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Full text of "Journal of the North Carolina Dental Society [serial]"

446 



Proceedings — Ninety-Eighth Meeting 



F. H. Worthington 
Mrs. F. H. Worthington 
W. F. Wright 
E. B. Wyman 



Austin, J. W. 
Beatty, Joe 
Burckner, Bill 
Buranden, R. M. 
Carson, Earl 
Coburn, F. J. 
Crane, E. D., Jr. 
Creel, Luther M. 
Crews, Harold B. 
Crisci, Mike 
Davis, Kent 
Deese, Mack 
Deese, Mrs. Mack 
Dobbins, Gene 
Fleming, John W. 
Hanck, William L. 
Hancock, Allan F. 
Harney, Charlie 
Harper, Floyd J., Jr. 
Hatch, B. G. 
Hawkins, J. B. 
Henry, Marge 
Higgason, Ed. 
Holder, Miss Pat 
Holtzclaw, W. H. 
Honeycutt, E. G. 
Horton, F. Tryon 
Johnson, Henry, Jr. 
Jones, Garther 
Jones, Roy 
Kehoe, John 
Kennedy, M. S. 
King, John 
Lemmons, Harry 
Little, Heath 
Longwell, O. E. 
Matthews, L. S. 
Menher, Lewis 
Miller, Bert 



J. C. Vaught, Jr. 
Gerardo Viso 
Adona Yelton 
Mrs. J. L. Yelton 



Exhibitors 



Miller, Louis K. 
Miller, Mrs. Louis K. 
Mundy, Gerry 
McHan, Miss'Ora 
McKay, N. R. 
Newman, F. W. 
Nixon, Joe J. 
Oliver, P. M. 
Payne, H. E. 
Phillips, Robert 
Rich, J. C. 
Rosevear, W. B. 
Rosevear, Mrs. W. B. 
Shoaf, Frank 
Shull, J. R., Jr. 
Smith, Paul K. 
Swanzey, Henry 
Taylor, B. W. 
Tchinski, Alex 
Travers, Dick 
Umstead, Miss Jane 
Uva, D. L. 
Vann, Mrs. J. G., Jr. 
Ware, Mrs. Bessie S. 
Warlick, Bill 
Warne, Willard 
Weatherford, Cary 
Weathers, Ray 
Wells, French 
White, Gordon 
Wicks, B. W. 
Wilson, Charlie 
Wilson, Mrs. T. C, Jr. 
Woodward, Margaret 
Woodward, Robert 
Woodward, Mrs. Robert 
Woolbright, Fred 
Wray, Albert 



Th 



AUG 30 1®*1 



^ ^ JV1\| iW-^ ^^^^^y^ AFFAIHS LlGlli^ 



XORTIJ CAROLLXA DJiNTAL SOCIETY 




Volume 38 



September, 1954 



Number 1 



WOODWARD 

SINCE 1922 

Virst with the finest for over thirty years, Doctor 




We have constantly grown over these thirty years, by your continued 
support, to become one of the leading recognized dental laboratories 
of the U. S. This past year we achieved our goal of moving into one 
of the most modern, well equipped dental laboratories second to none 
in the country. We now occupy some 4200 square feet of floor space. 
We are large enough to serve you well — yet small enough to serve you 
personally. 

WOODWARD possess the trained personnel — the equipment — and the 
know-how. 

WOODWARD a name worth remembering when you want the best. 




Woodward Prosthetic Co. 

GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 
330 Church Slreet 



THE JOURNAL 

of 

The North Carolina Dental Society 

(Component of the American Dental Association) 



OFFICERS 
1954-1955 



B. N. Walker 
President 
Charlotte 



Walton Branham 
President Elect 
Raleigh 



Horace K. Thompson 

Vice President 

Wilmineton 



Ralph Coffey 

Secretary -Tr easier er 

Morganton 



VOLUME 38 SEPTEMBER, 1954 NUMBER 1 



To the First Graduating Class Dedication 3 

The President's Page Walker 4 

From the Secretary's Desk Coffey 5 

First District 

Officers and Committees 12 

Asheville Host City Roberts 13 

Program 14 

Second District 

Program 16 

Charlotte — Site of Second District 

Meeting Kendrick 17 

Third District 

Program 20 

Join Us at Mid-Pines Kirkland 21 

Fourth District 

Officers and Committees 22 

Old Acquaintances Will 

Be Renewed Again Towler 23 

Program 24 

Fifth District 

New Bern Dentists Hosts Minges 27 

Officers and Committees 28 

Program 29 

Treatment of Fractured Permanent 

Incisor Teeth of Children Burket 30 

News Items 38 



Marvin R. Evans, Editor 
Chapel Hill 



The closmg dates for the Journal are, February 10. July 10, and November 10. 
MPubhshed four times a year. January. April, August and September. Entered as 
jSecond Class Matter. August 1951. Chapel Hill. N. C. Subscription 82.00. 



Gb^-C-"-^ 







'i 




To The First Graduating Class 

School of Dentistry 
University of North Carolina 

The doors of our great University were opened in 1795, but it 
was not until June. 1954, that it graduated the first class in 
dentistry. This, in realit3\ is North Carolina's first educational 
achievement in dentistry — there has been no other school prior to 
this time. Your heritage from the University and the profession of 
North Carolina is rich in tradition, in experience, and in accomplish- 
ment. You may well be proud but humble. All eyes of North Caro- 
lina and the dental world are focused on you, the members of the 
first class. You now are part of a great profession, which is dynamic, 
and far greater than any one individual in the profession. While 
you have been students in reality the past years, in preparation for 
your life's work, your greatest challenge and opportunity as a 
"student of dentistry" is still before you. 

For those of you who would be real leaders in dentistry, your 
communit3^ or your church, you must be ready to "give service 
above self." It has been truthfully stated, "The only thing that you 
can take with you is what you have given to others.'' 



First Row: Mett Bagley Ausley, Micro; Alexander Jones Biddell, Pem- 
broke; Lawrence A. Cameron, Carthage, D wight Lanier Clark, Asheville; 
Albert Purcell Cline, Jr., Canton; Albert Vernon Coble, Burlington; Robert 
Lee Daniel, Reidsville. 

Second Row: Donald Ray Draughon, Durham; George Loren Edwards, 
Jr., Fuquay Springs; James A. Foust, Graham; William Francis Fowler, 
King; Robert Earl Furr, Wilmington; Ferby Glen Gaither, Harmony; John 
Temple Gobbel, Jr., Chapel Hill. 

Third row: Carnie Clayton Gooding, New Bern; Cecil B. Hall, Brevard; 
Charles Frederick Harless, Jr., Sanford; LeRoy Koonce Heath, Burlington; 
Dwight Beam Hord, Lawndale; Charles Wilson Hughes, Roxboro; Lewis 
Wells Lee, Dunn. 

Fourth Row: James A. Leggette, Jr., Williamston; James Boyd Lewis, 
Gastonia; Henry O. Lineberger, Jr., Raleigh; Cecil Rhodes Lupton; Swan 
Quarter; Clyde N. McCall, Forest City; Zyba Kathryn Massey, Zebulon; 
Linzy Price Megginson, Jr., Shelby. 

Fifth Row: A. Dwight Price, Clinton; Gene Lewis Reese, Boone; Ludwig 
Gaston Scott, Burlington; Lloyd Butler Stanley, Wilmington; Alan Leonard 
Stoddard, Chadbourn; Willis Kenneth Young, Lexington. 



[ 3 ] 



The President's Page 

B. N. Walker. D.D.S., Charlotie 



In this year, preceding the ninetj^- 
ninth annual convention of the 
North Carolina Dental Society, we 
have witnessed the graduation of 
the first class of Doctors of Dental 
Surgery from an accredited Univer- 
sity in the State of North Carolina. 
In due time, other classes will fol- 
low. However, at this time, it 
behooves us to stop and review the 
history of Dentistry in North Caro- 
lina. 

On October 16, 1856, in the City 
of Raleigh, the First North Carolina 
Dental Society was organized. Its 
membership was limited to the 
graduate alumni of Dental Colleges, 
residing in North Carolina and was 
said to have been the only such 
society in the country placing that 
restriction on its membership. These 
pioneer doctors and those who have 
followed, wherever they may be, I 
am sure, are proud of the contribu- 
tion that they have made to make 
possible this event at Chapel Hill. 
It is the culmination of many years 
of dreams, work, and prayers. One 
has only to read the book by Dr. 
J. Martin Fleming, "History North 
Carolina Dental Society," to fully 
appreciate the efforts of each gen- 
eration to elevate the dignity of the 
profession and perfect the science 
of one of the healing arts. 

On behalf of the North Carolina 
Dental Society, I wish to welcome to 
the ranks of organized dentistry the 
graduates of the first class from the 
University of North Carolina School 
of Dentistry. In joining our ranks, 
we know that you will take your 
place in the continued progress of 
our chosen profession. 

The District Dental Society Meet- 
ings, the State Society Meetings, and 



the American Dental Associatioi 
Meetings offer short, interesting 
and practical postgraduate course 
of which every member should tak< 
advantage. The five District Denta 
Societies have excellent program 
planned and each member of th( 
North Carolina Dental Society is in 
vited to all of the m.eetings. I an 
sure that there are men on thes( 
program.s whom it will be wel 
worth your while to take time of 
and hear. The American Denta 
Association will hold its annual con 
vention in Miami, November 7-11 
1954, which is an excellent time t( 
go to Florida and combine a vaca 
t'.on with a convention. 

We are not only responsible fo 
continuing our pursuit of scientifii 
knowledge but also for educating 
the public as to the truths concern 
ing oral health and its great im 
portance to their general welfare. Ii 
this day of radio, television, and th( 
press, it is necessary that our pro 
fession take an active part in thi: 
education. It is hoped that the loca 
societies will continue the excellen 
program which they have initiate( 
during Children's Health Week. Th( 
radio and television programs thi; 
year did a wonderful job in educa 
tional work. It is hoped that everj 
local society will this year take ai 
active part either on radio or tele 
vision or both. Materials and assist 
ance will be furnished by the Staff 
Society for radio, television, am 
press releases, if they are desired. 

The officers of the North Carolinj 
Dental Society will be looking for 
ward to seeing you at the Distric 
meetings and the A.D.A. conventior 
in Miami. 



[ 4 ] 



1 



From The Secretary's Desk 

Ralph Coffey. D.D.S., Morganton 



The most interesting paper pre- 
sented on the program of the State 
Officer's Conference in Cleveland 
last September was a discussion of 
Hcalpractice insurance by Mr. O. B. 
Si llivan. Claims Attorney for the 
A'^tna Casualty & Surety Co. 

Mr. Sullivan was asked to prepare 
an article in order to cover all the 
questions and information that 
developed by his discussion of this 
important matter. In lieu of a mes- 
sage from your Secretary-Treasurer, 
I have asked the Editor-Publisher 
to print this article of Mr. Sullivan's. 
I feel that it will benefit the mem- 
bership more than any message of 
mine possibly could. I urge each of 
you to read it and give it your care- 
ful study. 

DENTISTS PROFESSIONAL 

LIABILITY INSURANCE 

By: O. B. Sullivan, Claims Attorney 

Aetna Casualty & Surety Company 

After many years of underwriting 
by various carriers of what was 
originally defined as "Malpractice" 
insurance, without uniformity as to 
the coverage afforded or rates 
charged, the National Bureau of 
Casualty Underwriters assumed 
jurisdiction of and developed a new 
underwriting program for Profes- 
sional Liability Insurance. 

Effective September 1, 1952, the 
new Physicians, Surgeons and Den- 
tists standard provisions policy form 
was announced, with uniform pre- 
mium schedules at what is con- 
sidered to be an adequate rate level 
based upon the Practitioners' expo- 
sure. 

The policy form is identical for 
Physicians, Surgeons, Dentists. 

Be sure your Professional Liability 
limits are adequate and conform to 



today's high awards. 

Nothing less than a standard pro- 
visions policy with high and ade- 
quate limits will do. 

I would like to go over this new 
policy briefly with you gentlemen 
and after a discussion of the insu- 
rance protection afforded — discuss: 

1. Definition of Malpractice 

2. Component parts of Malprac- 
tice 

3. Patients Burden of Proof 

4. Rule of Proximate Cause 

5. The Doctrine of Res Ipsa 

POLICY OUTLINE 
Individual Coverage 

Defiyiition of InsiLred 

"The term 'the insured' means 
each individual named in the 
declarations as insured." 

NO PARTNERSHIP COVERAGE 
IS AFFORDED FOR ACTS OF 
PARTNERS OR THE PARTNER- 
SHIP UNDER THE INDIVIDUAL 
COVERAGE. 

Estate coverage is afforded to the 
insured's legal representative 
with respect to liability previous- 
ly incurred, if the insured shall 
die or be adjudged incompetent. 

Partner.ship Coverage 

Dejijiition of Insured 

"The term 'the insured' means the 
partnership described in the de- 
clarations, including each mem- 
ber thereof with RESPECT TO 
THE ACTS OR OMISSIONS OF 
OTHERS." 

The insured thus is: 

1. The partnership, and 

2. Each member thereof with 
RESPECT TO THE ACTS OR 
OMISSIONS OF OTHERS. 



[ 5 ] 



NO COVERAGE FOR A MEM- 
BER'S OWN ACTS IS AFFORD- 
ED THAT MEMBER UNDER 
THE PARTNERSHIP COVER- 
AGE. 

Insuring Clause 

The company "agrees with the 
insured to pay on behalf of the 
insured all sums which the in- 
sured shall become legally obli- 
gated to pay as damages because 
of the hazard defined. 

Hazards 

The hazards insured against are 
identical under both the indi- 
vidual and partnership forms. 
The Company will pay all sums 
the insured shall become legally 
obligated to pay as damages 
because of: 

1. Injury (may take the form of 

Bodily Injury, 
(Property Damage or 
both, including death 
and 
(Mental anguish. 

2. arising out of Malpractice, 
error or mistake 

3. in the rendering or failing to 
render professional services 

4. in the practice of the insured's 
profession (as described in the 
declarations) 

5. committed during the cover- 
age period 

6. by the insured or by any per- 
son for whose acts or omissions 
the insured is legally responsi- 
ble". 

Special Provisions 

Profesional liability contracts are 
different than other liability 
forms in the following important 
respects: 

Limits 

1. No limit per accident or occur- 
rence 

2. No separate limit on Property 
Damage 



Instead, there is first a limit as 
to "each claim" (not each per- 
son,; secondly, there is 

An "aggregate limit" which is the 
total limit of the Company's lia- 
bility for the policy period. Claim 
payments deplete the limits, un- 
less renewed. The limits apply 
separately (1) as to each insured 
under the Individual Coverage 
and (2) as to the Partnership 
Coverage. 

First Aid Medical 

Unlike most liability policies there 
is no provision for immediate 
Medical and Surgical Aid as may 
be imperative at the time of ac 
cident. 

Signed Consent 

The policy provides that "the 
Company will not settle or com- 
promise any claim or suit cov- 
ered by the policy except with 
the written consent of the in- 
sured." 

EXCLUSIONS — FOUR 
Individual Form 

1. Injury arising out of: 
(a. Criminal Act or 

(b. While under influence of 
intoxicants or narcotics 

2. Liability 

(a. Assumed by Contract 
(b. Agreement guaranteeing 
result. 

3. Therapeutic X-ray 

(Unless declared and paid for- 
Note: No practical application 
to dentistry 

4. Proprietary Capacity 
(Superintendent or Officer 
(Hospital 

(Laboratory or 
(Business Enterprise 
Partnership Form 

The above exclusions, and this 

fifth one: 
Liability of a member of Partner 
ship arising out of Malpractice 
committed hy such member. 



[ 6 ] 



I 



NO INDIVIDUAL COVERAGE 

UNDER PARTNERSHIP FORM 

LIABILITY OF DENTIST SAME 

AS M. D.'S 

Your liability as respects profes- 
sional services is based on the 
same principles as that of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons. 

There is no distinction in the law, 
the same rules of liability apply 
to both and to the rendering of 
all professional services, includ- 
ing the practice of law. 

One of the earliest adjudicated 
cases — Ely vs. Wilbur, 49, N. J. 
L-685— 10 Atl. 441 held:— The 
physican and the dentist, like 
the attorney, undertakes in the 
practice of his profession that 
he is possessed of that degree of 
knowledge and skill therein 
which unsually pertains to the 
other members of his profession. 
That is the test of liability in any 
alleged professional liability 
claim. 
DEFINITION OF MALPRACTICE 

Malpractice is the failure to exer- 
cise that degree of care, dili- 
gence, judgement and skill which 
other practitioners in good stand- 
ing usually exercise under like or 
similar circumstances. Kuehe- 
mann vs X, 193 Wis 588. 

Malpractice is the treatment by 
a physician, surgeon or dentist 
in a manner contrary to accepted 
rules and with injurious results 
to the patient. Napier vs X, 256 
Fed. 196. 

Malpractice may arise from acts 
of omission as well as commission 
by the failure to perform or by 
bad performances. 

In most cases the degree of care 
and skill can be established only 
by the testimony of experts in 
the particular field of medicine. 
Without such testimony the jury 
has no standard which enables 
it to determine whether the prac- 



titioner failed to exercise the 
degree of care and skill required. 
Generally the issue of Malprac- 
tice is a question of fact. Ques- 
tions of fact are for the jury. 
That remains the rule, it has been 
consistently followed and univer- 
sally adopted. 

MALPRACTICE— COMPONENT 
PARTS 

1. Malpractice 

There must be error, mistake, 
failure, malpractice, a deviation 
from accepted practice or techni- 
que — the treatment must be de- 
ficient and not up to the standard 
and usual treatment followed by 
other members of the profession. 

2. Consequential Injury 

There must be as a result of such 
malpractice or failure, injury to 
the patient. The patient must 
show that his bad result or mis- 
fortune originated from the treat- 
ment. The patient must establish 
a probable causal relationship be- 
tween his complaints and the 
treatment — his is the burden of 
proving, the sometimes insur- 
mountable barrier "pi'oximate 
cause". 

It is axiomatic in the law of negli- 
gence that a causal connection 
must be established between the 
injury or loss suffered and the 
negligence with which the de- 
fendant is charged. 

BURDEN OF PROOF 
The burden of proof in a Mal- 
practice action against a physi- 
cian or dentist rests with the 
patient. The practice of medi- 
cine or dentistry is not an exact 
science; the test is: was the 
method proper and one in general 
use in the vicinity. De Bruine vs 
Dr. X, 168 Wis. page 104. An al- 
legation of improper treatment 
calls for expert testimony. Hol- 
ton vs Dr. X, N. W. 225. 



[ 7 ] 



RES IPSA LOQUITUR 
— the thing speaks for itself — 
The doctrine of res ipsa loquitur 
applies where accident could not 
have happened in usual course 
of things had ordinary care been 
exercised and raises presumption 
of negligence from happening of 
accident, but does not shift the 
burden of proof. Godard vs Dr. 
X, 123 III. app. 108. Res ipsa 
loquitur is rule of common sense 
and not a rule of law; it is a con- 
venient formula for saying that 
a plaintiff may in some cases 
sustain the burden of proof by 
showing how the accident occur- 
red without offering evidence to 
show why it occurred. Ryan vs 
Dr. X, 121 Conn. 26. 
TREND IN MALPRACTICE 
A Wisconsin case, Vale vs Dr. X 
179 N. W. 573 (1920), has been 
overruled by both Iowa and 
Minnesota, and the Res Ipsa rule 
applied. 

1. Wisconsin Case 

Vale vs Dr. X, 179 N. W. 575. 
Action against dentist for mal- 
practice; electrically operated 
stone slipped from patient's tooth 
and cut bottom of her mouth and 
tongue. Jury's award set aside 
and judgment reversed by the 
Supreme Court. Dentist's negli- 
gence could not be inferred mere- 
ly from his failure to cut off the 
power more instantaneously than 
the accident itself happened. 

2. Iowa Case 

Vergeldt vs. Dr. X, 1 Fed. 2nd 633 
(1924). Dentist's drill slipped 
penetrating floor of mouth. In- 
jured alleged among other 
things: "Negligence while and in 
manner of handling and operat- 
ing the instrument". Directed 
verdict for Defendant dentist re- 
versed; no question of com- 
petency or skill at issue. Citing 
135 Pac. 235 the court said "as 



a matter of common sense scienti- 
fic opinion can throw little light 
on the subject." Res Ipsa Lopui- 
tur. 
3. Minnesota Case 

Ellering vs Dr. X, 248 N. W. 330 
( 1933) . Dentist electrically opera- 
ed disk slipped and cut mucous 
membrane at base of patient's 
tongue. Dentist contends question 
as to whether he was negligent 
is a scientific question requiring 
expert testimony. Court held: 
The cause of the movement of 
drill not a scientific question, not 
a part of treatment or intended 
treatment. Res Ipsa Loquitur 
applies. 

That the Dentist's negligence may 
be inferred from the occurrence 
itcelf without the need for ex- 
pert testimony, applies to other 
types of cases in addition to the 
above. Failure to remove bone 
fragments after extraction, 226 S. 
W. 2nd 252. Penetrating the ton- 
gue of a patient with a drill, 18 
Neg. Cases, 848 (CCH) 

Bence vs. Dr. X, 286 Pac. 1076, 
Particle of tooth in lung. The 
court said: Expert testimony is 
not required, however, where 
the results of the treatment ar« 
of such character as to warrant 
the inference of want of care 
from the testimony of laymen or 
in the light of the knowledge 
and experience of the jurors 
themselves. 

The rule applies where the ac- 
cident causing the injury to per- 
son or property and instrumen- 
talities causing accident are under 
the exclusive control and 
management of the defendant 
and accident is such as ordinarily 
would not occur if due care was 
exercised. 

PROPOSED PROGRAM OF 

PREVENTION 

— of Malpractice Claims and Suits — 



[ 8 ] 



Physicians, Surgeons and Dentists 
in the practice of their profession, 
dedicated to alleviating human 
pain and suffering and saving 
the lives of their patients, can- 
not be expected to be preparing 
themselves for a lawsuit during 
the entire course of a case. Cer- 
tain fundamental safeguards do, 
however, go hand in hand with 
good practice. To follow them 
routinely, and as a matter of 
habit, may at some future time 
mean the difference between 
being sued or not being sued, or 
if an action is started, the dif- 
ference between winning it or 
losing it. 
Records 

First and foremost is the matter 
of records. Too frequently we 
find records to be scanty and 
fragmentary, or merely some 
brief word on the card, listing 
the calls or visits for the pur- 
pose of billing the patient. Such 
records are of no value in pre- 
paring a defense to a lawsuit 
alleging Malpractice. Experience 
shows that the patient himself 
remembers more about what was 
said and done than does the 
busy doctor who has many 
patients. The patient however, 
cannot rebut the written record. 
The record on each and every 
patient should be complete and 
comprehensive if it is to serve, 
as it is capable of serving, as 
a defense weapon. The history 
is most important; the symptoms 
both subjective and objective; the 
diagnosis and the treatment. Re- 
cord reference on each successive 
call or visit on the patient's con- 
dition, his comments, any change 
in treatment and comments on 
patient's progress. 

X-rays constitute an important 
part of the clinical record. In 
the absence of an agreement to 



the contrary X-ray negatives are 
the property of the physician or 
dentist who has made them in- 
cident to treatment. They are 
as much a part of the history of 
the case as any other case record. 
In the event of a Malpractice 
suit they may constitute the un- 
impeachable evidence which 
would fully justify the treat- 
ment of which the patient com- 
plains. McGarry vs Mercier, 262 
N. W. 296 (Michigan) 

Frequently a request for X-rays 
is but a prelude to a Malpractice 
action. They should be available 
for study by another physician 
or dentist to meet the future 
needs of the patient, but pos- 
session should remain in the 
hands of the owner. 
Collection Actions 

Upon my desk, as this is dictated, 
are two files with settlement 
stipulations and the court's order 
of dismissal. These alleged Mal- 
practice cases arose out of the 
collection efforts of an attorney 
representing the doctor in start- 
ing actions to enforce the pay- 
ment of the doctor's fee, just 
two months prior to the running 
of the two year Statute of Limita- 
tions. A dissatisfied and dis- 
gruntled patient, who has refused 
to pay his physician or dentist is 
bound to seek the advice of his 
attorney when confronted with 
a lawsuit on the bill. His council 
will be quick to recognize that a 
counter-claim alleging Malprac- 
tice will probably result in "a 
trade" in which both the original 
claim and the counter-claim will 
offset each other and both will 
be dismissed. If your collection 
action is deferred until after the 
running of the Statute of Limita- 
tions in selected cases that look 
troublesome, you will avoid 
automatically any allegation of 



[ 9 ] 



Malpractice, error or Mistake. 
Consultations 

Consultations in unusual situations 
and critical conditions are of 
great importance. If complaints 
cannot be readily diagnosed, if 
patient's symptoms persist and 
condition does not yield to treat- 
ment, if he or his family appear 
dissatisfied, call a consultant. The 
presence of a consultant will 
serve to defeat the contention 
that there was neglect and in 
itself indicates that a high degree 
of care was exercised. The ser- 
vices of a consultant is a protec- 
tive measure for both patient 
and the dentist. This procedure 
better serves the patient, tends 
to reassure him and permits you 
to share the responsiblity of the 
case and the liability if Malprac- 
tice is later alleged. 
Co-operation 

In a substantial percentage of the 
cases observed by this writer in 
more than twenty-five years of 
experience, I have found that an 
inadvertent criticism referable to 
the treatment afforded or the 
result obtained by a fellow prac- 
titioner, inspires the thought of 
Malpractice in the patient's mind. 
To comment adversely upon the 
method of treatment or the re- 
sult obtained, upon the mere 
statement of the patient on the 
condition that existed, and the 
treatment given and upon your 
examination at a much later 
time is to pre-judge the situa- 
tion. Malpractice cases continue 
to increase, lawyers are on the 
lookout for new fields of con- 
quest and physicians and den- 
tists m.ust be constantly on guard 
in their friendly co-operation 
with other physicians and den- 
tists to avoid conduct and con- 
versations that tend to stimulate 
Malpractice claims. It is self serv- 



ing to discourage patients from 
making charges and accusations 
against another doctor and dan- 
gerous to permit the patient to 
make such allegations predicated 
upon your advice, the cycle thus 
begun may some day reach you 
personally. The professions 
should take a united stand against 
this common danger. 

Patient's Consent 

A physician, surgeon or dentist 
can be guilty of technical 
"assault" and held liable for mal- 
practice in situations where he 
could otherwise interpose a suc- 
cessful defense and escape lia- 
bility if he operates or renders 
service, or performs extractions 
without the patient's consent. 

Insurance Protection 

Do not disclose the existence of 
insurance. Your insurance car- 
rier is not proper party to a law- 
suit, cannot be named as party 
defendant and therefore should 
be left out of any claim discus- 
sion. In all cases, however, thej' 
should be promptly notified and 
progressively advised of develop- 
ments. Banks advertise Insurance 
Protection to invite customers; 
for professional men to do so, 
would invite lawsuits. 

Notice to Your Body Guard 

When confronted with a potential 
claim for Malpractice, commun- 
icate at once with your insurer, 
or if uninsured, with your person- 
al attorney. Steps in the right 
direction early in the case are 
vital and influence the end re- 
sult. We have found there exists 
a vast difference in opinion, 
between lawyers and doctors, as 
to what constitutes Malpractice. 
Your lawyer may see liability -j 
where you recognize none and by 
the same token, your Insurer or 
attorney may be able to reassure 



[ 10 ] 



M 



you in a situation you feel is 
potentially dangerous. 

Fee Schedule 

Avoid disputes over fees. When 
afforded the opportunity arrive 
at approximate fees in advance. 

Legal Duty 

Do not attempt treatment, extrac- 
tions or surgery beyond the 
scope of your ability and ex- 
perience. 

Patient's Failure to Return 

In Gentile vs Dr. X, 138 Atlantic 
Page 540. Following extraction of 
two teeth, pregnant patient was 
told to go home to use salt water 
solution as mouth wash, apply 
ice packs to outside of the face 
and return the next day for 
further observation and treat- 
ment. Four days later she re- 
turned, complications had deve- 
loped, dentist referred her to 
recognized expert and x-rays 
were taken, osteomyelitis deve- 
loped; extensive surgery was 
required resulting in facial scar- 
ring, deformity and permanent 
disability. It was held: That it 
was the duty of the patient to 
co-operate with the dentist — if 
injury follows failure to return 
for treatment on following day 
a. requested, patient's neglect is 
his own misfortune for which he 
has no right to hold the dentist 
responsible. 

Note: We suggest that in cases 
where complications might de- 
velop and patient fails to keep 
appointment that the dentist con- 
tact the patient and request him 



plications or results. 

to return and if dissatisfaction is 
expressed by patient and he in- 
dicates he will not return that 
written notice in letter form be 
sent, requesting patient to return 
for observation and treatment, 
otherwise the dentist disclaims 
any responsibility for future com- 

Specialized Services 

One holding himself out to the 
public as a specialist owes a 
specialist's degree of care and 
skill, a higher degree of profes- 
sional skill than the ordinary or 
general practitioner. 

Medical Public Relations 

The practice of Medicine or Den- 
tistry, the operation of a Clinic or 
Hospital which is the business of 
medicine, like the insurance 
business exists because of the 
misfortune of others. This fact 
alone is sufficient to generate a 
positive and definite public in- 
terest. We are all engaged in a 
public service business, we have 
a tru:teeship with our ultimate 
responsibility to the public. Our 
conduct and services are con- 
stantly on trial in the court of 
"Public Opinion". It is from the 
members of the Public that the 
jurors are picked to sit in judg- 
ment of the professional man on 
triiil in a malpractice case. As 
the court said in a recent case: 

there is an implied contract in 
the rendering of all professional 
services to not only treat skill- 
fully but decently, respectfully 
and courteously. 



I 11 J 



First District Dental Society 

OFFICERS 

Pearce Roberts, Jr., Asheville President 

Samuel H. Isenhower, Newton President Elect 

Robert R. Hoffman, Asheville Vice President 

Clinton C. Diercks, Morganton Secretary-Treasurer 

J. E. Moser, Gastonia Editor 



COMMITTEES 

Executive 

Pearce Roberts S. H. Isenhower 

Clinton Diercks R. R. Howes 

Walter McFall 



R. R. Hoffman 
William Sloop 
H. E. Plaster 



Program 



S. H. Isenhower, Chairman 
Walter Clark 



William Davenport 



Membership 

R. R. Hoffman, Chairman 

Publicity 

J. E. Moser, Chairman 

Golf 

R. R. Hoffman, Chairman 



Edwin Plaster 



Constitution and By-Laws 



A. W. Bottoms, Chairman 
William McDaniel 



Marshall Barringer 



Ralph Falls 
B. S. Dixon 



Necrology 

Dennis Cook, Chairman 

Clinic 

Moultrie Trueluck, Chairman 



Local Arrangements 



W. J. Turbyfill, Chairman 
George Carrell 
F. S. Cunningham 



A. P. Cline 
W. H. Parker 



Clyde Whisnant 



John Fritz 



P. P. Yates 
S. H. Steelman 



R. S. McCall 



J. E. Moser 
Grady Mooney 



Allen T. Lockwood 
Frank Martin 
Max Carpenter 



[ 12 ] 




Asheville— 



Host City 



Dr. Roberts 



The Thirty-third Annual Meeting 
of the First District Dental Society 
will be held Sunday, September 19, 
and Monday, September 20, 1954 in 
Asheville at the George Vanderbilt 
Hotel. 

Your program committee has 
coordinated the efforts of the other 
committees to arrange what we 
believe will be an attractive and 
informative program. The program 
outline will be similar to that of 
years past which has proven so suc- 
cessful. As an additional attraction a 
buffet dinner will be held Sunday 
'vening for members, their ladies 
and special guests. No charge will 
be made and we sincerely hone this 
feature will prove so successful that 
it will be a permanent part of our 
future programs. On Monday our 
entire luncheon time will be devoted 
to the introduction and reception of 



PEARCE ROBERTS. JR.. D.D.S. 
President 



new members. Let us all try to be 
present to enjoy a delightful lunch 
and extend a hand of welccme to 
our new colleagues. If there is a 
prospective new member in your 
community please invite him to be 
with us. 

We are indeed fortunate to have 
such excellent clinicians as Dr. 
Irwin T. Hyatt and Dr. James H. 
Sherard. They will present subjects 
relating to "The Why, When and 
How of Alveoloplasty for Dentures," 
and "Endodontics." The full pro- 
gram of table clinics is not yet com- 
plete but they promise to be out- 
standing. We are indebted to these 
men for their efforts in compiling 
and presenting their subjects to us. 

I wish to express my sincere 
appreciation to all who by their loyal 
support have made this program 
possible, and to thank each of you 
for your untiring and willing 
cooperation during the past year. It 
has indeed been a pleasure to work 
with you. 

It is a privilege to extend a most 
cordial welcome to all our members, 
old and new; members of our ladies 
auxiliary and members of other dis- 
tricts and states to meet with us. 
Your presence will help assure us of 
success. 



[ 13 ] 



PROGRAM 
First District Dental Society 

George Vanderbilt Hotel 

Asheville. N. C. 

September 19-20, 1954 

Sunday, September 19, 1954 

11:00 A.M. Golf Tournament— Asheville Country Club 

4:00 P.M. Registration— George Vanderbilt Hotel 

6:00 P.M. Buffet Dinner — Ballroom (No charge for members of First 
District, their ladies and honorary guests.) 

8:00 P.M. General Session 

Meeting Called to Order by President Pearce Roberts 

Invocation 

Introduction of Visitors — W. J. Turbyfill 

Recognition of North Carolina Dental Society Officers 

Minutes of Last Meeting 

Treasurer's Report 

Committee Reports (Including a question and answer period | 

regarding Insurance Programs of the N. C. Dental Society.) 
Election of Officers 

9:30 P.M. Adjournment, to be followed by Motion Pictures 

Monday, September 20, 1954 

8:00 A.M. Registration 

9:00 A.M. President's Address Pearce Roberts, Asheville 

9:15 A.M. "The Why, When and How of Alveoloplasty for Dentures." 

Dr. Irwin Hyatt Atlanta, Georgia 

11:30 A.M. Table Clinics 

1:00 P.M. Luncheon — Ballroom 

Recognition of Visitors 

Presentation and Election of Candidates for Membership 

Recognition of New Members — W. T. McFall 

2:00 P.M. "Endodontics. When, Why and How." 

Dr. J. H. Sherard Atlanta, Georgia 

3:30 P.M. Door Prizes— Golf Awards 
Final Business Session 
Adjournment 



[ 14 ] 



IRWIN TOWNSEND HYATT, D.D.S. 

Professor of Oral Surgery and 
Anesthesia and Chairman of the 
Department, Emory University. Dr. 
Hyatt is a member of the American 
Society of Oral Surgeons and Diplo- 
mate of the American Board of Oral 
Surgery. He has served as President 
of Southeastern Society of Oral 
Surgeons and Georgia Dental Asso- 
ciation, and as Chairman of Scien- 
tific Section Oral Surgery and Anes- 
thesia American Dental Association. 
Appears on the program of the First 
District. 




Dr. Hyait 








Dr. Sherard 



J. H. SHERARD, JR., D.D.S. 

Dr. Sherard received his training 
at Emory University from which he 
was graduated in 1943. After serving 
with the Navy he joined the faculty 
of Emory University and is now 
Assistant Professor of Operative 
Dentistry. He will appear on the 
program of the First District. 



[ 15 ] 



PROGRAM 
Second District Dental Society 

Hotel Charlotte, Charlotte, N. C. 
October 10-11, 1954 

October 10, 1954 

1:00 P.M. President's Luncheon for Committeemen 

2:00 P.M. Registration 

2:00 P.M. Golf Tournament 

2:00 P.M. Skeet Shooting (Charlotte Skeet Club) 

7:00 P.M. Opening Session 
Invocation 

Address of Welcome, Clyde Jarrett, Charlotte 
Response 

Recognition of Visitors 
Committee Reports 

President's Address, Z. Vance Kendrick, Charlotte 
Report on President's Address 
Election of Officers 

October 11. 1954 

9:00 A.M. "Effects of Filling Materials on the Young Pulp" 

Dr. Maury Massler University of Illinois 

11:00 A.M. Table Clinics 
Participants: 

F. P. Pratt, D.D.S Salisbury! 

L. R. Thompson, D.D.S Winston-Salem 

D. L. Beavers, D.D.S Winston-Salem 

Hylton Crotts, D.D.S Winston-Salem 

R. F. Jarrett, D.D.S Charlotte 

C. A. Jarrett, D.D.S Charlotte 

E. M. Funderburk, D.D.S Charlotte 

E. U. Austin, D.D.S Charlotte 

F. C. Slaughter, D.D.S Kannapolis 

A. H. Cash, D.D.S Charlotte 

D. L. Ballard, D.D.S Charlotte 

D. T. Waller, D.D.S., J. K. Holladay, D.D.S _ Charlotte 

G. L. Lazenby, D.D.S Statesville 

1:00 P.M. Luncheon 

2:30 P.M. "Odontogenic Infections and Antibiotic Therapy." 

Dr. Daniel J. Holland Tufts College Dental School 

6:15 P.M. Cocktail Party 

7:00 P.M. Buffet Dinner— Dress Optional 
Installation of Officers 
Adjournment 

[ 16 ] 



J^^ 




Charlotte- 
Site of Second 
District Meeting 



Z. VANCE KENDRICK, D.D.S. 
President 



Dr. Kendrick 



The Thirty-Fourth annual meeting 
of the Second District Dental 
Society will convene in Charlotte at 
the Hotel Charlotte, October 10, 11. 
1954. 

A change in the timing of the 
meeting has been effected in order 
that a comprehensive program of 
scientific, social and business ses- 
sions can be accomplished in a mini- 
mum of time with a maximum bene- 
fit. 

The streamlining of the meeting 
will make it possible for all mem- 
bers to attend the entire meeting 



and at the same time allow them to 
return to their homes Monday night 
which, of course, means a day saved 
in their offices. 

The Second District Dental Auxil- 
iary is joining us in a correlated 
program, and we extend to its mem- 
bers a hearty invitation to be with 
us in Charlotte. 

My sincere gratitude goes to the 
members of the various committees 
whose efforts are providing a pro- 
gram of enrichment and inspiration. 

A cordial welcome awaits you and 
all our fellow dentists in Charlotte. 



[ 17 ] 





MAURY MASSLER, B.S.. D.D.S.. 
M.S. 

Professor and Head of the Depart- 
ment of Graduate Pedodontics, Uni- 
versity of Illinois College of Dentis- 
try. Dr. Massler earned his degrees 
at New York University and the 
University of Illinois. He has con- 
tributed to many scientific textbooks 
and has had over a hundred and 
twenty papers published in major 
scientific journals. He appears on 
the Second District program.. 



Dr. Massler 



DANIEL J. HOLLAND. D.M.D. 

Dr. Holland is Professor of Oral 
Surgery, Tufts College Dental 
School; a Diplomate American Board 
of Oral Surgery; Member of Ameri- 
can Society of Oral Surgeons; Vice 
President of the Massachusetts 
Dental Society; and Assistant Edi- 
tor — Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, 
Oral Pathology. His paper, "Odonto- 
genic Infections and Antibiotic 
Therapy," will be presented at the 
meeting of the Second District Den- 
tal Society. 




\ 



Dr. Holland 



[ 18 ] 



RALPH W. PHILLIPS, D.D.S.. 
F.I.C.D. 

A graduate of and now a member 
of the Staff of the University of 
Indiana School of Dentistry, Dr. 
Phillips is Associate Professor and 
Chairman of the Department of 
Dental Materials. He was awarded 
the annual national prize given by 
the Chicago Dental Society in 1948 
for research on the "Effect of Flu- 
orides on Hardness of Enamel." His 
many scientific papers have been 
published widely and he has lec- 
tured extensively throughout the 
United States and Canada. Appears 
on the program of the Third Dis- 
trict. 




Dr. Phillips 




Dr. Smith 



CHARLES H. SMITH, D.D.S. 

Dr. Smith is a graduate of Emory 
University. After serving as Dental 
Officer in the U. S. Navy; and grad- 
uate training in Orthodontics at the 
University of Montreal, he joined 
the staff at Emory in 1948, and is 
now Associate Professor of Ortho- 
dontics. His subject "Palliative 
Orthodontia" will be presented at 
the Third District Meeting. 



[ 19 1 



PROGRAM 
Third District Dental Society 

Mid-Pines, N. C. 
October 17. 18, 19, 1954 

Sunday, October 17, 1954 

12:00 Noon Golf Tournament 
6:00 P.M. Social Hour 



Monday, Oclober 18. 1954 



8:00 A.M. 
9:00 A.M. 
9:30 A.M. 



10:30 A.M. 



2:00 P.M. 



3:30 P.M. 



5:00 P.M. 

6:30 P.M. 
9:00 P.M. 



Breakfast 



Registration 

Opening Session 

Invocation — J. S. Betts, Greensboro 

Address of Welcome — E. M. Medlin, Aberdeen 

President's Address — George F. Kirkland, Durham 

Recognition of Dental Society Officers 

Introduction of Visitors — J. E. Roberts, Burlington 

Presentation of Candidates for Membership 

"Evaluation of Newer Dental Materials and Techniques and 

Factors Affecting Their Clincial Success." 
Dr. R. W. Phillips Indiana University 

"Palliative Orthodontia." 

Dr. Charles H. Smith Atlanta, Georgia 

"Use of Dental Materials." Panel Discussion 

Dr. Claude Baker, University of North Carolina, Moderator; 
Dr. R. W. Phillips, Indiana University; Dr. Paul Vinton, 
University of North Carolina; Dr. Frank Atwater, Greens- 
boro; Dr. Ken Pfeiffer, Veterans Hospital, Durham. 

Business Session 
Committee Reports 
Election of Officers 

Dinner — Awarding of Golf Prizes — Favors for the Ladies 

Dance — Pine Needles Club 



Tuesday, October 19, 1954 

8:30 A.M. Breakfast 

9:30 A.M. Table Clinics 

12:00 Noon Final Session 

Installation of Officers 
Adjournment 



[ 20 ] 




Dr. Kirkland 



It has been several years since we 
have held our Third District Dental 
Society meeting at Mid-Pines and I 
think we all are looking forward to 
getting together again at this most 
ideal spot on Sunday, October 17. 

The facilities have always been 
good and I think we can again 
expect to have a wonderful time 
and at the same time better our- 
selves in a professional sense. 

I might say that at this particular 
time the golf course is in excellent 
shape. I would advise those who 
love the game to be sure to bring 
their clubs. Also, I want to urge 
the ladies to come because we are 
planning to have some fine enter- 
tainm.ent. This year we decided to 
appoint a special entertainment com- 
mittee and knowing this committee 
I know we will not be disappointed 
in this respect. 

The Program Committee has done 
an excellent job in securing top 
flight clinicians for our program 
and this year we are going to devi- 



Join Us— 

at Mid-Pines 

GEORGE F. KIRKLAND, D.D.S. 
President 



ate a little from our programs in 
the past just as an experiment to 
see if we can create more interest 
and more local participation in our 
program, if that is possible. 

The membership in our Society 
has grown tremendously in the last 
few years and now we are second 
only to the Second District in mem- 
bers. We have over two hundred 
members and the prospects for the 
future are that one day we will be 
the largest of the District Societies. 

So let me urge all the members of 
the Third District to attend this 
meeting. Not only will they meet 
old friends, and classmates, they 
will make new contacts and new 
friends, some that may prove to be 
life time associations. It is always 
nice to be around people that have 
the same problems that we do. We 
are all in the same profession and 
we can only benefit by close associa- 
tion. 

There are some outside our district 
that like our meetings. I want to 
extend to those who have been and 
to those who would like to come a 
cordial invitation. The more the 
merrier. 

At this time let me thank those 
that have given their time and 
effort to make this meeting possible. 
Let me especially thank the other 
officers and committee chairmen. 
With the help of the other members 
I am sure we can make this the 
Thirty-Fifth Annual Meeting of the 
Third District Dental Society one 
of the best. 



[ 21 ] 



Fourth District Dental Society 

OFFICERS 

S. B. TowLER, Raleigh President 

W. H. Finch, Jr., Henderson President Elect 

D. C. WooDALL, Erwin Vice President 

J. E. Swindell, Raleigh Secretary-Treasurer 

L. J. Moore, Jr., Lumberton Editor 

COMMITTEES 

Program 

W. Howard Branch, Chairman 



Tom Collins 



Glenn F. Bitler 
H. L. Ligon, Jr. 



Robert S. Beam 
T. L. Young 



J. S. D. Nelson 
Worth M. Byrd 
Glen L. Hooper 
Alex Pearson 



J. J. Tew 
David W. Seifert 



J. M. Pringle 



G. Fred Hale 



Paul T. Harrell 



Entertainment 

H. Royster Chamblee, Chairman 

Mental Institutions 

Victor E. Bell, Chairman 



Marcus Smith 



L. D. Herring 
James H. Edwards 



Ernest A. Branch 
J. R. Edwards, Jr. 



Publicity 

J. Walton Branham, Chairman 

Membership 

W. H. Finch, Jr., Chairman 

ADA Relief 

J. Martin Fleming, Chairman 

Ethics 

S. L. Bobbitt, Chairman 

Hospitality 

William Penn Marshall, Chairman 

Constitution and By-Laws 

C. W. Sanders, Chairman 

Graduate Study Course 

L. M. Massey, Chairman 

School Health Committee 

C. E. Abernethy, Chairman 

[ 22 ] 



Robert Finch 



J. R. Edwards, Sr. 



R. D. Clements 



LeRoy Pridgen 



E. D. Baker 
Tom Hunter 



H. L. Allen 



L. J. Moore, Sr. 



R. S. Jones 






Old Acquaintances 
Will Be Renewed 
Again— 



S. B. TOWLER, D.D.S. 
President 



October 25th brings us back to the 
Capital City where the Fourth Dis- 
trict Dental Society proudly wel- 
comes you to the Sir Walter Hotel, 
to see old friends, meet new col- 
leagues, and add to our knowledge 
the many new things in the science 
of dentistry. 

On Monday evening, October 25, 
at seven o'clock we will be enter- 
tained at a banquet with many 
added features. Start making plans 
now to get on the band wagon and 
have fun. The Auxiliary has plans 
for the ladies on Tuesday whi^e we 
have our scientific program — so 
don't leave your wives at home. 

I am indeed grateful to our dis- 
trict officers. Dr. Royster Chamblee, 
Chairman of the Entertainment 
Committee, Dr. W. Howard Branch, 
Chairman of the Program Commit- 
tee, and the committee members 
who have worked so diligently to 
make this meeting one of our most 
outstanding. 

The Fourth District was fortunate 
this past year in having the first 
Postgraduate Extension Courses 
presented by our School 6f Dentis- 
try. These courses were offered in 
Fayetteville and Raleigh. The re- 
sponse was good and we believe that 




Dr. Towler 

the sessions were beneficial to all 
who attended. We bespeak for this 
service your continued interest and 
cooperation with a view of having 
such courses in several points in the 
Fourth District. 

Another matter to which I would 
like to direct your attention is that 
of the ADA group insurance p]an. 
This plan affords our younger mem- 
bers the opportunity of securing 
needed protection at a very attrac- 
tive rate and for some of our older 
members benefits which they could 
not otherwise obtain. We hope that 
the thirty additional applicants 
needed at the time of the Pinehurst 
meeting to put this plan into effect 
have been secured. 

In closing, may I express my 
appreciation to the members of the 
Fourth District for your concern and 
zeal in promoting, at all times, the 
welfare and high standards of our 
profession. Let us make our district 
meeting a pleasant and profitable 
occasion. 



[ 23 ] 



PROGRAM 
Fourth District Dental Society 

Hotel Sir Walter, Raleigh, N. C. 
October 25-26, 1954 

Monday, October 25, 1954 

7:00 P.M. Banquet — Senator Sam J. Ervin, Jr., Speaker 
9:00 P.M. Dance — Semi-formal 

Tuesday. October 26, 1954 

9:00 A.M. Meeting called to order by President S. B. Towler, Raleigh 
Invocation 

Secretary-Treasurer's Report 
President's Address 

9:30 A.M. Business Session 

Election of Officers and Delegates 

Presentation of Applicants for Membership, J. E. Swindell 
Recognition of Officers of the State Society 
Introduction of Visitors, G. Fred Hale, Raleigh 

10:30 A. M. "What the Dental Practitioner Should Know About Cancer." 
Dr. S. B. Kreshover Medical College of Virginia 

11:45 A.M. "Centric Relation" 

Dr. L. G. Coble Greensboro 

12:30 P.M. Luncheon 

1:30 P.M. "Recent Concepts in Prosthetic Dentistry." 

Dr. Walter A. Hall University of North Carolina 

3:00 P.M. Table Clinics 

4:00 P. M. Business Session 

"Charge to New Members," E. A. Branch, Raleigh 
Committee Reports 
Installation of Officers 
Adjournment 



[ 24 ] 



1!» 



S. J. KRESHOVER. D.D.S.. B.A.. 
M.D., Ph.D. 

Professor of Oral Pathology and 
Director of Dental Research and 
Graduate and Postgraduate Study, 
Medical College of Virginia School 
of Dentisti'v. Dr. Kreshover is a 
member of the American Dental 
Association, American Medical Asso- 
ciation, American Academy of Oral 
Pathology, and a Fellow of the 
American College of Dentists. He 
was formerly a Carnegie Fellow and 
Calhoun Scholar in Clinical Medi- 
cine and Pathology at Yale Uni- 
versity Graduate School of Medi- 




Dr. Kreshover 




Dr. Coble 



LUCIAN G. COBLE. D.D.S., F.I.C.D. 

Diplomate American Board of 
Prosthodontics, Staff Consultant at 
Camp Gordon, Georgia, Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Prosthodontics, University 
of North Carolina. He is a member 
of American Academy of Plastics 
Research, American Denture Society, 
and the Southeastern Academy of 
Prosthodontics. His subject, "Cen- 
tric Relation" will be presented at 
the meeting of the Fourth District. 



[ 25 ] 





Dr. Hall 



WALTER A. HALL, JR., B.S., 
D.D.S., M.S. 

Professor and Head of the Depart- 
ment of Prosthodontics, University 
of North Carolina. Received his 
training at the University of South- 
ern California and the University of 
Michigan. He is a member of the 
American Denture Society, Execu- 
tive member of Southeastern Acad- 
emy of Prosthodontics and a Diplo- 
mate American Board of Prostho- 
dontics. Has appeared on many state 
programs and on the programs of 
the American Dental Association. 




MARVIN R. EVANS. D.D.S. 



Head of the Department of Oral 
Diagnosis and Treatment Planning 
at the University of North Carolina. 
Received his training at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania Graduate 
School of Medicine. He will appear 
on the program of the Fifth District. 



Dr. Evans 




[ 26 ] 



New Bern 

Dentists Hosts 




,-^«*- 



COYTE R. MINGES, D.D.S. 
President 




Dr. Minges 



The Fifth District Dental Society 
will meet in New Bern, October 24 
and 25. The meeting will open Sun- 
day night with a banquet and enter- 
tainment. The New Bern Dentists 
are the hosts with Dr. C. B. John- 
son as Chairman. 

Dr. Charles Cook and Dr. Henry 
Zaytoun with their Program and 
Clinic Committees have some very 
fine and interesting presentations 
for Monday's program. I believe that 
they will meet with your approval. 

The ladies are especially invited. 
They will meet with us for the 
banquet. The Dental Auxiliary has 
a separate program for Monday 
which should be very worthwhile to 
the ladies. The Auxiliary is proving 



a big asset to the dental profession. 
They are really moving forward. 

All members of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society are invited to 
our meeting. We think that we have 
one of the best districts in the state. 
Come and find out. You have a sin- 
cere invitation. 

I want to thank each member 
that had a part in this year's pro- 
gram. Everyone has been most co- 
operative. 

Let's go to New Bern October 24 
and 25. Bring your wife, ask your 
neighbor dentist to come with you, 
ask that young dentist that has just 
started in practice to come — and 
most of all, YOU. 



[ 27 ] 



Fifth District Dental Society 

OFFICERS 

CoYTE R. MiNGES, Rocky Mount President 

J. M. Zealy, Goldsboro President Elect 

William H. Gray, Williamston Vice President I 

M. M. Lilley, Scotland Neck Secretary-Treaurer 

Donald L. Henson. Kinston Editor 



C. P. Godwin 



Tom Fleming 



W. L. Hammond 
C. T. Barker 



R. E. Williams 



Sidney V. Allen 



B. McK. Johnson 



Horace Thompson 



J. M. Kilpatrick 



Z. L. Edwards 



COMMITTEES 

Program 

C. S. Cooke, Chairman 

Clinic 

Henry Zaytoun, Chairman 

Arrangements and Publicity 

C. B. Johnson, Chairman 



Roy Miller 

Auditing 
Darden Eure, Chairman 



Dental Decay 

G. L. Overman, Chairman 

Resolutions 

Fred Hunt, Chairman 

Relief 

Paul Fitzgerald, Chairman 

Necrology 

Paul Jones, Chairman 

Membership 

W. H. Young, Chairman 



E. C. Denton 



Junius C. Smith 



J. M. Anderson 
W. L. Hand, Jr. 



R. L. Whitehurst 



A. Dwight Johnson 



J. M. Zealy 



Z. L. Edwards, Jr. 



H. E. Nixon 



Wm. H. Gray 



[ 28 ] 



PROGRAM 
Fifth District Dental Society 

New Bern, North Carolina 
October 24. 25, 1954 

Sunday, October 24. 1954. Shrine Temple 

6:00 P.M. Supper. Humorous Speaker, Musical Program, Prizes for the 
Ladies 

October 25. 1954 
Monday Morning. Shrine Temple 

9:00 A.M. Meeting called to order by President Coyte R. Minges 
Invocation, The Reverend Charles E. Williams 
Address of Welcome, Mayor Mack L. Lupton 
Response to Welcome, Darden Eure 
Minutes of Last Meeting 
President's Address 
Necrology Committee Report 
Presentation of Applicants for Membership 
Greeting from N. C. Dental Society Officers 
Greetings from the Dental College 
Introduction of Visitors 

10:00 A. M. "'X-ray Interpretation as an Aid to Diagnosis." 

Dr. Marvin R. Evans University of North Carolina 

11:00 A.M. Question and Answer Period 

11:.30 A.M. Table Clinics 

Monday Afternoon 

1:00 P.M. Luncheon. Episcopal Parish House 
2:15 P.M. Business Session 

Treasurer's Report 

Report on President's Address 

Committee Reports 

New Business 

Election of Officers 

Place of Next Meeting 

Installation of Officers 

Adjournment 

A bus tour to the historic points of interest has been arranged for the 
ladies for Monday morning. 

[ 29 ] 



Treatment of Fractures 



By Joseph F. Burket, D.D.S. 



The fractured or injured young 
permanent incisor presents a 
problem to all practitioners of 
dentistry who treat the teeth of 
children. The management of 
such cases is extremely import- 
ant and its result plays a vital 
part in the future dentition and 
dental outlook of the individual 
who has the misfortune to frac- 
ture a permanent incisor. Some 
dentists who examine these in- 
juries may be at a loss as to how 
to treat them and therefore as- 
sume an attitude of watchful and 
hopeful waiting to see what will 
happen. Early treatment may of- 
ten be a deciding factor between 
success and failure. Treatment 
methods for some of the more 
common types of fractures of the 
crowns of young permanent in- 
cisor teeth will be described. 

Injured anterior teeth occur 
from various kinds of accidents, 
some of which are most unusual. 
Those which appear more fre- 
quently result from accidents of 
automobile, drinking fountain, 
playground equipment, swim- 
ming pool, bicycle and athletic 
contests. The prevalence of auto- 
mobile wrecks and varied phy- 
sical activities of normal healty 
children are mute evidence that 
injuries of children are not de- 
creasing, so it behooves each 
dentist, and especially the family 
dentist, to be prepared to ac- 
complish adequate temporary 
treatment and, if possible, con- 
tinue each case to a successful 
conclusion. 

Sweet^ observed that more 



than ninety percent of all frac- 
tured teeth occurred in the upper 
jaw and that of those fractures 
more than ninety percent pro- 
truded and did not have lip 
coverage. From a survey of forty- 
five cases, Hogeboom^ noted that 
the largest number were of 
children from eight to ten years 
of age. In many children from 
ages seven to nine the lateral 
incisors have not erupted, leav- 
ing the two central in a vulner- 
able position to receive full im- 
pact from a blow. Demeritt^ ex- 
pressed the opinion that children 
with Class II malocclusion were 
more apt to experience injury 
to the upper anterior teeth. 

A classification of injuries is 
of advantage in planning treat- 
ment. Many authorities such as 
Brauer*, Ellis^, McBride^, and 
Sweet^ have classified injuries 
and fractures of children's teeth. 
Sweet's classification which 



vSweet, C. A., "Fractured anterior 
permanent teeth," J.A.D.A 29: 
97, Jan. 1942. 

Hogeboom, F. E., Practical 
Pedodontia, 6th ed., St. Louis, 
C. V. Mosby. 1953, 642 p. (p. 
388.) 

Demeritt, W. W., Personal Com- 
munication, Mar. 1, 1954. 
Brauer, J. C, "The treatment of 
children's fractured permanent 
anterior teeth", J.D.A. 21: 399- 
407, Oct. 1950. 

Ellis, R. G., The Classification 
and Treatment of Injuries to the 
Teeth of Children, 2nd ed., 
Chicago, Year Book 1918: 256 p. 
McBride, W. C, Juvenile Den- 
tistry, 5th ed., Philadelphia, Lea 
& Febiger, 1952: 370 p. (p. 250.) 



[ 30 ] 



i 



follows will be used for purpose 
of simplicity. 

1. Tip fracture without expo- 
sure of dentin. 

2. Tip fracture with slight 

amount of dentin exposed. 

3. Fracture of considerable 
depth without pulp expo- 
sure but well into dentin. 

4. Fracture with pulp expo- 
sure but apical opening of 
pulp canal not closed. 

5. Fracture with pulp expo- 
sure but apical opening of 
pulp canal well closed. 

Diagnosis: The importance of 
making an accurate diagnosis 
cannot be overstressed. There 
should be no delay in examining 
the child after the accident has 
occurred and every case should 
be carefully examined before a 
diagnosis is made. Many parents 
will telephone the dentist, re- 
porting the accident and stating 
that the teeth appear to be unin- 
jured. The busy practitioner may 
be tempted to postpone examina- 
tion or perhaps inform the parent 
that no treatment is necessary. 
There is always a possibility that 
the damage is greater than ob- 
served by the parent. Roots may 
be fractured, enamel on the lin- 
gual surface broken, adjacent 
and opposing teeth involved and 
other complications present. A 
history of the accident deter- 
mining when and how it 
occurred is of prime importance 
Radiographic, vitality and mobil- 
ity tests should be made for the 
tooth in question as well as the 
adjacent and opposing teeth. 
The ice test or electric pulp test- 
er may be employed to deter- 
mine vitality. The ice test is 
usually adequate and most chil- 
dren are not so apprehensive of 
it as of the electric pulp tester. 
A negative response is not 



always indicative of a non-vital 
or lost pulp. 

The puip may be in a state of 
shock and after a period of from 
a few days to a week or even 
longer it may respond favorably. 
Good radiographs of the teeth 
are not only an aid to diagnosis 
but are of value as a permanent 
record of the tooth, which may 
be referred to at a future date. 

Emergency Treatment: Some 
form of emergency treatment 
and covering should be accom- 
plished at the first visit to 
protect the pulp and maintain 
space. Before discussing manage- 
ment of fractures as to classifi- 
cation a few methods of tem- 
porary treatment will be describ- 
ed. A stainless steel band, fabri- 
cated from .002 thickness stain- 
less steel matrix metal, may be 
placed on the tooth. A strip, cut 
to a width slightly wider than 
the length of remaining crown is 
adapted around the tooth and 
pinched tight at the lingual. The 
band is then removed from the 
tooth, the joint spot welded or 
soldered, lapped and polished, 
similar to an orthodontic band. 
Chrome steel crowns are now 
available in several sizes for an- 
terior teeth. They are readily 
adapted and contoured to the 
remaining portion of the tooth 
and provide an acceptable tem- 
porary restoration which usually 
will protect the tooth over a 
period of a few weeks or several 
months. Should aesthetics be a 
factor and the fracture is not 
extensive the labial portion of 
the crown may be cut away 
similar to an open face crown. '^ 

7. Humphrey, W. P. & Fleige, F.J., 
"Restoration of fractured ante- 
rior teeth with steel crowns," 
J. Dent. Child.. 4th quarter, 1953: 
p. 178. 



[ 31 ] 



A narrow portion of the crown at 
the labiogingival margin is left 
to prevent the crown from 
spreading (Fig. 1). When this 
restoration is cemented care 
must be taken to assure that 
cement is present under the nar- 
row labial band of metal to pre- 
vent decalcification of that area 
of enamel. Celluloid or resin 
crown forms may also serve as 
temporary coverings but they 
lack the strength and durability 
of the metal bands and crowns. 




A temporary restoration which 
is frequently dislodged decreases 
the chances of maintaining the 
vitality of the tooth so treated. 
Before any restoration is cement- 
ed, exposed dentin should be 
cleansed with a mild antiseptic, 
dried and covered with a layer 
of sedative cement of the zinc 
oxide-eugenol type. 

Management hy Classification: 
Class 1 and 2: Tip fractures 
with little or no involvement of 
the dentin: If no dentin is ex- 
posed slight disking and polish- 
ing, to provide a smooth, self 
cleansing area, will prove ade- 
quate. The same treatment may 
frequently suffice where a very 
slight amount of dentin is ex- 
posed. Should the tooth be sen- 
sitive, moderate grinding may 
be undertaken at intervals of 



several weeks. This also proves 
successful where it is deemed 
necessary to grind the incisal 
edge of the adjacent tooth for 
reasons of esthetics. 

Class 3: Fracture of consider- 
able depth without pulp expo- 
sure but well into the dentin: 
Teeth so fractured should be 
treated with a temporary re- 
storation as soon as possible after 
injury. When adequate diagnosis 
has been made the tooth is iso- 
lated, dried and the exposed 
dentin cleaned with a mild anti- 
septic. Hydrogen peroxide may 
be used as a cleansing agent 
followed by drying and applica- 
tion of a layer of sedative cement 
covering the exposed dentin. The 
temporary restoration should 
then be cemented with a suitable 
crown and bridge cement A 
close follow up is necessary and 
the parent should be so informed. 
At monthly intervals the tooth 
is tested for vitality, sensitivity 
to percussion and mobility. After » 
six months, if no unfavorable j 
symptoms have developed, a ' 
radiographic examination is 
made and a temporary-per- 
manent restoration is made and 
placed on the tooth. This restora- 
tion may be an inlay or a gold 
(three-quarter) basket crown. 
The basket crown described by 
Brauer^'S and Ellis^, although 
lacking some esthetic properties, 
is as acceptable a temporary- 
permanent restoration as has 
been developed to date. It is 
practical, conservative, easily 
fabricated and in most instances 
will serve until eruption and 
pulp recession will permit a per- 
manent type of restoration to , 
be placed. 

8. Brauer, J. C, et al., Dentistry 
for Children, 3rd ed., New York 
Blakiston. 454 p. 



[ 32 ] 



Technic for preparation and 
construction of a basket crown: 
A minimum of preparation of 
the tooth is desired for this type 
of crown. Slices are made with 
a separating disk on the mesial 
and distal. If the tooth is thin 
labio-lingually one slice is per- 
formed on the mesial and on 
the distal directed with a taper 
toward the labial (Fig. 2). If 
the tooth is thick labio-lingually 
and the crown has considerable 
bell shape it is necessary to make 
two slices each on the mesial 
and on the distal, one tapering 




Direction oi slices on tooth 
which is thin labio-lingually 

Fig. 2 




Direction of slices on tooth 
which is thick labio-lingually 

Fig. 3 



toward the labial and one taper- 
ing toward the lingual (Fig. 
3) . The slices should be parallel 
extending just beneath the free 
gingival margin. The unfrac- 
tured incisal edge is disked or 
ground slightly to allow for a 
thin protective edge of gold. 
Very little grinding is usually 
required on the lingual. In the 
event of a very close bite a 
slight amount of enamel of the 
opposing teeth is ground away 
and polished. In every instance 
the gingival border of the crown 
will be determined by the stage 
of eruption of the tooth. Fre- 
quently on young teeth the 
crown will not extend over the 
cingulum which has not yet 
erupted. A compound impres- 
sion in a well adopted copper 
band is taken and a stone die 
produced. A piece of softened 
inlay wax is placed on the pre- 
pared tooth followed by an im- 
pression, in plaster or solvite, 
of the anterior teeth. A wax bite 
is taken to register occlusion of 
opposing teeth. The tooth is 
again covered with a temporary 
crown cemented with sedative 
cement. The base of the die is 
tapered, lubricated and waxed to 
place in the plaster impression. 
Separating media is applied and 
a stone case produced. The cast 
is articulated with the wax bite. 
A thin three-quarter crown is 
then waxed, in inlay wax, on the 
stone die. A window is cut out in 
the wax on the fractured por- 
tion so that only a thin incisal 
edge of gold is visible from the 
labial (Fig. 4). The wax pat- 
tern is invested and cast in a 
hard spring type gold. The cast- 
ing is then placed on the die to 
be finished and polished. At the 
next appointment the finished 
crown is cemented on the tooth 



[ 33 ] 



A light cement is used allowing 
a thin layer to remain in the 
incisal corner window to mask 
the gold. The window is then 
restored with a matching shade 
of silicate. 

Fractures which are too exten- 
sive to restore ivith a basket 



teeth^. Reduction of the enamel 
is required to provide for ade- 
quate bulk in the finished crown. 
The pulp is not as close to the 
labial surface as one might 
believe. According to Hartsook^^, 
the pulp of young permanent 
incisors is wide mesiodistally but 
narrow in labio-lingual diameter. 




Erupted portion of the c 




Preparation of tooth 
for gold thimble 



Fig. 5 



crown yet do not expose the 
pulp: A temporary - permanent 
restoration which will not be 
dislodged may be constructed by 
the use of auxiliary pins in a 
basket crown; a gold thimble or 
various combinations of gold 
and acrylic. The end result of 
extensive loss of tooth structure, 
when pulp recession permits, is 
usually a jacket crown. There- 
fore, it is permissible to remove 
more of the enamel in order to 
devise a gold thimble acrylic 
faced crown. 

Technic for construction of 
gold thimble acrylic croion: A 
local anesthetic is administered. 
The radiographs are studied 
carefully to determine the size 
and position of the pulp. Mesial 
and distal slices are prepared, 
similar to those for a basket 
crown (Fig. 5). The labial and 
lingual enamel is carefully re- 
duced by conservative grinding 
and disking for the danger of 
pulp injury is great in young 



A tube impression is made of 
the prepared tooth and a stone 
die produced. After lubricating 
the die one layer of 28 gauge 
wax is used to form a wax thim- 
ble on the die. This wax may 
be reinforced on the lingual with 
inlay wax extended incisally 
enough to permit the opposing 
teeth to strike gold instead of 
acrylic. A retention groove and 
finish line are carved in the wax 
on the lingual (Fig. 7). The 
wax pattern is invested and cast 
in hard gold. The casting is then 
stoned and disked on the labial 
until it is quite thin. A series of 
retention holes are cut through 
the labial with a No. 1 round 
bur (Fig. 6). The casting is 

9. Lefkowitz, W., "Effect of opera- 
tive procedures on non carious 
teeth of young persons," J.A.D.A. 
1864: 1874: October, 1942. 



