requested 
exhibit space at the 110th Annual Session in Pinehurst. It was agreed 
that space should be allotted to this organization in the scientific exhibit 
area and that Dr. Sandy C. Marks, Chairman, Scientific Exhibits, should 
be so instructed. 

He announced that a conference with representatives of auxiliary or- 
ganizations would be held in the Central Office, October 11, 1965, to co- 
ordinate annual session programs. 

American Prosthodontic Society: Dr. Hand moved that the Society 
accept with appreciation an offer from the American Prosthodontic So- 
ciety to distribute slides to TV stations in North Carolina in the interest of 
good dental health. Dr. Harrell seconded the motion and it was carried. 

License Renewal Fees: Concern was expressed over the reaction of 
dentists throughout the State to the recent amendments to the General 
Statutes which authorized the Board of Dental Examiners to increase 
license renewal fees. It was felt that if the dentists were made aware that 
the Board needed more income to adequately enforce the dental practice 
act, then criticism of the amendment would decrease. Dr. Hand moved 
that the Executive Committee request the Board of Dental Examiners to 
consider sending a letter to all dentists justifying the need for an increase 
in license renewal fees. Dr. Harrell seconded the motion and it was 
carried. 



42 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Next Meeting: Dr. Roberts moved that the Executive Committee hold 
its next regular meeting in Pinehurst, January 8, 1966, and meet jointly 
with the Annual Session Committee on January 9, 1966, in Pinehurst. 
Dr. Lindahl seconded the motion and it was carried. 

Adjournment: On motion by Dr. Lindahl, seconded by Dr. Roberts and 
duly carried the meeting was adjourned at 5:01 p.m. 

C. W. POINDEXTER, D.D.S. 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Read and approved January 8, 1966 

PINEHURST, NORTH CAROLINA 

January 8, 1966 

Call to Order: The Executive Committee convened in the Crystal Room 
of The Carolina, Pinehurst, North Carolina, Saturday, January 8, 1966. 
Dr. S. H. Isenhower called the meeting to order at 8:50 p.m. Mr. A. M. 
Cunningham led in prayer. 

Roll Call: Members of the Executive Committee present were: S. H. 
Isenhower, Pearce Roberts, Jr., J. Homer Guion, James A. Harrell, 
Darden J. Eure, W. L. Hand, Jr., and C. W. Poindexter. 

Others present were: Barry G. Miller, Editor-Publisher; Glenn F. 
Bitler, Chairman, Dental Prepayment Committee; C. P. Osborne, Jr., 
Chairman, Advisory Committee on Education of Dental Auxiliary Per- 
sonnel; Harold W. Twisdale, Chairman, Committee on Site Location for 
Annual Sessions; Joseph M. Johnson, President-Elect, Fourth District 
Dental Society. 

Staff members present were: Mr. Andrew M. Cunningham, Executive 
Secretary; and Miss Mira Riddle, Central Office Secretary. 

Approval of Minutes: The minutes of October 10, 1965, were approved 
on motion by Dr. Eure and seconded by Dr. Roberts, Motion carried. 

Report of Secretary-Treasurer: The financial report of December 31, 
1965, presented by Dr. Poindexter was accepted for information on mo- 
tion by Dr. Eure and seconded by Dr. Roberts. Motion carried. It was 
noted that collection of 1966 dues was proceeding ahead of schedule. 

Letters of Thanks: Dr. Isenhower read a letter from Dr. Roberts ex- 
pressing appreciation for the flowers sent by the Executive Committee 
on the death of his mother. 

Dr. Isenhower also read letters from Mr. and Mrs. Cunningham and 
Miss Riddle thanking the Executive Committee and the Society for gifts 
sent them at Christmas. 

Dental Prepayment: Dr. Bitler, Chairman, Dental Prepayment Com- 
mittee, presented a progress report. The Committee recommended that 
a three-day Workshop on Dental Prepayment be held in April. It was 
noted that Federal funds might be available for this purpose, provided 
that all dentists in the State were invited to attend and that nearby states 
be invited to send representatives. 

Dr. Harrell moved that the Dental Prepayment Committee be authorized 
to plan and hold a Workshop on Dental Prepayment as outlined in its re- 
port. Seconded by Dr. Eure. Motion carried. 

Future Sites for Annual Sessions: Dr. Harold W. Twisdale, Chairman, 
Sites for Annual Sessions Committee, presented a report of the activi- 
ties of his Committee to date. He indicated that several cities in North 
Carolina had expressed an interest in having the Society hold its Annual 
Sessions within their environs in the future, including Asheville, Char- 
lotte, Durham, Greensboro, and Raleigh. He submitted a summary of fa- 



f 



i: 

I 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 43 

cilities available at these communities. He suggested that this information 
be printed in a future issue of the Newsletter, that representatives of 
these communities be invited by the President to appear at the Second 
General Session of the Annual Meeting next May, and that each be al- 
lowed limited time to present invitations to the Society. 

Dental Education: Dr. Roberts reported that on November 22, C. W. 
Sanders, Chairman, Dental Education Committee, and Mr. Cunningham, 
appeared before the committee appointed by the Chancellor of the Uni- 
versity to search for a dean of the dental school to succeed John C. Brauer, 
who will retire next July 1. At this meeting the Committee asked many 
pointed questions concerning the Society's position on educational stan- 
dards and the qualifications of a dean, but the Committee gave no indi- 
cation of the men being considered for the position. Subsequently, Dr. 
Sanders said, he had learned that an announcement by the Committee 
would be made by February 10. 

Insurance: A report from John S. Dilday, Chairman, Insurance Com- 
mittee, stated that a group retirement program had been proposed to the 
committee for its consideration. However, other proposals would be sought 
and a study of group retirement programs sponsored by other state so- 
cieties would be conducted before the committee made any recommen- 
dations. 

Dr. Poindexter moved that the report be received for information. Sec- 
onded by Dr. Harrell. Motion carried. 

Education of Auxiliary Personnel: Colin P. Osborne, Jr., Chairman, 
Advisory Committee on the Education of Dental Auxiliary Personnel to 
the Department of Community Colleges, presented a progress report. Dr. 
Poindexter moved that the President be directed to appoint a special 
committee to work in liaison with state educational agencies and to make 
known to them the Society's policies on the education of auxiliary per- 
sonnel. Second by Dr. Harrell. Motion carried. 

Dental Health Insurance: A report from James B. Howell, Chairman, 
Dental Health Insurance-Industry Liaison Committee, was received. The 
Committee recommended that the President inform the North Carolina 
Health Insurance Council that this Committee was prepared to co-operate 
in promoting good dental health for the people of the State and to assist 
the Council in evaluating dental health insurance policies and claims 
arising from them. 

Dr. Eure moved that the President be instructed to write the North 
Carolina Health Council as outlined in the report of the Dental Health 
Insurance-Industry Liaison Committee. Seconded by Dr. Poindexter. Mo- 
tion carried. 

Dental Care for the Aged: A report was received from Henry O. Line- 
berger, Jr., Chairman, Dental Care for the Aged Committee. 

Insurance Carrier: Dr. Roberts informed the Committee that the State 
Board of Health had requested that the Society designate an insurance 
carrier for dentistry in the implementation of Medicare and other related 
programs in this State. 

Dr. Eure moved that the President be authorized to name an insurance 
carrier at his discretion for dental health coverage under Medicare and 
other related programs. Seconded by Dr. Harrell. Motion carried. 

Central Office: A report from J. Henry Ligon, Jr., Chairman, Central 
Office Site Committee, was received. It indicated that the Committee 
would submit definite recommendations on the location and facilities of 
the Central Office by May. Dr. Poindexter moved that the report be re- 
ceived for information. Seconded by Dr. Eure. Motion carried. 

Membership: A report was received from J. Homer Guion, Chairman, 
Membership Committee. It was noted that the Society ended the year 



44 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

1965 with a total membership of 1,245, a net gain of 14 members over 
1964. 

Dr. Guion moved that the following resolution be adopted: 

Resolved, that it be a matter of record the following did not pay 
their 1965 dues by December 31, 1965, and according to Article VI, 
Section 6 of the Bylaws, have been dropped from the roll: 

First District — J. Spencer Howell, Little Switzerland 

L. T. Russell, Asheville 
Third District — W. M. Pearce, Hamlet 

Frank T. Webster, Madison 
Fourth District — Charles B. Sabiston, Jr., Richmond, Va. 

Seconded by Dr. Roberts. Motion carried. 

Medpac: J. Homer Guion, reported that he and the Executive Secretary 
had attended a workshop conference of the Medical Society's Political 
Education and Action Committee (Medpac) December 8, 1965, at Greens- 
boro. Dr. Guion moved that his full report on the Workshop be received 
for information and used for future study. Seconded by Dr. Roberts. Mo- 
tion carried. 

District Representation: A recommendation from the District Officers 
Conference was considered, requesting the President to appoint a com- 
mittee to study the problem of representation in the House of Delegates 
and to submit a report of its study to the House of Delegates. Dr. Harrell 
moved that the recommendation be approved. Seconded by Dr. Poin- 
dexter. Motion carried. 

Reimbursement of Officers: A resolution requesting that the Society 
defray entertainment expenses of officers at District meetings was re- 
ceived from the District Officers Conference. Dr. Hand moved that the 
resolution be disapproved and that the Chairman of the Executive Com- 
mittee inform the Conference that: (1) it is the privilege of the Districts 
to bear the cost of entertainment of whomever they choose; (2) if further 
direction is needed it should come from the Conference; and (3) if a 
standard policy is desired, it should be established by action of the Con- 
ference. Seconded by Dr. Poindexter. Motion carried. 

Bylaws Amendment: A resolution from the District Officers Conference 
was received, requesting that the Bylaws be amended to provide that 
members be dropped from the roll for non-payment of dues by March 31, 
in order to correlate our dues policy with that of the ADA. It was pointed 
out that the ADA Bylaws provide that a member who establishes active 
membership for the first time after July 1 is eligible for a half-year dues 
rate of $20. The NCDS Bylaws provide that a member who does not pay 
his dues by March 1 becomes delinquent and is assessed a $5 delinquent 
penalty by the District, but is not dropped from the roll for non-payment 
of dues until December 31. This makes it possible for a new member to 
wait until after July 1 to pay his dues and thereby save $15. 

Dr. Poindexter moved that the Constitution and Bylaws Committee be 
directed to prepare an amendment to the Bylaws to provide that a member 
be dropped from the roll if he has not paid his dues by March 31. Sec- 
onded by Dr. Eure. Motion carried. 

Journal and Newsletter: It was pointed out that failure to submit 
copy for the Journal and Newsletter by the deadline date puts a burden 
on the Central Office staff and unnecessary delay in mailing these publica- 
tions. Dr. Roberts moved that the Chairman of the Executive Committee 
inform the editorial staff (Editor-Publisher, Associate Editor, and the 
District Editors) that this problem had been discussed by the Executive 
Committee and request that the editorial staff study this problem and 
submit a report to the Executive Committee at its next regular meeting. 
Seconded by Dr. Eure. Motion carried. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 45 

Reimbursement of Editor-Publisher: A request for reimbursement of 
transportation expenses and per diem for one day was received from the 
Editor-Publisher for attendance at the American Association of Dental 
Editors Conference in Las Vegas, November 6, 1965. It was pointed out 
that it was the policy of the Executive Committee to honor requests for 
reimbursement of travel and per diem expenses only when the trip had 
been authorized by the President or the Executive Committee prior to 
making the trip. 

Dr. Poindexter moved that an exception to this policy be made in this 
instance, that the Editor-Publisher's request for reimbursement be hon- 
ored after a voucher had been submitted by him to the Secretary- 
Treasurer, and that he be informed of the reimbursement policy to avoid 
misunderstanding in the future. Seconded by Dr. Roberts. Motion carried. 

Comments by the President: Dr. Roberts reported that Dr. Maynard K. 
Hine, ADA President, had not yet accepted an invitation to speak at the 
Annual Session next May, and that Dr. William A. Garrett, President- 
Elect, could not commit himself to this engagement without the approval 
of Dr. Hine. He also reported that he had extended an invitation to Dr. 
Kellner, Fifth District Trustee, to the meeting, but had received no answer. 

Dr. Roberts reported that he had written Dr. Harold Hillenbrand, ADA 
Secretary, requesting information on how and when the resolutions on 
membership adopted by the House of Delegates would be implemented, 
particularly the resolution requiring that no more than a simple majority 
vote be required for election of new members by component societies. 
In reply, Dr. Hillenbrand stated that the resolutions would be imple- 
mented early in 1966 and that constituents and components would be so 
informed. 

Dr. Roberts said he was very pleased with the District Officers Con- 
ference held in December, that he considers this annual meeting one of 
the most valuable assets of the Society, and that he hoped it would con- 
tinue to grow every year. 

Delegation Headquarters: Dr. Roberts moved that the following reso- 
lution be presented to the House of Delegates: 

Resolved, that a hotel suite consisting of two bedrooms and a parlor 
be reserved at ADA meetings for the convenience of the North Caro- 
lina Delegation and members, and be it further 

Resolved, that the cost be paid by the Society and be it further 
Resolved, that one bedroom be occupied by the President and the 
other by the Executive Secretary. 
Seconded by Dr. Harrell. Motion carried. 

Next Meeting: Dr. Poindexter moved that the next meeting of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee be held in Pinehurst, at 10 a.m. on Wednesday, May 4, 
just prior to the Annual Session. Seconded by Dr. Eure. Motion carried. 

Thanks: Dr. Isenhower thanked the committee members for attending, 
and expressed special thanks to President and Mrs. Roberts for entertain- 
ing the members so graciously at a social hour prior to dinner. 

Adjournment: The meeting was adjourned at 1:00 a.m. on motion by 
Dr. Roberts, seconded by Dr. Harrell. Motion carried. 

C. W. Poindexter, D.D.S. 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Read and approved February 6, 1966 

JOINT MEETING WITH ANNUAL SESSION COMMITTEE 

Pinehurst, North Carolina 

January 9, 1966 

Call to Order: The Executive Committee and the Annual Session Com- 
mittee convened in joint session at The Carolina, Pinehurst, North Caro- 



46 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

lina, January 9, 1966. President Roberts called the meeting to order at 
10:00 a.m. and led in prayer. 

Roll Call: Members of the Executive Committee present were: Pearce 
Roberts, Jr., S. H. Isenhower, Darden J. Eure, W. L. Hand, Jr., James A. 
Harrell, J. Homer Guion, and C. W. Poindexter. 

Members of the Annual Session Committee present were: Baxter B. 
Sapp, Jr., Convention Co-ordinator; Norman F. Ross (Program); L. D. 
Herring (Arrangements); Robert B. Litton (Clinic); M. L. Cherry (En- 
tertainment Co-ordinator); C. P. Osborne, Jr. (Banquet); Cecil A. Pless, 
Jr. (Reception); John W. Girard, Jr. (Hospitality); A. P. Cline, Jr. 
(Monitor); Robert W. Holmes (Projected Clinics); F. A. Buchanan (Pub- 
licity); W. K. Griffin (Sports); Freeman C. Slaughter (Program). 

Others present were: S. B. Towler, C. H. Teague, E. U. Austin, Mr. 
Demont Roseman, Jr. 

Staff members present were: Mr. Andrew M. Cunningham, Executive 
Secretary; and Miss Mira Riddle, Central Office Secretary. 

Remarks by President: Dr. Roberts thanked everyone for their interest 
and attendance. He introduced Mr. Demont Roseman, Jr., Public Infor- 
mation Officer, UNC Division of Health Affairs, who handled press re- 
leases for the 1965 Annual Session and would perform this duty for the 
1966 Annual Session. 

Annual Session Reports: Annual Session Committee members present 
submitted reports. 

Reports in absentia were submitted by: E. A. Pearson, Jr. (Exhibits); 
A. Dwight Price (Dance); Robert T. Byrd (Necrology); Sandy C. Marks 
(Scientific Exhibits); and Walter T. McFall, Jr. (Visual Education). 

Dr. Sapp, Convention Co-ordinator, expressed his appreciation to mem- 
bers of the Annual Session Committee for their reports. 

Executive Session: The Committee then went into executive session, ije 
with Dr. Isenhower presiding. 

Approval of Reports: Dr. Eure moved that the report of the Arrange- 
ments Committee be approved and that $2,825.00 be allocated to this com- 
mittee. Seconded by Dr. Harrell. Motion carried. 

Dr. Eure moved that the report of the Clinic Committee be approved 
and that $25 be allocated to this committee. Seconded by Dr. Poindexter. 
Motion carried. 

Dr. Hand moved that the report of the Entertainment Committee be ap- 
proved and that $1,475.00 be allocated to this committee to be expended as 
follows : 

Banquet $ 25.00 

Reception 800.00 

Dance 275.00 

Entertainment 125.00 

Special Music 50.00 

Contingency 200.00 



$1,475.00 



Seconded by Dr. Roberts. Motion carried. 

Dr. Roberts moved that the report of the Exhibit Committee be ap- 
proved and that $1,825.00 be allocated to this committee. Seconded by ' 
Dr. Hand. Motion carried. [ 

Dr. Roberts moved that the report of the Hospitality Committee be J 
approved and that $100.00 be allocated to this committee. Seconded by 'i 
Dr. Harrell. Motion carried. I 

Dr. Harrell moved that the Monitor Committee request the Dean of I 
the UNC School of Dentistry to permit dental students to serve as moni- fl 
tors. Seconded by Dr. Roberts. Motion defeated. It was noted that no }' 
budget request was submitted by this committee. 

Dr. Roberts moved that the report of the Necrology Committee be ap 



I 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 47 

proved and that $75.00 be allocated to this committee with the sugges- 
tion that the committee reconsider including music in its memorial service 
and thus reduce its expenses. Seconded by Dr. Harrell. Motion carried. 

Dr. Eure moved that the report of the Program Committee be approved 
and that $1,750.00 be allocated to this committee. Seconded by Dr. 
iHand. Motion carried. 

It was noted that the Projected Clinics Committee had secured four 
clinics for its program and that no budget request was submitted. 

Dr. Roberts moved that the report of the Publicity Committee be ap- 
iproved and that $275.00 be allocated to this committee. Seconded by Dr. 
Eure. Motion carried. 

It was noted that the Scientific Exhibits Committee had secured 14 ex- 
hibits of scientific interest to be on display at the Annual Session and 
that an allocation of $25.00 for this committee had been included in the 
budget request of the Exhibits Committee. 

Dr. Roberts moved that the report of the Sports Committee be approved 
and that $50.00 be allocated to this committee. Seconded by Dr. Harrell. 
Motion carried. 

Dr. Harrell moved that the report of the Visual Education Committee 
be approved and that $25.00 be allocated to this committee. It was sug- 
gested that if possible Dr. Roberts contact the clinicians during the Chi- 
cago Midwinter meeting, to ascertain if the scientific films to be shown 
at the Annual Session were acceptable to them, and that the committee 
adjust their schedule of films accordingly. Seconded by Dr. Roberts. Mo- 
tion carried. 

Dr. Harrell moved that $225.00 be allocated to underwrite the ex- 
penses of the House of Delegates. Seconded by Dr. Hand. Motion carried. 

Dr. Poindexter moved that $200.00 be allocated to the Annual Session 
Committee as a Contingency Fund. Seconded by Dr. Eure. Motion carried. 

Total Budget: Dr. Roberts moved that the total budget of the Annual 
Session Committee of $8,900.00 be approved. Seconded by Dr. Eure. Mo- 
'tion carried. A copy of the approved budget for the Annual Session is 
iattached. It was noted that this was $700.00 in excess of the $8,200.00 
allocation approved October 10 and that this amount will be charged to 
the Contingency appropriation in the General Fund. This will leave a 
balance of $800.00 in this account. 

Delegates to ADA: Dr. Hand moved that the Constitution and Bylaws 
Committee be requested to prepare and submit to the House of Delegates 
!an amendment to the Bylaws which would provide that the President and 
President-Elect automatically be delegates to the ADA. Seconded by Dr. 
Harrell. Motion carried. 

State-wide Fluoridation: Dr. Roberts moved that the House of Dele- 
gates be requested to consider initiating a program of state-wide fluori- 
dation as soon as practicable. Seconded by Dr. Hand. Motion carried. 

Adjournment: The meeting was adjourned at 1:25 p.m. on motion by 
Dr. Eure. Seconded by Dr. Poindexter. Motion carried. 

C. W. Poindexter, D.D.S. 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Read and approved February 6, 1966 



48 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

1966 ANNUAL SESSION BUDGET 

Approved January 9, 1966 

Arrangements $2,875.00 

Exhibits 1,825.00 

Entertainment 1,475.00 

Hospitality 100.00 

Monitor 000.00 

Necrology 75.00 

Program 1,750.00 

Publicity 275.00 

Clinic 25.00 

Sports 50.00 

Visual Education 25.00 

House of Delegates 225.00 

Contingency 200.00 



$8,900.00 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

February 6, 1966 

Call to Order: The Executive Committee convened at the Sir Walter 
Hotel, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sunday, February 6, 1966. S. H. Isenhower, 
Chairman, called the meeting to order at 8:45 a.m. Darden J. Eure led 
in prayer. 

Roll Call: Members of the Executive Committee present were: S. H. 
Isenhower, Darden J. Eure, Pearce Roberts, Jr., Roy L. Lindahl, James A. 
Harrell, W. L. Hand, Jr., and C. W. Poindextei:. It was noted that J. Homer 
Guion was currently in South America and could not be present. 

Others present were: Barry G. Miller, Editor-'Publisher; William H. 
Oliver, President, Fourth District Dental Society; Colonel W. T. Joyner 
and Mr. R. C. Howison, Jr., legal counsel. 

Staff members present were: Mr. Andrew M. Cunningham, Executive 
Secretary; and Miss Mira Riddle, Central Office Secretary. 

Approval of Minutes: Dr. Eure moved that the minutes of January 8 
and 9, 1966, be approved. Seconded by Dr. Roberts. Motion carried. 

Approval of Expenditures: Dr. Lindahl moved that the expenditure for 
Christmas presents for the Central Office staff be approved. Seconded 
by Dr. Eure. Motion carried. 

Call for Special Session: Dr. Roberts reported that he had received 
written petitions from a majority of the officers, including the Executive 
Committee and the Ethics Committee, requesting that he call a special 
meeting of the House of Delegates and the General Session for the pur- 
pose of determining what action the Society should take in the case of 
Reginald Hawkins v. the North Carolina Dental Society and the Second 
District Society, as a result of the decision rendered by the Fourth Circuit 
Court of Appeals in Richmond, Virginia, on January 20, 1966, which de- 
<;ision is unfavorable to the Society. 

Therefore, according to Article III, Section 10 and Article VIII, Sec- 
tion 2 of the Bylaws he had issued a call for special meetings of the afore- 
mentioned bodies to be held Sunday, February 6, 1966, at 10:00 a.m. at 
the Sir Walter Hotel in Raleigh. 

Report of Legal Counsel: Col. W. T. Joyner and Mr. R. C. Howison, Jr., 
legal counsel, announced that on January 20, 1966, the Fourth Circuit 
Court of Appeals reversed the decision of the District Court in the case of 
Hawkins v. the Society and remanded it to the District Court for further 
proceedings not inconsistent with its opinion. 

They interpreted the court's decision in detail, explained its implica- 



II 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 49 

Tions and advised the committee that the following actions might be taken: 

(1) Petition the Circuit Court for a re-hearing 

(2) File a petition for certiorari with the U. S. Supreme Court 

(3) Await the order of the District Court 

Action on Hawkins Case: Dr. Lindahl moved that the following reso- 
lution be adopted and submitted to the House of Delegates: 

Resolved, that the Executive Committee recommends to the House 
of Delegates that the Society allow the case of Hawkins v. the So- 
ciety to be remanded to the District Court as ordered by the Circuit 
Court of Appeals. 
Seconded by Dr. Eure. Resolution adopted. 

Use of Reserve Funds: Dr. Lindahl moved that the following resolution 
be adopted and submitted to the House of Delegates: 

Resolved, that the Executive Committee be authorized to use re- 
serve funds to pay for the cost of the special session of the House of 
Delegates. 
Seconded by Dr. Harrell. Resolution was adopted. 

Dr. Poindexter moved that the following resolution be adopted and 
submitted to the House of Delegates: 

Resolved, that the Executive Committee be authorized to use re- 
serve funds to pay for legal counsel fees and any court costs involved, 
in excess of $3,500. 
Seconded by Dr. Lindahl. Resolution was adopted. 

Next Meeting: Dr. Isenhower announced that the next meeting of the 
Committee would be held at Whispering Pines Motor Lodge on Wednes- 
day, May 4, at 10:00 a.m. and that a block of rooms had been reserved at 
the motor lodge for the night of Tuesday, May 3. He said that committee 
members would be given an opportunity through the mail to reserve 
rooms for that night. 

Recess: At 10:10 a.m. Dr. Eure moved that the committee recess to re- 
convene after adjournment of the final General Session. Seconded by Dr. 
Harrell. Motion carried. 

Call to Order: The committee reconvened at 2:35 p.m. and was called 
to order by Dr. Isenhower. 

Press Release: The release to the press of actions of the House of Dele- 
gates was discussed. 

Dr. Eure moved that President Roberts be designated to release a state- 
ment to the press. Seconded by Dr. Harrell. Motion carried. 

Dr. Roberts said that the following statement approved by legal coun- 
sel would be released to the news media: 

"The Executive Committee, the House of Delegates, and the Gen- 
eral Session of the North Carolina Dental Society, acting in the light 
of the circumstances as they exist today, voted that with respect to 
the decision of the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals, no petition for 
certiorari should be filed wtih the Supreme Court." 

Announcements: Dr. Roberts announced that Dr. Maynard K. Hine, 
President of the ADA, and Dr. Arthur W. Kellner, Fifth District Trustee, 
had accepted invitations to be at the 110th Annual Session. 

Adjournment: On motion by Dr. Eure, seconded by Dr. Harrell, the 
meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 

C. W. Poindexter, D.D.S 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Read and approved May 4, 1966 



50 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

SOUTHERN PINES, NORTH CAROLINA 

May 4, 1966 

Call to Order: The Executive Committee convened at Whispering Pines 
Motel, Southern Pines, North Carolina, Wednesday, May 4, 1966. Dr. S. H. 
Isenhower called the meeting to order at 9:00 a.m. Dr. James A. Harrell 
led in prayer. 

Roll Call: Members of the Executive Committee present were: Drs. 
S. H. Isenhower, Pearce Roberts, Jr., J. Homer Guion, James A. Harrell, 
Darden J. Eure, W. L. Hand, Jr., Roy L. Lindahl, and C. W. Poindexter. 

Others present were: Dr. Maynard K. Hine, President, American Dental 
Association; Dr. Arthur W. Kellner, Trustee, Fifth District, American 
Dental Association; Mr. Robert C. Howison, Jr., legal counsel for the 
Society; Dr. Barry G. Miller, Editor-Publisher; Dr. Ralph D. Coffey, 
Speaker of the House of Delegates; Dr. Baxter B. Sapp, Jr., Convention 
Co-ordinator; Dr. J. Henry Ligon, Jr., Chairman, Location of Central 
Office Committee; and Dr. L. B. Peeler, Executive Committee member 
designate. 

Remarks by Chairman: Dr. Isenhower welcomed the guests and com- 
mittee members and thanked them for their presence at the meeting. 

Remarks by ADA President: Dr. Isenhower presented Dr. Maynard K. 
Hine, President, American Dental Association, and welcomed him to the 
110th Annual Session. Dr. Hine thanked the Society for inviting him to 
the meeting and said he looked forward to his stay in Pinehurst. 

Remarks by Fifth District Trustee: Dr. Isenhower presented Dr. Ar- 
thur W. Kellner, Fifth District Trustee, American Dental Association. 
Dr. Kellner expressed his appreciation for being invited to the Annual 
Session and noted that he would make his Fifth District Report to the 
House of Delegates at its first session. 

Approval of Minutes: Dr. Lindahl moved that the minutes of February 6, 
1966, be approved. Seconded by Dr. Hand. Motion carried. 

Report of Secretary-Treasurer: The financial report of April 30, 1966, 
was presented by Dr. Poindexter, who moved that it be accepted for in- 
formation. Seconded by Dr. Lindahl. Motion carried. 

Report of Location of Central Office Committee: Dr. J. Henry Ligon, Jr., 
Chairman, Location of Central Office Committee, reported that his com- 
mittee during the past several months, had investigated several sites in 
Raleigh suitable for the needs of the Central Office. He recommended 
that a new committee be appointed with the hope that a suitable location 
could be found in the near future. 

Dr. Poindexter moved that the incoming president appoint a commit- 
tee to seek property for lease suitable to our needs with adequate parking 
for a new Central Office, such property to be approximately 1,200 square 
feet at a maximum rental of $5 per square foot. Seconded by Dr. Lindahl. 
Motion carried. 

Development Fund: In 1956 a Sinking Fund (renamed Development 
Fund) "was established for the purpose of financing the purchase of 
property, and the erection of a building for the Society at some future 
date, or some permanent project." Five percent of income from dues 
was to be transferred from the General Fund to the Sinking Fund, each 
fiscal year if possible and feasible, subject to approval of the Executive 
Committee. It was noted that because of the cost of litigation in which the 
Society has been involved, no money has been put in the Development 
Fund for the last several years. Now that the litigation has been settled, 
it was suggested that money from dues could again be deposited to this 
Fund and that it could be used for some permanent project. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 51 

Dr. Eure moved that no funds be added to the Development Fund at 
this time and that the Fund be continued in the status quo. Seconded by 
Dr. Roberts. Motion carried. 

Report of Litigation: Mr. Howison summarized the action taken by 
Judge Wilson Warlick on March 29, 1966, requiring the Second District 
to act on the application of Dr. Reginald A. Hawkins on or before April 15. 
He further reported that on April 13, 1966, the Second District Dental 
Society met in special session in Salisbury and that the application of 
Dr. Hawkins had been approved for membership in the Society. 

Non-Member Dentists at Annual Session: The admission of non-member 
dentists to the Annual Session was discussed. Dr. Eure moved that non- 
member dentists be admitted as guests of members in accordance with 
our usual policy. Seconded by Dr. Hand. Motion carried. 

Indenture of Trust for Relief Fund: Mr. Howison discussed salient fea- 
tures of a proposed Indenture of Trust for the Relief Fund, authorized 
by the 1965 House of Delegates. Dr. Poindexter moved that the Indenture 
of Trust prepared by legal counsel to be filed with the Internal Revenue 
Service be approved. Seconded by Dr. Guion. Motion carried. 

Investment Reserve Funds: Dr. Lindahl moved that consideration of the 
investment of reserve funds be postponed until the second regular meet- 
ing of the 1966-67 Executive Committee. Seconded by Dr. Guion. Motion 
carried. 

Dental Prepayment Conference: Dr. Eure moved that $396 be allocated 
from the contingency fund of the General Fund for expenditures incurred 
relative to a Conference on Dental Prepayment held in Raleigh, April 14- 
16, 1966. Seconded by Dr. Harrell. Motion carried. 

Regional Medical Program: Dr. Roberts reported that Dr. Manson 
Meads, Temporary Chairman, North Carolina Regional Medical Program 
related to heart disease, stroke, and cancer under P.L. 89-239, had re- 
quested that the Society president serve on the advisory council to the pro- 
gram, and that he had referred the request to Dr. Guion. 

School Health Programs: Dr. Lindahl reported that he and Dr. Bitler 
had conferred with Dr. Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent, Department of 
Public Instruction, concerning the School Health Co-ordinating Service 
fee schedule and its use in programs under the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act. Dr. Lindahl indicated that Dr. Carroll appeared receptive 
to revising this fee schedule and that revised schedule of fees should be 
prepared and proposed without delay. 

Dental Health Course in Public Schools: Dr. Poindexter reported that 
he had forwarded to Dr. Charles F. Carroll, Superintendent, Department 
of Public Instruction, a copy of the resolution adopted by the 1965 House 
of Delegates, recommending that a more comprehensive course in dental 
health be developed in the public schools. In his reply, Dr. Carroll of- 
fered his co-operation with the Society in developing such a program. Dr. 
Poindexter moved that this information be reported to the House of Dele- 
gates and to the incoming president. Seconded by Dr. Roberts. Motion 
carried. 

Fine Arts Fund: Dr. Roberts moved that the Executive Committee rec- 
ommend to the House of Delegates that a donation of $300 be authorized 
to the Fine Arts Fund of the new American Dental Association Building. 
Seconded by Dr. Hand. Motion carried. 

American Fund for Dental Education: Dr. Roberts moved that the 
Executive Committee recommend to the House of Delegates that a token 
contribution of $25 be authorized to the American Fund for Dental Edu- 
cation in recognition of the support of the purposes of the fund, and 



5S 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 





LEFT. Maynard K. Hine, ADA president, ad- 
dressed the Society at its 110th Annual 
Session. 



RIGHT. W. L Hand, Jr., newly appointed Ex- 
ecutive Committee Chairman, confers with 
incoming president J. Homer Guion. 



further, that the House encourage the membership at large to contribute 
@n an individual basis. Seconded by Dr. Guion. Motion carried. 

Delegates to ADA: Dr. Lindahl moved that an amendment to the 
Constitution be submitted to the House of Delegates which would pro- 
vide that the President and President-Elect automatically be delegates to 
the ADA with a statement in support of the proposed amendment. Sec- 
onded by Dr. Hand. Motion carried. 

State Action by the Society: It was noted that according to the ruling 
of the Circuit Court of Appeals on January 20, 1966, the activities of the 
North Carolina Dental Society had the character of "state action." In 
view of this ruling. Dr. Roberts moved that the North Carolina Dental 
Society seek legislation where possible to gain Society endorsed repre- 
sentatives on the boards, councils, and other health agencies of the State 
of North Carolina where dentistry is a part of their administered pro- 
grams. Seconded by Dr. Euro. Motion carried. 

Insurance Carrier for Medicare: For the information of the Committee. 
Dr. Roberts announced that Blue Cross-Blue Shield had been designated 
the interim insurance carrier for Medicare and other related programs 
in this State. 

Commendations: Dr. Isenhower noted that Drs. Eure, Lindahl and Har- 
rell were completing their terms as members of the Committee this year 
and thanked them for their devoted service to the Society. 

He noted that Dr. L. B. Peeler will succeed Dr. Lindahl as a member 
of the Committee. 

He also thanked all the members of the Committee for their help and 
cooperation during the past year. 

Adjournment: On motion by Dr. Eure, seconded by Dr. Roberts, and 
duly carried, the meeting was adjourned at 11:45 a.m. 

C. W. POINDEXTER, D.D.S. 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Read and approved June 25, 1966 



Committee 
Reports 



STANDING AND SPECIAL 

(In alphabetical order with action 
by House of Delegates) 



ANNUAL SESSION COMMITTEE 

Convention Co-ordinator — Baxter B. Sapp, Jr. 



Arrangements — L. D. Herring 
Clinic — Robert B. Litton 
Entertainment — M. L. Cherry 
Banquet — Colin P. Osborne, Jr. 
Reception — Cecil A. Pless, Jr. 
Dance — A. Dwight Price 
Exhibits — E. A. Pearson, Jr. 



Hospitality— J . W. Girard, Jr. 
Monitor — A. P. Cline, Jr. 
Necrology — Robert T. Byrd 
Program — Norman F. Ross 
Projected Clinics — R. W. Holmes 
Publicity — F. A. Buchanan 
Sports — W. KiMBELL Griffin 



Scientific Exhibits — Sandy C. Marks Visual Education — W. T. McFall, Jr. 

Meetings: The Annual Session Committee met January 8, 1966, at The 
Carolina in Pinehurst. All members of the Annual Session Committee 
were present. On January 9, 1966, members of the Annual Session Com- 
mittee met with the Executive Committee at the same location. 

Responsibility: The convention co-ordinator has endeavored to develop 
a program format and to co-ordinate the activities of the Annual Session 
Committee for fulfillment of the program format. The co-ordinator has 
acted as a liaison between the President and the Annual Session Com- 
mittee. 

Arrangements: The duties of this committee are extensive and require 
frequent communication with the Executive Secretary. This committee 
was responsible for the following: 

1. Housing of members, guests, staff, and representatives of exhibit- 
ing companies. 

2. Assignment of meeting spaces in the headquarters hotel. 

3. Procurement of properties for essayists and an adequate amplify- 
ing system for all meetings. 

4. Employment of a stenotypist to report verbatim all General Ses- 
sions, House of Delegates meetings, and the banquet (at the option 
of the President). 

5. Provide signs for registration area, lobby, and meeting rooms. 

6. Submit detailed instructions to the headquarters hotel for the en- 
tire meeting. 

7. Arrange for coffee-break service for Scientific Sessions 

8. Operation of registration desk. 

9. Assign floor managers for all meetings. 
An appropriation of $2,875 has been approved. 

Clinics: Twenty-six table clinics have been scheduled for Saturday 
morning. May 7, from 9:00 to 12:15. Invitations were extended to the 



53 



54 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Dental Hygienists Association and the Dental Assistants Association toi 
send a representative member from each of these two groups to partici- 
pate in this clinic program. Three student clinics from the Career Day 
Program at the University of North Carolina, School of Dentistry will be 
selected by the faculty to actively participate in this table clinic program. 
Six clinics will be selected by the Table Clinic Committee to represent 
the North Carolina Dental Society at the annual American Dental As- 
sociation meeting in Dallas, Texas. An appropriation of $25 has been ap- 
proved. 

Projected Clinics: Four projected clinics will be presented Wednesday, 
May 4 from 3:30 to 5:00 p.m. No appropriation was requested. 

Sports: The golf tournament will be held on Wednesday, May 4, at the 
Pinehurst Country Club, beginning at 8:00 a.m. Entrance fees will help 
make this a self-sustainin,g event. No other organized sports are planned. 
However, the Pinehurst Gun Club has made it facilities available for in- 
formal skeet and trap shooting. An appropriation of $50 has been ap- 
proved. 

Necrology: An appropriate memorial service for our deceased members 
will be conducted on Wednesday night before the First General Session 
and this service will last for fifteen minutes or less. 

An appropriation of $75 has been approved. 

Commercial Exhibits: The commercial exhibits will be located on the 
West Porches of The Carolina, and 89 booths are available. There has 
been no change in the floor plan from last year. All booths were sold 
by early December. Revenue will total $7,765. 

Three new policies approved by the Executive Committee have been 
applied in the sale of commercial exhibits this year. 

1. An increase from from $85 to $95 was made in the charge for 
twenty booths in the air conditioned area which produces $200 
more revenue. 

2. Exhibit spaces have been offered only to companies which offer 
services or products directly related to the dental profession. 

3. Soft drink companies have been offered exhibit space provided 
they advertise or dispense only soft drinks that are sugar free or 
low calorie type. 

The commercial exhibits will open at 2:00 Wednesday, May 4, and 
will close on Friday, May 6 at 5:00 p.m. Commercial exhibits will not 
be open on Saturday. A social hour for exhibitors will be held in the 
Pine Room on Thursday at 5:00 p.m. Door prizes will be awarded during 
the annual banquet on Saturday night. May 7. 

The Shepard Decorating Company of Atlanta has been retained to 
set up and decorate the commercial exhibit area at a cost of $8 per booth. 

The Carolina will continue to furnish the exhibit space and provide 
labor for servicing all areas of the convention for a blanket fee of $500. 
This will include the necessary labor and costs in setting up the scientific 
exhibits. 

Last year, exhibitors were permitted accommodations in the head- 
quarters hotel. This policy will be continued. 

The requested allocation of $1,825 was approved. 

Visual Education: This committee has selected ten scientific films 
for the meeting. The visual education films will begin Wednesday, May 4 
at 2:00 p.m. and three films will be shown preceding the projected clinics. 
On Thursday and Friday a film will be shown preceding each scheduled 
essayist. There are eight scheduled films and the committee has taken the 
precaution of acquiring two extra films in the event there should be some 
difficulty with the scheduled films. Two films of interest will be carried 
by a committee moderator to the Dental Assistants Association and Dental 
Hygienists Association meetings to be shown. 

The committee chairman suggested that in the future some consideration 
be given to the possibility of having projected clinics precede the es- 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 55 

sayists because there are very few current scientific films being produced. 
DJl The members of this committee will be responsible for the operation of 
• '■ the movie projector at all sessions. An appropriation of $25 was approved. 

Monitor: Assigned members of the Monitor Committee will be present 
at all General and Scientific Sessions. These members will be appropri- 
ately identified by red arm bands and will be responsible for the sound 
system, the lighting, the ventilation, floor microphones, the call board, 
and for maintaining proper order in and around the meeting area. They 
will attend the microphones from the floor in order that all speakers will 
get adequate coverage. Monitors will work with the floor managers in 
whatever way possible to provide for a smooth, successful meeting. No 
appropriation was requested. 

Publicity: The Society has again this year retained the services of a 
professional journalist, Mr. Demont Roseman, Jr., who will prepare pre- 
convention news releases and will release all news of the meeting via 
the wire services during the convention with the assistance and approval 
of the Publicity Committee. 

An appropriation of $275 has been approved. 

Scientific Exhibits: The dedicated efforts of this committee has secured 
for the meeting a total of seventeen excellent exhibits which will be con- 
veniently spread out through the main floor of the headquarters hotel. 
These exhibits will be on display throughout the entire meeting. An ap- 
propriation of $25 was approved. 

Program: The Program Committee has developed an exceptional pro- 
gram of great interest to the membership. The essayists and their subjects 
are: 

1. Dr. John C. Bartels, "Porcelain" 

2. Dr. Ralph H. Boos, "Full and Partial Prosthetics" 

3. Dr. Thomas K. Cureton, "Physical Fitness for the Dentist" 

The latter speaker has spoken extensively throughout the country and 
encourages the presence of the wives at his session. 

Dr. Maynard K. Hine, President, American Dental Association, will be 
a featured speaker at the First General Session on Wednesday night. Dr. 
Arthur W. Kellner, Fifth District Trustee, will present his report to the 
House of Delegates on Wednesday afternoon. 

The Program Committee has assumed the responsibility for assuring 
the transportation of the clinicians to the convention headquarters after 
their arrival in the State. They will also be responsible for transporta- 
tion to their place of departure from the State. The Hospitality Commit- 
tee will assist in the entertainment of the clinicians. 

An appropriation of $1,750 has been approved. 

Hospitality: The Hospitality Committee has assumed the responsibility 
of entertainment and attending to the needs of distinguished guests and 
clinicians and to assure that their stay will be a pleasant one. 

A hospitality room will be provided for their use. The reception which 
traditionally has been a responsibility of the Hospitality Committee, has 
been delegated to a special committee of the Entertainment Committee. 

An appropriation of $100 has been approved. 

Entertainment: With the change in the meeting time at Pinehurst this 
year, the Entertainment Committee has planned an excellent program for 
the entire meeting for the pleasure of the Society and to encourage con- 
tinued attendance throughout the meeting. 

The Dental Auxiliary will sponsor a lawn party on Thursday afternoon 
at 5:00 weather permitting. In the event of inclement weather, the party 
will be held indoors. 

On Thursday evening from 10:00 to 12:30, the Pine Room will be open 
for dancing to the orchestra of Basil Freeman. 

On Saturday night, our traditional dance will be held from 9:00 to 
1:00 in the Ballroom with music supplied by the Jim Crisp Band. There 



56 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

will be entertainment at intermission by song stylist Muriel Wilson. 

The traditional banquet will be held on Saturday night at 7:00 in the 
Dining Room. Door prizes will be awarded at the Banquet along with the 
presentation of the President's emblem. There will be no banquet speaker. 
Favors will be provided for the ladies. 

An informal reception has been scheduled for Saturday at 5:45 p.m. 
to be held in the Bridge Room. This room will be appropriately decorated 
for the occasion and refreshments will be served to the members and 
ADA guests until 6:45 p.m. 

Entertainment will consist of taped music supplied by this committee. 
It is anticipated that some four hundred members will attend this affair. 

An appropriation of $1,475 has been approved. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 

ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONS COMMITTEE 

Thomias G. Collins, Chairman 
Richard S. Hunter A. Dwight Price 

Meetings: All members of this committee have attended at least one of 
the meetings of the Association of Professions. 

Actions: We have tried to consider the desirability of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society becoming a member and participating in its activities. 

The North Carolina Association of Professions was organized to allow 
and promote joint and combined action and influence on matters of mutual 
interest to the various groups it represents. It has been endorsed and 
recommended by the American Dental Association. 

Professional groups that have already become members in North Caro- 
lina are the following: 

The North Carolina Medical Society 

The North Carolina Pharmaceutical Society 

The North Carolina Society of Veterinary Medicine 

The North Carolina Society of Engineers 

The North Carolina Society of Architecture 

Your committee feels that the North Carolina Dental Society definitely 
could profit by being a member of the North Carolina Association of Pro- 
fessions. 

Resolution 

Resolved, that the North Carolina Dental Society become a member of 
the North Carolina Association of Professions. 

Action by House of Delegates: Adopted May 6, 1966. 

BLUE SHIELD-BLUE CROSS COMMITTEE 

F. D. Bell, Chairman 

A. C. Riddle, Jr. 
Vaiden B. Kendrick Grover W. Smith 

Meetings: The chairman and the members of the committee held many 
meetings with legal counsel and attended several sessions of the General 
Assembly of the State of North Carolina during 1965. 

Assignments: The House of Delegates in 1963, 1964, and 1965 instructed 
this committee to continue its efforts to have certain dental and oral 
surgical procedures covered by the insurance companies. 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 57 

Results of Study: After submitting a brief to the Insurance Commis- 
sioner of the State of North Carolina in January, 1965, and receiving no 
action, our legal counsel advised us to take our request before the North 
Carolina State Legislature. This was done during the 1965 Legislature, 
and after a number of meetings and public hearings before the Senate 
and House of Representatives, both houses passed Senate Bill 397. A 
copy of this bill is on file with the North Carolina Dental Society and 
also a copy of scheduled oral surgical allowances to be paid to physicians 
and dentists for oral surgical procedures performed. 

Expenses: The 1965 House of Delegates authorized an appropriation 
of $500 for the fiscal year 1965-66 for the continued services of legal 
counsel by the committee in behalf of direct payments to dentists under 
Blue Shield contracts in North Carolina. In order to carry the project 
to a successful conclusion, a total of $782.45 was expended. An appropri- 
ate resolution on this over-expenditure appears at the conclusion of this 
report. 

Thanks: The committee and the Society are indebted to Senator Den- 
nis S. Cook, Senator Robert Morgan and many other members of the Gen- 
eral Assembly for their interest and support of legislation sponsored by 
the Society. Appropriate letters of appreciation have been written to all 
members of the General Assembly who actively lent their support. 

Resolution 

Resolved, that the expenditure of $782.45 for legal fees in behalf of 
legislation which now makes mandatory direct payments to dentists un- 
der Blue Shield contracts be approved. 