10. 



Hartsook, Joseph T., "Manage- 
ment of young anterior teeth 
which have been involved in 
accidents," J.A.D.A., 554-564, 
Nov. 1948. 



[ 34 ] 



4 



then fitted on the tooth in the 
mouth, or on the die in the arti- 
culated casts and the remaining 
portion of the crown waxed in 
ivory inlaj' wax. It is desirable 
that the crown be waxed up 
slightly larger than the original 
to allow for finishing, establish- 
ment of contact and polishing. 
The waxed up crown is then 
invested in a small split flask 
for processing in acrylic. After 
the flask has been separated and 
the wax flushed out, a masking 
medium is applied to the labial 
portion of the gold to prevent 
the gold color from showing 
through the acrylic. One of the 
resin cements, applied by brush 
technic in a thin layer, will mask 
the gold. The desired shade of 
acrylic resin is then packed and 
cured. 

Class 4: Fractures with pulp 
exposure but apical opening of 
pulp canal not closed: Such in- 
juries may range from a minute 
opening to a complete exposure 
of the bulbous portion of the 
pulp. Emergency treatment, 
initiated as soon as possible 
after injury, usually falls into 
one of two modes - pulp capping 
or vital pulpotomy. Successful 
pulp capping has been reported; 
however, results from the vital 
pulpotomy are as good if not 
better and it offers certain 



advantages which favor it as 
treatment of choice^°. A plan 
similar to that described by 
Zander and Law^^ is described 
below. The operation is best per- 
formed under local anesthesia 
following an aseptic technic. 

Technic for Vital Pulpotomy: 

A. Crown is isolated, cleansed 
and mild antiseptic applied. 

B. Access to pulp chamber is 
gained through the lingual. 
The enamel and dentin 
directlj^ over the pulp is care- 
fully removed. 

C. The coronal portion of the 
pulp is amputated with a 
sharp spoon excavator or 
large round bur to a depth 
of one to four millimeters 
below the level of the cer- 
vical margin. This depth will 
later provide space for a 
retention pin or post. The 
entire p u 1 p a 1 cavity is 
thoroughly cleansed of 
debris. 

D. Hemorrhage is usually con- 
trolled with pledgets of 
cotton applied to the pulp 
stump, but where difficulty 
is encountered, the pledget 
may be saturated with ad- 

11. Zander, H. A. & Law. D. B., 
"Pulp management in fractures 
of young permanent teeth," 
J.A.D.A. 29: 737, May 1948. 



Labial view o( gold Ihimble 
wilh relcnlion holes 

Fig. 6 



Unerupled crown 

Margin of Ihimble 




Margin o( gold 




Lingua] view of Ihimblo acrylic 
rij. 7 



[ 35 ] 



renalin hydrochloride 1 to 
1000 or a few drops of the 
anesthetic solution. Should 
these measures fail to stop 
pulpal bleeding the prog- 
nosis of success is not good. 

E. A thin layer of calcium hy- 
droxide, in either paste or 
powder form, is placed over 
the pulp stump followed by 
a layer of zinc-oxide eugenol 
cement. The remainder of the 
pulpal cavity is filled with 
regular dental cement 
(Fig. 8). 

F. One of the temporary restora- 




Calcium hydroxide 
DWide eugenol 



and continued root formation 
will progress on teeth so treated 
successfully. 

When the dentin bridge is 
clearly observed and the tooth 
responds to a vitality test, a 
tem.porary-permanent restora- 
tion may be placed upon the 
tooth. The dentin bridge is not 
always a criterion of successful 
pulpotomy treatment. In some 
instances, death of the pulp 
occurs after formation of a 
bridge. The pulp may likewise 
remain vital where no bridge 
of dentin is formed. Either of 




Dentin bridge 
Relenlion posl 



illustrating vital pulpotomy technic 
Fig 8 



ction of thimble 



tions, as previously described, 
is cemented on the tooth. 
G. A post operative radiograph 
taken at this time will prove 
of value later as a basis of 
comparison. 
A close follow up of the patient 
is advisable. A bridge of dentin 
may be observed radiographi- 
cally beneath the calcium hydro- 
xide in from 30 to 60 days. 

The calcium hydroxide will 
appear as a radiolucent area and 
should not be mistaken as a void 
or area of decay under a restora- 
tion. Pulp vitality is maintained 



the two temporary-permanent 
crowns as described, with addi- 
tion of a retention post may serve 
this purpose (Fig. 9). 

Class 5: Fracture with pulp 
exposure but apical opening of 
the pulp canal well closed: A 
vital pulpotomy or a pulp cap 
may be attempted. Should these 
fail, a complete pulp extirpation 
and root canal filling could be 
accomplished. Where these in- 
juries have been neglected, an 
infected pulp and apical abscess 
may be present for which root 
canal therapy followed by apico- 



[ 36 ] 




FIG. IC — Left: Temporary restorations. Steel crown on maxillary- 
incisor and steel bands on mandibular incisors. (Courtesy of Dr. Roy 
Lmdahl, University of North Carolina.) Center: Open face steel crown. 
Temporary restoration on fractured incisor. Right: Gold basket crowns 
on maxillary incisors, in service seven years. 



ectomy would be the indicated 
treatment. 

Sumviary: 

Treatment of fractured per- 
manent incisor teeth of children 
may present a problem to some 
dentists. These injuries occur 
from many types of accidents 
and appear to be increasing due 
to the varied physical activities 
of children. A system of classifi- 



cation and treatment for these 
fractured teeth is described 
which includes emergency care 
and technic for pulpotomy, con- 
struction of basket crown and 
thimble acrylic crown. These 
methods have been followed by 
many operators, thereby saving 
countless valuable anterior teeth 
which otherwise might have 
been condemned. 




^ i^^ 




FIG. 11 — Left: Thimble acrylic crown on maxillary incisor. Center: 
Roentgenogram of maxillary incisor wnich had pulpotomy treatment 
followed by thimble acrylic crown. Note dentin bridge. Right: Thimbla 
acrylic crown in mandibular incisor. 



[ 37 ] 



News Items 



• The final session of the series of meetings in postgraduate 
study held in Fayetteville ended with a barbecue given by Dr. L. J. 
Moore, Sr. at his cabin on Rockfish Creek. 

• After serving eleven months in the Korean Campaign, Dr. 
Harold Maxwell has returned to Fayetteville and his practice with 
Dr. Jimmie Pringle. 

• Dr. and Mrs. Frankel Grimes are the proud parents of a 
baby boy who arrived a few months ago. Dr. Grimes is now in 
practice with Dr. Lawrence Paschal of Fayetteville. 

• Dr. Lawrence Cameron who was graduated last June from 
the University of North Carolina is now in practice with Dr. L. J. 
Moore of St. Pauls. 

• Dr. R. R. Sappington is now in practice with Dr. W. G. 
Nimocks of Fayetteville. 

• Dr. Ben Ward of Chadbourn is expecting to enter the 
service this fall. 

• Dr. R. M. Olive, Sr., attended the reunion of the Class of 
1914 at the University of Maryland. 

• Dr. Clarence Stone, of Greensboro, has returned to his 
office after an absence of several months due to illness. 

• Greensboro dentists who expect to move into new offices 
soon are Drs. J. B. Caldwell and C. B. Corey, August first, and J. W. 
Sigmon, September first. 

• Dr. J. B. Brown, Ahoskie, has recently moved into his new 
office on Highway 13. 

• Dr. W. E. Rasberry, former mayor of Griffon, has been 
elected to the Griffon Town Board of Aldermen. 

• Dr. E. G. Boyette, Enfield, recently retired from private 
practice and is now employed by the State Hospital at Butner. 

• The State Mental Hospital in Goldsboro has a new dentist. 
He is Dr. David Jackson of Clinton and was graduated from Emory 
this past spring. Assisting Dr. Jackson is an extern from Emory, 
Bob West, a rising senior. 

• Dr. Donald L. Henson, Kinston, attended the postgraduate 
course. Children's Dentistry H, given at the University of North 
Carolina in July. 

• Dr. Lonnie Dickens has moved from Charlottesville, Vir- 
ginia to Windsor and has opened an office there. 

• Dr. Bill Tucker, Goldsboro, has moved into the new Burser 
Building. 

[ 38 ] 



• Dr. J. R. Carson, Jr., Rocky Mount, recently moved to the 
First Federal Savings Building. 

• Dr. W. H. Gray, Jr., Williamston, has returned to practice 
after a short illness. 

• Wayne County Hospital now has a dentist on call through- 
out the year. 

• Drs. Zealy, Houston, and Tucker of Goldsboro attended 
the series of postgraduate lectures sponsored by the Fourth District 
Dental Society. 

• Dr. L. E. Ross has moved from Ayden to Greenville. 

• Dr. Robert H. Gilbert, Kinston Orthodontist, was married to 
Miss Patricia Ann Lanier May 31. Their honeymoon was spent at 
Colorado Springs, Colorado. 

• The Lenoir County Dental Society was entertained by Dr. 
J. Garves Pool for a week end at the Core Bank Rod and Gun Club. 

• Dr. Zeno Edwards, Jr., Washington, attended the post- 
graduate course. Children's Dentistry I, sponsored by the Depart- 
ment of Pedodontics at the University. 

• Kinston and Lenoir County lost one of its most beloved 
citizens when Dr. O. L. Wilson passed away in June. Dr. Wilson 
had practiced dentistry in North Carolina for over fifty years. 

NORTH CAROLINA UNIT 

AMERICAN SOCIETY OF DENTISTRY FOR CHILDREN 

ORGANIZED AT PINEHURST MEETING 

Sixty-five members of the North Carolina Dental Society expressed an 
interest in the American Society of Dentistry for Children on May 18, 1954, 
at Pinehurst. 

Twenty members are necessary to form a state unit. Some 32 states 
have such organizations. To date 57 members have paid their dues, and a 
charter has been applied for. 

Charter members will be those who pay their dues to this new organiza- 
tion before the State Charter is granted by the national organization in 
Miami, Florida in November. 

Officers elected at the first meeting are: 

Drs. J. B. Freedland, Charlotte, president; R. A. George, Mount Airy, 
vice president; W. W. Demeritt, Chapel Hill, secretary-treasurer. 

Any member of the North Carolina dental Society who is interested in 
better dentistry for children is invited to become a charter member by 
mailing a check for $7.50 to the Secretary. Five dollars is for 1954-1955 dues 
to the National Organization. It also includes a subscription to the Journal 
of the American Society of Dentistry for Children. The remainder is the 
. 1954 dues to the state unit. 



[ 39 ] 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY'S SPECIAL PLAN OF 
ACCIDENT AND HEALTH INSURANCE ESTABLISHED 1S43 




As close as your phone . 

TELEPHONE COLLECT 
5-5341 -DURHAM 



If you have any problems in con- 
nection with disabihty insurance 
we invite you to call this office 
collect. Weil do our best to help 
you — and there is no obligation 
on your part. 



This is the accident and health 
plan established., by the State 
Society for its members in 1943. 



PLANS AVAILABLE 



Accidental Dismemberment 

Death Benefits. Up to 

Plan 1 $5,000.00 |10,000.00 

Plan 2 5,000.00 15,000.00 

Plan 3 5,000.00 20,000.00 



Accident and 

Sickness Benefits 

$ 50.00 weekly 

75.00 weekly 

100.00 weeklv 

($433.00 per month) 



Annual 

Premium 

$ 90.00 

131.00 

172.00 



Semi-Annual 
Premium 
$45.50 

66.00 

86. .50 



(a) Members under age 60 may apply for $10.00 per day extra for hospitalization at 
premium of only $20.00 annually, or $10.00 semi-annually. 

(b) Members under age 60 may also apply for surgical benefits up to $225.00 per 
operation, as provided in policy schedule, at a premium of only $10.00 annually 
or $5.00 semi-annually. 

For Application, or Further Information, Write or Call 

J. L. CRUMPTON, State Mgr. 

Professional Group Disability Division 
Box 147, Durham, N. C. 



Representing COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEWARK, N. J. 



Th 



lURNAL 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 




APR 18 1955 

i^m'sm OF 

HMLTH AFFAIRS LIBRARY 



Volume 38 



January, 1955 



Number 2 



WOODWARD 

SINCE 1922 

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There are very good reasons why you can choose with confidence 
precisely the laboratory which faithfully reproduces an appliance from 
your prescription. 

First among these reasons is proven dependability — our reputation — 
established by 32 years of constant striving to produce the finest in 
prosthetic dentistry. 

We are proud of our record, of our introducing Vitallium — the 
"Miracle Alloy" — to the profession of the state, of our maintaining 
a complete service by the incorporating of proven materials and 
techniques as a part of our regular operation. Included among these are 

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Jectron Denture material 
Luxene 44 Denture material 
Micromold pin less teeth 
Color Form Dentures 
HydrocoUoid bridgework 
Magnetic Dentures 




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Greensboro, North Carolina 
Woodard — a name worth remembering when you want the best. 



THE JOURNAL 
of 

The North Carolina Dental Society 

(Component of the American Dental Association) 



OFFICERS 
1954-1955 



B. N. Walker 
President 
Charlotte 



J. Walton Branham 
' President Elect 
Raleigh 



Horace K. Thompson 

Vice President 

Wilmington 



Ralph Coffey 

Secretary -Treasurer 

Morganton 



VOLUME 38 JANUARY, 1955 NUMBER 2 



Page 
Dedication Adams 

The President's Page Walker 43 

From the Secretary's Desk Coffey 45 

Central Office is Recommendation 

of Executive Committee Editorial 46 

Executive Committee Meeting Minutes 47 

Reports from the District Presidents: 

First District Roberts 53 

Second District Kendrick 55 

Third District Kirkland 57 

Fourth District Towler 59 

Fifth District Minges 62 

Why Don't We See More 

Fixed Bridgework? Keller 64 

News Items 66 

Memorial Fund Established 67 



Marvin R. Evans, Editor 

Frank G. Atwater. Associate Editor 



■U 



...^ closing dates for the Journal are, February 10. July 10. and November 10. 
Published four times a year. January, April, August and September. Entered as 
Second Class Matter. August 1951, Chapel Hill. N. C. Subscription $2.00. 




Dr. Adams 



North Carolina Dentists are privileged 

to pay tribute and honor to 

Dr. Claude A. Adams, of Durham. 



The President's Page 

Bernard N. Walker. D.D.S. 

National Children's Dental Health Week 
February 7-13, 1955 



The American Dental Associ- 
ation has approved the changing 
of National Children's Dental 
Health Day to National Chil- 
dren's Dental Health Week. 
Many dental societies hold that 
a one week observance is justi- 
fied due to the months of effort 
in planning and because other 
events in the community some- 
times make it difficult to observe 
the nationally designated day. 

Many communities through- 
out North Carolina have ob- 
served this National Children's 
Dental Health Day. Others have 
made it a week long observance. 
The North Carolina Dental So- 
ciety hopes that every local 
dental society will participate 
in this program. 

Educational concepts today 
emphasize the importance of 
utilizing community resources 
for broadening and enriching 
the school program. Many agen- 
cies, organizations, and individ- 
uals have valuable contributions 
to make to education. Each has a 
responsibility for doing what it 
can to improve the community 
and its educational program. 

Dental societies, dental health 



committees, and individual den- 
tists have a responsibility in con- 
tributing to the health and wel- 
fare of children as well as adults, 
both through making dental care 
available in their private offices 
and by giving leadership and 
consultation to the community 
health program. 

It has been the dental profes- 
sion, more than any other group, 
that has evidenced the greatest 
concern for the dental health 
status of the people of this state. 
Considering this, it seems incred- 
ible that a few dentists are con- 
tributing major blocks to the 
community dental health pro- 
gram. They should realize that 
they are a part of a health team 
and if they wish to continue to 
participate on the team, they 
must assume their responsibili- 
ties. It behooves us in dentistry 
to again review the four objec- 
tives that dentistry should pur- 
sue, namely: 1. Continued Edu- 
cation; 2. Prevention; 3. Correc- 
tion; and 4. Continued Research 
Activities. 

Dental societies are engaged in 
dental education activities in 
varying degrees. Dental educa- 



43 



tion can be improved through 
the cooperative efforts of den- 
tistry and educators. Children, 
who have a sound foundation in 
the principles of good dental 
health, can assume more respon- 
sibility for their own dental 
health. They will develop good 
oral hygiene habits and seek 
regular dental care. Dental 
health throughout life is deter- 
mined, in part, by the effective- 
ness of dental health lessons 
learned during childhood. 

Each school and community 
functions differently and no pat- 
tern can be established that fits 
all. No one knows better than 
the dentist the tremendous task 
of keeping the teeth of children 
in a healthy condition. At the 
same time, the dental profession 
knows that there are measures 
that can be taken by each indi- 
vidual to help in the prevention 
and control of dental diseases. 
The success of any one of these 
measures depends almost wholly 
on educating the parents and the 
child. 



When anyone mentions educa- 
tion, we think, ordinarily, that it 
is a responsibility of the school. 
Perhaps it is, but do we ever 
stop to think of the tremendous 
task of the school in trying to 
provide the child with all the 
skill, attitudes, and knowledge 
he will need to become a useful, 
self-sustaining member of so- 
ciety? Everyone in the com- 
munity has a share in the educa- 
tion of its children. The grocer, 
the policeman, the physician, the 
electrician, the minister, and the 
dentist, each has a responsibility. 
All about us, we see examples of 
how schools have used com- 
munity resources to provide a 
more dynamic, meaningful edu- 
cational program. The dental 
profession recognizes that it has 
moral and social responsibilities 
for extending its influence be- 
yond the rendering of dental 
services to the patient in the 
dental chair. The profession has 
the obligation of providing in- 
formation that will help people 
better understand dental health. 



Dr. Bernard Walker, president of the North Carolina Denial Society addresses 
the members of the Fourth District at their meeting in Raleigh. Others shown are 
Drs. Sam Towler and J. E. Swindell. 




From The Secretary's Desk 



Ralph Coffey. D.D.S. 



I feel that the following letter, 
which I received from Mr. Wil- 
liam J. Fitzgibbon, Manager 
Carolina Hotel, is of importance 
to our entire membership. I urge 
your careful consideration of 
this letter, and call your atten- 
tion particularly to items 2, 4, 
and 5 which affect you as indi- 
vidual members. 

A conference with Mr. Fitz- 
gibbon has been arranged. You 
will be informed if any changes 
are made in his proposals. The 
tentative date for mailing reser- 
vation blanks for our Annual 
Meeting is February 1, 1955. 

October 15, 1954 
Dr. Ralph Coffey, 
Secretary-Treasurer 
North Carolina Dental Society 
Morganton, North Carolina 

Dear Dr. Coffey: 

In the past, the Carolina has 
been penalized by having vacant 
rooms during May conventions 
and we think it is now time that 
the hotel should be protected. 
We are willing to do everything 
possible to make your meeting a 
success but, on the other hand, 
we feel that we should in no 
way penalize the revenue of the 
Hotel. Therefore for our May, 



19dd meetings, we would like to 
suggest the following: 

1. The Association to be held 
responsible for a minimum 
payment of three full days 
on all official block reser- 
vations for rooms not taken 
by 5:00 p. m. on the day 
scheduled for arrival — in 
your case this would be 
Sunday, May 15. 

2. All those staying in the 
Headquarters hotel {the 
Carolina) should be com- 
pelled to pay for the com- 
plete period of the conven- 
tion — emergencies and 
sickness excepted. 

3. All programs for conven- 
tions to be presented to us 
before they go to the print- 
er. 

4. No evening meal to be 
scheduled before 6:30 p.m. 

5. We feel that the 10^^ for 
gratuities that has been 
added in the past, is not 
ample to take care of our 
employees, especially the 
bellboys and we feel that 
we should add 15 Or this 
year for gratuities. 

I should be glad to hear from 
you at your convenience. 

Cordially yours, 

William J. Fitzgibbon 
Manager 



[ 45 J 



Central Office Is 
Recommendation Of The 
Executive Committee 



For some time now it has been 
the opinion of many of our mem- 
bers that the North Carolina 
Dental Society has grown to be 
big business. A business that has 
grown to such proportions that 
it cannot continue to depend on 
the willingness and generosity 
of its volunteer workers who 
have had to sacrifice not only 
their personal emotions, time 
with family and friends, but 
have actually made financial 
sacrifices that would alarm most 
of you if you knew the amount 
given gladly and eagerly for the 
cause of Organized Dentistry. 

Many previous leaders of our 
society have suggested the need 
for an executive secretary, but it 
was not until last year's Pine- 
hurst meeting that definite steps 
were taken in this direction. 
President Neal Sheffield recom- 
mended that a corresponding 
secretary be hired to relieve 
some of the load, and following 
the adoption of this recommen- 
dation a special committee was 
appointed to study the needs of 
the Society. 



The special committee spent 
many hours in analyzing the 
problem, making trips and ask- 
ing for information from every 
known reliable source. The re- 
sults were compiled and pre- 
sented to the Executive Commit- 
tee in Asheville, Sunday, Sep- 
tember 19. 

In order to have an informed 
membership the Executive Com- 
mittee of the North Carolina 
Dental Society requested that 
the entire minutes of the meet- 
ing with the report of the special 
committee attached be printed 
in th^s issue. Please read this 
report with an open mind and 
think of the many advantages 
that would accrue from such a 
progressive step. | 

Dentistry in North Carolina ! 
has achieved an enviable record. 
We must not relax now and rest [ 
on our laurels, or allow our lead- , 
ers to become so bogged down 
with the impedimenta of organ- 
ization that the broader vision is 
obscured. 

The Editor 



[ 46 ] 



Minutes of the Meeting of 

The Executive Conimittee 

NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 

Sunday, September 19, 19 54 



The meeting was called to order at 3:00 p. m. by the Chairman, 
Dr. Olin W. Owen. Those present were: Drs. Owen, C. C. Poindexter. 
I. R. Self, B. N. Walker, H. W. Thompson, J. W. Branham, Ralph Coffey, 
E. A. Pearson, and M. R. Evans. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and the following correc- 
tion made, "The question of visitors being allowed to attend both the 
general business and also the House of Delegates was discussed by the 
committee. Dr. C. C. Poindexter moved that all Business and House of 
Delegates meetings shall be closed to all persons other than members of 
the North Carolina Dental Society, and that pages be placed at the doors 
to carry out this rule. This was seconded by Dr. I. R. Self and passed." 

Dr. Owen asked for the report of the appointed committee named to 
study the plan for a Central Office and the employment of an Executive 
Secretary. The report, recommendations, and proposed budget (see below) 
was read by the Secretary, Ralph Coffey. The report was discussed and 
on motion by Dr. J. W. Branham and second by Dr. C. C. Poindexter the 
report and recommendations were approved by the unanimous vote of 
the Executive Committee. 

Dr. C. C. Poindexter moved that the report, recommendations, and 
budget proposals, and also the action of the Executive Committee be 
made available to each district society, the District Officers Conference, and 
be published in the January issue of the JOURNAL. This motion was 
seconded by Dr. I. R. Self and was passed. 

Dr. Marvin Evans presented a special report (see below) relative to 
our publications. Dr. B. N. Walker commended Dr. Evans for this report 
and moved that it be adopted and that the report be printed in the 
January issue. This motion was seconded by Dr. Coffey and passed. 

Dr. Walker moved that the Editor-Publisher publish the names v.r 
addresses of all paid members in the Convention issue of the Journal. Thi:- 
motion was seconded by Ralph Coffey and was passed. 

Dr. Branham discussed the appointment of an Associate Editor- 
Publisher to work with Dr. Evans. Dr. Owen appointed the following 
committee to report at the next meeting of the Executive Committee 
relative to this matter: Dr. J. W. Branham. Chairman, M. R. Evans, and 
H. K. Thompson. 

Dr. Poindexter moved that any companies of questionable natur;^ 

which are, in the opinion of the Chairman of the Exhibits Committee, in 

onflict with the views of the North Carolina Dental Society be excluded 

from the list of exhibitors at the 1955 Annual meeting. Dr. Self seconded 

this motion and it was passed unanimously. 

L 47 J 



Dr. Owen made the following announcements: The next regular meet- 
ing of the Executive Committee would be held Monday night October 25 
in Raleigh. The tentative date for the District Officers Conference would 
be November 20-21 in Greensboro. 

On the motion of J. W. Branham and second by Ralph Coffey thr 
meeting was adjourned. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ralph Coffey, Secretary-Treasurer 

APPOINTED COMMITTEE REPORT ON CENTRAL OFFICE 
AND EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

The Special Committee, appointed by the Chairman of the Executive 
Committee to determine the feasibility of the establishment of a Central 
Office and the employment of an Executive Secretary, submits the follow- 
ing report and recommendations. 

A study of the past recommendations made by the presidents and special 
committee in all instances show and report that such a change in our 
organization would be beneficial to our membership. We find also in these 
reports that to establish such a program the one factor is that an increase of 
dues would be necessary. 

The committee has studied the recommendation of Dr. Neal Sheffield 
which was proposed and accepted last May. This provided for a paid cor- 
responding secretary. The following analysis in our opinion would make 
this plan undesirable in view of the study and investigation we have made. 

The analysis of our Society which we bring to your attention in this '. 
report is in no way any reflection on any past administration or committee. 
We do this with the feeling that as leaders in our Society we are duty 
bound to present the facts, if by doing so we can better serve our Society 
and the public. Our study has been in cooperation with the Legal Council 
of the American Dental Association and therefore we cite other changes 
which are found to be not in harmony with the ADA. 

The North Carolina Dental Society ranks 20th in membership of all ] 
constituent societies. Seventeen societies have a larger membership 1100- ■ 
10,242. We are the third largest Southern state trailing Tennessee and I 
Florida by less than 100 members. We find that 35 states have dues of I 
over $11, 6 states have dues of $10. There are 14 societies having dues of 
less than $10. Seventeen states or constituent societies have an executive 
secretary with a central office. A break-down on the category reveals 
that 11 of the states have a membership of 882 or over. There are 5 
societies employing an executive secretary with total membership under 
882. Thirteen of the states have dues from $10 to $42. Three states having 
this program collect dues as follows: 

Florida $8.50 993 Members 

Missouri 9.00 1643 Members 

Pennsylvania 10.00 4630 Members 

We wish to call to your attention in this report that we in North Caro- 
lina operate under our system whereby we carry State Life Members, 
ADA Life Members and Military Service Members with no revenue at all. 

We do not propose a change. We concur and urge that this practice 
be continued. We do call to your attention the fact that 22% of our member- 

[ 48 ] 



ship does not pay dues. Our study reveals that at the time the American 
Dental Association made a change in their requirements for Life Member- 
ship we had no such provision. We still recognize our members on the 
state level and, of course, we abide by the ADA requirements. We also find 
that in addition to those states which do not have State Life Memberships 
also have revenues from State appropriated funds to the society and in 
addition carry advertisements in all publications and hand programs. A 
study of the Tennessee State Dental Association shows funds of approxi- 
mately $6000 are provided in this manner. 

A brief picture of our organization reveals the following. The records of 
the Society are held in various places. The records of the Secretary- 
Treasurer are not kept in a fire-proof place. Records dated prior to 1927 are 
not available to the officers, therefore, certification of members to the ADA 
is processed on word of the applicant and not by records. The authorization 
of our new card index bookkeeping system cannot be instituted because of 
the lack of space. Correspondence is being inadequately handled from the 
yearly change of committee members. We feel that a central office would 
coordinate the work of the Secretary-Treasurer, Editor-Publisher, and the 
Standing Committees. 

We also find that additional revenue would provide other changes which 
are in keeping with other states and ADA recommendations. We feel that 
our delgates to the ADA should be paid travel expenses, plus $10 per day. 
Committee Chairmen carrying on the work in cooperation with the 
various Councils of the ADA should attend conferences in Chicago or 
national meetings. These expenses should be paid by our Society. We do 
not feel that any office should be abolished or appointments be taken 
away from the Executive Committee. We do feel that by the officers 
directing an Executive Secretary in his work we could render a better 
service. 

Last year the officers and committees mailed approximately 8000 
items. A society of 882 should have mailed from a central office 32,000 
items to be assured of an informed membership. In addition to regular 
duties we foresee the following additional services that would be available 
to our membership with an Executive Secretary. 

1. Monthly News Letter. 

2. Edit clipping newspaper service. 

.3. Better public relations with PTA, civic groups, and allied profes- 
sional groups. 

4. Conduct annual workshop for officers and committee chairmen. 

5. To provide continuous contact with advertisers and exhibitors. 

We submit in this report a budget proposal on our findings. We also 
call to your attention certain requirements that will insure and protect 
our financial standing. 

In conclusion we recognize the fact that in the event this plan is put 
into operation many changes will, of necessity, have to be made. Namely, 
realignment of the duties of the Editor-Publisher, Secretary-Treasurer and 
many committees. An increase of dues must be considered. A city for the 
Central Office must be selected, and personnel chosen. 

We of the Special Committee are the first to recognize the complete 
reorganization and change this will bring in our Society but in an evaluation 

[ 49 1 



of the states which have this program we found a healthy growth and a 
well informed membership. We recognize the hardships that are now 
being carried by those in charge and that eventually the membership as a 
whole will demand this program. 

Your Special Committee makes the following recommendations. First, 
that the dues of the North Carolina Dental Society be increased from $10 
to $32. Second, that a program based on this report be studied and imple- 
mented with definite safeguards provided for all financial and operative 
procedures. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. N. Walker, M. R. Evans, Ralph Coffey 

PROPOSED BUDGET 1956 GENERAL FUND 
Eslimated Income 
Dues 

750 Regular members — @ $32.00 $24,000.00 ! 

(Increase of $22.00) 

142 State Life Members 

12 ADA Life Members 

36 Military Service Members 

Exhibits 

45 @ $75.00 3,500.00 



Total : $27,500.00 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES APPROPRIATIONS 

Sinking Fund General 5% — Gross $ 1,375.00 

Relief Fund 500.00 

(This amount to be appropriated annually until a 
three year reserve is accumulated in both funds.) 
Committees 

All committees that work with the different ADA Councils, 
special committees of our Society, District Officers' Con- 
ferences, Workshop for officers and committee chairmen 

and Centennial celebration 2,500.00 

Salaries 

Secretary-Treasurer 250.00 

District Secretaries 125.00 

ADA Delegates 1,000.00 

Annual Meeting 5,000.00 

(This estimate based on the cost of previous meetings.) 
Central Office 

Rent $1,300.00 

Supplies, printing, stationery. News Letter 1,200.00 

Postage 500.00 

Telephone, Telegraph, lights 500.00 

Travel (Executive Secretary) 1,000.00 

Salary (Executive Secretary) 6,000.00 

Salary — Secretary 3,000.00 

S. S. Taxes 140.00 

$13,640.00 

[ 50 ] 



Capital Outlay for Central Office 
On Hand 

Electric Addressograph 
Camera 

Typewriter- Jumbo 
Equipment to Be Bought 

Bookkeeping System $800.00 

(This has been authorized.) 
2 Typewriters 267.00 

1 Adding Machine 118.00 

2 Desks 293.00 

2 Chairs for desks 127.50 

1 Safe 157.50 

4 Fireproof filing cabinets 894.00 

1 Mimeograph machine 63.00 

1 Conference table and chairs 300.00 

Miscellaneous supplies 90.00 $ 3,110.00 

Total $27,500.00 

ESTIMATED INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 
NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY PUBLICATIONS 
Income 

Advertising Fees $3,900.00 

Subscriptions 25.00 

$3,925.00 
Expenditures 

Printing: 4 issues and hand programs $3,245.00 

Photo Supplies 100.00 

Telephone and Telegraph 100.00 

Postage and Second Class Deposit 50.00 

Stencils 25.00 

Binding 15.00 

ADA Dues 10.00 

$3,545.00 

Estimated Gross Profit $ 380.00 

Honorarium Editor-Publisher 200.00 

Estimated net profit $ 180.00 

REGARDING CAPITAL EXPENDITURES 

In future years the amount appropriated for capital outlay could be 
used as follows: 

1. Public Relations 

2. Dental Education of the Public 

3. Student Loan 

4. Workshops 

5. Seminars 

6. Buy or erect building for Central Office 

7. History 

8. Financial aid to the North Carolina Dental Auxiliary 

[ 51 ] 



Change in Proceedings Format Requested 

EDITOR'S REPORT TO THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Your Editor-Publisher has considered seriously the feasibility of 
changing the custom, followed in previous years, of printing a verbatim 
report of the proceedings of the annual meeting of the North Carolina 
Dental Society. 

My study and observations of other publications as well as contact 
with other members of the American Association of Dental Editors has 
convinced me that a change is long overdue. 

It is my considered opinion that the Proceedings format is obsolete 
and cumbersome and is not up to the progressive standards to be found 
in other areas of the North Carolina Dental Society's activities. A revision 
undoubtedly would point the way for further accomplishments. 

Since there is always the original and two duplicate copies of the 
verbatim report of the proceedings available for reference it is my opinion 
that no other copies are necessary for a permanent record. 

The revised published Proceedings would reflect more credit to the 
North Carolina Dental Society and to the profession of dentistry. There- 
fore, I would respectfully submit for your consideration the possibility of 
a revision of the published Proceedings whereby the contents would be as 
follows; 

Dedicatory page 
President's Address 

Report on President's Address 
Obituaries 
Committee Reports 

Standing — Special 
Report of the State Board of Dental Examiners 
Auditor's Report 

Financial Statement of the Editor-Publisher 
Minutes of the Executive Committee Meetings 
Eulogy of Guest of Honor at Annual Banquet 
List of Essayists and Clinicians 
Editorially acceptable scientific papers 
Other items of special significance 
Appendices: 

Directory of new officers and committees elected and appointed at ' 
the annual meeting. 

List of the attendance record of members of the House of Delegates. 

This report will bring to your attention some of the matters that I 
believe should be given consideration either by action at this time or by 
study leading to action in the near future. 

Signed: M. R. Evans 



[ 52 ] 



Reports from the 
District Presidents 

FIRST DISTRICT 



Pearce Roberts, Jr., D.D.S., Asheville, North Carolina 



During the past six years I 
have had the honor of serving 
you and have been fortunate 
during these years to follow the 
advance of organized dentistry. 
As individuals we often lose 
sight of the progress made by 
our district, state and national 
organizations and we fail to 
realize what each means to us as 
an individual and as a member 
of the profession. The following 
is not an address, preferably a 
report for our members to 
acquaint themselves and our 
new members to know what our 
organizations are doing for us 
and our profession. It is often 
easy to sit aside, pay our organ- 
izational dues and reap our 
profits without realizing that 
someone is responsible for our 
well being in such a satisfying 
profession as we have chosen. 
May we all endeavor in the fu- 
ture to not only be better pro- 
fessional people but to assist in 
the further progress of our pro- 
fession as a health group. 

It is of course impossible dur- 
ing this time to completely list 
the committees, members and 
activities of all groups that work 
so earnestly in our behalf, so the 
following are a few of the major 
actions that have been per- 
formed for us through Organ- 
ized Dentistry. 



During final actions before 
Congress adjourned self- 
employed dentists were ex- 
cluded from coverage under the 
Old Age and Survivors Insur- 
ance Program. Leaders of an 
attempt to remove dentists from 
the exemption list were opposed 
by Senate Finance Committee 
members who observed that 
those leaders reflected the views 
of relatively few dentists and 
dental groups. The committee 
had acted upon recommenda- 
tions of the body which repre- 
sents the profession nationally, 
the American Dental Associa- 
tion. In brief, it was the opinion 
of our delegates to the American 
Dental Association that profes- 
sional persons are self-employed 
and self-determining and are not 
limited by economic considera- 
tions which compel retirement 
at age 65 as in general industrial 
employment. 

The Weir Bill (H.R. 234) to 
prohibit fluoridation of public 
water supplies throughout the 
United States was defeated em- 
phasizing again the continued 
work of our fluoridation groups 
with correct scientific data. Inci- 
dentally, Osawatomie, Kansas 
just became the 1000th com- 
munity in the United States to 
report the start of a fluoridation 
program. 



53 



Through the influence of our 
representative groups a Selec- 
tive Service Draft was set up. 
Priority groups were established 
trying to arrange an equality for 
service by our professional men. 
We have also been able to main- 
tain for our Dental Corps offi- 
cers their increase in salary. 

Never before have we been 
offered such wide coverage at 
such low premiums as are now 
available in our State Health 
and Accident Group Insurance, 
National Health and Accident 
Group, and National Life Insur- 
ance policies. At this writing 
only 600 additional applicants 
for the Association's insurance 
are needed to meet the national 



quota. If this quota is reached 
it will be possible to extend in- 
surance protection on a national 
basis to dentists with poor medi- 
cal histories. 

Our dental schools are now re- 
quired to meet certain standards 
in order to be accredited with 
the national organization's pro- 
gram. By establishing these 
standards our professional 
schooling ranks highest in the 
world thereby graduating better 
qualified men each year into our 
profession. 

Among other activities of in- 
terest have been the cooperation 
with labor organizations to pro- 
mote better health programs; 
obtaining Federal funds for the 



Gathered around for serious discussion al Ihe First District meeting are 
Drs. Clyde Minges, past president of the American Dental Association; Irwin Hyatt 
and J. H. Sherard, both of Emory, and standing. Sam Isenhower, president-elect 
and C. Z. Candler of Asheville. 




advancement of dental research; 
preparing plans for a part in 
wartime health care; and the re- 
quest for larger deductions of 
dental expenditures from Fed- 
eral income tax. 

Our dental school at Chapel 
Hill continues to progress offer- 
ing more each year to all of us. 
Not only was this year the year 
of the first graduating class but 
a year when the school has 
offered each member of our So- 
ciety a chance to enroll in a 
graduate course or postgraduate 
course, to have his dental assist- 
ant enroll in their extension 
course. They have continued to 
supply all of our group with 
essayists. As our school pro- 
gresses may we progress with it 
and avail ourselves of the oppor- 
tunities presented. 



Last year it was decided that 
flowers would not be sent in 
case of sickness or death of a 
member but that a contribution 
would be sent to the Dental 
Foundation of North Carolina in 
the name of the member. This 
can be hastened by dropping a 
card to the District secretary- 
treasurer when the gesture is 
necessary. 

We are happy to have our 
members back who have been in 
the Armed Forces. To those who 
are now entering their tour of 
duty we wish a speedy return. 
Without new members we could 
not grow, we are sincerely glad 
to have you as one of us and I 
hope you feel as I that you gain 
from an organization as much as 
you are willing to give! 



SECOND DISTRICT 



Z. Vance Kendrick, D.D.S.. Charlotte, North Carolina 



Some thirty-four years ago this 
organization began as a spontan- 
eous desire on the part of the 
professional men to broaden 
their knowledge of develop- 
ments in dentistry and to uphold 
the basic philosophy of ethical 
standards. 

Times have changed drasti- 
cally since then. We are now liv- 
ing in an age of unprecedented 
tension when the truths we have 



s 



always considered "self-evident" 
to reappraise ourselves and our 
organization from time to time 
and adapt ourselves to change. 
But this has been a refining 
process and always we have 
come forward with valid prin- 
ciples reaffirmed. 

These are the values that do 
not change: We know that (1) 
orienting our practice to facili- 
tate the maximum good to all 



L 55 J 




Dr. Z. Vance Kendrick presides at 
Ihe meeting of the Second District 
Dental Society at Charlotte. 



are being questioned. We have 
patients both rich and poor, (2) 
maintaining our professional in- 
tegrity as individuals and as a 
group, and (3) keeping abreast 
with the exciting new discov- 
eries and applying them to our 
field are fundamental goals. We 
know that these are values 
which, if firmly upheld, will not 
be threatened by socialization, 
Communism, or any other force 
which tends toward professional 
mediocrity. When the public 
realizes that we are secure in 
our ideals, they will look to den- 
tistry and the other professions 
for leadership rather than 
attempting to devise legal means 
to use us as a tool. 

In recent months, certain 
areas in our district have been 
faced with problems which may 
be detrimental to the public 
good. Without our present pro- 
fessional and organizational 
standards these threats could 



not be met. At present there is 
an active and unscrupulous 
group which, to use a Biblical 
phrase, "darkens counsel by 
words without knowledge." This 
group would assume our pre- 
rogatives of dental medication, 
preventive measures and health 
care. We must arm ourselves to 
meet such attacks on a dignified 
and scientific plane. To this end, 
I recommend the abolition of the 
Dental Relief Committee, since 
its function has been taken over 
at the state level. A new Com- 
mittee for Public Education 
should be formed to replace it. 
This committee should provide 
for the education of the laity as 
well as the profession on mat- 
ters of common interest. This 
information can be disseminated 
through present information 
channels, organized groups such 
as P.T.A., civic clubs, etc., as 
well as through brochures and 
pamphlets directly from the 
Committee whenever desirable, i 

In this vein, I recommend that 
we now reaffirm our position of 
encouraging and furthering the 
fluoridation of communal water 
supplies until such time as this 
preventive measure is proven 
ineffectual. 

I recommend further that this 
society adopt the changes in the 
Constitution and By-Laws as 
presented by the Committee on 
Constitution and By-Laws. 

Lastly, I recommend the seri- 
ous consideration of employing 
an Executive Secretary for the 
North Carolina State Dental So- 
ciety, and if this recommenda- 
tion is affirmed, that our mem- 
bers of the House of Delegates 
be instructed to work for and 
vote for such a measure at the 
earliest opportunity. 



[ 56 ] 



\ 



New officers of the Third District Dental Society. Drs. Guy Willis, Durham, 
)resident-elect; Sam Shaffer, Greensboro, president; H. A. Karesh, Greensboro, 
ice-president; and W. T. Burns. Chapel Hill, secretary-treasurer. 




THIRD DISTRICT 

George F. Kirkland, D.D.S., Durham, North Carolina 



There are three issues I would 
like to discuss in this address. 
One, Old Age Survivors Insur- 
ance for dentists; two, the need 
for an Executive Secretary for 
our state dental society; three, 
the need for a unanimity of 
opinion about fluoridation. 

Now to get back to Old Age 
Survivors Insurance for den- 
tists. A bill which was to include 
dentists in a Federal insurance 
program has just been defeated. 
However, for quite a while we 
were very close to being in- 
cluded in this program and if the 
trend remains the same there is 
every indication that this sort of 
legislation will be proposed 
again. Now if we are to have 
any control over the destiny of 
our profession I think it is high 
time we learned more about the 



Federal Old Age Survivors In- 
surance program. On the surface 
such a program seems like an 
ideal set-up for one planning re- 
tirement, but before we dream 
too much about the day when 
we can quit working and live off 
the government, let's find out 
how much we will have to put 
up to become a recipient of So- 
cial Security. 

To begin with we will be com- 
pelled under the present law to 
pay twice as much as the wage 
earner or salaried employee. Al- 
so if the Federal Old Age Insur- 
ance program is made to include 
our profession, compulsory par- 
ticipation is required by every 
member. No one can withdraw. 
Neither can future generations 
who will have had no voice in 
making the law. 



[ 57 ] 



At the present time we would 
be required to pay 49^ on the 
first $3600 of our income or $144 
a year. This is only the begin- 
ning because the tax is set up on 
a graduated scale so that by 1970 
the percentage will have risen 
to 4y8 9<, also under the present 
recommendations the base sal- 
ary would be raised from $3600 
to $4200. This would mean that a 
participant on the average 
would pay over $175 each year 
as additional tax. Over a period 
of 40 years this would amount to 
over $7000. When to this is add- 
ed a compound interest of a con- 
servative 3%, it would amount 
to a total in excess of $13,000. 
This is what Social Security 
would cost in dollars and cents, 
plus taking away the freedom of 
being able to invest our own 
money. 

Now, let's find out what the 
payoff would be. First we would 
have to be 65 before we could 
qualify for the insurance. 
Another qualification is that the 
recipient could not earn more 
than $75 a month from any em- 
ployment. Then at age 65 we 
would only receive $85 a month 
for life. Your wife would have 
to meet the same qualifications 
to receive $42 a month. Jointly 
you would only receive $120 a 
month or $1440 annually. This 
would mean that both you and 
your wife would have to live to 
age 74 to get back the $13,000 or 
more it had cost. If the insured 
should die before his 65th birth- 
day, his estate would receive no 
part of what he had paid as a 
participant except $225 at death. 
If the wife predeceased the hus- 
band after age 65 he would still 
receive only $85 a month. On 
the other hand if the husband 
predeceased his wife after age 65 



she would receive only $63 a 
month provided she is over 65. 
What it boils down to is this. 
The government is taking away 
from us in the form of a tax 
another $175.50 a year. In return 
for this if we live long enough 
(age 65) and are willing to stop 
practicing, we would receive $85 
a month or $120 a month if our 
wives are living and are over 
age 65. 

Now it does not seem logical 
that any of us are going to want 
to give up a practice which will 
net over $5000 a year even work- 
ing part time to qualify for a 
mere $120 a month Social Se- 
curity, so to most of us it means 
that in an average lifetime we 
have just donated an extra $7000 
to the government. It is my 
opinion that we would be much 
better off if we left Old Age 
Survivors Insurance alone and 
made our own plans for the fu- 
ture. Take this money that 
would go to the government, 
save it and invest it and plan for 
semi-retirement. 

So even though at the present 
time it seems that such legisla- 
tion will not be enacted, we 
should be better prepared in the 
future to meet such a crisis. I 
would like to go on record as 
being opposed to the profession 
of Dentistry being included in 
the Federal Old Age Insurance 
program and I think the wishes 
of this group should be recorded 
for future reference when and if 
this issue should arise again. 

Another problem which con- 
fronts our Society at this time 
is the need for an Executive 
Secretary to serve the North 
Carolina Dental Society. Our 
organization has grown so large 
and the duties of the Secretary- 
Treasurer and Editor have 



[ 58 ] 



reached such proportions that a 
hired secretary with a central 
office has become a necessity. 
Very few men can give the nec- 
essary time to handle these jobs 
and handle them well. So I am 
recommending that we raise our 
state dues to a level where we 
can hire an Executive Secretary. 
I really did not intend to bring 
up the question of fluoridation. I 
thought enough had been said. 
Recently, however, in a neigh- 
boring city the question has 
blossomed anew. Greensboro 
happened to be one of the cities 
which had fluoridated its water 
supply. However, a very vigor- 
ous campaign by the opponents 
of fluoridation which included 
several dentists and medics led 
to the city council voting to 



eliminate sodium fluoride from 
the water supply. This is still a 
red hot issue. With all the re- 
search that has been conducted, 
and data available presenting 
unquestionable proof of the 
beneficial effects of the fluoride 
compound in drinking water it 
is hard to see how any group 
opposing fluoridation could pre- 
sent such a strong argument and 
sway city officials to decide with 
them. But it has been done and 
if something isn't done to stop it, 
it may set a trend for the future. 
The very fact that we dentists 
disagree on the issue has the 
public confused and rightly so. 
We must get a unanimity of 
opinion among ourselves before 
we can expect the general public 
to follow suit! 



FOURTH DISTRICT 



S. B. Towler, D.D.S., Raleigh. North Carolina 



Since we last met, another 
notch has been cut in dental his- 
tory. For the first time in the 
life of our state a class in den- 
tistry has been graduated. If my 
memory serves me right the am- 
bition of many dentists for many 
years has been that we might 
have a dental school in this 
state. 

Soon after the first dental 
school was established in Bain- 
bridge, Ohio, by Dr. John Harris 
and his brother, Chapin — and 
you will recall that, while this 
school was primarily a medical 
school, most of the students 
elected to follow dentistry — the 
Baltimore College of Dental Sur- 
gery was founded. Other schools 



of dentistry followed one after 
the other. It was a glorious day 
for dentistry in North Carolina 
when the first class was gradu- 
ated. I am sure it will afford 
those who were fortunate 
enough to be members of that 
class a great deal of satisfaction 
in later years to have this dis- 
tinction. 

Dentistry has made rapid 
strides in the last few years. Its 
progress in North Carolina has 
been wonderful. I am persuaded, 
yes, convinced, that some of 
these accomplishments and for- 
ward movements are due to the 
high ethical standards which 
dentistry in our state has in- 
sisted upon. The unusual integ- 



59 ] 




Apparently it isn't all work. Drs. Towler. Swindell and Woodall seem to b' 
enjoying the business session of the Fourth District meeting. 



rity of the membership as a 
whole, their appreciation and 
love for their fellow men, the 
mutual respect and friendship 
existing among the dentists, and 
the cordial relationship between 
the medical and dental profes- 
sions have all contributed to the 
present status of the profession. 
Another thing for which I feel 
we should be grateful is that v/e 
have had in this state a dental 
public health program which 
has succeeded in no small way 
in making our children and 
mothers-to-be conscious of the 
importance of dental health and, 
therefore, more appreciative of 
the values of good dentistry. It 
might be enlightening to some 
of us to realize just how large a 
budget the Division of Oral Hy- 
giene of our State Board of 
Health spends each year in this 



educational endeavor — approxi- 
mately $125,000. This expendi- 
ture and effort, as you know, is 
in the name and cause of public 
health but, after all is said and 
done, we, the practitioners of the 
state, are among the benefici- 
aries. In the long run, dentistry 
will profit more from a program 
directed toward motivating peo- 
ple to accept personal responsi- 
bility for their own and their 
children's dental health than 
from one in which people are en- 
couraged to depend on public 
funds to relieve them of such a 
responsibility. For this reason 
alone, if for no other, I believe 
we should do everything pos- 
sible to encourage our estab- 
lished and tested program and to 
lend our aid in the securing of 
an adequate staff for this work. 
Many of you have heard the 



[ 60 ] 



I 



question, pro and con. as to the 
advisability of employing a full- 
time executive secretary for the 
North Carolina Dental Society. 
M}^ purpose in mentioning it at 
this time is to suggest that each 
of us give this matter considera- 
tion. 

There may be a possibility of 
getting our dues too high, and, 
of course, employing a full-time 
secretary will mean that dues 
must be increased. We must 
guard against dues becoming so 
steep that they will keep any 
one from joining the Society. 
However, it is necessary to use 
our best judgment in such an im- 
portant matter. The North Caro- 
. lina Dental Society is, without 
[ question, big business. By in- 
I dulging in a little mental arith- 
metic — you know the dues and 
there are appi cximately 1,000 
i dentists eligible for membership 
— you will arrive at a sizeable 
amount of money. Long time 
planning is absolutely necessary, 
and I can see that keeping some 
ijne on the job who is acquainted 
with past history, present condi- 
tions, trends, and future possi- 
bilities could really be an econ- 
omy measure. 

The dental health matter 
which is in the limelight is flu- 
oridation. This has attracted the 



attention of the lay public to a 
greater extent, perhaps, than has 
any other single public health 
measure. We are all familiar 
with much of the past history, 
the painstaking research, and the 
successful experiments which 
have led to widespread endorse- 
ment of this preventive measure 
by leading scientific bodies. Per- 
sonally, I look with favor on this 
plan for the prevention of tooth 
decay by the restoration of an 
important nutritional element to 
our water. We are all deeply 
concerned with the widespread 
prevalence of dental caries and 
welcome each and every con- 
tribution to the solution of this 
problem. I agree with many 
other dentists that the fluorida- 
tion of public water supplies is a 
great forward step in dental 
health. 

I believe that one of the best 
ways to help bring about ac- 
ceptance of fluoridation is for 
each of us first of all to be up 
on the subject and to be able to 
discuss it intelligently and, then, 
to make a point of stressing the 
values of fluoridated water to 
the patient in the chair. I do not 
mean that we should talk it all 
the time to every patient, but we 
can talk it more of the time to 
selected patients. 



Announcements— 



The District of Columbia Den- 
tal Society. Annual Postgradu- 
ate Clinic. March 13-16, 1955. 
Shoreham Hotel, Washington. 
D. C. 

The Ninety-Ninth Anniver- 
sary meeting of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society. May 15-18, 



1955. Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst, 
North Carolina. WrHe Dr. Ralph 
Coffey, Secretary, Kibler Build- 
ing, Morganton, North Carolina. 
* * * 

The Thomas P. Hinman Mid- 
Winter Clinic. March 20-23, 1955. 
Municipal Auditorium, Atlanta, 
Georgia. 



61 J 



FIFTH DISTRICT 

Coyte R. Minges, Rocky Mount, North Carolina 




Dr. Coyte Minges delivers his 
Presidential Address at New Bern. 
Dr. M. M. Lilley listens intently. 



It was a pleasure to serve as 
your President this past year. 
Every one has been most co- 
operative. I want to thank 
Charles Cook and his Program 
Committee, Henry Zaytoun and 
his Clinic Committee. Our sec- 
retary, M. M. Lilley did his usual 
fine job. A "special" thanks to 
C. B. Johnson and his local com- 
mittee. The New Bern dentists 
really went all out. I believe this 
is the best arranged District 
Meeting that I have ever attend- 
ed. The fellows went to a lot of 
trouble and expense — and it 
really paid off. 

Have any of you taken one of 
the postgraduate courses offered 
at the University? I have talked 
with several dentists who have. 
They praised these courses to 
the sky, as being most helpful. 
It's something you can bring 
back to your office. I would like 
to commend Dean Brauer, and 
urge each of you to take advan- 
tage of these fine courses. 



Congress recently excluded 
dentists from the Old Age and 
Survivors Insurance provisions 
of the Federal Social Security 
Act. This issue will be up for dis- 
cussion at the Miami meeting. 
Members with strong opinions 
on this subject should convey 
these to the Delegates to the 
American Dental Association. 
The Association wants and needs 
your help for a sound policy for 
the future. 

For several years, there has 
been some talk about raising our 
district dues. The dues are $2.00 
a year. The lowest in the State. 
We have around 165 members 
and out of that number, only 
about 110 pay District dues. The 
others are exempt because they 
are State or ADA Life Mem- 
bers, or in the Service. So that 
leaves us only about $220 to run 
the Fifth District for a year, and 
to put on our yearly meeting. 
With stationery, stamps (each 
member is written at least three 
times each year), hotel rooms 
and expenses for our special 
guests, the clinician's expenses, 
etc., you can see that it is pretty 
rough. A big point I would like 
to bring out here is that we are 
getting too expensive for our 
host town's dentists to be able to 
have our meeting. I think that 
the District should pay at least 
part of the local expenses. My 
suggestion would be to raise our 
dues and help out the local den- 
tists, and too, we could pay our 
clinicians in line with the other 
districts. It is up to you. 



[ 62 ] 




Shown from left to right are: Drs. W. L. Hammond. New Bern, editor; C. B. 
Johnson, New Bern, secretary-treasurer; C. P. Godwin, Rocky Mount, vice-president; 
M. M. Lilley, Scotland Neck, president-elect; and Z. M. Zealy, Goldsboro, presi- 
dent — Fifth District Dental Society officers for 1954-1955. 



Dental Assistants Correspondence 
Course at University of North 
Carolina Approved— 



The Chairman of the Educa- 
tional Committee of the Ameri- 
can Dental Assistants Associa- 
tion notified Dean J. C. Brauer 
that the Correspondence Course 
developed by the University of 
North Carolina and the Dental 
Assistants Committee of the 
North Carolina Dental Society 
had been approved by the 
American Dental Assistants 
Association. This means that the 
course material now can be com- 
pleted through correspondence. 



whereby the laboratory work is 
done in the local dental office. 
Following the completion of the 
course, and with other require- 
ments satisfied (work in dental 
office, etc.), the assistant will be 
eligible to take the examination 
for certification given by the 
American Dental Assistants 
Association. 

Information may be received 
by writing Extension Division, 
Correspondence Bureau, Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, Chapel 
Hill. 



63 J 



Why don't we see more fixed 
bridgework? 



R. W. Keller, Assistant Professor of Crown and Bridge 
Prosthodontics, University of North Carolina 



It was due largely to the work 
of Forest H. Orton," in 1919, that 
fixed bridgework was given a 
new birth as it were in dentistry. 
It was he who was among the 
first to show, that by proper at- 
tention to occlusion and ana- 
tomic form in the construction of 
this type of prosthesis, much of 
the "Oral Sepsis" decried by 
William Hunter could be elim- 
inated. Prodigious strides have 
been made in the field of fixed 
bridgework from that time till 
the present. It is true that these 
gains were mostly in excellence 
of technique and mechanical de- 
tails. There has been some prog- 
ress in the intergradation of the 
biological and the mechanical; 
much more work in this direc- 
tion is still needed. 

Fixed bridgework has for 
sometime now had a definite 
place in the curriculum of our 
dental schools. There is no evi- 
dence to the contrary that it will 
not be maintained in the cur- 
riculum in the years to come. 
Volumes have been written on 
the subject and no doubt many 
more volumes will be forthcom- 
ing in the future. At various 
dental meetings, techniques and 
theories are discussed at great 
length by outstanding clinicians. 
You see reams of paper, filled 
with notes made by the dentists 



attending these meetings. Manu- 
facturers outdo themselves in 
the race to fabricate materials 
that will enhance the beauty and 
function of fixed bridgework. In 
spite of all the activity sur- 
rounding this field of endeavor, 
fixed bridgework does not occu- 
py its rightful place in the serv- 
ices rendered by a large major- 
ity of our practicing dentists. I 
don't believe anyone will argue 
the point, that there are more 
cases where some type of fixed 
restoration is not done, as 
against those cases where the 
service is indicated and per- 
formed. In view of the progress 
in this area, why should th^'s sit- 
uation exist? 

To try and answer this ques- 
tion let us look first to our den- 
tal schools. Our schools, in 
recent years, have not been neg- 
ligent in their teaching in this 
field. Some schools emphasize 
this area more than others, but 
by and large the graduate is suf- 
ficiently trained. He is capable 
of handling the average cases 
with passable skill. 

Let us consider now the prac- 
tice of dentistry outside the 
schools. From the training he 
has received, there can be no 
doubt that the practitioner is 
convinced that there are definite 
indications where only a fixed 



[ 64 ] 



type of service will be satisfac- 
tory for the patient. It is agreed 
that he possesses the necessaiy 
skill to handle the average cases. 
There is one factor we might 
consider here. Perhaps because 
he has not rendered this type of 
service, where indicated in a 
large majority of cases, he may 
possibly no longer possess the 
skill to perform an adequate 
service of this nature. 

We must now consider the pa- 
tient in our search for our 
answer. Our patients have re- 
ceived much too much blame for 
the status quo of fixed bridge- 
work. The oft repeated phrase, 
■'they won't pay for this type of 
service," rings constantly in our 
ears. So often and so vehemently 
has this been stated, that many a 
young man starting his practice 
takes it as gospel truth. He 
thinks he can do nothing about 
it, therefore, he never tries. 
There is only one reason why 
patients won't pay for a service; 
they are not convinced of its 
need or value, and we of the 
profession are responsible for 
this attitude. 

For our last consideration we 
return to the dentist. This time 
to examine the materialistic 
philosophy, which seems to be 
everywhere present, in our 
world today. It is this type of 
thinking, governing our actions, 
which more than any other fac- 
tor gives us the answer to our 



question. We are as a profession 
too often guilty of following the 
line of least resistance in our 
effort to attain the happiness 
we believe comes from material 
gains. A concrete example of 
what I mean can be seen in the 
many instances where remov- 
able prosthesis is present; in 
cases where fixed bridgework is 
definitely the indicated treat- 
ment. It is true that our charac- 
ter and thinking tends to be in- 
fluenced by the times in which 
we live; and we are living in a 
materialistic age. That is all the 
more reason why, in this time of 
talk of socializing the healing 
arts, that we of the dental pro- 
fession must guard against this 
materialistic trend, which tends 
to enter into our patient rela- 
tionships. 

Over the years, since 1919, we 
have as a profession made great 
strides in attaining a high de- 
gree of technical skill. I believe, 
however, that during this same 
period, we have to some degree 
lost that spirit of idealism which 
those who have gone before pos- 
sessed. The solution to the prob- 
lem lies in a rekindling in all 
who are associated with the pro- 
fession, this spirit of idealism. 
Without this type of thinking to 
guide our actions in our patient 
relationships, all our technical 
advancement has been wasted 
effort for a lost cause. 



65 



Ne\vs Items 



New officers of the First Dis- 
trict Dental Society are: presi- 
dent, Sam Isenhower, Newton; 
president-elect C. C. Diercks, 
Morganton; vice-president, W. H. 
Parker, Valdese; secretary-treas- 
urer, C. Z. Candler, Asheville; 
and John L. Yelton, Shelby, edi- 
tor. 

Dr. L. Franklin Bumgardner 
of Charlotte and former editor 
of the North Carolina Dental 
Society was re-elected secretary- 
treasurer of the American Asso- 
ciation of Dental Editors at their 
annual meeting in Miami. 

Dr. Marvin E. Chapin of the 
School of Dentistry, Chapel Hill, 
has been reappointed national 
consultant in oral surgery to the 
office of the Surgeon General of 
the United States Air Force. The 
job entails visits to various Air 
Force installations in the United 
States and overseas. 

Dr. Nash Underwood of Wake 
Forest is moving to Durham 
and will specialize in Pedodon- 
tics. 

Dr. Glen Bitler is much better 
after being stricken with Polio 
in the early fall. He is treating a 
few patients and spends some 
time teaching at the dental 
school. One thing that has prob- 
ably hastened Glen's recovery is 
the arrival of a new baby in the 
family. A little brother for the 
Bitler's daughter, Barbara. 

Dr. Joe Evans of Henderson is 
expected to return from military 
service around the first of the 
year. 

Dr. Worth Byrd is now back in 
Sanford specializing in the prac- 



tice of Orthodontics. Dr. Byrd 
received his Orthodontic train- 
ing at the University of North 
Carolina. 

Dr. Sam Massey has returned 
from a tour of duty in Europe 
and is now back in Warrenton. 

Dr. and Mrs. J. F. Pearce of 
Raleigh announce the birth of a 
daughter. 

Dr. Frank Atwater of Greens- 
boro has been chosen by the 
Executive Committee as Associ- 
ate Editor of the North Carolina 
Dental Society. 

The stork seems to have made 
more than his quota of trips to 
Chapel Hill recently. Among the 
proud and happy parents are 
Dr. and Mrs. J. Wilfred Gal- 
lagher, a son: Dr. and Mrs. Jack 
Shankle, a little girl; Dr. and 
Mrs. C. L. Sockwell, a little girl; 
Dr. and Mrs. W. T. Burns, a son; 
Dr. and Mrs. T. A. Blum, a little 
girl; and Dr. and Mrs. Tom 
Darden, a little girl. 

The second annual District Of- 
ficers' Conference was held in 
Greensboro November 20-21, 
1954. The Officers' group was 
entertained by a number of the 
Greensboro dentists at Dr. Neal 
Sheffield's cabin Saturday night. 

At the Sunday business meet- 
ing Dr. Clinton Diercks, Morgan- 
ton, was elected president and 
Dr. Riley Spoon, Winston-Salem, 
secretary-treasurer. The princi- 
pal speaker was Mr. John H. 
Shumaker, Jr., executive secre- 
tary for the Tennessee State 
Dental Association who present- 
ed an interesting summary of 
his activities in the "central of- 
fice" at Nashville. 



[ 66 ] 




Presentation of the Blanche C. Downie Memorial Fund to the Dental Founda- 
Ition and the University of North Carolina October 3. 1954. Left to right: Mrs. H. O. 
Lcneberger, Chairman, North Carolina Dental Auxiliary Dental Foundation Com- 
mittee; Miss Emma Mills, President, North Carolina Dental Hygienists' Association; 
and Dr. John C. Brauer, Dean, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina. 



Memorial Fund Established 



The dental hygienists of North 
Carolina in a meeting held at 
the University of North Caro- 
lina, Chapel Hill, Sunday, Octo- 
ber 3, 1954, established The 
Blanche C. Downie Memorial 
Fund. This fund provides for a 
grant to deserving second year 
students of dental hygiene, and 
it will be administered by the 
Dental Foundation of North 
Carolina and the University Stu- 
dent Loan and Scholarship Com- 
mittee. 

In addition to the delegation 
of dental hygienists from the 
state, others present at the meet- 
ing were: Mrs. Henry O. Line- 



berger, Chairman, North Caro- 
lina Dental Auxiliary Dental 
Foundation Committee, the fac- 
ulty and dental hygiene students 
of the University of North Caro- 
lina. The following citation was 
read and presented by Miss Em- 
ma Mills, President, North Caro- 
lina Dental Hygienists' Associa- 
tion: 

"In commemoration of an out- 
standing leader and a devoted 
teacher whose love of the dental 
hygiene profession expressed 
her talents and her enthusiasm. 
Her radiance and inspiration re- 
main eternal." 



67 J 




^^^ti-uvoi^: 



GIV 




'■^-O.-O-.r. 






Rel 



f 

J 




"^-^^-V^u^^ 



The A.D.A. Relief Fund 
exists to help dentists 
and their dependents who, 
because of accident 
or illness, are totally 
unable to help themselves. 
It is a charitable trust 
supported only by the 
voluntary contributions 
of dentists every^vhere. 
Mail your contribution 
today to 



AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION RELIEF FUND 



222 East Superior Street 
Chicago 11, Illinois 



The 

3URNAL 

"^XORTll ('AROLLXA DENTAL SOCIETY 

SECEtVED 

VIAY 30 1955 

visio.t of 




H AFFAIRS LIBRARV 



Volume 38 



April, 1955 



Number 3 



WOODWARD 

SINCE 1922 

First with the finest for over thirty years. Doctor 

"That little bit extra" is the mark of distinction in each 
department of this laboratory, the distinction that means the 
finest craftsmanship, prompt and courteous service and the 
best materials to accurately reflect your professional ability. 

Due to our background of more than a quarter of a century, 
we can be relied upon to achieve the finest results from 
modern equipment and advanced procedures. 




Woodward Prosthetic Co. 

330 Church Street 
Greensboro, North Carolina 



Woodward — a name worth remembering when you want the best. 



THE JOURNAL 

of 

The North Carolina Dental Society 

(Component of the American Dental Association) 



OFFICERS 
1954-1955 



B. N. Walker 
President 
Charlotte 



J. Walton Branham 

President Elect 

Raleigh 



Horace K. Thompson 

Vice President 

Wilmington 



Ralph Coffey 

Secretary -Treasurer 

Morganton 



VOLUME 38 



APRIL, 1955 



NUMBER 3 



Jjn Ofiif. Z/.i 



a£ 



Page 

General Information 72 

North Carolina Dental Society Program 

Schedule by Days 74 

Essays: 

Endodontics - - Sommer 77 

Operative Dentistry -- Phillips 78 

Periodontics Fox 79 

Oral Diagnosis Burket 80 

Table Clinics 81 

House of Delegates 84 

North Carolina Dental Society Committees 85 

Program, North Carolina Dental Auxiliary 90 

Program, North Carolina Dental 

Hygienists' Association 92 

Program, North Carolina Dental 

Assistants Association 93 

Dedication Walker 94 

The President's Page Walker 95 

From the Secretary's Desk Coffey 96 

Natural Tooth Project Sockwell 97 

Temporo-Mandibular Joint Dysfunction in 

Relation to Occlusal Dysfunction .. Gallagher 99 

News from the Districts 106 



Marvin R. Evans, Editor 

Frank G. Atwarter, Associate Editor 



rhe closing dates for the Journal are. February 10, July 10, and November 10. 
'ublished four times a year. January. April, August and September. Entered as 
Second Class Matter, August 1951, Chapel Hill, N. C. Subscription $2.00. 