Action by House of Delegates: Adopted May 6, 1966. 



CANCER COMMITTEE 

Robert H. Sager, Chairman 
T. L. Blair Jere E. Roe 

John F. Lemler W. L. Rudder 

Meetings: No meetings were held. 

Education Program: The Cancer Committee has been actively support- 
ing the current education program of the Division of Dental Health, of 
the North Carolina State Board of Health, on the use of exfoliative 
cytology as a laboratory aid in the early detection of oral carcinoma. This 
is the final year of a three-year project. Thirty-six seminar meetings were 
held throughout North Carolina and 947 dentists were in attendance. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 



CHILDREN'S DENTAL HEALTH COMMITTEE 

Franklin E. Martin, Chairman 

John M. Archer, III Richard S. Hunter 

Duncan M. Getsinger Donald L. Henson 

Meetings: The committee held a meeting October 28, 1965, in Charlotte. 

Principal Function: To conduct state-wide National Children's Dental 
Health Week, February 6-12, 1966. Promotion and encouragement as the 



58 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

liaison agent between the Bureau of Dental Health Education of the 
ADA and the local society chairmen was begun in August, 1965, and I 
periodic mailings thereafter were made. 

Results of Promotion: (National Children's Dental Health Week, 1966) 
Twenty-five (25) local dental societies co-operated in the program. 

The planning kits made available from the ADA were practically in- 
dispensable. Most materials were ordered directly from the ADA, so in- 
formation as to amounts used is not available. 

The North Carolina Dental Society again supplied free, outdoor bill- 
board posters @$3.50. It is known that of the total of 60 ordered, 53 were 
used. 

General Electric Corporation again supplied automatic tooth brushes 
on a ratio basis to be used as awards for poster or essay contests. North i 
Carolina was allotted 18, but only 12 were requested. 

The material for radio spots, TV filmstrips and slides, prepared talks 
for various age groups, mailing enclosures, and the many types of posters 
was thought to be quite good. The co-ordinating center for the mailings 
was our Central Office in Raleigh. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 



CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS COMMITTEE 

Thomas G. Nisbet (1970), Chairman 

G. Shuford Abernethy (1968) Z. L. Edwards (1966) 

D. T. Carr (1969) Walter H. Finch, Jr. (1967) 

Meetings: A meeting was held in Raleigh on March 13, 1966. 

Assignments: The Executive Committee of the North Carolina Dental 
Society at a meeting on January 8, 1966, passed a motion requesting the 
Constitution and Bylaws Committee to prepare an amendment to the 
bylaws to provide that a member be dropped from the roll of the So- 
ciety if he has not paid his dues by March 1. This matter was discussed 
at length. 

As the bylaws now stand, a member is delinquent after March 1 , but is 
not dropped from the roll for non-payment of dues until December 31. 
The thinking of the majority of the committee was that some members 
of the Society might not be able to meet the March 1 deadline due to 
extenuating circumstances. The committee voted in favor of not changing 
the bylaws on this point. 

At a meeting on January 9, 1966, the Executive Committee of the 
North Carolina Dental Society passed a motion requesting the Constitu- 
tion and Bylaws Committee to prepare and submit to the House of Dele- 
gates an amendment to the bylaws which would provide that the presi- 
dent and president-elect automatically be delegates to the American 
Dental Association. The committee discussed this proposal at length. The 
majority of the committee felt that seniority is important for a state dele- 
gation to the American Dental Association just as it is for the United 
States Congress. This point outweighed the merits of having the presi- 
dent and president-elect serve as delegates. The committee voted in favor 
of not changing the bylaws on this point. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 






COMMITTEE REPORTS 59 

CORPORATE PRACTICE COMMITTEE 

Henry C. Harrelson, Jr., Chairman 

W. M. Ditto J. Henry Ligon, Jr. 

G. F. McBrayer Penn Marshall, Jr. 

J. Harry Spillman 

There has been no change in the Corporate Practice Law since this 
committee reported to the House of Delegates in May, 1965. Therefore, 
this committee has nothing in the way of information to report. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 



DENTAL ASSISTANTS COMMITTEE 

William H. Oliver, Chairman 

T. S. Fleming O. J. Freund 

Charles H. Sugg Gerald F. McBrayer 

Meetings: This committee has not met since its appointment Febru- 
ary 16, 1966. 

Assignments: This committee was appointed by President Roberts to 
study, analyze and suggest progress of dental assistant training programs. 
Up to this time, one member of the Society has served as liaison with 
the dental assistants. Because the committee was appointed late in the 
administrative year, only the groundwork could be laid before the annual 
meeting. 

Results of Preliminary Study: The following data has been compiled 
from information received from schools offering dental assistant training 
programs. 

Wayne Technical Institute, Goldsboro: A course in dental as- 
sisting was begun in August, 1963. As of March 25, 1966, approxi- 
mately 34 students have been graduated. There are now 20 students 
in training. The maximum capacity of each class is 12, but it is under- 
stood that the school could accommodate 18, if necessary. Of the 
34 graduates, 20 are presently employed and 16 have passed the 
examination of the Dental Assistant Certification Board. The one- 
year program is provisionally approved by the ADA Council on 
Dental Education. 

Technical Institute of Alamance, Burlington: The first class 
began training in September, 1962. To date approximately 33 stu- 
dents have been graduated. The maximum capacity of each class is 
12, and the program is operating at maximum capacity. The pro- 
gram is fully approved by the ADA Council on Dental Education. 

Central Piedmont Community College, Charlotte: The first 
class entered in September, 1964, and to date one class of 9 students 
has been graduated. The maximum capacity of each class is 20 and 
20 students are currently enrolled. This one-year program has been 
provisionally approved by the ADA Council on Dental Education. 

UNC School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill: Information on the 
dental assistant training program at the UNC School of Dentistry has 
not been obtained. 

Conclusion: The committee feels that with the basic information re- 
ceived, the number of dental assistants being graduated is far inadequate 
to meet the demands of the dentists of North Carolina. Even with the basic 
equipment cost of $35-40,000 per school, the committee feels that at least 



60 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

two or more schools are needed. The location of the schools can be de- 
termined only after a survey of individual dentists is conducted. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 

Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 

DENTAL CARE FOR THE AGED COMMITTEE 

Henry O. Lineberger, Jr., Chairman 

Bennie D. Barker James E. Graham, Jr. 

L. A. Cameron Glenn L. Hooper 

C. Z. Candler, Jr. John T. Hughes 

A. P. Cline John R. Irwin 

Charles S. Cooke A. T. Lockwood 

S. P. Gay Coyte R. Minges 
M. H. Truluck 

Meetings: There were no meetings of the committee, but members of 
the committee participated in various other activities that were closely 
associated with problems of the aging. 

Activities: With the coming of the Medicare program for hospitalization 
and medical care, dental programs have been temporarily forgotten. This 
is to be expected as there is an almost insurmountable task for those who 
must set up the program. There is definitely one thing true — dentistry 
is next. As soon as the initial program is off the ground, dentistry will 
be added, whether it is by the old-age group down, or the "Headstart" 
program up. 

Under the present Medical Aid to the Aging (Kerr-Mills), and the Old 
Age Assistance (Welfare) Programs, dentistry has been merely providing 
"emergency" treatment. 

For the past year only $6,953.09 was spent for dentistry under the 
Kerr-Mills program, while $24,835.05 was spent under the Old Age As- 
sistance (Welfare) programs. This is a very small amount of the total 
$6,000, 000-plus spent on the entire health-welfare program. Most of the 
$31,788.24 was used for emergency extractions and denture repair. So we 
can all see that as far as a dental program is concerned, we are still twenty 
years behind in the old "emergency treatment" era of public assistance. 

There are great chanegs being made, and dentistry must be prepared 
when asked for its contribution. This committee believes that the only way 
to give adequate dentistry to any and all groups brought under the many 
government programs is by some form of Dental Service Program. Under 
this type of program, the dental profession would be the determining force 
for the dentistry administered. A Dental Service Corporation, in our 
opinion, is dentistry's only answer to governmental control. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 

DENTAL CARE FOR THE AGED COMMITTEE 

Supplemental Report Number 1 

This supplemental report is made because there was no resolution pro- 
posed in the committee's report and recent actions and decisions of courts 
make the North Carolina Dental Society a "state action" body. 

Therefore, the Dental Care for the Aged Committee recommends that 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 61 

the House of Delegates of the North Carolina Dental Society request the 
1967 Legislature to enact a law that would make it mandatory for the 
Governor to seek recommendations from the North Carolina Dental So- 
ciety for a dental member on the State Board of Welfare. 

Resolution 

Resolved, that the North Carolina Dental Society seek appropriate leg- 
islation in the 1967 General Assembly to provide for a dental member of 
the State Board of Public Welfare and to make it mandatory for the 
Governor to seek recommendations from the North Carolina Dental So- 
ciety for the appointment of a dental member on the State Board of 
Public Welfare. 

Action by House of Delegates: Resolution rejected May 6, 1966. 

DENTAL EDUCATION COMMITTEE 

Cleon W. Sanders (1969), Chairman 
R. B. Barden (1966) Riley E. Spoon, Jr. (1970) 

E. D. Baker (1970) F. A. Buchanan (1966) 

Roy L. Lindahl (1967) S. P. Gay (1968) 

Z. L. Edwards, Jr. (1967) George S. Alexander (1968) 

Ralph D. Coffey (1969) 

Activities: The chairman of this committee w^as asked to appear before 
the "Search Committee" which he did, in company with the Executive 
Secretary, Mr. Andrew Cunningham, on the evening of November 22, 
1965. At that time this committee was holding meetings in an effort to 
find a dean to succeed Dr. John C. Brauer. Many questions were asked 
by the committee members and Mr. Cunningham and the chairman 
answered to the best of their ability and knowledge. At the time this 
report is being written, it is understood that the "Search Committee" has 
recommended to the chancellor, Dr. James W. Bawden as new dean of 
the School of Dentistry. It is the feeling of the Education Committee that 
our sincere appreciation be expressed to all members of the "Search 
Committee" for the hard work (meeting twice each week for four 
months) and the wonderful job they have done. Our most sincere thanks 
to Dr. Robert J. Shankle, School of Dentistry, who was chairman of this 
committee. 

Meetings: This committee held a meeting in Pinehurst at The Carolina, 
on Saturday, January 8, 1966, at 3:30 p.m. Discussion centered around 
the responsibilities and opinions of the members of this committee in 
relation to securing a suitable dean for the School of Dentistry. Mentioned 
also was progress being made relating to this committee's assignment by 
Dr. Darden Eure to assist in carrying out the resolution adopted by the 
1964 House of Delegates (Trans. 1964:56). This resolution dealt with 
increasing the number of hygienists. 

UNC Building Program Curtailed: Funds were authorized by the State 
and federal governments for construction of facilities adequate to ac- 
commodate twenty-five (25) additional dental students and forty-five 
(45) additional hygienists. Things were taking shape very rapidly to 
make this possible and then the chairman received the following informa- 
tion from Dean John C. Brauer on March 3, 1966: 

Because construction costs have risen about one percent per month 
for the past year and continue to rise, it will be necessary to eliminate 
twenty percent of the total building program, or one entire floor, 
from the clinical dental building. Furthermore, about 35,000 square 
feet will be eliminated from the original 225,000 square feet planned 
for the basic science and library facility. These figures predicated 
on the letting of contracts on specific dates when the working draw- 
ings are completed and approved. The present level of dental hygiene 



62 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

education program (15 per class), present graduate education pro- 
gram and present level of continuing education will be retained. 
Dental student intake will be increased from fifty to seventy-five 
per class. All above considerations have been finalized by the Uni- 
versity administration. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 

Action by House of Delegates: The following resolution was submitted 
by Reference Committee A and adopted May 6, 1966. 

Whereas, the 1965 General Assembly appropriated funds of approxi- 
mately 6.2 million dollars, and Federal Agencies designated funds amount- 
ing to approximately six million dollars, for construction of a new Dental 
Clinical Wing, an addition to the basic science building, and a new Di- 
vision of Health Affairs Library at the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill, and, 

Whereas, These facilities will provide for expansion of the class size 
for the D.D.S. curriculum from 50 to 75 students, increase in dental hy- 
giene students from 15 to 60 per class, the development of auxiliary per- 
sonnel teacher-training programs and expansion of graduate and con- 
tinuing education programs, and. 

Whereas, the rapidly increasing cost of construction during the past 
eighteen months has required the University and State Administration 
to reduce the size of the planned structures by approximately 25 percent, 
thus eliminating those areas not supported in-part by Federal Funds in- 
cluding: 

(a) expansion of the dental hygiene program 

(b) development of teacher-training programs for dental auxiliary 
personnel 

(c) expansion of graduate programs relating to specialty training 
and training for academic careers and, 

(d) extension of continuing education or post graduate programs. 
Whereas, the loss of these facilities and programs would have a severe 

impact on the health care available to the people of the state and on the 
general welfare of the population. Therefore, be it 

Resolved, that the House of Delegates of the North Carolina Dental 
Society express its full support and authorize the officers of the Society 
to seek legislative action in the 1967 General Assembly which would 
provide the appropriation necessary to restore the planned facilities 
and programs to their original size and intended function. 



COUNCIL ON DENTAL HEALTH 

W. L. Hand, Jr., (1966), Chairman 
Frank G. Atwater (1967) J. Homer Guion (1969) 

F. A. Buchanan (1970) E. A. Pearson, Jr. (1968) 

The Council on Dental Health is pleased to bring to your attention the 
fact that 175 dental students received loans enabling them to pursue 
dental careers, loans that could not have been made in this quantity if 
the dentists in this State were not realizing and responding to the need 
for dental student loans. 

It is prudent to be cognizant of the continued need for a Student Loan 
Program. The Health Profession Scholarship Program is not designed to 
supplant loan programs but to supplement them. 

The council reviewed the participation of dentists throughout the State 
relative to Project Headstart and reported to the President as directed 
for his information and action. 

Continued efforts through the Health Career Days, Health Career Con- 
gresses, Science Fairs, Dental Career Day at Chapel Hill were directed 
to those students who are seeking information and guidance toward dental 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 63 

careers. An exhibit "Careers in Dentistry" with appropriate informational 
and motivational literature is available through our Central Office. 

Your continued efforts and support for communal fluoridation will 
be needed at this annual session. 

To the many dentists that have given of their time and thoughts for 
the proper guidance and information of prospective dental students, may 
the council urge a renewal of efforts to bring to our profession individuals 
who will reflect a mature professional man. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 

Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 



DENTAL HEALTH INSURANCE-INDUSTRY LIAISON COMMITTEE 

James B. Howell, Chairman 
Frank G. Atwater D. L. Henson 

J. B. Freedland Thomas M. Hunter 

J. W. GiRARD, Jr. Glenn A. Lazenby, Jr. 

Bennie D. Barker 

Meetings: The committee held a meeting on October 22, 1965. 

Assignments: On July 14, 1965, President Pearce Roberts, Jr. informed 
the committee that the purpose of the committee was as follows: 

"To form a joint committee with representatives of the health in- 
surance companies to evaluate policies and claims arising from either 
source, and to recommend solutions for same. It will function strictly 
as an advisory group and will have no policing powers." 

Hospital Saving Association Fee Schedules: At the initial meeting, the 
committee was asked to consider a request from Mr. E. B. Crawford of 
Blue Cross, Chapel Hill, for certain information regarding fees for dental 
services authorized in the recent enactment of a statute by the North 
Carolina Legislature. Mr. Crawford, when contacted, stated that he had 
been working with Dr. Chapin of the University of North Carolina, and 
for the present time had all the information that was necessary. 

Investigation of Other Health Insurance Liaison Organizations: The 

committee has contacted and reviewed a similar organization in opera- 
tion by the Medical Society of the State of North Carolina. It has also 
reviewed the organization and operations of the Dental Health Insurance 
Committee of the State of New York, which is the only dental organization 
active in this field. 

Experimental Forms for Use in Health Insurance Claims: Experimental 
forms, prepared by the American Dental Association Council on Dental 
Health, and by the American Society of Periodontics, have been obtained 
for the files of the committee. 

N. C. Committee of the Health Insurance Council: Contact with this 
organization, which represents the health insurance industry, has been 
made through President Pearce Roberts, Jr. A reply has been received 
from Chairman, H. Frank Starr, Jr., M.D., congratulating the Society on 
the formation of this liaison committee. This letter also invites the chair- 
man to attend a joint meeting to be held with the Insurance-Industry 
Liaison Committee of the North ^aroUna Medical Society, on April 13, 
1966, and later to explore methods of implementing co-operative action 
with the Health Insurance Council of North Carolina. 

General Objectives of the Committee Action: It has been the objective 
of this committee to proceed with caution, while reviewing all available 
information in this field so that any action taken could be fully justified. 



64 COMMITTEE REPORTS 



Resolution 

Resolved, that the North Carolina Dental Society Committee on Dental 
Health Insurance-Industry Liaison take joint action with the North Caro- 
lina Committee of the Health Insurance Council to form a committee to 
evaluate policies and claims arising from either source, and to recom- 
mend solutions for same, and be it further 

Resolved, that this committee function strictly as an advisory group 
and have no policing powers. 

Action by House of Delegates: Adopted May 6, 1966. 



DENTAL HYGIENISTS COMMITTEE 

J. Harry Spillman, Chairman 

c. w. poindexter max w. carpenter 

Lloyd B. Stanley James H. Lee 

Meetings: The committee held a meeting November 28, 1965, and had 
numerous telephone and letter communications throughout the year. 

Assignments: The 1965 House of Delegates adopted the following reso- 
lution (Trans. 1965:359): 

"Resolved, that the President of the North Carolina Dental Society 
express to the State Board of Education's Advisory Committee for 
Education of Dental Auxiliary Personnel, the urgency of establish- 
ing a school of dental hygiene in the Eastern part of the State; and 
specifically, to ask that this committee visit the Wayne Technical 
Institute in Goldsboro and study its facilities and accreditation po- 
tential as they pertain to the establishment of a school of dental hy- 
giene, and urge immediate favorable action. 

"Resolved, that the members of the North Carolina Dental Society 
do all in their power to encourage and solicit qualified applicants for 
dental programs at the Charlotte School." 

Actions: This committee, together with practically the entire member- 
ship of the North Carolina Dental Society, worked hard to get the North 
Carolina State Legislature to reinstate funds for the dental programs at 
Central Piedmont Community College and the Wayne Technical Institute 
that had been cut in the original budget. 

Members of this committee met many times informally with members 
of the local Dental Advisory Committee of the Guilford Technical Insti- 
tute in an effort to advise the administration of the school on steps to be 
taken in order to begin a school of dental hygiene that would conform to 
the desires of the members of the NCDS. The full committee met at the 
Guilford Technical Institute on November 28, 1965, and drafted the fol- 
lowing resolution: 

"Resolved, that this committee finds the location, physical plant, 
and preliminary planning highly conductive to the establishment of 
a school of dental hygiene at Guilford Technical Institute." 
In order to justify our action in drafting this resolution, which has been 
subject to question on the part of some members, we would like to briefly 
review the past resolutions of the House of Delegates of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society. 

In May, 1964, the House of Delegates passed three resolutions which, 
in effect, recognized the critical shortage of dental hygienists in the State 
and directed the president of the NCDS to appoint a committee to try 
to alleviate this shortage. This committee was directed to "activate a 
program to establish additional schools of dental hygiene immediately." 
Our committee interpreted this to mean activating as many schools of 
dental hygiene of superior quality as was felt necessary to meet this 



i 



I 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 65 

shortage. We did not believe the 1965 House of Delegates meant in their 
resolutions that we were to confine our efforts to the two schools men- 
tioned in the resolutions, but were mentioned only because programs were 
already planned for those schools. 

Our committee has been working with the State Advisory Committee 
for Education of Dental Auxiliary Personnel in order to determine the 
needs for dental hygienists in North Carolina for a period of time, ap- 
proximately the next five years. 

A report on this study will be completed before the scheduled meet- 
ings of the House of Delegates in May. 

As a result of studies and actions of this committee during 1965, four 
resolutions are submitted. 

Resolutions 

1. Resolved, that with the activation of a school of dental hygiene at 
Wayne Technical Institute and the Guilford Technical Institute, together 
with the present programs at Chapel Hill and Central Piedmont Com- 
munity College, the needs in the State for dental hygienists will be met 
for the immediate future and further programs be discouraged until a re- 
evaluation is made of the needs after the present schools have graduated 
their first classes. 

2. Resolved, that this committee continue to work closely with the State 
Advisory Committee for Education of Dental Auxiliary Personnel with 
the common aim of rendering assistance to programs being initiated and 
those already begun, and particularly to see that these programs work 
toward receiving full accreditation from the Council on Dental Educa- 
tion of the American Dental Association. 

3. Resolved, that the president of the North Carolina Dental Society 
urge the State Advisory Committee for Education of Dental Auxiliary 
Personnel to study methods of increasing the salaries of directors of 
dental programs and their assistants to insure that properly trained faculty 
members may be attracted and retained by these schools. 

4. Resolved, that the president of the North Carolina Dental Society 
urge the State Board of Health to re-appraise the salary scale of dental 
hygienists in the Division of Dental Health, so that when hygienists are 
available in sufficient quantity to satisfy all the needs of the practicing 
dentists, others may be attracted to the field of public health. 

Action by House of Delegates: Resolutions 2, 3, and 4 adopted May 6, 
1966. Resolution 1 amended and adopted May 6, 1966, to read: 

Resolved, that with the activation of a school of dental hygiene at 
Wayne Technical Institute and the Guilford Technical Institute together 
with the present programs at Chapel Hill and Central Piedmont Com- 
munity College further programs be discouraged for one year so that a 
re-evaluation may be made of the program. 

DENTAL HYGIENISTS COMMITTEE 

Supplemental Report Number 1 

In answer to a request from the Executive Committee, the Dental Hy- 
gienists Committee of the NCDS is submitting this report as a supplement 
to its final committee report. 

Current Dental Hygiene Programs: There are at present two schools 
of dental hygiene operating in the State: the UNC School of Dentistry 
with an annual enrollment of approximately fifteen, and Central Pied- 
mont Community College with an annual enrollment of thirty-five to 
forty girls. In March, Wayne Technical Institute in Goldsboro will begin 
with an initial enrollment of seventeen girls, but this will be raised to 
between twenty and twenty-five this Fall. We have learned that a dental 
hygiene program at Guilford Technical Institute in Jamestown has re- 
ceived its final approval and will enroll its first class this spring. En- 



66 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

rollment will be sixty girls for the first two-year period and approxi- 
mately twenty girls per year after that. 

We have been advised by the Dean of the UNC School of Dentistry 
that because of unexpected accelerated construction costs, the dental hy- 
giene classes there will remain at the current level for the foreseeable 
future. Also, the plans at Chapel Hill are to place increasing emphasis 
on the training of students for the Bachelors Degree (four years) in order 
to meet the demands for teachers in dental hygiene schools. 

At the current levels of enrollment and allowing for normal attrition, 
the four schools should graduate approximately eighty to one hundred 
dental hygienists per year. 

The committee feels that for the immediate future, additional schools 
of dental hygiene should be discouraged. However, we feel that after all 
these schools have graduated their first classes, a re-evaluation of the 
needs be made. If this further study indicates that the needs are not 
being met, then consideration should be given to starting additional 
schools, or increasing the size of classes at the existing ones. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 



DENTAL PREPAYMENT COMMITTEE 

Glenn F. Bitler, Chairman 

M. W. Aldridge W. E. Kelley 

C. T. Barker H. O. Lineberger, Jr. 

F. S. Cunningham E. A. Pearson, Jr. 

R. A. Daniel, Jr. J. W. Sigmon 

M. Lamar Dorton T. Edgar Sikes, Jr. 

M. M. Forbes Freeman C. Slaughter 

Meetings: Committee meetings were held at the Second, Third, Fourth, 
and Fifth District Society meetings, and on December 6, 1965, January 11, 
1966, and February 6, 1966. 