North Carolina Dental Society 
]955 




B. N. Walker 
President 





J. W. Branham 
President-Elect 





H. K. Thompson 
Vice-President 




I 70 ] 



Ralph Coffey 
Secretary -Treasurer 



I 



The Ninety-Ninth Anniversary Meeting 

19 5 5 

The North Carolina 
Dental Society 




SUNDAY 
May 15 

MONDAY 

May 16 

TUESDAY 
May 17 

WEDNESDAY 
May 18 



The Carolina Hotel 

Pinehurst, North Carolina 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Registration 

The registration desk will be in the foyer of the Carolina Hotel. It wi] 
open Sunday afternoon May 15, at two o'clock, and remain open on th 
following days of the meeting. 

Members will please fill out a card and have it checked by your distric 
secretary before presenting it for your lapel badge. This procedure wil 
save time during the peak hours of registration. All guests and exhibitorti 
attending the meeting are expected to register. 

General Sessions 

All general sessions will be held in the ballroom of the Carolina Hotel 
and you are cordially invited to participate. The Election of Officers an( 
the House of Delegates meetings are closed and only members of the Nortl 
Carolina Dental Society may attend. 



Commercial Exhibits 

Dr. E. A. Pearson states that the Commercial Exhibitors will have th 
newest dental equipment and supplies on display. This is a most importani 
part of our meeting and you are urged to visit and register with them 

Again this year there will be a drawing for approximately $300 wortlt' 
of prizes. This drawing will take place Tuesday afternoon at five o'clocl^ 
Only dentists are eligible and you must be present to win. 



Golf 

The Golf Tournament will be held on Sunday at the beautiful Pinehurs- 
Country Club. The Golf Committee urges every dentist who plays golf t\ 
take part in this activity which has been planned especially for yom' 
pleasure. 

Each contestant is urged to start as early as possible and no entries 
will be allowed to start later than 2:00 p.m. Scores must be verified b; 
another contestant and turned in by six o'clock. This request is made s 
that prizes may be awarded at the Golf Dinner in the Crystal Room a 
seven. 



Banquet and Dance 

A most cordial welcome is extended to the members and guests of thi 
North Carolina Dental Society to attend the annual banquet and danc 
Tuesday evening. Tickets to the banquet will be furnished by the Carolin 
Hotel to their guests, and those who are not registered at the hotel ma; 
secure tickets at the desk. 

Dr. Donald Kiser, Chairman of the Entertainment Committee assure 
us that a most enjoyable evening of music for dancing will be offered. 

[ 72 ] 



lontl 



Breakfast Conferences 

District Officers: The District Officers will meet Monday morning at 
jight o'clock in the Crystal Room. All district officers are requested to 
ittend this breakfast. 



lire ','• 



Past Presidents: All Past Presidents attending the meeting are espe- 
ially invited and urged to meet together for breakfast Tuesday morning at 
?ight in the Crystal Room. Dr. Neal Sheffield will preside. 



■"raternities 

The various fraternities will meet Tuesday afternoon immediately 
'ollowing the drawing for prizes. You are urged to attend and take advan- 
age of this further opportunity to meet new friends and greet old ones. 
The fraternities and place of meeting are: Psi Omega, the Card Room; 
■Ci Psi Phi, the Pine Room; and Delta Sigma Delta, the Dutch Room. 



:ers5ii 
le Noi 



:OT the Ladies 

The schedule of events for the North Carolina Dental Auxiliary, the 
Dental Hygienist.T' Association, and the Dental Assistants Association will 
)e found listed elsewhere in this program. There are planned activities for 
ill three groups. 

The North Carolina Dental Auxiliary extends a cordial invitation to 

its members and the guests of the North Carolina Dental Society to partici- 

' )ate in its program. The Auxiliary will entertain the members of the Dental 

ociety and their guests at a lawn party Sunday afternoon. A card party 

ilonday morning and a tour of the Orchid Gardens are other exciting 

iffairs which have been arranged especially for the ladies. 



lave !: 
.iporti 



)'cloi 



ent: 



s 
ida! 

>0l! 

assu 



[ 73 ] 



North Carolina Dental Society 
Program Schedule by Days 



SUNDAY. MAY 15 

12:00 Noon Golf Tournament (Pinehurst Country Club) 

2:00 P.M. Registration (Foyer) 

3:00 P.M. North Carolina Unit American Society of Dentistry for Chil 
dren. Dr. Ralph F. Sommer, Guest Lecturer (Card Room| 

7:00 P. M. Golf Dinner (Crystal Room) 

8:00 P. M. General Session (Ballroom) 

Invocation, Dr. Pierce Layfield, West End, North Carolina 
Necrology Report, E. D. Eatman, D.D.S., Rocky Mount, North 
Carolina 

Recognition and Greetings, Dan Wright, D.D.S., Greenville 
North Carolina 

Mrs. Ralph Coffey, Morganton, North Carolina 
President, North Carolina Dental Auxiliary 

Dr. A. S. Bumgardner, Charlotte, North Carolina 
President Dental Foundation of Noi'th Carolina, Inc. 

Report of Fifth District Trustee Dr. Howard B. Higgins, 
Spartanburg, South Carolina 

"Leadership in Dentistry." 

Dr. Daniel F. Lynch, President, American Dental Association 

9:30 P.M. House of Delegates (Ballroom) 

MONDAY. MAY IG 

i 

8:00 A.M. District Officers' Conference (Crystal Room) 

9:00 A.M. General Session (Ballroom) 

President's Address — Bernard N. Walker, D.D.S., 
Charlotte, North Carolina 

10:00 A. M. "Endodontics," Dr. Ralph F. Sommer, University of Michigan; 
Moderator, Dr. J. B. Freedland, Charlotte, North Carolina 

12:30 P.M. Luncheon 

1:30 P.M. "Operative Dentistry," Dr. Ralph W. Phillips, University of 
Indiana; Moderator, Dr. Norman Ross, Durham, North 
Carolina 

3:30 P.M. "Periodontics," Dr. Lewis Fox, South Norwalk, Connecticut; 
Moderator, Dr. Z. Vance Kendrick, Charlotte, North Caro- 
lina 

[ 74 ] 



MONDAY. MAY 16 

6:00 P.M. Dinner 

8:00 P. M. Election of Officers (Ballroom) 

9:00 P. M. House of Delegates (Ballroom) 

TUESDAY, MAY 17 

8:00 A. M. Past Presidents' Breakfast (Crystal Room) 

9:00 A.M. "Periodontics," Dr. Lewis Fox; Moderator, Dr. Z. Vance Ken- 
drick, Charlotte, North Carolina. 

10:30 A. M. "Oral Diagnosis," Dr. Lester W. Burket, University of Pennsyl- 
vania; Moderator, Dr. P. B. Whittington, Greensboro, 
North Carolina 

12:30 P.M. Luncheon 

2:30 P.M. Table Clinics (Ballroom) See page 81 

5:00 P.M. Drawing for Exhibit Prizes 

5:15 P.M. Fraternity Hour 

Psi Omega — Card Room 

Xi Psi Phi — Pine Room 

Delta Sigma Delta — Dutch Room 

7:00 P.M. Banquet 

9:00 P.M. Dance 

WEDNESDAY. MAY 18 

9:00 A. M. Meeting of House of Delegates (Ballroom) 

10:00 A. M. General Session (Ballroom) 
Installation of Officers 
Adjournment 



[ 75 J 




DR. DANIEL F. LYNCH 

President 

American Dental Association 



Dr. Lynch has for many years 
been prominent in dental organiza- 
tion both nationally and inter- 
nationally and has taken an active 
role in a movement to advance 
standards of dentistry throughout 
the world. 

He is a member of Sigma Xi, 
Omicron Kappa Upsilon, the Ameri- 
can Society of Oral Surgeons, the 
American College of Dentists, the 
International College of Dentists and 
numerous other dental societies. 



Dr. Lynch 



DR. HOWARD B. HIGGINS 

Dr. Higgins of Spartanburg, South 
Carolina is the Trustee of the Fifth 
District of the American Dental 
Association. He will give his report 
to the membership Sunday evening. 



[ 76 ] 




Essays 



ENDODONTICS 



Monday, May 16 



10:00 A. M., Ballroom 



RALPH F. SOMMER. D.D.S. 

M.S., F.A.C.D.. F.A.A.O.R. 

Ann Arbor. Michigan 




Dr. Sommer has been Professor of 
Operative Dentistry at the Univer- 
sity of Michigan Dental School for 
the past thirty years. He is head of 
the departments of Endodontics and 
Radiology at the University Dental 
School, and also at the W. K. Kellogg 
Institute for graduate and post- 
graduate studies. Dr. Sommer has 
lectured before many groups in the 
United States, Canada, Latin Ameri- 
ca and Europe. 

He is a past president of the American Association of Endodontists; 
past director of the Detroit Dental Clinic Club of Endodontics; honorary 
president of several Canadian dental societies; and a member of the Odon- 
tological Association of Argentina. A fellow, American College of Dentists; 
member, American Association for the Advancement of Science; Academy 
of Oral Roentganology, Delta Sigma Delta, Sigma Xi and the Telephone 
and Television Extension program of the University of Illinois College of 
Dentistry. 

Synopsis-^The changing concepts in Endodontic procedures based upon 
Histopathologic. Bacteriologic and Roentgenographic findings. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIT 
AMERICAN SOCIETY OF DENTISTRY FOR CHILDREN 

Annual Meeling 

Card Room, Carolina Hotel 3:30 P. M. Sunday. May 16 

Speaker: Ralph Sommer, D.D.S. , M.S., FACD, FAAOR 

Subject: ''Accidental injuries to young permanent teeth and their 
management." 

All members of the North Carolina Dental Society are invited to attend. 

A short business meeting will follow Dr. Summer's lecture. 



[ 77 ] 



Essays 



OPERATIVE DENTISTRY 



"Common Causes for the Failure of Dental Materials in Operative Dentistry" 
Monday, May 16 1:30 P.M., Ballroom 



RALPH W. PHILLIPS, D.D.S. 





Associate Professor and Chairman 

Department of Dental Materials 

Indiana University, Indianapolis, 

Indiana 



Dr. Phillips has appeared on many 
programs throughout the United 
States and is widely known for his 
research in the field of dental mate- 
rials. He v/as awarded the annual 
prize in 1948 given by the Chicago 
Dental Society for research on "The 
Effect of Fluorides on Hardness of 
Enamel," and is the recipient of 
research grants from many govern- 
ment agencies. 

A total of 58 scientific papers, written by Dr. Phillips, have been 
published in the Journal of the American Dental Association, Journal of 
Dental Research. Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry and various chemical 
journals. 

Dr. Phillips i'3 a member of the Dental Study Section of the U. S. Public 
Health Service, Sigma Xi, Omicron Kappa Upsiion, International College 
of Dentists, International Association for Dental Research, American Associ- 
ation for the Advancement of Science and numerous other dental organiza- 
tions. 

He is a graduate of Indiana University. His present position consists 
of teaching the undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate courses in his 
field and directing all research in dental materials. 

Synopsis — A high percent of the clinical failure of restorative materials 
can be attributed to their improper use. Recent research has presented the 
dentist with many new materials and techniques as well as perfection of 
older methods. This presentation will evaluate these newer developments, 
covering such things as: a clinical evaluation of amalgam failures, wax 
pattern distortion and porosity in dental castings, inaccuracy in hydro- 
colloid impressions, the properties of self-evaluation of resin cements, etc. 



[ 78 ] 



Essays 



PERIODONTICS 

"Principles of Occlusion" 



Monday, May 16 
Tuesday, May 17 



3:30 P. M., Ballroom 
9:00 P. M., Ballroom 



LEWIS FOX, D.D.S. 
South Norwalk, Connecticut 



Dr. Fox is Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Dentistry at Columbia Uni- 
versity's School of Dental and Oral 
Surgery, New York City, and has 
appeared on many state and national 
programs. 

He is a member, American Academy of Periodontology, American 
Academy of Oral Pathology, International Association for Dental Research, 
American Association for Advancement of Science, and the American Den- 
ture Society. In addition he is a Diplomate of the American Board of 
Periodontology; a Fellow, American College of Dentists; and Associate in 
Dental Research, New England Institute for Medical Research. 

Synopsis — The evaluation and management of the clinical aspects of 
occlusion will be presented. The functions and objectives of occlusion will 
be correlated to the needs for securing and maintaining periodontal health. 
Concepts of occlusal trauma and occlusal balance will be discussed. 




[ 79 ] 



Essays 



ORAL DIAGNOSIS 

"Oral Diseases" 
Tuesday, May 17 10:30 A.M.. Ballroom 




Lester W. Burkel, D.D.S., M.D. 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



Dr. Burket is Professor of Oral Medicine, and Dean of the School of 
Dentistry, University of Pennsylvania. He is a member of Penn's Graduate 
School of Medicine staff and in addition is Chief of the Oral Medicine 
Service, Philadelphia General Hospital. 

His textbook, Oral Medicine, is widely used by dental schools and 
private practitioners. He is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Nutrition 
and the Journal of Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Surgery. 

Synopsis — A retional procedure for oral diagnosis will be outlined. The 
diagnostic features of the more common diseases of the tongue and oral 
mucosa will be discussed and illustrated by means of kodachrome slides. 



[ 80 ] 



TABLE CLINICS 



Tuesday, May 17. 1955 



2:30 to 5:00 P. M., Ballroom 



OPERATIVE DENTISTRY 



Clinician — 
Subject — 



Clinician — 
Subject — 



Clinic Number 1 

M. G. Miska, University of North Carolina 
Preparation for Porcelain Faced Full Veneer Crowns. 

Clinic Number 2 

Charles A. Jarrett, Charlotte 
Porcelain Jacket Technic. 



Clinic Number 3 

Clinicians — J. J. Lauten and R. S. Turner, Greensboro 
Subject — Elastic Impression Technic for Crown and Bridge. 

Clinic Number 4 

Clinician — Robert E. Finch, Raleigh 

Subject — Permalastic Technic for Single and Multiple Impressions. 

Clinic Number 5 

Clinician — Thomas D. Volmer, Burlington 

Subject — Antibiotic Cement in Pulp Exposures, Statistics of Use Over 
Two Year Period. 

Clinic Number 6 

Clinician — J. R. Carson, Rocky Mount 
Subject • — Plastic Restorations. 

Clinic Number 7 

Clinician — Clarence Lee Sockwell, University of North Carolina 
Subject — Natural Tooth Project. 

Clinic Number 8 

Clinician — Richard W. Keller, University of North Carolina 
Subject — Factors Contributing to Bridge Failures. 



ORAL SURGERY 



Clinic Number 9 



Clinician — C. W. Poindexter, Greensboro 
Subject — Technic for Root Resection. 

Clinic Number 10 

Clinician — L. D. Herring, Raleigh 

Subject — Marsupialization Procedure for Treatment of Cysts. 

[ 81 ] 



Clinic Number 11 

Clinician — P. B. Whittington, Greensboro 
Subject — Root Tip Elevators. 

Clinic Number 12 

Clinician — Ben H. Houston, Goldsboro 

Subject — Replantation Subsequent to Traumatic Injury. 

PROSTHETICS 

Clinic Number 13 

Clinician — Ralph F. Jarrett, Charlotte 

Subject — Functional Impression and Duplication of the Lower Denture. 

Clinic Number 14 

Clinician — A. G. Inscoe, Spring Hope 
Subject — Immediate Dentures. 

Clinic Number 15 

Clinician — J. K. Holladay, Charlotte 

Subject — Anatomic Versus Non-Anatomic Teeth in Full Denture Con 
struction. 

PERIODONTIA 

Clinic Number 16 

Clinician — J. Wilfred Gallagher, University of North Carolina 
Subject — Problem Cases in Periodontics. 

ENDODONTIA 

Clinic Number 17 

Clinician — C. Den Gerdes, Biltmore 
Subject — Root Canal Therapy Dynamics. 

ROENTGENOLOGY 

Clinic Number 18 

Clinician — J. H. Edwards, Raleigh 

Subject — Mounting and Filing X-ray Films. 

ANESTHESIA :^ 

Clinic Number 19 

Clinician — Freeman C. Slaughter, Kannapolis 
Subject — General Anesthesia in Dental Practice. 

PEDODONTICS 

Clinic Number 20 

Clinician — Dwipht L. Clark, Asheville 
Subject — Aids in Pedodontics. 

[ 82 ] 



Clinic Number 21 

Clinician — Joseph Fremont Burket, University of North Carolina 
Subject — Demonstration Models — An Easy Method of Fabrication. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Clinic Number 22 

Clinician — Clinton C. Diercks, Morganton 

Subject — Pharmaceuticals and Prescriptions for the General Practi- 
tioner. 

ORAL PATHOLOGY 

Clinic Number 23 

Clinician — Stanford Harris, Weaverville 

Subject — Oral Manifestations of Systemic Diseases. 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA STUDENT CLINICS 

Clinic Number 24 

Subject — Oral Pathology and Periodontology. 

Clinic Number 25 

Subject — Pedodontics. 

Clinic Number 26 

Subject — Operative Dentistry. 

Clinic Number 27 
Subject — Prjsthodontics. 

NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL HYGIENISTS' ASSOCIATION 

Clinic Number 28 

Clinician — Miss Margaret Shealy, Greensboro 
Subject — The Scope of the Dental Hj'gienist. 

Clinic Number 29 

Clinicians — Dental Hygiene Students, University of North Carolina 
Subject — Your Ambassador of Good Will. 

NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL ASSISTANTS ASSOCIATION 

Clinic Number 30 

Clinician — Miss Edna Zedaker, Charlotte 
Subject — Gadgets for the Small Fry. 

Clinic Number 31 

Clinicians — Durham-Orange Dental Assistants Society 

Subject — Learning Through the A.D.A.A. Extension Study Course. 

[ 83 ] 



House of Delegates 

OFFICERS 

Dr. Bernard N. Walker, Charlotte President 

Dr. J. W. Branham, Raleigh President-Elect 

Dr. H. K. Thompson, Wilmington Vice-President 

Dr. Ralph Coffey, Morganton Secretary -Treasurer 

Executive Commiliee Third District 

Olin W. Owen S. W. Shaffer 

C. C. Poindexter W. T. Burns 

I. R. Self M. R. Hunter 

Ethics Committee ^^. \^ ^ .... 

W. K. Griffm 

H. D. Froneberger 

John A. McClung Fourth District 

Clyde Minges „^ tt -r-.- i t 

TT -r, r^u ui W. H. Finch, Jr. 

H. R. Chamblee a t^ t^ , 

T-> 1 Tn -t ij T A. D. Barbour 

Paul Fitzgerald, Jr. ^ _ _, . , .. 

J. E. Swindell 

State Board of Dental Examiners j; ^- P^i^^g^^ 

G. L. Hooper 
W. M. Matheson 
A. T. Jennette Fifth District 

„. . T^- * ■ * J. M. Zealy 

First District o t u 

Charles B. Johnson 

Samuel E. Isenhower M m. Lilley 

C. C. Diercks Paul Jones 

C. Z. Candler, Jr. Z. L. Edwards, Sr. 

W. D. Yelton 

M. H. Truluck 

Second District 

H. W. Thompson 
Riley E. Spoon 
E. L. Martin 
Joe Davis 
John Pharr 



84 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY 
STANDING COMMITTEES 

Executive Committee 

Olin W. Owen, Chairman (1957) 
I. R. Self. Sr. (1955) C. C. Poindexter (1956) 

Ethics Committee 

H. D. Froneberger, Chairman (1959) 
John A. McClung (1955) Royster Chamblee (1957) 

Clyde Minges (1956) Paul Fitzgerald, Jr. (1958) 

Legislative Committee 

Z. L. Edwards, Sr. (1957) Paul Jones (1956) 

Royster Chamblee (1955) John Pharr (1958) 

Guy R. Willis (1959) 

Program Committee 

Vance Z. Kendrick, Chairman 
J. B. Freedland, Co-Chairman 
Moultrie H. Truluck Charles D. Eatman 

P. B. Whittington, Jr. E. A. Pearson 

Clinic Committee 

Milo J. Hoffman, Chairman 

R. R. Hoffman Guy V. Harris 

W. Penn Marshall Ramsey Weathersbee, Jr. 

Membership Committee 

J. W. Branham, Chairman 
C. C. Diercks Riley Spoon 

W. T. Burns M. M. Lilley 

J. E. Swindell 

Exhibits Committee 

E. A. Pearson, Chairman 
C. T. Wells, Sr. H. C. Parker 

Ralph Falls Edward R. Burns 

Necrology Committee 

E. L. Eatman, Chairman (1959) 
W. L. McRae (1955) Ralph Coffey (1957) 

F. E. Gilliam (1956) J. P. Reece (1958) 

Library and History Committee 

Harold W. Thompson, Chairman (1959) 
J. Z. Moreland (1955) Paul Fitzgerald (1957) 

B. McK. Johnson (1956) M. R. Hunter (1958) 



[ 85 ] 



Insurance Committee 

Joe V. Davis, Chairman (1959) 
P. P. Yates (1955) M. M. Lilly (1957) 

C. H. Teague (1956) J.R.Edwards (1958) 

Publicity Committee 

W. K. Griffin, Chairman (1959) 
Walter Clark (1955) E. D. Baker (1957) 

Howard Allen (1956) C. P. Godwin (1958) 

Constitution and By-Laws Committee 

S. W. Shaffer, Chairman (1959) 
F. O. Alford (1955) C. W. Sanders (1957) 

Z. L. Edwards, Sr. (1956) A. P. Cline (1958) 

Prosthetic Dental Service Committee 

C. C. Poindexter, Chairman (1957) 
Coyte Minges (1955) Walter McRae (1958) 

F. O. Alford (1956) Hubert S. Plaster (1959) 

Council on Dental Health 

Ralph Jarrett, Chairvnan (1959) 
E. W. Connell (1955) E. A. Branch (1958) 

R. L. Whitehurst (1956) Sam Bobbitt (1957) 

State Institutions Committee 

R. E. Hasten, Chairman (1959) 
O. L. Presnell (1955) J. G. Poole (1957) 

W. M. Matheson (1956) C. W. Poindexter (1958) 

Relief Committee 

Paul Fitzgerald, Sr., Chairman (1957) 
Wilbert Jackson (1955) S. H. Steelman (1956) 

J. T. Lasley (1958) J. Homer Guion (1959) 

Advisory Committee for Veterans Administration Program 

Guy E. Pigford, Chairman (1959) 
C. A. Graham, Sr. (1955) Walter Clark (1956) 

Riley Spoon (1957) P. B. Whittington, Jr. (1958) 

The North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners 

Frank O. Alford, Secretary (1955) 
Darden Eure (1955) W. M. Matheson (1957) 

A. T. Jennette (1956) C.W.Sanders (1957) 

E. M. Medlin (1956) 



[ 86 ] 



t 



SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

Resolutions Committee 

Wade H. Breeland, Chairman 
J. E. Moser D. L. Pridgen 

W. T. Burns Z. L. Edwards. Jr. 

T. L. Blair 

Dental Advisory Committee to the University of North Carolina 

S. Everett Moser, Chairman 
C. C. Diercks Milo Hoffman 

S. W. Shaffer John L. Ashby 

C. H. Teague G. L. Hooper 

Paul Jones R. S. Jones 

J. D. Broughton 

Clinic Board of Censors 

Henry C. Parker, Chairman 
David F. Hord Everett R. Teague 

Robert B. Lessem Walter H. Finch, Jr. 

Publications Committee 

M. R. Evans, Chairman 
James E. Moser Frank Atwater 

Horace P. Reeves L. J. Moore, Jr. 

Donald L. Henson 

Entertainment of Out-of-State Visitors Committee 

Dan Wright, Chairman 
G. F. Kirkland D. L. Belvin 

David M. Tuttle B. R. Morrison 

T. W. Atwood H. Edwin Plaster 

Superintendent of Clinic Committee 

Donald W. Morris, Chairman 

H. C. Harrelson Robert L. Smith 

B. F. Edwards M. E. Walker 

J. M. Zealy W. M. Byrd 

Advisory Committee to Dental Hygienist Association 

Amos Bumgardner, Chairman 

S. P. Gay Carey T. Wells, Jr. 

Wade Sowers R. M. Olive, Jr. 

Carl L. Bowen F. Spencer Woody 

Arrangements Committee 

Charles D. Eatman, Chairman 
E. M. Medlin Norman Ross 

Morris L. Cherry Jame.s Zealy 

R. Z. Turner C. B. Fritz 

[ 87 J 



Entertainment Committee 

J. Donald Kiser, Chairman 
John Pharr Edward U. Austin 

D. M. Getsinger Howard S. Rhyne 
C. B. Johnson Rufus A. Daniel 

Golf Committee 

J. E. Graham, Jr., Chairman 

E. M. Medlin Edwin Plaster 
H. P. Reeves, Jr. John R. Fritz 

P. B. Whittington, Jr. 

Liaison Committee to the Old North State Dental Society 

Neal Sheffield, Chairman 
Cecil Pless Ralph Jarrett 

C. W. Sanders Clyde Minges 

Hospital Dental Service Committee 

Norman Ross, Chairman 
Dan Carr G. L. Hooper 

C. D. Eatman P. B. Whittington, Jr. 

S. E. Moser 

Dental Caries Committee 

Grover Hunter, Chairman 
Thomas G. Nisbet A. C. Current, Jr. 

L. H. Butler Pearce Roberts, Jr. 

Allen W. Cash Paul T. Harrell 

Housing Committee 

Howard Branch, Chairman 

Gary Hesseman J. C. Senter 

A. J. Galarde W. H. Young 

C. W. Stevens C. B. Johnson 

Rural Health Affairs Committee 

L. M. Massey, Chairman 
Fred Hale W. S. Griffin 

C. M. Whisnant Ben H. Webster 

Walter Finch, Jr. 

Advisory Committee to N. C. Dental Assistants Association 

Burke W. Fox, Chairman 
Hugh M. Hunsucker F. C. Mendenhall 

D. T. Carr R. M. Olive, Sr. 
W. J. Turbyfill L. C. Hedman 



[ 88 ] 



t 



Public Relations Committee 

John C. Brauer, Chairtnan 
Walter T. McFall J- B. Freedland 

C. B. Wolfe D. B. Seitter 

Royster Chamblee 

Military Affairs Committee 
Elliott Motley, Chairman 
E. L. Eatman Jack L. Raymer 

J. R. Edwards, Jr. W. T. Burns 

Advisory Committee to Selective Service 
Sam Bobbitt, Chairman 
Walter Clark Guy Pigford 

A. D. Abernethy Grady Ross 

Norman Ross T. L. Blair 

C. C. Poindexter Tom Collins 

Dan Wright Walter L. McRae 

Advisory Committee to School Health 
Co-ordinating Service 
Z. L. Edwards, Sr., Chairman 
M. H .Truluck W. B. Sherrod 

Ralph Falls Sam Bobbitt 

Guy R. Willis Paul Fitzgerald 

Industrial Commission Committee 
Sam Towler, Chairman 
O. R. Hodgin W. S. Griffin 

William H. Price A. T. Lockwood 

Marcus Smith 

Centennial Committee 
Frank O. Alford, Chairman 
Martin Fleming, Co-Chairman 
Wade Breeland Frank Atwater 

C. T. Weils, Sr. Fred Hale 

Homer Guion Alex Pearson 

Guy Masten Clyde Minges 

C. C. Poindexter Charles D. Eatman 

Extension Course Committee 
W. W. Demeritt, Chairman 
L. M. Massey J. F. Burket 

D. L. Henson Pearce Roberts 

J. Clopton Farthing 

Fluoridation Committee 
Pearce Roberts, Chairman 

E. D. Baker T. E. Sikes, Jr. 
R. Fred Hunt W. Stewart Peery 

Civilian Defense Committee 
Robert Libby, Chairman 
Allen Lockwood A. R. Stanford 

H. K. Crotts H. L. Monk, Jr. 

H. P. Riggs David W. Seifert 

[ 89 ] 




sst*^ 






North Carolina Dental Auxiliary 

Officers 

Mrs. Ralph D. Coffey President, 

Mrs. J. M. Kilpatrick Vice-President 

Mrs. Grady Ross President-Elect 

Mrs. Ralph L. Falls Secretary 

Mrs. Edward U. Austin Treasurer 

Mrs. Zeno Edwards, Jr Historian 

[ 90 ] 



North Carolina Dental Auxiliary 

FIFTH ANNUAL MEETING 

Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst. Norlh Carolina 

May 15-17, 1955 



Program 

SUNDAY, MAY 15 

3:00 P.M. Registration Foyer 

5:00 P.M. Lawn Party - Lawn 

The members of the North Carolina 
Dental Society will be honor guests. 

8:00 P.M. Ganeral Session, North Carolina Dental Society Ballroom 

MONDAY, MAY 16 

3:30 A.M. Registration Foyer 

9:00 A.M. Golf Tournament Pinehurst Country Club 

10:30 A.M. Card Tournament, Bridge and Canasta Card Room 

Tables for play may be made up at the 
Card Room Tuesday morning, or if you 
desire you may make up your own table. 

2:30 P.M. Executive Board Meeting Card Room 

TUESDAY, MAY 17 

10:00 A. M. General Meeting Card Room 

Invocation — Mrs. Walter Clark 
Pre.^ident's Report 
Election of Officers 
Installation of Officers 
Adjournment 

1:00 P.M. Luncheon Main Dining Room 

Recognition of New Members 

Awarding of Door Prizes, Golf Prizes and Trophy. 

3:00 P. M. Tour of Carolina Orchid Gardens 

7:00 P.M. Banquet 

9:00 P. M. Dance 



The North Carolina Dental Auxiliary extends a cordial invitation to its 
members and to the guests of the North Carolina Dental Society to partici- 
pate in its program. 

[ 91 ] 



North Carolina Dental Hygienists' Association 

OFFICERS 

Miss Emma Mills, President Winston-Salem 

Miss Margaret Jones, Secretary High Point 

Mrs. Nancy Horton, Treasurer Greensboro 

Executive Council 

Miss Eleanor Forbes Miss Emma Mills Miss Margaret Shealy 

Program 

SUNDAY, MAY 15, 1955 

3:00 P.M. Registration 

5-7 P. M. Official Reception, Pinecrest Inn 

8:00 P. M. General Session, North Carolina Dental Society, Carolina Hotel 

MONDAY. MAY 16, 1955 

8:30 A.M. Registration 

9:00 A.M. Opening Session 
Call to Order 

Dr. Amos Bumgardner, Chairman, Advisory Committee to 
Dental Hygienists' Association 

9:30 A.M. "Pedodontics in General Practice," Dr. Donald L. Henson, 
Kinston, North Carolina 

10:30 A.M. "Report of National Meeting," Mrs. Nancy Horton and Miss 
Alberta Beat 

11:00 A.M. "Role of the Dental Hygienist in the Establishment and Main- 
tenance of Oral Hygiene Service in Private Practice," Miss 
Mae Sarsfield, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

12:00 Noon Business Session 

President's Report 

1:00 P.M. Luncheon 

2:30 P. M. "Objectives in Dental Hygiene," Dr. Wilfred Gallagher, Chapel 
Hill 

3:30 P. M. Election and Installation of Officers 

4:30 P. M. Executive Council Meeting 

TUESDAY. MAY 17. 1955 

8:30 A.M. Registration 

9:30 A. M. Dr. J. W. Branham, Raleigh 

10:00 A.M. "Your Professional Association," Miss Margaret Swanson, 
Washington, D.C. 

11:00 A.M. Business Session 

12:30 P.M. Luncheon 

2:00 P.M. General Clinics, Carolina Hotel 

5:00 P. M. Adjournment 

[ 92 ] 



North Carolina Dental Assistants Association 

Program 

Holly Inn. Pinehurst, North Carolina 
May 14-17, 1955 

SATURDAY. MAY 14 

5:00 P. M. Registration 

8:00 P.M. Board of Directors Meeting 

9:00 P. M. Reception bj' Charlotte Dental Assistants Society 

SUNDAY. MAY 15 

9:00 A.M. Registration 

10:00 A.M. First Business Session 

1:00 P.M. Luncheon Honoring Component Society Presidents 

4:00 P. M. Board of Directors Meeting 

6:00 P. M. Social Hour — Greensboro Dental Assistants Society 

8:00 P.M. General Session, North Carolina Dental Society, Carolina Hotel 

MONDAY. MAY 16 

10:00 A.M. Clinics 

11:00 A.M. Second Business Session 

12:30 P.M. Luncheon 

2:00 P.M. G3neral Meeting 

Call to Order — Miss Nellie Reeves 

Address of Welcome — Dr. J. J. Lauten, Greensboro 

Response — Miss Edna Zedaker 

Greetings — Miss Ruth V. Doring, Montclair, N.J., President 
ADAA 

"The Dental Assistants Role in the Dental Office." Dr. J. W. 
Branham. Raleigh 

Address, Miss lone Roberts, Memphis, Tennessee 

President's Address, Miss Mary Benton, Greensboro 

8:00 P. M. Banquet and Dance 

TUESDAY. MAY 17 

9:30 A.M. Third Business Session 

11:00 A. M. Fourth Business Session 
Installation of Officers 
Adjournment 

2:00 P.M. Table Clinics, Carolina Hotel 

[ 93 ] 




BERNARD N. WALKER. D.D.S. 
Charlolte, North Carolina 

When Bernard Walker came to this state from 
his home in Mississippi we gained a very vital 
personality. A man of varied interests and bound- 
less enthusiasm. His primary interest is dentistry; 
his main hobby is amateur radio. 

He has worked hard and well at the big job of 
guiding our Society this year, and it is particu- 
larly fitting that during his term as President of 
the North Carolina Dental Society that we honor 
him with the dedication of this Journal. 



[ 94 ] 



The President's Page 



Bernard N. Walker, D.D.S. 

CHARLOTTE 

As the ninety-ninth year of 
organized dentistry in North 
CaroUna draws to a close, we 
should pause to reflect on the 
progress that has been made 
during these years. The number 
of members has grown from 
eight in the original society 
founded in 1856 to over nine 
hundred in 1955. During these 
intervening years, many have 
given of their time and resourc- 
es to bring dentistry to the posi- 
tion of respect that it now holds. 
Constant effort on the part of 
these men has resulted in the 
establishment of the State Board 
of Dental Examiners and the 
formulation of laws governing 
the practice of dentistry in North 
Carolina. There has been the 
establishment of a Division of 
Oral Health as a part of the 
State Board of Health. Repre- 
sentation has been given to dent- 
al members on the State Board 
of Health and on County Boards 
of Health. Organized dentistry 
paid for a survey of the dental 
educational needs in North Caro- 
lina, and then worked for and 
helped found the School of 
Dentistry at the University of 
North Carolina. These are some 
of the major projects, but there 
have been many more. Much 
credit should be given to the 
many local dental societies and 
individuals who, through their 



efforts, have reflected honor on 
our profession. The place that 
dentistry holds among the health 
professions did not just happen 
but it took planning, foresight, 
and much work. 

During the past ten years, due 
to the growth of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society and the prob- 
lems connected with this in- 
crease, it has become more evi- 
dent to the officials of the society 
that something needs to be done 
to lessen the demands on 
the Secretary-Treasurer, Editor- 
Publisher, and the President, 
not to mention the Exhibits 
Chairman, Program Chairman, 
and many other chairmen with 
their ever increasing routine du- 
ties. The recommendation of an 
executive secretary is not new, 
and those who have given this 
subject thorough and intensive 
study are agreed that for the 
best interest of the society a 
central office should be set up 
and an executive secretary em- 
ployed. 

As we close out a century of 
organized dentistry in North 
Carolina, we stand at the thresh- 
old of great opportunity to go 
forward with the times. Surely, 
with the heritage which has been 
handed down to us by our pre- 
decessors, we must continue to 
exert every effort in behalf of 
our organization. 



[ 95 ] 



From The Secretary's Desk 

Previewing the Annual Meeting 
Ralph Coffey. D.D.S., Morganton 

Registration: Registration for our meeting will begin at two o'clock 
Sunday afternoon, and will continue throughout the entire meeting. Each 
member will register for himself and if he wishes for his wife also. Badges 
have been prepared for every member who is "Paid Up" in current dues. 
With this arrangement no great delay should be encountered. 

General Arrangements: During the year the various committees 
responsible for this meeting have met and coordinated all their duties, 
thereby assuring the membership of a smooth meeting. Members of these 
committees will be identified by badges. Charlie Eatman, General Arrange- 
ments Chairman, will direct and coordinate this work and all requests 
should be made to him. 

House of Delegates: It is the plan now to hold the meetings of the 
House of Delegates in the main ballroom. This is being done so that a 
greater number of the membership can attend. Another reason for this 
decision is that our reporters will be able to do a better job if all persons 
are visible. For the first time this year hand microphones will be provided 
for those who address the Chair. This duty will be handled by the ushers 
and pages working under the Arrangements Committee. 

Exhibits: I want to remind each member of the fine Exhibitors who 
help in a great v/ay to give us a better meeting. Dr. Pearson has worked 
hard and you will have missed something if you do not visit each booth. 
The best thanks to our Chairman and the Exhibitors will be a visit from 
you. And above 8ll— SAVE AN ORDER FOR THE MEETING. 

Stenographic Service: Mr. Crumpton, our insurance agent, furnished 
the services of a stenographer for our convenience last year and plans to 
extend this same courtesy to us again. In the foyer you will find one of his 
stenographers eager to help you. She will be available for the entire meeting 
should you need secretarial services. 

Ladies: This year the Auxiliary will assist the Society in entertaining 
our out-of-state visitors and their wives. One of the highlights of the 
meeting, planned by the joint committee, will be a tour of the Carolina 
Orchid Gardens. Transportation to the gardens will be provided by members 
of the Auxiliary. 

Program: Dr3. Kendrick and Freedland have an outstanding group 
of essayists and clinicians for this meeting. Their plans were completed in 
July with their first choices accepting the invitation to appear. Our thanks 
go to them for the fine program, and I feel sure that the system which they 
are planning to use will be an outstanding feature of this year's meeting. We 
are fortunate that Dr. Daniel F. Lynch, President of the Am^erican Dental 
Association, will be our guest. 

In closing may I urge each member of the Society to come to Pinehurst. 
A fine program has been arranged for you. 



[ 96 ] 



If you extract teeth, read this! 



Natural Tooth Project 

Clarence L. Sockwell, D.D.S., Chapel Hill 



Can 3^ou remember as a dental 
student the difficulty you had 
collecting enough natural teeth 
for various laboratory technics? 
Dental students are still faced 
with the same problem. More 
teeth than ever before are now 
being used. 

A natural tooth project is now 
in operation at North Carolina's 
School of Dentistry. It is felt that 
this project is a simple solution 
to the problem of obtaining 
enough teeth to meet the stu- 
dents' needs. Many dentists are 
regular contributors of natural 
teeth for which the students and 
the School of Dentistry are most 
appreciative. 

The project was set up shortly 
after the school opened. Cards 
were sent out to many dentists 
inquiring; first, if they extracted 
teeth, and second, if they would 
save the teeth and mail them to 
the School of Dentistry provided 
the school furnish a container, 
mailing box and instructions. 
The response was so overwhelm- 
ing that only a fraction of those 
requesting containers could be 
supplied due to the initial cost of 
materials. Containers were sent 
out on a first come — first served 
basis. 

Many teeth were sent in dur- 
ing the first year. At present, the 
supply on hand is diminishing 
and contributions are rapidly de- 
clining. Several reasons for this 
are known. Many times students 



bring in containers of teeth from 
dentists without seeing that 
emptj^ containers are returned 
to the dentists. Other reasons 
could be listed but they are not 
important. The thing that is im- 
portant is that more teeth are 
needed now and will continue to 
be needed in the future. 

An alternative plan to send- 
ing extracted teeth to the school 
would be to bring them to the 
state meeting just as amalgam 
scraps have been brought in the 
past. A table clinic showing how 
natural teeth are utilized will be 
presented at the coming state 
meeting. This clinic would ap- 
pear annually and act as a sta- 
tion for collecting extracted 
teeth. 

Your contribution to this pro- 
gram is needed, welcomed, and 
appreciated. Save all teeth ex- 
cept those that are badly broken 
down and third molars. The 
teeth should be kept moist from 
time of extraction in a solution 
of equal parts of glycerin and 
formaldehyde. Teeth which are 
allowed to dry out become brit- 
tle and fracture easily, therefore, 
cannot be used in technic 
courses. 

If you wish the school to send 
you a container with the glycer- 
in-formaldehyde solution, please 
send a post card to the Natural 
Tooth Project in care of the 
School of Dentistry. 



[ 97 



North Carolina Welcomes The Southeastern 
Academy Of Prosthodontics 

The annual Scientific Meeting of the Southeastern Academy of 
Prosthodontics will be held for the first time this year in North 
Carolina. This meeting will be just prior to the State Meeting with 
Saturday, May 14 designated as the 
day during which the Essays and 
Scientific Sessions will be held. 
The entire day will be devoted to 
two formal presentations by the 
featured speaker and interesting 
table clinics. 

The Academy was extremely 
fortunate to procure the services of 
Dr. Ernest R. Granger of Mount 
Vernon, New York. Dr. Granger is 
recognized as one of the foremost 
lecturers of Prosthodontics and is a 
brilliant student and thinker in 
that field. He is a graduate of the 
University of Pennsylvania, class 
of 1928, a Fellow, American Col- 
lege of Dentists, Fellow, American 
Academy of Restorative Dentistry, 
Member, International Association 
for Dental Research, Member, 

American Dental Society of Eur- t^ ^ . t, ^ 

ope. Fellow, New York Academy Dr. Ernest R. Granger 

of Dentistry, Director, Post Graduate Instruction on Oral Rehabili- 
tation, University of Pennsylvania. 

The titles of Dr. Granger's presentations will be "Functional 
Consideration in Model Mounting" and "A Method of Recording 
Functional Relations." Following these two presentations, a two- 
hour table clinic session will ensue with representative members of 
seven southeastern states participating. 

Dental Society members as guests are cordially invited to attend 
the Academy Scientific Session which will start at 10:00 a.m. on 
Saturday, May 14. A guest fee of $10.00 will be charged for each 
attending guest which includes admittance to all Scientific Ses- 
sions during the day. The entire meeting of the Southeastern Acad- 
emy will be held in the Hollywood Hotel in Southern Pines and 
reservations may be secured now for attendance to this meeting. 




[ 98 ] 



Temporo-Mandibular Joint Dysfunction 
In Relation To Occlusal Dysfunction 

J. Wilfred Gallagher, D.M.D., Chapel Hill 



Approximately ninety percent 
of temporo-mandibular joint 
dysfunctions are caused by oc- 
clusal dysfunction; the remain- 
ing 10 /f are present with rheu- 
matoid arthritis, degenerative 
joint disease, rickets, etc. 

The symptoms of temporo- 
mandibular joint dysfunction are 
impaired function, muscle tris- 
mus, clicking, snapping joints, 
and the radiating reflex pain 
described in Costen's syndrome. 

Occlusal dysfunctions causing 
the above mentioned are: 

1. Muscular disturbances re- 
lating to biting habits, 
hj'peractivity of muscles, 
trismus, bruxism. 

2. Injury or strain on joint 
beyond the tolerance of tis- 
sue caused by prolonged 
dental operations. 

3. Displacement of the joint 
by premature contacts of 
the occlusal surfaces. 

(a) Prematurity of centric 
position 

(b) Prematurities of the 
non-function (balance) 
bite relation. 

4. Displacement type of Class 
11 malocclusion 

The stomatognathic system 
consists of the teeth and their 
supporting structures, the mandi- 
ble and maxilla, the temporo- 
mandibular joints, the muscula- 
ture, the nerve and vascular sup- 
ply and structures of lesser im- 
portance. Derangement of any of 



these parts will affect the other 
components. 

The musculature and the TMJ 
are the most constant, the least 
changeable and the least adapt- 
able to change. 

The TMJ is formed of articular 
fibro-cartilage on the articular 
fossa and tubercle and the head 
of the condyle. The articular 
disc interposed between the con- 
djde and articular tubercle is 
composed of dense fibrous tis- 
sue resembling a ligament in 
which islands of hyaline carti- 
lage develop in older patients. 
Cellular changes occur in these 
tissues under mechanical influ- 
ence. Synovial villi are in the 
posterior part of the articular 
capsule and extend into the ar- 
ticular cavity. There is a small 
amount of viscous synovial fluid 
in the articular spaces. Injury to 
the joint results in traumiatism 
to tissues without a blood supply, 
and may result in lessening the 
secretion of the synovial fluid 
which is the nutrient for the tis- 
sues of the TMJ. Painful function 
and degeneration of the joint 
may occur. 

This may even develop with 
normal occlusion and muscular 
activity. However, the dysfunc- 
tions classified above, related to 
abnormal occlusal and muscular 
function, are the major cause of 
TMJ. 

Before analyzing the dysfunc- 
tions, let us discuss the normal 
function and important funda- 
mentals. 

First, Rest Position is the basic 



99 ] 



relation of mandible to maxillae. 
It is established soon after birth 
and is a constant all during life. 
It has nothing to do with the 
teeth. It is a relationship in 
which all the muscles of masti- 
cation are in slight "tension" or 
tonus and balance, with the 
muscles at physiologic resting 
length. The muscles are in a state 
of balance in all planes. 

Rest position cannot be alter- 
ed by restorative or orthodontic 
procedure. However, there are 
variations of rest position related 
to variations of tonicity of the 
musculature, (1) hypotonicity, as 
seen in disease, fatigue, and 
generally diminished muscular 
tone; (2) hypertonicity, which, 
when extreme, is muscle trismus. 
This may alter the normal rest 
position. It is only when the 
normal tonus of muscle is re- 
gained that normal rest position 
re-occurs. After case history and 
recognition of objective and sub- 
jective symptoms, (clicking and 
crepitus, pain, limitation of open- 
ing, etc.) the causative factors 
can be relieved and the normal 
rest position restored. In rest 
position the condyle is in a rest- 
ing relation in the anterior part 
of the articular fossa, distal to 
the articular tubercle with a 
balanced musculature. 

The movement from rest posi- 
tion to occlusal contact occurs as 
a hinge movement with the axis 
of rotation within the head of 
the condyle, the mandible mov- 
ing in a short forward and up- 
ward arc in a majority of cases 
and sufficiently so for practical 
purposes of analysis. This posi- 
tion reached with occlusion is 
defined as the centric occlusal 
position. There may be occlusion 
of two teeth or of all teeth, when 



it is then called true centric posi- 
tion. When the jaws and teeth 
are in full contact the muscles 
of mastication are in tension and 
can only hold this position for 
an interval of time, before re- 
turning to rest position. If two 
teeth only come into contact in 
the centric bite relation closure 
from rest position to occlusal 
contact, they would be in trau- 
matic function bearing the full 
load of occlusion. The injury 
state would either be translated 
with injury of the periodontics 
supporting these teeth or would 
be transmitted to the TMJ. Ini- 
tial contact on inclined planes 
of these teeth may cause a de- 
flection or displacement of the 
mandible and condyle which re- 
sults in injury. 

The patient, as an accomoda- 
tion pattern to the TMJ injury, 
frequently develops biting hab- 
its. There are also developed 
by worry, tension, and other 
psychosomatic principles, with 
flexion, abnormal tension, wear 
and pressure on other parts of 
the stomatognathic system. 

Gottlieb stated that we would 
not have injury states if we used 
our teeth only during the chew- 
ing of foods. If abnormal attri- 
tion and wear are present, look 
for biting habits and either act- 
ual or potential injury states of 
the periodontium or TMJ. 

The term "vertical dimension" 
of the face requires the distinc- 
tion to be made between "oc- 
clusal" vertical dimension and 
"facial" vertical dimension. 

In making reference to the] 
term vertical dimension of the] 
face let us first distinguish be- 
tween the occlusal vertical di- 
nnension and rest vertical dimen- 
sion. The former refers to the 



[ 100 ] 



facial measurement when the 
teeth are in occlusion and is 
amenable to changes and altera- 
tions in the occlusion. This di- 
mension will decrease when the 
teeth are worn more quickly 
than compensatory eruption can 
occur, with biting habits, and is 
lost when the teeth are ex- 
tracted. 

The rest vertical diviension is 
present with the mandible in 
the physiologic rest position and 
has a constant relation to the 
cranial and facial anatomical re- 
lations all through life. 

The distance between these 
two is the freeway space or in- 
terocclusal clearance usually 3- 
4 mms. which exists between 
the teeth with the mandible in 
the rest position. 

There is general agreement 
that abnormal occlusion or oc- 
clusal dysfunction causes the 
majority of TMJ dysfunction. 

The occlusion therefore must 
be analyzed by a functional 
method. Observing the teeth in 
the various static occlusal rela- 
tions is not sufficient. A dynamic 
concept is necessary to evaluate 
the condition and to produce an 
occlusion that is in functional 
harmony with the facial skele- 
■ ton, the musculature and the 
TMJ. 
The first step in the functional 
analysis of the maxilla mandib- 
ular relationship is the step 
which is too often or completely 
neglected: that is the evaluation 
of the TMJ function. The fingers 
are placed lightly over the joints 
to detect crepitus. One may even 
use a stethoscope to assist. The 
patient may complain of clicking 
that is audible during mastica- 
tion or the crepitus may be so 
slight it can hardly be detected. 



The clicking or crepitus repre- 
sents abnormal joint function 
usually caused by malocclusion 
of the teeth. Muscular tension 
will be present particularly of 
the pterygoid muscles, the super- 
ior head of which is attached to 
the anterior part of the articular 
disc and protracts the disc in the 
opening of the mandible. (Re- 
member there is no retractor of 
the disc.) The clicking is the re- 
sult of the condj^le head passing 
over the posterior border of the 
disc in the opening and closing 
function. 

Clicking can occur with ab- 
normal occlusion as a result of 
injury and an accompanying 
tension of the superior head of 
the external pterygoid. However, 
the following portrayal of the 
malocclusion usually existing ex- 
plains the clicking: deep over- 
bite, wide inter-occlusal clear- 
ance, distorted as regards the 
various teeth. The mandible clos- 
es instead of an upward forward 
arc, an upward backward move- 
ment for the posterior teeth to 
come into contact. A click occurs 
as the condyle moves distally 
over the posterior border of the 
disc and again re-occurs on open- 
ing because the condyle head is 
posterior to its normal position, 
a posterior displacement. The 
disc is restrained from passing 
posteriorly by the superior head 
of the external pterygoid. Click- 
ing does not occur during the 
speech function of the mandible, 
just in occluding. The placement 
of an occlusal bite splint will 
eliminate the clicking immedi- 
ately. 

If displacement of the condyle 
occurs due to any other occlusal 
pattern of dysfunction then do 
not expect a normal function of 



[ 101 ] 



the musculature until rest and 
the relief of tension occurs. 

As the true centric position 
is the basis of all correct dental 
prosthesis and also for the func- 
tional diagnosis of dysfunction 
a bite splint worn until the mus- 
culature regains its normal func- 
tion and the mandible its normal 
position, aids the correct diag- 
nosis and allows the operator to 
get the correct centric bite. Figs. 
1 and 2. 

Another aid in the clinical 
diagnosis of dysfunction is the 
correct mounting of casts with 
centric relation bite and check 
bite, a bite relation without 
muscular tension and occlusal in- 
terdigitation taken within the 
interocclusal clearance. The bite 
relation plus the check bite coin- 
ciding, shows that the true cen- 
tric is obtained as there is no 
other relationship of the mandi- 
ble to the maxillae which we can 
duplicate exactly time after 
time in normal function. The use 
of an adjustable anatomical face- 
bow which finds the correct axis 
of rotation and orients the maxil- 
lary casts on the articular as the 
maxilla is related to the Frank- 



fort plane in cranial studies, is 
a necessity. Study can be made 
of prematurities and lingual re- 
lation of cusps and inclined 
planes not other wise observed. 




Fig. 3 — Tracing of cephalomelric 
film of rest position and full clos- 
ure. Overclosure and posterior dis- 
placement. Dotted line shows rest 
position. Continuous line shows 
position of displacement. 

Another aid in checking dis- 
placements of the condyle of the 
mandible in analysis of occlu- 
sion is the use of the cephalo- 
metric x-rays and tracings with 
the mandible in different func- 



Fig. 1 — Bite splint Fig. 4 used with 
impression paste to take centric relation 
record. 



Fig. 2 — Casts together with cenir 
bite interposed. 




tional positions, notably rest 
position and full closure. This 
provides graphic proof of dis- 
placement. Fig. 3. 

The history of the biting hab- 
its is an essential guide to the 
analysis of the occlusal dysfunc- 
tion as well as a guide to the 
need of occlusal equilibration. 

The clincal diagnosis requires 
the dentist to observe the patient 
in relaxed speech and function, 
to use his observation in deter- 
mining the rest position. From 
the anterior aspect, taking a 
landmark of the teeth as a 
marxer, the patient is observed 
closing from rest position to oc- 
clusal contact, first, initial con- 
tact or full closure whichever 
occurs. Any displacement to the 
right or left is noticed. The same 
observation is done from the 
lateral aspect, noting from rest 
position to full closure any dis- 
placement either anterior or 
posterior. 

Precaution: a patient may 
have a displaced centric and be 
able to close right into this rela- 
tion because of an accomoda- 
tion pattern of closure. However, 
if he be allowed to close only 
from rest position slowly he will 
close to initial contact and then 
deviate to full closure. The pre- 
mature or initial contact in clos- 
ing in the centric relation is the 
most important occlusal dysfunc- 
tion causing both periodontal 
and temporo-mandibular joint 
dysfunction. 

The next most damaging func- 
tional relationship to both the 
periodontium and the TMJ is 
premature contact in the non- 
functional or "balance" bite re- 
lation. When the patient is ob- 
served to close in either the right 
or left chewing stroke and has 



premature contact occur on the 
opposite side he will have an 
interrupted movement with the 
tooth in premature contact bear- 
ing a heavy traumatic load with 
injury transmitted to both perio- 
dontium and the TMJ. 

The centric and nonfunctional 
prematurities may be corrected 
by selective grinding, reconstruc- 
tion or other means but many 
times with the TMJ injury se- 
vere, it would be the wisest pro- 
cedure to use a bite splint to 
prevent occlusal interdigitation 
and relieve the traumatic stres- 
ses to give the TMJ a chance to 
rest and repair. It takes longer 
than most tissues for the TMJ 
to repair, due to its avascular 
cellular nutrition and inability 
to get complete rest. 

Harmonious relations at rest 
and function in all parts of the 
stomatognathic system should 
be the primary objective in the 
practice of general dentistry, 
orthodontics, periodontics, and 
prosthetics. 

Permanent correction of TMJ 
dysfunction may involve ortho- 
dontic procedures, occlusal re- 
construction, crowns, bridges, in- 
lays, onlays or partial dentures. 
Occlusal equilibration as an 
exact grinding procedure of the 
interfering cuspal relations is 
indicated in most cases of dys- 
function either as a complete 
treatment or in conjunction with 
the other procedures just men- 
tioned. 

Temporary correction of the 
dysfunction and relief of pain 
is of the utmost importance be- 
fore these procedures can be 
undertaken for the restoiation 
of normal function of the TMJ 
and the comfort of the patient. 
Trismus and tension must be re- 



[ 103 ] 




Fig. 4 — Bile splint with 
flat contacting surface for 
the mandibular teeth. 



Fig. 5 — Bite splint for 
anterior overbite cases 
with flat contacting sur- 
faces for the mandibular 
incisors at the correct 
vertical opening. 



Fig. 6 — Acrylic 
splints, sometimes 
during occlusal t 
struction to maintau 
proper vertical dimel 



lieved from the musculature and 
the injury state removed from 
the TMJ. Accordingly various 
bite splints are employed accord- 
ing to the occlusal dysfunction 
present. Three commonly used 
occlusal splints are described: 

1. Bite Splint — Figure 4 

This is the most commonly 
used occlusal bite splint which 
provides even contact of all the 
mandibular teeth on a flat table 
or plane. 

It is constructed as a clicker 
type maxillary palatal retention 
partial extending over the pal- 
ate to the lingual surfaces of 
the maxillary teeth, processed 
and polished. A soft mix of isom- 
er and polymer quick setting 
plastic is placed on the periphery 
of the palatal acrylic and the 
patient is asked to close gentl}) 
into the soft acrylic mass. There 
is a very thin layer of acrylic 
between the occlusal surfaces of 
the maxillary and mandibular 
teeth. The acrylic which has set 
in the mouth is trimmed flush 
with the buccal and labial sur- 
faces of the teeth and any oc- 
clusal impression of the teeth on 
the mandibular surface is trim- 
med flat so that only the flattest 
contact relation of the mandi- 



bular teeth remains in the acry- 
lic preventing interdigitation of 
the teeth. Patients with severe 
symptoms can usually get im- 
mediate relief or within a short 
time. When the muscle trismus 
is gone in a week or two the cor- 
rect centric relation may be de- 
termined for mounting the casts 
by using the bite splint in Figure 
2, and adding quick setting den- 
ture impression cream to the oc- 
clusal surface of the splint with 
the patient closing slowly to con- 
tact from the rest position. The 
case is then mounted with a face- 
bow on a fully adjustable artic- 
ulator. 

II. Bite Splint — Figure 5 

This is for anterior overbite 
cases, with large freeway, inter- 
occlusal clearance, commonly a 
posterior and superior displace- 
ment of the condyle. This fea- 
tures an upper palatal acrylic 
'clicker" type partial, with a 
flat anterior table for the lower 
anterior teeth to contact only 
lingual to the upper anteriors, 
sufficient to restore the proper 
occlusal vertical dimension. This 
type may or may not have a 
Hawley Retaining Wire on the 
labial of the upper anteriors de- 
pending on the indications. The 



[ 104 ] 



primary purpose of this as well 
as the other bite splints is to 
restore the proper occlusal verti- 
cal dimension, prevent the inter- 
digitation of teeth with the ac- 
companying occlusal dysfunc- 
tion, and allow the musculature 
to rest and return the mandible 
to normal centric relation. 

III. Bite Splint — Figure 6 

There is a flat occlusal table 
provided in this splint with open- 
ing within the freeway space to 
allow proper protrusive and 
lateral function of the anterior 
teeth. This is helpful to use dur- 
ing reconstruction of the occlusal 
surfaces with bridges, onlays or 
crowns. This is made of tooth 
colored acr3dic and fits the 
mandibular teeth to the height 



of contour. It will either be 
cemented to place or left free 
to be removed and the teeth 
cleaned — whichever is desirable. 
When TMJ dysfunction and 
symptoms are present, the use 
of a bite splint is recommended 
for relief of pain and symptoms 
and the ability to study the case 
in developing the diagnosis. The 
suggested treatment by some 
operators for the dysfunction and 
symptoms is injection of the 
joint to obtain immobility. This 
alters the physiology of the 
joint and should not be done 
unless all other possibilities are 
precluded. It is recommended- 
that the analysis of occlusal 
function be a necessary and basic 
part of every dental examina- 
tion. 



[ 105 



News From the Districts 

The Second District Dental Society is happy to welcome as 
members the following: Drs. Wm. F. Fowler, King; F. G. Gaither, 
Statesville; W. E. Harris, Harrisburg; Robert Hull, Charlotte; Homer 
C. Jamison, Charlotte; W. A. Jarrell, Jr., Charlotte; Harold S. 
Lanier, Welcome; J. G. Moore, Mooresville; Thomas H. Roach, 
Salisbury; Richard F. Scherer, Winston-Salem; Richard Cooley, 
Charlotte; and James J. Elliott, Charlotte. 

Dr. William E. Harris has entered the Service and is stationed in 
Puerto Rico and Dr. H. S. Lanier is at Cherry Point, North Caro- 
lina. 

Dr. W. Kenneth Young has moved from Winston-Salem to 
Greensboro. Dr. Young is a graduate of the University of North 
Carolina School of Dentistry. 

Dr. M. R. Garber is now located at Albemarle. 

A newcomer to Washington dental circles is Dr. William Kidd; 
he recently moved from Warrenton. 

Dr. Rhodes Lupton, a native of Hyde County, has been practicing 
dentistry at Swanquarter since early fall. 

Fifth District Dental Society Officers, J. M. Zealy, Goldsboro; 
M. M. Lilley, Scotland Neck; Charles P. Godwin, Rocky Mount; and 
Charles B. Johnson, New Bern, met in Greenville February 2, at 
the Country Club. The Program Committee and the Constitution 
and By-Laws Committee also met the same night. 

Dr. Charles T. Barker of New Bern attended the Alumni Home- 
coming at the Medical College of Virginia, January 31 and Febru- 
ary 1. 

The Lenoir County Dental Society is preparing for the meeting 
of the Fifth District Dental Society which will be held in Kinston 
in September. Several local members have met in Greenville and 
Goldsboro with the executive officers of the district society to 
formulate plans. 

At a recent meeting of the Lenoir County Society Dr. George 
L. Edwards, Jr. was selected as president and Dr. Britton F. Beasley 
is secretary-treasurer. This society is still actively participating at 
the Kennedy Memorial Home where dental services are rendered 
the children there. 

Dr. Donald L. Henson of Kinston was in charge of promoting 
Children's Dental Health Week. The newspapers and radio stations 
cooperated generously and Dr. George L. Edwards appeared on a 
radio program for this event. 



[ 106 ] 



Dr. Maurice E. Newton, who has been serving a two year tour 
of duty as a Major in the Army Dental Corps, is planning to return 
to Chapel Hill to resume his practice in June.. Mrs. Newton and 
their three young daughters have been residing at Fort Meade, 
Maryland while Dr. Newton was assigned to that Post. 

Dr. James Caudle will resume practice in Greensboro in April 
after serving in the Army two years. His tour of duty included nine 
months in Japan and eleven months in Korea. 

Commander W. R. Hinton of Greensboro is now at Camp Le- 
jeune with the Navy Dental Corps. He should be out of the service 
in May. 

Dr. Royster Chamblee of Raleigh has now limited his practice 
to Periodontia, and has joined the faculty at the University of North 
Carolina School of Dentistry on a part-time basis. 

It is rumored that Drs. Thomas Hunter of Henderson and J. M. 
Pringle of Fayetteville will receive their calls to military service 
very soon. 

Dr. Charles Kistler has returned after a tour of duty with the 
Army. 

Newcomers to Raleigh are Dr. Burkhead Ledbetter, who has 
opened an office in Cameron Village and Dr. Richard Hunter who 
is associated with Dr. Henry Ligon in his new office at St. Mary's 
Street. 

The Fourth District Dental Auxiliary will entertain their 
husbands at a picnic in April. Dr. Sanders has invited the group 
to meet at his lake in Benson. 

Drs. Williams, Tucker and Zealy and their wives attended the 
American Dental Association meeting in Miami. On their trip 
home the Tuckers and Zealys visited Dr. H. A. Baughan of Avon 
Park, Florida. Dr. Baughan was formerly in Mount Olive. 

Dr. and Mrs. S. D. Poole and their son attended the Orange 
Bowl game in Miami New Years day. 

Drs. Mett Ausley and James Lee attended the postgraduate 
course in Periodontia given at the University in March. 

Dr. E. R. Warren of Goldsboro has been a patient at the North 
Carolina Memorial Hospital in Chapel Hill. 

A new appointee to the staff of the Duplin County Hospital is 
;Dr. Mett Ausley. 

Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence Angus Cameron, of Saint Pauls, proudly 
i announce the birth of a son, Lawrence Angus, Jr., born February 28. 

Dr. Cameron was president of the U.N.C. Dental School's first grad- 
luating class, and is now busy planning an alumni meeting to be 

held in Chapel Hill sometime in April. 

[ 107 ] 



NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY'S SPECIAL PLAN OF 
ACCIDENT AND HEALTH INSURANCE ESTABLISHED 1943 



As close OS your phone . .. 




TELEPHONE COLLECT 
5-5341 -DURHAM 



If you have any problems in con- 
nection with disability insura^ace 
we invite you to call this office 
collect. We'll do our best to help 
you — and there is no obligation 
on your part. 



This is the accident and health 
plan established., by the State 
Society for its members in 1943. 



PLANS AVAILABLE 



Accidental Dismemberment 

Death Benefits. Up to 

Plan 1 $5,000.00 $10,000.00 

Plan 2 5,000.00 15.000.00 

Plan 3 5,000.00 20,000.00 



Accident and 

Sickness Benefits 

$ 50.00 weekly 

75.00 weekly 

lOO.CfO weekly 

($433.00 per month) 



Annual 

Premium 

$ 90.00 

131.00 

172.00 



Semi-Annual 
Premium 
$45.50 

66.00 

86.50 



(a) Members under age 60 may apply for $10.00 per day extra for hospitalization at| 
premium of only $20.00 annually, or $10.00 semi-annually. 

(b) Members under age 60 may also apply for surgical benefits up to $225.00 perl 
operation, as provided in policy schedule, at a premium of only $10.00 annuallyj 
or $5.00 semi-annually. 

For Application, or Further Information, Write or Call 

J. L. CRUMPTON, State Mgr. 

Professional Group Disability Division 
Box 147, Durham, N. C. 



Representing COMMERCIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEWARK, N. J.I 



The JOURNAL 

OF THE 

orth Carolina 
Dental Society 




'CO 

StP 19 



1956 



tttAl"^^ 



S&'v»«^ 



The Proceedings of the Ninety-Ninth Anniversary Meeting 
Carohna Hotel - Pinehurst, North CaroHna 

Vol. 3 8, No. 4 Chapel Hill, N. C. August, 195 5 



»K7 



THE JOURNAL 

Of The 

North Carolina Dental Society 

Component of the American Dental Association 
Containing the 

PROCEEDING 

of the 

Ninety-Ninth Anniversary Meeting 

at the 
Carolina Hotel — Pinehurst, North Carolina 

May 15-18, 1955 
Volume 38 August, 1955 Number 4 



Published four times a year — January, April, August and September. Entered as 
Second Class Matter, August 1951, Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Subscription $2.00 

Officers 1954-195 5 

Dr. Bernard N. Walker, President Charlotte 

Dr. J. W. Branham, President-Elect Raleigh 

Dr. H. K. Thompson, Vice-President Wilmington 

Dr. Ralph Coffey, Secretary-Treasurer Morganton 

Executive Committee 

Dr. Clin W. Owen, Chairman (1957) Charlotte 

Dr. C. C. Poindexter (1956) Greensboro 

Dr. I. R. Self (1955; Lincolnton 

Editorial Staff 

Dr. Marvin R. Evans, Editor-Publisher Chapel Hill 

Dr. Frank Atwater, Associate Editor Greensboro 




DR. BERNARD N. WALKER 
Charlotte, North Carolina 



President 

North Carolina Dental Society 

1954-1955 



Table of Contents 



Page 

Report of the President, Walker 118 

"Leadership in Dentistry", Lynch 124 

Report of the Fifth District Trustee, Higgins 134 

OBITUARIES 

O. L. Wilson 138 

Leslie James Meredith 138 

Thomas Duke Morse 139 

William Ralph Aiken 139 

William W. Bowling 140 

Edward Anthony Troxler 140 

David Millard Tuttle 141 

Reed T. Goe 142 

William C. Mercer 142 

COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Ethics Committee 144 

Program Committee 149 

Clinic Committee 150 

Exhibits Committee 151 

Constitution and By-Laws Committee 158 

Necrology Committee 159 

Insurance Committee 160 

Prosthetic Dental Service Committee 162 

State Institutions Committee 167 

Relief Committee 168 

Advisory Committee for Veterans Administration 169 

Dental Advisory Committee to the University of 

North Carolina 170 

Clinic Board of Censors 172 

Advisory Committee to the Dental Hygienists' 

Association 173' 

Liaison Committee to the Old North State Dental Society 174 

Arrangements Committee 174 

Hospital Dental Service Committee 175 



Dental Caries Committee - I'^S 

Housing Committee 1'^^ 

Rural Health Affairs Committee 177 

Advisory Committee to the Dental Assistants Association 178 

Public Relations Committee 179 

Military Affairs Committee 180 

Advisory Committee to the School Health Coordinating 

Service 1°^ 

Centennial Committee 1^3 

Extension Course Committee 1^4 

Fluoridation Committee 1^^ 

Industrial Commission Committee 187 

Children's Dental Health Week Committee 188 

Superintendent of Clinics Committee 190 

Entertainment of Out-of-State Visitors Committee 190 

Library and History Committee 191 

North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners 194 

Audit Report, North Carolina Dental Society 204 

Executive Committee — Minutes of Meetings 210 

Report of the Editor-Publisher 230 

SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS 

Essayists and Clinicians 234 

"Oral Diagnosis", Burket 236 

"Some Common Causes for Failures of Materials in 

Operative Dentistry", Phillips 241 

District Officers Conference 248 

Report of the North Carolina Dental Auxiliary 253 

Appendix 

Membership Report 260 

Officers 1955-1956 261 

Committees 262 

Roster of Members 267 



Frances Ellen gets the first dance with daddy, president Walker. 



REPORT OF 
THE PRESIDENT 



Report of 
the President 



B. N, Walker, Charlotte 



Charlolte, N. C. 
May 1955 

Dr. Thompson, fellow members of the North Carolina Dental Society 
and guests, it has been a signal honor and pleasure for me to be presi- 
dent of this society as it nears the completion of a century of growth 
and service not only to the dental profession but also to the citizens of our 
great state of North Carolina. 

Ninety-nine years ago the founders of this society felt the need of 
such an organization. The many accomplishments that dentistry and 
the North Carolina Dental Society have made over the years reflect the 
scope of their vision. Dentistry during this period has grown from a 
haphazard trade to one of the most respected of all professions. 

The faith that was reflected by the founders of this society must 
be reaffirmed by us again and again. We too must assume our share 
of the responsibility that always comes with growth and maturity. We 
too must have the vision to plan for the years ahead, not only for 1956 
and 1957 but also for a more distant future. The planning that we do 
now is a direct indication of our faith in ourselves, in our profession, and 
in the growth and future of North Carolina and the United States. 
Therefore it behooves us to plan wisely and well in order to continue 
the advancement of our profession. 

May we first consider the past year's accomplishments. My five years 
of service to this society in an elective capacity have, I feel, given me 
an education and insight into the problems and needs of this organiza- 
tion and the district societies. That experience has been invaluable to 
me this past year as your president. It has therefore been my aim to 
identify my administration with a theme of education, not only educa- 
tion in the field of dental science but also in the broad field of assum- 
ing a part in the education of our lay public in preventive dentistry. 

118 



J 




resident Bernard Walker opens Ihe ninety-ninth Anniversary meeting of the 
North Carolina Dental Society. 

We have met every challenge and have gone forth to cooperate first 
with the Dairy Industry, second with planned committee assistance for 
Children's Dental Health Week, third by coordination and cooperation 
with the Division of Oral Hygiene. Fourth, we have met and worked 
with the North Carolina Medical Society to formulate a better and more 
acceptable public health program. Fifth we have established a committee 
to stimulate and encourage in every way the fluoridation of community 
water supplies. Sixth we have participated in three large rural health 
conferences, in each of which dentistry was given a large part on the 
program. We have given, aid, advice, time and effort to bring to the 
attention of the citizenry a more enlightened program of dental educa- 
tion. 

This year I have asked the chairmen of the various committees to 
send in their reports early, if possible, so that I could review the work 
which has been done and the recommendations which they have to make. 
In order that we may profit by those reports, this, my presidential report 
or speech, whichever you care to call it, will have been sent to each 
member of the House of Delegates for his study and consideration prior 
to our meeting. Thus at your leisure you may consider the stewardship 
of your officers and executive committee for the past year and be 
prepared to act on any matter of importance to the society. In this way 
much valuable time may be saved in transacting the society's business. 

All members of the society should already be well acquainted with 
the study and reports which have been made this year by the officers 
and executive committee concerning the establishment of a central office 
and the employment of an executive secretary. This problem has been 



119 



120 PRESIDENT 

discussed for several years and many before me have recommended it. 
I wish to go on record as urging that this step be taken. 

The North Carolina Dental Society has grown too large for two 
individuals, a president and a secretary, to handle all the administration 
and housekeeping on a voluntary basis. The job is too big and the 
responsibility too great to expect any member to sacrifice his time 
and consequently money out of his pocket to protect and further the 
interest of the dental profession as a whole. We need to employ an 
executive secretary to handle such routine matters as correspondence, 
records, accounting, and keeping up-to-date address lists. 

There is also a need for better communication between the society 
and its membership in order that each member may know more about 
what is taking place in the districts and the local societies. At one time 
it was true that the districts were the important cogs in the society, 
but today the local societies throughout the state are the real workers. 
An executive secretary would provide the answer to this need. 

Now may I call your attention to the remaining reports of the 
committees of the North Carolina Dental Society and then make my 
other recommendations. 

The Editor-Publisher of the Journal of the North Carolina Dental 
Society has served and has attended at his own expense all of American 
Dental Association conventions, as well as his own state and district con- 
ventions during his term of office. The society owes him a debt of grati- 
tude for the excellent work he has performed and his devotion to duty. 
The Executive Committee has approved unanimously the recommenda- 
tions which he submitted at its meeting September 19, 1954 and published 
in the January 1955 issue of the Journal. I wish to direct your attention 
to his recommendations in his annual report and urge their adoption. 

The Rural Health Committee has this year done an outstanding 
job and achieved much for dentistry. It takes several years for this 
committee, like some of the other committees, to work its projects up 
to a point where they are productive. Therefore I would urge that this 
committee's recommendation be approved and that it be asked to serve 
another year. 

The Advisory Committee for the Veterans Administration has this 
year cooperated with the District Veterans Administration's office in 
settling a case concerning one of our members. This could have been a 
serious affair as far as the individual dentist was concerned. I would 
like to stress the importance of the recommendations of this committee 
and warn each of you that the members of the dental society who partici- 
pate in the Veterans Administration's out patient program must realize 
that this is contract government work and that they are liable for prose- 
cution in the event of fraud, falsifying or misrepresentation. The recom- 
mendations of this committee are of such importance that they will 
bear repeating here. 

1. Complete all work exactly as stated on the voucher. Do not 
substitute unless permission has been obtained from the Veterans Ad- 
ministration. This does not apply where it is necessary to extract a 
tooth that was marked to be restored. 



PRESIDENT 121 

2. Do not mail in vouchers as being completed unless work is finished. 
If time limit expires, get extension. 

3. Do not change work from that authorized and make additional 
charge to veteran for the changes. 

When in doubt as to how to proceed write the Veterans Administra- 
tion. 

The Insurance Committee has this year done an excellent job in 
securing enough members in the society to enroll in the A.D.A's insurance 
plan, so that many who have had physical disability histories could 
secure this coverage. It is still the opinion of those of us who have 
investigated sick and accident insurance policies that the A.D.A's 
plan is a good supplement to one's insurance plan, but that the North 
Carolina Dental Societies' own policy is the best for first protection. 
I strongly urge that each member who takes out any policy read it 
thoroughly and acquaint himself fully with the coverage. 

The Fluoridation Committee has this year done a great amount of 
work and much remains to be done. This committee has worked with 
many local societies in the state this year. Educational work of this 
nature must of necessity be on a local level with the state committee lend- 
ing all the aid that it can. I ask you to give this report of the Fluoridation 
Committee your attention. 

The Public Relations Committee this year has endeavored to set up 
some pattern that in the future will be productive. Here again we have 
a committee that has no limits as to its area of responsibility; there is 
over-lapping, and duplication. In spite of this handicap, this committee 
has done an excellent job and has a report that deserves study. I appre- 
ciate the recommendations and believe that the society should provide 
a definite amount of money each year for use by the Public Relations, 
Publicity, Rural Health and other committees that need money to help 
present our profession and the problems of dental health to the public. 

In the committee set up in the North Carolina Dental Society there 
is much overlapping of duties and sometimes there is confusion, duplica- 
tion or direct omission. Therefore it is my opinion that our society 
should review the by-laws as they relate to the committee structure. 
Unless this structure is revised periodically, it is likely to grow hap- 
hazardly with the result that it becomes a many-legged animal trying 
to go in too many directions at one time. I very strongly recommend 
that a committee be appointed by the incoming president for the purpose 
of evaluating the numerous committees that now exist in our state 
society. As many of you know there are many committees that have 
outlived their usefulness over the years, while new committees are 
being appointed each year to meet new needs of our society. A study 
of this problem by a competent committee could result in making our 
society more efficient in its operation through the elimination of non- 
functioning elements and the creating of new committees to help in the 
problems that arise from the growth and development of our society. 

With all these facts and reports in mind I respectfully submit the 
following recommendations: 

I. That a Convention chairman be appointed to facilitate and coordi- 
nate arrangements for the annual state meeting. This year both the 



122 PRESIDENT 

Program Committee and the Arrangements Committee have made similar 
recommendations. 

II. That a budget committee consisting of the president, president 
elect, secretary-treasurer, the three members of the Executive Co-nmit- 
tee and the immediate past president be formed to prepare each year the 
proposed budget for the society, and that this proposed budget be 
presented to the House of Delegates for its consideration and approval. 
The immediate past president could be named chairman and act only in 
an ex-officio capacity. His previous experience could be of great help in 
this planning. 

III. That the dues of the state society be raised from ten to twenty- 
five dollars in order that this society can function as it should on its own 
and with no financial drain on the officers who gladly give of their time 
and talents. 

IV. That any member appointed from the North Carolina Dental 
Society by the Legislature to a State committee or commission be 
required to make a written annual report to this House of Delegates. 

V. That a central office be set up and an executive secretary be 
employed by the North Carolina Dental Society. 

Any society is dependent on its working members for its success, 
and the North Carolina Dental Society has a wealth of workers. In 
closing I wish to thank all of the committee chairmen and members for 
their loyal efforts this year. My special gratitude goes to our secretary- 
treasurer. Dr. Ralph Coffey, and to our editor-publisher, Dr. Marvin 
Evans, for their excellent work. 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

Your committee on the President's Address begs leave to report 
we heartily commend and congratulate our hardworking and capable 
president for his fine services to our Society during the past five years, 
and especially this immediate past year. We are grateful for each officer 
and committee member who has served with President Walker's leader- 
ship. 

Regarding our president's recommendations: 

Recommendalion 1. That a Convention Chairman be appointed. In 
view of the possibility of an Executive Secretary being selected, we 
feel this appointment is not necessary now. 

Recommendation 2. We agree that the immediate Past President may 
be added to the present Executive Committee in an ex officio 
capacity, if the Constitution and By-Laws Committee approves. 

Recommendation 3. The committee concurs in raising dues from $10 
to $25 for employment of an Executive Secretary. 
Recommendation 4. The committee concurs in the suggestion that 
any member of the North Carolina Dental Society appointed to any 
committee or commission by the Governor or his authorized agent, 
wherein dentistry is directly or indirectly concerned shall be required 
to make a written report to the House of Delegates of the North 
Carolina Dental Society at its annual meeting. 
Recommendation 5. The committee concurs in this recommendation, 
provided sufficient funds are available. 



f 

p 



I 



LEADERSHIP 

IN 

DENTISTRY 



Leadership in 
Dentistry 



Daniel F. Lynch, President 
American Dental Association 



Mr. President, Dr. Minges, Mr. Trustee, and Friends: I am glad to 
be with you, in North Carolina and I am especially pleased that 
immediately following this session, your House of Delegates is going to 
meet. I have something of great importance I want to say to each and 
every delegate and to each and every member of the North Carolina 
Dental Society, and to their wives and to their friends also. 

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of spending the entire day at Chapel 
Hill, inspecting and admiring your new dental school. You should take 
pride in this school, because it is one of the finest. It was a privilege 
and a pleasure for me to see it. This school has been made possible 
because you have been progressive and unselfish, and have been willing 
to work together to create a great school. 

Perhaps, tonight, when the chairman of your Dental Foundation 
reported the fact that you have pledged $100,000 to advance the 
interests of dentistry and the school within this great state, you did not 
realize that there were certain intangible values that came to the 
dental profession as a direct result of your pledges. You got much more 
than you bargained for, because yesterday, Dean Brauer told me that 
as a result of the forward, the unselfish, and the progressive attitude of 
the dentists of this state in pledging the first $100,000 to the Dental 
Foundation, the president and the administrative staff of the University 
of North Carolina were greatly impressed. As a result of their respect 
and high regard, they have given the greatest possible support to dental 
education at the university. Gentlemen, to me, that is the greatest com- 
pliment the dental profession of this state could have. You did not seek 
it. You started out with another goal. However, in doing good work, 
you have achieved something additional that sets you apart from other 
professions within this state and especially at the university. 

I have a suggestion to make. I should like to see this Dental Society 
take a vote tonight to send to each member of the North Carolina State 
Legislature a copy of the catalog of your great dental school. Let them 
know that the dental profession is proud of the school and of what is 

124 



I 



LEADERSHIP 125 

being done in dental education. I believe if you will do this, you will do 
something for dentistry with the very people who can help and aid our 
profession. I know they will be proud of their dental school also. 

It is a pleasure and a privilege for me, as president of the American 
Dental Association, to bring you the official greeting of the officers 
and members of the Board of Trustees of the American Dental Associa- 
tion. I should like, particularly, to commend your president, Dr. Bernard 
N. Walker, and his able and willing associates who have made this 
great meeting possible. 

Dr. Howard Higgins, the American Dental Association Trustee repre- 
senting the Fifth District, has just given you a fine report of the 
activities of the American Dental Association. He could only touch on 
a few, but I should like very much to urge you strongly to support the 
activities of the American Dental Association, because it is your associa- 
tion, speaking for you on a national level. However, more particularly, 
I should like to urge you, each and every one of you, to become interested 
in leadership — leadership outside of your office. There is no doubt in 
my mind but what each of you, every day bring commendable credit 
upon our profession by the quality of work in your practice. However, 
never forget that the objectives of the American Dental Association are, 
first, to improve and protect the dental health of the American people 
and, second, to advance the art and science of dentistry. 

Today, we are a strong, united, scientific professional organization 
of more than 83,000 members. Our recent work is an example in the 
United States as to what a united profession can do. We have the 
highest per capita membership of any voluntary professional organiza- 
tion in the world. We know that this is true within the United States. 
,0n April 5 of last month, I had the pleasure of telling that to President 
Eisenhower, when I had lunch with him, and several other members of 
other professions at the White House. I was proud to be representing 
the great profession of dentistry. 

As dentists, we have a dual obligation. We have the obligation to 
be good professional men. However, before that, we have the prime 
obligation of being good citizens. We should participate more in the 
everyday activities of our government if we are to remain a free and 
strong democracy. You know and I know too many of our members who 
are afraid of the word "politician." I have had the word "dental 
politician" thrown at me in a derogatory sense many times and all it 
ever did was to bounce off my chest and make me proud that I was a 
dental politician. I would be proud of you, too, if you were more of a 
politician in the interest of our profession. We need your individual 
contribution. 

Therefore, tonight, I urge you to become interested in civic affairs 
and to take greater personal interest in them. Do not let George do it 
alone. Each of you has the obligation to participate in affairs of your 
government on all levels. 

Tonight I shall try to blueprint what you can do. Eor example, 
take civil defense. This is one field in which dentistry has a prime obliga- 
tion, and I doubt very much that most of you are aware of what we are 



126 LEADERSHIP 

doing today. For instance, are you on the mailing list to secure the 
Newsletter which Dr. Russell Bunting and his staff are sending out 
every month? If you are not, please write to Dr. Russell Bunting, Dental 
Director, Civil Defense Administration, Battle Creek, Michigan, and 
ask him to put you on his mailing list. It is important that you know 
in advance what you should do, and what your place is in the overall 
pattern from mass casualty care in the event of atomic attack. How you 
will conduct yourself at that time may have a bearing on the future 
of our profession — especially in the public's regard. 

There is a third course of instruction that is to be given for dentists 
at the school conducted by the Civil Defense Administration. It will 
begin November 16, at Battle Creek, Mich., and each of you is eligible to 
attend. There have been two other such courses. The last time, seventy- 
six dentists from the United States and Canada attended. I have not met 
one man who has taken the course, who has ever been sorry that he did. 
I would urge you to take this course. 

I also urge you to participate, not only in civil defense affairs, but 
also in the other works of our nation. I want you to become interested 
in our government — actively interested. I will read to you a statement 
which was made by the late Senator Lester Hunt of Wyoming. He said: 
"Unfortunately, my observations lead me to believe that there is, to 
some extent, an attitude of indifference in our profession toward public 
service, or active participation in the government; or perhaps a better 
word is 'politics.' Aside from the needs of our profession to be represented 
in all branches of our government, especially the legislative branch where 
we might direct legislation specifically affecting our profession, I might 
point out that all great factors which determine peace or war, the matter 
of taxes, monetary policies, policies of production and distribution, 
health services, social benefits, industrial security — these and a hundred 
other important factors — are the product of the applied science of 
government." 

You, of course, are very fortunate in this state, in having a great 
leader, a great legislator and a great dentist, Paul Jones (applause), 
but there should be more Paul Joneses. Do not leave it to Paul to do 
alone. In the daily life of every citizen, there is scarcely one hour or 
one activity not affected by what our political leaders in the executive 
and administrative branches of our government determine. Therefore, 
you can see why I believe public service is such an important activity 
to which every person can, and, I feel, should, devote his talent and 
his character. In so doing, public service in our government would 
be greatly improved. 

Statesmen should not be confined to a few leaders, but should also 
include each and every person who gives honorable and dedicated public 
service in public affairs. Thus, my friends, it just does not make sense 
to devote 1 per cent of our time to something that affects 99 per cent of 
our lives. 

It occurs to me, also, that those who would not participate in 
government should, perhaps, be the last to be critical of those who do 



LEADERSHIP 127 

take an interest and give their time and talents. Thus, I am urging you 
to give more than 1 per cent of your time to civic affairs. Regardless 
of what you are doing now, increase it. 

Last year in the United States, more than one billion, 300 million 
dollars, was spent for dental health care, plus another 100 million 
spent by the federal government for dental care for the Armed Forces, 
the Veterans Administration, and other recipients, and yet at the same 
time our government only spent two million dollars for dental research. 
That is less than 1 per cent of the total amount of money appropriated 
by this government for health research. You can change this situation 
by writing to your congressman about it. The American people are 
interested in good dental health. Last year they spent 156 million 
dollars for dentifrices alone. In 1932, only 22 per cent of the American 
people went to dentists regularly. Last year, our Bureau of Statistics 
found that more than 44 per cent of the American people go to dentists 
regularly — an increase of 100 per cent in just over twenty years. That's 
a great record. 

Are we as individual dentists aware of what is going on? Are we up 
on our toes all the time? Are we doing all we should? For instance, 
here is a little but important thing. Do you know your congressman 
personally, and does he know you? Do you know your senators? Do 
they know that you are a dentist and do they know that you are interested 
in what they are doing for you every day in Washington? If they do 
not, it is about time that they should. Write to your congressman tonight. 
Tell him to put you on his mailing list to receive a copy of every bill 
that is introduced into the Congress that affects the health of the people. 
There are more than 350 health bills introduced annually. You should 
know what those bills are, and you should write your congressman your 
opinion concerning them. This is one form of leadership in which every 
dentist can participate. Do it tonight! 

I should like to talk to you more about the American Dental Associa- 
tion, and the great work we are doing. Dr. Higgins has told you some- 
thing about it, but there are many more activities and services which 
we offer you. Because of an operating budget of more than two million 
dollars a year, we can do things today that we could not have done ten 
years ago. For instance, as Dr. Higgins has told you, we are adding to our 
office space in Chicago. We are putting on an addition to our present 
building that is costing us a million dollars or more. We need it, because 
we have 147 full-time employees, specialists in various fields of endeavor 
who are working under crowded conditions. These great loyal people, 
these hardworking people who work under the able direction of our 
great secretary, Dr. Hillenbrand, need additional space in which to 
work for us. 

Again, I should like to urge you — and I should like to say this 
especially to the members of your House of Delegates — the American 
Dental Association has total assets of more than three million, 500 
thousand dollars, and there is no reason in the immediate future, that I 
can see, why we should raise our dues. However, I believe that the 
component societies and the constituent societies of this great organiza- 



128 LEADERSHIP 

tion should raise their dues in order that they may be able to move 
around more effectively and do more active work at the grass roots, at 
the local level. It is at the local level that you can do effective work 
cheaper, better, and more efficiently. Do not take my word for that. 
Just remember. Congressman Harness, from Indiana, when he was in 
the Congress, made a survey — it is a matter of record; you can get a 
copy of it by writing your congressman — which showed that for every 
tax dollar that goes to Washington, only 16 cents of it ever gets back to 
the states. Therefore, why send all our money to Washington, or to 
Chicago, or to any place else? Let us keep enough of it at home to do 
a good job at the local level. 

Somebody has said that charity begins at home. I believe that all 
good work begins at home. However, when you begin to work, and you 
want to do the right thing, what should you do first? 

Well, the first thing to do is to get correct information. There are 
many people functioning in this great country of ours with incorrect 
information, perfectly willing to accept gossip from anyone as authori- 
tative information, and then, they function on it. All they are doing 
is compounding their problems one on top of the other, on the basis 
of misinformation. It's a shame. 

The American Dental Association, through its expanded programs, 
is trying to give you the sources of correct information. First, through 
the News Letter that is published every fifteen days. Every dentist can 
and should subscribe to it for a dollar and a half a year. Second, we put 
out special news bulletins on various issues which apparently no one 
reads, or, at least, very few people read; otherwise, we would not have 
the current confusion and misunderstanding about some of our problems. 
Then we have our Journal, which is the finest dental journal in the 
World. Yet, I often see it in dental offices without the wrapper being 
taken off! What can I think of my friend, the dentist, who has last month's 
Journal with the wrapper still on? Of course, I am too polite to tell him 
what I think about him. 

We have a new publication coming out in January, the American 
Dental Association's abstract or digest journal, which will sell for six 
dollars a year. It will sort of spoon feed to the profession the latest news 
on dentistry in all parts of the world. I am hopeful that will be helpful 
in our endeavors to give the profession current and correct information. 

Before I finish, the one thing I should like to say to you, is that the 
American Dental Association is one of the greatest democratic profes- 
sional organizations in the world. It functions from the bottom up, and 
not from the top down. It will always function that way, and I want you 
to help keep it functioning that way by your personal interest. Dr. 
Higgins has told you that there is not a dentist in the United States who 
cannot be heard in the policy-forming branch of the American Dental 
Association, the House of Delegates. If you have a bee in your bonnet, 
or if you have an idea, go to San Francisco next October 17 and on 
Tuesday, go to any reference committee you want, and as a dues-paying 
member, you can be heard on any issue that interests you. I will be 
interested in seeing how many of you are there. 



i 



LEADERSHIP 129 

It is important for us, as individual dentists, to assume more per- 
sonal responsibilities in our organization. We have lots of problems 
today and I want your help. But first let me say, I am sorry to talk to 
you the way I have to talk to you. You are the saints, you come to the 
congregation and you listen. You are to be congratulated and encouraged. 
However, I would like to talk to the sinners who are not here. You can 
help me to reach them. I am going to ask you to be my missionaries, and 
I want you to get out and tell these other good friends of ours who are 
not here, what I am telling you tonight. With your help, we can do 
wonders, and I am asking your help. However, before you begin to talk, 
be sure you have the correct information. Remember I have already told 
you where you can get correct information. 

I picked this news item up the other day, and it applies to dentistry 
as well as to business. It said, "No longer does the man who works his 
way up in a business necessarily qualify for a top executive position in 
that business simply by virtue of his hard work or his knowledge of 
the various techniques involved in each job. Economic, social, and 
political changes in our modern society have forced him into a position 
of public leadership, have forced him to recognize and to comprehend 
the various influences and changes and problems of the nation and the 
world around him. The modern businessman not only must have knowl- 
edge and proficiency in a special field, but must widen his scope to 
many fields and many phases of human behavior." 

So it is with our profession. The dentists of this great country must 
stir themselves now, before it is too late. First, they must become cor- 
rectly informed, and this means reading source material. Where do you 
get it? You can get it through the American Dental Association. You 
can get it through your congressman, by being put on his mailing list. 
You can even become a full, rounded man by going to your city library 
and asking your librarian to suggest cultural books for you to read. 
Furthermore, since you have this great university at North Carolina, 
you can take special courses there. I am sure that Dean Brauer, through 
his contacts with the university-at-large, would be glad to arrange 
special courses in the fields of economics, social science, political science, 
history and philosophy, to mention only a few. With such knowledge 
and current information, the dental practitioner would become a full, 
rounded and well informed member of his community. 

I said there are lots of problems. I will mention only a few. What 
are some of them that are troubling us tonight? Well, there are the 
problems of the proper relations with the ancillary groups in dentistry. 
There is the problem of the proper, broader, and correct use of ancillary 
personnel. Then there is the problem of continuing and proper relations 
with other professional, scientific and civic groups, particularly our 
Congress. 

I say there are these relationships that should be handled properly. 
Why? Because out of them have grown some of our current problems. 
For instance, there is the problem of the definition and scope of oral 
surgery. There is the problem of the special place of dentistry in the 
hospital. There is the great problem of whether a dentist shall be given 



130 LEADERSHIP 

the right to continue to practice anesthesiology in his practice of den- 
tistry. These deal, quite properly, with our relationships with the medi- 
cal profession. 

Then there is the matter of OASI, and for the uninformed, that is 
Social Security. I mention that because, just two weeks ago, I was in 
Portland, Oregon. I was at a meeting, and as I was walking out with 
the trustee of that district. Dr. Renouard, there were two gentlemen in 
front of us. 

One of them said, "You know, I don't know why that guy Lynch 
didn't talk about Social Security." 

Dr. Renouard leaned over and touched him. "Listen my friend," he 
said, "are you in favor of Social Security?" 

"Sure, I am." 

"Lynch talked about OASI for ten minutes, and you're in favor of 
it, and you don't even know the name of it." 

There are lots of people in our country, today, who are like that. 
They are in favor of or opposed to things without adequate knowledge 
and sometimes they do not even know the names of the issues that con- 
cern them. 

OASI is one of the big issues that worries me, because it is dividing 
our profession — unnecessarily. Whether we participate in Social Security 
or not is a personal responsibility. However, in considering Social 
Security we must consider it from the broad concept. Is it good for our 
profession in the long run. Is it good for our country? We must not con- 
sider it from the angle that everybody else is getting something for 
nothing from the government so why not the dentist. Who is the govern- 
ment? When I last left Washington, it was us — you and me. Well, it 
is hard for me to get something for nothing from myself. I always have 
to pay. 

There is also the matter of the manpower problem in the Armed 
Forces, and so, we have the doctors' draft. 

Then there is the problem of the fluoridation of the community water 
supplies. 

These last three things, OASI, dental manpower in the Armed 
Forces, and fluoridation, involve the continuing and proper relationships 
with Congress and other government agencies. 

Then we enter the field of labor groups with dental programs. Such 
programs are in effect on the west coast, in the states of California, 
Oregon, and Washington. Soon they will be in North Carolina. Are you 
prepared to meet the challenges of these new programs with their great 
implications for our profession and its future? I would advise the great 
State of North Carolina to appoint a committee, tonight, which should 
begin to study the philosophy back of all these programs. I can tell you 
that the labor union people on the west coast showed the dental pro- 
fessions on the west coast that they know more about dentistry than 
we know about labor unions. 

Then there is the matter of the illegal practice of dentistry in all 
the states, and why it exists. It exists because the dentists generally 



LEADERSHIP 131 

are not interested, except when it touches them personally. They are 
not willing to see to it that their state boards of dental examiners get 
on the ball and prosecute these people. And, furthermore, they are not 
willing to furnish the funds to provide for the cost of investigation, nor 
are they willing to devote the time or energy necessary to prosecute 
these people. Thus, through lethargic attitudes, negligence, selfish 
interests, and other factors, the illegal practice of dentistry continues. 
What are you as an individual going to do about it? 

Recently you received a letter from me about the work of the Ameri- 
can-Korean Foundation. The American dentists are being asked to help 
rehabilitate the dental profession in Korea. This is a great opportunity 
for the dentists of this country to participate in international relations. 

I want to congratulate you on your work in contributing to the 
American Dental Association's Relief Fund. You have done a grand job. 
I could go on, and talk about many more topics but time is late, 
and your House of Delegates has to start pretty soon. I could give you 
a full lecture on practically everyone of the things I mentioned. How- 
ever, time only allows me to give you just a few suggestions. 

First, I would say to you, as a professional man or woman, develop 
a philosophy of life, so that you know what you want to do, and why 
you want to do it. I would suggest that you examine your conscience 
on all of the issues that beset our profession. To examine your conscience 
properly, you must have the facts; you must have the correct facts. If 
you cannot get the correct facts from any other source, write me, in 
Washington, D. C. You will find my name in the American Dental Asso- 
ciation Journal. I will send them to you. 

Having gotten the correct facts, and having examined your con- 
science, kneel down and pray for guidance, so that you will act for the 
interest of our profession. It has been plain, simple, sincere men who 
have made this profession the great profession it is. We have pulled 
ourselves up by our own bootstraps, and we are only going to continue 
to advance through the continuing honest efforts of each and every 
dentist. You must do your share. 

Thus, as a final thought, I should like to urge each and every one 
of you to take a more active part in the affairs of organized dentistry, 
from your local society right straight up through the American Dental 
Association. There is need for your help and your advice, and there is 
room for you. I fully believe that the great strength of our profession as 
well as our nation, stems from the grass roots. I invite you, each and 
every one of you, to assume your share of responsibilities so that our 
profession may continue to grow, and to progress in the service of the 
people. Until every dentist makes it his business — and I cannot emphasize 
that enough — to work for the common good, our profession will suffer 
in the public esteem. 

The people look to us for dental leadership in their interest. The 
American Dental Association is dedicated to serve the people. That is 
the only reason we exist as an organization. It simply remains for you, 
as an individual, to find your place in the line and to work whole- 
heartedly for a program of better dental health for the American people. 




The annual Golf Tournament always has a number of enthusiasts 
on hand to compete for the trophies and prizes generously donated by 
the dental laboratories and supply houses. Ready to tee off are: Dr. 
C. B. Hall of Washington, D. C; Dr. Tom Smith of Havelock; Mr. Henry 
Swanzey. Charlotte; Dr. Darden Eure of Morehead and Dr. C. C. Gooding. 



132 



\ 



REPORT OF THE 
FIETH DISTRICT 
TRUSTEE 



Report of the 

Fifth District 

Trustee 



Howard B. Higgins 
Spartanburg, South Carolina 



It is indeed a pleasure to be with you as the representative of this 
district from your American Dental Association. 

I bring "greetings" to you, and best wishes. You and your state 
membership, and your work progress in the year, are to be congratulated. 

Also, you, a branch of the American Dental Association, have 
increased your membership. I firmly believe the increase in membership 
is because our Association gives to you and you, in turn, receive some- 
thing from organized dentistry, and in its way, it enables you to be of 
better service to mankind. It is on these bases that we must continue 
to increase our services, our duties and our responsibilities to our 
profession and to the general public. 

May I mention at this time the membership of the student or junior 
members of the American Dental Association. This membership is 
increasing. We have approximately 13,000 students that are now in the 
forty-three dental colleges of America. Approximately 9000 of those 
students are members, and I wish to congratulate your state and your 
school for a 100 per cent enrollment, in regard to your membership. It 
is the boys, the young men, that start in the field of dentistry who will 
take your place as the years go by. I have the greatest faith, confidence, 
and respect for the young men, and for the men that help to form, direct, 
and instruct and build from those student members, the future members 
of the American Dental Association. 

I should like to mention the financial condition of the American 
Dental Association. At present you are an organization with an income 
of a little over two million dollars. At this time, there is a rebuilding 
program at the home office. With the increase of our membership and 
with other increases of duties and responsibilities to the members, it 
has been necessary for the home office to expand. In this building pro- 
gram, a few years ago $500,000 was set aside as the first start to the 
building fund. Today, this rebuilding program will cost a little over a 
million dollars, and as it progresses this balance of the building program 
will be taken from the general operating expense, not bothering the 
general reserve fund. 

In regard to our annual session in California this fall. The scientific 
program meets October 17-20. Also, your House of Delegates; it is the 
official and governing body of your Association. On Tuesday when that 
House of Delegates meets, there will be an open session of the reference 
committees pertaining to the different things and policies which your 

134 



DISTRICT REPORT 



135 



Association sets up. You, as a member of organized dentistry, have a 
right to appear in that committee and express your viewpoints, your 
ideas, your beliefs. This I encourage you to do. By such action as this, 
by expressing to them your ideas and wishes, you help to form and 
direct and set the policies that govern your Association. 

If, in any way as your Trustee, I can be of aid to you, I am only 
too glad to do it. I serve and represent each of you, and it is your wish 
that I wish to recognize. 




The North Carolina State Unit of the American Society of Dentistry for Children 
met on Sunday afternoon and heard Dr. Ralph Sommer, left, speak on "Accidental 
injuries to young permanent teeth and their management." Others shown are Drs. 
J. B. Freedland, Charlotte; Walter McFalL Asheville; and W. W. Demeritt, Chapel 
Hill. ^ 



135 




Dr. Horace K. Thompson, vice-president, 
acknowledges his unanimous election as 
president-elect for the year 1955-1956. Dr. 
Thompson is from Wilmington and a 
member of the Fifth District. 



Dr. Ralph Coffey acknowledges his unani- 
mous election to the office of secretary- 
treasurer — for the third time. 





/ V- 



136 



p 



OBITUARIES 



Obituaries 



0. L. Wilson, D.D.S. 
Leslie James Meredith, D.D.S. 
Thomas Duke Morse, D.D.S. 
William Ralph Aiken, D.D.S. 
William W. Bowling, D.D.S. 
Edward Anthony Troxler, D.D.S. 
David Millard Tuttle, D.D.S 
Reed T. Goe, D.D.S. 
William C. Mercer, D.D.S. 



O. L. WILSON, D.D.S. 
1874-1954 

Dr. Wilson was born in Wakefield, Virginia in 1874. He spent most 
of his boyhood days in Norfolk, Virginia. 

After attending college in Richmond and Baltimore, he received his 
D.D.S. degree and started his practice in LaGrange, North Carolina. After 
a few years of practice, he married Almeta Kennedy and moved to Dunn, 
North Carolina. He practiced his profession there until 1912 and moved to 
Kinston. »--0 

Dr. Wilson was a member of the Methodist Church and served as a 
member of the choir for over forty years. 

A devout Christian, a man of will and determination, he raised a 
family of five children who survive. His wife lived three weeks to the 
day after his death. 

He loved his profession and served with diligence and care and high 
ethical standards for fifty-eight years. Regardless of an operation and 
malignancy prior to his death, he worked in his office just several days 
before his demise. 

Greater love for his profession and fortitude of strength hath no 
man, and Dr. Wilson will be loved and missed by all that knew him. 

Dr. Herbert Spear 

LESLIE JAMES MEREDITH, D.D.S. 
1887-1954 

Dr. Leslie James Meredith was born in Bladen County August 16, 
1887. 

He received his early education in the public schools and the Cape 
Fear Academy in Wilmington, North Carolina. He received the degree of 



138 



OBITUARIES 139 

Doctor of Dental Surgery from the Atlanta Southern Dental College in 
1912. He married Miss Dixie Curtis in 1934. 

The first two years of his practice were in Wilmington except for 
two years served in World War I. He served as Captain of the Dental 
Corps, U. S. Army, 30th Division, General Dentistry and First Aid 
office battle engagements. 

Dr. Meredith was a member of the Fifth District Dental Society; a 
member of the American Dental Association; a staff member of the 
James Walker Memorial Hospital; and also a member of the First 
Baptist Church of Wilmington, North Carolina. 

Dr. Horace K. Thompson 

THOMAS DUKE MORSE, D.D.S. 
1904-1955 

Dr. Thomas Duke Morse was born in East Bend, North Carolina, 
July 31, 1904. He was the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Morse. 

He received his education at the school of East Bend, Trinity College, 
Guilford College, and was graduated from Atlanta Southern Dental 
College in 1928. 

Dr. Morse was a member of the District and State Dental Societies. 
He was a member of the Methodist Church of East Bend, North Carolina. 

He was loved by his patients and many friends. He rendered a 
valuable service to the profession and the community in which he lived. 
Dr. Duke will always be remembered for his kind and friendly disposi- 
tion. 

Dr. Ralph H. Herman 

WILLIAM RALPH AIKEN, D.D.S. 
1900-1954 

Dr. Aiken was born in Weaverville, North Carolina, September 19, 
1900, the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Aiken. 

He attended the Weaverville Elementary School and Weaverville 
College. He was graduated from the Atlanta Southern Dental College in 
1927. 

While in dental school, he was a member of the North Carolina Club 
and the Square and Compass Club. He made an enviable college record 
and was known as one of the best operative men in the class of 1927. 

In 1932 he was married to Miss Mamie Wagoner of Biltmore, North 
Carolina, and two sons were born of this union, William Ralph, Jr., and 
George Leonard. 

Besides being a most active member of his dental organizations, 
he was active in the civic, religious, and social life of his community. He 
was an Elder in the Kenilworth Presbyterian Church of Asheville, North 
Carolina. He was a member and past president of the Asheville Dental 
Study Club, the First District Dental Society, The Buncombe County 
Dental Society, the North Carolina Dental Society, and the American 
Dental Association. He was a member of the Mount Herman Lodge of 



140 OBITUARIES 

Weaverville and a member and past president of the American Business 
Club of Asheville. 

Dr. Aiken had a large and always-increasing clientele. He established 
his practice in Asheville upon graduation from dental college and had 
offices in the Flatiron Building and later in Biltmore, North Carolina. 

He was an excellent citizen, a devoted husband and father, and 
always one of the leading dentists of Western North Carolina. 

Dr. Walter T. McFall 

WILLIAM W. BOWLING, D.D.S. 
1904-1954 

Dr. William W. Bowling was born March 10, 1904, in Durham County. 
He died suddenly and unexpectedly on October 23, 1954. 

Bill, as he was known by his many friends, was a member of a 
family of doctors. His father, now deceased, was a physician of the old 
school and performed his early duties in the fondly remembered horse 
and buggy. One of his brothers, now also deceased, followed in his 
father's footsteps and practiced medicine in Durham and Atlanta, 
Georgia. Another brother is living in Washington, D. C. His youngest 
brother, Howard X., is practicing dentistry in Durham. 

Dr. Bowling was a graduate of Durham High School and attended 
the University of North Carolina for three years. He received his 
dental training at Atlanta Southern Dental College and was graduated 
in 1932. He was a member of Psi Omega Fraternity . 

He received his license to practice dentistry in Georgia and North 
Carolina in 1932, and returned to his native state in the same year, and 
had practiced general dentistry in Durham since that time. 

He was a member of the Watts Street Baptist Church. His warm 
interest in people was evidenced by his participation and membership 
in the Durham Exchange Club, B.P.O.E., and Durham Masonic Lodge 
No. 352. However, his hobby during recent years was boating. 

He is survived by his widow. Mrs. Agnes Paulk Bowling, and two 
daughters, Catherine Anne, aged fourteen, and Billie Jean, aged twelve. 

Bill will long be remembered and missed by the dentists of Durham 
and North Carolina. 

Dr. Guy R. Willis 

EDWARD ANTHONY TROXLER, D.D.S. 
1888-1954 

Dr. Edward Anthony Troxler was born near Brown Summit, Guil- 
ford County, North Carolina June 27, 1888, the son of George Russel 
and Sallie Cobb Troxler. 

He received his early education in a rural high school, and later 
entered Whitsett Institute, where he was graduated in 1910. He entered 
the College of Dental Surgery, University of Maryland, in 1911, and 



OBITUARIES 141 

was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery in the class 
of 1913. In 1916 he was married to Miss Mabel Riddle White of Reids- 
ville, North Carolina. 

Dr. Troxler practiced general dentistry in Spartanburg, South Caro- 
lina, Reidsville, and Burlington, North Carolina. In 1924 he entered 
Dewey School of Orthodontia, New York City, and upon completion of 
a course of study at the Dewey School, he entered upon a successful 
practice of his specialty in Greensboro in 1925. 

For twenty years, Dr. Ed., as he was affectionately known to his 
colleagues and patients, rendered an outstanding service to his profes- 
sion and community. In 1945, ill health forced him to retire. Neither 
retirement nor ill health daunted his zeal for good things in life; he 
found a liobby in flowers and plants. 

Dr. Troxler was a member of the following dental societies: Guil- 
ford County, Third District, North Carolina, and the American Dental 
Association. 

He was a member of Fair Grove Methodist Church, Brown Sum- 
mitt, North Carolina. 

On July 28, 1954, Dr. Troxler died after ten years of declining 
health. 

Dr. J. T. Lasley 

DAVID MILLARD TUTTLE, D.D.S. 
1917-1954 

On September 19, 1954, Dr. and Mrs. David Millard Tuttle were 
fatally injured in a fall over Toxaway Falls in western North Carolina. 
They had been taking pictures of this scenic place and it was thought 
that Mrs. Tuttle slipped on the slick rock surface overlooking the falls 
and her husband died in a futile attempt to save her. 

David Tuttle was born September 18, 1917, in Walnut Cove, North 
Carolina, the son of Dr. Ruben Gray Tuttle and Addie May Long Tuttle, 
who survive. 

He was a graduate of Reynolds High School in Winston-Salem, 
Davidson College, and the Atlanta Southern Dental School. 

During World War II, Dr. Tuttle served four years in the Army 
Dental Corps. He began the practice of dentistry in Gastonia in 1940, 
and resumed it shortly after being separated from the Army in 1946. 

Dr. Tuttle was a member of the American Dental Association and 
all of its component societies. He was a past president of the Gaston 
County Dental Society, and at the time of his death was chief of the 
dental staff of the Gaston Memorial Hospital. He was a member of the 
Civitan Club, Gaston County Country Club, and the Gastonia Elks and 
Eagles Clubs. He was also a member of Delta Sigma Delta, dental fra- 
ternity. 

David Tuttle was a credit to his profession. A conscientious dentist 
and the type of man who believed that anything worth doing at all was 
worth doing well. His hobby was his flowers and the beautiful grounds 



142 OBITUARIES 

about his home are a monument to the loving care and many hours of 
hard work spent there. He was a devoted father and husband. 

David's untimely death is a deep personal loss to those of us who 
were privileged to have been associated with him. 

Dr. James E. Moser 

REED T. GOE, D.D.S. 
1906-1954 

Major Reed T. Goe was born June 19, 1906, in Weston, West Virginia. 
He was the son of Reed T. Goe and Emma C. Goe. He was married to 
Ellen Radaborgh in 1930. They have three children, Sandra Jane, Reed 
T., and Mary Ellen. 

Dr. Goe was educated in Massanutten Military Academy in Virginia. 
He entered West Virginia University and later Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, where he received his degree. He was a member of 
Psi Omega Fraternity and held licenses in Maryland and North Carolina. 

Major Goe was a member of the following organizations: Scottish 
Rite, Sudan Temple, Raleigh Commandery No. 4, Toril Oasis Shrine 
Club of Japan, York Rite, North Carolina Dental Society, Fourth District 
Dental Society and the American Dental Association. He was also Past 
Master, William G. Hill Lodge, No. 128, and Past Patron, Capital Order 
of Eastern Star. 

Major Goe entered the United States Air Force in June 1953, and 
was on tour in Japan where his family resided with him. He was on 
a safari in Vietnam, Indo China, when he died of a heart attack, Febru- 
ary 21, 1955. 

He was buried in Arlington National Cemetery March 18, 1955. 

Dr. Sam Towler 

WILLIAM C. MERCER, D.D.S. 
1895-1954 

Dr. William C. Mercer was bom in Fountain, North Carolina, October 
23, 1895. He was the son of Mr. William Henry Mercer and Mrs. Mary 
Parker Mercer. 

He attended elementary school in Macclesfield, North Carolina; 
Piedmont Institute, and Atlanta Southern Dental School where he 
received his Doctor of Dental Surgery degree. He practiced in Durham 
and Ahoskie and had been in Williamston, where he died, for twenty- 
four years. 

Dr. Mercer was a member of the Kiwanis Club, Memorial Baptist 
Church, in Williamston, and also a member of the Fifth District and 
North Carolina Dental Societies. 

He was married to Miss Grace Beasley in 1919. He is survived by two 
children, W. C. Mercer, Jr., a dental student at the University of 
Tennessee, and Mrs. Lewis Smith of Whiteville, N. C. 

Dr. Mercer died July 25, 1954. 

Dr. Britton F. Beasley 



COMMITTEE 
REPORTS 



Ethics 
Committee 



H. D. Froneberger, Chairman (1959) 
John A. McClung (1955) 
Clyde Minges (1956) 
Royster Chamblee (1957) 
Paul Fitzgerald, Jr. (1958) 



The Ethics Committee of the North Carolina Dental Society having 
heard the charges made by a large representation from the Third District 
Dental Society, a component of the North Carolina Dental Society against 
two of its members Dr. Ross Pringle and Dr. Dick H. Erwin of Greens- 
boro, N. C, and having weighed all testimony and studied all briefs 
have found said Dr. Pringle and Dr. Erwin guilty of unethical conduct. 

Your Ethics Committee on this day suspend Dr. Ross Pringle and Dr. 
Dick H. Erwin from membership in the North Carolina Dental Society 
for a period of one year, provided they are not guilty of any further 
violations of the code of ethics. If, however. Dr. Erwin and Dr. Pringle 
persist in their violations of the code of Ethics and a complaint is filed 
with the Ethics Committee signed by three or more members of the 
North Carolina Dental Society, the Ethics Committee will meet in ad- 
interim session and hear all evidence. 

After hearing all evidence and if in the opinion of the Ethics Com- 
mittee either Dr. Erwin or Dr. Pringle or both are guilty of further 
violations of the code of ethics, he or they shall be expelled from mem- 
bership in the North Carolina Dental Society as of date of hearing. 

IN THE MATTER OF DR. DICK H. ERWIN 



The undersigned dentists are each duly licensed and practicing 
dentists in the State of North Carolina and are members in good stand- 
ing of the North Carolina Dental Society and its component part, the 
North Carolina Third District Dental Society. 

II. 

Dr. Dick H. Erwin is a duly licensed and practicing dentist in the 
City of Greensboro, State of North Carolina, and is presently a member 
of the North Carolina Dental Society and of its component part, the 
North Carolina Third District Dental Society. 

III. 

That the undersigned charge that Dr. Dick H. Erwin did between 
the dates of 1 May, 1954, and 1 December, 1954, knowingly engage in 
certain activities, conduct and behavior in and near the City of Greens- 
boro, North Carolina, which conduct and behavior did constitute grossly 
unprofessional conduct on the part of said Dr. Dick H. Erwin in the 



144 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 145 

practice of his profession as a licensed dentist, and as a member of 
the North Carolina Dental Society; that said Dr. Dick H. Erwin know- 
ingly violated the Constitution, By-Laws and Code of Ethics of the 
North Carolina Dental Society, and of the North Carolina Third District 
Dental Society, in the following respects: 

CHARGE NO. I 

That during the summer and fall of 1954 Dr. Dick H. Erwin did 
distribute to his patients and to members of the public generally who 
were not his patients from his office and from other places a great 
number of pamphlets entitled "Fluoridation Unmasked" edited by one 
Fanchon Battele (a woman known to be without professional training 
or reputation in the medical or dental fields) which pamphlet contained 
numerous and repeated accusations derogatory to the dental profession 
generally; that said statements and accusations in said pamphlet were 
obviously false and misleading (alleging, for example, that fluoridation 
was "Communist Warfare" and that the endorsement of fluoridation by 
dentists was based "on ignorance of medical facts"); that the distribution 
of said false, malicious, and misleading literature under the circum- 
stances aforesaid by Dr. Dick H. Erwin constituted a violation of Article 
I, Section 7 of the By-Laws of the North Carolina Dental Society and 
Article II, Sections 1, 2, and 4 of the Code of Ethics of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society, and of Article V, Section 1 of the North Carolina 
Third District Dental Society. 

CHARGE NO. 2 
That Dr. Dick H. Erwin did, during the summer and fall of 1954, 
distribute to his patients and to the members of the public generally 
who were not his patients copies of knowingly false and misleading litera- 
ture printed under the name "Greensboro Pure Water Committee" which 
said Dr. Dick H. Erwin knew contained misleading, false, and ridiculous 
statements which tended to place a majority of members of said Dr. Dick 
H. Erwin's own local Dental Society (who advocated Fluoridation) in 
public disrepute and contempt; that the distribution of said literature 
as aforesaid constituted grossly unprofessional conduct on the part of 
said Dr. Dick H. Erwin and was calculated to discredit, and did discredit, 
his profession and members thereof; that said conduct herein alleged 
on the part of said Dr. Dick H. Erwin was all in violation of Article I, 
Section 7, of the By-Laws of the North Carolina Dental Society, of 
Article II, Sections 1, 2, and 4 of the Code of Ethics of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society, and of Article V, Section 1 of the North Carolina 
Third District Dental Society. 

CHARGE NO. 3 
That during the summer and fall of 1954 Dr. Dick H. Erwin did 
frequently appear on a public radio broadcast program called "The Party 
Line" over Radio Station W.C.O.G. in Greensboro, North Carolina. That 
the said radio program was a weekly night program, widely heard over 
a large and populous area of North Carolina, whereby members of the 
public might call the radio station by telephone and discuss matters over 
the air by a method of transcribing said telephone conversations; that 
beginning in the summer of 1954 said program became the principal 
medium by which certain members of the public concentrated their 
attacks on fluoridation, accusing the dentists of Greensboro, among 
other things, of accepting bribes from large corporations, of conspiring 
for some fraudulent purpose to fluoridate the water, of aiding the Com- 
munists, and accusing them, in effect, of all manner of ulterior motives, 
that said Dr. Dick H. Erwin did on numerous occasions participate on 
said program frequently announcing his name (although such was not 
customary or requested) to the public, thereby advertising and soliciting 
business; that all of said conduct on the part of Dr. Dick H. Erwin did 
constitute grossly unprofessional conduct and did violate Article I, 



146 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Section 7, of the North Carolina Dental Society, Article II, Sections 1, 2, 
and 3 of the Code of Ethics of the North Carolina Dental Society, and 
Article V, Section 1 of the Constitution of the North Carolina Third 
District Dental Society. 

CHARGE NO. 4 

That during the summer and fall of 1954 in and near the City of 
Greensboro, North Carolina, Dr. Dick H. Erwin did associate himself with 
persons and organizations opposing fluoridation of public water supplies 
in Greensboro, North Carolina, and that in the course of such opposition 
he did frequently attack respected and learned members of his own 
profession who took an opposite stand; that he did in writings and public 
statements reflect discredit on members of his own profession in and 
near Greensboro, North Carolina, and elsewhere; that he did participate 
in public programs and in meetings before Government bodies in and 
near the City of Greensboro speaking as a trained professional dentist 
without representing to the public that he was speaking only for himself 
and not for members of his local Dental Society. That said conduct on 
the part of Dr. Dick H. Erwin did constitute grossly unprofessional con- 
duct and did violate Article I, Section 7, of the By-Laws of the North 
Carolina Dental Society, and Article II, Sections 1, 2, and 3 of the Code 
of Ethics of said Dental Society, and Article V, Section 1 of the North 
Carolina Third District Dental Society. 

IV. 

That all of the aforesaid acts and conduct alleged in the charges 
enumerated were in violation of the Constitution and By-Laws and Code 
of Ethics of the North Carolina Dental Society, of the Constitution and 
By-Laws of the North Carolina Third District Dental Society, of the Prin- 
ciples of Ethics of the American Dental Association, and of General 
Statutes 90-41 of the Laws of North Carolina governing the practice of 
Dentistry. 

WHEREFORE, the undersigned pray that the North Carolina Third 
District Dental Society make such investigation and take such appropri- 
ate action as by its Constitution and By-Laws it may be authorized, and 
that said Third District Society transmit and refer these said charges to 
the North Carolina Dental Sociey for such final action as is authorized by 
said Society's Constitution, By-Laws, and Code of Ethics. 



IN THE MATTER OF DR. ROSS PRINGLE: 



The undersigned dentists are each duly licensed and practicing 
dentists in the State of North Carolina and are members in good stand- 
ing of the North Carolina Dental Society and its component part, the 
North Carolina Third District Dental Society. 

II. 

Dr. Ross Pringle is a duly licensed and practicing dentist in the City 
of Greensboro, State of North Carolina, and is presently a member of 
the North Carolina Dental Society and of its component part, the North 
Carolina Third District Dental Society. 

III. 

That the undersigned charge that Dr. Ross Pringle did between the 
dates of 1 May, 1954, and 1 December, 1954, knowingly engage in certain 
activities, conduct and behavior in and near the City of Greensboro, 
North Carolina, which conduct and behavior did constitute grossly 



I 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 147 

unprofessional conduct on the part of said Dr. Ross Pringle in the prac- 
tice of his profession as a licensed dentist, and as a member of the 
North Carolina Dental Society; that said Dr. Ross Pringle knowingly 
violated the Constitution, By-Laws and Code of Ethics of the North 
Carolina Dental Society and of the North Carolina Third District Dental 
Society in the following respects; 

CHARGE NO. 1 

That during the summer and fall of 1954 Dr. Ross Pringle did dis- 
tribute to his patients and to members of the public generally who were 
not his patients from his office and from other places a great number of 
pamphlets entitled "Fluoridation Unmasked" edited by one Fanchon 
Battele (a woman known to be without professional training or reputa- 
tion in the medical or dental fields) which pamphlet contained numerous 
and repeated accusations derogatory to the dental profession generally; 
that said statements and accusations in said pamphlet were obviously 
false and misleading (alleging, for example, that fluoridation was "Com- 
munist Warfare" and that the endorsement of fluoridation by dentists 
was based "on ignorance of medical facts"); that the distribution of said 
false, malicious, and misleading literature under the circumstances afore- 
said by Dr. Ross Pringle constituted a violation of Article I, Section 7 
of the' By-Laws of the North Carolina Dental Society and Article II, 
Sections 1, 2, and 4 of the Code of Ethics of the North Carolina Dental 
Society, and of Article V, Section 1 of the North Carolina Third District 
Dental Society. 

CHARGE NO. 2 

That Dr. Ross Pringle did, during the summer and fall of 1954, 
distribute to his patients and to the members of the public generally who 
were not his patients copies of knowingly false and misleading litera- 
ture printed under the name "Greensboro Pure Water Committee" 
which said Ross Pringle knew contained misleading, false, and ridicu- 
lous statements which tended to place a majority of members of said 
Dr. Ross Pringle's own local Dental Society (who advocated fluorida- 
tion) in public disrepute and contempt; that the distribution of said litera- 
ture as aforesaid constituted grossly unprofessional conduct on the part 
of said Dr. Ross Pringle and was calculated to discredit, and did discredit, 
his profession and members thereof; that said conduct herein alleged 
on the part of said Dr. Ross Pringle was all in violation of Article I, 
Section 7, of the By-Laws of the North Carolina Dental Society, of 
Article II, Sections 1, 2, and 4 of the Code of Ethics of the North Carolina 
Dental Society, and of Article V, Section 1 of the North Carolina Third 
District Dental Society. 

CHARGE NO. 3 

That during the summer and fall of 1954 Dr. Ross Pringle did fre- 
quently appear on a public radio broadcast program called "The Party 
Line" over Radio Station W.C.O.G. in Greensboro, North Carolina. That 
the said radio program was a weekly night program widely heard over 
a large and populous area of North Carolina whereby members of the 
public might call the radio station by telephone and discuss matters over 
the air by a method of transcribing said telephone conversations; that 
beginning in the summer of 1954 said program became the principal 
medium by which certain members of the public concentrated their 
attacks on fluoridation, accusing the dentists of Greensboro, among other 
things, of accepting bribes from large corporations, of conspiring for 
some fraudulent purpose to fluoridate the water, of aiding the Com- 
munists, and accusing them, in effect, of all manner of ulterior motives, 
that said Dr. Ross Pringle did on numerous occasions participate on 
said program frequently announcing his name (although such was not 
customary or requested) to the public, thereby advertising and soliciting 



148 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

business; that on at least one occasion he discussed over the air with the 
program moderator certain dental work that he had done for said 
moderator, and he allowed and encouraged the moderator to announce 
publicly and broadcast his satisfaction with said work; that he did on 
one occasion confirm on said radio program an appointment; that he 
did on one occasion on said program discuss personal dental x-rays that 
he had made; that all of said conduct on the part of Dr. Ross Pringle 
did constitute grossly unprofessional conduct and did violate Article I, 
Section 7, of the North Carolina Dental Society, Article II, Sections 1, 2, 
and 3 of the Code of Ethics of the North Carolina Dental Society, and 
Article V, Section 1 of the Constitution of the North Carolina Third 
District Dental Society. 

CHARGE NO. 4 

That during the summer and fall of 1954 in and near the City of 
Greensboro, North Carolina, Dr. Ross Pringle did associate himself with 
persons and organizations opposing fluoridation of public water supplies 
in Greensboro, North Carolina, and that in the course of such opposition 
he did frequently attack respected and learned members of his own 
profession who took an opposite stand; that he did in writings and 
public statements reflect discredit on members of his own profession 
in and near Greensboro, North Carolina, and elsewhere; that he did 
participate in public programs and in meetings before Government 
bodies in and near the City of Greensboro speaking as a trained profes- 
sional dentist without representing to the public that he was speaking 
only for himself and not for members of his local Dental Society. That 
said conduct on the part of Dr. Ross Pringle did constitute grossly 
unprofessional conduct and did violate Article I, Section 7, of the By- 
Laws of the North Carolina Dental Society, Article II, Sections 1, 2, 
and 3 of the Code of Ethics of said Dental Society, and Article V, 
Section 1, of the North Carolina Third District Dental Society. 

IV. 

That all of the aforesaid acts and conduct alleged in the charges 
enumerated were in violation of the Constitution and By-Laws and Code 
of Ethics of the North Carolina Dental Society, of the Constitution and 
By-Laws of the North Carolina Third District Dental Society, of the 
Principles of Ethics of the American Dental Association, and of General 
Statutes 90-41 of the Laws of North Carolina governing the practice of 
dentistry. 

WHEREFORE, the undersigned pray that the North Carolina Third 
District Dental Society make such investigation and take such appropri- 
ate action as by its Constitution and By-Laws it may be authorized, and 
that said Third District Society transmit and refer these said charges to 
the North Carolina Dental Society for such final action as is authorized 
by said Society's Constitution, By-Laws, and Code of Ethics. 



Program 
Comraittee 



Vance Kendrick, Chairman 

J. B. Freedland, Co-Chairman 

M. H. Truluck 

P. B. WhiUington, Jr. 

Charles D. Eatman 

E. A. Pearson 



For the year 1954-1955, the Program Committee has functioned 
according to the By-Laws and Constitution in accomplishing the follow- 
ing: 

1. Four outstanding lectures were secured for the main scientific 
program: 

(a) Dr. Ralph F. Sommer, Endodontics 

(b) Dr. Ralph W. Phillips, Common Causes for the failure of 
Dental Materials in Operative Dentistry. 

(c) Dr. Lewis W. Fox, Principles of Occlusion. 

(d) Dr. Lester Burket, Oral Diagnosis. 

These speakers received an honorarium of $250 each with expenses. 
Travel expenses were figured on air travel basis. 

2. In addition, Dr. Howard Higgins, trustee for the Fifth District 
of the A.D.A. gave a report from the district. 

3. Dr. Daniel Lynch, President of the American Dental Association, 
was secured as a speaker on the subject, "Leadership in Dentistry." 

Proper introduction was provided for these speakers. 

4. A public address technician and equipment were secured for the 
annual meeting at the cost of $100 plus expenses. 

5. A system of ushers under Dr. Thomas Nisbet was organized for 
service during the meeting. 

6. A system of monitors was organized to handle movable micro- 
phones for improved audience participation during the question and 
answer period for each speaker. 

7. In coordination with the General Arrangements Committee and 
the committee for Entertainment of Out-of-State Guests, all details for 
the proper and efficient conduct of the meeting were worked out. 

8. The organization of the program and scheduling of events was 
completed and submitted to the State Editor for publication. 

9. Interim reports were given to the Executive Committee in July 
1954, and January 1955. 



149 



150 COMMITTEE REPORTS 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

1. President-Elect should have the authority to appoint or suggest 
an ex-olficio member of the Program Committee to provide some con- 
tinuity in carrying over new ideas and concepts in presenting scientific 
data to the North Carolina Dental Society from year to year. 

2. Program Committee appointments should not be handicapped by 
appointment to any other committee. 

3. Co-operation of Table Clinic Committee and Program Committee 
to encourage table clinic presentations to be corelated with presentations 
of major essayists — with consent and aid of essayist in question. 

4. That a Convention Chairman be appointed to facilitate and 
coordinate arrangements for the Annual State meeting. 

5. That some adequate system of ushering be instituted by commit- 
tee appointment under supervision of Program Committee. 



Clinic 
Committee 



Milo J. Hoffman, Chairman 

G. V. Harris 

R. Weathersbee, Jr. 

R. R. Hoffman 

W. Penn Marshall 



During the year we have endeavored to obtain high quality clinics 
from all sections of the state. Twenty-three clinics will be given by 
Dentists, two by Dental Hygienists, two by Dental Assistants, and four 
by Students of the University of North Carolina Dental School. 

The Committee wishes to express grateful appreciation to each of 
these clinicians for their participation in this part of our program. 



Exhibits 
Committee 



E. A. Pearson, Chairman 
C. T. Wells, Sr. 
Ralph Falls 
H. C. Parker 
Edward R. Burns 



The following is a report of the Exhibits Committee along with 
recommendations. 

Early last summer, I compiled a mailing list, and arranged in alpha- 
betical order, the names of all manufacturers, supply houses and pharma- 
ceutical houses which would be eligible to exhibit at our state meeting. 

In August, announcements were sent to all exhibitors of the previous 
year, announcing our meeting dates for 1955; and if they desired their 
previous spaces for exhibiting, to please respond with a check or letter 
confirming same. 

In the middle of October, letters were sent to all dental laboratories 
who were members of the North Carolina Laboratory Association, asking 
and urging all member laboratories to purchase at least one exhibit 
space. The response was not at all complimentary to their agreement 
which they made with the Exhibits Committee and its chairman, Dr. 
Branham, several years ago. There was a gentleman's agreement then 
to the effect that if the North Carolina Dental Society would not allow 
any non-member laboratory either within the state or out, to exhibit, 
that the members of the North Carolina Laboratory Association would 
take spaces at our state meeting. 

We do not have to solicit any dental laboratory; but we feel that 
owing to the dental laboratory's sole dependency upon the dentist, it 
would be to their advantage if they would exhibit. 

The first few years, this plan worked very well; but this year only 
six laboratories have purchased space and one space for the North Caro- 
lina Laboratory Association. Last year there were 10 laboratories and 
one space for the North Carolina Laboratory Association. 

Of course, I realize that there can never be a contract between the 
laboratories and our state society in regards to this matter. However, 
it seems that there is a mutual benefit to be gained by both if the 
laboratories cooperate in this program. We cannot force, nor can the 
North Carolina Laboratory Association force its members to participate 
in such a program. There is as you know, a $10.00 minimum fee for each 
laboratory to become accredited; this is renewed each year and is paid 
to the Prosthetic Service Committee. By this very act of which our 
society has agreed and is a part, there can be no non-member dental 
laboratories who would come and exhibit, unless the named laboratory 
meet the requirements of the Prosthetics Service Committee as set forth 
in the rules for the Prosthetics Service Committee and passed by the 
house of delegates last year. 

I am of the opinion that there is disharmony and strife between the 
members of the North Carolina Laboratory Association and the North 



151 



152 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Carolina Dental Society. I strongly urge that the North Carolina Dental 
Society not have anything to do with accrediting or receiving funds 
from the North Carolina Laboratory Association. If the North Carolina 
Laboratory Association desires a committee to work with them in an 
advisory capacity, all well and good; but let them run their entire show 
and thus allow our society to invite any person or company that the 
Exhibits Committee deems worthy to purchase spaces for exhibits at 
our meeting. 

The American Dental Association has ceased the majority of their 
activities in regards to accreditation of dental laboratories. There are now 
only 5 state societies actively engaged in such practices. I refer to the 
transactions of the American Dental Association 1954 under the heading 
"Council on Dental Trade and Laboratory Relations." The history of the 
organization, its experiences over the past 8 or 9 years, and how 
unsuccessful the program was. I feel we are participating in a program 
of the dental laboratory trade and that we are sponsoring things which 
in the near future will have repercussion against us to the extent that 
once the laboratories gain control of majority of laboratories in this 
state that they will be dictating our policies to a great extent. 

I have a letter from Dr. Poindexter stating the changes in his com- 
mittee which the house of delegates approved last year. Item No. 4 in 
his letter states "All fees received should go to the North Carolina 
Dental Relief Fund and toward the cost of having a more rigid inspection 
and investigation of laboratories up for accreditation. I do not know his 
proposal or policy for more rigid accreditation. I personally feel that we 
should have a committee to work as liaison between the North Carolina 
Dental Society in purely an advisory capacity, and refrain from sponsor- 
ing any association outside our own; thus allowing us as a state society 
to have no obligation to any association or group whether good or bad. 
Then in the future, if this group does step out of line, we can voice an 
opinion against them and not be sponsoring their association and at the 
same time, not having to accept policies that would be contrary to demo- 
cratic principles and ethics of fair trade with any commercial association 
or individual. 

As to date we have secured 43 exhibitors who have paid to our 
committee $4,150.00. The Powers and Anderson Dental Company owes 
$150.00, for their spaces as confirmed by letter. The Encyclopedia 
Britannica has reserved a space for $115.00, to be paid before May 10. I 
am sure these additional amounts will be paid on or before the date 
above mentioned. 

The Noble Dental Laboratory had made a contract last September 
for the space they had the previous year. Today as this article is being 
written, Mr. Noble informed me he would not take a space as he had 
contracted to do. I have a letter in my file to this agreement. I have 
written Mr. Noble in reply to this situation asking him to reconsider. 
I do not know the outcome at present time. 

In view of the above mentioned items in regards to Dental Labora- 
tories (who seem to be our chief problem), our committee recommends 
the following to the House of Delegates: 

I. Our committee feels that the agreement between the North 
Carolina Laboratory Association and the North Carolina Dental 
Society in regards to allowing only members of the Laboratory 
Association to exhibit, has not been for best interest of the 
Dental Society. 

Therefore, your Exhibit Committee would like to propose the 
following resolution. 

Resolved that your Exhibit Committee be authorized to extend 
invitation to all laboratories whom the committee deems worthy 
to exhibit at our annual meetings, without any financial 
obstacle. 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 153 

II. That the chairman of the Exhibits Committee draw up a suit- 
able uniform contract for all exhibitors to be used in confirm- 
ing space. This is an effort to secure exhibitors early in the 
j^ear; most houses do not like to pay for space so long ahead 
of time. This would allow the chairman to announce dates of 
meetings and get confirmations early and pay within the same 
fiscal year that our meeting is held. 

III. That the chairman of Exhibits Committee be allowed funds to 
secure stenographic help when necessary. This is a heavy cor- 
respondence job plus bookkeeping. Additional help is most 
necessary if we secure enough exhibitors to fill our allotted 
space each year. 