Assignments: The committee was requested to review all forms of 
dental prepayment and make recommendations to the North Carolina 
Dental Society. 

Results of Study: The committee presented to all those in attendance 
at the District Officers Conference in December, 1965, mimeographed 
copies of "Suggested Principles of Acceptability of Dental Care Contracts 
Offered by Commercial Insurance Carriers." A summary of prepaid 
dental care was presented to the conference, and Dr. E. A. Pearson, Jr., 
spoke on the Public Assistance Programs now in use in North Carolina. 
The committee made a recnmmendation that a Workshop on Dental Pre- 
payment be held prior to the annual May meeting of the Society, to in- 
form all dentists of the State what dental prepayment involves. 

The Executive Committee of the NCDS approved the recommendation 
for the Workshop on January 8, 1966. 

Seven nationally-known men in the field of dental prepayment con- 
sented to speak at the Workshop to be held in Raleigh April 14-16, 1966. 

The committee desires to withhold its recommendations until after the 
Workshop has been held. A supplementary report will be filed and pre- 
sented to the House of Delegates. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 7, 1966. 



68 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

DENTAL PREPAYMENT COMMITTEE 

Supplemental Report Number 1 

From the results of the North Carolina Dental Prepayment Confer- 
ence in Raleigh, April 14-16, 1966, it was concluded that now is the time 
to institute and structure an active dental service corporation. 

It was generally felt by the group that the dental service corporation 
gives the ability of control in the hands of organized dentistry. 

All faculty members were questionea as to the desirability of initiating 
a so-called no-risk dental .service corporation merely to administer the 
various federal programs. By a substantial margin, we were advised to 
go into the capitalized dental service corporation from the beginning 
for several reasons. One was that this would more nearly satisfy the In- 
surance Commissioner and another was that we would then be equipped 
to act in the private sector to negotiate with various companies, unions, 
etc. Several faculty members were questioned about methods of admin- 
istering programs such as Headstart. 

Consensus of Work Group No. 1: When dealing with commercial insur- 
ance plans that both the dental service corporation and insurance car- 
riers can co-exist in a harmonious competitive basis. 

1. Adopt a set of basic principles by which any proposed or pay- 
ment plan could be judged. 

2. Set up an appropriate committee to apply these principles or 
standards to any plan which attempts to operate in our State to the 
end that the plan shall be rated acceptable or unacceptable to the 
NCDS membership and the public at large. 

3. Recognize that a DSC is a necessity for our State and therefore 
we should seek the formation of a DSC but with the caution that we 
investigate the possibility of at least in the beginning purchase some 
of our service from av exi<5ting exoerif^nced organization. 

4. Propose that the NCDS join the National Association of Dental 
Service Plans. 

Faculty Comments: Mr. Hoggard and Dr. Lindahl both thought no- 
risk, service corporation best, at least to begin with. 

Mr. Harding and Mr. Goodman both endorsed the idea of full-risk 
trended dental service corporation. 

Mr. Lassiter and Dr. Ryan both thought it desirable to set up dental 
service corporation to encompass all programs. 

Principles of Acceptability: The Dental Prepayment Committee drafted 
"Suggested Principles of Acceptability of Dental Care Contracts Offered 
by Commercial Insurance Carriers." A copy is attached to this report. 
These principles were reviewed by the District Officers Conference, De- 
cember 4-5, 1965. 

Recommendations: The Dental Prepayment Committee recommends 
that the resolutions adopted at the North Carolina Workshop on Dental 
Prepayment be adopted by the North Carolina Dental Society. The reso- 
lutions appear at the end of this report. 

Resolutions 

1. Resolved, that the House of Delegates adopt the "Suggested Principles 
of Acceptability of Dental Care Contracts Offered by Commercial Insur- 
ance Carriers." 

2. Resolved, that the Dental Service Corporation Committee be directed 
to draw up articles of incorporation and bylaws, and prepare prototype 
prepaid dental care contracts for presentation to the Executive Commit- 
tee for review and approval, and be it further 

Resolved, that upon approval by the Executive Committee, application 
be made for approval by the Insurance Commissioner and Secretary of 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 69 

State leading to the incorporation of a Dental Service Corporation, and 
be it further 

Resolved, that an appropriation of funds not to exceed $5,000 be au- 
thorized for implementation of this resolution. 

3. Resolved, that the North Carolina Dental Society join the National 
Association of Dental Service Plans. 

Action by House of Delegates: Resolution 1 adopted May 6. Resolution 2 
amended and adopted May 6, 1966, to read: 

Resolved, that the Dental Service Corporation Committee be directed 
to draw up articles of incorporation and bylaws, and prepare prototype 
prepaid dental care contracts for presentation to the Executive Committee 
for review and approval, and be in further 

Resolved, that upon approval by the Executive Committee, application 
be made for approval by the Insurance Commissioner and Secretary of 
State leading to the incorporation of a Dental Service Corporation and be 
it further 

Resolved, that an appropriation of funds not to exceed $5,000, to be 
allocated from the reserve fund, be authorized for implementation of this 
resolution. 

Resolution 3 rejected May 6, 1966. 



SUGGESTED PRINCIPLES OF ACCEPTABILITY OF DENTAL CARE 
CONTRACTS OFFERED BY COMMERCIAL INSURANCE CARRIERS 

Recognizing the need and desirability of encouraging further experi- 
mentation in the design and operation of effective mechanisms for fi- 
nancing the cost of dental care services on an insured or prepaid basis, 
the Prepayment Committee of the North Carolina Dental Society has 
developed the following principles of acceptability for the guidance of 
commercial insurance carriers in the design and operation of dental care 
contracts offered for purchase to residents of the State of North Carolina. 

It is the intention of the Prepayment Committee that these principles 
will serve to expand, clarify, and supplement the Principles for De- 
termining the Acceptability of Plans for the Group Purchase of Dental 
Care, as adopted by the American Dental Association, for specific appli- 
cation to plans offered by commercial insurance carriers. 

These principles are designed to protect, preserve, and promote the best 
interest of the public, the profession, and the insurers. 

1. Commercial insurance carriers offering insured dental care con- 
tracts to the public shall meet all the requirements of the State 
Insurance Commission, including proof of fiscal solvency and 
be licensed to transact business in the state. 

2. All ethical qualified dentists licensed to practice in the state shall 
be eligible to provide dental services to beneficiaries covered 
under dental care contracts offered by commercial insurance 
carriers. 

3. Policy contracts issued by commercial carriers shall provide for 
complete freedom of choice by individual beneficiaries in select- 
ing any ethically licensed dentist in the state to provide dental 
services. Conversely, the right of any dentist to accept or reject 
such beneficiaries shall be maintained. 

4. The carrier shall recognize that all professional standards of 
treatment shall be entirely within the control of the dental pro- 
fession. All diagnosis and treatment planning shall remain ex- 
clusively the prerogative of dental practitioners. 

5. Contracts and dental care plans shall be designed and developed 
with the advice and guidance of the dental profession. Through 
their design, such plans and contracts shall encourage the utiliza- 
tion of preventive dental services and limited benefit plans should 
emphasize preventive and restorative services. 



70 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

6. Insurance devices, techniques, and methods calculated to con- 
trol utilization and costs, such as deductible and coinsurance 
factors, should be employed in commercial insurance plans only 
to the extent necessary to maintain the fiscal soundness of the 
plan and to prevent abuse. 

7. Policyholder contracts, policies, and promotional literature 
should clearly state in understandable terms the dental benefits 
covered by the plan and the conditions under which such bene- 
fits are provided. They should likewise clearly specify all bene- 
fit limitations, exclusions, and restrictions. 

8. Restrictions and limitations applied to diagnostic and preventive 
dental services shall be limited to those required to prevent plan 
abuse. 

9. Where funding limitations preclude purchase by the subscriber 
group of comprehensive benefit coverage, the use of deductibles 
and coinsurance features should be utilized in order to afford 
the broadest range of benefits possible. Use of such features 
should be minimized in contract renewals. 

10. Plan administration should include an appropriate mechanism 
for the review and evaluation of the quantity, quality, and cost 
of dental services provided to beneficiaries. 

11. Plans shall include adequate provision for the impartial adjudica- 
tion of questionable claims and the review of policyholder and 
beneficiary complaints. All questions or complaints arising out 
of the dentist-patient relationship shall be settled exclusively 
by the dental profession. 

12. All plans or contracts for dental care offered by commercial 
carriers shall provide for at least the following minimal bene- 
fits: Diagnostic services, continuing emergency care, prophylaxes, 
and restorative services and shall cover not less than 75 percent 
of the aggregate cost of such services. 

13. All contracts shall clearly specify the extent of the insurer's 
liability for indemnification of policyholder expenditures for 
dental services. 

14. Emergency care for the relief of pain and acute painful condi- 
tions shall be included as contract benefits free of all restrictions 
pertaining to the financial obligations of the insurer, the resi- 
dence of the insured, or the time or place of occurrence. 

15. Policies which provide for the insuring of specialty and/or low 
incidence dental services only shall not be considered as pro- 
fessionally acceptable dental care plans. 

16. All carriers shall strive to design plans which provide uniform 
benefits in multi-state and multi-employer contracts. 

17. Tables of allowances, indemnity schedules and other methods of 
payment provided shall be sufficient to cover as large a portion 
of the actual cost of dental services as possible and shall be 
clearly promoted to the public as an indemnity which may be 
less than the prevailing rate charged for the service. 

18. Promotional standards utilized in marketing dental insurance 
plans shall not conflict with the ethical principles of the organized 
profession. Such advertising methods shall be of a responsible 
nature which in no way attack, degrade, or in any manner may be 
considered as engaging in unfair or unethical marketing practices. 

19. Claims procedures and reporting requirements shall be simple 
and minimal in number and volume, yet sufficient to adequately 
identify the beneficiary and describe the dental services rendered. 

20. Medical/ surgical and hospital contracts whose benefits include 
services or procedures which may be performed by qualified 
dentists shall make clear the identity of such procedures and 
services, and clearly specify that benefit claims for such services 
provided by qualified dental practitioners are fully compensable. 

21. No dental, medical/surgical, or hospital insurance policy may 
discriminate through contract restriction or administrative in- 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 71 

terpretation in determining the underwriter's liability, when 
such restriction or interpretation is based solely on the character 
of the professional degree and/ or licensure held by the provider 
of the service. 

22. When requested, insurance carriers shall produce evidence, 
similar to that provided to the Commissioner of Insurance, that 
a reasonable relationship exists between the scope of dental 
benefits and services offered in its constructual committments, 
the anticipated cost of providing such benefits and services, and 
the premium utilized in fixing the cost of the policy. 

23. All policies which cover any portion of the cost of dental services 
shall include a statement as to the non-cancellable nature of the 
contract based solely on adverse utilization or claims experience. 

24. Commercial carriers offering insured dental care contracts shall 
maintain as part of their regular organization an active program 
of professional relations directed toward securing and maintain- 
ing the co-operation of dental practitioners. 

25. Carriers shall indicate an interest and willingness to participate 
in joint efforts with the dental profession to promote the oral 
health of all citizens through planned programs of dental health 
education which are designed to encourage the utilization of 
preventive dental services and stimulate the practice of good 
habits of oral hygiene. 

DENTAL SERVICE CORPORATION COMMITTEE 

Roy L. Lindahl, Chairman 

Thomas G. Collins Cecil A. Pless, Jr. 

William A. Current M. B. Richardson 

C. P. Godwin Neal Sheffield, Jr. 

L. C. Holshouser Charles M. Westrick 

W. E. Kelley J. M. Zealy 

Meetings: There were no formal meetings of the committee during the 
year. A scheduled meeting had to be postponed due to illness. 

Assignments: The 1965 House of Delegates adopted the following reso- 
lutions (Trans. 1965, p. 362): 

"Resolved, that inasmuch as there is a definite possibility that there 
will be formed, in the next several months a North Carolina Dental 
Service Corporation, and that the sum of three hundred dollars 
previously provided for the committee will probably be insufficient, 
the addition of one thousand ($1,000) dollars be approved for the 
next year, provided that expenditures in excess of five hundred 
dollars ($500) be approved by the Executive Committee." 

Activity During the Year: The chairman has met with several members 
and has continued to investigate dental service corporations. Contact was 
made with dental service activities in the states of Illinois, New York, and 
California. All of the members of the committee were supplied with 
rather extensive reference material to familiarize them with the develop- 
ment of prepayment programs and dental service corporations. These 
have been supplied by the U. S. Public Health Service and the California 
Dental Service. 

Close liaison has been established and maintained with the Dental 
Prepayment Committee and this committee has been informed concern- 
ing the development of the North Carolina Workshop on Dental Pre- 
payment. 

The National Association of Dental Service Plans has been formed 
and endorsed by the House of Delegates of the American Dental Asso- 
ciation. This organization has an important function in co-ordinating na- 
tional dental service activities but not of itself an insuring agent. The 
North Carolna Dental Society is eligible for constituent society mem- 
bership. 

A supplemental report will follow which will also include a resolution. 



72 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Resolution 

Resolved, that the North Carolina Dental Society establish constituent 
society membership in the National Association of Dental Service Plans. 

Action by House of Delegates: Adopted May 6, 1966. 

DENTAL SERVICE CORPORATION COMMITTEE 

Supplemental Report Number 1 

Following the Prepayment Workshop sponsored by the Dental Division 
of the North Carolina State Department of Health the consensus of the 
committee was to initiate at the earliest possible time a dental service 
corporation in the State of North Carolina. 

During the meeting contact was made with the chairman by representa- 
tives of Hospital Saving Association of Chapel Hill and Hospital Care 
Association of Durham, the Blue Cross-Blue Shield agencies in the State. 
It was requested by these people to open talks leading to co-operation 
between the profession of dentistry and Blue Cross-Blue Shield in the 
State. It is the suggestion of this committee that the representatives of 
the North Carolina Dental Society meet with these organizations to dis- 
cuss the areas of mutual interest which might be expressed. It should 
be made clear that the profession of dentistry is not willing to abrogate 
its responsibility to maintain a high standard of practice to anyone other 
than the dental profession. 

Resolutions 

1. Resolved, that resolution 2 of Supplemental Report Number 1 of the 
Dental Prepayment Committee be adopted by the House of Delegates of 
the North Carolina Dental Society. 

2. Resolved, that representatives of the Dental Service Corporation 
Committee and other officially appointed representatives of the North 
Carolina Dental Society meet with representatives of Hospital Saving 
Association and Hospital Care Association to discuss areas of mutual in- 
terest in the establishment of dental prepayment in North Carolina. 

Action by House of Delegates: Resolution 1 withdrawn; resolution 2 
adopted May 6, 1966. 

DISTRICT APPORTIONMENT COMMITTEE 

Clifton E. Crandell, Chairman 

Darden J. EuRE, Vice Chairman 
J. W. GiRARD, Jr. M. M. Lilley 

M. M. Forbes J. E. Furr 

S. E. MosER C. R. VanderVoort 

H. P. Reeves, Jr. Norman F. Ross 

George S. Alexander Luther H. Butler 

G. W. Yokeley William H. Oliver 

J. H. Lee E. D. Baker 

Joseph M. Johnson 

Meetings: The committee held meetings in Raleigh on February 6, 1966, 
and March 13, 1966. 

Assignments: The Executive Committee directed the President of the 
North Carolina Dental Society to appoint a committee, as suggested by 
the 1965 District Officers Conference, to study the problem of just repre- 
sentation to our House of Delegates, and to submit a report of its studies 
and recommendations to the House of Delegates at its annual meeting in 
1966. 

Results of Study: The ADA House of Delegates is limited to 416 mem- 
bers. Each constituent society (54) and each federal dental service (5) is 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 73 

given one delegate regardless of size. The remaining 357 delegates are 
allocated to the 54 constituent societies proportionally to their number of 
active and life members. Fractional numbers of delegates are rounded 
to the nearest whole number and then adjusted by the method of least 
relative error to make the total equal to 416. 

A summary of a survey by the Washington State Dental Association 
was noted. Of the 54 constitutent societies, eight did not reply to a ques- 
tionnaire, seven have no House of Delegates, 28 are apportioned by popu- 
lation, four have no components, four have an equal number from each 
component on an Executive Committee or Council, or Board of Trustees, 
and North Carolina is the only state with a House of Delegates composed 
of an equal number of delegates from each component. 

Washington State Dental Association has a special committee on Dele- 
gate Distribution which has studied the problem and is submitting a 
resolution to their 1966 House of Delegates to establish a House size of 
75 in 1967, allocated as follows: one each to the president, president- 
elect, and immediate past-president; one to each component regardless of 
size; the remainder to the components proportionally, following the 
ADA method of least relative error. 

North Carolina Dental Society: It was sliown that the Second District 
has for the past five years been adding members twice as fast as the 
Fourth and Fifth Districts and similar growth is occurring in the Third 
and First Districts. 

New Members Added to North Carolina Dental Society 
By Districts During the Past Five Years 



Year 


1st Dist. 


2nd Dist. 


3rd Dist. 


4th Dist. 


5th Dist 


1965 


15 


14 


19 


8 


7 


1964 


15 


24 


18 


5 


10 


1963 


10 


12 


13 


5 


5 


1962 


12 


13 


10 


9 


4 


1961 


13 


26 


12 


10 


11 



65 89 72 37 37 

Four maps were drawn by the chaiman and considered by the com- 
mittee : 

Map a represents a reapportionment so that each of the five compo- 
nents will have an equal number of dentists (251) by adding Johnston, 
Sampson, Cumberland, Bladen, Robeson, and Columbus counties to the 
Fifth District; adding Person, Durham, Orange, and Chatham counties to 
the Fourth District; adding Forsyth and Stokes counties to the Third Dis- 
trict; removing Forsyth and Stokes from the Second District; and leaving 
the First District as is. 

Map B illustrates how two new components could be formed by reduc- 
ing all districts to a number of members similar to the Fifth District. 

Map C illustrates how ten components could be formed with a mem- 
bership equivalent to that of Mecklenburg County. 

Map D shows the status of the districts as of March 31, 1965, including 
the number of dentists in each county and district, the number of counties 
in each district and the number of new members added in each district 
in 1965. 

Litigation: It was pointed out that legal counsel was of the opinion that, 
should the issue be tested, the courts would probably order the changing 
of the representation of the districts. 

Recommendations: The committee recommends that the districts re- 
main as is at the present time, the delegates representing the districts as 



74 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

they are now serving. (On motion by Darden J. Eure, seconded by 
Joseph M. Johnson, passed). 

* Attachments: Maps A, B, C, and D. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 

Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966, 
with the following comment: 

"Reference Committee C wishes to question the accuracy of the para- 
graph entitled 'Litigation' on page twenty-four of the Blue Book. On 
the basis of an opinion from the State Society legal counsel, the assump- 
tion that the State Society would probably be forced to re-apportion is 
false." 

ETHICS COMMITTEE 

Thomas M. Hunter (1967), Chairman 
Elliot R. Motley (1970) Frank G. Atwater (1968) 

H. K. Thompson (1966) C. Z. Candler, Jr. (1969) 

Meetings: The committee held no formal meetings. All business was 
conducted by correspondence or telephone. 

Assignments: The committee received no assignments from the 1965 
House of Delegates. The usual requests for information and rulings were 
received. All these were handled on the district level with the chairman 
of this committee in consultation. The chairman supplied one lecture on 
the Code of Ethics of the North Carolina Dental Society to the graduating 
class at the University of North Carolina as indoctrination. 

A study of the Code of Ethics of the North Carolina Dental Society re- 
vealed typographical errors in Sections 12 and 14. Appropriate resolutions 
correcting these errors are submitted with this report. 

The study also revealed that subsequent to the adoption of the cur- 
rent Code of Ethics the following sections of the Principles of Ethics of 
the American Dental Association have been revised: Section 15 entitled 
"Use of Professional Titles and Degrees" in 1964; and Section 18 entitled 
"Announcement of Limitation of Practice" in 1962. Appropriate resolu- 
tions amending these sections of the NCDS Code of Ethics so that they 
conform with similar sections of the ADA Principles of Ethics are sub- 
mitted with this report. 

Resolutions 

1. Resolved, that the second paragraph of Section 12 of the Code of 
Ethics entitled "Advertising" be amended by adding the words "from 
whom they are receiving references" after the words "members of the 
profession" and before the word "but" so that the paragraph shall read: 

"Dentists practicing a specialty of dentistry may mail charts, re- 
prints, or personal communications to those members of the pro- 
fession from whom they are receiving references, but shall not be 
privileged to circularize the profession at large with charts, reprints, 
or any matter that is obviously a subterfuge for advertising." 

2. Resolved, that in the first paragraph of Section 14 of the Code of 
Ethics entitled "Office Door Lettering and Signs" the word "within" be 
changed to the word "with," so that it shall read: 

"A dentist may properly utilize office door lettering and signs 
provided that their style and text are consistent with the dignity of 
the profession and with the custom of other dentists in the com- 
munity." 



* For practical reasons the maps were not reproduced for this publica- 
tion. They are on file in the Central Office and copies will be furnished on 
request. 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 75 

3. Resolved, that Section 15 of the Code of Ethics entitled "Use of 
Professional Titles and Degrees" be deleted and the following substituted 
therefor : 

"Section 15. Use of Professional Titles and Degrees. A dentist may 
use the titles or degrees, Doctor, Dentist, D.D.S., or D.M.D., in con- 
nection with his name on cards, letterheads, office door signs and an- 
nouncements. A dentist who also possesses a medical degree may use 
this degree in addition to his dental degree in connection with his 
name on cards, letterheads, office door signs and announcements. A 
dentist who has been certified by a national certifying board for 
one of the specialties approved by the American Dental Association 
may use the title 'diplomate' in connection with his specialty on his 
cards, letterheads and announcements if such usage is consistent with 
the custom of dentists in the community. A dentist may not use his 
title or degree in connection with the promotion of any drug, agent, 
instrument or appliance. 

"The use of eponyms in connection with drugs, agents, instruments 
or appliances is generally to be discouraged." 

4. Resolved, that Section 18 of the Code of Ethics entitled "Speciali- 
zation and Limitation of Practice" be deleted and the following substituted 
therefor : 

''Section 18. Announcement of Limitation of Practice. Only a 
dentist who limits his practice exclusively to one of the special areas 
approved by the American Dental Association for limited practice 
may include a statement of his limitations in announcements, cards, 
letterheads, and directory listing (consistent with the custom of den- 
tists of the community), provided, at the time of the announcement, 
he has met the existing educational requirements and standards set 
by the American Dental Association for members wishing to an- 
nounce limitation of practice, or possesses a state license permitting 
announcement in an area approved by the American Dental Asso- 
ciation. 

"In accord with the established ethical ruling that dentists should 
not claim or imply superiority, use of the phrases 'Specialist in 

' or 'Specialist on ' in announcements, 

cards, letterheads or directory listings should be discouraged. The 
use of the phrase 'Practice limited to ' is preferable." 