The expenses of our committee are not all in, an itemized account 
will be submitted later. 

DISCUSSION 
Dr. Pearson: For information, I did not enter a supplemental 
report before yesterday, because I was holding out for some more checks 
to be paid in. We have received, from forty-four exhibits, $4375. We still 
have another check, which I am sure will be in when I get back to the 
office, for $115, which will bring our total from exhibits space to $4490. 

I did not list expenses from our committee because when the bill 
was submitted, we did not have a complete list of expenses. I have, for 
office services, for mimeographing, $3; Raleigh letter writers, multi- 
lithing $35, phone calls to date, there are two or three calls that have 
not been sent into the office, $9.63; stamps, $13.71; Mrs. Henderson, $25; 
exhibits prizes, $211.08; and our party for the exhibitors, $49.66; duplicate 
tickets for the drawing $7.50. That brings our total expenses, to date, 
to $354.59. There will probably be $2 in phone calls yet to come in. 

President Walker: Is there any discussion of the report of this 
committee? 

Dr. Breeland: Mr. Chairman, if we adopt that, the resolution as 
proposed reads like this: 

Whereas, be it resolved that your Exhibit Committee be authorized 
to extend invitation to all laboratories whom the committee deems 
worthy to exhibit at our annual meeting, without any financial obstacle. 

The Resolutions Committee is not in favor of this proposed resolu- 
tion, and requests that it be rejected. 

Dr. Walker: The floor is open for this committee's report. Does 
anyone want to make a motion? 

Dr. Chamblee: I move, sir, that the Resolutions Committee decision 
be adopted. 

(This was seconded by Dr. C. C. Poindexter.) 

Dr. Pearson: May I bring this, again, for information? You 
heard me the other night speak in regard to the problem that we, the 
Exhibits Committee, feel is an unfair practice the North Carolina Dental 
Society has entered into with the North Carolina Laboratory Association, 
and the accreditation program. I feel the manner in which we receive 
funds from an organization, which is not a part of the North Carolina 



154 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Dental Society, is not in keeping for the best interests and progress and 
harmony of our society. There are many ramifications that exist in this 
problem. I am confident that there are things which need to be worked 
out, and I would like to see the House of Delegates find an answer, a 
fair answer, one that will promote harmony and union with the labora- 
tories in this state and out of it, and have a good working relationship 
between our Society and the laboratory operators in this state. 

However, to me and the members of the Exhibits Committee, it 
still seems that when any committee is empowered to collect fees from 
an organization outside our own, accept those fees into the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society, regardless of how they are handled, in disposing 
of those fees, that the moment we accept those fees, our Society is bound 
morally and legally, and otherwise, as a part of that organization. 

I am 100 per cent in favor of any control of the dental laboratory 
trade and practice, at which the American Dental Association has func- 
tioned and set itself up in the past few years. I should like to see that 
control continued. I cannot see, by attaching a fee, a dues, or what have 
you, to the members who want to become accredited, and pay into our 
Society, we should accept that. 

I think this: if the laboratories in this state wish to become accred- 
ited, there is a means by which we can accredit the dental laboratories 
and not receive any funds from the laboratories into our organization. 

What is the answer to that? The Editor-Publisher needs revenue 
and advertising in the Journal in order to help defray expenses. There is 
a problem there, again, of which I have no control or no real information. 
I imagine that the cooperation of the laboratory owners in purchasing 
space is certainly a great help in defraying the expense of our publica- 
tion. 

As I stated the other night we do not have to solicit any commercial 
laboratory, but the moment we accept fees and allow only those members 
who have paid that fee to come in here — to me, and those who have 
discussed this problem with me, it is our feeling we have in this state 
a closed union shop by doing this. 

You know as well as I do that there cannot be free organization in 
this state. We are limited. We are governed. And we are discriminating 
against commercial houses. 

If we have to have a fee on dental laboratories in North Carolina, 
let us put a fee on the S. S. White Company, let us put one on every 
commercial house that comes into the state to exhibit, and make it fair 
to all. They are all free trade enterprises. They come by invitation. 

However, we do not have to accept them, but the moment we refuse 
one of those men because they are laboratories then, of course, we 
get into a severe controversy. 

For the information of this group I really feel we should do away 
with any fees the laboratories pay to any committee in our state Society 
for accreditation. 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 155 

In the report of the Prosthetic Dental Service Committee Dr. Poin- 
dexter has listed expenses of the past seven years, I believe it is approxi- 
mately $364 or $374. Pro rate that yearly and you will find it will come 
out to about $40 or $50 per year. 

We are talking in terms of public relations and what we are going to 
do to promote harmony. I feel $50 a year paid out of the General Funds 
of the North Carolina Dental Society to accredited laboratories who paid 
expenses to the Prosthetic Committee, would be money well spent to 
accredit these laboratories and accredit every laboratory in North Caro- 
lina that meets the requirements of the Prosthetic Dental Service Com- 
mittee, and when those laboratories are accredited, then they can come 
here and exhibit as they see fit. If, for some reason, they are not 
eligible, if they cannot meet the requirements of the Prosthetic Dental 
Service Committee, then they should not be allowed to exhibit at the 
meetings of the North Carolina Dental Society. 

Dr. Breeland: Mr. President, in defense of the action of the Resolu- 
tions Committee, the only way in which we can legally and honestly 
consider this resolution is in accordance with the setup of the Prosthetic 
Dental Service Committee that has been approved by this Society. We 
feel this resolution as proposed does not conform with the priniciples as 
they were set up, and therefore we voted for its rejection. We heard the 
discussion the other night and we looked into the possibilities of this 
discussion. We are somewhat in accord with the proposal, or at least, 
the discussion of the Exhibits Committee. Probably we had no business 
going into it as far as we did, but we felt we should. 

I agree that the North Carolina Dental Society should never be a 
part of the exhibits or of the laboratory men. I feel we should be only 
an advisory group and never in any way be entangled with them. They 
have a lot of disharmony and distrust among themselves, which is not our 
problem. 

I do not think we should rescind our responsibility to them for the 
future. I know they need help, and they are asking for help, but they 
do not know whom to trust within their own organization. 

I, personally, feel that the minute this committee thinks we should 
set this thing up as a special committee, only as an advisory group to 
them, and help them reorganize, whatever expense it entails, let this 
Society propose it and pay it, just as a liaison group, instead of as it 
now stands. Let them accredit themselves. I should like to see them 
take the proposal of the ADA and let them handle their own affairs, and 
let this Society act in an advisory manner to them. I believe this will 
solve many of the problems. 

As far as opening up and letting these men that do not become 
accredited and meet those requirements come in, the Resolutions Com- 
mittee will never go on record as favoring that. 

Dr. Poindexter: Mr. President, it has been indicated that there is 
a great deal of strife between the laboratory industry and the profession. 
That is something new to me. I think one of the reasons this thing was 



156 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

set up was to promote harmony. Of course there is friction in the labora- 
tory group, and there is friction in the Society, like in all other organiza- 
tions. 

I should like to ask Dr. Pearson a question, and I want to get this 
one thing straight; whether you were misquoted or not. Dr. Pearson, did 
you make the remark that Woodward and Fleming Laboratory said they 
were not going to exhibit any more? 

Dr. Pearson: No, sir. Dr. Poindexter. Mr. Fleming and Mr. Wood- 
ward came to me and told me they were not going to be members of the 
North Carolina Laboratory Association next year. I am sorry if I did 
not make myself clear, because we know that last year, I believe it was, 
it was passed by this group that a laboratory could become accredited 
and not be a member of the Laboratory Association. I am sorry if I mis- 
quoted. I did not mean to do so. It is only that they are not going to be 
members of the Association . . . 

Dr. Poindexter: In Paragraph 6 of your report, it said there had 
been a decrease in the number of laboratories applying for space. 

In 1946, there were five. That is about the time the program was 
started. In 1947, there were seven. Figures for 1948, 1949, and 1950 are 
not available. In 1951 there were twelve; in 1952, there were eight; in 
1953 there were nine, and last year there were ten. 

I wonder. Dr. Pearson — this is your administration — what your 
explanation is to why you did not have any more exhibitors? 

Dr. Pearson: Dr. Poindexter, the only explanation I can give is 
this: for every member of the Dental Laboratory Association and those 
accredited, from the list which I received from you early last summer, 
letters went out, I believe, to all members of the Dental Laboratory 
Association and those members who were accredited. I did not recieve 
a single reply to any invitation, from those men, except those who are 
exhibiting here this year. 

Mr. Noble did contract for space in October. He did not accept the 
space, nor did he pay for it. When I knew he was not going to take 
the space, I wrote asking him to reconsider. In his letter of reply he 
stated, in substance, that his accountant had been over his books and 
had found he was giving out donations, and what have you, in a manner 
of advertising, that he was not staffing this booth down here, it was 
purely a complimentary purpose space. His CPA advised him that was 
one of the items he could cut from his budget. 

That was the answer Mr. Noble gave me. I cannot go in and look 
at their overhead and expenses and tell them where they can cut down 
and save money, but according to Mr. Noble and his accountant, that 
was the matter they wanted to cut out. That is the only one who told 
me positively it was purely financial. 

I have understood, not directly from members, that finance was 
the big reason these men are not coming down here. Our spaces are 
the cheapest that any of these tradespople have, and I do not think the 
purchase of the exhibit space is exorbitant by any means, for these men 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 157 

who are entirely dependent on the dentists of North Carolina. I think 
there is a mutual benefit for both. However, they must use it to get that 
benefit. 

Vice President Thompson: Will passage of this resolution solve the 
whole problem? I tried to inquire around among the laboratory men, 
and there is something I cannot put my finger on. It would seem to me 
that if we pass the resolution, we will not solve the problem. Therefore, 
I feel there should be some harmonious plan, some friendly relation 
whereby we could all work together. As it is running on now, I think 
we are building up for further study of the same subject. What we do 
here, today, I do not believe is going to solve it. 

Dr. Hooper: I would like to see this thing worked out satisfactorily 
for all concerned. I would like to make a substitute motion: that the 
incoming president appoint a committee to really study this and come 
back next year before the House of Delegates with something they think 
will work, for our approval. 

(Dr. Owen seconded the motion.) 

Dr. Edwards: Mr. President, I find myself in sympathy with both 
views of the situation. I am in sympathy with Dr. Poindexter's position 
because he is as familiar with the situation as any man in the Society; on 
the other hand I feel there is great merit in what Dr. Pearson has said. 

I feel there are weaknesses in the present plan and that Dr. Hooper's 
suggestion for the appointment of a committee to work with these 
gentlemen, to try to solve this problem and bring out a recommenda- 
tion that will be to the mutual interest of all, would be at this time 
the proper thing to do. 

I second Dr. Hooper's motion. 

(The motion was put to a vote and carried.) 

The report, with recommendations deleted, was adopted. 



Constitution 

and 

By-La\vs 

Committee 



S. W. Shaffer, Chairman 
A. P. Cline 
C. W. Sanders 
Z. L. Edwards 
F. 0. Alford 



I. Change By-Laws Article I, Section 6, Executive Committee, by 
adding in line two following "the President", the word, "Vice-President". 
This increases the Executive Committee from six to seven members. This 
amendment was presented last year and is ready to be voted on at the 
first meeting. 

II. Change Constitution Article VII, Section 2 to read as follows: 
"Unless otherwise specifically provided, each standing committee shall 
consist of six members, one from each district society appointed by the 
President for terms of three years, plus one member at large appointed 
for a term of one year, and the Chairman shall be designated by the 
President. Such change of length of term shall apply only to those 
appointed after this change has been adopted." This amendment was pre- 
sented last year along with a similar one. The two were laid on the 
table till this year at which time the Constitution and By-Laws Com- 
mittee was to decide on one to be presented. 

III. Change By-Laws Article I, Section 21, by striking out the 
first sentence: "The Relief Committee shall consist of 5 members, one 
from each district society." The second sentence shall begin, "The 
Relief Committee shall elect one of its own members", and continue 
as at present. This amendment was presented last year and is ready 
to be voted on at the first meeting. 

IV. In May, 1954, Dr. Neal Sheffield in his address recommended 
that the President, President-Elect, Vice-President, Secretary, and Editor 
be made alternate delegates to the American Dental Association, provided 
none of the State Officers were elected to serve as a delegate. With this 
in mind and since there would be only one other alternate delegate at 
present to be elected, the Constitution and By-Laws Committee proposes 
the following change in Article IV, Section 2 of the Constitution: In 
the second sentence of the paragraph relating to alternate delegates, 
add following the word "Secretary-Treasurer", the words, "Vice-Presi- 
dent", "Editor-Publisher", and "Chairman of the Executive Committee". 
The proposed change will now read as follows: The President, President- 
Elect, Secretary-Treasurer, Vice-President", Editor-Publisher, and Chair- 
man of the Executive Committee, unless they are an elected delegate, 
shall become an alternate to the House of Delegates of the American 
Dental Association, without the formality of election. This amendrnent 
is to be presented at one meeting and voted on at a subsequent meeting. 

V. Due to a resolution passed by the House of Delegates which reads 
as follows: "Resolved, that the President of this Society be requested to 



158 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 



159 



submit to the Committee on the President's address and to all members 
of the House of Delegates, at least 30 days prior to the Annual Meeting, 
all recommendations which will be presented in the President's address", 
the Constitution and By-Laws Committee proposes to change Article I, 
Section i of the By-Laws by adding to the end of Section i, the following 
sentence: "The recommendations which will be presented in the Presi- 
dent's address must be submitted by him to the Committee on the 
President's address and to all members of the House of Delegates at 
least 30 days prior to the Annual Meeting." This amendment is to be 
presented at one meeting and voted on at a subsequent meeting. 

The amendment in regard to the Advisory Committee to the Dental 
School of the University of N. C. failed to pass a 90% vote last year, 
and the Constitution and By-Laws Committee wishes to advise the 
officers of the society that it considers this as unfinished business, and 
prefers that they use their own discretion as to the future action to be 
taken on this matter. 

VI. Due to the fact that Dr. Neal Sheffield in his Presidential address 
last year, recommended that steps be taken to secure a corresponding sec- 
retary to help ease the ever-increasing load of the state officers, and due 
to the fact that President Walker recommends the same thing, we should 
like to present an amendment, a change in Article I, Section 5, of the 
By-Laws, to read: "The annual dues of this Society shall be $46.", in 
place of $31. This is an increase of $15. 

Recommendations of the Constitution and By-Laws Committee were 
voted upon with the results as follows: 

Recommendation I, Adopted 

Rpcommendation H, Not approved 

Recommendation III, Not approved 

Recommendation IV, Adopted 

Recommendation V, Adopted 

Recommendation VI, Adopted — To become effective January 1, 1956. 



Necrology 
Comraittee 



E, L. Eatman, Chairman 

F. E. Gilliam 
J. P. Reece 
W. L. McRae 
Ralph Coffey 



I met with the chairmen of the different committees and there the 
duties of the Necrology Committee were discussed. It was decided at 
this meeting to leave off the lengthy memorial reading at the Sunday 
night session. The Necrology report on Sunday night would be the 
lighting of a candle and the placing of a rose in a vase for each deceased 
during the past year. The memorials would be written and presented 
to the Executive Committee for approval later, so that they may be 
published in the Journal. 

I would recommend that the Necrology Committee of each district 
and under a general chairman report them to the state society each 
year at Pinehurst. 



Insurance 
Committee 



Joe V. Davis, Jr., Chairman 
C. H. league 
J. R. Edwards 
P. P. Yates 
M. M. Lilly 



The Insurance Committee has held no meetings during the year but 
it has been active in its encouragement to our members to carry ade- 
quate insurance. 

Through the cooperation of Mr. J. L. Crumpton who administers for 
the Commercial Insurance Company the State Society sponsored plan, 
the new members and the old members who are not participants were 
contacted by mailing to these men a brochure which carried this letter 
signed by the members of this committee: 

TO MEMBERS OF THE NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY: 

We should like to write you briefly about a matter that affects all 
of us as dentists. Each of us is subject to sickness and injuries that 
destroy our earnings from practice. We are exposed to diseases and 
injuries that would not disable the ordinary layman but would render 
us unfit for our professional duties. To protect and provide income for 
such emergencies, a dentist should own the best Health and Accident 
insurance available. 

From our experience and observation, we believe the Special Health 
and Accident Plan sponsored by the North Carolina Dental Society 
provides the best coverage available to us and feel that our members will 
make no mistake in making it their first choice for several reasons, 
especially because it provides up to five years for each sickness as 
against only one or two years in other plans offered our members. 

Another reason is that we think good claim service is the key to 
good protection. Our State Society Plan, as administered by J. L. Crump- 
ton, Durham, North Carolina, Manager for our insuring company, has 
been warmly praised by our membership during the past eleven years 
for his prompt and full payment of all claims without contention and 
troublesome detail. 

It is not our desire to unduly influence your choice or action, but 
urgently recommend that every dentist in our Society not already 
insured under this Plan avail himself of this protection without delay. 
Other plans are suggested only to supplement this coverage where more 
protection is needed. 

The following pages describe the benefits to which you are entitled. 

Respectfully, submitted, 

Joe V. Davis, Jr., Chairman 
Insurance Committee 



160 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 161 

Your committee wishes to thank Mr. Crumpton for his prompt and 
efficient handling of this plans affairs. This company has approximately 
550 members of the North Carolina Dental Society insured under the 
North Carolina Sponsored Plan. During the past year claims for the 
Group amounted to $78,000.00, which is the heaviest claim record since 
the Group became effective in 1943. During the year, there were a 
number of members who were disabled for tne entire year. In fact, some 
of them have been running about two years. Six members of the Society, 
during 1954, drew nearly $30,000.00, in disability benefits. You can 
readily see how greatly that affected the total losses sustained. 

The more we observe the North Carolina Dental Society Plan the 
more we are convinced that it is highly important that the younger men 
coming into the Society join the Group. 

We are pleased that the 50% membership in the American Dental 
Association sponsored plan was reached, making it possible for those 
members who are ineligible for coverage under other plans to now 
obtain good coverage from the A.D.A. plan. We would like to use 
this report as a medium to inform and encourage these men to avail 
themselves of this opportunity. Also we feel that in some cases one 
Company may not offer adequate coverage. Therefore we encourage the 
use of the two plans to supplement one another. 

One problem came to the attention of the committee concerning 
Liability Coverage for new members. This was taken up with Mr. A. C. 
Givens of the Charlotte office of the Aetna Casualty and Surety Com- 
pany. I will quote from his letter the manner in which this problem 
is now handled: 

"The problem that you mentioned in your letter was reviewed by 
us a few months ago. The procedure we now follow is, if an applica- 
tion is submitted by a doctor who has not previously been a mem- 
ber of the North Carolina Medical Society but indicates on his 
application that he has applied for membership, we immediately 
issue a policy for the doctor. At the same time, we write a letter to 
the secretary of the North Carolina Medical Society and request 
the secretary that if he has any information which would lead him 
to believe we should hold up issuance of the policy until the applica- 
tion is acted upon, that he notify us immediately. We follow up on 
the matter to be sure the application is acted upon favorably but 
some times this takes quite a few months. In most cases, the 
original application goes first to the local society who must then 
refer it to the state society. Because of no meetings during the 
summer months or for other reasons, the application can be delayed, 
therefore, for maybe as much as six (6) months. We believe, how- 
ever, that the procedure we are now following satisfactorily takes 
care of the doctor during the interval." 

In the mind of your committee chairman this represents a very 
satisfactory solution to this problem. 

Your committee feels that the Health and Accident Insurance avail- 
able is very satisfactory and offers exceptional coverage possibilities. 

The recommendation of your committee is that members investigate 
and obtain more than just the minimum liability coverage. We feel that 
this lowest coverage is inadequate in most of our cases and that greater 
coverage should be carried. 



Prosthetic 

Dental 

Service 

Committee 



C. C. Poindexter, Chairman 
Coyte Minges 
F. 0. Alford 
Walter McRae 
Hubert S. Plaster 



The American Dental Association worked out the original plan and 
requirements of accrediting commercial dental laboratories. 

The purpose of the accreditation was to develop and maintain a 
cordial relation between the profession and the laboratories for the best 
interest of the health of the people. Among the many requirements, 
the most pertinent were: 

1. Must not violate nor permit technicians in their employ to violate 
the current dental laws of the State in which the laboratory operates. 

2. Must render services only to legal practitioners of dentistry. 

A. This does not prohibit the construction of demonstration cases 
for laboratories or manufacturers. 

3. Must not employ, nor retain in its employ, any technician who 
has been found guilty of a violation of a dental law in a court of record 
of any state, without the approval of the State Prosthetic Dental Service 
Committee. 

4. Must conform to the regulations and prevailing standards of 
sanitation, health, labor, and safety of the state and community in which 
it operates. 

5. Must not, by any means, method, or device, advertise to the 
general public. 

6. Must comply with, and follow explicitly the written instructions 
of the legal practitioner of dentistry for the construction or fabrication of 
any dental appliance which it accepts for construction or fabrication 
when they are furnished by the dentist. 

7. This section is interpreted to mean that no change of design nor 
substitution of materials may be made without the knowledge and 
approval of the legal practitioner of dentistry who required the service, 
except by previous mutual understanding. 

8. Must deliver with each completed dental appliance an itemized 
statement showing the name and quality of materials used in its fabri- 
cation. 

9. Must have a staff of technicians adequately trained for the types 
of work which they are doing. 

A. The interpretation of this requirement will be made by the 
State Prosthetic Dental Service Committee to conform to 
local conditions. 

10. Must have adequate equipment for doing the types of work 
which are accepted by the laboratory. 

11. Must have satisfactory credit relations. 

162 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 163 

12. The annual fee for accreditation shall be Ten Dollars (10.00) 
for all laboratories with five or less employees. The annual fee for labora- 
tories with more than five technician employees shall be on the basis of 
Two dollars (2.00) per technician employee with a maximum annual fee 
of Two Hundred and Fifty Dollars (250.00). 

In putting the program in operation in 1947, the North Carolina 
Dental Society adhered very closely to those agreements of the parent 
organization. Later it was recognized that the various states presented 
different problems in the administration of the program, that is certain 
understandings in one state were not applicable in another. On at least 
one occasion the House of Delegates of the North Carolina Dental 
Society approved some changes in our set up in the hope of making the 
program more successful. 

By virtue of meeting the requirements of your committee the follow- 
ing number of laboratories have been approved during the past several 
years. 

1947 20 

1948 22 

1949 28 

1950 28 

1951 32 

1952 35 

1953 35 

1954-55 30 

There is perhaps a decrease in number of states that are now operat- 
ing the actual accreditation plan, but many states have a modified pro- 
gram with certain understanding and it is understood doing very nicely. 
At the Miami meeting last fall the American Dental Association 
re-affirmed its position that properly planned state society program 
for accreditation or approving dental laboratories with the support of 
the dentist and the laboratory industry should be the most practical 
device for improving dental laboratory service. 

The program is entirely voluntary. No compulsion on either the 
dentist or laboratory owner. It is also self supporting and all fees collected 
above the actual expenses of the operation were returned to the North 
Carolina Dental Laboratory Association and used by that group for 
educational purposes. Under the present set-up, however, any surplus 
is to go into the Relief Fund of the North Carolina Dental Society. 

It is noted that 30 places of business were approved last year. This 
is a good average for past several years. Incidents to administrating the 
program were about as usual. During the year a couple of illegal prac- 
tices on the part of technicians were reported. Interesting to observe 
that both of those infractions of the law were reported by owners of 
accredited laboratories. Reports of these infractions were in turn sent 
to the Secretary of the State Board of Dental Examiners. Future plans 
of the committee are to continue an energetic program by re-examining 
and inspecting all those who have been recognized and give ample 
opportunity to those meeting the qualifications to participate in the 
program. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
From October, 1949 to October, 1954 total fees paid by accredited 
laboratories was $2,234.15. 

For educational purposes the Committee returned to the labora- 
tories in 1949 $200.00 

1950 200.00 

1951 150.00 

1952 500.00 

1953 400.00 

1954 350.00 

Making total of $1,800.00 



164 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Over the six year period other expenses were incurred as follows: 



1950 


Multigraphing 




$ 20.00 


1950 


Printing 




34.00 


1950 


Stamps 




25.00 


1951 


Printing certificates 




18.00 


1951 


Stamps 




23.10 


1952 


Stamps 




26.01 


1952 


Seal, Stamp, Mat 




117.90 


1952 


Printing Accreditation 


Blanks 


30.52 


1952 


Refund — Durham Dental Laboratory 


10.00 


1953 


Printing Renewal Applications 


20.50 


1953 


Printing 




19.00 


1953 


Stamps 




25.00 


1953 


Stamps 




3.24 


1954 


Stamps 




5.00 



This expenditure of $377.27 plus $1,800.00 returned to the labora- 
tories makes a total of $2,177.27 and this subtracted from the $2,234.15 
leaves a bank balance in the Bank of Greensboro, Greensboro, North 
Carolina, of $56.43. 

AN AMENDMENT 
TO THE PROSTHETIC DENTAL SERVICE COMMITTEE REPORT 
We recommend that paragraph 4, page 252, 1954 Proceedings as 
adopted by the House of Delegates be changed to read that anv surplus 
funds beyond the expense in administrating the program be held by the 
Prosthetic Dental Service Committee or until there is some recognizable 
body of the North Carolina Dental Laboratory Association. In other 
words no part of these funds are to go to the Relief Fund or any other 
agency of the State. 

DISCUSSION 

Dr. Jennette: I question, sometimes, whether the out-of-state 
laboratory is treated quite fairly, and as I look at this it seems to me 
that, for instance, Mr. Rothstein's is an old reliable concern, and it is 
a rather big item if he comes here and displays. 

Dr. Poindexter: Dr. Jennette, as these rules and requirements were 
changed by the House of Delegates last year, Mr. Rothstein, or any out- 
of-state laboratory, if they meet the requirements of the Prosthetic 
Dental Committee, has the same right to exhibit at this meeting, to 
advertise in the JOURNAL as those in the state. 

Dr. Diercks: If any laboratory outside of the state could display 
this year, why do we have no out-of-state laboratories exhibiting at our 
meeting? 

Dr. Poindexter: If Dr. Diercks will look around the exhibit space 
he will see there is no exhibit space left. In the second place, it seemed 
the Chairman of the Exhibits Committee did not invite any out-of-state 
laboratories. 

Dr. Jennette: Mr. President, I am not fighting for the Rothstein 
Laboratory, it makes no difference to me at all. For instance, a labora- 
tory the size of Rothstein would find it rather steep to pay this fee. It 
would cost them about $250, plus the space they pay for, which is not 
too cheap. 

Dr. Poindexter: Gentlemen, in view of the fact that the labora- 
tories in this state have been a part of this for many years, they are 
interested in keeping cordial relations between the laboratory group 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 165 

and the professional group, and they are perfectly willing to pay this 
fee. There has to be some control. If there is not some control — I hope 
you know what is taking place in some other states. The laboratories in 
the state are not complaining, so why should a laboratory from out-of- 
state, big or small, come in and take part in the program without paying 
the same fee our own laboratories pay? 

Dr. Pearson: When my report comes up for discussion, you will 
have there some comments which our committee has made. The comment 
I want to make here, in regard to the laboratory practice act is this: 
we do not have to solicit any dental laboratory anywhere in order for us 
to put on a scientific program at our meetings. We can get our programs 
and put on scientific sessions without that. However, it has been the 
practice to invite these commercial people. 

In 1947 when this Prosthetic Dental Service Committee was estab- 
lished, and worked out an agreement with the North Carolina Dental 
Laboratory Association, there was an agreement between the Association 
and its members, and the North Carolina Dental Society, to this effect: 
that each member of that organization would purchase one space at our 
annual meeting. That has never happened, 100 per cent. The first few 
years it worked very succssfully; they came around with ten or twelve. 
Each year succeeding 1947, the number has decreased. 

Mr. Noble, manager of the Noble Dental Laboratory, came to me last 
summer, earnest and sincere, trying to persuade, and help me in an effort 
to enlighten the membership to become a part of our state team. He felt 
that it was of mutual benefit for them to take part in the program. He 
gave me a letter of contract to the fact that he would secure one space. 
Two weeks ago, I had not received a check in the amount to cover his 
space. My secretary called him advising that his check would be expected 
before May 10. Mr. Noble informed my secretary that he would not 
exhibit this year; therefore he would not be obligated to his space. 

We have no written contracts. Personally, I feel that his laboratory 
was obligated, and if we saw fit to induce him or persuade him, I think 
he should be obligated to pay for it. 

The only thing is that Rothstein would like to come here, and Mr. 
Rothstein spent several dollars in long-distance telephone calls to me. 
When Mr. Rothstein was advised of the requirements, he stated he could 
not possibly pay that to come down here and exhibit. The prices were 
exorbitant. 

Tonight, two of the most ardent supporters of this Laboratory Asso- 
ciation came to me and told me that next year, there would be two 
members less of the North Carolina Dental Laboratory Association, 
namely Fleming's Dental Laboratory in Raleigh, and Woodward's in 
Greensboro. 

I give you that, just for general information. 

In my opinion, the fee that the Prosthetic Service Committee is 
setting for these people to become members is too high for the majority 
of the members to come in. If it is a protective measure, it is protecting 
too few. 



166 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

Another thing I have found from the Exhibits Committee — hoping 
not to conflict with any other committee or any other organization — is 
that we feel the fees or the funds that are collected by the Prosthetic 
Dental Service Committee, by that act, immediately involve the North 
Carolina Dental Society as a part of the North Carolina Laboratory 
Association. We are sponsoring it. We are accepting funds from it. 

In Dr. Poindexter's report, you will see, over the past six or seven 
years which he has reported here, tonight, that his total expense, is 
somthing like $300. That would be approximately $50 a year since this 
organization was born in our state. The $10, or the fees that are paid 
to his committee are going to close shop. There are other laboratories 
that would like to come down and exhibit. They do not belong to the 
North Carolina Dental Laboratory Association. Nevertheless, they still 
have to pay the same fee. They do not like that. There is disharmony, 
I am sure, among their own members. As I told you, there are two that 
are not going to be members next year, and there are others who are 
not members at the present time. 

The feeling of the Exhibits Committee is this: if there has to be a 
fee charged, let it be paid directly to the Laboratory Association, and not 
to any committee of the North Carolina Dental Society. Then we will 
not be a part of that organization. 

If we see fit, then, to have a committee, a Prosthetic Dental Service 
Committee can be set up — which I wholeheartedly recommend — to con- 
tinue its function as an advisory committee. If they are still empowered 
with the laboratories, fine. However, I think the question of fees, and 
the way they are paid into our organization, is what our entire problem is 
about. 

Dr. Poindexter: Mr. President, it seems that the Prosthetic Dental 
Service Report and the Report of the Exhibits Committee are so closely 
allied, I do not know whether discussion is due here or when Dr. Pear- 
son's report comes up. However, I do believe, by Dr. Pearson's remarks, 
that he might not be in accord with the laboratory program. 

First, the Prosthetic Dental Service Committee has not accredited 
the laboratories. The members are accredited by the North Carolina 
Dental Society. 

I should like to say that at no time did any laboratory ever agree 
to take one foot of exhibit space not in the original agreement, nor in 
any other agreement. They did, however, agree to take advertising 
space in the JOURNAL, and one member of the Laboratory Association, 
when the Editor or the Secretary was professing to build the Association, 
signed a bill for space. However, at no time did the North Carolina 
Dental Laboratory Association agree to take one inch of space. 

Dr. Pearson remarked that two prominent laboratory men said they 
will not be back next year. I believe he was thinking about a member of 
the Laboratory Association. There is not strife; there is disagreement 
among the laboratory men, just as we have our disagreements. 

May I refer to his quote here? He says the American Dental Associa- 
tion ceased its major activities along that line. That is just one of the 
inaccurate statements. At its meeting, the American Dental Association 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 



167 



reaffirmed itself and its faith in that program. However, as it has done 
for the last few years, it advised each state to go on a so-called single 
basis, because each had a different problem. However, it is still interested 
in the program, and before this thing is over — I do not think anyone 
knows more about this than Frank Alford and Fred Hale — I should like 
those boys to be heard. 

(At President Walker's suggestion, this report was tabled until the 
final meeting of the House of Delegates when it was accepted without 
further discussion.) 



State 
Institutions 
Committee 



Robert E. Masten, Chairman 

J. G. Poole 

C. W. Poindexter 

0. L. Presnell 

W. M. Matheson 



As far as can be determined at this time by this committee the 
dental activities at the state institutions are being carried out in a satis- 
factory manner. 

As Chairman, I have reviewed no unfavorable reports nor request 
for any changes as regard to the dental services. 

DISCUSSION 

Dr. G. L. Hooper: I should like to make this comment — not reflect- 
ing on the committee at all. I have observed that the reports of this par- 
ticular committee are similar, year after year. I question it. I know there 
are some state institutions that do not have a dentist at all, and some have 
one part-time, and that as far as I can ascertain, all institutions are desir- 
ous of having a dentist within their institutions. 

I am wondering if it would be possible for this committee to question 
by phone, personally or otherwise, the superintendent of each state 
institution regarding its condition as far as dental care is concerned, and 
those institutions, within our state, that do not have a dentist whether 
we might not be able to work with them in making an effort to secure 
a man for those particular institutions. 

We could render these institutions a real service by our assistance 
in getting dental personnel if some are available. I realize they are hard 



168 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

to get, but the state institutions are paying a fairly good salary. They 
will pay $7000 per year, plus maintenance, including a house and all 
utilities. 

I should like to see us do something about this, therefore, I make 
a recommendation, or a motion, that the chairman of this committee, 
immediately after being appointed, contact these institutions and help 
them in any way he and his committee might be able to. 

RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE REPORT 
Whereas, the State Institutions of North Carolina are not properly 
staffed in the Dental personnel to provide adequate treatment for their 
patients, and whereas the North Carolina Dental Society is willing and 
anxious to render every service possible toward securing such personnel, 
therefore be it: 

Resolved that the State Institutions Committee of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society be requested to contact the heads of the various 
State Institutions and offer them any assistance that the North Carolina 
Dental Society may render. 
We endorse this resolution: 

W. H. Breeland, Chairman 

This report, and the Resolutions Committee Report were adopted by 
the House of Delegates, May 16, 1955. 



Relief 
Committee 



Paul Fitzgerald, Chairman 
S. H. Steelman 
J. H. Guion 
J. T. Lasley 
Wilbert Jackson 



Receiving aid from the fund at this time are three members of the 
Society and the widow of a member, this lady is past seventy-five years 
of age, almost totally blind, her husband was ill and unable to practice 
for nine years prior to his death last June. 

During the past year we made forty-eight payments which amounted 
to a total of $2,520.00 

We have pending one application for aid, if this application is 
approved we will have five recipients, this will make the monthly pay- 
ments $262.50, per month, a total for the ensuing year of $3,150.00. 

Our income for the past year was as follows: 

Received from the American Dental Association $ 781.25 

Received from the Ladies Auxiliary 1,673.04 



Total Receipts $2,454.29 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 



169 



We have a bank balance at this time of $1,201.30 

Our Relief Fund constitutes the cheapest disability protection we can 
obtain. The average member receiving aid being paid $105.00, per month 
receives more in one month than he would pay in dues in over 100 
years. 

It is the sense of this committee that we will have to obtain more 
funds or in the foreseeable future we will be compelled to reduce the 
amount paid monthly to members. 

The relief extended to those members who through misfortune, ill- 
ness and the infirmities of age are unable to support themselves is an 
important function of our organization and it is our paramount duty to 
keep our Relief Fund in a condition that enables us to give aid to our 
unfortunate members. 



Advisory Comniittee 

for Veterans 

Administration 



Guy E. Pigford, Chairman 
Riley Spoon 
P. B. Whittington, Jr. 
C. A. Graham, Sr. 
Walter Clark 



Since the meeting of the North Carolina Dental Society in Pinehurst 
in 1954 there has been but one case in which the Veterans Administra- 
tion felt it necessary to call upon this committee for consultation. 

This was a case in which the participating dentist signed a voucher 
for a certain class of work and failed to deliver this class of work to the 
patient. 

The Veterans Administration discovered this during a routine exam- 
ination of the patient. The dentist in question was removed from the 
eligible list and required to reimburse the Veterans Administration for 
the work he failed to deliver. 

The committee therefore makes the following recommendations for 
guidance of the members of the North Carolina Dental Society. 

1. Complete all work exactly as stated on voucher. Do not substitute 
unless permission has been obtained from Veterans Administra- 
tion. This does not apply where it is necessary to extract a tooth 
that was marked to be restored. 

2. Do not mail in vouchers as being completed unless work is 
finished. If time limit expires, get extension. 

3. Do not change work from that authorized and make additional 
charge to Veteran for the changes. 

4. When in doubt as to how to proceed write the Veterans Admin- 
istration. 



Dental Advisory 

Committee 

to the University 

of North CaroHna 



S. Everett Moser, Chairman 

C. C. Diercks 

S. W. Shaffer 

C. H. league 

Paul Jones 

Milo Hoffman 

John L. Ashby 

G. L. Hooper 

R. S. Jones 

J. D. Broughton 



The committee called its meeting at 4 P. 
Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst, North Carolina. 



M. May 15, 1955, at the 



There was a discussion for about an hour concerning the organiza- 
tion and planning of the Committee and to have the reports and ques- 
tions of various members of the committee. 

Dean John C. Brauer of the School of Dentistry then was invited 
to attend the meeting to make a report of the activities and progress 
of the school. He made the following comments: 

1. The first class with 34 students graduated in June of 1954. 

2. The Council on Dental Education of the American Dental Associ- 
ation following an inspection in May 1954, gave formal full approval to 
the School of Dentistry. 

3. T!:at the University of North Carolina School of Dentistry became 
the first school in the country to be formally examined in its graduate 
program for the several specialties. This was a pilot study on the part 
of the Council on Dental Education, and to-date no plan for approval or 
non-approval has been adopted by the Council for graduate school edu- 
cation. 

4. The Council on Dental Education again visited the school this May, 
1955, for a final evaluation of the Dental Hygiene program. The Council 
will report formally on this inspection at an early date, and there is every 
reason to believe that full approval will be granted to the Dental 
Hygiene curriculum. 

5. The school now has two graduate programs working toward the 
Master of Science degree in Orthodontics and Oral Surgery, and Pedo- 
dontics will be added this coming summer. The first graduates in 
Orthodontics completed their work in August of 1954. All these programs 
have been developed with a view of preparing the candidate for subse- 
quent certification in the specialty. 

6. The second class of 39 graduates will be realized in June 1955. 



170 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 171 

7. There has been an excellent and adequate distribution of patients 
in all clinical areas of the school. 

8. There are now 143 girls registered in the Dental Assistants Exten- 
sion Study Course. Girls are registered from all areas of the country. 

9. The intramural practice program was discussed in its various 
phases. Dean Brauer indicated that the gross income of the 19 partici- 
pating dentists ranged from $5,000 to $7,000 per month, that 50 per cent 
of this gross went to operating dentists as supplemental pay, that 40 
per cent was used for payment of supplies, replacements of equipment 
or new equipment, salary of office personnel, etc.; that 10 per cent was 
paid to University fund for heat, lights, and janitorial service. The Dean 
indicated that a University Business office auditor checked all books 
and accounts at intervals to permit the Administration concerned to 
evaluate the program. 

10. Postgraduate (one week) courses also have been activated this 
past year in Pedodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics. Further 
announcements will be made in this area. 

11. Dean Brauer extended an invitation to the Committee to visit 
the school individually or as a group to permit long range planning for 
further developments in all areas of dental education. 

The chairman would like to recommend that the committee next 
year make a careful study of the possible future impact on the profession 
of a large number of new graduates in dentistry. If possible, the average 
of men now in practice, with their probable professional life expectancy, 
combined with the average population growth in the state, might be 
considered in the light of the addition of some forty to fifty new 
dentists graduating from our own school each year. If the results of this 
study indicate that there may be an over-supply of dentists in this state 
within the next few years, a recommendation might be in order to the 
school that a larger percentage of out-of-state applicants be accepted as 
students. Since South Carolina has delayed its plans for a dental school, 
an arrangement might be made to take more students from South Caro- 
lina, and, for that matter, other southern states. 

The North Carolina Dental Society paid considerable money for an 
extensive survey, made by the late Dr. John T. O'Rourke, on the Dental 
Needs and Facilities of North Carolina. This survey was made pos- 
sible, if you will recall, by voluntary contributions from members of the 
North Carolina Dental Society sponsored by the Dental College Commit- 
tee. Future Dental Advisory Committee members would do well to 
re-evaluate this comprehensive report, bringing it up to date. 



Clinic Board 
of Censors 



H. C. Parker, Chairman 

D. F. Hord 
R. B. Lessem 

E. R. league 

W. H. Finch, Jr. 



We wish to sincerely thank all the dentists that presented table 
clinics at the Ninety-Ninth Anniversary Meeting of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society. 

All were concerned with vital phases of dentistry and all were pre- 
sented most effectively. We, the committee, would like to single out 
several as representative and outstanding and recommend they be 
invited to present their clinics at the American Dental Association meet- 
ing in San Francisco. 

Clinicians — J. J. Lauten and R. S. Turner, Greensboro 

Subject — Elastic Impression Technic for Crown and Bridge 

Clinician — Robert E. Finch, Raleigh 

Subject — Permalastic Technic for Single and Multiple Impressions 

Clinician — J. K. Holladay, Charlotte 

Subject — Anatomic Versus Non-Anatomic Teeth in Full Denture 
Construction 

Clinician — J. Wilfred Gallagher, University of North Carolina 
Subject — Problem Cases in Periodontics 

Clinician — Freeman C. Slaughter, Kannapolis 
Subject — General Anesthesia in Dental Practice 

Clinician — Joseph Fremont Burket, University of North Carolina 
Subject — Demonstration Models — an Easy Method of Fabrication 

Clinicians — Durham-Orange Dental Assistants Society 

Subject — Learning Through the A.D.A.A. Extension Study Course 



172 



Advisory Comniittee 

to the Dental 

Hygienists' 

Association 



Amos S. Bumgardner, Chairma; 

S. P. Gay 

Wade Sowers 

Carl L. Bowen 

Carey T. Wells, Jr. 

R. M. Olive, Jr. 

F. Spencer Woody 



In October of 1954 the North Carolina Dental Hygienists' Associa- 
tion entertained at tea the dental hygiene students at Chapel Hill. At 
that time a $100.00 grant was presented the Dental Foundation of North 
Carolina as the initial gift toward the Blanche C. Downie Memorial 
Fund. This fund is to be used to aid a second year student in dental 
hygiene. 

The Association sent a delegate and alternate delegate to the national 
convention in Miami. The delegate presented a table clinic which was 
enthusiastically received by those in attendance. 

At the National meeting Mrs. Nancy Horton was elected Trustee, 
District VI, American Dental Hygienists' Association. She is the first 
North Carolina hygienist to hold that position. We are proud of the honor 
to her and to the state. 

Miss Emma Mills is serving on two National committees. 

The Association gained eight new members this year, bringing the 
total membership to twenty-five. 

An excellent program has been planned for the annual meeting in 
Pinehurst. We expect a record attendance, and will have for the first 
time the students in oral hygiene at Chapel Hill. 

Plans are in the formative stage to organize a component society 
in Charlotte. We feel that is a major step for our organization. 

A proposed five-dollar increase in state dues will be voted on at 
the Pinehurst meeting. That indicates much growth. 

Next March the North Carolina Dental Hygienists' Association will 
be hostess to the Second Biannual Meeting of District VI, comprised of 
the nine southeastern states. The two-day meeting will be held in Chapel 
Hill. The Dental School has very graciously offered assistance in our 
efforts to make it a most informative and beneficial session. 

The North Carolina Dental Hygienists' Association would be very 
happy to see some modifications made in the dental hygiene practice 
act of this state. 



173 



Liaison Committee 

to the 

Old North State 

Dental Society 



Meal Sheffield, Chairman 
C. W. Sanders 
Clyde Minges 
Cecil Pless 
Ralph Jarrett 



The Liaison Committee to the Old North State Dental Society wishes 
to report that the committee has not had any calls or communications 
from the Old North State Dental Society. This committee has repeatedly 
made it known that it stands ready to cooperate and assist them in any 
way possible. 

There have been no calls for assistance in securing speakers and 
clinicians from the membership of the North Carolina Dental Society. 
If such requests are made known to us we will cooperate to the fullest 
extent, as has been done in previous years. 

We urge the members of the North Carolina Dental Society to 
cooperate fully in any requests that might come from any of their local, 
district, or state societies to supply speakers and clinicians whenever 
requested. 



Arrangements 
Committee 



C. D. Eatman, Chairman 

Norman Ross 

James Zealy 

C. B. Fritz 

E. M. Medlin 

M. L. Cherry 

R. S. Turner 



During the past years the chairman of the Arrangements Committee 
has met with the Executive Committee at Pinehurst in January, at 
which time the duties of the committee were discussed and various 
suggestions were offered by members present. 

It was decided at this meeting that an Arrangements Committee 
Booth be used as an information center. It was also decided that mem- 
bers of various committees would be delegated to function under the 
jurisdiction of the Arrangements Committee in all of its endeavors. 

Since it is the duty of the Arrangements Committee to be in complete 
charge of all special committees and be responsible for their functions, 
I would suggest that the name of the committee be changed to General 
Arrangements Committee. I would also suggest, that since this com- 
mittee has such an important task to perform, that it head the list of 



174 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 



175 



special commitees. I know that a good, responsible person heading this 
committee each year will see that everything is in order and well 
arranged. This will take a great headache off the shoulder of the presi- 
dent each year. 



Hospital 

Dental Service 

Comniittee 



Norman F. Ross, Chairman 

C. D. Eatman 

P. B. Whittington, Jr. 

Dan Carr 

G. L. Hooper 

S. E. Moser 



Your Hospital Dental Service Committee wishes to report that 
members of this group visited and inspected the Durham Veterans 
Hospital on September 29, 1954, with the purpose of examining the 
Dental Department for approval or disapproval of its fitness to train 
residents in Oral Surgery, for the American Dental Association. 

Arrangements have been made to visit Camp Lejeune, North Caro- 
lina, during the month of April, to examine their Dental Service for 
the Council on Hospital Dental Service of the American Dental Associa- 
tion. 

The chairman would like to commend the cooperation and sin- 
cerity of all the members of this committee. 



Dental 

Caries 

Committee 



Grover Hunter, Jr., Chairman 

Thomas Nisbet 

L. H. Butler 

Allen Cash 

A. C. Current, Jr. 

Pearce Roberts 

Paul T. Harrell 



The Dental Caries Committee of the North Carolina Dental Society 
had a call meeting on November 27, 1954, at Chapel Hill to consider 
the Plan of Operation of the Caries Count Service by the University 
of N. C. School of Dentistry. The plan was approved by the members of 
the Committee, and accordingly the Plan was activated as of January 1, 
1955. Thus one of the recommendations of the 1954 Caries Committee 
which was endorsed by the House of Delgates in May, 1954, has now been 
carried out. 

We did not consider it advisable to notify North Carolina dentists 
or to place any notice in the State Journal of the availability of this 
service, as this would be considered a violation of ethics of the specialty 
practice of Oral Pathology. 



176 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 



The Dental Caries Committee would like to make the following 
recommendations to the North Carolina Dental Society with the sugges- 
tion that Prevention and Control of Dental Disease be the theme of our 
efforts in raising the level of oral health and dental service in North 
Carolina. 

1. A more comprehensive patient and public education with motiva- 
tion from the local and state organizations concerning diet in 
relation to dental caries and oral health. 

2. The presentation of our views to the public locally when oppor- 
tunity is afforded. This would also include the suggestion wel- 
coming opportunities to talk before our local medical societies so 
that our views on oral health could at least be presented to our 
medical colleagues. 

3. The utilization of the Caries Count Service at the University of 
North Carolina School of Dentistry wherever indicated in the 
local dental office. 

4. Cooperation and support of the efforts of our Committee on 
Fluoridation. 



Housin 
Committee 



Howard Branch, Chairman 

J. C. Senter 

W. H. Young 

C. B. Johnson 

Gary Hesseman 

A. J. Galarde 

C. W. Stevens 



The Housing Committee wishes to report that its work haa been com- 
pleted. The membership of the Society has been assigned rooms by the 
Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst, North Carolina. Several clinicians and spe- 
cial guests have been assigned rooms from the official block of reserved 
rooms. 



The expenses of the committee are as follows: 
1000 Government printed and stamped envelopes 



$38.54 



The envelopes were addressed by the editor. The hotel application 
blanks were furnished, inserted in the envelopes, and mailed by the 
Carolina Hotel. 

The present system of the Housing Committee seems to be working 
quite well, therefore, I have no changes to recommend. 



Rural 

Health 

Affairs 

Committee 



L. M. Massey, Chairman 

Fred Hale 

C. M. Whisnant 

Walter Finch 

W. S. Griffin 

Ben H. Webster 



I 



The Rural Health Affairs Committee of the North Carolina Dental 
Society would like to present its report for the year 1954-1955. 

Our greatest step forward in the Rural Health work for the Society 
has been to work with the North Carolina Medical Society's Executive 
Secretary for Rural Health and the Rural Health Committee of the 
North Carolina Medical Society. The chairman of the North Carolina 
Dental Society's Rural Health Committee was invited to attend all of 
the Rural Health Meetings of the North Carolina Medical Society, and 
our greatest accomplishment has been the participation in the Rural 
Health Conference held in Raleigh in September 1954, and securing a 
place on the program for dentistry and a dental speaker. Dr. John 
Brauer, Dean of the School of Dentistry of the University of North Caro- 
lina, was invited to make a speech and sit on a panel to discuss dentistry 
in this conference. Dr. Bernard Walker, President of the North Carolina 
Dental Society, and fourteen other dentists were presented and recog- 
nized in this conference in which dentistry played a prominent part. 
Heretofore, dentistry had, by default, never been recognized or had a 
place in the Rural Health Conference except by Dr. Ernest Branch. We 
feel that much was accomplished for dentistry and for the general public 
in this conference. 

The Dental Society's Chairman at a Committee meeting following 
the conference, recommended that in 1955 we hold three health con- 
ferences in order to reach more people. The committee adopted this idea, 
and one conference was held in Greenville on March 17, 1955, and 
another in Asheville on March 24, 1955. The third conference will be 
held in Raleigh during the month of October, 1955. In each of these 
meetings a composite program of all phases of rural health was discussed, 
and dental health was again presented by the Dean of the School of 
Dentistry of the University of North Carolina. Also, a question and 
answer panel discussion was used in these conferences. 

The Chairman of the North Carolina Dental Society Committee on 
Rural Health was Chairman of the Evaluation Committee of these pro- 
grams and in the questionnaire handed out for evaluation, dentistry was 
the second important subject of which information was requested. 

In making arrangements for the Asheville and Greenville meetings 
a local dentist was asked to assist. Dr. Walter McFall, Asheville, and Dr. 
M. B. Massey, Greenville, rendered excellent service, and dignified 
the profession of dentistry in their co-operation for the conferences. 



177 



178 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 



RECOMMENDATIONS : 

1. The North Carolina Farm Bureau Federation publishes a monthly 
paper, and it has been agreed that they will accept and publish dental 
information for its seventy-six thousand rural families if the committee 
will furnish the material. The committee would like to recommend that 
the North Carolina Dental Society authorize the committee to select and 
furnish dental articles for publication in this particular paper. 

2. The committee would also like to urge the Society to give 
emphasis to the responsibility of the local dentists to make talks before 
Parent-Teacher Associations and Civic Clubs whenever possible to give 
the information of dental health to the people in their localities. 

3. The Medical Society's Rural Health Committee estimated the 
cost of the conferences as approximately $1,000.00 each. The Committee 
recommends $50.00 be contributed to the Medical Society for each of the 
three meetings which have been held in 1954-1955, and while we cannot 
make future commitments, we should like to recommend to the incom- 
ing administration that it include a contribution of $50.00 to the Rural 
Health Conference to be held in Raleigh in October of this year. 

The Committee wishes to express its appreciation to Dr. John 
Brauer for filling the speaking engagements on all conferences and 
acting as the dental profession's panel member on the respective panels 
of discussion in the conferences. 



Advisory 

Committee 

to the 

Dental Assistants 

Association 



Burke W. Fox, Chairman 

F. C. Mendenhall 

R. M. Olive, Sr. 

L. C. Hedman 

H. M. Hunsuci<er 

Dan T. Carr 

W. J. Turbyfill 



The state society for the dental assistants is an entirely independent 
organization from the North Carolina Dental Society, financed and run 
entirely independent of our organization. However, since many of their 
problems parallel, or in some cases conflict with the dental society, they 
have brought in the past, some of their problems before the Executive 
Committee or House of Delegates to get help or avoid conflicts. 

This committee is a new one, appointed for the purpose of advising 
the dental assistants, and saving the time of our Executive and other 
Committees. 

Several members of the Committee have met with the Association 
to help with their problems, and aid them in various ways. Since the 
purpose of the committee is to save time for the Dental Society a detailed 
report is unnecessary. Our aim has been to encourage them to settle 
their problems, and as a result we have not found it necesary to bring 
the Dental Society into the picture. 



Public 
Relations 

Committee 



John C. Brauer, Chaiiman 

C. B. Wolfe 

D. B. Seitter 
W. T. McFall 

J. B. Freedland 
Royster Chamblee 



The Public Relations Committee has endeavored to approach the 
Committee's assignment in three different areas: (1) Vocational Guid- 
ance, (2) Television, and (3) Miscellaneous Appearances for Radio, Civic 
Clubs and State Organizations. 

Vocational Guidance. The Auxiliary of the North Carolina Dental 
Society is to be commended most highly for the acceptance of this pro- 
ject as one of their primary areas of interest. The ladies of the Auxiliary 
have visited a hundred or more high schools to activate an interest in 
vocational guidance as related to dentistry. Accordingly, a member of 
the Auxiliary after the school visitation requested the Dean of the School 
of Dentistry to send an adequate number of folders: (a) Career in 
Dentistry, (b) Career as a Dental Hygienist, and (c) Career as a Dental 
Assistant. In many instances talks by dentists supplemented the folders. 
Recruitment, through this medium, permits the story of dentistry to be 
told to large numbers of high school and junior college students. It is an 
excellent and valuable public relations mechanism. Fortunately, there 
are too many ladies of the Auxiliary and too many dentists to list their 
names or indicate their appearances. They, however, did render a 
splendid service to dentistry. 

Television Programming. A considerable number of members of the 
North Carolina Dental Society contributed their talents on stations 
throughout the state, including Drs. W. McFall, Cecil Pless, W. W. 
Demeritt, Joe Burket and others. 

A meeting also was called by the University's Television Council, 
extending invitations to the dental and medical societies and various 
health agencies. The president of the North Carolina Dental Society and 
the Public Relations Committee of the Society were invited to the meet- 
ing to be briefed in the development and planning of the University's 
TV station and potential programs. 

Four spot announcements regarding the values of dental health were 
developed by your chairman with the aid of the University production 
directors for the live basketball games at the University. These were 
used by the sports announcer in at least two games. 

In addition to the above, two TV dental spots (one minute) have 
been developed by the University production directors with the guidance 
and approval of the Public Relations Committee and the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Society. These spots are being developed on films for 
subsequent use during various athletic events, not only usable here at 
UNC, but also by any sports commentator. If these dental spots are 
satisfactory and desirable from the dental society's point of view, addi- 
tional films (one minute) will be made. The production costs for these 
first two dental films is absorbed by the TV budget. Further develop- 
ment will warrant Dental Society support financially. 

179 



180 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

General TV programs relating to dental health education as well as 
other health topics now are being developed for broadcasting via the 
University's Channel No. 4. 

Radio, Civic Cluhs and State Organizations. There have been a 
considerable number of appearances by members of the dental school 
faculty, members of the Public Relations Committee, and others in the 
profession on radio, civic club programs and miscellaneous state organi- 
zations (such as Rural Health Programs). 

Budget 1954-55. One hundred dollars was allocated for the Com- 
mittee during the fiscal year. To date, $15.47 has been spent for postage 
and miscellaneous ADA publication materials. A balance of $84.53, 
therefore, is available. 

Recommendations: 

1. That the primary function of the Committee be retained as cited 
in first paragraph of this report. 

2. That a sum of $1500 be authorized for the Committee for the 
fiscal year 1955-56. That not more than $1250 of this total sum 
($1500) be expended for development of Television (spots) 
shorts at U.N.C. TV studios. Such spot movies for TV to be 
approved by the Public Relations and Executive Committees of 
the North Carolina Dental Society before production is started 
or funds committed. The $250 is to be used to purchase ADA 
publication (Career in Dentistry) and other materials for public 
relations programs. 

3. That the purpose and function of this committee, in relation to 
other committees with possible overlapping purpose and function, 
be defined more clearly by the House of Delegates. 

4. While this report in preliminary form (less cited recommen- 
dations) has been transmitted to all members of the Committee, 
the chairman does not have Committee approval of this report at 
this time. This revised report will be sent to each of the Com- 
mittee members for their further review and comment. 



Military 

Affairs 

Committee 



Elliott R. Motley, Chairman 

E. L. Eatman 

J. R. Edwards, Jr. 

Jack L. Raymer 

W. T. Burns 



As Chairman of the Military Affairs Committee, I wish to report 
that during the last year, since there was no call made on this committee 
and since the committee saw no reason for action, this committee has 
remained inactive. 

In future years, for the sake of clarity and understanding, it is 
recommended that the duties of this committee be distinctly outlined, 
since there is some confusion as to the function of this committee. 



Advisory 

Coramittee 

to the 

School Health 

Coordinating 

Service 



Z. L. Edwards, Chairman 

M. H. Truluck 

Ralph Falls 

W. B. Sherrod 

Guy Willis 

Sam Bobbitt 

Paul Fitzgerald 



During the past year this committee continued its study of the 
School Health Program and the policies under which it has been and is 
now administered. We feel that it would be an unnecessary reiteration 
of our previous findings and recommendations to restate them at this 
time. If you have read the reports of this committee in the past you will 
recall that we have repeatedly called to the attention of the responsible 
heads of the School Health Coordinating Service instances of abuses, 
extravagance and duplication of services of other agencies of Govern- 
ment. At the sam.e time we made recommendations which, in our humble 
opinion, were designed to provide more services for less money, elimi- 
nate many opportunities for abuses, revitalize the spirit of community 
responsibility, and, in the end, to bring about some semblance of stabil- 
ity and harmony out of a state of chaos and confusion. 

In spite of our humble pleadings and honest protestations during 
the past three years, in so far as we are aware, there have been few 
changes, if any, in administrative policies during the past fiscal year. 
However, if we read correctly the signs that have recently appeared 
upon the horizon of reality we are bound to conclude that there is being 
experienced at this hour an acute awakening within the mental processes 
of those who have heard but would not listen; those who have seen but 
would not believe. 

At the time this report is written we do not know what the final 
decision of the Legislature will be with respect to the amount of the 
appropriation, or the rules and stipulations that may be adopted for the 
purpose of governing the expenditure of funds. At one time the Sub 
Committee on Appropriations voted to cut the usual appropriation of 
$550,000.00 for each year of the biennium and to transfer the funds to 
the budget of the State Board of Health where, in our judgment, the 
funds and the authority to administer the program should be. Later, as 
a result of pressure from the State Education Department the committee 
voted to restore most of the funds and let the program be administered 
as is. This action on the part of the Sub Appropriations Committee, 
together with the many searching questions asked concerning the pro- 
gram strongly indicate that many of our law makers are not too happy 



181 



182 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

over the way the program has been administered. Some members of the 
General Assembly were in favor of abolishing the program; others were 
in favor of reducing the funds by one half and transferring them to the 
budget of the State Board of Health, while many were in favor of 
reducing the amount of the funds and then stipulating in the appropria- 
tions act some rules governing the expenditures. Regardless of what the 
final decision by the Legislature is the responsible heads of the School 
Health Coordinating Service should take warning that during the next 
biennium the program will be on trial as never before, and unless 
immediate steps are taken to revise their present planning of expansion 
and to adopt policies designed to eliminate abuses, extravagant spending 
of the funds, and the duplication of services, the School Health Program 
that we have known heretofore will become only an unpleasant memory 
at the end of the next biennium. You will note that this varying degree 
of opposition and dissatisfaction with the program prevailing among 
members of the General Assembly resulted in spite of the fact that only 
those who favored the present program appeared before the Appropria- 
tions Committee, and of course, reserved for themselves the privilege of 
withholding the bad features of the program. This committee has before 
it facts that justify the conclusion that had some of those who are 
familiar with the administration of the program availed themselves of 
the privilege of appearing before the Appropriations Committee and 
giving the true facts that final decision of this Legislature would be 
quite different. It has been the earnest and sincere hope of this com- 
mittee that in calling attention to the many weaknesses of the program 
that the administrative heads of the School Health Coordinating Service 
would revise their planning and initiate a reform in administrative 
policies before the Legislature felt compelled to do it for them by 
incorporating in the Appropriations Act certain specific rules and 
regulations, however, like in the Biblical days of the Old Prophet Isaiah 
our pleadings have been ignored. Consequently, it is our guess that the 
time may come soon, even sooner than we expected, when the adminis- 
trative heads and those who participate in the program in a professional 
capacity will not have as wide a latitude in the formulation of policies 
and working arrangements as we have had heretofore. 

Now, in fairness to all concerned it must be admitted that those who 
have provided the professional services should share some of the blame. 
Too many of our own members have refused to participate except on a 
"Do as you please plan of operation," or on a fee basis satisfactory to 
them, notwithstanding prior unanimous recommendations of this society. 
It must be remembered that this committee is not an enforcement agency. 
We merely seek to do our duty in making an honest effort to report 
correctly our findings and recommendations. Whether or not the mem- 
bers of the North Carolina Dental Society see fit to approve, adopt, or 
abide by the recommendations is a privilege which the members of this 
committee would deny no one. We have tried to emphasize the fact 
that it would be more desirable to all concerned for us to have the 
privilege of working under a fair and mutually acceptable state-wide 
voluntary plan than it would be under the red tape and rules forced upon 
us by Legislative enactment. 

In closing this report we wish to take notice of a press report 
attributed to our State Health Officer who is one of the two responsible 
heads of the School Health Coordinating Service. In his report to the 
North Carolina Medical Society here at Pinehurst two weeks ago he is 
reported to have compared those of us who have criticized the School 
Health Program with those who were originally opposed to vaccinations 
and other Public Health preventive measures. What our esteemed State 
Health Officer seems to have overlooked is the fact that the discovery 
of the effects of small pox vaccination, typhoid inoculation, diphtheria 
immunization and even the Salk vaccine were results of long and pains- 
taking study and scientific research, working in laboratories with test 
tubes and microscopes. In the case of the present school health program 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 183 

it requii-es no test tube or microscope, except that of personal experience 
and observation, to discover the bad planning and the unwise policies 
that have characterized the program during the past five years. We 
feel that this "shrug of the shoulder" attitude of the policy makers in 
not being willing to admit mistakes and to accept suggestions from those 
whose only motives are to be helpful in making the program a success 
is most regrettable. 



Centennial 
Committee 



Frank 0. Alford, Chairman 

J. Martin Fleming, Co-Chairman 



The committee met Sunday afternoon with the following members 
present: Drs. Carey Wells, J. Martin Fleming, Fred Hale, Alex Pearson, 
Frank Atwater and Frank Alford. 

The purpose of the meeting was to arrange plans for the Centennial 
meeting of the North Carolina Dental Society. It was decided to explore 
the possibilities for the Centennial meeting, and the following sugges- 
tions were offered. 

1. Show pictures on a screen of the eight original founders. 

2. Make program interesting, quick and snappy. 

3. Have a thirty minute talk on "A Century of Service." 

4. Have a thirty minute talk on "A Century of Dentistry." 

5. Contact Kay Kyser and try to encourage his participation in 
the program. 

6. Have a ventriloquist to go through the audience to add life to 
the entertainment. 

7. Ask the Dental Auxiliary to put on a skit using costumes of 
1850 to 1860. 

8. Contact an artist about possibilities of a mural of the progress 
of dentistry, or possibly a painting of the eight original foun- 
ders, to later be hung in the Dental School of the University. 

9. Have costumes of whiskers and mustaches for all members to 
wear to add color to the program. 

10. Engage a good band for dinner and dance, dance to be co. tume 
of that period. 

11. Have Glee Club sing old songs of the period. 

12. There is a promise of exhibits from two of the older dental 
schools in this section. S. S. White has promised to send a 
suitable exhibit, provided we will insure it and have someone 
appointed to take care of it. Unpack it, display it, crate it and 
send it back to them. They will pay transportation, but do not 
have personnel to send along to take care of it. 

13. It was thought we might contact the laboratories and supply 
houses and get a stamp published, or some stickers for them to 
use on their stationery. I do not know what the possibilities 
are of getting the Government to put out a memorial postage 
stamp, but congressmen will be contacted regarding this. 

14. Investigate the possibilities of getting Andy Griffith for the 
program. 



184 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

15. Work with the Entertainment Committee in working out plans 
for the meeting. 

16. If possible, set up an operating room of 1860 and one of today 
as contrast. 

17. If there are any members of the Dental Society who have 
skits they can put on we would like to know who they are and 
see if we can work them in to any advantage on this program. 

As you know the North Carolina Dental Society has appropriated 
$3,000 to put on this program. We could not take it all out of the budget 
in one year, so $1000 has already been put aside, another $1000 will be 
allocated for the program this year, and next year another $1000 will 
be added. We ought to have a pretty good program for that amount of 
money. Perhaps it will not take that much. We hope it will not. 

The committee will meet again in July, and after these possibilities 
have been explored we hope something definite will be decided and the 
program pretty well shaped up at that time. 



Extension 

Course 

Committee 



W. W. Demeritt, Chairman 

L. M. Massey 

D. L. Henson 

J. F. Burket 

Pearce Roberts 

J. C. Farthing 



The Extension Course Committee, working through the School of 
Dentistry and its Dean, Dr. John C. Brauer, concentrated on the estab- 
lishment of an extension course to train dental assistants. 

Realizing that there are many areas in the state that do not permit 
the establishment of courses for dental assistants that would qualify 
them for certification, the Committee felt that an extension program 
for those areas would be desirable. 

This program for the extension training of dental assistants has now 
been completed and was fully approved by the American Association of 
Dental Assistants at their National Meeting in Miami, Florida, last 
November. 

There are now 90 dental assistants who have completed or are taking 
advantage of this extension training. 

Recommendation: The Committee recommends that the State 
Dental Society further publicize to the dentists of the more rural areas 
the fact that such training is now available to their dental assistants and 
to girls that are desirous of becoming dental assistants. 






Fluoridation 
Committee 



Pearce Roberts, Chairman 
T. E. Sikes, Jr. 
W. Stewart Peery 
Fred Hunt 
E. D. Baker 



During the 1954 meeting of the North Carolina Dental Society, Dr. 
John C. Brauer, Chairman of the Fluoridation and Public Relations 
Committee brought to the members attention the formation of a corpora- 
tion "The Fluoridation Educational Society of the Carolinas, Inc." At 
that time we knew that this corporation with substantial financial back- 
ing had as its objective a campaign for the removal of Fluorides from 
communal water supplies in North Carolina. During the past year we 
have watched this organization at work noting how effective its cam- 
paign was in Greensboro by influencing the people to vote in November 
1954 the discontinuance of Fluoridation after two years successful 
operation. We also observed how effectively the dental society members 
of Charlotte prevented a similar occurrence in their city. 