Action by House of Delegates: Resolutions 1, 2 and 4 adopted May 7, 
1966. Resolution 3 amended and adopted May 7, 1966, to read: 

Resolved, that Section 15 of the Code of Ethics entitled "Use of Pro- 
fessional Titles and Degrees" be deleted and the following substituted 
therefor : 

"Section 15. Use of Professional Titles and Degrees. A dentist may use 
the titles or degrees, Doctor, Dentist, D.D.S. or D.M.D., in connection with 
his name on cards, letterheads, office door signs, and announcements. 
A dentist who also possesses a medical degree or any earned degree per- 
taining to dentistry may use this degree in addition to his name on cards, 
letterheads, office door signs and announcements. A dentist who has been 
certified by a national certifying board for one of the specialties ap- 
proved by the American Dental Association may use the title 'diplomate' 
in connection with his specialty on his cards, letterheads, and announce- 
ments if such usage is consistent with the custom of dentists of the com- 
munity. A dentist may not use his title or degree in connection with the 
promotion of any drug, agent, instrument or appliance. 

"The use of eponyms in connection with drugs, agents, instruments or 
appliances is generally discouraged." 

The following resolution submitted by the Reference Committee on 
Ethics was adopted May 7, 1966. 

"Resolved, that the last three paragraphs of Section 21 pertaining to 
conduct of relations with commercial laboratories and laboratory per- 



76 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 



sonnel be deleted from Section 21 and added to Section 6, 'Use of Aux- 
iliary Personnel' after the last paragraph in this Section." 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

S. H. ISENHOWER (1968), Chairman 

Roy L. Lindahl (1966) William L. Hand, Jr. (1967) 

Darden J. EuRE (1966) 

On January 8, 1966, the Executive Committee adopted a resolution 
to be presented to the House of Delegates which authorizes that a hotel 
suite be provided at ADA meetings for use by the North Carolina Dele- 
gation and members. The resolution is submitted with this report. 

On January 9, 1966, the Executive Committee approved in principle 
a program of State-wide fluoridation. An appropriate resolution is sub- 
mitted with this report. 

Resolutions 

1. Resolved, that a hotel suite, consisting of 2 bedrooms and a parlor 
be reserved at ADA meetings for the convenience of the North Carolina 
Delation an dmembers, and be it further 

Resolved, that the cost be paid by the Society, and be it further 
Resolved, that one bedroom be occupied by the President and the other 
by the Executive Secretary. 

2. Resolved, that the House of Delegates consider initiating a program 
of State-wide fluoridation as soon as practicable. 

Action by House of Delegates: Resolutions 1 and 2 adopted May 6, 1966. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Supplemental Report Number 1 

The Executive Committee of the North Carolina Dental Society recom- 
mends appropriate change in the Constitution and Bylaws to provide 
that the president and president-elect automatically be delegates to the 
American Dental Association. This recommendation is made for the 
following reasons: 

1. The president is the officially elected spokesman of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society, and as such should represent the Society in the House 
of Delegates of the American Dental Association. 




DR. THOMAS K. CURETON, physical fitness specialist, demonstrated his regime for better 

health as he lectured. 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 77 

2. This provision will guarantee close liaison between the delegation, 
the Executive Committee, and the House of Delegates of the N.C.D.S. 

3. The president-elect in order to maintain continuity so he may be 
fully informed should serve prior to his elevation to the office of president. 

4. Most state societies have found it to be advantageous and effective in 
maintaining and continuing the thoughts, efforts and actions of the ADA 
House of Delegates as they relate to the component societies by having 
their officers represented as delegates. 

5. It is also rcognized that the House of Delegates of the American 
Dental Association does not function by the seniority system. 

It is recommended that this be implemented the first year following 
approval by electing as delegates the president and president-elect to 
serve as delegates to the American Dental Association and that thereafter 
the president-elect be named automatically as a delegate to serve to the 
completion of his office as president of the North Carolina Dental Society. 

Resolutions 

1. Resolved, that Article V of the Consitution be amended by deleting 
Sections 1 and 2 and substituting therefor: 

"Section 1. The number of delegates to represent this Society in the 
House of Delegates of the American Dental Association shall be al- 
located annually by the American Dental Association. 

"The delegates to represent this Society in the House of Delegates 
of the American Dental Association shall be the President, and the 
President-Elect of this Society and additional delegates elected for 
terms of three years each in accordance with Article IX of these 
Bylaws to equal the number of delegates allocated this Society by 
the American Dental Association. 

"Section 2. The Vice President, Secretary-Treasurer, Chairman of 
the Executive Committee, Editor-Publisher, Immediate Past Presi- 
dent, and members of the Executive Committee by seniority, shall be 
alternate delegates as required to equal the number of delegates. 
Should additional alternates be necessary, they shall be elected for 
terms of one year each in accordance with Article IX of these By- 
laws." 

2. Resolved, to activate the change in the Constitution and Bylaws for 
1967 to include the President and President-Elect as delegates to the 
ADA, expiring terms for the year 1967 shall be filled automatically by 
the President and President-Elect. 

3. Resolved, that the incoming president appoint a committee to seek 
property for lease suitable to our needs with adequate parking for a new 
Central Office, such property to be approximately 1,200 square feet at a 
maximum rental of $5.00 per square foot. 

4. Resolved, that the House of Delegates of the North Carolina Dental 
Society authorize the donation of $300 to the Fine Arts Fund of the new 
American Dental Association Building. 

5. Resolved, that the House of Delegates of the North Carolina Dental 
Society authorize a token contribution of $25 to the A.F.D.E. in recogni- 
tion of the support of the purposes of the fund and further, that the House 
encourage the membership at large to contribute on an individual basis. 

6. Resolved, that the North Carolina Dental Society seek legislation 
where possible to gain Society endorsed representatives on the boards and 
councils and other health agencies of the State of North Carolina where 
dentistry is a part of their administered programs. 

Action by House of Delegates: Resolutions 3, 4 and 6 adopted May 6, 
1966. Resolution 1 amended and adopted May 6, 1966, to read: 



78 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Resolved, that Article V of the Constitution be amended by deleting 
Sections 1 and 2 and substituting therefor: 

"Section 1. The number of delegates to represent this Society in the 
House of Delegates of the American Dental Association shall be al- 
located annually by the American Dental Association. 

"The delegates to represent this Society in the House of Delegates 
of the American Dental Association shall be the President, for a term 
of one year, and additional delegates elected for terms of three years 
each in accordance with Article IX of the Bylaws to equal the num- 
ber of delegates allocated this Society by the American Dental As- 
sociation." 

"Section 2. The President-Elect, Vice President, Secretary-Trea- 
surer, Chairman of the Executive Committee, Editor-Publisher, Im- 
mediate Past President, and members of the Executive Committee by 
seniority, shall be alternate delegates as required to equal the num- 
ber of delegates. Should additional alternates be necessary, they 
shall be elected for terms of one year each in accordance with Ar- 
ticle IX of the Bylaws." 

Resolution 2 amended and adopted May 6, 1966, to read: 

Resolved, that these changes in the Constitution and Bylaws become 
effective in 1967. 

Resolution 5 amended and adopted May 6, 1966, to read: 
Resolved, that the House of Delegates of the North Carolina Dental 
Society authorize a contribution of $100 to the American Fund for Dental 
Education in recognition of the support of the purposes of the Fund, and 
further that the House encourage the membership at large to contribute 
on an individual basis. 

INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION COMMITTEE 

S. B. TowLER, Chairman 

E. D. Baker Luther H. Butler 

James W. Bawden 

The committee is pleased to report that only one letter has been re- 
ceived referring to the fee schedule. The writer was immediately con- 
tacted by telephone and asked to furnish the committee with specific 
information of the change desired so that the committee could attempt to 
work out a mutually satisfactory adjustment with the Chairman of the 
North Carolina Industrial Commission. The committee has not been fur- 
nished sufficient information to ask for any change. 

The North Carolina Industrial Commission ordinarily approves the 
fees set forth in the published fee schedule. However, if circumstances 
seem to indicate a fee in excess of those published, the attending dentist 
must submit a detailed description of the extraordinary services rendered 
and the same will be given careful consideration. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 

INSURANCE COMMITTEE 

John S. Dilday (1966), Chairman 
Charles T. Barker (1967) William A. Mynatt (1970) 

Thomas L. Blair (1969) J. S. D. Nelson (1968) 

Meetings: Formal meetings of the committee were held on Septem- 
ber 19, 1965 in Durham, and on February 20, 1966, in Raleigh. 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 79 

Assignments: The committee received no assignments from the 1965 
House of Delegates. 

Purpose of Meetings: To review the current insurance programs spon- 
sored by the Society, and make a study of some recommended retirement 
programs. There has been some interest expressed by Society members 
concerning a retirement program for our Society. 

Results of Meetings: A number of proposals for retirement programs 
have been submitted to the Insurance Committee. The committee has 
made a study of various retirment plans being used by other groups, along 
with the direct proposals to our committee. These programs generally 
were composed of life insurance tied in with a mutual fund investment. 
The committee feels that separation of the combined programs — a separate 
life insurance program, and a separate mutual funds program — would be 
more appealing and useful to our Society. 

Mr. J. L. Crumpton of J. L. Crumpton Agency and Mr. W. J. Ward of 
Moore and Johnson Company presented similar hospital income plans to 
supplement the Health and Accident program by J. L. Crumpton Agency 
and the Major Medical Plan by Moore and Johnson Company. The policy 
would pay a flat daily rate to the insured for the days hospitalized, re- 
gardless of payment from any other program. The committee feels that 
making these supplemental policies available to Society members would 
strengthen our insurance program. 

Resolutions 

1. Resolved, that a group life insurance program and a mutual fund 
investment program be developed and made available to Society members. 

2. Resolved, that J. L. Crumpton Agency and Moore and Johnson Com- 
pany be authorized to make available, as a supplement to their present 
group insurance programs, a hospital income plan which pays flat daily 
rates for hospitalization. 

Action by House of Delegates: Resolution 1 and 2 adopted May 6, 1966. 



LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE 

MoTT P. Blair (1969), Chairman 
H. RoYSTER Chamblee (1970) L. C. Holshouser (1968) 

Dennis S. Cook (1967) Paul E. Jones (1966) 

Meetings: No committee meetings were held this year as the General 
Assembly was not in session. 

Assignments: The committee received no assignments from the 1965 
House of Delegates. 

Health Legislation: Since the last report, the following bills of interest 
and importance to the dental profession were ratified by the 1965 General 
Assembly: 

1. S. B. 397 giving citizens of this State freedom of choice relative to 
obtaining oral surgical services from practitioners licensed by the 
State to render those services was ratified June 17. This bill was 
sponsored by the Society by direction of the House of Delegates, 
and introduced by Senator Cook of Lenoir and Senator Morgan of 
Lillington. It has created wide interest in other states. Numerous 
requests for copies of the bill have been received by the Central 
Office, and the ADA requested copy for distribution to other 



80 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

constituents. Of particular interest is the fact that the bill applies 
to commercial carriers as well as medical service corporations. 

2. H. B. 1087 appropriating money for the training of nurses and 
dental hygienists in North Carolina was ratified June 16. It in- 
cluded an appropriation of $113,994 in the 1965-66 fiscal year, and 
$214,416 in the 1966-67 fiscal year to the State Board of Educa- 
tion for the training of nurses and dental hygienists in the com- 
munity college system. This money underwrites the 2-year dental 
hygiene course at Central Piedmont Community College in Char- 
lotte and Wayne Technical Institute beginning this year. 

3. S.B. 478 broadened the authority of the Medical Care Commission 
in awarding loans and scholarships to students in dentistry, medi- 
cine, pharmacy, nursing, and other related fields. Recipients must 
agree to practice one year in a geographic area or facility desig- 
nated by the Commission for each year the grant is given. Pre- 
viously loans were made on the condition that recipients locate 
in a town of 2,500 population or less. This overlooked the fact 
that many small towns with populations exceeding 2,500 were 
equally in need of dentists, physicians, and other medical spe- 
cialists. 

Liaison Dentists: The Executive Committee upon the suggestion of 
our legal counsel, Mr. R. C. Howison, Jr., adopted the following: 

That a more effective liaison system be established for contacting 
legislators in future sessions of the General Assembly to include: 

A. A chairman of liaison dentists in each district. 

B. A sub-chairman of liaison dentists for at least five counties in 
each district. 

C A liaison dentist in each county. 

Expression of Gratitude: The Legislative Committee wishes to express 
its appreciation to the many friends of the Society who, as members of 
the General Assembly, passed every bill sponsored or endorsed by the 
North Carolina Dental Society. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 

Action by the House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 
1966. 

LIBRARY AND HISTORY COMMITTEE 

Neal Sheffield (1968), Chairman 
Frank O. Alford (1969) M. M. Lilley (1966) 

H. RoYSTER Chamblee (1967) S. H. Steelman (1970) 

Meetings: A brief meeting was held during the annual state meeting last 
year. Since that time we have been in touch by correspondence. 

Assignments: The 1965 House of Delegates adopted the following reso- 
lutions (Trans. 1965:368): 

1. "Resolved, that the Library and History Committee be authorized 
by the House of Delegates to place the exhibit 'Dentists in Gray' in 
the Hall of History in Raleigh for viewing by the public. 

2. "Resolved, that the Library and History Committee explore the 
possibility of assembling a typical dental office of the 1860 era, to 
be placed with the other exhibits of the North Carolina Dental So- 
ciety in the Hall of History in Raleigh." 

Results of Study: After exploring the field of assembling a typical dental 
office of the era of 1860, we have been fortunate in locating some of the 
basic items and they will be donated. We will collect these items and begin 
restoration. 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 81 

Resolution 

Resolved, that the Library and History Committee proceed in assembling 
and restoring equipment to represent a typical dental office of the era of 
1860 to be placed in the Hall of History in Raleigh. 

Action by House of Delegates: Adopted May 6, 1966. 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 

J. Homer Guion, Chairman 

M. W. Aldridge Penn Marshall, Jr. 

C. W. Horton W. Stewart Peery 

Cecil A. Pless, Jr. 

Membership in 1965: As of December 31, 1965, we had a total of 1,245 
members in good standing, which is a net gain of 14 members over 1964. 
The breakdown furnished by the Central Office follows: 

District State *ADA **Re- Dropped from 

Number Active Life Total Life tired the Roll 



1 


224 


22 


246 


20 


3 


2 


2 


284 


44 


328 


43 


1 





3 


259 


28 


287 


29 


3 


2 


4 


167 


29 


196 


28 


1 


1 


5 


150 


38 


188 


35 



8 







1,084 


161 


1,245 


155 


5 



* Included in Total Column 
** NOT included in Total Column 

Of the 1,084 active members in the above breakdown, 1,073 paid State 
dues. Dues were waived for 11 members: 1 on relief; 1 totally disabled; 
and 9 in the military service. 

Of the 161 State Life members all but 10 were also ADA Life members. 

Of the 155 ADA Life members, all but 4 were also State Life members. 

In 1965 five members were dropped from the roll for non-payment of 
dues, two less than in 1964. An appropriate resolution will be found at 
the end of this report. 

In 1964 there were 5 retired members. In 1965 three were added, for 
a total of 8. 

New Members: Last Fall 63 members were received by the Districts. 
Of this number 53 were new members, 5 of which were reinstated, and 
10 were transfers from other Districts. Thus, the Society gained 53 new 
members. 

Membership in 1966: As of March 31, 1966, we had a total membership 
of 1,257. The breakdown furnished by the Central Office follows: 

State *ADA **Re- 



District 


Active 


Life 


Total 


Life 


tired 


Delinquent 


1 


231 


24 


255 


24 


3 


6 


2 


293 


46 


339 


46 


1 


7 


3 


269 


29 


298 


30 


3 


4 


4 


173 


27 


200 


27 


1 





5 


155 


39 


194 


36 





2 




1,121 


165 


1,286 


163 


8 


19 



* Included in Total Column 
** NOT included in Total Column 



82 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Resolution 

Resolved, that it be made a matter of record the following did not pay 
their 1965 dues by December 31, 1965, and according to Article VI, 
Section 6 of the Bylaws, have been dropped from the roll: 
First District — J. Spencer Howell, Little Switzerland 

— L. T. Russell, Asheville 
Third District — W. M. Pearce, Hamlet 

— Frank T. Webster, Madison 
Fourth District — Charles B. Sabiston, Jr., Richmond, Virginia 

Action by House of Delegates: Adopted May 6, 1966. 

MILITARY AND VETERANS AFFAIRS COMMITTEE 

J. Harry Spillman (1967), Chairman 
CoYTE R. MiNGES (1969) H. E. Plaster (1966) 

T. Edwin Perry (1968) Baxter B. Sapp, Jr. (1970) 

Meetings: The committee held no meetings during the year. The Chair- 
man attended a three-day Professions Training Seminar October 6-8, 
1965. 

Assignments: The 1965 House of Delegates adopted the following reso- 
lution (Trans. 1965:369): 

"Resolved, that the President of the North Carolina Dental Society 
appoint a dentist to be known as Chief for Civil Defense to serve 
within the framework of this committee; and that this dentist be 
charged with the responsibility for selecting six dentists to serve as 
Area Chief Dentists in the six Office of Civil Defense geographical 
areas." 

Actions: In a letter to General Edward F. Griffin, Director, North 
Carolina Civil Defense Agency, President Roberts recommended that 
the following dentists be considered for appointment to serve in the ca- 
pacities indicated: 

Chief Dentist for Civil Defense: Dr. T. Edwin Perry, Raleigh 
Dental Area Chiefs: 

Area A: Dr. Zeno L. Edwards, Jr., Washington 
Area B: Dr. James E. Etheridge, Wilson 
Area C: Dr. Willard I. Herring, Clinton 
Area D: Dr. M. Stevenson Thurston, Salisbury 
Area E: Dr. Robert Long, Statesville 
Area F: Dr. Joe B. Roberson, Asheville 
President Roberts advised General Griffin that "the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society is not an agency of the State or Federal Govern- 
ment and will not accept any function or obligation which might 
make it such. We are, however, glad to make any recommendations 
where the same may be helpful." 
Before recommending the above men to General Griffin, all of them 
were contacted and all of them were enthusiastic about serving in these 
assignments. 

An appropriate resolution appears at the end of this report. 

Resolutions 

Resolved, that if the members of the Society recommended by the 
president are appointed as Chief Dentist for Civil Defense and Dental 
Area Chiefs, all members of the North Carolina Dental Society co-operate 
in every way possible with them in order that the vast reservoir of train- 
ing and talent represented by the dentists be utilized to the fullest in the 
North Carolina Operational Survival Plan. 

Action by the House of Delegates: Adopted May 6, 1966. 






I 




C.^ '^ 



LEFT. Walter T. McFall presented the presi- 
dent's emblem and citation to Peorce Rob- 
erts, Jr. Vice President and Mrs. James A. 
Harrell looked on. 

RIGHT. Retiring president, Pearce Roberts, 
Jr., installed J. Homr Guion on the 92nd 
president of the Society. 




m lfek%lw 



COMMITTEE ON PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

Luther H. Butler, Chairman 
James E. Graham, Jr. C. Z. Candler, Jr. 

(President Roberts, it is with great pride that this committee is afforded 
the pleasant task of congratulating you on a most excellent address. We 
are particularly pleased with the genuine display of leadership which 
you exercised in the handling of problems that are not only near to our 
hearts but are of grave importance to the North Carolina Dental Society. 

You are a credit to your profession and we thank you for your tireless 
efforts in behalf of the Society you love and may God continue to grant 
you the wisdom, understanding and humility to achieve even greater 
heights. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 

Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 7, 1966. 



PROSTHETIC DENTAL SERVICE COMMITTEE 

C. P. Osborne, Jr. (1968), Chairman 



C. Z. Candler, Jr. (1969) 
C. D. Eatman (1970) 



Thomas L. Dixon (1966) 
James A. Harrell (1967) 



We feel this committee has accomplished two main objectives during 
the past few years that have materialized in the form of better acceptance 
of laboratory personnel and closer relationship with the dentists. This 
has come about because of a mutual, earnest desire on the part of both 
parties to give a patient the best that is available. Since this is, after all, 
the main objective for practicing dentistry and its allied fields, it is with 
pride that we point up the work that has been done over a period of many 
years and wish to pay tribute to all dentists who have contributed toward 
the betterment of this relationship. 

It has been the good fortune to have enrolled laboratories in a pro- 
gram of accreditation of dental laboratories sponsored by the Joint Com- 
mission of which the American Dental Association is a part. We feel that 
this is only another tool with which to work as both dentists and labora- 
tories try to find the right answers for our problems. 

Our committee has attended meetings with members of the North Caro- 



83 



84 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

lina Dental Laboratory Association on three occasions during the past 
year and the chairman was invited to speak at their session in May, 1965. 
All members were present for a seminar given in Wilson, to help the 
laboratory men better understand the problems of some unusual tech- 
niques. All of these meetings have been filled with a spirit of co-operation 
and a desire to seek the best means of forming a real team. 

It is hoped that all members of the North Carolina Dental Society will 
become liaisons for the great need which we recognize in today's labora- 
tory procedures. Let all of us take it upon ourselves to spend time with 
the personnel who are fabricating our appliances so that each one fully 
understands what is expected and the method by which this can be most 
easily accomplished. 

Resolutions 

1. Resolved, that the Prosthetic Dental Service Committee be permitted 
to continue its present approach to the dentist-laboratory problems. 

2. Resolved, that laboratory personnel be given the opportunity to 
attend pertinent dental affairs whenever possible. 

3. Resolved, that further pursuit be made in the direction of elimi- 
nating special listing of a dental laboratory in the yellow pages of the 
telephone directory. 

4. Resolved, that the special investigators for the North Carolina State 
Board of Dental Examiners be encouraged to pursue enforcement of the 
prescription law. 

Action by House of Delegates: Resolutions 1, 2, 3, and 4 adopted May 6, 
1966. 

PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 

F. A. Buchanan (1970), Chairman 
C. T. Barker (1968) H. Estes Butler (1969) 

J. Henry Ligon, Jr. (1967) W. Stewart Peery (1966) 

Dr. Roberts requested the Publicity Committee of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society to investigate the feasibility of a Dental Health 
Column in the newspapers throughout the State. This is that report. 

It has been felt by many dentists that our State Society should use 
every means possible to help educate the people of our State to the facts 
about dentistry — what dentistry is, what the dental problems are, what 
dentistry is doing, and what we can do for a better dentally educated 
public. 

Several forward-looking dentists in High Point have co-operated in 
writing a dental health column which now appears in the High Point 
Enterprise. An excellent description of this arrangement appeared in a 
past issue of the N. C. Dental Journal. The Asheville Times (evening 
paper) is a subscriber to the Newspaper Enterprise Associates (NEA) 
syndicated column of Dr. William Lawrence. There may be other pa- 
pers in North Carolina that subscribe to this syndicated service. There 
is a dentist, Dr. Harold Younger, who writes a column for the Dallas, 
Texas, paper under an assumed name. 

The NEA is the largest newspaper syndicated column supplier in the 
United States. They feel that Dr. Lawrence's column appears in about 
150 papers in the United States. They offer this column to newspapers in 
a "package deal." That is, they sell to the newspapers about 70 syndicated 
services — editorials, medical columns, political cartoons — all in one 
package. The newspapers can publish all or any of the columns each 
week or just as frequently as they desire (in many instances these news- 
papers publish a column if there is nothing else available). The other 
syndicated services will sell to newspapers any syndicated column they 
desire, not in a "package." The chairman of this committee is personally 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 85 

acquainted with one of the editorial writers for NEA and he has not been 
i able to get any information from the other syndicated services. We have 
'• talked with newspaper editors, our publicity consultant, Demont Rose- 
: man, Jr., syndicated column writers, and dentists who have had some 
i dealings with the High Point Enterprise column. After a great deal of 

discussion the following points have come out: 

1. Newspapers are literally swamped with such columns. They can 
purchase them for practically nothing from syndicated services. One 

. would be surprised to find that very widely read columns such as Ann 
Landers, Billy Graham, etc., can be purchased for as little as 25-50(' per 
column from the syndicated services. 