With a victory in Greensboro the group has begun their campaign 
in Greenville, South Carolina, promising a similar campaign in Hickory. 

Your Fluoridation Committee has adopted a defensive role this year 
in addition to an offensive role. This being necessary because of the 
rapid growth of anti-Fluoridation groups in our state. 

We realize that the dental profession cannot compete with these 
groups in their fanatical appeal to the people, we do believe as Dr. 
Ernest Branch so well stated, "That the right will eventually prevail." 
As a result we have suggested through each district president that each 
member of our Society avail himself with the scientific facts on Fluori- 
dation so that he will be correctly informed. He should then inform each 
of his patients of these facts, at the same time exposing the anti- 
Fluoridation groups and members for what they are and represent. To 
see that the public has access to the scientific information on Fluorida- 
tion, we are suggesting that all public libraries in North Carolina have 
in their files material on Fluoridation compiled by the American Dental 
Association. 

"Comments on the Opponents of Fluoridation" 

"Science vs. Fanaticism: A report of the Hearing of the Weir Bill." 

The Toledo Blade publication on Fluoridation and the book Fluoridation 
as a Public Health Measure by the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science should all be reviewed by proponents of 
Fluoridation as should the Ten Year Grand Rapids Fluoridation Study. 

Nationally, there are approximately 20,283,000 persons now receiving 
Fluoridated water and 1,032 communities have the program in operation. 
During November seven communities voted out Fluoridation, Greens- 
boro, North Carolina, being one of the seven. 

Financial — 

An adequate amount was appropriated by the executive committee 
to secure and distribute fluoridation material. This was done and 

185 



186 COMMITTEE REPORTS 

material has and is being distributed throughout the state under the 
guidance of our Fluoridation Committee. 

NOTE: $246.65 of the $1000, appropriated was spent by the committees. 

The members of the committee believe that a Fluoridation Commit- 
tee should be appointed for the next year. It is essential that a group 
of members of the dental profession have knowledge of the most current 
information regarding fluoridation both state and nation wide. Only 
by having a committee appointed specifically are we sure that we as a 
profession in North Carolina can fully endorse and propose a Fluorida- 
tion program. 

During the past year your committee spent hours acquainting them- 
selves with this subject, also in obtaining material from every town in 
North Carolina over 15,000 population to determine the status of Fluori- 
dation and now a permanent file has been started. We believe it wise 
to have one or two members of this committee retained so that the work 
begun this year can be continued in addition to the plans of the com- 
mittee next year, thereby having a better informed committee that can 
cope with situations that may arise regarding Fluoridation. 

During this year the Public Relations Committee has stood by, 
ready to furnish speakers to defend or propose Fluoridation. This has 
proven a very valuable support and should be continued. 

Attached for reference and information is a copy of letters sent 
to all district presidents and copies of the most current information 
available on Fluoridation. 

Dear Sir: 

During the past months the Fluoridation Committee of the North 
Carolina Dental Society has been formulating plans that may be of aid 
to all members of the North Carolina Dental Society and eventually 
to all citizens of North Carolina. The members desire to acquaint all 
of our North Carolina members with the information we have acquired 
through study. If every one would acquaint themselves with the 
scientific data concerning "Fluoridation of Communal Water Supplies" 
we feel that every town and city would adopt this program thereby 
reducing dental decay, much pain and suffering and the dental care cost. 

We know it is impossible to contact each member of the North 
Carolina Dental Society so we are suggesting the following to all the 
District presidents: 

1. It might be helpful if each District president would appoint a 
Fluoridation Chairman, and he in turn appoint a committee in each city 
and town in his district. In this way the committee appointed locally 
could see the local needs regarding Fluoridation, could educate their 
local groups supplying them with information knowing that the state 
Committee is ready to offer assistance at any time. 

2. If all of the citizens had been truthfully informed in Greens- 
boro, it is felt that Fluoridation would not have been discontinued. To 
avoid additional pitfalls the public should have access to information 
through their local libraries. We have Fluoridation material to furnish 
libraries in this state if the request is made directly to Dr. Pearce 
Roberts, City Building. Asheville, North Carolina. 

3. Realizing that an uninformed group can be a dangerous group 
we further suggest that copies of the following material be obtained by 
your district and local committees for information and education. 

A. "Comments on the Opponents of Fluoridation" (American 
Dental Association, 222 East Superior Street, Chicago 11, Illinois.) 

B. "Science vs. Fanaticism: A Report of the Hearing on the Weir 
Bill to Prohibit Fluoridation" by Claire Danziger. (Can be obtained 
from the American Dental Association) 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 



187 



C. "Toledo Blade" Publication, Wednesday, May 26, 1954, Thurs- 
day, May 27, 1954, and Friday, May 28, 1954. (Can be obtained from the 
American Dental Association.) 

D. ''Watsonville California, Register-Pajoronia and Sun," Friday, 
June 4, 1954. (Can be obtained from the American Dental Association.) 

E. "Facts You Should Know About Fluoridation," North Carolina 
State Board of Health, Division of Oral Hygiene, Raleigh, N. C. 

"Fluorides and Teeth," North Carolina State Board of Health, 
Division of Oral Hygiene, Raleigh, N. C. 

F. "Fluoridation, As A Public Health Measure" by the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science. 

G. Fluoridation kits, from the American Dental Association. 

Your committee feels that if all patients are educated to the value 
of Fluoridation there will be few opponents to this health measure. 
This will have to be begun by the individual himself with assistance 
from his local, district and state fluoridation groups. Your state com- 
mittee can furnish you with all the latest developments concerning 
Fluoridation and will be willing at all times to assist with any problems 
that may arise locally. 

Enclosed are informative copies that we hope will be of value. 

Dr. Pearce Roberts, Chairman 
Fluoridation Committee 
North Carolina Dental Society 



Industrial 

Cominission 

Committee 



Sam Towler, Chairman 

W. S. Griffin 

A. T. Lockwood 

0. R. Hodgin 

W. H. Price 

Marcus Smith 



The members of the Industrial Commission Committee of the North 
Carolina Dental Society met with the North Carolina Industrial Com- 
mission, at which time they agreed to change the dental fees to the fees 
paid by the Veterans Administration with only two or three exceptions, 
which were of minor importance. 

I feel there are no recommendations to be made at this time, I know 
of no changes to be made now or in the future. 



Children's 

Dental 

Health Week 

Committee 



W. W. Demeritt, Chairman 
E. A. Branch, Honorary Chairman 
Pearce Roberts F. C. Slaughter 
J. B. Freedland D. L. Henson 

W. K. Griffin T. G. Collins 
L. H. Paschal F. G. Harris 

Frank Atwater Z. L. Edwards, Jr. 
Howard Payne R. B. Barden 

E. McK. Hester D. G. Frye 



"As Chairman of your Children's Dental Health Week Committee, I 
will try and act as coordinator and the central supply and information 
center for the organization of the week and to supply material to the 
committee members of a type that will fit their particular aroa. 

I feel certain that there is no one plan that will work successfully 
in all cities of North Carolina, therefore, the following attack is sug- 
gested to each committee member. 

The committee member should enlist the aid of as many dentists 
as possible in his respective area to serve with him in selecting as many 
of the following suggested programs and in putting them into effect. 

1. Poster Contest in the Schools 

2. Radio Programs 

(a) Panels 

(b) Speakers 

(c) Spot Announcements 

3. TV Programs 

(a) Informal Panels with Lay Moderator 

(b) Spot Announcements 

4. Essay Contest on Dental Health 

5. Proclamation by Mayor 

6. Newspaper Articles 

7. Dental Society Meeting of Local Dentists with Publicity 

Just as soon as the type of program to be used is selected, the 
information concerning the specific requests for material will be 
furnished to you by checking the enclosed list and mailing it to me. 

If you can return your request to me by January 1, I will make every 
effort to send you the necessary information by January 7. This will 
permit you one month to put your plans into effect. 

Any suggestions for developing this Children's Health Week into 
a great state-wide program would be appreciated." 

The response to this letter from the members was excellent. This 
information, when compiled, gave me the information that I needed to 
supply their various requests. 



188 



COMMITTEE REPORTS 189 

The American Dental Association was contacted and they furnished 
me, free of charge, with a great deal of very fine information and 
material, which I forwarded to the members of the Committee. 

The Wilmington area, under the leadership of Dr. Barden, requested 
additional ADA material. The cost for this material was $8.10. Stamps 
and envelopes cost $1.60. Thus the total cost to the State Dental Society 
was $9.70. A budget of $100 was allotted for this program. The above 
costs were paid by the Chairman of the Committee. 

The work done by the Committee members was outstanding in many 
areas of the state and they are to be congratulated. 

Recovnneridations 

1. That this type of committee become a standing committee of 
the State Society in order that work and planning can start 
much earlier in the year. 

2. That the budget of $100 be appropriated for committee use. 

3. That the committee members be selected, whenever possible 
from the membership of the North Carolina Unit, American 
Society of Dentistry for Children. 



RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE REPORT 

Dr. Breeland, Chairman: The Resolutions Committee does not concur in 
Recommendation 1 for three reasons: 

First, the recommendation claims it would give them more time to 
get their work together. We cannot agree with that because this com- 
mittee is appointed for the term of this meeting. They will have approxi- 
mately eight months to get their work together. We do not think it 
should be made a standing committee, because it constitutes a change 
in the Constitution and By-Laws of this Society. We recommend it be 
left just as it now is, as a special committee. 

In regard to Recommendation 2: We recommend that this be left 
to the judgment of the Executive Committee, as it should be in regard 
to all financial questions. 

Recommendation 3: We heartily endorse this recommendation 
because we feel the president will always appoint those fellows who are 
most interested and who belong to the American Society of Dentistry 
for Children. 



Superintendent 

of Clinics 

Committee 



Donald W. Morris, Chairman 

Robert L. Smith 

IVI. E. Walker 

W. M. Byrd 

H. C. Harrelson 

B. F. Edwards 

J. M. Zealy 



Thirty-one table clinics, an increase of six over last year, have been 
procured to help make the Ninety-Ninth meeting of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society the largest and best ever. 

Permanent signs of plyboard are being made to designate each table 
clinic by number to correspond with the number given each table 
clinic in the program. 

Stands for holding the numbered signs will be stored at the Hotel, as 
well as the signs, for use at our next meeting. 



Entertainment of 

Out-of-State 

Visitors 

Committee 



Dan Wright, Chairman 

D. L. Belvin 

B. R. Morrison 

G. F. Kirkland 

T. W. Atwood 

H. Edwin Plaster 



The activities of this committee up to this time have been very 
limited. The chairman attended the meeting in January of the Executive 
committee and chairmen of other committees to coordinate the activities 
of the annual State meeting. The planned activities of the committee are: 

1. To write to and meet all clinicians and distinguished guests. 

2. To assign one member of the committee to one clinician or V.I. P. 
to minister to his wishes as to solid or liquid intake, and recrea- 
tion of athletic nature, and to see that he does none of these alone. 

3. To maintain a sitting-room-bar to be open at all strategic times. 

4. Cocktail party before banquet. 

5. To see that each clinician or V.I.P. gets home by plane, train, bus 
or car. 

Recommendations: None. 



190 



Library 

and 

History 

Committee 



H. W. Thompson, Chairnidii 
B. McK. Johnson 
M. R. Hunter 
Paul Fitzgerald 
J. Z. Moreland 



Books on hand 5-19-54 


86 


Books sold 


5 


Complimentary Copies 


2 


Total books on hand 3-26-55 


79 


Bank balance July 1953 


$52.75 


Proceeds 5 books 


$15.00 



Total balance $67.75 

The committee has decided to turn over to the North Carolina Dental 
Society a check in the amount of $50.00. The committee intends to have 
copies of the History of our Society for sale at the registration desk at 
our Pinehurst meeting. 



191 






*^*:r%* 



%*:v*.^». 



i<'i ' 'r 




Left lo right are Dr. E. A. Branch, Director of the Division of Oral Hygiene, 
State Board of Health; Dr. J. Martin Fleming, historian of the North Carolina 
Dental Society and Dr. C. W. Banner of Greensboro, oldest living past president 
of the Soceity. Dr. Banner, now retired, came especially to attend the annual 
banquet at which all living past presidents were honored. 



192 



NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE BOARD OF 
DENTAL EXAMINERS 



194 DENTAL EXAMINERS 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD 

OF DENTAL EXAMINERS 

OFFICERS 

PRESIDENT 

Dr. E. M. Medlin Aberdeen, N. C. 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 
Dr. Frank O. Alford Charlotte, N. C. 

MEMBERS 

Dr. Darden J. Eure Morehead City, N. C. 

Dr. A. T. Jennette Washington, N. C. 

Dr. W. M. Matheson Boone, N. C. 

Dr. Cleon W. Sanders Benson, N. C. 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DENTAL EXAMINERS 

February 14. 1955 
Honorable Luther Hodges 

Governor of North Carolina 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dear Sir: 

In accordance with the provision of the Dental Law I wish to hand 
you herewith a report of the proceedings of the North Carolina State 
Board of Dental Examiners for the calendar year 1954. 

Three meetings of the Board have been held during the year. 

The first special meeting was held in Pinehurst, North Carolina, on 
May 18, 1954, for the purpose of outlining plans for the 1954 examina- 
tions, to be held in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, beginning June 28, 1954 
and to dispose of any other business coming before the Board. 

All members of the Board were present. 

A Report was read that one Dr. H. F. Baity was practicing near 
Mocksville, N. C, without license. This man was at one time licensed 
to practice dentistry in this state, but after moving to Tennessee several 
years ago he had failed to renew his license and at present time is 
unlicensed in North Carolina. The Secretary was instructed to investi- 
gate this report to ascertain the facts in the case and take whatever 
action necessary. On investigation, sufficient evidence to bring about 
conviction was unobtainable so far. 

The Secretary reported that a permanent restraining order has 
been obtained against one Frank Roberts of Asheville, N. C, who had 
been guilty of practicing dentistry without a license. This order was 
obtained in Buncombe County Superior Court, signed bv Judge Zeb V. 
Nettles, on March 13, 1954. 

The Secretary reported on the investigation of the case against one 
Everett Floyd, Lexington, N. C, who had been reported to be practic- 
ing dentistry without a license. One affidavit was obtained in this case 
by the investigator, but upon persuing the matter further it was lecirned 
that the violation was over three years old and the statute of limitations 
would prevail. 

The Board voted to meet in Chapel Hill, at the Carolina Inn. Satur- 
day afternoon, June 26, 1954, at 2:00 o'clock to examine applications 
for examination June 28, 1954. 

New Grade sheets for the examiners, giving more detailed infor- 
mation on the grades w^as discussed. Not having time to change these 
sheets for the 1954 examination, it was decided to attempt to make 
this change for the 1955 examination. 

The Board voted to change the examination scheduled for Tuesday 
morning at 9:00 o'clock to Wednesday evening at 8:00 o'clock thereby 
giving more time for the clinical examinations on Tuesday. 



DENTAL EXAMINERS 



195 



The second matter was the seventv-fourth regular annual meeting, 
held at the Carolina Inn. Chapel Hill, N. C, June 26, 1954, for the purpose 
of examining applications of the applicants to be examined beginning 
June 28, 1954, and to dispose of any other business coming before the 
Board. 

All Members of the Board were present. 

One hundred and eighteen applications for the dental examination 
and twelve applications for the dental hygiene examination were exam- 
ined and found in order. The apclicants having complied with the 
requirements of the North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners 
and the dental law of North Carolina were permitted to take the exam- 
ination. Applicants No. 10, Robert Sims Moulton and No. 102, Pratt 
Ringland withdrew from the dental examination. Applicant No. 8-H, 
Avis Louise Fellows failed to be present for the dental hygiene examina- 
tion. 

The written examinations were held in the auditorium of the 
Medical School and the clinical examinations were held in the Dental 
School of the University of North Carolina. The examinations started 
promptly at 9:00 o'clock, Monday morning, June 28, 1954 and continued 
until Friday at noon, July 2, 1954. 

The third meeting of the Board was held at the Sir Walter Hotel, 
Raleigh, North Carolina, beginning at 2:00 o'clock P. M., July 24, 1954, 
for the purpose of canvassing the grades of the applicants exammed at 
the School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, beginning Monday, 
June 28, 1954 and to transact any other business coming before the 
Board. 

All members of the Board were present. 

A letter from Dr. E. A. Branch, Director of Division of Oral 
Hygiene, State Board of Health was read, explaining the need for 



r^^ 



siKS^Sk 




Members of the Pierre Fauchard Academy line up for pictures following 
their get-together at Pinehurst. 



196 



DENTAL EAMINERS 



dental personnel by this division. Dr. Branch was invited to come before 
the Board and explain his problem. This conference revealed that some 
of the unlicensed help which he had been employing, under the provi- 
sions of the dental law, was not a solution to the problem. The Board 
felt that this unlicensed help was merely using this employment with 
a feeling that it was an aid to secure license, or as a source of employ- 
ment until they could secure license and open an office, without regard 
for the welfare of the Division of Oral Hygiene. At present, the Board 
has approved three men for his employment under this provision. 

License No. 1935, issued June 28, 1948 to Dr. A. R. Tannenbaum of 
Alexandria, Va., was reinstated, after a thorough investigation of his 
activities since the license was issued. 

The Secretary was instructed to investigate several reported viola- 
tions of the dental law and to make the necessary actions to prevent 
such violations and bring the violators to justice. 

The Board elected the following officers for the ensuing year: 

Dr. E. M. Medlin, President 

Dr. Frank O. Alford, Secretary-Treasurer 

Delegates to the North Carolina Dental Society: 

Dr. A. T. Jennette 

Dr. W. M. Matheson 

Delegates to the American Association of Dental Examiners: 

Dr. Frank O. Alford 

Dr. Cleon W. Sanders 

The Secretary-Treasurer was authorized to pay all bills in connec- 
tion with the examination and any other bills incident to the operation 
of his office. 

The results of the tabulation of the grades of the examination given 
beginning June 28, 1954, in Chapel Hill, N. C, revealed the following 
applicants for dental licensure, having made an average of 80 or more, 
were issued license to practice dentistry in North Carolina. 

Name Address License No. 



-Tohn Hoyt French 
George Grundy Dudney 
Wm. A. Myantt 
Paul Mahn Cummings 
Harold Swain Lanier 
Wm. Hawley Powell 
Wm. Edney Harris 
Billy Jean Christian 
Wm. Waymon King 
Samuel McKee Cannon 
John Douglas Hartness 
Charles Henry Beck 
Wm. A. Jarrell 
Anton John Hejl 
Roger Evans Barton 
Robert Harrison Hull 
Robert Benton Litton 
Don David Hyatt 
Thomas Hutchinson Roach 
Camerson Hazel Keels 
Carl Lee Johnson 
Eastwood Giggs Turlington 
Tedd Lowell Harper 
Ludwig Gaston Scott 
George L. Edwards 
Dwight Beam Hord 
James Alonzo Leg^ette 
Wm. Francis Fowler 



Greenback, Tenn. 2271 

Gainsboro, Tenn. 2272 

Memphis, Tenn. 2273 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 2274 

Welcome, N. C. 2275 

Canton, N. C. 2276 

Harrisburg, N. C. 2277 

White Plains, N. C. 2278 

Anderson, S. C. 2279 

Gastonia, N. C. 2280 

Sanford, N .C. 2281 

Lenoir, N. C. 2282 

Charlotte, N. C. 2283 

Chagrin Falls, Ohio 2284 

Allentown, Pa. 2285 

Charlotte, N. C. 2286 

Shelby, N. C. 2287 

Rose Hill, Va. 2288 

Lowell, N. C. 2289 

McColl, S. C. 2290 

Greensboro, N. C. 2291 

Dunn, N. C. 2292 

Iowa City, Iowa 2293 

Burlington, N. C. 2294 

Kinston, N. C. 2295 

Lawndale, N. C. 2296 

Williamston, N. C. 2297 

King, N. C. 2298 



DENTAL EXAMINERS 



197 



James Alexander Foust 
Herman Eugine Bolinger 
Ira Leon McGill 
Curtis Ray Holmes 
Joseph Milton Johnson 
David Stone Jackson 
George Graham Patterson 
Stanford Harris 
Almond Dwight Price 
Norman Joseph Hollj^ 
Lawrence Angus Cameron 
Barry Green Miller 
Grigsby Gordon Browning 
Robert Earl Furr 
Earl Raymond Dolbee 
Ferby Glen Gaither 
Carnie Clayton Gooding 
John Temple Gobbell 
Cecil Rhodes Lupton 
Dwight Lanier Clark 
Alexander Jones Biddell 
George Stevens Johnson 
Mett Bagley Ausley 
Donald Ray Draughon 
Zyba Kathryn Massey 
James Boyd Lewis 
Julian Richard Cooley 
Lloyd Butler Stanley 
Lewis Wells Lee 
Henry Otis Lineberger 
Alan Leonard Stoddard 
Willis Kenneth Young 
John Earl Crisp 
Thomas Carrol Boykin 
Robert Lee Daniel 
Erastus G. Bumgardner, jr. 
Sydnor Lorenzo Stealey 
Clyde Newton McCall 
Albert Vernon Coble 
LeRoy Koonce Heath 
Linzy Price Megginson 
Thomas Andrew Blum 
Arthur Chester Riddle 
James Sylvester Davidson 
Sumter DeL. Lowry Camp 
George Stephen Panky 
Richard Francis Scherer 
Julian George Moore 
Sidney Dean Peterson 
Cecil B. Hall 
Cecil Frederick Harless 
Gene Lewis Reese 
AJbert Purcell Cline 
Bruce Wadsworth Higley 
Charles Willson Hughes 



Graham, N. C. 2299 

Memphis, Tenn. 2300 

Orangeburg, S. C. 2301 

Fayetteville, N. C. 2302 

Sanford, N. C. 2303 

Clinton, N. C. 2304 

Burlington, N. C. 2305 

Asheville, N. C. 2306 

Clinton, N. C. 2307 

Lynnfield, Mass. 2308 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 2309 

Statesville, N. C. 2310 

Dry Ridge, Ky. 2311 

Wilmington, N. C. 2312 

Hendersonville, N. C. 2313 

Harmony, N. C. 2314 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 2315 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 2316 

Swan Quarter, N. C. 2317 

Asheville, N. C. 2318 

Pembroke, N. C. 2319 

Bellmore, N. Y. 2320 

Micro, N. C. 2321 

Durham, N. C. 2322 

Zebulon, N. C. 2323 

Gastonia, N. C. 2324 

Charlotte, N. C. 2325 

Angler, N. C. 2326 

Dunn, N. C. 2327 

Raleigh, N. C. 2328 

Chadbourne, N. C. 2329 

Lexington, N. C. 2330 

Bryson City, N. C. 2331 

Simms, N. C. 2332 

Reidsville, N. C. 2333 

Columbia, S. C. 2334 

Wake Forest, N. C. 2335 

Forest City, N. C. 2336 

Burlington, N. C. 2337 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 2338 

Shelbv, N. C. 2339 

Chapel Hill. N. C. 2340 

Erwin, Tenn. 2341 

Charlotte, N. C. 2342 

Miami, Fla. 2343 

Jacksonville, N. C. 2344 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 2345 

Erwin, Tenn. 2346 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 2347 

Thomasville, N. C. 2348 

Sanford, N. C. 2349 

Boone, N. C. 2350 

Canton, N. C. 2351 

Iowa City, Iowa 2352 

Roxboro, N. C. 2353 



The following applicants for dental hygiene license, having made an 
average of 80 or more, were issued license to practice dental hygiene in 
North Carolina: 



Name 


Address 


License No 


Jayne Marie Collett 


Trinity, N. C. 


59 


Kathleen Dolores Leskosky 


Springdale, Pa. 


60 


Cynthia Seabron Milner 


Charlotte, N. C. 


61 



198 



DENTAL EXAMINERS 



Peggy Anne Everett 
Carolyn Louise Bullock 
Betty Jean Patterson 
Shirley Louise Hunter 
Letitia C. Holmes Morris 
Inez Hope Owenby 
Grace Yvonne Hatherill 
Willadean Rose Eckerd 



Kinston, N. C. 62 

Spartanburg, S. C. 63 

Burlington, N. C. 64 

Derita, N. C. 65 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 66 

Greensboro, N. C. 67 

Guilford College, N. C. 68 

Conover, N. C. 69 



The following applicants for dental license, having made an average 
of less than 80, were declared to have failed the examination: 



Name 

Byron Browning Budd 
Wade Allison Hinson 
Herbert Hoover Hughes 
George James Gouvas 
John Edward Murray 
Charles Wilkes Bagley 
Russell Anthony Grandich 
Alfred Earl Gerrans 
Richard Plant 
William Harrison Woodford 
Howard Roberts Hobbs 
John H. McKenzie 
Thomas F. Castro 
Edgar Everette Edwards 
Charles Johnson Younger 
George Robert Reynolds 
Hugo Kossoff 
Arthur Herschaft 
Judson Augustus Davis 
Max K. Bloom 
Richard William Keller 
Philip Judah Spector 
John A. Crowley 
William Robinson Bagby 
James Q. Wenger 
Bazil Theodore Geckler 
David Marmoh 
Nancy Carroll Gannaway 
Ira Jones Adams 
Nelson Alexander Fain 
Frederick Allen Skinner 
Bernard Davis Agress 
Robert Melvin Phillips 



Address 

Woodbury, N. J. 
Monroe, N. C. 
Elizabethton, Tenn. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
Le Roy, N. Y. 
Lewisburg, Tenn. 
New Orleans, La. 
Balboa, Canal Zone 
Madison, Fla. 
Salisbury, N. C. 
Philadelphia, Penn. 
Brooksville, Fla. 
Charleston, W. Va. 
Snow Hill, N. C. 
Tampa, Fla. 
Quantico, Va. 
Greensboro, N. C. 
Flushing, N. Y. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Rowland, N. C. 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
New York, N. Y. 
Wilmington, N. C. 
Dyersburg, Tenn. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Danville, 111. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Reidsville, N. C. 
Kershaw, S. C. 
Rogersville, Tenn. 
Chicago, 111. 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Charlotte, N. C. 



The Board is investigating several cases of violations at present 
time and we hope to get evidence for conviction within the near future. 

I am enclosing herewith a financial statement of the Board of 
Dental Examiners as of January 1, 1954, to December 31, 1954, which 
was compiled by Certified Public Accountants. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank O. Alford, Sec. -Treasurer 
North Carolina State Board of 
Dental Examiners. 



DENTAL EXAMINERS 199 



AUDIT REPORT 

JANUARY 1, 1954 

to 

DECEMBER 31, 1954 

Prepared by 

DOMBHART AND HOLDEN 

Certified Public Accountants 

Commercial Bank Building 

Charlotte, N. C. 

February 2, 1955 



Dr. E. M. Medlin, President 

North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners 

Aberdeen, North Carolina 

Dear Sir: 

We have examined the balance sheet of the North Carolina State 
Board of Dental Examiners as of December 31, 1954 and the related 
statement of cash receipts and disbursements for the year then ended. 
Our examination was made in accordance with generally accepted audit- 
ing standards and accordingly included such tests of the accounting 
records and such other auditing procedures as we considered necessary 
in the circumstances. 

In our opinion, the accompanying balance sheet and the related 
statement of cash receipts and disbursements, present fairly the finan- 
cial position of the North Carolina State Board of Dental Examiners at 
December 31, 1954, and the result of its operations for the year then 
ended, in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles 
applied on a basis consistent with that of the preceding year. 

The following is an index of the Exhibits and Schedules contained 
herein: 

EXHIBIT A BALANCE SHEET AS AT DECEMBER 31, 1954 

EXHIBIT B CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR 
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1954 

Schedule A-1 Reconciliation of Cash — December 31, 1954 

Schedule B-1 Examination and Clinic Expenses for the year Ended 
December 31, 1954 

Schedule B-2 Per Diem and Travel Expenses for Year Ended 
December 31, 1954 

Respectfully submitted. 



DOMBHART AND HOLDEN 
Certified Public Accountants 

By /s/ Benjamin T. Holden 



200 DENTAL EXAMINERS 



BALANCE SHEET AS AT 
DECEMBER 31, 1954 



EXHIBIT A 



ASSETS 
CASH (Schedule A-1) 
On Hand: 

In Office $ 32,00 

In Bank: 

Union National Bank— Charlotte, N. C. 9,170.90 $9,202.90 

PROPERTY ACCOUNT 

Wire Recorder— 1950 $ 101.96 
Underwood Typewriter — 1951 110.00 

Cardvertiser — 1951 254.80 

Two Filing Cabinets— 1953 102.80 569.56 



TOTAL ASSETS $9,772.46 

LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS 

LIABILITIES $ -0- 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $ -0- 

SURPLUS 

Capital Fund Surplus $ 569.56 

Current Fund: 

Balance at January 1, 1954 $4,958.45 

Plus-Operating Surplus for Year 4,244.45 9,202.90 9,772.46 



TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS $9,772,46 



EXHIBIT B 
CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1954 

CASH BALANCE AT JANUARY 1. 1954 

Bank Balance 
Cash on Hand 
CASH RECEIPTS DURING YEAR 

1954 Dental Licenses Issued 

1955 Dental Licenses Issued 

1954 Hygienist Licenses Issued 

1955 Hygienist Licenses Issued 

1954 Dental Examination Fees 

1955 Dental Examination Fees 
1954 Hygienist Examination Fees 
Sale of Mailing List 
Reinstatement Fees 
Penalties for Late Application 

TOTAL CASH AVAILABLE $14,538.45 

CASH DISBURSEMENTS DURING YEAR 

Salaries: 

Dr. Frank O. Alford, Sec.-Treas. $500.00 

Mrs. Va. R. Rochelle, Ass't. Sec. 500.00 $1,000.00 





$4,953.45 




5.00 $ 4,958.45 


56 


$ 280.00 


1086 


5,430.00 


7 


14.00 


49 


98.00 


109 


3,280.00 


2 


60.00 


12 


240.00 




3.00 




150.00 




25.00 9,580.00 



DENTAL EXAMINERS 



201 



Per Diem & Travel Expense — State Board 



(Schedule B-2) 


1,776.50 




Examination & Clinic Exp. (Schedule B-1) 


758.99 




Postage 


171.64 




Stationery, Printing & Office Expense 


409.33 




Auditing 


50.00 




Telephone and Telegraph 


161.96 




Dues — American Association of Dental Examiners 


75.00 




Special Board Meeting — Room and Meals 


25.95 




Carolina Detective Service — Investigation 






Expense — Everett Floyd Case 


225.55 




Herschel S. Hawkins — Attorney's Fee — 






Frank Roberts Case 


311.20 




Printing 4,000 copies of Dental Law- 


246.83 




Printing Forms 1, 2 & 3 for Applications 


122.60 


5,335.55 


CASH BALANCE AT DECEMBER 31. 1954 






Bank Balance 


$9,170.90 




Cash on Hand 


32.00 


$9,202.90 




Schedule A- 1 


RECONCILIATION OF CASH 






DECEMBER 31, 1954 






CASH ON HAND 






In Office 




$ 32.00 


CASH IN BANK 






Union National Bank, Charlotte, N. C: 






Balance as per Bank Statement 


$9,210.34 




Less — Outstanding Checks: 






Number Amounl 






469 $15.00 






471 24.44 


39.44 


9,170.90 



TOTAL CASH AS SHOWN BY EXHIBIT A 



$9,202.90 



EXAMINATION AND CLINIC EXPENSES 
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1954 

Rooms, Meals and Incidentals for Board Members 

Secretarial Work and Expense 

Laundry Service 

Advertising for Free Clinic and Notices of Meeting 

Dental Supplies 

Printing 

Models for Clinic 

Room and Meals — Grading Applicants 

TOTAL EXAMINATION AND CLINIC EXPENSES 
AS SHOWN BY EXHIBIT B 



Schedule B-1 



386.76 
62.69 
15.00 
75.18 
24.44 
6.95 
87.60 

100.37 



$ 758.99 



202 DENTAL EAMINERS 

Schedule B-2 
PER DIEM AND TRAVEL EXPENSE 

YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1954 

Dr. Frank O. Alford: 
Per Diem 
Travel 
Meals 
Printing Examination Questions 



Dr. W. M. Matheson: 
Per Diem 
Travel 
Meals 
Printing Examination Questions 



Dr. Cleon W. Sanders: 
Per Diem 
Travel 
Meals 
Printing Examination Questions 



Dr. E. M. Medlin: 
Per Diem 
Travel 
Meals 
Printing Examination Questions 



Dr. A. T. Jennette: 
Per Diem 
Travel 
Meals 
Printing Examination Questions 



Dr. Darden J. Eure: 
Per Diem 
Travel 
Meals 
Printing Examination Questions 

TOTAL PER DIEM AND TRAVEL EXPENSE 
AS SHOWN BY EXHIBIT B 



$290.00 

46.00 

6.00 

7.00 


$ 349.00 


$250.00 

38.00 

4.00 

7.00 


299.00 


$250.00 

10.30 

4.00 

7.00 


271.30 


$250.00 

14.50 

4.00 

7.00 


275.50 


$250.00 

24.50 

4.00 

7.00 


285.50 


$250.00 

35.20 

4.00 

7.00 


296.20 




$1,776.50 



AUDIT 
REPORT 



204 



AUDIT 



AUDIT REPORT FOR YEAR ENDED MAY 31, 1955 

Morganton, North Carolina 
July 14, 1955 

The Officers and Directors 

North Carolina Dental Society 

Morganton, North Carolina 

Gentlemen: 

I have examined the books and vouchers of the North Carolina 
Dental Society for the fiscal year ended May 31, 1955. My report is sub- 
mitted herewith consisting of the following Exhibits and Schedules 
together with my comments hereon: 
Exhibit A Balance Sheet 

Exhibit B Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 
Schedule 1 Bank Reconciliation 
Schedule 2 1955 Meeting Expense 
Schedule 3 Bonds Held 
I confirmed cash in the bank and physically examined all bonds. 
Receipts were traced into the bank. Cancelled checks and paid bills were 
examined and found to be in good order. 

My examination was confined to the records maintained by the 
Secretary-Treasurer. Membership records and unpaid bills were not sub- 
mitted to me for examination. 

The records are maintained on a cash rather than an accrual basis. 
Members' arrears and liabilities, if any, consequently are not reflected in 
the balance sheet. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Graham S. DeVane 
Certified Public Accountant 



Morganton, North Carolina 
July 14, 1955 

The Officers and Directors 

North Carolina Dental Society 

Morganton, North Carolina 

Gentlemen: 

I have examined the records of the North Carolina Dental Relief 
Fund for the fiscal year ended May 31, 1955. These records were main- 
tained by Dr. Ralph Coffey. 

Following is a statement of receipts and disbursements. 

Bank Balance May 30, 1954 $2,943.35 

Receipts — 

ADA Share Christmas Seal Receipts $ 781.25 
Sale of Scrap 1,744.25 

Refund on Bonds 17.00 2,542.50 



Disbursements : 

ADA Special Relief Fund 
Bank Charges 



$5,485.85 



$ 2,730.00 

3.30 2,733.30 



Bank Balance May 31, 1955 $2,752.55 

The assets of the fund at May 31, 1955, were as follows, there being 
no record of any liabilities: 

Cash (Schedule 4) $ 2,752.55 

U.S. Treasury Bonds — Series F 

Maturity $13,950.00— Cost (Sch. 5) 10,295.00 



Total Assets 



$13,047.55 



AUDIT 



205 



Cash in bank was confirmed with the depository. The bonds were 
physically examined; the list of bonds is in Schedule 5. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Graham S. DeVane 
Certified Public Accountant 



North Carolina Dental Society 

Morganton, North Carolina 

Balance Sheet — General Fund 

May 31, 1955 

Assets 
Cash in Bank — Schedule 1 
U.S. Treasury Bonds— Schedule 3 — at cost 



Liabilities 



Net Worth 



North Carolina Dental Society 

Morganton, North Carolina 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 

For The Year Ended May 31, 1955 

Bank Balance June 1, 1954 



Exhibit A 



$ 5,655.55 
9,620.00 

$15,275.55 



$15,275.55 
Exhibit B 



$5,356.28 



Receipts — 






Membership Dues ADA Share Relief 


Other 


Total 


District No. 1 $ 3,903.00 $204.00 


$1,771.00 


$ 5,878.00 


District No. 2 4,658.50 241.00 


2,070.00 


6,969.50 


District No. 3 4,395.50 234.00 


1,886.00 


6,515.50 


District No. 4 3,070.30 167.00 


1,331.70 


4,569.00 


District No. 5 2,904.50 151.00 


1,140.00 


4,195.50 


$18,931.80 $997.00 


$8,198.70 


$28,127.50 


Sale of Exhibit Space — 1954 meeting 




4,490.00 


Refunds 




435.13 33,052.63 


Total Available Funds 


$38,408.91 


Disbursements 






American Dental Association 






Share of Dues 


$18,952.00 




Relief 


998.00 


$19,950.00 


Expenses — 






Salary — Secretary 


$ 341.77 




— Editor and Publisher 


500.00 




— Secretary and Treasurer 


250.00 




— District Secretaries 


125.00 




Reporting Service — 1954 Meeting 


539.78 




Printing Proceedings — 1954 Meeting 


2,105.90 




Stationery, Printing & Ofc. Expense 


1,189.86 




Committee Expense 


100.00 




Mimeograph Machine 


899.66 




Dental Foundation of N.C. 


55.00 




Guilford County Dental Group 


544.68 




Audit 


100.00 





206 AUDIT 



Medals 

Hotel bill — Greensboro 

Honorarium — John H. Dunche, Jr. 

Refunds 

1955 Meeting Expense 

Directory 


81.66 

104.77 

90.00 

148.50 

5,620.78 

6.00 


12,803.36 


Total Disbursements 




32,753.36 


k Balance May 31, 1955 


$ 5,655.55 
Schedule 1 



North Carolina Dental Society 
Morganton, North Carolina 

Bank Reconciliation — General Fund 
May 31, 1955 

State Bank of Burke, Morganton, N. C. 

Balance per bank statement May 31, 1955 $7,840.25 

Add: Deposits in transit $ 550.50 

1,469.19 

31.00 2,050.69 



Less: Outstanding checks 



$9,890.94 



Numbei 


Payee 


Amount 


272 


Dr. W. T. Burns 


$ 5.00 


375 


Dr. Lewis Fox 


40.48 


380 


Todd's Flowers, Inc. 


103.00 


381 


Pinehurst, Inc. 


30.90 


384 


Hemmers Photo Shop 


36.00 


387 


Dr. C. Z. Candler 


25.00 


388 


Dr. Riley E. Spoon 


25.00 


389 


Dr. W. T. Burns 


25.00 


390 


Dr. J. M. Pringle 


25.00 


397 


ADA 


20.00 


398 


ADA 


1.00 


399 


Shepard Decorating Co. 


572.00 


400 


Charlotte Linen Service 


5.41 


401 


The Carolina 


1,157.07 


403 


ADA 


40.00 


404 


ADA 


2.00 


405 


Artistic Letter Shop 


62.10 


406 


Cooper D. Cass Co. 


2.75 


407 


ADA 


150.50 


408 


ADA 


9.00 


409 


ADA 


220.00 


410 


ADA 


11.00 


411 


ADA 


938.50 


412 


ADA 


56.00 


413 


Dr. W. T. Burns 


31.00 


414 


Carolina Typewriter Co. 


4.64 


415 


Chas. G. Poteat 


2.75 


416 


The Book Store 


16.42 


417 


Pound and Moore Co. 


325.12 


418 


Hemmers Photo Shop 


72.80 


419 


Artcraft Press 


35.45 


421 


Dr. Z. Vance Kendrick, Jr. 


36.80 


422 


Dr. C. D. Eatman 


115.00 



AUDIT 



207 



423 

424 
425 



Dr. Edw. 

ADA 

ADA 



U. Austin 



11.70 

20.00 

1.00 



Balance per records May 31, 1955 



4,235.39 

$5,655.55 

Schedule 2 



North Carolina Dental Society 

Morganton, North Carolina 

1955 Meeting Expense 

For The Year Ended May 31, 1955 



Bastian Bros. Co. 


Badges 


$ 205.68 


Carolina Motor Club 


Travel — Dr. Sommer 


90.31 


Carolina Motor Club 


Travel — Drs. Fox & Phillips 


145.76 


Dr. Ralph Sommer 


Honorarium 


250.00 


Dr. Ralph W. Phillips 


Honorarium 


250.00 


Dr. Lewis Fox 


Honorarium 


250.00 


Dr. Lester W. Burket 


Honorarium and Travel 


327.00 


Carolina Motor Club 


Entertainment 


25.00 


Dr. Lewis Fox 


Travel 


17.00 


Dr. B. Frank Hall 


Entertainment 


100.00 


Clyde Watson Orchestra 


Music 


210.00 


Mrs. A. Henderson, Jr. 


Registration 


50.00 


Mrs. 0. E. Longwell 


Registration 


50.00 


Dr. Dan Wright 


Entertainment 


190.87 


J. A. Purser 


Loud speaker equip. 


150.00 


Dr. E. A. Pearson, Jr. 


Exhibits Expense 


354.58 


Dr. Lewis Fox 


Travel 


40.48 


The Carolinians 


Entertainment 


100.00 


Dr. Pierce Layfield 


Honorarium 


25.00 


Todd Flowers 


Entertainment 


103.00 


Pinehurst 


Entertainment 


30.90 


Hemmers Photo Shop 


Photographs 


36.00 


Longs Distributing Co. 


Supplies 


6.98 


Dr. W. H. Branch 


Housing Committee 


38.54 


Dr. Donald W. Morris 


Committee Expense 


22.76 


Shepard Decorating Co. 


Decorations 


572.00 


Charlotte Linen Service 


Linen 


5.41 


The Carolina 


Accommodations 


1,157.07 


Joe Duke, Jr. 


Publicist 


190.17 


Artistic Letter Shop 


Printing 


62.10 


Pound & Moore Co. 


Gavels & Engraving 


325.12 


Hemmers Photo Shop 


Photographs 


72.80 


Dr. Z. V. Kendrick 


Program Committee 


36.80 


Dr. C. D. Eatman 


Committee Expense 


115.00 


Dr. E. U. Austin 


Entertainment Committee 


11.70 


Charles Poteat 


Engraving 


2.75 




$5,620.78 






Schedule 3 



North Carolina Dental Society 
Morganton, North Carolina 

Bonds Held — General Fund 
May 31, 1955 



Serial 


Date 




Maturity 


Maturity 


Number 
M 934457F 
C 1086681F 


Acquired 
July 1944 
July 1944 


Cost 
$ 740.00 
74.00 


Value 
$ 1,000.00 
100.00 


Date 
July 1956 
July 1956 



208 



AUDIT 



C 1086682F 


July 


1944 


74.00 


100.00 


July 


1956 


M 1235516F 


Aug. 


1945 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Aug. 


1957 


M 1476155F 


Nov. 


1947 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Nov. 


1959 


M 1476157F 


Nov. 


1947 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Nov. 


1959 


M 1476158F 


Nov. 


1947 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Nov. 


1959 


M 1476159F 


Nov. 


1947 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Nov. 


1959 


M 1476160F 


Nov. 


1947 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Nov. 


1959 


M 1476161F 


Nov. 


1947 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Nov. 


1959 


M 1476162F 


Nov. 


1947 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Nov. 


1959 


M 1476163F 


Nov. 


1947 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Nov. 


1959 


M 1476184F 


Nov. 


1947 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Nov. 


1959 


M 42475J 


Jan. 


1954 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Jan. 


1966 


D 18387J 


Jan. 


1954 


370.00 


500.00 


Jan. 


1966 


C 40545J 


Jan. 


1954 


74.00 


100.00 


Jan. 


1966 


C 40546J 


Jan. 


1954 


74.00 


100.00 


Jan. 


1966 


C 40547J 


Jan. 


1954 


74.00 


100.00 


Jan. 


1966 


Totals 


$9,620.00 


$13,000.00 














Schedule 4 



North Carolina Dental Society 

Morganton, North Carolina 

Bank Reconciliation — Relief Fund 

May 31, 1955 

First National Bank, Morganton, North Carolina 
Balance per bank statement May 31, 1955 
Add: Deposit in Transit 

Less: Outstanding Checks 

No. 57 

Balance per records May 31, 1955 

North Carolina Dental Society 

Morganton, North Carolina 

Bonds Held— Relief Fund 

May 31, 1955 



$1,201.30 
1,761.25 

$2,962.55 

210.00 

$2,752.55 

Schedule 5 



Serial 


Date 




Maturity 


Maturity 


Number 


Acquired 


Cost 


Value 


Date 


M 661617F 


Aug. 


1943 


$ 740.00 


$ 1,000.00 


Aug. 1955 


M 934067F 


July 


1944 


740.00 


1,000.00 


July 1956 


M 1338950F 


Oct. 


1946 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Oct. 1958 


M 1476164F 


Nov. 


1947 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Nov. 1959 


M 1686801F 


Aug. 


1950 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Aug. 1962 


M 1686902F 


Aug. 


1950 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Aug. 1962 


M 1686903F 


Aug. 


1950 


740.00 


1,000.00 


Aug. 1962 


V 11338J 


Jan. 


1954 


3,700.00 


5,000.00 


Jan. 1966 


D 18386J 


Jan. 


1954 


370.00 


500.00 


Jan. 1966 


Q 17164J 


Jan. 


1954 


18.50 


25.00 


Jan. 1966 


Q 17165J 


Jan. 


1954 


18.50 


25.00 


Jan. 1966 


C 153116J 


May 


1955 


72.00 


100.00 


May 1967 


C 153117J 


May 


1955 


72.00 


100.00 


May 1967 


C 153118J 


May 


1955 


72.00 


100.00 


May 1967 


C 153119J 


May 


1955 


72.00 


100.00 


May 1967 


M 173548J 


May 


1955 


720.00 


1,000.00 


May 1967 



Totals 



$10,295.00 $13,950.00 



EXECUTIVE 
COMMITTEE 

MINUTES 

OF 

MEETINGS 



210 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



MINUTES OF THE MEETINGS 

OF THE 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Olin W. Owen, Chairman (1957) 
I. R. Self, Sr. (1955) C. C. Poindexter (1956) 

Executive Committee 

Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst 

May 19, 1954 

Immediately following the close of the 98th Annual Meeting of the 
North Carolina Dental Society, a meeting of the new Executive Commit- 
tee was held. Those present were: 

Dr. Olin W. Owen, Chairman 
Dr. C. C. Poindexter Dr. J. W. Branham 

Dr. I. R. Self Dr. H. K. Thompson 

Dr. B. N. Walker Dr. Ralph Coffey 

Others present were: 

Dr. Marvin Evans 

Dr. Owen called the meeting to order. The minutes of February 14, 
were not read. 

Dr. B. N. Walker was recognized and moved that Dr. Marvin Evans 
be elected to serve again as Editor-Publisher. The motion was seconded 
by Dr. Poindexter and passed unanimously. 

Dr. Walker discussed at length the recommendation of Dr. Sheffield, 
with regards to the employment of a corresponding secretary. This was 
further discussed by those present. Dr. Coffey made a motion that this be 
studied by a committee and a report be given at the next meeting of 
the Executive Committee. This motion was seconded by Dr. Poindexter 
and passed. Dr. Owen appointed the following committee to report in 
July, Doctors Walker, Evans and Coffey. 

Dr. Walker made a motion that the Secretary write Dr. Evans a 
letter of thanks for the work that he had done during the past year. 
He furthermore requested that Dr. Evans call upon the Executive Com- 
mittee for any help that he may need, financially or otherwise, during 
the coming year. This was seconded by Dr. Branham and passed. 

Dr. Coffey, the Secretary-Treasurer was directed to pay all out- 
standing bills and salaries. To have stationery printed for all officers and 
committees requesting stationery. To close the books in thirty days, and 
place them in the hands of the auditor. 

Dr. Walker announced that the dates of the 99th Annual Meeting 
would be May 15-16-17-18, at the Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst. 

Dr. Self moved that the President, Editor-Publisher and Secretary 
read and edit the Proceedings as taken by the reporter, and that those 
parts that are not in keeping with the best interest of the Society be 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 211 

deleted, however, no information is to be withheld or changed in any 
respect. This was seconded by Dr. Branham and passed. 

Dr. Evans was requested to print the Proceedings in the order that 
the meetings were held. This had reference to the General Sessions and 
the House of Delegates. 

Dr. Branham moved that the next meeting of the Executive Com- 
mittee be held in Charlotte, July 18, at 10:00 a. m. This was seconded by 
Dr. Self and passed. 

On motion of Dr. Coffey this meeting was adjourned. 

JOINT MEETING 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 
COLONY ROOM, HOTEL BARRINGER 
CHARLOTTE, N. C, SUNDAY, JULY 18, 1954 
The Executive Committee met at 10:30 a. m. with Chairmen of the 
General Arrangements, Exhibits, Clinics, Publicity, Entertainment, and 
Publications, and the full attendance of the Program Committee. 
Those present were: 

Dr. B. N. Walker, President 
Dr. H. K. Thompson, Vice-President 
Dr. J. W. Branham, President-Elect 
Dr. Ralph Coffey, Secretary-Treasurer 
Dr. O. W. Owen, Chairman Executive Committee 
Dr. C. C. Poindexter, Executive Committee 
Dr. I. R. Self, Executive Committee 
Dr. Marvin Evans, Editor-Publisher 
Dr. Vance Z. Kendrick, Program Chairman 
Dr. J. B. Freedland, Co-Chairman Program 
Dr. M. H. Truluck, Program 
Dr. P. B. Whittington, Jr., Program 

Dr. Charles Eatman, Program and Gen. Arrange. Chairman 
Dr. E. A. Pearson, Program and Exhibits Chairman 
Dr. Milo J. Hoffman, Chairman Clinics Committee 
Dr. W. K. Griffin, Chairman Publicity 
Dr. J. Donald Kiser, Chairman Entertainment 
The meeting was called to order by Dr. Olin W. Owen, presiding 
over the joint session. The invocation was given by Dr. J. Donald Kiser. 
Dr. B. N. Walker stated that the purpose of the meeting was to make 
plans for the 1955 Annual Meeting, and asked that the Chairmen of the 
various committees present their plans for the coming year, and in such 
cases where an appropriation was necessary, that this request be pre- 
sented to the Executive Committee which would meet following the joint 
session. 

Dr. Vance Kendrick, Program Chairman, was recognized and 
reported that his committee had plans for four major clinicians for 
the Annual Meeting. He requested that the Executive Committee make a 
definite appropriation so that his committee could conclude their arrange- 
ments. A discussion followed concerning the Wednesday morning meet- 
ing. The group present was concerned about the late beginning and the 



212 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

poor attendance of the Wednesday morning program. The program com- 
mittee was instructed to arrange the program with this discussion in 
mind. 

Dr. C. D. Eatman, Chairman of the General Arrangements Commit- 
tee revealed the following plan for the 1955 meeting. An information 
booth will be maintained by his committee, members of his committee 
are to serve as pages for all sessions, identification badges or ribbons 
will be provided for all guests, clinicians, visitors, officers, and members 
of committees responsible for the meeting. Dr. Eatman requested copies 
of all letters regarding equipment and supplies that will be necessary for 
the meeting, and that all committees meet with his committee in Pine- 
hurst at the January meeting. 

Dr. E. A. Pearson, Chairman of the Exhibits Committee, reported that 
his committee was making plans for the annual meeting. Dr. Pearson 
stated that the committee was taking into consideration changes whereby 
additional revenue can be obtained. The questions of space, arrangements, 
out-of-state laboratories, and free exhibitors were discussed, and Dr. 
Pearson was instructed to make the decisions within his committee, keep- 
ing in mind the policies of the Society regarding certain standards that 
we have adopted. 

Dr. Milo J. Hoffman, Chairman of the Clinic Committee reported 
that his committee had plans to select the best table clinics from the 
District meetings. Other table clinics will be secured and plans are being 
made to make certain changes. The exact number of table clinics had 
not been decided upon but would be announced in January. 

Dr. W. K. Griffin, Chairman of the Publicity Committee reported 
that plans had not been completed for the annual meeting. Dr. Griffin 
stated that he would like to use ADA releases for publication in the State. 
The group agreed that any release could be used if it is not of a contro- 
versial issue within the Society. In this event Dr. Griffin stated that he 
would clear the releases through the Executive Committee. 

Dr. J. Donald Kiser reported that his final plans would be completed 
at the January meeting. This is necessary due to the fact that the pro- 
gram had not been announced. Dr. Kiser stated that he would work with 
Dr. Walker on this phase of the program. 

Dr. Marvin Evans, Editor-Publisher and Chairman of the Publica- 
tions Committee, reported that the September issue of the JOURNAL 
went to press last Thursday. This issue, which carries the District pro- 
grams, will be mailed to the membership in August. He also stated that 
the Proceedings would go to press the following week. Dr. Evans said 
that at the January meeting he would submit plans for additional pro- 
grams in condensed forms for the membership. This request was made 
by Dr. Walker. Dr. Evans again reminded both those officers present 
and those of the District, of the importance of the deadline that he had 
to meet. He urged all to keep this in mind. Dr. Evans also requested 
articles of news and scientific papers for use in the Journal. The Chair- 
man of the Program Committee was reminded that in securing the 
clinicians for the Annual Meeting, to inform the clinician or essayist that 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 213 

the Society will expect him to submit at the time of the lecture his pre- 
pared paper in triplicate; this becoming the property of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society as provided in our Constitution and By-Laws. 

The joint meeting was adjourned at 1:00 p. m. for lunch in the Club 
Room. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
CHARLOTTE, N. C, JULY 18, 1954 

The Executive Committee of the North Carolina Dental Society 
was called to order at 2:30 p.m. by Dr. Olin W. Owen, Chairman. 

Those present were: 

Dr. Olin W. Owen, Chairman 
Dr. C. C. Poindexter Dr. H. K. Thompson 

Dr. I. R. Self Dr. J. W. Branham 

Dr. B. N. Walker Dr. Ralph Coffey 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved. 

Dr. Owen asked for the report of the Committee named to study the 
questions of employing a secretary for the Society, as recommended by 
Dr. Sheffield. The Committee was unable to make a recommendation and 
on a motion by Dr. Coffey the question was tabled until the September 
meeting of the Executive Committee. The above motion was seconded by 
Dr. Walker and passed. 

Dr. Coffey presented the report of the auditor to each of the com- 
mittee. Dr. Walker moved that the report be accepted and was seconded 
by Dr. Poindexter. The report was approved with comments by the 
Chairman and other members of the committee commending the auditor, 
Mr. DeVane, for the detailed report that he had made. 

Dr. Coffey made a motion that a sum of $2,000.00 be appropriated for 
the Program Committee for the 1955 meeting. This was seconded by Dr. 
Poindexter and passed. This amount is to include honorariums, travel, 
and hotel expenses. 

Dr. Walker asked that the Executive Committee make available the 
funds that had been approved last year for the use of the Exhibits Com- 
mittee. Dr. Owen directed the Secretary-Treasurer to provide Dr. Pear- 
son with the stipulated amount. 

Dr. Poindexter moved that the Secretary work with the District 
Secretaries in redesigning new report blanks for their use. This was 
seconded by Dr. Self and passed. 

Dr. Walker spoke of the importance of having a District Officers' 
Conference before the Annual Meetings of the Districts. A tentative date 
of September 18-19 was set for the meeting to be held in Greensboro with 
the following to be present; namely Executive Committee, District Offi- 
cers, and Liaison Committee. 

Dr. Owen directed the Secretary to call the attention of the Housing 
Committee to certain policies of the Society with regard to the housing 
of members at Pinehurst. He had reference to one room assignment to a 
member for the meeting. 



214 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The question of visitors being allowed to attend both the general 
business and also the House of Delegates was discussed by the Commit- 
tee. Dr. C. C. Poindexter moved that all Business and House of Delegates 
meetings shall be closed to all persons other than members of the North 
Carolina Dental Society, and that pages be placed at the doors to carry 
out this rule. This was seconded by Dr. I. R. Self and passed. 

The appropriation for the Centennial celebration was discussed and 
on a motion by Dr. Walker was tabled until the January meeting. 

Dr. Owen directed the Secretary to place an order for the Past Presi- 
dent emblems. 

On a motion by Dr. Branham, seconded by Dr. Self, the meeting 
was adjourned at 3:45 p. m. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
GEORGE VANDERBILT HOTEL, ASHEVILLE, N. C. 
SUNDAY, SEPT. 19, 1954 
The meeting was called to order at 3:00 o'clock by the Chairman, 
Dr. Olin W. Owen. 

Those present were: 

Dr. Olin W. Owen, Chairman 
Dr. C. C. Poindexter Dr. H. K. Thompson 

Dr. I. R. Self Dr. J. W. Branham 

Dr. B. N. Walker Dr. Ralph Coffey 

Others present were: Dr. M. R. Evans and Dr. E. A. Pearson 
The minutes of the last meeting were read and the following correc- 
tions made regarding the meetings of both Business and House of Dele- 
gates, relative to non-members. The correction reads, "all Business and 
House of Delegates meetings shall be closed to all persons other than 
members of the North Carolina Dental Society." 

Dr. Owen asked for the report of the appointed committee named to 
study the plan for a Central office and the employment of an Executive 
Secretary. The report, recommendations, and proposed budget (attached 
Report No. 1) was read by the Secretary, Ralph Coffey. The report was 
discussed and on motion by Dr. J. W. Branham and second by Dr. C. C. 
Poindexter the report and recommendations were approved by the 
unanimous vote of the Executive Committee. 

(See Executive Committee meeting for change in recomraendations 
dated Raleigh Sunday, February 20, 1955) 

Dr. C. C. Poindexter moved that the report, recommendations, and 
budget proposals; also the action of the Executive Committee be made 
available to each District Society, the District Officers' Conference, and 
be published in the January issue of the JOURNAL. This motion was 
seconded by Dr. I. R. Self and was passed. 

Dr. Marvin Evans presented a special report (Report No. 2) relative 
to our publications. Dr. B. N. Walker commended Dr. Evans for this 
report and moved that it be adopted and that the report be printed 
in the January issue of the JOURNAL. This motion was seconded by 
Ralph Coffey and passed. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 215 

Dr. Walker moved that the Editor-Publisher publish the names and 
addresses of all paid members in the Convention issue of the JOURNAL. 
This motion was seconded by Ralph Coffey and was passed. 

Dr. Branham discussed the appointment of an Associate Editor- 
Publisher, to work with Dr. Evans. Dr. Owen appointed the following 
committee to report at the next meeting of the Executive Committee 
relative to this matter: 

Dr. J. W. Branham, Chairman 
Dr. M. R. Evans 
Dr. H. K. Thompson 

Dr. C. C. Poindexter moved that any companies of questionable 
nature which are, in the opinion of the Chairman of the Exhibits Com- 
mittee, in conflict with the views of the North Carolina Dental Society 
be excluded from the list of exhibitors at the 1955 Annual Meeting. Dr. 
I. R. Self seconded this motion and it was passed unanimously. 

Dr. Owen, the Chairman made the following announcements: the 
next regular meeting of the Executive Committee would be held Monday 
night, October 25, following the banquet and speaker at the Fourth Dis- 
trict meeting in Raleigh. 

The tentative date for the District Officers' Conference would be 
November 20 and 21, in Greensboro. 

On the motion of Dr. J. W. Branham and the second by Ralph 
Coffey the meeting was adjourned. 

REPORT NO. 1 

APPOINTED COMMITTEE REPORT ON 

CENTRAL OFFICE AND EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

The Special Committee, appointed by the Chairman of the Execu- 
tive Committee to determine the feasibility of the establishment of a 
central office and the employment of an Executive Secretary, submits the 
following report and recommendations: 

A study of the past recommendations made by the presidents and 
Special Committee in all instances show and report that such a change 
in our organization would be beneficial to our membership. We find also 
in these reports that to establish such a program the one factor is that 
an increase of dues would be necessary. 

The Committee has studied the recommendations of Dr. Neal Shef- 
field which were proposed and accepted last May. This provided for a 
paid corresponding secretary. The following analysis in our opinion would 
make this plan undesirable in view of the study and investigation we 
have made. 

The analysis of our Society which we bring to your attention in 
this report is in no way any reflection on any past administration or 
committee. We do this with the feeling that as leaders in our Society 
we are duty bound to present the facts, if by doing so we can better 
serve our Society and the public. Our study has been in cooperation with 
the Legal Council of the American Dental Association and therefore, we 
cite other changes which are found to be not in harmony with the 
American Dental Association. 

The North Carolina Dental Society ranks 20th in membership of 
all Constituent Societies. Seventeen societies have a larger membership 
1100 — 10,242. We are the third largest Southern state trailing Tennessee 
and Florida by less than 100 members. We find that 35 states have dues 



215 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

of over $11.00, 6 states have dues of $10.00. There are 14 Societies having 
dues of less than $10.00. Seventeen states or Constituent Societies have 
Executive Secretaries with a central office. A break-down on the cate- 
gory reveals that 11 of the states have a membership of 822 or over. 
There are 5 Societies employing an Executive Secretary with total 
membership under 822. Thirteen of the states have dues from $10 to $42. 
Three states having this program collect dues as follows: 

Florida 8.50 993 Members 

Missouri 9.00 1643 Members 

Pennsylvania 10.00 4630 Members 

We wish to call to your attention in this report that we in North 
Carolina operate under our system whereby we carry State Life mem- 
bers, ADA Life Members and Military Service Members with no revenue 
at all. 

We do not propose a change in the report. We concur and urge that 
this practice be continued. We do call to your attention the fact that 22% 
of our membership does not pay dues. Our study reveals that at the time 
the American Dental Association made a change in their requirements 
for Life Membership, namely 65 years of age with 35 years of practice 
we had no such provision. We still recognize our members on the state 
level and of course we abide by the ADA requirements. We also find 
that in addition to those states which do not have State Life Memberships 
also have revenues from State appropriated funds to the Society and 
in addition carry advertisements in all publications and hand programs. 
A study on the Tennessee State Dental Association shows funds of 
approximately $5000 are provided in this manner. 

A brief picture of our Society reveals the following. The records of 
the Society are held in various places. The records of the Secretary- 
Treasurer are not kept in a fire-proof place. Records dated prior to 
1927 are not available to the officers, therefore, certifications of members 
to the ADA is processed on word of the applicant and not by the records. 
The authorization of our new card index bookkeeping system cannot be 
instituted because of the lack of space. Correspondence is being inade- 
quately handled from the yearly change on committee members. We feel 
that a central office would coordinate the work of the Secretary- 
Treasurer, Editor-Publisher, and the Standing Committees. 

We also find that additional revenue would provide other changes 
which are in keeping with other states and ADA recommendations. We 
feel that our delegates to the ADA should be paid travel expenses, plus 
$10 per day. Committee Chairmen carrying on the work in coopera- 
tion with the various Councils of the ADA should attend conferences in 
Chicago or ADA Annual Meetings. These expenses should be paid by 
our Society. We do not feel that any office should be abolished or 
appointments be taken away from the Executive Committee. We do 
feel that by the officers directing an Executive Secretary in his work 
we could render a better service. 

Last year the officers and committees mailed approximately 8,000 
items. A society of 832 should have mailed from a central office 32,000 
items to be assured of an informed membership. In addition to regular 
duties we foresee the following additional services that would be avail- 
able to our membership with an Executive Secretary. 

1. Monthly News Letter 

2. Edit clipping News Paper Service 

3. Better public relations with PTA, Civic Groups and allied pro- 
fessional groups. 

4. Conduct annual workshop for officers and committee chairmen 

5. To provide continuity in contacting advertisers and exhibitors 
We submit in this report a budget proposal on our findings. We 

also call to your attention certain requirements that will insure and pro- 
tect our financial standing. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 217 

In conclusion we recognize the fact that in the event this plan is 
put into operation many changes will, of necessity, have to be made. 
Namely realignment of the duties of the Editor-Publisher, Secretary- 
Treasurer, and many committees. An increase of dues must be con- 
sidered. A city for the Central Office must be selected and personnel 
decided upon. 

We of the Special Committee are the first to recognize the complete 
reorganization and change this will bring in our Society but an evalua- 
tion of the states which have this program we found a healthy growth 
and a well informed membership. We recognize the hardships that are 
now being carried by those in charge and that eventually the member- 
ship as a whole will demand this program. 

We, your Special Committee, make the following recommendations. 
First, that the dues of the North Carolina Dental Society be increased 
from $10 to $32. Second, that a program based on this report be 
studied and implemented with definite safeguards provided for all 
financial and operative procedures. 

PROPOSED BUDGET 

1956 

GENERAL FUND 

ESTIMATED INCOME 

Dues 

750 Regular members— @ $32.00 $24,000.00 

(Increase of $22.00) 

142 State Life Members 

12 ADA Life Members 

36 Military Service Members 

Exhibits 

45 @ $75.00 3,500.00 



Total $27,500.00 

ESTIMATED EXPENSES 

APPROPRIATIONS 

Sinking Fund General 5% — Gross— $ 1,375.00 

Relief Fund 500.00 

(This amount to be appropriated annually until a 

three year reserve is accumulated in both funds) 

Commiltees 

All committees that work with the different ADA 
Councils, Special committees of our Society, District 
Officers' Conferences, Workshop for officers and 
committee chairmen and Centennial celebration 2,500.00 

Salaries 

Secretary-Treasurer 250.00 

District Secretaries 125.00 

ADA Delegates 1,000.00 

Annual Meeling 

(This estimate is based on the cost of previous meetings) 5,000.00 

Central Office 

Rent 1.300.00 

Supplies, printing stationery. News Letter 1,200.00 

Postage 500.00 

Telephone, Telegraph & Lights 500.00 

Travel (Exec. Sec.) 1,000.00 

Salary (Exec. Sec.) 6,000.00 

Salary (Secretary) 3,000.00 

S. S. Taxes 140.00 13,640.00 



218 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Capital Outlay for Central Office 
On Hand 

Electric Addressograph 

Camera 

Typewriter — Jumbo 

Equipment to Be Bought 

Bookkeeping System 800.00 

(This has been authorized) 

2 Typewriters 267.00 

1 Adding machine 118 00 

2 Desks 293 00 
2 Chairs for desks 127 50 
1 Safe 157.50 
4 Fireproof filing cabinets 894.00 
1 Mimeograph Machine 63.00 
1 Conference table & chairs 

to accommodate committee 300. 00 

Misc. Supplies 90.00 3,110.00 



3,245.00 




100.00 




100.00 




50.00 




25.00 




15.00 




10.00 


3,545.00 




380.00 




200.00 



Total $27,500.00 

ESTIMATED INCOME AND EXPENDITURES 

NORTH CAROLINA DENTAL SOCIETY PUBLICATIONS 
Income 

Advertising fees 3,900.00 

Subscriptions 25.00 $3,925.00 

Expenditures 

Printing: 4 issues and hand programs 

Photo supplies 

Tel. and Tel. 

Postage & 2nd class dep. 

Stencils 

Binding 

ADA Dues 

Estimated Gross profit 
Honorarium Editor-Publisher 

Estimated net profit $180.00 

REGARDING CAPITAL EXPENDITURES 
In future years the amount appropriated for capital outlay could be 
used as follows: 

1. Public Relations 

2. Dental Education of the Public 

3. Student Loan 

4. Workshop 

5. Seminars 

6. Buy or erect building for Central Office 

7. History 

8. Financial aid to the North Carolina Dental Auxiliary 

REPORT NO. 2 
Special Report 

To the Executive Committee 
North Carolina Dental Society 

Your Editor-Publisher has considered seriously the feasibility of 
changing the custom, followed in previous years, of printing a verbatim 
report of the proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North Carolina 
Dental Society. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 219 

My study and observations of other publications as well as my con- 
tact with other members of the American Association of Dental Editors 
has convinced me that a change is long overdue. 