2. Newspapers judge the interest in a particular column by reader 
response — by letter or phone calls. Dental columns generally do not 
create great reader response. I am not saying that the column is not 
read — I am saying that the readers do not write or phone the newspapers 
as a result of reading a dental health column. 

3. We do not feel that newspapers are going to publish a dental column 
every week just because the editor is a good friend of Dr. Smith, the local 
dentist. It is just not good business for the editor, who also has to make 
a living. For less than $1 the newspapers can publish a column or po- 
litical cartoon that will creat much more reader response. 

Discussions with those in the newspaper field resulted in their expres- 
sion that this dental health column would have to be supplied without 
charge to the newspapers. Even then many papers might not publish the 
column regularly. 

The North Carolina Dental Society could correspond with the state 
newspapers, both daily and non-daily, inquiring as to how many papers 
would be interested in having a column sent free each week. If there was 
sufficient response, there are 30-40 columns available from among those 
furnished to the High Point Enterprise. As the interest increased, other 
arrangements could be made to have other columns written. 

This is something that we believe is worth trying. However, one can- 
not be sure how successful it will be. I feel that it is a project worthy of 
our Society and could possibly serve to be very educational to the public. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 

Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 

RELIEF COMMITTEE 

J. T. Lasley (1968), Chairman 
S. L. BoBBiTT (1970) J. W. Heinz (1969) 

W. E. Clark (1966) J. M. Kilpatrick (1967) 

Continuing Report: This report is from March 1, 1965 to March 1, 1966, 
in order to make it a continuing report. Therefore, it may not correspond 
in every detail with the audit for the fiscal year 1965-66, which ends 
May 31, 1966. 

Grants: On March 1, 1965, there were three receiving aid from the 
Relief Fund: one member from the Fifth District; a widow of a member 
of the Second District; and a widow of a member of the First District. 

We regret to report that the member of the Fifth District receiving aid 
died on February 21, 1966, after a long and serious illness. This will leave 
only two receiving aid from March through May. 

If there is no further change we will have paid out in grants this fiscal 
year $2,002. 50, matched by a like amount from the ADA Relief Fund. 

Relief grants are paid on a 50-50 basis by the North Carolina Dental 
Society Relief Fund and the American Dental Association Relief Fund. 



86 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Application Disapproved: In January the committee received and con- 
sidered an application for a relief grant from a member of the Third Dis- 
trict. It was unanimously disapproved by the committee because the 
applicant's assets and monthly income were considered too great to 
qualify him for aid at this time. 

All applications are forwarded to the ADA Council on Relief for re- 
view, whether we have approved or disapproved them, to determine if 
we have erred in our decision. 

Income: The members of the North Carolina Dental Society contributed 
$2,081 to the 1964-65 campaign of the American Dental Association Re- 
lief Fund. One-half of this amount, or $1,040.50, was returned to the 
North Carolina Dental Society Relief Fund. In addition the Society's 
Relief Fund was paid a bonus of $520.25 because we raised our quota in 
the ADA Relief Fund Campaign and paid out more in grants than we re- 
ceived from the ADA Relief Fund. Thus, we received a total of $1,560.75 
from the 1964-65 ADA Relief Fund Campaign. 

By January 31, 1966, members of the North Carolina Dental Society 
had contributed $1,868 to the 1965-66 ADA Relief Fund Campaign which 
is in excess of the quota assigned. It is anticipated that we will pay out 
more in grants this year than we receive from the ADA and so we will 
again qualify for a bonus payment from the ADA next year. 

The North Carolina Dental Auxiliary raised $4,160.22 in its 1964-65 
Scrap Amalgam Drive. Since the Auxiliary inaugurated the Scrap Amal- 
gam Drive in 1953 in behalf of the North Carolina Dental Society Relief 
Fund, they have contributed a total of $24,225.79 to this cause. 

The total received from the ADA and the Auxiliary this year is 
$5,720.97. 

Thanks: The North Carolina Dental Society and the Relief Committee 
are grateful to the North Carolina Dental Auxiliary for its continued sup- 
port and contributions to the Relief Fund. You can see by the above 
figures that it means the difference between a surplus and a deficit. 

Annual Meeting: The committee holds its annual meeting during the 
Annual Session of the Society. Minutes are kept by the chairman. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. ; 

COMMITTEE ON RULES AND ORDER 

Joseph M. Johnson, Chairman 
William H. Oliver Penn Marshall, Jr. 

Speaker of the House: Article III, Section 6 of the Bylaws provides 
that: "The Speaker of the House shall preside at all meetings of the 
House of Delegates and shall determine the order of business for all 
meetings subject to the approval of the House of Delegates and shall 
perform such other duties as custom and parliamentary usage require. 
The decision of the Speaker shall be final unless an appeal from de- 
cision shall be made by a member of the House in which case final de- 
cision shall be by majority vote." 

The above provision is interpreted by this committee to include au- 
thority of the Speaker to appoint a parliamentarian and such committees 
of the House as he deems necessary to expedite business. Further, the 
committee recommends that the Speaker be granted a vote only in case of 
a tie. 

Adoption of Agenda: The committee submits the agenda on pages iii, iv 
and V (blue sheets) for the 1966 session of the House of Delegates and 
recommends its approval as the official order of business. 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 87 

Voting Procedures: The method of voting in the House will usually be 
indicated by the Speaker in the call for the vote: voice vote, hand vote, 
or rising vote. When a rising vote is called for, delegates are asked to 
remain standing until the count has been completed and the Speaker 
indicates that the voters may be seated. 

A 90 percent vote shall be interpreted as requiring 90 percent of all 
legal votes cast. 

A two-thirds vote shall be interpreted as requiring two-thirds of all 
legal votes cast. 

Recognition of Those Wanting to Speak: When a member wishes to 
address the House, he should secure the attention of the Speaker and 
I not begin to speak until he has been recognized by the Chair. He should 
! then state his name and his district for the benefit of the recorder. 

Access to the Floor: Access to the floor of the House will be permitted 
only to Delegates, Officers, and Staff. Alternate Delegates and miembers 
of the Society will be seated in a special section of the House. 

Attendance of Representatives of the Press: Members of the House will 
wish to be guided in their deliberations and debate by the knowledge 
that representatives of the press may be in the visitors gallery. 

Introduction of New Business at Last Meeting: No new business, except 
the Report of the Clinic Board of Censors, shall be introduced into the 
House of Delegates at the final meeting on Saturday, unless by unanimous 
consent. Approval of such business shall require unanimous vote. 

Privilege of the Floor: Article IH, Section 6 of the Bylaws provides 
that: "Chairmen and members of committees who are not members of 
the House of Delegates shall have the right to participate in the debate 
on their respective reports, but shall not have the right to vote." 

At the discretion of the Speaker, with the approval of the House, privi- 
lege of the floor may be granted to any member of the Society and Staff. 

Minority Report: Attention is called to Article HI, Section 2 of the 
Bylaws which states: "Ten members of the House of Delegates may file 
a minority report dissenting from the action of the House of Delegates and 
appeal to the General Session of the Society." 

Reference Committees: All reports and resolutions of committees, ex- 
cept amendments or alterations to the Constitution and Bylaws, matters 
of ethics, and recommendations of the President, may be referred to ref- 
erence committees appointed by the Speaker. 

The standing Committee on Constitution and Bylaws will constitute 
the reference committee on amendments and alterations to the Constitu- 
tion and Bylaws. 

The standing Committee on Ethics shall constitute the reference com- 
mittee on all matters pertaining to ethics. 

The special Committee on the President's Address will constitute the 
reference committee on recommendations of the President. 

Roll Call: The roll will be called by the Secretary-Treasurer at the 
beginning of each meeting. For the record, those answering the roll at 
that time will constitute the Delegates in attendance for that meeting. 
No substitutions for Delegates will be made after the roll call, except by 
request of the floor chairman of the delegation concerned. 

Floor Chairmen: District delegations shall elect a floor chairman (un- 
less he is designated by the District Bylaws) and report their names to 
the Secretary prior to the second meeting of the House. The Floor Chair- 
man will designate the delegates to comprise the delegation from his 
district for each meeting of the House of Delegates. 



88 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Seating of Delegates: Delegates are requested to seat themselves ac- 
cording to the floor plan of the House. This will enable the Speaker to 
recognize and identify any delegate who wants to speak. 

Disposition of Reports: All reports will be referred to a reference com- 
mittee by the Speaker of the House. The reference committee, after evalu- 
ating a report, must advise the House to adopt, amend, postpone, or 
reject all resolutions presented in the report. If no resolutions are pre- 
sented in the report, the reference committee will present the report to 
the House of Delegates with appropriate comments and a motion that the 
report be filed for information and printed in the Transactions. A refer- 
ence committee may not 'pigeon hole' any item, but must refer it to the 
House of Delegates for final action. 

Resolutions 

1. Resolved, that the agenda on pages iii, iv and v of the Blue Book be 
adopted as the official order of business for this session of the House of 
Delegates. 

2. Resolved, that the list of referrals submitted by the Speaker of the 
House of Delegates be approved. 

3. Resolved, that the report of the Committee on Rules and Order be 
adopted, and be it further 

Resolved, that the report of the Committee on Rules and Order consti- 
tute the rules for the proper conduct of business at this session of the 
House of Delegates. 

Action by House of Delegates: Resolutions 1, 2, 3 and 4 adopted Mav 4, 
1966. 

SCHOOL HEALTH COMMITTEE 

Thomas B. Reid, Jr. Chairman 
George S. Alexander Thomas G. Collins 

C. Z. Candler, Jr. T. Edgar Sikes, Jr. 

Meetings: This committee held three meetings — May 2, 1965, May 19, 
1965, and January 15, 1966. However, the report which follows will bear 
out our activity. 

Assignments: The 1964 House of Delegates adopted the following reso- 
lution, in principle (Trans. 1964:332): 

"Resolved, that the North Carolina Dental Society and the Medical 
Society of the State of North Carolina request the Governor to ap- 
point an Advisory Council on the Administration of the School Health 
Program to advise on policy, rules, regulations, and such other mat- 
ters as may be referred to it by the State Board of Education and the 
State Board of Health, and be it further 

"Resolved, that the composition of said Council should be three 
dentists, three physicians, two active local school administrators, one 
pharmacist, and three representatives of the community at large. 
The administrative head of the program for the State Board of 
Education should serve as Secretary of the Council. The State Health 
Officer and the Commissioner of Public Welfare should be represented 
either in person or by designated assistants as ex-officio members 
of the Council." 

Action: The School Health Committee has worked closely with the cor- 
responding committee of the North Carolina Medical Society in further 
attempts to alleviate various problems in the area of school health. Our 
main objective has been to get Governor Moore to appoint an advisory 
committee on school health problems. To date we have not received fa- 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 89 

vorable action due to blockage by certain influential people at the high 
state level. We are continuing our efforts to convince Governor Moore 
that this is an excellent suggestion, and, in fact, the only sensible way to 
control a situation in which a great deal of money is involved. These 
monies are not, in our opinion, being spent in the most efficient manner 
due to lack of co-ordination of the various programs. 

The most recent case of Federal money for public health is to be found 
in Public Law 89-10, the Elementary and Secondary School Act. Title I 
of this Act includes provision for health services to the scliools. The De- 
partment of Public Instruction has proceeded independently to utilize 
this money without seeking advice or counsel from the Medical or Dental 
Societies in the best use of these monies and the best use of medical, 
dental, and nursing personnel involved. It was the opinion of our com- 
mittee that we were not concerned with the law itself, but rather how 
best it can be implemented in North Carolina. It was felt that it is the 
Dental Society's responsibility (and, therefore, the responsibility of the 
Committee on School Health) to see that professional people are not 
wasted, and that all of the School Health programs are co-ordinated and 
working together. It is not our function, on the other hand, to intervene 
in any way in the portions of PL 89-10 which are not concerned with 
school health. 

On May 2, 1965, the Chairman met with the School Health Committee 
of the Medical Society at which time it was determined that it was not 
feasible to conduct a survey of athletic injuries in the high schools of 
North Carolina. 

As to the fee schedule of the School Health Fund, we understand that 
our President has appointed a committee to devise a comprehensive fee 
schedule which will then be submitted to all government agencies as the 
one schedule acceptable by the North Carolina Dental Society. We will 
co-operate fully in implementing this schedule as soon as it is available. 

Future Projects: 1. We will continue to press the Governor for action 
on the appointment of the School Health Advisory Council. 2. We will pre- 
sent to proper authorities a new fee schedule for the School Health Fund 
as soon as the House of Delegates has approved the schedule being pro- 
posed by the Dental Prepayment Committee. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 

SITE LOCATION FOR ANNUAL SESSIONS COMMITTEE 

H. W. TwisDALE, Chairman 

C. Fred Clark, Jr. Penn Marshall, Jr. 

James E. Furr T. Edgar Sikes, Jr. 

Frank W. Hoyle Egbert P. Williams 

Actions: The committee has contacted proper representatives from the 
following cities: Charlotte, Durham, Asheville, Winston-Salem, Wilming- 
ton, Greensboro and Raleigh. We have collected the proper information 
concerning available facilities for liousing the North Carolina Dental 
Society's Annual Session in the future. 

Affirmative responses with detailed information and availability were 
received from all the aforementioned cities. 

An oral report as to the results of our studies was given to the Execu- 
tive Committee at Pinehurst in January, accompanied by a written report. 

We are in the process of formulating letters to be signed by the chair- 
man of this committee and the president of the North Carolina Dental 
Society inviting proper representatives from each city to make a bid in 
Pinehurst at the 1966 Annual Session for the 1968 session. Presentations 



90 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

by representatives will be made at the second General Session. Naturally, 
at that time the location will be chosen. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 

STATE EMPLOYEES COMMITTEE 

M. W. Aldridge, Chairman 
William H. Oliver Paul A. Stroup, Jr. 

C. W. HoRTON C. B. Taylor 

Meetings: The committee held no meetings this year. 

Assignments: To act as liaison between the State Society and the 
Governor's Committee. i 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS COMMITTEE 

K. L. Johnson (1968), Chairman 
Robert J. Harned (1970) S. H. Isenhower (1966) 

Thomas A. Smith (1969) Donald L. Henson (1967) 

Meetings: This committee has held no meetings. However, each mem- 
ber has been contacted for any information concerning state institutions 
in their communities. 

Reports from Institutions: Your chairman has been in contact with 
the heads of the dental departments in most of our mental institutions. 

A new wing is in the planning stage at Dorothea Dix. It is our under- 
standing that the dental department will be in this building and almost 
all of the equipment will be new. 

New dental equipment has been installed at Butner and Murdoch Hos- 
pitals. 

Western Carolina Center at Morganton has been opened in the past 
year and has a beautiful modern dental department with one dentist. 

All institutions need more funds for additional dentists. However, it 
appears that considerable progress has been made in the dental depart- 
ments of our mental institutions in the past two years. 

Your committee has offered its full assistance in any undertaking that 
will improve the dental service in our state institutions. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 91 

STUDY CLUB COMMITTEE 

M. Lamar Dorton, Chairman 
Donald E. Bland Neal Sheffield, Jr. 

Zeno L. Edwards, Jr. Raymond C. Whitehurst, Jr. 

The Committee is pleased to report that several new study clubs have 
been formed within the year, and growing interest is being stimulated. 

Upon request to the Central Office, sample copies of Constitution and 
Bylaws for study clubs are mailed. Forms for reporting feature news of 
the existing study clubs have been made available, so that news items may 
be published in The Journal of the North Carolina Dental Society. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 6, 1966. 



Resolutions 



Submitted to the 

1966 House of Delegates 



Resolution by Fifth District Dental Society 
FLUORIDATION OF COMMUNAL WATER SUPPLIES 

Whereas, it is the duty and responsibility of the dental profession 
to promote dental health for the people of this State, and 

Whereas, it has been long recognized that the prevention of dental ills 
should be foremost in our treatment efforts, and 

Whereas, dental caries is of majority consideration in oral health, and 

Whereas, fluoridation of communal water supply has been shown to be 
a most effective, safe, and inexpensive means to attain this end, there- 
fore, be it 

Resolved, that the North Carolina Dental Society approve, endorse, and 
otherwise further the implementation of statewide fluoridation of com- 
munal water supplies for the benefit of the health and welfare of our 
citizens and be it further 

Resolved, that it be referred to the proper committee. 

Action by House of Delegates: Adopted May 6, 1966. 

Resolution by Fifth District Dental Society 

FLUORIDATION OF COMMUNAL WATER SUPPLIES 

Resolved, that the North Carolina Dental Society approve and endorse 
the efforts of the Division of Dental Health of the North Caroina State 
Board of Health to secure a full-time engineer to work under the super- 
vision of the Division of Dental Health in the promotion of statewide 
fluoridation of communal water supplies. 

Action by House of Delegates: Adopted May 6, 1966. 

Resolution of Delegate Joseph M, Johnson 

Fourth District Dental Society 

SALARY OF EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

Resolved, that the salary of the Executive Secretary be set at $15,000 
a year and be it further 

Resolved, that this salary be reviewed on an annual basis and adjusted 
according to the Consumer Price Index as published by the Department 
of Labor, either up or down, using June 1, 1966, as the base. 

Action by House of Delegates: Adopted May 6, 1966. 

92 



RESOLUTIONS 93 

Resolution by Secretary-Treasurer C. W. Poindexter 

APPROPRIATION FROM RESERVE FUNDS 

Resolved, that if funds are not available from this year's budget, the 
following non-recurring items be paid from reserve funds: Blue Shield- 
Blue Cross Committee for legal expenses, $782.45; contribution to the 
ADA Fine Arts Fund, $300; and contribution to the American Fund for 
Dental Education, $100. 

Action by House of Delegates: Adopted May 7, 1966. 

Resolution of President Pearce Roberts, Jr. 
JOHN BRAUER DAY 

Whereas, only a comparatively brief fifteen years ago there was not a 
school for dental education in North Carolina, and 

Whereas, during this comparatively brief period of fifteen years, the 
School of Dentistry at the University of North Carolina has been born 
and nurtured into a position of leadership and eminence among the dental 
schools of the United States, and 

Whereas, the growth and development of the University of North Caro- 
lina School of Dentistry has been due in large measure to the deep de- 
votion, constant effort and wise guidance and leadership of John Brauer, 
who has served as its Dean from the very beginnings, and 

Whereas, the North Carolina Dental Society desires to express its ap- 
preciation for the contribution which John Brauer has made to dental 
education in this State, and our esteem and affection for him upon his 
retirement from his present service, 

Now, therefore, as President of the North Carolina Dental Society, I 
take much pleasure in proclaiming Friday, May 6, 1966, as John Brauer 
Day. 

Action by House of Delegates: Adopted May 6, 1966. 

Resolutions of Delegate Charles W. Horton, Third District 
DENTAL HEALTH COLUMN 

Background Statement: With the belief that a dental health column is 
a useful tool to educate the public toward a better understanding of 
dental health problems, a pilot dental health column was published in 
North Carolina for a period of 2V2 years. The information gained has 
been factually disseminated to the profession during this period in table 
clinics and by publication of reports in the Journal. 

According to all the information available, people do read dental health 
columns. They find them interesting and informative. In many ways, the 
printed word has greater impact than direct education by the dentist, 
and can reach far greater numbers of people. 

Support within the profession itself has been excellent. Many mem- 
bers of the Society have expressed the desire to see the column published 
on a statewide basis. The Third District Dental Society has authorized 
the column to be published in the newspapers throughout its area. 

A method has been originated so that any breach of ethics is highly 
unlikely, and no difficulties have been experienced by the authors in the 
past. 

More than 40 articles are already available to the Society which have 
previously been authorized by the Ethics Committee of the Third Dis- 
trict Dental Society, and have been published. Dental health column ma- 
terial from other states is readily available. 

The expense involved in publication of such a column in the news- 
papers by the State Dental Society would be very small. 

With these facts in mind, it is believed that a dental health column 
could be of unlimited value in building good will for dentistry in North 



94 RESOLUTIONS 

Carolina and will better the climate in which all North Carolina dentists 
practice, allowing them to have a happier, more useful practice. 

Dentistry needs friends and needs them badly. With the belief that a 
column would be an important service we could render to the public for 
the mutual benefit of both, 3 resolutions are submitted. 

Resolutions 

1. Resolved, that the House of Delegates request the President and the 
Executive Committee of this Society to give active support and direction 
to the publication of a dental health column throughout the State of 
North Carolina. 

2. Resolved, that the Publicity Committee be charged with the respon- 
sibility of establishing and disseminating the column to the newspapers 
throughout the State. 

3. Resolved, that the Society lend all its prestige and support toward 
obtaining good coverage in as many newspapers as possible; and that an 
official appeal be made by the Society to the North Carolina Press As- 
sociation, to help in this important public service project. 

Action by House of Delegates: Resolutions 1 and 3 adopted May 6, 
1966. Resolution 2 amended and adopted May 6, 1966, to read: 

Resolved, that a sub-committee of the Publicity Committee be ap- 
pointed which shall be named the Public Relations Committee, and which 
shall be charged with the responsibility of establishing and disseminating 
the Dental Health Column to the newspapers throughout the State. 



Report of 
Delegation 
To A.D.A. 



Paul E. Jones (1966), Chairman 
Frank O. Alford (1967) 
Ralph D. Coffey (1968) 
Z. L. Edwards (1966) 
Erbie M. Medlin (1967) 
C. C. Poindexter (1968) 



The delegates from North Carolina to the 106th Annual Session of the 
American Dental Association in Las Vegas, Nevada, attended a busy 
round of meetings in order to fulfill their obligations as representatives 
of the Society. 

North Carolina Caucus: On Sunday, November 7, the delegates met in 
caucus to determine and develop strategy in opposing the resolutions by 
New York, Minnesota, Michigan, and Connecticut on membership prac- 
tices by constituents. 

House of Delegates: There were three sessions of the House of Dele- 
gates which were attended by all six delegates. It was not necessary for 
the Chairman to designate any alternates, although several were pres- 
ent and available for such duty if needed, including: Pearce Roberts, Jr., 
C. W. Poindexter, Barry G. Miller, and S. H. Isenhower. 

Fifth District Caucuses: Two caucuses of the Fifth District were held 
which were attended by all delegates, as well as several of the alternates. 
Discussion at these caucuses centered chiefly on the resolutions on mem- 
bership practices submitted by New York, et al. 

Reference Committee Hearings: Reference Committees held hearings all 
day Tuesday, November 9, on resolutions and reports before the House. 

At the hearing of the Reference Committee on the President's Address 
and Administrative Matters, the chairman of the delegation led an effort 
to defeat the resolutions on membership practices by New York and other 
constituents. Four North Carolinians spoke in opposition to the resolu- 
tion. They were: Pearce Roberts, Jr., Z. L. Edwards, Clyde E. Minges, 
and S. H. Isenhower. 

Actions by the House: In its recommendations to the House of Dele- 
gates, the Reference Committee introduced two substitute resolutions on 
membership practices. The full text of the resolutions follows. The first 

95 



96 DELEGATION TO A.D.A. 

(231) was adopted by voice vote, and the second (232) was passed by a 
standing vote of 199 to 177. 

231. Resolved, that in a profession-wide effort to remove discrimi- 
natory barriers to membership in the organized dental profession, 
all constituent and component societies be directed to take all neces- 
sary steps to eliminate all practices and procedures, both written and 
unwritten, which are discriminatory in fact or in concept, and be it 
further 

Resolved, that all constituent and component societies be advised 
formally that non-conformance to this request will mandate more 
stringent action by the Association, and be it further 

Resolved, that the constitutent and component societies which 
have already taken action to eliminate all forms of discriminatory 
practices and procedures be commended and their actions recom- 
mended to other constituent and component societies as effective 
mechanisms for the elimination of discrimination, and be it further 

Resolved, that the constituent and component societies be requested 
to report periodically to the Board of Trustees on the steps that have 
been taken to eliminate discriminatory practices and procedures and 
that this information be reported to the House of Delegates. 

232. Resolved, that all component societies of the American Dental 
Association be directed to eliminate from their bylaws and member- 
ship practices the following procedures which might be construed 
as discriminatory under the Civil Rights Act of 1964: 

1. Any procedure which requires more than a majority vote for the 
entrance of any dentist into membership in a component society. 

2. Any procedure which requires the submission of a photograph in 
connection with an application for membership in a component 
society. 

3. Any procedure which places an unreasonable requirement for 
the sponsorship of a dentist applicant. 

4. Any procedure which establishes an unacceptable period for the' 
renewal of the application of a dentist who has been refused mem- 
bership in a component society. 

In other principal actions, the House of Delegates: 

. . . Disapproved a proposal for reorganization of the trustee districts, 
and voted to refer the question to a new Special Committee; 

. . . Adopted bylaws and membership standards for the National As- 
sociation of Dental Service Plans; 

. . . Approved a resolution urging the development of a national dental 
care program for children, particularly the needy and underprivi- 
leged; 
. . Adopted a resolution urging states to enact mandatory fluoridation! 
legislation; 

. . . Approved a statement by the Council on Dental Health saluting the 
20th anniversary of fluoridation; 

. . . Requested the Board of Trustees to present recommendations on the : 
establishment of a Bureau of Dental Care Programs in 1966; 

. . . Referred back to the Board of Trustees for further information a : 
resolution to permit a dentist who has had 25 years membership in 
the National Dental Association to become a life member of the ; 
ADA when he has had 10 additional years of ADA membership. 
A complete summary of all transactions of the House of Delegates has 

been prepared by the Executive Secretary, who sat with the delegation 

in Las Vegas in all deliberations. Copies are available from the Central 

Office. 

Resolutions 

This report is informational in nature and no resolutions are presented. 
Action by House of Delegates: Received for information May 4, 1966. 



I 



Scientific 
Sessions 



Essays 

Projected Clinics 
Table Clinics 



ESSAYS 

1. Aesthetics with Longevity in Restorative Dentistry and Conservative 
Crown and Bridge Construction, John C. Bartels, D.M.D., Portland, 
Oregon. 

2. Preliminary Treatment of Prosthetic Patients and Principles of Ad- 
vanced Aesthetics, Ralph H. Boos, D.D.S., Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

3. Physical Fitness for the Dentist, Thomas K. Cureton, Ph.D., University 
of Illinois. 

PROJECTED CLINICS 

1. Restorative Considerations Directly Influencing Prognosis of Ad- 
vanced Periodontal Cases, Paul M. Cummings, Jr., Winston-Salem. 

2. The Use of Pins for the Splinting of Periodontally Involved Teeth, 
Douglas M. Young, Winston-Salem. 

3. Crossbites in Pedodontia, Jack B. Upchurch, Apex. 

4. New Concept in a Dental Office, Charles T. Barker, New Bern. 
TABLE CLINICS 

1. Simplified Parallel Pin Technique, E. Kent Rogers, III, Asheville. 

2. Precision Attachments, James H. Maddox, Enka. 

3. Panorex X ray as an Orthodontic Tool, Martin D. Barringer, Charlotte. 

4. Patient Education, Fred C. Miller, Jr., Jonesville. 

5. Two and One-half Years Experience with a Dental Health Column, 
L. P. Megginson, Jr. and C. W. Horton, High Point. 

6. Periodontal Evaluation of New Oral Hygiene Concepts, James B. 
Howell, Greensboro. 

7. Clinical Evaluation of Parallel Pins, Baxter B. Sapp, Jr., Durham. 

8. Lower Lateral Incisor, Galen W. Quinn, Durham. 

9. Pin Technique Crown and Bridge, Keith L. Bentley, North Wilkesboro. 

10. Impression Technique Crown and Bridge, Joe B. Craig, Charlotte. 

11. Overby Dental Splint, Guy E. Haddix, Statesville. 

12. Quick Curing Acrylic Technique, J. Sidney Hood, Lexington. 

13. Use of a New Material for Crown and Bridge Work, J. Malcolm Mc- 
Allister, Raleigh. 

14. A New Investment Material for Single Unit Casting, E. N. Pridgen, 
Fayetteville. 

15. Occlusal Tracing, S. Byron Towler, Raleigh. 

16. Diagnosis and Treatment of the Non-Functional Prematurity, Lloyd B. 
Stanley, Raleigh. 

17. Morning Routine, Ethelene Massengill, Selma, NCDAA. 

18. North Carolina Dental Assistants Association. 

19. Eliminating Post-Operative Pain in Restorative Dentistry, Junius H. 
Rose, Jr., Loblolly Study Club. 

20. Use of Pins in Periodontal Splinting, William H. Gray, Jr., Eastern 
Prosthetics Study Club. 

21. Use of Pins in Crown and Bridge Dentistry, W. K. Morgan, Eastern 
Prosthetics Study Club. 

22. Block That Kick, Mary Ann Olsen and Bobbie Phipps, Greensboro, 
NCDHA. 

23. Extraction Problems, Orthodontic Research Study Group. 

24. University of North Carolina Dental Student, 

25. University of North Carolina Dental Student. 

26. University of North Carolina Dental Student. 

97 



House of 

Delegates 

1966 



Attendance Record 



May 4 

SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE 

Ralph D Coffey • 

OFFICERS 

Pearce Roberts, Jr., President • 

J. Homer Guion, Pres. -Elect • 

James A. Harrell, Vice Pres • 

C. W. Poindexter, Sec.-Treas • 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

S. H. Isenhower, Chairman • 

W. L. Hand, Jr • 

Roy L. Lindahl • 

Darden J. Eure • 

ETHICS COMMITTEE 

Thomas M. Hunter, Chairman • 

Frank G. Atwater • 

C. Z. Candler, Jr • 

Elliot R. Motley • 

Horace K. Thompson • 

FIRST DISTRICT 

M. W. Carpenter • 

John W. Girard, Jr • 

D. B. Hord 

Cecil A. Pless, Jr 

C. B. Taylor 

F. A. Buchanan 



MEETINGS 

May 6 May 6 
a.m. p.m. 



May 7 



98 



SECOND DISTRICT 

M. Lamar Dorton 

W. Stewart Peery 

William H. Price 

Horace P. Reeves, Jr. 

J. Harry Spillman 

James E. Graham, Jr. 
Marshall B. Corl 



HOUSE OF DELEGATES 



May 4 



MEETINGS 

May 6 May 6 
a.m. p.m. 



99 
May 7 



THIRD DISTRICT 

Luther H. Butler 

Charles W. Horton 

L. P. Megginson, Jr 

C. H. Teague 

C. Robert VanderVoort. 



FOURTH DISTRICT 
Joseph M. Johnson. 
Penn Marshall, Jr.. 
Harold E. Maxwell. 
William H. Oliver... 
C. P. Osborne, Jr.... 
John N. Denning 



FIFTH DISTRICT 

Zeno L. Edwards, Jr.. 

James E. Furr 

C. P. Godwin 

E. Smith Jewell 

James H. Lee 

David H. Freshwater. 



TOTAL PRESENT 35 



37 



35 



30 



General 
Sessions 



Wednesday, May 4, 1966 
Thursday, May 5, 1966 
Saturday, May 7, 1966 



FIRST GENERAL SESSION 

Wednesday, May 4, 1966 

Call to Order: The first general session of the 110th Annual Session 
of the North Carolina Dental Society was called to order by President 
Pearce Roberts, Jr., at 8:30 p.m. in the Ballroom of The Carolina, Pine- 
hurst, North Carolina and was opened with prayer by Samuel H. Isen- 
hower, chairman, Executive Committee. 

Memorial Service: Robert T. Byrd, chairman, Necrology Committee, 
conducted a memorial service in memory of the following members who 
had died since the 1965 Annual Session: 

First District: L. W. Woody, Spruce Pine, December 14, 1965. 

Second District: O. L. Joyner, Kernersville, April 5, 1966; L. L. Reitzel, 
Charlotte, September 24, 1965; and W. A. Secrest, Winston-Salem, No- 
vember 12, 1965. 

Third District: J. H. Hughes, Roxboro, September 19, 1965; D. R. Pitts, 
Jamestown, July 2, 1965; and W. A. Pressly, Jr., Greensboro, Septem- 
ber 3, 1965. 

Fourth District: E. H. Broughton, Raleigh, February 28, 1966; J. R. 
Edwards, Fuquay, July 26, 1965; J. M. Gardner, Gibson, May 20, 1965; 
Gates McKaughan, Lumberton, January 5, 1966; and R. M. Olive, Jr., 
Fayetteville, December 23, 1965. 

Fifth District: H. B. Bowden, Faison, February 21, 1966; R. H. Holden, 
Shallotte, March 4, 1966; and R. L. Tomlinson, Wilson, July 28, 1965. 

Introduction of Officers and Guests: President Roberts introduced the 
Society officers; the presidents of the District Societies; Arthur W. Kell- 
ner, Hollywood, Florida, trustee. Fifth District, American Dental Asso- 
ciation; and the following representatives of allied organizations: 

Mrs. Reandy Clement, Raleigh, president, North Carolina Dental As- 
sistants Association; Edna Zedaker, Charlotte, president, American Dental 
Assistants Association; Jean Stines, Asheville, president. North Carolina 
Dental Hygienists Association; Fred Horton, Wilson, president. North 

100 



GENERAL SESSIONS 101 

Carolina Dental Laboratory Association; and Mrs. John H. Dearman, 
Statesville, president, North Carolina Dental Auxiliary. 

Scrap Amalgam Drive Report: Mrs. E. Kent Rogers, III, Asheville, 
chairman, Dental Auxiliary Scrap Amalgam Drive, 1965-66, reported that 
$4,249.28 had been raised and presented a check in that amount payable 
to the North Carolina Dental Society Relief Fund. J. T. Lasley, chairman, 
Relief Fund Committee, accepted the check on behalf of the Society and 
noted that since 1953 the Auxiliary had contributed a total of $28,440.70 
to the Relief Fund through its annual Scrap Amalgam Drives. 

President's Report: Vice President James A. Harrell assumed the chair 
and President Roberts presented his report to the Society. 

Vice President Harrell announced the appointment of the follow^ing to 
the Committee on the President's Address: Luther H. Butler, chairman; 
C. Z. Candler, Jr., Asheville; and James E. Graham, Jr,. Charlotte. 

President Roberts resumed the chair. 

Address by ADA President: Clyde E. Minges, Rocky Mount, introduced 
Maynard K. Hine, Indianapolis, Indiana, president, American Dental As- 
sociation. 

Dr. Hine reviewed the activities of the ADA during the past year. He 
complimented the Society for its efforts to uplift the educational stan- 
dards of auxiliary personnel and for its support of fluoridation programs 
throughout the State. He noted that North Carolina ranked sixteenth 
among all states with 54 per cent of its urban population drinking fluori- 
dated water. 

Report of Dental Foundation: Cleon W. Sanders, Benson, president. 
Dental Foundation of North Carolina, Inc., reported that the Foundation 
through pledges would contribute more than 300 thousand dollars to the 
new Dental Research Center at Chapel Hill. He expressed gratitude to 
Dean John C. Brauer for his leadership and counsel through the years 
and noted with sadness that Dean Brauer would retire July 1, 1966. He 
introduced James W. Bawden who will succeed Dr. Brauer as dean of 
the UNC School of Dentistry. 

Awards to Writers: Darden J. Eure, immediate past president, pre- 
sented awards to Grover C. Hunter, Jr., and Walter T. McFall, Jr., both 
of Chapel Hill, for the most significant contributions to The Journal of 
THE North Carolina Dental Society during the past year. 

Announcements: Executive Secretary Andrew M. Cunningham an- 
nounced that registration at 5 p.m. totaled 520. He noted that J. M. Hol- 
land of Statesville registered for his 50th consecutive meeting. 

Adjournment: The meeting was adjourned at 10:15 p.m. 



SECOND GENERAL SESSION 

Thursday, May 5, 1966 

Call to Order: The second general session of the 110th Annual Session 
of the North Carolina Dental Society was called to order by President 
Pearce Roberts, Jr., at 8:30 p.m. Thursday, May 5, 1966. in the Ballroom 
of The Carolina, Pinehurst, North Carolina and was opened with prayer 
by Thomas G. Nisbet, Charlotte. 



102 GENERAL SESSIONS 

Election of Officers: President Roberts appointed the following to serve 
as tellers: M. W. Carpenter, Asheville, chief; C. P. Godwin, Rocky Mount; 
and Joseph M. Johnson, Laurinburg. 

The following officers for 1966-67 were elected by acclamation: 
President-Elect: George F. Kirkland, Jr., Durham 
Vice President: Walter H. Finch, Jr., Henderson 
Secretary-Treasurer: C. W. Poindexter, Greensboro 
S. Byron Towler, Raleigh, and Roy L. Lindahl, Chapel Hill were nomi- 
nated as a delegate to the American Dental Association to succeed Z. L. 
Edwards, Washington. By secret ballot Dr. Lindahl was elected for a 
three-year term. 

Paul E. Jones, Farmville, was elected by acclamation to succeed him- 
self as a delegate to the American Dental Association for a three-year 
term. 

Announcements: Executive Secretary announced that registration at 
5 p.m. totalled 1,232. 

Communications: President Roberts read a telegram from G. Fred Hale 
expressing his regrets for not being present at the meeting because of 
health reasons. He directed the secretary-treasurer to answer Dr. Hale's 
telegram appropriately. 

Selection of Site for 1968: Harold W. Twisdale, Charlotte, chairman, 
Future Site Location for Annual Sessions Committee reported that eight 
North Carolina cities had invited the Society to hold its 1968 annual 
session in their communities, including: Asheville, Charlotte, Durham, 
Greensboro, Pinehurst, Raleigh, Wilmington, and Winston-Salem. 

Representatives of Charlotte, Greensboro, and Raleigh presented invi- 
tations in person. Other invitations were received by letter. 

George F. Kirkland, Jr., Durham, moved that the 1968 annual session 
be held in Pinehurst. C. W. Poindexter, Greensboro, seconded the mo- 
tion and it was carried. 

Adjournment: The meeting was adjourned at 10:30 p.m. 



THIRD GENERAL SESSION 

Saturday, May 7, 1966 

Call to Order: The third general session of the 110th Annual Session of 
the North Carolina Dental Society was called to order by President Pearce 
Roberts, Jr., at 4:00 p.m., Saturday, May 7, 1966, and was opened with 
prayer by Ralph D. Coffey. 

Report of Clinic Committee: Robert B. Litton, chairman, Clinic Com- 
mittee, announced that the following clinics had been selected for pre- 
sentation at the American Dental Association meeting in Dallas, Texas: 

1. Patient Education, Fred C. Miller, Jr., Jonesville. 

2. Clinical Evaluation of Parallel Pins, Baxter B. Sapp, Jr., 
Durham. 

3. Lower Lateral Incisor, Galen W. Quinn, Durham. 

4. Occlusal Tracing, S. Byron Towler, Raleigh. 

5. Parallel and Nonparallel Pins, William H. Gray, Jr., William- 
ston, and W. K. Morgan, Jacksonville, Eastern Prosthetics Study 
Club. 

6. Extraction Problems, Orthodontic Research Study Group. 



GENERAL SESSIONS 103 

Announcements: Executive Secretary Andrew M. Cunningham an- 
nounced that registration for the 110th Annual Session had set a new 

record as follows: 

I 

Members 

First District 102 

Second District 196 

Third District 199 

Fourth District 130 

Fifth District Ill 

Total Members 738 

Visiting dentists 134 

Auxiliary 316 

Exhibitors 140 

Dental hygienists 44 

Dental assistants 185 

Students 133 

Laboratory technicians 40 

Guests 186 

Grand Total 1,916 

Installation of Officers: President Roberts installed J. Homer Guion of 
Charlotte as president for 1966-1967. 

Dr. Guion installed the following officers and delegates: 
President-Elect: George F. Kirkland, Jr., Durham 
Vice President: Walter H. Finch, Jr., Henderson 
Secretary-Treasurer: C. W. Poindexter, Greensboro 
ADA delegates: Roy L. Lindahl (1969), Chapel Hill 
Paul E. Jones (1969), Farmville 

Presidential Appointments: President Guion announced the following 
appointments: 

Chairman, Executive Committee: William L. Hand, Jr., New Bern 
Member, Executive Committee: Lackey B. Peeler, Charlotte 
Speaker of the House: Ralph D. Coffey, Morganton 
General Chairman, 111th Annual Session: Edward U. Austin, Charlotte 

Adjournment: The 110th Annual Session was adjourned sine die at 
4:35 p.m. 




NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY OFFICERS 1966-1967: Seated: J. Homer Guion, 
Charlotte, president; George F. Kirkland, Jr., Durham, president-elect. Standing: Walter H. 
Finch, Jr., Henderson, vice president; C. W. Poindexter, Greensboro, secretary-treasurer. 



104 



Directory 
1966-1967 



North Carolina Dental Society 

Officers and Committees 
N. C. Dental Assistants 

Association Officers 
N. C. Dental Hygienists 

Association Officers 
N. C. Dental Auxiliary Officers 
N. C. Dental Laboratory 

Association Officers 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 

1966-1967 



OFFICERS 

President: J. Homer Guion, 604 Doctors Building, 

1012 Kings Drive Charlotte 28207 

President-Elect: George F. Kirkland, Jr. 

912 Lamond Avenue Durham 27701 

Vice President: Walter H. Finch, Jr., Box 862 Henderson 27536 

Secretary-Treasurer: C. W. Poindexter, 

309 East Wendover Ave Greensboro 27401 

Editor Publisher: A. Breece Breland, 

1927 Brunswick Avenue.. Charlotte 28207 

Associate Editor-Publisher: Barry G. Miller, 

1927 Brunswick Avenue .Charlotte 28207 

Speaker of the House: Ralph D. Coffey, Box 693 Morganton 28655 

Executive Secretary: Andrew M. Cunningham, Box 11065. .Raleigh 27604 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Chairman: W. L. Hand, Jr. (1967), Box 335 New Bern 28561 

S. H. Isenhower (1968), Box 307.. Newton 28658 

L. B. Peeler (1969), 606 Doctors Building, 

1012 Kings Drive Charlotte 28207 

Pearce Roberts, Jr. (1967) 410 Doctors Building Asheville 28801 

DELEGATES TO THE AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION 

Paul E. Jones (1969), Chairman 
Frank O. Alford (1967) Roy L. Lindahl (1969) 

Frank D. Coffey (1968) Erbie M. Medlin (1967) 

C. C. Poindexter (1968) 



ALTERNATE DELEGATES 
TO THE AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION 



A. Breece Breland 
Walter H. Finch, Jr. 
J. Homer Guion 



W. L. Hand, Jr. 

George F. Kirkland, Jr. 

C. W. Poindexter 



105 



106 DIRECTORY 1966-1967 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Clinic: Paul A. Stroup, Jr., Chairman; Leonard R. Cashion, David H. 
Freshwater, Robert H. Gainey, Robert B. Litton. 

Constitution and Bylaws: Thomas G. Nisbet (1970), Chairman; G. Shuford 
Abernethy (1968); D. T. Carr (1969); Walter H. Finch, Jr. (1967); C. P. 
Godwin (1971). 

Council on Dental Health: F. A. Buchanan (1970), Chairman; Frank G. 
Atwater (1967); E. A. Pearson, Jr. (1968); W. H. Price (1969); Horace K. 
Thompson (1971). 

Dental Education: Cleon W. Sanders (1969), Chairman; George S. Alex- 
ander (1968); E. D. Baker (1970); R. B. Barden (1971); F. A. Buchanan 
(1971); Ralph D. Coffey (1969); Z. L. Edwards, Jr. (1967); S. P. Gay 
(1968); Roy L. Lindahl (1967); Riley E. Spoon, Jr. (1970). 

Ethics: Elliot R. Motley (1970), Chairman; Frank G. Atwater (1968); 
C. Z. Candler, Jr. (1969); Darden J. Eure (1971); Thomas M. Hunter 
(1967). 

Exhibit: Thomas G. Collins, Chairman; Matthew G. Delbridge, M. L. 
Cherry, M. M. Forbes, J. G. Rehm, Roy L. Earp (Scientific Exhibits). 

Insurance: J. S. D. Nelson (1968), Chairman; C. T. Barker (1967); T. L. 
Blair (1969); John S. Dilday (1971); W. A. Mynatt (1970). 

Legislative: Mott P. Blair (1969), Chairman; L. C. Holshouser (1968), 
Secretary; H. Royster Chamblee (1970); Dennis S. Cook (1967); Paul E. 
Jones (1971). 

Library and History: Neal Sheffield (1968), Chairman; Frank O. Alford 
(1969); H. Royster Chamblee (1967); M. M. Lilley (1971); S. H. Steel- 
man (1970). 

Membership: George F. Kirkland, Jr., Chairman; M. W. Aldridge, Penn 
Marshall, Jr., L. P. Megginson, Jr., W. Stewart Peery, Cecil A. Pless, Jr. 

Military and Veterans Affairs: T. Edwin Perry (1968), Chairman; Coyte R. 
Minges (1969); Baxter B. Sapp, Jr. (1970); J. Harry Spillman (1967); 
Carey T. Wells, Jr. (1971). 

Necrology: Luther H. Butler (1971), Chairman; Robert T. Byrd (1970); 
Robert A. George (1968); C. B. Johnson, New Bern (1969); W. T. Pennell 
(1967). 

Program: Edward U. Austin, Chairman; M. W. Aldridge, E. D. Baker, 
Bennie D. Barker, Ralph D. Coffey. 

Prosthetic Dental Service: C. P. Osborne, Jr. (1968), Chairman; C. Z. 
Candler, Jr. (1969); Thomas L. Dixon (1971); C. D. Eatman (1970); 
James A. Harrell (1967). 

Publicity: J. Donald Kiser (1971), Chairman; C. T. Barker (1968); F. A. 
Buchanan (1970); H. Estes Butler (1969); J. Henry Ligon, Jr. (1967). 



DIRECTORY 1966-1967 107 

Relief: J. W. Heinz (1969), Chairman; S. L. Bobbitt (1970); W. H. Bree- 
land (1971); J. M. Kilpatrick (1967); J. T. Lasley (1968). 

State Institutions: Gerald F. McBrayer (1971), Chairman; Robert J. 
Harned (1970); Donald L. Henson (1967); K. L. Johnson (1968); 
Thomas A. Smith (1969). 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

Annual Session: Edward U. Austin, General Chairman and Program 
Chairman; Paul A. Stroup, Jr. (Clinic); R. Bruce Warlick (Entertain- 
ment Co-ordinator); C. R. VanderVoort (Banquet); W. Harrell Johnson 
(Reception); J. P. Hale (Dance); Thomas G. Collins (Exhibit); Fleming H. 
Stone (Hospitality); W. A. Current (Monitor); Luther H. Butler (Ne- 
crology); J. Donald Kiser (Publicity); Roy L. Earp (Scientific Exhibits); 
Robert H. Watson (Sports); Frederick G. Hasty (Visual Education); 
Charles A. Jarrett (Arrangements). 