It is my considered opinion that the Proceedings format is obso- 
lete and cumbersome and is not up to the progressive standards to be 
found in other areas of the North Carolina Dental Society's activities. 
A revision undoubtedly would point the way for further accomplish- 
ments. 

Since there is always the original and two duplicate copies of the 
verbatim report of the proceedings available for reference it is my 
opinion that no more copies are necessary for a permanent record. 

The revised published Proceedings would reflect more credit to 
the North Carolina Dental Society and to the profession of dentistry. 
Therefore, I would respectfully submit for your consideration the possi- 
bility of a revision of the Published Proceedings whereby the contents 
would be as follows. 

Dedicatory page 

President's Address 

Report on President's Address 

Obituaries 

Committee Reports: 
Standing — Special 

Report of the State Board of Dental Examiners 

Auditor's Report 

Financial Statement of the Editor-Publisher 

Minutes of the Executive Committee Meetings 

Eulogy of Guest of Honor at Annual Banquet 

List of Essayists and Clinicians 

Editorially acceptable scientific papers 

Other items of special significance 

Appendix: 

Directory of new officers and committees elected and appointed 
at the meeting. 

List of the attendance record of members of the House of Dele- 
gates. 

This report will bring to your attention some of the matters that I 
believe should be given consideration either by action at this time or by 
study leading to action in the near future. 

JOINT MEETING OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

AND COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN AND MEMBERS 

HOTEL CHARLOTTE, CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2:30 P.M. 

Dr. Olin W. Owen, Chairman of the Executive Committee, called 
the meeting to order at 3:00 p. m. Dr. Walter T. McFall gave the Invo- 
cation. 

Those present were: 

Dr. Olin W. Owen, Chairman Executive Committee 

Dr. C. C. Poindexter, Executive Committee 

Dr. I. R. Self, Executive Committee 

Dr. B. N. Walker, President, N. C. D. S. 

Dr. J. W. Branham, President-Elect, N. C. D. S. 

Dr. Ralph Coffey, Secretary-Treasurer, N. C. D. S. 

Dr. Marvin Evans, Editor-Publisher 



220 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Dr. W. K. Griffin, Chairman Publicity Committee 

Dr. E. D. Baker, Publicity Committee 

Dr. Neal Sheffield, Chairman Liaison Committee 

Dr. Walter T. McFall, Public Relations Committee 

Dr. C. B. Wolfe, Public Relations Committee 

Dr. J. B. Freedland, Public Relations Committee 

Dr. H. R. Chamblee, Public Relations Committee 

Dr. Pearce Roberts Jr., Chairman Fluoridation Committee 

Dr. T. E. Sikes, Jr., Fluoridation Committee 

Dr. W. B. Peery, Fluoridation Committee 

Others present were: 
Dr. Stuart Barksdale 
Dr. Milo J. Hoffman 
Dr. Paul A. Stroup Jr. 
Dr. Clyde Jarrett 

Dr. B. N. Walker, President was recognized and stated that it was 
the desire to have those Committees present and outline to the Society 
the plans for the coming year and to report the work that had been done. 

Doctors Roberts, Sikes and Sheffield reported on the work of the 
Fluoridation Committee. Plans were presented by Dr. Roberts for his 
work during the year. 

Dr. Walter T. McFall acting as Chairman of the Public Relations 
Committee, in the absence of Dr. J. C. Brauer asked that Doctor Cham- 
blee and Dr. Wolf report on the plans for this year. Reports were made 
and presented showing the objectives for this year. 

Dr. Owen recessed the meeting for thirty minutes in order for the 
three Committees to have a joint conference and bring back a report 
for the Executive Committee. 

Dr. Pearce Roberts, Jr. reporting for the three Committees asked 
that the Executive Committee grant $1000 for the use of these Committees 
for the year. 

Dr. Neal Sheffield reported that the Liaison Committee had studied 
the requests that had been presented to their Committee and at this 
time no report would be made. 

Dr. W. K. Griffin had no report at this meeting with regards to the 
Publicity for the Annual Meeting. 

This joint meeting was adjourned after the showing of a movie on 
Fluoridation. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
The meeting was called to order by Dr. Olin W. Owen at 5:50 p.m. 

Those present were: 

Dr. Olin W. Owen, Chairman Dr. B. N. Walker 

Dr. C. C. Poindexter Dr. J. W. Branham 

Dr. I. R. Self Dr. Ralph Coffey 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved. 

Dr. J. W. Branham reported that the Committee appointed to 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



221 




Drs. Fred Hale of Raleigh. D. L. Pridgen of Fayetteville, and John 
Pharr of Cheirlotte take time out for serious discussion. 

secure an Associate Editor-Publisher was unable to report at this 
meeting. 

Dr. Walker moved that $1,000 be granted the Publicity, Public 
Relations, and Fluoridation Committees, and that these Committees 
use this money at their own discretion for the education of the public. 
On second by Dr. I. R. Self this was passed. 

Dr. Walker asked that the Executive Committee meeting sched- 
uled for October 25, be cancelled. This date was withdrawn by the 
Chairman. 

Dr. Owen asked that he be authorized to have the District Secre- 
taries make reports on the 1st and 15th of each month. On motion 
by Dr. Walker and second by Dr. Self this was passed. 

On motion by Dr. Coffey and second by Dr. Poindexter the meet- 
ing was adjourned. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
O. HENRY HOTEL, GREENSBORO, N. C. 
NOVEMBER 21, 1954 
The meeting was called to order by Dr. Olin W. Owen, follow- 
ing the morning meeting of the District Officers Conference. 



222 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Those present were: 

Dr. Olin W. Owen, Chairman 
Dr. C. C. Poindexter Dr. J. W. Branham 

Dr. I. R. Self Dr. H. K. Thompson 

Dr. B. N. Walker Dr. Ralph Coffey 

Others present were: Dr. M. R. Evans, Editor-Publisher and 
Dr. Frank Atwater. 

Dr. Coffey moved that the North Carolina Dental Society pay 
for the luncheon served the District Officers. On second by Dr. 
Branham this was passed. 

Dr. Branham moved that Mr. John Shumaker Jr., the speaker for 
the Conference be paid $50.00 and expenses. On second by Dr. Poin- 
dexter this passed. 

Dr. Branham gave the report on the Associate Editor-Publisher. 
He announced that Dr. Frank Atwater of Greensboro was the selec- 
tion of his committee and that he moved that Dr. Atwater be named. 
On second by Dr. Poindexter that he be named a unanimous vote 
was recorded. 

Dr. Branham moved that the Committee appropriate $1000 to the 
use of the Centennial Committee, this money to come from the 1954 
income of the Society. On second by Dr. Walker this was passed. 

Dr. Coffey moved that Dr. Marvin Evans employ a Stenotypist 
for the 1955 Annual Meeting. This was seconded by Dr. Walker and 
passed. 

Dr. Walker moved that the Committee appropriate $100 to secure 
material from the ADA for the use of committees during Children's 
Dental Health Week. On second by Dr. Self this was granted. 

Dr. Owen announced that he and Dr. Walker approved January 
16 as the date for the Pinehurst meeting for the final meeting prior 
to the Annual Meeting. At this time final plans would be made. 

On motion by Ralph Coffey and second by Dr. Self the meeting 
was adjourned. 

JOINT MEETING OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

AND COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN AND MEMBERS 

CAROLINA HOTEL, PINEHURST, N. C. 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 1955 

Dr. B. N. Walker, President of the North Carolina Dental Society, 

called the meeting to order at 10:30 a. m. Dr. Walter T. McFall gave the 

Invocation. 

Members present were: 

Dr. B. N. Walker, President 

Dr. J. W. Branham, President-Elect 

Dr. H. K. Thompson, Vice-President 

Dr. Ralph Coffey, Secretary-Treasurer 

Dr. M. R. Evans, Editor-Publisher 

Dr. F. G. Atwater, Associate Editor-Publisher 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 223 

Dr. Olin W. Owen, Executive Committee Chairman 

Dr. C. C. Poindexter, Executive Committee 

Dr. Z. V. Kendrick, Program Chairman 

Dr. J. B. Freedland, Program Committee 

Dr. M. H. Truluck, Program Committee 

Dr. P. B. Whittington, Jr., Program Committee 

Dr. C. D. Eatman, General Arrangements Committee 

Dr. E. A. Pearson, Exhibits Committee 

Dr. E. L. Eatman, Necrology Committee 

Dr. Mile J. Hoffman, Clinic Committee 

Dr. W. K. Griffin, Publicity Committee 

Dr. S. W. Shaffer, Constitution and By-Laws Committee 

Dr. F. O. Alford, Constitution and By-Laws Committee 

Dr. Dan Wright, Out-of-State Entertainment Committee 

Dr. D. W. Morris, Superintendent of Clinics 

Dr. E. M. Medlin, Arrangements Committee 

Dr. M. L. Cherry, Arrangements Committee 

Dr. R. Z. Turner, Arrangements Committee 

Dr. Norman Ross, Arrangements Committee 

Dr. James Zealy, Arrangements Committee 

Dr. J. D. Kiser, Entertainment Committee 

Dr. C. B. Johnson, Entertainment Committee 

Dr. E. U. Austin, Entertainment Committee 

Dr. R. A. Daniel, Entertainment Committee 

Dr. J. E. Graham, Jr., Golf Committee 

Dr. Burke W. Fox, Advisory to Dental Assistants 

Dr. W. H. Breeland, Resolutions Committee 

Dr. Riley E. Spoon, Jr., Secretary-Treasurer-Second 

Dr. W. T. Burns, Secretary-Treasurer-Third 

Dr. J. M. Pringle, Secretary-Treasurer-Fourth 

Others present were: 

Dr. C. P. Godwin Dr. Ralph Falls 

Dr. H. V. Murray Dr. H. E. Plaster 

Dr. E. F. Slott Miss Edna Zedaker 

Dr. W. T. McFall Miss Lillian Callicutt 

Miss Mary Benton, President, Dental Assistants Association 
Miss Emma Mills, President, N. C. D. H. Association 
Miss Eleanor Forbes, N. C. D. H. Association 

Miss Eleanor Forbes, Program Chairman Dental Hygienists' Associa 
tion, was recognized and presented the program of her association. 

The Program Chairman, Dr. Z. V. Kendrick, presented an outline 
of the entire program for the Annual Meeting. 

The following Chairmen presented reports: 
Dr. W. K. Griffin, Publicity Committee 
Dr. E. A. Pearson, Exhibits Committee 
Dr. C. D. Eatman, General Arrangements Committee 
Dr. Milo J. Hoffman, Clinic Committee 
Dr. J. D. Kiser, Entertainment Committee 
Dr. D. W. Morris, Superintendent of Clinics 



224 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Dr. J. E. Graham, Jr., Golf Committee 
Dr. E. L. Eatman, Necrology Committee 
Dr. Marvin Evans, Editor, was recognized and reminded the mem- 
bers present of the deadline of February 10, of the "Journal." He called 
to the attention of all the requirements for having the program approved 
by Mr. Fitzgibbon, Manager of The Carolina, before they are printed in 
the "Journal." 

Dr. W. H. Breeland, Chairman of the Resolutions Committee, was 
recognized and requested that all committees and members submitting 
reports which require constitutional or by-laws changes should be in his 
hands 30 days prior to the Annual Meeting. 

The housing of exhibitors in the Carolina Hotel was discussed with 
no action taken at this meeting. 

Dr. Walker commended the Chairmen of the Committees for their 
fine work and he felt assured the 99th Annual Meeting would be a most 
successful one. 

The Meeting was adjourned at 1:00 p. m. with the Executive Com- 
mittee to reconvene at 2:00 p. m. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

CAROLINA HOTEL, PINEHURST, N. C. 

SUNDAY, JANUARY 16, 1955 

Those present were: 

Dr. B. N. Walker, President Dr. J. M. Branham, Pres.-Elect. 

Dr. H. K. Thompson, Vice Pres. Dr. Ralph Coffey, Sec.-Treas. 

Dr. Olin W. Owen, Exec. Comm. Dr. C. C. Poindexter, Exec. Comm. 

Others present were: 

Dr. M. R. Evans, Editor-Pub. Dr. Frank Atwater, Associate 

Dr. R. E. Spoon Jr. Editor-Publisher 

Dr. W. H. Breeland Dr. Dan Wright, Chairman, Out- 

of-State Entertainment Comm. 

This meeting was opened by prayer by Dr. Branham. The minutes 
of the last meeting were read and on motion of Dr. Branham and 
seconded by Dr. Walker they were approved. 

Dr. C. C. Poindexter moved that the Secretary be instructed to 
secure badges and necessary supplies for the Annual Meeting. This was 
seconded by Dr. Walker and passed. 

Dr. Poindexter moved that the Secretary employ Mrs. Longwell 
and Mrs. Henderson to help with the registration. This was seconded by 
Dr. Branham and passed. 

Dr. Walker moved that the Secretary be instructed to pay the 
Honorariums and expenses of the meeting, when each is presented and 
he be allowed to make these paym.ents in order for the audit to be made 
by May 31. 

Dr. Morris, Chairman Clinics Committee, requested an appropriation 
to purchase equipment that would be necessary for the clinicians to use 
at the State Meeting. Dr. Coffey moved the amount up to $50 be 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



225 




The Executive Board of the Dental Foundation of North Carolina, Inc., 
met on Sunday afternoon. Shown facing the camera are. Dr. Amos Bum- 
gardner, president; Mr. Charles Shaffer, University official and Dean John 
C. Brauer, secretary-treasurer of the Foundation. 



approved and to be paid by the Secretary-Treasurer upon the presenta- 
tion of bills. This motion was seconded by Dr. Walker and approved. 

Dr. Walker moved that the Secretary and Dr. W. Howard Branch 
Chairman of the Housing Committee, assign and be responsible for all 
rooms for the coming meeting. This motion was seconded by Dr. Branham 
and approved. 

Dr. Dan Wright, Chairman of the Out-of-State Entertainment Com- 
mittee, requested an appropriation of $200 for the use of his committee. 
Dr. Wright's request included a $25 charge for the visiting ladies to go to 
the Carolina Orchid Gardens. The members of the Auxiliary are to pro- 
vide the transportation for this tour. On motion of Dr. Coffey and sec- 
onded by Dr. Walker this passed. 

Dr. Coffey moved that Dr. Walker work with Dr. Kiser and his 
committee in arranging the entertainment for the banquet and other 
activities that the committee will be responsible for. This was seconded 
by Dr. Branham and passed. 

Dr. Owen, Chairman of the Executive Committee, reviewed the 
requests presented by Dr. Coffey with regards to the Fraternities having 
meetings during the annual meeting. It was decided to draw for meeting 



226 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

space assignments. These drawings were held and the assignments are 
to be carried in the "Journal." 

The honor guest for the banquet was discussed and Dr. Branham 
moved that the President appoint a committee of three to make the 
selection for this year's meeting. Dr. Walker appointed the following 
committe: Doctors Poindexter, Owen and Thompson. 1 

Dr. Walker moved that the Card Room be assigned to the American 
Society of Dentistry for Children, Sunday, May 15, at 5:30 p. m. This 
request was presented through Dr. W. W. Demeritt of Chapel Hill. 

Dr. Coffey presented the estimates and descriptions of the new 
bookkeeping system which had been agreed upon. The cost being $974. 
Dr. Poindexter moved that this be authorized and in addition funds pro- 
vided for the secretarial help in transferring the records. This motion 
was seconded by Dr. Walker and passed. 

Dr. Branham moved that the District Secretaries be responsible for 
mimeograph forms to their members in order to secure the proper 
information for the new bookkeeping system. This was seconded by Dr. 
Poindexter and passed. 

A motion was made by Dr. Coffey and seconded by Dr. Branham 
that the meeting be adjourned. 

JOINT MEETING EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE AND SUB-COMMITTEE 

OF ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO 

SCHOOL HEALTH CO-ORDINATING SERVICE 

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1955—11:00 A.M. 

SIR WALTER HOTEL, RALEIGH, N. C. 

Dr. Olin W. Owen, Chairman of Executive Committee, called the 
meeting to order. Dr. E. A. Branch gave the Invocation. 

Those present were: 

Dr. Olin W. Owen Dr. Ralph Coffey 

Dr. C. C. Poindexter Dr. Ralph Falls 

Dr. J. W. Branham Dr. Paul Fitzgerald, Sr. 

Dr. E. A. Branch Dr. Z. L. Edwards, Sr. 

Dr. Z. L. Edwards, Chairman, was recognized and reviewed the work 
and recommendations of his committee. Dr. Owen asked that the Execu- 
tive Committee prepare a resolution and present it to the committee for 
consideration. The following resolution was submitted: 

WHEREAS, at its last Annual Convention the North Carolina Medi- 
cal Society, through its Executive Council, instructed its Legislative 
Committee, with the aid of legal counsel, to prepare a bill for intro- 
duction in the present General Assembly, the enactment of which 
would authorize the transfer of school health functions from the 
State Board of Education to the State Board of Health, and 

WHEREAS, the Advisory Committee of the North Carolina Dental 
Society has been requested by the Advisory Committee of the North 
Carolina Medical Society to join with them and the members of 
the medical profession in their efforts to effectuate a transfer of 
school health functions to the State Board of Health through the 
successful passage of legislation originating with and sponsored by 
the North Carolina Medical Society, and 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 227 

WHEREAS, the North Carolina Dental Society has, through the 
adoption of committee reports, previously expressed its official 
opinion that the appropriation of $550,000.00 for each year of the 
biennium, beginning in 1949, and made available in the budget of 
the State Board of Education, should have been channeled through 
the budget of the State Board of Health, and under the supervision 
of some division of the State Health Department, and directed by 
one trained in the science and the practice of medicine, and 

WHEREAS, throughout the years harmony, good will and the closest 
of cooperation have existed between the two professions, especially 
in legislative matters pertaining to the best interests of the public 
at large, therefore, 

BE IT RESOLVED, that the Executive Committee of the North Caro- 
lina Dental Society, in special session. Sir Walter Hotel, Raleigh, 
North Carolina, on this the 20th day of February, 1955, do hereby 
authorize the Advisory Committee, or its Sub-Committee, as well as 
advising all members of the North Carolina Dental Society to 
cooperate to the fullest extent morally, personally and politically 
with representatives of the Medical Society in their efforts to 
achieve the object setforth. 

EXPLANATION 

The above resolution was adopted upon the request of Dr. Z. L. 
Edwards, Chairman, Advisory Committee to the School Health Co- 
ordinating Service. It is to be noted that it is an established policy 
of the North Carolina Dental Society not to permit any committee 
to initiate or to sponsor any legislation in the name of the Society 
unless and until the proposed legislation is presented to the House of 
Delegates for discussion, study and approval. 

Bernard N. Walker, D.D.S., President 
North Carolina Dental Society 

Dr. Branham moved that the resolution including the attached state- 
ment by Dr. Walker be approved. This motion was seconded by Dr. 
Poindexter and approved. 

The joint meeting was adjourned and the Executive Committee 
reconvened. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read by the Secretary and on 
motion by Dr. Branham they were approved as corrected. The motion 
was seconded by Dr. Poindexter and passed. 

The proposal of an Executive Secretary was discussed and Dr. 
Branham moved that the committee composed of Doctors Walker, Evans 
and Coffey make a further study of the proposal and submit their report 
to the House of Delegates on Sunday evening May 15, at the Annual 
Meeting. This motion was seconded by Dr. Poindexter and passed. 

On motion of Dr. Coffey and second by Dr. Branham the meeting 
was adjourned. 

Ralph D. Coffey 

NOTE: The recommendation "dues be increased from $10.00 to $32.00" 
should read "INCREASE FROM $10.00 to $25.00." 

Ralph Coffey 




Dr. Frank Aiwater, new editor of the North Carolina Dental Society, and Mrs. 
Atwater at the dance on Tuesday evening. 



228 



REPORT OF THE 
EDITOR-PUBLISHER 



Report of the 
Editor Publisher 



The annual report of your Publication Committee is herewith sub- 
mitted setting forth the activities for the year 1954-1955. 

Journal. The Journal as printed is a record of this phase of activity 
and is printed as Volume 38. In addition to the duties connected with 
the publications, the printed program for the annual meeting of the 
North Carolina Dental Society was arranged by the editor and paid for 
from Editor-Publisher funds. 

Proceedings Issue oj the Journal. Your Editor-Publisher has con- 
sidered carefully the feasibility of changing the custom, followed in 
previous years, of printing a verbatim report of the Proceedings of the 
annual meeting of the North Carolina Dental Society. This recommen- 
dation was made to the members of the Executive Committee September 
19, 1954, and approved by them. The entire report has been recorded 
in the January, 1955, issue of the Journal of the North Carolina Dental 
Society. 

American Association of Dental Editors Workshop. Each year an 
editorial workshop is sponsored by the American Association of Dental 
Editors. These workshop meetings are extremely important and our 
publication would no doubt reflect the many benefits to be gained by 
attendance. It would be well for the Editor of the North Carolina Dental 
Society to avail himself of this opportunity to improve his journalistic 
knowledge and widen his experience. His expenses should be paid from 
the Editor-Publisher funds if such funds are available at the time of 
the meeting. 

American Association of Dental Editors. The editor of the Journal 
of the North Carolina Dental Society has in previous years paid the fee 
for membership in the American Association of Dental Editors from 
the Editor-Publisher funds. It would be well for the general editorial 
staff, including district editors, to become members of this Association 
in order that they may receive information from this source, thereby 
becoming better informed on editorial policies. The cost for the addi- 
tional memberships would be $3.00 per member. 

RecomTTiendations. 

1. That the editor of the North Carolina Dental Society attend the 
workshops of the American Association of Dental Editors, and 
that his expenses be paid from the Editor-Publisher funds. 

2. That the general editorial staff, including the five district editors 
become members of the American Association of Dental Editors 
at the expense of the state society. 

M. R. Evans, Editor-Publisher 
North Carolina Dental Society 

230 



EDITOR-PUBLISHER 231 

Editor-Publisher 

Financial Statement 

Year 1954-1955 

Balance on hand May 15, 1954 $1,283.70 

Receipts 

Advertising Fees $3,077.71 

Subscriptions 10.00 



Expenditures 

Chapel Hill Telephone Company 76.15 

McLean Trucking Company 3.09 

Associated Transport 4.81 

Roadway Express 3.09 

Addressograph-Multigraph Corp 669.54 

Hemmer's Photo Shop 17.50 

Colonial Press 

September Issue _ 766.62 

January issue 584.40 

April issue 771.05 

Hand Programs 176.45 

Table of Contents 34.50 

U. S. Post Office 

(Postage and deposit) 80.00 

Joseph Ruzicka (binding) 21.76 

Universitj' Service Plants 14.67 

Ledbetter-Pickard (supplies) 28.17 

Knight-Campbell (supplies) 4.47 

Herald Sun Papers 1.00 

Western Union 2.78 

Foister's Camera Store 27.80 

American Association Dental Editors 10.00 

Book Exchange 4.70 

Fisher-Harrison 7.47 

Clerical and mailing 

Miss Harriet Horney 32.50 

Mrs. Mark Short 5.00 

Mr. George Wheless 5.00 

Mrs. Ray Litaker 6.00 

Mrs. Philip Lloyd 3.00 

Miss Jean Serpell 2.50 

Intangible tax 1.19 



,371.41 



$3,365.21 



Balance on Deposit — Bank of Chapel Hill 

August 27, 1955 $1,006.20 





The ladies have a golf tournament loo and trying for the trophy are Mrs. C. H. 
Jarrett and Mrs. Ernest C. Morris of Charlotte. 



232 



SCIENTIFIC 
SESSIONS 



Scientific 
Sessions 



I 



ESSAYISTS 
Endodontics 

Ralph F. Sommer, D.D.S., M.S., F.A.C.D., F.A.A.O.R., Ann Arbor, 
Michigan 

Operative Dentistry 

Ralph W. Phillips, D.D.S., Indianapolis, Indiana 
Periodontics 

Lewis Fox, D.D.S., South Norwalk, Connecticut 
Oral Diagnosis 

Lester W. Burket, D.D.S, M.D., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
CLINICIANS 
Operative Dentistry 

M. G. Miska, University of North Carolina 

Charles A. Jarrett, Charlotte 

J. J. Lauten, Greensboro 

R. S. Turner, Greensboro 

Robert E. Finch, Raleigh 

Thomas D. Volmer, Burlington 

J. R. Carson, Rocky Mount 

Clarence Lee Sockwell, University of North Carolina 

Richard W. Keller, University of North Carolina 
Oral Surgery 

C. W. Poindexter, Greensboro 

L. D. Herring, Raleigh 

P. B. Whittington, Greensboro 

Ben H. Houston, Goldsboro 
Prosthetics 

Ralph F. Jarrett, Charlotte 

A. G. Inscoe, Spring Hope 

J. K. Holladay, Charlotte 
Periodontics 

J. Wilfred Gallagher, University of North Carolina 

Endodontics 

C. Don Gerdes, Biltmore 

Roentgenology 

J. H. Edvi^ards, Raleigh 

234 



SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS 



235 



Anesthesia 

Freeman C. Slaughter, Kannapolis 
Pedodontics 

Dwight L. Clark, Asheville 

Joseph Fremont Burket, University of North Carolina 
Pharmacology 

Clinton C. Diercks, Morganton 
Oral Pathology 

Stanford Harris, Weavei'ville 



Dr. Remus Turner demonslrates his technique to an interested group. The 
ible clinic presented by Dr. J. J. Lauten and Turner of Greensboro was very well 
sceived by the dentists and was chosen by the Clinic Board of Censors to represent 
forth Carolina at the ADA meeting in San Francisco. 




Oral Diagnosis 

Lester W. Burket, Dean, University of 
Pennsylvania, School of Dentistry 

Dentistry has more or less grown in stature as a member of the 
health service professions as the practitioners of this profession have 
become more interested in prevention and more interested in diagnosis. 
There is no better avenue for friendly relations between our medical 
and dental colleagues than in the field of diagnosis. Here, we can show 
our medical colleagues that we are truly interested in the health of our 
patient, and not just in the particular procedures that we are going to 
perform in the oral cavity. 

Our potentialities in the field of giving our patients a health service 
has only been scratched on the surface. In some respects, we are far 
ahead of our medical colleagues in appreciating the value of periodic 
dental health care, and while I am not advocating that we should be 
concerned as much about the general health status of the patient as we 
are about the dental health of the patient, I can assure you that if we 
have a sick patient who cannot get to our office, he is not going to be 

■ ■ food dental patient. I often tell my students that there are more 
sick patients walking the streets tha'^ there are in hospitals; they just 
do not know they are sick. Some of these sick patients are going to come 
into your office, not realizing that they are ill. 

Time is not available for a discussion of all the ways that you might 
render a health service to the patient from the standpoint of his general 
physical condition. I am going to more or less concentrate on discussing 
techniques or measures that you might employ which will help you to 
diagnose some of the lesions on the soft oral tissues. In the field of 
diagnosis, as dentists, we have been somewhat negligent in that we have 
concentrated on the teeth and the supporting tissues — and that is a very 
noble objective, because, after all, that is where most of our patients 
need services. We must not overlook, however, the oral mucosal tissues 
and the tongue. 

Primarily lesions affecting the oral mucosa and the gingival tissues 
of systemic origin will be discussed. 

First, I wish to dispel the opinion that some have that an oral 
diagnostician is some dental superman. This impression has been 
implanted in the minds of some general practitioners by the oral diag- 
nostician. I am not referring to Dr. Evans or Dr. Hunter in your own 
state; but in former years some oral diagnosticians wanted to give the 
impression that they were supermen in the oral field. I feel all of you 
have the fundamental knowledge and ability to be good diagnosticians. 
It is not so much what you know, but how you apply what you know. 

I always think of an analogy that one of my former professors in 
medical school used. He said, "I came up for a final examination in 

236 



\ 



SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS 237 

anatomy, and I was a little rusty on it. One of the exam questions was 
'Describe in detail the terminal distribution of the ulnar nerve.' " He 
said, "There was only one thing I remembered about the ulnar nerve — 
that it ran over the elbow. I did know enough about physiology to 
realize that you could stimulate a nerve by electrical shock or trauma. 
That was very easily done; I answered that question and got 100. I 
banged my arm down on the table right on my 'funny bone.' Then I 
traced beautifully the distribution of the ulnar nerve." 

It is not how much detailed information you have, but how you 
apply what you already know but perhaps you do not realize you know. 

I feel we have an unusual responsibility in diagnosis, and perhaps 
many of us have not achieved it because we have failed to follow simple 
routine diagnostic procedures. I attempt to divide the diagnosis of oral 
lesions into two main steps. First is the patient's contribution to the 
diagnosis. I think we underestimate how much the patient can help us 
in diagnosing lesions. The second phase of the diagnostic procedure is 
our major contribution; it consists of a careful oral examination. 

If you think the patient does not contribute significantly to the 
diagnosis of oral lesions, particularly the type that I am talking about, 
let me give you an example. I had a most unusual secretary many years 
ago. She worked for the late Dr. Ziskin for seven or eight years and 
thus had an excellent background. During the six years she was my 
secretary, she heard many patients give their histories of various com- 
plaints. When we would write the letter to the physician or the dentist 
about the patient, she would say, "What did that patient have — this or 
that?" Seven out ten times, she would be correct. 

I wish to stress the importance of the patient's history in the correct 
diagnosis of some of the lesions that you will be shown later. The 
patient's history is an extremely important aid in the diagnosis of these 
less frequent, and perhaps not quite so striking, lesions. 

Many of us put the patients in a psychologically unfavorable position 
when we attempt to take a history. We may seat them in a dental chair 
and put the chair rather low. We stand over them with great profes- 
sional dignity and bombard them with questions. This may be a very 
satisfactory relationship, with the patient seated in the chair and the 
dentists standing, when fees are discussed, but when you try to obtain 
the true story of the patient it puts him in a psychologically disadvan- 
tageous position. 

I sometimes wonder how we would react if we had to consult a 
surgeon with a pain in our belly and the first thing he did was to have 
us get on the examining table and then start to take our history while 
we were in the prone position. It would be a little embarrassing to us, 
and the history would be unsatisfactory. Many of us do a comparable 
thing when we attempt to obtain a history from our patients when they 
are seated in the dentist's chair. 

I think this is the stage of the diagnostic procedure when you should 
place yourself on the patient's level. You should be interested in not 
only hearing the patient's symptoms, but more important, in determin- 




University of North Carolina dental students line up for 
registration Tuesday morning. 

ing how the patient is reacting to his disease. We are not treating 
d-icase as such, but we are treating patients with disease, and each 
patient may react differently to his disease. It may save us much time 
and embarrassment to determine how the patient is reacting to this 
disease or complaint as we proceed. 

I like to have the patient seated at my level. I also like to shake 
hands with the patient. This gives me some idea of his reaction to the 
chief complaint. 

I do not ask, "Give me the history of your trouble." I say, "What 
is wrong?" If the patient replies that he has a sore in the mouth, I let 
it go at that, because at the very beginning when the patient states the 
chief complaint, we may make one of our most serious errors. That is, 
we attempt to correct the patient's use of scientific terms. As long ns we 
have a general idea what the patient is talking about, do not correct him. 
Remember, when the average layman comes to any professional man, 
he is somewhat embarrassed and at a disadvantage. 

I ask that patient to tell me the "story" of his trouble, not the 
history, because most patients associate with the term "story" a nar- 
rative giving the important events in chronological sequence. Another 
mistake that is frequently made is to interrupt the patient if he starts 



238 



SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS 239 

to digress slightly from his story. You cannot let a pa'tienc sit and tell 
you about all of the things that have happened in the last twentj-'-five 
j-ears, but I think it is extremely important at times, to allow tne patient 
to digress slightly. 

Let me give you an example. The patient comes to you with a pain- 
ful burning tongue. The usual patient who complains of a burning tongue 
will be a female, probably past the menopause. She will probably state 
that she has been to this physician, and this and that dentist. She will 
tell you what treatment they prescribed, and she will tell you how it 
was unsuccessful. I think it is important for you to get this background 
of the patient because if you do not, you might be the next man she will 
be talking about. These patients are not exactly the type who will build 
up your practice. 

It is important for you to find out how this patient reacts, to some 
extent. You will say, "I cannot listen all day long to this type of story" 
I find this a very effective way to bring the patient back on the track. 
As soon as the patient stops to take a breath, you say, "Now, Mrs. So and 
So," and then repeat the last thing you think was significant in her 
history. She will usually continue the narrative. These little detours 
may save you much trouble later. 

Sometimes the patient just "gets stuck." He stops, and he is still 
six or eight months behind time. He is not up to date. Frequently, you 
can get these patients started again by using the same technique, just 
repeating the last significant thing they said, and say, "Well, then what 
happened?" 

During this history taking, I do not think you should question the 
patient too much. Let him tell his own story, and certainly, do not ask 
any leading questions. After the patient has more or less completed 
this "story" and has brought things up to date, then ask him if he 
observed any other symptoms in other parts of the body that occurred 
during this same period. I have repeatedly seen students arrive at a 
reasonably accurate tentative diagnosis when practitioners with many 
years of experience have failed, because of this one simple question. If 
a patient has numbness and pains in the lower extremities he is not 
going to associate these with a painful tongue or some oral disturbance. 
Many times these more distant symptoms will be significant parts of 
the history that will help you make a correct diagnosis. 

At the conclusion of the history, write down or bear in mind several 
diagnostic possibilities. You may wish to ask the patient some specific 
questions. This is the time to do it. When you make your examination 
of the patient, you already have certain tentative diagnoses in mind. 

I have not said anything about an evaluation of the general health 
status of the patient. This can be done by routine questioning. For many 
years we have used a health questionnaire for evaluating the general 
health status of the patient. It has been an excellent case-finding tool 
for patients who did not realize that they had symptoms of sufficient 
severity to see a physician. This technique is used routinely with our 
clinic patients, and many members of our staff use it in their private 
practice. Time does not permit a discussion of this health questionnaire 
with you. 



240 SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS 

Now we come to the physical examination of the patient, or the 
second phase of the diagnostic procedures. You now assume your full 
professional role. A definite routine should be used. The chief complaint 
for which the patient may seek treatment is not the most significant 
lesion that might be present. Therefore, the patient must be treated as 
a total individual and not on the basis of the chief complaint alone. 

Too frequently when a patient complains of an ulcerative lesion at 
some area in the mouth, we are prone to look first at the ulcerative 
lesion. If the patient is in acute pain, that is a very justifiable and 
correct procedure. If it is a lesion of a few days' or weeks' standing, it 
is preferable to begin our examination in areas at some distance from 
the lesion in question. As we examine these areas routinely throughout 
the mouth we gain the confidence of the patient so that when the lesions 
in question are eventually examined it is possible to evaluate how the 
patient is reacting to palpation and similar procedures. We will obtain 
a better evaluation of the patient's reaction to pain. 

It is desirable to have some tentative diagnosis in mind when the 
patient is examined, because it permits a more logical examination. 
The teeth or supporting tissues are not neglected, but I am interested 
chiefly in soft tissue lesions that might be sent to me for a diagnosis. 
The chief complaint of the patient is the last area to be examined. This 
should be done in a very careful and sympathetic manner. 

Bi-digital and bi-manual manipulation should be used in any area 
where it is possible. This is particularly valuable in the examination of 
the tongue. Careful palpation of a relatively small superficial lesion on 
the tongue might reveal a much more extensive hidden lesion. 

Lastly, the patient should be examined for adenopathy. The throat 
of the patient should be examined, but any procedure that might cause 
the patient to gag is deferred. The examination for adenopathy is 
deferred until last, since it can be done more intelligently after the 
location, size, and extent of the lesion in the mouth are determined. 

The problem will arise as to whether x-rays or special laboratory 
procedures should be available when the patient is examined. Full 
mouth roentgenograms are highly desirable. Laboratory studies should 
be deferred until after the clinical examination has been made. By this 
time, the diagnostic possibilities should be reduced to two or three 
diseases. If laboratory studies are required, now is the time to request 
them. Remember that in dentistry, laboratory studies are of less value 
in diagnosis than they are in medicine. In dentistry we are more con- 
cerned with anatomical appearance and the physical character of the 
lesion, such as can be detected by palpation, than we are with laboratory 
procedure, except for biopsy study and a complete blood count. It is 
unfair to the patient to request laboratory procedures unless they are 
definitely indicated. 

Biopsy study may be required. The patients are now accepting more 
readily biopsy studies for the diagnosis of benign lesions. They are less 
apprehensive than formerly. If it is said tissue should be removed for 
"study under the microscope," the patient feels a little better about it 
than if it is said, "A biopsy should be made." 



SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS 241 

The biopsy is not infallible. The pathologist is not infallible. There 
are instances known where the tissue specimen has had the wrong 
number. A negative biopsy report is of little significance if the clinical 
lesion is indicative of serious pathology. 

A positive diagnosis cannot always be made, but the average dentist 
hesitates to tell the patient he is unable to make a diagnosis. Any dentist 
associated with a hospital staff will know that in the standard diagnosis 
coding there is a definite number of undiagnosed conditions. The dentist 
should not hesitate to tell the patient, if a good diagnostic procedure and 
routine has been followed, that he is unable to make a diagnosis. That 
is not enough for the patient. Many patients are more interested in what 
they do not have than in what they have. We should be honest with 
the patient. The dentist should tell the patient that he has gone through 
these various diagnostic procedures, and at this time, there is no evidence 
of any malignancy, no evidence of syphilis or any other particular 
disease the patient might be concerned about. 

It is the dentist's responsibility, if he cannot make a diagnosis, to 
give the patient the opportunity to consult someone else if he so desires. 
I always offer to make available the x-rays and all my records to any 
other consultant the patient may wish to see. It has been my experience 
that if you are honest with your patients, if you tell them what they do 
not have and what you have found, and if you give them the opportunity 
to consult someone else, in most instances they are satisfied with what 
you have done. 



Some Common Causes For Failures of 
Materials in Operative Dentistry 

Ralph W. Phillips, Associate Professor 
Indiana University School of Dentistry 

With the inauguration of the American Dental Association research 
fellowship at the National Bureau of Standards and the ever expanding 
research activities in dental shcools and commercial companies, the 
quality of dental materials is improving daily. Generally the clinical 
failure of the materials used in operative dentistry can no longer be 
blamed upon use of an inferior product but rather upon improper use of 
a material which, when properly manipulated, does have adequate 
chemical and physical properties. Unfortunately all dental materials are 
subject to many human variables and their properties, and thus their 
clinical behavior is dependent upon the manner in which they are used. 
It is the purpose of this paper to discuss those factors which may, and 
do, cause clinical failure of the more popular restorative materials. No 
discussion of failures due to improper selection of material or to faulty 
cavity preparation will be included — just the factors involved in the 
handling of the materials themselves. 



242 SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS 

AMALGAM 

Recent research has shown that approximately 40 per cent of all 
failures of amalgam can be attributed to faulty manipulation of the 
alloy.i Most of these failures due to manipulation can be associated with 
inadequate strength or excessive dimensional change. Unfortunately 
these particular properties are influenced greatly by certain manipula- 
tive variables. 

There is no doubt that adequate compressive strength is essential to 
the success of the restoration. Fracture, even on a small area, will 
hasten deterioration, recurrence of decay and subsequent clinical failure. 
Loss in strength of amalgam, and thus fracture under normal biting 
stress, is invariably associated with excess residual mercury in the final 
restoration. Excess mercury has a deleterious effect not only in lowering 
the strength but also the resistance of the restoration to tarnish and 
corrosion. Research has shown that the average amalgam contains 
approximately 45 per cent residual mercury after condensation and in 
some cases may exceed 65 per cent.2 

There are three factors which basically will govern the final mercury 
content and the ability of the restoration to resist biting stresses: 

1. original mercury-alloy ratio; 2. trituration; 3. condensation. 
The minimum amount of mercury to attain a workable mass of 
material is employed. The manufacturer's recommended ratio must be 
followed. Thus some type of weighing or proportioning device is indi- 
cated. Guessing at the ratio invariably results in use of too much 
mercury and excess mercury in the original mix leads to excess in the 
final restoration, regardless of the condensation technic.3 

Undertrituration, with any commercial alloy, results in a severe 
loss in strength.4 It likewise produces a grainy mass of material that 
is difficult to condense and carve, leaving a rough surface that will 
result in fraying of the margins and corrosion. The amalgam should 
have a smooth appearance at completion of trituration. There is no 
danger in thorough trituration, within reasonable limits, but under- 
trituration must be prevented. 

Heavy condensation pressure is necessary to remove the excess 
mercury and thus assure maximum strength. Either hand or mechanical 
condensers may be employed with comparable results insofar as the 
physical properties are concerned. Insufficient condensation pressure 
is a common cause for fracture of amalgam even when placed into a 
cavity preparation that does provide adequate bulk of material. Com- 
pressive strength is directly proportional to the packing pressure. 

Regardless of the care taken to properly weigh, mix and condense 
the amalgam and to prepare a cavity preparation that will provide 
adequate bulk, the amalgam restoration is extremely fragile during the 
first few hours.5,6 Although the strength rises to approximately 45,000 
pounds per square inch at the end of 24 hours, its strength at one hour 
may be as low as 10,000 pounds per square inch. Accidental or intentional 
stress at this time results in fracture and clinical failure. Thus the 
patient must be warned to refrain from biting on the restoration during 



SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS 243 

these first few critical hours. Undoubtedly it is during this time that 
a high per cent of fractures do occur — stress placed before the alloy has 
had sufficient time to gain the necessary strength. 

Of equal importance to adequate strength is control of excessive 
dimensional change. It is known that severe expansion of amalgam 
accounts for 16 per cent of all failures.! This expansion is due to only 
one thing — contamination of the alloy with moisture.'? The zinc, present 
in most popular alloys in various concentrations, in the presence of 
mercury dissociates water into hydrogen and oxygen. The trapped gas 
exerts a pressure within the restoration which results in a delayed 
expansion of several hundred microns. This expansion is exhibited 
clinically in the form of protrusion, pitting, postoperative pain and 
internal corrosion. The overhanging margins produced by the expansion 
invariably lead to recurrent caries. Recent research has also shown that 
this phenomenon causes a serious loss in strength of the alloy, approxi- 
mately 25 per cent. 8 Thus mulling amalgam in the palm of the hand or 
contamination with saliva during insex'tion must be prevented. 

GOLD INLAY 

The object of a dental casting technic is to produce from a wax 
pattern a casting which will fit snugly on the preparation, be smooth 
and be free from any porosity. The success of the inlay depends upon 
minute accuracy and maintenance of the high physical properties of the 
metal in order to resist deformation and corrosion. Probably the most 
critical problem facing the operator is to obtain this necessary accuracy. 
Unfortunately, zinc phosphate cement is soluble in oral fluids. The less 
precise the fit of the inlay, the greater the margin of cement exposed 
and the sooner will this margin deteriorate due to the dissolution of the 
cement. Use of magnifying lenses soon impress upon the observer that 
the best inlay fits none too good. Consequently maximum accuracy is 
imperative for the gold inlay and most common failures are associated 
with this problem and in particular to the lack of controlling any dis- 
tortion in the wax pattern. 

Since the wax pattern must be an exact replica of the preparation, 
it is necessary to reduce to a minimum any distortion of the pattern 
from the time it is made until it is invested. A wax pattern contains a 
great amount of internal strain due to the natural tendency of the wax 
to contract on cooling, changing the shape of the wax in molding, 
carving, etc. These strains can be minimized by avoiding undue patching 
and pooling of the wax and by molding the pattern at as high a temper- 
ature as possible. However, all wax patterns do contain internal strain 
and these strains will be relieved over a period of time, producing dis- 
tortion. The strain starts to be released as soon as the pattern is removed 
from the cavity preparation or die. Some types of patterns will distort 
sufficiently in one-half hour to prevent critical fitting of the inlay. 9 
Therefore, the pattern must be invested immediately upon removal from 
the cavity preparation. It may remain in the investment as long as 
necessary before casting but it is vitally important to invest it before 
distortion can occur. Of course the degree of distortion which may take 
place is regulated also by the storage temperature. The higher the 



244 SCIENTIFC SESSONS 

temperature, for example near a radiator, the greater the distortion. If 
a pattern must be stored off of the preparation, it should be placed in a 
refrigerator since wax is most stable at low temperatures.9 

With indirect procedures, it is a good policy to check all margins 
immediately before investing. On occasion, even on the stone die, the 
wax will distort slightly during the interval between fabrication and 
investing. 

The accuracy of the casting is likewise governed by the impression 
technic whenever indirect procedures are employed. It is impossible to 
discuss this phase of work in this paper. It can be pointed out, however, 
that reversible hydrocolloid is an extremely accurate impression material 
and is unexcelled in this area. lo. ii. 12 However, the accuracy of the 
working die can be assured only by preventing any distortion in the 
impression material. Again the most common source of error is the 
common practice of allowing the impression to stand for a period of 
time before the model is poured. During this time interval, the material, 
which is approximately 80 per cent water, will lose or gain water and 
thus change in dimension. Likewise the internal strains are released 
and add to the distortion. Thus hydrocolloid or alginate impressions 
must be poured as soon as possible after removal from the mouth. 13 There 
is no storage environment which will prevent distortion. 

Other factors which will assure maximum accuracy are: 1. use of 
water no colder than 60°F for chilling the impression; 2. allowing the 
hydrocolloid to gel for at least five minutes before removal; 3. removal 
with a snap thrust in a direction parallel to the long axis of the tooth. 

The other problem other than accuracy, that greatly influences the 
clinical behavior of the inlay is the density of the casting. Any porosity 
is a source for corrosion cells and if severe the loss in physical proper- 
ties, such as hardness, is dramatic. There are three causes for porosity in 
dental castings: 1. shrinkage porosity is associated with use of too thin 
a sprue. The sprue should be at least 14 gauge unless the pattern is very 
small. This type of porosity is localized at the point of sprue attach- 
ment and is due to the gold freezing in the sprue before it completely 
fills the mold; 2. back pressure porosity is produced whenever the 
pattern is too far from the end of the ring. The air in the mold must 
escape through the investment or the gold cannot completely fill the 
pattern area. If the pattern is not placed approximately 1/4 inch from 
the end of the ring, the air cannot escape and the back pressure cieated 
produces an incomplete casting or sporatic porosity. The pattern can 
be located properly either by using a long sprue or by merely not com- 
pletely filling the ring; 3. occluded gas porosity is produced whenever the 
metal is oxidized. The blowpipe should be held in a position so that the 
reducing part of the flame is always on the metal. When the metal is in 
this position, it has a shiny mirror-like surface. If it appears dull and is 
covered with a scum, then it is apparent that the metal is being oxidized. 
Upon solidification the gases are liberated and the entire casting is filled 
with voids. Liberal use of flux, either with new or old metal, is another 
aid in protecting the metal. 

The cement itself is naturally an integral part of the inlay. Its 



SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS 245 

properties are greatly effected by manipulation and since this material 
is the actual weak point in the chain, it is necessary to obtain the best 
properties possible. The primary factor that controls the solubility and 
strength of zinc phosphate cement and silicate, is the powder-liquid ratio. 
These vital properties are directly related to amount of powder that is 
incorporated into the liquid, the more powder used in a given amount 
of liquid the stronger and less soluble will be the cement.i4 The only 
way that a maximum amount of powder can be incorporated is by the 
use of a cool slab. The slab must be chilled before mixing; however, 
care should be taken that the temperature of the slab is not below the 
dew point. Moisture contamination of the cement will lower its physical 
properties. 

Another variable which influences the clinical success of the cement- 
ing material is proper care of the powder and liquid. The liquid contains 
a definite amount of water and if this balance is not maintained the 
setting time is altered and the consistency of the mix will vary accord- 
ingly. The bottles of cement and liquid should be kept tightly stoppered 
at all times. 

KESIN 

Failures with the self-cured resins in restorative dentistry can 
generally be associated with the known inherent shortcomings in the 
physical properties of the material. Great progress has, and is, being 
made in perfecting these materials. For example the color stability is 
improving and use of new types of accelerators should yield further 
beneficial results. The brush technic originated by Nealon has aided 
materially in minimizing the contraction which occurs during polymeri- 
zation. 15 However the resins, as a class of materials, are still in the 
formative period and the dentist must be aware of their weaknesses in 
order to employ them successfully. 

The auto-polymers have a low hardness, one-half that of pure gold 
and are therefore subject to wear and abrasion. Their low modulus of 
elasticity also contraindicates their use whenever they will be subject 
to stress. 

Possibly one of the main disadvantages of these materials is the 
high thermal coefficient of expansion. For every degree change in 
temperature of the mouth, the resin will expand or contract, seven times 
as much as the surrounding tooth structure. It is believed by many that 
this phenomenon may produce a marginal percolation and finally 
caries. 16 This problem is being attacked in numerous ways. One 
method is to reduce the coefficient of expansion of the resin itself and 
many of the resin cements now on the market do contain filler materials 
added for this purpose. Likewise better adaptation, or if possible actual 
adhesion of the material to the tooth surface, would help to minimize 
the percolation. Cavity liners to paint on the preparation before inser- 
tion of the resin are probably advantageous from this standpoint and 
the brush technic unquestionably produces better adaptation. 



246 SCIENTIFIC SESSIONS 

SUMMARY 

The perfect restorative material has not yet been made and it may 
be many years before such an ideal is reached. However, the several 
materials that are widely used in operative dentistry are basically 
satisfactory. Their clinical success is dependent to a great extent upon 
a thorough knowledge of their properties and intelligent manipulation. 



REFERENCES 

1. Healey, H. J., Phillips, R. W.: A clinical study of amalgam failures, 
J. D. Res., 28:439, 1949. 

2. Phillips, R. W., Swartz, M. L.: Mercury analysis of one hundred 
amalgam restorations, J. D. Res., 28:569, 1949. 

3. Phillips, R. W., Boyd, D. A.: Importance of the mercury-alloy ratio 
to the amalgam alloy, J.A.D.A., 34:451, 1947. 

4. Ward, M. L., Scott, E. A.: Effects of variation in manipulation on 
dimensional change, crushing strength and flow of amalgam, 
J.A.D.A., 19:1683, 1932. 

5. Phillips, R. W.: Compressive strength of amalgam as related to 
time, J. D. Res., 28:348, 1949. 

6. Taylor, N. O., Sweeney, W. T., Mahler, D. B.: The effects of variable 
factors on crushing strengths of amalgams, J. D. Res., 28:228, 1949. 

7. Schoonover, I. C, Souder, Wilmer, Beall, J. R.: Excessive expansion 
of dental amalgam, J.A.D.A., 29:1825, 1942. 

8. Phillips, R. W., Swartz, M. L., Boozayaangool, Rith: Effect of mois- 
ture on the compressive strength of amalgam, in press. 

9. Phillips, R. W., Biggs, D. H.; Distortion of wax patterns as influ- 
enced by storage time, temperature and temperature of wax manip- 
ulation, J.A.D.A., 41:28, 1950. 

10. Sears, A. W.: Hydrocolloid techniques for inlays and fixed bridges, 
D. Digest, 43:230, 1937. 

11. Thompson, M. J.: Hydrocolloid — its treatment and application in 
securing consistent accurate models for indirect inlays and bridges, 
Bui. Okl. D. A., 38:7, 1949. 

12. Bignell, K. A.; Hydrocolloid technic — its use in crown and bridge 
work, 111. D. J., 18:163, 1949. 

13. Phillips, R. W., Ito, B. Y.: Factors influencing the accuracy of 
reversible hydrocolloid impressions, J.A.D.A., 43:1, 1951. 

14. Skinner, E. W.; Science of Dental Materials, 3rd edition, W. B. 
Saunders, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1946, p. 146. 

15. Nealon, F. H., Acrylic restorations — operative non-pressure pro- 
cedure, N. Y. J. Den., 22:201, 1952. 

16. Nelsen, R. J., Wolcott, R. B., Paffenbarger, G. C: Fluid exchange 
at the margins of dental restorations, J.A.D.A., 44:288, 1952. 



DISTRICT 
OFFICERS 
CONFERENCE 



District Officers 
Conference 



I 



Dr. Horace Thompson opened the second annual meeting of the 
North Carolina District Officers Conference at the Belmead Room of 
the O'Henry Hotel, Greensboro, Sunday, November 21, 1954. Present 
were: Charlie Poindexter, Gilbert W. Yokeley, Harold W. Thompson, 
W. H. Parker, Harry A. Karesh, James M. Zealy, J. Walton Branham, 
Olin Owen, Sam Isenhower, C. Z. Candler, Charles B. Johnson, M. M. 
Lilley, Guy R. Willis, William Burns, Walter Finch, Jr., Arthur D. 
Barber, J. M. Pringle, J. E. Swindell, Thomas G. Collins, Marvin Evans, 
Bernard Walker, Horace Thompson, Ralph Coffey, Clint Diercks, Riley 
E. Spoon, Frank Atwater, Neal Sheffield, I. R. Self. 

The Secretary was asked to read the minutes of the previous meet- 
ing. They were read, and there being no corrections or errors, were 
approved. 

Dr. Thompson called for the election of officers for the coming 
year. Dr. Marvin Evans, nominated Dr. Diercks for the office of presi- 
dent. The nominations were closed and Dr. Diercks was elected unani- 
mously. 

For the office of secretary. Dr. J. Walton Branham nominated Dr. 
Riley Spoon. The nomination was seconded, closed, and Dr. Thompson 
instructed the secretary to cast a unanimous ballot in behalf of Dr. 
Spoon. It was done. 

Dr. Thompson then recognized Dr. John Brauer, Dean of the Dental 
School, University of North Carolina, who spoke briefly on the Dental 
Education Program of the University of North Carolina. After a lengthy 
discussion, Dr. Coffey made a motion that the first series of this program 
be approved as outlined. Dr. Frank Atwater seconded the motion and 
it was approved unanimously. 

Dr. Bernard Walker was called on to introduce Mr. John Shumaker, 
Executive Secretary for the Tennessee State Dental Society. Mr. 
Shumaker presented a detailed paper of the workings of the Central 
Office of the Tennessee Society. It was followed by a question and 
answer period. Dr. Thompson made a motion that the District Officers 
Conference go on record of approving the need for an executive secre- 
tary. Dr. Atwater seconded the motion, and it was carried unanimously. 

248 



DISTRICT OFFICERS CONFERENCE 249 

'I I 




"Old grads" Al Cline of Canton and Dwight Clark of Asheville 
get together at the meeting. They are members of the first grad- 
uating class of the University of North Carolina's School of Den- 
tistry. 

Dr. Marvin Evans was recognized and he reviewed the procedure 
for sending material to the editor. 

Dates for the District Dental Meetings to be held in the fall 1955 
were set as follows: 

1st — 25-26 September 
2nd— 11-12 September 
3rd— 2- 3 October 
4th— 19-20 September 
5th— 18-19 September 
The meeting was then recessed for lunch, after which Dr. Thompson 
turned the gavel over to the new president, Dr. Diercks, who spoke 
briefly on the idea of trying to obtain some uniformity among the five 
districts on a few sections of the Constitution and By-Laws to expedite 
the business of the State Society. 

The meeting was then adjourned. 

Riley Spoon, Secretary, N.C.D.O.C. 



250 DISTRICT OFFICERS CONFERENCE 

DISTRICT OFFICERS CONFERENCE 

Pinehurst, May 16, 1955 

Dr. Clint Diercks called the meeting to order. 

Minutes of the last meeting were read and changed as follows: Dr. 
Brauer's references to Dental Education Program of the University of 
North Carolina relates to television programs. The minutes were then 
approved. 

Members present: Drs. Diercks, Spoon, Shaffer, Harold Thomp- 
son, Horace Thompson, Roberts, Lilly, Willis, Barber, Finch, Karesh, 
Nisbet, Zealy, Pringle, Swindell, Charles Johnson, Coffey, Candler, 
Isenhower, and Evans. 

Dr. Diercks suggested that since the group did not have funds avail- 
able we should ask for appropriations to establish permanent records. 
After discussion it was decided to work with the State Secretary to set 
up a permanent record for the minutes of the District Officers Confer- 
ence. (This has already been set up and copies of the two meetings are 
available to the members.) 

A discussion was held relative to the differences existing in the 
Constitution and By-Laws of the various districts and again it was 
decided that the D.O.C. members should study the problems in an effort 
to suggest changes to more closely correlate the various District Con- 
stitution and By-Laws and to more closely conform with the State 
and A.D.A. 

Dr. Isenhower moved that each District Secretary forward his 
particular Constitution and By-Laws, with all changes noted, to the 
D.O.C. Secretary. The Secretary would then compile these variations 
into comparative forms for future study. Seconded and passed. Specific 
forms will be sent each District Secretary for this information. 

It was moved and passed that another D.O.C. meeting be called 
sometime in June to complete this study and to invite the Chairman of 
the Constitution and By-Laws Committee from each District. Changes 
thus recommended will be published in the District issue of the Bulletin. 

The group then discussed the processing of new member applicants. 
Since it was indicated the policy of new members would be established 
at the district level a more standardized procedure for new member 
applications was felt was necessary for the districts. An opinion was 
stated by some members present that the policy relative to new member 
applicants should be established at a state level and the districts then 
comply. Upon the suggestion of Dr. Coffey the matter was tabled 
until a later date. 

As information: Members of the Old North State are not recognized 
by the A.D.A. because they are a "splinter society" in our state. Their 
members cannot participate in our group insurance nor can they receive 
The Journal of the A.D.A. 

Meeting adjourned. 

R. E. Spoon, Secretary 



I 



NORTH CAROLINA 
DENTAL 
AUXILIARY 
1954-1955 



DENTAL AUXILIARY 



252 




Compeiing in the Auxiliary's annual Bridge lournament are left to 
right: Mrs. Frank Atwater. Mrs. T. E. Sikes, Jr.. Mrs. Remus Turner, all 
of Greensboro and Mrs. L. M. Massey of Zebulon. 




Following installation ceremonies, members of the Auxiliary started 
working on plans for next year. Shown are Mrs. Henry Carr, president- 
elect; Mrs. Grady Ross, president; and Mrs. R. A. Daniel, vice-president, 
all seated. Standing are Mrs. Darden Eure, Executive Committee member 
and Mrs. Edward U. Austin, treasurer. 



Report of the 

North Carohna 

Dental AuxiHary 

1954-1955 



At the request of your President, Dr. Bernard Walker, I wish to 
respectfully submit the following report of the year's work of the 
Auxiliary in those fields of endeavor which were assigned to us by the 
North Carolina Dental Society. Namely; the collection of amalgam scrap 
for Dental Relief, the supervision of vocational guidance in the high 
schools and junior colleges of the state, the assistance to the North 
Carolina Dental Foundation in the matter of fund raising, and assistance 
to the Out-of-State Entertainment Committee in looking after these 
visitors of the dental society, particularly their wives. Due to the fact 
that our year's work will not be closed until after these reports are 
mailed to you, I regret that none of them will be entirely complete. 

Mrs. W. M. Ditto, Chairman of the Amalgam Scrap Committee, 
reports that the shipment of scrap to the refinery is being held until 
May the second. She has consulted the supply house that is handling 
the pooling of the collection and, from their estimate, feels sure that 
the check which we will turn over to you this year for Dental Relief 
will exceed $2000. 

Mrs. Henry O. Lineberger, Jr., Chairman of Vocational Guidance, 
reports that, in the three districts which have sent in their yearly 
reports, county chairmen were secured who distributed, either person- 
ally or by mail, pamphlets to the high schools and junior colleges in their 
respective areas and talked to the Vocational guidance teachers of each. 
These pamphlets contained information concerning the advantages of 
becoming a dentist, an oral hygienist, and a dental assistant. They -ilso 
contained the qualifications necessary for entrance into a school of 
dentistry or oral hygiene. The county chairman also arranged for a 
dentist to speak to individuals and to groups of students when there 
was enough interest evidenced to merit this. There were a considerable 
number of these interviews and talks. 

Mrs. H. O. Lineberger, Chairman of the Dental Foundation Com- 
mittee, reports that as of April 25, there had been eight (8) memorials 
given for the Memorial Book, and in the Book of Service there had been 
nine (9) recognitions. These memorials and recognitions will bring to 
the Dental Foundation the sum of not less than $1365. 

In the matter of the entertainment of out-of-state visitors, in 
particular their wives, I, as President of the Auxiliary, have written to 
the wives of each of the clinicians and out-of-state visitors, whom I 
have been informed would be there, welcoming them, telling them the 

253 



DENTAL AUXILIARY 



254 



entertainment we have planned and urging them to participate in our 
activities. Mrs. Everette Moser, Chairman of Hospitality, will have a 
note of welcome with a special invitation to attend the Sunday afternoon 
lawn party in the box of each of these people upon their arrival in 
Pinehurst. She has also arranged with Mr. Lee, of the Carolina Orchid 
Gardens, to present each of the clinicians wives and the wives of the 
special guests of the society with an orchid corsage. Mrs. Walter McFall, 
Chairman of the Entertainment Committee, is making a particular effort 
to see that these ladies will have plenty of good company, and she will 
have someone in the Out-of-State visitors parlor before lunch and dinner 
to assist in the entertainment there. 

We have all enjoyed the work we have carried on at your direction 
this year. We have not only found pleasure in it but the deep satisfac- 
tion that comes from doing something worthwhile and feeling that in 
some small way perhaps we have helped you, our husbands, advance 
your profession a bit further. We appreciate, far more than we can 
express, your allowing us the very real privilege of helping you in these 
endeavors. 

Mrs. Ralph D. Coffey, President 
North Carolina Dental Auxiliary 




Door prizes were awarded at Ihe Auxiliary luncheon on Tuesday and 
shown presiding over Ihe festivities are Mrs. Ralph Coffey, president; Mrs. 
Ralph Falls, secretary and Mrs. James E. Furr. 




^^ 



The North Carolina Dental Hygienists Association greeted their members and 
Bspecially invited guests at a reception Sunday afternoon. Shown ^t the party 
Ee— seated, left to right, Mrs. J. W. Branham, Dons Griff m, Carolyn Bullock, Mrs. 
I W Bowman, Peggy Everette, Emma Mills, Margaret Jones, Mrs. Bernard Walker. 
Ind "standing Margaret Swanson, Mrs. Nancy Horton, Eleanor Forbes and Mrs. 
Lmos Bumgardner. 



255 




Representatives of the Durham Dental Assistants Society are shown with thi] 
table clinic "Learning Through the A.D.A.A. Extension Study Course," which 
selected by the Clinic Board of Censors to represent North Carolina at the S\ 
Francisco meeting. 



The Dental Fraternities found time to 
together for a meeting, too, on Tuesday 8 
noon. From top to bottom are the Psi Ono 
the Xi Psi Phis and Delta Sigma Deltas. 



256 



I 




ti 1 



s 





x 



Dr. J. W. Branham, president-elecl, talks with Dr. Henry Carr of Durham before 
the ceremonies installing him as president for the year 1955-1956. 



258 



APPENDIX 



Membership Report 



District Numbex' 12 3 4 5 Total 

Current Dues 154 189 160 102 106 711 

State Life 14 30 31 29 34 138 

ADA Life (No Journal) 3 5 8 

ADA Life (with Journal) 4 12 10 8 

Student Member 8 9 11 5 7 40 

Re-instated 10 2 3 

Military 6 5 6 9 3 29 

Back Dues 4 5 9 

New Members 5 4 2 2 1 14 

Totals 195 239 220 155 151 960 



f 



260 



North Carolina Dental Society 1955-1956 



OFFICERS 

J. Walton Branham, President 

200 Masonic Temple Building Raleigh 

Horace K. Thompson, President-Eelect 

3600 Oleander Drive Wilmington 

George F. Kirkland, Vice-President 

405 Trust Building .....Durham 

Ralph Coffey, Secretary -Treasurer Morganton 

Frank G. Atwater, Editor -Publisher 

1202 Madison Avenue Greensboro 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

E. A. Pearson, Chairman (1958) 410 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Olin W. Owen (1957) 1201 E. Morehead St Charlotte 

C. C. Poindexter (1956) Jefferson Building Greensboro 



DELEGATES TO THE AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION 

Paul Jones ( 1957) Farmville 

C. C. Poindexter (1956) Jefferson Building Greensboro 

B. N. Walker (1958) 301 Hawthorne Lane Charlotte 

F. O. Alford (1958) Liberty Life Building Charlotte 

WiLBERT Jackson (1957) Rich Building Clinton 

Walter McFall (1956) Flatiron Building Asheville 



ALTERNATE DELEGATES TO THE AMERICAN 
DENTAL ASSOCIATION 

J. Walton Branham, 200 Masonic Temple Raleigh 

Horace K. Thompson, 600 Oleander Drive Wilmington 

George F. Kirkland, 405 Trust Building Durham 

Frank G. Atwater, 1202 Madison Avenue Greensboro 

E. A. Pearson, 410 Professional Building Raleigh 

261 



North Carolina Dental Society 

Committees 1955-1956 I 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

E. A. Pearson, Chairman (1958) 

Olin W. Owen (1957) C. C. Poindexter (1956) 

ETHICS COMMITTEE 
Hylton K. Crotts, Chairman, (1960) 
Clyde Minges (1956) Royster Chamblee (1957' 

H. V. Murray (1958) H. D. Froneberger (1959 

LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE 
C. W. Sanders (1960) 
Z. L. Edwards (1957) Paul Jones (1956) 

John Pharr (1958) Guy R. Willis (1959) 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

Pearce Roberts, Chairman 

K. L. Johnson, Co-Chairman 

N. F. Ross S. P. Gay 

Olin W. Owen 

CLINIC COMMITTEE 
C. C. Diercks, Chairman 
W. H. Young T. G. Nisbet 

Sam Shaffer Paul T. Harrell 

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 
H. K. Thompson 
(President Elect, Chairman) 
C. Z. Candler W. T. Burns 

Riley E. Spoon J. M. Pringle 

C. B. Johnson 

EXHIBITS COMMMITTEE 
E. A. Pearson, Chairman 
J. E. Moser H. C. Parker 

Ralph Falls Edward R. Burns 

NECROLOGY COMMITTEE 
Marcus Smith, Chairman (1960) 
F. E. Gilliam (1956) Ralph Coffey (1957) 

J. P. Reece (1958) E. L. Eatman (1959) 

LIBRARY AND HISTORY COMMITTEE 
S. H. Steelman, Chairman (1960) 
B. McK. Johnson (1956) M. R. Hunter (1958) 

Paul Fitzgerald (1957) Harold W. Thompson (1959) 

INSURANCE COMMITTEE 
W. J. Turbyfill, Chairman (1960) 
J. V. Davis (1959) M. M. Lilly (1957) 

J. R. Edwards (1958) C. H. Teague (1956) 

262 



I 

f 



COMMITTEES 263 

PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 
Ralph Falls, Chairman (1960) 
W. K. Griffin (1959) E. D. Baker (1957) 

C. P. Godwin (1958) Howard Allen (1956) 

CONSTITUTION AND BY-LAWS COMMITTEE 
Bernard Walker, Chairman (1960) 
S. W. Shaffer (1959) Z. L. Edwards, Sr. (1956) 

A. P. Cline (1958) C. W. Sanders (1957) 

PROSTHETIC DENTAL SERVICE COMMITTEE 
Charles D. Eatman, Chairman (1960) 
Hubert S. Plaster (1959) C. C. Poindexter (1957) 

Walter McRae (1958) F. O. Alford (1956) 

COUNCIL ON DENTAL HEALTH 
Samuel E. Isenhower, Chairman (1960) 
Ralph Jarrett (1959) Sam Bobbitt (1957) 

E. A. Branch (1958) R. L. Whitehurst (1956) 

STATE INSTITUTIONS COMMITTEE 
B. B. Sapp, Jr., Chairman (1960) 
R. E. Masten (1959) J. G. Poole (1957) 

C. W. Poindexter (1958) W. M. Matheson (1956) 

RELIEF COMMITTEE 
Everett Smith (1960) J. T. Lasley (1958) 

J. Homer Guion (1959) Paul Fitzgerald, Sr. (1957) 

S. H. Steelman (1956) 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
FOR VETERANS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM 
C. H. Teague, Chairman (1960) 
Guy E. Pigford (1959) Riley Spoon (1957) 

P. B. Whittington, Jr. (1958) Walter Clark (1956) 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE BOARD OF DENTAL EXAMINERS 
Darden Eure (1958) Homer Guion (1958) 

W. M. Matheson (1957) E. M. Medlin (1956) 

C. W. Sanders (1957) A. T. Jennette (1956) 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

RESOLUTIONS COMMITTEE 
C. E. Abernethy, Chairman 

C. Whisnant W. T. Burns 

D. L. Pridgen Z. L. Edwards, Jr. 

DENTAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
TO THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 
Carl Barkley, Chairman 
C. C. Diercks Milo Hoffman 

S. W. Shaffer John L. Ashby 

C. H. Teague G. L. Hooper 

Paul Jones R. S. Jones 

J. D. Broughton 

PUBLICATIONS COMMITTEE 
Frank Atwater, Chairman 
Frank W. Hoyle W. L. Hammond 

Horace P. Reeves Thomas C. Collins 

C. B. Wolfe 



264 COMMITTEES 

ENTERTAINMENT OF OUT-OF-STATE VISITORS COMMITTEE 
Henry Ligon, Chairman 
T. E. Sykes, Jr. L. D. Herring 

Milo Hoffman J. L. Yelton 

SUPERINTENDENT OF CLINICS COMMITTEE 
Thomas C. Collins, Chairman 
M. M. Lilley Wade Breeland 

Henry Lineberger J. O. Davis, Jr. 

Guy Willis 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO DENTAL HYGIENIST ASSOCIATION 
S. P. Gay, Chairman 
Wade Sowers Carey T. Wells, Jr. 

Carl L. Bowen R. M. Olive, Jr. 

F. Spencer Woody 

CONVENTON COMMITTEE 
Howard Branch, Chairman 

Penn Marshall, Co-Chairman 
Vance Kendrick Paul Stroupe, Jr. 

P. P. Yates W. T. Burns 

W. H. Young Donald L. Henson 

ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE 
E. D. Baker, Chairman 
M. H. Truluck J. B. Newman 

Homer Guion C. B. Johnson 

GOLF COMMITTEE 

M. E. Walker, Chairman , 

Paul Fitzgerald, Jr. J. L. Henson F 

P. B. Whittington, Jr. R. R. Hoffman ■" 

LIAISON COMMITTEE 
TO THE OLD NORTH STATE DENTAL SOCIETY 
Neal Sheffield, Chairman 
Cecil Pless Ralph Jarrett 

C. W. Sanders Clyde Minges 

HOSPITAL DENTAL SERVICE COMMITTEE 
Edward U. Austin, Chairman 
Dan Carr G. L. Hooper 

C. D. Eatman P. B. Whittington, Sr. 

S. E. Moser 

DENTAL CARIES COMMITTEE 
T. E. Nelson, Jr., Chairman 
C. C. Poindexter, Jr. A. C. Current, Jr. 

A. P. Cline, Jr. J. M. Zealey 

HOUSING COMMITTEE 

Robert Finch, Chairman 
Gary Hesseman J. C. Senter 

A. J. Galarde W. H. Young 

C. W. Stevens C. B. Johnson 

RURAL HEALTH AFFAIRS COMMITTEE 
L. M. Massey, Chairman 
Paul T. Harrell W. S. Griffin 

C. M. Whisnant Ben H. Webster 

Walter Finch, Jr. 



III. 



COMMITTEES 265 



ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
TO N. C. DENTAL ASSISTANTS ASSOCIATION 
Everett Moser, Chairman 
Hugh M. Hunsuckex- F. C. Mendenhall 

D. T. Carr R. M. Olive, Sr. 

W. J. Turbyfill L. C. Hedman 

PUBLIC RELATIONS AND FLUORIDATION COMMITTEE 

Jake Freedland. Chairman 
T. E. Sikes, Jr. R. Fred Hunt 

Walter T. McFall John C. Brauer 

MILITARY AFFAIRS AND CIVIL DEFENSE COMMITTEE 

Richard Hunter, Chairman 
Guy Pigford Thomas L. Blair 

Luther H. Butler R. G. Mauney 

ADVSORY COMMITTEE 
TO THE SCHOOL HEALTH CO-ORDINATING SERVICE 

Z. L. Edwards, Sr., Chairman 
M. H. Truluck W. B. Sherrod 

Ralph Falls Sam Bobbitt 

Guy R. Willis Paul Fitzgerald 

INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION COMMITTEE 
Sam Towler, Chairman 
O. R. Hodgin W. S. Griffin 

William H. Price A. T. Lockwood 

CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 
Frank O. Alford, Chairman 
J. Martin Fleming, Co-Chairman 
Wade Breeland Frank Atwater 

C. T. Wells, Sr. Fred Hale 

Homer Guion Alex Pearson 

Guy Masten Clyde Minges 

C. C. Poindexter Charles Eatman 

EXTENSION COURSE COMMITTEE 
J. R. Edwards, Sr., Chairman 
Dan Wright C. D. Kistler 

John H. Pharr Walter E. Clark 

CHILDREN'S DENTAL HEALTH WEEK COMMITTEE 
Nash Underwood, Chairman 
William D. Yelton Ralph B. Barden 

Z. V. Kendrick W. K. Griffin 

A. R. Stanford L. F. Paschal 

Elliott Mck. Hester Howard Rhyne 

Freeman C. Slaughter Donald Henson 

Frank G. Harris Glenn Bitler 

Zeno Edwards, Jr. 

COMMITTEE ON PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 
Bernard Walker, Chairman 
C. W. Sanders J. R. Edwards, Sr. 

Fred Hale Neal Sheffield 

CLINIC BOARD OF CENSORS 
Luther Butler, Chairman 
Darden J. Eure Sam Isenhower 

Vance Kendrick J. M. Pringle 




President-elect Branham and co-workers for year 1955-1956, Left to right 
Horace K. Thompson, president-elect; George Kirkland, vice-president; Ralph 
Coffey, secretary-treasurer; Walter McFall. Wilbert Jackson, Frank Alford. dele- 
gates to the American Dental Association; Darden Eure and Homer Guion, State 
Board of Dental Examiners. 



266 



Roster of Members 

Abernethy, a. D. (1) Abernethy Bldg Hickory 

Abernethy. a. David, Jr. (1) Abernethy Bldg Hickory 

Abernethy, C. E. (4) 705 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Abernethy, G. Shuford (1) Holler Bldg Hickory 

Adair, John T. (1) Newton 

Adams, C. A. (3) Fidelity Bank Bldg Durham 

Adams, Claude A., IH (3) Box 749 Durham 

Adams, P. Y. (3) 600 Security Bank Bldg. .. High Point 

Adams, R. G. (3) 41 V2 Main St Hamlet 

Adcock, G. W. (4) Fuquay Springs 

Albright, L. B. (2) 311 Independence Bldg Charlotte 

Aldridge, M. W. (5) 517-19 State Bank Bldg Greenville 

Alexander, G. S. (2) 323 Professional Bldg Kannapolis 

Alexander, W. E. (3) Robbins 

Alford, Frank O. (2) 1109 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Allen, Howard L. (4) P. O. Box 503 Henderson 

Allen, Sidney V. (5) 415 Murchison Bldg Wilmington 

Allen, Thomas I. (2) 608 Independence Bldg Charlotte 

Anderson, G. N. (5) Gold Professional Bldg Wilson 

Anderson, Joel M. (5) New Bern 

Andreve, K. I. (3) 112 Wolfe Medical Bldg Greensboro 

Apple, Howard D. (3) 1205 Richardson Drive Reidsville 

Armstrong, Walter L., Jr. (1) ..E. Main St Cherry ville 

Arthur, Dale L. (2) 208 E. Blvd Charlotte 

AsHBY, John L. (2) Mount Airy 

Atwater, Frank G. (3) 1202 Madison Ave Greensboro 

Atwood, T. W. (3) Carolee Apts Durham 

Ausley, Mett B. (5) Warsaw 

Austin, Edward (2) Doctor's Bldg Charlotte 

Aycock, B. L. (4) Princeton 

Bain, C. D. (4) P. O. Box 517 Dunn 

Baker, Claude R. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

Baker, E. D. (4) Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Baker, L. P. (1) Kings Mountain 

Baker, R. N. (1) Kings Mountain 

Ballard, David L. (2) 219 Sedgefield Rd Charlotte 

Banker, L. L., Jr. (2) 524 Professional Bldg Charlotte 

Barber, A. D. (4) Sanford 

Barden, Ralph B. (5) Murchison Bldg Wilmington 

Barker, C. T. (5) 1800 River Road New Bern 

Barker, O. C. (1) P. O. Box 486 Asheville 

Barkley, Carl A. (2) 740 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Barksdale, Stuart A. (2) 1627 V2 Elizabeth Avenue .... Charlotte 

Barnes, V. M. (5) National Bank Bldg Wilson 

Barringer, M. R. (1) Newton 

267 



268 ROSTER 

Barton, Roger E. (3) School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 

Beam, C. M. (1) 702 Public Service Bldg Asheville 

Beam, Robert S. (4) Perry Arcade, Box 888 Sanford 

Beasley, Britton F. (5) Kinston 

Beavers, D. L. (2) 640 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Beavers, F. C. (2) 640 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Becker, David H. (1) 203 Commerce Bldg Asheville 

Bell, Franklin D. (5) 248 E. Main St Washington 

Bell, J. R. (1) Murphy 

Bell, John T. (3) Ill Corcoran St Durham 

Bell, Morris L. (4) Clinton 

Bell, Victor E. (4) State Hospital Raleigh 

Bellois, W. B. (5) Box 1024 Wilmington 

Belvin, D. L. (2) 709 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Bencini, E. a. (3) 115 W. High St High Point 

Benfield, Robert H. (2) 1301 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Bennett, C. C. (1) — Flatiron Bldg Asheville 

Benson, Ernest S. (5) 304 Irwin Drive Fort Bragg 

Bentley, Clint W. (2) Hayes Bldg N. Wilkesboro 

Betts, J. S. (3) P. O. Box 316 Greensboro 

Biddell, Alex J. (4) Box 628 Laurinburg 

Biddell, F. H. (4) Laurinburg 

BiDDix, Clarence F. (2) 225 N. Torrence St Charlotte 

Biggerstaff, E. N. (1) - P. O. Box 515 Spindale 

Bingam, J. P., Sr. (2) Lexington 

Bingham, Maj. J. P. (2) DC No. 1 Fort Bliss, Texas 

Bissette, M. D. (5) 206 Davis Bldg Wilson 

Bitler, Glenn F. (4) 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 

Black, A. R. (2) 704 Commercial Bk. Bldg. .. Charlotte 

Black, V. A. (2) 824 E. Trade St Charlotte 

Blackburn, Chas. A. (2) 810 O'Hanlon Bldg Winston-Salem 

Blackman, R. M. (4) P. O. Box 424 Selma 

Blair, M. P. (3) Earle Bldg Siler City 

Blair, Thomas L. (2) 736 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Blalock, C. a. (4) Wendell 

Blanchard, M. T. (3) Leaksville 

Bland, A. B. (5) Wallace 

BoBBiTT, S. L. (4) 718 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Bolinger, H. E. (1) Box C Marshall 

Bonner, A. B. (5) Hertford 

BooE, I. A. (2) King 

BosEMAN, Dewey (5) Wilson 

Bottoms, Alton W. (1) Medical Bldg Canton 

BowDEN, H. B. (5) Jacksonville 

Bov^en, Carl Lee (3) 302 S. 3rd St Albemarle 

Bowling, Howard X. (3) 702 Dep. Nat'l Bank Bldg Durham 

Boyd, Stanley M. (2) Sparta 

BoYETTE, Edward G. (4) Butner 

Boyles, a. V. (1) Dallas 

BOYLES, Jack Lee (1) Box 976 Gastonia 

Bradsher, J. D. (3) Roxboro 



ROSTER 269 

Brady. C. A. (1) Hickory 

Brake. E. K. (1) Black Mountain 

Branch, Ernest A. (4) State Board of Health Raleigh 

Branch. W. Howard (4) 721 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Branham, J. Walton (4) 200 Masonic Temple Raleigh 

Brannan, B. M., Jr. (3) 2006 Fernwood Drive Greensboro 

Brannock, R. W. (3) P. O. Box 535 Burlington 

Brauer, John C. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

Brawley, Boyce a. (2) Mooresville 

Breeland, W. H. (1) Armstrong Bldg Belmont 

Bridger, Robert L. (3) Little Bldg Wadesboro 

Britt, W. F. (5) Murfreesboro 

Brooks, H. L. (2) N. Main St Monroe 

Broughton. E. H. (4) 203 Hillcrest Road Raleigh 

Broughton, J. O. (5) 802 Murchison Bldg Wilmington 

Brown, C. F., Jr. (1) Box 144 Hickory 

Brown, J. B. (5) 115 W. Main St Ahoskie 

Brown, J. W. (5) Rich Square 

Bryan, C. H. (4) P. O. Box 8 Apex 

Bryan, J. K. (4) Box 426 Oxford 

Bumgardner, a. S. (2) 1516 Elizabeth Ave Charlotte 

Bumgardner, L. F. (2) 4-H Doctors Bldg Charlotte 

BuRKET, Joseph F. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

Burns, Edward R. (3) 137 V2 E. Franklin St Chapel Hill 

Burns, W. T. (3) 1371/2 E. Franklin St Chapel Hill 

Butcher, Dale H. (3) Talbert Bldg Guilford College 

Butler, H. E. (3) 404 Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

Butler, Luther H. (3) 406 Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

Byerly, Robert T. (2) 639 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Byrd, Robert (4) 211 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Byrd, Thomas H., Jr. (4) 819 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Byrd, Worth M. (4) Box 522 Sanford 

Caddell, F. S. (3) 312 Security Bank Bldg Burlington 

Caldwell, J. B. (3) Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

Callaghan, N. R., Jr. (3) 12 Bella Vista Place .... Iowa City, Iowa 

Campbell, Ralph B. (2) 739 Providence Rd Charlotte 

Campbell, Cdr. Walter (3) USS Bushnell AS-15 .. FPO New York, 

N. Y. 

Candler, C. Z. (1) 310 City Hall Bldg Asheville 

Carlough, Robert D. (2) 16 Morris Bldg Concord 

Carlton, J. D. (5) Box 1072 Rocky Mount 

Carpenter, M. W. (1) Flatiron Bldg Asheville 

Carpenter, W. W. (1) 4th Ave. W Hendersonville 

Carr, D. T. (3) Ill Corcoran St Durham 

Carr, H. C. (3) Ill Corcoran St Durham 

Carrell, George H. (1) 727 Haywood Rd W. Asheville 

Carson, H. H. (1) Hendersonville 

Carson, J. R. (5) 116 S. Franklin St Rocky Mount 

Carter, George K. (2) P. O. Box 185 Taylorsville 

Casey, R. P. (2) P. O. Box 406 N. Wilkesboro 



270 ROSTER 

Cash, Allan H. (2) 1110 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Caudle, James N. (3) Box 145 Greensboro 

Chamberlain, A. C. (2) Box 466 N. Wilkesboro 

Chamberlain, Vander F. (3) Randleman 

Chamblee, H. Royster (4) 719 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Chandler, Fred H. (2) P. O. Box 255 Salisbury 

Chapin, Marvin E. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

Cherry, Morris L. (3) 701 Dep. Nat. Bk. Bldg Durham 

Choate, E. C. (2) P. O. Box 586 Salisbury 

Christian, Bill J. (1) Box 294 Forest City 

CiviLS, H. Franklin (5) Box 82 Kinston 

CiviLS, Harvey W. (5) 211 Mohn Bldg New Bern 

Clark, Alexander (1) Fletcher 

Clark, Dw^ight L. (1) Flatiron Bldg Asheville 

Clark, Walter E. (1) 507 Flatiron Bldg Asheville 

Clayton, W. F. (3) High Point 

Clayton, Walter S. (1) 224 S. Caldwell St Brevard 

Clements, R. D. (4) 616 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Cline, Albert P. (1) Medical Bldg Canton 

Cline, a. p., Jr. (1) Medical Bldg Canton 

Coble, Albert V. (3) Box 1583 Burlington 

Coble, L. G. (3) 330 Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

Cochran, J. D. (1) Newton 

Coffey, Ralph (1) Morganton 

Collins, Thomas G. (4) 804 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Collins, T. Roy (2) 326 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Coltrane, J. F. (4) Zebulon 

Conduff, Duke P. (2) Mount Airy 

CoNNELL, E. W. (1) Mount Holly 

Cook, A. J. (2) 3312 Tuckaseege Road Charlotte 

Cook, Chas. S. (5) Wilson 

Cook, Dennis S. (1) Lenoir 

CooLEY, J. Richard (2) 1627y2 Elizabeth Avenue .... Charlotte 

Corey, C. B., Jr. (3) 414 Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

Cotter, P. E. (4) Sanford 

Covi^ARD, Worth M. (3) 514y2 S. Elm St Greensboro 

Cox, Vernon H. (2) 636 Reynolds Bldg Winston-Salem 

Crandell, Clifton Earl (5) School of Dent Chapel Hill 

Crank, J. Cecil (3) 411 Guilford Bldg Greensboro 

Craver, a. W. (3) Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

Cravi^ford, D. H. (1) 231 Haywood Bldg Asheville 

Crawford, J. R. (2) 612 O'Hanlon Bldg Winston-Salem 

Crotts, Hylton K. (2) 1512 Reynolds Bldg Winston-Salem 

Crouse, Vance Lee (2) Doctors Bldg Charlotte 

Crowell, J. G. (1) 310 Com. Bldg Hendersonville 

Cummings, Paul M. (3) School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 

Cunningham, Fenton S. (1) City Bldg Asheville 

Current, A. C. (1) 612 Commercial Bk. Bldg. .. Gastonia 

Current, A. C, Jr. (1) 612 Commercial Bk. Bldg. .. Gastonia 

Current, William Clyde (2) First Nat. Bk. Bldg Statesville 

Cuthrell, Edwin (2) 5V2 E. Main St Thomasville 



ROSTER 271 

Daniel, Robert Lee (3) Reidsville 

Daniel, Rufus A., Jr. (5) Roanoke Rapids 

Daniels, L. M. (3) Southern Pines 

Daniels, O. C. (5) 2819 Stonewall Ave Richmond, Va. 

Darden, Thomas H. (3) Box 1322 Chapel Hill 

Davenport, H. V. (1) 507 N. Center St Hickory 

Davenport, William (1) P. O. Box 85 Spruce Pine 

Davis. Frank W. (1) Flatiron Bldg Asheville 

Davis, J. V., Jr. (2) 181 N. Spring St Concord 

Davis, Walter Hamlet (1) 13 Hill Top Rd Asheville 

Dawkins, Charles D. (3) Marshville 

Dawson, Irby C. (3) 126 N. Main St High Point 

Dearman, J. H. (2) Box 5 Statesville 

Dehart, V. L. (2) Walnut Cove 

Demary, C. J. (5) New River Clinic Jacksonville 

Demeritt, W. W. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

Denton, E. C. (5) Whitakers 

Derby, Jay E. (1) Tryon 

Dickens, Carl W. (3) Box 837 ...- Chapel Hill 

Dickey, Harry (1) Murphy 

Dickson, B. A. (1) IOV2 S. Main St Marion 

DiERCKS, C. C. (1) Kibler Bldg Morganton 

DiLDAY, John S. (3) Ill Corcoran St Durham 

Ditto, W. M. (3) 912 N. Elm St Greensboro 

Dixon, T. L. (3) Ill Corcoran St Durham 

DoLBEE, Earl R., Jr. (1) 312 Commercial Bldg. Hendersonville 

Dowdy, John H. (5) 225 Rose St Rocky Mount 

Drum, Borden C. (1) Conover 

Dudley, D. W. (1) 20 Lorraine Ave Asheville 

DuDNEY, George G. (4) State Board of Health Raleigh 

Duke, J. F. (5) P. O. Box 695 Washington 

Duncan, Norman James (2) 636 Reynolds Bldg Winston-Salem 

Duncan, S. C. (2) Box 294 Monroe 

Dupree, Louis J., Jr. (5) Kinston 

DuPREE, Col. Lewis J. (5) Box 325 Swansboro 

Durham, B. J. (3) Box 918 Southern Pines 

Eagles, R. L. (4) Louisburg 

Eakes, S. E. (4) First Citi. Bk. Bldg Franklinton 

Early, A. C. (5) 303 Bk. of Wayne Bldg Goldsboro 

Eatman, C. D. (5) 212 Peoples Bk. Bldg. .. Rocky Mount 

Eatman, E. L. (5) 212 Peoples Bk. Bldg. .. Rocky Mount 

Eckard, Everette, a. (2) Box 311 Mocksville 

Edwards, A. C. (1) Box 3 Lawndale 

Edwards, Byard F. (1) Webb Bldg Shelby 

Edwards, E. L. (1) State Hospital Morganton 

Edwards, George L., Jr. (5) Kinston 

Edwards, H. A. (5) P. O. Box 60 Pink Hill 

Edwards, James H. (4) Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Edwards, J. R. (4) Fuquay Springs 

Edwards, J. R., Jr. (4) Fuquay Springs 



272 ROSTER 

Edwards, L. M. (3) Ill Corcoran St Durham 

Edwards, W. J. (3) Chatham Bk. Bldg Siler City 

Edwards, Z. L. (5) Hoyt Bldg Washington 

Edwards, Zeno L., Jr. (5) Hoyt Bldg Washington 

Efird, Ira P., Jr. (3) 1217 Magnolia St Greensboro 

Ellerbe, J. H. (3) Steele Bldg Rockingham 

Ellington, R. H. (2) Wallace Bldg Salisbury 

Elliott, James J. (2) 928 E. Boulevard Charlotte 

Ethridge, J. E. (4) Kenly 

Eure, Darden, J. (5) Morehead 

Evans, M. R. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

EzzELL, John William (2) 205 Cabarrus Bk. Bldg Concord 

Ezzell, L. L. (1) Andrews 

Fales, a. R. (5) Murchison Bldg Wilmington 

Falls, Ralph L. (1) Box 270 Morganton 

Farrell, Roscoe M. (3) Pittsboro 

Farthing, J. Clopten (2) Reynolds Bldg Winston-Salem 

Faucette, J. W. (1) New Med. Bldg Asheville 

Ferro, Edward R. (5) 306 Connley Ave Ahoskie 

Fields, Paisley (4) P. O. Box 375 Fairmont 

Finch, Robert E. (4) Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Finch, S. J. (4) P. O. Box 311 Oxford 

Finch, Walter H., Jr. (4) Box 862 Henderson 

Finn, James C. (3) 510 W. Market St Greensboro 

Fisher, W. R. (2) Concord 

Fitzgerald, Paul (5) P. O. Box 538 Greenville 

Fitzgerald, Paul, Jr. (4) Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Fleming, A. H. (4) P. O. Box 66 Louisburg 

Fleming, J. Martin (4) 1218 Glenwood Ave Raleigh 

Fleming, Thos. S. (5) Tarboro 

Folger, J. M. (2) Dobson 

Forbes, M. M., Jr. (1) 106 S. Main St Lenoir 

Foster, H. K. (3) Southeastern Bldg Greensboro 

Foushee, L. M. (3) Box 966 Burlington 

Foust, J. A., Jr. (3) Mebane 

Fowler, W. Frank (2) Walnut Cove 

Fox, Burke W. (2) 308 Med. Arts Bldg Charlotte 

Fox, M. O. (2) 201 W. Main St Elkin 

Fox, Noah D. (2) 1656 Reynolds Bldg. .. Winston-Salem 

Freedland, Jake B. (2) 1206 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Freeman, Tom P. (4) Route 2 Raleigh 

Freund, O. J. (2) 715 W. 4th St Winston-Salem 

Fritz, C. B. (1) Menzies Bldg Hickory 

Fritz, John R. (1) Menzies Bldg Hickory 

Froneberger, H. D. (1) Medical Bldg Gastonia 

Frost, J. S. (3) 203 Park Square Burlington 

Frye, David G., Jr. (1) 214 Second St Hickory 

Fuerst, Herbert (5) 1210 Sunset Ave Rocky Mount 

Funderburke, Ervin M. (2) Doctors Bldg Charlotte 

FuRR, Curtis E. (2) 2405 Kannapolis Rd Concord 



ROSTER 273 

FuRR, James E. (5) Wilmington 

FuRR, W. E. (1) Franklin 

Gaither, F. Glenn (2) 403 W. Broad St Statesville 

Galarde, a. J. (2) 101 Queen's Road Charlotte 

Gale, John I. (3) Box 243 Wadesboro 

Gallagher, J. Wilfred (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

Garber, Max R. (3) 115 South St Albemarle 

Gardner, J. M. (4) Gibson 

Garrett, R. T. (3) Rockingham 

Garriott, Rosebud M. (2) East Bend 

Garris, M. a. (5) Weldon 

Gay, S. p. (3) 326 Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

George, Robert Allen (2) 192 S. Main St Mount Airy 

Georgl\de, N. G. (3) Duke Hospital Durham 

Gerdes, CD. (1) McGeachy Bldg Biltmore 

Getsinger, D. M. (3) Box 1078 Chapel Hill 

Gilbert, R. H. (5) Clinic Bldg. Glenwood Ave. .. Kinston 

Gilbert, W. B., Jr. (3) Fidelity Bank Bldg Durham 

Gilliam, F. E. (3) Box 448 Burlington 

Glenn, Edmond, T. (1) Boone 

Godwin, Charles P. (5) P. O. Box 926 Rocky Mount 

Goldwasser, Jos. M. (5) 2217 Ivy Rd Kinston 

Gollobin, Arthur (5) Carolina Bldg Elizabeth City 

Gooding, Carney C. (5) Havelock 

Gooding, Herbert W. (5) Ayden 

Goodwin, C. J. (1) Brevard 

Grady, L. V. (2) 1509 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Graham, C. Allen (3) Ramseur 

Graham, C. A., Jr. (3) Ramseur 

Graham, James E., Jr. (2) 1506y2 Central Ave Charlotte 

Graham, Richard H. (1) Lenoir 

Grant, Ben P. (1) Franklin 

Grant, L. C. (5) Jackson 

Gray, W. H. (5) Box 169 Williamston 

Griffin, W. K. (3) 1004V2 W. Main St Durham 

Griffin, Wallace S. (5) Citizens Bank Bldg Edenton 

Grimes, W. F. (4) First Citi. Bk. Bldg Fayetteville 

Grimsley, Walter, R. (3) Asheboro 

Guion, Jno. Homer (2) 6-B Doctors Bldg Charlotte 

Hair, J. E. (1) Canton 

Hair, J. S. (4) Fayetteville 

Hair, L. G. (4) Box 684 Fayetteville 

Hale, Clarence C. (5) Sutton Bldg Kinston 

Hale, G. Fred (4) Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Hale, J. P. (4) 115 Bow St Fayetteville 

Hall, Walter A., Jr. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

Hamer, Thomas N. (2) 415 Professional Bldg Charlotte 

Hamilton, A. L., Jr. (5) Morehead City 

Hamilton, R. P. (4) Cary 

Hammond, W. L. (5) 330 S. Front St New Bern 



274 ROSTER 

Hand, William L., Jr. (5) New Bern 

Hargrove, A. W. (4) 302 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Hargrove, W. F. (1) 526 N. Main St Hendersonville 

Harless, Lt. Charles (4) 615 Infirm Ent. AFB, Colo. 

Harrell, James A. (2) Box 688 Elkin 

Harrell, Paul T. (4) P. O. Box 12 Wake Forest 

Harrell, R. B. (2) Box 688 Elkin 

Harrelson, Henry C. (2) Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Harris, Archie L. (5) 416 Murchison Bldg Wilmington 

Harris, F. G. (4) 135 Wicker St Sanford 

Harris, Guy V. (3) 511 Trust Bldg Durham 

Harris, Stanford (1) Weaverville 

Harris, T. H. (4) Wake County Health Dept. .. Raleigh 

Harris, Wm. E. (2) Ramey AFB Puerto Rico 

Hart, S. T. (3) Security Nat. Bank High Point 

Hart, W. I., Jr. (5) Edenton 

Hartness, John F. (2) Box 6262 St. Petersburg, Florida 

Harwood, Brooks W. (3) Mt. Gilead 

Haynes, Frank K. (2) 509 Independence Bldg Charlotte 

Heath, LeRoy (3) 1506 Carolina Avenue Durham 

Hedman, L. C. (5) 413 Murchison Bldg Wilmington 

Hedrick, Paul E. (1) Hedrick Bldg Lenoir 

Heinz, J. W. (2) 1516 B. Central Ave Charlotte 

Helsabeck, C. Robert (2) Box 38 Rural Hall 

Helsabeck, William J. (2) Box 325 King 

Henderson, H. C. (2) Charlotte 

Hendricks, F. R. (1) Box 116 Waynesville 

Henson, Donald L. (5) 208 Glenwood Ave Kinston 

Henson, James L. (3) 1029 Madison Avenue Greensboro 

Herman, Ralph E. (2) Taylorsville 

Herring, L. D. (4) 617 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Hesseman, Gary (2) 801 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Hester, Elliot McK. (3) 132 Church St High Point 

Hester, J. N. (3) Penn. Bldg Reidsville 

Hester, O. H. (3) 507 N. Main St High Point 

HiGHSMiTH, Chauncey (1) P. O. Box 573 Gastonia 

Higley, Bruce W. (4) 617 Searight Drive Fort Bragg 

HiGLEY, L. B. (3) Laurel Hill Rd Chapel Hill 

Hill, J. N. (1) Box 191 Murphy 

Hinson, J. Y. (3) 1181/2 E. Main St Durham 

Hinson, W. p. (3) 649 N. Main St High Point 

HiNTON, W. R., Jr. (3) Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

HoDGiN, Orien R. (2) 17 W. Main St Thomasville 

Hoffman, Milo (2) 211 Hawthorne Lane Charlotte 

Hoffman, Robert R. (1) 808 Flatiron Bldg Asheville 

HoLCOMB, D. W. (2) 605 Reynolds Bldg Winston-Salem 

HoLDEN, R. H. (3) P. O. Box 1221 Shallotte 

HoLLADAY, J. K. (2) 301 A. Hawthorne Lane Charlotte 

Holland, J. M. (2) Mills Bldg Statesville 

Holland, N. T. (4) Clayton 



i 



I 



ROSTER 275 

HoLLiDAY, R. H. (2) 17 Randolph St Thomasville 

Holly, Norman J. (1) Tryon 

Holmes, C. Ray (3) 1029 Madison Ave Greensboro 

HoLSHOUSER, L. C. (2) Box 535 Rockwell 

Hooks, Oscar (5) Box 754 Wilson 

Hooper, G. L. (4) Turlington Bldg Dunn 

Hooper, L. J. (1) 606 Flatiron Bldg Asheville 

Hoover, Dan C. (2) Professional Bldg Charlotte 

Hoover, Rufus Gray (2) 108 Colville Rd Charlotte 

HoRD, D. F. (1) Box 301 Kings Mountain 

HoRD, DwiGHT B. (1) Box 192 Lawndale 

HoRTON, Charles W. (3) 114V2 S. Main St High Point 

HoRTON, R. L. (4) Route 2 Wendell 

HoRTON, S. Robert (4) 620 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Houston, B. H. (5) 710 S. Oleander Ave Goldsboro 

Howell, A. E. (2) P. O. Box 344 Spencer 

Howell, J. Spencer (1) Box 255 Little Switzerland 

Howell, W. C, Jr. (3) 1109 W. Main St Durham 

Howes, Ralph R. (1) Romina Theatre Bldg Forest City 

Hoyle, Frank W. (1) 727 Haywood Road Asheville 

Hughes, Charles W. (3) Roxboro 

Hughes, Jack H. (3) Roxboro 

Hughes, John T. (3) Box 237 Pittsboro 

HuLiN, James F. (4) Sanford 

Hull, P. C. (2) 1014 Independence Bldg Charlotte 

Hull. P. C, Jr. (2) 6-H Doctors Bldg Charlotte 

Hunsucker, Hugh M. (3) 100 Fisher Park Circle .... Greensboro 

Hunt, John J. (1) Box 247 Cliffside 

Hunt, J. K. (4) Lakeview 

Hunt, J. T. (4) Henderson 

Hunt, R. F. (5) P. O. Box 926 Rocky Mount 

Hunt. R. Nat (2) Lexington 

Hunter, E. W. (4) Box 786 Sanford 

Hunter, Grover C, Jr. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

Hunter, M. R. (3) 414 Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

Hunter, R. S. (4) 1515 St. Mary's St Raleigh 

Hunter, Thomas M. (4) Jefferson Bldg Henderson 

HussEY, T. E. (3) Star 

Hutchinson, C. L. (5) Scotland Neck 

Ingram, W. A. (2) Secrest Bldg Monroe 

Inscoe, a. G. (5) Box 427 Spring Hope 

Irwin, John R. (2) 901 Independence Bldg Charlotte 

Isenhower, Samuel E. (1) Newton 

Jackson, David S. (5) State Hospital Goldsboro 

Jackson, Dwight A. (2) Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Jackson, Wilbert (4) Rich Bldg Clinton 

Jamison, Homer C. (2) 615 East 4th St Charlotte 

Jarrell, W. a. (2) nil E. Morehead St Charlotte 

Jarrett, Charles A. (2) 913 Independence Bldg Charlotte 

Jarrett, Clyde H. (2) Doctor's Bldg Charlotte 



276 ROSTER 

Jarrett, Ralph F. (2) 913 Independence Bldg Charlotte 

Jennette, a. T. (5) Washington 

Jent, Herman C. (2) 9 E. Sprague St Winston-Salem 

Jerntgan, J. A. (4) Box 68 Dunn 

Johnson, Artis D. (5) National Bank Bldg Wilson 

Johnson, A. H. (3) 101 E. Washington St Greensboro 

Johnson, B. McK. (5) Box 391 Greenville 

Johnson, C. B. (5) Jacksonville 

Johnson, Charles B. (5) 220 Elks Temple New Bern 

Johnson, F. G. (2) Lexington 

Johnson, K. L. (4) 302 Masonic Temple Raleigh 

Johnson, M. L. (4) P. O. Box 392 Whiteville 

Johnson, N. C, Jr. (3) 608 N. Main St High Point 

Johnson, Wade H. (5) Box 109 Plymouth 

Johnson, William H. (3) Southern Pines 

Johnston, Charles D., Jr. (5) Elizabeth City 

Jones, Broadus E. (2) 57 N. Church St Concord 

Jones, Edgar D. (1) West Jefferson 

Jones, Marvin T. (4) Hosp. Dental Clinic Fort Jackson, 

South Carolina 

Jones, Paul E. (5) South Main St Farmville 

Jones, R. S. (4) Warrenton 

Jones, William F. (2) 820y2 Main St N. Wilkesboro 

Jordan, J. F. (4) Raeford 

Joyner, O. L. (2) P. O. Box 55 Kernersville 

Kanoy, Burrell Edmond (3) 2809 1/2 Roxboro Rd N. Durham 

Karesh, H. a. (3) Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

Keener, Harold (1) 474y2 Haywood Rd Asheville 

Keerans, James L. (2) 810 Com. Bank Bldg Charlotte 

Keiger, C. C. (2) 712 Independence Bldg Charlotte 

Kendrick, V. B. (2) 1001 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Kendrick, Zebulon V. (2) Doctors Bldg Charlotte 

Kennerly, Robert B. (1) 609 Public Service Bldg Asheville 

Ketcham, William S. (5) Box D Jacksonville 

KiDD, William E. (5) Washington 

KiLKELLY, T. F. (3) 303 Dixie Bldg Greensboro 

KiLPATRiCK, J. M. (5) Robersonville 

Kilpatrick, Ralph E. (3) 325 Sunset Ave Asheboro 

King, D. D. (4) Box 336 Lumberton 

KiRBY, O. B. (2) 228y2 N. Tryon St Charlotte 

Kirk, Frank W. (2) 200 Wallace Bldg Salisbury 

Kirk, William S. (2) 200 Wallace Bldg Salisbury 

KiRKENDALL, C. E. (2) 1516 Central Ave Charlotte 

KiRKLAND, Geo. F. (3) 405 Trust Bldg Durham 

KiSER, J. Donald (2) 3275 S. Perry St Montgomery, Ala. 

KiSTLER, A. R. (2) P. O. Box 314 Monroe 

KiSTLER, C. D. (3) Box 34 Randleman 

KiTTs, Warren H. (4) State Hospital Raleigh 

KoRNEGAY, J. M. (5) Warsaw 



ROSTER 277 

Krueger, G. L., Jr. (2) 807 Com. Bank Bldg Charlotte 

Kyles, C. Paul (1) Box 129 Maiden 

Lackey, A. A. (1) Fallston 

Lanier, Harold S. (2) Dental Corps MCAS Cherry Point 

Lansche, F. E. (5) 400 State Bank Bldg Greenville 

L.ARGE, Nelson D. (5) 5303 Duke St Alexandria, Va. 

Lasley, J. T. (3) 334 Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

Lauten, J. J. (3) 811 N. Elm Greensboro 

Lawrence, E. N. (4) 701 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Lawrence, Jack D. (1) Appalachian Theater Bldg Boone 

Laxton, W. p. (5) 308 Murchison Bldg Wilmington 

Lazenby, G. a., Jr. (2) 403 W. Broad St Statesville 

Lee, E. G. (4) Clinton 

Lee. James (5) 201 W. College St Mount Olive 

Lee, Lewis W. (5) 207 N. Tarboro St Wilson 

Lee, W. G. (4) Smithfield 

Leggette, James A. (3) School of Dentistry Chapel Hill 

Lentz, Bernard P. (2) Professional Bldg Charlotte 

Lessem, Robert B. (4) Box 949 Fayetteville 

Levine, H. H. (2) 537 Nissen Bldg. Winston-Salem 

Lewis, O. Preston (1) Kings Mountain 

LiBBY, Robert H. (2) 1524 Harding Place Charlotte 

LiGON, J. H., Jr. (4) 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 

Lilly, M. M. (5) Professional Bldg Scotland Neck 

LiNDAHL, Roy L. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

Lindsay, Dan A. (1) West Jefferson 

LiNDSEY, Kemp (4) 507 First Cit. Bk. Bldg. Fayetteville 

Lineberger, H. O., Jr. (4) Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Life, E. W. (2) Professional Bldg Kannapolis 

Lipscomb, C. T. (3) P. O. Box 325 Greensboro 

Little, James E. (2) Box 733 Statesville 

Little, Thomas A. (3) 2908 Roxboro Rd Durham 

Litton, Robert B. (1) 704 W. Warren St Shelby 

LocKHART, D. K. (3) Fidelity Bank Building Durham 

LocKWOOD, A. T. (1) 508 City Bldg Asheville 

Long, Herbert S. (3) P. O. Box 246 Graham 

Long, Robert (2) Mocksville 

Long, Robert E. (3) Roxboro 

Love, James H. (1) 102y2 Broadway Black Mountain 

LuPTON, Cecil R. (5) Swanquarter 

Mackie, E. B. (1) Granite Falls 

Mallard, A. R. (5) P. O. Box 256 Goldsboro 

Marks, Sandy C. (5) APCM Lubondai, Tshimbulu, 

Congo Beige, Africa 

Marshall, W. Penn (4) Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Marshbank, B. p. (4) Lillington 

Marshburn, J. A. (4) State Hospital Camp Butner 

Martin, Ernest L. (2) 502 Stearns Bldg Statesville 

Martin, Franklin E. (1) Box 146 Enka 



278 ROSTER 

Martin, Wm. T. (4) 303 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Massey, L. M. (4) Zebulon 

Massey, M. B. (5) 200 State Bank Bldg Greenville 

Massey, S. H., Jr. (4) Warrenton 

Massey, W. J., Jr. (4) Smithfield 

Massey, Zyba K. (4) Box 252 Zebulon 

Masten, Guy (2) 724 Arbor Rd. N. W Winston-Salem 

Masten, R. E. (2) 335 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Masters, W. B. (1) Bakersville 

Matheson, William M. (1) Boone Drug Bldg Boone 

Mauney, Richard G., Jr. (1) Box 345 Forest City 

Maxwell, H. E. (4) 907 Hay Street Fayetteville 

May. H. M. (1) 205 Flatiron Bldg Asheville 

McAnnally, C. W. (3) Madison 

McBrayer, Wm. Fisher (1) 1042 N. Washington .... Rutherfordton 

McBrayer, Matt (1) Rutherfordton 

McCall, Clyde N. (1) Dobbins Air Force Base Marietta, Ga. 

McCall, C. S. (1) Box 102 Forest City 

McCall, C. W. (1) Tryon 

McCall, Glenn Wesley (1) Box 1331 Tryon 

McCall, R. S. (1) Box 527 Marion 

McCall, S. H. (3) P. O. Box 157 Troy 

McClung, John A. (2) 401 Pepper Bldg Winston-Salem 

McCracken, C. H. (1) 131 Arcade Bldg Asheville 

McDaniels, W. J. (1) Security Bank Bldg Rutherfordton 

McDowell, Wm. White (1) 407 2nd St Hickory 

McDuffie, a. a. (3) P. O. Box 173 Candor 

McFall, Walter T. (1) 602 Flatiron Bldg Asheville 

McFarland, W. G. (3) 272 N. Graham-Hopedale Rd. 

Burlington 

McGuiRE, Alice Patsy (1) Sylva 

McGuiRE, Daisy (1) Sylva 

McGuiRE, Harold S. (1) Sylva 

McGuiRE, NoRACELLA E. (1) Box 445 Sylva 

McGuiRE, W. P. (1) Sylva 

McIntosh, J. A. (3) Barnes Bldg Asheboro 

McKaughan, Gates (4) P. O. Box 878 Lumberton 

McKaughan, W. R. (3) 330 Locke St High Point 

McKay, S. R. (4) Lillington 

McLean, Graham (4) Lumberton 

McRae, Walter L. (4) Red Springs 

Meador, J. R. (3) P. O. Box 1105 Reidsville 

Medford, N. M. (1) Box 156 Waynesville 

Medford, Phil McRae (1) Waynesville 

Medlin, E. M. (3) Box 176 Aberdeen 

Megginson, L. p., Jr. (3) High Point 

Melvin, R. Phillip (2) 2008 Cloverdale Ave. .. Winston-Salem 

Mendenhall, F. C. (2) 214 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Menius, John W., Jr. (3) Box 144 Asheboro 

Miller, C. I. (3) Box 748 Albemarle 

Miller, Roy A., Jr. (5) Mohn Bldg New Bern 



ROSTER 279 

Miller, W. J. (1) Box 501 Lenoir 

MiLLiKEN, J. B. (3) P. O. Box 71 Siler City 

MiNGES, Clyde E. (5) Box 192 Rocky Mount 

MiNGES, C. R. (5) Box 192 Rocky Mount 

MiSKA, Monte G. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

MiZE, John T. (1) Box 305 Tryon 

Mizell, D. B. (2) 215 Professional Bldg Charlotte 

MoHN, Robert L. (4) Box 1223 Fayetteville 

MoHR, I. W. (3) 4203 Chester Ave Philadelphia, Pa. 

Monk, H. L., Jr. (3) 401 Dept. Nat. Bk. Bldg Durham 

Montgomery, D. O. (2) P. O. Box 309 Statesville 

Moore, E. D. (2) 921 Elizabeth Ave Charlotte 

Moore, H. W. (3) P. O. Box 373 Hillsboro 

Moore, J. G. (2) 154 N. Main St Mooresville 

Moore, J. S. (3) Box 149 Reidsville 

Moore, L. J. (4) St. Pauls 

Moore, L. J., Jr. (4) Box 998 Lumberton 

Moore, R. T. (1) Mount Holly 

Moore, R. W. (5) 112 St. James St Tarboro 

Moorefield, Paul (2) P. O. Box 311 Mount Airy 

MoRELAND, Jesse Z. (1) Highlands 

Morgan, Eugene Brow^n (2) P. O. Box 794 Kannapolis 

Morris, Donald W. (2) 1519 Elizabeth Ave Charlotte 

Morris, Ernest C. (2) 1519 Elizabeth Ave Charlotte 

Morrison, B. R. (5) 210 Murchison Bldg Wilmington 

Morrison, Robert R. (4) 520 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

MosER, James E. (1) Box 1123 Gastonia 

MosER, Kenneth B. (2) 25 A. Woodland Terrace Apts. 

Columbia, S. C. 

Moser, S. E. (1) Commercial Bldg Gastonia 

Moses, John E. (2) Doctor's Bldg Charlotte 

Moses, J. M. (1) 25 Myrtle St Belmont 

Motley, Elliott R. (2) 217 N. Torrence St Charlotte 

MuNSELL, Paul L. (5) First Cit. Bank Bldg Kinston 

MuRPHREY, W. E. (5) Roanoke Rapids 

Murray, Henry V. (3) Box 98 Burlington 

MusTAiN, Wallace F. (5) Box 113 Kill Devil Hills 

Mynatt, Wm. a. fl) Biltmorc 

Neal, W. E. (3) Liberty 

Nelson, J. S. D. (4) Masonic Bldg Raleigh 

Nelson, R. M. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

Nelson. Thomas E., Jr. (4) 200 St. Mary's St. Raleigh 

Newman, J. B. (3) Box 196 Burlington 

Newton, M. E. (3) Box 1291 Chapel Hill 

Nichols, R. T. (3) Rockingham 

Nicholson, J. H. (2) Box 527 Statesville 

Nicholson, Marion P., Jr. (4) ..Bryan Bldg Raleigh 

NiMocKS, W. G. (4) Sandrocks Bldg Fayetteville 

NisBET, T. G. (2) 301 Hawthorne Lane Charlotte 

Nissen, Eva Carter (2) 633 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 



280 ROSTER 

Nixon, H. E. (5) 322 Carolina Bldg Elizabeth City 

Noble, R. J. (4) 7557 Au-Disp. APO 851C, 

New York, N. Y. 

O'Leary, J. a. (1) Box 156 Fletcher 

Olive, C. S. (4) First Cit. Bk. Bldg Fayetteville 

Olive, R. M. (4) First Cit. Bk. Bldg Fayetteville 

Olive, R. M., Jr. (4) 211 Devene St Fayetteville 

Oliver, Otis (2) P. O. Box 784 Mount Airy 

Oliver, W. H. (4) 4455 USAF Hospital .. Donaldson AFB, 

South Carolina 

Osborne, C. P. Jr. (4) Box 724 Lumberton 

OvERCASH, Robert F. (3) Harris Bldg Albemarle 

Overman, G. L. (5) 506 Wayne Nat. Bk. Bldg. .. Goldsboro 

Owen, Olin Watson (2) 1201 E. Morehead St Charlotte 

Page, L. G. (3) P. O. Box 157 Yanceyville 

Paisley, R. L. (1) Ervin Bldg Morganton 

Parker, C. A. (1) Box 305 Marion 

Parker, H. C, Jr. (2) 1301 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Parker, W. H. (1) Box 2 Valdese 

Parks, J. H. (2) 209 Professional Bldg Kannapolis 

Paschal, Lawrence H. (4) Fayetteville 

Patterson, Curtis E. (3) 2007 Walker Ave Greensboro 

Patterson, George K. (3) Box 432 Burlington 

Patterson, G. K. (1) 617 Flatiron Bldg Asheville 

Patterson, H. M. (3) Box 792 Burlington 

Patterson, Ralph M. (2) P. O. Box 544 Concord 

Payne, John Edward (4) Hancock Bldg Oxford 

Payne, Joseph M. (4) Clayton 

Pearce, Jacob A. (4) 2713 Peachtree St Raleigh 

Pearce, O. R. Jr. (4) Turlington Bldg Dunn 

Pearce, W. M. (3) 49V2 Main St Hamlet 

Pearson, E. A. (4) 410 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Pearson, P. L. (4) Apex 

Peeler, C. M. (1) Box 363 Shelby 

Peeler, Lackey B. (3) 6-C Doctor's Bldg Charlotte 

Peery, Walton S. (2) 225 N. Torrence St Charlotte 

Pegg, Fred N. (2) P. O. Box 204 Kernersville 

Pennell, William T. (1) 2 Windsor Rd Asheville 

Penny, J. E. (1) Boyd Bldg Waynesville 

Perdue, H. L. (3) Box 1547 Burlington 

Petree, R. E. (2) 418 Professional Bldg Charlotte 

Pharr, Joe (1) Cherryville 

Pharr, John R. (2) 619 Professional Bldg Charlotte 

Phillips, A. A. (4) Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Pigford, Guy E. (5) 611 Murchison Bldg Wilmington 

Pitts, D. R. (3) R.F.D. 1, Box 126A Jamestown 

Plaster, Harold Edwin (1) Royster Bldg Shelby 

Plaster, Hubert S. (1) P. O. Box 216 Shelby 

Pleasants, Marvin (4) Louisburg 

Pless, C. a. (1) 801 Flatiron Bldg Asheville 



ROSTER 281 

PoiNDEXTER, Claiborne W. (3) ..311 Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

PoiNDEXTER, C. C. (3) 311 Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

Poole. J. G. (5) Mem. Gen. Hospital Kinston 

Poole, S. D. (5) Box 203 Goldsboro 

PoovEY. Auburn L. (1) Bernard Bldg Hickory 

Pope, E. F. (1) Box 188 Hendersonville 

Powell, C. G. (5) 115 W. Main St Ahoskie 

Powell, J. B. (4) Clinton 

Pratt, F. P., Jr. (2) 528 Mitchell Ave Salisbury 

Pressley, Wm. a. (3) 822 N. Elm St Greensboro 

Presnell, O. L. (3) First Nat. Bk. Bldg Asheboro 

Price, A. Dwight (3) 208 Lennox Bldg Chapel Hill 

Price, J. L. (1) Hickory 

Price, William H. (2) 205 Jefferson St Monroe 

Pridgen, D. L. (4) -...115 Bow St Fayetteville 

Pringle, a. J. (2) RFD No. 2 Kernersville 

Pringle, J. M. (4) Box 1134 Fayetteville 

Pruett, Julius E. (1) Bessemer City 

Pruett. L. Doyle (2) 210 W. Main St Elkin 

Pruitt, C. C. Jr. (4) USNH Chelsea, Mass. 

Purvis. P. C. (4) Fairmont 

Ralph, W. T. (5) Belhaven 

Ramsey, Arthur (1) P. O. Box 93 Marshall 

Rankin, W. W. (4) 406 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Ranson, Robert K. (1) Burnsville 

Rasberry, William E. (5) Griffon 

Ratton, Thomas G. (2) Development Bldg Lexington 

Raymer, J. L. (1) Masonic Bldg Shelby 

Reade, a. p. (3) Fidelity Bank Bldg Durham 

Reece, J. F. (1) 203 Fidelity Bldg Lenoir 

Reece, J. P. (2) Cannon Bldg Concord 

Reeves, Horace P., Jr. (2) 225 N. Torrence St Charlotte 

Rehm, Jerome G. (2) Doctors Bldg Charlotte 

Reich, E. H. (2) 104 Lexington Rd Winston-Salem 

Reid, Curtis S. (2) 506 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Renfrow, R. R. (4) 1304 Fort Bragg Rd Fayetteville 

Rhea, R. C. (1) Box 366 Canton 

Rhyne, Howard S. (1) Realty Bldg Gastonia 

Rich, C. F. (1) 7 Bk. of Asheville Bldg Asheville 

Richardson, Richard E. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

RiDDiCK, C. R. (5) Ayden 

Riddle, Arthur C. (1) 435 Biltmore Ave Asheville 

Ridenhour, Charles E. (2) Carolina Bldg Kannapolis 

Riggs, Abner F. (5) 319 Carolina Bldg Elizabeth City 

Riggs, H. p. (5) No. 9 N 17th St Wilmington 

Roach, Thomas H. (2) 214 Wallace Bldg Salisbury 

Roberts, C. F. (4) Dunn 

Roberts, James E. (3) Box 1362 Burlington 

Roberts, Pearce, Jr. (1) 417 City Hall Bldg Asheville 

Rogers, John (2) 2400 Wilkinson Blvd Charlotte 



282 ROSTER 

Rollins, L. C. (1) Wells Bldg Canton 

Ross, Grady (2) 613 Independence Bldg Charlotte 

Ross, Heywood (2) 505 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Ross, Ledyard Elree (5) First Nat. Bk. Bldg Ayden 

Ross, Norman F. (3) Duke Hospital Durham 

Ross, Thurman J. (3) Trust Bldg Durham 

Rudder, William L. (5) Box 332 Beaufort 

Russell, L. T. (1) City Bldg Asheville 

Sain, H. T. (1) Kirksey Clinic Morganton 

Sams, R. B. (1) Mars Hill 

Sanders, C. W. (4) First Cit. Bk. Bldg Benson 

Sapp, Baxter B. (3) Durham 

Sappington, Roy Robert (4) ....P. O. Box 1253 Fayetteville 

Saunders, William L. (3) Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

ScHiEBEL, Edward C. (2) 219 W. Main St Elkin 

Schneider, Cdr. J. J. (1) U. S. Naval Dental Clinic, 

Navy Base Norfolk, Va. 

ScHMUCKER, Ralph (2) 801 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Scott, Glen G. (3) Leaksville 

Scott, Ludwig G. (3) Route 2 Burlington 

Scruggs, Charles S. (5) 'D' DIV USS VULCAN 'ARS' 

c/o F.P.O New York, N. Y. 

Scruggs, W. N. (2) 402 Wilder Bldg Charlotte 

Secrest, J. R. (2) 1181/2 W. 4th St Winston-Salem 

Secrest, W. a. (2) 208 O'Hanlon Bldg Winston-Salem 

Seifert, David W. (4) 804 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Seitter, D. B., Jr. (5) 907 Murchison Bldg Wilmington 

Self, Fred L. (1) Lawing Bldg Lincolnton 

Self, I. R. (1) Lawing Bldg Lincolnton 

Self, Ruffin, Jr. (1) P. O. Box 127 Lincolnton 

Senter, J. C. (3) Box 911 Albemarle 

Sessoms, William W. (3) Southeastern Bldg Greensboro 

Shaffer, S. W. (3) Southeastern Bldg Greensboro 

Shamburger, B. B. (3) Star 

Shankle, Robert J. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

Shapiro, Eugene (1) Asheville 

Shaw, F. C. (1) 304 Willow St Lenoir 

Sheffield, Neal (3) 304 Dixie Bldg Greensboro 

Sherrod, W. B. (2) Wachovia Bank Bid. .. Winston-Salem 

Shoaf, R. R. (2) Box 542 Lexington 

Sholar, N. p. (2) 201 W. McClelland Ave Mooresville 

Short, L. H. (2) Doctors Bldg Charlotte 

Sigmon, James W. (3) Southeastern Bldg Greensboro 

SiKES, T. E. (3) Southeastern Bldg Greensboro 

Sikes, T. E., Jr. (3) Southeastern Bldg Greensboro 

Slaughter, Freeman C. (2) 209-11 Professional Bldg. .. Kannapolis 

Sloop, W. M. (1) Crossnore 

Slott, Edwin F. (3) Box 15 Graham 

Smith, A. H. (2) Route 2 Lexington 

Smith, A. L., Jr. (4) Box 198 Sanford 



1 



ROSTER 283 

Smith, Edward N. (4) 1900 Bragg Blvd Fayetteville 

Smith, Everett L. (4) 820 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Smith, Grover Wilton (5) 1300 West Road Kinston 

Smith, James H. (5) Southern Bldg Wilmington 

Smith, Junius C. (5) 502 Murchison Bldg Wilmington 

Smith, Marcus R. (4) Raeford 

Smith, Robert Lee (3) 606 N. Fifth St Albemarle 

Smith, Thomas A. (5) 90 Manteo Drive Havelock 

Smithwick, D. T. (4) First Nat. Bk. Bldg Louisburg 

Snyder, J. M. (1) Box 177 Old Fort 

SocKWELL, Clarence L. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

SoLOMAN, M. H. (3) 912 Elm St Greensboro 

Southard, Floyd J. (2) Pinnix Bldg Kernersville 

SouTHwoRTH, JoHN D. (3) 1202 Madison Ave Greensboro 

Sowers, Wade A. (2) Lexington 

Spear, Herbert (5) Box 615 Kinston 

Spence, Wm. M. (5) 215 Carolina Bldg Elizabeth City 

Spillman, John H. (2) 2008 Cloverdale Ave. .. Winston-Salem 

Spoon, Riley E. (2) 834 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Stanford, A. R. (3) Guilford Bldg Greensboro 

Stanley, Lloyd B. (4) 800 St. Mary's St Raleigh 

Stanley, J. W. (5) Wilmington 

Stealey, S. L., Jr. (4) Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Steelman, S. H. (1) P. O. Box 308 Lincolnton 

Stephens, J. A. (3) E. Front St Burlington 

Stephenson, George (4) Box 588 Red Springs 

Stevens, C. W. (4) Box 535 Elizabethtown 

Stoddard, A. L. (5) Bethel 

Stone, C. N. (3) 9th, Vine St Greensboro 

Stone, Fleming H. (2) Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Stone, L F. (2) Box 116 Pilot Mountain 

Stonestreet, F. M. (3) 304 Hill Bldg Albemarle 

Stowe, G. C, Jr. (1) Drawer 125 Shelby 

Stroup, Paul A., Jr. (2) 9-F Doctors Bldg Charlotte 

Stubbs, J. M. (3) Jefferson Apts Rockingham 

Sturdevant, Clifford M. (3) ....School of Den Chapel Hill 

Sturdevant, Roger E. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

Sugg, C. H. (3) Ridge St Draper 

Suggs, J. R. (3) First Nat. Bank Bldg Asheboro 

SwAiM, John (3) Asheboro 

Swain, John P., Jr. (4) Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Swindell, James E. (4) Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Tannenbaum, a. R. (3) 1001 N. Elm St Greensboro 

Tatum, E. W. (5) Mount Olive 

Taylor, Ma.j. C. B. (1) Dental Clinic lA Camp Gordon, 

Georgia 

Taylor, C. F. (2) Box 4024 Charlotte 

Taylor, Lois E. (2) 720 E. Blvd Charlotte 

Taylor, Omer W. (1) Hunter Bldg Hendersonville 

Taylor, P. R. (1) Belmont 



284 ROSTER 

Taylor, Robert G. (2) Box 586 N. Wilkesboro 

Taylor, W. C. (2) P. O. Box 1429 Salisbury 

Teague, C. H. (3) 716 Southeastern Bldg Greensboro 

Teague, Everett R. (3) Box 659 Reidsville 

Templeton, W. B. (2) Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Tew, J. J. (4) Clayton 

Thomas, C. A. (5) P. O. Box 1315 Wilmington 

Thomas, Carl L. (2) P. O. Box 663 Mount Airy 

Thomas, J. T. (3) 151 N. Fayetteville St Asheboro 

Thompson, H. K. (5) 802 N. C. Bank Bldg Wilmington 

Thompson, Harold W. (2) China Grove 

Thompson, Lee Roy (2) 801 O'Hanlon Bldg Winston-Salem 

Thorpe, Jacob Oliver (2) 2015 Crescent Ave Charlotte 

Thurston, Milton S. (2) I26V2 Ennis St Salisbury 

Todd, H. A. (4) Whiteville 

ToMLiNSON, F. N. (2) O'Hanlon Bldg Winston-Salem 

Tomlinson, Robert L. (5) 204 Nat. Bank Bldg Wilson 

TowLER, S. B. (4) 804 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

TowNSEND, G. L. (4) Dunn 

Trivette, L. p. (2) Box 574 Mooresville 

Troutman, Marcus L. (2) P. O. Box 751 Kannapolis 

Truluck, M. H. (1) 704 Flatiron Bldg Asheville 

Tucker, Willlam W. (5) 210 Herman St Goldsboro 

Turbyfill, W. J. (1) 302 Flatiron Bldg Asheville 

Turlington, R. A. (4) P. O. Box 416 Clinton 

Turlington, Roscoe Harold (4) Henry C. Vann Bldg Clinton 

Turner, J. V. (5) Nat. Bank Bldg Wilson 

Turner, L. R. (5) P. O. Box D Jacksonville 

Turner, R. S. (3) 3606 Madison Ave Greensboro 

Tuttle, R. D. (2) 829 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Umphlett, W. W., Jr. (5) 507 Nash St Wilson 

Underw^ood, F. H. (3) Carthage 

Underv^ood, J. T. (3) 2829 Chapel Hill Rd Durham 

Underwood, N. H. (4) Wake Forest 

Underwood, R. L. (3) II5V2 S. Elm St Greensboro 

Vandervoort, Camiel Robert (3)107 N. Poplar Aberdeen 

Van Proyen, Leon (1) Box 27 Weaverville 

VoiLs, C. U. (2) Mooresville 

VoiLs, V. V. (2) Mooresville 

Vollmer, Thomas Dennis (3) ....Carlyle Clinic Burlington 

Wadsworth, Charles (2) 401 Cabarrus Savings Bank Bldg. 

Concord 

Walker, B. N. (2) 301 Hawthorne Lane Charlotte 

Walker, F. H. (2) Yadkinville 

Walker, M. E. (3) 1431 Broad St Durham 

Walker, W. W. (3) Box 301 Burlington 

Wall, L. E. (2) 704 Independence Bldg Charlotte 

Waller, D. T. (2) 301-C Hawthorne Lane Charlotte 

Ward, Ernest B. (4) Chadbourn 



ROSTER 285 

Ward, W. M. (5) Roanoke Rapids 

Warlick, R. B. (3) Southern Pines 

Warren, E. R. (5) 303 Broden Bldg Goldsboro 

Watkins, J. C. (2) 417 Forsyth St Winston-Salem 

Watson, S. R. (4) Henderson 

Waynick, George E. (2) 731 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Waynick, I. M. (2) 731 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Weant, T. F., Jr. (2) 506 Fourth St Spencer 

Weathersbee, Ramsey (5) Box 602 Wilmington 

Weathersbee, Ramsey, Jr. (5) ..Box 602 Wilmington 

Weaver, R. C. (1) 303 Flatiron Bldg Asheville 

Webster, B. H. (2) 1112 Liberty Life Bldg Charlotte 

Webster, Frank T. (3) Box 62 Madison 

Weeks, H. E. (5) Tarboro 

Weeks, Wm. P. (2) Veterans Admin Winston-Salem 

Wehunt, Evan S. (1) Main & Mtn. St Cherry ville 

Wehunt, Lloyd D. (1) Guigou Bldg Valdese 

Wells, C. T. (1) Wells Bldg Canton 

Wells, C. T., Jr. (1) Wells Bldg Canton 

Wells, DeLeon, Jr. (5) Wallace 

Wertz, Joe L. (2) P. O. Box 101 Landis 

West, J. F. (5) Roanoke Rapids 

West, J. L. (1) Franklin Bank Bldg Franklin 

Westrick, Chas. M. (3) School of Den Chapel Hill 

Wharton, Richard G. (2) Box 422 Salisbury 

Wheeler, C. D. (2) 500 Wallace Bldg Salisbury 

Wheeler, Charles M. (3) 305 Banner Bldg Greensboro 

Wheless, John R. (3) Meador Bldg Reidsville 

Whicker, T. A. (2) Professional Bldg Thomasville 

Whisnant, C. M. (1) Burnsville 

Whisnant, J. F. (1) Box 237 Ellis Bldg Spindale 

White, T. L. (2) N. Wilkesboro 

Whitehead, A. P. (5) Peoples Bk. Bldg Rocky Mount 

Whitehead, J. W. (4) Smithfield 

Whitehurst, R. L. (5) Box 907 Rocky Mount 

Whitson, W. K. (1) 401 Jackson Bldg Asheville 

Whittemore, Capt. Robert (3) ..4002th ASU Dent. Sec. 

Camp Chaffee, Ark. 

Whittington, p. B., Jr. (3) 230 Med. Arts Bldg Greensboro 

WiLKiNS, Ralph A. (3) Box 828 Burlington 

Wilkins, R. a. (5) Mount Olive 

Willl\ms, Carolyn T. (2) Box 103 N. Wilkesboro 

Williams, Harry (4) Roseboro 

Williams, Henry T. (1) Hollar Bldg Hickory 

Williams, Joel Sherrod, Jr. (2) West Bldg Statesville 

Williams, John R. (2) 714 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Williams, R. E. (5) Professional Bldg Greensboro 

Williamson, B. W. (3) 406 Entwistle St Hamlet 

Williamson, J. F. (3) Wadesboro 

Willis, Guy R. (3) Ill Corcoran St Durham 



286 ROSTER 

Wilson, F. M. (2) 101 S. Hayne St Monroe 

Wilson, Roy W. (2) 818 Professional Bldg Charlotte 

Winchester, P. W. (1) Box 628 Morganton 

Withers, Robert M. (2) Box 396 Davidson 

Wolfe, Carl B. (3) 153 Bishop St Greensboro 

WoLTZ, William L., Jr. (4) 222 E. Main St Sanford 

WooDALL, D. C. (4) Erwin 

WooDARD, W. L. (5) Beaufort 

Woody, J. L. (1) Box 335 Bryson City 

Woody, L. W. (1) P. O. Box 36 Spruce Pine 

Woody, L. W., Jr. (1) Spruce Pine 

Woody, M. E., Jr. (1) 318 South St Gastonia 

Woody, Spencer (3) Box 226 Roxboro 

Woody, William L. (1) 318 South St Gastonia 

Wooten, a. L. (5) National Bank Bldg Wilson 

Wooten, C. L. (4) Whiteville 

Wooten, G. A. (5) P. O. Box 163 Snow Hill 

Wright, Dan (5) 405 E. Fourth St Greenville 

Wright, E. K., Jr. (5) Robersonville 

Yates, P. P. (1) Hedrick Bldg Lenoir 

Yelton, J. L. (1) Shelby 

Yelton, W. F., Jr. (2) 531 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Yelton, William D. (1) P. O. Box 795 Hickory 

Yelverton, J. Hugh (5) Davis Bldg Wilson 

Yokeley, Gilbert W. (2) 407 O'Hanlon Bldg Winston-Salem 

YoKELEY, K. M. (2) O'Hanlon Bldg Winston-Salem 

Young, David C, Jr. (2) 212 Wallace Bldg Salisbury 

Young, H. L. (5) Rocky Mount 

Young, T. L. (4) 502 Professional Bldg Raleigh 

Young, W. H. (5) Burgaw 

Young, W. Kenneth (3) Jefferson Bldg Greensboro 

Zackery, J. F. (1) Brevard 

Zaytoun, Henry (5) Rocky Mount 

Zealy, J. M. (5) Bordman Bldg Goldsboro 

ZiBELiN, C. V. (5) Box 194 Wallace 

Zimmerman, H. Stokes (2) 804 Nissen Bldg Winston-Salem 

Zimmerman, J. W., Jr. (2) 405 Wallace Bldg Salisbury 

Zimmerman, L. H. (3) Security Bank Bldg High Point 

Zimmerman, L. R. (3) Security Bank Bldg High Point 

Zimmerman, T. R. (3) Security Bank Bldg High Point 



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