Arrangements: Charles A. Jarrett, Chairman; R. H. Benfield, C. W. Bent- 
ley, Ralph B. Campbell, Dwight Clark, J. R. Cooley, M. G. Delbridge, 
Frank R. Graham, L. D. Herring, Dwight B. Hord. 

Banquet: C. R. VanderVoort, Chairman; R. L. Bridger, Dudley D. Comp- 
ton, Hubert E. Hatcher, L. P. Megginson, Jr., John E. Moses, Junius H. 
Rose, Jr. 

Cancer: Benny Worth Martin, Chairman; C. Dean Couch, Jr., Grover C. 
Hunter, Jr., John F. Lemler, Grover W. Smith. 

Children's Dental Health: Richard S. Hunter, Chairman; Duncan M. 
Getsinger, Richard F. Hunt, Jr., Cecil A. Pless, Jr., Carlton V. Winter. 

Dance: J. P. Hale, Chairmen; George D. Anderson, L. B. Barber, Jr., Ron- 
ald L. Johnson, Walter S. Linville, Jr., Penn Marshall, Jr. 

Dental Assistants: William H. Oliver, Chairman; T. S. Fleming, O. J. 
Freund, G. F. McBrayer, Charles H. Sugg. 

Dental Care for the Aged: Henry O. Lineberger, Jr., Chairman; Bennie D. 
Barker, L. A. Cameron, Charles S. Cooke, A. P. Cline, Jr., Milo J. Hoff- 
man, Clyde L. Taylor, John T. Hughes. 

Dental Health Insurance-Industry Liaison: James B. Howell, Chairman; 
J. B. Freedland, Donald L. Henson, Thomas M. Hunter, Pearce Roberts, Jr'. 

Dental Hygienists: J. Harry Spillman, Chairman; M. W. Carpenter, 
James H. Lee, J. Henry Ligon, Jr., W. Stewart Peery, C. W. Poindexter. 

Dental Service Corporation: Roy L. Lindahl, Chairman; Glenn F. Bitler, 
F. A. Buchanan, John H. Dixon, Charles P. Godwin, James B. Howell, 
R. S. Hunter, Pearce Roberts, Jr., Freeman C. Slaughter, James M. Zealy. 

Entertainment: R. Bruce Warlick, Entertainment Co-ordinator; J. P. Hale, 
(Dance); C. R. VanderVoort (Banquet); W. Harrell Johnson (Reception)! 

Hospitality: Fleming H. Stone, Chairman; Robert H. Gainey, W. H. Gray 
Jr., P. C. Hull, Jr., Donald W. Morris, William H. Oliver, E. Kent Rogers' 
III, S. W. Shaffer, L. H. Short. ' 

Industrial Commission: S. B. Towler, Chairman; E. D. Baker, C. Robert 
Helsabeck, Jr., Norman F. Ross. 

Monitor: W. A. Current, Chairman; Eli J. Attayek, S. P. Ausband, Lew- 
is P. Bratton, H. D. Browning, III, Frederick M. Chandler, F. H. Cuibreth 
William W. Ellis, Julian H. Fisher, Robert M. Fox, W. L. Haltiwanger, Jr ,' 
Bruce H. Hawkins, Richard N. Hines, Jr., Garland R. Homes, W. s' 
G'Berry, Dixon L. Quails, William G. Quarles, David H. Simpson, Von- 



108 DIRECTORY 1966-1967 

nie B. Smith, Frederick B. Storey, James G. Strupe, Dennis F. Troutman, 
Samuel N. Trueblood, Harold W. Twisdale, William Danford Wilson. 

Reception: W. Harrell Johnson, Chairman; M. L. Cherry, J. H. Dearman, 
LeRoy K. Heath, L. D. Herring, Fred C. Miller. 

School Health: Glenn L. Hooper, Chairman; G. Shuford Abernethy, 
George S. Alexander, R. B. Barden, Guy R. Willis. 

Sports: Robert H. Watson, Chairman; J. Mack Collie, Dennis S. Cook, Jr., 
Robert J. Harned, Gary Heeseman, Jr., Willard I. Herring. 

State Employees: W. H. Oliver, Chairman; C. W. Horton, J. M. Kilpatrick, 
Riley E. Spoon, Jr., C. B. Taylor. 

Visual Education: Frederick G. Hasty, Chairman; Dwight B. Hord, W. J. 
Porter, Phil S. Sanders, W. D. Strickland. 

SPECIAL ADVISORS 

N. C. Dental Assistants Association: William H. Oliver. 
N. C. Dental Hygienists Association: W. Stewart Peery. 
N. C. Dental Auxiliary: William A. Mynatt. 



DIRECTORY 1966-1967 109 

ALLIED ORGANIZATIONS 
OFFICERS 1966-1967 

NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL ASSISTANTS ASSOCIATION 

President: Miss Carey E. Sherrill, 304 Cole Building, 

211 Hawthorne Lane _ Charlotte 28204 

President-Elect: Mrs. Shelby Brown, 800-A St. Mary's Street, 

Raleigh 27605 
Vice President: Miss Joyce Sigmon, 1141 Elizabeth 

Avenue Charlotte 28205 

Secretary: Mrs. Ethelene Massengill, Selma Medical 

Center - - Selma 27576 

Assistant Secretary: Mrs. Frances McPherson, 211 Laurel 

Hill Drive --- - - Burlington 27215 

Treasurer: Miss Rebecca Ritchie, 403 East Front Street.... Statesville 28677 

NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL AUXILIARY 

President: Mrs. William A. Mynatt, 46 Hilltop Rd Asheville 

President-Elect: Mrs. David Freshwater, 203 Calico Drive.-Morehead City 

Vice President: Mrs. Thomas E. Nelson, 2507 Sanderson Drive Raleigh 

Recording Secretary: Mrs. Cecil A. Pless, Jr., 18 Hilltop Rd Asheville 

Corresponding Secretary: Mrs. Franklin Martin, 

75 Cambridge Rd Asheville 

Treasurer: Mrs. Thomas Collins, 3341 Alleghany Drive Raleigh 

Historian: Mrs. Fred Hasty, 2525 Edgewater Dr Fayetteville 

Parliamentarian: Mrs. Ralph D. Coffey, Box 693 Morganton 

NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL HYGIENISTS ASSOCIATION 

President: Mrs. Sheila A. Wright, 226 W. 20y2 Street Newton 28658 

President-Elect: Mrs. Carolyn C. Williams, 

1904 McCarthy Street Raleigh 27608 

Vice President: Mrs. Jackelyn K. Morris, 

A-6 Beverly Apartments. Asheville 28803^. 

Secretary: Miss Mary Ann Olsen, 

838 West Bessemer Avenue Greensboro 27408' 

Treasurer: Mrs. Gail H. McLean, 2423 Nation Avenue Durham 27707 

Program Chairman: Mrs. Sally K. Rose, 

3029 Hanson Drive Charlotte 28207 

NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL LABORATORY ASSOCIATION 

President: C. G. Renfroe, C. D. T., P. O. Box 6 Charlotte 28201 

President-Elect: V. E. McCoy, C. D. T., P. O. 157 Goldsboro 27530 

Vice President: C. S. Newton, P. O. Box 306.— _ Wilmingtonx 

Secretary-Treasurer: R. L. Jones, C. D. T., 

P. O. Box 1230 _ Reidsville 27320 

ZIP CODE NUMBERS REQUIRED 

Postal regulations require the zip code numbers on all bulk mail. Check 
your address on this Journal. If your zip code does not appear, return 
this blank today with the necessary information to : North Carolina Dental 
Society, P. O. Box 11065, Raleigh, N. C. 27604. After January 1, 1967, 
your Journal cannot be delivered unless your address includes your zip 
code, 
(please print) 

Name 

Address 

(mailing address only) 

Zip Code : 



The New Enlarged Program of 

DISABILITY INSURANCE 

FOR 

MEMBERS OF THE 

NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 

PLANS UP TO 

• $250.00 WEEKLY DISABILITY INCOME BENEFITS ($1,080.00 monthly) 

• $20.00 PER DAY EXTRA HOSPITAL BENEFIT, AND UP TO $225.00 SURGICAL BENEFITS 
FOR MEMBER AND DEPENDENTS (Optional) 

PLAN L-7 (Basic) 

Lifetime Accident and 7 Years Sickness 







Principal 
Sum For 


SEMI-ANNU 


AL PREMIUMS 


Weekly 
Benefits 


Dismemberment 
Benefits 


Accidental 
Death 


Premium 
Age 40 and over 


tReduced Premium 
To Age 40 


$250.00 
$200.00 
$150.00 
$100.00 


Up to $50,000.00 
Up to $40,000.00 
Up to $30,000.00 
Up to $20,000.00 


$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 


$244.50 
$196.50 
$148.50 
$100.50 


$183.50 
$147.50 
$111.50 
$ 75.50 



PLAN L-65 (Long Term) 

Lifetime Accident and For Sickness, from Inception of Disability 
To Your Attainment of Age 65 



SEMI-ANNUAL PREMIUMS 



Weekly 
Benefits 


Dismemberment 
Benefits 


Accidental 
Death 


Premium 
Age 40 and over 


tReduced Premium 
To Age 40 


$250.00 
$200.00 
$150.00 
$100.00 


Up to $50,000.00 
Up to $40,000.00 
Up to $30,000.00 
Up to $20,000.00 


$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 
$5,000.00 


$292.00 
$234.50 
$177.00 
$119.50 


$219.25 
$176.00 
$133.00 
$ 89.75 



The premiums for Plan L-65 will be reduced to the same premium as for Plan L-7 at age 58. 

Note: The above rotes do not increase at age 50 or even at age 60! 
tOn attaining age 40, age 40 rotes apply on renewal. 



J. L. CRUMPTON, State Mgr. 

Professional Group Disability Division 

J. SLADE CRUMPTON, Asst. Mgr. 
Box 147, Durham, N. C. 

Representing Commercial Insurance Co. of Newark, N. J. 
Member Continental Insurance Companies (New York) 

110 



YOUR LUXENE PROCESSING 
DENTAL LABORATORY 



■^ ^ ^ ^ ik presents -^ ^ i^ i:^ -^ 






BAIANCING ACT IN D[N!ISTRY 



i^ ^ ^ with LUXENE ^ ^ it 



tm 




ALBA 



CROU^ Axn 

BRIDGE 





Ever get the feeling that you're 
being followed? We do. 

For some time now we've been telling you that Carbocaine can be relied upon to give 
profound anestliesia with rapid onset whether a vasoconstrictor is present or not. 
We've been telling you that Carbocaine without vasoconstrictor is ideal for procedures 
of shorter duration, and that Carbocaine was the first well tolerated local anesthetic 
agent capable of producing predictable and consistent anesthesia in dentistry without 
a vasoconstrictor. 

In short, Carbocaine represents a significant breakthrough in local anesthesia for 
dentistry. And when one product leads the way, others are bound to attempt to follow. 

Nevertheless, you will not find these unique advantages of Carbocaine duplicated, 
nor the unique choice of benefits surpassed... 

Carbocaine HCl 3% without vasoconstrictor 

provides very rapid, profound anesthesia of shorter duration for routine extractions 
and modern high-speed restorative procedures (yet not so short as to fade during such 
procedures). Operating anesthesia averages 20 minutes upper, 40 minutes lower. 

Carbocaine HCl 2% with Neo-Cobefrin- (brand of levo-nordefrin) 1:20,000 

offers rapid-acting, consistently profound anesthesia of sufficiently long duration that 
even extensive and complicated procedures seldom require reinjection. 

FOR YOUR INFORMATION: These local anesthetic solutions are for dental block 
and infiltration injections only. There are no known contraindications in dentistry 
except for patients known to be sensitized. Inject slowly and avoid intravascular in- 
jection by aspirating. As with all local anesthetic solutions, adverse reactions due to 
intolerance, overdosage, or intravascular injection may occur and include hypotension 
and respiratory depression. Such reactions occur infrequently and usually are readily 
controlled by supporting circulation with a vasopressor and respiration with oxygen. 

Carbocaine and Neo-Cobefrin are trademarks (Reg. U.S. Pat. OfiE.) of Sterling Drug Inc. 



Carbocaine hci 

brand of iTiepivacaine hci 



Cook-Waite Laboratories, Inc. 

90 Park Avenue, New York, X. Y. 10016 



COOK-WAITE 








ROTHSTEIN 
DENTAL LABORATORIES 

Engineered for Progress 



DOCTOR, what is your choice 

parallel or non-parallel pin 
splintingi^ 

ROTHSTEIN'S extensive ex- 
perience in these fields will 
assure you a successful res- 
toration. 



Rothstein Dental Laboratories, Inc. 

1100 East West Highway 

Silver Spring, Md. 

Box 1740, Washington 13, D. C. 




II ^ ^^ .„ «^ 






U % 






Uv- 



T 



U 1 

WHY 



MORE 





NORTH CAROLINA DAIRY COUNCILS 



816 Broad St. 
DURHAM 

610 Coliseum Drive 
WINSTON-SALEM 



914 N. Elm 
GREENSBORO 




he time to prepare for the 
physiological demands of motherhooo 
is in the formative adolescent years 

Nowadays, the trend to earlier 
marriages makes it even more desirabl 
that full calcification of the skeleton 
be achieved at an early age. 
Complete calcification of the bones 
by this age requires an average 
retention of about 400 mg. of calcium 
daily during most of adolescence. 
For girls 13 to 19 years old a calcium 
intake of 1.4 grams per day is 
recommended . . . along with 400 I.U. 
of vitamin D. Only with a liberal 
consumption of milk and milk 
products ... at least the equivalent 
of 4 glasses daily ... is calcium 
retention likely to reach this objective. 

The expectant mother should receive 
extra calcium during the second 
half of pregnancy ... or earlier if her 
dietary history is poor. An allowance 
of 1.5 grams daily is recommended 
... to be followed by a further 
increase to 2.0 grams during lactation 
As three-fourths of the calcium in 
the national food supply comes from 
milk and milk products . . . low 
consumption of these foods usually 
reduces the calcium below 
recommended allowances. If weight 
control is a problem and certain 
food restrictions are recommended, 
proper food selection must be 
further emphasized ... to insure 
adequate calcium intake, plus adequat( 
protein, vitamin and other nutrient 
consumption. Milk products ... of a 
wide variety . . . can be utilized with 
ease in weight control programs. 

Milk and other dairy foods stand alone 
in their ability to provide the calcium 
needed by the pregnant and lactating 
mother in a form that is highly 
palatable, easily digested, and readily 
absorbed . . . and they also provide 
other nutrients which contribute to a 
balanced dietary and buoyant health. 

The nutritional statements made in this 
advertisement have been reviewed by the 
Council on Foods and Nutrition of the 
American Medical Association and founc 
consistent with current authoritative med- 
ical opinion. 



Dear Doctor, 



You can be both 
Coach and Quarterback 

(MONDAY MORNING ONE TOO) 

But 

Be sure to use the Team 

At 



» ULLIVAN J^ABORATORIES 

You'll Score 
With Every Restoration 



FE 8-5515 1130 18th ST. N.W. 

BOX 1823 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

Established in 1930 
115 



NOBLE DENTAL 
LABORATORY 



—Complete Laboratory Service— 



Fred Noble Fred Noble, Jr. 

225 Professional Building 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Telephone: 832-4616 



116 



nlktx-^mx ^mini Compang 



Raleigh, North Carolina 



Robert D. Walker 7- Pullen Sizer 



117 



FLEMING DENTAL LABORATORY 

Incorporated 



Professional Building 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



Telephone 832-6054 Post Office Box 2086 



E. R. Schwerin Leon Chadwick, Jr. 



118 




TICONIUM 




Honor Roll 

of Qualified 

Laboratories 



HENDERSONVILLE DENTAL LAB 

Hunter BIdg. 

P. 0. Box 1019 

Hendersonville, No. Carolina 28739 

Phone: 3-9870 

NOBLE DENTAL LABORATORY 

225 Professional BIdg. 

P. 0. Box 825 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27602 

Phone: 832-4616 

NORMAN DENTAL LABORATORY 

612 Pasteur Drive 

P. 0. Box 10003 

Greensboro, North Carolina 27404 

Phone: 299-9128 

QUEEN CITY DENTAL LABORATORY 

306 N. Church St. 
Charlotte, No. Carolina 28201 
Phone: EDison 3-6497 

SAMPLE DENTAL LABORATORY 

633 Nissen Building 
P. 0. Box 2897 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 27102 
Phone: PArk 3-3897 

SULLIVAN DENTAL LABORATORY 

p. 0. Box 1679 

Wilmington, No. Carolina 28402 

Phone: ROger 2-9793 



Specify 




on your next case 




TICONIUM PREMIUM 100 • TILON • TICON 

Ticonium, Division of CMP Industries, Inc., Albany, N.Y. 12201 



119 










THE NEW SILICATE FILLING MATERIAL 

Unequalled characteristics that make possible 
restorations never before obtainable with a silicate. 



Tooth Color Stability— With MQ's 
wide spectrum of colors, you are 
assured of quick and easy tooth 
matching, unusual color stability 
and life-like translucence. 

More Natural Fluorescence— A new 

eiementcauses MQ to fluoresce un- 
der ultraviolet light as do live teeth. 

High Early Strength— MQ develops 
MQ is guaranteed to comply with A.D. 
It is a product of S. S. WHITE 



strength rapidly. At the end of 
24 hours, its compressive strength 
is 39,000 p.s.i. (A.D. A. Span 24,200 
p.s.i. in 24 hours.) 

In A Week, Strength Approximatss 
That Of Human Teeth— In seven 
days, MQ increases to 42,000 p.s.i., 
or over 70% greater than A.D. A. 
specifications. 

A. Specification No. 9. Second Revision. 

COMPANY, Philadelphia, Pa. 19105. 



^ 



i. WHITE® 



120 



J. MINOR STURGIS 

PORCELAIN LABORATORY 

BAKED PORCELAIN TO GOLD 
VACUUM FIRED PORCELAIN 

AND 

ACRYLIC RESTORATIONS 

Cast Crowns and Gold Fixed Bridge Work 
* * * 

QUALITY AND SERVICE 

* * * 



1110 Candler BIdg. 


Atlanta 1, Georgia 
525-6512 


Box 1404 



121 



Doctor. . . let us be part 
of your team! 





PORCELAIN JACKETS AND BRIDGES 



vASUjuoA^ 




AL STUDIO, INC. 



6T01 PENN AVENUE SOUTH pulS^JMfNNEAPO LIS 23, MINN. 



lorceiain ;:5ervice iroin t^oasi to i^oasi 





Location may vary . . . 
but our Quality 
consistently remains 
at the highest degree 
of excellence. 



'-^^a^ 
--^s* 





^ porcelain 
jackets 
I incorporated 




PORCELAIN SINCE 1937 



sl-FREE-NOT EVEN 
>STAGE STAMP 

\\\ mail you our price list. 

lid mailing labels and 
I'iption pads. Cutout 
i?ss reply label, paste to 
:|tpe with your name 

ddress— 

ill pay the postage. 



FROM 
DR 



FIRST CLASS 

PERMIT 

NO. 19278 

NIW YORK CITY 



BUSINESS REPLY LABEL 

NO POSTAGE STAMP NECESSARY IF MAILED IN THE UNITED STATES 



POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY 

PORCELAIN JACKETS INCORPORATED 

162 West 72nd Street New York, N. Y. 10023 



CARTER LABORATORY 



CERAMCO, PORCELAIN JACKET AND ACRYLIC VENEER CROWNS 

FIXED AND REMOVABLE GOLD RESTORATIONS 

PARTIAL DENTURE SERVICE 



BRUCE R. CARTER 

301-338 Professional Building 
Raleigh, N. C. 27602 



Ceramco and Nobilium Representative 
Telephone TEmple 3-2618 Box 1327 



The LOCHHEAD LABORATORIES, Inc. 

Harry Dunton, Manager 

835 Enquirer BIdg. Cincinnati, Ohio 45202 

Phone 241-6203 — 241-6204 

MICRO-BOND ® 

now 

AVAILABLE IN EITHER 

GOLD PLATINUM 

ALLOY SERIES ALLOY 

VACUUM-FIRED PORCELAIN CROWNS and BRIDGEWORK 

VACALON (electro-vacuum) ACRYLIC 

CERAMCO® FIXED GOLD BRIDGEWORK 

ORTHODONTIC APPLIANCES 



124 



For 78 Years 



KEENER DENTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 

SERVICE SINCE 1888 

Has Served the Dental 
Profession 




NORTH CAROLINA REPRESENTATIVES 
Mr. Robert R. Hudson Mr. Robert C. Haude 

Phone 704-252-8121 
Asheville 



125 




...Unfailing 
Performance 

Professional Appearance . . . 
Pink Capsuled Analgesic . . . 
Accepted with Confidence by Patients ••• 



Leading "Non-Prescripfion" 
Capsulated Pain Reliever 

For regular SAL-FA YNE service of two-capsule 
Pr9fcssional Dental Packets in Dispenser Canoa 
write on your letterhead to: 

The Kenton Pharmacal Co., Inc. 

Covington, Kentucky 41012 



sal-fa yne 



GREENSBORO LABORATORY 

Phone BR 2-6562 Post Office Box 2938 

205 N. Davie Street 
GREENSBORO, N. C. 27402 
WILLIE WRAY CARL DRAKE 



ZIP CODE NUMBERS REQUIRED 

Postal regulations require the zip code numbers on all bulk mail. 
Check your address on this Journal. If it is not correct, or if your 
zip code does not appear, return this blank today with the necessary 
information to: North Carolina Dental Society, P. 0. Box 11065, 
Raleigh, N. C. 27604. After January 1, 1967, your Journal cannot 
be delivered unless your address includes your zip code, 
(please print) 



Name 

Address 

(mailing address only) 

Zip Code 



126 



'Would You 

Believe?'' 



IT IS DIFFICULT TO TELL THE 
BRIDGE TOOTH FROM THE REAL 
THING IF IT'S 



MICRO-BOND" 

(PORCELAIN FUSED TO PRECIOUS METAL) 



SEE FOR YOURSELF ON YOUR 
NEXT CROWN OR BRIDGE 



Tincher Dental Laboratories, Inc. 

2211/2 HALE ST. 
CHARLESTON, WEST VIRGINIA 

Phone Collect 
343-7571 



127 



PLUS 

QUALITY 

SERVICE 

DEPENDABILTY 

+ + + 

>^C^<m SuildiK^ ?00 St, 7fl<^n4f^ St, 

P. O. S(^x rg56 ^2^-0379 ^2^-0370 

128 



— IN THE SOUTH — 



►^ .i^ 



4ir f^ 

Crji Aj^ Dental Company, Inc. 




.1* 



MEANS 

COMPLETE SER VICE 



ANY ONE 
OF OUR FIVE 

Efficiently Staffed 

Completely Stocked 

Branches 




Arlington 

Richmond 

Roanoke 

Raleigh 

Charlotte 



WILL SERVE YOU BETTER 



CHARLOTTE 
LABORATORY 





414 North Church Street 






CHARLOTTE, N. C. 




P. 0. Box 2033 


Pho 


nes 4-6874—4-6875 




VITALLIUM 


- 




/^^■^^ 




MICRO- 
BOND 


DENTURE 


GOLD 
CERAMICS 


Each 


Department Offering a Highly 
Specialized Service . . . 



LUXENE 44 FOR SUPERIOR DENTURES 

Marching along together 
for 

BETTER DENTISTRY